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Sample records for international nuclear information system

  1. INIS: A Computer-Based International Nuclear Information System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balakrishnan, M. R.

    1986-01-01

    Description of the International Nuclear Information System includes its history, organizational structure, subject classification scheme, thesaurus, input standards, and various products and services generated by the system. Appendices provide a list of participating countries, subjects covered by the system, and a sample output record.…

  2. Nuclear criticality information system

    SciTech Connect

    Koponen, B.L.; Hampel, V.E.

    1981-11-30

    The nuclear criticality safety program at LLNL began in the 1950's with a critical measurements program which produced benchmark data until the late 1960's. This same time period saw the rapid development of computer technology useful for both computer modeling of fissile systems and for computer-aided management and display of the computational benchmark data. Database management grew in importance as the amount of information increased and as experimental programs were terminated. Within the criticality safety program at LLNL we began at that time to develop a computer library of benchmark data for validation of computer codes and cross sections. As part of this effort, we prepared a computer-based bibliography of criticality measurements on relatively simple systems. However, it is only now that some of these computer-based resources can be made available to the nuclear criticality safety community at large. This technology transfer is being accomplished by the DOE Technology Information System (TIS), a dedicated, advanced information system. The NCIS database is described.

  3. Computerized international geothermal information systems

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, S.L.; Lawrence, J.D.; Lepman, S.R.

    1980-03-01

    The computerized international geothermal energy information system is reviewed. The review covers establishment of the Italy - United States linked data centers by the NATO Committee on Challenges of Modern Society, through a bilateral agreement, and up to the present time. The result of the information exchange project is given as the bibliographic and numerical data available from the data centers. Recommendations for the exchange of computerized geothermal information at the international level are discussed.

  4. NCIS - a Nuclear Criticality Information System (overview)

    SciTech Connect

    Koponen, B.L.; Hampel, V.E.

    1983-07-01

    A Nuclear Criticality Information System (NCIS) is being established at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in order to serve personnel responsible for safe storage, transport, and handling of fissile materials and those concerned with the evaluation and analysis of nuclear, critical experiments. Public concern for nuclear safety provides the incentive for improved access to nuclear safety information.

  5. Experience with Nuclear Medicine Information System

    PubMed Central

    Volkan-Salanci, Bilge; Şahin, Figen; Babekoğlu, Vahide; Uğur, Ömer

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Radiology information system (RIS) is basically evolved for the need of radiologists and ignores the vital steps needed for a proper work flow of Nuclear Medicine Department. Moreover, CT/MRI oriented classical PACS systems are far from satisfying Nuclear Physicians like storing dynamic data for reprocessing and quantitative analysis of colored images. Our purpose was to develop a workflow based Nuclear Medicine Information System (NMIS) that fulfills the needs of Nuclear Medicine Department and its integration to hospital PACS system. Material and Methods: Workflow in NMIS uses HL7 (health level seven) and steps include, patient scheduling and retrieving information from HIS (hospital information system), radiopharmacy, acquisition, digital reporting and approval of the reports using Nuclear Medicine specific diagnostic codes. Images and dynamic data from cameras of are sent to and retrieved from PACS system (Corttex©) for reprocessing and quantitative analysis. Results: NMIS has additional functions to the RIS such as radiopharmaceutical management program which includes stock recording of both radioactive and non-radioactive substances, calculation of the radiopharmaceutical dose for individual patient according to body weight and maximum permissible activity, and calculation of radioactivity left per unit volume for each radionuclide according their half lives. Patient scheduling and gamma camera patient work list settings were arranged according to specific Nuclear Medicine procedures. Nuclear Medicine images and reports can be retrieved and viewed from HIS. Conclusion: NMIS provides functionality to standard RIS and PACS system according to the needs of Nuclear Medicine. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:23487446

  6. Experience with nuclear medicine information system.

    PubMed

    Volkan-Salanci, Bilge; Sahin, Figen; Babekoğlu, Vahide; Uğur, Omer

    2012-12-01

    Radiology information system (RIS) is basically evolved for the need of radiologists and ignores the vital steps needed for a proper work flow of Nuclear Medicine Department. Moreover, CT/MRI oriented classical PACS systems are far from satisfying Nuclear Physicians like storing dynamic data for reprocessing and quantitative analysis of colored images. Our purpose was to develop a workflow based Nuclear Medicine Information System (NMIS) that fulfills the needs of Nuclear Medicine Department and its integration to hospital PACS system. Workflow in NMIS uses HL7 (health level seven) and steps include, patient scheduling and retrieving information from HIS (hospital information system), radiopharmacy, acquisition, digital reporting and approval of the reports using Nuclear Medicine specific diagnostic codes. Images and dynamic data from cameras of are sent to and retrieved from PACS system (Corttex©) for reprocessing and quantitative analysis. NMIS has additional functions to the RIS such as radiopharmaceutical management program which includes stock recording of both radioactive and non-radioactive substances, calculation of the radiopharmaceutical dose for individual patient according to body weight and maximum permissible activity, and calculation of radioactivity left per unit volume for each radionuclide according their half lives. Patient scheduling and gamma camera patient work list settings were arranged according to specific Nuclear Medicine procedures. Nuclear Medicine images and reports can be retrieved and viewed from HIS. NMIS provides functionality to standard RIS and PACS system according to the needs of Nuclear Medicine. None declared.

  7. Computer Information System For Nuclear Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahill, P. T.; Knowles, R. J.....; Tsen, O.

    1983-12-01

    To meet the complex needs of a nuclear medicine division serving a 1100-bed hospital, a computer information system has been developed in sequential phases. This database management system is based on a time-shared minicomputer linked to a broadband communications network. The database contains information on patient histories, billing, types of procedures, doses of radiopharmaceuticals, times of study, scanning equipment used, and technician performing the procedure. These patient records are cycled through three levels of storage: (a) an active file of 100 studies for those patients currently scheduled, (b) a temporary storage level of 1000 studies, and (c) an archival level of 10,000 studies containing selected information. Merging of this information with reports and various statistical analyses are possible. This first phase has been in operation for well over a year. The second phase is an upgrade of the size of the various storage levels by a factor of ten.

  8. Nuclear plants gain integrated information systems

    SciTech Connect

    Villavicencio-Ramirez, A.; Rodriquez-Alvarez, J.M.

    1994-10-01

    With the objective of simplifying the complex mesh of computing devices employed within nuclear power plants, modern technology and integration techniques are being used to form centralized (but backed up) databases and distributed processing and display networks. Benefits are immediate as a result of the integration and the use of standards. The use of a unique data acquisition and database subsystem optimizes the high costs of engineering, as this task is done only once for the life span of the system. This also contributes towards a uniform user interface and allows for graceful expansion and maintenance. This article features an integrated information system, Sistema Integral de Informacion de Proceso (SIIP). The development of this system enabled the Laguna Verde Nuclear Power plant to fully use the already existing universe of signals and its related engineering during all plant conditions, namely, start up, normal operation, transient analysis, and emergency operation. Integrated systems offer many advantages over segregated systems, and this experience should benefit similar development efforts in other electric power utilities, not only for nuclear but also for other types of generating plants.

  9. International Aircraft Operator Information System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-01

    engine/series to the EICCODE exception list. It only allows UPDATE on AICCODE field. The top portion of the screen displays information in table F107 ... F107 ASAS Engine Xrf F108 ASAS Aic Xrf Fl 1 1 Operators B-2 Jetnet JNO 1 Corporate fleet JN02 Country Xrf JN03 ASAS speedo table ( subset of NACI for...Link to F107 25 EST AGE CHAR 1 Y Estimated Age of Aircraft 26 FLIGHT HRS NUMBER 22 9 Y Flying Hours 27 INFLUENCE CHAR 2 Y Influence 28 LUPDATE DATE

  10. Nuclear Criticality Information System. Database examples

    SciTech Connect

    Foret, C.A.

    1984-06-01

    The purpose of this publication is to provide our users with a guide to using the Nuclear Criticality Information System (NCIS). It is comprised of an introduction, an information and resources section, a how-to-use section, and several useful appendices. The main objective of this report is to present a clear picture of the NCIS project and its available resources as well as assisting our users in accessing the database and using the TIS computer to process data. The introduction gives a brief description of the NCIS project, the Technology Information System (TIS), online user information, future plans and lists individuals to contact for additional information about the NCIS project. The information and resources section outlines the NCIS database and describes the resources that are available. The how-to-use section illustrates access to the NCIS database as well as searching datafiles for general or specific data. It also shows how to access and read the NCIS news section as well as connecting to other information centers through the TIS computer.

  11. Straight-Line: A nuclear material storage information management system

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsen, C.; Mangan, D.

    1995-07-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is developing Straight-Line -- a pilot system to demonstrate comprehensive monitoring of nuclear material in storage. Straight-Line is an integrated system of sensors providing information that will enhance the safety, security, and international accountability of stored nuclear material. The goals of this effort are to: (1) Provide the right sensor information to the right user immediately. (2) Reduce the expenses, risks, and frequency of human inspection of the material. (3) Provide trustworthy data to international inspectors to minimize their need to make on site inspections. In pursuit of these goals, Straight-Line unites technology from Sandia`s Authenticated Item Monitoring System (AIMS) and other programs to communicate the authenticated status of the monitored item back to central magazine receivers. Straight-Line, however, incorporates several important features not found in previous systems: (1) Information Security -- the ability to collect and safely disseminate both classified and unclassified sensor data to users on a need-to-know basis. (2) Integrate into a single system the monitoring needs of safety, security, and international accountability. (3) Incorporate the use of sensors providing analog or digital output. This paper will present the overall architecture and status of the Straight-Line project.

  12. Straight-Line -- A nuclear material storage information management system

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsen, C.; Mangan, D.

    1995-12-31

    Sandia National Laboratories is developing Straight-Line -- a pilot system to demonstrate comprehensive monitoring of nuclear material in storage. Straight-Line is an integrated system of sensors providing information that will enhance the safety, security, and international accountability of stored nuclear material. The goals of this effort are to (1) Provide the right sensor information to the right user in a timely manner. (2) Reduce the expenses, risks, and frequency of human inspection of the material. (3) Provide trustworthy data to international inspectors to minimize their need to make on site inspections. In pursuit of these goals, Straight-Line unites technology from Sandia`s Authenticated Item Monitoring System (AIMS) and other programs to communicate the authenticated status of the monitored item back to central magazine receivers. Straight-Line, however, incorporates several important features not found in previous systems: (1) Information Security -- the ability to collect and safely disseminate both classified and unclassified sensor data to users on a need-to-know basis. (2) Integrate into a single system the monitoring needs of safety, security, and international accountability. (3) Incorporate the use of sensors providing analog or digital output. This paper will present the overall architecture and status of the Straight-Line project.

  13. ICENES '91:Sixth international conference on emerging nuclear energy systems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This document contains the program and abstracts of the sessions at the Sixth International Conference on Emerging Nuclear Energy Systems held June 16--21, 1991 at Monterey, California. These sessions included: The plenary session, fission session, fission and nonelectric session, poster session 1P; (space propulsion, space nuclear power, electrostatic confined fusion, fusion miscellaneous, inertial confinement fusion, [mu]-catalyzed fusion, and cold fusion); Advanced fusion session, space nuclear session, poster session 2P, (nuclear reactions/data, isotope separation, direct energy conversion and exotic concepts, fusion-fission hybrids, nuclear desalting, accelerator waste-transmutation, and fusion-based chemical recycling); energy policy session, poster session 3P (energy policy, magnetic fusion reactors, fission reactors, magnetically insulated inertial fusion, and nuclear explosives for power generation); exotic energy storage and conversion session; and exotic energy storage and conversion; review and closing session.

  14. The international nuclear non-proliferation system: Challenges and choices

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, J.; McGrew, A.G.

    1984-01-01

    When a topic has been under discussion for almost 40 years there is a danger that the literature will become excessively esoteric and that, as Philip Grummett suggests, '...a new scholasticism will arise' (p.79). Originating in a November l982 seminar co-sponsored by the British International Studies Association and the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, this volume is a refreshing, well conceived, and well written antidote to that trend. It is also well timed for the 1985 NPT Review Conference. The eight chapters of the volume are divided into three sections. Following an introduction by Anthony McGrew that touches on all the major themes of the volume, the first section deals with the existing non-proliferation system. In three chapters the historical, institutional and policy-making elements of the present system are outlined. There is a vignette on the Nuclear Suppliers Group in Wilmshurst's chapter one (pp. 28-33). Fischer's informative chapter on the IAEA is followed by Gummett's examination of policy options, including, for example, the linking of conventional weapons transfer to non-proliferation policies. The second section, also of three chapters, examines current issues: the state of the international nuclear industry, and the non-proliferation policies of the United States and Britain. Walker's chapter focuses chiefly on change in the industry-from monopoly to pluralism in suppliers, the effect of the economic recession, and the combined effect of these two factors on international politics. Devine's American non-proliferation chapter is a statement of the State Department view, whilst Keohane's chapter on Britain attempts to put the Trident procurement into a proliferation context. The British chapter is present because of ethnocentric considerations.

  15. User requirements for information systems in nuclear medicine.

    PubMed

    Todd-Pokropek, A; Vauramo, E; Cosgriff, P; Sippo-Tujunen, I; Britton, K

    1992-05-01

    In the field of COST cooperation (COST = European Cooperation in the Field of Scientific and Technical Research) a project B2 for Quality Assurance in Nuclear Medicine Software has been established. In a memorandum of understanding setting up this project, user requirements were to be defined for the hardware and software used for data acquisition, processing and presentation. A subgroup of the management committee of COST B2 were interested in the Advanced Informatics in Medicine, AIM, task T-734 'Quality Assurance of Medical Software', and the AIM Project 'A 1034', coordinated by Dr K. Britton, was initiated. The initial drafts of this document were written in Helsinki during 1988-1990, and submitted for comment by the members of the management committee of COST B2. These comments were integrated in the text and this document was finalized by the UK group so as to make it available for international discussion. It is anticipated that, after appropriate international discussion, these User Requirements for Information Systems in Nuclear Medicine will be adopted by the management committee of COST B2 as a COST document. Towards these ends, a working group chaired by Dr Britton, including the British and Finnish teams and Ulrich Noelpp from Switzerland, was appointed by the management committee of COST B2 in April 1990. While writing it we have had the pleasure of working with referees from different European hospitals in many countries. We are happy to thank all of them for their valuable contributions.

  16. Defense Nuclear Material Stewardship Integrated Inventory Information Management System (IIIMS).

    SciTech Connect

    Aas, Christopher A.; Lenhart, James E.; Bray, Olin H.; Witcher, Christina Jenkin

    2004-11-01

    Sandia National Laboratories was tasked with developing the Defense Nuclear Material Stewardship Integrated Inventory Information Management System (IIIMS) with the sponsorship of NA-125.3 and the concurrence of DOE/NNSA field and area offices. The purpose of IIIMS was to modernize nuclear materials management information systems at the enterprise level. Projects over the course of several years attempted to spearhead this modernization. The scope of IIIMS was broken into broad enterprise-oriented materials management and materials forecasting. The IIIMS prototype was developed to allow multiple participating user groups to explore nuclear material requirements and needs in detail. The purpose of material forecasting was to determine nuclear material availability over a 10 to 15 year period in light of the dynamic nature of nuclear materials management. Formal DOE Directives (requirements) were needed to direct IIIMS efforts but were never issued and the project has been halted. When restarted, duplicating or re-engineering the activities from 1999 to 2003 is unnecessary, and in fact future initiatives can build on previous work. IIIMS requirements should be structured to provide high confidence that discrepancies are detected, and classified information is not divulged. Enterprise-wide materials management systems maintained by the military can be used as overall models to base IIIMS implementation concepts upon.

  17. JANIS: NEA JAva-based Nuclear Data Information System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soppera, Nicolas; Bossant, Manuel; Cabellos, Oscar; Dupont, Emmeric; Díez, Carlos J.

    2017-09-01

    JANIS (JAva-based Nuclear Data Information System) software is developed by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Data Bank to facilitate the visualization and manipulation of nuclear data, giving access to evaluated nuclear data libraries, such as ENDF, JEFF, JENDL, TENDL etc., and also to experimental nuclear data (EXFOR) and bibliographical references (CINDA). It is available as a standalone Java program, downloadable and distributed on DVD and also a web application available on the NEA website. One of the main new features in JANIS is the scripting capability via command line, which notably automatizes plots generation and permits automatically extracting data from the JANIS database. Recent NEA software developments rely on these JANIS features to access nuclear data, for example the Nuclear Data Sensitivity Tool (NDaST) makes use of covariance data in BOXER and COVERX formats, which are retrieved from the JANIS database. New features added in this version of the JANIS software are described along this paper with some examples.

  18. EVALUATING INTERNAL STAKEHOLDER PERSPECTIVES ON RISK-INFORMED REGULATORY PRACTICES FOR THE NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, L.K.; Wight, E.H.; Caruso, M.A.

    2003-02-27

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation has begun a program to create a risk-informed environment within the reactor program. The first step of the process is to evaluate the existing environment and internal NRC stakeholder perceptions of risk-informed regulatory practices. This paper reports on the results of the first phase of this evaluation: assessing the current environment, including the level of acceptance of risk-informed approaches throughout the reactor program, the level of integration, areas of success, and areas of difficulty. The other two phases of the evaluation will identify barriers to the integration of risk into NRC activities and gather input on how to move to a risk-informed environment.

  19. Space Station Information System - Concepts and international issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. B.; Pruett, David; Hall, Dana L.

    1987-01-01

    The Space Station Information System (SSIS) is outlined in terms of its functions and probable physical facilities. The SSIS includes flight element systems as well as existing and planned institutional systems such as the NASA Communications System, the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System, and the data and communications networks of the international partners. The SSIS strives to provide both a 'user friendly' environment and a software environment which will allow for software transportability and interoperability across the SSIS. International considerations are discussed as well as project management, software commonality, data communications standards, data security, documentation commonality, transaction management, data flow cross support, and key technologies.

  20. Monitoring international nuclear activity

    SciTech Connect

    Firestone, R.B.

    2006-05-19

    The LBNL Table of Isotopes website provides primary nuclearinformation to>150,000 different users annually. We have developedthe covert technology to identify users by IP address and country todetermine the kinds of nuclear information they are retrieving. Wepropose to develop pattern recognition software to provide an earlywarning system to identify Unusual nuclear activity by country or regionSpecific nuclear/radioactive material interests We have monitored nuclearinformation for over two years and provide this information to the FBIand LLNL. Intelligence is gleaned from the website log files. Thisproposal would expand our reporting capabilities.

  1. Nuclear weapons and international law

    SciTech Connect

    Pogany, I.

    1987-01-01

    Using two different perspectives, this collection of essays addresses the central legal question of whether the manufacture, deployment, and potential use of nuclear weapons is lawful. In addition, individual chapters focus on a variety of topical issues, including nuclear weapon free zones, nuclear testing, international law and regulations, nuclear weapons and nonproliferation, anti-ballistic missile systems, and the Strategic Defense Initiative.

  2. An international aerospace information system: A cooperative opportunity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cotter, Gladys A.; Blados, Walter R.

    1992-01-01

    Scientific and technical information (STI) is a valuable resource which represents the results of large investments in research and development (R&D), and the expertise of a nation. NASA and its predecessor organizations have developed and managed the preeminent aerospace information system. We see information and information systems changing and becoming more international in scope. In Europe, consistent with joint R&D programs and a view toward a united Europe, we have seen the emergence of a European Aerospace Database concept. In addition, the development of aeronautics and astronautics in individual nations have also lead to initiatives for national aerospace databases. Considering recent technological developments in information science and technology, as well as the reality of scarce resources in all nations, it is time to reconsider the mutually beneficial possibilities offered by cooperation and international resource sharing. The new possibilities offered through cooperation among the various aerospace database efforts toward an international aerospace database initiative which can optimize the cost/benefit equation for all participants are considered.

  3. On Teaching International Courses on Health Information Systems

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Axel W.; Bott, Oliver J.; Gietzelt, Matthias; Haarbrandt, Birger; Hackl, Werner O.; Hellrung, Nils; Hübner-Bloder, Gudrun; Jahn, Franziska; Jaspers, Monique W.; Kutscha, Ulrike; Machan, Christoph; Oppermann, Bianca; Pilz, Jochen; Schwartze, Jonas; Seidel, Christoph; Slot, Jan-Eric; Smers, Stefan; Spitalewsky, Katharina; Steckel, Nathalie; Strübing, Alexander; van der Haak, Minne

    2017-01-01

    Summary Background Health information systems (HIS) are one of the most important areas for biomedical and health informatics. In order to professionally deal with HIS well-educated informaticians are needed. Because of these reasons, in 2001 an international course has been established: The Frank – van Swieten Lectures on Strategic Information Management of Health Information Systems. Objectives Reporting about the Frank – van Swieten Lectures and about our students‘ feedback on this course during the last 16 years. Summarizing our lessons learned and making recommendations for such international courses on HIS. Methods The basic concept of the Frank – van Swieten lectures is to teach the theoretical background in local lectures, to organize practical exercises on modelling sub-information systems of the respective local HIS and finally to conduct Joint Three Days as an international meeting were the resulting models are introduced and compared. Results During the last 16 years, the Universities of Amsterdam, Braunschweig, Heidelberg/Heilbronn, Leipzig as well as UMIT were involved in running this course. Overall, 517 students from these universities participated. Our students‘ feedback was clearly positive. The Joint Three Days of the Frank – van Swieten Lectures, where at the end of the course all students can meet, turned out to be an important component of this course. Based on the last 16 years, we recommend common teaching materials, agreement on equivalent clinical areas for the exercises, support of group building of international student groups, motivation of using a collaboration platform, ensuring quality management of the course, addressing different levels of knowledge of the students, and ensuring sufficient funding for joint activities. Conclusions Although associated with considerable additional efforts, we can clearly recommend establishing such international courses on HIS, such as the Frank – van Swieten Lectures. PMID:28272648

  4. International Nuclear Safeguards at Sandia

    SciTech Connect

    Sternat, Matthew R.

    2015-02-01

    As global nuclear energy expands, assuring peaceful uses of nuclear technology becomes increasingly important. In addition to complying with international nuclear safeguards, a responsible nuclear energy program promotes a corresponding safeguards culture. Establishment of transparent peaceful uses of nuclear technologies starts with cooperative international engagements and safeguards systems. Developing states investing in nuclear energy must assure the international community of their longterm commitment to safeguards, safety, and security (3S) of nuclear materials and technologies. Cultivating a safeguards culture starts in the initial phases of infrastructure planning and must be integrated into the process of developing a responsible nuclear energy program. Sandia National Laboratories supports the implementation of safeguards culture through a variety of activities, including infrastructure development.

  5. ICENES `91:Sixth international conference on emerging nuclear energy systems. Program and abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    This document contains the program and abstracts of the sessions at the Sixth International Conference on Emerging Nuclear Energy Systems held June 16--21, 1991 at Monterey, California. These sessions included: The plenary session, fission session, fission and nonelectric session, poster session 1P; (space propulsion, space nuclear power, electrostatic confined fusion, fusion miscellaneous, inertial confinement fusion, {mu}-catalyzed fusion, and cold fusion); Advanced fusion session, space nuclear session, poster session 2P, (nuclear reactions/data, isotope separation, direct energy conversion and exotic concepts, fusion-fission hybrids, nuclear desalting, accelerator waste-transmutation, and fusion-based chemical recycling); energy policy session, poster session 3P (energy policy, magnetic fusion reactors, fission reactors, magnetically insulated inertial fusion, and nuclear explosives for power generation); exotic energy storage and conversion session; and exotic energy storage and conversion; review and closing session.

  6. International Remote Monitoring Project Embalse Nuclear Power Station, Argentina Embalse Remote Monitoring System

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Sigfried L.; Glidewell, Donnie D.; Bonino, Anibal; Bosler, Gene; Mercer, David; Maxey, Curt; Vones, Jaromir; Martelle, Guy; Busse, James; Kadner, Steve; White, Mike; Rovere, Luis

    1999-07-21

    The Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear of Argentina (ARN), the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), ABACC, the US Department of Energy, and the US Support Program POTAS, cooperated in the development of a Remote Monitoring System for nuclear nonproliferation efforts. This system was installed at the Embalse Nuclear Power Station last year to evaluate the feasibility of using radiation sensors in monitoring the transfer of spent fuel from the spent fuel pond to dry storage. The key element in this process is to maintain continuity of knowledge throughout the entire transfer process. This project evaluated the fundamental design and implementation of the Remote Monitoring System in its application to regional and international safeguard efficiency. New technology has been developed to enhance the design of the system to include storage capability on board sensor platforms. This evaluation has led to design enhancements that will assure that no data loss will occur during loss of RF transmission of the sensors.

  7. International Virtual Observatory System for Water Resources Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leinenweber, Lewis; Bermudez, Luis

    2013-04-01

    Sharing, accessing, and integrating hydrologic and climatic data have been identified as a critical need for some time. The current state of data portals, standards, technologies, activities, and expertise can be leverage to develop an initial operational capability for a virtual observatory system. This system will allow to link observations data with stream networks and models, and to solve semantic inconsistencies among communities. Prototyping a virtual observatory system is an inter-disciplinary, inter-agency and international endeavor. The Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) within the OGC Interoperability Program provides the process and expertise to run such collaborative effort. The OGC serves as a global forum for the collaboration of developers and users of spatial data products and services, and to advance the development of international standards for geospatial interoperability. The project coordinated by OGC that is advancing an international virtual observatory system for water resources information is called Climatology-Hydrology Information Sharing Pilot, Phase 1 (CHISP-1). It includes observations and forecasts in the U.S. and Canada levering current networks and capabilities. It is designed to support the following use cases: 1) Hydrologic modeling for historical and near-future stream flow and groundwater conditions. Requires the integration of trans-boundary stream flow and groundwater well data, as well as national river networks (US NHD and Canada NHN) from multiple agencies. Emphasis will be on time series data and real-time flood monitoring. 2) Modeling and assessment of nutrient load into the lakes. Requires accessing water-quality data from multiple agencies and integrating with stream flow information for calculating loads. Emphasis on discrete sampled water quality observations, linking those to specific NHD stream reaches and catchments, and additional metadata for sampled data. The key objectives of these use cases are: 1) To link

  8. An International Aerospace Information System: A Cooperative Opportunity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blados, Walter R.; Cotter, Gladys A.

    1992-01-01

    Introduces and discusses ideas and issues relevant to the international unification of scientific and technical information (STI) through development of an international aerospace database (IAD). Specific recommendations for improving the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Aerospace Database (NAD) and for implementing IAD are given.…

  9. Advanced international training course on state systems of accounting for and control of nuclear materials

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-10-01

    This report incorporates all lectures and presentations at the Advanced International Training Course on State Systems of Accounting for and Control of Nuclear Material held April 27 through May 12, 1981 at Santa Fe and Los Alamos, New Mexico, and Richland, Washington, USA. Authorized by the US Nuclear Non-Proliferation Act and sponsored by the US Department of Energy in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency, the course was developed to provide practical training in the design, implementation, and operation of a state system of nuclear materials accountability and control that satisfies both national and international safeguards. Major emphasis for the 1981 course was placed on safeguards methods used at bulk-handling facilities, particularly low-enriched uranium conversion and fuel fabrication plants. The course was conducted by the University of California's Los Alamos National Laboratory, the Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory, and Exxon Nuclear Company, Inc. Tours and demonstrations were arranged at both the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, and the Exxon Nuclear fuel fabrication plant, Richland, Washington.

  10. International Nuclear Security

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, James E.

    2012-08-14

    This presentation discusses: (1) Definitions of international nuclear security; (2) What degree of security do we have now; (3) Limitations of a nuclear security strategy focused on national lock-downs of fissile materials and weapons; (4) What do current trends say about the future; and (5) How can nuclear security be strengthened? Nuclear security can be strengthened by: (1) More accurate baseline inventories; (2) Better physical protection, control and accounting; (3) Effective personnel reliability programs; (4) Minimize weapons-usable materials and consolidate to fewer locations; (5) Consider local threat environment when siting facilities; (6) Implement pledges made in the NSS process; and (7) More robust interdiction, emergency response and special operations capabilities. International cooperation is desirable, but not always possible.

  11. FOREWORD: International Summer School for Advanced Studies 'Dynamics of open nuclear systems' (PREDEAL12)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delion, D. S.; Zamfir, N. V.; Raduta, A. R.; Gulminelli, F.

    2013-02-01

    This proceedings volume contains the invited lectures and contributions presented at the International Summer School on Nuclear Physics held at Trei Brazi, a summer resort of the Bioterra University, near the city of Predeal, Romania, on 9-20 July 2012. The long tradition of International Summer Schools on Nuclear Physics in Romania dates as far back as 1964, with the event being scheduled every two years. During this period of almost 50 years, many outstanding nuclear scientists have lectured on various topics related to nuclear physics and particle physics. This year we celebrate the 80th birthday of Aureliu Sandulescu, one of the founders of the Romanian school of theoretical nuclear physics. He was Serban Titeica's PhD student, one of Werner Heisenberg's PhD students, and he organized the first edition of this event. Aureliu Sandulescu's major contributions to the field of theoretical nuclear physics are related in particular to the prediction of cluster radioactivity, the physics of open quantum systems and the innovative technique of detecting superheavy nuclei using the double magic projectile 48Ca (Calcium), nowadays a widely used method at the JINR—Dubna and GSI—Darmstadt laboratories. The title of the event, 'Dynamics of Open Nuclear Systems', is in recognition of Aureliu Sandulescu's great personality. The lectures were attended by Romanian and foreign Master and PhD students and young researchers in nuclear physics. About 25 reputable professors and researchers in nuclear physics delivered lectures during this period. According to a well-established tradition, an interval of two hours was allotted for each lecture (including discussions). Therefore we kept a balance between the school and conference format. Two lectures were held during the morning and afternoon sessions. After lecture sessions, three or four oral contributions were given by young scientists. This was a good opportunity for them to present the results of their research in front of

  12. International remote monitoring project Argentina Nuclear Power Station Spent Fuel Transfer Remote Monitoring System

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, S.; Lucero, R.; Glidewell, D.

    1997-08-01

    The Autoridad Regulataria Nuclear (ARN) and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) are cooperating on the development of a Remote Monitoring System for nuclear nonproliferation efforts. A Remote Monitoring System for spent fuel transfer will be installed at the Argentina Nuclear Power Station in Embalse, Argentina. The system has been designed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), with Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) providing gamma and neutron sensors. This project will test and evaluate the fundamental design and implementation of the Remote Monitoring System in its application to regional and international safeguards efficiency. This paper provides a description of the monitoring system and its functions. The Remote Monitoring System consists of gamma and neutron radiation sensors, RF systems, and video systems integrated into a coherent functioning whole. All sensor data communicate over an Echelon LonWorks Network to a single data logger. The Neumann DCM 14 video module is integrated into the Remote Monitoring System. All sensor and image data are stored on a Data Acquisition System (DAS) and archived and reviewed on a Data and Image Review Station (DIRS). Conventional phone lines are used as the telecommunications link to transmit on-site collected data and images to remote locations. The data and images are authenticated before transmission. Data review stations will be installed at ARN in Buenos Aires, Argentina, ABACC in Rio De Janeiro, IAEA Headquarters in Vienna, and Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. 2 refs., 2 figs.

  13. MyOcean Internal Information System (Dial-P)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanc, Frederique; Jolibois, Tony; Loubrieu, Thomas; Manzella, Giuseppe; Mazzetti, Paolo; Nativi, Stefano

    2010-05-01

    MyOcean is a three-year project (2008-2011) which goal is the development and pre-operational validation of the GMES Marine Core Service for ocean monitoring and forecasting. It's a transition project that will conduct the European "operational oceanography" community towards the operational phase of a GMES European service, which demands more European integration, more operationality, and more service. Observations, model-based data, and added-value products will be generated - and enhanced thanks to dedicated expertise - by the following production units: • Five Thematic Assembly Centers, each of them dealing with a specific set of observation data: Sea Level, Ocean colour, Sea Surface Temperature, Sea Ice & Wind, and In Situ data, • Seven Monitoring and Forecasting Centers to serve the Global Ocean, the Arctic area, the Baltic Sea, the Atlantic North-West shelves area, the Atlantic Iberian-Biscay-Ireland area, the Mediterranean Sea and the Black sea. Intermediate and final users will discover, view and get the products by means of a central web desk, a central re-active manned service desk and thematic experts distributed across Europe. The MyOcean Information System (MIS) is considering the various aspects of an interoperable - federated information system. Data models support data and computer systems by providing the definition and format of data. The possibility of including the information in the data file is depending on data model adopted. In general there is little effort in the actual project to develop a ‘generic' data model. A strong push to develop a common model is provided by the EU Directive INSPIRE. At present, there is no single de-facto data format for storing observational data. Data formats are still evolving, with their underlying data models moving towards the concept of Feature Types based on ISO/TC211 standards. For example, Unidata are developing the Common Data Model that can represent scientific data types such as point

  14. Qualification of Programmable Electronic System (PES) equipment based on international nuclear I and C standards

    SciTech Connect

    De Grosbois, J.; Hepburn, G. A.; Olmstead, R.; Goble, W.; Kumar, V.

    2006-07-01

    Nuclear power plants (NPPs) are increasingly faced with the challenge of qualifying procured equipment, sub-components, and systems that contain digital programmed electronics for use in safety-related applications. Referred to as a 'programmable electronic system' (PES), such equipment typically contains both complex logic that is vulnerable to systematic design faults, and low voltage electronics hardware that is subject to random faults. Procured PES products or components are often only commercial grade, yet can offer reliable cost effective alternatives to custom-designed or nuclear qualified equipment, provided they can be shown to meet the quality assurance, functional safety, environmental, and reliability requirements of a particular application. The process of confirming this is referred to as application-specific product qualification (ASPQ) and can be challenging and costly. This paper provides an overview of an approach that has been developed at Atomic Energy Canada Limited (AECL) and successfully applied to PES equipment intended for use in domestic Candu R 6 nuclear power plants and special purpose reactors at Chalk River Laboratories. The approach has evolved over the past decade and has recently been adapted to be consistent with, and take advantage of new standards that are applicable to nuclear safety-related I and C systems. Also discussed are how recognized third-party safety-certifications of PES equipment to International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) standards, and the assessment methods employed, may be used to reduce ASPQ effort. (authors)

  15. 10 CFR 50.69 - Risk-informed categorization and treatment of structures, systems and components for nuclear...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., systems and components for nuclear power reactors. 50.69 Section 50.69 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY..., systems and components for nuclear power reactors. (a) Definitions. Risk-Informed Safety Class (RISC)-1... holder of a license to operate a light water reactor (LWR) nuclear power plant under this part; a holder...

  16. 10 CFR 50.69 - Risk-informed categorization and treatment of structures, systems and components for nuclear...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., systems and components for nuclear power reactors. 50.69 Section 50.69 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY..., systems and components for nuclear power reactors. (a) Definitions. Risk-Informed Safety Class (RISC)-1... holder of a license to operate a light water reactor (LWR) nuclear power plant under this part; a holder...

  17. 10 CFR 50.69 - Risk-informed categorization and treatment of structures, systems and components for nuclear...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., systems and components for nuclear power reactors. 50.69 Section 50.69 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY..., systems and components for nuclear power reactors. (a) Definitions. Risk-Informed Safety Class (RISC)-1... holder of a license to operate a light water reactor (LWR) nuclear power plant under this part; a holder...

  18. Comparison of Different Internal Dosimetry Systems for Selected Radionuclides Important to Nuclear Power Production

    SciTech Connect

    Leggett, Richard Wayne; Eckerman, Keith F; Manger, Ryan P

    2013-08-01

    This report compares three different radiation dosimetry systems currently applied by various U.S. Federal agencies and dose estimates based on these three dosimetry systems for a set of radionuclides often identified in power reactor effluents. These dosimetry systems were developed and applied by the International Commission on Radiological Protection at different times over the past six decades. Two primary modes of intake of radionuclides are addressed: ingestion in drinking water and inhalation. Estimated doses to individual organs and to the whole body based on each dosimetry system are compared for each of four age groups: infant, child, teenager, and adult. Substantial differences between dosimetry systems in estimated dose per unit intake are found for some individual radionuclides, but differences in estimated dose per unit intake generally are modest for mixtures of radionuclides typically found in nuclear power plant effluents.

  19. Preliminary characterization of risks in the nuclear waste management system based on information in the literature

    SciTech Connect

    Daling, P.M.; Rhoads, R.E.; Van Luick, A.E.; Fecht, B.A.; Nilson, S.A.; Sevigny, N.L.; Armstrong, G.R.; Hill, D.H.; Rowe, M.; Stern, E.

    1992-01-01

    This document presents preliminary information on the radiological and nonradiological risks in the nuclear waste management system. The objective of the study was to (1) review the literature containing information on risks in the nuclear waste management system and (2) use this information to develop preliminary estimates of the potential magnitude of these risks. Information was collected on a broad range of risk categories to assist the US Department of Energy (DOE) in communicating information about the risks in the waste management systems. The study examined all of the portions of the nuclear waste management system currently expected to be developed by the DOE. The scope of this document includes the potential repository, the integral MRS facility, and the transportation system that supports the potential repository and the MRS facility. Relevant literature was reviewed for several potential repository sites and geologic media. A wide range of ``risk categories`` are addressed in this report: (1) public and occupational risks from accidents that could release radiological materials, (2) public and occupational radiation exposure resulting from routine operations, (3) public and occupational risks from accidents involving hazards other than radioactive materials, and (4) public and occupational risks from exposure to nonradioactive hazardous materials during routine operations. The report is intended to provide a broad spectrum of risk-related information about the waste management system. This information is intended to be helpful for planning future studies.

  20. Information analysis and international safeguards

    SciTech Connect

    Pilat, Joseph F.; Budlong-Sylvester, K. W.; Tape, J. W.

    2004-01-01

    After the first Gulf War, it was recognized that one of the key weaknesses of the international safeguards system was that there was no systematic attempt by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to analyze all available information about States nuclear programs to determine whether these programs were consistent with nonproliferation obligations. The IAEA, as part of its effort to redesign the international safeguards system, is looking closely at the issue of information review and evaluation. The application of information analysis (IA) techniques to the international nuclear safeguards system has the potential to revolutionize the form and practice of safeguards. Assessing the possibilities of IA for the IAEA, and in particular those embodied in concepts of information-driven safeguards, requires an understanding of IA, the limits on its effectiveness and the requirements placed on such analyses in a variety of safeguards contexts. The Australian Safeguards and Nonproliferation Office (ASNO) and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) agreed in July 2002 to undertake a joint study of 'information-driven safeguards' under a long-standing cooperative arrangement. It was decided that a broad range of ideas should be considered, and that the study would not be intended to be and would not be an elaboration of either US or Australian governmental positions. This paper reports some findings of Phase 1 of this collaborative effort and offers some initial thinking on the part of the authors on the outstanding issues to be addressed in Phase 2. An effort to explore through case studies alternative strategies for utilizing IA by the IAEA that provide the same or increased confidence in safeguards conclusions while allowing safeguards resource allocation to be determined not only by the types and quantities of nuclear material and facilities in a State but also by other objective factors.

  1. International Nuclear Safeguards Inspection Support Tool (INSIST)

    SciTech Connect

    St. Pierre, D.E.; Steinmaus, K.L.; Moon, B.D.

    1994-07-01

    DOE is committed to providing technologies to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to meet escalating monitoring and inspection requirements associated with the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT). One example of technology provided to the IAEA is the information management and remote monitoring capabilities being customized for the IAEA by the International Safeguards Division of the Office of Non-Proliferation and National Security. The ongoing Safeguards Information Management Systems (SIMS) program is an interlaboratory effort providing the IAEA with a range of information management capabilities designed to enhance the effectiveness of their nuclear inspection activities. The initial commitment involved the customization of computer capabilities to provide IAEA with the basic capability to geographically organize, store, and retrieve the large quantity of information involved in their nuclear on site inspection activities in Iraq. This initial system, the International Nuclear Safeguards Inspection Support Tool (INSIST), was developed by DOE`s Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). To date, two INSIST workstations have been deployed at the IAEA. The first has been used to support the IAEA Action Team in the inspection of Iraqi nuclear facilities since August 1993. A second, and similar, workstation has been deployed to support environmental monitoring under the IAEA 93+2 Programme. Both INSIST workstations geographically integrate analog (video) and digital data to provide an easy to use and effective tool for storing retrieving and displaying multimedia site and facility information including world-wide maps, satellite and aerial imagery, on site photography, live inspection videos, and treaty and inspection textual information. The interactive, UNIX-based workstations have a variety of peripheral devices for information input and output. INSIST software includes commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) modules and application-specific code developed at PNL.

  2. International Water Information Systems: Evolving the CUAHSI Hydrologic Information System to a Standards-based Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentine, D. W.; Taylor, P.; Arctur, D. K.; Zaslavsky, I.

    2011-12-01

    The CUAHSI Hydrologic Information System (HIS) project is migrating core components of its service-oriented infrastructure to information models and service interfaces being standardized by the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC), through coordination with the joint Hydrology Domain Working Group (HDWG) of the OGC and the World Meteorological Organization. The CUAHSI cyberinfrastructure for hydrologic observations will rely on OGC service standards including Web Map Service (WMS) for map portrayal, Web Feature Service (WFS) for delivery of geographic feature information, Catalog Services for the Web (CSW) for discovery in service catalogs, and Sensor Observation Service (SOS) for data delivery. These standards will be supplemented by additional services and corresponding standards, such as the Water Quality Exchange (WQX), which is presently in use at the USGS and US EPA for delivery of water quality and ex situ analytical data. One of the key standards being developed through the OGC process is Water Markup Language (WaterML) 2.0, which specifies standard encoding for the representation of in-situ hydrological observations. Implemented as an application schema of OGC Observations and Measurements (O&M) standard, WaterML 2.0 incorporates the semantics of the hydrologic information: location, procedure, and observations, focusing on encoding different types of hydrologic time series. In addition to developing this exchange standard, the HDWG conducts Interoperability Experiments (IE) to test WaterML 2.0 and OGC services to see they meet the requirements of the Hydrologic community. The Groundwater IE tested cross border exchange of water information between the US and Canada, and exercised, not only a prototype of WaterML 2.0, but existing standards GeoSciML and GroundwaterML. A Surface Water IE is testing 3 use cases focusing on cross-border exchange of surface water information, hydrologic forecasting, and automated monthly and yearly volume calculations from large

  3. Study on Communication System of Social Risk Information on Nuclear Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Hidekazu Yoshikawa; Toshio Sugiman; Yasunaga Wakabayashi; Hiroshi Shimoda; Mika Terado; Mariko Akimoto; Yoshihiko Nagasato

    2004-07-01

    As a new risk communication method for the construction of effective knowledge bases about 'safety and non-anxiety for nuclear energy', a study on new communication method of social risk information by means of electronic communication has been started, by noticing rapid expansion of internet usage in the society. The purpose of this research is to enhance the public acceptance to nuclear power in Japan by the following two aspects. The first is to develop the mutual communication system among the working persons involved in both the operation and maintenance activities for nuclear power plant, by which they will exchange their daily experiences to improve the safety conscious activities to foster 'safety culture' attitude. The other is the development of an effective risk communication system between nuclear society and the general publics about the hot issues of 'what are the concerned involved in the final disposal of high-level radioactive waste?' and 'what should we do to have social consensus to deal with this issue in future'. The authors' research plan for the above purpose is summarized as shown in Table 1. As the first step of the authors' three year research project which started from August 2003, social investigation by questionnaires by internet and postal mail, have been just recently conducted on their risk perception for the nuclear power for the people engaged in nuclear business and women in the metropolitan area, respectively, in order to obtain the relevant information on how and what should be considered for constructing effective risk communication methods of social risk information between the people within nuclear industries and the general public in society. Although there need to be discussed, the contrasting risk images as shown in Fig.1, can be depicted between the nuclear people and general public these days in Japan, from the results of the social investigation. As the conclusion of the authors' study thus far conducted, the

  4. Integrating Nuclear Information to Enhance Safeguards

    SciTech Connect

    Suski, N; Dubrin, J; Scarbrough, J

    2001-10-01

    Implementation of the Strengthened Safeguards System provides many new opportunities and challenges for collecting; analyzing and archiving nuclear materials safeguards information. For the first time in the history of safeguards, the International Atomic Energy Agency will be required not only to verify the accuracy of declarations, but also the completeness. To successfully implement the new safeguards regime, new and innovative ways of collecting, analyzing and archiving large amounts of safeguards information will be required. A conceptual system design that utilizes a geographical information system for the integration and analysis of this safeguards information will be described and demonstrated.

  5. International training course on implementation of state systems of accounting for and control of nuclear materials: proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-06-01

    This report incorporates all lectures and presentations at the International Training Course on Implementation of State Systems of Accounting for and Control of Nuclear Materials held October 17 through November 4, 1983, at Santa Fe and Los Alamos, New Mexico and Richland, Washington, USA. Authorized by the US Nuclear Non-Proliferation Act and sponsored by the US Department of Energy in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency, the course was developed to provide practical training in the design, implementation, and operation of a State system of nuclear materials accountability and control that satisfies both national and international safeguards requirements. Major emphasis for the 1983 course was placed on safeguards methods used at bulk-handling facilities, particularly low-enriched uranium conversion and fuel fabrication plants. The course was conducted by the University of California's Los Alamos National Laboratory and Exxon Nuclear Company, Inc. Tours and demonstrations were arranged at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, and the Exxon Nuclear fuel fabrication plant, the Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Westinghouse Fast Flux Test Facility Visitor Center, and Washington Public Power System nuclear reactor facilities in Richland, Washington. Individual presentations were indexed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  6. Digital control systems in nuclear power plants: Failure information, modeling concepts, and applications. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Galyean, W.J.

    1993-06-23

    This report briefly describes some current applications of advanced computerized digital display and control systems at US commercial nuclear power plants and presents the results of a literature search that was made to gather information on the reliability of these systems. Both hardware and software reliability were addressed in this review. Only limited failure rate information was found, with the chemical process industry being the primary source of information on hardware failure rates and expert opinion the primary source for software failure rates. Safety-grade digital control systems are typically installed on a functional like-for-like basis, replacing older analog systems without substantially changing interactions with other plant systems. Future work includes performing a limited probabilistic risk assessment of a representative DCS to assess its risk significance.

  7. Digital control systems in nuclear power plants: Failure information, modeling concepts, and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Galyean, W.J.

    1993-06-23

    This report briefly describes some current applications of advanced computerized digital display and control systems at US commercial nuclear power plants and presents the results of a literature search that was made to gather information on the reliability of these systems. Both hardware and software reliability were addressed in this review. Only limited failure rate information was found, with the chemical process industry being the primary source of information on hardware failure rates and expert opinion the primary source for software failure rates. Safety-grade digital control systems are typically installed on a functional like-for-like basis, replacing older analog systems without substantially changing interactions with other plant systems. Future work includes performing a limited probabilistic risk assessment of a representative DCS to assess its risk significance.

  8. Evaluation of information technology impact on effective internal control in the University system

    SciTech Connect

    Sanusi Fasilat, A. Hassan, Haslinda

    2015-12-11

    Information Technology (IT) plays a key role in internal control system in various organizations in terms of maintaining records and other internal services. Internal control system is defined as an efficient control procedures set up by firm to safeguard resources and to assure the reliability and accuracy of both financial and non-financial records in line with applicable governance and procedure to acquire the established goal and objectives. This paper focuses on the impact of IT on internal control system in the Nigerian universities. Data are collected from three different universities via questionnaire. Descriptive statistics is used to analyze the data; Chi-square is performed to test the hypothesis. The results of the hypothesis showed that IT has a positive relationship with the effective internal control activities in the University system. It is concluded that the adoption of IT will significantly improve the effectiveness of the internal control system operations in the University in terms of quality service delivery.

