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Sample records for international botanical congress

  1. Outcomes of the 2011 Botanical Nomenclature Section at the XVIII International Botanical Congress

    PubMed Central

    Miller, James S.; Funk, Vicki A.; Wagner, Warren L.; Barrie, Fred; Hoch, Peter C.; Herendeen, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The Nomenclature Section held just before the 18th International Botanical Congress in Melbourne, Australia in July 2011 saw sweeping changes to the way scientists name new plants, algae, and fungi. The changes begin on the cover: the title was broadened to make explicit that the Code applies not only to plants, but also to algae and fungi. The new title will now be the International Code of Nomenclature of algae, fungi, and plants. For the first time in history the Code will allow for the electronic publication of names of new taxa. In an effort to make the publication of new names more accurate and efficient, the requirement for a Latin validating diagnosis or description was changed to allow either English or Latin for these essential components of the publication of a new name. Both of these latter changes will take effect on 1 January 2012. The nomenclatural rules for fungi will see several important changes, the most important of which is probably the adoption of the principle of “one fungus, one name.” Paleobotanists will also see changes with the elimination of the concept of “morphotaxa” from the Code. PMID:22171188

  2. Outcomes of the 2011 Botanical Nomenclature Section at the XVIII International Botanical Congress.

    PubMed

    Miller, James S; Funk, Vicki A; Wagner, Warren L; Barrie, Fred; Hoch, Peter C; Herendeen, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    The Nomenclature Section held just before the 18th International Botanical Congress in Melbourne, Australia in July 2011 saw sweeping changes to the way scientists name new plants, algae, and fungi. The changes begin on the cover: the title was broadened to make explicit that the Code applies not only to plants, but also to algae and fungi. The new title will now be the International Code of Nomenclature of algae, fungi, and plants. For the first time in history the Code will allow for the electronic publication of names of new taxa. In an effort to make the publication of new names more accurate and efficient, the requirement for a Latin validating diagnosis or description was changed to allow either English or Latin for these essential components of the publication of a new name. Both of these latter changes will take effect on 1 January 2012. The nomenclatural rules for fungi will see several important changes, the most important of which is probably the adoption of the principle of "one fungus, one name." Paleobotanists will also see changes with the elimination of the concept of "morphotaxa" from the Code.

  3. Changes to publication requirements made at the XVIII International Botanical Congress in Melbourne - what does e-publication mean for you?

    PubMed

    Knapp, Sandra; McNeill, John; Turland, Nicholas J

    2011-01-01

    Changes to the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature are decided on every 6 years at Nomenclature Sections associated with International Botanical Congresses (IBC). The XVIII IBC was held in Melbourne, Australia; the Nomenclature Section met on 18-22 July 2011 and its decisions were accepted by the Congress at its plenary session on 30 July. Several important changes were made to the Code as a result of this meeting that will affect publication of new names. Two of these changes will come into effect on 1 January 2012, some months before the Melbourne Code is published. Electronic material published online in Portable Document Format (PDF) with an International Standard Serial Number (ISSN) or an International Standard Book Number (ISBN) will constitute effective publication, and the requirement for a Latin description or diagnosis for names of new taxa will be changed to a requirement for a description or diagnosis in either Latin or English. In addition, effective from 1 January 2013, new names of organisms treated as fungi must, in order to be validly published, include in the protologue (everything associated with a name at its valid publication) the citation of an identifier issued by a recognized repository (such as MycoBank). Draft text of the new articles dealing with electronic publication is provided and best practice is outlined.To encourage dissemination of the changes made to the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants, this article will be published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, Brittonia, Cladistics, MycoKeys, Mycotaxon, New Phytologist, North American Fungi, Novon, Opuscula Philolichenum, PhytoKeys, Phytoneuron, Phytotaxa, Plant Diversity and Resources, Systematic Botany and Taxon.

  4. Changes to publication requirements made at the XVIII International Botanical Congress in Melbourne - what does e-publication mean for you?

    PubMed

    Knapp, Sandra; McNeill, John; Turland, Nicholas J

    2011-09-14

    Changes to the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature are decided on every 6 years at Nomenclature Sections associated with International Botanical Congresses (IBC). The XVIII IBC was held in Melbourne, Australia; the Nomenclature Section met on 18-22 July 2011 and its decisions were accepted by the Congress at its plenary session on 30 July. Several important changes were made to the Code as a result of this meeting that will affect publication of new names. Two of these changes will come into effect on 1 January 2012, some months before the Melbourne Code is published. Electronic material published online in Portable Document Format (PDF) with an International Standard Serial Number (ISSN) or an International Standard Book Number (ISBN) will constitute effective publication, and the requirement for a Latin description or diagnosis for names of new taxa will be changed to a requirement for a description or diagnosis in either Latin or English. In addition, effective from 1 January 2013, new names of organisms treated as fungi must, in order to be validly published, include in the protologue (everything associated with a name at its valid publication) the citation of an identifier issued by a recognized repository (such as MycoBank). Draft text of the new articles dealing with electronic publication is provided and best practice is outlined. To encourage dissemination of the changes made to the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants, this article will be published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, Brittonia, Cladistics, MycoKeys, Mycotaxon, New Phytologist, North American Fungi, Novon, Opuscula Philolichenum, PhytoKeys, Phytoneuron, Phytotaxa, Plant Diversity and Resources, Systematic Botany and Taxon.

  5. International Energy and Environmental Congress: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    This document contains information presented at the International Energy and Environmental Congress `93 proceedings. Symposiums included demand-side management strategic directions; federal energy management; corporate energy management; and pollution control technologies. Individual reports from the symposiums are processed separately for the data bases.

  6. Second International Fascia Research Congress

    PubMed Central

    Findley, Thomas W.

    2009-01-01

    Findings from papers published by key speakers at the 2007 Fascia Research Congress are presented in preparation for the second congress, October 2009, in Amsterdam. The role of fascia is demonstrated in new scientific findings in mechanotransduction between the cytoskeletal structure and the extracellular matrix, and its implications for health and disease.the presence of contractile cells (myofibroblasts) within the fascial fabric. Clinicians are interested in their role in creating contractile tonus in the fascial fabric—how myofibroblasts form, how they are activated, and their influence on passive muscle tonus.the biomechanical properties of fascial tissues: creep, relaxation, hysteresis, effect of sustained spinal flexion on lumbar tissues, strain-induced hydration changes, myofascial manipulation, and fascial viscoelastic deformation. These properties underlie the response of these tissues to therapy.how fascia is innervated, and how proprioception and pain are created, detected, and modulated by the spinal cord and the rest of the nervous system.forms of mechanical signaling within the fascial matrix, such as the tugging in the collagen matrix created by twisting acupuncture needles.new techniques for measurement of fascial motion in living tissue. PMID:21589727

  7. Eighth international congress on nitrogen fixation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of the Eighth International Congress on Nitrogen Fixation held May 20--26, 1990 in Knoxville, Tennessee. The volume contains abstracts of individual presentations. Sessions were entitled Recent Advances in the Chemistry of Nitrogen Fixation, Plant-microbe Interactions, Limiting Factors of Nitrogen Fixation, Nitrogen Fixation and the Environment, Bacterial Systems, Nitrogen Fixation in Agriculture and Industry, Plant Function, and Nitrogen Fixation and Evolution.

  8. 11th International Congress of Endocrinology.

    PubMed

    Fuller, P J

    2001-03-01

    The Olympics of endocrinology, the 11th International Congress of Endocrinolgy was held rather appropriately in Sydney, four weeks after the summer games of the XXWIIth Modern Olympiad. Both occasions were a great success and whilst it may be tempting to extend the analogy to the pool or the track or heaven forbid, digress into 'drugs in sport', this review will focus on endocrinology. There were over 3000 participants with ten plenary lectures, 20 meet-the-expert sessions, 41 symposia, 128 oral free communications and 1500 posters. Sydney post-Olympics provided a vibrant, exciting and picturesque setting with outstanding convention facilities. The Congress Party was held at Campbells Cove in the lee of the Harbour Bridge looking toward the Opera House which provided an opportunity for delegates to view the two architectural icons that had become so familiar in the preceding months. Credit must be given both to the Local Organising Committee of Sydney endocrinologists who made it all happen and to the International Program Organising Committee who crafted a pageant of first rate endocrinology. It is self-evident that this report can only hope to give the reader a flavour of a Congress such as this with the choice of topics being largely idiosyncratic. With five concurrent symposia and two concurrent orals each morning and afternoon of the four days, any omissions reflect not on the topic or its importance but on this reviewer's inability to be in more than one place at once!

  9. VII International Congress of Engineering Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-01-01

    In the frame of the fortieth anniversary celebration of the Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana and the Physics Engineering career, the Division of Basic Science and Engineering and its Departments organized the "VII International Congress of Physics Engineering". The Congress was held from 24 to 28 November 2014 in Mexico City, Mexico. This congress is the first of its type in Latin America, and because of its international character, it gathers experts on physics engineering from Mexico and all over the globe. Since 1999, this event has shown research, articles, projects, technological developments and vanguard scientists. These activities aim to spread, promote, and share the knowledge of Physics Engineering. The topics of the Congress were: • Renewable energies engineering • Materials technology • Nanotechnology • Medical physics • Educational physics engineering • Nuclear engineering • High precision instrumentation • Atmospheric physics • Optical engineering • Physics history • Acoustics This event integrates lectures on top trending topics with pre-congress workshops, which are given by recognized scientists with an outstanding academic record. The lectures and workshops allow the exchange of experiences, and create and strengthen research networks. The Congress also encourages professional mobility among all universities and research centres from all countries. CIIF2014 Organizing and Editorial Committee Dr. Ernesto Rodrigo Vázquez Cerón Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana - Azcapotzalco ervc@correo.azc.uam.mx Dr. Luis Enrique Noreña Franco Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana - Azcapotzalco lnf@correo.azc.uam.mx Dr. Alberto Rubio Ponce Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana - Azcapotzalco arp@correo.azc.uam.mx Dr. Óscar Olvera Neria Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana - Azcapotzalco oon@correo.azc.uam.mx Professor Jaime Granados Samaniego Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana - Azcapotzalco jgs@correo.azc.uam.mx Dr. Roberto Tito Hern

  10. The 20th International Congress of Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hunter, P A

    1997-09-01

    Over 4,000 participants from all over the world attended the 20th International Congress of Chemotherapy (ICC) between 29th June-3rd July, 1997, in Sydney. Anti-infective and cancer chemotherapy were discussed in a wide context, with presentations being made on new products, compounds in development and current clinical approaches. Inevitably in a congress of this size, there were many sessions running concurrently (usually nine), with several simultaneous poster sessions as well. A common theme currently at many chemotherapy congresses is the growth of resistance to existing agents, and the ICC was no exception. Resistance to Gram-positive cocci is a particular problem, and many sessions were devoted to this subject. This report attempts to highlight just some of the aspects of antibacterial chemotherapy presented at the meeting. New fluoroquinolones formed a major topic that attracted a number of poster sessions and symposia, continuing a trend seen in recent years. The streptogramins offer an alternative approach to combating Gram-positive infections, and a symposium was devoted to these compounds.

  11. The fifth International Geological Congress, Washington, 1891

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, C.M.

    2006-01-01

    The 5th International Geological Congress (IGC), the initial meeting in North America, was the first of the three IGCs that have been held in the United States of America (USA). Of the 538 registrants alive when the 5th IGC convened in Washington, 251 persons, representing fifteen countries, actually attended the meeting. These participants included 173 people from the USA, of whom forty-two represented the US Geological Survey (USGS). Fourteen of the US State geological surveys sent representatives to Washington. Eight participants came from other countries in the Western Hemisphere - Canada (3), Chile (1), Mexico (3), and Peru (1). The sixty-six European geologists and naturalists at the 5th IGC represented Austro-Hungary (3), Belgium (3), Britain (12), France (7), Germany (23), Norway (1), Romania (3), Russia (8), Sweden (4), and Switzerland (2). The USGS and the Columbian College (now the George Washington University) acted as the principal hosts. The American Association for the Advancement of Science and then the Geological Society of America (GSA) met in the Capital immediately before the Congress convened (26 August-1 September 1891). The 5th IGC's formal discussions treated the genetic classification of Pleistocene rocks, the chronological correlation of clastic rocks, and the international standardization of colors, symbols, and names used on geologic maps. The third of those topics continued key debates at the 1st through 4th IGCs. The GSA, the Korean Embassy, the Smithsonian Institution's US National Museum, the USGS, and one of the two Secretaries-General hosted evening receptions. Field excursions examined Paleozoic exposures in New York (18-25 August), Cretaceous-Pleistocene localities along the Potomac River south of Washington (30 August), and classic Precambrian-Pleistocene sequences and structures in the Great Plains, Yellowstone, Rocky Mountains, and Great Basin (2-26 September), with optional trips to the Grand Canyon (19-28 September) and Lake

  12. International Congress of Applied Linguistics: Congress Abstracts (3rd, Copenhagen, August 21-26, 1972).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qvistgaard, Jacques, Ed.; And Others

    This volume contains abstracts of the 239 papers given at the Third International Congress of Applied Linguistics. The volume contains a topical and author index arranged alphabetically. Topics include applied linguistics, quantitative linguistics, contrastive linguistics, application of grammar models, the syntax of spoken language, applied…

  13. American Perspectives on the Seventh International Congress on Mathematical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dossey, John A., Ed.

    This publication is a collection of papers portraying an American view of the happenings of the Seventh International Congress on Mathematical Education (ICME-7). Papers included: (1) "ICME-7 and Tertiary Level Mathematics: Une Petite Affaire" (Shirley Hill); (2) "Technology and Mathematics Education at ICME-7" (James T. Fey); (3) "Assessment in…

  14. Highlights from the First World Congress of Education International.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education International, Brussels (Belgium).

    The papers in this volume reflect the general theme of the congress, "Educators United, Ready for Change." A theme that emerged during the conference concerned the need to fight structural adjustment programs, imposed by the World Bank or the International Monetary Fund, which were destroying the educational and social infrastructure of…

  15. The International Mycological Association: its history in brief with summaries of its International Mycological Congresses and diverse international relationships.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Emory G

    2010-06-01

    This history presents a review of International Mycological Association activities, its international congresses, and its relationships with regional mycological associations as well as with international organizations of other scientific disciplines. The IMA was organized in 1971 during the First Mycological Congress (IMC-1) convened at Exeter, U.K. In the period 1971 to 2010, nine international congresses have been held, each with its own organizational structure but under the guidance of one of the successive inter-Congress management groups of IMA officers and executive committee members. The congress list includes Exeter, U.K.; Tampa, U.S.A.; Tokyo, Japan; Regensburg, Germany; Vancouver, Canada; Jerusalem, Israel; Oslo, Norway; Cairns, Australia; and Edinburgh, Scotland. Inter-congress activities of each IMA executive group are summarized. The characteristics of each congress are surveyed as to organization, programming, attendance numbers, finances, and satellite meetings.The IMA has sponsored the establishment of Regional Mycological Associations beginning in 1977 and has lent operational funding. Regional associations currently are functional and hold their own regional congresses in Africa, Asia, Australasia, Europe, and Latin America. The relationships of the IMA with other organizations recognized within the supra-national International Council of Scientific Unions are discussed.

  16. Third International Congress on Epilepsy, Brain and Mind: Part 1

    PubMed Central

    Korczyn, Amos D.; Schachter, Steven C.; Amlerova, Jana; Bialer, Meir; van Emde Boas, Walter; Brázdil, Milan; Brodtkorb, Eylert; Engel, Jerome; Gotman, Jean; Komárek, Vladmir; Leppik, Ilo E.; Marusic, Petr; Meletti, Stefano; Metternich, Birgitta; Moulin, Chris J.A.; Muhlert, Nils; Mula, Marco; Nakken, Karl O.; Picard, Fabienne; Schulze-Bonhage, Andreas; Theodore, William; Wolf, Peter; Zeman, Adam; Rektor, Ivan

    2017-01-01

    Epilepsyis both a disease of the brain and the mind. Here, we present the first of two papers with extended summaries of selected presentations of the Third International Congress on Epilepsy, Brain and Mind (April 3–5, 2014; Brno, Czech Republic). Epilepsy in history and the arts and its relationships with religion were discussed, as were overviews of epilepsy and relevant aspects of social cognition, handedness, accelerated forgetting and autobiographical amnesia, and large-scale brain networks. PMID:26276417

  17. Eighth international congress on nitrogen fixation. Final program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-31

    This volume contains the proceedings of the Eighth International Congress on Nitrogen Fixation held May 20--26, 1990 in Knoxville, Tennessee. The volume contains abstracts of individual presentations. Sessions were entitled Recent Advances in the Chemistry of Nitrogen Fixation, Plant-microbe Interactions, Limiting Factors of Nitrogen Fixation, Nitrogen Fixation and the Environment, Bacterial Systems, Nitrogen Fixation in Agriculture and Industry, Plant Function, and Nitrogen Fixation and Evolution.

  18. Third International Congress on Epilepsy, Brain and Mind: Part 1.

    PubMed

    Korczyn, Amos D; Schachter, Steven C; Amlerova, Jana; Bialer, Meir; van Emde Boas, Walter; Brázdil, Milan; Brodtkorb, Eylert; Engel, Jerome; Gotman, Jean; Komárek, Vladmir; Leppik, Ilo E; Marusic, Petr; Meletti, Stefano; Metternich, Birgitta; Moulin, Chris J A; Muhlert, Nils; Mula, Marco; Nakken, Karl O; Picard, Fabienne; Schulze-Bonhage, Andreas; Theodore, William; Wolf, Peter; Zeman, Adam; Rektor, Ivan

    2015-09-01

    Epilepsy is both a disease of the brain and the mind. Here, we present the first of two papers with extended summaries of selected presentations of the Third International Congress on Epilepsy, Brain and Mind (April 3-5, 2014; Brno, Czech Republic). Epilepsy in history and the arts and its relationships with religion were discussed, as were overviews of epilepsy and relevant aspects of social cognition, handedness, accelerated forgetting and autobiographical amnesia, and large-scale brain networks.

  19. Translation into French of: “Changes to publication requirements made at the XVIII International Botanical Congress in Melbourne – what does e-publication mean for you?”. Translated by Christian Feuillet and Valéry Malécot Changements des conditions requises pour la publication faits au XVIII e Congrès International de Botanique à Melbourne – qu’est-ce que la publication électronique représente pour vous?

    PubMed Central

    Knapp, Sandra; McNeill, John; Turland, Nicholas J.

    2011-01-01

    Résumé Les changements au Code International de Nomenclature Botanique sont décidés tous les 6 ans aux Sections de Nomenclature associées aux Congrès Internationaux de Botanique (CIB). Le XVIIIe CIB se tenait à Melbourne, Australie; la Section de Nomenclature s’est réunie les 18-22 juillet 2011 et ses décisions ont été acceptées par le Congrès en session plénière le 30 juillet. Suite à cette réunion, plusieurs modifications importantes ont été apportées au Code et vont affecter la publication de nouveaux noms. Deux de ces changements prendront effet le 1er janvier 2012, quelques mois avant que le Code de Melbourne soit publié. Les documents électroniques publiés en ligne en ‘Portable Document Format’ (PDF) avec un ‘International Standard Serial Number’ (ISSN) ou un ‘International Standard Book Number’ (ISBN) constitueront une publication effective, et l’exigence d’une description ou d’une diagnose en latin pour les noms des nouveaux taxa sera changée en l’exigence d’une description ou d’une diagnose en latin ou en anglais. De plus, à partir du 1er janvier 2013, les noms nouveaux des organismes traités comme champignons devront, pour que la publication soit valide, inclure dans le protologue (tous ce qui est associé au nom au moment de la publication valide) la citation d’un identifiant (‘identifier’) fourni par un dépôt reconnu (tel MycoBank). Une ébauche des nouveaux articles concernant la publication électronique est fournie et des conseils de bon usage sont esquissés. Pour encourager la diffusion des changements adoptés au Code International de Nomenclature pour les algues, les champignons et les plantes, cet article sera publié dans BMC Evolutionary Biology, Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, Brittonia, Cladistics, MycoKeys, Mycotaxon, New Phytologist, North American Fungi, Novon, Opuscula Philolichenum, PhytoKeys, Phytoneuron, Phytotaxa, Plant Diversity and Resources, Systematic Botany et

  20. Translation into French of: "Changes to publication requirements made at the XVIII International Botanical Congress in Melbourne - what does e-publication mean for you?". Translated by Christian Feuillet and Valéry Malécot Changements des conditions requises pour la publication faits au XVIII Congrès International de Botanique à Melbourne - qu'est-ce que la publication électronique représente pour vous?

    PubMed

    Knapp, Sandra; McNeill, John; Turland, Nicholas J

    2011-01-01

    RésuméLes changements au CodeInternational de Nomenclature Botanique sont décidés tous les 6 ans aux Sections de Nomenclature associées aux Congrès Internationaux de Botanique (CIB). Le XVIII(e) CIB se tenait à Melbourne, Australie; la Section de Nomenclature s'est réunie les 18-22 juillet 2011 et ses décisions ont été acceptées par le Congrès en session plénière le 30 juillet. Suite à cette réunion, plusieurs modifications importantes ont été apportées au Code et vont affecter la publication de nouveaux noms. Deux de ces changements prendront effet le 1(er) janvier 2012, quelques mois avant que le Code de Melbourne soit publié. Les documents électroniques publiés en ligne en 'Portable Document Format' (PDF) avec un 'International Standard Serial Number' (ISSN) ou un 'International Standard Book Number' (ISBN) constitueront une publication effective, et l'exigence d'une description ou d'une diagnose en latin pour les noms des nouveaux taxa sera changée en l'exigence d'une description ou d'une diagnose en latin ou en anglais. De plus, à partir du 1(er) janvier 2013, les noms nouveaux des organismes traités comme champignons devront, pour que la publication soit valide, inclure dans le protologue (tous ce qui est associé au nom au moment de la publication valide) la citation d'un identifiant ('identifier') fourni par un dépôt reconnu (tel MycoBank). Une ébauche des nouveaux articles concernant la publication électronique est fournie et des conseils de bon usage sont esquissés.Pour encourager la diffusion des changements adoptés au Code International de Nomenclature pour les algues, les champignons et les plantes, cet article sera publié dans BMC Evolutionary Biology, Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, Brittonia, Cladistics, MycoKeys, Mycotaxon, New Phytologist, North American Fungi, Novon, Opuscula Philolichenum, PhytoKeys, Phytoneuron, Phytotaxa, Plant Diversity and Resources, Systematic Botany et Taxon.

  1. PREFACE: 3rd International Congress on Mechanical Metrology (CIMMEC2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-10-01

    From October 14th to 16th 2014, The Brazilian National Institute of Metrology, Quality, and Technology (Inmetro) and the Brazilian Society of Metrology (SBM) organized the 3rd International Congress on Mechanical Metrology (3rd CIMMEC). The 3rd CIMMEC was held in the city of Gramado, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Anticipating the interest and enthusiasm of the technical-scientific community, the Organizing Institutions invite people and organizations to participate in this important congress, reiterating the commitment to organize an event according to highest international standards. This event has been conceived to integrate people and organizations from Brazil and abroad in the discussion of advanced themes in metrology. Manufacturers and dealers of measuring equipment and standards, as well as of auxiliary accessories and bibliographic material, had the chance to promote their products and services in stands at the Fair, which has taken place alongside the Congress. The 3rd CIMMEC consisted of five Keynote Speeches and 116 regular papers. Among the regular papers, the 25 most outstanding ones, comprising a high quality content on Mechanical Metrology, were selected to be published in this issue of Journal of Physics: Conference Series. It is our great pleasure to present this volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series to the scientific community to promote further research in Mechanical Metrology and related areas. We believe that this volume will be both an excellent source of scientific material in the fast evolving fields that were covered by CIMMEC 2014.

  2. Editorial Introduction on Proceedings of the 2015 International Congress on Ultrasonics, 2015 ICU Metz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patin, Nico Felicien Declercq de

    A brief summary of the 2015 International Congress on Ultrasonics is presented. The 2015 ICU has taken place in Metz, France, at the Arsenal and was hosted by Georgia Tech Lorraine in collaboration with the French Acoustical Society. The congress hosted a record number of 700 participants. The report focuses on the awards presented during the congress, the invited speakers and some statistics. Other details can be found in reports available on the congress website. The author N. F. Declercq, president of 2015 ICU and Editor of the congress proceedings, wishes to publish the congress proceedings in loving memory of his father Maurice Alois who suddenly passed away 5 weeks after the end of the congress.

  3. 20th International Congress of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, ICTAM2000

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan, Aref

    2000-08-27

    The 20th International Congress of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, ICTAM2000, was held in Chicago, IL, from August 27 - September 2, 2000. It was 32 years since the last of these congresses had been held in USA. A record number of researchers in the mechanical engineering sciences attended and presented their work. The Congress provided an opportunity for the US mechanics community to act as international hosts. Several universities, professional societies, private foundations and individuals, and Federal agencies provided financial support for the Congress.

  4. Third International Congress on Epilepsy, Brain, and Mind: Part 2.

    PubMed

    Rektor, Ivan; Schachter, Steven C; Arya, Ravindra; Arzy, Shahar; Braakman, Hilde; Brodie, Martin J; Brugger, Peter; Chang, Bernard S; Guekht, Alla; Hermann, Bruce; Hesdorffer, Dale C; Jones-Gotman, Marilyn; Kanner, Andres M; Garcia-Larrea, Luis; Mareš, Pavel; Mula, Marco; Neufeld, Miri; Risse, Gail L; Ryvlin, Philippe; Seeck, Margitta; Tomson, Torbjörn; Korczyn, Amos D

    2015-09-01

    Epilepsy is both a disease of the brain and the mind. Here, we present the second of two papers with extended summaries of selected presentations of the Third International Congress on Epilepsy, Brain and Mind (April 3-5, 2014; Brno, Czech Republic). Humanistic, biologic, and therapeutic aspects of epilepsy, particularly those related to the mind, were discussed. The extended summaries provide current overviews of epilepsy, cognitive impairment, and treatment, including brain functional connectivity and functional organization; juvenile myoclonic epilepsy; cognitive problems in newly diagnosed epilepsy; SUDEP including studies on prevention and involvement of the serotoninergic system; aggression and antiepileptic drugs; body, mind, and brain, including pain, orientation, the "self-location", Gourmand syndrome, and obesity; euphoria, obsessions, and compulsions; and circumstantiality and psychiatric comorbidities.

  5. The 16th International Geological Congress, Washington, 1933

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, C.M.

    2009-01-01

    In 1933, the International Geological Congress (IGC) returned to the United States of America (USA) for its sixteenth meeting, forty-two years after the 5th IGC convened in Washington. The Geological Society of America and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) supplied the major part of the required extra-registration funding after the effects of the Great Depression influenced the 72th U.S. Congress not to do so. A reported 1, 182 persons or organizations, representing fifty-four countries, registered for the 16 th IGC and thirty-four countries sent 141 official delegates. Of the total number of registrants, 665 actually attended the meeting; 500 came from the USA; and fifteen had participated in the 5th IGC. The 16 th Meeting convened in the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Building from 22 to 29 July. The eighteen half-day scientific sections-orogenesis (four), major divisions of the Paleozoic (three), miscellaneous (three), batholiths and related intrusives (two), arid-region geomorphic processes and products (one), fossil man and contemporary faunas (one), geology of copper and other ore deposits (one), geology of petroleum (one), measuring geologic time (one), and zonal relations of metalliferous deposits (one)-included 166 papers, of which fifty (including several of the key contributions) appeared only by title. The Geological Society of Washington, the National Academy of Sciences, and the U.S. Bureau of Mines hosted or contributed to evening presentations or receptions. Twenty-eight of the 16th IGC's thirty new guidebooks and one new USGS Bulletin aided eight pre-meeting, seven during-meeting, and four post-meeting field trips of local, regional, or national scope. The remaining two new guidebooks outlined the USA's structural geology and its stratigraphic nomenclature. The 16th IGC published a two-volume monograph on the world's copper resources (1935) and a two-volume report of its proceedings (1936).

  6. Invitation to the 17th international congress on photosynthesis research in 2016: photosynthesis in a changing world.

    PubMed

    van Amerongen, Herbert; Croce, Roberta

    2016-02-01

    The 17th International Congress on Photosynthesis will be held from August 7 to 12, 2016 in Maastricht, The Netherlands. The congress will include an opening reception, 15 plenary lectures, 28 scientific symposia, many poster sessions, displays by scientific companies, excursions, congress dinner, social activities, and the first photosynthesis soccer world championship. See http://www.ps2016.com/ . The congress is organized as an official event of the International Society of Photosynthesis Research (see http://www.photosynthesisresearch.org/).

  7. Key paediatric messages from the 2016 European Respiratory Society International Congress.

    PubMed

    Grigg, Jonathan; Balfour-Lynn, Ian M; Everard, Mark; Hall, Graham; Karadag, Bülent; Priftis, Kostas; Roehr, Charles Christoph; Rottier, Bart L; Midulla, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    In this article, the Group Chairs of the Paediatric Assembly of the European Respiratory Society (ERS) highlight some of the most interesting abstracts presented at the 2016 ERS International Congress, which was held in London.

  8. Key paediatric messages from the 2016 European Respiratory Society International Congress

    PubMed Central

    Balfour-Lynn, Ian M.; Everard, Mark; Hall, Graham; Karadag, Bülent; Priftis, Kostas; Roehr, Charles Christoph; Rottier, Bart L.; Midulla, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    In this article, the Group Chairs of the Paediatric Assembly of the European Respiratory Society (ERS) highlight some of the most interesting abstracts presented at the 2016 ERS International Congress, which was held in London. PMID:28154820

  9. The 1948 international congress of genetics in Sweden: people and politics.

    PubMed

    Bengtsson, Bengt O; Tunlid, Anna

    2010-07-01

    The International Congresses have played an important role in the history of genetics. The Eighth International Congress, which in 1948 was held in Sweden, celebrated the conclusion of the war against Nazism and many new decisive scientific advances. It also signaled a hardening of the fight against Lysenkoism, which was growing in strength in the Soviet Union. A rare document is available from the Congress--an amateur film made by a young delegate, Nils Nybom. With its help a living description can be given of the scientific and political melees in which the delegates were involved.

  10. 'Standing on the shoulders of giants' at the ISAE international congress.

    PubMed

    2016-09-17

    The 50th anniversary of the International Society for Applied Ethology (ISAE) was celebrated in July, with the return of its annual international congress to Edinburgh, the city where the society was founded in 1966. Scientific legacy was a prevalent topic at the meeting, in line with the congress theme: standing on the shoulders of giants. The event was the biggest in the ISAE's history, spanning five days, from July 12 to 16, and comprising almost 200 talks. Rachel Orritt reflects on proceedings.

  11. International congress on DNA damage and repair: Book of abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    This document contains the abstracts of 105 papers presented at the Congress. Topics covered include the Escherichia coli nucleotide excision repair system, DNA repair in malignant transformations, defective DNA repair, and gene regulation. (TEM)

  12. Highlights from the Biennial International Congress on Schizophrenia Research (ICOSR), April 21-25, 2013.

    PubMed

    Curley, Allison A; Fisher, Helen L

    2013-01-01

    The 2013 International Congress on Schizophrenia Research, held in Orlando Grande Lakes, Florida, attracted over 1,000 attendees to the JW Marriott Hotel from 21-25 April 2013, not to mention the satellite meetings on cognition and the schizophrenia prodrome. With thanks to the Schizophrenia Research Forum (www.schizophreniaforum.org), a project of the Brain and Behavior Research Foundation, we bring you the following report on the Congress' sessions concerning DSM-5/ICD-11 and the psychosis continuum. We also want to thank Congress directors Carol Tamminga and Chuck Schulz, as well as meeting staff Dorothy Denton and Cristan Tamminga, for their gracious assistance.

  13. A Brief History of INA and ICOH SCNP: International Neurotoxicology Association and International Congress on Occupational Health Scientific Committee on Neurotoxicology and Psychophysiology

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two international scientific societies dedicated to research in neurotoxicology and neurobehavioral toxicology are the International Neurotoxicology Association (INA) and the International Congress on Occupational Health International Symposium on Neurobehavioral Methods and Effe...

  14. Support for U.S. Participants at the 15th International Congress on Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wachs, Israel E.

    2013-08-05

    The grant was used to partially assist the travel expenses of U.S. academic scientists to attend the 15th International Congress on Catalysis. The conference was held in Munich, Germany from July 1-6, 2012. The importance of the International Congress was to bring together the international community of faculty members who participate in catalysis research, and to share information that would lead to further developments and directions in the field of study. Graduate students and Post Docs were invited to apply for travel assistance based on criteria established by the North American Catalysis Society (NACS) and the local Catalysis Clubs.

  15. 100th anniversary of the Fourth International Congress of Thalassotherapy in Opatija.

    PubMed

    Fischinger, Ales; Fischinger, Dusa; Fischinger, Janez; Skrobonja, Ante

    2008-01-01

    The authors of the text have been particularly interested into the organization, the procedure,the accompanying activities as well as the themes covered at 4th International Congress of Thalassotherapy in Opatija in 1908. The Congress was organised by the then head of the thermal spa resort Professor Dr.Julius Glax. The official languages at the Congress were German, French, English, and also Italian and Croatian as the languages of the hosting country. Each lecturer had twenty minutes time to give a lecture or a co-lecture, ten minutes for papers and five for a follow-up discussion. The participants could make use of the information centre of the Congress, in the centre of Opatija, the whole day. Unofficially, the Congress started on 27th September 1908 with the introductory evening for all the participants in Adria Club. The Congress officially began on 28th September 1908 when all the participants gathered at the theatre hall of Hotel Stephanie. The lectures were presented in the morning. In the afternoon, the participants were taken to visit some exhibitions (e.g. the medical exhibition at Hotel Palace, the exhibition of the native Istrian-Dalmatian home crafts and antiquates and the painting exhibition at Vila Angiolina), a short sea voyage through the bay of Kvarner. On the last day of the Congress, the participants observed the sanitary conditions in Opatija (the water supply, the sewer system, litter incinerator, and quarantine for infectious illnesses), three sanatoriums, Zander's Institute, the rehabilitating-heart paths and the Archduke Ludwig-Viktor's indoor baths. The round-Opatija tour was followed by the concluding meeting and the conclusion of the Congress. The authors of this research have established that there are no important differences in the organization and realization of the congresses in the past and now.

  16. A renaissance for botanical insecticides?

    PubMed

    Isman, Murray B

    2015-12-01

    Botanical insecticides continue to be a subject of keen interest among the international research community, reflected in the steady growth in scientific publications devoted to the subject. Until very recently though, the translation of that theory to practice, i.e. the commercialisation and adoption of new botanical insecticides in the marketplace, has seriously lagged behind. Strict regulatory regimes, long the bane of small pesticide producers, are beginning to relax some of the data requirements for 'low-risk' pesticide products, facilitating movement of more botanicals into the commercial arena. In this paper I discuss some of the jurisdictions where botanicals are increasingly finding favour, some of the newer botanical insecticides in the plant and animal health arsenal and some of the specific sectors where botanicals are most likely to compete effectively with other types of insecticidal product.

  17. Bridging the Gap, Facing the Challenge—the 26th Great Wall International Congress of Cardiology (GW-ICC)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yingmei

    2016-01-01

    The joint venue of the 26th Great Wall International Congress of Cardiology (GW-ICC) & Asia Pacific Heart Congress 2015 (APHC 2015) & International Congress Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation 2015 (ICCPR 2015) were held from October 29 to November 01, 2015 at the China National Convention Center (CNCC), Beijing, China. This year’s conference focused on cardiovascular disease prevention, health promotion, education and training, as well as disease management and rehabilitation. PMID:26885499

  18. The XIIIth International Physiological Congress in Boston in 1929: American physiology comes of age.

    PubMed

    Rall, Jack A

    2016-03-01

    In the 19th century, the concept of experimental physiology originated in France with Claude Bernard, evolved in Germany stimulated by the teaching of Carl Ludwig, and later spread to Britain and then to the United States. The goal was to develop a physicochemical understanding of physiological phenomena. The first International Physiological Congress occurred in 1889 in Switzerland with an emphasis on experimental demonstrations. The XIIIth Congress, the first to be held outside of Europe, took place in Boston, MA, in 1929. It was a watershed meeting and indicated that American physiology had come of age. Meticulously organized, it was the largest congress to date, with over 1,200 participants from more than 40 countries. Getting to the congress was a cultural adventure, especially for the 400 scientists and their families from over 20 European countries, who sailed for 10 days on the S.S. Minnekahda. Many of the great physiologists of the world were in attendance, including 22 scientists who were either or would become Nobel Laureates. There were hundreds of platform presentations and many experimental demonstrations. The meeting was not without controversy as a conflict, still not completely settled, arose over the discovery of ATP. After the meeting, hundreds of participants made a memorable trip to the Marine Biological Laboratory at Woods Hole, MA, which culminated in a "good old fashioned Cape Cod Clambake." Although not as spectacular as the 1929 congress, the physiological congresses have continued with goals similar to those established more than a century ago.

  19. Developments in Mathematical Education: Proceedings of the Second International Congress on Mathematical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howson, A. G., Ed.

    It is the aim of this book to transmit to its readers something of the general spirit of the proceedings of the Second International Congress on Mathematical Education. Nine invited papers were presented by distinguished educators and psychologists from many different countries. Thirty-eight working committees prepared papers and reports on a wide…

  20. The International Congress of Mechanical Engineering and Agricultural Sciences - CIIMCA 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remolina-Millán, Aduljay; Hernández-Arroyo, Emil

    2014-06-01

    The organizing committee of The International Congress of Mechanical Engineering and Agricultural Sciences - CIIMCA 2013 - are pleased to present CIIMCA-2013: the first international conference focused on subjects of materials science, mechanical engineering and renewable energy organized by Mechanical Engineering Faculty of the ''Universidad Pontificia Bolivariana'' in Bucaramanga, Colombia. This conference aims to be a place to produce discussions on whole topics of the congress, between the scientists of Colombia and the world. We strongly believe that knowledge is fundamental to the development of our countries. For that reason this multidisciplinary conference is looking forward to integrate engineering, agricultural science and nanoscience and nanotechnology to produce a synergy of this area of knowledge and to achieve scientific and technological developments. Agriculture is a very important topic for our conference; in Colombia, agricultural science needs more attention from the scientific community and the government. In the Faculty of Mechanical Engineering we are beginning to work on these issues to produce knowledge and improve the conditions in our country. The CIIMCA conference is a great opportunity to create interpersonal relationships and networks between scientists around the world. The interaction between scientists is very important in the process of the construction of knowledge. The general chairman encourages and invites you to make friends, relationships and participate strongly in the symposia and all program activities. PhD Aduljay Remolina-Millán Principal Chairman, International Mechanical Engineering and Agricultural Sciences Congress - CIIMCA Msc Emil Hernández-Arroyo Principal Chairman, International Mechanical Engineering and Agricultural Sciences Congress - CIIMCA Conference photograph Conference photograph 'Universidad Pontificia Bolivariana seccional Bucaramanga' host of the first International Mechanical Engineering and

  1. Declaration of Lahore of the IIIrd International Congress on Maternal and Neonatal Health.

    PubMed

    1987-12-01

    Maternal and child health remains a theme of utmost importance in developing as well as in developed countries. The 3rd International Association For Maternal And Neonatal Health (IAMANEH) Congress deliberated in Lahore, Pakistan, from 7-11 November, 1987. The Congress stressed in particular that the very high maternal mortality in the developing world has not, by far, received the attention it deserves. It remains a global scandal, both technically and ethically, that the risk for a mother of dying in pregnancy, labor or postpartum in less favored regions is 100 to 200 times higher than in industrialized countries. This document contains important statements made at the congress about women's status, family planning, prenatal care, neonatal health, breastfeeding, oral rehydration therapy, diarrhea prevention, immunization, AIDS, traditional birth attendants, outreach work, and education.

  2. International collaborations in cancer control and the Third International Cancer Control Congress.

    PubMed

    Micheli, Andrea; Sanz, Natalia; Mwangi-Powell, Faith; Coleman, Michel P; Neal, Claire; Ullrich, Andreas; Travado, Luzia; Santini, Luiz Antonio; Grassi, Luigi; De Lorenzo, Francesco; Costa, Alberto; Dangou, Jean-Marie; Bisanti, Luigi; Seniori Costantini, Adele; Abu-Rmeileh, Niveen; Kamal, Mostafa; Federico, Massimo; Saracci, Rodolfo; Rennert, Gad; Stefanini, Angelo; Cavalli, Franco; Cazap, Eduardo; Redmond, Kathy; O'Reilly, Susan; Muti, Paola; Casali, Paolo; Gatta, Gemma; Ferrari, Andrea; Koifman, Sergio; Bah, Ebrima; Pastore, Guido; Barr, Ronald; Lombardo, Claudio; Frazzingaro, Cristina; Ciampichini, Roberta; Baili, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    Over the past few decades, there has been growing support for the idea that cancer needs an interdisciplinary approach. Therefore, the international cancer community has developed several strategies as outlined in the WHO non-communicable diseases Action Plan (which includes cancer control) as the World Health Assembly and the UICC World Cancer Declaration, which both include primary prevention, early diagnosis, treatment, and palliative care. This paper highlights experiences/ideas in cancer control for international collaborations between low, middle, and high income countries, including collaborations between the European Union (EU) and African Union (AU) Member States, the Latin-American and Caribbean countries, and the Eastern Mediterranean countries. These proposals are presented within the context of the global vision on cancer control set forth by WHO in partnership with the International Union Against Cancer (UICC), in addition to issues that should be considered for collaborations at the global level: cancer survival (similar to the project CONCORD), cancer control for youth and adaptation of Clinical Practice Guidelines. Since cancer control is given lower priority on the health agenda of low and middle income countries and is less represented in global health efforts in those countries, EU and AU cancer stakeholders are working to put cancer control on the agenda of the EU-AU treaty for collaborations, and are proposing to consider palliative care, population-based cancer registration, and training and education focusing on primary prevention as core tools. A Community of Practice, such as the Third International Cancer Control Congress (ICCC-3), is an ideal place to share new proposals, learn from other experiences, and formulate new ideas. The aim of the ICCC-3 is to foster new international collaborations to promote cancer control actions in low and middle income countries. The development of supranational collaborations has been hindered by the fact

  3. PREFACE: International Congress on Energy Fluxes and Radiation Effects (EFRE-2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-11-01

    The International Congress on Energy Fluxes and Radiation Effects 2014 (EFRE 2014) was held in Tomsk, Russia, on September 21-26, 2014. The organizers of the Congress were the Institute of High Current Electronics SB RAS and Tomsk Polytechnic University. EFRE 2014 combines three international conferences which are regularly held in Tomsk, Russia: the 18th International Symposium on High-Current Electronics (18th SHCE), the 12th International Conference on Modification of Materials with Particle Beams and Plasma Flows (12th CMM) and the 16th International Conference on Radiation Physics and Chemistry of Condensed Matter (16th RPC). The International Conference on Radiation Physics and Chemistry of Condensed Matter is a traditional representative forum devoted to the discussion of the fundamental problems of physical and chemical non-linear processes in condensed matter (mainly inorganic dielectrics) under the action of particle and photon beams of all types including pulsed power laser radiation. The International Symposium on High-Current Electronics is held biannually in Tomsk, Russia. The program of the conferences covers a wide range of scientific and technical areas including pulsed power technology, ion and electron beams, high-power microwaves, plasma and particle beam sources, modification of materials, and pulsed power applications in chemistry, biology and medicine. The 12th International Conference on Modification of Materials with Particle Beams and Plasma Flows is devoted to the discussion of the fundamental and applied issues in the field of modification of materials properties with particle beams and plasma flows. The six-day Congress brought together more than 250 specialists and scientists from different countries and organizations and provided an excellent opportunity to exchange knowledge, make oral contributions and poster presentations, and initiate discussion on the topics of interest. The proceedings were edited by Victor Lisitsyn, Vladimir

  4. The conceptualization and organization of the first International Neurological Congress (1931): the coming of age of neurology.

    PubMed

    Louis, Elan D

    2010-07-01

    The first International Neurological Congress (Berne, Switzerland, 1931), attended by individuals from 42 countries, signified a global presence of world neurology; a coming of age. The aim of this study was to trace the history of that Congress, an important episode in the emergence of our discipline. The historical literature was reviewed and a detailed study conducted of the Henry Alsop Riley Papers, Columbia University. These papers contain primary source material from the Berne conference. In 1927, two neurologists, Bernard Sachs (American, 1858-1944) and Otto Marburg (Austrian, 1874-1948) met at an Austrian spa town and began to consider the creation of a meeting with a truly international character. The Americans were to play a seminal role in the organization of the Congress. In 1928, an introductory letter from Sachs went out to the international community and, in 1929, a planning meeting was held and the general principles of the Congress were established. Several earlier attempted congresses had been thwarted by World War I and European tensions would also influence the organization of the Berne Congress. Gordon Holmes (1876-1965) wrote: 'It would be certainly wiser to have the meeting in Scandinavia, Holland or Switzerland, as the only difficulty may be to get the French and Germans to mix.' Interest in the congress was immense and subsequent international congresses (London, Copenhagen, Paris, Lisbon and Brussels) became a central event in world neurology. In summary, the Berne Congress brought together individuals from several continents, thereby facilitating the exchange of ideas across entire schools. More broadly, the congress reflected a growing trend toward specialization in neurology and medicine.

  5. International Drug Discovery Science and Technology--BIT's Seventh Annual Congress.

    PubMed

    Bodovitz, Steven

    2010-01-01

    BIT's Seventh Annual International Drug Discovery Science and Technology Congress, held in Shanghai, included topics covering new therapeutic and technological developments in the field of drug discovery. This conference report highlights selected presentations on open-access approaches to R&D, novel and multifactorial targets, and technologies that assist drug discovery. Investigational drugs discussed include the anticancer agents astuprotimut-r (GlaxoSmithKline plc) and AS-1411 (Antisoma plc).

  6. Travel grant program for the IX International Congresses of Mycology and Bacteriology -- Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Granigan, Marion

    2000-05-25

    In 1999, the American Society for Microbiology (ASM) and the National Academy of Sciences' U.S. National Committee for the International Union of Microbiological Sciences (IUMS) jointly organized a competitive travel grant program to support the participation of U.S. scientists in the 9th International Congresses of the Bacteriological and Applied Microbiology, Mycology and Virology Divisions of the IUMS in Sydney, Australia, August 16-20, 1999. Funding was solicited for the program, and the ASM Minority and International Activities department administered the $40,000 raised. Travel grants in the amount of $2,000 were offered to U.S. investigators (citizens, including federal employees, and permanent residents working in the United States) in the early stages of their careers who planned to attend and present their research at the Congress. Teams of established and new investigators who applied jointly were eligible to received a combined $3,000 award. IUMS developed a questionnaire th at each applicant were required to complete and return, which asked each award recipient about their experience at the Congresses. Questionnaire results are included.

  7. EDITORIAL: Invited review and topical lectures from the 13th International Congress on Plasma Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagorodny, A.; Kocherga, O.

    2007-05-01

    The 13th International Congress on Plasma Physics (ICPP 2006) was organized, on behalf of the International Advisory Committee of the ICPP series, by the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine and the Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics (BITP) and held in Kiev, Ukraine, 22 26 May 2006. The Congress Program included the topics: fundamental problems of plasma physics; fusion plasmas; plasmas in astrophysics and space physics; plasmas in applications and technologies; complex plasmas. A total of 305 delegates from 30 countries took part in the Congress. The program included 9 invited review lectures, 32 invited topical and 313 contributed papers (60 of which were selected for oral presentation). The Congress Program was the responsibility of the International Program Committee: Anatoly Zagorodny (Chairman) Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics, Ukraine Olha Kocherga (Scientific Secretary) Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics, Ukraine Boris Breizman The University of Texas at Austin, USA Iver Cairns School of Physics, University of Sydney, Australia Tatiana Davydova Institute for Nuclear Research, Ukraine Tony Donne FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics, Rijnhuizen, The Netherlands Nikolai S Erokhin Space Research Institute of RAS, Russia Xavier Garbet CEA, France Valery Godyak OSRAM SYLVANIA, USA Katsumi Ida National Institute for Fusion Science, Japan Alexander Kingsep Russian Research Centre `Kurchatov Institute', Russia E P Kruglyakov Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Russia Gregor Morfill Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Germany Osamu Motojima National Institute for Fusion Science, Japan Jef Ongena ERM-KMS, Brussels and EFDA-JET, UK Konstantyn Shamrai Institute for Nuclear Research, Ukraine Raghvendra Singh Institute for Plasma Research, India Konstantyn Stepanov Kharkiv Institute of Physics and Technology, Ukraine Masayoshi Tanaka National Institute for Fusion Science, Japan Nodar Tsintsadze Physics Institute, Georgia The

  8. Visions for the 20th International Epidemiological Association's World Congress of Epidemiology (WCE 2014).

    PubMed

    Monsour, B B; Johnston, J M; Hennessy, T W; Schmidt, M I; Krieger, N

    2012-03-01

    During August 17th-21st, 2014, the University of Alaska Anchorage, along with other local, state, and federal agencies throughout Alaska, will host the 20(th) International Epidemiological Association's (IEA) World Congress of Epidemiology (WCE 2014). The theme for this Congress is "Global Epidemiology in a Changing Environment: The Circumpolar Perspective." The changing environment includes the full range of environments that shape population health and health inequities from the physical to the social and economic. Our circumpolar perspective on these environments includes views on how political systems, work, immigration, Indigenous status, and gender relations and sexuality affect the global world and the health of its people. Suggestions and insights from the 3(rd) North American Congress of Epidemiology (2011) and the first-ever joint regional workshop co-organized by the IEA North American Region and the IEA Latin American and Caribbean Region held at the 19(th) IEA World Congress of Epidemiology (2011) have helped direct the focus for WCE 2014. Since the Arctic regions are feeling the effects of climate change first, we believe focusing on the emerging data on the health impacts of climate change throughout the world will be an important topic for this Congress. This will include a broad range of more traditional epidemiology areas such as infectious disease epidemiology, environmental epidemiology, health disparities, and surveillance and emergency preparedness. Addressing health inequities and promoting health equity is likewise a key concern of the Congress. This Congress will also host presentations on injury epidemiology, occupational health, infectious diseases, chronic diseases, maternal and child health, surveillance and field epidemiology, mental health, violence (from self-directed, e.g., suicide, to interpersonal to structural), psychoactive substance use (including tobacco), and measures of subjective health. Attention will be given to

  9. The return of the phoenix: the 1963 International Congress of Zoology and American zoologists in the twentieth century.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kristin

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines the International Congress of Zoology held in Washington D.C. in 1963 as a portrait of American zoologists' search for effective and rewarding relationships with both each other and the public. Organizers of the congress envisioned the congress as a last ditch effort to unify the disparate subdisciplines of zoology, overcome the barriers of specialization, and ward off the heady claims of more reductionist biologists. The problems zoologists faced as they worked to fulfill these ambitious goals illuminate some of the challenges faced by members of the naturalist tradition as they worked to establish disciplinary unity while seeking public support in the competitive world of twentieth century science.

  10. International Population Assistance and Family Planning Programs: Issues for Congress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-24

    birth control . This policy, however, has generated contentious debate for over two decades, resulting in frequent clarification and modification of U.S. international family planning programs. In 1984, controversy arose over U.S. population aid policy when the Reagan Administration introduced restrictions, which became known as the "Mexico City policy." The Mexico City policy denies U.S. funds to foreign nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) that perform or promote abortion as a method of family planning -- even if the activities are undertaken with non-U.S. funds.

