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Sample records for international diagnostic interview

  1. New women-specific diagnostic modules: the Composite International Diagnostic Interview for Women (CIDI-VENUS).

    PubMed

    Martini, Julia; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Soares, Claudio N; Rieder, Amber; Steiner, Meir

    2009-10-01

    The World Health Organization-Composite International Diagnostic Interview (WHO-CIDI) is a highly structured interview for the assessment of mental disorders, based on the definitions and criteria of the fourth edition of the American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV). Over the past decade it has become evident that the CIDI does not sufficiently address the assessment needs of women. Women are affected by most mental disorders, particularly mood and anxiety disorders, approximately twice as frequently as men. Women-specific disorders, such as Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS), Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder (PMDD), psychiatric disorders during pregnancy and postpartum as well as during the perimenopause, menopause and beyond are not addressed by the standard CIDI diagnostic modules. In addition, the CIDI in its current form does not address the potential effect that female reproductive milestones may have on diagnosis, treatment and prevention of mental disorders in women. Our aim was to develop a new women specific platform (CIDI-VENUS; CIDI-V) to be embedded in the existing CIDI that will address the above mentioned current deficiencies. Guided by a team of experts in the field of Women's Mental Health from Canada and Germany the following modules were developed: 1) A complete menstrual history and comprehensive contraceptive history with a link to the Premenstrual Symptoms Screening Tool (PSST). 2) A complete perinatal history of pregnancies, miscarriages, terminations, still births, death of a child, with details of current pregnancy including gestation and expected date of confinement, labour history and breastfeeding, history of tobacco, alcohol, and other substance use including prescription drugs during pregnancy and postpartum, a section on specific phobias and on recurrent obsessive/compulsive thoughts/behaviours (OCD) related to the baby with a link to the Perinatal Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (POCS), as

  2. Modifying and Validating the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI) for Use in Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Ghimire, Dirgha J.; Chardoul, Stephanie; Kessler, Ronald C.; Axinn, William G.; Adhikari, Bishnu P.

    2012-01-01

    Background Efforts to develop and validate fully-structured diagnostic interviews of mental disorders in non-Western countries have been largely unsuccessful. However, the principled methods of translation, harmonization, and calibration that have been developed by cross-national survey methodologists have never before been used to guide such development efforts. The current report presents the results of a rigorous program of research using these methods designed to modify and validate the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI) for an epidemiological survey in Nepal. Methods A five-step process of translation, harmonization, and calibration was used to modify the instrument. A blinded clinical reappraisal design was used to validate the instrument. Results Preliminary interviews with local mental health expert led to a focus on major depressive episode, mania/hypomania, panic disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, and intermittent explosive disorder. After an iterative process of multiple translations-revisions guided by the principles developed by cross-national survey methodologists, lifetime DSM-IV diagnoses based on the final Nepali CIDI had excellent concordance with diagnoses based on blinded SCID clinical reappraisal interviews. Conclusions Valid assessment of mental disorders can be achieved with fully-structured diagnostic interviews even in low-income non-Western settings with rigorous implementation of replicable developmental strategies. PMID:23494758

  3. [Assessment of complex PTSD - internal and external validity of a diagnostic interview].

    PubMed

    Boroske-Leiner, Katja; Hofmann, Arne; Sack, Martin

    2008-05-01

    The diagnostic construct of complex posttraumatic stress disorder (complex PTSD) describes the consequences of early onset and long-term persisting psychological traumatizations. The interview for complex PTSD (I-kPTBS) - is the German adaptation of the structured interview for disorders of extreme stress (SIDES). The present study reports first data regarding the internal validity of the I-kPTBS as well as on the external validity of the diagnosis of complex PTSD. The I-kPTBS was applied in 72 consecutive patients of a specialized outpatient clinic. 31 patients fulfilled the criteria of the diagnosis complex PTSD. 25 suffered from a PTSD but did not fulfil the diagnostic criteria of complex PTSD. Both groups where compared regarding their symptoms, resources and reports of childhood events. Internal consistence of the I-kPTBS regarding the sample was good to excellent (alpha = 0.88). As expected, patients with the diagnosis of complex PTSD showed more severe dissociative, depressive and general anxiety symptoms than patients with PTSD alone. Patients fulfilling the criteria of complex PTSD reported a lower age at their first traumatic event, more multiple traumatizations and more often a dissociative disorder as comorbid diagnosis. Patients with complex PTSD show a higher traumaload in childhood and a lower level of compensatory resources. The interview for complex PTSD (I-kPTBS) describes a consistent diagnostic construct. The results demonstrate that the diagnosis of complex PTSD selects a specific group of patients with early childhood trauma and high symptom level. Specific criteria can differentiate this patient group well from patients that suffer from PTSD alone.

  4. Diagnostic accuracy of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI 3.0) PTSD module among female Vietnam-era veterans.

    PubMed

    Kimerling, Rachel; Serpi, Tracey; Weathers, Frank; Kilbourne, Amy M; Kang, Han; Collins, Joseph F; Cypel, Yasmin; Frayne, Susan M; Furey, Joan; Huang, Grant D; Reinhard, Matthew J; Spiro, Avron; Magruder, Kathryn

    2014-04-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI) posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) module is widely used in epidemiological studies of PTSD, yet relatively few data attest to the instrument's diagnostic utility. The current study evaluated the diagnostic utility of the CIDI 3.0 PTSD module with U. S. women Vietnam-era veterans. The CIDI and the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS) were independently administered to a stratified sample of 160 women, oversampled for current PTSD. Both lifetime PTSD and recent (past year) PTSD were assessed within a 3-week interval. Forty-five percent of the sample met criteria for a CAPS diagnosis of lifetime PTSD, and 21.9% of the sample met criteria for a CAPS diagnosis of past-year PTSD. Using CAPS as the diagnostic criterion, the CIDI correctly classified 78.8% of cases for lifetime PTSD (κ = .56) and 82.0% of past year PTSD cases (κ = .51). Estimates of diagnostic performance for the CIDI were sensitivity of .61 and specificity of .91 for lifetime PTSD and sensitivity of .71 and specificity of .85 for past-year PTSD. Results suggest that the CIDI has good utility for identifying PTSD, though it is a somewhat conservative indicator of lifetime PTSD as compared to the CAPS. Published 2014. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  5. The World Mental Health (WMH) Survey Initiative Version of the World Health Organization (WHO) Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI).

    PubMed

    Kessler, Ronald C; Ustün, T Bedirhan

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the World Mental Health (WMH) Survey Initiative version of the World Health Organization (WHO) Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI) and a discussion of the methodological research on which the development of the instrument was based. The WMH-CIDI includes a screening module and 40 sections that focus on diagnoses (22 sections), functioning (four sections), treatment (two sections), risk factors (four sections), socio-demographic correlates (seven sections), and methodological factors (two sections). Innovations compared to earlier versions of the CIDI include expansion of the diagnostic sections, a focus on 12-month as well as lifetime disorders in the same interview, detailed assessment of clinical severity, and inclusion of information on treatment, risk factors, and consequences. A computer-assisted version of the interview is available along with a direct data entry software system that can be used to keypunch responses to the paper-and-pencil version of the interview. Computer programs that generate diagnoses are also available based on both ICD-10 and DSM-IV criteria. Elaborate CD-ROM-based training materials are available to teach interviewers how to administer the interview as well as to teach supervisors how to monitor the quality of data collection.

  6. THE COMPOSITE INTERNATIONAL DIAGNOSTIC INTERVIEW (CIDI): ITS RELIABILITY AND APPLICABILITY IN A RURAL COMMUNITY OF NORTHERN INDIA

    PubMed Central

    Kishore, Jugal; Kapoor, Vinay; Reddaiah, V.P.

    1999-01-01

    To study the reliability and applicability of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI) in a rural community of India, a two steps sampling procedure was adopted, Step I: A clinical diagnosis based on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorder-Ill-Revised (DSM-IIIR) criteria was administered to 218 persons aged 18-60 years who consulted the Primary Health Centre (PHC); Step II: Of these persons, 71 were selected for detailed examination with the CIDI Hindi version in their home environment. The current diagnoses produced by the CIDI (scored two ways DSM-III-R and ICD-10) were evaluated against the DSM-III-R clinical diagnoses. The kappa values were 0.43 and 0.64. The likelihood ratios of positive CIDI-DSM-III-R and CIDI-ICD-10 were found to be 13.11 and 17.23; the specificity rates were 95.4% in each; the positive predictive values were 96.6% and 97.4% and the sensitivity rates were 59.2% and 77.5%. A significant longer time was faken for coding one CIDI. Only 8% of the 71 CIDI interviewed required more than one sitting. 96% of those interviewed were receptive for future interviews with CIDI. The study findings emphasize the good reliability and acceptability of the CIDI in a rural community of India. PMID:21430810

  7. Concordance between Composite International Diagnostic Interview and self-reports of depressive symptoms: a re-analysis.

    PubMed

    Rosenström, Tom; Elovainio, Marko; Jokela, Markus; Pirkola, Sami; Koskinen, Seppo; Lindfors, Olavi; Keltikangas-Järvinen, Liisa

    2015-09-01

    Concordance between sum scores of self-reported depressive symptoms and structured interview diagnoses has been studied extensively, but are these the best attainable self-report-based predictions for interview diagnoses? We maximized the cross-validated concordance between World Health Organization's Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI) diagnosis and Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI), and General Health Questionnaire (GHQ), from the viewpoint of exploratory statistics, re-analysing Health 2000 general-population sample of adults over 30 years in mainland Finland (N = 5200-5435). BDI sum-score prediction of CIDI diagnosis could be superseded by using (1) weighted sums of items, (2) classification trees constructed from items, or (3) a single item. Best solution (2) yielded cross-validated Youden's Index 0.757 [standard error (SE) = 0.001, sensitivity = 0.907, specificity = 0.851], improving the concordance to 1.07-fold (1.18-fold for 12-month diagnosis). A single-item solution was best for the GHQ. All positive predictive values remained low (0.09-0.31). Thus, CIDI-to-questionnaire concordance can be improved by using all information in the questionnaires instead of just sum scores, but latent-trait theory for questionnaires is incompatible with interview diagnoses (single item achieved better concordance than summing all). Self-reports have low predictive value for CIDI diagnoses in the general population, but better in settings with higher major depressive disorder (MDD) base rates. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Assessment of alcoholic standard drinks using the Munich composite international diagnostic interview (M-CIDI): An evaluation and subsequent revision.

    PubMed

    Kuitunen-Paul, Sören; Rehm, Jürgen; Lachenmeier, Dirk W; Kadrić, Firdeus; Kuitunen, Paula T; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Manthey, Jakob

    2017-09-01

    The quantity and frequency of alcohol consumption are crucial both in risk assessment as well as epidemiological and clinical research. Using the Munich Composite International Diagnostic Interview (M-CIDI), drinking amounts have been assessed in numerous large-scale studies. However, the accuracy of this assessment has rarely been evaluated. This study evaluates the relevance of drink categories and pouring sizes, and the factors used to convert actual drinks into standard drinks. We compare the M-CIDI to alternative drink assessment instruments and empirically validate drink categories using a general population sample (n = 3165 from Germany), primary care samples (n = 322 from Italy, n = 1189 from Germany), and a non-representative set of k = 22503 alcoholic beverages sold in Germany in 2010-2016. The M-CIDI supplement sheet displays more categories than other instruments (AUDIT, TLFB, WHO-CIDI). Beer, wine, and spirits represent the most prevalent categories in the samples. The suggested standard drink conversion factors were inconsistent for different pouring sizes of the same drink and, to a smaller extent, across drink categories. For the use in Germany and Italy, we propose the limiting of drink categories and pouring sizes, and a revision of the proposed standard drinks. We further suggest corresponding examinations and revisions in other cultures. © 2017 The Authors International Journal of Methods in Psychiatric Research Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. [Alcohol dependence in the Italian general population: diagnostic criteria according to general practitioners and to the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI)].

    PubMed

    Marcatto, Francesco; Ferrante, Donatella; Allamani, Allaman; Bravi, Stefano; Cipriani, Francesco; Voller, Fabio; Mariani, Fabio; Scafuri, Francesca; Manthey, Jakob; Rehm, Jürgen; Struzzo, Pierluigi

    2016-01-01

    to identify the criteria used by general practitioners (GPs) for the diagnosis of alcohol dependence (AD) and to compare them with the criteria of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI). cross-sectional correlational study. the 55 GPs of Friuli Venezia Giulia Region (Northern Italy) and Tuscany Region (Central Italy) who took part in the research conducted a clinical evaluation of the first 40 patients who came for a medical examination. prevalence of AD diagnosed by GPs and CIDI and their association with sociodemographic variables, other diseases, and alcohol consumption. AD prevalence assessed by the GPs was 5.4%, while AD prevalence assessed by the CIDI was 4.4%, with an overlap of about 26%. Patients identified as AD by the GPs were older and more frequently suffering from liver disease and hypertension than patients identified by the CIDI. the limited overlap between diagnoses of AD made by GPs and the one made by the CIDI is problematic. GPs appear to identify mainly more severe forms of AD, in which excessive consumption of alcohol is associated with the presence of liver disease, while the CIDI could identify younger patients who have not yet developed diseases. GPs' recognition of AD could be increased by using their expertise along with standardised questionnaires which measure alcohol consumption.

  10. [Adaptation of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI) for the assessment of comorbid mental disorders in oncology patients: the CIDI-O].

    PubMed

    Hund, Bianca; Reuter, Katrin; Jacobi, Frank; Siegert, Jens; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Härter, Martin; Mehnert, Anja

    2014-03-01

    This article describes the development of an oncology-specific adaptation of the Composite Diagnostic International Interview (CIDI) for the assessment of comorbid mental disorders in cancer patients. The specific problems related to the assessment of mental disorders in cancer patients are described, in particular the overlap of somatic and mental symptoms as well as the insufficiently elaborated assessment of adjustment disorders and cancer related posttraumatic stress using structured and standardized procedures. The modification strategies that fostered the development of the CIDI-Oncology (CIDI-O) are described. Primary purpose of this adaptation is to enhance the diagnostic spectrum of the CIDI adding the diagnostic group of stress-related mental disorders. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. Development and feasibility of the computerized Turkish edition of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview [DIA-X/CIDI version 2.8(TR)].

    PubMed

    Dingoyan, Demet; Mösko, Mike; Imamoğlu, Yadigar; von Wolff, Alessa; Strehle, Jens; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Schulz, Holger; Koch-Gromus, Uwe; Heinz, Andreas; Kluge, Ulrike

    2017-09-01

    The Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI), which has been widely applied in epidemiological research, is a standardized, clinically structured interview that enables the diagnosis of mental disorders based on DSM and ICD criteria. The computerized DIA-X CIDI Version 2.8 investigated in this study is an adaptation of the German DIA-X/Munich CIDI, which was translated in a multi-step process into Turkish and used to survey the prevalence of mental disorders in individuals with Turkish migration backgrounds in Germany (N = 662). The bilingual lay interviewers were intensively trained and supervised during the data collection. The survey was accompanied by further quality measures, including editing and documenting. To investigate the instrument's feasibility, quality criteria were used based on the following data sources: (1) socio-demographic sample characteristics; (2) interviewer assessments and (3) quantitative measures (interview duration, non-response items, error items). The results indicated that quality differences between the German and Turkish DIA-X/CIDI are associated with age, educational level and socio-economic status and not with the CIDI version itself. In short, the Turkish DIA-X/CIDI Version 2.8 has comparatively good quality and feasibility relative to its German counterpart. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Clinical reappraisal of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview Screening Scales (CIDI-SC) in the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS)

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, Ronald C.; Santiago, Patcho N.; Colpe, Lisa J.; Dempsey, Catherine L.; First, Michael B.; Heeringa, Steven G.; Stein, Murray B.; Fullerton, Carol S.; Gruber, Michael J.; Naifeh, James A.; Nock, Matthew K.; Sampson, Nancy A.; Schoenbaum, Michael; Zaslavsky, Alan M.; Ursano, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    A clinical reappraisal study was carried out in conjunction with the Army STARRS All-Army Study (AAS) to evaluate concordance of DSM-IV diagnoses based on the Composite International Diagnostic Interview screening scales (CIDI-SC) and PTSD Checklist (PCL) with diagnoses based on independent clinical reappraisal interviews (Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV [SCID]). Diagnoses included: lifetime mania/hypomania, panic disorder, and intermittent explosive disorder; 6-month adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder; and 30-day major depressive episode, generalized anxiety disorder, PTSD, and substance (alcohol or drug) use disorder (abuse or dependence). The sample (n=460) was weighted for over-sampling CIDI-SC/PCL screened positives. Diagnostic thresholds were set to equalize false positives and false negatives. Good individual-level concordance was found between CIDI-SC/PCL and SCID diagnoses at these thresholds (AUC = .69–.79). AUC was considerably higher for continuous than dichotomous screening scale scores (AUC = .80–.90), arguing for substantive analyses using not only dichotomous case designations but also continuous measures of predicted probabilities of clinical diagnoses. PMID:24318219

  13. Negative and positive participant responses to the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Results of the Netherlands Mental Health Survey and Incidence Study.

    PubMed

    de Graaf, Ron; Ten Have, Margreet; van Dorsselaer, Saskia; Schoemaker, Casper; Vollebergh, Wilma A M

    2004-07-01

    Little is known about the emotional responses of participants in community surveys to standardised psychiatric interviews like the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI). This study investigates the proportion of subjects responding negatively or positively to the CIDI, and identifies their sociodemographic, psychopathological, personality and social characteristics. At the end of the three-wave Netherlands Mental Health Survey and Incidence Study, 4796 participants aged 18-64 at baseline were questioned about how the interviews had affected them. In all, 2.7% found the interviews quite distressing and 9.5% somewhat distressing. Compared to those without distress, they were more likely to be female, not living with a partner, not in paid employment, and to have a somatic disorder. A total of 5.7% of subjects reported that participation had helped them cope better with problems, and 3.4% reported they could now seek help more easily. These were more likely to be older, less educated, not in paid employment (except those seeking help more easily) and to have a somatic disorder. Both negative and positive responses were associated with mood, anxiety and substance use disorders and comorbidity, as well as with neuroticism, external mastery, low self-esteem and low social support. Only a small minority of participants reported distress from the interviews. This is an important finding for ethics committees charged with approving general population surveys that use the CIDI. It can also be valuable for planning such studies, enabling researchers to inform participants more fully about the effects of the interview before asking them for informed consent.

  14. The Diagnostic/Therapeutic Preabortion Interview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boekelheide, Priscilla Day

    1978-01-01

    The therapeutic and diagnostic aspect of the preabortion interview are discussed with attention to specifics that will identify students with the greatest likelihood for psychological problems and/or repeat abortions. (JD)

  15. Accuracy of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI 2.1) for diagnosis of post-traumatic stress disorder according to DSM-IV criteria.

    PubMed

    Quintana, Maria Inês; Mari, Jair de Jesus; Ribeiro, Wagner Silva; Jorge, Miguel Roberto; Andreoli, Sergio Baxter

    2012-07-01

    The objective was to study the accuracy of the post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) section of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI 2.1) DSM-IV diagnosis, using the Structured Clinical Interview (SCID) as gold standard, and compare the ICD-10 and DSM IV classifications for PTSD. The CIDI was applied by trained lay interviewers and the SCID by a psychologist. The subjects were selected from a community and an outpatient program. A total of 67 subjects completed both assessments. Kappa coefficients for the ICD-10 and the DSM IV compared to the SCID diagnosis were 0.67 and 0.46 respectively. Validity for the DSM IV diagnosis was: sensitivity (51.5%), specificity (94.1%), positive predictive value (9.5%), negative predictive value (66.7%), misclassification rate (26.9%). The CIDI 2.1 demonstrated low validity coefficients for the diagnosis of PTSD using DSM IV criteria when compared to the SCID. The main source of discordance in this study was found to be the high probability of false-negative cases with regards to distress and impairment as well as to avoidance symptoms.

  16. A method to diagnose opioid dependence resulting from heroin versus prescription opioids using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview.

    PubMed

    Potter, Jennifer S; Prather, Kristi; Kropp, Frankie; Byrne, Mimmie; Sullivan, C Rollynn; Mohamedi, Nadia; Copersino, Marc L; Weiss, Roger D

    2010-03-01

    Treatment research with opioid-dependent populations has not traditionally distinguished between those dependent on prescription opioids versus dependent upon heroin. Evidence suggests there is a substantial subpopulation of individuals with opioid dependence resulting largely or exclusively from prescription opioid use. Because this subpopulation may respond to treatment differently from heroin users, a method for discriminating DSM-IV opioid dependence due to prescription opioid use would provide more precision when examining this population. This paper describes an innovative method using a currently available diagnostic instrument, to diagnose DSM-IV opioid dependence and distinguish between dependence resulting from prescription opioids versus dependence upon heroin.

  17. Cultural adaptation of the Latin American version of the World Health Organization Composite International Diagnostic Interview (WHO-CIDI) (v 3.0) for use in Spain.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Mateu, Fernando; Morán-Sánchez, Inés; Alonso, Jordi; Tormo, Ma José; Pujalte, Ma Luisa; Garriga, Ascensión; Aguilar-Gaxiola, Sergio; Navarro, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    To develop a Spanish version of the WHO-Composite International Diagnostic Interview (WHO-CIDI) applicable to Spain, through cultural adaptation of its most recent Latin American (LA v 20.0) version. A 1-week training course on the WHO-CIDI was provided by certified trainers. An expert panel reviewed the LA version, identified words or expressions that needed to be adapted to the cultural or linguistic norms for Spain, and proposed alternative expressions that were agreed on through consensus. The entire process was supervised and approved by a member of the WHO-CIDI Editorial Committee. The changes were incorporated into a Computer Assisted Personal Interview (CAPI) format and the feasibility and administration time were pilot tested in a convenience sample of 32 volunteers. A total of 372 questions were slightly modified (almost 7% of approximately 5000 questions in the survey) and incorporated into the CAPI version of the WHO-CIDI. Most of the changes were minor - but important - linguistic adaptations, and others were related to specific Spanish institutions and currency. In the pilot study, the instrument's mean completion administration time was 2h and 10min, with an interquartile range from 1.5 to nearly 3h. All the changes made were tested and officially approved. The Latin American version of the WHO-CIDI was successfully adapted and pilot-tested in its computerized format and is now ready for use in Spain. Copyright © 2012 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. Validity of the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lecavalier, Luc; Aman, Michael G.; Scahill, Lawrence; McDougle, Christopher J.; McCracken, James T.; Vitiello, Benedetto; Tierney, Elaine; Arnold, L. Eugene; Ghuman, Jaswinder K.; Loftin, Rachel L.; Cronin, Pegeen; Koenig, Kathleen; Posey, David J.; Martin, Andres; Hollway, Jill; Lee, Lisa S.; Kau, Alice S. M.

    2006-01-01

    The factor structure, internal consistency, and convergent validity of the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised (ADI-R) algorithm items were examined in a sample of 226 youngsters with pervasive developmental disabilities. Exploratory factor analyses indicated a three-factor solution closely resembling the original algorithm and explaining 38% of…

  19. Bringing diagnostics to developing countries: an interview with Rosanna Peeling.

    PubMed

    Peeling, Rosanna

    2015-01-01

    Interview with Professor Rosanna Peeling, PhD by Claire Raison (Commissioning Editor) Professor Rosanna Peeling is Chair of Diagnostic Research at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (London, UK) and founded the International Diagnostics Centre at the institution. Professor Peeling previously worked for the WHO in Geneva, Switzerland, and continues to work on innovations for molecular diagnostics for point-of-care use in developing countries, addressing challenges posed by lack of funding and resources, regulatory issues and under-developed healthcare systems in these locations. Here, she discusses her career, recent progress in the field and how connectivity will affect global healthcare.

  20. STRESSORS, SYMPTOM PROFILE, AND PREDICTORS OF ADJUSTMENT DISORDER IN CANCER PATIENTS. RESULTS FROM AN EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDY WITH THE COMPOSITE INTERNATIONAL DIAGNOSTIC INTERVIEW, ADAPTATION FOR ONCOLOGY (CIDI-O).

    PubMed

    Hund, Bianca; Reuter, Katrin; Härter, Martin; Brähler, Elmar; Faller, Hermann; Keller, Monika; Schulz, Holger; Wegscheider, Karl; Weis, Joachim; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Koch, Uwe; Friedrich, Michael; Mehnert, Anja

    2016-02-01

    We aimed to investigate type and frequency of stressors, predominant symptom profiles, and predictors of adjustment disorders (AD) in cancer patients across major tumor entities. In this epidemiological study, we examined 2,141 cancer patients out of 4,020 screened with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview, adaptation for oncology (CIDI-O). AD were operationalized as subthreshold disorders according to DSM-IV criteria. In our sample, 265 out of 2,141 patients (12.4%) met all criteria for AD (unweighted 4-week prevalence). The disclosure of the cancer diagnosis, relapse or metastases, and cancer treatments were most frequently described as stressors associated with depressive or anxious symptoms. With regard to AD symptom profiles, patients showed high prevalence rates of affective symptoms according to the DSM-IV criteria of Major Depression: The highest prevalence rates were found for cognitive disturbances (concentration and memory problems) (88%), sleeping disturbances (86%), and depressive mood (83%). We found sex, education, and metastasis as significant predictors for AD. Higher education was the most influential predictor. Men were half as likely to report symptoms fulfilling the AD criteria as women. Patients with metastasized tumors had a more than 80% higher risk of AD than those without metastasis. However, the explained variance of our model is very small (Nagelkerke's R² = 0.08). Patients with AD can be identified using a standardized instrument and deserve clinical attention, as they often show severe clinical symptoms and impairments. Improving the clinical conceptualization of AD by the adding-on of potential stress-response-symptoms is necessary to identify severe psychological strain. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: concordance of the adolescent version of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview Version 3.0 (CIDI) with the K-SADS in the US National Comorbidity Survey Replication Adolescent (NCS-A) supplement

    PubMed Central

    Green, Jennifer Greif; Avenevoli, Shelli; Finkelman, Matthew; Gruber, Michael J.; Kessler, Ronald C.; Merikangas, Kathleen R.; Sampson, Nancy A.; Zaslavsky, Alan M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper evaluates the internal consistency reliability and concurrent validity of the assessment of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in the adolescent version of the World Health Organization (WHO) Composite International Diagnostic Interview Version 3.0 (CIDI). The CIDI is a lay-administered diagnostic interview that was carried out in conjunction with the US National Comorbidity Survey Adolescent Supplement, a US nationally representative survey of 10,148 adolescents and their parents. Internal consistency reliability was evaluated using factor and item response theory analyses. Concurrent validity was evaluated against diagnoses based on blinded clinician-administered interviews. Inattention and hyperactivity-impulsivity items loaded on separate but correlated factors, with hyperactivity and impulsivity items forming a single factor in parent reports but separate factors in youth reports. We were able to differentiate hyperactivity and impulsivity factors for parents as well by eliminating a subset who endorsed zero ADHD items from the factor analysis. Although concurrent validity was relatively weak, decomposition showed that this was due to low validity of adolescent reports. A modified CIDI diagnosis based exclusively on parent reports generated a diagnosis that had good concordance with clinical diagnoses [area under the curve (AUC) = 0.78]. Implications for assessing ADHD using the CIDI and the effect of different informants on measurement are discussed. PMID:20191660

  2. International Book Review and Interview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dieker, Lisa; McTigue, Anna

    2001-01-01

    This article reviews the book "Helping Individuals with Disabilities and Their Families: Mexican and U.S. Perspectives," edited by Todd V. Fletcher and Candace S. Bos (1999). An interview with Todd V. Fletcher is presented in which he discusses the importance of U.S. understanding and collaboration with Mexico. (CR)

  3. Interview: Setting up NICE International.

    PubMed

    Chalkidou, Kalipso

    2012-03-01

    Kalipso Chalkidou is the founding director of the NICE's international program helping governments build technical and institutional capacity for using evidence to inform health policy. She is interested in how comparative effectiveness evidence, combined with local expertise and local institutions, can drive scientific and legitimate healthcare resource allocation decisions. She has been involved in the Chinese rural health reform and also in national health reform projects in Colombia, Turkey and the Middle East, working with the World Bank, Pan American Health Organization (PAHO), Department For International Development (DFID) and the Inter-American Development Bank, as well as national governments. She holds a doctorate on the molecular biology of prostate cancer from the University of Newcastle (UK), an MD with Honors from the University of Athens (Greece) and is an honorary senior lecturer at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (UK), a senior advisor on international policy at the Center for Medical Technology Policy (MD, USA) and a visiting faculty member at the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute for Bioethics (MD, USA). Between 2007 and 2008, she spent a year at the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health as a Harkness Fellow in Health Policy and Practice, studying how comparative effectiveness research can inform policy and US government drug pricing policies.

  4. [Diagnostic structured interviews in child and adolescent's psychiatry].

    PubMed

    Renou, S; Hergueta, T; Flament, M; Mouren-Simeoni, M-C; Lecrubier, Y

    2004-01-01

    Structured diagnostic interviews, which evolved along the development of classification's systems, are now widely used in adult psychiatry, in the fields of clinical trials, epidemiological studies, academic research as well as, more recently, clinical practice. These instruments improved the reliability of the data collection and interrater reliability allowing greater homogenisation of the subjects taking part in clinical research, essential factor to ensure the reproducibility of the results. The diagnostic instruments, conversely to the clinical traditional diagnostic processes allow a systematic and exhaustive exploration of disorders, diagnostic criteria but also severity levels, and duration. The format of the data collection, including the order of exploration of the symptoms, is fixed. The formulation of the questions is tested to be univocal, in order to avoid confusions. In child and adolescent, researches in pharmacology and epidemiology increased a lot in the last decade and the standardisation of diagnostic procedures is becoming a key feature. This Article aims to make an assessment, a selection, and a description of the standardized instruments helping psychiatric diagnosis currently available in the field of child and adolescent's psychiatry. Medline and PsycINFO databases were exhaustively checked and the selection of the instruments was based on the review of four main criteria: i) compatibility with international diagnostic systems (DSM IV and/or ICD-10); ii) number of disorders explored; iii) peer reviewed Journals and iv) richness of psychometric data. After the analysis of the instruments described or mentioned in the literature, 2 structured interviews [the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children (DISC) and the Children's Interview for Psychiatric Syndromes (ChIPS)] and 4 diagnostic semi-structured interviews [the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children (Kiddie-SADS), the Diagnostic Interview for

  5. Diagnosing Autism: Analyses of Data from the Autism Diagnostic Interview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lord, Catherine; Pickles, Andrew; McLennan, John; Rutter, Michael; Bregman, Joel; Folstein, Susan; Fombonne, Eric; Leboyer, Marion; Minshew, Nancy

    1997-01-01

    A study of 319 individuals with autism (ages 3-43) and 113 other subjects found that a single set of criteria, as operationalized by individually structured questions in the Autism Diagnostic Interview and Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised, was effective in differentiating autism from mental disabilities and language impairment. (Author/CR)

  6. Acceptance of a structured diagnostic interview in children, parents, and interviewers.

    PubMed

    Neuschwander, Murielle; In-Albon, Tina; Meyer, Andrea H; Schneider, Silvia

    2017-09-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the satisfaction and acceptance of a structured diagnostic interview in clinical practice and in a research setting. Using the Structured Diagnostic Interview for Mental Disorders in Children and Adolescents (Kinder-DIPS), 28 certified interviewers conducted 202 interviews (115 with parents, 87 with children). After each interview, children, parents, and interviewers completed a questionnaire assessing the overall satisfaction (0 = not at all satisfied to 100 = totally satisfied) and acceptance (0 = completely disagree to 3 = completely agree) with the interview. Satisfaction ratings were highly positive, all means >82. The mean of the overall acceptance for children was 2.43 (standard deviation [SD] = 0.41), 2.54 (SD = 0.33) of the parents, 2.30 (SD = 0.43) of the children's interviewers, and 2.46 (SD = 0.32) of the parents' interviewers. Using separate univariate regression models, significant predictors for higher satisfaction and acceptance with the interview are higher children's Global Assessment of Functioning, fewer number of children's diagnoses, shorter duration of the interview, a research setting, female sex of the interviewer, and older age of the interviewer. Results indicate that structured diagnostic interviews are highly accepted by children, parents, and interviewers. Importantly, this is true for different treatment settings. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Psychiatric Diagnostic Interviews for Children and Adolescents: A Comparative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angold, Adrian; Erkanli, Alaattin; Copeland, William; Goodman, Robert; Fisher, Prudence W.; Costello, E. Jane

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To compare examples of three styles of psychiatric interviews for youth: the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children (DISC) ("respondent-based"), the Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Assessment (CAPA) ("interviewer-based"), and the Development and Well-Being Assessment (DAWBA) ("expert judgment"). Method: Roughly equal numbers of…

  8. Psychiatric Diagnostic Interviews for Children and Adolescents: A Comparative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angold, Adrian; Erkanli, Alaattin; Copeland, William; Goodman, Robert; Fisher, Prudence W.; Costello, E. Jane

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To compare examples of three styles of psychiatric interviews for youth: the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children (DISC) ("respondent-based"), the Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Assessment (CAPA) ("interviewer-based"), and the Development and Well-Being Assessment (DAWBA) ("expert judgment"). Method: Roughly equal numbers of…

  9. [Sensitivity and specificity between the Composite International Diagnostic Interview Version 3.0 (World Mental Health, CIDI) and the Standardised Clinical Evaluation version I (SCID-I) in a mental health survey of the city of Medellin, 2012].

    PubMed

    Montoya Gonzalez, Laura Elisa; Restrepo Bernal, Diana Patricia; Mejía-Montoya, Roberto; Bareño-Silva, José; Sierra-Hincapié, Gloria; Torres de Galvis, Yolanda; Marulanda-Restrepo, Daniel; Gómez-Sierra, Natalia; Gaviria-Arbeláez, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    In order to address the mental health problems of the Colombian population it is necessary to have diagnostic tools (local and international) that are valid, easy to apply, and comparable. To compare the sensitivity and specificity between the CIDI 3.0 and the SCID-I for major depressive disorder, bipolar I and II disorder, and substance dependence disorder. Cross-sectional study comparing the life prevalence of three mental disorders in 100 subjects using the CIDI 3.0 and the SCID-I. The study was approved by the Institutional Ethics Committee. The two diagnostic interviews were performed that measured by sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value with confidence intervals of 95%. The SPSS version 21.0 software was used for data analysis. The median age was 43.5 years, with an interquartile interval of 30 years. The highest sensitivity (Se) and specificity (Sp) was observed for drug dependence diagnosis - with 80%, (95%CI, 34.94-100), and 98.46 (95%CI, 94.7-100), respectively. SCID-I and CIDI 3.0 showed different levels of sensitivity and specificity for the three disorders studied with: high for substance dependence disorder, moderate for bipolar disorder I and II, and low for major depressive disorder. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. All rights reserved.

  10. Use of the SADS Diagnostic Interview in Evaluating Legal Insanity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Richard; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Examined clinical usefulness of the Schedule of Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia (SADS) diagnostic interview in evaluations of criminal responsibility. Findings, based on 78 evaluations from a forensic clinic, indicated that SADS successfully differentiated between sane and insane evaluatees. Differences were primarily in severity of symptoms…

  11. Use of the SADS Diagnostic Interview in Evaluating Legal Insanity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Richard; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Examined clinical usefulness of the Schedule of Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia (SADS) diagnostic interview in evaluations of criminal responsibility. Findings, based on 78 evaluations from a forensic clinic, indicated that SADS successfully differentiated between sane and insane evaluatees. Differences were primarily in severity of symptoms…

  12. Inpatient diagnostic assessments: 1. Accuracy of structured vs. unstructured interviews.

    PubMed

    Miller, P R; Dasher, R; Collins, R; Griffiths, P; Brown, F

    2001-12-31

    This study compared structured vs. unstructured interviews for making psychiatric diagnoses. Three clinicians independently diagnosed 56 inpatient-subjects, each using a different method: (1) the unstructured Traditional Diagnostic Assessment (TDA), the standard method of clinical practice; (2) the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-Clinical Version (SCID-CV), a widely used structured method; and (3) the Computer Assisted Diagnostic Interview (CADI), a structured computer-based method. Once finished, the three clinicians developed a Consensus diagnosis, using Spitzer's LEAD Standard (L=Longitudinal evaluation of symptomatology, E=Evaluation by expert consensus, AD=All Data from multiple sources). Diagnoses were assigned to one of 10 groups (cognitive impairment, general medical condition-induced, alcohol-induced, drug-induced, mania, depression, schizophrenia, schizoaffective, psychosis NOS, and anxiety). Diagnostic accuracy for each method, measured against Consensus, was as follows: TDA-agreement=53.8%, kappa=0.4325 ('fair'); SCID-CV-agreement=85.7%, kappa=0.8189 ('excellent'); CADI -agreement=85.7%, kappa=0.8147 ('excellent'). All three methods reached acceptable levels of diagnostic accuracy. Structured methods (SCID-CV, CADI) were significantly better than the unstructured TDA.

  13. Current major depressive syndrome measured with the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) and the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI): results from a cross-sectional population-based study of adults in Germany.

    PubMed

    Maske, Ulrike E; Busch, Markus A; Jacobi, Frank; Beesdo-Baum, Katja; Seiffert, Ingeburg; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Riedel-Heller, Steffi; Hapke, Ulfert

    2015-04-10

    Prevalence estimates for depression vary considerably by the type of assessment instrument, and there is limited information on their overlap in population-based samples. Our aim was to compare the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI) as measures for current major depressive syndrome (MDS) in a large population-based sample. Data derived from the mental health module of the nationwide cross-sectional German Health Interview and Examination Survey for Adults (DEGS1-MH) (n = 4483; age 18-79 years). MDS in the past two weeks was assessed (a) using the PHQ-9 diagnostic algorithm (PHQ-MDS) and (b) based on CIDI information about the latest symptom occurrence (recency) (CIDI-MDS). Prevalences, overall concordance and percentages of overlap of both MDS measures were determined. Prevalences of affirmed PHQ-9 depression symptoms and the mean and median PHQ-9 sum scores were analyzed per measure. Prevalence of current MDS was 2.7% (95% CI: 2.0-3.6) for PHQ-MDS and 3.9% (95% CI: 3.1-5.0) for CIDI-MDS. The overall agreement between both measures was moderate (kappa: 0.43). Of all the participants, 1.5% (95% CI: 1.0-2.2) were classified as MDS cases by both measures, with 54.5% (95% CI: 42.7-65.9) of PHQ-MDS cases and 37.9% (95% CI: 27.8-49.1) of CIDI-MDS cases also being classified as MDS by the respective other MDS measure. However, 94.8% (95% CI: 93.6-95.8) of the participants were classified as non-MDS by both measures, with 97.5% (95% CI: 96.6-98.1) of non-PHQ-MDS and 98.7% (95% CI: 98.2-99.1) of non-CIDI-MDS being classified as non-MDS by the respective other MDS measure. The mean and median PHQ-9 sum score was higher in those with PHQ-MDS than in those with CIDI-MDS. Both measures have a high level of agreement for ruling out current MDS, but the overlap in their classification of cases is moderate. Our results indicate that they cannot be interpreted as equal measures of the same construct, suggesting

  14. Evaluating depressive symptoms in hypomanic and manic episodes using a structured diagnostic tool: validation of a new Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (M.I.N.I.) module for the DSM-5 'With Mixed Features' specifier.

    PubMed

    Hergueta, Thierry; Weiller, Emmanuelle

    2013-01-01

    The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fifth edition (DSM-5), includes a new 'With Mixed Features' specifier for mood episodes. In (hypo-)manic episodes, the specifier is given if three or more depressive symptoms are present nearly every day during the episode. A new module of the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (M.I.N.I.) has been developed as a patient-completed questionnaire to evaluate the DSM-5 specifier for (hypo-)manic episodes. The objective of this study was to validate this new module. In Phase I, patients with a manic episode in the past 6 months completed the module and were asked whether the wording was clear, understandable, relevant and specific. Based on their feedback, the module was refined and finalised. In Phase II, psychiatrists each invited five patients to complete the module. The psychiatrists completed record forms for these five patients, which included their diagnoses, made according to DSM-5 criteria during clinical interviewing. The module was validated by comparing depressive symptoms reported by the patients themselves using the M.I.N.I. module with those evaluated by their psychiatrist using DSM-5 criteria during clinical interviewing. In Phase I, a few changes were made to the M.I.N.I. module based on feedback from 20 patients (60% of whom had mixed features). In Phase II, 23 psychiatrists completed record forms for 115 patients, 99 (86.1%) of whom completed the M.I.N.I. module. Agreement between psychiatrists' DSM-5 diagnoses and patients' M.I.N.I. responses was substantial (Cohen's kappa coefficient, 0.60). The overall sensitivity of the M.I.N.I. was 0.91 and its specificity was 0.70. Sensitivity ranged from 0.63 for psychomotor retardation to 0.90 for suicidal thoughts. Specificity ranged from 0.63 for diminished interest/pleasure to 0.90 for suicidal thoughts. The module's positive and negative predictive values were 0.72 and 0.90, respectively. In summary, the M.I.N.I. module demonstrated good

  15. Assessment of clinical information: Comparison of the validity of a Structured Clinical Interview (the SCID) and the Clinical Diagnostic Interview.

    PubMed

    Drill, Rebecca; Nakash, Ora; DeFife, Jared A; Westen, Drew

    2015-06-01

    Adaptive functioning is a key aspect of psychiatric diagnosis and assessment in research and practice. This study compared adaptive functioning validity ratings from Structured Clinical Interviews (SCIDs, symptom-focused structured diagnostic interviews), and Clinical Diagnostic Interviews (CDIs, systematic diagnostic interviews modeling naturalistic clinical interactions focusing on relational narratives). Two hundred forty-five patients (interviewed by two independent interviewers) and their interviewers completed the Clinical Data Form which assesses adaptive functioning and clinical information. Both interviews converged strongly with patient-reports, with no significant differences in validity of the interviews in measuring global and specific domains of adaptive functioning variables. Findings suggest that CDIs provide adaptive functioning data comparable to SCIDs (often considered "gold standard" for assessment but difficult to use in practice) and have important implications for bridging the research-practice gap. By incorporating clinicians' everyday methods, CDIs yield information that is psychometrically sound for empirical investigation, diagnostically practical, and clinically meaningful and valid.

  16. The hypnotic diagnostic interview for hysterical disorders, pediatric form.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, Alex; Iglesias, Adam

    2009-07-01

    This article reports on the use of hypnosis to facilitate the diagnostic process in two cases of pediatric hysterical reactions. The Hypnotic Diagnostic Interview for Hysterical Disorders (HDIHD), an interview tool, specifically designed for these cases, is reported. The first case was an adolescent male with motor Conversion Disorder manifested as paralysis of his lower limbs. The second was a preadolescent girl with sensory Conversion Disorder manifested as reduction of visual field in her right eye. Freudian conceptualization of hysterical reactions was employed as the conceptual basis in the formulation of these cases. This orientation posits hysterical phenomena a psychological defense employed by individuals exposed to traumatic experiences in order to effectuate a defense from intolerable affective material. The emotionally overwhelming material converts into physical reactivity free of the traumatic consequences by keeping the intolerable images and emotions deeply repressed within the subconscious. As the focus on these cases was diagnostic, treatment efforts were avoided. As it turned out, environmental interventions, based on the obtained information from the hypnotic interviews, extinguished the symptoms. The children were symptom free at follow-up.

  17. The Structure of the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised: Diagnostic and Phenotypic Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snow, Anne V.; Lecavalier, Luc; Houts, Carrie

    2009-01-01

    Background: Multivariate statistics can assist in refining the nosology and diagnosis of pervasive developmental disorders (PDD) and also contribute important information for genetic studies. The Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised (ADI-R) is one of the most widely used assessment instruments in the field of PDD. The current study investigated its…

  18. The Structure of the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised: Diagnostic and Phenotypic Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snow, Anne V.; Lecavalier, Luc; Houts, Carrie

    2009-01-01

    Background: Multivariate statistics can assist in refining the nosology and diagnosis of pervasive developmental disorders (PDD) and also contribute important information for genetic studies. The Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised (ADI-R) is one of the most widely used assessment instruments in the field of PDD. The current study investigated its…

  19. Learning to Question: Categories of Questioning Used by Preservice Teachers during Diagnostic Mathematics Interviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moyer, Patricia S.; Milewicz, Elizabeth

    2002-01-01

    Examines the questioning strategies used by (n=48) preservice teachers during one-on-one diagnostic mathematics interviews with children. Conducts audiotaped interviews, following analyses, and reflection on the interview. Indicates that using the diagnostic interview format allows preservice teachers to recognize and reflect upon effective…

  20. Additional psychiatric illness by Diagnostic Interview Schedule in male alcoholics.

    PubMed

    Herz, L R; Volicer, L; D'Angelo, N; Gadish, D

    1990-01-01

    Seventy-four male veterans entering an alcohol abuse treatment program were screened for additional psychiatric diagnoses using the Diagnostic Interview Schedule (DIS). Fifty-four of these also completed a questionnaire on personal and family drinking history. Over half (54.1%) had another diagnosis. The most common syndromes other than substance abuse were antisocial personality disorder, phobic disorder, and depression. In each of these cases, the presence of the additional disorder accelerated the course of the alcohol problem significantly. The difference in course between syndromes was dwarfed by the time of presentation by the difference between "pure" alcoholism and alcoholism with another diagnosis. The primary versus secondary distinction appeared to account for only a part of this effect.

  1. Reliability and Validity of Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised, Japanese Version

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsuchiya, Kenji J.; Matsumoto, Kaori; Yagi, Atsuko; Inada, Naoko; Kuroda, Miho; Inokuchi, Eiko; Koyama, Tomonori; Kamio, Yoko; Tsujii, Masatsugu; Sakai, Saeko; Mohri, Ikuko; Taniike, Masako; Iwanaga, Ryoichiro; Ogasahara, Kei; Miyachi, Taishi; Nakajima, Shunji; Tani, Iori; Ohnishi, Masafumi; Inoue, Masahiko; Nomura, Kazuyo; Hagiwara, Taku; Uchiyama, Tokio; Ichikawa, Hironobu; Kobayashi, Shuji; Miyamoto, Ken; Nakamura, Kazuhiko; Suzuki, Katsuaki; Mori, Norio; Takei, Nori

    2013-01-01

    To examine the inter-rater reliability of Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised, Japanese Version (ADI-R-JV), the authors recruited 51 individuals aged 3-19 years, interviewed by two independent raters. Subsequently, to assess the discriminant and diagnostic validity of ADI-R-JV, the authors investigated 317 individuals aged 2-19 years, who were…

  2. Reliability and Validity of Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised, Japanese Version

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsuchiya, Kenji J.; Matsumoto, Kaori; Yagi, Atsuko; Inada, Naoko; Kuroda, Miho; Inokuchi, Eiko; Koyama, Tomonori; Kamio, Yoko; Tsujii, Masatsugu; Sakai, Saeko; Mohri, Ikuko; Taniike, Masako; Iwanaga, Ryoichiro; Ogasahara, Kei; Miyachi, Taishi; Nakajima, Shunji; Tani, Iori; Ohnishi, Masafumi; Inoue, Masahiko; Nomura, Kazuyo; Hagiwara, Taku; Uchiyama, Tokio; Ichikawa, Hironobu; Kobayashi, Shuji; Miyamoto, Ken; Nakamura, Kazuhiko; Suzuki, Katsuaki; Mori, Norio; Takei, Nori

    2013-01-01

    To examine the inter-rater reliability of Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised, Japanese Version (ADI-R-JV), the authors recruited 51 individuals aged 3-19 years, interviewed by two independent raters. Subsequently, to assess the discriminant and diagnostic validity of ADI-R-JV, the authors investigated 317 individuals aged 2-19 years, who were…

  3. International Literacy Crusader: An Interview with Susan Mandel Glazer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ambrose, Valerie K.

    2011-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Susan Mandel Glazer, past president of both the International Reading Association and the College Reading Association. Dr. Glazer received her doctorate in education from the University of Pennsylvania and her master of arts from New York University. Her most recent books are "Beyond the Looking Glass:…

  4. International Literacy Crusader: An Interview with Susan Mandel Glazer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ambrose, Valerie K.

    2011-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Susan Mandel Glazer, past president of both the International Reading Association and the College Reading Association. Dr. Glazer received her doctorate in education from the University of Pennsylvania and her master of arts from New York University. Her most recent books are "Beyond the Looking Glass:…

  5. International, High-Ability Adventures: An Interview with Miraca Gross

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henshon, Suzanna E.

    2006-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Dr. Miraca Gross, Professor of Gifted Education, and Director of the Gifted Education Research, Resource, and Information Centre (GERRIC), at the University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia. Dr. Gross is a leading international authority on the education of gifted and talented children, particularly…

  6. The health preoccupation diagnostic interview: inter-rater reliability of a structured interview for diagnostic assessment of DSM-5 somatic symptom disorder and illness anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Axelsson, Erland; Andersson, Erik; Ljótsson, Brjánn; Wallhed Finn, Daniel; Hedman, Erik

    2016-06-01

    Somatic symptom disorder (SSD) and illness anxiety disorder (IAD) are two new diagnoses introduced in the DSM-5. There is a need for reliable instruments to facilitate the assessment of these disorders. We therefore developed a structured diagnostic interview, the Health Preoccupation Diagnostic Interview (HPDI), which we hypothesized would reliably differentiate between SSD, IAD, and no diagnosis. Persons with clinically significant health anxiety (n = 52) and healthy controls (n = 52) were interviewed using the HPDI. Diagnoses were then compared with those made by an independent assessor, who listened to audio recordings of the interviews. Ratings generally indicated moderate to almost perfect inter-rater agreement, as illustrated by an overall Cohen's κ of .85. Disagreements primarily concerned (a) the severity of somatic symptoms, (b) the differential diagnosis of panic disorder, and (c) SSD specifiers. We conclude that the HPDI can be used to reliably diagnose DSM-5 SSD and IAD.

  7. Will This Net Work?: Development of a Diagnostic Interview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Rose; Wright, Vince

    2014-01-01

    Spatial visualisation is a subset of spatial ability and is exemplified in predicting whether or not a net will fold to form a target solid. The researchers examined video of interviews to explore the schemes of Year 5 students for determining the validity of nets for a cube and pyramid. Findings suggest the significance of imaged actions, shown…

  8. An Interview with Medical Diagnostics Scientist Bernhard Weigl

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Megan

    2010-01-01

    Medical diagnostics help us evaluate a range of disorders, such as cancer and infectious diseases. In the United States and other developed countries, doctors have access to advanced equipment and laboratories that provide reliable diagnoses. As a result, when we are sick, we feel confident that we will get the treatment we need. Unfortunately,…

  9. An Interview with Medical Diagnostics Scientist Bernhard Weigl

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Megan

    2010-01-01

    Medical diagnostics help us evaluate a range of disorders, such as cancer and infectious diseases. In the United States and other developed countries, doctors have access to advanced equipment and laboratories that provide reliable diagnoses. As a result, when we are sick, we feel confident that we will get the treatment we need. Unfortunately,…

  10. The structured diagnostic interview for sleep patterns and disorders: rationale and initial evaluation.

    PubMed

    Merikangas, K R; Zhang, J; Emsellem, H; Swanson, S A; Vgontzas, A; Belouad, F; Blank, M M; Chen, W; Einen, M; He, J P; Heaton, L; Nakamura, E; Rooholamini, S; Mignot, E

    2014-05-01

    We aimed to describe and report the initial validity of a newly developed structured interview for sleep disorders (Diagnostic Interview for Sleep Patterns and Disorders [DISP]) administered by trained lay interviewers. A total of 225 patients with various sleep disorders were recruited from two nationally recognized sleep centers in the United States. The International Classification of Sleep Disorders, second edition (ICSD-2) criteria, were used to classify sleep disorders (e.g., delayed sleep phase disorder, hypersomnia, narcolepsy with cataplexy [NC], restless legs syndrome [RLS], periodic limb movement disorder [PLMD], insomnia, rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder [RBD], and obstructive sleep apnea [OSA]). Interview diagnoses were compared with final diagnoses by sleep specialists (reference diagnosis based on clinical history, examination, and polysomnography [PSG] when indicated). DISP diagnoses had fair to substantial concordance with clinician diagnoses for various sleep disorders, with area under the receiver operator characteristic curves (AUC) ranging from 0.65 to 0.84. Participants classified by the clinician as having a sleep disorder were moderately well-detected (sensitivity ranging from 0.50 for RBD disorder to 0.87 for insomnia). Substantial specificity (>0.8) also was seen for five of the eight sleep disorders (i.e., delayed sleep phase, hypersomnia, NC, PLMD, and RBD). Interviews were more likely than clinicians to detect disorders secondary to the primary sleep problem. The DISP provides an important tool for the detection of a wide range of sleep disorders in clinical settings and is particularly valuable in the detection of secondary disorders that were not the primary referral diagnosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Reliability and diagnostic efficiency of the abbreviated-diagnostic interview for borderlines in an adolescent clinical population.

    PubMed

    Guilé, Jean Marc; Greenfield, Brian; Berthiaume, Claude; Chapdelaine, Cimon; Bergeron, Lise

    2009-09-01

    Examine the reliability as well as the concurrent validity and diagnostic efficiency of the Abbreviated version of the diagnostic interview for borderlines revised (Ab-DIB) as a screening measure of borderline psychopathology in an adolescent clinical population. The Ab-DIB is a DIB-R-derived self-report covering the impulsiveness as well as the affect and cognitive components of the borderline construct. Its administration lasts 10 min. The Ab-DIB was tested on 139 suicidal youths for reliability and concurrent validity against the DIB-R and the Columbia Impairment Scale (CIS). Internal consistencies and test-retest Intra-Class-Correlations ranged from 0.80 to 0.86 and 0.77 to 0.95, respectively. ROC analysis yielded an area under the curve of 0.87 (p < 0.001). Sensitivity was 0.88 and specificity ranged from 0.82 to 0.73 depending on the age-range. Correlation of the Ab-DIB's continuous score with the CIS was 0.42 (p < 0.001). In conclusion, The Ab-DIB's brief duration and psychometric properties suggest its utility in time-limited settings.

  12. A Diagnostic Interview Module for Anabolic-Androgenic Steroid Dependence: Preliminary Evidence of Reliability and Validity

    PubMed Central

    Pope, Harrison G.; Kean, Joseph; Nash, Adam; Kanayama, Gen; Samuel, Douglas B.; Bickel, Warren K.; Hudson, James I.

    2010-01-01

    The syndrome of anabolic-androgenic steroid (AAS) dependence, though well recognized, remains poorly studied. In this preliminary psychometric study, American and British investigators separately administered a structured diagnostic interview module, based on recently proposed criteria for AAS dependence, to 42 male AAS users in Middlesbrough, England. Another investigator, blinded to the diagnostic interview findings, assessed self-reported symptoms of “muscle-dysmorphia”; effects of AAS on various aspects of functioning; and maximum proportion of annual income spent on AAS. We also assessed demographic measures, history of other substance use, and performance on a hypothetical AAS-purchasing task. The interview module yielded very good interrater reliability (kappa = 0.76 and overall intraclass correlation = 0.79) and strong internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha = 0.77–0.87). Men diagnosed as AAS-dependent, when compared to nondependent men, reported significantly earlier onset of AAS use, longer duration and higher maximum doses of AAS used, more frequent use of other performance-enhancing drugs, and a somewhat larger maximum percentage of income spent on AAS. Dependent users also “bought” more AAS in the hypothetical purchase task, but rated significantly more negatively the effects of AAS on their mental health—findings all suggesting that the diagnosis of AAS dependence shows construct validity. As a group, AAS users showed high preoccupation with muscular appearance, but dependence per se was not significantly associated with this measure—suggesting that the diagnosis of AAS dependence shows some evidence of discriminant validity. Collectively, these findings suggest that AAS dependence may be diagnosed reliably, with preliminary evidence for construct and discriminant validity. PMID:20545384

  13. Parent-adolescent concordance on the Revised Diagnostic Interview for Borderlines (DIB-R) and the Childhood Interview for Borderline Personality Disorder (CI-BPD).

    PubMed

    Wall, K; Sharp, C; Ahmed, Y; Goodman, M; Zanarini, M C

    2017-08-01

    While the degree of concordance between parent and adolescent self-report of internalizing and externalizing pathology is well studied, virtually nothing is known about concordance in borderline pathology and the implication of parent-adolescent discrepancies for outcomes. The present study aimed to (1) examine discrepancies between parents and adolescents on two interview-based measures of borderline personality disorder (BPD)-the Revised Diagnostic Interview for Borderlines (DIB-R(22) ) and the Childhood Interview for Borderline Personality Disorder (CI-BPD(23) ); and (2) investigate the implications of discrepancies for clinical outcomes. Diagnostic concordance on the DIB-R and CI-BPD showed rates of 82% and 94% respectively, with lower concordance demonstrated for dimensionally scored variables. Standardized difference scores between adolescent and parent reports on both borderline measures were significantly correlated with few interview-based axis I diagnoses as reported by parents, but not adolescents themselves. Implications regarding the use of each measure for the assessment and diagnosis of borderline personality disorder are discussed. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. The Developmental, Dimensional and Diagnostic Interview (3Di): A Novel Computerized Assessment for Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skuse, David; Warrington, Richard; Bishop, Dorothy; Chowdhury, Uttom; Lau, Jennifer; Mandy, William; Place, Maurice

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Autism is a diagnostic spectrum of variable severity, with significant comorbidity. No existing standardized interview measures autistic features dimensionally. The authors aimed to develop a parental autism interview that could be administered to unselected clinical and general population samples that measures both symptom intensity…

  15. The Swedish Version of the Diagnostic Interview for Social and Communication Disorders (DISCO-10). Psychometric Properties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nygren, Gudrun; Hagberg, Bibbi; Billstedt, Eva; Skoglund, Asa; Gillberg, Christopher; Johansson, Maria

    2009-01-01

    Psychometric properties of the Diagnostic Interview for Social and Communication Disorders schedule (DISCO) have only been studied in the UK. The authorised Swedish translation of the tenth version of the DISCO (DISCO-10) was used in interviews with close relatives of 91 Swedish patients referred for neuropsychiatrical assessment. Validity…

  16. Translation Challenges and Strategies: The ASL Translation of a Computer-Based, Psychiatric Diagnostic Interview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montoya, Louise A.; Egnatovitch, Reginald; Eckhardt, Elizabeth; Goldstein, Marjorie; Goldstein, Richard A.; Steinberg, Annie G.

    2004-01-01

    This article describes the translation goals, challenges, strategies, and solutions employed in the development of a computer-based, self administered, psychiatric diagnostic instrument, the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for the Deaf (D-DIS-IV) in American Sign Language (ASL) with English captions. The article analyzes the impact of the…

  17. Development of a transient internal probe diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarboe, Thomas R.; Mattick, Arthur T.

    1994-12-01

    A research effort was carried out to develop and test key components of the transient internal probe, a diagnostic tool for measuring internal magnetic fields in a plasma. A gasdynamic sabot separation method was developed for discarding the sabot upstream of the plasma. Separation is effected in a vented 50-caliber gun barrel, and the sabot is deflected upstream of the plasma, reliably removing the sabot without disrupting the probe trajectory. A vacuum interface was constructed to isolate the plasma from gun gases, which uses a very fast trap-door valve to prevent gas from entering the plasma chamber. A full-up test of the diagnostic was made using a 2.2 km/sec probe to measure a static field in a vacuum. This yielded excellent agreement with Hall probe measurements, with a resolution of 20 Gauss, and the gun gas entering the measurement chamber is to be acceptably small for application to plasma devices.

  18. Parent-Child Diagnostic Agreement on Anxiety Symptoms with a Structured Diagnostic Interview for Mental Disorders in Children.

    PubMed

    Popp, Lukka; Neuschwander, Murielle; Mannstadt, Sandra; In-Albon, Tina; Schneider, Silvia

    2017-01-01

    Objective: In clinical structured diagnostic interviews, diagnoses based on parent and child reports have low to moderate agreement. The aims of the present study are (1) to examine diagnostic agreement on anxiety disorders between parents and children on the levels of current and lifetime diagnostic category and diagnoses focusing in particular on diagnostic criteria and (2) to identify parent- and child-related predictors for diagnostic agreement. Method: The sample consisted of 166 parent-child dyads interviewed with the Structured Diagnostic Interview for Mental Disorders in Children (Kinder-DIPS, Schneider et al., 2009). The children (51.8% girls) were between the ages of 7 and 18 years (M = 10.94; SD = 2.22). Results: Overall, parent-child agreement on the diagnostic category of anxiety disorder (k = 0.21; k = 0.22) and the specific anxiety diagnoses (base rate > 10%) of social phobia, specific phobia and separation anxiety disorder (k = 0.24-0.52; k = 0.19-0.43) and corresponding diagnostic criteria (k = 0.22-0.67; k = 0.24-0.41) were low to moderate with the highest agreement on separation anxiety disorder (k > 0.43). Lower maternal depression, and higher social support reported by mother and father were associated with higher parent-child agreement. Maternal depression was indicated as the strongest predictor. Parental sense of competence, parental anxiety, the amount of parent-child interaction and the child's age and gender had no predictive value. Conclusions: Parent-child agreement can be expected to be higher on the level of anxiety criteria compared to specific anxiety diagnoses and diagnostic anxiety category. Psychological strains in the family-especially maternal depression and low social support-lower the parent-child agreement on anxiety symptoms. Child- and relation-related variables (age, gender, amount of time parent(s) and children interact) play no role in the prediction of low parent-child agreement.

  19. Advanced technologies and diagnostic spin-outs: an interview with Carl Borrebaeck.

    PubMed

    Borrebaeck, Carl

    2015-01-01

    Interview with Professor Carl Borrebaeck DSc by Claire Raison (Commissioning Editor) Professor Carl Borrebaeck DSc, is the Director of CREATE Health (Lund, Sweden), a translational cancer center, previous Vice President of Lund University and specializes in immunotechnology, diagnostics and treatments for cancer. He has had remarkable success in co-founding collaborative working groups and related spin-out companies based in Lund. Professor Borrebaeck also serves as a member of the editorial advisory board for Expert Review of Molecular Diagnostics. Here, Professor Borrebaeck talks to Expert Review of Molecular Diagnostics about his experience and what is next for cutting-edge technology in cancer diagnostics.

