Science.gov

Sample records for international ash utilization

  1. Proceedings: Eighth international ash utilization symposium: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-10-01

    The two-volume publication contains 65 papers, including six abstracts, presented at ten sessions during the October 1987 event. Some topics covered basic research themes, such as: new studies of fly ash, fly ash concrete, and important properties and construction uses; updated ash sampling and testing procedures; advances in fluidized bed combustion (FBC), flue gas desulfurization (FGD), and other sulfur dioxide control products; and latest pozzolan programs of the Cement and Concrete Reference Laboratory (CCRL) of the National Bureau of Standards. Other topics focused on applied coal ash technology, including: airport, highway and dam construction; structural fills; flowable fill; roller compacted concrete;lightweight building products; recovery of metals from coal ash; fillers for paints and plastics; and new coal ash uses in agriculture and reclamation.

  2. Proceedings: Eighth international ash utilization symposium: Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-10-01

    The two-volume publication contains 65 papers, including six abstracts, presented at ten sessions during the October 1987 event. Some topics covered basic research themes, such as new studies of fly ash, fly ash concrete, and important properties and construction uses; updated ash sampling and testing procedures; advances in fluidized bed combustion (FBC), flue gas desulfurization (FGD), and other sulfur dioxide control products; and latest pozzolan programs of the Cement and Concrete Reference Laboratory (CCRL) of the National Bureau of Standards. Other topics focused on applied coal ash technology including: airport, highway and dam construction; structural fills; flowable fill; roller compacted concrete; lightweight building products; recovery of metals from coal ash; fillers for paints and plastics; and new coal ash uses in agriculture and reclamation.

  3. Biomass ash utilization

    SciTech Connect

    Bristol, D.R.; Noel, D.J.; O`Brien, B.; Parker, B.

    1993-12-31

    This paper demonstrates that with careful analysis of ash from multiple biomass and waste wood fired power plants that most of the ash can serve a useful purpose. Some applications require higher levels of consistency than others. Examples of ash spreading for agricultural purposes as a lime supplement for soil enhancement in Maine and North Carolina, as well as a roadbase material in Maine are discussed. Use of ash as a horticultural additive is explored, as well as in composting as a filtering media and as cover material for landfills. The ash utilization is evaluated in a framework of environmental responsibility, regulations, handling and cost. Depending on the chemical and physical properties of the biomass derived fly ash and bottom ash, it can be used in one or more applications. Developing a program that utilizes ash produced in biomass facilities is environmentally and socially sound and can be financially attractive.

  4. Coal ash utilization in India

    SciTech Connect

    Michalski, S.R.; Brendel, G.F.; Gray, R.E.

    1998-12-31

    This paper describes methods of coal combustion product (CCP) management successfully employed in the US and considers their potential application in India. India produces about 66 million tons per year (mty) of coal ash from the combustion of 220 mty of domestically produced coal, the average ash content being about 30--40 percent as opposed to an average ash content of less than 10 percent in the US In other words, India produces coal ash at about triple the rate of the US. Currently, 95 percent of this ash is sluiced into slurry ponds, many located near urban centers and consuming vast areas of premium land. Indian coal-fired generating capacity is expected to triple in the next ten years, which will dramatically increase ash production. Advanced coal cleaning technology may help reduce this amount, but not significantly. Currently India utilizes two percent of the CCP`s produced with the remainder being disposed of primarily in large impoundments. The US utilizes about 25 percent of its coal ash with the remainder primarily being disposed of in nearly equal amounts between dry landfills and impoundments. There is an urgent need for India to improve its ash management practice and to develop efficient and environmentally sound disposal procedures as well as high volume ash uses in ash haulback to the coalfields. In addition, utilization should include: reclamation, structural fill, flowable backfill and road base.

  5. Fly ash quality and utilization

    SciTech Connect

    Barta, L.E.; Lachner, L.; Wenzel, G.B.; Beer, M.J.

    1995-12-01

    The quality of fly ash is of considerable importance to fly ash utilizers. The fly ash puzzolanic activity is one of the most important properties that determines the role of fly ash as a binding agent in the cementing process. The puzzolanic activity, however is a function of fly ash particle size and chemical composition. These parameters are closely related to the process of fly ash formation in pulverized coal fired furnaces. In turn, it is essential to understand the transformation of mineral matter during coal combustion. Due to the particle-to-particle variation of coal properties and the random coalescence of mineral particles, the properties of fly ash particles e.g. size, SiO{sub 2} content, viscosity can change considerably from particle to particle. These variations can be described by the use of the probability theory. Since the mean values of these randomly changing parameters are not sufficient to describe the behavior of individual fly ash particles during the formation of concrete, therefore it is necessary to investigate the distribution of these variables. Examples of these variations were examined by the Computer Controlled Scanning Electron Microscopy (CCSEM) for particle size and chemical composition for Texas lignite and Eagel Butte mineral matter and fly ash. The effect of combustion on the variations of these properties for both the fly ash and mineral matter were studied by using a laminar flow reactor. It is shown in our paper, that there are significant variations (about 40-50% around the mean values) of the above-listed properties for both coal samples. By comparing the particle size and chemical composition distributions of the mineral matter and fly ash, it was possible to conclude that for the Texas lignite mineral matter, the combustion did not effect significantly the distribution of these properties, however, for the Eagel Butte coal the combustion had a major impact on these mineral matter parameters.

  6. Eco-friendly fly ash utilization: potential for land application

    SciTech Connect

    Malik, A.; Thapliyal, A.

    2009-07-01

    The increase in demand for power in domestic, agricultural, and industrial sectors has increased the pressure on coal combustion and aggravated the problem of fly ash generation/disposal. Consequently the research targeting effective utilization of fly ash has also gained momentum. Fly ash has proved to be an economical substitute for expensive adsorbents as well as a suitable raw material for brick manufacturing, zeolite synthesis, etc. Fly ash is a reservoir of essential minerals but is deficient in nitrogen and phosphorus. By amending fly ash with soil and/or various organic materials (sewage sludge, bioprocess materials) as well as microbial inoculants like mycorrhizae, enhanced plant growth can be realized. Based on the sound results of large scale studies, fly ash utilization has grown into prominent discipline supported by various internationally renowned organizations. This paper reviews attempts directed toward various utilization of fly ash, with an emphasis on land application of organic/microbial inoculants amended fly ash.

  7. Differential utilization of ash phloem by emerald ash borer larvae: Ash species and larval stage effects

    Treesearch

    Yigen Chen; Michael D. Ulyshen; Therese M. Poland

    2012-01-01

    Two experiments were performed to determine the extent to which ash species (black, green and white) and larval developmental stage (second, third and fourth instar) affect the efficiency of phloem amino acid utilization by emerald ash borer (EAB) Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) larvae. EAB larvae generally utilized green ash...

  8. Environmental assessment and utilization CFB ash

    SciTech Connect

    Conn, R.

    1997-12-31

    Landfill disposal has generally been accepted as the most common option for ash management in CFB power plants. However, the cost of ash disposal continues to increase due to a reduction in landfill capacity and more stringent environmental regulations. As a result, beneficial uses of CFB ashes (versus landfilling) are being investigated in order to provide a more cost effective ash management program. The chemical and physical characteristics of CFB by-products will influence both their environmental impact and potential utilization options. Compared to conventional pulverized coal boiler ashes, CFB ashes generally have different chemical properties which may limit their utilization for production of Portland cement. Other diverse utilization options have been identified for CFB residues which include: agricultural applications, structural fill, and waste stabilization. Most of these applications have to meet specifications by following certain test methods. The exact utilization options for CFB by-products will depend primarily on the type of fuel being fired, and to a lesser extent, the type of sorbent utilized for sulfur capture. Based on laboratory investigation of ash characteristics, utilization options were concluded for different Foster Wheeler commercial boilers throughout the US and abroad. Based on the results of this study, it was demonstrated that most CFB ashes could be utilized for one or more of the purposes noted above.

  9. International Database of Volcanic Ash Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, K.; Cameron, C.; Wilson, T. M.; Jenkins, S.; Brown, S.; Leonard, G.; Deligne, N.; Stewart, C.

    2015-12-01

    Volcanic ash creates extensive impacts to people and property, yet we lack a global ash impacts catalog to organize, distribute, and archive this important information. Critical impact information is often stored in ephemeral news articles or other isolated resources, which cannot be queried or located easily. A global ash impacts database would improve 1) warning messages, 2) public and lifeline emergency preparation, and 3) eruption response and recovery. Ashfall can have varying consequences, such as disabling critical lifeline infrastructure (e.g. electrical generation and transmission, water supplies, telecommunications, aircraft and airports) or merely creating limited and expensive inconvenience to local communities. Impacts to the aviation sector can be a far-reaching global issue. The international volcanic ash impacts community formed a committee to develop a database to catalog the impacts of volcanic ash. We identify three user populations for this database: 1) research teams, who would use the database to assist in systematic collection, recording, and storage of ash impact data, and to prioritize impact assessment trips and lab experiments 2) volcanic risk assessment scientists who rely on impact data for assessments (especially vulnerability/fragility assessments); a complete dataset would have utility for global, regional, national and local scale risk assessments, and 3) citizen science volcanic hazard reporting. Publication of an international ash impacts database will encourage standardization and development of best practices for collecting and reporting impact information. Data entered will be highly categorized, searchable, and open source. Systematic cataloging of impact data will allow users to query the data and extract valuable information to aid in the development of improved emergency preparedness, response and recovery measures.

  10. Worldwide high-volume coal ash utilization

    SciTech Connect

    Manz, O.E.

    1999-11-01

    Coal ash refers to fly ash as well as bottom ash and boiler slag. High-volume uses include those fly ash products that are either large in quantity or use huge percentages (over 50%) of fly ash. High-volume uses are typified by fills, embankments, backfills, highway base course, and soil stabilization and amendment. In 1992, 367 million tonnes of fly ash were produced, as well as 91.8 million tonnes of bottom ash and boiler slag; 152.8 million tonnes (33.3%) were used. The main uses of coal ash have been in cement and concrete manufacture, in road construction and as filler on construction sites, in cellular concrete, and in lightweight aggregate and brick. Worldwide in 1992, 40.2 million tonnes were used in cement and concrete manufacture; 47.5 million tonnes in road construction and as filler on construction sites, in cellular concrete, and in lightweight aggregate and brick. Worldwide in 1992, 40.2 million tonnes were used in cement and concrete manufacture; 47.5 million tonnes in road construction and as filler on construction sites; 7.2 million tonnes in cellular concrete; 3.1 million tonnes in lightweight aggregate and bricks; over 40 million tonnes for filler for mines, quarries, or pits; and almost 3 million tonnes for soil amendment. EPRI (the collaborative R and D organization with membership of over 700 electric utilities) initiated an ash utilization research and development program in 1979 aimed at supporting the increased use of fly ash in the United States. This paper includes a worldwide survey of the production and utilization of coal ash from 1964 to 1995. The data were collected from various working papers of the UN Group of Experts on the Utilization of Ash and from three papers by the author on the worldwide production and utilization of coal ash. For 1995, information was obtained through a questionnaire sent to selected individuals. The last available data for eastern Europe and the United Kingdom are for 1989.

  11. Characteristics of the transfer of fly ash utilization technology

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, B.; Nieel, E.; Raats, M.

    1997-12-31

    In the Netherlands, the total amount of fly ash produced from power generating plants lies between 900,000 and 1,000,000 tons per year. Since 1986, a 100% fly ash utilization has been achieved as a high quality raw material for the building materials industry. In China, the present fly ash production capacity is approximately 100 million tons per year. The share of fly ash used by the building materials industry is less then 15% of the total fly ash production. In this presentation, efforts are made to illustrate the difference in characteristics between the Dutch and the Chinese approach towards the fly ash utilization problem. Government policy, environmental legislation and an active involvement of the power industry have been, amongst others, three crucial factors for the successful utilization of fly ash in the Netherlands. It is believed that some of the Dutch experiences might also be applicable in China.

  12. Proceedings: Tenth international ash use symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The objective of the 1993 International Coal Ash Use Symposium, the tenth in a series since 1967, is to publicize innovations in coal ash technology. These symposia support the mission of the American Coal Ash Association (ACAA) to promote coal ash use in a variety of markets through technology transfer and commercialization. The two-volume publication contains 82 papers arranged in fourteen sections which include: waste solidification and stabilization; aggregate; agriculture; structural fill; mine reclamation; aquatic uses; environmental considerations; concrete and flowable fill; base stabilization; clean coal by-products; international and regional perspectives; research and development; fillers in plastic and aluminum; and manufactured products--marketable gypsum, masonry blocks, cast in-situ and precast houses, bricks, mineral wool fibers and ready-mixed concrete. The 82 papers were submitted to ACAA by authors from sixteen countries including. The symposium, with 45 percent of the papers from locations outside the USA, represents a truly international interest in the development of uses for coal ash. Individual reports are processed separately for the data bases.

  13. International utilization and operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Stanley R.

    1989-01-01

    The international framework of the Space Station Freedom Program is described. The discussion covers the U.S. space policy, international agreements, international Station elements, overall program management structure, and utilization and operations management. Consideration is also given to Freedom's user community, Freedom's crew, pressurized payload and attached payload accommodations, utilization and operations planning, user integration, and user operations.

  14. Utilization of CFB fly ash for construction applications

    SciTech Connect

    Conn, R.E.; Sellakumar, K.; Bland, A.E.

    1999-07-01

    Disposal in landfills has been the most common means of handling ash in circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler power plants. Recently, larger CFB boilers with generating capacities up to 300 MWe are currently being planned, resulting in increased volumes and disposal cost of ash by-product. Studies have shown that CFB ashes do not pose environmental concerns that should significantly limit their potential utilization. Many uses of CFB ash are being investigated by Foster Wheeler, which can provide more cost-effective ash management. Construction applications have been identified as one of the major uses for CFB ashes. Typically, CFB ash cannot be used as a cement replacement in concrete due to its unacceptably high sulfur content. However, CFB ashes can be used for other construction applications that require less stringent specifications including soil stabilization, road base, structural fill, and synthetic aggregate. In this study, potential construction applications were identified for fly ashes from several CFB boilers firing diverse fuels such as petroleum coke, refuse derived fuel (RDF) and coal. The compressive strength of hydrated fly ashes was measured in order to screen their potential for use in various construction applications. Based on the results of this work, the effects of both ash chemistry and carbon content on utilization potential were ascertained. Actual beneficial uses of ashes evaluated in this study are also discussed.

  15. Utilization of coal fly ash. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Openshaw, S.C.

    1992-01-01

    Coal-fired power plants produce approximately 80 million tons of fly ash each year. Efforts to use fly ash have reached only a twenty to thirty percent reutilization rate. A literature review was performed to provide a consensus of the available information regarding fly ash. Fly ash is highly variable depending on the coal source, plant operations, and several other parameters. The various fly ash characteristics are discussed including classifications, physical characteristics, chemical properties and chemical compositions. Although extensive research has been performed on the use of fly ash, very little of this research has monitored any environmental impacts. The environmental concerns addressed include mobilization of toxic elements, biota impact, microbial impact, handling dangers, and pertinent regulations. Finally, the various disposal and reutilization options for fly ash are examined. A recommendation is provided for further research to cover deficiencies found in the literature.

  16. Fundamental Study of Low-Nox Combustion Fly Ash Utilization

    SciTech Connect

    E. M. Suuberg; I. Kuloats; K. Smith; N. Sabanegh; R. H. Hurt; W. D. Lilly; Y. M. Gao

    1997-11-01

    This study is principally concerned with characterizing the organic part of coal combustion fly ashes. High carbon fly ashes are becoming more common as by-products of low-NOx combustion technology, and there is need to learn more about this fraction of the fly ash. The project team consists of two universities, Brown and Princeton, and an electrical utility, New England Power. A sample suite of over forty fly ashes has been gathered from utilities across the United States, and includes ashes from a coals ranging in rank from bituminous to lignite. The characterizations of these ashes include standard tests (LOI, Foam Index), as well as more detailed characterizations of their surface areas, porosity, extractability and adsorption behavior. The ultimate goal is, by better characterizing the material, to enable broadening the range of applications for coal fly ash re-use beyond the current main market as a pozzolanic agent for concretes. The potential for high carbon-content fly ashes to substitute for activated carbons is receiving particular attention. The work performed to date has already revealed how very different the surfaces of different ashes produced by the same utility can be, with respect to polarity of the residual carbon. This can help explain the large variations in acceptability of these ashes as concrete additives.

  17. FUNDAMENTAL STUDY OF LOW-NOx COMBUSTION FLY ASH UTILIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    ERIC M. SUUBERG; ROBERT H. HURT

    1998-10-19

    This study is principally concerned with characterizing the organic part of coal combustion fly ashes. High carbon fly ashes are becoming more common as by-products of low-NOx combustion technology, and there is need to learn more about this fraction of the fly ash. The project team consists of two universities, Brown and Princeton, and an electrical utility, New England Power. A sample suite of over fifty fly ashes has been gathered from utilities across the United States, and includes ashes from a coals ranging in rank from bituminous to lignite. The characterizations of these ashes include standard tests (LOI, Foam Index), as well as more detailed characterizations of their surface areas, porosity, extractability and adsorption behavior. The ultimate goal is, by better characterizing the material, to enable broadening the range of applications for coal fly ash re-use beyond the current main market as a pozzolanic agent for concretes. The potential for high carbon-content fly ashes to substitute for activated carbons is receiving particular attention. The work performed to date has already revealed how very different the surfaces of different ashes produced by the same utility can be, with respect to polarity of the residual carbon. This can help explain the large variations in acceptability of these ashes as concrete additives.

  18. Fundamental Study of Low NOx Combustion Fly Ash Utilization

    SciTech Connect

    E. M. Suubert; I. Kuloats; K. Smith; N. Sabanegh; R.H. Hurt; W. D. Lilly; Y. M. Gao

    1997-05-01

    This study is principally concerned with characterizing the organic part of coal combustion fly ashes. High carbon fly ashes are becoming more common as by-products of low-NOx combustion technology, and there is need to learn more about this fraction of the fly ash. The project team consists of two universities, Brown and Princeton, and an electrical utility, New England Power. A sample suite of over forty fly ashes has been gathered from utilities across the United States, and includes ashes from a coals ranging in rank from bituminous to lignite. The characterizations of these ashes include standard tests (LOI, Foam Index), as well as more detailed characterizations of their surface areas, porosity, extractability and adsorption behavior. The ultimate goal is, by better characterizing the material, to enable broadening the range of applications for coal fly ash re-use beyond the current main market as a pozzolanic agent for concretes. The potential for high carbon-content fly ashes to substitute for activated carbons is receiving particular attention. The work performed to date has already revealed how very different the surfaces of different ashes produced by the same utility can be, with respect to polarity of the residual carbon. This can help explain the large variations in acceptability of these ashes as concrete additives.

  19. Utilization options for fly ash, bottom ash, and slag in Eastern Europe

    SciTech Connect

    Manz, O.E.

    1995-12-01

    Since 1967, at least six ash utilization symposiums have been held in the United States, with papers presented by several European authors on the utilization of coal by-products in Eastern Europe. There is currently over 80,000 megawatts of installed coal-fired capacity available in that region. Unfortunately, of the 117,778,000 tonnes of fly ash, bottom ash, and slag produced in Eastern Europe in 1989, only 13% was utilized. This paper outlines the research and levels and kinds of coal by-product utilization taking place in Eastern Europe since the late 1960s.

  20. Status of research for ash utilization at mine sites

    SciTech Connect

    Ziemkiewicz, P.F.

    1998-12-31

    There is a natural symbiosis between coal mining and coal ash utilization. Proximity, transportation haulage/back haulage, the need for soil and spoil amendments as well as bulk filling of mine voids all argue for ash utilization in coal mining and reclamation. Each application, however, must be assessed in light of potential environmental contamination issues. This paper addresses the evolution of ash policy from its early treatment as an environmental threat to policies encouraging its beneficial uses. Beneficial ash uses include: soil amendment, bulk fill material and spoil neutralization. Soil amendments include the use of bottom ash for conditioning western sodic spoils and fly ash use to improve the alkalinity and moisture holding capacity of eastern mine spoils. The use of fly ash to bring surface mine spoils up to grade and to fill abandoned underground mines is also discussed. The paper focuses on the role of research in guiding both application technology and policy. Recent ash policies developed by Pennsylvania and West Virginia emphasize beneficial use of coal ash. They are summarized and compared with other states` policies.

  1. COAL-FIRED UTILITY BOILERS: SOLVING ASH DEPOSITION PROBLEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher J. Zygarlicke; Donald P. McCollor; Steven A. Benson; Jay R. Gunderson

    2001-04-01

    The accumulation of slagging and fouling ash deposits in utility boilers has been a source of aggravation for coal-fired boiler operators for over a century. Many new developments in analytical, modeling, and combustion testing methods in the past 20 years have made it possible to identify root causes of ash deposition. A concise and comprehensive guidelines document has been assembled for solving ash deposition as related to coal-fired utility boilers. While this report accurately captures the current state of knowledge in ash deposition, note that substantial research and development is under way to more completely understand and mitigate slagging and fouling. Thus, while comprehensive, this document carries the title ''interim,'' with the idea that future work will provide additional insight. Primary target audiences include utility operators and engineers who face plant inefficiencies and significant operational and maintenance costs that are associated with ash deposition problems. Pulverized and cyclone-fired coal boilers are addressed specifically, although many of the diagnostics and solutions apply to other boiler types. Logic diagrams, ash deposit types, and boiler symptoms of ash deposition are used to aid the user in identifying an ash deposition problem, diagnosing and verifying root causes, determining remedial measures to alleviate or eliminate the problem, and then monitoring the situation to verify that the problem has been solved. In addition to a step-by-step method for identifying and remediating ash deposition problems, this guideline document (Appendix A) provides descriptions of analytical techniques for diagnostic testing and gives extensive fundamental and practical literature references and addresses of organizations that can provide help in alleviating ash deposition problems.

  2. Tests and specifications pertinent to coal ash utilization

    SciTech Connect

    Manz, O.

    1994-12-31

    Fortunately, in the United States, most of the test methods and specifications for the use of coal ash in cement, concrete, lime, or soil-related products are found in the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) books of standards. Many of the same or slightly different specifications are also found in the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) books of standards, as well as those of the various Departments of Transportation (DOTs). Other specifications for selected uses are found in publications of the American Petroleum Institute (API), the Sulfur Institute, the mineral wool industry, and West Virginia University. It is difficult to keep up with the most recent printed specifications, particularly in ASTM, since the committees meet twice yearly and have many time-consuming ballots. This paper summarizes the critical engineering properties required to assess the utilization applications of coal ash products. For most uses, both physical and chemical limits are specified. There are specifications for blended cement containing fly ash, for sulfate resistance, and for alkali aggregate reaction, also for fly ash for use in concrete, in oil well cement, and in grout. Coal ash is specified for use in ash-lime stabilization, as lightweight aggregate, and for mineral filler, as well as for structural fill and flowable fill. Other uses include sulfur concrete, high flexural strength ceramics, mineral wool, brick, cenospheres, and filler.

  3. ENVIRONMENTAL EVALUATION FOR UTILIZATION OF ASH IN SOIL STABILIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    David J. Hassett; Loreal V. Heebink

    2001-08-01

    The Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) approved the use of coal ash in soil stabilization, indicating that environmental data needed to be generated. The overall project goal is to evaluate the potential for release of constituents into the environment from ash used in soil stabilization projects. Supporting objectives are: (1) To ensure sample integrity through implementation of a sample collection, preservation, and storage protocol to avoid analyte concentration or loss. (2) To evaluate the potential of each component (ash, soil, water) of the stabilized soil to contribute to environmental release of analytes of interest. (3) To use laboratory leaching methods to evaluate the potential for release of constituents to the environment. (4) To facilitate collection of and to evaluate samples from a field runoff demonstration effort. The results of this study indicated limited mobility of the coal combustion fly ash constituents in laboratory tests and the field runoff samples. The results presented support previous work showing little to negligible impact on water quality. This and past work indicates that soil stabilization is an environmentally beneficial CCB utilization application as encouraged by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. This project addressed the regulatory-driven environmental aspect of fly ash use for soil stabilization, but the demonstrated engineering performance and economic advantages also indicate that the use of CCBs in soil stabilization can and should become an accepted engineering option.

  4. Utilization of blended fluidized bed combustion (FBC) ash and pulverized coal combustion (PCC) fly ash in geopolymer.

    PubMed

    Chindaprasirt, Prinya; Rattanasak, Ubolluk

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, synthesis of geopolymer from fluidized bed combustion (FBC) ash and pulverized coal combustion (PCC) fly ash was studied in order to effectively utilize both ashes. FBC-fly ash and bottom ash were inter-ground to three different finenesses. The ashes were mixed with as-received PCC-fly ash in various proportions and used as source material for synthesis of geopolymer. Sodium silicate (Na(2)SiO(3)) and 10M sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solutions at mass ratio of Na(2)SiO(3)/NaOH of 1.5 and curing temperature of 65 degrees C for 48h were used for making geopolymer. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), degree of reaction, and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) were performed on the geopolymer pastes. Compressive strength was also tested on geopolymer mortars. The results show that high strength geopolymer mortars of 35.0-44.0MPa can be produced using mixture of ground FBC ash and as-received PCC-fly ash. Fine FBC ash is more reactive and results in higher degree of reaction and higher strength geopolymer as compared to the use of coarser FBC ash. Grinding increases reactivity of ash by means of increasing surface area and the amount of reactive phase of the ash. In addition, the packing effect due to fine particles also contributed to increase in strength of geopolymers.

  5. Utilization of blended fluidized bed combustion (FBC) ash and pulverized coal combustion (PCC) fly ash in geopolymer

    SciTech Connect

    Chindaprasirt, Prinya; Rattanasak, Ubolluk

    2010-04-15

    In this paper, synthesis of geopolymer from fluidized bed combustion (FBC) ash and pulverized coal combustion (PCC) fly ash was studied in order to effectively utilize both ashes. FBC-fly ash and bottom ash were inter-ground to three different finenesses. The ashes were mixed with as-received PCC-fly ash in various proportions and used as source material for synthesis of geopolymer. Sodium silicate (Na{sub 2}SiO{sub 3}) and 10 M sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solutions at mass ratio of Na{sub 2}SiO{sub 3}/NaOH of 1.5 and curing temperature of 65 deg. C for 48 h were used for making geopolymer. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), degree of reaction, and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) were performed on the geopolymer pastes. Compressive strength was also tested on geopolymer mortars. The results show that high strength geopolymer mortars of 35.0-44.0 MPa can be produced using mixture of ground FBC ash and as-received PCC-fly ash. Fine FBC ash is more reactive and results in higher degree of reaction and higher strength geopolymer as compared to the use of coarser FBC ash. Grinding increases reactivity of ash by means of increasing surface area and the amount of reactive phase of the ash. In addition, the packing effect due to fine particles also contributed to increase in strength of geopolymers.

  6. Ash utilization for elimination of acid mine drainage

    SciTech Connect

    Petzrick, P.

    1997-09-01

    Maryland is surrounded by states whose coal production exceeds its own, namely West Virginia, Pennsylvania, and Virginia. Because of the State`s relatively limited coal production, the distribution of Abandoned Mine Land (AML) funds mandated by law leaves the State at a disadvantage. In order to support maryland`s overall ash utilization program, the State solicits assistance from electric utilities and any other parties who may benefit from the development of a cost-effective technology to seal abandoned underground mines with CCB-based grouts, replacing the conventional use of more costly Portland cement for such applications. The development of these mine sealing techniques can be used to abate Maryland`s AMD discharges, because sealing prevents the exposure of sulfur-bearing minerals in coal seams to oxygen and water, which causes AMD. Ultimately, it is for this reason that Maryland`s overall ash utilization program was developed: to coordinate and encourage the large-scale utilization of CCBs to eliminate AMD in Maryland waters.

  7. Utilization of SRS pond ash in controlled low strength material. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, C.A.; Rajendran, N.

    1995-12-01

    Design mixes for Controlled Low Strength Material (CLSM) were developed which incorporate pond ashes (fly ashes) from the A-Area Ash Pile, the old F-Area Ash Basin and the D-Area Ash Basin. CLSM is a pumpable, flowable, excavatable backfill used in a variety of construction applications at SRS. Results indicate that CLSM which meets all of the SRS design specifications for backfill, can be made with the A-, D-, and F-Area pond ashes. Formulations for the design mixes are provided in this report. Use of the pond ashes may result in a cost savings for CLSM used at SRS and will utilize a by-product waste material, thereby decreasing the amount of material requiring disposal.

  8. Utilization of coal fly ash in solidification of liquid radioactive waste from research reactor.

    PubMed

    Osmanlioglu, Ahmet Erdal

    2014-05-01

    In this study, the potential utilization of fly ash was investigated as an additive in solidification process of radioactive waste sludge from research reactor. Coal formations include various percentages of natural radioactive elements; therefore, coal fly ash includes various levels of radioactivity. For this reason, fly ashes have to be evaluated for potential environmental implications in case of further usage in any construction material. But for use in solidification of radioactive sludge, the radiological effects of fly ash are in the range of radioactive waste management limits. The results show that fly ash has a strong fixing capacity for radioactive isotopes. Specimens with addition of 5-15% fly ash to concrete was observed to be sufficient to achieve the target compressive strength of 20 MPa required for near-surface disposal. An optimum mixture comprising 15% fly ash, 35% cement, and 50% radioactive waste sludge could provide the solidification required for long-term storage and disposal. The codisposal of radioactive fly ash with radioactive sludge by solidification decreases the usage of cement in solidification process. By this method, radioactive fly ash can become a valuable additive instead of industrial waste. This study supports the utilization of fly ash in industry and the solidification of radioactive waste in the nuclear industry.

  9. Utilization of ash from municipal solid waste combustion. Final report, Phase I

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, C.M.; Hartman, R.M.; Kort, D.; Rapues, N.

    1994-09-01

    This ash study investigates several aspects of Municipal Waste Combustion (MWC) ash utilization to develop an alternative to the present disposal practice of landfilling in a lined monofill. Ash was investigated as a daily or final cover for municipal waste in the landfill to prevent erosion and as a road construction aggregate. Samples of eight mixtures of ash and other materials, and one sample of soil were analyzed for chemical constituents. Biological tests on these mixters were conducted, along with erosion tests and sieve analyses. A chemical analysis of each sieve size was conducted. Geotechnical properties of the most promising materials were made. Findings to this point include: all ash samples take have passed the EPA TCLP testing; chemical analysis of bottom and combined ash samples indicate less than expected variability; selected ash mixtures exhibited very low coefficients of hydraulic conductivity; all but one of the ash mixtures exhibited greater erosion resistance than the currently used landfill cover material; MWC combined analysis indicates this is a viable alternative for landfill cover; MWC ash size reactions and chemical analysis show bottom and combined ash to be a viable alternative for road construction.

  10. Utilization of power plant bottom ash as aggregates in fiber-reinforced cellular concrete.

    PubMed

    Lee, H K; Kim, H K; Hwang, E A

    2010-02-01

    Recently, millions tons of bottom ash wastes from thermoelectric power plants have been disposed of in landfills and coastal areas, regardless of its recycling possibility in construction fields. Fiber-reinforced cellular concrete (FRCC) of low density and of high strength may be attainable through the addition of bottom ash due to its relatively high strength. This paper focuses on evaluating the feasibility of utilizing bottom ash of thermoelectric power plant wastes as aggregates in FRCC. The flow characteristics of cement mortar with bottom ash aggregates and the effect of aggregate type and size on concrete density and compressive strength were investigated. In addition, the effects of adding steel and polypropylene fibers for improving the strength of concrete were also investigated. The results from this study suggest that bottom ash can be applied as a construction material which may not only improve the compressive strength of FRCC significantly but also reduce problems related to bottom ash waste.

  11. High-volume fly ash utilization projects in the United States and Canada. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Patelunas, G.M.

    1986-02-01

    The purpose of this report is to document existing high-volume applications of fly ash. Examples of high-volume projects are: backfills, embankments, fills, landfill cover, pavement base course, soil amendment, subgrade stabilization, grouts and hydraulic fills. Information was solicited from electric utilities, state highway agencies, ash marketers, engineering firms and other organizations in the United States and Canada. Over 270 separate projects that used fly ash in high-volume applications were identified. Class F fly ash was used in 172 projects, and Class C fly ash was used in 108 projects. The most frequent high-volume use of Class F fly ash was for fills, embankments and pavement base courses. These projects are primarily located in the north central and mid-Atlantic states. The most frequent use of Class C fly ash was for subgrade stabilization. Most of these projects are located in the midwestern and southwestern United States. The existence of many different applications of fly ash documented during this project demonstrates that fly ash is a practical high-volume construction material.

  12. Power-plant fly-ash utilization: a chemical processing perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Burnet, G.; Murtha, M.J.

    1981-01-01

    The 1976 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) deals with the management of solid and hazardous wastes, and encourages energy and resource recovery. Recent research has indicated that solid wastes from coal combustion, including fly ash, could be classified as hazardous under present EPA definitions. The seriousness of this possibility has been recognized and new rules for coal ash waste disposal are being considered. Ames Laboratory research on fly ash utilization as an alternative to disposal includes extraction of metals from the ash and discovery of uses for the process residues. Recovery of alumina and iron oxides by physical and chemical processing would permit large scale utilization of fly ash and help reduce dependency on imports. One of the processes investigated uses a lime-soda sinter method to form soluble aluminate compounds from mixtures of fly ash, limestone, and soda ash. The aluminates are extracted, treated to remove silicates, and precipitated: the precipitate is calcined to metallurgical grade alumina. The extract residue shows promise as a raw material for the production of Portland cement. Process economics are presented, and the effects of alumina and silica contents of the fly ash, sintering temperatures and time, and sales credits for by-products are discussed.

  13. Utilization of fly ash as engineering pellet aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arslan, Haydar; Baykal, Gokhan

    2006-07-01

    It has been recognized that there exists a serious need for recovery and reuse of industrial wastes. Agglomeration by pelletization method can alleviate the problems associated with fly ash. The objective of this study was to evaluate the material properties of manufactured aggregates produced from fly ash and cement mixing by pelletization method. Engineering properties of the manufactured aggregates were evaluated experimentally. Crushing strength, specific gravity, water absorption, particle size distribution, surface characteristics and shear strength properties of the manufactured aggregates were evaluated. For all practical purposes, the study showed that the manufactured aggregates are a good alternative for wide range civil engineering applications.

  14. Advanced research and technology: Direct utilization recovery of minerals from coal fly ash. Fossil energy program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnet, G.; Murtha, M. J.; Adelman, D. J.

    1980-12-01

    Methods for utilizing coal fly ash through processes for the extraction of alumina and titania, and for the separation and use of an iron-rich fraction are described. Research of the HiChlor process for the extraction of alumina and titania by high temperature chlorination of a fly ash reductant mixture is described. An engineering cost evaluation is presented for a centralized HiChlor processing facility to process the fly ash of several large coal fueled power stations. Investigations for a high temperature lime soda process for extraction of alumina from fly ash included the use of several types of quarry limestones and waste materials to replace the limestone and/or soda ash.

  15. Critical aspects of biomass ashes utilization in soils: Composition, leachability, PAH and PCDD/F.

    PubMed

    Freire, Márcia; Lopes, Helena; Tarelho, Luís A C

    2015-12-01

    Bottom and fly ashes streams collected along a year in several biomass thermal plants were studied. The bulk composition of ashes and other chemical characteristics that may impact soil application showed a high variability depending on the ash stream, combustion technology and ash management practice at the power plants. The acid neutralization capacity (ANC) and metal's availability for leaching at fixed pH 7 and 4 was performed according with EA NEN 7371, as a quick evaluation method to provide information on the long-term behavior of ashes, regarding heavy metals and also plant nutrients release. Also the pH dependence leachability study was performed according to CEN/TS 14429 for predicting the leaching behavior under different scenarios. Leachability profiles were established between pH 3 and 12, allowing to distinguish different solubility control phenomena of toxic heavy metals (Cu, Cr, Mn, Ni, Zn, Pb) as well as other salts (Ca, K, Mg, Na, Cl). The ANC of fly ashes at pH 4 (3.6-9.6 molH(+)/kg) were higher than that observed for the bottom ashes (1.2-2.1 molH(+)/kg). Ashes were also characterized for persistent organic pollutants (POP), such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and paradibenzodioxines and furanes (PCDD/F). Contents were found to be much higher in fly ash than in bottom ash streams. None of the PAH levels did reach the current national limit value of sewage sludge application in soils or the guide value for ash in north European countries. However, PCDD/F contents, which are not regulated, varied from non-detectable levels to high amounts, regardless the level of loss on ignition (LOI) or unburned carbon content in fly ashes. Given the current ash management practices and possible use of blends of bottom and fly ash streams as soil conditioners resembles clear the urgent need to regulate ash utilization in soils, incorporating limit values both for heavy metals, PAH and PCDD/F.

  16. Artificial lightweight aggregates as utilization for future ashes - A case study.

    PubMed

    Sarabèr, Angelo; Overhof, Robert; Green, Terry; Pels, Jan

    2012-01-01

    In the future, more electricity in the Netherlands will be produced using coal with co-combustion. Due to this, the generated annual ash volume will increase and the chemical composition will be influenced. One of the options for utilization if present markets are saturated and for use of fly ashes with different compositions, is as raw material for lightweight aggregates. This was selected as one of the best utilizations options regarding potential ash volume to be applied, environmental aspects and status of technology. Because of this, a study has been performed to assess the potential utilization of fly ash for the production of lightweight aggregate. Lightweight aggregate has been produced in a laboratory scale rotary kiln. The raw material consisted of class F fly ash with high free lime content. An addition of 8% clay was necessary to get green pellets with sufficient green strength. The basic properties of the produced lightweight aggregate and its behaviour in concrete have been investigated. The concrete has a good compressive strength and its leaching behaviour meets the most stringent requirements of Dutch environmental regulations. The carbon foot print of concrete will be negatively influenced if only the concrete itself is taken into account, but the reduction of the volume weight has advantages regarding design, transport emissions and isolation properties which may counteract this. In the Dutch situation the operational costs are higher than expected potential selling price for the LWA, which implies that the gate fee for the fly ash is negative.

  17. An overview on characterization, utilization and leachate analysis of biomedical waste incinerator ash.

    PubMed

    Rajor, Anita; Xaxa, Monika; Mehta, Ratika; Kunal

    2012-10-15

    Solid waste management is one of the major global environmental issues, as there is continuous increase in industrial globalization and generation of waste. Solid wastes encompass the heterogeneous mass of throwaways from the urban community as well as the homogeneous accumulations of agricultural, industrial and mineral wastes. Biomedical waste pose a significant impact on health and environment. A proper waste management system should be required to dispose hazardous biomedical waste and incineration should be the best available technology to reduce the volume of this hazardous waste. The incineration process destroys pathogens and reduces the waste volume and weight but leaves a solid material called biomedical waste ash as residue which increases the levels of heavy metals, inorganic salts and organic compounds in the environment. Disposal of biomedical waste ash in landfill may cause contamination of groundwater as metals are not destroyed during incineration. The limited space and the high cost for land disposal led to the development of recycling technologies and the reuse of ash in different systems. In order to minimize leaching of its hazardous components into the environment several studies confirmed the successful utilization of biomedical waste ash in agriculture and construction sector. This paper presents the overview on the beneficial use of ash in agriculture and construction materials and its leachate characteristics. This review also stressed on the need to further evaluate the leachate studies of the ashes and slag for their proper disposal and utilization. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Feasible experimental study on the utilization of a 300 MW CFB boiler desulfurizating bottom ash for construction applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, X.F.; Amano, R.S.

    2006-12-15

    CFB boiler ash cannot be used as a cement replacement in concrete due to its unacceptably high sulfur content. The disposal in landfills has been the most common means of handling ash in circulating fluidized bed boiler power plants. However for a 300 MW CFB boiler power plant, there will be 600,000 tons of ash discharged per year and will result in great volumes and disposal cost of ash byproduct. It was very necessary to solve the utilization of CFB ash and to decrease the disposal cost of CFB ash. The feasible experimental study results on the utilization of the bottom ashes of a 300 MW CFB boiler in Baima power plant in China were reported in this paper. The bottom ashes used for test came from the discharged bottom ashes in a 100 MW CFB boiler in which the anthracite and limestone designed for the 300 MW CFB project was burned. The results of this study showed that the bottom ash could be used for cementitious material, road concrete, and road base material. The masonry cements, road concrete with 30 MPa compressive strength and 4.0 MPa flexural strength, and the road base material used for base courses of the expressway, the main road and the minor lane were all prepared with milled CFB bottom ashes in the lab. The better methods of utilization of the bottom ashes were discussed in this paper.

  19. Utilization of MSWI fly ash for stabilization/solidification of industrial waste sludge.

    PubMed

    Qian, Guangren; Cao, Yali; Chui, Pengcheong; Tay, Joohwa

    2006-02-28

    This work investigated the potential for utilization of MSWI incineration fly ash as solidification binder to treat heavy metals-bearing industrial waste sludge. In the study, Municipal Solid Waste Incineration (MSWI) fly ash was used along with ordinary Portland cement to immobilize three different types of industrial sludge while MSWI incineration fly ash was stabilized at the same time. The results showed that the matrixes with heavy metals-bearing sludge and MSWI fly ash have a strong fixing capacity for heavy metals: Zn, Pb, Cu, Ni and Mn. Specimens with only 5-15% cement content was observed to be sufficient to achieve the target compressive strength of 0.3 MPa required for landfill disposal. An optimum mix comprising 45% fly ash, 5% cement and 50% of the industrial sludge could provide the required solidification and stabilization. Addition of MSWI can improve the strength of matrix. Meanwhile, the main hydration products of new S/S matrix are ettringite AFt, Friedel's salt and C-S-H. These hydration products play an important role in the fixing of heavy metals. The co-disposal of MSWI fly ash with heavy metals-bearing sludge can minimize the enlargement of the landfill volume and stabilize the heavy metals effectively.

  20. Selenium and arsenic speciation in fly ash from full-scale coal-burning utility plants.

    PubMed

    Huggins, Frank E; Senior, Constance L; Chu, Paul; Ladwig, Ken; Huffman, Gerald P

    2007-05-01

    X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy has been used to determine directly the oxidation states and speciation of selenium and arsenic in 10 fly ash samples collected from full-scale utility plants. Such information is needed to assess the health risk posed by these elements in fly ash and to understand their behavior during combustion and in fly ash disposal options, such as sequestration in tailings ponds. Selenium is found predominantly as Se(IV) in selenite (SeO3(2-)) species, whereas arsenic is found predominantly as As(V) in arsenate (AsO4(3-)) species. Two distinct types of selenite and arsenate spectra were observed depending upon whether the fly ash was derived from eastern U.S. bituminous (Fe-rich) coals or from western subbituminous or lignite (Ca-rich) coals. Similar spectral details were observed for both arsenic and selenium in the two different types of fly ash, suggesting that the postcombustion behavior and capture of both of these elements are likely controlled by the same dominant element or phase in each type of fly ash.

  1. The relation between pre-eruptive bubble size distribution, ash particle morphology, and their internal density: Implications to volcanic ash transport and dispersion models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proussevitch, Alexander

    2014-05-01

    Parameterization of volcanic ash transport and dispersion (VATD) models strongly depends on particle morphology and their internal properties. Shape of ash particles affects terminal fall velocities (TFV) and, mostly, dispersion. Internal density combined with particle size has a very strong impact on TFV and ultimately on the rate of ash cloud thinning and particle sedimentation on the ground. Unlike other parameters, internal particle density cannot be measured directly because of the micron scale sizes of fine ash particles, but we demonstrate that it varies greatly depending on the particle size. Small simple type ash particles (fragments of bubble walls, 5-20 micron size) do not contain whole large magmatic bubbles inside and their internal density is almost the same as that of volcanic glass matrix. On the other side, the larger compound type ash particles (>40 microns for silicic fine ashes) always contain some bubbles or the whole spectra of bubble size distribution (BSD), i.e. bubbles of all sizes, bringing their internal density down as compared to simple ash. So, density of the larger ash particles is a function of the void fraction inside them (magmatic bubbles) which, in turn, is controlled by BSD. Volcanic ash is a product of the fragmentation of magmatic foam formed by pre-eruptive bubble population and characterized by BSD. The latter can now be measured from bubble imprints on ash particle surfaces using stereo-scanning electron microscopy (SSEM) and BubbleMaker software developed at UNH, or using traditional high-resolution X-Ray tomography. In this work we present the mathematical and statistical formulation for this problem connecting internal ash density with particle size and BSD, and demonstrate how the TFV of the ash population is affected by variation of particle density.

  2. A survey of the technical and regulatory issues concerning unburned carbon on utility fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkus, T.A.; Renninger, Scott; Ruppel, T.C.

    1998-12-31

    The phenomenon of unburned carbon on/in utility fly ash has become a major imminent problem for the electric utility industry. The deadlines set by the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 limiting nitrogen oxides emissions and the Environmental Protection Agency`s regulations implementing the statute are beginning to take effect. This survey discusses the technical and regulatory issues pertaining to the phenomenon and possible courses of action/solutions.

  3. Present status and future initiatives regarding coal ash utilization in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Blackstock, T.H.; Tyson, S.S.

    1996-11-01

    The American Coal Ash Association, Inc., (ACAA) has represented the coal combustion byproduct (CCB) industry in the US since 1968. ACAA`s mission is to advance the management and use of CCBs in ways that are technically sound, commercially competitive and environmentally safe. ACAA conducts an annual survey of coal-burning electric utilities in the US to determine the quantities of CCBs that are produced and used. In 1994 approximately 80.8 million metric tons (89.0 million short tons) of CCBs were produced in the US in the form of fly ash, bottom ash, boiler slag and flue gas desulfurization (FGD) material. About 25% of the combined production of these CCBs was used, while the remainder was disposed. Quantities for CCB production and use in the US for calendar-year 1994 are summarized. In 1994 fly ash production alone amounted to 49.7 million metric tons (54.8 million short tons), and of that amount approximately 24%, some 11.7 million metric tons (12.9 million short tons), was used. The major applications for fly ash were: cement and concrete products (57.0%); structural fill (9.4%); road base (5.5%); flowable fill (5.0%); waste solidification and stabilization (1.9%); mineral filler applications (1.0%); mining applications (0.7%); and various other applications (19.5%). This information is shown.

  4. Ash chemistry aspects of straw and coal-straw co-firing in utility boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Frandsen, F.J.; Nielsen, H.P.; Hansen, L.A.; Hansen, P.F.B.; Andersen, K.H.

    1998-12-31

    Deposits formed in straw-fired grate-boilers showed significant amounts of KCl (40--80% (w/w)) and KCl-coated Ca-Si-rich particles. CFB co-firing of straw and coal caused deposits in the convective pass containing predominantly K{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (50--60% (w/w)) with small amounts of KCl close to the metal surface. In pulverized coal-straw co-fired boilers, deposits almost free of KCl were found. Most of the potassium in these deposits is derived from K-Al-Si-rich fly ash particles and the rest occurs as K{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. The presence of K-Al-Si-rich fly ash particles indicates that solid residue quality and reuse of fly ash in cement and concrete production rather than deposit formation may be of concern when utilizing straw in pulverized fuel boilers. This paper provides a review of Danish experiences with high-temperature ash deposit formation in the following full-scale utility boilers: Slagelse CHP (31 MWth), Haslev CHP (23 MWth) and Rudkoebing CHP (10.7 MWth), all straw-fired grate-boilers; Grenaa CHP (80 MWth), a coal-straw co-fired Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) boiler; and the Midtkraft-Studstrup Power Station, Unit 1 (380 MWth), a coal-straw co-fired PF-boiler.

  5. Overcoming ash deposition: A case study. Part 2: Application of model reaps benefits -- The utility perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Backman, B.C.; Gunderson, J.R.

    1998-12-31

    The Montana-Dakota Utilities (MDU) Company Coyote Station is a 425-MW Babcock and Wilcox cyclone-fired unit commissioned in 1981. The plant was designed to fire a high-ash-, high-sodium-content lignite from the adjacent Knife River Coal Mining Company (KRCMC) Beulah Mine. In recent years, the Coyote Station had been experiencing increasingly severe fouling and slagging, resulting in more frequent and often unscheduled outages. A joint project with the Energy and Environmental Research Center to address this problem was instituted by MDU and KRCMC. Plant operating parameters were reviewed and compared with historical coal data and PCQUEST modeling to identify fuel and operating effects on convective pass ash fouling. Results indicated separate and combined effects of fuel quality and operating parameters leading to troublesome ash-fouling tendencies. Historically, Coyote Station was down for cleaning between three and four times per year as a result of problematic boiler tube ash fouling and has been down as many as five times per year. Outages represent a considerable expense to the utility in both cleaning costs and lost generating revenue. Application of the model at the mine to deliver a consistent product, using the model at the plant to track incoming coal quality, and setting reasonable operating limits based on incoming coal quality have resulted in improved operation of the plant. Current operations suggest that between two and three outages per year on average will be required to maintain the unit.

  6. International Students' Utilization of Counseling Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Bong Joo; Bennett, Robert; Beauchemin, James

    2014-01-01

    Utilization rates of counseling services by international students continue to be low despite the growing presence of this population in American colleges and universities. There are a number of adjustment factors and stressors that can have a detrimental impact on the mental health and well-being of international students, as well as a variety of…

  7. International Students' Utilization of Counseling Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Bong Joo; Bennett, Robert; Beauchemin, James

    2014-01-01

    Utilization rates of counseling services by international students continue to be low despite the growing presence of this population in American colleges and universities. There are a number of adjustment factors and stressors that can have a detrimental impact on the mental health and well-being of international students, as well as a variety of…

  8. The Global Framework for Providing Information about Volcanic-Ash Hazards to International Air Navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, R. W.; Guffanti, M.

    2009-12-01

    The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) created the International Airways Volcano Watch (IAVW) in 1987 to establish a requirement for international dissemination of information about airborne ash hazards to safe air navigation. The IAVW is a set of operational protocols and guidelines that member countries agree to follow in order to implement a global, multi-faceted program to support the strategy of ash-cloud avoidance. Under the IAVW, the elements of eruption reporting, ash-cloud detecting, and forecasting expected cloud dispersion are coordinated to culminate in warnings sent to air traffic controllers, dispatchers, and pilots about the whereabouts of ash clouds. Nine worldwide Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers (VAAC) established under the IAVW have the responsibility for detecting the presence of ash in the atmosphere, primarily by looking at imagery from civilian meteorological satellites, and providing advisories about the location and movement of ash clouds to aviation meteorological offices and other aviation users. Volcano Observatories also are a vital part of the IAVW, as evidenced by the recent introduction of a universal message format for reporting the status of volcanic activity, including precursory unrest, to aviation users. Since 2003, the IAVW has been overseen by a standing group of scientific, technical, and regulatory experts that assists ICAO in the development of standards and other regulatory material related to volcanic ash. Some specific problems related to the implementation of the IAVW include: the lack of implementation of SIGMET (warning to aircraft in flight) provisions and delayed notifications of volcanic eruptions. Expected future challenges and developments involve the improvement in early notifications of volcanic eruptions, the consolidation of the issuance of SIGMETs, and the possibility of determining a “safe” concentration of volcanic ash.

  9. Highlights of worldwide production and utilization of coal ash -- A survey for the period 1959--1989

    SciTech Connect

    Manz, O.E.; Stewart, B.R.

    1997-09-01

    In 1960, the Coal Committee for the United Nations Economic Committee for Europe requested a group of rapporteurs to undertaken work on the utilization of ash from coal fueling thermal power stations. This later became the Group of Experts on the Utilization of Ash. In 1959, out of a world production of 100 million tons of ash, only 2% was put to use, whereas in 1969, about 15% of a production of 200 million tons was used. In 1989, 562 million tons were produced, and 90.5 million tons were used. The main uses of coal ash have been in cement and concrete manufacture; in road construction and as filler on construction sites; in cellular concrete; and in lightweight aggregate and brick. Worldwide, in 1989, 27.7 million tons were used in cement and concrete manufacture, 23.6 million tons in road construction and as filler on construction sites, 2.8 million tons in cellular concrete, and 6.8 million tons in lightweight aggregate and bricks. This paper presents a worldwide survey of the production and utilization of coal ash from 1959 to 1989. The data were collected from various working papers of the US Group of Experts on the utilization of Ash and from two papers by O.E. Manz on the worldwide production and utilization of coal ash.

  10. Plasma etching and ashing: a technique for demonstrating internal structures of helminths using scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Veltkamp, C J; Chubb, J C

    2006-03-01

    Plasma etching and ashing for demonstrating the three-dimensional ultrastructure of the internal organs of helminths is described. Adult worms of the cestode Caryophyllaeides fennica were dehydrated through an ethanol series, critical point dried (Polaron E3000) and sputter coated with 60% gold-palladium (Polaron E5100) and glued to a standard scanning electron microscope (SEM) stub positioned as required for ashing. After initial SEM viewing of worm surfaces for orientation, stubs were placed individually in the reactor chamber of a PT7150 plasma etching and ashing machine. Worms were exposed to a radio frequency (RF) potential in a low pressure (0.2 mbar) oxygen atmosphere at room temperature. The oxidation process was controlled by varying the times of exposure to the RF potential between 2 to 30 min, depending on the depth of surface tissue to be removed to expose target organs or tissues. After each exposure the oxidized layer was blown from the surface with compressed air, the specimen sputter-coated, and viewed by SEM. The procedure was repeated as necessary, to progressively expose successive layers. Fine details of organs, cells within, and cell contents were revealed. Ashing has the advantage of providing three dimensional images of the arrangement of organs that are impossible to visualize by any other procedure, for example facilitating testes counts in cestodes. Both freshly-fixed and long-term stored helminths can be ashed. Ashing times to obtain the desired results were determined by trial so that some duplicate material was needed.

  11. In-situ study of beneficial utilization of coal fly ash in reactive mine tailings.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joon Kyu; Shang, Julie Q; Wang, Hongliu; Zhao, Cheng

    2014-03-15

    Oxidation of reactive mine tailings and subsequent generation of acid mine drainage (AMD) have been long recognized as the largest environmental concern for the mining industry. Laboratory studies on utilization of coal fly ash in management of reactive mine tailings have shown reducing water and oxygen infiltration into tailings matrix, thus preventing oxidation of sulphide minerals and acid generation. However, few data from field studies to evaluate the performance of co-placement of mine tailings and fly ash (CMF hereafter) are reported in the open literature. This paper documents the construction and instrumentation of three CMF systems on the Musselwhite mine located in Ontario, Canada and presents results of 3-year real time monitoring. The field data indicates that the CMFs reduced the ingress of water due to cementation generated by hydration of fly ash. It was also found that the electrical conductivity of leachate from CMFs decreased in the early stage of co-placement, compared to the control. With further study, the principle and approach demonstrated in this paper can be adopted as a sustainable technology in the mine tailings management. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Co-utilization of pulverized coal ash and flue gas scrubber sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Burnet, G.; Murtha, M.J.; Harnby, N.

    1984-01-01

    The increased use of coal to generate electricity and of scrubbers to reduce SO/sub x/ emissions is creating solid waste disposal problems of increasing magnitude. The lime-sinter process for the recovery of alumina from pulverized fuel ash (PFA) provides a means for co-utilization of these wastes. The FGD scrubber sludge is used as a mineralizer and partial replacement for the limestone. Extractable alumina-containing compounds are formed and high alumina yields result at moderate sintering temperatures. The process residue formed shows promise as a raw material for the manufacture of portland cement. 8 references, 6 figures, 3 tables.

  13. Environmental impact assessment of wood ash utilization in forest road construction and maintenance--A field study.

    PubMed

    Oburger, Eva; Jäger, Anna; Pasch, Alexander; Dellantonio, Alex; Stampfer, Karl; Wenzel, Walter W

    2016-02-15

    The ever increasing use of wood material as fuel for green energy production requires innovative, environmentally safe strategies for recycling of the remaining wood ash. Utilizing wood ash in forest road construction and maintenance to improve mechanical stability has been suggested as a feasible recycling option. To investigate the environmental impact of wood ash application in forest road maintenance, a two-year field experiment was conducted at two Austrian forest sites (Kobernausserwald (KO) (soil pH 5.5) and Weyregg (WE) (pH 7.7)) differing in their soil chemical properties. Two different ashes, one produced by grate incineration (GA) and the other by fluidized bed incineration in a mixture with 15 vol% burnt lime (FBA), were incorporated in repeated road sections at a 15:85% (V/V) ash-to-soil rate. Leaching waters from the road body were collected and analyzed for 32 environmentally relevant parameters over two years. Upon termination of the experiment, sub-road soil samples were collected and analyzed for ash-related changes in soil chemistry. Even though a larger number of parameters was affected by the ash application at the alkaline site (WE), we observed the most pronounced initial increases of pH as well as Al, As, Fe, Mn, Ni, Co, Cu, Mo, and NO2(−) concentrations in leachates beneath GA-treated road bodies at Kobernausserwald due to the lower soil buffer capacity at this site. Despite the observed effects our results indicate that, when specific requirements are met (i.e. appropriate ash quality, sufficient soil buffer capacity below the road body, and single time-point ash incorporation within several decades), wood ash application in forest road construction is generally environmentally acceptable.

  14. [Fly ash and its biological effects. I. Production, utilization and physico-chemical properties of fly ash].

    PubMed

    Woźniak, H; Wiecek, E; Tenerowicz, B

    1988-01-01

    The paper includes the results of Part I of the studies designed to evaluate occupational risk of power engineering workers, i.e. people employed in plants producing fly-ashes, as well as those working in lightweight concrete plants where fly-ashes are applied as raw materials. The authors have found out that fly-ashes included mainly quartz, orthoclase and mullite. In dust samples, particles of fibrous structure have been found (probably--mullite). The content of free crystalline silica came to 31.6% in total dust and 8.9% in respirable dust. Fly-ashes contained:--naturally radioactive elements K40, Ra226, Th228 (maximum values were, respectively: 1070 Bq/kg, 222 Bq/kg, 142 Bq/kg of dust),--aromatic hydrocarbons (benzene-soluble fraction) in the amount of 0.001 to 0.003 microgram/mg, as well as admixtures of heavy metals in amounts varying largely. The dust concentrations at workplaces ranged from 1 mg/m3 to 200 mg/m3, depending on the type of work (inspection, repair of boilers). The results demonstrate that in the working environment of power engineering and lightweight concrete plants there occur agents of potentially fibrogenic and cancerogenic properties.

  15. Use of FBC ash to stablize dairy barn feedlots, minimize nutrient pollution, and develop new utilization outlets

    SciTech Connect

    Korcak, R.F.; Stout, W.

    1995-11-01

    Using technology developed by the USDA/ARS and US DOE, the Ahlstrom Ash Development Corporation has been successfully using fluidized bed combustion (FBC) ash from the Black River Co-Gen plant in Watertown, NY as an agricultural soil amendment. This permitted land application was based primarily on the jointly derived handbook on FBC utilization. During times of the year when ash cannot be spread on crop land, Ahlstrom has been using the ash as a low strength concrete to stabilize dairy barn feedlots. The stabilized feedlots provide a place for cattle to escape from muddy conditions in the spring and fall. Farmer acceptance of these stabilized feedlots is very positive. However, there is a need to provide data on the leachates from and through these barnyard pads.

  16. Experimental volcanic ash aggregation: Internal structuring of accretionary lapilli and the role of liquid bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Sebastian B.; Kueppers, Ulrich; Ayris, Paul M.; Jacob, Michael; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2016-01-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions can release vast quantities of pyroclastic material into Earth's atmosphere, including volcanic ash, particles with diameters less than two millimeters. Ash particles can cluster together to form aggregates, in some cases reaching up to several centimeters in size. Aggregation alters ash transport and settling behavior compared to un-aggregated particles, influencing ash distribution and deposit stratigraphy. Accretionary lapilli, the most commonly preserved type of aggregates within the geologic record, can exhibit complex internal stratigraphy. The processes involved in the formation and preservation of these aggregates remain poorly constrained quantitatively. In this study, we simulate the variable gas-particle flow conditions which may be encountered within eruption plumes and pyroclastic density currents via laboratory experiments using the ProCell Lab System® of Glatt Ingenieurtechnik GmbH. In this apparatus, solid particles are set into motion in a fluidized bed over a range of well-controlled boundary conditions (particle concentration, air flow rate, gas temperature, humidity, liquid composition). Experiments were conducted with soda-lime glass beads and natural volcanic ash particles under a range of experimental conditions. Both glass beads and volcanic ash exhibited the capacity for aggregation, but stable aggregates could only be produced when materials were coated with high but volcanically-relevant concentrations of NaCl. The growth and structure of aggregates was dependent on the initial granulometry, while the rate of aggregate formation increased exponentially with increasing relative humidity (12-45% RH), before overwetting promoted mud droplet formation. Notably, by use of a broad granulometry, we generated spherical, internally structured aggregates similar to some accretionary pellets found in volcanic deposits. Adaptation of a powder-technology model offers an explanation for the origin of natural accretionary

  17. Commercial opportunities utilizing the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearney, Michael E.; Mongan, Phil; Overmyer, Carolyn M.; Jackson, Kenneth

    1998-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) has the unique capability of providing a low-g environment for both short- and long-duration experimentation. This environment can provide a unique and competitive research capability to industry; but until recently, utilization of this environment by the private sector has been limited if not totally unavailable. NASA has recently expressed an interest in the commercial development of space and this is now an integral part of the Agency's enabling legislation through the Space Act. NASA's objective is to foster the use of the space environment for the development of commercial products and processes. Through alliances and agreements with several commercial companies and universities, SPACEHAB, Inc., has built a comprehensive package of services designed to provide low-cost reliable access to space for experimenters. These services provide opportunities to support engineering test beds for materials exposure analysis, to mitigate structural failures as observed on the Hubble Space Telescope; materials processing, remote sensing; space environment definition; and electronic experiments. The intent of this paper is to identify commercial opportunities for utilizing the International Space Station and provide examples of several facilities currently being designed and manufactured by commercial companies with the purpose of providing access to the space environment for commercial users.

  18. Modernization of the International Volcanic Ash Website - a global resource for ashfall preparedness and impact guidance.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, K.; Leonard, G.; Stewart, C.; Wilson, T. M.; Randall, M.; Stovall, W. K.

    2015-12-01

    The internationally collaborative volcanic ash website (http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/ash/) has been an important global information resource for ashfall preparedness and impact guidance since 2004. Recent volcanic ashfalls with significant local, regional, and global impacts highlighted the need to improve the website to make it more accessible and pertinent to users worldwide. Recently, the Volcanic Ash Impacts Working Group (Cities and Volcanoes Commission of IAVCEI) redesigned and modernized the website. Improvements include 1) a database-driven back end, 2) reorganized menu navigation, 3) language translation, 4) increased downloadable content, 5) addition of ash-impact case studies, 7) expanded and updated references , 8) an image database, and 9) inclusion of cooperating organization's logos. The database-driven platform makes the website more dynamic and efficient to operate and update. New menus provide information about specific impact topics (buildings, transportation, power, health, agriculture, water and waste water, equipment and communications, clean up) and updated content has been added throughout all topics. A new "for scientists" menu includes information on ash collection and analysis. Website translation using Google translate will significantly increase user base. Printable resources (e.g. checklists, pamphlets, posters) provide information to people without Internet access. Ash impact studies are used to improve mitigation measures during future eruptions, and links to case studies will assist communities' preparation and response plans. The Case Studies menu is intended to be a living topic area, growing as new case studies are published. A database of all images from the website allows users to access larger resolution images and additional descriptive details. Logos clarify linkages among key contributors and assure users that the site is authoritative and science-based.

  19. Direct utilization - recovery of minerals from coal fly ash. Technical progress report, October 1, 1982-December 31, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Burnet, G.; Murtha, M.J.; Seaverson, L.M.

    1983-02-01

    Research included an examination of the adsorbed water on coal fly ash, the utilization of phosgene as a chlorination agent, the physical adsorption and chemisorption of phosgene on fly ash particles, and the aqueous separation of chlorination products. Results of an investigation of coal fly ash powder samples using photoacoustic infrared spectroscopy showed almost complete removal of adsorbed water after drying for 30 hours at 700/sup 0/C. A thermodynamic computer simulation of the chlorination of an SiO/sub 2/ and Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ mixture of 2:1 molar ratio with a stoichiometric amount of carbon present revealed that silica is the preferred reactant at lower temperature, but that alumina chlorination is preferred at 800/sup 0/C. Experiments using phosgene to chlorinate acid-leached Texas lignite fly ash gave information about the kinetic rate dependence of the reaction involved. Work to determine the amount of chemisorption and physical adsorption of phosgene on pellets of the leached Texas lignite ash was initiated to permit the calculation of surface reaction rates. Separation of FeCl/sub 3/ by solvent extraction improved as the chloride ion concentration of the aqueous phase increased, regardless of whether the associated cation was hydrogen or aluminum. A static equilibrium cell/furnace arrangement with ultraviolet spectroscopy capability has been confirmed to be suitable for measurement of the absorbance of vapor species. A Harper 6 in. dia rotary kiln was used to continuously sinter a limestone-soda ash-fly ash mixture in the form of 1/8 in. dia pellets. Extraction of sintered material with dilute aqueous soda ash solution gave aluminate recoveries comparable to those obtained when small samples were sintered in a benchscale tube furnace. Results are presented which show that x-ray diffraction data can be used to calculate the amounts of individual compounds in sintered samples.

  20. Simultaneous utilization of soju industrial waste for silica production and its residue ash as effective cationic dye adsorbent

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soju industrial waste is an important biomass resource. The present study is aimed to utilize soju industrial waste for silica extraction, and residual ash as a low cost adsorbent for the removal of Methylene Blue (MB) from aqueous solution. High percentage of pure amorphous nanosilica was obtained ...

  1. Utilization of Bagasse Fly Ash to Remove the Unpleasant Odor of Stevia Extract and Soy Milk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashadi; Masykuri, M.; Haryono

    2017-04-01

    Stevia is a safe natural sweetener that, but has a slightly unpleasant odor. Soy milk is undoubtedly high nutritional value, soy milk slightly unpleasant odor. Bagasse Fly Ash (BFA) is a sugar factory waste which is abundant, not widely used yet, and allowed to accumulate around the sugar factory. BFA can be activated with a solution of NaOH become adsorbent. Utilization of activated BFA to remove the odor of stevia extract and soy milk means the utilization of a waste to reduce other waste. Deodorizing done by batch system. Before being used as adsorbent, BFA characterized using SEM, XRD, FTIR, and AAS. Odor and color analysis conducted by organoleptic. The results shown activation increases the cavity, BFA containing SiO2 and Al2O3, does not contain Pb, Cr, Cd. The results shown that the BFA can reduce odor of stevia from a scale of 4 to 2, the color becomes more clear, unpleasant odor of soy milk is also reduced.

  2. A Procedure for Determining the Resource Utilization Potential of Coal Ash.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    can re- place clinker in the production of blended cement . The replacement of 20 tons of clinker with fly ash in 100 tons of cement during the final...admixture to concrete. In most cases fly ash/bottom ash is used as an admixture to the concrete rather than a replacement for the cement clinker (27: 1...consisting of an intimate and uniform blend of Portland cement and fine pozzolan produced either by intergrinding Portland- cement clinker and pozzolan

  3. International collaboration between Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers: Geospatially enabled tools to ensure forecast harmonization across global air routes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osiensky, J. M.; Moore, D.; Kibler, J.; Bensimon, D.

    2013-12-01

    Volcanic plumes and drifting ash clouds pose a risk to flight operations somewhere across the globe every day. Airborne ash plumes pose a significant hazard to aircraft and timely and accurate forecasts greatly help mitigate the risk of an encounter. The world's nine (9) Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers (VAACs) provide products and services to address the volcanic ash hazard to aviation. These nine centers are operated by the meteorological authority within the state in which they are located. Each VAAC has its unique set of tools and procedures on how the data will be captured, displayed, analyzed and turned into a suite of products. The end products (e.g. Volcanic Ash Advisories (VAA) and Volcanic Ash Graphic (VAG)) are standardized through the International Civil Aviation Organization's International Airways Volcano Watch Operations Group (ICAO IAVWOPSG). Improvements in methods of collaboration between the VAACs are needed to allow for a seamless global harmonization of volcanic ash products. A geospatially enabled tool would allow for a common operating platform, data sharing, and situational awareness. The North American VAACs have been testing a capability to provide this environment to make forecast collaboration simple across the globe. This presentation highlights work that has been done to demonstrate this capability.