  9. Evaluation of information technology impact on effective internal control in the University system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanusi Fasilat, A.; Hassan, Haslinda

    2015-12-01

    Information Technology (IT) plays a key role in internal control system in various organizations in terms of maintaining records and other internal services. Internal control system is defined as an efficient control procedures set up by firm to safeguard resources and to assure the reliability and accuracy of both financial and non-financial records in line with applicable governance and procedure to acquire the established goal and objectives. This paper focuses on the impact of IT on internal control system in the Nigerian universities. Data are collected from three different universities via questionnaire. Descriptive statistics is used to analyze the data; Chi-square is performed to test the hypothesis. The results of the hypothesis showed that IT has a positive relationship with the effective internal control activities in the University system. It is concluded that the adoption of IT will significantly improve the effectiveness of the internal control system operations in the University in terms of quality service delivery.

  10. The preparedness of hospital Health Information Services for system failures due to internal disasters.

    PubMed

    Lee, Cheens; Robinson, Kerin M; Wendt, Kate; Williamson, Dianne

    2009-01-01

    The unimpeded functioning of hospital Health Information Services (HIS) is essential for patient care, clinical governance, organisational performance measurement, funding and research. In an investigation of hospital Health Information Services' preparedness for internal disasters, all hospitals in the state of Victoria with the following characteristics were surveyed: they have a Health Information Service/ Department; there is a Manager of the Health Information Service/Department; and their inpatient capacity is greater than 80 beds. Fifty percent of the respondents have experienced an internal disaster within the past decade, the majority affecting the Health Information Service. The most commonly occurring internal disasters were computer system failure and floods. Two-thirds of the hospitals have internal disaster plans; the most frequently occurring scenarios provided for are computer system failure, power failure and fire. More large hospitals have established back-up systems than medium- and small-size hospitals. Fifty-three percent of hospitals have a recovery plan for internal disasters. Hospitals typically self-rate as having a 'medium' level of internal disaster preparedness. Overall, large hospitals are better prepared for internal disasters than medium and small hospitals, and preparation for disruption of computer systems and medical record services is relatively high on their agendas.

  11. 1983 international intercomparison of nuclear accident dosimetry systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Swaja, R.E.; Greene, R.T.; Sims, C.S.

    1985-04-01

    An international intercomparison of nuclear accident dosimetry systems was conducted during September 12-16, 1983, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) using the Health Physics Research Reactor operated in the pulse mode to simulate criticality accidents. This study marked the twentieth in a series of annual accident dosimetry intercomparisons conducted at ORNL. Participants from ten organizations attended this intercomparison and measured neutron and gamma doses at area monitoring stations and on phantoms for three different shield conditions. Results of this study indicate that foil activation techniques are the most popular and accurate method of determining accident-level neutron doses at area monitoring stations. For personnel monitoring, foil activation, blood sodium activation, and thermoluminescent (TL) methods are all capable of providing accurate dose estimates in a variety of radiation fields. All participants in this study used TLD's to determine gamma doses with very good results on the average. Chemical dosemeters were also shown to be capable of yielding accurate estimates of total neutron plus gamma doses in a variety of radiation fields. While 83% of all neutron measurements satisfied regulatory standards relative to reference values, only 39% of all gamma results satisfied corresponding guidelines for gamma measurements. These results indicate that continued improvement in accident dosimetry evaluation and measurement techniques is needed.

  12. International training course on implementation of state systems of accounting for and control of nuclear materials: proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-06-01

    This report incorporates all lectures and presentations at the International Training Course on Implementation of State Systems of Accounting for and Control of Nuclear Materials held June 3 through June 21, 1985, at Santa Fe and Los Alamos, New Mexico, and San Clemente, California. Authorized by the US Nuclear Non-Proliferation Act and sponsored by the US Department of Energy in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency, the Course was developed to provide practical training in the design, implementation, and operation of a state system of nuclear materials accountability and control that satisfies both national and international safeguards requirements. Major emphasis for the 1985 course was placed on safeguards methods used at item-control facilities, particularly nuclear power generating stations and test reactors. An introduction to safeguards methods used at bulk handling facilities, particularly low-enriched uranium conversion and fuel fabrication plants, was also included. The course was conducted by the University of California's Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Southern California Edison Company. Tours and demonstrations were arranged at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, and the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station, San Clemente, California.

  13. Nuclear reactor internals alignment configuration

    DOEpatents

    Gilmore, Charles B.; Singleton, Norman R.

    2009-11-10

    An alignment system that employs jacking block assemblies and alignment posts around the periphery of the top plate of a nuclear reactor lower internals core shroud to align an upper core plate with the lower internals and the core shroud with the core barrel. The distal ends of the alignment posts are chamfered and are closely received within notches machined in the upper core plate at spaced locations around the outer circumference of the upper core plate. The jacking block assemblies are used to center the core shroud in the core barrel and the alignment posts assure the proper orientation of the upper core plate. The alignment posts may alternately be formed in the upper core plate and the notches may be formed in top plate.

  14. International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book

    SciTech Connect

    Leigh, I.W.; Patridge, M.D.

    1991-05-01

    As the US Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE contractors have become increasingly involved with other nations in nuclear fuel cycle and waste management cooperative activities, a need has developed for a ready source of information concerning foreign fuel cycle programs, facilities, and personnel. This Fact Book was compiled to meet that need. The information contained in the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book has been obtained from many unclassified sources: nuclear trade journals and newsletters; reports of foreign visits and visitors; CEC, IAEA, and OECN/NEA activities reports; not reflect any one single source but frequently represent a consolidation/combination of information.

  15. Nuclear materials control technology in the post-cold war world: Radiation-based methods and information management systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tape, J.W.; Eccleston, G.W.; Ensslin, N.; Markin, J.T.

    1993-06-01

    The end of the cold war is providing both opportunities and requirements for improving the control of nuclear materials around the world. The dismantlement of nuclear weapons and the growth of nuclear power, including the use of plutonium in light water reactors and breeder reactor programs, coupled with enhanced proliferation concerns, drive the need for improved nuclear materials control. We describe nuclear materials control and the role of technology in making controls more effective and efficient. The current use and anticipated development in selected radiation-based methods and related information management systems am described briefly.

  16. International training course on nuclear materials accountability for safeguards purposes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-12-01

    The two volumes of this report incorporate all lectures and presentations at the International Training Course on Nuclear Materials Accountability and Control for Safeguards Purposes, held May 27-June 6, 1980, at the Bishop's Lodge near Santa Fe, New Mexico. The course, authorized by the US Nuclear Non-Proliferation Act and sponsored by the US Department of Energy in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency, was developed to provide practical training in the design, implementation, and operation of a National system of nuclear materials accountability and control that satisfies both National and IAEA International safeguards objectives. Volume I, covering the first week of the course, presents the background, requirements, and general features of material accounting and control in modern safeguard systems. Volume II, covering the second week of the course, provides more detailed information on measurement methods and instruments, practical experience at power reactor and research reactor facilities, and examples of operating state systems of accountability and control.

  17. Laboratory information management system: an example of international cooperation in Namibia.

    PubMed

    Colangeli, Patrizia; Ferrilli, Monica; Quaranta, Fabrizio; Malizia, Elio; Mbulu, Rosa-Stella; Mukete, Esther; Iipumbu, Lukas; Kamhulu, Anna; Tjipura-Zaire, Georgina; Di Francesco, Cesare; Lelli, Rossella; Scacchia, Massimo

    2012-01-01

    The authors describe the project undertaken by the Istituto G. Caporale to provide a laboratory information management system (LIMS) to the Central Veterinary Laboratory (CVL) in Windhoek, Namibia. This robust laboratory management tool satisfies Namibia's information obligations under international quality standard ISO 17025:2005. The Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) for Africa was designed to collect and manage all necessary information on samples, tests and test results. The system involves the entry of sample data on arrival, as required by Namibian sampling plans, the tracking of samples through the various sections of the CVL, the collection of test results, generation of test reports and monitoring of outbreaks through data interrogation functions, eliminating multiple registrations of the same data on paper records. It is a fundamental component of the Namibian veterinary information system.

  18. International nuclear waste management fact book

    SciTech Connect

    Abrahms, C W; Patridge, M D; Widrig, J E

    1995-11-01

    The International Nuclear Waste Management Fact Book has been compiled to provide current data on fuel cycle and waste management facilities, R and D programs, and key personnel in 24 countries, including the US; four multinational agencies; and 20 nuclear societies. This document, which is in its second year of publication supersedes the previously issued International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book (PNL-3594), which appeared annually for 12 years. The content has been updated to reflect current information. The Fact Book is organized as follows: National summaries--a section for each country that summarizes nuclear policy, describes organizational relationships, and provides addresses and names of key personnel and information on facilities. International agencies--a section for each of the international agencies that has significant fuel cycle involvement and a list of nuclear societies. Glossary--a list of abbreviations/acronyms of organizations, facilities, and technical and other terms. The national summaries, in addition to the data described above, feature a small map for each country and some general information that is presented from the perspective of the Fact Book user in the US.

  19. Electrical propulsion units based on TOPAZ-type thermionic nuclear power systems for information satellite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, Pavel V.; Galkin, Anatoly Ya.; Zhabotinsky, Evgeny E.; Serbin, Victor I.; Zaritzky, Gennady A.

    1995-01-01

    In the report the principles of nuclear power and propulsion complex (NPPC) construction are presented. NPPC considered can ensure the time of spacecraft transfer to geostationary orbit (GSO) within 1 year under electric power level no less than 40 kW at prolonged nominal mode on GSO for spacecraft loads feeding. The main power and mass and dimension performances of such NPPC are summarized. Analysis of relationship between spacedraft mass, its mission payload and transfer time also and a number of main NPPC parameters is performed. The conclusion is made about considerable promises of the NPPC for creating future satellite multi-purpose systems by using PROTON- and TITAN-class launch vehicles.

  20. Nuclear Regulatory Commission information digest

    SciTech Connect

    None,

    1990-03-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission information digest provides summary information regarding the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, its regulatory responsibilities, and areas licensed by the commission. This is an annual publication for the general use of the NRC Staff and is available to the public. The digest is divided into two parts: the first presents an overview of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the second provides data on NRC commercial nuclear reactor licensees and commercial nuclear power reactors worldwide.

  1. On Teaching International Courses on Health Information Systems. Lessons Learned during 16 Years of Frank - van Swieten Lectures on Strategic Information Management in Health Information Systems.

    PubMed

    Ammenwerth, Elske; Knaup, Petra; Winter, Alfred; Bauer, Axel W; Bott, Oliver J; Gietzelt, Matthias; Haarbrandt, Birger; Hackl, Werner O; Hellrung, Nils; Hübner-Bloder, Gudrun; Jahn, Franziska; Jaspers, Monique W; Kutscha, Ulrike; Machan, Christoph; Oppermann, Bianca; Pilz, Jochen; Schwartze, Jonas; Seidel, Christoph; Slot, Jan-Eric; Smers, Stefan; Spitalewsky, Katharina; Steckel, Nathalie; Strübing, Alexander; van der Haak, Minne; Haux, Reinhold; Ter Burg, Willem J

    2017-03-08

    Health information systems (HIS) are one of the most important areas for biomedical and health informatics. In order to professionally deal with HIS well-educated informaticians are needed. Because of these reasons, in 2001 an international course has been established: The Frank - van Swieten Lectures on Strategic Information Management of Health Information Systems. Reporting about the Frank - van Swieten Lectures and about our students' feedback on this course during the last 16 years. Summarizing our lessons learned and making recommendations for such international courses on HIS. The basic concept of the Frank - van Swieten lectures is to teach the theoretical background in local lectures, to organize practical exercises on modelling sub-information systems of the respective local HIS and finally to conduct Joint Three Days as an international meeting were the resulting models are introduced and compared. During the last 16 years, the Universities of Amsterdam, Braunschweig, Heidelberg/Heilbronn, Leipzig as well as UMIT were involved in running this course. Overall, 517 students from these universities participated. Our students' feedback was clearly positive. The Joint Three Days of the Frank - van Swieten Lectures, where at the end of the course all students can meet, turned out to be an important component of this course. Based on the last 16 years, we recommend common teaching materials, agreement on equivalent clinical areas for the exercises, support of group building of international student groups, motivation of using a collaboration platform, ensuring quality management of the course, addressing different levels of knowledge of the students, and ensuring sufficient funding for joint activities. Although associated with considerable additional efforts, we can clearly recommend establishing such international courses on HIS, such as the Frank - van Swieten Lectures.

  2. International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book

    SciTech Connect

    Leigh, I.W.

    1992-05-01

    As the US Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE contractors have become increasingly involved with other nations in nuclear fuel cycle and waste management cooperative activities, a need exists costs for a ready source of information concerning foreign fuel cycle programs, facilities, and personnel. This Fact Book has been compiled to meet that need. The information contained in the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book has been obtained from many unclassified sources: nuclear trade journals and newsletters; reports of foreign visits and visitors; CEC, IAEA, and OECD/NMEA activities reports; and proceedings of conferences and workshops. The data listed typically do not reflect any single source but frequently represent a consolidation/combination of information.

  3. International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book

    SciTech Connect

    Leigh, I W; Mitchell, S J

    1990-01-01

    As the US Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE contractors have become increasingly involved with other nations in nuclear fuel cycle and waste management cooperative activities, a need has developed for a ready source of information concerning foreign fuel cycle programs, facilities, and personnel. This Fact Book was compiled to meet that need. The information contained in the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book has been obtained from many unclassified sources: nuclear trade journals and newsletters; reports of foreign visits and visitors; CEC, IAEA, and OECD/NEA activities reports; proceedings of conferences and workshops, etc. The data listed do not reflect any one single source but frequently represent a consolidation/combination of information.

  4. Working Party on International Nuclear Data Evaluation Cooperation (WPEC)

    SciTech Connect

    Dupont, E.; Chadwick, M.B.; Danon, Y.; De Saint Jean, C.; Dunn, M.; Fischer, U.; Forrest, R.A.; Fukahori, T.; Ge, Z.; Harada, H.; Herman, M.; Igashira, M.; Ignatyuk, A.; Ishikawa, M.; Iwamoto, O.; Jacqmin, R.; Kahler, A.C.; Kawano, T.; Koning, A.J.; Leal, L.; and others

    2014-06-15

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) organizes cooperation between the major nuclear data evaluation projects in the world. The NEA Working Party on International Nuclear Data Evaluation Cooperation (WPEC) was established to promote the exchange of information on nuclear data evaluation, measurement, nuclear model calculation, validation, and related topics, and to provide a framework for cooperative activities between the participating projects. The working party assesses nuclear data improvement needs and addresses these needs by initiating joint activities in the framework of dedicated WPEC subgroups. Studies recently completed comprise a number of works related to nuclear data covariance and associated processing issues, as well as more specific studies related to the resonance parameter representation in the unresolved resonance region, the gamma production from fission product capture reactions, the {sup 235}U capture cross section, the EXFOR database, and the improvement of nuclear data for advanced reactor systems. Ongoing activities focus on the evaluation of {sup 239}Pu in the resonance region, scattering angular distribution in the fast energy range, and reporting/usage of experimental data for evaluation in the resolved resonance region. New activities include two subgroups on improved fission product yield evaluation methodologies and on modern nuclear database structures. Future activities under discussion include a pilot project for a Collaborative International Evaluated Library Organization (CIELO) and methods to provide feedback from nuclear and covariance data adjustment for improvement of nuclear data. In addition to the above mentioned short-term task-oriented subgroups, WPEC also hosts a longer-term subgroup charged with reviewing and compiling the most important nuclear data requirements in a high priority request list (HPRL)

  5. Working Party on International Nuclear Data Evaluation Cooperation (WPEC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupont, E.; Chadwick, M. B.; Danon, Y.; De Saint Jean, C.; Dunn, M.; Fischer, U.; Forrest, R. A.; Fukahori, T.; Ge, Z.; Harada, H.; Herman, M.; Igashira, M.; Ignatyuk, A.; Ishikawa, M.; Iwamoto, O.; Jacqmin, R.; Kahler, A. C.; Kawano, T.; Koning, A. J.; Leal, L.; Lee, Y. O.; McKnight, R.; McNabb, D.; Mills, R. W.; Palmiotti, G.; Plompen, A.; Salvatores, M.; Schillebeeckx, P.

    2014-06-01

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) organizes cooperation between the major nuclear data evaluation projects in the world. The NEA Working Party on International Nuclear Data Evaluation Cooperation (WPEC) was established to promote the exchange of information on nuclear data evaluation, measurement, nuclear model calculation, validation, and related topics, and to provide a framework for cooperative activities between the participating projects. The working party assesses nuclear data improvement needs and addresses these needs by initiating joint activities in the framework of dedicated WPEC subgroups. Studies recently completed comprise a number of works related to nuclear data covariance and associated processing issues, as well as more specific studies related to the resonance parameter representation in the unresolved resonance region, the gamma production from fission product capture reactions, the 235U capture cross section, the EXFOR database, and the improvement of nuclear data for advanced reactor systems. Ongoing activities focus on the evaluation of 239Pu in the resonance region, scattering angular distribution in the fast energy range, and reporting/usage of experimental data for evaluation in the resolved resonance region. New activities include two subgroups on improved fission product yield evaluation methodologies and on modern nuclear database structures. Future activities under discussion include a pilot project for a Collaborative International Evaluated Library Organization (CIELO) and methods to provide feedback from nuclear and covariance data adjustment for improvement of nuclear data. In addition to the above mentioned short-term task-oriented subgroups, WPEC also hosts a longer-term subgroup charged with reviewing and compiling the most important nuclear data requirements in a high priority request list (HPRL).

  6. Working Party on International Nuclear Data Evaluation Cooperation (WPEC)

    SciTech Connect

    Dupont, E.; Herman, M.; Dupont, E.; Chadwick, M. B.; Danon, Y.; De Saint Jean, C.; Dunn, M.; Fischer, U.; Forrest, R. A.; Fukahori, T.; Ge, Z.; Harada, H.; Herman, M.; Igashira, M.; Ignatyuk, A.; Ishikawa, M.; Iwamoto, O.; Jacqmin, R.; Kahler, A. C.; Kawano, T.; Koning, A. J.; Leal, L.; Lee, Y. O.; McKnight, R.; McNabb, D.; Mills, R. W.; Palmiotti, G.; Plompen, A.; Salvatores, M.; Schillebeeckx, P.

    2014-06-01

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) organizes cooperation between the major nuclear data evaluation projects in the world. Moreover, the NEA Working Party on International Nuclear Data Evaluation Cooperation (WPEC) was established to promote the exchange of information on nuclear data evaluation, measurement, nuclear model calculation, validation, and related topics, and to provide a framework for cooperative activities between the participating projects. The working party assesses nuclear data improvement needs and addresses these needs by initiating joint activities in the framework of dedicated WPEC subgroups. Studies recently completed comprise a number of works related to nuclear data covariance and associated processing issues, as well as more specific studies related to the resonance parameter representation in the unresolved resonance region, the gamma production from fission product capture reactions, the 235U capture cross section, the EXFOR database, and the improvement of nuclear data for advanced reactor systems. Ongoing activities focus on the evaluation of 239Pu in the resonance region, scattering angular distribution in the fast energy range, and reporting/usage of experimental data for evaluation in the resolved resonance region. New activities include two subgroups on improved fission product yield evaluation methodologies and on modern nuclear database structures. Some future activities under discussion include a pilot project for a Collaborative International Evaluated Library Organization (CIELO) and methods to provide feedback from nuclear and covariance data adjustment for improvement of nuclear data. In addition to the above mentioned short-term task-oriented subgroups, WPEC also hosts a longer-term subgroup charged with reviewing and compiling the most important nuclear data requirements in a high priority request list (HPRL).

  7. Working Party on International Nuclear Data Evaluation Cooperation (WPEC)

    SciTech Connect

    Giuseppe Palmiotti

    2014-06-01

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) is organizing the cooperation between the major nuclear data evaluation projects in the world. The NEA Working Party on International Nuclear Data Evaluation Cooperation (WPEC) was established to promote the exchange of information on nuclear data evaluation, measurement, nuclear model calculation, validation, and related topics, and to provide a framework for cooperative activities between the participating projects. The working party assesses nuclear data improvement needs and addresses these needs by initiating joint activities in the framework of dedicated WPEC subgroups. Studies recently completed comprise a number of works related to nuclear data covariance and associated processing issues, as well as more specific studies related to the resonance parameter representation in the unresolved resonance region, the gamma production from fission-product capture reactions, the U-235 capture cross-section, the EXFOR database, and the improvement of nuclear data for advanced reactor systems. Ongoing activities focus on the evaluation of Pu-239 in the resonance region, scattering angular distribution in the fast energy range, and reporting/usage of experimental data for evaluation in the resolved resonance region. New activities include two new subgroups on improved fission product yield evaluation methodologies and on modern nuclear database structures. Future activities under discussion include a pilot project of a Collaborative International Evaluated Library (CIELO) and methods to provide feedback from nuclear and covariance data adjustment for improvement of nuclear data. In addition to the above mentioned short-term, task-oriented subgroups, the WPEC also hosts a longer-term subgroup charged with reviewing and compiling the most important nuclear data requirements in a high priority request list (HPRL).

  8. Use of a geographic information system (GIS) in the medical response to the Fukushima nuclear disaster in Japan.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Takashi; Kimura, Yoshinari; Ishii, Masami

    2012-04-01

    The Great East Japan Earthquake occurred on March 11, 2011. In the first 10 days after the event, information about radiation risks from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant was unavailable, and the disaster response, including deployment of disaster teams, was delayed. Beginning on March 17, 2011, the Japan Medical Association used a geographic information system (GIS) to visualize the risk of radiation exposure in Fukushima. This information facilitated the decision to deploy disaster medical response teams on March 18, 2011.

  9. Enhancing nuclear emergency response through international cooperation.

    PubMed

    Ugletveit, Finn; Aaltonen, Hannele

    2004-01-01

    Nuclear and radiological emergencies may easily become severe international emergencies requiring substantial resources in several or many states for an adequate response, which in some cases may require resources exceeding national capabilities. Through the development of a consistent, coherent and sustainable joint programme for improved and more efficient international responses to nuclear and radiological emergencies, it is believed that we could achieve a better and more cost-effective response capability for nuclear and radiological emergencies. This requires, however, that we be willing and able to establish mechanisms of assistance where information and resources are globally shared and that standardised/harmonised procedures be developed and implemented. If we are willing to make this investment, we believe that, in the long term, there will be a significant benefit for all of us.

  10. Progress in cybernetics and systems research. Vol. XI. Data base design. International Information Systems. Semiotic Systems. Artificial Intelligence. Cybernetics and Philosophy. Special aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Trappl, R.; Findler, N.V.; Horn, W.

    1982-01-01

    This book covers current research topics in six areas. These are data base design, international information systems, semiotic systems, artificial intelligence, cybernetics and philosophy, and special aspects of systems research. 1326 references.

  11. The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Agency's Use of Geographic Information Systems for Nuclear Emergency Response Support

    SciTech Connect

    A. L. Guber

    2001-06-01

    The U.S, Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Agency's (NNSA) Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) provides Geographic Information System (GIS) support during nuclear emergency response activities. As directed by the NNSA, the RSL GIS staff maintains databases and equipment for rapid field deployment during an emergency response. When on location, GIS operators provide information products to on-site emergency managers as well as to emergency managers at the DOE Headquarters (HQ) Emergency Operations Center (EOC) in Washington, D.C. Data products are derived from multiple information sources in the field including radiological prediction models, field measurements taken on the ground and from the air, and pertinent information researched on the Internet. The GIS functions as a central data hub where it supplies the information to response elements in the field, as well as to headquarters officials at HQ during emergency response activities.

  12. International Remote Monitoring Project Argentina nuclear power station remote monitoring system

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, S.L.; Lucero, R.; Glidewell, D.

    1998-08-01

    A remote monitoring system, designed to monitor spent fuel transfers from wet to dry storage, was installed at the Embalse Nuclear Power Station at Embalse, Argentina. The system consists of 6 gamma and one neutron radiation sensors. Five gamma sensors utilize RF transmission to communicate with Echelon nodes connected to a Local Operating Network (LON). One gamma and one neutron sensor are hardwired to the LON network. Each sensor Echelon node is bound to a single Datalogger that stores data until it receives an acquisition command to download to the Data Acquisition Software (DASW) database. The data from the Datalogger are transferred and stored in the Data Acquisition Software database, which resides on the IAEA MOS-MUX server. At a pre-determined interval, data from the DASW database are converted into Excel files and transferred to the IAEA database every 24 hours. At an predetermined interval all data are transferred to the distribution server located at the ARN laboratory at Ezeiza, Argentina. Remote access to data from the distribution server will be made from IAEA headquarters, Vienna, Austria, from ABACC in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, from the IAEA field office in Buenos Aires, from ARN, and from Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.

  13. International Ultraviolet Explorer New Spectral Image Processing System Information Manual: Version 2.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garhart, M. P.; Smith, M. A.; Turnrose, B. E.; Levay, K. L.; Thompson, R. W.

    1997-10-01

    This document is intended for use by researchers who wish to analyze data acquired by the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) and processed for the IUE Final Archive with the New Spectral Image Processing System (NEWSIPS) at either Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) or the European Space Agency (ESA) Villafranca del Castillo IUE Observatory (VILSPA). The information contained in this document explains the instrument characteristics and the processing methodology and calibration techniques used in the NEWSIPS system to produce the output products available to researchers. This second version of the IUE NEWSIPS Information Manual has been updated to include the processing techniques for LWR low-dispersion and LWP, LWR, and SWP high-dispersion data.

  14. International Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saba, Farhad, Ed.

    1999-01-01

    Completes a discussion of a systems model of distance education (in articles since May 1999) focusing on the most complex level, international. Discussion includes transfer of technology from United States universities to developing nations, the free market, and the age of the global economy. Presents a list of "early indicators" of changes in…

  15. International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative Development of Computational Models for Pyrochemical Electrorefiners of Nuclear Waste Transmutation Systems

    SciTech Connect

    M.F. Simpson; K.-R. Kim

    2010-12-01

    In support of closing the nuclear fuel cycle using non-aqueous separations technology, this project aims to develop computational models of electrorefiners based on fundamental chemical and physical processes. Spent driver fuel from Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) is currently being electrorefined in the Fuel Conditioning Facility (FCF) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). And Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) is developing electrorefining technology for future application to spent fuel treatment and management in the Republic of Korea (ROK). Electrorefining is a critical component of pyroprocessing, a non-aqueous chemical process which separates spent fuel into four streams: (1) uranium metal, (2) U/TRU metal, (3) metallic high-level waste containing cladding hulls and noble metal fission products, and (4) ceramic high-level waste containing sodium and active metal fission products. Having rigorous yet flexible electrorefiner models will facilitate process optimization and assist in trouble-shooting as necessary. To attain such models, INL/UI has focused on approaches to develop a computationally-light and portable two-dimensional (2D) model, while KAERI/SNU has investigated approaches to develop a computationally intensive three-dimensional (3D) model for detailed and fine-tuned simulation.

  16. Three-dimensional dose evaluation system using real-time wind field information for nuclear accidents in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jay; Lu, Chung-Hsin; Chang, Shu-Jun; Yang, Yung-Muh; Chang, Bor-Jing; Teng, Jen-Hsin

    2006-09-01

    In Taiwan, the three operating nuclear power plants are all built along the coast over complex terrain. Dose estimates after a nuclear accident with releases of radioactive materials, therefore, cannot be accurately calculated using simple dispersion models. We developed a three-dimensional dose evaluation system, which incorporates real-time prognostic wind field information with three-dimensional numerical models to predict dose results. The proposed system consists of three models: a three-dimensional mesoscale atmospheric model (HOTMAC), a three-dimensional transport and diffusion model (RAPTAD), and a dose calculation model (DOSE). The whole-body dose and thyroid dose as well as dose rates can be rapidly estimated and displayed on the three-dimensional terrain model constructed by satellite images. The developed three-dimensional dose evaluation system could accurately forecast the dose results and has been used in the annual nuclear emergency response exercise to provide suggestions for protective measures.

  17. Concluding Remarks on the International Symposium on Exotic Nuclear Systems ENS'05

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habs, D.

    2005-11-01

    In nuclear phyiscs within Europe we observe a strong concentration onto a few large-scale facilities like FAIR, ALICE and EURISOL, which at the same time results in a strong focus of all resources towards these facilities. My personal belief is, that we need in Europe in addition a broad network of smaller institutes with local nuclear physics for a healthy structure of our science. I propose two fields of nuclear science onto which these smaller institutes may focus: (i) Fundamental Physics, studying physics beyond the Standard Model with high precision measurements at low energies and (ii) joining Advanced Photon Science, where new high energy photon and particle beams become available in compact devices at low cost. While such networks are planned or exist already among different universities in Germany for these two subjects, I propose to extend these towards a European networks within the 7th framework. A first starting point could be associations with the German networks, funded by the German Science Foundation DFG.

  18. Air pollution simulation and geographical information systems (GIS) applied to Athens International Airport.

    PubMed

    Theophanides, Mike; Anastassopoulou, Jane

    2009-07-01

    This study presents an improved methodology for analysing atmospheric pollution around airports using Gaussian-plume numerical simulation integrated with Geographical Information Systems (GIS). The new methodology focuses on streamlining the lengthy analysis process for Airport Environmental Impact Assessments by integrating the definition of emission sources, simulating and displaying the results in a GIS environment. One of the objectives of the research is to validate the methodology applied to the Athens International Airport, "Eleftherios Venizelos", to produce a realistic estimate of emission inventories, dispersion simulations and comparison to measured data. The methodology used a combination of the Emission Dispersion and Modelling System (EDMS) and the Atmospheric Dispersion and Modelling system (ADMS) to improve the analysis process. The second objective is to conduct numerical simulations under various adverse conditions (e.g. scenarios) and assess the dispersion in the surrounding areas. The study concludes that the use of GIS in environmental assessments provides a valuable advantage for organizing data and entering accurate geographical/topological information for the simulation engine. Emissions simulation produced estimates within 10% of published values. Dispersion simulations indicate that airport pollution will affect neighbouring cities such as Rafina and Loutsa. Presently, there are no measured controls in these areas. In some cases, airport pollution can contribute to as much as 40% of permissible EU levels in VOCs.

  19. JANIS 4: An Improved Version of the NEA Java-based Nuclear Data Information System

    SciTech Connect

    Soppera, N. Bossant, M.; Dupont, E.

    2014-06-15

    JANIS is software developed to facilitate the visualization and manipulation of nuclear data, giving access to evaluated data libraries, and to the EXFOR and CINDA databases. It is stand-alone Java software, downloadable from the web and distributed on DVD. Used offline, the system also makes use of an internet connection to access the NEA Data Bank database. It is now also offered as a full web application, only requiring a browser. The features added in the latest version of the software and this new web interface are described.

  20. JANIS 4: An Improved Version of the NEA Java-based Nuclear Data Information System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soppera, N.; Bossant, M.; Dupont, E.

    2014-06-01

    JANIS is software developed to facilitate the visualization and manipulation of nuclear data, giving access to evaluated data libraries, and to the EXFOR and CINDA databases. It is stand-alone Java software, downloadable from the web and distributed on DVD. Used offline, the system also makes use of an internet connection to access the NEA Data Bank database. It is now also offered as a full web application, only requiring a browser. The features added in the latest version of the software and this new web interface are described.

  1. Nuclear reactor with internal thimble-type delayed neutron detection system

    DOEpatents

    Gross, Kenny C.; Poloncsik, John; Lambert, John D. B.

    1990-01-01

    This invention teaches improved apparatus for the method of detecting a breach in cladded fuel used in a nuclear reactor. The detector apparatus is located in the primary heat exchanger which conveys part of the reactor coolant past at least three separate delayed-neutron detectors mounted in this heat exchanger. The detectors are spaced apart such that the coolant flow time from the core to each detector is different, and these differences are known. The delayed-neutron activity at the detectors is a function of the delay time after the reaction in the fuel until the coolant carrying the delayed-neutron emitter passes the respective detector. This time delay is broken down into separate components including an isotopic holdup time required for the emitter to move through the fuel from the reaction to the coolant at the breach, and two transit times required for the emitter now in the coolant to flow from the breach to the detector loop and then via the loop to the detector. At least two of these time components are determined during calibrated operation of the reactor. Thereafter during normal reactor operation, repeated comparisons are made by the method of regression approximation of the third time component for the best-fit line correlating measured delayed-neutron activity against activity that is approximated according to specific equations. The equations use these time-delay components and known parameter values of the fuel and of the part and emitting daughter isotopes.

  2. Nuclear Weapon Testing Limitations and International Security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corden, Pierce S.

    2017-01-01

    For over 50 years stopping nuclear weapon tests has been sought to support achieving international security without nuclear weapons. Testing is the critical path beyond primitive fission devices, e.g. to develop thermonuclear weapons, reduce weight and volume and increase yield. The 1958 Geneva Conference of Experts considered ways to verify a test ban. With then-limitations on seismology, and lack of in-country monitoring and on-site inspections, the 1963 Limited Test Ban Treaty prohibits testing only in the atmosphere, outer space and under water, and is verified by National Technical Means. The US and USSR agreed to a limit of 150 kilotons on underground explosions in the 1970s-80s. The 1996 Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty bans all nuclear explosions. Its International Monitoring System - seismic, hydroacoustic, infrasound and radionuclide sensors - is being used, and has easily detected testing by the DPRK. On-site inspections will be available under an in-force Treaty. A 2012 National Academy report concludes that cheating attempts would not undermine U.S. security, and the program for monitoring and extending the life of US weapons has succeeded since US testing ceased in 1992.

  3. DESIGN INFORMATION VERIFICATION FOR NUCLEAR SAFEGUARDS

    SciTech Connect

    Robert S. Bean; Richard R. M. Metcalf; Phillip C. Durst

    2009-07-01

    A critical aspect of international safeguards activities performed by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is the verification that facility design and construction (including upgrades and modifications) do not create opportunities for nuclear proliferation. These Design Information Verification activities require that IAEA inspectors compare current and past information about the facility to verify the operator’s declaration of proper use. The actual practice of DIV presents challenges to the inspectors due to the large amount of data generated, concerns about sensitive or proprietary data, the overall complexity of the facility, and the effort required to extract just the safeguards relevant information. Planned and anticipated facilities will (especially in the case of reprocessing plants) be ever larger and increasingly complex, thus exacerbating the challenges. This paper reports the results of a workshop held at the Idaho National Laboratory in March 2009, which considered technologies and methods to address these challenges. The use of 3D Laser Range Finding, Outdoor Visualization System, Gamma-LIDAR, and virtual facility modeling, as well as methods to handle the facility data issues (quantity, sensitivity, and accessibility and portability for the inspector) were presented. The workshop attendees drew conclusions about the use of these techniques with respect to successfully employing them in an operating environment, using a Fuel Conditioning Facility walk-through as a baseline for discussion.

  4. EUNIS '99: Information Technology Shaping European Universities. Proceedings of the International European University Information Systems (5th, Espoo, Finland, June 7-9, 1999).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1999

    This document presents the proceedings from the 5th International European University Information Systems (EUNIS) Conference on Information Technology that took place in Helsinki, Finland on June 7-9, 1999. Topics of the conference proceedings were divided into five tracks (A through E): Use of Information Technology in Learning and Teaching;…

  5. Nuclear weapons, the end of the cold war, and the future of the international system

    SciTech Connect

    Gaddis, J.L.

    1992-12-31

    The collapse of empires, the overthrow of dynasties, the outbreak of plagues, the onset of revolutions, and even the improvement of the human condition itself - all of these are categories of events, which means that they have happened before and will almost certainly happen again. There are very few occurrences of which it can be said that nothing like them has ever taken place; but surely what took place in the New Mexico desert on July 16, 1945, qualifies as such as occurrence. The first test explosion of an atomic bomb, together with the actual use of that weapon three weeks later against the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, was as sharp a break from the past as any in all of history. Theory had intersected reality to produce a weapon that was regarded at the time as unlike any other that had ever been invented, and that is still so regarded today, almost half a century later. The result, it now appears, has been a fundamental, and possibly permanent, change in human behavior. `The unleashed power of the atom has changed everything save our modes of thinking,` Albert Einstein wrote in 1946, `and thus we drift toward unparalleled catastrophe.` Einstein would have been as surprised as anyone else who lived through the early Cold War years had he known that Nagasaki would be the last occasion upon which atomic weapons would be used in anger for at least the next four and one-half decades, despite the fact that the great geopolitical rivalry between the United States and the Soviet Union would drag on throughout that length of time. History is full of unexpected developments, but few have been as completely unexpected as that the great powers would produce some 70,000 nuclear weapons between the end of World War II and the present day, without a single one of them having been used. Perfecting the ultimate instrument of war had made the ancient institution of war, for the first time in history, obsolete. Or so it would appear. 23 refs.

  6. GRIN-Global: An International Project to Develop a Global Plant Genebank and Information Management System

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The mission of the GRIN-Global Project is to create a new, scalable version of the Germplasm Resource Information System (GRIN) to provide the world’s crop genebanks with a powerful, flexible, easy-to-use plant genetic resource (PGR) information management system. The system will help safeguard PGR ...

  7. GRIN-Global: An International Project to Develop a Global Plant Genebank and Information Management System

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The mission of the GRIN-Global Project is to create a new, scalable version of the Germplasm Resource Information System (GRIN) to provide the world's crop genebanks with a powerful, flexible, easy-to-use plant genetic resource (PGR) information management system. The system will help safeguard PGR ...

  8. GRIN-Global: An International Project to Develop a Global Plant Genebank Information Management System

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The mission of the GRIN-Global Project is to create a new, scalable version of the Germplasm Resource Information System (GRIN) to provide the world’s crop genebanks with a powerful, flexible, easy-to-use plant genetic resource (PGR) information management system. The system will help safeguard PGR ...

  9. GRIN-Global: An International Project to Develop a Global Plant Genebank and Information Management System

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The mission of the GRIN-Global Project is to create a new, scalable version of the Germplasm Resource Information System (GRIN) to provide the world's crop genebanks with a powerful, flexible, easy-to-use plant genetic resource (PGR) information management system. The system will help safeguard PGR ...

  10. GRIN-Global: An International Project to Develop a Global Plant Genebank and Information Management System

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The mission of the GRIN-Global Project is to create a new, scalable version of the Germplasm Resource Information System (GRIN) to provide the world’s crop genebanks with a powerful, flexible, easy-to-use plant genetic resource (PGR) information management system. The system will help safeguard PGR...

  11. IMGT®, the international ImMunoGeneTics information system® 25 years on.

    PubMed

    Lefranc, Marie-Paule; Giudicelli, Véronique; Duroux, Patrice; Jabado-Michaloud, Joumana; Folch, Géraldine; Aouinti, Safa; Carillon, Emilie; Duvergey, Hugo; Houles, Amélie; Paysan-Lafosse, Typhaine; Hadi-Saljoqi, Saida; Sasorith, Souphatta; Lefranc, Gérard; Kossida, Sofia

    2015-01-01

    IMGT(®), the international ImMunoGeneTics information system(®)(http://www.imgt.org) is the global reference in immunogenetics and immunoinformatics. By its creation in 1989 by Marie-Paule Lefranc (Université de Montpellier and CNRS), IMGT(®) marked the advent of immunoinformatics, which emerged at the interface between immunogenetics and bioinformatics. IMGT(®) is specialized in the immunoglobulins (IG) or antibodies, T cell receptors (TR), major histocompatibility (MH) and proteins of the IgSF and MhSF superfamilies. IMGT(®) is built on the IMGT-ONTOLOGY axioms and concepts, which bridged the gap between genes, sequences and 3D structures. The concepts include the IMGT(®) standardized keywords (identification), IMGT(®) standardized labels (description), IMGT(®) standardized nomenclature (classification), IMGT unique numbering and IMGT Colliers de Perles (numerotation). IMGT(®) comprises 7 databases, 17 online tools and 15,000 pages of web resources, and provides a high-quality and integrated system for analysis of the genomic and expressed IG and TR repertoire of the adaptive immune responses, including NGS high-throughput data. Tools and databases are used in basic, veterinary and medical research, in clinical applications (mutation analysis in leukemia and lymphoma) and in antibody engineering and humanization. The IMGT/mAb-DB interface was developed for therapeutic antibodies and fusion proteins for immunological applications (FPIA). IMGT(®) is freely available at http://www.imgt.org.

  12. [International community efforts in prevention of nuclear terrorism].

    PubMed

    Ilijas, Boris

    2006-06-01

    Terrorism is now a global threat, spreading its shadows over regions which were previously regarded as the exclusive domain of the military superpowers. One of the prime threats is nuclear terrorism, using nuclear or radiological agents. To assess the threat, it is important to include all factors that make it possible. A nuclear terrorist attack can be conducted in three basic ways, by detonation of a nuclear weapon, by sabotage or diversion of a nuclear facility or by dispersion of radioactive material into the environment (radiological weapon). Each possibility is specific and with different consequences. Nuclear terrorism can be prevented by establishing a global system which requires from all countries to strictly follow international rules of trading, storing and using nuclear and radioactive materials and to produce an efficient national legislation. The United Nations have provided a basis for such legislation in the form of the International Convention for the Suppression of Acts of Nuclear Terrorism.

  13. Radioxenon detections in the CTBT international monitoring system likely related to the announced nuclear test in North Korea on February 12, 2013.

    PubMed

    Ringbom, A; Axelsson, A; Aldener, M; Auer, M; Bowyer, T W; Fritioff, T; Hoffman, I; Khrustalev, K; Nikkinen, M; Popov, V; Popov, Y; Ungar, K; Wotawa, G

    2014-02-01

    Observations made in April 2013 of the radioxenon isotopes (133)Xe and (131m)Xe at measurement stations in Japan and Russia, belonging to the International Monitoring System for verification of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty, are unique with respect to the measurement history of these stations. Comparison of measured data with calculated isotopic ratios as well as analysis using atmospheric transport modeling indicate that it is likely that the xenon measured was created in the underground nuclear test conducted by North Korea on February 12, 2013, and released 7-8 weeks later. More than one release is required to explain all observations. The (131m)Xe source terms for each release were calculated to 0.7 TBq, corresponding to about 1-10% of the total xenon inventory for a 10 kt explosion, depending on fractionation and release scenario. The observed ratios could not be used to obtain any information regarding the fissile material that was used in the test. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. International nuclear fuel cycle fact book. Revision 6

    SciTech Connect

    Harmon, K.M.; Lakey, L.T.; Leigh, I.W.; Jeffs, A.G.

    1986-01-01

    The International Fuel Cycle Fact Book has been compiled in an effort to provide (1) an overview of worldwide nuclear power and fuel cycle programs and (2) current data concerning fuel cycle and waste management facilities, R and D programs and key personnel. Additional information on each country's program is available in the International Source Book: Nuclear Fuel Cycle Research and Development, PNL-2478, Rev. 2.

  15. NUCLEAR REACTOR CONTROL SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Epler, E.P.; Hanauer, S.H.; Oakes, L.C.

    1959-11-01

    A control system is described for a nuclear reactor using enriched uranium fuel of the type of the swimming pool and other heterogeneous nuclear reactors. Circuits are included for automatically removing and inserting the control rods during the course of normal operation. Appropriate safety circuits close down the nuclear reactor in the event of emergency.

  16. Nuclear systems 1

    SciTech Connect

    Todreas, N.E.; Kazami, M.J. )

    1990-01-01

    The book covers thermal hydraulic design fundamentals and analysis of the core of a nuclear reactor. Other components of the nuclear power plant, such as the pressurizer, the containment and the entire primary coolant system are addressed. The book reflects the importance of such considerations in thermal engineering of a modern nuclear power plant.

  17. The international geosphere biosphere programme data and information system global land cover data set (DIScover)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Loveland, T.R.; Belward, A.S.

    1997-01-01

    The International Geosphere Biosphere Programme Data and Information System (IGBP-DIS), through the mapping expertise of the U.S. Geological Survey and the European Commission's Joint Research Centre, recently guided the completion of a 1-km resolution global land cover data set from advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) data. The 1-km resolution land cover product, 'DISCover,' was based on monthly normalized difference vegetation index composites from 1992 and 1993. The development of DISCover was coordinated by the IGBP-DIS Land Cover Working Group as part of the IGBP-DIS Focus 1 activity. DISCover is a 17-class land cover data set based on the scientific requirements of IGBP elements. The mapping used unsupervised classification and postclassification refinement using ancillary data. The development of this data set was motivated by the need for global land cover data with higher spatial resolution, improved temporal specificity, and known classification accuracy. The completed DISCover data set will soon be validated to determine the accuracy of the global classification.

  18. Audit in public administration’s information systems - External or internal?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drljača, D.; Latinović, B.

    2017-05-01

    Audit of the information system, thanks to the increased use of ICT and related cyber-crime, becomes a very important process in modern companies and institutions. It is usual to engage or outsource a third party for independent financial audit. But what about auditing of the information system of public administration institutions? This paper gives an introduction to possible aspects of information system’s audit with the aim to discuss possible answer on the question in the title.

  19. Using the International Directory Network and connected information systems for research in the Earth and space sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thieman, J. R.

    1994-01-01

    Many researchers are becoming aware of the International Directory Network (IDN), an interconnected federation of international directories to Earth and space science data. Are you aware, however, of the many Earth-science-relevant information systems which can be accessed automatically from the directories? After determining potentially useful data sets in various disciplines through directories such as the Global Change Master Directory, it is becoming increasingly possible to get detailed information about the correlative possibilities of these data sets through the connected guide/catalog and inventory systems. Such capabilities as data set browse, subsetting, analysis, etc. are available now and will be improving in the future.

  20. Using the international directory network and connected information systems for research in the earth and space sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thieman, J. R.

    1994-01-01

    Many researchers are becoming aware of the International Directory Network (IDN), an interconnected federation of international directories to Earth and space science data. Are you aware, however, of the many Earth-sciece-relevant information systems which can be accessed automatically from the directories? After determining potentially useful data sets in various disciplines through directories such as the Global Change Master Directory, it is becoming increasingly possible to get detailed information about the correlative possibilities of these data sets through the connected guide/catalog and inventory systems. Such capabilities as data set browse, subsetting, analysis, etc. are available now and will be improving in the future.

  1. Reisebericht London: Interner Workshop: "Knowledge Based Systems in Information Science" (London Travel Report: Internal Workshop: "Knowledge Based Systems in Information Science").

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Hans-Reiner

    Written in German, this report summarizes a workshop on teaching and research activities in information science that was held at the City University, London, and attended by faculty and students from the university's Department of Information Science and H.-R. Simon of the GID (Gesellschaft fur Information und Dokumentation), Frankfort am Main,…

  2. Reisebericht London: Interner Workshop: "Knowledge Based Systems in Information Science" (London Travel Report: Internal Workshop: "Knowledge Based Systems in Information Science").

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Hans-Reiner

    Written in German, this report summarizes a workshop on teaching and research activities in information science that was held at the City University, London, and attended by faculty and students from the university's Department of Information Science and H.-R. Simon of the GID (Gesellschaft fur Information und Dokumentation), Frankfort am Main,…

  3. Informing future societies about nuclear waste repositories

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, M.

    1994-04-01

    In 1990 a working group of the NKS (the Nordic nuclear safety program) was formed and give the task of established a basis for a common Nordic view of the need for information conservation for nuclear waste repositories. The Group investigated what tipy of information should be conserved; in what form the information should be kept; the quality of the information; and the problems of future retrieval of information, including retrieval after very long periods of time. Topics covered include the following: scientific aspects including social context of scientific solutions; information management; systems for conservation and retrieval of information including the problems of prediction; archives, markers, archives vs. markers, and continuing processes in society; Archive media including paper documents, microfilm, digital media, media lifetimes; and finally conclusions and recommendations.