  20. Diagnostic radiography and adult acute myeloid leukaemia: an interview and medical chart review study

    PubMed Central

    Pogoda, J M; Nichols, P W; Ross, R K; Stram, D O; Thomas, D C; Preston-Martin, S

    2011-01-01

    Background: Aetiology of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is not well understood, perhaps because of its distinct subtypes. High-dose ionising radiation is a known risk factor, but less is known about risk from low-dose exposure such as from diagnostic radiography. Methods: Subjects were 412 matched case-control pairs. Ten-year subject histories of diagnostic radiography were based on interview and medical records. Results: There was no convincing association between AML risk and ionising radiation exposure from diagnostic imaging procedures, either for AML overall or for any AML subtype. Conclusion: The association between diagnostic radiography and AML risk remains uncertain. PMID:21522150

  1. International health electives: thematic results of student and professional interviews.

    PubMed

    Petrosoniak, Andrew; McCarthy, Anne; Varpio, Lara

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the complexities (including harms and benefits) of international health electives (IHEs) involving medical trainees. This exploration contributes to the ongoing debate about the goals and implications of IHEs for medical trainees. This qualitative study used anonymous, one-to-one, semi-structured interviews. All participants had previous international health experiences. Between September 2007 and March 2008, we interviewed a convenience sample of health care professionals (n=10) and medical trainees (n=10). Using a modified grounded theory methodology, we carried out cycles of data analysis in conjunction with data collection in an iterative and constant comparison process. The study's thematic structure was finalised when theme saturation was achieved. Participants described IHEs in both negative and positive terms. IHEs were described as unsustained short-term contributions that lacked clear educational objectives and failed to address local community needs. Ethical dilemmas were described as IHE challenges. Participants reflected that many IHEs included aspects of medical tourism and the majority of participants described the IHE in negative terms. However, a few participants acknowledged the benefits of the IHE. Specifically, it was seen as an introduction to a career in global health and as a potential foundation for more sustainable projects with positive host community impacts. Finally, despite similar understandings among participants, self-awareness of medical tourism was low. International health electives may include potential harms and benefits for both the trainee and the host community. Educational institutions should encourage and support structured IHEs for trainee participation. We recommend that faculties of medicine and global health educators establish pre-departure training courses for trainees and that IHE opportunities have sufficient structures in place to mitigate the negative effects of medical

  2. An interview with Manuel Salto-Tellez on diagnostic pathology: the future is morphomolecular.

    PubMed

    Salto-Tellez, Manuel; Raison, Claire

    2015-05-01

    Interview with Professor Manuel Salto-Tellez by Claire Raison, Commissioning Editor Professor Manuel Salto-Tellez of Queen's University, Belfast, Northern Ireland is an expert histopathologist and molecular diagnostician. Professor Salto-Tellez is a lead investigator at the Northern Ireland Molecular Pathology Laboratory and also serves as a member of the Editorial Advisory Board for Expert Review of Molecular Diagnostics. In this interview, he proposes directions for the future of molecular pathology and molecular diagnostics, integrating all aspects of pathology toward a common goal.

  3. Psychiatric diagnosis of African Americans: diagnostic divergence in clinician-structured and semistructured interviewing conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Neighbors, H. W.; Trierweiler, S. J.; Munday, C.; Thompson, E. E.; Jackson, J. S.; Binion, V. J.; Gomez, J.

    1999-01-01

    This study is a primary data collection that varied patient race and diagnosis and used two diagnostic interviewing conditions: one clinician-structured (phase one) and the other a semi-structured diagnostic instrument (phase two). Four basic research questions are addressed: What is the relationship between race and the hospital diagnosis? How is race related to diagnosis in both research interviewing conditions? Why does diagnostic concordance between the hospital diagnosis and the research diagnosis vary by research interviewing condition? Is diagnostic concordance between the hospital and research diagnosis influenced by patient race? A total of 291 patients completed an interview during phase one, while 665 patients completed an interview during phase two. Blacks were more likely to receive a hospital diagnosis of schizophrenia and less likely to be diagnosed with mood disorder. Patient race was similarly related to the research diagnoses produced in the clinician-structured research condition (phase one). Although less pronounced, a higher percentage of African Americans than whites received a diagnosis of schizophrenia using the semi-structured DSM-III-R Symptom Checklist (phase two). The black-white distribution for mood disorders showed that whites were more likely than blacks to be diagnosed with mood disorder. PMID:10641496

  4. New Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised Algorithms for Toddlers and Young Preschoolers from 12 to 47 Months of Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, So Hyun; Lord, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised (Rutter et al. in "Autism diagnostic interview-revised." Western Psychological Services, Los Angeles, 2003) diagnostic algorithms specific to toddlers and young preschoolers were created using 829 assessments of children aged from 12 to 47 months with ASD, nonspectrum disorders, and typical development. The…

  5. New Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised Algorithms for Toddlers and Young Preschoolers from 12 to 47 Months of Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, So Hyun; Lord, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised (Rutter et al. in "Autism diagnostic interview-revised." Western Psychological Services, Los Angeles, 2003) diagnostic algorithms specific to toddlers and young preschoolers were created using 829 assessments of children aged from 12 to 47 months with ASD, nonspectrum disorders, and typical development. The…

  6. Internal connections and conversations: the internalized other interview in bereavement work.

    PubMed

    Moules, Nancy J

    Much of the work of grief lies in the ways the bereaved learn to maintain connection to the deceased in their lives, while living alongside the physical absence of them. The theory of an Internalized Other Interview is that we carry within ourselves impressions, memories, beliefs, assessments, doctrines, and codes of those who have shaped our lives through relationship. This internalized community of commentators is active in our lives on a day-to-day basis, but when someone dies, their active voice in the dialogue is shifted to a perceived inactivity. However, I argue that, despite the physical absence of the other, the voice continues to resonate and interact in our formation of our worlds. How our loved ones live on inside us influences who we are in the world and in our bereavement. As a result of our research and clinical work, I have come to believe that the active interviewing of the deceased person as internalized in the bereaved can have powerful and healing effects. In this article, I share the results of the research related to this intervention, describe the history located in Internalized Other Interviewing, and offer a transcription of an Internalized Other Interview with a young man and his family who recently lost both his brother and father.

  7. Violence and Victimization in the Refugee Patient. I. Special Issues in Diagnostic and Therapeutic Interviewing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westermeyer, Joseph; And Others

    This paper is intended for teachers, faculty instructors, and clinical supervisors whose trainees are evaluating and treating refugee patients. It addresses special issues in the diagnostic and therapeutic interviewing of refugee patients who have experienced various types of physical violence and victimization. After a brief introduction, a…

  8. The Validity of the ADHD Section of the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrath, Ann M.; Handwerk, Michael L.; Armstrong, Kevin J.; Lucas, Cristopher P.; Friman, Patrick C.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the concurrent criterion validity of the attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) portion of the National Institute of Mental Health Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children-IV (NIMHDISC-IV). Fifty-seven adolescent participants were divided into three groups on the basis of whether participants met…

  9. Exploratory and Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frazier, Thomas W.; Youngstrom, Eric A.; Kubu, Cynthia S.; Sinclair, Leslie; Rezai, Ali

    2008-01-01

    The factor structure of the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised (ADI-R) algorithm items was examined using exploratory (EFA) and confirmatory factor analyses (CFA) factor methods. The ADI-R was completed for 1,170 youths and adults (ages 2-46). Results of EFAs indicated strong support for two-factor structure, with social communication and…

  10. Parent-Child Diagnostic Agreement on Anxiety Symptoms with a Structured Diagnostic Interview for Mental Disorders in Children

    PubMed Central

    Popp, Lukka; Neuschwander, Murielle; Mannstadt, Sandra; In-Albon, Tina; Schneider, Silvia

    2017-01-01

    Objective: In clinical structured diagnostic interviews, diagnoses based on parent and child reports have low to moderate agreement. The aims of the present study are (1) to examine diagnostic agreement on anxiety disorders between parents and children on the levels of current and lifetime diagnostic category and diagnoses focusing in particular on diagnostic criteria and (2) to identify parent- and child-related predictors for diagnostic agreement. Method: The sample consisted of 166 parent-child dyads interviewed with the Structured Diagnostic Interview for Mental Disorders in Children (Kinder-DIPS, Schneider et al., 2009). The children (51.8% girls) were between the ages of 7 and 18 years (M = 10.94; SD = 2.22). Results: Overall, parent-child agreement on the diagnostic category of anxiety disorder (k = 0.21; k = 0.22) and the specific anxiety diagnoses (base rate > 10%) of social phobia, specific phobia and separation anxiety disorder (k = 0.24–0.52; k = 0.19–0.43) and corresponding diagnostic criteria (k = 0.22–0.67; k = 0.24–0.41) were low to moderate with the highest agreement on separation anxiety disorder (k > 0.43). Lower maternal depression, and higher social support reported by mother and father were associated with higher parent-child agreement. Maternal depression was indicated as the strongest predictor. Parental sense of competence, parental anxiety, the amount of parent-child interaction and the child's age and gender had no predictive value. Conclusions: Parent-child agreement can be expected to be higher on the level of anxiety criteria compared to specific anxiety diagnoses and diagnostic anxiety category. Psychological strains in the family—especially maternal depression and low social support—lower the parent-child agreement on anxiety symptoms. Child- and relation-related variables (age, gender, amount of time parent(s) and children interact) play no role in the prediction of low parent-child agreement. PMID:28396644

  11. Assessing the diagnostic validity of a structured psychiatric interview in a first-admission hospital sample.

    PubMed

    Nordgaard, Julie; Revsbech, Rasmus; Sæbye, Ditte; Parnas, Josef

    2012-10-01

    The use of structured psychiatric interviews performed by non-clinicians is frequent for research purposes and is becoming increasingly common in clini-cal practice. The validity of such interviews has rarely been evaluated empirically. In this study of a sample of 100 diagnostically heterogeneous, first-admitted inpatients, the results of an assessment with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID), yielding a DSM-IV diagnosis and performed by a trained non-clinician, were compared with a consensus lifetime best diagnostic estimate (DSM-IV) by two experienced research clinicians, based on multiple sources of information, which included videotaped comprehensive semi-structured narrative interviews. The overall kappa agreement was 0.18. The sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of schizophrenia by SCID were 19% and 100%, respectively. It is concluded that structured interviews performed by non-clinicians are not recommendable for clinical work and should only be used in research with certain precautions. It is suggested that a revival of systematic theoretical and practical training in psychopathology is an obvious way forward in order to improve the validity and therapeutic utility of psychiatric diagnosis.

  12. Assessing the diagnostic validity of a structured psychiatric interview in a first-admission hospital sample

    PubMed Central

    NORDGAARD, JULIE; REVSBECH, RASMUS; SÆBYE, DITTE; PARNAS, JOSEF

    2012-01-01

    The use of structured psychiatric interviews performed by non-clinicians is frequent for research purposes and is becoming increasingly common in clini-cal practice. The validity of such interviews has rarely been evaluated empirically. In this study of a sample of 100 diagnostically heterogeneous, first-admitted inpatients, the results of an assessment with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID), yielding a DSM-IV diagnosis and performed by a trained non-clinician, were compared with a consensus lifetime best diagnostic estimate (DSM-IV) by two experienced research clinicians, based on multiple sources of information, which included videotaped comprehensive semi-structured narrative interviews. The overall kappa agreement was 0.18. The sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of schizophrenia by SCID were 19% and 100%, respectively. It is concluded that structured interviews performed by non-clinicians are not recommendable for clinical work and should only be used in research with certain precautions. It is suggested that a revival of systematic theoretical and practical training in psychopathology is an obvious way forward in order to improve the validity and therapeutic utility of psychiatric diagnosis. PMID:23024678

  13. Interview Practice U.S. Style: A Workshop for International Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behrens, Debra

    2009-01-01

    The author describes a practice interview workshop customized for international graduate students. The session covered cultural and communication dynamics in the interview process, practice exercises, and a question-and-answer period.

  14. Reliability and Validity of a Chinese version of the Diagnostic Interview for Borderlines-Revised (DIB-R)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lanlan; Yuan, Chenmei; Qiu, Jianying; Gunderson, John; Zhang, Min; Jiang, Kaida; Leung, Freedom; Zhong, Jie; Xiao, Zeping

    2014-01-01

    Background Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is the most studied of the Axis II disorders. One of the most widely used diagnostic instruments is the Diagnostic Interview for Borderline Patients - Revised (DIB-R). The aim of this study was to test the reliability and validity of DIB-R for use in the Chinese culture. Methods The reliability and validity of the DIB-R Chinese version were assessed in a sample of 236 outpatients with a probable BPD diagnosis. The Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Personality Disorders (SCID-II) was used as a standard. Test/re-test reliability was tested at 6 months later with 20 patients and inter-rater reliability was tested on 32 patients. Results The Chinese version of the DIB-R showed good internal global consistency (Cronbach’s alpha of 0.916), good test-retest reliability (Pearson correlation of 0.704), good inter-raters reliability (ICC of 0.892 and Kappa of 0.861). When compared to the DSM-IV diagnosis as measured by the SCID-II, the DIB-R showed relatively good sensitivity (0.768) and specificity (0.891) at the cutoff of 7; moderate diagnostic convergence (Kappa of 0.631), as well as good discriminating validity. Conclusion The Chinese version of the DIB-R has good psychometric properties, which renders it a valuable method for examining the presence, the severity and component phenotypes of BPD in Chinese samples. PMID:24302703

  15. Brief Report: Telephone Administration of the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised--Reliability and Suitability for Use in Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward-King, Jessica; Cohen, Ira L.; Penning, Henderika; Holden, Jeanette J. A.

    2010-01-01

    The Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised is one of the "gold standard" diagnostic tools for autism spectrum disorders. It is traditionally administered face-to-face. Cost and geographical concerns constrain the employment of the ADI-R for large-scale research projects. The telephone interview is a reasonable alternative, but has not yet been…

  16. Brief Report: Telephone Administration of the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised--Reliability and Suitability for Use in Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward-King, Jessica; Cohen, Ira L.; Penning, Henderika; Holden, Jeanette J. A.

    2010-01-01

    The Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised is one of the "gold standard" diagnostic tools for autism spectrum disorders. It is traditionally administered face-to-face. Cost and geographical concerns constrain the employment of the ADI-R for large-scale research projects. The telephone interview is a reasonable alternative, but has not yet been…

  17. Inter-rater reliability and acceptance of the structured diagnostic interview for regulatory problems in infancy.

    PubMed

    Popp, Lukka; Fuths, Sabrina; Seehagen, Sabine; Bolten, Margarete; Gross-Hemmi, Mirja; Wolke, Dieter; Schneider, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory problems such as excessive crying, sleeping-and feeding difficulties in infancy are some of the earliest precursors of later mental health difficulties emerging throughout the lifespan. In the present study, the inter-rater reliability and acceptance of a structured computer-assisted diagnostic interview for regulatory problems (Baby-DIPS) was investigated. Using a community sample, 132 mothers of infants aged between 3 and 18 months (mean age = 10 months) were interviewed with the Baby-DIPS regarding current and former (combined = lifetime) regulatory problems. Severity of the symptoms was also rated. The interviews were conducted face-to-face at a psychology department at the university (51.5 %), the mother's home (23.5 %), or via telephone (25.0 %). Inter-rater reliability was assessed with Cohen's kappa (k). A sample of 48 mothers and their interviewers filled in acceptance questionnaires after the interview. Good to excellent inter-rater reliability on the levels of current and lifetime regulatory problems (k = 0.77-0.98) were found. High inter-rater agreement was also found for ratings of severity (ICC = 0.86-0.97). Participants and interviewers' overall acceptance ratings of the computer-assisted interview were favourable. Acceptance scores did not differ between interviews that revealed one or more clinically relevant regulatory problem(s) compared to those that revealed no regulatory problems. The Baby-DIPS was found to be a reliable instrument for the assessment of current and lifetime problems in crying and sleeping behaviours. The computer-assisted version of the Baby-DIPS was well accepted by interviewers and mothers. The Baby-DIPS appears to be well-suited for research and clinical use to identify infant regulatory problems.

  18. Comparative Autonomic Responses to Diagnostic Interviewing between Individuals with GAD, MDD, SAD and Healthy Controls

    PubMed Central

    Diamond, Allison E.; Fisher, Aaron J.

    2017-01-01

    Dysregulation of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) has been well documented in individuals diagnosed with a range of psychological disorders, including generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and major depressive disorder (MDD). Moreover, these disorders both confer an increased risk of cardiovascular disease—which may relate to increased sympathetic and decreased parasympathetic tone. Extant research has indicated a reduction in autonomic flexibility in GAD, and while reduced flexibility has also been seen in MDD, the specific physiological alterations have been more difficult to categorize due to methodological limitations, including high co-morbidity rates with anxiety disorders. Prior studies have largely assessed autonomic functioning in stress paradigms or at the trait level, yet to date, no research has investigated the ANS during a diagnostic interview, a ubiquitous task employed in both research and clinical settings. In this study we sought to identify physiological differences in both branches of the ANS across diagnostic categories in the context of a diagnostic interview. Participants (n = 82) were administered a structured clinical interview, during which heart rate (HR), respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) and pre-ejection period (PEP) were recorded in participants carrying a diagnosis of GAD (n = 34), MDD (n = 22), Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD; n = 15) and healthy controls (n = 27). Person-specific linear regression models were employed to assess the level and slope for HR, RSA and PEP throughout the course of the interview. A multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) model was conducted to baseline differences in HR, RSA and PEP between diagnostic groups. Multiple regression models were then conducted to differences in slope of HR, RSA and PEP throughout the course of the interview amongst diagnostic groups, including both suppression and worry as moderators. Results indicated significant increases in RSA throughout the interview in MDD (p = 0

  19. Diagnosing major depression in the elderly: evidence for response bias in standardized diagnostic interviews?

    PubMed

    Knäuper, B; Wittchen, H U

    1994-01-01

    Recent epidemiological and family genetic studies in different countries using standardized diagnostic interviews for mental disorders have rather consistently demonstrated considerably lower current (e.g. ECA Study: 0.9%) and lifetime (1.4%) prevalence estimates of Major Depression in the elderly (older than 65 years of age) as compared to younger age groups (e.g. 30-44 years: 1 year, 3.9%; lifetime, 7.5%). Some investigators have questioned the validity of these data and suggested alternative interpretations. One possibility is that the complex standardized symptoms and clinical probe questions, and the required judgmental process inherent in diagnostic interviews exceed the cognitive capacity of older adults. This may result in systematic response bias. This paper examines the degree to which the lower prevalence estimates of depression in the elderly are biased due to specific characteristics of the assessment strategy. Analyses of epidemiologic data from the Munich Follow-up Study (MFS), based on the Diagnostic Interview Schedule, demonstrate that (1) older respondents report lifetime depressive symptoms with the same frequency as younger respondents. The additional probe questions designed to identify the degree to which symptoms were caused by factors other than psychological revealed that (2) the elderly more often attribute such symptoms to physical illnesses or conditions. This results in (3) the exclusion of the reported symptoms as a basis for diagnosing depression. A laboratory study demonstrated that "working memory capacity" was a good predictor of this response behavior, indicating that the complexity of the formalized questions exceeds the cognitive capacity of the elderly. Attributing symptoms to a physical illness or condition might be a heuristic strategy to simplify complex recall and judgment processes; the resulting answer is plausible but incorrect. We recommend that the symptom and probe questions of standardized diagnostic interviews be

  20. Qualitative Facets of Prospective Elementary Teachers' Diagnostic Proceeding: Collecting and Interpreting in One-on-One Interviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinhold, Simone

    2015-01-01

    The research presented in this paper focuses on the cognitive diagnostic strategies that prospective elementary mathematics teachers (PTs) use in their reflections of one-on-one diagnostic interviews with children in grade one. Thereby, it responds to the detected lack of knowledge regarding qualitative facets of diagnostic proceeding in interview…

  1. Inpatient diagnostic assessments: 2. Interrater reliability and outcomes of structured vs. unstructured interviews.

    PubMed

    Miller, P R

    2001-12-31

    A preceding study found that structured interviews (SCID-CV, Computer Assisted Diagnostic Interview [CADI]) were significantly more accurate than the unstructured Traditional Diagnostic Assessment (TDA) for making inpatient diagnoses, using Consensus Diagnosis as the standard. This study measured interrater reliability for diagnoses between the Emergency Room (ER) and the Inpatient Unit (IU), as achieved by TDA vs. CADI. It selected subjects from consecutive admissions to the ER who were transferred to the IU. Group 1 had 33 subjects evaluated with TDA, leading to interrater agreement=45.5% (15/33) and kappa=0.24 ('poor'). Group 2 had 39 subjects evaluated with CADI, leading to interrater agreement=79.5% (31/39) and kappa=0.75 ('excellent'). Group 3 had 33 subjects, again evaluated with TDA, leading to interrater agreement=54.5% (18/33) and kappa=0.43 ('fair'). The test-retest-test (TDA-CADI-TDA) format demonstrated that CADI had better interrater reliability than TDA. How diagnostic reliability might correlate with parameters like timing of treatment choices and length of stay are also measured and discussed.

  2. Assessment of physical etiologies for mood and anxiety disorders in structured diagnostic interviews.

    PubMed

    Patten, Scott B; Williams, Jeanne V A

    2007-06-01

    Structured diagnostic inter- views include items that evaluate physical etiologies for mood and anxiety disorders. The objective of this article was to assess the impact of such items. A mental health survey in Canada collected data from n = 36,984 household residents. The lifetime prevalence of mood and anxiety disorders was calculated with and without exclusions due to physical causes. Approximately 10% of subjects with a lifetime depressive disorder reported that all of their episodes were due to one or more physical cause. Many of the reported etiologies were implausible given the DSM-IV requirement that the disturbance be a "direct physiological consequence" of the physical cause. The results were similar for manic episodes and anxiety disorders. Structured diagnostic interviews assess physical etiologies in ways that are subject to inconsistency and inaccuracy. Physical etiology items may bias estimates by introducing etiological opinions into the assessment of disorder frequency.

  3. [Polish version of the ADI-R (Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised)].

    PubMed

    Chojnicka, Izabela; Płoski, Rafał

    2012-01-01

    Childhood autism belongs to pervasive developmental disorders and is characterised by qualitative abnormalities in reciprocal social interactions, communication, and by restricted, repetitive interests and behaviours. Until now there was no standardised tool for a diagnosis of autism in Poland. The paper presents the Polish version of the Autism Diagnostic Interview - Revised (ADI-R), which is the "gold standard" for the diagnosis of autism in Europe, United States and Australia. It describes the translation process and adaptation of the original version into Polish, as well as differences between the two versions. ADI-R is a complex, standardised, semi-structured investigator-based interview for parent or caregiver of person with autism, linked to ICD-10 and DSM-IV-TR criteria and appropriate for both adults and children, who have the minimum mental age of 24 months. Moreover ADI-R consists of, beside diagnostic algorithms, the current behaviour algorithms, which enable to assess and compare various levels of functioning during planning and implementation of treatment and therapy. ADI-R is also a very useful tool in the diagnosis for scientific purposes due to its standardisation.

  4. Convergent Validity of the Autism Spectrum Disorder-Diagnostic for Children (ASD-DC) and Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised (ADI-R)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matson, Johnny L.; Hess, Julie A.; Mahan, Sara; Fodstad, Jill C.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to further establish the validity of the Autism Spectrum Disorder-Diagnostic for Children (ASD-DC). The methodology consisted of testing the similarity of findings between the ASD-DC and the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised (ADI-R), which proved to be statistically significant for subscale content scores on social,…

  5. Longitudinal Changes in Scores on the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised (ADI-R) in Pre-School Children with Autism: Implications for Diagnostic Classification and Symptom Stability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soke, Gnakub Norbert; Philofsky, Amy; Diguiseppi, Carolyn; Lezotte, Dennis; Rogers, Sally; Hepburn, Susan

    2011-01-01

    We prospectively examined mean changes in Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised (ADI-R) Total and Domains scores and stability of the ADI-R diagnostic classification in 28 children with autism initially assessed at age 2-4 years and reassessed 2 years later. Mean Total, Social Interaction, and Communication scores decreased significantly from Time 1…

  6. Longitudinal Changes in Scores on the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised (ADI-R) in Pre-School Children with Autism: Implications for Diagnostic Classification and Symptom Stability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soke, Gnakub Norbert; Philofsky, Amy; Diguiseppi, Carolyn; Lezotte, Dennis; Rogers, Sally; Hepburn, Susan

    2011-01-01

    We prospectively examined mean changes in Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised (ADI-R) Total and Domains scores and stability of the ADI-R diagnostic classification in 28 children with autism initially assessed at age 2-4 years and reassessed 2 years later. Mean Total, Social Interaction, and Communication scores decreased significantly from Time 1…

  7. Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised and the Childhood Autism Rating Scale: Convergence and Discrepancy in Diagnosing Autism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saemundsen, Evald; Magnusson, Pall; Smari, Jakob; Sigurdaedottir, Solveig

    2003-01-01

    The agreement between the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised (ADI- R) and the Childhood Autism Rating Scale (CARS) was investigated in the diagnostic assessment of 54 children (ages 22-114 months) referred for possible autism. The observed agreement between the two systems was 66.7%. The CARS identified more cases of autism than the ADI-R.…

  8. Multisite Study of New Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised (ADI-R) Algorithms for Toddlers and Young Preschoolers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, So Hyun; Thurm, Audrey; Shumway, Stacy; Lord, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Using two independent datasets provided by National Institute of Health funded consortia, the Collaborative Programs for Excellence in Autism and Studies to Advance Autism Research and Treatment (n = 641) and the National Institute of Mental Health (n = 167), diagnostic validity and factor structure of the new Autism Diagnostic Interview (ADI-R)…

  9. Multisite Study of New Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised (ADI-R) Algorithms for Toddlers and Young Preschoolers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, So Hyun; Thurm, Audrey; Shumway, Stacy; Lord, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Using two independent datasets provided by National Institute of Health funded consortia, the Collaborative Programs for Excellence in Autism and Studies to Advance Autism Research and Treatment (n = 641) and the National Institute of Mental Health (n = 167), diagnostic validity and factor structure of the new Autism Diagnostic Interview (ADI-R)…

  10. The Use of the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised with a Latino Population of Adolescents and Adults with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magana, Sandy; Smith, Leann E.

    2013-01-01

    Research shows that Latinos are less likely to be diagnosed with autism than their non-Latino counterparts. One factor that may contribute to these differences is that autism diagnostic instruments have not been adapted for the Latino population. The present study compared scores from the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised for two groups: 48…

  11. Strong genetic correlation between interview-assessed internalizing disorders and a brief self-report symptom scale.

    PubMed

    Gjerde, Line C; Røysamb, Espen; Czajkowski, Nikolai; Reichborn-Kjennerud, Ted; Orstavik, Ragnhild E; Kendler, Kenneth S; Tambs, Kristian

    2011-02-01

    Self-report scales for symptoms of anxiety and depression are frequently used for screening and research purposes. A moderate phenotypic association between disorders measured by diagnostic interviews and symptoms of anxiety and depression measured by self-report scales has been shown, but little is known about the overlap in these phenotypes' genetic and environmental variance. In the present study, we used twin modeling to identify common genetic and environmental liabilities underlying the phenotypic association between the self-report Symptom Checklist-5 (SCL-5) and lifetime internalizing disorders derived from the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI). The sample consisted of 7,992 young adult twins from the Norwegian Institute of Public Health Twin Panel (NIPHT), who all responded to a questionnaire. A subset of 2,793 individuals later underwent structured interviews. The best fitting model showed a strong genetic correlation of 0.82 (95% confidence interval; 0.61-1.0) between current self-report symptoms of anxiety and depression, and lifetime internalizing disorders, which suggests an almost complete overlap in genetic liability. The correlation between environmental factors was much lower: 0.16 (0.00-0.34, 95% CI). This implies that brief self-report scales capture genetic variance that is highly overlapping with the genetic variance common to internalizing disorder diagnoses. It thus follows that SCL-5 and similar instruments may be used as screening instruments for genetic risk factors that influence liability to internalizing disorders. In addition, existing data on self-report symptoms of anxiety and depression can be used with increased confidence to specify models including effects from genes coding for internalizing disorders.

  12. Is web interviewing a good alternative to telephone interviewing? Findings from the International Tobacco Control (ITC) Netherlands survey.

    PubMed

    Nagelhout, Gera E; Willemsen, Marc C; Thompson, Mary E; Fong, Geoffrey T; van den Putte, Bas; de Vries, Hein

    2010-06-18

    Web interviewing is becoming increasingly popular worldwide, because it has several advantages over telephone interviewing such as lower costs and shorter fieldwork periods. However, there are also concerns about data quality of web surveys. The aim of this study was to compare the International Tobacco Control (ITC) Netherlands web and telephone samples on demographic and smoking related variables to assess differences in data quality. Wave 1 of the ITC Netherlands Survey was completed by 1,668 web respondents and 404 telephone respondents of 18 years and older. The two surveys were conducted in parallel among adults who reported smoking at least monthly and had smoked at least 100 cigarettes over their lifetime. Both the web and telephone survey had a cooperation rate of 78%. Web respondents with a fixed line telephone were significantly more often married, had a lower educational level, and were older than web respondents without a fixed line telephone. Telephone respondents with internet access were significantly more often married, had a higher educational level, and were younger than telephone respondents without internet. Web respondents were significantly less often married and lower educated than the Dutch population of smokers. Telephone respondents were significantly less often married and higher educated than the Dutch population of smokers. Web respondents used the "don't know" options more often than telephone respondents. Telephone respondents were somewhat more negative about smoking, had less intention to quit smoking, and had more self efficacy for quitting. The known association between educational level and self efficacy was present only in the web survey. Differences between the web and telephone sample were present, but the differences were small and not consistently favourable for either web or telephone interviewing. Our study findings suggested sometimes a better data quality in the web than in the telephone survey. Therefore, web

  13. Preschoolers’ Observed Temperament and Psychiatric Disorders Assessed with a Parent Diagnostic Interview

    PubMed Central

    Dougherty, Lea R.; Bufferd, Sara J.; Carlson, Gabrielle A.; Dyson, Margaret; Olino, Thomas M.; Durbin, C. Emily; Klein, Daniel N.

    2011-01-01

    Evidence supports the role of temperament in the origins of psychiatric disorders. However, there are few data on associations between temperament and psychiatric disorders in early childhood. A community sample of 541 three-year old preschoolers participated in a laboratory temperament assessment, and caregivers were administered a structured diagnostic interview on preschool psychopathology. In bivariate analyses, temperamental dysphoria and low exuberance were associated with depression; fear, low exuberance, and low sociability were associated with anxiety disorders; and disinhibition and dysphoria were associated with oppositional defiant disorder. Although there were no bivariate associations between temperament and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, disinhibition emerged as a unique predictor in multivariate analyses. Findings indicate that the pattern of relations between temperament and psychopathology in older youth and adults is evident as early as age 3. PMID:21391025

  14. Brief report: telephone administration of the autism diagnostic interview--revised: reliability and suitability for use in research.

    PubMed

    Ward-King, Jessica; Cohen, Ira L; Penning, Henderika; Holden, Jeanette J A

    2010-10-01

    The Autism Diagnostic Interview--revised is one of the "gold standard" diagnostic tools for autism spectrum disorders. It is traditionally administered face-to-face. Cost and geographical concerns constrain the employment of the ADI-R for large-scale research projects. The telephone interview is a reasonable alternative, but has not yet been examined for reliability with face-to-face administration. In this study, participants were interviewed both face-to-face and on the telephone using the complete ADI-R interview. Results indicate that there was no significant difference between the algorithm scores or the diagnoses arrived at for face-to-face and telephone administrations. Reliability statistics across the two modalities were very good and indicate that telephone interviews using the ADI-R are a viable option for researchers.

  15. Utility of the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children for Assessing Tourette Syndrome in Children

    PubMed Central

    Mink, Jonathan W.; Bitsko, Rebecca H.; Holbrook, Joseph R.; Parker-Athill, E. Carla; Hanks, Camille; Storch, Eric A.; Augustine, Erika F.; Adams, Heather R.; Vierhile, Amy E.; Thatcher, Alyssa R.; Murphy, Tanya K.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children IV (DISC) has been used extensively in research and screening. Despite wide use, little information exists on the validity of the DISC for diagnosing tic disorders. Methods: Participants were 181 youth with expert clinician-diagnosed Tourette syndrome (TS). Results: Using expert clinician-diagnosed TS as the gold standard, the sensitivity of the DISC-Y (youth, 0.27) and DISC-P (parent, 0.44) was poor. The DISC-Y identified 29.7% of youth with diagnosed TS whereas the DISC-P identified 47.4% of cases. Only 54% of cases of TS were detected by either the DISC-Y or -P. Diagnostic agreement between the DISC and expert clinician diagnosis was poor. The DISC-Y/P results did not differ as a function of tic severity. Conclusions: Despite utility for assessing child psychiatric disorders, the sensitivity of the DISC for detecting TS appears poor. This study suggests that DISC has low agreement with expert clinician diagnosis of TS. Findings highlight the need for modification of the DISC and/or the identification and development of more sensitive measures for TS screening. PMID:24813854

  16. The Added Value of the Combined Use of the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised and the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule: Diagnostic Validity in a Clinical Swedish Sample of Toddlers and Young Preschoolers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zander, Eric; Sturm, Harald; Bölte, Sven

    2015-01-01

    The diagnostic validity of the new research algorithms of the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised and the revised algorithms of the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule was examined in a clinical sample of children aged 18-47 months. Validity was determined for each instrument separately and their combination against a clinical consensus…

  17. The Added Value of the Combined Use of the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised and the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule: Diagnostic Validity in a Clinical Swedish Sample of Toddlers and Young Preschoolers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zander, Eric; Sturm, Harald; Bölte, Sven

    2015-01-01

    The diagnostic validity of the new research algorithms of the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised and the revised algorithms of the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule was examined in a clinical sample of children aged 18-47 months. Validity was determined for each instrument separately and their combination against a clinical consensus…

  18. Interview and Assessment: Practice of International Student Services in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isomine, Sei

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore what types of student services are useful in helping international students make a smooth transition to American college experience. Four members from an international student office at a particular four-year university in the U.S. were interviewed to discuss variables in student support services. The…

  19. Radiographers' perceptions of their professional rights in diagnostic radiography: a qualitative interview study.

    PubMed

    Matilainen, Kati; Ahonen, Sanna-Mari; Kankkunen, Päivi; Kangasniemi, Mari

    2017-03-01

    Considering the ethics of each profession is important as inter-professional collaboration increases. Professional ethics creates a basis for radiographers' work, as it includes values and principles, together with rights and duties that guide and support professionals. However, little is known about radiographers' rights when it comes to professional ethics. The aim of this study was to describe radiographers' perceptions and experiences of their professional rights. The ultimate aim was to increase the understanding of professional ethics in this context and support radiographers' ethical pondering in diagnostic radiography. A qualitative method was used. Semistructured group interviews with 15 radiographers were conducted in spring 2013 at two publicly provided diagnostic imaging departments in Finland. Data were analysed by inductive content analysis. All the participants were women, and they had worked as radiographers for an average of 18 years. Based on our analysis, radiographers' professional rights consisted of rights related to their expertise in radiography and the rights related to working conditions that ensured their wellbeing. Expertise-based rights included rights to plan, conduct and assess radiological care with patient advocacy. Radiographers have the right to contribute to a culture of safe radiation in their organisation and to use their professional knowledge to achieve their main target, which is the safe imaging of patients. Radiographers also have right to work in conditions that support their well-being, including the legal rights stated in their employment contract, as well as their rights concerning resources at work. Radiographers' professional rights are an elementary and multidimensional part of their clinical practice. In future, more theoretical and empirical research is needed to deepen the understanding of their rights in the clinical practice and support radiographers on issues related to this aspect of their work. © 2016

  20. A motivational interview promotes retention of blood donors with high internal motivation.

    PubMed

    France, Christopher R; France, Janis L; Carlson, Bruce W; Himawan, Lina K; Kessler, Debra A; Rebosa, Mark; Shaz, Beth H; Madden, Katrala; Carey, Patricia M; Slepian, P Maxwell; Ankawi, Brett; Livitz, Irina E; Fox, Kristen R

    2017-10-01

    Based on the hypothesis that self-determined motivation is associated with an increased likelihood of future behavior, the present study examined the ability of a motivational interview to promote internal motivation for giving blood and future donation attempts. A sample of 484 recent whole-blood and double red blood cell donors (62.4% female; age = 30.2 ± 11.8 years) were randomly assigned to either a telephone-delivered motivational interview or a control call approximately 6 weeks after donating. Several weeks before the call and again 1 week after the call, participants completed the Blood Donor Identity Survey, a multidimensional measure of donor motivation, to derive indices of amotivation, external motivation, and internal motivation to give blood. Repeat donation attempts were tracked using blood center records. Relative to controls, participants in the motivational interview group showed a shift toward more self-determined motivation, as indicated by significant decreases in amotivation (p = 0.01) and significant increases in external (p = 0.009) and internal (p = 0.002) motivation. Furthermore, those with initially high levels of autonomous motivation were more likely to make a donation attempt in the subsequent year if they completed the motivational interview (71.1%) versus the control call (55.1%). Motivational interviewing is a potentially useful strategy to enhance retention of existing blood donors, particularly among those who express a greater sense of internal motivation for giving. © 2017 AABB.

  1. Development and evaluation of the Women's Sexual Interest Diagnostic Interview (WSID): a structured interview to diagnose hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) in standardized patients.

    PubMed

    DeRogatis, Leonard R; Allgood, Adam; Rosen, Raymond C; Leiblum, Sandra; Zipfel, Lisa; Guo, Chun-Yuan

    2008-12-01

    Female sexual dysfunction (FSD) is a common disorder in postmenopausal women. Currently, there is no clear "gold standard" for the diagnosis of FSD. The aim of this study was to evaluate the interrater reliability of the Women's Sexual Interest Diagnostic Interview (WSID), a new structured clinical interview designed to diagnose hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD). The reliability of additional interview questions focused on the diagnosis of other types of FSD was also evaluated. The main outcome measure was the level of agreement in the diagnosis of FSD among clinical experts, between clinical experts and study coordinators, and between clinical experts and patients' self-reported interactive voice response system (IVRS) version of the WSID. Two versions of WSID were developed based on current diagnostic criteria: a clinician-administered version using a structured interview guide, and a patient self-report version using an IVRS. Three sexual medicine experts developed 20 clinical scenarios portraying cases and noncases of HSDD and other FSD diagnostic subtypes. Ten actresses with experience in standardized patient interviewing rehearsed these scenarios and performed the scripted patient roles in a standardized clinical interview with clinical experts (not the author of the script) and study coordinators, on a one-on-one basis, using the WSID interview format. In addition, all actresses completed the IVRS version of the WSID. Interviews were videotaped and viewed by the expert panel. In each instance, the diagnosis that the interview was scripted to portray was considered as the "gold standard." Kappa (kappa) coefficients were utilized to assess the level of agreement among experts, between study coordinators and the "gold standard", and between the IVRS version of the WSID and the "gold standard". All experts agreed with the gold standard diagnosis provided by the author of the script (kappa=1.0). Similarly, there was perfect agreement among the experts on

  2. Variability among Research Diagnostic Interview Instruments in the Application of "DSM-IV-TR" Criteria for Pediatric Bipolar Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galanter, Cathryn A.; Hundt, Stephanie R.; Goyal, Parag; Le, Jenna; Fisher, Prudence W.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The "DSM-IV-TR "criteria for a manic episode and bipolar disorder (BD) were developed for adults but are used for children. The manner in which clinicians and researchers interpret these criteria may have contributed to the increase in BD diagnoses given to youth. Research interviews are designed to improve diagnostic reliability and…

  3. Criteria and Concurrent Validity of DIVA 2.0: A Semi-Structured Diagnostic Interview for Adult ADHD.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Quiroga, Josep Antoni; Nasillo, Viviana; Richarte, Vanesa; Corrales, Montserrat; Palma, Felipe; Ibáñez, Pol; Michelsen, Marieke; Van de Glind, Geurt; Casas, Miquel; Kooij, J J Sandra

    2016-04-28

    The aim of this study was to assess for the first time the criterion validity of the semi-structured Diagnostic Interview for ADHD in adults (DIVA 2.0), and its concurrent validity in comparison with the Conners' Adult ADHD Diagnostic Interview for DSM-IV (CAADID) and other ADHD severity scales, following the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed.; DSM-IV) criteria. A transversal study was performed on 40 out-patients with ADHD to check the criteria and concurrent validity of the DIVA 2.0 compared with the CAADID. The DIVA 2.0 interview showed a diagnostic accuracy of 100% when compared with the diagnoses obtained with the CAADID interview. The concurrent validity demonstrated good correlations with three self-reported rating scales: the Wender Utah Rating Scale (WURS; r = .544, p < .0001), the ADHD-Rating Scale (r = .720, p < .0001), and Sheehan's Dysfunction Inventory (r = .674, p < .0001). The DIVA 2.0 is a reliable tool for assessing and diagnosing Adult ADHD and is the only one that offers free online access for clinical and research purposes. © The Author(s) 2016.

  4. Variability among Research Diagnostic Interview Instruments in the Application of "DSM-IV-TR" Criteria for Pediatric Bipolar Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galanter, Cathryn A.; Hundt, Stephanie R.; Goyal, Parag; Le, Jenna; Fisher, Prudence W.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The "DSM-IV-TR "criteria for a manic episode and bipolar disorder (BD) were developed for adults but are used for children. The manner in which clinicians and researchers interpret these criteria may have contributed to the increase in BD diagnoses given to youth. Research interviews are designed to improve diagnostic reliability and…

  5. Assessing Attention and Disruptive Behavior Symptoms in Preschool-Age Children: The Utility of the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children

    PubMed Central

    Rolon-Arroyo, Benjamin; Arnold, David H.; Harvey, Elizabeth A.; Marshall, Nastassja

    2016-01-01

    Data are presented from two samples of preschool children to evaluate the reliability, concurrent validity, and predictive validity of the ADHD, ODD, and CD sections of the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children, Fourth Edition (DISC-IV). Information was obtained from a community sample of 128 children (Mage = 53.16 months; 63 girls) and from a sample of 72 externalizing children (Mage = 45.23 months; 31 girls) plus 25 control children (Mage = 44.51 months; 8 girls). In both studies, the DISC-IV was administered to parents along with parent and teacher behavior rating scales, and teacher rating scales were obtained again later to evaluate the predictive validity of the DISC-IV (after approximately 6 months in Study 1, and 3 years in Study 2). The ADHD and ODD sections exhibited acceptable internal consistency in both studies, and showed concurrent validity with parent behavior rating scales. In both studies, the ADHD section was also concurrent with teacher reports. In Study 2, the ADHD, ODD, and CD sections distinguished externalizing children from controls. In both studies, the ADHD section predicted future teacher ratings beyond initial teacher ratings, and beyond initial parent rating scales; the ODD section similarly predicted later teacher ratings in Study 1. Findings provide strong support for the utility of the ADHD section for preschool children and moderate support for the ODD and CD sections. PMID:27909389

  6. Towards a Standard Psychometric Diagnostic Interview for Subjects at Ultra High Risk of Psychosis: CAARMS versus SIPS.

    PubMed

    Fusar-Poli, P; Cappucciati, M; Rutigliano, G; Lee, T Y; Beverly, Q; Bonoldi, I; Lelli, J; Kaar, S J; Gago, E; Rocchetti, M; Patel, R; Bhavsar, V; Tognin, S; Badger, S; Calem, M; Lim, K; Kwon, J S; Perez, J; McGuire, P

    2016-01-01

    Background. Several psychometric instruments are available for the diagnostic interview of subjects at ultra high risk (UHR) of psychosis. Their diagnostic comparability is unknown. Methods. All referrals to the OASIS (London) or CAMEO (Cambridgeshire) UHR services from May 13 to Dec 14 were interviewed for a UHR state using both the CAARMS 12/2006 and the SIPS 5.0. Percent overall agreement, kappa, the McNemar-Bowker χ (2) test, equipercentile methods, and residual analyses were used to investigate diagnostic outcomes and symptoms severity or frequency. A conversion algorithm (CONVERT) was validated in an independent UHR sample from the Seoul Youth Clinic (Seoul). Results. There was overall substantial CAARMS-versus-SIPS agreement in the identification of UHR subjects (n = 212, percent overall agreement = 86%; kappa = 0.781, 95% CI from 0.684 to 0.878; McNemar-Bowker test = 0.069), with the exception of the brief limited intermittent psychotic symptoms (BLIPS) subgroup. Equipercentile-linking table linked symptoms severity and frequency across the CAARMS and SIPS. The conversion algorithm was validated in 93 UHR subjects, showing excellent diagnostic accuracy (CAARMS to SIPS: ROC area 0.929; SIPS to CAARMS: ROC area 0.903). Conclusions. This study provides initial comparability data between CAARMS and SIPS and will inform ongoing multicentre studies and clinical guidelines for the UHR psychometric diagnostic interview.

  7. Identifying features of 'pathological demand avoidance' using the Diagnostic Interview for Social and Communication Disorders (DISCO).

    PubMed

    O'Nions, Elizabeth; Gould, Judith; Christie, Phil; Gillberg, Christopher; Viding, Essi; Happé, Francesca

    2016-04-01

    The term 'pathological demand avoidance' (PDA) was coined by Elizabeth Newson to describe children within the autism spectrum who exhibit obsessive resistance to everyday demands and requests (Newson et al., Arch Dis Child 88:595-600, 2003). Clinical accounts describe avoidance strategies including apparently strategic use of distraction or socially shocking behaviour, and obsessive need for control, reflected in domineering behaviour to peers and adults. Educational and management approaches effective for PDA reportedly differ from those for 'typical' autism spectrum disorders (ASD), and include novelty, humour and flexibility. Identification of PDA in individuals with ASD may have important implications for management (Eaton and Banting, J Learn Disabil Offending Behav 3:150-157, 2012). Despite increasing interest, no clinician-rated instrument for PDA has been developed. Here, items relevant to PDA were identified from the Diagnostic Interview for Social and Communication Disorder (DISCO) (Wing et al., J Child Psychol Psychiatry 43:307-325, 2002). The most PDA-specific subset of relevant DISCO items was selected, based on low endorsement in general across a sample of 153 individuals assessed for possible ASD using the DISCO. Having selected 11 DISCO PDA items for the measure, a subset of individuals with a high number of these features was identified (N = 27). Consistent with Newson's descriptions, this high scoring group was characterised by lack of co-operation, use of apparently manipulative behaviour, socially shocking behaviour, difficulties with other people, anxiety and sudden behavioural changes from loving to aggression. All but one case met criteria for an ASD. This study brings the field a step closer to a clinician-rated measure of PDA features and highlights the need for further elucidation of the PDA phenotype.

  8. The Alcohol Use Disorder and Associated Disabilities Interview Schedule-IV (AUDADIS-IV): Reliability of New Psychiatric Diagnostic Modules and Risk Factors in a General Population Sample

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, W. June; Goldstein, Risë B.; Chou, S. Patricia; Smith, Sharon M.; Saha, Tulshi D.; Pickering, Roger P.; Dawson, Deborah A.; Huang, Boji; Stinson, Frederick S.; Grant, Bridget F.

    2008-01-01

    This study presents test-retest reliability statistics and information on internal consistency for new diagnostic modules and risk factor of alcohol, drug, and psychiatric disorders the Alcohol Use Disorder and Associated Disabilities Interview Schedule-IV (AUDADIS-IV). Test-retest statistics were derived from a random sample of 1,899 adults selected from 34,653 respondents who participated in the 2004–2005 Wave 2 National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC). Internal consistency of continuous scales was assessed using the entire Wave 2 NESARC. Both test and retest interviews were conducted face-to-face. Test-retest and internal consistency results for diagnoses and symptom scales associated with posttraumatic stress disorder, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and borderline, narcissistic, and schizotypal personality disorders were predominantly good (kappa > 0.63; ICC > 0.69; alpha > 0.75) and reliability for risk factor measures fell within the good to excellent range (intraclass correlations = 0.50–0.94; alpha = 0.64–0.90). The high degree of reliability found in this study suggests that new AUDADIS-IV diagnostic measures can be useful tools in research settings. The availability of highly reliable measures of risk factors of alcohol, drug, and psychiatric disorders will contribute to the validity of conclusions drawn from future research in the domains of substance use disorder and psychiatric epidemiology. PMID:17706375

  9. The International Space Science Institute (ISSI) -- An Interview with Roger M. Bonnet,

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heck, André

    2006-12-01

    In this interview, Roger M. Bonnet1 recalls the history and describes the activities of the "International Space Science Institute" (ISSI2) founded in 1995 and devoted to achieving a deeper understanding from space research missions, ground-based observations and laboratory experiments.

  10. Voices in International School Psychology: Interviews in Honor of Calvin D. Catterall.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culbertson, Frances M.

    Following a brief memorial message and a dedicatory tribute to Calvin D. Catterall, a leader in the field of school psychology, this volume provides a description of the origins of the International School Psychology Association and interviews with five school psychologists: Bram Norwich, University of London, England; Tony Cline, London, England;…

  11. Voices in International School Psychology: Interviews in Honor of Calvin D. Catterall.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culbertson, Frances M.

    Following a brief memorial message and a dedicatory tribute to Calvin D. Catterall, a leader in the field of school psychology, this volume provides a description of the origins of the International School Psychology Association and interviews with five school psychologists: Bram Norwich, University of London, England; Tony Cline, London, England;…

  12. Interrelationship between Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule-Generic (ADOS-G), Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised (ADI-R), and the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV-TR) Classification in Children and Adolescents with Mental Retardation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Bildt, Annelies; Sytema, Sjoerd; Ketelaars, Cees; Kraijer, Dirk; Mulder, Erik; Volkmar, Fred; Minderaa, Ruud

    2004-01-01

    The interrelationship between the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised (ADI-R), Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule-Generic (ADOS-G) and clinical classification was studied in 184 children and adolescents with Mental Retardation (MR). The agreement between the ADI-R and ADOS-G was fair, with a substantial difference between younger and older…

  13. PREFACE: Second International Conference on Optical and Laser Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arcoumanis, C.; Grattan, K. T. V.

    2006-08-01

    The area of optical and laser diagnostics continues to expand and develop, and is now an essential part of many fields in engineering. Indeed it is one of the most interdisciplinary of the topics of today's research, impacting upon areas from fundamental physics to IT and encompassing a wide number of specific fields in engineering today. The proceedings of this, the second International Conference on Optical and Laser Diagnostics (ICOLAD 2005), follows upon the very successful first conference held in 2002, and reflects in its content many of the developments in this area since that time. The aim of a Conference which is an international forum for new ideas and developments in this exciting branch of optical engineering continues, building upon the foundation of research in optical diagnostics and optical sensing for a number of industrial and biomedical application areas at the City University, London. The Conference was structured into a number of sessions, held over three days in London, with the contributed talks led by invited papers from many internationally known and respected experts in their field from the UK, mainland Europe, the United States and Japan. The material covered includes such major themes as laser diagnostics, reciprocating engine-related applications and flow velocity measurement, extending to encompass, for example, biomedical and structural monitoring using advanced optical techniques. The papers draw their authority from the reputations of the authors and the groups and companies internationally that they represent and this volume brings together a valuable cross-section of such world-leading research. The local Organizing Committee would like to acknowledge and thank the industrial sponsors of the Conference and the members of the local and the International Steering Committee for their contribution to the success of this Conference. In particular thanks are due to Ms Claire Pantlin and the Institute of Physics for their work to make

  14. Effects of Child Characteristics on the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised: Implications for Use of Scores as a Measure of ASD Severity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hus, Vanessa; Lord, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    The Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised (ADI-R) is commonly used to inform diagnoses of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Considering the time dedicated to using the ADI-R, it is of interest to expand the ways in which information obtained from this interview is used. The current study examines how algorithm totals reflecting past (ADI-Diagnostic)…

  15. Effects of Child Characteristics on the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised: Implications for Use of Scores as a Measure of ASD Severity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hus, Vanessa; Lord, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    The Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised (ADI-R) is commonly used to inform diagnoses of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Considering the time dedicated to using the ADI-R, it is of interest to expand the ways in which information obtained from this interview is used. The current study examines how algorithm totals reflecting past (ADI-Diagnostic)…

  16. Psychometric Properties of a Structured Diagnostic Interview for DSM-5 Anxiety, Mood, and Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorders.

    PubMed

    Tolin, David F; Gilliam, Christina; Wootton, Bethany M; Bowe, William; Bragdon, Laura B; Davis, Elizabeth; Hannan, Scott E; Steinman, Shari A; Worden, Blaise; Hallion, Lauren S

    2016-03-17

    Three hundred sixty-two adult patients were administered the Diagnostic Interview for Anxiety, Mood, and OCD and Related Neuropsychiatric Disorders (DIAMOND). Of these, 121 provided interrater reliability data, and 115 provided test-retest reliability data. Participants also completed a battery of self-report measures that assess symptoms of anxiety, mood, and obsessive-compulsive and related disorders. Interrater reliability of DIAMOND anxiety, mood, and obsessive-compulsive and related diagnoses ranged from very good to excellent. Test-retest reliability of DIAMOND diagnoses ranged from good to excellent. Convergent validity was established by significant between-group comparisons on applicable self-report measures for nearly all diagnoses. The results of the present study indicate that the DIAMOND is a promising semistructured diagnostic interview for DSM-5 disorders. © The Author(s) 2016.

  17. Prevalence of depression in cancer patients: a meta-analysis of diagnostic interviews and self-report instruments

    PubMed Central

    Krebber, A M H; Buffart, L M; Kleijn, G; Riepma, I C; de Bree, R; Leemans, C R; Becker, A; Brug, J; van Straten, A; Cuijpers, P; Verdonck-de Leeuw, I M

    2014-01-01

    Objective We aimed to investigate the prevalence of depression in cancer patients assessed by diagnostic interviews and self-report instruments, and to study differences in prevalence between type of instrument, type of cancer and treatment phase. Methods A literature search was conducted in four databases to select studies on the prevalence of depression among adult cancer patients during or after treatment. A total of 211 studies met the inclusion criteria. Pooled mean prevalence of depression was calculated using Comprehensive Meta-Analysis. Results Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale—depression subscale (HADS-D) ≥ 8, HADS-D ≥11, Center for Epidemiologic Studies ≥ 16, and (semi-)structured diagnostic interviews were used to define depression in 66, 53, 35 and 49 studies, respectively. Respective mean prevalence of depression was 17% (95% CI = 16–19%), 8% (95% CI = 7–9%), 24% (95% CI = 21–26%), and 13% (95% CI = 11–15%) (p < 0.001). Prevalence of depression ranged from 3% in patients with lung cancer to 31% in patients with cancer of the digestive tract, on the basis of diagnostic interviews. Prevalence of depression was highest during treatment 14% (95% CI = 11–17%), measured by diagnostic interviews, and 27% (95% CI = 25–30%), measured by self-report instruments. In the first year after diagnosis, prevalence of depression measured with diagnostic interviews and self-report instruments were 9% (95% CI = 7–11%) and 21% (95% CI = 19–24%), respectively, and they were 8% (95% CI = 5–12%) and 15% (95% CI = 13–17%) ≥ 1 year after diagnosis. Conclusions Pooled mean prevalence of depression in cancer patients ranged from 8% to 24% and differed by the type of instrument, type of cancer and treatment phase. Future prospective studies should disentangle whether differences in prevalence of depression are caused by differences in the type of instrument, type of cancer or treatment

  18. PREFACE: Third International Conference on Optical and Laser Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arcoumanis, C.; Grattan, K. T. V.

    2007-09-01

    The International Conference on Optical and Laser Diagnostics (ICOLAD 2007), held at City University in May 2007, was the third meeting in this well established series, following upon the first in 2002 and the second in 2005. During that time the area of optical and laser diagnostics has continued to develop and to expand with both the changes seen in the technology and the availability of new optical components and laser systems. The field remains one of the most interdisciplinary of the topics of today's research, impacting upon areas from fundamental physics to IT and encompassing a number of different areas in engineering today. These proceedings are a record of current practice in this area from a Conference which remains an international forum for new ideas and developments in this exciting branch of optical engineering. It builds upon the foundation of research in the broad field of optical diagnostics in a number of industrial and biomedical application areas at the City University, London. The Conference was structured into a number of sessions reflecting topical developments in engine research, optical sensing and measurement and biomedical engineering held over three days in London, with the contributed talks led by invited papers from many internationally known and respected experts in their field from mainland Europe, the United States and Japan and the UK. The material covered encompasses such major themes as laser diagnostics, reciprocating engine-related applications and flow velocity measurement, extending to include biomedical and structural monitoring using advanced optical techniques. The papers at this Conference continue to draw their authority from the reputations of the authors and the groups and companies internationally that they represent. This volume brings together a valuable cross-section of world-leading research at the time. The local Organizing Committee would like to acknowledge and thank the industrial sponsors of the Conference

  19. The Interview for the Diagnosis of Eating Disorders--IV: Application to DSM-IV Diagnostic Criteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kutlesic, Vesna; Williamson, Donald A.; Gleaves, David H.; Barbin, Jane M.; Murphy-Eberenz, Kathleen P.

    1998-01-01

    Describes psychometric development of the fourth revision of the Interview for Diagnosis of Eating Disorders (IDED-IV). IDED-IV internal consistency and item-total correlations were assessed. IDED-IV yields sufficiently reliable and valid data for determining diagnoses in research studies and clinics specializing in the treatment of eating…

  20. The Diagnostic Interview of Children and Adolescents for Parents of Preschool and Young Children: psychometric properties in the general population.

    PubMed

    Ezpeleta, Lourdes; de la Osa, Núria; Granero, Roser; Domènech, Josep Maria; Reich, Wendy

    2011-11-30

    There is a need for reliable and well-validated diagnostic measures for studying psychopathology in preschool and young children. The goal is to study the psychometric properties of the Diagnostic Interview for Children and Adolescents for Parents of Preschool and Young Children (DICA-PPYC) in the general population. A sample of 852 Spanish school children, aged 3 to 7 years, were randomly selected and screened for a double phase design. A total of 251 families were interviewed with the DICA-PPYC and 244 participated in a test-retest design. Different measures of psychopathology and functional impairment were also administered. Test-retest agreement with a mean interval of 8.8 days ranged from excellent to slight (kappa from 1 to 0.39) for DSM-IV-TR and from good to fair (kappa from 0.77 to 0.49) for Research Diagnostic Criteria-Preschool Age diagnoses. Attenuation between test and retest was not significant for the prevalence of diagnoses, although it was significant for the number of externalising and total symptoms in the interview. The diagnoses converged moderately with the CBCL and Dominic scores. The presence of diagnoses in the DICA-PPYC significantly differentiated preschoolers and young children who had used mental health services, were more impaired, and presented more severe psychopathology measured by dimensional scales. The DICA-PPYC is a reliable and valid semi-structured interview schedule for preschool and young children, and can serve to advance the knowledge and mental health care of this population. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Diagnostic interview study of the prevalence of depression among public employees engaged in long-term relief work in Fukushima.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Masaharu; Ueda, Yukiko; Nagai, Masato; Fujii, Senta; Oe, Misari

    2016-09-01

    The Great East Japan Earthquake and in particular, the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident, have had a serious psychological impact on not only residents, but also relief workers in Fukushima. Although public employees work in highly stressful situations and play a very important role in long-term relief, their psychiatric features have yet to be clarified. The two aims of this study were to identify the current prevalence rate of depression and post-traumatic stress disorder among public employees working in the disaster area using diagnostic interviews, and to speculate on the psychosocial factors affecting their mental condition. We conducted diagnostic interviews and self-administered questionnaires with 168 public employees working in two coastal towns in Fukushima. Results showed that the current prevalence of depression among public employees is as high as 17.9%, in contrast to the relatively low prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder (4.8%). Based on the results of self-administered questionnaires and interview contents, frequent exposure to strong complaints or anger from residents and role conflicts were considered the cause of the high prevalence of depression. The present study reveals the serious mental status of public employees working in Fukushima and sheds light on the urgent need to establish an efficient care network to provide adequate psychiatric intervention. © 2016 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2016 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  2. Structured interview for mild traumatic brain injury after military blast: inter-rater agreement and development of diagnostic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Walker, William C; Cifu, David X; Hudak, Anne M; Goldberg, Gary; Kunz, Richard D; Sima, Adam P

    2015-04-01

    The existing gold standard for diagnosing a suspected previous mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is clinical interview. But it is prone to bias, especially for parsing the physical versus psychological effects of traumatic combat events, and its inter-rater reliability is unknown. Several standardized TBI interview instruments have been developed for research use but have similar limitations. Therefore, we developed the Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) retrospective concussion diagnostic interview, blast version (VCU rCDI-B), and undertook this cross-sectional study aiming to 1) measure agreement among clinicians' mTBI diagnosis ratings, 2) using clinician consensus develop a fully structured diagnostic algorithm, and 3) assess accuracy of this algorithm in a separate sample. Two samples (n = 66; n = 37) of individuals within 2 years of experiencing blast effects during military deployment underwent semistructured interview regarding their worst blast experience. Five highly trained TBI physicians independently reviewed and interpreted the interview content and gave blinded ratings of whether or not the experience was probably an mTBI. Paired inter-rater reliability was extremely variable, with kappa ranging from 0.194 to 0.825. In sample 1, the physician consensus prevalence of probable mTBI was 84%. Using these diagnosis ratings, an algorithm was developed and refined from the fully structured portion of the VCU rCDI-B. The final algorithm considered certain symptom patterns more specific for mTBI than others. For example, an isolated symptom of "saw stars" was deemed sufficient to indicate mTBI, whereas an isolated symptom of "dazed" was not. The accuracy of this algorithm, when applied against the actual physician consensus in sample 2, was almost perfect (correctly classified = 97%; Cohen's kappa = 0.91). In conclusion, we found that highly trained clinicians often disagree on historical blast-related mTBI determinations. A fully structured interview

  3. Criterion and concurrent validity of Conners Adult ADHD Diagnostic Interview for DSM-IV (CAADID) Spanish version.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Quiroga, Josep Antoni; Bosch, Rosa; Richarte, Vanesa; Valero, Sergi; Gómez-Barros, Nuria; Nogueira, Mariana; Palomar, Gloria; Corrales, Montse; Sáez-Francàs, Naia; Corominas, Margarida; Real, Alberto; Vidal, Raquel; Chalita, Pablo J; Casas, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common neuropsychiatric disorder in adulthood. Its diagnosis requires a retrospective evaluation of ADHD symptoms in childhood, the continuity of these symptoms in adulthood, and a differential diagnosis. For these reasons, diagnosis of ADHD in adults is a complex process which needs effective diagnostic tools. To analyse the criterion validity of the CAADID semi-structured interview, Spanish version, and the concurrent validity compared with other ADHD severity scales. An observational case-control study was conducted on 691 patients with ADHD. They were out-patients treated in a program for adults with ADHD in a hospital. A sensitivity of 98.86%, specificity 67.68%, positive predictive value 90.77% and a negative predictive value 94.87% were observed. Diagnostic precision was 91.46%. The kappa index concordance between the clinical diagnostic interview and the CAADID was 0.88. Good concurrent validity was obtained, the CAADID correlated significantly with WURS scale (r=0.522, P<.01), ADHD Rating Scale (r=0.670, P<.0.1) and CAARS (self-rating version; r=0.656, P<.01 and observer-report r=0.514, P<.01). CAADID is a valid and useful tool for the diagnosis of ADHD in adults for clinical, as well as for research purposes. Copyright © 2012 SEP y SEPB. Published by Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  4. Teaching about Psychological Disorders: Using a Group Interviewing and Diagnostic Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomcho, Thomas J.; Wolfe, Wendy L.; Foels, Rob

    2006-01-01

    We designed a cooperative learning classroom activity to enhance students' ability to understand psychological disorders and distinguish among anxiety, mood, and psychotic disorders. We employed a group interviewing approach with the instructor (or a graduate student) serving as the pseudo-client. Students interacted with a pseudo-client to arrive…

  5. A brief motivational interview promotes internal motivation to donate blood among young adults with and without a prior donation history.

