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Sample records for international criminal tribunal

  1. Mock Tribunal in Action: Mock International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia. 10th Grade Lesson. Schools of California Online Resources for Education (SCORE): Connecting California's Classrooms to the World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fix, Terrance

    In this lesson, students role-play as members of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia that will bring to trial "Persons Responsible for Serious Violations of International Humanitarian Law." Students represent the following groups: International Criminal Tribunal; Prosecution; Defense; Serbians; Croatians; Bosnian Muslims;…

  2. The psychiatric defence and international criminal law.

    PubMed

    Tobin, John

    2007-01-01

    Following the development of the International Criminal Court (ICC) the mental state of the perpetrators of genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes will become a more important issue in regard to defence and mitigating factors. This article examines how the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY) in particular has dealt with the mental illness defence to date, and how its judgements can serve as guidance for the ICC as it becomes the major international court of the future. The absence of a mental health defence in the Statutes of the ICTY and the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda has led to a reliance on the Rules of Procedure and Evidence of the two tribunals. There are major difficulties in using the mental health defence as it is defined in the Statutes of the ICC because of a requirement for the destruction of mental capacity as a valid defence. Fitness to plead and the defence of intoxication are also examined.

  3. Tribunal on the policies of the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank, West Berlin, September 26-29, 1988: verdict. Permanent Peoples' Tribunal.

    PubMed

    1990-01-01

    At the request of the American Association of Jurists, the Permanent Peoples' Tribunal was called upon to consider violations of international law of the self-determination of peoples by the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank, as well as to make proposals for change. The Tribunal declared the request to be admissible, in accordance with Article 3 of the Statutes; therefore, the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank were informed, in application of the provisions of Articles 14 and 15. The Tribunal convened in West Berlin, September 26-29, 1988. Presented here is the report of the Tribunal, including its verdict and proposals for action. PMID:2332266

  4. Personality disorders and criminal law: an international perspective.

    PubMed

    Sparr, Landy F

    2009-01-01

    At the International War Crimes Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY), a detention camp guard, charged with acts of murder and torture, advanced a plea of diminished responsibility. Defense psychiatrists testified that he had a personality disorder that influenced his ability to control his behavior, but a prosecution expert testified that the guard did not meet Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR) criteria. Thus, the unresolved question of how the law defines a mental disease or defect for purposes of mitigation or excuse was transposed to an international setting. It has been argued in a variety of jurisdictions and national legal systems that exculpatory mental disorders must be serious, and personality disorders should not qualify. In fact, it has been proposed that the volitional aspect of excuse defenses be eliminated, and definitions of mental disease or defect narrowed. Others have argued that such exclusions are too restrictive and arbitrary. This article examines the criminal defense at ICTY and traces its origin in national jurisdictions. Mental incapacity defenses based on personality disorders are more often used in The Netherlands, England, Germany and Belgium, but seldom in Canada and rarely in the United States and Sweden.

  5. Fitness to stand trial under international criminal law: the historical context.

    PubMed

    Freckelton, Ian; Karagiannakis, Magda

    2014-06-01

    Decision-making about fitness to stand trial and the consequences of a finding of unfitness are fundamental to the integrity of any criminal justice system. They create thresholds for when mentally and physically unwell people are mandated to participate in criminal proceedings and they address the outcomes of such decisions for unwell accused persons. The jurisprudence relating to fitness to stand trial under international criminal law has particular challenges and complexities. The origins of contemporary controversies and the bases for modern decisions lie in rulings by the Nuremberg and Tokyo tribunals in the immediate aftermath of the Second World War. The decisions relating to Gustav Krupp, Rudolf Hess, Julius Streicher and Shumei Okawa wrestled with issues that have since recurred in respect of how trial systems should respond to unwellness going to the heart of whether persons can participate meaningfully in their own trials but dealing too with the temptation for persons accused of matters as serious as crimes against humanity and genocide to malinger, exaggerate symptomatology and to generate delays for strategic objectives.

  6. Mental incapacity defenses at the War Crimes Tribunal: questions and controversy.

    PubMed

    Sparr, Landy F

    2005-01-01

    Following a report from the Secretary General in May 1993, the United Nations Security Council adopted Resolution 827 and its Statute establishing an International War Crimes Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY) located in The Hague, The Netherlands. Although such action has been discussed in the past, this is the first time the international community has established a tribunal to indict and try individuals for war crimes. The crimes had been previously "created" by multilateral international treaties. The ICTY Rules of Procedure and Evidence allowed for "any special defense, including that of diminished or lack of mental responsibility." Precise legal parameters of the defense were not specified. In 1998, a defendant at the ICTY "Celebici" Trial named Esad Landzo raised the defense of diminished mental responsibility. The Celebici Trial Chamber thus became the first legal body to consider reduced mental capacity as it applies to international criminal law. This article is an examination of the application of the affirmative defense of diminished responsibility at the ICTY and relates the process to the need for further definition of mental incapacity defenses at the newly established International Criminal Court (ICC). At the ICC preparatory commission, drafting material elements of crimes was emphasized, with less consideration given to mental elements. That diminished capacity and diminished-responsibility defenses have often confused scholars and practitioners alike is explored in this article with suggestions for further directions.

  7. Mental incapacity defenses at the War Crimes Tribunal: questions and controversy.

    PubMed

    Sparr, Landy F

    2005-01-01

    Following a report from the Secretary General in May 1993, the United Nations Security Council adopted Resolution 827 and its Statute establishing an International War Crimes Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY) located in The Hague, The Netherlands. Although such action has been discussed in the past, this is the first time the international community has established a tribunal to indict and try individuals for war crimes. The crimes had been previously "created" by multilateral international treaties. The ICTY Rules of Procedure and Evidence allowed for "any special defense, including that of diminished or lack of mental responsibility." Precise legal parameters of the defense were not specified. In 1998, a defendant at the ICTY "Celebici" Trial named Esad Landzo raised the defense of diminished mental responsibility. The Celebici Trial Chamber thus became the first legal body to consider reduced mental capacity as it applies to international criminal law. This article is an examination of the application of the affirmative defense of diminished responsibility at the ICTY and relates the process to the need for further definition of mental incapacity defenses at the newly established International Criminal Court (ICC). At the ICC preparatory commission, drafting material elements of crimes was emphasized, with less consideration given to mental elements. That diminished capacity and diminished-responsibility defenses have often confused scholars and practitioners alike is explored in this article with suggestions for further directions. PMID:15809241

  8. Postcode Criminals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hiett, Sandra; Kushner, Joann

    2013-01-01

    Postcode Criminals was the second phase of an international participatory community arts project challenging negative stereotypes of urban youth. Concerned with the impact of zero tolerance community policing strategies in the UK and USA, artists Joann Kushner and Dread Scott developed an art-based project with a social justice agenda. To give…

  9. 32 CFR 845.5 - Provision of bail in criminal cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Provision of bail in criminal cases. 845.5 Section 845.5 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE CLAIMS AND LITIGATION COUNSEL FEES AND OTHER EXPENSES IN FOREIGN TRIBUNALS § 845.5 Provision of bail in criminal...

  10. The HIV and AIDS Tribunal of Kenya

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Established under Section 25 of the HIV Prevention and Control Act of 2006, the HIV and AIDS Tribunal of Kenya is the only HIV-specific statutory body in the world with the mandate to adjudicate cases relating to violations of HIV-related human rights. Yet, very limited research has been done on this tribunal. Based on findings from a desk research and semi-structured interviews of key informants conducted in Kenya, this article analyzes the composition, mandate, procedures, practice, and cases of the tribunal with the aim to appreciate its contribution to the advancement of human rights in the context of HIV. It concludes that, after a sluggish start, the HIV and AIDS Tribunal of Kenya is now keeping its promise to advance the human rights of people living with and affected by HIV in Kenya, notably through addressing barriers to access to justice, swift ruling, and purposeful application of the law. The article, however, highlights various challenges still affecting the tribunal and its effectiveness, and cautions about the replication of this model in other jurisdictions without a full appraisal. PMID:27781008

  11. Analysis of Special Education Tribunal Outcomes Using Luhmann's Systems Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valeo, Angela; Underwood, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines Special Education Tribunals, in Ontario, Canada through a Luhmannian theoretical lens. At total of 58 Special Education Tribunal summary hearings were analyzed using the constant comparative method through NVivo software. The results revealed that these Tribunals appear to favour the assessment testimony of teachers and other…

  12. 32 CFR 516.56 - Witnesses before foreign tribunals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Witnesses before foreign tribunals. 516.56..., Travel, and Expenses of Witnesses § 516.56 Witnesses before foreign tribunals. (a) Referral to the SJA. Requests or subpoenas from a foreign government or tribunal for present DA personnel stationed or...

  13. Special Educational Needs Tribunal--A New British Innovation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khan, Anwar N.; Bloomer, Sheila

    1997-01-01

    Dissatisfaction with the previous special-education appeals system led Britain to adopt the 1993 Education Act, which created the Special Needs Tribunal (SENT). The tribunal aims to provide consistency of treatment within and among local education authorities and to avoid the confusion caused by varying and inconsistent LEA policies and decisions.…

  14. The Brazilian Audit Tribunal's role in improving the federal environmental licensing process

    SciTech Connect

    Lima, Luiz Henrique; Magrini, Alessandra

    2010-02-15

    This article describes the role played by the Brazilian Audit Tribunal (Tribunal de Contas da Uniao - TCU) in the external auditing of environmental management in Brazil, highlighting the findings of an operational audit conducted in 2007 of the federal environmental licensing process. Initially, it records the constitutional and legal framework of Brazilian environmental licensing, describing the powers and duties granted to federal, state and municipal institutions. In addition, it presents the responsibilities of the TCU in the environmental area, comparing these with those of other Supreme Audit Institutions (SAI) that are members of the International Organization of Supreme Audit Institutions (INTOSAI). It also describes the work carried out in the operational audit of the Brazilian environmental licensing process and its main conclusions and recommendations. Finally, it draws a parallel between the findings and recommendations made in Brazil with those of academic studies and audits conducted in other countries.

  15. Criminal Careers and Cognitive Scripts: An Investigation into Criminal Versatility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gavin, Helen; Hockey, David

    2010-01-01

    "Criminal careers" denotes ways in which offenders develop specialisms and versatility, but studies linking delinquency to social skills deficits have not attempted to explore cognitive, internalised processes by which such "careers" might be chosen. This study investigated criminal minds via script theory: "internal" scripts are used to guide…

  16. 32 CFR 776.44 - Impartiality and decorum of the tribunal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Impartiality and decorum of the tribunal. 776.44... ADVOCATE GENERAL Rules of Professional Conduct § 776.44 Impartiality and decorum of the tribunal. (a) Impartiality and decorum of the tribunal. A covered attorney shall not: (1) Seek to influence a judge,...

  17. 32 CFR 776.42 - Candor and obligations toward the tribunal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Candor and obligations toward the tribunal. 776... JUDGE ADVOCATE GENERAL Rules of Professional Conduct § 776.42 Candor and obligations toward the tribunal. (a) Candor and obligations toward the tribunal: (1) A covered attorney shall not knowingly: (i)...

  18. 31 CFR 535.222 - Suspension of claims eligible for Claims Tribunal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Claims Tribunal. 535.222 Section 535.222 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and... REGULATIONS Prohibitions § 535.222 Suspension of claims eligible for Claims Tribunal. (a) All claims which may be presented to the Iran-United States Claims Tribunal under the terms of Article II of...

  19. Photographic copy of October 4, 1931 New Orleans Morning Tribune ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photographic copy of October 4, 1931 New Orleans Morning Tribune newspaper article. Located in a photo album at the National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution, Archives Center, Work and Industry Division, Washington, D.C. OCTOBER 4, 1931 NEW ORLEANS MORNING TRIBUNE NEWSPAPER ARTICLE ANNOUNCING THAT THE WORK ON THE NEW BRIDGE IS EXPECTED TO START IN 90 DAYS. - Huey P. Long Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River approximately midway between nine & twelve mile points upstream from & west of New Orleans, Jefferson, Jefferson Parish, LA

  20. Photographic copy of September 16, 1931 New Orleans Morning Tribune ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photographic copy of September 16, 1931 New Orleans Morning Tribune newspaper article. Located in a photo album at the National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution, Archives Center, Work and Industry Division, Washington, D.C. SEPTEMBER 16, 1931 NEW ORLEANS MORNING TRIBUNE NEWSPAPER ARTICLE AND PICTURE OF BRIDGE BID OPENING FEATURING LOUISIANA GOVERNOR HUEY LONG, NEW ORLEANS MAYOR WALMSLEY, STATE HIGHWAY COMMISSION CHAIRMAN O.K. ALLEN AND PUBLIC BELT RAILROAD CHIEF ENGINEER ROBERT BARCLAY. - Huey P. Long Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River approximately midway between nine & twelve mile points upstream from & west of New Orleans, Jefferson, Jefferson Parish, LA

  1. 32 CFR 776.45 - Extra-tribunal statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Extra-tribunal statements. 776.45 Section 776.45 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY MISCELLANEOUS RULES PROFESSIONAL... possibility of a plea of guilty to the offense or the existence or contents of any confession, admission,...

  2. 32 CFR 776.45 - Extra-tribunal statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Extra-tribunal statements. 776.45 Section 776.45 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY MISCELLANEOUS RULES PROFESSIONAL... possibility of a plea of guilty to the offense or the existence or contents of any confession, admission,...

  3. 32 CFR 776.45 - Extra-tribunal statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Extra-tribunal statements. 776.45 Section 776.45 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY MISCELLANEOUS RULES PROFESSIONAL... possibility of a plea of guilty to the offense or the existence or contents of any confession, admission,...

  4. 77 FR 51604 - Certification Related to the Khmer Rouge Tribunal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-24

    ... United Nations and Government of Cambodia are taking credible steps to address allegations of corruption... taking credible steps to address allegations of corruption and mismanagement within the tribunal... address allegations of corruption and mismanagement within the ECCC. Deputy Secretary Nides has signed...

  5. 32 CFR 776.45 - Extra-tribunal statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... performance or results of any forensic examination or test or the refusal or failure of a person to submit to an examination or test, or the identity or nature of physical evidence expected to be presented; (iv... as evidence before a tribunal and would, if disclosed, create a substantial risk of...

  6. 22 CFR 1101.16 - Criminal penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Criminal penalties. 1101.16 Section 1101.16 Foreign Relations INTERNATIONAL BOUNDARY AND WATER COMMISSION, UNITED STATES AND MEXICO, UNITED STATES SECTION PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 § 1101.16 Criminal penalties. (a) Under the provisions of the Act, it is...

  7. 22 CFR 1101.16 - Criminal penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Criminal penalties. 1101.16 Section 1101.16 Foreign Relations INTERNATIONAL BOUNDARY AND WATER COMMISSION, UNITED STATES AND MEXICO, UNITED STATES SECTION PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 § 1101.16 Criminal penalties. (a) Under the provisions of the Act, it is...

  8. 22 CFR 210.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Criminal drug statute. 210.625 Section 210.625 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 210.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means a Federal...

  9. 22 CFR 210.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Criminal drug statute. 210.625 Section 210.625 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 210.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means a Federal...

  10. Assisted Death: The Risks and Benefits of Tribunal Approval.

    PubMed

    Handelman, Mark

    2016-02-01

    Should every request for physician-assisted death require approval from some kind of independent tribunal? The benefits include consistent interpretation of statutory or judge-created guidelines from hospital to hospital, accurate reporting of assisted deaths, a process that protects vulnerable patients and health practitioners, and assurance to the public that the process has sufficient safeguards. On the other hand, such a process might cause delays for persons suffering intolerably. Accessibility might be a problem, and there is the risk that the patient's personal health information becomes fodder for media sensationalism. The author weighs these risks and benefits and concludes that a tribunal approval process is a transparent system capable of helping the law clearly gel in a way that provides guidelines, encourages trust in the healthcare process generally and the assisted death process specifically. I PMID:27169206

  11. Country watch: international.

    PubMed

    Dionne, P

    1998-01-01

    The International Tribunal for Children's Rights (ITCR) was established to conduct individual and public inquiries and propose concrete solutions to violations of children's rights. This article reports on the efforts of the ITCR to enforce extraterritorial laws in response to the international dimension of child sex exploitation. The primary message being advocated is that travelers cannot go to foreign countries to engage in sexual crimes against children, evade criminal prosecution in the countries where the crimes are committed and then expect to return home without any consequences. In its first public hearings held in Paris, France to the address the effectiveness of extraterritorial legislation, governments and nongovernmental organizations informed the ITCR about their attempts to halt child sexual exploitation. Several changes needed to make extraterritorial laws more effective were cited. These include public awareness-raising; supporting existing instruments; application of preventive approaches to child abuse; and sensitizing and motivating judicial, police and administrative authorities to provide for the needs to fight child sex tourism. PMID:12348687

  12. Henry Ward Beecher: A Nation's Tribune.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandler, Daniel Ross

    Henry Ward Beecher was America's most prominent 19th century liberal preacher and a major spokesperson for New England Transcendentalism. His philosophy integrated four fundamental themes: the creation of a moral code based on the internalization of values and peer group pressures, the establishment of the reform ideal of the impartial nonpartisan…

  13. Termination of pregnancy under French law: from criminalization to a right in accordance with international developments on women's rights.

    PubMed

    Madanamoothoo, Allane

    2011-12-01

    Termination of pregnancy is the premature exit of the products of conception, which include the placenta, bag of waters, embryo or fetus from the uterus. In general, the term "termination of pregnancy" refers to non-medical termination of pregnancy, which is requested for different reasons other than medical ones. When such a request is made in countries where it is lawful, women have access to induced termination of pregnancy under lawful and limited conditions. However, in countries where the practice is illegal, women tend to suffer and die of complications from unsafe termination of pregnancy. Nowadays, there seems to be a worldwide trend towards the legalization of termination of pregnancy. The impact of international developments on women's rights has played an increasing role in improving access to termination of pregnancy. This article aims at describing how legalization of termination of pregnancy in France has become a right which is in accordance with international developments on women's rights. PMID:22397179

  14. Termination of pregnancy under French law: from criminalization to a right in accordance with international developments on women's rights.

    PubMed

    Madanamoothoo, Allane

    2011-12-01

    Termination of pregnancy is the premature exit of the products of conception, which include the placenta, bag of waters, embryo or fetus from the uterus. In general, the term "termination of pregnancy" refers to non-medical termination of pregnancy, which is requested for different reasons other than medical ones. When such a request is made in countries where it is lawful, women have access to induced termination of pregnancy under lawful and limited conditions. However, in countries where the practice is illegal, women tend to suffer and die of complications from unsafe termination of pregnancy. Nowadays, there seems to be a worldwide trend towards the legalization of termination of pregnancy. The impact of international developments on women's rights has played an increasing role in improving access to termination of pregnancy. This article aims at describing how legalization of termination of pregnancy in France has become a right which is in accordance with international developments on women's rights.

  15. Kenyan government to establish special tribunal for HIV-related issues.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Kelly

    2010-06-01

    On 21 January 2010, Kenyan government officials formally announced the creation of the first-ever tribunal dedicated to hearing legal issues related to HIV/AIDS. Among other things, the Tribunal will handle issues relating to the transmission of HIV; confidentiality of medical information and records; testing; access to healthcare services; discriminatory acts and policies; and HIV-related research.

  16. The Relative Ineffectiveness of Criminal Network Disruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duijn, Paul A. C.; Kashirin, Victor; Sloot, Peter M. A.

    2014-02-01

    Researchers, policymakers and law enforcement agencies across the globe struggle to find effective strategies to control criminal networks. The effectiveness of disruption strategies is known to depend on both network topology and network resilience. However, as these criminal networks operate in secrecy, data-driven knowledge concerning the effectiveness of different criminal network disruption strategies is very limited. By combining computational modeling and social network analysis with unique criminal network intelligence data from the Dutch Police, we discovered, in contrast to common belief, that criminal networks might even become `stronger', after targeted attacks. On the other hand increased efficiency within criminal networks decreases its internal security, thus offering opportunities for law enforcement agencies to target these networks more deliberately. Our results emphasize the importance of criminal network interventions at an early stage, before the network gets a chance to (re-)organize to maximum resilience. In the end disruption strategies force criminal networks to become more exposed, which causes successful network disruption to become a long-term effort.

  17. The Relative Ineffectiveness of Criminal Network Disruption

    PubMed Central

    Duijn, Paul A. C.; Kashirin, Victor; Sloot, Peter M. A.

    2014-01-01

    Researchers, policymakers and law enforcement agencies across the globe struggle to find effective strategies to control criminal networks. The effectiveness of disruption strategies is known to depend on both network topology and network resilience. However, as these criminal networks operate in secrecy, data-driven knowledge concerning the effectiveness of different criminal network disruption strategies is very limited. By combining computational modeling and social network analysis with unique criminal network intelligence data from the Dutch Police, we discovered, in contrast to common belief, that criminal networks might even become ‘stronger’, after targeted attacks. On the other hand increased efficiency within criminal networks decreases its internal security, thus offering opportunities for law enforcement agencies to target these networks more deliberately. Our results emphasize the importance of criminal network interventions at an early stage, before the network gets a chance to (re-)organize to maximum resilience. In the end disruption strategies force criminal networks to become more exposed, which causes successful network disruption to become a long-term effort. PMID:24577374

  18. The relative ineffectiveness of criminal network disruption.

    PubMed

    Duijn, Paul A C; Kashirin, Victor; Sloot, Peter M A

    2014-02-28

    Researchers, policymakers and law enforcement agencies across the globe struggle to find effective strategies to control criminal networks. The effectiveness of disruption strategies is known to depend on both network topology and network resilience. However, as these criminal networks operate in secrecy, data-driven knowledge concerning the effectiveness of different criminal network disruption strategies is very limited. By combining computational modeling and social network analysis with unique criminal network intelligence data from the Dutch Police, we discovered, in contrast to common belief, that criminal networks might even become 'stronger', after targeted attacks. On the other hand increased efficiency within criminal networks decreases its internal security, thus offering opportunities for law enforcement agencies to target these networks more deliberately. Our results emphasize the importance of criminal network interventions at an early stage, before the network gets a chance to (re-)organize to maximum resilience. In the end disruption strategies force criminal networks to become more exposed, which causes successful network disruption to become a long-term effort.

  19. Transnational criminal organizations and drug trafficking.

    PubMed

    Williams, P; Florez, C

    1994-01-01

    Transnational criminal organizations, particularly drug-trafficking organizations, operate unrestricted across international borders. They are very similar in kind to legitimate transnational corporations in structure, strength, size, geographical range and scope of their operations. Above all other features they engage in unregulated forms of capitalist enterprise. To fully understand transnational criminal organizations it is necessary to examine them as organizations responding to economic opportunities and focus on the factors that influence their emergence. Those factors can be understood as a result of the confluence of opportunities, pressures, incentives and resources at the global and national level. The present article identifies the key environmental factors relevant to the emergence of transnational criminal organizations, and explores the intrinsic relationship between those organizations, their home States and host States. It is those conditions which not only give rise to transnational criminal organizations, but also help to sustain them.

  20. Forensic psychiatry and the birth of the criminal insane asylum in modern Italy.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Mary

    2014-01-01

    This paper focuses on the creation of the criminal insane asylum in Italy between unification in 1861 and World War I. The establishment of criminal insane asylums was a triumph of the positivist criminology of Cesare Lombroso, who advocated for an institution to intern insane criminals in his classic work, Criminal Man (1876). As a context for the analysis of the birth of the criminal insane asylum in Italy, this essay also outlines the history of the insanity plea in Italian criminal law and the young discipline of psychiatry during the fifty years after Italian unification.

  1. Forensic psychiatry and the birth of the criminal insane asylum in modern Italy.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Mary

    2014-01-01

    This paper focuses on the creation of the criminal insane asylum in Italy between unification in 1861 and World War I. The establishment of criminal insane asylums was a triumph of the positivist criminology of Cesare Lombroso, who advocated for an institution to intern insane criminals in his classic work, Criminal Man (1876). As a context for the analysis of the birth of the criminal insane asylum in Italy, this essay also outlines the history of the insanity plea in Italian criminal law and the young discipline of psychiatry during the fifty years after Italian unification. PMID:24210450

  2. Crimes against Humanity: The Role of International Courts

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Éder Milton; Iglesias, José Roberto; Hallberg, Karen; Kuperman, Marcelo Néstor

    2014-01-01

    We study the role of international tribunals, like the International Criminal Court (ICC), as an effective way of reducing the number and/or gravity of crimes against humanity. The action of the ICC is directed against leaders that promote or tolerate these kinds of crimes, that is, political authorities, army commanders, civil leaders, etc. In order to simulate the action of the ICC we build a hierarchical society where the most important leaders have the highest connectivity and can spread their points of view, or their orders, through a chain of less but still highly connected deputy chiefs or opinion chieftains. In this way, if they practice misconduct, corruption, or any kind of discriminatory or criminal actions against individuals or groups, it would very difficult and improbable that they will be prosecuted by the courts of their own country. It is to alleviate this situation that the ICC was created. Its mission is to process and condemn crimes against humanity though a supranational organism that can act on criminal leaders in any country. In this study, the action of the ICC is simulated by removing the corrupt leader and replacing it by a “decent” one. However, as the action of the corrupt leader could have spread among the population by the time the ICC acts, we try to determine if a unique action of the ICC is sufficient or if further actions are required, depending on the degree of deterioration of the human rights in the hypothetical country. The results evidence the positive effect of the ICC action with a relatively low number of interventions. The effect of the ICC is also compared with the action of the local national judiciary system. PMID:24967894

  3. Crimes against humanity: the role of international courts.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Eder Milton; Iglesias, José Roberto; Hallberg, Karen; Kuperman, Marcelo Néstor

    2014-01-01

    We study the role of international tribunals, like the International Criminal Court (ICC), as an effective way of reducing the number and/or gravity of crimes against humanity. The action of the ICC is directed against leaders that promote or tolerate these kinds of crimes, that is, political authorities, army commanders, civil leaders, etc. In order to simulate the action of the ICC we build a hierarchical society where the most important leaders have the highest connectivity and can spread their points of view, or their orders, through a chain of less but still highly connected deputy chiefs or opinion chieftains. In this way, if they practice misconduct, corruption, or any kind of discriminatory or criminal actions against individuals or groups, it would very difficult and improbable that they will be prosecuted by the courts of their own country. It is to alleviate this situation that the ICC was created. Its mission is to process and condemn crimes against humanity though a supranational organism that can act on criminal leaders in any country. In this study, the action of the ICC is simulated by removing the corrupt leader and replacing it by a "decent" one. However, as the action of the corrupt leader could have spread among the population by the time the ICC acts, we try to determine if a unique action of the ICC is sufficient or if further actions are required, depending on the degree of deterioration of the human rights in the hypothetical country. The results evidence the positive effect of the ICC action with a relatively low number of interventions. The effect of the ICC is also compared with the action of the local national judiciary system.