  11. Biotechnica 󈨚. International Congress for Biotechnology (2nd) Held in Hannover, Germany, F.R. on 23-25 September 1986.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    BIOCHEMISTRY, * GENETIC ENGINEERING , *BIOENGINEERING, CONGRESS, DETECTORS, MEDICINE, CHEMICAL REACTIONS, QUALITY CONTROL, INTERNATIONAL, BIOLOGICAL DETECTION, BIOTECHNOLOGY, FOOD, GERMANY(EAST AND WEST), WEST GERMANY.

  12. A new way to experience the International Gastric Cancer Association Congress: the Web Round Tables.

    PubMed

    Morgagni, Paolo; Verlato, Giuseppe; Marrelli, Daniele; Roviello, Franco; de Manzoni, Giovanni

    2014-10-01

    In an attempt to attract a wider diversity of professionals to the 10th International Gastric Cancer Association Congress (IGCC) held in June 2013, the Scientific Committee of the conference organized a number of pre-congress Web Round Tables to discuss cutting-edge topics relating to gastric cancer treatment. Twenty Web Round Tables, each coordinated by a different chairman, were proposed on the IGCC Website 1 year before the congress. Each chairman identified a number of studies related to the theme of his/her Round Table and invited corresponding authors to send an update of their conclusions in light of their subsequent experience, which would then form the basis of discussion of the Web Round Tables. The chairmen posted several questions regarding these updates on the web and opened a forum for a period of 1-2 months. The forum was free and specifically intended for congress participants. Fifty-one (9.9 %) of the 516 authors contacted took part in the initiative. Two hundred fifty participants from 21 countries joined the forum discussion and posted 671 comments. The Web Round Tables were viewed 15,810 times while the forum was open. Overall, the Web Round Tables aroused considerable interest, especially among young professionals working in the area of gastric cancer who had the opportunity to contact and interact with experts in what often turned out to be an interesting and lively exchange of views. All the discussions are now freely available for consultation on the IGCC website. The Web Round Table experience was presented, with great success, during the conference at special afternoon sessions.

  13. Proceedings of the 4th International Conference and Exhibition: World Congress on Superconductivity, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishen, Kumar (Editor); Burnham, Calvin (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    The papers presented at the 4th International Conference Exhibition: World Congress on Superconductivity held at the Marriott Orlando World Center, Orlando, Florida, are contained in this document and encompass the research, technology, applications, funding, political, and social aspects of superconductivity. Specifically, the areas covered included: high-temperature materials; thin films; C-60 based superconductors; persistent magnetic fields and shielding; fabrication methodology; space applications; physical applications; performance characterization; device applications; weak link effects and flux motion; accelerator technology; superconductivity energy; storage; future research and development directions; medical applications; granular superconductors; wire fabrication technology; computer applications; technical and commercial challenges, and power and energy applications.

  14. Proceedings of the 4th International Conference and Exhibition: World Congress on Superconductivity, Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishen, Kumar (Editor); Burnham, Calvin (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    This document contains papers presented at the 4th International Conference Exhibition: World Congress on Superconductivity held June 27-July 1, 1994 in Orlando, Florida. These documents encompass research, technology, applications, funding, political, and social aspects of superconductivity. The areas covered included: high-temperature materials; thin films; C-60 based superconductors; persistent magnetic fields and shielding; fabrication methodology; space applications; physical applications; performance characterization; device applications; weak link effects and flux motion; accelerator technology; superconductivity energy; storage; future research and development directions; medical applications; granular superconductors; wire fabrication technology; computer applications; technical and commercial challenges; and power and energy applications.

  15. Final Documents of the International Congress of Educating Cities (1st, Barcelona, Spain, November 26-30, 1990).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barcelona Council (Spain).

    The First International Congress of Educating Cities in Barcelona (Spain) considered education in its broadest sense, beyond the school system. An introduction by P. Figueras Bellot is provided. The following are the English translations of the Spanish titles of the presentations given by representatives of international and government…

  16. The 1991 Solar World Congress: Proceedings of the Biennial Congress of the International Solar Energy Society, volume 3, part 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arden, M. E.; Burley, Susan M. A.; Coleman, Martha

    Proceedings of the 1991 Solar World Congress, volume 3, part 1 are presented. Topics covered include: solar building design; zero-energy building designs; emerging architecture; vernacular architecture; passive commercial buildings; daylighting; atriums; passive strategies and materials; transparent insulation; convection and mass; comfort; passive cooling; and passive computer analysis.

  17. The best of respiratory infections from the 2015 European Respiratory Society International Congress

    PubMed Central

    Polverino, Eva; Bothamley, Graham H.; Goletti, Delia; Heyckendorf, Jan; Aliberti, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    The breadth and quality of scientific presentations on clinical and translational research into respiratory infections at the 2015 European Respiratory Society (ERS) International Congress in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, establishes this area as one of the leadings fields in pulmonology. The host–pathogen relationship in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and the impact of comorbidities and chronic treatment on clinical outcomes in patients with pneumonia were studied. Various communications were dedicated to bronchiectasis and, in particular, to different prognostic and clinical aspects of this disease, including chronic infection with Pseudomonas and inhaled antibiotic therapy. Recent data from the World Health Organization showed that Europe has the highest number of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis cases and the poorest countries have the least access to suitable treatments. Latent tuberculosis and different screening programmes were also discussed with particular attention to risk factors such as HIV infection and diabetes. Several biomarkers were proposed to distinguish between active tuberculosis and latent infection. Major treatment trials were discussed (REMOX, RIFQUIN and STREAM). The possibility of once-weekly treatment in the continuation phase (RIAQUIN) was especially exciting. The continuing rise of Mycobacterium abscessus as a significant pathogen was noted. This article reviews some of the best contributions from the Respiratory Infections Assembly to the 2015 ERS International Congress. PMID:27730203

  18. Meeting report: fourth international congress of the Society for Melanoma Research.

    PubMed

    Fisher, David E; Medrano, Estela E; McMahon, Martin; Soengas, Marisol S; Schuchter, Lynn; Wolchok, Jedd D; Merlino, Glenn

    2008-02-01

    The 4th international melanoma congress of the Society for Melanoma Research (SMR), organized by Marianne Berwick (University of New Mexico), Paul Chapman (Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center), Rene Gonzalez (University of Colorado) and Ze'ev Ronai (Burnham Institute), was held at the Marriott Hotel in downtown New York on November 2007. The congress was attended by a record high number of attendees (over 500 delegates) who joined to discuss recent advances in melanoma biology and therapy. About 40% of the participants arrived from 39 countries, a testament to the high impact of this annual gathering on the international melanoma community. Over 120 of the participants were students or postdoctoral fellows, representing a most impressive fraction of young scientists engaged in melanoma research. The meeting consisted of more than 50 plenary and minisymposia presentations, stimulating the exchange of unpublished data and novel ideas, and helping to forge new collaborations that are anticipated to facilitate significant advances in basic, translational and clinical melanoma research. Another major focus of this meeting was over 160 posters, which were heavily attended and provided an effective forum for extensive informal discussions. This report will highlight the major scientific themes and advances of this most successful meeting, and provide a useful perspective on the current state of melanoma research, as well as where the field should be heading.

  19. The best of respiratory infections from the 2015 European Respiratory Society International Congress.

    PubMed

    Polverino, Eva; Bothamley, Graham H; Goletti, Delia; Heyckendorf, Jan; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Aliberti, Stefano

    2016-07-01

    The breadth and quality of scientific presentations on clinical and translational research into respiratory infections at the 2015 European Respiratory Society (ERS) International Congress in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, establishes this area as one of the leadings fields in pulmonology. The host-pathogen relationship in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and the impact of comorbidities and chronic treatment on clinical outcomes in patients with pneumonia were studied. Various communications were dedicated to bronchiectasis and, in particular, to different prognostic and clinical aspects of this disease, including chronic infection with Pseudomonas and inhaled antibiotic therapy. Recent data from the World Health Organization showed that Europe has the highest number of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis cases and the poorest countries have the least access to suitable treatments. Latent tuberculosis and different screening programmes were also discussed with particular attention to risk factors such as HIV infection and diabetes. Several biomarkers were proposed to distinguish between active tuberculosis and latent infection. Major treatment trials were discussed (REMOX, RIFQUIN and STREAM). The possibility of once-weekly treatment in the continuation phase (RIAQUIN) was especially exciting. The continuing rise of Mycobacterium abscessus as a significant pathogen was noted. This article reviews some of the best contributions from the Respiratory Infections Assembly to the 2015 ERS International Congress.

  20. International Congress of the International Council of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation (14th, Kingston, Jamaica, July 30-August 3, 1971).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Council on Health, Physical Education, and Recreation, Washington, DC.

    Papers presented at the Fourteenth International Congress of the International Council on Health, Physical Education, and Recreation (ICHPER) are included in this document. Among the subjects discussed are suggestions for physical education in the 1970's (primary school level, research divisions for the 1970's, research needs in girls and women's…

  1. International Society of Heterocyclic Chemistry--17th international congress. 1-6 August 1999, Vienna, Austria.

    PubMed

    Daneshtalab, M

    1999-10-01

    Approximately 1200 scientists attended this congress of heterocyclic chemistry, which focused on: New synthetic methods in heterocyclic chemistry; synthesis of bioactive heterocycles including natural products; heterocycles and asymmetric synthesis; heterocycles in bioorganic chemistry; new heterocyclic materials; structure and properties of heterocyclic compounds; solid-phase synthesis, combinatorial chemistry and heterocyclic scaffolds. These topics were covered in 600 posters and 100 plenary, invited and oral presentations. This report summarizes the highlights of the presentations related to the category of the synthesis of bioactive heterocycles including natural products.

  2. Improving adolescent sexual and reproductive health in Latin America: reflections from an International Congress.

    PubMed

    Córdova Pozo, Kathya; Chandra-Mouli, Venkatraman; Decat, Peter; Nelson, Erica; De Meyer, Sara; Jaruseviciene, Lina; Vega, Bernardo; Segura, Zoyla; Auquilla, Nancy; Hagens, Arnold; Van Braeckel, Dirk; Michielsen, Kristien

    2015-01-24

    In February 2014, an international congress on Promoting Adolescent Sexual and Reproductive Health (ASRH) took place in Cuenca, Ecuador. Its objective was to share evidence on effective ASRH intervention projects and programs in Latin America, and to link this evidence to ASRH policy and program development. Over 800 people participated in the three-day event and sixty-six presentations were presented.This paper summarizes the key points of the Congress and of the Community Embedded Reproductive Health Care for Adolescents (CERCA) project. It aims at guiding future ASRH research and policy in Latin America. 1. Context matters. Individual behaviors are strongly influenced by the social context in which they occur, through determinants at the individual, relational, family, community and societal levels. Gender norms/attitudes and ease of communication are two key determinants. 2. Innovative action. There is limited and patchy evidence of effective approaches to reach adolescents with the health interventions they need at scale. Yet, there exist several promising and innovative examples of providing comprehensive sexuality education through conventional approaches and using new media, improving access to health services, and reaching adolescents as well as families and community members using community-based interventions were presented at the Congress. 3. Better measurement. Evaluation designs and indicators chosen to measure the effect and impact of interventions are not always sensitive to subtle and incremental changes. This can create a gap between measured effectiveness and the impact perceived by the targeted populations. Thus, one conclusion is that we need more evidence to better determine the factors impeding progress in ASRH in Latin American, to innovate and respond flexibly to changing social dynamics and cultural practices, and to better measure the impact of existing intervention strategies. Yet, this Congress offered a starting point from which to

  3. XI Congress of the International Headache Society. September 13-16, 2003, Rome, Italy.

    PubMed

    Sarchielli, Paola

    2004-04-01

    The XI Congress of the International Headache Society (IHC) provided useful feedback for a wide range of disciplines for all scientists involved in basic and applied research concerning headaches. The major topics of the Congress included comorbidity, paediatric headache, phenotypic markers, genetics, migraine therapy, trigeminal neuralgia and paroxysmal facial pain with autonomic signs. The most recent advances were presented and discussed and all efforts were made to transfer these new understandings of pathogenesis, clinical features and treatments, to clinical practice, in an attempt to gain a better understanding of patient problems and requests. The Presidential Symposium, which anticipated the scientific sessions, provided the most updated knowledge regarding neuroimaging, neurophysiological and potential clinical implications of the activation of brainstem structures as well as the dependency of cortical events on this activation during migraine attacks. The results of the strenuous work carried out from autumn 1999 to 2003 of an International Committee of headache experts, presided by J. Olesen, reached its peak with the presentation of the new International Headache Classification ICHD-II. There are many relevant changes in the new classification, even though the basic structure and the most important criteria, such as those for migraine without aura and tension-type headache, have been maintained. Several new entities have been added including chronic migraine for patients having migraine >or= 15 days/month. New rules separate primary and secondary headaches and a new chapter now presents headaches attributed to psychiatric disorders. Headaches due to disturbance of homeostasis has been brought together in a new chapter and the diagnostic criteria for secondary headaches are now more systematically constructed. All these changes will hopefully promote research, especially for the novel entities reported in the appendix, which have not been sufficiently

  4. Helmholtz in Gilded-Age America: The International Electrical Congress of 1893 and the Relations of Science and Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cahan, David

    2010-01-01

    This essay recounts Hermann von Helmholtz's trip to represent Germany at the International Electrical Congress in Chicago in 1893 as well as his reception by various members of the American scientific, technological, and cultural elite in several other American cities. In doing so, it seeks to portray something of the vitality of the youthful and…

  5. Proceedings of the International Congress on Pharmacy Education (2nd, Boston, Massachusetts, July 17-20, 1980).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suntrup, Noreen L., Ed.

    Proceedings of the Second International Congress on Pharmacy Education, which address the entire pharmacy curriculum, are presented. Contents are as follows: "Educating for the Pharmaceutical Industry," J.N. Banerjee; "Overview on Pharmaceuticals for Developing Countries," Leighton E. Cluff; "Pharmacy and the Third…

  6. Bericht uber den 2. Internationalen Kongress fur Angewandte Linguistik (Report on the Second International Congress for Applied Linguistics).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohr, Peter

    This report of the 1969 Second International Congress for Applied Linguistics contains summaries of papers and speeches on the following topics: (1) linguistics applied to literary texts, (2) computer analysis of texts, (3) research in the psychology of first language learning, (4) research in the psychology of second language learning, (5) speech…

  7. 13th IUPAC- international congress of pesticide chemistry: crop, environment, and public health protection, technologies for a changing world

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This introductory paper provides an overview of Perspectives papers written by plenary speakers from the 13th IUPAC International Congress of Pesticide Chemistry held in San Francisco, CA in August, 2014. This group of papers emphasizes some of the emerging issues and challenges at the forefront of...

  8. Summaries of the Regional Conferences Held in Preparation for the Second International Congress on Technical and Vocational Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    UNEVOC Info, 1999

    1999-01-01

    In 1998, five regional conferences were held in preparation for the Second International Congress on Technical and Vocational Education (TVE). The Asia-Pacific regional conference focused on challenges of the 21st century, demands of the world of work, and changing patterns in the delivery of training programs. The European symposium covered five…

  9. Residues in food and feed topic area at the 13th IUPAC International Congress of pesticide chemistry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The organizers of two symposia in the “Residues in Food and Feed” topic area held at the 13th IUPAC International Congress of Pesticide Chemistry introduce the papers that were contributed to this special section in the Journal. The symposia were titled “Taking Advantage of Advanced Analytical Tool...

  10. Meeting report on the 3rd International Congress on Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) focuses on the earliest stages of human development, and provides a novel paradigm to complement other strategies for lifelong prevention of common chronic health conditions. The 3rd International Congress on DOHaD, held in 2005, retained the most ...

  11. UNIV-84: The Professions and Society. [Proceedings of the] International University Congress, Rome, April 14-23, 1984.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palla, Pier Giovanni, Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Proceedings of the 1984 International University Congress (ICU) on the social implications of the university's preparation of professionals are presented. Studies on this topics were undertaken in more than 400 universities in about 40 countries. After Philippe Monod summarizes the activities carried out worldwide, Ana Maria Vergara briefly…

  12. Proceedings of the International Congress on Clinical Pharmacy Education. (1st, Minneapolis, Minnesota, July 13-16, 1976).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy, Bethesda, MD.

    The proceedings of the First International Congress on Clinical Pharmacy Education, which introduced pharmacy educators from outside of North America to the U.S. clinical pharmacy component of education and practice are presented in more than 20 separate papers. The program's objectives were: (1) to provide a historical overview of the development…

  13. PREFACE: 22nd International Congress on X-Ray Optics and Microanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falkenberg, Gerald; Schroer, Christian G.

    2014-04-01

    ICXOM22 The 22nd edition of the International Congress on X-ray Optics and Microanalysis (ICXOM 22) was held from 2-6 September 2013, in Hamburg, Germany. The congress was organized by scientists from DESY in collaboration with TU Dresden and Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, who also formed the scientific advisory board. The congress was hosted in the historical lecture hall building of the University of Hamburg located in the city center. ICXOM22 was attended by about 210 registered participants, including 67 students, and was open for listeners. The attendance was split between 26 countries (Germany 120, rest of Europe 57, America 20, Asia 8, Australia 6). The ICXOM series is a forum for the discussion of new developments in instrumentation, methods and applications in the fields of micro- and nano-analysis by means of X-ray beams. Following the trend of the last 10 years, the conference focusses more and more on synchrotron radiation rather than X-ray laboratory sources. Besides micro-beam X-ray fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy, different methods based on diffraction and full-field imaging were covered. Newly introduced to the ICXOM series was scanning coherent X-ray diffraction imaging, which was shown to evolve into a mature method for the imaging of nanostructures, defects and strain fields. New developments on fast X-ray detectors were discussed (Lambda, Maia) and advances in X-ray optics — like the generation of a sub 5nm point focus by Multilayer Zone plates — were presented. Talks on micro- and nano-analysis applications were distributed in special sessions on bio-imaging, Earth and environmental sciences, and Cultural heritage. The congress featured nine keynote and ten plenary talks, 56 talks in 14 parallel sessions and about 120 posters in three afternoon sessions. Seventeen commercial exhibitors exposed related X-ray instrumentation products, and two luncheon seminars on detector electronics were given. This allowed us to keep the student

  14. International Congress on the Occasion of the Thirtieth Anniversary of the Associated Schools Project. (Sofia, Bulgaria, September 12-16, 1983). Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France).

    This report of the Proceedings of an international congress to mark the 30th anniversary of the Associated Schools Project of UNESCO is divided into seven sections. Section I, an introduction, outlines the background of the congress and initial proceedings: the opening address, election of officers, presentation of the program and rules of…

  15. The International Congress of the International Council on Health, Physical Education, and Recreation (13th, Sydney, Australia, July 30-August 3, 1970).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Council on Health, Physical Education, and Recreation, Washington, DC.

    The theme of the 1970 Congress of the International Council on Health, Physical Education, and Recreation (ICHPER), where the papers in this collection originated, was "New Endeavors in Health, Physical Education and Recreation." After the opening and the presidential address, there are three papers listed under the heading "General:""How Standard…

  16. Participation of People with Disabilities: An International Perspective. Selected Papers from the 1980 World Congress of Rehabilitation International (Winnipeg, Canada, June 22-27, 1980).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Kathleen S., Ed.; And Others

    Selected papers from the 1980 World Congress of Rehabilitation International Meeting on the participation of disabled people are presented. The papers address the rights of the disabled, the organization and functions of consumer groups, the impact of consumer involvement on rehabilitation and related services, social implications of the consumer…

  17. The Fifteenth International Congress of the International Council on Health, Physical Education, and Recreation (London, England, August 9-11, 1972).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Council on Health, Physical Education, and Recreation, Washington, DC.

    This collection of conference papers is based on talks given at the Congress of the International Council on Health, Physical Education, and Recreation. Topics dealt with are the following: (a) social perspectives in child development; (b) relationships between children and teachers in health, physical education, and recreation; (c) relationships…

  18. PREFACE: 25th International Congress on Condition Monitoring and Diagnostic Engineering (COMADEM 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Andrew; Mishra, Rakesh; Gu, Fengshou; Rao, Raj B. K. N.

    2012-05-01

    The proactive multidisciplinary conceptual philosophy of Condition Monitoring and Diagnostic Engineering Management (COMADEM) was conceived and has been nurtured, developed and sustained since 1988. Since then, it is gratifying to note that the condition monitoring, diagnostic and prognostic community worldwide (representing industrialists, academics, research and development organizations, professional/private establishments and many hardware/software vending organizations) has warmly welcomed and supported this venture. As is evidenced, many have reaped (and are reaping) the benefits of COMADEM interdiscipline through continuous knowledge discovery, generation and dissemination. We are now proud to celebrate the 25th Annual Event (Silver Jubilee) in Huddersfield, the most beautiful part of the United Kingdom. The theme of this Congress is 'Sustained Prosperity through Proactive Monitoring, Diagnosis, Prognosis and Management'. This proceedings is enriched by contributions from many keynote experts representing many industry and academic establishments worldwide. Authors from more than 30 different countries have pooled their rich multidisciplinary up-to-date knowledge, in order to share their invaluable experience with the COMADEM community. In this proceedings, the readers will find more than 120 refereed papers encompassing a number of topical areas of interest relating to the theme of the congress. The proceedings of COMADEM 2012 will appear in the Open Access Journal of Physics: Conference Series (JPCS), which is part of the IOP Conference Series. All papers published in the IOP Conference Series are fully citable and upon publication will be free to download. We would like to express our deep gratitude to all the keynote speakers, authors, referees, exhibitors, Technical Co-Sponsoring Organizations, Gold Sponsors, IOP Publishers, COMADEM 2012 organizing committee members, delegates and many others on whom the success of this prestigious event depends

  19. Report: Combustion Byproducts and Their Health Effects: Summary of the 10th International Congress

    PubMed Central

    Dellinger, Barry; D'Alessio, Antonio; D'Anna, Andrea; Ciajolo, Anna; Gullett, Brian; Henry, Heather; Keener, Mel; Lighty, JoAnn; Lomnicki, Slawomir; Lucas, Donald; Oberdörster, Günter; Pitea, Demetrio; Suk, William; Sarofim, Adel; Smith, Kirk R.; Stoeger, Tobias; Tolbert, Paige; Wyzga, Ron; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2008-01-01

    Abstract The 10th International Congress on Combustion Byproducts and their Health Effects was held in Ischia, Italy, from June 17–20, 2007. It is sponsored by the US NIEHS, NSF, Coalition for Responsible Waste Incineration (CRWI), and Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The congress focused on: the origin, characterization, and health impacts of combustion-generated fine and ultrafine particles; emissions of mercury and dioxins, and the development/application of novel analytical/diagnostic tools. The consensus of the discussion was that particle-associated organics, metals, and persistent free radicals (PFRs) produced by combustion sources are the likely source of the observed health impacts of airborne PM rather than simple physical irritation of the particles. Ultrafine particle-induced oxidative stress is a likely progenitor of the observed health impacts, but important biological and chemical details and possible catalytic cycles remain unresolved. Other key conclusions were: (1) In urban settings, 70% of airborne fine particles are a result of combustion emissions and 50% are due to primary emissions from combustion sources, (2) In addition to soot, combustion produces one, possibly two, classes of nanoparticles with mean diameters of ~10 nm and ~1 nm. (3) The most common metrics used to describe particle toxicity, viz. surface area, sulfate concentration, total carbon, and organic carbon, cannot fully explain observed health impacts, (4) Metals contained in combustion-generated ultrafine and fine particles mediate formation of toxic air pollutants such as PCDD/F and PFRs. (5) The combination of metal-containing nanoparticles, organic carbon compounds, and PFRs can lead to a cycle generating oxidative stress in exposed organisms. PMID:22476005

  20. Botanical nematicides: a review.

    PubMed

    Ntalli, Nikoletta G; Caboni, Pierluigi

    2012-10-10

    Despite the uselfuness of nematicidal compounds in agricultural practices, some serious concerns are raised today about their excessive use leading to enhancement of biodegradation mechanisms in soil expressed as lack of efficacy under field conditions and resistance development. Moreover, the phase-out of methyl bromide has led to the need for a valid alternative to organophosporous and carbamate compounds, such us fosthiazate, fenamiphos, oxamyl, and aldicarb. In the past years, intregated pest management strategies have been practised worldwide to maximize crop production while maintaining and contributing to agriculture sustainability. Biopesticides and specifically bionematicides constitute a desirable component of pest management technology and practices. Particularly, in the frame of our ongoing research on natural nematicides of botanical origin, we have reviewed the international bibliography for candidate nematicidal compounds. We report herein the nematicidal activity of plant metabolites on the basis of their chemical characteristics and structure.

  1. PREFACE: 23rd Congress of the International Commission for Optics (ICO 23)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salgueiro, J. R.; Flores-Arias, M. T.; Vázquez-Dorrío, J. B.; Guzmán, Á.; Arakawa, Y.

    2015-04-01

    The 23rd Congress of the International Commission for Optics (ICO) was held in Santiago de Compostela (Spain) 26-29 August 2014, organized by the Universities of Vigo and Santiago de Compostela. Approximately 450 people attended the conference, sharing their knowledge in the cheerful, warm atmosphere of this lovely city. The conference was extremely successful in contributing to the mission of the ICO: to contribute worldwide, on an international basis, to the progress and diffusion of scientific and technological knowledge on optics and photonics. Optics and photonics have reached a critical level of importance for the development of our societies and are present in a great many aspects of our technological progress, from communication systems supporting the Internet to the most modern techniques in medicine. Consistent with the conference slogan Enlightening the Future, the meeting stressed the importance of optical science as a key to technological progress in the coming years. UNESCO's designation of 2015 as the International Year of Light and Light-Based Technologies (www.light2015.org) acknowledges the importance of raising global awareness of how light and light-based technologies are present in a large fraction of today's advances and how they can address challenges in important areas such as energy, education, agriculture, and health. The four-day conference highlighted eleven plenary talks by outstanding scientists working in important areas of optics and photonics. A. Aspect, T. Kippenberg (2013 ICO Prize awardee) and K. Razewski (2013 ICO Galileo Galilei Award) spoke on quantum optics; P. Russell and Yu. Kivshar lectured on topics related to optical processing devices as optical fibers and metamaterials for light shaping; N. X. Fang (2011 ICO Prize), U. Woggon, and A. Alú (2013 IUPAP Young Scientists Prize) discussed applications of optics to nanoscience; and K. Dholakia and J. Widjaja (2008 Galileo Galilei Award) presented in their plenaries

  2. 15th International Congress on Plasma Physics & 13th Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto, Leopoldo

    2014-05-01

    The International Advisory Committee of the 15th International Congress on Plasma Physics (ICPP 2010) and the International Advisory Committee of the 13th Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics (LAWPP 2010), together agreed to carry out this combined meeting ICPP-LAWPP-2010 in Santiago de Chile, 8-13 August 2010, on occasion of the Bicentennial of Chilean Independence. The ICPP-LAWPP-2010 was organized by the Thermonuclear Plasma Department of the Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission (CCHEN) as part of the official program within the framework of the Chilean Bicentennial. The event was also a scientific and academic activity of the project ''Center for Research and Applications in Plasma Physics and Pulsed Power, P4'', supported by National Scientific and Technological Commission, CONICYT-Chile, under grant ACT-26. The International Congress on Plasma Physics was first held in Nagoya, in 1980, and followed by the Congresses: Gothenburg (1982), Lausanne (1984), Kiev (1987), New Delhi (1989), Innsbruck (1992), Foz do Iguacu (1994), Nagoya (1996), Prague (1998), Quebec City (2000), Sydney (2002), Nice (2004), Kiev (2006), and Fukuoka (2008). The purpose of the Congress is to discuss the recent progress and future views in plasma science, including fundamental plasma physics, fusion plasmas, astrophysical plasmas, and plasma applications, and so forth. The Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics was first held in 1982 in Cambuquira, Brazil, followed by the Workshops: Medellín (1985), Santiago (1988), Buenos Aires (1990), Mexico City (1992), Foz do Iguacu (1994, also combined with ICPP), Caracas (1997), Tandil (1998), La Serena (2000), Sao Pedro (2003), Mexico City (2005), and Caracas (2007). The Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics is a communication forum of the achievements of the plasma-physics regional community, fostering collaboration between plasma scientists within the region and elsewhere. The program of the ICPP-LAWPP-2010 included the topics

  3. Proceedings of the fourth international conference and exhibition: World Congress on superconductivity. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Krishen, K.; Burnham, C.

    1994-12-31

    This document contains papers presented at the 4th International Conference Exhibition: World Congress on Superconductivity held at the Marriott Orlando World Center, Orlando, Florida, June 27--July 1, 1994. This conference encompassed research, technology, applications, funding, political, and social aspects of superconductivity. Specifically, the areas of research, technology, and development covered during the conference included high-temperature materials, thin films, C-60 based superconductors, persistent magnetic fields and shielding, fabrication methodology, space applications, physical applications, performance characterization, device applications, weak link effects and flux motion, accelerator technology, superconductivity energy, storage, future research and development directions, medical applications, granular superconductors, wire fabrication technology, computer applications, technical and commercial challenges, and power and energy applications. The key objective of this conference was to provide a forum for the world community to share technological results of recent advances made in the field of superconductivity and to discuss translation of the research to technology which will benefit humanity. More than 150 presentations were made at this conference. Individual papers are indexed separately on the Energy Data Bases.

  4. 14th International Congress on Antiphospholipid Antibodies: task force report on antiphospholipid syndrome treatment trends.

    PubMed

    Erkan, Doruk; Aguiar, Cassyanne L; Andrade, Danieli; Cohen, Hannah; Cuadrado, Maria J; Danowski, Adriana; Levy, Roger A; Ortel, Thomas L; Rahman, Anisur; Salmon, Jane E; Tektonidou, Maria G; Willis, Rohan; Lockshin, Michael D

    2014-06-01

    Antiphospholipid Syndrome (APS) is characterized by vascular thrombosis and/or pregnancy morbidity occurring in patients with persistent antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL). The primary objective of the APS Treatment Trends Task Force, created as part of the 14th International Congress on aPL, was to systematically review the potential future treatment strategies for aPL-positive patients. The task force chose as future clinical research directions: a) determining the necessity for controlled clinical trials in venous thromboembolism with the new oral direct thrombin or anti-factor Xa inhibitors pending the results of the ongoing rivaroxaban in APS (RAPS) trial, and designing controlled clinical trials in other forms of thrombotic APS; b) systematically analyzing the literature as well as aPL/APS registries, and creating specific registries for non-warfarin/heparin anticoagulants; c) increasing recruitment for an ongoing primary thrombosis prevention trial, and designing secondary thrombosis and pregnancy morbidity prevention trials with hydroxychloroquine; d) determining surrogate markers to select patients for statin trials; e) designing controlled studies with rituximab and other anti-B-cell agents; f) designing mechanistic and clinical studies with eculizumab and other complement inhibitors; and g) chemically modifying peptide therapy to improve the half-life and minimize immunogenicity. The report also includes recommendations for clinicians who consider using these agents in difficult-to-manage aPL-positive patients.

  5. 14th International Congress on Antiphospholipid Antibodies Task Force report on obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    de Jesus, Guilherme R; Agmon-Levin, Nancy; Andrade, Carlos A; Andreoli, Laura; Chighizola, Cecilia B; Porter, T Flint; Salmon, Jane; Silver, Robert M; Tincani, Angela; Branch, D Ware

    2014-08-01

    Pregnancy morbidity is one of the clinical manifestations used for classification criteria of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). During the 14th International Congress on Antiphospholipid Antibodies (aPL), a Task Force with internationally-known experts was created to carry out a critical appraisal of the literature available regarding the association of aPL with obstetric manifestations present in actual classification criteria (recurrent early miscarriage, fetal death, preeclampsia and placental insufficiency) and the quality of the evidence that treatment(s) provide benefit in terms of avoiding recurrent adverse obstetric outcomes. The association of infertility with aPL and the effectiveness of the treatment of patients with infertility and positive aPL was also investigated. This report presents current knowledge and limitations of published studies regarding pregnancy morbidity, infertility and aPL, identifying areas that need better investigative efforts and proposing how critical flaws could be avoided in future studies, as suggested by participants of the Task Force. Except for fetal death, there are limitations in the quality of the data supporting the association of aPL with obstetric complications included in the current APS classification criteria. Recommended treatments for all pregnancy morbidity associated to APS also lack well-designed studies to confirm its efficacy. APL does not seem to be associated with infertility and treatment does not improve the outcomes in infertile patients with aPL. In another section of the Task Force, Dr. Jane Salmon reviewed complement-mediated inflammation in reproductive failure in APS, considering new therapeutic targets to obstetric APS (Ob APS).

  6. Safety issues of botanicals and botanical preparations in functional foods.

    PubMed

    Kroes, R; Walker, R

    2004-05-20

    Although botanicals have played a role in the marketing of health products for ages, there is an increased interest today due to their perceived health benefits. Not only do consumers increasingly take charge of their health, but the scientific information and understanding of the beneficial health effects of bioactive substances in food, functional foods and food supplements have improved. Increasing use of these products has also led to concerns about their actual safety. Recorded cases of intoxications have triggered such concerns. The safety assessment of these substances is complicated by, amongst others, the variability of composition. Furthermore, consumption of such functional products is expected to produce physiological effects, which may lead to low margins of safety as the margin between exposure of such products and the safe level of intake are likely to be small. The safety assessment of botanicals and botanical preparations in food and food supplement should at least involve: the characterisation and quality of the material, its quality control; the intended use and consequent exposure; history of use and exposure; product comparison(s); toxicological information gathering; Risk characterisation/safety assessment. As a guidance tool, a decision tree approach is proposed to assist in determining the extent of data requirements based on the nature of the such product. This guidance tool in safety assessment was developed by an expert group of the International Life Sciences Institute (ILSI), European Branch, and is currently in press. In this paper a summarised version of this tool is presented.

  7. Special Issue: Proceedings From the 9th International Congress on Isozymes, Genes, and Gene Families, San Antonio, TX, April 14-19, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    McCarrey, John R.; VandeBerg, John L.

    1998-10-01

    This volume includes 27 peer-reviewed papers, plus an overview of the International Congress on Genes, Gene Families, and Isozymes. These proceedings provide a representative portion of the outstanding scientific program compiled for the Congress. Presented is a volume that documents the vigorous state of this field, and the manner in which is has progressed to include a wide range of approaches, from classic isozyme analysis to modern molecular biology.

  8. Botanical ingredients in cosmeceuticals.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Leslie

    2007-11-01

    During the last 10 to 15 years, complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) has become increasingly popular in the US. Within this realm of health care, oral and topical herbal supplements have become some of the most frequently used alternative therapies. Most herbal supplements are based on, or include, several botanical ingredients with long histories of traditional or folk medicine usage. Among the numerous botanical ingredients available on the market today, several are believed to confer dermatologic benefits. This article will focus on a select group of botanical compounds, many of which have long traditions in Asian medicine, with potential or exhibited dermatologic applications, including curcumin, Ginkgo biloba, ginseng, silymarin, soy, and tea tree oil. Other botanical agents, such as arnica, bromelain, chamomile, pomegranate, caffeine, green tea, licorice, and resveratrol, are also briefly considered. Some of these ingredients have been incorporated into topical formulations.

  9. Residues in Food and Feed Topic Area at the 13th IUPAC International Congress of Pesticide Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Lehotay, Steven J; Riter, Leah S; Saha, Manasi

    2015-05-13

    The organizers of two symposia in the "Residues in Food and Feed" topic area held at the 13th IUPAC International Congress of Pesticide Chemistry introduce the papers that were contributed to this special section in the Journal. The symposia were titled "Taking Advantage of Advanced Analytical Tools" and "Going from Macro to Micro: The Future of Sample Processing in Residue Analytical Methods". The oral and poster sessions generated much interest and discussion among the attendees, and some highlights are described in this introductory paper.

  10. Proceedings of the 6th International Congress on Noise as a Public Health Problem, volume 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-07-01

    The 160 papers from the congress are presented. Topics covered include the following: noise induced hearing loss; noise and communication; community response to noise; noise and animal life; non-auditory physiological effects; influence of noise on performance and behavior; noise and disturbed sleep; and regulations and standards.

  11. Third International Congress on Soldiers' Physical Performance: Translating State-of-the-Science Soldier Research for Operational Utility.

    PubMed

    Nindl, Bradley C; Sharp, Marilyn A

    2015-11-01

    The Third International Congress on Soldiers' Physical Performance (ICSPP) was held on August 18-21, 2014 in Boston, MA, where it had a record attendance of 374 registrants from 27 countries. The Congress included 8 invited keynote lectures, 12 symposia, 1 featured science session, more than 200 oral and poster free communication sessions, 8 thematic poster sessions, and a Warfighter Readiness Roundtable. Collectively, the presentations focused on a fundamental premise that soldiers are the center of warfighting capability, and the human service member is the prime resource and key enabler of all warfighting systems. The intent of the ICSPP series is to focus on the soldier-the individual service member. As we move forward with focus placed on the human dimension of soldiering, the key to our scientific success and what will prove to be transformative will be the extent to which we can operationalize and disseminate our scientific knowledge for the benefit of our soldiers on the ground. The Congress fostered important scientific exchange, and dialog centered on improving military physical performance and readiness. As countries around the globe respond to current and emerging threats to their national security, it is increasingly clear that we must ensure optimal human performance of our military personnel. By taking advantage of the science and applications of physical fitness and injury prevention research, we can leverage our increased understanding for the optimal application of physical readiness processes while minimizing the injury risk potential. We believe that the continued scientific and evidence-based dialog across international partners will prove to be transformative in identifying the most effective strategies for human performance optimization in the 21st century. Innovation, leveraging current state-of-the-science, and international partnerships were all key themes throughout the Congress. From the ICSPP scientific program, it was clear that there

  12. PREFACE: First International Congress of the International Association of Inverse Problems (IPIA): Applied Inverse Problems 2007: Theoretical and Computational Aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhlmann, Gunther

    2008-07-01

    This volume represents the proceedings of the fourth Applied Inverse Problems (AIP) international conference and the first congress of the Inverse Problems International Association (IPIA) which was held in Vancouver, Canada, June 25 29, 2007. The organizing committee was formed by Uri Ascher, University of British Columbia, Richard Froese, University of British Columbia, Gary Margrave, University of Calgary, and Gunther Uhlmann, University of Washington, chair. The conference was part of the activities of the Pacific Institute of Mathematical Sciences (PIMS) Collaborative Research Group on inverse problems (http://www.pims.math.ca/scientific/collaborative-research-groups/past-crgs). This event was also supported by grants from NSF and MITACS. Inverse Problems (IP) are problems where causes for a desired or an observed effect are to be determined. They lie at the heart of scientific inquiry and technological development. The enormous increase in computing power and the development of powerful algorithms have made it possible to apply the techniques of IP to real-world problems of growing complexity. Applications include a number of medical as well as other imaging techniques, location of oil and mineral deposits in the earth's substructure, creation of astrophysical images from telescope data, finding cracks and interfaces within materials, shape optimization, model identification in growth processes and, more recently, modelling in the life sciences. The series of Applied Inverse Problems (AIP) Conferences aims to provide a primary international forum for academic and industrial researchers working on all aspects of inverse problems, such as mathematical modelling, functional analytic methods, computational approaches, numerical algorithms etc. The steering committee of the AIP conferences consists of Heinz Engl (Johannes Kepler Universität, Austria), Joyce McLaughlin (RPI, USA), William Rundell (Texas A&M, USA), Erkki Somersalo (Helsinki University of Technology

  13. Sixth International Limnogeology Congress: abstract volume, Reno, Nevada, June 15-19, 2015

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosen, Michael R.; Cohen, Andrew S.; Kirby, Matthew; Gierlowski-Kordesch, Elizabeth; Starratt, Scott W.; Valero Garcés, Blas L.; Varekamp, Johan

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey has sponsored each ILIC that has been held in the United States because of the importance of understanding paleoclimate and contaminant histories of lakes, two main themes of the Congress. This volume provides a permanent record of the wide variety of studies that are being conducted in modern lakes and ancient lake deposits worldwide, and it provides a stepping stone for any one desiring further discussion of the work that was presented at ILIC6.

  14. Botanical Scavenger Hunt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker-Livingston, Wendy

    2009-01-01

    Why not combine the use of technology with the excitement of a scavenger hunt that moves middle-level students out into the "wilds" of their school campus to classify plants? In the lesson plan described here, students embark on a botanical scavenger hunt and then document their findings using a digital camera. This project was designed to allow…

  15. Charles Darwin's Botanical Investigations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harley, Suzanne M.

    2010-01-01

    Charles Darwin's botanical studies provide a way to expose students to his work that followed the publication of "On the Origin of Species." We can use stories from his plant investigations to illustrate key concepts in the life sciences and model how questions are asked and answered in science.

  16. Reading for All; Proceedings of the IRA (International Reading Association) World Congress on Reading (4th, Buenos Aires, Argentina, August 3-5, 1972).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karlin, Robert, Ed.

    This book contains papers presented at the Fourth International Reading Association World Congress on Reading in Buenos Aires, Argentina, in August 1972. The contents of the book are divided into three parts: "Literacy and Literature" includes papers on libraries, books, and reading by Jorge Borges, the future of reading by Theodore Harris, the…

  17. Proceedings of the fourth international conference and exhibition: World Congress on superconductivity. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Krishen, K.; Burnham, C.

    1994-12-31

    The goals of the World Congress on Superconductivity (WCS) have been to establish and foster the development and commercial application of superconductivity technology on a global scale by providing a non-adversarial, non-advocacy forum where scientists, engineers, businessmen and government personnel can freely exchange information and ideas on recent developments and directions for the future of superconductive research. Sessions were held on: accelerator technology, power and energy, persistent magnetic fields, performance characterization, physical properties, fabrication methodology, superconductive magnetic energy storage (SMES), thin films, high temperature materials, device applications, wire fabrication, and granular superconductors. Individual papers are indexed separately.

  18. Third international congress of plant molecular biology: Molecular biology of plant growth and development

    SciTech Connect

    Hallick, R.B.

    1995-02-01

    The Congress was held October 6-11, 1991 in Tucson with approximately 3000 scientists attending and over 300 oral presentations and 1800 posters. Plant molecular biology is one of the most rapidly developing areas of the biological sciences. Recent advances in the ability to isolate genes, to study their expression, and to create transgenic plants have had a major impact on our understanding of the many fundamental plant processes. In addition, new approaches have been created to improve plants for agricultural purposes. This is a book of presentation and posters from the conference.

  19. Sixth International Limnogeology Congress: field trip guidebook, Reno, Nevada, June 15-19, 2015

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosen, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey has sponsored each ILIC that has been held in the United States because of the importance of understanding paleoclimate and contaminant histories of lakes, two main themes of the Congress. This field trip guide provides a permanent record of some of the wide variety of studies that are being conducted in modern lakes and ancient lake deposits in western North America, and it provides a starting point for any one desiring to visit these exceptional sites or begin work in these areas.

  20. The Fifteenth International Congress on Hygiene and Demography Held in Washington, D. C. from September 16 to October 5. 1912. I. Some Lessons and Suggestions from the Exhibition; II. Digests of Some of the Papers Presented at the Congress. Bulletin, 1913, No. 18. Whole Number 528

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dresslar, Fletcher B.

    1913-01-01

    The Fifteenth International Congress on Hygiene and Demography, held in Washington City in the autumn of 1912, was a notable event in the history of sanitation and in the discussion of the conditions of the physical and mental health of the people. The exhibition held in connection with the congress was instructive in many ways, and contained much…

  1. International Communications and Information; Hearings before the Subcommittee on International Operations of the Committee on Foreign Relations United States Senate, 95th Congress, First Session, June 8-10, 1977. Washington, D.C.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U. S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Foreign Affairs.

    This volume presents the hearings on the implications of international communications and information held before the Senate Subcommittee on International Operations of the Ninety-fifth Congress. Statements taken from Otis Chandler, publisher of the "Los Angeles Times," Andrew Heiskell, chair of Time Incorporated, Glenn E. Watts,…

  2. International Congress: Physical Activities--Sport--Development (Nabeul, Tunisia, February 24-26, 1992). Final Report. = Congres International: Activites physiques--Sport--Developpement (Nabeul, Tunisie, 24-26 fevrier 1992). Rapport final.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France).

    The aim of this international congress was to strengthen international cooperation in the field of physical education and sport and to promote practical measures based on partnership among government authorities, volunteer organizations, and private national or multinational corporations, by pointing out the contribution that the rational practice…

  3. 14th International Congress on Antiphospholipid Antibodies Task Force. Report on antiphospholipid syndrome laboratory diagnostics and trends.

    PubMed

    Bertolaccini, Maria Laura; Amengual, Olga; Andreoli, Laura; Atsumi, Tatsuya; Chighizola, Cecilia B; Forastiero, Ricardo; de Groot, Philip; Lakos, Gabriella; Lambert, Marc; Meroni, Pierluigi; Ortel, Thomas L; Petri, Michelle; Rahman, Anisur; Roubey, Robert; Sciascia, Savino; Snyder, Melissa; Tebo, Anne E; Tincani, Angela; Willis, Rohan

    2014-09-01

    Current classification criteria for definite Antiphospholipid Syndrome (APS) require the use of three laboratory assays to detect antiphospholipid antibodies (aCL, anti-β2GPI and LA) in the presence of at least one of the two major clinical manifestations (i.e. thrombosis or pregnancy morbidity) of the syndrome. However, several other autoantibodies shown to be directed to other proteins or their complex with phospholipids have been proposed to be relevant to APS but their clinical utility and their diagnostic value remains elusive. This report summarizes the findings, conclusions and recommendations of the "APS Task Force 3-Laboratory Diagnostics and Trends" meeting that took place during the 14th International Congress on Antiphospholipid Antibodies (APLA 2013, September 18-21, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil).

  4. Travelogue of Konrad Keilhack (1858-1944), Geologist from Berlin, attending the International Geological Congress 1897 in St. Petersburg (Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfaffl, Fritz A.; Dullo, Wolf-Christian

    2015-09-01

    Keilhack reported his impressions from his participation at the International Geological Congress in Russia in 1897 in several consecutive articles. In the more than 100 years since that time, a lot has changed. Apart from the totally different style of scientific presentations, with almost no illustrations, except maps, being shown during a talk, field trips were also a very special event, involving huge amounts of logistics. More than 200 people were transported to very remote areas of the European part of Russia. As well as organizing transportation by coaches and horses, places to stay overnight had to be found in large numbers and special regulations had to be issued by the government to allow access to various outcrops. Keilhacks visit of the oil-producing sites around Baku are of special interest, since they belonged obviously to the most productive ones on the globe at that time.

  5. Bericht uber den 2. Internationalen Kongress fur Angewandte Linguistik. Cambridge 8.-12. IX. 1969. [Report on the Second International Congress for Applied Linguistics, Cambridge, Dec. 8-12, 1969.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohr, Peter

    This paper is a summary report on the Second International Congress of Applied Linguistics held in Cambridge, England in September 1969. Because of the large number of papers delivered, only a selection of the papers delivered in any one section of the Congress are considered, and the author attempts to identify current interests and trends in…

  6. Botanical Sciences Team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, C. J.

    1982-01-01

    The orbital ability to remotely sense vegetated targets can be improved by increased understanding of atmospheric effects, and by the use of appropriate spatial resolution, narrow spectral bandwidths, additional spectral bands, and a temporal frequency of 2 to 3 days. The effects of atmosphere on radiative transfer, remote sensing over a nonuniform surface, the choice of the red and photographic IR portions of the spectra for delinating botanical features, and areas where additional research is needed are covered.

  7. Educational Sciences, Morality and Politics: International Educational Congresses in the Early Twentieth Century

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuchs, Eckhardt

    2004-01-01

    Internationalism became one of the keywords in the international intellectual and political debates at the end of the nineteenth century. As a political, cultural and social movement it also included science and education. The desire for international cooperation and global understanding was caused by the growing economic interdependence in the…

  8. Yeasts for Global Happiness: report of the 14th International Congress on Yeasts (ICY14) held in Awaji Island.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Daisuke; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2017-02-01

    The 14th International Congress on Yeasts (ICY14) was held at Awaji Yumebutai International Conference Center (Awaji, Hyogo) in Japan from 11 to 15 September 2016. The main slogan of ICY14 was 'Yeasts for Global Happiness', which enabled us to acknowledge the high-potential usefulness of yeasts contributing to the global happiness in terms of food/beverage, health/medicine and energy/environment industries, as well as to basic biosciences. In addition, two more concepts were introduced: 'from Japan to the world' and 'from senior to junior'. As it was the first ICY meeting held in Japan or other Asian countries, ICY14 provided a good opportunity to widely spread the great achievements by Japanese and Asian yeast researchers, such as those by the 2016 Nobel Laureate Dr. Yoshinori Ohsumi, and also, to convey the fun and importance of yeasts to the next generation of researchers from Asia and all over the world. As a result, a total of 426 yeast lovers from 42 countries (225 overseas and 201 domestic participants) with different generations attended ICY14 to share the latest knowledge of a wide range of yeast research fields and to join active and constructive scientific discussions.

  9. The IUPAC International Congresses of Pesticide Chemistry (1963-2014) and Pest Management Science: a half-century of progress.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Gerald T

    2014-08-01

    As we approach the 2014 San Francisco IUPAC Pesticide Chemistry Congress, we reflect on the 51 years of such congresses every 4 years since 1963. Meanwhile, our journal, Pesticide Science/Pest Management Science, has in parallel continually published relevant science for nearly as long (44 years from 1970).

  10. Proposal to consistently apply the International Code of Nomenclature of Prokaryotes (ICNP) to names of the oxygenic photosynthetic bacteria (cyanobacteria), including those validly published under the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature (ICBN)/International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi and plants (ICN), and proposal to change Principle 2 of the ICNP.

    PubMed

    Pinevich, Alexander V

    2015-03-01

    This taxonomic note was motivated by the recent proposal [Oren & Garrity (2014) Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 64, 309-310] to exclude the oxygenic photosynthetic bacteria (cyanobacteria) from the wording of General Consideration 5 of the International Code of Nomenclature of Prokaryotes (ICNP), which entails unilateral coverage of these prokaryotes by the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants (ICN; formerly the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature, ICBN). On the basis of key viewpoints, approaches and rules in the systematics, taxonomy and nomenclature of prokaryotes it is reciprocally proposed to apply the ICNP to names of cyanobacteria including those validly published under the ICBN/ICN. For this purpose, a change to Principle 2 of the ICNP is proposed to enable validation of cyanobacterial names published under the ICBN/ICN rules.

  11. Address given at the Opening Meeting of the XIXth Congress of the International Publishers Association.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maheu, Rene

    The relationship between Unesco's task "to promote the free flow of ideas by word and image" and the International Publishers Association's goal of the promotion, through international cooperation, of the right to culture is brought out in this speech. The cooperative efforts of the two organizations in efforts to protect creative…

  12. The G-20 and International Economic Cooperation: Background and Implications for Congress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-23

    European Union (EU) is a member of the G-20. Pink (for color copies) or medium gray (for black- and-white copies) indicate members of the European... tax avoidance, international financial architecture, financial regulation, development, climate change, and corruption. • News reports indicate that...issues: growth, jobs, investment, multilateral trade, tax avoidance, international financial architecture, financial regulation, development, climate

  13. Highlights from the Second World Congress of Education International (2nd, Washington, DC, July 1998).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education International, Brussels (Belgium).