    PubMed

    Livitz, Irina E; Fox, Kristen R; Himawan, Lina K; France, Christopher R

    2017-06-01

    Recruitment and retention of first-time and repeat donors is essential to maintain a stable blood supply. Recent evidence has shown that promoting internal motivation may be an effective strategy to enhance donation behavior. We tested the efficacy of an in-person motivational interview at increasing internal motivation and intention to donate. A sample of 219 donors and nondonors (69.4% female; mean ± SD age, 19.2 ± 1.1 years; 52.1% nondonors) were randomly assigned to either a motivational or a knowledge interview. Immediately before and after the interview participants completed a measure of donation intention and the Blood Donor Identity Survey, which is a multidimensional measure of donor motivation. A latent profile analysis revealed three distinct latent classes, which were identified as low internal motivation, mid internal motivation, and high internal motivation. Comparison of change in latent class from pre- to postinterview revealed that a higher proportion of participants in the motivational interview group moved to a more internally motivated class compared to the knowledge interview group (i.e., 34% vs. 4%, respectively). Further, relative to the knowledge interview group, participants in the motivational interview group reported greater increases in intention to donate. A brief motivational interview may enhance donation intention and intrinsic motivation among both experienced donors and nondonors alike. © 2017 AABB.

  6. Interviewing Children Versus Tossing Coins: Accurately Assessing the Diagnosticity of Children’s Disclosures of Abuse

    PubMed Central

    LYON, THOMAS D.; AHERN, ELIZABETH C.; SCURICH, NICHOLAS

    2014-01-01

    We describe a Bayesian approach to evaluating children’s abuse disclosures and review research demonstrating that children’s disclosure of genital touch can be highly probative of sexual abuse, with the probative value depending on disclosure spontaneity and children’s age. We discuss how some commentators understate the probative value of children’s disclosures by: confusing the probability of abuse given disclosure with the probability of disclosure given abuse, assuming that children formally questioned about sexual abuse have a low prior probability of sexual abuse, misstating the probative value of abuse disclosure, and confusing the distinction between disclosure and nondisclosure with the distinction between true and false disclosures. We review interviewing methods that increase the probative value of disclosures, including interview instructions, narrative practice, noncontingent reinforcement, and questions about perpetrator/caregiver statements and children’s reactions to the alleged abuse. PMID:22339423

  7. Natural history of Diagnostic Interview Schedule/DSM-IV major depression. The Baltimore Epidemiologic Catchment Area follow-up.

    PubMed

    Eaton, W W; Anthony, J C; Gallo, J; Cai, G; Tien, A; Romanoski, A; Lyketsos, C; Chen, L S

    1997-11-01

    Natural history can be characterized by incidence, recurrence, and duration of episodes. Research on the incidence of major depression is rare; studies of recurrence and duration are limited to clinical samples. The Baltimore, Md, site of the Epidemiologic Catchment Area Program followed up its 1981 baseline cohort of 3481 respondents with an additional assessment in 1993 to 1996. Interviews were obtained from 1920 respondents (73% of the survivors). The Diagnostic Interview Schedule and the same survey procedures as in 1981 were used, augmented with a Life Chart Interview for dating the onset and duration of syndromes. There were 71 new cases of Diagnostic interview Schedule/DSM-IV major depression and 23,698 person-years of exposure, generating an estimated incidence of 3.0 per 1000 per year. Incidence peaked while subjects were in their 30s, with a smaller peak when they were in their 50s. Prodromal symptoms often occurred many years before the full criteria for diagnosis were met. Women were at higher risk for becoming new cases but had neither higher risk for recurrence nor longer episodes than men. Episodes of depression lasted for 12 weeks. The duration of an episode, and time to an episode-free year, was longer in the first episode than in recurrent episodes. The incidence estimated in this study is consistent with that found in the few other similar studies performed. The bimodality of onset suggests the value of further exploring the heterogeneity of depression via its natural history. Reported differences in prevalence between men and women seem to be due to differences in incidence, not chronicity.

  8. Women in post-trafficking services in Moldova: diagnostic interviews over two time periods to assess returning women's mental health.

    PubMed

    Ostrovschi, Nicolae V; Prince, Martin J; Zimmerman, Cathy; Hotineanu, Mihai A; Gorceag, Lilia T; Gorceag, Viorel I; Flach, Clare; Abas, Melanie A

    2011-04-14

    Trafficking in women is a widespread human rights violation commonly associated with poor mental health. Yet, to date, no studies have used psychiatric diagnostic assessment to identify common forms of mental distress among survivors returning to their home country. A longitudinal study was conducted of women aged 18 and over who returned to Moldova between December 2007 and December 2008 registered by the International Organisation for Migration as a survivor of human trafficking. Psychiatric diagnoses in women at a mean of 6 months after return (range 2-12 months) were made by a trained Moldavian psychiatrist using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV, and compared with diagnoses recorded in the same women within 5 days of return. We described the socio-demographic characteristics of the women in the sample including both pre and post-trafficking information. We then described the distribution of mental health diagnoses recorded during the crisis intervention phase (1-5 days after return) and the re-integration phase (2-12 months after return). We compared diagnoses at the patient level between the two time points by tabulating the diagnoses and carrying out a kappa test of agreement and the Stuart-Maxwell test for marginal homogeneity (an extension of the McNemar test to kxk table). 120/176 (68%) eligible women participated. At 2-12 months after their return, 54% met criteria for at least one psychiatric diagnoses comprising post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) alone (16%); co-morbid PTSD (20%); other anxiety or mood disorder (18%). 85% of women who had been diagnosed in the crisis phase with co-morbid PTSD or with another anxiety or mood disorder sustained a diagnosis of any psychiatric disorder when followed up during rehabilitation. Trafficked women returning to their country of origin are likely to suffer serious psychological distress that may endure well beyond the time they return. Women found to have co-morbid PTSD or other forms of anxiety and

  9. Women in post-trafficking services in moldova: diagnostic interviews over two time periods to assess returning women's mental health

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Trafficking in women is a widespread human rights violation commonly associated with poor mental health. Yet, to date, no studies have used psychiatric diagnostic assessment to identify common forms of mental distress among survivors returning to their home country. Methods A longitudinal study was conducted of women aged 18 and over who returned to Moldova between December 2007 and December 2008 registered by the International Organisation for Migration as a survivor of human trafficking. Psychiatric diagnoses in women at a mean of 6 months after return (range 2-12 months) were made by a trained Moldavian psychiatrist using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV, and compared with diagnoses recorded in the same women within 5 days of return. We described the socio-demographic characteristics of the women in the sample including both pre and post-trafficking information. We then described the distribution of mental health diagnoses recorded during the crisis intervention phase (1-5 days after return) and the re-integration phase (2-12 months after return). We compared diagnoses at the patient level between the two time points by tabulating the diagnoses and carrying out a kappa test of agreement and the Stuart-Maxwell test for marginal homogeneity (an extension of the McNemar test to kxk table). Results 120/176 (68%) eligible women participated. At 2-12 months after their return, 54% met criteria for at least one psychiatric diagnoses comprising post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) alone (16%); co-morbid PTSD (20%); other anxiety or mood disorder (18%). 85% of women who had been diagnosed in the crisis phase with co-morbid PTSD or with another anxiety or mood disorder sustained a diagnosis of any psychiatric disorder when followed up during rehabilitation. Conclusions Trafficked women returning to their country of origin are likely to suffer serious psychological distress that may endure well beyond the time they return. Women found to have co

  10. Reliability and validity of a semi-structured DSM-based diagnostic interview module for the assessment of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder in adult psychiatric outpatients.

    PubMed

    Gorlin, Eugenia I; Dalrymple, Kristy; Chelminski, Iwona; Zimmerman, Mark

    2016-08-30

    Despite growing recognition that the symptoms and functional impairments of Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) persist into adulthood, only a few psychometrically sound diagnostic measures have been developed for the assessment of ADHD in adults, and none have been validated for use in a broad treatment-seeking psychiatric sample. The current study presents the reliability and validity of a semi-structured DSM-based diagnostic interview module for ADHD, which was administered to 1194 adults presenting to an outpatient psychiatric practice. The module showed excellent internal consistency and interrater reliability, good convergent and discriminant validity (as indexed by relatively high correlations with self-report measures of ADHD and ADHD-related constructs and little or no correlation with other, non-ADHD symptom domains), and good construct validity (as indexed by significantly higher rates of psychosocial impairment and self-reported family history of ADHD in individuals who meet criteria for an ADHD diagnosis). This instrument is thus a reliable and valid diagnostic tool for the detection of ADHD in adults presenting for psychiatric evaluation and treatment. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  11. [Pharmacovigilance center --internal medicine interactions: A useful diagnostic tool].

    PubMed

    Rochoy, M; Gautier, S; Bordet, R; Caron, J; Launay, D; Hachulla, E; Hatron, P-Y; Lambert, M

    2015-08-01

    Patients hospitalized in internal medicine often have unexplained clinical symptoms for which a drug origin can be considered. The prevalence of patients hospitalized for iatrogenic is estimated between 4-22%. We wanted to evaluate the diagnostic value of the regional center of pharmacovigilance to identify or confirm an iatrogenic disease in the department of internal medicine of Lille and characterize factors associated with drug-related side effect. This is a single-center prospective diagnostic study. We included all subsequent requests from the department of internal medicine with the Nord-Pas-de-Calais regional pharmacovigilance center between 2010 and 2012. The opinion of the regional pharmacovigilance centre was held on the record of the adverse drug reaction in the national pharmacovigilance database and analyzed according to the conclusion of iatrogenic used by clinicians in internal medicine (reference diagnosis) with a follow-up to June 2013. The variables relating to the patient, medication and adverse events were analyzed by binary logistic regression. We analyzed 160 contacts: 118 concordant cases, 38 false-positives (drug-related side effect retained by the regional pharmacovigilance center only), 4 false negatives. Registration in the national pharmacovigilance database had a sensitivity of 96% (95% CI [0.92 to 0.99]), a specificity of 46% (95% CI [0.38 to 0.53]), a value positive predictive of 69% (95% CI [0.62 to 0.76]), a negative predictive value of 89% (95% CI [0.84 to 0.94]) and a negative likelihood ratio of 0.1. False-positive had chronological and semiological accountabilities questionable (adjusted RR=2.1, 95% CI [1.2 to 2.8]). In our study, the regional pharmacovigilance center confirms the clinician's suspicion of drug-related side effects and helps to exclude drug-induced with a high negative predictive value. Copyright © 2015 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Expedition 6 Crew Interviews: Don Pettit, Flight Engineer 2/ International Space Station (ISS) Science Officer (SO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Expedition 6 member Don Pettit (Flight Engineer 2/ International Space Station (ISS) Science Officer (SO)) is seen during a prelaunch interview. He answers questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut and his career path. Pettit, who had been training as a backup crewmember, discusses the importance of training backups for ISS missions. He gives details on the goals and significance of the ISS, regarding experiments in various scientific disciplines such as the life sciences and physical sciences. Pettit also comments on the value of conducting experiments under microgravity. He also gives an overview of the ISS program to date, including the ongoing construction, international aspects, and the routines of ISS crewmembers who inhabit the station for four months at a time. He gives a cursory description of crew transfer procedures that will take place when STS-113 docks with ISS to drop off Pettit and the rest of Expedition 6, and retrieve the Expedition 5 crew.

  13. Expedition 6 Crew Interviews: Don Pettit, Flight Engineer 2/ International Space Station (ISS) Science Officer (SO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Expedition 6 member Don Pettit (Flight Engineer 2/ International Space Station (ISS) Science Officer (SO)) is seen during a prelaunch interview. He answers questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut and his career path. Pettit, who had been training as a backup crewmember, discusses the importance of training backups for ISS missions. He gives details on the goals and significance of the ISS, regarding experiments in various scientific disciplines such as the life sciences and physical sciences. Pettit also comments on the value of conducting experiments under microgravity. He also gives an overview of the ISS program to date, including the ongoing construction, international aspects, and the routines of ISS crewmembers who inhabit the station for four months at a time. He gives a cursory description of crew transfer procedures that will take place when STS-113 docks with ISS to drop off Pettit and the rest of Expedition 6, and retrieve the Expedition 5 crew.

  14. Refining the assessment of internal working models: the Attachment Multiple Model Interview.

    PubMed

    Miljkovitch, Raphaële; Moss, Ellen; Bernier, Annie; Pascuzzo, Katherine; Sander, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    The Attachment Multiple Model Interview (AMMI) was developed to assess internal working models (IWMs) of specific relationships in adulthood (e.g., with mother, father, and romantic partner). In an initial effort to validate the AMMI, the interview was administered to participants who were followed from age 4 to 23. ANOVA and contrast tests confirmed the AMMI's capacity to discriminate between mother, father, and partner IWMs. AMMI security with each parent was correlated with coherence according to the Adult Attachment Interview, and AMMI disorganization with mother with unresolved trauma (N = 53). AMMI dimensions of security, deactivation, and hyperactivation with the mother were associated with cumulative lifetime scores of security (N = 23), avoidance, and resistance (N = 34), respectively. Intercorrelations between these AMMI scales were also theory-consistent. Associations with the AAI and between AMMI security scores of different relationships are consistent with previous findings suggesting a contribution from both parents in the development of a state of mind, but a more important role of the mother for representations of the partner.

  15. Diagnostic ultrasound and telemedicine utilization in the international space station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Stephen J.; Stewart, Brent K.; Kushmerick, Martin J.; Langer, Steve G.; Schmiedl, Udo P.; Winter, Thomas C.; Conley, Kevin E.; Jubrias, Sharon A.

    1999-01-01

    Clinical diagnostic ultrasound (US) is experiencing an expanding role that is well suited to application on the International Space Station (ISS). Diagnostic US can be used to reduce the risks associated with long duration human space flight by providing a non-invasive tool with head-to-toe diagnostic capability in both biomedical research and crew health care. General health care of the astronauts will be diagnosed with US, e.g., kidney stones, gall bladder disease, appendicitis, etc. Initial studies will focus on detection of ``ureteral jets'' in the bladder. This is a non-invasive test to rule out obstructive uropathy from kidney stones with minimal requirements for crew training. Biomedical research experiments, focusing on the effects of the microgravity environment, will be performed using both the HHU and the HDI 5000. US will be used to evaluate bone density and muscle mass in this environment. Prolonged or emergency EVAs may occur with the ISS. The hand-held ultrasound unit (HHU) and its telemedicine capability will be used in EVA settings to monitor events such as decompression sickness (DCS) microbubble formation in the cardiovascular system. There will be telemetry links between the HHU and the ATL/Lockheed Martin rack mounted HDI 5000 in the ISS Human Research Facility (HRF), as well as between the HRF and medical expertise on the ground. These links will provide the ISS with both real-time and store-and-forward telemedicine capabilities. The HHU can also be used with the existing telemedicine instrument pack (TIP).

  16. International consensus diagnostic criteria for neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Wingerchuk, Dean M; Banwell, Brenda; Bennett, Jeffrey L; Cabre, Philippe; Carroll, William; Chitnis, Tanuja; de Seze, Jérôme; Fujihara, Kazuo; Greenberg, Benjamin; Jacob, Anu; Jarius, Sven; Lana-Peixoto, Marco; Levy, Michael; Simon, Jack H; Tenembaum, Silvia; Traboulsee, Anthony L; Waters, Patrick; Wellik, Kay E; Weinshenker, Brian G

    2015-07-14

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is an inflammatory CNS syndrome distinct from multiple sclerosis (MS) that is associated with serum aquaporin-4 immunoglobulin G antibodies (AQP4-IgG). Prior NMO diagnostic criteria required optic nerve and spinal cord involvement but more restricted or more extensive CNS involvement may occur. The International Panel for NMO Diagnosis (IPND) was convened to develop revised diagnostic criteria using systematic literature reviews and electronic surveys to facilitate consensus. The new nomenclature defines the unifying term NMO spectrum disorders (NMOSD), which is stratified further by serologic testing (NMOSD with or without AQP4-IgG). The core clinical characteristics required for patients with NMOSD with AQP4-IgG include clinical syndromes or MRI findings related to optic nerve, spinal cord, area postrema, other brainstem, diencephalic, or cerebral presentations. More stringent clinical criteria, with additional neuroimaging findings, are required for diagnosis of NMOSD without AQP4-IgG or when serologic testing is unavailable. The IPND also proposed validation strategies and achieved consensus on pediatric NMOSD diagnosis and the concepts of monophasic NMOSD and opticospinal MS. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  17. International consensus diagnostic criteria for neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    Banwell, Brenda; Bennett, Jeffrey L.; Cabre, Philippe; Carroll, William; Chitnis, Tanuja; de Seze, Jérôme; Fujihara, Kazuo; Greenberg, Benjamin; Jacob, Anu; Jarius, Sven; Lana-Peixoto, Marco; Levy, Michael; Simon, Jack H.; Tenembaum, Silvia; Traboulsee, Anthony L.; Waters, Patrick; Wellik, Kay E.

    2015-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is an inflammatory CNS syndrome distinct from multiple sclerosis (MS) that is associated with serum aquaporin-4 immunoglobulin G antibodies (AQP4-IgG). Prior NMO diagnostic criteria required optic nerve and spinal cord involvement but more restricted or more extensive CNS involvement may occur. The International Panel for NMO Diagnosis (IPND) was convened to develop revised diagnostic criteria using systematic literature reviews and electronic surveys to facilitate consensus. The new nomenclature defines the unifying term NMO spectrum disorders (NMOSD), which is stratified further by serologic testing (NMOSD with or without AQP4-IgG). The core clinical characteristics required for patients with NMOSD with AQP4-IgG include clinical syndromes or MRI findings related to optic nerve, spinal cord, area postrema, other brainstem, diencephalic, or cerebral presentations. More stringent clinical criteria, with additional neuroimaging findings, are required for diagnosis of NMOSD without AQP4-IgG or when serologic testing is unavailable. The IPND also proposed validation strategies and achieved consensus on pediatric NMOSD diagnosis and the concepts of monophasic NMOSD and opticospinal MS. PMID:26092914

  18. An ontology for Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) to infer ASD phenotypes from Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised data.

    PubMed

    Mugzach, Omri; Peleg, Mor; Bagley, Steven C; Guter, Stephen J; Cook, Edwin H; Altman, Russ B

    2015-08-01

    Our goal is to create an ontology that will allow data integration and reasoning with subject data to classify subjects, and based on this classification, to infer new knowledge on Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and related neurodevelopmental disorders (NDD). We take a first step toward this goal by extending an existing autism ontology to allow automatic inference of ASD phenotypes and Diagnostic & Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) criteria based on subjects' Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised (ADI-R) assessment data. Knowledge regarding diagnostic instruments, ASD phenotypes and risk factors was added to augment an existing autism ontology via Ontology Web Language class definitions and semantic web rules. We developed a custom Protégé plugin for enumerating combinatorial OWL axioms to support the many-to-many relations of ADI-R items to diagnostic categories in the DSM. We utilized a reasoner to infer whether 2642 subjects, whose data was obtained from the Simons Foundation Autism Research Initiative, meet DSM-IV-TR (DSM-IV) and DSM-5 diagnostic criteria based on their ADI-R data. We extended the ontology by adding 443 classes and 632 rules that represent phenotypes, along with their synonyms, environmental risk factors, and frequency of comorbidities. Applying the rules on the data set showed that the method produced accurate results: the true positive and true negative rates for inferring autistic disorder diagnosis according to DSM-IV criteria were 1 and 0.065, respectively; the true positive rate for inferring ASD based on DSM-5 criteria was 0.94. The ontology allows automatic inference of subjects' disease phenotypes and diagnosis with high accuracy. The ontology may benefit future studies by serving as a knowledge base for ASD. In addition, by adding knowledge of related NDDs, commonalities and differences in manifestations and risk factors could be automatically inferred, contributing to the understanding of ASD pathophysiology. Copyright

  19. Parent-youth agreement on symptoms and diagnosis: assessment with a diagnostic interview in an adolescent inpatient clinical population.

    PubMed

    Lauth, Bertrand; Arnkelsson, Guðmundur B; Magnússon, Páll; Skarphéðinsson, Guðmundur Á; Ferrari, Pierre; Pétursson, Hannes

    2010-12-01

    Diagnostic information on adolescents may be elicited from both youths and their parents, especially for depressive and suicidal symptomatology. The objective of this study was to examine the degree of agreement between parent and adolescent reports of major psychiatric disorders, at the diagnostic and at the symptom level, in a severely affected inpatient clinical population. 64 parent-adolescent pairs were interviewed separately with the semi-structured diagnostic interview Kiddie-SADS-PL. Symptomatology was also assessed with 11 self-report and parent-report scales, all translated, adapted and in most cases validated in Iceland. A total of 25 subscales were included to assess emotional dimensions such as depression or anxiety and cognitive dimensions such as attention deficit or self-concept. Good agreement was found for social phobia and fair agreement for generalized anxiety disorder. Although parent-youth agreement was poor in most cases at the symptoms level, significant correlations indicated consistency for most severity scores, except those related to depressive symptomatology, attention deficit, separation anxiety or conduct disorder. The low agreement between reports of suicidal ideation is in line with results from previous studies and suggests that parents might under- or over-estimate this symptomatology. The combination of data obtained with diagnostic interviews and rating-scales confirmed results from prior empirical work, giving greater weight to parents' reports of observable behavior and to adolescents' reports of subjective experiences, especially depressive symptomatology. Our findings suggest that both parent and child informants are necessary to obtain adequate assessments in adolescents. Further research should explore the correspondence between discrepant diagnoses and external criteria such as parental psychopathology or parent-child relationships and attachment. Psychoanalysis could benefit from cognitive neuroscience and use cognitive

  20. Screening young adult cancer survivors for distress with the Distress Thermometer: Comparisons with a structured clinical diagnostic interview.

    PubMed

    Recklitis, Christopher J; Blackmon, Jaime E; Chang, Grace

    2016-01-15

    The validity of the Distress Thermometer (DT) as a screen for psychological distress in young adult cancer survivors was assessed by comparing it with the results of a psychiatric diagnostic interview, the Structured Clinical Interview for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition (DSM-IV) (SCID), to evaluate the accuracy of the DT and identify optimal cutoff scores for this population. A total of 247 survivors aged 18 to 40 years completed the DT and SCID. Based on the SCID, participants were classified as having: 1) ≥ 1 SCID diagnoses; 2) significant symptoms, but no SCID diagnosis; or 3) no significant SCID symptoms. Receiver operating characteristic analyses determined the sensitivity and specificity of all possible DT cutoff scores for detecting survivors with a SCID diagnosis, and subsequently for survivors with significant SCID symptoms or a SCID diagnosis. The recommended DT cutoff score of ≥5 failed to identify 31.81% of survivors with a SCID diagnosis (sensitivity of 68.18% and specificity of 78.33%), and 32.81% of survivors with either significant SCID symptoms or a SCID diagnosis. No alternative DT cutoff score met the criteria for acceptable sensitivity (≥85%) and specificity (≥75%). The DT does not reliably identify young adult cancer survivors with psychiatric problems identified by a "gold standard" structured psychiatric interview. Therefore, the DT should not be used as a stand-alone psychological screen in this population. Cancer 2016;122:296-303. © 2015 American Cancer Society. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  1. Screening Young Adult Cancer Survivors for Distress with the Distress Thermometer (DT): Comparisons with a Structured Clinical Diagnostic Interview

    PubMed Central

    Recklitis, Christopher J.; Blackmon, Jaime E.; Chang, Grace

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The validity of the Distress Thermometer (DT) as a screen for psychological distress in young adult (YA) cancer survivors was assessed by comparing it with results of a psychiatric diagnostic interview, the Structured Clinical Interview for the DSM-IV (SCID), in order to evaluate accuracy of the DT and identify optimal cut-off scores for this population. METHODS 247 survivors (age 18–40 years) completed the DT and SCID. Based on the SCID, participants were classified as having: 1) One or more SCID diagnoses; 2) Significant symptoms, but no SCID diagnosis; or 3) No significant SCID symptoms. ROC analyses determined sensitivity and specificity of all possible DT cut-off scores for detecting survivors with a SCID diagnosis, and subsequently for survivors with significant SCID symptoms or a SCID diagnosis. RESULTS The recommended DT cut-off score of ≥ 5 failed to identify 31.81% of survivors with a SCID diagnosis (sensitivity 68.18%, specificity 78.33%), and 32.81% of survivors with either Significant SCID symptoms or a SCID diagnosis. No alternative DT cut-off score met criteria for acceptable sensitivity (≥.85) and specificity (≥.75). CONCLUSIONS The DT does not reliably identify YA cancer survivors with psychiatric problems identified by a “gold standard” structured psychiatric interview; the DT should not be used as a stand-alone psychological screen in this population. PMID:26457669

  2. An Internet Version of the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children (DISC-IV) : Correspondence of the ADHD Section with the Paper-and-Pencil Version

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steenhuis, Mark-Peter; Serra, Marike; Minderaa, Rudolf Boudewijn; Hartman, Catharina Annette

    2009-01-01

    The authors recently developed an Internet version of the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children-Version 4 (DISC-IV), parent version (D. Shaffer, P. Fisher, C. P. Lucas, M. K. Dulcan, & M. E. Schwab-Stone, 2000), with the main purpose of using it at home without an interviewer. This offers many advantages (e.g., extended applicability,…

  3. Evaluation of the Criterion and Convergent Validity of the Diagnostic Interview for Social and Communication Disorders in Young and Low-Functioning Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maljaars, Jarymke; Noens, Ilse; Scholte, Evert; van Berckelaer-Onnes, Ina

    2012-01-01

    The Diagnostic Interview for Social and Communication Disorders (DISCO; Wing, 2006) is a standardized, semi-structured and interviewer-based schedule for diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The objective of this study was to evaluate the criterion and convergent validity of the DISCO-11 ICD-10 algorithm in young and low-functioning…

  4. Evaluation of the Criterion and Convergent Validity of the Diagnostic Interview for Social and Communication Disorders in Young and Low-Functioning Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maljaars, Jarymke; Noens, Ilse; Scholte, Evert; van Berckelaer-Onnes, Ina

    2012-01-01

    The Diagnostic Interview for Social and Communication Disorders (DISCO; Wing, 2006) is a standardized, semi-structured and interviewer-based schedule for diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The objective of this study was to evaluate the criterion and convergent validity of the DISCO-11 ICD-10 algorithm in young and low-functioning…

  5. An Internet Version of the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children (DISC-IV) : Correspondence of the ADHD Section with the Paper-and-Pencil Version

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steenhuis, Mark-Peter; Serra, Marike; Minderaa, Rudolf Boudewijn; Hartman, Catharina Annette

    2009-01-01

    The authors recently developed an Internet version of the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children-Version 4 (DISC-IV), parent version (D. Shaffer, P. Fisher, C. P. Lucas, M. K. Dulcan, & M. E. Schwab-Stone, 2000), with the main purpose of using it at home without an interviewer. This offers many advantages (e.g., extended applicability,…

  6. Reliability and validity of ADHD diagnostic criteria in the Assessment System for Individuals with ADHD (ASIA): a Japanese semi-structured diagnostic interview.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Toshinobu; Tsuji, Yui; Uwatoko, Teruhisa; Kurita, Hiroshi

    2015-06-20

    With reports of a high prevalence of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in adults, publication of ADHD diagnostic criteria in DSM-5, and the urgent need for a relevant diagnostic instrument conforming to DSM-5, we developed the Assessment System for Individuals with ADHD (ASIA), a Japanese semi-structured diagnostic interview. We report here the reliability and validity of ASIA ADHD diagnostic criteria. ASIA ADHD criterion A corresponds to DSM-5 ADHD criterion A and has 144 original questions assessing nine inattention symptoms and nine hyperactivity-impulsivity symptoms, each having four childhood and four adulthood questions. The 144 questions are evaluated on a 3-point frequency scale. ASIA ADHD criteria B to E correspond to DSM-5 ADHD criteria B to E and are evaluated on a 2-point scale. ASIA was administered to 60 adults (mean age, 29.9 ± 9.0 years; 28 males; 36 ADHD and 24 non-ADHD participants diagnosed by consensus of two experts). For ASIA ADHD criterion A, values of Cronbach's α for the adulthood and childhood inattention and hyperactivity-impulsivity symptoms ranged from 0.64 to 0.90. Values of κ for two independent raters ranged from 0.98 to 1.00 for the 144 questions and raw agreement rates ranged from 0.97 to 1.00 for criteria B, C, D, and E. The consensus DSM-5 diagnoses endorsed 59 of the 60 ASIA diagnoses (ADHD and non-ADHD). The ADHD group scored significantly higher on 125 of the 144 questions for criterion A than the non-ADHD group. Correlations between ASIA total and subscale scores in adulthood and corresponding scores on the Japanese version of the Conners' Adult ADHD Scales-Self Report were high. ASIA ADHD criteria showed acceptable psychometric properties, although further investigation is necessary. The use of ASIA ADHD criteria could facilitate clinical practice and research into adult ADHD in Japan.

  7. Development of transient internal probe (TIP) magnetic field diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Galambos, J.P.; Bohnet, M.A.; Jarboe, T.R.; Mattick, A.T.

    1994-12-31

    The Transient Internal Probe (TIP) is designed to permit measurement of internal magnetic fields, in hot, high density plasmas. The concept consists of accelerating a probe to high velocities (2.2 Km/s) in order to minimize probe exposure time to plasma. Faraday rotation within the probe is used to measure the local magnetic field. An Argon laser illuminates the probe consisting of a Faraday-rotator material with a retro-reflector that returns the incident light to the detection system. Performance results of the light gas gun and optical detection system will be shown. To date, the gas gun has been extensively tested consistently achieving velocities between 2 and 3 km/s. The probe and detection scheme have been tested by dropping the probe through a static magnetic field. Magnetic field resolution of 20 gauss and spatial resolution of 5 mm has been achieved. System frequency response is 10Mhz. Work is currently being conducted to integrate the diagnostic system with laboratory plasma experiments. Specifically a gas interfaced system has been developed to prevent helium muzzle gas from entering the plasma chamber with the probe. Additionally the probe must be separated from the sabot which protects the probe during acceleration in the gas gun. Data will be presented showing the results of various separation techniques.

  8. Qualitative interviews of pharmacy interns: determining curricular preparedness for work life.

    PubMed

    Stupans, Ieva

    2012-01-01

    One of the key features affecting the transition from university to paid employment is the graduate's perception of their capability to satisfactorily perform the work of a graduate. In some professions such as in nursing, the concept of "transition shock" is referred to. There is a need to understand how pharmacy students perceive the transition to their first job as intern pharmacists and identify potential curriculum gaps in their pharmacy studies. To date, little evidence around whether university programs are effective in equipping pharmacy graduates in transitioning to the world of work has been published. To explore from the perspective of new pharmacy professionals, graduated from one Australian university areas that need to be addressed in pharmacy programs to prepare graduates for the transition to full-time work as interns in pharmacy. Thematic analysis of interviews with interns. Subthemes were identified within the responses- relationships within the workplace and graduates needing to interest themselves in other people, adjusting to work hours and the differences between university assessments and performing in a workplace. Suggestions were made by graduates that the placement period within the pharmacy program be increased. Pharmacy graduates appear prepared for the world of pharmacy work. The concept of "transition shock" or "transition stress" described for graduates of other health professions commencing work was not apparent.

  9. Parent-Reported Mental Health in Preschoolers: Findings Using a Diagnostic Interview

    PubMed Central

    Bufferd, Sara J.; Dougherty, Lea R.; Carlson, Gabrielle A.; Klein, Daniel N.

    2010-01-01

    Previous research suggests that many preschoolers meet criteria for psychiatric diagnoses; still, relatively little is known about preschool mental health, particularly emotional problems, in the community. The present study investigates the rates of parent-reported DSM-IV disorders in a large community sample of preschoolers using the Preschool Age Psychiatric Assessment (PAPA). 541 parents were interviewed with the PAPA. Of the children, 27.4% met criteria for a PAPA/DSM-IV diagnosis; 9.2% met criteria for two or more diagnoses. Oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) (9.4%), specific phobia (9.1%), and separation anxiety disorder (5.4%) were the most common diagnoses; depression (1.8%), selective mutism (1.5%), and panic disorder (0.2%) were least common. In addition, there was significant comorbidity/covariation between depression, anxiety, and ODD, and between ODD and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (odds ratios: 1.81-18.44; p < .05). The stability and clinical significance of diagnoses and patterns of comorbidity must be elucidated in future research. PMID:21683173

  10. Psychopathology in Bariatric Surgery Candidates: A Review of Studies Using Structured Diagnostic Interviews

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Sarah; Mitchell, James E.; Engel, Scott; Crosby, Ross; Wonderlich, Steve

    2014-01-01

    Psychiatric disorders are not uncommon among severely obese patients who present for bariatric surgery. This paper (1) reviews the results of the published studies using the structured interviews to assess psychopathology in bariatric surgery candidates; (2) compares the prevalence rates of psychiatric disorders across these studies with the data from other population samples; and (3) assesses whether sociodemographic variables appear to affect these prevalence rates. We searched online resources, PubMed, PsychINFO and reference lists of all the relevant articles to provide an overview of evidence so far and highlight some details in the assessment and comparisons of different samples in different countries. The prevalence estimates in the non- treatment obese group did not appear to differ substantially from the general population group in the US or the Italian population samples, although they were relatively higher for the German population. However, the rates of psychopathology in the bariatric surgery candidates were considerably higher than the other two population groups in all the samples. Overall, the most common category of lifetime Axis I disorders in all the studies was affective disorders, with anxiety disorders being the most common category of current Axis I disorders. Certain demographic characteristics are also associated with higher rates of psychopathology, such as, female gender, low socioeconomic status, higher BMI. Overall, methodological and sociodemographic differences make these studies difficult to compare and these differences should be taken into account when interpreting the results. PMID:24290079

  11. Using the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised and the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule with Young Children with Developmental Delay: Evaluating Diagnostic Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Kylie M.; Tonge, Bruce J.; Sweeney, Deborah J.

    2008-01-01

    Few studies have focused on the validity of the ADI-R and ADOS in the assessment of preschool children with developmental delay. This study aimed to evaluate the diagnostic validity of the ADI-R and the ADOS in young children. Two-hundred and nine children aged 20-55 months participated in the study, 120 of whom received a diagnosis of autism.…

  12. The multiple mini-interview for selection of international medical graduates into family medicine residency education.

    PubMed

    Hofmeister, Marianna; Lockyer, Jocelyn; Crutcher, Rodney

    2009-06-01

    The multiple mini-interview (MMI) was used to measure professionalism in international medical graduate (IMG) applicants for family medicine residency in Alberta for positions accessed through the Alberta International Medical Graduate (AIMG) Program. This paper assesses the evidence for the MMI's reliability and validity in this context. A group of 71 IMGs participated in our 12-station MMI designed to assess professionalism competency. A 10-point scale evaluated applicants on ability to address the objectives of the situation, interpersonal skills, suitability for a residency and for family medicine, and overall performance. We conducted generalisability and decision studies to assess the reliability of MMI scores. We assessed the validity by examining the differences in MMI scores associated with session, track and socio-demographic characteristics of applicants and by measuring the correlations between MMI scores and scores on compulsory examinations, including the AIMG objective structured clinical examination, the Medical Council of Canada Evaluating Examination (MCCEE) and the Medical Council of Canada Qualifying Examination Part I (MCCQE I). We measured the correlation between MMI and non-requisite MCCQE Part II (MCCQE II) scores that were provided. The reliability as indicated by the generalisability coefficient associated with average station scores was 0.70 with one interviewer per station. There were no statistically significant differences in total MMI scores or mean station sum scores based on session, track, applicant age, gender, years since medical school completion, or language of medical school. There were low, non-significant correlations with OSCE overall (r = 0.15), MCCEE (r = 0.01) and MCCQE I (r = 0.06) scores and a higher non-significant correlation with MCCQE II scores (r = 0.33). There is evidence that the MMI offers a reliable and valid assessment of professionalism in IMG doctors applying for Canadian family medicine residencies and

  13. A Challenging Time in the History of Lamaze International: An Interview With Francine Nichols

    PubMed Central

    Zwelling, Elaine

    2006-01-01

    Dr. Francine Nichols—President of Lamaze International from 1988 to 1991 (when the organization was known as “the American Society for Psychoprophylaxis in Obstetrics” or “ASPO/Lamaze”) and the founding editor of The Journal of Perinatal Education in 1990—is a woman with many skills that have contributed to her success throughout her career. Dr. Nichols is a knowledgeable leader in maternal-newborn nursing, a respected nurse and childbirth educator, a researcher, and an author. However, these skills were not the abilities she relied upon the most to lead the Lamaze organization through a challenging period in the 1980s; rather, Dr. Nichols's tenacity, business savvy, and willingness to face controversy helped guide Lamaze International back on track so that it was able to grow into the strong organization it remains today. This interview took place by telephone on June 12, 2006, when Dr. Nichols was in Washington, D.C., for the summer to coordinate the National Institute of Nursing Research's Summer Genetics Institute, a doctoral-level course cosponsored by Georgetown University. PMID:17768430

  14. Using the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised and the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule-Generic for the Diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorders in a Greek Sample with a Wide Range of Intellectual Abilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papanikolaou, Katerina; Paliokosta, Elena; Houliaras, Giorgos; Vgenopoulou, Sofia; Giouroukou, Eleni; Pehlivanidis, Artemios; Tomaras, Vlassis; Tsiantis, Ioannis

    2009-01-01

    We studied the interrelationship between the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule-Generic (ADOS-G), the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised (ADI-R) and DSM-IV clinical diagnosis, in a Greek sample of 77 children and adolescents, referred for the assessment of a possible pervasive developmental disorder (PDD) and presenting a wide range of…

  15. Novel clustering of items from the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised to define phenotypes within autism spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Valerie W.; Steinberg, Mara E.

    2009-01-01

    Heterogeneity in phenotypic presentation of ASD has been cited as one explanation for the difficulty in pinpointing specific genes involved in autism. Recent studies have attempted to reduce the “noise” in genetic and other biological data by reducing the phenotypic heterogeneity of the sample population. The current study employs multiple clustering algorithms on 123 item scores from the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised (ADI-R) diagnostic instrument of nearly 2000 autistic individuals to identify subgroups of autistic probands with clinically relevant behavioral phenotypes in order to isolate more homogeneous groups of subjects for gene expression analyses. Our combined cluster analyses suggest optimal division of the autistic probands into 4 phenotypic clusters based on similarity of symptom severity across the 123 selected item scores. One cluster is characterized by severe language deficits, while another exhibits milder symptoms across the domains. A third group possesses a higher frequency of savant skills while the fourth group exhibited intermediate severity across all domains. Grouping autistic individuals by multivariate cluster analysis of ADI-R scores reveals meaningful phenotypes of subgroups within the autistic spectrum which we show, in a related (accompanying) study, to be associated with distinct gene expression profiles. PMID:19455643

  16. To see or not to see: a qualitative interview study of patients’ views on their own diagnostic images

    PubMed Central

    Carlin, Leslie E; Smith, Helen E; Henwood, Flis

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To ascertain what meaning individuals attach to perceiving images of their own interior body and how the images and their meanings affect the clinical consultation. Design Face-to-face semistructured interviews. Participants 25 adult patients in southern England who, within the preceding 12 months, had been referred for diagnostic imaging. Setting Community. Results For patients, being shown their own X-rays, MRIs or CT images creates a variety of effects: (1) a sense of better understanding of the diagnosis; (2) validation of their sensory and emotional response to the illness or injury and (3) an alteration to the tenor and nature of the clinical encounter between patient and physician. In addition to meanings attached to these images, patients also impute meaning to the physician's decision not to share an image with them. The desire to see their image was greater in those patients with a skeletal injury; patients are less keen on viewing abdominal or other soft tissue images. Conclusions Viewing images of one's interior, invisible body is powerful and resonant in a number of ways. The experience of not seeing, whether through the patient's or the physician's choice, is also fraught with meaning. PMID:25082418

  17. To see or not to see: a qualitative interview study of patients' views on their own diagnostic images.

    PubMed

    Carlin, Leslie E; Smith, Helen E; Henwood, Flis

    2014-07-31

    To ascertain what meaning individuals attach to perceiving images of their own interior body and how the images and their meanings affect the clinical consultation. Face-to-face semistructured interviews. 25 adult patients in southern England who, within the preceding 12 months, had been referred for diagnostic imaging. Community. For patients, being shown their own X-rays, MRIs or CT images creates a variety of effects: (1) a sense of better understanding of the diagnosis; (2) validation of their sensory and emotional response to the illness or injury and (3) an alteration to the tenor and nature of the clinical encounter between patient and physician. In addition to meanings attached to these images, patients also impute meaning to the physician's decision not to share an image with them. The desire to see their image was greater in those patients with a skeletal injury; patients are less keen on viewing abdominal or other soft tissue images. Viewing images of one's interior, invisible body is powerful and resonant in a number of ways. The experience of not seeing, whether through the patient's or the physician's choice, is also fraught with meaning. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  18. Development, reliability, and validity of the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Interview for Vietnamese refugees: a diagnostic instrument for Vietnamese refugees.

    PubMed

    Dao, Tam K; Poritz, Julia M P; Moody, Rachel P; Szeto, Kim

    2012-08-01

    The Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Interview for Vietnamese Refugees (PTSD-IVR) was created specifically to assess for the presence of current and lifetime history of premigration, migration, encampment, and postmigration traumas in Vietnamese refugees. The purpose of the present study was to describe the development of and investigate the interrater and test-retest reliability of the PTSD-IVR and its validity in relation to the diagnoses obtained from the Longitudinal, Expert, and All Data (LEAD; Spitzer, 1983) standard. Clinicians conducted the diagnosis process with 127 Vietnamese refugees using the LEAD standard and the PTSD-IVR. Assessment of the reliability and validity of the PTSD-IVR yielded good to excellent AUC (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve; .86, .87) and κ values (.66, .74) indicating the reliability of the PTSD-IVR and the agreement between the LEAD procedure and the PTSD-IVR. The results of the present study suggest that the PTSD-IVR performs successfully as a diagnostic instrument specifically created for Vietnamese refugees in their native language.

  19. Translation and Validation of the Developmental, Dimensional and Diagnostic Interview (3Di) for Diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder in Thai Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chuthapisith, Jariya; Taycharpipranai, Pasinee; Ruangdaraganon, Nichara; Warrington, Richard; Skuse, David

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the effectiveness of a translated version of the short version of the Developmental, Dimensional and Diagnostic Interview (3Di) in discriminating children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) from typically developing children. Two groups, comprising 63 children with clinically ascertained ASDs and 67 typically…

  20. The Incremental Utility of Behavioral Rating Scales and a Structured Diagnostic Interview in the Assessment of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughn, Aaron J.; Hoza, Betsy

    2013-01-01

    The current study examined the incremental utility of rating scales, a structured diagnostic interview, and multiple informants in a comprehensive assessment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The sample included 185 children with ADHD (M[subscript age] = 9.22, SD = 0.95) and 82 children without ADHD (M[subscript age] = 9.24, SD =…

  1. Validation of the Developmental, Dimensional and Diagnostic Interview (3Di) among Chinese Children in a Child Psychiatry Clinic in Hong Kong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, Kelly Y. C.; Leung, Patrick W. L.; Mo, Flora Y. M.; Lee, Marshall M. C.; Shea, Caroline K. S.; Chan, Grace F. C.; Che, Kiti K. I.; Luk, Ernest S. L.; Mak, Arthur D. P.; Warrington, Richard; Skuse, David

    2015-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a disorder with high levels of co-morbidities. The Developmental, Dimensional and Diagnostic Interview (3Di) is a relatively new instrument designed to provide dimensional as well as categorical assessment of autistic behaviours among children with normal intelligence. Its sound psychometric properties and…

  2. Validation of the Developmental, Dimensional and Diagnostic Interview (3Di) among Chinese Children in a Child Psychiatry Clinic in Hong Kong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, Kelly Y. C.; Leung, Patrick W. L.; Mo, Flora Y. M.; Lee, Marshall M. C.; Shea, Caroline K. S.; Chan, Grace F. C.; Che, Kiti K. I.; Luk, Ernest S. L.; Mak, Arthur D. P.; Warrington, Richard; Skuse, David

    2015-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a disorder with high levels of co-morbidities. The Developmental, Dimensional and Diagnostic Interview (3Di) is a relatively new instrument designed to provide dimensional as well as categorical assessment of autistic behaviours among children with normal intelligence. Its sound psychometric properties and…

  3. Exploring the Relationship between K-8 Prospective Teachers' Algebraic Thinking Proficiency and the Questions They Pose during Diagnostic Algebraic Thinking Interviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van den Kieboom, Leigh A.; Magiera, Marta T.; Moyer, John C.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we explored the relationship between prospective teachers' algebraic thinking and the questions they posed during one-on-one diagnostic interviews that focused on investigating the algebraic thinking of middle school students. To do so, we evaluated prospective teachers' algebraic thinking proficiency across 125…

  4. Translation and Validation of the Developmental, Dimensional and Diagnostic Interview (3Di) for Diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder in Thai Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chuthapisith, Jariya; Taycharpipranai, Pasinee; Ruangdaraganon, Nichara; Warrington, Richard; Skuse, David

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the effectiveness of a translated version of the short version of the Developmental, Dimensional and Diagnostic Interview (3Di) in discriminating children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) from typically developing children. Two groups, comprising 63 children with clinically ascertained ASDs and 67 typically…

  5. Effects of depression and anxiety on mortality in a mixed cancer group: a longitudinal approach using standardised diagnostic interviews.

    PubMed

    Chan, Caryn Mei Hsien; Wan Ahmad, Wan Azman; Yusof, Mastura M D; Ho, Gwo-Fuang; Krupat, Edward

    2015-06-01

    Distress and psychiatric morbidity in cancer patients are associated with poorer outcomes including mortality. In this study, we examined the prevalence of psychiatric morbidity and its association with cancer survival over time. Participants were 467 consecutive adult cancer patients attending oncology follow-ups at a single academic medical centre. Assessment consisted of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition, text revision. Comparison between co-morbid psychiatric cases and non-cases was made in follow-ups of up to 24 months. Of the 467 patients, 217 of 220 patients with elevated total Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale scores (≥16) met the criteria for an Axis I disorder at 6 months follow-up, with 102 of the follow-up sample having a persistent diagnosable psychiatric disorder after 1 year. The most frequent initial diagnoses were minor depression (17.6%), major depressive disorder (15.8%) and adjustment disorder (15.8%). Cancer patients without psychiatric morbidity had a survival benefit of 2.24 months or 67 days. Mean survival at 24 months was 20.87 months (95% CI 20.06-21.69) for cancer patients with psychiatric morbidity versus 23.11 months (95% CI 22.78-23.43) for those without (p < 0.001 for log rank). After adjusting for demographics and cancer stage on a Cox proportional hazards model, psychiatric morbidity remained associated with worse survival (hazard ratio 4.13, 95% CI 1.32-12.92, p = 0.015). This study contributes to the growing body of evidence linking psychiatric morbidity to cancer mortality. Treating underlying psychiatric conditions in cancer may therefore improve not just quality of life but also survival. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Feasibility, acceptability and clinical utility of the Cultural Formulation Interview: mixed-methods results from the DSM-5 international field trial.

    PubMed

    Lewis-Fernández, Roberto; Aggarwal, Neil Krishan; Lam, Peter C; Galfalvy, Hanga; Weiss, Mitchell G; Kirmayer, Laurence J; Paralikar, Vasudeo; Deshpande, Smita N; Díaz, Esperanza; Nicasio, Andel V; Boiler, Marit; Alarcón, Renato D; Rohlof, Hans; Groen, Simon; van Dijk, Rob C J; Jadhav, Sushrut; Sarmukaddam, Sanjeev; Ndetei, David; Scalco, Monica Z; Bassiri, Kavoos; Aguilar-Gaxiola, Sergio; Ton, Hendry; Westermeyer, Joseph; Vega-Dienstmaier, Johann M

    2017-04-01

    BackgroundThere is a need for clinical tools to identify cultural issues in diagnostic assessment.AimsTo assess the feasibility, acceptability and clinical utility of the DSM-5 Cultural Formulation Interview (CFI) in routine clinical practice.MethodMixed-methods evaluation of field trial data from six countries. The CFI was administered to diagnostically diverse psychiatric out-patients during a diagnostic interview. In post-evaluation sessions, patients and clinicians completed debriefing qualitative interviews and Likert-scale questionnaires. The duration of CFI administration and the full diagnostic session were monitored.ResultsMixed-methods data from 318 patients and 75 clinicians found the CFI feasible, acceptable and useful. Clinician feasibility ratings were significantly lower than patient ratings and other clinician-assessed outcomes. After administering one CFI, however, clinician feasibility ratings improved significantly and subsequent interviews required less time.ConclusionsThe CFI was included in DSM-5 as a feasible, acceptable and useful cultural assessment tool.

  7. Personality, biographical characteristics, and job interview success: a longitudinal study of the mediating effects of interviewing self-efficacy and the moderating effects of internal locus of causality.

    PubMed

    Tay, Cheryl; Ang, Soon; Van Dyne, Linn

    2006-03-01

    In this study, the authors developed and tested a model of performance in job interviews that examines the mediating role of interviewing self-efficacy (I-SE; job applicants' beliefs about their interviewing capabilities) in linking personality and biographical background with interview success and the moderating role of locus of causality attributions in influencing the relationship between interview success and subsequent I-SE. The authors tested their model (over 5 months' duration) with matched data from 229 graduating seniors, firms, and university records. Hierarchical regression analyses demonstrated I-SE mediated the effects of Extraversion, Conscientiousness, and leadership experience on interview success. Locus of causality attributions for interview outcomes moderated the relationship between interview success and subsequent I-SE. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

  8. Diagnostic guidelines for bipolar disorder: a summary of the International Society for Bipolar Disorders Diagnostic Guidelines Task Force Report.

    PubMed

    Ghaemi, S Nassir; Bauer, Michael; Cassidy, Frederick; Malhi, Gin S; Mitchell, Philip; Phelps, James; Vieta, Eduard; Youngstrom, Eric

    2008-02-01

    The Diagnostic Guidelines Task Force of the International Society for Bipolar Disorders (ISBD) presents in this document and this special issue a summary of the current nosological status of bipolar illness, a discussion of possible revisions to current DSM-IV and ICD-10 definitions, an examination of the relevant literature, explication of areas of consensus and dissensus, and proposed definitions that might guide clinicians in the most valid approach to diagnosis of these conditions given the current state of our knowledge.

  9. Communicating Chemistry from "Molecules" to International Efforts: An Interview with Peter Atkins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardellini, Liberato

    2008-01-01

    In this interview, Peter Atkins explains the deep motivations that compel him to sit at his desk at 6 AM writing books and textbooks. He discusses the four principal elements that help to make a chemistry textbook successful, including the secret ingredient. He also discusses the importance of problem solving, the interaction of multimedia, and…

  10. Communicating Chemistry from "Molecules" to International Efforts: An Interview with Peter Atkins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardellini, Liberato

    2008-01-01

    In this interview, Peter Atkins explains the deep motivations that compel him to sit at his desk at 6 AM writing books and textbooks. He discusses the four principal elements that help to make a chemistry textbook successful, including the secret ingredient. He also discusses the importance of problem solving, the interaction of multimedia, and…

  11. International harmonization of standards for diagnostic tests and vaccines: role of the Office International des Epizooties (OIE).

    PubMed

    Wright, P F

    1999-01-01

    The OIE is recognized as the world organization for animal health. Serving 145 member countries, the OIE provides current information on disease occurrence, coordinates studies on disease surveillance and control, and harmonizes regulations for trade in animals and animal products. This paper focuses on the role of one the OIE's specialist commissions, the Standards Commission. The Standards Commission works in close collaboration with the Scientific and Technical Department of the OIE's Central Bureau on the international harmonization of standards for diagnostic tests and vaccines. The Manual of Standards for Diagnostic Tests and Vaccines, approved by the International Committee, defines the international standards for diagnostic tests and for the production of biological products as applied to mammals, birds, and bees. The Manual lists and details those tests which are prescribed for international trade and others which are suitable for bilateral trade agreements. The Manual represents one of the key scientific and technical references for harmonization of regulations for trade in animals and animal products. The commission coordinates the activities of a network of some 110 OIE reference laboratories and six collaborating centers. By creating and nurturing this network, international harmonization is promoted through the sharing of knowledge and the establishment of collaborative projects related to methods development and standardization, production and distribution of international reference standards, quality assurance, and assay validation. Through a series of guidelines provided to participants, the commission ensures the quality and focus of these projects. In matters of a scientific and technical nature concerning diagnostic tests and vaccines, the Standards Commission collaborates with other international organizations such as the FAO, WHO, IICA, and PAHO, thus promoting harmonization at the international program level. Underscoring the important role

  12. Internal-External Control and the Attribution of Responsibility Under Questionnaire and Interview Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stebbings, Paul; Stone, Gerald L.

    1977-01-01

    The study examined the attribution of responsibility of 34 students with an internal or external locus of control following success or failure feedback on a communication task. Results indicated externals attribute more responsibility to impersonal external sources than do internals. The importance of attributional processes for counseling is…

  13. Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised (ADI-R) Algorithms for Toddlers and Young Preschoolers: Application in a Non-US Sample of 1,104 Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Bildt, Annelies; Sytema, Sjoerd; Zander, Eric; Bölte, Sven; Sturm, Harald; Yirmiya, Nurit; Yaari, Maya; Charman, Tony; Salomone, Erica; LeCouteur, Ann; Green, Jonathan; Bedia, Ricardo Canal; Primo, Patricia García; van Daalen, Emma; de Jonge, Maretha V.; Guðmundsdóttir, Emilía; Jóhannsdóttir, Sigurrós; Raleva, Marija; Boskovska, Meri; Rogé, Bernadette; Baduel, Sophie; Moilanen, Irma; Yliherva, Anneli; Buitelaar, Jan; Oosterling, Iris J.

    2015-01-01

    The current study aimed to investigate the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised (ADI-R) algorithms for toddlers and young preschoolers (Kim and Lord, "J Autism Dev Disord" 42(1):82-93, 2012) in a non-US sample from ten sites in nine countries (n = 1,104). The construct validity indicated a good fit of the algorithms. The diagnostic…

  14. Validation of a Brief Quantitative Measure of Autistic Traits: Comparison of the Social Responsiveness Scale with the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Constantino, John N.; Davis, Sandra A.; Todd, Richard D.; Schindler, Matthew K.; Gross, Maggie M.; Brophy, Susan L.; Metzger, Lisa M.; Shoushtari, Christiana S.; Splinter, Reagan; Reich, Wendy

    2003-01-01

    A study compared the Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS) with the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised in 61 children (ages 4-16) with autism. Correlations between the test scores for DSM-IV criterion sets were on the order of 0.7. SRS scores were unrelated to I.Q. and exhibited inter-rater reliability on the order of 0.8. (Contains references.)…

  15. Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised (ADI-R) Algorithms for Toddlers and Young Preschoolers: Application in a Non-US Sample of 1,104 Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Bildt, Annelies; Sytema, Sjoerd; Zander, Eric; Bölte, Sven; Sturm, Harald; Yirmiya, Nurit; Yaari, Maya; Charman, Tony; Salomone, Erica; LeCouteur, Ann; Green, Jonathan; Bedia, Ricardo Canal; Primo, Patricia García; van Daalen, Emma; de Jonge, Maretha V.; Guðmundsdóttir, Emilía; Jóhannsdóttir, Sigurrós; Raleva, Marija; Boskovska, Meri; Rogé, Bernadette; Baduel, Sophie; Moilanen, Irma; Yliherva, Anneli; Buitelaar, Jan; Oosterling, Iris J.

    2015-01-01

    The current study aimed to investigate the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised (ADI-R) algorithms for toddlers and young preschoolers (Kim and Lord, "J Autism Dev Disord" 42(1):82-93, 2012) in a non-US sample from ten sites in nine countries (n = 1,104). The construct validity indicated a good fit of the algorithms. The diagnostic…

  16. Peer Victimization during Middle Childhood as a Lead Indicator of Internalizing Problems and Diagnostic Outcomes in Late Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, David; Lansford, Jennifer E.; Dodge, Kenneth A.; Pettit, Gregory S.; Bates, John E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective We examined evidence that peer victimization in middle childhood is a lead indicator of internalizing behavior problems and diagnostic outcomes during adolescence. Methods This research was conducted as part of an ongoing multisite longitudinal investigation. The participants were 388 children (198 boys, 190 girls). Peer victimization was assessed with a peer nomination inventory that was administered when the average age of the participants was approximately 8.5 years. Internalizing problems were assessed using a behavior problem checklist completed by mothers in nine consecutive years and a structured clinical interview was administered to the participants in the summer following high school graduation (10 to 11 years after the victimization assessment). Results Peer victimization in middle childhood was correlated with internalizing problems on a bivariate basis through the late years of adolescence. Multilevel analyses also revealed associations between peer victimization and increases in internalizing problems over time. In addition, peer victimization had a modest link to unipolar depressive disorders in late adolescence. Conclusions Victimization in the peer group during middle childhood appears to be a marker of long-term risk for internalizing behavior problems and unipolar depression. PMID:24660666

  17. Communicating Chemistry from Molecules to International Efforts: An Interview with Peter Atkins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardellini, Liberato

    2008-06-01

    In this interview, Peter Atkins explains the deep motivations that compel him to sit at his desk at 6 AM writing books and textbooks. He discusses the four principal elements that help to make a chemistry textbook successful, including the secret ingredient. He also discusses the importance of problem solving, the interaction of multimedia, and the effect of the Web on textbooks. Finally, Atkins articulates the beliefs that learning chemistry opens our eyes to a deeper enjoyment of the world, that chemistry plumbs a deeper level of reality.

  18. Medical ward round competence in internal medicine - an interview study towards an interprofessional development of an Entrustable Professional Activity (EPA).

    PubMed

    Wölfel, Teresa; Beltermann, Esther; Lottspeich, Christian; Vietz, Elisa; Fischer, Martin R; Schmidmaier, Ralf

    2016-07-11

    The medical ward round is a central but complex activity that is of relevance from the first day of work. However, difficulties for young doctors have been reported. Instruction of ward round competence in medical curricula is hampered by the lack of a standardized description of the procedure. This paper aims to identify and describe physicians' tasks and relevant competences for conducting a medical ward round on the first day of professional work. A review of recent literature revealed known important aspects of medical ward rounds. These were used for the development of a semi-structured interview schedule. Medical ward round experts working at different hospitals were interviewed. The sample consisted of 14 ward physicians (M = 8.82 years of work experience) and 12 nurses (M = 14.55 years of work experience) working in different specializations of internal medicine. All interviews were audiotaped, fully transcribed, and analyzed using an inductive-deductive coding scheme. Nine fields of competences with 18 related sub-competences and 62 observable tasks were identified as relevant for conducting a medical ward round. Over 70 % of the experts named communication, collaborative clinical reasoning and organization as essential competences. Deeper analysis further unveiled the importance of self-management, management of difficult situations, error management and teamwork. The study is the first to picture ward round competences and related tasks in detail and to define an EPA "Conducting an internal medicine ward round" based on systematic interprofessional expert interviews. It thus provides a basis for integration of ward round competences in the medical curricula in an evidence based manner and gives a framework for the development of instructional intervention studies and comparative studies in other medical fields.

  19. Molecular Diagnostics of the Internal Motions of Massive Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pineda, Jorge; Velusamy, T.; Goldsmith, P.; Li, D.; Peng, R.; Langer, W.

    2009-12-01

    We present models of the internal kinematics of massive cores in the Orion molecular cloud. We use a sample of cores studied by Velusamy et al. (2008) that show red, blue, and no asymmetry in their HCO+ line profiles in equal proportion, and which therefore may represent a sample of cores in different kinematic states. We use the radiative transfer code RATRAN (Hogerheijde & van der Tak 2000) to model several transitions of HCO+ and H13CO+ as well as the dust continuum emission, of a spherical model cloud with radial density, temperature, and velocity gradients. We find that an excitation and velocity gradients are prerequisites to reproduce the observed line profiles. We use the dust continuum emission to constrain the density and temperature gradients. This allows us to narrow down the functional forms of the velocity gradient giving us the opportunity to test several theoretical predictions of velocity gradients produced by the effect of magnetic fields (e.g. Tassis et. al. 2007) and turbulence (e.g. Vasquez-Semanedi et al 2007).

  20. Improving Student Outcomes with mCLASS: Math, a Technology-Enhanced CBM and Diagnostic Interview Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Ye; Gushta, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    The No Child Left Behind Act resulted in increased school-level implementation of assessment-based school interventions that aim to improve student performance. Diagnostic assessments are included among these interventions, designed to help teachers use evidence about student performance to modify and differentiate instruction and improve student…

  1. A Pre and Post-Practicum Comparison of Teacher Interns' Perceptions of Diagnostic Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berkell, Dianne E.; Schmelkin, Liora Pedhazur

    A study examined the perceptions of special education interns on a set of diagnostic constructs: (1) mental age; (2) developmental history; (3) IQ; (4) identifying information; (5) family history; (6) medical history; (7) receptive language; (8) fine motor coordination; (9) auditory discrimination; (10) memory; (11) written language; (12) self…

  2. Validity of the Brief Symptom Inventory-18 (BSI-18) for Identifying Depression and Anxiety in Young Adult Cancer Survivors: Comparison With a Structured Clinical Diagnostic Interview.

    PubMed

    Recklitis, Christopher J; Blackmon, Jaime E; Chang, Grace

    2017-01-12

    The Brief Symptom Inventory-18 (BSI-18) is widely used to assess psychological symptoms in cancer survivors, but the validity of conventional BSI-18 cut-off scores in this population has been questioned. This study assessed the accuracy of the BSI-18 for identifying significant anxiety and depression in young adult cancer survivors (YACS), by comparing it with a "gold standard" diagnostic interview measure. Two hundred fifty YACS, age 18-40 completed the BSI-18 and the Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV; SCID) interview assessing anxiety and depressive disorders. BSI-18 results were compared with SCID criteria using receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analyses. Forty four participants (17.7%) met criteria for ≥1 SCID diagnoses, and an additional 20 (8.0%) met criteria for clinically significant SCID symptoms without a diagnosis. General concordance between the BSI-18 GSI scale and SCID diagnosis was good (AUC = 0.848), but the 2 most widely used BSI-18 case rules failed to identify a majority of survivors with SCID diagnoses, and no alternative BSI-18 cut-off scores met study criteria for clinical screening. Analyses aimed at identifying survivors with significant SCID symptoms or a SCID diagnosis had similar results, as did analyses examining depression and anxiety separately. The BSI-18 shows good overall concordance with a psychiatric interview, but recommended cut-off scores fail to identify a majority of YACS with psychiatric diagnosis. Clinicians should not rely on the BSI-18 alone as a screening measure for YACS. Alternative BSI-18 scoring algorithms optimized for detecting psychiatric symptoms in YACS may be an important step to address this limitation. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. An interview with Dr. Judith Shamian, president, International Council of Nurses.

    PubMed

    Nagle, Lynn; Shamian, Judith

    2014-03-01

    Judith Shamian, RN, PhD, LLD (hon), D.Sci (hon), FAAN, is the president of the International Council of Nurses (ICN). Previous positions include immediate past president and CEO of the Victorian Order of Nurses, immediate past President of the Canadian Nurses Association (CNA), executive director of the Office of Nursing Policy at Health Canada and vice-president of nursing at Mount Sinai Hospital. She is the recipient of numerous awards including the Canada's Most Powerful Women: Top 100 award; the Golden Jubilee Medal from the Governor General of Canada; and CNA's 2008 Centennial Award. From my mentor, colleague and friend here are some insights shared with CJNL about her current work and challenges

  4. Validation of an Arabic multi-informant psychiatric diagnostic interview for children and adolescents: development and Well Being Assessment-Arabic (DAWBA-Arabic).