  4. Crimes against humanity: the role of international courts.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Eder Milton; Iglesias, José Roberto; Hallberg, Karen; Kuperman, Marcelo Néstor

    2014-01-01

    We study the role of international tribunals, like the International Criminal Court (ICC), as an effective way of reducing the number and/or gravity of crimes against humanity. The action of the ICC is directed against leaders that promote or tolerate these kinds of crimes, that is, political authorities, army commanders, civil leaders, etc. In order to simulate the action of the ICC we build a hierarchical society where the most important leaders have the highest connectivity and can spread their points of view, or their orders, through a chain of less but still highly connected deputy chiefs or opinion chieftains. In this way, if they practice misconduct, corruption, or any kind of discriminatory or criminal actions against individuals or groups, it would very difficult and improbable that they will be prosecuted by the courts of their own country. It is to alleviate this situation that the ICC was created. Its mission is to process and condemn crimes against humanity though a supranational organism that can act on criminal leaders in any country. In this study, the action of the ICC is simulated by removing the corrupt leader and replacing it by a "decent" one. However, as the action of the corrupt leader could have spread among the population by the time the ICC acts, we try to determine if a unique action of the ICC is sufficient or if further actions are required, depending on the degree of deterioration of the human rights in the hypothetical country. The results evidence the positive effect of the ICC action with a relatively low number of interventions. The effect of the ICC is also compared with the action of the local national judiciary system. PMID:24967894

  5. A just alternative. Church tribunals may be the best forum for settling wrongful discharge disputes.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, J M; Fitzgerald, L M

    1991-09-01

    The threat of a wrongful discharge lawsuit should be a concern for every employer. However, Church employers can minimize their risk if they follow Church teaching in their employment practices and policies and if they use the Church tribunal system to settle employer-employee disputes. As it originally developed in common law, the "employment-at-will" concept stipulated that an employer could discharge an employee at any time, for any reason, or for no reason at all. Most states have adopted this common law concept, although courts and legislatures have created a number of exceptions to it. Despite these exceptions, employment-at-will has proven to be a powerful tool in the hands of employers. However, employees of Church institutions who feel they have been discharged wrongfully can turn to Church tribunals, which are governed by canon law. A Church tribunal can do virtually anything a civil court can do, with the exception of ordering someone to jail. Moreover, because the standards of justice and equity applied by Church tribunals are stricter than those applied by American courts, employees of Catholic institutions in the United States may make increasing use of them in the future. Disputes that come before a Church tribunal will be settled by either arbitration or mediation. Arbitration is a kind of informal litigation. Mediation, however, is preferable because it forces the parties involved to examine themselves, their motives, and their effects on each other and the Church as a whole.

  6. "The Tribunal Was the Most Stressful Thing: More Stressful than My Son's Diagnosis or Behaviour"--The Experiences of Families Who Go to the Special Educational Needs and Disability Tribunal (SENDisT)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Runswick-Cole, Katherine

    2007-01-01

    It is more than 10 years since the Special Educational Needs Tribunal was established in 1994 as an independent panel which arbitrates in disputes between parents of children with the label special educational needs and Local Education Authorities (LEAs) in England. In 2002 the Tribunal began hearing claims for disability discrimination and was…

  7. Criminality and climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Rob

    2016-08-01

    The impacts of climate change imply a reconceptualization of environment-related criminality. Criminology can offer insight into the definitions and dynamics of this behaviour, and outline potential areas of redress.

  8. "Listen to the Voice of Reason": The "New Orleans Tribune" as Advocate for Public, Integrated Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melancon, Kristi Richard; Hendry, Petra Munro

    2015-01-01

    The "New Orleans Tribune" (1864-1870), the first black daily newspaper in the United States, was the singular text in the public South at its time to staunchly advocate for public, integrated education, anticipating the ruling of "Brown v. Board of Education," and arguing that separate education would always be synonymous with…

  9. Subject and source trends in the Star Tribune's coverage of the medical literature.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Lisa; Kelly, Julia Ann

    2003-04-01

    Medical developments are front-page news, and many health-related news reports are based on articles from the medical research literature. We analyzed the subjects and sources of literature-based medical news articles that appeared in Minnesota's largest newspaper, the Star Tribune, from May 1994 through December 2002. Data were collected by searching Health and Medicine in the News (http://www.biomed.lib.umn.edu/hmed), an online database that catalogues Star Tribune articles on health and medical topics. The most common topics of the 3,419 literature-based medical news articles appearing during the period were cancer, obesity/diet/exercise, and heart disease. The New England Journal of Medicine was the source cited most often, followed by the Journal of the American Medical Association, Science, and Nature. We compared the most common subjects covered in the news articles with those covered in MEDLINE and with the most common causes of death in the United States. Diet, smoking, AIDS, and Alzheimer's disease are represented much more often in the Star Tribune than in the medical literature in general, and articles on genetics and pregnancy were found much more often in the medical literature than in this sample of newspaper articles. Cancer and heart disease, which were the first and third most-often-covered topics in the Star Tribune, are 2 of the 3 top causes of death in this country.

  10. Genevieve Forbes Herrick: A "Chicago Tribune" Reporter Covers Women in Politics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steiner, Linda; Gray, Susanne

    Genevieve Forbes Herrick was one of the foremost women reporters of the "Chicago Tribune" during the 1920s and 1930s. Noted for her particular and consistent attention to women in national politics, her earliest political articles appeared in 1922, when she covered the Cook County primaries with an eye toward women contenders running against the…

  11. 78 FR 78463 - Summary of the Certification Related to the Khmer Rouge Tribunal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-26

    ... Social Affairs, mentally incompetent to stand trial. She was released from custody in September 2012... Independent Counselor and the effect that office has on the public perception of the ECCC--that the Tribunal's... monthly report to the UN Controller and the UN Department of Economic and Social Affairs, which...

  12. 31 CFR 535.222 - Suspension of claims eligible for Claims Tribunal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... be presented to the Iran-United States Claims Tribunal under the terms of Article II of the... Iran, dated January 19, 1981, and all claims for equitable or other judicial relief in connection with... or counterclaim in any pending or subsequent judicial proceeding commenced by the Government of...

  13. 31 CFR 535.222 - Suspension of claims eligible for Claims Tribunal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... be presented to the Iran-United States Claims Tribunal under the terms of Article II of the... Iran, dated January 19, 1981, and all claims for equitable or other judicial relief in connection with... or counterclaim in any pending or subsequent judicial proceeding commenced by the Government of...

  14. 31 CFR 535.222 - Suspension of claims eligible for Claims Tribunal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... be presented to the Iran-United States Claims Tribunal under the terms of Article II of the..., any political subdivision of Iran, or any agency, instrumentality or entity controlled by the Government of Iran or any political subdivision thereof. (c) Nothing in this section precludes...

  15. [Alcohol and criminal behavior].

    PubMed

    Arzt, G

    1990-05-01

    The topic 'alcohol and crime' has several aspects. This article shows how drug administration is based on a complex network of legal provisions and is enforced by criminal law sanctions. As to crimes influenced by alcohol, drunken driving is by far the most important and best researched field. Next, the article turns to the role of alcohol with regard to severe common crimes such as murder or child abuse. Finally, the issue of drunkenness as a defence is raised and the treatment of alcoholics as a criminal law sanction discussed.

  16. Some perspectives on criminalization.

    PubMed

    Lamb, H Richard; Weinberger, Linda E

    2013-01-01

    In recently published articles, there has been an underemphasis on the role serious mental illness (SMI) plays in causing persons to be in the criminal justice system. Increasing attention has been paid to other factors, including criminogenic needs. While these needs may be present and contribute to criminal behavior, persons with SMI who are at greatest risk of criminalization are those who are not receiving adequate treatment, structure, social control, and, when necessary, 24-hour care in the mental health system. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) has been used to reduce recidivism for prisoners, including those with SMI, but persons impaired by their untreated psychotic symptoms may not be able to profit from it. The importance of psychiatric treatment must not be underestimated. Moreover, given their current constraints, correctional systems may not be able to continue accepting large numbers of persons with SMI. Many offenders with serious mental illness pose difficult and expensive problems in treatment and management, such as nonadherence to medication, potential for violence, and substance abuse. The mental health system needs to be given more funding and to take more responsibility for these challenging individuals. PMID:23771942

  17. Age and criminal poisonings.

    PubMed

    Stankova, Evgenia; Gesheva, Margarita; Hubenova, Aneta

    2005-01-01

    We present a series of 8 cases of acute combined poisonings, occurred in an identical way in patients over 70 years of age for a period of 6 months. The way of exposure, characteristic of the clinical presentation, complications and the outcome of the intoxications, as well as the therapeutic approach is described. In all of the cases combined drug intoxication with benzodiazepines and opiates have been proved. The impact of the combination of two toxic substances: the first causing rapid and brief suppression of the consciousness and the second, causing prolonged continuation of the already suppressed consciousness, on the clinical course is discussed. The similarities in the circumstances of the exposure, clinical course of the poisonings, the identified toxic substances, lead to the consideration of criminal characteristic of the poisonings. The contact with the corresponding authorities brought off the disclosure of a group of criminals, committed the intentional intoxications with the aim of robbery. Age, with all its various characteristics, has been discussed as a factor for occurrence of criminal poisonings. PMID:16225098

  18. Criminal history systems: new technology and new directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Threatte, James

    1997-02-01

    Many forces are driving states to improve their current Criminal History and On-Line Criminal Justice Information Systems. The predominate factors compelling this movement are (1) the deterioration and cost of supporting older legacy systems, (2) current generation high performance, low cost hardware and system software, and (3) funding programs, such as the National Criminal History Improvement Program, which are targeted specifically at improving these important systems. In early 1996, SAIC established an Internal Research and Development project devoted to Computerized Criminal History Systems (CCH). This project began with an assessment of current hardware, operating system, and relational database technology. Application software design and development approaches were then reviewed with a focus on object-oriented approaches, three tier client server architectures, and tools that enable the `right sizing' of systems. An operational prototype of a State CCH system was established based on the results of these investigations.

  19. Addiction between therapy and criminalization.

    PubMed

    Birklbauer, Alois; Schmidthuber, Kathrin

    2014-12-01

    The present paper delves into the question of whether and to what extent it is appropriate to leave addiction problems between the conflicting priorities of therapy and criminalization. After outlining the issue the criminal addictive behaviour including crimes associated with drug misuse and with obtaining drugs is described. Subsequently it is discussed if and how you could make allowances for addiction-related legal insanity in the criminal law sector. Following a few remarks on the principle of "voluntary therapy instead of penal sanction" as a way to alleviate the strict law on narcotic drugs misuse a summary and an outlook with criminal-political demands complete the issue.

  20. Addiction between therapy and criminalization.

    PubMed

    Birklbauer, Alois; Schmidthuber, Kathrin

    2014-12-01

    The present paper delves into the question of whether and to what extent it is appropriate to leave addiction problems between the conflicting priorities of therapy and criminalization. After outlining the issue the criminal addictive behaviour including crimes associated with drug misuse and with obtaining drugs is described. Subsequently it is discussed if and how you could make allowances for addiction-related legal insanity in the criminal law sector. Following a few remarks on the principle of "voluntary therapy instead of penal sanction" as a way to alleviate the strict law on narcotic drugs misuse a summary and an outlook with criminal-political demands complete the issue. PMID:25377376

  1. Drug-associated psychoses and criminal responsibility.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Andrew; McSherry, Bernadette; Wood, Debra; Yannoulidis, Steven

    2008-01-01

    At present, the law draws a distinction when assigning criminal responsibility to those who commit offences while experiencing psychotic symptoms: if the symptoms are believed to arise because of ingesting drugs (an external cause), the offender is generally convicted of the offence; if the symptoms arise from a mental illness (an internal cause), the offender may be afforded a defence of insanity. In practice, drawing such a distinction can be problematic. There are difficulties for example in determining criminal responsibility when the use of drugs is followed by the emergence of a psychotic illness process that then continues to have an independent existence even in the absence of the ongoing substance use. This article analyses legal, policy, and expert witness perspectives relating to liberal, conservative, and intermediate approaches to this problematic area of jurisprudence.

  2. Victim-induced criminality.

    PubMed

    Fooner, M

    1966-09-01

    In summary, there are certain issues that need to be dealt with if a coherent system of victim compensation is to be created. 1) Is the victim's entitlement to compensation qualified by his behavior in connection with the crime? If a Texas tycoon visits a clip joint, flashes a fat roll of bills, and gets hit on the head and rolled, is he entitled to compensation? If a man enters into a liaison with another's wife and gets shot by the husband, should his dependents be compensated? If a woman goes walking alone in a disreputable neighborhood and is assaulted, is she entitled to compensation? Unless the answer to such questions is a flat "yes," the adjudication of victim compensation as a "right" would be embarkation upon a vast sea of confusion. On the surface it may seem simpler to bypass the issue of "right" and declare for victim compensation as a matter of social policy-a logical extension of the welfare state approach. But the apparent simplicity may quickly prove illusory, in light of the second issue. 2) Is the victim's entitlement to compensation on the basis of indigency to be qualified by the requirement that an offender be apprehended and his guilt determined by a court? There are two levels to this problem. First, if a severely injured man reports to police that he has been mugged and robbed and if the police cannot apprehend a suspect, how is the administrator of compensation to know that the man is in fact the victim of a crime? The administrator of compensation must determine whether the episode was a criminal act or an argument-and who started it, and who precipitated the violence. What shall be the role of the witnesses, and of investigators? More important is the second level of the problem: How will law-enforcement of ficials and the courts evaluate the testimony of the victim if compensation of the victim may be at stake? In the evaluation of proposals for victim compensation, criminologists may need to think very hard about such questions and

  3. [The pedophilic criminal].

    PubMed

    Heim, M; Morgner, J

    1985-02-01

    After a review of the literature dealing with pedophilia, the results of an analysis of 100 forensic psychiatric reports dealing with pedophile criminals are described. They show that, except for a few homosexual pedophiles, pedophilia is a pseudoperversion originating from different developmental conditions and, in individual cases, verifiable personality traits. The authors discuss problems involved in the forensic-psychiatric assessment of these delinquents. Attention is drawn to the necessity of purposeful, coordinated further education in this respect to enable the existing considerable discrepancies between forensic-psychiatric evaluation of these and other sexual deviants to be overcome.

  4. The Self-Stigma Process in Criminal Offenders

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Kelly E.; Tangney, June P.; Stuewig, Jeffrey B.

    2016-01-01

    Upon conviction, individuals receive the stigmatizing label “criminal offender.” Existing stereotypes about criminal offenders may be integrated into the self-concept, a phenomenon known as self-stigma. In many stigmatized groups, self-stigma is a robust predictor of poor functioning (Livingston & Boyd, 2010; Schomerus et al., 2011). However, little is known about how self-stigma occurs (Corrigan et al., 2006), and there has been limited research with criminal offenders. This study examines a theoretical model of self-stigma in which perceived stigma leads to stereotype agreement, internalized stigma, and then to anticipated stigma. A sample of 203 male jail inmates completed assessments of these constructs just prior to release. Results show a significant indirect path from perceived stigma to stereotype agreement to internalized stigma, but not to anticipated stigma. However, perceived stigma was directly related to anticipated stigma. In conclusion, perceived stigma affects the self through two processes: it indirectly leads to internalized stigma through one avenue, and directly leads to anticipated stigma through a separate avenue. Race, criminal identity, and attitudes toward criminals were examined as moderators. PMID:27761521

  5. A criminal offender introspective report.

    PubMed

    Barnett, O; Barnett, D J

    1975-08-01

    The development of a new scale suitable for research with the criminal offender was described. Based on the factor analysis of an item pool delineating sociopathic personality traits, five factors were derived to compose an 80-item criminal offender introspective report (COIR). PMID:1195092

  6. Drug Use and Criminal Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fink, Ludwig; Hyatt, Murray P.

    1978-01-01

    An overview of addiction and crime is presented. Crimes of violence and sex crimes are contrasted with non-violent criminal behavior when drug-connected. It is suggested that alternative methods of dealing with drug abuse and criminal behavior be explored, and that several previously discarded methods be re-examined. (Author)

  7. Craziness and criminal responsibility.

    PubMed

    Morse, S J

    1999-01-01

    This article addresses why mental disorder is relevant to criminal responsibility. It begins by considering the meaning of criminal responsibility because it is impossible to understand the relevance of mental disorder unless one understands responsibility clearly. The next section provides a theoretical account of responsibility and excuse in general and addresses common misconceptions about these topics. The third section examines in detail why mental disorder can sometimes produce either a complete or partial excusing condition, such as legal insanity or "partial responsibility," and whether the U.S. Constitution requires the provision of an excuse based on mental disorder. The section proposes that mental disorder should produce an excusing condition in appropriate cases. The next section considers the relation of mental disorder to mens rea, the mental state "element" that is a definitional criterion of most crimes, and whether the U.S. Constitution requires that defendants be permitted to use evidence of mental disorder to negate mental state elements of the crime charged. This section argues that mental disorder rarely negates mens rea, but in those cases in which a plausible claim for negation could be made, defendants should be allowed to make this claim.

  8. Avoiding criminal liabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Blattner, J.W. ); Bramble, G.M. )

    1994-06-01

    Armed with more than 120 investigative agents, the US Environmental Protection Agency, through its attorneys at the Dept. of Justice, charges 5 to 10 engineers and business people with criminal violations of the nation's environmental regulations in any given week. There are some 10,000 pages of federal (let alone state) environmental regulations. The rules apply to large and small companies alike. As a practical matter, the sheer scope and complexity of environmental regulatory programs make 100% compliance virtually unattainable for most industrial enterprises. Where it is no longer a defense to claim lack of knowledge of one's regulatory obligations, and where courts allow the inference of criminal knowledge based on what the defendant should have known, what is a company to do The environmental audit provides a solution to this problem. Progressive audit programs are established with three goals in mind: to ensure that programs and practices at facilities are in compliance with applicable rules and regulations; to affirm that management systems are in place at the facilities to support ongoing compliance; and to identify needs or opportunities where it may be desirable to go beyond compliance to protect human health and the environment. This paper discusses the implementation of an audit program.

  9. Rethinking Conceptual Definitions of the Criminal Career and Serial Criminality.

    PubMed

    Edelstein, Arnon

    2016-01-01

    Since Cesare Lombroso's days, criminology seeks to define, explain, and categorize the various types of criminals, their behaviors, and motives. This aim has theoretical as well as policy-related implications. One of the important areas in criminological thinking focuses chiefly on recidivist offenders who perform large numbers of crimes and/or commit the most dangerous crimes in society (rape, murder, arson, and armed robbery). These criminals have been defined as "habitual offenders," "professional criminals," "career criminals," and "serial offenders." The interest in these criminals is a rational one, given the perception that they present a severe threat to society. The main challenge in this area of research is a conceptual problem that has significant effects across the field. To this day, scholars have reused and misused titles to define and explain different concepts. The aim of this article is 3-fold. First, to review the concepts of criminal career, professional crime, habitual offenses, and seriality with a critical attitude on confusing terms. Second, to propose the redefinition of concepts mentioned previously, mainly on the criminal career. Third, to propose a theoretical model to enable a better understanding of, and serve as a basis for, further research in this important area of criminology.

  10. International consultation on the criminalization of HIV transmission: 31 October-2 November 2007, Geneva, Switzerland. Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) Geneva, United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), New York, 2007.

    PubMed

    2009-11-01

    Since the beginning of the HIV epidemic, some jurisdictions have applied criminal law to the transmission of HIV. In 2002, UNAIDS issued a policy options paper on this issue. In light of renewed calls for the application of criminal law to HIV transmission and concerns raised in this regard by the UNAIDS Reference Group on HIV and Humans Rights and others, UNDP and the UNAIDS Secretariat decided to bring together a number of legal experts and other concerned stakeholders to discuss this issue in the context of an effective human rights and public health response to HIV. The discussion would inform a UNAIDS/UNDP policy brief on this subject. It was clarified that the consultation would focus primarily on HIV transmission through sexual contact, although it was noted that concerns exist in relation to applying criminal law to HIV transmission in other contexts. This Bookshelf article consists of excerpts from the report of the meeting.

  11. "Bad genes" & criminal responsibility.

    PubMed

    González-Tapia, María Isabel; Obsuth, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    The genetics of the accused is trying to break into the courts. To date several candidate genes have been put forward and their links to antisocial behavior have been examined and documented with some consistency. In this paper, we focus on the so called "warrior gene", or the low-activity allele of the MAOA gene, which has been most consistently related to human behavior and specifically to violence and antisocial behavior. In preparing this paper we had two objectives. First, to summarize and analyze the current scientific evidence, in order to gain an in depth understanding of the state of the issue and determine whether a dominant line of generally accepted scientific knowledge in this field can be asserted. Second, to derive conclusions and put forward recommendations related to the use of genetic information, specifically the presence of the low-activity genotype of the MAOA gene, in modulation of criminal responsibility in European and US courts.

  12. "Bad genes" & criminal responsibility.

    PubMed

    González-Tapia, María Isabel; Obsuth, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    The genetics of the accused is trying to break into the courts. To date several candidate genes have been put forward and their links to antisocial behavior have been examined and documented with some consistency. In this paper, we focus on the so called "warrior gene", or the low-activity allele of the MAOA gene, which has been most consistently related to human behavior and specifically to violence and antisocial behavior. In preparing this paper we had two objectives. First, to summarize and analyze the current scientific evidence, in order to gain an in depth understanding of the state of the issue and determine whether a dominant line of generally accepted scientific knowledge in this field can be asserted. Second, to derive conclusions and put forward recommendations related to the use of genetic information, specifically the presence of the low-activity genotype of the MAOA gene, in modulation of criminal responsibility in European and US courts. PMID:25708001

  13. The influence of actuarial risk assessment in clinical judgments and tribunal decisions about mentally disordered offenders in maximum security.

    PubMed

    Hilton, N Z; Simmons, J L

    2001-08-01

    Research has shown that actuarial assessments of violence risk are consistently more accurate than unaided judgments by clinicians, and it has been suggested that the availability of actuarial instruments will improve forensic decision making. This study examined clinical judgments and autonomous review tribunal decisions to detain forensic patients in maximum security. Variables included the availability of an actuarial risk report at the time of decision making, patient characteristics and history, and clinical presentation over the previous year. Detained and transferred patients did not differ in their actuarial risk of violent recidivism. The best predictor of tribunal decision was the senior clinician's testimony. There was also no significant association between the actuarial risk score and clinicians' opinions. Whether the actuarial report was available at the time of decision making did not alter the statistical model of either clinical judgments or tribunal decisions. Implications for the use of actuarial risk assessment in forensic decision making are discussed.

  14. Unethical conduct by the nurse: a critical discourse analysis of Nurses Tribunal inquiries.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Kathleen A

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to uncover and critically examine hidden assumptions that underpin the findings of nurses' unethical conduct arising from inquiries conducted by the Nurses Tribunal in New South Wales. This was a qualitative study located within a post-structural theoretical framework. Transcripts of five inquiries conducted between 1998 and 2003 were analysed using critical discourse analysis. The findings revealed two dominant discourses that were drawn upon in the inquiries to construct nurses' conduct as unethical. These were discourses of trust and accountability. The way the nurses were spoken about during the inquiries was shaped by normalising judgements that were used to discursively position the nurse through narrative.

  15. Handedness, criminality, and sexual offending.

    PubMed

    Bogaert, A F

    2001-01-01

    A very large database was used to investigate whether men with a history of criminality and/or sexual offending have a higher incidence of nonright-handedness (NRH) relative to a control sample of nonoffender men. The sample (N>8000) comprised interviews by investigators at the Kinsey Institute for Sex and Reproduction in Indiana. The general offender group and a subsample of sex offenders (e.g. pedophiles) had a significantly higher rate of NRH relative to the control (nonoffender) men. In addition, evidence was found that the general criminality/NRH relationship might result from increased educational difficulties that some nonright-handers experience. In contrast, education was unrelated to the handedness/pedophilia relationship, suggesting that there may be a different mechanism underlying the handedness/pedophile relationship than the handedness/(general) criminality relationship. Finally, as a cautionary note, it is stressed that the effects are small and that NRH should not be used as a marker of criminality.

  16. What the Rule of Law Should Mean in Civics Education: From the "Following Orders" Defence to the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minow, Martha

    2006-01-01

    Sixty years after the International Military Tribunal opened in Nuremberg to try "major war criminals", how should soldiers learn not to follow clearly illegal or unconscionable orders? Following the Charter of the International Military Tribunal, judges during the Nuremberg Trials rejected defendants' efforts to avoid punishment on the basis of…

  17. [Economic criminality. Problems of definition and lines of research].

    PubMed

    Di Gennaro, G; Vetere, E

    1977-01-01

    After reviewing the many proposed definitions of economic criminality, which are now very numerous in specialized literature, and after considering the various critical attitudes assumed on this point by the most qualified experts on the subject, the Authors state that it is absolutely indispensable to establish an appropriate definition on which an aggreement can be reached. In fact, without such a definition it is impossible to deal with the object of interest and therefore to make any progress with the research, the legislation and the measures necessary for the prevention and repression of economic criminality. If this problem of economic criminality is discussed at the various national and international levels without the aforementioned definition, this is an indication that a popular intuition has been formed which is able to distinguish the object of interest. The most suitable lines of research are indicated in order to establish and clarify the elements of such an intuition which the Authors consider in a hypothetical light.

  18. Mentally disordered criminal offenders: legal and criminological perspectives.

    PubMed

    Dahlin, Moa Kindström; Gumpert, Clara Hellner; Torstensson-Levander, Marie; Svensson, Lupita; Radovic, Susanna

    2009-01-01

    Legal research in Sweden has traditionally focused on a systematization of the legal rules and their practical application, while the task of studying the effects of the application of the laws has been handed over to other branches of the social sciences. In contrast, new legal theories focusing on proactive and therapeutic dimensions in law have gained increasing attention in the international arena. These approaches may be better suited for evaluating legislation governing compulsory psychiatric care. Theoretical discussions and studies of causal mechanisms underlying criminal behaviour, as well as the implementation and value of instruments for predicting behaviour, are relevant to contemporary criminological research. Criminal behaviour varies across different groups of perpetrators, and the causes can be sought in the interplay between the individual and social factors. Multi-disciplinary efforts, integrating research from forensic psychiatry, psychology, sociology, and criminology, would be beneficial in leading to a better understanding of the causes underlying criminal behaviour.

  19. Statements of Special Educational Needs and Tribunal Appeals in England and Wales 2003-2013--In Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsh, Alan J.

    2014-01-01

    The study presents a statistical analysis of statements of special educational needs and Special Educational Needs and Disability (SEND) tribunal appeal rates in England and Wales. It is set against the backcloth of the 2014 Children and Families Act which replaces statements with Education, Health and Care (EHC) plans. The numerical overview…

  20. The Founding of the Penny Press: Nothing New under "The Sun,""The Herald," or "The Tribune."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Julie Hedgepeth

    While the founders of the penny press did not set out to establish a truer form of journalism, they did popularize both low prices for newspapers and newspaper economics based on sales instead of political party backing. The history of "The Sun,""The Herald," and "The Tribune" disprove the idea (advanced by journalism scholars) that the penny…

  1. The Impact of Special Education Tribunal Decisions on the Right of Exceptional Children to Support Services in Ontario.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godsell, Edward J.

    1993-01-01

    This study found that implementation of Special Education Tribunals under Ontario's Education Amendment Act 1980 has, in fact, expanded the educational rights of exceptional children including the right to program coordination. Review of cases suggests that future mandated services are likely to include the services of speech pathologists,…

  2. [Revision of the medical malpractice law? Malpractice in an international comparison].

    PubMed

    Deutsch, E

    1998-10-01

    An international comparison shows that the German criminal law is severe on physicians. In the majority of the other countries the doctor is just liable for criminal or gross negligence. There are some countries where lack of informed consent leads to a special criminal action. The comparative law shows us that it is better to keep the current criminal law.

  3. Neurologic disorder and criminal responsibility.

    PubMed

    Yaffe, Gideon

    2013-01-01

    Sufferers from neurologic and psychiatric disorders are not uncommonly defendants in criminal trials. This chapter surveys a variety of different ways in which neurologic disorder bears on criminal responsibility. It discusses the way in which a neurologic disorder might bear on the questions of whether or not the defendant acted voluntarily; whether or not he or she was in the mental state that is required for guilt for the crime; and whether or not he or she is deserving of an insanity defense. The discussion demonstrates that a just determination of whether a sufferer from a neurologic disorder is diminished in his or her criminal responsibility for harmful conduct requires equal appreciation of the nature of the relevant disorder and its impact on behavior, on the one hand, and of the legal import of facts about the psychologic mechanisms through which behavior is generated, on the other.