  4. Alkaline hydrothermal conversion of fly ash filtrates into zeolites 2: utilization in wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Somerset, Vernon; Petrik, Leslie; Iwuoha, Emmanuel

    2005-01-01

    Filtrates were collected using a codisposal reaction wherein fly ash was reacted with acid mine drainage. These codisposal filtrates were then analyzed by X-ray Fluorescence spectrometry for quantitative determination of the SiO2 and Al2O3 content. Alkaline hydrothermal zeolite synthesis was then applied to the filtrates to convert the fly ash material into zeolites. The zeolites formed under the experimental conditions were faujasite, sodalite, and zeolite A. The use of the fly ash-derived zeolites and a commercial zeolite was explored in wastewater decontamination experiments as it was applied to acid mine drainage in different dosages. The concentrations of Ni, Zn, Cd, As, and Pb metal ions in the treated wastewater were investigated. The results of the treatment of the acid mine drainage with the prepared fly ash zeolites showed that the concentrations of Ni, Zn, Cd, and Hg were decreased as the zeolite dosages of the fly ash zeolite (FAZ1) increased.

  5. Utilization of ferrochrome wastes such as ferrochrome ash and ferrochrome slag in concrete manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Prasanna K; Patro, Sanjaya K

    2016-08-01

    Solid waste management is one of the subjects essentially addressing the current interest today. Due to the scarcity of land filling area, utilization of wastes in the construction sector has become an attractive proposition for disposal. Ferrochrome ash (FA) is a dust obtained as a waste material from the gas cleaning plant of Ferro alloy industries. It possesses the chemical requirements of granulated slag material used for the manufacture of Portland cement. Ferrochrome slag (FS) is another residue that is obtained as a solid waste by the smelting process during the production of stainless steel in Ferroalloy industries. FS possesses the required engineering properties of coarse aggregates. The possibility of using FA with lime for partial replacement of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) and FS for total replacement of natural coarse aggregates is explored in this research. The combined effect of FA with lime and FS-addition on the properties of concrete, such as workability, compressive strength, flexural strength, splitting tensile strength and sorptivity, were studied. Results of investigation revealed improvement in strength and durability properties of concrete on inclusion of FA and FS. Concrete mix containing 40% FA with 7% lime (replacing 47% OPC) and100% of FS (replacing 100% natural coarse aggregate) achieved the properties of normal concrete or even better properties at all ages. The results were confirmed by microscopic study such as X-ray diffraction and petrography examination. Environmental compatibility of concrete containing FA and FS was verified by the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure test.

  6. Application of fly ash on the growth performance and translocation of toxic heavy metals within Cajanus cajan L.: implication for safe utilization of fly ash for agricultural production.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Vimal Chandra; Abhilash, P C; Upadhyay, Raj Narayan; Tewari, D D

    2009-07-15

    The present study was undertaken to examine the influence of the application of fly ash (FA) into garden soil for Cajanus cajan L. cultivation and on accumulation and translocation of hazardous metals from FA to edible part. Numerous studies have been reported on the growth and yield of agricultural crops under FA stress; however, there is a dearth of studies recommending the safe utilization of fly ash for crop production. Pot experiments were conducted on C. cajan L., a widely cultivating legume in India for its highly nutritious seeds. C. cajan L. were grown in garden soil and amended with varying concentrations of FA in a weight/weight ratio (0%, 25%, 50% and 100%; w/w). Incorporation of fly ash from 25% to 100% in garden soil increases the levels of pH, particle density, porosity and water holding capacity from 3.47% to 26.39%, 3.98% to 26.14%, 37.50% to 147.92% and 163.16% to 318.42%, respectively, than the control while bulk density decrease respectively from 8.94% to 48.89%. Pot experiment found that accumulation and translocation of heavy metals in tested plant depends on the concentration of FA. Addition of FA at lower concentration (25%) had shown positive results in most of the studied parameters of growth and yield (14.23% than control). The experimental results confirmed that lower concentration of FA (25%) is safe for C. cajan cultivation, which not only enhanced the yield of C. cajan L. significantly but also ensured the translocation of heavy metals to edible parts within the critical limits.

  7. Coal ash utilization for soil amendment to enhance water relations and turf growth. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Adriano, D.C.; Weber, J.T.

    1998-10-01

    A long-term (1993--96) field study assessed the effects of applying high rates of coal fly-ash as a soil amendment for the growth of the turf species, centipedegrass (Eremochloa ophiroides). A Latin Square plot design was employed with a control (no ash applied), and 280, 560, and 1,120 Mg ha{sup {minus}1} (i.e., tonne/ha) application rates of unweathered baghouse fly-ash from a power station of the South Carolina Electric and Gas Company. The applied fly-ash was spread evenly over each plot area, rototilled, and allowed to weather for 8 months before seeding to centipedegrass. High levels of soluble salts, indicated by the electrical conductivity of the soil extracts, in tandem with the phytotoxic effect of B, apparently inhibited the initial plant establishment as shown by substantially lower germination counts in ashed soils. The plant height and root length, however, were not adversely affected, nor were the dry matter yields throughout the study period. Ash treatment did not significantly influence infiltration rate, bulk density, or temperature of the soil, but substantially improved its water holding capacity and plant available water. This enhanced water retention capacity apparently rendered the soil less droughty and improved the coherence and handling property of the harvested sod.

  8. Direct utilization - recovery of minerals from coal fly ash. Advanced research and technology. Technical progress report, 1 January 1983-31 March 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Burnet, G.; Murtha, M.J.

    1983-05-01

    The primary objective is to develop and/or improve methods for utilization of coal fly ash as a source of minerals. Processes are being studied for the recovery of aluminium, iron, and titanium from fly ash and for the utilization of residues. There are 4 tasks which include: development of the HiChlor process; improvement of the Lime-Soda Sinter Process; improvement of the Lime-Flyash Sinter Process; and the recovery and use of an iron-rich fly ash fraction. Progress accomplished during the quarter ending March 31, 1983, is reported. 6 references, 21 figures, 9 tables. (DMC)

  9. Utilization of open pit burned household waste ash--a feasibility study in Dhaka.

    PubMed

    Haque, Md Obaidul; Sharif, Ahmed

    2014-05-01

    Informal incineration or open pit burning of waste materials is a common practice in the peripheral area of Dhaka, one of the fastest growing mega-cities in the world. This study deals with the effect of open pit burned (i.e. open burned) household waste bottom ash on fired clay bricks. Between 0 to 50% (by weight) of open pit burned household waste bottom ash was mixed with clay to make bricks. The molded specimens were air-dried at room temperature for 24 h and then oven dried at 100 °C for another 24 h to remove the water. The raw bricks were fired in a muffle furnace to a designated temperature (800, 900 and 1000 °C, respectively). The firing behaviour (mechanical strength, water absorption and shrinkage) was determined. The microstructures, phase compositions and leachates were evaluated for bricks manufactured at different firing temperatures. These results demonstrate that open pit burned ash can be recycled in clay bricks. This study also presents physical observations of the incinerated ash particles and determination of the chemical compositions of the raw materials by wet analysis. Open pit burned ash can be introduced easily into bricks up to 20% wt. The concentrations of hazardous components in the leachates were below the standard threshold for inert waste category landfill and their environmental risk during their use-life step can be considered negligible.

  10. Effect of coal quality on maintenance costs at utility plants. Final report. [Effect of ash and sulfur content of coal

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, E.C. Jr.

    1980-06-01

    In an attempt to determine if correlation exists between coal quality, as measured by its ash and sulfur contents, and the maintenance cost at utility plants, an examination was made of the actual maintenance cost experience of selected portions of five TVA coal-fired power plants as a function of the fuel quality consumed during an extended period of time. The results indicate that, according to our decision rules developed in compliance with accepted statistical practices, correlation does exist in many portions of the coal-fired plants for which sufficient maintenance cost records were available. The degree of correlation varies significantly among the individual portions of a particular plant as well as among the various plants. However, the indicators are sufficient to confirm that a change (within the design constraints of the unit) in the ash and/or sulfur content of the coal being consumed by a utility boiler will have a proportionate effect on the maintenance cost at the plant. In the cases examined, each percent variation in ash content could have a monetary effect of from $0.05 to $0.10 per ton of coal consumed. Similarly, each percent variation in sulfur content could influence maintenance costs from $0.30 to $0.50 per ton of coal. Since these values are based on preliminary analysis of limited data, they must be approached with caution and not removed from the context in which they are presented. However, if borne out by further study, the potential magnitude of such savings may be sufficient to justify the acquisition of superior coal supplies, either by changing the source and/or using preparation to obtain a lower ash and sulfur fuel.

  11. Value-added utilization of oil palm ash: a superior recycling of the industrial agricultural waste.

    PubMed

    Foo, K Y; Hameed, B H

    2009-12-30

    Concern about environmental protection has increased over the years from a global viewpoint. To date, the infiltration of oil palm ash into the groundwater tables and aquifer systems which poses a potential risk and significant hazards towards the public health and ecosystems, remain an intricate challenge for the 21st century. With the revolution of biomass reutilization strategy, there has been a steadily growing interest in this research field. Confirming the assertion, this paper presents a state of art review of oil palm ash industry, its fundamental characteristics and environmental implications. Moreover, the key advance of its implementations, major challenges together with the future expectation are summarized and discussed. Conclusively, the expanding of oil palm ash in numerous field of application represents a plausible and powerful circumstance, for accruing the worldwide environmental benefit and shaping the national economy.

  12. Utilization of rice husk ash as novel adsorbent: a judicious recycling of the colloidal agricultural waste.

    PubMed

    Foo, K Y; Hameed, B H

    2009-11-30

    Concern about environmental protection has aroused over the years from a global viewpoint. To date, the ever-increasing importance of biomass as the energy and material resources has lately been accounted by the rising prices for the crude petroleum oil. Rice husk ash, the most appropriate representative of the high ash biomass waste, is currently obtaining sufficient attraction, owning to its wide usefulness and potentiality in environmental conservation. Confirming the assertion, this paper presents a state of the art review of the rice milling industry, its background studies, fundamental properties and industrial applications. Moreover, the key advance on the preparation of novel adsorbents, its major challenges together with the future expectation has been highlighted and discussed. Conclusively, the expanding of rice husk ash in the field of adsorption science represents a viable and powerful tool, leading to the superior improvement of pollution control and environmental preservation.

  13. Effective utilization of waste ash from MSW and coal co-combustion power plant: Zeolite synthesis.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yun; Zhang, Fu-Shen; Zhu, Jianxin; Liu, Zhengang

    2008-05-01

    The solid by-product from power plant fueled with municipal solid waste and coal was used as a raw material to synthesize zeolite by fusion-hydrothermal process in order to effectively use this type of waste material. The effects of treatment conditions, including NaOH/ash ratio, operating temperature and hydrothermal reaction time, were investigated, and the product was applied to simulated wastewater treatment. The optimal conditions for zeolite X synthesis were: NaOH/ash ratio=1.2:1, fusion temperature=550 degrees C, crystallization time=6-10 h and crystallization temperature=90 degrees C. In the synthesis process, it was found that zeolite X tended to transform into zeolite HS when NaOH/ash ratio was 1.8 or higher, crystallization time was 14-18 h, operating temperature was 130 degrees C or higher. The CEC value, BET surface area and pore volume for the synthesized product at optimal conditions were 250 cmol kg(-1), 249 m(2) g(-1) and 0.46 cm(3) g(-1) respectively, higher than coal fly ash based zeolite. Furthermore, when applied to Zn(2+) contaminated wastewater treatment, the synthesized product presented larger adsorption capacity and bond energy than coal fly ash based zeolite, and the adsorption isotherm data could be well described by Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models. These results demonstrated that the special type of co-combustion ash from power plant is suitable for synthesizing high quality zeolite, and the products are suitable for heavy metal removal from wastewater.

  14. Sinabung Volcanic Ash Utilization As The Additive for Paving Block Quality A and B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sembiring, I. S.; Hastuty, I. P.

    2017-03-01

    Paving block is one of the building materials used as the top layer of the road structure besides asphalt and concrete. Paving block is made of mixed materials such as portland cement or other adhesive materials, water and aggregate. In this research, the material used as the additive of cement and concrete is volcanic ash from Mount Sinabung, it is based on the results of the material testing, Sinabung ash contains 74.3% silica (SiO2). The purpose of this research aims to analyze the behavior of the paving blocks quality A and B with and without a mixture of Sinabung ash, to analyze the workability of fresh concrete using Sinabung ash as an additive in concrete, and to compare the test results of paving blocks with and without using Sinabung ash. The samples that we made consist of four variations of the concrete mix to experiment a mixture of normal sample without additive, samples which are mixed with the addition of Sinabung ash 5%, 10%, 15%, 20% and 25% of the volume of concrete/m3. Each variation consists of 10 samples of the concrete with 28 days curing time period. We will do the compressive strength and water absorption test to the samples to determine whether the samples are in accordance with the type needed. According to the test result, paving blocks with Sinabung ash and curing time reach quality A at 0%, 5% and 10% mixture with the compressive strength of each 50.14 MPa, 46.20 MPa and 1.49Mpa, and reach quality B at 15%, 20 %,25% mixture with curing time and 0%, 5%, 10%, 15%, 20% and 25% mixture without curing time. According to the absorption values we got from the test which are 6.66%, 6.73%, 6.88%, 7.03%, 7.09% and 7.16%, the entire sample have average absorption exceeding SNI standardization which is above 6% and reach quality C. Based on compressive strength and absorption data obtained Sinabung ash can’t fully replace cement as the binder because of the low CaO content.

  15. Utilization of coal ash/coal combustion products for mine reclamation

    SciTech Connect

    Dolence, R.C.; Giovannitti, E.

    1997-09-01

    Society`s demand for an inexpensive fuel, combined with ignorance of the long term impacts, has left numerous scars on the Pennsylvania landscape. There are over 250,000 acres of abandoned surface mines with dangerous highwalls and water filled pits. About 2,400 miles of streams do not meet water quality standards because of drainage from abandoned mines. There are uncounted households without an adequate water supply due to past mining practices. Mine fires and mine subsidence plague many Pennsylvania communities. The estimated cost to reclaim these past scars is over $15 billion. The beneficial use of coal ash in Pennsylvania for mine reclamation and mine drainage pollution abatement projects increased during the past ten years. The increase is primarily due to procedural and regulatory changes by the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP). Prior to 1986, DEP required a mining permit and a separate waste disposal permit for the use of coal ash in backfilling and reclaiming a surface mine site. In order to eliminate the dual permitting requirements and promote mine reclamation, procedural changes now allow a single permit which authorize both mining and the use of coal ash in reclaiming active and abandoned pits. The actual ash placement, however, must be conducted in accordance with the technical specifications in the solid waste regulations.

  16. Thermal treatment and utilization of Al-rich waste in high calcium fly ash geopolymeric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chindaprasirt, Prinya; Rattanasak, Ubolluk; Vongvoradit, Pimdao; Jenjirapanya, Supichart

    2012-09-01

    The Al-rich waste with aluminium and hydrocarbon as the major contaminant is generated at the wastewater treatment unit of a polymer processing plant. In this research, the heat treatment of this Al-rich waste and its use to adjust the silica/alumina ratio of the high calcium fly ash geopolymer were studied. To recycle the raw Al-rich waste, the waste was dried at 110°C and calcined at 400 to 1000°C. Mineralogical analyses were conducted using X-ray diffraction (XRD) to study the phase change. The increase in calcination temperature to 600, 800, and 1000°C resulted in the phase transformation. The more active alumina phase of active γ-Al2O3 was obtained with the increase in calcination temperature. The calcined Al-rich waste was then used as an additive to the fly ash geopolymer by mixing with high calcium fly ash, water glass, 10 M sodium hydroxide (NaOH), and sand. Test results indicated that the calcined Al-rich waste could be used as an aluminium source to adjust the silica/alumina ratio and the strength of geopolymeric materials. The fly ash geopolymer mortar with 2.5wt% of the Al-rich waste calcined at 1000°C possessed the 7-d compressive strength of 34.2 MPa.

  17. Utilization of low-ash biochar to partially replace carbon black in SBR composites

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A biochar made from woody waste feedstock with low ash content was blended with carbon black as filler for styrene-butadiene rubber. At 10% total filler concentration (w/w), composites made from 25 or 50% biochar showed improved tensile strength, elongation, and toughness compared to similar composi...

  18. Utilizing acid mine drainage sludge and coal fly ash for phosphate removal from dairy wastewater.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y R; Tsang, Daniel C W; Olds, William E; Weber, Paul A

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to investigate a new and sustainable approach for the reuse of industrial by-products from wastewater treatment. The dairy industry produces huge volumes of wastewater, characterized by high levels of phosphate that can result in eutrophication and degradation of aquatic ecosystems. This study evaluated the application of acid mine drainage (AMD) sludge, coal fly ash, and lignite as low-cost adsorbents for the removal of phosphate from dairy wastewater. Material characterization using X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction, and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area analysis revealed significant amounts of crystalline/amorphous Fe/Al/Si/Ca-based minerals and large surface areas of AMD sludge and fly ash. Batch adsorption isotherms were best described using the Freundlich model. The Freundlich distribution coefficients were 13.7 mg(0.577) L(0.423) g(-1) and 16.9 mg(0.478) L(0.522) g(-1) for AMD sludge and fly ash, respectively, and the nonlinearity constants suggested favourable adsorption for column applications. The breakthrough curves of fixed-bed columns, containing greater than 10 wt% of the waste materials (individual or composite blends) mixed with sand, indicated that phosphate breakthrough did not occur within 100 pore volumes while the cumulative removal was 522 and 490 mg kg(-1) at 10 wt% AMD sludge and 10 wt% fly ash, respectively. By contrast, lignite exhibited negligible phosphate adsorption, possibly due to small amounts of inorganic minerals suitable for phosphate complexation and limited surface area. The results suggest that both AMD sludge and fly ash were potentially effective adsorbents if employed individually at a ratio of 10 wt% or above for column application.

  19. DETAIL OF UTILITY PIPES AT THE BOTTOM LEVEL OF INTERNAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF UTILITY PIPES AT THE BOTTOM LEVEL OF INTERNAL PLATFORMS, ALTITUDE CHAMBER L, FACING WEST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  20. Advanced research and technology: direct utilization, recovery of minerals from coal fly ash. Fossil energy program. Technical progress report, July 1-September 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Burnet, G.; Murtha, M.J.; Adelman, D.J.

    1980-12-01

    This investigation is to develop methods for utilizing coal fly ash through processes for the extraction of alumina and titania, and for the separation and use of an iron-rich fraction. Research of the HiChlor process for the extraction of alumina and titania by high-temperature chlorination of a fly ash-reductant mixture is described. An engineering cost evaluation is presented for a centralized HiChlor processing facility to process the fly ash of several large coal-fueled power stations. Investigations for a high-temperature lime-soda process for extraction of alumina from fly ash included the use of several types of quarry limestones and waste materials to replace the limestone and/or soda ash. A breakthrough was made on the development of a limestone-fly ash process without soda. The addition of less than 5% by weight waste coal refuse to the sinter mixtures increased alumina recoveries from a 55 to 90%, at a much lower sintering temperature of 1200/sup 0/C. For the lime-soda sinter process, an engineering cost evaluation was prepared for a facility to process the fly ash from a 1000 MWe coal-fueled power station to produce alumina and Portland cement. This facility will process and dispose of the total generated fly ash volume as products rather than as waste, and the facility investment will be less than 10% of the cost of the corresponding power station. The magnetic fly ash fraction, separated before either HiChlor or sinter processing, was shown to have a market value as a heavy medium material for coal and ore beneficiation. Research was also conducted on the upgrading of magnetic fly ash to iron ore quality. Research of coal beneficiation using magnetic fly ash media was expanded.

  1. Possible utilization of flue-gas desulfurization gypsum and fly ash for citrus production: Evaluation of crop growth response

    SciTech Connect

    Alva, A.K. . Citrus Research and Education Center)

    1994-01-01

    The application of industrial by-products to agricultural land has been a topic of considerable interest during recent years. For the industries, this is an attractive avenue to utilize the by-products rather than land filling. Agriculturists/horticulturists are faced with a new challenge to evaluate the potential advantages of this practice in terms of crop growth, production, and quality as well as effects of such practices on environmental quality. Fly ash and flue-gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum are by-products produced from coal-fired electric power generation plants. There is a growing interest in evaluation of potential benefits of land application of coal combustion by products mixed with organic by-products. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of application of FGD gypsum, fly ash or chicken manure,, or application of the former two in combination with the latter, on soil properties as well as on growth and mineral nutrition of Cleopatra mandarin and Swingle citrumelo rootstock seedlings grown on a Myakka sand. The growth of seedlings of either rootstock improved significantly in soils amended with either FGD gypsum, fly ash, or chicken manure, individually or in combination of either by-product with chicken manure. However, the ranking of various amendments in relation to growth response differed between the two rootstocks. The combined application of all three amendments decreased the growth of both rootstock seedlings significantly as compared to that of seedlings in unamended soil. The application of either FGD gypsum, fly ash, or chicken manure each at 2 g/kg soil increased the concentration of Ca, Ca and K, and Ca and P in the leaves of seedlings, respectively.

  2. Assessment and comparison of three high-aluminum fly ash utilization scenarios in Inner Mongolia, China using an eco-efficiency indicator.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuo; Lin, Ling; Li, Shao Peng; Li, Qiang; Wang, Xiu Teng; Sun, Liang

    2017-05-01

    Utilization of fly ash is of great importance in China in the context of resource and environmental crises. Different fly ash utilization processes are proposed, and some have been practically applied. However, none of these fly ash utilization pathways has been evaluated comprehensively by integrating both environmental and economic perspectives. In this study, three high-aluminum fly ash utilization methods in Mongolia were assessed and compared based on the concept of eco-efficiency. The environmental assessment was conducted in accordance with life-cycle assessment principles, and a monetization-weighting approach was applied to obtain social willingness-to-pay as a reflection of environmental impact. The environmental assessment results revealed that the reuse of fly ash had significant advantage for saving primary resource, while solid waste, depletion of water, and global warming were the three highest environmental impacts from the life cycle perspective. The economic performance assessment showed positive net profits for fly ash utilization, but high value-added products were not necessarily indicative of better economic performance due to the relatively high operation cost. Comparison of the eco-efficiency indicators (EEIs) implied that the process of scenario 1#, which produced mullite ceramic and active calcium silicate, was the most recommended out of the three scenarios on the present scale. This judgment was consistent with the evaluation of the resource utilization rate. The present study showed that the EEI could be used to compare different fly ash utilization processes in a comprehensive and objective manner, thus providing definitive and insightful suggestions for decision-making and technical improvement.

  3. An experimental study on the hazard assessment and mechanical properties of porous concrete utilizing coal bottom ash coarse aggregate in Korea.

    PubMed

    Park, Seung Bum; Jang, Young Il; Lee, Jun; Lee, Byung Jae

    2009-07-15

    This study evaluates quality properties and toxicity of coal bottom ash coarse aggregate and analyzes mechanical properties of porous concrete depending on mixing rates of coal bottom ash. As a result, soundness and resistance to abrasion of coal bottom ash coarse aggregate were satisfied according to the standard of coarse aggregate for concrete. To satisfy the standard pertaining to chloride content, the coarse aggregates have to be washed more than twice. In regards to the result of leaching test for coal bottom ash coarse aggregate and porous concrete produced with these coarse aggregates, it was satisfied with the environment criteria. As the mixing rate of coal bottom ash increased, influence of void ratio and permeability coefficient was very little, but compressive and flexural strength decreased. When coal bottom ash was mixed over 40%, strength decreased sharply (compressive strength: by 11.7-27.1%, flexural strength: by maximum 26.4%). Also, as the mixing rate of coal bottom ash increased, it was confirmed that test specimens were destroyed by aggregate fracture more than binder fracture and interface fracture. To utilize coal bottom ash in large quantities, it is thought that an improvement method in regards to strength has to be discussed such as incorporation of reinforcing materials and improvement of aggregate hardness.

  4. Utilization of zeolites synthesized from coal fly ash for the purification of acid mine waters.

    PubMed

    Moreno, N; Querol, X; Ayora, C; Pereira, C F; Janssen-Jurkovicová, M

    2001-09-01

    Two pilot plant products containing 65 and 45% NaP1 zeolite were obtained from two Spanish coal fly ashes (Narcea and Teruel Power Station, respectively). The zeolitic product obtained showed a cation exchange capacity (CEC) of 2.7 and 2.0 mequiv/g, respectively. Decontamination tests of three acid mine waters from southwestern Spain were carried out using the zeolite derived from fly ash and commercial synthetic zeolite. The results demonstrate that the zeolitic material could be employed for heavy metal uptake in the water purification process. Doses of 5-30 g of zeolite/L have been applied according on the zeolite species and the heavy metal levels. Moreover, the application of zeolites increases the pH. This causes metal-bearing solid phases to precipitate and enhances the efficiency of the decontamination process.

  5. Utilization of fly ash for stabilization/solidification of heavy metal contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect

    Dermatas, D.; Meng, X.

    1995-12-01

    Pozzolanic-based stabilization/solidification (S/S) is an effective, yet economic technological alternative to immobilize heavy metals in contaminated soils and sludges. Fly ash waste materials were used along with quicklime (CaO) to immobilize lead, trivalent and hexavalent chromium present in contaminated clayey sand soils. The degree of heavy metal immobilization was evaluated using the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) as well as controlled extraction experiments. These leaching test results along with X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive x-ray (SEM-EDX) analyses were also implemented to elucidate the mechanisms responsible for immobilization of the heavy metals under study. Finally, the reusability of the stabilized waste forms in construction applications was also investigated by performing unconfined compressive strength and swell tests. Results suggest that the controlling mechanism for both lead and hexavalent chromium immobilization is surface adsorption, whereas for trivalent chromium it is hydroxide precipitation. Addition of fly ash to the contaminated soils effectively reduced heavy metal leachability well below the non-hazardous regulatory limits. However, quicklime addition was necessary in order to attain satisfactory immobilization levels. Overall, fly ash addition increases the immobilization pH region for all heavy metals tested, and significantly improves the stress-strain properties of the treated solids, thus allowing their reuse as readily available construction materials. The only potential problem associated with this quicklime/fly ash treatment is the excessive formation of the pozzolanic product ettringite in the presence of sulfates. Ettringite, when brought in contact with water, may cause significant swelling and subsequent deterioration of the stabilized matrix. Addition of minimum amounts of barium hydroxide was shown to effectively eliminate ettringite formation.

  6. Utilization of municipal solid waste incineration fly ash for sulfoaluminate cement clinker production

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Kai; Shi Huisheng; Guo Xiaolu

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: > The replacement can be taken up to 30% of MSWI fly ash in the raw mix. > The novelty compositional parameters were defined, their optimum values were determined. > Expansive property of SAC is strongly depended on gypsum content. > Three leaching test methods are used to assess the environmental impact. - Abstract: The feasibility of partially substituting raw materials with municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash in sulfoaluminate cement (SAC) clinker production was investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), compressive strength and free expansion ratio testing. Three different leaching tests were used to assess the environmental impact of the produced material. Experimental results show that the replacement of MSWI fly ash could be taken up to 30% in the raw mixes. The good quality SAC clinkers are obtained by controlling the compositional parameters at alkalinity modulus (C{sub m}) around 1.05, alumina-sulfur ratio (P) around 2.5, alumina-silica ratio (N) around 2.0{approx}3.0 and firing the raw mixes at 1250 deg. C for 2 h. The compressive strengths of SAC are high in early age while that develop slowly in later age. Results also show that the expansive properties of SAC are strongly depended on the gypsum content. Leaching studies of toxic elements in the hydrated SAC-based system reveal that all the investigated elements are well bounded in the clinker minerals or immobilized by the hydration products. Although some limited positive results indicate that the SAC prepared from MSWI fly ash would present no immediate thread to the environment, the long-term toxicity leaching behavior needs to be further studied.

  7. Characterization of MSWI bottom ashes towards utilization as glass raw material

    SciTech Connect

    Monteiro, R.C.C. Figueiredo, C.F.; Alendouro, M.S.; Ferro, M.C.; Davim, E.J.R.; Fernandes, M.H.V.

    2008-07-01

    The characterization of the bottom ashes produced by two Portuguese municipal solid waste incinerators (MSWI) was performed with the aim of assessing the feasibility of using this waste as raw material in the production of glass that can be further processed as glass-ceramics for application in construction. Density and particle size distribution measurements were carried out for physical characterization. Chemical characterization revealed that SiO{sub 2}, a network glass former oxide, was present in a relatively high content (52-58 wt%), indicating the suitability for this waste to be employed in the development of vitreous materials. CaO, Na{sub 2}O and K{sub 2}O, which act as fluxing agents, were present in various amounts (2-17 wt%) together with several other oxides normally present in ceramic and glass raw materials. Mineralogical characterization revealed that the main crystalline phases were quartz (SiO{sub 2}) and calcite (CaCO{sub 3}) and that minor amounts of different alkaline and alkaline-earth aluminosilicate phases were also present. Thermal characterization showed that the decomposition of the different compounds occurred up to 1100 deg. C and that total weight loss was <10 wt%. Heating both bottom ashes at 1400 deg. C for 2 h resulted in a melt with suitable viscosity to be poured into a mould, and homogeneous black-coloured glasses with a smooth shiny surface were obtained after cooling. The vitrified bottom ashes were totally amorphous as confirmed by X-ray diffraction. The results from the present experimental work indicate that the examined bottom ashes can be a potential material to melt and to obtain a glass that can be further processed as glass-ceramics to be applied in construction.

  8. Utilization of oil palm ash as an reinforcing filler in natural rubber biocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malawet, Chutarat; Jarnthong, Methakarn; Intharapat, Punyanich; Liao, Lusheng; Zhang, Fuquan; Wang, Yueqiong; Li, Puwang; Peng, Zheng

    2017-05-01

    Biocomposites based on blending of natural rubber (NR) and oil palm ash (OPA) were prepared. The properties of OPA filled NR composites were investigated in terms of mechanical, morphological and thermal properties. Mechanical tests indicated that the addition of the OPA resulted in an increase in the modulus, tensile strength and elongation at break of the films. However, no significant changes were observed to glass transition temperature (Tg) of NR/OPA composites.

  9. Characterization of MSWI bottom ashes towards utilization as glass raw material.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, R C C; Figueiredo, C F; Alendouro, M S; Ferro, M C; Davim, E J R; Fernandes, M H V

    2008-01-01

    The characterization of the bottom ashes produced by two Portuguese municipal solid waste incinerators (MSWI) was performed with the aim of assessing the feasibility of using this waste as raw material in the production of glass that can be further processed as glass-ceramics for application in construction. Density and particle size distribution measurements were carried out for physical characterization. Chemical characterization revealed that SiO(2), a network glass former oxide, was present in a relatively high content (52-58wt%), indicating the suitability for this waste to be employed in the development of vitreous materials. CaO, Na(2)O and K(2)O, which act as fluxing agents, were present in various amounts (2-17wt%) together with several other oxides normally present in ceramic and glass raw materials. Mineralogical characterization revealed that the main crystalline phases were quartz (SiO(2)) and calcite (CaCO(3)) and that minor amounts of different alkaline and alkaline-earth aluminosilicate phases were also present. Thermal characterization showed that the decomposition of the different compounds occurred up to 1100 degrees C and that total weight loss was <10wt%. Heating both bottom ashes at 1400 degrees C for 2h resulted in a melt with suitable viscosity to be poured into a mould, and homogeneous black-coloured glasses with a smooth shiny surface were obtained after cooling. The vitrified bottom ashes were totally amorphous as confirmed by X-ray diffraction. The results from the present experimental work indicate that the examined bottom ashes can be a potential material to melt and to obtain a glass that can be further processed as glass-ceramics to be applied in construction.

  10. Fly ash utilization in McLean County, North Dakota. Topical report, Task 7.25

    SciTech Connect

    Moretti, C.J.

    1993-03-01

    In 1989, the McLean County Commissioners requested assistance from personnel at the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) with the construction of a section of road and a boat ramp in their county. Assistance was sought from the EERC because the county`s construction plans called for partial replacement of the lime and portland cement normally used for soil stabilization with fly ash. Since the EERC had recently conducted several research projects dealing with the use of coal combustion by-products for road construction, the commissioners requested that EERC personnel help to determine appropriate formulas for the stabilized soil mixtures to be used for both the road and boat ramp applications. An additional incentive was provided when the management of the Coal Creek Power Plant offered to donate the necessary fly ash at no cost. This project was performed as a joint venture between McLean County and the EERC. The EERC was primarily responsible for conducting a laboratory testing program to develop soil stabilization mixtures for the two construction activities. These mixtures were to contain a relatively high percentage of fly ash and to exhibit sufficient strength and durability so that the road and boat ramp would both have a service life of 20 years or more. McLean County would be primarily responsible for the road and boat ramp construction activities. The funding for the EERC portion of the project was provided by the US Department of Energy through a joint venture support program.

  11. Utilization of municipal solid waste incineration fly ash for sulfoaluminate cement clinker production.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kai; Shi, Huisheng; Guo, Xiaolu

    2011-01-01

    The feasibility of partially substituting raw materials with municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash in sulfoaluminate cement (SAC) clinker production was investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), compressive strength and free expansion ratio testing. Three different leaching tests were used to assess the environmental impact of the produced material. Experimental results show that the replacement of MSWI fly ash could be taken up to 30% in the raw mixes. The good quality SAC clinkers are obtained by controlling the compositional parameters at alkalinity modulus (C(m)) around 1.05, alumina-sulfur ratio (P) around 2.5, alumina-silica ratio (N) around 2.0~3.0 and firing the raw mixes at 1250 °C for 2h. The compressive strengths of SAC are high in early age while that develop slowly in later age. Results also show that the expansive properties of SAC are strongly depended on the gypsum content. Leaching studies of toxic elements in the hydrated SAC-based system reveal that all the investigated elements are well bounded in the clinker minerals or immobilized by the hydration products. Although some limited positive results indicate that the SAC prepared from MSWI fly ash would present no immediate thread to the environment, the long-term toxicity leaching behavior needs to be further studied.

  12. Commercial Demonstration of the Manufactured Aggregate Processing Technology Utilizing Spray Dryer Ash

    SciTech Connect

    Roy Scandrol

    2004-11-01

    This quarterly report covers the period from July 1st, 2004 through September 30th, 2004. It covers: technical development, permitting status, engineering status, construction status, operations summary and marketing support activities for this period. Plant startup, including equipment and system debugging, is underway. Minor adjustments to the SDA feed system, pug mill, and extruder were completed. Testing of admixtures to prevent the wetted SDA from sticking is continuing. The power plant is implementing a lime optimization program to reduce the calcium hydroxide values in the ash.

  13. [Utilizing fly ash to prepare polysilicon acid and compounded PFS and the study of its properties].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ai-Li; Wang, Dian-Yu; Zhou, Ji-Ti; Deng, Qing-Wen

    2009-07-15

    Fly ash which is a kind of solid waste of power station in Dalian was prepared as polysilicon acid, and compound polymerized ferric sulphate and its properties was studied. Fly ash was dipped in NaOH solution. The effects of temperature, concentration of NaOH solution and reactive time were examined respectively on the conversion efficiencies of silicon. Then the solution which was rich in silicon was used to compound polymerized ferric sulfate (PFS) and got compounded polymerized ferric sulphate (F-PFS), and evaluated the effects of slaking time and Fe3+/Si molar ratio on conversion efficiencies of silicon. Then used Na2SiO3 to prepare polysilicon acid compounded polymerized ferric sulphate (N-PFS) with the same silicon concentration at the best condition. The best ratio of dissolved silicon 0.207 9 g x g(-1) was attained at the condition of 4 mol x L(-1) NaOH solution, 120 degrees C for 4 h. The coagulant was attained at the condition of Fe3+/Si molar ratio of 1:0.2 and slaking time of 2 h. The reducing turbidity by F-PFS is the same as N-PFS, but F-PFS is better than N-PFS and PFS is in the stabilization, sedimentation,and the property of treating with urban sewage.

  14. Advanced research and technology: direct utilization-recovery of minerals from coal fly ash. Technical progress report, 1 October 1978-30 September 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Burnet, G.; Murtha, M.

    1980-01-01

    Research focused on technical development of promising methods for recovering minerals from power plant fly ash. Development of the high-temperature (HiChlor) gas chlorination process and refinement and definition of the recovery steps of extraction and desilication for the lime-soda sinter process were emphasized. A preliminary design and cost estimate for commercialization of the HiChlor process and a proposal for a process development unit for scale-up of the lime-soda sinter process were prepared. Both physical and chemical beneficiation techniques to upgrade the iron content of the magnetic fly ash were tested; chemical beneficiation using high-temperature NaOH leaching was found to be the most effective method. Pretreatment for each of the processes includes magnetic separation of coal fly ash. Bituminous coal fly ashes contain magnetic iron oxide particles which can be removed by magnetic separation. The magnetic material consists primarily of iron oxides, with small amounts of silica and alumina. Removal of additional silica and alumina will give a product which can be used for steel production. Physical investigations included careful study of internal structure of fly ash particles. Fly ash samples were separated for a range of electromagnetic power settings and the fractions were analyzed for size determinations, chemical compositions, and morphological contents. Chemical analyses showed that, for the nonmagnetic fly ash fractions, the silica and iron contents are independent of size, and that the alumina content is highest in the smaller particles.

  15. Advanced research and technology: direct utilization-recovery of minerals from coal fly ash. Fossil energy program. Technical progress report, 1 April-30 June 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Burnet, G.; Murtha, M.J.; Frederick, J.

    1980-08-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to develop methods to utilize coal fly ashes through processes for the extraction of alumina and titania, and for the separation and utilization of an iron-rich fraction. Research of the HiChlor process for the extraction of alumina and titania by high-temperature chlorination of a fly ash-reductant mixture has involved comparative calculations for several fly ashes, and the design of a bench-scale fluidized chlorination system. The initial chlorination research of the high-volume fly ashes from western coals was begun. Process development of the sinter process for alumina recovery has included the investigation of several variables for improving the quantity and quality of the alumina extracted from sintered materials. As a result of this work, it is clear that further optimization of the sintering and extraction variables is required for commercialization of the fly ash sinter process. Iron-rich, magnetically separated coal fly ash particles were beneficiated to a quality equal to high grade, naturally mined iron ore by a high-temperature pressurized caustic treatment. About 95% of the contained silica and 65% of the alumina was extracted. Work was begun on the assembly of equipment for a detailed comparison of magnetically separated iron-rich fly ashes and commercial magnetities for use in heavy media coal beneficiation. Characterization of the particles, ad stability and rheological properties of media solutions prepared with these materials will provide data for further evaluating magnetic fly ash as a heavy media material. A circuit is also being built for long-term flow tests of the media suspensions for measurement of construction material erosion and solid medium particle friability.

  16. Adsorption of sulfur compound utilizing rice husk ash modified with niobium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavalcanti, Rodrigo M.; Pessoa Júnior, Wanison A. G.; Braga, Valdeilson S.; Barros, Ivoneide de C. L.

    2015-11-01

    Adsorbents based in rice husk ash (RHA) modified with niobium pentoxide were prepared for impregnation methods and applied in sulfur removal in liquid fuels. The solids were characterized by X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, nitrogen physisorption and thermal analysis; they show that there was no qualitative change in the amorphous structure of the RHA; however, the method of impregnation could modify the particle size and topology of RHA particles. The larger sulfur removal (>50%) was achieved using RHA with 5 wt.% Nb2O5 at a dosage of 10 g L-1, after 4 h of contact with the model fuel. The kinetic study of adsorption of thiophene showed that the models of pseudo-second order and intra-particle diffusion best fit the experimental data. The adsorption experiments with the thiophenic derivatives compounds show a large selectivity of the adsorbent.

  17. Investigation on the utilization of coal fly ash as amendment to compost for vegetation in acid soil

    SciTech Connect

    Menon, M.P.

    1990-04-16

    The use of fly ash as amendment to compost is presented. Plant growth/yields of corn collard greens, mustard greens, and sorgum is described. The treatment parameters such as fly ash to compost ratio, fly ash-amended compost to soil ratio, type of compost used for treatment etc. are discussed. 2 refs., 5 figs., 8 tabs. (CBS)

  18. Trends in domestic and international markets for ash logs and lumber

    Treesearch

    Dan. Meyer

    2010-01-01

    While ash is a "minor" commercial hardwood species relative to oak, poplar, and maple, it still accounts for roughly 3 percent of all hardwood lumber produced, with an estimated kiln-dried value exceeding $150 million annually.

  19. Wide-scale utilization of MSWI fly ashes in cement production and its impact on average heavy metal contents in cements: The case of Austria.

    PubMed

    Lederer, Jakob; Trinkel, Verena; Fellner, Johann

    2017-02-01

    A number of studies present the utilization of fly ashes from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) in cement production as a recycling alternative to landfilling. While there is a lot of research on the impact of MSWI fly ashes utilization in cement production on the quality of concrete or the leaching of heavy metals, only a few studies have determined the resulting heavy metal content in cements caused by this MSWI fly ashes utilization. Making use of the case of Austria, this study (1) determines the total content of selected heavy metals in cements currently produced in the country, (2) designs a scenario and calculates the resulting heavy metal contents in cements assuming that all MSWI fly ashes from Austrian grate incinerators were used as secondary raw materials for Portland cement clinker production and (3) evaluates the legal recyclability of demolished concretes produced from MSWI fly ash amended cements based on their total heavy metal contents. To do so, data from literature and statistics are combined in a material flow analysis model to calculate the average total contents of heavy metals in cements and in the resulting concretes according to the above scenario. The resulting heavy metal contents are then compared (i) to their respective limit values for cements as defined in a new technical guideline in Austria (BMLFUW, 2016), and (ii) to their respective limit values for recycling materials from demolished concrete. Results show that MSWI fly ashes utilization increases the raw material input in cement production by only +0.9%, but the total contents of Cd by +310%, and Hg, Pb, and Zn by +70% to +170%. However these and other heavy metal contents are still below their respective limit values for Austrian cements. The same legal conformity counts for recycling material derived from concretes produced from the MSWI fly ash cements. However, if the MSWI fly ash ratio in all raw materials used for cement production were increased from 0.9% to 22

  20. Proceedings: Avian Interactions with Utility Structures. International Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    The first international workshop on Avian Interactions with Utility Structures featured an exchange of information on the impact of utility structures on avian populations. EPRI cosponsored the workshop with the Avian Power Line Interaction Committee (APLIC), formed in 1988 and designed to share data and experience regarding avian interactions with utility structures. The workshop -- held September 13--16, 1992 in Miami-welcomed engineers, scientists, academic researchers, and representatives from conservation and special interest groups. Attendees from 10 countries presented 28 papers that provide a basis for understanding and establishing new research directions to reduce bird mortality due to collisions and electrocutions. Papers highlighted advances in technology and analysis tools, the geographic extent of the problem, and regulatory needs of utilities and other interested parties involved in preventing and mitigating avian/power line interaction problems.

  1. International Space Station External Contamination Environment for Space Science Utilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soares, Carlos E.; Mikatarian, Ronald R.; Steagall, Courtney A.; Huang, Alvin Y.; Koontz, Steven; Worthy, Erica

    2014-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) is the largest and most complex on-orbit platform for space science utilization in low Earth orbit. Multiple sites for external payloads, with exposure to the associated natural and induced environments, are available to support a variety of space science utilization objectives. Contamination is one of the induced environments that can impact performance, mission success and science utilization on the vehicle. The ISS has been designed, built and integrated with strict contamination requirements to provide low levels of induced contamination on external payload assets. This paper addresses the ISS induced contamination environment at attached payload sites, both at the requirements level as well as measurements made on returned hardware, and contamination forecasting maps being generated to support external payload topology studies and science utilization.

  2. Utilization of municipal solid waste bottom ash and recycled aggregate in concrete.

    PubMed

    Juric, B; Hanzic, L; Ilić, R; Samec, N

    2006-01-01

    In the combustion process of municipal solid waste (MSW), bottom ash (BA) represents the major portion of the solid residue. Since BA is composed of oxides, especially SiO(2) and CaO, the feasibility of its application in concrete as a substitute for cement was tested. It was found that at the age of 28 days, the flexural and compressive strengths of the binder linearly decrease at the rate of 0.03 and 0.02 MPa per wt% of BA in the binder, respectively. According to the results it may be recommended to replace up to 15 wt% of cement by BA and to use such binder where a low strength of concrete elements is required. Furthermore, the aggregate used for low strength concrete need not be of a very good quality. Therefore, gravel aggregate was partially replaced by recycled aggregate (RA). Consistency measured by slump was significantly reduced (>50%) when BA or/and RA were introduced into the mixture. However, concrete density and compressive strength were not affected and were approximately 2300 kg/m(3) and approximately 40 MPa, respectively.

  3. High-value zeolitic material from bagasse fly ash: utilization for dye elimination.

    PubMed

    Shah, Bhavna A; Shah, Ajay V; Patel, Harendra D; Mistry, Chirag B

    2013-06-01

    Bagasse fly ash (BFA), a sugar industry waste, was used to prepare zeolitic material (ZFA) by means of alkaline hydrothermal treatment. ZFA showed improved morphology as a result of this treatment. The adsorption of the reactive dyes turquoise blue (TB) and brilliant magenta (BM), on both BFA and ZFA, was investigated in a batch contact system. A series of batch experiments revealed that optimal dye removal occurs at a 200 mg/L to 300 mg/L solute concentration, 60 minutes of agitation time, 5 g/L to 10 g/L adsorbent dose, a pH level of 2 to 4, and a temperature of 298 K. ZFA showed enhanced adsorption capacity as compared to BFA. According to the Langmuir equation, the maximum adsorption capacity was 12.66 mg/g and 45.45 mg/g for turquoise blue and brilliant magenta dyes, respectively, on BFA; and 21.74 mg/g and 100.00 mg/g for turquoise blue and brilliant magenta dyes, respectively, on ZFA. Kinetic studies showed that the correlation coefficients best fit with the pseudo-second-order kinetic model, confirming that the adsorption rate was controlled by a hemisorptions process.

  4. Commercial Demonstration of the Manufactured Aggregate Processing Technology Utilizing Spray Dryer Ash

    SciTech Connect

    Milton Wu; Paul Yuran

    2006-12-31

    Universal Aggregates LLC (UA) was awarded a cost sharing Co-operative Agreement from the Department of Energy (DOE) through the Power Plant Improvement Initiative Program (PPII) to design, construct and operate a lightweight aggregate manufacturing plant at the Birchwood Power Facility in King George, Virginia in October 2001. The Agreement was signed in November 2002. The installation and start-up expenses for the Birchwood Aggregate Facility are $19.5 million. The DOE share is $7.2 million (37%) and the UA share is $12.3 million (63%). The original project team consists of UA, SynAggs, LLC, CONSOL Energy Inc. and P. J. Dick, Inc. Using 115,000 ton per year of spray dryer ash (SDA), a dry FGD by-product from the power station, UA will produce 167,000 tons of manufactured lightweight aggregate for use in production of concrete masonry units (CMU). Manufacturing aggregate from FGD by-products can provide an economical high-volume use and substantially expand market for FGD by-products. Most of the FGD by-products are currently disposed of in landfills. Construction of the Birchwood Aggregate Facility was completed in March 2004. Operation startup was begun in April 2004. Plant Integration was initiated in December 2004. Integration includes mixing, extrusion, curing, crushing and screening. Lightweight aggregates with proper size gradation and bulk density were produced from the manufacturing aggregate plant and loaded on a stockpile for shipment. The shipped aggregates were used in a commercial block plant for CMU production. However, most of the production was made at low capacity factors and for a relatively short time in 2005. Several areas were identified as important factors to improve plant capacity and availability. Equipment and process control modifications and curing vessel clean up were made to improve plant operation in the first half of 2006. About 3,000 tons of crushed aggregate was produced in August 2006. UA is continuing to work to improve plant

  5. Fundamental study of low-NOx combustion fly ash utilization. Semiannual report, May 1, 1998--October 31, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Hurt, R.H.; Suuberg, E.M.

    1999-10-20

    The objective of the current work was to investigate the oxidation reactivity of fly ash carbons, using thermogravimetric analysis techniques. Good measures of the oxidation reactivity of fly ash carbon were the critical temperature (T{sub cr}) and the late burnout temperature (T{sub late}). The lower the critical temperature of the fly ash carbon, the more reactive the sample. By contrast, the higher T{sub late}, the less reactive the fly ash carbon. The difference between T{sub cr} and T{sub late} provided information about the reactivity distribution and was mainly dependent on fly ash carbon content (Loss-On-Ignition (LOI)). Fly ash carbons having different origins, some from lower rank coals and some from higher rank coals had slightly different reactivities. Class C fly ash carbons from low rank coals were more reactive than the typical class F fly ash carbons from higher rank coals. The reactivity parameters did not, however, provide any additional ability to predict the suitability of a given ash for use in concrete.

  6. Simulation of the alpha particle heating and the helium ash source in an International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor-like tokamak with an internal transport barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Lei Guo, Wenfeng; Xiao, Xiaotao; Dai, Zongliang; Wang, Shaojie

    2014-12-15

    A guiding center orbit following code, which incorporates a set of non-singular coordinates for orbit integration, was developed and applied to investigate the alpha particle heating in an ITER-like tokamak with an internal transport barrier. It is found that a relatively large q (safety factor) value can significantly broaden the alpha heating profile in comparison with the local heating approximation; this broadening is due to the finite orbit width effects; when the orbit width is much smaller than the scale length of the alpha particle source profile, the heating profile agrees with the source profile, otherwise, the heating profile can be significantly broadened. It is also found that the stagnation particles move to the magnetic axis during the slowing-down process, thus the effect of stagnation orbits is not beneficial to the helium ash removal. The source profile of helium ash is broadened in comparison with the alpha source profile, which is similar to the heating profile.

  7. Determination of internal resistance and electrocatalyst utilization of fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, José A.; Ward, C. A.; Venter, R. D.; Ho, S.

    Analytical methods have been proposed recently for determining both the internal resistance of fuel cell electrodes and the fraction of the electrocatalyst that is completely utilized. To apply these methods requires that the Tafel slope and the equilibrium exchange current for the electrolyte-electrocatalyst combination to be known when this combination is exposed to O 2 and when it is exposed to H 2. The Tafel parameters have been previously reported for O 2 and their measurement for H 2 is reported herein. Also, to apply one of these analytical methods maximum power method — requires that the current and potential to be measured when a fuel cell is operating at steady state and at maximum power. To apply the second method — approximate maximum power method — requires that the cell potential and slope of the potential versus current curve be measured at a current that is less than that corresponding to maximum power. To evaluate these methods, a series of porous carbon electrodes were constructed, and to give them different resistances nickel was electro-deposited on the one side of each. These electrodes were then assembled into fuel cells and tested. Their internal resistance was determined by the current-interrupt technique, and by using the analytical methods. These results agree to within the experimental error, 12%. Electro-depositing nickel on the gas side of the electrodes was found to decrease their internal resistance by an order of magnitude and increase the electrocatalyst utilization by a factor of three.

  8. Investigation on the utilization of coal fly ash as amendment to compost for vegetation in acid soil

    SciTech Connect

    Menon, M.P.

    1991-08-01

    Application of fly ash-amended composts as manure enhances the crop yield of certain plants like corn, sorghum, collard and mustard greens. Organic compost made out of grass and leaves (home-made) is better than the commercial composts for amendment with fly ash. A 20--40% fly ash in the amended compost and a soil to ash-amended compost ratio of 3:1 are recommended for making bed for plantation. Organic compost mixed with fly ash, due to reduced porosity, will help the bed to retain water and conserve water supply to plants. Organic compost will release to the manure additional quantities of N, P, and S that are not substantially available in fly ash. It appears that chemical reaction and/or mineralization occurs during composting of fly ash with organic manure to release more N, P, K and S to the system. Potassium is more elevated in all plants grown in potted soil treated with fly ash-amended compost than in those grown in soil or soil treated with organic manure. Contrary to expectation Ca in fly ash is not effectively used by plants as the latter treated with ash- amended compost is not rich in Ca. This suggests that Ca may be tied up as insoluble CaSO{sub 4} in the manure so that it may not be bioavailable to the plant. Uptake of boron by bean, bell pepper and egg plant is considerably higher than that absorbed by corn, sorghum and greens resulting in poor yield for the former.

  9. Investigation on the utilization of coal fly ash as amendment to compost for vegetation in acid soil. Technical terminal report

    SciTech Connect

    Menon, M.P.

    1991-08-01

    Application of fly ash-amended composts as manure enhances the crop yield of certain plants like corn, sorghum, collard and mustard greens. Organic compost made out of grass and leaves (home-made) is better than the commercial composts for amendment with fly ash. A 20--40% fly ash in the amended compost and a soil to ash-amended compost ratio of 3:1 are recommended for making bed for plantation. Organic compost mixed with fly ash, due to reduced porosity, will help the bed to retain water and conserve water supply to plants. Organic compost will release to the manure additional quantities of N, P, and S that are not substantially available in fly ash. It appears that chemical reaction and/or mineralization occurs during composting of fly ash with organic manure to release more N, P, K and S to the system. Potassium is more elevated in all plants grown in potted soil treated with fly ash-amended compost than in those grown in soil or soil treated with organic manure. Contrary to expectation Ca in fly ash is not effectively used by plants as the latter treated with ash- amended compost is not rich in Ca. This suggests that Ca may be tied up as insoluble CaSO{sub 4} in the manure so that it may not be bioavailable to the plant. Uptake of boron by bean, bell pepper and egg plant is considerably higher than that absorbed by corn, sorghum and greens resulting in poor yield for the former.

  10. Eulusmap: An international land resources map utilizing satellite imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paludan, T.; Csati, E.

    1978-01-01

    In 1972, the International Geographical Union's Commission on World Land Use Survey adopted a project for a land-use map of Europe. Such a map, under the name Eulusmap was started earlier under sponsorship of several government offices in Hungary. Although there was great response from a number of contributors in many countries, it became evident by mid-1974 that the map would contain gaps and some inaccuracies unless additional data sources were utilized. By then, the satellite Landsat-1 had obtained imagery of most of Europe. Using theme extraction techniques, the map was completed in draft form and portions of it displayed at the 23d International Geographical Congress in Moscow during July 1976. Printing of the completed map was accomplished in May 1978.

  11. Nickel and sulfur speciation of residual oil fly ashes from two electric utility steam-generating units.

    PubMed

    Galbreath, Kevin C; Schulz, Richard L; Toman, Donald L; Nyberg, Carolyn M; Huggins, Frank E; Huffman, Gerald P; Zillioux, Edward J

    2005-03-01

    Representative duplicate fly ash samples were obtained from the stacks of 400- and 385-MW utility boilers (Unit A and Unit B, respectively) using a modified U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Method 17 sampling train assembly as they burned 0.9 and 0.3 wt % S residual (No. 6 fuel) oils, respectively, during routine power plant operations. Residual oil fly ash (ROFA) samples were analyzed for Ni concentrations and speciation using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy, X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction (XRD). ROFA deionized H2O extraction residues were also analyzed for Ni speciation using XAFS and XRD. Total Ni concentrations in the ROFAs were similar, ranging from 1.3-1.5 wt%; however, stack gas Ni concentrations in the Unit A were 0.990 microg/Nm3 compared with 0.620 microg/Nm3 for Unit B because of the greater residual oil feed rates employed at Unit A to attain higher 400-MW load conditions with a lower heating value oil. Ni speciation analysis results indicated that ROFAs from Unit A contain approximately 3 wt % NiSO4 x xH2O (where x is assumed to be 6 for calculation purposes) and appoximately 4.5 wt% of a Ni-containing spinel compound, similar in composition to (Mg,Ni)(Al,Fe)2O4. ROFAs from Unit B contain on average 2 wt% NiSO4 x 6 H20 and 1.1 wt% NiO. XAFS and XRD analyses did not detect any nickel sulfide compounds, including carcinogenic nickel subsulfide (Ni3S2) (XAFS detection limit is 5% of the total Ni concentration). In addition, XAFS measurements indicated that inorganic sulfate and organic thiophene species accounted for > 97% of the total S in the ROFAs. Unit A ROFAs contained much lower thiophene proportions because cyclone-separated ROFA reinjection is employed on this unit to collect and reburn the larger carbonaceous particles.

  12. Utilization of municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash in blended cement Part 1: Processing and characterization of MSWI fly ash.

    PubMed

    Aubert, J E; Husson, B; Sarramone, N

    2006-08-25

    This paper is the first of a series of two articles dealing with the processes applied to MSWI fly ash with a view to reusing it safely in cement-based materials. Part 1 presents two stabilization processes and Part 2 deals with the use of the two treated fly ashes (TFA) in mortars. Two types of binder were used: an Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) containing more than 95% clinker (CEM I 52.5R) and a binary blend cement composed of 70% ground granulated blast furnace slag and 30% clinker (CEM III-B 42.5N). In this first part, two stabilization processes are presented: the conventional process, called "A", based on the washing, phosphation and calcination of the ash, and a modified process, called "B", intended to eliminate metallic aluminum and sulfate contained in the ash. The physical, chemical and mineralogical characteristics of the two TFA were comparable. The main differences observed were those expected, i.e. TFA-B was free of metallic aluminum and sulfate. The mineralogical characterization of the two TFAs highlighted the presence of large amounts of a calcium aluminosilicate phase taking two forms, a crystalline form (gehlenite) and an amorphous form. Hydration studies on pastes containing mixed TFA and calcium hydroxide showed that this phase reacted with calcium hydroxide to form calcium aluminate hydrates. This formation of hydrates was accompanied by a hardening of the pastes. These results are very encouraging for the reuse of such TFA in cement-based materials because they can be considered as pozzolanic additions and could advantageously replace a part of the cement in cement-based materials. Finally, leaching tests were carried out to evaluate the environmental impact of the two TFAs. The elements which were less efficiently stabilized by process A were zinc, cadmium and antimony but, when the results of the leaching tests were compared with the thresholds of the European landfill directive, TFA-A could nevertheless be accepted at landfills for non

  13. Environmental and technical assessments of the potential utilization of sewage sludge ashes (SSAs) as secondary raw materials in construction

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Maozhe; Blanc, Denise; Gautier, Mathieu; Mehu, Jacques; Gourdon, Rémy

    2013-05-15

    Highlights: ► We used sewage sludge ashes in ready-mix concrete recipe. ► SSAs were used as a substitution of cement. ► Compressive strength of ready-mix concrete incorporating SSAs were similar as blank one. ► Contaminants leaching from concrete monoliths were above threshold limits. - Abstract: Ashes produced by thermal treatments of sewage sludge exhibit common properties with cement. For example, major elements present in SSA are the same of major elements of cement. Hydraulic properties of SSA are quite the same of cement ones. They may therefore be used to substitute part of cement in concrete or other cementitious materials, provided that technical prescriptions are satisfied and that environmental risks are not significantly increased. The objective of the present study was to determine the appropriate substitution ratios to satisfy both technical and environmental criteria. In a first step, the elemental composition and particle size distribution of the ashes were measured. Then the ashes were used along with Portland cement and sand at different ratios of substitution to produce mortar and concrete which were cured for up to 90 days into parallelepipedic or cylindrical monoliths. The mechanical properties of the monoliths were measured using standard procedures for flexural and compressive strengths, and compared to blanks containing no ashes. The environmental criteria were assessed using leaching tests conducted according to standard protocols both on the ashes and the monoliths, and compared to the blanks. Results showed that the characteristics of the ashes ranged between those of cement and sand because of their larger particle size and higher content in SiO{sub 2} as compared to cement. The monoliths made with the highest substitution ratios exhibited a significant decrease in flexural and compressive strengths. However, when the ashes were used in partial substitution of cement at appropriate ratios, the concrete monoliths exhibited similar

  14. Health and environmental impacts of increased generation of coal ash and FGD sludges. Report to the Committee on Health and Ecological Effects of Increased Coal Utilization.

    PubMed Central

    Santhanam, C J; Lunt, R R; Johnson, S L; Cooper, C B; Thayer, P S; Jones, J W

    1979-01-01

    This paper focuses on the incremental impacts of coal ash and flue gas desulfurization (FGD) wastes associated with increased coal usage by utilities and industry under the National Energy Plan (NEP). In the paper, 1985 and 2000 are the assessment points using the baseline data taken from the Annual Environmental Analysis Report (AEAR, September 1977). In each EPA region, the potential mix of disposal options has been broadly estimated and impacts assessed therefrom. In addition, future use of advanced combustion techniques has been taken into account. The quantities of coal ash and FGD wastes depend on ash and sulfur content of the coal, emission regulations, the types of ash collection and FGD systems, and operating conditions of the systems and boiler. The disposal of these wastes is (or will be) subject to Federal and State regulations. The one key legal framework concerning environmental impact on land is the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). RCRA and related Federal and State laws provide a sufficient statutory basis for preventing significant adverse health and environmental impacts from coal ash and FGD waste disposal. However, much of the development and implementation of specific regulations lie ahead. FGD wastes and coal ash and FGD wastes are currently disposed of exclusively on land. The most common land disposal methods are inpoundments (ponds) and landfills, although some mine disposal is also practiced. The potential environmental impacts of this disposal are dependent on the characteristics of the disposal site, characteristics of the coal ash and FGD wastes, control method and the degree of control employed. In general, the major potential impacts are ground and surface water contamination and the "degradation" of large quantities of land. However, assuming land is available for disposal of these wastes, control technology exists for environmentally sound disposal. Because of existing increases in coal use, the possibility of

  15. Health and environmental impacts of increased generation of coal ash and FGD sludges. Report to the Committee on Health and Ecological Effects of Increased Coal Utilization.

    PubMed

    Santhanam, C J; Lunt, R R; Johnson, S L; Cooper, C B; Thayer, P S; Jones, J W

    1979-12-01

    This paper focuses on the incremental impacts of coal ash and flue gas desulfurization (FGD) wastes associated with increased coal usage by utilities and industry under the National Energy Plan (NEP). In the paper, 1985 and 2000 are the assessment points using the baseline data taken from the Annual Environmental Analysis Report (AEAR, September 1977). In each EPA region, the potential mix of disposal options has been broadly estimated and impacts assessed therefrom. In addition, future use of advanced combustion techniques has been taken into account. The quantities of coal ash and FGD wastes depend on ash and sulfur content of the coal, emission regulations, the types of ash collection and FGD systems, and operating conditions of the systems and boiler. The disposal of these wastes is (or will be) subject to Federal and State regulations. The one key legal framework concerning environmental impact on land is the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). RCRA and related Federal and State laws provide a sufficient statutory basis for preventing significant adverse health and environmental impacts from coal ash and FGD waste disposal. However, much of the development and implementation of specific regulations lie ahead. FGD wastes and coal ash and FGD wastes are currently disposed of exclusively on land. The most common land disposal methods are inpoundments (ponds) and landfills, although some mine disposal is also practiced. The potential environmental impacts of this disposal are dependent on the characteristics of the disposal site, characteristics of the coal ash and FGD wastes, control method and the degree of control employed. In general, the major potential impacts are ground and surface water contamination and the "degradation" of large quantities of land. However, assuming land is available for disposal of these wastes, control technology exists for environmentally sound disposal. Because of existing increases in coal use, the possibility of

  16. A novel resource utilization of the calcium-based semi-dry flue gas desulfurization ash: As a reductant to remove chromium and vanadium from vanadium industrial wastewater.

    PubMed

    Fang, Dean; Liao, Xiang; Zhang, Xuefei; Teng, Aijun; Xue, Xiangxin

    2017-08-26

    A novel resource utilization of the calcium-based semi-dry flue gas desulfurization ash is investigated. In the present study, the semi-dry desulfurization ash is used as a reductant for chromium and vanadium removal by chemical reduction precipitation, the byproduct gypsum and chromium-contained sludge are obtained. Besides, the effects of main operational parameters (reaction pH, desulfurization ash dosage and reaction time) on the heavy metal removal are investigated, and the main reaction mechanism for this treatment technology is also proposed. Under the optimal conditions, the residual concentrations of Cr(VI), total Cr and V are 0.163mg/L, 0.395mg/L and 0.155mg/L, respectively. Additionally, byproduct gypsum and chromium-contained sludge are characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), scanning electron microscope-energy dispersive spectrometer (SEM-EDS) and thermogravimetry differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC), respectively. Finally, the resource utilization methods of the byproduct gypsum and chromium-contained sludge from this technology are also submitted. The byproduct gypsum can be utilized to produce hemihydrate calcium sulfate whisker, and the roasted heavy metal precipitation can be used as a primary chromium raw material (Cr2O3 content is about 83%). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Characterization, extraction, and reuse of coal-gasification solid wastes. Volume 3. Technical and economic feasibility of bulk utilization and metal recovery for ashes from an integrated coal-gasification facility. Final report, April 1983-June 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Manz, O.E.; Hassett, D.J.; Laudal, D.L.; Ellman, R.C.

    1986-06-01

    Coal-gasification waste products, including those from Lurgi gasification, have different properties from the combustion ashes, especially with respect to mineralogy. To date, comparatively little effort has been directed toward the investigation of bulk utilization or metals extraction. This project was directed towards correction of that deficiency by matching properties of the Great Plains Gasification Plant gasifier ash and the Antelope Valley Power Plant combustion explored: mineral wool; sulfur concrete; high-flexural-strength ceramics; ceramic glazed wall tile and vitrified floor tile; dual concrete replacement; road stabilization; blended cement; and recovery of aluminum. Mineral wool of similar physical character to commercial wool and at lower potential cost was produced using the ashes from the GPGA complex. Sulfur concrete utilizing 80% ash and 20% modified sulfur developed flexural and compressive strengths in excess of 2250 and 6000 psi, respectively. A vitrified ceramic product with flexural strength above 7800 psi was produced from a mixture of 50% AVS scrubber ash 45% sand, and 5% clay. By using a total ash mixture of 26% gasifier ash and 74% combustion ash, a very satisfactory, economical, and durable road-base material was developed. The replacement of up to 50% of the cement in concrete with AVS scrubber ash produces higher strength. A modified lime-soda sinter process for aluminum recovery was developed, but is not economical.

  18. The potential of recycling and reusing municipal solid waste incinerator ash in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chin-Ming; Yang, Wan-Fa; Ma, Hwong-Wen; Song, Yii-Ren

    2006-01-01

    By 2004, there were 19 municipal solid waste incinerators (MSWI) with a total yearly treatment capacity of 7.72 million tons in service in Taiwan. All 19 incinerators operated daily to generate about 1.05 million tons of incinerator ash, including bottom ash and stabilized fly ash in 2003, and the average ash yield is 18.67%. The total number of incinerators is expected to increase to 27, serving almost all cities in Taiwan by 2007. The authors have suggested a set of criteria based on the yield of incinerator ash (Phi) to study the ash recycle and reuse potential. The Taiwan Environmental Protection Administration has studied the treatment and reuse of MSWI ashes for many years and collected references on international experience accumulated by developed nations for establishing policies on treatment and reuse of MSWI ashes. These citations were analyzed as the basis for current governmental decision making on policies and factors to be considered for establishing policies on recycle and reuse of MSWI ashes. Feasible applications include utilization of ashes, which after sieving and separation of metal particles, produce granular materials. When granular materials comply with TCLP limitations, they can be utilized as cement additives or road base. The procedures of evaluation have been proposed in the performance criteria to be included in the proposed decision-making process of ash utilization.