  4. International Demographic Data Director. A Computerized Information Retrieval System for Demographic and Family Planning Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bargar, Martha

    Announced in this booklet is the availability of the International Demographic Data Directory (IDDD). The IDDD is designed to expedite the retrieval of demographic and family planning statistics for use by administrators, planners, and researchers. This guide describes the computerized system indicating the geographic scope of the data, subject…

  5. The case for an international patient-reported outcomes measurement information system (PROMIS®) initiative

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) play an increasingly important role in clinical practice and research. Modern psychometric methods such as item response theory (IRT) enable the creation of item banks that support fixed-length forms as well as computerized adaptive testing (CAT), often resulting in improved measurement precision and responsiveness. Here we describe and discuss the case for developing an international core set of PROs building from the US PROMIS® network. PROMIS is a U.S.-based cooperative group of research sites and centers of excellence convened to develop and standardize PRO measures across studies and settings. If extended to a global collaboration, PROMIS has the potential to transform PRO measurement by creating a shared, unifying terminology and metric for reporting of common symptoms and functional life domains. Extending a common set of standardized PRO measures to the international community offers great potential for improving patient-centered research, clinical trials reporting, population monitoring, and health care worldwide. Benefits of such standardization include the possibility of: international syntheses (such as meta-analyses) of research findings; international population monitoring and policy development; health services administrators and planners access to relevant information on the populations they serve; better assessment and monitoring of patients by providers; and improved shared decision making. The goal of the current PROMIS International initiative is to ensure that item banks are translated and culturally adapted for use in adults and children in as many countries as possible. The process includes 3 key steps: translation/cultural adaptation, calibration, and validation. A universal translation, an approach focusing on commonalities, rather than differences across versions developed in regions or countries speaking the same language, is proposed to ensure conceptual equivalence for all items. International item

  6. The case for an international patient-reported outcomes measurement information system (PROMIS®) initiative.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Jordi; Bartlett, Susan J; Rose, Matthias; Aaronson, Neil K; Chaplin, John E; Efficace, Fabio; Leplège, Alain; Lu, Aiping; Tulsky, David S; Raat, Hein; Ravens-Sieberer, Ulrike; Revicki, Dennis; Terwee, Caroline B; Valderas, Jose M; Cella, David; Forrest, Christopher B

    2013-12-20

    Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) play an increasingly important role in clinical practice and research. Modern psychometric methods such as item response theory (IRT) enable the creation of item banks that support fixed-length forms as well as computerized adaptive testing (CAT), often resulting in improved measurement precision and responsiveness. Here we describe and discuss the case for developing an international core set of PROs building from the US PROMIS® network.PROMIS is a U.S.-based cooperative group of research sites and centers of excellence convened to develop and standardize PRO measures across studies and settings. If extended to a global collaboration, PROMIS has the potential to transform PRO measurement by creating a shared, unifying terminology and metric for reporting of common symptoms and functional life domains. Extending a common set of standardized PRO measures to the international community offers great potential for improving patient-centered research, clinical trials reporting, population monitoring, and health care worldwide. Benefits of such standardization include the possibility of: international syntheses (such as meta-analyses) of research findings; international population monitoring and policy development; health services administrators and planners access to relevant information on the populations they serve; better assessment and monitoring of patients by providers; and improved shared decision making.The goal of the current PROMIS International initiative is to ensure that item banks are translated and culturally adapted for use in adults and children in as many countries as possible. The process includes 3 key steps: translation/cultural adaptation, calibration, and validation. A universal translation, an approach focusing on commonalities, rather than differences across versions developed in regions or countries speaking the same language, is proposed to ensure conceptual equivalence for all items. International item

  7. OCRWM International Cooperation in Nuclear Waste Management

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, R.; Levich, R.; Strahl, J.

    2002-02-27

    With the implementation of nuclear power as a major energy source, the United States is increasingly faced with the challenges of safely managing its inventory of spent nuclear materials. In 2002, with 438 nuclear power facilities generating electrical energy in 31 nations around the world, the management of radioactive material including spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste, is an international concern. Most of the world's nuclear nations maintain radioactive waste management programs and have generally accepted deep geologic repositories as the long-term solution for disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. Similarly, the United States is evaluating the feasibility of deep geologic disposal at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This project is directed by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), which has responsibility for managing the disposition of spent nuclear fuel produced by commercial nuclear power facilities along with U.S. government-owned spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. Much of the world class science conducted through the OCRWM program was enhanced through collaboration with other nations and international organizations focused on resolving issues associated with the disposition of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste.

  8. The FIFE information system. [First International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project Field Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strebel, Donald E.; Newcomer, Jeffrey A.; Ormsby, James P.; Hall, Forrest G.; Sellers, Piers J.

    1990-01-01

    A description is given of the FIFE (First ISLSCP Field Experiment) information system, which was developed to serve FIFE investigators as a tool for designing the experiment and for organizing and manipulating the complex data set. Fulfilling these functions on an experiment-driven timeline led to abandoning the classical sequential development paradigm of software engineering in favor of a more responsive and broadly based approach. The design, development, and operation of the information system supporting the experiment had to be flexible and under direct day-to-day control of scientist/users. Because of the organization around scientific requirements, the system was able to incorporate diverse data types in a systematic way as they became available, to add scientific rigor by identifying data gaps at an early stage, and to provide real-time quality assurance. These factors are important for designing and building future databases and long-term information systems to support interdisciplinary scientific research.

  9. International perceptions of US nuclear policy.

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, Elizabeth A. (Georgetown Universtiy, Washington, DC)

    2006-02-01

    The report presents a summary of international perceptions and beliefs about US nuclear policy, focusing on four countries--China, Iran, Pakistan and Germany--chosen because they span the spectrum of states with which the United States has relationships. A paradox is pointed out: that although the goal of US nuclear policy is to make the United States and its allies safer through a policy of deterrence, international perceptions of US nuclear policy may actually be making the US less safe by eroding its soft power and global leadership position. Broadly held perceptions include a pattern of US hypocrisy and double standards--one set for the US and its allies, and another set for all others. Importantly, the US nuclear posture is not seen in a vacuum, but as one piece of the United States behavior on the world stage. Because of this, the potential direct side effects of any negative international perceptions of US nuclear policy can be somewhat mitigated, dependent on other US policies and actions. The more indirect and long term relation of US nuclear policy to US international reputation and soft power, however, matters immensely to successful multilateral and proactive engagement on other pressing global issues.

  10. Unification - An international aerospace information issue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cotter, Gladys A.; Lahr, Thomas F.

    1992-01-01

    Scientific and Technical Information (STI) represents the results of large investments in research and development (R&D) and the expertise of a nation and is a valuable resource. For more than four decades, NASA and its predecessor organizations have developed and managed the preeminent aerospace information system. NASA obtains foreign materials through its international exchange relationships, continually increasing the comprehensiveness of the NASA Aerospace Database (NAD). The NAD is de facto the international aerospace database. This paper reviews current NASA goals and activities with a view toward maintaining compatibility among international aerospace information systems, eliminating duplication of effort, and sharing resources through international cooperation wherever possible.

  11. Unification - An international aerospace information issue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cotter, Gladys A.; Lahr, Thomas F.

    1992-01-01

    Scientific and Technical Information (STI) represents the results of large investments in research and development (R&D) and the expertise of a nation and is a valuable resource. For more than four decades, NASA and its predecessor organizations have developed and managed the preeminent aerospace information system. NASA obtains foreign materials through its international exchange relationships, continually increasing the comprehensiveness of the NASA Aerospace Database (NAD). The NAD is de facto the international aerospace database. This paper reviews current NASA goals and activities with a view toward maintaining compatibility among international aerospace information systems, eliminating duplication of effort, and sharing resources through international cooperation wherever possible.

  12. GRIN-Global: An International Project to Develop a Global Plant Genebank and Information Management System

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Many of the world's national genebanks, responsible for the safeguarding and availability of their country's Plant Genetic Resource (PGR) collections, have lacked access to high quality IT needed to document and manage their collections electronically. The Germplasm Resource Information System (GRI...

  13. Nuclear fuel cycle information workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    This overview of the nuclear fuel cycle is divided into three parts. First, is a brief discussion of the basic principles of how nuclear reactors work; second, is a look at the major types of nuclear reactors being used and world-wide nuclear capacity; and third, is an overview of the nuclear fuel cycle and the present industrial capability in the US.

  14. Nuclear Regulatory Commission 1989 Information Digest

    SciTech Connect

    None,

    1989-03-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission 1989 Information Digest provides summary information regarding the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, its regulatory responsibilities, and areas licensed by the Commission. This is the first of an annual publication for the general use of the NRC staff and is available to the public. The Digest is divided into two parts: the first presents an overview of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the second provides data on NRC commercial nuclear reactor licensees and commercial nuclear power reactors worldwide.

  15. International nuclear fuel cycle fact book: Revision 9

    SciTech Connect

    Leigh, I.W.

    1989-01-01

    The International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book has been compiled in an effort to provide current data concerning fuel cycle and waste management facilities, R and D programs and key personnel. The Fact Book contains: national summaries in which a section for each country which summarizes nuclear policy, describes organizational relationships and provides addresses, names of key personnel, and facilities information; and international agencies in which a section for each of the international agencies which has significant fuel cycle involvement, and a listing of nuclear societies. The national summaries, in addition to the data described above, feature a small map for each country as well as some general information. The latter is presented from the perspective of the Fact Book user in the United States.

  16. Proceedings of the fourth international conference on parallel and distributed information systems

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    Parallel and distributed database technology is at the heart of many mission-critical applications such as online transaction processing, data warehousing, business workflow management, interoperable information systems, and information brokering in global networks. The program of PDIS`96 conference reflects both the breadth of the relevant subjects and the rapid progress of this area. The 22 selected papers cover the full spectrum ranging from Web-related issues and data mining to core technologies such as indexing and transactions. In addition to these research papers, the conference also includes 8 industrial contributions on the latest commercial developments and future trends.

  17. Interfaces between transport and geologic disposal systems for high-level radioactive wastes and spent nuclear fuel: A new international guidance document

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, R.B.; Baekelandt, L.; Hoorelbeke, J.M.; Han, K.W.; Pollog, T.; Blackman, D.; Villagran, J.E.

    1994-04-01

    An International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Technical Document (TECDOC) has been developed and will be published by the IAEA. The TECDOC addresses the interfaces between the transport and geologic disposal systems for, high-level waste (HLW) and spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The document is intended to define and assist in discussing, at both the domestic and the international level, regulatory, technical, administrative, and institutional interfaces associated with HLW and SNF transport and disposal systems; it identifies and discusses the interfaces and interface requirements between the HLW and SNF, the waste transport system used for carriage of the waste to the disposal facility, and the HLW/SNF disposal facility. It provides definitions and explanations of terms; discusses systems, interfaces and interface requirements; addresses alternative strategies (single-purpose packages and multipurpose packages) and how interfaces are affected by the strategies; and provides a tabular summary of the requirements.

  18. International nuclear fuel cycle fact book. Revision 4

    SciTech Connect

    Harmon, K.M.; Lakey, L.T.; Leigh, I.W.

    1984-03-01

    This Fact Book has been compiled in an effort to provide (1) an overview of worldwide nuclear power and fuel cycle programs and (2) current data concerning fuel cycle and waste management facilities, R and D programs, and key personnel in countries other than the United States. Additional information on each country's program is available in the International Source Book: Nuclear Fuel Cycle Research and Development, PNL-2478, Rev. 2. The Fact Book is organized as follows: (1) Overview section - summary tables which indicate national involvement in nuclear reactor, fuel cycle, and waste management development activities; (2) national summaries - a section for each country which summarizes nuclear policy, describes organizational relationships and provides addresses, names of key personnel, and facilities information; (3) international agencies - a section for each of the international agencies which has significant fuel cycle involvement; (4) energy supply and demand - summary tables, including nuclear power projections; (5) fuel cycle - summary tables; and (6) travel aids - international dialing instructions, international standard time chart, passport and visa requirements, and currency exchange rate.

  19. International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book. Revision 5

    SciTech Connect

    Harmon, K.M.; Lakey, L.T.; Leigh, I.W.; Jeffs, A.G.

    1985-01-01

    This Fact Book has been compiled in an effort to provide: (1) an overview of worldwide nuclear power and fuel cycle programs; and (2) current data concerning fuel cycle and waste management facilities, R and D programs, and key personnel in countries other than the United States. Additional information on each country's program is available in the International Source Book: Nuclear Fuel Cycle Research and Development, PNL-2478, Rev. 2. The Fact Book is organized as follows: (1) Overview section - summary tables which indicate national involvement in nuclear reactor, fuel cycle, and waste management development activities; (2) national summaries - a section for each country which summarizes nuclear policy, describes organizational relationships and provides addresses, names of key personnel, and facilities information; (3) international agencies - a section for each of the international agencies which has significant fuel cycle involvement; (4) energy supply and demand - summary tables, including nuclear power projections; (5) fuel cycle - summary tables; and (6) travel aids international dialing instructions, international standard time chart, passport and visa requirements, and currency exchange rate.

  20. Nuclear propulsion systems engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Madsen, W.W.; Neuman, J.E.: Van Haaften, D.H.

    1992-12-31

    The Nuclear Energy for Rocket Vehicle Application (NERVA) program of the 1960`s and early 1970`s was dramatically successful, with no major failures during the entire testing program. This success was due in large part to the successful development of a systems engineering process. Systems engineering, properly implemented, involves all aspects of the system design and operation, and leads to optimization of theentire system: cost, schedule, performance, safety, reliability, function, requirements, etc. The process must be incorporated from the very first and continued to project completion. This paper will discuss major aspects of the NERVA systems engineering effort, and consider the implications for current nuclear propulsion efforts.

  1. Nuclear propulsion systems engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Madsen, W.W.; Neuman, J.E.: Van Haaften, D.H.

    1992-01-01

    The Nuclear Energy for Rocket Vehicle Application (NERVA) program of the 1960's and early 1970's was dramatically successful, with no major failures during the entire testing program. This success was due in large part to the successful development of a systems engineering process. Systems engineering, properly implemented, involves all aspects of the system design and operation, and leads to optimization of theentire system: cost, schedule, performance, safety, reliability, function, requirements, etc. The process must be incorporated from the very first and continued to project completion. This paper will discuss major aspects of the NERVA systems engineering effort, and consider the implications for current nuclear propulsion efforts.

  2. International safeguards: Accounting for nuclear materials

    SciTech Connect

    Fishbone, L.G.

    1988-09-28

    Nuclear safeguards applied by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) are one element of the non-proliferation regime'', the collection of measures whose aim is to forestall the spread of nuclear weapons to countries that do not already possess them. Safeguards verifications provide evidence that nuclear materials in peaceful use for nuclear-power production are properly accounted for. Though carried out in cooperation with nuclear facility operators, the verifications can provide assurance because they are designed with the capability to detect diversion, should it occur. Traditional safeguards verification measures conducted by inspectors of the IAEA include book auditing; counting and identifying containers of nuclear material; measuring nuclear material; photographic and video surveillance; and sealing. Novel approaches to achieve greater efficiency and effectiveness in safeguards verifications are under investigation as the number and complexity of nuclear facilities grow. These include the zone approach, which entails carrying out verifications for groups of facilities collectively, and randomization approach, which entails carrying out entire inspection visits some fraction of the time on a random basis. Both approaches show promise in particular situations, but, like traditional measures, must be tested to ensure their practical utility. These approaches are covered on this report. 15 refs., 16 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. American Nuclear Society exchanges of information

    SciTech Connect

    Du Temple, O.J.

    2000-07-01

    Many are familiar with the technical journals and other publications that American Nuclear Society (ANS) members receive. However, there is a whole series of documents that is helpful to any nuclear society group for a modest fee or no fee. The author is referring to documents such as the ANS Bylaws and Rules, which have been made available to almost every existing nuclear society in the world. He remembers working with groups from Russia, Europe, China, Japan, Brazil, France, Germany, and others when they sought the experience of ANS in establishing a society. Financial planning guides are available for meetings, international conferences, technical expositions, and teacher workshops. Periodically, the ANS publishes position papers on the uses and handling of fuel materials and other publications helpful to public relations and teacher training courses. A few have had distributions in the hundreds of thousands, and one went as high as 750,000. Some of these have been translated in part into Spanish, French, Portuguese, and Japanese. Nuclear Standards are developed by a series of ANS committees consisting of about 1000 experts--the largest technical operation of ANS. Buyers guides and directories are very helpful in promoting the commerce in the nuclear industry. The Utility Directory covers utilities all over the globe. Radwaste Solutions, the new name for the former Radwaste Magazine, covers the efforts made by all sectors--private, government, and utility--to deal with radioactive waste. In the author's opinion, the one area in which all societies are weak is in interfacing with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Since his retirement 9 yr ago, he has become much more aware of the IAEA as a news and technical information source. The ANS is trying to be more aware of what the IAEA is doing for everyone.

  4. An analysis of international nuclear fuel supply options

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, J'tia Patrice

    As the global demand for energy grows, many nations are considering developing or increasing nuclear capacity as a viable, long-term power source. To assess the possible expansion of nuclear power and the intricate relationships---which cover the range of economics, security, and material supply and demand---between established and aspirant nuclear generating entities requires models and system analysis tools that integrate all aspects of the nuclear enterprise. Computational tools and methods now exist across diverse research areas, such as operations research and nuclear engineering, to develop such a tool. This dissertation aims to develop methodologies and employ and expand on existing sources to develop a multipurpose tool to analyze international nuclear fuel supply options. The dissertation is comprised of two distinct components: the development of the Material, Economics, and Proliferation Assessment Tool (MEPAT), and analysis of fuel cycle scenarios using the tool. Development of MEPAT is aimed for unrestricted distribution and therefore uses publicly available and open-source codes in its development when possible. MEPAT is built using the Powersim Studio platform that is widely used in systems analysis. MEPAT development is divided into three modules focusing on: material movement; nonproliferation; and economics. The material movement module tracks material quantity in each process of the fuel cycle and in each nuclear program with respect to ownership, location and composition. The material movement module builds on techniques employed by fuel cycle models such as the Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation (VISION) code developed at the Idaho National Laboratory under the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) for the analysis of domestic fuel cycle. Material movement parameters such as lending and reactor preference, as well as fuel cycle parameters such as process times and material factors are user-specified through a Microsoft Excel(c) data spreadsheet

  5. International Crisis Information Network

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    that will be used is the use of Drupal , an open source content management platform. According to the Drupal.org website, Drupal is, software...thousands of people and organizations have used Drupal to set up scores of different kinds of web sites, including: • community web portals and...directories Drupal includes features to enable • content management systems • blogs • collaborative authoring environments • forums

  6. Nuclear medicine imaging system

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, Gerald W.; Brill, A. Bertrand; Bizais, Yves J. C.; Rowe, R. Wanda; Zubal, I. George

    1986-01-01

    A nuclear medicine imaging system having two large field of view scintillation cameras mounted on a rotatable gantry and being movable diametrically toward or away from each other is disclosed. In addition, each camera may be rotated about an axis perpendicular to the diameter of the gantry. The movement of the cameras allows the system to be used for a variety of studies, including positron annihilation, and conventional single photon emission, as well as static orthogonal dual multi-pinhole tomography. In orthogonal dual multi-pinhole tomography, each camera is fitted with a seven pinhole collimator to provide seven views from slightly different perspectives. By using two cameras at an angle to each other, improved sensitivity and depth resolution is achieved. The computer system and interface acquires and stores a broad range of information in list mode, including patient physiological data, energy data over the full range detected by the cameras, and the camera position. The list mode acquisition permits the study of attenuation as a result of Compton scatter, as well as studies involving the isolation and correlation of energy with a range of physiological conditions.

  7. Nuclear medicine imaging system

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, Gerald W.; Brill, A. Bertrand; Bizais, Yves J.; Rowe, R. Wanda; Zubal, I. George

    1986-01-07

    A nuclear medicine imaging system having two large field of view scintillation cameras mounted on a rotatable gantry and being movable diametrically toward or away from each other is disclosed. In addition, each camera may be rotated about an axis perpendicular to the diameter of the gantry. The movement of the cameras allows the system to be used for a variety of studies, including positron annihilation, and conventional single photon emission, as well as static orthogonal dual multi-pinhole tomography. In orthogonal dual multi-pinhole tomography, each camera is fitted with a seven pinhole collimator to provide seven views from slightly different perspectives. By using two cameras at an angle to each other, improved sensitivity and depth resolution is achieved. The computer system and interface acquires and stores a broad range of information in list mode, including patient physiological data, energy data over the full range detected by the cameras, and the camera position. The list mode acquisition permits the study of attenuation as a result of Compton scatter, as well as studies involving the isolation and correlation of energy with a range of physiological conditions.

  8. International Library Program to Prevent Nuclear Holocaust.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sable, Martin H.

    1985-01-01

    Suggests that International Federation of Library Associations act as agent of UNESCO and arrange through its member national library associations to hold lectures and teach-ins, organize discussion groups, and publish and distribute pamphlets dealing with danger of nuclear holocaust. Suggested war-preventive activities, program structures, and…

  9. Information Warfare and International Law

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-01-01

    information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources , gathering and...OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE 1998 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-1998 to 00-00-1998 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Information Warfare and...for International Studies; Melanie Greenberg of the Stanford University Center for International Security and Arms Control (CISAC); Daniel Kuehl of

  10. Lessons learnt from an international intercomparison of national network systems used to provide early warning of a nuclear accident.

    PubMed

    Sáez-Vergara, J C; Thompson, I M G; Funck, E; Andersen, C E; Neumaier, S; Bøtter-Jensen, L

    2003-01-01

    As part of the European Research Council's Fourth Framework Programme, the EURADOS Action Group on Monitoring of External Exposures held an intercomparison of national network systems. This took place during May/June 1999 at the Risø Natural Enviromental Radiation Measurement Station in Denmark and at the Underground Laboratory for Dosimetry and Spectrometry (UDO) of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Germany. The network systems are used continuously to monitor radiation levels throughout a country in order to give early warning of nuclear accidents having transboundary implications. The radiation levels measured are used to estimate the radiation risks to people arising from the accident. Seven European countries participated in the intercomparison with detector systems used in their national network systems as well as with detectors being developed for future use. Since different radiation quantities were measured by the systems (namely exposure, air kerma and ambient dose equivalent), the initial analysis of the intercomparison results was made in terms of the quantity air kerma rate. This report completes the analysis of the results and these are given in terms of air kerma rate in order to be consistent with the preliminary report. In addition, in some cases the results are also given in terms of the quantity measured by each national network system. The experience gained from this intercomparison is used to help organise a follow-up intercomparison to be held at the PTB Braunschweig in September 2002 and in which a further seven or eight countries from Europe will participate.

  11. International nuclear fuel cycle fact book

    SciTech Connect

    Leigh, I.W.

    1988-01-01

    As the US Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE contractors have become increasingly involved with other nations in nuclear fuel cycle and waste management cooperative activities, a need has developed for a ready source or information concerning foreign fuel cycle programs, facilities, and personnel. This Fact Book was compiled to meet that need. The information contained has been obtained from nuclear trade journals and newsletters; reports of foreign visits and visitors; CEC, IAEA, and OECD/NEA activities reports; proceedings of conferences and workshops; and so forth. Sources do not agree completely with each other, and the data listed herein does not reflect any one single source but frequently is consolidation/combination of information. Lack of space as well as the intent and purpose of the Fact Book limit the given information to that pertaining to the Nuclear Fuel Cycle and to data considered of primary interest or most helpful to the majority of users.

  12. Nuclear medicine imaging system

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, G.W.; Brill, A.B.; Bizais, Y.J.C.; Rowe, R.W.; Zubal, I.G.

    1983-03-11

    It is an object of this invention to provide a nuclear imaging system having the versatility to do positron annihilation studies, rotating single or opposed camera gamma emission studies, and orthogonal gamma emission studies. It is a further object of this invention to provide an imaging system having the capability for orthogonal dual multipinhole tomography. It is another object of this invention to provide a nuclear imaging system in which all available energy data, as well as patient physiological data, are acquired simultaneously in list mode.

  13. International Atomic Energy Agency specialists meeting on experience in ageing, maintenance, and modernization of instrumentation and control systems for improving nuclear power plant availability

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    This report presents the proceedings of the Specialist`s Meeting on Experience in Aging, Maintenance and Modernization of Instrumentation and Control Systems for Improving Nuclear Power Plant Availability that was held at the Ramada Inn in Rockville, Maryland on May 5--7, 1993. The Meeting was presented in cooperation with the Electric Power Research Institute, Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the International Atomic Energy Agency. There were approximately 65 participants from 13 countries at the Meeting. Individual reports have been cataloged separately.

  14. Nuclear Technology: Making Informed Decisions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altshuler, Kenneth

    1989-01-01

    Discusses a unit on nuclear technology which is taught in a physics class. Explains the unit design, implementation process, demonstrations used, and topics of discussion that include light and optics, naturally and artificially produced sources of radioactivity, nuclear equations, isotopes and half-lives, and power-generating nuclear reactors.…

  15. Nuclear Technology: Making Informed Decisions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altshuler, Kenneth

    1989-01-01

    Discusses a unit on nuclear technology which is taught in a physics class. Explains the unit design, implementation process, demonstrations used, and topics of discussion that include light and optics, naturally and artificially produced sources of radioactivity, nuclear equations, isotopes and half-lives, and power-generating nuclear reactors.…

  16. [Semantic information. Internal language. Thinking].

    PubMed

    Azcoaga, J E

    1993-06-01

    Semantic information has reached an objective condition after a lengthy history of semantic inquiries that instrumental neurophysiological devices--such as event-related potentials, electroencephalographic spectral analysis, regional brain circulation, PET scan, deep brain electrodes, and other--have made easier. In turn, internal language, as screened according to Vigotsky's perspective, is considered a product of semantic information circulation understood as neurosemae interconnection. Finally, in normal adults, thinking processes are assumed to be made up by both sensoperceptive information (proprioceptive information included) and semantic information. Thus, an "extraverbal thinking" can be distinguished, whose activity is hardly describable in healthy adults but should be considered as a condition of non-educated deaf persons, and a "verbal thinking", or internal language, made up by semantic information.

  17. Nuclear Systems Kilopower Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palac, Don; Gibson, Marc; Mason, Lee; Houts, Michael; McClure, Patrick; Robinson, Ross

    2016-01-01

    The Nuclear Systems Kilopower Project was initiated by NASAs Space Technology Mission Directorate Game Changing Development Program in fiscal year 2015 to demonstrate subsystem-level technology readiness of small space fission power in a relevant environment (Technology Readiness Level 5) for space science and human exploration power needs. The Nuclear Systems Kilopower Project consists of two elements. The primary element is the Kilopower Prototype Test, also called the Kilopower Reactor Using Stirling Technology(KRUSTY) Test. This element consists of the development and testing of a fission ground technology demonstrator of a 1 kWe fission power system. A 1 kWe system matches requirements for some robotic precursor exploration systems and future potential deep space science missions, and also allows a nuclear ground technology demonstration in existing nuclear test facilities at low cost. The second element, the Mars Kilopower Scalability Study, consists of the analysis and design of a scaled-up version of the 1 kWe reference concept to 10 kWe for Mars surface power projected requirements, and validation of the applicability of the KRUSTY experiment to key technology challenges for a 10 kWe system. If successful, these two elements will lead to initiation of planning for a technology demonstration of a 10 kWe fission power capability for Mars surface outpost power.

  18. Internal dose following a major nuclear war

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, K.R.; Shapiro, C.S. )

    1992-01-01

    The PATHWAY model results were used, in conjunction with a hypothetical major nuclear attack on the U.S., to arrive at the ratio of internal to external dose for humans from early (48 h) fallout. Considered were the four nuclides (137Cs, 89Sr, 90Sr, 131I) that account for most of the reconstructed whole-body committed equivalent dose from internal radiation in people who lived downwind of the Nevada Test Site during atmospheric tests. Effects of climate perturbations (the 'nuclear winter' effect) on food crops were considered. These could increase internal dose estimates, depending on the severity of the climate perturbations. Internal and external doses to humans for 10 locations within the U.S. have been calculated, with varying local conditions and varying assumption about their shelters. The estimated 50-y internal dose commitment ranged from 0.0-0.17 Sv, the 48-h external dose from 0.15-4.6 Sv. The resultant ratios of internal to external committed dose received in the first months (until food transport was restored) varied from less than 0.01 to about 0.2. In all cases examined, the total dose from early fallout was found to be dominated by the external dose.

  19. Internal dose following a major nuclear war.

    PubMed

    Peterson, K R; Shapiro, C S

    1992-01-01

    The PATHWAY model results were used, in conjunction with a hypothetical major nuclear attack on the U.S., to arrive at the ratio of internal to external dose for humans from early (48 h) fallout. Considered were the four nuclides (137Cs, 89Sr, 90Sr, 131I) that account for most of the reconstructed whole-body committed equivalent dose from internal radiation in people who lived downwind of the Nevada Test Site during atmospheric tests. Effects of climate perturbations (the "nuclear winter" effect) on food crops were considered. These could increase internal dose estimates, depending on the severity of the climate perturbations. Internal and external doses to humans for 10 locations within the U.S. have been calculated, with varying local conditions and varying assumption about their shelters. The estimated 50-y internal dose commitment ranged from 0.0-0.17 Sv, the 48-h external dose from 0.15-4.6 Sv. The resultant ratios of internal to external committed dose received in the first months (until food transport was restored) varied from less than 0.01 to about 0.2. In all cases examined, the total dose from early fallout was found to be dominated by the external dose.

  20. The evolution of the international system of radiological protection: food for thought from the Nuclear Energy Agency Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health.

    PubMed

    Lazo, Ted

    2003-09-01

    From its inception, the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), which is part of the broader Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, has contributed to the development of international radiological protection norms and standards. This continues today, in the form of studies and workshops to assist radiological protection policy makers, regulators and practitioners to develop concepts and approaches to help the international system of radiological protection, as recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), to evolve to better serve societal needs. The NEA's Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health (CRPPH), in providing this support, has collaborated closely with the ICRP and strongly supports the current ICRP recommendation development process. In particular, active dialogue with a broad range of stakeholders is contributing to the evolution of concepts towards consensus on new ICRP recommendations. The CRPPH, as a body of ICRP recommendation practitioners, feels that the public, workers and the environment are well protected by the current radiological protection system, but agrees that a new consolidation and clarification of ICRP recommendations would be of value. The intent of the CRPPH in collaborating with ICRP is to develop a system of radiological protection that is simplified, more coherent, firmly based upon science and more clearly presented than the current system. This paper summarises the more detailed views of the CRPPH on the evolution of the system of radiological protection.

  1. NICA project management information system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashashin, M. V.; Kekelidze, D. V.; Kostromin, S. A.; Korenkov, V. V.; Kuniaev, S. V.; Morozov, V. V.; Potrebenikov, Yu. K.; Trubnikov, G. V.; Philippov, A. V.

    2016-09-01

    The science projects growth, changing of the efficiency criteria during the project implementation require not only increasing of the management specialization level but also pose the problem of selecting the effective planning methods, monitoring of deadlines and interaction of participants involved in research projects. This paper is devoted to choosing the project management information system for the new heavy-ion collider NICA (Nuclotron based Ion Collider fAcility). We formulate the requirements for the project management information system with taking into account the specifics of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR, Dubna, Russia) as an international intergovernmental research organization, which is developed on the basis of a flexible and effective information system for the NICA project management.

  2. International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book. Revision 12

    SciTech Connect

    Leigh, I.W.

    1992-05-01

    As the US Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE contractors have become increasingly involved with other nations in nuclear fuel cycle and waste management cooperative activities, a need exists costs for a ready source of information concerning foreign fuel cycle programs, facilities, and personnel. This Fact Book has been compiled to meet that need. The information contained in the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book has been obtained from many unclassified sources: nuclear trade journals and newsletters; reports of foreign visits and visitors; CEC, IAEA, and OECD/NMEA activities reports; and proceedings of conferences and workshops. The data listed typically do not reflect any single source but frequently represent a consolidation/combination of information.

  3. Proceedings of the International Conference e-Learning 2014. Multi Conference on Computer Science and Information Systems (Lisbon, Portugal, July 15-19, 2014)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baptista Nunes, Miguel, Ed.; McPherson, Maggie, Ed.

    2014-01-01

    These proceedings contain the papers of the International Conference e-Learning 2014, which was organised by the International Association for Development of the Information Society and is part of the Multi Conference on Computer Science and Information Systems (Lisbon, Portugal July 15-19, 2014). The e-Learning 2014 conference aims to address the…

  4. Nuclear Reaction Data Center Network; International and Asia

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Kiyoshi; Otuka, Naohiko

    2009-03-31

    The activities of the Nuclear Reaction Data Centre at Hokkaido University and International Network of Nuclear Reaction Data Centre (NRDC) are explained. Finally, collaboration in the nuclear data activities among Asian countries are proposed.

  5. Nuclear core positioning system

    DOEpatents

    Garkisch, Hans D.; Yant, Howard W.; Patterson, John F.

    1979-01-01

    A structural support system for the core of a nuclear reactor which achieves relatively restricted clearances at operating conditions and yet allows sufficient clearance between fuel assemblies at refueling temperatures. Axially displaced spacer pads having variable between pad spacing and a temperature compensated radial restraint system are utilized to maintain clearances between the fuel elements. The core support plates are constructed of metals specially chosen such that differential thermal expansion produces positive restraint at operating temperatures.

  6. Systems of evidence-based healthcare and personalised health information: some international and national trends.

    PubMed

    Gordon, C; Gray, J A; Toth, B; Veloso, M

    2000-01-01

    In Europe, North America and elsewhere, growing interest has focussed on evidence-based healthcare systems, incorporating the deployment of practice guidelines, as a field of application for health telematics. The clinical benefit and technical feasibility of common European approaches to this task has recently been demonstrated. In Europe it is likely that, building on recent progress in electronic health record architecture (EHRA) standards, a sufficient state of maturity can be reached to justify initiation within CEN TC251 of a prestandards process on guideline content formats during the current 5th Framework of EC RT&D activity. There is now a similar impetus to agree standards for this field in North America. Thanks to fruitful EC-USA contacts during the 4th Framework programme, there is now a chance, given well-planned coordination, to establish a global consensus optimally suited to serve the world-wide delivery and application of evidence-based medicine. This review notes three factors which may accelerate progress to convergence: (1) revolutionary changes in the knowledge basis of professional/patient/public healthcare partnerships, involving the key role of the Web as a health knowledge resource for citizens, and a rapidly growing market for personalised health information and advice; (2) the emergence at national levels of digital warehouses of clinical guidelines and EBM knowledge resources, agencies which are capable of brokering common mark-up and interchange media definitions between knowledge providers, industry and healthcare organizations; (3) the closing gap in knowledge management technology, with the advent of XML and RDF, between approaches and services based respectively on text mark-up and knowledge-base paradigms. A current project in the UK National Health Service (the National electronic Library of Health) is cited as an example of a national initiative designed to harness these trends.

  7. Safety and Nonsafety Communications and Interactions in International Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Kisner, Roger A; Mullens, James Allen; Wilson, Thomas L; Wood, Richard Thomas; Korsah, Kofi; Qualls, A L; Muhlheim, Michael David; Holcomb, David Eugene; Loebl, Andy

    2007-08-01

    Current industry and NRC guidance documents such as IEEE 7-4.3.2, Reg. Guide 1.152, and IEEE 603 do not sufficiently define a level of detail for evaluating interdivisional communications independence. The NRC seeks to establish criteria for safety systems communications that can be uniformly applied in evaluation of a variety of safety system designs. This report focuses strictly on communication issues related to data sent between safety systems and between safety and nonsafety systems. Further, the report does not provide design guidance for communication systems nor present detailed failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) results for existing designs. This letter report describes communications between safety and nonsafety systems in nuclear power plants outside the United States. A limited study of international nuclear power plants was conducted to ascertain important communication implementations that might have bearing on systems proposed for licensing in the United States. This report provides that following information: 1.communications types and structures used in a representative set of international nuclear power reactors, and 2.communications issues derived from standards and other source documents relevant to safety and nonsafety communications. Topics that are discussed include the following: communication among redundant safety divisions, communications between safety divisions and nonsafety systems, control of safety equipment from a nonsafety workstation, and connection of nonsafety programming, maintenance, and test equipment to redundant safety divisions during operation. Information for this report was obtained through publicly available sources such as published papers and presentations. No proprietary information is represented.

  8. Space Nuclear Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houts, Michael G.

    2012-01-01

    Fission power and propulsion systems can enable exciting space exploration missions. These include bases on the moon and Mars; and the exploration, development, and utilization of the solar system. In the near-term, fission surface power systems could provide abundant, constant, cost-effective power anywhere on the surface of the Moon or Mars, independent of available sunlight. Affordable access to Mars, the asteroid belt, or other destinations could be provided by nuclear thermal rockets. In the further term, high performance fission power supplies could enable both extremely high power levels on planetary surfaces and fission electric propulsion vehicles for rapid, efficient cargo and crew transfer. Advanced fission propulsion systems could eventually allow routine access to the entire solar system. Fission systems could also enable the utilization of resources within the solar system.

  9. Fieldable Nuclear Material Identification System

    SciTech Connect

    Radle, James E; Archer, Daniel E; Carter, Robert J; Mullens, James Allen; Mihalczo, John T; Britton Jr, Charles L; Lind, Randall F; Wright, Michael C

    2010-01-01

    The Fieldable Nuclear Material Identification System (FNMIS), funded by the NA-241 Office of Dismantlement and Transparency, provides information to determine the material attributes and identity of heavily shielded nuclear objects. This information will provide future treaty participants with verifiable information required by the treaty regime. The neutron interrogation technology uses a combination of information from induced fission neutron radiation and transmitted neutron imaging information to provide high confidence that the shielded item is consistent with the host's declaration. The combination of material identification information and the shape and configuration of the item are very difficult to spoof. When used at various points in the warhead dismantlement sequence, the information complimented by tags and seals can be used to track subassembly and piece part information as the disassembly occurs. The neutron transmission imaging has been developed during the last seven years and the signature analysis over the last several decades. The FNMIS is the culmination of the effort to put the technology in a usable configuration for potential treaty verification purposes.

  10. International Exchange of Emergency Phase Information and Assessment: An Aid to Inter/National Decision Makers

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, T J; Chino, M; Ehrhardt, J; Shershakov, V

    2003-09-01

    This paper discusses a collaborative project whose purpose is (1) to demonstrate the technical feasibility and mutual benefit of a system seeking early review or preview, in a ''quasi peer review'' mode, of nuclear accident plume and dose assessment predictions by four major international nuclear accident emergency response systems before release of their calculations to their respective national authorities followed by (2) sharing these results with responsible international authorities. The extreme sensitivity of the general public to any nuclear accident information has been a strong motivation to seek peer review prior to public release. Another intended objective of this work is (3) the development of an affordable/accessible system for distribution of prediction results to countries having no prediction capabilities and (4) utilization of the link for exercises and collaboration studies. The project exploits the Internet as a ubiquitous communications medium, browser technology as a simple, user friendly interface, and low-cost PC level hardware. The participants are developing a web based dedicated node with ID and password access control, where the four systems can deposit a minimal set of XML-based data and graphics files, which are then displayed in a common identical map format. Side-by-side viewing and televideo conferencing will permit rapid evaluation, correction or elaboration of data, recalculation (if necessary) and should produce a strong level of consensus to assist international decision makers. Successful completion of this work could lead to easy utilization by national and international organizations, such as the IAEA and WHO, as well as by non-nuclear states at risk of a trans-boundary incursion on their territory.

  11. The Orbital Space Environment and Space Situational Awareness Domain Ontology - Toward an International Information System for Space Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rovetto, R.

    2016-09-01

    The orbital space environment is home to natural and artificial satellites, debris, and space weather phenomena. As the population of orbital objects grows so do the potential hazards to astronauts, space infrastructure and spaceflight capability. Orbital debris, in particular, is a universal concern. This and other hazards can be minimized by improving global space situational awareness (SSA). By sharing more data and increasing observational coverage of the space environment we stand to achieve that goal, thereby making spaceflight safer and expanding our knowledge of near-Earth space. To facilitate data-sharing interoperability among distinct orbital debris and space object catalogs, and SSA information systems, I proposed ontology in (Rovetto, 2015) and (Rovetto and Kelso, 2016). I continue this effort toward formal representations and models of the overall domain that may serve to improve peaceful SSA and increase our scientific knowledge. This paper explains the project concept introduced in those publications, summarizing efforts to date as well as the research field of ontology development and engineering. I describe concepts for an ontological framework for the orbital space environment, near-Earth space environment and SSA domain. An ontological framework is conceived as a part of a potential international information system. The purpose of such a system is to consolidate, analyze and reason over various sources and types of orbital and SSA data toward the mutually beneficial goals of safer space navigation and scientific research. Recent internationals findings on the limitations of orbital data, in addition to existing publications on collaborative SSA, demonstrate both the overlap with this project and the need for datasharing and integration.

  12. Information Systems Development--ISD '94. Methods & Tools. Theory & Practice. Proceedings of the International Conference (4th, Bled, Slovenia, September 20-22, 1994).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zupancic, Joze, Ed.; Wrycza, Stanislaw, Ed.

    These proceedings present 3 invited papers, 65 submitted papers, and 17 presentations on work in progress that were given at the Fourth International Conference on Information Systems Development. The three invited papers are: "Information Systems Planning in Small Business" (Georgios Doukidis, Panagiotis Lybereas, Robert D. Galliers);…

  13. REPORT OF THE WORKSHOP ON NUCLEAR FACILITY DESIGN INFORMATION EXAMINATION AND VERIFICATION FOR SAFEGUARDS

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Metcalf; Robert Bean

    2009-10-01

    Executive Summary The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) implements nuclear safeguards and verifies countries are compliant with their international nuclear safeguards agreements. One of the key provisions in the safeguards agreement is the requirement that the country provide nuclear facility design and operating information to the IAEA relevant to safeguarding the facility, and at a very early stage. , This provides the opportunity for the IAEA to verify the safeguards-relevant features of the facility and to periodically ensure that those features have not changed. The national authorities (State System of Accounting for and Control of Nuclear Material - SSAC) provide the design information for all facilities within a country to the IAEA. The design information is conveyed using the IAEA’s Design Information Questionnaire (DIQ) and specifies: (1) Identification of the facility’s general character, purpose, capacity, and location; (2) Description of the facility’s layout and nuclear material form, location, and flow; (3) Description of the features relating to nuclear material accounting, containment, and surveillance; and (4) Description of existing and proposed procedures for nuclear material accounting and control, with identification of nuclear material balance areas. The DIQ is updated as required by written addendum. IAEA safeguards inspectors examine and verify this information in design information examination (DIE) and design information verification (DIV) activities to confirm that the facility has been constructed or is being operated as declared by the facility operator and national authorities, and to develop a suitable safeguards approach. Under the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI), the National Nuclear Security Administrations (NNSA) Office of Non-Proliferation and International Security identified the need for more effective and efficient verification of design information by the IAEA for improving international safeguards

  14. Development and Implementation of An Information System for the Naval Postgraduate School International Programs Office

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-09-01

    implemented or the way that any person thinks the system might be developed and implemented. The visual tool Delphi™, an object-oriented- Pascal -based...ServicesUsed Type: Group Profile: ServicesUsed Contained in: IP_ACTIVITY Caption: Description: Describes the services consumed duri ng IP activity ID

  15. Nuclear internal conversion between bound atomic states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemin, J. F.; Harston, M. R.; Karpeshin, F. F.; Carreyre, J.; Attallah, F.; Aleonard, M. M.; Scheurer, J. N.; Boggaert, G.; Grandin, J. R.; Trzhaskovskaya, M. B.

    2003-01-01

    We present experimental and theoretical results for rate of decay of the (3/2)+ isomeric state in 125Te versus the ionic charge state. For charge state larger than 44 the nuclear transition lies below the threshold for emission of a K-shell electron into the continuum with the result that normal internal conversion is energetically forbiden. Rather surprisingly, for the charge 45 and 46 the lifetime of the level was found to have a value close to that in neutral atoms. We present direct evidence that the nuclear transition could still be converted but without the emission of the electron into the continuum, the electron being promoted from the K-shell to an other empty bound state lying close to the continuum. We called this process BIC. The experimental results agree whith theoretical calculations if BIC resonances are taken into account. This leads to a nuclear decay constant that is extremely sensitive to the precise initial state and simple specification of the charge state is no longer appropriate. The contribution to decay of the nucleus of BIC has recently been extended to the situation in which the electron is promoted to an intermediate filled bound state (PFBIC) with an apparent violation of the Pauli principle. Numerical results of the expected dependence of PFBIC on the charge state will be presented for the decay of the 77.351 keV level in 197Au.

  16. Information and communication technology systems to improve quality of life and safety of Alzheimer's disease patients: a multicenter international survey.

    PubMed

    Pilotto, Alberto; D'Onofrio, Grazia; Benelli, Edoardo; Zanesco, Antonio; Cabello, Ana; Margelí, M Carmen; Wanche-Politis, Sophia; Seferis, Kostas; Sancarlo, Daniele; Kilias, Dimitrios

    2011-01-01

    Within the frame of the European Commission funded Smart Home for Elderly People (HOPE) Project, relatives/caregivers of 223 Alzheimer's Disease (AD) patients were recruited in Italy, Spain, and Greece for a multicenter international survey on the potential role of Information and Communication Technology system (ICT-systems) for AD patients. A five-minute video on HOPE ICT-systems was shown, and all relatives/caregivers completed a 13-item questionnaire that evaluated the potential role of: A) ICT-systems in improving quality of life, care, and safety; B) devices for monitoring personal movements, medication use, and ambient environmental conditions; C) devices to improve communication, home-based rehabilitation, and reduction of specific risks; and D) possible agreement in using ICT-systems by AD patients. Relatives/caregivers reported that ICT-systems could be very useful to improve: A) quality of life (66.4%), care (56.1%), and safety (87.0%); B) monitoring bed rest and movements (80.7%), medication use (87.4%), and ambient environmental conditions (85.2%); and C) emergency communication (83.4%). Relatives/caregivers reported that ICT-systems could be significantly more useful for AD patients aged 75-84 than patients aged <75 or ≥85 years (p < 0.0001) and with moderate than mild or severe dementia (p < 0.0001). Relatives/caregivers aged ≥50 years and with low educational level considered ICT-systems more useful than relatives/caregivers aged <50 years (p < 0.0001) and with high educational level (p < 0.0001). In conclusion, relatives/caregivers considered that the HOPE ICT-system could be useful to improve the management of AD patients.

  17. Informed consent in the nuclear medicine setting.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, M Sara

    2011-03-01

    In the nuclear medicine setting, the task of obtaining informed consent for procedures that require it is frequently left to the nuclear medicine technologist. Unfortunately, a patient's signature on a consent form does not mean the patient has given informed consent, or what legal scholars call valid consent. On completion of this scholarly bioethics article, the reader will understand the troubled history that led to informed consent as social and regulatory policy. Additionally, the reader will discover the meaning of "informed consent," which includes 3 critical components: disclosure, decision-making capacity, and voluntariness. Finally, this article will discuss which nuclear medicine procedures require informed consent, how to assess whether patients have given informed consent, what to do when the patient refuses a procedure, and what to do when informed consent is unachievable.

  18. The U.S. national nuclear forensics library, nuclear materials information program, and data dictionary

    SciTech Connect

    Lamont, Stephen Philip; Brisson, Marcia; Curry, Michael

    2011-02-17

    Nuclear forensics assessments to determine material process history requires careful comparison of sample data to both measured and modeled nuclear material characteristics. Developing centralized databases, or nuclear forensics libraries, to house this information is an important step to ensure all relevant data will be available for comparison during a nuclear forensics analysis and help expedite the assessment of material history. The approach most widely accepted by the international community at this time is the implementation of National Nuclear Forensics libraries, which would be developed and maintained by individual nations. This is an attractive alternative toan international database since it provides an understanding that each country has data on materials produced and stored within their borders, but eliminates the need to reveal any proprietary or sensitive information to other nations. To support the concept of National Nuclear Forensics libraries, the United States Department of Energy has developed a model library, based on a data dictionary, or set of parameters designed to capture all nuclear forensic relevant information about a nuclear material. Specifically, information includes material identification, collection background and current location, analytical laboratories where measurements were made, material packaging and container descriptions, physical characteristics including mass and dimensions, chemical and isotopic characteristics, particle morphology or metallurgical properties, process history including facilities, and measurement quality assurance information. While not necessarily required, it may also be valuable to store modeled data sets including reactor burn-up or enrichment cascade data for comparison. It is fully expected that only a subset of this information is available or relevant to many materials, and much of the data populating a National Nuclear Forensics library would be process analytical or material accountability

  19. Nuclear safety research collaborations between the U.S. and Russian Federation International Nuclear Safety Centers

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, D. J.; Braun, J. C.; Klickman, A. E.; Bougaenko, S. E.; Kabonov, L. P.; Kraev, A. G.