  4. Pathological States and Criminal Responsibility

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, D. Laurence

    1965-01-01

    The doctor is embarrassed in court when asked to testify to the effects of illness on a defendant's capability “of appreciating the nature and quality of an act or omission or of knowing that an act or omission is wrong”. The source of his difficulty is traced to the legal concepts of “guilt”, “crime” and “punishment” which imply a legal view of man at variance with our modern biological view. To abolish this discrepancy we need not accept a medical model for criminal law where “crime” is analogous to “disease”, and “punishment” to “treatment”. A pragmatic approach to the handling of the criminal could exclude the notions of “guilt” and “punishment” and yet fulfil the rational goals of protecting society from the criminal and of compensating his victims. PMID:14341653

  5. Neurologic disorder and criminal responsibility.

    PubMed

    Yaffe, Gideon

    2013-01-01

    Sufferers from neurologic and psychiatric disorders are not uncommonly defendants in criminal trials. This chapter surveys a variety of different ways in which neurologic disorder bears on criminal responsibility. It discusses the way in which a neurologic disorder might bear on the questions of whether or not the defendant acted voluntarily; whether or not he or she was in the mental state that is required for guilt for the crime; and whether or not he or she is deserving of an insanity defense. The discussion demonstrates that a just determination of whether a sufferer from a neurologic disorder is diminished in his or her criminal responsibility for harmful conduct requires equal appreciation of the nature of the relevant disorder and its impact on behavior, on the one hand, and of the legal import of facts about the psychologic mechanisms through which behavior is generated, on the other. PMID:24182391

  6. 31 CFR 100.13 - Criminal penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CURRENCY AND COIN Exchange of Coin § 100.13 Criminal penalties. Criminal penalties connected with the defacement or mutilation of U.S. coins are provided in the United States Code, Title 18, section 331....

  7. 31 CFR 100.13 - Criminal penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY EXCHANGE OF PAPER CURRENCY AND COIN Exchange of Coin § 100.13 Criminal penalties. Criminal penalties connected with the defacement or mutilation of U.S. coins are provided in the...

  8. Unethical conduct by the nurse: a critical discourse analysis of Nurses Tribunal inquiries.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Kathleen A

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to uncover and critically examine hidden assumptions that underpin the findings of nurses' unethical conduct arising from inquiries conducted by the Nurses Tribunal in New South Wales. This was a qualitative study located within a post-structural theoretical framework. Transcripts of five inquiries conducted between 1998 and 2003 were analysed using critical discourse analysis. The findings revealed two dominant discourses that were drawn upon in the inquiries to construct nurses' conduct as unethical. These were discourses of trust and accountability. The way the nurses were spoken about during the inquiries was shaped by normalising judgements that were used to discursively position the nurse through narrative. PMID:23378542

  9. Reviewing Tribunal cases and nurse behaviour: putting empathy back into nurse education with Bloom's taxonomy.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Kerrie; Hungerford, Catherine; Cruickshank, Mary

    2014-07-01

    Recent events in the UK and Australia have shown how poor patient outcomes are achieved when the behaviour of nurses lacks empathy. The UK's Francis Inquiry and the Keogh Report both call for an increase in the 'caring and compassion' of health care workers. A review of cases presented to the nurses' disciplinary tribunal in New South Wales' (Australia) also suggests that the majority of complaints against nurses in this jurisdiction is the result of callousness or lack of empathy. Such events reinforce the need for nurse educators to support nursing students to develop the affective attributes of caring and empathy. This paper considers how to raise the awareness of undergraduate students as a first step to developing empathy by using Bloom's Taxonomy of Educational Objectives; and includes a description of how to facilitate interactions with undergraduate nursing students about caring with empathy. Enculturating empathy is an evidence-based method of increasing compassionate care in health organisations generally.

  10. Clinical neuropsychology in the criminal forensic setting.

    PubMed

    Denney, R L; Wynkoop, T F

    2000-04-01

    This article reviews the application of clinical neuropsychology to criminal court proceedings, a complex, underserved, yet growing area of neuropsychological practice. The authors write from the perspective that the audience is primarily neurorehabilitation clinicians with limited experience in criminal matters. Discussions on the theoretical differences between clinical and forensic work, the forensic evaluation process with conceptual model, historical and current perspectives on criminal competencies and responsibility, prediction of dangerousness, and professional and ethical issues often encountered in criminal neuropsychology are provided.

  11. Pathological gambling and criminal responsibility.

    PubMed

    Rachlin, S; Halpern, A L; Portnow, S L

    1986-01-01

    There exists significant interdisciplinary support for eliminating the volitional component of the insanity defense. Somewhat in contrast to this trend is the presentation of pathological gambling as a potentially exculpatory condition in criminal trials. The authors discuss three federal appellate court decisions on this attempted inappropriate usage of psychiatric diagnostic nomenclature. All have upheld convictions, and thereby rejected contentions that such an impulse disorder can form the basis for a valid plea of lack of criminal responsibility. It is suggested that the public interest will be served by statutorily making disturbances of behavioral control insufficient to raise a defense of insanity.

  12. Voluntary intoxication and criminal responsibility.

    PubMed

    Marlowe, D B; Lambert, J B; Thompson, R G

    1999-01-01

    This paper reviews the law related to voluntary intoxication and criminal responsibility in the 50 United States, the District of Columbia, the US Virgin islands, and Puerto Rico. Statutory and case law citations are provided which govern the use of intoxication evidence in each jurisdiction to negate mens rea (i.e., to establish diminished capacity), to support an insanity defense, and to mitigate criminal sentencing. Factors that courts typically focus on when deciding whether to admit this evidence in a particular case are discussed, and these factors are related to clinically relevant criteria.

  13. Mentally disordered criminal offenders in the Swedish criminal system.

    PubMed

    Svennerlind, Christer; Nilsson, Thomas; Kerekes, Nóra; Andiné, Peter; Lagerkvist, Margareta; Forsman, Anders; Anckarsäter, Henrik; Malmgren, Helge

    2010-01-01

    Historically, the Swedish criminal justice system conformed to other Western penal law systems, exempting severely mentally disordered offenders considered to be unaccountable. However, in 1965 Sweden enforced a radical penal law abolishing exceptions based on unaccountability. Mentally disordered offenders have since then been subjected to various forms of sanctions motivated by the offender's need for care and aimed at general prevention. Until 2008, a prison sentence was not allowed for offenders found to have committed a crime under the influence of a severe mental disorder, leaving forensic psychiatric care the most common sanction in this group. Such offenders are nevertheless held criminally responsible, liable for damages, and encumbered with a criminal record. In most cases, such offenders must not be discharged without the approval of an administrative court. Two essentially modern principles may be discerned behind the "Swedish model": first, an attempted abolishment of moral responsibility, omitting concepts such as guilt, accountability, atonement, and retribution, and, second, the integration of psychiatric care into the societal reaction and control systems. The model has been much criticized, and several governmental committees have suggested a re-introduction of a system involving the concept of accountability. This review describes the Swedish special criminal justice provisions on mentally disordered offenders including the legislative changes in 1965 along with current proposals to return to a pre-1965 system, presents current Swedish forensic psychiatric practice and research, and discusses some of the ethical, political, and metaphysical presumptions that underlie the current system.

  14. 10 CFR 76.133 - Criminal penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Criminal penalties. 76.133 Section 76.133 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) CERTIFICATION OF GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANTS Enforcement § 76.133 Criminal penalties. (a) Section 223 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, provides for criminal sanctions...

  15. 10 CFR 76.133 - Criminal penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Criminal penalties. 76.133 Section 76.133 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) CERTIFICATION OF GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANTS Enforcement § 76.133 Criminal penalties. (a) Section 223 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, provides for criminal sanctions...

  16. 10 CFR 76.133 - Criminal penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Criminal penalties. 76.133 Section 76.133 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) CERTIFICATION OF GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANTS Enforcement § 76.133 Criminal penalties. (a) Section 223 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, provides for criminal sanctions...

  17. 10 CFR 76.133 - Criminal penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Criminal penalties. 76.133 Section 76.133 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) CERTIFICATION OF GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANTS Enforcement § 76.133 Criminal penalties. (a) Section 223 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, provides for criminal sanctions...

  18. 10 CFR 76.133 - Criminal penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Criminal penalties. 76.133 Section 76.133 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) CERTIFICATION OF GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANTS Enforcement § 76.133 Criminal penalties. (a) Section 223 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, provides for criminal sanctions...

  19. 10 CFR 55.73 - Criminal penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Criminal penalties. 55.73 Section 55.73 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) OPERATORS' LICENSES Enforcement § 55.73 Criminal penalties. (a) Section 223 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, provides for criminal sanctions for willful...

  20. 12 CFR 1807.905 - Criminal provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 9 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Criminal provisions. 1807.905 Section 1807.905 Banks and Banking COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS FUND, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY CAPITAL MAGNET FUND Terms and Conditions of Assistance § 1807.905 Criminal provisions. The criminal provisions...

  1. 12 CFR 1807.905 - Criminal provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 9 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Criminal provisions. 1807.905 Section 1807.905 Banks and Banking COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS FUND, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY CAPITAL MAGNET FUND Terms and Conditions of Assistance § 1807.905 Criminal provisions. The criminal provisions...

  2. 12 CFR 1807.905 - Criminal provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Criminal provisions. 1807.905 Section 1807.905 Banks and Banking COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS FUND, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY CAPITAL MAGNET FUND Terms and Conditions of Assistance § 1807.905 Criminal provisions. The criminal provisions...

  3. 12 CFR 1807.905 - Criminal provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Criminal provisions. 1807.905 Section 1807.905 Banks and Banking COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS FUND, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY CAPITAL MAGNET FUND Terms and Conditions of Assistance § 1807.905 Criminal provisions. The criminal provisions...

  4. The Japanese Criminal Thinking Inventory: Development, Reliability, and Initial Validation of a New Scale for Assessing Criminal Thinking in a Japanese Offender Population.

    PubMed

    Kishi, Kaori; Takeda, Fumi; Nagata, Yuko; Suzuki, Junko; Monma, Takafumi; Asanuma, Tohru

    2015-11-01

    Using a sample of 116 Japanese men who had been placed under parole/probationary supervision or released from prison, the present study examined standardization, reliability, and validation of the Japanese Criminal Thinking Inventory (JCTI) that was based on the short form of the Psychological Inventory of Criminal Thinking Styles (PICTS), a self-rating instrument designed to evaluate cognitive patterns specific to criminal conduct. An exploratory factor analysis revealed that four dimensions adequately captured the structure of the JCTI, and the resultant 17-item JCTI demonstrated high internal consistency. Compared with the Japanese version of the Buss-Perry Aggression Questionnaire (BAQ), the JCTI showed a favorable pattern of criterion-related validity. Prior criminal environment and drug abuse as the most recent offense also significantly correlated with the JCTI total score. Overall, the JCTI possesses an important implication for offender rehabilitation as it identifies relevant cognitive targets and assesses offender progress.

  5. QUESTIONS REGARDING AMERICAN INDIAN CRIMINALITY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    STEWART, OMER C.

    FOR THE PURPOSE OF THIS DOCUMENT, AMERICAN INDIAN MEANS A SOCIAL-LEGAL GROUP. THE STATISTICS WERE OBTAINED FROM FEDERAL, STATE, AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT SOURCES. IN 1960, THERE WERE OVER 70,000 INDIAN ARRESTS OUT OF FOUR MILLION ARRESTS REPORTED TO THE F.B.I. THE PER CAPITA AMERICAN INDIAN CRIMINALITY IS NEARLY SEVEN TIMES THE NATIONAL AVERAGE, NEARLY…

  6. Criminal Justice - Selected Reference Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClure, John D., III, Comp.

    This bibliography reviews approximately 70 reference materials on criminal justice. Entries are presented in eight categories--dictionaries, indexes and abstracts, professional position papers, working conditions and unions, law and the police, crime, prisons and prisoners, and victimization. Types of publications included under the subject…

  7. Epilepsy, aggression, and criminal responsibility.

    PubMed

    Borum, R; Appelbaum, K L

    1996-07-01

    Although epilepsy-related violence can occur, accounts of criminal behavior caused by epilepsy remain rare and unconvincing. The authors describe a case of apparent postictal aggression, resulting in felony assault charges, by a patient who had nocturnal complex partial seizures, followed by what appeared to be sleepwalking and periods of postictal wandering and confusion.

  8. Cultural Cleavage and Criminal Justice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheingold, Stuart A.

    1978-01-01

    Reviews major theories of criminal justice, proposes an alternative analytic framework which focuses on cultural factors, applies this framework to several cases, and discusses implications of a cultural perspective for rule of law values. Journal available from Office of Publication, Department of Political Science, University of Florida,…

  9. Substance abuse and criminal behavior.

    PubMed

    Bradford, J M; Greenberg, D M; Motayne, G G

    1992-09-01

    As forensic psychiatry develops as a clinical subspecialty, clinical skill in understanding, treating, and predicting violent behavior will become more important. This article addresses the importance of understanding the relationship between substance abuse and violent behavior. This article also discusses morbidity and mortality in substance abuse, the demographics of substance abuse and criminality, and the clinical aspects of the forensic psychiatric evaluation.

  10. Criminal Careers of Habitual Felons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersilia, Joan; And Others

    The criminal development of habitual felons was examined by means of lengthy interviews with 49 prison inmates, all armed robbers serving at least their second prison terms. Results are not considered generalized, but should be regarded as 49 case studies. Although some of the findings were consistent with traditional images (juvenile offender…

  11. Time discounting and criminal behavior

    PubMed Central

    Åkerlund, David; Golsteyn, Bart H. H.; Grönqvist, Hans; Lindahl, Lena

    2016-01-01

    One of the most basic predictions of almost any model of crime is that individual time preferences matter. However, empirical evidence on this fundamental property is essentially nonexistent. To our knowledge, this paper provides the first pieces of evidence on the link between time discounting and crime. We use a unique dataset that combines a survey-based measure of time discount rates (at age 13) with detailed longitudinal register data on criminal behavior spanning over 18 y. Our results show that individuals with short time horizons have a significantly higher risk of criminal involvement later in life. The magnitude of the relationship is substantial and corresponds to roughly one-third of the association between intelligence and crime. PMID:27185950

  12. Time discounting and criminal behavior.

    PubMed

    Åkerlund, David; Golsteyn, Bart H H; Grönqvist, Hans; Lindahl, Lena

    2016-05-31

    One of the most basic predictions of almost any model of crime is that individual time preferences matter. However, empirical evidence on this fundamental property is essentially nonexistent. To our knowledge, this paper provides the first pieces of evidence on the link between time discounting and crime. We use a unique dataset that combines a survey-based measure of time discount rates (at age 13) with detailed longitudinal register data on criminal behavior spanning over 18 y. Our results show that individuals with short time horizons have a significantly higher risk of criminal involvement later in life. The magnitude of the relationship is substantial and corresponds to roughly one-third of the association between intelligence and crime. PMID:27185950

  13. [A testimony procedure of forensic psychiatry used for criminal cases].

    PubMed

    Chen, X S

    1991-04-01

    A testimony procedure of forensic psychiatry containing of the following steps as: "to set-up the medical diagnosis-to clarify the criminal motive-to determine the property of criminal legal ability damage-to evaluate the criminal responsibility" is recommended, and upon them "to clarify the criminal motive" is of importance. The property of criminal legal ability damage can be determined through the criminal motive and then the degree of criminal responsibility can be evaluated objectively through the criminal motive and criminal legal ability effected by the disease.

  14. The Criminal Attribution Inventory: A Measure of Offender Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kroner, Daryl G.; Mills, Jeremy F.

    2004-01-01

    The Criminal Attribution Inventory (CRAI), drawing upon attribution theory and criminally-related domains, measures criminal responsibility and blame. The CRAI's six scales measure criminal responsibility (Psychopathology, Personality), external criminal blame (Victim, Alcohol, Society) and the attribution of crime to random factors (Random). The…

  15. Dangerous mentally disordered criminals: unresolvable societal fear?

    PubMed

    Leong, G B; Silva, J A; Weinstock, R

    1991-01-01

    The average person fears dangerous criminals, especially those suffering from mental illness. Existing mental health and criminal justice systems provide social control for some of these dangerous individuals, but may be inadequate to deal with those mentally disordered offenders who were not found not guilty by reason of insanity (NGI). In California, innovative laws have attempted to address this problem. However, putative lack of efficacious treatment of mentally ill criminals, insufficient economic support, and individual liberty concerns loom as limiting factors in solving the criminal and psychiatric recidivism problem posed by non-NGI dangerous mentally disordered offenders.

  16. Enduring Risk? Old Criminal Records and Predictions of Future Criminal Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurlychek, Megan C.; Brame, Robert; Bushway, Shawn D.

    2007-01-01

    It is well accepted that criminal records impose collateral consequences on offenders. Such records affect access to public housing, student financial aid, welfare benefits, and voting rights. An axiom of these policies is that individuals with criminal records--even old criminal records--exhibit significantly higher risk of future criminal…

  17. (De-) criminalization of attempted suicide in India: A review

    PubMed Central

    Ranjan, Rajeev; Kumar, Saurabh; Pattanayak, Raman Deep; Dhawan, Anju; Sagar, Rajesh

    2014-01-01

    Attempted suicide is a serious problem requiring mental health interventions, but it continues to be treated as a criminal offence under the section 309 of Indian Penal Code. The article reviews the international legal perspective across various regions of the world, discusses the unintended consequences of section 309 IPC and highlights the need for decriminalization of attempted suicide in India. The Mental Health Care Bill, 2013, still under consideration in the Rajya Sabha (upper house), has proposed that attempted suicide should not be criminally prosecuted. Decriminalization of suicidal attempt will serve to cut down the undue stigma and avoid punishment in the aftermath of incident, and lead to a more accurate collection of suicide-related statistics. From a policy perspective, it will further emphasize the urgent need to develop a framework to deliver mental health services to all those who attempt suicide. PMID:25535437

  18. Criminal responsibility in amphetamine psychosis.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, A

    1994-01-01

    Historical changes in forensic psychiatric evaluation on criminal responsibility and proceedings in psychopathological findings of amphetamine psychosis are reviewed at first. The classification of amphetamine related mental disorders are proposed in 6 types. Among them, the clinical characteristics and psychopathological features of "Anxiety-situational reaction type" (Fukushima) are described. According to some reasonable grounds, offenders diagnosed as anxiety-situational reaction type should be evaluated as diminished responsibility in place of irresponsibility. Finally, two cases of murder committed under the influence of amphetamine, are reported in detail.

  19. Male Psychopaths and Their Criminal Careers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hare, Robert D.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Examined criminal histories of male psychopaths and nonpsychopaths, exploring time in prison and conviction rates for five-year periods between ages of 16 and 45. Criminal activities of nonpsychopaths were relatively constant over years; activities of psychopaths remained high until around age 40, then declined dramatically. Results are consistent…

  20. 10 CFR 1017.30 - Criminal penalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... INFORMATION Violations § 1017.30 Criminal penalty. Any person who violates section 148 of the Atomic Energy Act or any regulation or order of the Secretary issued under section 148 of the Atomic Energy Act, including these regulations, may be subject to a criminal penalty under section 223 of the Atomic Energy...

  1. 10 CFR 1017.30 - Criminal penalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... INFORMATION Violations § 1017.30 Criminal penalty. Any person who violates section 148 of the Atomic Energy Act or any regulation or order of the Secretary issued under section 148 of the Atomic Energy Act, including these regulations, may be subject to a criminal penalty under section 223 of the Atomic Energy...

  2. 10 CFR 1017.30 - Criminal penalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... INFORMATION Violations § 1017.30 Criminal penalty. Any person who violates section 148 of the Atomic Energy Act or any regulation or order of the Secretary issued under section 148 of the Atomic Energy Act, including these regulations, may be subject to a criminal penalty under section 223 of the Atomic Energy...

  3. 32 CFR 1801.52 - Criminal penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Criminal penalties. 1801.52 Section 1801.52 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense NATIONAL COUNTERINTELLIGENCE CENTER PUBLIC RIGHTS UNDER THE PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 Prohibitions § 1801.52 Criminal penalties. (a)...

  4. Adaptationism and intuitions about modern criminal justice.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Michael Bang

    2013-02-01

    Research indicates that individuals have incoherent intuitions about particular features of the criminal justice system. This could be seen as an argument against the existence of adapted computational systems for counter-exploitation. Here, I outline how the model developed by McCullough et al. readily predicts the production of conflicting intuitions in the context of modern criminal justice issues. PMID:23211275

  5. 10 CFR 54.43 - Criminal penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Criminal penalties. 54.43 Section 54.43 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) REQUIREMENTS FOR RENEWAL OF OPERATING LICENSES FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS General Provisions § 54.43 Criminal penalties. (a) Section 223 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954,...

  6. 10 CFR 54.43 - Criminal penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Criminal penalties. 54.43 Section 54.43 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) REQUIREMENTS FOR RENEWAL OF OPERATING LICENSES FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS General Provisions § 54.43 Criminal penalties. (a) Section 223 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954,...

  7. 10 CFR 54.43 - Criminal penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Criminal penalties. 54.43 Section 54.43 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) REQUIREMENTS FOR RENEWAL OF OPERATING LICENSES FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS General Provisions § 54.43 Criminal penalties. (a) Section 223 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954,...

  8. 10 CFR 54.43 - Criminal penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Criminal penalties. 54.43 Section 54.43 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) REQUIREMENTS FOR RENEWAL OF OPERATING LICENSES FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS General Provisions § 54.43 Criminal penalties. (a) Section 223 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954,...

  9. 10 CFR 54.43 - Criminal penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Criminal penalties. 54.43 Section 54.43 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) REQUIREMENTS FOR RENEWAL OF OPERATING LICENSES FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS General Provisions § 54.43 Criminal penalties. (a) Section 223 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954,...

  10. 25 CFR 41.28 - Criminal penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Criminal penalties. 41.28 Section 41.28 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION GRANTS TO TRIBALLY CONTROLLED COMMUNITY COLLEGES AND NAVAJO COMMUNITY COLLEGE Navajo Community College § 41.28 Criminal penalties. Persons submitting...

  11. 25 CFR 41.28 - Criminal penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Criminal penalties. 41.28 Section 41.28 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION GRANTS TO TRIBALLY CONTROLLED COMMUNITY COLLEGES AND NAVAJO COMMUNITY COLLEGE Navajo Community College § 41.28 Criminal penalties. Persons submitting...

  12. 25 CFR 41.13 - Criminal penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Criminal penalties. 41.13 Section 41.13 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION GRANTS TO TRIBALLY CONTROLLED COMMUNITY COLLEGES AND NAVAJO COMMUNITY COLLEGE Tribally Controlled Community Colleges § 41.13 Criminal penalties....

  13. 25 CFR 41.13 - Criminal penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Criminal penalties. 41.13 Section 41.13 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION GRANTS TO TRIBALLY CONTROLLED COMMUNITY COLLEGES AND NAVAJO COMMUNITY COLLEGE Tribally Controlled Community Colleges § 41.13 Criminal penalties....

  14. Association between Criminal Thinking and Reading Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heintschel, Karen L.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze a relationship between adult, male inmate's criminal attitudes and reading level. Data is derived from the secondary assessments, Criminal Sentiments Scale-Modified (CSS-M) and the reading scores from the Test of Adult Basic Education (TABE). The sample size is 112 adult, males incarcerated at California…

  15. Teaching Hispanic Culture to Criminal Justice Personnel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reyes-Cairo, Orlando M.

    A course in comparative Hispanic/American culture was developed for a criminal justice training center to provide exposure to Hispanic cultural norms to local criminal justice workers. The participants included employees in the fields of adult probation, health care, and alcohol and drug programs. Hispanic participants provided a valuable…

  16. Therapeutic Interventions with the Lifestyle Criminal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, Glenn D.; White, Thomas W.

    1989-01-01

    Examines assessment, intervention, and follow-up phases of treatment process with lifestyle criminals. Recognizes that every therapeutic relationship is unique and should take into account individual characteristics of therapist, criminal, and environment. Subdivides assessment and intervention phases to reflect importance of lifestyle analysis,…

  17. Criminal Justice in America. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Croddy, Marshall; And Others

    This comprehensive textbook on criminal justice is intended to serve as the foundation for a high school course on law-related education or as a supplement for civics, government or contemporary-issues courses. Designed to foster critical thinking and analytical skills, the book provides students with an understanding of the criminal justice…

  18. 25 CFR 41.28 - Criminal penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Criminal penalties. 41.28 Section 41.28 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION GRANTS TO TRIBALLY CONTROLLED COMMUNITY COLLEGES AND NAVAJO COMMUNITY COLLEGE Navajo Community College § 41.28 Criminal penalties. Persons submitting...

  19. 10 CFR 63.172 - Criminal penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Criminal penalties. 63.172 Section 63.172 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Violations § 63.172 Criminal penalties. (a) Section 223 of the Atomic Energy Act of...

  20. 10 CFR 63.172 - Criminal penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Criminal penalties. 63.172 Section 63.172 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Violations § 63.172 Criminal penalties. (a) Section 223 of the Atomic Energy Act of...

  1. 10 CFR 63.172 - Criminal penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Criminal penalties. 63.172 Section 63.172 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Violations § 63.172 Criminal penalties. (a) Section 223 of the Atomic Energy Act of...

  2. Breaking into Careers in Criminal Justice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Lucia, Robert C.

    1993-01-01

    Contends that young people's image of career in criminal justice field has been shaped by entertainment media and does not nearly match real thing. Describes reality of career in criminal justice and discusses how to prepare for such a career. Examines numerous career tracks in law enforcement, corrections, courts, forensic science, and private…

  3. 10 CFR 39.103 - Criminal penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Criminal penalties. 39.103 Section 39.103 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR WELL LOGGING Enforcement § 39.103 Criminal penalties. (a) Section 223 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, provides for...

  4. 10 CFR 39.103 - Criminal penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Criminal penalties. 39.103 Section 39.103 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR WELL LOGGING Enforcement § 39.103 Criminal penalties. (a) Section 223 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, provides for...

  5. 10 CFR 60.183 - Criminal penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Criminal penalties. 60.183 Section 60.183 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN GEOLOGIC REPOSITORIES Violations § 60.183 Criminal penalties. (a) Section 223 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as...

  6. 10 CFR 60.183 - Criminal penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Criminal penalties. 60.183 Section 60.183 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN GEOLOGIC REPOSITORIES Violations § 60.183 Criminal penalties. (a) Section 223 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as...

  7. 10 CFR 60.183 - Criminal penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Criminal penalties. 60.183 Section 60.183 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN GEOLOGIC REPOSITORIES Violations § 60.183 Criminal penalties. (a) Section 223 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as...

  8. 10 CFR 60.183 - Criminal penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Criminal penalties. 60.183 Section 60.183 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN GEOLOGIC REPOSITORIES Violations § 60.183 Criminal penalties. (a) Section 223 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as...

  9. 10 CFR 60.183 - Criminal penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Criminal penalties. 60.183 Section 60.183 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN GEOLOGIC REPOSITORIES Violations § 60.183 Criminal penalties. (a) Section 223 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as...