  19. Environmental and technical assessments of the potential utilization of sewage sludge ashes (SSAs) as secondary raw materials in construction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Maozhe; Blanc, Denise; Gautier, Mathieu; Mehu, Jacques; Gourdon, Rémy

    2013-05-01

    Ashes produced by thermal treatments of sewage sludge exhibit common properties with cement. For example, major elements present in SSA are the same of major elements of cement. Hydraulic properties of SSA are quite the same of cement ones. They may therefore be used to substitute part of cement in concrete or other cementitious materials, provided that technical prescriptions are satisfied and that environmental risks are not significantly increased. The objective of the present study was to determine the appropriate substitution ratios to satisfy both technical and environmental criteria. In a first step, the elemental composition and particle size distribution of the ashes were measured. Then the ashes were used along with Portland cement and sand at different ratios of substitution to produce mortar and concrete which were cured for up to 90 days into parallelepipedic or cylindrical monoliths. The mechanical properties of the monoliths were measured using standard procedures for flexural and compressive strengths, and compared to blanks containing no ashes. The environmental criteria were assessed using leaching tests conducted according to standard protocols both on the ashes and the monoliths, and compared to the blanks. Results showed that the characteristics of the ashes ranged between those of cement and sand because of their larger particle size and higher content in SiO2 as compared to cement. The monoliths made with the highest substitution ratios exhibited a significant decrease in flexural and compressive strengths. However, when the ashes were used in partial substitution of cement at appropriate ratios, the concrete monoliths exhibited similar compressive strengths as the blank samples. The most appropriate ratios were found to be 10% substitution of cement and 2% substitution of sand. The leaching tests conducted on the ashes in their powdery form revealed that amongst the potential contaminants analyzed only Mo and Se were leached at

  20. The Era of International Space Station Utilization Begins: Research Strategy, International Collaboration, and Realized Potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thumm, Tracy; Robinson, Julie A.; Ruttley, Tara; Johnson-Green, Perry; Karabadzhak, George; Nakamura, Tai; Sorokin, Igor V.; Zell, Martin; Jean, Sabbagh

    2010-01-01

    With the assembly of the International Space Station (ISS) nearing completion and the support of a full-time crew of six, a new era of utilization for research is beginning. For more than 15 years, the ISS international partnership has weathered financial, technical and political challenges proving that nations can work together to complete assembly of the largest space vehicle in history. And while the ISS partners can be proud of having completed one of the most ambitious engineering projects ever conceived, the challenge of successfully using the platform remains. During the ISS assembly phase, the potential benefits of space-based research and development were demonstrated; including the advancement of scientific knowledge based on experiments conducted in space, development and testing of new technologies, and derivation of Earth applications from new understanding. The configurability and human-tended capabilities of the ISS provide a unique platform. The international utilization strategy is based on research ranging from physical sciences, biology, medicine, psychology, to Earth observation, human exploration preparation and technology demonstration. The ability to complete follow-on investigations in a period of months allows researchers to make rapid advances based on new knowledge gained from ISS activities. During the utilization phase, the ISS partners are working together to track the objectives, accomplishments, and the applications of the new knowledge gained. This presentation will summarize the consolidated international results of these tracking activities and approaches. Areas of current research on ISS with strong international cooperation will be highlighted including cardiovascular studies, cell and plant biology studies, radiation, physics of matter, and advanced alloys. Scientific knowledge and new technologies derived from research on the ISS will be realized through improving quality of life on Earth and future spaceflight endeavours

  1. An international standarizaed utility to collect data, MIC.

    SciTech Connect

    Pelowitz, D. G.

    2004-01-01

    Multi-Instrument Collect, MIC, is rapidly becoming the international standard for safeguard data collection. First implemented in 1998, it was adopted by the International Atomic Energy Agency the following year and fielded in numerous locations around the world. This application is capable of simultaneous collection from up to 100 independent instruments. It supports a variety of instrument types and a variety of communications media. Although created and currently being maintained by Los Alamos National Laboratory's Safeguards Science and Technology Group, N1, effort is underway (completion planned mid-year 2004) to open up the architecture promoting outside or third party development. This effort is nearly unique in the safeguards arena. It provides a standard user interface philosophy for a multiplicity of hardware vendors. User community advantages are: enhanced use-ability, decreased training, faster field implementation, decreased user data collection time, and ultimately lower implementation and maintenance costs. There are also significant advantages to the instrument developer. For example a variety of pre-existing communications objects may be used, pre-existing power management capabilities exist, and extensive data management capabilities. All of these may be leveraged into a vendors development effort - significantly decreasing the amount of development effort and consequently decreasing cost. The presentation will include an overview of the existing MIC and MIC utilities from a developers and a users point of view, the user interface philosophy, and will discuss the open architecture allowing third party development.

  2. Synthesis of merlinoite from Chinese coal fly ashes and its potential utilization as slow release K-fertilizer.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Zhuang, Xinguo; Font, Oriol; Moreno, Natalia; Vallejo, V Ramon; Querol, Xavier; Tobias, Aurelio

    2014-01-30

    This study focuses on the synthesis of merlinoite from Chinese coal fly ashes by KOH direct conversion method, with special emphasis on the application of synthetic merlinoite as fertilizer. These fly ashes were collected from two pulverized-coal combustion (PCC) power plants in Xinjiang, Northwest China. The synthesis results are influenced by fly ash characteristics and different synthesis conditions (KOH solution concentrations, activation temperature, time, and KOH/fly ash ratios). A high quality merlinoite-rich product was synthesized under optimal activation conditions (KOH concentration of 5M, activation temperature of 150°C, activation time of 8h and KOH/fly ash ratio of 2l/kg), with a cation exchange capacity (CEC) of 160cmolkg(-1). The synthetic merlinoite is proved to be an efficient slow release K-fertilizer for plant growth, indicating that it can be widely used for high-nutrient demanding crops growing in nutrient-limited soils and for large-area poor soil amendment in opencast coal mine areas around the power plants that will substantially grow with the increasing coal combustion in Xinjiang in the near future. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Utilization of fly ash-derived HZSM-5: catalytic pyrolysis of Jatropha wastes in a fixed-bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Vichaphund, S; Sricharoenchaikul, V; Atong, D

    2017-07-01

    Fly ash-derived HZSM-5 catalyst was first applied in the catalytic pyrolysis of Jatropha residues in a semi-continuous fixed-bed reactor. The catalytic performance of HZSM-5 catalysts prepared from chemicals including conventional hydrothermal HZSM-5, Ni/HZSM-5 by ion exchange, and commercial HZSM-5 (Si/Al = 30) was evaluated for comparison. Catalytic pyrolysis of Jatropha residues with HZSM-5 catalysts was investigated in terms of product yields and qualities of bio-oil and bio-char. The liquid yield produced from fly ash-derived HZSM-5 was 29.4%, which was comparable to those obtained from chemicals and commercial (30.2-32.2%). Fly ash-derived HZSM-5 had high efficiency in increasing desirable compounds such as aliphatics and phenols as well as decreasing oxygenates and particularly N-containing compounds in bio-oils. The higher heating values and pH value of catalytic bio-oil achieved from fly ash-derived HZSM-5 were comparable to those achieved from HZSM-5 prepared from chemicals and commercial. The bio-char had 48-50 wt% carbon and was classified as mesoporous material. Overall, HZSM-5 derived from fly ash showed potentials to use as a catalyst for catalytic pyrolysis application.

  4. Direct utilization: recovery of minerals from coal fly ash. Fossil Energy program. Technical progress report, 1 January-30 March 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Burnet, G.; Murtha, M.J.

    1980-05-01

    Research is focused on the development of methods for recovering minerals from power station fly ash, use of less costly reactants, improvement of energy efficiency, and development of uses for by-products. A research plan developed for collection of kinetic data for fly ash chlorination (HiChlor process) includes the use of different reactant gas mixtures contacting a small bed of fly ash in a new, vertical, down-flow reactor. In work on the lime-soda sinter process, research includes the common ion effect on the concentrations of dissolved alumina, silica, and calcium in the filtrates obtained from extraction of the sintered clinker. Experiments conducted to determine decomposition data for several samples of limestone scrubber sludge are reported. These experiments are the first step toward the possible use of the waste sludge as a replacement for limestone in the sintering process. A series of experiments conducted to evaluate the reactivity of commercial limestones showed that high grade limestone gave alumina recoveries equivalent to those obtained using reagent-grade CaCO/sub 3/ for nine sinter mixtures which were tested. Increased interest use of the iron-rich magnetic fly ash fraction as a heavy media material for coal beneficiation led to preparation of a research proposal to increase the scale of testing by use of commercial heavy media cyclones. The scope of the research is to be expanded to include a range of fly ashes and several commercial magnetite samples. Hydrochemical beneficiation tests of the iron-rich fraction to produce iron ore indicate that the limited dissolution of alumina from the ash is probably due to secondary precipitation reactions during digestion.

  5. Evaluation of quantitative satellite-based retrievals of volcanic ash clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, D. J.; Pavolonis, M. J.; Bojinski, S.; Siddans, R.; Thomas, G.

    2015-12-01

    Volcanic ash clouds are a serious hazard to aviation, and mitigation requires a robust system of volcano monitoring, eruption detection, characterization of cloud properties, forecast of cloud movement, and communication of warnings. Several research groups have developed quantitative satellite-based volcanic ash products and some of these are in operational use by Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers around the world to aid in characterizing cloud properties and forecasting regions of ash hazard. The algorithms applied to the satellite data utilize a variety of techniques, and thus produce results that differ. The World Meteorological Organization has recently sponsored an intercomparison study of satellite-based retrievals with four goals: 1) to establish a validation protocol for satellite-based volcanic ash products, 2) to quantify and understand differences in products, 3) to develop best practices, and 4) to standardize volcanic cloud geophysical parameters. Six volcanic eruption cases were considered in the intercomparison: Eyjafallajökull, Grimsvötn, Kelut, Kirishimayama, Puyehue-Cordón Caulle, and Sarychev Peak. Twenty-four algorithms were utilized, which retrieved parameters including: ash cloud top height, ash column mass loading, ash effective radius, and ash optical depth at visible and thermal-infrared wavelengths. Results were compared to space-based, airborne, and ground-based lidars; complementary satellite retrievals; and manual "expert evaluation" of ash extent. The intercomparison results will feed into the International Civil Aviation Organization "Roadmap for International Airways Volcano Watch", which integrates volcanic meteorological information into decision support systems for aircraft operations.

  6. Utilization of municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash in blended cement Part 2. Mechanical strength of mortars and environmental impact.

    PubMed

    Aubert, J E; Husson, B; Sarramone, N

    2007-07-19

    This second of two articles dealing with the utilization of MSWI fly ash in blended cement studies the effects of two variants of the stabilization process on the behavior of the treated fly ash (TFA) introduced into cement-based mortars. From a technological point of view, the modifications of the process are very efficient and eliminate the swelling produced by the introduction of MSWI fly ash in cement-based mortars. TFA has a significant activity in cement-based mortars and can also advantageously replace a part of the cement in cement-based material. From an environmental point of view, the results of traditional leaching tests on monolithic and crushed mortars highlight a poor stabilization of some harmful elements such as antimony and chromium. The use of a cement rich in ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS) with a view to stabilizing the chromium is not efficient. Since neither adequate tests nor quality criteria exist to evaluate the pollutant potential of a waste with a view to reusing it, it is difficult to conclude on the environmental soundness of such a practice. Further experiments are necessary to investigate the environmental impact of TFA introduced in cement-based mortars depending on the reuse scenario.

  7. The internal microstructure and fibrous mineralogy of fly ash from coal-burning power stations.

    PubMed

    Brown, Patrick; Jones, Tim; BéruBé, Kelly

    2011-12-01

    Coal fly ash (CFA) is a significant environmental pollutant that presents a respiratory hazard when airborne. Although previous studies have identified the mineral components of CFA, there is a paucity of information on the structural habits of these minerals. Samples from UK, Polish and Chinese power stations were studied to further our understanding of the factors that affect CFA geochemistry and mineralogy. ICP-MS, FE-SEM/EDX, XRD, and laser diffraction were used to study physicochemical characteristics. Analysis revealed important differences in the elemental compositions and particle size distributions of samples between sites. Microscopy of HF acid-etched CFA revealed the mullite present possesses a fibrous habit; fibres ranged in length between 1 and 10 μm. Respirable particles (<10 μm) were frequently observed to contain fibrous mullite. We propose that the biopersistence of these refractory fibres in the lung environment could be contributing towards chronic lung diseases seen in communities and individuals continually exposed to high levels of CFA.

  8. Advances in the biology and therapy of chronic myeloid leukemia: proceedings from the 6th Post-ASH International Chronic Myeloid Leukemia and Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Workshop.

    PubMed

    Van Etten, Richard A; Mauro, Michael; Radich, Jerald P; Goldman, John M; Saglio, Giuseppe; Jamieson, Catriona; Soverini, Simona; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo; Hehlmann, Rüdiger; Martinelli, Giovanni; Perrotti, Danilo; Scadden, David T; Skorski, Tomasz; Tefferi, Ayalew; Mughal, Tariq I

    2013-06-01

    Following the 53rd annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology (ASH) in San Diego in December 2011, a group of clinical and laboratory investigators convened for the 6th Post-ASH International Workshop on Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) and Myeloproliferative Neoplasms (MPN). The Workshop took place on 13-14 December at the Estancia, La Jolla, California, USA. This report summarizes the most recent advances in the biology and therapy of CML that were presented at the ASH meeting and discussed at the Workshop. Preclinical studies focused on the CML stem cell and its niche, and on early results of deep sequencing of CML genomes. Clinical advances include updates on second- and third-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), molecular monitoring, TKI discontinuation studies and new therapeutic agents. A report summarizing the pertinent advances in MPN has been published separately.

  9. Utilize Cementitious High Carbon Fly Ash (CHCFA) to Stabilize Cold In-Place Recycled (CIR) Asphalt Pavement as Base Coarse

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Haifang; Li, Xiaojun; Edil, Tuncer; O'Donnell, Jonathan; Danda, Swapna

    2011-02-05

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of cementitious high carbon fly ash (CHCFA) stabilized recycled asphalt pavement as a base course material in a real world setting. Three test road cells were built at MnROAD facility in Minnesota. These cells have the same asphalt surface layers, subbases, and subgrades, but three different base courses: conventional crushed aggregates, untreated recycled pavement materials (RPM), and CHCFA stabilized RPM materials. During and after the construction of the three cells, laboratory and field tests were carried out to characterize the material properties. The test results were used in the mechanistic-empirical pavement design guide (MEPDG) to predict the pavement performance. Based on the performance prediction, the life cycle analyses of cost, energy consumption, and greenhouse gasses were performed. The leaching impacts of these three types of base materials were compared. The laboratory and field tests showed that fly ash stabilized RPM had higher modulus than crushed aggregate and RPM did. Based on the MEPDG performance prediction, the service life of the Cell 79 containing fly ash stabilized RPM, is 23.5 years, which is about twice the service life (11 years) of the Cell 77 with RPM base, and about three times the service life (7.5 years) of the Cell 78 with crushed aggregate base. The life cycle analysis indicated that the usage of the fly ash stabilized RPM as the base of the flexible pavement can significantly reduce the life cycle cost, the energy consumption, the greenhouse gases emission. Concentrations of many trace elements, particularly those with relatively low water quality standards, diminish over time as water flows through the pavement profile. For many elements, concentrations below US water drinking water quality standards are attained at the bottom of the pavement profile within 2-4 pore volumes of flow.

  10. Adsorbents made from waste ashes and post-consumer PET and their potential utilization in wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fu-Shen; Itoh, Hideaki

    2003-08-01

    This study was carried out to prepare low-cost adsorbents from different types of waste ashes and post-consumer PET for use in industrial wastewater treatment. PET was melted and blended with ashes. The mixture was then carbonized to form different types of adsorbents. Heavy metal leaching from the adsorbents was greatly reduced compared to leaching from the bulk ashes. The BET surface area of the adsorbents ranged from 115 to 485m(2)/g. The acidic sites on the adsorbents varied from 0.84 to 1.56meq./g, higher than that of the PET carbon. The adsorption of methylene blue (MB) or heavy metals on the adsorbents was not in accordance with their surface areas because acidic sites reaction, affinity adsorption and cation exchange all contribute to the adsorption of the adsorbents. The isotherm for MB adsorption on the adsorbents can be well described by the Langmuir or Freundlich equation but heavy metal adsorption cannot. It is believed that the adsorbents produced in this manner can be used in wastewater treatments for discoloration and heavy metal removal.

  11. International Utilization at the Threshold of "Assembly Complete"- Science Returns from the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Julie A.

    2009-01-01

    The European Columbus and Japanese Kibo laboratories are now fully operational on the International Space Station (ISS), bringing decades of international planning to fruition. NASA is now completing launch and activation of major research facilities that will be housed in the Destiny U.S. Laboratory, Columbus, and Kibo. These facilities include major physical sciences capabilities for combustion, fluid physics, and materials science, as well as additional multipurpose and supporting infrastructure. Expansion of the laboratory space and expansion to a 6-person crew (planned for May 2009), is already leading to significant increases in research throughput even before assembly is completed. International research on the ISS includes exchanges of results, sharing of facilities, collaboration on experiments, and joint publication and communication of accomplishments. Significant and ongoing increases in research activity on ISS have occurred over the past year. Although research results lag behind on-orbit operations by 2-5 years, the surge of early research activities following Space Shuttle return to flight in 2005 is now producing an accompanying surge in scientific publications. Evidence of scientific productivity from early utilization opportunities combined with the current pace of research activity in orbit are both important parts of the evidence base for evaluating the potential future achievements of a complete and active ISS.

  12. Cost Sharing, Health Care Expenditures, and Utilization: An International Comparison.

    PubMed

    Perkowski, Patryk; Rodberg, Leonard

    2016-01-01

    Health systems implement cost sharing to help reduce health care expenditure and utilization by discouraging the use of unnecessary health care services. We examine cost sharing in 28 countries in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development from 1999 through 2009 in the areas of medical care, hospital care, and pharmaceuticals. We investigate associations between cost sharing, health care expenditures, and health care utilization and find no significant association between cost sharing and health care expenditures or utilization in these countries. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. Technology for the Recovery of Fuel and Adsorbent Carbons from Coal Burning Utility Ash Ponds and Landfills

    SciTech Connect

    J.G. Groppo; T.L. Robl

    2005-09-30

    Several sampling techniques were evaluated to recover representative core samples from the ash ponds at Western Kentucky Energy's Coleman Station. The most successful was a combination of continuous-flight augers and specially designed soft-sediment sampling tubes driven by a Hammerhead drill mounted on an amphibious ARGO vehicle. A total of 51 core samples were recovered and analyzed in 3 ft sections and it was determined that there are 1,354,974 tons of ash in Pond C. Of the over 1.35M tons of ash present, 14% or 190K tons can be considered as coarse (+100 mesh). Pond C contains approximately 88K tons of carbon, nearly half of which is coarse and potentially recoverable with spiral concentration while the fine carbon (-100 mesh) is recoverable with froth flotation. There are 1.27M tons of carbon-free ash, 12% of which is coarse and potentially usable as block sand. Spiral concentration testing on bulk samples showed that product grade of 30 to 38% C (4200 to 5500 Btu/lb) was obtainable. When this product was cleaned again in an additional stage of spiral concentration, the product grade was improved to 7200 to 8200 Btu/lb with an accompanying 13 to 29% decrease in yield. Release analysis of hydraulically classified pond ash showed that froth flotation could provide froth products with as high a grade as 9000 Btu/lb with a yield of 5%. Increasing yield to 10% reduced froth grade to 7000 Btu/lb. Batch flotation provided froth grades as high as 6500 Btu/lb with yields of 7% with 1.5 lb/ton SPP and 1 lb/ton frother. Column flotation test results were similar to those achieved in batch flotation in terms of both grade and yield, however, carbon recoveries were lower (<70%). High airflow rate was required to achieve >50% carbon recovery and using wash water improved froth grade. Bottom ash samples were recovered from each of the units at Coleman Station. Characterization confirmed that sufficient quantity and quality of material is generated to produce a marketable

  14. Space Station - Opportunity for international cooperation and utilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pedersen, K. S.

    1984-01-01

    In connection with his announcement regarding the development of a permanently manned Space Station, President Reagan invited the United States' friends and allies to join in the Space Station program. The President's invitation was preceded by more than two years of interaction between NASA and some of its potential partners in Space Station planning activities. Attention is given to international participation in Space Station planning, international cooperation on the Space Station, the guidelines for international cooperation, and the key challenges. Questions regarding quid pro quos are considered along with aspects of technology transfer, commercial use, problems of management, and the next steps concerning the Space Station program.

  15. Space Station - Opportunity for international cooperation and utilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pedersen, K. S.

    1984-01-01

    In connection with his announcement regarding the development of a permanently manned Space Station, President Reagan invited the United States' friends and allies to join in the Space Station program. The President's invitation was preceded by more than two years of interaction between NASA and some of its potential partners in Space Station planning activities. Attention is given to international participation in Space Station planning, international cooperation on the Space Station, the guidelines for international cooperation, and the key challenges. Questions regarding quid pro quos are considered along with aspects of technology transfer, commercial use, problems of management, and the next steps concerning the Space Station program.

  16. Proceedings of symposium on ash in North America

    Treesearch

    Charles H. Michler; Matthew D., eds. Ginzel

    2010-01-01

    Includes 5 papers and 30 abstracts covering topics related to the biology and ecology of the ash species, ash utilization and management, emerald ash borer, and other threats to ash, and genetics and conservation of ash species. A paper titled "Population-level variation of Fraxinus americana L. is influenced by climate...

  17. Biosynthesis of nano cupric oxide on cotton using Seidlitzia rosmarinus ashes utilizing bio, photo, acid sensing and leaching properties.

    PubMed

    Bashiri Rezaie, Ali; Montazer, Majid; Rad, Mahnaz Mahmoudi

    2017-12-01

    In this research, a facile, rapid and eco-friendly method is introduced for synthesis and loading of cupric oxide on cellulosic chains of cotton fabric with functional properties. Seidlitzia rosmarinus ashes and copper acetate were employed as a natural source of alkaline and metal salt without further chemical materials. The treated samples indicated very good antibacterial activities toward both pathogen Staphylococcus aureus as Gram-positive and Escherichia coli as Gram-negative bacteria. Significant self-cleaning properties against degradation of methylene blue stain under UV irradiation were found. The sensing properties of high concentrated inorganic and organic acids such as sulfuric and formic acids based on colorimetric alterations of the treated fabrics were also confirmed showing acid leaching effects of the treated fabrics. Further, the treated samples showed coloring effects with an enhancement on the physio-mechanical properties including tensile strength, crease recovery angle and hydrophobocity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. International housing construction developments - implications for hardwood utilization

    Treesearch

    Delton Alderman

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the current state of international housing markets, providing general and statistical information on regional housing markets and will posit implications for the future. The emphasis is on regions that use appreciable quantities of wood in housing construction, principally North America, Europe, and Japan. In the past 15 years, housing markets...

  19. DTN Implementation and Utilization Options on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, Kelvin; Holbrook, Mark; Pitts, Lee; Gifford, Kevin; Jenkins, Andrew; Kuzminsky, Sebastian

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the implementation and future uses of Delay/Disruption Tolerant Networking (DTN) for space communication, using the International Space Station as the primary example. The presentation includes: (1) A brief introduction of the current communications architecture of the ISS (2) How current payload operations are handled in the non-DTN environment (3) Making the case to implement DTN into the current payload science operations model (4) Phase I DTN Operations: early implementation with BioServe's CGBA Payload (5) Phase II DTN Operations: Developing the HOSC DTN Gateway

  20. International Space Station Utilization: Tracking Investigations from Objectives to Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruttley, T. M.; Mayo, Susan; Robinson, J. A.

    2011-01-01

    Since the first module was assembled on the International Space Station (ISS), on-orbit investigations have been underway across all scientific disciplines. The facilities dedicated to research on ISS have supported over 1100 investigations from over 900 scientists representing over 60 countries. Relatively few of these investigations are tracked through the traditional NASA grants monitoring process and with ISS National Laboratory use growing, the ISS Program Scientist s Office has been tasked with tracking all ISS investigations from objectives to results. Detailed information regarding each investigation is now collected once, at the first point it is proposed for flight, and is kept in an online database that serves as a single source of information on the core objectives of each investigation. Different fields are used to provide the appropriate level of detail for research planning, astronaut training, and public communications. http://www.nasa.gov/iss-science/. With each successive year, publications of ISS scientific results, which are used to measure success of the research program, have shown steady increases in all scientific research areas on the ISS. Accurately identifying, collecting, and assessing the research results publications is a challenge and a priority for the ISS research program, and we will discuss the approaches that the ISS Program Science Office employs to meet this challenge. We will also address the online resources available to support outreach and communication of ISS research to the public. Keywords: International Space Station, Database, Tracking, Methods

  1. Using fly ash for construction

    SciTech Connect

    Valenti, M.

    1995-05-01

    Each year electrical utilities generate 80 million tons of fly ash, primarily from coal combustion. Typically, utilities dispose of fly ash by hauling it to landfills, but that is changing because of the increasing cost of landfilling, as well as environmental regulations. Now, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), in Palo Alto, Calif., its member utilities, and manufacturers of building materials are finding ways of turning this energy byproduct into the building blocks of roads and structures by converting fly ash into construction materials. Some of these materials include concrete and autoclaved cellular concrete (ACC, also known as aerated concrete), flowable fill, and light-weight aggregate. EPRI is also exploring uses for fly ash other than in construction materials. One of the more high-end uses for the material is in metal matrix composites. In this application, fly ash is mixed with softer metals, such as aluminum and magnesium, to strengthen them, while retaining their lighter weight.

  2. The fractal and multifractal dimension of volcanic ash particles contour: a test study on the utility and volcanological relevance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dellino, P.; Liotino, G.

    2002-03-01

    Image processing analysis is used to check the ability of the fractal dimension for quantitatively describing the shape of volcanic ash particles. Digitized scanning electron microscopy images of fine pyroclasts from the eruptions of Monte Pilato-Rocche Rosse (Lipari, Italy) are investigated to test the efficiency of the fractal dimension to discriminate between particles of different eruptive processes. Multivariate analysis of multiple fractal components allows distinction between magmatic particles and phreatomagmatic particles, which however is less significant than the discrimination obtained in previous studies by the use of simple 'adimensional' shape parameters. Approximation of the actual particle boundary and the not rotation invariant nature of the fractal data frequently result in a significant scatter of data points in the Mandelbrot-Richardson plot. Such behavior obscures in some cases the actual information of particle shape and renders the discriminating power of fractal analysis less effective than classical shape descriptors. Data less affected by scatter reveal that phreatomagmatic particles of the Monte Pilato-Rocche Rosse eruptions are true (mono) fractals, whereas magmatic particles are multifractals. The textural (small-scale) fractal of magmatic particles is similar to the fractal dimension value of phreatomagmatic particles, and is attributed to the rheological behavior of melt upon brittle fragmentation. The structural (large-scale) fractal of magmatic particles refers to the walls of ruptured vesicles that lay on the particle outline. The high difference between the values of the textural and structural fractals of magmatic particles of the Monte Pilato-Rocche Rosse eruptions suggests two distinct and independent processes in the formation of such pyroclasts. At the scales corresponding to the textural fractal, the fragmentation process is independent of vesicles. Magmatic fragmentation is not simply related to growth, expansion

  3. The child brain computes and utilizes internalized maternal choices

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Seung-Lark; Cherry, J. Bradley C.; Davis, Ann M.; Balakrishnan, S. N.; Ha, Oh-Ryeong; Bruce, Jared M.; Bruce, Amanda S.

    2016-01-01

    As children grow, they gradually learn how to make decisions independently. However, decisions like choosing healthy but less-tasty foods can be challenging for children whose self-regulation and executive cognitive functions are still maturing. We propose a computational decision-making process in which children estimate their mother's choices for them as well as their individual food preferences. By employing functional magnetic resonance imaging during real food choices, we find that the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) encodes children's own preferences and the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) encodes the projected mom's choices for them at the time of children's choice. Also, the left dlPFC region shows an inhibitory functional connectivity with the vmPFC at the time of children's own choice. Our study suggests that in part, children utilize their perceived caregiver's choices when making choices for themselves, which may serve as an external regulator of decision-making, leading to optimal healthy decisions. PMID:27218420

  4. Diagnostic ultrasound and telemedicine utilization in the international space station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Stephen J.; Stewart, Brent K.; Kushmerick, Martin J.; Langer, Steve G.; Schmiedl, Udo P.; Winter, Thomas C.; Conley, Kevin E.; Jubrias, Sharon A.

    1999-01-01

    Clinical diagnostic ultrasound (US) is experiencing an expanding role that is well suited to application on the International Space Station (ISS). Diagnostic US can be used to reduce the risks associated with long duration human space flight by providing a non-invasive tool with head-to-toe diagnostic capability in both biomedical research and crew health care. General health care of the astronauts will be diagnosed with US, e.g., kidney stones, gall bladder disease, appendicitis, etc. Initial studies will focus on detection of ``ureteral jets'' in the bladder. This is a non-invasive test to rule out obstructive uropathy from kidney stones with minimal requirements for crew training. Biomedical research experiments, focusing on the effects of the microgravity environment, will be performed using both the HHU and the HDI 5000. US will be used to evaluate bone density and muscle mass in this environment. Prolonged or emergency EVAs may occur with the ISS. The hand-held ultrasound unit (HHU) and its telemedicine capability will be used in EVA settings to monitor events such as decompression sickness (DCS) microbubble formation in the cardiovascular system. There will be telemetry links between the HHU and the ATL/Lockheed Martin rack mounted HDI 5000 in the ISS Human Research Facility (HRF), as well as between the HRF and medical expertise on the ground. These links will provide the ISS with both real-time and store-and-forward telemedicine capabilities. The HHU can also be used with the existing telemedicine instrument pack (TIP).

  5. Method and apparatus for utilizing alcohol as fuel for internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Concepcion, J.M.

    1982-08-03

    This invention broadly relates to a fuel system for an internal combustion engine. More particularly the invention concerns a method and apparatus for utilizing alcohol as fuel for gasoline fed internal combustion engine, wherein the alcohol to gasoline ratio is controlled by a double acting metering device and the alcohol fuel is vaporized using heated positive crankcase ventilation gas.

  6. Ash cloud aviation advisories

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, T.J.; Ellis, J.S.; Schalk, W.W.; Nasstrom, J.S.

    1992-06-25

    During the recent (12--22 June 1991) Mount Pinatubo volcano eruptions, the US Air Force Global Weather Central (AFGWC) requested assistance of the US Department of Energy`s Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) in creating volcanic ash cloud aviation advisories for the region of the Philippine Islands. Through application of its three-dimensional material transport and diffusion models using AFGWC meteorological analysis and forecast wind fields ARAC developed extensive analysis and 12-hourly forecast ash cloud position advisories extending to 48 hours for a period of five days. The advisories consisted of ``relative`` ash cloud concentrations in ten layers (surface-5,000 feet, 5,000--10,000 feet and every 10,000 feet to 90,000 feet). The ash was represented as a log-normal size distribution of 10--200 {mu}m diameter solid particles. Size-dependent ``ashfall`` was simulated over time as the eruption clouds dispersed. Except for an internal experimental attempt to model one of the Mount Redoubt, Alaska, eruptions (12/89), ARAC had no prior experience in modeling volcanic eruption ash hazards. For the cataclysmic eruption of 15--16 June, the complex three-dimensional atmospheric structure of the region produced dramatically divergent ash cloud patterns. The large eruptions (> 7--10 km) produced ash plume clouds with strong westward transport over the South China Sea, Southeast Asia, India and beyond. The low-level eruptions (< 7 km) and quasi-steady-state venting produced a plume which generally dispersed to the north and east throughout the support period. Modeling the sequence of eruptions presented a unique challenge. Although the initial approach proved viable, further refinement is necessary and possible. A distinct need exists to quantify eruptions consistently such that ``relative`` ash concentrations relate to specific aviation hazard categories.

  7. Development of new ash cooling method for atmospheric fluidized beds

    SciTech Connect

    Li Xuantian; Luo Zhongyang; Ni Mingjiang; Cheng Leming; Gao Xiang; Fang Mengxiang; Cen Kefa

    1995-12-31

    The pollution caused by hot ash drained from the bed is another challenge to atmospheric fluidized bed combustion technology when low-rank, high ash fuels are used. A new technique is developed for ash cooling and utilization of the waste heat of ash. Results from the demonstration of an 1.5 T/H patented device have shown the potential to use this type of ash cooler for drying and secondary air preheating. Bottom ash sized in the range 0--13 mm can be cooled from 1,650 F (900 C) to tolerable temperatures for conveying machinery, and the cooled ash can be re-utilized for cement production.

  8. Advanced research and technology direct utilization: recovery of minerals from coal fly ash. Fossil energy program technical progress report, 1 April 1981-30 June 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Burnet, G.; Dunker, J.W.; Murtha, M.J.

    1981-09-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop methods to process fly ash for (1) the separation and use of an iron-rich fraction; (2) the recovery of metals (primarily Al, Fe, and Ti); and (3) the use of the process residues. During this report period, research on the HiChlor process for the high-temperature chlorination of fly ash included investigation of prechlorinations using Cl/sub 2/-CO gas mixtures to selectively remove iron and titanium, and the physical characterization of fly ash pellets. Gas diffusion coefficients, surface areas, and pore size distributions were measured for both gamma-alumina and fly ash pellets. Experiments on the high temperature sintering of limestone-fly ash mixtures include alumina extractions from sinters prepared using waste materials. High alumina recoveries were obtained for sinters prepared using cement kiln dust as the lime source, and with small amounts of coal refuse added as a mineralizer. Sinter feed mixtures prepared from fly ash, kiln dust, and soda ash were also tested. X-ray diffraction measurements were used to identify the soluble and insoluble compounds found in the clinkers produced. Research has been initiated on methods to agglomerate fly ash mixtures for processing. Agglomerators rather than finely-divided powder mixtures will be more easily handled, transported, and processed. Feed mixtures for both the lime-sinter and HiChlor processes are being studied. A balling disc unit is being used to form agglomerate spheroids. A theoretical analysis of the magnetic separation of fly ash has been completed.

  9. [Novel process utilizing alkalis assisted hydrothermal process to stabilize heavy metals both from municipal solid waste or medical waste incinerator fly ash and waste water].

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Jin, Jian; Li, Xiao-dong; Chi, Yong; Yan, Jian-hua

    2010-08-01

    An alkalis assisted hydrothermal process was induced to stabilize heavy metals both from municipal solid waste or medical waste incinerator fly ash and waste water. The results showed that alkalis assisted hydrothermal process removed the heavy metals effectively from the waste water, and reduced leachability of fly ash after process. The heavy metal leachabilities of fly ash studied in this paper were Mn 17,300 microg/L,Ni 1650 microg/L, Cu 2560 microg/L, Zn 189,000 microg/L, Cd 1970 microg/L, Pb 1560 microg/L for medical waste incinerator fly ash; Mn 17.2 microg/L, Ni 8.32 microg/L, Cu 235.2 microg/L, Zn 668.3 microg/L, Cd 2.81 microg/L, Pb 7200 microg/L for municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash. After hydrothermal process with experimental condition [Na2CO3 dosage (5 g Na2CO3/50 g fly ash), reaction time = 10 h, L/S ratio = 10/1], the heavy metal removal efficiencies of medical waste incinerator fly ash were 86.2%-97.3%, and 94.7%-99.6% for municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash. The leachabilities of both two kinds of fly ash were lower than that of the Chinese national limit. The mechanism of heavy metal stabilization can be concluded to the chemisorption and physically encapsulation effects of aluminosilicates during its formation, crystallization and aging process, the high pH value has some contribution to the heavy metal removal and stabilization.

  10. Direct utilization - recovery of minerals from coal fly ash. Fossil Energy Program. Technical progress report, 1 July 1984-30 September 1984 including summary of work for FY84

    SciTech Connect

    Burnet, G.; Murtha, M.J.; Benson, J.D.

    1985-03-01

    The research discussed in this report deals with resource recovery from coal conversion solid wastes. Progress is reported on two methods (the HiChlor and Lime-Sinter processes) for extracting metal values from power plant fly ash. Preliminary work is also reported on a method of making cement from the residue of the lime-sinter process. In the HiChlor Process, metal oxides in the fly ash are converted to volatile chlorides by reaction with chlorine in the presence of a reductant. Several versions of this approach are being investigated. The Lime-Sinter Process utilizes a solid state reaction to selectively convert the alumina in fly ash to a soluble form. Fly ash is mixed with limestone and a suitable mineralizer (to reduce the temperature required for sintering and to enhance alumina recovery) and then sintered in a high temperature kiln. Alumina is recovered by leaching the resulting clinker. A complex relationship between the calcium, alumina, silica, and sulfur constituents in the feed mixture controls the formation and extraction of aluminate compounds. Alumina recovery levels are enhanced by promoting the formation of less-soluble calcium compounds and/or more-soluble aluminum compounds. A study is underway to determine the degree to which flue gas scrubber sludge can be used both as a limestone substitute and as a sulfur bearing mineralizer. Results show that 20 to 25% of the limestone can be provided by the scrubber sludges. 25 refs.,25 figs., 10 tabs.

  11. Advanced research and technology: direct utilization, recovery of minerals from coal fly ash. Fossil-Energy Program technical progress report, October 1, 1981-December 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Burnet, G.; Dunker, J.W.; Murtha, M.J.

    1982-03-01

    Research on the chlorination of alpha-alumina with CO and Cl/sub 2/ indicates that mass transfer limitations of the reaction can be minimized through use of the thin layer technique. Kinetic studies of the reaction indicate that it is first order with respect to both CO and Cl/sub 2/, and has an apparent activation energy of 13.35 kcal/mole. Preliminary results show that the chlorination of a leached Texas lignite fly ash with CO and Cl/sub 2/ is about 50 times slower than the chlorination of alpha-alumina. Work continues to explain this phenomenon. The development of sintering processes for alumina solubilization focuses on the collection of additional data for limestone-kiln dust-fly ash sinters, and for limestone-soda ash-fly ash sinters. These results more clearly describe the relationship between sinter mixture compositions and the extraction of high percentages of alumina. X-ray diffraction analysis techniques are also used to identify the compounds formed and to describe the sinter reaction mechanisms. Research conducted on the use of magnetically separated iron-rich fly ash as heavy medium material in coal beneficiation included: determination of the magnetic content of samples, a study of the effects of grinding on the stability of fly ash heavy media suspensions, measurement of corrosion and abrasion caused by flowing heavy media slurries, and measurement of the rheological properties of fly ash suspensions. Performance of suspensions of iron-rich fly ash and commercial magnetites is compared.

  12. NASA UTILIZATION OF THE INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION AND THE VISION FOR SPACE EXPLORATION

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Julie A.; Thomas, Donald A.

    2006-01-01

    Under U.S. President Bush s Vision for Space Exploration (January 14, 2004), NASA has refocused its utilization plans for the International Space Station (ISS). This use will now focus on: (1) the development of countermeasures that will protect crews from the hazards of the space environment, (2) testing and validating technologies that will meet information and systems needs for future exploration missions.

  13. Ecological Unequal Exchange: International Trade and Uneven Utilization of Environmental Space in the World System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, James

    2007-01-01

    We evaluate the argument that international trade influences disproportionate cross-national utilization of global renewable natural resources. Such uneven dynamics are relevant to the consideration of inequitable appropriation of environmental space in particular and processes of ecological unequal exchange more generally. Using OLS regression…

  14. Utility of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) for Educational Psychologists' Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aljunied, Mariam; Frederickson, Norah

    2014-01-01

    Despite embracing a bio-psycho-social perspective, the World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) assessment framework has had limited application to date with children who have special educational needs (SEN). This study examines its utility for educational psychologists' work with…

  15. Utility of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) for Educational Psychologists' Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aljunied, Mariam; Frederickson, Norah

    2014-01-01

    Despite embracing a bio-psycho-social perspective, the World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) assessment framework has had limited application to date with children who have special educational needs (SEN). This study examines its utility for educational psychologists' work with…

  16. Ecological Unequal Exchange: International Trade and Uneven Utilization of Environmental Space in the World System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, James

    2007-01-01

    We evaluate the argument that international trade influences disproportionate cross-national utilization of global renewable natural resources. Such uneven dynamics are relevant to the consideration of inequitable appropriation of environmental space in particular and processes of ecological unequal exchange more generally. Using OLS regression…

  17. Utilization of Counseling Services: Comparing International and U.S. College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Sharon L.; Greenwood, Andrea K.; Guglielmi, Maggie C.

    2007-01-01

    Counseling center utilization patterns during a 2-year period for 218 international and 222 U.S. college students were examined. Significant between-group differences were found with regard to age, academic status, referral source, relationship status, self-reported concerns, counselor diagnosis, disposition, hospitalization rates, prior…

  18. International Space Station (ISS) Plasma Contactor Unit (PCU) Utilization Plan Assessment Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernandez-Pellerano, Amri; Iannello, Christopher J.; Wollack, Edward J.; Wright, Kenneth H.; Garrett, Henry B.; Ging, Andrew T.; Katz, Ira; Keith, R. Lloyd; Minow, Joseph I.; Willis, Emily M.; Schneider, Todd A.; Whittlesey, Albert C.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) received a request to support the Assessment of the International Space Station (ISS) Plasma Contactor Unit (PCU) Utilization Update. The NESC conducted an earlier assessment of the use of the PCU in 2009. This document contains the outcome of the assessment update.

  19. Utilization of Counseling Services: Comparing International and U.S. College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Sharon L.; Greenwood, Andrea K.; Guglielmi, Maggie C.

    2007-01-01

    Counseling center utilization patterns during a 2-year period for 218 international and 222 U.S. college students were examined. Significant between-group differences were found with regard to age, academic status, referral source, relationship status, self-reported concerns, counselor diagnosis, disposition, hospitalization rates, prior…

  20. Adsorptive properties of fly ash carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, U.M.; Robl, T.L.; Rathbone, R.F.

    1996-12-31

    The driving force behind the development of this research project has been the increasing concerns about the detrimental effects of high carbon carryover into combustion ash. Without the carbon, combustion ash can be utilized in cement industry avoiding environmental implications in landfill operations. Because the carbon surfaces have been structurally altered while passing through the combustor, including the formation of a macro-porous surface, fly ash carbons, after separation from the ash, may constitute a unique precursor for the production of adsorbents. This paper discusses a novel approach for using fly ash carbons in the cleanup of organic pollutants.

  1. Emerald Ash Borer: Invasion of the Urban Forest and the Threat to North America's Ash Resource

    Treesearch

    Therese M. Poland; Deborah G. McCullough

    2006-01-01

    The emerald ash borer (EAB), a phloem-feeding beetle native to Asia, was discovered killing ash trees in southeastern Michigan and Windsor, Ontario, in 2002. Like several other invasive forest pests, the EAB likely was introduced and became established in a highly urbanized setting, facilitated by international trade and abundant hosts. Up to 15 million ash trees in...

  2. Engineering Behavior and Characteristics of Wood Ash and Sugarcane Bagasse Ash

    PubMed Central

    Grau, Francisco; Choo, Hyunwook; Hu, Jong Wan; Jung, Jongwon

    2015-01-01

    Biomasses are organic materials that are derived from any living or recently-living structure. Plenty of biomasses are produced nationwide. Biomasses are mostly combusted and usually discarded or disposed of without treatment as biomass ashes, which include wood and sugarcane bagasse ashes. Thus, recycling or treatment of biomass ashes leads to utilizing the natural materials as an economical and environmental alternative. This study is intended to provide an environmental solution for uncontrolled disposal of biomass ashes by way of recycling the biomass ash and replacing the soils in geotechnical engineering projects. Therefore, in this study, characteristic tests of wood and sugarcane bagasse ashes that are considered the most common biomass ashes are conducted. The test of chemical compositions of biomass ashes is conducted using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), and heavy metal analysis is also conducted. Engineering behaviors including hydraulic conductivity, constrained modulus and shear modulus are examined. Also, coal fly ash Class C is used in this study for comparison with biomass ashes, and Ottawa 20/30 sands containing biomass ashes are examined to identify the soil replacement effect of biomass ashes. The results show that the particle sizes of biomass ashes are halfway between coal fly ash Class C and Ottawa 20/30 sand, and biomass ashes consist of a heterogeneous mixture of different particle sizes and shapes. Also, all heavy metal concentrations were found to be below the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) maximum limit. Hydraulic conductivity values of Ottawa 20/30 sand decrease significantly when replacing them with only 1%–2% of biomass ashes. While both the constrained modulus and shear modulus of biomass ashes are lower than Ottawa 20/30 sand, those of mixtures containing up to 10% biomass ashes are little affected by replacing the soils with biomass ashes. PMID:28793611

  3. Engineering Behavior and Characteristics of Wood Ash and Sugarcane Bagasse Ash.

    PubMed

    Grau, Francisco; Choo, Hyunwook; Hu, Jong Wan; Jung, Jongwon

    2015-10-12

    Biomasses are organic materials that are derived from any living or recently-living structure. Plenty of biomasses are produced nationwide. Biomasses are mostly combusted and usually discarded or disposed of without treatment as biomass ashes, which include wood and sugarcane bagasse ashes. Thus, recycling or treatment of biomass ashes leads to utilizing the natural materials as an economical and environmental alternative. This study is intended to provide an environmental solution for uncontrolled disposal of biomass ashes by way of recycling the biomass ash and replacing the soils in geotechnical engineering projects. Therefore, in this study, characteristic tests of wood and sugarcane bagasse ashes that are considered the most common biomass ashes are conducted. The test of chemical compositions of biomass ashes is conducted using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), and heavy metal analysis is also conducted. Engineering behaviors including hydraulic conductivity, constrained modulus and shear modulus are examined. Also, coal fly ash Class C is used in this study for comparison with biomass ashes, and Ottawa 20/30 sands containing biomass ashes are examined to identify the soil replacement effect of biomass ashes. The results show that the particle sizes of biomass ashes are halfway between coal fly ash Class C and Ottawa 20/30 sand, and biomass ashes consist of a heterogeneous mixture of different particle sizes and shapes. Also, all heavy metal concentrations were found to be below the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) maximum limit. Hydraulic conductivity values of Ottawa 20/30 sand decrease significantly when replacing them with only 1%-2% of biomass ashes. While both the constrained modulus and shear modulus of biomass ashes are lower than Ottawa 20/30 sand, those of mixtures containing up to 10% biomass ashes are little affected by replacing the soils with biomass ashes.

  4. Effects of particle transport on helium ash accumulation and sustained ignition in the ITER (International Tokamak Experimental Reactor) design

    SciTech Connect

    Redi, M.H.; Cohen, S.A.

    1990-01-01

    The buildup of helium ash in the proposed ITER experiment has been studied in a series of simulations with the BALDUR transport code. Using radially dependent thermal diffusivities which were scaled from JET values, we studied the role of particle transport coefficients and edge recycling on helium poisoning of ignition. A sustained ignition was obtained when the exhaust of helium from the edge plasma was allowed to exceed 10% of the helium flux into the edge plasma from the core plasma, and the ratio of particle (He ion) to thermal diffusivities, D/{chi}, was larger than 1/4. The simulations included the effects of sawtooth oscillations, radiative as well as conductive energy loss channels, and density profile variations. 29 refs., 11 figs.

  5. Direct utilization - recovery of minerals from coal fly ash. Fossil energy program technical progress report, 1 October 1983-31 December 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Burnet, G.; Murtha, M.J.

    1984-03-01

    This research deals with resource recovery from coal conversion solid wastes. A reaction model for the carbochlorination of coal fly ash with phosgene is described which predicts fly ash reactivity as a function of time for the range of experimental conditions investigated. Kinetic data and information gained by examination of solids using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction analyses, and phosgene dissociation measurements were used in the development of the model relationship. The carbochlorination of fly ash with solid carbon reductant requires close proximity (less than 40 microns) between ash and carbon particles. This necessity, together with handling and process requirements, suggests that a fly ash-carbon mixture can be reacted in the form of homogeneous, hardened pellets. The most economical solid carbon to use would be raw coal if the volatile matter can be removed during heat treatment to harden the pellets. Coal-fly ash pellets were formed and heat treated in an oxidizing atmosphere. When the fired pellets were then heated in an inert atmosphere, little additional devolatilization occurred. Preparation of ash-coal pellets with devolatilization of the coal during pellet heat treatment could significantly decrease the production costs for the HiChlor process. Tests were also conducted which showed that mixture reactivity was not decreased by either the agglomeration or the heat treatment. As part of an examination of the mechanisms of the gas-solid process reactions, data from several new literature sources were reviewed. Work was continued on optimization and evaluation of the lime-sinter processing method which uses a high temperature sintering step to form soluble aluminates. 16 references, 22 figures, 6 tables.

  6. Utilization of Coal Fly Ash

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    the animals. However, no growth, strength, or pathological damage was noted. Stoewsand etal. (1990) performed a study on rats fed rutabagas grown on a...519 (1987). Stoewsand, G., J. Anderson, L. Weinstein, J. Osmeloski, W. Gutenmann, and D. Lisk, "Selenium in Tissues of Rats Fed Rutabagas Grown on Soil

  7. Commentary an urgent need for an EPA standard for disposal of coal ash

    Treesearch

    A. Dennis. Lemly

    2014-01-01

    EPA, the White House, and electric utilities are stalled in a struggle over a proposed new rule on coal ash disposal. Although this rule is long overdue, EPA now stands on the cusp of bringing forward a landmark decision that could benefit aquatic resources in the USA for decades to come and also set an important regulatory leadership example for the international...

  8. Direct utilization - recovery of minerals from coal fly ash. Technical progress report, April 1-June 30, 1982. [HiChlor process

    SciTech Connect

    Burnet, G.; Murtha, M.J.

    1982-08-01

    Research on the chlorination of coal fly ash has included the evaluation of several reducing and chlorinating agents for use in the HiChlor process. Several additional coal fly ashes were chlorinated to demonstrate that processing is usable for a range of bituminous coal fly ash compositions. Aqueous separation research for purification of the mixed metal chloride products was initiated. Exploratory evaluation of the potential for using a fused salt media for coal fly ash chlorination coupled with a thermodynamic study of the possible reactions provided encouragement for pursuing this alternative chlorination procedure. The use of a fused salt should significantly improve the process reaction kinetics and the potential for more selective chlorination of specific oxides. Research was continued on the development of a desilication procedure to remove dissolved silica from lime-soda filtrates. Essentially all of the silica (less than 150 ppM) must be removed from solution before an alumina product suitable for aluminum metal production can be recovered. Further experiments were conducted on the magnetic separation of coal fly ash - water slurries. Counter-current air sparging was used to increase the agitation inside the magnetic grid volume but the separated products were still not of comparable quality to those obtained by dry separation using a moving-field electromagnet.

  9. Direct utilization: recovery of minerals from coal fly ash. Fossil Energy program, technical progress report, July 1, 1983-September 30, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Burnet, G.; Murtha, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    Work has focused on two methods for resource recovery from coal conversion solid wastes. The HiChlor Process recovers Al, Fe, and Ti minerals from coal fly ash by high temperature chlorination in the presence of a reductant. An understanding of the mechanisms of the gas-solid reactions involved is essential to the design and development of the reactor system. Three possible reaction mechanisms are considered, evaluated, and tested. The second method involves a lime-sinter step to produce soluble aluminates. Research on the process includes scale-up of the sinter step using a 5 in. diam electrically heated kilm. Batch samples of limestone-fly ash-soda ash mixtures are processed, at a rate of about 4 lb/hr. The resulting clinker is used to fully evaluate processing conditions for the extraction, desilication, and product recovery steps. Experiments are completed which evaluate raw material preparation requirements, for sintering and clinker crushing requirements for extraction.

  10. A multi-parametric approach to studying volcanic lightning utilizing LMA observations, ash characteristics, plume dynamics, seismic, and infrasound data at Sakurajima Volcano, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, C. M.; Van Eaton, A. R.; McNutt, S. R.; Behnke, S. A.; Cimarelli, C.; Thomas, R. J.; Edens, H. E.; Cigala, V.

    2016-12-01

    The May-June 2015 eruptive period of Sakurajima Volcano, located in southern Kyushu Province, Japan was studied using 9 Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) units, 2 broadband seismometers, 6 infrasound sensors, and video footage of the plume (infrared and lowlight). Studies were performed in cooperation with the Sakurajima Volcano Observatory. In addition, several dozen temporal ash samples were taken during multiple eruptive episodes. Volcanic lightning, especially small vent discharges, was prevalent during this eruptive period. Previous work at Sakurajima has shown relationships between overall plume charge and ash grain size as well as mineral number density and maximum seismic amplitude. We take a multi-parametric approach and examine a full suite of ash grain characteristics (including grain size distributions, particle shapes, componentry, and microlite number densities), plume heights and eruption durations, seismic and infrasound amplitudes, and the occurrence of volcanic lighting. We seek to determine the underlying relationships between commonly measured parameters and the production of volcanic lighting.

  11. Economic evaluation of losses to electric power utilities caused by ash fouling. Final technical report, November 1, 1979-April 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Burkhardt, F.R.; Persnger, M.M.

    1980-01-01

    Problems with convection ash fouling and wall slagging were considerable during our study. The Dakota lignites posed the greatest problems, particularly with fouling. The subbituminous coals had considerable problems, related mostly with wall slagging. The Texas lignites had few problems, and those were only associated with wall slagging. The generation losses were as follows: The Dakota lignite burning stations averaged an overall availability of 87.13%. Convection fouling outages were responsible for 57.75% of this outage time for a decrease in availability of 7.43%. Fouling was responsible for curtailment losses of 317,649 Mwh or 8.25% of the remaining available generation. Slagging was responsible for losses of 2732 megawatt hours or .07% of the remaining available generation. Total ash related losses amounted to 16.08% of the total available generation. The subbituminous burning stations averaged an overall availability of 78.36%. Total ash related losses amounted to 1.54% of the total available generation. The Texas lignite burning stations averaged an overall availability of 80.63%. No ash related outage losses occurred. Slagging curtailments accounted 0.08% of the total available generation. Costs due to ash fouling and slagging related curtailments are a tremendous sum. Seven power stations were studied for a six month period to assess costs. The total cost directly attributable to ash slagging and fouling condition was $20,638,113. Recommendations for reducing the problems involve soot blowers, control of furnace gas exit temperature, water blowers and more conservative boiler design.

  12. ACAA fly ash basics: quick reference card

    SciTech Connect

    2006-07-01

    Fly ash is a fine powdery material created when coal is burned to generate electricity. Before escaping into the environment via the utility stacks, the ash is collected and may be stored for beneficial uses or disposed of, if necessary. The use of fly ash provides environmental benefits, such as the conservation of natural resources, the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions and eliminating the needed for ash disposal in landfills. It is also a valuable mineral resource that is used in construction and manufacturing. Fly ash is used in the production of Portland cement, concrete, mortars and stuccos, manufactured aggregates along with various agricultural applications. As mineral filler, fly ash can be used for paints, shingles, carpet backing, plastics, metal castings and other purposes. This quick reference card is intended to provide the reader basic source, identification and composition, information specifically related to fly ash.

  13. Utility of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) for educational psychologists’ work

    PubMed Central

    Aljunied, Mariam; Frederickson, Norah

    2014-01-01

    Despite embracing a bio-psycho-social perspective, the World Health Organization’s International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) assessment framework has had limited application to date with children who have special educational needs (SEN). This study examines its utility for educational psychologists’ work with children who have Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). Mothers of 40 children with ASD aged eight to 12 years were interviewed using a structured protocol based on the ICF framework. The Diagnostic Interview for Social and Communication Disorder (DISCO) was completed with a subset of 19 mothers. Internal consistency and inter-rater reliability of the interview assessments were found to be acceptable and there was evidence for concurrent and discriminant validity. Despite some limitations, initial support for the utility of the ICF model suggests its potential value across educational, health and care fields. Further consideration of its relevance to educational psychologists in new areas of multi-agency working is warranted. PMID:26157197

  14. Characterization and valorization of biomass ashes.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Nikhilesh S; Mandavgane, Sachin A; Mehetre, Sayaji; Kulkarni, Bhaskar D

    2016-10-01

    In India, farming is the primary source of income for many families. Following each harvest, a huge amount of biomass is generated. These are generally discarded as "agrowaste," but recent reports have indicated several beneficial uses for these biomasses and their ashes. However, before the utilization of biomass ashes (BMAs), their chemical and physical properties need to be investigated (characterized) so as to utilize their potential benefit to the fullest. In this paper, eight different biomass ashes (soybean plant ash, mustard plant ash, maize ash, groundnut plant ash, cotton plant ash, wheat plant ash, pigeon peas ash, and groundnut shell ash) were characterized, and their chemical properties are discussed. Surface chemical composition analysis, proximate analysis, and ultimate analysis were performed on all BMA samples, and properties such as porosity, particle density, bulk density, point of zero charge, BET surface area, water-absorption capacity, and bulk parameters such as surface pH and surface charges were determined. BMAs were characterized by SEM and FTIR. The surface areas of biomass ashes vary from 1.9 to 46 m(2)/g, and point of zero charge for all BMAs exceed 9.8, which confirmed the alkaline nature of these samples. Based on the chemical composition, BMAs are categorized into four types (S, C, K, and CK), and their utilization is proposed based on the type. BMAs find applications in agriculture and construction industries; glass, rubber, and zeolite manufacturing; and in adsorption (as a source of silica/zeolites). The paper also discusses the research challenges and opportunities in utilization of BMAs.

  15. Fly ash beneficiation by carbon burnout

    SciTech Connect

    Cochran, J.W.; Boyd, T.J.

    1995-03-01

    The CBO process for fly ash beneficiation shows excellent potential. Values derived from avoided disposal costs, revenue from fly ash sales, environmental attributes and the ability to process 100% of the ash indicate the potential market for this process. Work has begun on the next phase of process development and commercialization and includes site specific application studies (technical and economic investigations for specific sites). Demonstration plant designs at approximately 100,000 TPY are being considered by several participating utilities.

  16. Ash Aggregates in Proximal Settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porritt, L. A.; Russell, K.

    2012-12-01

    early pyroclastic phase of the formation of Kima'Kho, a tuya in northern B.C., Canada produced a subaqueous pyroclastic cone which became emergent during the latter stages of formation. Armoured lapilli are pervasive within the emergent upper third of the sequence. No other types of ash aggregates have been observed. Petrographic and textural analysis of the armoured lapilli shows them to comprise a central 2-30 mm-sized, juvenile, vesiculated pyroclast, concentrically coated by mm-scale layers of 10-250 μm sized ash particles. At Kima'Kho, the armoured lapilli are shown to be a direct indicator of fallout from a sustained plume attended by concomitant production of pyroclastic density currents. The size and internal structure of the armoured lapilli provide constraints on the nature of the initial explosive phase of eruption at Kima'Kho. Their proximity to the vent also indicates rapid aggregation within the eruption plume. Within both sequences rapid aggregation of ash particles occurred in proximity to the vent. However, the conditions were substantially different leading to the production of armoured lapilli (no accretionary lapilli) at Kima'Kho and diverse ash aggregates but no armoured lapilli at A418. Here we investigate vent-proximal ash aggregation and the specific conditions which lead to the formation of coated ash pellets and armoured lapilli.

  17. The relationship between mental healthcare utilization and criminal behaviors among internal medicine outpatients.

    PubMed

    Sansone, Randy A; Lam, Charlene; Wiederman, Michael W

    2011-06-01

    According to the scant empirical literature, largely in studies of offenders, there appears to be a general but diffuse relationship between various psychiatric disorders and criminal behavior. In this study, we examined mental healthcare utilization, a general measure of psychiatric dysfunction, in relationship to a history of criminal behavior in a sample of internal medicine outpatients. In a consecutive sample of 376 internal medicine outpatients being seen predominantly by resident providers, we examined the relationship between 27 illegal behaviors (charges, not convictions) as delineated by the Federal Bureau of Investigation's crime cataloguing schema and four items related to mental healthcare utilization (i.e., ever been seen by a psychiatrist, ever been hospitalized in a psychiatric hospital, ever been in counseling, ever been on medication for your "nerves"). Twenty-two percent of the sample reported a history of having been charged with at least one criminal behavior. With the exception of ever having been on "nerve" medication, the remaining mental-healthcare-utilization variables demonstrated statistically significant relationships with the number of illegal behaviors reported. However, overall correlations were relatively weak. Using both a sample and methodology that is unique to the current literature, we found relationships between past mental health treatment and history of criminal behavior.

  18. Apparent digestibility of wheat bran and extruded flax in horses determined from the total collection of feces and acid-insoluble ash as an internal marker.

    PubMed

    De Marco, M; Miraglia, N; Peiretti, P G; Bergero, D

    2012-02-01

    Several studies have reported data on comparisons between two methods: the total collection of feces and the internal markers method. The aim of this study was to assess the apparent digestibility of two concentrates and to compare the apparent digestion coefficients using the total collection of feces and acid-insoluble ash (AIA) as the internal marker method. In 2009, six adult geldings aged between 3 and 11 years, with an average weight per trial of 543, 540 and 542 kg, respectively, were used to determine the apparent digestibility by means of three in vivo digestibility trials on hay, hay plus wheat bran (60 : 40) and hay plus extruded flax (80 : 20). Feces were collected over a 6-day period with a previous 14-day adaptation period. The three digestibility trials were carried out to determine the digestion coefficients of the three diets and, indirectly, of the two concentrates. The digestion coefficients of the diets were determined for the dry matter, organic matter, crude protein and gross energy, whereas the apparent digestion coefficients of the same parameters were calculated for wheat bran and extruded flax, by calculating the difference from the previous results. The data were analyzed using the Student t-test for paired samples. The digestion coefficients obtained were similar when the total collection of feces and the AIA method were used. Higher data variability, confirmed by a greater standard deviation, was observed using the AIA method to estimate the apparent digestion coefficients. It can be concluded that the use of AIA as an internal marker in digestibility trials on average leads to values similar to those obtained with the total collection of feces and can therefore be considered a less-expensive method to determine apparent digestion coefficients. Nevertheless, the total collection of feces should still be considered the best choice to determine the digestibility of some specific feedstuffs.

  19. Saving green ash

    Treesearch

    J. Romero-Severson; Jennifer L. Koch

    2017-01-01

    The emerald ash borer (EAB, Agrilus planipennis) continues to kill ash trees in North America at an alarmingly fast pace. Although EAB is a threat to all species of ash (Fraxinus) in the United States, green ash (F. pennsylvanica) is among the most susceptible. Among the most commonly planted landscape trees in the United States, green ash is also an important species...

  20. Direct utilization - recovery of minerals from coal fly ash. Fossil Energy Program. Technical progress report, 1 April 1984-30 June 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Burnet, G.; Murtha, M.J.

    1984-08-01

    Research progress is reported on two methods for extracting metal values from power plant fly ash. In the first method (the HiChlor process), a carbochlorination reaction is used to produce a mixture of volatile metal chlorides from the oxides in the ash. Developmental research is underway on a unique slurry reactor in which the ash is contacted by gaseous chlorine while suspended with finely divided carbon in a molten salt (NaCl + AlCl/sub 3/). Experimental apparatus is being tested and the necessary analytical procedures are being developed. In the second method, a lime-sinter solid state reaction is used to selectively convert the alumina in the ash to a soluble form. The alumina is recovered by leaching the finely divided clinker. This report deals with the effects of mineralizers on the sinter reaction as a means for increasing alumina yield and reducing the required temperature. Dissolved silica in the alumina-containing extract from the leaching of the lime-sinter clinker can result in an alumina product that fails to meet electrolytic cell feed specifications. Research has shown that the silica content can be reduced by digestion with a small amount of lime. The amount of lime addition, digestion temperatures required, and desilication reactions occurring are reported. New data are also presented on the recovery and purification of the alumina product. Preliminary research on the production of low-alumina, sulfate resistant cement from the extracted sinter residue has resulted in information on the need for such cement, estimated costs, and experimental work required. 5 references, 4 figures, 3 tables.

  1. Direct utilization-recovery of minerals from coal fly ash. Fossil Energy Program. Technical progress report, 1 October 1979-31 December 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Burnet, G.; Murtha, M.J.

    1980-03-01

    Research is focused on the development of methods for recovering minerals from power plant fly ash. Definition and refinement of steps in the high-temperature (HiChlor) gas chlorination process and in the lime-soda sinter process are emphasized. Samples of chlorinated ash residues were analyzed to determine changes in physical structure and to measure compositions of individual particles. The results show that when ash particles are fractured by heat treatment the chlorination of contained alumina and iron is more complete. The use of SiCl/sub 4/ as a chlorination agent in addition to chlorine was studied as a method to reduce the amount of silica being chlorinated. Optimum conditions for SiCl/sub 4/ partial pressure and reaction temperature reduced the percentage of silica chlorinated from 20% without SiCl/sub 4/ to about 5%, with minimal reduction in the percentage of alumina reacted. Evaluation of waste FGD sludges and FBC residues for use as lime resources in the lime-soda sinter process has begun, and further research was conducted on high-pressure desilication of sinter extraction filtrates. At optimum conditions, the concentration of dissolved silica was reduced by 60%, but this is still in excess of the silica specification for alumina used in metal production. Chemical beneficiation of magnetically separated fly ash showed that the contained silica dissolves quickly during a high-pressure alkali extraction, and that most of the contained alumina is dissolved after one-half hour. Development of a two-stage process, first dissolving the silica and then the alumina in even less time, shows promise of further reducing the size and cost of the extraction equipment required.

  2. Advanced research and technology, direct utilization: recovery of minerals from coal fly ash. Fossil energy program. Technical progress report, 1 October 1980-31 December 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Burnet, G.; Weiss, S.J.; Murtha, M.J.

    1981-02-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop methods to process fly ash for the separation and use of an iron-rich fraction, for the recovery of metals, primarily Al and Ti, and for use of the process residues. Research during this report period of the HiChlor process for the extraction of alumina and titania by high-temperature chlorination of a fly ash-reductant mixture included investigation of the simulation of the reactions as a design tool, the assembly of a unit to measure reaction kinetic rates and particle specific surface areas and porosities, and the design of equipment to measure necessary chloride product separation data. A pretreatment chlorination reaction using CO and Cl/sub 2/ was found to be capable of removing 80% of the iron with only minimal alumina and silica reaction. Development of the lime-soda sinter process includes the collection of data on the phenomenon of auto-disintegration of lime-fly ash sinters. Results indicate that it is the presence of minor constituents having +5 pr +6 valence cations of a size that can enter the lattice of the calcium silicate which prevent sinter auto-disintegration.

  3. Utilization of fly ash to improve the quality of the acid mine drainage generated by oxidation of a sulphide-rich mining waste: column experiments.

    PubMed

    Pérez-López, Rafael; Nieto, José Miguel; de Almodóvar, Gabriel Ruiz

    2007-04-01

    The production of Acid Mine Drainage (AMD) as a result of the oxidative dissolution of sulphides is one of the main pollution problems affecting natural watercourses in mining environments with sulphide-rich residues. In this work, the generation of AMD was prevented by means of the addition of fly ash to sulphide-rich residues in non-saturated column experiments. A column experiment filled with a pyrite-rich sludge with artificial irrigation leached acid drainages (pH approx. 2) containing high concentrations of sulphate, iron and other metals. However, non-saturated column experiments filled with pyritic-rich sludge and fly ash drained leachates characterized by alkaline pH (pH up to 10), low sulphate concentration, and lack of iron and other metals in solution. The pyrite oxidative dissolution at high pH, as a consequence of the leaching of fly ash, favours the metal precipitation inside the column (mainly iron), the coating of pyrite grains, and the attenuation of the oxidation process, resulting in a great improvement in the quality of the leachates.