    PubMed

    Zeinoun, Pia; Bawab, Souha; Atwi, Mia; Hariz, Nayla; Tavitian, Lucy; Khani, Mounir; Nahas, Ziad; Maalouf, Fadi T

    2013-10-01

    Countries in the Arab region lack a valid Arabic psychiatric diagnostic interview for children and adolescents. We set out to establish the diagnostic validity of the Arabic version of the Development and Well Being Assessment (DAWBA-Arabic), a multi-informant structured interview for predicting DSM-IV-TR diagnoses. The DAWBA was translated, updated, and administered to 45 participants (child and adolescent psychiatric outpatients and their parents) as part of a clinic registry. Two clinicians, blinded to their respective diagnoses, formulated the DAWBA diagnoses. Participants also underwent a clinical evaluation by a child and adolescent psychiatrist who generated clinical diagnoses according to the DSM-IV-TR. Inter-rater reliabilities were .93, .82, and .72 for disruptive disorders, mood disorders and anxiety disorders respectively. Agreement between DAWBA and clinical diagnoses was substantial for disruptive disorders (κ=.0.82) and mood disorders (κ=0.74), and moderate for anxiety disorders (κ=0.46). The DAWBA-Arabic could serve as a valid and reliable clinical tool for assessing psychiatric disorders among children and adolescents in the Arab region. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Understanding the Interview and Ranking Behaviors of Unmatched International Medical Students and Graduates in the 2013 Main Residency Match

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Mei; Curtin, Laurie S.; Signer, Mona M.; Savoia, Maria C.

    2015-01-01

    Background  Over the past decade, the number of unfilled positions in the National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) Main Residency Match has declined by one-third, while the number of unmatched applicants has grown by more than 50%, largely due to a rise in the number of international medical school students and graduates (IMGs). Although only half of IMG participants historically have matched to a first-year position, the Match experiences of unmatched IMGs have not been studied. Objective  We examined differences in interview and ranking behaviors between matched and unmatched IMGs participating in the 2013 Match and explored strategic errors made by unmatched IMGs when creating rank order lists. Methods  Rank order lists of IMGs who failed to match were analyzed in conjunction with their United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Step 1 scores and responses on the 2013 NRMP Applicant Survey. IMGs were categorized as “strong,” “solid,” “marginal,” or “weak” based on the perceived competitiveness of their USMLE Step 1 scores compared to other IMG applicants who matched in the same specialty. We examined ranking preferences and strategies by Match outcome. Results  Most unmatched IMGs were categorized as “marginal” or “weak”. However, unmatched IMGs who were non-US citizens presented more competitive USMLE Step 1 scores compared to unmatched IMGs who were US citizens. Unmatched IMGs were more likely than matched IMGs to rank programs at which they did not interview and to rank programs based on their perceived likelihood of matching. Conclusions  The interview and ranking behaviors of IMGs can have far-reaching consequences on their Match experience and outcomes. PMID:26692974

  6. International consensus for neuroblastoma molecular diagnostics: report from the International Neuroblastoma Risk Group (INRG) Biology Committee.

    PubMed

    Ambros, P F; Ambros, I M; Brodeur, G M; Haber, M; Khan, J; Nakagawara, A; Schleiermacher, G; Speleman, F; Spitz, R; London, W B; Cohn, S L; Pearson, A D J; Maris, J M

    2009-05-05

    Neuroblastoma serves as a paradigm for utilising tumour genomic data for determining patient prognosis and treatment allocation. However, before the establishment of the International Neuroblastoma Risk Group (INRG) Task Force in 2004, international consensus on markers, methodology, and data interpretation did not exist, compromising the reliability of decisive genetic markers and inhibiting translational research efforts. The objectives of the INRG Biology Committee were to identify highly prognostic genetic aberrations to be included in the new INRG risk classification schema and to develop precise definitions, decisive biomarkers, and technique standardisation. The review of the INRG database (n=8800 patients) by the INRG Task Force finally enabled the identification of the most significant neuroblastoma biomarkers. In addition, the Biology Committee compared the standard operating procedures of different cooperative groups to arrive at international consensus for methodology, nomenclature, and future directions. Consensus was reached to include MYCN status, 11q23 allelic status, and ploidy in the INRG classification system on the basis of an evidence-based review of the INRG database. Standardised operating procedures for analysing these genetic factors were adopted, and criteria for proper nomenclature were developed. Neuroblastoma treatment planning is highly dependant on tumour cell genomic features, and it is likely that a comprehensive panel of DNA-based biomarkers will be used in future risk assignment algorithms applying genome-wide techniques. Consensus on methodology and interpretation is essential for uniform INRG classification and will greatly facilitate international and cooperative clinical and translational research studies.

  7. Pediatric restless legs syndrome diagnostic criteria: an update by the International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group.

    PubMed

    Picchietti, Daniel L; Bruni, Oliviero; de Weerd, Al; Durmer, Jeffrey S; Kotagal, Suresh; Owens, Judith A; Simakajornboon, Narong

    2013-12-01

    Specific diagnostic criteria for pediatric restless legs syndrome (RLS) were published in 2003 following a workshop at the National Institutes of Health. Due to substantial new research and revision of the adult RLS diagnostic criteria, a task force was chosen by the International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group (IRLSSG) to consider updates to the pediatric diagnostic criteria. A committee of seven pediatric RLS experts developed a set of 15 consensus questions to review, conducted a comprehensive literature search, and extensively discussed potential revisions. The committee recommendations were approved by the IRLSSG executive committee and reviewed by the IRLSSG membership. The pediatric RLS diagnostic criteria were simplified and integrated with the newly revised adult RLS criteria. Specific recommendations were developed for pediatric application of the criteria, including consideration of typical words used by children to describe their symptoms. Pediatric aspects of differential diagnosis, comorbidity, and clinical significance were then defined. In addition, the research criteria for probable and possible pediatric RLS were updated and criteria for a related condition, periodic limb movement disorder (PLMD), were clarified. Revised diagnostic criteria for pediatric RLS have been developed, which are intended to improve clinical practice and promote further research. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A Scalable, Out-of-Band Diagnostics Architecture for International Space Station Systems Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, Daryl P.; Alena, Rick; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The computational infrastructure of the International Space Station (ISS) is a dynamic system that supports multiple vehicle subsystems such as Caution and Warning, Electrical Power Systems and Command and Data Handling (C&DH), as well as scientific payloads of varying size and complexity. The dynamic nature of the ISS configuration coupled with the increased demand for payload support places a significant burden on the inherently resource constrained computational infrastructure of the ISS. Onboard system diagnostics applications are hosted on computers that are elements of the avionics network while ground-based diagnostic applications receive only a subset of available telemetry, down-linked via S-band communications. In this paper we propose a scalable, out-of-band diagnostics architecture for ISS systems support that uses a read-only connection for C&DH data acquisition, which provides a lower cost of deployment and maintenance (versus a higher criticality readwrite connection). The diagnostics processing burden is off-loaded from the avionics network to elements of the on-board LAN that have a lower overall cost of operation and increased computational capacity. A superset of diagnostic data, richer in content than the configured telemetry, is made available to Advanced Diagnostic System (ADS) clients running on wireless handheld devices, affording the crew greater mobility for troubleshooting and providing improved insight into vehicle state. The superset of diagnostic data is made available to the ground in near real-time via an out-of band downlink, providing a high level of fidelity between vehicle state and test, training and operational facilities on the ground.

  9. The politics of agenda setting at the global level: key informant interviews regarding the International Labour Organization Decent Work Agenda

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Global labour markets continue to undergo significant transformations resulting from socio-political instability combined with rises in structural inequality, employment insecurity, and poor working conditions. Confronted by these challenges, global institutions are providing policy guidance to protect and promote the health and well-being of workers. This article provides an account of how the International Labour Organization’s Decent Work Agenda contributes to the work policy agendas of the World Health Organization and the World Bank. Methods This qualitative study involved semi-structured interviews with representatives from three global institutions – the International Labour Organization (ILO), the World Health Organization and the World Bank. Of the 25 key informants invited to participate, 16 took part in the study. Analysis for key themes was followed by interpretation using selected agenda setting theories. Results Interviews indicated that through the Decent Work Agenda, the International Labour Organization is shaping the global policy narrative about work among UN agencies, and that the pursuit of decent work and the Agenda were perceived as important goals with the potential to promote just policies. The Agenda was closely linked to the World Health Organization’s conception of health as a human right. However, decent work was consistently identified by World Bank informants as ILO terminology in contrast to terms such as job creation and job access. The limited evidence base and its conceptual nature were offered as partial explanations for why the Agenda has yet to fully influence other global institutions. Catalytic events such as the economic crisis were identified as creating the enabling conditions to influence global work policy agendas. Conclusions Our evidence aids our understanding of how an issue like decent work enters and stays on the policy agendas of global institutions, using the Decent Work Agenda as an illustrative

  10. The politics of agenda setting at the global level: key informant interviews regarding the International Labour Organization Decent Work Agenda.

    PubMed

    Di Ruggiero, Erica; Cohen, Joanna E; Cole, Donald C

    2014-07-01

    Global labour markets continue to undergo significant transformations resulting from socio-political instability combined with rises in structural inequality, employment insecurity, and poor working conditions. Confronted by these challenges, global institutions are providing policy guidance to protect and promote the health and well-being of workers. This article provides an account of how the International Labour Organization's Decent Work Agenda contributes to the work policy agendas of the World Health Organization and the World Bank. This qualitative study involved semi-structured interviews with representatives from three global institutions--the International Labour Organization (ILO), the World Health Organization and the World Bank. Of the 25 key informants invited to participate, 16 took part in the study. Analysis for key themes was followed by interpretation using selected agenda setting theories. Interviews indicated that through the Decent Work Agenda, the International Labour Organization is shaping the global policy narrative about work among UN agencies, and that the pursuit of decent work and the Agenda were perceived as important goals with the potential to promote just policies. The Agenda was closely linked to the World Health Organization's conception of health as a human right. However, decent work was consistently identified by World Bank informants as ILO terminology in contrast to terms such as job creation and job access. The limited evidence base and its conceptual nature were offered as partial explanations for why the Agenda has yet to fully influence other global institutions. Catalytic events such as the economic crisis were identified as creating the enabling conditions to influence global work policy agendas. Our evidence aids our understanding of how an issue like decent work enters and stays on the policy agendas of global institutions, using the Decent Work Agenda as an illustrative example. Catalytic events and policy

  11. Telephone versus face-to-face administration of the Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, for diagnosis of psychotic disorders.

    PubMed

    Hajebi, Ahmad; Motevalian, Abbas; Amin-Esmaeili, Masoumeh; Hefazi, Mitra; Radgoodarzi, Reza; Rahimi-Movaghar, Afarin; Sharifi, Vandad

    2012-07-01

    The current study aims to compare telephone vs face-to-face administration of the version of Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, (SCID) for diagnosis of "any psychotic disorder" in a clinical population in Iran. The sample consisted of 72 subjects from 2 psychiatric outpatient services in Tehran, Iran. The subjects were interviewed using face-to-face SCID for the purpose of diagnosing psychotic disorders. A second independent telephone SCID was administered to the entire sample within 5 to 10 days, and the lifetime and 12-month diagnoses were compared. The positive likelihood ratio of telephone-administered SCID for diagnosis of "any lifetime psychotic disorder" was 5.1 when compared with the face-to-face SCID. The value for the primary psychotic disorders in the past 12 months was lower (2.3). The data indicate that telephone administration of the SCID is an acceptable method to differentiate between subjects with lifetime psychotic disorders and those who have had no psychotic disorders and provides a less resource-demanding alternative to face-to-face assessments. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Accuracy of EFIT equilibrium reconstruction with internal diagnostic information at JET.

    PubMed

    Brix, M; Hawkes, N C; Boboc, A; Drozdov, V; Sharapov, S E

    2008-10-01

    In tokamak experiments, equilibrium reconstruction codes are used to calculate the location of the last closed flux surface, to map diagnostic information, and to derive important properties like current density and safety factor. At JET, the equilibrium code EFIT is automatically executed after each discharge. For speed and robustness, intershot EFIT is based on magnetic probe measurements only. As a consequence, the intershot profiles of the safety factor can be wrong for a variety of plasma scenarios. Internal diagnostic information, the pitch angle as measured with the motional stark effect, Faraday rotation angles, as well as pressure profile information can increase the accuracy of the EFIT equilibrium. In this paper, the accuracy of the internal diagnostics at JET and their impact on the EFIT results are discussed in detail. The influence of control parameters like the form of the test functions for ff' and p' on the equilibrium is investigated. The q(min) from this analysis agrees with information from magnetohydrodynamics analysis (e.g., Alfvén cascades and sawtooth analysis) to within 10%-15%.

  13. Accuracy of EFIT equilibrium reconstruction with internal diagnostic information at JETa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brix, M.; Hawkes, N. C.; Boboc, A.; Drozdov, V.; Sharapov, S. E.; Jet-Efda Contributors

    2008-10-01

    In tokamak experiments, equilibrium reconstruction codes are used to calculate the location of the last closed flux surface, to map diagnostic information, and to derive important properties like current density and safety factor. At JET, the equilibrium code EFIT is automatically executed after each discharge. For speed and robustness, intershot EFIT is based on magnetic probe measurements only. As a consequence, the intershot profiles of the safety factor can be wrong for a variety of plasma scenarios. Internal diagnostic information, the pitch angle as measured with the motional stark effect, Faraday rotation angles, as well as pressure profile information can increase the accuracy of the EFIT equilibrium. In this paper, the accuracy of the internal diagnostics at JET and their impact on the EFIT results are discussed in detail. The influence of control parameters like the form of the test functions for ff' and p' on the equilibrium is investigated. The qmin from this analysis agrees with information from magnetohydrodynamics analysis (e.g., Alfvén cascades and sawtooth analysis) to within 10%-15%.

  14. Accuracy of EFIT equilibrium reconstruction with internal diagnostic information at JET

    SciTech Connect

    Brix, M.; Hawkes, N. C.; Boboc, A.; Drozdov, V.; Sharapov, S. E.

    2008-10-15

    In tokamak experiments, equilibrium reconstruction codes are used to calculate the location of the last closed flux surface, to map diagnostic information, and to derive important properties like current density and safety factor. At JET, the equilibrium code EFIT is automatically executed after each discharge. For speed and robustness, intershot EFIT is based on magnetic probe measurements only. As a consequence, the intershot profiles of the safety factor can be wrong for a variety of plasma scenarios. Internal diagnostic information, the pitch angle as measured with the motional stark effect, Faraday rotation angles, as well as pressure profile information can increase the accuracy of the EFIT equilibrium. In this paper, the accuracy of the internal diagnostics at JET and their impact on the EFIT results are discussed in detail. The influence of control parameters like the form of the test functions for ff{sup '} and p{sup '} on the equilibrium is investigated. The q{sub min} from this analysis agrees with information from magnetohydrodynamics analysis (e.g., Alfven cascades and sawtooth analysis) to within 10%-15%.

  15. Case Definitions, Diagnostic Algorithms, and Priorities in Encephalitis: Consensus Statement of the International Encephalitis Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesan, A.; Tunkel, A. R.; Bloch, K. C.; Lauring, A. S.; Sejvar, J.; Bitnun, A.; Stahl, J-P.; Mailles, A.; Drebot, M.; Rupprecht, C. E.; Yoder, J.; Cope, J. R.; Wilson, M. R.; Whitley, R. J.; Sullivan, J.; Granerod, J.; Jones, C.; Eastwood, K.; Ward, K. N.; Durrheim, D. N.; Solbrig, M. V.; Guo-Dong, L.; Glaser, C. A.; Sheriff, Heather; Brown, David; Farnon, Eileen; Messenger, Sharon; Paterson, Beverley; Soldatos, Ariane; Roy, Sharon; Visvesvara, Govinda; Beach, Michael; Nasci, Roger; Pertowski, Carol; Schmid, Scott; Rascoe, Lisa; Montgomery, Joel; Tong, Suxiang; Breiman, Robert; Franka, Richard; Keuhnert, Matt; Angulo, Fred; Cherry, James

    2013-01-01

    Background.Encephalitis continues to result in substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide. Advances in diagnosis and management have been limited, in part, by a lack of consensus on case definitions, standardized diagnostic approaches, and priorities for research. Methods.In March 2012, the International Encephalitis Consortium, a committee begun in 2010 with members worldwide, held a meeting in Atlanta to discuss recent advances in encephalitis and to set priorities for future study. Results.We present a consensus document that proposes a standardized case definition and diagnostic guidelines for evaluation of adults and children with suspected encephalitis. In addition, areas of research priority, including host genetics and selected emerging infections, are discussed. Conclusions.We anticipate that this document, representing a synthesis of our discussions and supported by literature, will serve as a practical aid to clinicians evaluating patients with suspected encephalitis and will identify key areas and approaches to advance our knowledge of encephalitis. PMID:23861361

  16. Case definitions, diagnostic algorithms, and priorities in encephalitis: consensus statement of the international encephalitis consortium.

    PubMed

    Venkatesan, A; Tunkel, A R; Bloch, K C; Lauring, A S; Sejvar, J; Bitnun, A; Stahl, J-P; Mailles, A; Drebot, M; Rupprecht, C E; Yoder, J; Cope, J R; Wilson, M R; Whitley, R J; Sullivan, J; Granerod, J; Jones, C; Eastwood, K; Ward, K N; Durrheim, D N; Solbrig, M V; Guo-Dong, L; Glaser, C A

    2013-10-01

    Encephalitis continues to result in substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide. Advances in diagnosis and management have been limited, in part, by a lack of consensus on case definitions, standardized diagnostic approaches, and priorities for research. In March 2012, the International Encephalitis Consortium, a committee begun in 2010 with members worldwide, held a meeting in Atlanta to discuss recent advances in encephalitis and to set priorities for future study. We present a consensus document that proposes a standardized case definition and diagnostic guidelines for evaluation of adults and children with suspected encephalitis. In addition, areas of research priority, including host genetics and selected emerging infections, are discussed. We anticipate that this document, representing a synthesis of our discussions and supported by literature, will serve as a practical aid to clinicians evaluating patients with suspected encephalitis and will identify key areas and approaches to advance our knowledge of encephalitis.

  17. Qualitative Event-Based Diagnosis: Case Study on the Second International Diagnostic Competition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daigle, Matthew; Roychoudhury, Indranil

    2010-01-01

    We describe a diagnosis algorithm entered into the Second International Diagnostic Competition. We focus on the first diagnostic problem of the industrial track of the competition in which a diagnosis algorithm must detect, isolate, and identify faults in an electrical power distribution testbed and provide corresponding recovery recommendations. The diagnosis algorithm embodies a model-based approach, centered around qualitative event-based fault isolation. Faults produce deviations in measured values from model-predicted values. The sequence of these deviations is matched to those predicted by the model in order to isolate faults. We augment this approach with model-based fault identification, which determines fault parameters and helps to further isolate faults. We describe the diagnosis approach, provide diagnosis results from running the algorithm on provided example scenarios, and discuss the issues faced, and lessons learned, from implementing the approach

  18. Interview with Mark Ashwill

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landsberger, Joe

    2006-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Mark Ashwill, Director of the Institute of International Education-Vietnam in Ha Noi, Vietnam, a branch of the Institute of International Education (IIE). In this interview, Ashwill talks about his work as Director of the Institute of International Education-Vietnam, the role that communications technology…

  19. Interview with Mark Ashwill

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landsberger, Joe

    2006-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Mark Ashwill, Director of the Institute of International Education-Vietnam in Ha Noi, Vietnam, a branch of the Institute of International Education (IIE). In this interview, Ashwill talks about his work as Director of the Institute of International Education-Vietnam, the role that communications technology…

  20. An International Comparison Using a Diagnostic Testing Model: Turkish Students' Profile of Mathematical Skills on TIMSS-R

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dogan, Enis; Tatsuoka, Kikumi

    2008-01-01

    This study illustrates how a diagnostic testing model can be used to make detailed comparisons between student populations participating in international assessments. The performance of Turkish students on the TIMSS-R mathematics test was reanalyzed with a diagnostic testing model called the Rule Space Model. First, mathematical and cognitive…

  1. A Validation Study of the International Consensus Diagnostic Criteria for Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gurrera, Ronald J; Mortillaro, Gino; Velamoor, Varadaraj; Caroff, Stanley N

    2017-02-01

    Neuroleptic malignant syndrome requires prompt recognition for effective management, but there are no established diagnostic criteria. This is the first validation study of recently published international expert consensus (IEC) diagnostic criteria, which include priority points assigned on the basis of the importance of each criterion for making a diagnosis of neuroleptic malignant syndrome. Data were extracted from 221 archived telephone contact reports of clinician-initiated calls to a national telephone consultation service from 1997 to 2009; each case was given a total priority point score on the basis of the IEC criteria. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision, (DSM-IV-TR) research criteria, in original form and modified to accept less than "severe" rigidity, served as the primary diagnostic reference standard. Consultants' diagnostic impressions were used as a secondary reference standard. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was used to optimize the priority point cutoff score with respect to the reference standards. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve ranged from 0.715 (95% confidence interval, 0.645-0.785; P = 1.62 × 10) for consultant diagnoses to 0.857 (95% confidence interval, 0.808-0.907; P < 5 × 10) for modified DSM-IV-TR criteria. The latter was associated with 69.6% sensitivity and 90.7% specificity. Agreement was best between IEC criteria with a cutoff score of 74 and modified DSM-IV-TR criteria (sensitivity, 69.6%; specificity, 90.7%); this cutoff score demonstrated the highest agreement in all comparisons. Consultant diagnoses showed much better agreement with modified, compared with original, DSM-IV-TR criteria, suggesting that the DSM-IV-TR criterion of "severe" rigidity may be more restrictive than what most knowledgeable clinicians use in practice.

  2. A Validation Study of the Web Screening Questionnaire (WSQ) Compared With the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview-Plus (MINI-Plus).

    PubMed

    Meuldijk, Denise; Giltay, Erik J; Carlier, Ingrid Ve; van Vliet, Irene M; van Hemert, Albert M; Zitman, Frans G

    2017-08-29

    There is a need for brief screening methods for psychiatric disorders in clinical practice. This study assesses the validity and accuracy of a brief self-report screening questionnaire, the Web Screening Questionnaire (WSQ), in detecting psychiatric disorders in a study group comprising the general population and psychiatric outpatients aged 18 years and older. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the WSQ is an adequate test to screen for the presence of depressive and anxiety disorders in clinical practice. Participants were 1292 adults (1117 subjects from the general population and 175 psychiatric outpatients), aged 18 to 65 years. The discriminant characteristics of the WSQ were examined in relation to the ("gold standard") Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview-Plus (MINI-Plus) disorders, by means of sensitivity, specificity, area under the curve (AUC), and positive and negative predictive values (PPVs, NPVs). The specificity of the WSQ to individually detect depressive disorders, anxiety disorders, and alcohol abuse or dependence ranged from 0.89 to 0.97 for most disorders, with the exception of post-traumatic stress disorder (0.52) and specific phobia (0.73). The sensitivity values ranged from 0.67 to 1.00, with the exception of depressive disorder (0.56) and alcohol abuse or dependence (0.56). Given the low prevalence of separate disorders in the general population sample, NPVs were extremely high across disorders (≥0.97), whereas PPVs were of poor strength (range 0.02-0.33). In this study group, the WSQ was a relatively good screening tool to identify individuals without a depressive or anxiety disorder, as it accurately identified those unlikely to suffer from these disorders (except for post-traumatic stress disorders and specific phobias). However, in case of a positive WSQ screening result, further diagnostic procedures are required.

  3. Method for remote diagnostics of the internal structure of layered media

    SciTech Connect

    Lychagov, V V; Kal'yanov, A L; Ryabukho, V P; Lyakin, D V

    2008-06-30

    The method of autocorrelation low coherence interferometry is proposed for diagnostics of inhomogeneities and the internal structure of layered technical and biological samples. In this method the low coherence optical field reflected from the layered sample is analysed by using a Michelson interferometer. Because the object is outside the interferometer, the distance between the interferometer and the object under study is not limited and thus the object can move during the measurements. Theoretical substantiation of the autocorrelation method for media with discrete and continuous optical structure modifications is presented. (special issue devoted to application of laser technologies in biophotonics and biomedical studies)

  4. Student and intern awareness of ionising radiation exposure from common diagnostic imaging procedures.

    PubMed

    Zhou, G Z; Wong, D D; Nguyen, L K; Mendelson, R M

    2010-02-01

    This study aims to evaluate medical student and intern awareness of ionising radiation exposure from common diagnostic imaging procedures and to suggest how education could be improved. Fourth to sixth year medical students enrolled at a Western Australian university and interns from three teaching hospitals in Perth were recruited. Participants were asked to complete a questionnaire consisting of 26 questions on their background, knowledge of ionising radiation doses and learning preferences for future teaching on this subject. A total of 331 completed questionnaires were received (95.9%). Of the 17 questions assessing knowledge of ionising radiation, a mean score of 6.0 was obtained by respondents (95% CI 5.8-6.2). Up to 54.8% of respondents underestimated the radiation dose from commonly requested radiological procedures. Respondents (11.3 and 25.5%) incorrectly believed that ultrasound and MRI emit ionising radiation, respectively. Of the four subgroups of respondents, the intern doctor subgroup performed significantly better (mean score 6.9, P < 0.0001, 95% CI 6.5-7.3) than each of the three medical student subgroups. When asked for the preferred method of teaching for future radiation awareness, a combination of lectures, tutorials and workshops was preferred. This study has clearly shown that awareness of ionising radiation from diagnostic imaging is lacking among senior medical students and interns. The results highlight the need for improved education to minimise unnecessary exposure of patients and the community to radiation. Further studies are required to determine the most effective form of education.

  5. International Harmonization of Nomenclature and Diagnostic Criteria (INHAND) for Lesions in the Minipig.

    PubMed

    Skydsgaard, Mikala

    2016-04-01

    The International Harmonization of Nomenclature and Diagnostic Criteria (INHAND) is a global project establishing diagnostic criteria and nomenclature for both proliferative and nonproliferative changes in laboratory animals. Nonrodent working groups (NRWGs) have been established for the dog, nonhuman primate, minipig, and the rabbit. The Global Editorial and Steering Committee (GESC) oversees the activities of the INHAND projects and is composed of toxicologic pathologists from all of the participating societies. In 2012, INHAND GESC began a collaboration with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (USFDA) in adapting INHAND terminology for standardized nonclinical data submission to the FDA. The Standard for Exchange of Nonclinical Data is an implementation of the Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium Study Data Tabulation Model for nonclinical studies. The NRWG for the minipig consists of toxicologic and diagnostic pathologists from Japan, North America, and Europe, and the group has 15 members including a GESC representative. The NRWGs are reviewing the applicability of the rodent nomenclature for the species and providing terminology unique for the species as well as determining rodent terminology not appropriate for the species. This information will be published with representative illustrations and references.

  6. A new asteroseismic diagnostic for internal rotation in γ Doradus stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouazzani, Rhita-Maria; Salmon, S. J. A. J.; Antoci, V.; Bedding, T. R.; Murphy, S. J.; Roxburgh, I. W.

    2017-02-01

    With four years of nearly continuous photometry from Kepler, we are finally in a good position to apply asteroseismology to γ Doradus stars. In particular, several analyses have demonstrated the possibility to detect non-uniform period spacings, which have been predicted to be directly related to rotation. In this paper, we define a new seismic diagnostic for rotation in γ Doradus stars which are too rapidly rotating to present rotational splittings. Based on the non-uniformity of their period spacings, we define the observable Σ as the slope of the period spacing when plotted as a function of period. We provide a one-to-one relation between this observable Σ and the internal rotation, which applies widely in the instability strip of γ Doradus stars. We apply the diagnostic to a handful of stars observed by Kepler. Thanks to g modes in γ Doradus stars, we are now able to determine the internal rotation of stars on the lower main sequence, which is still not possible for Sun-like stars.

  7. Diagnostic accuracy of the International HIV Dementia Scale and HIV Dementia Scale: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xueying; Zhou, Yang; Long, Jianxiong; Feng, Qiming; Wang, Rensheng; Su, Li; Zhao, Tingting; Wei, Bo

    2012-10-01

    This aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic accuracy of the International HIV Dementia Scale (IHDS) or HIV Dementia Scale (HDS) for the diagnosis of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). A comprehensive and systematic search was carried out in PubMed and EMBASE databases. Sensitivity, specificity, Q(*)-values, summary receiver operating characteristic curves and other measures of accuracy of IHDS or HDS in the diagnosis of HAND were summarized. Summary receiver operator characteristic (SROC) curve analysis for HAND data demonstrates a pooled sensitivity of 0.90 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.88-0.91] and overall specificity of 0.96 (95% CI, 0.95-0.97) for IHDS, the Q(*)-value for IHDS was 0.9195 and the diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) was 162.28 (95% CI, 91.82-286.81). HDS had an overall sensitivity of 0.39 (95% CI, 0.34-0.43) and specificity of 0.90 (95% CI, 0.89-0.91), the Q(*)-value for HDS was 0.6321 and DOR was 5.81 (95% CI, 3.64-9.82). There was significant heterogeneity for studies that reported IHDS and HDS. This meta-analysis has shown that IHDS and HDS may offer high diagnostic performance accuracy for the detection of HAND in primary health care and resource-limited settings. IHDS and HDS may require reformed neuropsychological characterization of impairments in accordance with regional culture and language in future international studies.

  8. Translating tuberculosis research into global policies: the example of an international collaboration on diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Ramsay, A; Steingart, K R; Cunningham, J; Pai, M

    2011-10-01

    Using the example of an international collaboration on tuberculosis (TB) diagnostics, we mapped the key stages and stakeholders involved in translating research into global policies. In our experience, the process begins with advocacy for high-quality, policy-relevant research and appropriate funding. Following the assessment of current policy and the identification of key study areas, policy-relevant research questions need to be formulated and prioritised. It is important that a framework for translating evidence into policy at the target policymaking level, in this case global, is available to researchers. This ensures that research questions, study designs and research standards are appropriate to the type and quality of evidence required. The framework may evolve during the period of research and, as evidence requirements may change, vigilance is required. Formal and informal multi-stakeholder partnerships, as well as information sharing through extensive networking, facilitate efficient building of a broad evidence base. Coordination of activities by an international, neutral body with strong convening powers is important, as is regular interaction with policy makers. It is recognised that studies on diagnostic accuracy provide weak evidence that a new diagnostic will improve patient care when implemented to scale in routine settings. This may be one reason why there has been poor uptake of new tools by national TB control programmes despite global policy recommendations. Stronger engagement with national policy makers and donors during the research-intopolicy process may be needed to ensure that their evidence requirements are met and that global policies translate into national policies. National policies are central to translating global policies into practice.

  9. International diagnostic guidelines for patients with HCV-related extrahepatic manifestations. A multidisciplinary expert statement.

    PubMed

    Ferri, Clodoveo; Ramos-Casals, Manuel; Zignego, Anna Linda; Arcaini, Luca; Roccatello, Dario; Antonelli, Alessandro; Saadoun, David; Desbois, Anne Claire; Sebastiani, Marco; Casato, Milvia; Lamprecht, Peter; Mangia, Alessandra; Tzioufas, Athanasios G; Younossi, Zobair M; Cacoub, Patrice

    2016-12-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is responsible for both hepatic and extra-hepatic disorders (HCV-EHDs); these latter are correlated on one hand clearly with HCV lymphotropism causing immune-system dysregulation as well as with viral oncogenic potential, and on the other hand probably with chronic inflammatory status causing cardio-metabolic complications as well as neurocognitive disturbances. The spectrum of HCV-EHDs ranges from mild or moderate manifestations, such as arthralgia, sicca syndrome, peripheral neuropathy, to severe, life-threatening complications, mainly vasculitis and neoplastic conditions. Given the clinical heterogeneity of HCV-EHDs, HCV-infected individuals are inevitably referred to different specialists according to the presenting/prevalent symptom(s); therefore, the availability of comprehensive diagnostic guidelines is necessary for a patient's whole assessment that is decisive for early diagnosis and correct therapeutic approach of various hepatic and HCV-EHDs, regardless of the specific competencies of different physicians or referral centers. In this respect, a multidisciplinary network of experts, the International Study Group of Extrahepatic Manifestations Related to Hepatitis C Virus Infection (ISG-EHCV), was organized with the intention to formulate diagnostic guidelines for the work-up of possible HCV-EHDs. There was a broad consensus among ISG-EHCV members on the proposed guidelines, which essentially are based on two main levels of patient's assessment. At the referral stage, it is proposed that all patients with HCV infection should be invariably examined by means of first-line diagnostic procedures including virological and hepatic parameter evaluation, as well as the detection of clinical findings that may suggest one or more HCV-EHDs. This preliminary assessment should reveal specific HCV-EHDs, which will be deeper analyzed by means of second-line, targeted investigations. The proposed multidisciplinary expert statement

  10. The European Union CREATE project: a model for international standardization of allergy diagnostics and vaccines.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Martin D; Ferreira, Fatima; Villalba, Mayte; Cromwell, Oliver; Bryan, Donna; Becker, Wolf-Meinhard; Fernández-Rivas, Montserrat; Durham, Stephen; Vieths, Stefan; van Ree, Ronald

    2008-11-01

    Allergen measurements are used extensively in the formulation of allergy diagnostics and vaccines, yet no purified international allergen standards are available for calibration purposes. The aims of the European Union CREATE project were to develop international standards with verifiable allergen content. Purified natural and recombinant allergens were analyzed by means of SDS-PAGE, mass spectrometry, circular dichroism spectra, and small-angle x-ray scattering. IgE reactivity was assessed by means of direct RAST, RAST inhibition, immunoblotting, and basophil histamine release with sera from 961 allergic patients. Three recombinant allergens, rBet v 1, rPhl p 5a, and rDer p 2, were structurally indistinguishable from their natural counterparts and showed excellent IgE reactivity suitable for use as certified reference materials. A second tier of allergens (rPhl p 5b, rOle e1, rDer p 1, rDer f 1, and rDer f 2) was identified that could provide suitable candidates for certified reference materials with minor improvements to the recombinant proteins. Only rPhl p 1 was considered unsuitable as a reference material. Quantitative ELISAs were identified that accurately measured each allergen, except for rPhl p 1. The CREATE project has provided a major step forward in allergen standardization and provides a model for the development of a comprehensive panel of international reference preparations that will harmonize allergen measurements worldwide.

  11. The time-frequency method of signal analysis in internal combustion engine diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avramchuk, V. S.; Kazmin, V. P.; Faerman, V. A.; Le, V. T.

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents the results of the study of applicability of time-frequency correlation functions to solving the problems of internal combustion engine fault diagnostics. The proposed methods are theoretically justified and experimentally tested. In particular, the method’s applicability is illustrated by the example of specially generated signals that simulate the vibration of an engine both during the normal operation and in the case of a malfunction in the system supplying fuel to the cylinders. This method was confirmed during an experiment with an automobile internal combustion engine. The study offers the main findings of the simulation and the experiment and highlights certain characteristic features of time-frequency autocorrelation functions that allow one to identify malfunctions in an engine’s cylinder. The possibility in principle of using time-frequency correlation functions in function testing of the internal combustion engine is demonstrated. The paper’s conclusion proposes further research directions including the application of the method to diagnosing automobile gearboxes.

  12. Brief Report: Excellent Agreement between Two Brief Autism Scales (Checklist for Autism Spectrum Disorder and Social Responsiveness Scale) Completed Independently by Parents and the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Michael J.; Mayes, Susan Dickerson; Smith, Laura A.

    2011-01-01

    Agreement between the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised (ADI-R) and two brief scales completed by parents was 93.1% for the Checklist for Autism Spectrum Disorder (CASD) and 89.7% for the Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS) in a sample of adolescents with suspected autism spectrum disorders. Our study is consistent with others showing that brief…

  13. Internal Amplification Control for a Cryptosporidium Diagnostic PCR: Construction and Clinical Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Hawash, Yousry; Ghonaim, M M; Al-Hazmi, Ayman S

    2015-04-01

    Various constituents in clinical specimens, particularly feces, can inhibit the PCR assay and lead to false-negative results. To ensure that negative results of a diagnostic PCR assay are true, it should be properly monitored by an inhibition control. In this study, a cloning vector harboring a modified target DNA sequence (≈375 bp) was constructed to be used as a competitive internal amplification control (IAC) for a conventional PCR assay that detects ≈550 bp of the Cryptosporidium oocyst wall protein (COWP) gene sequence in human feces. Modification of the native PCR target was carried out using a new approach comprising inverse PCR and restriction digestion techniques. IAC was included in the assay, with the estimated optimum concentration of 1 fg per reaction, as duplex PCR. When applied on fecal samples spiked with variable oocysts counts, ≈2 oocysts were theoretically enough for detection. When applied on 25 Cryptosporidium-positive fecal samples of various infection intensities, both targets were clearly detected with minimal competition noticed in 2-3 samples. Importantly, both the analytical and the diagnostic sensitivities of the PCR assay were not altered with integration of IAC into the reactions. When tried on 180 randomly collected fecal samples, 159 were Cryptosporidium-negatives. Although the native target DNA was absent, the IAC amplicon was obviously detected on gel of all the Cryptosporidium-negative samples. These results imply that running of the diagnostic PCR, inspired with the previously developed DNA extraction protocol and the constructed IAC, represents a useful tool for Cryptosporidium detection in human feces.

  14. Diagnostic accuracy of an international static-imaging telepathology consultation service.

    PubMed

    Halliday, B E; Bhattacharyya, A K; Graham, A R; Davis, J R; Leavitt, S A; Nagle, R B; McLaughlin, W J; Rivas, R A; Martinez, R; Krupinski, E A; Weinstein, R S

    1997-01-01

    Static-image and dynamic- (real-time) image telepathology are competing technologies. Although some studies suggest that the diagnostic accuracy of the dynamic-image telepathology approaches the accuracy of light microscopy, few reports have documented the diagnostic accuracy of static-image telepathology as used in the setting of an actual surgical pathology consultation practice. We report the results of an analysis of 171 telepathology consultation cases submitted to the Arizona-International Telemedicine Network (AITN). Digital images were submitted by pathologists from six participating institutions in Arizona, Mexico, and China. Telepathologists could render a telepathology diagnosis (TP) or defer rendering a diagnosis to obtain additional video images, glass slides for detailed analysis, or to obtain tissue blocks for special studies such as immunohistochemistry. The telepathologists rendered diagnoses for 144 cases and deferred 27 cases. Two pathologists retrospectively evaluated-glass slides from each case and rendered a consensus glass slide (GS) "truth" diagnosis. There was 88.2% concordance between TP and GS diagnoses (127 of 144 diagnoses). Concordance of 96.5% was achieved for clinically important diagnoses (139 of 144 diagnoses). Telepathologists deferred making a diagnosis to obtain glass slides for conventional light microscopy in 14 cases (8.1%) and for results of immunohistochemistry studies in 13 cases (7.6%). Thus, correct diagnoses were rendered by static-image telepathology in 127 of 171 cases (74.3%) at the time of telepathology diagnostic sessions. Inappropriate field selection and sampling biases of referring pathologists, as well as a tendency of static-image telepathologists to underestimate the complexity of some cases, may reduce the value of consultations based on the viewing of static images.

  15. Diagnostic accuracy of a clinical diagnosis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: an international case–cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Maher, Toby M.; Kolb, Martin; Poletti, Venerino; Nusser, Richard; Richeldi, Luca; Vancheri, Carlo; Wilsher, Margaret L.; Antoniou, Katerina M.; Behr, Jüergen; Bendstrup, Elisabeth; Brown, Kevin; Calandriello, Lucio; Corte, Tamera J.; Crestani, Bruno; Flaherty, Kevin; Glaspole, Ian; Grutters, Jan; Inoue, Yoshikazu; Kokosi, Maria; Kondoh, Yasuhiro; Kouranos, Vasileios; Kreuter, Michael; Johannson, Kerri; Judge, Eoin; Ley, Brett; Margaritopoulos, George; Martinez, Fernando J.; Molina-Molina, Maria; Morais, António; Nunes, Hilario; Raghu, Ganesh; Ryerson, Christopher J.; Selman, Moises; Spagnolo, Paolo; Taniguchi, Hiroyuki; Tomassetti, Sara; Valeyre, Dominique; Wijsenbeek, Marlies; Wuyts, Wim; Hansell, David; Wells, Athol

    2017-01-01

    We conducted an international study of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) diagnosis among a large group of physicians and compared their diagnostic performance to a panel of IPF experts. A total of 1141 respiratory physicians and 34 IPF experts participated. Participants evaluated 60 cases of interstitial lung disease (ILD) without interdisciplinary consultation. Diagnostic agreement was measured using the weighted kappa coefficient (κw). Prognostic discrimination between IPF and other ILDs was used to validate diagnostic accuracy for first-choice diagnoses of IPF and were compared using the C-index. A total of 404 physicians completed the study. Agreement for IPF diagnosis was higher among expert physicians (κw=0.65, IQR 0.53–0.72, p<0.0001) than academic physicians (κw=0.56, IQR 0.45–0.65, p<0.0001) or physicians with access to multidisciplinary team (MDT) meetings (κw=0.54, IQR 0.45–0.64, p<0.0001). The prognostic accuracy of academic physicians with >20 years of experience (C-index=0.72, IQR 0.0–0.73, p=0.229) and non-university hospital physicians with more than 20 years of experience, attending weekly MDT meetings (C-index=0.72, IQR 0.70–0.72, p=0.052), did not differ significantly (p=0.229 and p=0.052 respectively) from the expert panel (C-index=0.74 IQR 0.72–0.75). Experienced respiratory physicians at university-based institutions diagnose IPF with similar prognostic accuracy to IPF experts. Regular MDT meeting attendance improves the prognostic accuracy of experienced non-university practitioners to levels achieved by IPF experts. PMID:28860269

  16. Diagnostic accuracy of a clinical diagnosis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: an international case-cohort study.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Simon L F; Maher, Toby M; Kolb, Martin; Poletti, Venerino; Nusser, Richard; Richeldi, Luca; Vancheri, Carlo; Wilsher, Margaret L; Antoniou, Katerina M; Behr, Jüergen; Bendstrup, Elisabeth; Brown, Kevin; Calandriello, Lucio; Corte, Tamera J; Cottin, Vincent; Crestani, Bruno; Flaherty, Kevin; Glaspole, Ian; Grutters, Jan; Inoue, Yoshikazu; Kokosi, Maria; Kondoh, Yasuhiro; Kouranos, Vasileios; Kreuter, Michael; Johannson, Kerri; Judge, Eoin; Ley, Brett; Margaritopoulos, George; Martinez, Fernando J; Molina-Molina, Maria; Morais, António; Nunes, Hilario; Raghu, Ganesh; Ryerson, Christopher J; Selman, Moises; Spagnolo, Paolo; Taniguchi, Hiroyuki; Tomassetti, Sara; Valeyre, Dominique; Wijsenbeek, Marlies; Wuyts, Wim; Hansell, David; Wells, Athol

    2017-08-01

    We conducted an international study of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) diagnosis among a large group of physicians and compared their diagnostic performance to a panel of IPF experts.A total of 1141 respiratory physicians and 34 IPF experts participated. Participants evaluated 60 cases of interstitial lung disease (ILD) without interdisciplinary consultation. Diagnostic agreement was measured using the weighted kappa coefficient (κw). Prognostic discrimination between IPF and other ILDs was used to validate diagnostic accuracy for first-choice diagnoses of IPF and were compared using the C-index.A total of 404 physicians completed the study. Agreement for IPF diagnosis was higher among expert physicians (κw=0.65, IQR 0.53-0.72, p<0.0001) than academic physicians (κw=0.56, IQR 0.45-0.65, p<0.0001) or physicians with access to multidisciplinary team (MDT) meetings (κw=0.54, IQR 0.45-0.64, p<0.0001). The prognostic accuracy of academic physicians with >20 years of experience (C-index=0.72, IQR 0.0-0.73, p=0.229) and non-university hospital physicians with more than 20 years of experience, attending weekly MDT meetings (C-index=0.72, IQR 0.70-0.72, p=0.052), did not differ significantly (p=0.229 and p=0.052 respectively) from the expert panel (C-index=0.74 IQR 0.72-0.75).Experienced respiratory physicians at university-based institutions diagnose IPF with similar prognostic accuracy to IPF experts. Regular MDT meeting attendance improves the prognostic accuracy of experienced non-university practitioners to levels achieved by IPF experts. Copyright ©ERS 2017.

  17. International Harmonization of Nomenclature and Diagnostic Criteria (INHAND): Progress to Date and Future Plans.

    PubMed

    Keenan, C M; Baker, J; Bradley, A; Goodman, D G; Harada, T; Herbert, R; Kaufmann, W; Kellner, R; Mahler, B; Meseck, E; Nolte, T; Rittinghausen, S; Vahle, J; Yoshizawa, K

    2015-07-01

    The International Harmonization of Nomenclature and Diagnostic Criteria for Lesions in Rats and Mice proposal (INHAND) has been operational since 2005. A Global Editorial Steering Committee manages the overall objectives of the project, and the development of harmonized terminology for each organ system is the responsibility of the Organ Working Groups, drawing upon experts from North America, Europe, and Japan. Great progress has been made with 9 systems published to date--respiratory, hepatobiliary, urinary, central/peripheral nervous systems, male reproductive and mammary, zymbals, clitoral, and preputial glands in Toxicologic Pathology and the integument and soft tissue and female reproductive in the Journal of Toxicologic Pathology as supplements and on a Web site--www.goReni.org. INHAND nomenclature guides offer diagnostic criteria and guidelines for recording lesions observed in rodent toxicity and carcinogenicity studies. The guides provide representative photomicrographs of morphologic changes, information regarding pathogenesis, and key references. The purpose of this brief communication is to provide an update on the progress of INHAND. © 2014 by The Author(s).

  18. A study to establish international diagnostic reference levels for paediatric computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Vassileva, J; Rehani, M; Kostova-Lefterova, D; Al-Naemi, H M; Al Suwaidi, J S; Arandjic, D; Bashier, E H O; Kodlulovich Renha, S; El-Nachef, L; Aguilar, J G; Gershan, V; Gershkevitsh, E; Gruppetta, E; Hustuc, A; Jauhari, A; Kharita, Mohammad Hassan; Khelassi-Toutaoui, N; Khosravi, H R; Khoury, H; Kralik, I; Mahere, S; Mazuoliene, J; Mora, P; Muhogora, W; Muthuvelu, P; Nikodemova, D; Novak, L; Pallewatte, A; Pekarovič, D; Shaaban, M; Shelly, E; Stepanyan, K; Thelsy, N; Visrutaratna, P; Zaman, A

    2015-07-01

    The article reports results from the largest international dose survey in paediatric computed tomography (CT) in 32 countries and proposes international diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) in terms of computed tomography dose index (CTDI vol) and dose length product (DLP). It also assesses whether mean or median values of individual facilities should be used. A total of 6115 individual patient data were recorded among four age groups: <1 y, >1-5 y, >5-10 y and >10-15 y. CTDIw, CTDI vol and DLP from the CT console were recorded in dedicated forms together with patient data and technical parameters. Statistical analysis was performed, and international DRLs were established at rounded 75th percentile values of distribution of median values from all CT facilities. The study presents evidence in favour of using median rather than mean of patient dose indices as the representative of typical local dose in a facility, and for establishing DRLs as third quartile of median values. International DRLs were established for paediatric CT examinations for routine head, chest and abdomen in the four age groups. DRLs for CTDI vol are similar to the reference values from other published reports, with some differences for chest and abdomen CT. Higher variations were observed between DLP values, based on a survey of whole multi-phase exams. It may be noted that other studies in literature were based on single phase only. DRLs reported in this article can be used in countries without sufficient medical physics support to identify non-optimised practice. Recommendations to improve the accuracy and importance of future surveys are provided.

  19. Development of three-tier heat, temperature and internal energy diagnostic test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurcay, Deniz; Gulbas, Etna

    2015-05-01

    Background:Misconceptions are major obstacles to learning physics, and the concepts of heat and temperature are some of the common misconceptions that are encountered in daily life. Therefore, it is important to develop valid and reliable tools to determine students' misconceptions about basic thermodynamics concepts. Three-tier tests are effective assessment tools to determine misconceptions in physics. Although a limited number of three-tier tests about heat and temperature are discussed in the literature, no reports discuss three-tier tests that simultaneously consider heat, temperature and internal energy. Purpose:The aim of this study is to develop a valid and reliable three-tier test to determine students' misconceptions about heat, temperature and internal energy. Sample:The sample consists of 462 11th-grade Anatolian high school students. Of the participants, 46.8% were female and 53.2% were male. Design and methods:This research takes the form of a survey study. Initially, a multiple-choice test was developed. To each multiple-choice question was added one open-ended question asking the students to explain their answers. This test was then administered to 259 high school students and the data were analyzed both quantitatively and qualitatively. The students' answers for each open-ended question were analyzed and used to create the choices for the second-tier questions of the test. Depending on those results, a three-tier Heat, Temperature and Internal Energy Diagnostic Test (HTIEDT) was developed by adding a second-tier and certainty response index to each item. This three-tier test was administered to the sample of 462 high school students. Results:The Cronbach alpha reliability for the test was estimated for correct and misconception scores as .75 and .68, respectively. The results of the study suggested that HTIEDT could be used as a valid and reliable test in determining misconceptions about heat, temperature and internal energy concepts.

  20. Show what you know and deal with stress yourself: a qualitative interview study of medical interns' perceptions of stress and gender.

    PubMed

    Verdonk, Petra; Räntzsch, Viktoria; de Vries, Remko; Houkes, Inge

    2014-05-17

    Medical students report high stress levels and in particular, the clinical phase is a demanding one. The field of medicine is still described as having a patriarchal culture which favors aspects like a physicians' perceived certainty and rationalism. Also, the Effort-Recovery Model explains stress as coming from a discrepancy between job demands, job control, and perceived work potential. Gendered differences in stress are reported, but not much is known about medical interns' perceptions of how gender plays in relation to stress. The aim of this study is to explore how medical interns experience and cope with stress, as well as how they reflect on the gendered aspects of stress. In order to do this, we have performed a qualitative study. In 2010-2011, semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with seventeen medical interns across all three years of the Masters programme (6 male, 11 female) at a Dutch medical school. The interview guide is based on gender theory, the Effort-Recovery Model, and empirical literature. Transcribed interviews have been analyzed thematically. First, stress mainly evolves from having to prove one's self and show off competencies and motivation ("Show What You Know…"). Second, interns seek own solutions for handling stress because it is not open for discussion (… "And Deal With Stress Yourself"). Patient encounters are a source of pride and satisfaction rather than a source of stress. But interns report having to present themselves as 'professional and self-confident', remaining silent about experiencing stress. Female students are perceived to have more stress and to study harder in order to live up to expectations. The implicit message interns hear is to remain silent about insecurities and stress, and, in particular, female students might face disadvantages. Students who feel less able to manifest the 'masculine protest' may benefit from a culture that embraces more collaborative styles, such as having open conversation

  1. Interview: interview with Gisbert Schneider.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Gisbert

    2012-10-01

    Gisbert Schneider studied biochemistry and computer science at the Free University of Berlin, Germany, where he received his doctoral degree in 1994. After several international post-doctoral research activities he joined F.Hoffmann-La Roche Pharmaceuticals in Basel, Switzerland, where he headed the cheminformatics group until 2001. He received his habilitation and venia legendi in biochemistry and bioinformatics from the University of Freiburg, Germany. From 2002 to 2009 he was Full Professor of Chem- and Bioinformatics (Beilstein Endowed Chair) at Goethe-University Frankfurt, Germany. In 2010 he joined ETH Zurich, Switzerland, as a Full Professor of Computer-Assisted Drug Design. Professor Schneider spoke to Future Medicinal Chemistry about how he became involved in the field, the effects advances in software have had on research and how computational chemistry is becoming more important in the role of a traditional medicinal chemist. Interview conducted by Isaac Bruce, Commissioning Editor.

  2. A clinical audit programme for diagnostic radiology: the approach adopted by the International Atomic Energy Agency.

    PubMed

    Faulkner, K; Järvinen, H; Butler, P; McLean, I D; Pentecost, M; Rickard, M; Abdullah, B

    2010-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has a mandate to assist member states in areas of human health and particularly in the use of radiation for diagnosis and treatment. Clinical audit is seen as an essential tool to assist in assuring the quality of radiation medicine, particularly in the instance of multidisciplinary audit of diagnostic radiology. Consequently, an external clinical audit programme has been developed by the IAEA to examine the structure and processes existent at a clinical site, with the basic objectives of: (1) improvement in the quality of patient care; (2) promotion of the effective use of resources; (3) enhancement of the provision and organisation of clinical services; (4) further professional education and training. These objectives apply in four general areas of service delivery, namely quality management and infrastructure, patient procedures, technical procedures and education, training and research. In the IAEA approach, the audit process is initiated by a request from the centre seeking the audit. A three-member team, comprising a radiologist, medical physicist and radiographer, subsequently undertakes a 5-d audit visit to the clinical site to perform the audit and write the formal audit report. Preparation for the audit visit is crucial and involves the local clinical centre completing a form, which provides the audit team with information on the clinical centre. While all main aspects of clinical structure and process are examined, particular attention is paid to radiation-related activities as described in the relevant documents such as the IAEA Basic Safety Standards, the Code of Practice for Dosimetry in Diagnostic Radiology and related equipment and quality assurance documentation. It should be stressed, however, that the clinical audit does not have any regulatory function. The main purpose of the IAEA approach to clinical audit is one of promoting quality improvement and learning. This paper describes the background to

  3. PREFACE: 25th International Congress on Condition Monitoring and Diagnostic Engineering (COMADEM 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Andrew; Mishra, Rakesh; Gu, Fengshou; Rao, Raj B. K. N.

    2012-05-01

    The proactive multidisciplinary conceptual philosophy of Condition Monitoring and Diagnostic Engineering Management (COMADEM) was conceived and has been nurtured, developed and sustained since 1988. Since then, it is gratifying to note that the condition monitoring, diagnostic and prognostic community worldwide (representing industrialists, academics, research and development organizations, professional/private establishments and many hardware/software vending organizations) has warmly welcomed and supported this venture. As is evidenced, many have reaped (and are reaping) the benefits of COMADEM interdiscipline through continuous knowledge discovery, generation and dissemination. We are now proud to celebrate the 25th Annual Event (Silver Jubilee) in Huddersfield, the most beautiful part of the United Kingdom. The theme of this Congress is 'Sustained Prosperity through Proactive Monitoring, Diagnosis, Prognosis and Management'. This proceedings is enriched by contributions from many keynote experts representing many industry and academic establishments worldwide. Authors from more than 30 different countries have pooled their rich multidisciplinary up-to-date knowledge, in order to share their invaluable experience with the COMADEM community. In this proceedings, the readers will find more than 120 refereed papers encompassing a number of topical areas of interest relating to the theme of the congress. The proceedings of COMADEM 2012 will appear in the Open Access Journal of Physics: Conference Series (JPCS), which is part of the IOP Conference Series. All papers published in the IOP Conference Series are fully citable and upon publication will be free to download. We would like to express our deep gratitude to all the keynote speakers, authors, referees, exhibitors, Technical Co-Sponsoring Organizations, Gold Sponsors, IOP Publishers, COMADEM 2012 organizing committee members, delegates and many others on whom the success of this prestigious event depends

  4. International Harmonization of Nomenclature and Diagnostic Criteria (INHAND) progress to date and future plans.

    PubMed

    Keenan, Charlotte M; Baker, Julia F; Bradley, Alys E; Goodman, Dawn G; Harada, Takanori; Herbert, Ronald; Kaufmann, Wolfgang; Kellner, Rupert; Mahler, Beth; Meseck, Emily; Nolte, Thomas; Rittinghausen, Susanne; Vahle, John; Yoshizawa, Katsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    The INHAND Proposal (International Harmonization of Nomenclature and Diagnostic Criteria for Lesions in Rats and Mice) has been operational since 2005. A Global Editorial Steering Committee (GESC) manages the overall objectives of the project and the development of harmonized terminology for each organ system is the responsibility of the Organ Working Groups (OWG), drawing upon experts from North America, Europe and Japan.Great progress has been made with 9 systems published to date - Respiratory, Hepatobiliary, Urinary, Central/Peripheral Nervous Systems, Male Reproductive and Mammary, Zymbals, Clitoral and Preputial Glands in Toxicologic Pathology and the Integument and Soft Tissue and Female Reproductive System in the Journal of Toxicologic Pathology as supplements and on a web site - www.goreni.org. INHAND nomenclature guides offer diagnostic criteria and guidelines for recording lesions observed in rodent toxicity and carcinogenicity studies. The guides provide representative photo-micrographs of morphologic changes, information regarding pathogenesis, and key references. During 2012, INHAND GESC representatives attended meetings with representatives of the FDA Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER), Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium (CDISC), and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Enterprise Vocabulary Services (EVS) to begin incorporation of INHAND terminology as preferred terminology for SEND (Standard for Exchange of Nonclinical Data) submissions to the FDA. The interest in utilizing the INHAND nomenclature, based on input from industry and government toxicologists as well as information technology specialists, suggests that there will be wide acceptance of this nomenclature. The purpose of this publication is to provide an update on the progress of INHAND.

  5. International recommendations and guidelines for the safe use of diagnostic ultrasound in medicine.

    PubMed

    Barnett, S B; Ter Haar, G R; Ziskin, M C; Rott, H D; Duck, F A; Maeda, K

    2000-03-01

    Modern sophisticated ultrasonographic equipment is capable of delivering substantial levels of acoustic energy into the body when used at maximum outputs. The risk of producing bioeffects has been studied by international expert groups during symposia supported by the World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology (WFUMB). These have resulted in the publication of internationally accepted conclusions and recommendations. National ultrasound safety committees have published guidelines as well. These recommendations and safety guidelines offer valuable information to help users apply diagnostic ultrasound in a safe and effective manner. Acoustic output from ultrasound medical devices is directly regulated only in the USA and this is done by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). However, there is also a modern trend towards self-regulation which has implications for the worldwide use of diagnostic ultrasound. It has resulted in a move away from the relatively simple scheme of FDA-enforced, application-specific limits on acoustic output to a scheme whereby risk of adverse effects of ultrasound exposure is assessed from information provided by the equipment in the form of a real-time display of safety indices. Under this option, the FDA allows a relaxation of some intensity limits, specifically approving the use of medical ultrasound devices that can expose the fetus or embryo to nearly eight times the intensity that was previously allowed. The shift of responsibility for risk assessment from a regulatory authority to the user creates an urgent need for awareness of risk and the development of knowledgeable and responsible attitudes to safety issues. To encourage this approach, it is incumbent on authorities, ultrasound societies and expert groups to provide relevant information on biological effects that might result from ultrasonographic procedures. It is obvious from the continued stream of enquiries received by ultrasound societies that effective

  6. How to Move Beyond the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders/International Classification of Diseases.

    PubMed

    Schildkrout, Barbara

    2016-10-01

    A new nosology for mental disorders is needed as a basis for effective scientific inquiry. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders and International Classification of Diseases diagnoses are not natural, biological categories, and these diagnostic systems do not address mental phenomena that exist on a spectrum. Advances in neuroscience offer the hope of breakthroughs for diagnosing and treating major mental illness in the future. At present, a neuroscience-based understanding of brain/behavior relationships can reshape clinical thinking. Neuroscience literacy allows psychiatrists to formulate biologically informed psychological theories, to follow neuroscientific literature pertinent to psychiatry, and to embark on a path toward neurologically informed clinical thinking that can help move the field away from Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders and International Classification of Diseases conceptualizations. Psychiatrists are urged to work toward attaining neuroscience literacy to prepare for and contribute to the development of a new nosology.

  7. Justification of diagnostic medical exposures: some practical issues. Report of an International Atomic Energy Agency Consultation.

    PubMed

    Malone, J; Guleria, R; Craven, C; Horton, P; Järvinen, H; Mayo, J; O'reilly, G; Picano, E; Remedios, D; Le Heron, J; Rehani, M; Holmberg, O; Czarwinski, R

    2012-05-01

    The Radiation Protection of Patients Unit of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is concerned about the effectiveness of justification of diagnostic medical exposures. Recent published work and the report of an initial IAEA consultation in the area gave grounds for such concerns. There is a significant level of inappropriate usage, and, in some cases, a poor level of awareness of dose and risk among some key groups involved. This article aims to address this. The IAEA convened a second group of experts in November 2008 to review practical and achievable actions that might lead to more effective justification. This report summarises the matters that this group considered and the outcome of their deliberations. There is a need for improved communication, both within professions and between professionals on one hand, and between professionals and the patients/public on the other. Coupled with this, the issue of consent to imaging procedures was revisited. The need for good evidence-based referral guidelines or criteria of acceptability was emphasised, as was the need for their global adaptation and dissemination. Clinical audit was regarded as a key tool in ensuring that justification becomes an effective, transparent and accountable part of normal radiological practice. In summary, justification would be facilitated by the "3 As": awareness, appropriateness and audit.

  8. Standardization of Negative Controls in Diagnostic Immunohistochemistry: Recommendations From the International Ad Hoc Expert Panel

    PubMed Central

    Torlakovic, Emina E.; Francis, Glenn; Garratt, John; Gilks, Blake; Hyjek, Elizabeth; Ibrahim, Merdol; Miller, Rodney; Nielsen, Søren; Petcu, Eugen B.; Swanson, Paul E.; Taylor, Clive R.; Vyberg, Mogens

    2014-01-01

    Standardization of controls, both positive and negative controls, is needed for diagnostic immunohistochemistry (dIHC). The use of IHC-negative controls, irrespective of type, although well established, is not standardized. As such, the relevance and applicability of negative controls continues to challenge both pathologists and laboratory budgets. Despite the clear theoretical notion that appropriate controls serve to demonstrate the sensitivity and specificity of the dIHC test, it remains unclear which types of positive and negative controls are applicable and/or useful in day-to-day clinical practice. There is a perceived need to provide “best practice recommendations” for the use of negative controls. This perception is driven not only by logistics and cost issues, but also by increased pressure for accurate IHC testing, especially when IHC is performed for predictive markers, the number of which is rising as personalized medicine continues to develop. Herein, an international ad hoc expert panel reviews classification of negative controls relevant to clinical practice, proposes standard terminology for negative controls, considers the total evidence of IHC specificity that is available to pathologists, and develops a set of recommendations for the use of negative controls in dIHC based on “fit-for-use” principles. PMID:24714041

  9. Optimizing an Internal Airway Percussion Device for Facilitating Exhalate Diagnostics of the Human Respiratory System.