  10. Youth: Criminal Involvement and Problems of Resocialization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lelekov, V. A.; Prokhorov, Iu. N.

    1995-01-01

    Reports on a survey of youth crime, youthful criminals, and efforts at resocialization in contemporary Russia. Asserts that political and social change have resulted in social stratification and criminal behavior. Maintains that the high level of recidivism is caused by a lack of coordinated efforts by public institutions. (CFR)

  11. [Expertise in the context of criminal law].

    PubMed

    Vermylen, Yvo

    2005-01-01

    The procedures of expert investigations in criminal law are different from those in civil law. Being an expert in criminal law investigations assumes thorough knowledge of dentistry, forensic investigations and of rules and procedures to follow. Adequate training and continuous education are mandatory.

  12. 10 CFR 52.303 - Criminal penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Criminal penalties. 52.303 Section 52.303 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS, AND APPROVALS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS Enforcement § 52.303 Criminal penalties. (a) Section 223 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as...

  13. 10 CFR 52.303 - Criminal penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Criminal penalties. 52.303 Section 52.303 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS, AND APPROVALS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS Enforcement § 52.303 Criminal penalties. (a) Section 223 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as...

  14. 10 CFR 52.303 - Criminal penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Criminal penalties. 52.303 Section 52.303 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS, AND APPROVALS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS Enforcement § 52.303 Criminal penalties. (a) Section 223 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as...

  15. 10 CFR 52.303 - Criminal penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Criminal penalties. 52.303 Section 52.303 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS, AND APPROVALS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS Enforcement § 52.303 Criminal penalties. (a) Section 223 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as...

  16. 10 CFR 52.303 - Criminal penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Criminal penalties. 52.303 Section 52.303 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS, AND APPROVALS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS Enforcement § 52.303 Criminal penalties. (a) Section 223 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as...

  17. 10 CFR 72.86 - Criminal penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Criminal penalties. 72.86 Section 72.86 Energy NUCLEAR..., HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE, AND REACTOR-RELATED GREATER THAN CLASS C WASTE Records, Reports, Inspections, and Enforcement § 72.86 Criminal penalties. (a) Section 223 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954,...

  18. 10 CFR 72.86 - Criminal penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Criminal penalties. 72.86 Section 72.86 Energy NUCLEAR..., HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE, AND REACTOR-RELATED GREATER THAN CLASS C WASTE Records, Reports, Inspections, and Enforcement § 72.86 Criminal penalties. (a) Section 223 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954,...

  19. 10 CFR 95.63 - Criminal penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Criminal penalties. 95.63 Section 95.63 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) FACILITY SECURITY CLEARANCE AND SAFEGUARDING OF NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION AND RESTRICTED DATA Violations § 95.63 Criminal penalties. (a) Section 223 of the Atomic...

  20. Adaptationism and intuitions about modern criminal justice.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Michael Bang

    2013-02-01

    Research indicates that individuals have incoherent intuitions about particular features of the criminal justice system. This could be seen as an argument against the existence of adapted computational systems for counter-exploitation. Here, I outline how the model developed by McCullough et al. readily predicts the production of conflicting intuitions in the context of modern criminal justice issues.

  1. Interstitial Jurisprudence Illustrated in Teaching Criminal Law

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Funk, David A.

    1975-01-01

    The incorporation of criminal law theory into the first-year criminal law course is discussed as an example of adding the jurisprudence of specific subject matters to standard courses. Jurisprudential issues appropriate for study are suggested along with guidelines for teaching techniques, selection of materials, and use of class time. (JT)

  2. Neuroscientific and behavioral genetic information in criminal cases in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    de Kogel, C.H.; Westgeest, E.J.M.C.

    2015-01-01

    In this contribution an empirical approach is used to gain more insight into the relationship between neuroscience and criminal law. The focus is on case law in the Netherlands. Neuroscientific information and techniques have found their way into the courts of the Netherlands. Furthermore, following an Italian case in which a mentally ill offender received a penalty reduction in part because of a ‘genetic vulnerability for impulsive aggression’, the expectation was expressed that such ‘genetic defenses’ would appear in the Netherlands too. To assess how neuroscientific and behavioral genetic information are used in criminal justice practice in the Netherlands, we systematically collect Dutch criminal cases in which neuroscientific or behavioral genetic information is introduced. Data and case law examples are presented and discussed. Although cases are diverse, several themes appear, such as prefrontal brain damage in relation to criminal responsibility and recidivism risk, and divergent views of the implications of neurobiological knowledge about addiction for judging criminal responsibility. Whereas in the international ‘neurolaw literature’ the emphasis is often on imaging techniques, the Dutch findings also illustrate the role of neuropsychological methods in criminal cases. Finally, there appears to be a clear need of practice oriented instruments and guidelines. PMID:27774213

  3. [Economic criminality. Problems of definition and lines of research].

    PubMed

    Di Gennaro, G; Vetere, E

    1977-01-01

    After reviewing the many proposed definitions of economic criminality, which are now very numerous in specialized literature, and after considering the various critical attitudes assumed on this point by the most qualified experts on the subject, the Authors state that it is absolutely indispensable to establish an appropriate definition on which an aggreement can be reached. In fact, without such a definition it is impossible to deal with the object of interest and therefore to make any progress with the research, the legislation and the measures necessary for the prevention and repression of economic criminality. If this problem of economic criminality is discussed at the various national and international levels without the aforementioned definition, this is an indication that a popular intuition has been formed which is able to distinguish the object of interest. The most suitable lines of research are indicated in order to establish and clarify the elements of such an intuition which the Authors consider in a hypothetical light. PMID:351692

  4. [Criminality in a birth cohort].

    PubMed

    Wolfgang, M E

    1975-01-01

    Beginning with a group of approximately 10,000 boys born in 1945 who lived in Philadelphia from at least ages ten through seventeen, the Center for Studies in Criminology and Criminal Law, University of Pennsylvania has engaged in a longitudinal analysis of the delinquency of the birth cohort. The first publication which examines the dynamic flow of delinquency committed by 3500 of the boys was published by the University of Chicago Press in 1972 and is entitled Delinquency in a Birth Cohort. This study is the first in the United States to establish a base line of delinquency probabilities and to analyze the types of delinquency committed over time, with the recording of the seriousness of each of the 10,000 acts committed by the 3500 boys. The seriousness scores were derived from the earlier work by Sellin and Wolfgang, entitle The Measurement of Delinquency. A stochastic model was used to analyze the delinquent patterns and one of the major conclusions, at least up to age eighteen, was that there was no specific delinquency specialization by type of offense. Moreover, after the third offense, the probabilities of desistence, or refraining from further delinquent acts, remained stable, thus indicating that the most propitious point for social intervention would be after the third offense rather than at some time prior to the onset of delinquency or even after the first or second offense-offenses which are usually of a very minor character. The Center for Studies in Criminology and Criminal Law has continued to follow up a ten per cent sample of the original birth cohort by interviewing them to obtain additional social psychological dynamic features of their background, of the situations involving their first and last delinquencies, and of their adult careers. The follow-up indicates thus far that approximately 12 per cent new cases of criminality appeared, thus adding to the original 35 per cent of the birth cohort who had a delinquency record. The study will

  5. 14 CFR 1267.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Criminal drug statute. 1267.625 Section 1267... FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 1267.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means a Federal or non-Federal criminal statute involving the manufacture,...

  6. 33 CFR 1.07-95 - Civil and criminal penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... GENERAL GENERAL PROVISIONS Enforcement; Civil and Criminal Penalty Proceedings § 1.07-95 Civil and criminal penalties. (a) If a violation of law or regulation carries both a civil and a criminal penalty... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Civil and criminal penalties....

  7. [Effect of criminal justice on civil rights apprehension].

    PubMed

    Deutsch, E

    1998-10-01

    Private law and criminal law are different in more than one way. On occasion, they overlap. Further liability may result from disregard of a criminal act. As far as the evidence is concerned, criminal law requires a higher degree of probability than private law. If the same case is subject to criminal and civil proceedings, both courts are not bound by each other's decisions.

  8. 2 CFR 1401.225 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Criminal drug statute. 1401.225 Section 1401... INTERIOR REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 1401.225 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means a Federal or non-Federal criminal statute involving the...

  9. 31 CFR 20.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Criminal drug statute. 20.625 Section... REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 20.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means a Federal or non-Federal criminal statute involving the...

  10. 14 CFR 1267.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Criminal drug statute. 1267.625 Section... REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 1267.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means a Federal or non-Federal criminal statute involving the...

  11. 32 CFR 26.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Criminal drug statute. 26.625 Section 26.625... REGULATIONS GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 26.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means a Federal or non-Federal criminal statute involving...

  12. 38 CFR 48.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Criminal drug statute. 48...) GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 48.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means a Federal or non-Federal criminal statute involving the...

  13. 24 CFR 21.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Criminal drug statute. 21.625... Development GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (GRANTS) Definitions § 21.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means a Federal or non-Federal criminal statute involving the...

  14. 41 CFR 105-74.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Criminal drug statute... Administration 74-GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 105-74.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means a Federal or non-Federal criminal...

  15. 38 CFR 48.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Criminal drug statute. 48...) GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 48.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means a Federal or non-Federal criminal statute involving the...

  16. 14 CFR 1267.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Criminal drug statute. 1267.625 Section... REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 1267.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means a Federal or non-Federal criminal statute involving the...

  17. 38 CFR 48.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Criminal drug statute. 48...) GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 48.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means a Federal or non-Federal criminal statute involving the...

  18. 45 CFR 630.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Criminal drug statute. 630.625 Section 630.625... GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 630.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means a Federal or non-Federal criminal statute involving the...

  19. 2 CFR 1401.225 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Criminal drug statute. 1401.225 Section 1401... INTERIOR REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 1401.225 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means a Federal or non-Federal criminal statute involving the...

  20. 32 CFR 26.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Criminal drug statute. 26.625 Section 26.625... REGULATIONS GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 26.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means a Federal or non-Federal criminal statute involving...

  1. 29 CFR 1472.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Criminal drug statute. 1472.625 Section 1472.625 Labor... REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 1472.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means a Federal or non-Federal criminal statute involving the...

  2. 36 CFR 1212.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Criminal drug statute. 1212... GENERAL RULES GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 1212.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means a Federal or non-Federal criminal...

  3. 2 CFR 182.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Criminal drug statute. 182.625 Section 182... GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 182.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means a Federal or non-Federal criminal statute involving the...

  4. 32 CFR 26.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Criminal drug statute. 26.625 Section 26.625... REGULATIONS GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 26.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means a Federal or non-Federal criminal statute involving...

  5. 45 CFR 630.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Criminal drug statute. 630.625 Section 630.625... GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 630.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means a Federal or non-Federal criminal statute involving the...

  6. 41 CFR 105-74.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Criminal drug statute... Administration 74-GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 105-74.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means a Federal or non-Federal criminal...

  7. 29 CFR 1472.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Criminal drug statute. 1472.625 Section 1472.625 Labor... REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 1472.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means a Federal or non-Federal criminal statute involving the...

  8. 36 CFR 1212.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Criminal drug statute. 1212... GENERAL RULES GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 1212.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means a Federal or non-Federal criminal...

  9. 32 CFR 26.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Criminal drug statute. 26.625 Section 26.625... REGULATIONS GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 26.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means a Federal or non-Federal criminal statute involving...

  10. 24 CFR 21.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Criminal drug statute. 21.625... Development GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (GRANTS) Definitions § 21.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means a Federal or non-Federal criminal statute involving the...

  11. 36 CFR 1212.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Criminal drug statute. 1212... GENERAL RULES GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 1212.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means a Federal or non-Federal criminal...

  12. 45 CFR 630.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Criminal drug statute. 630.625 Section 630.625... GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 630.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means a Federal or non-Federal criminal statute involving the...

  13. 31 CFR 20.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Criminal drug statute. 20.625 Section... REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 20.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means a Federal or non-Federal criminal statute involving the...

  14. 45 CFR 630.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Criminal drug statute. 630.625 Section 630.625... GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 630.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means a Federal or non-Federal criminal statute involving the...

  15. 40 CFR 36.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Criminal drug statute. 36.625 Section... GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 36.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means a Federal or non-Federal criminal statute involving the...

  16. 14 CFR 1267.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Criminal drug statute. 1267.625 Section... REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 1267.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means a Federal or non-Federal criminal statute involving the...

  17. 36 CFR 1212.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Criminal drug statute. 1212... GENERAL RULES GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 1212.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means a Federal or non-Federal criminal...

  18. 38 CFR 48.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Criminal drug statute. 48...) GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 48.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means a Federal or non-Federal criminal statute involving the...

  19. 29 CFR 1472.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Criminal drug statute. 1472.625 Section 1472.625 Labor... REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 1472.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means a Federal or non-Federal criminal statute involving the...

  20. 41 CFR 105-74.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Criminal drug statute... Administration 74-GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 105-74.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means a Federal or non-Federal criminal...

  1. 29 CFR 1472.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Criminal drug statute. 1472.625 Section 1472.625 Labor... REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 1472.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means a Federal or non-Federal criminal statute involving the...

  2. 2 CFR 182.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Criminal drug statute. 182.625 Section 182... GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 182.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means a Federal or non-Federal criminal statute involving the...

  3. 38 CFR 48.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Criminal drug statute. 48...) GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 48.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means a Federal or non-Federal criminal statute involving the...

  4. 14 CFR § 1267.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Criminal drug statute. § 1267.625 Section... REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 1267.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means a Federal or non-Federal criminal statute involving the...

  5. 29 CFR 1472.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Criminal drug statute. 1472.625 Section 1472.625 Labor... REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 1472.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means a Federal or non-Federal criminal statute involving the...

  6. 31 CFR 20.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Criminal drug statute. 20.625 Section... REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 20.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means a Federal or non-Federal criminal statute involving the...

  7. 41 CFR 105-74.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Criminal drug statute... Administration 74-GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 105-74.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means a Federal or non-Federal criminal...

  8. 32 CFR 26.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Criminal drug statute. 26.625 Section 26.625... REGULATIONS GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 26.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means a Federal or non-Federal criminal statute involving...

  9. 28 CFR 0.57 - Criminal prosecutions against juveniles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Criminal prosecutions against juveniles... JUSTICE Criminal Division § 0.57 Criminal prosecutions against juveniles. The Assistant Attorney General..., United States Code, relating to criminal proceedings against juveniles. The Assistant Attorney General...

  10. Asperger's disorder and the criminal law.

    PubMed

    Freckelton, Ian

    2011-06-01

    Asperger's Disorder has the potential to be relevant to many aspects of the functioning of the criminal justice system. However, its mere presence does not excuse or justify all offending. The inquiry into its potential relevance to criminal offending and sentencing must be both contextual and informed by suitably qualified expert evidence. This column reviews court decisions in respect of offences of physical violence, sexual violence, arson, stalking/harassing and computer offences across a range of jurisdictions to evaluate how courts have latterly incorporated Asperger's Disorder into decisions about criminal responsibility and culpability.

  11. Drug treatments in criminal justice settings.

    PubMed

    Nordstrom, Benjamin R; Williams, A R

    2012-06-01

    The available evidence suggests that drug treatment can lead to modest, but real, reductions in criminal offending for drug-using criminal offenders. Considering the scope of the problem of drug-related crime and the expense of dealing with these issues, even marginal improvements can lead to important aggregate savings in both economic and humanitarian terms. More randomized, controlled trials of drug treatment in criminal justice programs will lead to a more sophisticated understanding of what kind of treatment works best for this group.

  12. [An analysis of criminal liability in a criminal case involving an epileptic].

    PubMed

    Liu, H

    1989-12-01

    This paper presents the case of an epileptic patient who killed his wife during the intermittent period of epilepsy: three different units were asked to give the forensic psychiatric appraisement which came to three different conclusions, namely, the patient should be entitled to no criminal responsibility, partial criminal responsibility, and full criminal responsibility with respect to these three conclusions, the authors make a detailed discussion and give their own opinions.

  13. Criminal Offending and Learning Disabilities in New Zealand Youth: Does Reading Comprehension Predict Recidivism?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rucklidge, Julia J.; McLean, Anthony P.; Bateup, Paula

    2013-01-01

    Sixty youth (16-19 years) from two youth prison sites participate in a prospective study examining criminal offending and learning disabilities (LD), completing measures of estimated IQ, attention, reading, and mathematical and oral language abilities. Prevalence rates of LDs exceed those of international studies, with 91.67% of the offenders…

  14. Violent and criminal manifestations in dementia patients.

    PubMed

    Cipriani, Gabriele; Lucetti, Claudio; Danti, Sabrina; Carlesi, Cecilia; Nuti, Angelo

    2016-05-01

    Although the older adults have been studied as victims of violence, geriatric patients can display violent behavior. The purpose of the present review was to explore the phenomenon of criminal violations and violent acts in people with dementia. The authors used PubMed to search the MEDLINE database and other sources for original research and review articles on criminal and violent manifestation in demented patients combining the terms "criminal manifestation," "violence, aggressive behavior," "homicide," "suicide" and "homicide-suicide" together with "dementia". Possible biomarkers of violence are considered. The present review highlights the risk factors for violence in patients suffering from dementia, and reviews the literature about criminal violations and homicidal/suicidal behavior in this patient group. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2016; 16: 541-549. PMID:26460091

  15. 43 CFR 4770.5 - Criminal penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RANGE MANAGEMENT (4000) PROTECTION, MANAGEMENT, AND CONTROL OF WILD FREE-ROAMING HORSES AND BURROS Prohibited Acts, Administrative Remedies, and Penalties § 4770.5 Criminal...

  16. 43 CFR 4770.5 - Criminal penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RANGE MANAGEMENT (4000) PROTECTION, MANAGEMENT, AND CONTROL OF WILD FREE-ROAMING HORSES AND BURROS Prohibited Acts, Administrative Remedies, and Penalties § 4770.5 Criminal...

  17. 43 CFR 4770.5 - Criminal penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RANGE MANAGEMENT (4000) PROTECTION, MANAGEMENT, AND CONTROL OF WILD FREE-ROAMING HORSES AND BURROS Prohibited Acts, Administrative Remedies, and Penalties § 4770.5 Criminal...

  18. 43 CFR 4770.5 - Criminal penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RANGE MANAGEMENT (4000) PROTECTION, MANAGEMENT, AND CONTROL OF WILD FREE-ROAMING HORSES AND BURROS Prohibited Acts, Administrative Remedies, and Penalties § 4770.5 Criminal...

  19. Criminal responsibility and solvent exposure.

    PubMed

    Lemmen, C A; Holden, C E; Benedek, E P

    1996-01-01

    This case report contains the history of a man's exposure to benzene, trichloroethylene, and toluene. J suffered acutely from classic symptoms of toxic exposure to these compounds, such as fatigue, clumsiness, staggering, and hematopoietic depression. During his medical hospitalization, he was exposed to further organic insults, such as being treated with medications like Cytoxan and medications to treat an abscess in his right parietal lobe. After the acute exposure and after the abscess had resolved, his functioning on neuropsychological testing was still depressed, as he had a Full Scale IQ of 105, whereas at the time of the forensic evaluation he had a Full Scale IQ of 114. It would therefore appear that he did have some mild deficits when originally discharged from the hospital. While he reported having continual mental status changes at the time of the offense and even at the time of the forensic evaluation, it was not felt that these played a significant role in the commission of the offense. Comprehensive forensic evaluation suggested that psychological reactions to his illness and an underlying personality disorder were more direct contributors to the criminal acts. J was therefore recommended and ultimately found to be responsible for his behavior, according to the law.

  20. Cognitive fallacies and criminal investigations.

    PubMed

    Ditrich, Hans

    2015-03-01

    The human mind is susceptible to inherent fallacies that often hamper fully rational action. Many such misconceptions have an evolutionary background and are thus difficult to avert. Deficits in the reliability of eye-witnesses are well known to legal professionals; however, less attention has been paid to such effects in crime investigators. In order to obtain an "inside view" on the role of cognitive misconceptions in criminalistic work, a list of fallacies from the literature was adapted to criminalistic settings. The statements on this list were rated by highly experienced crime scene investigators according to the assumed likelihood of these errors to appear and their severity of effect. Among others, selective perception, expectation and confirmation bias, anchoring/"pars per toto" errors and "onus probandi"--shifting the burden of proof from the investigator to the suspect--were frequently considered to negatively affect criminal investigations. As a consequence, the following measures are proposed: alerting investigating officers in their training to cognitive fallacies and promoting the exchange of experiences in peer circles of investigators on a regular basis. Furthermore, the improvement of the organizational error culture and the establishment of a failure analysis system in order to identify and alleviate error prone processes are suggested. PMID:25754002

  1. The National Manpower Survey of the Criminal Justice System. Volume Five: Criminal Justice Education and Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Planning Association, Washington, DC.

    Focusing on education and training needs for law enforcement and criminal justice personnel, this document is one in a series of six volumes reporting the results of the National Manpower Survey (NMS) of the Criminal Justice System. Chapter 1 of ten chapters provides an overview of nine types of educational and/or training programs, including the…

  2. Expertise of body injuries in criminal procedure.

    PubMed

    Gutevska, A; Cakar, Z; Duma, A; Poposka, V

    2008-10-01

    In the every day practice of answering questions from the area of medicine, today there is growing need for forensic medical expertise of body injuries in the criminal procedure. Furthermore, when qualifying the body injury, the expert must possess knowledge and experience not only medical, but also he/she must be aware of the legal requirements and norms from the Code of Criminal Procedure and the Criminal Code of R. Macedonia. This will enable the expert to contribute to explanation and clarification of certain facts and issues related to the body injury. In this paper, by citing Articles 255 and 256 from the Code of Criminal Procedure, it is explained how expert can be adequately selected by the court. In addition to this, by citing Article 271 from the aforementioned Code, a way of analysing body injuries is defined; and finally, defining of body injuries is explained through citing of Article 130 and 131 from the Criminal Code of R. Macedonia, which is regarding body injury and grave body injury. The aim of this paper is to outline the method of performing these forensic medical expertises, i.e. by who and when can expertise of body injuries be asked and moreover, what is the legal and ethical responsiblity of the expert during the execution of the expertise. Additionally, the steps that the expert should follow when preparing a written statement and opinion for the type of the body injury are explained. More specifically, emphasis is placed on expert's requirements after examination of injured individual; after revision of the medical documentation during expertise of body injuries in criminal subjects; and providing oral statement and opinion during the criminal procedure.

  3. Expertise in bodily injuries in criminal procedure.

    PubMed

    Gutevska, A; Cakar, Z; Duma, A; Poposka, V

    2008-07-01

    In the day-to-day practice of answering questions from the area of medicine today, there is a growing need for forensic medical expertise in bodily injuries in criminal procedure. Furthermore, when qualifying a bodily injury, the expert must possess knowledge and experience not only medical, but s/he must also be aware of the legal requirements and norms of the Code of Criminal Procedure and the Criminal Code of R. Macedonia. This will enable the expert to contribute to the explanation and clarification of certain facts and issues relating to the bodily injury. In this paper, by citing Articles 255 and 256 of the Code of Criminal Procedure, it is explained how an expert can be appropriately selected by the court. In addition to this, by citing Article 271 of the afore-mentioned Code, a way of analysing bodily injuries is defined; and finally, the definition of bodily injuries is explained through citing Articles 130 and 131 of the Criminal Code of R. Macedonia, relating to bodily injury and grave bodily injury. The aim of this paper is to outline the method of performing this forensic medical expertise, i.e. by whom and when can expertise in bodily injuries be sought and, moreover, what is the legal and ethical responsibility of the expert during the execution of the expertise. Additionally, the steps that the expert should follow when preparing a written statement and opinion on the type of the bodily injury are explained. More specifically, emphasis is placed on the expert's requirements after examination of the injured individual; after revision of the medical documentation during expert assessment of bodily injuries in the case of criminal subjects; and providing oral statements and opinions during the criminal procedure.

  4. Premenstrual syndrome as a criminal defense.

    PubMed

    Lewis, J W

    1990-10-01

    Premenstrual syndrome may be effective as an affirmative defense to a criminal charge if the defendant can show that (i) she was suffering from premenstrual syndrome at the time the crime was committed; and (ii) because of her condition, either that the criminal act was an involuntary act or that at the time of the criminal act she did not possess the mental state required by law for the commission of a crime. Premenstrual syndrome has been successfully pleaded as a criminal defense in Great Britain but has not been tested in American criminal courts. It may now be possible, however, because of the increase of behavioral, psychological, and physiological studies precisely characterizing premenstrual syndrome and elucidating the necessary criteria for its accurate diagnosis, for the appropriate defendant to assert this defense in an American court. This paper discusses (i) the use of recent scientific data to demonstrate the existence of premenstrual syndrome; (ii) the use of standardized psychological tests or physiological assays to demonstrate that the defendant suffers from premenstrual syndrome; and, (iii) the legal choices to be made and evidentiary hurdles that must be overcome in presenting a premenstrual syndrome defense.

  5. China's criminal penalty for medical malpractice: too lenient or not?

    PubMed

    Zhu, Sun; Li, Lei; Li, Yuanchao

    2011-05-01

    Although China had greatly improved its health and medical system, the contradiction between arduous medical tasks and insufficient health resources has not been fundamentally resolved. This contradiction raised a large number of legal issues in medical industry. Literatures about these issues are usually published in legal journal, and are not easy accessible to clinicians. We thus provide clinicians a brief introduction to the legal liability of medical malpractice, and describe the debate about the punishment setting of China's medical malpractice crime in detail. Considering the complexity and humanitarian nature of medical practice, legislators set a relative lenient punishment system for medical malpractice crime. But the "aggravating" supporter argued that, judging from criminal jurisprudence, only serious irresponsible medical personnel might face criminal penalty, so severe penalty was not conflict with the humanitarian nature of medical work. They also deemed that, too lenient penalties of this crime had broken the internal harmony of Criminal Law, and violated the basic principles of law. The opponents believed that: although the statutory penalty for medical malpractice crime seemed lenient, the declared sentence was more severe than surrounding areas. And, too severe penalties would not only aggravate the shortage of Chinese medical personnel, but also deteriorate the unbalanced physician-patient relationship. So, they did not agree enhancing the penalty of medical malpractice crime. We propose to add disqualification to the punishment setting of medical malpractice crime, reform the health system more thoroughly. We also hope Chinese governments could encourage medicolegal research. And, from the viewpoint of risk management in health care, we emphasize the role of Medical Professional Liability Insurance system as a powerful tool to prevent medical malpractice.