  4. JV Task 6 - Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium Research

    SciTech Connect

    Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Tera Buckley; Bruce Dockter; Kurt Eylands; David Hassett; Loreal Heebink; Erick Zacher

    2008-04-01

    The Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium{reg_sign} (CARRC{reg_sign}, pronounced 'cars') focuses on performing fundamental and applied scientific and engineering research emphasizing the environmentally safe, economical use of coal combustion by-products (CCBs). CARRC member organizations, which include utilities and marketers, are key to developing industry-driven research in the area of CCB utilization and ensuring its successful application. The U.S. Department of Energy is a partner in CARRC through the EERC Jointly Sponsored Research Program (JSRP), which provides matching funds for industrial member contributions and facilitates an increased level of effort in CARRC. CARRC tasks were designed to provide information on CCB performance, including environmental performance, engineering performance, favorable economics, and improved life cycle of products and projects. CARRC technical research tasks are developed based on member input and prioritization. CARRC special projects are developed with members and nonmembers to provide similar information and to support activities, including the assembly and interpretation of data, support for standards development and technology transfer, and facilitating product development and testing. CARRC activities from 1998 to 2007 included a range of research tasks, with primary work performed in laboratory tasks developed to answer specific questions or evaluate important fundamental properties of CCBs. CARRC topical reports were prepared on several completed tasks. Specific CARRC 1998B2007 accomplishments included: (1) Development of several ASTM International Standard Guides for CCB utilization applications. (2) Organization and presentation of training courses for CCB professionals and teachers. (3) Development of online resources including the Coal Ash Resource Center, Ash from Biomass in Coal (ABC) of cocombustion ash characteristics, and the Buyer's Guide to Coal-Ash Containing Products. In addition, development of

  5. Factors Associated With Visual Impairment and Eye Care Utilization: The International Mobility in Aging Study.

    PubMed

    Balegamire, Safari; Aubin, Marie-Josée; Curcio, Carmen-Lucia; Alvarado, Beatriz; Guerra, Ricardo O; Ylli, Alban; Deshpande, Nandini; Zunzunegui, Maria-Victoria

    2017-06-01

    To examine factors associated with visual impairment (VI) and eye care in the International Mobility in Aging Study (IMIAS). IMIAS data were analyzed ( N = 1,995 with ages 65-74). Outcomes were VI defined as presenting visual acuity worse than 6/18 in the better eye and eye care utilization assessed by annual visits to eye care professionals. The Hurt-Insult-Threaten-Scream (HITS) questionnaire requested information on domestic violence. Among men, VI varied from 24% in Manizales (Colombia) to 0.5% in Kingston (Canada); among women, VI ranged from 20% in Manizales to 1% in Kingston; lifetime exposure to domestic violence was associated with VI (odds ratio [OR] = 1.87; 95% confidence interval [CI] = [1.17, 3.00]). Eye care utilization varied from 72% in Kingston's men to 25% in Tirana's men; it was associated with domestic violence (prevalence ratio [PR] = 1.3; 95% CI = [1.1, 1.6]). VI is more frequent where eye care utilization is low. Domestic violence may be a risk factor for VI.

  6. Rapid toxicity screening of gasification ashes.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Xu; Rong, Le; Ng, Wei Cheng; Ong, Cynthia; Baeg, Gyeong Hun; Zhang, Wenlin; Lee, Si Ni; Li, Sam Fong Yau; Dai, Yanjun; Tong, Yen Wah; Neoh, Koon Gee; Wang, Chi-Hwa

    2016-04-01

    The solid residues including bottom ashes and fly ashes produced by waste gasification technology could be reused as secondary raw materials. However, the applications and utilizations of these ashes are very often restricted by their toxicity. Therefore, toxicity screening of ash is the primary condition for reusing the ash. In this manuscript, we establish a standard for rapid screening of gasification ashes on the basis of in vitro and in vivo testing, and henceforth guide the proper disposal of the ashes. We used three different test models comprising human cell lines (liver and lung cells), Drosophila melanogaster and Daphnia magna to examine the toxicity of six different types of ashes. For each ash, different leachate concentrations were used to examine the toxicity, with C0 being the original extracted leachate concentration, while C/C0 being subsequent diluted concentrations. The IC50 for each leachate was also quantified for use as an index to classify toxicity levels. The results demonstrated that the toxicity evaluation of different types of ashes using different models is consistent with each other. As the different models show consistent qualitative results, we chose one or two of the models (liver cells or lung cells models) as the standard for rapid toxicity screening of gasification ashes. We may classify the gasification ashes into three categories according to the IC50, 24h value on liver cells or lung cells models, namely "toxic level I" (IC50, 24h>C/C0=0.5), "toxic level II" (C/C0=0.05ashes generated in gasification plants every day. Subsequently, appropriate disposal methods can be recommended for each toxicity category. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Emerald ash borer infestation of ash stumps

    Treesearch

    Robert A. Haack; Toby R. Petrice

    2005-01-01

    The emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Buprestidae), was first found in North America in 2002. Eradication efforts are currently underway for this insect in both Canada and the United States. As part of the eradication program, thousands of ash trees are cut and chipped. Ash trees are known to produce stump sprouts, and therefore...

  8. High-resolution 3D analyses of the shape and internal constituents of small volcanic ash particles: The contribution of SEM micro-computed tomography (SEM micro-CT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vonlanthen, Pierre; Rausch, Juanita; Ketcham, Richard A.; Putlitz, Benita; Baumgartner, Lukas P.; Grobéty, Bernard

    2015-02-01

    The morphology of small volcanic ash particles is fundamental to our understanding of magma fragmentation, and in transport modeling of volcanic plumes and clouds. Until recently, the analysis of 3D features in small objects (< 250 μm) was either restricted to extrapolations from 2D approaches, partial stereo-imaging, or CT methods having limited spatial resolution and/or accessibility. In this study, an X-ray computed-tomography technique known as SEM micro-CT, also called 3D X-ray ultramicroscopy (3D XuM), was used to investigate the 3D morphology of small volcanic ash particles (125-250 μm sieve fraction), as well as their vesicle and microcrystal distribution. The samples were selected from four stratigraphically well-established tephra layers of the Meerfelder Maar (West Eifel Volcanic Field, Germany). Resolution tests performed on a Beametr v1 pattern sample along with Monte Carlo simulations of X-ray emission volumes indicated that a spatial resolution of 0.65 μm was obtained for X-ray shadow projections using a standard thermionic SEM and a bulk brass target as X-ray source. Analysis of a smaller volcanic ash particle (64-125 μm sieve fraction) showed that features with volumes > 20 μm3 (~ 3.5 μm in diameter) can be successfully reconstructed and quantified. In addition, new functionalities of the Blob3D software were developed to allow the particle shape factors frequently used as input parameters in ash transport and dispersion models to be calculated. This study indicates that SEM micro-CT is very well suited to quantify the various aspects of shape in fine volcanic ash, and potentially also to investigate the 3D morphology and internal structure of any object < 0.1 mm3.

  9. Total internal reflection-based biochip utilizing a polymer-filled cavity with a micromirror sidewall.

    PubMed

    Chronis, Nikolas; Lee, Luke P

    2004-04-01

    A total internal reflection (TIR)-based biochip utilizing a polymer-filled cavity with a micromirror sidewall has been designed and fabricated. The implementation of the micromirror sidewall cavity facilitates precise alignment of the excitation light beam into the system. The incident angle of illumination can be easily modified by selecting polymers of different indices of refraction while optical losses are minimized. The design enables the hybrid, vertical integration of a laser diode and a CCD camera, resulting in a compact optical system. Brownian motion of fluorescent microspheres and real-time photobleaching of rhodamine 6G molecules is demonstrated. The proposed TIR-based chip simplifies current TIR optical configurations and could potentially be used as an optical-microfluidic platform for an integrated lab-on-a-chip microsystem.

  10. Internal performance of two nozzles utilizing gimbal concepts for thrust vectoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berrier, Bobby L.; Taylor, John G.

    1990-01-01

    The internal performance of an axisymmetric convergent-divergent nozzle and a nonaxisymmetric convergent-divergent nozzle, both of which utilized a gimbal type mechanism for thrust vectoring was evaluated in the Static Test Facility of the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel. The nonaxisymmetric nozzle used the gimbal concept for yaw thrust vectoring only; pitch thrust vectoring was accomplished by simultaneous deflection of the upper and lower divergent flaps. The model geometric parameters investigated were pitch vector angle for the axisymmetric nozzle and pitch vector angle, yaw vector angle, nozzle throat aspect ratio, and nozzle expansion ratio for the nonaxisymmetric nozzle. All tests were conducted with no external flow, and nozzle pressure ratio was varied from 2.0 to approximately 12.0.

  11. Cost-utility analysis of stenting versus endarterectomy in the International Carotid Stenting Study.

    PubMed

    Morris, Stephen; Patel, Nishma V; Dobson, Joanna; Featherstone, Roland L; Richards, Toby; Luengo-Fernandez, Ramon; Rothwell, Peter M; Brown, Martin M

    2016-06-01

    The International Carotid Stenting Study was a multicenter randomized trial in which patients with symptomatic carotid artery stenosis were randomly allocated to treatment by carotid stenting or endarterectomy. Economic evidence comparing these treatments is limited and inconsistent. We compared the cost-effectiveness of stenting versus endarterectomy using International Carotid Stenting Study data. We performed a cost-utility analysis estimating mean costs and quality-adjusted life years per patient for both treatments over a five-year time horizon based on resource use data and utility values collected in the trial. Costs of managing stroke events were estimated using individual patient data from a UK population-based study (Oxford Vascular Study). Mean costs per patient (95% CI) were US$10,477 ($9669 to $11,285) in the stenting group (N = 853) and $9669 ($8835 to $10,504) in the endarterectomy group (N = 857). There were no differences in mean quality-adjusted life years per patient (3.247 (3.160 to 3.333) and 3.228 (3.150 to 3.306), respectively). There were no differences in adjusted costs between groups (mean incremental costs for stenting versus endarterectomy $736 (95% CI -$353 to $1826)) or adjusted outcomes (mean quality-adjusted life years gained -0.010 (95% CI -0.117 to 0.097)). The incremental net monetary benefit for stenting versus endarterectomy was not significantly different from zero at the maximum willingness to pay for a quality-adjusted life year commonly used in the UK. Sensitivity analyses showed little uncertainty in these findings. Economic considerations should not affect whether patients with symptomatic carotid stenosis undergo stenting or endarterectomy. © 2016 World Stroke Organization.

  12. An innovative vibration fluidized bed ash cooler

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, Y.; Zhang, M.; Liu, A.; Yao, Z.; Tang, H.; Liu, Q.

    1999-07-01

    With the ever-increasing versatility, scaling up and commercialization of coal-fired fluidized bed boiler technologies, it has become more and more important to improve the technique of draining bed ash from bubbling or circulating fluidized bed boilers. Choosing an ash cooler is a good way but highly stable and reliable system is hard to find for a massive ash flow rate having a broad particle size distributions. An innovative technique known as Vibration Fluidized Bed Ash Cooler (VFBAC) is proposed in this paper. It can drain bottom ash at a high temperature from FB or CFB boilers continuously and controllably. In this device, air used for cooling can be used as combustion-aided air or coal spreading air. The hot ash is cooled by the air to a temperature which it can be transported easily and safely by conventional technology. Meanwhile, an industrial apparatus utilizing the new technology was manufactured and used in a 35 t/h bubbling FB boiler. For the purpose of detecting residence time distribution of wide-sieved bed materials in this ash cooler systematically, advantage was taken of a new approach for physical quality discrimination. Investigations into the hydrodynamic characteristics of the gas-solid two-phase flows and theoretical analyses on hot operational performance were carried out. The results show that heat recovery efficiency of the ash cooler reaches 85% greater when operating at a ratio of air to ash of 1.5{approximately}2.5 Nm{sup 3}/kg.

  13. U.S. Department of Energy Program of International Technical Cooperation for Research Reactor Utilization

    SciTech Connect

    Chong, D.; Manning, M.; Ellis, R.; Apt, K.; Flaim, S.; Sylvester, K.

    2004-10-03

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) has initiated collaborations with the national nuclear authorities of Egypt, Peru, and Romania for the purpose of advancing the commercial potential and utilization of their respective research reactors. Under its Office of International Safeguards ''Sister Laboratory'' program, DOE/NNSA has undertaken numerous technical collaborations over the past decade intended to promote peaceful applications of nuclear technology. Among these has been technical assistance in research reactor applications, such as neutron activation analysis, nuclear analysis, reactor physics, and medical radioisotope production. The current collaborations are intended to provide the subject countries with a methodology for greater commercialization of research reactor products and services. Our primary goal is the transfer of knowledge, both in administrative and technical issues, needed for the establishment of an effective business plan and utilization strategy for the continued operation of the countries' research reactors. Technical consultation, cooperation, and the information transfer provided are related to: identification, evaluation, and assessment of current research reactor capabilities for products and services; identification of opportunities for technical upgrades for new or expanded products and services; advice and consultation on research reactor upgrades and technical modifications; characterization of markets for reactor products and services; identification of competition and estimation of potential for market penetration; integration of technical constraints; estimation of cash flow streams; and case studies.

  14. Ash recycling - the coming of age!

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, J.M.; Roffman, H.K.; Roethel, F.J.

    1997-12-01

    A major concern of the Waste-To-Energy (WTE) industry is ash disposal and the uncertainty of controlled long term ash management. Ash management costs have risen steadily over the last ten years making it the fastest rising cost segment of the WTE industry. The challenge of how to curb the rising cost while maintaining the protection of human health and the environment has been accomplished by responsibly recycling the ash on a commercial basis. American Ash Recycling Corp. (AAR), utilizing the Duos Engineering (USA), Inc. patent pending ash recycling technology, has promoted ash recycling on a commercial basis in the United States. An important product of the processing and recycling of non-hazardous municipal waste combustor (MWC) ash is Treated Ash Aggregate (TAA). Additionally, ferrous and non-ferrous metals are recovered and unburned materials removed and returned to the WTE facility for re-combustion. The TAA is sized and then treated by the WES-PHix{reg_sign} immobilization process in order to reduce the potential solubility and environmental availability of the metal constituents of the MWC ash. The TAA is available for commercial use in such applications as an aggregate substitute in roadway materials, asphalt and concrete applications, as structural fill, and as landfill cover. Commercial and technical considerations that must be addressed before ash can be beneficially recycled are: permitting requirements, physical and chemical characteristics, potential end uses, environmental concerns (product safety), product market development, and economic viability. True recycling only occurs if all of these considerations can be addressed. This paper presents the details of AAR`s most recent experience in the development of an ash recycling facility in the State of Maine and the associated beneficial use of the TAA product. Each of the considerations listed above are discussed with a special focus on the permitting process.

  15. Market assessment and technical feasibility study of PFBC ash use

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, V.E.; Bland, A.E.; Brown, T.H.; Georgiou, D.N.; Wheeldon, J.

    1994-10-01

    The overall objectives of this study are to determine the market potential and the technical feasibility of using PFBC ash in high volume ash use applications. The information will be of direct use to the utility industry in assessing the economics of PFBC power generation in light of ash disposal avoidance through ash marketing. In addition, the research is expected to result in the generation of generic data on the use of PFBC ash that could lead to novel processing options and procedures. The specific objectives of the proposed research and demonstration effort are: Define resent and future market potential of PFBC ash for a range of applications (Phase I); assess the technical feasibility of PFBC ash use in construction, civil engineering and agricultural applications (Phase II); and demonstrate the most promising of the market and ash use options in full-scale field demonstrations (Phase III).

  16. Volcanic ash impacts on critical infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Thomas M.; Stewart, Carol; Sword-Daniels, Victoria; Leonard, Graham S.; Johnston, David M.; Cole, Jim W.; Wardman, Johnny; Wilson, Grant; Barnard, Scott T.

    2012-01-01

    Volcanic eruptions can produce a wide range of hazards. Although phenomena such as pyroclastic flows and surges, sector collapses, lahars and ballistic blocks are the most destructive and dangerous, volcanic ash is by far the most widely distributed eruption product. Although ash falls rarely endanger human life directly, threats to public health and disruption to critical infrastructure services, aviation and primary production can lead to significant societal impacts. Even relatively small eruptions can cause widespread disruption, damage and economic loss. Volcanic eruptions are, in general, infrequent and somewhat exotic occurrences, and consequently in many parts of the world, the management of critical infrastructure during volcanic crises can be improved with greater knowledge of the likely impacts. This article presents an overview of volcanic ash impacts on critical infrastructure, other than aviation and fuel supply, illustrated by findings from impact assessment reconnaissance trips carried out to a wide range of locations worldwide by our international research group and local collaborators. ‘Critical infrastructure’ includes those assets, frequently taken for granted, which are essential for the functioning of a society and economy. Electricity networks are very vulnerable to disruption from volcanic ash falls. This is particularly the case when fine ash is erupted because it has a greater tendency to adhere to line and substation insulators, where it can cause flashover (unintended electrical discharge) which can in turn cause widespread and disruptive outages. Weather conditions are a major determinant of flashover risk. Dry ash is not conductive, and heavy rain will wash ash from insulators, but light rain/mist will mobilise readily-soluble salts on the surface of the ash grains and lower the ash layer’s resistivity. Wet ash is also heavier than dry ash, increasing the risk of line breakage or tower/pole collapse. Particular issues for water

  17. Hazards Associated With Recent Popocatepetl Ash Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieto, A.; Martin, A.; Espinasa-Pereña, R.; Ferres, D.

    2013-05-01

    Popocatepetl has been producing ash from small eruptions since 1994. Until 2012 about 650 small ash emissions have been recorded at the monitoring system of Popocatépetl Volcano. Ash consists mainly of glassy lithic clasts from the recent crater domes, plagioclase and pyroxene crystals, and in major eruptions, olivine and/or hornblende. Dome forming eruptions produced a fine white ash which covers the coarser ash. This fine ash consists of plagioclase, glass and cristobalite particles mostly under15 microns. During the recent crisis at Popocatépetl, April and May2012 ash fell on villages to the east and west of the volcano, reaching Mexico City (more than 20 million people) and Puebla (2 million people). In 14 cases the plumes had heights over 2 km, the largest on May 2 and 11 (3 and 4 km in height, respectively). Heavier ash fall occurred on April 13, 14, 20, and 23 and May 2, 3, 5, 11, 14, 23, 24 and 25. A database for ash fall was constructed from April 13 with field observations, reports emitted by the Centro Nacional de Comunicaciones (CENACOM), ash fall advisories received at CENAPRED and alerts from the Servicios a la Navegación en el Espacio Aéreo Mexicano (SENEAM). This aim of this database is to calculate areas affected by the ash and estimate the ash fall volume emitted by Popocatépetl in each of these events. Heavy ash fall from the May 8 to May 11 combined with reduced visibility due to fog forced to closure of the Puebla airport during various periods of time, for up to 13 hours. Domestic and international flights were cancelled. Ash eruptions have caused respiratory conditions in the state of Puebla, to the east of the volcano, since 1994 (Rojas et al, 2001), but because of the changing wind conditions in the summer mainly, some of these ash plumes go westward to towns in the State of Mexico and even Mexico City. Preliminary analyses of these eruptions indicate that some ash emissions produced increased respiratory noninfectious problems

  18. Cost-utility analysis of stenting versus endarterectomy in the International Carotid Stenting Study

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Stephen; Patel, Nishma V; Dobson, Joanna; Featherstone, Roland L; Richards, Toby; Luengo-Fernandez, Ramon; Rothwell, Peter M; Brown, Martin M

    2017-01-01

    Background The International Carotid Stenting Study (ICSS) was a multicentre randomised trial in which patients with symptomatic carotid artery stenosis were randomly allocated to treatment by carotid stenting or endarterectomy. Economic evidence comparing these treatments is limited and inconsistent. Aims We compared the cost-effectiveness of stenting versus endarterectomy using ICSS data. Methods We performed a cost-utility analysis estimating mean costs and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) per patient for both treatments over a five-year time horizon based on resource use data and utility values collected in the trial. Costs of managing stroke events were estimated using individual patient data from a UK population-based study (Oxford Vascular Study). Results Mean costs per patient (95% CI) were US$10 477 ($9669 to $11 285) in the stenting group (N=853) and $9669 ($8835 to $10 504) in the endarterectomy group (N=857).There were no differences in mean QALYs per patient (3.247 (3.160 to 3.333) and 3.228 (3.150 to 3.306), respectively). There were no differences in adjusted costs between groups (mean incremental costs for stenting versus endarterectomy $736 (95% CI -$353 to $1826)) or adjusted outcomes (mean QALYs gained -0.010 (95% CI -0.117 to 0.097)). The incremental net monetary benefit for stenting versus endarterectomy was not significantly different from zero at the maximum willingness to pay for a QALY commonly used in the UK. Sensitivity analyses showed little uncertainty in these findings. Conclusions Economic considerations should not affect whether patients with symptomatic carotid stenosis undergo stenting or endarterectomy. PMID:26880056

  19. Utilization of rice husk ash as silica source for the synthesis of mesoporous silicas and their application to CO2 adsorption through TREN/TEPA grafting.

    PubMed

    Bhagiyalakshmi, Margandan; Yun, Lee Ji; Anuradha, Ramani; Jang, Hyun Tae

    2010-03-15

    Mesoporous MCM-41, MCM-48 and SBA-15 were synthesized using Rice husk ash (RHA) as the silica source and their defective Si-OH sites were functionalized by 3-chloropropyltrimethoxysilane (CPTMS) which was subsequently grafted with amine compounds, Tris(2-aminoethyl)amine (TREN) and Tetraethylenepentamine (TEPA). X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and BET results of the parent mesoporous silica suggested their closeness of structural properties to those obtained from conventional silica sources. CO(2) adsorption of branched amine TREN and straight chain amine TEPA at 25, 50 and 75 degrees C was obtained by Thermogravimetric Analyser (TGA) at atmospheric pressure. TREN grafted mesoporous silica showed 7% of CO(2) adsorption while TEPA grafted mesoporous silicas showed less CO(2) adsorption, which is due to the presence of isolated amine groups in TREN. TREN grafted mesoporous silicas were also observed to be selective towards CO(2), thermally stable and recyclable. The order of CO(2) adsorption with respect to amount of amine grafting was observed to be MCM-48/TREN>MCM-41/TREN>SBA-15/TREN.

  20. Direct utilization - recovery of minerals from coal fly ash. Technical progress report, January 1-March 31, 1982. [CO/Cl/sub 2/; C/Cl/sub 2/ and COCl

    SciTech Connect

    Burnet, G.; Dunker, J.W.; Murtha, M.J.

    1982-05-01

    Research on the chlorination of a leached Texas lignite fly ash has examined CO/Cl/sub 2/, C/Cl/sub 2/, and COCl/sub 2/ as reaction systems. Arrhenius plots suggest that there is a change in reaction mechanisms with increasing temperature in both the CO/Cl/sub 2/ and the C/Cl/sub 2/ systems. Reaction in the COCl/sub 2/ system appears to be limited by mass transfer, but this system has the highest initial reaction rates at lower temperatures of the systems studied. The research of coal fly ash sinter processes include the collection of limestone-soda ash sinter alumina extraction data using two additional fly ashes. A fly ash sample containing over 30 weight percent alumina was obtained from South Africa. This fly ash, which is the highest alumina content ash that has been investigated in this work, yielded, for optimum sinter mixture composition, over 90% alumina extraction. The other fly ash processed was a subbituminous fly ash of western coal which was obtained from the Ottumwa, Iowa, power station. This fly ash is very similar to other western coal fly ashes which have been investigated previously, but this ash is available locally and it will be used in the larger-scale sinter tests using the rotary kiln. Several tests were run investigating the desilication of extracted filtrates. Research has also been conducted on the magnetic separation of coal fly ash in a water slurry, and data are presented on the use of magnetically separated fly ash as heavy medium material in coal beneficiation.

  1. Physicochemical characterization of Spanish fly ashes

    SciTech Connect

    Querol, X.; Umana, J.C.; Alastuey, A.; Bertrana, C.; Lopez-Soler, A.; Plana, F.

    1999-12-01

    This article summarizes the results obtained from the physical, chemical, and mineralogical characterization of 14 fly ash samples. Major features that influence the utilization of each fly ash for zeolite synthesis are evidenced, and several fly ash types were selected as potential high-quality starting material for zeolite synthesis and ceramic applications. The main parameters influencing this selection were relatively small grain size; high Al and Si contents; high glass content; low CaO, S, and Fe contents; and relatively low heavy metal concentration. The Compostilla and Cou He fly ashes have high potential applications because of the low content of major impurities (such as Ca, Fe, and S) and the low content of soluble hazardous elements. The Espiel, Escucha, Los Barrios, As Pontes, Soto de Ribera, Meirama, Narcea, and Teruel fly ashes have important application potential, but this potential is slightly limited by the intermediate content of nonreactive impurities, such as Fe and Ca. The La Robla fly ash is of moderate interest, since the relatively high Ca and Fe oxide contents may reduce its potential applications. Finally, the Puertollano fly ash also has limited application because of the very high concentration of some heavy metals such as As, Cd, Ge, Hg, Pb, and Zn. From a mineralogical point of view, the Compostilla, Espiel, and Soto de Ribera fly ashes show the highest aluminum-silicate glass content and, consequently, the highest industrial application potential.

  2. Internal Medicine Resident Engagement with a Laboratory Utilization Dashboard: Mixed Methods Study.

    PubMed

    Kurtzman, Gregory; Dine, Jessica; Epstein, Andrew; Gitelman, Yevgenly; Leri, Damien; Patel, Miltesh S; Ryskina, Kyra

    2017-09-01

    The objective of this study was to measure internal medicine resident engagement with an electronic medical record-based dashboard providing feedback on their use of routine laboratory tests relative to service averages. From January 2016 to June 2016, residents were e-mailed a snapshot of their personalized dashboard, a link to the online dashboard, and text summarizing the resident and service utilization averages. We measured resident engagement using e-mail read-receipts and web-based tracking. We also conducted 3 hour-long focus groups with residents. Using grounded theory approach, the transcripts were analyzed for common themes focusing on barriers and facilitators of dashboard use. Among 80 residents, 74% opened the e-mail containing a link to the dashboard and 21% accessed the dashboard itself. We did not observe a statistically significant difference in routine laboratory ordering by dashboard use, although residents who opened the link to the dashboard ordered 0.26 fewer labs per doctor-patient-day than those who did not (95% confidence interval, -0.77 to 0.25; = 0 .31). While they raised several concerns, focus group participants had positive attitudes toward receiving individualized feedback delivered in real time. © 2017 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  3. NASA Utilization of the International Space Station and the Vision for Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Julie A.; Thumm, Tracy L.; Thomas, Donald A.

    2007-01-01

    In response to the U.S. President s Vision for Space Exploration (January 14, 2004), NASA has revised its utilization plans for ISS to focus on (1) research on astronaut health and the development of countermeasures that will protect our crews from the space environment during long duration voyages, (2) ISS as a test bed for research and technology developments that will insure vehicle systems and operational practices are ready for future exploration missions, (3) developing and validating operational practices and procedures for long-duration space missions. In addition, NASA will continue a small amount of fundamental research in life and microgravity sciences. There have been significant research accomplishments that are important for achieving the Exploration Vision. Some of these have been formal research payloads, while others have come from research based on the operation of International Space Station (ISS). We will review a selection of these experiments and results, as well as outline some of ongoing and upcoming research. The ISS represents the only microgravity opportunity to perform on-orbit long-duration studies of human health and performance and technologies relevant for future long-duration missions planned during the next 25 years. Even as NASA focuses on developing the Orion spacecraft and return to the moon (2015-2020), research on and operation of the ISS is fundamental to the success of NASA s Exploration Vision.

  4. NASA Utilization of the International Space Station and the Vision for Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Julie A.; Thumm, Tracy L.; Thomas, Donald A.

    2006-01-01

    In response to the U.S. President s Vision for Space Exploration (January 14, 2004), NASA has revised its utilization plans for ISS to focus on (1) research on astronaut health and the development of countermeasures that will protect our crews from the space environment during long duration voyages, (2) ISS as a test bed for research and technology developments that will insure vehicle systems and operational practices are ready for future exploration missions, (3) developing and validating operational practices and procedures for long-duration space missions. In addition, NASA will continue a small amount of fundamental research in life and microgravity sciences. There have been significant research accomplishments that are important for achieving the Exploration Vision. Some of these have been formal research payloads, while others have come from research based on the operation of International Space Station (ISS). We will review a selection of these experiments and results, as well as outline some of ongoing and upcoming research. The ISS represents the only microgravity opportunity to perform on-orbit long-duration studies of human health and performance and technologies relevant for future long-duration missions planned during the next 25 years. Even as NASA focuses on developing the Orion spacecraft and return to the moon (2015-2020), research on and operation of the ISS is fundamental to the success of NASA s Exploration Vision.

  5. NASA Utilization of the International Space Station and the Vision for Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Julie A.; Thomas, Donald A.; Thumm, Tracy L.

    2006-01-01

    In response to the U.S. President's Vision for Space Exploration (January 14, 2004), NASA has revised its utilization plans for ISS to focus on (1) research on astronaut health and the development of countermeasures that will protect our crews from the space environment during long duration voyages, (2) ISS as a test bed for research and technology developments that will insure vehicle systems and operational practices are ready for future exploration missions, (3) developing and validating operational practices and procedures for long-duration space missions. In addition, NASA will continue a small amount of fundamental research in life and microgravity sciences. There have been significant research accomplishments that are important for achieving the Exploration Vision. Some of these have been formal research payloads, while others have come from research based on the operation of International Space Station (ISS). We will review a selection of these experiments and results, as well as outline some of ongoing and upcoming research. The ISS represents the only microgravity opportunity to perform on-orbit long-duration studies of human health and performance and technologies relevant for future long-duration missions planned during the next 25 years. Even as NASA focuses on developing the Orion spacecraft and return to the moon (2015-2020), research on and operation of the ISS is fundamental to the success of NASA s Exploration Vision.

  6. NASA utilization of the International Space Station and the Vision for Space Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Julie A.; Thumm, Tracy L.; Thomas, Donald A.

    2007-06-01

    In response to the US President's Vision for Space Exploration (January 14, 2004), NASA has revised its utilization plans for International Space Station (ISS) to focus on (1) research on astronaut health and the development of countermeasures that will protect our crews from the space environment during long-duration voyages, (2) ISS as a test bed for research and technology developments that will insure vehicle systems and operational practices are ready for future exploration missions, (3) developing and validating operational practices and procedures for long-duration space missions. In addition, NASA will continue a small amount of fundamental research in life and microgravity sciences. There have been significant research accomplishments that are important for achieving the Exploration Vision. Some of these have been formal research payloads, while others have come from research based on the operation of ISS. We will review a selection of these experiments and results, as well as outline some of ongoing and upcoming research. The ISS represents the only microgravity opportunity to perform on-orbit long-duration studies of human health and performance and technologies relevant for future long-duration missions planned during the next 25 years. Even as NASA focuses on developing the Orion spacecraft and return to the moon (2015 2020), research on and operation of the ISS is fundamental to the success of NASA's Exploration Vision.

  7. Production of inorganic pellet binders from fly-ash. Technical report, March 1--May 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Kawatra, S.K.; Eisele, T.C.

    1995-12-31

    Fly-ash is produced by all coal-fired utilities, and it must be removed from the plant exhaust gases, collected, and disposed of. While much work has been done in the past to utilize fly-ash rather than disposing of it, we nevertheless do not find widespread examples of successful industrial utilization. This is because past work has tended to find uses only for high-quality, easily-utilized fly-ashes, which account for less than 25% of the fly-ash that is produced. The main factor which makes fly-ashes unusable is a high unburned carbon content. In this project, physical separation technologies are being used to remove this carbon, and to convert these unusable fly-ashes into usable products. The main application being studied for the processed fly-ash is as a binder for inorganic materials, such as iron-ore pellets. In the second quarter, additional fly-ash samples were collected from the E. D. Edwards station (Bartonville, IL). Experimentation was begun to study the removal of carbon from these fly-ashes by froth flotation, and make and test pellets that use fly-ash as binder. During the current quarter, flotation experiments were continued on the fly- ashes. Three types of ashes were studied: 1. Ash from the disposal pond (``wet`` ash); 2. Dry fly-ash collected directly from the standard burners (``low-carbon`` ash); 3. Dry fly-ash collected from the low-NOx burners (``high-carbon`` ash). Each of these was chemically analyzed, and conventional flotation experiments were carried out to determine the optimum reagent dosages for carbon removal. Decarbonized ashes were then made from each ash type, in sufficient quantity to be used in pelletization experiments.

  8. State of volcanic ash dispersion prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliasson, Jonas; Palsson, Thorgeir; Weber, Konradin

    2017-04-01

    The Eyjafjallajokull 2010 and Grimsvotn 2011 eruptions created great problems for commercial aviation in Western Europe and in the North Atlantic region. Comparison of satellite images of the visible and predicted ash clouds showed the VAAC prediction to be much larger than the actual ash clouds. No official explanation of this discrepancy exists apart from the definition of the ash cloud boundary. Papers on simulation of the Eyjafjallajökull ash cloud in peer reviewed journals, typically attempted to simulate the VAAC predictions rather than focusing on the satellite pictures. Sporadic measurements made in-situ showed much lower ash concentrations over Europe than the predicted values. Two of the weak points in ash cloud prediction have been studied in airborne measurements of volcanic ash by the Universities in Kyoto Japan, Iceland and Düsseldorf Germany of eruptions in Sakurajima, Japan. It turns out that gravitational deformation of the plume and a streak fallout process make estimated ash content of clouds larger than the actual, both features are not included in the simulation model. Tropospheric plumes tend to ride in stable inversions this causes gravitational flattening (pancaking) of the volcanic plume, while diffusion in the mixing layer is insignificant. New rules from ICAO, effective from November 2014, reiterate that jetliners should avoid visible ash, this makes information on visible ash important. A procedure developed by JMÁs Tokyo VAAC uses satellite images of visible ash to correct the prediction. This and the fact that meteorological data necessary to model gravitational dispersion and streak fallout do not exist in the international database available to the VAAĆs. This shows that close monitoring by airborne measurements and satellite and other photographic surveillance is necessary.

  9. Public Health Services Utilization and Its Determinants among Internal Migrants in China: Evidence from a Nationally Representative Survey.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingya; Lin, Senlin; Liang, Di; Qian, Yi; Zhang, Donglan; Hou, Zhiyuan

    2017-09-01

    There have been obstacles for internal migrants in China in accessing local public health services for some time. This study aimed to estimate the utilization of local public health services and its determinants among internal migrants. Data were from the 2014 and 2015 nationally representative cross-sectional survey of internal migrants in China. Multivariate logistic regressions were used to estimate the relationship between socioeconomic, migration, and demographic characteristics and public health services utilization. Our results showed that internal migrants in more developed eastern regions used less public health services. Those with higher socioeconomic status were more likely to use public health services. The years of living in the city of residence were positively associated with the utilization of public health services. Compared to migration within the city, migration across provinces significantly reduced the probability of using health records (OR = 0.88, 95% CI: 0.86-0.90), health education (OR = 0.97, 95% CI: 0.94-1.00), and health education on non-communicable diseases (OR = 0.92, 95% CI: 0.89-0.95) or through the Internet (OR = 0.96, 95% CI: 0.94-0.99). This study concludes that public health services coverage for internal migrants has seen great improvement due to government subsidies. Internal migrants with lower socioeconomic status and across provinces need to be targeted. More attention should be given to the local government in the developed eastern regions in order to narrow the regional gaps.

  10. Energy efficient continuous flow ash lockhopper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Earl R., Jr. (Inventor); Suitor, Jerry W. (Inventor); Dubis, David (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    The invention relates to an energy efficient continuous flow ash lockhopper, or other lockhopper for reactor product or byproduct. The invention includes an ash hopper at the outlet of a high temperature, high pressure reactor vessel containing heated high pressure gas, a fluidics control chamber having an input port connected to the ash hopper's output port and an output port connected to the input port of a pressure letdown means, and a control fluid supply for regulating the pressure in the control chamber to be equal to or greater than the internal gas pressure of the reactor vessel, whereby the reactor gas is contained while ash is permitted to continuously flow from the ash hopper's output port, impelled by gravity. The main novelty resides in the use of a control chamber to so control pressure under the lockhopper that gases will not exit from the reactor vessel, and to also regulate the ash flow rate. There is also novelty in the design of the ash lockhopper shown in two figures. The novelty there is the use of annular passages of progressively greater diameter, and rotating the center parts on a shaft, with the center part of each slightly offset from adjacent ones to better assure ash flow through the opening.

  11. California Dust and Ash

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  Airborne Dust and Ash over Southern California     ... during late fall and winter swept large amounts of dust and ash across the skies of San Diego and over the Pacific Ocean on November 27, ...

  12. Proceedings of papers presented at the 2nd international symposium on applications of biotechnology to tree culture, protection, and utilization.

    Treesearch

    Charles H. Michler; Michael R. Becwar; Daniel Cullen; Warren L. Nance; Ronald R. Sederoff; James M. Silvicek

    1994-01-01

    Contains 38 oral presentation abstracts, 34 poster abstracts, and 18 manuscripts on applications of biotechnology to tree research in the areas of stress resistance, protection, and wood utilization presented at an international conference in Bloomington, Minnesota, October 2-6, 1994.

  13. Delay/Disruption Tolerance Networking (DTN) Implementation and Utilization Options on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holbrook, Mark; Pitts, Robert Lee; Gifford, Kevin K.; Jenkins, Andrew; Kuzminsky, Sebastian

    2010-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) is in an operational configuration and nearing final assembly. With its maturity and diverse payloads onboard, the opportunity exists to extend the orbital lab into a facility to exercise and demonstrate Delay/Disruption Tolerant Networking (DTN). DTN is an end-to-end network service providing communications through environments characterized by intermittent connectivity, variable delays, high bit error rates, asymmetric links and simplex links. The DTN protocols, also known as bundle protocols, provide a store-and-forward capability to accommodate end-to-end network services. Key capabilities of the bundling protocols include: the Ability to cope with intermittent connectivity, the Ability to take advantage of scheduled and opportunistic connectivity (in addition to always up connectivity), Custody Transfer, and end-to-end security. Colorado University at Boulder and the Huntsville Operational Support Center (HOSC) have been developing a DTN capability utilizing the Commercial Generic Bioprocessing Apparatus (CGBA) payload resources onboard the ISS, at the Boulder Payload Operations Center (POC) and at the HOSC. The DTN capability is in parallel with and is designed to augment current capabilities. The architecture consists of DTN endpoint nodes on the ISS and at the Boulder POC, and a DTN node at the HOSC. The DTN network is composed of two implementations; the Interplanetary Overlay Network (ION) and the open source DTN2 implementation. This paper presents the architecture, implementation, and lessons learned. By being able to handle the types of environments described above, the DTN technology will be instrumental in extending networks into deep space to support future missions to other planets and other solar system points of interest. Thus, this paper also discusses how this technology will be applicable to these types of deep space exploration missions.

  14. Delay/Disruption Tolerance Networking (DTN) Implementation and Utilization Options on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holbrook, Mark; Pitts, Robert Lee; Gifford, Kevin K.; Jenkins, Andrew; Kuzminsky, Sebastian

    2010-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) is in an operational configuration and nearing final assembly. With its maturity and diverse payloads onboard, the opportunity exists to extend the orbital lab into a facility to exercise and demonstrate Delay/Disruption Tolerant Networking (DTN). DTN is an end-to-end network service providing communications through environments characterized by intermittent connectivity, variable delays, high bit error rates, asymmetric links and simplex links. The DTN protocols, also known as bundle protocols, provide a store-and-forward capability to accommodate end-to-end network services. Key capabilities of the bundling protocols include: the Ability to cope with intermittent connectivity, the Ability to take advantage of scheduled and opportunistic connectivity (in addition to always up connectivity), Custody Transfer, and end-to-end security. Colorado University at Boulder and the Huntsville Operational Support Center (HOSC) have been developing a DTN capability utilizing the Commercial Generic Bioprocessing Apparatus (CGBA) payload resources onboard the ISS, at the Boulder Payload Operations Center (POC) and at the HOSC. The DTN capability is in parallel with and is designed to augment current capabilities. The architecture consists of DTN endpoint nodes on the ISS and at the Boulder POC, and a DTN node at the HOSC. The DTN network is composed of two implementations; the Interplanetary Overlay Network (ION) and the open source DTN2 implementation. This paper presents the architecture, implementation, and lessons learned. By being able to handle the types of environments described above, the DTN technology will be instrumental in extending networks into deep space to support future missions to other planets and other solar system points of interest. Thus, this paper also discusses how this technology will be applicable to these types of deep space exploration missions.

  15. Asymmetric Ashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-11-01

    , it is. "This has some impact on the use of Type Ia supernovae as standard candles," says Ferdinando Patat. "This kind of supernovae is used to measure the rate of acceleration of the expansion of the Universe, assuming these objects behave in a uniform way. But asymmetries can introduce dispersions in the quantities observed." "Our discovery puts strong constraints on any successful models of thermonuclear supernova explosions," adds Wang. Models have suggested that the clumpiness is caused by a slow-burn process, called 'deflagration', and leaves an irregular trail of ashes. The smoothness of the inner regions of the exploding star implies that at a given stage, the deflagration gives way to a more violent process, a 'detonation', which travels at supersonic speeds - so fast that it erases all the asymmetries in the ashes left behind by the slower burning of the first stage, resulting in a smoother, more homogeneous residue.

  16. Alpha ash transport and ash control

    SciTech Connect

    Miley, G.H.; Hu, S.C.; Varadarajan, V.

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses: thermal {alpha}-particle transport is a crucial issue in ash buildup. The transport will determine if buildup prevents ignition and if external control is necessary. Due to uncertainties in the transport coefficients, 1-1/2-D sensitivity study of the influence on the fusion power density is done using the BALDUR code. The Baldur simulations with varying diffusion coefficients for ash plasma are performed. The results of ash transport in the presence of sawteeth and varying edge conditions are discussed. Also, the nature of the fishbone oscillation in the presence of two hot species consisting of hot alphas and beam injected ions is discussed. The sawteeth and fishbones can be potential mechanisms for enhanced ash transport; the latter will indirectly influence the ash transport.

  17. Activation of fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Corbin, D.R.; Velenyi, L.J.; Pepera, M.A.; Dolhyj, S.R.

    1986-08-19

    Fly ash is activated by heating a screened magnetic fraction of the ash in a steam atmosphere and then reducing, oxidizing and again reducing the hydrothermally treated fraction. The activated fly ash can be used as a carbon monoxide disproportionating catalyst useful in the production of hydrogen and methane.

  18. Activation of fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Corbin, David R.; Velenyi, Louis J.; Pepera, Marc A.; Dolhyj, Serge R.

    1986-01-01

    Fly ash is activated by heating a screened magnetic fraction of the ash in a steam atmosphere and then reducing, oxidizing and again reducing the hydrothermally treated fraction. The activated fly ash can be used as a carbon monoxide disproportionating catalyst useful in the production of hydrogen and methane.

  19. Magnetism of cigarette ashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordanova, Neli; Jordanova, Diana; Henry, Bernard; Le Goff, Maxime; Dimov, Dimo; Tsacheva, Tsenka

    2006-06-01

    Mineral composition of cigarette ashes is well studied in the literature, but no reports are available about the magnetic fraction. Our study presents an investigation of the basic magnetic characteristics of ashes from several commercially available cigarette brands and a wood ash. Magnetic susceptibility, which is a concentration-dependent parameter in case of uniform mineralogy, shows that cigarette ashes contain relatively high amount of magnetic iron minerals, similar to that in wood ash from our study and other literature data. Magnetization data suggest that cigarette ashes contain some 0.1 wt% or lower quantity of magnetite, depending on the brand. Analyses of magnetic mineralogy imply that the main magnetic minerals in ashes from higher quality cigarette brands are magnetite and iron carbide cementite, while in ashes from lower quality brands without additives magnetic minerals are pure and substituted with foreign ions magnetite. Magnetic grain-size analysis shows that cigarette ashes contain significant amount of very fine, nano-meter sized magnetic particles, as well as coarser (up to several microns), magnetically stable grains. Thus, the magnetic study of cigarette ashes proved that these plant ashes possess non-negligible magnetic properties. The results could serve for better elucidation of mineralogy of cigarette ashes as a whole, as well as for future investigation on the presence of magnetic ultra fine particles in cigarette smoke, which may be inhaled in lungs during smoking.

  20. Rising from the ashes: Coal ash in recycling and construction

    SciTech Connect

    Naquin, D.

    1998-02-01

    Beneficial Ash Management (BAM, Clearfield, Pa.) has won an environmental award for its use of ash and other waste to fight acid mine drainage. The company`s workers take various waste materials, mainly fly ash from coal-burning plants, to make a cement-like material or grouting, says Ernest Roselli, BAM president. The grouting covers the soil, which helps prevent water from contacting materials. This, in turn, helps control chemical reactions, reducing or eliminating formation of acid mine drainage. The company is restoring the 1,400-acre Bark Camp coal mine site near Penfield in Clearfield County, Pa. Under a no-cost contract with the state of Pennsylvania, BAM is using boiler slag, causticizing byproducts (lime) and nonreclaimable clarifier sludge from International Paper Co. (Erie, Pa.). The mine reclamation techniques developed and monitored at the site include using man-made wetlands to treat acid mine drainage and testing anhydrous ammonia as a similar treatment agent. BAM researches and tests fly ash mixed with lime-based activators as fill material for land reclamation, and develops and uses artificial soil material from paper mill and tannery biosolids.

  1. Gasification of high ash, high ash fusion temperature bituminous coals

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Guohai; Vimalchand, Pannalal; Peng, WanWang

    2015-11-13

    This invention relates to gasification of high ash bituminous coals that have high ash fusion temperatures. The ash content can be in 15 to 45 weight percent range and ash fusion temperatures can be in 1150.degree. C. to 1500.degree. C. range as well as in excess of 1500.degree. C. In a preferred embodiment, such coals are dealt with a two stage gasification process--a relatively low temperature primary gasification step in a circulating fluidized bed transport gasifier followed by a high temperature partial oxidation step of residual char carbon and small quantities of tar. The system to process such coals further includes an internally circulating fluidized bed to effectively cool the high temperature syngas with the aid of an inert media and without the syngas contacting the heat transfer surfaces. A cyclone downstream of the syngas cooler, operating at relatively low temperatures, effectively reduces loading to a dust filtration unit. Nearly dust- and tar-free syngas for chemicals production or power generation and with over 90%, and preferably over about 98%, overall carbon conversion can be achieved with the preferred process, apparatus and methods outlined in this invention.

  2. Ash in fire affected ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Paulo; Jordan, Antonio; Cerda, Artemi; Martin, Deborah

    2015-04-01

    Ash in fire affected ecosystems Ash lefts an important footprint in the ecosystems and has a key role in the immediate period after the fire (Bodi et al., 2014; Pereira et al., 2015). It is an important source of nutrients for plant recover (Pereira et al., 2014a), protects soil from erosion and controls soil hydrological process as runoff, infiltration and water repellency (Cerda and Doerr, 2008; Bodi et al., 2012, Pereira et al., 2014b). Despite the recognition of ash impact and contribution to ecosystems recuperation, it is assumed that we still have little knowledge about the implications of ash in fire affected areas. Regarding this situation we wanted to improve our knowledge in this field and understand the state of the research about fire ash around world. The special issue about "The role of ash in fire affected ecosystems" currently in publication in CATENA born from the necessity of joint efforts, identify research gaps, and discuss future cooperation in this interdisciplinary field. This is the first special issue about fire ash in the international literature. In total it will be published 10 papers focused in different aspects of the impacts of ash in fire affected ecosystems from several parts of the world: • Fire reconstruction using charcoal particles (Burjachs and Espositio, in press) • Ash slurries impact on rheological properties of Runoff (Burns and Gabet, in press) • Methods to analyse ash conductivity and sorbtivity in the laboratory and in the field (Balfour et al., in press) • Termogravimetric and hydrological properties of ash (Dlapa et al. in press) • Effects of ash cover in water infiltration (Leon et al., in press) • Impact of ash in volcanic soils (Dorta Almenar et al., in press; Escuday et al., in press) • Ash PAH and Chemical extracts (Silva et al., in press) • Microbiology (Barreiro et al., in press; Lombao et al., in press) We believe that this special issue will contribute importantly to the better understanding of

  3. Effect of fuel properties on the bottom ash generation rate by a laboratory fluidized bed combustor

    SciTech Connect

    Rozelle, P.L.; Pisupati, S.V.; Scaroni, A.W.

    2007-06-15

    The range of fuels that can be accommodated by an FBC boiler system is affected by the ability of the fuel, sorbent, and ash-handling equipment to move the required solids through the boiler. Of specific interest is the bottom ash handling equipment, which must have sufficient capacity to remove ash from the system in order to maintain a constant bed inventory level, and must have sufficient capability to cool the ash well below the bed temperature. Quantification of a fuel's bottom ash removal requirements can be useful for plant design. The effect of fuel properties on the rate of bottom ash production in a laboratory FBC test system was examined. The work used coal products ranging in ash content from 20 to 40+ wt. %. The system's classification of solids by particle size into flyash and bottom ash was characterized using a partition curve. Fuel fractions in the size range characteristic of bottom ash were further analyzed for distributions of ash content with respect to specific gravity, using float sink tests. The fuel fractions were then ashed in a fixed bed. In each case, the highest ash content fraction produced ash with the coarsest size consist (characteristic of bottom ash). The lower ash content fractions were found to produce ash in the size range characteristic of flyash, suggesting that the high ash content fractions were largely responsible for the production of bottom ash. The contributions of the specific gravity fractions to the composite ash in the fuels were quantified. The fuels were fired in the laboratory test system. Fuels with higher amounts of high specific gravity particles, in the size ranges characteristic of bottom ash, were found to produce more bottom ash, indicating the potential utility of float sink methods in the prediction of bottom ash removal requirements.

  4. International Space Station (ISS) Plasma Contactor Unit (PCU) Utilization Plan Assessment Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernandez-Pellerano, Amri; Iannello, Christopher J.; Garrett, Henry B.; Ging, Andrew T.; Katz, Ira; Keith, R. Lloyd; Minow, Joseph I.; Willis, Emily M.; Schneider, Todd A.; Whittlesey, Edward J.; Wollack, Edward J.; Wright, Kenneth H.

    2014-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) vehicle undergoes spacecraft charging as it interacts with Earth's ionosphere and magnetic field. The interaction can result in a large potential difference developing between the ISS metal chassis and the local ionosphere plasma environment. If an astronaut conducting extravehicular activities (EVA) is exposed to the potential difference, then a possible electrical shock hazard arises. The control of this hazard was addressed by a number of documents within the ISS Program (ISSP) including Catastrophic Safety Hazard for Astronauts on EVA (ISS-EVA-312-4A_revE). The safety hazard identified the risk for an astronaut to experience an electrical shock in the event an arc was generated on an extravehicular mobility unit (EMU) surface. A catastrophic safety hazard, by the ISS requirements, necessitates mitigation by a two-fault tolerant system of hazard controls. Traditionally, the plasma contactor units (PCUs) on the ISS have been used to limit the charging and serve as a "ground strap" between the ISS structure and the surrounding ionospheric plasma. In 2009, a previous NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) team evaluated the PCU utilization plan (NESC Request #07-054-E) with the objective to assess whether leaving PCUs off during non-EVA time periods presented risk to the ISS through assembly completion. For this study, in situ measurements of ISS charging, covering the installation of three of the four photovoltaic arrays, and laboratory testing results provided key data to underpin the assessment. The conclusion stated, "there appears to be no significant risk of damage to critical equipment nor excessive ISS thermal coating damage as a result of eliminating PCU operations during non- EVA times." In 2013, the ISSP was presented with recommendations from Boeing Space Environments for the "Conditional" Marginalization of Plasma Hazard. These recommendations include a plan that would keep the PCUs off during EVAs when the

  5. Comparative study on the characteristics of fly ash and bottom ash geopolymers.

    PubMed

    Chindaprasirt, Prinya; Jaturapitakkul, Chai; Chalee, Wichian; Rattanasak, Ubolluk

    2009-02-01

    This research was conducted to compare geopolymers made from fly ash and ground bottom ash. Sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and sodium silicate (Na(2)SiO(3)) solutions were used as activators. A mass ratio of 1.5 Na(2)SiO(3)/NaOH and three concentrations of NaOH (5, 10, and 15M) were used; the geopolymers were cured at 65 degrees C for 48 h. A Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FT-IR), differential scanning calorimeter (DSC), and scanning electron microscope (SEM) were used on the geopolymer pastes. Geopolymer mortars were also prepared in order to investigate compressive strength. The results show that both fly ash and bottom ash can be utilized as source materials for the production of geopolymers. The properties of the geopolymers are dependent on source materials and the NaOH concentration. Fly ash is more reactive and produces a higher degree of geopolymerization in comparison with bottom ash. The moderate NaOH concentration of 10 M is found to be suitable and gives fly ash and bottom ash geopolymer mortars with compressive strengths of 35 and 18 MPa.

  6. Comparative study on the characteristics of fly ash and bottom ash geopolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Chindaprasirt, Prinya; Jaturapitakkul, Chai; Chalee, Wichian; Rattanasak, Ubolluk

    2009-02-15

    This research was conducted to compare geopolymers made from fly ash and ground bottom ash. Sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and sodium silicate (Na{sub 2}SiO{sub 3}) solutions were used as activators. A mass ratio of 1.5 Na{sub 2}SiO{sub 3}/NaOH and three concentrations of NaOH (5, 10, and 15 M) were used; the geopolymers were cured at 65 deg. C for 48 h. A Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FT-IR), differential scanning calorimeter (DSC), and scanning electron microscope (SEM) were used on the geopolymer pastes. Geopolymer mortars were also prepared in order to investigate compressive strength. The results show that both fly ash and bottom ash can be utilized as source materials for the production of geopolymers. The properties of the geopolymers are dependent on source materials and the NaOH concentration. Fly ash is more reactive and produces a higher degree of geopolymerization in comparison with bottom ash. The moderate NaOH concentration of 10 M is found to be suitable and gives fly ash and bottom ash geopolymer mortars with compressive strengths of 35 and 18 MPa.

  7. Utilizing Technology to Infuse International Content into Social Work Curriculum: A Siberian Correspondent Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bye, Lynn; Prom, Kim Boland; Tsybikdorzhieva, Bairma; Boldonova, Irina

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a model for using technology to help fulfill the Council on Social Work Education requirement for international content in the social work curriculum. The literature on including global content and using Web-based technology in social work education is reviewed. Special considerations for international Web-based discussions are…

  8. Utilizing Technology to Infuse International Content into Social Work Curriculum: A Siberian Correspondent Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bye, Lynn; Prom, Kim Boland; Tsybikdorzhieva, Bairma; Boldonova, Irina

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a model for using technology to help fulfill the Council on Social Work Education requirement for international content in the social work curriculum. The literature on including global content and using Web-based technology in social work education is reviewed. Special considerations for international Web-based discussions are…

  9. Fly ash carbon passivation

    DOEpatents

    La Count, Robert B; Baltrus, John P; Kern, Douglas G

    2013-05-14

    A thermal method to passivate the carbon and/or other components in fly ash significantly decreases adsorption. The passivated carbon remains in the fly ash. Heating the fly ash to about 500 and 800 degrees C. under inert gas conditions sharply decreases the amount of surfactant adsorbed by the fly ash recovered after thermal treatment despite the fact that the carbon content remains in the fly ash. Using oxygen and inert gas mixtures, the present invention shows that a thermal treatment to about 500 degrees C. also sharply decreases the surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash even though most of the carbon remains intact. Also, thermal treatment to about 800 degrees C. under these same oxidative conditions shows a sharp decrease in surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash due to the fact that the carbon has been removed. This experiment simulates the various "carbon burnout" methods and is not a claim in this method. The present invention provides a thermal method of deactivating high carbon fly ash toward adsorption of AEAs while retaining the fly ash carbon. The fly ash can be used, for example, as a partial Portland cement replacement in air-entrained concrete, in conductive and other concretes, and for other applications.

  10. Validation of Volcanic Ash Forecasting Performed by the Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salemi, A.; Hanna, J.

    2009-12-01

    In support of NOAA’s mission to protect life and property, the Satellite Analysis Branch (SAB) uses satellite imagery to monitor volcanic eruptions and track volcanic ash. The Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC) was established in late 1997 through an agreement with the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO). A volcanic ash advisory (VAA) is issued every 6 hours while an eruption is occurring. Information about the current location and height of the volcanic ash as well as any pertinent meteorological information is contained within the VAA. In addition, when ash is detected in satellite imagery, 6-, 12- and 18-hour forecasts of ash height and location are provided. This information is garnered from many sources including Meteorological Watch Offices (MWOs), pilot reports (PIREPs), model forecast winds, radiosondes and volcano observatories. The Washington VAAC has performed a validation of their 6, 12 and 18 hour airborne volcanic ash forecasts issued since October, 2007. The volcanic ash forecasts are viewed dichotomously (yes/no) with the frequency of yes and no events placed into a contingency table. A large variety of categorical statistics useful in describing forecast performance are then computed from the resulting contingency table.

  11. Marine mesocosm bacterial colonisation of volcanic ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witt, Verena; Cimarelli, Corrado; Ayris, Paul; Kueppers, Ulrich; Erpenbeck, Dirk; Dingwell, Donald; Woerheide, Gert

    2015-04-01

    Volcanic eruptions regularly eject large quantities of ash particles into the atmosphere, which can be deposited via fallout into oceanic environments. Such fallout has the potential to alter pH, light and nutrient availability at local scales. Shallow-water coral reef ecosystems - "rainforests of the sea" - are highly sensitive to disturbances, such as ocean acidification, sedimentation and eutrophication. Therefore, wind-delivered volcanic ash may lead to burial and mortality of such reefs. Coral reef ecosystem resilience may depend on pioneer bacterial colonisation of the ash layer, supporting subsequent establishment of the micro- and ultimately the macro-community. However, which bacteria are involved in pioneer colonisation remain unknown. We hypothesize that physico-chemical properties (i.e., morphology, mineralogy) of the ash may dictate bacterial colonisation. The effect of substrate properties on bacterial colonisation was tested by exposing five substrates: i) quartz sand ii) crystalline ash (Sakurajima, Japan) iii) volcanic glass iv) carbonate reef sand and v) calcite sand of similar grain size, in controlled marine coral reef aquaria under low light conditions for six months. Bacterial communities were screened every month by Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis of the 16S-23S rRNA Internal Transcribed Spacer region. Multivariate statistics revealed discrete groupings of bacterial communities on substrates of volcanic origin (ash and glass) and reef origin (three sands). Analysis of Similarity supported significantly different communities associated with all substrates (p=0.0001), only quartz did not differ from both carbonate and calcite sands. The ash substrate exhibited the most diverse bacterial community with the most substrate-specific bacterial operational taxonomic units. Our findings suggest that bacterial diversity and community composition during colonisation of volcanic ash in a coral reef-like environment is controlled by the

  12. Utilization of internal evaluation results by community mental health organizations: Credibility in different forms.

    PubMed

    Yusa, Anna; Hynie, Michaela; Mitchell, Scott

    2016-02-01

    Internal evaluations are numerous but the literature is largely focused on external evaluations. There have been few explorations of the factors affecting the use of findings from internal evaluations that are carried out by program staff in community organizations. This study examined the instrumental use of internal evaluation findings within 19 community mental health organizations in Ontario, Canada. All but one respondent reported instrumental use in their organization, using the evaluation findings to make program-related decisions. For these non-controversial programs, qualities such as the ability of internal evaluators to identify relevant information, their role/expertise within the organization and the consistency of evaluation findings with current understanding appeared to influence use more strongly than evaluator objectivity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Embedded fiber-optic sensing for accurate internal monitoring of cell state in advanced battery management systems part 2: Internal cell signals and utility for state estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguli, Anurag; Saha, Bhaskar; Raghavan, Ajay; Kiesel, Peter; Arakaki, Kyle; Schuh, Andreas; Schwartz, Julian; Hegyi, Alex; Sommer, Lars Wilko; Lochbaum, Alexander; Sahu, Saroj; Alamgir, Mohamed

    2017-02-01

    A key challenge hindering the mass adoption of Lithium-ion and other next-gen chemistries in advanced battery applications such as hybrid/electric vehicles (xEVs) has been management of their functional performance for more effective battery utilization and control over their life. Contemporary battery management systems (BMS) reliant on monitoring external parameters such as voltage and current to ensure safe battery operation with the required performance usually result in overdesign and inefficient use of capacity. More informative embedded sensors are desirable for internal cell state monitoring, which could provide accurate state-of-charge (SOC) and state-of-health (SOH) estimates and early failure indicators. Here we present a promising new embedded sensing option developed by our team for cell monitoring, fiber-optic (FO) sensors. High-performance large-format pouch cells with embedded FO sensors were fabricated. This second part of the paper focuses on the internal signals obtained from these FO sensors. The details of the method to isolate intercalation strain and temperature signals are discussed. Data collected under various xEV operational conditions are presented. An algorithm employing dynamic time warping and Kalman filtering was used to estimate state-of-charge with high accuracy from these internal FO signals. Their utility for high-accuracy, predictive state-of-health estimation is also explored.

  14. International practice patterns and resource utilization in the treatment of neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Casciano, Roman; Wang, Xufang; Stern, Lee; Parikh, Rohan; Chulikavit, Maruit; Willet, Jacob; Liu, Zhimei; Strosberg, Jonathan; Cadiot, Guillaume; Riechelmann, Rachel

    2013-03-01

    This study compared resource use and practice patterns in patients with advanced neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) on disease progression, across countries, and by tumor type. Physicians in the United States, United Kingdom, Germany, France, Brazil, and Italy completed data extraction forms to extract chart data of patients with NET relating to health care resource utilization and treatment practice. Data were assessed in a cross-sectional manner, by country, and by NET subtype. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to compare categories of resource use by disease progression status. A total of 197 physicians provided data on 394 patients. Overall resource utilization was high across tumor types, countries, and progression. Nearly half of all patients received chemotherapy (49%); moreover, high rates of hospitalization (65%), surgery (47%), and use of somatostatin analog (77%) were observed, with lower rates of peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (10%) and targeted therapies (6%). These patterns were consistent across gastrointestinal tract/lung NET and pancreatic NET. However, a certain variation in resource utilization was observed across countries. Disease progression was associated with increasing utilization of chemotherapy, hospitalization, and targeted therapy. Advanced NET is associated with significant resource use across subtypes and countries, and resource utilization is likely to increase on disease progression. There remains an unmet need for therapeutic options after disease progression.

  15. Effective drinking water collaborations are not accidental: interagency relationships in the international water utility sector.

    PubMed

    Jalba, D I; Cromar, N J; Pollard, S J T; Charrois, J W; Bradshaw, R; Hrudey, S E

    2014-02-01

    The role that deficient institutional relationships have played in aggravating drinking water incidents over the last 30 years has been identified in several inquiries of high profile drinking water safety events, peer-reviewed articles and media reports. These indicate that collaboration between water utilities and public health agencies (PHAs) during normal operations, and in emergencies, needs improvement. Here, critical elements of these interagency collaborations, that can be integrated within the corporate risk management structures of water utilities and PHAs alike, were identified using a grounded theory approach and 51 semi-structured interviews with utility and PHA staff. Core determinants of effective interagency relationships are discussed. Intentionally maintained functional relationships represent a key ingredient in assuring the delivery of safe, high quality drinking water. © 2013.

  16. Characterization of ash in algae and other materials by determination of wet acid indigestible ash and microscopic examination

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Algae are known for high ash content. It is important to properly characterize their ash for value added utilization of algae as food, feed, and feedstock for biofuels. In this study, 12 algae of different sources were measured for proximate composition and mineral profile. Results showed that the r...

  17. Forecasting exposure to volcanic ash based on ash dispersion modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Rorik A.; Dean, Ken G.

    2008-03-01

    A technique has been developed that uses Puff, a volcanic ash transport and dispersion (VATD) model, to forecast the relative exposure of aircraft and ground facilities to ash from a volcanic eruption. VATD models couple numerical weather prediction (NWP) data with physical descriptions of the initial eruptive plume, atmospheric dispersion, and settling of ash particles. Three distinct examples of variations on the technique are given using ERA-40 archived reanalysis NWP data. The Feb. 2000 NASA DC-8 event involving an eruption of Hekla volcano, Iceland is first used for analyzing a single flight. Results corroborate previous analyses that conclude the aircraft did encounter a diffuse cloud of volcanic origin, and indicate exposure within a factor of 10 compared to measurements made on the flight. The sensitivity of the technique to dispersion physics is demonstrated. The Feb. 2001 eruption of Mt. Cleveland, Alaska is used as a second example to demonstrate how this technique can be utilized to quickly assess the potential exposure of a multitude of aircraft during and soon after an event. Using flight tracking data from over 40,000 routes over three days, several flights that may have encountered low concentrations of ash were identified, and the exposure calculated. Relative changes in the quantity of exposure when the eruption duration is varied are discussed, and no clear trend is evident as the exposure increased for some flights and decreased for others. A third application of this technique is demonstrated by forecasting the near-surface airborne concentrations of ash that the cities of Yakima Washington, Boise Idaho, and Kelowna British Columbia might have experienced from an eruption of Mt. St. Helens anytime during the year 2000. Results indicate that proximity to the source does not accurately determine the potential hazard. Although an eruption did not occur during this time, the results serve as a demonstration of how existing cities or potential

  18. Volcanic Ash Transport and Dispersion Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Servranckx, R.; Stunder, B.

    2006-12-01

    Volcanic ash transport and dispersion models (VATDM) have been used operationally since the mid 1990's by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) designated Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers (VAAC) to provide ash forecast guidance. Over the years, significant improvements in the detection and prediction of airborne volcanic ash have been realized thanks to improved models, increases in computing power, 24-hr real time monitoring by VAACs / Meteorological Watch Offices and close coordination with Volcano Observatories around the world. Yet, predicting accurately the spatial and temporal structures of airborne volcanic ash and the deposition at the earth's surface remains a difficult and challenging problem. The forecasting problem is influenced by 3 main components. The first one (ERUPTION SOURCE PARAMETERS) comprises all non-meteorological parameters that characterize a specific eruption or volcanic ash cloud. For example, the volume / mass of ash released in the atmosphere, the duration of the eruption, the altitude and distribution of the ash cloud, the particle size distribution, etc. The second component (METEOROLOGY) includes all meteorological parameters (wind, moisture, stability, etc.) that are calculated by Numerical Weather Prediction models and that serve as input to the VATDM. The third component (TRANSPORT AND DISPERSION) combines input from the other 2 components through the use of VATDM to transport and disperse airborne volcanic ash in the atmosphere as well as depositing it at the surface though various removal mechanisms. Any weakness in one of the components may adversely affect the accuracy of the forecast. In a real-time, operational response context such as exists at the VAACs, the rapid delivery of the modeling results puts some constraints on model resolution and computing time. Efforts are ongoing to evaluate the reliability of VATDM forecasts though the use of various methods, including ensemble techniques. Remote sensing data

  19. Quantifying change in riparian ash forests following the introduction of EAB in Michigan and Indiana

    Treesearch

    Susan J. Crocker; Dacia M. Meneguzzo

    2012-01-01

    The emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire; Coleoptera: Buprestidae; EAB) is an introduced beetle that kills ash (Fraxinus spp.) trees. While most EAB-related ash mortality has been documented in urban areas, the effects of EAB in forested settings, particularly in riparian forests, are not well known. This study utilizes...

  20. Application of solid ash based catalysts in heterogeneous catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Shaobin Wang

    2008-10-01

    Solid wastes, fly ash, and bottom ash are generated from coal and biomass combustion. Fly ash is mainly composed of various metal oxides and possesses higher thermal stability. Utilization of fly ash for other industrial applications provides a cost-effective and environmentally friendly way of recycling this solid waste, significantly reducing its environmental effects. On the one hand, due to the higher stability of its major component, aluminosilicates, fly ash could be employed as catalyst support by impregnation of other active components for various reactions. On the other hand, other chemical compounds in fly ash such as Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} could also provide an active component making fly ash a catalyst for some reactions. In this paper, physicochemical properties of fly ash and its applications for heterogeneous catalysis as a catalyst support or catalyst in a variety of catalytic reactions were reviewed. Fly-ash-supported catalysts have shown good catalytic activities for H{sub 2} production, deSOx, deNOx, hydrocarbon oxidation, and hydrocracking, which are comparable to commercially used catalysts. As a catalyst itself, fly ash can also be effective for gas-phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds, aqueous-phase oxidation of organics, solid plastic pyrolysis, and solvent-free organic synthesis. 107 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Application of solid ash based catalysts in heterogeneous catalysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaobin

    2008-10-01

    Solid wastes, fly ash, and bottom ash are generated from coal and biomass combustion. Fly ash is mainly composed of various metal oxides and possesses higher thermal stability. Utilization of fly ash for other industrial applications provides a cost-effective and environmentally friendly way of recycling this solid waste, significantly reducing its environmental effects. On the one hand, due to the higher stability of its major component, aluminosilicates, fly ash could be employed as catalyst support by impregnation of other active components for various reactions. On the other hand, other chemical compounds in fly ash such as Fe2O3 could also provide an active component making fly ash a catalyst for some reactions. In this paper, physicochemical properties of fly ash and its applications for heterogeneous catalysis as a catalyst support or catalyst in a variety of catalytic reactions were reviewed. Fly-ash-supported catalysts have shown good catalytic activities for H2 production, deSO(x), deNO(x), hydrocarbon oxidation,and hydrocracking, which are comparable to commercially used catalysts. As a catalyst itself, fly ash can also be effective for gas-phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds, aqueous-phase oxidation of organics, solid plastic pyrolysis, and solvent-free organic synthesis.