    PubMed

    Afshar-Mohajer, Nima; Wu, Chang-Yu; Tsai, Hsiu-Wen; Silverman, Erin; Davenport, Paul; Hegde, Satyanarayan

    2015-03-31

    There is an urgent need for simple, inexpensive, noninvasive, and repeatable technique for the diagnosis of pulmonary diseases. Bronchoalveolar lavage, which is the gold standard diagnostic method for pulmonary diseases, does not meet any of these criteria. This study seeks to develop and optimize a novel technique of Internal Airway Percussion (IAP) to facilitate the collection and characterization of human respiratory system exhalates. The IAP device transmits sound waves into the respiratory tract, thereby increasing the release of aerosolized particles within exhaled breath by vibrating both lungs. Nine combinations of sound wave frequencies and amplitudes were studied to determine optimal frequency and amplitude combination for maximum aerosol particle gain in healthy human subjects. Square-shaped sound waves generated at 15 Hz and 3 cm H2O resulted in 15 times greater total mass of collected particles in the first 2 min of sampling, and 1.2 to 1.5 times increase in count median diameter of the particles. IAP, optimized at the frequency of 15 Hz and the pressure amplitude of 3 cm H2O, increased the total mass of particles exhaled from the human respiratory system. IAP has a broad range of potential clinical applications for noninvasive diagnosis of lung diseases including asthma, cystic fibrosis, pneumonia, and lung cancer, along with improvement of mucus clearance.

  10. International heterogeneity in diagnostic frequency and clinical outcomes of ascending aortic intramural hematoma.

    PubMed

    Pelzel, Jamie M; Braverman, Alan C; Hirsch, Alan T; Harris, Kevin M

    2007-11-01

    Differing diagnostic frequencies and management strategies for intramural hematoma (IMH) have been described in North American (NA)/European and Japanese/Korean studies. All publications including type-A aortic IMH were reviewed for details on patient demographics, treatment strategy, and clinical outcomes. Publications were stratified by the geographic region (NA/Europe or Japan/Korea). IMH, as a percentage of aortic dissection, occurs more frequently in Japan/Korea versus NA/Europe (31.7% vs 10.9%, P < .0001). The proportion of patients treated with early medical therapy is greater in Japanese/Korean studies (77.9% vs 48.8% in NA/Europe, P < .0001). However, the overall mortality is significantly lower in Japan/Korea compared with NA/Europe (9.4% vs 20.6%, odds ratio = 2.80, P = .003) in part because of the lower mortality with early medical therapy (7.8% vs 33.3%, P < .0001). There is significant international heterogeneity in the diagnosis and clinical outcomes of ascending IMH. IMH is diagnosed more frequently and has better overall outcomes in Japan/Korea.

  11. Standardization of negative controls in diagnostic immunohistochemistry: recommendations from the international ad hoc expert panel.

    PubMed

    Torlakovic, Emina E; Francis, Glenn; Garratt, John; Gilks, Blake; Hyjek, Elizabeth; Ibrahim, Merdol; Miller, Rodney; Nielsen, Søren; Petcu, Eugen B; Swanson, Paul E; Taylor, Clive R; Vyberg, Mogens

    2014-04-01

    Standardization of controls, both positive and negative controls, is needed for diagnostic immunohistochemistry (dIHC). The use of IHC-negative controls, irrespective of type, although well established, is not standardized. As such, the relevance and applicability of negative controls continues to challenge both pathologists and laboratory budgets. Despite the clear theoretical notion that appropriate controls serve to demonstrate the sensitivity and specificity of the dIHC test, it remains unclear which types of positive and negative controls are applicable and/or useful in day-to-day clinical practice. There is a perceived need to provide "best practice recommendations" for the use of negative controls. This perception is driven not only by logistics and cost issues, but also by increased pressure for accurate IHC testing, especially when IHC is performed for predictive markers, the number of which is rising as personalized medicine continues to develop. Herein, an international ad hoc expert panel reviews classification of negative controls relevant to clinical practice, proposes standard terminology for negative controls, considers the total evidence of IHC specificity that is available to pathologists, and develops a set of recommendations for the use of negative controls in dIHC based on "fit-for-use" principles.

  12. Justification of diagnostic medical exposures: some practical issues. Report of an International Atomic Energy Agency Consultation

    PubMed Central

    Malone, J; Guleria, R; Craven, C; Horton, P; Järvinen, H; Mayo, J; O’reilly, G; Picano, E; Remedios, D; Le Heron, J; Rehani, M; Holmberg, O; Czarwinski, R

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The Radiation Protection of Patients Unit of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is concerned about the effectiveness of justification of diagnostic medical exposures. Recent published work and the report of an initial IAEA consultation in the area gave grounds for such concerns. There is a significant level of inappropriate usage, and, in some cases, a poor level of awareness of dose and risk among some key groups involved. This article aims to address this. Methods The IAEA convened a second group of experts in November 2008 to review practical and achievable actions that might lead to more effective justification. Results This report summarises the matters that this group considered and the outcome of their deliberations. There is a need for improved communication, both within professions and between professionals on one hand, and between professionals and the patients/public on the other. Coupled with this, the issue of consent to imaging procedures was revisited. The need for good evidence-based referral guidelines or criteria of acceptability was emphasised, as was the need for their global adaptation and dissemination. Conclusion Clinical audit was regarded as a key tool in ensuring that justification becomes an effective, transparent and accountable part of normal radiological practice. In summary, justification would be facilitated by the “3 As”: awareness, appropriateness and audit. PMID:21343316

  13. Cross-cultural validation of the Falls Efficacy Scale International (FES-I) using self-report and interview-based questionnaires among Persian-speaking elderly adults.

    PubMed

    Baharlouei, Hamzeh; Salavati, Mahyar; Akhbari, Behnam; Mosallanezhad, Zahra; Mazaheri, Masood; Negahban, Hossein

    2013-01-01

    FES-I has been designed to assess fear of falling (FoF). The purpose of this study was to establish the Persian-language version of the FES-I and to assess its psychometric properties under different modes of administration: self-report and interview-based. Participants included 191 elderly people aged over 60 who were mostly community dwelling. With an interval of 14 days, 97 volunteers completed the questionnaire in the retest session. To evaluate the construct validity, we assessed the ability of the FES-I to discriminate people based on gender, level of education, number of falls and FoF. The correlation with the Short Form of Health Survey (SF-36), Timed Up and Go (TUG) and Functional Reach Test (FRT) was also determined to test validity. Internal consistency was excellent in both self-report (0.93) and interview (0.92) versions. All intra-class correlations (ICCs) were above 0.70 with the highest reliability obtained for the condition where the interview based FES-I was used in both test and retest sessions. The strength of correlation between the FES-I and TUG varied based on mode of administration: moderate for interview and high for self-report mode. The FES-I had a higher correlation with the SF-36 subscales of physical health than subscales of mental health. The FES-I had the ability to discriminate the participants based on gender, educational level, and number of falls and FoF. In conclusion, both interview and self-report versions of the FES-I demonstrated acceptable measurement properties to assess FoF in Iranian elderly persons.

  14. Does Parental Psychological Control Relate to Internalizing and Externalizing Problems in Early Childhood? An Examination Using the Berkeley Puppet Interview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Lisanne L.; Otten, Roy; Janssens, Jan M. A. M.; Soenens, Bart; Kuntsche, Emmanuel; Engels, Rutger C. M. E.

    2013-01-01

    Parental psychological control has been linked to symptoms of psychopathology in adolescence, yet less is known about its correlates in childhood. The current study is among the first to address whether psychological control is related to internalizing and externalizing problems in early childhood. A community sample of 298 children aged 7.04…

  15. Does Parental Psychological Control Relate to Internalizing and Externalizing Problems in Early Childhood? An Examination Using the Berkeley Puppet Interview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Lisanne L.; Otten, Roy; Janssens, Jan M. A. M.; Soenens, Bart; Kuntsche, Emmanuel; Engels, Rutger C. M. E.

    2013-01-01

    Parental psychological control has been linked to symptoms of psychopathology in adolescence, yet less is known about its correlates in childhood. The current study is among the first to address whether psychological control is related to internalizing and externalizing problems in early childhood. A community sample of 298 children aged 7.04…

  16. Preparation and applications of the International Aquatic Animal Health Code and Diagnostic Manual for Aquatic Animal Diseases of the Office International des Epizooties.

    PubMed

    Håstein, T

    1996-06-01

    The Office International des Epizooties (OIE) has recently prepared an International Aquatic Animal Health Code, based on the principles set out in the corresponding OIE International Animal Health Code for terrestrial animals. The principal aim of the Code and the companion Diagnostic Manual for Aquatic Animal Diseases is to harmonise health guarantees for international trade in aquatic animals (fish, molluscs, crustaceans) and aquatic animal products, and to guide state Veterinary Services and/or other competent authorities in the preparation of appropriate health certificates. The Aquatic Animal Health Code and Manual provide detailed information on definitions, notifications, ethics in connection with certification, import risk analysis and import/export procedures. By these means, the preparation of international health certificates can be based on a uniform approach to health control in aquatic animal populations, using the standardised methods described in the Diagnostic Manual. In general, health certification under the Aquatic Animal Health Code is required only for diseases notifiable to the OIE. In addition to such notifiable diseases, however, the Code establishes a list of other significant diseases which need consideration. The listed diseases are recognised as serious transmissible diseases of socio-economic and/or public health importance, in relation to which the international trade of aquatic animals and their products poses a significant risk of transfer between countries. The current status of the Code and Manual is described in detail.

  17. PREFACE: Fourteenth International Symposium on Laser-Aided Plasma Diagnostics (LAPD14)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giudicotti, L.; Pasqualotto, R.

    2010-04-01

    The attached PDF contains, the full preface, a list of the scientific committee, former LAPD chairmen, local organizers, previous locations of LAPD meetings, participants email contacts and a list of the contributed papers. logo The Fourteenth International Symposium on Laser-Aided Plasma Diagnostics (LAPD14), was held from 21-24 September 2009 in Castelbrando, Treviso, Italy. The series of LAPD symposia was originally started at Kyushu University in 1983, and since then it has been organized every two years alternately in Japan, Europe and the United States, traveling around the world five times. Each LAPD Symposium brings together scientists working in different disciplines all related to the diagnostics of any type of plasma by laser or similar techniques. Researchers working on nuclear fusion, industrial process, low temperature plasma chemistry, laser development and material science, are invited to present prominent new diagnostic developments, with the aim of synergetic discussions. The broad spectrum of contributions represents one of the strengths of this symposium, which is an important, unique and fruitful source of cross-fertilization between these fields and a forum of discussions. The scope of LAPD14 was very broad, including many techniques related to laser probing of plasmas: incoherent and coherent Thomson scattering, polarimetry, interferometry, reflectometry, laser induced fluorescence, laser absorption spectroscopy, laser photodetachment spectroscopy, cavity ringdown spectroscopy, Raman scattering, reflectometry, microwave diagnostics and related laser and hardware developments. LAPD14 was attended by 66 researchers, from 15 different countries who presented a total of 57 papers (13 general, 12 topical, 10 short talks and 23 poster contributions). It is a tradition of LAPD that the first lecture of each meeting, which is more general and aims to review prominent new developments, is called 'the Akazaki lecture' in honor of Professor Masanori

  18. International veterinary epilepsy task force consensus proposal: diagnostic approach to epilepsy in dogs.

    PubMed

    De Risio, Luisa; Bhatti, Sofie; Muñana, Karen; Penderis, Jacques; Stein, Veronika; Tipold, Andrea; Berendt, Mette; Farqhuar, Robyn; Fischer, Andrea; Long, Sam; Mandigers, Paul J J; Matiasek, Kaspar; Packer, Rowena M A; Pakozdy, Akos; Patterson, Ned; Platt, Simon; Podell, Michael; Potschka, Heidrun; Batlle, Martí Pumarola; Rusbridge, Clare; Volk, Holger A

    2015-08-28

    This article outlines the consensus proposal on diagnosis of epilepsy in dogs by the International Veterinary Epilepsy Task Force. The aim of this consensus proposal is to improve consistency in the diagnosis of epilepsy in the clinical and research settings. The diagnostic approach to the patient presenting with a history of suspected epileptic seizures incorporates two fundamental steps: to establish if the events the animal is demonstrating truly represent epileptic seizures and if so, to identify their underlying cause. Differentiation of epileptic seizures from other non-epileptic episodic paroxysmal events can be challenging. Criteria that can be used to make this differentiation are presented in detail and discussed. Criteria for the diagnosis of idiopathic epilepsy (IE) are described in a three-tier system. Tier I confidence level for the diagnosis of IE is based on a history of two or more unprovoked epileptic seizures occurring at least 24 h apart, age at epileptic seizure onset of between six months and six years, unremarkable inter-ictal physical and neurological examination, and no significant abnormalities on minimum data base blood tests and urinalysis. Tier II confidence level for the diagnosis of IE is based on the factors listed in tier I and unremarkable fasting and post-prandial bile acids, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain (based on an epilepsy-specific brain MRI protocol) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis. Tier III confidence level for the diagnosis of IE is based on the factors listed in tier I and II and identification of electroencephalographic abnormalities characteristic for seizure disorders. The authors recommend performing MRI of the brain and routine CSF analysis, after exclusion of reactive seizures, in dogs with age at epileptic seizure onset <6 months or >6 years, inter-ictal neurological abnormalities consistent with intracranial neurolocalisation, status epilepticus or cluster seizure at epileptic seizure onset

  19. [Cross-Mapping: diagnostic labels formulated according to the ICNP® versus diagnosis of NANDA International].

    PubMed

    Tannure, Meire Chucre; Salgado, Patrícia de Oliveira; Chianca, Tânia Couto Machado

    2014-01-01

    This descriptive study aimed at elaborating nursing diagnostic labels according to ICNP®; conducting a cross-mapping between the diagnostic formulations and the diagnostic labels of NANDA-I; identifying the diagnostic labels thus obtained that were also listed in the NANDA-I; and mapping them according to Basic Human Needs. The workshop technique was applied to 32 intensive care nurses, the cross-mapping and validation based on agreement with experts. The workshop produced 1665 diagnostic labels which were further refined into 120 labels. They were then submitted to a cross-mapping process with both NANDA-I diagnostic labels and the Basic Human Needs. The mapping results underwent content validation by two expert nurses leading to concordance rates of 92% and 100%. It was found that 63 labels were listed in NANDA-I and 47 were not.

  20. The quality and diagnostic value of open narratives in verbal autopsy: a mixed-methods analysis of partnered interviews from Malawi.

    PubMed

    King, C; Zamawe, C; Banda, M; Bar-Zeev, N; Beard, J; Bird, J; Costello, A; Kazembe, P; Osrin, D; Fottrell, E

    2016-02-01

    Verbal autopsy (VA), the process of interviewing a deceased's family or caregiver about signs and symptoms leading up to death, employs tools that ask a series of closed questions and can include an open narrative where respondents give an unprompted account of events preceding death. The extent to which an individual interviewer, who generally does not interpret the data, affects the quality of this data, and therefore the assigned cause of death, is poorly documented. We aimed to examine inter-interviewer reliability of open narrative and closed question data gathered during VA interviews. During the introduction of VA data collection, as part of a larger study in Mchinji district, Malawi, we conducted partner interviews whereby two interviewers independently recorded open narrative and closed questions during the same interview. Closed questions were collected using a smartphone application (mobile-InterVA) and open narratives using pen and paper. We used mixed methods of analysis to evaluate the differences between recorded responses to open narratives and closed questions, causes of death assigned, and additional information gathered by open narrative. Eighteen partner interviews were conducted, with complete data for 11 pairs. Comparing closed questions between interviewers, the median number of differences was 1 (IQR: 0.5-3.5) of an average 65 answered; mean inter-interviewer concordance was 92% (IQR: 92-99%). Discrepancies in open narratives were summarized in five categories: demographics, history and care-seeking, diagnoses and symptoms, treatment and cultural. Most discrepancies were seen in the reporting of diagnoses and symptoms (e.g., malaria diagnosis); only one pair demonstrated no clear differences. The average number of clinical symptoms reported was 9 in open narratives and 20 in the closed questions. Open narratives contained additional information on health seeking and social issues surrounding deaths, which closed questions did not gather. The

  1. Narrative interviewing.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Claire; Kirkpatrick, Susan

    2016-06-01

    Introduction Narrative interviews place the people being interviewed at the heart of a research study. They are a means of collecting people's own stories about their experiences of health and illness. Narrative interviews can help researchers to better understand people's experiences and behaviours. Narratives may come closer to representing the context and integrity of people's lives than more quantitative means of research. Methodology Researchers using narrative interview techniques do not set out with a fixed agenda, rather they tend to let the interviewee control the direction, content and pace of the interview. The paper describes the interview process and the suggested approach to analysis of narrative interviews, We draw on the example from a study that used series of narrative interviews about people's experiences of taking antidepressants. Limitations Some people may find it particularly challenging to tell their story to a researcher in this way rather than be asked a series of questions like in a television or radio interview. Narrative research like all qualitative research does not set out to be generalisable and may only involve a small set of interviews.

  2. The Unstructured Clinical Interview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Karyn Dayle

    2010-01-01

    In mental health, family, and community counseling settings, master's-level counselors engage in unstructured clinical interviewing to develop diagnoses based on the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (4th ed., text rev.; "DSM-IV-TR"; American Psychiatric Association, 2000). Although counselors receive education about…

  3. The Unstructured Clinical Interview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Karyn Dayle

    2010-01-01

    In mental health, family, and community counseling settings, master's-level counselors engage in unstructured clinical interviewing to develop diagnoses based on the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (4th ed., text rev.; "DSM-IV-TR"; American Psychiatric Association, 2000). Although counselors receive education about…

  4. Interviewing Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorenzen, Elizabeth A.; And Others

    Directed especially at graduating college seniors, this paper contains information about employment interviews and how to prepare for them. Subjects discussed include the following: preparing for interviews (analyzing strengths and weaknesses, gathering information about the company); points to remember (dress codes, follow up thank-you letters);…

  5. Measurements of the internal magnetic field using the B-Stark motional Stark effect diagnostic on DIII-D (inivited).

    PubMed

    Pablant, N A; Burrell, K H; Groebner, R J; Holcomb, C T; Kaplan, D H

    2010-10-01

    Results are presented from the B-Stark diagnostic installed on the DIII-D tokamak. This diagnostic provides measurements of the magnitude and direction of the internal magnetic field. The B-Stark system is a version of a motional Stark effect (MSE) diagnostic based on the relative line intensities and spacing of the Stark split D(α) emission from injected neutral beams. This technique may have advantages over MSE polarimetry based diagnostics in future devices, such as the ITER. The B-Stark diagnostic technique and calibration procedures are discussed. The system is shown to provide accurate measurements of B(θ)/B(T) and ∣B∣ over a range of plasma conditions. Measurements have been made with toroidal fields in the range of 1.2-2.1 T, plasma currents in the range 0.5-2.0 MA, densities between 1.7 and 9.0×10(19) m(-3), and neutral beam voltages between 50 and 81 keV. The viewing direction and polarization dependent transmission properties of the collection optics are found using an in situ beam into gas calibration. These results are compared to values found from plasma equilibrium reconstructions and the MSE polarimetry system on DIII-D.

  6. Interviews with Students of High Confidence and Low Achievement. Mathematics Education Diagnostic and Instructional Centre (MEDIC) Report No. 5-76.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feghali, Issa

    A previous study had confirmed that a substantial number of low achievers in grades 5 through 8 had high algorithmic confidence in each of the four arithmetic operations with whole numbers. The purpose of the present study was to follow up the results through interviewing low achievement-high confidence students in order to ascertain if they…

  7. The Diagnostic Validity of Clinical Tests in Temporomandibular Internal Derangement: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Chaput, Eve; Gross, Anita; Stewart, Ryan; Nadeau, Gordon; Goldsmith, Charlie H

    2012-01-01

    To assess the diagnostic validity of clinical tests for temporomandibular internal derangement relative to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MEDLINE and Embase were searched from 1994 through 2009. Independent reviewers conducted study selection; risk of bias was assessed using Quality Assessment of studies of Diagnostic Accuracy included in Systematic reviews (QUADAS); ≥9/14) and data abstraction. Overall quality of evidence was profiled using Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE). Agreement was measured using quadratic weighted kappa (κw). Positive (+) or negative (-) likelihood ratios (LR) with 95% CIs were calculated and pooled using the DerSimonian-Laird method and a random-effects model when homogeneous (I(2)≥0.40, Q-test p≤0.10). We selected 8 of 36 studies identified. There is very low quality evidence that deflection (+LR: 6.37 [95% CI, 2.13-19.03]) and crepitation (LR:5.88 [95% CI, 1.95-17.76]) as single tests and crepitation, deflection, pain, and limited mouth opening as a cluster of tests are the most valuable for ruling in internal derangement without reduction (+LR:6.37 [95% CI, 2.13-19.03]), (-LR:0.27 [95% CI, 0.11-0.64]) while the test cluster click, deviation, and pain rules out internal derangement with reduction (-LR: 0.09 [95% CI, 0.01-0.72]). No single test or cluster of tests was conclusive and of significant value for ruling in internal derangement with reduction. Findings of this review will assist clinicians in deciding which diagnostic tests to use when internal derangement is suspected. The literature search revealed a lack of high-quality studies; further research with adequate description of patient populations, blinded assessments, and both sagittal and coronal MRI planes is therefore recommended. Purpose: To assess the diagnostic validity of clinical tests for temporomandibular internal derangement relative to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods: MEDLINE and Embase were searched from

  8. Test-Retest Reliability of the Chinese Version of the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children-Version 4 (DISC-IV)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ho, Ting-Pong; Leung, Patrick Wing-leung; Lee, Chi-chiu; Tang, Chun-pan; Hung, Se-fong; Kwong, Shi-leung; Lucas, Christopher P.; Lieh-Mak, Felice; Shaffer, David

    2005-01-01

    Background: Despite the huge youth population, there is a lack of psychiatric diagnostic instruments with reported psychometric properties in Chinese. This study reports the development of the Chinese version of DISC-IV and examines its test-retest reliability. Method: Seventy-eight parents and 79 youths (mean age 13.1 years) attending child…

  9. Mathematics diagnostic testing in engineering: an international comparison between Ireland and Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, M.; Fidalgo, C.; Bigotte de Almeida, M. E.; Branco, J. R.; Santos, V.; Murphy, E.; Fhloinn, E. Ní

    2015-09-01

    Concern has been expressed throughout Europe about the significant deficiencies in the basic mathematical skills of many engineering undergraduates. Mathematics diagnostic tests in the UK, Ireland and Portugal have shown these shortcomings, which provide a challenge to those striving to introduce more innovative educational practices into engineering education, such as projects or real-world problems. Every year, in the Dublin Institute of Technology (Ireland) and the Instituto Superior de Engenharia de Coimbra (Portugal), a diagnostic test is given to incoming first-year students. A comparison showed some potentially interesting differences between these students. In September 2013, a project was undertaken to compare mathematical competencies of incoming engineering students in both countries. A modified diagnostic test was devised and the results were then compared to ascertain if there are common areas of difficulty between students in Ireland and Portugal, or evidence of one group significantly outperforming the other in a particular area.

  10. 14th International Congress on Antiphospholipid Antibodies Task Force. Report on antiphospholipid syndrome laboratory diagnostics and trends.

    PubMed

    Bertolaccini, Maria Laura; Amengual, Olga; Andreoli, Laura; Atsumi, Tatsuya; Chighizola, Cecilia B; Forastiero, Ricardo; de Groot, Philip; Lakos, Gabriella; Lambert, Marc; Meroni, Pierluigi; Ortel, Thomas L; Petri, Michelle; Rahman, Anisur; Roubey, Robert; Sciascia, Savino; Snyder, Melissa; Tebo, Anne E; Tincani, Angela; Willis, Rohan

    2014-09-01

    Current classification criteria for definite Antiphospholipid Syndrome (APS) require the use of three laboratory assays to detect antiphospholipid antibodies (aCL, anti-β2GPI and LA) in the presence of at least one of the two major clinical manifestations (i.e. thrombosis or pregnancy morbidity) of the syndrome. However, several other autoantibodies shown to be directed to other proteins or their complex with phospholipids have been proposed to be relevant to APS but their clinical utility and their diagnostic value remains elusive. This report summarizes the findings, conclusions and recommendations of the "APS Task Force 3-Laboratory Diagnostics and Trends" meeting that took place during the 14th International Congress on Antiphospholipid Antibodies (APLA 2013, September 18-21, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil).

  11. Agreement and Diagnostic Performance of FITNESSGRAM®, International Obesity Task Force, and Hungarian National BMI Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laurson, Kelly R.; Welk, Gregory J.; Marton, Orsolya; Kaj, Mónika; Csányi, Tamás

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined agreement between all 3 standards (as well as relative diagnostic associations with metabolic syndrome) using a representative sample of youth from the Hungarian National Youth Fitness Study. Method: Body mass index (BMI) was assessed in a field sample of 2,352 adolescents (ages 10-18.5 years) and metabolic syndrome…

  12. Mathematics Diagnostic Testing in Engineering: An International Comparison between Ireland and Portugal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, M.; Fidalgo, C.; Bigotte de Almeida, M. E.; Branco, J. R.; Santos, V.; Murphy, E.; Ní Fhloinn, E.

    2015-01-01

    Concern has been expressed throughout Europe about the significant deficiencies in the basic mathematical skills of many engineering undergraduates. Mathematics diagnostic tests in the UK, Ireland and Portugal have shown these shortcomings, which provide a challenge to those striving to introduce more innovative educational practices into…

  13. Agreement and Diagnostic Performance of FITNESSGRAM®, International Obesity Task Force, and Hungarian National BMI Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laurson, Kelly R.; Welk, Gregory J.; Marton, Orsolya; Kaj, Mónika; Csányi, Tamás

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined agreement between all 3 standards (as well as relative diagnostic associations with metabolic syndrome) using a representative sample of youth from the Hungarian National Youth Fitness Study. Method: Body mass index (BMI) was assessed in a field sample of 2,352 adolescents (ages 10-18.5 years) and metabolic syndrome…

  14. Mathematics Diagnostic Testing in Engineering: An International Comparison between Ireland and Portugal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, M.; Fidalgo, C.; Bigotte de Almeida, M. E.; Branco, J. R.; Santos, V.; Murphy, E.; Ní Fhloinn, E.

    2015-01-01

    Concern has been expressed throughout Europe about the significant deficiencies in the basic mathematical skills of many engineering undergraduates. Mathematics diagnostic tests in the UK, Ireland and Portugal have shown these shortcomings, which provide a challenge to those striving to introduce more innovative educational practices into…

  15. Second International Diagnostic Accuracy Study for the Serological Detection of West Nile Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Papa, Anna; Sambri, Vittorio; Teichmann, Anette; Niedrig, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Background In recent decades, sporadic cases and outbreaks in humans of West Nile virus (WNV) infection have increased. Serological diagnosis of WNV infection can be performed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), immunofluorescence assay (IFA) neutralization test (NT) and by hemagglutination-inhibition assay. The aim of this study is to collect updated information regarding the performance accuracy of WNV serological diagnostics. Methodology/Principal findings In 2011, the European Network for the Diagnostics of Imported Viral Diseases-Collaborative Laboratory Response Network (ENIVD-CLRN) organized the second external quality assurance (EQA) study for the serological diagnosis of WNV infection. A serum panel of 13 samples (included sera reactive against WNV, plus specificity and negative controls) was sent to 48 laboratories involved in WNV diagnostics. Forty-seven of 48 laboratories from 30 countries participated in the study. Eight laboratories achieved 100% of concurrent and correct results. The main obstacle in other laboratories to achieving similar performances was the cross-reactivity of antibodies amongst heterologous flaviviruses. No differences were observed in performances of in-house and commercial test used by the laboratories. IFA was significantly more specific compared to ELISA in detecting IgG antibodies. The overall analytical sensitivity and specificity of diagnostic tests for IgM detection were 50% and 95%, respectively. In comparison, the overall sensitivity and specificity of diagnostic tests for IgG detection were 86% and 69%, respectively. Conclusions/Significance This EQA study demonstrates that there is still need to improve serological tests for WNV diagnosis. The low sensitivity of IgM detection suggests that there is a risk of overlooking WNV acute infections, whereas the low specificity for IgG detection demonstrates a high level of cross-reactivity with heterologous flaviviruses. PMID:23638205

  16. PREFACE: IX International Conference on Modern Techniques of Plasma Diagnostics and their Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savjolov, A. S.; Dodulad, E. I.

    2016-01-01

    The IX Conference on ''Modern Techniques of Plasma Diagnosis and their Application'' was held on 5 - 7 November, 2014 at National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (NRNU MEPhI). The goal of the conference was an exchange of information on both high-temperature and low-temperature plasma diagnostics as well as deliberation and analysis of various diagnostic techniques and their applicability in science, industry, ecology, medicine and other fields. The Conference also provided young scientists from scientific centres and universities engaged in plasma diagnostics with an opportunity to attend the lectures given by the leading specialists in this field as well as present their own results and findings. The first workshop titled ''Modern problems of plasma diagnostics and their application for control of chemicals and the environment'' took place at Moscow Engineering and Physics Institute (MEPhI) in June 1998 with the support of the Section on Diagnostics of the Council of Russian Academic of Science on Plasma Physics and since then these forums have been held at MEPhI every two years. In 2008 the workshop was assigned a conference status. More than 150 specialists on plasma diagnostics and students took part in the last conference. They represented leading Russian scientific centres (such as Troitsk Institute of Innovative and Thermonuclear Research, National Research Centre ''Kurchatov Institute'', Russian Federal Nuclear Centre - All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Experimental Physics and others) and universities from Belarus, Ukraine, Germany, USA, Belgium and Sweden. About 30 reports were made by young researchers, students and post-graduate students. All presentations during the conference were broadcasted online over the internet with viewers in Moscow, Prague, St. Petersburgh and other cities. The Conference was held within the framework of the Centre of Plasma, Laser Research and Technology supported by MEPhI Academic Excellence Project (Russian

  17. Interview Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Detroit Public Schools, MI.

    The questions in this interview guide pertain to the Detroit Public Schools Uniform Code of Student Conduct and City Wide Attendance Regulations. They are directed to school principals and assistant principals. The questions help to determine if the Uniform Code and Attendance Regulations were disseminated, if orientations were carried out, and…

  18. Faraday-effect polarimeter diagnostic for internal magnetic field fluctuation measurements in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.; Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.; Finkenthal, D.; Muscatello, C.; Taussig, D.; Boivin, R.

    2016-11-15

    Motivated by the need to measure fast equilibrium temporal dynamics, non-axisymmetric structures, and core magnetic fluctuations (coherent and broadband), a three-chord Faraday-effect polarimeter-interferometer system with fast time response and high phase resolution has recently been installed on the DIII-D tokamak. A novel detection scheme utilizing two probe beams and two detectors for each chord results in reduced phase noise and increased time response [δb ∼ 1G with up to 3 MHz bandwidth]. First measurement results were obtained during the recent DIII-D experimental campaign. Simultaneous Faraday and density measurements have been successfully demonstrated and high-frequency, up to 100 kHz, Faraday-effect perturbations have been observed. Preliminary comparisons with EFIT are used to validate diagnostic performance. Principle of the diagnostic and first experimental results is presented.

  19. Standardization of positive controls in diagnostic immunohistochemistry: recommendations from the International Ad Hoc Expert Committee.

    PubMed

    Torlakovic, Emina E; Nielsen, Søren; Francis, Glenn; Garratt, John; Gilks, Blake; Goldsmith, Jeffrey D; Hornick, Jason L; Hyjek, Elizabeth; Ibrahim, Merdol; Miller, Keith; Petcu, Eugen; Swanson, Paul E; Zhou, Xiaoge; Taylor, Clive R; Vyberg, Mogens

    2015-01-01

    Diagnostic immunohistochemistry (dIHC) has been practiced for several decades, with an ongoing expansion of applications for diagnostic use, and more recently for detection of prognostic and predictive biomarkers. However, standardization of practice has yet to be achieved, despite significant advances in methodology. An Ad Hoc Expert Committee was formed to address the standardization of controls, which is a missing link in demonstrating and assuring standardization of the various components of dIHC. This committee has also developed a concept of immunohistochemistry critical assay performance controls that are intended to facilitate methodology transfer and harmonization in dIHC. Furthermore, the committee has clarified definitions of IHC assay sensitivity and specificity, with special emphasis on how these definitions apply to positive controls. Recommendations for "best laboratory practice" regarding positive controls for dIHC are specified. The first set of immunohistochemistry critical assay performance controls for several frequently used IHC stains or tests is also developed and presented.

  20. Faraday-effect polarimeter diagnostic for internal magnetic field fluctuation measurements in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.; Finkenthal, D.; Muscatello, C.; Taussig, D.; Boivin, R.

    2016-11-01

    Motivated by the need to measure fast equilibrium temporal dynamics, non-axisymmetric structures, and core magnetic fluctuations (coherent and broadband), a three-chord Faraday-effect polarimeter-interferometer system with fast time response and high phase resolution has recently been installed on the DIII-D tokamak. A novel detection scheme utilizing two probe beams and two detectors for each chord results in reduced phase noise and increased time response [δb ˜ 1G with up to 3 MHz bandwidth]. First measurement results were obtained during the recent DIII-D experimental campaign. Simultaneous Faraday and density measurements have been successfully demonstrated and high-frequency, up to 100 kHz, Faraday-effect perturbations have been observed. Preliminary comparisons with EFIT are used to validate diagnostic performance. Principle of the diagnostic and first experimental results is presented.

  1. Faraday-effect polarimeter diagnostic for internal magnetic field fluctuation measurements in DIII-D.

    PubMed

    Chen, J; Ding, W X; Brower, D L; Finkenthal, D; Muscatello, C; Taussig, D; Boivin, R

    2016-11-01

    Motivated by the need to measure fast equilibrium temporal dynamics, non-axisymmetric structures, and core magnetic fluctuations (coherent and broadband), a three-chord Faraday-effect polarimeter-interferometer system with fast time response and high phase resolution has recently been installed on the DIII-D tokamak. A novel detection scheme utilizing two probe beams and two detectors for each chord results in reduced phase noise and increased time response [δb ∼ 1G with up to 3 MHz bandwidth]. First measurement results were obtained during the recent DIII-D experimental campaign. Simultaneous Faraday and density measurements have been successfully demonstrated and high-frequency, up to 100 kHz, Faraday-effect perturbations have been observed. Preliminary comparisons with EFIT are used to validate diagnostic performance. Principle of the diagnostic and first experimental results is presented.

  2. Consensus statement of the international summit on intellectual disability and Dementia related to post-diagnostic support.

    PubMed

    Dodd, Karen; Watchman, Karen; Janicki, Matthew P; Coppus, Antonia; Gaertner, Claudia; Fortea, Juan; Santos, Flavia H; Keller, Seth M; Strydom, Andre

    2017-09-07

    Post diagnostic support (PDS) has varied definitions within mainstream dementia services and different health and social care organizations, encompassing a range of supports that are offered to adults once diagnosed with dementia until death. An international summit on intellectual disability and dementia held in Glasgow, Scotland in 2016 identified how PDS applies to adults with an intellectual disability and dementia. The Summit proposed a model that encompassed seven focal areas: post-diagnostic counseling; psychological and medical surveillance; periodic reviews and adjustments to the dementia care plan; early identification of behaviour and psychological symptoms; reviews of care practices and supports for advanced dementia and end of life; supports to carers/ support staff; and evaluation of quality of life. It also explored current practices in providing PDS in intellectual disability services. The Summit concluded that although there is limited research evidence for pharmacological or non-pharmacological interventions for people with intellectual disability and dementia, viable resources and guidelines describe practical approaches drawn from clinical practice. Post diagnostic support is essential, and the model components in place for the general population, and proposed here for use within the intellectual disability field, need to be individualized and adapted to the person's needs as dementia progresses. Recommendations for future research include examining the prevalence and nature of behavioral and psychological symptoms (BPSD) in adults with an intellectual disability who develop dementia, the effectiveness of different non-pharmacological interventions, the interaction between pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions, and the utility of different models of support.

  3. Development of internally controlled duplex real-time NASBA diagnostics assays for the detection of microorganisms associated with bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Clancy, Eoin; Coughlan, Helena; Higgins, Owen; Boo, Teck Wee; Cormican, Martin; Barrett, Louise; Smith, Terry J; Reddington, Kate; Barry, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Three duplex molecular beacon based real-time Nucleic Acid Sequence Based Amplification (NASBA) assays have been designed and experimentally validated targeting RNA transcripts for the detection and identification of Haemophilus influenzae, Neisseria meningitidis and Streptococcus pneumoniae respectively. Each real-time NASBA diagnostics assay includes an endogenous non-competitive Internal Amplification Control (IAC) to amplify the splice variant 1 mRNA of the Homo sapiens TBP gene from human total RNA. All three duplex real-time NASBA diagnostics assays were determined to be 100% specific for the target species tested for. Also the Limits of Detection (LODs) for the H. influenzae, N. meningitidis and S. pneumoniae duplex real-time NASBA assays were 55.36, 0.99, and 57.24 Cell Equivalents (CE) respectively. These robust duplex real-time NASBA diagnostics assays have the potential to be used in a clinical setting for the rapid (<60min) specific detection and identification of the most prominent microorganisms associated with bacterial meningitis in humans.

  4. Routine internal- and external-quality control data in clinical laboratories for estimating measurement and diagnostic uncertainty using GUM principles.

    PubMed

    Magnusson, Bertil; Ossowicki, Haakan; Rienitz, Olaf; Theodorsson, Elvar

    2012-05-01

    Healthcare laboratories are increasingly joining into larger laboratory organizations encompassing several physical laboratories. This caters for important new opportunities for re-defining the concept of a 'laboratory' to encompass all laboratories and measurement methods measuring the same measurand for a population of patients. In order to make measurement results, comparable bias should be minimized or eliminated and measurement uncertainty properly evaluated for all methods used for a particular patient population. The measurement as well as diagnostic uncertainty can be evaluated from internal and external quality control results using GUM principles. In this paper the uncertainty evaluations are described in detail using only two main components, within-laboratory reproducibility and uncertainty of the bias component according to a Nordtest guideline. The evaluation is exemplified for the determination of creatinine in serum for a conglomerate of laboratories both expressed in absolute units (μmol/L) and relative (%). An expanded measurement uncertainty of 12 μmol/L associated with concentrations of creatinine below 120 μmol/L and of 10% associated with concentrations above 120 μmol/L was estimated. The diagnostic uncertainty encompasses both measurement uncertainty and biological variation, and can be estimated for a single value and for a difference. This diagnostic uncertainty for the difference for two samples from the same patient was determined to be 14 μmol/L associated with concentrations of creatinine below 100 μmol/L and 14 % associated with concentrations above 100 μmol/L.

  5. Advanced diagnostic approaches and current management of internal disorders of select species (rodents, sugar gliders, hedgehogs).

    PubMed

    Evans, Erika E; Souza, Marcy J

    2010-09-01

    African pygmy and European hedgehogs, sugar gliders, and rodents such as rats, mice, gerbils, hamsters, guinea pigs, and chinchillas are becoming increasingly popular as pets in the United States, and more practitioners are being asked to examine, diagnose, and treat these animals for a bevy of disorders and diseases. Many procedures and techniques used in traditional small and large animal medicine are used for these species, with minor adaptations or considerations. This article examines available diagnostic tools and treatment methodologies for use in hedgehogs, sugar gliders, and selected rodents.

  6. Development of horn antenna mixer array with internal local oscillator module for microwave imaging diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Kuwahara, D.; Ito, N.; Nagayama, Y.; Yoshinaga, T.; Yamaguchi, S.; Yoshikawa, M.; Kohagura, J.; Sugito, S.; Kogi, Y.; Mase, A.

    2014-11-15

    A new antenna array is proposed in order to improve the sensitivity and complexity of microwave imaging diagnostics systems such as a microwave imaging reflectometry, a microwave imaging interferometer, and an electron cyclotron emission imaging. The antenna array consists of five elements: a horn antenna, a waveguide-to-microstrip line transition, a mixer, a local oscillation (LO) module, and an intermediate frequency amplifier. By using an LO module, the LO optics can be removed, and the supplied LO power to each element can be equalized. We report details of the antenna array and characteristics of a prototype antenna array.

  7. Development of horn antenna mixer array with internal local oscillator module for microwave imaging diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, D; Ito, N; Nagayama, Y; Yoshinaga, T; Yamaguchi, S; Yoshikawa, M; Kohagura, J; Sugito, S; Kogi, Y; Mase, A

    2014-11-01

    A new antenna array is proposed in order to improve the sensitivity and complexity of microwave imaging diagnostics systems such as a microwave imaging reflectometry, a microwave imaging interferometer, and an electron cyclotron emission imaging. The antenna array consists of five elements: a horn antenna, a waveguide-to-microstrip line transition, a mixer, a local oscillation (LO) module, and an intermediate frequency amplifier. By using an LO module, the LO optics can be removed, and the supplied LO power to each element can be equalized. We report details of the antenna array and characteristics of a prototype antenna array.

  8. Development of horn antenna mixer array with internal local oscillator module for microwave imaging diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwahara, D.; Ito, N.; Nagayama, Y.; Yoshinaga, T.; Yamaguchi, S.; Yoshikawa, M.; Kohagura, J.; Sugito, S.; Kogi, Y.; Mase, A.

    2014-11-01

    A new antenna array is proposed in order to improve the sensitivity and complexity of microwave imaging diagnostics systems such as a microwave imaging reflectometry, a microwave imaging interferometer, and an electron cyclotron emission imaging. The antenna array consists of five elements: a horn antenna, a waveguide-to-microstrip line transition, a mixer, a local oscillation (LO) module, and an intermediate frequency amplifier. By using an LO module, the LO optics can be removed, and the supplied LO power to each element can be equalized. We report details of the antenna array and characteristics of a prototype antenna array.

  9. The fairness, predictive validity and acceptability of multiple mini interview in an internationally diverse student population--a mixed methods study.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Maureen E; Dowell, Jon; Husbands, Adrian; Newell, John; O'Flynn, Siun; Kropmans, Thomas; Dunne, Fidelma P; Murphy, Andrew W

    2014-12-21

    International medical students, those attending medical school outside of their country of citizenship, account for a growing proportion of medical undergraduates worldwide. This study aimed to establish the fairness, predictive validity and acceptability of Multiple Mini Interview (MMI) in an internationally diverse student population. This was an explanatory sequential, mixed methods study. All students in First Year Medicine, National University of Ireland Galway 2012 were eligible to sit a previously validated 10 station MMI. Quantitative data comprised: demographics, selection tool scores and First Year Assessment scores. Qualitative data comprised separate focus groups with MMI Assessors, EU and Non-EU students. 109 students participated (45% of class). Of this 41.3% (n = 45) were Non-EU and 35.8% (n = 39) did not have English as first language. Age, gender and socioeconomic class did not impact on MMI scores. Non-EU students and those for whom English was not a first language achieved significantly lower scores on MMI than their EU and English speaking counterparts (difference in mean 11.9% and 12.2% respectively, P<0.001). MMI score was associated with English language proficiency (IELTS) (r = 0.5, P<0.01). Correlations emerged between First Year results and IELTS (r = 0.44; p = 0.006; n = 38) and EU school exit exam (r = 0.52; p<0.001; n = 56). MMI predicted EU student OSCE performance (r = 0.27; p = 0.03; n = 64). In the analysis of focus group data two overarching themes emerged: Authenticity and Cultural Awareness. MMI was considered a highly authentic assessment that offered a deeper understanding of the applicant than traditional tools, with an immediate relevance to clinical practice. Cultural specificity of some stations and English language proficiency were seen to disadvantage international students. Recommendations included cultural awareness training for MMI assessors, designing and piloting culturally neutral stations, lengthening station

  10. Myocardial injury after noncardiac surgery: a large, international, prospective cohort study establishing diagnostic criteria, characteristics, predictors, and 30-day outcomes.

    PubMed

    Botto, Fernando; Alonso-Coello, Pablo; Chan, Matthew T V; Villar, Juan Carlos; Xavier, Denis; Srinathan, Sadeesh; Guyatt, Gordon; Cruz, Patricia; Graham, Michelle; Wang, C Y; Berwanger, Otavio; Pearse, Rupert M; Biccard, Bruce M; Abraham, Valsa; Malaga, German; Hillis, Graham S; Rodseth, Reitze N; Cook, Deborah; Polanczyk, Carisi A; Szczeklik, Wojciech; Sessler, Daniel I; Sheth, Tej; Ackland, Gareth L; Leuwer, Martin; Garg, Amit X; Lemanach, Yannick; Pettit, Shirley; Heels-Ansdell, Diane; Luratibuse, Giovanna; Walsh, Michael; Sapsford, Robert; Schünemann, Holger J; Kurz, Andrea; Thomas, Sabu; Mrkobrada, Marko; Thabane, Lehana; Gerstein, Hertzel; Paniagua, Pilar; Nagele, Peter; Raina, Parminder; Yusuf, Salim; Devereaux, P J; Devereaux, P J; Sessler, Daniel I; Walsh, Michael; Guyatt, Gordon; McQueen, Matthew J; Bhandari, Mohit; Cook, Deborah; Bosch, Jackie; Buckley, Norman; Yusuf, Salim; Chow, Clara K; Hillis, Graham S; Halliwell, Richard; Li, Stephen; Lee, Vincent W; Mooney, John; Polanczyk, Carisi A; Furtado, Mariana V; Berwanger, Otavio; Suzumura, Erica; Santucci, Eliana; Leite, Katia; Santo, Jose Amalth do Espirirto; Jardim, Cesar A P; Cavalcanti, Alexandre Biasi; Guimaraes, Helio Penna; Jacka, Michael J; Graham, Michelle; McAlister, Finlay; McMurtry, Sean; Townsend, Derek; Pannu, Neesh; Bagshaw, Sean; Bessissow, Amal; Bhandari, Mohit; Duceppe, Emmanuelle; Eikelboom, John; Ganame, Javier; Hankinson, James; Hill, Stephen; Jolly, Sanjit; Lamy, Andre; Ling, Elizabeth; Magloire, Patrick; Pare, Guillaume; Reddy, Deven; Szalay, David; Tittley, Jacques; Weitz, Jeff; Whitlock, Richard; Darvish-Kazim, Saeed; Debeer, Justin; Kavsak, Peter; Kearon, Clive; Mizera, Richard; O'Donnell, Martin; McQueen, Matthew; Pinthus, Jehonathan; Ribas, Sebastian; Simunovic, Marko; Tandon, Vikas; Vanhelder, Tomas; Winemaker, Mitchell; Gerstein, Hertzel; McDonald, Sarah; O'Bryne, Paul; Patel, Ameen; Paul, James; Punthakee, Zubin; Raymer, Karen; Salehian, Omid; Spencer, Fred; Walter, Stephen; Worster, Andrew; Adili, Anthony; Clase, Catherine; Cook, Deborah; Crowther, Mark; Douketis, James; Gangji, Azim; Jackson, Paul; Lim, Wendy; Lovrics, Peter; Mazzadi, Sergio; Orovan, William; Rudkowski, Jill; Soth, Mark; Tiboni, Maria; Acedillo, Rey; Garg, Amit; Hildebrand, Ainslie; Lam, Ngan; Macneil, Danielle; Mrkobrada, Marko; Roshanov, Pavel S; Srinathan, Sadeesh K; Ramsey, Clare; John, Philip St; Thorlacius, Laurel; Siddiqui, Faisal S; Grocott, Hilary P; McKay, Andrew; Lee, Trevor W R; Amadeo, Ryan; Funk, Duane; McDonald, Heather; Zacharias, James; Villar, Juan Carlos; Cortés, Olga Lucía; Chaparro, Maria Stella; Vásquez, Skarlett; Castañeda, Alvaro; Ferreira, Silvia; Coriat, Pierre; Monneret, Denis; Goarin, Jean Pierre; Esteve, Cristina Ibanez; Royer, Catherine; Daas, Georges; Chan, Matthew T V; Choi, Gordon Y S; Gin, Tony; Lit, Lydia C W; Xavier, Denis; Sigamani, Alben; Faruqui, Atiya; Dhanpal, Radhika; Almeida, Smitha; Cherian, Joseph; Furruqh, Sultana; Abraham, Valsa; Afzal, Lalita; George, Preetha; Mala, Shaveta; Schünemann, Holger; Muti, Paola; Vizza, Enrico; Wang, C Y; Ong, G S Y; Mansor, Marzida; Tan, Alvin S B; Shariffuddin, Ina I; Vasanthan, V; Hashim, N H M; Undok, A Wahab; Ki, Ushananthini; Lai, Hou Yee; Ahmad, Wan Azman; Razack, Azad H A; Malaga, German; Valderrama-Victoria, Vanessa; Loza-Herrera, Javier D; De Los Angeles Lazo, Maria; Rotta-Rotta, Aida; Szczeklik, Wojciech; Sokolowska, Barbara; Musial, Jacek; Gorka, Jacek; Iwaszczuk, Pawel; Kozka, Mateusz; Chwala, Maciej; Raczek, Marcin; Mrowiecki, Tomasz; Kaczmarek, Bogusz; Biccard, Bruce; Cassimjee, Hussein; Gopalan, Dean; Kisten, Theroshnie; Mugabi, Aine; Naidoo, Prebashini; Naidoo, Rubeshan; Rodseth, Reitze; Skinner, David; Torborg, Alex; Paniagua, Pilar; Urrutia, Gerard; Maestre, Mari Luz; Santaló, Miquel; Gonzalez, Raúl; Font, Adrià; Martínez, Cecilia; Pelaez, Xavier; De Antonio, Marta; Villamor, Jose Marcial; García, Jesús Alvarez; Ferré, Maria José; Popova, Ekaterina; Alonso-Coello, Pablo; Garutti, Ignacio; Cruz, Patricia; Fernández, Carmen; Palencia, Maria; Díaz, Susana; Del Castillo, Teresa; Varela, Alberto; de Miguel, Angeles; Muñoz, Manuel; Piñeiro, Patricia; Cusati, Gabriel; Del Barrio, Maria; Membrillo, Maria José; Orozco, David; Reyes, Fidel; Sapsford, Robert J; Barth, Julian; Scott, Julian; Hall, Alistair; Howell, Simon; Lobley, Michaela; Woods, Janet; Howard, Susannah; Fletcher, Joanne; Dewhirst, Nikki; Williams, C; Rushton, A; Welters, I; Leuwer, M; Pearse, Rupert; Ackland, Gareth; Khan, Ahsun; Niebrzegowska, Edyta; Benton, Sally; Wragg, Andrew; Archbold, Andrew; Smith, Amanda; McAlees, Eleanor; Ramballi, Cheryl; Macdonald, Neil; Januszewska, Marta; Stephens, Robert; Reyes, Anna; Paredes, Laura Gallego; Sultan, Pervez; Cain, David; Whittle, John; Del Arroyo, Ana Gutierrez; Sessler, Daniel I; Kurz, Andrea; Sun, Zhuo; Finnegan, Patrick S; Egan, Cameron; Honar, Hooman; Shahinyan, Aram; Panjasawatwong, Krit; Fu, Alexander Y; Wang, Sihe; Reineks, Edmunds; Nagele, Peter; Blood, Jane; Kalin, Megan; Gibson, David; Wildes, Troy

    2014-03-01

    Myocardial injury after noncardiac surgery (MINS) was defined as prognostically relevant myocardial injury due to ischemia that occurs during or within 30 days after noncardiac surgery. The study's four objectives were to determine the diagnostic criteria, characteristics, predictors, and 30-day outcomes of MINS. In this international, prospective cohort study of 15,065 patients aged 45 yr or older who underwent in-patient noncardiac surgery, troponin T was measured during the first 3 postoperative days. Patients with a troponin T level of 0.04 ng/ml or greater (elevated "abnormal" laboratory threshold) were assessed for ischemic features (i.e., ischemic symptoms and electrocardiography findings). Patients adjudicated as having a nonischemic troponin elevation (e.g., sepsis) were excluded. To establish diagnostic criteria for MINS, the authors used Cox regression analyses in which the dependent variable was 30-day mortality (260 deaths) and independent variables included preoperative variables, perioperative complications, and potential MINS diagnostic criteria. An elevated troponin after noncardiac surgery, irrespective of the presence of an ischemic feature, independently predicted 30-day mortality. Therefore, the authors' diagnostic criterion for MINS was a peak troponin T level of 0.03 ng/ml or greater judged due to myocardial ischemia. MINS was an independent predictor of 30-day mortality (adjusted hazard ratio, 3.87; 95% CI, 2.96-5.08) and had the highest population-attributable risk (34.0%, 95% CI, 26.6-41.5) of the perioperative complications. Twelve hundred patients (8.0%) suffered MINS, and 58.2% of these patients would not have fulfilled the universal definition of myocardial infarction. Only 15.8% of patients with MINS experienced an ischemic symptom. Among adults undergoing noncardiac surgery, MINS is common and associated with substantial mortality.

  11. A World Allergy Organization International Survey on Diagnostic Procedures and Therapies in Drug Allergy/Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Mirakian, Rita; Castells, Mariana; Pichler, Werner; Romano, Antonino; Bonadonna, Patrizia; Diana, Deleanu; Kowalski, Marek; Yanez, Anahi; Lleonart, Ramon; Sanchez-Borges, Mario; Demoly, Pascal

    2011-01-01

    Objective To study the diagnostic and treatment modalities used in drug allergy/hypersensitivity among members of the World Allergy Organization (WAO). Methods A questionnaire comprising 39 questions was circulated electronically to member societies, associate member societies, and regional and affiliate organizations of WAO between June 29, 2009, and August 9, 2009. Results Eighty-two responses were received. Skin testing was used by 74.7%, with only 71.4% having access to penicillin skin test reagents. In vitro–specific IgE tests were used by 67.4%, and basophil activation test was used by 54.4%. Lymphocyte transformation tests were used by 36.8% and patch tests by 54.7%. Drug provocation tests were used by 68.4%, the most common indication being to exclude hypersensitivity where history/symptoms were not suggestive of drug hypersensitivity/allergy (76.9%). Rapid desensitization for chemotherapy, antibiotics, or biologic agents was used by 69.6%. Systemic corticosteroid was used in the treatment of Stevens–Johnson syndrome by 72.3%, and high-dose intravenous immunoglobulins in toxic epidermal necrolysis by 50.8%. Human leukocyte antigen screening before prescription of abacavir was used by 92.9% and before prescription of carbamazepine by 21.4%. Conclusions Results of this survey form a useful framework for developing educational and training needs and for improving access to drug allergy diagnostic and treatment modalities across WAO member societies. PMID:23268453

  12. The Internal, External, and Diagnostic Validity of Sluggish Cognitive Tempo: A Meta-Analysis and Critical Review

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Stephen P.; Leopold, Daniel R.; Burns, G. Leonard; Jarrett, Matthew A.; Langberg, Joshua M.; Marshall, Stephen A.; McBurnett, Keith; Waschbusch, Daniel A.; Willcutt, Erik G.

    2015-01-01

    , although there is initial support for SCT being associated with processing speed, sustained attention, and metacognitive deficits. Conclusion This meta-analytic review provides strong support for the internal validity of SCT and preliminary support for the external validity of SCT. In terms of diagnostic validity, there is not currently enough evidence to describe SCT in diagnostic terms. Key directions for future research are discussed, including evaluating the conceptualization of SCT as a transdiagnostic construct and the need for longitudinal research. PMID:26903250

  13. Intrusive thoughts in patients with obsessive compulsive disorder and non-clinical participants: a comparison using the International Intrusive Thought Interview Schedule.

    PubMed

    Bouvard, Martine; Fournet, Nathalie; Denis, Anne; Sixdenier, Adelaide; Clark, David

    2016-12-22

    The International Intrusive Thought Interview Schedule (IITIS) was used to assess and compare the unwanted intrusive thoughts (UITs) reported in a group of patients with obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) and a non-clinical group. Although all participants reported at least one type of intrusion, OCD patients experienced more intrusive thoughts than non-clinical participants, and this difference was statistically significant. In the OCD group, intrusive thoughts were more frequent, interfered more with daily life, were considered to be more important to get out of the mind, and were more difficult to stop than in non-clinical participants. The two groups did not differ significantly in terms of five appraisals of the most distressing intrusive thought. One appraisal (importance) was used far more by the OCD group than the non-clinical group. For three appraisals (intolerance of anxiety, need to control, and intolerance of uncertainty), the difference was smaller. Only two of the strategies for controlling the most upsetting intrusive thought (ritual and avoidance) were of value in differentiating between the two groups. The IITIS (an instrument used to assess intrusions in non-clinical samples) appears to be of value for the assessment of patients with OCD.

  14. Cross-cultural and comparative epidemiology of insomnia: the Diagnostic and statistical manual (DSM), International classification of diseases (ICD) and International classification of sleep disorders (ICSD).

    PubMed

    Chung, Ka-Fai; Yeung, Wing-Fai; Ho, Fiona Yan-Yee; Yung, Kam-Ping; Yu, Yee-Man; Kwok, Chi-Wa

    2015-04-01

    To compare the prevalence of insomnia according to symptoms, quantitative criteria, and Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th and 5th Edition (DSM-IV and DSM-5), International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision (ICD-10), and International Classification of Sleep Disorders, 2nd Edition (ICSD-2), and to compare the prevalence of insomnia disorder between Hong Kong and the United States by adopting a similar methodology used by the America Insomnia Survey (AIS). Population-based epidemiological survey respondents (n = 2011) completed the Brief Insomnia Questionnaire (BIQ), a validated scale generating DSM-IV, DSM-5, ICD-10, and ICSD-2 insomnia disorder. The weighted prevalence of difficulty falling asleep, difficulty staying asleep, waking up too early, and non-restorative sleep that occurred ≥3 days per week was 14.0%, 28.3%, 32.1%, and 39.9%, respectively. When quantitative criteria were included, the prevalence dropped the most from 39.9% to 8.4% for non-restorative sleep, and the least from 14.0% to 12.9% for difficulty falling asleep. The weighted prevalence of DSM-IV, ICD-10, ICSD-2, and any of the three insomnia disorders was 22.1%, 4.7%, 15.1%, and 22.1%, respectively; for DSM-5 insomnia disorder, it was 10.8%. Compared with 22.1%, 3.9%, and 14.7% for DSM-IV, ICD-10, and ICSD-2 in the AIS, cross-cultural difference in the prevalence of insomnia disorder is less than what is expected. The prevalence is reduced by half from DSM-IV to DSM-5. ICD-10 insomnia disorder has the lowest prevalence, perhaps because excessive concern and preoccupation, one of its diagnostic criteria, is not always present in people with insomnia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Updating the International Standards for Tuberculosis Care. Entering the era of molecular diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Hopewell, Philip C; Fair, Elizabeth L; Uplekar, Mukund

    2014-03-01

    The International Standards for Tuberculosis Care, first published in 2006 (Lancet Infect Dis 2006;6:710-725.) with a second edition in 2009 ( www.currytbcenter.ucsf.edu/international/istc_report ), was produced by an international coalition of organizations funded by the United States Agency for International Development. Development of the document was led jointly by the World Health Organization and the American Thoracic Society, with the aim of promoting engagement of all care providers, especially those in the private sector in low- and middle-income countries, in delivering high-quality services for tuberculosis. In keeping with World Health Organization recommendations regarding rapid molecular testing, as well as other pertinent new recommendations, the third edition of the Standards has been developed. After decades of dormancy, the technology available for tuberculosis care and control is now rapidly evolving. In particular, rapid molecular testing, using devices with excellent performance characteristics for detecting Mycobacterium tuberculosis and rifampin resistance, and that are practical and affordable for use in decentralized facilities in low-resource settings, is being widely deployed globally. Used appropriately, both within tuberculosis control programs and in private laboratories, these devices have the potential to revolutionize tuberculosis care and control, providing a confirmed diagnosis and a determination of rifampin resistance within a few hours, enabling appropriate treatment to be initiated promptly. Major changes have been made in the standards for diagnosis. Additional important changes include: emphasis on the recognition of groups at increased risk of tuberculosis; updating the standard on antiretroviral treatment in persons with tuberculosis and human immunodeficiency virus infection; and revising the standard on treating multiple drug-resistant tuberculosis.

  16. Assessment of the knowledge of graphical symbols labelled on malaria rapid diagnostic tests in four international settings

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Graphical symbols on in vitro diagnostics (IVD symbols) replace the need for text in different languages and are used on malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) marketed worldwide. The present study assessed the comprehension of IVD symbols labelled on malaria RDT kits among laboratory staff in four different countries. Methods Participants (n = 293) in Belgium (n = 96), the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC, n = 87), Cambodia (n = 59) and Cuba (n = 51) were presented with an anonymous questionnaire with IVD symbols extracted from ISO 15223 and EN 980 presented as stand-alone symbols (n = 18) and in context (affixed on RDT packages, n = 16). Responses were open-ended and scored for correctness by local professionals. Results Presented as stand-alone, three and five IVD symbols were correctly scored for comprehension by 67% and 50% of participants; when contextually presented, five and seven symbols reached the 67% and 50% correct score respectively. 'Batch code' scored best (correctly scored by 71.3% of participants when presented as stand-alone), 'Authorized representative in the European Community' scored worst (1.4% correct). Another six IVD symbols were scored correctly by less than 10% of participants: 'Do not reuse', 'In vitro diagnostic medical device', 'Sufficient for', 'Date of manufacture', 'Authorised representative in EC', and 'Do not use if package is damaged'. Participants in Belgium and Cuba both scored six symbols above the 67% criterion, participants from DRC and Cambodia scored only two and one symbols above this criterion. Low correct scores were observed for safety-related IVD symbols, such as for 'Biological Risk' (42.7%) and 'Do not reuse' (10.9%). Conclusion Comprehension of IVD symbols on RDTs among laboratory staff in four international settings was unsatisfactory. Administrative and outreach procedures should be undertaken to assure their acquaintance by end-users. PMID:22047089

  17. Assessment of the knowledge of graphical symbols labelled on malaria rapid diagnostic tests in four international settings.

    PubMed

    Hermans, Veerle; Monzote, Lianet; Van den Sande, Björn; Mukadi, Pierre; Sopheak, Thai; Gillet, Philippe; Jacobs, Jan

    2011-11-02

    Graphical symbols on in vitro diagnostics (IVD symbols) replace the need for text in different languages and are used on malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) marketed worldwide. The present study assessed the comprehension of IVD symbols labelled on malaria RDT kits among laboratory staff in four different countries. Participants (n = 293) in Belgium (n = 96), the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC, n = 87), Cambodia (n = 59) and Cuba (n = 51) were presented with an anonymous questionnaire with IVD symbols extracted from ISO 15223 and EN 980 presented as stand-alone symbols (n = 18) and in context (affixed on RDT packages, n = 16). Responses were open-ended and scored for correctness by local professionals. Presented as stand-alone, three and five IVD symbols were correctly scored for comprehension by 67% and 50% of participants; when contextually presented, five and seven symbols reached the 67% and 50% correct score respectively. 'Batch code' scored best (correctly scored by 71.3% of participants when presented as stand-alone), 'Authorized representative in the European Community' scored worst (1.4% correct). Another six IVD symbols were scored correctly by less than 10% of participants: 'Do not reuse', 'In vitro diagnostic medical device', 'Sufficient for', 'Date of manufacture', 'Authorised representative in EC', and 'Do not use if package is damaged'. Participants in Belgium and Cuba both scored six symbols above the 67% criterion, participants from DRC and Cambodia scored only two and one symbols above this criterion. Low correct scores were observed for safety-related IVD symbols, such as for 'Biological Risk' (42.7%) and 'Do not reuse' (10.9%). Comprehension of IVD symbols on RDTs among laboratory staff in four international settings was unsatisfactory. Administrative and outreach procedures should be undertaken to assure their acquaintance by end-users.