    The papers in this volume reflect the general theme of the conference, which includes issues that will shape the future of Education International and of education for decades to come. The first half of the publication includes speeches by the following individuals: (1) Mary Hatwood Futrell, President, Education International; (2) Sandra Feldman,…

  14. Political dimensions of 'the psychosocial': The 1948 International Congress on Mental Health and the Mental Hygiene Movement.

    PubMed

    Toms, Jonathan

    2012-12-01

    The Foucauldian sociologist Nikolas Rose has influentially argued that psychosocial technologies have offered means through which the ideals of democracy can be made congruent with the management of social life and the government of citizens in modern Western liberal democracies. This interpretation is contested here through an examination of the 1948 International Congress on Mental Health held in London and the mental hygiene movement that organised it. It is argued that, in Britain, this movement's theory and practice represents an uneasy and ambiguous attempt to reconcile visions of 'the modern' with 'the traditional'. The mental hygienist emphasis on the family is central. Here it appears as a forcing-house of the modern self-sustaining individual. Mental hygienists cast the social organisation of 'traditional' communities as static, with rigid authority frustrating both social progress and the full emergence of individual personality. Yet mental hygienists were also concerned about threats to social cohesion and secure personhood under modernity. If the social organisation of 'traditional' communities was patterned by the archetype of the family, with its personal relations of authority, mental hygienists compressed these relations into the 'private' family. Situated here they became part of a developmental process of mental adjustment through which 'mature', responsible citizens emerged. This reformulation of the family's centrality for the social order informed mental hygienist critiques of the growth of state power under existing forms of democracy, as well as suspicion of popular political participation or protest, and of movements towards greater egalitarianism.

  15. PREFACE: The IARU International Scientific Congress on Climate Change: Global Risks, Challenges and Decisions (10-12 March, Copenhagen, Denmark)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-01-01

    In an attempt to make the main results from the Congress on Climate Change: Global Risk, Challenges and Decisions available to the public as early as possible, the steering committee decided to publish all talks and posters presented at the Congress in this unique collection of abstracts, in time for the conference Further to the abstract collection the Congress will publish two more products in the near future as described in the following; a synthesis report with the main conclusions, and a book aimed at an academic audience 1 Two Products from the Congress Two products are being produced based on the presentations and discussions at the Congress The first product will be a synthesis report of the main conclusions from the Congress The synthesis report will be ready in June 2009 The synthesis has the purpose of explaining the current state of understanding man-made climate change and what we can do about it to the non-scientist, ie politicians, media and interested citizens The synthesis will build on the messages presented to the Danish Prime Minister, Mr Anders Fogh Rasmussen, host of the COP15, at the closing session of the Congress These six messages were drafted by the Writing Team (see below) based on input from the session chairs and a reading of the 1600+ abstracts submitted to the Congress The second product is a book aimed at an academic audience The book will include more detailed scientific results from all of the sessions and will be published by Cambridge University Press in 2010 It will be an extension and elaboration of the synthesis report Who's writing the Synthesis Report and the Book? A Writing Team consisting of 12 internationally respected scientists from all continents is responsible for developing both products When the synthesis report has been drafted by the Writing Team, it will be discussed in the Scientific Steering Committee of the Congress and reviewed by the Earth System Science Partnership (ESSP) and a group of experts identified

  16. The XIIIth International Physiological Congress in Boston in 1929: American Physiology Comes of Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rall, Jack A.

    2016-01-01

    In the 19th century, the concept of experimental physiology originated in France with Claude Bernard, evolved in Germany stimulated by the teaching of Carl Ludwig, and later spread to Britain and then to the United States. The goal was to develop a physicochemical understanding of physiological phenomena. The first International Physiological…

  17. International Terrorism and Transnational Crime: Security Threats, U.S. Policy, and Considerations for Congress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-05

    U.S. and international detection, identification, and locating of these activities. However, while the use of these smaller mobile technologies may...prison, an environment where criminals and terrorist entities may come in contact and develop relationships or friendships that can set the stage...operatives sold narcotics to pay for cars, safe houses, phones , and other logistical support, and weapons. Furthermore, they reportedly exchanged drugs for

  18. The G-20 and International Economic Cooperation: Background and Implications for Congress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-09

    Financial Stability Forum (FSF), the Counter-Terrorism Action Group, and the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria , and the G-8...G-20 and International Economic Cooperation Congressional Research Service 19 precipitously declined. Overall, however, the resurgence of capital...countries look a lot different than G-20 developed countries on a number of factors that could impact implementation, including rule of law, government

  19. EPA Helps Botanic Garden Blossom

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    One of the keys to the continued transformation of abandoned mine lands into a world-class botanic garden near Pittsburgh is an innovative rainwater system financed by EPA’s Clean Water State Revolving Fund.

  20. Political dimensions of ‘the psychosocial’: The 1948 International Congress on Mental Health and the Mental Hygiene Movement

    PubMed Central

    Toms, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    The Foucauldian sociologist Nikolas Rose has influentially argued that psychosocial technologies have offered means through which the ideals of democracy can be made congruent with the management of social life and the government of citizens in modern Western liberal democracies. This interpretation is contested here through an examination of the 1948 International Congress on Mental Health held in London and the mental hygiene movement that organised it. It is argued that, in Britain, this movement’s theory and practice represents an uneasy and ambiguous attempt to reconcile visions of ‘the modern’ with ‘the traditional’. The mental hygienist emphasis on the family is central. Here it appears as a forcing-house of the modern self-sustaining individual. Mental hygienists cast the social organisation of ‘traditional’ communities as static, with rigid authority frustrating both social progress and the full emergence of individual personality. Yet mental hygienists were also concerned about threats to social cohesion and secure personhood under modernity. If the social organisation of ‘traditional’ communities was patterned by the archetype of the family, with its personal relations of authority, mental hygienists compressed these relations into the ‘private’ family. Situated here they became part of a developmental process of mental adjustment through which ‘mature’, responsible citizens emerged. This reformulation of the family’s centrality for the social order informed mental hygienist critiques of the growth of state power under existing forms of democracy, as well as suspicion of popular political participation or protest, and of movements towards greater egalitarianism. PMID:26379371

  1. Guidelines and policies on collection of biological specimens in the Philippines. Philippine Congress, International Convention on Biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Madulid, D A

    1996-04-01

    In October, 1993, 16 months after the United Nations approved the International Convention on Biodiversity held in Rio de Janeiro, June, 1992, the Philippine Congress ratified and adopted the Convention. This is a manifestation of the full support of the Philippines for the principles and policies adopted by the UN body on the conservation of biodiversity, sustainable development of biological resources and equitable sharing of benefits between users and owners of biodiversity resources. The Philippine scientific community has long recognized the need for and importance of a national guideline and policy with regard to the collection of plants and animals in the Philippines for scientific or commercial purposes. A series of consultative meetings were held by representatives of government agencies, non-government organizations, private organizations, academic and private persons concerned with biodiversity conservation to formulate national guidelines that regulate the collection of plant and animal specimens in the country. Guidelines were unanimously adopted by various government agencies and academia and a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) was signed on September 28, 1990. Very recently a new document was drafted, specifically to serve as a guideline for those who desire to undertake sample collecting in the Philippines for biodiversity prospecting. The document is now being reviewed by government departments and agencies and will be presented to the President of the Philippines for signing as an Executive Order (EO). Once signed, this EO will serve as a national policy for bioprospecting in the country. The Philippines is one of the countries in Southeast Asia that has endorsed the adoption of regional guidelines on the collection of plant and animal organisms for drug development. The ASEAN Agreement on the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (1985). The Manila Declaration (1992) and lately, the Melaka Accord (1994), all of which were signed by various

  2. International Congress on Transposable Elements (ICTE) 2012 in Saint Malo and the sea of TE stories.

    PubMed

    Ainouche, Abdelkader; Bétermier, Mireille; Chandler, Mick; Cordaux, Richard; Cristofari, Gaël; Deragon, Jean-Marc; Lesage, Pascale; Panaud, Olivier; Quesneville, Hadi; Vaury, Chantal; Vieira, Cristina; Vitte, Clémentine

    2012-10-30

    An international conference on Transposable Elements (TEs) was held 21-24 April 2012 in Saint Malo, France. Organized by the French Transposition Community (GDR Elements Génétiques Mobiles et Génomes, CNRS) and the French Society of Genetics (SFG), the conference's goal was to bring together researchers from around the world who study transposition in diverse organisms using multiple experimental approaches. The meeting drew more than 217 attendees and most contributed through poster presentations (117), invited talks and short talks selected from poster abstracts (48 in total). The talks were organized into four scientific sessions, focused on: impact of TEs on genomes, control of transposition, evolution of TEs and mechanisms of transposition. Here, we present highlights from the talks given during the platform sessions. The conference was sponsored by Alliance pour les sciences de la vie et de la santé (Aviesan), Centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS), Institut national de la santé et de la recherche médicale (INSERM), Institut de recherche pour le développement (IRD), Institut national de la recherche agronomique (INRA), Université de Perpignan, Université de Rennes 1, Région Bretagne and Mobile DNA. CHAIR OF THE ORGANIZATION COMMITTEE: Jean-Marc Deragon ORGANIZERS: Abdelkader Ainouche, Mireille Bétermier, Mick Chandler, Richard Cordaux, Gaël Cristofari, Jean-Marc Deragon, Pascale Lesage, Didier Mazel, Olivier Panaud, Hadi Quesneville, Chantal Vaury, Cristina Vieira and Clémentine Vitte.

  3. International Congress on Transposable Elements (ICTE) 2012 in Saint Malo and the sea of TE stories

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    An international conference on Transposable Elements (TEs) was held 21–24 April 2012 in Saint Malo, France. Organized by the French Transposition Community (GDR Elements Génétiques Mobiles et Génomes, CNRS) and the French Society of Genetics (SFG), the conference’s goal was to bring together researchers from around the world who study transposition in diverse organisms using multiple experimental approaches. The meeting drew more than 217 attendees and most contributed through poster presentations (117), invited talks and short talks selected from poster abstracts (48 in total). The talks were organized into four scientific sessions, focused on: impact of TEs on genomes, control of transposition, evolution of TEs and mechanisms of transposition. Here, we present highlights from the talks given during the platform sessions. The conference was sponsored by Alliance pour les sciences de la vie et de la santé (Aviesan), Centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS), Institut national de la santé et de la recherche médicale (INSERM), Institut de recherche pour le développement (IRD), Institut national de la recherche agronomique (INRA), Université de Perpignan, Université de Rennes 1, Région Bretagne and Mobile DNA. Chair of the organization committee Jean-Marc Deragon Organizers Abdelkader Ainouche, Mireille Bétermier, Mick Chandler, Richard Cordaux, Gaël Cristofari, Jean-Marc Deragon, Pascale Lesage, Didier Mazel, Olivier Panaud, Hadi Quesneville, Chantal Vaury, Cristina Vieira and Clémentine Vitte PMID:23110759

  4. The development of pain medicine in Italy and the rest of Europe 40 years after the first International Association for the Study of Pain Congress.

    PubMed

    Varrassi, Giustino; Paladini, Antonella

    2017-01-01

    Professor Giustino Varrassi and Antonella Paladini speak to Jade Parker, Commissioning Editor: Professor Giustino Varrassi is Full Professor of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine in the LUdeS University, Valletta, Malta. He graduated at the Medical School of the University 'La Sapienza' (Rome, Italy) in 1973, and became board certified in Anesthesiology and Intensive Care in 1976 and in Pneumology in 1978, both in the same Medical School. He is currently President of the European League Against Pain and of the Paolo Procacci Foundation, and is a founding member of both of these. He is also a member of the World Institute of Pain, and a member of the Board of the Associazione Italiana per lo Studio del Dolore. He has been an invited speaker at more than 500 congresses (national and international), mainly in obstetric anesthesia and pain medicine. He is also the author of approximately 500 papers, published in international and national scientific journals, and 46 book chapters, mainly on obstetric anesthesia and pain medicine. He is the editor of 31 books and congress proceedings, including a textbook on obstetric anesthesia. He has also been the organizer of around 40 congresses, including European and World congresses on Pain Medicine. Professor Antonella Paladini is an Assistant Professor of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine at the L'Aquila University, Italy. She has recently been nominated as Associate Professor of Anesthesiology in the LUdeS University, in Valletta, Malta. She graduated in medicine at L'Aquila University in 1989, and has got her Board Certification with laude in Anesthesia in 1992 and served as anesthetist in few teaching hospitals, mainly in cardiac surgery departments. Since 2000, she is in charge of the L'Aquila University, and has addressed her interests toward pain medicine. In 2004, she got the Board Certificate in Pain Medicine, with laude, in the University of Verona. She has a huge scientific production, with over 60 papers published in

  5. The current status of research into Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: Proceedings of the 2nd International Congress on ADHD: From Childhood to Adult Disease.

    PubMed

    Thome, Johannes; Reddy, Duvvoor Prathap

    2009-12-01

    Despite being a devastating psychiatric condition with high prevalence, ADHD has traditionally been widely under-researched, specifically in adult patients. Therefore, the recent surge in scientific projects focusing on ADHD is impressive. By reviewing selected research findings presented at the 2nd International Congress on ADHD, this paper gives an overview about current state-of-the art research in such different areas as diagnosis, classification, epidemiology, differential diagnosis and comorbidity, neurobiology (including molecular genetics, proteomics, neuroimaging and electrophysiology), environmental factors, modelling of ADHD, treatment (pharmacological and non-pharmacological), as well as forensic and social aspects.

  6. The worldwide trend of using botanical drugs and strategies for developing global drugs.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Kyungseop

    2017-03-01

    Natural product drugs, or botanical drugs, are drugs composed of natural substances which have constituents with healthenhancing or medicinal activities. In Korea, government-led projects brought attention to botanical drugs invigorating domestic botanical drug industry. Foreign markets, as well, are growing bigger as the significance of botanical drugs stood out. To follow along with the tendency, Korea puts a lot of effort on developing botanical drugs suitable for global market. However, standards for approving drug sales vary by countries. And also, thorough standardization, certification, clinical studies and data of these will be required as well as data confirming safety and effectiveness. Meanwhile, as an international exchange in botanical drug market continues, the importance of plant resources was emphasized. Thus countries' ownership of domestic natural resources became vital. Not only establishing a systematic method to secure domestic plant resources, but also cooperation with other countries on sharing natural resources is essential to procure natural resources effectively. Korea started to show visible results with botanical drugs, and asthma/COPD treatment made out of speedwell is one example. Sufficient investment and government's active support for basic infrastructure for global botanical drugs will bring Korea to much higher level of botanical drug development. [BMB Reports 2017; 50(3): 111-116].

  7. UNIV 83. A Student's Work. Proceedings of the International University Congress (15th, Rome, Italy, March 26-April 4, 1983).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooperation in Education: International Quarterly of the Institute for University Cooperation, 1983

    1983-01-01

    In this proceedings, attention is focused on career preparation and the relationship between general and specialized studies, as well as the link between theoretical knowledge and practical experience. The preparatory study for the congress was conducted in about 300 universities, primarily in Europe and America. Nearly 15,000 interviews were…

  8. Short Communications Prepared for the Second Congress of the International Association for the Scientific Study of Mental Deficiency (Warsaw, 1970).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Academy of Pedagogical Sciences of the USSR, Moscow. Inst. of Defectology.

    Presented are 24 brief papers prepared by members of the Institute of Defectology in the Soviet Union for a congress on the scientific study of mental deficiency held in Warsaw in 1970. Major papers have the following titles: "Principal Directions of the Study of Anomalous Children in the U.S.S.R.", "Etiopathogenesis and…

  9. The Future of International Education Hearings before the Subcommittee on International Operations of the Committee on International Relations. House of Representatives. Ninety-Fifth Congress, Second Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on International Relations.

    The purpose of the five-day hearings was to provide a forum for examination by members of the House Committee on International Relations of public and private involvement in international education programs in the United States. The proceedings contain testimony and prepared statements by educators, foundation officials, federal government agency…

  10. Integrating Biodiversity Data into Botanic Collections

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Today's species names are entry points into a web of publicly available knowledge and are integral parts of legislation concerning biological conservation and consumer safety. Species information usually is fragmented, can be misleading due to the existence of different names and might even be biased because of an identical name that is used for a different species. Safely navigating through the name space is one of the most challenging tasks when associating names with data and when decisions are made which name to include in legislation. Integrating publicly available dynamic data to characterise plant genetic resources of botanic gardens and other facilities will significantly increase the efficiency of recovering relevant information for research projects, identifying potentially invasive taxa, constructing priority lists and developing DNA-based specimen authentication. New information To demonstrate information availability and discuss integration into botanic collections, scientific names derived from botanic gardens were evaluated using the Encyclopedia of Life, The Catalogue of Life and The Plant List. 98.5% of the names could be verified by the combined use of these providers. Comparing taxonomic status information 13 % of the cases were in disagreement. About 7 % of the verified names were found to be included in the International Union for Conservation of Nature Red List, including one extinct taxon and three taxa with the status "extinct in the wild". As second most important factor for biodiversity loss, potential invasiveness was determined. Approximately 4 % of the verified names were detected using the Global Invasive Species Information Network, including 208 invasive taxa. According to Delivering Alien Invasive Species Inventories for Europe around 20 % of the verified names are European alien taxa including 15 of the worst European invasive taxa. Considering alternative names in the data recovery process, success increased up

  11. Putting science behind botanical supplements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This report describes the goals and activities of the Center for Research on Botanical Dietary Supplements at Iowa State University and the University of Iowa, a multidisciplinary effort to investigate the bioactivity and bioavailability of three genera of medicinal plants: Echinacea, Hypericum, and...

  12. School Hygiene: A Report of the Fourth International Congress of School Hygiene, Held at Buffalo, New York, August 25-30, 1913. Bulletin, 1913, No. 48. Whole Number 559

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, W. Carson, Jr.

    1913-01-01

    The Fourth International Congress of School Hygiene, held at Buffalo, New York, August 25-30, was a notable event in the progress of health supervision as a part of public education. Because of its importance, the author was detailed to attend this conference and prepare a report of it. This report contains three parts: (1) An introduction giving…

  13. Reports by the Members of the Institution of Defectology of the APS USSR/Moscow/to the First Congress of the International Association for the Scientific Study of Mental Deficiency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Academy of Pedagogical Sciences of the USSR, Moscow. Inst. of Defectology.

    Presented are 14 reports given by members of the Institute of Defectology in Moscow to the First Congress of the International Association for the Scientific Study of Mental Deficiency held in Montpellier, France, in 1967. The papers have the following titles: "The Soviet Education Scheme for Mentally Retarded Children", "Main…

  14. Hearings on Foreign Language and International Studies. Hearings before the Subcommittee on Select Education of the Committee on Education and Labor. House of Representatives, Ninety-Sixth Congress, Second Session (September 10 and 17, 1980).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1980

    These hearings concerned a proposed Foreign Language Assistance Act and a Congressional Resolution designed to promote the study of foreign languages and international affairs at all levels of education in the United States. Testimony was given by concerned members of Congress, keynoted by former Senator J. William Fulbright, as well as by…

  15. World Congress: the International Union of Forestry Research Organizations calls for action on pollution and tropical deforestation

    SciTech Connect

    Whitmore, J.L.

    1987-02-01

    The XVIII IUFRO World Congress was held in Ljubljana, Yugoslavia Sept. 7-21, 1986. The purpose of the meeting was to provide a forum for exchange of information on all aspects of forestry research. The program was based on the structure of IUFRO's six main divisions. They are: forest environment and silviculture; forest plants and protection; forest operations and techniques; planning economics, growth and yield, management and policy; forest products; and general subjects. The considerations and recommendations of a declaration approved by the delegates are presented.

  16. Proposals to clarify and enhance the naming of fungi under the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants.

    PubMed

    Hawksworth, David L

    2015-06-01

    Twenty-three proposals to modify the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants adopted in 2011 with respect to the provisions for fungi are made, in accordance with the wishes of mycologists expressed at the 10(th) International Mycological Congress in Bangkok in 2014, and with the support of the International Commission on the Taxonomy of Fungi (ICTF), the votes of which are presented here. The proposals relate to: conditions for epitypification, registration of later typifications, protected lists of names, removal of exemptions for lichen-forming fungi, provision of a diagnosis when describing a new taxon, citation of sanctioned names, avoiding homonyms in other kingdoms, ending preference for sexually typified names, and treatment of conspecific names with the same epithet. These proposals are also being published in Taxon, will be considered by the Nomenclature Committee for Fungi and General Committee on Nomenclature, and voted on at the 19(th) International Botanical Congress in Shenzhen, China, in 2017.

  17. Free amino acids in botanicals and botanical preparations.

    PubMed

    Carratù, B; Boniglia, C; Giammarioli, S; Mosca, M; Sanzini, E

    2008-06-01

    Numerous studies were carried out about aminoacidic composition of vegetable proteins, but information about the free amino acid pool and the role of these substances is very incomplete. The aim of this paper was to contribute to the scarce knowledge concerning the composition of free amino acids in botanicals and botanical preparations widely used as food, in dietary supplements, and in pharmaceutical products. This work studied the composition of free amino acids, identified the major components of 19 species of plants, and evaluated the influence of different types of extraction on the amino acid profile. Amino acids were determined using an automatic precolumn derivatization with fluorenylmethyl-chloroformate and reversed-phase liquid chromatography with fluorescence and ultraviolet detection. The amounts of total free amino acids varied widely between plants, from approximately 12 g in 100 g of Echinacea pallida extract to less than 60 mg in the same amount of Coleus forskohlii, Garcinia cambogia, and Glycine max. In 13 plants arginine, asparagine, glutamine, proline, and gamma-aminobutyric acid were the free amino acids found in preponderant quantities. The levels of free amino acids above the quantification limit in 36 assayed samples of botanicals, extracts, and supplements are shown.

  18. A report from the European Association for the Study of the Liver's 50th International Liver Congress (April 22-26 - Vienna, Austria).

    PubMed

    Rabasseda, X

    2015-04-01

    While Vienna's Prater park offers a varied selection of options, from theme parks to lush gardens and prairies to enjoy the sun, the nearby Messe Wien convention center was the focus of attention in April 2015 for all the scientists, researchers and clinicians interested in viral hepatitis, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, hepatocellular carcinoma and a variety of other liver diseases. Treatments and potential new therapeutic strategies for these hepatopathies were discussed during the 50th International Liver Congress organized by the European Association for the Study of the Liver. Echoing epidemiological facts and a high social interest for hepatitis C virus infection, new findings with investigational and potential new therapies for the disease centered much of the attention at the conference. Nevertheless, new research was also reported related to potential improvements in how other liver diseases, particularly hepatitis B virus infection, hepatocellular carcinoma and a range of inflammatory and immune-mediated liver diseases, including rare hereditary diseases that should never be forgotten.

  19. Proceedings from the Third National Institutes of Health International Congress on Advances in Uterine Leiomyoma Research: comprehensive review, conference summary and future recommendations.

    PubMed

    Segars, James H; Parrott, Estella C; Nagel, Joan D; Guo, Xiaoxiao Catherine; Gao, Xiaohua; Birnbaum, Linda S; Pinn, Vivian W; Dixon, Darlene

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Uterine fibroids are the most common gynecologic tumors in women of reproductive age yet the etiology and pathogenesis of these lesions remain poorly understood. Age, African ancestry, nulliparity and obesity have been identified as predisposing factors for uterine fibroids. Symptomatic tumors can cause excessive uterine bleeding, bladder dysfunction and pelvic pain, as well as associated reproductive disorders such as infertility, miscarriage and other adverse pregnancy outcomes. Currently, there are limited noninvasive therapies for fibroids and no early intervention or prevention strategies are readily available. This review summarizes the advances in basic, applied and translational uterine fibroid research, in addition to current and proposed approaches to clinical management as presented at the 'Advances in Uterine Leiomyoma Research: 3rd NIH International Congress'. Congress recommendations and a review of the fibroid literature are also reported. METHODS This review is a report of meeting proceedings, the resulting recommendations and a literature review of the subject. RESULTS The research data presented highlights the complexity of uterine fibroids and the convergence of ethnicity, race, genetics, epigenetics and environmental factors, including lifestyle and possible socioeconomic parameters on disease manifestation. The data presented suggest it is likely that the majority of women with uterine fibroids will have normal pregnancy outcomes; however, additional research is warranted. As an alternative to surgery, an effective long-term medical treatment for uterine fibroids should reduce heavy uterine bleeding and fibroid/uterine volume without excessive side effects. This goal has not been achieved and current treatments reduce symptoms only temporarily; however, a multi-disciplined approach to understanding the molecular origins and pathogenesis of uterine fibroids, as presented in this report, makes our quest for identifying novel targets

  20. Botanicals as "new" drugs: US development.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Freddie Ann

    2015-11-01

    Botanicals are ingredients that can be marketed as foods, drugs, cosmetics, and medical devices in the United States. When a botanical is intended to diagnose, treat, prevent, mitigate, or cure a disease, it is considered to be a "drug". This article reviews the US regulatory requirements for botanicals as "new" drugs. An overview of the regulatory principles used to determine product category and the basic elements of an Investigational New Drug application and New Drug Application with the US Food and Drug Administration are presented. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Botanicals for Epilepsy".

  1. Advent of a Link between Ayurveda and Modern Health Science: The Proceedings of the First International Congress on Ayurveda, “Ayurveda: The Meaning of Life—Awareness, Environment, and Health” March 21-22, 2009, Milan, Italy

    PubMed Central

    Morandi, Antonio; Tosto, Carmen; Sartori, Guido; Roberti di Sarsina, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    The First International Congress on Ayurveda was held in Milan, Italy in March 2009 and it has been the first scientific event of this kind in western world. This groundbreaking international congress was devoted to human being as the product of interactions between Awareness, Environment and Health, subjects that the West tends to consider separate and independent, but that are believed deeply connected in Ayurveda, whose interdependence defines “The Meaning of Life”. The Congress established a bridge between indian and western philosophy, scientific and biomedical thinking in order to expand knowledge and healthcare. Main attention and address of the invited speakers was on the concept of “relationships” that, connecting living beings with environment, shape Nature itself. This concept is central in Ayurveda but is also common to other western scientific disciplines such as quantum physics and epigenetics that, in the four Sessions of the Congress, were represented by eminent experts. The importance of this event was underlined by the attendance of more than 400 participants and by noteworthy institutional endorsements, that added a significative political dimension of high social impact due to the topical period for CAM acceptance and integration in Europe. PMID:20981327

  2. 26 CFR 5e.274-8 - Travel expenses of Members of Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Travel expenses of Members of Congress. 5e.274...) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) TEMPORARY INCOME TAX REGULATIONS, TRAVEL EXPENSES OF MEMBERS OF CONGRESS § 5e.274-8 Travel expenses of Members of Congress. (a) In general. Members of Congress (including...

  3. 26 CFR 5e.274-8 - Travel expenses of Members of Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Travel expenses of Members of Congress. 5e.274...) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) TEMPORARY INCOME TAX REGULATIONS, TRAVEL EXPENSES OF MEMBERS OF CONGRESS § 5e.274-8 Travel expenses of Members of Congress. (a) In general. Members of Congress (including...

  4. 26 CFR 5e.274-8 - Travel expenses of Members of Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Travel expenses of Members of Congress. 5e.274-8... TAX (CONTINUED) TEMPORARY INCOME TAX REGULATIONS, TRAVEL EXPENSES OF MEMBERS OF CONGRESS § 5e.274-8 Travel expenses of Members of Congress. (a) In general. Members of Congress (including any Delegate...

  5. 'Criteria' aPL tests: report of a task force and preconference workshop at the 13th International Congress on Antiphospholipid Antibodies, Galveston, Texas, April 2010.

    PubMed

    Pierangeli, S S; de Groot, P G; Dlott, J; Favaloro, E; Harris, E N; Lakos, G; Ortel, T; Meroni, P L; Otomo, K; Pengo, V; Tincani, A; Wong, R; Roubey, R

    2011-02-01

    Current classification criteria for definite antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) mandate the use of one or more of three positive 'standardized' laboratory assays to detect antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) (viz: anticardiolipin [aCL] IgG and IgM; anti-β(2)glycoprotein I [anti-β(2)GPI] antibodies IgG and IgM; and/or a lupus anticoagulant [LAC]), when at least one of the two major clinical manifestations (thrombosis or pregnancy losses) are present. Although, efforts of standardization for these 'criteria' aPL tests have been conducted over the last 27 years, reports of inconsistencies, inter-assay and inter-laboratory variation in the results of aCL, LAC, and anti-β(2)GPI, and problems with the interpretation and the clinical value of the tests still exist, which affect the consistency of the diagnosis of APS. A Task Force of scientists and pioneers in the field from different countries, subdivided in three working groups, discussed and analyzed critical questions related to 'criteria' aPL tests in an evidence-based manner, during the 13(th) International Congress on Antiphospholipid Antibodies (APLA 2010, April 13-16, 2010, Galveston, TX). These included: review of the standardization and the need for international consensus protocol for aCL and anti-β(2)GPI tests; the use of monoclonal and/or polyclonal standards in the calibration curve of those tests; and the need for establishment of international units of measurement for anti-β(2)GPI tests. The group also reviewed the recently updated guidelines for LAC testing, and analyzed and discussed the possibility of stratification of 'criteria' aPL tests as risk factors for APS, as well as the clinical value of single positive vs. multiple aPL positivity. The group members presented, discussed, analyzed data, updated and re-defined those critical questions at a preconference workshop that was open to congress attendees. This report summarizes the findings, conclusions, and recommendations of this Task Force.

  6. Guidelines for validation of botanical identification methods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Identification of botanical materials, especially botanical dietary supplements, has become a major concern in light of the tremendous growth of the market. Adulteration, intentional and accidental, is common. The FDA has recently issued current good manufacturing procedures (cGMPs) that require i...

  7. 22 CFR 181.7 - Transmittal to the Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Transmittal to the Congress. 181.7 Section 181.7 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL AGREEMENTS COORDINATION, REPORTING AND PUBLICATION OF INTERNATIONAL AGREEMENTS § 181.7 Transmittal to the Congress. (a) International agreements other than treaties shall be transmitted by...

  8. Moscow '87. Unesco-UNEP International Congress on Environmental Education and Training (USSR, August 17-21, 1987).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connect, 1987

    1987-01-01

    This document summarizes the proceedings of an international conference on environmental education which was organized jointly by Unesco and the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP). The conference attracted 300 participants and observers from 80 countries, including experts and representatives of 15 international and national…

  9. Reflections on CME Congress 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knox, Alan B.

    2013-01-01

    This commentary reflects the author's impressions of Continuing Medical Education (CME) Congress 2012, a provocative international conference on professional development and quality improvement in the health professions that took place in Toronto, Ontario, last spring. The sessions he attended and conversations he had with other attendees were…

  10. [Report of the World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies (WFNS) international course and Cameroon Neurosurgery Society Congress (CNS) Yaoundé (Cameroon), 1st--4th October 2007].

    PubMed

    Eyenga, V C; Ndoumbe, A; Eloundou, N J

    2008-04-01

    Neurosurgery remains a very marginal activity in sub-Saharan Africa. In this part of the world which counts nearly 40 countries, some do not have a single neurosurgeon, some have one to five, the number of ten neurosurgeons per country remaining an exception! In its concern of popularizing and of developing neurosurgery worldwide, the WFNS organized an international course in Africa, October 2007 2nd-3rd in Yaoundé (Cameroon). The Cameroon Neurosurgery Society (CNS) took this opportunity to organize its very first congress in the presence of the WFNS delegation from October 1st to 4th, 2007. The joint meeting with the WFNS was baptized the "African Week of Neurosurgery". This special event was a first in sub-Saharan Africa. The delegation of the WFNS, led by Professor J. Brotchi (Belgium) President of the WFNS, was made up of Professors A. Sousa (Brazil), Mr. Choux (France), N. Tribolet (Swiss), M. Arraez (Spain), A. Bricolo (Italy), A. Kamlichi (Morocco), G. Dechambenoit (France), K. Kalangu (Zimbabwe). Twenty three neurosurgeons coming from nine African countries (Cameroon, Nigeria, Gabon, Congo, Niger, Burkina Faso, Ivory Coast, Senegal, and Guinea) took an active part in work. The scientific success of this event led to the creation of the "Association of Neurological Surgeons of Africa (ANSA)" which will be the WFNS-Africa interface in order to insure the development of neurosurgery in Africa.

  11. Annual report to Congress

    SciTech Connect

    1992-03-01

    This is the eighth annual report submitted by the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) to Congress. It covers activities and expenditures during Fiscal Year 1991, which ended September 30, 1991. Chapter 1 of this report describes OCRWM`s mission and objectives. Chapters 2 through 8 cover the following topics: earning public trust and confidence; geological disposal; monitored retrieval storage; transportation; systems integration and regulatory compliance; international programs; and program management. Financial statements for the Nuclear Waste Fund are presented in Chapter 9.

  12. Proceedings from the Third National Institutes of Health International Congress on Advances in Uterine Leiomyoma Research: comprehensive review, conference summary and future recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Segars, James H.; Parrott, Estella C.; Nagel, Joan D.; Guo, Xiaoxiao Catherine; Gao, Xiaohua; Birnbaum, Linda S.; Pinn, Vivian W.; Dixon, Darlene

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Uterine fibroids are the most common gynecologic tumors in women of reproductive age yet the etiology and pathogenesis of these lesions remain poorly understood. Age, African ancestry, nulliparity and obesity have been identified as predisposing factors for uterine fibroids. Symptomatic tumors can cause excessive uterine bleeding, bladder dysfunction and pelvic pain, as well as associated reproductive disorders such as infertility, miscarriage and other adverse pregnancy outcomes. Currently, there are limited noninvasive therapies for fibroids and no early intervention or prevention strategies are readily available. This review summarizes the advances in basic, applied and translational uterine fibroid research, in addition to current and proposed approaches to clinical management as presented at the ‘Advances in Uterine Leiomyoma Research: 3rd NIH International Congress’. Congress recommendations and a review of the fibroid literature are also reported. METHODS This review is a report of meeting proceedings, the resulting recommendations and a literature review of the subject. RESULTS The research data presented highlights the complexity of uterine fibroids and the convergence of ethnicity, race, genetics, epigenetics and environmental factors, including lifestyle and possible socioeconomic parameters on disease manifestation. The data presented suggest it is likely that the majority of women with uterine fibroids will have normal pregnancy outcomes; however, additional research is warranted. As an alternative to surgery, an effective long-term medical treatment for uterine fibroids should reduce heavy uterine bleeding and fibroid/uterine volume without excessive side effects. This goal has not been achieved and current treatments reduce symptoms only temporarily; however, a multi-disciplined approach to understanding the molecular origins and pathogenesis of uterine fibroids, as presented in this report, makes our quest for identifying novel

  13. SETI-3: the Search for ExtraTerrestrial Intelligence. A selection of papers from 1987-1990 Symposia of the International Academy of Astronautics held during the 38th-41st Congress (Brighton, Bangalore, Malaga, Dresden) of the International Astronautical Federation.

    PubMed

    1992-01-01

    This special issue of Acta Astronautica is a compilation of selected papers presented at Review Meetings on SETI at the 1987-1990 International Academy of Astronautics Congresses. Papers are drawn from seven areas: bioastronomical context, SETI technology, SETI searches, radio frequency interferences, possibilities for newer instrumentation, interdisciplinary connections, and public relations. Two papers presented at the Pesek Lecture are included.

  14. Proceedings of the International Congress on Noise as a Public Health Problem (Dubrovnik, Yugoslavia, May 13-18, 1973).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, W. Dixon, Ed.

    This paper is from the proceedings of a second international conference on noise as a public health hazard. Funded by the Office of Noise Abatement and Control of the Environmental Protection Agency, these conference proceedings serve as a source material summarizing all known criteria that could be used in establishing national standards for…

  15. Practical uses of botanicals in skin care.

    PubMed

    Stallings, Alison F; Lupo, Mary P

    2009-01-01

    Cosmeceuticals are the fastest growing sector of the cosmetic industry, and the future of antiaging cosmeceuticals in particular is very promising. Botanical extracts that support the health, texture, and integrity of the skin, hair, and nails are widely used in cosmetic formulations. They form the largest category of cosmeceutical additives found in the marketplace today due to the rising consumer interest and demand for natural products. Various plant extracts that formed the basis of medical treatments in ancient civilizations and many traditional cultures are still used today in cleansers, moisturizers, astringents, and many other skin care products. New botanical skin care treatments are emerging, presenting dermatologists and their patients the challenge of understanding the science behind these cosmeceuticals. Thus, dermatologists must have a working knowledge of these botanicals and keep up with how they evolve to provide optimal medical care and answer patient questions. The most popular botanicals commonly incorporated into skin care protocols are discussed.

  16. Research and development in haematology. A report on international congresses and visit to academic centres in Europe.

    PubMed

    Wood, L

    1990-01-01

    Haematology is one of the most rapidly expanding disciplines in medicine and nursing. As occurs in other highly specialised areas, optimum care is now largely of a multidisciplinary nature. In this context there are literally unlimited opportunities for the involvement of professional nurses and, as I have attempted to illustrate in this report, integration in all aspects of research and development and active participation in presentation of research data and discussion at international meetings is one direction in which fulfillment of academic aspirations can be achieved. It is my viewpoint, based on more than a decade of direct involvement in all the activities of our department in Cape Town that these are entirely attainable goals. There is currently, in our country, a concerted move afoot to develop an improved career structure for the professional nurse along the lines of the American clinical nurse specialist. Much of this experience overseas would strongly support that commitment. It was my privilege to enjoy the confidence of the department, university and medical school sufficient for me to present research data at international meetings and to be a welcome visitor at some of the world's premier academic and research institutions. That this was possible reflects the uncompromising commitment in Haematology to the position of the professional nurse as an integral and equal part of the multidisciplinary health care team.

  17. EDITORIAL: Invited papers from the 15th International Congress on Plasma Physics combined with the 13th Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics Invited papers from the 15th International Congress on Plasma Physics combined with the 13th Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto, Leopoldo

    2011-07-01

    The International Advisory Committee of the 15th International Congress on Plasma Physics (ICPP 2010) and the International Advisory Committee of the 13th Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics (LAWPP 2010) both agreed to hold this combined meeting ICPP-LAWPP-2010 in Santiago de Chile, 8-13 August 2010, considering the celebration of the Bicentennial of Chilean Independence. ICPP-LAWPP-2010 was organized by the Thermonuclear Plasma Department of the Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission (CCHEN) as part of its official program, within the framework of the Chilean Bicentennial activities. This event was also a scientific and academic activity of the project `Center for Research and Applications in Plasma Physics and Pulsed Power, P4', supported by the National Scientific and Technological Commission, CONICYT-Chile, under grant ACT-26. The International Congress on Plasma Physics was first held in Nagoya in 1980, and was followed by: Gothenburg (1982), Lausanne (1984), Kiev (1987), New Delhi (1989), Innsbruck (1992), Foz do Iguacu (1994), Nagoya (1996), Prague (1998), Quebec City (2000), Sydney (2002), Nice (2004), Kiev (2006) and Fukuoka (2008). The purpose of the Congress is to discuss recent progress and outlooks in plasma science, covering fundamental plasma physics, fusion plasmas, astrophysical plasmas, plasma applications, etc. The Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics was first held in 1982 in Cambuquira, Brazil, followed by: Medellín (1985), Santiago (1988), Buenos Aires (1990), Mexico City (1992), Foz do Iguacu (1994, also combined with ICPP), Caracas (1997), Tandil (1998), La Serena (2000), Sao Pedro (2003), Mexico City (2005) and Caracas (2007). The purpose of the Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics is to provide a forum in which the achievements of the Latin American plasma physics communities can be displayed, as well as to foster collaboration between plasma scientists within the region and elsewhere. The Program of ICPP-LAWPP-2010 included

  18. Screening botanical extracts for quinoid metabolites.

    PubMed

    Johnson, B M; Bolton, J L; van Breemen, R B

    2001-11-01

    Botanical dietary supplements represent a significant share of the growing market for alternative medicine in the USA, where current regulations do not require assessment of their safety. To help ensure the safety of such products, an in vitro assay using pulsed ultrafiltration and LC-MS-MS has been developed to screen botanical extracts for the formation of electrophilic and potentially toxic quinoid species upon bioactivation by hepatic cytochromes P450. Rat liver microsomes were trapped in a flow-through chamber by an ultrafiltration membrane, and samples containing botanical extracts, GSH and NADP(H), were flow-injected into the chamber. Botanical compounds that were metabolized to reactive intermediates formed stable GSH adducts mimicking a common in vivo detoxification pathway. If present in the ultrafiltrate, GSH conjugates were detected using LC-MS-MS with precursor ion scanning followed by additional characterization using product ion scanning and comparison to standard compounds. As expected, no GSH adducts of reactive metabolites were found in extracts of Trifolium pratense L. (red clover), which are under investigation as botanical dietary supplements for the management of menopause. However, extracts of Sassafras albidum (Nutt.) Nees (sassafras), Symphytum officinale L. (comfrey), and Rosmarinus officinalis L. (rosemary), all of which are known to contain compounds that are either carcinogenic or toxic to mammals, produced GSH adducts during this screening assay. Several compounds that formed GSH conjugates including novel metabolites of rosmarinic acid were identified using database searching and additional LC-MS-MS studies. This assay should be useful as a preliminary toxicity screen during the development of botanical dietary supplements. A positive test suggests that additional toxicological studies are warranted before human consumption of a botanical product.

  19. International School Feeding Initiatives. Hearing before the Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry. US Senate, 106th Congress, Second Session (July 27, 2000).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry.

    These hearing transcripts recount testimony before Congress on proposals to work with recipient governments and communities to establish a preschool and school feeding program in developing countries. Of particular focus in the hearing was the infrastructure needed to implement the program effectively and the roles of government agencies,…

  20. 6. Photocopy of 1895 photograph. From illustration in Missouri Botanical ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Photocopy of 1895 photograph. From illustration in Missouri Botanical Garden, Seventh Annual Report, 1896, p. 17. VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST THROUGH MUSEUM GATE - Missouri Botanical Garden, Cleveland Avenue Gatehouse, 2345 Tower Grove Avenue, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  1. Reflecting on the 5th World Environmental Education Congress, Montreal, 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jickling, Bob

    2010-01-01

    This article traces the development of the World Environmental Congress movement and its establishment as an important international forum. Reflecting on the 5th Congress, it notes the particular contribution of the Congress theme, "Our Common Home". Finally, it considers environmental education's place alongside other parallel transformative…

  2. 22 CFR 1101.17 - Annual report to Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Annual report to Congress. 1101.17 Section 1101.17 Foreign Relations INTERNATIONAL BOUNDARY AND WATER COMMISSION, UNITED STATES AND MEXICO, UNITED STATES SECTION PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 § 1101.17 Annual report to Congress. (a) On or before August 1 of...

  3. 1991 SOLAR WORLD CONGRESS - VOLUME 1, PART I

    EPA Science Inventory

    The four-volume proceedings document the 1991 Solar World Congress (the biennial congress of the International Solar Energy Society) in Denver, CO, August 19-23, 1991. Volume 1 is dedicated to solar electricity, biofuels, and renewable resources. Volume 2 contains papers on activ...

  4. 22 CFR 1102.9 - Annual report to Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Annual report to Congress. 1102.9 Section 1102.9 Foreign Relations INTERNATIONAL BOUNDARY AND WATER COMMISSION, UNITED STATES AND MEXICO, UNITED STATES SECTION FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT § 1102.9 Annual report to Congress. (a) On or before March 1 of...

  5. 22 CFR 1102.9 - Annual report to Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2013-04-01 2009-04-01 true Annual report to Congress. 1102.9 Section 1102.9 Foreign Relations INTERNATIONAL BOUNDARY AND WATER COMMISSION, UNITED STATES AND MEXICO, UNITED STATES SECTION FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT § 1102.9 Annual report to Congress. (a) On or before March 1 of...

  6. 22 CFR 1101.17 - Annual report to Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Annual report to Congress. 1101.17 Section 1101.17 Foreign Relations INTERNATIONAL BOUNDARY AND WATER COMMISSION, UNITED STATES AND MEXICO, UNITED STATES SECTION PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 § 1101.17 Annual report to Congress. (a) On or before August 1 of...

  7. International Congress on Glass XII

    SciTech Connect

    Doremus, R H; LaCourse, W C; Mackenzie, J D; Varner, J R; Wolf, W W

    1980-01-01

    A total of 158 papers are included under nine headings: structure and glass formation; optical properties; electrical and magnetic properties; mechanical properties and relaxation; mass transport; chemical durability and surfaces; nucleation; crystallization; and glass ceramics; processing; and automatic controls. Separate abstracts were prepared for eight papers; four of the remaining papers had been processed previously for the data base. (DLC)

  8. Phytosociology for Undergraduates with Minimal Botanical Background

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goulder, Raymond; Scott, Graham

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes how second/third year undergraduates with little prior botanical knowledge, attending a one-week field course in Western Scotland, were enabled to complete within one day an intensive phytosociological exercise. They showed that two stands of heathland vegetation were objectively different through identification of plants,…

  9. The use of botanical products and vitamins in sunscreens.

    PubMed

    Monico, Gabriela; Leo, Micheal; Ma, Brian; Johal, Ritika S; Ma, Thomas; Sivamani, Raja K

    2015-11-18

    The use of botanical products and vitamins in skin care creams and sunscreens is prevalent. Herein we conduct an evaluation of sunscreens to quantitatively assess how often sunscreens incorporate botanically derived products and vitamins. The most commonly used botanicals products and vitamins are identified and stratified based on the sunscreen sun protection factor (SPF). The overall prevalence for the use of botanical agents and vitamins was 62% and 79%, respectively. Aloe vera and licorice root extracts were the most common botanical agents used in sunscreens. Retinyl palmitate was the most common vitamin derivative utilized in sunscreens. The prices of sunscreens significantly increased when more than one botanical product was added. Botanical products and vitamins are widely utilized in sunscreens and more research is needed to assess how their inclusion may enhance or alter the function of sunscreens.

  10. Annual report to Congress 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-25

    By Congress in 1977 as an independent entity within the Department of Energy, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) is the principal and authoritative source of comprehensive energy data for the Congress, the Federal Government, the States, and the public. During 1992, EIA provided information and analysis in response to many energy-related issues and events, including Hurricane Andrew. In addition, EIA made substantial strides in a number of critical special projects, most notably development of the National Energy Modeling System, preparation of National Petroleum Council studies on petroleum refining and natural gas, and establishment of oxygenate data program mandated by the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. EIA also took advantage of new opportunities for international consultations and energy information exchanges. This report to Congress contains energy-related information on the following: petroleum; natural gas; integrated analysis and forecasting; electricity; coal; energy markets and end use, nuclear, statistical standards, and information services. The appendices include: data collection surveys of the Energy Information Administration; Analytic models of the Energy Information Administration; EIA publication -- EIA products available on diskette; and Major laws affecting EIA, 1974-1992.

  11. Botanical Compounds: Effects on Major Eye Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Huynh, Tuan-Phat; Mann, Shivani N.; Mandal, Nawajes A.

    2013-01-01

    Botanical compounds have been widely used throughout history as cures for various diseases and ailments. Many of these compounds exhibit strong antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, and antiapoptotic properties. These are also common damaging mechanisms apparent in several ocular diseases, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD), glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, cataract, and retinitis pigmentosa. In recent years, there have been many epidemiological and clinical studies that have demonstrated the beneficial effects of plant-derived compounds, such as curcumin, lutein and zeaxanthin, danshen, ginseng, and many more, on these ocular pathologies. Studies in cell cultures and animal models showed promising results for their uses in eye diseases. While there are many apparent significant correlations, further investigation is needed to uncover the mechanistic pathways of these botanical compounds in order to reach widespread pharmaceutical use and provide noninvasive alternatives for prevention and treatments of the major eye diseases. PMID:23843879

  12. Strengthening the scientific contribution of botanic gardens to the second phase of the Global Strategy for Plant Conservation.

    PubMed

    Blackmore, Stephen; Gibby, Mary; Rae, David

    2011-01-01

    The need for action on the global environment is now well understood and governments, agencies, non-governmental organizations and botanic gardens have all been working in their various ways to promote environmental sustainability and reduce species and habitat loss for at least 10–20 years. The Global Strategy for Plant Conservation (GSPC) has been widely adopted, particularly by the botanic garden community, and has resulted in many successes despite failing to achieve its ultimate goal of halting the loss of plant biodiversity. The objectives and targets for Phase 2 of the GSPC, running from 2010 to 2020, mirror those of Phase 1 and had been largely agreed prior to their formal adoption at the Conference of the Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity in Nagoya in October 2010. However, to be successful, the scientific contribution of botanic gardens needs to be strengthened, as does government policy and commitment. Botanic garden research to underpin conservation action, including the role of botanic garden horticulture, training and international capacity building, has a major part to play and needs to be better understood and better coordinated. We provide examples based on the experience of the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh in the UK and overseas. Government policy, at national and international levels, needs to reflect the fundamental importance of plant diversity in maintaining the biosphere and supporting humanity. The commitment of significant new resources is an essential prerequisite for success, but this needs to be well coordinated, inclusive of all stakeholders and carefully targeted. A further challenge is the need to integrate better the plant diversity-related activities of what are currently diverse and disconnected sectors, including agriculture, forestry, protected area management and botanic gardens.

  13. CONGRESS ON SCIENCE TEACHING AND ECONOMIC GROWTH.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inter-Union Commission on the Teaching of Science, Paris (France).

    REPORTED ARE THE ACTIVITIES OF THE CONGRESS ORGANIZED BY THE INTER-UNION COMMISSION ON SCIENCE TEACHING (CEIS) OF THE INTERNATIONAL COUNCIL OF SCIENTIFIC UNIONS (ICSU). STUDIED WERE PROBLEMS ARISING IN SEVERAL BRANCHES OF KNOWLEDGE DUE TO BOTH INCREASED NUMBERS OF STUDENTS AND SHORTAGE OF TEACHERS. OF PARTICULAR INTEREST WERE THE PROBLEMS OF…

  14. Botanical, Phytochemical, and Anticancer Properties of the Eucalyptus Species.

    PubMed

    Vuong, Quan V; Chalmers, Anita C; Jyoti Bhuyan, Deep; Bowyer, Michael C; Scarlett, Christopher J

    2015-06-01

    The genus Eucalyptus (Myrtaceae) is mainly native to Australia; however, some species are now distributed globally. Eucalyptus has been used in indigenous Australian medicines for the treatment of a range of aliments including colds, flu, fever, muscular aches, sores, internal pains, and inflammation. Eucalyptus oils containing volatile compounds have been widely used in the pharmaceutical and cosmetics industries for a multitude of purposes. In addition, Eucalyptus extracts containing nonvolatile compounds are also an important source of key bioactive compounds, and several studies have linked Eucalyptus extracts with anticancer properties. With the increasing research interest in Eucalyptus and its health properties, this review briefly outlines the botanical features of Eucalyptus, discusses its traditional use as medicine, and comprehensively reviews its phytochemical and anticancer properties and, finally, proposes trends for future studies.

  15. Phytochemical and Botanical Therapies for Rosacea: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Fisk, Whitney A; Lev-Tov, Hadar A; Clark, Ashley K; Sivamani, Raja K

    2015-10-01

    Botanical and cosmeceutical therapies are commonly used to treat symptoms of rosacea such as facial erythema, papules/pustule counts, and telangiectasia. These products may contain plant extracts, phytochemicals, and herbal formulations. The objective of this study was to review clinical studies evaluating the use of botanical agents for the treatment of rosacea. MEDLINE and Embase databases were searched for clinical studies evaluating botanical therapies for rosacea. Major results were summarized, and study methodology was analyzed. Several botanical therapies may be promising for rosacea symptoms, but few studies are methodologically rigorous. Several plant extract and phytochemicals effectively improved facial erythema and papule/pustule counts caused by rosacea. Many studies are not methodologically rigorous. Further research is critical, as many botanicals have been evaluated in only one study. Botanical agents may reduce facial erythema and effectively improve papule/pustule counts associated with rosacea. Although promising, further research in the area is imperative.