  2. The performance and application of fly ash modified by PDMDAAC.

    PubMed

    Cao, X Y; Yue, Q Y; Song, L Y; Li, M; Zhao, Y C

    2007-08-17

    Fly ash modification by polydimethydiallylammonium chloride (PDMDAAC) in laboratory scale was explored in this work and the adsorption performance of modified fly ash and its application in dyeing wastewater treatment were also studied. The key factors (concentration and temperature) for PDMDAAC to affect the adsorption properties of fly ash (FA) were revealed using the orthogonal test with four factors. The results indicated that the adsorption magnitude of fly ash to PDMDAAC increased due to its favorable specific surface causing the change of the surface charge nature. Hence, adsorption performance of modified fly ash on organic molecules and its ion exchange capacity are strengthened. The maximum color removal efficiency was obtained as 88.2% by modified fly ash with 2.0 g/100 mL dosage in dyeing wastewater, which is much higher than 12.5% color removal efficiency by raw fly ash with the same dosage. And, the used modified fly ash could be used for cement production as additive agent. The intensity of cement produced with 15% the modified fly ash in weight reached the Chinese Cement Standard (GB/T17671-1999), blazing a promising novel way in fly ash utilization.

  3. On Track: A University Retention Model Utilizing School Counseling Program Interns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorngren, Jill M.; Nelson, Mark D.; Baker, Larry J.; Zuck, Barbara; Koltz, Rebecca L.

    2013-01-01

    This article outlines a pilot study conducted with persisting and non-persisting students in a mid-sized public university in the West. Based on those findings, a retention initiative was developed. The study and initiative both utilize the ASCA [American School Counselor Association] framework, making a case that this model has application in…

  4. Substance misuse prevention and economic analysis: Challenges and opportunities regarding international utility

    PubMed Central

    Guyll, Max; Spoth, Richard; Cornish, Marilyn

    2013-01-01

    Economic analyses of substance misuse prevention assess the intervention cost necessary to achieve a particular outcome, and thereby provide an additional dimension for evaluating prevention programming. This paper reviews several types of economic analysis, considers how they can be applied to substance misuse prevention, and discusses challenges to enhancing their international relevance, particularly their usefulness for informing policy decisions. Important first steps taken to address these challenges are presented, including the disease burden concept and the development of generalized cost-effectiveness, advances that facilitate international policy discussions by providing a common framework for evaluating health care needs and program effects. PMID:22676560

  5. Utilization of Electrical Impedance Tomography to Detect Internal Anomalies in Southern Pine Logs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, Philip; Cooper, Jerome

    2006-03-01

    A large body of research has shown that knowledge of internal defect location in logs prior to sawing has the potential to significantly increase lumber value yield. This paper describes a relatively low-capital log scanning technique based on Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) to image anomalies interior to sawlogs. Static testing results showed that knots, juvenile and compression wood internal to logs can be detected. Although resolution is lower than that of CT and NMR technologies, the low cost of this EIT application should render it competitive.

  6. Flue gas desulfurization gypsum and fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-01

    The Cumberland Fossil Plant (CUF) is located in Stewart County, Tennessee, and began commercial operation in 1972. This is the Tennessee Valley Authority`s newest fossil (coal-burning) steam electric generating plant. Under current operating conditions, the plant burns approximately seven million tons of coal annually. By-products from the combustion of coal are fly ash, approximately 428,000 tons annually, and bottom ash, approximately 115,000 tons annually. Based on historical load and projected ash production rates, a study was initially undertaken to identify feasible alternatives for marketing, utilization and disposal of ash by-products. The preferred alternative to ensure that facilities are planned for all by-products which will potentially be generated at CUF is to plan facilities to handle wet FGD gypsum and dry fly ash. A number of different sites were evaluated for their suitability for development as FGD gypsum and ash storage facilities. LAW Engineering was contracted to conduct onsite explorations of sites to develop information on the general mature of subsurface soil, rock and groundwater conditions in the site areas. Surveys were also conducted on each site to assess the presence of endangered and threatened species, wetlands and floodplains, archaeological and cultural resources, prime farmland and other site characteristics which must be considered from an environmental perspective.

  7. Satellite Derived Volcanic Ash Product Inter-Comparison in Support to SCOPE-Nowcasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddans, Richard; Thomas, Gareth; Pavolonis, Mike; Bojinski, Stephan

    2016-04-01

    In support of aeronautical meteorological services, WMO organized a satellite-based volcanic ash retrieval algorithm inter-comparison activity, to improve the consistency of quantitative volcanic ash products from satellites, under the Sustained, Coordinated Processing of Environmental Satellite Data for Nowcasting (SCOPEe Nowcasting) initiative (http:/ jwww.wmo.int/pagesjprogjsatjscopee nowcasting_en.php). The aims of the intercomparison were as follows: 1. Select cases (Sarychev Peak 2009, Eyjafyallajökull 2010, Grimsvötn 2011, Puyehue-Cordón Caulle 2011, Kirishimayama 2011, Kelut 2014), and quantify the differences between satellite-derived volcanic ash cloud properties derived from different techniques and sensors; 2. Establish a basic validation protocol for satellite-derived volcanic ash cloud properties; 3. Document the strengths and weaknesses of different remote sensing approaches as a function of satellite sensor; 4. Standardize the units and quality flags associated with volcanic cloud geophysical parameters; 5. Provide recommendations to Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers (VAACs) and other users on how to best to utilize quantitative satellite products in operations; 6. Create a "road map" for future volcanic ash related scientific developments and inter-comparison/validation activities that can also be applied to SO2 clouds and emergent volcanic clouds. Volcanic ash satellite remote sensing experts from operational and research organizations were encouraged to participate in the inter-comparison activity, to establish the plans for the inter-comparison and to submit data sets. RAL was contracted by EUMETSAT to perform a systematic inter-comparison of all submitted datasets and results were reported at the WMO International Volcanic Ash Inter-comparison Meeting to held on 29 June - 2 July 2015 in Madison, WI, USA (http:/ /cimss.ssec.wisc.edujmeetings/vol_ash14). 26 different data sets were submitted, from a range of passive imagers and spectrometers and

  8. Utilizing Video Conferencing to Introduce an International Perspective to Foundation Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forgey, Mary Ann; Loughran, Hilda; Hansen, Johna

    2013-01-01

    Video conferencing has much potential to enrich international social work education. In this educational initiative, video conferencing was used to deliver a joint foundation social work practice class to students attending an MSW degree program both in the United States and in Ireland. Student feedback indicated that they gained an appreciation…

  9. Utilizing Video Conferencing to Introduce an International Perspective to Foundation Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forgey, Mary Ann; Loughran, Hilda; Hansen, Johna

    2013-01-01

    Video conferencing has much potential to enrich international social work education. In this educational initiative, video conferencing was used to deliver a joint foundation social work practice class to students attending an MSW degree program both in the United States and in Ireland. Student feedback indicated that they gained an appreciation…

  10. Component Exchange Community: A Model of Utilizing Research Components to Foster International Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deng, Yi-Chan; Lin, Taiyu; Kinshuk; Chan, Tak-Wai

    2006-01-01

    "One-to-one" technology enhanced learning research refers to the design and investigation of learning environments and learning activities where every learner is equipped with at least one portable computing device enabled by wireless capability. G1:1 is an international research community coordinated by a network of laboratories conducting…

  11. Structure, properties, and surfactant adsorption behavior of fly ash carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulaots, Indrek

    The objective of this research was to suggest methods by which certain problems associated with use of coal fly ash as a pozzolanic agent in concrete mixtures could be alleviated, guided by a better characterization of fly ash properties. A sample suite of eighty fly ashes was gathered from utilities across the world (mainly US-based) and included ashes from coals ranging in rank from bituminous to lignite. The widely used foam index test is used to characterize ashes with respect to their propensity to adsorb surfactants (called Air Entraining Admixtures or AEAs) used to impart freeze-thaw resistance to concrete. In ash-containing concrete mixtures, AEAs are adsorbed from the polar concrete-water solution onto non-polar unburned carbon surfaces in the ash. The AEA uptake by fly ashes only crudely correlates with the amount of carbon in the fly ash, because carbon surface area, accessibility and polarity all play a role in determining adsorption capacities. Fly ash carbon particle size distribution is also a key factor. Fine carbon particles in fly ash fractions of <106mum are responsible for about 90% of surfactant adsorption capacity. Surfactant adsorption on fly ash carbon is, in the foam index test, a dynamic process. The time of the test (typically <10 minutes) is not long enough to permit penetration of small porosity by the relatively large AEA molecules, and only the most readily available adsorption surface near the geometrical surface of the carbon particles is utilized. The nature of the foam index test was also examined, and it is recommended that a more standardized test procedure based upon pure reagents be adopted for examining the nature of fly ashes. Several possible reagents were identified. Room temperature fly ash ozonation is a powerful technique that allows increasing fly ash surface polarity in a relatively short time and thus is very effective for decreasing the AEA uptake capacity. Depending on the ozone input concentration, sample amount

  12. Geotechnical properties of ash deposits near Hilo, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wieczorek, G.F.; Jibson, R.W.; Wilson, R.C.; Buchanan-Banks, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    Two holes were hand augered and sampled in ash deposits near Hilo, Hawaii. Color, water content and sensitivity of the ash were measured in the field. The ash alternated between reddish brown and dark reddish brown in color and had water contents as high as 392%. A downhole vane shear device measured sensitivities as high as 6.9. A series of laboratory tests including grain size distribution, Atterberg limits, X-ray diffraction analysis, total carbon determination, vane shear, direct shear and triaxial tests were performed to determine the composition and geotechnical properties of the ash. The ash is very fine grained, highly plastic and composed mostly of gibbsite and amorphous material presumably allophane. The ash has a high angle of internal friction ranging from 40-43? and is classified as medium to very sensitive. A series of different ash layers was distinguished on the basis of plasticity and other geotechnical properties. Sensitivity may be due to a metastable fabric, cementation, leaching, high organic content, and thixotropy. The sensitivity of the volcanic ash deposits near Hilo is consistent with documented slope instability during earthquakes in Hawaii. The high angles of internal friction and cementation permit very steep slopes under static conditions. However, because of high sensitivity of the ash, these slopes are particularly susceptible to seismically-induced landsliding.

  13. A frictional law for volcanic ash gouge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavallée, Y.; Hirose, T.; Kendrick, J. E.; De Angelis, S.; Petrakova, L.; Hornby, A. J.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2014-08-01

    Volcanic provinces are structurally active regions - undergoing continual deformation along faults. Within such fault structures, volcanic ash gouge, containing both crystalline and glassy material, may act as a potential fault plane lubricant. Here, we investigate the frictional properties of volcanic ash gouges with varying glass fractions using a rotary shear apparatus at a range of slip rates (1.3-1300 mm/s) and axial stresses (0.5-2.5 MPa). We show that the frictional behaviour of volcanic ash is in agreement with Byerlee's friction law at low slip velocities, irrespective of glass content. The results reveal a common non-linear reduction of the friction coefficient with slip velocity and yield a frictional law for fault zones containing volcanic ash gouge. Textural analysis reveals that strain localisation and the development of shear bands are more prominent at higher slip velocities (>10 mm/s). The textures observed here are similar to those recorded in ash gouge at the surface of extrusive spines at Mount St. Helens (USA). We use the rate-weakening component of the frictional law to estimate shear-stress-resistance reductions associated with episodic seismogenic slip events that accompany magma ascent pulses. We conclude that the internal structure of volcanic ash gouge may act as a kinematic marker of exogenic dome growth.

  14. Hydrothermal reactions of fly ash. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, P.W.

    1995-12-31

    The emphasis of the work done has been to determine the reactivities of two ashes believed to be representative of those generated. A bituminous ash and a lignitic ash have been investigated. The reactions of these ashes undergo when subjected to mild hydrothermal conditions were explored. The nature of the reactions which the ashes undergo when alkaline activators, calcium hydroxide and calcium sulfate are present was also investigated. It was determined that calcium silicate hydrate, calcium aluminate hydrate, and the calcium sulfoaluminate hydrate ettringite form under these conditions. It appears 3CaO{center_dot}Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}3CaSO{sub 4}{center_dot}32H{sub 2}O (ettringite) formation needs to be considered in ashes which contain significant amounts of sulfate. Therefore the stability region for ettringite was established. It was also determined that calcium silicate hydrate, exhibiting a high internal surface area, will readily form with hydrothermal treatment between 50{degrees} and 100{degrees}C. This phase is likely to have a significant capacity to take up heavy metals and oxyanions and this ability is being explored.

  15. Improving dynamic phytoplankton reserve-utilization models with an indirect proxy for internal nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Malerba, Martino E; Heimann, Kirsten; Connolly, Sean R

    2016-09-07

    Ecologists have often used indirect proxies to represent variables that are difficult or impossible to measure directly. In phytoplankton, the internal concentration of the most limiting nutrient in a cell determines its growth rate. However, directly measuring the concentration of nutrients within cells is inaccurate, expensive, destructive, and time-consuming, substantially impairing our ability to model growth rates in nutrient-limited phytoplankton populations. The red chlorophyll autofluorescence (hereafter "red fluorescence") signal emitted by a cell is highly correlated with nitrogen quota in nitrogen-limited phytoplankton species. The aim of this study was to evaluate the reliability of including flow cytometric red fluorescence as a proxy for internal nitrogen status to model phytoplankton growth rates. To this end, we used the classic Quota model and designed three approaches to calibrate its model parameters to data: where empirical observations on cell internal nitrogen quota were used to fit the model ("Nitrogen-Quota approach"), where quota dynamics were inferred only from changes in medium nutrient depletion and population density ("Virtual-Quota approach"), or where red fluorescence emission of a cell was used as an indirect proxy for its internal nitrogen quota ("Fluorescence-Quota approach"). Two separate analyses were carried out. In the first analysis, stochastic model simulations were parameterized from published empirical relationships and used to generate dynamics of phytoplankton communities reared under nitrogen-limited conditions. Quota models were fitted to the dynamics of each simulated species with the three different approaches and the performance of each model was compared. In the second analysis, we fit Quota models to laboratory time-series and we calculate the ability of each calibration approach to describe the observed trajectories of internal nitrogen quota in the culture. Results from both analyses concluded that the

  16. FLY ASH RECYCLE IN DRY SCRUBBING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes the effects of fly ash recycle in dry scrubbing. (Previous workers have shown that the recycle of product solids improves the utilization of slaked lime--Ca(OH)2--for sulfur dioxide (SO2) removal by spray dryers with bag filters.) In laboratory-scale experimen...

  17. FLY ASH RECYCLE IN DRY SCRUBBING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes the effects of fly ash recycle in dry scrubbing. (Previous workers have shown that the recycle of product solids improves the utilization of slaked lime--Ca(OH)2--for sulfur dioxide (SO2) removal by spray dryers with bag filters.) In laboratory-scale experimen...

  18. Utilizing intentional internal resonance to achieve multi-harmonic atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Bongwon; Pettit, Chris; Dharmasena, Sajith; Keum, Hohyun; Lee, Joohyung; Kim, Jungkyu; Kim, Seok; McFarland, D Michael; Bergman, Lawrence A; Vakakis, Alexander F; Cho, Hanna

    2016-03-29

    During dynamic atomic force microscopy (AFM), the deflection of a scanning cantilever generates multiple frequency terms due to the nonlinear nature of AFM tip-sample interactions. Even though each frequency term is reasonably expected to encode information about the sample, only the fundamental frequency term is typically decoded to provide topographic mapping of the measured surface. One of main reasons for discarding higher harmonic signals is their low signal-to-noise ratio. Here, we introduce a new design concept for multi-harmonic AFM, exploiting intentional nonlinear internal resonance for the enhancement of higher harmonics. The nonlinear internal resonance, triggered by the non-smooth tip-sample dynamic interactions, results in nonlinear energy transfers from the directly excited fundamental bending mode to the higher-frequency mode and, hence, enhancement of the higher harmonic of the measured response. It is verified through detailed theoretical and experimental study that this AFM design can robustly incorporate the required internal resonance and enable high-frequency AFM measurements. Measurements on an inhomogeneous polymer specimen demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed design, namely that the higher harmonic of the measured response is capable of enhanced simultaneous topography imaging and compositional mapping, exhibiting less crosstalk with an abrupt height change.

  19. Utilizing intentional internal resonance to achieve multi-harmonic atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Bongwon; Pettit, Chris; Dharmasena, Sajith; Keum, Hohyun; Lee, Joohyung; Kim, Jungkyu; Kim, Seok; McFarland, D. Michael; Bergman, Lawrence A.; Vakakis, Alexander F.; Cho, Hanna

    2016-03-01

    During dynamic atomic force microscopy (AFM), the deflection of a scanning cantilever generates multiple frequency terms due to the nonlinear nature of AFM tip-sample interactions. Even though each frequency term is reasonably expected to encode information about the sample, only the fundamental frequency term is typically decoded to provide topographic mapping of the measured surface. One of main reasons for discarding higher harmonic signals is their low signal-to-noise ratio. Here, we introduce a new design concept for multi-harmonic AFM, exploiting intentional nonlinear internal resonance for the enhancement of higher harmonics. The nonlinear internal resonance, triggered by the non-smooth tip-sample dynamic interactions, results in nonlinear energy transfers from the directly excited fundamental bending mode to the higher-frequency mode and, hence, enhancement of the higher harmonic of the measured response. It is verified through detailed theoretical and experimental study that this AFM design can robustly incorporate the required internal resonance and enable high-frequency AFM measurements. Measurements on an inhomogeneous polymer specimen demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed design, namely that the higher harmonic of the measured response is capable of enhanced simultaneous topography imaging and compositional mapping, exhibiting less crosstalk with an abrupt height change.

  20. Proceedings: 13. international symposium on use and management of coal combustion products (CCPs). Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    1999-01-01

    The objective of the 1999 International Symposium on the Management and Use of Coal Combustion Products (CCPs), the thirteenth in a series since 1967, is to publicize innovations in coal ash use technology. These symposia support the mission of the American Coal Ash Association (established originally as the National Ash Association after the first symposium) to promote coal ash technology transfer and commercial utilization. The three-volume publication contains 91 papers, presented in 15 sessions during the January 1999 event. Volume 1 contains papers related to waste aggregates, agricultural uses, beneficiation/quality, and building products. Volume 2 covers the growing market in concrete, environmental performance, FGD material, filler applications, flowable fill, and international perspectives. Volume 3 contains papers on mining applications, regional and State perspectives, stabilized road bases, structural fills, and vitrification/solidification.

  1. Protecting black ash from the emerald ash borer

    Treesearch

    Les Benedict

    2010-01-01

    Black ash (Fraxinus nigra) is an important resource for Tribes in the Northeast and Great Lakes regions of the North American continent. Ash in North America is being threatened with widespread destruction as a result of the introduction of emerald ash borer beetle (Agrilus planipennis) in 2002. Measures are being taken to slow the spread of emerald ash borer beetle....

  2. A creative approach to the development of an agenda for knowledge utilization: outputs from the 11th international knowledge utilization colloquium (KU 11).

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Joyce E; Rycroft-Malone, Jo; Davies, Huw T O; McCormack, Brendan

    2012-12-01

    A group of researchers and practitioners interested in advancing knowledge utilization met as a colloquium in Belfast (KU 11) and used a "world café" approach to exploit the social capital and shared understanding built up over previous events to consider the research and practice agenda. We considered three key areas of relevance to knowledge use: (1) understanding the nature of research use, influence and impact; (2) blended and collaborative approaches to knowledge production and use; and (3) supporting sustainability and spread of evidence-informed innovations. The approach enabled the development of artifacts that reflected the three areas and these were analyzed using a creative hermeneutic approach. The themes that emerged and which are outlined in this commentary are not mutually exclusive. There was much overlap in the discussions and therefore of the themes, reflecting the complex nature of knowledge translation work. The agenda that has emerged from KU 11 also reflects the participatory and creative approach in which the meeting was structured and focused, and therefore emphasizes the processual, relational and contingent nature of some of the challenges we face. The past 20 years has seen an explosion in activity around understanding KU, and we have learned much about the difficulties. Whilst the agenda for the next decade may be becoming clearer, colloquia such as KU 11, using creative and engaging approaches, have a key role to play in dissecting, articulating and sharing that agenda. In this way, we also build an ever-expanding international community that is dedicated to working towards increasing the chances of success for better patient care. © 2012 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  3. Rapid field measurement of the assimilation rate versus internal CO(2) concentration relationship in green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marsh.): the influence of light intensity.

    PubMed

    Davis, J E; Arkebauer, T J; Norman, J M; Brandle, J R

    1987-12-01

    Assimilation rate (A) versus intercellular CO(2) concentration (C(i)) relationships for leaflets of five-year-old green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marsh.) trees were computed from gas exchange measurements obtained in the field with a closed-circuit, portable photosynthesis measurement system comprising an LI-6200 gas analyzer and an LI-6000 computer, (Li-Cor, Inc., Lincoln, Nebraska, USA). Observations were made over a range of light intensities achieved by attenuating direct sunlight with neutral density filters, and over a range of ambient CO(2) concentrations achieved by breathing into the assimilation chamber and then lowering the CO(2) concentration to the desired level with the LI-6200's soda-lime scrubber. Boundary layer conductance was determined by use of a leaf replica made of moist filter paper. Typically, A-C(i) curves at four light intensities were obtained in three to four hours. The initial slope (when A = 0) of the A-C(i) curve obtained at a light intensity of 1750 micromol m(-2) s(-1) (full sunlight) was similar to that obtained at a light intensity of 840 micromol m(-2) s(-1). However, when light intensity was reduced further (to 370 and 160 micromol m(-2) s(-1)), the initial slope of the A-C(i) curve also decreased, indicating that at these light intensities, assimilation was limited by photochemical energy supply, as well as CO(2) concentration.

  4. Assessment of Utilization of Food Variety on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, M. R.; Paradis, R.; Zwart, S. R.; Smith, S. M.; Kloeris, V. L.; Douglas, G. L.

    2018-01-01

    Long duration missions will require astronauts to subsist on a closed food system for at least three years. Resupply will not be an option, and the food supply will be older at the time of consumption and more static in variety than previous missions. The space food variety requirements that will both supply nutrition and support continued interest in adequate consumption for a mission of this duration is unknown. Limited food variety of past space programs (Gemini, Apollo, International Space Station) as well as in military operations resulted in monotony, food aversion, and weight loss despite relatively short mission durations of a few days up to several months. In this study, food consumption data from 10 crew members on 3-6-month International Space Station missions was assessed to determine what percentage of the existing food variety was used by crew members, if the food choices correlated to the amount of time in orbit, and whether commonalities in food selections existed across crew members. Complete mission diet logs were recorded on ISS flights from 2008 - 2014, a period in which space food menu variety was consistent, but the food system underwent an extensive reformulation to reduce sodium content. Food consumption data was correlated to the Food on Orbit by Week logs, archived Data Usage Charts, and a food list categorization table using TRIFACTA software and queries in a SQL SERVER 2012 database.

  5. Clinical utilization of genomics data produced by the international Pseudomonas aeruginosa consortium

    PubMed Central

    Freschi, Luca; Jeukens, Julie; Kukavica-Ibrulj, Irena; Boyle, Brian; Dupont, Marie-Josée; Laroche, Jérôme; Larose, Stéphane; Maaroufi, Halim; Fothergill, Joanne L.; Moore, Matthew; Winsor, Geoffrey L.; Aaron, Shawn D.; Barbeau, Jean; Bell, Scott C.; Burns, Jane L.; Camara, Miguel; Cantin, André; Charette, Steve J.; Dewar, Ken; Déziel, Éric; Grimwood, Keith; Hancock, Robert E. W.; Harrison, Joe J.; Heeb, Stephan; Jelsbak, Lars; Jia, Baofeng; Kenna, Dervla T.; Kidd, Timothy J.; Klockgether, Jens; Lam, Joseph S.; Lamont, Iain L.; Lewenza, Shawn; Loman, Nick; Malouin, François; Manos, Jim; McArthur, Andrew G.; McKeown, Josie; Milot, Julie; Naghra, Hardeep; Nguyen, Dao; Pereira, Sheldon K.; Perron, Gabriel G.; Pirnay, Jean-Paul; Rainey, Paul B.; Rousseau, Simon; Santos, Pedro M.; Stephenson, Anne; Taylor, Véronique; Turton, Jane F.; Waglechner, Nicholas; Williams, Paul; Thrane, Sandra W.; Wright, Gerard D.; Brinkman, Fiona S. L.; Tucker, Nicholas P.; Tümmler, Burkhard; Winstanley, Craig; Levesque, Roger C.

    2015-01-01

    The International Pseudomonas aeruginosa Consortium is sequencing over 1000 genomes and building an analysis pipeline for the study of Pseudomonas genome evolution, antibiotic resistance and virulence genes. Metadata, including genomic and phenotypic data for each isolate of the collection, are available through the International Pseudomonas Consortium Database (http://ipcd.ibis.ulaval.ca/). Here, we present our strategy and the results that emerged from the analysis of the first 389 genomes. With as yet unmatched resolution, our results confirm that P. aeruginosa strains can be divided into three major groups that are further divided into subgroups, some not previously reported in the literature. We also provide the first snapshot of P. aeruginosa strain diversity with respect to antibiotic resistance. Our approach will allow us to draw potential links between environmental strains and those implicated in human and animal infections, understand how patients become infected and how the infection evolves over time as well as identify prognostic markers for better evidence-based decisions on patient care. PMID:26483767

  6. In vivo Raman spectroscopy of human uterine cervix: exploring the utility of vagina as an internal control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaikh, Rubina; Dora, Tapas Kumar; Chopra, Supriya; Maheshwari, Amita; Kedar K., Deodhar; Bharat, Rekhi; Krishna, C. Murali

    2014-08-01

    In vivo Raman spectroscopy is being projected as a new, noninvasive method for cervical cancer diagnosis. In most of the reported studies, normal areas in the cancerous cervix were used as control. However, in the Indian subcontinent, the majority of cervical cancers are detected at advanced stages, leaving no normal sites for acquiring control spectra. Moreover, vagina and ectocervix are reported to have similar biochemical composition. Thus, in the present study, we have evaluated the feasibility of classifying normal and cancerous conditions in the Indian population and we have also explored the utility of the vagina as an internal control. A total of 228 normal and 181 tumor in vivo Raman spectra were acquired from 93 subjects under clinical supervision. The spectral features in normal conditions suggest the presence of collagen, while DNA and noncollagenous proteins were abundant in tumors. Principal-component linear discriminant analysis (PC-LDA) yielded 97% classification efficiency between normal and tumor groups. An analysis of a normal cervix and vaginal controls of cancerous and noncancerous subjects suggests similar spectral features between these groups. PC-LDA of tumor, normal cervix, and vaginal controls further support the utility of the vagina as an internal control. Overall, findings of the study corroborate with earlier studies and facilitate objective, noninvasive, and rapid Raman spectroscopic-based screening/diagnosis of cervical cancers.

  7. Internal efficiency of nutrient utilization: what is it and how to measure it during vegetative plant growth?

    PubMed

    Santa-María, Guillermo E; Moriconi, Jorge I; Oliferuk, Sonia

    2015-06-01

    Efficient use of the resources required by plants to sustain crop production is considered an important objective in agriculture. In this context, the idea of developing crops with an enhanced ability to utilize mineral nutrients already taken up by roots has been proposed. In recent years powerful tools that allow the association of phenotypic variation with high-resolution genetic maps of crop plants have also emerged. To take advantage of these tools, accurate methods are needed to estimate the internal efficiency of nutrient utilization (ENU) at the whole-plant level, which requires using suitable conceptual and experimental approaches. Here we highlight some inconsistencies in the definitions of ENU commonly used for ENU 'phenotyping' at the vegetative stage and suggest that it would be convenient to adopt a dynamic definition. The idea that ENU should provide information about the relationship between carbon and mineral nutrient economies mainly during the period under which growth is actually affected by low internal nutrient concentration is here advocated as a guide for the selection of adequate operational ENU formulae for the vegetative stage. The desirability of using experimental approaches that allow removal of the influence of nutrient acquisition efficiency on ENU estimations is highlighted. It is proposed that the use of simulation models could help refine the conclusions obtained through these experimental procedures. Some potential limitations in breeding for high ENU are also considered.

  8. Dewatering to stabilize fly ash disposal ponds. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Delaney, B.T.; Cluen, G.J.; Floess, C.

    1985-05-01

    The required removal of an inactive fly ash pond at the Seward Generating Station posed three related problems to Pennsylvania Electric Company. The saturated, unstable fly ash was difficult to excavate, to transport and to place on the disposal pile at slopes steep enough to be contained within the limited available storage area. This report describes: the performance of a limited field testing using a vacuum wellpoint dewatering system; the extrapolation of the test data into an overall dewatering scheme; the testing and monitoring performed on the fly ash and dewatering system during ash removal; and the recommended procedures to be used for applying the methods described to other fly ash ponds. The wellpoint system utilized at this site was capable of improving the condition of the fly ash to the extent that excavation of the ash could easily be performed with a tire mounted front end loader operating from the natural clay bottom of the pond. Of the initial twelve-foot average thickness of ash, the residual unstable material after dewatering was less than one foot thick. Hauling and disposal problems were also improved since the ash would no longer flow when being bumped. 21 refs., 56 figs., 9 tabs.

  9. Utilizing the Southwest Ultraviolet Imaging System (SwUIS) on the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindhelm, Eric; Stern, S. Alan; Ennico-Smith, Kimberly

    2013-09-01

    We present the Southwest Ultraviolet Imaging System (SwUIS), a compact, low-cost instrument designed for remote sensing observations from a manned platform in space. It has two chief configurations; a high spatial resolution mode with a 7-inch Maksutov-Cassegrain telescope, and a large field-of-view camera mode using a lens assembly. It can operate with either an intensified CCD or an electron multiplying CCD camera. Interchangeable filters and lenses enable broadband and narrowband imaging at UV/visible/near-infrared wavelengths, over a range of spatial resolution. SwUIS has flown previously on Space Shuttle flights STS-85 and STS-93, where it recorded multiple UV images of planets, comets, and vulcanoids. We describe the instrument and its capabilities in detail. The SWUIS's broad wavelength coverage and versatile range of hardware configurations make it an attractive option for use as a facility instrument for Earth science and astronomical imaging investigations aboard the International Space Station.

  10. [Spectrophotometric and visual analysis of internal dental bleaching utilizing laser and heat as catalyzing sources].

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Elaine Manso Oliveira Franco; Robazza, Carlos Roberto Colombo; Lage-Marques, José Luiz

    2002-01-01

    This experiment aimed at evaluating, in vitro, the chromatic alteration of dental crowns submitted to internal bleaching. Color alterations were evaluated by means of spectrophotometric analysis and visual observation, at the following experimental phases: initial reading (LI), after-darkening reading (LE), immediate after-bleaching reading (LC), bleaching checked after 15 days (LC15) and after 30 days (LC30). After finding the values of L* (luminosity), a* and b* (shade and saturation), which made it possible to quantify the chromatic alterations of the specimens, color differences (deltaE ) were assessed by means of the CIE Lab Program. The statistical analysis of the results did not reveal any significant difference between conventional bleaching and bleaching activated by Er:YAG laser. No statistical difference was observed between the results after 15 and 30 days, for both experimental groups.

  11. Utilization of the International Space Station for Crew Autonomous Scheduling Test (CAST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Healy, Matthew; Marquez, Jesica; Hillenius, Steven; Korth, David; Bakalyar, Laure Rush; Woodbury, Neil; Larsen, Crystal M.; Bates, Shelby; Kockler, Mikayla; Rhodes, Brooke; Moore, William E., III; Deliz, Ivonne; Kanefsky, Bob; Zheng, Jimin; Henninger, Ashley; Edhlund, Isabelle; Smith, Kate; Kockler, William; Silva-Martinez, Jackelynne

    2017-01-01

    The United States space policy is evolving toward missions beyond low Earth orbit. In an effort to meet that policy, NASA has recognized Autonomous Mission Operations (AMO) as a valuable capability. Identified within AMO capabilities is the potential for autonomous planning and replanning during human spaceflight operations. That is allowing crew members to collectively or individually participate in the development of their own schedules. Currently, dedicated mission operations planners collaborate with international partners to create daily plans for astronauts aboard the International Space Station (ISS), taking into account mission requirements, ground rules, and various vehicle and payload constraints. In future deep space operations the crew will require more independence from ground support due to communication transmission delays. Furthermore, crew members who are provided with the capability to schedule their own activities are able to leverage direct experience operating in the space environment, and possibly maximize their efficiency. CAST (Crew Autonomous Scheduling Test) is an ISS investigation designed to analyze three important hypotheses about crew autonomous scheduling. First, given appropriate inputs, the crew is able to create and execute a plan in a reasonable period of time without impacts to mission success. Second, the proximity of the planner, in this case the crew, to the planned operations increases their operational efficiency. Third, crew members are more satisfied when given a role in plan development. This paper presents the results from a single astronaut test subject who participated in five CAST sessions. The details on the operational philosophy of CAST are discussed, including the approach to crew training, selection criteria for test days, and data collection methods. CAST is a technology demonstration payload sponsored by the ISS Research Science and Technology Office, and performed by experts in Mission Operations Planning from

  12. National volcanic ash operations plan for aviation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,; ,

    2007-01-01

    The National Aviation Weather Program Strategic Plan (1997) and the National Aviation Weather Initiatives (1999) both identified volcanic ash as a high-priority informational need to aviation services. The risk to aviation from airborne volcanic ash is known and includes degraded engine performance (including flameout), loss of visibility, failure of critical navigational and operational instruments, and, in the worse case, loss of life. The immediate costs for aircraft encountering a dense plume are potentially major—damages up to $80 million have occurred to a single aircraft. Aircraft encountering less dense volcanic ash clouds can incur longer-term costs due to increased maintenance of engines and external surfaces. The overall goal, as stated in the Initiatives, is to eliminate encounters with ash that could degrade the in-flight safety of aircrews and passengers and cause damage to the aircraft. This goal can be accomplished by improving the ability to detect, track, and forecast hazardous ash clouds and to provide adequate warnings to the aviation community on the present and future location of the cloud. To reach this goal, the National Aviation Weather Program established three objectives: (1) prevention of accidental encounters with hazardous clouds; (2) reduction of air traffic delays, diversions, or evasive actions when hazardous clouds are present; and (3) the development of a single, worldwide standard for exchange of information on airborne hazardous materials. To that end, over the last several years, based on numerous documents (including an OFCMsponsored comprehensive study on aviation training and an update of Aviation Weather Programs/Projects), user forums, and two International Conferences on Volcanic Ash and Aviation Safety (1992 and 2004), the Working Group for Volcanic Ash (WG/VA), under the OFCM-sponsored Committee for Aviation Services and Research, developed the National Volcanic Ash Operations Plan for Aviation and Support of the

  13. Using coal fly ash as a support for Mn(II), Co(II) and Ni(II) and utilizing the materials as novel oxidation catalysts for 4-chlorophenol mineralization.

    PubMed

    Deka, Bharati; Bhattacharyya, K G

    2015-03-01

    In this work, Mn(II), Co(II) and Ni(II) were incorporated into waste coal fly ash used as a catalyst support by refluxing with the appropriate aqueous salt solution. The materials were calcined at 773-873 K for 5 h and the amount of divalent cations entering into the fly ash was determined by AAS measurements. Further characterization included estimation of oxides by XRF, structural properties by XRD, topographical features by SEM, surface functional groups by FT-IR, surface area and pore dimensions by BET N2-adsorption isotherms. The efficiency of the materials as environmental oxidation catalysts were tested with respect to destruction of 4-chlorophenol (4-CP) in water in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. Considered as one of the most persistent, toxic and largely applied organic compound, 4-CP enters water from the effluents of petrochemical, plastic, pesticide, kraft mill and other organochemical industries and research centers. Wet oxidation of 4-CP was tested by varying the mole ratio of 4-CP and H2O2, catalyst load, temperature, reaction time, 4-CP concentration and pH. Oxidation of 4-CP (5 × 10(-3) M or 643 mg L(-1)) was 51.1% for Mn(II)-fly ash, 58.3% for Co(II)-fly ash and 61.0% for Ni(II)-fly ash after 180 min at 323 K with 4-CP: H2O2 mole ratio of 1:1. COD load of the reaction mixture (4-CP: 5 × 10(-3) M, H2O2: 5 × 10(-3) M, catalyst load: 1.0 g L(-1), temperature 323 K, reaction time 0-240 min) decreased from 1480 to 620, 380, and 140 mg L(-1) respectively after oxidation with Mn(II)-fly ash, Co(II)-fly ash and Ni(II)-fly ash (overall COD reduction was 58.0, 74.3 and 90.5% respectively). The oxidation followed second order kinetics with the average rate coefficient of 7.9, 1.3 and 1.2 L mol(-1) min(-1) for Mn(II)-, Co(II)- and Ni(II)-fly ash. Increase in H2O2: 4-CP mole ratio from 1:1 to 20:1 (reaction time 300 min, catalyst load 1.0 g L(-1)) enhanced destruction from 52.1 to 95.6% for Mn(II)-fly ash, 58.3-95.6% for Co(II)-fly ash and from 60.4 to

  14. A high throughput spectrometer system for helium ash detection on JET

    SciTech Connect

    Hillis, D.L.; Fehling, D.T.; Bell, R.E.; Johnson, D.W.; Zastrow, K.-D.; Meigs, A.; Negus, C.; Giroud, C.; Stamp, M.

    2004-10-01

    Acquiring information about helium ash production and transport is fundamental for future burning plasma devices, such as International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, since the helium ash must be continuously removed from the plasma to prevent the dilution of the deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel. This diagnostic for future JET DT operation uses charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) in conjunction with the JET neutral heating beam to measure the helium density at 20 radial locations across the JET plasma via the 4686 A He{sup +} line and an array of heated 1 mm quartz fibers. The CXRS diagnostic utilizes a high throughput short focal length spectrometer with f/1.8 input optics, two entrance slits, a holographic transmission grating, and refractive optics. The detector is a thinned back-illuminated charge coupled device that has high quantum efficiency, a 10 MHz readout speed, and a time resolution of 5 ms.

  15. An urgent need for an EPA standard for disposal of coal ash.

    PubMed

    Lemly, A Dennis

    2014-08-01

    EPA, the White House, and electric utilities are stalled in a struggle over a proposed new rule on coal ash disposal. Although this rule is long overdue, EPA now stands on the cusp of bringing forward a landmark decision that could benefit aquatic resources in the USA for decades to come and also set an important regulatory leadership example for the international community to follow. However, multi-million dollar wildlife losses are continuing to pile up as things stall in Washington. In this commentary I use a newly reported example, Wildlife Damage Case 23, to further illustrate serious flaws in the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System that EPA's new rule can address. Case 23 provides additional impetus for EPA and the White House to move swiftly and decisively to end surface impoundment disposal of coal ash and the associated toxic impacts to wildlife.

  16. The in-situ production of ash in pyroclastic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manga, M.; Dufek, J.; Standish, D.

    2007-12-01

    Abrasion and fragmentation of pumice clasts during the propagation of pyroclastic flows has long been recognized as a potential source for the enhanced production of volcanic ash, however its relative importance has eluded quantification (Walker, 1981). The amount of ash produced in-situ can potentially affect runout distance, deposit sorting, the volume of ash introduced in the upper atmosphere, and internal pore pressure. We conduct a series of laboratory experiments on the collisional production of ash that may occur during different regimes of pyroclastic flow transport. We further parameterize the experiments of Cagnoli and Manga (2004) to determine the rate of production of frictional ash. We find that the energy of these interactions is insufficient to create a fractal particle size distribution; rather a bimodal suite of large particles and 10-100 micron ash particles are typically produced Using these laboratory experiments we can develop a subgrid model for ash production that can be included in analytical and multiphase numerical procedures to estimate the total volume of ash produced during transport. We examine numerically a range of initial flow energies and bed slopes over which the flows propagate. To simplify the problem we consider flows starting with 1 cm pumice clasts that can be broken up into 100 micron ash. We find that for most flow conditions10-20% of the initial 1 cm clasts comminutes into ash with the percentage increasing as a function of initial flow energy. Most of the ash is produced in the high-energy regions near the flow inlet, although flow acceleration on steep slopes can produce ash far from the vent. Ash produced at the frictional base of the flow and in the collisional upper regions of the flow can be redistributed through the entirety of the flow, although frictionally produced ash accumulates preferentially near its source in the bed-load. As slope increases, the relative proportion of ash generated by friction increases

  17. In situ production of ash in pyroclastic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufek, J.; Manga, M.

    2008-09-01

    Abrasion and comminution of pumice clasts during the propagation of pyroclastic flows have long been recognized as a potential source for the enhanced production of volcanic ash, however, their relative importance has eluded quantification. The amount of ash produced in situ can potentially affect runout distance, deposit sorting, the volume of ash introduced in the upper atmosphere, and internal pore pressure. We conduct a series of laboratory experiments on the collisional and frictional production of ash that may occur during different regimes of pyroclastic flow transport. Ash produced in these experiments is predominately 10-100 microns in size and has similar morphology to tephra fall ash from Plinian events. We find that collisional ash production rates are proportional to the square of impact velocity. Frictional ash production rates are a linear function of the velocity of the basal, particle-enriched bed load region of these flows. Using these laboratory experiments we develop a subgrid model for ash production that can be included in analytical and multiphase numerical procedures to estimate the total volume of ash produced during transport. We find that for most flow conditions, 10-20% of the initial clasts comminute into ash with the percentage increasing as a function of initial flow energy. Most of the ash is produced in the high-energy regions near the flow inlet, although flow acceleration on steep slopes can produce ash far from the vent. On level terrain, collisionally and frictionally produced ash generates gravity currents that detach from the main flow and can more than double the effective runout distance of these flows. Ash produced at the frictional base of the flow and in the collisional upper regions of the flow can be redistributed through the entirety of the flow, although frictionally produced ash accumulates preferentially near its source in the bed load. Flows that descend steep slopes produce the majority of their ash in the

  18. A status report on international utility-scale wind energy markets

    SciTech Connect

    Rackstraw, K.; Vaupen, S.

    1997-12-31

    AWEA`s latest ten-year projections for new installations of utility-scale wind turbines show nearly 30,000 new megawatts (MW) should be installed between the years 1997 and 2006. The study also briefly explores the potential impact of a significant event, such as a fossil fuel price spike or a strong move to slow global climate change, that could double installed new wind capacity to nearly 60,000 MW over the same period. This outlook is substantially more optimistic than last year`s (about 20,000 MW), but the numbers are somewhat skewed by rolling the outlook forward one year. In other words, the new projections cover a ten-year period beginning one year later than last year`s study. The skewing is a result of substituting the lowest year in last year`s study with the highest year in the new ten-year period (2006), when far more capacity additions can be expected. In addition, AWEA has adjusted upward the numbers for some countries, most notably Germany, Denmark, Spain, Italy, China and the US. Last year`s projections were decidedly, and purposefully, conservative but trends are such that greater optimism about future markets is justified.

  19. Interagency Operating Plan for Pacific Northwest Volcanic Ash Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osiensky, J. M.; Birch, S.

    2010-12-01

    The National Weather Service (NWS), United States Geological Survey (USGS)and Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) have partnered on the development of an operating plan for volcanic ash events in the Pacific Northwest. This plan provides an overview of integrated, multi-agency operations in response to the threat of volcanic ash in the Pacific Northwest, and describes communication links and operational actions necessary to support the NWS/USGS/FAA Volcano Hazards Program. This regional plan follows guidelines in support of the Office of the Federal Coordinator for Meteorology (OFCM) National Volcanic Ash Operations Plan for Aviation and the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) International Airways Volcano Watch (IAVW).

  20. Internalized HIV and Drug Stigmas: Interacting Forces Threatening Health Status and Health Service Utilization Among People with HIV Who Inject Drugs in St. Petersburg, Russia

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Sara E.; Dovidio, John F.; Levina, Olga S.; Uusküla, Anneli; Niccolai, Linda M.; Heimer, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Marked overlap between the HIV and injection drug use epidemics in St. Petersburg, Russia, puts many people in need of health services at risk for stigmatization based on both characteristics simultaneously. The current study examined the independent and interactive effects of internalized HIV and drug stigmas on health status and health service utilization among 383 people with HIV who inject drugs in St. Petersburg. Participants self-reported internalized HIV stigma, internalized drug stigma, health status (subjective rating and symptom count), health service utilization (HIV care and drug treatment), sociodemographic characteristics, and health/behavioral history. For both forms of internalized stigma, greater stigma was correlated with poorer health and lower likelihood of service utilization. HIV and drug stigmas interacted to predict symptom count, HIV care, and drug treatment such that individuals internalizing high levels of both stigmas were at elevated risk for experiencing poor health and less likely to access health services. PMID:26050155

  1. Internalized HIV and Drug Stigmas: Interacting Forces Threatening Health Status and Health Service Utilization Among People with HIV Who Inject Drugs in St. Petersburg, Russia.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, Sarah K; Burke, Sara E; Dovidio, John F; Levina, Olga S; Uusküla, Anneli; Niccolai, Linda M; Heimer, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Marked overlap between the HIV and injection drug use epidemics in St. Petersburg, Russia, puts many people in need of health services at risk for stigmatization based on both characteristics simultaneously. The current study examined the independent and interactive effects of internalized HIV and drug stigmas on health status and health service utilization among 383 people with HIV who inject drugs in St. Petersburg. Participants self-reported internalized HIV stigma, internalized drug stigma, health status (subjective rating and symptom count), health service utilization (HIV care and drug treatment), sociodemographic characteristics, and health/behavioral history. For both forms of internalized stigma, greater stigma was correlated with poorer health and lower likelihood of service utilization. HIV and drug stigmas interacted to predict symptom count, HIV care, and drug treatment such that individuals internalizing high levels of both stigmas were at elevated risk for experiencing poor health and less likely to access health services.

  2. Experimental aggregation of volcanic ash: the role of liquid bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, S.; Kueppers, U.; Jacob, M.; Ayris, P. M.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2015-12-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions may release vast quantities of ash. Because of its size, it has the greatest dispersal potential and can be distributed globally. Ash may pose severe risks for 1) air traffic, 2) human and animal health, 3) agriculture and 4) infrastructure. Such ash particles can however cluster and form ash aggregates that range in size from millimeters to centimeters. During their growth, weight and aerodynamic properties change. This leads to significantly changed transport and settling behavior. The physico-chemical processes involved in aggregation are quantitatively poorly constrained. We have performed laboratory ash aggregation experiments using the ProCell Lab System® of Glatt Ingenieurtechnik GmbH. Solid particles are set into motion in a fluidized bed over a range of well-controlled boundary conditions (e.g., air flow rate, gas temperature, humidity, liquid composition). In this manner we simulate the variable gas-particle flow conditions expected in eruption plumes and pyroclastic density currents. We have used 1) soda-lime glass beads as an analogue material and 2) natural volcanic ash from Laacher See Volcano (Germany). In order to influence form, size, stability and the production rate of aggregates, a range of experimental conditions (e.g., particle concentration, degree of turbulence, temperature and moisture in the process chamber and the composition of the liquid phase) have been employed. We have successfully reproduced several features of natural ash aggregates, including round, internally structured ash pellets up to 3 mm in diameter. These experimental results help to constrain the boundary conditions required for the generation of spherical, internally-structured ash aggregates that survive deposition and are preserved in the volcanological record. These results should also serve as input parameters for models of ash transport and ash mass distribution.

  3. Improved prediction and tracking of volcanic ash clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webley, Peter; Mastin, Larry

    2009-09-01

    During the past 30 years, more than 100 airplanes have inadvertently flown through clouds of volcanic ash from erupting volcanoes. Such encounters have caused millions of dollars in damage to the aircraft and have endangered the lives of tens of thousands of passengers. In a few severe cases, total engine failure resulted when ash was ingested into turbines and coating turbine blades. These incidents have prompted the establishment of cooperative efforts by the International Civil Aviation Organization and the volcanological community to provide rapid notification of eruptive activity, and to monitor and forecast the trajectories of ash clouds so that they can be avoided by air traffic. Ash-cloud properties such as plume height, ash concentration, and three-dimensional ash distribution have been monitored through non-conventional remote sensing techniques that are under active development. Forecasting the trajectories of ash clouds has required the development of volcanic ash transport and dispersion models that can calculate the path of an ash cloud over the scale of a continent or a hemisphere. Volcanological inputs to these models, such as plume height, mass eruption rate, eruption duration, ash distribution with altitude, and grain-size distribution, must be assigned in real time during an event, often with limited observations. Databases and protocols are currently being developed that allow for rapid assignment of such source parameters. In this paper, we summarize how an interdisciplinary working group on eruption source parameters has been instigating research to improve upon the current understanding of volcanic ash cloud characterization and predictions. Improved predictions of ash cloud movement and air fall will aid in making better hazard assessments for aviation and for public health and air quality.

  4. Improved prediction and tracking of volcanic ash clouds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Webley, P.; Mastin, L.

    2009-01-01

    During the past 30??years, more than 100 airplanes have inadvertently flown through clouds of volcanic ash from erupting volcanoes. Such encounters have caused millions of dollars in damage to the aircraft and have endangered the lives of tens of thousands of passengers. In a few severe cases, total engine failure resulted when ash was ingested into turbines and coating turbine blades. These incidents have prompted the establishment of cooperative efforts by the International Civil Aviation Organization and the volcanological community to provide rapid notification of eruptive activity, and to monitor and forecast the trajectories of ash clouds so that they can be avoided by air traffic. Ash-cloud properties such as plume height, ash concentration, and three-dimensional ash distribution have been monitored through non-conventional remote sensing techniques that are under active development. Forecasting the trajectories of ash clouds has required the development of volcanic ash transport and dispersion models that can calculate the path of an ash cloud over the scale of a continent or a hemisphere. Volcanological inputs to these models, such as plume height, mass eruption rate, eruption duration, ash distribution with altitude, and grain-size distribution, must be assigned in real time during an event, often with limited observations. Databases and protocols are currently being developed that allow for rapid assignment of such source parameters. In this paper, we summarize how an interdisciplinary working group on eruption source parameters has been instigating research to improve upon the current understanding of volcanic ash cloud characterization and predictions. Improved predictions of ash cloud movement and air fall will aid in making better hazard assessments for aviation and for public health and air quality. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V.

  5. Utilizing national and international registries to enhance pre-market medical device regulatory evaluation.

    PubMed

    Yue, Lilly Q; Campbell, Gregory; Lu, Nelson; Xu, Yunling; Zuckerman, Bram

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory decisions are made based on the assessment of risk and benefit of medical devices at the time of pre-market approval and subsequently, when post-market risk-benefit balance needs reevaluation. Such assessments depend on scientific evidence obtained from pre-market studies, post-approval studies, post-market surveillance studies, patient perspective information, as well as other real world data such as national and international registries. Such registries provide real world evidence and are playing a more and more important role in enhancing the safety and effectiveness evaluation of medical devices. While these registries provide large quantities of data reflecting real world practice and can potentially reduce the cost of clinical trials, challenges arise concerning (1) data quality adequate for regulatory decision-making, (2) bias introduced at every stage and aspect of study, (3) scientific validity of study designs, and (4) reliability and interpretability of study results. This article will discuss related statistical and regulatory challenges and opportunities with examples encountered in medical device regulatory reviews.

  6. Mechanism utilizing a single rocker arm for controlling an internal combustion engine valve

    SciTech Connect

    Burandt, C.O.

    1988-02-09

    This patent describes in combination with an internal combustion engine having a rotatable camshaft, a cam on the camshaft, a combustion chamber and a reciprocable valve member for opening and closing a valve port in communication with the combustion chamber, a mechanism for operating the valve member comprising a rocker arm having first and second angularly disposed and integrally connected legs. The first leg having a cam follower suface thereon having a first section thereof extending in the same general direction that the valve member reciprocates and having a second section thereof curving toward the valve member and toward the direction in which the valve member reciprocates, means mounting the rocker arm for rocking movement about a first axis, and means for shifting the first axis relative to the camshaft in also the same general direction the valve member reciprocates so that various portions of the first and second sections of the cam follower surface on the first leg are relatively engageable with the cam, sufficient shifting of the first axis in the same general direction producing a desmodromic action, and the second leg including a single portion thereof engaging the valve member so that only the single portion acts on the valve member.

  7. Methods to reduce the CO(2) concentration of educational buildings utilizing internal ventilation by transferred air.

    PubMed

    Kalema, T; Viot, M

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study is to develop internal ventilation by transferred air to achieve a good indoor climate with low energy consumption in educational buildings with constant air volume (CAV) ventilation. Both measurements of CO2 concentration and a multi-room calculation model are presented. The study analyzes how to use more efficiently the available spaces and the capacity of CAV ventilation systems in existing buildings and the impact this has on the indoor air quality and the energy consumption of the ventilation. The temperature differences can be used to create natural ventilation airflows between neighboring spaces. The behavior of temperature-driven airflows between rooms was studied and included in the calculation model. The effect of openings between neighboring spaces, such as doors or large apertures in the walls, on the CO2 concentration was studied in different classrooms. The air temperatures and CO2 concentrations were measured using a wireless, internet-based measurement system. The multi-room calculation model predicted the CO2 concentration in the rooms, which was then compared with the measured ones. Using transferred air between occupied and unoccupied spaces can noticeably reduce the total mechanical ventilation rates needed to keep a low CO2 concentration.

  8. Development of Metal Plate with Internal Structure Utilizing the Metal Injection Molding (MIM) Process

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Kwangho; Heo, Youngmoo; Park, Hyungpil; Chang, Sungho; Rhee, Byungohk

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we focus on making a double-sided metal plate with an internal structure, such as honeycomb. The stainless steel powder was used in the metal injection molding (MIM) process. The preliminary studies were carried out for the measurement of the viscosity of the stainless steel feedstock and for the prediction of the filling behavior through Computer Aided Engineering (CAE) simulation. PE (high density polyethylene (HDPE) and low density polyethylene (LDPE)) and polypropylene (PP) resins were used to make the sacrificed insert with a honeycomb structure using a plastic injection molding process. Additionally, these sacrificed insert parts were inserted in the metal injection mold, and the metal injection molding process was carried out to build a green part with rectangular shape. Subsequently, debinding and sintering processes were adopted to remove the sacrificed polymer insert. The insert had a suitable rigidity that was able to endure the filling pressure. The core shift analysis was conducted to predict the deformation of the insert part. The 17-4PH feedstock with a low melting temperature was applied. The glass transition temperature of the sacrificed polymer insert would be of a high grade, and this insert should be maintained during the MIM process. Through these processes, a square metal plate with a honeycomb structure was made. PMID:28788427

  9. Development of Metal Plate with Internal Structure Utilizing the Metal Injection Molding (MIM) Process.

    PubMed

    Shin, Kwangho; Heo, Youngmoo; Park, Hyungpil; Chang, Sungho; Rhee, Byungohk

    2013-12-12

    In this study, we focus on making a double-sided metal plate with an internal structure, such as honeycomb. The stainless steel powder was used in the metal injection molding (MIM) process. The preliminary studies were carried out for the measurement of the viscosity of the stainless steel feedstock and for the prediction of the filling behavior through Computer Aided Engineering (CAE) simulation. PE (high density polyethylene (HDPE) and low density polyethylene (LDPE)) and polypropylene (PP) resins were used to make the sacrificed insert with a honeycomb structure using a plastic injection molding process. Additionally, these sacrificed insert parts were inserted in the metal injection mold, and the metal injection molding process was carried out to build a green part with rectangular shape. Subsequently, debinding and sintering processes were adopted to remove the sacrificed polymer insert. The insert had a suitable rigidity that was able to endure the filling pressure. The core shift analysis was conducted to predict the deformation of the insert part. The 17-4PH feedstock with a low melting temperature was applied. The glass transition temperature of the sacrificed polymer insert would be of a high grade, and this insert should be maintained during the MIM process. Through these processes, a square metal plate with a honeycomb structure was made.

  10. [Professional containment methods used in psychiatry wards: justifications for their utilization, types, international practices, and perceptions].

    PubMed

    Tekkaş, Kader; Bilgin, Hülya

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this review is to examine the literature on professional containment methods, to draw attention to this important topic concerning which relevant research remains limited in our country and to offer professionals the opportunity to make evaluations utilizing holistic perspectives. Relevant, obtainable studies published within the last 15 years, but primarily after the year 2000, were included in this retrospective literature review. For this purpose a literature search was conducted via-internet based search engines, including Pubmed, Science Direct, Medline, Psychinfo, the ULAKBIM Turkish Medicine Index and the Turkish Psychiatry Index, using the keywords containment methods, psychiatry, aggression, conflict, restraint, seclusion and mental health hospitals, in different combinations. According to the literature, professional containment methods are defined as methods used to prevent harm to patients or others as a result of the patient's conflict-provoking behaviour (aggression, absconding, rule breaking, refusing medication etc.) in psychiatric wards. These methods include the use of mechanical/physical restraint, seclusion, compulsory intramuscular sedation, observation, and pro re nata (prn) medication. The type and frequency of use, views or attitudes to methods varies between different countries. Although professional containment methods are an effective management strategy, they may cause physical and psychological damage to both patient and staff. So the use of these methods in psychiatric care settings remains controversial and an ongoing source of legal and ethical dilemmas. Despite discussions, the containment methods used in the past remain present as a part of psychiatric treatment and care. There is a need for standard practice guidelines to ensure the security of patients and staff and to use those methods effectively and correctly. In conclusion, it is necessary that health care professionals be informed about preparing the new

  11. Formation of cement mortar with incineration municipal solid waste bottom ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, Ng Hooi; Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al Bakri; Hussin, Kamarudin; Jin, Tan Soo

    2017-04-01

    Product of incineration municipal solid waste bottom ash was substitute to Portland cement in construction industry. This study investigated the changes of bottom ash in Portland cement by chemical and mineralogical testing. Various substitution of bottom ash (10%, 20%, 30%, and 40%) to Portland cement was investigated. The main purpose was to clarify the mechanisms behind the formation of the cement mortar with bottom ash particles. The result indicated that the chemical and mineralogical of the cement mortar incorporating bottom ash was not significantly changed with the substitution of 10-40% bottom ash. However, the use of bottom ash minimizes the main composition of cement mortar. Overall, it was found that there is significant potential to increase the utilization of bottom ash.

  12. Physiologic Responses to Motorized and Non-Motorized Locomotion Utilizing the International Space Station Treadmill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Cassie; Lee, Stuart MC; Laughlin, Mitzi; Loehr, James; Norcross, Jason; DeWitt, John; Hagan, R. D.

    2006-01-01

    Treadmill locomotion is used onboard the International Space Station (ISS) as a countermeasure to the effects of prolonged weightlessness. The treadmill operates in two modes: motorized (T-M) and non-motorized (T-NM). Little is known about the potential physiologic differences between modes which may affect countermeasure exercise prescription. PURPOSE: To quantify heart rate (HR), oxygen consumption (VO2), perceived exertion (RPE), and blood lactate (BLa) during T-M and T-NM locomotion at 2 and 4 mph in normal ambulatory subjects. METHODS: Twenty subjects (10 men, 10 women; 31+/-5 yr, 172+/-10 cm, 68+/-13 kg, mean SD) with a treadmill peakVO2 of 45.5+/-5.4 ml/kg/min (mean+/-SD) exercised on the ground-based ISS treadmill. Following a familiarization session in each mode, subjects completed two data collection sessions, T-M and T-NM in random order, at 2 and 4 mph. Subjects attempted to complete 5 min of exercise at each speed; if they could not maintain the speed, the trial was discontinued. At least 5 minutes of rest separated each speed trial, and at least 48 hrs separated each session. VO2 was measured continuously (metabolic gas analysis), while HR (HR monitor) and RPE (Borg Chart, 6-20 scale) were recorded each min. Not all subjects completed 5 min during each condition, therefore the mean of the min 3 and 4 was taken as representative of steady-state. BLa was measured (finger stick) within 2 min post-exercise. Paired t-tests were used to test for differences (p<0.05) between treadmill modes within the same speed. RESULTS: All twenty subjects completed at least 4 min of exercise during all conditions, except T-NM 4 mph when only 11 subjects completed the minimum exercise duration. VO2, HR, RPE and BLa were significantly higher during T-NM locomotion at both speeds.

  13. Examining Factors of Acculturative Stress on International Students as They Affect Utilization of Campus-Based Health and Counseling Services at Four-Year Public Universities in Ohio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofmann, Paul N.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined factors of acculturative stress experienced by international students as they affect utilization of campus-based health and counseling services. Eight hundred thirty-eight international students studying at 11 four-year public institutions in the State of Ohio were surveyed to determine how frequently they had experienced 20…

  14. Examining Factors of Acculturative Stress on International Students as They Affect Utilization of Campus-Based Health and Counseling Services at Four-Year Public Universities in Ohio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofmann, Paul N.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined factors of acculturative stress experienced by international students as they affect utilization of campus-based health and counseling services. Eight hundred thirty-eight international students studying at 11 four-year public institutions in the State of Ohio were surveyed to determine how frequently they had experienced 20…

  15. Chemical composition and properties of ashes from combustion plants using Miscanthus as fuel.

    PubMed

    Lanzerstorfer, Christof

    2017-04-01

    Miscanthus giganteus is one of the energy crops considered to show potential for a substantial contribution to sustainable energy production. In the literature there is little data available about the chemical composition of ashes from the combustion of Miscanthus and practically no data about their physical properties. However, for handling, treatment and utilization of the ashes this information is important. In this study ashes from two biomass combustion plants using Miscanthus as fuel were investigated. The density of the ashes was 2230±35kg/m(3), which was similar to the density of ashes from straw combustion. Also the bulk densities were close to those reported for straw ashes. The flowability of the ashes was a little worse than the flowability of ashes from wood combustion. The measured heavy metal concentrations were below the usual limits for utilization of the ashes as soil conditioner. The concentrations in the bottom ash were similar to those reported for ash from forest residue combustion plants. In comparison with cyclone fly ashes from forest residue combustion the measured heavy metal concentrations in the cyclone fly ash were considerably lower. Cl(-), S and Zn were enriched in the cyclone fly ash which is also known for ashes from wood combustion. In comparison with literature data obtained from Miscanthus plant material the concentrations of K, Cl(-) and S were lower. This can be attributed to the fact that the finest fly ash is not collected by the cyclone de-dusting system of the Miscanthus combustion plants. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Comparison of Ash from PF and CFB Boilers and Behaviour of Ash in Ash Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arro, H.; Pihu, T.; Prikk, A.; Rootamm, R.; Konist, A.

    Over 90% of electricity produced in Estonia is made by power plants firing local oil shale and 25% of the boilers are of the circulating fluidised bed (CFB) variety. In 2007 approximately 6.5 million tons of ash was acquired as a byproduct of using oil shale for energy production. Approximately 1.5 million tons of that was ash from CFB boilers. Such ash is deposited in ash fields by means ofhydro ash removal.

  17. Preparing for a Global Community. Achieving an International Perspective in Higher Education. ASHE-ERIC Higher Education Report No. 2, 1992.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickert, Sarah M.

    This report discusses the response of colleges and universities in the United States to the need of graduate students to become equipped to make personal and public policy decisions as citizens of an international society. Curriculum changes are showing a tightening of foreign language standards in schools of higher education and, throughout the…

  18. Utilizing the International GeoSample Number Concept during ICDP Expedition COSC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conze, Ronald; Lorenz, Henning; Ulbricht, Damian; Gorgas, Thomas; Elger, Kirsten

    2016-04-01

    The concept of the International GeoSample Number (IGSN) was introduced to uniquely identify and register geo-related sample material, and make it retrievable via electronic media (e.g., SESAR - http://www.geosamples.org/igsnabout). The general aim of the IGSN concept is to improve accessing stored sample material worldwide, enable the exact identification, its origin and provenance, and also the exact and complete citation of acquired samples throughout the literature. The ICDP expedition COSC (Collisional Orogeny in the Scandinavian Caledonides, http://cosc.icdp-online.org) prompted for the first time in ICDP's history to assign and register IGSNs during an ongoing drilling campaign. ICDP drilling expeditions are using commonly the Drilling Information System DIS (http://doi.org/10.2204/iodp.sd.4.07.2007) for the inventory of recovered sample material. During COSC IGSNs were assigned to every drill hole, core run, core section, and sample taken from core material. The original IGSN specification has been extended to achieve the required uniqueness of IGSNs with our offline-procedure. The ICDP name space indicator and the Expedition ID (5054) are forming an extended prefix (ICDP5054). For every type of sample material, an encoded sequence of characters follows. This sequence is derived from the DIS naming convention which is unique from the beginning. Thereby every ICDP expedition has an unlimited name space for IGSN assignments. This direct derivation of IGSNs from the DIS database context ensures the distinct parent-child hierarchy of the IGSNs among each other. In the case of COSC this method of inventory-keeping of all drill cores was done routinely using the ExpeditionDIS during field work and subsequent sampling party. After completing the field campaign, all sample material was transferred to the "Nationales Bohrkernlager" in Berlin-Spandau, Germany. Corresponding data was subsequently imported into the CurationDIS used at the aforementioned core storage

  19. The 300-kV international submarine transmission line: Erie, Pennsylvania to Nanticoke, Ontario, Canada, General Public Utilities Corporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1982-05-01

    This final environmental impact statement (FEIS) was prepared by the Office of Energy Emergency Operations. The proposed action by the Department of Energy is the granting of a Presidential Permit for the construction, connection, operation, and maintenance of 69.6 kilometers (44 miles) of a +250 to +325 and -250 to -325 kilovolt (250 to 325 kV) transmission facility from the Erie West Substation to the international border. The proposed project will connect the General Public Utilities Corporation System with the Ontario Hydro System for the purpose of economic exchanges of power and increased reliability. Environmental impacts expected from construction and operation of the proposed Lake Erie Interconnection appear to be mainly transitory effects on aquatic life due to construction.

  20. Examination of the system fly ash lime calcined gypsum water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinkovic, S.; Kostic-Pulek, A.

    2007-05-01

    The feasibility of the utilization of the system fly ash lime calcined gypsum (β-hemihydrate) water (the mass ratio 2:1:2:2.5) for the production of building ceramics was investigated. The system was cured under different conditions, i.e., tap water and ambient air. It was confirmed by X-ray diffraction analysis that three hydration products (gypsum, portlandite and ettringite) were formed in the water-cured system and two (gypsum and portlandite) in the air-cured system. Due to the formation of these products, a compressive strength of 4.01 MPa in the water-cured and 7.83 MPa in air-cured system developed. When the air-cured system was exposed to three alternate heating cooling or three alternate cooling heating cycles, the compressive strength increased (from 7.83 to 9.47 and 10.55 MPa, respectively). The fly ash lime calcined gypsum water systems prepared in this work can be applied for the manufacture of products for internal walls (bricks and blocks).

  1. CO2 capture using fly ash from coal fired power plant and applications of CO2-captured fly ash as a mineral admixture for concrete.

    PubMed

    Siriruang, Chaichan; Toochinda, Pisanu; Julnipitawong, Parnthep; Tangtermsirikul, Somnuk

    2016-04-01

    The utilization of fly ash as a solid sorbent material for CO2 capture via surface adsorption and carbonation reaction was evaluated as an economically feasible CO2 reduction technique. The results show that fly ash from a coal fired power plant can capture CO2 up to 304.7 μmol/g fly ash, consisting of 2.9 and 301.8 μmol/g fly ash via adsorption and carbonation, respectively. The CO2 adsorption conditions (temperature, pressure, and moisture) can affect CO2 capture performance of fly ash. The carbonation of CO2 with free CaO in fly ashes was evaluated and the results indicated that the reaction consumed most of free CaO in fly ash. The fly ashes after CO2 capture were further used for application as a mineral admixture for concrete. Properties such as water requirement, compressive strength, autoclave expansion, and carbonation depth of mortar and paste specimens using fly ash before and after CO2 capture were tested and compared with material standards. The results show that the expansion of mortar specimens using fly ash after CO2 capture was greatly reduced due to the reduction of free CaO content in the fly ash compared to the expansion of specimens using fresh fly ash. There were no significant differences in the water requirement and compressive strength of specimens using fly ash, before and after CO2 capture process. The results from this study can lead to an alternative CO2 capture technique with doubtless utilization of fly ash after CO2 capture as a mineral admixture for concrete.