  6. Criminal Responsibility of the Frontal Lobe Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sener, Mustafa Talip; Ozcan, Halil; Sahingoz, Sadik; Ogul, Hayri

    2015-10-01

    Neurological and/or psychiatric symptoms might be detected due to damage of frontal lobes as detected in damages of many brain regions. Frontal lobe syndrome (FLS) occurs as a result of damage in prefrontal region due to various causes. Symptoms due to prefrontal region damage, varies according to the size and location of the lesion. In most of the cases; executive dysfunctions, attention deficits, inconsistencies in social life, impulse control problems, obsessive behaviors and violence behaviors are common clinical signs. Behavioral symptoms seen in FLS can be confused with personality disorders and negative symptoms of schizophrenia. FLS is a neuropsychiatric disorder rarely assessed in forensic psychiatry and in terms of detection of criminal responsibility. In this case report, criminal responsibility in FLS was assessed through a FLS case in which an offense of "threat" was committed and investigated in terms of criminal responsibility. PMID:26644774

  7. Criminal Responsibility of the Frontal Lobe Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sener, Mustafa Talip; Ozcan, Halil; Sahingoz, Sadik; Ogul4, Hayri

    2015-01-01

    Neurological and/or psychiatric symptoms might be detected due to damage of frontal lobes as detected in damages of many brain regions. Frontal lobe syndrome (FLS) occurs as a result of damage in prefrontal region due to various causes. Symptoms due to prefrontal region damage, varies according to the size and location of the lesion. In most of the cases; executive dysfunctions, attention deficits, inconsistencies in social life, impulse control problems, obsessive behaviors and violence behaviors are common clinical signs. Behavioral symptoms seen in FLS can be confused with personality disorders and negative symptoms of schizophrenia. FLS is a neuropsychiatric disorder rarely assessed in forensic psychiatry and in terms of detection of criminal responsibility. In this case report, criminal responsibility in FLS was assessed through a FLS case in which an offense of “threat” was committed and investigated in terms of criminal responsibility. PMID:26644774

  8. Criminal Responsibility of the Frontal Lobe Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sener, Mustafa Talip; Ozcan, Halil; Sahingoz, Sadik; Ogul, Hayri

    2015-10-01

    Neurological and/or psychiatric symptoms might be detected due to damage of frontal lobes as detected in damages of many brain regions. Frontal lobe syndrome (FLS) occurs as a result of damage in prefrontal region due to various causes. Symptoms due to prefrontal region damage, varies according to the size and location of the lesion. In most of the cases; executive dysfunctions, attention deficits, inconsistencies in social life, impulse control problems, obsessive behaviors and violence behaviors are common clinical signs. Behavioral symptoms seen in FLS can be confused with personality disorders and negative symptoms of schizophrenia. FLS is a neuropsychiatric disorder rarely assessed in forensic psychiatry and in terms of detection of criminal responsibility. In this case report, criminal responsibility in FLS was assessed through a FLS case in which an offense of "threat" was committed and investigated in terms of criminal responsibility.

  9. Assessing the criminal capacity of children: a challenge to the capacity of mental health professionals.

    PubMed

    Pillay, Anthony L; Willows, Clive

    2015-01-01

    With increasing numbers of juveniles accused of serious crimes international concern is growing around the procedural consequences for affected individuals within the context of the law and criminal justice. Issues of culpability in children and adolescents are often raised, with much deliberation and insufficient agreement among legal and child development experts. Exactly when and to what extent juveniles can be held responsible for their action is a matter requiring careful consideration to avoid substantial erring in either direction. Although some international guiding standards and principles have been established, these are rather broad and unable to provide specific prescriptions. In addition, the assessment of criminal capacity in juveniles is a complex task, and one that is not wholly without reliability and validity problems. As in the case of South Africa and a few other countries, mental health specialists are often tasked with conducting developmental assessments to provide courts with expert evidence regarding criminal capacity. This paper examines the concept of criminal capacity in the context of the theory, controversies and challenges that affect this area of psychological focus.

  10. Assessing the criminal capacity of children: a challenge to the capacity of mental health professionals.

    PubMed

    Pillay, Anthony L; Willows, Clive

    2015-01-01

    With increasing numbers of juveniles accused of serious crimes international concern is growing around the procedural consequences for affected individuals within the context of the law and criminal justice. Issues of culpability in children and adolescents are often raised, with much deliberation and insufficient agreement among legal and child development experts. Exactly when and to what extent juveniles can be held responsible for their action is a matter requiring careful consideration to avoid substantial erring in either direction. Although some international guiding standards and principles have been established, these are rather broad and unable to provide specific prescriptions. In addition, the assessment of criminal capacity in juveniles is a complex task, and one that is not wholly without reliability and validity problems. As in the case of South Africa and a few other countries, mental health specialists are often tasked with conducting developmental assessments to provide courts with expert evidence regarding criminal capacity. This paper examines the concept of criminal capacity in the context of the theory, controversies and challenges that affect this area of psychological focus. PMID:26357915

  11. Psychiatric aspects of criminal responsibility: insanity and mitigation.

    PubMed

    Burrows, Maureen; Reid, William H

    2011-11-01

    Forensic psychiatry expertise may be useful to criminal courts in several ways, including evaluating competence (e.g., to stand trial, waive Miranda rights, confess, plead, represent oneself, or be sentenced), assessing responsibility for alleged criminal behavior, and clarifying mental or psychosocial factors that may mitigate criminal charges or the form and severity of punishment. This column focuses on psychiatric/psychological aspects of mitigation in criminal matters.

  12. Genetics and criminal behaviour: recent accomplishments.

    PubMed

    Lagoa, Arlindo; Santos, Agostinho; Pinheiro, M Fátima; Magalhães, Teresa

    2009-10-01

    The past two decades have seen an explosion in research in the fields of violence and behavioural genetics. Advances in human genetics have raised the possibility that genetic mechanisms can explain various aspects of human criminal and aggressive behaviour. However, this new knowledge can pose enormous challenges concerning the moral and legal conceptions of free will and responsibility. This paper reviews the main aspects of behavioural genetics, focusing on criminal and aggressive behaviour and describes the most important genes known to influence this behaviour.

  13. Criminal and legal responsibilities in Tourette's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gullucayir, Sibel; Asirdizer, Mahmut; Yavuz, M Sunay; Zeyfeoglu, Yildiray; Ulucay, Tarik

    2009-01-01

    Tourette's Syndrome (TS) is a neuropsychological disorder characterized by the presence of multiple involuntary motor tics accompanied by one or more vocal tics. Articles about TS and criminal responsibility and the restriction of civil rights are limited. A person with TS was evaluated to consider his criminal responsibility after swearing at a referee during a football game. He was also evaluated as to whether or not he was capable of professionally driving a service bus. Additionally, medico-legal situations regarding military service, obtaining a shotgun license and marriages of patients with TS were considered.

  14. 22 CFR 1509.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Criminal drug statute. 1509.625 Section 1509.625 Foreign Relations AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 1509.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means a Federal...

  15. 20 CFR 439.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Criminal drug statute. 439.625 Section 439.625 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 439.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means...

  16. 22 CFR 1008.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Criminal drug statute. 1008.625 Section 1008.625 Foreign Relations INTER-AMERICAN FOUNDATION GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 1008.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means a Federal or...

  17. 22 CFR 312.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Criminal drug statute. 312.625 Section 312.625 Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 312.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means a Federal or non-Federal...

  18. 28 CFR 0.57 - Criminal prosecutions against juveniles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Criminal prosecutions against juveniles. 0.57 Section 0.57 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE ORGANIZATION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Criminal Division § 0.57 Criminal prosecutions against juveniles. The Assistant Attorney...

  19. Childhood and Adolescent Predictors of Late Onset Criminal Careers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zara, Georgia; Farrington, David P.

    2009-01-01

    This study explores the emergence of a criminal career in adulthood. The main hypothesis tested is that late criminal onset (at age 21 or later) is influenced by early factors that delay antisocial manifestations. The Cambridge Study in Delinquent Development (CSDD) was used to examine early determinants of criminal behavior. 400 Inner London…

  20. Investigating U.S. Links to Nazi War Criminals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holtzman, Elizabeth

    1984-01-01

    The list of United States government connections with Nazi war criminals is a long one. We must ensure that Nazi war criminals living in America are brought to justice. And we must both explore and expunge the history of our government's relations with Nazi war criminals. (CS)

  1. 32 CFR 147.12 - Guideline J-Criminal conduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Guideline J-Criminal conduct. 147.12 Section 147.12 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE PERSONNEL, MILITARY AND... Adjudication § 147.12 Guideline J—Criminal conduct. (a) The concern. A history or pattern of criminal...

  2. 10 CFR 607.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Criminal drug statute. 607.625 Section 607.625 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 607.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means a Federal...

  3. The Inextricable Link between Age and Criminal History in Sentencing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bushway, Shawn D.; Piehl, Anne Morrison

    2007-01-01

    In sentencing research, significant negative coefficients on age research have been interpreted as evidence that actors in the criminal justice system discriminate against younger people. This interpretation is incomplete. Criminal sentencing laws generally specify punishment in terms of the number of past events in a defendant's criminal history.…

  4. 32 CFR 635.5 - Police Intelligence/Criminal Information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Police Intelligence/Criminal Information. 635.5... ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS LAW ENFORCEMENT REPORTING Records Administration § 635.5 Police Intelligence/Criminal Information. (a) The purpose of gathering police intelligence is to identify...

  5. 32 CFR 635.5 - Police Intelligence/Criminal Information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Police Intelligence/Criminal Information. 635.5... ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS LAW ENFORCEMENT REPORTING Records Administration § 635.5 Police Intelligence/Criminal Information. (a) The purpose of gathering police intelligence is to identify...

  6. 32 CFR 635.5 - Police Intelligence/Criminal Information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Police Intelligence/Criminal Information. 635.5... ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS LAW ENFORCEMENT REPORTING Records Administration § 635.5 Police Intelligence/Criminal Information. (a) The purpose of gathering police intelligence is to identify...

  7. 32 CFR 635.5 - Police Intelligence/Criminal Information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Police Intelligence/Criminal Information. 635.5... ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS LAW ENFORCEMENT REPORTING Records Administration § 635.5 Police Intelligence/Criminal Information. (a) The purpose of gathering police intelligence is to identify...

  8. 32 CFR 635.5 - Police Intelligence/Criminal Information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Police Intelligence/Criminal Information. 635.5... ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS LAW ENFORCEMENT REPORTING Records Administration § 635.5 Police Intelligence/Criminal Information. (a) The purpose of gathering police intelligence is to identify...

  9. The Productivity of Criminology and Criminal Justice Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeZee, Matthew R.

    The scholarly productivity of criminology and criminal justice faculty and programs was investigated. The methodologies that were used to rate journals that publish articles in the criminology/criminal justice field and to select 71 schools with graduate programs in criminology or criminal justice are described. Primary interest focused on…

  10. 32 CFR 147.12 - Guideline J-Criminal conduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Guideline J-Criminal conduct. 147.12 Section 147.12 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE PERSONNEL, MILITARY AND... Adjudication § 147.12 Guideline J—Criminal conduct. (a) The concern. A history or pattern of criminal...

  11. 32 CFR 147.12 - Guideline J-Criminal conduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Guideline J-Criminal conduct. 147.12 Section 147.12 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE PERSONNEL, MILITARY AND... Adjudication § 147.12 Guideline J—Criminal conduct. (a) The concern. A history or pattern of criminal...

  12. 32 CFR 147.12 - Guideline J-Criminal conduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Guideline J-Criminal conduct. 147.12 Section 147.12 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE PERSONNEL, MILITARY AND... Adjudication § 147.12 Guideline J—Criminal conduct. (a) The concern. A history or pattern of criminal...

  13. 32 CFR 147.12 - Guideline J-Criminal conduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Guideline J-Criminal conduct. 147.12 Section 147.12 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE PERSONNEL, MILITARY AND... Adjudication § 147.12 Guideline J—Criminal conduct. (a) The concern. A history or pattern of criminal...

  14. 33 CFR 1.07-90 - Criminal penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... death. (2) Marine Boards (46 CFR part 4). (3) Violations of port security regulations (33 CFR parts 6... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Criminal penalties. 1.07-90... GENERAL PROVISIONS Enforcement; Civil and Criminal Penalty Proceedings § 1.07-90 Criminal penalties....

  15. 49 CFR 209.131 - Criminal penalties generally.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Criminal penalties generally. 209.131 Section 209... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD SAFETY ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Hazardous Materials Penalties Criminal Penalties § 209.131 Criminal penalties generally. A person who knowingly violates 49 U.S.C....

  16. 49 CFR 107.333 - Criminal penalties generally.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Criminal penalties generally. 107.333 Section 107... MATERIALS PROGRAM PROCEDURES Enforcement Criminal Penalties § 107.333 Criminal penalties generally. A person... violation involves the release of a hazardous material which results in death or bodily injury to any person....

  17. 49 CFR 190.229 - Criminal penalties generally.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Criminal penalties generally. 190.229 Section 190... PROGRAMS AND RULEMAKING PROCEDURES Enforcement Criminal Penalties § 190.229 Criminal penalties generally... resulting in death, serious bodily harm, or property damage exceeding $50,000; (2) Subsequently damages...

  18. 49 CFR 107.333 - Criminal penalties generally.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Criminal penalties generally. 107.333 Section 107... MATERIALS PROGRAM PROCEDURES Enforcement Criminal Penalties § 107.333 Criminal penalties generally. A person... violation involves the release of a hazardous material which results in death or bodily injury to any person....

  19. 49 CFR 209.131 - Criminal penalties generally.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Criminal penalties generally. 209.131 Section 209... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD SAFETY ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Hazardous Materials Penalties Criminal Penalties § 209.131 Criminal penalties generally. A person who knowingly violates 49 U.S.C....

  20. 33 CFR 1.07-90 - Criminal penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... death. (2) Marine Boards (46 CFR part 4). (3) Violations of port security regulations (33 CFR parts 6... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Criminal penalties. 1.07-90... GENERAL PROVISIONS Enforcement; Civil and Criminal Penalty Proceedings § 1.07-90 Criminal penalties....

  1. 48 CFR 1349.106 - Fraud or other criminal conduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Fraud or other criminal... MANAGEMENT TERMINATION OF CONTRACTS General Principles 1349.106 Fraud or other criminal conduct. If the terminating contracting officer (TCO) suspects fraud or other criminal conduct related to the settlement of...

  2. 48 CFR 649.106 - Fraud or other criminal conduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Fraud or other criminal... MANAGEMENT TERMINATION OF CONTRACTS General Principles 649.106 Fraud or other criminal conduct. If the Termination Contracting Officer (TCO) suspects fraud or other criminal conduct related to the settlement of...

  3. 48 CFR 449.106 - Fraud or other criminal conduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Fraud or other criminal... MANAGEMENT TERMINATION OF CONTRACTS General Principles 449.106 Fraud or other criminal conduct. (a) If the contracting officer suspects fraud or other criminal conduct a written report documenting the facts shall...

  4. 48 CFR 649.106 - Fraud or other criminal conduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fraud or other criminal... MANAGEMENT TERMINATION OF CONTRACTS General Principles. 649.106 Fraud or other criminal conduct. If the Termination Contracting Officer (TCO) suspects fraud or other criminal conduct related to the settlement of...

  5. 48 CFR 649.106 - Fraud or other criminal conduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Fraud or other criminal... MANAGEMENT TERMINATION OF CONTRACTS General Principles 649.106 Fraud or other criminal conduct. If the Termination Contracting Officer (TCO) suspects fraud or other criminal conduct related to the settlement of...

  6. 48 CFR 1449.106 - Fraud or other criminal conduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Fraud or other criminal... CONTRACT MANAGEMENT TERMINATION OF CONTRACTS General Principles 1449.106 Fraud or other criminal conduct. When fraud or other criminal conduct is suspected, the CO will submit a report documenting the...

  7. 48 CFR 1349.106 - Fraud or other criminal conduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fraud or other criminal... MANAGEMENT TERMINATION OF CONTRACTS General Principles 1349.106 Fraud or other criminal conduct. If the terminating contracting officer (TCO) suspects fraud or other criminal conduct related to the settlement of...

  8. 48 CFR 449.106 - Fraud or other criminal conduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fraud or other criminal... MANAGEMENT TERMINATION OF CONTRACTS General Principles 449.106 Fraud or other criminal conduct. (a) If the contracting officer suspects fraud or other criminal conduct a written report documenting the facts shall...

  9. 48 CFR 449.106 - Fraud or other criminal conduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Fraud or other criminal... MANAGEMENT TERMINATION OF CONTRACTS General Principles 449.106 Fraud or other criminal conduct. (a) If the contracting officer suspects fraud or other criminal conduct a written report documenting the facts shall...

  10. 48 CFR 1349.106 - Fraud or other criminal conduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Fraud or other criminal... MANAGEMENT TERMINATION OF CONTRACTS General Principles 1349.106 Fraud or other criminal conduct. If the terminating contracting officer (TCO) suspects fraud or other criminal conduct related to the settlement of...

  11. 48 CFR 1449.106 - Fraud or other criminal conduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Fraud or other criminal... CONTRACT MANAGEMENT TERMINATION OF CONTRACTS General Principles 1449.106 Fraud or other criminal conduct. When fraud or other criminal conduct is suspected, the CO will submit a report documenting the...

  12. 48 CFR 449.106 - Fraud or other criminal conduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Fraud or other criminal... MANAGEMENT TERMINATION OF CONTRACTS General Principles 449.106 Fraud or other criminal conduct. (a) If the contracting officer suspects fraud or other criminal conduct a written report documenting the facts shall...

  13. 48 CFR 49.106 - Fraud or other criminal conduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Fraud or other criminal... CONTRACT MANAGEMENT TERMINATION OF CONTRACTS General Principles 49.106 Fraud or other criminal conduct. If the TCO suspects fraud or other criminal conduct related to the settlement of a terminated...

  14. 48 CFR 49.106 - Fraud or other criminal conduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fraud or other criminal... CONTRACT MANAGEMENT TERMINATION OF CONTRACTS General Principles 49.106 Fraud or other criminal conduct. If the TCO suspects fraud or other criminal conduct related to the settlement of a terminated...

  15. 48 CFR 49.106 - Fraud or other criminal conduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Fraud or other criminal... CONTRACT MANAGEMENT TERMINATION OF CONTRACTS General Principles 49.106 Fraud or other criminal conduct. If the TCO suspects fraud or other criminal conduct related to the settlement of a terminated...

  16. 48 CFR 649.106 - Fraud or other criminal conduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Fraud or other criminal... MANAGEMENT TERMINATION OF CONTRACTS General Principles 649.106 Fraud or other criminal conduct. If the Termination Contracting Officer (TCO) suspects fraud or other criminal conduct related to the settlement of...

  17. 48 CFR 49.106 - Fraud or other criminal conduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Fraud or other criminal... CONTRACT MANAGEMENT TERMINATION OF CONTRACTS General Principles 49.106 Fraud or other criminal conduct. If the TCO suspects fraud or other criminal conduct related to the settlement of a terminated...

  18. 48 CFR 1349.106 - Fraud or other criminal conduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Fraud or other criminal... MANAGEMENT TERMINATION OF CONTRACTS General Principles 1349.106 Fraud or other criminal conduct. If the terminating contracting officer (TCO) suspects fraud or other criminal conduct related to the settlement of...

  19. 48 CFR 1449.106 - Fraud or other criminal conduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fraud or other criminal... CONTRACT MANAGEMENT TERMINATION OF CONTRACTS General Principles 1449.106 Fraud or other criminal conduct. When fraud or other criminal conduct is suspected, the CO will submit a report documenting the...

  20. 48 CFR 949.106 - Fraud or other criminal conduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Fraud or other criminal... MANAGEMENT TERMINATION OF CONTRACTS General Principles 949.106 Fraud or other criminal conduct. Any evidence of fraud or other criminal conduct in connection with the settlement of a contract termination...

  1. 48 CFR 1449.106 - Fraud or other criminal conduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Fraud or other criminal... CONTRACT MANAGEMENT TERMINATION OF CONTRACTS General Principles 1449.106 Fraud or other criminal conduct. When fraud or other criminal conduct is suspected, the CO will submit a report documenting the...

  2. 48 CFR 949.106 - Fraud or other criminal conduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Fraud or other criminal... MANAGEMENT TERMINATION OF CONTRACTS General Principles 949.106 Fraud or other criminal conduct. Any evidence of fraud or other criminal conduct in connection with the settlement of a contract termination...

  3. 48 CFR 849.106 - Fraud or other criminal conduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Fraud or other criminal... CONTRACT MANAGEMENT TERMINATION OF CONTRACTS General Principles 849.106 Fraud or other criminal conduct. (a) If the contracting officer suspects fraud or other criminal conduct related to the settlement of...

  4. 48 CFR 849.106 - Fraud or other criminal conduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Fraud or other criminal... CONTRACT MANAGEMENT TERMINATION OF CONTRACTS General Principles 849.106 Fraud or other criminal conduct. (a) If the contracting officer suspects fraud or other criminal conduct related to the settlement of...

  5. 49 CFR 32.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Criminal drug statute. 32.625 Section 32.625 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 32.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means a Federal...

  6. 45 CFR 1155.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Criminal drug statute. 1155.625 Section 1155.625... HUMANITIES NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE ARTS GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 1155.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means a Federal or...

  7. 22 CFR 1008.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Criminal drug statute. 1008.625 Section 1008.625 Foreign Relations INTER-AMERICAN FOUNDATION GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 1008.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means a Federal or...

  8. 49 CFR 32.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Criminal drug statute. 32.625 Section 32.625 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 32.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means a Federal...

  9. 22 CFR 1509.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2012-04-01 2009-04-01 true Criminal drug statute. 1509.625 Section 1509.625 Foreign Relations AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 1509.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means a Federal...

  10. 21 CFR 1405.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Criminal drug statute. 1405.625 Section 1405.625 Food and Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 1405.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means...

  11. 13 CFR 147.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Criminal drug statute. 147.625 Section 147.625 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 147.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal...

  12. 21 CFR 1405.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Criminal drug statute. 1405.625 Section 1405.625 Food and Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 1405.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means...

  13. 45 CFR 1155.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Criminal drug statute. 1155.625 Section 1155.625... HUMANITIES NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE ARTS GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 1155.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means a Federal or...

  14. 45 CFR 1173.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Criminal drug statute. 1173.625 Section 1173.625... HUMANITIES NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 1173.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means a Federal...

  15. 7 CFR 3021.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Criminal drug statute. 3021.625 Section 3021.625..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 3021.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means a Federal or non-Federal...

  16. 22 CFR 133.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Criminal drug statute. 133.625 Section 133.625 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE MISCELLANEOUS GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 133.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means a Federal...

  17. 22 CFR 1008.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2012-04-01 2009-04-01 true Criminal drug statute. 1008.625 Section 1008.625 Foreign Relations INTER-AMERICAN FOUNDATION GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 1008.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means a Federal or...

  18. 22 CFR 133.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Criminal drug statute. 133.625 Section 133.625 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE MISCELLANEOUS GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 133.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means a Federal...

  19. 22 CFR 312.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2012-04-01 2009-04-01 true Criminal drug statute. 312.625 Section 312.625 Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 312.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means a Federal or non-Federal...

  20. 49 CFR 32.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Criminal drug statute. 32.625 Section 32.625 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 32.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means a Federal...

  1. 22 CFR 133.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Criminal drug statute. 133.625 Section 133.625 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE MISCELLANEOUS GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 133.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means a Federal...

  2. 22 CFR 312.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Criminal drug statute. 312.625 Section 312.625 Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 312.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means a Federal or non-Federal...

  3. 15 CFR 29.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Criminal drug statute. 29.625 Section 29.625 Commerce and Foreign Trade Office of the Secretary of Commerce GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 29.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal...

  4. 21 CFR 1405.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Criminal drug statute. 1405.625 Section 1405.625 Food and Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 1405.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means...

  5. 28 CFR 83.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Criminal drug statute. 83.625 Section 83.625 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) GOVERNMENT-WIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (GRANTS) Definitions § 83.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means...

  6. 15 CFR 29.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Criminal drug statute. 29.625 Section 29.625 Commerce and Foreign Trade Office of the Secretary of Commerce GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 29.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal...

  7. 29 CFR 94.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Criminal drug statute. 94.625 Section 94.625 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 94.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means a Federal or non-Federal...

  8. 34 CFR 84.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Criminal drug statute. 84.625 Section 84.625 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 84.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means a Federal...

  9. 15 CFR 29.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Criminal drug statute. 29.625 Section 29.625 Commerce and Foreign Trade Office of the Secretary of Commerce GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 29.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal...

  10. 13 CFR 147.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Criminal drug statute. 147.625 Section 147.625 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 147.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal...

  11. 45 CFR 1155.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Criminal drug statute. 1155.625 Section 1155.625... HUMANITIES NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE ARTS GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 1155.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means a Federal or...

  12. 22 CFR 133.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Criminal drug statute. 133.625 Section 133.625 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE MISCELLANEOUS GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 133.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means a Federal...

  13. 34 CFR 84.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Criminal drug statute. 84.625 Section 84.625 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 84.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means a Federal...

  14. 21 CFR 1405.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Criminal drug statute. 1405.625 Section 1405.625 Food and Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 1405.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means...

  15. 15 CFR 29.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Criminal drug statute. 29.625 Section 29.625 Commerce and Foreign Trade Office of the Secretary of Commerce GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 29.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal...

  16. 28 CFR 83.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Criminal drug statute. 83.625 Section 83.625 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) GOVERNMENT-WIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (GRANTS) Definitions § 83.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means...

  17. 43 CFR 43.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Criminal drug statute. 43.625 Section 43.625 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 43.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal...

  18. 28 CFR 83.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Criminal drug statute. 83.625 Section 83.625 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) GOVERNMENT-WIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (GRANTS) Definitions § 83.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means...

  19. 28 CFR 83.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Criminal drug statute. 83.625 Section 83.625 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) GOVERNMENT-WIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (GRANTS) Definitions § 83.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means...

  20. 45 CFR 1155.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Criminal drug statute. 1155.625 Section 1155.625... HUMANITIES NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE ARTS GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 1155.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means a Federal or...

  1. 34 CFR 84.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Criminal drug statute. 84.625 Section 84.625 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 84.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means a Federal...

  2. 34 CFR 84.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Criminal drug statute. 84.625 Section 84.625 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 84.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means a Federal...

  3. 22 CFR 1509.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Criminal drug statute. 1509.625 Section 1509.625 Foreign Relations AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 1509.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means a Federal...

  4. 28 CFR 83.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Criminal drug statute. 83.625 Section 83.625 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) GOVERNMENT-WIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (GRANTS) Definitions § 83.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means...

  5. 45 CFR 1155.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Criminal drug statute. 1155.625 Section 1155.625... HUMANITIES NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE ARTS GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 1155.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means a Federal or...

  6. 49 CFR 32.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Criminal drug statute. 32.625 Section 32.625 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 32.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means a Federal...

  7. 22 CFR 312.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2013-04-01 2009-04-01 true Criminal drug statute. 312.625 Section 312.625 Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 312.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means a Federal or non-Federal...

  8. 29 CFR 94.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Criminal drug statute. 94.625 Section 94.625 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 94.625 Criminal drug statute. Criminal drug statute means a Federal or non-Federal...

  9. 33 CFR 1.07-90 - Criminal penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... death. (2) Marine Boards (46 CFR part 4). (3) Violations of port security regulations (33 CFR parts 6... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Criminal penalties. 1.07-90... GENERAL PROVISIONS Enforcement; Civil and Criminal Penalty Proceedings § 1.07-90 Criminal penalties....

  10. 49 CFR 107.333 - Criminal penalties generally.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Criminal penalties generally. 107.333 Section 107... MATERIALS PROGRAM PROCEDURES Enforcement Criminal Penalties § 107.333 Criminal penalties generally. A person... violation involves the release of a hazardous material which results in death or bodily injury to any person....

  11. 49 CFR 209.131 - Criminal penalties generally.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Criminal penalties generally. 209.131 Section 209... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD SAFETY ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Hazardous Materials Penalties Criminal Penalties § 209.131 Criminal penalties generally. A person who knowingly violates 49 U.S.C....

  12. 49 CFR 209.131 - Criminal penalties generally.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Criminal penalties generally. 209.131 Section 209... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD SAFETY ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Hazardous Materials Penalties Criminal Penalties § 209.131 Criminal penalties generally. A person who knowingly violates 49 U.S.C....

  13. 33 CFR 1.07-90 - Criminal penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... death. (2) Marine Boards (46 CFR part 4). (3) Violations of port security regulations (33 CFR parts 6... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Criminal penalties. 1.07-90... GENERAL PROVISIONS Enforcement; Civil and Criminal Penalty Proceedings § 1.07-90 Criminal penalties....