  16. Overview of Botanical Status in EU, USA, and Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Mahady, Gail B.

    2013-01-01

    The botanical status in EU, USA, and Thailand is different owing to the regulatory status, the progress of science, and the influence of culture and society. In the EU, botanicals are positioned as herbal medicinal products and food supplements, in the US they are regulated as dietary supplements but often used as traditional medicines, and in Thailand, they are regulated and used as traditional medicines. Information for some of the most popular botanicals from each country is included in this review. PMID:24228061

  17. 36 CFR 223.277 - Forest botanical products definition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., pine straw, roots, sedges, seeds, shrubs, transplants, tree sap, and wildflowers. Forest botanical products are not animals, animal parts, Christmas trees, fence material, firewood, insects, mine...

  18. 101st Congress: The Children's Congress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willer, Barbara

    1991-01-01

    Reports on legislation on child care and regulations for children's television enacted during the 101st congress. Legislation involving block grants, Title IV-A funding, and earned income tax credits was intended to bring about quality improvement and affordability. Reauthorizations included Head Start, Follow Through, Community Services Block…

  19. Risk assessment of botanicals and botanical preparations intended for use in food and food supplements: emerging issues.

    PubMed

    Rietjens, Ivonne M C M; Slob, Wout; Galli, Corrado; Silano, Vittorio

    2008-08-15

    At present there is a growing interest for use of botanicals and botanical ingredients in medicines, for teas or in foods and in food supplements. In addition, a number of plant-derived food items form an integral part of regular human diets. Currently, there is an increasing awareness among safety experts and regulators of risks associated with the use of botanicals and botanical ingredients in food including food supplements. It is becoming clear that "natural" does not equal "safe" and that, in modern society, adverse health effects can occur as a result of (mis)use. With the growing awareness of these issues efforts to ensure safety of botanicals and botanical ingredients are also increasing. Several guidance documents on safety assessment of botanicals and botanical preparations to be used as ingredients in food and food supplements have been published, although, at present, relevant legislative frameworks and guidances for risk assessment are not established yet. Furthermore, when defining possible guidance documents for risk assessment of botanicals, several issues emerge that need to be developed beyond the present state-of-the-art. The present paper describes some of the issues to be considered and developed to a further extent to improve risk assessment of botanicals and botanical preparations, illustrated by examples based on some allylalkoxybenzenes. It is concluded that, for an improved and more accurate future risk assessment of botanicals, it is necessary to further develop and validate: (i) the use of the margin of exposure (MOE) concept for compounds that are both genotoxic and carcinogenic; (ii) new ways to quantify and incorporate matrix effects into risk assessment strategies; (iii) the use of analytical chemistry approaches, enabling complete chemical characterisation of complex mixtures. Defining new approaches in risk assessment would be in line with the inspiring attitude of the late Professor Robert Kroes, who, for example by supporting the

  20. Environmental Education in Botanic Gardens: Exploring Brooklyn Botanic Garden's Project Green Reach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Susan Conlon; Hamilton, Susan L.; Bentley, Michael L.; Myrie, Sharon

    2009-01-01

    Brooklyn Botanic Garden's Project Green Reach (PGR) is a children's program that has offered garden-based youth education since 1990. PGR focuses on Grade K-8 students and teachers from local Title I schools who work in teams on garden and science projects. In this exploratory study, the authors used field observations, document analysis, and past…

  1. 36 CFR 223.277 - Forest botanical products definition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., transplants, tree sap, and wildflowers. Forest botanical products are not animals, animal parts, Christmas... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Forest botanical products definition. 223.277 Section 223.277 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT...

  2. 36 CFR 223.277 - Forest botanical products definition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., transplants, tree sap, and wildflowers. Forest botanical products are not animals, animal parts, Christmas... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Forest botanical products definition. 223.277 Section 223.277 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT...

  3. 36 CFR 223.277 - Forest botanical products definition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., transplants, tree sap, and wildflowers. Forest botanical products are not animals, animal parts, Christmas... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Forest botanical products definition. 223.277 Section 223.277 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT...

  4. 36 CFR 223.277 - Forest botanical products definition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., transplants, tree sap, and wildflowers. Forest botanical products are not animals, animal parts, Christmas... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Forest botanical products definition. 223.277 Section 223.277 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT...

  5. Mendelian controversies: a botanical and historical review.

    PubMed

    Fairbanks, D J; Rytting, B

    2001-05-01

    Gregor Mendel was a 19(th) century priest and botanist who developed the fundamental laws of inheritance. The year 2000 marked a century since the rediscovery of those laws and the beginning of genetics. Although Mendel is now recognized as the founder of genetics, significant controversy ensued about his work throughout the 20(th) century. In this paper, we review five of the most contentious issues by looking at the historical record through the lens of current botanical science: (1) Are Mendel's data too good to be true? (2) Is Mendel's description of his experiments fictitious? (3) Did Mendel articulate the laws of inheritance attributed to him? (4) Did Mendel detect but not mention linkage? (5) Did Mendel support or oppose Darwin?A synthesis of botanical and historical evidence supports our conclusions: Mendel did not fabricate his data, his description of his experiments is literal, he articulated the laws of inheritance attributed to him insofar as was possible given the information he had, he did not detect linkage, and he neither strongly supported nor opposed Darwin.

  6. Development of Safe and Effective Botanical Dietary Supplements

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Regulated differently than drugs or foods, the market for botanical dietary supplements continues to grow worldwide. The recently implemented U.S. FDA regulation that all botanical dietary supplements must be produced using good manufacturing practice is an important step toward enhancing the safety of these products, but additional safeguards could be implemented, and unlike drugs, there are currently no efficacy requirements. To ensure a safe and effective product, botanical dietary supplements should be developed in a manner analogous to pharmaceuticals that involves identification of mechanisms of action and active constituents, chemical standardization based on the active compounds, biological standardization based on pharmacological activity, preclinical evaluation of toxicity and potential for drug–botanical interactions, metabolism of active compounds, and finally, clinical studies of safety and efficacy. Completing these steps will enable the translation of botanicals from the field to safe human use as dietary supplements. PMID:26125082

  7. Botanicals and Their Bioactive Phytochemicals for Women’s Health

    PubMed Central

    Dietz, Birgit M.; Hajirahimkhan, Atieh; Dunlap, Tareisha L.

    2016-01-01

    Botanical dietary supplements are increasingly popular for women’s health, particularly for older women. The specific botanicals women take vary as a function of age. Younger women will use botanicals for urinary tract infections, especially Vaccinium macrocarpon (cranberry), where there is evidence for efficacy. Botanical dietary supplements for premenstrual syndrome (PMS) are less commonly used, and rigorous clinical trials have not been done. Some examples include Vitex agnus-castus (chasteberry), Angelica sinensis (dong quai), Viburnum opulus/prunifolium (cramp bark and black haw), and Zingiber officinale (ginger). Pregnant women have also used ginger for relief from nausea. Natural galactagogues for lactating women include Trigonella foenum-graecum (fenugreek) and Silybum marianum (milk thistle); however, rigorous safety and efficacy studies are lacking. Older women suffering menopausal symptoms are increasingly likely to use botanicals, especially since the Women’s Health Initiative showed an increased risk for breast cancer associated with traditional hormone therapy. Serotonergic mechanisms similar to antidepressants have been proposed for Actaea/Cimicifuga racemosa (black cohosh) and Valeriana officinalis (valerian). Plant extracts with estrogenic activities for menopausal symptom relief include Glycine max (soy), Trifolium pratense (red clover), Pueraria lobata (kudzu), Humulus lupulus (hops), Glycyrrhiza species (licorice), Rheum rhaponticum (rhubarb), Vitex agnus-castus (chasteberry), Linum usitatissimum (flaxseed), Epimedium species (herba Epimedii, horny goat weed), and Medicago sativa (alfalfa). Some of the estrogenic botanicals have also been shown to have protective effects against osteoporosis. Several of these botanicals could have additional breast cancer preventive effects linked to hormonal, chemical, inflammatory, and/or epigenetic pathways. Finally, although botanicals are perceived as natural safe remedies, it is important for women and

  8. Botanicals and Their Bioactive Phytochemicals for Women's Health.

    PubMed

    Dietz, Birgit M; Hajirahimkhan, Atieh; Dunlap, Tareisha L; Bolton, Judy L

    2016-10-01

    Botanical dietary supplements are increasingly popular for women's health, particularly for older women. The specific botanicals women take vary as a function of age. Younger women will use botanicals for urinary tract infections, especially Vaccinium macrocarpon (cranberry), where there is evidence for efficacy. Botanical dietary supplements for premenstrual syndrome (PMS) are less commonly used, and rigorous clinical trials have not been done. Some examples include Vitex agnus-castus (chasteberry), Angelica sinensis (dong quai), Viburnum opulus/prunifolium (cramp bark and black haw), and Zingiber officinale (ginger). Pregnant women have also used ginger for relief from nausea. Natural galactagogues for lactating women include Trigonella foenum-graecum (fenugreek) and Silybum marianum (milk thistle); however, rigorous safety and efficacy studies are lacking. Older women suffering menopausal symptoms are increasingly likely to use botanicals, especially since the Women's Health Initiative showed an increased risk for breast cancer associated with traditional hormone therapy. Serotonergic mechanisms similar to antidepressants have been proposed for Actaea/Cimicifuga racemosa (black cohosh) and Valeriana officinalis (valerian). Plant extracts with estrogenic activities for menopausal symptom relief include Glycine max (soy), Trifolium pratense (red clover), Pueraria lobata (kudzu), Humulus lupulus (hops), Glycyrrhiza species (licorice), Rheum rhaponticum (rhubarb), Vitex agnus-castus (chasteberry), Linum usitatissimum (flaxseed), Epimedium species (herba Epimedii, horny goat weed), and Medicago sativa (alfalfa). Some of the estrogenic botanicals have also been shown to have protective effects against osteoporosis. Several of these botanicals could have additional breast cancer preventive effects linked to hormonal, chemical, inflammatory, and/or epigenetic pathways. Finally, although botanicals are perceived as natural safe remedies, it is important for women and

  9. Constipation and Botanical Medicines: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Cirillo, Carla; Capasso, Raffaele

    2015-10-01

    Constipation affects 14% of the adult population globally, mainly women, and significantly impacts on health-related quality of life. The causes of constipation are mainly three: lifestyle related (functional constipation), disease related, and drug induced. Constipation can generate considerable suffering, including abdominal pain and distension, anorexia, and nausea. The value of some therapeutic measures such as increased fluid intake, physical activity, diet rich in fiber, and nutritional supplements recommended for the relief of constipation is still questionable. The treatment of constipation can be carried out not only with traditional drugs but also with herbal medicines or with nutraceuticals, which are used to prevent or treat the disorder. We have reviewed the most common botanical laxatives such as senna, cascara, frangula, aloe, and rhubarb and their use in the treatment of constipation.

  10. Pharmacokinetic Interactions between Drugs and Botanical Dietary Supplements

    PubMed Central

    Sprouse, Alyssa A.

    2016-01-01

    The use of botanical dietary supplements has grown steadily over the last 20 years despite incomplete information regarding active constituents, mechanisms of action, efficacy, and safety. An important but underinvestigated safety concern is the potential for popular botanical dietary supplements to interfere with the absorption, transport, and/or metabolism of pharmaceutical agents. Clinical trials of drug–botanical interactions are the gold standard and are usually carried out only when indicated by unexpected consumer side effects or, preferably, by predictive preclinical studies. For example, phase 1 clinical trials have confirmed preclinical studies and clinical case reports that St. John’s wort (Hypericum perforatum) induces CYP3A4/CYP3A5. However, clinical studies of most botanicals that were predicted to interact with drugs have shown no clinically significant effects. For example, clinical trials did not substantiate preclinical predictions that milk thistle (Silybum marianum) would inhibit CYP1A2, CYP2C9, CYP2D6, CYP2E1, and/or CYP3A4. Here, we highlight discrepancies between preclinical and clinical data concerning drug–botanical interactions and critically evaluate why some preclinical models perform better than others in predicting the potential for drug–botanical interactions. Gaps in knowledge are also highlighted for the potential of some popular botanical dietary supplements to interact with therapeutic agents with respect to absorption, transport, and metabolism. PMID:26438626

  11. Pharmacokinetic Interactions between Drugs and Botanical Dietary Supplements.

    PubMed

    Sprouse, Alyssa A; van Breemen, Richard B

    2016-02-01

    The use of botanical dietary supplements has grown steadily over the last 20 years despite incomplete information regarding active constituents, mechanisms of action, efficacy, and safety. An important but underinvestigated safety concern is the potential for popular botanical dietary supplements to interfere with the absorption, transport, and/or metabolism of pharmaceutical agents. Clinical trials of drug-botanical interactions are the gold standard and are usually carried out only when indicated by unexpected consumer side effects or, preferably, by predictive preclinical studies. For example, phase 1 clinical trials have confirmed preclinical studies and clinical case reports that St. John's wort (Hypericum perforatum) induces CYP3A4/CYP3A5. However, clinical studies of most botanicals that were predicted to interact with drugs have shown no clinically significant effects. For example, clinical trials did not substantiate preclinical predictions that milk thistle (Silybum marianum) would inhibit CYP1A2, CYP2C9, CYP2D6, CYP2E1, and/or CYP3A4. Here, we highlight discrepancies between preclinical and clinical data concerning drug-botanical interactions and critically evaluate why some preclinical models perform better than others in predicting the potential for drug-botanical interactions. Gaps in knowledge are also highlighted for the potential of some popular botanical dietary supplements to interact with therapeutic agents with respect to absorption, transport, and metabolism.

  12. REPORT TO CONGRESS ON BLACK CARBON | Science ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Report to Congress on Black Carbon describes domestic and international sources of black carbon emissions, and summarizes available scientific information on the climate effects of black carbon. Further, the Report evaluates available black carbon mitigation options and their potential for protecting climate, public health, and the environment. The EPA Advisory Council on Clean Air Compliance Analysis has peer-reviewed the report. In the October 2009 Interior Appropriations bill, Congress requested that EPA, in consultation with other Federal agencies, study the emissions and impacts of black carbon in the US and internationally. To fulfill this charge, EPA has conducted an intensive effort to compile, assess, and summarize available scientific information on the current and future impacts of black carbon, and to evaluate the effectiveness of available mitigation approaches and technologies for protecting climate, public health, and the environment.

  13. 'Non-criteria' aPL tests: report of a task force and preconference workshop at the 13th International Congress on Antiphospholipid Antibodies, Galveston, TX, USA, April 2010.

    PubMed

    Bertolaccini, M L; Amengual, O; Atsumi, T; Binder, W L; de Laat, B; Forastiero, R; Kutteh, W H; Lambert, M; Matsubayashi, H; Murthy, V; Petri, M; Rand, J H; Sanmarco, M; Tebo, A E; Pierangeli, S S

    2011-02-01

    Abstract: Current classification criteria for definite APS recommend the use of one or more of three positive standardized laboratory assays, including anticardiolipin antibodies (aCL), lupus anticoagulant (LA), and antibodies directed to β(2)glycoprotein I (anti-β(2)GPI) to detect antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) in the presence of at least one of the two major clinical manifestations (i.e., thrombosis or pregnancy morbidity) of the syndrome. Several other autoantibodies shown to be directed to phospholipids and/or their complexes with phospholipids and/or to proteins of the coagulation cascade, as well as a mechanistic test for resistance to annexin A5 anticoagulant activity, have been proposed to be relevant to APS. A task force of worldwide scientists in the field discussed and analyzed critical questions related to 'non-criteria' aPL tests in an evidence-based manner during the 13th International Congress on Antiphospholipid Antibodies (APLA 2010, 13-16 April 2010, Galveston, Texas, USA). This report summarizes the findings, conclusions, and recommendations of this task force.

  14. Colombia: Issues for Congress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-18

    30, 2010, at http://www.lasillavacia.com/ historia /14953. 22 Camila Osorio, “Esta Es la Cara de la Legislatura que Se Posesiona Hoy,” La Silla Vacía...website, July 19, 2010, at http://www.lasillavacia.com/ historia /16740; “New Congress Grants Santos Huge Majority,” Latin American Weekly Report

  15. Communicating with Congress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ochs, Mike

    2005-01-01

    At a seminar, two Congressional staff members offered good tips on how it is best to communicate with legislators. Although offered in the context of communicating with Congress, these insights are also valuable when working with state and local legislators. This article discusses the key points that were provided in the seminar. In addition to…

  16. Sport Heroes in Congress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corbett, Doris R.

    This paper reports the findings of a study of the role of sports in the lives of U.S. Congressmen and focuses attention on six gifted athletes for whom sports provided preparation for government service. The word "hero" as used in this paper refers to former members of Congress who were admired for their athletic prowess and for their…

  17. Addressing the threat to biodiversity from botanic gardens.

    PubMed

    Hulme, Philip E

    2011-04-01

    Increasing evidence highlights the role that botanic gardens might have in plant invasions across the globe. Botanic gardens, often in global biodiversity hotspots, have been implicated in the early cultivation and/or introduction of most environmental weeds listed by IUCN as among the worst invasive species worldwide. Furthermore, most of the popular ornamental species in living collections around the globe have records as alien weeds. Voluntary codes of conduct to prevent the dissemination of invasive plants from botanic gardens have had limited uptake, with few risk assessments undertaken of individual living collections. A stronger global networking of botanic gardens to tackle biological invasions involving public outreach, information sharing and capacity building is a priority to prevent the problems of the past occurring in the future.

  18. Botanic gardens science for conservation and global change.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, John S

    2009-11-01

    The contributions of botanic gardens to conservation biology and global-change research need to be understood within the context of the traditional strengths of such gardens in herbarium collections, living collections and interactions with the public. Here, I propose that research in conservation planning, modelling species responses to climate change, conservation of threatened species and experimental tests of global change build on the core strengths of botanic gardens. However, there are limits to what can be achieved through traditional gardens-based programs, and some botanic gardens have adapted their research to include studies of threatening processes and to monitor and verify global-change impacts. There is an opportunity for botanic gardens to use their living collections more effectively in global-change research and for them to have a role in linking biodiversity conservation with benefits derived from ecosystem services.

  19. A Botanical Garden Data Base Implemented in SAS Software.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Edward A.; Lewis, Bruce R.

    1985-01-01

    A database had been developed for the Phoenix Desert Botanical Garden's Living Plant Collection using Statistical Analysis System software. Implementation procedures, data dictionary maintenance, data entry, updating, and reporting are described. (JN)

  20. Botanicals in dermatology: an evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    Reuter, Juliane; Merfort, Irmgard; Schempp, Christoph M

    2010-01-01

    Botanical extracts and single compounds are increasingly used in cosmetics but also in over-the-counter drugs and food supplements. The focus of the present review is on controlled clinical trials with botanicals in the treatment of acne, inflammatory skin diseases, skin infections, UV-induced skin damage, skin cancer, alopecia, vitiligo, and wounds. Studies with botanical cosmetics and drugs are discussed, as well as studies with botanical food supplements. Experimental research on botanicals was considered to a limited extent when it seemed promising for clinical use in the near future. In acne therapy, Mahonia, tea tree oil, and Saccharomyces may have the potential to become standard treatments. Mahonia, Hypericum, Glycyrrhiza and some traditional Chinese medicines appear promising for atopic dermatitis. Some plant-derived substances like dithranol and methoxsalen (8-methoxypsoralen) [in combination with UVA] are already accepted as standard treatments in psoriasis; Mahonia and Capsicum (capsaicin) are the next candidates suggested by present evidence. Oral administration and topical application of antioxidant plant extracts (green and black tea, carotenoids, coffee, and many flavonoids from fruits and vegetables) can protect skin from UV-induced erythema, early aging, and irradiation-induced cancer. Hair loss and vitiligo are also traditional fields of application for botanicals. According to the number and quality of clinical trials with botanicals, the best evidence exists for the treatment of inflammatory skin diseases, i.e. atopic dermatitis and psoriasis. However, many more controlled clinical studies are needed to determine the efficacy and risks of plant-derived products in dermatology. Safety aspects, especially related to sensitization and photodermatitis, have to be taken into account. Therefore, clinicians should not only be informed of the beneficial effects but also the specific adverse effects of botanicals used for dermatologic disorders and

  1. Proceedings of the International Congress (12th), Corrosion Control for Low-Cost Reliability, Held in Houston, Texas on September 19 -24, 1993. Volume 1. Coatings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-24

    New York City. Dr. Greco enlisted the assistance of Frank La Que, Mars Fontana, and Herb Uhlig in contracting internationaily known corrosion...Frank La Que, Mars Fontana and Herb Uhlig in contacting internationally known corrosion scientists and engineers for their support and participation...204 COATINGS METALLIC COATING AND SURFACE TREATMENTS 025 Study of Anticorrosion Properties of Metal Arc

  2. Districts for 104th Congress

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1990-01-01

    This is a polygon coverage of 104th Congressional District boundaries obtained from the U.S. Bureau of the Census. The 103rd Congress was the first Congress that reflected the reapportionment and delineation of congressional districts based on the 1990 census. The next (104th) Congress reflects redelineation of districts that occurred for six states: Georgia, Louisiana, Maine, Minnesota, South Carolina, and Virginia. Congressional Districts U.S. House of Representatives Census TIGER/Line Files

  3. Noise and Man 󈨡. Noise as a Public Health Problem. Proceedings of the International Congress (6th) Held in Nice on July 5 - 9, 1993

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-01

    34-Centre d’Information et de Documentation sur le Bruit) INTERNATIONAL COMMISSION ON THE BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF NOISE (ICBEN) Chairman/president Dr. Alain...non auditifs et d’orienter les politiques de lutte contre le bruit, que celui-ci soit considdrd comme un probl~me de sant6 publique, c’est bien le cas...continue de crolitre rdguli~rement, malgr6 les politiques de lutte contre le bruit adoptdes dans de nombreux pays dont ceux de 1’OCDE. 11 est

  4. Congress Honors Glenn, Apollo 11 Crew

    NASA Video Gallery

    Congress honored storied NASA astronauts John Glenn, Neil Armstrong, Michael Collins and Buzz Aldrin on Wednesday, with the Gold Medal, Congress' highest expression of national appreciation for dis...

  5. Regulation of Inflammatory Gene Expression in PBMCs by Immunostimulatory Botanicals

    PubMed Central

    Denzler, Karen L.; Waters, Robert; Jacobs, Bertram L.; Rochon, Yvan; Langland, Jeffrey O.

    2010-01-01

    Many hundreds of botanicals are used in complementary and alternative medicine for therapeutic use as antimicrobials and immune stimulators. While there exists many centuries of anecdotal evidence and few clinical studies on the activity and efficacy of these botanicals, limited scientific evidence exists on the ability of these botanicals to modulate the immune and inflammatory responses. Using botanogenomics (or herbogenomics), this study provides novel insight into inflammatory genes which are induced in peripheral blood mononuclear cells following treatment with immunomodulatory botanical extracts. These results may suggest putative genes involved in the physiological responses thought to occur following administration of these botanical extracts. Using extracts from immunostimulatory herbs (Astragalus membranaceus, Sambucus cerulea, Andrographis paniculata) and an immunosuppressive herb (Urtica dioica), the data presented supports previous cytokine studies on these herbs as well as identifying additional genes which may be involved in immune cell activation and migration and various inflammatory responses, including wound healing, angiogenesis, and blood pressure modulation. Additionally, we report the presence of lipopolysaccharide in medicinally prepared extracts of these herbs which is theorized to be a natural and active component of the immunostimulatory herbal extracts. The data presented provides a more extensive picture on how these herbs may be mediating their biological effects on the immune and inflammatory responses. PMID:20838436

  6. The relevance of "non-criteria" clinical manifestations of antiphospholipid syndrome: 14th International Congress on Antiphospholipid Antibodies Technical Task Force Report on Antiphospholipid Syndrome Clinical Features.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Mirhelen M; Danowski, Adriana; Wahl, Denis G; Amigo, Mary-Carmen; Tektonidou, Maria; Pacheco, Marcelo S; Fleming, Norma; Domingues, Vinicius; Sciascia, Savino; Lyra, Julia O; Petri, Michelle; Khamashta, Munther; Levy, Roger A

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this task force was to critically analyze nine non-criteria manifestations of APS to support their inclusion as APS classification criteria. The Task Force Members selected the non-criteria clinical manifestations according to their clinical relevance, that is, the patient-important outcome from clinician perspective. They included superficial vein thrombosis, thrombocytopenia, renal microangiopathy, heart valve disease, livedo reticularis, migraine, chorea, seizures and myelitis, which were reviewed by this International Task Force collaboration, in addition to the seronegative APS (SN-APS). GRADE system was used to evaluate the quality of evidence of medical literature of each selected item. This critical appraisal exercise aimed to support the debate regarding the clinical picture of APS. We found that the overall GRADE analysis was very low for migraine and seizures, low for superficial venous thrombosis, thrombocytopenia, chorea, longitudinal myelitis and the so-called seronegative APS and moderate for APS nephropathy, heart valve lesions and livedo reticularis. The next step can be a critical redefinition of an APS gold standard, for instance derived from the APS ACTION registry that will include not only current APS patients but also those with antiphospholipid antibodies not meeting current classification criteria.

  7. Congress and the Air Force.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-04-01

    know where to go to find out that information. The "Congress and the Air Force" Internet web page serves as a " one - stop shop" where Air Force personnel...Congress. The need for a " one - stop " guide is clear. The literature on this topic is not readily accessible by the Air Force member out in the field who

  8. Botanical insecticides inspired by plant-herbivore chemical interactions.

    PubMed

    Miresmailli, Saber; Isman, Murray B

    2014-01-01

    Plants have evolved a plethora of secondary chemicals to protect themselves against herbivores and pathogens, some of which have been used historically for pest management. The extraction methods used by industry render many phytochemicals ineffective as insecticides despite their bioactivity in the natural context. In this review, we examine how plants use their secondary chemicals in nature and compare this with how they are used as insecticides to understand why the efficacy of botanical insecticides can be so variable. If the commercial production of botanical insecticides is to become a viable pest management option, factors such as production cost, resource availability, and extraction and formulation techniques need be considered alongside innovative application technologies to ensure consistent efficacy of botanical insecticides.

  9. Conservation of indigenous medicinal botanicals in Ekiti State, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Kayode, Joshua

    2006-01-01

    The rapid appraisal method was used to identify the botanicals used ethnomedicinally from a total of 300 randomly selected respondents drawn from the existing three geo-political zones of Ekiti State, Nigeria. The results obtained revealed that about 40% of the 71 botanicals identified presently rare. Most of the presently abundant botanicals are species primarily cultivated for other purpose other than medicine. Most of the identified species are valued for their curative effects on malaria and fever, the predominant diseases in the study area. The need for the conservation of the rare species cannot be over emphasised as most rural dwellers in the study area depend mostly on herbs from these species. Strategies towards the attainment of this goal are proposed. PMID:16909472

  10. Library of Congress Gives Teachers Digital Access to All Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orchowski, Peggy

    2009-01-01

    "Learning to think is the real goal of educators," said Lauren Resnick, internationally known University of Pittsburgh professor of cognitive science, in mid-March at the Library of Congress (LOC). "The real pedagogical conflict is over what comes first: content or thinking skills?" According to Resnick, new brain research leads to the answer:…

  11. Bush Administration Looks to Congress to Proceed in Lender Bailout

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basken, Paul

    2008-01-01

    The Bush administration has called off internal deliberations over a bailout plan for student-loan companies after concluding it did not have the authority to act on its own. Instead, it endorsed a Congressional proposal that would allow the education secretary to purchase loans from private lenders. The decision leaves Congress facing a ticking…

  12. The PlantLIBRA project: how we intend to innovate the science of botanicals.

    PubMed

    Bucchini, Luca; Rodarte, Alejandro; Restani, Patrizia

    2011-12-01

    The main aim of the EC-financed R&D project PlantLIBRA (PLANT food supplements: Levels of Intake, Benefit and Risk Assessment) is to foster the safe use of food supplements containing plants or botanical preparations, by enabling science-based decision making by regulators and stakeholders. To make informed decisions, competent authorities and industry need more accessible and quality-assured information, as well as better tools (e.g., databases) and procedures for safety and benefit assessments, supported by broadly accepted methodologies. Consequently, PlantLIBRA is working to develop, validate and disseminate data and methodologies for risk and benefit assessment of plant food supplements, and to implement sustainable international cooperation. International cooperation will help ensure the quality of botanicals imported in the EU. Moreover, the project will provide data on intake by conducting a harmonized consumption survey. Existing composition and safety data will be collated into a meta-database. New analytical data and methods will be investigated and validated. The consortium is working closely with competent authorities and stakeholders.

  13. The current status of cyanobacterial nomenclature under the "prokaryotic" and the "botanical" code.

    PubMed

    Oren, Aharon; Ventura, Stefano

    2017-02-27

    Cyanobacterial taxonomy developed in the botanical world because Cyanobacteria/Cyanophyta have traditionally been identified as algae. However, they possess a prokaryotic cell structure, and phylogenetically they belong to the Bacteria. This caused nomenclature problems as the provisions of the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants (ICN; the "Botanical Code") differ from those of the International Code of Nomenclature of Prokaryotes (ICNP; the "Prokaryotic Code"). While the ICN recognises names validly published under the ICNP, Article 45(1) of the ICN has not yet been reciprocated in the ICNP. Different solutions have been proposed to solve the current problems. In 2012 a Special Committee on the harmonisation of the nomenclature of Cyanobacteria was appointed, but its activity has been minimal. Two opposing proposals to regulate cyanobacterial nomenclature were recently submitted, one calling for deletion of the cyanobacteria from the groups of organisms whose nomenclature is regulated by the ICNP, the second to consistently apply the rules of the ICNP to all cyanobacteria. Following a general overview of the current status of cyanobacterial nomenclature under the two codes we present five case studies of genera for which nomenclatural aspects have been discussed in recent years: Microcystis, Planktothrix, Halothece, Gloeobacter and Nostoc.

  14. Recent Trends in Studies on Botanical Fungicides in Agriculture

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Mi-Young; Cha, Byeongjin; Kim, Jin-Cheol

    2013-01-01

    Plants are attacked by various phytopathogenic fungi. For many years, synthetic fungicides have been used to control plant diseases. Although synthetic fungicides are highly effective, their repeated use has led to problems such as environmental pollution, development of resistance, and residual toxicity. This has prompted intensive research on the development of biopesticides, including botanical fungicides. To date, relatively few botanical fungicides have been registered and commercialized. However, many scientists have reported isolation and characterization of a variety of antifungal plant derivatives. Here, we present a survey of a wide range of reported plant-derived antifungal metabolites. PMID:25288923

  15. Traceability markers to the botanical origin in olive oils.

    PubMed

    Montealegre, Cristina; Marina Alegre, María Luisa; García-Ruiz, Carmen

    2010-01-13

    This review provides an overview of traceability studies performed to date (April 2009) for olive oils. Special emphasis has been made on the botanical origin because high-quality monovarietal olive oils have been recently introduced on the markets and their quality control requires the development of new and powerful analytical tools as well as new regulations to avoid fraud to consumers. Several parameters with discriminant power have been used for olive oil traceability according to the olive variety used in the production of the oil. They have been considered as traceability markers to the botanical origin and classified, in this work, as compositional and genetical markers.

  16. [The Royal Botanical Expedition to New Spain and the intention to start the Royal Botanical Garden in Havana].

    PubMed

    Valero, M

    1995-01-01

    The creation of a Botanical Garden in La Habana, at the beginning of the nineteenth century, was due to the efforts of the Real Sociedad Patriótica of La Havana and those of Martín de Sessé in 1795, member of the Botanical Expedition to Nueva España, who was commissioner for the recognition of natural productions and the organization of botanical studies and gardens at the colonies. The arrival of Sessé awakened the interest of some members of the Real Sociedad Patriótica with respect to the proposition made in 1793. A few years later, the Havana Garden was a reality.

  17. Self-Realization Through Education. Proceedings of the VIIth World Congress of the International Association for the Advancement of Educational Research (7th, Gent, Belgium, July 25-29, 1977).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Herreweghe, M. L., Ed.; And Others

    Experts in education from universities and other centers of research, coming from almost 60 countries and meeting in a world congress, studied the factors underlying self realization in education. The essential points presented through the various reports are: (1) All human beings have potentialities which should be developed to an optimum degree.…

  18. The Status of Education Libraries in Botanical Gardens throughout the World: A Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pirio, Pamela

    1992-01-01

    Stupp Teacher Resource Center at the Missouri Botanical Gardens serves as a resource to botanical gardens staff and to educators. A survey conducted in 1991 to determine whether the educational programs of the Stupp model were unique found that education programs in botanical gardens libraries are becoming more widespread and that their…

  19. Annual report to Congress 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-01

    Since its creation in 1977, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) has provided high-quality energy information products and services to a broad spectrum of customers across the Nation and around the world, including Congress, representatives of the print and broadcast news media, businesses, officials of Federal, State, and local agencies, foreign governments and international organizations, students, librarians, researchers, lawyers and private citizens. Our motto: {open_quotes}On-line or off the shelf, EIA is the first place to go for the last word in energy information.{close_quotes} Established as an independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), EIA was charged by its enabling legislation with: (1) Maintaining a comprehensive data and information program on energy resources and reserves, energy production, energy demand, energy technologies, and related financial and statistical information relevant to the adequacy of energy resources to meet the Nation`s demands in the near and longer term future. (2) Developing and maintaining analytical tools and collection and processing systems; providing analyses that are accurate, timely, and objective; and providing information dissemination services. This report summarizes the reports and contact information issued by the EIA.

  20. Nutraceuticals and botanicals: overview and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Nicoletti, Marcello

    2012-03-01

    The discovery, development and marketing of food supplements, nutraceuticals and related products are currently the fastest growing segments of the food industry. Functional foods can be considered part or borderline to these products and may be defined as foods or food ingredients that have additional health or physiological benefits over and above the normal nutritional value they provide. This trend is driven by several factors, mainly due to the current consumer perceptions: the first and dominant being 'Natural is good', and other secondary, such as the increasing cost of many pharmaceuticals and their negative secondary effects, the insistent marketing campaign, the increasing perception of the need of a healthy diet and its importance in the health and homeostasis organism conditions. However, the central point is that nutraceuticals, botanicals and other herbal remedies, including the entry of new functional foods, are important because of their acceptance as the novel and modern forms to benefit of natural substances. Due to the rapid expansion in this area, the development of several aspects is considered as it could influence the future of the market of these products negatively: an imbalance existing between the increasing number of claims and products on the one hand, the development of policies to regulate their application and safety on the other, rapid and valuable controls to check the composition, including the plant extracts or adulteration to improve efficacy, like the presence of synthetic drugs. It is interesting to see that, from the negative factors reported by the market analysts, a change in consumers preferences is absent. The functional properties of many plant extracts, in particular, are being investigated for potential use as novel nutraceuticals and functional foods. Although the availability of scientific data is rapidly improving, the central aspect concerns the validation of these products. The first step of this crucial aspect is

  1. U.S. Perspectives: International Action on Aging. A Background Paper Prepared by the American Association for International Aging for the Select Committee on Aging. House of Representatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, Second Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Select Committee on Aging.

    In response to challenges and guidelines set forth in the 1982 International Plan of Action on Aging (IPAA) by the World Assembly on Aging, this background paper summarizes (1) immediate and long-range reasons for the World Assembly; (2) content and significance of the IPAA and the factual base on which action plan decisions were made; (3)…

  2. Relating Social Inclusion and Environmental Issues in Botanic Gardens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vergou, Asimina; Willison, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Botanic gardens have been evolving, responding to the changing needs of society, from their outset as medicinal gardens of monasteries and university gardens to more recently as organizations that contribute to the conservation of plant genetic resources. Considering that social and environmental issues are deeply intertwined and cannot be tackled…

  3. Botanical trash mixtures analyzed with near-infrared spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Botanical cotton trash mixed with lint reduces cotton’s marketability and appearance. During cotton harvesting, ginning, and processing, trash size reduction occurs, thus complicating its removal and identification. This trash causes problems by increasing ends down in yarn formation and thus proce...

  4. Healing and Empowering Veterans in a Botanic Garden

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kreski, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Research supports the common understanding that spending enjoyable time in nature is one of the most reliable ways of reducing stress indicators such as heart rate and blood pressure. This article describes a pilot program in which the Chicago Botanic Garden leveraged nature's stress-reducing qualities to complement a program for veterans in…

  5. [Studies of the herbal and botanical origins of seman Cuscutae].

    PubMed

    Guo, C; Zhang, Z; Zheng, H; Shu, Z; Li, C

    1990-03-01

    Herbalogical study shows that Seman Cuscutae originated from Cuscuta chinensis is one of the most commonly used drugs in ancient times. Survey of botanical origins indicates that there are 9 species in Genus Cuscutae and 4 of them are commodities. The Cuscuta chinensis specified in current Chinese Pharmacopoeia (1985) is not the principal one.

  6. Biological reactive intermediates (BRIs) formed from botanical dietary supplements.

    PubMed

    Dietz, Birgit M; Bolton, Judy L

    2011-06-30

    The use of botanical dietary supplements is increasingly popular, due to their natural origin and the perceived assumption that they are safer than prescription drugs. While most botanical dietary supplements can be considered safe, a few contain compounds, which can be converted to biological reactive intermediates (BRIs) causing toxicity. For example, sassafras oil contains safrole, which can be converted to a reactive carbocation forming genotoxic DNA adducts. Alternatively, some botanical dietary supplements contain stable BRIs such as simple Michael acceptors that react with chemosensor proteins such as Keap1 resulting in induction of protective detoxification enzymes. Examples include curcumin from turmeric, xanthohumol from hops, and Z-ligustilide from dang gui. Quinones (sassafras, kava, black cohosh), quinone methides (sassafras), and epoxides (pennyroyal oil) represent BRIs of intermediate reactivity, which could generate both genotoxic and/or chemopreventive effects. The biological targets of BRIs formed from botanical dietary supplements and their resulting toxic and/or chemopreventive effects are closely linked to the reactivity of BRIs as well as dose and time of exposure.

  7. A Writing Template for Probing Students' Botanical Sense of Place

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wandersee, James H.; Clary, Renee M.; Guzman, Sandra M.

    2006-01-01

    Writing can be a powerful tool for learning biology. Writing assignments in biology could help students personalize and understand the biology knowledge they are studying. In this article, the authors present the "Botanical Sense of Place" (BSP), a convenient and easy-to-use writing template that they developed to elicit and probe students' prior…

  8. Mycotoxins in botanicals and dried fruits: a review.

    PubMed

    Trucksess, M W; Scott, P M

    2008-02-01

    Botanicals are used in many countries for medicinal and general health-promoting purposes. Numerous natural occurrences of mycotoxins in botanicals and dried fruits have been reported. Aflatoxins or ochratoxin A (OTA) have been found in botanicals such as ginseng, ginger, liquorice, turmeric, and kava-kava in the USA, Spain, Argentina, India, and some other countries, while fumonisins have been found in medicinal wild plants in South Africa and in herbal tea and medicinal plants in Turkey. Zearalenone was identified in ginseng root. Dried fruits can be contaminated with aflatoxins, OTA, kojic acid, and, occasionally, with patulin or zearalenone. One main area of concern is aflatoxins in dried figs; bright greenish yellow fluorescence under ultraviolet light is associated with aflatoxin contamination. OTA in dried vine fruits (raisins, sultanas, and currants) is another concern. There are also reports of aflatoxins in raisins and OTA in dried figs, apricots, dried plums (prunes), dates, and quince. Maximum permitted levels in the European Union include 4 microg kg(-1) for total aflatoxins in dried fruit intended for direct consumption and 10 microg kg(-1) for OTA in dried vine fruit. This review discusses the occurrence of mycotoxins in botanicals and dried fruits and analytical issues such as sampling, sample preparation, and methods for analysis. Fungal contamination of these products, the influence of sorting, storage, and processing, and prevention are also considered.

  9. Screening native botanicals for bioactivity: an interdisciplinary approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boudreau, Anik; Cheng, Diana M.; Ruiz, Carmen; Ribnicky, David; Allain, Larry K.; Brassieur, C. Ray; Turnipseed, D. Phil; Cefalu, William T.; Floyd, Z. Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: An interdisciplinary approach to screening botanical sources of therapeutic agents can be successfully applied to identify native plants used in folk medicine as potential sources of therapeutic agents in treating insulin resistance in skeletal muscle or inflammatory processes associated with obesity-related insulin resistance.

  10. PICNIC PAVILION JUST BEYOND THE WESTERN EDGE OF THE BOTANIC ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PICNIC PAVILION JUST BEYOND THE WESTERN EDGE OF THE BOTANIC GARDEN. THIS PAVILION IS ROUGHLY LOCATED ON THE SITE OF "BARTRAM HALL," ANDREW EASTLAKE'S ITALIANATE VILLA DESIGNED BY NOTED PHILADELPHIA ARCHITECT SAMUEL SLOAN AND CONSTRUCTED IN 1850-1851 - John Bartram House & Garden, 54th Street & Lindbergh Boulevard, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  11. Educating Engineers for World Development. Proceedings of a World Congress (Estes Park, Colorado, June 10-12, 1975).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English, J. Morley, Ed.; Collins, W. Leighton, Ed.

    This report comprises papers commissioned for the World Congress on Educating Engineers for World Development, sponsored by the International Division of the American Society for Engineering Education, and held in Colorado in June 1975. The purpose of the Congress was to bring about significant changes in the education of engineers and in the…

  12. Bioactivity-Guided Identification of Botanical Inhibitors of Ketohexokinase

    PubMed Central

    Scholten, Jeffrey D.; Hunter, Brandi L.; Rivard, Christopher J.; Randolph, R. Keith

    2016-01-01

    Objective In developed countries with westernized diets, the excessive consumption of added sugar in beverages and highly refined and processed foods is associated with increased risk for obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases. As a major constituent of added sugars, fructose has been shown to cause a variety of adverse metabolic effects, such as impaired insulin sensitivity, hypertriglyceridemia, and oxidative stress. Recent studies have shown that ketohexokinase isoform C is the key enzyme responsible in fructose metabolism that drive’s fructose's adverse effects. The objective of this study was to identify botanical ingredients with potential for inhibitory activity against ketohexokinase-C and fructose-induced metabolic effects by using a series of in vitro model systems. Methods Extracts from 406 botanicals and 1200 purified phytochemicals were screened (initial concentration of 50 μg/mL and 50 μM, respectively) for their inhibitory activity using a cell free, recombinant human ketohexokinase-C assay. Dose response evaluations were conducted on botanical extracts and phytochemicals that inhibited ketohexokinase-C by > 30% and > 40%, respectively. Two different extract lots of the top botanical candidates were further evaluated in lysates of HepG2 cells overexpressing ketohexokinase-C for inhibition of fructose-induced ATP depletion. In addition, extracts were evaluated in intact Hep G2 cells for inhibition of fructose-induced elevation of triglyceride and uric acid production. Results Among the botanical extracts, phloretin (Malus domestica) extracts were the most potent (IC50: 8.9–9.2 μg/mL) followed by extracts of Angelica archangelica (IC50: 22.6 μg/mL—57.3 μg/mL). Among the purified phytochemicals, methoxy-isobavachalcone (Psoralea corylifolia, IC50 = 0.2 μM) exhibited the highest potency against ketohexokinase isoform C activity followed by osthole (Angelica archangelica, IC50 = 0.7 μM), cratoxyarborenone E (Cratoxylum prunifolium, IC

  13. The 1982 International Congress of Photographic Science.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-26

    of the lattice photographic emulsions) was reported by defects, to the demonstration of the L. Ketellapper ( Agfa -Gevaert, Mortsel, effect of d-shell...of a set of AgBr:I emul- Hoffman ( Agfa -Gevaert) showed that sions, an effect they attributed to an whereas the photoelectron lifetime influence on the... Agfa -Gevaert) dis- poration of Cd2 . The effect of cussed the phenomenon of high-int ity Pb2+ adsorbed onto the surfaces of reciprocity failure and

  14. Mercury Study Report to Congress

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA's Report to Congress on Mercury provides an assessment of the magnitude of U.S. mercury emissions by source, the health and environmental implications of those emissions, and the availability and cost of control technologies.

  15. Upcoming hearings in Congress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The following hearings and markups have been tentatively scheduled for the coming weeks by the Senate and House of Representatives. Dates and times should be verified with the committee or subcommittee holding the hearing or markup; all offices on Capitol Hill may be reached by telephoning 202-224-3121. For guidelines on contacting a member of Congress, see AGU's Guide to Legislative Information and Contacts (Eos, August 28, 1984, p. 669).October 8: A joint hearing by the Energy Research & Development Subcommittee of the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee and the Nuclear Regulation Subcommittee of the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee on low-level radioactive waste (S. 1517 and S. 1578). Room SD-366, Dirksen Building, 9:30 A.M.

  16. Development and validation of the modular Feed-code method for qualitative and quantitative determination of feed botanical composition.

    PubMed

    Braglia, Luca; Gianì, Silvia; Breviario, Diego; Gavazzi, Floriana; Mastromauro, Francesco; Morello, Laura

    2016-11-01

    The analysis of feed composition in terms of ingredients is addressed by Regulation (EC) 767/2009 and is important for detecting economic fraud and for monitoring feed safety. Within the framework of the EU project Feed-code, we developed and internally validated a modular assay, relying on intron polymorphism, for the complete qualitative analysis of the botanical composition of feed and the quantitative determination of six target plant species. Main performance parameters of each module, such as applicability, repeatability, specificity, and limit of detection, were evaluated. The whole assay was applied to a set of feed-like samples and results were in agreement with the expected composition. Application to a large set of compound feed and individual raw materials revealed the occurrence of botanical impurities. When compared with microscopic analysis, the proposed method gave more reliable results. We conclude that the Feed-code prototype, readily upgradable to include more plant species, is worthy of consideration for a full validation through a collaborative trial. Graphical Abstract The modular Feed-code method for the authentication of feed botanical composition.

  17. Project BioShield: Authorities, Appropriations, Acquisitions, and Issues for Congress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-23

    BioShield funds described later in this report (see “Acquisitions”). The HHS used these contracts to purchase treatments for botulism and internal...CRS Report for Congress Prepared for Members and Committees of Congress Project BioShield: Authorities, Appropriations, Acquisitions...R41033 Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the collection of information is estimated to average 1

  18. Project BioShield: Authorities, Appropriations, Acquisitions, and Issues for Congress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-03

    report (see “Acquisitions”). The HHS used these contracts to purchase treatments for botulism and internal radioactive particle contamination. See U.S...CRS Report for Congress Prepared for Members and Committees of Congress Project BioShield: Authorities, Appropriations, Acquisitions...R41033 Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the collection of information is estimated to average 1

  19. Project BioShield: Authorities, Appropriations, Acquisitions, and Issues for Congress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-22

    described later in this report (see “Acquisitions”). The HHS used these contracts to purchase treatments for botulism and internal radioactive particle...CRS Report for Congress Prepared for Members and Committees of Congress Project BioShield: Authorities, Appropriations, Acquisitions...R41033 Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the collection of information is estimated to average 1

  20. Botanical Agents for the Treatment of Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Nonmelanoma skin cancers, including basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, are common neoplasms worldwide and are the most common cancers in the United States. Standard therapy for cutaneous neoplasms typically involves surgical removal. However, there is increasing interest in the use of topical alternatives for the prevention and treatment of nonmelanoma skin cancer, particularly superficial variants. Botanicals are compounds derived from herbs, spices, stems, roots, and other substances of plant origin and may be used in the form of dried or fresh plants, extracted plant material, or specific plant-derived chemicals. They possess multiple properties including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and immunomodulatory properties and are, therefore, believed to be possible chemopreventive agents or substances that may suppress or reverse the process of carcinogenesis. Here, we provide a review of botanical agents studied for the treatment and prevention of nonmelanoma skin cancers. PMID:23983679

  1. Highlights from the 15th International Congress of Twin Studies/Twin Research: Differentiating MZ Co-twins Via SNPs; Mistaken Infant Twin-Singleton Hospital Registration; Narcolepsy With Cataplexy; Hearing Loss and Language Learning/Media Mentions: Broadway Musical Recalls Conjoined Hilton Twins; High Fashion Pair; Twins Turn 102; Insights From a Conjoined Twin Survivor.

    PubMed

    Segal, Nancy L

    2015-02-01

    Highlights from the 15th International Congress of Twin Studies are presented. The congress was held November 16-19, 2014 in Budapest, Hungary. This report is followed by summaries of research addressing the differentiation of MZ co-twins by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), an unusual error in infant twin-singleton hospital registration, twins with childhood-onset narcolepsy with cataplexy, and the parenting effects of hearing loss in one co-twin. Media interest in twins covers a new Broadway musical based on the conjoined twins Violet and Daisy Hilton, male twins becoming famous in fashion, twins who turned 102 and unique insights from a conjoined twin survivor. This article is dedicated to the memory of Elizabeth (Liz) Hamel, DZA twin who met her co-twin for the first time at age seventy-eight years. Liz and her co-twin, Ann Hunt, are listed in the 2015 Guinness Book of Records as the longest separated twins in the world.

  2. Botanical modulation of menopausal symptoms: Mechanisms of action?

    PubMed Central

    Hajirahimkhan, Atieh; Dietz, Birgit M.; Bolton, Judy L.

    2013-01-01

    Menopausal women suffer from a variety of symptoms, including hot flashes and night sweats which can affect quality of life. Although hormone therapy (HT) has been the treatment of choice for relieving these symptoms, HT has been associated with increased breast cancer risk leading many women to search for natural, efficacious, and safe alternatives such as botanical supplements. Data from clinical trials suggesting that botanicals have efficacy for menopausal symptom relief, have been controversial and several mechanisms of action have been proposed including estrogenic, progestogenic, and serotonergic pathways. Plant extracts with potential estrogenic activities include soy, red clover, kudzu, hops, licorice, rhubarb, yam, and chasteberry. Botanicals with reported progestogenic activities are red clover, hops, yam, and chasteberry. Serotonergic mechanisms have also been proposed since women taking antidepressants often report reduction in hot flashes and night sweats. Black cohosh, kudzu, kava, licorice, and dong quai all either have reported 5-HT7 ligands or inhibit serotonin re-uptake, therefore have potential serotonergic activities. Understanding the mechanisms of action of these natural remedies used for women’s health, could lead to more efficacious formulations and to the isolation of active components which have the potential of becoming effective medications in the future. PMID:23408273

  3. The role of botanical gardens in climate change research.

    PubMed

    Primack, Richard B; Miller-Rushing, Abraham J

    2009-01-01

    Botanical gardens have a unique set of resources that allows them to host important climate change research projects not easily undertaken elsewhere. These resources include controlled growing conditions, living collections with broad taxonomic representation, meticulous record-keeping, networks spanning wide geographic areas, and knowledgeable staff. Indeed, botanical gardens have already contributed significantly to our understanding of biological responses to climate change, particularly the effects of temperature on the timing of flowering and leaf-out. They have also made significant contributions to the understanding of the relationships among climate, physiology, and anatomy. Gardens are finding new uses for traditional research tools such as herbarium specimens and historical photographs, which are increasingly being used to obtain information on past plant behavior. Additional work on invasive species and comparative studies of responses to climatic variation are providing insights on important ecological, evolutionary, and management questions. With their large collections of plant species from throughout the world and excellent herbaria, botanical gardens are well positioned to expand their current activities to continue to provide leadership in climate change research and education.