  2. Reactivity of fly ashes in a spray dryer FGD process

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, W.T.; Reed, G.D.

    1983-05-01

    During the period 1981-1982, a study was performed to determine the ability of various fly ashes to retain sulfur dioxide in a pilot plant spray dryer/fabric filter flue gas desulfurization system. This knowledge would provide design engineers with the necessary data to determine whether the fly ash from a particular utility could be used as an effective supplement or substitute for slaked lime in a spray dryer system. The study commenced with the collection of 22 fly ashes from lignite, subbituminous, and bituminous eastern and western coals. The ashes were contacted with the flue gas entering the pilot plant by two different techniques. In the first, the ashes were slurried in water and injected into the spray dryer through a spinning disk atomizer. In the second, the ashes were injected as a dry additive into the flue gas upstream of the spray dryer. Analyses were conducted to determine the ability of each ash to retain sulfur dioxide in the system followed by statistical correlations of the sulfur retention with the physical/chemical properties of each ash. 17 references, 32 figures, 19 tables.

  3. Marine Mesocosm Bacterial Colonisation of Volcanic Ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witt, V.; Cimarelli, C.; Ayris, P. M.; Kueppers, U.; Erpenbeck, D.; Dingwell, D. B.; Woerheide, G.

    2014-12-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions regularly eject large quantities of ash particles into the atmosphere, which can be deposited via fallout into oceanic environments. Such fallout has the potential to alter pH, light and nutrient availability at local or regional scales. Shallow-water coral reef ecosystems - "rainforests of the sea" - are highly sensitive to disturbances, such as ocean acidification, sedimentation and eutrophication. Therefore, ash deposition may lead to burial and mortality of such reefs. Coral reef ecosystem resilience may depend on pioneer bacterial colonisation of the ash layer, supporting subsequent establishment of the micro- and ultimately the macro-community. However, it is currently unknown which bacteria are involved in pioneer colonisation. We hypothesize that physico-chemical properties (i.e., morphology, chemistry, mineralogy) of the ash may dictate bacterial colonisation. We have tested the effect of substrate properties on bacterial diversity and abundance colonising five substrates: i) quartz sand ii) crystalline ash from the Sakurajima volcano (Japan) iii) volcanic glass iv) carbonate reef sand and v) calcite sand of similar grain size - by incubation in a controlled marine mesocosm (coral reef aquarium) under low light conditions for three months. Bacterial communities were screened every month by Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis of the 16S-23S rRNA Internal Transcribed Spacer region. Multivariate statistics revealed discrete groupings of bacterial communities on substrates of volcanic origin (ash and glass) and reef origin (three sands). Analysis Of Similarity supports significantly different communities associated with all substrates (p=0.0001), only quartz did not differ from both carbonate and calcite sands. The ash substrate exhibited the most diverse bacterial community and carried the most substrate-specific bacterial operational taxonomic units. Our findings suggest that bacterial diversity and community

  4. The distribution of ash in North America

    Treesearch

    Randall S. Morin

    2010-01-01

    Ash trees have been important to the people of North America for thousands of years. Of the nine ash species, white ash (Fraxinus americana L.) and green ash (F. pennsylvanica Marsh.) are the most widely distributed.

  5. Analysis of the Eyjafjallajökull Eruption using the WRF-Chem Model compared to Satellite-Based Ash Retrieval Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steensen, T. S.; Stuefer, M.; Webley, P.; Grell, G. A.; de Freitas, S. R.

    2010-12-01

    On April 14th, 2010, the long-dormant ice-capped volcano Eyjafjallajökull in southern Iceland exhibited a black ash-rich plume that quickly developed into an upper-tropospheric ash-cloud covering large parts of Europe grounding the majority of European air traffic for days. The emission of the ash-cloud continued for three days before the eruption turned more magmatic on April 18th. Due to a strong jet stream the plume initially drifted towards the United Kingdom and Norway with ash-fall occurring in many cities in both countries. Over the course of a week, most countries in Europe were affected by the dispersing cloud resulting in numbers of closed airports never seen before, grounded planes and confused passengers. This eruption, although small on the international scale, drew volcanic hazards into the public eye and called for better understanding of evolving volcanic plumes and their ash content. The Weather Research and Forecast model (WRF) coupled with Chemistry (Chem) has been utilized to use wind fields and chemical compositions to forecast the drift and chemical alteration of dispersed substances such as forest fires and volcanic ash and, in this study, was used to simulate the developing plume in time, based on physical input parameters of the initial plume as well as the wind patterns over Europe during April 2010. The results of this model have been compared to satellite-based ash retrieval algorithms like the Reverse Absorption Method and the Principal Component Analysis using Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data. This comparison allows both, the ratification of the model as a forecasting tool and of the satellites as an in-situ measurement. Both parts are essential components to be able to predict and analyze airborne volcanic ash and to constantly improve the hazard assessment of ash cloud forecasting to minimize the burden on the aviation community while maximizing the

  6. Use of coal ash in highway construction: Georgia demonstration project

    SciTech Connect

    Larrimore, C.L.; Pike, C.W.

    1987-06-01

    EPRI has initiated a program designed to promote ash utilization in roadways, embankments, and backfills - potentially large volume application areas. Included within the EPRI program is a Georgia study involving the development and construction of a demonstration project in which several types of ash were used as major components in highway pavement construction. The primary objective is to plan, design, build and monitor the structural and environmental aspects of a full-scale application of ash in a highway pavement. All planning, design, and construction activities are completed and have been fully described in this report. Both structural and environmental monitorings are in progress and will be reported at the conclusion of study.

  7. Comparison of acid-detergent lignin, alkaline-peroxide lignin, and acid-detergent insoluble ash as internal markers for predicting fecal output and digestibility by cattle offered bermudagrass hays of varying nutrient composition

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The potential for acid-detergent insoluble ash (ADIA), alkaline-peroxide lignin (APL), and acid-detergent lignin (ADL) to predict fecal output (FO) and dry matter digestibility (DMD) by cattle offered bermudagrass [Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers.] hays of different qualities was evaluated. Eight ruminally cannulated cows (594 ± 35.5 kg) were allocated randomly to 4 hay diets: low (L), medium low (ML), medium high (MH), and high (H) crude protein (CP) concentration (79, 111, 131, and 164 g CP/kg on a DM basis, respectively). Diets were offered in 3 periods with 2 diet replicates per period and were rotated across cows between periods. Cows were individually fed 20 g DM/kg of body weight in equal feedings at 08:00 and 16:00 h for a 10-d adaptation followed by a 5-d total fecal collection. Actual DM intake (DMI), DMD, and FO were determined based on hay offered, ort, and feces excreted. These components were then analyzed for ADL, APL, and ADIA concentration to determine marker recovery and marker-based estimates of FO and DMD. Results Forage DMI was affected by diet (P = 0.02), and DMI from MH and H was greater (P < 0.05) than from L. Apparent DMD tended (P = 0.08) to differ among diets while FO (P = 0.20) was not affected by diet treatments. Average ADL recovery (1.16) was greater (P < 0.05) than that of ADIA (1.03) and APL (1.06), but ADIA and APL did not differ (P = 0.42). Estimates of FO and DMD derived using APL and ADIA were not different (P ≥ 0.05) from total fecal collection while those using ADL differed (P < 0.05). There was no diet by marker interaction (P ≥ 0.22) for either FO or DMD. Conclusion Acid-detergent insoluble ash and APL accurately predicted FO and DMD of cattle fed bermudagrass hay of varying nutrient composition. These internal markers may facilitate studies involving large numbers of animals and forages. Results from such studies may be used to develop improved equations to predict energy values of

  8. Ashes to ashes: Large Fraxinus germplasm collections and their fates

    Treesearch

    Kim C. Steiner; Paul. Lupo

    2010-01-01

    As the emerald ash borer (EAB) threatens the survival of our ash species, measures should be taken to preserve their genetic variability in the event that we discover a way to restore populations destroyed by the beetle. As it happens, large germplasm collections exist for our most important and widely distributed eastern species of the genus, white ash (...

  9. Emerald ash borer aftermath forests: the future of ash ecosystems

    Treesearch

    Kathleen S. Knight; Daniel A. Herms; John Cardina; Robert Long; Kamal J.K. Gandhi; Catharine P. Herms

    2011-01-01

    The effects of emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis) on forest ecosystems are being studied through a collaborative research program between the U.S. Forest Service and The Ohio State University. We are monitoring ash demographics, understory light availability, EAB population dynamics, native and non-native plants, and effects of ash...

  10. Effective use of fly ash slurry as fill material.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, S; Kawaguchi, M; Yasuhara, K

    2000-09-15

    A lot of effort has been put into increasing coal ash utilization; however, 50% of total amount is disposed of on land and in the sea. Several attempts have been reported recently concerning slurried coal fly ash use for civil engineering materials, such as for structural fill and backfill. The authors have studied this issue for more than 15 years and reported its potential for (1) underwater fills, (2) light weight backfills, and (3) light weight structural fills, through both laboratory tests and construction works. This paper is an overview of the results obtained for slurry, focusing on the following. (1) Coal fly ash reclaimed by slurry placement shows lower compressibility, higher ground density, and higher strength than by the other methods. This higher strength increases stability against liquefaction during earthquake. (2) Higher stability of the fly ash ground formed by slurry placement is caused by higher density and its self-hardening property. (3) Stability of fly ash reclaimed ground can be increased by increasing density and also by strength enhancement by cement addition. (4) Technical data obtained through a man-made island construction project shows the advantages of fly ash slurry in terms of mechanical properties such as higher stability against sliding failure, sufficient ground strength, and also in terms of cost saving. (5) Concentration in leachates from the placed slurry is lower than the Japanese environmental law. (6) In order to enlarge the fly ash slurry application toward a lightweight fill, mixtures of air foam, cement and fly ash were examined. Test results shows sufficient durability of this material against creep failure. This material was then used as lightweight structural fill around a high-rise building, and showed sufficient quality. From the above data, it can be concluded that coal fly ash slurry can be effectively utilized in civil engineering projects.

  11. Fly Ash Characteristics and Carbon Sequestration Potential

    SciTech Connect

    Palumbo, Anthony V.; Amonette, James E.; Tarver, Jana R.; Fagan, Lisa A.; McNeilly, Meghan S.; Daniels, William L.

    2007-07-20

    Concerns for the effects of global warming have lead to an interest in the potential for inexpensive methods to sequester carbon dioxide (CO2). One of the proposed methods is the sequestration of carbon in soil though the growth of crops or forests.4,6 If there is an economic value placed on sequestration of carbon dioxide in soil there may be an an opportunity and funding to utilize fly ash in the reclamation of mine soils and other degraded lands. However, concerns associated with the use of fly ash must be addressed before this practice can be widely adopted. There is a vast extent of degraded lands across the world that has some degree of potential for use in carbon sequestration. Degraded lands comprise nearly 2 X 109 ha of land throughout the world.7 Although the potential is obviously smaller in the United States, there are still approximately 4 X 106 ha of degraded lands that previously resulted from mining operations14 and an additional 1.4 X 108 ha of poorly managed lands. Thus, according to Lal and others the potential is to sequester approximately 11 Pg of carbon over the next 50 years.1,10 The realization of this potential will likely be dependent on economic incentives and the use of soil amendments such as fly ash. There are many potential benefits documented for the use of fly ash as a soil amendment. For example, fly ash has been shown to increase porosity, water-holding capacity, pH, conductivity, and dissolved SO42-, CO32-, HCO3-, Cl- and basic cations, although some effects are notably decreased in high-clay soils.8,13,9 The potential is that these effects will promote increased growth of plants (either trees or grasses) and result in greater carbon accumulation in the soil than in untreated degraded soils. This paper addresses the potential for carbon sequestration in soils amended with fly ash and examines some of the issues that should be considered in planning this option. We describe retrospective studies of soil carbon accumulation on

  12. Automated system for removal and pneumatic transport of fly ash from electric precipitator hoppers

    SciTech Connect

    V.K. Konovalov; O.V. Yashkin; V.V. Ermakov

    2008-03-15

    A system for removal and pneumatic transport of fly ash is examined, in which air pulses act on batches (pistons) of ash formed in a duct. Studies are made of the effect of several physical parameters on the force required to displace a piston of ash and these serve as a basis for choosing a system for removal and pneumatic transport of ash simultaneously from several hoppers of an electric precipitator. This makes it possible to separate the ash particles according to size without introducing additional components. Formulas are given for calculating the structural and dynamic parameters of this system and measurements of indirect dynamic parameters are used to calculate the input-output characteristics of the system. In order to optimize the system, configurations for summing several ducts into a single transport duct for pneumatic ash transport are proposed. Some variants of dry ash utilization and the advantages of producing of size-separated particles are considered.

  13. Infrasonic source parameters for stratospheric volcanic ash injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffke, A. M.; Fee, D.; Garces, M.; Arnoult, K.

    2009-12-01

    Dispersion models and remote sensing techniques are used to project and track hazards to the aviation community created by volcanic ash plumes. Currently, remote sensing data is analyzed to determine eruption onset, duration, and plume heights that are in turn used in ash dispersion models. However these methods have limitations caused by the temporal resolution of satellite sensors and large volcanic plumes obscuring the vent after the eruption onset. More accurate constraints of the eruption onset, intensity, and duration are necessary for improved forecasting of volcanic plume dispersion. We show how International Monitoring System (IMS) infrasound array data can be utilized to remotely detect the onset of large volcanic eruptions. Infrasound data were acquired for the recent (2008-2009) Kasatochi, Okmok, and Redoubt eruptions. At least six IMS stations clearly recorded the 7-8 August 2008 Kasatochi eruption with I53 (Fairbanks, AK), I18 (Greenland), I59 (Kona, Hawai’i) recording the clearest signals. Three distinct acoustic pulses, with durations of hours, correlate well with satellite imagery collected during the Kasatochi eruption. Acoustically derived onsets, intensities, and durations of the eruption pulses are broadly consistent with those derived from satellite and seismic observations, although some discrepancies exist. Of the three pulses recorded the second pulse was the most energetic with acoustic energy concentrated in the infrasonic very long period (IVLP) band (0.01 - 0.1 Hz). Sustained IVLP signals have previously indicated tropospheric to stratospheric ash emissions (Garces et al., 2008; Fee et al., submitted; Steffke et al., submitted). We also present comparable results for Okmok and Redoubt volcanoes. Preliminary results indicate the acoustic spectra of eruptions that produced stratospheric ash injections are similar to those of man-made jets, as observed at Tungurahua and Mount St. Helens Volcanoes by Matoza et al., 2009. Acoustically

  14. Third International Congress on Soldiers' Physical Performance: Translating State-of-the-Science Soldier Research for Operational Utility.

    PubMed

    Nindl, Bradley C; Sharp, Marilyn A

    2015-11-01

    The Third International Congress on Soldiers' Physical Performance (ICSPP) was held on August 18-21, 2014 in Boston, MA, where it had a record attendance of 374 registrants from 27 countries. The Congress included 8 invited keynote lectures, 12 symposia, 1 featured science session, more than 200 oral and poster free communication sessions, 8 thematic poster sessions, and a Warfighter Readiness Roundtable. Collectively, the presentations focused on a fundamental premise that soldiers are the center of warfighting capability, and the human service member is the prime resource and key enabler of all warfighting systems. The intent of the ICSPP series is to focus on the soldier-the individual service member. As we move forward with focus placed on the human dimension of soldiering, the key to our scientific success and what will prove to be transformative will be the extent to which we can operationalize and disseminate our scientific knowledge for the benefit of our soldiers on the ground. The Congress fostered important scientific exchange, and dialog centered on improving military physical performance and readiness. As countries around the globe respond to current and emerging threats to their national security, it is increasingly clear that we must ensure optimal human performance of our military personnel. By taking advantage of the science and applications of physical fitness and injury prevention research, we can leverage our increased understanding for the optimal application of physical readiness processes while minimizing the injury risk potential. We believe that the continued scientific and evidence-based dialog across international partners will prove to be transformative in identifying the most effective strategies for human performance optimization in the 21st century. Innovation, leveraging current state-of-the-science, and international partnerships were all key themes throughout the Congress. From the ICSPP scientific program, it was clear that there

  15. Chemical constraints on fly ash glass compositions

    SciTech Connect

    John H. Brindle; Michael J. McCarthy

    2006-12-15

    The major oxide content and mineralogy of 75 European fly ashes were examined, and the major element composition of the glass phase was obtained for each. Correlation of compositional trends with the glass content of the ash was explored. Alkali content was deduced to have a major influence on glass formation, and this in turn could be related to the probable chemistry of clay minerals in the source coals. Maximal glass content corresponded to high aluminum content in the glass, and this is in accordance with the theoretical mechanism of formation of aluminosilicate glasses, in which network-modifying oxides are required to promote tetrahedral coordination of aluminum in glass chain structures. Iron oxide was found to substitute for alkali oxides where the latter were deficient, and some indications of preferred eutectic compositions were found. The work suggests that the proportion of the glass phase in the ash can be predicted from the coal mineralogy and that the utility of a given ash for processing into geopolymers or zeolites is determined by its source. 23 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Circle of Ashes

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-04-05

    This plot shows that a pulsar, the remnant of a stellar explosion, is surrounded by a disk of its own ashes. The disk, revealed by the two data points at the far right from NASA Spitzer Space Telescope, is the first ever found around a pulsar.

  17. Emerald Ash Borer

    Treesearch

    Deborah G. McCullough; Steven A. Katovich

    2004-01-01

    An exotic beetle from Asia was discovered in July 2002 feeding on ash (Fraxinus spp.) trees in southeastern Michigan. It was identified as Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae). Larvae feed in the cambium between the bark and wood, producing galleries that eventually girdle and kill branches and entire trees. Evidence suggests that A. planipennis has...

  18. Correlating Ground-Based Lightning Measurements with Ash Cloud Satellite Data from the 2010 Eruption of Eyjafjallajökull Volcano, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahon, N. D.; Thomas, R. J.; Pavolonis, M. J.; Sieglaff, J.; Aster, R. C.

    2012-12-01

    Airborne volcanic ash is a major aviation hazard. For example, the 2010 eruption of Eyjafjallajökull volcano in Iceland resulted in the largest air-traffic shutdown since World War II. More than 100,000 flights were grounded, stranding passengers in Europe and across the globe, and producing a multi-billion dollar economic impact. Because of the high impact on aviation, sophisticated tools are needed to provide real-time alerts, tracking, and forecasting of volcanic clouds. In an attempt address the 5-minute volcanic cloud warning criteria established by the international aviation community, an automated volcanic cloud alert system for the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite - R Series (GOES-R) built upon the automated ash cloud alert system for the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) is in development. The new system will be capable of identifying ash and SO2 clouds with greater accuracy. One component of GOES-R will be a lightning mapper. To study the temporal, spatial, and physical relationships between ash clouds and lightning, and the utility of lightning detection in a real-time alert system, we analyze data collected by the Lightning Mapping Array, a ground-based lightning detection network, in conjunction with satellite data gathered by the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) instrument aboard Meteosat-9 during in the 2010 eruption of Eyjafjallajökull volcano. We correlate lightning characteristics, intensity, and distribution with plume location, height, mass loading, and effective particle radius. Lightning mapping in volcanic ash clouds potentially will allow for better characterization of the ash cloud and aid in forecasting the distribution of ash and its effects on aviation.

  19. Optimizing and Characterizing Geopolymers from Ternary Blend of Philippine Coal Fly Ash, Coal Bottom Ash and Rice Hull Ash.

    PubMed

    Kalaw, Martin Ernesto; Culaba, Alvin; Hinode, Hirofumi; Kurniawan, Winarto; Gallardo, Susan; Promentilla, Michael Angelo

    2016-07-15

    Geopolymers are inorganic polymers formed from the alkaline activation of amorphous alumino-silicate materials resulting in a three-dimensional polymeric network. As a class of materials, it is seen to have the potential of replacing ordinary Portland cement (OPC), which for more than a hundred years has been the binder of choice for structural and building applications. Geopolymers have emerged as a sustainable option vis-à-vis OPC for three reasons: (1) their technical properties are comparable if not better; (2) they can be produced from industrial wastes; and (3) within reasonable constraints, their production requires less energy and emits significantly less CO₂. In the Philippines, the use of coal ash, as the alumina- and silica- rich geopolymer precursor, is being considered as one of the options for sustainable management of coal ash generation from coal-fired power plants. However, most geopolymer mixes (and the prevalent blended OPC) use only coal fly ash. The coal bottom ash, having very few applications, remains relegated to dumpsites. Rice hull ash, from biomass-fired plants, is another silica-rich geopolymer precursor material from another significantly produced waste in the country with only minimal utilization. In this study, geopolymer samples were formed from the mixture of coal ash, using both coal fly ash (CFA) and coal bottom ash (CBA), and rice hull ash (RHA). The raw materials used for the geopolymerization process were characterized using X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF) for elemental and X-ray diffraction (XRD) for mineralogical composition. The raw materials' thermal stability and loss on ignition (LOI) were determined using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and reactivity via dissolution tests and inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP) analysis. The mechanical, thermal and microstructural properties of the geopolymers formed were analyzed using compression tests, Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning

  20. Optimizing and Characterizing Geopolymers from Ternary Blend of Philippine Coal Fly Ash, Coal Bottom Ash and Rice Hull Ash

    PubMed Central

    Kalaw, Martin Ernesto; Culaba, Alvin; Hinode, Hirofumi; Kurniawan, Winarto; Gallardo, Susan; Promentilla, Michael Angelo

    2016-01-01

    Geopolymers are inorganic polymers formed from the alkaline activation of amorphous alumino-silicate materials resulting in a three-dimensional polymeric network. As a class of materials, it is seen to have the potential of replacing ordinary Portland cement (OPC), which for more than a hundred years has been the binder of choice for structural and building applications. Geopolymers have emerged as a sustainable option vis-à-vis OPC for three reasons: (1) their technical properties are comparable if not better; (2) they can be produced from industrial wastes; and (3) within reasonable constraints, their production requires less energy and emits significantly less CO2. In the Philippines, the use of coal ash, as the alumina- and silica- rich geopolymer precursor, is being considered as one of the options for sustainable management of coal ash generation from coal-fired power plants. However, most geopolymer mixes (and the prevalent blended OPC) use only coal fly ash. The coal bottom ash, having very few applications, remains relegated to dumpsites. Rice hull ash, from biomass-fired plants, is another silica-rich geopolymer precursor material from another significantly produced waste in the country with only minimal utilization. In this study, geopolymer samples were formed from the mixture of coal ash, using both coal fly ash (CFA) and coal bottom ash (CBA), and rice hull ash (RHA). The raw materials used for the geopolymerization process were characterized using X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF) for elemental and X-ray diffraction (XRD) for mineralogical composition. The raw materials’ thermal stability and loss on ignition (LOI) were determined using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and reactivity via dissolution tests and inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP) analysis. The mechanical, thermal and microstructural properties of the geopolymers formed were analyzed using compression tests, Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning

  1. Lunar ash flows - Isothermal approximation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pai, S. I.; Hsieh, T.; O'Keefe, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    Suggestion of the ash flow mechanism as one of the major processes required to account for some features of lunar soil. First the observational background and the gardening hypothesis are reviewed, and the shortcomings of the gardening hypothesis are shown. Then a general description of the lunar ash flow is given, and a simple mathematical model of the isothermal lunar ash flow is worked out with numerical examples to show the differences between the lunar and the terrestrial ash flow. The important parameters of the ash flow process are isolated and analyzed. It appears that the lunar surface layer in the maria is not a residual mantle rock (regolith) but a series of ash flows due, at least in part, to great meteorite impacts. The possibility of a volcanic contribution is not excluded. Some further analytic research on lunar ash flows is recommended.

  2. Size distribution of rare earth elements in coal ash

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, Clinton T.; Deonarine, Amrika; Kolker, Allan; Adams, Monique; Holland, James F.

    2015-01-01

    Rare earth elements (REEs) are utilized in various applications that are vital to the automotive, petrochemical, medical, and information technology industries. As world demand for REEs increases, critical shortages are expected. Due to the retention of REEs during coal combustion, coal fly ash is increasingly considered a potential resource. Previous studies have demonstrated that coal fly ash is variably enriched in REEs relative to feed coal (e.g, Seredin and Dai, 2012) and that enrichment increases with decreasing size fractions (Blissett et al., 2014). In order to further explore the REE resource potential of coal ash, and determine the partitioning behavior of REE as a function of grain size, we studied whole coal and fly ash size-fractions collected from three U.S commercial-scale coal-fired generating stations burning Appalachian or Powder River Basin coal. Whole fly ash was separated into , 5 um, to 5 to 10 um and 10 to 100 um particle size fractions by mechanical shaking using trace-metal clean procedures. In these samples REE enrichments in whole fly ash ranges 5.6 to 18.5 times that of feedcoals. Partitioning results for size separates relative to whole coal and whole fly ash will also be reported. 

  3. Thermal behaviour of ESP ash from municipal solid waste incinerators.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y; Xiao, Y; Wilson, N; Voncken, J H L

    2009-07-15

    Stricter environmental regulations demand safer treatment and disposal of incinerator fly ashes. So far no sound technology or a process is available for a sustainable and ecological treatment of the waste incineration ashes, and only partial treatment is practised for temporary and short-term solutions. New processes and technology need to be developed for comprehensive utilization and detoxification of the municipal solid waste (MSW) incinerator residues. To explore the efficiency of thermal stabilisation and controlled vitrification, the thermal behaviour of electrostatic precipitator (ESP) ash was investigated under controlled conditions. The reaction stages are identified with the initial moisture removal, volatilization, melting and slag formation. At the temperature higher than 1100 degrees C, the ESP ashes have a quicker weight loss, and the total weight loss reaches up to 52%, higher than the boiler ash. At 1400 degrees C a salt layer and a homogeneous glassy slag were formed. The effect of thermal treatment on the leaching characteristics of various elements in the ESP ash was evaluated with the availability-leaching test. The leaching values of the vitrified slag are significantly lowered than that of the original ash.

  4. Sonic enhanced ash agglomeration and sulfur capture. Technical progress report, January 1992--March 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    This program will demonstrate the effectiveness of a unique approach which uses a bimodal distribution composed of large sorbent particles and fine fly ash particles to enhance ash agglomeration and sulfur capture at conditions found in direct coal-fired turbines. Under the impact of high-intensity sound waves, sorbent reactivity and utilization, it is theorized, will increase while agglomerates of fly ash and sorbents are formed which are readily collected in commercial cyclones.

  5. Optimized Replicating Renilla Luciferase Reporter HIV-1 Utilizing Novel Internal Ribosome Entry Site Elements for Native Nef Expression and Function.

    PubMed

    Alberti, Michael O; Jones, Jennifer J; Miglietta, Riccardo; Ding, Haitao; Bakshi, Rakesh K; Edmonds, Tara G; Kappes, John C; Ochsenbauer, Christina

    2015-12-01

    We previously developed replication-competent reporter HIV-1 (referred to herein as LucR.T2A reporter viruses), utilizing a "ribosome skipping" T2A peptide strategy to link Renilla luciferase (LucR) with Nef expression. The demonstrated utility for HIV-1 vaccine and transmission study applications included measurement of neutralizing antibody (NAb) activity in vaccine sera, improved cell-mediated virus inhibition assays, such as T cell-mediated virus inhibition and antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) assays, and humanized mouse models. Herein, we extend our prior work and introduce reporter virus technology for applications that require fully functional Nef. We demonstrate that in CD4(+) T cells productively infected with LucR.T2A reporter viruses, T2A peptide-driven Nef expression and function, such as down-regulation of surface CD4 and MHC-I, were impaired. We overcame this limitation of LucR.T2A reporter viruses and achieved physiological Nef expression and function by engineering novel LucR reporter HIV-1 comprising 11 different internal ribosome entry site (IRES) elements chosen for size and relative activity. A range of Nef expression was observed in 293T cells transfected with the different LucR.IRES reporter virus constructs. Iteratively, we identified IRES reporter genomes that expressed Nef closest to physiological levels and produced virus with infectivity, titers, and replication kinetics similar to nonreporter viruses. Our results demonstrated that LucR reporter activity was stable over multiple replication cycles in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Furthermore, we analyzed Nef functionality, i.e., down-modulation of MHC-I and CD4, following infection of T cell lines and PBMCs. Unlike LucR.T2A reporter virus, one of the redesigned LucR.IRES reporter viruses [containing the modified encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) 6ATR IRES element, "6ATRi"] demonstrated Nef expression and function similar to parental "nonreporter" virus

  6. Utilizing Web 2.0 to Provide an International Experience for Pre-Service Elementary Education Teachers--The IPC Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ausband, Leigh T.; Schultheis, Klaudia

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes an international project completed by groups of pre-service elementary education students in four countries. Students utilized Web 2.0 technologies to design and conduct a study on a topic of their choosing related to curriculum and instruction, in elementary schools. This paper also presents results of a survey given to two…

  7. Fly ash based zeolitic pigments for application in anticorrosive paints

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, Ruchi Tiwari, Sangeeta

    2016-04-13

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate the utilization of waste fly ash in anticorrosive paints. Zeolite NaY was synthesized from waste fly ash and subsequently modified by exchanging its nominal cation Na{sup +} with Mg{sup 2+} and Ca{sup 2+} ions. The metal ion exchanged zeolite was then used as anticorrosive zeolitic pigments in paints. The prepared zeolite NaY was characterized using X-Ray diffraction technique and Scanning electron microscopy. The size, shape and density of the prepared fly ash based pigments were determined by various techniques. The paints were prepared by using fly ash based zeolitic pigments in epoxy resin and the percentages of pigments used in paints were 2% and 5%. These paints were applied to the mild steel panels and the anticorrosive properties of the pigments were assessed by the electrochemical spectroscopy technique (EIS).

  8. Fly ash based zeolitic pigments for application in anticorrosive paints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Ruchi; Tiwari, Sangeeta

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate the utilization of waste fly ash in anticorrosive paints. Zeolite NaY was synthesized from waste fly ash and subsequently modified by exchanging its nominal cation Na+ with Mg2+ and Ca2+ ions. The metal ion exchanged zeolite was then used as anticorrosive zeolitic pigments in paints. The prepared zeolite NaY was characterized using X-Ray diffraction technique and Scanning electron microscopy. The size, shape and density of the prepared fly ash based pigments were determined by various techniques. The paints were prepared by using fly ash based zeolitic pigments in epoxy resin and the percentages of pigments used in paints were 2% and 5%. These paints were applied to the mild steel panels and the anticorrosive properties of the pigments were assessed by the electrochemical spectroscopy technique (EIS).

  9. Development and utility of an internal threshold control (ITC) real-time PCR assay for exogenous DNA detection.

    PubMed

    Ni, Weiyi; Le Guiner, Caroline; Moullier, Philippe; Snyder, Richard O

    2012-01-01

    Sensitive and specific tests for detecting exogenous DNA molecules are useful for infectious disease diagnosis, gene therapy clinical trial safety, and gene doping surveillance. Taqman real-time PCR using specific sequence probes provides an effective approach to accurately and quantitatively detect exogenous DNA. However, one of the major challenges in these analyses is to eliminate false positive signals caused by either non-targeted exogenous or endogenous DNA sequences, or false negative signals caused by impurities that inhibit PCR. Although multiplex Taqman PCR assays have been applied to address these problems by adding extra primer-probe sets targeted to endogenous DNA sequences, the differences between targets can lead to different detection efficiencies. To avoid these complications, a Taqman PCR-based approach that incorporates an internal threshold control (ITC) has been developed. In this single reaction format, the target sequence and ITC template are co-amplified by the same primers, but are detected by different probes each with a unique fluorescent dye. Sample DNA, a prescribed number of ITC template molecules set near the limit of sensitivity, a single pair of primers, target probe and ITC probe are added to one reaction. Fluorescence emission signals are obtained simultaneously to determine the cycle thresholds (Ct) for amplification of the target and ITC sequences. The comparison of the target Ct with the ITC Ct indicates if a sample is a true positive for the target (i.e. Ct less than or equal to the ITC Ct) or negative (i.e. Ct greater than the ITC Ct). The utility of this approach was demonstrated in a nonhuman primate model of rAAV vector mediated gene doping in vivo and in human genomic DNA spiked with plasmid DNA.

  10. Development and Utility of an Internal Threshold Control (ITC) Real-Time PCR Assay for Exogenous DNA Detection

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Weiyi; Le Guiner, Caroline; Moullier, Philippe; Snyder, Richard O.

    2012-01-01

    Sensitive and specific tests for detecting exogenous DNA molecules are useful for infectious disease diagnosis, gene therapy clinical trial safety, and gene doping surveillance. Taqman real-time PCR using specific sequence probes provides an effective approach to accurately and quantitatively detect exogenous DNA. However, one of the major challenges in these analyses is to eliminate false positive signals caused by either non-targeted exogenous or endogenous DNA sequences, or false negative signals caused by impurities that inhibit PCR. Although multiplex Taqman PCR assays have been applied to address these problems by adding extra primer-probe sets targeted to endogenous DNA sequences, the differences between targets can lead to different detection efficiencies. To avoid these complications, a Taqman PCR-based approach that incorporates an internal threshold control (ITC) has been developed. In this single reaction format, the target sequence and ITC template are co-amplified by the same primers, but are detected by different probes each with a unique fluorescent dye. Sample DNA, a prescribed number of ITC template molecules set near the limit of sensitivity, a single pair of primers, target probe and ITC probe are added to one reaction. Fluorescence emission signals are obtained simultaneously to determine the cycle thresholds (Ct) for amplification of the target and ITC sequences. The comparison of the target Ct with the ITC Ct indicates if a sample is a true positive for the target (i.e. Ct less than or equal to the ITC Ct) or negative (i.e. Ct greater than the ITC Ct). The utility of this approach was demonstrated in a nonhuman primate model of rAAV vector mediated gene doping in vivo and in human genomic DNA spiked with plasmid DNA. PMID:22570718

  11. Rapid Quantitative Analysis of Microcystins in Raw Surface Waters with MALDI MS Utilizing Easily Synthesized Internal Standards

    PubMed Central

    Roegner, Amber F.; Schirmer, Macarena Pírez; Puschner, Birgit; Brena, Beatriz; Gonzalez-Sapienza, Gualberto

    2014-01-01

    The freshwater cyanotoxins, microcystins (MCs), pose a global public health threat as potent hepatotoxins in cyanobacterial blooms; their persistence in drinking and recreational water has been associated with potential chronic effects in addition to acute intoxications. Rapid and accurate detection of the over 80 structural congeners is challenged by the rigorous and time consuming clean up required to overcome interference found in raw water samples. MALDI-MS has shown promise for rapid quantification of individual congeners in raw water samples, with very low operative cost, but so far limited sensitivity and lack of available and versatile internal standards (ISs) has limited its use. Two easily synthesized S-hydroxyethyl–Cys(7)-MC-LR and –RR ISs were used to generate linear standard curves in a reflectron MALDI instrument, reproducible across several orders of magnitude for MC –LR, - RR and –YR. Minimum quantification limits in direct water samples with no clean up or concentration step involved were consistently below 7 μg/L, with recoveries from spiked samples between 80 and 119%. This method improves sensitivity by 30 fold over previous reports of quantitative MALDI-TOF applications to MCs and provides a salient option for rapid throughput analysis for multiple MC congeners in untreated raw surface water blooms as a means to identify source public health threats and target intervention strategies within a watershed. As demonstrated by analysis of a set of samples from Uruguay, utilizing the reaction of different MC congeners with alternate sulfhydryl compounds, the m/z of the IS can be customized to avoid overlap with interfering compounds in local surface water samples. PMID:24388801

  12. International.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoover, Linn

    1979-01-01

    The International Geological Correlation Project has attained scientific maturity and broad support and participation by geologists world wide. Its purpose is to provide a mechanism for international cooperation and information exchange about geological problems that transcend national boundaries. (Author/BB)

  13. The cumulative ash curve: a best tool to evaluate complete mill performance.

    PubMed

    Sakhare, Suresh D; Inamdar, Aashitosh A

    2014-04-01

    Slick test is carried out by a flour miller to qualitatively segregate the flour from different streams in a roller flour mill. This test is done manually by pressing flour samples on tray using thin bladed paddle (the slick) and inspecting color or dress of the sample. However, the test is subjective and totally depends on human judgment. Cumulative ash curve relates to cumulative flour ash content and cumulative flour yield, which could help a flour miller to be more precise while selecting flour streams for different needs. In this study, cleaning and conditioning of wheat was carried out in the pilot plant of International School of Milling Technology (ISMT). Further, roller flour milling of wheat was done. Flour from different streams (four breaks, five reductions) was collected. Each flour stream was analyzed for ash content using standard AACC methods. The analytical values of ash content were used to plot the cumulative ash curve. It was found that ash content increased in the break passages from first to last break, with exception of first break (ash content 0.71%). An increase in percentage of ash was observed in the reduction passages (C1 to C5), however, C3 ash (0.76%) was slightly higher than that of C4 (0.65%). Higher yield of flour with minimum ash content was obtained from the front reduction passages C1 and C2; whereas, the break passages and the tail end reduction passages produce less flour with higher ash content.

  14. International nuclear nonproliferation pressure and Japan's domestic policy response: A comparison of plutonium utilization policies in the 1970s and the 1990s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hahn-Kyu

    1997-10-01

    This study seeks to explain Japan's different policy responses to international nuclear nonproliferation pressures in the 1970s and the 1990s. It argues that Japan's different responses were not only a consequence of the changing international environment but also the result of the changing domestic political context, specifically, the altered relationship between the government and nuclear power industry and the nature of the policymaking structure. In the 1970s, Japan met severe nonproliferation pressure from the US to stop operations at the Tokai reprocessing plant. At the time the Japanese government and nuclear power industry shared the view that Japan should develop plutonium utilization programs to enhance its energy security. There was also very weak domestic opposition to the plutonium utilization policy. With such strong domestic political base, the Japanese government was able to continue its plutonium utilization policy without major change despite the strong US pressure. In the early 1990s, Japan's shipment of plutonium from France created strong international criticisms of its plutonium programs on the nonproliferation and environment grounds. In 1994 Japan made some important changes in its plutonium utilization policy in response to the international pressures. However, the major impetus behind the policy change was the reduced commitment of the nuclear power industry to plutonium utilization programs. Antinuclear forces also expanded their participation in the policymaking process by politicizing the plutonium issue. This study hopes to contribute to the literature of Japanese political studies by explaining how the interaction between international and domestic politics affects Japanese policymaking, by examining how and when Japan's policies can change under foreign pressure, and by illuminating the more dynamic and pluralistic aspects of Japanese politics in the 1990s.

  15. ASH EMISSIVITY CHARACTERIZATION AND PREDICTION

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher J. Zygarlicke; Donald P. McCollor; Charlene R. Crocker

    1999-12-01

    The increased use of western subbituminous coals has generated concerns regarding highly reflective ash disrupting heat transfer in the radiant zone of pulverized-fuel boilers. Ash emissivity and reflectivity is primarily a function of ash particle size, with reflective deposits expected to consist of very small refractory ash materials such as CaO, MgO, or sulfate materials such as Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. For biomass fuels and biomass-coal blends, similar reflectivity issues may arise as a result of the presence of abundant organically associated calcium and potassium, which can transform during combustion to fine calcium, and potassium oxides and sulfates, which may act as reflective ash. The relationship of reflectivity to ash chemistry is a second-order effect, with the ash particle size distribution and melting point being determined by the size and chemistry of the minerals present in the starting fuel. Measurement of the emission properties of ash and deposits have been performed by several research groups (1-6) using both laboratory methods and measurements in pilot- and full-scale combustion systems. A review of the properties and thermal properties of ash stresses the important effect of ash deposits on heat transfer in the radiant boiler zone (1).

  16. Volcanic ash melting under conditions relevant to ash turbine interactions

    PubMed Central

    Song, Wenjia; Lavallée, Yan; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Kueppers, Ulrich; Cimarelli, Corrado; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2016-01-01

    The ingestion of volcanic ash by jet engines is widely recognized as a potentially fatal hazard for aircraft operation. The high temperatures (1,200–2,000 °C) typical of jet engines exacerbate the impact of ash by provoking its melting and sticking to turbine parts. Estimation of this potential hazard is complicated by the fact that chemical composition, which affects the temperature at which volcanic ash becomes liquid, can vary widely amongst volcanoes. Here, based on experiments, we parameterize ash behaviour and develop a model to predict melting and sticking conditions for its global compositional range. The results of our experiments confirm that the common use of sand or dust proxy is wholly inadequate for the prediction of the behaviour of volcanic ash, leading to overestimates of sticking temperature and thus severe underestimates of the thermal hazard. Our model can be used to assess the deposition probability of volcanic ash in jet engines. PMID:26931824

  17. Volcanic ash melting under conditions relevant to ash turbine interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Wenjia; Lavallée, Yan; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Kueppers, Ulrich; Cimarelli, Corrado; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2016-03-01

    The ingestion of volcanic ash by jet engines is widely recognized as a potentially fatal hazard for aircraft operation. The high temperatures (1,200-2,000 °C) typical of jet engines exacerbate the impact of ash by provoking its melting and sticking to turbine parts. Estimation of this potential hazard is complicated by the fact that chemical composition, which affects the temperature at which volcanic ash becomes liquid, can vary widely amongst volcanoes. Here, based on experiments, we parameterize ash behaviour and develop a model to predict melting and sticking conditions for its global compositional range. The results of our experiments confirm that the common use of sand or dust proxy is wholly inadequate for the prediction of the behaviour of volcanic ash, leading to overestimates of sticking temperature and thus severe underestimates of the thermal hazard. Our model can be used to assess the deposition probability of volcanic ash in jet engines.

  18. Chemical composition and physical properties of filter fly ashes from eight grate-fired biomass combustion plants.

    PubMed

    Lanzerstorfer, Christof

    2015-04-01

    For the handling, treatment and utilization of fly ash from biomass combustion its chemical composition and physical properties are important. In this study eight filter fly ashes from different grate-fired biomass combustion plants were investigated. In fly ash from straw combustion high concentrations of (K) were found, whereas in the fly ash from wood combustion the concentrations of Ca and Mg were higher. The average concentration of PO4(3-) was similar in both types of fly ashes. In all wood fly ashes some measured heavy metal concentrations were above the limits for utilization. The straw fly ashes were much less contaminated and can be utilized. For wood fly ash most parameters showed little variation, except from one fly ash where the dust pre-separator is in poor condition. The average values were: mass median diameter 4.3±0.8 μm, spread of particle size distribution 19±11, particle density 2620±80 kg/m3 and angle of repose 50°±1°. The density of the straw fly ashes is lower (2260±80 kg/m3) and the spread of the size distribution is higher (72±24). For one straw combustion fly ash the values of the mass median diameter and the angle of repose were similar to the values of wood combustion fly ash, for the other straw fly ash the values differed considerably. While the particle size of this fly ash was much smaller, surprisingly the angle of repose was also lower. This can be attributed to the formation of small agglomerates in this fly ash, which were not disintegrated without a certain stress.

  19. Modeling volcanic ash dispersal

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Explosive volcanic eruptions inject into the atmosphere large amounts of volcanic material (ash, blocks and lapilli). Blocks and larger lapilli follow ballistic and non-ballistic trajectories and fall rapidly close to the volcano. In contrast, very fine ashes can remain entrapped in the atmosphere for months to years, and may affect the global climate in the case of large eruptions. Particles having sizes between these two end-members remain airborne from hours to days and can cover wide areas downwind. Such volcanic fallout entails a serious threat to aircraft safety and can create many undesirable effects to the communities located around the volcano. The assessment of volcanic fallout hazard is an important scientific, economic, and political issue, especially in densely populated areas. From a scientific point of view, considerable progress has been made during the last two decades through the use of increasingly powerful computational models and capabilities. Nowadays, models are used to quantify hazard scenarios and/or to give short-term forecasts during emergency situations. This talk will be focused on the main aspects related to modeling volcanic ash dispersal and fallout with application to the well known problem created by the Eyjafjöll volcano in Iceland. Moreover, a short description of the main volcanic monitoring techniques is presented.

  20. Modeling volcanic ash dispersal

    SciTech Connect

    2010-10-22

    Explosive volcanic eruptions inject into the atmosphere large amounts of volcanic material (ash, blocks and lapilli). Blocks and larger lapilli follow ballistic and non-ballistic trajectories and fall rapidly close to the volcano. In contrast, very fine ashes can remain entrapped in the atmosphere for months to years, and may affect the global climate in the case of large eruptions. Particles having sizes between these two end-members remain airborne from hours to days and can cover wide areas downwind. Such volcanic fallout entails a serious threat to aircraft safety and can create many undesirable effects to the communities located around the volcano. The assessment of volcanic fallout hazard is an important scientific, economic, and political issue, especially in densely populated areas. From a scientific point of view, considerable progress has been made during the last two decades through the use of increasingly powerful computational models and capabilities. Nowadays, models are used to quantify hazard scenarios and/or to give short-term forecasts during emergency situations. This talk will be focused on the main aspects related to modeling volcanic ash dispersal and fallout with application to the well known problem created by the Eyjafjöll volcano in Iceland. Moreover, a short description of the main volcanic monitoring techniques is presented.

  1. Circle of Ashes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Circle of Ashes

    This plot tells astronomers that a pulsar, the remnant of a stellar explosion, is surrounded by a disk of its own ashes. The disk, revealed by the two data points at the far right from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope, is the first ever found around a pulsar. Astronomers believe planets might rise up out of these stellar ashes.

    The data in this plot, or spectrum, were taken by ground-based telescopes and Spitzer. They show that light from around the pulsar can be divided into two categories: direct light from the pulsar, and light from the dusty disk swirling around the pulsar. This excess light was detected by Spitzer's infrared array camera. Dust gives off more infrared light than the pulsar because it's cooler.

    The pulsar, called 4U 0142+61, was once a massive star, until about 100,000 years ago, when it blew up in a supernova explosion and scattered dusty debris into space. Some of that debris was captured into what astronomers refer to as a 'fallback disk,' now circling the leftover stellar core, or pulsar. The disk resembles protoplanetary disks around young stars, out of which planets are thought to be born.

    The data have been corrected to remove the effects of light scattering from dust that lies between Earth and the pulsar.

    The ground-based data is from the Keck I telescope atop Mauna Kea, Hawaii.

  2. Melting Behavior of Volcanic Ash relevant to Aviation Ash Hazard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, W.; Hess, K.; Lavallee, Y.; Cimarelli, C.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2013-12-01

    Volcanic ash is one of the major hazards caused by volcanic eruptions. In particular, the threat to aviation from airborne volcanic ash has been widely recognized and documented. In the past 12 years, more than 60 modern jet airplanes, mostly jumbo jets, have been damaged by drifting clouds of volcanic ash that have contaminated air routes and airport facilities. Seven of these encounters are known to have caused in-flight loss of engine power to jumbo jets carrying a total of more than 2000 passengers. The primary cause of engine thrust loss is that the glass in volcanic ash particles is generated at temperatures far lower than the temperatures in the combustion chamber of a jet engine ( i.e. > 1600 oC) and when the molten volcanic ash particles leave this hottest section of the engine, the resolidified molten volcanic ash particles will be accumulated on the turbine nozzle guide vanes, which reduced the effective flow of air through the engine ultimately causing failure. Thus, it is essential to investigate the melting process and subsequent deposition behavior of volcanic ash under gas turbine conditions. Although few research studies that investigated the deposition behavior of volcanic ash at the high temperature are to be found in public domain, to the best our knowledge, no work addresses the formation of molten volcanic ash. In this work, volcanic ash produced by Santiaguito volcano in Guatemala in November 8, 2012 was selected for study because of their recent activity and potential hazard to aircraft safety. We used the method of accessing the behavior of deposit-forming impurities in high temperature boiler plants on the basis of observations of the change in shape and size of a cylindrical coal ash to study the sintering and fusion phenomena as well as determine the volcanic ash melting behavior by using characteristic temperatures by means of hot stage microscope (HSM), different thermal analysis (DTA) and Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) to

  3. An atlas of volcanic ash

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heiken, G.

    1974-01-01

    Volcanic ash samples collected from a variety of recent eruptions were studied, using petrography, chemical analyses, and scanning electron microscopy to characterize each ash type and to relate ash morphology to magma composition and eruption type. The ashes are best placed into two broad genetic categories: magnetic and hydrovolcanic (phreatomagmatic). Ashes from magmatic eruptions are formed when expanding gases in the magma form a froth that loses its coherence as it approaches the ground surface. During hydrovolcanic eruptions, the magma is chilled on contact with ground or surface waters, resulting in violent steam eruptions. Within these two genetic categories, ashes from different magma types can be characterized. The pigeon hole classification used here is for convenience; there are eruptions which are driven by both phreatic and magmatic gases.

  4. Ash in the Soil System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, P.

    2012-04-01

    Ash is the organic and inorganic residue produced by combustion, under laboratory and field conditions. This definition is far away to be accepted. Some researchers consider ash only as the inorganic part, others include also the material not completely combusted as charcoal or biochar. There is a need to have a convergence about this question and define clear "what means ash". After the fire and after spread ash onto soil surface, soil properties can be substantially changed depending on ash properties, that can be different according to the burned residue (e.g wood, coal, solid waste, peppermill, animal residues), material treatment before burning, time of exposition and storage conditions. Ash produced in boilers is different from the produced in fires because of the material diferent propertie and burning conditions. In addition, the ash produced in boilers is frequently treated (e.g pelletization, granulation, self curing) previously to application, to reduce the negative effects on soil (e.g rapid increase of pH, mycorrhiza, fine roots of trees and microfauna). These treatments normally reduce the rate of nutrients dissolution. In fires this does not happen. Thus the implications on soil properties are logically different. Depending on the combustion temperature and/or severity, ash could have different physical (e.g texture, wettability) and chemical properties (e.g amount and type of total and leached nutrients) and this will have implications on soil. Ash can increase and decrease soil aggregation, wettablity and water retention, bulk density, runoff and water infiltration. Normally, ash increases soil pH, Electrical Conductivity, and the amount of some basic nutrients as calcium, magnesium, sodium and potassium. However it is also a potential source of heavy metals, especially if ash pH is low. However the effect of ash on soil in space and time depends especially of the ash amount and characteristics, fire temperature, severity, topography, aspect

  5. The structure of submicron ash from combustion of pulverized South African and Colombian coals

    SciTech Connect

    Kauppinen, E.I.; Lind, T.M.; Valmarui, T.; Ylaetalo, S.; Jokiniemi, J.K.; Powell, Q.; Gurav, A.S.; Kodas, T.T.; Mohr, M.

    1996-12-31

    The formation of submicron ash particles during the utility-scale pulverized combustion of South African Klein Kopie and Colombian El Dorado coals was studied by measuring the ash particle number and mass size distributions in the size range 0.01--1 {micro}m upstream of the electrostatic precipitator (ESP). Ash morphology, composition and microstructure were studied by high resolution scanning and transmission electron microscopes (SEM and TEM). The authors propose new mechanisms for the formation of submicron agglomerated ash particles in pulverized coal-fired boiler flames.

  6. Volcanic ash infrared signature: realistic ash particle shapes compared to spherical ash particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kylling, A.; Kahnert, M.; Lindqvist, H.; Nousiainen, T.

    2013-10-01

    The reverse absorption technique is often used to detect volcanic clouds from thermal infrared satellite measurements. From these measurements particle size and mass loading may also be estimated using radiative transfer modelling. The radiative transfer modelling usually assumes that the ash particles are spherical. We calculate thermal infrared optical properties of highly irregular and porous ash particles and compare these with mass- and volume-equivalent spherical models. Furthermore, brightness temperatures pertinent to satellite observing geometry are calculated for the different ash particle shapes. Non-spherical shapes and volume-equivalent spheres are found to produce a detectable ash signal for larger particle sizes than mass-equivalent spheres. The assumption of mass-equivalent spheres for ash mass loading estimates will underestimate the mass loading by several tens of percent compared to morphologically complex inhomogeneous ash particles.

  7. INVESTIGATION OF AMMONIA ADSORPTION ON FLY ASH DUE TO INSTALLATION OF SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    G.F. Brendel; J.E. Bonetti; R.F. Rathbone; R.N. Frey Jr.

    2000-11-01

    This report summarizes an investigation of the potential impacts associated with the utilization of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems at coal-fired power plants. The study was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Emission Control By-Products Consortium, Dominion Generation, the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research and GAI Consultants, Inc. SCR systems are effective in reducing nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions as required by the Clean Air Act (CAA) Amendments. However, there may be potential consequences associated with ammonia contamination of stack emissions and combustion by-products from these systems. Costs for air quality, landfill and pond environmental compliance may increase significantly and the marketability of ash may be seriously reduced, which, in turn, may also lead to increased disposal costs. The potential impacts to air, surface water, groundwater, ash disposal, ash utilization, health and safety, and environmental compliance can not be easily quantified based on the information presently available. The investigation included: (1) a review of information and data available from published and unpublished sources; (2) baseline ash characterization testing of ash samples produced from several central Appalachian high-volatile bituminous coals from plants that do not currently employ SCR systems in order to characterize the ash prior to ammonia exposure; (3) an investigation of ammonia release from fly ash, including leaching and thermal studies; and (4) an evaluation of the potential impacts on plant equipment, air quality, water quality, ash disposal operations, and ash marketing.

  8. Effect of the Additives on the Desulphurization Rate of Flash Hydrated and Agglomerated CFB Fly Ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, D. X.; Li, H. L.; Xu, M.; Lu, J. F.; Liu, Q.; Zhang, J. S.; Yue, G. X.

    CFB fly ash from separators was mixed with water or the mixture of water and additives under the temperature of 363K by use of a blender. Then, this compound of fly ash and water or additives was pumped into a CFB combustion chamber by a sludge pump. Because the temperature of flue gas was high in CFB, the fly ash was hydrated fast and agglomerated in the same time. Through this process, the size of agglomerating fly ash is larger than the original particle and the relative residence time of agglomerated fly ash in CFB becomes longer. Therefore, the rate of utility of calcium in fly ash improves and the content of carbon in fly ash decreases. This results in a low Ca/S and low operational cost for CFB boiler. The additive is one key factor, which affects the rate of desulfurization of agglomerated fly ash. Effect of different additives on rate of desulfurization is not same. Cement and limestone are beneficiated to sulfur removal of agglomerated fly ash, but sodium silicate does not devote to the rate of sulfur removal of agglomerated fly ash.

  9. Study on Type C Coal Fly ash as an Additive to Molding Sand for Steel Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palaniappan, Jayanthi

    2017-04-01

    Study of physio-chemical properties studies such as granulometric analysis, moisture, X ray fluorescence etc. were performed with Type C coal—combustion fly ash to investigate their potential as a distinct option for molding sand in foundry, thereby reducing the dependency on latter. Technological properties study such as compressive strength, tensile strength, permeability and compaction of various compositions of fly ash molding sand (10, 20 and 30 % fly ash substitute to chemically bonded sand) were performed and compared with silica molding sand. Steel casting production using this fly ash molding sand was done and the casting surface finish and typical casting parameters were assessed. It was noted that a good quality steel casting could be produced using type C fly ash molding sand, which effectively replaced 20 % of traditional molding sand and binders thereby providing greater financial profits to the foundry and an effective way of fly ash utilization (waste management).

  10. Potential use of fly ash to soil treatment in the Morava region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulíková, Lucia; Kresta, František; Rochovanský, Martin

    2017-09-01

    Soil treatment by binders is a standard technology and leads to optimal utilization of excavated soils in road constructions. Soil treatment is controlled in the Czech Republic by EN 14227-15 and Technical Requirement TP 94. Soil treatment using fly ash has not been performed in the Czech Republic, although there is a sufficient normative base. Fly ash produced by burning of hard coal in the Moravian region was tested as a potential binder. Fly ash samples were mixed with loess loams (CI). Tested siliceous fly ash of class F (ASTM C618) did not showed hydraulic properties but it showed positive effect on reducing maximum dry density of mixtures, increasing the IBI value (Immediate bearing index) and decreasing tendency to volume changes when the amount of fly ash was increased. The results of laboratory tests demonstrate the possibility of using fly ashes as a binder for soil treatment.

  11. Study on Type C Coal Fly ash as an Additive to Molding Sand for Steel Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palaniappan, Jayanthi

    2016-05-01

    Study of physio-chemical properties studies such as granulometric analysis, moisture, X ray fluorescence etc. were performed with Type C coal—combustion fly ash to investigate their potential as a distinct option for molding sand in foundry, thereby reducing the dependency on latter. Technological properties study such as compressive strength, tensile strength, permeability and compaction of various compositions of fly ash molding sand (10, 20 and 30 % fly ash substitute to chemically bonded sand) were performed and compared with silica molding sand. Steel casting production using this fly ash molding sand was done and the casting surface finish and typical casting parameters were assessed. It was noted that a good quality steel casting could be produced using type C fly ash molding sand, which effectively replaced 20 % of traditional molding sand and binders thereby providing greater financial profits to the foundry and an effective way of fly ash utilization (waste management).

  12. Ash, the emerald ash borer, and private forest land management

    Treesearch

    Tom. Crowe

    2010-01-01

    Forest management through emerald ash borer (EAB) will be a dynamic process that will change based on the best information available at the time. Management decisions will depend on the anticipated time of EAB arrival; the diameter and number of ash present in the forest stand; the diameter and number of other desirable and undesirable species present in the stand (...

  13. Ash level meter for a fixed-bed coal gasifier

    DOEpatents

    Fasching, George E.

    1984-01-01

    An ash level meter for a fixed-bed coal gasifier is provided which utilizes the known ash level temperature profile to monitor the ash bed level. A bed stirrer which travels up and down through the extent of the bed ash level is modified by installing thermocouples to measure the bed temperature as the stirrer travels through the stirring cycle. The temperature measurement signals are transmitted to an electronic signal process system by an FM/FM telemetry system. The processing system uses the temperature signals together with an analog stirrer position signal, taken from a position transducer disposed to measure the stirrer position to compute the vertical location of the ash zone upper boundary. The circuit determines the fraction of each total stirrer cycle time the stirrer-derived bed temperature is below a selected set point, multiplies this fraction by the average stirrer signal level, multiplies this result by an appropriate constant and adds another constant such that a 1 to 5 volt signal from the processor corresponds to a 0 to 30 inch span of the ash upper boundary level. Three individual counters in the processor store clock counts that are representative of: (1) the time the stirrer temperature is below the set point (500.degree. F.), (2) the time duration of the corresponding stirrer travel cycle, and (3) the corresponding average stirrer vertical position. The inputs to all three counters are disconnected during any period that the stirrer is stopped, eliminating corruption of the measurement by stirrer stoppage.

  14. The effect of fly ash and coconut fibre ash as cement replacement materials on cement paste strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayuaji, R.; Kurniawan, R. W.; Yasin, A. K.; Fatoni, H. AT; Lutfi, F. M. A.

    2016-04-01

    Concrete is the backbone material in the construction field. The main concept of the concrete material is composed of a binder and filler. Cement, concrete main binder highlighted by environmentalists as one of the industry are not environmentally friendly because of the burning of cement raw materials in the kiln requires energy up to a temperature of 1450° C and the output air waste CO2. On the other hand, the compound content of cement that can be utilized in innovation is Calcium Hydroxide (CaOH), this compound will react with pozzolan material and produces additional strength and durability of concrete, Calcium Silicate Hydrates (CSH). The objective of this research is to explore coconut fibers ash and fly ash. This material was used as cement replacement materials on cement paste. Experimental method was used in this study. SNI-03-1974-1990 is standard used to clarify the compressive strength of cement paste at the age of 7 days. The result of this study that the optimum composition of coconut fiber ash and fly ash to substitute 30% of cement with 25% and 5% for coconut fibers ash and fly ash with similar strength if to be compared normal cement paste.

  15. Sewage sludge ash to phosphorus fertiliser (II): Influences of ash and granulate type on heavy metal removal.

    PubMed

    Mattenberger, H; Fraissler, G; Jöller, M; Brunner, T; Obernberger, I; Herk, P; Hermann, L

    2010-01-01

    Ashes from monoincineration of sewage sludge suggest themselves as an ideal base for inorganic fertiliser production due to their relatively high phosphorus (P)-content. However, previously they need to be detoxified by reducing their heavy metal content. The core process considered in this paper consists of three steps: mixing of the ashes with suitable chlorine-containing additives, granulation of the mixture and thermochemical treatment in a rotary kiln. Here relevant heavy metal compounds are first transformed into volatile species with the help of the additives and then evaporated from the granules. In this study two chemically different ashes and their mixture were agglomerated to two different granulate types, briquettes and rolled pellets. The resulting six different materials were subjected to thermal treatment at different temperatures. The heavy metals examined were Cu and Zn due to their strong dependence on treatment conditions and their relevance concerning thermal treatment of sewage sludge ashes. Besides, the behaviour of Cl and K was monitored and evaluated. The experiments showed that ash type and temperature are more influential on Cl and heavy metal chemistry than granulate type. Temperature is a primary variable for controlling removal in both cases. Cu removal was less dependent on both ash and granulate type than Zn. The Cl utilization was more effective for Cu than for Zn. Depending on the treatment conditions some K could be retained, whereas always all P remained in the treated material. This satisfies the requirement for complete P recycling.

  16. Future Developments in Modeling and Monitoring of Volcanic Ash Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonadonna, Costanza; Folch, Arnau; Loughlin, Sue

    2011-03-01

    IAVCEI-WMO Workshop on Ash Dispersal Forecast and Civil Aviation; Geneva, Switzerland, 18-20 October 2010; The April-May 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption brought to light the harmful effects of volcanic ash on civil aviation and the importance of robust ash forecasting based on the combination of numerical weather prediction (NWP), volcanic ash transport and dispersal models (VATDMs), and data acquisition. The Workshop on Ash Dispersal Forecast and Civil Aviation has produced a consensual document describing the characteristics and range of application of different VATDMs, identifying the needs of the modeling community, investigating new data acquisition strategies, and discussing how to improve communication between the volcanology community and operational agencies. The workshop was held at the World Meteorological Organization's (WMO) Geneva headquarters under the sponsorship of the Faculty of Sciences of the University of Geneva, the International Association of Volcanology and Chemistry of the Earth's Interior (IAVCEI), and the canton of Geneva and was organized by scientists from the University of Geneva (Switzerland), the Barcelona Supercomputing Center (Spain), the Aeronautical Meteorology Division of the WMO, and the British Geological Survey (United Kingdom). Fifty-two volcanologists, meteorologists, atmospheric dispersion modelers, and space- and ground-based monitoring specialists from 12 different countries were gathered (attendance was by invitation only), including representatives from six Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers (VAACs) and related institutions.

  17. Biogas purification with biomass ash.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Delgado Juárez, M; Mostbauer, P; Knapp, A; Müller, W; Tertsch, S; Bockreis, A; Insam, H

    2017-10-07

    The aim of the study was to investigate the option to purify biogas from small-scale biogas plants by entrapping CO2 and H2S with regionally available biomass ash. Connected to the existing biogas plant Neustift (Tyrol) wood ash placed in a 1 m(3) container was used as a trap for CO2 and H2S in the biogas. With the process conditions chosen, for a period of a few hours CO2 was trapped resulting in pure methane. The removal of H2S was much longer-lasting (up to 34 d). The cumulative H2S uptake by the biomass ash ranged from 0.56 to 1.25 kg H2S per ton of ash. The pH of the ash and the leachability of Lead and Barium were reduced by the flushing with biogas, however toxicity towards plants was increased thus reducing the potential of ash use in agriculture. It can be concluded that biomass ash may be used for removal of hydrogen sulphide from biogas in small and medium biogas plants. The economic evaluation, however, indicated that the application of this system is limited by transport distances for the ash and its potential use afterwards. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Emerald ash borer flight potential

    Treesearch

    Robin A. Taylor; Leah S. Bauer; Deborah L. Miller; Robert A. Haack

    2005-01-01

    The emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), is an invasive pest of ash trees (Fraxinus spp.) that is rapidly spreading from the probable introduction site in Detroit, Michigan. The rapid spread to areas outside Michigan is undoubtedly due to phoretic transport on nursery stock, logs, and...

  19. Volcanic ash - Terrestrial versus extraterrestrial

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okeefe, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    A principal difference between terrestrial and extraterrestrial lavas may consist in the greater ability of terrestrial lavas to form thin films (like those of soap bubbles) and hence foams. It would follow that, in place of the pumice and spiny shards found in terrestrial volcanic ash, an extraterrestrial ash should contain minute spherules. This hypothesis may help to explain lunar microspherules.

  20. Incineration and incinerator ash processing

    SciTech Connect

    Blum, T.W.

    1991-01-01

    Parallel small-scale studies on the dissolution and anion exchange recovery of plutonium from Rocky Flats Plant incinerator ash were conducted at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and at the Rocky Flats Plant. Results from these two studies are discussed in context with incinerator design considerations that might help to mitigate ash processing related problems. 11 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  1. Emerald Ash Borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, is an invasive beetle from Asia that has caused large scale ash (Fraxinus spp.) mortality in North America. This book chapter reviews the taxonomy, biology, life history of this invasive pest and its associated natural enemies in both its native ...

  2. Emerald ash borer life cycle

    Treesearch

    Leah S. Bauer; Robert A. Haack; Deborah L. Miller; Toby R. Petrice; Houping Liu

    2004-01-01

    The emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), native to several Asian countries, was discovered in southeastern Michigan and nearby Ontario in June of 2002. EAB was identified as the cause of extensive ash (Fraxinus spp.) mortality in approximately 2,500 mi2, and...

  3. Emerald ash borer biological control

    Treesearch

    Leah Bauer; Juli Gould; Jian Duan; Mike. Ulyshen

    2011-01-01

    Emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis), an invasive buprestid from northeast Asia, was identified in 2002 as the cause of ash (Fraxinus) tree mortality in southeast Michigan and adjacent areas of Ontario, Canada. This destructive beetle apparently arrived in North America via infested solid wood packaging materials from...

  4. Ash-Based Ceramic Materials.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    This patent discloses a ceramic material made from raw coal fly ash or raw municipal solid waste fly ash and (1) sodium tetraborate or (2) a mixture of sodium tetraborate and a calcium containing material that is triple superphosphate, lime, dolomite lime, or mixtures thereof.

  5. Bottom ash boosts poor soil

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, D.

    1993-04-01

    This article describes agricultural uses of fluidized bed bottom ash residue from burning limestone and coal in electric power generating plants: as a limestone substitute, to increase calcium levels in both soil and plants, and as a gypsom-containing soil amendment. Apples and tomatoes are the crops used. The industrial perspective and other uses of bottom ash are also briefly described.

  6. Ash Plume from Shiveluch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    When NASA’s Terra satellite passed over Russia’s Kamchatka Peninsula at noon local time (00:00 Universal Time) on October 6, 2012, Shilveluch Volcano was quiet. By the time NASA’s Aqua satellite passed over the area two hours later (bottom image), the volcano had erupted and sent a plume of ash over the Kamchatskiy Zaliv. The plume traveled about 90 kilometers (55 miles) toward the south-southeast, where a change in wind direction began pushing the plume toward the east. On October 6, 2012, the Kamchatka Volcanic Emergency Response Team (KVERT) reported that the ash plume from Shiveluch reached an altitude of 3 kilometers (9,800 feet) above sea level, and had traveled some 220 kilometers (140 miles) from the volcano summit. Shiveluch (also spelled Sheveluch) ranks among the biggest and most active volcanoes on the Kamchatka Peninsula. Rising to 3,283 meters (10,771 feet) above sea level, Shiveluch is a stratovolcano composed of alternating layers of hardened lava, compacted ash, and rocks ejected by previous eruptions. The beige-colored expanse of rock on the volcano’s southern slopes (visible in both images) is due to an explosive eruption that occurred in 1964. Part of Shiveluch’s southern flank collapsed, and the light-colored rock is avalanche debris left by that event. High-resolution imagery of Shiveluch shows very little vegetation within that avalanche zone. On October 6, 2012, KVERT cited observations from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments on Terra and Aqua in detecting the Shiveluch eruption. This was not the first time that MODIS observed a Shiveluch eruption shortly after it started. In 2007, MODIS captured an image within minutes of the eruption’s start, before winds could blow the ash away from the summit. When NASA’s Terra satellite passed over Russia’s Kamchatka Peninsula at noon local time (00:00 Universal Time) on October 6, 2012, Shilveluch Volcano was quiet (top image). By the time NASA

  7. PREFERENTIAL PARTITIONING OF PAHS AND PCBS TO COAL FLY ASH

    EPA Science Inventory

    It has long been known that fly ash has a significant capacity for the adsorption of several classes of anthropogenic pollutants, including toxic metals, nutrients and organic compounds. This adsorption capacity has been utilized by wastewater treatment plants for the removal of ...