    2000-05-05

    The Russian Federation Ministry for Atomic Energy (MINATOM) and the US Department of Energy (USDOE) have formed International Nuclear Safety Centers to collaborate on nuclear safety research. USDOE established the US Center (ISINSC) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in October 1995. MINATOM established the Russian Center (RINSC) at the Research and Development Institute of Power Engineering (RDIPE) in Moscow in July 1996. In April 1998 the Russian center became a semi-independent, autonomous organization under MINATOM. The goals of the center are to: Cooperate in the development of technologies associated with nuclear safety in nuclear power engineering; Be international centers for the collection of information important for safety and technical improvements in nuclear power engineering; and Maintain a base for fundamental knowledge needed to design nuclear reactors. The strategic approach is being used to accomplish these goals is for the two centers to work together to use the resources and the talents of the scientists associated with the US Center and the Russian Center to do collaborative research to improve the safety of Russian-designed nuclear reactors. The two centers started conducting joint research and development projects in January 1997. Since that time the following ten joint projects have been initiated: INSC databases--web server and computing center; Coupled codes--Neutronic and thermal-hydraulic; Severe accident management for Soviet-designed reactors; Transient management and advanced control; Survey of relevant nuclear safety research facilities in the Russian Federation; Computer code validation for transient analysis of VVER and RBMK reactors; Advanced structural analysis; Development of a nuclear safety research and development plan for MINATOM; Properties and applications of heavy liquid metal coolants; and Material properties measurement and assessment. Currently, there is activity in eight of these projects. Details on each of these

  20. Nuclear reactor sealing system

    DOEpatents

    McEdwards, James A.

    1983-01-01

    A liquid metal-cooled nuclear reactor sealing system. The nuclear reactor includes a vessel sealed at its upper end by a closure head. The closure head comprises at least two components, one of which is rotatable; and the two components define an annulus therebetween. The sealing system includes at least a first and second inflatable seal disposed in series in an upper portion of the annulus. The system further includes a dip seal extending into a body of insulation located adjacent a bottom portion of the closure head. The dip seal comprises a trough formed by a lower portion of one of the components, and a seal blade pendently supported from the other component and extending downwardly into the trough. A body of liquid metal is contained in the trough which submerges a portion of the seal blade. The seal blade is provided with at least one aperture located above the body of liquid metal for providing fluid communication between the annulus intermediate the dip seal and the inflatable seals, and a body of cover gas located inside the vessel. There also is provided means for introducing a purge gas into the annulus intermediate the inflatable seals and the seal blade. The purge gas is introduced in an amount sufficient to substantially reduce diffusion of radioactive cover gas or sodium vapor up to the inflatable seals. The purge gas mixes with the cover gas in the reactor vessel where it can be withdrawn from the vessel for treatment and recycle to the vessel.

  1. Nuclear Data Needs for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rullhusen, Peter

    2006-04-01

    Nuclear data needs for generation IV systems. Future of nuclear energy and the role of nuclear data / P. Finck. Nuclear data needs for generation IV nuclear energy systems-summary of U.S. workshop / T. A. Taiwo, H. S. Khalil. Nuclear data needs for the assessment of gen. IV systems / G. Rimpault. Nuclear data needs for generation IV-lessons from benchmarks / S. C. van der Marck, A. Hogenbirk, M. C. Duijvestijn. Core design issues of the supercritical water fast reactor / M. Mori ... [et al.]. GFR core neutronics studies at CEA / J. C. Bosq ... [et al]. Comparative study on different phonon frequency spectra of graphite in GCR / Young-Sik Cho ... [et al.]. Innovative fuel types for minor actinides transmutation / D. Haas, A. Fernandez, J. Somers. The importance of nuclear data in modeling and designing generation IV fast reactors / K. D. Weaver. The GIF and Mexico-"everything is possible" / C. Arrenondo Sánchez -- Benmarks, sensitivity calculations, uncertainties. Sensitivity of advanced reactor and fuel cycle performance parameters to nuclear data uncertainties / G. Aliberti ... [et al.]. Sensitivity and uncertainty study for thermal molten salt reactors / A. Biduad ... [et al.]. Integral reactor physics benchmarks- The International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) and the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPHEP) / J. B. Briggs, D. W. Nigg, E. Sartori. Computer model of an error propagation through micro-campaign of fast neutron gas cooled nuclear reactor / E. Ivanov. Combining differential and integral experiments on [symbol] for reducing uncertainties in nuclear data applications / T. Kawano ... [et al.]. Sensitivity of activation cross sections of the Hafnium, Tanatalum and Tungsten stable isotopes to nuclear reaction mechanisms / V. Avrigeanu ... [et al.]. Generating covariance data with nuclear models / A. J. Koning. Sensitivity of Candu-SCWR reactors physics calculations to nuclear data files / K. S

  2. North Korea and Iran’s Nuclear Programs as Instability Factors in the New System of International Relations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-01

    Aleksandr. “V mire letiat ‘iadernye utki’.” (Nuclear Hoax in the World.) Izvestiia, October 19, 2004. 113 Andreenko, Anton. “Iran i uran .” (Iran and...149 Andreenko, Anton. “Iran i uran .” (Iran and Uranium). 7 dnei. August 26, 2004. 150 Shumilin, Aleksandr. “V mire letiat ‘iadernye utki...152 IAEA materials. http://www.iaea.org. 153 Andreenko, Anton. “Iran i uran .” (Iran and Uranium). 7 dnei. August 26, 2004. - 38 - of its missile

  3. Proposals for the Future Development of the Russian Automated Federal Information System for Nuclear Material Control and Accounting: The Universal Reporting Concept

    SciTech Connect

    Martiyanov, A; Pitel, V; Kasumova, L; Babcock, R; Heinberg, C

    2004-06-17

    Development of the automated Russian Federation Federal Information System for Nuclear Material Control and Accounting (FIS) started in 1996. From the beginning, the creation of the FIS was based on the concept of obtaining data from the material balance areas of the organizations, which would enable the system to collect detailed information on nuclear material. In December 2000, the organization-level summarized reporting method was mandated by the Russian Federation and subsequently implemented for all organizations. Analysis of long-term FIS objectives, reporting by all the MBAs in Russia, showed that the present summarized reporting approach decreed by regulations posed a fair number of problems. We need alternative methods that allow the FIS to obtain more detailed information on nuclear material but which accurately reflect the technical and economic resources available to Russian organizations. One possible solution is the universal reporting method. In August 2003, the proposals of the FIS working group to transition to the universal reporting method were approved at the fourth meeting of the Joint Coordinating Committee for Implementation of the Russian Federation and U.S. Government-to-Government Agreement on Cooperation in the Area of Nuclear Material Physical Protection, Control and Accounting (JCC). One of the important elements of universal reporting is that organizations handling nuclear material will establish 'reporting areas' in cooperation with MinAtom of Russia. A reporting area may consist of one MBA, several MBAs, or even an entire organization. This paper will discuss the universal reporting concept and its major objectives and methods for the FIS.

  4. Unification: An international aerospace information opportunity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cotter, Gladys A.; Lahr, Thomas F.; Carroll, Bonnie C.

    1992-01-01

    Science and technology projects are becoming more and more international and interdisciplinary. Other parts of the world, notably Europe, are increasingly powerful players in the aerospace industry. This change has led to the development of various aerospace information initiatives in other countries. With scarce resources in all areas of government and industry, the NASA STI Program is reviewing its current acquisition and exchange practices and policies to factor in the changing requirements and new opportunities within the international community. Current NASA goals and activities are reviewed with a new view toward developing a scenario for establishing an international aerospace database, maintaining compatibility among national aerospace information systems, eliminating duplication of effort, and sharing resources through international cooperation wherever possible.

  5. Unification: An international aerospace information issue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cotter, Gladys A.; Lahr, Thomas F.

    1991-01-01

    Science and technology projects are becoming more and more international and interdisciplinary. Other parts of the world, notably Europe, are increasingly powerful players in the aerospace business. This change has led to the development of various aerospace information initiatives in other countries. With scarce resources in all areas of government and industry, the NASA STI Program is reviewing its current acquisition and exchange practices and policies to factor in the changing requirements and new opportunities within the international community. Current NASA goals and activities are reviewed with a view toward developing a scenario for establishing an international aerospace data base, maintaining compatibility among national aerospace information systems, eliminating duplication of effort, and sharing resources through international cooperation wherever possible.

  6. Internal dose following a large-scale nuclear war

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, K.R.; Shapiro, C.S.; Harvey, T.F.

    1988-03-01

    In this study, we use the PATHWAY model, in conjunction with a reasonable hypothetical nuclear attack on the US to arrive at calculations of internal and external dose estimates that are based on valid model results. Our own estimates are presented with calculational aids (at every step) that enable readers to use their own nuclear war scenarios, fallout patterns, assumptions about the climatic changes brought on by large fires following a nuclear attack, the viability of the transportation system for food delivery, the quality and quantity of water and foods available locally, the required caloric intakes of the survivors, and several other factors. We conclude that the average American family that survived a large-scale nuclear war, using their own home or workplace as a refuge, would receive a total internal dose from ingestion that is from one to 10 percent of the total external dose. Those who stayed where shelter protection factors and foraged food consumption were large could receive internal doses from 11 percent to more than 100% of the total external dose. 28 refs., 9 figs.

  7. 16th International Conference on Nuclear Structure: NS2016

    DOE PAGES

    Galindo-Uribarri, Alfredo

    2016-10-28

    Every two years the Nuclear Structure (NS) conference series brings together researchers from an international community of experimental and theoretical nuclear physicists to present and discuss their latest results in nuclear structure. This biennial conference covered the latest results on experimental and theoretical research into the structure of nuclei at the extremes of isospin, excitation energy, mass, and angular momentum. Topics included many of the most exciting areas of modern nuclear structure research such as transitional behavior, nuclear structure and its evolution across the nuclear landscape, shell structure, collectivity, nuclear structure with radioactive beams, and macroscopic and microscopic approaches tomore » nuclear structure.« less

  8. 16th International Conference on Nuclear Structure: NS2016

    SciTech Connect

    Galindo-Uribarri, Alfredo

    2016-10-28

    Every two years the Nuclear Structure (NS) conference series brings together researchers from an international community of experimental and theoretical nuclear physicists to present and discuss their latest results in nuclear structure. This biennial conference covered the latest results on experimental and theoretical research into the structure of nuclei at the extremes of isospin, excitation energy, mass, and angular momentum. Topics included many of the most exciting areas of modern nuclear structure research such as transitional behavior, nuclear structure and its evolution across the nuclear landscape, shell structure, collectivity, nuclear structure with radioactive beams, and macroscopic and microscopic approaches to nuclear structure.

  9. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Information Digest, 1991 edition

    SciTech Connect

    Olive, K L

    1991-03-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission Information Digest provides a summary of information about the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), NRC's regulatory responsibilities, and the areas NRC licenses. This digest is a compilation of NRC-related data and is designed to provide a quick reference to major facts about the agency and the industry it regulates. In general, the data cover 1975 through 1990, with exceptions noted. For operating US commercial nuclear power reactors, information on generating capacity and average capacity factor is obtained from Monthly Operating Reports submitted to the NRC directly by the licensee. This information is reviewed for consistency only. No independent validation and/or verification is performed by the NRC. For detailed and complete information about tables and figures, refer to the source publications. This digest is published annually for the general use of the NRC staff and is available to the public. 30 figs., 12 tabs.

  10. Training Management Information System

    SciTech Connect

    Rackley, M.P.

    1989-01-01

    The Training Management Information System (TMIS) is an integrated information system for all training related activities. TMIS is at the leading edge of training information systems used in the nuclear industry. The database contains all the necessary records to confirm the department's adherence to accreditation criteria and houses all test questions, student records and information needed to evaluate the training process. The key to the TMIS system is that the impact of any change (i.e., procedure change, new equipment, safety incident in the commercial nuclear industry, etc.) can be tracked throughout the training process. This ensures the best training can be performed that meets the needs of the employees. TMIS is comprised of six functional areas: Job and Task Analysis, Training Materials Design and Development, Exam Management, Student Records/Scheduling, Evaluation, and Commitment Tracking. The system consists of a VAX 6320 Cluster with IBM and MacIntosh computers tied into an ethernet with the VAX. Other peripherals are also tied into the system: Exam Generation Stations to include mark sense readers for test grading, Production PC's for Desk-Top Publishing of Training Material, and PC Image Workstations. 5 figs.

  11. The 26th International Nuclear Physics Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    It was a pleasure to welcome all delegates and accompanying persons to Adelaide for the 26th International Conference in Nuclear Physics, INPC2016. As the major meeting in our field, it was a wonderful opportunity to catch up with colleagues from around the world, learn about the very latest developments and share ideas. We were grateful for the support of the Commission on Nuclear Physics, C12, of the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP), which chose Adelaide to host this meeting. We were also honoured that the President of IUPAP, Prof. Bruce McKellar was present at the meeting to welcome delegates and participate in the proceedings. We acknowledge the financial support for the conference which was made available by a number of organisations. We were especially grateful to the major sponsors, the Adelaide Convention Bureau, the University of Adelaide, the Australian National University and ANSTO, as well as IUPAP, the ARC Centre of Excellence for Particle Physics at the Terascale (CoEPP) and several of the world's major nuclear physics laboratories, BNL, GSI, JLab and TRIUMF. As a result of these contributions we were able to offer support to attend the conference to more than 50 international students. Not only did we have a superb scientific program but, consistent with IUPAP guidelines, more than 40% of the invited plenary talks were presented by women. In order to reach out to the local community, Cynthia Keppel (from JLab) presented a public lecture on Hadron Beam Therapy on Tuesday evening, September 13th. As presenting a talk is now often a condition for financial support to attend an international conference, there were 11 simultaneous parallel sessions with more than 350 presentations. We are especially grateful to the International Advisory Committee, the Program Committee and the Conveners whose advice and hard work made it possible for all this to come together. I would also like to acknowledge the work of the Local Organising

  12. Nuclear reactor shutdown system

    DOEpatents

    Bhate, Suresh K.; Cooper, Martin H.; Riffe, Delmar R.; Kinney, Calvin L.

    1981-01-01

    An inherent shutdown system for a nuclear reactor having neutron absorbing rods affixed to an armature which is held in an upper position by a magnetic flux flowing through a Curie temperature material. The Curie temperature material is fixedly positioned about the exterior of an inner duct in an annular region through which reactor coolant flows. Elongated fuel rods extending from within the core upwardly toward the Curie temperature material are preferably disposed within the annular region. Upon abnormal conditions which result in high neutron flux and coolant temperature, the Curie material loses its magnetic permeability, breaking the magnetic flux path and allowing the armature and absorber rods to drop into the core, thus shutting down the fissioning reaction. The armature and absorber rods are retrieved by lowering the housing for the electromagnet forming coils which create a magnetic flux path which includes the inner duct wall. The coil housing then is raised, resetting the armature.

  13. Information Systems for Government and Business: Trends, Issues, Challenges. Proceedings of the Kawasaki International Seminar on the Information Systems Challenge for Government and Business (2nd, Kawasaki City, Japan, July 21-24, 1987).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Centre for Regional Development, Nagoya (Japan).

    The 25 papers in this proceedings were presented by national and international information systems experts, development planners, and scholars at a seminar that was jointly sponsored by the United Nations Centre for Regional Development and the city of Kawasaki, Japan. Designed to reach a wider group of interested planning practitioners and…

  14. Information Scanning and Processing at the Nuclear Safety Information Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parks, Celia; Julian, Carol

    This report is a detailed manual of the information specialist's duties at the Nuclear Safety Information Center. Information specialists scan the literature for documents to be reviewed, procure the documents (books, journal articles, reports, etc.), keep the document location records, and return the documents to the plant library or other…

  15. Nuclear Power: Problems in Information Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaver, William

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the problems encountered at the Duquesne Light Company of Pittsburgh's nuclear power plant as the result of an inability to process information effectively and keep pace with technological change. The creation of a separate division trained and directed to manage the plant's information flows is described and evaluated. (CLB)

  16. Nuclear Power: Problems in Information Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaver, William

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the problems encountered at the Duquesne Light Company of Pittsburgh's nuclear power plant as the result of an inability to process information effectively and keep pace with technological change. The creation of a separate division trained and directed to manage the plant's information flows is described and evaluated. (CLB)

  17. Nuclear Weapons, Psychology, and International Relations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dougherty, James E.

    1976-01-01

    Fear of nuclear energy, nuclear weapons, and nuclear was is widespread among the peoples of the world. However, to what extent do the fears (both rational and irrational) of policy-making elites and political masses produce actual effects upon the behavior of governments (who, after all, control the use of nuclear weapons)? (Author/RK)

  18. Nuclear Weapons, Psychology, and International Relations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dougherty, James E.

    1976-01-01

    Fear of nuclear energy, nuclear weapons, and nuclear was is widespread among the peoples of the world. However, to what extent do the fears (both rational and irrational) of policy-making elites and political masses produce actual effects upon the behavior of governments (who, after all, control the use of nuclear weapons)? (Author/RK)

  19. 10 CFR 1017.11 - Information exempt from being Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Nuclear Information. 1017.11 Section 1017.11 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) IDENTIFICATION AND PROTECTION OF UNCLASSIFIED CONTROLLED NUCLEAR INFORMATION Initially Determining What Information Is Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information § 1017.11 Information exempt from being...

  20. 10 CFR 1017.11 - Information exempt from being Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Nuclear Information. 1017.11 Section 1017.11 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) IDENTIFICATION AND PROTECTION OF UNCLASSIFIED CONTROLLED NUCLEAR INFORMATION Initially Determining What Information Is Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information § 1017.11 Information exempt from being...

  1. 10 CFR 1017.11 - Information exempt from being Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Nuclear Information. 1017.11 Section 1017.11 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) IDENTIFICATION AND PROTECTION OF UNCLASSIFIED CONTROLLED NUCLEAR INFORMATION Initially Determining What Information Is Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information § 1017.11 Information exempt from being...

  2. 10 CFR 1017.11 - Information exempt from being Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Nuclear Information. 1017.11 Section 1017.11 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) IDENTIFICATION AND PROTECTION OF UNCLASSIFIED CONTROLLED NUCLEAR INFORMATION Initially Determining What Information Is Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information § 1017.11 Information exempt from being...

  3. 10 CFR 1017.11 - Information exempt from being Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Nuclear Information. 1017.11 Section 1017.11 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) IDENTIFICATION AND PROTECTION OF UNCLASSIFIED CONTROLLED NUCLEAR INFORMATION Initially Determining What Information Is Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information § 1017.11 Information exempt from...

  4. International Technical Working Group Cooperation to Counter Illicit Nuclear Trafficking

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D K; Niemeyer, S

    2004-09-18

    The Nuclear Smuggling International Technical Working Group (ITWG) is an international body of nuclear forensic experts that cooperate to deter the illicit trafficking of nuclear materials. The objective of the ITWG is to provide a common approach and effective technical solutions to governments who request assistance in nuclear forensics. The ITWG was chartered in 1996 and since that time more than 28 nations and organizations have participated in 9 international meetings and 2 analytical round-robin trials. Soon after its founding the ITWG adopted a general framework to guide nuclear forensics investigations that includes recommendations for nuclear crime scene security and analysis, the best application of radioanalytical methods, the conduct of traditional forensic analysis of contaminated materials, and effective data analysis to interpret the history of seized nuclear materials. This approach has been adopted by many nations as they respond to incidents of illicit nuclear trafficking.

  5. Next generation information systems

    SciTech Connect

    Limback, Nathan P; Medina, Melanie A; Silva, Michelle E

    2010-01-01

    The Information Systems Analysis and Development (ISAD) Team of the Safeguards Systems Group at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has been developing web based information and knowledge management systems for sixteen years. Our vision is to rapidly and cost effectively provide knowledge management solutions in the form of interactive information systems that help customers organize, archive, post and retrieve nonproliferation and safeguards knowledge and information vital to their success. The team has developed several comprehensive information systems that assist users in the betterment and growth of their organizations and programs. Through our information systems, users are able to streamline operations, increase productivity, and share and access information from diverse geographic locations. The ISAD team is also producing interactive visual models. Interactive visual models provide many benefits to customers beyond the scope of traditional full-scale modeling. We have the ability to simulate a vision that a customer may propose, without the time constraints of traditional engineering modeling tools. Our interactive visual models can be used to access specialized training areas, controlled areas, and highly radioactive areas, as well as review site-specific training for complex facilities, and asset management. Like the information systems that the ISAD team develops, these models can be shared and accessed from any location with access to the internet. The purpose of this paper is to elaborate on the capabilities of information systems and interactive visual models as well as consider the possibility of combining the two capabilities to provide the next generation of infonnation systems. The collection, processing, and integration of data in new ways can contribute to the security of the nation by providing indicators and information for timely action to decrease the traditional and new nuclear threats. Modeling and simulation tied to comprehensive

  6. International variation in neighborhood walkability, transit, and recreation environments using geographic information systems: the IPEN adult study.

    PubMed

    Adams, Marc A; Frank, Lawrence D; Schipperijn, Jasper; Smith, Graham; Chapman, James; Christiansen, Lars B; Coffee, Neil; Salvo, Deborah; du Toit, Lorinne; Dygrýn, Jan; Hino, Adriano Akira Ferreira; Lai, Poh-chin; Mavoa, Suzanne; Pinzón, José David; Van de Weghe, Nico; Cerin, Ester; Davey, Rachel; Macfarlane, Duncan; Owen, Neville; Sallis, James F

    2014-10-25

    The World Health Organization recommends strategies to improve urban design, public transportation, and recreation facilities to facilitate physical activity for non-communicable disease prevention for an increasingly urbanized global population. Most evidence supporting environmental associations with physical activity comes from single countries or regions with limited variation in urban form. This paper documents variation in comparable built environment features across countries from diverse regions. The International Physical Activity and the Environment Network (IPEN) study of adults aimed to measure the full range of variation in the built environment using geographic information systems (GIS) across 12 countries on 5 continents. Investigators in Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Colombia, the Czech Republic, Denmark, China, Mexico, New Zealand, Spain, the United Kingdom, and the United States followed a common research protocol to develop internationally comparable measures. Using detailed instructions, GIS-based measures included features such as walkability (i.e., residential density, street connectivity, mix of land uses), and access to public transit, parks, and private recreation facilities around each participant's residential address using 1-km and 500-m street network buffers. Eleven of 12 countries and 15 cities had objective GIS data on built environment features. We observed a 38-fold difference in median residential densities, a 5-fold difference in median intersection densities and an 18-fold difference in median park densities. Hong Kong had the highest and North Shore, New Zealand had the lowest median walkability index values, representing a difference of 9 standard deviations in GIS-measured walkability. Results show that comparable measures can be created across a range of cultural settings revealing profound global differences in urban form relevant to physical activity. These measures allow cities to be ranked more precisely than previously

  7. Management Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    New Automated Management Information Center (AMIC) employs innovative microcomputer techniques to create color charts, viewgraphs, or other data displays in a fraction of the time formerly required. Developed under Kennedy Space Center's contract by Boeing Services International Inc., Seattle, WA, AMIC can produce an entirely new informational chart in 30 minutes, or an updated chart in only five minutes. AMIC also has considerable potential as a management system for business firms.

  8. A Multidisciplinary Approach to the Characterisation and Accelerated Remediation of Nuclear Contaminated Sites: Less Intrusive Techniques and Better Use of Geographical Information System (GIS) Model Development

    SciTech Connect

    Brydie, J.R.; Hiller, P.; Mathers, D.; Gordon, R.

    2006-07-01

    Rapid, cost effective decommissioning and associated remediation of many nuclear licensed sites requires the physical and chemical characterisation of a range of bulk materials including natural soils, sediments, cementitious materials, miscellaneous historically buried waste and natural waters (surface and groundwaters). Conventional techniques (such as cable percussion drilling, rotary coring of building materials, extensive soil sampling campaigns and [ground]water sampling and analysis) tend to be expensive, time consuming, in many cases provide insufficient data and typically take several months to implement. The high level aim of the work is to reduce the overall time and cost of site characterisation, whilst maintaining quality of information and increasing the safety of field and laboratory personnel. We describe here the integrated technical approach being adopted and developed within Nexia Solutions Ltd. to provide a full in situ site characterisation and modelling capability, resulting in significantly reduced costs and acceleration of the Life Cycle Baseline (LCBL) of many United Kingdom (U. K.) nuclear licensed sites. The evolving technical toolbox includes many off-the-shelf technologies, as well as innovative technologies which have either been originally conceived or have been effectively adapted from a range of technical disciplines. All of the techniques here are either in use or are being actively developed and commissioned. All information gained via in situ techniques is used to iteratively update the Geographical Information System (GIS) conceptual model, allowing further targeted site investigation, informed decision making and optioneering. (authors)

  9. Enhancing international radiation/nuclear detection training opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Thomas L.; Bersell, Bridget M.; Booker, Paul M.; Anderson, Gerald E.; Leitch, Rosalyn M.; Meagher, John B.; Siefken, Rob R.; Spracklen, James L.

    2015-09-23

    The United States has worked domestically to develop and provide radiological and nuclear detection training and education initiatives aimed at interior law enforcement, but the international community has predominantly focused efforts at border and customs officials. The interior law enforcement officials of a State play a critical role in maintaining an effective national-level nuclear detection architecture. To meet this vital need, DNDO was funded by the U.S. Department of State (DOS) to create and deliver a 1-week course at the International Law Enforcement Academy (ILEA) in Budapest, Hungary to inform interior law enforcement personnel of the overall mission, and to provide an understanding of how the participants can combat the threats of radiological and nuclear terrorism through detection efforts. Two courses, with approximately 20 students in each course, were delivered in fiscal year (FY) 2013, two were delivered in FY 2014 and FY 2015, and as of this report’s writing more are planned in FY 2016. However, while the ILEA courses produced measurable success, DNDO requested Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) research potential avenues to further increase the course impact.In a multi-phased approach, PNNL researched and analyzed several possible global training locations and venues, and other possible ways to increase the impact of the course using an agreed-to data-gathering format.

  10. Leveraging existing information for use in a National Nuclear Forensics Library (NNFL)

    DOE PAGES

    Davydov, Jerry; Dion, Heather; LaMont, Stephen; ...

    2015-12-16

    A National Nuclear Forensics Library (NNFL) assists a State to assess whether nuclear material encountered out of regulatory control is of domestic or international origin. And by leveraging nuclear material registries, nuclear enterprise records, and safeguards accountancy information, as well as existing domestic technical capability and subject-matter domain expertise, states can better assess the effort required for setting up an NNFL. For states who are largely recipients of nuclear and radiological materials and have no internal production capabilities may create an NNFL that relies on existing information rather than carry out advanced analyses on domestic materials.

  11. International Planetary Data Alliance (IPDA) Information Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, John Steven; Beebe, R.; Guinness, E.; Heather, D.; Huang, M.; Kasaba, Y.; Osuna, P.; Rye, E.; Savorskiy, V.

    2007-01-01

    This document is the third deliverable of the International Planetary Data Alliance (IPDA) Archive Data Standards Requirements Identification project. The goal of the project is to identify a subset of the standards currently in use by NASAs Planetary Data System (PDS) that are appropriate for internationalization. As shown in the highlighted sections of Figure 1, the focus of this project is the Information Model component of the Data Architecture Standards, namely the object models, a data dictionary, and a set of data formats.

  12. PREFACE: International Conference on Computing in High Energy and Nuclear Physics (CHEP'07)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobie, Randall; Tafirout, Reda; Thomson, Jana

    2007-07-01

    The 2007 International Conference on Computing in High Energy and Nuclear Physics (CHEP) was held on 2-7 September 2007 in Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. CHEP is a major series of international conferences for physicists and computing professionals from the High Energy and Nuclear Physics community, Computer Science and Information Technology. The CHEP conference provides an international forum to exchange information on computing experience and needs for the community, and to review recent, ongoing, and future activities. The CHEP'07 conference had close to 500 attendees with a program that included plenary sessions of invited oral presentations, a number of parallel sessions comprising oral and poster presentations, and an industrial exhibition. Conference tracks covered topics in Online Computing, Event Processing, Software Components, Tools and Databases, Software Tools and Information Systems, Computing Facilities, Production Grids and Networking, Grid Middleware and Tools, Distributed Data Analysis and Information Management and Collaborative Tools. The conference included a successful whale-watching excursion involving over 200 participants and a banquet at the Royal British Columbia Museum. The next CHEP conference will be held in Prague in March 2009. We would like thank the sponsors of the conference and the staff at the TRIUMF Laboratory and the University of Victoria who made the CHEP'07 a success. Randall Sobie and Reda Tafirout CHEP'07 Conference Chairs

  13. Nuclear Power Sources for Space Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukharkin, N. E.; Ponomarev-Stepnoi, N. N.; Usov, V. A.

    This chapter contains the information about nuclear power sources for space systems. Reactor nuclear sources are considered that use the energy of heavy nuclei fission generated by controlled chain fission reaction, as well as the isotope ones producing heat due to the energy of nuclei radioactive decay. Power of reactor nuclear sources is determined by the rate of heavy nuclei fission that may be controlled within a wide range from the zero up to the nominal one. Thermal power of isotope sources cannot be controlled. It is determined by the type and quantity of isotopes and decreases in time due to their radioactive decay. Both, in the reactor sources and in the isotope ones, nuclear power is converted into the thermal one that may be consumed for the coolant heating to produce thrust (Nuclear Power Propulsion System, NPPS) or may be converted into electricity (Nuclear Power Source, NPS) dynamically (a turbine generator) or statically (thermoelectric or thermionic converters). Electric power is supplied to the airborne equipment or is used to produce thrust in electric (ionic, plasma) low-thrust engines. A brief description is presented of the different nuclear systems with reactor and isotopic power sources implemented in Russia and the USA. The information is also given about isotopic sources for the ground-based application, mainly for navigation systems.

  14. Information basis for developing comprehensive waste management system-US-Japan joint nuclear energy action plan waste management working group phase I report.

    SciTech Connect

    Nutt, M.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2010-05-25

    The activity of Phase I of the Waste Management Working Group under the United States - Japan Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan started in 2007. The US-Japan JNEAP is a bilateral collaborative framework to support the global implementation of safe, secure, and sustainable, nuclear fuel cycles (referred to in this document as fuel cycles). The Waste Management Working Group was established by strong interest of both parties, which arise from the recognition that development and optimization of waste management and disposal system(s) are central issues of the present and future nuclear fuel cycles. This report summarizes the activity of the Waste Management Working Group that focused on consolidation of the existing technical basis between the U.S. and Japan and the joint development of a plan for future collaborative activities. Firstly, the political/regulatory frameworks related to nuclear fuel cycles in both countries were reviewed. The various advanced fuel cycle scenarios that have been considered in both countries were then surveyed and summarized. The working group established the working reference scenario for the future cooperative activity that corresponds to a fuel cycle scenario being considered both in Japan and the U.S. This working scenario involves transitioning from a once-through fuel cycle utilizing light water reactors to a one-pass uranium-plutonium fuel recycle in light water reactors to a combination of light water reactors and fast reactors with plutonium, uranium, and minor actinide recycle, ultimately concluding with multiple recycle passes primarily using fast reactors. Considering the scenario, current and future expected waste streams, treatment and inventory were discussed, and the relevant information was summarized. Second, the waste management/disposal system optimization was discussed. Repository system concepts were reviewed, repository design concepts for the various classifications of nuclear waste were summarized, and the factors

  15. Automated International Information Networks; Systems Design Concepts, Goal-Setting and Priorities. FID/TM Panel at the ASIS Meeting in San Francisco, 2 October, 1969.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuelson, Kjell

    An invitation to participate in this panel discussion was sent to official representatives of organizations which had an expressed interest in information networks. Since some of the represented international bodies had started preliminary planning for network communication, the discussion was centered around systems design concepts. However, as…

  16. Model VESL Program Guide, Office Information Systems, International: One Semester Intensive Training Certificate of Achievement Programs in General, Medical, and Legal Office.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvarez, Irma J.

    The Office Information Systems-International Program at Southwestern College, in California, was designed to provide Hispanic students with training for entry-level office employment. This model program guide stems from a project to improve curricula and delivery and focuses on changes in three intensive bilingual programs in general, medical, and…

  17. Health information exchange: national and international approaches.

    PubMed

    Vest, Joshua R

    2012-01-01

    Health information exchange (HIE), the process of electronically moving patient-level information between different organizations, is viewed as a solution to the fragmentation of data in health care. This review provides a description of the current state of HIE in seven nations, as well was three international HIE efforts, with a particular focus on the relation of exchange efforts to national health care systems, common challenges, and the implications of cross-border information sharing. National and international efforts highlighted in English language informatics journals, professional associations, and government reports are described. Fully functioning HIE is not yet a common phenomenon worldwide. However, multiple nations see the potential benefits of HIE and that has led to national and international efforts of varying scope, scale, and purview. National efforts continue to work to overcome the challenges of interoperability, record linking, insufficient infrastructures, governance, and interorganizational relationships, but have created architectural strategies, oversight agencies, and incentives to foster exchange. The three international HIE efforts reviewed represent very different approaches to the same problem of ensuring the availability of health information across borders. The potential of HIE to address many cost and quality issues will ensure HIE remains on many national agendas. In many instances, health care executives and leaders have opportunities to work within national programs to help shape local exchange governance and decide technology partners. Furthermore, HIE raises policy questions concerning the role of centralized planning, national identifiers, standards, and types of information exchanged, each of which are vital issues to individual health organizations and worthy of their attention.

  18. An interactive ontology-driven information system for simulating background radiation and generating scenarios for testing special nuclear materials detection algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Sorokine, Alexandre; Schlicher, Bob G.; Ward, Richard C.; Wright, Michael C.; Kruse, Kara L.; Bhaduri, Budhendra; Slepoy, Alexander

    2015-05-22

    This paper describes an original approach to generating scenarios for the purpose of testing the algorithms used to detect special nuclear materials (SNM) that incorporates the use of ontologies. Separating the signal of SNM from the background requires sophisticated algorithms. To assist in developing such algorithms, there is a need for scenarios that capture a very wide range of variables affecting the detection process, depending on the type of detector being used. To provide such a cpability, we developed an ontology-driven information system (ODIS) for generating scenarios that can be used in creating scenarios for testing of algorithms for SNM detection. The ontology-driven scenario generator (ODSG) is an ODIS based on information supplied by subject matter experts and other documentation. The details of the creation of the ontology, the development of the ontology-driven information system, and the design of the web user interface (UI) are presented along with specific examples of scenarios generated using the ODSG. We demonstrate that the paradigm behind the ODSG is capable of addressing the problem of semantic complexity at both the user and developer levels. Compared to traditional approaches, an ODIS provides benefits such as faithful representation of the users' domain conceptualization, simplified management of very large and semantically diverse datasets, and the ability to handle frequent changes to the application and the UI. Furthermore, the approach makes possible the generation of a much larger number of specific scenarios based on limited user-supplied information

  19. An interactive ontology-driven information system for simulating background radiation and generating scenarios for testing special nuclear materials detection algorithms

    DOE PAGES

    Sorokine, Alexandre; Schlicher, Bob G.; Ward, Richard C.; ...

    2015-05-22

    This paper describes an original approach to generating scenarios for the purpose of testing the algorithms used to detect special nuclear materials (SNM) that incorporates the use of ontologies. Separating the signal of SNM from the background requires sophisticated algorithms. To assist in developing such algorithms, there is a need for scenarios that capture a very wide range of variables affecting the detection process, depending on the type of detector being used. To provide such a cpability, we developed an ontology-driven information system (ODIS) for generating scenarios that can be used in creating scenarios for testing of algorithms for SNMmore » detection. The ontology-driven scenario generator (ODSG) is an ODIS based on information supplied by subject matter experts and other documentation. The details of the creation of the ontology, the development of the ontology-driven information system, and the design of the web user interface (UI) are presented along with specific examples of scenarios generated using the ODSG. We demonstrate that the paradigm behind the ODSG is capable of addressing the problem of semantic complexity at both the user and developer levels. Compared to traditional approaches, an ODIS provides benefits such as faithful representation of the users' domain conceptualization, simplified management of very large and semantically diverse datasets, and the ability to handle frequent changes to the application and the UI. Furthermore, the approach makes possible the generation of a much larger number of specific scenarios based on limited user-supplied information« less

  20. Nuclear Islands: International Leasing of Nuclear Fuel Cycle Sites to Provide Enduring Assurance of Peaceful Use

    SciTech Connect

    Paine, Christopher E.; Cochran, Thomas B.

    2010-11-01

    Current International Atomic Energy Agency safeguards do not provide adequate protection against the diversion to military use of materials or technology from certain types of sensitive nuclear fuel cycle facilities. In view of highly enriched uranium’s relatively greater ease of use as a nuclear explosive material than plutonium and the significant diseconomies of commercial spent fuel reprocessing, this article focuses on the need for improved international controls over uranium enrichment facilities as the proximate justification for creation of an International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Association (INFCA). In principle, the proposal is equally applicable to alleviating the proliferation concerns provoked by nuclear fuel reprocessing plants and other sensitive nuclear fuel cycle facilities. The INFCA would provide significantly increased nonproliferation assurance to its member states and the wider international community by holding long-term leasehold contracts to operate secure restricted zones containing such sensitive nuclear facilities.

  1. International activities in chemical thermodynamics of nuclear materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navratil, J. D.; Oetting, F. L.; Ohare, P. A. G.

    For over twenty years, the International Atomic Energy Agency has played a major role in furthering the exchange of information on the thermodynamics of nuclear materials between scientists all over the world. The methodology used by the Agency to achieve this exchange has been to convene five international symposia on the thermodynamics of nuclear materials (1962, 1965, 1967, 1974 and 1979). These symposia not only served as a means for scientific exchange of experimental results, but also provided a mechanism whereby various scientists could collaborate on pertinent topics. Under the sponsorship of the Agency, several panels have been held resulting in the publication of several technical reports specifically related to thermochemical assessment, e.g. UC and PuC (1962), UO2 (1964), and PuO2 and UPuO2 (1964). On a broader front, publication of two series of monographs on thermodynamic assessment has recently been undertaken; one consists of a special series of the Atomic Energy Review and the other is a series on The Chemical Thermodynamics of Actinide Elements and Compounds.

  2. FENDL: International reference nuclear data library for fusion applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pashchenko, A. B.; Wienke, H.; Ganesan, S.

    1996-10-01

    The IAEA Nuclear Data Section, in co-operation with several national nuclear data centres and research groups, has created the first version of an internationally available Fusion Evaluated Nuclear Data Library (FENDL-1). The FENDL library has been selected to serve as a comprehensive source of processed and tested nuclear data tailored to the requirements of the engineering design activity (EDA) of the ITER project and other fusion-related development projects. The present version of FENDL consists of the following sublibraries covering the necessary nuclear input for all physics and engineering aspects of the material development, design, operation and safety of the ITER project in its current EDA phase: FENDL/A-1.1: neutron activation cross-sections, selected from different available sources, for 636 nuclides, FENDL/D-1.0: nuclear decay data for 2900 nuclides in ENDF-6 format, FENDL/DS-1.0: neutron activation data for dosimetry by foil activation, FENDL/C-1.0: data for the fusion reactions D(d,n), D(d,p), T(d,n), T(t,2n), He-3(d,p) extracted from ENDF/B-6 and processed, FENDL/E-1.0:data for coupled neutron—photon transport calculations, including a data library for neutron interaction and photon production for 63 elements or isotopes, selected from ENDF/B-6, JENDL-3, or BROND-2, and a photon—atom interaction data library for 34 elements. The benchmark validation of FENDL-1 as required by the customer, i.e. the ITER team, is considered to be a task of high priority in the coming months. The well tested and validated nuclear data libraries in processed form of the FENDL-2 are expected to be ready by mid 1996 for use by the ITER team in the final phase of ITER EDA after extensive benchmarking and integral validation studies in the 1995-1996 period. The FENDL data files can be electronically transferred to users from the IAEA nuclear data section online system through INTERNET. A grand total of 54 (sub)directories with 845 files with total size of about 2

  3. Data Systems vs. Information Systems

    PubMed Central

    Amatayakul, Margret K.

    1982-01-01

    This paper examines the current status of “hospital information systems” with respect to the distinction between data systems and information systems. It is proposed that the systems currently existing are incomplete data dystems resulting in ineffective information systems.

  4. The International System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    East, Maurice A.

    Designed as a unit for an international relations course, this systems approach paper outlines a learning method which contributes to the student's awareness that the United States is only one of many actors in the world. It also makes the student aware that there are limitations on the U. S. individual actions because of this interdependence and…

  5. Assuaging Nuclear Energy Risks: The Angarsk International Uranium Enrichment Center

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, Astasia

    2011-06-28

    The recent nuclear renaissance has motivated many countries, especially developing nations, to plan and build nuclear power reactors. However, domestic low enriched uranium demands may trigger nations to construct indigenous enrichment facilities, which could be redirected to fabricate high enriched uranium for nuclear weapons. The potential advantages of establishing multinational uranium enrichment sites are numerous including increased low enrichment uranium access with decreased nuclear proliferation risks. While multinational nuclear initiatives have been discussed, Russia is the first nation to actualize this concept with their Angarsk International Uranium Enrichment Center (IUEC). This paper provides an overview of the historical and modern context of the multinational nuclear fuel cycle as well as the evolution of Russia's IUEC, which exemplifies how international fuel cycle cooperation is an alternative to domestic facilities.

  6. Quantify information system benefits

    SciTech Connect

    Koppel, L.B.

    1995-06-01

    What are information systems and how do they relate to control systems? How do information systems produce benefits in hydrocarbon processing? What are some examples of benefit-generating information system applications? Information System Benefits (ISBEN) is a structured methodology for estimating information system benefits in hydrocarbon processing. The paper discusses information and control systems, information system benefits and applications, objectives, strategies and measures of ISBEN, ISBEN business drivers, ISBEN database, ISBEN methodology, and implementation.

  7. Proceedings of the XVIIIth international symposium on nuclear physics

    SciTech Connect

    Marten, H.; Seeliger, D.

    1992-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings of the XVIII International Symposium on nuclear physics. Topics covered include: fission fragment distributions; fundamental fission problems; theory of nuclear fission; fragment de-excitation; ternary fission; spontaneous-fission and decay; induced fission; heavy-ion reactions; and applications of fission.

  8. Nuclear Safety for Space Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Offiong, Etim

    2010-09-01

    It is trite, albeit a truism, to say that nuclear power can provide propulsion thrust needed to launch space vehicles and also, to provide electricity for powering on-board systems, especially for missions to the Moon, Mars and other deep space missions. Nuclear Power Sources(NPSs) are known to provide more capabilities than solar power, fuel cells and conventional chemical means. The worry has always been that of safety. The earliest superpowers(US and former Soviet Union) have designed and launched several nuclear-powered systems, with some failures. Nuclear failures and accidents, however little the number, could be far-reaching geographically, and are catastrophic to humans and the environment. Building on the numerous research works on nuclear power on Earth and in space, this paper seeks to bring to bear, issues relating to safety of space systems - spacecrafts, astronauts, Earth environment and extra terrestrial habitats - in the use and application of nuclear power sources. It also introduces a new formal training course in Space Systems Safety.

  9. Proceedings of the 2006 international congress on advances in nuclear power plants - ICAPP'06

    SciTech Connect

    2006-07-01

    reliability improvements, outage optimization, human factors, plant staffing, outage reduction features, major component reliability, repair and replacement, in-service inspection, and codes and standards. - 5. Plant Safety Assessment and Regulatory Issues Transient and accident performance including LOCA and non-LOCA, severe accident analysis, impact of risk informed changes, accident management, assessment and management of aging, degradation and damage, life extension lessons from plant operations, probabilistic safety assessment, plant safety analysis, reliability engineering, operating and future plants. - 6. Thermal Hydraulic Analysis and Testing Phenomena identification and ranking, computer code scaling applicability and uncertainty, containment thermal hydraulics, component and integral system tests, improved code development and qualification, single and two phase flow; advanced computational thermal hydraulic methods. - 7. Core and Fuel Cycle Concepts and Experiments Core physics, advances in computational reactor analysis, in-core fuel management, mixed-oxide fuel, thorium fuel cycle, low moderation cores, high conversion reactor designs, particle and pebble bed fuel design, testing and reliability; fuel cycle waste minimization, recycle, storage and disposal. - 8. Materials and Structural Issues Fuel, core, RPV and internals structures, advanced materials issues and fracture mechanics, concrete and steel containments, space structures, analysis, design and monitoring for seismic, dynamic and extreme accidents; irradiation issues and materials for new plants. - 9. Nuclear Energy and Sustainability including Hydrogen, Desalination and Other Applications Environmental impact of nuclear and alternative systems, spent fuel dispositions and transmutation systems, fully integrated fuel cycle and symbiotic nuclear power systems, application of advanced designs to non-power applications such as the production of hydrogen, sea water desalination, heating and other co

  10. Characterization of Xe-133 global atmospheric background: Implications for the International Monitoring System of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achim, Pascal; Generoso, Sylvia; Morin, Mireille; Gross, Philippe; Le Petit, Gilbert; Moulin, Christophe

    2016-05-01

    Monitoring atmospheric concentrations of radioxenons is relevant to provide evidence of atmospheric or underground nuclear weapon tests. However, when the design of the International Monitoring Network (IMS) of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) was set up, the impact of industrial releases was not perceived. It is now well known that industrial radioxenon signature can interfere with that of nuclear tests. Therefore, there is a crucial need to characterize atmospheric distributions of radioxenons from industrial sources—the so-called atmospheric background—in the frame of the CTBT. Two years of Xe-133 atmospheric background have been simulated using 2013 and 2014 meteorological data together with the most comprehensive emission inventory of radiopharmaceutical facilities and nuclear power plants to date. Annual average simulated activity concentrations vary from 0.01 mBq/m3 up to above 5 mBq/m3 nearby major sources. Average measured and simulated concentrations agree on most of the IMS stations, which indicates that the main sources during the time frame are properly captured. Xe-133 atmospheric background simulated at IMS stations turn out to be a complex combination of sources. Stations most impacted are in Europe and North America and can potentially detect Xe-133 every day. Predicted occurrences of detections of atmospheric Xe-133 show seasonal variations, more accentuated in the Northern Hemisphere, where the maximum occurs in winter. To our knowledge, this study presents the first global maps of Xe-133 atmospheric background from industrial sources based on two years of simulation and is a first attempt to analyze its composition in terms of origin at IMS stations.

  11. International Source Book: Nuclear Fuel Cycle Research and Development Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Harmon, K. M.; Lakey, L. T.

    1982-11-01

    This document starts with an overview that summarizes nuclear power policies and waste management activities for nations with significant commercial nuclear fuel cycle activities either under way or planned. A more detailed program summary is then included for each country or international agency conducting nuclear fuel cycle and waste management research and development. This second volume includes the program summaries of those countries listed alphabetically from Japan to Yugoslavia. Information on international agencies and associations, particularly the IAEA, NEA, and CEC, is provided also.