  4. Dermocosmetics for dry skin: a new role for botanical extracts.

    PubMed

    Casetti, F; Wölfle, U; Gehring, W; Schempp, C M

    2011-01-01

    Dry skin is associated with a disturbed skin barrier and reduced formation of epidermal proteins and lipids. During recent years, skin-barrier-reinforcing properties of some botanical compounds have been described. Searching the PubMed database revealed 9 botanical extracts that specifically improve skin barrier and/or promote keratinocyte differentiation in vivo after topical application. The topical application of Aloe vera (leaf gel), Betula alba (birch bark extract), Helianthus annuus (sunflower oleodistillate), Hypericum perforatum (St. John's wort extract), Lithospermum erythrorhizon (root extract), Piptadenia colubrina (angico-branco extract) and Simarouba amara (bitter wood extract) increased skin hydration, reduced the transepidermal water loss, or promoted keratinocyte differentiation in humans in vivo. The topical application of Rubia cordifolia root extract and rose oil obtained from Rosa spp. flowers stimulated keratinocyte differentiation in mouse models. The underlying mechanisms of these effects are discussed. It is concluded that some botanical compounds display skin-barrier-reinforcing properties that may be used in dermocosmetics for dry skin. However, more investigations on the mode of action and more vehicle-controlled studies are required.

  5. Metabolite Profiling and Classification of DNA-Authenticated Licorice Botanicals.

    PubMed

    Simmler, Charlotte; Anderson, Jeffrey R; Gauthier, Laura; Lankin, David C; McAlpine, James B; Chen, Shao-Nong; Pauli, Guido F

    2015-08-28

    Raw licorice roots represent heterogeneous materials obtained from mainly three Glycyrrhiza species. G. glabra, G. uralensis, and G. inflata exhibit marked metabolite differences in terms of flavanones (Fs), chalcones (Cs), and other phenolic constituents. The principal objective of this work was to develop complementary chemometric models for the metabolite profiling, classification, and quality control of authenticated licorice. A total of 51 commercial and macroscopically verified samples were DNA authenticated. Principal component analysis and canonical discriminant analysis were performed on (1)H NMR spectra and area under the curve values obtained from UHPLC-UV chromatograms, respectively. The developed chemometric models enable the identification and classification of Glycyrrhiza species according to their composition in major Fs, Cs, and species specific phenolic compounds. Further key outcomes demonstrated that DNA authentication combined with chemometric analyses enabled the characterization of mixtures, hybrids, and species outliers. This study provides a new foundation for the botanical and chemical authentication, classification, and metabolomic characterization of crude licorice botanicals and derived materials. Collectively, the proposed methods offer a comprehensive approach for the quality control of licorice as one of the most widely used botanical dietary supplements.

  6. Semiannual report to Congress

    SciTech Connect

    Layton, J.C.

    1991-04-01

    The issue of the Office of Inspector General (OIG) Semiannual Report to the congress covers the period from October 1, 1990, to March 31, 1991. Among the significant audits, inspections, and investigations presented in this Semiannual Report are those on environmental testing done by Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories, issues relating to the construction of the Superconducting Super Collider, control exercised by the DOE over subcontracts awarded by DOE contractors in furtherance of the Work-For-Others Program, deficiencies in DOE's oversight of the personnel security program, vendors substituting used circuit breakers in place of new ones ordered, and noncompliance with DOE documentation and reporting requirements in making and managing major system acquisitions. The Semiannual report is organized into five major sections. The first section contains brief overviews of the Department of Energy and the Office of Inspector General, as well as OIG views on current legislative matters. The second section describes the significant operational results of OIG audit, inspection, and investigative activity. The third, fourth, and fifth sections contain compilations of OIG statistical data.

  7. Botanical origin of Indian celery seed (fruit).

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Takuro; Abbaskhan, Ahmed; Choudhary, Muhammad Iqbal; Tsuda, Yoshisuke; Goda, Yukihiro; Farille, Michel; Reduron, Jean-Pierre

    2009-07-01

    In the course of our study on the traditional medicines and foodstuffs used in Pakistan, we investigated the origin of Indian celery by using the analysis of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequence of nuclear rDNA and a phytochemical approach. We found that the source plant of the Indian celery containing coumarin derivatives such as seselin (1), bergapten (2) and isopimpinellin (3) was not common celery, Apium graveolens. Our results suggest the source plant is Seseli diffusum even though Indian workers reported that A. graveolens seeds contain the aforementioned compounds. In addition, a market survey of the Indian celery in Pakistan and related countries revealed that the Indian celery seeds in Pakistani markets are mainly composed of three species which have been confused in rural markets.

  8. EDITORIAL: Dialog on Science and Policy to Address the Climate Crisis to conclude the International Association of Research Universities Climate Congress, Copenhagen, Denmark Dialog on Science and Policy to Address the Climate Crisis to conclude the International Association of Research Universities Climate Congress, Copenhagen, Denmark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baer, Paul; Kammen, Daniel M.

    2009-06-01

    This is not the usual Editor-in-Chief letter, namely one that focuses on the accomplishments of the journal—and for ERL they have been numerous this year—but a recognition of the critical time that we are now in when it comes to addressing not only global climate change, but also the dialog between science and politics. In recognition of the many 'tipping points' that we now confront—ideally some of them positive social moments—as well as the clear scientific conclusion that environmental tipping points are points of long-lasting disruption, this paper takes a different form than I might have otherwise written. While the scientific body of knowledge around global environmental change mounts, so too, do the hopeful signs that change can happen. The election of Barack Obama is unquestionably one such sign, witnessed by the exceptional interest that his story has brought not only to US politics, but also to global views of the potential of the United States, as well as to the potential role of science and investigation in addressing pressing issues. In light of these inter-related issues, reproduced here—largely due to the efforts of Paul Baer to transcribe a remarkable conversation—is a dialog not only on the science of global warming and the potential set of means to address this issue, but also on the interaction between research, science and the political process. The dialog itself is sufficiently important that I will dispense with the usual discussion of the exciting recognition that ERL has received with an ISI rating (a factor rapidly increasing), the high levels of downloads of our papers (for some articles over 5000 and counting), and the many news and scientific publications picking up ERL articles (in recent days alone Science, Environmental Science and Technology, and The Economist). This conversation was the concluding plenary session of the 10-12 March International Association of Research Universities (IARU) Conference on Climate Change

  9. Update on Congress: A Review of Current Issues Facing Congress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Update on Law-Related Education, 1998

    1998-01-01

    Addresses four issues facing Congress: (1) freedom from religious bias in the workplace; (2) campaign finance reform; (3) President Clinton's education program and the allocation of money for various proposals; and (4) Senator John McCain's legislative package for reducing smoking in the United States. (CMK)

  10. Congress Looks at the Campus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brock, W. E.

    This is a report of a campus tour led by US Representative Bill Brock of Tennessee to gain a better understanding of student unrest. The 22 participating Congressment were divided into 6 regional groups which together visited over 50 universities of all types and sizes. Their report discusses a series of issues named by students as major sources…

  11. Congress Wraps Up 2011 Budget

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Alyson

    2011-01-01

    Education advocates are already bracing for protracted budget battles in the coming year, even as they sort the winners and losers in the bill approved by Congress late last week financing the U.S. Department of Education and the rest of the federal government through September. The hard-fought agreement followed months of wrangling between…

  12. Outstanding Women Members of Congress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington, Shirley

    Women's participation in congressional politics began in 1917 when Jeannette Pickering Rankin became the first woman in Congress. This was an unusual historic mark because women did not have the right to vote until 1920 when the 19th Amendment was passed. The book lists 12 prominent women who made an impact in U.S. politics. Corrine Boggs, like…

  13. Traditional botanical knowledge of artisanal fishers in southern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This study characterized the botanical knowledge of artisanal fishers of the Lami community, Porto Alegre, southern Brazil based on answers to the following question: Is the local botanical knowledge of the artisanal fishers of the rural-urban district of Lami still active, even since the district’s insertion into the metropolitan region of Porto Alegre? Methods This region, which contains a mosaic of urban and rural areas, hosts the Lami Biological Reserve (LBR) and a community of 13 artisanal fisher families. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 15 fishers, complemented by participatory observation techniques and free-lists; in these interviews, the species of plants used by the community and their indicated uses were identified. Results A total of 111 species belonging to 50 families were identified. No significant differences between the diversities of native and exotic species were found. Seven use categories were reported: medicinal (49%), human food (23.2%), fishing (12.3%), condiments (8%), firewood (5%), mystical purposes (1.45%), and animal food (0.72%). The medicinal species with the highest level of agreement regarding their main uses (AMUs) were Aloe arborescens Mill., Plectranthus barbatus Andrews, Dodonaea viscosa Jacq., Plectranthus ornatus Codd, Eugenia uniflora L., and Foeniculum vulgare Mill. For illness and diseases, most plants were used for problems with the digestive system (20 species), followed by the respiratory system (16 species). This community possesses a wide botanical knowledge, especially of medicinal plants, comparable to observations made in other studies with fishing communities in coastal areas of the Atlantic Forest of Brazil. Conclusions Ethnobotanical studies in rural-urban areas contribute to preserving local knowledge and provide information that aids in conserving the remaining ecosystems in the region. PMID:23898973

  14. Leadership's Use of Educational Technologies in U.S. Botanic Gardens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harper, Ginger Virginia

    2014-01-01

    Botanic gardens are rich informational environments that exhibit ideas in limited increments due to constraints of time and physical layout. This study addressed a gap in research about experiences and issues of botanic gardens leaders related to implementing educational technologies. Educational theorists Dewey, Kolb, and Bandura provided the…

  15. Expanding the role of botanical gardens in the future of food

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Collectively, the world’s more than 3,000 botanical gardens cultivate approximately one-third of known plant species in living collections, and contribute valuable information on plant identification, geographic distributions, morphology, reproduction, and traditional uses. Further, each year botan...

  16. Climate Change Education: Quantitatively Assessing the Impact of a Botanical Garden as an Informal Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sellmann, Daniela; Bogner, Franz X.

    2013-01-01

    Although informal learning environments have been studied extensively, ours is one of the first studies to quantitatively assess the impact of learning in botanical gardens on students' cognitive achievement. We observed a group of 10th graders participating in a one-day educational intervention on climate change implemented in a botanical garden.…

  17. ENVIRONMENTAL CONTAMINANTS AND POTENTIAL HUMAN RISK ASSOCIATED WITH SELECTED BOTANICAL DIETARY SUPPLEMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Botanical dietary supplements have a long history of use in Europe and China and they are becoming increasingly popular in the United States. However, little data is available regarding environmental contaminants in botanical dietary supplements and the risk posed to those ingest...

  18. 36 CFR 223.278 - Sale of forest botanical products and collection of fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sale of forest botanical products and collection of fees. 223.278 Section 223.278 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SALE AND DISPOSAL OF NATIONAL FOREST SYSTEM TIMBER Forest Botanical Products §...

  19. Probability of identification (POI): a statistical model for the validation of qualitative botanical identification methods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A qualitative botanical identification method (BIM) is an analytical procedure which returns a binary result (1 = Identified, 0 = Not Identified). A BIM may be used by a buyer, manufacturer, or regulator to determine whether a botanical material being tested is the same as the target (desired) mate...

  20. Brazilian red propolis--chemical composition and botanical origin.

    PubMed

    Daugsch, Andreas; Moraes, Cleber S; Fort, Patricia; Park, Yong K

    2008-12-01

    Propolis contains resinous substances collected by honey bees from various plant sources and has been used as a traditional folk medicine since ca 300 BC. Nowadays, the use of evidence-based complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is increasing rapidly and so is the use of propolis in order to treat or support the treatment of various diseases. Much attention has been focused on propolis from Populus sp. (Salicaceae) and Baccharis dracunculifolia (Asteracea), but scientific information about the numerous other types of propolis is still sparse. We gathered six samples of red propolis in five states of Northeastern Brazil. The beehives were located near woody perennial shrubs along the sea and river shores. The bees were observed to collect red resinous exudates on Dalbergia ecastophyllum (L) Taub. (Leguminosae) to make propolis. The flavonoids of propolis and red resinous exudates were investigated using reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography and reversed-phase high-performance thin-layer chromatography. We conclude that the botanical origin of the reddish propolis is D. ecastophyllum. In areas where this source (D. ecastophyllum) was scarce or missing, bees were collecting resinous material from other plants. Propolis, which contained the chemical constituents from the main botanical origin, showed higher antimicrobial activity.

  1. [History of the Nippon Shinyaku Institute for Botanical Research].

    PubMed

    Yamaura, Takao

    2011-03-01

    Soon after its foundation in 1919, Nippon Shinyaku Co., Ltd began to develop the domestic production of Santonin, an anthelmintic agent, which, until then, had been totally imported from Russia. In 1927, Artemisia maritima ssp. monogyna was introduced from Europe and confirmed to contain Santonin. This European aster plant was named Mibu-yomogi after the place name of the headquarters of Nippon Shinyaku. In 1934, Yamashina Experimental Farm was founded to breed Mibu-yomogi cultivars of high quality as a plant material for Santonin production in Japan. In 1953, the Experimental Farm was reorganized into the Institute for Botanical Research for the continuous breeding of Santonin-containing aster plants and for the development of any new medicines from medicinal plants. Through the breeding of Santonin-containing aster plants, many cultivars including Yamashina No. 2 from Mibu-yomogi, Penta-yomogi and Hexa-yomogi which were crosssed with Mibu-yomogi and A. kurramensis, were bred. Furthermore, we still have four ethical drug products originated from medicinal plants. Since 1994, the Institute has become a botanical garden in order to maintain, develop and exhibit the plant collection and for the cultivation studies of rare plants.

  2. Phytoestrogens in botanical dietary supplements: implications for cancer.

    PubMed

    Piersen, Colleen E

    2003-06-01

    Phytoestrogens are plant constituents that possess either estrogenic or antiestrogenic activity. Although their activities are weak as compared with human endogenous estrogens, the consumption of phytoestrogens may have clinically significant consequences. A number of botanicals, or the compounds contained therein, have been identified as putative estrogenic agents, but consensus in the biomedical community has been hampered by conflicting data from various in vitro and in vivo models of estrogenic activity. Phytoestrogens may serve as chemopreventive agents while at the same time being capable of promoting growth in estrogen receptor positive cancer cell lines. Furthermore, they may exert their estrogenic influence through receptor-dependent and/or receptor-independent mechanisms. These findings have led to speculation that phytoestrogen intake might be ill advised for patients at an increased risk for hormone-dependent cancers, cancer patients, or cancer survivors. This article will attempt to sort out discrepancies between various experimental models and establish whether certain herbs possess estrogenic activity. The review will focus on 5 popular botanical dietary supplements: Trifolium pratense (red clover), Cimicifuga racemosa (black cohosh), Humulus lupulus (hops), Angelica sinensis (dong quai), and Glycyrrhiza glabra (licorice). It will address their mechanisms of action, clinical evidence bases, and implications for use in cancer.

  3. The role of botanic gardens in the science and practice of ecological restoration.

    PubMed

    Hardwick, Kate A; Fiedler, Peggy; Lee, Lyndon C; Pavlik, Bruce; Hobbs, Richard J; Aronson, James; Bidartondo, Martin; Black, Eric; Coates, David; Daws, Matthew I; Dixon, Kingsley; Elliott, Stephen; Ewing, Kern; Gann, George; Gibbons, David; Gratzfeld, Joachim; Hamilton, Martin; Hardman, David; Harris, Jim; Holmes, Pat M; Jones, Meirion; Mabberley, David; Mackenzie, Andrew; Magdalena, Carlos; Marrs, Robert; Milliken, William; Mills, Anthony; Lughadha, Eimear Nic; Ramsay, Margaret; Smith, Paul; Taylor, Nigel; Trivedi, Clare; Way, Michael; Whaley, Oliver; Hopper, Stephen D

    2011-04-01

    Many of the skills and resources associated with botanic gardens and arboreta, including plant taxonomy, horticulture, and seed bank management, are fundamental to ecological restoration efforts, yet few of the world's botanic gardens are involved in the science or practice of restoration. Thus, we examined the potential role of botanic gardens in these emerging fields. We believe a reorientation of certain existing institutional strengths, such as plant-based research and knowledge transfer, would enable many more botanic gardens worldwide to provide effective science-based support to restoration efforts. We recommend botanic gardens widen research to include ecosystems as well as species, increase involvement in practical restoration projects and training practitioners, and serve as information hubs for data archiving and exchange.

  4. The 100th FDI World Dental Congress.

    PubMed

    Yeung, C A

    2013-05-01

    The 100th FDI World Dental Congress was held in Hong Kong from 29 August to 1 September 2012. This article gives a report on the congress, which saw the first FDI World Oral Health Recognition Award being given to Professor Zhu Chen, the Minister of Health in China. During the congress, both the FDI Vision 2020 project and the Global Caries Initiative website were launched.

  5. The new Congress and population issues.

    PubMed

    Kalish, S

    1993-02-01

    A change of the US administration and an increase in the number of new members of the US Congress, many of whom are minorities and/or women, in 1993 may strengthen population activities including data collection, demographic research, family planning and population, and policies. In fact, the 1993 freshman class of US House of Representatives is the largest since World War II (110 vs. 118). Women and minorities in the House now comprise 25% of the vote. The US Senate now has the first ever elected African American woman (Carol Mosely Braun [D-IL]) and the first Native American in more than 60 years (Ben Nighthorse Campbell [D-CO]). Even though they are new members, 72% have previous legislative experience. This experience, especially in the era of New Federalism set during the 1980s which resulted in new responsibilities without additional resources, has prepared them to make compromises. Further, the new members tend to be moderates. Moreover, 33% were elected to office by margins less than 60% and are therefore candidates for targeting by the opposition. In addition, the huge federal budget deficit concerns the public. Thus, Congress and the new administration will probably have to focus on deficit reduction rather than on population and social issues. There will also be competition over available funds coming from the cut to defense spending. Therefore, it is difficult to predict spending levels for population and population-related issues. Yet there appears to be support for family planning programs and clinics, passage of the Family Medical Leave Act, environmental policies, and implementing 2 studies of sexual behavior. There is uncertainty about the level of support for international family planning, however.

  6. Colombia: Issues for Congress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-19

    massacres of civilians, and that the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, to which Colombia is party, requires that states will ensure...cultivation in Peru and Bolivia increased. Instead, many urge that counternarcotics policy should stress interdiction rather than eradication so that... Bolivia , and Colombia. Until the mid-1990s, Peru and Bolivia were the two major producers. Colombia eclipsed Bolivia in 1995 and Peru in 1997, the result

  7. Annual report to Congress, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-31

    Created by Congress in 1977 as an independent entity within the Department of Energy, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) is the principal and authoritative source of comprehensive energy data for the Congress, the Federal Government, the States, and the public. With the mandate to ``collect, assemble, evaluate, analyze, and disseminate data and information,`` EIA`s mission has been defined to: maintain a comprehensive data and information program relevant to energy resources and reserves, energy production, energy demand, energy technologies, and related financial and statistical information relevant to the adequacy of energy resources to meet the Nation`s demands in the near and longer term future. Develop and maintain analytical tool and collection and processing systems; provide analyses that are accurate, timely, and objective; and provide information dissemination services. This annual report summarizes EIA`s activities and accomplishments in 1993.

  8. Annual report to Congress, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1999-04-01

    Section 205 of the Department of Energy Organization Act of 1977 established the Energy Information Administration (EIA). One of the mandates in this legislation is that EIA prepare for Congress an annual report summarizing both activities and information collected and published. EIA`s major 1998 accomplishments are profiled in the body of this edition of the Annual Report to Congress. Appendix A contains abstracts of significant reports issued by EIA in 1998 and a chart of all titles and a list of all feature articles published during the year. Appendix B contains graphs of selected performance measures. Appendix C lists contact information for EIA subject matter specialists. Appendix D lists the major laws which form the basis of EIA`s legislative mandate.

  9. Mechanisms of Chromosome Congression during Mitosis.

    PubMed

    Maiato, Helder; Gomes, Ana Margarida; Sousa, Filipe; Barisic, Marin

    2017-02-17

    Chromosome congression during prometaphase culminates with the establishment of a metaphase plate, a hallmark of mitosis in metazoans. Classical views resulting from more than 100 years of research on this topic have attempted to explain chromosome congression based on the balance between opposing pulling and/or pushing forces that reach an equilibrium near the spindle equator. However, in mammalian cells, chromosome bi-orientation and force balance at kinetochores are not required for chromosome congression, whereas the mechanisms of chromosome congression are not necessarily involved in the maintenance of chromosome alignment after congression. Thus, chromosome congression and maintenance of alignment are determined by different principles. Moreover, it is now clear that not all chromosomes use the same mechanism for congressing to the spindle equator. Those chromosomes that are favorably positioned between both poles when the nuclear envelope breaks down use the so-called "direct congression" pathway in which chromosomes align after bi-orientation and the establishment of end-on kinetochore-microtubule attachments. This favors the balanced action of kinetochore pulling forces and polar ejection forces along chromosome arms that drive chromosome oscillatory movements during and after congression. The other pathway, which we call "peripheral congression", is independent of end-on kinetochore microtubule-attachments and relies on the dominant and coordinated action of the kinetochore motors Dynein and Centromere Protein E (CENP-E) that mediate the lateral transport of peripheral chromosomes along microtubules, first towards the poles and subsequently towards the equator. How the opposite polarities of kinetochore motors are regulated in space and time to drive congression of peripheral chromosomes only now starts to be understood. This appears to be regulated by position-dependent phosphorylation of both Dynein and CENP-E and by spindle microtubule diversity by

  10. Photocopy of photograph entitled "Botanical Gardens and officers quarters, Fitzsimons ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph entitled "Botanical Gardens and officers quarters, Fitzsimons General Hospital". Dated 1924 on the back, the photograph looks north from the corner of E. Colfax Ave. and Peoria St. Some features such as the buildings at the upper right are actual but other features such as the large building at the upper left are drawn in. Photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Public Affairs Office, building 120. This photograph was never copyrighted and is in the public domain. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Bounded by East Colfax to south, Peoria Street to west, Denver City/County & Adams County Line to north, & U.S. Route 255 to east, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  11. A new proposal concerning the botanical origin of Baltic amber

    PubMed Central

    Wolfe, Alexander P.; Tappert, Ralf; Muehlenbachs, Karlis; Boudreau, Marc; McKellar, Ryan C.; Basinger, James F.; Garrett, Amber

    2009-01-01

    Baltic amber constitutes the largest known deposit of fossil plant resin and the richest repository of fossil insects of any age. Despite a remarkable legacy of archaeological, geochemical and palaeobiological investigation, the botanical origin of this exceptional resource remains controversial. Here, we use taxonomically explicit applications of solid-state Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy, coupled with multivariate clustering and palaeobotanical observations, to propose that conifers of the family Sciadopityaceae, closely allied to the sole extant representative, Sciadopitys verticillata, were involved in the genesis of Baltic amber. The fidelity of FTIR-based chemotaxonomic inferences is upheld by modern–fossil comparisons of resins from additional conifer families and genera (Cupressaceae: Metasequoia; Pinaceae: Pinus and Pseudolarix). Our conclusions challenge hypotheses advocating members of either of the families Araucariaceae or Pinaceae as the primary amber-producing trees and correlate favourably with the progressive demise of subtropical forest biomes from northern Europe as palaeotemperatures cooled following the Eocene climate optimum. PMID:19570786

  12. John Locke's seed lists: a case study in botanical exchange.

    PubMed

    Harris, Stephen A; Anstey, Peter R

    2009-12-01

    This paper gives a detailed analysis of four seed lists in the journals of John Locke. These lists provide a window into a fascinating open network of botanical exchange in the early 1680s which included two of the leading botanists of the day, Pierre Magnol of Montpellier and Jacob Bobart the Younger of Oxford. The provenance and significance of the lists are assessed in relation to the relevant extant herbaria and plant catalogues from the period. The lists and associated correspondence provide the main evidence for Locke's own important, though modest contribution to early modern botany, a contribution which he would have regarded as a small part of the broader project of constructing a natural history of plants. They also provide a detailed case study of the sort of open and informal network of knowledge exchange in the early modern period that is widely recognised by historians of science, but all too rarely illustrated.

  13. Tropical botanical gardens: at the in situ ecosystem management frontier.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jin; Cannon, Charles H; Hu, Huabin

    2009-11-01

    Tropical botanical gardens (TBGs) should have a leading role in in situ conservation by directly promoting several initiatives, including the reintroduction of important or valuable native species, focused habitat restoration, 'assisted migration' of species that are vulnerable to climate change, and creative local collaboration with governments, NGOs and indigenous peoples. Compared with temperate gardens, TBGs face heightened challenges for ex situ conservation, including greater absolute amounts of biodiversity, need for resource mobilization, risk of introducing invasive species and potential genetic introgression within living collections. Meanwhile, the ecosystems surrounding TBGs have undergone widespread and rapid conversion. Here, we provide several illustrations of the effectiveness of TBGs in achieving their mission of preserving tropical biodiversity at the frontier of in situ ecosystem management.

  14. The botanical explorer's legacy: a promising bioprospecting tool.

    PubMed

    Helmstädter, Axel

    2016-11-16

    Records about the traditional uses of medicinal plants can be considered useful in bioprospecting (i.e., the search for new active agents or lead structures in nature). Several sources like Egyptian papyri, early modern herbals and pharmacopoeias have been studied in this respect. It is proposed to use recordings of botanically interested explorers of the 19th and early 20th centuries as well. Some of them give detailed information about traditionally used medicinal plants and analysis shows that a considerable number of these have never been scientifically investigated. Existing studies, however, are confirming the traditional uses described to a great extent. Thus, the explorer's writings should not be neglected while looking for starting points for plant screening; success seems more likely than with screening at random.

  15. Selection and authentication of botanical materials for the development of analytical methods.

    PubMed

    Applequist, Wendy L; Miller, James S

    2013-05-01

    Herbal products, for example botanical dietary supplements, are widely used. Analytical methods are needed to ensure that botanical ingredients used in commercial products are correctly identified and that research materials are of adequate quality and are sufficiently characterized to enable research to be interpreted and replicated. Adulteration of botanical material in commerce is common for some species. The development of analytical methods for specific botanicals, and accurate reporting of research results, depend critically on correct identification of test materials. Conscious efforts must therefore be made to ensure that the botanical identity of test materials is rigorously confirmed and documented through preservation of vouchers, and that their geographic origin and handling are appropriate. Use of material with an associated herbarium voucher that can be botanically identified is always ideal. Indirect methods of authenticating bulk material in commerce, for example use of organoleptic, anatomical, chemical, or molecular characteristics, are not always acceptable for the chemist's purposes. Familiarity with botanical and pharmacognostic literature is necessary to determine what potential adulterants exist and how they may be distinguished.

  16. The Library of Congress Information Bulletin, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library of Congress Information Bulletin, 1999

    1999-01-01

    These 12 issues, representing 1 calendar year (1999) of "The Library of Congress Information Bulletin," contain information on Library of Congress new collections and program developments, lectures and readings, financial support and materials donations, budget, honors and awards, Web sites and digital collections, new publications,…

  17. The Role of Congress in Indian Affairs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benham, William J.

    An examiniation of past and recent federal legislation affecting American Indians reveals the important role of Congress in developing policy for Indian affairs. The role of Congress inititally seemed directed toward providing a legal means of taking Indian land and other resources for the benefit of non-Indians. Subsequent policy has varied…

  18. The Library of Congress Information Bulletin, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamolinara, Guy, Ed.; Dalrymple, Helen, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    These 10 issues, representing one calendar year, including two double issues (2002) of "The Library of Congress Information Bulletin," contain information on Library of Congress new collections and program developments, lectures and readings, financial support and materials donations, budget, honors and awards, World Wide Web sites and…

  19. Teaching Parliamentary Procedure Through the Student Congress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metcalf, Marguerite Pearce

    An effective means of teaching parliamentary procedure to high school students is the Student Congress. Advance planning and imagination are necessary to the success of the Congress. Included in the advance planning are discussions of the types of legislation permitted and the governing body to which each resolution is directed. The point system…

  20. The Library of Congress Information Bulletin, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamolinara, Guy, Ed.

    2001-01-01

    These 12 issues, representing one calendar year (2001) of "The Library of Congress Information Bulletin," contain information on Library of Congress new collections and program developments, lectures and readings, financial support and materials donations, budget, honors and awards, World Wide Web sites and digital collections, new…

  1. International Education Act: Hearings Before the Subcommittee on Education of the Committee on Labor and Public Welfare, United States Senate, Eighty-Ninth Congress, Second Session on S. 2874 and H.R. 14643.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Labor and Public Welfare.

    Testimony presented at hearings for a bill to provide for the strengthening of American educational resources for international studies and research is contained in this volume. The bill and its amendments, which are reproduced, call for the establishment of centers for advanced international studies grants to strengthen undergraduate programs in…

  2. Full journal publication of abstracts presented at the Nordic Congress of General Practice in 2009 and 2011

    PubMed Central

    Waldorff, Frans Boch; Petersen, Kristine; Vinther, Siri; Sandholdt, Håkon; Siersma, Volkert; Andersen, John Sahl

    2017-01-01

    Objective To determine the overall publication rates for abstracts presented at two consecutive Nordic Congresses of General Practice and to evaluate determinants for these publication rates. Design Prospective study. Setting MEDLINE (PubMed) and Google Scholar were searched for relevant publications from 1 January 2009 up until 31 August 2014. Methods Abstracts accepted for oral or poster presentation were identified from the original congress booklets from the Nordic Congresses of General Practice in 2009 and 2011. Based on PubMed and Google Scholar searches, we subsequently identified full journal publications within a 36-month follow-up from both congresses. In cases of doubt, the first author was contacted directly. Main outcome measures Full journal publication within 36 months after the congress. Results A total of 200 abstracts were analyzed. Of these, 85 (42.5%) were identified with a full publication within 36 months after the congress. More abstracts from the 2011 congress were published compared to the 2009 congress odds ratio (OR) 1.97, 95% confidence interval (CI) (1.10; 3.50). Abstracts accepted for oral presentation were more often published OR 1.94, 95% CI (1.08; 3.50) than accepted poster abstracts. In the multivariate analysis, a university affiliation for both first and last author increased the probability for publication OR 4.23, 95% CI (1.71; 10.42), as well as more than two authors. An optimal number, based on the highest OR, seems to be 3–4 authors with OR 2.43, 95% CI (1.07; 5.54). Qualitative studies were published at the same frequency as quantitative studies OR 1.36, 95% CI (0.57; 3.24). Conclusion Less than half of the abstracts accepted for oral or poster presentation at two consecutive Nordic Congresses of General Practice were published as full text articles within 36 months. Key points Congress abstracts accepted for Nordic Congress of General Practice are not indexed in international search databases. Less than half of the

  3. Bioethics: US Congress tries again.

    PubMed

    Budiansky, Stephen

    1985-07-04

    Bills have been introduced in both houses of Congress to create a nonregulatory bioethics advisory panel to operate as an agency of the legislative branch. The panel, consisting of researchers, physicians, ethicists, and laypeople, would review ethical problems and evolve policy. Two areas of present concern are human gene therapy guidelines now under consideration by a subcommittee of the National Institutes of Health's Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee, and the essentially total moratorium on fetal research resulting from the failure of the Secretary of Health and Human Services to appoint an advisory board to consider such research.

  4. The 33rd IGC, Oslo, Norway 2008; Geoscience World Congress 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solheim, A.; Bjoerlykke, A.

    2007-12-01

    The International Geological Congress (IGC) has been arranged every four years since 1878. During the previous Congress in Florence, Italy, 2004, the Nordic countries were awarded the organisation of the 33rd IGC, which will be held in Oslo, Norway, August 6-14, 2008. We expect between 6000 and 9000 participants to the Congress, which also includes workshops, short-courses, and business meetings, as well as more than 50 pre -and post Congress excursions. The Congress is organised under the umbrella of IUGS and the patronage of UNESCO. The Congress will run with 40 parallel sessions and cover the whole width of the geosciences. About 500 symposia will run in 40 parallel sessions. There will be a major poster session, as well as a large exhibition (Geoexpo 2008), in which industry and other organisations will be able to exhibit their products and services. A number of international affiliations have announced their interest in organising annual business meetings during the Congress. In addition, a number of workshops and short-courses will be arranged. More than 50 excursions are planned for the two weeks before the Congress and one week after. These run in all the Nordic Countries, as well as in NW Russia, Ukraine, Greenland, Svalbard, and the Faeroes Islands. These excursions will give the participants a first-hand insight into Nordic Geosciences, as well as the Nordic natural and cultural heritage. Two major international events are important for the Congress. The "International Polar Year" (IPY) and the United Nations' "International Year of Planet Earth" (IYPE) are both running in the period 2007-2009. The Congress focuses on many of the main themes of IYPE, with major emphasis on "Geoscience and Society". Seven major themes will be treated in full-day plenary sessions of lectures given by invited lecturers. These plenary sessions will have a scientific part in the morning, a key-note lecture at lunch-time, and a societal part in the afternoon, followed by a

  5. Melanin: dietary mucosal immune modulator from Echinacea and other botanical supplements.

    PubMed

    Pugh, Nirmal D; Balachandran, Premalatha; Lata, Hemant; Dayan, Franck E; Joshi, Vaishali; Bedir, Erdal; Makino, Toshiaki; Moraes, Rita; Khan, Ikhlas; Pasco, David S

    2005-04-01

    The agents responsible for the therapeutic effects of many botanical supplements have not been established in spite of their popularity. Here we show that melanin is a previously unrecognized immunostimulatory compound that is a major component of botanicals traditionally used to enhance immune function. While melanin is present in commonly consumed vegetables, its specific activity is several orders of magnitude less than melanin extracted from these botanicals. The major reason that this agent has eluded detection is its solvent-specific requirement for extraction/solubility. Melanin activates NF-kappa B in monocytes in vitro through a toll-like receptor 2-dependent process. Ingestion of melanin by mice for four days increases production ex vivo of interferon-gamma by spleen cells and IgA and interleukin-6 by Peyer's patch cells. The identification of this new class of mucosal immune stimulants will allow further characterization of botanical products and advances our understanding of the basis for their traditional use.

  6. Verifying the botanical authenticity of commercial tannins through sugars and simple phenols profiles.

    PubMed

    Malacarne, Mario; Nardin, Tiziana; Bertoldi, Daniela; Nicolini, Giorgio; Larcher, Roberto

    2016-09-01

    Commercial tannins from several botanical sources and with different chemical and technological characteristics are used in the food and winemaking industries. Different ways to check their botanical authenticity have been studied in the last few years, through investigation of different analytical parameters. This work proposes a new, effective approach based on the quantification of 6 carbohydrates, 7 polyalcohols, and 55 phenols. 87 tannins from 12 different botanical sources were analysed following a very simple sample preparation procedure. Using Forward Stepwise Discriminant Analysis, 3 statistical models were created based on sugars content, phenols concentration and combination of the two classes of compounds for the 8 most abundant categories (i.e. oak, grape seed, grape skin, gall, chestnut, quebracho, tea and acacia). The last approach provided good results in attributing tannins to the correct botanical origin. Validation, repeated 3 times on subsets of 10% of samples, confirmed the reliability of this model.

  7. Modulation of Estrogen Chemical Carcinogenesis by Botanical Supplements used for Postmenopausal Women’s Health

    PubMed Central

    Snelten, Courtney S.; Dietz, Birgit; Bolton, Judy L.

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer risk has been associated with long-term estrogen exposure including traditional hormone therapy (HT, formally hormone replacement therapy). To avoid traditional HT and associated risks, women have been turning to botanical supplements such as black cohosh, red clover, licorice, hops, dong gui, and ginger to relieve menopausal symptoms despite a lack of efficacy evidence. The mechanisms of estrogen carcinogenesis involve both hormonal and chemical pathways. Botanical supplements could protect women from estrogen carcinogenesis by modulating key enzymatic steps [aromatase, P4501B1, P4501A1, catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), and reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging] in estradiol metabolism leading to estrogen carcinogenesis as outlined in Figure 1. This review summarizes the influence of popular botanical supplements used for women’s health on these key steps in the estrogen chemical carcinogenesis pathway, and suggests that botanical supplements may have added chemopreventive benefits by modulating estrogen metabolism. PMID:24223609

  8. Application of nanotechnology for the encapsulation of botanical insecticides for sustainable agriculture: prospects and promises.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Jhones Luiz; Campos, Estefânia Vangelie Ramos; Bakshi, Mansi; Abhilash, P C; Fraceto, Leonardo Fernandes

    2014-12-01

    This review article discusses the use of nanotechnology in combination with botanical insecticides in order to develop systems for pest control in agriculture. The main types of botanical insecticides are described, together with different carrier systems and their potential uses. The botanical insecticides include those based on active principles isolated from plant extracts, as well as essential oils derived from certain plants. The advantages offered by the systems are highlighted, together with the main technological challenges that must be resolved prior to future implementation of the systems for agricultural pest control. The use of botanical insecticides associated with nanotechnology offers considerable potential for increasing agricultural productivity, while at the same time reducing impacts on the environment and human health.

  9. Toxicity of botanical formulations to nursery-infesting white grubs (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The toxicity of eight commercially-available botanical formulations were evaluated against 3rd instars of the nursery-infesting white grubs (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) Popillia japonica Newman, Exomala orientalis (Waterhouse), Rhizotrogus majalis (Razoumowsky), and Cyclocephala borealis Arrow. In vi...

  10. Mechanisms of Chromosome Congression during Mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Maiato, Helder; Gomes, Ana Margarida; Sousa, Filipe; Barisic, Marin

    2017-01-01

    Chromosome congression during prometaphase culminates with the establishment of a metaphase plate, a hallmark of mitosis in metazoans. Classical views resulting from more than 100 years of research on this topic have attempted to explain chromosome congression based on the balance between opposing pulling and/or pushing forces that reach an equilibrium near the spindle equator. However, in mammalian cells, chromosome bi-orientation and force balance at kinetochores are not required for chromosome congression, whereas the mechanisms of chromosome congression are not necessarily involved in the maintenance of chromosome alignment after congression. Thus, chromosome congression and maintenance of alignment are determined by different principles. Moreover, it is now clear that not all chromosomes use the same mechanism for congressing to the spindle equator. Those chromosomes that are favorably positioned between both poles when the nuclear envelope breaks down use the so-called “direct congression” pathway in which chromosomes align after bi-orientation and the establishment of end-on kinetochore-microtubule attachments. This favors the balanced action of kinetochore pulling forces and polar ejection forces along chromosome arms that drive chromosome oscillatory movements during and after congression. The other pathway, which we call “peripheral congression”, is independent of end-on kinetochore microtubule-attachments and relies on the dominant and coordinated action of the kinetochore motors Dynein and Centromere Protein E (CENP-E) that mediate the lateral transport of peripheral chromosomes along microtubules, first towards the poles and subsequently towards the equator. How the opposite polarities of kinetochore motors are regulated in space and time to drive congression of peripheral chromosomes only now starts to be understood. This appears to be regulated by position-dependent phosphorylation of both Dynein and CENP-E and by spindle microtubule

  11. Proceedings of the Bio-Energy '80 world congress and exposition

    SciTech Connect

    1980-01-01

    Many countries are moving with increasing urgency to obtain larger fractions of their energy from biomass. Over 1800 leading experts from 70 countries met on April 21 to 24 in Atlanta to conduct a World Congress and Exposition on Bio-Energy. This summary presents highlights of the Congress and thoughts stimulated by the occasion. Topics addressed include a comparison of international programs, world and country regionalism in the development of energy supplies, fuel versus food or forest products, production of ethyl alcohol, possibilities for expanded production of terrestrial vegetation and marine flora, and valuable chemicals from biomass. Separate abstracts have been prepared for 164 papers for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  12. Determination of Ephedrine Alkaloids in Botanicals and Dietary Supplements by HPLC-UV

    PubMed Central

    Roman, Mark C.; Gray, D.; Luo, G.; McClanahan, R.; Perez, R.; Roper, C.; Roscoe, V.; Shevchuk, C.; Suen, E.; Sullivan, D.; Walther, H.J.

    2008-01-01

    An international collaborative study was conducted of a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-UV method for the determination of the major (ephedrine [EP] and pseudoephedrine [PS]) and minor (norephedrine [NE], norpseudoephedrine [NP], methylephedrine [ME], and methylpseudoephedrine [MP]) alkaloids in selected dietary supplements representative of the commercially available products. Ten collaborating laboratories determined the ephedrine-type alkaloid content in 8 blind replicate samples. Five products contained ephedra ground herb or ephedra extract. These 5 products included ground botanical raw material of Ephedra sinica, a common powdered extract of Ephedra sinica, a finished product containing only Ephedra sinica ground botanical raw material, a complex multicomponent dietary supplement containing Ma Huang, and a high-protein chocolate flavored drink mix containing Ma Huang extract. In addition, collaborating laboratories received a negative control and negative control spiked with ephedrine alkaloids at high and low levels for recovery studies. Test extracts were treated to solid-phase extraction using a strong-cation exchange column to help remove interferences. The HPLC analyses were performed on a polar-embedded phenyl column using UV detection at 210 nm. Repeatability relative standard deviations (RSDr) ranged from 0.64–3.0% for EP and 2.0–6.6% for PS, excluding the high protein drink mix. Reproducibility relative standard deviations (RSDR) ranged from 2.1–6.6% for EP and 9.0–11.4% for PS, excluding the high protein drink mix. Recoveries ranged from 84.7–87.2% for EP and 84.6–98.2% for PS. The data developed for the minor alkaloids are more variable with generally unsatisfactory HORRATS(i.e., >2). However, since these alkaloids generally add little to the total alkaloid content of the products, the method gives satisfactory results in measuring total alkaloid content (RSDr 0.85–3.13%; RSDR 2.03–10.97%, HORRAT 0.69–3

  13. Nuclear regulatory legislation, 104th Congress, Volume 1, No. 4

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-01

    This document is the first of two volumes compiling statutes and material pertaining to nuclear regulatory legislation through the 104th Congress, 2nd Session. It is intended for use as a U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) internal resource document. Legislative information reproduced in this document includes portions of the Atomic Energy Act, Energy Reorganization Act, Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act, and Nuclear Waste Policy Act. Other information included in this volume pertains to NRC user fees, NRC authorizations, the Inspector General Act, and the Administrative Procedure Act.

  14. Resolving whether botanic gardens are on the road to conservation or a pathway for plant invasions.

    PubMed

    Hulme, Philip E

    2015-06-01

    A global conservation goal is to understand the pathways through which invasive species are introduced into new regions. Botanic gardens are a pathway for the introduction of invasive non-native plants, but a quantitative assessment of the risks they pose has not been performed. I analyzed data on the living collections of over 3000 botanic gardens worldwide to quantify the temporal trend in the representation of non-native species; the relative composition of threatened, ornamental, or invasive non-native plant species; and the frequency with which botanic gardens implement procedures to address invasive species. While almost all of the world's worst invasive non-native plants occurred in one or more living collections (99%), less than one-quarter of red-listed threatened species were cultivated (23%). Even when cultivated, individual threatened species occurred in few living collections (7.3), while non-native species were on average grown in 6 times as many botanic gardens (44.3). As a result, a botanic garden could, on average, cultivate four times as many invasive non-native species (20) as red-listed threatened species (5). Although the risk posed by a single living collection is small, the probability of invasion increases with the number of botanic gardens within a region. Thus, while both the size of living collections and the proportion of non-native species cultivated have declined during the 20th century, this reduction in risk is offset by the 10-fold increase in the number of botanic gardens established worldwide. Unfortunately, botanic gardens rarely implement regional codes of conduct to prevent plant invasions, few have an invasive species policy, and there is limited monitoring of garden escapes. This lack of preparedness is of particular concern given the rapid increase in living collections worldwide since 1950, particularly in South America and Asia, and highlights past patterns of introduction will be a poor guide to determining future

  15. (International meetings on ecology)

    SciTech Connect

    DeAngelis, D.L.; Garten, C.T. Jr.; Turner, M.G.

    1990-09-25

    the travelers attended the Fifth International Congress of Ecology (INTECOL) in Yokohama, Japan, and two presented invited papers and chaired symposia. One traveler also attended the OJI International Seminar in Gifu, Japan and the Fukuoka Symposium on Theoretical Ecology in Fukuoka, Japan and presented invited papers. At these scientific gatherings, a large number of symposia and specific presentations were relevant to current research at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), especially in the areas of landscape dynamics, plant physiology, and aquatic ecosystems.

  16. Building Cost and Quality. Proceedings of the CIB Congress (4th, Ottawa, Ontario, and Washington, D.C., 1968).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Council for Building Research, Studies, and Documentation, Rotterdam (Netherlands).

    An international congress was devoted to a contemporary examination of the existing relation between building costs and building quality and of possible ways of influencing this relation positively. Key-note papers by members of CIB and of other international organizations discussed the following topics--(1) human requirements of buildings, (2)…

  17. European Society of Cardiology Congress 2013 highlights.

    PubMed

    Fox, Keith A A

    2014-01-01

    The European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Congress in 2013 met in Amsterdam (The Netherlands) as an innovative and interactive congress involving more than 30,000 participants. There were 10,490 abstract submissions and a total of 227 hotline, basic science hotline and trial update submissions. Participants were involved from more than 150 countries. To make the congress manageable for participants, related topics were grouped together in ‘villages’ and a smart electronic application allowed the participants to guide their way through the congress and choose the sessions of interest. The innovative new program was initiated by the ESC Congress Programme Committee and the Congress Chair (Keith AA Fox, Chair 2012–2014) has responsibility for the design and delivery of the scientific program. The spotlight of the congress was ‘the heart interacting with systemic organs’, chosen because of the importance of cardiovascular disease conditions crossing conventional boundaries. In all 572 abstracts, the work involved an interaction between the heart and another organ, such as the brain, lungs, kidney, vasculature or inflammation system. In addition, innovative new approaches linked basic science and clinical science and the new ‘hubs of the congress’ allowed excellent interaction and exchange of ideas.

  18. Efficacy of dietary supplementation with botanicals on carbohydrate metabolism in humans.

    PubMed

    Cefalu, William T; Ye, Jianping; Wang, Zhong Q

    2008-06-01

    Botanical products are widely used in nutritional supplementation for promotion of health or prevention of diseases. With the high prevalence of obesity and type 2 diabetes, abnormalities in carbohydrate metabolism are common in the general population and obtaining glycemic control is important in reducing the complications of diabetes. If shown to be effective, botanical products have a unique position in potentially aiding the general public in regard to obesity and diabetes. They can be obtained "over-the-counter" and may have less side effects compared to many synthetic drugs. Although most of the popular botanicals have a long history in folk medicine, there is paucity of data regarding their efficacy and safety, particularly as it relates to human studies. In this review, we discuss the data that was available in the literature for nine botanicals that are frequently promoted to help manage blood glucose. They are Bitter Melon (Momordica charantia), Fenugreek (trigonella foenum graecum), Gymnema Sylvestre, Ivy Gourd (Coccinia indica), Nopal or Prickly Pear Cactus (Opuntia streptacantha), Ginseng, Aloe Vera, Russian Tarragon (Artemisia dracunculus), and Garlic (Allium sativum). The discussion is emphasized on the clinical aspect of these botanicals. Due to the lack of sufficient evidence from clinical studies for any of the botanicals reviewed, it is premature to actively recommend use of any particular herb to treat either glucose or other risk factors. Thus, well defined randomized clinical trials are warranted in this area.

  19. Biological and Chemical Standardization of a Hop (Humulus lupulus) Botanical Dietary Supplement

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Elizabeth; Yuan, Yang; Hajirahimkhan, Atieh; Dong, Huali; Dietz, Birgit M.; Nikolic, Dejan; Pauli, Guido F.; Bolton, Judy L.; van Breemen, Richard B.

    2014-01-01

    Concerned about the safety of conventional estrogen replacement therapy, women are using botanical dietary supplements as alternatives for the management of menopausal symptoms such as hot flashes. Before botanical dietary supplements can be evaluated clinically for safety and efficacy, botanically authenticated and standardized forms are required. To address the demand for a standardized, estrogenic botanical dietary supplement, an extract of hops (Humulus lupulus, L.) was developed. Although valued in the brewing of beer, hop extracts are used as anxiolytics and hypnotics and have well established estrogenic constituents. Starting with a hop cultivar used in the brewing industry, spent hops (the residue remaining after extraction of bitter acids) were formulated into a botanical dietary supplement that was then chemically and biologically standardized. Biological standardization utilized the estrogen dependent induction of alkaline phosphatase in the Ishikawa cell line. Chemical standardization was based on the prenylated phenols in hops that included estrogenic 8-prenylnaringenin (8-PN), its isomer 6-prenylnaringenin (6-PN), and pro-estrogenic isoxanthohumol (IX) and its isomeric chalcone xanthohumol (XN), all of which were measured using high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS-MS). The product of this process was a reproducible botanical extract suitable for subsequent investigations of safety and efficacy. PMID:24861737

  20. Biological and chemical standardization of a hop (Humulus lupulus) botanical dietary supplement.

    PubMed

    Krause, Elizabeth; Yuan, Yang; Hajirahimkhan, Atieh; Dong, Huali; Dietz, Birgit M; Nikolic, Dejan; Pauli, Guido F; Bolton, Judy L; van Breemen, Richard B

    2014-06-01

    Concerned about the safety of conventional estrogen replacement therapy, women are using botanical dietary supplements as alternatives for the management of menopausal symptoms such as hot flashes. Before botanical dietary supplements can be evaluated clinically for safety and efficacy, botanically authenticated and standardized forms are required. To address the demand for a standardized, estrogenic botanical dietary supplement, an extract of hops (Humulus lupulus L.) was developed. Although valued in the brewing of beer, hop extracts are used as anxiolytics and hypnotics and have well-established estrogenic constituents. Starting with a hop cultivar used in the brewing industry, spent hops (the residue remaining after extraction of bitter acids) were formulated into a botanical dietary supplement that was then chemically and biologically standardized. Biological standardization utilized the estrogen-dependent induction of alkaline phosphatase in the Ishikawa cell line. Chemical standardization was based on the prenylated phenols in hops that included estrogenic 8-prenylnaringenin, its isomer 6-prenylnaringenin, and pro-estrogenic isoxanthohumol and its isomeric chalcone xanthohumol, all of which were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The product of this process was a reproducible botanical extract suitable for subsequent investigations of safety and efficacy.

  1. Dr. Auzoux's botanical teaching models and medical education at the universities of Glasgow and Aberdeen.

    PubMed

    Olszewski, Margaret Maria

    2011-09-01

    In the 1860s, Dr. Louis Thomas Jérôme Auzoux introduced a set of papier-mâché teaching models intended for use in the botanical classroom. These botanical models quickly made their way into the educational curricula of institutions around the world. Within these institutions, Auzoux's models were principally used to fulfil educational goals, but their incorporation into diverse curricula also suggests they were used to implement agendas beyond botanical instruction. This essay examines the various uses and meanings of Dr. Auzoux's botanical teaching models at the universities of Glasgow and Aberdeen in the nineteenth century. The two main conclusions of this analysis are: (1) investing in prestigious scientific collections was a way for these universities to attract fee-paying students so that better medical accommodation could be provided and (2) models were used to transmit different kinds of botanical knowledge at both universities. The style of botany at the University of Glasgow was offensive and the department there actively embraced and incorporated ideas of the emerging new botany. At Aberdeen, the style of botany was defensive and there was some hesitancy when confronting new botanical ideas.