  8. PREFERENTIAL PARTITIONING OF PAHS AND PCBS TO COAL FLY ASH

    EPA Science Inventory

    It has long been known that fly ash has a significant capacity for the adsorption of several classes of anthropogenic pollutants, including toxic metals, nutrients and organic compounds. This adsorption capacity has been utilized by wastewater treatment plants for the removal of ...

  9. EFFECTS OF FLY ASH ON MERCURY OXIDATION DURING POST COMBUSTION CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2000-10-01

    Tests were performed in simulated flue gas streams using two fly ash samples from the electrostatic precipitators of two full-scale utility boilers. One fly ash was derived from a Powder River Basin (PRB) coal, while the other was derived from Blacksville coal (Pittsburgh No. 8 seam). The tests were performed at temperatures of 120 and 180 C under different gas compositions using whole fly ash samples as well as magnetic and nonmagnetic concentrates from sized fly ash. Only the Blacksville ash contained magnetic phases. The whole and fractionated fly ash samples were analyzed for morphology, chemical composition, mineralogical composition, total organic carbon, porosity, and surface area. Mineralogically, the Blacksville ash was composed predominantly of magnetite, hematite, quartz, and mullite, while the PRB ash contained mostly quartz with lesser amounts of lime, periclase, and calcium aluminum oxide. The iron oxides in the Blacksville ash were concentrated almost entirely in the largest size fraction. As anticipated, there was not a clean separation of magnetic (Fe-rich) and nonmagnetic (aluminosilicate-rich) phases for the Blacksville ash. The Blacksville ash had a significantly higher surface area and a much higher unburned carbon content than the PRB ash. Elemental mercury (Hg) streams were injected into the simulated flue gas and passed over filters (housed in a convection oven) loaded with fly ash. Concentrations of total, oxidized, and elemental Hg downstream from the ash samples were determined by the Ontario Hydro Method. The gas stream composition and whether or not ash was present in the gas stream were the two most important variables. Based on the statistical analyses, the presence of HCl, NO, NO{sub 2}, and SO{sub 2} and all two-way gas interactions were significant. In addition, it appears that even four-factor interactions between those gases are significant. The HCl, NO{sub 2}, and SO{sub 2} were critical gases resulting in Hg oxidation, while

  10. Trace elements in coal ash

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Deonarine, Amrika; Kolker, Allan; Doughten, Michael W.

    2015-01-01

    In this fact sheet, the form, distribution, and behavior of trace elements of environmental interest in samples of coal fly ash were investigated in response to concerns about element mobility in the event of an ash spill. The study includes laboratory-based leaching experiments to examine the behavior of trace elements, such as arsenic (As) and chromium (Cr), in response to key environmental factors including redox conditions (degree of oxygenation), which are known to vary with depth within coal ash impoundments and in natural ecosystems. The experiments show that As dissolves from samples of coal fly ash into simulated freshwater under both oxic (highly oxygenated) and anoxic (poorly oxygenated) conditions, whereas dissolved Cr concentrations are very redox dependent. This U.S. Geological Survey research helps define the distribution of elements such as As in coal ash and shows that element mobility can vary considerably under different conditions expected in the environment.

  11. Beneficial uses of CFB ash

    SciTech Connect

    Young, L.J.; Cotton, J.L. Jr.

    1994-12-31

    Coal-fired generation accounts for almost 55 percent of the electricity produced in the United States. It has been estimated that over 90 million tons of coal combustion waste by-products were generated in 1990. Currently, only 30% of coal combustion waste is recycled for various beneficial applications. The remaining waste is primarily managed in landfills and surface impoundments. Circulating fluidized bed (CFB) combustion technology will play an important role in supplying power for future load growth and Title 4 of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments compliance. CFB ash by-products have many beneficial uses. This paper describes potential applications of CFB ashes based on the ash characteristics. The beneficial uses of CFB ash discussed in this study include agricultural applications, acidic waste stabilizer, ash rock, sludge stabilizer, strip mine reclamation, and structural fill.

  12. Experimentally constraining the boundary conditions for volcanic ash aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kueppers, U.; Auer, B.; Cimarelli, C.; Scolamacchia, T.; Guenthel, M.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2011-12-01

    Volcanic ash is the primary product of various volcanic processes. Due to its size, ash can remain in the atmosphere for a prolonged period of time. Aggregation processes are a first-order influence on the residence time of ash in the atmosphere and its dispersion from the vent. Due to their internal structure, ash aggregates have been classified as ash pellets or accretionary lapilli. Although several concomitant factors may play a role during aggregation, there is a broad consensus that both 1) particle collision and 2) humidity are required for particles to aggregate. However, direct observation of settling aggregates and record of the boundary conditions favourable to their formation are rare, therefore limiting our understanding of the key processes that determine ash aggregates formation. Here, we present the first results from experiments aimed at reproducing ash aggregation by constraining the required boundary conditions. We used a ProCell Lab System of Glatt Ingenieurtechnik GmbH that is conventionally used for food and chemical applications. We varied the following parameters: 1) air flow speed [40-120 m3/h], 2) air temperature [30-60°C], 3) relative humidity [20-50 %], and 4) liquid droplets composition [water and 25% water glass, Na2SiO3]. The starting material (125-90 μm) is obtained by milling natural basaltic lapilli (Etna, Italy). We found that the experimental duration and the chosen conditions were not favourable for the production of stable aggregates when using water as spraying liquid. Using a 25% water-glass solution as binder we could successfully generate and investigate aggregates of up to 2 mm size. Many aggregates are spherical and resemble ash pellets. In nature, ash pellets and accretionary lapilli are the product of complex processes taking place at very different conditions (temperature, humidity, ash concentration, degree of turbulence). These experiments shed some first light on the ash agglomeration process for which direct

  13. What Controls the Sizes and Shapes of Volcanic Ash? Integrating Morphological, Textural and Geochemical Ash Properties to Decipher Eruptive Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, E. J.; Cashman, K. V.; Rust, A.

    2015-12-01

    Volcanic ash particles encompass a diverse spectrum of shapes as a consequence of differences in the magma properties and the magma ascent and eruption conditions. We show how the quantitative analysis of ash particle shapes can be a valuable tool for deciphering magma fragmentation and transport processes. Importantly, integrating morphological data with ash texture (e.g. bubble and crystal sizes) and dissolved volatile data provides valuable insights into the physical and chemical controls on the resulting ash deposit. To explore the influence of magma-water interaction (MWI) on fine ash generation, we apply this multi-component characterisation to tephra from the 2500BC Hverfjall Fires, Iceland. Here, coeval fissure vents spanned sub-aerial to shallow lacustrine environments. Differences in the size and morphology of pyroclasts thus reflect fragmentation mechanisms under different near-surface conditions. Using shape parameters sensitive to both particle roughness and internal vesicularity, we quantify the relative proportions of dense fragments, bubble shards, and vesicular grains from 2-D SEM images. We show that componentry (and particle morphology) varies as a function of grain size, and that this variation can be related back to the bubble size distribution. Although both magmatic and hydromagmatic deposits exhibit similar component assemblages, they differ in how these assemblages change with grain size. These results highlight the benefits of characterising ash deposits over a wide range of grain sizes, and caution against inferring fragmentation mechanism from a narrow grain size range. Elevated matrix glass S concentrations in hydromagmatic ash (600-1500 ppm) compared to those in magmatic ash and scoria lapilli (200-500 ppm) indicate interrupted vesiculation. In contrast to the subaerial 'dry' deposits, fragmentation during MWI likely occurred over a greater range of depths with quench rates sufficient to prevent post-fragmentation degassing. High

  14. Immersion freezing of different kinds of combustion ashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augustin-Bauditz, Stefanie; Grawe, Sarah; Hellner, Lisa; Wex, Heike; Pettersson, Jan B. C.; Stratmann, Frank

    2015-04-01

    Ice particles in the atmosphere influence both, weather and climate. Therefore it is important to know which kind of particles can act as ice nucleating particles (INP) under atmospheric conditions. In the last years, a lot of effort has been made to investigate the freezing abilities of natural INPs such as dusts and biological particles (Murray et al., 2012, Hoose and Möhler, 2012). However, there are only a few investigations concerning the ice nucleation ability of combustion ashes, which are the remains of fossil fuel and wood combustion and thus a possible source for anthropogenic INPs. Ash particles have similar compositions as mineral dust particles. However, the actual contribution of combustion ash particles to the atmospheric ice nucleation is rather unclear. A recent study by Umo et al. (2014) showed that combustion ashes could have a significant impact on the ice nucleation in clouds and thus should be the focus of further research. Ash particles can be lifted to the atmosphere by wind (bottom ashes) or directly during the combustion process (fly ashes). In the present study we investigated the freezing behavior of bottom ash particles which originated from wood as well as from coal. Additionally we investigated particles from fly ash from a coal-fired power plant. Particles were generated by dry dispersion and afterwards size selected with a differential mobility analyzer (DMA). The immersion freezing ability of the different ash particles was quantified utilizing the Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator (LACIS, Hartmann et al., 2011), where exactly one size segregated ash particle is immersed in a droplet. We found significant differences between the freezing abilities of the different ash types. Particles from wood bottom ashes initiate freezing at rather low temperatures near the homogenous freezing point (around -36°C). Particles from coal bottom ashes show significant higher ice nucleation abilities than the wood bottom ash, with

  15. EFFECTS OF FLY ASH ON MERCURY OXIDATION DURING POST COMBUSTION CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Glenn A. Norton; Hongqun Yang; Robert C. Brown; Dennis L. Laudal; Grant E. Dunham; John Erjavec; Joseph M. Okoh

    2002-01-31

    Tests were performed in simulated flue gas streams using fly ash from the electrostatic precipitators of two full-scale utility boilers. One fly ash was from a Powder River Basin (PRB) coal, while the other was from Blacksville coal. Elemental Hg was injected upstream from samples of fly ash loaded onto filters housed in an oven at 120 or 180 C. Concentrations of oxidized and elemental Hg downstream from the filters were determined using the Ontario Hydro method. The gas stream composition and whether or not ash was present in the gas stream were the two most important variables affecting Hg oxidation. The presence of HCl, NO, NO{sub 2}, and SO{sub 2} were all important with respect to Hg oxidation, with NO{sub 2} and HCl being the most important. The presence of NO suppressed Hg oxidation in these tests. Although the two fly ashes were chemically and mineralogically diverse, there were generally no large differences in catalytic potential (for oxidizing Hg) between them. Similarly, no ash fraction appeared to be highly catalytic relative to other ash fractions. This includes fractions enriched in unburned carbon and fractions enriched in iron oxides. Although some differences of lesser magnitude were observed in the amount of oxidized Hg formed, levels of oxidized Hg generally tracked well with the surface areas of the different ashes and ash fractions. Therefore, although the Blacksville fly ash tended to show slightly more catalytic activity than the PRB fly ash, this could be due to the relatively high surface area of that ash. Similarly, for Blacksville fly ash, using nonmagnetic ash resulted in more Hg oxidation than using magnetic ash, but this again tracked well with the relative surface areas of the two ash fractions. Test results suggest that the gas matrix may be more important in Hg oxidation chemistry than the fly ash composition. Combustion tests were performed in which Blacksville and PRB fly ashes were injected into filtered (via a baghouse with

  16. Chemical sequential extraction of heavy metals and sulphur in bottom ash and in fly ash from a pulp and paper mill complex.

    PubMed

    Nurmesniemi, Hannu; Pöykiö, Risto; Kuokkanen, Toivo; Rämö, Jaakko

    2008-08-01

    A five-stage sequential extraction procedure was used to determine the distribution of 11 metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Mo, Pb, Zn, As, Co, V, Ni, Ba), and sulphur (S) in bottom ash and in fly ash from a fluidized bed co-combustion (i.e. wood and peat) boiler of Stora Enso Oyj Oulu Mill at Oulu, Northern Finland, into the following fractions: (1) water-soluble fraction (H2O); (2) exchangeable fraction (CH3COOH); (3) easily reduced fraction (NH2OH-HCl); (4) oxidizable fraction (H2O2 + CH3COONH4); and (5) residual fraction (HF + HNO3 + HCl). Although metals were extractable in all fractions, the highest concentrations of most of the metals occurred in the residual fraction. From the environmental point of view, this fraction is the non-mobile fraction and is potentially the least harmful. The Ca concentrations of 29.3 g kg(-1) (dry weight) in bottom ash and of 68.5 g kg(-1) (dry weight) in fly ash were correspondingly approximately 18 and 43 times higher than the average value of 1.6 g kg(-1) (dry weight) in arable land in Central Finland. The ashes were strongly alkaline pH (approximately 12) and had a liming effects of 9.3% (bottom ash) and 13% (fly ash) expressed as Ca equivalents (dry weight). The elevated Ca concentrations indicate that the ashes are potential agents for soil remediation and for improving soil fertility. The pH and liming effect values indicate that the ashes also have a pH buffering capacity. From the environmental point of view, it is notable that the heavy metal concentrations in both types of ash were lower than the Finnish criteria for ash utilization.

  17. An Investigation Utilizing an Electrical Analogue of Cyclic Deicing of Hollow Steel Propellers with Internal Electric Heaters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neel, Carr B., Jr.

    1953-01-01

    A study has been made of the heating requirements for the cyclic de?icing of hollow steel propellers fitted with two types of internal electric heaters. Solutions to the transient?teat?flow equations depicting the cyclic de?icing of propellers were obtained by use of an electrical analogy. The study showed the impracticability of using an internal tubular heater and illustrated the advantages of employing an internal shoe?type heater, which distributes the heat more evenly to the blade surface. The importance of minimizing the thermal inertia of the system was demonstrated, and the magnitude of reductions in the total energy requirement made possible through reductions in the heating period was indicated.

  18. Chronic insomnia, quality-of-life, and utility scores: comparison with good sleepers in a cross-sectional international survey.

    PubMed

    Léger, Damien; Morin, Charles M; Uchiyama, Makoto; Hakimi, Zalmaï; Cure, Sandrine; Walsh, James K

    2012-01-01

    Chronic insomnia has a recognized impact on health-related quality-of-life (HRQoL) but data on utility scores across countries are lacking. The objective of the present study was to assess health related quality of life (HRQoL) and utility scores in individuals from three different countries (USA, France, and Japan), comparing sufferers of chronic insomnia to good sleepers. A cross-sectional survey (SLEEPI-i) of 4067 persons in the US (n=1298; 478 good sleepers and 820 patients with insomnia), France (n=1858; 998 good sleepers and 860 patients with insomnia) and Japan (n=911; 506 good sleepers and 405 patients with insomnia). Enrollment and data collection using consumer panels were web-based in the US and France, and gathered via a postal survey in Japan. People with chronic insomnia (>6 months) were selected based on Insomnia Severity Index scores (ISI). Severity of insomnia was assessed using the ISI score and HRQoL was assessed using the self-administered Short-Form SF-36 Health Survey. Utility scores were derived using the algorithm developed by Brazier et al. Multivariate analyses were used to adjust for potential confounding factors. In all countries, people with chronic insomnia (40% treated) reported lower SF-36 scores in each of eight domains compared with good sleepers (P<.0001). Chronic insomnia was associated with significantly lower utility scores compared with good sleepers (mean scores 0.63 versus 0.72 in the US, 0.57 versus 0.67 in France, and 0.67 versus 0.77 in Japan, P<.0001). This survey suggests that chronic insomnia is associated with significant impairment of HRQoL and decreased utilities across the different geographical regions studied. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Production of fired construction brick from high sulfate-containing fly ash with boric acid addition.

    PubMed

    Başpinar, M Serhat; Kahraman, Erhan; Görhan, Gökhan; Demir, Ismail

    2010-01-01

    The increase of power plant capacity has led to the production of an increasing amount of fly ash that causes high environmental impact in Turkey. Some of the fly ash is utilized within the fired brick industry but high sulfate-containing fly ash creates severe problems during sintering of the fired brick. This study attempted to investigate the potential for converting high sulfate-containing fly ash into useful material for the construction industry by the addition of boric acid. The chemical and mineralogical composition of fly ash and clay were investigated. Boric acid (H(3)BO(3)) was added to fly ash-clay mixtures with up to 5 wt.%. Six different series of test samples were produced by uniaxial pressing. The samples were fired at the industrial clay-brick firing temperatures of 800, 900 and 1000 degrees C. The microstructures of the fired samples were investigated by scanning electron microscopy and some physical and mechanical properties were measured. It was concluded that the firing at conventional brick firing temperature of high sulfate fly ash without any addition of boric acid resulted in very weak strength bricks. The addition of boric acid and clay simultaneously to the high sulfate- containing fly ash brick dramatically increased the compressive strength of the samples at a firing temperature of 1000 degrees C by modifying the sintering behaviour of high sulfate fly ash.

  20. Metal distribution characteristic of MSWI bottom ash in view of metal recovery.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yi; He, Pinjing; Shao, Liming; Zhang, Hua

    2017-02-01

    Bottom ash is the major by-product of municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI), and is often reused as an engineering material, such as road-base aggregate. However, some metals (especially aluminum) in bottom ash can react with water and generate gas that could cause expansion and failure of products containing the ash; these metals must be removed before the ash is utilized. The size distribution and the chemical speciation of metals in the bottom ash from two Chinese MSWI plants were examined in this study, and the recovery potential of metals from the ash was evaluated. The metal concentrations in these bottom ashes were lower than that generated in other developed countries. Specifically, the contents of Al, Fe, Cu and Zn were 18.9-29.2, 25.5-32.3, 0.7-1.0 and 1.6-2.5g/kg, respectively. Moreover, 44.9-57.0wt.% of Al and 55.6-75.4wt.% of Fe were distributed in bottom ash particles smaller than 5mm. Similarly, 46.6-79.7wt.% of Cu and 42.9-74.2wt.% of Zn were concentrated in particles smaller than 3mm. The Fe in the bottom ash mainly existed as hematite, and its chemical speciation was considered to limit the recovery efficiency of magnetic separation.

  1. 49 CFR 230.69 - Ash pans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ash pans. 230.69 Section 230.69 Transportation... TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and Tenders Ash Pans § 230.69 Ash pans. Ash pans shall be securely supported from mud-rings or frames with no part less than 21...

  2. 49 CFR 230.69 - Ash pans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ash pans. 230.69 Section 230.69 Transportation... TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and Tenders Ash Pans § 230.69 Ash pans. Ash pans shall be securely supported from mud-rings or frames with no part less than 21...

  3. Large-scale reintroduction of ash

    Treesearch

    Ronald. Overton

    2010-01-01

    No strategies currently exist for reintroducing ash; progression of emerald ash borer (EAB) through the eastern United States is likely to be a decades-long process, and extirpation of ash from this area is likely to take even longer. Reintroduction of ash into areas where it has been extirpated by EAB will require addressing technical issues as well as social and...

  4. 49 CFR 230.69 - Ash pans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ash pans. 230.69 Section 230.69 Transportation... TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and Tenders Ash Pans § 230.69 Ash pans. Ash pans shall be securely supported from mud-rings or frames with no part less than 21...

  5. 49 CFR 230.69 - Ash pans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ash pans. 230.69 Section 230.69 Transportation... TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and Tenders Ash Pans § 230.69 Ash pans. Ash pans shall be securely supported from mud-rings or frames with no part less than 21...

  6. 49 CFR 230.69 - Ash pans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ash pans. 230.69 Section 230.69 Transportation... TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and Tenders Ash Pans § 230.69 Ash pans. Ash pans shall be securely supported from mud-rings or frames with no part less than 21...

  7. 46 CFR 148.225 - Calcined pyrites (pyritic ash, fly ash).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Calcined pyrites (pyritic ash, fly ash). 148.225 Section... § 148.225 Calcined pyrites (pyritic ash, fly ash). (a) This part does not apply to the shipment of calcined pyrites that are the residual ash of oil or coal fired power stations. (b) This section applies...

  8. 46 CFR 148.225 - Calcined pyrites (pyritic ash, fly ash).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Calcined pyrites (pyritic ash, fly ash). 148.225 Section... § 148.225 Calcined pyrites (pyritic ash, fly ash). (a) This part does not apply to the shipment of calcined pyrites that are the residual ash of oil or coal fired power stations. (b) This section applies...

  9. 46 CFR 148.225 - Calcined pyrites (pyritic ash, fly ash).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Calcined pyrites (pyritic ash, fly ash). 148.225 Section... § 148.225 Calcined pyrites (pyritic ash, fly ash). (a) This part does not apply to the shipment of calcined pyrites that are the residual ash of oil or coal fired power stations. (b) This section applies...

  10. 46 CFR 148.225 - Calcined pyrites (pyritic ash, fly ash).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Calcined pyrites (pyritic ash, fly ash). 148.225 Section... § 148.225 Calcined pyrites (pyritic ash, fly ash). (a) This part does not apply to the shipment of calcined pyrites that are the residual ash of oil or coal fired power stations. (b) This section applies...

  11. The quest for ash resistance to emerald ash borer: Towards a mechanistic understanding

    Treesearch

    D.A. Herms; D. Cipollini; K.S. Knight; J.L. Koch; T.M. Poland; C.M. Rigsby; J.G.A. Whitehill; P. Bonello

    2015-01-01

    Since emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis, was discovered in North America in 2002, it has killed many millions of ash trees in North America, and ash mortality now exceeds 99% near the epicenter of the invasion in southeast Michigan (Klooster et al. 2014). The development of EAB-resistant ash trees will be critical for restoration of ash...

  12. International inter-rater agreement in scoring acne severity utilizing cloud-based image sharing of mobile phone photographs.

    PubMed

    Foolad, Negar; Ornelas, Jennifer N; Clark, Ashley K; Ali, Ifrah; Sharon, Victoria R; Al Mubarak, Luluah; Lopez, Andrés; Alikhan, Ali; Al Dabagh, Bishr; Firooz, Alireza; Awasthi, Smita; Liu, Yu; Li, Chin-Shang; Sivamani, Raja K

    2017-09-01

    Cloud-based image sharing technology allows facilitated sharing of images. Cloud-based image sharing technology has not been well-studied for acne assessments or treatment preferences, among international evaluators. We evaluated inter-rater variability of acne grading and treatment recommendations among an international group of dermatologists that assessed photographs. This is a prospective, single visit photographic study to assess inter-rater agreement of acne photographs shared through an integrated mobile device, cloud-based, and HIPAA-compliant platform. Inter-rater agreements for global acne assessment and acne lesion counts were evaluated by the Kendall's coefficient of concordance while correlations between treatment recommendations and acne severity were calculated by Spearman's rank correlation coefficient. There was good agreement for the evaluation of inflammatory lesions (KCC = 0.62, P < 0.0001), noninflammatory lesions (KCC = 0.62, P < 0.0001), and the global acne grading system score (KCC = 0.69, P < 0.0001). Topical retinoid, oral antibiotic, and isotretinoin treatment preferences correlated with photographic based acne severity. Our study supports the use of mobile phone based photography and cloud-based image sharing for acne assessment. Cloud-based sharing may facilitate acne care and research among international collaborators. © 2017 The International Society of Dermatology.

  13. Phosphate-Bonded Fly Ash.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-12-09

    FCODE OC ______________ ARLINGTON VA 22217-5660 - dis~bu~i.19~ 3 B Navy Case No. 75,787 PATENTS PHOSPHATE -BONDED FLY ASH IN’NA G. TALMY DEBORAH A. HAUGHT...2 3 , CaO. MgO, etc. with which the H.PO4 reacts to form the polymer-like phosphate bonds which hold the fly ash particles together. In the second...conventional means. The moisture (water) content of the aqueous HP0 4 /fly ash mixture is preferably from about 3 to about 5 weight percent for semidry

  14. Explaining high health care spending in the United States: an international comparison of supply, utilization, prices, and quality.

    PubMed

    Squires, David A

    2012-05-01

    This analysis uses data from the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development and other sources to compare health care spending, supply, utilization, prices, and quality in 13 industrialized countries: Australia, Canada, Denmark, France, Germany, Japan, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Sweden, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and the United States. The U.S. spends far more on health care than any other country. However this high spending cannot be attributed to higher income, an older population, or greater supply or utilization of hospitals and doctors. Instead, the findings suggest the higher spending is more likely due to higher prices and perhaps more readily accessible technology and greater obesity. Health care quality in the U.S. varies and is not notably superior to the far less expensive systems in the other study countries. Of the countries studied, Japan has the lowest health spending, which it achieves primarily through aggressive price regulation.

  15. Ash after forest fires. Effects on soil hydrology and erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodí, Merche B.

    2013-04-01

    from certain Eucaliptus and Pinus), or if clog soil pores (depending also on the soil type). If ash is wettable, it can store even 80% of its volume and then it will delay and reduce overland flow proportionally to the thickness of the ash layer. Once ash gets saturated, the flow tends to adjust to an infiltration rate similar to the soil itself, or sometimes higher due to the protection of ash that can reduce soil water repellency and soil sealing (Bodí et al. 2011, 2012). Still, many other aspects on ash remain unknown and ash present us more questions like, what it is its role on the carbon cycle? what is the extent of the ahs effects at basin scale? what is the fate of ash and how long it remains in the ecosystem? are there specific effects of ash depending on the ecosystem and so the type of ash? Acknowledgements This work was supported financially by a research fellowship (AP2007-04602) from the Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation (M.B. Bodí) and the projects PT2009-0073 and CGL2010-21670-C02-01. References Bodí, M.B., Mataix-Solera, J., Doerr, S.H., Cerdà, A., 2011, The wettability of ash from burned vegetation and its relationship to Mediterranean plant species type, burn severity and total organic carbon content. Geoderma 160, 599-607. Bodí, M.B., Doerr, S.H., Cerdà, A., Mataix-Solera, J., 2012, Hydrological effects of a layer of vegetation ash on underlying wettable and water repellent soil. Geoderma 191, 14-23 Cerdà, A., 1998, Changes in overland flow and infiltration after a rangeland fire in a Mediterranean scrubland. Hydrological Processes 12, 1031-1042. Cerdà, A., Doerr, S.H., 2008, The effect of ash and needle cover on surface runoff and erosion in the immediate post-fire period. Catena 74, 256-263. Woods, S.W., Balfour, V., 2008, The effect of ash on runoff and erosion after a forest wildfire, Montana, U.S.A. International Journal of Wildland Fire 17, 535-548.

  16. Partitioning behavior of trace elements during pilot-scale fluidized bed combustion of high ash content lignite.

    PubMed

    Selçuk, Nevin; Gogebakan, Yusuf; Gogebakan, Zuhal

    2006-10-11

    This study describes the partitioning of 20 trace elements (As, B, Ba, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Hg, Li, Mn, Mo, Ni, P, Pb, Sb, Se, Sn, Tl, V, Zn) and eight major and minor elements (Al, Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Na, Si, Ti) during the combustion of high ash content lignite. The experiments were carried out in the 0.3 MW(t) Middle East Technical University (METU) atmospheric bubbling fluidized bed combustor (ABFBC) test rig with and without limestone addition. Inert bed material utilized in the experiments was bed ash obtained previously from the combustion of the same lignite without limestone addition in the same test rig. Concentrations of trace elements in coal, limestone, bottom ash, cyclone ash and filter ash were determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). Partitioning of major and minor elements are influenced by the ash split between the bottom ash and fly ash and that the major proportion of most of the trace elements (As, Ba, Cr, Hg, Li, Mo, Ni, Sn, V, Zn) are recovered in fly ash. Limestone addition shifts the partitioning of Ba, Cr, Mo, Ni, Sn, V, Zn from bottom ash to fly ash.

  17. Volcanic ash vs. sand and dust - "to stick or not to stick" in jet engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kueppers, U.; Song, W.; Lavallée, Y.; Hess, K. U.; Cimarelli, C.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2015-12-01

    Safe air travel activity requires clean flight corridors. But particles scattered in the atmosphere, whether volcanic ash, dust or sand, may present a critical threat to aviation safety. When these foreign particles are ingested into jet engines, whose interiors (e.g., the combustor and turbine blades) reach 1200-2000 °C, they can abrade, melt, and stick to the internal components of the engine, clogging ventilation traps of the cooling system as well as imparting substantial damage and potentially resulting in catastrophic system failure. To date, no criterion predicts ash behaviour at high temperature. Here, we experimentally develop the first quantitative model to predict melting and sticking conditions for the compositional range of volcanic ash encountered worldwide (Fig.1). The assumption that volcanic ash can be approximated by sand or dust is wholly inadequate, leading to an overestimation of sticking temperature and a correspondingly severe underestimation of the thermal hazard. Our findings confirm that the melting/softening behaviour of volcanic ash at high temperatures is essentially controlled by the composition of erupted ash - which may serve as an accurate proxy of the thermal hazard potential of volcanic ash interaction with jet engines. The criterion proposed here successfully parameterizes the potentially complex "melting" process of volcanic ash and can be used to assess the deposition probability of volcanic ash upon ingestion into hot jet engines.

  18. Alkali ash material: a novel fly ash-based cement.

    PubMed

    Rostami, Hossein; Brendley, William

    2003-08-01

    The United States generates 110 million t of coal ash annually. Approximately 70 million t of this coal ash is fly ash, of which 27% is recycled and the remaining 73% is landfilled. Disposal of such a huge quantity of ash poses a significant environmental problem. A new cementitious material has been developed, called alkali ash material (AAM), which is used to produce concrete for construction. AAM can be used to create a variety of concrete strengths and could revolutionize the concrete product manufacturing industry due to its economic advantage. AAM contains 40-95% Class F fly ash and is used as cement to bind sand, stone, and fibers creating concrete. AAM concrete has been tested for strength, durability, mechanical properties, and, most importantly, economic viability. AAM concrete is economically and technically viable for many construction applications. Some properties include rapid strength gain (90% of ultimate in 1 d), high ultimate strengths (110 MPa or 16,000 psi in 1 d), excellent acid resistance, and freeze-thaw durability. AAM's resistance to chemical attack, such as sulfuric (H2SO4), nitric (HNO3), hydrochloric (HCl), and organic acids, is far better than portland cement concrete. AAM is resistant to freeze-thaw attack based on ASTM C-666 specifications. Potential immediate applications of AAM are blocks, pipe, median barriers, sound barriers, and overlaying materials. Eventual markets are high strength construction products, bridge beams, prestressed members, concrete tanks, highway appurtenances, and other concrete products.

  19. Volcanic ash - danger to aircraft in the north Pacific

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neal, Christina A.; Casadevall, Thomas J.; Miller, Thomas P.; Hendley, James W.; Stauffer, Peter H.

    1997-01-01

    The world's busy air traffic corridors pass over hundreds of volcanoes capable of sudden, explosive eruptions. In the United States alone, aircraft carry many thousands of passengers and millions of dollars of cargo over volcanoes each day. Volcanic ash can be a serious hazard to aviation even thousands of miles from an eruption. Airborne ash can diminish visibility, damage flight control systems, and cause jet engines to fail. USGS and other scientists with the Alaska Volcano Observatory are playing a leading role in the international effort to reduce the risk posed to aircraft by volcanic eruptions.

  20. Coal fly ash: a potential resource for aluminium and titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Frederick, J.R.; Murtha, M.J.; Burnet, G.

    1980-01-01

    Two processes are described which utilize fly ash as a source of metals and by-products. The lime-soda sinter process involves sintering of the fly ash and alkaline oxides at 1100-1300/sup 0/C to break the alumina-silica bonds and form soluble aluminate compounds and insoluble calcium silicates. The aluminates are extracted from the sinter by dissolution in sodium carbonate. The calcium silicate sinter extract shows promise as a raw material for the manufacture of portland cement. The HiChlor process uses high temperature chlorination of fly ash in the presence of a reductant to form volatile metal chlorides of aluminium, titanium, iron, and silicon. The HiChlor process extracts aluminium, titanium, and iron, while the sinter process extracts only aluminium.

  1. Sintered mullite from fly ash and alumina powder mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Junmin; Li Yuqiong

    1997-12-31

    Fly ash generated in coal-fired power plants is produced mainly from the aluminosilicates in coal powder. To utilize fly ash in making refractory products, a study of the synthesis of mullite from fly ash and alumina powder mixture was initiated. A series of sintered products designated M70, M60, M50 was achieved with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} contents in the mixtures being 70%, 60%, 50%, respectively. Properties of M70 and M60 are comparable to those of commercial mullite. Though the M50 cannot be used as superior refractory material, it has great potential in making ceramic kiln tools to replace the traditional clayey products.

  2. Ash reduction strategies in corn stover facilitated by anatomical and size fractionation

    DOE PAGES

    Lacey, Jeffrey A.; Emerson, Rachel M.; Thompson, David N.; ...

    2016-04-22

    There is growing interest internationally to produce fuels from renewable biomass resources. Inorganic components of biomass feedstocks, referred to collectively as ash, damage equipment and decrease yields in thermal conversion processes, and decrease feedstock value for biochemical conversion processes. Decreasing the ash content of feedstocks improves conversion efficiency and lowers process costs. Because physiological ash is unevenly distributed in the plant, mechanical processes can be used to separate fractions of the plant based on ash content. This study focuses on the ash separation that can be achieved by separating corn stover by particle size and anatomical fraction. Baled corn stovermore » was hand-separated into anatomical fractions, ground to <19.1 mm, and size separated using six sieves ranging from 9.5 to 0.150 mm. Size fractions were analyzed for total ash content and ash composition. Particle size distributions observed for the anatomical fractions varied considerably. Cob particles were primarily 2.0 mm or greater, while most of the sheath and husk particles were 2.0 mm and smaller. Particles of leaves greater than 0.6 mm contained the greatest amount of total ash, ranging from approximately 8 to 13% dry weight of the total original material, while the fractions with particles smaller than 0.6 mm contained less than 2% of the total ash of the original material. As a result, based on the overall ash content and the elemental ash, specific anatomical and size fractions can be separated to optimize the feedstocks being delivered to biofuels conversion processes and minimize the need for more expensive ash reduction treatments.« less

  3. Ash reduction strategies in corn stover facilitated by anatomical and size fractionation

    SciTech Connect

    Lacey, Jeffrey A.; Emerson, Rachel M.; Thompson, David N.; Westover, Tyler L.

    2016-04-22

    There is growing interest internationally to produce fuels from renewable biomass resources. Inorganic components of biomass feedstocks, referred to collectively as ash, damage equipment and decrease yields in thermal conversion processes, and decrease feedstock value for biochemical conversion processes. Decreasing the ash content of feedstocks improves conversion efficiency and lowers process costs. Because physiological ash is unevenly distributed in the plant, mechanical processes can be used to separate fractions of the plant based on ash content. This study focuses on the ash separation that can be achieved by separating corn stover by particle size and anatomical fraction. Baled corn stover was hand-separated into anatomical fractions, ground to <19.1 mm, and size separated using six sieves ranging from 9.5 to 0.150 mm. Size fractions were analyzed for total ash content and ash composition. Particle size distributions observed for the anatomical fractions varied considerably. Cob particles were primarily 2.0 mm or greater, while most of the sheath and husk particles were 2.0 mm and smaller. Particles of leaves greater than 0.6 mm contained the greatest amount of total ash, ranging from approximately 8 to 13% dry weight of the total original material, while the fractions with particles smaller than 0.6 mm contained less than 2% of the total ash of the original material. As a result, based on the overall ash content and the elemental ash, specific anatomical and size fractions can be separated to optimize the feedstocks being delivered to biofuels conversion processes and minimize the need for more expensive ash reduction treatments.

  4. Development of Scientific Tools at the USGS to Prepare for Ash-Producing Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guffanti, M.; Mastin, L. G.; Wallace, K.; Schneider, D. J.; Neal, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey has undertaken a focused effort over the past several years to develop scientific tools to improve capabilities to forecast, assess, and mitigate the adverse impacts of ash-producing eruptions. To improve forecasting capabilities, USGS scientists developed a Eulerian ash dispersion and deposition model, Ash3D, with output designed for operational use by other agencies. For ashfall hazards, Ash3D output includes forecasts of time of arrival and duration of ashfall, as well as traditional isopach maps. We coordinated with colleagues at the National Weather Service in Alaska to ensure Ash3D output is useable by NWS in its official ashfall advisories, and we are developing methods to generate long-term probabilistic ashfall hazard maps for DOE. For ash-cloud hazards, Ash3D output includes animations of cloud height, mass load, concentration, and arrival times over airports. To improve assessment capabilities, diverse approaches were pursued: a portable Doppler radar was acquired and successfully used to characterize ash plumes during the 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano in Alaska; a database system was created to manage ashfall collection and observations, including by the public ('Is Ash Falling?' at www.avo.alaska.edu/ashfall/ashreport.php); a display-and-analysis tool was developed that accesses public satellite data from a variety of sensors and platforms ('Volcview' at volcview.wr.usgs.gov/). To improve mitigation capabilities, the USGS hosts a website (volcanoes.usgs.gov/ash), developed by the partners of IAVCEI's International Volcanic Ashfall Impacts Working Group and recently revamped, that provides practical guidance about how to prepare for and recover from ash eruptions, organized by affected sector (buildings, transportation, power supply, health, agriculture, water supply, communications). With these various tools now available, scientists and citizenry are better prepared for ash eruptions.

  5. Ash reduction strategies in corn stover facilitated by anatomical and size fractionation

    SciTech Connect

    Lacey, Jeffrey A.; Emerson, Rachel M.; Thompson, David N.; Westover, Tyler L.

    2016-04-22

    There is growing interest internationally to produce fuels from renewable biomass resources. Inorganic components of biomass feedstocks, referred to collectively as ash, damage equipment and decrease yields in thermal conversion processes, and decrease feedstock value for biochemical conversion processes. Decreasing the ash content of feedstocks improves conversion efficiency and lowers process costs. Because physiological ash is unevenly distributed in the plant, mechanical processes can be used to separate fractions of the plant based on ash content. This study focuses on the ash separation that can be achieved by separating corn stover by particle size and anatomical fraction. Baled corn stover was hand-separated into anatomical fractions, ground to <19.1 mm, and size separated using six sieves ranging from 9.5 to 0.150 mm. Size fractions were analyzed for total ash content and ash composition. Particle size distributions observed for the anatomical fractions varied considerably. Cob particles were primarily 2.0 mm or greater, while most of the sheath and husk particles were 2.0 mm and smaller. Particles of leaves greater than 0.6 mm contained the greatest amount of total ash, ranging from approximately 8 to 13% dry weight of the total original material, while the fractions with particles smaller than 0.6 mm contained less than 2% of the total ash of the original material. As a result, based on the overall ash content and the elemental ash, specific anatomical and size fractions can be separated to optimize the feedstocks being delivered to biofuels conversion processes and minimize the need for more expensive ash reduction treatments.

  6. A HIgh Current Density Low Cost Niobium 3 Tin Titanium Doped Conductor Utilizing A Novel Internal Tin Process

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce A Zeitlin

    2005-02-23

    An internal tin conductor has been developed using a Mono Element Internal Tin (MEIT) with an integral Nb barrier surrounding the Nb filaments. High current densities of 3000 A/mm2+ at 12 T and 1800 A/mm2 at 15 T have been achieved in conductors as small as 0.152 mm with the use of Nb7.5Ta filaments and Ti in the Sn core. In contrast, conductors with pure Nb and Ti in the Sn achieved 2700 A/mm2 at 12 T. Two internal fins, developed and patented on the project, were introduced into the filament array and reduced the effective filament diameter (Deff) by 38%. Additional fins will further reduce Deff The conductor was produced from 152.4 mm diameter billets to produce wire as small as 0.152 mm. The process promises be scaleable to 304 mm diameter billets yielding wire of 0.304 mm diameter. The MEIT process wire was easy to draw with relatively few breaks. The cost of this conductor in large production quantities based on the cost model presented could meet the 1.5 $/kilo amp meter(KAM) target of the HEP community

  7. Toward an integrated Volcanic Ash Observing System in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Deborah; Lisk, Ian

    2014-05-01

    and initiatives. We will also look to highlight the work underway by VAACs (Volcanic Ash Advisory Centres) and aviation regulatory authorities within the IAVWOPSG (International Airways Volcano Watch Operations Group) to develop the 'agreed in situ and/or remote sensing techniques' that underpin the newly approved definition of 'Discernible ash'.

  8. Fly ash as a liming material for corn production

    SciTech Connect

    Tarkalson, D.D.; Hergert, G.W.; Stevens, W.B.; McCallister, D.L.; Kackman, S.D.

    2005-05-01

    Fly ash produced as a by-product of subbituminous coal combustion can potentially serve as an alternative liming material without negatively affecting corn (Zea mays L.) production in areas where use of conventional liming materials can be uneconomical due to transportation costs. A study was conducted to determine if fly ash produced from the Nebraska Public Power District Gerald Gentleman Power Station located in Sutherland, NE could be used as an alternative liming material. Combinations of dry fly ash (DFA), wet fly ash (WFA), beet lime (by-product of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) processing) (BL), and agricultural lime (AGL) were applied at rates ranging from 0.43 to 1.62 times the recommended lime rate to plots on four acidic soils (Anselmo fine sandy loam, Hord fine sandy loam, Holdrege sandy loam, and Valentine fine sand). Soil samples were collected to a depth of 0.2 m from plots and analyzed for pH before lime applications and twice periodically after lime application. The Hord and Valentine soils were analyzed for exchangeable Ca, Mg, K, Na,and Al for determination of percent Al saturation on selected treatments and sampling dates. Corn grain yields were determined annually. It is concluded that the fly ash utilized in this study and applied at rates in this study, increases soil pH comparable to agricultural lime and is an appropriate alternative liming material.

  9. Sorbents for CO2 capture from high carbon fly ashes.

    PubMed

    Maroto-Valer, M Mercedes; Lu, Zhe; Zhang, Yinzhi; Tang, Zhong

    2008-11-01

    Fly ashes with high-unburned-carbon content, referred to as fly ash carbons, are an increasing problem for the utility industry, since they cannot be marketed as a cement extender and, therefore, have to be disposed. Previous work has explored the potential development of amine-enriched fly ash carbons for CO2 capture. However, their performance was lower than that of commercially available sorbents, probably because the samples investigated were not activated prior to impregnation and, therefore, had a very low surface area. Accordingly, the work described here focuses on the development of activated fly ash derived sorbents for CO2 capture. The samples were steam activated at 850 degrees C, resulting in a significant increase of the surface area (1075 m2/g). The activated samples were impregnated with different amine compounds, and the resultant samples were tested for CO2 capture at different temperatures. The CO2 adsorption of the parent and activated samples is typical of a physical adsorption process. The impregnation process results in a decrease of the surface areas, indicating a blocking of the porosity. The highest adsorption capacity at 30 and 70 degrees C for the amine impregnated activated carbons was probably due to a combination of physical adsorption inherent from the parent sample and chemical adsorption of the loaded amine groups. The CO2 adsorption capacities for the activated amine impregnated samples are higher than those previously published for fly ash carbons without activation (68.6 vs. 45 mg CO2/g sorbent).

  10. Prediction of ash deposition in pulverized coal combustion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, F.C.C.; Riley, G.S.; Lockwood, F.C.

    1996-12-31

    A predictive scheme based on CCSEM flyash data and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) has been developed to study the slagging propensity of coals. The model has been applied to predict the deposition potential of three UK coals; Bentinck, Daw Mill and Silverdale, in a pilot scale single burner ash deposition test facility and an utility size multi-burner front wall-fired furnace. The project is part of a collaborative research program sponsored by the UK Department of Trade and Industry and involved various industrial organizations and universities. The objective of the project is to understand the fundamental aspects of slagging in pulverized coal-fired combustion systems. This paper is a sequel to the poster paper entitled: The Prediction of Ash Deposition in a Coal Fired Axi-symmetric Furnace, presented in the last Engineering Foundation Conference. The present model predicts the relative slagging propensity of the three coals correctly. The predicted deposition patterns are also consistent with the observations. The results from the model indicate a preferential deposition of iron during the initial stage of ash deposition. The average compositions of the deposits become closer to that of the bulk ash when the accumulation of ash deposits is taken into account.

  11. Hydrometallurgical recovery of zinc from ashes of automobile tire wastes.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, T; Yamaguchi, K; Akita, S; Nii, S; Kawaizumi, F; Takahashi, K

    2005-05-01

    Study has been performed on the investigation of metal leaching behavior for fly and bottom ashes from automobile tire wastes using acid and alkaline solutions from both viewpoints of environmental protection and resource utilization. The two ashes were found to contain substantial amounts of zinc and iron along with small quantities of cobalt, manganese, magnesium, copper, titanium and aluminum. The fly ash contained a much larger amount of zinc than the bottom ash, and seems to be a promising secondary source for the metal. Effects of such experimental parameters as temperature, time and solid-liquid ratio on the leaching behavior were investigated. Using three mineral acids and citric acid, selective leaching of zinc was successfully attained; the concentration of zinc in the leach liquors from the fly ash reached as high as 20 g l(-1) while the iron leaching was much suppressed. Selective separation of zinc was also attained in the leaching with alkaline solutions, though the percent leaching was lower than that in the acid leaching. Moreover, solvent extraction and precipitation were applied to the metal-loaded leach liquors as downstream processing to evaluate the feasibility of zinc recovery.

  12. Advanced Multi-Product Coal Utilization By-Product Processing Plant

    SciTech Connect

    John Groppo; Thomas Robl

    2006-09-30

    The objective of the project is to build a multi-product ash beneficiation plant at Kentucky Utilities 2,200-MW Ghent Generating Station, located in Carroll County, Kentucky. This part of the study includes an investigation of the secondary classification characteristics of the ash feedstock excavated from the lower ash pond at Ghent Station.

  13. Volcanic ash hazards and aviation risk: Chapter 4

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guffanti, Marianne C.; Tupper, Andrew C.

    2015-01-01

    The risks to safe and efficient air travel from volcanic-ash hazards are well documented and widely recognized. Under the aegis of the International Civil Aviation Organization, globally coordinated mitigation procedures are in place to report explosive eruptions, detect airborne ash clouds and forecast their expected movement, and issue specialized messages to warn aircraft away from hazardous airspace. This mitigation framework is based on the integration of scientific and technical capabilities worldwide in volcanology, meteorology, and atmospheric physics and chemistry. The 2010 eruption of Eyjafjallajökull volcano in Iceland, which led to a nearly week-long shutdown of air travel into and out of Europe, has prompted the aviation industry, regulators, and scientists to work more closely together to improve how hazardous airspace is defined and communicated. Volcanic ash will continue to threaten aviation and scientific research will continue to influence the risk-mitigation framework.

  14. Flowable Backfill Materials from Bottom Ash for Underground Pipeline

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyung-Joong; Kim, Seong-Kyum; Lee, Kwan-Ho

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between strength and strain in manufacturing controlled low strength materials to recycle incineration bottom ash. Laboratory tests for controlled low strength materials with bottom ash and recycled in-situ soil have been carried out. The optimum mixing ratios were 25%–45% of in-situ soil, 30% of bottom ash, 10%–20% of fly ash, 0%–3% of crumb rubber, 3% of cement, and 22% of water. Each mixture satisfied the standard specifications: a minimum 20 cm of flowability and 127 kPa of unconfined compressive strength. The average secant modulus (E50) was (0.07–0.08) qu. The ranges of the internal friction angle and cohesion for mixtures were 36.5°–46.6° and 49.1–180 kPa, respectively. The pH of all of the mixtures was over 12, which is strongly alkaline. Small-scale chamber tests for controlled low strength materials with bottom ash and recycled in-situ soil have been carried out. Vertical deflection of 0.88–2.41 mm and horizontal deflection of 0.83–3.72 mm were measured during backfilling. The vertical and horizontal deflections of controlled low strength materials were smaller than that of sand backfill. PMID:28788621

  15. Flowable Backfill Materials from Bottom Ash for Underground Pipeline.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung-Joong; Kim, Seong-Kyum; Lee, Kwan-Ho

    2014-04-25

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between strength and strain in manufacturing controlled low strength materials to recycle incineration bottom ash. Laboratory tests for controlled low strength materials with bottom ash and recycled in-situ soil have been carried out. The optimum mixing ratios were 25%-45% of in-situ soil, 30% of bottom ash, 10%-20% of fly ash, 0%-3% of crumb rubber, 3% of cement, and 22% of water. Each mixture satisfied the standard specifications: a minimum 20 cm of flowability and 127 kPa of unconfined compressive strength. The average secant modulus (E50) was (0.07-0.08) qu. The ranges of the internal friction angle and cohesion for mixtures were 36.5°-46.6° and 49.1-180 kPa, respectively. The pH of all of the mixtures was over 12, which is strongly alkaline. Small-scale chamber tests for controlled low strength materials with bottom ash and recycled in-situ soil have been carried out. Vertical deflection of 0.88-2.41 mm and horizontal deflection of 0.83-3.72 mm were measured during backfilling. The vertical and horizontal deflections of controlled low strength materials were smaller than that of sand backfill.

  16. Artificial radioactivity in fuel peat and peat ash in Finland after the Chernobyl accident

    SciTech Connect

    Mustonen, R.A.; Reponen, A.R.; Jantunen, M.J.

    1989-04-01

    The accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in April 1986 caused very uneven deposition of radionuclides in Finland. The deposited radionuclides were found in relatively high concentrations in fuel peat and especially in peat ash because a thin surface layer of peat-production bogs was extracted as fuel peat soon after the fallout occurred. Concentrations of artificial radionuclides in fuel peat and peat ash were measured at six peat-fired power plants in Finland throughout the heating season 1986-87. Concentrations of /sup 137/Cs in composite peat samples varied between 30 and 3600 Bq kg-1 dry weight and in ash samples between 600 and 68,000 Bq kg-1. High concentrations in peat ash caused some restrictions to the utilization of peat ash for various purposes.

  17. Desulfurization Characteristics of Fly Ash Recirculation and Combustion in the Circulating Fluidized Bed Boiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S. F.; Fang, M. X.; Yu, B.; Wang, Q. H.; Luo, Z. Y.

    The experiments of the fly ash recycle combustion using Guizhou anthracite were carried out in a bench scale circulating fluidized bed (CFB) combustor. Effects of some key operating parameters such as recycle ash to coal mass ratio (Ca to S molar ratio), temperature, reactivation modeof fly ash, circulation rateand fluidization velocity on the desulfurization efficiency were intensively investigated. It is shown that thelimestone utilization efficiency could be improved about 30% with the following operating conditions: the mass ratio of fly ash (reactivated by water and dried at 90°C) to coal was 0.45, the furnace temperature was 880°C, the water to ash mass ratio was 4.5% (the water-to-calcium molar ratio was 0.55) and circulation rate was 18.

  18. Use of rubber and bentonite added fly ash as a liner material.

    PubMed

    Cokca, Erdal; Yilmaz, Zeka

    2004-01-01

    In many countries regulations require all hazardous waste disposal facilities to be lined with suitable impermeable barriers to protect against contamination. In this study, a series of laboratory tests on rubber and bentonite added fly ash were conducted. The aim of the tests was to evaluate the feasibility of utilizing fly ash, rubber and bentonite as a low hydraulic conductivity liner material. Type C fly ash was obtained from Soma thermal power plant in Turkey; rubber in pulverized form was waste from the retreading industry. To investigate the properties of rubber and bentonite added fly ash, hydraulic conductivity, leachate analysis, unconfined compression, split tensile strength, one-dimensional consolidation, swell and freeze/thaw cycle tests were performed. The overall evaluation of results have revealed that rubber and bentonite added fly ash showed good promise and a candidate for construction of a liner.

  19. Use of rubber and bentonite added fly ash as a liner material

    SciTech Connect

    Cokca, Erdal; Yilmaz, Zeka

    2004-07-01

    In many countries regulations require all hazardous waste disposal facilities to be lined with suitable impermeable barriers to protect against contamination. In this study, a series of laboratory tests on rubber and bentonite added fly ash were conducted. The aim of the tests was to evaluate the feasibility of utilizing fly ash, rubber and bentonite as a low hydraulic conductivity liner material. Type C fly ash was obtained from Soma thermal power plant in Turkey; rubber in pulverized form was waste from the retreading industry. To investigate the properties of rubber and bentonite added fly ash, hydraulic conductivity, leachate analysis, unconfined compression, split tensile strength, one-dimensional consolidation, swell and freeze/thaw cycle tests were performed. The overall evaluation of results have revealed that rubber and bentonite added fly ash showed good promise and a candidate for construction of a liner.

  20. Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium. Annual report and selected publications, 1 July 1992--30 June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Pflughoeft-Hassett, D.F.; Dockter, B.A.; Eylands, K.E.; Hassett, D.J.; O`Leary, E.M.

    1994-04-01

    The Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium (CARRC, pronounced cars), formerly the Western Fly Ash Research, Development, and Data Center (WFARDDC), has continued fundamental and applied scientific and engineering research focused on promoting environmentally safe, economical use of coal combustion fly ash. The research tasks selected for the year included: (1) Coal Ash Properties Database Maintenance and Expansion, (2) Investigation of the High-Volume Use of Fly Ash for Flowable Backfill Applications, (3) Investigation of Hydrated Mineralogical Phases in Coal Combustion By-Products, (4) Comparison of Department of Transportation Specifications for Coal Ash Utilization, (5) Comparative Leaching Study of Coal Combustion By-Products and Competing Construction Materials, (6) Application of CCSEM for Coal Ash Characterization, (7) Determination of Types and Causes of Efflorescence in Regional Concrete Products, and (8) Sulfate Resistance of Fly Ash Concrete: A Literature Review and Evaluation of Research Priorities. The assembly of a database of information on coal fly ash has been a focus area for CARRC since its beginning in 1985. This year, CARRC members received an updated run time version of the Coal Ash Properties Database (CAPD) on computer disk for their use. The new, user-friendly database management format was developed over the year to facilitate the use of CAPD by members as well as CARRC researchers. It is anticipated that this direct access to CAPD by members as well as CARRC researchers. It is anticipated that this direct access to CAPD by members will be beneficial to each company`s utilization efforts, to CARRC, and to the coal ash industry in general. Many additions and improvements were made to CAPD during the year, and a three-year plan for computer database and modeling related to coal ash utilization was developed to guide both the database effort and the research effort.

  1. Nonlinear observation of internal states of fuel cell cathode utilizing a high-order sliding-mode algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Liangfei; Hu, Junming; Cheng, Siliang; Fang, Chuan; Li, Jianqiu; Ouyang, Minggao; Lehnert, Werner

    2017-07-01

    A scheme for designing a second-order sliding-mode (SOSM) observer that estimates critical internal states on the cathode side of a polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell system is presented. A nonlinear, isothermal dynamic model for the cathode side and a membrane electrolyte assembly are first described. A nonlinear observer topology based on an SOSM algorithm is then introduced, and equations for the SOSM observer deduced. Online calculation of the inverse matrix produces numerical errors, so a modified matrix is introduced to eliminate the negative effects of these on the observer. The simulation results indicate that the SOSM observer performs well for the gas partial pressures and air stoichiometry. The estimation results follow the simulated values in the model with relative errors within ± 2% at stable status. Large errors occur during the fast dynamic processes (<1 s). Moreover, the nonlinear observer shows good robustness against variations in the initial values of the internal states, but less robustness against variations in system parameters. The partial pressures are more sensitive than the air stoichiometry to system parameters. Finally, the order of effects of parameter uncertainties on the estimation results is outlined and analyzed.

  2. ITER helium ash accumulation

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, J.T.; Hillis, D.L.; Galambos, J.; Uckan, N.A. ); Dippel, K.H.; Finken, K.H. . Inst. fuer Plasmaphysik); Hulse, R.A.; Budny, R.V. . Plasma Physics Lab.)

    1990-01-01

    Many studies have shown the importance of the ratio {upsilon}{sub He}/{upsilon}{sub E} in determining the level of He ash accumulation in future reactor systems. Results of the first tokamak He removal experiments have been analysed, and a first estimate of the ratio {upsilon}{sub He}/{upsilon}{sub E} to be expected for future reactor systems has been made. The experiments were carried out for neutral beam heated plasmas in the TEXTOR tokamak, at KFA/Julich. Helium was injected both as a short puff and continuously, and subsequently extracted with the Advanced Limiter Test-II pump limiter. The rate at which the He density decays has been determined with absolutely calibrated charge exchange spectroscopy, and compared with theoretical models, using the Multiple Impurity Species Transport (MIST) code. An analysis of energy confinement has been made with PPPL TRANSP code, to distinguish beam from thermal confinement, especially for low density cases. The ALT-II pump limiter system is found to exhaust the He with maximum exhaust efficiency (8 pumps) of {approximately}8%. We find 1<{upsilon}{sub He}/{upsilon}{sub E}<3.3 for the database of cases analysed to date. Analysis with the ITER TETRA systems code shows that these values would be adequate to achieve the required He concentration with the present ITER divertor He extraction system.

  3. Long duration ash probe

    DOEpatents

    Hurley, John P.; McCollor, Don P.; Selle, Stanley J.

    1994-01-01

    A long duration ash probe includes a pressure shell connected to a port in a combustor with a sample coupon mounted on a retractable carriage so as to retract the sample coupon within the pressure shell during sootblowing operation of the combustor. A valve mounted at the forward end of the pressure shell is selectively closeable to seal the sample coupon within the shell, and a heating element in the shell is operable to maintain the desired temperature of the sample coupon while retracted within the shell. The carriage is operably mounted on a pair of rails within the shell for longitudinal movement within the shell. A hollow carrier tube connects the hollow cylindrical sample coupon to the carriage, and extends through the carriage and out the rearward end thereof. Air lines are connected to the rearward end of the carrier tube and are operable to permit coolant to pass through the air lines and thence through the carrier tube to the sample coupon so as to cool the sample coupon.

  4. Long duration ash probe

    DOEpatents

    Hurley, J.P.; McCollor, D.P.; Selle, S.J.

    1994-07-26

    A long duration ash probe includes a pressure shell connected to a port in a combustor with a sample coupon mounted on a retractable carriage so as to retract the sample coupon within the pressure shell during soot blowing operation of the combustor. A valve mounted at the forward end of the pressure shell is selectively closeable to seal the sample coupon within the shell, and a heating element in the shell is operable to maintain the desired temperature of the sample coupon while retracted within the shell. The carriage is operably mounted on a pair of rails within the shell for longitudinal movement within the shell. A hollow carrier tube connects the hollow cylindrical sample coupon to the carriage, and extends through the carriage and out the rearward end thereof. Air lines are connected to the rearward end of the carrier tube and are operable to permit coolant to pass through the air lines and thence through the carrier tube to the sample coupon so as to cool the sample coupon. 8 figs.

  5. MARKET ASSESSMENT AND TECHNICAL FEASIBILITY STUDY OF PRESSURIZED FLUIDIZED BED COMBUSTION ASH USE

    SciTech Connect

    A.E. Bland; T.H. Brown

    1997-04-01

    Western Research Institute, in conjunction with the Electric Power Research Institute, Foster Wheeler International, Inc. and the US Department of Energy, has undertaken a research and demonstration program designed to examine the market potential and the technical feasibility of ash use options for PFBC ashes. Ashes from the Foster Wheeler Energia Oy pilot-scale circulating PFBC tests in Karhula, Finland, combusting (1) low-sulfur subbituminous and (2) high-sulfur bituminous coal, and ash from the AEP's high-sulfur bituminous coal-fired bubbling PFBC in Brilliant, Ohio, were evaluated in laboratory and pilot-scale ash use testing at WR1. The technical feasibility study examined the use of PFBC ash in construction-related applications, including its use as a cementing material in concrete and use in cement manufacturing, fill and embankment materials, soil stabilization agent, and use in synthetic aggregate production. Testing was also conducted to determine the technical feasibility of PFBC ash as a soil amendment for acidic and sodic problem soils and spoils encountered in agricultural and reclamation applications. The results of the technical feasibility testing indicated the following conclusions. PFBC ash does not meet the chemical requirements as a pozzolan for cement replacement. However, it does appear that potential may exist for its use in cement production as a pozzolan and/or as a set retardant. PFBC ash shows relatively high strength development, low expansion, and low permeability properties that make its use in fills and embankments promising. Testing has also indicated that PFBC ash, when mixed with low amounts of lime, develops high strengths, suitable for soil stabilization applications and synthetic aggregate production. Synthetic aggregate produced from PFBC ash is capable of meeting ASTM/AASHTO specifications for many construction applications. The residual calcium carbonate and calcium sulfate in the PFE3C ash has been shown to be of value in

  6. Absorption, Distribution, and Root Exudation of 2,4,5-T and Picloram by Ash and Maple

    DTIC Science & Technology

    distributed throughout ash and ample tissues in greater quantities than picloram and microautoradiography of green ash stem tissue showed possible xylem to... phloem exchange. Both picloram and 2,4,5-T were translocated acropetally and basipetally in all species, indicating utilization of both the apoplast

  7. Characterization of fly ash from a circulating fluidized bed incinerator of municipal solid waste.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Su, Xiaowen; Zhang, Zhixuan; Liu, Siming; Xiao, Yuxin; Sun, Mingming; Su, Jixin

    2014-11-01

    Treatment and disposal of fly ash in China are becoming increasingly difficult, since its production has steadily risen and its features are uncertain. The excess pollutant components of fly ash are the key factor affecting its treatment and resource utilization. In this study, fly ash samples collected from a power plant with circulating fluidized incinerators of municipal solid waste (MSW) located in Shandong Province (eastern China) were studied. The results showed that there were no obvious seasonal differences in properties of fly ash. The content of total salt, Zn, and pH exceeded the national standards and low-ring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDD) and dibenzofurans (Fs) were the main organic components of fly ash for this power plant, which posed great threats to the surrounding environment. The amount of Zn of fly ash was higher than other heavy metals, which should be due to alkaline batteries of MSW. The leachate of fly ash had low concentrations of heavy metals and the main soluble components were sulfates and chlorides. The major mineral crystals of fly ash were SiO2, CaSO4, and Fe2O3. The main organic pollutants were low-ring PAHs, polychlorinated PCDDs, and low-chlorinated PCDFs, and concentrations were lower than the limiting values of the national regulations. Additionally, the distribution of PCDD/Fs had either a positive or a negative linear correlation with fly ash and flue gas, which was associated with the chlorinated degree of PCDD/Fs. The analysis was conducted to fully understand the properties of fly ash and to take appropriate methods for further comprehensive utilization.

  8. New, efficient and viable system for ethanol fuel utilization on combined electric/internal combustion engine vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, André G.; Silva, Gabriel C. D.; Paganin, Valdecir A.; Biancolli, Ana L. G.; Ticianelli, Edson A.

    2015-10-01

    Although ethanol can be directly employed as fuel on polymer-electrolyte fuel cells (PEMFC), its low oxidation kinetics in the anode and the crossover to the cathode lead to a substantial reduction of energy conversion efficiency. However, when fuel cell driven vehicles are considered, the system may include an on board steam reformer for converting ethanol into hydrogen, but the hydrogen produced contains carbon monoxide, which limits applications in PEMFCs. Here, we present a system consisting of an ethanol dehydrogenation catalytic reactor for producing hydrogen, which is supplied to a PEMFC to generate electricity for electric motors. A liquid by-product effluent from the reactor can be used as fuel for an integrated internal combustion engine, or catalytically recycled to extract more hydrogen molecules. Power densities comparable to those of a PEMFC operating with pure hydrogen are attained by using the hydrogen rich stream produced by the ethanol dehydrogenation reactor.

  9. Internal Structure and Clinical Utility of the Anxiety Control Questionnaire-Revised (ACQ-R) Spanish Version.

    PubMed

    Osma, Jorge; Barrada, Juan Ramón; García-Palacios, Azucena; Navarro-Haro, María; Aguilar, Alejandra

    2016-10-03

    Perceived control has shown predictive value for anxiety severity symptoms as well as cognitive-behavior therapy outcomes. The most commonly used measure of perceived control is the Anxiety Control Questionnaire (ACQ), and more recently the ACQ Revised (ACQ-R). However, both questionnaires have shown structural inconsistencies among several studies. Also, although the ACQ and ACQ-R seem to be multidimensional instruments, a single total score have been commonly used. This study examined the internal structure of the ACQ-R Spanish version using exploratory factor and exploratory bi-factor analysis in a sample of 382 college students and 52 people diagnosed of panic disorder (with or without agoraphobia). Also, in this study we assessed the preliminary diagnostic value of the ACQ-R scores. The results indicated that the ACQ-R Spanish version structure consisted of two factors: one related with perceived control of internal emotional reactions (Emotion Control) and another related with perceived control of external events (Threat and Stress Control). Both specific factors can be adequately summarized by a general factor (General Anxiety Perception of Control; CFI = .973, TLI = .954, RMSEA = .039; p = .002), which accounted for 70% of the common explained variance. The correlations between the ACQ-R scores and with variables like anxiety (r = -.66) or anxiety sensitivity (r = -.50) presented the expected pattern of results. Either the two dimensions structure or the total score have proved to be a good tool to distinguish between participants with panic disorder and non-clinical samples (area under the curve = 0.79).

  10. Aerosols Monitoring Network to Create a Volcanic ASH Risk Management System in Argentina and Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quel, Eduardo; Sugimoto, Nobuo; Otero, Lidia; Jin, Yoshitaka; Ristori, Pablo; Nishizawa, Tomoaki; González, Francisco; Papandrea, Sebastián; Shimizu, Atsushi; Mizuno, Akira

    2016-06-01

    Two main decisions were made in Argentina to mitigate the impact of the recent volcanic activity in de country basically affected by the presence of volcanic ash in the air and deposited over the Argentinean territory. The first one was to create a risk management commission were this risk between others were studied, and second to develop new ground based remote sensing technologies to be able to identify and inform the risk close to the airports. In addition the Japanese government program for Science and Technology joint Research Partnership between Argentina, Chile and Japan for Sustainable Development (SATREPS) accepted to fund this cooperation due to the potential future utilization of the research outcomes to the benefit of the society. This work present the actual achievements and expected advance of these projects that try to joint efforts between national and international agencies as well as countries on behalf of a better understanding of the risks and a joint collaboration on the mitigation of suspended ashes impact over the aerial navigation.

  11. Reclamation and revegetation of fly ash disposal sites - Challenges and research needs.

    PubMed

    Haynes, R J

    2009-01-01

    Coal-fired power generation is a principal energy source throughout the world. Approximately, 70-75% of coal combustion residues are fly ash and its utilization worldwide is only slightly above 30%. The remainder is disposed of in landfills and fly ash basins. It is desirable to revegetate these sites for aesthetic purposes, to stabilize the surface ash against wind and water erosion and to reduce the quantity of water leaching through the deposit. Limitations to plant establishment and growth in fly ash can include a high pH (and consequent deficiencies of Fe, Mn, Cu, Zn and P), high soluble salts, toxic levels of elements such as B, pozzalanic properties of ash resulting in cemented/compacted layers and lack of microbial activity. An integrated organic/biotechnological approach to revegetation seems appropriate and should be investigated further. This would include incorporation of organic matter into the surface layer of ash, mycorrhizal inoculation of establishing vegetation and use of inoculated legumes to add N. Leaching losses from ash disposal sites are likely to be site-specific but a sparse number of studies have revealed enriched concentrations of elements such as Ca, Fe, Cd, Pb, and Sb in surrounding groundwater. This aspect deserves further study particularly in the longer-term. In addition, during weathering of the ash and deposition of organic matter during plant growth, a soil will form with properties vastly different to that of the parent ash. In turn, this will influence the effect that the disposal site has on the surrounding environment. Nevertheless, the effects of ash weathering and organic matter accumulation over time on the chemical, physical and biological properties of the developing ash-derived soil are not well understood and require further study.

  12. Kinetics of fly ash beneficiation by carbon burnout. [Quarterly report], October 1, 1995--January 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Dodoo, J.N.; Okoh, J.M.; Yilmaz, E.