  18. Faraday-Effect Polarimeter Diagnostic for Internal Magnetic Field Fluctuation Measurements in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jie; Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.

    2015-11-01

    A high-resolution Faraday-effect polarimeter-interferometer diagnostic currently under construction at the DIII-D tokamak has three overall measurement goals: (1) determine the current density dynamics at the magnetic axis, J(0,t), for torque-free plasmas (no NBI) and bootstrap current in the pedestal region; (2) resolve both coherent and broadband magnetic fluctuations [at the level δb <= 1 Gauss with up to 2 MHz bandwidth] associated with MHD perturbations, energetic particle driven modes and broadband turbulence (e.g. microtearing modes), and (3) identify non-axisymmetric structures and plasma response to externally applied RMP (resonant magnetic perturbation) fields being developed for ELM control as well as MHD events. These goals will be achieved using a 650-700 GHz source and heterodyne receiver system to measure the line-integrated Faraday-effect and density along three horizontal chords positioned at the magnetic axis and +/-15 cm off-axis. The system will be double-pass and cornercube retroreflectors have already been installed. Simultaneous measurement of density and Faraday effect allows isolation of the fluctuating magnetic field component in the radial direction. Supported by US DOE under DE-FG03-01ER54615 and DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  19. Revised diagnostic criteria and classification for the autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS): report from the 2009 NIH International Workshop.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Joao B; Bleesing, Jack J; Dianzani, Umberto; Fleisher, Thomas A; Jaffe, Elaine S; Lenardo, Michael J; Rieux-Laucat, Frederic; Siegel, Richard M; Su, Helen C; Teachey, David T; Rao, V Koneti

    2010-10-07

    Lymphadenopathy in children for which no infectious or malignant cause can be ascertained constitutes a challenging diagnostic dilemma. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a human genetic disorder of lymphocyte apoptosis resulting in an accumulation of lymphocytes and childhood onset chronic lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, multilineage cytopenias, and an increased risk of B-cell lymphoma. In 1999, investigators at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) suggested criteria to establish the diagnosis of ALPS. Since then, with approximately 500 patients with ALPS studied worldwide, significant advances in our understanding of the disease have prompted the need for revisions to the existing diagnostic criteria and classification scheme. The rationale and recommendations outlined here stem from an international workshop held at NIH on September 21 and 22, 2009, attended by investigators from the United States, Europe, and Australia engaged in clinical and basic science research on ALPS and related disorders. It is hoped that harmonizing the diagnosis and classification of ALPS will foster collaborative research and better understanding of the pathogenesis of autoimmune cytopenias and B-cell lymphomas.

  20. Revised diagnostic criteria and classification for the autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS): report from the 2009 NIH International Workshop

    PubMed Central

    Bleesing, Jack J.; Dianzani, Umberto; Fleisher, Thomas A.; Jaffe, Elaine S.; Lenardo, Michael J.; Rieux-Laucat, Frederic; Siegel, Richard M.; Su, Helen C.; Teachey, David T.

    2010-01-01

    Lymphadenopathy in children for which no infectious or malignant cause can be ascertained constitutes a challenging diagnostic dilemma. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a human genetic disorder of lymphocyte apoptosis resulting in an accumulation of lymphocytes and childhood onset chronic lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, multilineage cytopenias, and an increased risk of B-cell lymphoma. In 1999, investigators at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) suggested criteria to establish the diagnosis of ALPS. Since then, with approximately 500 patients with ALPS studied worldwide, significant advances in our understanding of the disease have prompted the need for revisions to the existing diagnostic criteria and classification scheme. The rationale and recommendations outlined here stem from an international workshop held at NIH on September 21 and 22, 2009, attended by investigators from the United States, Europe, and Australia engaged in clinical and basic science research on ALPS and related disorders. It is hoped that harmonizing the diagnosis and classification of ALPS will foster collaborative research and better understanding of the pathogenesis of autoimmune cytopenias and B-cell lymphomas. PMID:20538792

  1. Systematic Internal Transcribed Spacer Sequence Analysis for Identification of Clinical Mold Isolates in Diagnostic Mycology: a 5-Year Study▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Ciardo, Diana E.; Lucke, Katja; Imhof, Alex; Bloemberg, Guido V.; Böttger, Erik C.

    2010-01-01

    The implementation of internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequencing for routine identification of molds in the diagnostic mycology laboratory was analyzed in a 5-year study. All mold isolates (n = 6,900) recovered in our laboratory from 2005 to 2009 were included in this study. According to a defined work flow, which in addition to troublesome phenotypic identification takes clinical relevance into account, 233 isolates were subjected to ITS sequence analysis. Sequencing resulted in successful identification for 78.6% of the analyzed isolates (57.1% at species level, 21.5% at genus level). In comparison, extended in-depth phenotypic characterization of the isolates subjected to sequencing achieved taxonomic assignment for 47.6% of these, with a mere 13.3% at species level. Optimization of DNA extraction further improved the efficacy of molecular identification. This study is the first of its kind to testify to the systematic implementation of sequence-based identification procedures in the routine workup of mold isolates in the diagnostic mycology laboratory. PMID:20573873

  2. Systematic internal transcribed spacer sequence analysis for identification of clinical mold isolates in diagnostic mycology: a 5-year study.

    PubMed

    Ciardo, Diana E; Lucke, Katja; Imhof, Alex; Bloemberg, Guido V; Böttger, Erik C

    2010-08-01

    The implementation of internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequencing for routine identification of molds in the diagnostic mycology laboratory was analyzed in a 5-year study. All mold isolates (n = 6,900) recovered in our laboratory from 2005 to 2009 were included in this study. According to a defined work flow, which in addition to troublesome phenotypic identification takes clinical relevance into account, 233 isolates were subjected to ITS sequence analysis. Sequencing resulted in successful identification for 78.6% of the analyzed isolates (57.1% at species level, 21.5% at genus level). In comparison, extended in-depth phenotypic characterization of the isolates subjected to sequencing achieved taxonomic assignment for 47.6% of these, with a mere 13.3% at species level. Optimization of DNA extraction further improved the efficacy of molecular identification. This study is the first of its kind to testify to the systematic implementation of sequence-based identification procedures in the routine workup of mold isolates in the diagnostic mycology laboratory.

  3. The new regulation to investigate potentially beneficial diagnostic and therapeutic methods in Germany: up to international standard?

    PubMed

    Olberg, Britta; Perleth, Matthias; Busse, Reinhard

    2014-08-01

    Funding of diagnostic and therapeutic methods in Germany's statutory health insurance (SHI) follows a dichotomy: in outpatient care, only methods with proven benefit are reimbursed while in inpatient care, all methods may be provided unless they are excluded due to proven harm or lack of benefit. In January 2012, a new section 137e was added to the Social Code Book V (SGB V), allowing for the inclusion of innovative and potentially beneficial diagnostic or therapeutic methods in the SHI benefit basket, while additional evidence regarding their effectiveness and safety must be gathered. In 2013, the Federal Joint Committee (G-BA) has specified the details of this new approach, which can be considered a variety of "Coverage with Evidence Development" (CED). Our comparison with CED schemes in selected countries reveals a dependence of the CED implementation on the encompassing healthcare system. However, we identify a clear legislative foundation, a definitive decision-making body, the possibility to obtain public funding, and the preference for high quality study designs as constituting factors of an emerging international standard for CED. In addition, it is necessary to ensure the suitability of circumstances and technologies for the successful application of CED in a clear and transparent way.

  4. Electronic publication of new animal names - An interview with Frank-T. Krell, Commissioner of the International Commission on Zoological Nomenclature and Chair of the ICZN ZooBank Committee

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    On the 4th September 2012 the International Commission on Zoological Nomenclature announced an amendment to the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature allowing for electronic publication of the scientific names of animals. In this interview Frank-T. Krell discusses the implications of this amendment for authors wishing to publish descriptions of newly identified animal species in online and open access journals, and for the future of taxonomic science. PMID:22978411

  5. The assessment and characterization of the built-in internal photometer of primary diagnostic monitors.

    PubMed

    Ruuge, Andres E; Mahmood, Usman A; Erdi, Yusuf E

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this work was to perform the initial evaluation of primary diagnostic monitor (PDM) characteristics following the implementation of New York City quality assurance (NYC QA) regulations on January 1, 2016, and compare the results of the QA measurements performed by an external photometer and the PDM manufacturer's built-in photometer. TG-18 and Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers test patterns were used to evaluate monitor performance. Overall, 79 PDMs were included in the analysis. The verification of grayscale standard display function (GSDF) calibration, using a built-in photometer, showed that only 2 out of 79 PDMs failed calibration. However, the same measurements performed by the external luminance meter showed that 15 out of 79 monitors had failed GSDF calibration. Measurements of the PDMs maximum luminance (Lmax ), using an external photometer showed that 10 out of 53 PDMs calibrated for Lmax = 400 cd/m(2) and 17 out of 26 PDMs calibrated for Lmax = 500 cd/m(2) do not meet the manufacturer's recommended 10% tolerance limit for the target Lmax calibration. Two PDMs did not pass the Lmax ≥ 350 cd/m(2) NYC QA regulations with Lmax = 331 cd/m(2) and Lmax = 340 cd/m(2) . All tested PDMs exceeded the minimum luminance ratio (LR) of 250:1 as required by NYC QA regulations. Measurements taken of Lmax and LR performed by a built-in photometer showed that none of the PDMs had failed the NYC QA regulations. All PDMs passed the luminance uniformity test with a maximum nonuniformity of 17% (according to NYC regulations it must be less than 30%). The luminance uniformity test could only be performed using an external photometer. The evaluation of 79 PDMs of various ages and models demonstrated up to 18% disagreement between luminance measurements performed by the manufacturer's built-in photometer when compared with those performed by an externally calibrated luminance meter. These disagreements were larger for older PDMs. © 2017 The

  6. Diagnostic strategy and timing of intervention in infected necrotizing pancreatitis: an international expert survey and case vignette study

    PubMed Central

    van Grinsven, Janneke; van Brunschot, Sandra; Bakker, Olaf J.; Bollen, Thomas L.; Boermeester, Marja A.; Bruno, Marco J.; Dejong, Cornelis H.; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G.; van Eijck, Casper H.; Fockens, Paul; van Goor, Harry; Gooszen, Hein G.; Horvath, Karen D.; van Lienden, Krijn P.; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C.; Besselink, Marc G.; Abdelhafez, M.; Andersson, R.; Andren-Sandberg, A.; Ashley, S.; van Baal, M.; Baron, T.; Bassi, C.; Bradley, E.; Buchler, M.; Cappendijk, V.; Carter, R.; Charnley, R.; Coelho, D.; Connor, S.; Dellinger, P.; Dervenis, C.; Deviere, J.; Doctor, N.; Dudeja, V.; En-qiang, M.; Escourrou, J.; Fagenholz, P.; Farkas, G.; Forsmark, C.; Freeman, M.; Freeny, P.; French, J.; Friess, H.; Gardner, T.; Goetzinger, P.; Haveman, J.; Hofker, S.; Imrie, C.; Isaji, S.; Isenmann, R.; Klar, E.; Laméris, J.; Lerch, M.; Lévy, P.; Lillemoe, K.; Löhr, M.; Mayerle, J.; Mayumi, T.; Mittal, A.; Moessner, J.; Morgan, D.; Mortele, K.; Nealon, W.; Neoptolemos, J.; Nieuwenhuijs, V.; Nordback, I.; Olah, A.; Oppong, K.; Padbury, R.; Papachristou, G.; Parks, R.; Poley, J.; Radenkovic, D.; Raraty, M.; Rau, B.; Rebours, V.; Rische, S.; Runzi, M.; Sainani, N.; Sarr, M.; Schaapherder, S.; Seewald, S.; Seifert, H.; Shimosegawa, T.; Silverman, S.; Singh, V.; Siriwardena, A.; Steinberg, W.; Sutton, R.; Takeda, K.; Timmer, R.; Vege, S.; Voermans, R.; de Waele, J.; Wang, Ch.; Warshaw, A.; Werner, J.; Weusten, B.; Whitcomb, D.; Wig, J.; Windsor, J.; Zyromski, N.

    2015-01-01

    Background The optimal diagnostic strategy and timing of intervention in infected necrotizing pancreatitis is subject to debate. We performed a survey on these topics amongst a group of international expert pancreatologists. Methods An online survey including case vignettes was sent to 118 international pancreatologists. We evaluated the use and timing of fine needle aspiration (FNA), antibiotics, catheter drainage and (minimally invasive) necrosectomy. Results The response rate was 74% (N = 87). None of the respondents use FNA routinely, 85% selectively and 15% never. Most respondents (87%) use a step-up approach in patients with infected necrosis. Walled-off necrosis (WON) is considered a prerequisite for endoscopic drainage and percutaneous drainage by 66% and 12%, respectively. After diagnosing infected necrosis, 55% routinely postpone invasive interventions, whereas 45% proceed immediately to intervention. Lack of consensus about timing of intervention was apparent on day 14 with proven infected necrosis (58% intervention vs. 42% non-invasive) as well as on day 20 with only clinically suspected infected necrosis (59% intervention vs. 41% non-invasive). Discussion The step-up approach is the preferred treatment strategy in infected necrotizing pancreatitis amongst expert pancreatologists. There is no uniformity regarding the use of FNA and timing of intervention in the first 2–3 weeks of infected necrotizing pancreatitis. PMID:26776851

  7. Improving diagnostic capability for HPV disease internationally within the NIH-NIAID Division of AIDS Clinical Trial Networks.

    PubMed

    Godfrey, Catherine C; Michelow, Pamela M; Godard, Mandana; Sahasrabuddhe, Vikrant V; Darden, Janice; Firnhaber, Cynthia S; Wetherall, Neal T; Bremer, James; Coombs, Robert W; Wilkin, Timothy

    2013-12-01

    To evaluate an external quality assurance (EQA) program for the laboratory diagnosis of human papillomavirus (HPV) disease that was established to improve international research capability within the Division of AIDS at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease-supported Adult AIDS Clinical Trials Group network. A three-component EQA scheme was devised comprising assessments of diagnostic accuracy of cytotechnologists and pathologists using available EQA panels, review of quality and accuracy of clinical slides from local sites by an outside expert, and HPV DNA detection using a commercially available HPV test kit. Seven laboratories and 17 pathologists in Africa, India, and South America participated. EQA scores were suboptimal for EQA proficiency testing panels in three of seven laboratories. There was good agreement between the local laboratory and the central reader 70% of the time (90% confidence interval, 42%-98%). Performance on the College of American Pathologists' HPV DNA testing panel was successful in all laboratories tested. The prequalifying EQA round identified correctable issues that will improve the laboratory diagnosis of HPV-related cervical disease at the participating international study sites and will provide a mechanism for ongoing education and continuous quality improvement.

  8. Improving diagnostic capability for HPV disease internationally within the NIH-NIAID-Division of AIDS Clinical Trial Networks

    PubMed Central

    Godfrey, Catherine C.; Michelow, Pamela M.; Godard, Mandana; Sahasrabuddhe, Vikrant V.; Darden, Janice; Firnhaber, Cynthia S.; Wetherall, Neal T.; Bremer, James; Coombs, Robert W.; Wilkin, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate an external quality assurance (EQA) program for the laboratory diagnosis of human papillomavirus (HPV) disease that was established to improve international research capability within the Division of AIDS at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease–supported Adult AIDS Clinical Trials Group network. Methods A three-component EQA scheme was devised comprising assessments of diagnostic accuracy of cytotechnologists and pathologists using available EQA packages, review of quality and accuracy of clinical slides from local sites by an outside expert, and HPV DNA detection using the commercially available HPV test kit. Results Seven laboratories and 17 pathologists in Africa, India, and South America participated. EQA scores were suboptimal for standard packages in three of seven laboratories. There was good agreement between the local laboratory and the central reader 70% of the time (90% confidence interval, 42%-98%). Performance on the College of American Pathologists’ HPV DNA testing panel was successful in all laboratories tested. Conclusions The prequalifying EQA round identified correctable issues that will improve the laboratory diagnosis of HPV related cervical disease at the international sites and will provide a mechanism for ongoing education and continuous quality improvement. PMID:24225757

  9. The role of patient involvement in the diagnostic process in internal medicine: a cognitive approach.

    PubMed

    Lucchiari, Claudio; Pravettoni, Gabriella

    2013-07-01

    Much cognitive and clinical research has addressed clinical reasoning, pointing out that physicians often have difficulties in following a linear course when making accurate diagnoses. Some authors suspect that physicians make mistakes because they unknowingly fail to observe the laws of formal logic and that their reasoning becomes influenced by contextual factors. In this paper, we introduce some basic principles of the cognitive approach to medical decision making and we describe the cognitive balanced model. Then we discuss the relationship between construction of mental models, cognitive biases and patient involvement by the use of a clinical vignette. Medical decisions may be considered fundamentally biased since the use of judgment heuristics and a combination of cognitive-related and system-related factors limit physicians' rationality. While traditional understanding of clinical reasoning has failed to consider contextual factors, most techniques designed to avoid biases seem to fail in promoting sound and safer medical practice. In particular, we argue that an unbiased process requires the use of a cognitive balanced model, in which analytical and intuitive mind skills should be properly integrated. In order to improve medical decision making and thereby lessen incidence of adverse events, it is fundamental to include the patient perspective in a balanced model. Physicians and patients should improve their collective intelligence by sharing mental models within a framework of distributed intelligence. Copyright © 2013 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Yttrium-90 internal pair production imaging using first generation PET/CT provides high-resolution images for qualitative diagnostic purposes

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Y H; Tan, E H; Lim, K Y; Ng, C E; Goh, S W

    2012-01-01

    Yttrium-90 (90Y) internal pair production can be imaged by positron emission tomography (PET)/CT and is superior to bremsstrahlung single-photon emission CT/CT for evaluating hepatic 90Y microsphere biodistribution. We illustrate a case of 90Y imaging using first generation PET/CT technology, producing high-quality images for qualitative diagnostic purposes. PMID:21976634

  11. Psychiatric comorbidity in autism spectrum disorder: Correspondence between mental health clinician report and structured parent interview.

    PubMed

    Stadnick, Nicole; Chlebowski, Colby; Baker-Ericzén, Mary; Dyson, Margaret; Garland, Ann; Brookman-Frazee, Lauren

    2016-07-11

    Publicly funded mental health services are critical in caring for children with autism spectrum disorder. Accurate identification of psychiatric comorbidity is necessary for effective mental health treatment. Little is known about psychiatric diagnosis for this population in routine mental health care. This study (1) examined correspondence between psychiatric diagnoses reported by mental health clinicians and those derived from a structured diagnostic interview and (2) identified predictors of agreement between clinician-reported and diagnostic interview-derived diagnoses in a sample of 197 children aged 4-14 years with autism spectrum disorder receiving mental health services. Data were drawn from a randomized effectiveness trial conducted in publicly funded mental health services. Non-autism spectrum disorder diagnoses were assessed using an adapted version of the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview, parent version. Cohen's kappa was calculated to examine agreement between Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview, parent version and clinician-reported diagnoses of comorbid conditions. Children met criteria for an average of 2.83 (standard deviation = 1.92) Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview, parent version diagnoses. Agreement was poor across all diagnostic categories (κ values: 0.06-0.18). Logistic regression identified child gender and clinical characteristics as significant predictors of agreement for specific diagnoses. Results underscore the need for training mental health clinicians in targeted assessment of specific psychiatric disorders and prioritizing treatment development and testing for specific diagnoses to improve care for children with autism spectrum disorder served in publicly funded mental health settings.

  12. Performance of Different Diagnostic Criteria for Familial Mediterranean Fever in Children with Periodic Fevers: Results from a Multicenter International Registry.

    PubMed

    Demirkaya, Erkan; Saglam, Celal; Turker, Turker; Koné-Paut, Isabelle; Woo, Pat; Doglio, Matteo; Amaryan, Gayane; Frenkel, Joost; Uziel, Yosef; Insalaco, Antonella; Cantarini, Luca; Hofer, Michael; Boiu, Sorina; Duzova, Ali; Modesto, Consuelo; Bryant, Annette; Rigante, Donato; Papadopoulou-Alataki, Efimia; Guillaume-Czitrom, Severine; Kuemmerle-Deschner, Jasmine; Neven, Bénédicte; Lachmann, Helen; Martini, Alberto; Ruperto, Nicolino; Gattorno, Marco; Ozen, Seza

    2016-01-01

    Our aims were to validate the pediatric diagnostic criteria in a large international registry and to compare them with the performance of previous criteria for the diagnosis of familial Mediterranean fever (FMF). Pediatric patients with FMF from the Eurofever registry were used for the validation of the existing criteria. The other periodic fevers served as controls: mevalonate kinase deficiency (MKD), tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS), cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS), aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, adenitis syndrome (PFAPA), and undefined periodic fever from the same registry. The performances of Tel Hashomer, Livneh, and the Yalcinkaya-Ozen criteria were assessed. The FMF group included 339 patients. The control group consisted of 377 patients (53 TRAPS, 45 MKD, 32 CAPS, 160 PFAPA, 87 undefined periodic fevers). Patients with FMF were correctly diagnosed using the Yalcinkaya-Ozen criteria with a sensitivity rate of 87.4% and a specificity rate of 40.7%. On the other hand, Tel Hashomer and Livneh criteria displayed a sensitivity of 45.0 and 77.3%, respectively. Both of the latter criteria displayed a better specificity than the Yalcinkaya-Ozen criteria: 97.2 and 41.1% for the Tel Hashomer and Livneh criteria, respectively. The overall accuracy for the Yalcinkaya-Ozen criteria was 65 and 69.6% (using 2 and 3 criteria), respectively. Ethnicity and residence had no effect on the performance of the Yalcinkaya-Ozen criteria. The Yalcinkaya-Ozen criteria yielded a better sensitivity than the other criteria in this international cohort of patients and thus can be used as a tool for FMF diagnosis in pediatric patients from either the European or eastern Mediterranean region. However, the specificity was lower than the previously suggested adult criteria.

  13. Diagnostic and Prognostic Impact of pc-ASPECTS Applied to Perfusion CT in the Basilar Artery International Cooperation Study.

    PubMed

    Pallesen, Lars-Peder; Gerber, Johannes; Dzialowski, Imanuel; van der Hoeven, Erik J R J; Michel, Patrik; Pfefferkorn, Thomas; Ozdoba, Christoph; Kappelle, L Jaap; Wiedemann, Baerbel; Khomenko, Andrei; Algra, Ale; Hill, Michael D; von Kummer, Ruediger; Demchuk, Andrew M; Schonewille, Wouter J; Puetz, Volker

    2015-01-01

    The posterior circulation Acute Stroke Prognosis Early CT Score (pc-APECTS) applied to CT angiography source images (CTA-SI) predicts the functional outcome of patients in the Basilar Artery International Cooperation Study (BASICS). We assessed the diagnostic and prognostic impact of pc-ASPECTS applied to perfusion CT (CTP) in the BASICS registry population. We applied pc-ASPECTS to CTA-SI and cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), and mean transit time (MTT) parameter maps of BASICS patients with CTA and CTP studies performed. Hypoattenuation on CTA-SI, relative reduction in CBV or CBF, or relative increase in MTT were rated as abnormal. CTA and CTP were available in 27/592 BASICS patients (4.6%). The proportion of patients with any perfusion abnormality was highest for MTT (93%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 76%-99%), compared with 78% (58%-91%) for CTA-SI and CBF, and 46% (27%-67%) for CBV (P < .001). All 3 patients with a CBV pc-ASPECTS < 8 compared to 6/23 patients with a CBV pc-ASPECTS ≥ 8 had died at 1 month (RR 3.8; 95% CI, 1.9-7.6). CTP was performed in a minority of the BASICS registry population. Perfusion disturbances in the posterior circulation were most pronounced on MTT parameter maps. CBV pc-ASPECTS < 8 may indicate patients with high case fatality. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  14. A Secondary Analysis of Claims Regarding the Reflective Judgment Interview: Internal Consistency, Sequentiality and Intra-Individual Differences in Ill-Structured Problem Solving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Phillip

    The Reflective Judgment Model and associated interview (RJI) (Kitchener and King, 1981) measure the ability of individuals to reason about ill-structured problems. It has gained popularity as a measure of college outcomes associated with postsecondary education. This study examines general claims for the model made from existing data from 15 of 25…

  15. A broad diagnostic battery for bedside transcranial Doppler to detect flow changes with internal carotid artery stenosis or occlusion.

    PubMed

    Christou, I; Felberg, R A; Demchuk, A M; Grotta, J C; Burgin, W S; Malkoff, M; Alexandrov, A V

    2001-07-01

    The authors establish accuracy parameters of a broad diagnostic battery for bedside transcranial Doppler (TCD) to detect flow changes due to internal carotid artery (ICA) stenosis or occlusion. The authors prospectively studied consecutive patients with stroke or transient ischemic attack referred for TCD. TCD was performed and interpreted at bedside using a standard insonation protocol. A broad diagnostic battery included major criteria: collateral flow signals, abnormal siphon or terminal carotid signals, and delayed systolic flow acceleration in the middle cerebral artery. Minor criteria included a unilateral decrease in pulsatility index (< or = 0.6 or < or = 70% of contralateral side), flow diversion signs, and compensatory velocity increase. Angiography or carotid duplex ultrasound (CDU) was used to grade the degree of carotid stenosis using North American criteria. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) of TCD findings were determined. Seven hundred and twenty patients underwent TCD, of whom 517 (256 men and 261 women) had angiography and/or CDU within 8.8 +/- 0.9 days. Age was 63.1 +/- 15.7 years. For a 70% to 99% carotid stenosis or occlusion, TCD had sensitivity of 79.4%, specificity of 86.2%, PPV of 57.0%, NPV of 94.8%, and accuracy of 84.7%. For a 50% to 99% carotid stenosis or occlusion, TCD had sensitivity of 67.5%, specificity of 83.9%, PPV of 54.5%, NPV of 90.0%, and accuracy of 81.6%. TCD detected intracranial carotid lesions with 84.9% accuracy and extracranial carotid lesions with 84.4% accuracy (sensitivity of 88% and 79%, specificity of 85% and 86%, PPV of 24% and 54%, and NPV of 99% and 95%, respectively). The prevalence of the ophthalmic artery flow reversal was 36.4% in patients with > or = 70% stenosis or occlusion. If present, this finding indicated a proximal ICA lesion location in 97% of these patients. In symptomatic patients, bedside TCD can accurately detect flow changes

  16. Interview: interview with P Jeffrey Conn. Interview by Hannah Coaker.

    PubMed

    Conn, P Jeffrey

    2013-09-01

    Dr Conn is the Lee E Limbird Professor of Pharmacology at Vanderbilt University and Director of the Vanderbilt Center for Neuroscience Drug Discovery (VCNDD). Dr Conn received a PhD in Pharmacology from Vanderbilt in 1986 and pursued postdoctoral studies at Yale University. He served as a professor of Pharmacology at Emory University from 1988 to 2000, before moving to Merck and Co. (PA, USA) as head of the Department of Neuroscience. Dr Conn moved to Vanderbilt University in 2003 where he is the founding director of the VCNDD, with a primary mission of facilitating translation of recent advances in basic science to novel therapeutics. The VCNDD consists of approximately 100 full-time scientists and has advanced novel molecules from four major programs as development candidates for clinical testing with industry partners. Dr Conn has served in editorial positions with multiple international journals and has served the scientific advisory boards of multiple foundations and companies. He has received numerous awards based on the impact of his basic and translational research. Dr Conn's current research is focused on development of novel treatment strategies for schizophrenia, Parkinson's disease and other serious brain disorders. Interview conducted by Hannah Coaker, Assistant Commissioning Editor.

  17. Internal control for real-time polymerase chain reaction based on MS2 bacteriophage for RNA viruses diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Zambenedetti, Miriam Ribas; Pavoni, Daniela Parada; Dallabona, Andreia Cristine; Dominguez, Alejandro Correa; Poersch, Celina de Oliveira; Fragoso, Stenio Perdigão; Krieger, Marco Aurélio

    2017-05-01

    Real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) is routinely used to detect viral infections. In Brazil, it is mandatory the use of nucleic acid tests to detect hepatitis C virus (HCV), hepatitis B virus and human immunodeficiency virus in blood banks because of the immunological window. The use of an internal control (IC) is necessary to differentiate the true negative results from those consequent from a failure in some step of the nucleic acid test. The aim of this study was the construction of virus-modified particles, based on MS2 bacteriophage, to be used as IC for the diagnosis of RNA viruses. The MS2 genome was cloned into the pET47b(+) plasmid, generating pET47b(+)-MS2. MS2-like particles were produced through the synthesis of MS2 RNA genome by T7 RNA polymerase. These particles were used as non-competitive IC in assays for RNA virus diagnostics. In addition, a competitive control for HCV diagnosis was developed by cloning a mutated HCV sequence into the MS2 replicase gene of pET47b(+)-MS2, which produces a non-propagating MS2 particle. The utility of MS2-like particles as IC was evaluated in a one-step format multiplex real-time RT-PCR for HCV detection. We demonstrated that both competitive and non-competitive IC could be successfully used to monitor the HCV amplification performance, including the extraction, reverse transcription, amplification and detection steps, without compromising the detection of samples with low target concentrations. In conclusion, MS2-like particles generated by this strategy proved to be useful IC for RNA virus diagnosis, with advantage that they are produced by a low cost protocol. An attractive feature of this system is that it allows the construction of a multicontrol by the insertion of sequences from more than one pathogen, increasing its applicability for diagnosing different RNA viruses.

  18. Revisiting Classification of Eating Disorders-toward Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-5 and International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems-11.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Shrigopal; Balhara, Yatan Pal Singh; Khandelwal, S K

    2012-07-01

    Two of the most commonly used nosological systems- International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD)-10 and Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM)-IV are under revision. This process has generated a lot of interesting debates with regards to future of the current diagnostic categories. In fact, the status of categorical approach in the upcoming versions of ICD and DSM is also being debated. The current article focuses on the debate with regards to the eating disorders. The existing classification of eating disorders has been criticized for its limitations. A host of new diagnostic categories have been recommended for inclusion in the upcoming revisions. Also the structure of the existing categories has also been put under scrutiny.

  19. Revisiting Classification of Eating Disorders-toward Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-5 and International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems-11

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Shrigopal; Balhara, Yatan Pal Singh; Khandelwal, S. K.

    2012-01-01

    Two of the most commonly used nosological systems- International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD)-10 and Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM)-IV are under revision. This process has generated a lot of interesting debates with regards to future of the current diagnostic categories. In fact, the status of categorical approach in the upcoming versions of ICD and DSM is also being debated. The current article focuses on the debate with regards to the eating disorders. The existing classification of eating disorders has been criticized for its limitations. A host of new diagnostic categories have been recommended for inclusion in the upcoming revisions. Also the structure of the existing categories has also been put under scrutiny. PMID:23440448

  20. [Health behavior change: motivational interviewing].

    PubMed

    Pócs, Dávid; Hamvai, Csaba; Kelemen, Oguz

    2017-08-01

    Public health data show that early mortality in Hungary could be prevented by smoking cessation, reduced alcohol consumption, regular exercise, healthy diet and increased adherence. Doctor-patient encounters often highlight these aspects of health behavior. There is evidence that health behavior change is driven by internal motivation rather than external influence. This finding has led to the concept of motivational interview, which is a person-centered, goal-oriented approach to counselling. The doctor asks targeted questions to elicit the patient's motivations, strengths, internal resources, and to focus the interview around these. The quality and quantity of the patient's change talk is related to better outcomes. In addition, the interview allows the patient to express ambivalent feelings and doubts about the change. The doctor should use various communication strategies to resolve this ambivalence. Furthermore, establishing a good doctor-patient relationship is the cornerstone of the motivational interview. An optimal relationship can evoke change talk and reduce the patient's resistance, which can also result in a better outcome. The goal of the motivational interview is to focus on the 'why' to change health behavior rather than the 'how', and to utilize internal motivation instead of persuasion. This is the reason why motivational interview has become a widely-accepted evidence based approach. Orv Hetil. 2017; 158(34): 1331-1337.

  1. Characterization of fatigue states in medicine and psychiatry by structured interview.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Barbara Kaye; Goldstein, David; Chen, Michelle; Davenport, Tracey A; Vollmer-Conna, Ute; Scott, Elizabeth M; Hickie, Ian B; Lloyd, Andrew R

    2014-06-01

    Unexplained fatigue states are prevalent, with uncertain diagnostic boundaries. Patients with fatigue-related illnesses were investigated by questionnaire and a novel semistructured interview to identify discriminatory features. Cross-sectional samples of women from specialist practices with chronic fatigue syndrome (n = 20), postcancer fatigue (PCF; n = 20), or major depression (n = 16) were recruited. Additionally, two longitudinal samples were studied: women with fatigue associated with acute infection who subsequently developed postinfective fatigue syndrome (n = 20) or recovered uneventfully (n = 21), and women undergoing adjuvant therapy for breast cancer experiencing treatment-related fatigue who subsequently developed PCF (n = 16) or recovered uneventfully (n = 16). Patients completed self-report questionnaires, and trained interviewers applied the Semi-structured Clinical Interview for Neurasthenia. The receiver operating characteristics curves of the interview were measured against clinician-designated diagnoses. Cluster analyses were performed to empirically partition participants by symptom characteristics. The interview had good internal consistency (Cronbach alpha "fatigue" = .83), and diagnostic sensitivity and specificity for chronic fatigue syndrome (100% and 83%) and major depression (100% and 72%), with reasonable parameters for PCF (72% and 58%). Empirical clustering by "fatigue" or "neurocognitive difficulties" items allocated most patients to one group, whereas "mood disturbance" items correctly classified patients with depression only. The Semi-structured Clinical Interview for Neurasthenia offers reliable diagnostic use in assessing fatigue-related conditions. The symptom domains of fatigue and neurocognitive difficulties are shared across medical and psychiatric boundaries, whereas symptoms of depression such as anhedonia are distinguishing.

  2. Diagnostic value of combinations of symptoms of migraine and tension-type headache included in the diagnostic criteria for children and adolescents in the International Classification of Headache Disorders 2nd Edition.

    PubMed

    Pacheva, Iliyana H; Milanov, Ivan G; Ivanov, Ivan S; Stefanov, Rumen S

    2013-01-01

    To suggest diagnostic combinations of symptoms for migraine and tension type headache (TTH), and for differentiation of overlapping headache (classified as either migraine or TTH) through evaluation of the diagnostic value of combinations of characteristics included in the International Headache Society diagnostic criteria for migraine and TTH in children and adolescents. The study comprised an epidemiological school-based study (412 of 1029 pupils with chronic/recurrent headache) and a clinical study conducted in the Pediatric Neurology Ward and outpatient clinic at Plovdiv Medical University Hospital (203 patients with chronic/recurrent headache). An inclusion criterion was at least two episodes of headache during the last year. Exclusion criteria were: headache occurring only during acute infections; withdrawal of informed consent. Headache was classified according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders 2nd edition (ICHD-II) The diagnostic value of all combinations of items in criteria C and D for migraine and TTH was measured by sensitivity, specificity, and odds ratio. The combination "unilateral location, severe intensity, aggravation by physical activity" had 100% specificity for migraine. The combination "bilateral location, pressing-tightening quality, mild intensity, no aggravation by physical activity" had 100% specificity for TTH. The combinations: "migrainous location, severe intensity, aggravation by physical activity", "severe intensity, nausea", "pulsating quality, nausea", "pulsating quality, migrainous location, aggravation by physical activity" seemed to pose the greatest risk for developing migraine. These combinations--"no nausea, no photophobia", "bilateral location, mild intensity and either no aggravation by physical activity or pressing-tightening quality, or no nausea or no photophobia" increased the most the TTH risk. Using these combinations as additional criteria for overlapping headache we classified 50% of

  3. Usage of analytical representations of time functions of some parameters of blood for early diagnostics of an internal pathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisova, Tatyana P.; Malinov, Igor A.; Malinova, Lidia I.; Brook, Sergey B.

    2000-04-01

    On the basis of experimental data obtained at clinical examination of 5 specially fitted groups of the patients the analytical system of early diagnostic of metabolic condition appropriate for an atherosclerosis and non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus was designed.

  4. Restless legs syndrome/Willis-Ekbom disease diagnostic criteria: updated International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group (IRLSSG) consensus criteria--history, rationale, description, and significance.

    PubMed

    Allen, Richard P; Picchietti, Daniel L; Garcia-Borreguero, Diego; Ondo, William G; Walters, Arthur S; Winkelman, John W; Zucconi, Marco; Ferri, Raffaele; Trenkwalder, Claudia; Lee, Hochang B

    2014-08-01

    In 2003, following a workshop at the National Institutes of Health, the International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group (IRLSSG) developed updated diagnostic criteria for restless legs syndrome/Willis-Ekbom disease (RLS/WED). These criteria were integral to major advances in research, notably in epidemiology, biology, and treatment of RLS/WED. However, extensive review of accumulating literature based on the 2003 NIH/IRLSSG criteria led to efforts to improve the diagnostic criteria further. The clinical standards workshop, sponsored by the WED Foundation and IRLSSG in 2008, started a four-year process for updating the diagnostic criteria. That process included a rigorous review of research advances and input from clinical experts across multiple disciplines. After broad consensus was attained, the criteria were formally approved by the IRLSSG executive committee and membership. Major changes are: (i) addition of a fifth essential criterion, differential diagnosis, to improve specificity by requiring that RLS/WED symptoms not be confused with similar symptoms from other conditions; (ii) addition of a specifier to delineate clinically significant RLS/WED; (iii) addition of course specifiers to classify RLS/WED as chronic-persistent or intermittent; and (iv) merging of the pediatric with the adult diagnostic criteria. Also discussed are supportive features and clinical aspects that are important in the diagnostic evaluation. The IRLSSG consensus criteria for RLS/WED represent an international, interdisciplinary, and collaborative effort intended to improve clinical practice and promote further research. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Child and Interviewer Race in Forensic Interviewing.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Amy K; Mackey, Tomiko D; Langendoen, Carol; Barnard, Marie

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the potential effect of child race and interviewer race on forensic interviewing outcomes. The results of the regression analysis indicated that child race and interviewer race had a significant effect on interview outcome category (no findings, inconclusive, or findings consistent with sexual abuse). Furthermore, the results indicate that the interaction of child and interviewer race had predictive value for rates of findings consistent with sexual abuse but not in the direction predicted. Cross-race dyads had significantly higher rates of interview outcomes consistent with sexual abuse. These findings suggest that more research into the effect of race on disclosure of child sexual abuse is needed.

  6. Diagnostic Efficiency among Psychiatric Outpatients of a Self-Report Version of a Subset of Screen Items of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-TR Personality Disorders (SCID-II)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Germans, Sara; Van Heck, Guus L.; Masthoff, Erik D.; Trompenaars, Fons J. W. M.; Hodiamont, Paul P. G.

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the identification of a 10-item set of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Personality Disorders (SCID-II) items, which proved to be effective as a self-report assessment instrument in screening personality disorders. The item selection was based on the retrospective analyses of 495 SCID-II interviews. The…

  7. An Interview with Jamelie Hassan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Lisa K.; Zine, Jasmin; Davis, Hilary E.

    2007-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Jamelie Hassan. Jamelie Hassan is a visual artist and activist based in London, Ontario, Canada. Since the 1970s she has exhibited widely in Canada and internationally. In 1993 she was presented the "Canada 125 Medal" in recognition of her outstanding service to the community, and in 2001 she…

  8. Whiffing the Airport Interview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, David

    2008-01-01

    An airport interview is an initial interview for a senior administrative position conducted at an airport hotel not too far from the campus in question. Meeting at an airport enables a search committee to interview a large number of candidates in a short period of time with a degree of confidentiality. At the conclusion of the airport interviews,…

  9. Whiffing the Airport Interview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, David

    2008-01-01

    An airport interview is an initial interview for a senior administrative position conducted at an airport hotel not too far from the campus in question. Meeting at an airport enables a search committee to interview a large number of candidates in a short period of time with a degree of confidentiality. At the conclusion of the airport interviews,…

  10. External quality assessment study for ebolavirus PCR-diagnostic promotes international preparedness during the 2014 – 2016 Ebola outbreak in West Africa

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsen, Sonja; Patel, Pranav; Rieger, Toni; Eickmann, Markus; Becker, Stephan; Günther, Stephan; Naidoo, Dhamari; Schrick, Livia; Keeren, Kathrin; Targosz, Angelina; Teichmann, Anette; Formenty, Pierre; Niedrig, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    During the recent Ebola outbreak in West Africa several international mobile laboratories were deployed to the mainly affected countries Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia to provide ebolavirus diagnostic capacity. Additionally, imported cases and small outbreaks in other countries required global preparedness for Ebola diagnostics. Detection of viral RNA by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction has proven effective for diagnosis of ebolavirus disease and several assays are available. However, reliability of these assays is largely unknown and requires serious evaluation. Therefore, a proficiency test panel of 11 samples was generated and distributed on a global scale. Panels were analyzed by 83 expert laboratories and 106 data sets were returned. From these 78 results were rated optimal and 3 acceptable, 25 indicated need for improvement. While performance of the laboratories deployed to West Africa was superior to the overall performance there was no significant difference between the different assays applied. PMID:28459810

  11. External quality assessment study for ebolavirus PCR-diagnostic promotes international preparedness during the 2014 - 2016 Ebola outbreak in West Africa.

    PubMed

    Ellerbrok, Heinz; Jacobsen, Sonja; Patel, Pranav; Rieger, Toni; Eickmann, Markus; Becker, Stephan; Günther, Stephan; Naidoo, Dhamari; Schrick, Livia; Keeren, Kathrin; Targosz, Angelina; Teichmann, Anette; Formenty, Pierre; Niedrig, Matthias

    2017-05-01

    During the recent Ebola outbreak in West Africa several international mobile laboratories were deployed to the mainly affected countries Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia to provide ebolavirus diagnostic capacity. Additionally, imported cases and small outbreaks in other countries required global preparedness for Ebola diagnostics. Detection of viral RNA by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction has proven effective for diagnosis of ebolavirus disease and several assays are available. However, reliability of these assays is largely unknown and requires serious evaluation. Therefore, a proficiency test panel of 11 samples was generated and distributed on a global scale. Panels were analyzed by 83 expert laboratories and 106 data sets were returned. From these 78 results were rated optimal and 3 acceptable, 25 indicated need for improvement. While performance of the laboratories deployed to West Africa was superior to the overall performance there was no significant difference between the different assays applied.

  12. Fundamentals of quality assessment of molecular amplification methods in clinical diagnostics. International Federation of Clinical Chemistry Scientific Division Committee on Molecular Biology Techniques.

    PubMed

    Neumaier, M; Braun, A; Wagener, C

    1998-01-01

    The increasing interest in molecular biology diagnostics is a result of the tremendous gain of scientific knowledge in genetics, made possible especially since the introduction of amplification techniques. High expectations have been placed on genetic testing, and the number of laboratories now using the relevant technology is rapidly increasing--resulting in an obvious need for standardization and definition of laboratory organization. This communication is an effort towards that end. We address aspects that should be considered when structuring a new molecular diagnostic laboratory, and we discuss individual preanalytical and analytical procedures, from sampling to evaluation of assay results. In addition, different means of controlling contamination are discussed. Because the methodology is in constant change, no general standards can be defined. Accordingly, this publication is intended to serve as a recommendation for good laboratory practice and internal quality control and as a guide to troubleshooting, primarily in amplification techniques.

  13. UNUSUAL FINDINGS IN ZEBRAFISH, DANIO RERIO, FROM TOXICOLOGICAL STUDIES AND THE ZEBRAFISH INTERNATIONAL RESOURCE CENTER DIAGNOSTIC SERVICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A number of interesting and unusual lesions have been diagnosed in zebrafish that have been evaluated from toxicological studies or submitted as cases to the Diagnostic Service at Oregon State University. Lesions were observed in various wild-type and mutant lines of zebrafish an...

  14. The Effect of Question Format and Task Difficulty on Reasoning Strategies and Diagnostic Performance in Internal Medicine Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heemskerk, Laura; Norman, Geoff; Chou, Sophia; Mintz, Marcy; Mandin, Henry; McLaughlin, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    Background: Previous studies have suggested an association between reasoning strategies and diagnostic success, but the influence on this relationship of variables such as question format and task difficulty, has not been studied. Our objective was to study the association between question format, task difficulty, reasoning strategies and…

  15. Development of the B-Stark motional Stark effect diagnostic for measurements of the internal magnetic field in the DIII-D tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pablant, Novimir Antoniuk

    A new diagnostic, B⃗ -Stark, has been developed at the DIII-D tokamak for measurements of the magnitude and direction of the internal magnetic field. The B⃗ -Stark system is a version of a motional Stark effect (MSE) diagnostic based on the Stark split Dalpha emission from injected neutral beams. This diagnostic uses the spacing of the Stark lines to measure the magnitude of the magnetic field, and the intensities of the pi3 and sigma1 lines to measure the magnetic pitch angle. These lines originate from the same upper level, and are therefore not dependent on the n = 3 level populations. The measurement of the magnetic pitch angle requires a specific viewing geometry with respect to the neutral beams, which is provided by the B⃗ -Stark diagnostic installation. The B⃗ -Stark technique may have advantages over motional Stark effect polarimetry (MSE polarimetry) diagnostics in future devices with high densities and temperatures, such as ITER. Under these conditions coatings on the plasma facing mirrors are expected, which can cause changes in the polarization state of the reflected light. The B⃗ -Stark technique is insensitive to the polarization direction, and can calibrate for polarization dependent transmission by using an in-situ beam-into-gas calibration. This dissertation describes the development and characterization of the B⃗ -Stark diagnostic. The hardware design and spectral fitting techniques are discussed in detail. Calibration procedures are described including the in-situ determination of the beam emission line profiles, viewing geometry and properties of the collection optics. The performance of the system is evaluated over the range of plasma conditions accessible at DIII-D. Measurements of the magnetic field have been made with toroidal fields in the range 1.2--2.1T, plasma currents in the range 0.5--2.0MA, densities between 1.7--9.0 x 1019m -3, and neutral beam voltages between 50--81keV. These results are compared to values found from

  16. Job Interviewing: Process and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hellwig, Harold H.

    1992-01-01

    Offers ways to amplify current instruction on the all-important job interview. Discusses resumes, job application letters, oral reports, preparing for the interview, mock interview checklist, doing the interview, sample interview questions, and leaving the interview. (SR)

  17. International.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoover, Linn

    1979-01-01

    The International Geological Correlation Project has attained scientific maturity and broad support and participation by geologists world wide. Its purpose is to provide a mechanism for international cooperation and information exchange about geological problems that transcend national boundaries. (Author/BB)

  18. Internal carotid artery pseudo occlusion with embolic cerebral ischemia and low flow in the central retinal artery: a diagnostic challenge.

    PubMed

    Röhrer, Christoph; Ertl, Michael; Altmann, Mathias; Kasprzak, Piotr; Bogdahn, Ulrich; Schuierer, Gerhard; Schlachetzki, Felix

    2011-07-01

    We present a rare case of internal carotid artery pseudoocclusion (ICAPO) in a 60-year-old male Caucasian patient who experienced a reversible sudden loss of vision of the right eye for 10 min followed by recurrent blurring of vision as well as dysarthria and numbness in the left face. The referring ophthalmologist admitted the patient for suspicious occlusion of the internal carotid artery causing anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (AION).

  19. Computerized screening devices and performance assessment: development of a policy towards automation. International Academy of Cytology Task Force summary. Diagnostic Cytology Towards the 21st Century: An International Expert Conference and Tutorial.

    PubMed

    Bartels, P H; Bibbo, M; Hutchinson, M L; Gahm, T; Grohs, H K; Gwi-Mak, E; Kaufman, E A; Kaufman, R H; Knight, B K; Koss, L G; Magruder, L E; Mango, L J; McCallum, S M; Melamed, M R; Peebles, A; Richart, R M; Robinowitz, M; Rosenthal, D L; Sauer, T; Schenck, U; Tanaka, N; Topalidis, T; Verhest, A P; Wertlake, P T; Wilbur, D C

    1998-01-01

    The extension of automation to the diagnostic assessment of clinical materials raises issues of professional responsibility, on the part of both the medical professional and designer of the device. The International Academy of Cytology (IAC) and other professional cytology societies should develop a policy towards automation in the diagnostic assessment of clinical cytologic materials. The following summarizes the discussion of the initial position statement at the International Expert Conference on Diagnostic Cytology Towards the 21st Century, Hawaii, June 1997. 1. The professional in charge of a clinical cytopathology laboratory continues to bear the ultimate medical responsibility for diagnostic decisions made at the facility, whether automated devices are involved or not. 2. The introduction of automated procedures into clinical cytology should under no circumstances lead to a lowering of standards of performance. A prime objective of any guidelines should be to ensure that an automated procedure, in principle, does not expose any patient to new risks, nor should it increase already-existing, inherent risks. 3. Automated devices should provide capabilities for the medical professional to conduct periodic tests of the appropriate performance of the device. 4. Supervisory personnel should continue visual quality control screening of a certain percentage of slides dismissed at primary screening as within normal limits (WNL), even when automated procedures are employed in the laboratory. 5. Specifications for the design of primary screening devices for the detection of cervical cancer issued by the IAC in 1984 were reaffirmed. 6. The setting of numeric performance criteria is the proper charge of regulatory agencies, which also have the power of enforcement. 7. Human expert verification of results represents the "gold standard" at this time. Performance characteristics of computerized cytology devices should be determined by adherence to defined and well

  20. Interview with Sandra Thompson.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Chiung-chih

    1994-01-01

    Presents an interview of Sandra Thompson on various topics relating to the Chinese language. The interview touches on conversational data on Chinese, the lack of morphological complexity in Mandarin Chinese, and the development of Chinese functionalism. (12 references) (CK)

  1. A specifically designed nanoconstruct associates, internalizes, traffics in cardiovascular cells, and accumulates in failing myocardium: a new strategy for heart failure diagnostics and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Esparza, Guillermo U; Segura-Ibarra, Victor; Cordero-Reyes, Andrea M; Youker, Keith A; Serda, Rita E; Cruz-Solbes, Ana S; Amione-Guerra, Javier; Yokoi, Kenji; Kirui, Dickson K; Cara, Francisca E; Paez-Mayorga, Jesus; Flores-Arredondo, Jose H; Guerrero-Beltrán, Carlos E; Garcia-Rivas, Gerardo; Ferrari, Mauro; Blanco, Elvin; Torre-Amione, Guillermo

    2016-02-01

    Ongoing inflammation and endothelial dysfunction occurs within the local microenvironment of heart failure, creating an appropriate scenario for successful use and delivery of nanovectors. This study sought to investigate whether cardiovascular cells associate, internalize, and traffic a nanoplatform called mesoporous silicon vector (MSV), and determine its intravenous accumulation in cardiac tissue in a murine model of heart failure. In vitro cellular uptake and intracellular trafficking of MSVs was examined by scanning electron microscopy, confocal microscopy, time-lapse microscopy, and flow cytometry in cardiac myocytes, fibroblasts, smooth muscle cells, and endothelial cells. The MSVs were internalized within the first hours, and trafficked to perinuclear regions in all the cell lines. Cytotoxicity was investigated by annexin V and cell cycle assays. No significant evidence of toxicity was found. In vivo intravenous cardiac accumulation of MSVs was examined by high content fluorescence and confocal microscopy, with results showing increased accumulation of particles in failing hearts compared with normal hearts. Similar to observations in vitro, MSVs were able to associate, internalize, and traffic to the perinuclear region of cardiomyocytes in vivo. Results show that MSVs associate, internalize, and traffic in cardiovascular cells without any significant toxicity. Furthermore, MSVs accumulate in failing myocardium after intravenous administration, reaching intracellular regions of the cardiomyocytes. These findings represent a novel avenue to develop nanotechnology-based therapeutics and diagnostics in heart failure. © 2016 The Authors European Journal of Heart Failure © 2016 European Society of Cardiology.

  2. A specifically designed nanoconstruct associates, internalizes, traffics in cardiovascular cells, and accumulates in failing myocardium: a new strategy for heart failure diagnostics and therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Esparza, Guillermo U.; Segura-Ibarra, Victor; Cordero-Reyes, Andrea M.; Youker, Keith A.; Serda, Rita E.; Cruz-Solbes, Ana S.; Amione-Guerra, Javier; Yokoi, Kenji; Kirui, Dickson K.; Cara, Francisca E.; Paez-Mayorga, Jesus; Flores-Arredondo, Jose H.; Guerrero-Beltrán, Carlos E.; Garcia-Rivas, Gerardo; Ferrari, Mauro; Blanco, Elvin; Torre-Amione, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Aims Ongoing inflammation and endothelial dysfunction occurs within the local microenvironment of heart failure, creating an appropriate scenario for successful use and delivery of nanovectors. This study sought to investigate whether cardiovascular cells associate, internalize, and traffic a nanoplatform called mesoporous silicon vector (MSV), and determine its intravenous accumulation in cardiac tissue in a murine model of heart failure. Methods and results In vitro cellular uptake and intracellular trafficking of MSVs was examined by scanning electron microscopy, confocal microscopy, time-lapse microscopy, and flow cytometry in cardiac myocytes, fibroblasts, smooth muscle cells, and endothelial cells. The MSVs were internalized within the first hours, and trafficked to perinuclear regions in all the cell lines. Cytotoxicity was investigated by annexin V and cell cycle assays. No significant evidence of toxicity was found. In vivo intravenous cardiac accumulation of MSVs was examined by high content fluorescence and confocal microscopy, with results showing increased accumulation of particles in failing hearts compared with normal hearts. Similar to observations in vitro, MSVs were able to associate, internalize, and traffic to the perinuclear region of cardiomyocytes in vivo. Conclusions Results show that MSVs associate, internalize, and traffic in cardiovascular cells without any significant toxicity. Furthermore, MSVs accumulate in failing myocardium after intravenous administration, reaching intracellular regions of the cardiomyocytes. These findings represent a novel avenue to develop nanotechnology-based therapeutics and diagnostics in heart failure. PMID:26749465

  3. Validation of cytogenetic risk groups according to International Prognostic Scoring Systems by peripheral blood CD34+FISH: results from a German diagnostic study in comparison with an international control group

    PubMed Central

    Braulke, Friederike; Platzbecker, Uwe; Müller-Thomas, Catharina; Götze, Katharina; Germing, Ulrich; Brümmendorf, Tim H.; Nolte, Florian; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Giagounidis, Aristoteles A. N.; Lübbert, Michael; Greenberg, Peter L.; Bennett, John M.; Solé, Francesc; Mallo, Mar; Slovak, Marilyn L.; Ohyashiki, Kazuma; Le Beau, Michelle M.; Tüchler, Heinz; Pfeilstöcker, Michael; Nösslinger, Thomas; Hildebrandt, Barbara; Shirneshan, Katayoon; Aul, Carlo; Stauder, Reinhard; Sperr, Wolfgang R.; Valent, Peter; Fonatsch, Christa; Trümper, Lorenz; Haase, Detlef; Schanz, Julie

    2015-01-01

    International Prognostic Scoring Systems are used to determine the individual risk profile of myelodysplastic syndrome patients. For the assessment of International Prognostic Scoring Systems, an adequate chromosome banding analysis of the bone marrow is essential. Cytogenetic information is not available for a substantial number of patients (5%–20%) with dry marrow or an insufficient number of metaphase cells. For these patients, a valid risk classification is impossible. In the study presented here, the International Prognostic Scoring Systems were validated based on fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses using extended probe panels applied to cluster of differentiation 34 positive (CD34+) peripheral blood cells of 328 MDS patients of our prospective multicenter German diagnostic study and compared to chromosome banding results of 2902 previously published patients with myelodysplastic syndromes. For cytogenetic risk classification by fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses of CD34+ peripheral blood cells, the groups differed significantly for overall and leukemia-free survival by uni- and multivariate analyses without discrepancies between treated and untreated patients. Including cytogenetic data of fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses of peripheral CD34+ blood cells (instead of bone marrow banding analysis) into the complete International Prognostic Scoring System assessment, the prognostic risk groups separated significantly for overall and leukemia-free survival. Our data show that a reliable stratification to the risk groups of the International Prognostic Scoring Systems is possible from peripheral blood in patients with missing chromosome banding analysis by using a comprehensive probe panel (clinicaltrials.gov identifier:01355913). PMID:25344522

  4. Interviewing Coaches and Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mosier, Joel

    1990-01-01

    Offers advice to student sports reporters on how to get the best interviews with coaches and athletes. States that good sports interviewing should start before the game, and follow up with an in-depth interview as soon as possible once the game is over. (MG)

  5. Feasibility, internal consistency and covariates of TICS-m (telephone interview for cognitive status-modified) in a population-based sample: findings from the KORA-Age study.

    PubMed

    Lacruz, Me; Emeny, Rt; Bickel, H; Linkohr, B; Ladwig, Kh

    2013-09-01

    Test the feasibility of the modified telephone interview for cognitive status (TICS-m) as a screening tool to detect cognitive impairment in a population-based sample of older subjects. Data were collected from 3,578 participants, age 65-94 years, of the KORA-Age study. We used analysis of covariance to test for significant sex, age and educational differences in raw TICS-m scores. Internal consistency was analysed by assessing Cronbach's alpha. Correction for education years was undertaken, and participants were divided in three subgroups following validated cut-offs. Finally, a logistic regression was performed to determine the impact of sex on cognition subgroups. Internal consistency of the TICS-m was 0.78. Study participants needed approximately 5.4 min to complete the interview. Lower raw TICS-m scores were associated with male sex, older age and lower education (all p < 0.0001). After correction for education years, 2,851 (79%) had a non-impaired cognitive status (score >31). Male sex was independently associated with having a score equal to or below 27 and 31 (OR = 1.9, 95% CI 1.4-2.5 and OR = 1.5, 95% CI 1.2-1.7, respectively). The TICS-m is a feasible questionnaire for community-dwelling older adults with normal cognitive function or moderate cognitive impairment. Lower cognitive performance was associated with being a man, being older, and having fewer years of formal education. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (DC/TMD) for Clinical and Research Applications: Recommendations of the International RDC/TMD Consortium Network* and Orofacial Pain Special Interest Group†

    PubMed Central

    Schiffman, Eric; Ohrbach, Richard; Truelove, Edmond; Look, John; Anderson, Gary; Goulet, Jean-Paul; List, Thomas; Svensson, Peter; Gonzalez, Yoly; Lobbezoo, Frank; Michelotti, Ambra; Brooks, Sharon L.; Ceusters, Werner; Drangsholt, Mark; Ettlin, Dominik; Gaul, Charly; Goldberg, Louis J.; Haythornthwaite, Jennifer A.; Hollender, Lars; Jensen, Rigmor; John, Mike T.; De Laat, Antoon; de Leeuw, Reny; Maixner, William; van der Meulen, Marylee; Murray, Greg M.; Nixdorf, Donald R.; Palla, Sandro; Petersson, Arne; Pionchon, Paul; Smith, Barry; Visscher, Corine M.; Zakrzewska, Joanna; Dworkin, Samuel F.

    2015-01-01

    Aims The original Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) Axis I diagnostic algorithms have been demonstrated to be reliable. However, the Validation Project determined that the RDC/TMD Axis I validity was below the target sensitivity of ≥ 0.70 and specificity of ≥ 0.95. Consequently, these empirical results supported the development of revised RDC/TMD Axis I diagnostic algorithms that were subsequently demonstrated to be valid for the most common pain-related TMD and for one temporomandibular joint (TMJ) intra-articular disorder. The original RDC/TMD Axis II instruments were shown to be both reliable and valid. Working from these findings and revisions, two international consensus workshops were convened, from which recommendations were obtained for the finalization of new Axis I diagnostic algorithms and new Axis II instruments. Methods Through a series of workshops and symposia, a panel of clinical and basic science pain experts modified the revised RDC/TMD Axis I algorithms by using comprehensive searches of published TMD diagnostic literature followed by review and consensus via a formal structured process. The panel's recommendations for further revision of the Axis I diagnostic algorithms were assessed for validity by using the Validation Project's data set, and for reliability by using newly collected data from the ongoing TMJ Impact Project—the follow-up study to the Validation Project. New Axis II instruments were identified through a comprehensive search of the literature providing valid instruments that, relative to the RDC/TMD, are shorter in length, are available in the public domain, and currently are being used in medical settings. Results The newly recommended Diagnostic Criteria for TMD (DC/TMD) Axis I protocol includes both a valid screener for detecting any pain-related TMD as well as valid diagnostic criteria for differentiating the most common pain-related TMD (sensitivity ≥ 0.86, specificity ≥ 0

  7. Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (DC/TMD) for Clinical and Research Applications: recommendations of the International RDC/TMD Consortium Network* and Orofacial Pain Special Interest Group†.

    PubMed

    Schiffman, Eric; Ohrbach, Richard; Truelove, Edmond; Look, John; Anderson, Gary; Goulet, Jean-Paul; List, Thomas; Svensson, Peter; Gonzalez, Yoly; Lobbezoo, Frank; Michelotti, Ambra; Brooks, Sharon L; Ceusters, Werner; Drangsholt, Mark; Ettlin, Dominik; Gaul, Charly; Goldberg, Louis J; Haythornthwaite, Jennifer A; Hollender, Lars; Jensen, Rigmor; John, Mike T; De Laat, Antoon; de Leeuw, Reny; Maixner, William; van der Meulen, Marylee; Murray, Greg M; Nixdorf, Donald R; Palla, Sandro; Petersson, Arne; Pionchon, Paul; Smith, Barry; Visscher, Corine M; Zakrzewska, Joanna; Dworkin, Samuel F

    2014-01-01

    The original Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) Axis I diagnostic algorithms have been demonstrated to be reliable. However, the Validation Project determined that the RDC/TMD Axis I validity was below the target sensitivity of ≥ 0.70 and specificity of ≥ 0.95. Consequently, these empirical results supported the development of revised RDC/TMD Axis I diagnostic algorithms that were subsequently demonstrated to be valid for the most common pain-related TMD and for one temporomandibular joint (TMJ) intra-articular disorder. The original RDC/TMD Axis II instruments were shown to be both reliable and valid. Working from these findings and revisions, two international consensus workshops were convened, from which recommendations were obtained for the finalization of new Axis I diagnostic algorithms and new Axis II instruments. Through a series of workshops and symposia, a panel of clinical and basic science pain experts modified the revised RDC/TMD Axis I algorithms by using comprehensive searches of published TMD diagnostic literature followed by review and consensus via a formal structured process. The panel's recommendations for further revision of the Axis I diagnostic algorithms were assessed for validity by using the Validation Project's data set, and for reliability by using newly collected data from the ongoing TMJ Impact Project-the follow-up study to the Validation Project. New Axis II instruments were identified through a comprehensive search of the literature providing valid instruments that, relative to the RDC/TMD, are shorter in length, are available in the public domain, and currently are being used in medical settings. The newly recommended Diagnostic Criteria for TMD (DC/TMD) Axis I protocol includes both a valid screener for detecting any pain-related TMD as well as valid diagnostic criteria for differentiating the most common pain-related TMD (sensitivity ≥ 0.86, specificity ≥ 0.98) and for one intra

  8. From sixty-two interviews on 'the worst and the best episode of your life'. Relationships between internal working models and a grammatical scale of subject-object affective connections.