  2. Free amino acids analysis by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry in several botanicals with antioxidant character.

    PubMed

    Moldoveanu, Serban C; Zhu, Jeff; Qian, Nancy

    2015-07-01

    A novel method based on liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry for the analysis of 19 amino acids in plant materials is described. For the analysis, the plant material is extracted with 0.1 N hydrochloric acid with internal standards present in the extraction solution. The filtered extracts are injected using no clean-up into the liquid chromatographic system coupled with a triple-quadrupole tandem mass spectrometer with an electrospray ionization source. The analytes are separated using ion pair chromatography on a reversed-phase column. The detection is performed in multiple-reaction monitoring positive-ion mode. Quantitation is obtained using calibrations. The validated procedure has been applied for the analysis of amino acids in 18 samples of plant material including botanicals with antioxidant character. The analysis requires 16 min separation time, has excellent precision and accuracy allowing amino acid analysis in a wide range of concentrations.

  3. History of the World Allergy Organization: The World Allergy Organization Congress - XVIII ICACI, Vancouver 2003

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    History of the World Allergy Organization: In 1951, the leaders in allergy from all over the world came together to form the International Association of Allergology and Clinical Immunology (IAACI). For the next 60 years, the allergy world converged at the IAACI triennial meetings, which became biennial in 2003. The international meetings, originally named the International Congress of Allergology and Clinical Immunology (ICACI), are now the World Allergy Congress (WAC) hosted by the World Allergy Organization (WAO). Everyone who has aspired to have worldwide recognition has played a part in IAACI-WAO. The History of the World Allergy Organization traces the global arc of the allergy field over the past 60 years. The current officers of WAO elected to focus on this rich history, inviting prominent leaders who are interested in being part of this history project to write about their time with IAACI-WAO. This series will be presented in Cancún, México as part of the XXII World Allergy Congress (December 4-8, 2011). Leading up to the Congress in Cancún, the World Allergy Organization Journal is presenting segments of the History as part of the "Notes of Allergy Watchers Series." Please enjoy. --Michael A. Kaliner, MD Historian, and Past-President (2006-2007) World Allergy Organization PMID:23282543

  4. Congress and the Army Bridging the Gap.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    f -.U.Th ~ -, * , , - r rr,-.c ~..-. *~r’’- -’ ~ U U .* .-- - * 1U" : ..,.".U"V"~9 3 homeland, deter attack, fight and win if deterrence... leadership must be prepared - . - -t .1~.~ 1~~ - .-v..- - - - - 2.... 5 CHAPTER II CONGRESS AND THE ARMY-HISTORICAL RELATIONS Congress and the Army have been... leadership to work at ways of increasing our credibility and minimizing the skepticism of Congress. Historically speaking, the Army should have the edge

  5. Ghrelin, food intake, and botanical extracts: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Rezaie, Peyman; Mazidi, Mohsen; Nematy, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    A kind of growth hormone secretagogue (GHS), ghrelin, was first isolated from the rat stomach and plays a major role in the activation of the growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a (GHS-R1a) resulting the release of growth hormone (GH). The preproghrelin gene is placed on chromosome 3, at locus 3p25 –2 in humans and constitutes five exons and three introns. Ghrelin is most plentifully expressed in particular cells in the oxyntic glands of the gastric epithelium, initially named X/A-like cells. Almost 60-70% of circulating ghrelin is secreted by the stomach. Plasma ghrelin concentration alters throughout the day. Ghrelin has been suggested to act as a meal initiator because of its appetite-stimulating influences in free feeding rats in short period. In addition to ghrelin’s function as a meal motivator, it seems to contribute in long-term energy balance and nutritional status. In addition, many studies have been carried out in order to investigate the effects of natural and medicinal plants and botanical extracts on appetite, food intake, energy hemostasis, and the level of related hormones including ghrelin. Due to the importance of ghrelin in nutritional and medical sciences, this review was performed to understand new aspects of this hormone’s function. PMID:26445708

  6. Screening Native Botanicals for Bioactivity: An Interdisciplinary Approach

    PubMed Central

    Boudreau, Anik; Cheng, Diana M.; Ruiz, Carmen; Ribnicky, David; Allain, Larry; Brassieur, C. Ray; Turnipseed, D. Phil; Cefalu, William T.; Floyd, Z. Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Objective Plant-based therapies have been used in medicine throughout recorded history. Information about the therapeutic properties of plants can often be found in local cultures as folk medicine is communicated from one generation to the next. Our objective is to identify native Louisiana plants from Creole folk medicine as a potential source of therapeutic compounds for the treatment of insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes and related disorders. Materials and Methods We used an interdisciplinary approach combining expertise in disciplines ranging from cultural anthropology and botany to biochemistry and endocrinology to screen native southwest Louisiana plants. Translation of accounts of Creole folk medicine yielded a list of plants with documented use in treating a variety of conditions, including inflammation. These plants were collected, vouchered and catalogued prior to extraction of the soluble components. The extracts were analyzed for bioactivity in regulating inflammatory responses in macrophages or fatty-acid induced insulin resistance in C2C12 skeletal muscle cells. Results Several extracts altered gene expression of inflammatory markers in macrophages. Multiplex analysis of kinase activation in insulin signaling pathways in skeletal muscle also identified a subset of extracts that alter insulin-stimulated AKT phosphorylation in the presence of fatty acid-induced insulin resistance. Conclusion An interdisciplinary approach to screening botanical sources of therapeutic agents can be successfully applied to identify native plants used in folk medicine as potential sources of therapeutic agents in treating insulin resistance in skeletal muscle or inflammatory processes associated with obesity-related insulin resistance. PMID:24985099

  7. Botanical pharmacognosy of stem of Gmelina asiatica Linn.

    PubMed

    Kannan, R; Prasant, K; Babu, U V

    2012-04-01

    Gmelina asiatica Linn (G. parvifolia Roxb.) is a large shrub or a small tree. Roots and aerial parts are used in Ayurvedic medicine and also have ethno-medical uses. Root is reported as adulterant to G. arborea roxb roots. Pharmacognostical characters of root were reported. Owing to the shortage of genuine drug and ever-increasing demands in market, it becomes necessary to search an alternative with equal efficacy without compromising the therapeutic value. Nowadays, it becomes a common practice of using stem. In case of roots phytochemical and pharmacological analysis of stem was reported. However, there is no report on the pharmacognostical characters of stem and to differentiate it from roots. The present report describes the botanical pharmacognostical characters of stem and a note to differentiate it from root. Hollow pith, faint annual rings in cut ends, alternatively arranged macrosclereids and bundle cap fibers, and presence of abundant starch grains and calcium oxalates in pith and in ray cells are the diagnostic microscopic characters of stem. Stem pieces can be differentiated from roots by absence of tylosis.

  8. International Child Abduction Act. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Administrative Law and Governmental Relations of the Committee on the Judiciary. House of Representatives, One Hundredth Congress, Second Session on H.R. 2673 and H.R. 3971.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on the Judiciary.

    This document contains witnesses' testimonies and prepared statements from the Congressional hearing called to consider enactment of H.R. 2673, a bill to facilitate implementation of the 1980 Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction. The text of H.R. 2673 is included in the document as is the text of H.R. 3971, a bill…

  9. International Education, Foreign Exchange and Scholarships. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Postsecondary Education of the Committee on Education and Labor. House of Representatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, First Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Education and Labor.

    Hearings on international student exchanges are presented. Information is presented on the countries of origin of foreign students in the United States and the fields they tend to study. It is noted that only 2.2 percent of foreign students studying in the United States are provided scholarships by the U.S. Government; the vast majority are…

  10. International Satellite Issues: The Roles of the Executive Branch and FCC. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Telecommunications, Consumer Protection, and Finance of the Committee on Energy and Commerce. House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, First Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Energy and Commerce.

    This hearing addressed the general topic of the role of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) in establishing U.S. policy toward new international communications satellite systems. Statements presented by the following people are included: (1) Mark S. Fowler, Chairman, Federal Communications Commission; (2) David J. Markey, Assistant…

  11. U.S. Participation in International, Scientific, Educational, Cultural, and Communications Fields in the Absence of U.S. Membership in UNESCO. Report prepared for the Subcommittees on Human Rights and International Organizations and on International Operations of the Committee on Foreign Affairs. U.S. House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, First Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library of Congress, Washington, DC. Congressional Research Service.

    This report contains the results of an evaluation of the impact of U.S. withdrawal from UNESCO on various international educational, scientific, and cultural activities. The study was undertaken to assist Congressional subcommittees in considering the Reagan administration's fiscal year 1986-87 requests for contributions to the United Nations'…

  12. PREFACE: 9th World Congress on Computational Mechanics and 4th Asian Pacific Congress on Computational Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalili, N.; Valliappan, S.; Li, Q.; Russell, A.

    2010-07-01

    The use for mathematical models of natural phenomena has underpinned science and engineering for centuries, but until the advent of modern computers and computational methods, the full utility of most of these models remained outside the reach of the engineering communities. Since World War II, advances in computational methods have transformed the way engineering and science is undertaken throughout the world. Today, theories of mechanics of solids and fluids, electromagnetism, heat transfer, plasma physics, and other scientific disciplines are implemented through computational methods in engineering analysis, design, manufacturing, and in studying broad classes of physical phenomena. The discipline concerned with the application of computational methods is now a key area of research, education, and application throughout the world. In the early 1980's, the International Association for Computational Mechanics (IACM) was founded to promote activities related to computational mechanics and has made impressive progress. The most important scientific event of IACM is the World Congress on Computational Mechanics. The first was held in Austin (USA) in 1986 and then in Stuttgart (Germany) in 1990, Chiba (Japan) in 1994, Buenos Aires (Argentina) in 1998, Vienna (Austria) in 2002, Beijing (China) in 2004, Los Angeles (USA) in 2006 and Venice, Italy; in 2008. The 9th World Congress on Computational Mechanics is held in conjunction with the 4th Asian Pacific Congress on Computational Mechanics under the auspices of Australian Association for Computational Mechanics (AACM), Asian Pacific Association for Computational Mechanics (APACM) and International Association for Computational Mechanics (IACM). The 1st Asian Pacific Congress was in Sydney (Australia) in 2001, then in Beijing (China) in 2004 and Kyoto (Japan) in 2007. The WCCM/APCOM 2010 publications consist of a printed book of abstracts given to delegates, along with 247 full length peer reviewed papers published with

  13. 2002 NPDES CSO Report to Congress

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This report, delivered to Congress on January 29, 2002, identifies progress made in implementing and enforcing combined sewer overflow (CSO) controls prior to, and because of, the 1994 CSO control policy.

  14. Energy Crisis Spurs Congress Into Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1973

    1973-01-01

    Discusses legislation recently passed by Congress in response to the energy crisis, and the Nixon Administration's proposal for creating a new Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) and a Nuclear Energy Commission (NEC). (JR)

  15. Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program Reports to Congress

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page includes EPA reports to congress on pesticide licensing and endocrine disruptor screening activities, Endocrine Disruptor Methods Validation Subcomittee (EDMVS) progress, and Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program (EDSP) implementation progress.

  16. 2004 NPDES CSO Report to Congress

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This report, delivered to Congress on Thursday, August 26, 2004, presents a comprehensive characterization of CSOs and SSOs, including the extent of environmental and human health impacts caused by CSOs and SSOs.

  17. World Energy Council 16. Congress review

    SciTech Connect

    Hammons, T.J.; Kim, C.S.; Jennings, J.S.; Fresco, P.; Nasu, S.; Baker, J.

    1996-03-01

    The sixteenth World Energy Council (WEC) Congress was hosted in Tokyo, Japan, October 8--13, 1995, with a theme of ``Energy for Our Common World: What will the future ask of us?`` Participants in the congress examined several fundamental issues of these times: hot to provide the energy services for an increasing world population, especially in developing countries; hot to meet local, regional, and global environmental and social concerns; how to adapt to changing markets and institutions; how to respond to diversified transportation and other end use patterns reflecting human behavior; how to deal with the emerging interdependence of energy markets; and what action to be pursued individually and collectively. This article summarizes the highlights of the congress, and includes an overview of the World Energy Council (WEC), a synopsis of the events, summaries of the technical program division addresses, and a summary of the congress conclusions.

  18. EPA Reports to Congress on Technology Transfer

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Agencies are required to report to the Congress annually on their technology transfer activities. These reports summarize technology transfer activities of the EPA’s federal laboratories, by fiscal year.

  19. Congress approves science agency nominees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    In late July, with the U.S. Congress rushing toward its recess and preparing for the November elections, the Senate confirmed several nominees for key positions in the government. In addition, President Bill Clinton announced his nominee for director of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), a division of the Department of the Interior.The Senate confirmed Neal Lane as director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP). Lane also will serve as assistant to the President for science and technology, provide the President with advice in all areas of science and technology policy, and work to coordinate science, space, and technology policy and programs across the federal government. Lane previously was director of the National Science Foundation.

  20. Working at Congress : a Sandian's experience.

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Matthew

    2009-03-01

    During the 110th Congress (calendar years 2007 and 2008), Matthew Allen, a Sandian nuclear scientist, served as a Congressional Fellow on the Committee on Homeland Security in the House of Representatives. This report is an informative account of the role staffers play in assisting the members of Congress in their oversight and legislative duties. It is also a personal account of Matthew Allen's experience as a committee staffer in the House of Representatives.

  1. Chemometric analysis for identification of botanical raw materials for pharmaceutical use: a case study using Panax notoginseng.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jieqiang; Fan, Xiaohui; Cheng, Yiyu; Agarwal, Rajiv; Moore, Christine M V; Chen, Shaw T; Tong, Weida

    2014-01-01

    The overall control of the quality of botanical drugs starts from the botanical raw material, continues through preparation of the botanical drug substance and culminates with the botanical drug product. Chromatographic and spectroscopic fingerprinting has been widely used as a tool for the quality control of herbal/botanical medicines. However, discussions are still on-going on whether a single technique provides adequate information to control the quality of botanical drugs. In this study, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC), capillary electrophoresis (CE) and near infrared spectroscopy (NIR) were used to generate fingerprints of different plant parts of Panax notoginseng. The power of these chromatographic and spectroscopic techniques to evaluate the identity of botanical raw materials were further compared and investigated in light of the capability to distinguishing different parts of Panax notoginseng. Principal component analysis (PCA) and clustering results showed that samples were classified better when UPLC- and HPLC-based fingerprints were employed, which suggested that UPLC- and HPLC-based fingerprinting are superior to CE- and NIR-based fingerprinting. The UPLC- and HPLC- based fingerprinting with PCA were able to correctly distinguish between samples sourced from rhizomes and main root. Using chemometrics and its ability to distinguish between different plant parts could be a powerful tool to help assure the identity and quality of the botanical raw materials and to support the safety and efficacy of the botanical drug products.

  2. External calibration strategy for trace element quantification in botanical samples by LA-ICP-MS using filter paper.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Matheus A G; Voss, Mônica; Corazza, Gabriela; Flores, Erico M M; Dressler, Valderi L

    2016-01-28

    The use of reference solutions dispersed on filter paper discs is proposed for the first time as an external calibration strategy for matrix matching and determination of As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sr, V and Zn in plants by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). The procedure is based on the use of filter paper discs as support for aqueous reference solutions, which are further evaporated, resulting in solid standards with concentrations up to 250 μg g(-1) of each element. The use of filter paper for calibration is proposed as matrix matched standards due to the similarities of this material with botanical samples, regarding to carbon concentration and its distribution through both matrices. These characteristics allowed the use of (13)C as internal standard (IS) during the analysis by LA-ICP-MS. In this way, parameters as analyte signal normalization with (13)C, carrier gas flow rate, laser energy, spot size, and calibration range were monitored. The calibration procedure using solution deposition on filter paper discs resulted in precision improvement when (13)C was used as IS. The method precision was calculated by the analysis of a certified reference material (CRM) of botanical matrix, considering the RSD obtained for 5 line scans and was lower than 20%. Accuracy of LA-ICP-MS determinations were evaluated by analysis of four CRM pellets of botanical composition, as well as by comparison with results obtained by ICP-MS using solution nebulization after microwave assisted digestion. Plant samples of unknown elemental composition were analyzed by the proposed LA method and good agreement were obtained with results of solution analysis. Limits of detection (LOD) established for LA-ICP-MS were obtained by the ablation of 10 lines on the filter paper disc containing 40 μL of 5% HNO3 (v v(-1)) as calibration blank. Values ranged from 0.05 to 0.81  μg g(-1). Overall, the use of filter paper as support for dried aqueous

  3. Insecticidal properties of a Chenopodium-based botanical.

    PubMed

    Chiasson, H; Vincent, C; Bostanian, N J

    2004-08-01

    The emulsifiable concentrate UDA-245 based on an essential oil extract from Chenopodium ambrosioides variety near ambrosioides, a North American herbaceous plant, was compared with commercially available pesticides for their effectiveness to control green peach aphid, Myzus persicae (Sulzer) (Homoptera: Aphididae), western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), and greenhouse whitefly, Trialeurodes vaporariorium (Westwood) (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae). Side effects on the whitefly parasitoid Encarsia formosa Gahan (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae) also were determined. With green peach aphid, UDA-245 at 0.5% concentration was significantly more effective than the control (water) treatment in a laboratory bioassay and significantly more effective than neem oil and the control treatment and as effective as insecticidal soap in a greenhouse assay. With the western flower thrips, UDA-245 at 0.5% was significantly more effective than neem oil, insecticidal soap and the control treatment in a laboratory bioassay, whereas in a greenhouse assay, UDA-245 at 1.0% was the only treatment that maintained control of the western flower thrips 2 wk after the last treatment period. UDA-245 at 0.5% (laboratory bioassay) was significantly more effective in managing greenhouse whitefly than neem oil, endosulfan, and the control treatment and as effective as insecticidal soap. Insecticidal soap proved to be toxic to the parasitoid E. formosa (71.9% mortality), whereas UDA-245 at 0.5% was not significantly more toxic than the control (11.2 and 4.6% mortality, respectively). Our results suggest that a greenhouse integrated pest management (IPM) program using a botanical such as UDA-245 could effectively control infestations of major pests present while having a negligible effect on biological control agents.

  4. Inflorescence development in petunia: through the maze of botanical terminology.

    PubMed

    Castel, Rob; Kusters, Elske; Koes, Ronald

    2010-05-01

    Flowering plants have developed many ways to arrange their flowers. A flower-bearing branch or system of branches is called an inflorescence. The number of flowers that an inflorescence contains ranges from a single flower to endless flower-clusters. Over the past centuries, botanists have classified inflorescences based on their morphology, which has led to an unfortunate maze of complex botanical terminology. With the rise of molecular developmental biology, research has become increasingly focused on how inflorescences develop, rather than on their morphology. It is the decisions taken by groups of stem cells at the growing tips of shoots, called meristems, on when and where to produce a flower or a shoot that specify the course of inflorescence development. Modelling is a helpful aid to follow the consequences of these decisions for inflorescence development. The so-called transient model can produce the broad inflorescence types: cyme, raceme, and panicle, into which most inflorescences found in nature can be classified. The analysis of several inflorescence branching mutants has led to a solid understanding of cymose inflorescence development in petunia (Petunia hybrida). The cyme of petunia is a distinct body plan compared with the well-studied racemes of Arabidopsis and Antirrhinum, which provides an excellent opportunity to study evolutionary developmental biology (evo-devo) related questions. However, thus far, limited use has been made of this opportunity, which may, at least in part, be due to researchers getting lost in the terminology. Some general issues are discussed here, while focusing on inflorescence development in petunia.

  5. In Vitro Effects of Some Botanicals with Anti-Inflammatory and Antitoxic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Guidetti, Gianandrea; Giovazzino, Angela; Rubino, Valentina; Palatucci, Anna Teresa; Centenaro, Sara; Fraccaroli, Elena; Cortese, Laura; Bonomo, Maria Grazia; Ruggiero, Giuseppina; Canello, Sergio; Terrazzano, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Several extrinsic factors, like drugs and chemicals, can foster autoimmunity. Tetracyclines, in particular oxytetracycline (OTC), appear to correlate with the emergence of immune-mediated diseases. Accumulation of OTC, the elective drug for gastrointestinal and respiratory infectious disease treatment in broiler chickens, was reported in chicken edible tissues and could represent a potential risk for pets and humans that could assume this antibiotic as residue in meat or in meat-derived byproducts. We investigated the in vitro anti-inflammatory properties of a pool of thirteen botanicals as a part of a nutraceutical diet, with proven immunomodulatory activity. In addition, we evaluated the effect of such botanicals in contrasting the in vitro proinflammatory toxicity of OTC. Our results showed a significant reduction in interferon- (INF-) γ production by human and canine lymphocytes in presence of botanicals (⁎p < 0.05). Increased INF-γ production, dependent on 24-hour OTC-incubation of T lymphocytes, was significantly reduced by the coincubation with Haematococcus pluvialis, with Glycine max, and with the mix of all botanicals (⁎p < 0.05). In conclusion, the use of these botanicals was shown to be able to contrast OTC-toxicity and could represent a new approach for the development of functional foods useful to enhance the standard pharmacological treatment in infections as well as in preventing or reducing the emergence of inflammatory diseases. PMID:27597982

  6. In Vitro Effects of Some Botanicals with Anti-Inflammatory and Antitoxic Activity.

    PubMed

    Guidetti, Gianandrea; Di Cerbo, Alessandro; Giovazzino, Angela; Rubino, Valentina; Palatucci, Anna Teresa; Centenaro, Sara; Fraccaroli, Elena; Cortese, Laura; Bonomo, Maria Grazia; Ruggiero, Giuseppina; Canello, Sergio; Terrazzano, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Several extrinsic factors, like drugs and chemicals, can foster autoimmunity. Tetracyclines, in particular oxytetracycline (OTC), appear to correlate with the emergence of immune-mediated diseases. Accumulation of OTC, the elective drug for gastrointestinal and respiratory infectious disease treatment in broiler chickens, was reported in chicken edible tissues and could represent a potential risk for pets and humans that could assume this antibiotic as residue in meat or in meat-derived byproducts. We investigated the in vitro anti-inflammatory properties of a pool of thirteen botanicals as a part of a nutraceutical diet, with proven immunomodulatory activity. In addition, we evaluated the effect of such botanicals in contrasting the in vitro proinflammatory toxicity of OTC. Our results showed a significant reduction in interferon- (INF-) γ production by human and canine lymphocytes in presence of botanicals ((⁎) p < 0.05). Increased INF-γ production, dependent on 24-hour OTC-incubation of T lymphocytes, was significantly reduced by the coincubation with Haematococcus pluvialis, with Glycine max, and with the mix of all botanicals ((⁎) p < 0.05). In conclusion, the use of these botanicals was shown to be able to contrast OTC-toxicity and could represent a new approach for the development of functional foods useful to enhance the standard pharmacological treatment in infections as well as in preventing or reducing the emergence of inflammatory diseases.

  7. Does Concurrent Use of Some Botanicals Interfere with Treatment of Tuberculosis?

    PubMed

    Folk, William R; Smith, Aaron; Song, Hailong; Chuang, Dennis; Cheng, Jianlin; Gu, Zezong; Sun, Grace

    2016-09-01

    Millions of individuals with active TB do not receive recommended treatments, and instead may use botanicals, or use botanicals concurrently with established treatments. Many botanicals protect against oxidative stress, but this can interfere with redox-dependent activation of isoniazid and other prodrugs used for prophylaxis and treatment of TB, as suggested by results of a recent clinical trial of the South African botanical Sutherlandia frutescens (L.) R. Br. (Sutherlandia). Here we provide a brief summary of Sutherlandia's effects upon rodent microglia and neurons relevant to tuberculosis of the central nervous system (CNS-TB). We have observed that ethanolic extracts of Sutherlandia suppress production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in rat primary cortical neurons stimulated by NMDA and also suppress LPS- and interferon γ (IFNγ)-induced ROS and nitric oxide (NO) production by microglial cells. Sutherlandia consumption mitigates microglial activation in the hippocampus and striatum of ischemic brains of mice. RNAseq analysis indicates that Sutherlandia suppresses gene expression of oxidative stress, inflammatory signaling and toll-like receptor pathways that can reduce the host's immune response to infection and reactivation of latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis. As a precautionary measure, we recommend that individuals receiving isoniazid for pulmonary or cerebral TB, be advised not to concurrently use botanicals or dietary supplements having antioxidant activity.

  8. Consumer and farmer safety evaluation of application of botanical pesticides in black pepper crop protection.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Moreno, David; Soffers, Ans E M F; Wiratno; Falke, Hein E; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M; Murk, Albertinka J

    2013-06-01

    This study presents a consumer and farmer safety evaluation on the use of four botanical pesticides in pepper berry crop protection. The pesticides evaluated include preparations from clove, tuba root, sweet flag and pyrethrum. Their safety evaluation was based on their active ingredients being eugenol, rotenone, β-asarone and pyrethrins, respectively. Botanical pesticides from Acorus calamus are of possible concern because of the genotoxic and carcinogenic ingredient β-asarone although estimated margins of exposure (MOE) for consumers indicate a low priority for risk management. For the other three botanical pesticides the margin of safety (MOS) between established acute reference doses and/or acceptable daily intake values and intake estimates for the consumer, resulting from their use as a botanical pesticide are not of safety concern, with the exception for levels of rotenone upon use of tuba root extracts on stored berries. Used levels of clove and pyrethrum as botanical pesticides in pepper berry crop production is not of safety concern for consumers or farmers, whereas for use of tuba root and sweet flag some risk factors were defined requiring further evaluation and/or risk management. It seems prudent to look for alternatives for use of sweet flag extracts containing β-asarone.

  9. Botanical DNA evidence in criminal cases: Knotgrass (Polygonum aviculare L.) as a model species.

    PubMed

    Koopman, Wim J M; Kuiper, Irene; Klein-Geltink, Dick J A; Sabatino, Gerda J H; Smulders, Marinus J M

    2012-05-01

    The possibilities and strategies for using DNA characteristics to link a botanical sample to a specific source plant or location vary with its breeding system. For inbreeding species, which often form small patches of identical genotypes, knotgrass (Polygonum aviculare L.) is a suitable model species because of its (1) occurrence in a wide range of natural environments, (2) abundant presence in pieces of evidence, and (3) ease in molecular processing. The value of knotgrass for forensic casework was demonstrated using data from a homicide case. Using the DNA fingerprinting technique AFLP(®) we were able to identify the knotgrass population at the crime site as the most likely origin of the botanical evidence. We expect that the development of tailored marker systems for knotgrass and other frequently occurring (model) species will considerably accelerate the use of botanical DNA evidence in criminal cases.

  10. Amylopectin small chain glucans form structure fingerprint that determines botanical origin of starch.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Sarita; Chibbar, Ravindra N

    2017-02-20

    Starch granule size, shape and structure of amylopectin are species specific and influence starch properties and end-use of starch. Amylopectin glucan chain structure was used to predict the starch botanical sources. Mathematical probability for accumulation of small glucan chains DP 6-10 reveal exponential fit curve with maximum R(2) in smallest granule size starches (Chlamydomonas, quinoa, buckwheat). Cereal and cassava showed R(2) of 0.81-0.96 while in pulses and tubers it was less than 0.7. The amylopectin small glucan chains form a unique 'finger print region' that identified starch botanical source. Differential amylopectin chain length distribution (APCLD) graphs between DP 6-80 of all species from Chlamydomonas starch distinguished five structural groups that clustered the 31 analyzed starches into four major patterns. APCLD analyses of amylopectin combined with characteristic pattern of small linear DP (6-9) glucan chains predicted the starch botanical source.

  11. The effects of botanical dietary supplements on cardiovascular, cognitive and metabolic function in males and females

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Scott; Peng, Ning; Prasain, Jeevan K.; Wyss, J. Michael

    2009-01-01

    The onset of menopause marks a pivotal time in which the incidence of hypertension and cardiovascular disease begins to increase dramatically in women. Prior to menopause, the incidence of these diseases is significantly lower than in similarly aged men, but following menopause the rates rise rapidly until paralleling that in men. The loss of endogenous estrogen at menopause has traditionally been thought to be the primary factor involved in these changes and resulted in the widespread use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) to reduce cardiovascular risk factors and decrease the affective symptoms of menopause. However, the adverse effects of HRT reported in recent large-scale trials (e.g., the Women’s Health Initiative) have greatly decreased the use of HRT by postmenopausal women. Many women are seeking alternatives to HRT, including the use of dietary supplements that have a long history of use in traditional medicine, particularly in Asia. Examples of frequently used botanicals are soy, black cohosh, red clover, grape derivatives, St. John’s wort, Ginko biloba and Echinacea. While many of these botanicals appear to ameliorate some postmenopausal symptoms (i.e., bone loss, hot flushes/flashes and night sweats), none of the tested botanicals has proven as effective as HRT in decreasing the affective disorders of menopause. Further, despite the increasing usage of botanical supplements, their efficacy and safety have not been well documented by critical research studies. This review summarizes recent findings related to the utility of botanicals for menopause-related cardiovascular and metabolic disorders, specifically hypertension, diabetes, progressive cognitive decline and hyperlipidemia. While great caution should be exercised in the translation of animal findings to the human, these studies, along with those of others, suggest that some commonly used botanical supplements may be useful adjuvants for providing protection to women (and men) against

  12. Target and non-target toxicity of botanical insecticide derived from Couroupita guianensis L. flower against generalist herbivore, Spodoptera litura Fab. and an earthworm, Eisenia foetida Savigny

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Novel chemistries in botanical insecticides may provide alternatives to, or development of synthetic insecticides suitable for controlling the Lepidopteran pests, like Spodoptera litura (F.). Many botanical chemistries are biodegradable, and have lower mammalian toxicity. Eight natural chemical comp...

  13. Education International Annual Report, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education International, Brussels (Belgium).

    In 2001, Education International (EI) achieved a high level of program implementation. This report provides a summary of that action. It is the first annual report and the last dealing with an earlier approach to programming. Following a review of ways of enhancing membership participation, the EI World Congress adopted a new approach to the…

  14. HIV/AIDS in a Puerto Rican/Dominican Community: A Collaborative Project with a Botanical Shop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delgado, Melvin; Santiago, Jorge

    1998-01-01

    Presents an overview of the literature concerning HIV/AIDS in Latino communities in the United States and Puerto Rico. Discusses the presence of botanical shops (where herbal medicines and other healing paraphernalia can be purchased) in Latino culture. Describes Projecto Cooperacion, a project that utilized botanical shops as a means of…

  15. Revised LHC deal quiets congress

    SciTech Connect

    Lawler, A.

    1997-05-23

    The roughest part of the ride may be over for U.S. physicists who want to participate in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the $5 billion accelerator planned for CERN in Geneva. They have found themselves on a political roller coaster for the past few months. This week, U.S. and European negotiators were putting the final touches on a revamped agreement that should pave the way for the United States to help pay for construction of the accelerator and its two main detectors, and guarantee U.S. scientists a role in research on the machine. The trouble began in March, when Representative Joe Barton (R-TX) declared war on a proposed $530 million U.S. contribution to the new facility, slated for completion in 2005. Barton and many other members of Congress were still smarting from what they said was a lack of European support for the canceled Superconducting Super Collider that was being built in Barton`s backyard. Representative James Sensenbrenner (R-WI), who chairs the House Science Committee, led the charge to alter a draft agreement initialed this winter by Department of Energy (DOE) and CERN officials that spelled out the details of U.S. participation. After hurried negotiations, both sides have sharpened the agreement to address the lawmakers` concerns. The new deal, says Energy Secretary Federico Pena, {open_quotes}has made that project even better.{close_quotes}

  16. The NASA budget in Congress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiff, Patricia H.

    I would like to make the members of AGU aware of the recent happenings in Congress with regard to the fiscal year (FY) 1986 budget for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). NASA was scheduled for modest increases from FY 1985 levels in the President's budget (Eos, February 19, 1985, p. 73), which was approved by the House Science and Technology Committee. However, when the authorization bill (H.R. 1714) “hit the floor” on April 3, amendments were offered and overwhelmingly passed to freeze funding at FY 1985 levels. (A similar fate met the National Science Foundation bill, H.R. 1210, on April 17.) The process is under way in the Senate, and the Subcommittee on Science, Technology, and Space, which is the authorizing committee (under the chairmanship of Slade Gorton), plans to mark up its NASA bill in the next few days; the full committee—the Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee—will then offer it to the floor.

  17. 32 CFR 700.304 - Recommendations to Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Recommendations to Congress. 700.304 Section 700... The Secretary of the Navy § 700.304 Recommendations to Congress. After first informing the Secretary of Defense, the Secretary of the Navy may make such recommendations to Congress relating to...

  18. 32 CFR 700.304 - Recommendations to Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Recommendations to Congress. 700.304 Section 700... The Secretary of the Navy § 700.304 Recommendations to Congress. After first informing the Secretary of Defense, the Secretary of the Navy may make such recommendations to Congress relating to...

  19. 32 CFR 700.304 - Recommendations to Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Recommendations to Congress. 700.304 Section 700... The Secretary of the Navy § 700.304 Recommendations to Congress. After first informing the Secretary of Defense, the Secretary of the Navy may make such recommendations to Congress relating to...

  20. 32 CFR 700.304 - Recommendations to Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Recommendations to Congress. 700.304 Section 700... The Secretary of the Navy § 700.304 Recommendations to Congress. After first informing the Secretary of Defense, the Secretary of the Navy may make such recommendations to Congress relating to...

  1. 32 CFR 700.304 - Recommendations to Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Recommendations to Congress. 700.304 Section 700... The Secretary of the Navy § 700.304 Recommendations to Congress. After first informing the Secretary of Defense, the Secretary of the Navy may make such recommendations to Congress relating to...

  2. PREFACE: XVII Congress of Bioengineering and VI Clinical Engineering Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, Darío

    2011-09-01

    SABI 2009 was the XVII Biennial Congress of the Argentinean Bioengineering Society (SABI - www.sabi.org.ar), celebrated along with the VI Clinical Engineering Conference. It took place in Rosario, the second city of Argentina, located on the west bank of the Paraná, one of the world's most important rivers. This city, with its 150 year history and one million inhabitants, is characterized by a strong enterprising spirit. It is the agroindustrial leader of Argentina, with cereal ports recognized to be among the most active in the world, and its cereal stock exchange competes with Chicago's in international cereal pricing. Demographically Rosario presents a European profile, and there are seven national and private higher level universities in the area. SABI 2009 was the first time the Congress was celebrated in Rosario. Usually the Congress is organized by the Bioengineering Society in cooperation with a university with an undergraduate program, which Rosario lacks. To meet the needs of this exceptional case, a young local institution was asked to coordinate the Congress, the Rosario Technological Center (www.polotecnologico.net). This organization gathers together around 100 companies that produce technology, with a large number focused on IT, but those focused on biotechnology also stand out. The Center is also integrated with relevant public and government bodies. Traditionally, bioengineering has been related to human health applications, with less emphasis on applications significant to agrotechnology, an area in which Rosario is growing as an economic force. In order to address this oversight, the Congress formulated its main goals for integrating and synergizing bioengineering and biotechnology, particularly bioengineering and agrotechnology. This initiative has produced promising results. The importance of the Congress was reflected in the high number of participants - including researchers, professionals and students - from abroad, with participants from

  3. Chemistry of Atmospheric Aerosols at Pacifichem 2015 Congress

    SciTech Connect

    Nizkorodov, Sergey

    2016-12-28

    This grant was used to provide participant support for a symposium entitled “Chemistry of Atmospheric Aerosols” at the 2015 International Chemical Congress of Pacific Basin Societies (Pacifichem) that took place in Honolulu, Hawaii, USA, on December 15-20, 2015. The objective was to help attract both distinguished scientists as well as more junior researchers, including graduate students, to this international symposium by reducing the financial barrier for its attendance. It was the second time a symposium devoted to Atmospheric Aerosols was part of the Pacifichem program. This symposium provided a unique opportunity for the scientists from different countries to gather in one place and discuss the cutting edge advances in the cross-disciplinary areas of aerosol research. To achieve the highest possible impact, the PI and the symposium co-organizers actively advertised the symposium by e-mail and by announcements at other conferences. A number of people responded, and the end result was a very busy program with about 100 oral and poster presentation described in the attached PDF file. Presentations by invited speakers occupied approximately 30% of time in each of the sessions. In addition to the invited speakers, each session also had contributed presentations, including those by graduate students and postdoctoral researchers. This symposium gathered established aerosol chemists from a number of countries including United States, Canada, China, Japan, Korea, Australia, Brazil, Hongkong, Switzerland, France, and Germany. There were plenty of time for the attendees to discuss new ideas and potential collaborations both during the oral sessions and at the poster sessions of the symposium. The symposium was very beneficial to graduate student researchers, postdoctoral fellows, and junior researchers whose prior exposure to international aerosol chemistry science had been limited. The symposium provided junior researchers with a much broader perspective of aerosol

  4. Public Laws of the 98th Congress Relating to Information Policy. Report No. 85-215 S.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milevski, Sandra N.

    This study enumerates statutes of the 98th Congress treating information-related concerns. Limited to public laws of a substantive nature, the topical overview of areas of congressional concern is divided into nine sections: (1) Federal Information Resources Management; (2) International Communications and Information Policy; (3)…

  5. Simulation of a Congress at the Chair of Biology II in Bioengineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naranjo, A. V.; Reznichenco, V.; López, N.; Hernández, R.; Bajinay, S.

    2007-11-01

    This work has been developed in the Chair of Biology II, the curricular contents of which correspond to Human Anatomy. This subject is taught in the second semester of the second year of studies in Bioengineering. Our main objective is that the students attending the course may integrate the syllabus contents of Anatomy with those of other subjects in the career. Ever since 1998 we have organized a congress named Congreso Intracátedra de Biología II (Intra Chair Congress on Biology II). This is the last assignment in the semester and is compulsory for regular students of the subject. It consists in simulating a scientific congress with international characteristics. The guidelines for the congress are made known to the students at the beginning of the semester. In groups of up to three members, the students must undertake a work that relates aspects of Anatomy with Bioengineering. Students are expected to investigate on diagnostic and/or therapeutic technology in order to write a paper that must be accepted in advance of the event. The presentation of the work must be made through PowerPoint. The originality of the research work done and the wide range of topics selected are surprising. Problems are tackled from the standpoints both of the various medical fields and of bioengineering despite the fact that they are just students of the second year in Bioengineering.

  6. Goldwater-Nichols at 30: Defense Reform and Issues for Congress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-02

    as well as the broader organization and structure of the contemporary Department of Defense (DOD) more broadly. Most observers agree that in...fundamental, “first order” questions appear to be driving the current examination of DOD’s structure . These include, but are not limited to the following...review of its internal structures , and plans to present suggested legislative changes to Congress in the coming weeks and months. 2 Among defense

  7. Semiannual Report to Congress on the Effectiveness of the Civil Aviation Security Program.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-30

    and airport security measures in effect. Section V of this report provides a smry of firearms which were detected at screening points under suspicious...with the Secretary of State concerning threats, and (3) the inclusion of a sumnmary on foreign airport security in the Semiannual Report to Congress on...International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) to embark inediately upon an intensified program aimed at responding to the need for enhanced airport security . As

  8. EDITORIAL: Sixth World Congress on Industrial Process Tomography (WCIPT6) Sixth World Congress on Industrial Process Tomography (WCIPT6)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takei, Masahiro; Xu, Lijun

    2011-10-01

    We are pleased to publish this special feature on the Sixth World Congress on Industrial Process Tomography (WCIPT6) in Measurement Science and Technology. The international congress was successfully held in the campus of Beihang University, Beijing, China, from 6-9 September 2010. It was jointly organized by International Society for Industrial Process Tomography (ISIPT), North China Electric Power University (NCEPU) and Beihang University (BUAA). Process tomography is a tangible tool to visualize and determine the material distribution inside a process non-intrusively in real time. The internal features that can be monitored by process tomography are frequently encountered and required in the design of processes and industrial plants in the fields of chemical, oil, power and metallurgical engineering as well as many other activities such as food, material handling and combustion systems. One of the key characteristics of process tomography is to provide a direct impression and instant and clear understanding of a complex phenomenon. From the viewpoint of practical applications, industries all over the world are currently facing a number of daunting challenges including many wide-range and complex technical problems. The innovative technology of process tomography consistently contributes to providing better and better solutions to the problems as 'seeing is believing'. As a regular event, WCIPT is playing a more and more important role in addressing the challenges to overcome these problems. We are glad to see that this special feature provides a great opportunity for world-wide top-level researchers to discuss and make further developments in process tomography and its applications. The 20 articles included in this issue cover a wide range of relevant topics including sensors and sensing mechanisms, data acquisition systems and instrumentation, electrical, optical, acoustic and hybrid systems, image reconstruction and system evaluation, data and sensor fusion

  9. Library of Congress Model, Anaglyph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) has produced the first high-resolution, near-global elevation dataset of Earth. In recognition of this achievement, and as an illustration of the data, the United States Library of Congress now displays a 'solid terrain model' of Los Angeles and adjacent mountainous terrain. The model was created by carving a high-density foam block using computer-guided drills that referenced the SRTM dataset. The block was then covered with a Landsat satellite image using computer-guided paint guns that referenced both the Landsat image and the SRTM dataset. The view shown here mimics the actual model on display at the Library of Congress and was generated from the same satellite image and elevation data sets.

    Anaglyph glasses are required to see this view in three-dimensions. Anaglyph glasses cover the left eye with a red filter and cover the right eye with a blue filter.

    The model shows the Pacific Ocean and Santa Monica Mountains along the Malibu Coast (lower left), San Fernando Valley (left center), downtown Los Angeles (bottom center), San Gabriel and Pomona Valleys (lower right), San Gabriel Mountains (right center to far right), and part of the Mojave Desert (upper right). Colors are enhanced true color with added topographic shading, and elevation differences are exaggerated 1.5 times. The view is toward the north-northwest.

    The Los Angeles region was chosen for the Library of Congress model because it illustrates so many ways that topography affects the daily lives of people. The region consists of a coastal plain, inland valleys, mountains up to 3068 meters (10,064 feet), and a desert interior. Topography blocks the landward influence of marine airmasses here such that summer temperatures often differ by 40 degrees Fahrenheit (22 C) across this region at a given moment even at similar elevations. Temperatures also typically cool with rising elevation, and winter storms drop most of their moisture in the

  10. Library of Congress Model, Anaglyph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) has produced the first high-resolution, near-global elevation dataset of Earth. In recognition of this achievement, and as an illustration of the data, the United States Library of Congress now displays a 'solid terrain model' of Los Angeles and adjacent mountainous terrain. The model was created by carving a high-density foam block using computer-guided drills that referenced the SRTM dataset. The block was then covered with a Landsat satellite image using computer-guided paint guns that referenced both the Landsat image and the SRTM dataset. The view shown here mimics the actual model on display at the Library of Congress and was generated from the same satellite image and elevation data sets.

    Anaglyph glasses are required to see this view in three-dimensions. Anaglyph glasses cover the left eye with a red filter and cover the right eye with a blue filter.

    The model shows the Pacific Ocean and Santa Monica Mountains along the Malibu Coast (lower left), San Fernando Valley (left center), downtown Los Angeles (bottom center), San Gabriel and Pomona Valleys (lower right), San Gabriel Mountains (right center to far right), and part of the Mojave Desert (upper right). Colors are enhanced true color with added topographic shading, and elevation differences are exaggerated 1.5 times. The view is toward the north-northwest.

    The Los Angeles region was chosen for the Library of Congress model because it illustrates so many ways that topography affects the daily lives of people. The region consists of a coastal plain, inland valleys, mountains up to 3068 meters (10,064 feet), and a desert interior. Topography blocks the landward influence of marine airmasses here such that summer temperatures often differ by 40 degrees Fahrenheit (22 C) across this region at a given moment even at similar elevations. Temperatures also typically cool with rising elevation, and winter storms drop most of their moisture in the

  11. International Travel by Congress: Legislation in the 111th Congress, Background, and Potential Policy Options

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-31

    16 Brazil 16 Czech Republic 16 El Salvador 16 Guatemala 16 Hungary 16 India 16 Ireland 16 Japan 16 Jordan 16 Peru 16 Poland 16 Russia 16...Africa, Republic of 17 44 Spain 16 43 India 16 42 Australia 16 41 Egypt 17 41 Czech Republic 16 40 Hong Kong 17 40 Hungary 16 40 Netherlands...Angola Dominican Republic Kyrgyzstan Qatar Antarctica East Timora Laos Romania Antigua and Barbuda Ecuador Latvia Russia Argentina Egypt Lebanon

  12. A Garden of Stories: An English Lesson in a Botanical Garden

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazor, Rachel

    2011-01-01

    Five middle school teachers are among the few people wandering around the Brooklyn Botanic Garden, squinting at labels describing the plants that will bloom soon. The author and her colleagues are on a reconnaissance mission, trying to plan an interdisciplinary field trip for the seventh grade. They represent different departments--science, math,…

  13. An Improved Botanical Search Application for Middle-and High-School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kajiyama, Tomoko

    2016-01-01

    A previously reported botanical data retrieval application has been improved to make it better suited for use in middle-and high-school science classes. This search interface is ring-structured and treats multi-faceted metadata intuitively, enabling students not only to search for plant names but also to learn about the morphological features and…

  14. Breast cancer survivors who use estrogenic botanical supplements have lower serum estrogen levels than non users

    PubMed Central

    Wayne, Sharon J; Neuhouser, Marian L; Koprowski, Carol; Ulrich, Cornelia M; Wiggins, Charles; Gilliland, Frank; Baumgartner, Kathy B; Baumgartner, Richard N; McTiernan, Anne; Bernstein, Leslie; Ballard-Barbash, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    Objective To measure the association between use of estrogenic botanical supplements and serum sex hormones in postmenopausal breast cancer survivors. Methods 502 postmenopausal women were queried 2-3 years after breast cancer diagnosis about their use of botanical supplements, and supplements were categorized according to their estrogenic properties. Concurrently, a fasting blood sample was obtained for assay of estrone, estradiol, free estradiol, testosterone, free testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) and sex hormone-binding globulin. Adjusted means of the serum hormones were calculated by use of estrogenic supplements. Results Women reporting use of any estrogenic botanical supplement had significantly lower levels of estrone (20.8 v 23.6 pg/mL), estradiol (12.8 v 14.7 pg/mL), free estradiol (0.29 v 0.35 pg/mL), and DHEAS (47.7 v 56.2 ug/dL) compared to women reporting no use. Conclusion Data from this cross-sectional study suggest the use of estrogenic botanical supplements may be associated with sex hormone concentrations in breast cancer survivors. Considering the high use of these supplements among breast cancer patients, further research is needed to clarify the relative estrogenicity/antiestrogenicity of these compounds and their relation with prognosis. PMID:18931907

  15. The Acquisition and Transfer of Botanical Classification by Elementary Science Methods Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knapp, Clifford Edward

    Investigated were two questions related to the acquisition and transfer of botanical classification skill by elementary science methods students. Data were collected from a sample of 89 students enrolled in methods courses. Sixty-two students served as the experimental sample, and 27 served as the control for the transfer portion of the research.…

  16. Up the Garden Path: A Chemical Trail through the Cambridge University Botanic Garden

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Battle, Gary M.; Kyd, Gwenda O.; Groom, Colin R.; Allen, Frank H.; Day, Juliet; Upson, Timothy

    2012-01-01

    The living world is a rich source of chemicals with many medicines, dyes, flavorings, and foodstuffs having their origins in compounds produced by plants. We describe a chemical trail through the plant holdings of the Cambridge University Botanic Gardens. Visitors to the gardens are provided with a laminated trail guide with 22 stopping points…

  17. The Plant Information Center (PIC): A Web-Based Learning Center for Botanical Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, J.; Daniel, E.; Massey, J.; White, P.

    The Plant Information Center (PIC) is a project funded under the Institute of Museum and Library Studies that aims to provide global access to both primary and secondary botanical resources via the World Wide Web. Central to the project is the development and employment of a series of applications that facilitate resource discovery, interactive…

  18. A Botanical Treasure Hunt: A Fun and Educational Tree Identification Exercise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Marty; Gaynor, John J.; Cribben, Larry

    1998-01-01

    Shares an approach to tree identification that can be adapted to use with all levels from middle school through college. Stresses student involvement and cooperation in a botanical scavenger hunt. Describes the development of the treasure map and how to use the guide sheet. (DDR)

  19. [A historical review of the therapeutic use of wood creosote based on its botanical origin].

    PubMed

    Moriguchi, Nobuaki; Sato, Akane; Kimura, Masuo; Shibata, Takashi; Yoneda, Yukio

    2007-01-01

    After thoroughly studying the chronology of the therapeutic use of wood creosote, we obtained novel findings on its botanical origin. Furthermore, we could demonstrate the importance of differentiating between wood creosote and coal tar creosote, which is clearly stipulated by Japanese Pharmacopoeia.

  20. ENVIRONMENTAL CONTAMINANTS IN BOTANICAL DIETARY SUPPLEMENT GINSENG AND POTENTIAL HUMAN HEALTH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Botanical dietary supplements have a long history of use in Europe and Asia, but the use of these products is becoming increasingly popular in the United States. Because these products are classified as dietary supplements, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration does not routinely...

  1. APPROACH FOR ASSESSING RISK OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONTAMINANTS PRESENT IN BOTANICAL DIETARY SUPPLEMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Botanical dietary supplements have a long history of use in Europe and China, but they are becoming increasing popular in the United States. Since these products are classified as herbals, the United States Food and Drug Administration does not regulate nor monitor these suppleme...

  2. 36 CFR 223.278 - Sale of forest botanical products and collection of fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sale of forest botanical products and collection of fees. 223.278 Section 223.278 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SALE AND DISPOSAL OF NATIONAL FOREST SYSTEM TIMBER, SPECIAL FOREST PRODUCTS,...

  3. 36 CFR 223.278 - Sale of forest botanical products and collection of fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sale of forest botanical products and collection of fees. 223.278 Section 223.278 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SALE AND DISPOSAL OF NATIONAL FOREST SYSTEM TIMBER, SPECIAL FOREST PRODUCTS,...

  4. 36 CFR 223.278 - Sale of forest botanical products and collection of fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sale of forest botanical products and collection of fees. 223.278 Section 223.278 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SALE AND DISPOSAL OF NATIONAL FOREST SYSTEM TIMBER, SPECIAL FOREST PRODUCTS,...

  5. 36 CFR 223.278 - Sale of forest botanical products and collection of fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sale of forest botanical products and collection of fees. 223.278 Section 223.278 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SALE AND DISPOSAL OF NATIONAL FOREST SYSTEM TIMBER, SPECIAL FOREST PRODUCTS,...

  6. Development of botanical principles for clinical use in cancer: where are we lacking?

    PubMed

    Poojari, R J; Patil, A G; Gota, V S

    2012-01-01

    Development of drugs from plant sources (botanicals) for the treatment of cancer has not been successful in India, despite a plethora of medicinal plants and an equal number of experiments demonstrating anti-cancer activity of plant principles in vitro. There are several pitfalls in our approach to botanical drug development. Foremost is the lack of industry-academia collaborations in this field. Research goals in Indian academic institutions are generally short-term and mostly aimed at fulfilling the minimum requirements of a doctoral/MD or MPharm thesis. Secondly, quality assurance of herbal formulations is difficult to achieve and good manufacturing practices are expensive to implement. This could introduce bias during the biological evaluation of botanicals. A systematic approach covering a wide range of investigations including but not limited to mechanistic studies, potential herb-drug interactions, pharmacokinetics and bioavailability could help in the optimization of herbal formulations in the preclinical stage of development before they can be considered for clinical trials. Government initiatives such as Ayurveda, Unani, Siddha and Homeopathic have encouraged research in these areas, but are insufficient to promote focused and aggressive evaluation of potential herbs. Particular emphasis should be given to clinical pharmacokinetics, drug interactions and clinical trials in specific cancers for the evaluation of dosage, safety, efficacy and concomitant use with chemotherapy. Only such policies can result in meaningful evaluation of botanicals for cancer therapy.