  14. 49 CFR 209.131 - Criminal penalties generally.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Criminal penalties generally. 209.131 Section 209... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD SAFETY ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Hazardous Materials Penalties Criminal Penalties § 209.131 Criminal penalties generally. A person who knowingly violates 49 U.S.C....

  15. 49 CFR 107.333 - Criminal penalties generally.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Criminal penalties generally. 107.333 Section 107... MATERIALS PROGRAM PROCEDURES Enforcement Criminal Penalties § 107.333 Criminal penalties generally. A person... violation involves the release of a hazardous material which results in death or bodily injury to any person....

  16. 49 CFR 107.333 - Criminal penalties generally.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Criminal penalties generally. 107.333 Section 107... MATERIALS PROGRAM PROCEDURES Enforcement Criminal Penalties § 107.333 Criminal penalties generally. A person... violation involves the release of a hazardous material which results in death or bodily injury to any person....

  17. [Justice concern, perceived procedural justice, and subjective validity of the results in the labor tribunal system in Japan: A comparison of parties between labors and employers].

    PubMed

    Imazai, Kei-Ichiro

    2015-06-01

    The labor tribunal system, which is a form of alternative dispute resolution rather than a type of lawsuit, requires both parties' agreements to settle disputes and maintains a high settlement rate. As most of parties involved in the system are said to expect that labor problems should be settled fairly, it is assumed that they will readily accept the results of fair procedures. However, it seems that laborers who submit claims for compensation have a different concept of justice than employers or company employees in charge of settlements and this determines the attitudes toward the results. This study conducted a survey of participants in the labor tribunal system, and suggest that laborers attribute the validity of this system's results directly to judges, while company representatives attribute it to the procedure conducted by the judges.

  18. [Justice concern, perceived procedural justice, and subjective validity of the results in the labor tribunal system in Japan: A comparison of parties between labors and employers].

    PubMed

    Imazai, Kei-Ichiro

    2015-06-01

    The labor tribunal system, which is a form of alternative dispute resolution rather than a type of lawsuit, requires both parties' agreements to settle disputes and maintains a high settlement rate. As most of parties involved in the system are said to expect that labor problems should be settled fairly, it is assumed that they will readily accept the results of fair procedures. However, it seems that laborers who submit claims for compensation have a different concept of justice than employers or company employees in charge of settlements and this determines the attitudes toward the results. This study conducted a survey of participants in the labor tribunal system, and suggest that laborers attribute the validity of this system's results directly to judges, while company representatives attribute it to the procedure conducted by the judges. PMID:26182487

  19. 10 CFR 72.86 - Criminal penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Criminal penalties. 72.86 Section 72.86 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR THE INDEPENDENT STORAGE OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL, HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE, AND REACTOR-RELATED GREATER THAN CLASS C WASTE Records,...

  20. 10 CFR 72.86 - Criminal penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Criminal penalties. 72.86 Section 72.86 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR THE INDEPENDENT STORAGE OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL, HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE, AND REACTOR-RELATED GREATER THAN CLASS C WASTE Records,...

  1. 10 CFR 72.86 - Criminal penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Criminal penalties. 72.86 Section 72.86 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR THE INDEPENDENT STORAGE OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL, HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE, AND REACTOR-RELATED GREATER THAN CLASS C WASTE Records,...

  2. 32 CFR 1901.52 - Criminal penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY PUBLIC RIGHTS.... Criminal penalties may be imposed against any officer or employee of the CIA who, by virtue of employment... imposed against any officer or employee of the CIA who willfully maintains a system of records...

  3. 32 CFR 1901.52 - Criminal penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY PUBLIC RIGHTS.... Criminal penalties may be imposed against any officer or employee of the CIA who, by virtue of employment... imposed against any officer or employee of the CIA who willfully maintains a system of records...

  4. 32 CFR 1901.52 - Criminal penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY PUBLIC RIGHTS.... Criminal penalties may be imposed against any officer or employee of the CIA who, by virtue of employment... imposed against any officer or employee of the CIA who willfully maintains a system of records...

  5. 32 CFR 1901.52 - Criminal penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY PUBLIC RIGHTS.... Criminal penalties may be imposed against any officer or employee of the CIA who, by virtue of employment... imposed against any officer or employee of the CIA who willfully maintains a system of records...

  6. Criminal Justice and Criminology. Library Research Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Phillip M.

    This guide to sources for students at San Diego State University who are doing library research in Criminal Justice, Criminology, and related subject areas begins by noting that topics in these areas can be researched in a variety of subject disciplines, including psychology, sociology, law, social work, political science, public administration,…

  7. Training Program Development for Criminal Justice Agencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheesebro, Deborah; Skinner, Gilbert H.

    This manual is designed to assist in the development of a criminal justice agency training program. The first chapter is a discussion of various learning principles (motivation, practice, reinforcement, and learning transfer) and how they may help the trainer select instructional strategies later in the process. Administration, trainer, and…

  8. Legal Rights of the Criminally Accused.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Young Lawyers Association, Austin.

    A brief review of the federal constitutional provisions and equivalent Texas Constitutional provisions for the criminally accused is provided in question and answer form. First Amendment rights related to such matters as freedom of the press, rights of students, picketing, distributing leaflets, state licensing, and obscenity are considered in the…

  9. Cyber Forensics Ontology for Cyber Criminal Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Heum; Cho, Sunho; Kwon, Hyuk-Chul

    We developed Cyber Forensics Ontology for the criminal investigation in cyber space. Cyber crime is classified into cyber terror and general cyber crime, and those two classes are connected with each other. The investigation of cyber terror requires high technology, system environment and experts, and general cyber crime is connected with general crime by evidence from digital data and cyber space. Accordingly, it is difficult to determine relational crime types and collect evidence. Therefore, we considered the classifications of cyber crime, the collection of evidence in cyber space and the application of laws to cyber crime. In order to efficiently investigate cyber crime, it is necessary to integrate those concepts for each cyber crime-case. Thus, we constructed a cyber forensics domain ontology for criminal investigation in cyber space, according to the categories of cyber crime, laws, evidence and information of criminals. This ontology can be used in the process of investigating of cyber crime-cases, and for data mining of cyber crime; classification, clustering, association and detection of crime types, crime cases, evidences and criminals.

  10. [The rights of criminally insane individuals].

    PubMed

    Correia, Ludmila Cerqueira; Lima, Isabel Maria Sampaio Oliveira; Alves, Vânia Sampaio

    2007-09-01

    The Psychiatric Reform Movement has supported proposals to reorient the hegemonic mental health care model. In Brazil, a facility for the criminally insane was created, called the Custody and Psychiatric Treatment Hospital (CPTH). The maintenance of such a structure, known as total institutionalization, has reinforced individual exclusion, limiting the patients' social rehabilitation. This article discusses the right to health in the CPTH from a human rights perspective. The advances achieved in Brazil under the National Mental Health Policy have failed to include reorientation of the care provided in such facilities for the criminally insane. The institution has remained an isolationist asylum, reflecting a historical denial of human rights. Progress in policy, per se, does not guarantee the materialization of recent strides gained through the Psychiatric Reform, particularly in relation to criminals with mental disorders. The state, through shared responsibility with society, should promote the effective reorientation of the health care model for these individuals, whose criminal responsibility should be acknowledged, while providing simultaneously for specialized care. Respect for human rights is not synonymous with impunity.

  11. Commentary: personality disorders and criminal law.

    PubMed

    Slovenko, Ralph

    2009-01-01

    The history of the personality-disorder diagnosis in law and psychiatry-in particular, the antisocial personality disorder-is recounted along with the arguments of renowned forensic psychiatrists as well as public opinion. Jurisdictions around the world are divided on the impact of the diagnosis on criminal responsibility or on sentencing.

  12. Criminal Forensic Psychiatry: A Primer for Psychiatrists.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Scott A

    2016-06-01

    Many mentally ill people are currently held in correctional settings, and general psychiatrists should be familiar with criminal forensic psychiatry in order to understand the legal aspects of the evaluation and treatment of these individuals, especially with regard to competency to stand trial and insanity. This educational activity briefly explains these evaluations and reviews relevant landmark legal cases.

  13. 31 CFR 1010.840 - Criminal penalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Criminal penalty. 1010.840 Section 1010.840 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FINANCIAL CRIMES ENFORCEMENT NETWORK, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY GENERAL PROVISIONS Enforcement; Penalties;...

  14. 31 CFR 1010.840 - Criminal penalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Criminal penalty. 1010.840 Section 1010.840 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FINANCIAL CRIMES ENFORCEMENT NETWORK, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY GENERAL PROVISIONS Enforcement; Penalties;...

  15. 31 CFR 1010.840 - Criminal penalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Criminal penalty. 1010.840 Section 1010.840 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FINANCIAL CRIMES ENFORCEMENT NETWORK, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY GENERAL PROVISIONS Enforcement; Penalties;...

  16. 31 CFR 1010.840 - Criminal penalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Criminal penalty. 1010.840 Section 1010.840 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FINANCIAL CRIMES ENFORCEMENT NETWORK, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY GENERAL PROVISIONS Enforcement; Penalties;...

  17. 10 CFR 50.111 - Criminal penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... paragraph (b) of this section. (b) The regulations in 10 CFR part 50 that are not issued under sections 161b... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Criminal penalties. 50.111 Section 50.111 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC LICENSING OF PRODUCTION AND UTILIZATION FACILITIES Enforcement §...

  18. 10 CFR 50.111 - Criminal penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... paragraph (b) of this section. (b) The regulations in 10 CFR part 50 that are not issued under sections 161b... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Criminal penalties. 50.111 Section 50.111 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC LICENSING OF PRODUCTION AND UTILIZATION FACILITIES Enforcement §...

  19. 10 CFR 50.111 - Criminal penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... paragraph (b) of this section. (b) The regulations in 10 CFR part 50 that are not issued under sections 161b... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Criminal penalties. 50.111 Section 50.111 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC LICENSING OF PRODUCTION AND UTILIZATION FACILITIES Enforcement §...

  20. Monitoring for Criminal Justice Planning Agencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waller, John D.; And Others

    The handbook is designed to help State Planning Agencies (SPA, grantees of Federal funds) to develop or improve performance monitoring systems in order to monitor the implementation, operation, and results of the criminal justice projects they support. Such monitoring is required by the Law Enforcement Assistance Administration (LEAA) guidelines.…

  1. 32 CFR 935.40 - Criminal offenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Criminal offenses. 935.40 Section 935.40 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE TERRITORIAL AND INSULAR... firearm, whether operated by air, gas, spring, or otherwise, or explosive device, including...

  2. 32 CFR 935.40 - Criminal offenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Criminal offenses. 935.40 Section 935.40 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE TERRITORIAL AND INSULAR... firearm, whether operated by air, gas, spring, or otherwise, or explosive device, including...

  3. Media-Cultivated Perceptions of Criminal Victimization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogles, Robert M.

    Many television viewers construct their social reality from media content as well as from sensory and interpersonally communicated information. One aspect of this media-influenced social reality is television viewers' estimates of crime in society, or their fear of criminal victimization. Several media-effects studies have demonstrated the…

  4. Strategies for Reducing Criminal Violence among Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staffo, Donald F.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the serious problem of criminal violence in the personal lives of athletes, suggesting strategies that physical educators, coaches, and school systems can implement with young athletes which could reduce the incidence and severity of violence later in life (e.g., teaching unconditional respect for others, continually reinforcing social…

  5. Mental disorder and criminality in Canada.

    PubMed

    Moran, James E

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the relationship between mental disorder and criminality in Canada from the colonial period to the landmark 1992 Mental Disorder Amendments that followed the passing of Bill C-30. The history of this relationship has been shaped by longstanding formal and informal systems of social regulation, by the contests of federal-provincial jurisdiction, by changing trends in the legal and psychiatric professions, and by amendments to the federal Criminal Code. A study of these longer-term features demonstrates that there has been no linear path of progress in Canada's response to mentally unwell offenders. Those caught in the web of crime and mental disorder have been cast and recast over the past 150 years by the changing dynamics of criminal law, psychiatry, and politics. A long historical perspective suggests how earlier and more contemporary struggles over mental disorder and criminality are connected, how these struggles are bound by historical circumstance, and how a few relatively progressive historical moments emerging from these struggles might be recovered, and theorized to advantage.

  6. Criminal Justice in America. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Bill, Ed.

    This book, a comprehensive and interactive introductory text on criminal justice, consists of six units: (1) Crime: covers victims' rights, gangs, violent crime, white-collar crime, elements of crimes, legal defenses, methods for measuring crime, hate crime, computer crime, and a history of crime in the United States; (2) Police: explores local…

  7. 32 CFR 1901.52 - Criminal penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .... Criminal penalties may be imposed against any officer or employee of the CIA who, by virtue of employment... imposed against any officer or employee of the CIA who willfully maintains a system of records without... concerning an individual from the CIA under false pretenses. Exemptions...

  8. 14 CFR 13.23 - Criminal penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... section 902 (i) through (m) which is reported directly to the Federal Bureau of Investigation), or of the... Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PROCEDURAL RULES... and 1203 of the Federal Aviation Act of 1958 (49 U.S.C. 1472 and 1523), provide criminal penalties...

  9. 14 CFR 13.23 - Criminal penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... section 902 (i) through (m) which is reported directly to the Federal Bureau of Investigation), or of the... Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PROCEDURAL RULES... and 1203 of the Federal Aviation Act of 1958 (49 U.S.C. 1472 and 1523), provide criminal penalties...

  10. 14 CFR 13.23 - Criminal penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... section 902 (i) through (m) which is reported directly to the Federal Bureau of Investigation), or of the... Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PROCEDURAL RULES... and 1203 of the Federal Aviation Act of 1958 (49 U.S.C. 1472 and 1523), provide criminal penalties...

  11. 14 CFR 13.23 - Criminal penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... section 902 (i) through (m) which is reported directly to the Federal Bureau of Investigation), or of the... Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PROCEDURAL RULES... and 1203 of the Federal Aviation Act of 1958 (49 U.S.C. 1472 and 1523), provide criminal penalties...

  12. 14 CFR 13.23 - Criminal penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... section 902 (i) through (m) which is reported directly to the Federal Bureau of Investigation), or of the... Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PROCEDURAL RULES... and 1203 of the Federal Aviation Act of 1958 (49 U.S.C. 1472 and 1523), provide criminal penalties...

  13. Criminal Forensic Psychiatry: A Primer for Psychiatrists.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Scott A

    2016-06-01

    Many mentally ill people are currently held in correctional settings, and general psychiatrists should be familiar with criminal forensic psychiatry in order to understand the legal aspects of the evaluation and treatment of these individuals, especially with regard to competency to stand trial and insanity. This educational activity briefly explains these evaluations and reviews relevant landmark legal cases. PMID:27337424

  14. Legal "rites": criminalizing the mentally ill.

    PubMed

    Treffert, D A

    1981-01-01

    1. Because of more stringent civil commitment criteria, persons formerly hospitalized on a civil commitment now enter the system on criminal observation orders, having been arrested, booked, and often jailed for minor offenses such as vagrancy, shoplifting, or disorderly conduct. This represents a criminalization of the mentally ill. 2. In a single forensic system (Wisconsin) there was an increase of 73% in such commitments following court decisions and legislative revisions setting forth new commitment criteria. This increase was principally in criminal observations, although this rise was evident as well in "unable to stand trial" commitments. It was not present in "not guilty by reason of insanity" adjudications. 3. Aside from the obvious untoward effects per se of criminalizing mentally ill persons, other untoward effects occur in terms of prolonging hospitalization, depriving those persons of prompt treatment, and putting unnecessary and inhumane pressures on the family and the community, as well as on the mentally ill person himself. 4. The "freedom" to the penniless, helpless, ill, and finally arrested, jailed and criminally committed is not freedom at all--it's abandonment. The "right" to be demented, agonized and terrorized in the face of treatment which cannot, because of legal prohibition, be applied is no right at all--it's a new form of imprisonment. The "liberty" to be naked in a padded cell, hallucinating, delusional, and tormented, is not liberty--it is a folie à deux between pseudo-sophisticated liberals and an unrealizing public. The delusion is that if one changes the name of something to something else, or if one substitutes a jail for a hospital or a preoccupation with legal rites for honest concern over patients' rights, he has done something significant, useful and important, or at least something.

  15. Criminal investigations in child protective services cases: an empirical analysis.

    PubMed

    Cross, Theodore P; Chuang, Emmeline; Helton, Jesse J; Lux, Emily A

    2015-05-01

    This study analyzed the frequency and correlates of criminal investigation of child maltreatment in cases investigated by child protective service (CPS), using national probability data from the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being. Criminal investigations were conducted in slightly more than 25% of cases. Communities varied substantially in percentage criminally investigated. Sexual abuse was the most frequent type of maltreatment criminally investigated followed by physical abuse. Logistic regression results indicated that criminal investigations were more likely when caseworkers perceived greater harm and more evidence; when CPS conducted an investigation rather than an assessment; when a parent or a legal guardian reported the maltreatment; and when cases were located in communities in which CPS and police had a memorandum of understanding (MOU) governing coordination. Most variation between communities in criminal investigation remained unexplained. The findings suggest the potential of MOUs for communities wanting to increase criminal investigation.

  16. A Collaborative Epidemiological Investigation into the Criminal Fake Artesunate Trade in South East Asia

    PubMed Central

    Newton, Paul N; Fernández, Facundo M; Plançon, Aline; Mildenhall, Dallas C; Green, Michael D; Ziyong, Li; Christophel, Eva Maria; Phanouvong, Souly; Howells, Stephen; McIntosh, Eric; Laurin, Paul; Blum, Nancy; Hampton, Christina Y; Faure, Kevin; Nyadong, Leonard; Soong, C. W. Ray; Santoso, Budiono; Zhiguang, Wang; Newton, John; Palmer, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    Background Since 1998 the serious public health problem in South East Asia of counterfeit artesunate, containing no or subtherapeutic amounts of the active antimalarial ingredient, has led to deaths from untreated malaria, reduced confidence in this vital drug, large economic losses for the legitimate manufacturers, and concerns that artemisinin resistance might be engendered. Methods and Findings With evidence of a deteriorating situation, a group of police, criminal analysts, chemists, palynologists, and health workers collaborated to determine the source of these counterfeits under the auspices of the International Criminal Police Organization (INTERPOL) and the Western Pacific World Health Organization Regional Office. A total of 391 samples of genuine and counterfeit artesunate collected in Vietnam (75), Cambodia (48), Lao PDR (115), Myanmar (Burma) (137) and the Thai/Myanmar border (16), were available for analysis. Sixteen different fake hologram types were identified. High-performance liquid chromatography and/or mass spectrometry confirmed that all specimens thought to be counterfeit (195/391, 49.9%) on the basis of packaging contained no or small quantities of artesunate (up to 12 mg per tablet as opposed to ∼ 50 mg per genuine tablet). Chemical analysis demonstrated a wide diversity of wrong active ingredients, including banned pharmaceuticals, such as metamizole, and safrole, a carcinogen, and raw material for manufacture of methylenedioxymethamphetamine (‘ecstasy'). Evidence from chemical, mineralogical, biological, and packaging analysis suggested that at least some of the counterfeits were manufactured in southeast People's Republic of China. This evidence prompted the Chinese Government to act quickly against the criminal traders with arrests and seizures. Conclusions An international multi-disciplinary group obtained evidence that some of the counterfeit artesunate was manufactured in China, and this prompted a criminal investigation

  17. The interaction of criminal procedure and outcome.

    PubMed

    Laxminarayan, Malini; Pemberton, Antony

    2014-01-01

    Procedural quality is an important aspect of crime victims' experiences in criminal proceedings and consists of different dimensions. Two of these dimensions are procedural justice (voice) and interpersonal justice (respectful treatment). Social psychological research has suggested that both voice and respectful treatment are moderated by the impact of outcomes of justice procedures on individuals' reactions. To add to this research, we extend this assertion to the criminal justice context, examining the interaction between the assessment of procedural quality and outcome favorability with victim's trust in the legal system and self-esteem. Hierarchical regression analyses reveal that voice, respectful treatment and outcome favorability are predictive of trust in the legal system and self-esteem. Further investigation reveals that being treated with respect is only related to trust in the legal system when outcome favorability is high. PMID:24656217

  18. Criminal justice procedures in civil commitment.

    PubMed

    Slovenko, R

    1977-11-01

    The actions of federal district courts and state legislatures in recent years have resulted in the growing application of procedures of the criminal justice system to the civil commitment process. Increasingly patients can be confined only if they are dangerous to others, and increasingly due-process procedures of the criminal law are required, to the detriment of the patient's treatment and his survival in the community. The author says that allegations of patients' being railroaded into hospitals are, with few exceptions, fictitious. Abuses thet do exist should be handled through writs of habeas corpus and malpractice suits, remedies much more available now than in the past. The principal abuse in commitment occurs not when patients are admitted, the author believes, but at discharge, when so many patients are turned out into communities that lack proper services for them.

  19. Criminal justice procedures in civil commitment.

    PubMed

    Slovenko, R

    1977-11-01

    The actions of federal district courts and state legislatures in recent years have resulted in the growing application of procedures of the criminal justice system to the civil commitment process. Increasingly patients can be confined only if they are dangerous to others, and increasingly due-process procedures of the criminal law are required, to the detriment of the patient's treatment and his survival in the community. The author says that allegations of patients' being railroaded into hospitals are, with few exceptions, fictitious. Abuses thet do exist should be handled through writs of habeas corpus and malpractice suits, remedies much more available now than in the past. The principal abuse in commitment occurs not when patients are admitted, the author believes, but at discharge, when so many patients are turned out into communities that lack proper services for them. PMID:914239

  20. Modeling Criminal Activity in Urban Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brantingham, Patricia; Glässer, Uwe; Jackson, Piper; Vajihollahi, Mona

    Computational and mathematical methods arguably have an enormous potential for serving practical needs in crime analysis and prevention by offering novel tools for crime investigations and experimental platforms for evidence-based policy making. We present a comprehensive formal framework and tool support for mathematical and computational modeling of criminal behavior to facilitate systematic experimental studies of a wide range of criminal activities in urban environments. The focus is on spatial and temporal aspects of different forms of crime, including opportunistic and serial violent crimes. However, the proposed framework provides a basis to push beyond conventional empirical research and engage the use of computational thinking and social simulations in the analysis of terrorism and counter-terrorism.

  1. The multiple personality and the criminal law.

    PubMed

    Slovenko, R

    1993-01-01

    Multiple personality disorder (MPD) is a growing phenomenon in the United States. The number of cases have mounted following the celebrated cases of 'Three Faces of Eve' and 'Sybil' that have been popularized over the past several decades. How can--or should--the criminal law deal with multiple personality? Should the defendant suffering MPD be deemed competent to stand trial, or be able successfully to assert the insanity defence, or diminished capacity or automatism? Does MPD qualify as a mental disease or defect under the test of criminal responsibility, which would call for commitment upon a finding of not guilty by reason of insanity? What is the effect of MPD on cognition or control? These issues are discussed.

  2. The interaction of criminal procedure and outcome.

    PubMed

    Laxminarayan, Malini; Pemberton, Antony

    2014-01-01

    Procedural quality is an important aspect of crime victims' experiences in criminal proceedings and consists of different dimensions. Two of these dimensions are procedural justice (voice) and interpersonal justice (respectful treatment). Social psychological research has suggested that both voice and respectful treatment are moderated by the impact of outcomes of justice procedures on individuals' reactions. To add to this research, we extend this assertion to the criminal justice context, examining the interaction between the assessment of procedural quality and outcome favorability with victim's trust in the legal system and self-esteem. Hierarchical regression analyses reveal that voice, respectful treatment and outcome favorability are predictive of trust in the legal system and self-esteem. Further investigation reveals that being treated with respect is only related to trust in the legal system when outcome favorability is high.

  3. [Criminal madness in the 18th century].

    PubMed

    Barras, V

    1990-01-01

    Forensic psychiatry, as we know it, was established in the early 19th century. But already the "Ancien Régime" knew--with regard to mentally disturbed criminals--particular legal and medical considerations and practical arrangements. The author analyses the theoretical reasoning of some cases selected from the judicial archives of Geneva (mainly 18th c.). This enables him to establish the great lines of a "prehistory" of forensic-psychiatric expertise.

  4. Traumatic brain injury and criminal behaviour.

    PubMed

    Diaz, F G

    1995-01-01

    The clinical characteristics of traumatic brain injury (TBI), the association of TBI with lasting behavioural problems and neuropsychological deficits, and the use of the insanity defense in criminal proceedings in relation to TBI are discussed. Furthermore, the possible abuse of the incidental association of a TBI to the commission of a crime is explored. A framework of evaluation is described to determine the relevance of the association of TBI and the ultimate commission of a crime.

  5. Transfer of Juvenile Cases to Criminal Court.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soo Jung; Kraus, Louis J

    2016-01-01

    The first juvenile court was founded in 1899 with the focus on rehabilitation of a juvenile offender as opposed to punishment in adult court. Determining culpability and disposition for adolescents has become a source of much discussion. With serious crimes, juvenile delinquents may be transferred from juvenile court to adult criminal court; this practice became more prevalent in the past century. However, growing knowledge of adolescent development has mitigated the culpability of youth offenders and resulted in judicial decisions influential to juvenile dispositions.

  6. Multiple personality disorder in criminal law.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, M; Bancroft, J; Buchanan, J

    1993-01-01

    The authors review the recent literature on multiple personality disorder (MPD), the most severe and chronic of the dissociative disorders, in relation to court cases of competence to stand trial, the insanity defense, and research on malingerers feigning MPD. Issues relevant in the assessment of competency and insanity are described. Features characteristic of MPD, including amnesia and alterations in consciousness and personality, have varying degrees of influence over the criminal behavior of an individual with MPD. As in other psychiatric disorders, the influence of MPD on an individual's competence to stand trial, and sanity, can be evaluated systematically. This article discusses a specific diagnostic tool, the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Dissociative Disorders (SCID-D), an extensively field tested instrument that is potentially quite useful in forensic assessment of suspects manifesting dissociative symptoms and disorders. The particular advantages of the SCID-D will be reviewed in the context of some well known criminal cases involving MPD. Further research using diagnostic interviews for the systematic assessment of dissociative symptoms and MPD in criminal cases will continue to clarify the influence of these symptoms in a forensic context.

  7. Without thinking: impulsive aggression and criminal responsibility.

    PubMed

    Shuman, Daniel W; Gold, Liza H

    2008-01-01

    In the U.S. the decision to impose criminal responsibility rests on an assumption about the defendant's decision to engage in proscribed conduct. We punish only those who we believe had the capacity to make a choice. In an increasingly violent world, the criminal law and the assumptions upon which it rests are relentlessly tested. A new generation of neuro-imaging technologies offers to provide insights into structural and functional abnormalities in the brain that may limit the autonomy of many dangerous offenders and unravel the fabric of the criminal justice system. How will the results of these technologies be received by the courts--are they relevant to existing formulations of the prima facie case, the insanity defense, or mitigation of sentence; will changes in the science or the law be required to accommodate this knowledge? The new generation of technologies may appropriately play a role in assessing culpable mental states only if they are also reliable. This short article takes on these and a host of other related questions at the intersection between science, law, and science fiction.