    PubMed

    Seganti, A; Carnevale, G; Mucelli, R; Solano, L; Target, M

    2000-06-01

    The authors address the issue of inferring unconscious internal working models of interaction through language. After reviewing Main's seminal work of linguistic assessment through the 'adult attachment interview', they stress the idea of adults' internal working models (IWMs) as information-processing devices, which give moment-to-moment sensory orientation in the face of any past or present, animate or inanimate object. They propose that a selective perception of the objects could match expected with actual influence of objects on the subject's self, through very simple 'parallel-processed' categories of internal objects. They further hypothesise that the isomorphism between internal working models of interaction and grammatical connections between subjects and objects within a clause could be a key to tracking positive and negative images of self and other during discourse. An experiment is reported applying the authors' 'scale of subject/object affective connection' to the narratives of sixty-two subjects asked to write about the 'worst' and 'best' episodes of their lives. Participants had previously been classified using Hazan & Shaver's self-reported 'attachment types' (avoidant, anxious and secure) categorising individuals' general expectations in relation to others. The findings were that the subject/object distribution of positive and negative experience, through verbs defined for this purpose as either performative or state verbs, did significantly differ between groups. In addition, different groups tended, during the best episodes, significantly to invert the trend of positive/negative subject/object distribution shown during the worst episode. Results are discussed in terms of a psychoanalytic theory of improvement through co-operative elaboration of negative relational issues.

  9. Does the Cultural Formulation Interview (CFI) for the Fifth Revision of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) affect medical communication? A qualitative exploratory study from the New York site

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Neil K.; DeSilva, Ravi; Nicasio, Andel V.; Boiler, Marit; Lewis-Fernández, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Cross-cultural mental health researchers often analyze patient explanatory models of illness to optimize service provision. The Cultural Formulation Interview (CFI) is a cross-cultural assessment tool released in May 2013 with DSM-5 to revise shortcomings from the DSM-IV Outline for Cultural Formulation (OCF). The CFI field trial took place in 6 countries, 14 sites, and with 321 patients to explore its feasibility, acceptability, and clinical utility with patients and clinicians. We sought to analyze if and how CFI feasibility, acceptability, and clinical utility were related to patient-clinician communication. Design We report data from the New York site which enrolled 7 clinicians and 32 patients in 32 patient-clinician dyads. We undertook a data analysis independent of the parent field trial by conducting content analyses of debriefing interviews with all participants (n=64) based on codebooks derived from frameworks for medical communication and implementation outcomes. Three coders created codebooks, coded independently, established inter-rater coding reliability, and analyzed if the CFI affects medical communication with respect to feasibility, acceptability, and clinical utility. Results Despite racial, ethnic, cultural, and professional differences within our group of patients and clinicians, we found that promoting satisfaction through the interview, eliciting data, eliciting the patient’s perspective, and perceiving data at multiple levels were common codes that explained how the CFI affected medical communication. We also found that all but 2 codes fell under the implementation outcome of clinical utility, 2 fell under acceptability, and none fell under feasibility. Conclusion Our study offers new directions for research on how a cultural interview affects patient-clinician communication. Future research can analyze how the CFI and other cultural interviews impact medical communication in clinical settings with subsequent effects on outcomes

  10. Does the Cultural Formulation Interview for the fifth revision of the diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (DSM-5) affect medical communication? A qualitative exploratory study from the New York site.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Neil K; Desilva, Ravi; Nicasio, Andel V; Boiler, Marit; Lewis-Fernández, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Cross-cultural mental health researchers often analyze patient explanatory models of illness to optimize service provision. The Cultural Formulation Interview (CFI) is a cross-cultural assessment tool released in May 2013 with DSM-5 to revise shortcomings from the DSM-IV Outline for Cultural Formulation (OCF). The CFI field trial took place in 6 countries, 14 sites, and with 321 patients to explore its feasibility, acceptability, and clinical utility with patients and clinicians. We sought to analyze if and how CFI feasibility, acceptability, and clinical utility were related to patient-clinician communication. We report data from the New York site which enrolled 7 clinicians and 32 patients in 32 patient-clinician dyads. We undertook a data analysis independent of the parent field trial by conducting content analyses of debriefing interviews with all participants (n = 64) based on codebooks derived from frameworks for medical communication and implementation outcomes. Three coders created codebooks, coded independently, established inter-rater coding reliability, and analyzed if the CFI affects medical communication with respect to feasibility, acceptability, and clinical utility. Despite racial, ethnical, cultural, and professional differences within our group of patients and clinicians, we found that promoting satisfaction through the interview, eliciting data, eliciting the patient's perspective, and perceiving data at multiple levels were common codes that explained how the CFI affected medical communication. We also found that all but two codes fell under the implementation outcome of clinical utility, two fell under acceptability, and none fell under feasibility. Our study offers new directions for research on how a cultural interview affects patient-clinician communication. Future research can analyze how the CFI and other cultural interviews impact medical communication in clinical settings with subsequent effects on outcomes such as medication adherence

  11. Computerized training and proficiency testing. International Academy of Cytology Task Force summary. Diagnostic Cytology Towards the 21st Century: An International Expert Conference and Tutorial.

    PubMed

    Vooijs, G P; Davey, D D; Somrak, T M; Goodell, R M; Grohs, D H; Knesel, E A; Mango, L J; Mui, K K; Nielsen, M L; Wilbur, D C

    1998-01-01

    Computerized technologies probably will revolutionize the field of gynecologic cytology in the next century. Such technologies will be useful in both training and evaluating proficiency. However, manual screening/review of gynecologic cytology preparations is the current "gold standard" for both training and assessment of proficiency. Training programs for cytotechnologists and pathologists should provide instruction and experience in new technologies, but their introduction may depend on the availability of equipment and staff. Advantages of digital images for training include standardization of teaching sets and interactive capabilities, allowing educational feedback. Computerized support/assistance devices aid in complete screening of the slide during training and provide feedback to cytologists on screening techniques. Liquid-based cytopreparatory instruments facilitate multiple glass slides for teaching or testing. Proficiency testing (PT) in cytology has similar quality assurance goals as in other areas of the laboratory, but the subjective nature of cytologic analysis poses many challenges for implementation. There is consensus that all cytology practitioners would like to know the proficiency of the laboratory. However, the majority question the value and validity of any large-scale formal testing programs. Locator and diagnostic skills are both critical in cytology, but assessment of each skill may occur in different ways using computerized technologies. Any type of assessment should provide educational feedback to participants. Psychometric issues in PT include the consideration of different types of validity, including face, content, construct and criterion related. The reliability or consistency of the testing event is also critical. A valid and reliable correlation between work performance and performance on a PT needs to be established. The goal is to ensure that PT will identify submarginal practitioners and that persons successful on PT are in fact

  12. STS-112 Crew Interviews: Melroy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Pamela A. Melroy USAF Pilot, is seen during a prelaunch interview. She gives a brief overview of the STS-112 mission which is to install the S1 truss on the International Space Station. She also gives some specific details about the structural design of the S1 truss. Pamela Melroy is also the Internal EVA (IV) coordinator for this mission. She talks about her responsibilities as the IV which are to direct the spacewalkers back into the Airlock after the S1 is installed. A detailed description about the goals of EVA (2) and EVA (3) are also given by Melroy.

  13. Use of chimeric influenza viruses as a novel internal control for diagnostic rRT-PCR assays.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xueliang; Liu, Fen; Jiang, Lingli; Bao, Yun; Xiao, Yanqun; Wang, Hualiang

    2016-02-01

    Real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) is now widely used to detect viral pathogens in various human specimens. The application of internal controls to validate the entire process of these assays is necessary to prevent false-negative results caused by unexpected inhibition or inefficient extraction. In the present study, we describe a strategy to produce a stable internal control for rRT-PCR by packaging foreign RNA into influenza virions using plasmid-based reverse genetics technology. The envelope structure of influenza virus can effectively protect RNA segments from RNase digestion, which provides an advantage for its routine use as an internal control. Utilizing this approach, we successfully generated a recombinant influenza virus (rPR8-HCV) containing the 5′ untranslated region (5′UTR) of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA genome. After inactivation and purification, the rPR8-HCV particles were demonstrated to be RNase resistant and stable at 4 °C for at least 252 days in human plasma, with no degradation even after being frozen and thawed multiple times. These results were reproducible in the COBAS TaqMan HCV test for 164 days. Moreover, the chimeric influenza virus particles could be easily produced in embryonated eggs and were noninfectious after inactivation treatment. Additionally, this strategy could also be adapted for real-time clinical applications of other RNA targets, providing a universal approach with broad clinical applications in rRT-PCR assays.

  14. International recommendation for a comprehensive neuropathologic workup of epilepsy surgery brain tissue: A consensus Task Force report from the ILAE Commission on Diagnostic Methods.

    PubMed

    Blümcke, Ingmar; Aronica, Eleonora; Miyata, Hajime; Sarnat, Harvey B; Thom, Maria; Roessler, Karl; Rydenhag, Bertil; Jehi, Lara; Krsek, Pavel; Wiebe, Samuel; Spreafico, Roberto

    2016-03-01

    Epilepsy surgery is an effective treatment in many patients with drug-resistant focal epilepsies. An early decision for surgical therapy is facilitated by a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-visible brain lesion congruent with the electrophysiologically abnormal brain region. Recent advances in the pathologic diagnosis and classification of epileptogenic brain lesions are helpful for clinical correlation, outcome stratification, and patient management. However, application of international consensus classification systems to common epileptic pathologies (e.g., focal cortical dysplasia [FCD] and hippocampal sclerosis [HS]) necessitates standardized protocols for neuropathologic workup of epilepsy surgery specimens. To this end, the Task Force of Neuropathology from the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) Commission on Diagnostic Methods developed a consensus standard operational procedure for tissue inspection, distribution, and processing. The aims are to provide a systematic framework for histopathologic workup, meeting minimal standards and maximizing current and future opportunities for morphofunctional correlations and molecular studies for both clinical care and research. Whenever feasible, anatomically intact surgical specimens are desirable to enable systematic analysis in selective hippocampectomies, temporal lobe resections, and lesional or nonlesional neocortical samples. Correct orientation of sample and the sample's relation to neurophysiologically aberrant sites requires good communication between pathology and neurosurgical teams. Systematic tissue sampling of 5-mm slabs along a defined anatomic axis and application of a limited immunohistochemical panel will ensure a reliable differential diagnosis of main pathologies encountered in epilepsy surgery. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 International League Against Epilepsy.

  15. [Motivational interview: supporting change].

    PubMed

    Fond, Guillaume; Ducasse, Déborah

    2015-01-01

    The motivational interview aims to help patients to resolve their ambivalence regarding problematic behaviors and to guide them into change. It differs from other therapeutic approaches mainly through the attitude of the therapist. In motivational interviewing, the therapist defends the statu quo. By reactance, the patient defends the change and enhance her/his motivation. This article provides a summary of the other concepts of motivational interviewing and its applications in the psychiatric daily practice.

  16. Diagnostic performance of a multiple real-time PCR assay in patients with suspected sepsis hospitalized in an internal medicine ward.

    PubMed

    Pasqualini, Leonella; Mencacci, Antonella; Leli, Christian; Montagna, Paolo; Cardaccia, Angela; Cenci, Elio; Montecarlo, Ines; Pirro, Matteo; di Filippo, Francesco; Cistaro, Emma; Schillaci, Giuseppe; Bistoni, Francesco; Mannarino, Elmo

    2012-04-01

    Early identification of causative pathogen in sepsis patients is pivotal to improve clinical outcome. SeptiFast (SF), a commercially available system for molecular diagnosis of sepsis based on PCR, has been mostly used in patients hospitalized in hematology and intensive care units. We evaluated the diagnostic accuracy and clinical usefulness of SF, compared to blood culture (BC), in 391 patients with suspected sepsis, hospitalized in a department of internal medicine. A causative pathogen was identified in 85 patients (22%). Sixty pathogens were detected by SF and 57 by BC. No significant differences were found between the two methods in the rates of pathogen detection (P = 0.74), even after excluding 9 pathogens which were isolated by BC and were not included in the SF master list (P = 0.096). The combination of SF and BC significantly improved the diagnostic yield in comparison to BC alone (P < 0.001). Compared to BC, SF showed a significantly lower contamination rate (0 versus 19 cases; P < 0.001) with a higher specificity for pathogen identification (1.00, 95% confidence interval [CI] of 0.99 to 1.00, versus 0.94, 95% CI of 0.90 to 0.96; P = 0.005) and a higher positive predictive value (1.00, 95% CI of 1.00 to 0.92%, versus 0.75, 95% CI of 0.63 to 0.83; P = 0.005). In the subgroup of patients (n = 191) who had been receiving antibiotic treatment for ≥24 h, SF identified more pathogens (16 versus 6; P = 0.049) compared to BC. These results suggest that, in patients with suspected sepsis, hospitalized in an internal medicine ward, SF could be a highly valuable adjunct to conventional BC, particularly in patients under antibiotic treatment.

  17. Pubertal Maturation and African American Children's Internalizing and Externalizing Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ge, Xiaojia; Brody, Gene H.; Conger, Rand D.; Simons, Ronald L.

    2006-01-01

    The association of pubertal maturation with internalizing and externalizing symptoms was examined with a sample of 867 African-American 10-12-year-old children. Children reported their pubertal development status and timing using a self-report questionnaire, and symptoms were assessed through diagnostic interviews with the children and their…

  18. Colposcopy, cervicography, speculoscopy and endoscopy. International Academy of Cytology Task Force summary. Diagnostic Cytology Towards the 21st Century: An International Expert Conference and Tutorial.

    PubMed

    van Niekerk, W A; Dunton, C J; Richart, R M; Hilgarth, M; Kato, H; Kaufman, R H; Mango, L J; Nozawa, S; Robinowitz, M

    1998-01-01

    into the residency programs of obstetrics and gynecology. Criteria for the adequate training of colposcopists should be developed. Continuing education programs in colposcopy should be developed when they are not already in existence. The cost-effectiveness of integrating colposcopy as a primary screening technique should be evaluated. Following a high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL) cytology result, colposcopically directed punch biopsy should be taken with or without endocervical curettage. This generally should precede the loop electrosurgical excision procedure (LEEP); however, in certain circumstances direct LEEP may be indicated. LEEP under colposcopic vision is an efficient way to treat an HSIL lesion of the cervix because the histologic extent and margins can be determined, unlike with laser surgery or cryosurgery. It is also more cost-effective than cold knife conization because general anesthesia and an operating room are unnecessary. Following LEEP, the endocervical canal should be examined colposcopically for any evidence of involvement. Lesions in the endocervix can then be removed with a different-shaped loop. Further research into Raman spectroscopy as a diagnostic aid in cervical pathology is needed, as is the use of micrococolpohysteroscopy for in vivo cytologic analyses, especially of the endocervical canal and transformation zone. Hysteroscopy is the most direct method for the diagnosis and treatment of intrauterine diseases. Hysteroscopic endometrial biopsy is more accurate than conventional biopsy methods. Cervical invasion of endometrial cancer can be detected by hysteroscopy. The depth of invasion, however, is more accurately determined by magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography. Many topics for ongoing research and/or implementation are mentioned under "Consensus Position," above. (ABSTRACT TRUNCATED)

  19. [Clinical diagnostics of ADHD in preschool-aged children].

    PubMed

    Merkt, Julia; Petermann, Franz

    2015-03-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is one of the most prevalent psychiatric disorders in childhood and adolescence and has many negative consequences for both the child and the family. Early identification of children with ADHD would be helpful for the prevention of long-term consequences. This review appraises questionnaires and clinical interviews that can be used for the diagnosis of ADHD in preschool-aged children (3-5 years). We compare and discuss both German and international methods. The role of questionnaires and clinical interviews in the diagnostic process of ADHD is discussed.

  20. Application of a high-repetition-rate laser diagnostic system for single-cycle-resolved imaging in internal combustion engines.

    PubMed

    Hult, Johan; Richter, Mattias; Nygren, Jenny; Aldén, Marcus; Hultqvist, Anders; Christensen, Magnus; Johansson, Bengt

    2002-08-20

    High-repetition-rate laser-induced fluorescence measurements of fuel and OH concentrations in internal combustion engines are demonstrated. Series of as many as eight fluorescence images, with a temporal resolution ranging from 10 micros to 1 ms, are acquired within one engine cycle. A multiple-laser system in combination with a multiple-CCD camera is used for cycle-resolved imaging in spark-ignition, direct-injection stratified-charge, and homogeneous-charge compression-ignition engines. The recorded data reveal unique information on cycle-to-cycle variations in fuel transport and combustion. Moreover, the imaging system in combination with a scanning mirror is used to perform instantaneous three-dimensional fuel-concentration measurements.

  1. Three-dimensional, paper-based microfluidic devices containing internal timers for running time-based diagnostic assays.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Scott T; Thom, Nicole K

    2013-01-01

    This chapter describes a method for fabricating three-dimensional (3D), paper-based microfluidic devices that contain internal timers for running quantitative, time-based assays. The method involves patterning microfluidic channels into paper, and cutting double-sided adhesive tape into defined patterns. Patterned paper and tape are assembled layer by layer to create 3D microfluidic devices that are capable of distributing microliter volumes of a sample into multiple regions on a device for conducting multiple assays simultaneously. Paraffin wax is incorporated into defined regions within the device to provide control over the distribution rate of a sample, and food coloring is included in defined regions within the device to provide an unambiguous readout when the sample has reached the bottom of the device (this latter feature is the endpoint of the timer).

  2. Diagnostic Tool for Assessing Overactive Bladder Symptoms: Could the International Prostate Symptom Storage Subscore Replace the Overactive Bladder Symptom Score?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The goal of this study was to compare the International Prostate Symptom Storage Subscore (IPSS-s) and the overactive bladder symptom score (OABSS) as tools for assessing the symptoms of overactive bladder (OAB). Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted of a sample of 1,341 patients aged 50 years and older with lower urinary tract complaints who had undergone a medical examination at one of several centers. For each patient, we reviewed the International Prostate Symptom Score and the OABSS. The patients were divided into 2 groups according to their IPSS-s result (group 1, score ≥6; group 2, score<6) and into another 2 groups according to their OABSS diagnosis (group 3, OAB patients; group 4, non-OAB patients). We determined whether the OABSS varied to a statistically significant extent between groups 1 and 2. Furthermore, we evaluated the correlation of IPSS-s severity with the OABSS results in group 3, and the OAB diagnosis rate was compared between groups 1 and 2. Results In groups 1 and 2, the OABSS results were not found to vary to a statistically significant extent (P=0.326). In group 3, no significant correlation was found between IPSS-s severity and the OABSS results (P=0.385). In the prevalence analysis, no statistically significant difference was found among the groups, and the receiver operating characteristic curve showed an area under the curve of 0.474. Conclusions The results of this cross-sectional analysis suggest that the IPSS-s and the OABSS are not significantly correlated. Although both scores are used to measure OAB symptoms, the simultaneous use of IPSS-s and OABSS is not warranted. PMID:27706011

  3. Progeria Research Foundation Diagnostic Testing Program

    MedlinePlus

    ... Interview with John Tacket Find the Other 150 Medical Research NEW! Lonafarnib Pre-clinical Drug Supply Program What's ... Scientific Publications Grand Rounds Workshop 2010 Videos Home » Medical Research » Diagnostic Testing The PRF Diagnostic Testing Program The ...

  4. Diagnosing disruptive mood dysregulation disorder: Integrating semi-structured and unstructured interviews.

    PubMed

    McTate, Emily A; Leffler, Jarrod M

    2017-04-01

    The newest iteration of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual-fifth edition (DSM-5), is the first to include the diagnosis of disruptive mood dysregulation disorder (DMDD). The assessment and diagnosis of psychopathology in children are complicated, particularly for mood disorders. Practice can be guided by the use of well-validated instruments. However, as this is a new diagnosis existing instruments have not yet been evaluated for the diagnosis of DMDD. This study seeks to provide a method for using existing structured interview instruments to assess for this contemporary diagnosis. The Children's Interview for Psychiatric Syndromes (ChIPS) and the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview for Children and Adolescents (MINI-KID) are reviewed and existing items consistent with a diagnosis of DMDD are identified. Finally, a case is presented using both measures and applying the theoretical items identified to illustrate how one might use these measures to assess DMDD. Limitations and future directions are discussed.

  5. Presterilization Interviewing: An Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, Raymond G.

    1976-01-01

    The role of interviewing in diffusing possible harmful side effects of sterilization operations was evaluated in an acute general hospital. Two simultaneous field experiments were conducted with 50 vasectomy couples and 50 tubal-ligation couples. There were no significant differences between the interview and control groups. (Author)

  6. Interview with Ron Wasserstein

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossmann, Allan; Wasserstein, Ron

    2014-01-01

    Ron Wasserstein is Executive Director of the American Statistical Association (ASA). He previously served as Vice-President for Academic Affairs and Professor of Statistics at Washburn University. This interview took place via email on January 21- February 24, 2014. Topics covered in this interview are as follows: 1) Beginnings, 2) Teaching…

  7. Legal Interviewing For Paralegals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Statsky, William P.

    One of the training materials prepared for paralegals, or legal assistants, by the National Paralegal Institute under a Federal grant, the document presents legal interviewing techniques by focusing on an analysis of a particular legal interview conducted by a paralegal on a hypothetical case. From the analysis of the case, a number of problems,…

  8. Literacy and Informational Interviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Decarie, Christina

    2010-01-01

    Informational interviews are valuable tools for improving writing, editing, and interviewing skills, and they are also extremely valuable in improving the soft skills that are valued by employers, such as confidence, adaptability, the ability to set and keep deadlines, the ability to manage risk, and so on. These soft skills, this article argues,…

  9. Interview with Octavio Solis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yowell, Bob

    This interview with Mexican-American, Octavio Solis, considers that many facets of his education and experience in the theater. Solis, interviewed by Bob Yowell, Northern Arizona University Theatre Department faculty member and that campus' producer of Solis' play "El Paso Blue," touches on the importance of his acting experience when…

  10. Interview with Ron Wasserstein

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossmann, Allan; Wasserstein, Ron

    2014-01-01

    Ron Wasserstein is Executive Director of the American Statistical Association (ASA). He previously served as Vice-President for Academic Affairs and Professor of Statistics at Washburn University. This interview took place via email on January 21- February 24, 2014. Topics covered in this interview are as follows: 1) Beginnings, 2) Teaching…

  11. Employee Exit Interviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulk, Larry J.

    1984-01-01

    Describes an exit interview procedure for employees leaving the school system designed to identify potential personnel problems, maintain good employee relations, provide statistics on reasons for turnover, and provide assessment data for inservice education programs. Reports statistical data based on interview implementation, 1981-83. (TE)

  12. Literacy and Informational Interviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Decarie, Christina

    2010-01-01

    Informational interviews are valuable tools for improving writing, editing, and interviewing skills, and they are also extremely valuable in improving the soft skills that are valued by employers, such as confidence, adaptability, the ability to set and keep deadlines, the ability to manage risk, and so on. These soft skills, this article argues,…

  13. Questions in Reference Interviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Marilyn Domas

    1998-01-01

    Characterizes the questioning behavior in reference interviews preceding delegated online searches of bibliographic databases and relates it to questioning behavior in other types of interviews/settings. Compares questions asked by the information specialist and those asked by the client; findings show the information specialist dominates the…

  14. Interviewing for a Principalship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daresh, John C.

    2001-01-01

    When interviewing for a principal position, candidates should practice with friends and acquaintances, anticipate "sure thing" questions, listen and respond carefully, know something about the school and community, show passion and enthusiasm, and ask interviewers what the new principal ought to tackle first. (MLH)

  15. Winning the interviewing game.

    PubMed

    Lyons, M F

    2000-01-01

    Those who don't "interview well" are not likely to receive the job offer, despite their qualifications. A job interview is actually a fierce competitive activity that offers only two grades: an A or F. By nature, physicians are competitive; they like to win. Infrequent interviewees are prone to making easily corrected mistakes, such as showing no enthusiasm or having poor eye contact. The key for interviewing success is preparation--doing research, developing a personal statement, and role-playing practice interviews. View the interview as a sales call whose bottom-line goal is to achieve an offer, or at least to let you leave with the option to return for future discussions.

  16. An ion thruster internal discharge chamber electrostatic probe diagnostic technique using a high-speed probe positioning system.

    PubMed

    Herman, Daniel A; Gallimore, Alec D

    2008-01-01

    Extensive resources have been allocated to diagnose and minimize lifetime-limiting factors in gridded ion thrusters. While most of this effort has focused on grid erosion, results from wear tests indicate that discharge cathode erosion may also play an important role in limiting the lifetime of ring-cusp ion thrusters proposed for future large flagship missions. The detailed characterization of the near-cathode discharge plasma is essential for mitigating discharge cathode erosion. However, severe difficulty is encountered when attempting to measure internal discharge plasma parameters during thruster operation with conventional probing techniques. These difficulties stem from the high-voltage, high-density discharge cathode plume, which is a hostile environment for probes. A method for interrogating the discharge chamber plasma of a working ion thruster over a two-dimensional grid is demonstrated. The high-speed axial reciprocating probe positioning system is used to minimize thruster perturbation during probe insertion and to reduce heating of the probe. Electrostatic probe measurements from a symmetric double Langmuir probe are presented over a two-dimensional spatial array in the near-discharge cathode assembly region of a 30-cm-diameter ring-cusp ion thruster. Electron temperatures, 2-5 eV, and number density contours, with a maximum of 8 x 10(12) cm(-3) on centerline, are measured. These data provide detailed electron temperature and number density contours which, when combined with plasma potential measurements, may shed light on discharge cathode erosion processes and the effect of thruster operating conditions on erosion rates.

  17. Video Taping and Abnormal Psychology: Dramatized Clinical Interviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyons, Michael J.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Students in an abnormal psychology course worked in teams to produce dramatizations of diagnostic interviews and then presented them in class. Positive and negative aspects of the activity are discussed. (RM)

  18. Video Taping and Abnormal Psychology: Dramatized Clinical Interviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyons, Michael J.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Students in an abnormal psychology course worked in teams to produce dramatizations of diagnostic interviews and then presented them in class. Positive and negative aspects of the activity are discussed. (RM)

  19. Tom Engler Interview

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-01-21

    Tom Engler, the deputy director of the Center Planning and Development Directorate, or CPDD, at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, speaks to reporter James Dean from Florida Today newspaper during an interview at the Kennedy News Center.

  20. Instructor Interviews Joseph Featherstone.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Instructor, 1987

    1987-01-01

    An interview with Joseph Featherstone, a teacher at Michigan State University, reveals his attitudes regarding good teaching. Good teaching is a victory over meaninglessness, giving children the chance to hope and to have faith in their future. (CB)

  1. Interview With Leland Melvin

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Middle school student Molly Moore interviews NASA's Associate Administrator for Education, Leland Melvin. She asks about his career as an engineer and astronaut and what it was like to live and wor...

  2. STS-112 Crew Interviews - Wolf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    STS-112 Mission Specialist David Wolf is seen during this preflight interview, where he first answers questions on his career path and role models. Other questions cover mission goals, ISS (International Space Station) Expedition 5 spacecrew, crew training, the S1 Truss and its radiators, the MBS (Mobile Base Structure), his experience onboard Mir, and his EVAs (extravehicular activities) on the coming mission. The EVAs are the subject of several questions. Wolf discusses his crew members, and elsewhere discusses Pilot Pamela Melroy's role as an IV crew member during EVAs. In addition, Wolf answers questions on transfer operations, the SHIMMER experiment, and his thoughts on multinational crews and crew bonding.

  3. STS-112 Crew Interviews - Wolf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    STS-112 Mission Specialist David Wolf is seen during this preflight interview, where he first answers questions on his career path and role models. Other questions cover mission goals, ISS (International Space Station) Expedition 5 spacecrew, crew training, the S1 Truss and its radiators, the MBS (Mobile Base Structure), his experience onboard Mir, and his EVAs (extravehicular activities) on the coming mission. The EVAs are the subject of several questions. Wolf discusses his crew members, and elsewhere discusses Pilot Pamela Melroy's role as an IV crew member during EVAs. In addition, Wolf answers questions on transfer operations, the SHIMMER experiment, and his thoughts on multinational crews and crew bonding.

  4. A novel clinical score (InterTAK Diagnostic Score) to differentiate takotsubo syndrome from acute coronary syndrome: results from the International Takotsubo Registry.

    PubMed

    Ghadri, Jelena R; Cammann, Victoria L; Jurisic, Stjepan; Seifert, Burkhardt; Napp, L Christian; Diekmann, Johanna; Bataiosu, Dana Roxana; D'Ascenzo, Fabrizio; Ding, Katharina J; Sarcon, Annahita; Kazemian, Elycia; Birri, Tanja; Ruschitzka, Frank; Lüscher, Thomas F; Templin, Christian

    2017-08-01

    Clinical presentation of takotsubo syndrome (TTS) mimics acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and does not allow differentiation. We aimed to develop a clinical score to estimate the probability of TTS and to distinguish TTS from ACS in the acute stage. Patients with TTS were recruited from the International Takotsubo Registry ( www.takotsubo-registry.com) and ACS patients from the leading hospital in Zurich. A multiple logistic regression for the presence of TTS was performed in a derivation cohort (TTS, n = 218; ACS, n = 436). The best model was selected and formed a score (InterTAK Diagnostic Score) with seven variables, and each was assigned a score value: female sex 25, emotional trigger 24, physical trigger 13, absence of ST-segment depression (except in lead aVR) 12, psychiatric disorders 11, neurologic disorders 9, and QTc prolongation 6 points. The area under the curve (AUC) for the resulting score was 0.971 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.96-0.98] and using a cut-off value of 40 score points, sensitivity was 89% and specificity 91%. When patients with a score of ≥50 were diagnosed as TTS, nearly 95% of TTS patients were correctly diagnosed. When patients with a score ≤31 were diagnosed as ACS, ∼95% of ACS patients were diagnosed correctly. The score was subsequently validated in an independent validation cohort (TTS, n = 173; ACS, n = 226), resulting in a score AUC of 0.901 (95% CI 0.87-0.93). The InterTAK Diagnostic Score estimates the probability of the presence of TTS and is able to distinguish TTS from ACS with a high sensitivity and specificity. NCT0194762. © 2016 The Authors. European Journal of Heart Failure published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of European Society of Cardiology.

  5. Interviews in qualitative research.

    PubMed

    Peters, Kath; Halcomb, Elizabeth

    2015-03-01

    Interviews are a common method of data collection in nursing research. They are frequently used alone in a qualitative study or combined with other data collection methods in mixed or multi-method research. Semi-structured interviews, where the researcher has some predefined questions or topics but then probes further as the participant responds, can produce powerful data that provide insights into the participants' experiences, perceptions or opinions.

  6. Assessment of Semi-Structured Clinical Interview for Mobile Phone Addiction Disorder.

    PubMed

    Alavi, Seyyed Salman; Mohammadi, Mohammad Reza; Jannatifard, Fereshteh; Mohammadi Kalhori, Soroush; Sepahbodi, Ghazal; BabaReisi, Mohammad; Sajedi, Sahar; Farshchi, Mojtaba; KhodaKarami, Rasul; Hatami Kasvaee, Vahid

    2016-04-01

    The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR) classified mobile phone addiction disorder under "impulse control disorder not elsewhere classified". This study surveyed the diagnostic criteria of DSM-IV-TR for the diagnosis of mobile phone addiction in correspondence with Iranian society and culture. Two hundred fifty students of Tehran universities were entered into this descriptive-analytical and cross-sectional study. Quota sampling method was used. At first, semi- structured clinical interview (based on DSM-IV-TR) was performed for all the cases, and another specialist reevaluated the interviews. Data were analyzed using content validity, inter-scorer reliability (Kappa coefficient) and test-retest via SPSS18 software. The content validity of the semi- structured clinical interview matched the DSM-IV-TR criteria for behavioral addiction. Moreover, their content was appropriate, and two items, including "SMS pathological use" and "High monthly cost of using the mobile phone" were added to promote its validity. Internal reliability (Kappa) and test-retest reliability were 0.55 and r = 0.4 (p<0. 01) respectively. The results of this study revealed that semi- structured diagnostic criteria of DSM-IV-TR are valid and reliable for diagnosing mobile phone addiction, and this instrument is an effective tool to diagnose this disorder.

  7. Assessment of Semi-Structured Clinical Interview for Mobile Phone Addiction Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Alavi, Seyyed Salman; Jannatifard, Fereshteh; Mohammadi Kalhori, Soroush; Sepahbodi, Ghazal; BabaReisi, Mohammad; Sajedi, Sahar; Farshchi, Mojtaba; KhodaKarami, Rasul; Hatami Kasvaee, Vahid

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR) classified mobile phone addiction disorder under “impulse control disorder not elsewhere classified”. This study surveyed the diagnostic criteria of DSM-IV-TR for the diagnosis of mobile phone addiction in correspondence with Iranian society and culture. Method: Two hundred fifty students of Tehran universities were entered into this descriptive-analytical and cross-sectional study. Quota sampling method was used. At first, semi- structured clinical interview (based on DSM-IV-TR) was performed for all the cases, and another specialist reevaluated the interviews. Data were analyzed using content validity, inter-scorer reliability (Kappa coefficient) and test-retest via SPSS18 software. Results: The content validity of the semi- structured clinical interview matched the DSM–IV-TR criteria for behavioral addiction. Moreover, their content was appropriate, and two items, including “SMS pathological use” and “High monthly cost of using the mobile phone” were added to promote its validity. Internal reliability (Kappa) and test–retest reliability were 0.55 and r = 0.4 (p<0. 01) respectively. Conclusion: The results of this study revealed that semi- structured diagnostic criteria of DSM-IV-TR are valid and reliable for diagnosing mobile phone addiction, and this instrument is an effective tool to diagnose this disorder. PMID:27437008

  8. The psychiatric interview: validity, structure, and subjectivity.

    PubMed

    Nordgaard, Julie; Sass, Louis A; Parnas, Josef

    2013-06-01

    There is a glaring gap in the psychiatric literature concerning the nature of psychiatric symptoms and signs, and a corresponding lack of epistemological discussion of psycho-diagnostic interviewing. Contemporary clinical neuroscience heavily relies on the use of fully structured interviews that are historically rooted in logical positivism and behaviorism. These theoretical approaches marked decisively the so-called "operational revolution in psychiatry" leading to the creation of DSM-III. This paper attempts to examine the theoretical assumptions that underlie the use of a fully structured psychiatric interview. We address the ontological status of pathological experience, the notions of symptom, sign, prototype and Gestalt, and the necessary second-person processes which are involved in converting the patient's experience (originally lived in the first-person perspective) into an "objective" (third person), actionable format, used for classification, treatment, and research. Our central thesis is that psychiatry targets the phenomena of consciousness, which, unlike somatic symptoms and signs, cannot be grasped on the analogy with material thing-like objects. We claim that in order to perform faithful distinctions in this particular domain, we need a more adequate approach, that is, an approach that is guided by phenomenologically informed considerations. Our theoretical discussion draws upon clinical examples derived from structured and semi-structured interviews. We conclude that fully structured interview is neither theoretically adequate nor practically valid in obtaining psycho-diagnostic information. Failure to address these basic issues may have contributed to the current state of malaise in the study of psychopathology.

  9. STS-112 Crew Interviews: Ashby

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    STS-112 Mission Commander Jeffrey Ashby is seen during this preflight interview, answering questions about his inspiration in becoming an astronaut and his career path and provides an overview of the mission. Ashby outlines his role in the mission in general, and specifically during the docking and extravehicular activities (EVAs). He describes the payload (S1 truss) and the importance that the S1 truss will have in the development of the International Space Station (ISS). Ashby discusses the delivery and installation of the S1 truss scheduled to be done in the planned EVAs in some detail. He touches on the use and operation of the Canadarm 2 robotic arm in this process and outlines what supplies will be exchanged with the resident crew of the ISS during transfer activities. He ends with his thoughts on the value of the ISS in fostering international cooperation.

  10. STS-101 Crew Interview / Mary Ellen Weber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Live footage of a preflight interview with Mission Specialist Mary Ellen Weber is seen. The interview addresses many different questions including why Weber became an astronaut, the events that led to her interest in chemistry and sky diving. Other interesting information that this one-on-one interview discusses is the reaction and reasons for the change of the mission objectives. Weber also mentions the scheduled space-walk, docking with the International Space Station (ISS), the repairs of equipment and change of the batteries, and the installation of handrails. Weber also discusses her responsibilities during the space-walk, and docking of the spacecraft.

  11. STS-101: Crew Interview / Yuri Vladimirovich Usachev

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Live footage of a preflight interview with Mission Specialist Yuri Vladimirovich Usachev is seen. The interview addresses many different questions including why Usachev became a cosmonaut, the individuals who influenced him, and the events that led to his interest. Other interesting information that this one-on-one interview discusses is his reaction and integration into the STS-101 crew. Usachev also mentions the scheduled space-walk of James S. Voss and Jeffrey N. Williams, his feeling once he steps into the International Space Station (ISS), the repairs of equipment, his handling of the hand held laser, and the change of the batteries.

  12. STS-101: Crew Interview / Jeffrey N. Williams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Live footage of a preflight interview with Mission Specialist Jeffrey N. Williams is seen. The interview addresses many different questions including why Williams became an astronaut, and the events that led to his interest. Other interesting information that this one-on-one interview discusses is his reaction to and the reasons for the change of the mission objectives. Williams also mentions the scheduled space-walk that he will perform, docking with the International Space Station (ISS), the repairs of equipment, and the change of the batteries.

  13. STS-106 Crew Interviews: Scott D. Altman

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Live footage of a preflight interview with Pilot Scott D. Altman is seen. The interview addresses many different questions including why Altman became a pilot, the events that led to his interest, his career path through the Navy, and then finally, his selection by NASA as an astronaut. Other interesting information discussed in this one-on-one interview was his work on the movie set of "Top Gun," the highlights of his Navy career, and possible shorter time frame turnarounds for missions. Altman also mentions the scheduled docking with the new International Space Station (ISS) after the arrival of the Zvezda Service Module.

  14. Validity of the Italian algorithm for the attribution of neuropsychiatric events in systemic lupus erythematosus: a retrospective multicentre international diagnostic cohort study.

    PubMed

    Bortoluzzi, Alessandra; Fanouriakis, Antonis; Appenzeller, Simone; Costallat, Lilian; Scirè, Carlo Alberto; Murphy, Elana; Bertsias, George; Hanly, John; Govoni, Marcello

    2017-05-29

    To validate the Italian algorithm of attribution of neuropsychiatric (NP) events to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in an external international cohort of patients with SLE. A retrospective cohort diagnostic accuracy design was followed. SLE patients attending three tertiary care lupus clinics, with one or more NP events, were included. The attribution algorithm, applied to the NP manifestations, considers four weighted items for each NP event: (1) time of onset of the event; (2) type of NP event (major vs minor), (3) concurrent non-SLE factors; (4) favouring factors. To maintain blinding, two independent teams of assessors from each centre evaluated all NP events: the first provided an attribution diagnosis on the basis of their own clinical judgement, assumed as the 'gold standard'; the second applied the algorithm, which provides a probability score ranging from 0 to 10. The performance of the algorithm was evaluated by calculating the area under curve (AUC) of thereceiver operating characteristic curve. The study included 243 patients with SLE with at least one NP manifestation, for a total of 336 events. 285 (84.8%) NP events involved the central nervous system and 51 (15.2%) the peripheral nervous system. The attribution score for the first NP event showed good accuracy with an AUC of 0.893 (95% CI 0.849 to 0.937) using dichotomous outcomes for NPSLE (related vs uncertain/unrelated). The best single cut-off point to optimise classification of a first NPSLE-related event was≥7 (sensitivity 87.9%, specificity 82.6%). Satisfactory accuracy was observed also for subsequent NP events. Validation exercise on an independent international cohort showed that the Italian attribution algorithm is a valid and reliable tool for the identification of NP events attributed to SLE. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  15. Successful Interviewing: A Practical Guide for the Applicant and Interviewer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sitzmann, Marion; Garcia, Reloy

    This booklet offers practical examples and guidelines to assist job hunters and other applicants in effectively confronting the interview process. Chapters include "Preparing for an Interview," which traces the process from making an initial inquiry to the actual interview situation and analyzes the interviewer's role; "The Job Interview: Practice…

  16. Successful Interviewing: A Practical Guide for the Applicant and Interviewer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sitzmann, Marion; Garcia, Reloy

    This booklet offers practical examples and guidelines to assist job hunters and other applicants in effectively confronting the interview process. Chapters include "Preparing for an Interview," which traces the process from making an initial inquiry to the actual interview situation and analyzes the interviewer's role; "The Job Interview: Practice…

  17. Diagnostic utility of the HIV dementia scale and the international HIV dementia scale in screening for HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders among Spanish-speaking adults.

    PubMed

    López, Enrique; Steiner, Alexander J; Smith, Kimberly; Thaler, Nicholas S; Hardy, David J; Levine, Andrew J; Al-Kharafi, Hussah T; Yamakawa, Cristina; Goodkin, Karl

    2016-08-15

    Given that neurocognitive impairment is a frequent complication of HIV-1 infection in Spanish-speaking adults, the limited number of studies assessing HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) in this population raises serious clinical concern. In addition to being appropriately translated, instruments need to be modified, normed, and validated accordingly. The purpose of the current study was to examine the diagnostic utility of the HIV Dementia Scale (HDS) and International HIV Dementia Scale (IHDS) to screen for HAND in Spanish-speaking adults living with HIV infection. Participants were classified as either HAND (N = 47) or No-HAND (N = 53) after completing a comprehensive neuropsychological evaluation. Receiver operating characteristic analyses found the HDS (AUC = .706) was more sensitive to detecting HAND than the IHDS (AUC = .600). Optimal cutoff scores were 9.5 for the HDS (PPV = 65.2%, NPV = 71.4%) and 9.0 for the IHDS (PPV = 59.4%, NPV = 59.1%). Canonical Correlation Analysis found the HDS converged with attention and executive functioning. Findings suggest that while the IHDS may not be an appropriate screening instrument with this population, the HDS retains sufficient statistical validity and clinical utility to screen for HAND in Spanish-speaking adults as a time-efficient and cost-effective measure in clinical settings with limited resources.

  18. Interjections in interviews.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Daniel C; Kowal, Sabine; Ageneau, Carie

    2005-03-01

    A psycholinguistic hypothesis regarding the use of interjections in spoken utterances, originally formulated by Ameka (1992b, 1994) for the English language, but not confirmed in the German-language research of Kowal and O'Connell (2004 a & c), was tested: The local syntactic isolation of interjections is paralleled by their articulatory isolation in spoken utterances i.e., by their occurrence between a preceding and a following pause. The corpus consisted of four TV and two radio interviews of Hillary Clinton that had coincided with the publication of her book Living History (2003) and one TV interview of Robin Williams by James Lipton. No evidence was found for articulatory isolation of English-language interjections. In the Hillary Clinton interviews and Robin Williams interviews, respectively, 71% and 73% of all interjections occurred initially, i.e., at the onset of various units of spoken discourse: at the beginning of turns; at the beginning of articulatory phrases within turns, i.e., after a preceding pause; and at the beginning of a citation within a turn (either Direct Reported Speech [DRS] or what we have designated Hypothetical Speaker Formulation [HSF]. One conventional interjection (OH) occurred most frequently. The Robin Williams interview had a much higher occurrence of interjections, especially nonconventional ones, than the Hillary Clinton interviews had. It is suggested that the onset or initializing role of interjections reflects the temporal priority of the affective and the intuitive over the analytic, grammatical, and cognitive in speech production. Both this temporal priority and the spontaneous and emotional use of interjections are consonant with Wundt's (1900) characterization of the primary interjection as psychologically primitive. The interjection is indeed the purest verbal implementation of conceptual orality.

  19. Interviewing techniques: an overview.

    PubMed

    Estrada, Jack

    2009-01-01

    Taking the correct precautions, being well prepared, doing the research, and reassessing the real needs when vacancies arise will assure success in hiring the best candidate for the job(s). Job descriptions, interviewing technique, communication style,and candidate evaluations are discussed as foundations for hiring successfully. Hiring managers should trust their own instincts if they have had previous success with hiring high performance employees. Often times it will come down to making a decision using best judgment based on the facts that have been gathered through the interview process.

  20. Basic Considerations in Interviewing Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennings, Rick L.

    This manual summarizes and highlights basic considerations in interviewing children. The relationship between interviewing for data collection and interviewing within the counseling or psychotherapeutic context is discussed. The Interviewer's Functional Checklist is presented to provide a method for self-evaluating interviewer behavior, and for…

  1. Peer interviewing in medical education research: experiences and perceptions of student interviewers and interviewees.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Elaine; Brugha, Ruairi; Clarke, Eric; Lavelle, Aisling; McGarvey, Alice

    2015-09-30

    Interviewing is one of the main methods used for data collection in qualitative research. This paper explores the use of semi-structured interviews that were conducted by students with other students in a research study looking at cultural diversity in an international medical school. Specifically this paper documents and gives 'voice' to the opinions and experiences of interviewees and interviewers (the peers and the communities) on the value of peer interviewing in the study and outlines (1) the preparation made to address some of the foreseen challenges, (2) the challenges still faced, and (3) the benefits of using peer interviews with respect to the research study, the individual and the institution. Peer interviewing was used as part of a two-year phased-study, 2012-2013, which explored and then measured the impact of cultural diversity on undergraduate students in a medical higher education institution in Ireland. In phase one 16 peer interviewers were recruited to conduct 29 semi-structured interviews with fellow students. In order to evaluate the peer interviewing process two focus group discussions were he ld and an online survey conducted. Key findings were that substantial preparations in relation to training, informed consent processes and addressing positionality are needed if peer-interviewing is to be used. Challenges still faced included were related to power, familiarity, trust and practical problems. However many benefits accrued to the research, the individual interviewer and to the university. A more nuanced approach to peer interviewing, that recognises commonalities and differences across a range of attributes, is needed. While peer interviewing has many benefits and can help reduce power differentials it does not eliminate all challenges. As part of a larger research project and as a way in which to get 'buy-in' from the student body and improve a collaborative research partnership peer interviewing was extremely useful.

  2. Interview: G. Kip Bollinger

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aronin, Miriam; McDuffie, Thomas E., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents an interview with G. Kip Bollinger. G. Kip Bollinger currently works as a consultant for Intermediate Units, school districts, professional science societies, and science text and kit producers. He performs curriculum alignment, does assessment training, coaches science teachers, trains teachers in the use of specific…

  3. Interview: Dr. Nathan Hare.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pete, Gregory

    1986-01-01

    Presents an interview with Dr. Nathan Hare, who proposes to address some of the problems of lower class, Black male youth by developing a formally supervised ritual to initiate the Black boy into adult male maturity and asserts that materialism prevents rather than promotes success. (KH)

  4. A General Interview Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ives, Edward D.

    This guide is divided into 11 sections, each containing a number of questions and suggestions for conducting successful folklore and oral history interviews. Section 1, "Settlement and Dwellings," deals with the physical environment, local inhabitants, houses and outbuildings, and public buildings. Section 2, "Livelihood and…

  5. Interview with Steve Parks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hitchcock, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Jennifer Hitchcock interviews community activist and director of Syracuse University's Composition and Cultural Rhetoric doctoral program, Steve Parks. They discuss Parks's working-class background, career path, influences, and activism. Parks also considers the direction of the field of composition and rhetoric and expresses optimism for the…

  6. Interviewing Children: Reporter Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Interviewing children is a critical element of the education reporter's daily work. However, practices for gaining access and avoiding harm and embarrassment vary widely depending on the news organization and individual reporter in question. This document aims to provide journalists with broad guidelines, but it stops short of advocating for the…

  7. Interview with Dennis Pearl

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossman, Allan; Pearl, Dennis

    2017-01-01

    Dennis Pearl is Professor of Statistics at Pennsylvania State University and Director of the Consortium for the Advancement of Undergraduate Statistics Education (CAUSE). He is a Fellow of the American Statistical Association. This interview took place via email on November 18-29, 2016, and provides Dennis Pearl's background story, which describes…

  8. Interview with Deborah Andrews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Cynthia

    2005-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Deborah Andrews about her experiences during her editorship of "Business Communication Quarterly." From June 1997 to March 2005, Debby served as editor of the journal, encouraging all readers to ask important questions about their work: How should we define business communication? On which disciplines and…

  9. Interview With Shelley Harwayne.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albers, Peggy; Koshewa, Allen

    2003-01-01

    Interviews Shelley Harwayne, founder of the Manhattan New School, who has been named one of 10 new regional superintendents for New York City's public school system. Explains that Shelley's work is renowned in literacy. Discusses leadership, diversity, teaching, and professional development. (PM)

  10. Interview with Patrick Shannon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albers, Peggy

    2002-01-01

    Presents an interview with Patrick Shannon, a professor of Education at Penn State University. Describes how he writes widely on the politics of literacy and, in particular, the marketing of literacy. Discusses his interpretation of how literacy is marketed in schools today. (SG)

  11. Interview with Christine Franklin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossman, Allan; Franklin, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Chris Franklin is Senior Lecturer, Undergraduate Coordinator, and Lothar Tresp Honoratus Honors Professor of Statistics at the University of Georgia. She is a Fellow of the American Statistical Association and received the USCOTS Lifetime Achievement Award in 2013. This interview took place via email on August 16, 2013-October 9, 2013. Franklin…

  12. TECHNOS Interview: Esther Dyson.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raney, Mardell

    1997-01-01

    This interview with Esther Dyson, who is president and owner of EDventure Holdings which focuses on emerging information technology worldwide, discusses personal responsibility for technology; government's role; content ownership and intellectual property; Internet development; education and computers; parents' role in education; teacher…

  13. Interview with Jessica Utts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossman, Allan; Utts, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    This article offers a transcript of author Allan Rossman's interview with Jessica Utts, Professor and Chair of Statistics at the University of California-Irvine. Utts is also a Fellow of the American Statistical Association and a recipient of a Founders Award from ASA. Additionally, she has been elected as President of ASA for the year 2016. The…

  14. Interview with Louise Lonabocker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Munkwitz-Smith, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    This issue of "College and University" marks a transition in the Editor-in-Chief Position, with the interview of Louise Lonabocker, who has served in this capacity for the past ten years. She has also served as President of AACRAO, and in both positions, Lonabocker has been a role model for many AACRAO leaders. Lonabocker describes the…

  15. Interview with Jessica Utts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossman, Allan; Utts, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    This article offers a transcript of author Allan Rossman's interview with Jessica Utts, Professor and Chair of Statistics at the University of California-Irvine. Utts is also a Fellow of the American Statistical Association and a recipient of a Founders Award from ASA. Additionally, she has been elected as President of ASA for the year 2016. The…

  16. Interview With Shelley Harwayne.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albers, Peggy; Koshewa, Allen

    2003-01-01

    Interviews Shelley Harwayne, founder of the Manhattan New School, who has been named one of 10 new regional superintendents for New York City's public school system. Explains that Shelley's work is renowned in literacy. Discusses leadership, diversity, teaching, and professional development. (PM)

  17. Parent Interview Schedule.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purdue Univ., Lafayette, IN. Educational Research Center.

    This 116-item interview schedule designed for parents who failed to respond to the Questionnaire for Parents, is individually administered to the mother of the child of elementary school age. It consists of scales measuring 14 parent variables plus a section devoted to demographic variables: (1) parent's achievement aspirations for the child, (2)…

  18. Interview with Deborah Andrews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Cynthia

    2005-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Deborah Andrews about her experiences during her editorship of "Business Communication Quarterly." From June 1997 to March 2005, Debby served as editor of the journal, encouraging all readers to ask important questions about their work: How should we define business communication? On which disciplines and…

  19. Interview with Christine Franklin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossman, Allan; Franklin, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Chris Franklin is Senior Lecturer, Undergraduate Coordinator, and Lothar Tresp Honoratus Honors Professor of Statistics at the University of Georgia. She is a Fellow of the American Statistical Association and received the USCOTS Lifetime Achievement Award in 2013. This interview took place via email on August 16, 2013-October 9, 2013. Franklin…

  20. Interview with Louise Lonabocker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Munkwitz-Smith, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    This issue of "College and University" marks a transition in the Editor-in-Chief Position, with the interview of Louise Lonabocker, who has served in this capacity for the past ten years. She has also served as President of AACRAO, and in both positions, Lonabocker has been a role model for many AACRAO leaders. Lonabocker describes the…

  1. Evaluation of diagnostic and prognostic value of clinical characteristics of migraine and tension type headache included in the diagnostic criteria for children and adolescents in International Classification of Headache Disorders--second edition.

    PubMed

    Pacheva, I; Milanov, I; Ivanov, I; Stefanov, R

    2012-12-01

    Data about the sensitivity and the specificity of the items included in the diagnostic criteria for migraine and tension type headache (TTH) in children is limited and sometimes controversial. To evaluate the diagnostic value of characteristics of migraine and TTH included in the diagnostic criteria of ICHD-II and according to results to suggest additional criteria for diagnostic differentiation of primary paediatric headache. The investigation consisted of an epidemiological school-based study (1029 pupils completed the study and 412 had chronic or recurrent headache) and a clinical study conducted in Paediatric Neurology Ward and outpatient clinic (203 patients with chronic or recurrent headache). Inclusion criterion was at least two episodes of headache during the last year. Exclusion criteria were: headache occurring only during acute infections; withdrawal of informed consent. ICHD - II was used to classify headache. The diagnostic value of characteristics of migraine and TTH was measured using sensitivity, specificity, odds ratio and area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Regarding the AUC, the best diagnostic items for migraine are: moderate or severe intensity or only severe intensity, pain aggravation by physical activity, pulsating quality, respectively, for TTH - no photophobia, no nausea, no aggravation by physical activity, mild or moderate intensity and non-pulsating quality. The most significant symptom for increasing the migraine risk was pulsating pain and the most significant items for TTH risk were no photophobia, bilateral location and no nausea. Family history of migraine also increased migraine risk and could be either included in the diagnostic criteria for migraine or recommended as additional item in differentiating migraine and TTH with overlapping diagnostic criteria. According to AUC, we could recommend changing the content of the item of intensity for migraine as only severe intensity. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Interviews to Assess Learners' Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seda, Ileana; Pearson, P. David

    1991-01-01

    Presents open-ended and semistructured interviews to assess reading comprehension. Highlights the potential value of interviews in aligning assessment practices with instruction and learning theory. (MG)

  3. A Course in Medical Interviewing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Froelich, Robert E.

    1969-01-01

    Course develops medical interviewing skills of students through a programed manual, role-playing exercises, programed patients and medical interviewing films, and the writing of medical histories. (IR)

  4. Current practice patterns of rectal suction biopsy in the diagnostic work-up of Hirschsprung's disease: results from an international survey.

    PubMed

    Friedmacher, Florian; Puri, Prem

    2016-08-01

    The diagnosis of Hirschsprung's disease (HD) was revolutionized by the introduction of rectal suction biopsy (RSB), allowing specimens to be taken without general anesthesia on the ward or as an out-patient procedure. However, insufficient tissue samples are not uncommon, and subsequently histopathologists often remain reluctant to confirm the presence or absence of enteric ganglion cells merely on the basis of submucosal RSBs. The aim of this study was to evaluate the current usage of RSB in the diagnostic work-up of HD based on an international survey. A 15-item questionnaire was distributed among participants and faculty members at the 21st International Meeting of the Pediatric Colorectal Society. Eighty-seven pediatric surgeons from 30 countries completed the anonymous survey (response rate 70.2 %), grouped into 68 (78.2 %) staff surgeons and 19 (21.8 %) trainees, with a median work experience of 18 years (range 2-45 years). Of these, 74 (85.1 %) use RSB in the diagnostic work-up of patients with suspected HD, whereas 13 (14.9 %) prefer open full-thickness biopsy under general anesthesia. In total, 47 (63.5 %) respondents perform ≥20 RSBs (range 3-100 RSBs) per year. Five different RSB instruments were reported, the most common ones being rbi2 (65.0 %), Solo-RBT (15.0 %) and multipurpose suction biopsy kit (8.3 %). Only 22 (29.7 %) of the respondents use a defined negative suction pressure, with a median of 10 mL air (range 6-25 mL air). The most proximal reported biopsy site was located at a median of 2 cm (range 1-15 cm) above the pectinate line and a median of 2 (range 1-5) specimens are routinely taken, mainly from the posterior rectal wall. Insufficient tissue samples with need for repeat RSB were encountered in a median of 10 % (range 0-40 %). Most frequently used staining methods for rectal biopsies are hematoxylin/eosin (75.9 %), acetylcholinesterase (73.6 %), and calretinin (33.3 %). Overall, 36 (48.6 %) respondents had

  5. STS-100 Crew Interview: John Phillips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    STS-100 Mission Specialist John Phillips is seen being interviewed. He answers questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut and his career path. He gives details on the mission's goals and significance, the rendezvous and docking of Endeavour with the International Space Station (ISS), the mission's spacewalks, and installation and capabilities of the Space Station robotic arm, UHF antenna, and Rafaello Logistics Module. Phillips then discusses his views about space exploration as it becomes an international collaboration.

  6. STS-100 Crew Interview: Jeff Ashby

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    STS-100 Pilot Jeff Ashby is seen being interviewed. He answers questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut and his career path. He gives details on the mission's goals and significance, the rendezvous and docking of Endeavour with the International Space Station (ISS), the mission's spacewalks, and installation and capabilities of the Space Station robotic arm, UHF antenna, and Rafaello Logistics Module. Ashby then discusses his views about space exploration as it becomes an international collaboration.

  7. STS-100 Crew Interview: Chris Hadfield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    STS-100 Mission Specialist Chris Hadfield is seen being interviewed. He answers questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut and his career path. He gives details on the mission's goals and significance, the rendezvous and docking of Endeavour with the International Space Station (ISS), the mission's spacewalks, and installation and capabilities of the Space Station robotic arm, UHF antenna, and Rafaello Logistics Module. Hadfield then discusses his views about space exploration as it becomes an international collaboration.

  8. STS-100 Crew Interview: Umberto Guidoni

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    STS-100 Mission Specialist Umberto Guidoni is seen being interviewed. He answers questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut and his career path. He gives details on the mission's goals and significance, the rendezvous and docking of Endeavour with the International Space Station (ISS), the mission's spacewalks, and installation and capabilities of the Space Station robotic arm, UHF antenna, and Rafaello Logistics Module. Guidoni then discusses his views about space exploration as it becomes an international collaboration.

  9. STS-100 Crew Interview: Yuri Lonchakov

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    STS-100 Mission Specialist Yuri Lonchakov is seen being interviewed. He answers questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut and his career path. He gives details on the mission's goals and significance, the rendezvous and docking of Endeavour with the International Space Station (ISS), the mission's spacewalks, and installation and capabilities of the Space Station robotic arm, UHF antenna, and Rafaello Logistics Module. Lonchakov then discusses his views about space exploration as it becomes an international collaboration.

  10. STS-100 Crew Interview: Kent Rominger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    STS-100 Commander Kent Rominger is seen being interviewed. He answers questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut and his career path. He gives details on the mission's goals and significance, the rendezvous and docking of Endeavour with the International Space Station (ISS), the mission's spacewalks, and installation and capabilities of the Space Station robotic arm, UHF antenna, and Rafaello Logistics Module. Rominger then discusses his views about space exploration as it becomes an international collaboration.

  11. STS-100 Crew Interview: Scott Parazynski

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    STS-100 Mission Specialist Scott Parazynski is seen being interviewed. He answers questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut and his career path. He gives details on the mission's goals and significance, the rendezvous and docking of Endeavour with the International Space Station (ISS), the mission's spacewalks, and installation and capabilities of the Space Station robotic arm, UHF antenna, and Rafaello Logistics Module. Parazynski then discusses his views about space exploration as it becomes an international collaboration.

  12. STS-100 Crew Interview: Scott Parazynski

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    STS-100 Mission Specialist Scott Parazynski is seen being interviewed. He answers questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut and his career path. He gives details on the mission's goals and significance, the rendezvous and docking of Endeavour with the International Space Station (ISS), the mission's spacewalks, and installation and capabilities of the Space Station robotic arm, UHF antenna, and Rafaello Logistics Module. Parazynski then discusses his views about space exploration as it becomes an international collaboration.

  13. Physics design of a 100 keV acceleration grid system for the diagnostic neutral beam for international tokamak experimental reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, M. J.; De Esch, H. P. L.

    2010-01-15

    This paper describes the physics design of a 100 keV, 60 A H{sup -} accelerator for the diagnostic neutral beam (DNB) for international tokamak experimental reactor (ITER). The accelerator is a three grid system comprising of 1280 apertures, grouped in 16 groups with 80 apertures per beam group. Several computer codes have been used to optimize the design which follows the same philosophy as the ITER Design Description Document (DDD) 5.3 and the 1 MeV heating and current drive beam line [R. Hemsworth, H. Decamps, J. Graceffa, B. Schunke, M. Tanaka, M. Dremel, A. Tanga, H. P. L. De Esch, F. Geli, J. Milnes, T. Inoue, D. Marcuzzi, P. Sonato, and P. Zaccaria, Nucl. Fusion 49, 045006 (2009)]. The aperture shapes, intergrid distances, and the extractor voltage have been optimized to minimize the beamlet divergence. To suppress the acceleration of coextracted electrons, permanent magnets have been incorporated in the extraction grid, downstream of the cooling water channels. The electron power loads on the extractor and the grounded grids have been calculated assuming 1 coextracted electron per ion. The beamlet divergence is calculated to be 4 mrad. At present the design for the filter field of the RF based ion sources for ITER is not fixed, therefore a few configurations of the same have been considered. Their effect on the transmission of the electrons and beams through the accelerator has been studied. The OPERA-3D code has been used to estimate the aperture offset steering constant of the grounded grid and the extraction grid, the space charge interaction between the beamlets and the kerb design required to compensate for this interaction. All beamlets in the DNB must be focused to a single point in the duct, 20.665 m from the grounded grid, and the required geometrical aimings and aperture offsets have been calculated.

  14. Physics design of a 100 keV acceleration grid system for the diagnostic neutral beam for international tokamak experimental reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, M. J.; De Esch, H. P. L.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the physics design of a 100 keV, 60 A H- accelerator for the diagnostic neutral beam (DNB) for international tokamak experimental reactor (ITER). The accelerator is a three grid system comprising of 1280 apertures, grouped in 16 groups with 80 apertures per beam group. Several computer codes have been used to optimize the design which follows the same philosophy as the ITER Design Description Document (DDD) 5.3 and the 1 MeV heating and current drive beam line [R. Hemsworth, H. Decamps, J. Graceffa, B. Schunke, M. Tanaka, M. Dremel, A. Tanga, H. P. L. De Esch, F. Geli, J. Milnes, T. Inoue, D. Marcuzzi, P. Sonato, and P. Zaccaria, Nucl. Fusion 49, 045006 (2009)]. The aperture shapes, intergrid distances, and the extractor voltage have been optimized to minimize the beamlet divergence. To suppress the acceleration of coextracted electrons, permanent magnets have been incorporated in the extraction grid, downstream of the cooling water channels. The electron power loads on the extractor and the grounded grids have been calculated assuming 1 coextracted electron per ion. The beamlet divergence is calculated to be 4 mrad. At present the design for the filter field of the RF based ion sources for ITER is not fixed, therefore a few configurations of the same have been considered. Their effect on the transmission of the electrons and beams through the accelerator has been studied. The OPERA-3D code has been used to estimate the aperture offset steering constant of the grounded grid and the extraction grid, the space charge interaction between the beamlets and the kerb design required to compensate for this interaction. All beamlets in the DNB must be focused to a single point in the duct, 20.665 m from the grounded grid, and the required geometrical aimings and aperture offsets have been calculated.