  7. Carl Linnaeus, Erasmus Darwin and Anna Seward: Botanical Poetry and Female Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Sam

    2014-03-01

    This article will explore the intersection between `literature' and `science' in one key area, the botanical poem with scientific notes. It reveals significant aspects of the way knowledge was gendered in the Enlightenment, which is relevant to the present-day education of girls in science. It aims to illustrate how members of the Lichfield Botanical Society (headed by Erasmus Darwin) became implicated in debates around the education of women in Linnaean botany. The Society's translations from Linnaeus inspired a new genre of women's educational writing, the botanical poem with scientific notes, which emerged at this time. It focuses in particular on a poem by Anna Seward and argues that significant problems regarding the representation of the Linnaean sexual system of botany are found in such works and that women in the culture of botany struggled to give voice to a subject which was judged improper for female education. The story of this unique poem and the surrounding controversies can teach us much about how gender impacted upon women's scientific writing in eighteenth century Britain, and how it shaped the language and terminology of botany in works for female education. In particular, it demonstrates how the sexuality of plants uncovered by Linnaeus is a paradigmatic illustration of how societal forces can simultaneously both constrict and stimulate women's involvement in science. Despite the vast changes to women's access in scientific knowledge of the present day, this `fair sexing' of botany illustrates the struggle that women have undergone to give voice to their botanical knowledge.

  8. Influence of botanic origin and amylose content on the morphology of starch nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeCorre, Déborah; Bras, Julien; Dufresne, Alain

    2011-12-01

    Starch nanocrystals (SNC) are crystalline platelets resulting from the disruption of the semi-crystalline structure of starch granules by the acid hydrolysis of amorphous parts. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of botanic origin and amylose content of native starches on the morphology and properties of resulting nanoparticles. SNC were prepared from five different starches normal maize, high amylose maize, waxy maize, potato, and wheat; covering three botanic origins, two crystalline types, and three range of amylose content (0, 25, and 70%) for maize starch. Different types of nanocrystals were obtained with a thickness ranging between 4 and 8 nm and diameter from about 50 to 120 nm depending on the source. The comparison of their morphology, crystallinity, and rheological properties is proposed for the first time. For the same amylose content, maize, potato, and wheat resulted in rather similar size and crystallinity of SNC proving the limited influence of the botanic origin. For the same botanic origin (maize), differences in size were more important indicating the influence of the amylopectin content. Also, particles tended to show square shapes with increasing native starch's amylopectin content and A-type crystalinity. Thus, only high amylose content starches should be avoided to prepare SNC.

  9. Carl Linnaeus, Erasmus Darwin and Anna Seward: Botanical Poetry and Female Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, Sam

    2014-01-01

    This article will explore the intersection between "literature" and "science" in one key area, the botanical poem with scientific notes. It reveals significant aspects of the way knowledge was gendered in the Enlightenment, which is relevant to the present-day education of girls in science. It aims to illustrate how members of…

  10. Botanical drugs, synergy, and network pharmacology: forth and back to intelligent mixtures.

    PubMed

    Gertsch, Jürg

    2011-07-01

    For centuries the science of pharmacognosy has dominated rational drug development until it was gradually substituted by target-based drug discovery in the last fifty years. Pharmacognosy stems from the different systems of traditional herbal medicine and its "reverse pharmacology" approach has led to the discovery of numerous pharmacologically active molecules and drug leads for humankind. But do botanical drugs also provide effective mixtures? Nature has evolved distinct strategies to modulate biological processes, either by selectively targeting biological macromolecules or by creating molecular promiscuity or polypharmacology (one molecule binds to different targets). Widely claimed to be superior over monosubstances, mixtures of bioactive compounds in botanical drugs allegedly exert synergistic therapeutic effects. Despite evolutionary clues to molecular synergism in nature, sound experimental data are still widely lacking to support this assumption. In this short review, the emerging concept of network pharmacology is highlighted, and the importance of studying ligand-target networks for botanical drugs is emphasized. Furthermore, problems associated with studying mixtures of molecules with distinctly different pharmacodynamic properties are addressed. It is concluded that a better understanding of the polypharmacology and potential network pharmacology of botanical drugs is fundamental in the ongoing rationalization of phytotherapy.

  11. Nuclear regulatory legislation, 104th Congress. Volume 2, No. 4

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-01

    This document is the second of two volumes compiling statutes and material pertaining to nuclear regulatory legislation through the 104th Congress, 2nd Session. It is intended for use as a U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) internal resource document. Legislative information reproduced in this document includes portions of the Paperwork Reduction Act, various acts pertaining to low-level radioactive waste, the Clean Air Act, the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, the National Environmental Policy Act, the Hazardous Materials Transportation Act, the West Valley Demonstration Project Act, Nuclear Non-Proliferation and Export Licensing Statutes, and selected treaties, agreements, and executive orders. Other information provided pertains to Commissioner tenure, NRC appropriations, the Chief Financial Officers Act, information technology management reform, and Federal civil penalties.

  12. Thirtieth Annual Congress on Veterinary Acupuncture: IVAS Report

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    More than 155 participants from 25 countries attended the 30th Annual IVAS Congress, September 8–11, 2004 in Oostende, Belgium. The focus was on veterinary acupuncture (AP) and immunology, and the event was sponsored by the International Veterinary Acupuncture Society (IVAS). IVAS is a non-profit organization dedicated to promoting excellence in the practice of veterinary AP as an integral part of the total veterinary health care delivery system. The Society endeavors to establish uniformly high standards of veterinary AP through its educational programs and accreditation examination. IVAS seeks to integrate veterinary AP and the practice of Western veterinary science, while also noting that the science of veterinary AP does not overlook allied health systems, such as homeopathy, herbology, nutrition, chiropractic, kinesiology, etc. ().

  13. Report to Congress on ocean dumping, 1987-1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    The Report to Congress summarizes the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) activities in carrying out its responsibilities under Title I of the Marine Protection, Research, and Sanctuaries Act (MPRSA) and its 1988 amendment, the Ocean Dumping Ban Act (ODBA). ODBA makes the ocean dumping of industrial waste and municipal sewage sludge unlawful after December 31, 1991. EPA's Office of Water (OW) in conjunction with EPA Regional Offices have responsibilities under MPRSA to regulate and monitor ocean disposal of municipal sewage sludge, industrial waste, and dredged materials as well as incineration-at-sea. In addition to administering MPRSA and ODBA, OW: (1) continued its participation in the work of the London Dumping Convention (LDC), the international agreement that addresses the dumping of wastes into the marine environment; (2) continued monitoring and public education activities aboard the Ocean Survey Vessel PETER W. ANDERSON; and (3) collaborated in programs with other organizations involved in marine protection.

  14. American Sculpture and the Library of Congress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Somma, Thomas P.

    2010-01-01

    The Thomas Jefferson Building of the Library of Congress is one of the more significant public structures in American architecture, due for the most part to its wealth and quality of decoration, including an extensive sculptural program executed in 1894-97. The architects entrusted the program to a committee of three prominent sculptors, J. Q. A.…

  15. Punctuation in Library of Congress Subject Headings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinweg, Hilda

    1978-01-01

    An analysis of the punctuation of the eighth edition Library of Congress Subject Headings reveals that the hyphen, coma and parentheses are most often used. Examples of these and the use of the apostrophe, dash, and period are discussed. (Author/MBR)

  16. Math-Science Bills Advance in Congress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoff, David J.; Cavanagh, Sean

    2007-01-01

    Improving K-12 instruction and student achievement in mathematics and science is at the heart of separate bills intended to bolster America's economic standing that won overwhelming approval in both houses of Congress last week. The House on April 24 approved the 10,000 Teachers, 10 Million Minds Science and Math Scholarship Act by a vote of…

  17. Groups concerned about Congress and criticism

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, A.

    1994-12-07

    Environmental groups are concerned about the impact a Republican-dominated Congress will have on their activities. The Republican agenda would {open_quotes}severely undercut public health and environmental protection, {close_quotes} says the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC; Washington).

  18. Experiments in Automatic Library of Congress Classification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Ray R.

    1992-01-01

    Presents the results of research into the automatic selection of Library of Congress Classification numbers based on the titles and subject headings in MARC records from a test database at the University of California at Berkeley Library School library. Classification clustering and matching techniques are described. (44 references) (LRW)

  19. Navy Ship Names: Background for Congress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-26

    principal cities and towns. A law approved in 1858 (Act of June 12, 1858, c. 153, §5, 11 Stat. 319) provided a similar rule for “ steamships of the...similar to those above, varying slightly depending on whether the vessel was a sailing ship or a steamship . In 1898, Congress passed a law (Act of May 4

  20. Navy Ship Names: Background for Congress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    principal cities and towns. A law approved in 1858 (Act of June 12, 1858, c. 153, §5, 11 Stat. 319) provided a similar rule for “ steamships of the navy...above, varying slightly depending on whether the vessel was a sailing ship or a steamship . In 1898, Congress passed a law (Act of May 4, 1898, c. 234

  1. Navy Ship Names: Background for Congress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-06

    cities and towns. A law approved in 1858 (Act of June 12, 1858, c. 153, §5, 11 Stat. 319) provided a similar rule for “ steamships of the navy...those above, varying slightly depending on whether the vessel was a sailing ship or a steamship . In 1898, Congress passed a law (Act of May 4, 1898, c

  2. Navy Ship Names: Background for Congress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    June 12, 1858, c. 153, §5, 11 Stat. 319) provided a similar rule for “ steamships of the navy,” except that third-class vessels (those with fewer than...the vessel was a sailing ship or a steamship . In 1898, Congress passed a law (Act of May 4, 1898, c. 234, 30 Stat. 390 [appropriations for the naval

  3. Legislative Priorities for the 105th Congress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of State Directors of Vocational Technical Education Consortium.

    The National Association of State Directors of Vocational Technical Education Consortium (NASDVTEC) supports enactment of legislation that is dedicated solely to vocational-technical education (VTE). NASDVTEC urges the 105th Congress to build on the existing foundation of a strong state role in VTE by drafting legislation that achieves the…

  4. IT Strategy for the Library of Congress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inouye, Alan

    2000-01-01

    Presents an abstract for a planned technical session to discuss the report of the Committee on the Information Technology Strategy of the Library of Congress, developed by the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board of the National Academies. Highlights include digital information, Web links, preservation, and the management of libraries.…

  5. World Geothermal Congress WGC-2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomarov, G. V.; Shipkov, A. A.

    2016-08-01

    This article discusses materials and results of the World Geothermal Congress that was held in Melbourne (Australia) from April 19 to April 25, 2015. Information on the extent and technological features of utilization of geothermal resources for heat supply and power production, as well as in other economic areas, is given. A stable growth in the capacity and number of geothermal power systems that is determined by ecological cleanliness, economic efficiency, and the highest (among renewable energy sources) indicators of installed capacity utilization is shown. It was noted that combined schemes of geothermal power plants (GPPs), such as turbine units of different type (binary units, units with one or two separation pressures, etc.), have become more frequently used to increase the efficiency of utilization of geothermal heat carrier. Actual data determining room heating systems with the total worldwide capacity of nearly 50000 MW thermal (MWt) as the most currently significant segment of consumption of geothermal waters are given. In addition, geothermal resources are also utilized in soil pumps, balneological and sports basins, greenhouse complexes, and other manufactures. It was noted that geological studies were carried out in more than 40 countries, with the development of methods of simulation of tanks for the existing and new geothermal fields. Trends of development and the role of geothermal power engineering in the energy supply of many countries are shown. It was shown that prospects for the development of geothermal power generation are significantly associated with utilization of low-temperature geothermal sources in binary power generating units, as well as with the increase in installed capacity of operating geothermal power plants (GPPs) without drilling additional wells, i.e., by using waste geothermal heat carrier in binary-cycle or combined-cycle power plants. The article provides data on a pilot binary power unit at Pauzhetka GPP and on a

  6. How to interact with Congress about Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orbach, Raymond

    The role of Congress is critical to the succes of the scientific enterprise, both in terms of authorization and appropriation. As a consequence, it is very important to make the case for science directly with Congress. Every scientist has a representative in the House of Representatives in whose district he/she lives, and in the Senate. Constituents are especially welcomed in their offices. A personal visit is the most effective means for transmitting the importance of science in general, and physics in particular. The AAAS website lists the ``Top Ten Rules for Working With Congress.'' They are: (1) Know your goal; (2) Understand how Congress works; (3) Conduct detailed background research; (4) Determine the timing of your course of action; (5) Be clear and succinct; (6) Understand Congressional staff and their influence; (7) Provide concrete suggestions; (8) Present support of science as a means to meet national and local goals, not as an entitlement; (9)Be willing to say ``I don't know'' and (10) Follow up appropriately. Each of these will be described in more detail during the presentation. The March Meeting is an example of a particularly important time period for meeting with representatives (Rule #4). The President's Budget Request has been submitted to Congress, and the individual appropriation subcommittees are in the process of developing their respective ``mark ups.'' Appointments with members or their staff is now timely, and urgent. Authorization bills are also in play, and can have significant impact on the scientific community. Paying attention to their development in key committees (e.g. the Science, Space, and Technology Committee of the House of Representatives), and providing appropriate and timely input, is the responsibility of every scientist.

  7. Global Genome Biodiversity Network: saving a blueprint of the Tree of Life – a botanical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Seberg, O.; Droege, G.; Barker, K.; Coddington, J. A.; Funk, V.; Gostel, M.; Petersen, G.; Smith, P. P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Genomic research depends upon access to DNA or tissue collected and preserved according to high-quality standards. At present, the collections in most natural history museums do not sufficiently address these standards, making them often hard or impossible to use for whole-genome sequencing or transcriptomics. In response to these challenges, natural history museums, herbaria, botanical gardens and other stakeholders have started to build high-quality biodiversity biobanks. Unfortunately, information about these collections remains fragmented, scattered and largely inaccessible. Without a central registry or even an overview of relevant institutions, it is difficult and time-consuming to locate the needed samples. Scope The Global Genome Biodiversity Network (GGBN) was created to fill this vacuum by establishing a one-stop access point for locating samples meeting quality standards for genome-scale applications, while complying with national and international legislations and conventions. Increased accessibility to genomic samples will further genomic research and development, conserve genetic resources, help train the next generation of genome researchers and raise the visibility of biodiversity collections. Additionally, the availability of a data-sharing platform will facilitate identification of gaps in the collections, thereby empowering targeted sampling efforts, increasing the breadth and depth of preservation of genetic diversity. The GGBN is rapidly growing and currently has 41 members. The GGBN covers all branches of the Tree of Life, except humans, but here the focus is on a pilot project with emphasis on ‘harvesting’ the Tree of Life for vascular plant taxa to enable genome-level studies. Conclusion While current efforts are centred on getting the existing samples of all GGBN members online, a pilot project, GGI-Gardens, has been launched as proof of concept. Over the next 6 years GGI-Gardens aims to add to the GGBN high-quality genetic

  8. A hybridized membrane-botanical biofilter for improving air quality in occupied spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llewellyn, David; Darlington, Alan; van Ras, Niels; Kraakman, Bart; Dixon, Mike

    Botanical biofilters have been shown to be effective in improving indoor air quality through the removal of complex mixtures of gaseous contaminants typically found in human-occupied environments. Traditional, botanical biofilters have been comprised of plants rooted into a thin and highly porous synthetic medium that is hung on vertical surfaces. Water flows from the top of the biofilter and air is drawn horizontally through the rooting medium. These botanical biofilters have been successfully marketed in office and institutional settings. They operate efficiently, with adequate contaminant removal and little maintenance for many years. Depending on climate and outdoor air quality, botanical biofiltration can substantially reduce costs associated with ventilation of stale indoor air. However, there are several limitations that continue to inhibit widespread acceptance: 1. Current designs are architecturally limiting and inefficient at capturing ambient light 2. These biofilters can add significant amounts of humidity to an indoor space. This water loss also leads to a rapid accumulation of dissolved salts; reducing biofilter health and performance 3. There is the perception of potentially actively introducing harmful bioaerosols into the air stream 4. Design and practical limitations inhibit the entrance of this technology into the lucrative residential marketplace This paper describes the hybridization of membrane and botanical biofiltration technologies by incorporating a membrane array into the rootzone of a conventional interior planting. This technology has the potential for addressing all of the above limitations, expanding the range of indoor settings where botanical biofiltration can be applied. This technology was developed as the CSA-funded Canadian component an ESA-MAP project entitled: "Biological airfilter for air quality control of life support systems in manned space craft and other closed environments", A0-99-LSS-019. While the project addressed a

  9. Report to Congress: Expressions of interest in commercial clean coal technology projects in foreign countries

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    This report was prepared in response to the guidance provided by the Congress in the course of the Fiscal Year 1995 appropriations process for the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE). As described in detail below, DOE was directed to make the international dissemination of Clean Coal Technologies (CCTs) an integral part of its policy to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in developing countries. Congress directed DOE to solicit ``Statements of Interest`` in commercial projects employing CCTs in countries projected to have significant growth in greenhouse gas emissions. Additionally, DOE was asked to submit to the Congress a report that analyzes the information contained in the Statements of Interest, and that identifies the extent to which various types of Federal incentives would accelerate the commercial availability of these technologies in an international context. In response to DOE`s solicitation of 18 November 1994, 77 Statements of Interest were received from 33 companies, as well as five additional materials. The contents of these submittals, including the requested Federal incentives, the CCTs proposed, the possible host countries, and the environmental aspects of the Statements of Interest, are described and analyzed in the chapters that follow.

  10. Unmanned Aerial Vehicles: Background and Issues for Congress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-11-21

    Congressional Research Service ˜ The Library of Congress CRS Report for Congress Received through the CRS Web Order Code RL31872 Unmanned Aerial Vehicles : Background...00-2005 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Unmanned Aerial Vehicles : Background and Issues for Congress 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...unclassified c. THIS PAGE unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Unmanned Aerial Vehicles : Background and

  11. Botanical origin of mei-gui hua (petal of a Rosa species).

    PubMed

    Ochir, Sarangowa; Ishii, Kouta; Park, ByoungJae; Matsuta, Tomohiko; Nishizawa, Makoto; Kanazawa, Tsutomu; Funaki, Minoru; Yamagishi, Takashi

    2010-10-01

    Mei-gui hua has been used as a crude drug in traditional medicine and as herbal tea in China. The scientific name of Mei-gui is Rosa rugosa thunb. However, the morphological characteristics and botanical ecology of Mei-gui were different from those of R. rugosa. Since the botanical origins of Mei-gui cultivated in China have not yet been clarified, we compared Mei-gui and R. rugosa in terms of their morphological characteristics, phylogenetic analysis, and phytochemical studies. Our research suggested that Mei-gui cultivated around Tarim Basin in Xinjiang Province showed homology to Rosa gallica, while those cultivated in the northeastern parts of China are considered to be hybrids of R. rugosa.

  12. Classification of the botanical origin for Malaysian honey using UV-Vis spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almaleeh, Abd Alazeez; Adom, Abdul Hamid; Fathinul-Syahir, A. S.

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study is to perform the classification of three brands of Malaysian honeys according to their botanical origin using UV-Vis Spectroscopy. The ability to classify honey according to their botanical origin is important to ensure the quality of the product. A total of nine samples from three commercial brands of honey produces were measured by a Lambda 35 UV-Vis Spectrometer. The wavelength range recorded was from 200 nm to 400 nm and used for model calibration. The (PCs) were extracted from principal components analysis (PCA), the first three (PCs) which accounted 98.03% of disparity of the spectra were combined separately with support vector machine (SVM) for the development of (PC-SVM) model, and achieved 100% discrimination accuracy. The results can be utilized in the development of device for the classification of honey accurately and rapid as well as safe guarantee to ordinary consumers.

  13. A brief history of time: the power of botanical systematic reviews.

    PubMed

    Ezzo, Jeanette

    2004-08-01

    There are more than 20 completed Cochrane systematic reviews on botanical medicine presently published in the Cochrane Library. There are more than 40 that are planned or in progress. It is an opportune time to explore the information needs of readers of botanical systematic reviews and how those needs can be met better by Cochrane systematic reviews. It is proposed that Cochrane systematic reviews focus not only on efficacy but also on expanded safety and quality. Expanded safety refers not only to the occurrence of adverse events but also the contraindications for use such as drug-herb interactions or allergies to products. Quality pertains to whether or not there was a method of standardizing active ingredients in trials and methods for minimizing risks of contamination. Because there are no package inserts to accompany herbal products as there are for drugs, Cochrane systematic reviews offer the ideal forum to present this much-needed information on expanded safety and quality.

  14. Rapid identification of the botanical and entomological sources of honey using DNA metabarcoding.

    PubMed

    Prosser, Sean W J; Hebert, Paul D N

    2017-01-01

    Honey is generated by various bee species from diverse plants, and because the value of different types of honey varies more than 100-fold, it is a target for fraud. This paper describes a protocol that employs DNA metabarcoding of three gene regions (ITS2, rbcLa, and COI) to provide an inexpensive tool to simultaneously deliver information on the botanical and entomological origins of honey. This method was used to examine seven varieties of honey: light, medium, dark, blended, pasteurized, creamed, and meliponine. Plant and insect sources were identified in five samples, but only the botanical or insect source could be identified in the other two. Two samples were found to be misrepresented. Although this method was generally successful in determining both plant and insect sources, honeys rich in polyphenolic compounds or subject to crystallization were recalcitrant to analysis, so further research is required to combat honey adulteration and mislabeling.

  15. Botanical origin, colour, granulation, and sensory properties of the Harenna forest honey, Bale, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Belay, Abera; Solomon, W K; Bultossa, Geremew; Adgaba, Nuru; Melaku, Samuel

    2015-01-15

    In this study, the Harenna forest honey samples were investigated with respect to their botanical origin, granulation, colour and sensory properties. Sixteen honey samples were collected from two representative sites (Chiri, C, and Wabero, W) using random sampling techniques. Botanical origin was investigated using qualitative pollen analysis by counting 500 pollen grains using harmonised methods of melissopalynology. Granulation, colour, and sensory properties of honey were determined by visual observation, using Pfund grader, acceptability and preference tests, respectively. Honey samples were also tested for tetracycline. Honey obtained from Wabero is originated dominantly from Syzygium guineense while Chiri was multifloral. The colour of honey ranged from 34 to 85 with light amber and extra light amber colours. The honey samples were free from tetracycline residue and form coarse granules slowly. Significant variation (p>0.05) in sensory preference and acceptability tests not observed due to hive types and locations.

  16. Convenient, Sensitive and High-Throughput Method for Screening Botanic Origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yuan; Jiang, Chao; Liu, Libing; Yu, Shulin; Cui, Zhanhu; Chen, Min; Lin, Shufang; Wang, Shu; Huang, Luqi

    2014-06-01

    In this work, a rapid (within 4-5 h), sensitive and visible new method for assessing botanic origin is developed by combining loop-mediated isothermal amplification with cationic conjugated polymers. The two Chinese medicinal materials (Jin-Yin-Hua and Shan-Yin-Hua) with similar morphology and chemical composition were clearly distinguished by gene SNP genotyping assays. The identification of plant species in Patented Chinese drugs containing Lonicera buds is successfully performed using this detection system. The method is also robust enough to be used in high-throughput screening. This new method is very helpful to identify herbal materials, and is beneficial for detecting safety and quality of botanic products.

  17. Botanical Drugs as an Emerging Strategy in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Algieri, Francesca; Rodriguez-Nogales, Alba; Rodriguez-Cabezas, M. Elena; Risco, Severiano; Ocete, M. Angeles; Galvez, Julio

    2015-01-01

    Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are the two most common categories of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which are characterized by chronic inflammation of the intestine that comprises the patients' life quality and requires sustained pharmacological and surgical treatments. Since their aetiology is not completely understood, nonfully efficient drugs have been developed and those that show effectiveness are not devoid of quite important adverse effects that impair their long-term use. Therefore, many patients try with some botanical drugs, which are safe and efficient after many years of use. However, it is necessary to properly evaluate these therapies to consider a new strategy for human IBD. In this report we have reviewed the main botanical drugs that have been assessed in clinical trials in human IBD and the mechanisms and the active compounds proposed for their beneficial effects. PMID:26576073

  18. Batch-to-batch quality consistency evaluation of botanical drug products using multivariate statistical analysis of the chromatographic fingerprint.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Haoshu; Yu, Lawrence X; Qu, Haibin

    2013-06-01

    Botanical drug products have batch-to-batch quality variability due to botanical raw materials and the current manufacturing process. The rational evaluation and control of product quality consistency are essential to ensure the efficacy and safety. Chromatographic fingerprinting is an important and widely used tool to characterize the chemical composition of botanical drug products. Multivariate statistical analysis has showed its efficacy and applicability in the quality evaluation of many kinds of industrial products. In this paper, the combined use of multivariate statistical analysis and chromatographic fingerprinting is presented here to evaluate batch-to-batch quality consistency of botanical drug products. A typical botanical drug product in China, Shenmai injection, was selected as the example to demonstrate the feasibility of this approach. The high-performance liquid chromatographic fingerprint data of historical batches were collected from a traditional Chinese medicine manufacturing factory. Characteristic peaks were weighted by their variability among production batches. A principal component analysis model was established after outliers were modified or removed. Multivariate (Hotelling T(2) and DModX) control charts were finally successfully applied to evaluate the quality consistency. The results suggest useful applications for a combination of multivariate statistical analysis with chromatographic fingerprinting in batch-to-batch quality consistency evaluation for the manufacture of botanical drug products.

  19. Management of root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita) in bottle gourd using different botanicals in pots.

    PubMed

    Singh, Tulika; Patel, B A

    2015-09-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to study the efficacy of different botanicals in varying doses for management of root-knot nematode, M. incognita in bottle gourd. The results exhibited that madar (Calotropis procera) and neem (Azadirachta indica) leaves application proved to be more effective in improving plant growth characters and reducing root-knot index and final nematode population. Among the doses tested, higher dose of 1.5 % (w/w) was more effective than lower ones.

  20. Elements of Success in Chicago Botanic Garden’s Science Career Continuum

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Katherine A.

    2016-01-01

    The Science Career Continuum at the Chicago Botanic Garden is a model program for successfully encouraging youth from diverse backgrounds into STEM careers. This program has shown that when students are given an opportunity to participate in real scientific research under the mentorship of a caring professional over multiple years, they are more likely to go to college and pursue STEM careers than their peers. Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education PMID:27047595

  1. Wrapping up the 105th Congress.

    PubMed

    Link, D

    1998-12-01

    The 105th Congress was one of the most fiercely partisan in memory. It approved historic increases in AIDS funding, wrestled through the Clinton impeachment process, and saw dramatic changes in leadership. Virtually all legislative activity related to HIV funding occurred just before the election, in an omnibus budget package that included an $855 million increase in AIDS funding. The 105th Congress also restored immigrants' eligibility for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and Medicaid. The Ricky Ray Hemophilia Relief Act was passed, providing financial compensation to people infected by contaminated clotting products. Also, Dr. Jane Henney was approved as Commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). She is the first woman to head the agency. She was approved only after promising not to support an anti-tobacco agenda or the approval of RU-486, which is also known as the abortion pill.

  2. Annual report to Congress, FY 1992

    SciTech Connect

    1993-07-01

    The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is responsible for disposing of the Nation`s spent nuclear fuel from civilian nuclear power reactors and high-level radioactive waste from its defense activities in a cost-effective manner that protects the health and safety of the public and workers and the quality of the environment. To accomplish this mission OCRWM is developing a waste management system consisting of a geologic repository, a facility for monitored retrievable storage, and a system for transporting the waste. This is the ninth annual report submitted by the OCRWM to Congress. The OCRWM submits this report to inform Congress of its activities and expenditures during fiscal year 1992 (October 1, 1991 through September 30, 1992).

  3. 43 CFR 1610.6 - Management decision review by Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL MANAGEMENT (1000) PLANNING, PROGRAMMING, BUDGETING Resource Management Planning § 1610.6 Management decision review by Congress. The Federal Land Policy...

  4. WEST CORRIDOR (ORIGINALLY KNOWN AS LIBRARY OF CONGRESS CARD CATALOG) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    WEST CORRIDOR (ORIGINALLY KNOWN AS LIBRARY OF CONGRESS CARD CATALOG) ON FIRST FLOOR, LOOKING EAST - Free Library of Philadelphia, Central Library, 1901 Vine Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  5. Capillary electrophoresis of multigene barcoding chloroplast markers for species identification of botanical trace evidence.

    PubMed

    Ferri, Gianmarco; Corradini, Beatrice; Alù, Milena

    2012-01-01

    The analysis of nonhuman biological evidence both animal and botanical to find out the correct species of a sample comes as a great help to crime investigators. Particularly, forensic botany may be useful in many criminal and civil cases, e.g., for linking an individual to a crime scene or physical evidence to a geographic location, or tracking marijuana distribution patterns.Despite many molecular techniques for species identification so far applied, botanical evidences are still overlooked by forensic scientists due to the lack of reproducible and efficient protocols standardized across a wide range of different organisms and among different laboratories.Recently, the term "DNA barcoding" has been coined to describe the use of a short gene sequence from a standardized region of the genome as a molecular tool for species identification. DNA barcodes have been successfully applied to a number of animal groups and introduced in forensic science with the application of the mitochondrial gene COI. Building on this success, ongoing investigations have searched for the best barcode to apply to all land plants. Here we describe the basic protocol based on amplification and sequence analysis of barcoding markers for land plants considering the latest developments of Plant DNA barcoding Project. The aim of this chapter is to provide forensic scientists an accurate and reliable tool for assigning unidentified botanical specimens to the correct species as powerful mainstay in investigations, increasing the contributions from nonhuman DNA to forensics.

  6. Chemoprevention Trial Feasibility Using Botanicals in Exceptionally High Risk Populations for Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Nagi B; Quinn, Gwendolyn P; Alexandrow, Mark G; Gray, Jhanelle; Schell, Michael; Sutton, Steve; Haura, Eric B

    2015-01-01

    While chemoprevention with botanicals shows promise in reducing cancer risk, recruitment and retention of participants for trials continues to be costly and presents unique challenges. Knowledge of interest, willingness of target populations and evaluation of design challenges are critical to improve accrual in these chemoprevention trials. Objective The study assessed interest and willingness of former smokers to participate in a chemoprevention trial using a botanical agent. Methods An introductory letter and survey instrument were mailed to 609 consecutive, former heavy smokers, with no cancer, from a database of 826 subjects at the Moffitt Cancer Center. Results 202 (40.4%) subjects returned completed surveys. 92-96% reported interest in receiving free lung exams and knowing their lung cancer risk. 88% were interested in participating in a trial evaluating a botanical agent for lung cancer prevention. Over 92% of subjects reported willingness to comply with study requirements; multiple blood draws and trips to the Center, spiral CTs and chest x-rays. Subjects were relatively less enthusiastic (73-79%) about bronchoscopy, taking multiple study agents and assignment to placebo arm. Conclusions Our study strongly suggests feasibility, highlights potential challenges and the significant interest and willingness of this exceptionally high risk population to participate in chemoprevention trials. PMID:26101725

  7. What Does It Mean to be Central? A Botanical Geography of Paris 1830-1848.

    PubMed

    Hoquet, Thierry

    2016-02-01

    This paper focuses on the geography of the botanical community in Paris, under the July Monarchy (1830-1848). At that time, the Muséum d'Histoire naturelle (MHN) was at its institutional acme and, under the impulse of François Guizot, its budget was increasing dramatically. However, closer attention to manuscript sources (correspondence, travel diaries) reveals that the botanists of the time favoured other private institutions, located both on the Right and Left Banks of the Seine. The MHN was prestigious for its collections and professors but it was relatively remote from the centre of Paris, and its plant samples were sometimes difficult to access. Several other first-class private herbaria granted liberal access to botanists: those of Jacques Gay, Phillip Barker Webb, and Benjamin Delessert. Thanks to their wealth, these plant amateurs had ownership of historical herbaria consisting of species types alongside rich botanical libraries. Botanists visiting Paris from foreign countries or other provinces of France also spent some time studying less general plant collections, like those of Count Jaubert, or specialized collections, like Montagne's or Léveillé's on cryptogams. Other botanists also enjoyed renown at the time, although they published little, if anything (like Maire). Living in crammed apartments, literally in the middle of their plant samples, these botanists were key nodes in botanical networks, although they had no relation with the prestigious MHN.

  8. Application of quality by design to the process development of botanical drug products: a case study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Yan, Binjun; Gong, Xingchu; Yu, Lawrence X; Qu, Haibin

    2013-03-01

    This paper was designed to assess the value of quality by design (QbD) to improve the manufacturing process understanding of botanical drug products. Ethanol precipitation, a widely used unit operation in the manufacture of botanical drug products was employed to illustrate the use of QbD, taking the process of danshen (the dry root of Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge) as an example. The recovery of four active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) and the removal of saccharides were used to represent the performance of ethanol precipitation. Potentially critical variables, including density of concentrate, ethanol consumption, and settling temperature were identified through risk assessment methods. Design of experiments (DOE) was used to evaluate the effects of the potentially critical factors on the performance of ethanol precipitation. It was observed that higher density of concentrate leads to higher removal of saccharides, but results in lower recovery of APIs. With the rise of ethanol consumption, the recovery of different APIs behaves in different ways. A potential design space of ethanol precipitation operation was established through DOE studies. The results in this work facilitate the enhanced understanding of the relationships between multiple factors (material attributes and process parameters) and the performance of ethanol precipitation. This case study demonstrated that QbD is a powerful tool to develop manufacturing process of botanical drug products.

  9. Standardization and evaluation of botanical mixtures: lessons from a traditional Chinese herb, Epimedium, with oestrogenic properties.

    PubMed

    Yong, E L; Wong, S P; Shen, P; Gong, Y H; Li, J; Hong, Y

    2007-01-01

    Botanical extracts differ from conventional supplements in that they are complicated mixtures of many bioactive compounds. Here we describe our experience with a traditional Chinese medicinal plant Epimedium sp. to illustrate the scientific challenges of firstly, obtaining a standardized product from a complex mixture and secondly, evaluating that product for preclinical and clinical efficacy. In contrast, to its colloquial name 'Horny goat weed' and Internet advertisements as a herbal 'Viagra' for men, extracts of Epimedium are strongly oestrogenic due to the presence of novel potent phytoestrogens of the prenyl-flavone family. Since Epimedium is not cultivated, it was necessary to source for taxonomically identified samples and to authenticate their species by phylogenetic, chemical and bioresponse profiling. The feasibility of using a panel of oestrogen-responsive cell-based bioassays to measure summated oestrogenic effects at close time points for pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) modelling was evaluated. We document proportionate oestrogenic responses in sera of animals fed oestrogenic drugs and botanical extracts, indicating that these target molecule responsive cell-based bioassays may have utility to capture the global effects of the myriad bioactive compounds in botanical extracts, informing the design of rigorous clinical trials for safety and efficacy.

  10. Forensic botany: species identification of botanical trace evidence using a multigene barcoding approach.

    PubMed

    Ferri, Gianmarco; Alù, Milena; Corradini, Beatrice; Beduschi, Giovanni

    2009-09-01

    Forensic botany can provide significant supporting evidence during criminal investigations. However, it is still an underutilized field of investigation with its most common application limited to identifying specific as well as suspected illegal plants. The ubiquitous presence of plant species can be useful in forensics, but the absence of an accurate identification system remains the major obstacle to the present inability to routinely and correctly identify trace botanical evidence. Many plant materials cannot be identified and differentiated to the species level by traditional morphological characteristics when botanical specimens are degraded and lack physical features. By taking advantage of a universal barcode system, DNA sequencing, and other biomolecular techniques used routinely in forensic investigations, two chloroplast DNA regions were evaluated for their use as "barcoding" markers for plant identification in the field of forensics. We therefore investigated the forensic use of two non-coding plastid regions, psbA-trnH and trnL-trnF, to create a multimarker system for species identification that could be useful throughout the plant kingdom. The sequences from 63 plants belonging to our local flora were submitted and registered on the GenBank database. Sequence comparison to set up the level of identification (species, genus, or family) through Blast algorithms allowed us to assess the suitability of this method. The results confirmed the effectiveness of our botanic universal multimarker assay in forensic investigations.

  11. Probability of identification: a statistical model for the validation of qualitative botanical identification methods.

    PubMed

    LaBudde, Robert A; Harnly, James M

    2012-01-01

    A qualitative botanical identification method (BIM) is an analytical procedure that returns a binary result (1 = Identified, 0 = Not Identified). A BIM may be used by a buyer, manufacturer, or regulator to determine whether a botanical material being tested is the same as the target (desired) material, or whether it contains excessive nontarget (undesirable) material. The report describes the development and validation of studies for a BIM based on the proportion of replicates identified, or probability of identification (POI), as the basic observed statistic. The statistical procedures proposed for data analysis follow closely those of the probability of detection, and harmonize the statistical concepts and parameters between quantitative and qualitative method validation. Use of POI statistics also harmonizes statistical concepts for botanical, microbiological, toxin, and other analyte identification methods that produce binary results. The POI statistical model provides a tool for graphical representation of response curves for qualitative methods, reporting of descriptive statistics, and application of performance requirements. Single collaborator and multicollaborative study examples are given.

  12. A novel insight into the cost–benefit model for the evolution of botanical carnivory

    PubMed Central

    Pavlovič, Andrej; Saganová, Michaela

    2015-01-01

    Background The cost–benefit model for the evolution of botanical carnivory provides a conceptual framework for interpreting a wide range of comparative and experimental studies on carnivorous plants. This model assumes that the modified leaves called traps represent a significant cost for the plant, and this cost is outweighed by the benefits from increased nutrient uptake from prey, in terms of enhancing the rate of photosynthesis per unit leaf mass or area (AN) in the microsites inhabited by carnivorous plants. Scope This review summarizes results from the classical interpretation of the cost–benefit model for evolution of botanical carnivory and highlights the costs and benefits of active trapping mechanisms, including water pumping, electrical signalling and accumulation of jasmonates. Novel alternative sequestration strategies (utilization of leaf litter and faeces) in carnivorous plants are also discussed in the context of the cost–benefit model. Conclusions Traps of carnivorous plants have lower AN than leaves, and the leaves have higher AN after feeding. Prey digestion, water pumping and electrical signalling represent a significant carbon cost (as an increased rate of respiration, RD) for carnivorous plants. On the other hand, jasmonate accumulation during the digestive period and reprogramming of gene expression from growth and photosynthesis to prey digestion optimizes enzyme production in comparison with constitutive secretion. This inducibility may have evolved as a cost-saving strategy beneficial for carnivorous plants. The similarities between plant defence mechanisms and botanical carnivory are highlighted. PMID:25948113

  13. Altitude Stress During Participation of Medical Congress.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soon Bae; Kim, Jong Sung; Kim, Sang Jun; Cho, Su Hee; Suh, Dae Chul

    2016-09-01

    Medical congresses often held in highlands. We reviewed several medical issues associated with altitude stress especially while physicians have participated medical congress held in high altitude. Altitude stress, also known as an acute mountain sickness (AMS), is caused by acute exposure to low oxygen level at high altitude which is defined as elevations at or above 1,200 m and AMS commonly occurs above 2,500 m. Altitude stress with various symptoms including insomnia can also be experienced in airplane. AMS and drunken state share many common features in symptoms, neurologic manifestations and even show multiple microbleeds in corpus callosum and white matter on MRI. Children are more susceptible to altitude stress than adults. Gradual ascent is the best method for the prevention of altitude stress. Adequate nutrition (mainly carbohydrates) and hydration are recommended. Consumption of alcohol can exacerbate the altitude-induced impairments in judgment and the visual senses and promote psychomotor dysfunction. For prevention or treatment of altitude stress, acetazolamide, phosphodiesterase inhibitors, dexamethasone and erythropoietin are helpful. Altitude stress can be experienced relatively often during participation of medical congress. It is necessary to remind the harmful effect of AMS because it can cause serious permanent organ damage even though the symptoms are negligible in most cases.

  14. Altitude Stress During Participation of Medical Congress

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soon Bae; Kim, Jong Sung; Kim, Sang Jun; Cho, Su Hee

    2016-01-01

    Medical congresses often held in highlands. We reviewed several medical issues associated with altitude stress especially while physicians have participated medical congress held in high altitude. Altitude stress, also known as an acute mountain sickness (AMS), is caused by acute exposure to low oxygen level at high altitude which is defined as elevations at or above 1,200 m and AMS commonly occurs above 2,500 m. Altitude stress with various symptoms including insomnia can also be experienced in airplane. AMS and drunken state share many common features in symptoms, neurologic manifestations and even show multiple microbleeds in corpus callosum and white matter on MRI. Children are more susceptible to altitude stress than adults. Gradual ascent is the best method for the prevention of altitude stress. Adequate nutrition (mainly carbohydrates) and hydration are recommended. Consumption of alcohol can exacerbate the altitude-induced impairments in judgment and the visual senses and promote psychomotor dysfunction. For prevention or treatment of altitude stress, acetazolamide, phosphodiesterase inhibitors, dexamethasone and erythropoietin are helpful. Altitude stress can be experienced relatively often during participation of medical congress. It is necessary to remind the harmful effect of AMS because it can cause serious permanent organ damage even though the symptoms are negligible in most cases. PMID:27621942

  15. Taking Action on Climate Change: Prospects for the 110th United States Congress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trapani, J.

    2006-12-01

    States and local governments have begun instituting regulations to deal with climate change by reducing greenhouse gas emissions. For example, California recently passed legislation requiring its greenhouse gas emissions be reduced to 1990 levels by 2020. Activity in the United States Congress on climate change has thus far included committee hearings and conferences, floor debate, and resolutions, but Congress has yet to pass significant legislation on the issue. Statements and co-sponsorships can provide clues as to where individual members stand on climate change. Opinions of individual members of Congress about the urgency of this problem run the gamut, from members who support immediate passage of aggressive legislation to drastically reduce greenhouse gas emissions, to those who believe that climate change is not anthropogenic in origin and/or is not a significant problem. Especially in the Senate, the framework of the debate appears to be shifting. Recent activity in Senate committees has focused not just on evidence for climate change and whether it is a problem worth consideration, but also on possible solutions. For example, the Senate Energy Committee last April held a day-long conference on how best to institute regulations on greenhouse gas emissions while minimizing detrimental impacts on U.S. economic performance and international competitiveness. A variety of legislative options that would address the climate change issue have already been introduced or are expected at the start of the 110th Congress. These proposals vary in terms of their stated goals, duration, scope, and mechanism. Committee jurisdiction over climate change issues affects the feasibility of passing any legislation. Anticipated changes in key Committee leadership may significantly change the dynamic. As Congress devotes further attention to climate change in the next Congress, scientists have an opportunity to continue to contribute to the debate and inform any policy decisions

  16. Highlights of the 12th International Conference on Nuclear Cardiology and Cardiac CT.

    PubMed

    Kitsiou, Anastasia; Dorbala, Sharmila; Scholte, Arthur J H A

    2015-09-01

    The 12th International Conference on Nuclear Cardiology and Cardiac CT was held from 3 to 5 May 2015 in Madrid, Spain. In this article, the three Congress Program Committee Chairs summarize selected highlights of the presented abstracts.

  17. Secretary's annual report to Congress

    SciTech Connect

    1980-01-01

    This second annual report of the DOE covers activities of all elements of the department except the independent FERC, which issues its own annual report. Individual chapters concern a posture statement, conservation, solar and other renewable energy, fossil energy, electric energy, nuclear energy, the environment, defense programs, international programs, general science programs, energy information, economic regulation, energy production, and support operations. The following appendixes are also included: foreign direct investments in US energy sources and supplies, exports of energy resources by foreign companies, major recipients of DOE funding, actions taken regarding disclosure of energy assets by DOE employees, financial assistance programs for alternative fuel demonstration facilities, and 1978 budget summary. 16 figures, 56 tables. (RWR)

  18. Chartrand: Congress More Computer Literate. Government Computer News Interview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Government Computer News: The Newspaper Serving Computer Users throughout the Federal Government, 1985

    1985-01-01

    This excerpt from a newsletter presents an interview with Robert Lee Chartrand, senior specialist in information policy and technology for the Congressional Research Service of the Library of Congress, on issues related to information technology and the U.S. Congress. A brief biography of Mr. Chartrand presents his major professional experience,…

  19. 40 CFR 1603.13 - Report to Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Report to Congress. 1603.13 Section 1603.13 Protection of Environment CHEMICAL SAFETY AND HAZARD INVESTIGATION BOARD RULES IMPLEMENTING THE GOVERNMENT IN THE SUNSHINE ACT § 1603.13 Report to Congress. The CSB General Counsel shall annually report...

  20. 10 CFR 9.109 - Report to Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Report to Congress. 9.109 Section 9.109 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION PUBLIC RECORDS Government in the Sunshine Act Regulations § 9.109 Report to Congress... against the Commission pursuant to the Government in the Sunshine Act, including any cost assessed...

  1. 10 CFR 9.109 - Report to Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Report to Congress. 9.109 Section 9.109 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION PUBLIC RECORDS Government in the Sunshine Act Regulations § 9.109 Report to Congress... against the Commission pursuant to the Government in the Sunshine Act, including any cost assessed...

  2. 10 CFR 9.109 - Report to Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Report to Congress. 9.109 Section 9.109 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION PUBLIC RECORDS Government in the Sunshine Act Regulations § 9.109 Report to Congress... against the Commission pursuant to the Government in the Sunshine Act, including any cost assessed...

  3. 10 CFR 9.109 - Report to Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Report to Congress. 9.109 Section 9.109 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION PUBLIC RECORDS Government in the Sunshine Act Regulations § 9.109 Report to Congress... against the Commission pursuant to the Government in the Sunshine Act, including any cost assessed...

  4. LC21: A Digital Strategy for the Library of Congress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC.

    The Library of Congress asked the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board (CSTB) of the National Academies to conduct a study to provide strategic advice concerning the information technology path that the Library of Congress should traverse over the coming decade. The Committee on an Information Technology Strategy for the Library of…

  5. 45 CFR 12.15 - Reports to Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Reports to Congress. 12.15 Section 12.15 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION DISPOSAL AND UTILIZATION OF SURPLUS REAL PROPERTY FOR PUBLIC HEALTH PURPOSES § 12.15 Reports to Congress. The Secretary will make...

  6. 45 CFR 12.15 - Reports to Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Reports to Congress. 12.15 Section 12.15 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION DISPOSAL AND UTILIZATION OF SURPLUS REAL PROPERTY FOR PUBLIC HEALTH PURPOSES § 12.15 Reports to Congress. The Secretary will make...

  7. 22 CFR 1102.9 - Annual report to Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Annual report to Congress. 1102.9 Section 1102.9... SECTION FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT § 1102.9 Annual report to Congress. (a) On or before March 1 of each calendar year the Commissioner shall submit a report covering the preceding calendar year to the Speaker...

  8. 22 CFR 1101.17 - Annual report to Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Annual report to Congress. 1101.17 Section 1101... STATES SECTION PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 § 1101.17 Annual report to Congress. (a) On or before August 1 of each calendar year the Commissioner shall submit a report covering the preceding calendar year to the Speaker...

  9. 75 FR 70031 - Advisory Committee on the Records of Congress

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-16

    ... RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Advisory Committee on the Records of Congress AGENCY: National Archives and Records... National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) announces a meeting of the Advisory Committee on the Records of Congress. The committee advises NARA on the full range of programs, policies, and plans for...

  10. 76 FR 31367 - Advisory Committee on the Records of Congress

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-31

    ... RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Advisory Committee on the Records of Congress AGENCY: National Archives and Records... National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) announces a meeting of the Advisory Committee on the Records of Congress. The committee advises NARA on the full range of programs, policies, and plans for...

  11. ESS: The Library of Congress Experimental Search System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilder, Dean; Greenfield, Rich

    1997-01-01

    Describes the Library of Congress's Experimental Search System (ESS), a Web-based online public access catalog that introduced new search methods to replace Boolean searching as well as powerful navigational aids for browsing and cross-linking. Discusses problems, ESS user comments, acceptance by Library of Congress staff, and future…

  12. 18 CFR 16.15 - Commission recommendation to Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... recommendation to Congress. 16.15 Section 16.15 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY... 15 of the Federal Power Act § 16.15 Commission recommendation to Congress. Upon receipt of a recommendation from any Federal department or agency, a proposal of any party, or on the Commission's own...

  13. 18 CFR 16.15 - Commission recommendation to Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... recommendation to Congress. 16.15 Section 16.15 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY... 15 of the Federal Power Act § 16.15 Commission recommendation to Congress. Upon receipt of a recommendation from any Federal department or agency, a proposal of any party, or on the Commission's own...

  14. 18 CFR 16.15 - Commission recommendation to Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... recommendation to Congress. 16.15 Section 16.15 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY... 15 of the Federal Power Act § 16.15 Commission recommendation to Congress. Upon receipt of a recommendation from any Federal department or agency, a proposal of any party, or on the Commission's own...

  15. 18 CFR 16.15 - Commission recommendation to Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... recommendation to Congress. 16.15 Section 16.15 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY... 15 of the Federal Power Act § 16.15 Commission recommendation to Congress. Upon receipt of a recommendation from any Federal department or agency, a proposal of any party, or on the Commission's own...

  16. Population Estimates Used by Congress during the Constitutional Convention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potter, Lee Ann

    2006-01-01

    During the summer of 1787, when the delegates to the Constitutional Convention met in Philadelphia, the issue of representation in Congress was strongly debated. Delegates from the large states favored the Virginia Plan's proposal for two houses of Congress with representation based on population. Delegates from the small states favored equal…

  17. 93rd Congress: Federal Laws and Regulations Affecting the Handicapped.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gettings, Robert M.

    Provided is a summary of 1973 and 1974 legislative and administrative developments affecting handicapped persons. The report is divided into five major sections: an outline of some overriding issues faced by the 93rd Congress; a detailed analysis of the implications for the handicapped of bills enacted by the past session of Congress; a brief…

  18. An Analysis of Math Congress in an Eighth Grade Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kotsopoulos, Donna; Lee, Joanne

    2012-01-01

    A "math congress" is a pedagogical approach in which students present their solutions from their mathematical work completed individually, in pairs, or in small groups, and share and defend their mathematical thinking. Mathematical artifacts presented during math congress remain on display as community records of practice. Math congress…

  19. 75 FR 32229 - Advisory Committee on the Records of Congress

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-07

    ... National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) announces a meeting of the Advisory Committee on the Records of Congress. The committee advises NARA on the full range of programs, policies, and plans for the... RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Advisory Committee on the Records of Congress AGENCY: National Archives and...

  20. Changes in the Arctic: Background and Issues for Congress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-07

    Report RL32838, Arctic National Wildlife Refuge ( ANWR ): Votes and Legislative Actions, 95th Congress through 110th Congress, by M. Lynne Corn and Beth A...Roberts CRS Report RL34547, Possible Federal Revenue from Oil Development of ANWR and Nearby Areas, by Salvatore Lazzari CRS Report RL33705, Oil

  1. Changes in the Arctic: Background and Issues for Congress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-15

    Wildlife Refuge ( ANWR ): Votes and Legislative Actions, 95th Congress through 110th Congress, by M. Lynne Corn and Beth A. Roberts CRS Report RL34547...Possible Federal Revenue from Oil Development of ANWR and Nearby Areas, by Salvatore Lazzari CRS Report RL33705, Oil Spills in U.S. Coastal Waters

  2. Network Centric Warfare: Background and Oversight Issues for Congress. CRS Report for Congress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-18

    see CRS Report RS21294, Unmanned Vehicles for U.S. Naval Forces: Background and Issues for Congress. 15 Edward A. Smith , “Network Centric Warfare...excess of non- defense-related agencies. While outsourcing may have been initially motivated by CRS-12 42 Patrick Theobald and Sumner Lemon, “R&D

  3. Pressures and Priorities. The Report of Proceedings of the Congress of the Universities of the Commonwealth (12th, Vancouver, Canada, August 1978).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Commonwealth Universities, London (England).