  12. NUCLEAR REACTOR CONTROL SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Howard, D.F.; Motta, E.E.

    1961-06-27

    A method for controlling the excess reactivity in a nuclear reactor throughout the core life while maintaining the neutron flux distribution at the desired level is described. The control unit embodies a container having two electrodes of different surface area immersed in an electrolytic solution of a good neutron sbsorbing metal ion such as boron, gadolinium, or cadmium. Initially, the neutron absorber is plated on the larger electrode to control the greater neutron flux of a freshly refueled core. As the fuel burns up, the excess reactivity decreases and the neutron absorber is then plated onto the smaller electrode so that the number of neutrons absorbed also decreases. The excess reactivity in the core may thus be maintained without the introduction of serious perturbations in the neutron flux distributibn.

  13. Nuclear Safety Information Center, Its Products and Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchanan, J. R.

    1970-01-01

    The Nuclear Safety Information Center (NSIC) serves as a focal point for the collection, analysis and dissemination of information related to safety problems encountered in the design, analysis, and operation of nuclear facilities. (Author/AB)

  14. Nuclear Safety Information Center, Its Products and Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchanan, J. R.

    1970-01-01

    The Nuclear Safety Information Center (NSIC) serves as a focal point for the collection, analysis and dissemination of information related to safety problems encountered in the design, analysis, and operation of nuclear facilities. (Author/AB)

  15. Minimal Internal Radiation Exposure in Residents Living South of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Disaster.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Junichi; Kato, Shigeaki; Tsubokura, Masaharu; Mori, Jinichi; Tanimoto, Tetsuya; Abe, Koichiro; Sakai, Shuji; Hayano, Ryugo; Tokiwa, Michio; Shimmura, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    Following the Fukushima nuclear power plant disaster, assessment of internal radiation exposure was indispensable to predict radiation-related health threats to residents of neighboring areas. Although many evaluations of internal radiation in residents living north and west of the crippled Fukushima nuclear power plant are available, there is little information on residents living in areas south of the plant, which were similarly affected by radio-contamination from the disaster. To assess the internal radio-contamination in residents living in affected areas to the south of the plant or who were evacuated into Iwaki city, a whole body counter (WBC) screening program of internal radio-contamination was performed on visitors to the Jyoban hospital in Iwaki city, which experienced less contamination than southern areas adjacent to the nuclear plant. The study included 9,206 volunteer subjects, of whom 6,446 were schoolchildren aged 4-15 years. Measurements began one year after the incident and were carried out over the course of two years. Early in the screening period only two schoolchildren showed Cs-137 levels that were over the detection limit (250 Bq/body), although their Cs-134 levels were below the detection limit (220 Bq/body). Among the 2,760 adults tested, 35 (1.3%) had detectable internal radio-contamination, but only for Cs-137 (range: 250 Bq/body to 859 Bq/body), and not Cs-134. Of these 35 subjects, nearly all (34/35) showed elevated Cs-137 levels only during the first year of the screening. With the exception of potassium 40, no other radionuclides were detected during the screening period. The maximum annual effective dose calculated from the detected Cs-137 levels was 0.029 and 0.028 mSv/year for the schoolchildren and adults, respectively, which is far below the 1 mSv/year limit set by the government of Japan. Although the data for radiation exposure during the most critical first year after the incident are unavailable due to a lack of systemic

  16. Minimal Internal Radiation Exposure in Residents Living South of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Disaster

    PubMed Central

    Akiyama, Junichi; Kato, Shigeaki; Tsubokura, Masaharu; Mori, Jinichi; Tanimoto, Tetsuya; Abe, Koichiro; Sakai, Shuji; Hayano, Ryugo; Tokiwa, Michio; Shimmura, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    Following the Fukushima nuclear power plant disaster, assessment of internal radiation exposure was indispensable to predict radiation-related health threats to residents of neighboring areas. Although many evaluations of internal radiation in residents living north and west of the crippled Fukushima nuclear power plant are available, there is little information on residents living in areas south of the plant, which were similarly affected by radio-contamination from the disaster. To assess the internal radio-contamination in residents living in affected areas to the south of the plant or who were evacuated into Iwaki city, a whole body counter (WBC) screening program of internal radio-contamination was performed on visitors to the Jyoban hospital in Iwaki city, which experienced less contamination than southern areas adjacent to the nuclear plant. The study included 9,206 volunteer subjects, of whom 6,446 were schoolchildren aged 4–15 years. Measurements began one year after the incident and were carried out over the course of two years. Early in the screening period only two schoolchildren showed Cs-137 levels that were over the detection limit (250 Bq/body), although their Cs-134 levels were below the detection limit (220 Bq/body). Among the 2,760 adults tested, 35 (1.3%) had detectable internal radio-contamination, but only for Cs-137 (range: 250 Bq/body to 859 Bq/body), and not Cs-134. Of these 35 subjects, nearly all (34/35) showed elevated Cs-137 levels only during the first year of the screening. With the exception of potassium 40, no other radionuclides were detected during the screening period. The maximum annual effective dose calculated from the detected Cs-137 levels was 0.029 and 0.028 mSv/year for the schoolchildren and adults, respectively, which is far below the 1 mSv/year limit set by the government of Japan. Although the data for radiation exposure during the most critical first year after the incident are unavailable due to a lack of systemic

  17. Internal insulation system development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gille, J. P.

    1973-01-01

    The development of an internal insulation system for cryogenic liquids is described. The insulation system is based on a gas layer concept in which capillary or surface tension effects are used to maintain a stable gas layer within a cellular core structure between the tank wall and the contained cryogen. In this work, a 1.8 meter diameter tank was insulated and tested with liquid hydrogen. Ability to withstand cycling of the aluminum tank wall to 450 K was a design and test condition.

  18. Materials challenges for nuclear systems

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Todd; Busby, Jeremy; Meyer, Mitch; Petti, David

    2010-11-26

    The safe and economical operation of any nuclear power system relies to a great extent, on the success of the fuel and the materials of construction. During the lifetime of a nuclear power system which currently can be as long as 60 years, the materials are subject to high temperature, a corrosive environment, and damage from high-energy particles released during fission. The fuel which provides the power for the reactor has a much shorter life but is subject to the same types of harsh environments. This article reviews the environments in which fuels and materials from current and proposed nuclear systems operate and then describes how the creation of the Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility is allowing researchers from across the U.S. to test their ideas for improved fuels and materials.

  19. 78 FR 49726 - International Framework for Nuclear Energy Cooperation Finance/Regulatory/Energy Planning...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-15

    ... International Trade Administration International Framework for Nuclear Energy Cooperation Finance/ Regulatory/Energy Planning Authority Workshop October 22 in Abu Dhabi, UAE AGENCY: International Trade... International Framework for Nuclear Energy Cooperation (IFNEC)--to organize participation by representatives of...

  20. The Importance of International Technical Nuclear Forensics to Deter Illicit Trafficking

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D K

    2007-01-30

    Illicit trafficking of nuclear materials is a transboundary problem that requires a cooperative approach involving international nuclear forensics to ensure all states understand the threat posed by nuclear smuggling as well as a means to best deter the movement of nuclear contraband. To achieve the objectives, all cases involving illicit trafficking of nuclear and radiological materials must be vigorously pursued and prosecuted when appropriate. The importance of outreach and formal government-to-government relationships with partner nations affected by nuclear trafficking cannot be under-estimated. States that are situated on smuggling routes may be well motivated to counter nuclear crimes to bolster their own border and transportation security as well as strengthen their economic and political viability. National law enforcement and atomic energy agencies in these states are aggressively pursuing a comprehensive strategy to counter nuclear smuggling through increasing reliance on technical nuclear forensics. As part of these activities, it is essential that these organizations be given adequate orientation to the best practices in this emerging discipline including the categorization of interdicted nuclear material, collection of traditional and nuclear forensic evidence, data analysis using optimized analytical protocols, and how to best fuse forensics information with reliable case input to best develop a law enforcement or national security response. The purpose of formalized USG relationship is to establish an institutional framework for collaboration in international forensics, improve standards of forensics practice, conduct joint exercises, and pursue case-work that benefits international security objectives. Just as outreach and formalized relationships are important to cultivate international nuclear forensics, linking nuclear forensics to ongoing national assistance in border and transpiration security, including port of entry of entry monitoring

  1. Decontamination of nuclear systems at the Grand Gulf Nuclear Station

    SciTech Connect

    Weed, R.D.; Baker, K.R.

    1996-12-31

    Early in 1994 Management at the Grand Gulf Nuclear Station realized that a potential decontamination of several reactor systems was needed to maintain the commitments to the {open_quotes}As Low As Reasonably Achievable{close_quotes} (ALARA) program. There was a substantial amount of planned outage work required to repair and replace some internals in loop isolation valves and there were inspections and other outage work that needed to be accomplished as it had been postponed from previous outages because of the radiation exposure levels in and around the system equipment. Management scheduled for the procurement specification to be revised to incorporate additional boundary areas which had not been previously considered. The schedule included the period for gathering bids, awarding a contract, and reviewing the contractor`s procedures and reports and granting approval for the decontamination to proceed during the upcoming outage. In addition to the reviews required by the engineering group for overall control of the process, the plant system engineers had to prepare procedures at the system level to provide for a smooth operation to be made during the decontamination of the systems. The system engineers were required to make certain that the decontamination fluids would be contained within the systems being decontaminated and that they would not cross contaminate any other system not being decontaminated. Since these nuclear stations do not have the provisions for decontaminating these systems with using additional equipment, the equipment required is furnished by the contractor as skid mounted packaged units which can be moved into the area, set up near the system being decontaminated, and after the decontamination is completed, the skid mounted packages are removed as part of the contract. Figure 1 shows a typical setup in block diagram required to perform a reactor system decontamination. 1 fig.

  2. Home-centered health-enabling technologies and regional health information systems. An integration approach based on international standards.

    PubMed

    Gietzelt, M; von Bargen, T; Kohlmann, M; Marschollek, M; Schwartze, J; Song, B; Wagner, M; Wolf, K-H; Haux, R

    2014-01-01

    This article is part of the Focus Theme of Methods of Information in Medicine on "Using Data from Ambient Assisted Living and Smart Homes in Electronic Health Records". In this paper, we present a prototype of a Home-Centered Health-Enabling Technology (HET-HC), which is able to capture, store, merge and process data from various sensor systems at people's home. In addition, we present an architecture designed to integrate HET-HC into an exemplary regional Health Information System (rHIS). rHIS are traditionally document-based to fit to the needs in a clinical context. However, HET-HC are producing continuous data streams for which documents might be an inappropriate representation. Therefore, the HET-HC could register placeholder-documents at rHIS. These placeholder-documents are assembled upon user-authenticated request by the HET-HC and are always up-to-date. Moreover, it is not trivial to find a clinical coding system for continuous sensor data and to make the data machine-readable in order to enhance the interoperability of such systems. Therefore, we propose the use of SNOCAP-HET, which is a nomenclature to describe the context of sensor-based measurements in health-enabling technologies. We present an architectural approach to integrate HET-HC into rHIS. Our solution is the centralized registration of placeholder-documents with rHIS and the decentralized data storage at people's home. We concluded that the presented architecture of integrating HET-HC into rHIS might fit well to the traditional approach of document-based data storage. Data security and privacy issues are also duly considered.

  3. 77 FR 19278 - Informational Meeting on Nuclear Fuel Cycle Options

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-30

    ... participants knowledgeable in nuclear fuel cycles, particularly including those from the public, universities... Informational Meeting on Nuclear Fuel Cycle Options AGENCY: Office of Fuel Cycle Technologies, Office of Nuclear.... At this meeting, input is being sought from participants knowledgeable in nuclear fuel...

  4. Management of Global Nuclear Materials for International Security

    SciTech Connect

    Isaacs, T; Choi, J-S

    2003-09-18

    Nuclear materials were first used to end the World War II. They were produced and maintained during the cold war for global security reasons. In the succeeding 50 years since the Atoms for Peace Initiative, nuclear materials were produced and used in global civilian reactors and fuel cycles intended for peaceful purposes. The Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT) of 1970 established a framework for appropriate applications of both defense and civilian nuclear activities by nuclear weapons states and non-nuclear weapons states. As global inventories of nuclear materials continue to grow, in a diverse and dynamically changing manner, it is time to evaluate current and future trends and needed actions: what are the current circumstances, what has been done to date, what has worked and what hasn't? The aim is to identify mutually reinforcing programmatic directions, leading to global partnerships that measurably enhance international security. Essential elements are material protection, control and accountability (MPC&A) of separated nuclear materials, interim storage, and geologic repositories for all nuclear materials destined for final disposal. Cooperation among key partners, such as the MPC&A program between the U.S. and Russia for nuclear materials from dismantled weapons, is necessary for interim storage and final disposal of nuclear materials. Such cooperative partnerships can lead to a new nuclear regime where a complete fuel cycle service with fuel leasing and spent fuel take-back can be offered to reactor users. The service can effectively minimize or even eliminate the incentive or rationale for the user-countries to develop their indigenous enrichment and reprocessing technologies. International cooperation, supported by governments of key countries can be best to facilitate the forum for formation of such cooperative partnerships.

  5. Irans Nuclear Program: Tehrans Compliance with International Obligations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-07

    IAEA with additional information about, its uranium enrichment program and heavy-water reactor program pursuant to the July 2015 Joint Cooperative...NPT) and U.N. Security Council Resolution 2231, which the Council adopted on July 20, 2015, comprise the current legal framework governing Iran’s...Nuclear Program: Status, by Paul K. Kerr. For more information about the July 2015 Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action concerning Iran’s nuclear program

  6. Radioxenon detections in the CTBT International Monitoring System likely related to the announced nuclear test in North Korea conducted on February 12, 2013

    SciTech Connect

    Ringbom, Anders; Axelssson, A.; Aldener, M.; Auer, M.; Bowyer, Ted W.; Fritioff, T.; Hoffman, Ian; Khrustalev, Kirill; Nikkinen, Mika; Popov, Vladimir Y.; Popov, Y.; Ungar, R. Kurt; Wotawa, G.

    2014-02-01

    Abstract: Observations of the radioxenon isotopes 133Xe and 131mXe collected at the IMS stations RN38 and RN58 on April 7-8, and April 12-13 2013, respectively, are unique with respect to the measurement history of these stations. Comparison of measured data with calculated isotopic ratios as well as analysis using atmospheric transport modeling indicate that it is likely that the xenon measured was created in the underground nuclear test conducted by North Korea on February 12, 2013, and released 7 weeks later. More than one release is required to explain all observations. The 131mXe source terms for each release were calculated to 7x1011 Bq, corresponding to about 1-10% of the total xenon inventory for a 10-kt explosion, depending on fractionation and release scenario. The observed ratios could not be used to obtain any information regarding the fissile material that was used in the test.

  7. Sources of Information on Atomic Energy, International Series of Monographs in Library and Information Science, Volume 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anthony, L. J.

    This book provides a comprehensive survey of the principal national and international organizations which are sources of information on atomic and nuclear energy and of the published literature in this field. Organizations in all the major nuclear countries such as the United States, Britain, the Soviet Union, France, and Japan are described, and…

  8. Sources of Information on Atomic Energy, International Series of Monographs in Library and Information Science, Volume 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anthony, L. J.

    This book provides a comprehensive survey of the principal national and international organizations which are sources of information on atomic and nuclear energy and of the published literature in this field. Organizations in all the major nuclear countries such as the United States, Britain, the Soviet Union, France, and Japan are described, and…

  9. Information Services in the International Network Marketplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hepworth, Mark E.

    1987-01-01

    Examines the internationalism of the network marketplace through case studies of the London Stock Exchange and I. P. Sharp Associates, a Canadian computer service bureau. Discussion focuses on the importance of transnational computer networks to the production of information services and marketplace expansion, and global information policy issues.…

  10. International Space Station Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Propp, Timothy William

    2001-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives a general overview of the International Space Station Power Systems. The topics include: 1) The Basics of Power; 2) Space Power Systems Design Constraints; 3) Solar Photovoltaic Power Systems; 4) Energy Storage for Space Power Systems; 5) Challenges of Operating Power Systems in Earth Orbit; 6) and International Space Station Electrical Power System.

  11. Review of the ISTC innovative nuclear programs (information review)

    SciTech Connect

    Tocheny, L. V.

    2006-07-01

    The information will be included in the review, with special attention on details of corresponding experimental programs: Novel reactor concepts, fit with GIF and INPRO: Supercritical Pressure Water aspects, Heavy metals (Lead, Lead-Bismuth) technology, HTGR critical modeling, engineering. Molten salts. Reactor data benchmarking, Accelerator Driven Systems (experimental modelling), Nuclear data measurements, Severe accident study (corium modelling, QUENCH, Chernobyl), Experimental Analysis of Hydraulically Induced Vibrations in Compact Curling Tube Steam Generators. (authors)

  12. Automatically scramming nuclear reactor system

    DOEpatents

    Ougouag, Abderrafi M.; Schultz, Richard R.; Terry, William K.

    2004-10-12

    An automatically scramming nuclear reactor system. One embodiment comprises a core having a coolant inlet end and a coolant outlet end. A cooling system operatively associated with the core provides coolant to the coolant inlet end and removes heated coolant from the coolant outlet end, thus maintaining a pressure differential therebetween during a normal operating condition of the nuclear reactor system. A guide tube is positioned within the core with a first end of the guide tube in fluid communication with the coolant inlet end of the core, and a second end of the guide tube in fluid communication with the coolant outlet end of the core. A control element is positioned within the guide tube and is movable therein between upper and lower positions, and automatically falls under the action of gravity to the lower position when the pressure differential drops below a safe pressure differential.

  13. Materials challenges for nuclear systems

    DOE PAGES

    Allen, Todd; Busby, Jeremy; Meyer, Mitch; ...

    2010-11-26

    The safe and economical operation of any nuclear power system relies to a great extent, on the success of the fuel and the materials of construction. During the lifetime of a nuclear power system which currently can be as long as 60 years, the materials are subject to high temperature, a corrosive environment, and damage from high-energy particles released during fission. The fuel which provides the power for the reactor has a much shorter life but is subject to the same types of harsh environments. This article reviews the environments in which fuels and materials from current and proposed nuclearmore » systems operate and then describes how the creation of the Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility is allowing researchers from across the U.S. to test their ideas for improved fuels and materials.« less

  14. The AMMA information system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleury, Laurence; Brissebrat, Guillaume; Boichard, Jean-Luc; Cloché, Sophie; Eymard, Laurence; Mastrorillo, Laurence; Moulaye, Oumarou; Ramage, Karim; Favot, Florence; Roussot, Odile

    2014-05-01

    In the framework of the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses (AMMA) programme, several tools have been developed in order to facilitate and speed up data and information exchange between researchers from different disciplines. The AMMA information system includes (i) a multidisciplinary user-friendly data management and dissemination system, (ii) report and chart archives associated with display websites and (iii) a scientific paper exchange system. The AMMA information system is enriched by several previous (IMPETUS...) and following projects (FENNEC, ESCAPE, QweCI, DACCIWA…) and is becoming a reference information system about West Africa monsoon. (i) The AMMA project includes airborne, ground-based and ocean measurements, satellite data use, modelling studies and value-added product development. Therefore, the AMMA database user interface enables to access a great amount and a large variety of data: - 250 local observation datasets, that cover many geophysical components (atmosphere, ocean, soil, vegetation) and human activities (agronomy, health). They have been collected by operational networks from 1850 to present, long term monitoring research networks (CATCH, IDAF, PIRATA...) or scientific campaigns; - 1350 outputs of a socio-economics questionnaire; - 60 operational satellite products and several research products; - 10 output sets of meteorological and ocean operational models and 15 of research simulations. All the data are documented in compliance with metadata international standards, and delivered into standard formats. The data request user interface takes full advantage of the data and metadata base relational structure and enables users to elaborate easily multicriteria data requests (period, area, property, property value…). The AMMA data portal counts around 800 registered users and process about 50 data requests every month. The AMMA databases and data portal have been developed and are operated jointly by SEDOO and ESPRI in France

  15. The AMMA information system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleury, Laurence; Brissebrat, Guillaume; Boichard, Jean-Luc; Cloché, Sophie; Mière, Arnaud; Moulaye, Oumarou; Ramage, Karim; Favot, Florence; Boulanger, Damien

    2015-04-01

    In the framework of the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses (AMMA) programme, several tools have been developed in order to boost the data and information exchange between researchers from different disciplines. The AMMA information system includes (i) a user-friendly data management and dissemination system, (ii) quasi real-time display websites and (iii) a scientific paper exchange collaborative tool. The AMMA information system is enriched by past and ongoing projects (IMPETUS, FENNEC, ESCAPE, QweCI, ACASIS, DACCIWA...) addressing meteorology, atmospheric chemistry, extreme events, health, adaptation of human societies... It is becoming a reference information system on environmental issues in West Africa. (i) The projects include airborne, ground-based and ocean measurements, social science surveys, satellite data use, modelling studies and value-added product development. Therefore, the AMMA data portal enables to access a great amount and a large variety of data: - 250 local observation datasets, that cover many geophysical components (atmosphere, ocean, soil, vegetation) and human activities (agronomy, health). They have been collected by operational networks since 1850, long term monitoring research networks (CATCH, IDAF, PIRATA...) and intensive scientific campaigns; - 1350 outputs of a socio-economics questionnaire; - 60 operational satellite products and several research products; - 10 output sets of meteorological and ocean operational models and 15 of research simulations. Data documentation complies with metadata international standards, and data are delivered into standard formats. The data request interface takes full advantage of the database relational structure and enables users to elaborate multicriteria requests (period, area, property, property value…). The AMMA data portal counts about 900 registered users, and 50 data requests every month. The AMMA databases and data portal have been developed and are operated jointly by SEDOO and

  16. Status and Value of International Standards for Nuclear Criticality Safety

    SciTech Connect

    Hopper, Calvin Mitchell

    2011-01-01

    This presentation provides an update to the author's standards report provided at the ICNC-2007 meeting. It includes a discussion about the difference between, and the value of participating in, the development of international 'consensus' standards as opposed to nonconsensus standards. Standards are developed for a myriad of reasons. Generally, standards represent an agreed upon, repeatable way of doing something as defined by an individual or group of people. They come in various types. Examples include personal, family, business, industrial, commercial, and regulatory such as military, community, state, federal, and international standards. Typically, national and international 'consensus' standards are developed by individuals and organizations of diverse backgrounds representing the subject matter users and developers of a service or product and other interested parties or organizations. Within the International Organization for Standardization (ISO), Technical Committee 85 (TC85) on nuclear energy, Subcommittee 5 (SC5) on nuclear fuel technology, there is a Working Group 8 (WG8) on standardization of calculations, procedures, and practices related to criticality safety. WG8 has developed, and is developing, ISO standards within the category of nuclear criticality safety of fissionable materials outside of reactors (i.e., nonreactor fissionable material nuclear fuel cycle facilities). Since the presentation of the ICNC-2007 report, WG8 has issued three new finalized international standards and is developing two more new standards. Nearly all elements of the published WG8 ISO standards have been incorporated into IAEA nonconsensus guides and standards. The progression of consensus standards development among international partners in a collegial environment establishes a synergy of different concepts that broadens the perspectives of the members. This breadth of perspectives benefits the working group members in their considerations of consensus standards

  17. Alarm system for a nuclear control complex

    DOEpatents

    Scarola, Kenneth; Jamison, David S.; Manazir, Richard M.; Rescorl, Robert L.; Harmon, Daryl L.

    1994-01-01

    An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

  18. The internal model: A study of the relative contribution of proprioception and visual information to failure detection in dynamic systems. [sensitivity of operators versus monitors to failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessel, C.; Wickens, C. D.

    1978-01-01

    The development of the internal model as it pertains to the detection of step changes in the order of control dynamics is investigated for two modes of participation: whether the subjects are actively controlling those dynamics or are monitoring an autopilot controlling them. A transfer of training design was used to evaluate the relative contribution of proprioception and visual information to the overall accuracy of the internal model. Sixteen subjects either tracked or monitored the system dynamics as a 2-dimensional pursuit display under single task conditions and concurrently with a sub-critical tracking task at two difficulty levels. Detection performance was faster and more accurate in the manual as opposed to the autopilot mode. The concurrent tracking task produced a decrement in detection performance for all conditions though this was more marked for the manual mode. The development of an internal model in the manual mode transferred positively to the automatic mode producing enhanced detection performance. There was no transfer from the internal model developed in the automatic mode to the manual mode.

  19. International Space Station (ISS) Payload Information Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griswold, Tom

    2002-01-01

    The International Space Station Payload Information Source CD is a joint effort of NASA and United Space Alliance. It is an introduction to the Space Station's capabilities, payload accommodations and the payload integration process. The CD is designed for use in conjunction with the station payloads website. The outline for the website includes fields of research, getting on board, international partners, about the ISS, basic accommodations, specialized facilities, payload integration, payload processing, payload operations, and reference documents.

  20. International nuclear fuel cycle fact book. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect

    Leigh, I.W.; Lakey, L.T.; Schneider, K.J.; Silviera, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    As the US Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE contractors have become increasingly involved with other nations in nuclear fuel cycle and waste management cooperative activities, a need has developed for a ready source of information concerning foreign fuel cycle programs, facilities, and personnel. This Fact Book was compiled to meet that need. The information contained has been obtained from nuclear trade journals and newsletters; reports of foreign visits and visitors; CEC, IAEA, and OECD/NEA activities reports; proceedings of conferences and workshops; and so forth. Sources do not agree completely with each other, and the data listed herein does not reflect any one single source but frequently is a consolidation/combination of information. Lack of space as well as the intent and purpose of the Fact Book limit the given information to that pertaining to the Nuclear Fuel Cycle and to data considered of primary interest or most helpful to the majority of users.

  1. Nuclear Methods for Transmutation of Nuclear Waste: Problems, Perspextives, Cooperative Research - Proceedings of the International Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khankhasayev, Zhanat B.; Kurmanov, Hans; Plendl, Mikhail Kh.

    1996-12-01

    The Table of Contents for the full book PDF is as follows: * Preface * I. Review of Current Status of Nuclear Transmutation Projects * Accelerator-Driven Systems — Survey of the Research Programs in the World * The Los Alamos Accelerator-Driven Transmutation of Nuclear Waste Concept * Nuclear Waste Transmutation Program in the Czech Republic * Tentative Results of the ISTC Supported Study of the ADTT Plutonium Disposition * Recent Neutron Physics Investigations for the Back End of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle * Optimisation of Accelerator Systems for Transmutation of Nuclear Waste * Proton Linac of the Moscow Meson Factory for the ADTT Experiments * II. Computer Modeling of Nuclear Waste Transmutation Methods and Systems * Transmutation of Minor Actinides in Different Nuclear Facilities * Monte Carlo Modeling of Electro-nuclear Processes with Nonlinear Effects * Simulation of Hybrid Systems with a GEANT Based Program * Computer Study of 90Sr and 137Cs Transmutation by Proton Beam * Methods and Computer Codes for Burn-Up and Fast Transients Calculations in Subcritical Systems with External Sources * New Model of Calculation of Fission Product Yields for the ADTT Problem * Monte Carlo Simulation of Accelerator-Reactor Systems * III. Data Basis for Transmutation of Actinides and Fission Products * Nuclear Data in the Accelerator Driven Transmutation Problem * Nuclear Data to Study Radiation Damage, Activation, and Transmutation of Materials Irradiated by Particles of Intermediate and High Energies * Radium Institute Investigations on the Intermediate Energy Nuclear Data on Hybrid Nuclear Technologies * Nuclear Data Requirements in Intermediate Energy Range for Improvement of Calculations of ADTT Target Processes * IV. Experimental Studies and Projects * ADTT Experiments at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center * Neutron Multiplicity Distributions for GeV Proton Induced Spallation Reactions on Thin and Thick Targets of Pb and U * Solid State Nuclear Track Detector and

  2. Reliability assessment of nuclear structural systems

    SciTech Connect

    Reich, M.; Hwang, H.

    1983-01-01

    Reliability assessment of nuclear structural systems has been receiving more emphasis over the last few years. This paper deals with the recent progress made by the Structural Analysis Division of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), in the development of a probability-based reliability analysis methodology for safety evaluation of reactor containments and other seismic category I structures. An important feature of this methodology is the incorporation of finite element analysis and random vibration theory. By utilizing this method, it is possible to evaluate the safety of nuclear structures under various static and dynamic loads in terms of limit state probability. Progress in other related areas, such as the establishment of probabilistic characteristics for various loads and structural resistance, are also described. Results of an application of the methodology to a realistic reinforced concrete containment subjected to dead and live loads, accidental internal pressures and earthquake ground accelerations are presented.

  3. Expert Water Quality Panel Review of Responses to the NASA Request for Information for the International Space Station On-Board Environmental Monitoring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, Julianna L.; Mudgett, Paul D.; Packham, Nigel J.; Schultz, John R.; Straub, John E., II

    2005-01-01

    On August 9, 2003, NASA, with the cooperative support of the Vehicle Office of the International Space Station Program, the Advanced Human Support Technology Program, and the Johnson Space Center Habitability and Environmental Factors Office released a Request for Information, or RFI, to identify next-generation environmental monitoring systems that have demonstrated ability or the potential to meet defined requirements for monitoring air and water quality onboard the International Space Station. This report summarizes the review and analysis of the proposed solutions submitted to meet the water quality monitoring requirements. Proposals were to improve upon the functionality of the existing Space Station Total Organic Carbon Analyzer (TOCA) and monitor additional contaminants in water samples. The TOCA is responsible for in-flight measurement of total organic carbon, total inorganic carbon, total carbon, pH, and conductivity in the Space Station potable water supplies. The current TOCA requires hazardous reagents to accomplish the carbon analyses. NASA is using the request for information process to investigate new technologies that may improve upon existing capabilities, as well as reduce or eliminate the need for hazardous reagents. Ideally, a replacement for the TOCA would be deployed in conjunction with the delivery of the Node 3 water recovery system currently scheduled for November 2007.

  4. Mission Medical Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson-Throop, Kathy A.; Joe, John C.; Follansbee, Nicole M.

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of the Mission Medical Information System (MMIS). The topics include: 1) What is MMIS?; 2) MMIS Goals; 3) Terrestrial Health Information Technology Vision; 4) NASA Health Information Technology Needs; 5) Mission Medical Information System Components; 6) Electronic Medical Record; 7) Longitudinal Study of Astronaut Health (LSAH); 8) Methods; and 9) Data Submission Agreement (example).

  5. Application of Spatial Data Modeling Systems, Geographical Information Systems (GIS), and Transportation Routing Optimization Methods for Evaluating Integrated Deployment of Interim Spent Fuel Storage Installations and Advanced Nuclear Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Mays, Gary T; Belles, Randy; Cetiner, Sacit M; Howard, Rob L; Liu, Cheng; Mueller, Don; Omitaomu, Olufemi A; Peterson, Steven K; Scaglione, John M

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this siting study work is to support DOE in evaluating integrated advanced nuclear plant and ISFSI deployment options in the future. This study looks at several nuclear power plant growth scenarios that consider the locations of existing and planned commercial nuclear power plants integrated with the establishment of consolidated interim spent fuel storage installations (ISFSIs). This research project is aimed at providing methodologies, information, and insights that inform the process for determining and optimizing candidate areas for new advanced nuclear power generation plants and consolidated ISFSIs to meet projected US electric power demands for the future.

  6. NUCLEAR INFORMATION SERVICES AT THE NATIONAL NUCLEAR DATA CENTER.

    SciTech Connect

    BURROWS,T.W.; DUNFORD,C.L.

    2004-09-26

    The National Nuclear Data Center has provided remote access to its databases and other resources since 1986. This year we have completed the modernization of our databases and Web site. Resources available from our Web site will be summarized and some of the major improvements described in more detail.

  7. MILITARY INFORMATION SYSTEMS,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    upward are usually indications of how effectively the system is developing or operating. The use of computers in information systems tends to increase...computers into information systems must always begin at the lowest level of aggregation in the job hierarchy. Only those information-processing jobs

  8. 78 FR 23233 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; IEPS International Resource...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-18

    ... Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; IEPS International Resource Information System... Information System (IRIS). OMB Control Number: 1840-0759. Type of Review: a revision of an existing... the on-line reporting system, International Resource Information System (IRIS) that IFLE uses...

  9. Upgraded NERVA systems: Enabler nuclear system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farbman, Gerry

    1991-01-01

    The NERVA/Rover Enabler technology enables to go on a low risk, short-term program to meet the requirements of the Mars mission and maybe some lunar missions. The following subject areas are covered: NERVA technology - the foundation for tomorrow's space missions; NERVA/Rover reactor system test sequence; NERVA engine development program; nuclear thermal reactor capability based on many related Westinghouse technology programs; investment in Rover/Nerva technology; synergistic applications of NERVA technology; flow schematic of the NDR engine; the NERVA nuclear subsystem; and technology evolution.

  10. Informed consent: an international researchers' perspective.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Roberto; Borasky, David; Rice, Robert; Carayon, Florence; Wong, Emelita

    2007-01-01

    We reported 164 researchers' recommendations for information that should be included in the informed consent process. These recommendations were obtained during training workshops conducted in Africa, Europe, and the United States. The 8 elements of informed consent of the US Code of Federal Regulations were used to identify 95 items of information ("points"), most related to benefits and research description. Limited consensus was found among the 3 workshops: of the 95 points, only 27 (28%) were identified as useful by all groups. These points serve as a springboard for identifying information applicable in different geographic areas and indicate the need for involving a variety of individuals and stakeholders, with different research and cultural perspectives, in the development of informed consent, particularly for research undertaken in international settings.

  11. Expert computer systems. 1977-April, 1983 (Citations from the International Information Service for the Physics and Engineering Communities Data Base)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-04-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning the use of knowledge and reasoning techniques in computer programs designated as expert systems. Expert systems are a form of artificial intelligence, used to solve problems that often require human intervention to apply reasoning and experience. Applications include engineering design, medical diagnosis, management decision support systems, computer assisted instruction, structural analysis, and improvement in man-machine communications. (Contains 98 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

  12. Preparation of nuclear fuel spheres by flotation-internal gelation

    DOEpatents

    Haas, Paul A.; Fowler, Victor L.; Lloyd, Milton H.

    1987-01-01

    A simplified internal gelation process for the preparation of gel spheres of nuclear fuels. The process utilizes perchloroethylene as a gelation medium. Gelation is accomplished by directing droplets of a nuclear fuel broth into a moving volume of hot perchloroethylene (about 85.degree. C.) in a trough. Gelation takes place as the droplets float on the surface of the perchloroethylene and the resultant gel spheres are carried directly into an ager column which is attached to the trough. The aged spheres are disengaged from the perchloroethylene on a moving screen and are deposited in an aqueous wash column.

  13. Preparation of nuclear fuel spheres by flotation-internal gelation

    DOEpatents

    Haas, P.A.; Fowler, V.L.; Lloyd, M.H.

    1984-12-21

    A simplified internal gelation process is claimed for the preparation of gel spheres of nuclear fuels. The process utilizes perchloroethylene as a gelation medium. Gelation is accomplished by directing droplets of a nuclear fuel broth into a moving volume of hot perchloroethylene (about 85/sup 0/C) in a trough. Gelation takes place as the droplets float on the surface of the perchloroethylene and the resultant gel spheres are carried directly into an ager column which is attached to the trough. The aged spheres are disengaged from the perchloroethylene on a moving screen and are deposited in an aqueous wash column. 3 figs.

  14. Comparing International Curriculum Systems: The International Instructional Systems Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creese, Brian; Gonzalez, Alvaro; Isaacs, Tina

    2016-01-01

    This paper sets out the main findings of the International Instructional Systems Study (IISS), conducted by the UCL Institute of Education and funded by the Center on International Education Benchmarking (CIEB). The study examined the instructional systems and intended curricula of six "high performing" countries and two US states. The…

  15. Comparing International Curriculum Systems: The International Instructional Systems Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creese, Brian; Gonzalez, Alvaro; Isaacs, Tina

    2016-01-01

    This paper sets out the main findings of the International Instructional Systems Study (IISS), conducted by the UCL Institute of Education and funded by the Center on International Education Benchmarking (CIEB). The study examined the instructional systems and intended curricula of six "high performing" countries and two US states. The…

  16. An imaging nuclear survey system

    SciTech Connect

    Redus, R.; Squillante, M.R.; Gordon, J.S.; Bennett, P.; Entine, G.; Knoll, G.; Wehe, D.; Guru, S.

    1995-12-31

    A combined video and gamma ray imaging system was developed to rapidly determine the location, distribution, and intensity of gamma ray sources. This instrument includes both a conventional video camera and a gamma ray imaging system based on a position sensitive PM tube, scintillator, and pinhole collimator. The gamma camera records position and energy of each interaction, determining the energy spectrum and count rate from each direction. We have used a prototype of this instrument in preliminary field test to image radioactive sources with {gamma} ray energies between 120 keV and 2.4 MeV. This system achieves an angular resolution for the nuclear image of 6{degree} with an efficiency of 3x10{sup -6} at 1 meter, which is suitable for many nuclear applications. Sensitivity is sufficiently high that, in a low background environment, a 1 mCi {sup 137}Cs source at 5 meters can be located in <30 seconds. Alternatively, higher spatial resolution can be attained at lower efficiency and longer imaging times.

  17. International exchange of emergency phase information and assessments: an aid to national/international decision makers.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Thomas J; Chino, Masamichi; Ehrhardt, Joachim; Shershakov, Vyacheslav

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses a collaborative project (1) to demonstrate the feasibility and benefit of a system seeking early review, in a 'quasi peer review' mode, of nuclear accident plume and dose assessment predictions by four major international nuclear accident emergency response systems before release of calculations to respective national authorities followed by (2) sharing these results with responsible national/international authorities, (3) development of an affordable/accessible system to distribute results to countries without prediction capabilities and (4) utilisation for exercises and collaboration studies. The project exploits Internet browser technology and low-cost PC hardware, incorporates an Internet node, with access control, for depositing a minimal set of XML-based graphics files for presentation in an identical map format. Side-by-side viewing and televideo conferencing will permit rapid evaluation, data elaboration and recalculation (if necessary) and should produce strong consensus among decision makers. Successful completion affords easy utilisation by national/international organisations and non-nuclear states at risk of trans-boundary incursion.

  18. Mobile Student Information System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asif, Muhammad; Krogstie, John

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: A mobile student information system (MSIS) based on mobile computing and context-aware application concepts can provide more user-centric information services to students. The purpose of this paper is to describe a system for providing relevant information to students on a mobile platform. Design/methodology/approach: The research…

  19. Community Information Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Andrew

    Information is provided on technological and social trends as background for a workshop designed to heighten the consciousness of workers in community information systems. Initially, the basic terminology is considered in its implications for an integrated perspective of community information systems, with particular attention given to the meaning…

  20. Strategic Information Systems Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowley, Jennifer

    1995-01-01

    Strategic Information Systems Planning (SISP) is the process of establishing a program for implementation and use of information systems in ways that will optimize effectiveness of information resources and use them to support the objectives of the organization. Basic steps in SISP methodology are outlined. (JKP)

  1. Mobile Student Information System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asif, Muhammad; Krogstie, John

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: A mobile student information system (MSIS) based on mobile computing and context-aware application concepts can provide more user-centric information services to students. The purpose of this paper is to describe a system for providing relevant information to students on a mobile platform. Design/methodology/approach: The research…

  2. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Information Digest 1992 edition. Volume 4

    SciTech Connect

    Olive, K

    1992-03-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission Information Digest provides a summary of information about the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), NRC's regulatory responsibilities, the activities NRC licenses, and general information on domestic and worldwide nuclear energy. This digest is a compilation of nuclear- and NRC-related data and is designed to provide a quick reference to major facts about the agency and industry it regulates. In general, the data cover 1975 through 1991, with exceptions noted. Information on generating capacity and average capacity factor for operating US commercial nuclear power reactors is obtained from monthly operating reports that are submitted directly to the NRC by the licensee. This information is reviewed by the NRC for consistency only and no independent validation and/or verification is performed.

  3. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Information Digest 1994 edition. Volume 6

    SciTech Connect

    Stadler, L.

    1994-03-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission Information Digest (digest) provides a summary of information about the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), NRCs regulatory responsibility the activities NRC licenses, and general information on domestic and worldwide nuclear energy. The digest, published annually, is a compilation of nuclear-and NRC-related data and is designed to provide a quick reference to major facts about the agency and the industry it regulates. In general, the data cover 1975 through 1993, with exceptions noted. Information on generating capacity and average capacity factor for operating US commercial nuclear power reactors is obtained from monthly operating reports that are submitted directly to the NRC by the information is reviewed by the NRC for consistency only and no independent validation and/or verification is performed.

  4. Aging effects of US space nuclear systems in orbit

    SciTech Connect

    Bartram, B.W.; Huang, R.; Tammara, S.R.; Thielke, N.R.

    1982-05-14

    This report presents information and data in support of a cost-benefit analysis being performed by Fair child Industries (FI) on the feasibility of retrieving existing US space nuclear systems in earth orbit by the Space Shuttle. This report evaluates, for US space nuclear systems presently in orbit, the radioisotopic inventory and external radiation field as a function of time, the effect of aging on fuel containment materials over the projected lifetime of the system, and the possible radioactive source terms should reentry eventually occur. Although the radioisotopic inventories and radiation fields have been evaluated for all systems, Transit 4A and Transit Triad have been emphasized in the evaluation of the aging effects and reentry consequences because these spacecraft have the shortest projected orbital lifetimes (570 and 150 years, respectively). In addition to existing systems in orbit, the radioisotopic inventory, radiation field, and reentry source terms have been evaluated for a General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) in a parking orbit due to an aborted Galileo Mission or International Solar Polar Mission (ISPM).

  5. Political realism and international morality: Ethics in the nuclear age

    SciTech Connect

    Kipnis, K.; Meyers, D.T.

    1987-01-01

    These essays are at once insightful and accessible, noted political thinkers examine the tension of the conflicting demands of morality and national self-interest in the context of the foundations of international order, the possession and use of nuclear weapons, recourse to war, and the prospects for peace. A final postscript addresses the question of the responsibility of intellectuals in the national foreign policy debate. This book will appeal to scholars and students in any discipline dealing with international affairs, as well as to lay readers who with to explore the implications of taking morality and reason seriously in foreign policy.

  6. Free nuclear precession gradiometer system

    SciTech Connect

    Hinton, G. F.

    1985-10-08

    A free nuclear precession gradiometer uses a fluid sample surrounded by a coil the fluid sample containing one or more nuclear species which display a magnetic moment. Current in the coil polarizes the nucleii, which when the current is abruptly terminated precess coherently about the earth's magnetic field. The exact frequency generated is a precise measure of the absolute value of the earth's magnetic field. The signal is in the form of a damped sinusoid with the rate of decay being a function of gradients in the ambient magnetic field. Two vector magnetometers are mounted rigidly on the sensor at the right angles to each other and to the earth's magnetic field. A servo system continuously orients the sensor in a two-axis gimbal system to reduce the output of the vector magnetometers to zero. The instrument is polarized, a counter is triggered to make the frequency measurement, and the signal is analyzed by determining the average amplitude of the signal over a precise interval of time. The result is simultaneous measurement of total intensity and total gradient.

  7. International law problems for realisation of the IAEA conventions on notification and assistance in the case of a nuclear accident

    SciTech Connect

    Petrov, M.M.

    1993-12-31

    The Chernobyl accident underscored the need for an early warning system and international assistance plan in case of a nuclear accident. Shortly after Chernobyl, two conventions were adopted under the auspices of the IAEA. The convention on Early Notification of a Nuclear Accident, in force since 1986, establishes an early warning system for all nuclear accidents whose effects might cross national boundaries. Under the convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear accident or radiological Emergency,in force since 1987, countries must facilitate prompt assistance in case of a nuclear accident or radiological emergency, to minimize it`s consequences. Issues with the conventions are described.

  8. Information extraction system

    DOEpatents

    Lemmond, Tracy D; Hanley, William G; Guensche, Joseph Wendell; Perry, Nathan C; Nitao, John J; Kidwell, Paul Brandon; Boakye, Kofi Agyeman; Glaser, Ron E; Prenger, Ryan James

    2014-05-13

    An information extraction system and methods of operating the system are provided. In particular, an information extraction system for performing meta-extraction of named entities of people, organizations, and locations as well as relationships and events from text documents are described herein.

  9. Regional Health Information Systems

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, Sherrilynne

    1997-01-01

    Abstract In general, there is agreement that robust integrated information systems are the foundation for building successful regional health care delivery systems. Integrated Advanced Information Management System (IAIMS) institutions that, over the years, have developed strategies for creating cohesive institutional information systems and services are finding that IAIMS strategies work well in the even more complex regional environment. The key elements of IAIMS planning are described and lessons learned are discussed in the context of regional health information systems developed. The challenges of aligning the various information agencies and agendas in support of a regional health information system are complex ; however, the potential rewards for health care in quality, efficacy, and cost savings are enormous. PMID:9067887

  10. Terminology Strategies for International Information Exchange

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-08-01

    identify by block number) FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP Thesauri, Core thesauri, Bilingual thesauri Vocabulary, 5 2 Micro-vocabularies, Scientific and technical...specific micro vocabularies at the local level to meet specialized needs is explored. The thesaurus will be bilingual with both English and French...TERMINOLOGY STRATEGIES FOR INTERNATIONAL INFORMATION EXCHANGE Gladys A. Cotter Walter R. Blados Key Words: Thesauri, core thesauri, bilingual thesauri

  11. ECONOMICS OF INFORMATION SYSTEMS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The paper presents a study of the rational choice-making of an individual from among available information systems , or available components of such...components, of information systems . The available set depends on the choices made by suppliers. Joint choices by demanders and suppliers would...determine which information systems are in fact produced and used under given external conditions. These conditions include the technological knowledge of those concerned.

  12. Management Information Systems Research.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Research on management information systems is illusive in many respects. Part of the basic research problem in MIS stems from the absence of standard...definitions and the lack of a unified body of theory. Organizations continue to develop large and often very efficient information systems , but...decision making. But the transition from these results to the realization of ’satisfactory’ management information systems remains difficult indeed. The

  13. Weather Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    WxLink is an aviation weather system based on advanced airborne sensors, precise positioning available from the satellite-based Global Positioning System, cockpit graphics and a low-cost datalink. It is a two-way system that uplinks weather information to the aircraft and downlinks automatic pilot reports of weather conditions aloft. Manufactured by ARNAV Systems, Inc., the original technology came from Langley Research Center's cockpit weather information system, CWIN (Cockpit Weather INformation). The system creates radar maps of storms, lightning and reports of surface observations, offering improved safety, better weather monitoring and substantial fuel savings.

  14. Nuclear energy information flow from DOE to the public

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, J.L.; Rankin, W.L.; Nealey, S.M.

    1980-06-01

    The objective of this research was to study the DOE's program for educating the public about nuclear power and nuclear waste management. DOE's organizational structuree and the procedures used within this structure to disseminate information were studied and readability tests on nuclear information distributed by DOE were conducted. Initial information was obtained through interviews with 29 local, state, and federal DOE representatives. This was supplemented with additional information as it was released by the DOE. The primary goals of the DOE's information program are to encourage two-way communication between the DOE and the public and to encourage public participation in policy-making decisions. Most of this communication, however, is presented orally. Relative to other energy technologies and conservation, very few nuclear brochures are currently being distributed by the DOE. This is especially true with regard to information about nuclear waste. A recent public survey found that a majority of the public wants to learn more about nuclear power and that, with regard to the nuclear fuel cycle, the public wants most to learn about nuclear waste management. Thus, the DOE appears to be missing an eager audience.