  8. Criminal consequences of childhood sexual victimization.

    PubMed

    Widom, C P; Ames, M A

    1994-04-01

    Using a prospective cohorts design, we assess the long-term criminal consequences of childhood sexual abuse through an examination of official criminal histories for a large sample of validated cases of childhood sexual abuse, compared to cases of physical abuse and neglect and a control group matched for age, race, sex, and approximate family socioeconomic status. Compared to other types of abuse and neglect, early childhood sexual abuse does not uniquely increase an individual's risk for later delinquent and adult criminal behavior. Childhood sexual abuse victims were at increased risk of arrest as a juvenile for being a runaway. As adults, child sexual abuse victims were at higher risk of arrest for sex crimes than controls, as were victims of physical abuse and neglect. Childhood sexual abuse victims were more likely to be arrested for prostitution as adults than other abuse and neglect victims and controls, regardless of gender. However, there was no support for a direct relationship among child sexual abuse, arrests for running away in adolescence, and adult arrests for prostitution. The findings also suggest an association for males between physical abuse and arrests for violent sex crimes (rape and/or sodomy). Caution is needed in interpreting these findings because of exclusive reliance on official record data and the possible impact of agency intervention. PMID:8187016

  9. The irresponsible criminal in Norwegian medico-legal discourse.

    PubMed

    Skålevåg, Svein Atle

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses discourses on criminal responsibility in Norway in the 19th and 20th centuries, in light of Michel Foucault's regimes of power and knowledge: the apparatuses of law, discipline and security. The passing of two criminal codes, in 1842 and 1902 marks a development from neo-classical law to a law influenced by positivist criminology. In these consecutive ways of thinking law, the figure of the irresponsible criminal constituted a contentious issue. From being a figure marking the limits of the law, the irresponsible criminal became an object to be disciplined and a security threat. This redefinition of criminal responsibility created or was created by new groups of experts speaking from positions increasingly close to the criminals. The most important professional group was of course the psychiatrists, that emerged in Norway as a distinct professional group in the second half of the 19th century, and whose influence in the legislative process culminated in the 1920s.

  10. [Neuroscience and criminal law: new perspectives for old problems].

    PubMed

    Mercurio, Ezequiel N

    2009-01-01

    The advance of neuroscience has begun to affect different disciplines, one of the most influenced is the criminal law. The new researches add light on what region are in charge of the control and value of our behaviour and which might be the consequences of the dysfunction in these regions. Therefore, the criminal law begin to ask about criminal responsibility in subjects with brain injuries or dysfunction. The aim of this paper is to analyze the impact of the current neuroscience in criminal responsibility.

  11. Potential criminal adversaries of nuclear programs: a portrait

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, B.M.

    1980-07-01

    This paper examines the possibility that terrorists or other kinds of criminals might attempt to seize or sabotage a nuclear facility, steal nuclear material, or carry out other criminal activities in the nuclear domain which has created special problems for the security of nuclear programs. This paper analyzes the potential threat. Our tasks was to describe the potential criminal adversary, or rather the spectrum of potential adversaries who conceivably might carry out malevolent criminal actions against nuclear programs and facilities. We were concerned with both the motivations as well as the material and operational capabilities likely to be displayed by various categories of potential nuclear adversaries.

  12. 76 FR 69287 - National Instant Criminal Background Check System Section Agency Information Collection...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-08

    ... Federal Bureau of Investigation National Instant Criminal Background Check System Section Agency Information Collection Activities: Existing collection, comments requested the Voluntary Appeal File (VAF... Criminal Justice Information Services (CJIS) Division's National Instant Criminal Background Check...

  13. Neural connectivity during reward expectation dissociates psychopathic criminals from non-criminal individuals with high impulsive/antisocial psychopathic traits.

    PubMed

    Geurts, Dirk E M; von Borries, Katinka; Volman, Inge; Bulten, Berend Hendrik; Cools, Roshan; Verkes, Robbert-Jan

    2016-08-01

    Criminal behaviour poses a big challenge for society. A thorough understanding of the neurobiological mechanisms underlying criminality could optimize its prevention and management. Specifically,elucidating the neural mechanisms underpinning reward expectation might be pivotal to understanding criminal behaviour. So far no study has assessed reward expectation and its mechanisms in a criminal sample. To fill this gap, we assessed reward expectation in incarcerated, psychopathic criminals. We compared this group to two groups of non-criminal individuals: one with high levels and another with low levels of impulsive/antisocial traits. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to quantify neural responses to reward expectancy. Psychophysiological interaction analyses were performed to examine differences in functional connectivity patterns of reward-related regions. The data suggest that overt criminality is characterized, not by abnormal reward expectation per se, but rather by enhanced communication between reward-related striatal regions and frontal brain regions. We establish that incarcerated psychopathic criminals can be dissociated from non-criminal individuals with comparable impulsive/antisocial personality tendencies based on the degree to which reward-related brain regions interact with brain regions that control behaviour. The present results help us understand why some people act according to their impulsive/antisocial personality while others are able to behave adaptively despite reward-related urges. PMID:27217111

  14. [Does the amendment of the rules of Criminal Code referring to mandatory treatment mean paradigm change in the judgement of mentally ill criminals?].

    PubMed

    Kalapos, Miklós Péter

    2011-01-01

    Talking of the Act LXXX. of 2009, the amendment of the Act IV. of 1978 on Criminal Code, the author reviews the Hungarian history of the changes of regulations referring to mentally ill criminals. He discusses the treatment regulations referring to criminals identified as insane, too. From historical and legal philosophical points of view, those parts of the modification of Criminal Code are analyzed that deal with mandatory treatment and took effect in he May 2010. The changes are judged as paradigm changing in a negative course that represents a doubtful step from the direction of perpetrator based criminal law to criminal act based criminal law.

  15. Criminal typology of veterans entering substance abuse treatment.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Nicole R; Blonigen, Daniel; Finlay, Andrea; Timko, Christine

    2015-07-01

    Criminal justice involvement among veterans is a critical and timely concern, yet little is known about criminal histories and clinical characteristics among veterans seeking treatment for substance use disorders (SUDs). The present study examined criminal typology, clinical characteristics, treatment utilization, and 12-step mutual-help group (MHG) participation among veterans (N = 332) at intake to SUD treatment at the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), and 6 months and 1 year post-intake. Cluster analysis yielded three types of criminal histories mild-(78.9%), moderate (13.6%), and severe (7.5%)-distinguished by type of offense, number of convictions, and number of months incarcerated. At intake, participants with mild criminal histories reported more alcohol problems and fewer legal and employment problems than participants with moderate and severe criminal histories. Participants with severe criminal histories were most likely to attend a 12-step MHG meeting in the year post-intake, but all groups had high attendance. When only participants who had attended at least one meeting in the year post-intake were compared, participants with mild criminal histories worked more steps and were more involved in 12-step practices. All groups improved between baseline and follow-up and did not differ at follow-ups on substance use or other clinical outcomes. Multiple regressions identified treatment utilization and MHG attendance, but not baseline criminal history, as significant predictors of improved substance use problem severity at follow-up. Outpatient treatment and 12-step MHG attendance appear to be important components of recovery for veterans with varying criminal histories. Clinicians in SUD treatment programs should screen for criminal histories at treatment intake to ensure appropriate treatment planning.

  16. [Relationship between schizophrenia and criminal behavior].

    PubMed

    Baran, Brigitta; Gazdag, Gabor

    2011-12-01

    Referring to the scientific literature the authors analyze the correlation between criminal offense and psychiatric disorders. Frequency of violent behaviour in schizophrenia together with the risk factors are reviewed. The issue of violent offense is separately discussed. Impact of deinstitutionalization on offense is also analyzed. Results regarding the genetic correlations are also reviewed. Finally the question of re-offending is discussed. In summary the importance of this issue in stigmatization and in the development of the mental health care system is highlighted. PMID:22184195

  17. Criminal responsibility: an action language approach.

    PubMed

    Miller, G H

    1979-05-01

    Traditionally, the propositions of psychiatry are said to be in conflict with those of the law since psychiatry assumes a "psychic determinism" and the law assumes freedom of the will (Stone, 1978). An argument always arises over the insanity defense since it bridges psychiatry and the law. But one may hold that there is nothing intrinsic to psychiatry which requires causally stated propositions. By formulating psychiatric propositions in a different form, specifically by adopting the action language of Roy Schafer (1976a), there need be no incompatibility between psychiatric and legal statements about criminal responsibility.

  18. Neuroscience and legal determination of criminal responsibility.

    PubMed

    Eastman, Nigel; Campbell, Colin

    2006-04-01

    Neuroscience is increasingly identifying associations between biology and violence that appear to offer courts evidence relevant to criminal responsibility. In addition, in a policy era of 'zero tolerance of risk', evidence of biological abnormality in some of those who are violent, or biological markers of violence, may be seized on as a possible basis for preventive detention in the interest of public safety. However, there is a mismatch between questions that the courts and society wish answered and those that neuroscience is capable of answering. This poses a risk to the proper exercise of justice and to civil liberties.

  19. Criminal psychological profiling: validities and abilities.

    PubMed

    Kocsis, Richard N

    2003-04-01

    Criminal psychological profiling has attained unprecedented recognition despite little empirical evidence to support its validity and the absence of any thorough exposition of the skills involved with the technique. This article reports on the empirically derived conclusions of studies that sought to examine the accuracy and skill of various groups performing a profiling task. The conclusions provide some support for the contention that professional profilers can produce a more accurate prediction of an unknown offender in comparison to other studied groups. The results also give an indication of the type of skills required for proficient profiling.

  20. 32 CFR 150.26 - Internal rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Internal rules. 150.26 Section 150.26 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE REGULATIONS PERTAINING TO MILITARY JUSTICE COURTS OF CRIMINAL APPEALS RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE § 150.26 Internal rules. The...

  1. 78 FR 2443 - Criminal Justice Interview Room Recording System (IRRS) Standard, Supplier's Declaration of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-11

    ... Declaration of Conformity Requirements, and Selection and Application Guide AGENCY: National Institute of... Criminal Justice IRRS Supplier's Declaration of Conformity Requirements 3. Draft Criminal Justice...

  2. From international to zonal trials: the origins of the Nuremberg medical trial.

    PubMed

    Weindling, P

    2000-01-01

    This article examines how plans to have a second International Military Tribunal led to the Medical Trial at Nuremberg. While the British opposed a second international trial because of their distrust of the Soviets, they supported a plan for a series of special zonal trials to be conducted by the American authorities at Nuremberg. In December 1945 the British became aware of the extent of medical war crimes committed by the Germans. Their investigation led to an eventual handover to the Americans of a group of German doctors for trial at Nuremberg. At the same time the British and French Supported an International Scientific Commission for the Investigation of Medical War Crimes.

  3. 48 CFR 649.106 - Fraud or other criminal conduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fraud or other criminal conduct. 649.106 Section 649.106 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF STATE CONTRACT MANAGEMENT TERMINATION OF CONTRACTS General Principles. 649.106 Fraud or other criminal conduct. If...

  4. 48 CFR 49.106 - Fraud or other criminal conduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fraud or other criminal conduct. 49.106 Section 49.106 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION CONTRACT MANAGEMENT TERMINATION OF CONTRACTS General Principles 49.106 Fraud or other criminal conduct....

  5. 48 CFR 1349.106 - Fraud or other criminal conduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fraud or other criminal conduct. 1349.106 Section 1349.106 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE CONTRACT MANAGEMENT TERMINATION OF CONTRACTS General Principles 1349.106 Fraud or other criminal conduct. If...

  6. 48 CFR 1449.106 - Fraud or other criminal conduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fraud or other criminal conduct. 1449.106 Section 1449.106 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR CONTRACT MANAGEMENT TERMINATION OF CONTRACTS General Principles 1449.106 Fraud or other criminal...

  7. 48 CFR 449.106 - Fraud or other criminal conduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fraud or other criminal conduct. 449.106 Section 449.106 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CONTRACT MANAGEMENT TERMINATION OF CONTRACTS General Principles 449.106 Fraud or other criminal conduct. (a) If...

  8. Young Offenders' Diagnoses as Predictors of Subsequent Adult Criminal Behaviour.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bevc, Irene; Duchesne, Thierry; Rosenthal, Jeffrey; Rossman, Lianne; Theodor, Frances; Sowa, Edward

    This longitudinal study of 248 male offenders examined the relationship between psychiatric disorders, diagnosed in adolescence, and subsequent adult criminal activity. Criminal offences were tracked for an average of 8.7 years from age 18-33. Cox Proportional Intensity regression analyses were conducted to predict the rates of adult offending of…

  9. 42 CFR 2.4 - Criminal penalty for violation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Criminal penalty for violation. 2.4 Section 2.4 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS CONFIDENTIALITY OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS Introduction § 2.4 Criminal penalty for violation....

  10. 28 CFR 115.371 - Criminal and administrative agency investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Criminal and administrative agency investigations. 115.371 Section 115.371 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Juvenile Facilities Investigations § 115.371 Criminal...

  11. 28 CFR 115.171 - Criminal and administrative agency investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Criminal and administrative agency investigations. 115.171 Section 115.171 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Lockups Investigations § 115.171 Criminal and...

  12. 28 CFR 115.71 - Criminal and administrative agency investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Criminal and administrative agency investigations. 115.71 Section 115.71 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Adult Prisons and Jails Investigations § 115.71 Criminal...

  13. 28 CFR 115.71 - Criminal and administrative agency investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Criminal and administrative agency investigations. 115.71 Section 115.71 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Adult Prisons and Jails Investigations § 115.71 Criminal...

  14. 28 CFR 115.371 - Criminal and administrative agency investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Criminal and administrative agency investigations. 115.371 Section 115.371 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Juvenile Facilities Investigations § 115.371 Criminal...

  15. 28 CFR 115.371 - Criminal and administrative agency investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Criminal and administrative agency investigations. 115.371 Section 115.371 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Juvenile Facilities Investigations § 115.371 Criminal...

  16. 28 CFR 115.71 - Criminal and administrative agency investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Criminal and administrative agency investigations. 115.71 Section 115.71 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Adult Prisons and Jails Investigations § 115.71 Criminal...

  17. 28 CFR 115.171 - Criminal and administrative agency investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Criminal and administrative agency investigations. 115.171 Section 115.171 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Lockups Investigations § 115.171 Criminal and...

  18. 28 CFR 115.171 - Criminal and administrative agency investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Criminal and administrative agency investigations. 115.171 Section 115.171 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Lockups Investigations § 115.171 Criminal and...

  19. Syllabus Design and Construction in Criminal Justice Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culbertson, Robert G.; Carr, Adam F.

    Undergraduate course syllabi on law enforcement, courts-law, corrections, and general criminal justice-criminology were assessed, based on 759 usable submissions from 193 junior, community, and senior colleges and universities. Based on the analysis, a set of syllabi to represent the core of a criminal justice curriculum was constructed. Course…

  20. Childhood Neurodevelopmental Disorders and Violent Criminality: A Sibling Control Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lundström, Sebastian; Forsman, Mats; Larsson, Henrik; Kerekes, Nora; Serlachius, Eva; Långström, Niklas; Lichtenstein, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The longitudinal relationship between attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and violent criminality has been extensively documented, while long-term effects of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), tic disorders (TDs), and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) on criminality have been scarcely studied. Using population-based registers of all…

  1. 42 CFR 38.8 - Criminal and civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Criminal and civil penalties. 38.8 Section 38.8 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS DISASTER ASSISTANCE FOR CRISIS COUNSELING AND TRAINING § 38.8 Criminal and civil...

  2. 42 CFR 38.8 - Criminal and civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Criminal and civil penalties. 38.8 Section 38.8 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS DISASTER ASSISTANCE FOR CRISIS COUNSELING AND TRAINING § 38.8 Criminal and civil...

  3. 42 CFR 38.8 - Criminal and civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Criminal and civil penalties. 38.8 Section 38.8 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS DISASTER ASSISTANCE FOR CRISIS COUNSELING AND TRAINING § 38.8 Criminal and civil...

  4. 42 CFR 38.8 - Criminal and civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Criminal and civil penalties. 38.8 Section 38.8 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS DISASTER ASSISTANCE FOR CRISIS COUNSELING AND TRAINING § 38.8 Criminal and civil...

  5. Theories on Criminality and Mental Retardation Project CAMIO, Volume 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haskins, Jimmy R.; Friel, Charles M.

    This historical review of theories on criminality and mental retardation is part of Project CAMIO (Correctional Administration and the Mentally Incompetent Offender), a Texas study to determine the incidence of criminal incarceration of the mentally retarded (MR) and to identify laws, procedures, and practices which affect the prosecution and…

  6. 48 CFR 949.106 - Fraud or other criminal conduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fraud or other criminal conduct. 949.106 Section 949.106 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CONTRACT MANAGEMENT TERMINATION OF CONTRACTS General Principles 949.106 Fraud or other criminal conduct. Any...

  7. 48 CFR 949.106 - Fraud or other criminal conduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Fraud or other criminal conduct. 949.106 Section 949.106 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CONTRACT MANAGEMENT TERMINATION OF CONTRACTS General Principles 949.106 Fraud or other criminal conduct. Any...

  8. 48 CFR 949.106 - Fraud or other criminal conduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fraud or other criminal conduct. 949.106 Section 949.106 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CONTRACT MANAGEMENT TERMINATION OF CONTRACTS General Principles 949.106 Fraud or other criminal conduct. Any...

  9. Access to Sign Language Interpreters in the Criminal Justice System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Katrina R.

    2001-01-01

    This study surveyed 46 professional sign language interpreters working in criminal justice settings and evaluated 22 cases to evaluate access issues for individuals with hearing impairments. Recommendations to increase the accessibility of interpreting services included providing ongoing awareness training to criminal justice personnel and…

  10. A Guide to Researching the Criminal Justice/Corrections Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Annie M.

    This combination guide and bibliography is designed to assist students enrolled in classes in the criminal justice/corrections field. Step-by-step guidelines for writing a term paper are presented along with a bibliography listing resources dealing with corrections and criminal justice that are available in the Chicago State University library.…

  11. Criminal Justice in America. Teacher's Guide. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Croddy, Marshall; Hayes, Bill

    This teacher's guide outlines effective strategies for using "Criminal Justice in America." This comprehensive textbook on criminal justice may serve either as the foundation for a high school law-related education course or as a supplemental text for civics, government or contemporary-issues courses. Designed to foster critical thinking and…

  12. Mental abnormality and criminality--an uncertain relationship.

    PubMed

    Prins, H

    1990-07-01

    Some aspects of the uncertain relationship between mental abnormality and criminality are considered. Comments are offered on the contextual framework for such a relationship, studies of penal and other populations and the relationship between some specific mental abnormalities and criminal behaviour. Some implications for management are identified.

  13. 22 CFR 505.12 - Civil remedies and criminal penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2012-04-01 2009-04-01 true Civil remedies and criminal penalties. 505.12 Section 505.12 Foreign Relations BROADCASTING BOARD OF GOVERNORS PRIVACY ACT REGULATION § 505.12 Civil remedies and criminal penalties. (a) Grounds for court action. You will have a remedy in the...

  14. 22 CFR 505.12 - Civil remedies and criminal penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Civil remedies and criminal penalties. 505.12 Section 505.12 Foreign Relations BROADCASTING BOARD OF GOVERNORS PRIVACY ACT REGULATION § 505.12 Civil remedies and criminal penalties. (a) Grounds for court action. You will have a remedy in the...

  15. 22 CFR 505.12 - Civil remedies and criminal penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Civil remedies and criminal penalties. 505.12 Section 505.12 Foreign Relations BROADCASTING BOARD OF GOVERNORS PRIVACY ACT REGULATION § 505.12 Civil remedies and criminal penalties. (a) Grounds for court action. You will have a remedy in the...

  16. Paraphilia and sex offending - A South African criminal law perspective.

    PubMed

    Carstens, Pieter; Stevens, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Historically, the link between sexual deviance and criminality has been described and documented, asserted by psychiatry, and manifested in law. Laws that have regulated sexual behaviour have referred to terms such as 'sexual deviation', 'sexual perversion' or even archaic moral terms such as 'unnatural acts and unspeakable crimes against nature'. A possible link between sexual perversion, psychopathy, and criminality, specifically manifesting in sexual homicide, has been the subject of remarkable research in forensic psychiatry. This contribution examines the phenomenon of paraphilia with specific reference to its definition, diagnostic classification and characteristics, as well as a few selections of incidences of paraphilia in South African criminal case law. A brief assessment is made of how South African criminal courts have dealt with paraphilia. In this regard, an analysis is made of the criminal liability of the paraphiliac. The South African response to sexual deviation as addressed in the Criminal Law (Sexual Offences and Related Matters) Amendment Act 32 of 2007 will also be addressed with reference to its efficacy in addressing paraphilia within South African criminal law. The interface between criminal law and medical ethics within the context of this theme will also be canvassed. In conclusion, recommendations for possible reform are canvassed. PMID:27182003

  17. The Lyme Bay Canoeing Tragedy and the Criminal Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geary, Roger

    1996-01-01

    In 1994, an outdoor adventure company was the first British company to be found guilty of corporate manslaughter. General principles of criminal law, including the difference between recklessness and gross negligence, are reviewed to provide those in the outdoor industry a rough guide as to their possible criminal liability. Discusses U.K.…

  18. 42 CFR 2.4 - Criminal penalty for violation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Criminal penalty for violation. 2.4 Section 2.4 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS CONFIDENTIALITY OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS Introduction § 2.4 Criminal penalty for violation....

  19. 42 CFR 2.4 - Criminal penalty for violation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Criminal penalty for violation. 2.4 Section 2.4 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS CONFIDENTIALITY OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS Introduction § 2.4 Criminal penalty for violation....

  20. 42 CFR 2.4 - Criminal penalty for violation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Criminal penalty for violation. 2.4 Section 2.4 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS CONFIDENTIALITY OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS Introduction § 2.4 Criminal penalty for violation....

  1. Criminal Justice Education and the Humanities: A New Era?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halsted, James B.

    1985-01-01

    This study demonstrates that criminal justice education is interdisciplinary only to the limited extent it integrates the law, the social sciences, and its vocational and technical aspects. In order to integrate the humanities in criminal justice education, the educators must be educated. (Author/LMO)

  2. 25 CFR 11.902 - Non-criminal proceedings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAW AND ORDER COURTS OF INDIAN OFFENSES AND LAW AND ORDER CODE Children's Court § 11.902 Non-criminal proceedings. No adjudication upon the status of any minor in the jurisdiction of the children's court shall be deemed criminal or be deemed a conviction...

  3. 28 CFR 0.85a - Criminal justice policy coordination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Criminal justice policy coordination. 0.85a Section 0.85a Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE ORGANIZATION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Federal Bureau of Investigation § 0.85a Criminal justice policy coordination. The Federal...

  4. 28 CFR 0.85a - Criminal justice policy coordination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Criminal justice policy coordination. 0.85a Section 0.85a Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE ORGANIZATION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Federal Bureau of Investigation § 0.85a Criminal justice policy coordination. The Federal...

  5. 28 CFR 0.85a - Criminal justice policy coordination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Criminal justice policy coordination. 0.85a Section 0.85a Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE ORGANIZATION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Federal Bureau of Investigation § 0.85a Criminal justice policy coordination. The Federal...

  6. 28 CFR 0.85a - Criminal justice policy coordination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Criminal justice policy coordination. 0.85a Section 0.85a Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE ORGANIZATION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Federal Bureau of Investigation § 0.85a Criminal justice policy coordination. The Federal...

  7. 28 CFR 0.85a - Criminal justice policy coordination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Criminal justice policy coordination. 0.85a Section 0.85a Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE ORGANIZATION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Federal Bureau of Investigation § 0.85a Criminal justice policy coordination. The Federal...

  8. 18 CFR 430.31 - Sanctions: Civil and criminal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sanctions: Civil and criminal. 430.31 Section 430.31 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION SPECIAL REGULATIONS GROUND WATER PROTECTION AREA: PENNSYLVANIA § 430.31 Sanctions: Civil and criminal....

  9. 18 CFR 430.31 - Sanctions: Civil and criminal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Sanctions: Civil and criminal. 430.31 Section 430.31 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION SPECIAL REGULATIONS GROUND WATER PROTECTION AREA: PENNSYLVANIA § 430.31 Sanctions: Civil and criminal....

  10. 18 CFR 430.31 - Sanctions: Civil and criminal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sanctions: Civil and criminal. 430.31 Section 430.31 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION SPECIAL REGULATIONS GROUND WATER PROTECTION AREA: PENNSYLVANIA § 430.31 Sanctions: Civil and criminal....

  11. 48 CFR 849.106 - Fraud or other criminal conduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Fraud or other criminal conduct. 849.106 Section 849.106 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS CONTRACT MANAGEMENT TERMINATION OF CONTRACTS General Principles 849.106 Fraud or other criminal conduct....

  12. 48 CFR 849.106 - Fraud or other criminal conduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fraud or other criminal conduct. 849.106 Section 849.106 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS CONTRACT MANAGEMENT TERMINATION OF CONTRACTS General Principles 849.106 Fraud or other criminal conduct....

  13. The Use of Criminal History Information in College Admissions Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, Matthew W.; Runyan, Carol W.; Bangdiwala, Shrikant I.

    2014-01-01

    To understand the potential public health and social justice implications of criminal background screening on college admissions, we examined postsecondary institutions' reasons for collecting or not collecting applicants' criminal justice information. We invited heads of admissions from 300 randomly sampled postsecondary institutions to…

  14. 28 CFR 3.2 - Assistant Attorney General, Criminal Division.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .... (See also 28 CFR 0.55(i).) (28 U.S.C. 509 and 510) ... Division. 3.2 Section 3.2 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE GAMBLING DEVICES § 3.2 Assistant Attorney General, Criminal Division. The Assistant Attorney General, Criminal Division, is authorized...

  15. 45 CFR 630.625 - Criminal drug statute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Criminal drug statute. 630.625 Section 630.625 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 630.625 Criminal...

  16. 30 CFR 1208.14 - Civil and criminal penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Civil and criminal penalties. 1208.14 Section 1208.14 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE SALE OF FEDERAL ROYALTY OIL General Provisions § 1208.14 Civil and criminal...

  17. 30 CFR 1208.14 - Civil and criminal penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Civil and criminal penalties. 1208.14 Section 1208.14 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE SALE OF FEDERAL ROYALTY OIL General Provisions § 1208.14 Civil and criminal...

  18. 49 CFR 578.7 - Criminal safe harbor provision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) CIVIL AND CRIMINAL PENALTIES § 578.7... not subject to criminal penalties thereunder if: (1) At the time of the violation, such person does not know that the violation would result in an accident causing death or serious bodily injury; and...

  19. 49 CFR 578.7 - Criminal safe harbor provision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) CIVIL AND CRIMINAL PENALTIES § 578.7... not subject to criminal penalties thereunder if: (1) At the time of the violation, such person does not know that the violation would result in an accident causing death or serious bodily injury; and...

  20. 33 CFR 401.205 - Civil and criminal penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... and 13 of sec. 2 of Pub. L. 95-474, 92 Stat. 1471, and 49 CFR 1.52) ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Civil and criminal penalties. 401... § 401.205 Civil and criminal penalties. (a) If the violation of the Seaway Regulations carries...

  1. 30 CFR 208.14 - Civil and criminal penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... U.S.C. 1719-20, and regulations at 30 CFR part 241. Civil penalties applicable under the OCSLA and... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Civil and criminal penalties. 208.14 Section... MANAGEMENT SALE OF FEDERAL ROYALTY OIL General Provisions § 208.14 Civil and criminal penalties. Failure...

  2. 42 CFR 38.8 - Criminal and civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Criminal and civil penalties. 38.8 Section 38.8... EXAMINATIONS DISASTER ASSISTANCE FOR CRISIS COUNSELING AND TRAINING § 38.8 Criminal and civil penalties... a civil penalty of not more than $5,000 for each violation. (c) Whoever knowingly misapplies...