    1996-09-01

    The objective is to investigate the kinetics of beneficiation of fly ash by carbon burnout. The three year project that was proposed is a joint venture between Delmarva Power, a power generating company on the eastern shore of Maryland, and the University of Maryland Eastern Shore. The studies have focused on the beneficiation of fly ash by carbon burnout. The increasing use of coal fly ash as pozzolanic material in Portland cement concrete means that there is the highest economic potential in marketability of large volumes of fly ash. For the concrete industry to consider large scale use the fly ash must be of the highest quality. This means that the residual carbon content of the fly ash must have an acceptable loss on ignition (LOI) value, usually between 7--2% residual carbon. The economic gains to be had from low-carbon ash is a fact that is generally accepted by the electricity generating companies. However, since the cost of producing low-carbon in large quantities, based on present technology, far outweighs any financial gains, no electrical power company using coal as its fuel at present considers the effort worthwhile. The concrete industry would use fly ash in cement concrete mix if it can be assured of its LOI value. At present no utility company would give such assurance. Hence with several million tons of fly ash produced by a single power plant per year all that can be done is to dump the fly ash in landfills. The kinetics of fly ash beneficiation have been investigated in the zone II kinetic regime, using a Cahn TG 121 microbalance in the temperature 550--750{degrees}C. The P{sub 02} and total surface area dependence of the reaction kinetics were determined using a vacuum accessory attached to the microbalance and a surface area analyzer (ASAP 2010), respectively.

  13. Fly ash chemical classification based on lime

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, J.

    2007-07-01

    Typically, total lime content (CaO) of fly ash is shown in fly ash reports, but its significance is not addressed in US specifications. For certain applications a low lime ash is preferred. When a class C fly ash must be cementitious, lime content above 20% is required. A ternary S-A-C phase diagram pilot is given showing the location of fly ash compositions by coal rank and source in North America. Fly ashes from subbituminous coal from the Powder River Basin usually contain sufficient lime to be cementitious but blending with other coals may result in calcium being present in phases other than tricalcium aluminate. 9 refs., 1 fig.

  14. Controlling formaldehyde emissions with boiler ash.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Jennifer; Abu-Daabes, Malyuba; Banerjee, Sujit

    2005-07-01

    Fluidized wood ash reduces formaldehyde in air from about 20 to <1 ppmv. Methanol is removed to a much lower extent. The efficiency of formaldehyde reduction increases with increasing moisture content of the ash. Sorption of formaldehyde to ash can be substantially accounted for by partitioning to the water contained in the ash followed by rate-controlling binding to the ash solids. Adsorption occurs at temperatures of up to 165 degrees C; oxidation predominates thereafter. It is proposed that formaldehyde could be stripped from an air stream in a fluidized bed containing ash, which could then be returned to a boiler to incinerate the formaldehyde.

  15. Stabilization of Oklahoma expensive soils using lime and class C fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Buhler, R.L.; Cerato, A.B.

    2007-01-15

    This study uses lime and class C fly ash, an industrial byproduct of electric power production produced from burning lignite and subbituminous coal, to study the plasticity reduction in highly expensive natural clays from Idabel, Oklahoma. This study is important, especially in Oklahoma, because most of the native soils are expansive and cause seasonal damage to roadways and structures. The addition of lime or fly ash helps to arrest the shrinkage and swelling behavior of soil. Four soil samples with the same AASHTO classification were used in this study to show shrinkage variability within a soil group with the addition of lime and class C fly ash. The plasticity reduction in this study was quantified using the linear shrinkage test. It was found that soils classified within the same AASHTO group had varying shrinkage characteristics. It was also found that both lime and fly ash reduced the lienar shrinkage, however, the addition of lime reduced the linear shrinkage to a greater degree than the same percentage of class C fly ash. Even though it takes much less lime than fly ash to reduce the plasticity of a highly expansive soil, it may be less expensive to utilize fly ash, which is a waste product of electric power production. Lime also has a lower unit weight than fly ash so weight percentage results may be misleading.

  16. California bearing ratio behavior of soil-stabilized class F fly ash systems

    SciTech Connect

    Leelavathamma, B.; Mini, K.M.; Pandian, N.S.

    2005-11-01

    Fly ash is a finely divided mineral residue resulting from the combustion of coal in power plants that occupies large extents of land and also causes environmental problems. Hence, concerted attempts are being made to effectively use fly ash in an environmentally friendly way instead of dumping. Several studies have been carried out for its bulk utilization, such as its addition to improve the California bearing ratio (CBR) of soil in roads and embankments. But a thorough mixing of fly ash with soil may not be possible in the field. Hence a study has been carried out on the CBR behavior of black cotton soil and Raichur fly ash (which is class F) in layers and compared with the same in mixes. The results show that the CBR values of soil-fly ash mixes are better than layers, as expected. To improve the strength of layers, cement is used as an additive to fly ash. The results show that black cotton soil can be improved with stabilized fly ash, solving its strength problem as well as the disposal problem of fly ash.

  17. Prospects for cleaning ash in the acidic effluent from bioleaching of sulfidic concentrates.

    PubMed

    Paul, M; Sandström, A; Paul, J

    2004-01-02

    Leaching of ashes in sulfuric acid (pH 1.0, liquid-to-solid (L/S) ratio 10:1, 25 degrees C) has been characterized with respect to the neutralizing capacity and the dissolution of dominant ions and trace elements. The conditions mimic the oxidation stage of a biohydrometallurgical process for base metal production from sulfidic mineral concentrates. Direct acid leaching of ash, integrated with this metallurgical process, offers a feasible route to the sustainable handling of metal-rich ashes. The treated ash will be deposited together with the inert mineral residue. Cd, Co, Cu, Ni and Zn are effectively leached and can be recovered utilizing existing hydrometallurgical technology, but the recovery of other readily dissolved metals, notably Mn, U and V, requires that additional steps are implemented. We make two recommendations for industrial processes. The first is to replace limestone with ash from biofuels, except peat, for pH control in biohydrometallurgical processing. This requires a modest increase of fresh alkali compared with limestone. The second is to implement sulfuric acid leaching of fly ash from the combustion of solid waste and other metal-rich fuels (used wood, tires), thereby avoiding costly ash-deposits. There is a significant economic incentive for these changes, since no costly ash-deposits and less limestone will be needed.

  18. Volcanic ash hazard climatology for an eruption of Hekla Volcano, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leadbetter, Susan J.; Hort, Matthew C.

    2011-01-01

    Ash produced by a volcanic eruption on Iceland can be hazardous for both the transatlantic flight paths and European airports and airspace. In order to begin to quantify the risk to aircraft, this study explored the probability of ash from a short explosive eruption of Hekla Volcano (63.98°N, 19.7°W) reaching European airspace. Transport, dispersion and deposition of the ash cloud from a three hour 'explosive' eruption with an initial plume height of 12 km was simulated using the Met Office's Numerical Atmospheric-dispersion Modelling Environment, NAME, the model used operationally by the London Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre. Eruptions were simulated over a six year period, from 2003 until 2008, and ash clouds were tracked for four days following each eruption. Results showed that a rapid spread of volcanic ash is possible, with all countries in Europe facing the possibility of an airborne ash concentration exceeding International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) limits within 24 h of an eruption. An additional high impact, low probability event which could occur is the southward spread of the ash cloud which would block transatlantic flights approaching and leaving Europe. Probabilities of significant concentrations of ash are highest to the east of Iceland, with probabilities exceeding 20% in most countries north of 50°N. Deposition probabilities were highest at Scottish and Scandinavian airports. There is some seasonal variability in the probabilities; ash is more likely to reach southern Europe in winter when the mean winds across the continent are northerly. Ash concentrations usually remain higher for longer during summer when the mean wind speeds are lower.

  19. Review: Application of coal bottom ash as aggregate replacement in highway embankment, acoustic absorbing wall and asphalt mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afiza Mohammed, Syakirah; Rehan Karim, Mohamed

    2017-06-01

    Worldwide annual production of coal bottom ash waste was increased in the last decade and is being dumped on landfill over the years. Its improper disposal has become an environmental concern and resulted in a waste of recoverable resources. There is a pressing and on-going need to develop new recycling methods for coal bottom ash. The utilization of coal bottom ash in highway engineering is one of the options to reduce the environmental problems related to the disposal of bottom ash. The present review describe the physical and chemical properties of coal bottom ash waste and its current application as highway embankment material, as acoustic absorbing material and as aggregate replacement in asphalt mixtures. The purpose of this review is to stimulate and promote the effective recycling of coal bottom ash in highway engineering industry.

  20. Development of Satellite Remote Sensing Techniques for Quantifying Volcanic Ash Cloud Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavolonis, Michael J.

    Novel new approaches to automatically detect and characterize volcanic ash using satellite data are presented. The Spectrally Enhanced Cloud Objects (SECO) ash detection algorithm, combines radiative transfer theory, Bayesian methods, and image processing/computer vision concepts to identify volcanic ash clouds in satellite data with skill that is generally comparable to a human expert, especially with respect to false alarm rate. The SECO method is globally applicable and can be applied to virtually any low earth orbit or geostationary satellite sensor. The new ash detection approach was quantitatively proven to be significantly more skillful than traditional pixel based approaches, including the commonly used "split-window" technique. The performance of the SECO approach is extremely promising and well suited for a variety of new and improved applications. A new approach to retrieve volcanic ash cloud properties from infrared satellite measurements was also developed. The algorithm utilizes an optimal estimation framework to retrieve ash cloud height, mass loading, and effective particle radius. Optimal estimation allows uncertainties in the measurements and forward model to be taken into account and uncertainty estimates for each of the retrieved parameters to be determined. Background atmospheric water vapor, surface temperature, and surface emissivity are explicitly accounted for on a pixel-by-pixel basis, so the algorithm is globally applicable. In addition, the ash cloud retrieval algorithm is unique because it allows the cloud temperature/height to be a free parameter. Volcanic ash clouds are a major aviation hazard. Fine-grained ash from explosive eruptions can be transported long distances (>1000 km) from the source volcano by atmospheric winds, severely disrupting aviation operations. Volcanic ash clouds are complex and the background environment in which they reside can be as well. Thus, sophisticated satellite remote sensing techniques for extracting

  1. An international investigation into O red blood cell unit administration in hospitals: the GRoup O Utilization Patterns (GROUP) study.

    PubMed

    Zeller, Michelle P; Barty, Rebecca; Aandahl, Astrid; Apelseth, Torunn O; Callum, Jeannie; Dunbar, Nancy M; Elahie, Allahna; Garritsen, Henk; Hancock, Helen; Kutner, José Mauro; Manukian, Belinda; Mizuta, Shuichi; Okuda, Makoto; Pagano, Monica B; Pogłód, Ryszard; Rushford, Kylie; Selleng, Kathleen; Sørensen, Claess Henning; Sprogøe, Ulrik; Staves, Julie; Weiland, Thorsten; Wendel, Silvano; Wood, Erica M; van de Watering, Leo; van Wordragen-Vlaswinkel, Maria; Ziman, Alyssa; Jan Zwaginga, Jaap; Murphy, Michael F; Heddle, Nancy M; Yazer, Mark H

    2017-10-01

    Transfusion of group O blood to non-O recipients, or transfusion of D- blood to D+ recipients, can result in shortages of group O or D- blood, respectively. This study investigated RBC utilization patterns at hospitals around the world and explored the context and policies that guide ABO blood group and D type selection practices. This was a retrospective study on transfusion data from the 2013 calendar year. This study included a survey component that asked about hospital RBC selection and transfusion practices and a data collection component where participants submitted information on RBC unit disposition including blood group and D type of unit and recipient. Units administered to recipients of unknown ABO or D group were excluded. Thirty-eight hospitals in 11 countries responded to the survey, 30 of which provided specific RBC unit disposition data. Overall, 11.1% (21,235/191,397) of group O units were transfused to non-O recipients; 22.6% (8777/38,911) of group O D- RBC units were transfused to O D+ recipients, and 43.2% (16,800/38,911) of group O D- RBC units were transfused to recipients that were not group O D-. Disposition of units and hospital transfusion policy varied within and across hospitals of different sizes, with transfusion of group O D- units to non-group O D- patients ranging from 0% to 33%. A significant proportion of group O and D- RBC units were transfused to compatible, nonidentical recipients, although the frequency of this practice varied across sites. © 2017 AABB.

  2. Ash phloem reduction models vary among species and growing conditions

    Treesearch

    Tara L. Bal; Andrew J. Storer; Linda M. Nagel

    2011-01-01

    The exotic insect, emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis), is responsible for the death of millions of ash trees. Removal of ash from areas in close proximity to outlier populations will reduce the potential population density of emerald ash borer (EAB).

  3. Predicting slag viscosity from coal ash composition

    SciTech Connect

    Laumb, J.; Benson, S.A.; Katrinak, K.A.; Schwalbe, R.; McCollor, D.P.

    1999-07-01

    Management of slag flow from cyclone-fired utility boilers requires accurate prediction of viscosity. Cyclones tend to build up slag when the cyclone combustion temperature is less than the temperature required to melt and tap the ash from the coal being fired. Cyclone-fired boilers designed for lignite are equipped with predry systems, which remove 6-9% of the moisture from the coal. Cyclones tend to slag when the as-received heating value of the fuel is less than 6350 Btu/lb and T250 (temperature where viscosity equals 250 poise) is greater than 2350 F. The T250 value, as well as the rest of the viscosity-temperature relationship, can be predicted using models based on coal ash composition. The focus of this work is to evaluate several models in terms of their agreement with measured viscosities. Viscosity measurements were made for ten samples, including nine lignite coals and one lignite-derived slag. Model performance is related to the SiO{sub 2}, CaO, and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} contents of the slag. The Sage and McIlroy and Kalmanovitch models worked best for high SiO{sub 2} and low Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} fuels. The Senior model worked best when Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} content was moderate to high.

  4. Probing the physiology of ASH neuron in Caenorhabditis elegans using electric current stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Chokshi, Trushal Vijaykumar; Bazopoulou, Daphne; Chronis, Nikos

    2011-01-01

    Electrical stimulation has been widely used to modulate and study the in vitro and in vivo functionality of the nervous system. Here, we characterized the effect of electrical stimulation on ASH neuron in Caenorhabditis elegans and employed it to probe the neuron’s age dependent properties. We utilized an automated microfluidic-based platform and characterized the ASH neuronal activity in response to an electric current applied to the worm’s body. The electrically induced ASH neuronal response was observed to be dependent on the magnitude, polarity, and spatial location of the electrical stimulus as well as on the age of the worm. PMID:21886270

  5. Hazards posed by distal ash transport and sedimentation from extreme volcanic eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahagian, D. L.; Proussevitch, A. A.; White, C. M.; Klewicki, J.

    2016-12-01

    Volcanic ash injected into the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere poses a significant hazard to aviation and human security as a result of extreme, explosive eruptions. These have occurred in the recent geologic past, and are expected to occur again, now that modern society and its infrastructure is far more vulnerable than ever before. Atmospheric transport, dispersion, and sedimentation of Ash particles is controlled by fundamentally different processes than control other particles normally transported in the atmosphere due to their complex internal and external morphology. It is thus necessary to elucidate the fundamental processes of particle-fluid interactions in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, where most air traffic resides, and thereby enhance the capability of volcanic ash transport models to predict the ash concentration in distal regions that pose aviation and other hazards. Current Volcanic Ash Transport and Dispersion (VATD) models use simplistic stokes settling velocities for larger ash particles, and treat smaller ash particles (that are a large part of the hazard) merely as passive tracers. By incorporating the dynamics of fine ash particle-atmosphere interactions into existing VATD models provides the foundation for a much more accurate assessment framework applied to the hazard posed by specific future extreme eruptions, and thus dramatically reduce both the risk to air traffic and the cost of airport and flight closures, in addition to human health, water quality, agricultural, infrastructure hazards, as well as ice cap albedo and short term climate impacts.

  6. Market Assessment and Technical Feasibility Study of Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion Ash Use

    SciTech Connect

    Bland, A.E.; Brown, T.H.

    1996-12-31

    Western Research Institute in conjunction with the Electric Power Research Institute, Foster Wheeler Energy International, Inc. and the U.S. Department of Energy Technology Center (METC), has undertaken a research and demonstration program designed to examine the market potential and the technical feasibility of ash use options for pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) ashes. The assessment is designed to address six applications, including: (1) structural fill, (2) road base construction, (3) supplementary cementing materials in portland cement, (4) synthetic aggregate, and (5) agricultural/soil amendment applications. Ash from low-sulfur subbituminous coal-fired Foster Wheeler Energia Oy pilot circulating PFBC tests in Karhula, Finland, and ash from the high-sulfur bituminous coal-fired American Electric Power (AEP) bubbling PFBC in Brilliant, Ohio, were evaluated in laboratory and pilot-scale ash use testing. This paper addresses the technical feasibility of ash use options for PFBC unit using low- sulfur coal and limestone sorbent (karhula ash) and high-sulfur coal and dolomite sorbents (AEP Tidd ash).

  7. The predictive utility of micro indicators of concern about smoking: Findings from the International Tobacco Control 4-country study

    PubMed Central

    Partos, Timea R.; Borland, Ron; Thrasher, James F.; Li, Lin; Yong, Hua-Hie; O’Connor, Richard, J.; Siahpush, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    This study explored the association between six “micro indicators” of concern about smoking (1. stubbing out cigarettes before finishing; 2. forgoing cigarettes due to packet warning labels; thinking about... 3. the harms to oneself of smoking; 4. the harms to others of one’s smoking; 5. the bad conduct of tobacco companies; and 6. money spent on cigarettes) and cessation outcomes (making quit attempts, and achieving at least six months of sustained abstinence) among adult smokers from Australia, Canada, the United Kingdom, and the United States of America. Participants were 12049 individuals from five survey waves of the International Tobacco Control Four Country Survey (interviewed between 2002 and 2006, and followed-up approximately one year later). Generalized estimating equation logistic regression analysis was used, enabling us to control for within-participant correlations due to possible multiple responses by the same individual over different survey waves. The frequency of micro indicators predicted making quit attempts, with premature stubbing out, forgoing, and thinking about the harms to oneself of smoking being particularly strong predictors. An interaction effect with expressed intention to quit was observed, such that stubbing out and thinking about the harms to oneself predicted quit attempts more strongly among smokers with no expressed plans to quit. In contrast, there was a negative association between some micro indicators and sustained abstinence, with more frequent stubbing out, forgoing, and thinking about money spent on cigarettes associated with a reduced likelihood of subsequently achieving sustained abstinence. In countries with long-established tobacco control programs, micro indicators index both high motivation by smokers to do something about their smoking at least partly independent of espoused intention and, especially those indicators not part of a direct pathway to quitting, reduced capacity to quit successfully. PMID

  8. Apparatus utilizing a plural-profiled cam unit for actuating the valve of an internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Burandt, C.O.

    1987-08-04

    An apparatus is described for operating a reciprocable valve assembly associated with a combustion cylinder of an internal combustion engine comprising an axially-fixed camshaft having a central axis, first cam means mounted on the camshaft for rotation. The first cam means having a first base circle portion, and first and second ramp portions, the first ramp portion are connected at one end of the first base circle portion and extending in one direction away from the first base circle portion and gradually increasing in radius in the one direction. The second ramp portion is connected at one end to the first base circle portion and extends in an opposite direction away from the first base circle portion and gradually increasing in radius in the opposite direction. The second cam means has a second base circle portion of the same radius as the first base circle portion. A lobe portion radially extends from the central axis a first distance and connects third and fourth ramp portions. The third ramp portion extends in the one direction away from the second base circle portion and gradually increases in radius in the one direction. The fourth ramp portion extends in the opposite direction away from the second base circle portion and gradually increases in radius in the opposite direction. The first cam means has an outermost radial distance less than the first distance and follower means provides a single working surface engageable by both of the first and second cam means. The lobe portion and the third and fourth ramp portions of the second cam means engage a different portion of the single working surface of the follower means from that engaged by the first and second ramp portions of the first cam means.

  9. The predictive utility of micro indicators of concern about smoking: findings from the International Tobacco Control Four Country study.

    PubMed

    Partos, Timea R; Borland, Ron; Thrasher, James F; Li, Lin; Yong, Hua-Hie; O'Connor, Richard J; Siahpush, Mohammad

    2014-08-01

    This study explored the association between six "micro indicators" of concern about smoking (1. stubbing out cigarettes before finishing; 2. forgoing cigarettes due to packet warning labels; thinking about... 3. the harms to oneself of smoking; 4. the harms to others of one's smoking; 5. the bad conduct of tobacco companies; and 6. money spent on cigarettes) and cessation outcomes (making quit attempts, and achieving at least six months of sustained abstinence) among adult smokers from Australia, Canada, the United Kingdom, and the United States of America. Participants were 12,049 individuals from five survey waves of the International Tobacco Control Four Country Survey (interviewed between 2002 and 2006, and followed-up approximately one year later). Generalized estimating equation logistic regression analysis was used, enabling us to control for within-participant correlations due to possible multiple responses by the same individual over different survey waves. The frequency of micro indicators predicted making quit attempts, with premature stubbing out, forgoing, and thinking about the harms to oneself of smoking being particularly strong predictors. An interaction effect with expressed intention to quit was observed, such that stubbing out and thinking about the harms on oneself predicted quit attempts more strongly among smokers with no expressed plans to quit. In contrast, there was a negative association between some micro indicators and sustained abstinence, with more frequent stubbing out, forgoing, and thinking about money spent on cigarettes associated with a reduced likelihood of subsequently achieving sustained abstinence. In countries with long-established tobacco control programs, micro indicators index both high motivation by smokers to do something about their smoking at least partly independent of espoused intention and, especially those indicators not part of a direct pathway to quitting, reduced capacity to quit successfully.

  10. Advanced Multi-Product Coal Utilization By-Product Processing Plant

    SciTech Connect

    John Groppo; Thomas Robl

    2006-06-30

    The objective of the project is to build a multi-product ash beneficiation plant at Kentucky Utility's 2,200-MW Ghent Generating Station, located in Carroll County, Kentucky. This part of the study includes an investigation of the secondary classification characteristics of the ash feedstock excavated from the lower ash pond at Ghent Station. The secondary classification testing was concluded using a continuous demonstration-scale lamella classifier that was operated at a feed rate of 0.3 to 1.5 tons/hr. Feed to the secondary classifier was generated by operating the primary classifier at the conditions shown to be effective previously. Samples were taken while the secondary classifier was operated under a variety of conditions in order to determine the range of conditions where the unit could be efficiently operated. A Topical Report was prepared and included all of the pertinent processing data generated during Budget Period 1 of the project as well as results of beneficiated ash product evaluations in mortar and concrete, schematic plant designs with mass and water balances for the four flowsheets tested with equipment lists, capital and installation costs, expected product outputs and equipment justifications. A proposal for continuation of the project to Budget Period 2 was also prepared and submitted, with the exception of a Letter of Commitment from Cemex. The proposal is currently under internal review with Cemex and a decision is expected by the end of September, 2006.

  11. Development of novel ash hybrids to introgress resistance to emerald ash borer into north American ash species

    Treesearch

    Jennifer L. Koch; David W. Carey; Mary E. Mason

    2008-01-01

    Currently, there is no evidence that any of the native North American ash species have any resistance to the emerald ash borer (EAB). This means that the entire ash resource of the eastern United States and Canada is at risk of loss due to EAB. In contrast, outbreaks of EAB in Asian ash species are rare and appear to be isolated responses to stress (Bauer et al. 2005,...

  12. Atmospheric fate and transport of fine volcanic ash: Does particle shape matter?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, C. M.; Allard, M. P.; Klewicki, J.; Proussevitch, A. A.; Mulukutla, G.; Genareau, K.; Sahagian, D. L.

    2013-12-01

    Volcanic ash presents hazards to infrastructure, agriculture, and human and animal health. In particular, given the economic importance of intercontinental aviation, understanding how long ash is suspended in the atmosphere, and how far it is transported has taken on greater importance. Airborne ash abrades the exteriors of aircraft, enters modern jet engines and melts while coating interior engine parts causing damage and potential failure. The time fine ash stays in the atmosphere depends on its terminal velocity. Existing models of ash terminal velocities are based on smooth, quasi-spherical particles characterized by Stokes velocity. Ash particles, however, violate the various assumptions upon which Stokes flow and associated models are based. Ash particles are non-spherical and can have complex surface and internal structure. This suggests that particle shape may be one reason that models fail to accurately predict removal rates of fine particles from volcanic ash clouds. The present research seeks to better parameterize predictive models for ash particle terminal velocities, diffusivity, and dispersion in the atmospheric boundary layer. The fundamental hypothesis being tested is that particle shape irreducibly impacts the fate and transport properties of fine volcanic ash. Pilot studies, incorporating modeling and experiments, are being conducted to test this hypothesis. Specifically, a statistical model has been developed that can account for actual volcanic ash size distributions, complex ash particle geometry, and geometry variability. Experimental results are used to systematically validate and improve the model. The experiments are being conducted at the Flow Physics Facility (FPF) at UNH. Terminal velocities and dispersion properties of fine ash are characterized using still air drop experiments in an unconstrained open space using a homogenized mix of source particles. Dispersion and sedimentation dynamics are quantified using particle image

  13. SU-C-201-06: Utility of Quantitative 3D SPECT/CT Imaging in Patient Specific Internal Dosimetry of 153-Samarium with GATE Monte Carlo Package

    SciTech Connect

    Fallahpoor, M; Abbasi, M; Sen, A; Parach, A; Kalantari, F

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Patient-specific 3-dimensional (3D) internal dosimetry in targeted radionuclide therapy is essential for efficient treatment. Two major steps to achieve reliable results are: 1) generating quantitative 3D images of radionuclide distribution and attenuation coefficients and 2) using a reliable method for dose calculation based on activity and attenuation map. In this research, internal dosimetry for 153-Samarium (153-Sm) was done by SPECT-CT images coupled GATE Monte Carlo package for internal dosimetry. Methods: A 50 years old woman with bone metastases from breast cancer was prescribed 153-Sm treatment (Gamma: 103keV and beta: 0.81MeV). A SPECT/CT scan was performed with the Siemens Simbia-T scanner. SPECT and CT images were registered using default registration software. SPECT quantification was achieved by compensating for all image degrading factors including body attenuation, Compton scattering and collimator-detector response (CDR). Triple energy window method was used to estimate and eliminate the scattered photons. Iterative ordered-subsets expectation maximization (OSEM) with correction for attenuation and distance-dependent CDR was used for image reconstruction. Bilinear energy mapping is used to convert Hounsfield units in CT image to attenuation map. Organ borders were defined by the itk-SNAP toolkit segmentation on CT image. GATE was then used for internal dose calculation. The Specific Absorbed Fractions (SAFs) and S-values were reported as MIRD schema. Results: The results showed that the largest SAFs and S-values are in osseous organs as expected. S-value for lung is the highest after spine that can be important in 153-Sm therapy. Conclusion: We presented the utility of SPECT-CT images and Monte Carlo for patient-specific dosimetry as a reliable and accurate method. It has several advantages over template-based methods or simplified dose estimation methods. With advent of high speed computers, Monte Carlo can be used for treatment planning

  14. Coal Ash Corrosion Resistant Materials Testing

    SciTech Connect

    D. K. McDonald; P. L. Daniel; D. J. DeVault

    2003-08-31

    . The body of this report compares these for all of the samples in the test section. The 'Coal Ash Corrosion Resistant Materials Testing Program' is being conducted by The Babcock & Wilcox Company (B&W), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) at Reliant Energy's Niles plant in Niles, Ohio to provide full-scale, in-situ testing of recently developed boiler superheater materials. Fireside corrosion is a key issue for improving efficiency of new coal fired power plants and improving service life in existing plants. In November 1998, B&W began development of a system to permit testing of advanced tube materials at metal temperatures typical of advanced supercritical steam temperatures (1100 F and higher) in a boiler exhibiting coal ash corrosive conditions. Several materials producers including Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) contributed advanced materials to the project. In the spring of 1999 a system consisting of three identical sections, each containing multiple segments of twelve different materials, was installed. The sections are cooled by reheat steam, and are located just above the furnace entrance in Niles Unit No.1, a 110 MWe unit firing high sulfur Ohio coal. In November 2001 the first section was removed for thorough metallurgical evaluation after 29 months of operation. The second section was removed in August of 2003. Its evaluation has been completed and is the subject of this report. The final section remains in service and is expected to be removed in the spring of 2005. This paper describes the program; its importance, the design, fabrication, installation and operation of the test system, materials utilized, and experience to date. This report briefly reviews the results of the evaluation of the first section and then presents the results of the evaluation of the second section.

  15. Emerald ash borer biocontrol in ash saplings: the potential for early stage recovery of North American ash

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In many parts of North America, ash stands have been reduced by the emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis) invasion to a few surviving mature trees and young basal sprouts, saplings, and seedlings. Without a seed bank, ash tree recovery will require survival and maturation of these younger cohorts...

  16. Mineral resource of the month: soda ash

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kostic, Dennis S.

    2006-01-01

    Soda ash, also known as sodium carbonate, is an alkali chemical that can be refined from the mineral trona and from sodium carbonate-bearing brines. Several chemical processes exist for manufacturing synthetic soda ash.

  17. Effect of cement types, mineral admixtures, and bottom ash on the curing sensitivity of concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Kinaanath; Choktaweekarn, Pongsak; Saengsoy, Warangkana; Srichan, Theerati; Tangtermsirikul, Somnuk

    2013-01-01

    The curing sensitivity of concrete with cement Types 1, 3, and 5 as well as multiple powders consisting of cement, fly ash, and limestone powder was studied. Bottom ash was also used in the study as an internal curing agent and a partial substitution of fine aggregate. The curing sensitivity index was calculated by considering the performances of compressive strength and carbonation depth. Specimens were subjected to two curing conditions: continuously water-cured and continuously air-cured. The results show that cement Type 3 has a lower curing sensitivity, while cement Type 5 increases the curing sensitivity. For the mixes without bottom ash, the use of fly ash increases the curing sensitivity, while limestone powder reduces the curing sensitivity of concrete. The use of bottom ash in concrete reduces the curing sensitivity, especially at a lower mass ratio of water to binder. Concrete with limestone powder, together with bottom ash, is least sensitive to curing. The curing sensitivity calculated from carbonation depth also has a similar tendency as that derived by considering compressive strength. From the test results of compressive strength and curing sensitivity, bottom ash has been proven to be an effective internal curing agent.

  18. The spatial distribution of riparian ash: implications for the dispersal of the emerald ash borer

    Treesearch

    Susan J. Crocker; W. Keith Moser; Mark H. Hansen; Mark D. Nelson

    2007-01-01

    A pilot study to assess riparian ash connectivity and its implications for emerald ash borer dispersal was conducted in three subbasins in Michigan's Southern Lower Peninsula. Forest Inventory and Analysis data were used to estimate ash biomass. The nineteen percent of plots in riparian physiographic classes contained 40 percent of ash biomass. Connectivity of...

  19. Exploring the molecular and biochemical basis of ash resistance to emerald ash borer

    Treesearch

    Justin G.A. Whitehill; Daniel A. Herms; Pierluigi. Bonello

    2010-01-01

    Larvae of the emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis) feed on phloem of ash (Fraxinus spp.) trees. It is hypothesized that the resistance of Asian species of ash (e.g., Manchurian ash, F. mandshurica) to EAB is due to endogenous defenses present in phloem tissues in the form of defensive proteins and/or...

  20. Host resistance to emerald ash borer: development of novel ash hybrids

    Treesearch

    Jennifer L. Koch; David W. Carey; Richard Larson

    2007-01-01

    In contrast to the rapid destruction of ash trees in the United States by emerald ash borer (EAB, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire), outbreaks of EAB in Asia appear to be isolated responses to stress, such as drought, and do not devastate the ash population. This indicates that in Asia, ash trees may have a level of inherent resistance. This resistance...

  1. UTILIZATION OF LOW NOx COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS

    SciTech Connect

    J.Y. Hwang; X. Huang; M.G. McKimpson; R.E. Tieder; A.M. Hein; J.M. Gillis; D.C. Popko; K.L. Paxton; Z. Li; X. Liu; X. Song; R.I. Kramer

    1998-12-01

    Low NO{sub x} combustion practices are critical for reducing NO{sub x} emissions from power plants. These low NO{sub x} combustion practices, however, generate high residual carbon contents in the fly ash produced. These high carbon contents threaten utilization of this combustion by-product. This research has successfully developed a separation technology to render fly ash into useful, quality-controlled materials. This technology offers great flexibility and has been shown to be applicable to all of the fly ashes tested (more than 10). The separated materials can be utilized in traditional fly ash applications, such as cement and concrete, as well as in nontraditional applications such as plastic fillers, metal matrix composites, refractories, and carbon adsorbents. Technologies to use beneficiated fly ash in these applications are being successfully developed. In the future, we will continue to refine the separation and utilization technologies to expand the utilization of fly ash. The disposal of more than 31 million tons of fly ash per year is an important environmental issue. With continued development, it will be possible to increase economic, energy and environmental benefits by re-directing more of this fly ash into useful materials.

  2. Using program impact pathways to understand and improve program delivery, utilization, and potential for impact of Helen Keller International's homestead food production program in Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Olney, Deanna K; Vicheka, Sao; Kro, Meng; Chakriya, Chhom; Kroeun, Hou; Hoing, Ly Sok; Talukder, Aminzzaman; Quinn, Victoria; Iannotti, Lora; Becker, Elisabeth; Roopnaraine, Terry

    2013-06-01

    Evidence of the impact of homestead food production programs on nutrition outcomes such as anemia and growth is scant. In the absence of information on program impact pathways, it is difficult to understand why these programs, which have been successful in increasing intake of micronutrient-rich foods, have had such limited documented impact on nutrition outcomes. To conduct a process evaluation of Helen Keller International's (HKI's) homestead food production program in Cambodia to assess whether the program was operating as planned (in terms of design, delivery, and utilization) and to identify ways in which the program might need to be strengthened in order to increase its potential for impact. A program theory framework, which laid out the primary components along the hypothesized program impact pathways, was developed in collaboration with HKI and used to design the research. Semistructured interviews and focus group discussions with program beneficiaries (n = 36 and 12, respectively), nonbeneficiaries (n = 12), and program implementers (n = 17 and 2, respectively) and observations of key program delivery points, including health and nutrition training sessions (n = 6), village model farms (n = 6), and household gardens of beneficiaries (n = 36) and nonbeneficiaries (n = 12), were conducted to assess the delivery and utilization of the primary program components along the impact pathways. The majority of program components were being delivered and utilized as planned. However, challenges with some of the key components posited to improve outcomes such as anemia and growth were noted. Among these were a gap in the expected pathway from poultry production to increased intake of eggs and poultry meat, and some weaknesses in the delivery of the health and nutrition training sessions and related improvements in knowledge among the village health volunteers and beneficiaries. Although the program has been successful in delivering the majority of the program

  3. Survival of emerald ash borer in chips

    Treesearch

    Deborah G. McCullough; Therese M. Poland; David L. Cappaert

    2005-01-01

    The ability of emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, to survive following chipping or grinding of infested ash trees remains a critical question for regulatory officials. In October 2002, we felled eight infested ash trees and sampled sections of the trunk and large branches from each tree to estimate EAB density.

  4. Diagnostic utility of the HIV dementia scale and the international HIV dementia scale in screening for HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders among Spanish-speaking adults.

    PubMed

    López, Enrique; Steiner, Alexander J; Smith, Kimberly; Thaler, Nicholas S; Hardy, David J; Levine, Andrew J; Al-Kharafi, Hussah T; Yamakawa, Cristina; Goodkin, Karl

    2016-08-15

    Given that neurocognitive impairment is a frequent complication of HIV-1 infection in Spanish-speaking adults, the limited number of studies assessing HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) in this population raises serious clinical concern. In addition to being appropriately translated, instruments need to be modified, normed, and validated accordingly. The purpose of the current study was to examine the diagnostic utility of the HIV Dementia Scale (HDS) and International HIV Dementia Scale (IHDS) to screen for HAND in Spanish-speaking adults living with HIV infection. Participants were classified as either HAND (N = 47) or No-HAND (N = 53) after completing a comprehensive neuropsychological evaluation. Receiver operating characteristic analyses found the HDS (AUC = .706) was more sensitive to detecting HAND than the IHDS (AUC = .600). Optimal cutoff scores were 9.5 for the HDS (PPV = 65.2%, NPV = 71.4%) and 9.0 for the IHDS (PPV = 59.4%, NPV = 59.1%). Canonical Correlation Analysis found the HDS converged with attention and executive functioning. Findings suggest that while the IHDS may not be an appropriate screening instrument with this population, the HDS retains sufficient statistical validity and clinical utility to screen for HAND in Spanish-speaking adults as a time-efficient and cost-effective measure in clinical settings with limited resources.

  5. Kinetics of fly ash beneficiation by carbon burnout. Quarterly report, January--March 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Dodoo, J.N.; Okoh, J.M.; Yilmaz, E.

    1996-09-01

    The three year project that was proposed is a joint venture between Delmarva Power, a power generating company on the eastern shore of Maryland, and the University of Maryland Eastern Shore. The studies have focused on the benefication of fly ash by carbon burnout. The increasing use of coal fly ash as pozzolanic material in Portland cement concrete means that there is the highest economic potential in marketability of large volumes of fly ash. For the concrete industry to consider large scale use the fly ash must be of the highest quality. This means that the residual carbon content of the fly ash must have an acceptable loss on ignition (LOI) value, usually between 7-2% residual carbon. The economic gains to be had from low-carbon ash is a fact that is generally accepted by the electricity generating companies. However, since the cost of producing low-carbon in large quantities, based on present technology, far outweighs any financial gains, no electrical power company using coal as its fuel at present considers the effort worthwhile. The concrete industry would use fly ash in cement concrete mix if it can be assured of its LOI value. At present no utility company would give such assurance. Hence with several million tons of fly ash produced by a single power plant per year all that can be done is to dump the fly ash in landfills. The kinetics of fly ash benefication have been investigated in the zone II kinetic regime, using a Cahn TG 121 microbalance in the temperature 550-750{degrees}C. The P{sub O{sub 2}} and total surface area dependence of the reaction kinetics were determined using a vacuum accessory attached to the microbalance and a surface area analyzer (ASAP 2010), respectively. 16 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Wildfire Ash: Chemical Composition, Ash-Soil Interactions and Environmental Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brook, Anna; Hamzi, Seham; Wittenberg, Lea

    2015-04-01

    S., Morag H., 2013. The effect of wildfires on vegetation cover and dune activity in Australia's desert dunes: a multisensor analysis International Journal of Wildland Fire, vol. 21 (4), pp. 459-475. Lugassi R., Ben-Dor E., Eshel G., 2013. Reflectance spectroscopy of soils post-heating'Assessing thermal alterations in soil minerals. Geoderma, vol. 231, pp. 268-279. Pereira P., Úbeda X., Martin D., Mataix-Solera J., Guerrero C. 2011. Effects of a low prescribed fire in ash water soluble elements in a Cork Oak (Quercus suber) forest located in Northeast of Iberian Peninsula, Environmental Research, vol. 111(2), pp. 237-247. Shakesby R.A., 2011. Post-wildfire soil erosion in the Mediterranean: Review and future research directions Earth Science Reviews, vol. 105, pp. 71-100. Woods, S.W., Balfour, V.N. 2010. The effects of soil texture and ash thickness on the post-fire hydrological response from ash-covered soils, Journal of Hydrology, vol. 393, pp. 274-286.

  7. Development of a floating photobioreactor with internal partitions for efficient utilization of ocean wave into improved mass transfer and algal culture mixing.

    PubMed

    Kim, Z-Hun; Park, Hanwool; Hong, Seong-Joo; Lim, Sang-Min; Lee, Choul-Gyun

    2016-05-01

    Culturing microalgae in the ocean has potentials that may reduce the production cost and provide an option for an economic biofuel production from microalgae. The ocean holds great potentials for mass microalgal cultivation with its high specific heat, mixing energy from waves, and large cultivable area. Suitable photobioreactors (PBRs) that are capable of integrating marine energy into the culture systems need to be developed for the successful ocean cultivation. In this study, prototype floating PBRs were designed and constructed using transparent low-density polyethylene film for microalgal culture in the ocean. To improve the mixing efficiency, various types of internal partitions were introduced within PBRs. Three different types of internal partitions were evaluated for their effects on the mixing efficiency in terms of mass transfer (k(L)a) and mixing time in the PBRs. The partition type with the best mixing efficiency was selected, and the number of partitions was varied from one to three for investigation of its effect on mixing efficiency. When the number of partitions is increased, mass transfer increased in proportion to the number of partitions. However, mixing time was not directly related to the number of partitions. When a green microalga, Tetraselmis sp. was cultivated using PBRs with the selected partition under semi-continuous mode in the ocean, biomass and fatty acid productivities in the PBRs were increased by up to 50 % and 44% at high initial cell density, respectively, compared to non-partitioned ones. The results of internally partitioned PBRs demonstrated potentials for culturing microalgae by efficiently utilizing ocean wave energy into culture mixing in the ocean.

  8. Glass phase in municipal and industrial waste incineration bottom ashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafał Kowalski, Piotr; Michalik, Marek

    2015-04-01

    Waste incineration bottom ash is a material with rising significance in waste streams in numerous countries. Even if some part of them is now used as raw materials the great amount is still landfilled. High temperature of thermal processes (>1000°C) together with fast cooling results in high content of glass in bottom ash. Its chemical composition is influenced by various factors like composition of raw wastes and used incineration technique. Most of bottom ash grains are composed of glass with large amount of mineral phases and also metallic constituents embedded into it. Glass susceptibility for alteration processes together with the characteristics of glass-based grains can bring environmental risk in time of improper or long term storage on landfill site. In this study bottom ashes from thermal treatment of municipal and industrial (including hazardous and medical) wastes were studied to determine glass content, its chemical composition with emphasis on metal content (especially potentially hazardous) and its relations to metallic components of grains. Samples were collected from two thermal treatment plants in Poland. Qualitative and quantitative X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses were used for determination of mineral composition of studied samples. Rietveld method and addition of internal standard for determination of amorphous phase content were used. Scanning electron microscopy fitted with energy dispersive spectrometry (SEM-EDS) were used for detailed analysis of glass and glass associated phases. Waste incineration bottom ash is a multi-components material rich in amorphous phase. It dominant part is represented by Si-rich glass. It is a main component of bottom ash grains but it contains minerals present in large quantities and also various forms of metallic elements. Glass within grains is often porous and cracked. In bottom ashes from thermal treatment of municipal wastes ~ 45-55 wt % of amorphous phase were present, mostly in form of glass with high

  9. Emerald ash borer adult dispersal

    Treesearch

    Robert A. Haack; Toby R. Petrice

    2003-01-01

    The emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, is an Asian buprestid beetle that was first discovered in Michigan and Ontario in 2002 (Haack et al. 2002). Smaller populations, resulting from movement of infested host material, were found in Ohio, Maryland, and Virginia in 2003. EAB adult dispersal has not been studied in Asia; however,...

  10. Hydrochemical Leaching of Wildfire Ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamann, H.

    2008-12-01

    A century of fire suppression, combined with recent droughts has provoked some of the worst wildfire seasons in the western US. Although wild and prescribed fires are known to supply nutrients to grassland, shrubland and forest ecosystems, when ash and combustion byproducts are leached into surface waters the nutrients and other materials can affect aquatic ecosystems and pose a considerable risk to water quality. This ash may be persistent for periods as short as a storm or snowmelt event or up to several years, as suggested by periodic increases in dissolved nutrients and suspended solids. Here I present results from field sampling and bench scale experiments that examine the rate of change and chemical quality of leachate from ash samples collected from two wildfires that burned in Colorado in 2003 and 2006. Bench scale- experiments suggest that the conductivity of ash leachate increases in a continuous and modelable manner. Stream grab samples collected in burned and unburned areas within two weeks of the 2006 Mato Vega fire suggest an initial increase in pH, and conductivity, as well as an increase in solutes including dissolved organic carbon and manganese; however the results were spatially variable.

  11. Volcanic ash aggregation in the lab - can we mimic natural processes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Sebastian B.; Kueppers, Ulrich; Jacob, Michael; Ayris, Paul; Cimarelli, Corrado; Dingwell, Donald B.; Guttzeit, Melanie; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Walter, Ulrich

    2015-04-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions release large amounts of particles into the atmosphere. Volcanic ash, by definition pyroclasts smaller than 2 mm, can be distributed around the globe by prevailing winds. Ash poses hazards to aviation industry by melting in jet turbines, to human health by entering respiration systems and to society by damaging infrastructure. Under certain circumstances, ash particles can cluster together and build ash aggregates. Aggregates range in size from few mm to few cm and may exhibit complex internal stratigraphy. During growth, weight, density and aerodynamic properties change, leading to a significantly different settling behavior compared to individual ash particles. Although ash aggregation has been frequently observed in the geologic record, the physical and chemical mechanisms generating the aggregates remain poorly understood. During several field campaigns, we collected numerous ash aggregates and analyzed their textural, chemical and mechanical properties. Based on this knowledge, we have designed experiments using the ProCell Lab System® of Glatt Ingenieurtechnik GmbH, Germany. In this device, a continuous fluidized bed can be applied on solid particles and simulate gas-particle flow conditions as they would be expected in volcanic plumes or pyroclastic density currents. The geological record and direct observations have shown that both processes are capable of producing ash aggregates. As starting material we used Na-glass beads as an analogue and volcanic ash from Laacher See Volcano, Eifel Volcanic Field, Germany. We define parameters such as grainsize, specific surface area and concentration of the starting material, degree of turbulence, temperature and moisture in the process chamber and the composition of the liquid phase to influence form, size, stability and production rate of aggregates. We were able to experimentally produce round, unstructured ash pellets up to 5mm in diameter. A detailed textural description highlights

  12. Coal waste resource utilization within the Sasol group of companies

    SciTech Connect

    Steynberg, E.C.; Matjie, R.H.; Bunt, J.R.; Heap, M.A.

    1998-12-31

    Sasol converts low grade coal into high value synfuels and chemicals using fixed bed gasification and Fischer-Tropsch Technology. Sasol mines approximately 45 million tons of coal annually, which is utilized in: gasification, producing 9 million t/y of coarse ash; and steam generation, producing 3 million t/y of fly ash. The optimal use of the ash produced in these processes naturally has many advantages which among others addresses the long-term environmental problems associated with ash dumping, reduces the cost of ash dumping, prevents capital expenditure on further ash slimes dams or on land to create dumping facilities and indirectly creates new job opportunities. Furthermore higher value products can also be prepared from the ash which creates new opportunities for Sasol. This paper addresses the potential utilization of this waste product by examining it from two angles, namely from an engineering perspective and from a research point of view. Firstly the possible application of ash in the road construction and building industries will be discussed; thereafter work conducted by Research and Development concerning the production of lightweight aggregates and inorganic chemicals from ash will be highlighted.

  13. Biomimetic thermal barrier coating in jet engine to resist volcanic ash deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Wenjia; Major, Zsuzsanna; Schulz, Uwe; Muth, Tobias; Lavallée, Yan; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2017-04-01

    The threat of volcanic ash to aviation safety is attracting extensive attention when several commercial jet aircraft were damaged after flying through volcanic ash clouds from the May 1980 eruptions of Mount St. Helen in Washington, U.S. and especially after the air traffic disruption in 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption. A major hazard presented by volcanic ash to aircraft is linked to the wetting and spreading of molten ash droplets on engine component surfaces. Due to the fact ash has a lower melting point, around 1100 °C, than the gas temperature in the hot section (between 1400 to 2000 °C), this cause the ash to melt and potentially stick to the internal components (e.g., combustor and turbine blades), this cause the ash to melt and potentially stick to the internal components of the engine creating, substantial damage or even engine failure after ingestion. Here, inspiring form the natural surface of lotus leaf (exhibiting extreme water repellency, known as 'lotus effect'), we firstly create the multifunctional surface thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) by producing a hierarchical structure with femtosecond laser pulses. In detail, we investigate the effect of one of primary femtosecond laser irradiation process parameter (scanning speed) on the hydrophobicity of water droplets onto the two kinds of TBCs fabricated by electron-beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) and air plasma spray (APS), respectively as well as their corresponding to morphology. It is found that, comparison with the original surface (without femtosecond laser ablation), all of the irradiated samples demonstrate more significant hydrophobic properties due to nanostructuring. On the basis of these preliminary room-temperature results, the wettability of volcanic ash droplets will be analysed at the high temperature to constrain the potential impact of volcanic ash on the jet engines.

  14. Petrographic characterization of economizer fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Valentim, B.; Hower, J.C.; Soares, S.; Guedes, A.; Garcia, C.; Flores, D.; Oliveira, A.

    2009-11-15

    Policies for reducing NOx emissions have led power plants to restrict O{sub 2}, resulting in high-carbon fly ash production. Therefore, some potentially useful fly ash, such as the economizer fly ash, is discarded without a thorough knowledge of its composition. In order to characterize this type of fly ash, samples were collected from the economizer Portuguese power plant burning two low-sulfur bituminous coals. Characterization was also performed on economizer fly ash subsamples after wet sieving, density and magnetic separation. Analysis included atomic absorption spectroscopy, loss-on-ignition, scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, optical microscopy, and micro-Raman spectroscopy.

  15. The United States national volcanic ash operations plan for aviation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Albersheim, Steven; Guffanti, Marianne

    2009-01-01

    Volcanic-ash clouds are a known hazard to aviation, requiring that aircraft be warned away from ash-contaminated airspace. The exposure of aviation to potential hazards from volcanoes in the United States is significant. In support of existing interagency operations to detect and track volcanic-ash clouds, the United States has prepared a National Volcanic Ash Operations Plan for Aviation to strengthen the warning process in its airspace. The US National Plan documents the responsibilities, communication protocols, and prescribed hazard messages of the Federal Aviation Administration, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, US Geological Survey, and Air Force Weather Agency. The plan introduces a new message format, a Volcano Observatory Notice for Aviation, to provide clear, concise information about volcanic activity, including precursory unrest, to air-traffic controllers (for use in Notices to Airmen) and other aviation users. The plan is online at http://www.ofcm.gov/p35-nvaopa/pdf/FCM-P35-2007-NVAOPA.pdf. While the plan provides general operational practices, it remains the responsibility of the federal agencies involved to implement the described procedures through orders, directives, etc. Since the plan mirrors global guidelines of the International Civil Aviation Organization, it also provides an example that could be adapted by other countries.

  16. A novel method for immobilization of heavy metals from MSW incinerator fly ash via use of Sorel cement

    SciTech Connect

    Macakova, S.; Hepworth, M.H.

    1996-12-31

    Since fly ash contains a higher concentration of toxic elements than bottom ash, it is not usually possible to deposit it in ordinary landfills. The special landfill sites (ash monofills) for ash, which do not endanger ground water supplies are both temporary and an expensive solution and are not acceptable by people who live adjacent to them. According to the United States Supreme Court decision ruling on May 2, 1994, incinerator ash from municipal combustion facilities are subject to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act as potentially hazardous waste. In the autumn of 1993, a research program was initiated by one of the authors to employ a novel method for stabilization of the fly ash from electrostatic precipitators. The novelty of this method is that it used by-products from magnesium processing plants to prepare magnesia cement, so called Sorel cement, to stabilize fly ash from MSWI. Sorel cement is a combination of magnesium oxide and magnesium chloride, currently by-products of a combination of magnesium oxide and magnesium chloride, currently by-products of magnesium processing operations. The main goal of this research program was to treat fly ash prior to its disposal and to investigate the possibility of utilizing a new ash-concrete product.

  17. A pilot study of mercury liberation and capture from coal-fired power plant fly ash.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin; Gao, Xiaobing; Goeckner, Bryna; Kollakowsky, Dave; Ramme, Bruce

    2005-03-01

    The coal-fired electric utility generation industry has been identified as the largest anthropogenic source of mercury (Hg) emissions in the United States. One of the promising techniques for Hg removal from flue gas is activated carbon injection (ACI). The aim of this project was to liberate Hg bound to fly ash and activated carbon after ACI and provide high-quality coal combustion products for use in construction materials. Both bench- and pilot-scale tests were conducted to liberate Hg using a thermal desorption process. The results indicated that up to 90% of the Hg could be liberated from the fly ash or fly-ash-and-activated-carbon mixture using a pilot-scale apparatus (air slide) at 538 degrees C with a very short retention time (less than 1 min). Scanning electron microscope (SEM) evaluation indicated no significant change in fly ash carbon particle morphology following the thermal treatment. Fly ash particles collected in the baghouse of the pilot-scale apparatus were smaller in size than those collected at the exit of the air slide. A similar trend was observed in carbon particles separated from the fly ash using froth flotation. The results of this study suggest a means for power plants to reduce the level of Hg in coal-combustion products and potentially recycle activated carbon while maintaining the resale value of fly ash. This technology is in the process of being patented.

  18. CO2 Rebinding by Oil Shale CFBC Ashes: Effect of Pre-Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trikkel, Andres; Keelmann, Merli; Aranson, Aljona; Kuusik, Rein

    Power production in Estonia is predominantly based on combustion of a local low-grade fossil fuel Estonian oil shale. Due to the high content of carbonaceous mineral matter in oil shale, its combustion is related to formation of lime-containing ashes (content of free CaO 10-30%) which could be utilized as sorbents for CO2. In the present research CO2 uptake by circulating fluidized bed and pulverized firing ashes from different technological devices (furnace, cyclones etc) of an operating power plant was studied and the effect of pre-treatment (grinding, calcination at different temperatures) of these ashes on their capture capacity was estimated using thermogravimetric, SEM, X-Ray and EDX analysis methods. It was found that capture capacities were determined mainly by free CaO content in the ashes, thereby, fluidized bed ashes showed higher CaO conversion levels (19.2-74.2%) as compared to pulverized firing ones (8.7-51.8%). Pre-treatment conditions influenced noticeably CO2 uptake. Grinding decreased CO2 capture capacity of fluidized bed ashes, calcination at higher temperatures decreased capture capacity of both types of ashes. Clarification of this phenomenon was given. Kinetic analysis of the process has been carried out, mechanism of the reactions and respective kinetic constants have been estimated.

  19. The History of Attack and Success of Emerald Ash Borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) on White Fringetree in Southwestern Ohio.

    PubMed

    Thiemann, Danielle; Lopez, Vanessa; Ray, Ann M; Cipollini, Don

    2016-08-01

    Emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, is an invasive insect that has caused widespread mortality of ash species in North America. The ability of emerald ash borer to utilize white fringetree as an alternate host was reported recently. We aimed to determine how long white fringetree has been under attack from emerald ash borer, the degree of attack, and the overall success of this beetle on this novel host. Stems from three of nine infested white fringetrees collected from the Dayton and Cincinnati, OH, areas in the winter of 2015 yielded four live adult emerald ash borers after being held in rearing containers, and numerous older exit holes were observed. Measurement and aging of feeding galleries on these stems indicated that emerald ash borer has been using this species since 2011, at least, with peak gallery densities reached in 2012 and 2013 on most of the harvested trees. On average, 32 galleries per square meter were found in these stems with about one-third of them being indicative of fourth-instar larvae. This supports the assertion that emerald ash borer has been using white fringetree as a host plant with moderate to good success for as long as ash species in these particular areas have been utilized.

  20. Risk to ash from emerald ash borer: can biological control prevent the loss of ash stands?

    Treesearch

    Jian J. Duan; Roy G. Van Driesche; Leah S. Bauer; Daniel M. Kashian; Daniel A. Herms

    2015-01-01

    Ash trees (Fraxinus spp.) are an important components of both natural forests and urban plantings in the United States and Canada (Federal Register, 2003; Nowak et al., 2003). There are approximately 16 species of Fraxinus native to North America (Harlow et al., 1996; USGS, 2014), each adapted to different ecological niches across...

  1. Utilizing Interns in Facilities Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Judkins, Clarissa; Morris, John P.; Molocznik, Chuck

    2011-01-01

    Facilities management is rapidly changing and developing from a position an individual stumbles into--or work one's way up through--to a discipline and vocation all of its own. There is a need for a collaborative strategy among leaders in practice, education, and research to share knowledge and experience and to establish professional and ethical…

  2. Computational investigation of carbon-in-ash levels for a wall-fired boiler after low-NOx combustion modifications

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, K.A.; Eddings, E.G.; Heap, M.P.; Facchiano, A.; Hardman, R.R.

    1998-12-31

    understanding and addressing this issue. The computational tools used by Reaction Engineering International (REI) have been developed to address the operational and design considerations of a wide range of combustion systems including utility boilers, pyrolysis furnaces, rotary kilns, waste incinerators, flash smelters, and smelting cyclones. The current models simulate reacting flows and particles, including gaseous diffusion flames, pulverized-coal flames, liquid sprays, coal slurries, injected sorbents, and other oxidation/reduction systems. In particular, emphasis has been placed on simulating coal combustion and pollutant formation.

  3. pH-dependent leaching of constituents of potential concern from concrete materials containing coal combustion fly ash.

    PubMed

    Kosson, David S; Garrabrants, Andrew C; DeLapp, Rossane; van der Sloot, Hans A

    2014-05-01

    Current concerns about the environmental safety of coal combustion fly ash have motivated this evaluation of the impact of fly ash use as a cement replacement in concrete materials on the leaching of constituents of potential concern. The chemical effects of fly ash on leaching were determined through characterization of liquid-solid partitioning using EPA Method 1313 for four fly ash materials as well as concrete and microconcrete materials containing 0% (control materials), 25% and 45% replacement of portland cement with the fly ash source. All source materials, concrete formulations and replacement levels are representative of US concrete industry practices. Eluate concentrations as a function of pH were compared to a broader range of available testing results for international concretes and mortars for which the leaching characteristics of the component fly ashes were unknown. The chemistry of the hydrated cement fraction was found to dominate the liquid-solid partitioning resulting in reduced leaching concentrations of most trace metals compared to concentrations from fly ash materials alone. Compared to controls, eluate concentrations of Sb, As, B, Cr, Mo, Se, Tl and V from concrete products containing fly ash were essentially the same as the eluate concentrations from control materials produced without fly ash replacement indicating little to no significant impact on aqueous partitioning.

  4. Potential for thermochemical conversion of biomass residues from the integrated sugar-ethanol process - Fate of ash and ash-forming elements.

    PubMed

    Dirbeba, Meheretu Jaleta; Brink, Anders; DeMartini, Nikolai; Zevenhoven, Maria; Hupa, Mikko

    2017-06-01

    In this work, potential for thermochemical conversion of biomass residues from an integrated sugar-ethanol process and the fate of ash and ash-forming elements in the process are presented. Ash, ash-forming elements, and energy flows in the process were determined using mass balances and analyses of eight different biomass samples for ash contents, elemental compositions, and heating values. The results show that the ash content increases from the sugarcane to the final residue, vinasse. The cane straw, which is left in the field, contains one-third of the energy and 25% of the K and Cl while the vinasse contains 2% of the energy and 40% of the K and Cl in the cane. K and Cl in biomass fuels cause corrosion and fouling problems in boilers and gasifiers. Over 85% of these elements in the straw are water soluble indicating that water leaching would improve it for utilization in thermochemical conversion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Interspecific variation in resistance to emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) among North American and Asian ash (Fraxinus spp.).

    PubMed

    Rebek, Eric J; Herms, Daniel A; Smitley, David R

    2008-02-01

    We conducted a 3-yr study to compare the susceptibility of selected North American ash and an Asian ash species to emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, an invasive wood-boring beetle introduced to North America from Asia. Because of a coevolutionary relationship between Asian ashes and emerald ash borer, we hypothesized an Asian ash species, Manchurian ash, is more resistant to the beetle than its North American congeners. Consistent with our hypothesis, Manchurian ash experienced far less mortality and yielded far fewer adult beetles than several cultivars of North American green and white ash. Surprisingly, a black ash (North American) x Manchurian ash hybrid was highly susceptible to emerald ash borer, indicating this cultivar did not inherit emerald ash borer resistance from its Asian parent. A corollary study investigated the efficacy of soil-applied imidacloprid, a systemic, neonicotinoid insecticide, for controlling emerald ash borer in each of the five cultivars. Imidacloprid had no effect on emerald ash borer colonization of Manchurian ash, which was low in untreated and treated trees. In contrast, imidacloprid did enhance survival of the North American and hybrid cultivars and significantly reduced the number of emerald ash borer adults emerging from green and white ash cultivars. We identify a possible mechanism of resistance of Manchurian ash to emerald ash borer, which may prove useful for screening, selecting, and breeding emerald ash borer-resistant ash trees.

  6. NASA Applied Science Program Applications for the Volcanic Ash Threat to Aviation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, J. J.; Haynes, J. A.; Lindsay, F.

    2012-12-01

    Over the past decade, the public interest has been increasingly focused on the significant safety and economic impacts of the volcanic ash threat to aviation. During this period, the NASA Applied Science Program has developed a significant number of critical volcanic ash applications for a wide range of cutting-edge NASA satellite observations. This has entailed the development of many new and innovative technical advances and these advances have enabled and are increasingly improving the accuracy and the utility of volcanic ash advisories worldwide. The development of these applications is examined with respect to the specific sensor technologies, their pedigree and legacy, their unique and critical data for volcanic ash detection or characterization, volcanic ash algorithm development and validation and, finally, the use and impact of these applications. This substantial legacy rests on NASA Earth Observing Satellites and their advanced data. Imager applications for the The MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectro-radiometer (MODIS) instrument onboard NASA Terra and Aqua spacecraft and the Visible Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument onboard Suomi NPP allow better discrimination of ash from water vapor and ice clouds than traditional split-window imager techniques, as well as improved height assignment. Chemistry and aerosol applications for the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) onboard the NASA Aura spacecraft and the Ozone Mapper and Profiler Suite (OMPS) onboard Suomi NPP produce improved horizontal dispersion maps, and indices for volcanic ash and sulfate aerosol concentrations. Applications for the Caliop lidar onboard the NASA Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) satellite provide very accurate estimates of volcanic ash altitude, layering and concentration. These are critical assimilation elements for volcanic ash dispersion models and forecasts. The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument

  7. Kinetics of coal fly ash chlorination by phosgene

    SciTech Connect

    Adelman, D.J.

    1984-06-01

    The kinetics of the reaction between phosgene and a fly ash composed of 97 weight percent alumina and silica has been studied over a temperature range of 450 to 800/sup 0/C and a phosgene partial pressure range of 0.02 to 0.9 atm. A microbalance was used in obtaining initial conversion rate and extended conversion-time data, and B.E.T. surface areas and specific phosgene chemisorption weights as functions of conversion. Intrinsic kinetic parameters and constant alumina to silica molar reaction ratio were determined over a fly ash conversion range of 0 to 0.375. The reaction is first order with respect to phosgene partial pressure. The shrinking-core model was successfully applied to predict fly ash conversion versus time data for the full phosgene partial pressure range and for temperatures up to 600/sup 0/C. An activation energy of 40.8 kcal/M and a frequency factor of 4.7E07 cm/min were used in the model. The results of the kinetic study were utilized in the preliminary design of a fly ash chlorination reactor. It is predicted that four reactors with beds 3 m in diameter and 2.36 m tall could process the 272,000 metric tons of fly ash collected annually by a 1000 megawatt power station. Spherical pellets with a diameter of 0.25 cm would be reacted at 700/sup 0/C to recover 67% of the alumina and 13% of the silica. 71 references, 24 figures, 8 tables.

  8. Kinetics of coal fly ash chlorination by phosgene

    SciTech Connect

    Adelman, D.J.

    1984-01-01

    The kinetics of the reaction between phosgene and a fly ash composed of 97 weight percent alumina and silica was studied over a temperature range of 450 to 800/sup 0/C and a phosgene partial pressure range of 0.02 to 0.9 atm. A microbalance was used in obtaining initial conversion rate and extended conversion-time data, and B.E.T. surface areas and specific phosgene chemisorption weights as functions of conversion. Intrinsic kinetic parameters and a constant alumina to silica molar reaction ratio were determined over a fly ash conversion range of 0 to 0.375. The reaction is first order with respect to phosgene partial pressure. The shrinking-core model was successfully applied to predict fly ash conversion versus time data for the full phosgene partial pressure range and for temperatures up to 600/sup 0/C. An activation energy of 40.8 kcal/g-M and a frequency factor of 4.7EO7 cm/min were used in the model. The results of the kinetic study were utilized in the preliminary design of a fly ash chlorination reactor. It is predicted that four reactors with beds 3 m in diameter and 2.36 m tall could process the 272,000 metric tons of fly ash collected annually by a 1000 megawatt power station. Spherical pellets with a diameter of 0.25 cm would be reacted at 700/sup 0/C to recover 67% of the alumina and 13% of the silica.

  9. Characteristics of fly ashes from full-scale coal-fired power plants and their relationship to mercury adsorption

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Y.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Chang, R.; Richardson, C.; Paradis, J.

    2007-01-01

    Nine fly ash samples were collected from the particulate collection devices (baghouse or electrostatic precipitator) of four full-scale pulverized coal (PC) utility boilers burning eastern bituminous coals (EB-PC ashes) and three cyclone utility boilers burning either Powder River Basin (PRB) coals or PRB blends,(PRB-CYC ashes). As-received fly ash samples were mechanically sieved to obtain six size fractions. Unburned carbon (UBC) content, mercury content, and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET)-N2 surface areas of as-received fly ashes and their size fractions were measured. In addition, UBC particles were examined by scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission microscopy, and thermogravimetry to obtain information on their surface morphology, structure, and oxidation reactivity. It was found that the UBC particles contained amorphous carbon, ribbon-shaped graphitic carbon, and highly ordered graphite structures. The mercury contents of the UBCs (Hg/UBC, in ppm) in raw ash samples were comparable to those of the UBC-enriched samples, indicating that mercury was mainly adsorbed on the UBC in fly ash. The UBC content decreased with a decreasing particle size range for all nine ashes. There was no correlation between the mercury and UBC contents of different size fractions of as-received ashes. The mercury content of the UBCs in each size fraction, however, generally increased with a decreasing particle size for the nine ashes. The mercury contents and surface areas of the UBCs in the PRB-CYC ashes were about 8 and 3 times higher than UBCs in the EB-PC ashes, respectively. It appeared that both the particle size and surface area of UBC could contribute to mercury capture. The particle size of the UBC in PRB-CYC ash and thus the external mass transfer was found to be the major factor impacting the mercury adsorption. Both the particle size and surface reactivity of the UBC in EB-PC ash, which generally had a lower carbon oxidation reactivity than the PRB

  10. Ash Production in Eruptive Flows: Comminution in Conduits and Pyroclastic Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufek, J.; Manga, M.; Patel, A.

    2009-05-01

    Processes occurring at the grain scale, termed microphysical processes, can exert strong control of explosive eruption dynamics. In this talk we illustrate the importance of particle-particle interaction on the mass and momentum balance of eruptive flows. In particular we examine the break-up and transport of clasts during particle-particle interactions for two high-energy flow environments: pyroclastic and conduit flows. Abrasion and comminution of pumice clasts during the propagation of pyroclastic flows and post-fragmentation conduit flow have long been recognized as a potential source for the enhanced production of volcanic ash, however its relative importance has eluded quantification. The amount of fine-material produced in-situ can potentially affect runout distance, deposit sorting, the volume of ash introduced in the upper atmosphere, and internal pore pressure in pyroclastic flows. We conduct a series of laboratory experiments on the collisional production of ash that may occur during different regimes of pyroclastic flow transport and conduit flow. Using these laboratory experiments we develop a subgrid model for ash production that can be included in analytical and multiphase numerical procedures to estimate the total volume of ash produced during transport. We find that for most pyroclastic flow conditions, 10-20% of the initially 1 cm clasts comminutes into ash with the percentage increasing as a function of initial flow energy. Most of the ash is produced in the high-energy regions near the flow inlet, although flow acceleration on steep slopes can produce ash far from the vent. On level terrain, collisionally and frictionally produced ash generates gravity currents that detach from the main flow. Ash produced at the frictional base of the flow and in the collisional upper regions of the flow can be redistributed through the entirety of the flow, although frictionally produced ash accumulates preferentially near its source in the bed load. Flows that

  11. Solid by-products of coal combustion: Fly ash as a source of industrial minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Bhagwat, S.B.; Rapp, D.M.; Bukowski, J.M.

    1996-12-31

    Fly ash