  15. Developing International Guidelines on Volcanic Hazard Assessments for Nuclear Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connor, Charles

    2014-05-01

    Worldwide, tremendous progress has been made in recent decades in forecasting volcanic events, such as episodes of volcanic unrest, eruptions, and the potential impacts of eruptions. Generally these forecasts are divided into two categories. Short-term forecasts are prepared in response to unrest at volcanoes, rely on geophysical monitoring and related observations, and have the goal of forecasting events on timescales of hours to weeks to provide time for evacuation of people, shutdown of facilities, and implementation of related safety measures. Long-term forecasts are prepared to better understand the potential impacts of volcanism in the future and to plan for potential volcanic activity. Long-term forecasts are particularly useful to better understand and communicate the potential consequences of volcanic events for populated areas around volcanoes and for siting critical infrastructure, such as nuclear facilities. Recent work by an international team, through the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency, has focused on developing guidelines for long-term volcanic hazard assessments. These guidelines have now been implemented for hazard assessment for nuclear facilities in nations including Indonesia, the Philippines, Armenia, Chile, and the United States. One any time scale, all volcanic hazard assessments rely on a geologically reasonable conceptual model of volcanism. Such conceptual models are usually built upon years or decades of geological studies of specific volcanic systems, analogous systems, and development of a process-level understanding of volcanic activity. Conceptual models are used to bound potential rates of volcanic activity, potential magnitudes of eruptions, and to understand temporal and spatial trends in volcanic activity. It is these conceptual models that provide essential justification for assumptions made in statistical model development and the application of numerical models to generate quantitative forecasts. It is a

  16. Nuclear power plant alarm systems: Problems and issues

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hara, J.M.; Brown, W.S.

    1991-01-01

    Despite the incorporation of advanced technology into nuclear power plant alarm systems, human factors problems remain. This paper identifies to be addressed in order to allow advanced technology to be used effectively in the design of nuclear power plant alarm systems. The operator's use and processing of alarm system information will be considered. Based upon a review of alarm system research, issues related to general system design, alarm processing, display and control are discussed. It is concluded that the design of effective alarm systems depends on an understanding of the information processing capabilities and limitations of the operator. 39 refs.

  17. Reasonable Accommodation Information Tracking System

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Reasonable Accommodation Information Tracking System (RAITS) is a case management system that allows the National Reasonable Accommodation Coordinator (NRAC) and the Local Reasonable Accommodation Coordinators (LORAC) to manage information related to Reasonable Accommodation (RA) requests. It provides a data base system in compliance with Executive Order 13164 and required by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) Regulations and American Federation of Government Employees (AFGE) Bargaining Unit as described in the AFGE National Reasonable Accommodation Procedures. It is a tool that was internally developed in Lotus Notes to track requests for reasonable accommodation and was custom-configured to meet EPA's specific needs and infrastructure.

  18. High Energy Nuclear Database: A Testbed for Nuclear Data Information Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D A; Vogt, R; Beck, B; Pruet, J

    2007-04-18

    We describe the development of an on-line high-energy heavy-ion experimental database. When completed, the database will be searchable and cross-indexed with relevant publications, including published detector descriptions. While this effort is relatively new, it will eventually contain all published data from older heavy-ion programs as well as published data from current and future facilities. These data include all measured observables in proton-proton, proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions. Once in general use, this database will have tremendous scientific payoff as it makes systematic studies easier and allows simpler benchmarking of theoretical models for a broad range of experiments. Furthermore, there is a growing need for compilations of high-energy nuclear data for applications including stockpile stewardship, technology development for inertial confinement fusion, target and source development for upcoming facilities such as the International Linear Collider and homeland security. This database is part of a larger proposal that includes the production of periodic data evaluations and topical reviews. These reviews would provide an alternative and impartial mechanism to resolve discrepancies between published data from rival experiments and between theory and experiment. Since this database will be a community resource, it requires the high-energy nuclear physics community's financial and manpower support. This project serves as a testbed for the further development of an object-oriented nuclear data format and database system. By using ''off-the-shelf'' software tools and techniques, the system is simple, robust, and extensible. Eventually we envision a ''Grand Unified Nuclear Format'' encapsulating data types used in the ENSDF, ENDF/B, EXFOR, NSR and other formats, including processed data formats.

  19. PREFACE: International Nuclear Physics Conference 2010 (INPC2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dilling, Jens

    2011-09-01

    The International Nuclear Physics Conference 2010 (INPC 2010) was held from 4-9 July in Vancouver, Canada, hosted by TRIUMF, the Canadian National Laboratory for Particle and Nuclear Physics. The INPC is the main conference in the field of nuclear physics, endorsed and supported by IUPAP (International Union for Pure and Applied Physics) and held every three years. This year's conference was the 25th in the series and attracted over 750 delegates (150 graduate students) from 43 countries. The conference's hallmark is its breadth in nuclear physics; topics included structure, reactions, astrophysics, hadronic structure, hadrons in nuclei, hot and dense QCD, new accelerators and underground nuclear physics facilities, neutrinos and nuclei, and applications and interdisciplinary research. The conference started with a public lecture 'An Atom from Vancouver' by L Krauss (Arizona), who gave a broad perspective on how nuclear physics is key to a deeper understanding of how the Universe was formed and the birth, life, and death of stars. The conference opened its scientific plenary program with a talk by P Braun-Munzinger (GSI/EMMI Darmstadt) who highlighted the progress that has been made since the last conference in Tokyo 2007. The presentation showcased theoretical and experimental examples from around the world. All topics were well represented by plenary sessions and well attended afternoon parallel sessions where over 250 invited and contributed talks were presented, in addition to over 380 poster presentations. The poster sessions were among the liveliest, with high participation and animated discussions from graduate students and post-doctoral fellows. Many opportunities were found to connect to fellow nuclear physicists across the globe and, particularly for conferences like the INPC which span an entire field, many unexpected links exist, often leading to new discussions or collaborations. Among the scientific highlights were the presentations in the fields of

  20. Fuel cycle analysis of once-through nuclear systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, T. K.; Taiwo, T. A.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2010-08-10

    Once-through fuel cycle systems are commercially used for the generation of nuclear power, with little exception. The bulk of these once-through systems have been water-cooled reactors (light-water and heavy water reactors, LWRs and HWRs). Some gas-cooled reactors are used in the United Kingdom. The commercial power systems that are exceptions use limited recycle (currently one recycle) of transuranic elements, primarily plutonium, as done in Europe and nearing deployment in Japan. For most of these once-through fuel cycles, the ultimate storage of the used (spent) nuclear fuel (UNF, SNF) will be in a geologic repository. Besides the commercial nuclear plants, new once-through concepts are being proposed for various objectives under international advanced nuclear fuel cycle studies and by industrial and venture capital groups. Some of the objectives for these systems include: (1) Long life core for remote use or foreign export and to support proliferation risk reduction goals - In these systems the intent is to achieve very long core-life with no refueling and limited or no access to the fuel. Most of these systems are fast spectrum systems and have been designed with the intent to improve plant economics, minimize nuclear waste, enhance system safety, and reduce proliferation risk. Some of these designs are being developed under Generation IV International Forum activities and have generally not used fuel blankets and have limited the fissile content of the fuel to less than 20% for the purpose on meeting international nonproliferation objectives. In general, the systems attempt to use transuranic elements (TRU) produced in current commercial nuclear power plants as this is seen as a way to minimize the amount of the problematic radio-nuclides that have to be stored in a repository. In this case, however, the reprocessing of the commercial LWR UNF to produce the initial fuel will be necessary. For this reason, some of the systems plan to use low enriched uranium

  1. Information retrieval system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berg, R. F.; Holcomb, J. E.; Kelroy, E. A.; Levine, D. A.; Mee, C., III

    1970-01-01

    Generalized information storage and retrieval system capable of generating and maintaining a file, gathering statistics, sorting output, and generating final reports for output is reviewed. File generation and file maintenance programs written for the system are general purpose routines.

  2. Concept analysis of the patient reported outcomes measurement information system (PROMIS(®)) and the international classification of functioning, disability and health (ICF).

    PubMed

    Tucker, Carole A; Cieza, Alarcos; Riley, Anne W; Stucki, Gerold; Lai, Jin Shei; Bedirhan Ustun, T; Kostanjsek, Nenad; Riley, William; Cella, David; Forrest, Christopher B

    2014-08-01

    The Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS (®) ) is a US National Institutes of Health initiative that has produced self-report outcome measures, using a framework of physical, mental, and social health defined by the World Health Organization in 1948 (WHO, in Preamble to the Constitution of the World Health Organization as adopted by the International Health Conference, New York, 1948). The World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) is a comprehensive classification system of health and health-related domains that was put forward in 2001. The purpose of this report is to compare and contrast PROMIS and ICF conceptual frameworks to support mapping of PROMIS instruments to the ICF classification system . We assessed the objectives and the classification schema of the PROMIS and ICF frameworks, followed by content analysis to determine whether PROMIS domain and sub-domain level health concepts can be linked to the ICF classification. Both PROMIS and ICF are relevant to all individuals, irrespective of the presence of health conditions, person characteristics, or environmental factors in which persons live. PROMIS measures are intended to assess a person's experiences of his or her health, functional status, and well-being in multiple domains across physical, mental, and social dimensions. The ICF comprehensively describes human functioning from a biological, individual, and social perspective. The ICF supports classification of health and health-related states such as functioning, but is not a specific measure or assessment of health, per se. PROMIS domains and sub-domain concepts can be meaningfully mapped to ICF concepts. Theoretical and conceptual similarities support the use of PROMIS instruments to operationalize self-reported measurement for many body function, activity and participation ICF concepts, as well as several environmental factor concepts. Differences observed in

  3. Mass Storage Performance Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheuermann, Peter

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this task is to develop a data warehouse to enable system administrators and their managers to gather information by querying the data logs of the MDSDS. Currently detailed logs capture the activity of the MDSDS internal to the different systems. The elements to be included in the data warehouse are requirements analysis, data cleansing, database design, database population, hardware/software acquisition, data transformation, query and report generation, and data mining.

  4. New Nuclear Emergency Prognosis system in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyun-Ha; Jeong, Seung-Young; Park, Sang-Hyun; Lee, Kwan-Hee

    2016-04-01

    incorporate the dose assessment methods of IAEA, WHO, and USNRC. The dose assessment result will express on the GIS (GIS (Geographic Information System) to provide to the local- governments and the central government. Acknowledgements This research has been supported by the Nuclear Safety and Security Commission [Reference No.1305020-0315-SB110

  5. NASA Missions Enabled by Space Nuclear Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, John H.; Schmidt, George R.

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews NASA Space Missions that are enabled by Space Nuclear Systems. The topics include: 1) Space Nuclear System Applications; 2) Trade Space for Electric Power Systems; 3) Power Generation Specific Energy Trade Space; 4) Radioisotope Power Generation; 5) Radioisotope Missions; 6) Fission Power Generation; 7) Solar Powered Lunar Outpost; 8) Fission Powered Lunar Outpost; 9) Fission Electric Power Generation; and 10) Fission Nuclear Thermal Propulsion.

  6. 10 CFR 1017.12 - Prohibitions on identifying Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Nuclear Information. 1017.12 Section 1017.12 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) IDENTIFICATION AND PROTECTION OF UNCLASSIFIED CONTROLLED NUCLEAR INFORMATION Initially Determining What Information Is Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information § 1017.12 Prohibitions on identifying Unclassified...

  7. 10 CFR 1017.12 - Prohibitions on identifying Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Nuclear Information. 1017.12 Section 1017.12 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) IDENTIFICATION AND PROTECTION OF UNCLASSIFIED CONTROLLED NUCLEAR INFORMATION Initially Determining What Information Is Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information § 1017.12 Prohibitions on identifying Unclassified...

  8. 10 CFR 1017.12 - Prohibitions on identifying Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Nuclear Information. 1017.12 Section 1017.12 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) IDENTIFICATION AND PROTECTION OF UNCLASSIFIED CONTROLLED NUCLEAR INFORMATION Initially Determining What Information Is Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information § 1017.12 Prohibitions on identifying Unclassified...

  9. 10 CFR 1017.12 - Prohibitions on identifying Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Nuclear Information. 1017.12 Section 1017.12 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) IDENTIFICATION AND PROTECTION OF UNCLASSIFIED CONTROLLED NUCLEAR INFORMATION Initially Determining What Information Is Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information § 1017.12 Prohibitions on identifying Unclassified...

  10. 10 CFR 1017.12 - Prohibitions on identifying Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Nuclear Information. 1017.12 Section 1017.12 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) IDENTIFICATION AND PROTECTION OF UNCLASSIFIED CONTROLLED NUCLEAR INFORMATION Initially Determining What Information Is Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information § 1017.12 Prohibitions on identifying...

  11. Medical Information Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alterescu, S.; Hipkins, K. R.; Friedman, C. A.

    1979-01-01

    On-line interactive information processing system easily and rapidly handles all aspects of data management related to patient care. General purpose system is flexible enough to be applied to other data management situations found in areas such as occupational safety data, judicial information, or personnel records.

  12. Anesthesia information management systems.

    PubMed

    Williams, Joe R

    2005-06-01

    Documentation is the last component of anesthesia patient management to be affected by technology. Anesthesia information management systems (AIMS) have been introduced in a limited number of practice sites. The automated systems provide unbiased reporting of most patient information. This results in improved patient care and possible medical legal advantages. AIMS also allow anesthesia departments to monitor their business related activity.

  13. Environmental geographic information system.

    SciTech Connect

    Peek, Dennis W; Helfrich, Donald Alan; Gorman, Susan

    2010-08-01

    This document describes how the Environmental Geographic Information System (EGIS) was used, along with externally received data, to create maps for the Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement (SWEIS) Source Document project. Data quality among the various classes of geographic information system (GIS) data is addressed. A complete listing of map layers used is provided.

  14. Information Retrieval System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahle, Jack D., Jr.

    The Fort Detrick Information Retrieval System is a system of computer programs written in COBOL for a CDC 3150 to store and retrieve information about the scientific and technical reports and documents of the Fort Detrick Technical Library. The documents and reports have been abstracted and indexed. This abstract, the subject matter descriptors,…

  15. Archival Information Management System.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-02-01

    management system named Archival Information Management System (AIMS), designed to meet the audit trail requirement for studies completed under the...are to be archived to the extent that future reproducibility and interrogation of results will exist. This report presents a prototype information

  16. Irans Nuclear Program: Tehrans Compliance with International Obligations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-03

    Research Service Summary Several U.N. Security Council resolutions required Iran to cooperate fully with the International Atomic Energy Agency’s (IAEA’s...comprehensive International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards; Tehran concluded a comprehensive safeguards agreement with the IAEA in 1974. 2 In 2002...in the State (i.e. completeness).” 17 The Safeguards System of the International Atomic Energy Agency. Available at http://www.iaea.org/OurWork/SG

  17. 77 FR 28407 - Special Nuclear Material Control and Accounting Systems for Nuclear Power Plants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-14

    ... COMMISSION Special Nuclear Material Control and Accounting Systems for Nuclear Power Plants AGENCY: Nuclear...-5028, ``Special Nuclear Material Control and Accounting Systems for Nuclear Power Plants.'' In DG-5028... Control and Accounting Systems for Nuclear Power Plants.'' DATES: Submit comments by July 16, 2012...

  18. Use of open source information and commercial satellite imagery for nuclear nonproliferation regime compliance verification by a community of academics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solodov, Alexander

    The proliferation of nuclear weapons is a great threat to world peace and stability. The question of strengthening the nonproliferation regime has been open for a long period of time. In 1997 the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Board of Governors (BOG) adopted the Additional Safeguards Protocol. The purpose of the protocol is to enhance the IAEA's ability to detect undeclared production of fissile materials in member states. However, the IAEA does not always have sufficient human and financial resources to accomplish this task. Developed here is a concept for making use of human and technical resources available in academia that could be used to enhance the IAEA's mission. The objective of this research was to study the feasibility of an academic community using commercially or publicly available sources of information and products for the purpose of detecting covert facilities and activities intended for the unlawful acquisition of fissile materials or production of nuclear weapons. In this study, the availability and use of commercial satellite imagery systems, commercial computer codes for satellite imagery analysis, Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) verification International Monitoring System (IMS), publicly available information sources such as watchdog groups and press reports, and Customs Services information were explored. A system for integrating these data sources to form conclusions was also developed. The results proved that publicly and commercially available sources of information and data analysis can be a powerful tool in tracking violations in the international nuclear nonproliferation regime and a framework for implementing these tools in academic community was developed. As a result of this study a formation of an International Nonproliferation Monitoring Academic Community (INMAC) is proposed. This would be an independent organization consisting of academics (faculty, staff and students) from both nuclear weapon states (NWS) and

  19. [Legal implications of information to the patient in nuclear medicine].

    PubMed

    Fernández Sánchez, J

    2004-01-01

    Every patient has the right to be informed about a medical procedure. The nuclear medicine physician has the duty to inform the patients and, if necessary, to obtain a reasonable written consent before some radioisotopic examinations. The following must be considered in every informed consent of a nuclear medicine procedure: the need for the patient information ("why"), the type of information given ("how"), the person who performs it ("who"), the moment in the time ("when") and the place ("where") where the consent is performed. It must always be kept in mind that, although the informed consent has a protection function from the medicolegal point of view, this function may be lost if the consent is not performed correctly. In this paper the importance and the medicolegal implications of the patient information in Nuclear Medicine are evaluated and discussed.

  20. A Microbiology Information System

    PubMed Central

    Peebles, James E.; Ryan, Kenneth J.

    1980-01-01

    This paper describes a microbiology information system which is integrated into a general purpose laboratory information system as well as into the normal workflow of the microbiology laboratory. Data entry using “customized” terminal keyboards greatly simplify technologists interaction with the system allowing direct entry of results at each workstation. Results are reported in a user oriented format utilizing full English description of all terms.

  1. Health Information Systems.

    PubMed

    Sirintrapun, S Joseph; Artz, David R

    2015-06-01

    This article provides surgical pathologists an overview of health information systems (HISs): what they are, what they do, and how such systems relate to the practice of surgical pathology. Much of this article is dedicated to the electronic medical record. Information, in how it is captured, transmitted, and conveyed, drives the effectiveness of such electronic medical record functionalities. So critical is information from pathology in integrated clinical care that surgical pathologists are becoming gatekeepers of not only tissue but also information. Better understanding of HISs can empower surgical pathologists to become stakeholders who have an impact on the future direction of quality integrated clinical care.

  2. Health Information Systems.

    PubMed

    Sirintrapun, S Joseph; Artz, David R

    2016-03-01

    This article provides surgical pathologists an overview of health information systems (HISs): what they are, what they do, and how such systems relate to the practice of surgical pathology. Much of this article is dedicated to the electronic medical record. Information, in how it is captured, transmitted, and conveyed, drives the effectiveness of such electronic medical record functionalities. So critical is information from pathology in integrated clinical care that surgical pathologists are becoming gatekeepers of not only tissue but also information. Better understanding of HISs can empower surgical pathologists to become stakeholders who have an impact on the future direction of quality integrated clinical care.

  3. Earthquake Information System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1991-01-01

    IAEMIS (Integrated Automated Emergency Management Information System) is the principal tool of an earthquake preparedness program developed by Martin Marietta and the Mid-America Remote Sensing Center (MARC). It is a two-component set of software, data and procedures to provide information enabling management personnel to make informed decisions in disaster situations. The NASA-developed program ELAS, originally used to analyze Landsat data, provides MARC with a spatially-oriented information management system. Additional MARC projects include land resources management, and development of socioeconomic data.

  4. International Internships in Nuclear Safeguards and Security: Challenges and Successes

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, Cristen L.; Heinberg, Cynthia L.; Killinger, Mark H.; Goodey, Kent O.; Kryuchkov, Eduard F.; Geraskin, Nikolai I.; Silaev, Maxim E.; Sokova, Elena K.; Ford, David G.

    2010-04-20

    All students in the Russian safeguards and security degree programs at the National Research Nuclear University MEPhI and Tomsk Polytechnic University, sponsored by the Material Protection, Control and Accounting (MPC&A) Education Project, take part in a domestic internship at a Russian enterprise or facility. In addition, a select few students are placed in an international internship. These internships provide students with a better view of how MPC&A and nonproliferation in general are addressed outside of Russia. The possibility of an international internship is a significant incentive for students to enroll in the safeguards and security degree programs. The U.S. members of the MPC&A Education Project team interview students who have been nominated by their professors. These students must have initiative and reasonable English skills. The project team and professors then select students to be tentatively placed in various international internships during the summer or fall of their final year of study. Final arrangements are then made with the host organizations. This paper describes the benefits of the joint United States/Russia cooperation for next-generation workforce development, some of the international internships that have been carried out, the benefits of these international internships, and lessons learned in implementing them.

  5. Nuclear electric propulsion reactor control systems status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferg, D. A.

    1973-01-01

    The thermionic reactor control system design studies conducted over the past several years for a nuclear electric propulsion system are described and summarized. The relevant reactor control system studies are discussed in qualitative terms, pointing out the significant advantages and disadvantages including the impact that the various control systems would have on the nuclear electric propulsion system design. A recommendation for the reference control system is made, and a program for future work leading to an engineering model is described.

  6. Information of Open Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimontovich, Yuri L.

    In the theory of communication two definitions of the concept "information" are known. One of them coincides according to its form with the Boltzmann entropy. The second definition of information is the difference between unconditional and conditional entropies. In the present work this latter is used for the definition of the information about states of open systems with various meanings of the control parameter. Two kinds of open systems are considered. The first class of systems concerns those which with zero value of the control parameter are in an equilibrium state. The information on an equilibrium state is equal to zero. During self- organizing in the process of departing from an equilibrium state the information increases. For open systems of this class the conservation law for the sum of the information and entropy with all values of control parameter is proved. In open systems of the second class the equilibrium condition is impossible. For them the concept "norm of a chaoticity" is introduced. It allows to consider two kinds of processes of self-organization and to give the corresponding definitions of information. The statement is carried out on a number of (classical and quantum) examples of physical systems. The example of a medico-biological system also is considered.

  7. Nuclear Material Control and Accountability System Effectiveness Tool (MSET)

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, Danny H; Elwood Jr, Robert H; Roche, Charles T; Campbell, Billy J; Hammond, Glenn A; Meppen, Bruce W; Brown, Richard F

    2011-01-01

    A nuclear material control and accountability (MC&A) system effectiveness tool (MSET) has been developed in the United States for use in evaluating material protection, control, and accountability (MPC&A) systems in nuclear facilities. The project was commissioned by the National Nuclear Security Administration's Office of International Material Protection and Cooperation. MSET was developed by personnel with experience spanning more than six decades in both the U.S. and international nuclear programs and with experience in probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) in the nuclear power industry. MSET offers significant potential benefits for improving nuclear safeguards and security in any nation with a nuclear program. MSET provides a design basis for developing an MC&A system at a nuclear facility that functions to protect against insider theft or diversion of nuclear materials. MSET analyzes the system and identifies several risk importance factors that show where sustainability is essential for optimal performance and where performance degradation has the greatest impact on total system risk. MSET contains five major components: (1) A functional model that shows how to design, build, implement, and operate a robust nuclear MC&A system (2) A fault tree of the operating MC&A system that adapts PRA methodology to analyze system effectiveness and give a relative risk of failure assessment of the system (3) A questionnaire used to document the facility's current MPC&A system (provides data to evaluate the quality of the system and the level of performance of each basic task performed throughout the material balance area [MBA]) (4) A formal process of applying expert judgment to convert the facility questionnaire data into numeric values representing the performance level of each basic event for use in the fault tree risk assessment calculations (5) PRA software that performs the fault tree risk assessment calculations and produces risk importance factor reports on the

  8. Development of a Versatile Ultrasonic Internal Pipe/Vessel Component Monitor for In-Service Inspection of Nuclear Reactor Components

    SciTech Connect

    Searfass, Clifford T.; Malinowski, Owen M.; Van Velsor, Jason K.

    2015-03-22

    The stated goal of this work was to develop a versatile system which could accurately measure vessel and valve internal vibrations and cavitation formation under in-service conditions in nuclear power plants, ultrasonically. The developed technology will benefit the nuclear power generation industry by allowing plant operators to monitor valve and vessel internals during operation. This will help reduce planned outages and plant component failures. During the course of this work, Structural Integrity Associates, Inc. gathered information from industry experts that target vibration amplitudes to be detected should be in the range of 0.001-in to 0.005-in (0.025-mm to 0.127-mm) and target vibration frequency ranges which should be detected were found to be between 0-Hz and 300-Hz. During the performed work, an ultrasonic measuring system was developed which utilized ultrasonic pulse-echo time-of-flight measurements to measure vibration frequency and amplitude. The developed system has been shown to be able to measure vibration amplitudes as low as 0.0008-in (0.020-mm) with vibration frequencies in the range of 17-Hz to 1000-Hz. Therefore, the developed system was able to meet the industry needs for vibration measurement. The developed ultrasonic system was also to be able to measure cavitation formation by monitoring the received ultrasonic time- and frequency-domain signals. This work also demonstrated the survivability of commercially available probes at temperatures up to 300-F for several weeks.

  9. Multimegawatt nuclear power systems for nuclear electric propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, Jeffrey A.

    1991-01-01

    Results from systems analysis studies of multimegawatt nuclear power systems are presented for application to nuclear electric propulsion. Specific mass estimates are presented for nearer term SP-100 reactor-based potassium Rankine and Brayton power systems for piloted and cargo missions. Growth SP-100/Rankine systems were found to range from roughly 7 to 10 kg/kWe specific mass depending on full power life requirements. The SP-100/Rankine systems were also found to result in a 4-kg/kWe savings in specific mass over SP-100/Brayton systems. The potential of advanced, higher temperature reactor and power conversion technologies for achieving reduced mass Rankine and Brayton systems was also investigated. A target goal of 5 kg/kWe specific mass was deemed reasonable given either 1400 K potassium Rankine with 1500 K lithium-cooled reactors or 2000 K gas cooled reactors with Brayton conversion.

  10. PREFACE: 11th International Spring Seminar on Nuclear Physics: Shell Model and Nuclear Structure - achievements of the past two decades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-02-01

    The 11th International Seminar on Nuclear Physics was held in Ischia from May 12 to May 16, 2014. This Seminar was dedicated to Aldo Covello, who has been the promoter of this series of meetings, which started in Sorrento in 1986 and continued with meetings held every two or three years in the Naples area. Aldo's idea was to offer to a group of researchers, actively working in selected fields of Nuclear Physics, the opportunity to confront their points of view in a lively and informal way. The choice for the period of the year, Spring, as well as the sites chosen reflected this intent. The first meeting was of a purely theoretical nature, but it was immediately clear that the scope of these conferences needed to be enlarged calling into play the experimental community. Then, starting from the second meeting, all the following ones have been characterized by fruitful discussion between theoretical and experimental researchers on current achievements and future developments of nuclear structure. This may be read, in fact, as one of the motivating factors for Aldo's election as Fellow of the American Physical Society in 2008 "... for his outstanding contributions to the international nuclear physics community by providing, for over two decades, a venue for theorists and experimentalists to share their latest ideas." The present meeting, organized by Aldo's former students and with the benefit of his suggestions, has maintained this tradition. The title "Shell model and nuclear structure: achievements of the past two decades" recalls that of the 2nd International Spring Seminar "Shell Model and Nuclear Structure: where do we stand?". The main aim of this 11th Seminar was, in fact, to discuss the changes of the past two decades on our view of nuclei in terms of shell structure as well as the perspectives of the shell model, which has been one of the key points in Aldo's research. This point is well accounted by the Opening Speech of Igal Talmi, one of the fathers of the

  11. Nuclear reactor insulation and preheat system

    DOEpatents

    Wampole, Nevin C.

    1978-01-01

    An insulation and preheat system for preselected components of a fluid cooled nuclear reactor. A gas tight barrier or compartment of thermal insulation surrounds the selected components and includes devices to heat the internal atmosphere of the compartment. An external surface of the compartment or enclosure is cooled, such as by a circulating fluid. The heating devices provide for preheating of the components, as well as maintenance of a temperature sufficient to ensure that the reactor coolant fluid will not solidify during shutdown. The external cooling limits the heat transferred to other plant structures, such as supporting concrete and steel. The barrier is spaced far enough from the surrounded components so as to allow access for remote or manual inspection, maintenance, and repair.

  12. Air System Information Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filman, Robert E.

    2004-01-01

    I flew to Washington last week, a trip rich in distributed information management. Buying tickets, at the gate, in flight, landing and at the baggage claim, myriad messages about my reservation, the weather, our flight plans, gates, bags and so forth flew among a variety of travel agency, airline and Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) computers and personnel. By and large, each kind of information ran on a particular application, often specialized to own data formats and communications network. I went to Washington to attend an FAA meeting on System-Wide Information Management (SWIM) for the National Airspace System (NAS) (http://www.nasarchitecture.faa.gov/Tutorials/NAS101.cfm). NAS (and its information infrastructure, SWIM) is an attempt to bring greater regularity, efficiency and uniformity to the collection of stovepipe applications now used to manage air traffic. Current systems hold information about flight plans, flight trajectories, weather, air turbulence, current and forecast weather, radar summaries, hazardous condition warnings, airport and airspace capacity constraints, temporary flight restrictions, and so forth. Information moving among these stovepipe systems is usually mediated by people (for example, air traffic controllers) or single-purpose applications. People, whose intelligence is critical for difficult tasks and unusual circumstances, are not as efficient as computers for tasks that can be automated. Better information sharing can lead to higher system capacity, more efficient utilization and safer operations. Better information sharing through greater automation is possible though not necessarily easy.

  13. Air System Information Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filman, Robert E.

    2004-01-01

    I flew to Washington last week, a trip rich in distributed information management. Buying tickets, at the gate, in flight, landing and at the baggage claim, myriad messages about my reservation, the weather, our flight plans, gates, bags and so forth flew among a variety of travel agency, airline and Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) computers and personnel. By and large, each kind of information ran on a particular application, often specialized to own data formats and communications network. I went to Washington to attend an FAA meeting on System-Wide Information Management (SWIM) for the National Airspace System (NAS) (http://www.nasarchitecture.faa.gov/Tutorials/NAS101.cfm). NAS (and its information infrastructure, SWIM) is an attempt to bring greater regularity, efficiency and uniformity to the collection of stovepipe applications now used to manage air traffic. Current systems hold information about flight plans, flight trajectories, weather, air turbulence, current and forecast weather, radar summaries, hazardous condition warnings, airport and airspace capacity constraints, temporary flight restrictions, and so forth. Information moving among these stovepipe systems is usually mediated by people (for example, air traffic controllers) or single-purpose applications. People, whose intelligence is critical for difficult tasks and unusual circumstances, are not as efficient as computers for tasks that can be automated. Better information sharing can lead to higher system capacity, more efficient utilization and safer operations. Better information sharing through greater automation is possible though not necessarily easy.

  14. Arkansas Technology Information System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanBiervliet, Alan; Parette, Howard P., Jr.

    The Arkansas Technology Information System (ARTIS) was developed to fill a significant void in existing systems of technical support to Arkansans with disabilities by creating and maintaining a consumer-responsive statewide system of data storage and retrieval regarding assistive technology and services. ARTIS goals also include establishment of a…

  15. Organizing Information Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Charles R.

    The development of information systems is described with regard to the roles of the system user and the data processing specialist. Institutional needs are best served by coordination efforts, usually handled by a management systems office, which is also responsible for the maintenance and production of an institutional data element dictionary and…

  16. Application of Nuclear Material Tracking System to nuclear materials control

    SciTech Connect

    Eggers, R.F.

    1989-11-01

    This paper briefly reviews the design concept of the Nuclear Material Tracking System, which is called NTRAK. Subsequently, it provides preliminary estimates of NTRAK detection capability for selected situations and outlines how NTRAK can be used to defend against the insider adversary attempting to steal special nuclear material (SNM). The NTRAK is a special assembly of gamma radiation detectors. The feature of NTRAK which makes it unique is its ability to direction-find and triangulate the position of localized sources of gamma radiation. This capability allows the nuclear safeguards system designer to develop material control procedures based on the position or motion of detected material. This capability was not previously available, because detection systems were unable to determine the direction from the detectors to the nuclear material being monitored. Other features of NTRAK that make it useful for nuclear material control include its abilities to (1) detect SNM at significant ranges from the detectors, (2) verify material quantity, (3) detect theft material traveling piggyback on authorized material, and (4) provide defense in depth against the adversary insider attempting to steal SNM.

  17. Nuclear Space Power Systems Materials Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Buckman, R.W. Jr.

    2004-02-04

    High specific energy is required for space nuclear power systems. This generally means high operating temperatures and the only alloy class of materials available for construction of such systems are the refractory metals niobium, tantalum, molybdenum and tungsten. The refractory metals in the past have been the construction materials selected for nuclear space power systems. The objective of this paper will be to review the past history and requirements for space nuclear power systems from the early 1960's through the SP-100 program. Also presented will be the past and present status of refractory metal alloy technology and what will be needed to support the next advanced nuclear space power system. The next generation of advanced nuclear space power systems can benefit from the review of this past experience. Because of a decline in the refractory metal industry in the United States, ready availability of specific refractory metal alloys is limited.

  18. Nuclear Space Power Systems Materials Requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckman, R. W.

    2004-02-01

    High specific energy is required for space nuclear power systems. This generally means high operating temperatures and the only alloy class of materials available for construction of such systems are the refractory metals niobium, tantalum, molybdenum and tungsten. The refractory metals in the past have been the construction materials selected for nuclear space power systems. The objective of this paper will be to review the past history and requirements for space nuclear power systems from the early 1960's through the SP-100 program. Also presented will be the past and present status of refractory metal alloy technology and what will be needed to support the next advanced nuclear space power system. The next generation of advanced nuclear space power systems can benefit from the review of this past experience. Because of a decline in the refractory metal industry in the United States, ready availability of specific refractory metal alloys is limited.

  19. Information System Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burrows, J. H.

    This paper was prepared for distribution to the California Educational Administrators participating in the "Executive Information Systems" Unit of Instruction as part of the instructional program of Operation PEP (Prepare Educational Planners). The purpose of the course was to introduce some basic concepts of information systems…

  20. New reactor technology: safety improvements in nuclear power systems.

    PubMed

    Corradini, M L

    2007-11-01

    Almost 450 nuclear power plants are currently operating throughout the world and supplying about 17% of the world's electricity. These plants perform safely, reliably, and have no free-release of byproducts to the environment. Given the current rate of growth in electricity demand and the ever growing concerns for the environment, nuclear power can only satisfy the need for electricity and other energy-intensive products if it can demonstrate (1) enhanced safety and system reliability, (2) minimal environmental impact via sustainable system designs, and (3) competitive economics. The U.S. Department of Energy with the international community has begun research on the next generation of nuclear energy systems that can be made available to the market by 2030 or earlier, and that can offer significant advances toward these challenging goals; in particular, six candidate reactor system designs have been identified. These future nuclear power systems will require advances in materials, reactor physics, as well as thermal-hydraulics to realize their full potential. However, all of these designs must demonstrate enhanced safety above and beyond current light water reactor systems if the next generation of nuclear power plants is to grow in number far beyond the current population. This paper reviews the advanced Generation-IV reactor systems and the key safety phenomena that must be considered to guarantee that enhanced safety can be assured in future nuclear reactor systems.

  1. An Information System in the Private Sector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Arlene R.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    The article describes how the New York Association for the Blind (The Lighthouse) studied its information needs and further systematized information collection, retrieval, and use for internal case management and external information exchange with human service agencies by means of a computerized client information system. (Author)

  2. Information systems definition architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Calapristi, A.J.

    1996-06-20

    The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Information Systems Definition architecture evaluated information Management (IM) processes in several key organizations. The intent of the study is to identify improvements in TWRS IM processes that will enable better support to the TWRS mission, and accommodate changes in TWRS business environment. The ultimate goals of the study are to reduce IM costs, Manage the configuration of TWRS IM elements, and improve IM-related process performance.

  3. Nuclear test monitoring system detected meteor explosion over Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2013-10-01

    Sound waves from the Chelyabinsk meteor, which exploded over Russia on 15 February 2013, were detected by 20 infrasound stations that are part of the international monitoring system operated by the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO). The fireball was the most energetic event observed since the 1908 Tunguska meteorite impact and is the most energetic event detected by the CTBTO network.

  4. Analysis of recordings from underwater controlled sources in the Pacific Ocean received by the International Monitoring System (IMS) of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Tomoaki; Zampolli, Mario; Haralabus, Georgios; Heaney, Kevin; Prior, Mark; Isse, Takeshi

    2016-04-01

    Controlled impulsive scientific underwater sound sources in the Northwestern Pacific were observed at two IMS hydroacoustic stations in the Pacific Ocean. Although these experiments were conducted with the aim of studying the physical properties of the plate boundaries inside the Earth, they are also suitable for the investigation of long range underwater acoustic detections. In spite of the fact that the energy of these controlled impulsive scientific sources is significantly smaller than that of nuclear explosions, the signals were obtained by IMS hydrophone stations thousands of kilometres away and also by distant ocean bottom instruments operated by various Institutes, such as the Earthquake Research Institute, University of Tokyo. These experiments provide calibrated (yield, time, location) long-range acoustic transmissions, which enable one to examine the physics of long-range acoustic propagation and to verify the capabilities of the CTBTO IMS network to detect even small explosions.The two IMS stations used are H03 (Juan Fernandez Island, Chile) off the coast of Chile in the Southeastern Pacific and H11 (Wake Island, USA) in the Western Pacific. Both stations consist of two triplets of hydrophones in the SOFAR channel, which monitor the oceans for signs of nuclear explosions. H03 detected low-yield explosions above flat terrain at distances of 15,000 km across the Pacific as well as explosions above the landward slope off the coast of Japan at distances above 16,000 km across the Pacific. These records showed that source signatures, such as short duration and bubble pulses, were preserved over the long propagation distances. It was found that the observed maximum amplitudes from each source exhibit order of magnitude variations even when the yield and detonation depth are the same. The experimental data and transmission loss simulations suggest that bathymetric features around the sources and between the sources and the receivers are the main causes for

  5. HS3 Information System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maskey, M.; Conover, H.; Ramachandran, R.; Kulkarni, A.; Mceniry, M.; Stone, B.

    2015-12-01

    The Global Hydrology Resource Center (GHRC) is developing an enterprise information system to manage and better serve data for Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel (HS3), a NASA airborne field campaign. HS3 is a multiyear campaign aimed at helping scientists understand the physical processes that contribute to hurricane intensification. For in-depth analysis, HS3 encompasses not only airborne data but also variety of in-situ, satellite, simulation, and flight report data. Thus, HS3 provides a unique challenge in information system design. The GHRC team is experienced with previous airborne campaigns to handle such challenge. Many supplementary information and reports collected during the mission include information rich contents that provide mission snapshots. In particular, flight information, instrument status, weather reports, and summary statistics offer vital knowledge about the corresponding science data. Furthermore, such information help narrow the science data of interest. Therefore, the GHRC team is building HS3 information system that augments the current GHRC data management framework to support search and discover of airborne science data with interactive visual exploration. Specifically, the HS3 information system is developing a tool to visually playback mission flights along with other traditional search and discover interfaces. This playback capability allows the users to follow the flight in time and visualize collected data. The flight summary and analyzed information are also presented during the playback. If the observed data is of interest, then they can order the data from GHRC using the interface. The users will be able to order just the data for the part of the flight that they are interested in. This presentation will demonstrate use of visual exploration to data download along with other components that comprise the HS3 information system.

  6. A philosophy for space nuclear systems safety

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, A.C.

    1992-08-01

    The unique requirements and contraints of space nuclear systems require careful consideration in the development of a safety policy. The Nuclear Safety Policy Working Group (NSPWG) for the Space Exploration Initiative has proposed a hierarchical approach with safety policy at the top of the hierarchy. This policy allows safety requirements to be tailored to specific applications while still providing reassurance to regulators and the general public that the necessary measures have been taken to assure safe application of space nuclear systems. The safety policy used by the NSPWG is recommended for all space nuclear programs and missions.

  7. NUCLEAR ENERGY SYSTEM COST MODELING

    SciTech Connect

    Francesco Ganda; Brent Dixon

    2012-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Fuel Cycle Technologies (FCT) Program is preparing to perform an evaluation of the full range of possible Nuclear Energy Systems (NES) in 2013. These include all practical combinations of fuels and transmuters (reactors and sub-critical systems) in single and multi-tier combinations of burners and breeders with no, partial, and full recycle. As part of this evaluation, Levelized Cost of Electricity at Equilibrium (LCAE) ranges for each representative system will be calculated. To facilitate the cost analyses, the 2009 Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis Report is being amended to provide up-to-date cost data for each step in the fuel cycle, and a new analysis tool, NE-COST, has been developed. This paper explains the innovative “Island” approach used by NE-COST to streamline and simplify the economic analysis effort and provides examples of LCAE costs generated. The Island approach treats each transmuter (or target burner) and the associated fuel cycle facilities as a separate analysis module, allowing reuse of modules that appear frequently in the NES options list. For example, a number of options to be screened will include a once-through uranium oxide (UOX) fueled light water reactor (LWR). The UOX LWR may be standalone, or may be the first stage in a multi-stage system. Using the Island approach, the UOX LWR only needs to be modeled once and the module can then be reused on subsequent fuel cycles. NE-COST models the unit operations and life cycle costs associated with each step of the fuel cycle on each island. This includes three front-end options for supplying feedstock to fuel fabrication (mining/enrichment, reprocessing of used fuel from another island, and/or reprocessing of this island’s used fuel), along with the transmuter and back-end storage/disposal. Results of each island are combined based on the fractional energy generated by each islands in an equilibrium system. The cost analyses use the probability

  8. Safeguards Information Management Systems (SIMS)

    SciTech Connect

    Sorenson, R.J.; Sheely, K.B.; Brown, J.B.; Horton, R.D.; Strittmatter, R.; Manatt, D.R.

    1994-04-01

    The requirements for the management of information at the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and its Department of Safeguards are rapidly changing. Historically, the Department of Safeguards has had the requirement to process large volumes of conventional safeguards information. An information management system is currently in place that adequately handles the IAEA`s conventional safeguards data needs. In the post-Iraq environment, however, there is a growing need to expand the IAEA information management capability to include unconventional forms of information. These data include environmental sampling results, photographs, video film, lists of machine tools, and open-source materials such as unclassified publications. The US Department of Energy (DOE) has responded to this information management need by implementing the Safeguards Information Management Systems (SIMS) initiative. SIMS was created by the DOE to anticipate and respond to IAEA information management needs through a multilaboratory initiative that will utilize an integrated approach to develop and deploy technology in a timely and cost-effective manner. The DOE will use the SIMS initiative to coordinate US information management activities that support the IAEA Department of Safeguards.

  9. Three Problems: Nuclear Energy, National Defense and International Cooperation

    SciTech Connect

    Teller, E.

    1999-09-06

    A little more than half a century into the Nuclear Age, we cannot look back on a peaceful period, but we can say that the second (nuclear) half of the century has seen much less violence than the first half with its two violent wars. Also the second half of the century has seen the fortunate ending of the Cold War. But as to the future, we are left with three great questions. (1) How can the world be provided with ample energy? (2) How can we avoid the potentially devastating sudden applications of new destructive technologies? And finally, (3) How can we preserve the development of the world's new potentialities without producing a continuation of violent conflicts? The development of nuclear reactors appears to provide a most interesting new initiative to make energy available to every one. The reality of this promise is at least indicated by progress in France where electricity now is 80% ''nuclear.'' Unfortunately, fear of radioactivity and fear of weapons proliferation has turned public opinion in many parts of the world against nuclear energy. The fear of radioactivity seems to be exaggerated, as indicated, for instance, in the recent international conference in Vienna on the consequences of Chernobyl. The conference concluded that most of the anticipated difficulties (cancer and congenital malformation) have been grossly exaggerated. In my opinion, both the worry about radioactivity and the worry about massive military use of reactor products can be solved. There remain further real difficulties connected with expense and the availability of expertise that may be needed to handle nuclear reactors that may be absent in many parts of the world. I believe that all these problems can be solved. The three major accidents, Windscale in England in 1957, Three-Mile Island in Pennsylvania in 1979, and Chernobyl in Russia in 1986, could have been avoided by proper handling of reactors. The obvious answer seems to be more strict education of the reactor operators. In

  10. Informational analysis involving application of complex information system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciupak, Clébia; Vanti, Adolfo Alberto; Balloni, Antonio José; Espin, Rafael

    The aim of the present research is performing an informal analysis for internal audit involving the application of complex information system based on fuzzy logic. The same has been applied in internal audit involving the integration of the accounting field into the information systems field. The technological advancements can provide improvements to the work performed by the internal audit. Thus we aim to find, in the complex information systems, priorities for the work of internal audit of a high importance Private Institution of Higher Education. The applied method is quali-quantitative, as from the definition of strategic linguistic variables it was possible to transform them into quantitative with the matrix intersection. By means of a case study, where data were collected via interview with the Administrative Pro-Rector, who takes part at the elaboration of the strategic planning of the institution, it was possible to infer analysis concerning points which must be prioritized at the internal audit work. We emphasize that the priorities were identified when processed in a system (of academic use). From the study we can conclude that, starting from these information systems, audit can identify priorities on its work program. Along with plans and strategic objectives of the enterprise, the internal auditor can define operational procedures to work in favor of the attainment of the objectives of the organization.

  11. Management Information System Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foley, Walter J.; Harr, Gordon G.

    The Management Information System (MIS) described in this report represents a plan to utilize modern management techniques to facilitate the goal of a learner-responsive school system. The MIS component is being developed to meet the need for the coordination of the resources of staff, facilities, and time with the long range planning and…

  12. Intelligent Information Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zabezhailo, M. I.; Finn, V. K.

    1996-01-01

    An Intelligent Information System (IIS) uses data warehouse technology to facilitate the cycle of data and knowledge processing, including input, standardization, storage, representation, retrieval, calculation, and delivery. This article provides an overview of IIS products and artificial intelligence systems, illustrates examples of IIS…

  13. The IAGOS Information System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulanger, D.; Thouret, V.

    2016-12-01

    IAGOS (In-service Aircraft for a Global Observing System) is a European Research Infrastructure which aims at the provision of long-term, regular and spatially resolved in situ observations of the atmospheric composition. IAGOS observation systems are deployed on a fleet of commercial aircraft and do measurements of aerosols, cloud particles, greenhouse gases, ozone, water vapor and nitrogen oxides from the surface to the lower stratosphere. The IAGOS database is an essential part of the global atmospheric monitoring network. It contains IAGOS-core and IAGOS-CARIBIC data. The IAGOS Data Portal (http://www.iagos.fr) is part of the French atmospheric chemistry data center AERIS (http://www.aeris-data.fr). In 2016 the new IAGOS Data Portal has been released. In addition to the data download the portal provides improved and new services such as download in NetCDF or NASA Ames formats and plotting tools (maps, time series, vertical profiles). New added value products are available through the portal: back trajectories, origin of air masses, co-location with satellite data. Web services allow to download IAGOS metadata such as flights and airports information. Administration tools have been implemented for users management and instruments monitoring. A major improvement is the interoperability with international portals and other databases in order to improve IAGOS data discovery. In the frame of the IGAS project (IAGOS for the Copernicus Atmospheric Service), a data network has been setup. It is composed of three data centers: the IAGOS database in Toulouse, the HALO research aircraft database at DLR (https://halo-db.pa.op.dlr.de) and the CAMS (Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service) data center in Jülich (http://join.iek.fz-juelich.de). The link with the CAMS data center, through the JOIN interface, allows to combine model outputs with IAGOS data for inter-comparison. The CAMS project is a prominent user of the IGAS data network. Duting the next year IAGOS will

  14. The IAGOS Information System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulanger, Damien; Thouret, Valérie; Brissebrat, Guillaume

    2017-04-01

    IAGOS (In-service Aircraft for a Global Observing System) is a European Research Infrastructure which aims at the provision of long-term, regular and spatially resolved in situ observations of the atmospheric composition. IAGOS observation systems are deployed on a fleet of commercial aircraft and do measurements of aerosols, cloud particles, greenhouse gases, ozone, water vapor and nitrogen oxides from the surface to the lower stratosphere. The IAGOS database is an essential part of the global atmospheric monitoring network. It contains IAGOS-core data and IAGOS-CARIBIC (Civil Aircraft for the Regular Investigation of the Atmosphere Based on an Instrument Container) data. The IAGOS Data Portal http://www.iagos.org, damien.boulanger@obs-mip.fr) is part of the French atmospheric chemistry data center AERIS (http://www.aeris-data.fr). In 2016 the new IAGOS Data Portal has been released. In addition to the data download the portal provides improved and new services such as download in NetCDF or NASA Ames formats and plotting tools (maps, time series, vertical profiles, etc.). New added value products are or will be soon available through the portal: back trajectories, origin of air masses, co-location with satellite data, etc. Web services allow to download IAGOS metadata such as flights and airports information. Administration tools have been implemented for users management and instruments monitoring. A major improvement is the interoperability with international portals or other databases in order to improve IAGOS data discovery. In the frame of the IGAS project (IAGOS for the Copernicus Atmospheric Service), a data network has been setup. It is composed of three data centers: the IAGOS database in Toulouse, the HALO research aircraft database at DLR (https://halo-db.pa.op.dlr.de) and the CAMS (Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service) data center in Jülich (http://join.iek.fz-juelich.de). The link with the CAMS data center, through the JOIN interface, allows to

  15. Necessity of Internal Monitoring for Nuclear Medicine Staff in a Large Specialized Chinese Hospital.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Bo; Zhang, Qing-Zhao; Zhang, Zhen; Hou, Chang-Song; Li, Wen-Liang; Yang, Hui; Sun, Quan-Fu

    2016-04-12

    This work intends to quantify the risk of internal contaminations in the nuclear medicine staff of one hospital in Henan province, China. For this purpose, the criteria proposed by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to determine whether it is necessary to conduct internal individual monitoring was applied to all of the 18 nuclear medicine staff members who handled radionuclides. The activity of different radionuclides used during a whole calendar year and the protection measures adopted were collected for each staff member, and the decision as to whether nuclear medicine staff in the hospital should be subjected to internal monitoring was made on the basis of the criteria proposed by IAEA. It is concluded that for all 18 members of the nuclear medicine staff in the hospital, internal monitoring is required. Internal exposure received by nuclear medicine staff should not be ignored, and it is necessary to implement internal monitoring for nuclear medicine staff routinely.