  15. Diagnosis, treatment and long-term outcomes of autoimmune pancreatitis in Spain based on the International Consensus Diagnostic Criteria: A multi-centre study.

    PubMed

    López-Serrano, Antonio; Crespo, Javier; Pascual, Isabel; Salord, Silvia; Bolado, Federico; Del-Pozo-García, Andrés J; Ilzarbe, Lucas; de-Madaria, Enrique; Moreno-Osset, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a form of chronic pancreatitis that has been reported worldwide for the last two decades. The aim of this study is to analyse the clinical profile of patients from Spain with AIP, as well as treatments, relapses and long-term outcomes. Data from 59 patients with suspected AIP that had been diagnosed in 15 institutions are retrospectively analysed. Subjects are classified according to the International Consensus Diagnostic Criteria (ICDC). Patients with type 1 AIP (AIP1) and type 2 AIP (AIP2) are compared. Kaplan-Meier methodology is used to estimate the overall survival without relapses. Fifty-two patients met ICDC, 45 patients were AIP1 (86.5%). Common manifestations included abdominal pain (65.4%) and obstructive jaundice (51.9%). Diffuse enlargement of pancreas was present in 51.0%; other organ involvement was present in 61.5%. Serum IgG4 increased in 76.7% of AIP1 patients vs. 20.0% in AIP2 (p = 0.028). Tissue specimens were obtained in 76.9%. Initial successful treatment with steroids or surgery was achieved in 79.8% and 17.3%, respectively. Maintenance treatment was given in 59.6%. Relapses were present in 40.4% of AIP1, with a median of 483 days. Successful long-term remission was achieved in 86.4%. AIP1 is the most frequent form of AIP in Spain in our dataset. Regularly, ICDC allows AIP diagnosis without the need for surgery. Steroid and chirurgic treatments were effective and safe in most patients with AIP, although maintenance was required many times because of their tendency to relapse. Long-term serious consequences were uncommon. Copyright © 2016 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Rasch Analysis of the Premature Ejaculation Diagnostic Tool (PEDT) and the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) in an Iranian Sample of Prostate Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chung-Ying; Pakpour, Amir H.; Burri, Andrea; Montazeri, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background Male sexual dysfunction is an increasing problem across a variety of general and clinical populations, such as cancer populations; especially among prostate cancer patients who tend to receive treatments that often result in erectile dysfunction (ED) and/or premature ejaculation (PE). Therefore, in order to diagnose ED and PE in these populations, adequate and efficient instruments such as the International Index of Erectile Function 5-item version (IIEF-5) and the Premature Ejaculation Diagnostic Tool (PEDT) are needed. However, since this is an important topic additional evidence of psychometric properties of the IIEF-5 and the PEDT in such samples are required. Thus the aim of the present study was to use Rasch models to investigate the construct validity, local dependency, score order, and differential item functioning (DIF) of both questionnaires in a sample of prostate cancer patients. Methods Prostate cancer patients (n = 1058, mean±SD age = 64.07±6.84 years) who visited urology clinics were invited to fill out the IIEF-5 and the PEDT. Construct validity was examined using infit and outfit mean square (MnSq) and local dependency using correlations between each two residual Rasch scores. Score order was investigated using step and average measures of difficulty and DIF using DIF contrast. Results All IIEF-5 and PEDT items had acceptable infit and outfit MnSq. Step measures revealed that all but two items had disordered categories in terms of scores 1 to 3. Only one local dependency was found, and no items displayed DIF across age, educational level, and help seeking. Conclusions The results showed that both the IIEF-5 and the PEDT had sound psychometric properties in the Rasch analyses, although some score disordering could be detected in both instruments. The results of no DIF items in both instruments suggest using them to compare ED and PE across age and educational level is adequate. PMID:27336626

  17. Physics design of a 100 keV acceleration grid system for the diagnostic neutral beam for international tokamak experimental reactor.

    PubMed

    Singh, M J; De Esch, H P L

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the physics design of a 100 keV, 60 A H(-) accelerator for the diagnostic neutral beam (DNB) for international tokamak experimental reactor (ITER). The accelerator is a three grid system comprising of 1280 apertures, grouped in 16 groups with 80 apertures per beam group. Several computer codes have been used to optimize the design which follows the same philosophy as the ITER Design Description Document (DDD) 5.3 and the 1 MeV heating and current drive beam line [R. Hemsworth, H. Decamps, J. Graceffa, B. Schunke, M. Tanaka, M. Dremel, A. Tanga, H. P. L. De Esch, F. Geli, J. Milnes, T. Inoue, D. Marcuzzi, P. Sonato, and P. Zaccaria, Nucl. Fusion 49, 045006 (2009)]. The aperture shapes, intergrid distances, and the extractor voltage have been optimized to minimize the beamlet divergence. To suppress the acceleration of coextracted electrons, permanent magnets have been incorporated in the extraction grid, downstream of the cooling water channels. The electron power loads on the extractor and the grounded grids have been calculated assuming 1 coextracted electron per ion. The beamlet divergence is calculated to be 4 mrad. At present the design for the filter field of the RF based ion sources for ITER is not fixed, therefore a few configurations of the same have been considered. Their effect on the transmission of the electrons and beams through the accelerator has been studied. The OPERA-3D code has been used to estimate the aperture offset steering constant of the grounded grid and the extraction grid, the space charge interaction between the beamlets and the kerb design required to compensate for this interaction. All beamlets in the DNB must be focused to a single point in the duct, 20.665 m from the grounded grid, and the required geometrical aimings and aperture offsets have been calculated.

  18. The impact of dermatology consultation on diagnostic accuracy and antibiotic use among patients with suspected cellulitis seen at outpatient internal medicine offices: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Arakaki, Ryan Y; Strazzula, Lauren; Woo, Elaine; Kroshinsky, Daniela

    2014-10-01

    Cellulitis is a common and costly problem, often diagnosed in the outpatient setting. Many cutaneous conditions may clinically mimic cellulitis, but little research has been done to assess the magnitude of the problem. To determine if obtaining dermatology consultations in the outpatient primary care setting could assist in the diagnosis of pseudocellulitic conditions and reduce the rate of unnecessary antibiotic use. Nonblinded randomized clinical trial of competent adults who were diagnosed as having cellulitis by their primary care physicians (PCPs), conducted at outpatient internal medical primary care offices affiliated with a large academic medical center. Outpatient dermatology consultation. Primary outcomes were final diagnosis, antibiotic use, and need for hospitalization. A total of 29 patients (12 male and 17 female) were enrolled for participation in this trial. Nine patients were randomized to continue with PCP management (control group), and 20 patients were randomized to receive a dermatology consultation (treatment group). Of the 20 patients in the dermatology consultation group, 2 (10%) were diagnosed as having cellulitis. In the control group, all 9 patients were diagnosed as having cellulitis by PCPs, but dermatologist evaluation determined that 6 (67%) of these patients had a psuedocellulitis rather than true infection. All 9 patients (100%) in the control group were treated for cellulitis with antibiotics vs 2 patients (10%) in the treatment group (P < .001). One patient in the control group was hospitalized. All patients in the treatment group reported improvement of their cutaneous condition at the 1-week follow-up examination. Dermatology consultation in the primary care setting improves the diagnostic accuracy of suspected cellulitis and decreases unnecessary antibiotic use in patients with pseudocellulitic conditions. Obtaining an outpatient dermatology consultation may be a cost-effective strategy that improves quality of care

  19. The Autism Symptom Interview, School-Age: A Brief Telephone Interview to Identify Autism Spectrum Disorders in 5-to-12-Year-Old Children

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Somer L.; Huerta, Marisela; Gotham, Katherine; Havdahl, Karoline Alexandra; Pickles, Andrew; Duncan, Amie; Bal, Vanessa Hus; Croen, Lisa; Lord, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Lay Abstract Recent advances in multiple areas of autism research, including genetics and epidemiology, have increased the need for large numbers of participants with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The Autism Symptom Interview (ASI) is a brief phone interview that was designed to facilitate rapid ascertainment of children with ASD for research studies. The ASI is based on questions from the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised (ADI-R), a comprehensive, semi-structured parent interview, but the ASI is designed to be administered in approximately 20 minutes by interviewers with minimal training. This study reports on the initial validation of the ASI, School-Age, for children ages 5 to 12 years. Children with previous diagnoses or suspicion of ASD or another neurodevelopmental disorder participated in a comprehensive diagnostic assessment as part of the study and were classified as ASD or non-ASD following the assessment. The ASI scores of children with and without ASD were then compared. For verbal children (defined as using phrases or better on a daily basis), the ASI showed reasonable accuracy in identifying children with ASD (sensitivity=.87), but specificity was low (.62). However, when ASI scores were considered together with scores from the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS), sensitivity was maintained at .82, and specificity improved to .92. These findings suggest that the ASI school age may serve as a useful tool to more quickly classify children with ASD for research purposes. Scientific Abstract This study reports on the initial validation of the Autism Symptom Interview (ASI), School-Age, a brief (15–20 minute) phone interview derived from questions from the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised (ADI-R). The ASI, School-Age was administered by interviewers with minimal training to parents of children ages 5 to 12 who had all been previously identified with (or referred for assessment of) ASD or another neurodevelopmental disorder. Children

  20. Using Electronic Interviews to Explore Student Understanding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, D. J.; Rivera, J. J.; Mateycik, Fran; Jennings, Sybillyn

    2005-09-01

    This paper reports on methods used to probe student understandings of optical fibers and total internal reflection (TIR). The study was conducted as part of the expansion and improvement of web-based materials for an innovative introductory physics course. Initially, we conducted face-to-face Piaget-style interviews with a convenience sample. Our next step was to interview students taking the course at Rensselaer. Physical limitations necessitated that this be done from a distance, so we conducted "e-interviews" using a Chat Room. In this paper we focus on the e-interview experience, discussing similarities to and differences from the traditional face-to-face approach. In the process, we address how each method informs us about students' activation of prior experiences in making sense of unfamiliar phenomena (e.g., "transfer of learning").

  1. Dame Cicely Saunders: An Omega Interview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kastenbaum, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Presents interview with Dame Cicely Saunders, founder of international hospice care movement. Saunders describes her background and experiences that led her to form the hospice movement and discusses the need for pain control for terminally ill patients. Saunders also notes her opposition to euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide. (NB)

  2. Interview to Boaventura de Sousa Santos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guilherme, Manuela; Dietz, Gunther

    2017-01-01

    In this interview, Professor Boaventura de Sousa Santos addresses, on the one hand, the process of transnationalisation of universities and the neoliberalisation of the classical model of the European university. On the other hand, he stresses that the recognition of difference and internal pluralism of science, which have pervaded the…

  3. STS-98 Crew Interview: Tom Jones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The STS-98 Mission Specialist Tom Jones is seen being interviewed. He answers questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut, his career path, and his training. He gives details on the mission's goals and significance, and the payload and hardware it brings to the International Space Station (ISS). Mr. Jones discusses his role in the mission's spacewalks and activities.

  4. An Interview with Roy A. Herberger.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmotter, James W.

    1999-01-01

    An interview with Roy A. Herberger, president of Thunderbird, the American Graduate School of International Management (Arizona), addresses the strategy behind the school's great success, its curriculum and program development, faculty composition, institutional culture, faculty-employment practices, curriculum globalization, competition,…

  5. STS-98 Crew Interview: Mark Polansky

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The STS-98 Pilot Mark Polansky is seen being interviewed. He answers questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut, his career path, and his training. He gives details on the mission's goals and significance, and the payload (ORU, PDGF) and hardware it brings to the International Space Station (ISS). Mr. Polansky discusses his role in the mission's spacewalks and activities.

  6. Dame Cicely Saunders: An Omega Interview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kastenbaum, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Presents interview with Dame Cicely Saunders, founder of international hospice care movement. Saunders describes her background and experiences that led her to form the hospice movement and discusses the need for pain control for terminally ill patients. Saunders also notes her opposition to euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide. (NB)

  7. Interview to Boaventura de Sousa Santos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guilherme, Manuela; Dietz, Gunther

    2017-01-01

    In this interview, Professor Boaventura de Sousa Santos addresses, on the one hand, the process of transnationalisation of universities and the neoliberalisation of the classical model of the European university. On the other hand, he stresses that the recognition of difference and internal pluralism of science, which have pervaded the…

  8. The Structured Interview and Interviewer Training in the Admissions Process

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Wendy C.; White-Harris, Carla; Blalock, Susan J.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives To determine the extent to which the structured interview is used in the PharmD admissions process in US colleges and schools of pharmacy, and the prevalence and content of interviewer training. Methods A survey instrument consisting of 7 questions regarding interviews and interviewer training was sent to 92 colleges and schools of pharmacy in the United States that were accredited or seeking accreditation. Results Sixty survey instruments (65% response rate) were returned. The majority of the schools that responded (80%) used interviews as part of the PharmD admissions process. Of the schools that used an interview as part of the admissions process, 86% provided some type of interviewer training and 13% used a set of predefined questions in admissions interviews. Conclusions Most colleges and schools of pharmacy use some components of the structured interview in the PharmD admissions process; however, training for interviewers varies widely among colleges and schools of pharmacy. PMID:17998980

  9. The structured interview and interviewer training in the admissions process.

    PubMed

    Joyner, Pamela U; Cox, Wendy C; White-Harris, Carla; Blalock, Susan J

    2007-10-15

    To determine the extent to which the structured interview is used in the PharmD admissions process in US colleges and schools of pharmacy, and the prevalence and content of interviewer training. A survey instrument consisting of 7 questions regarding interviews and interviewer training was sent to 92 colleges and schools of pharmacy in the United States that were accredited or seeking accreditation. Sixty survey instruments (65% response rate) were returned. The majority of the schools that responded (80%) used interviews as part of the PharmD admissions process. Of the schools that used an interview as part of the admissions process, 86% provided some type of interviewer training and 13% used a set of predefined questions in admissions interviews. Most colleges and schools of pharmacy use some components of the structured interview in the PharmD admissions process; however, training for interviewers varies widely among colleges and schools of pharmacy.

  10. STS-112 Crew Interviews - Magnus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    STS-112 Mission Specialist 2 Sandra H. Magnus is seen during a prelaunch interview. She answers questions about her inspiration to become an astronaut and her career path. She gives details on the mission's goals, the most significant of which will be the installation of the S-1 truss structure on the International Space Station (ISS). The installation, one in a series of truss extending missions, will be complicated and will require the use of the robotic arm as well as extravehicular activity (EVA) by astronauts. Magnus also describes her function in the performance of transfer operations. Brief descriptions are given of experiments on board the ISS as well as on board the Shuttle.

  11. STS-112 Crew Interviews: Yurchikhin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A preflight interview with mission specialist Fyodor Yurchikhin is presented. He worked for a long time in Energia in the Russian Mission Control Center (MCC). Yurchikhin discusses the main goal of the STS-112 flight, which is to install the Integrated Truss Assembly S1 (Starboard Side Thermal Radiator Truss) on the International Space Station. He also talks about the three space walks required to install the S1. After the installation of S1, work with the bolts and cameras are performed. Yurchikhin is involved in working with nitrogen and ammonia jumpers. He expresses the complexity of his work, but says that he and the other crew members are ready for the challenge.

  12. STS-112 Crew Interviews: Yurchikhin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A preflight interview with mission specialist Fyodor Yurchikhin is presented. He worked for a long time in Energia in the Russian Mission Control Center (MCC). Yurchikhin discusses the main goal of the STS-112 flight, which is to install the Integrated Truss Assembly S1 (Starboard Side Thermal Radiator Truss) on the International Space Station. He also talks about the three space walks required to install the S1. After the installation of S1, work with the bolts and cameras are performed. Yurchikhin is involved in working with nitrogen and ammonia jumpers. He expresses the complexity of his work, but says that he and the other crew members are ready for the challenge.

  13. STS-112 Crew Interviews - Magnus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    STS-112 Mission Specialist 2 Sandra H. Magnus is seen during a prelaunch interview. She answers questions about her inspiration to become an astronaut and her career path. She gives details on the mission's goals, the most significant of which will be the installation of the S-1 truss structure on the International Space Station (ISS). The installation, one in a series of truss extending missions, will be complicated and will require the use of the robotic arm as well as extravehicular activity (EVA) by astronauts. Magnus also describes her function in the performance of transfer operations. Brief descriptions are given of experiments on board the ISS as well as on board the Shuttle.

  14. Researcher Interview: Tom Hudson

    Cancer.gov

    Tom Hudson, M.D., President and Scientific Director of the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, describes the International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC), which brings together cancer genomic data and research from across the world.

  15. Association of Parental ADHD and Depression with Externalizing and Internalizing Dimensions of Child Psychopathology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphreys, Kathryn L.; Mehta, Natasha; Lee, Steve S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To study the independent association of parental depression and ADHD on three dimensions of child psychopathology among 178 children aged 5 to 10 years. Method: Self-reported measures of parental depression and ADHD as well as rating scales and structure diagnostic interviews of child internalizing, ADHD, and externalizing problems were…

  16. Association of Parental ADHD and Depression with Externalizing and Internalizing Dimensions of Child Psychopathology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphreys, Kathryn L.; Mehta, Natasha; Lee, Steve S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To study the independent association of parental depression and ADHD on three dimensions of child psychopathology among 178 children aged 5 to 10 years. Method: Self-reported measures of parental depression and ADHD as well as rating scales and structure diagnostic interviews of child internalizing, ADHD, and externalizing problems were…

  17. Interviews with Mexican midwives.

    PubMed

    Bortin, S

    1993-01-01

    Mexican society contains a variety of indigenous cultures as well as European influences. Most babies in rural areas are delivered by midwives. Traditional midwives, government-trained and empirical midwives, nurse-midwives, and foreign-trained midwives all practice in Mexico. Nurse-midwives in one project are demonstrating their ability to meet the needs of urban childbearing women. A midwifery organization is developing under the leadership of midwives influenced by the contemporary midwifery movement in the United States. In this article, some traditional Mexican midwifery practices are discussed and interviews with several different Mexican midwives from a variety of backgrounds are presented.

  18. Intersubjectivity in video interview.

    PubMed

    Haddouk, Lise

    2014-01-01

    The concept of relationship has rapidly evolved over the past few years, since the emergence of the internet network and the development of remote communication and exchanges. The emergence of cyberculture with the development of the internet has led to a new representation of the social link, in which communication never stops. In this context, computer mediated intersubjective relationships represent a main line of thinking and research. Thus, can we consider for example that relationship is only composed of an informational exchange? Would there be other dimensions possibly missing in computer mediated relationships? In this case, how could we re-introduce these aspects, "re-humanize" the remote relationships? New practices in psychology emerge with the ICT usage, both in the fields of research and for therapeutic purposes. Some fields like medicine already use remote health platforms that have proven useful in certain situations. In the field of remote clinical psychology, different media are used that contribute to the framework definition of the remote clinical interview, where the concept of relation holds a central place. Videoconference enables the introduction of an important element from the point of view of sensoriality: the body image, which engages the subjects' interaction in a different way than in a written or verbal exchange. But is the use of videoconference sufficient to establish a clinical framework comparable to the traditional one? How can the computer-mediated relationship enable and establish a potential object relation, rather than a mirrored one? Thinking through an online adaptation of the clinical interview framework led to the elaboration of a specific tool dedicated to this purpose and to research into the access to intersubjectivity in clinical video interview. This study's encouraging results have fostered the pursuit of this experience in the form of a platform dedicated to the conduction of clinical interviews through

  19. Expedition 2 Crew Interview: Susan Helms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Expedition 2 (the second resident crew of the International Space Station) Flight Engineer Susan Helms is seen being interviewed. She answers questions about her inspiration to become an astronaut and her career path. She gives details on the Space Shuttle mission and goals, including information on the spacewalks and transfer of Expedition crews, and discusses her upcoming stay on the International Space Station (ISS). Helms gives her thoughts on the international cooperation needed to successfully construct the ISS and some of the scientific experiments that will take place on the station.

  20. A comparison between screened NIMH and clinically interviewed control samples on neuroticism and extraversion

    PubMed Central

    Talati, A; Fyer, AJ; Weissman, MM

    2010-01-01

    The National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) has supported the collection of DNA samples on over 4000 subjects for use primarily as controls in psychiatric genetic studies. These subjects, though screened online, were not directly interviewed or assessed on family history. We compared this sample to one that was directly interviewed using structured diagnostic assessments on comparable measures of neuroticism and extraversion. The screened sample completed an online self-report based on the Composite International Diagnostic Instrument Short-Form (CIDI-SF). The interviewed sample was assessed by clinically trained personnel using the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia (SADS-LA-IV) and Family History Screen; final diagnoses were made blind to trait scores by a clinician using the best-estimate procedure. Neuroticism and extraversion were assessed on the NEO five-factor inventory (NEO-FFI) and the revised Eysenck Personality Questionnaire short form (EPQ-R). We found that subjects in the NIMH-screened sample who did not report any psychiatric symptoms on the self-report were indistinguishable from interviewed diagnosis free and family history negative controls on neuroticism and extraversion. Subjects in the screened sample who screened positive for anxiety disorders, however, deviated significantly on these measures both from the screened subjects with no self-reported symptoms, as well as from subjects in the interviewed sample diagnosed with comparable disorders. These findings suggest that control groups generated from the NIMH sample should ideally be restricted to subjects free of any self-reported symptoms, regardless of the disorder being addressed, in order to maximize their reflection of diagnosis-free populations. PMID:17938631

  1. Effects of Interviewing Style and Interviewer Appearance on a Child Behavioral Interview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mader, Lothar; Quevillon, Randal

    Clinical child interviews have received little attention in the psychological literature and in the absence of empirical findings, curent interview practices are primarily based on clinical lore. In order to investigate the effects of interviewing style and interviewer mode of dress, on the quantity and quality of information obtained from 8 to 11…

  2. Integrated diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunthausen, Roger J.

    1988-01-01

    Recently completed projects in which advanced diagnostic concepts were explored and/or demonstrated are summarized. The projects begin with the design of integrated diagnostics for the Army's new gas turbine engines, and advance to the application of integrated diagnostics to other aircraft subsystems. Finally, a recent project is discussed which ties together subsystem fault monitoring and diagnostics with a more complete picture of flight domain knowledge.

  3. Interview with David Moore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossman, Allan; Dietz, E. Jacquelin; Moor, David

    2013-01-01

    David Moore is Professor Emeritus of Statistics at Purdue University. He served as the first President of the International Association for Statistical Education (IASE) from 1993-1995 and as President of the American Statistical Association (ASA) in 1998. He is a Fellow of the ASA and of the IMS and was awarded the ASA's Founders Award in…

  4. Interview with David Moore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossman, Allan; Dietz, E. Jacquelin; Moor, David

    2013-01-01

    David Moore is Professor Emeritus of Statistics at Purdue University. He served as the first President of the International Association for Statistical Education (IASE) from 1993-1995 and as President of the American Statistical Association (ASA) in 1998. He is a Fellow of the ASA and of the IMS and was awarded the ASA's Founders Award in…

  5. Sensitive Interviewing in Qualitative Research.

    PubMed

    Dempsey, Laura; Dowling, Maura; Larkin, Philip; Murphy, Kathy

    2016-12-01

    In this paper we focus on important considerations when planning and conducting qualitative interviews on sensitive topics. Drawing on experiences of conducting interviews with dementia caregivers, a framework of essential elements in qualitative interviewing was developed to emphasize study participants' needs while also providing guidance for researchers. Starting with a definition of sensitive research, the framework includes preparing for interviews, interacting with gatekeepers of vulnerable groups, planning for interview timing, and location, building relationships and conducting therapeutic interactions, protecting ethically vulnerable participants, and planning for disengagement. This framework has the potential to improve the effectiveness of sensitive interviewing with vulnerable groups. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Tom Engler Interview

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-01-21

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Tom Engler, at left, the deputy director of the Center Planning and Development Directorate, or CPDD, at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, speaks to reporter James Dean from Florida Today newspaper during an interview at the Kennedy News Center. Kennedy Space Center is working with private industry in new and innovative ways as the agency's premier launch center adapts to changing spaceflight, research and exploration goals in America. Opportunities are rich and varied, ranging from working with the private launch industry, to involvement with NASA's expendable launch vehicles programs to beginning or participating in research in a number of advancing fields. For more information on CPDD, visit http://www.nasa.gov/centers/kennedy/business/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Daniel Casper

  7. Tom Engler Interview

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-01-21

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Tom Engler, the deputy director of the Center Planning and Development Directorate at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, speaks to reporter James Dean from Florida Today newspaper during an interview at the Kennedy News Center. Kennedy Space Center is working with private industry in new and innovative ways as the agency's premier launch center adapts to changing spaceflight, research and exploration goals in America. Opportunities are rich and varied, ranging from working with the private launch industry, to involvement with NASA's expendable launch vehicles programs to beginning or participating in research in a number of advancing fields. For more information on CPDD, visit http://www.nasa.gov/centers/kennedy/business/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Daniel Casper

  8. [Psychoanalytic initial interview and OPD-CA interview--no balancing act!].

    PubMed

    Diederichs-Paeschke, Veronika; Forkel, Christine; Held, Ulrike; Jaletzke, Cordula; Stafski, Bruno; Bilke-Hentsch, Oliver

    2011-01-01

    The application of the OPD-CA (Operationalised Psychodynamic Diagnostics in Childhood and Adolescence) for diagnostic purposes during the initial interview is no abdication of a psychoanalytic attitude. The study group OPD (2006, p. 289) proposed a "moderate structured action" for the investigation of the axes "interpersonal relations", "conflicts", "psychic structure", and "preconditions for treatment". But this is not a schematic checking. Space should be provided explicitly to a scenic development of the relationship-dynamics. In this article, the intersubjective character and the uniqueness of the conversation are underlined. Thus, the resulting diagnosis cannot be seen independently of the inner attitude and the concrete intervention of the interviewer. Certain phases of the interview that regularly ensue on the basis of the inherent dynamics and the "choreography" of a first meeting with a patient, are described in regard to the dynamic aspects and their significance in the OPD-Diagnostics. They are balanced with scenic points of view. Possible difficulties and suggestions for the practical handling are discussed on the basis of a case vignette.

  9. Motivational Interviewing and Adolescent Psychopharmacology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dilallo, John J.; Weiss, Gony

    2009-01-01

    The use of motivational interviewing strategies in the practice of adolescent psychopharmacology is described. Motivational interviewing is an efficient and collaborative style of clinical interaction and this helps adolescent patients to integrate their psychiatric difficulties into a more resilient identity.

  10. The Art of the Interview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Rhonda

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the qualities it takes for journalism students to be good interviewers and outlines several guidelines to follow. Lists seven "Boy Scout rules of interviewing." Gives a list of eight points on how to "punctuate what people say." (SC)

  11. Planning for the Job Interview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Close, Elizabeth, Ed.; Ramsey, Katherine, Ed.

    2000-01-01

    Offers advice from middle school educators (a principal, a supervisor, and a teacher) on job interviews for teaching positions: how applicants are selected from the stack of applications, what happens during an interview, and what truly makes a difference. (SR)

  12. Job Interviewing? Try the Telephone.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kegel, Paul L.

    1979-01-01

    Telephone interviews can save college and candidates time and money while precluding the judging of job candidates by extraneous factors. A format for a successful telephone interview is suggested. (Author/MLF)

  13. Motivational Interviewing and Adolescent Psychopharmacology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dilallo, John J.; Weiss, Gony

    2009-01-01

    The use of motivational interviewing strategies in the practice of adolescent psychopharmacology is described. Motivational interviewing is an efficient and collaborative style of clinical interaction and this helps adolescent patients to integrate their psychiatric difficulties into a more resilient identity.

  14. Public Participation Guide: Stakeholder Interviews

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Interviews with stakeholders are one-to-one conversations about a specific topic or issue. The primary purpose of these interviews is to obtain project-relevant information and elicit stakeholder reactions and suggestions.

  15. STS-101 Crew Interview / Scott Horowitz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Live footage of a preflight interview with Pilot Scott J. Horowitz is seen. The interview addresses many different questions including why Horowitz became an astronaut, the events that led to his interest, any role models that he had, and his inspiration. Other interesting information that this one-on-one interview discusses is the reaction and reasons for the splitting-up of the objectives for STS-101 with STS-106. Horowitz also mentions the scheduled space-walk, docking with the International Space Station (ISS), the new glass cockpit of Atlantis, the repairs of equipment and change of the batteries. Horowitz also discusses his responsibilities during the space-walk, and docking of the spacecraft. He stresses that he will have an added challenge during the space-walk, his inability to see where he needs to place the Extravehicular Activities (EVA) crew.

  16. STS-97 Crew Interviews: Michael J. Bloomfield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Live footage of a preflight interview with Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield is shown. The interview addresses many different questions including why Bloomfield became interested in the space program, the events and people that influence him and ultimately led to his interest, and his vigorous training in the astronaut program. Other interesting information that this one-on-one interview discusses are the main goals of the STS-97 mission, its scheduled docking with the new International Space Station (ISS), and its delivery of the first set of U.S.-provided solar arrays, batteries, and radiators. Bloomfield briefly discusses his responsibilities during the much-anticipated docking as well as during the scheduled space-walks.

  17. STS-101: Crew Interview / Susan J. Helms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Live footage of a preflight interview with Mission Specialist Susan J. Helms is seen. The interview addresses many different questions including why Helms became an astronaut, the individuals who influenced her, and the events that led to her interest. Other interesting information that this one-on-one interview discusses is his reaction to and the reasons for the change of the mission objectives. Susan also mentions the docking with the International Space Station (ISS), the repairs of equipment, the change of the batteries, and the transfer of equipment. Susan explains why she, James S. Voss, and Yuri Vladimirovich Usachev are the perfect choice for this mission because of their experience with the ISS modules. She also discusses what the ISS means to her as well as to the human efforts to explore space.

  18. STS-101: Crew Interview / James S. Voss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Live footage of a preflight interview with Mission Specialist James S. Voss is seen. The interview addresses many different questions including why Voss became an astronaut, the individuals who influenced him, and the events that led to his interest. Other interesting information that this one-on-one interview discusses is his reaction to and the reasons for the change of the mission objectives. Voss also mentions the scheduled space-walk that he will perform with Jeffrey N. Williams, docking with the International Space Station (ISS), the repairs of equipment, and the change of the batteries. Voss explains why himself, Susan J. Helms, and Yuri Vladimirovich Usachev are the perfect choice for this mission because of their certification from Russia to work on the Zarya Control Module.

  19. STS-101 Crew Interview / Scott Horowitz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Live footage of a preflight interview with Pilot Scott J. Horowitz is seen. The interview addresses many different questions including why Horowitz became an astronaut, the events that led to his interest, any role models that he had, and his inspiration. Other interesting information that this one-on-one interview discusses is the reaction and reasons for the splitting-up of the objectives for STS-101 with STS-106. Horowitz also mentions the scheduled space-walk, docking with the International Space Station (ISS), the new glass cockpit of Atlantis, the repairs of equipment and change of the batteries. Horowitz also discusses his responsibilities during the space-walk, and docking of the spacecraft. He stresses that he will have an added challenge during the space-walk, his inability to see where he needs to place the Extravehicular Activities (EVA) crew.

  20. STS-106 Crew Interviews: Edward T. Lu

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Live footage of a preflight interview with Mission Specialist Edward T. Lu is seen. The interview addresses many different questions including why Lu became interested in the space program, the events that led to his interest, the transition from an engineer to research scientist, and finally to getting selected into the astronaut program. Other interesting information that this one-on-one interview discusses are the main goals of the STS-106 mission, its scheduled docking with the new International Space Station (ISS), making the Zvezda Service Module ready for entrance, and crew training both in the United States and Russia. Lu mentions his responsibilities during the much-anticipated docking as well as his scheduled space-walk with Yuri Ivanovich Malenchenko. Lu also discusses the use of the Robotic Arm during his space-walk, installation of a magnetometer on the Zvezda Module, and work that will have to take place inside the Service Module.

  1. Structured or unstructured personnel interviews?

    PubMed

    Azarpazhooh, Amir; Ryding, William H; Leake, James L

    2008-01-01

    The challenge for health care managers is finding, hiring and retaining appropriately qualified and motivated employees. One useful method of gaining information about and insight into a candidate is interviewing, which can be classified as structured, unstructured or semi-structured. The disadvantages of unstructured interviews are reviewed; ways to enhance the psychometric properties of interviews by adding structure are reviewed and summarized; and the possible reasons for underutilization of structured interviews are explored.

  2. Mother/daughter intergenerational interviews: insights into qualitative interviewing.

    PubMed

    Clendon, Jill

    As part of a larger study examining the social history of the Well Child/Health and Development Record Book in New Zealand, mother-daughter intergenerational dyad interviews were undertaken. The inter-generational dyad interviews were utilised to explore why mothers often keep their children's Well Child/Health and Development Record Books (Plunket Books) well beyond the five years of age that the Well Child Nurse stops visiting. Mother-daughter intergenerational dyad interviews are not a commonly used method of interview but can elicit valuable information that may otherwise be overlooked. This article discusses the method with which the interviews were undertaken and argues that successful construction of mother/daughter intergenerational dyad interviews is the result of a combination of context and the resulting interaction between the mother, daughter and interviewer/researcher.

  3. Validation of a Brief Structured Interview: The Children's Interview for Psychiatric Syndromes (ChIPS).

    PubMed

    Young, Matthew E; Bell, Ziv E; Fristad, Mary A

    2016-12-01

    Evidence-based assessment is important in the treatment of childhood psychopathology. While researchers and clinicians frequently use structured diagnostic interviews to ensure reliability, the most commonly used instrument, the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School Aged Children (K-SADS) is too long for most clinical applications. The Children's Interview for Psychiatric Syndromes (ChIPS/P-ChIPS) is a highly-structured brief diagnostic interview. The present study compared K-SADS and ChIPS/P-ChIPS diagnoses in an outpatient clinical sample of 50 parent-child pairs aged 7-14. Agreement between most diagnoses was moderate to high between the instruments and with consensus clinical diagnoses. ChIPS was significantly briefer to administer than the K-SADS. Interviewer experience level and participant demographics did not appear to affect agreement. Results provide further evidence for the validity of the ChIPS and support its use in clinical and research settings.

  4. An Interview with Ralph Tyler

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nowakowski, Jeri Ridings

    2011-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Ralph Tyler. This interview will be of interest to those entering the field of education as well as for those who have made their home within the field for some time now. In the interview, Dr. Tyler discusses work in education and educational evaluation that spans over a half a century. He describes issues…

  5. Preparing for Your Principal Interview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spanneut, Gene

    2007-01-01

    Being invited to the initial round of interviews for a principal opening is an opportunity; preparing for it is an investment. A successful interview requires that you create a detailed plan and take specific steps. This article provides tips on how to prepare yourself for a principal interview. Before you focus on what to do during your…

  6. Mock Interviews for Student Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Jill M.

    2007-01-01

    Each semester during student-teacher seminars, the author invites local administrators to come to campus and participate in mock job interviews. These practice interviews provide students an opportunity to prepare for a successful interview and give administrators the chance to meet graduating students who will help alleviate Arizona's teacher…

  7. Preparing for Your Principal Interview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spanneut, Gene

    2007-01-01

    Being invited to the initial round of interviews for a principal opening is an opportunity; preparing for it is an investment. A successful interview requires that you create a detailed plan and take specific steps. This article provides tips on how to prepare yourself for a principal interview. Before you focus on what to do during your…

  8. Interviewing Skills for Supervisory Personnel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinmetz, Lawrence L.

    This book has been designed to elaborate on what interviewing is in its basic forms and how these various forms can be utilized by the operating supervisor. Its intent is to develop, in simple language, the techniques of successful interviewing. Illustrations of real interviews are presented and the supervisor is encouraged to use role playing as…

  9. Language and Intercultural Education: An Interview with Michael Byram

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porto, Melina

    2013-01-01

    This article reports an interview with Michael Byram, Professor Emeritus, University of Durham in the United Kingdom, during his visit to Argentina in September 2011. Michael Byram is one of the main international referents in intercultural education. The interview addresses issues such as language education, intercultural and citizenship…

  10. Language and Intercultural Education: An Interview with Michael Byram

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porto, Melina

    2013-01-01

    This article reports an interview with Michael Byram, Professor Emeritus, University of Durham in the United Kingdom, during his visit to Argentina in September 2011. Michael Byram is one of the main international referents in intercultural education. The interview addresses issues such as language education, intercultural and citizenship…

  11. Psychosocial interest, medical interviews, and the recognition of depression.

    PubMed

    Badger, L W; deGruy, F V; Hartman, J; Plant, M A; Leeper, J; Ficken, R; Maxwell, A; Rand, E; Anderson, R; Templeton, B

    1994-10-01

    To measure primary care physicians' attitudes toward psychosocial issues, determine their relationship to the style of the medical interview, and assess whether attitudes and interview behaviors lead to correct diagnosis in patients with depression. Physicians were videotaped while interviewing four patients standardized with criteria symptoms of major depression. Physicians were unaware of the mental health focus of the study. Patient examining rooms. Physicians were eligible for recruitment if they were board certified or eligible in family practice or internal medicine, practiced primary care medicine, and were listed in regional directories. Standardized patients were recruited from the community. Attitudes toward psychosocial issues (measured by the Physician Belief Scale), interview content (measured by review of the videotaped encounters), interview behaviors (measured by the Interaction Analysis System for Interview Evaluation), and a listing of depression in the differential diagnosis (determined by physician debriefing interviews). Forty-seven community-based practitioners participated. Forty-eight percent of interviews resulted in a diagnosis of depression. Physician Belief Scale scores were not significantly correlated with patient-centered interviewing, psychosocial questions, inquiry about depression symptoms, or a depression diagnosis. Longer interviews were more likely to result in a depression diagnosis. High interest in psychosocial issues was not associated with patient-centered interviewing behaviors, questions about psychosocial or depression symptoms, or depression diagnoses. However, certain patient-centered interviewing behaviors, particularly those defined as "affective," did lead to the recognition of depression.

  12. The Ritvo Autism Asperger Diagnostic Scale-Revised (RAADS-R): A Scale to Assist the Diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder in Adults--An International Validation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritvo, Riva Ariella; Ritvo, Edward R.; Guthrie, Donald; Ritvo, Max J.; Hufnagel, Demetra H.; McMahon, William; Tonge, Bruce; Mataix-Cols, David; Jassi, Amita; Attwood, Tony; Eloff, Johann

    2011-01-01

    The Ritvo Autism Asperger Diagnostic Scale-Revised (RAADS-R) is a valid and reliable instrument to assist the diagnosis of adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). The 80-question scale was administered to 779 subjects (201 ASD and 578 comparisons). All ASD subjects met inclusion criteria: DSM-IV-TR, ADI/ADOS diagnoses and standardized IQ…

  13. The Ritvo Autism Asperger Diagnostic Scale-Revised (RAADS-R): A Scale to Assist the Diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder in Adults--An International Validation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritvo, Riva Ariella; Ritvo, Edward R.; Guthrie, Donald; Ritvo, Max J.; Hufnagel, Demetra H.; McMahon, William; Tonge, Bruce; Mataix-Cols, David; Jassi, Amita; Attwood, Tony; Eloff, Johann

    2011-01-01

    The Ritvo Autism Asperger Diagnostic Scale-Revised (RAADS-R) is a valid and reliable instrument to assist the diagnosis of adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). The 80-question scale was administered to 779 subjects (201 ASD and 578 comparisons). All ASD subjects met inclusion criteria: DSM-IV-TR, ADI/ADOS diagnoses and standardized IQ…

  14. Expedition 4 Crew Interviews: Carl Walz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Expedition 4 Flight Engineer Carl Walz is seen during a prelaunch interview. He gives details on the mission's goals and significance, his role in the mission, what his responsibilities will be, what the crew exchange will be like (transferring the Expedition 4 crew in place of the Expedition 3 crew on the International Space Station (ISS)), the day-to-day life on an extended stay mission, the experiments he will be conducting on board, and what the S0 truss will mean to ISS. Walz ends with his thoughts on the short-term and long-term future of the International Space Station.

  15. Expedition 4 Crew Interviews: Yury I. Onufrienko

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Expedition 4 Commander Yury Onufrienko is seen during a prelaunch interview. He gives details on the mission's goals and significance, his role in the mission, what his responsibilities will be, what the crew exchange will be like (transferring the Expedition 4 crew in place of the Expedition 3 crew on the International Space Station (ISS)), the day-to-day life on an extended stay mission, the experiments he will be conducting on board, and what the S0 truss will mean to ISS. Onufrienko ends with his thoughts on the short-term and long-term future of the International Space Station.

  16. Expedition 4 Crew Interviews: Dan Bursch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Expedition 4 Flight Engineer Dan Bursch is seen during a prelaunch interview. He gives details on the mission's goals and significance, his role in the mission, what his responsibilities will be, what the crew exchange will be like (transferring the Expedition 4 crew in place of the Expedition 3 crew on the International Space Station (ISS)), the day-to-day life on an extended stay mission, the experiments he will be conducting on board, and what the S0 truss will mean to ISS. Bursch ends with his thoughts on the short-term and long-term future of the International Space Station.

  17. Diagnostics on Z (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nash, T. J.; Derzon, M. S.; Chandler, G. A.; Fehl, D. L.; Leeper, R. J.; Porter, J. L.; Spielman, R. B.; Ruiz, C.; Cooper, G.; McGurn, J.; Hurst, M.; Jobe, D.; Torres, J.; Seaman, J.; Struve, K.; Lazier, S.; Gilliland, T.; Ruggles, L. A.; Simpson, W. A.; Adams, R.; Seaman, J. A.; Wenger, D.; Nielsen, D.; Riley, P.; French, R.; Stygar, B.; Wagoner, T.; Sanford, T. W. L.; Mock, R.; Asay, J.; Hall, C.; Knudson, M.; Armijo, J.; McKenney, J.; Hawn, R.; Schroen-Carey, D.; Hebron, D.; Cutler, T.; Dropinski, S.; Deeney, C.; LePell, P. D.; Coverdale, C. A.; Douglas, M.; Cuneo, M.; Hanson, D.; Bailey, J. E.; Lake, P.; Carlson, A.; Wakefield, C.; Mills, J.; Slopek, J.; Dinwoodie, T.; Idzorek, G.

    2001-01-01

    The 100 ns, 20 MA pinch-driver Z is surrounded by an extensive set of diagnostics. There are nine radial lines of sight set at 12° above horizontal and each of these may be equipped with up to five diagnostic ports. Instruments routinely fielded viewing the pinch from the side with these ports include x-ray diode arrays, photoconducting detector arrays, bolometers, transmission grating spectrometers, time-resolved x-ray pinhole cameras, x-ray crystal spectrometers, calorimeters, silicon photodiodes, and neutron detectors. A diagnostic package fielded on axis for viewing internal pinch radiation consists of nine lines of sight. This package accommodates virtually the same diagnostics as the radial ports. Other diagnostics not fielded on the axial or radial ports include current B-dot monitors, filtered x-ray scintillators coupled by fiber optics to streak cameras, streaked visible spectroscopy, velocity interferometric system for any reflector, bremsstrahlung cameras, and active shock breakout measurement of hohlraum temperature. The data acquisition system is capable of recording up to 500 channels and the data from each shot is available on the Internet. A major new diagnostic presently under construction is the BEAMLET backlighter. We will briefly describe each of these diagnostics and present some of the highest-quality data from them.

  18. Crew Interviews: Treschev

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Sergei Treschev is a Cosmonaut of the Rocket Space Corporation Energia, (RSC), from Volynsky District, Lipetsk Region (Russia). He graduated from Moscow Energy Institute. After years of intense training with RSC Energia, he was selected as International Space Station (ISS) Increment 5 flight engineer. The Expedition-Five crew (two Russian cosmonauts and one American astronaut) will stay on the station for approximately 5 months. The Multipurpose Logistics Module, or MPLM, will carry experiment racks and three stowage and resupply racks to the station. The mission will also install a component of the Canadian Arm called the Mobile Base System (MBS) to the Mobile Transporter (MT) installed during STS-110. This completes the Canadian Mobile Servicing System, or MSS. The mechanical arm will now have the capability to "inchworm" from the U.S. Lab fixture to the MSS and travel along the Truss to work sites.

  19. Crew Interviews: Treschev

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Sergei Treschev is a Cosmonaut of the Rocket Space Corporation Energia, (RSC), from Volynsky District, Lipetsk Region (Russia). He graduated from Moscow Energy Institute. After years of intense training with RSC Energia, he was selected as International Space Station (ISS) Increment 5 flight engineer. The Expedition-Five crew (two Russian cosmonauts and one American astronaut) will stay on the station for approximately 5 months. The Multipurpose Logistics Module, or MPLM, will carry experiment racks and three stowage and resupply racks to the station. The mission will also install a component of the Canadian Arm called the Mobile Base System (MBS) to the Mobile Transporter (MT) installed during STS-110. This completes the Canadian Mobile Servicing System, or MSS. The mechanical arm will now have the capability to "inchworm" from the U.S. Lab fixture to the MSS and travel along the Truss to work sites.

  20. [Classification of Histopathological Findings in the Liver Cited in the Pesticides Risk Assessment Reports Published by the Food Safety Commission of Japan and Thesaurus Construction Based on the International Harmonization of Nomenclature and Diagnostic (INHAND) Criteria].

    PubMed

    Inoue, Kaoru; Takahashi, Miwa; Umemura, Takashi; Yoshida, Midori

    2015-01-01

    Histopathological findings are important to the understanding of toxicity profiles of pesticides. The liver is often a target organ of chemicals. In the present study, histopathological findings in the liver cited in the pesticides risk assessment reports published by the Food Safety Commission of Japan were classified. The histopathological findings were obtained in repeated-dose 90-day oral toxicity studies of mice, rats and dogs and carcinogenicity studies of rodents. After the classification, a thesaurus was constructed based on the International Harmonization of Nomenclature and Diagnostic (INHAND) Criteria. We recommend the use of INHAND criteria in risk assessment reports to improve mutual understanding between applicants and risk assessors.

  1. Medical school preadmission interviews: are structured interviews more reliable than unstructured interviews?

    PubMed

    Axelson, Rick; Kreiter, Clarence; Ferguson, Kristi; Solow, Catherine; Huebner, Kathi

    2010-10-01

    The medical education research literature consistently recommends a structured format for the medical school preadmission interview. There is, however, little direct evidence to support this recommendation. To shed further light on this issue, the present study examines the respective reliability contributions from the structured and unstructured interview components at the University of Iowa. We conducted three univariate G studies on ratings from 3,043 interviews and one multivariate G study using responses from 168 applicants who interviewed twice. Examining interrater reliability and test-retest types of reliability, the unstructured format proved more reliable in both instances. Yet, combining measures from the two interview formats yielded a more reliable score than using either alone. At least from a reliability perspective, the popular advice regarding interview structure may need to be reconsidered. Issues related to validity, fairness, and reliability should be carefully weighed when designing the interview process.

  2. The Ritvo Autism Asperger Diagnostic Scale-Revised (RAADS-R): a scale to assist the diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder in adults: an international validation study.

    PubMed

    Ritvo, Riva Ariella; Ritvo, Edward R; Guthrie, Donald; Ritvo, Max J; Hufnagel, Demetra H; McMahon, William; Tonge, Bruce; Mataix-Cols, David; Jassi, Amita; Attwood, Tony; Eloff, Johann

    2011-08-01

    The Ritvo Autism Asperger Diagnostic Scale-Revised (RAADS-R) is a valid and reliable instrument to assist the diagnosis of adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). The 80-question scale was administered to 779 subjects (201 ASD and 578 comparisons). All ASD subjects met inclusion criteria: DSM-IV-TR, ADI/ADOS diagnoses and standardized IQ testing. Mean scores for each of the questions and total mean ASD vs. the comparison groups' scores were significantly different (p < .0001). Concurrent validity with Constantino Social Responsiveness Scale-Adult = 95.59%. Sensitivity = 97%, specificity = 100%, test-retest reliability r = .987. Cronbach alpha coefficients for the subscales and 4 derived factors were good. We conclude that the RAADS-R is a useful adjunct diagnostic tool for adults with ASD.

  3. Interview with Alexander Cohen.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Alexander Ander

    2017-05-01

    Ander Cohen speaks to Adam Price-Evans, Commissioning Editor of Future Cardiology: Alexander (Ander) Cohen MBBS (Hons), MSc, MD, FRACP is a vascular physician and epidemiologist at Guy's and St Thomas' Hospital, King's College (London, UK). He graduated with honors in medicine and honors in surgery from the University of Melbourne, Australia, and became a fellow of the Royal Australasian College of Physicians in 1990. He was awarded an MSc in Epidemiology from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, University of London in 1991 with a thesis on the metabolic syndrome in South-Asian populations. In 1998, he was awarded an MD with a thesis on the epidemiology of venous thromboembolism and thromboprophylaxis. In addition to his clinical work, he is involved in designing, managing and analyzing clinical trials from Phase I to IV. He is the Chairman and a member of many international steering committees for multicenter trials, epidemiological and pharmacoeconomic studies, and was previously the Director of Clinical Research and an Epidemiologist in Thrombosis Research at King's College Hospital.

  4. Interview with James Bradner. Interviewed by Hannah Coaker.

    PubMed

    Bradner, James E

    2013-08-01

    James E Bradner is an Assistant Professor in Medicine at Harvard Medical School (MA, USA) as well as a Staff Physician in the Division of Hematologic Malignancies at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (MA, USA). The present research focus of the Bradner laboratory concerns the discovery and optimization of prototype drugs targeting cancer gene regulation. The clinical objective of the Bradner group is to deliver novel therapeutics for human clinical investigation in hematologic diseases. Bradner's awards and honors include the Damon Runyon-Rachleff Innovation Award, the Smith Family Award for Excellence in Biomedical Research, the Dunkin' Donuts Rising Star Award and the HMS Distinguished Excellence in Teaching Award. He is a member of the American Society of Clinical Investigation, the American Society of Hematology, the American Chemical Society and the American Association of Cancer Research. His recent research has been published in Nature, Cell, Nature Chemical Biology and the Journal of the American Chemical Society. He has authored more than 20 US Patent applications, licensed to five pharmaceutical companies, and is a scientific founder of Acetylon Pharmaceuticals, SHAPE Pharmaceuticals, Tensha Therapeutics and Syros Pharmaceuticals. Bradner received his AB from Harvard University, his MD from the University of Chicago (IL, USA) and a MMS from Harvard Medical School. He completed his postgraduate training in Internal Medicine at Brigham & Women's Hospital (MA, USA), followed by a fellowship in Medical Oncology and Hematology at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. Following additional post-doctoral training in Chemistry at Harvard University and the Broad Institute (MA, USA) with Professor Stuart Schreiber, Bradner joined the research faculty of Dana-Farber in 2008. Interview conducted by Hannah Coaker, Assistant Commissioning Editor.

  5. Validation of a Migraine Interview for Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Lihong; Heaton, Leanne; Nakamura, Erin F.; Ding, Jinhui; Ahmed, Sameer; Merikangas, Kathleen R.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To date there are no structured interviews to ascertain the diagnostic criteria for headache in children. The objective of this study was to assess the validity of the Diagnostic Interview of Headache Syndromes–Child Version (DIHS-C), which was developed at the National Institute of Mental Health for a community-based family study of headache syndromes and comorbid disorders. METHODS: The DIHS-C is a fully structured diagnostic interview composed of an open-ended clinical history, modules with key symptoms for each of the major headache subtypes, and associated impairment, duration, frequency, course, and treatment. This article presents the validation of the interview in a sample of 104 children evaluated as part of a community-based family study of migraine. RESULTS: The sensitivity of interview diagnosis compared with an expert neurologist’s diagnosis of migraine was 98%, and the specificity was 61%. Similar levels of sensitivity and specificity were found by gender and age of the children. CONCLUSIONS: The DIHS-C provides a new tool that can enhance the reliability of pediatric diagnoses in both clinical and community settings. PMID:23266928

  6. Multiple mini-interviews versus traditional interviews: stakeholder acceptability comparison.

    PubMed

    Razack, Saleem; Faremo, Sonia; Drolet, France; Snell, Linda; Wiseman, Jeffrey; Pickering, Joyce

    2009-10-01

    The McGill University Faculty of Medicine undertook a pilot, simulation-based multiple mini-interview (MMI) for medical school applicant selection, which ran simultaneously with traditional unstructured interviews (all applicants underwent both processes). This paper examines major stakeholder (applicants and evaluators) opinions towards the MMI compared with traditional interviews, including perceptions about the feasibility and utility of the MMI. A total of 100 candidates applying to McGill University Medical School were enrolled in the pilot comparison of the MMI with the traditional, unstructured interview. Applicants' opinions were obtained by questionnaire shortly after the process (for all applicants) and approximately 6 months after the interviews (for non-accepted applicants). Evaluators' perceptions were also surveyed. Questionnaires contained both quantitative items and space for qualitative impressions. Descriptive statistics, repeated measures analysis of variance (manova) and analysis of the topics raised in written comments were conducted. Univariate analyses of response scores revealed statistically significant differences, with the MMI rated more highly than the traditional interview on fairness, imposition of stress and effectiveness as a measurement tool. Compared with the traditional interview, applicants also felt the MMI: (i) allowed them to be competitive; (ii) was enjoyable, and (iii) was often a favourite part of their interview experience. It should be noted that applicants were aware that their MMI score would be included in their overall interview rating. Written comments were positive with regard to, for example, fairness, the provision of opportunities to show one's strengths, and appreciation of the fidelity of the simulations. Evaluators' responses were in agreement with applicants' responses, albeit that overall they expressed more caution about the MMI. Results suggest the MMI is a promising selection tool from the point of view

  7. Testing Models of Psychopathology in Preschool-aged Children Using a Structured Interview-based Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Dougherty, Lea R.; Bufferd, Sara J.; Carlson, Gabrielle A.; Klein, Daniel N.

    2014-01-01

    A number of studies have found that broadband internalizing and externalizing factors provide a parsimonious framework for understanding the structure of psychopathology across childhood, adolescence, and adulthood. However, few of these studies have examined psychopathology in young children, and several recent studies have found support for alternative models, including a bi-factor model with common and specific factors. The present study used parents’ (typically mothers’) reports on a diagnostic interview in a community sample of 3-year old children (n=541; 53.9 % male) to compare the internalizing-externalizing latent factor model with a bi-factor model. The bi-factor model provided a better fit to the data. To test the concurrent validity of this solution, we examined associations between this model and paternal reports and laboratory observations of child temperament. The internalizing factor was associated with low levels of surgency and high levels of fear; the externalizing factor was associated with high levels of surgency and disinhibition and low levels of effortful control; and the common factor was associated with high levels of surgency and negative affect and low levels of effortful control. These results suggest that psychopathology in preschool-aged children may be explained by a single, common factor influencing nearly all disorders and unique internalizing and externalizing factors. These findings indicate that shared variance across internalizing and externalizing domains is substantial and are consistent with recent suggestions that emotion regulation difficulties may be a common vulnerability for a wide array of psychopathology. PMID:24652485

  8. Testing models of psychopathology in preschool-aged children using a structured interview-based assessment.

    PubMed

    Olino, Thomas M; Dougherty, Lea R; Bufferd, Sara J; Carlson, Gabrielle A; Klein, Daniel N

    2014-10-01

    A number of studies have found that broadband internalizing and externalizing factors provide a parsimonious framework for understanding the structure of psychopathology across childhood, adolescence, and adulthood. However, few of these studies have examined psychopathology in young children, and several recent studies have found support for alternative models, including a bi-factor model with common and specific factors. The present study used parents' (typically mothers') reports on a diagnostic interview in a community sample of 3-year old children (n = 541; 53.9 % male) to compare the internalizing-externalizing latent factor model with a bi-factor model. The bi-factor model provided a better fit to the data. To test the concurrent validity of this solution, we examined associations between this model and paternal reports and laboratory observations of child temperament. The internalizing factor was associated with low levels of surgency and high levels of fear; the externalizing factor was associated with high levels of surgency and disinhibition and low levels of effortful control; and the common factor was associated with high levels of surgency and negative affect and low levels of effortful control. These results suggest that psychopathology in preschool-aged children may be explained by a single, common factor influencing nearly all disorders and unique internalizing and externalizing factors. These findings indicate that shared variance across internalizing and externalizing domains is substantial and are consistent with recent suggestions that emotion regulation difficulties may be a common vulnerability for a wide array of psychopathology.

  9. Patient Characteristics as Predictors of Image Quality and Diagnostic Accuracy of MDCT Compared With Conventional Coronary Angiography for Detecting Coronary Artery Stenoses: CORE-64 Multicenter International Trial

    PubMed Central

    Dewey, Marc; Vavere, Andrea L.; Arbab-Zadeh, Armin; Miller, Julie M.; Sara, Leonardo; Cox, Christopher; Gottlieb, Ilan; Yoshioka, Kunihiro; Paul, Narinder; Hoe, John; de Roos, Albert; Lardo, Albert C.; Lima, Joao A.; Clouse, Melvin E.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of the study was to investigate patient characteristics associated with image quality and their impact on the diagnostic accuracy of MDCT for the detection of coronary artery stenosis. MATERIALS AND METHODS Two hundred ninety-one patients with a coronary artery calcification (CAC) score of ≤ 600 Agatston units (214 men and 77 women; mean age, 59.3 ± 10.0 years [SD]) were analyzed. An overall image quality score was derived using an ordinal scale. The accuracy of quantitative MDCT to detect significant (≥ 50%) stenoses was assessed using quantitative coronary angiography (QCA) per patient and per vessel using a modified 19-segment model. The effect of CAC, obesity, heart rate, and heart rate variability on image quality and accuracy were evaluated by multiple logistic regression. Image quality and accuracy were further analyzed in subgroups of significant predictor variables. Diagnostic analysis was determined for image quality strata using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. RESULTS Increasing body mass index (BMI) (odds ratio [OR] = 0.89, p < 0.001), increasing heart rate (OR = 0.90, p < 0.001), and the presence of breathing artifact (OR = 4.97, p ≤ 0.001) were associated with poorer image quality whereas sex, CAC score, and heart rate variability were not. Compared with examinations of white patients, studies of black patients had significantly poorer image quality (OR = 0.58, p = 0.04). At a vessel level, CAC score (10 Agatston units) (OR = 1.03, p = 0.012) and patient age (OR = 1.02, p = 0.04) were significantly associated with the diagnostic accuracy of quantitative MDCT compared with QCA. A trend was observed in differences in the areas under the ROC curves across image quality strata at the vessel level (p = 0.08). CONCLUSION Image quality is significantly associated with patient ethnicity, BMI, mean scan heart rate, and the presence of breathing artifact but not with CAC score at a patient level. At a vessel level

  10. STS-114 Crew Interview: Stephen Robinson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-01-01

    Stephen Robinson, Mission Specialist 2 (MS2), of the STS-114 space mission is seen during a prelaunch interview. He discusses his duties as flight engineer, Extravehicular Activity 2 (EVA 2) spacewalker, and medical officer. Robinson answers questions about his interests in spaceflight and the specific goals of the mission. He identifies this mission as the International Space Station Resupply Mission because supplies and experiments are brought to the International Space Station and Expedition 6 crew of Commander Kenneth Bowersox, and Flight Engineers Donald Pettit and Nikolai Budarin are returning to Earth. Lastly, he talks about the docking of the Space Shuttle Atlantis with the International Space Station. He looks forward to this experience in space.

  11. Aikido Politics in Interview Interaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chew, Phyllis Ghim Lian

    1995-01-01

    Analyzes how less powerful subjects in an unequal encounter, an admission interview in an educational institution, were able to counter the power directed at them by the more powerful subject through "aikido" strategies. In the context of the interview, harmonizing with the ideological discursive formation of the institution in question…

  12. An Interview with Noam Chomsky

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jack, Gavin

    2006-01-01

    This article presents a transcript of an interview that the author conducted with Noam Chomsky. In this interview, Chomsky talks about language acquisition and his theory of Universal Grammar. He then explains how the USA best exemplifies the individualist national culture. He also cites the challenges researchers should address in intercultural…

  13. An Interview with Noam Chomsky

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jack, Gavin

    2006-01-01

    This article presents a transcript of an interview that the author conducted with Noam Chomsky. In this interview, Chomsky talks about language acquisition and his theory of Universal Grammar. He then explains how the USA best exemplifies the individualist national culture. He also cites the challenges researchers should address in intercultural…

  14. An Interview with Stephen Vitiello

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lampert, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    Stephen Vitiello is a world-renowned contemporary sound artist whom the author has known as a colleague for several years. This article presents an interview about the overall body of Vitiello's work to date, and his thoughts on teaching at Virginia Commonwealth University. The interview explores the creative and noncreative tensions between…

  15. Secretarial Administraton: The Interviewing Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nemesh, Anna

    1979-01-01

    Suggests classroom techniques to prepare business students for employment interviews and gives information on lawful and unlawful employment interview inquiries, as well as some fair employment legal requirements of the Equal Employment Opportunity Act of 1974, Civil Rights Act of 1964, Equal Pay Act of 1963, and Rehabilitation Act of 1973. (MF)

  16. An Interview with Stephen Vitiello

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lampert, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    Stephen Vitiello is a world-renowned contemporary sound artist whom the author has known as a colleague for several years. This article presents an interview about the overall body of Vitiello's work to date, and his thoughts on teaching at Virginia Commonwealth University. The interview explores the creative and noncreative tensions between…

  17. Simformation 4: Depth Interview Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowles, B. Dean

    This handbook is a systematic guide for planning and implementing a program of depth interviews either as part of a school's community relations program or as an effort in policy analysis. It includes all necessary information for understanding the advantages and disadvantages of depth interviews, for preliminary planning and preparation, for…

  18. Motivational Interviewing in Relational Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, William R.; Rose, Gary S.

    2010-01-01

    Responds to M. Stanton's comments on the current author's original article. One of the puzzles of motivational interviewing is why it works at all. How can it be that an individual interview or two yields change in a long-standing problem behavior even without any effort to alter social context? The time involved is such a tiny part of the…

  19. Current Events. Interview: Nuyorican Dreamer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stainburn, Samantha

    2000-01-01

    Interviews Robert Torres, a Nuyorican who excelled at school and escaped the ghetto while his family remained, then made a documentary about the situation. This interview examines how poverty affects children; how teachers can help impoverished Hispanic students; how teachers helped him; how educators should be compensated; what making the…

  20. Motivational Interviewing in Relational Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, William R.; Rose, Gary S.

    2010-01-01

    Responds to M. Stanton's comments on the current author's original article. One of the puzzles of motivational interviewing is why it works at all. How can it be that an individual interview or two yields change in a long-standing problem behavior even without any effort to alter social context? The time involved is such a tiny part of the…