  3. Fetal Abuse and the Criminalization of Behavior during Pregnancy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farr, Kathryn Ann

    1995-01-01

    Discusses efforts to criminalize fetal abuse, harm caused from a pregnant woman's use of illegal drugs. Such efforts have typically failed to withstand judicial scrutiny. Suggests that criminal prosecution for fetal abuse relies on questionable procedures, is unevenly applied, and may keep women from seeking drug treatment or prenatal care. (LKS)

  4. Cinema Verite and the Criminal Element: A Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, John W.

    1994-01-01

    Explores the contrast between white-collar financial crime and crime as seen on shows like "Cops." Argues that conservative politicians tend to equate lower class with "true" criminals (typically with little education), whereas white-collar criminals (usually well-educated) simply made a mistake, and that this picture of crime is overly simplistic…

  5. An Examination of Criminal Behavior among the Homeless.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solarz, Andrea

    Homelessness is a significant social problem in the United States, with an estimated 2.5 million homeless people in this country today. While criminal activity may become a means for the homeless to obtain resources needed for basic survival, little is known about the level of criminal activity among the homeless or about the types of crimnal…

  6. The role of criminal law within the healthcare sector.

    PubMed

    Alhafaji, Yasmin

    2012-12-01

    Health is for most of us the most precious thing one can have. However, in practice situations occur where the patient is harmed within the healthcare institution. Traditionally, there are several ways to protect individuals in society: with civil, criminal and administrative procedures. Over the years in the Netherlands complaints procedures were established in which the complaints about healthcare providers' performance can be handled. Recently, there are some developments within the criminal law that concern the healthcare sector. Examples are: the establishment of the Public Prosecution Service's Expertise Center on Medical Matters, appointments of medical prosecutors. In addition, in legal literature suggestions are made that criminal law is nowadays applied in order to provide redress to the patients (relatives) and as a 'safety tool' that is to ensure security and to counter the risks within the healthcare sector. The article discusses the role of criminal law within the healthcare sector, and in particular, whether criminal procedure is suitable for handling complaints about healthcare.

  7. [Civil and criminal responsibility of epileptics].

    PubMed

    Villanueva, F

    1997-03-01

    Since the new Penal Code has come into force, certain sections have been altered, such as those dealing with exculpatory circumstances, and as specialists treating patients with possible mental changes, we should be aware that section 20 now takes the place of the former section 8. The situation of the epileptic with regard to civil and criminal responsibility, has hardly changed. This is not surprising in view of current clinico-therapeutic knowledge. Epileptic patients are legally able to testify, inherit etc. and also have the obligation to compensate for damage they have caused. An attempt is made to define the immunity from prosecution of epileptics in accordance with non-static criteria, and to use a mixed biological-mental formula, which would make it possible to discover whether there was an alteration or anomaly of mental state at the time of the criminal offence, which would mean that the patient was unable to understand the unlawfulness of his action, or to act in accordance with such understanding. The deed itself is considered, without labelling illnesses or persons, seeking a simple definition of immunity from prosecution. The epileptic is immune from prosecution during a full attack, whilst during the rest of the time each case has to be decided individually. We emphasize the necessity of 'declassifying' epilepsy as a typical endogenous psychosis, which puts these patients into the group of the insane, although this term is no longer included in the new legal code.

  8. Criminal deterrence as a public health strategy.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, J P

    2001-11-17

    Deterrence is an established theme in criminal justice, but its role in prevention of assault has been treated with ambivalence and even hostility in medicine. The extent to which offenders can be persuaded, through knowledge of criminal and health risks, not to injure others is emerging from studies of the health effects of firearm and other crime legislation, and from macro-level studies and controlled experiments of police interventions. There is convincing evidence that motorists can be deterred from alcohol-impaired driving, and recognition that specific, targeted, and visible police work and increasing certainty of punishment are effective interventions. By contrast, duration of imprisonment and generic police initiatives such as blanket increases in police numbers seem to have little effect on deterrence, at least in the context of the decline in US homicide rates since 1991, to which demographic and economic factors seem to have contributed little. Together with established and cost-effective preschool education and early family support, targeted policing and increasing rates of conviction should be integrated into strategies for injury prevention.

  9. State Criminal Justice Telecommunications (STACOM). Final Report. Volume II: Requirements Analysis and Design of Ohio Criminal Justice Telecommunications Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fielding, J. E.; And Others

    Requirements analysis and design for the Ohio Criminal Justice Telecommunications Network are provided in this report on the application in the state of Ohio of techniques developed by the STACOM Project. These techniques focus on the identification of user requirements and network designs for criminal justice networks on a state-wide basis.…

  10. State Criminal Justice Telecommunications (STACOM). Final Report. Volume III: Requirements Analysis and Design of Texas Criminal Justice Telecommunications Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fielding, J. E.; And Others

    Requirements analysis and design for the Texas Criminal Justice Telecommunications Network are provided in this report on the application in the state of Texas of techniques developed by the STACOM project. These techniques focus on identification of user requirements and network designs for criminal justice information on a state-wide basis.…

  11. Female Sexual Abuse and Criminal Justice Intervention: A Comparison of Child Protective Service and Criminal Justice Samples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bader, Shannon M.; Scalora, Mario J.; Casady, Thomas K.; Black, Shannon

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The current study compared a sample of female perpetrators reported to Child Protective Services (CPS) to a sample of women from the criminal justice system. Instead of examining a clinical or criminal justice sample in isolation, this comparison allows a more accurate description of female sexual offending. Methods: Cases were drawn…

  12. Forensic geoscience: applications of geology, geomorphology and geophysics to criminal investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffell, Alastair; McKinley, Jennifer

    2005-03-01

    One hundred years ago Georg Popp became the first scientist to present in court a case where the geological makeup of soils was used to secure a criminal conviction. Subsequently there have been significant advances in the theory and practice of forensic geoscience: many of them subsequent to the seminal publication of "Forensic Geology" by Murray and Tedrow [Murray, R., Tedrow, J.C.F. 1975 (republished 1986). Forensic Geology: Earth Sciences and Criminal Investigation. Rutgers University Press, New York, 240 pp.]. Our review places historical development in the modern context of how the allied disciplines of geology (mineralogy, sedimentology, microscopy), geophysics, soil science, microbiology, anthropology and geomorphology have been used as tool to aid forensic (domestic, serious, terrorist and international) crime investigations. The latter half of this paper uses the concept of scales of investigation, from large-scale landforms through to microscopic particles as a method of categorising the large number of geoscience applications to criminal investigation. Forensic geoscience has traditionally used established non-forensic techniques: 100 years after Popp's seminal work, research into forensic geoscience is beginning to lead, as opposed to follow other scientific disciplines.

  13. [History of psychiatry and the criminally insane in Japan].

    PubMed

    Nakatani, Yoji

    2003-01-01

    This paper illustrates how insane offenders were perceived and treated at the turn of the 20th century, focusing on legal reforms. In accordance with overall reorganization of legal systems after the Meiji Restoration in 1968, the Criminal Law of 1880 stipulated criminal responsibility, ruling that "a person, who was unable to discriminate right and wrong because of loss of mental capacity at the time of committing crime, shall not be punished." Article 39 of the current Criminal Law, which was enacted in 1907, redefined criminal responsibility, to say that "an incompetent person shall not be punished; a person with diminished competence shall be given a mitigation of punishment." Meanwhile, the Law for the Custody for Insane Persons of 1900, which was the first law dealing with the mentally ill, aimed to establish strict regulations with regard to the custody of the insane. However, neither of these laws did not provide any procedures for subsequent management of persons acquitted because of insanity. Under the social changes in the early decades of the 20th century, concern about dangerousness of the criminally insane was intensified. In connection with reform of the Criminal Law, several plans for the management of the criminally insanes were formulated. The author examines these circumstances, referring to the current debate on the management of mentally ill offenders.

  14. Link Prediction in Criminal Networks: A Tool for Criminal Intelligence Analysis.

    PubMed

    Berlusconi, Giulia; Calderoni, Francesco; Parolini, Nicola; Verani, Marco; Piccardi, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    The problem of link prediction has recently received increasing attention from scholars in network science. In social network analysis, one of its aims is to recover missing links, namely connections among actors which are likely to exist but have not been reported because data are incomplete or subject to various types of uncertainty. In the field of criminal investigations, problems of incomplete information are encountered almost by definition, given the obvious anti-detection strategies set up by criminals and the limited investigative resources. In this paper, we work on a specific dataset obtained from a real investigation, and we propose a strategy to identify missing links in a criminal network on the basis of the topological analysis of the links classified as marginal, i.e. removed during the investigation procedure. The main assumption is that missing links should have opposite features with respect to marginal ones. Measures of node similarity turn out to provide the best characterization in this sense. The inspection of the judicial source documents confirms that the predicted links, in most instances, do relate actors with large likelihood of co-participation in illicit activities.

  15. Link Prediction in Criminal Networks: A Tool for Criminal Intelligence Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Berlusconi, Giulia; Calderoni, Francesco; Parolini, Nicola; Verani, Marco; Piccardi, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    The problem of link prediction has recently received increasing attention from scholars in network science. In social network analysis, one of its aims is to recover missing links, namely connections among actors which are likely to exist but have not been reported because data are incomplete or subject to various types of uncertainty. In the field of criminal investigations, problems of incomplete information are encountered almost by definition, given the obvious anti-detection strategies set up by criminals and the limited investigative resources. In this paper, we work on a specific dataset obtained from a real investigation, and we propose a strategy to identify missing links in a criminal network on the basis of the topological analysis of the links classified as marginal, i.e. removed during the investigation procedure. The main assumption is that missing links should have opposite features with respect to marginal ones. Measures of node similarity turn out to provide the best characterization in this sense. The inspection of the judicial source documents confirms that the predicted links, in most instances, do relate actors with large likelihood of co-participation in illicit activities. PMID:27104948

  16. Link Prediction in Criminal Networks: A Tool for Criminal Intelligence Analysis.

    PubMed

    Berlusconi, Giulia; Calderoni, Francesco; Parolini, Nicola; Verani, Marco; Piccardi, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    The problem of link prediction has recently received increasing attention from scholars in network science. In social network analysis, one of its aims is to recover missing links, namely connections among actors which are likely to exist but have not been reported because data are incomplete or subject to various types of uncertainty. In the field of criminal investigations, problems of incomplete information are encountered almost by definition, given the obvious anti-detection strategies set up by criminals and the limited investigative resources. In this paper, we work on a specific dataset obtained from a real investigation, and we propose a strategy to identify missing links in a criminal network on the basis of the topological analysis of the links classified as marginal, i.e. removed during the investigation procedure. The main assumption is that missing links should have opposite features with respect to marginal ones. Measures of node similarity turn out to provide the best characterization in this sense. The inspection of the judicial source documents confirms that the predicted links, in most instances, do relate actors with large likelihood of co-participation in illicit activities. PMID:27104948

  17. 28 CFR 904.3 - State criminal history record screening standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... III System. (a) The State Criminal History Record Repository or an authorized agency in the receiving... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false State criminal history record screening... STATE CRIMINAL HISTORY RECORD SCREENING STANDARDS § 904.3 State criminal history record...

  18. 28 CFR 20.33 - Dissemination of criminal history record information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... information. 20.33 Section 20.33 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE CRIMINAL JUSTICE INFORMATION SYSTEMS Federal Systems and Exchange of Criminal History Record Information § 20.33 Dissemination of criminal history record information. (a) Criminal history record information contained in the III...

  19. 28 CFR 904.3 - State criminal history record screening standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... III System. (a) The State Criminal History Record Repository or an authorized agency in the receiving... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false State criminal history record screening... STATE CRIMINAL HISTORY RECORD SCREENING STANDARDS § 904.3 State criminal history record...

  20. 28 CFR 20.33 - Dissemination of criminal history record information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... information. 20.33 Section 20.33 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE CRIMINAL JUSTICE INFORMATION SYSTEMS Federal Systems and Exchange of Criminal History Record Information § 20.33 Dissemination of criminal history record information. (a) Criminal history record information contained in the III...

  1. 28 CFR 20.33 - Dissemination of criminal history record information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... information. 20.33 Section 20.33 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE CRIMINAL JUSTICE INFORMATION SYSTEMS Federal Systems and Exchange of Criminal History Record Information § 20.33 Dissemination of criminal history record information. (a) Criminal history record information contained in the III...

  2. 28 CFR 20.33 - Dissemination of criminal history record information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... information. 20.33 Section 20.33 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE CRIMINAL JUSTICE INFORMATION SYSTEMS Federal Systems and Exchange of Criminal History Record Information § 20.33 Dissemination of criminal history record information. (a) Criminal history record information contained in the III...

  3. 28 CFR 20.33 - Dissemination of criminal history record information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dissemination of criminal history record... SYSTEMS Federal Systems and Exchange of Criminal History Record Information § 20.33 Dissemination of criminal history record information. (a) Criminal history record information contained in the III...

  4. Optical disk uses in criminal identification systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sypherd, Allen D.

    1990-08-01

    A significant advancement in law enforcement tools has been made possible by the rapid and innovative development of electronic imaging for criminal identification systems. In particular, development of optical disks capable of high-capacity and random-access storage has provided a unique marriage of application and technology. Fast random access to any record, non-destructive reading of stored images, electronic sorting and transmission of images and an accepted legal basis for evidence are a few of the advantages derived from optical disk technology. This paper discusses the application of optical disk technology to both Automated Fingerprint Identification Systems (AFIS) and Automated Mugshot Retrieval Systems (AMRS). The following topics are addressed in light of AFIS and AMRS user requirements and system capabilities: Write once vs. rewritable, gray level and storage requirements, multi-volume library systems, data organization and capacity trends.

  5. Criminal Code, Federal District, 16 February 1971.

    PubMed

    1988-01-01

    Article 320 of the Criminal Code of the Federal District of Mexico defines "abortion" as the death of the conceptus at any time during pregnancy. Articles 320-32 specify penalties for inducing abortion, and Articles 333-34 exempt punishment if the abortion resulted from failure of the woman to take proper care, if the pregnancy was the result of rape, or if the pregnancy endangered the life of the woman. The abortion provisions of the criminal codes of the Mexican states of Baja California, Chiapas, Mexico, Sinoala, Sonora, Tabasco, and Tamaulipas are nearly identical to those of the Federal District Code. Certain states also give immunity from prosecution for abortion 1) if the pregnancy resulted from artificial insemination neither requested or assented to by the woman, provided that the abortion is carried out within the first 90 days of pregnancy; 2) if there is good reason to believe that the unborn child suffers from severe physical or mental disabilities of genetic or congenital origin; 3) if the health of the woman would be seriously jeopardized by the pregnancy, and 4) if the abortion is carried out for serious and substantiated economic reasons in cases where the woman has at least three children. Guanajuato and Queretaro allow abortions only when the pregnancy is the result of rape. Guerrero authorizes abortions only when the pregnancy is the result of rape, when the pregnancy results from an unlawful artificial insemination, or for eugenic reasons. Hidalgo, Nuevo Leon, and San Luis Potosi allows abortions only when the pregnancy is the result of rape or when the continuation of the pregnancy would seriously jeopardize the woman's health. In Chihuahua, Coahuila, Durango, Oaxaca, and Veracruz, abortions allowed because the pregnancy resulted from rape must be performed in the first 90 days of pregnancy. PMID:12289543

  6. Predicting restorability of incompetent criminal defendants.

    PubMed

    Mossman, Douglas

    2007-01-01

    U.S. courts frequently require forensic examiners to offer opinions concerning the likelihood that criminal defendants found incompetent to stand trial can have their competence "restored" through treatment. Yet no jurisdiction has established legal guidelines for testimony concerning restorability, and several authors have suggested that mental health professionals cannot accurately predict whether treatment to restore competence will succeed. This study asked whether reliable information that is consistently available at the time of examination might support empirically grounded opinions about the likelihood of restoration. Using records from all 351 inpatient pretrial defendants who underwent competence restoration at a state psychiatric hospital from 1995 through 1999, I evaluated whether several types of information that are reliable and that could consistently be made available to forensic examiners--including evaluees' demographic characteristics, diagnoses, symptom patterns, criminal charges, number of prior public sector hospitalizations, and cumulative prior length of stay (LOS)--would predict outcome of restoration efforts. I modeled the probability of successful restoration using logistic regression equations, and evaluated the equations' predictive accuracy using k-fold cross-validation and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Lower probability of restoration was associated with having a misdemeanor charge, longer cumulative LOS, older age, and diagnoses of mental retardation, schizophrenia, and schizoaffective disorder. Although the overall rate of successful restoration for felony defendants was 75 percent, logistic equations allowed selection of subgroups with high predicted probabilities of restoration (>90%) and low probabilities of restoration (<35%). In cross-validation simulations, predictive equations had ROC areas of 0.727 for all defendants, and 0.735 for felony defendants. These findings provide scientific support for testimony

  7. Predicting restorability of incompetent criminal defendants.

    PubMed

    Mossman, Douglas

    2007-01-01

    U.S. courts frequently require forensic examiners to offer opinions concerning the likelihood that criminal defendants found incompetent to stand trial can have their competence "restored" through treatment. Yet no jurisdiction has established legal guidelines for testimony concerning restorability, and several authors have suggested that mental health professionals cannot accurately predict whether treatment to restore competence will succeed. This study asked whether reliable information that is consistently available at the time of examination might support empirically grounded opinions about the likelihood of restoration. Using records from all 351 inpatient pretrial defendants who underwent competence restoration at a state psychiatric hospital from 1995 through 1999, I evaluated whether several types of information that are reliable and that could consistently be made available to forensic examiners--including evaluees' demographic characteristics, diagnoses, symptom patterns, criminal charges, number of prior public sector hospitalizations, and cumulative prior length of stay (LOS)--would predict outcome of restoration efforts. I modeled the probability of successful restoration using logistic regression equations, and evaluated the equations' predictive accuracy using k-fold cross-validation and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Lower probability of restoration was associated with having a misdemeanor charge, longer cumulative LOS, older age, and diagnoses of mental retardation, schizophrenia, and schizoaffective disorder. Although the overall rate of successful restoration for felony defendants was 75 percent, logistic equations allowed selection of subgroups with high predicted probabilities of restoration (>90%) and low probabilities of restoration (<35%). In cross-validation simulations, predictive equations had ROC areas of 0.727 for all defendants, and 0.735 for felony defendants. These findings provide scientific support for testimony

  8. [Unusual case of the criminal administration of ranitidine].

    PubMed

    Celiński, Rafał; Skowronek, Rafał; Chowaniec, Czesław

    2010-01-01

    Psychoactive substances (alcohol, narcotics and drugs) are used for facilitation of various crimes, mostly sexual assaults ("rape pills", "date-rape drugs") and/or robbery. The most popular drugs used for criminal purposes are: benzodiazepines, antipsychotic, hypotensive and anesthetic agents. Sometimes, however, other types of drugs are employed. The authors present an unusual, first in the literature, attempt at the criminal use of ranitidine--a popular antisecretive drug (H2-blocker)--as a "date-rape drug". The present paper discusses problems of scientific information flow to the criminal world, easy accessibility of psychoactive agents and difficulties in medico-legal opinion and penal qualification in such cases. PMID:21520538

  9. Criminalization of HIV transmission: poor public health policy.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Edwin

    2009-12-01

    Criminalization of HIV transmission and exposure is an ineffective tool for combating AIDS and a costly distraction from programs that we know work--programs such as effective prevention, protection against discrimination, reducing stigma, empowering women and providing access to testing and treatment. In this article, which is based on a public lecture he gave at "From Evidence and Principle to Policy and Action," the 1st Annual Symposium on HIV, Law and Human Rights, held on 12-13 June 2009 in Toronto, Canada, Justice Edwin Cameron analyzes the surge in criminal prosecutions, discusses the role that stigma plays in these prosecutions and makes the case against criminalization.

  10. Racial differences in the criminalization of the mentally ill.

    PubMed

    Grekin, P M; Jemelka, R; Trupin, E W

    1994-01-01

    "Criminalization," the hypothesis that mentally ill persons are diverted to the criminal justice system, has been difficult to confirm. The few relevant studies have examined aspects of the mental health or the criminal justice systems, but not both. This study compares state hospital admissions with the admission of mentally ill persons to state prisons. There was considerable variation between counties. Counties sent more mentally ill members of their largest minority group to prison than expected. These results suggest that jurisdictions differ in their use of these two systems and that race is a factor in this difference.

  11. Criminal Behavior in Frontotemporal Dementia and Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liljegren, Madeleine; Naasan, Georges; Temlett, Julia; Perry, David C.; Rankin, Katherine P.; Merrilees, Jennifer; Grinberg, Lea T.; Seeley, William W.; Englund, Elisabet; Miller, Bruce L

    2015-01-01

    Importance Neurodegenerative diseases can cause dysfunction of neural structures involved in judgment, executive function, emotional processing, sexual behavior, violence, and self-awareness. Such dysfunctions can lead to antisocial and criminal behavior that appears for the first time in the adult or middle-aged individual or even later in life. Objective To investigate the frequency and type of criminal behavior among patients with a diagnosed dementing disorder. Design, Setting, and Participants We conducted a retrospective medical record review of 2397 patients who were seen at the University of California, San Francisco, Memory and Aging Center between 1999 and 2012, including 545 patients with Alzheimer disease (AD), 171 patients with behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), 89 patients with semantic variant of primary progressive aphasia, and 30 patients with Huntington disease. Patient notes containing specific keywords denoting criminal behavior were reviewed. Data were stratified by criminal behavior type and diagnostic groups. Main Outcomes and Measures Frequencies of criminal behavior and χ2 statistics were calculated. Results Of the 2397 patients studied, 204 (8.5%) had a history of criminal behavior that emerged during their illness. Of the major diagnostic groups, 42 of 545 patients (7.7%) with AD, 64 of 171 patients (37.4%) with bvFTD, 24 of 89 patients (27.0%) with semantic variant of primary progressive aphasia, and 6 of 30 patients (20%) with Huntington disease exhibited criminal behavior. A total of 14% of patients with bvFTD were statistically significantly more likely to present with criminal behavior compared with 2% of patients with AD (P < .001) and 6.4% were statistically significantly more likely to exhibit violence compared with 2% of patients with AD (P = .003). Common manifestations of criminal behavior in the bvFTD group included theft, traffic violations, sexual advances, trespassing, and public urination in contrast

  12. INSANITY AND CRIMINAL OFFENDERS. SOME COMMENTS ON THE REPORT OF GOVERNOR'S SPECIAL COMMISSIONS ON INSANITY AND CRIMINAL OFFENDERS.

    PubMed

    MCGAUGHEY, W M

    1963-11-01

    The definition proposed by the Commissions on Insanity and Criminal Offenders for determining criminal responsibility will not resolve the issue between offenders who are considered blameworthy and regarded as criminals and those who are not. No formula is satisfactory for differentiating responsibility and irresponsibility. Determinism, which is the fundamental tenet of all science, is violated by the assumption that an individual can wilfully elect to commit an act which, in fact, is the result of causal antecedents. This concept is in conflict with the basic premise of criminal law that an individual is considered criminally responsible unless it can be proved to the contrary. Since it is unlikely that any proposal to abolish the concept of criminal responsibility would be even considered, it is suggested that no definition be used at all. Laws similar to those for the disposition of the mentally ill could be enacted, with emphasis not on the concept of criminal responsibility and moral blameworthiness but on the offender's dangerousness to others, the disposition then being planned to fit the offender rather than the offense.

  13. Addressing Hate Crimes: Six Initiatives That Are Enhancing the Efforts of Criminal Justice Practitioners. Hate Crimes Series. Bureau of Justice Assistance Monograph.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wessler, Stephen

    This publication focuses on initiatives that are designed to address hate crimes by enhancing efforts of the criminal justice system. After discussing the pivotal role of law enforcement in this effort, the paper describes six Bureau of Justice Assistance-funded initiatives, which include: the International Association of Chiefs of Police Summit:…

  14. The ability of criminal law to produce gender equality: judicial discourses in the Swedish criminal legal system.

    PubMed

    Burman, Monica

    2010-02-01

    The main aim of the Swedish Women's Peace reform in 1998 was to enhance criminal legal protection for women exposed to violence in heterosexual relationships and to promote gender equality. However, these ambitions risk being contravened in a masculinist criminal legal system. One problem concerns how the victim is constructed in criminal legal cases. The author argues that moral balancing and discourses of responsibility and guilt in Swedish cases constrain the agency possible for women and suggest that a more comprehensive policy in Sweden must be developed to include violent men, their agency, and their responsibility for the violence.

  15. Congress, NRC mull utility access to FBI criminal files

    SciTech Connect

    Ultroska, D.

    1984-08-01

    Experiences at Alabama Power Company and other nuclear utilities have promped a request for institutionalizing security checks of personnel in order to eliminated convicted criminals and drug users. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), which could provide FBI criminal history information by submitting fingerprints, does not do so, and would require new legislation to take on that duty. Believing that current malevolent employees can be managed with existing procedures, NRC allows criminal background checks only on prospective employees in order to avoid a negative social impact on personnel. Legislation to transfer criminal histories to nuclear facilities is now pending, and NRC is leaning toward a request for full disclosure, partly because of terrorist threats and partly to save manpower time and costs in reviewing case histories.

  16. [Criminal acts leading to commitment according to psychiatric jurisprudence].

    PubMed

    Jöckel, D; Müller-Isberner, R

    1997-05-01

    The analysis of the delinquency bringing disordered offenders into a hospital order institution reveals a lot of very conscious and well organized behavior during the criminal activity. This must be taken into account in therapy and prognosis.

  17. Criminal recidivism in mentally ill offenders: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Harris, V; Koepsell, T D

    1996-01-01

    Criminal recidivism in mentally ill offenders, In the context of a county jail, has not been extensively studied. This study compares the rate of criminal recidivism between those who suffered from a mental illness at the time of arrest and those who did not. In addition, the length of incarceration between these two groups was compared. Using survival analysis, a risk assessment model describing the key features involved in criminal recidivism among the mentally ill may be built. To our knowledge, this study is the first of its kind and will suggest areas of intervention that could prevent criminal recidivism among mentally ill offenders. Due to the lack of literature on the subject, this pilot study provides estimates of key parameters, such as types of crimes and frequency of incarceration, needed to undertake a definitive study. Furthermore, the pilot study provides an opportunity to develop and field test a data abstraction form and computer matching methods.

  18. Training psychologists to function as competent scientists in criminal forensics.

    PubMed

    Everett, M L

    1996-01-01

    Psychologists planning to work in the criminal forensic area can benefit from a structured training experience, with learning objectives designed to bridge the gap between clinical practice and the legal system.

  19. Criminal investigations and the Superfund program. Fact sheet (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    The fact sheet, directed toward any one who witnesses fraudulent activity in EPA programs, discusses areas in which fraud and abuse can occur and provides an understanding of the criminal investigation process that results from reports of suspicious activity.

  20. Applications of neuroscience in criminal law: legal and methodological issues.

    PubMed

    Meixner, John B

    2015-01-01

    The use of neuroscience in criminal law applications is an increasingly discussed topic among legal and psychological scholars. Over the past 5 years, several prominent federal criminal cases have referenced neuroscience studies and made admissibility determinations regarding neuroscience evidence. Despite this growth, the field is exceptionally young, and no one knows for sure how significant of a contribution neuroscience will make to criminal law. This article focuses on three major subfields: (1) neuroscience-based credibility assessment, which seeks to detect lies or knowledge associated with a crime; (2) application of neuroscience to aid in assessments of brain capacity for culpability, especially among adolescents; and (3) neuroscience-based prediction of future recidivism. The article briefly reviews these fields as applied to criminal law and makes recommendations for future research, calling for the increased use of individual-level data and increased realism in laboratory studies.