  16. Necessity of Internal Monitoring for Nuclear Medicine Staff in a Large Specialized Chinese Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong-Bo; Zhang, Qing-Zhao; Zhang, Zhen; Hou, Chang-Song; Li, Wen-Liang; Yang, Hui; Sun, Quan-Fu

    2016-01-01

    This work intends to quantify the risk of internal contaminations in the nuclear medicine staff of one hospital in Henan province, China. For this purpose, the criteria proposed by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to determine whether it is necessary to conduct internal individual monitoring was applied to all of the 18 nuclear medicine staff members who handled radionuclides. The activity of different radionuclides used during a whole calendar year and the protection measures adopted were collected for each staff member, and the decision as to whether nuclear medicine staff in the hospital should be subjected to internal monitoring was made on the basis of the criteria proposed by IAEA. It is concluded that for all 18 members of the nuclear medicine staff in the hospital, internal monitoring is required. Internal exposure received by nuclear medicine staff should not be ignored, and it is necessary to implement internal monitoring for nuclear medicine staff routinely. PMID:27077874

  17. NEEDS - Information Adaptive System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, W. L.; Benz, H. F.; Meredith, B. D.

    1980-01-01

    The Information Adaptive System (IAS) is an element of the NASA End-to-End Data System (NEEDS) Phase II and is focused toward onboard image processing. The IAS is a data preprocessing system which is closely coupled to the sensor system. Some of the functions planned for the IAS include sensor response nonuniformity correction, geometric correction, data set selection, data formatting, packetization, and adaptive system control. The inclusion of these sensor data preprocessing functions onboard the spacecraft will significantly improve the extraction of information from the sensor data in a timely and cost effective manner, and provide the opportunity to design sensor systems which can be reconfigured in near real-time for optimum performance. The purpose of this paper is to present the preliminary design of the IAS and the plans for its development.

  18. Space information systems in the Space Station era; Proceedings of the AIAA/NASA International Symposium on Space Information Systems, Washington, DC and Greenbelt, MD, June 22, 23, 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerard, Mireille (Editor); Edwards, Pamela W. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    Technological and planning issues for data management, processing, and communication on Space Station Freedom are discussed in reviews and reports by U.S., European, and Japanese experts. The space-information-system strategies of NASA, ESA, and NASDA are discussed; customer needs are analyzed; and particular attention is given to communication and data systems, standards and protocols, integrated system architectures, software and automation, and plans and approaches being developed on the basis of experience from past programs. Also included are the reports from workshop sessions on design to meet customer needs, the accommodation of growth and new technologies, and system interoperability.

  19. 1993 International conference on nuclear waste management and environmental remediation, Prague, Czech Republic, September 5--11, 1993. Combined foreign trip report

    SciTech Connect

    Slate, S.C.; Allen, R.E.

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of the trip was to attend the 1993 International Conference on Nuclear Waste Management and Environmental Remediation. The principal objective of this conference was to facilitate a truly international exchange of information on the management of nuclear wastes as well as contaminated facilities and sites emanating from nuclear operations. The conference was sponsored by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, the Czech and Slovak Mechanical Engineering Societies, and the Czech and Slovak Nuclear Societies in cooperation with the Commission of the European Communities, the International Atomic Energy Agency, and the OECD Nuclear Agency. The conference was cosponsored by the American Nuclear Society, the Atomic Energy Society of Japan, the Canadian Nuclear Society, the (former USSR) Nuclear Society, and the Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers. This was the fourth in a series of biennial conferences, which started in Hong Kong, in 1987. This report summarizes shared aspects of the trip; however, each traveler`s observations and recommendations are reported separately.

  20. Nuclear physics information needed for accelerator driven transmutation of nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect

    Lisowski, P.W.; Bowman, C.D.; Arthur, E.D.; Young, P.G.

    1991-01-01

    There is renewed interest in using accelerator driven neutron sources to address the problem of high-level long-lived nuclear waste. Several laboratories have developed systems that may have a significant impact on the future use of nuclear power, adding options for dealing with long-lived actinide wastes and fission products, and for power production. This paper describes a new Los Alamos concept using thermal neutrons and examines the nuclear data requirements. 7 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Intergovernmental cooperation for mission-oriented information systems: a memoir

    SciTech Connect

    Woolston, John E.

    2004-12-01

    This frankly personal account is based on my involvement in negotiations, design, and development for international bibliographic systems to support three different missions: fostering the peaceful uses of atomic energy (International Nuclear Information System, or INIS); supporting research, development, and better practices in agriculture (International Information System for the Agricultural Sciences and Technology, or AGRIS); and improving economic and social conditions in poorer countries (Development Sciences Information System, or DEVSIS). All three designs were based on the concept of decentralized operation: each country reports the information produced in its own territory; the merging of this input and the overall management are in the hands of an organization in the United Nations system; and all participants have equal rights to exploit the entire database. INIS began in 1970 and is still in steady operation; AGRIS started in 1975 and showed quantitative and qualitative growth for more than twenty years but has been in disastrous decline since its peak in 1996; and DEVSIS, unfortunately, was not launched on a global scale. Attempts are made to identify the condition -- political and technical -- likely to favor or frustrate efforts to obtain cooperation among countries for the construction of large, essentially comprehensive databases and ultimately for sharing knowledge without discrimination between rich and poor participants.

  2. Determining information management needs for enhanced international safeguards

    SciTech Connect

    Badalamente, R.V.; DeLand, S.M.; Whiteson, R.; Anzelon, G.

    1994-08-01

    The Safeguards Information Management System initiative is a program of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation aimed at supporting the International Atomic Energy Agency`s (IAEA) efforts to strengthen safeguards through the enhancement of information management capabilities. The DOE hopes to provide the IAEA with the ability to correlate and analyze data from existing and new sources of information, including publicly available information, information on imports and exports, design information, environmental monitoring data, and non-safeguards information. The first step in this effort is to identify and define IAEA requirements. In support of this, we have created a users` requirements document based on interviews with IAEA staff that describes the information management needs of the end user projected by the IAEA, including needs for storage, retrieval, analysis, communication, and visualization of data. Also included are characteristics of the end user and attributes of the current environment. This paper describes our efforts to obtain the required information. We discuss how to accurately represent user needs and involve users for an international organization with a multi-cultural user population. We describe our approach, our experience in setting up and conducting the interviews and brainstorming sessions, and a brief discussion of what we learned.

  3. Lessons learned in applying the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research methodology to translating Canadian Emergency Department Information System Presenting Complaints List into German.

    PubMed

    Brammen, Dominik; Greiner, Felix; Dormann, Harald; Mach, Carsten; Wrede, Christian; Ballaschk, Anne; Stewart, Declan; Walker, Steven; Oesterling, Christine; Kulla, Martin

    2017-03-02

    The patient's presenting complaint guides diagnosis and treatment in the emergency department, but there is no classification system available in German. The Canadian Emergency Department Information System (CEDIS) Presenting Complaint List (PCL) is available only in English and French. As translation risks the altering of meaning, the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR) has set guidelines to ensure translational accuracy. The aim of this paper is to describe our experiences of using the ISPOR guidelines to translate the CEDIS PCL into German. The CEDIS PCL (version 3.0) was forward-translated and back-translated in accordance with the ISPOR guidelines using bilingual clinicians/translators and an occupationally mixed evaluation group that completed a self-developed questionnaire. The CEDIS PCL was forward-translated (four emergency physicians) and back-translated (three mixed translators). Back-translation uncovered eight PCL items requiring amendment. In total, 156 comments were received from 32 evaluators, six of which resulted in amendments. The ISPOR guidelines facilitated adaptation of a PCL into German, but the process required time, language skills and clinical knowledge. The current methodology may be applicable to translating the CEDIS PCL into other languages, with the aim of developing a harmonized, multilingual PCL.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/.

  4. Use of Advanced Tsunami Hazard Assessment Techniques and Tsunami Source Characterizations in U.S. and International Nuclear Regulatory Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammerer, A. M.; Godoy, A. R.

    2009-12-01

    In response to the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami, as well as the anticipation of the submission of license applications for new nuclear facilities, the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC) initiated a long-term research program to improve understanding of tsunami hazard levels for nuclear power plants and other coastal facilities in the United States. To undertake this effort, the US NRC organized a collaborative research program jointly undertaken with researchers at the United States Geological Survey (USGS) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) for the purpose of assessing tsunami hazard on the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts of the United States. This study identified and modeled both seismic and landslide tsunamigenic sources in the near- and far-field. The results from this work are now being used directly as the basis for the review of tsunami hazard at potential nuclear plant sites. This application once again shows the importance that the earth sciences can play in addressing issues of importance to society. Because the Indian Ocean Tsunami was a global event, a number of cooperative international activities have also been initiated within the nuclear community. The results of US efforts are being incorporated into updated regulatory guidance for both the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the United Nation’s International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Coordinated efforts are underway to integrate state-of-the art tsunami warning tools developed by NOAA into NRC and IAEA activities. The goal of the warning systems project is to develop automated protocols that allow scientists at these agencies to have up-to-the minute user-specific information in hand shortly after a potential tsunami has been identified by the US Tsunami Warning System. Lastly, USGS and NOAA scientists are assisting the NRC and IAEA in a special Extra-Budgetary Program (IAEA EBP) on tsunami being coordinated by the IAEA’s International Seismic Safety

  5. A study of how the Student and Exchange Visa Information System influences the influx and study of graduate international students in science and engineering in the U.S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncalves, Marcus V. A.

    The influx of international graduate students in science and engineering to the U.S. has changed since the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. The implementation of the Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS) and related F-1 visa policies have required a higher level of scrutiny of the student visa procedures, and introduced strict student monitoring policies and measures. In addition, the SEVIS monitoring and compliance system has altered the operation of international student service offices, affected the students they serve, and the operation of the universities enrolling international students. This study investigated the effects of SEVIS on graduate programs in science and engineering and their students. Information was gathered from respondents from the 60 universities having the highest population of international students in these fields, according to NSF. Respondents included department administrators, admissions officials, and SEVIS professionals. Data were collected from 75 on-line survey respondents and in 21 semi-structured interviews. The results of this study suggest that many international students are negatively affected by SEVIS, impacting their ability to remain in-status and to understand how the system works. To counter this, department administrators, SEVIS professionals, and student advisors have increased their level of support for these students, providing them guidance on how to remain in-status and how to improve their social and academic experience in the United States. As a result, relatively few international students are deported for falling out-of-status in SEVIS. The data also made clear that program administrators and admissions officials have little knowledge about SEVIS, F-1 visa policies, and their influence on international enrollments. Finally, this study provided evidence of an increased workload for international student advisors and SEVIS professionals. Universities have had to hire additional staff

  6. Materials management information systems.

    PubMed

    1996-01-01

    The hospital materials management function--ensuring that goods and services get from a source to an end user--encompasses many areas of the hospital and can significantly affect hospital costs. Performing this function in a manner that will keep costs down and ensure adequate cash flow requires effective management of a large amount of information from a variety of sources. To effectively coordinate such information, most hospitals have implemented some form of materials management information system (MMIS). These systems can be used to automate or facilitate functions such as purchasing, accounting, inventory management, and patient supply charges. In this study, we evaluated seven MMISs from seven vendors, focusing on the functional capabilities of each system and the quality of the service and support provided by the vendor. This Evaluation is intended to (1) assist hospitals purchasing an MMIS by educating materials managers about the capabilities, benefits, and limitations of MMISs and (2) educate clinical engineers and information system managers about the scope of materials management within a healthcare facility. Because software products cannot be evaluated in the same manner as most devices typically included in Health Devices Evaluations, our standard Evaluation protocol was not applicable for this technology. Instead, we based our ratings on our observations (e.g., during site visits), interviews we conducted with current users of each system, and information provided by the vendor (e.g., in response to a request for information [RFI]). We divided the Evaluation into the following sections: Section 1. Responsibilities and Information Requirements of Materials Management: Provides an overview of typical materials management functions and describes the capabilities, benefits, and limitations of MMISs. Also includes the supplementary article, "Inventory Cost and Reimbursement Issues" and the glossary, "Materials Management Terminology." Section 2. The

  7. Nuclear Energy Research Initiative. Risk Informed Assessment of Regulatory and Design Requirements for Future Nuclear Power Plants. Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ritterbusch, S.E.

    2000-08-01

    The overall goal of this research project is to support innovation in new nuclear power plant designs. This project is examining the implications, for future reactors and future safety regulation, of utilizing a new risk-informed regulatory system as a replacement for the current system. This innovation will be made possible through development of a scientific, highly risk-informed approach for the design and regulation of nuclear power plants. This approach will include the development and.lor confirmation of corresponding regulatory requirements and industry standards. The major impediment to long term competitiveness of new nuclear plants in the U.S. is the capital cost component--which may need to be reduced on the order of 35% to 40% for Advanced Light Water Reactors (ALWRs) such as System 80+ and Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR). The required cost reduction for an ALWR such as AP600 or AP1000 would be expected to be less. Such reductions in capital cost will require a fundamental reevaluation of the industry standards and regulatory bases under which nuclear plants are designed and licensed. Fortunately, there is now an increasing awareness that many of the existing regulatory requirements and industry standards are not significantly contributing to safety and reliability and, therefore, are unnecessarily adding to nuclear plant costs. Not only does this degrade the economic competitiveness of nuclear energy, it results in unnecessary costs to the American electricity consumer. While addressing these concerns, this research project will be coordinated with current efforts of industry and NRC to develop risk-informed, performance-based regulations that affect the operation of the existing nuclear plants; however, this project will go farther by focusing on the design of new plants.

  8. CUAHSI Hydrologic Information System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maidment, D. R.

    2005-12-01

    The Consortium of Universities for Advancement of Hydrologic Science, Inc. (CUAHSI) seeks to build a Hydrologic Information System (HIS) for which hydrologic data sources will be assembled in space and time to create a digital representation of atmospheric, surface and subsurface water flow through a watershed or other hydrologic system. A common data window for automatically accessing water observation data from US federal agencies is being developed based on web data services. Together with the related CLEANER program in environmental engineering, a cybercollaboratory is being used to foster remote access to data and shared research concerning its interpretation and model. A Digital Library to index hydrologic information within a river basin or aquifer has been developed and a Digital Watershed to synthesize observations, GIS, weather and climate grids and remote sensing is being designed and prootyped. Examples are presented from the Neuse basin in North Carolina and other locations to illustrate these components of a Hydrologic Information System.

  9. Brief 70 Nuclear Engineering Enrollments and Degrees, 2011 Summary Information

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Don Johnson

    2012-10-31

    The survey includes degrees granted between September 1, 2010 and August 31, 2011. Enrollment information refers to the fall term 2011. The enrollment and degree data include students majoring in nuclear engineering or in an option program equivalent to a major. Thirty-two academic programs reported having nuclear engineering programs during 2011, and data was received from all thirty-two programs. The data for two nuclear engineering programs include enrollments and degrees in health physics options that are also reported in the health physics enrollments and degrees data.

  10. Solar He-3: Information from nuclear reactions in flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Kozlovsky, B.

    1974-01-01

    Information on solar He-3 from nuclear reactions in flares was considered. Consideration was also given to the development of models for these reactions as well as the abundance of He-3 in the photosphere. Data show that abundances may be explained by nuclear reactions of flare acceleration protons and alpha particles with the ambient atmosphere, provided that various assumptions are made on the directionality of the interacting beams and acceleration of the particles after production.

  11. Geographic information systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, W. J.

    1982-01-01

    Information and activities are provided to: (1) enhance the ability to distinguish between a Geographic Information System (GIS) and a data management system; (2) develop understanding of spatial data handling by conventional methods versus the automated approach; (3) promote awareness of GIS design and capabilities; (4) foster understanding of the concepts and problems of data base development and management; (5) facilitate recognition of how a computerized GIS can model conditions in the present "real world" to project conditions in the future; and (6) appreciate the utility of integrating LANDSAT and other remotely sensed data into the GIS.

  12. Geographic information systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, W. J.

    1982-01-01

    Information and activities are provided to: (1) enhance the ability to distinguish between a Geographic Information System (GIS) and a data management system; (2) develop understanding of spatial data handling by conventional methods versus the automated approach; (3) promote awareness of GIS design and capabilities; (4) foster understanding of the concepts and problems of data base development and management; (5) facilitate recognition of how a computerized GIS can model conditions in the present "real world" to project conditions in the future; and (6) appreciate the utility of integrating LANDSAT and other remotely sensed data into the GIS.

  13. Global Land Information System

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1999-01-01

    The Global Land Information System (GLIS) is a World Wide Web-based query tool developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to provide data and information about the Earth's land surface. Examples of holdings available through the GLIS include cartographic data, topographic data, soils data, aerial photographs, and satellite images from various agencies and cooperators located around the world. Both hard copy and digital data collections are represented in the GLIS, and preview images are available for millions of the products in the system.

  14. Transactions of the fifth symposium on space nuclear power systems

    SciTech Connect

    El-Genk, M.S.; Hoover, M.D.

    1988-01-01

    This paper contains the presented papers at the fourth symposium on space nuclear power systems. Topics of these paper include: space nuclear missions and applications, reactors and shielding, nuclear electric and nuclear propulsion, high-temperature materials, instrumentation and control, energy conversion and storage, space nuclear fuels, thermal management, nuclear safety, simulation and modeling, and multimegawatt system concepts. (LSP)

  15. Transactions of the fourth symposium on space nuclear power systems

    SciTech Connect

    El-Genk, M.S.; Hoover, M.D.

    1987-01-01

    This paper contains the presented papers at the fourth symposium on space nuclear power systems. Topics of these papers include: space nuclear missions and applications, reactors and shielding, nuclear electric and nuclear propulsion, refractory alloys and high-temperature materials, instrumentation and control, energy conversion and storage, space nuclear fuels, thermal management, nuclear safety, simulation and modeling, and multimegawatt system concepts. (LSP)

  16. Non-Nuclear Testing of Space Nuclear Systems at NASA MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houts, Michael G.; Pearson, Boise J.; Aschenbrenner, Kenneth C.; Bradley, David E.; Dickens, Ricky; Emrich, William J.; Garber, Anne; Godfroy, Thomas J.; Harper, Roger T.; Martin, Jim J.; hide

    2010-01-01

    Highly realistic non-nuclear testing can be used to investigate and resolve potential issues with space nuclear power and propulsion systems. Non-nuclear testing is particularly useful for systems designed with fuels and materials operating within their demonstrated nuclear performance envelope. Non-nuclear testing allows thermal hydraulic, heat transfer, structural, integration, safety, operational, performance, and other potential issues to be investigated and resolved with a greater degree of flexibility and at reduced cost and schedule compared to nuclear testing. The primary limit of non-nuclear testing is that nuclear characteristics and potential nuclear issues cannot be directly investigated. However, non-nuclear testing can be used to augment the potential benefit from any nuclear testing that may be required for space nuclear system design and development. This paper describes previous and ongoing non-nuclear testing related to space nuclear systems at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  17. Laser-driven nuclear-polarized hydrogen internal gas target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seely, J.; Crawford, C.; Clasie, B.; Xu, W.; Dutta, D.; Gao, H.

    2006-06-01

    We report the performance of a laser-driven polarized internal hydrogen gas target (LDT) in a configuration similar to that used in scattering experiments. This target used the technique of spin-exchange optical pumping to produce nuclear spin polarized hydrogen gas that was fed into a cylindrical storage (target) cell. We present in this paper the performance of the target, methods that were tried to improve the figure-of-merit (FOM) of the target, and a Monte Carlo simulation of spin-exchange optical pumping. The dimensions of the apparatus were optimized using the simulation and the experimental results were in good agreement with the results from the simulation. The best experimental result achieved was at a hydrogen flow rate of 1.1×1018atoms/s , where the sample beam exiting the storage cell had 58.2% degree of dissociation and 50.5% polarization. Based on this measurement, the atomic fraction in the storage cell was 49.6% and the density averaged nuclear polarization was 25.0%. This represents the highest FOM for hydrogen from an LDT and is higher than the best FOM reported by atomic beam sources that used storage cells.

  18. Laser-driven nuclear-polarized hydrogen internal gas target

    SciTech Connect

    Seely, J.; Crawford, C.; Clasie, B.; Xu, W.; Dutta, D.; Gao, H.

    2006-06-15

    We report the performance of a laser-driven polarized internal hydrogen gas target (LDT) in a configuration similar to that used in scattering experiments. This target used the technique of spin-exchange optical pumping to produce nuclear spin polarized hydrogen gas that was fed into a cylindrical storage (target) cell. We present in this paper the performance of the target, methods that were tried to improve the figure-of-merit (FOM) of the target, and a Monte Carlo simulation of spin-exchange optical pumping. The dimensions of the apparatus were optimized using the simulation and the experimental results were in good agreement with the results from the simulation. The best experimental result achieved was at a hydrogen flow rate of 1.1x10{sup 18} atoms/s, where the sample beam exiting the storage cell had 58.2% degree of dissociation and 50.5% polarization. Based on this measurement, the atomic fraction in the storage cell was 49.6% and the density averaged nuclear polarization was 25.0%. This represents the highest FOM for hydrogen from an LDT and is higher than the best FOM reported by atomic beam sources that used storage cells.

  19. Space Station information systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swingle, W. L.; Mckay, C. W.

    1983-01-01

    The space operations information system is defined and characterized in a wide perspective. Interactive subsets of the total system are defined and discussed. Particular attention is paid to the concept of end-to-end systems and their repetitive population within the total system. High level program goals are reviewed and related to more explicit system requirements and user needs. Emphasis is placed on the utility and cost effectiveness of data system services from a user standpoint. Productivity, as a quantitative goal, in both development and operational phases is also addressed. Critical aspects of the approach to successful development of the data management system are discussed along with recommendations important to advanced development activities. Current and planned activity in both technology and advanced development areas are reviewed with emphasis on their importance to program success.

  20. Experimental implementation of quantum information processing by Zeeman-perturbed nuclear quadrupole resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teles, João; Rivera-Ascona, Christian; Polli, Roberson S.; Oliveira-Silva, Rodrigo; Vidoto, Edson L. G.; Andreeta, José P.; Bonagamba, Tito J.

    2015-06-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has been widely used in the context of quantum information processing (QIP). However, despite the great similarities between NMR and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR), no experimental implementation for QIP using NQR has been reported. We describe the implementation of basic quantum gates and their applications on the creation and manipulation of pseudopure states using linearly polarized radiofrequency pulses under static magnetic field perturbation. The NQR quantum operations were implemented using a single-crystal sample of and observing nuclei, which possess spin 3/2 and give rise to a two-qubit system. The results are very promising and indicate that NQR can be successfully used for performing fundamental experiments in QIP. One advantage of NQR in comparison with NMR is that the main interaction is internal to the sample, which makes the system more compact, lowering its cost and making it easier to be miniaturized to solid-state devices. Furthermore, as an example, the study of squeezed spin states could receive relevant contributions from NQR.

  1. International Instructional Systems: Social Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brant, Jacek; Chapman, Arthur; Isaacs, Tina

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on research conducted as part of the International Instructional System Study that explored five subject areas across nine jurisdictions in six high-performing countries. The Study's overall aim was to understand what, if anything, there is in common in the curricula and assessment arrangements among the high-performing…

  2. International Instructional Systems: Social Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brant, Jacek; Chapman, Arthur; Isaacs, Tina

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on research conducted as part of the International Instructional System Study that explored five subject areas across nine jurisdictions in six high-performing countries. The Study's overall aim was to understand what, if anything, there is in common in the curricula and assessment arrangements among the high-performing…

  3. Value Systems in International Business.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heiba, Farouk I.

    Every society has a system of values and seeks to achieve goals which it defines as desirable. To gain insight and a measure of understanding of another culture, international marketers can approach a country as a whole, seek out behavioral premises, obtain a theoretical knowledge of the culture, and learn the country's social heritage.…

  4. International Guide to Education Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Brian

    This book presents brief educational profiles of 85 countries based on reports presented at the International Conference of Education in 1977. Educational systems in Africa, the Arab states, Asia and Oceania, Europe, and the Americas are outlined according to general aims, administration, finance, structure and organization, curricula, and teacher…

  5. Salary Information for Nuclear Engineers and Health Physicists, October 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education

    1995-10-15

    Salary information was collected for October 1995 for personnel working as nuclear engineers and health physicists. The salary information includes personnel at the B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. levels with zero, one, and three years of professional work experience. Information is provided for utilities and non-utilities. Non-utilities include private sector organizations and U.S. Department of Energy contractor-operated facilities. Government agencies, the military, academic organizations, and medical facilities are excluded.

  6. Mapping the Content of the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS®) Using the International Classification of Functioning, Health and Disability

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Carole A; Escorpizo, Reuben; Cieza, Alarcos; Lai, Jin Shei; Stucki, Gerold; Ustun, T. Bedirhan; Kostanjsek, Nenad; Cella, David; Forrest, Christopher B.

    2014-01-01

    Background The Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS®) is a U.S. National Institutes of Health initiative that has produced self-reported item banks for physical, mental, and social health. Objective To describe the content of PROMIS at the item level using the World Health Organization’s International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). Methods All PROMIS adult items (publicly available as of 2012) were assigned to relevant ICF concepts. The content of the PROMIS adult item banks were then described using the mapped ICF code descriptors. Results The 1006 items in the PROMIS instruments could all be mapped to ICF concepts at the second level of classification, with the exception of 3 items of global or general health that mapped across the first-level classification of ICF activity and participation component (d categories). Individual PROMIS item banks mapped from 1 to 5 separate ICF codes indicating one-to-one, one-to-many and many-to-one mappings between PROMIS item banks and ICF second level classification codes. PROMIS supports measurement of the majority of major concepts in the ICF Body Functions (b) and Activity & Participation (d) components using PROMIS item banks or subsets of PROMIS items that could, with care, be used to develop customized instruments. Given the focus of PROMIS is on measurement of person health outcomes, concepts in body structures (s) and some body functions (b), as well as many ICF environmental factor have minimal coverage in PROMIS. Discussion The PROMIS-ICF mapped items provide a basis for users to evaluate the ICF related content of specific PROMIS instruments, and to select PROMIS instruments in ICF based measurement applications. PMID:24760532

  7. An integrated service digital network (ISDN)-based international telecommunication between Samsung Medical Center and Hokkaido University using telecommunication helped radiotherapy planning and information system (THERAPIS).

    PubMed

    Huh, S J; Shirato, H; Hashimoto, S; Shimizu, S; Kim, D Y; Ahn, Y C; Choi, D; Miyasaka, K; Mizuno, J

    2000-07-01

    This study introduces the integrated service digital network (ISDN)-based international teleradiotherapy system (THERAPIS) in radiation oncology between hospitals in Seoul, South Korea and in Sapporo, Japan. THERAPIS has the following functions: (1) exchange of patient's image data, (2) real-time teleconference, and (3) communication of the treatment planning, dose calculation and distribution, and of portal verification images between the remote hospitals. Our preliminary results of applications on eight patients demonstrated that the international telecommunication using THERAPIS was clinically useful and satisfactory with sufficient bandwidth for the transfer of patient data for clinical use in radiation oncology.

  8. Insect barcode information system.

    PubMed

    Pratheepa, Maria; Jalali, Sushil Kumar; Arokiaraj, Robinson Silvester; Venkatesan, Thiruvengadam; Nagesh, Mandadi; Panda, Madhusmita; Pattar, Sharath

    2014-01-01

    Insect Barcode Information System called as Insect Barcode Informática (IBIn) is an online database resource developed by the National Bureau of Agriculturally Important Insects, Bangalore. This database provides acquisition, storage, analysis and publication of DNA barcode records of agriculturally important insects, for researchers specifically in India and other countries. It bridges a gap in bioinformatics by integrating molecular, morphological and distribution details of agriculturally important insects. IBIn was developed using PHP/My SQL by using relational database management concept. This database is based on the client- server architecture, where many clients can access data simultaneously. IBIn is freely available on-line and is user-friendly. IBIn allows the registered users to input new information, search and view information related to DNA barcode of agriculturally important insects.This paper provides a current status of insect barcode in India and brief introduction about the database IBIn. http://www.nabg-nbaii.res.in/barcode.

  9. Pharmacology Information System Ready

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1973

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the development and future of Prophet,'' a specialized information handling system for pharmacology research. It is designed to facilitate the acquisition and dissemination of knowledge about mechanisms of drug action, and it is hoped that it will aid in converting pharmacology research from an empirical to a predictive science. (JR)

  10. Management Information Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finlayson, Jean, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    This collection of papers addresses key questions facing college managers and others choosing, introducing, and living with big, complex computer-based systems. "What Use the User Requirement?" (Tony Coles) stresses the importance of an information strategy driven by corporate objectives, not technology. "Process of Selecting a…

  11. Pharmacology Information System Ready

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1973

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the development and future of Prophet,'' a specialized information handling system for pharmacology research. It is designed to facilitate the acquisition and dissemination of knowledge about mechanisms of drug action, and it is hoped that it will aid in converting pharmacology research from an empirical to a predictive science. (JR)

  12. Communication and Information Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, Peter

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the Microelectronics Education Programme's work in the communication and information systems domain, suggesting that teachers understanding the new technologies and incorporate them into regular classroom instruction. Focuses on computers in the classroom, economy of time, keyboard skills, life skills, and vocational training. (Author/JN)

  13. Statistical Information Retrieval System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiFondi, Nicholas M.

    An information retrieval system was developed using technical word occurrences as a basis for classification. A set of words, designated a vocabulary, was selected from the middle range of frequency listing of words occurring in an experimental sample of 94 documents. The selection produced 115 non-function words with technical definition that did…

  14. Geographic information systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1992-01-01

    Geographic information systems (GIS) technology can be used for scientific investigations, resource management, and developmental planning. For example, a GIS might allow emergency planners to easily calculate emergency response times in the event of a natural disaster, or a GIS might be used to find wetlands that need protection form pollution.

  15. Alternative energy source II; Proceedings of the Second Miami International Conference, Miami Beach, Fla., December 10-13, 1979. Volume 6 - Nuclear energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veziroglu, T. N.

    This volume examines conventional nuclear energy, breeder reactors, and thermonuclear energy. The particular papers presented consider current developments in nuclear breeder technology, fusion-driven fissile fuel breeder systems, and the fusion fission hybrid reactor. The implications of nuclear energy utilization in the Phillipines and the internationally safeguarded atomic fuel exchanger center for the Asian-Pacific basin are also discussed.

  16. Dynamic Systems Analysis Report for Nuclear Fuel Recycle

    SciTech Connect

    Brent Dixon; Sonny Kim; David Shropshire; Steven Piet; Gretchen Matthern; Bill Halsey

    2008-12-01

    This report examines the time-dependent dynamics of transitioning from the current United States (U.S.) nuclear fuel cycle where used nuclear fuel is disposed in a repository to a closed fuel cycle where the used fuel is recycled and only fission products and waste are disposed. The report is intended to help inform policy developers, decision makers, and program managers of system-level options and constraints as they guide the formulation and implementation of advanced fuel cycle development and demonstration efforts and move toward deployment of nuclear fuel recycling infrastructure.

  17. The Fluvial Information System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dugdale, S. J.; Carbonneau, P.; Clough, S.

    2009-12-01

    River ecologists have long been aware that our understanding of lotic ecology is limited by our lack of methods applicable to catchment scale processes. Furthermore, the EU’s Water Framework Directive states that surface waters must be managed at catchment scales. This has created a need for a new approach to high-resolution catchment scale data collection in fluvial environments. In response to this, remote sensing has been the focus of increasing interest in river science, and it is now possible to map parameters such as water depth, grain size and habitat type with sub-metric resolutions over large areas. These techniques are capable of yielding unprecedented amounts of information about river systems, and with such levels of information, crucial questions about catchment scale ecology can now be addressed. However, this intensive approach produces vast amounts of raster data leading to significant issues in terms of data management, and extracting spatially explicit information from large image databases poses a significant challenge which must be resolved if fluvial remote sensing methods are to deliver their potential. GIS has already been successfully applied to manage remotely sensed data. Unfortunately, when applied to fluvial remote sensing raster data, traditional GIS appears limited and unsuited to the specific tasks required by river scientists and managers, and experience with GIS packages has shown that they become overwhelmed when faced with datasets comprising thousands of rasters. Another fundamental issue with traditional GIS packages is the use of established Cartesian map projection systems. Given that rivers are curvilinear entities, the use of Cartesian grid map projections is mismatched and curvilinear coordinate systems unique to each river will be required. This paper introduces the Fluvial Information System (FIS), a raster based GIS-type system designed to manage fluvial remote sensing data and automatically extract meaningful

  18. Software Quality Assurance for Nuclear Safety Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sparkman, D R; Lagdon, R

    2004-05-16

    The US Department of Energy has undertaken an initiative to improve the quality of software used to design and operate their nuclear facilities across the United States. One aspect of this initiative is to revise or create new directives and guides associated with quality practices for the safety software in its nuclear facilities. Safety software includes the safety structures, systems, and components software and firmware, support software and design and analysis software used to ensure the safety of the facility. DOE nuclear facilities are unique when compared to commercial nuclear or other industrial activities in terms of the types and quantities of hazards that must be controlled to protect workers, public and the environment. Because of these differences, DOE must develop an approach to software quality assurance that ensures appropriate risk mitigation by developing a framework of requirements that accomplishes the following goals: {sm_bullet} Ensures the software processes developed to address nuclear safety in design, operation, construction and maintenance of its facilities are safe {sm_bullet} Considers the larger system that uses the software and its impacts {sm_bullet} Ensures that the software failures do not create unsafe conditions Software designers for nuclear systems and processes must reduce risks in software applications by incorporating processes that recognize, detect, and mitigate software failure in safety related systems. It must also ensure that fail safe modes and component testing are incorporated into software design. For nuclear facilities, the consideration of risk is not necessarily sufficient to ensure safety. Systematic evaluation, independent verification and system safety analysis must be considered for software design, implementation, and operation. The software industry primarily uses risk analysis to determine the appropriate level of rigor applied to software practices. This risk-based approach distinguishes safety

  19. 78 FR 38739 - Special Nuclear Material Control and Accounting Systems for Nuclear Power Plants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-27

    ... COMMISSION Special Nuclear Material Control and Accounting Systems for Nuclear Power Plants AGENCY: Nuclear... Accounting Systems for Nuclear Power Plants.'' This regulatory guide provides guidance on recordkeeping and reporting requirements with respect to material control and accounting. This guide applies to all nuclear...

  20. A Study of How the Student and Exchange Visa Information System Influences the Influx and Study of Graduate International Students in Science and Engineering in the U.S.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goncalves, Marcus V. A.

    2009-01-01

    The influx of international graduate students in science and engineering to the U.S. has changed since the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. The implementation of the Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS) and related F-1 visa policies have required a higher level of scrutiny of the student visa procedures, and introduced…

  1. A Study of How the Student and Exchange Visa Information System Influences the Influx and Study of Graduate International Students in Science and Engineering in the U.S.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goncalves, Marcus V. A.

    2009-01-01

    The influx of international graduate students in science and engineering to the U.S. has changed since the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. The implementation of the Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS) and related F-1 visa policies have required a higher level of scrutiny of the student visa procedures, and introduced…

  2. Nuclear power propulsion system for spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koroteev, A. S.; Oshev, Yu. A.; Popov, S. A.; Karevsky, A. V.; Solodukhin, A. Ye.; Zakharenkov, L. E.; Semenkin, A. V.

    2015-12-01

    The proposed designs of high-power space tugs that utilize solar or nuclear energy to power an electric jet engine are reviewed. The conceptual design of a nuclear power propulsion system (NPPS) is described; its structural diagram, gas circuit, and electric diagram are discussed. The NPPS incorporates a nuclear reactor, a thermal-to-electric energy conversion system, a system for the conversion and distribution of electric energy, and an electric propulsion system. Two criterion parameters were chosen in the considered NPPS design: the temperature of gaseous working medium at the nuclear reactor outlet and the rotor speed of turboalternators. The maintenance of these parameters at a given level guarantees that the needed electric voltage is generated and allows for power mode control. The processes of startup/shutdown and increasing/reducing the power, the principles of distribution of electric energy over loads, and the probable emergencies for the proposed NPPS design are discussed.

  3. Dual mode nuclear rocket system applications.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boretz, J. E.; Bell, J. M.; Plebuch, R. K.; Priest, C. C.

    1972-01-01

    Mission areas where the dual-mode nuclear rocket system is superior to nondual-mode systems are demonstrated. It is shown that the dual-mode system is competitive with the nondual-mode system even for those specific missions and particular payload configurations where it does not have a clear-cut advantage.

  4. International system of units (SI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, D. T.; Bell, R. J.

    1986-07-01

    The booklet is the United States edition of the English translation of the fifth edition of Le Systeme International d'Unites (SI), the definitive publication in the French language issued in 1985 by the International Bureau of Weights and Measures (BIPM). This U.S. edition, which conforms in substance with the British edition that follows the French text in the BIPM document is the result of a joint effort by the National Bureau of Standards (NBS) of the United States and the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) in the United Kingdom.

  5. International Nuclear Safety Center database on thermophysical properties of reactor materials

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, J.K.; Sofu, T.; Ley, H.

    1997-08-01

    The International Nuclear Safety Center (INSC) database has been established at Argonne National Laboratory to provide easily accessible data and information necessary to perform nuclear safety analyses and to promote international collaboration through the exchange of nuclear safety information. The INSC database, located on the World Wide Web at http://www.insc.anl.gov, contains critically assessed recommendations for reactor material properties for normal operating conditions, transients, and severe accidents. The initial focus of the database is on thermodynamic and transport properties of materials for water reactors. Materials that are being included in the database are fuel, absorbers, cladding, structural materials, coolant, and liquid mixtures of combinations of UO{sub 2}, ZrO{sub 2}, Zr, stainless steel, absorber materials, and concrete. For each property, the database includes: (1) a summary of recommended equations with uncertainties; (2) a detailed data assessment giving the basis for the recommendations, comparisons with experimental data and previous recommendations, and uncertainties; (3) graphs showing recommendations, uncertainties, and comparisons with data and other equations; and (4) property values tabulated as a function of temperature.

  6. Toward intelligent information system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, Fumio; Hinatsu, Ken'ichi

    This article describes the indexing aid system and project at JICST, API, NLM and BIOSIS. They are dealing with the very broad domain of science, medicine and technological literatures and indexing is done by use of controlled terms, the indexing is routinely performed by highly skilled indexers. Because of the high cost of controlled indexing of bibliographic information they have designed automated indexing system and/or expert-like system to take advantage of many years of experienced indexing using knowledge bases and /on thesauri.

  7. Nuclear Reactors and Technology; (USA)

    SciTech Connect

    Cason, D.L.; Hicks, S.C.

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear Reactors and Technology (NRT) announces on a monthly basis the current worldwide information available from the open literature on nuclear reactors and technology, including all aspects of power reactors, components and accessories, fuel elements, control systems, and materials. This publication contains the abstracts of DOE reports, journal articles, conference papers, patents, theses, and monographs added to the Energy Science and Technology Database (EDB) during the past month. Also included are US information obtained through acquisition programs or interagency agreements and international information obtained through the International Energy Agency's Energy Technology Data Exchange or government-to-government agreements. The digests in NRT and other citations to information on nuclear reactors back to 1948 are available for online searching and retrieval on EDB and Nuclear Science Abstracts (NSA) database. Current information, added daily to EDB, is available to DOE and its contractors through the DOE integrated Technical Information System. Customized profiles can be developed to provide current information to meet each user's needs.

  8. Empirical information on nuclear matter fourth-order symmetry energy from an extended nuclear mass formula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rui; Chen, Lie-Wen

    2017-10-01

    We establish a relation between the equation of state of nuclear matter and the fourth-order symmetry energy asym,4 (A) of finite nuclei in a semi-empirical nuclear mass formula by self-consistently considering the bulk, surface and Coulomb contributions to the nuclear mass. Such a relation allows us to extract information on nuclear matter fourth-order symmetry energy Esym,4 (ρ0) at normal nuclear density ρ0 from analyzing nuclear mass data. Based on the recent precise extraction of asym,4 (A) via the double difference of the ;experimental; symmetry energy extracted from nuclear masses, for the first time, we estimate a value of Esym,4 (ρ0) = 20.0 ± 4.6 MeV. Such a value of Esym,4 (ρ0) is significantly larger than the predictions from mean-field models and thus suggests the importance of considering the effects of beyond the mean-field approximation in nuclear matter calculations.

  9. Nuclear Engine System Simulation (NESS) version 2.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelaccio, Dennis G.; Scheil, Christine M.; Petrosky, Lyman J.

    1993-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following; nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) engine system analysis program development; nuclear thermal propulsion engine analysis capability requirements; team resources used to support NESS development; expanded liquid engine simulations (ELES) computer model; ELES verification examples; NESS program development evolution; past NTP ELES analysis code modifications and verifications; general NTP engine system features modeled by NESS; representative NTP expander, gas generator, and bleed engine system cycles modeled by NESS; NESS program overview; NESS program flow logic; enabler (NERVA type) nuclear thermal rocket engine; prismatic fuel elements and supports; reactor fuel and support element parameters; reactor parameters as a function of thrust level; internal shield sizing; and reactor thermal model.

  10. Laboratory Information Systems.

    PubMed

    Henricks, Walter H

    2015-06-01

    Laboratory information systems (LISs) supply mission-critical capabilities for the vast array of information-processing needs of modern laboratories. LIS architectures include mainframe, client-server, and thin client configurations. The LIS database software manages a laboratory's data. LIS dictionaries are database tables that a laboratory uses to tailor an LIS to the unique needs of that laboratory. Anatomic pathology LIS (APLIS) functions play key roles throughout the pathology workflow, and laboratories rely on LIS management reports to monitor operations. This article describes the structure and functions of APLISs, with emphasis on their roles in laboratory operations and their relevance to pathologists.

  11. International cooperation in combating illicit trafficking of nuclear materials by technical means

    SciTech Connect

    Herbillon, J; Koch, L; Mason, G; Niemeyer, S; Nikiforov, N

    1999-04-01

    A consensus has been emerging during the past several years that illicit trafficking of nuclear materials is a problem that needs a more focused international response. One possible component of a program to combat illicit trafficking is nuclear forensics whereby intercepted nuclear materials are analyzed to provide clues for answering attribution questions. In this report we focus on international cooperation that is specifically addressing the development of nuclear forensics. First we will describe the role of the Nuclear Smuggling International Technical Working Group (ITWG) in developing nuclear forensics, and then we will present some specific examples of cooperative work by the Institute for Transuranium Elements of the European Commission with various European states. Recognizing the potential importance of a nuclear forensics capability, the P-8 countries in 1995 encouraged technical experts to evaluate the role of nuclear forensics in combating nuclear smuggling and possibly developing mechanisms for international cooperation. As a result, an International Conference on Nuclear Smuggling Forensic Analysis was held in November, 1995, at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to investigate technical cooperation on nuclear forensics. The International Conference provided a unique mix of scientists, law enforcement, and intelligence experts from 14 countries and organizations. All participants were invited to make presentations, and the format of the Conference was designed to encourage open discussion and broad participation.

  12. Safe, Affordable, Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houts, M. G.; Kim, T.; Emrich, W. J.; Hickman, R. R.; Broadway, J. W.; Gerrish, H. P.; Doughty, G. E.

    2014-01-01

    The fundamental capability of Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) is game changing for space exploration. A first generation Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (NCPS) based on NTP could provide high thrust at a specific impulse above 900 s, roughly double that of state of the art chemical engines. Characteristics of fission and NTP indicate that useful first generation systems will provide a foundation for future systems with extremely high performance. The role of the NCPS in the development of advanced nuclear propulsion systems could be analogous to the role of the DC-3 in the development of advanced aviation. Progress made under the NCPS project could help enable both advanced NTP and advanced Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP).

  13. 10 CFR 1017.16 - Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information markings on documents or material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information markings on...) IDENTIFICATION AND PROTECTION OF UNCLASSIFIED CONTROLLED NUCLEAR INFORMATION Review of a Document or Material for Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information § 1017.16 Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information markings on...

  14. 10 CFR 1017.16 - Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information markings on documents or material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information markings on...) IDENTIFICATION AND PROTECTION OF UNCLASSIFIED CONTROLLED NUCLEAR INFORMATION Review of a Document or Material for Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information § 1017.16 Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information markings on...

  15. 10 CFR 1017.16 - Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information markings on documents or material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information markings on...) IDENTIFICATION AND PROTECTION OF UNCLASSIFIED CONTROLLED NUCLEAR INFORMATION Review of a Document or Material for Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information § 1017.16 Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information markings on...

  16. 10 CFR 1017.16 - Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information markings on documents or material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information markings on...) IDENTIFICATION AND PROTECTION OF UNCLASSIFIED CONTROLLED NUCLEAR INFORMATION Review of a Document or Material for Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information § 1017.16 Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information markings on...

  17. 10 CFR 1017.16 - Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information markings on documents or material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information markings on...) IDENTIFICATION AND PROTECTION OF UNCLASSIFIED CONTROLLED NUCLEAR INFORMATION Review of a Document or Material for Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information § 1017.16 Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information markings...

  18. Information Systems in Dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Masic, Fedja

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Almost the entire human creativity today, from the standpoint of its efficiency and expediency, is conditioned with the existence of information systems. Most information systems are oriented to the management and decision-making, including health information system. System of health and health insurance together form one of the most important segments of society and its functioning as a compact unit. Increasing requirements for reducing health care costs while preserving or improving the quality of services provided represent a difficult task for the health system. Material and methods: Using descriptive metods by retreiiving literature we analyzed the latest solutions in information and telecommunications technology is the basis for building an effective and efficient health system. Computerization does not have the primary objective of saving, but the rationalization of spending in health care. It is estimated that at least 20-30% of money spent in health care can be rationally utilized. Computerization should give the necessary data and indicators for this rationalization. Very important are the goals of this project and the achievement of other uses and benefits, improving overall care for patients and policyholders, increasing the speed and accuracy of diagnosis in determining treatment using electronic diagnostic and therapeutic guidelines. Results and discussion: Computerization in dentistry began similarly as in other human activities–recording large amounts of data on digital media, and by replacing manual data processing to machine one. But specifics of the dental profession have led to the specifics of the application of information technology (IT), and continue to require special development of dental oriented and applied IT. Harmonization of dental software with global standards will enable doctors and dentists to with a few mouse clicks via the internet reach the general medical information about their patients from the central

  19. Du Pont Information Flow System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Warren S.

    1972-01-01

    The Information Flow System is a large-scale information retrieval system developed for processing of Du Pont information files. As currently implemented, the system stores and retrieves information on company technical reports. Extensions of the system for handling chemical structure information and on-line processing are also discussed. (3…

  20. Information sciences experiment system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katzberg, Stephen J.; Murray, Nicholas D.; Benz, Harry F.; Bowker, David E.; Hendricks, Herbert D.