    The proceedings of the twelfth Congress of the Universities of the Commonwealth (Canada) are reported. Two papers were presented at the first plenary session: "Reconciling National, International and Local Roles of Universities with the Essential Character of a University," by Charles Wilson and "The World Food Problem and the…

  4. The European Dimension in Vocational Training. Experiences and Tasks of Vocational Training Policy in the Member States of the European Union. Congress Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koch, Richard, Ed.; Reuling, Jochen, Ed.

    This volume contains presentations and workshop papers from the International Congress on "The European Dimension of Vocational Training--Experiences and Tasks" that provided those with responsibility for vocational training a forum for analyzing and discussing challenges that have emerged from European cooperation in vocational…

  5. George Orwell &"Nineteen Eighty-Four": The Man and the Book. A Conference at the Library of Congress, April 30 and May 1, 1984.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

    Proceedings of a conference of international Orwell experts gathered at the Library of Congress are presented in this collection. The collection is divided into four sections, corresponding with the four conference sessions: "What Orwell Really Wrote"; "Orwell: The Man"; "'Nineteen Eighty-Four': The Book"; and…

  6. Herbal medicinal products versus botanical-food supplements in the European market: state of art and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Bilia, Anna Rita

    2015-01-01

    Botanical products marketed in Europe are diverse, classified as herbal medicinal products, dietary supplements, cosmetics, foods and beverages depending on the relevant applicable legislation. Many factors are taken into account in the classification of a botanical product (e.g. intended use, labeling, preparations and dosages) according to how it is placed on the market. Herbal medicinal products (HMPs) can only be sold in pharmacies, under the supervision of a pharmacist, and are marketed after full or simplified registration procedures according to their classification, i.e. as over-the-counter drugs (OTC) available without special restrictions and prescription only medicine (POM), which must be prescribed by a licensed medical practitioner. The dietary supplement segment is also sold in the market in dose form (such as capsules, tablets, ampoules of liquids, drops etc) and represents 15-20% of the botanical market at the European level with high variability among each country (i.e. in Italy it reaches up to 80%). In many cases the distinction between medicinal products and food supplements has generated borderline botanical-sourced products, which generally produce confusion and mislead the consumers. As a consequence, there is an urgent need of consumer education and in addition to collect comprehensive data and make this database systematically available to herbalists, nutritionists and medical specialists for a proper classification and harmonization of the use of botanical ingredients, and, as consequence, a correct use of these products.

  7. World Space Congress: a vision quest.

    PubMed

    Iannotta, Ben

    2003-01-01

    The World Space Congress (WSC) in October, 2002, brought together luminaries, aerospace engineers, students, and scientists to discuss strategies for reviving the world's space agency. WSC lectures and plenary sessions focused on future research in space. Among topics discussed are the use of the Hubble Space Telescope to scan for habitable planets and obtain data about the beginning of the universe, new weather satellites, planetary protection from comets or asteroids, exploration and establishment of colonies on the Moon and Mars, medical advances, the role of space exploration in the world economy.

  8. International Council on Archives, Microfilm Committee. Bulletin 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Council on Archives. Microfilm Committee.

    The Microfilm Committee of the International Council on Archives grew out of various international meetings which began in 1966 with a congress on "Archives for Scholarship--Encouraging Greater Ease of Access." Meetings since then have resulted in recommendations that (1) archives and records should be fully microfilmed and widely…

  9. Analysis of Synthetic Cannabinoids in Botanical Material: A Review of Analytical Methods and Findings.

    PubMed

    Presley, B C; Jansen-Varnum, S A; Logan, B K

    2013-03-01

    Synthetic cannabinoid analogs have gained a great deal of attention from the forensic community within the last four years. The compounds found to be of most interest to forensic practitioners include those of the following series: JWH, CP, HU, AM, WIN, RCS, and most recently, XLR and UR. Structurally the HU compounds are most similar in structure to Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the main psychoactive component of marijuana. The novel compounds include cyclohexylphenols, naphthoylindoles, naphthylmethylindoles, naphthylmethylindenes, benzoylindoles, naphthoylpyrroles, phenylacetylindoles, adamantoylindoles, and tetramethylcyclopropylindoles. Many of these compounds are cannabinoid receptor agonists and were originally synthesized for medical research purposes but have recently been appropriated into the illicit drug market. Their psychoactive effects, mimicking those of marijuana, as well as their indeterminate legal status, have made them popular for recreational use. Solutions of the compounds dissolved in organic solvents are sprayed onto botanical material and sold as "herbal incense" products via the Internet, and in smoke shops, convenience stores, and gas stations around the world. Many of the products are labeled "Not for human consumption" in an attempt to circumvent legislation that bans the sale and manufacture of certain compounds and their analogs for human use. The compounds that were first detected following forensic analysis of botanical materials included JWH-018, JWH-073, and CP 47,497 (C7 and C8 homologs). However, in the four years since their appearance the number of compounds has grown, and additional diverse classes of compounds have been detected. Governments worldwide have taken action in an attempt to control those compounds that have become widespread in their regions. This article discusses the history of synthetic cannabinoids and how they have been detected in the illicit drug market. It also discusses the analytical methods and

  10. Effect of an herbal/botanical supplement on strength, balance, and muscle function following 12-weeks of resistance training: a placebo controlled study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background StemSport (SS; StemTech International, Inc. San Clemente, CA) contains a proprietary blend of the botanical Aphanizomenon flos-aquae and several herbal antioxidant and anti-inflammatory substances. SS has been purported to accelerate tissue repair and restore muscle function following resistance exercise. Here, we examine the effects of SS supplementation on strength adaptations resulting from a 12-week resistance training program in healthy young adults. Methods Twenty-four young adults (16 males, 8 females, mean age = 20.5 ± 1.9 years, mass = 70.9 ± 11.9 kg, stature = 176.6 ± 9.9 cm) completed the twelve week training program. The study design was a double-blind, placebo controlled parallel group trial. Subjects either received placebo or StemSport supplement (SS; mg/day) during the training. 1-RM bench press, 1-RM leg press, vertical jump height, balance (star excursion and center of mass excursion), isokinetic strength (elbow and knee flexion/extension) and perception of recovery were measured at baseline and following the 12-week training intervention. Results Resistance training increased 1-RM strength (p < 0.008), vertical jump height (p < 0.03), and isokinetic strength (p < 0.05) in both SS and placebo groups. No significant group-by-time interactions were observed (all p-values >0.10). Conclusions These data suggest that compared to placebo, the SS herbal/botanical supplement did not enhance training induced adaptations to strength, balance, and muscle function above strength training alone. PMID:24910543

  11. Fascia Research Congress evidence from the 100 year perspective of Andrew Taylor Still.

    PubMed

    Findley, Thomas W; Shalwala, Mona

    2013-07-01

    More than 100 years ago A.T. Still MD founded osteopathic medicine, and specifically described fascia as a covering, with common origins of layers of the fascial system despite diverse names for individual parts. Fascia assists gliding and fluid flow and is highly innervated. Fascia is intimately involved with respiration and with nourishment of all cells of the body, including those of disease and cancer. This paper reviews information presented at the first three International Fascia Research Congresses in 2007, 2009 and 2012 from the perspective of Dr Still, that fascia is vital for organism's growth and support, and it is where disease is sown.

  12. Botanical and Dietary Supplements for Menopausal Symptoms: What Works, What Doesn’t

    PubMed Central

    Geller, Stacie E.; Studee, Laura

    2006-01-01

    All women reach menopause and approximately two-thirds of women develop menopausal symptoms, primarily hot flashes. Hormone therapy long was considered the first line of treatment for vasomotor symptoms. However, given the results of the Women’s Health Initiative, many women are reluctant use exogenous hormones for symptomatic treatment and are turning to botanicals and dietary supplement (BDS) products for relief. Despite the fact that there is limited scientific evidence describing efficacy and long term safety of such products, many women find these “natural treatments” appealing. Peri- and postmenopausal women are amongst the highest users of these products, but 70% of women do not tell their health care providers about their use. Compounding this issue is the fact that few clinicians ask their patients about use of BDS, largely because they have not been exposed to alternative medical practices in their training and are unfamiliar with these products. This paper reviews the botanicals and dietary supplements commonly used in menopause, (such as black cohosh, red clover, soy products, among others) as well as the available data on efficacy and safety. We searched the MEDLINE database from 1966 to December 2004 using terms related to botanical and dietary supplements and menopausal symptoms for peri- or postmenopausal women. Abstracts from relevant meetings as well as reference books and websites on herbal supplements were also searched. Randomized-controlled trials (RCTs) were used if available; open trials and comparison group studies were used when RCTs were not available. The evidence to date suggests that black cohosh is safe and effective for reducing menopausal symptoms, primarily hot flashes and possibly mood disorders. Phytoestrogen extracts, including soy foods and red clover appear to have at best only minimal effect on menopausal symptoms but have positive health effects on plasma lipid concentrations and may reduce heart disease. St. John

  13. Ethno- medico - botanical studies of Badaga population In the Nilgiri district of Tamilnadu, South India

    PubMed Central

    Manikandan, P. N. Arul

    2008-01-01

    The study grains to explore ethno-medicobotany of Badaga population in the Nilgiri hills of Tamilnadu, South India. Ethno botanical field survey and personal discussion methods have been adopted in the collection of data. A list of 71 flowering plants belonging to 42 families, 67 genera and 70 species are employed by the Badaga popu-lation in their native system of medicine for therapeutic purposes. In reviewing ethnomedical information, data on folk herbal remedies and their various methods of applications for treating a wide range of ailments have been furnished. A brief description of plants, their habitat, family and local Badaga names are outlined here. PMID:22557279

  14. An ex vivo approach to botanical-drug interactions: A proof of concept study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xinwen; Zhu, Hao-Jie; Munoz, Juliana; Gurley, Bill J.; Markowitz, John S.

    2015-01-01

    Ethnopharmacological relevance Botanical medicines are frequently used in combination with therapeutic drugs, imposing a risk for harmful botanical-drug interactions (BDIs). Among the existing BDI evaluation methods, clinical studies are the most desirable, but due to their expense and protracted time-line for completion, conventional in vitro methodologies remain the most frequently used BDI assessment tools. However, many predictions generated from in vitro studies are inconsistent with clinical findings. Accordingly, the present study aimed to develop a novel ex vivo approach for BDI assessment and expand the safety evaluation methodoloy in applied ethnopharmacological research. Materials and Methods This approach differs from conventional in vitro methods in that rather than botanical extracts or individual phytochemicals being prepared in artificial buffers, human plasma/serum collected from a limited number of subjects administered botanical supplements was utilized to assess BDIs. To validate the methodology, human plasma/serum samples collected from healthy subjects administered either milk thistle or goldenseal extracts were utilized in incubation studies to determine their potential inhibitory effects on CYP2C9 and CYP3A4/5, respectively. Silybin A and B, two principal milk thistle phytochemicals, and hydrastine and berberine, the purported active constituents in goldenseal, were evaluated in both phosphate buffer and human plasma based in vitro incubation systems. Results Ex vivo study results were consistent with formal clinical study findings for the effect of milk thistle on the disposition of tolbutamide, a CYP2C9 substrate, and for goldenseal’s influence on the pharmacokinetics of midazolam, a widely accepted CYP3A4/5 substrate. Compared to conventional in vitro BDI methodologies of assessment, the introduction of human plasma into the in vitro study model changed the observed inhibitory effect of silybinA, silybin B and hydrastine and berberine

  15. U.S. Congress playing budgetary endgame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlowicz, Mike

    With fiscal year 1997 (FY '97) set to begin on October 1, the U.S. Congress was poised to fund most American science programs and agencies at or above the levels of funding appropriated in the tumultuous FY '96. Seeking to avert a drawn-out budget debate during an election year, congressional leaders were working feverishly in the last week of September to write appropriations bills that would be acceptable—though not necessarily satisfying—to both Congress and the Clinton Administration.On September 24, the U.S. House of Representatives and the Senate approved the conference report of H.R. 3666, the appropriations bill that provides funding for the departments of Veterans Affairs, Housing and Urban Development, and the Independent Agencies. The conference report of this VA-HUD bill provides $84.7 billion in spending for the affected agencies, including NASA, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the National Science Foundation (NSF). The conference report was weighted heavily toward the preferences of the Senate, where moderates and pragmatists were stressing compromise and pushing for appropriations bills that President Clinton would be likely to sign.

  16. In Congress Budget Update for NOAA, USGS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    Among the agenda items facing Congress as it reconvenes this week are the fiscal 1984 budgets for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), which is part of the Department of Commerce, and for the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), which is within the Department of the Interior. Fiscal year 1984 begins October 1, 1983. As Congress rolls up its shirtsleeves and gets down to business, Eos presents a status report on the two agency budgets.Both House and Senate appropriations committees have finished their work on the NOAA budget, which had been targeted by President Ronald Reagan for a $799.8 million appropriation request (program level of $843.2 million) in his proposed fiscal 1984 budget (Eos, February 15, 1983, p. 65). The House appropriation for NOAA (H.R. 3134 and H.R. 3222) is $998.5 million, with a program level of $1043.9 million. The Senate Appropriations Committee set its appropriation (S. 1721) at $987.8 million, with a program level of $1041.0 million.

  17. The inventory of botanical curiosities in Pierre-François-Xavier de Charlevoix's Nouvelle France (1744).

    PubMed

    Kobelinski, Michel

    2013-03-01

    The article explores the botanical contributions of Pierre-François-Xavier de Charlevoix's book Histoire et description générale de la Nouvelle France vis-à-vis the contributions of previous researchers, his use of iconographic and discursive representations and its relevance to the project of French colonization. It investigates why he refused Linnaeus' taxonomic model and what he intended with his catalogue of botanical curiosities. The unfolding of his philosophical and religious trajectory allows to understand his stance regarding the classification of nature, the meanings of ethnological information, his forms of intellectual appropriation, and his use of discourse and botanical iconography as political and emotional propaganda to encourage colonial settlement.

  18. Adverse effects of plant food supplements and botanical preparations: a systematic review with critical evaluation of causality

    PubMed Central

    Di Lorenzo, Chiara; Ceschi, Alessandro; Kupferschmidt, Hugo; Lüde, Saskia; De Souza Nascimento, Elizabeth; Dos Santos, Ariana; Colombo, Francesca; Frigerio, Gianfranco; Nørby, Karin; Plumb, Jenny; Finglas, Paul; Restani, Patrizia

    2015-01-01

    AIMS The objective of this review was to collect available data on the following: (i) adverse effects observed in humans from the intake of plant food supplements or botanical preparations; (ii) the misidentification of poisonous plants; and (iii) interactions between plant food supplements/botanicals and conventional drugs or nutrients. METHODS PubMed/MEDLINE and Embase were searched from database inception to June 2014, using the terms ‘adverse effect/s’, ‘poisoning/s’, ‘plant food supplement/s’, ‘misidentification/s’ and ‘interaction/s’ in combination with the relevant plant name. All papers were critically evaluated according to the World Health Organization Guidelines for causality assessment. RESULTS Data were obtained for 66 plants that are common ingredients of plant food supplements; of the 492 papers selected, 402 (81.7%) dealt with adverse effects directly associated with the botanical and 89 (18.1%) concerned interactions with conventional drugs. Only one case was associated with misidentification. Adverse effects were reported for 39 of the 66 botanical substances searched. Of the total references, 86.6% were associated with 14 plants, including Glycine max/soybean (19.3%), Glycyrrhiza glabra/liquorice (12.2%), Camellia sinensis/green tea ( 8.7%) and Ginkgo biloba/gingko (8.5%). CONCLUSIONS Considering the length of time examined and the number of plants included in the review, it is remarkable that: (i) the adverse effects due to botanical ingredients were relatively infrequent, if assessed for causality; and (ii) the number of severe clinical reactions was very limited, but some fatal cases have been described. Data presented in this review were assessed for quality in order to make the results maximally useful for clinicians in identifying or excluding deleterious effects of botanicals. PMID:25251944

  19. What is the Conservation Value of a Plant in a Botanic Garden? Using Indicators to Improve Management of Ex Situ Collections

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Living botanic garden plant collections are a fundamental and underutilized worldwide resource for plant conservation. A common goal in managing a botanical living collection is to maintain the greatest biodiversity at the greatest economic and logistic efficiency. However, to date there is no unifi...

  20. Spectral and chromatographic fingerprinting with analysis of variance-principal component analysis (ANOVA-PCA): a useful tool for differentiating botanicals and characterizing sources of variance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objectives: Spectral fingerprints, acquired by direct injection (no separation) mass spectrometry (DI-MS) or liquid chromatography with UV detection (HPLC), in combination with ANOVA-PCA, were used to differentiate 15 powders of botanical materials. Materials and Methods: Powders of 15 botanical mat...

  1. A Systematic Review on the Effects of Botanicals on Skeletal Muscle Health in Order to Prevent Sarcopenia

    PubMed Central

    Rondanelli, M.; Miccono, A.; Peroni, G.; Guerriero, F.; Morazzoni, P.; Riva, A.; Guido, D.

    2016-01-01

    We performed a systematic review to evaluate the evidence-based medicine regarding the main botanical extracts and their nutraceutical compounds correlated to skeletal muscle health in order to identify novel strategies that effectively attenuate skeletal muscle loss and enhance muscle function and to improve the quality of life of older subjects. This review contains all eligible studies from 2010 to 2015 and included 57 publications. We focused our attention on effects of botanical extracts on growth and health of muscle and divided these effects into five categories: anti-inflammation, muscle damage prevention, antifatigue, muscle atrophy prevention, and muscle regeneration and differentiation. PMID:27051451

  2. 78 FR 13931 - Delegation by the Secretary of State to the Assistant Secretary for International Security and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF STATE Delegation by the Secretary of State to the Assistant Secretary for International Security and Nonproliferation of Authority To Submit Certain Matters to Congress Regarding Implementation of the...

  3. Point-wise and whole-field laser speckle intensity fluctuation measurements applied to botanical specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yang; Wang, Junlan; Wu, Xiaoping; Williams, Fred W.; Schmidt, Richard J.

    1997-12-01

    Based on multi-scattering speckle theory, the speckle fields generated by plant specimens irradiated by laser light have been studied using a pointwise method. In addition, a whole-field method has been developed with which entire botanical specimens may be studied. Results are reported from measurements made on tomato and apple fruits, orange peel, leaves of tobacco seedlings, leaves of shihu seedlings (a Chinese medicinal herb), soy-bean sprouts, and leaves from an unidentified trailing houseplant. Although differences where observed in the temporal fluctuations of speckles that could be ascribed to differences in age and vitality, the growing tip of the bean sprout and the shihu seedling both generated virtually stationary speckles such as were observed from boiled orange peel and from localised heat-damaged regions on apple fruit. Our results suggest that both the identity of the botanical specimen and the site at which measurements are taken are likely to critically affect the observation or otherwise of temporal fluctuations of laser speckles.

  4. A review on botanical species and chemical compounds with appetite suppressing properties for body weight control.

    PubMed

    Astell, Katie J; Mathai, Michael L; Su, Xiao Q

    2013-09-01

    As obesity has reached epidemic proportions, the management of this global disease is of clinical importance. The availability and popularity of natural dietary supplements for the treatment of obesity has risen dramatically in recent years. The purpose of this paper was to review the effect of commonly available over the counter plant-derived supplements used to suppress appetite for obesity control and management. The data were obtained from the electronic databases PubMed, SpringerLink, Google Scholar, ScienceDirect, and MEDLINE with full text (via EBSCOHost) and the databases were accessed during late 2012 - early January 2013. The botanical species discussed in this review include Camellia sinensis, Caralluma fimbriata, Citrus aurantium, Coleus forskohlii, Garcinia cambogia and Phaseolus vulgaris. This review found that many botanical species including crude extracts and isolated compounds from plants have been shown to provide potentially promising therapeutic effects including appetite control and weight loss. However, many of these crude extracts and compounds need to be further investigated to define the magnitude of the effects, optimal dosage, mechanisms of action, long term safety, and potential side effects.

  5. Exploration of Novel Botanical Insecticide Leads: Synthesis and Insecticidal Activity of β-Dihydroagarofuran Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ximei; Xi, Xin; Hu, Zhan; Wu, Wenjun; Zhang, Jiwen

    2016-02-24

    The discovery of novel leads and new mechanisms of action is of vital significance to the development of pesticides. To explore lead compounds for botanical insecticides, 77 β-dihydroagarofuran derivatives were designed and synthesized. Their structures were mainly confirmed by (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, DEPT-135°, IR, MS, and HRMS. Their insecticidal activity was evaluated against the third-instar larvae of Mythimna separata Walker, and the results indicated that, of these derivatives, eight exhibited more promising insecticidal activity than the positive control, celangulin-V. Particularly, compounds 5.7, 6.6, and 6.7 showed LD50 values of 37.9, 85.1, and 21.1 μg/g, respectively, which were much lower than that of celangulin-V (327.6 μg/g). These results illustrated that β-dihydroagarofuran ketal derivatives can be promising lead compounds for developing novel mechanism-based and highly effective botanical insecticides. Moreover, some newly discovered structure-activity relationships are discussed, which may provide some important guidance for insecticide development.

  6. Cultivable microorganisms associated with honeys of different geographical and botanical origin.

    PubMed

    Sinacori, Milko; Francesca, Nicola; Alfonzo, Antonio; Cruciata, Margherita; Sannino, Ciro; Settanni, Luca; Moschetti, Giancarlo

    2014-04-01

    In this study, the composition of the cultivable microbial populations of 38 nectar honey and honeydew honey samples of different botanical and geographical origin were assessed. After growth in specific media, various colonies with different appearance were isolated and purified before phenotypic (morphological, physiological and biochemical traits) and genotypic [randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), repetitive DNA elements-PCR (rep-PCR) and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP)] differentiation. The identification was carried out by 16S rRNA gene sequencing for bacteria and, in addition to RFLP, by sequencing the D1/D2 region of the 26S rRNA gene for yeasts and the 5.8S-ITS rRNA region for filamentous fungi. The results showed the presence of 13 species of bacteria, 5 of yeasts and 17 of filamentous fungi; the species most frequently isolated were Bacillus amyloliquefaciens, Zygosaccharomyces mellis and Aspergillus niger for the three microbial groups, respectively. The highest microbial diversity was found in multifloral honeys. No correlation among the microbial species and the botanical/geographical origin was found, but some strains were highly adapted to these matrices since they were found in several samples of different origin.

  7. From Flower to Honey Bouquet: Possible Markers for the Botanical Origin of Robinia Honey

    PubMed Central

    Aronne, Giovanna; Giovanetti, Manuela; Sacchi, Raffaele; De Micco, Veronica

    2014-01-01

    Flowers are complex structures devoted to pollinator attraction, through visual as well as chemical signals. As bees collect nectar on flowers to produce honey, some aspects of floral chemistry are transferred to honey, making chemical markers an important technique to identify the botanical and geographical origins of honey. We applied a new approach that considers the simultaneous analysis of different floral parts (petals, stamens + pistils, calyxes + nectarines, and nectar) and the corresponding unifloral honey. We collected fresh flowers of Robinia pseudoacacia L. (black locust), selected five samples of Robinia honey from different geographical origins, applied SPME-GC/MS for volatile analyses, and defined the chemical contribution added by different floral parts to the honey final bouquet. Our results show that honey blends products from nectar as well as other flower parts. Comparing honey and flower profiles, we detected compounds coming directly from flower parts but not present in the nectar, such as hotrienol and β-pinene. These may turn out to be of special interest when selecting floral markers for the botanical origin of honey. PMID:25478595

  8. Toxins in botanical dietary supplements: blue cohosh components disrupt cellular respiration and mitochondrial membrane potential.

    PubMed

    Datta, Sandipan; Mahdi, Fakhri; Ali, Zulfiqar; Jekabsons, Mika B; Khan, Ikhlas A; Nagle, Dale G; Zhou, Yu-Dong

    2014-01-24

    Certain botanical dietary supplements have been associated with idiosyncratic organ-specific toxicity. Similar toxicological events, caused by drug-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, have forced the withdrawal or U.S. FDA "black box" warnings of major pharmaceuticals. To assess the potential mitochondrial liability of botanical dietary supplements, extracts from 352 authenticated plant samples used in traditional Chinese, Ayurvedic, and Western herbal medicine were evaluated for the ability to disrupt cellular respiration. Blue cohosh (Caulophyllum thalictroides) methanol extract exhibited mitochondriotoxic activity. Used by some U.S. midwives to help induce labor, blue cohosh has been associated with perinatal stroke, acute myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, multiple organ injury, and neonatal shock. The potential link between mitochondrial disruption and idiosyncratic herbal intoxication prompted further examination. The C. thalictroides methanol extract and three saponins, cauloside A (1), saponin PE (2), and cauloside C (3), exhibited concentration- and time-dependent mitochondriotoxic activities. Upon treatment, cell respiration rate rapidly increased and then dramatically decreased within minutes. Mechanistic studies revealed that C. thalictroides constituents impair mitochondrial function by disrupting membrane integrity. These studies provide a potential etiological link between this mitochondria-sensitive form of cytotoxicity and idiosyncratic organ damage.

  9. Piecing together the biogeographic history of Chenopodium vulvaria L. using botanical literature and collections.

    PubMed

    Groom, Quentin J

    2015-01-01

    This study demonstrates the value of legacy literature and historic collections as a source of data on environmental history. Chenopodium vulvaria L. has declined in northern Europe and is of conservation concern in several countries, whereas in other countries outside Europe it has naturalised and is considered an alien weed. In its European range it is considered native in the south, but the northern boundary of its native range is unknown. It is hypothesised that much of its former distribution in northern Europe was the result of repeated introductions from southern Europe and that its decline in northern Europe is the result of habitat change and a reduction in the number of propagules imported to the north. A historical analysis of its ecology and distribution was conducted by mining legacy literature and historical botanical collections. Text analysis of habitat descriptions written on specimens and published in botanical literature covering a period of more than 200 years indicate that the habitat and introduction pathways of C. vulvaria have changed with time. Using the non-European naturalised range in a climate niche model, it is possible to project the range in Europe. By comparing this predicted model with a similar model created from all observations, it is clear that there is a large discrepancy between the realized and predicted distributions. This is discussed together with the social, technological and economic changes that have occurred in northern Europe, with respect to their influence on C. vulvaria.

  10. Magnetic Microbead Affinity Selection Screening (MagMASS) of Botanical Extracts for Inhibitors of 15-Lipoxygenase.

    PubMed

    Rush, Michael D; Walker, Elisabeth M; Burton, Tristesse; van Breemen, Richard B

    2016-11-23

    To expedite the identification of active natural products in complex mixtures such as botanical extracts, a magnetic microbead affinity selection screening (MagMASS) procedure was developed. This technique utilizes target proteins immobilized on magnetic beads for rapid bioaffinity isolation of ligands from complex mixtures. A MagMASS method was developed and validated for 15-lipoxygenase. As a proof of concept, several North American prairie plants used medicinally by Native Americans were extracted with MeOH and screened. A hit from an extract of Proserpinaca palustris, also known as mermaid weed, was flagged for further characterization using high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry, dereplication, and identification using XCMS online. Through the application of high-resolution product ion tandem mass spectrometry, comparison with natural product databases, and confirmation using standards, the hit was identified as quercitrin, which is a known inhibitor of 15-lipoxygenase. The overall workflow of MagMASS is faster and more amendable to automation than alternative methods designed for screening botanical extracts or complex mixtures of combinatorial libraries.

  11. Piecing together the biogeographic history of Chenopodium vulvaria L. using botanical literature and collections

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This study demonstrates the value of legacy literature and historic collections as a source of data on environmental history. Chenopodium vulvaria L. has declined in northern Europe and is of conservation concern in several countries, whereas in other countries outside Europe it has naturalised and is considered an alien weed. In its European range it is considered native in the south, but the northern boundary of its native range is unknown. It is hypothesised that much of its former distribution in northern Europe was the result of repeated introductions from southern Europe and that its decline in northern Europe is the result of habitat change and a reduction in the number of propagules imported to the north. A historical analysis of its ecology and distribution was conducted by mining legacy literature and historical botanical collections. Text analysis of habitat descriptions written on specimens and published in botanical literature covering a period of more than 200 years indicate that the habitat and introduction pathways of C. vulvaria have changed with time. Using the non-European naturalised range in a climate niche model, it is possible to project the range in Europe. By comparing this predicted model with a similar model created from all observations, it is clear that there is a large discrepancy between the realized and predicted distributions. This is discussed together with the social, technological and economic changes that have occurred in northern Europe, with respect to their influence on C. vulvaria. PMID:25653906

  12. Experimental Investigation of the Deepening of the Combustion Front into Peat Layers Different in Botanical Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasymov, D. P.

    2017-01-01

    The deepening of the center of combustion into peat layers of different botanical compositions (pine-cotton grass and grass-sphagnum peats), typical for the Tomsk region, was investigated experimentally. Peats were ignited from a model ground forest fire initiated by firing of a needle-litter layer. As a result of laboratory investigations, the change in the temperature in the bulk of peat samples with time was determined and analyzed, and the rates of their combustion in the horizontal and vertical directions were estimated. It was established that a fire penetrates deep into a layer of grass-sphagnum peat, containing more than 70% of combustion conductors in its composition, more rapidly as compared to that of pine-cotton grass peat. The rates of combustion of grass-sphagnum peat in the vertical and horizontal directions are larger by 20 and 22%, respectively, than those of pine-cotton grass peat, which is evidently due to the botanical composition of grass-sphagnum peat and the random arrangement of components in its layers.

  13. A round-robin determination of boron in botanical and biological samples.

    PubMed

    Downing, R G; Strong, P L

    1998-01-01

    The accurate determination of boron (B) at trace and ultratrace concentrations is an important step toward establishing the role of B in biological functions. However, low-level B concentrations are difficult to determine accurately, especially for many botanical and biological matrices. A round-robin study was conducted to assess analytical agreement for low-level B determinations. Ten experienced research groups from analytical laboratories extending across Europe, Asia, and the US participated in this study. These groups represent a cross-section of academic, commercial, and government facilities. The researchers employed both ion-coupled plasma and neutron techniques in the study. Results from this round-robin study indicate good agreement between participating laboratories at the mg/kg level, but at the lowest levels, microg/kg, only three laboratories participated, and agreement was poor. By encouraging discussion among scientists over these data, the secondary goal of this round-robin study is to stimulate continued improvement in analytical procedures and techniques for accurate low-level B determinations. Furthermore, it is intended to encourage the development of a variety of low-level (low mg/kg and microg/kg) B certified reference samples in biological and botanical matrices. The results from the round-robin analyses were compiled and are summarized in this article.

  14. Ethnopharmacological information from the botanical correspondence of Berthold Seemann (1825 - 1871)--a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Helmstädter, A

    2015-09-01

    Historical research may be able to contribute to the exploration of traditional knowledge about medicinal plants and promising attempts have been made investigating Byzantine texts, Early Modern herbals, and writings of Christian missionaries. In this pilot study it should be explored if publications, travel reports, diaries or correspondence of the botanical explorers of the 19th and early 20th centuries may serve a source of ethnopharmacological information as well and may be able to guide modern phytopharmacological research. Writings of Berthold Seemann (1825-1871), a German investigator exploring the botany of Middle America, the Fiji islands and other regions, are investigated as a first example. It could be shown that Seemann's heritage mainly kept at Kew Garden Archives, does contain ethnopharmacological information which in part has already been confirmed by recent study results indicating some reliability of his observations. However, there are also reports about traditional medicinal plants scarcely investigated so far, including Schultesia stenophylla Mart. (syn. S. guainensis (Aubl.) Malme), Trixis inula Crantz, Waltheria glomerata Presl., Gonophlebium attenuatum (Humb. & Bonpl. Es Wil\\d) C. Presl., or Pseudoelephantopus spicatus (Juss ex Aubl.) C.F. Baker. It is suggested to further explore their potential as medicinal plants. In general, as Seemann's example has shown, publications and correspondence of botanical explorers of the past seem to be a valuable and hitherto almost neglected source of information to be considered in further historical and ethnopharmacological research.

  15. Botanical smuts and hermaphrodites: Lydia Becker, Darwin's botany, and education reform.

    PubMed

    Gianquitto, Tina

    2013-06-01

    In 1868, Lydia Becker (1827-1890), the renowned Manchester suffragist, announced in a talk before the British Association for the Advancement of Science that the mind had no sex. A year later, she presented original botanical research at the BAAS, contending that a parasitic fungus forced normally single-sex female flowers of Lychnis diurna to develop stamens and become hermaphroditic. This essay uncovers the complex relationship between Lydia Becker's botanical research and her stance on women's rights by investigating how her interest in evolutionary theory, as well as her correspondence with Charles Darwin, critically informed her reform agendas by providing her with a new vocabulary for advocating for equality. One of the facts that Becker took away from her work on Lychnis was that even supposedly fixed, dichotomous categories such as biological sex became unfocused under the evolutionary lens. The details of evolutionary theory, from specific arguments on structural adaptations to more encompassing theories on heredity (i.e., pangenesis), informed Becker's understanding of human physiology. At the same time, Becker's belief in the fundamental equality of the sexes enabled her to perceive the distinction between inherent, biological differences and culturally contingent ones. She applied biological principles to social constructs as she asked: Do analogous evolutionary forces act on humans?

  16. Toxins in Botanical Dietary Supplements: Blue Cohosh Components Disrupt Cellular Respiration and Mitochondrial Membrane Potential

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Sandipan; Mahdi, Fakhri; Ali, Zulfiqar; Jekabsons, Mika B.; Khan, Ikhlas A.; Nagle, Dale G.; Zhou, Yu-Dong

    2014-01-01

    Certain botanical dietary supplements have been associated with idiosyncratic organ-specific toxicity. Similar toxicological events, caused by drug-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, have forced the withdrawal or U.S. FDA “Black Box” warnings of major pharmaceuticals. To assess the potential mitochondrial liability of botanical dietary supplements, extracts from 352 authenticated plant samples used in traditional Chinese, Ayurvedic, and Western herbal medicine were evaluated for the ability to disrupt cellular respiration. Blue cohosh (Caulophyllum thalictroides) methanol extract exhibited mitochondriotoxic activity. Used by some U.S. midwives to help induce labor, blue cohosh has been associated with perinatal stroke, acute myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, multiple organ injury, and neonatal shock. The potential link between mitochondrial disruption and idiosyncratic herbal intoxication prompted further examination. The C. thalictroides methanol extract and three saponins, cauloside A (1), saponin PE (2), and cauloside C (3) exhibited concentration- and time-dependent mitochondriotoxic activities. Upon treatment, cell respiration rate rapidly increased and then dramatically decreased within minutes. Mechanistic studies revealed that C. thalictroides constituents impair mitochondrial function by disrupting membrane integrity. These studies provide a potential etiological link between this mitochondria-sensitive form of cytotoxicity and idiosyncratic organ damage. PMID:24328138

  17. International Cooperation in Science. Science Policy Study--Hearings Volume 7. Hearings before the Task Force on Science Policy of the Committee on Science and Technology, House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, First Session (June 18, 19, 20, 27, 1985). No. 50.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Science and Technology.

    These hearings on international cooperation in science focused on three issues: (1) international cooperation in big science; (2) the impact of international cooperation on research priorities; and (3) coordination in management of international cooperative research. Witnesses presenting testimony and/or prepared statements were: Victor Weisskopf;…

  18. Science and technology in the 101st Congress

    SciTech Connect

    Roush, W.

    1990-11-01

    Congressional say over science and technology is growing along with a consensus that the reins of management should accompany the power of the purse. This article outlines six key issues and how each member of Congress voted on them.

  19. Flying High in Philadelphia. "Congress Shall Make No Law. . ."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piel, Gerard

    1976-01-01

    Reviews congressional appropriations which have led to the development of science education curriculum materials and science teacher education. Describes the present reluctance of Congress to appropriate more funds for additional efforts. (CP)

  20. 17. Historic American Buildings Survey Original at Library of Congress, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Historic American Buildings Survey Original at Library of Congress, Pictorial Archives of Early American Architecture Arthur A. Snyder, Photographer AQUEDUCT BRIDGE, FEBRUARY 2,1900 - Potomac Aqueduct, Georgetown abutment at Georgetown waterfront, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  1. 111. STAN HYWET AND GROUNDS Member of Congress John F. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    111. STAN HYWET AND GROUNDS Member of Congress John F. Seiberling, photographer January 1942; 5' x 7' copy negatives made from 35 mm negatives loaned by Representative Seiberling - Stan Hywet Hall, 714 North Portage Path, Akron, Summit County, OH

  2. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-03-01

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identified an abnormal occurrence as an unscheduled incident or event that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health or safety and requires a quarterly report of such events to be made to Congress. This report covers the period from October 1 through December 31, 1990. The report discusses five abnormal occurrences, none of which involved a nuclear power plant. Two involved significant overexposures to the hands of two radiographers, two involved medical therapy misadministrations, and one involved a medical diagnostic misadministration. No abnormal occurrences were reported by the Agreement States. The report also contains information that updates a previously reported abnormal occurrence. 8 refs.

  3. Membership of the 109th Congress: A Profile

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-31

    includes data on party affiliation; average age and length of service; occupation; religious affiliation; female and minority Members; foreign-born...such as Greek Orthodox, Jewish, Christian Scientist, and The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints (Mormon), make up the balance. Female and...Minority Members Female Members. More women, 83, serve in the 109th Congress than have in any prior Congress. Sixty-nine in the House and 14 in the Senate

  4. Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV): Background and Issues for Congress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-09

    Background1 The JLTV is an Army- led , multi-service initiative to develop a family of future light tactical vehicles to replace many of the HMMWVs used...Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV): Background and Issues for Congress Andrew Feickert Specialist in Military Ground Forces March 9, 2015...SUBTITLE Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV): Background and Issues for Congress 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6

  5. Korea: U.S.-Korean Relations -- Issues for Congress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-16

    wounded in the Korean War (1950-53). The United States agreed to defend South Korea from external aggression in the 1954 Mutual Defense Treaty. The... Korean Relations — Issues for Congress Updated June 16, 2005 Larry A. Niksch Foreign Affairs, Defense , and Trade Division Report Documentation Page...A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Korea : U.S.- Korean Relations -- Issues for Congress 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c

  6. Virtualization of the Y.E.S. Congress 2009 Roundtable Symposia (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzales, L. M.; Gaines, S. M.

    2009-12-01

    The Y.E.S. Congress 2009 was the first international conference organized by the Y.E.S. Network, an association of early-career geoscientists who represent professional societies, geoscience companies, geoscience departments, and interested policy makers from across the world, in collaboration with the International Year of Planet Earth (IYPE). The conference, hosted by the China University of Geosciences in Beijing, focused on scientific and career challenges faced by early-career geoscientists, with a particular emphasis on how the Y.E.S. Network can work collaboratively and internationally towards solving these challenges and furthering the IYPE motto of “Earth Sciences for Society”. A key features of the Y.E.S. Congress was the implementation of “virtualized” roundtable symposia which engaged senior and early-career geoscientists via presentations, panel discussions, and working group sessions in which strategies related to scientific challenges (i.e. climate change in the polar regions, natural hazards, natural resource sustainability) and academic and career pathway challenges (i.e. academic-industry linkages, gender parity in the geosciences, geoscience education sustainability, and international licensure issues) were developed. These strategies were then tasked to the Y.E.S. Network for further development and implementation. The virtualization of the roundtable symposia facilitated active discussion between those participants and speakers who were physically located at the conference facilities in Beijing with a wider international audience of virtual participants and speakers. This talk will address the key features of the roundtable virtualization, the successes and challenges faced during the pre-conference set-up as well as during the roundtable sessions, and potential future applications.

  7. Reflections on the Medical Library Association's international activities.

    PubMed Central

    Poland, U H

    1982-01-01

    An overview of the Medical Library Association's past international activities is given with emphasis on the international fellowship program, international exchange of materials, participation in the International Federation of Library Associations, and international congresses on medical librarianship. Problems presented by cultural and educational differences, as well as governmental, political, and economic influences affecting international activities are enumerated. Lastly, continuation of the association's current international activities is endorsed, especially the extension of bilateral agreements with health sciences library associations of other countries, and increased activity in comparative medical librarianship. PMID:7150824

  8. Botanical trash mixtures analyzed with near-infrared and attenuated total reflectance fourier transform spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Botanical cotton trash mixed with lint reduces cotton’s marketability and appearance. During cotton harvesting, ginning, and processing, trash size reduction occurs, thus complicating its removal and identification. This trash causes problems by increasing ends down in yarn formation and thus proce...

  9. Investigation of the impact of instrumental and software applications on cotton and botanical trash identification by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Given the worldwide production, usage, and manufacturing of cotton, protocols that could identify botanical cotton trash components which can become comingled with cotton could be advantageous for quality assessment prior to spinning. Conventional methods such as the High Volume Instrument (HVITM) o...

  10. Discrimination of grassland species and their classification in botanical families by laboratory scale hyperspectral imaging NIR: preliminary results

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to discriminate by on-line hyperspectral imaging, taxonomic plant families comprised of different grassland species. Plants were collected from semi-natural meadows of the National Apuseni Park, Apuseni Mountains, Gârda area (Romania) according to botanical families. ...

  11. Talking about Plants--Comments of Primary School Groups Looking at Plant Exhibits in a Botanical Garden (ITS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tunnicliffe, Sue Dale

    2001-01-01

    Presents a study in which the conversations of primary school groups were collected in a botanical garden and analyzed for content. The data were examined for the effects of the presence or absence of an adult in the group, age, and the sex of the pupils. (Contains 27 references.) (Author/DDR)

  12. The Tandem of Full Spin Analysis and qHNMR for the Quality Control of Botanicals Exemplified with Ginkgo biloba

    PubMed Central

    Napolitano, José G.; Gödecke, Tanja; Rodríguez-Brasco, María F.; Jaki, Birgit U.; Chen, Shao-Nong; Lankin, David C.; Pauli, GuidoF.

    2012-01-01

    Botanical dietary supplements and herbal remedies are widely used for health promotion and disease prevention. Due to the high chemical complexity of these natural products, it is essential to develop new analytical strategies to guarantee their quality and consistency. In particular, the precise characterization of multiple botanical markers remains a challenge. This study demonstrates how a combination of computer-aided spectral analysis and 1D quantitative 1H NMR spectroscopy (qHNMR) generates the analytical foundation for innovative means of simultaneously identifying and quantifying botanical markers in complex mixtures. First, comprehensive 1H NMR profiles (fingerprints) of selected botanical markers were generated via 1H iterative Full Spin Analysis (HiFSA) with PERCH. Next, the 1H fingerprints were used to assign specific 1H resonances in the NMR spectra of reference materials, enriched fractions and crude extracts of Ginkgo biloba leaves. These 1H fingerprints were then used to verify the assignments by 2D NMR. Subsequently, a complete purity and composition assessment by means of 1D qHNMR was conducted. As its major strengths, this tandem approach enables the simultaneous quantification of multiple constituents without the need for identical reference materials, the semi-quantitative determination of particular sub-classes of components, and the detection of impurities and adulterants. PMID:22332915

  13. Discovery of Some Piperine-Based Phenylsulfonylhydrazone Derivatives as Potent Botanically Narcotic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Huan; Lv, Min; Yu, Xiang; Lian, Xihong; Xu, Hui

    2015-01-01

    By structural modification of piperine, some piperine-based phenylsulfonylhydrazone derivatives exhibited an unprecedented and potent narcotic activity against the oriental armyworm, Mythimna separata (Walker). The ND50 values of compounds 6c and 6e against the third-instar larvae of M. separata, which were more potent than those of wilfortrine and wilforgine, were 0.0074 μmol (after 3.5 h), and 0.0075 μmol (after 7 h) per larvae, respectively. By transmission electron microscope, it demonstrated that mitochondria were vacuolated and swollen in the ganglion cell of M. separata after treatment with 6c. More importantly, 6c selectively displayed the inhibition activity on acetylcholine esterase (AchE) of M. separata. This work paved the way for further studying the insecticidal mechanism of 6c as a new and promising botanical narcotic agent. PMID:26268805

  14. Cannabis sativa L. - Botanical Problems and Molecular Approaches in Forensic Investigation.

    PubMed

    Gigliano, G S

    2001-01-01

    An overview on legal regulation, taxonomy, and botanical and chemical methods of analysis of marijuana are provided. Emphases are placed on the applications of the recently developed molecular biology methods to the identification and characterization of marijuana samples. Procedures for the extraction of plant DNA, DNA amplification, restriction analysis, and sequence analysis are reviewed. The sequence analyses of the ITS1 and ITS2 of the n-rDNA [88,94]; the sequence of the trnL intron [95] and of the intergenic spacer between the trnL 3'exon and trnF gene of the cpDNA [56]; the RAPDs [26,34,89]; and the RFLPs [87,91,93] have been the most useful.

  15. [Natural resources of Central America: the origin of the botanical expedition to Guatemala].

    PubMed

    Maldonado Polo, J L

    1995-01-01

    The scientific commission to Central America originated like a continuation of the three big botanical Spanish expeditions being carried out during the reign of Carlos III through the American territories. The presence of the naturalists José Longinos Martínez and José Mociño, and the painter Vicente de la Cerda at the capital of Guatemala was reason of great interest in the "Capitanía General", and it caused great impact on the Enlightened institutions of the time. Friends' of the Country Economical Society and the Consulado of commerce supported the works of the members of the expedition contributing to the institutionalization of the Natural History in Central America.

  16. The classical drug discovery approach to defining bioactive constituents of botanicals.

    PubMed

    Kinghorn, A Douglas; Chai, Hee-byung; Sung, Chung Ki; Keller, William J

    2011-01-01

    In this review, several recently identified biologically active principles of selected botanical dietary supplement ingredients are described, and were isolated using classical phytochemical chromatographic methods, with various spectroscopic procedures used for their isolation and structure elucidation. A central component of such an approach is "activity-guided fractionation" to monitor the compound purification process. In vitro assays germane to cancer chemoprevention were used to facilitate the work performed. Bioactive compounds, including several new substances, were characterized from açai (Euterpe oleracea), baobab (Adansonia digitata), licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra), mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana), and noni (Morinda citrifolia). Many of these compounds exhibited quite potent biological activity, but tended to be present in their plant of origin only at low concentration levels.

  17. North American Artemisia species from the subgenus Tridentatae (Sagebrush): a phytochemical, botanical and pharmacological review.

    PubMed

    Turi, Christina E; Shipley, Paul R; Murch, Susan J

    2014-02-01

    The genus Artemisia consists of between 350 and 500 species with most of the North American endemic Artemisia species contained within the subgenus Tridentatae (Sagebrush). The reported uses of these species by Native American and First Nations peoples include analgesic, antiinflammatory, antiseptic, immunostimulation activity, as well as the treatment of afflictions from spiritual origins. Taxonomic revision for North American Sagebrush has created a number of synonyms that confuse the literature. The phytochemical diversity of the Tridentatae includes at least 220 distinct and important specialized metabolites. This manuscript reviews the current phytochemical, botanical and pharmacological understanding for the subgenus Tridentatae, and provides a foundation for future studies of the metabolomes of the Tridentatae. Modern approaches to phytochemical analysis and drug discovery are likely to provide interesting lead compounds in the near future.

  18. Botanical geographical aspects of plants cultivated in Medea's garden of medical plants in Colchis.

    PubMed

    Gagnidze, R; Khelaia, N; Margalitadze, N; Batsatsashvili, K; Churadze, M

    2009-04-01

    The aim of the present work is to make a detailed investigation of the dissemination and dispersion of the plants which were cultivated in Medea's garden of medical plants in Colchis. It was found that the plants in the Medea's garden were highly heterogeneous from the point of plant geography. Plants from humid and arid Mediterranean basin, Near, Minor and East Asia zones were found in Medea's garden. Among the most important were the plants of floristic centers of Mediterranean basin. Study of the botanical geographical aspects of medical plants gave us opportunities to establish optimal time of dissemination of medical plants diasporas in Colchis; this process is associated with climate oscillations of Holocene and intensive migrations of peoples of Mediterranean.

  19. The determination of botanical origin of honeys based on enantiomer distribution of chiral volatile organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Špánik, Ivan; Pažitná, Alexandra; Šiška, Peter; Szolcsányi, Peter

    2014-09-01

    The enantiomer ratios of chiral volatile organic compounds in rapeseed, chestnut, orange, acacia, sunflower and linden honeys were determined by multi-dimensional gas chromatography using solid phase microextraction (SPME) as a sample pre-treatment procedure. Linalool oxides, linalool and hotrienol were present at the highest concentration levels, while significantly lower amounts of α-terpineol, 4-terpineol and all isomers of lilac aldehydes were found in all studied samples. On the other hand, enantiomer distribution of some chiral organic compounds in honey depends on their botanical origin. The significant differences in enantiomer ratio of linalool were observed for rapeseed honey that allows us to distinguish this type of honey from the other ones. The enantiomer ratios of lilac aldehydes were useful for distinguishing of orange and acacia honey from other studied monofloral honeys. Similarly, different enantiomer ratio of 4-terpineol was found for sunflower honeys.

  20. Evaluation of oxygen pressurized microwave-assisted digestion of botanical materials using diluted nitric acid.

    PubMed

    Bizzi, Cezar Augusto; Barin, Juliano Smanioto; Müller, Edson Irineu; Schmidt, Lucas; Nóbrega, Joaquim A; Flores, Erico Marlon Moraes

    2011-02-15

    The feasibility of diluted nitric acid solutions for microwave-assisted decomposition of botanical samples in closed vessels was evaluated. Oxygen pressurized atmosphere was used to improve the digestion efficiency and Al, Ca, K, Fe, Mg and Na were determined in digests by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES). Efficiency of digestion was evaluated taking into account the residual carbon content (RCC) and residual acidity in digests. Samples were digested using nitric acid solutions (2, 3, 7, and 14 mol L(-1) HNO(3)) and the effect of gas phase composition inside the reaction vessels by purging the vessel with Ar (inert atmosphere, 1 bar), air (20% of oxygen, 1 bar) and pure O(2) (100% of oxygen, 1 bar) was evaluated. The influence of oxygen pressure was studied using pressures of 5, 10, 15 and 20 bar. It was demonstrated that a diluted nitric acid solution as low as 3 mol L(-1) was suitable for an efficient digestion of sample masses up to 500 mg of botanical samples using 5 bar of oxygen pressure. The residual acidities in final digests were lower than 45% in relation to the initial amount of acid used for digestion (equivalent to 1.3 mol L(-1) HNO(3)). The accuracy of the proposed procedure was evaluated using certified reference materials of olive leaves, apple leaves, peach leaves and pine needles. Using the optimized conditions for sample digestion, the results obtained were in agreement with certified values. The limit of quantification was improved up to a factor of 14.5 times for the analytes evaluated. In addition, the proposed procedure was in agreement with the recommendations of the green chemistry once it was possible to obtain relatively high digestion efficiency (RCC<5%) using only diluted HNO(3), which is important to minimize the generation of laboratory residues.