    1990-01-01

    The rapid expansion of remote sensing capability over the last two decades will take another major leap forward with the advent of the Earth Observing System (Eos). An approach is presented that will permit experiments and demonstrations in onboard information extraction. The approach is a non-intrusive, eavesdropping mode in which a small amount of spacecraft real estate is allocated to an onboard computation resource. How such an approach allows the evaluation of advanced technology in the space environment, advanced techniques in information extraction for both Earth science and information science studies, direct to user data products, and real-time response to events, all without affecting other on-board instrumentation is discussed.

  1. Manned space flight nuclear system safety. Voluem 5: Nuclear system safety guidelines. Part 2: Space shuttle/nuclear payloads safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The design and operations guidelines and requirements developed in the study of space shuttle nuclear system transportation are presented. Guidelines and requirements are presented for the shuttle, nuclear payloads (reactor, isotope-Brayton and small isotope sources), ground support systems and facilities. Cross indices and references are provided which relate guidelines to each other, and to substantiating data in other volumes. The guidelines are intended for the implementation of nuclear safety related design and operational considerations in future space programs.

  2. 25 CFR 543.16 - What are the minimum internal controls for information technology?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false What are the minimum internal controls for information... SERVICES MINIMUM INTERNAL CONTROL STANDARDS FOR CLASS II GAMING § 543.16 What are the minimum internal... access controls. (1) For computer systems that can be accessed remotely, the written system of...

  3. 25 CFR 543.16 - What are the minimum internal controls for information technology?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What are the minimum internal controls for information... SERVICES MINIMUM INTERNAL CONTROL STANDARDS FOR CLASS II GAMING § 543.16 What are the minimum internal... access controls. (1) For computer systems that can be accessed remotely, the written system of...

  4. CUAHSI Hydrologic Information Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maidment, D.; Zaslavsky, I.; Tarboton, D.; Piasecki, M.; Goodall, J.

    2006-12-01

    The Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrologic Science, Inc (CUAHSI) has a Hydrologic Information System (HIS) project, which is supported by NSF to develop infrastructure and services to support the advance of hydrologic science in the United States. This paper provides an overview of the HIS project. A set of web services called WaterOneFlow is being developed to provide better access to water observations data (point measurements of streamflow, water quality, climate and groundwater levels) from government agencies and individual investigator projects. Successful partnerships have been created with the USGS National Water Information System, EPA Storet and the NCDC Climate Data Online. Observations catalogs have been created for stations in the measurement networks of each of these data systems so that they can be queried in a uniform manner through CUAHSI HIS, and data delivered from them directly to the user via web services. A CUAHSI Observations Data Model has been designed for storing individual investigator data and an equivalent set of web services created for that so that individual investigators can publish their data onto the internet in the same format CUAHSI is providing for the federal agency data. These data will be accessed through HIS Servers hosted at the national level by CUAHSI and also by research centers and academic departments for regional application of HIS. An individual user application called HIS Analyst will enable individual hydrologic scientists to access the information from the network of HIS Servers. The present focus is on water observations data but later development of this system will include weather and climate grid information, GIS data, remote sensing data and linkages between data and hydrologic simulation models.

  5. Engineering Review Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grems, III, Edward G. (Inventor); Henze, James E. (Inventor); Bixby, Jonathan A. (Inventor); Roberts, Mark (Inventor); Mann, Thomas (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A disciplinal engineering review computer information system and method by defining a database of disciplinal engineering review process entities for an enterprise engineering program, opening a computer supported engineering item based upon the defined disciplinal engineering review process entities, managing a review of the opened engineering item according to the defined disciplinal engineering review process entities, and closing the opened engineering item according to the opened engineering item review.

  6. Applications of Virtual Reality to Nuclear Safeguards

    SciTech Connect

    Stansfield, S.

    1998-11-03

    This paper explores two potential applications of Virtual Reality (VR) to international nuclear safeguards: training and information organization and navigation. The applications are represented by two existing prototype systems, one for training nuclear weapons dismantlement and one utilizing a VR model to facilitate intuitive access to related sets of information.

  7. Nuclear Materials Identification System Operational Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, L.G.

    2001-04-10

    This report describes the operation and setup of the Nuclear Materials Identification System (NMIS) with a {sup 252}Cf neutron source at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The components of the system are described with a description of the setup of the system along with an overview of the NMIS measurements for scanning, calibration, and confirmation of inventory items.

  8. Symposium on Geographic Information Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felleman, John, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Six papers on geographic information systems cover the future of geographic information systems, land information systems modernization in Wisconsin, the Topologically Integrated Geographic Encoding and Referencing (TIGER) System of the U.S. Bureau of the Census, satellite remote sensing, geographic information systems and sustainable development,…

  9. Relationships in subtribe Diocleinae (Leguminosae; Papilionoideae) inferred from internal transcribed spacer sequences from nuclear ribosomal DNA.

    PubMed

    Varela, Eduardo S; Lima, João P M S; Galdino, Alexsandro S; Pinto, Luciano da S; Bezerra, Walderly M; Nunes, Edson P; Alves, Maria A O; Grangeiro, Thalles B

    2004-01-01

    The complete sequences of nuclear ribosomal DNA (nrDNA) internal transcribed spacer regions (ITS/5.8S) were determined for species belonging to six genera from the subtribe Diocleinae as well as for the anomalous genera Calopogonium and Pachyrhizus. Phylogenetic trees constructed by distance matrix, maximum parsimony and maximum likelihood methods showed that Calopogonium and Pachyrhizus were outside the clade Diocleinae (Canavalia, Camptosema, Cratylia, Dioclea, Cymbosema, and Galactia). This finding supports previous morphological, phytochemical, and molecular evidence that Calopogonium and Pachyrhizus do not belong to the subtribe Diocleinae. Within the true Diocleinae clade, the clustering of genera and species were congruent with morphology-based classifications, suggesting that ITS/5.8S sequences can provide enough informative sites to allow resolution below the genus level. This is the first evidence of the phylogeny of subtribe Diocleinae based on nuclear DNA sequences.

  10. Large-Scale Information Systems

    SciTech Connect

    D. M. Nicol; H. R. Ammerlahn; M. E. Goldsby; M. M. Johnson; D. E. Rhodes; A. S. Yoshimura

    2000-12-01

    Large enterprises are ever more dependent on their Large-Scale Information Systems (LSLS), computer systems that are distinguished architecturally by distributed components--data sources, networks, computing engines, simulations, human-in-the-loop control and remote access stations. These systems provide such capabilities as workflow, data fusion and distributed database access. The Nuclear Weapons Complex (NWC) contains many examples of LSIS components, a fact that motivates this research. However, most LSIS in use grew up from collections of separate subsystems that were not designed to be components of an integrated system. For this reason, they are often difficult to analyze and control. The problem is made more difficult by the size of a typical system, its diversity of information sources, and the institutional complexities associated with its geographic distribution across the enterprise. Moreover, there is no integrated approach for analyzing or managing such systems. Indeed, integrated development of LSIS is an active area of academic research. This work developed such an approach by simulating the various components of the LSIS and allowing the simulated components to interact with real LSIS subsystems. This research demonstrated two benefits. First, applying it to a particular LSIS provided a thorough understanding of the interfaces between the system's components. Second, it demonstrated how more rapid and detailed answers could be obtained to questions significant to the enterprise by interacting with the relevant LSIS subsystems through simulated components designed with those questions in mind. In a final, added phase of the project, investigations were made on extending this research to wireless communication networks in support of telemetry applications.

  11. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 24: Nuclear Systems and Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  12. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 5: Introduction to Nuclear Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  13. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 24: Nuclear Systems and Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  14. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 5: Introduction to Nuclear Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  15. Nuclear Fuel Cycle: A current awareness bulletin

    SciTech Connect

    Ringe, A.C.

    1988-01-01

    Nuclear Fuel Cycle (NFC) announces on a monthly basis the current worldwide information available on all aspects of the fuel cycle except in-reactor properties and performance of fuels and the management of radioactive wastes. This publication contains the abstracts of DOE reports, journal articles, conference papers, patents, theses, and monographs added to the Energy Data Base (EDB) during the past month. Also included are other US information obtained through acquisition programs or interagency agreements and international information obatained through the International Energy Agency's Energy Technology Data Exchange, the International Atomic Energy Agency's International Nuclear Information System, or government-to-government agreements.

  16. Pike International, LLC et al. Information Sheet

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Pike International LLC, et al. (the Company) is located in New Haven, Connecticut. The Complaint involves the lease of, and renovation activities conducted at, property constructed prior to 1978, located in New Haven, Connecticut.

  17. Nuclear-renewable hybrid energy systems: Opportunities, interconnections, and needs

    DOE PAGES

    Ruth, Mark F.; Zinaman, Owen R.; Antkowiak, Mark; ...

    2013-12-20

    As the U.S. energy system evolves, the amount of electricity from variable-generation sources is likely to increase, which could result in additional times when electricity demand is lower than available production. Therefore, purveyors of technologies that traditionally have provided base-load electricity—such as nuclear power plants—can explore new operating procedures to deal with the associated market signals. Concurrently, innovations in nuclear reactor design coupled with sophisticated control systems now allow for more complex apportionment of heat within an integrated system such as one linked to energy-intensive chemical processes. Our paper explores one opportunity – nuclear-renewable hybrid energy systems. These are definedmore » as integrated facilities comprised of nuclear reactors, renewable energy generation, and industrial processes that can simultaneously address the need for grid flexibility, greenhouse gas emission reductions, and optimal use of investment capital. Six aspects of interaction (interconnections) between elements of nuclear-renewable hybrid energy systems are identified: Thermal, electrical, chemical, hydrogen, mechanical, and information. In addition, system-level aspects affect selection, design, and operation of this hybrid system type. Throughout the paper, gaps and research needs are identified to promote further exploration of the topic.« less

  18. Nuclear-renewable hybrid energy systems: Opportunities, interconnections, and needs

    SciTech Connect

    Ruth, Mark F.; Zinaman, Owen R.; Antkowiak, Mark; Boardman, Richard D.; Cherry, Robert S.; Bazilian, Morgan D.

    2013-12-20

    As the U.S. energy system evolves, the amount of electricity from variable-generation sources is likely to increase, which could result in additional times when electricity demand is lower than available production. Therefore, purveyors of technologies that traditionally have provided base-load electricity—such as nuclear power plants—can explore new operating procedures to deal with the associated market signals. Concurrently, innovations in nuclear reactor design coupled with sophisticated control systems now allow for more complex apportionment of heat within an integrated system such as one linked to energy-intensive chemical processes. Our paper explores one opportunity – nuclear-renewable hybrid energy systems. These are defined as integrated facilities comprised of nuclear reactors, renewable energy generation, and industrial processes that can simultaneously address the need for grid flexibility, greenhouse gas emission reductions, and optimal use of investment capital. Six aspects of interaction (interconnections) between elements of nuclear-renewable hybrid energy systems are identified: Thermal, electrical, chemical, hydrogen, mechanical, and information. In addition, system-level aspects affect selection, design, and operation of this hybrid system type. Throughout the paper, gaps and research needs are identified to promote further exploration of the topic.

  19. Nuclear-renewable hybrid energy systems: Opportunities, interconnections, and needs

    SciTech Connect

    Ruth, Mark F.; Zinaman, Owen R.; Antkowiak, Mark; Boardman, Richard D.; Cherry, Robert S.; Bazilian, Morgan D.

    2014-02-01

    As the U.S. energy system evolves, the amount of electricity from variable-generation sources is likely to increase, which could result in additional times when electricity demand is lower than available production. Thus, purveyors of technologies that traditionally have provided base-load electricity—such as nuclear power plants—can explore new operating procedures to deal with the associated market signals. Concurrently, innovations in nuclear reactor design coupled with sophisticated control systems now allow for more complex apportionment of heat within an integrated system such as one linked to energy-intensive chemical processes. This paper explores one opportunity – nuclear-renewable hybrid energy systems. These are defined as integrated facilities comprised of nuclear reactors, renewable energy generation, and industrial processes that can simultaneously address the need for grid flexibility, greenhouse gas emission reductions, and optimal use of investment capital. Six aspects of interaction (interconnections) between elements of nuclear-renewable hybrid energy systems are identified: Thermal, electrical, chemical, hydrogen, mechanical, and information. Additionally, system-level aspects affect selection, design, and operation of this hybrid system type. Throughout the paper, gaps and research needs are identified to promote further exploration of the topic.

  20. Intelligent Information Systems Institute

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    International Conference on Language Resources and Evaluation (LREC 2008), Marrakech , Morocco, 2008. (to appear) 16 Cardie, Claire, Cynthia Farina...Annotating Topics of Opinions. Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on Language Resources and Evaluation (LREC 2008), Marrakech

  1. Dynamic information theory and information description of dynamic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Xiusan

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, we develop dynamic statistical information theory established by the author. Starting from the ideas that the state variable evolution equations of stochastic dynamic systems, classical and quantum nonequilibrium statistical physical systems and special electromagnetic field systems can be regarded as their information symbol evolution equations and the definitions of dynamic information and dynamic entropy, we derive the evolution equations of dynamic information and dynamic entropy that describe the evolution laws of dynamic information. These four kinds of evolution equations are of the same mathematical type. They show in unison when information transmits in coordinate space outside the systems that the time rate of change of dynamic information densities originates from their drift, diffusion and dissipation in state variable space inside the systems and coordinate space in the transmission processes, and that the time rate of change of dynamic entropy densities is caused by their drift, diffusion and production in state variable space inside the systems and coordinate space in the transmission processes. When space noise can be neglected, an information wave will appear. If we only consider the information change inside the systems, dynamic information evolution equations reduce to information equations corresponding to the dynamic equations which describe evolution laws of the above dynamic systems. This reveals that the evolution laws of respective dynamic systems can be described by information equations in a unified fashion. Hence, the evolution processes of these dynamic systems can be abstracted as the evolution processes of information. Furthermore, we present the formulas for information flow, information dissipation rate, and entropy production rate. We prove that the information production probably emerges in a dynamic system with internal attractive interaction between the elements, and derive a formula for this information

  2. Safeguards Guidance Document for Designers of Commercial Nuclear Facilities: International Nuclear Safeguards Requirements and Practices For Uranium Enrichment Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Bean; Casey Durst

    2009-10-01

    This report is the second in a series of guidelines on international safeguards requirements and practices, prepared expressly for the designers of nuclear facilities. The first document in this series is the description of generic international nuclear safeguards requirements pertaining to all types of facilities. These requirements should be understood and considered at the earliest stages of facility design as part of a new process called “Safeguards-by-Design.” This will help eliminate the costly retrofit of facilities that has occurred in the past to accommodate nuclear safeguards verification activities. The following summarizes the requirements for international nuclear safeguards implementation at enrichment plants, prepared under the Safeguards by Design project, and funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Office of NA-243. The purpose of this is to provide designers of nuclear facilities around the world with a simplified set of design requirements and the most common practices for meeting them. The foundation for these requirements is the international safeguards agreement between the country and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), pursuant to the Treaty on the Non-proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT). Relevant safeguards requirements are also cited from the Safeguards Criteria for inspecting enrichment plants, found in the IAEA Safeguards Manual, Part SMC-8. IAEA definitions and terms are based on the IAEA Safeguards Glossary, published in 2002. The most current specification for safeguards measurement accuracy is found in the IAEA document STR-327, “International Target Values 2000 for Measurement Uncertainties in Safeguarding Nuclear Materials,” published in 2001. For this guide to be easier for the designer to use, the requirements have been restated in plainer language per expert interpretation using the source documents noted. The safeguards agreement is fundamentally a

  3. ESTIMATION OF EARLY INTERNAL DOSES TO FUKUSHIMA RESIDENTS AFTER THE NUCLEAR DISASTER BASED ON THE ATMOSPHERIC DISPERSION SIMULATION.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunjoo; Tani, Kotaro; Kunishima, Naoaki; Kurihara, Osamu; Sakai, Kazuo; Akashi, Makoto

    2016-11-01

    Estimating the early internal doses to residents in the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station accident is a difficult task because limited human/environmental measurement data are available. Hence, the feasibility of using atmospheric dispersion simulations created by the Worldwide version of System for Prediction of Environmental Emergency Dose Information 2nd Version (WSPEEDI-II) in the estimation was examined in the present study. This examination was done by comparing the internal doses evaluated based on the human measurements with those calculated using time series air concentration maps ((131)I and (137)Cs) generated by WSPEEDI-II. The results showed that the latter doses were several times higher than the former doses. However, this discrepancy could be minimised by taking into account personal behaviour data that will be available soon. This article also presents the development of a prototype system for estimating the internal dose based on the simulations. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. PREFACE: International Symposium on Exotic Nuclear Structure From Nucleons (ENSFN 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honma, Michio; Utsuno, Yutaka; Shimizu, Noritaka

    2013-07-01

    The International Symposium on 'Exotic Nuclear Structure From Nucleons (ENSFN2012)' was held at the Koshiba Hall, the University of Tokyo, Japan, from October 10th to 12th, 2012. This symposium was supported by RIKEN Nishina Center (RNC) and the Center for Nuclear Study (CNS), University of Tokyo. This symposium was devoted to discussing recent achievement and perspectives in the structure of exotic nuclei from the viewpoint of the nuclear force. The following subjects were covered in this symposium from both theoretical and experimental sides: Evolution of shell structure and collectivity in exotic nuclei Ab-initio theory and its application to exotic nuclei Advancement in large-scale nuclear-structure calculations Effective Hamiltonian and energy density functional Spin-isospin responses New aspects of two- and three-body forces Impact on nuclear astrophysics Emphasis was placed on the development of large-scale nuclear-structure calculations and the new experimental information on exotic nuclei. Around 80 participants attended this symposium and we enjoyed 37 excellent invited talks and 9 selected oral presentations. A special talk was presented to celebrate the 60th birthday of professor Takaharu Otsuka, who has made invaluable contribution to the progress in the fields covered in this symposium. The organizing committee consisted of T Abe (Tokyo), M Honma (Aizu; chair), N Itagaki (YITP, Kyoto), T Mizusaki (Senshu), T Nakatsukasa (RIKEN), H Sakurai (Tokyo/RIKEN), N Shimizu (CNS, Tokyo; scientific secretary), S Shimoura (CNS, Tokyo), Y Utsuno (JAEA/CNS, Tokyo; scientific secretary). Finally, we would like to thank all the speakers and the participants as well as the other organizers for their contributions which made the symposium very successful. Michio Honma, Yutaka Utsuno and Noritaka Shimizu Editors Tokyo, April 2013 Sponsors logo1 Sponsors logo2 The PDF also contains the conference program.

  5. Nuclear Reactor Safety

    SciTech Connect

    Bales, J.D.; Boshears, R.

    1996-02-01

    Nuclear Reactor Safety (NRS), published monthly, is a collection of abstracts of worldwide information available on all safety-related aspects of reactors, including accident analysis, safety systems, radiation protection, decommissioning and dismantling, and security measures. This publication contains the abstracts of DOE reports, journal articles, conference papers, patents, theses, and monographs added to the Energy Science and Technology Database during the past month. Also included are other U.S. information obtained through acquisition programs or interagency agreements and international information obtained through the International Energy Agency`s Energy Technology Data Exchange, the International Atomic Energy Agency`s International Nuclear Information System, or government-to-government agreements. The digests in NRS and other citations to information on nuclear reactor safety dating from 1948 are available for online searching and retrieval in the Energy Science and Technology Database and Nuclear Science Abstracts (NSA) database. Current information, added daily to the Energy Science and Technology Database, is available to DOE and its contractors through the DOE Integrated Technical Information System. Customized profiles can be developed to provide current information to meet each user`s needs.

  6. MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEM,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Management Information System being developed for the Institute of Cybernetics of the Academy of Sciences of the Ukrainian SSR. The work is being done at the suggestion of Academician V. M. Glushkov under the leadership of Candidate of Physico-Mathematical Sciences A. A. Stognii. Projects reports prepared in various departments of the Institute of Cybernetics in 1963-64 were used in writing this paper. Among them, the works of V. N. Afanas’ev, V. G Bodnarchuk, E. F. Skorokhod’ko, and V. I. Shurikhin should be mentioned. A great deal of factural

  7. Interstellar reddening information system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnashev, V. I.; Grigorieva, E. A.; Malkov, O. Yu.

    2013-10-01

    We describe an electronic bibliographic information system, based on a card catalog, containing some 2500 references (publications of 1930-2009) on interstellar extinction. We have classified the articles according to their content. We present here a list of articles devoted to two categories: maps of total extinction and variation of interstellar extinction with the distance to the object. The catalog is tested using published data on open clusters, and conclusions on the applicability of different maps of interstellar extinctions for various distances are made.

  8. Safety assessment of a robotic system handling nuclear material

    SciTech Connect

    Atcitty, C.B.; Robinson, D.G.

    1996-02-01

    This paper outlines the use of a Failure Modes and Effects Analysis for the safety assessment of a robotic system being developed at Sandia National Laboratories. The robotic system, The Weigh and Leak Check System, is to replace a manual process at the Department of Energy facility at Pantex by which nuclear material is inspected for weight and leakage. Failure Modes and Effects Analyses were completed for the robotics process to ensure that safety goals for the system had been meet. These analyses showed that the risks to people and the internal and external environment were acceptable.

  9. Advanced information processing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lala, J. H.

    1984-01-01

    Design and performance details of the advanced information processing system (AIPS) for fault and damage tolerant data processing on aircraft and spacecraft are presented. AIPS comprises several computers distributed throughout the vehicle and linked by a damage tolerant data bus. Most I/O functions are available to all the computers, which run in a TDMA mode. Each computer performs separate specific tasks in normal operation and assumes other tasks in degraded modes. Redundant software assures that all fault monitoring, logging and reporting are automated, together with control functions. Redundant duplex links and damage-spread limitation provide the fault tolerance. Details of an advanced design of a laboratory-scale proof-of-concept system are described, including functional operations.

  10. Integrating Diverse Data Systems for International Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Peter

    2014-05-01

    International collaborations, especially ones that arise with little or no financial resources, still face challenges in opening up data collections via a wide variety of differing and often non-interoperable means. In turn, this hampers the collaborative process, slows or even prevents scientific exchange. Early efforts that proposed a centralized, and project specific data archive encountered many difficulties, ranging from little or no adoption, to the inability to provide required documentation and metadata to make the datasets findable or usable. In time, virtualized approaches appeared to gain traction, for e.g. virtual observatories. In this contribution, we report on several international collaboration case studies with distributed data systems; their needs, successes, challenges and failures and synthesize a set of suggested practices to inform future international collaboration efforts.

  11. Space exploration with nuclear propulsion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Venetoklis, P.

    1994-12-31

    One of the greatest obstacles to the human exploration of space has been the physical limit in the efficiency of chemical propulsion systems. Chemical propulsion has been a mature technology for decades, and efficiency improvements over this time span have amounted to only a few percent. The limits of chemical propulsion have forced the space exploration community to develop other strategies for overcoming the strictures imposed by gravity in their exploration pursuits. These strategies have their own limits and invariably result in increased costs and mission time. Nuclear propulsion does not face the same physical limitations as chemical propulsion. Nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) systems generate twice the efficiency of the best modern chemical systems, and nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) systems promise efficiencies 10 to 20 times that of chemical propulsion. These dramatic improvements provide mission planners with such an enormous leap in capability that the full range of possibilities has yet to be identified. This paper identifies the range of missions identified to date that benefit from nuclear propulsion, attempts to quantify the benefits, and discusses issues associated with the incorporation of nuclear propulsion into spacecraft.

  12. Review of Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabrielli, Roland Antonius; Herdrich, Georg

    2015-11-01

    This article offers a summary of past efforts in the development of Nuclear Thermal Propulsion systems for space transportation. First, the generic principle of thermal propulsion is outlined: a propellant is directly heated by a power source prior to being expanded which creates a thrusting force on the rocket. This enables deriving a motivation for the use of Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) relying on nuclear power sources. Then, a summary of major families of NTP systems is established on the basis of a literature survey. These families are distinguished by the nature of their power source, the most important being systems with radioisotope, fission, and fusion cores. Concepts proposing to harness the annihilation of matter and anti-matter are only touched briefly due to their limited maturity. For each family, an overview of physical fundamentals, technical concepts, and - if available - tested engines' propulsion parameters is given.

  13. Salary information for health physicists and nuclear engineers, October 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of a survey conducted by Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) to obtain current salary data from employers of health physicists and nuclear engineers. The questionnaires were distributed to 52 utilities and 139 non-utilities in October 1991. The non-utilities include private sector organizations and Department of Energy laboratories and production facilities operated by contractors. Excluded from the survey are government agencies, educational institutions, and medical/health facilities. The employers were asked to provide data on average salaries for BS, MS, and PhD degree level health physicists and nuclear engineers with zero, one, and three years of professional work experience. Responses from individual employers are kept confidential, and the list of respondents provided at the back of this report includes only those organizations authorizing the release of their names. The survey universe consists of those utilities and non-utilities that employed five or more health physicists or nuclear engineers based on data from the 1991 Survey of Occupational Employment in Nuclear-Related Activities'' conducted by Oak Ridge Associated Universities which includes information provided by the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations.

  14. Nanophotonics for information systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nezhad, M.; Abashin, M.; Ikeda, K.; Pang, L.; Kim, H. C.; Levy, U.; Tetz, K.; Rokitski, R.; Fainman, Y.

    2007-02-01

    Optical technology plays an increasingly important role in numerous applications areas, including communications, information processing, and data storage. However, as optical technology develops, it is evident that there is a growing need to develop reliable photonic integration technologies. This will include the development of passive as well as active optical components that can be integrated into functional optical circuits and systems, including filters, switching fabrics that can be controlled either electrically or optically, optical sources, detectors, amplifiers, etc. We explore the unique capabilities and advantages of nanotechnology in developing next generation integrated photonic chips. Our long-range goal is to develop a range of photonic nanostructures including artificially birefringent and resonant devices, photonic crystals, and photonic crystals with defects to tailor spectral filters, and nanostructures for spatial field localization to enhance optical nonlinearities, to facilitate on-chip system integration through compatible materials and fabrication processes. The design of artificial nanostructured materials, PCs and integrated photonic systems is one of the most challenging tasks as it not only involves the accurate solution of electromagnetic optics equations, but also the need to incorporate the material and quantum physics equations. Near-field interactions in artificial nanostructured materials provide a variety of functionalities useful for optical systems integration. Recently, the inclusion of surface plasmon photonics in this area has opened up a host of new possibilities Finally and most importantly, nanophotonics may enable easier integration with other nanotechnologies: electronics, magnetics, mechanics, chemistry, and biology. We will address some of these areas in this paper.

  15. Layers of Information: Geographic Information Systems (GIS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucking, Robert A.; Christmann, Edwin P.

    2003-01-01

    Describes the Geographic Information System (GIS) which is capable of storing, manipulating, and displaying data allowing students to explore complex relationships through scientific inquiry. Explains applications of GIS in middle school classrooms and includes assessment strategies. (YDS)

  16. Layers of Information: Geographic Information Systems (GIS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucking, Robert A.; Christmann, Edwin P.

    2003-01-01

    Describes the Geographic Information System (GIS) which is capable of storing, manipulating, and displaying data allowing students to explore complex relationships through scientific inquiry. Explains applications of GIS in middle school classrooms and includes assessment strategies. (YDS)

  17. Information Fusion and Aggregation for Cooperative Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-29

    34 International Journal of General Systems 36, 251-262, 2007. • Yager, R. R., " OWA trees and their role in security modeling using attack trees," Information...Symposium on Evolving Fuzzy Systems, 3-7, 2006. Publications to Appear • Yager, R. R., "Centered OWA operators," Soft Computing Journal, (To Appear...34 International Journal of Approximate Reasoning, (To Appear). • Yager, R. R., "Using stress functions to obtain OWA operators," IEEE Transactions on Fuzzy

  18. Remote nuclear screening system for hostile environments

    SciTech Connect

    Addleman, R.S.; Beck, M.A.; Blewett, G.R.; Selle, E.R.; McClellan, C.S.; Dodd, D.A.; Troyer, G.L.; Keele, B.D.

    1996-02-27

    A remote measurement system has been constructed for in situ gamma and beta isotopic characterization of highly radioactive nuclear material in hostile environments. A small collimated, planar CdZnTe detector is used for gamma-ray spectroscopy. Spectral resolution of 2% full width at half maximum at 662 kiloelectronvolts has been obtained remotely using rise time compensation and limited pulse shape discrimination, Isotopc measurement of high-energy beta emitters was accomplished with a ruggedized, deeply depleted, surface barrier silicon dictator. The primary function of the remote nuclear screening system is to provide fast qualitative and quantitative isotopic assessment of high-level radioactive material.

  19. Geographic Information Systems.

    PubMed

    Wieczorek, William F; Delmerico, Alan M

    2009-01-01

    This chapter presents an overview of the development, capabilities, and utilization of geographic information systems (GIS). There are nearly an unlimited number of applications that are relevant to GIS because virtually all human interactions, natural and man-made features, resources, and populations have a geographic component. Everything happens somewhere and the location often has a role that affects what occurs. This role is often called spatial dependence or spatial autocorrelation, which exists when a phenomenon is not randomly geographically distributed. GIS has a number of key capabilities that are needed to conduct a spatial analysis to assess this spatial dependence. This chapter presents these capabilities (e.g., georeferencing, adjacency/distance measures, overlays) and provides a case study to illustrate how GIS can be used for both research and planning. Although GIS has developed into a relatively mature application for basic functions, development is needed to more seamlessly integrate spatial statistics and models.The issue of location, especially the geography of human activities, interactions between humanity and nature, and the distribution and location of natural resources and features, is one of the most basic elements of scientific inquiry. Conceptualizations and physical maps of geographic space have existed since the beginning of time because all human activity takes place in a geographic context. Representing objects in space, basically where things are located, is a critical aspect of the natural, social, and applied sciences. Throughout history there have been many methods of characterizing geographic space, especially maps created by artists, mariners, and others eventually leading to the development of the field of cartography. It is no surprise that the digital age has launched a major effort to utilize geographic data, but not just as maps. A geographic information system (GIS) facilitates the collection, analysis, and reporting of

  20. Geographic Information Systems

    PubMed Central

    Wieczorek, William F.; Delmerico, Alan M.

    2009-01-01

    This chapter presents an overview of the development, capabilities, and utilization of geographic information systems (GIS). There are nearly an unlimited number of applications that are relevant to GIS because virtually all human interactions, natural and man-made features, resources, and populations have a geographic component. Everything happens somewhere and the location often has a role that affects what occurs. This role is often called spatial dependence or spatial autocorrelation, which exists when a phenomenon is not randomly geographically distributed. GIS has a number of key capabilities that are needed to conduct a spatial analysis to assess this spatial dependence. This chapter presents these capabilities (e.g., georeferencing, adjacency/distance measures, overlays) and provides a case study to illustrate how GIS can be used for both research and planning. Although GIS has developed into a relatively mature application for basic functions, development is needed to more seamlessly integrate spatial statistics and models. The issue of location, especially the geography of human activities, interactions between humanity and nature, and the distribution and location of natural resources and features, is one of the most basic elements of scientific inquiry. Conceptualizations and physical maps of geographic space have existed since the beginning of time because all human activity takes place in a geographic context. Representing objects in space, basically where things are located, is a critical aspect of the natural, social, and applied sciences. Throughout history there have been many methods of characterizing geographic space, especially maps created by artists, mariners, and others eventually leading to the development of the field of cartography. It is no surprise that the digital age has launched a major effort to utilize geographic data, but not just as maps. A geographic information system (GIS) facilitates the collection, analysis, and reporting of

  1. Risk-informed assessment of regulatory and design requirements for future nuclear power plants. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    2000-08-01

    OAK B188 Risk-informed assessment of regulatory and design requirements for future nuclear power plants. Annual report. The overall goal of this research project is to support innovation in new nuclear power plant designs. This project is examining the implications, for future reactors and future safety regulation, of utilizing a new risk-informed regulatory system as a replacement for the current system. This innovation will be made possible through development of a scientific, highly risk-formed approach for the design and regulation of nuclear power plants. This approach will include the development and/or confirmation of corresponding regulatory requirements and industry standards. The major impediment to long term competitiveness of new nuclear plants in the U.S. is the capital cost component--which may need to be reduced on the order of 35% to 40% for Advanced Light Water Reactors (ALWRS) such as System 80+ and Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR). The required cost reduction for an ALWR such as AP600 or AP1000 would be expected to be less. Such reductions in capital cost will require a fundamental reevaluation of the industry standards and regulatory bases under which nuclear plants are designed and licensed. Fortunately, there is now an increasing awareness that many of the existing regulatory requirements and industry standards are not significantly contributing to safety and reliability and, therefore, are unnecessarily adding to nuclear plant costs. Not only does this degrade the economic competitiveness of nuclear energy, it results in unnecessary costs to the American electricity consumer. While addressing these concerns, this research project will be coordinated with current efforts of industry and NRC to develop risk-informed, performance-based regulations that affect the operation of the existing nuclear plants; however, this project will go further by focusing on the design of new plants.

  2. International and American Students' Perceptions of Informal English Conversations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Eun Jeong

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated international and American students' perceptions of structured but informal English conversations with each other. American and international students perceived the effects of these conversations differently. While the international students claimed increased linguistic and cultural competence, the Americans identified…

  3. Review of Current Nuclear Vacuum System Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, M.; McCracken, J.; Shope, T.

    2003-02-25

    Nearly all industrial operations generate unwanted dust, particulate matter, and/or liquid wastes. Waste dust and particulates can be readily tracked to other work locations, and airborne particulates can be spread through ventilation systems to all locations within a building, and even vented outside the building - a serious concern for processes involving hazardous, radioactive, or nuclear materials. Several varieties of vacuum systems have been proposed and/or are commercially available for clean up of both solid and liquid hazardous and nuclear materials. A review of current technologies highlights both the advantages and disadvantages of the various systems, and demonstrates the need for a system designed to address issues specific to hazardous and nuclear material cleanup. A review of previous and current hazardous/nuclear material cleanup technologies is presented. From simple conventional vacuums modified for use in industrial operations, to systems specifically engineered for such purposes, the advantages and disadvantages are examined in light of the following criteria: minimal worker exposure; minimal secondary waste generation;reduced equipment maintenance and consumable parts; simplicity of design, yet fully compatible with all waste types; and ease of use. The work effort reviews past, existing and proposed technologies in light of such considerations. Accomplishments of selected systems are presented, including identified areas where technological improvements could be suggested.

  4. Iowa Flood Information System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demir, I.; Krajewski, W. F.; Goska, R.; Mantilla, R.; Weber, L. J.; Young, N.

    2011-12-01

    The Iowa Flood Information System (IFIS) is a web-based platform developed by the Iowa Flood Center (IFC) to provide access to flood inundation maps, real-time flood conditions, flood forecasts both short-term and seasonal, flood-related data, information and interactive visualizations for communities in Iowa. The key element of the system's architecture is the notion of community. Locations of the communities, those near streams and rivers, define basin boundaries. The IFIS provides community-centric watershed and river characteristics, weather (rainfall) conditions, and streamflow data and visualization tools. Interactive interfaces allow access to inundation maps for different stage and return period values, and flooding scenarios with contributions from multiple rivers. Real-time and historical data of water levels, gauge heights, and rainfall conditions are available in the IFIS by streaming data from automated IFC bridge sensors, USGS stream gauges, NEXRAD radars, and NWS forecasts. Simple 2D and 3D interactive visualizations in the IFIS make the data more understandable to general public. Users are able to filter data sources for their communities and selected rivers. The data and information on IFIS is also accessible through web services and mobile applications. The IFIS is optimized for various browsers and screen sizes to provide access through multiple platforms including tablets and mobile devices. The IFIS includes a rainfall-runoff forecast model to provide a five-day flood risk estimate for around 500 communities in Iowa. Multiple view modes in the IFIS accommodate different user types from general public to researchers and decision makers by providing different level of tools and details. River view mode allows users to visualize data from multiple IFC bridge sensors and USGS stream gauges to follow flooding condition along a river. The IFIS will help communities make better-informed decisions on the occurrence of floods, and will alert communities

  5. Comprehensive Nuclear Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Konings, Dr. Rudy J. M.; Allen, Todd R.; Stoller, Roger E; Yamanaka, Prof. Shinsuke

    2012-01-01

    This book encompasses a rich seam of current information on the vast and multidisciplinary field of nuclear materials employed in fission and prototype fusion systems. Discussion includes both historical and contemporary international research in nuclear materials, from Actinides to Zirconium alloys, from the worlds leading scientists and engineers. Synthesizes pertinent current science to support the selection, assessment, validation and engineering of materials in extreme nuclear environments. The work discusses the major classes of materials suitable for usage in nuclear fission, fusion reactors and high power accelerators, and for diverse functions in fuels, cladding, moderator and control materials, structural, functional, and waste materials.

  6. A Technology Roadmap for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Executive Summary

    SciTech Connect

    2003-03-01

    To meet future energy needs, ten countries--Argentina, Brazil, Canada, France, Japan, the Republic of Korea, the Republic of South Africa, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and the United States--have agreed on a framework for international cooperation in research for an advanced generation of nuclear energy systems, known as Generation IV. These ten countries have joined together to form the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) to develop future-generation nuclear energy systems that can be licensed, constructed, and operated in a manner that will provide competitively priced and reliable energy products while satisfactorily addressing nuclear safety, waste, proliferation, and public perception concerns. The objective for Generation IV nuclear energy systems is to be available for international deployment before the year 2030, when many of the world's currently operating nuclear power plants will be at or near the end of their operating licenses.

  7. Information flow in heterogeneously interacting systems.

    PubMed

    Yamaguti, Yutaka; Tsuda, Ichiro; Takahashi, Yoichiro

    2014-02-01

    Motivated by studies on the dynamics of heterogeneously interacting systems in neocortical neural networks, we studied heterogeneously-coupled chaotic systems. We used information-theoretic measures to investigate directions of information flow in heterogeneously coupled Rössler systems, which we selected as a typical chaotic system. In bi-directionally coupled systems, spontaneous and irregular switchings of the phase difference between two chaotic oscillators were observed. The direction of information transmission spontaneously switched in an intermittent manner, depending on the phase difference between the two systems. When two further oscillatory inputs are added to the coupled systems, this system dynamically selects one of the two inputs by synchronizing, selection depending on the internal phase differences between the two systems. These results indicate that the effective direction of information transmission dynamically changes, induced by a switching of phase differences between the two systems.

  8. Inherently safe nuclear-driven internal combustion engines

    SciTech Connect

    Alesso, P.; Chow, Tze-Show; Condit, R.; Heidrich, J.; Pettibone, J.; Streit, R.

    1991-06-14

    A family of nuclear driven engines is described in which nuclear energy released by fissioning of uranium or plutonium in a prompt critical assembly is used to heat a working gas. Engine performance is modeled using a code that calculates hydrodynamics, fission energy production, and neutron transport self-consistently. Results are given demonstrating a large negative temperature coefficient that produces self-shutoff of energy production. Reduced fission product inventory and the self-shutoff provide inherent nuclear safety. It is expected that nuclear engine reactor units could be scaled from 100 MW on up. 7 refs., 3 figs.

  9. Engineering Information Management Systems survey: CADCAM-002

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, S.K.

    1984-09-01

    An immediate goal of CAD/CAM integration in the DOE Nuclear Weapons Complex is automated data transfer/translation between the design, analysis, and manufacturing functions. A longer range goal is to use CAD derived geometric part descriptions as official product definition, rather than the current drawing based product definition. The Engineering Information Management System is described loosely as that software system which performs all the needed functions related to archiving and accessing computer based product definition. Major ingredients of such a system include automated data management, neutral format, engineering databases, information models, and translators. This report surveys the current state of the art in these five areas.

  10. Information Asymmetries as Trade Barriers: ISO 9000 Increases International Commerce

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potoski, Matthew; Prakash, Aseem

    2009-01-01

    Spatial, cultural, and linguistic barriers create information asymmetries between buyers and sellers that impede international trade. The International Organization for Standardization's ISO 9000 program is designed to reduce these information asymmetries by providing assurance about the product quality of firms that receive its certification.…

  11. Information Asymmetries as Trade Barriers: ISO 9000 Increases International Commerce

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potoski, Matthew; Prakash, Aseem

    2009-01-01

    Spatial, cultural, and linguistic barriers create information asymmetries between buyers and sellers that impede international trade. The International Organization for Standardization's ISO 9000 program is designed to reduce these information asymmetries by providing assurance about the product quality of firms that receive its certification.…

  12. Rod internal pressure of spent nuclear fuel and its effects on cladding degradation during dry storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ju-Seong; Hong, Jong-Dae; Yang, Yong-Sik; Kook, Dong-Hak

    2017-08-01

    Temperature and hoop stress limits have been used to prevent the gross rupture of spent nuclear fuel during dry storage. The stress due to rod internal pressure can induce cladding degradation such as creep, hydride reorientation, and delayed hydride cracking. Creep is a self-limiting phenomenon in a dry storage system; in contrast, hydride reorientation and delayed hydride cracking are potential degradation mechanisms activated at low temperatures when the cladding material is brittle. In this work, a conservative rod internal pressure and corresponding hoop stress were calculated using FRAPCON-4.0 fuel performance code. Based on the hoop stresses during storage, a study on the onset of hydride reorientation and delayed hydride cracking in spent nuclear fuel was conducted under the current storage guidelines. Hydride reorientation is hard to occur in most of the low burn-up fuel while some high burn-up fuel can experience hydride reorientation, but their effect may not be significant. On the other hand, delayed hydride cracking will not occur in spent nuclear fuel from pressurized water reactor; however, there is a lack of confirmatory data on threshold intensity factor for delayed hydride cracking and crack size distribution in the fuel.

  13. The IAGOS information system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulanger, Damien; Gautron, Benoit; Schultz, Martin; Brötz, Björn; Rauthe-Schöch, Armin; Thouret, Valérie

    2015-04-01

    IAGOS (In-service Aircraft for a Global Observing System) aims at the provision of long-term, frequent, regular, accurate, and spatially resolved in situ observations of the atmospheric composition. IAGOS observation systems are deployed on a fleet of commercial aircraft. The IAGOS database is an essential part of the global atmospheric monitoring network. Data access is handled by open access policy based on the submission of research requests which are reviewed by the PIs. The IAGOS database (http://www.iagos.fr, damien.boulanger@obs-mip.fr) is part of the French atmospheric chemistry data centre Ether (CNES and CNRS). In the framework of the IGAS project (IAGOS for Copernicus Atmospheric Service) interoperability with international portals or other databases is implemented in order to improve IAGOS data discovery. The IGAS data network is composed of three data centres: the IAGOS database in Toulouse including IAGOS-core data and IAGOS-CARIBIC (Civil Aircraft for the Regular Investigation of the Atmosphere Based on an Instrument Container) data since January 2015; the HALO research aircraft database at DLR (https://halo-db.pa.op.dlr.de); and the MACC data centre in Jülich (http://join.iek.fz-juelich.de). The MACC (Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Climate) project is a prominent user of the IGAS data network. In June 2015 a new version of the IAGOS database will be released providing improved services such as download in NetCDF or NASA Ames formats; graphical tools (maps, scatter plots, etc.); standardized metadata (ISO 19115) and a better users management. The link with the MACC data centre, through JOIN (Jülich OWS Interface), will allow to combine model outputs with IAGOS data for intercomparison. The interoperability within the IGAS data network, implemented thanks to many web services, will improve the functionalities of the web interfaces of each data centre.

  14. Information Systems and Development in the Third World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heitzman, James

    1990-01-01

    Discussion of the relationship between information and development in Third World countries highlights information systems development in four South Asian nations: India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, and Bangladesh. The impact of microelectronics technology, development theories, multinational corporations, international information agencies, and…

  15. Nuclear Fuel Cycle; (USA)

    SciTech Connect

    Cason, D.L.; Hicks, S.C.

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear Fuel Cycle (NFC) announces on a monthly basis the current worldwide information available from the open literature on all aspects of the fuel cycle except in-reactor properties and performance of fuels. More information related to radioactive waste and to the transport and storage of spent fuel is included in the current awareness publication, Radioactive Waste Management. This publication contains the abstracts of DOE reports, journal articles, conference papers, patents, theses, and monographs added to the Energy Science and Technology Database (EDB) during the past month. Also included are other US information obtained through acquisition programs or interagency agreements and international information obtained through the International Energy Agency's Technology Data Exchange, the International Atomic Energy Agency's International Nuclear Information System, or government-to-government agreements. The digests in NFC on nuclear fuel back to 1948 are available for online searching and retrieval in EDB and Nuclear Science Abstracts (NSA) database. Current information, added daily to EDB, is available to DOE and its contractors through the DOE Integrated Technical Information System. Customized profiles can be developed to provide current information to meet each user's needs.

  16. [Geographic information systems].

    PubMed

    Hernández-Vásquez, Akram; Azañedo, Diego; Bendezú-Quispe, Guido; Pacheco-Mendoza, Josmel; Chaparro, R Martín

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to geospatially explore the occurrence rates of car accidents involving pedestrians in Cercado de Lima (Lima District), Peru. Car accidents involving pedestrians recorded in the 2015 National Police Station Census of the National Statistics and Information Institute were described and georeferenced. Subsequently, a Kernel Density analysis was carried out to locate areas with high, medium, and low density events. Records of 171 car accidents involving pedestrians were studied: the types of vehicles involved were automobiles (56.7%) and smaller vehicles (22.8%). The highest percentage of car accidents involving pedestrians (38.6%) took place between 12:00 p.m. and 5:00 p.m. There were two densely populated areas and two areas with intermediate density for car accidents involving pedestrians, locations that were previously reported as critical due to their deficiencies and high probability of traffic accidents. The use of geographic information systems offers a quick overview of the occurrence rates of car accidents involving pedestrians to make comparisons and enable the local implementation of strategies.

  17. Spent nuclear fuel project high-level information management plan

    SciTech Connect

    Main, G.C.

    1996-09-13

    This document presents the results of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project (SNFP) Information Management Planning Project (IMPP), a short-term project that identified information management (IM) issues and opportunities within the SNFP and outlined a high-level plan to address them. This high-level plan for the SNMFP IM focuses on specific examples from within the SNFP. The plan`s recommendations can be characterized in several ways. Some recommendations address specific challenges that the SNFP faces. Others form the basis for making smooth transitions in several important IM areas. Still others identify areas where further study and planning are indicated. The team`s knowledge of developments in the IM industry and at the Hanford Site were crucial in deciding where to recommend that the SNFP act and where they should wait for Site plans to be made. Because of the fast pace of the SNFP and demands on SNFP staff, input and interaction were primarily between the IMPP team and members of the SNFP Information Management Steering Committee (IMSC). Key input to the IMPP came from a workshop where IMSC members and their delegates developed a set of draft IM principles. These principles, described in Section 2, became the foundation for the recommendations found in the transition plan outlined in Section 5. Availability of SNFP staff was limited, so project documents were used as a basis for much of the work. The team, realizing that the status of the project and the environment are continually changing, tried to keep abreast of major developments since those documents were generated. To the extent possible, the information contained in this document is current as of the end of fiscal year (FY) 1995. Programs and organizations on the Hanford Site as a whole are trying to maximize their return on IM investments. They are coordinating IM activities and trying to leverage existing capabilities. However, the SNFP cannot just rely on Sitewide activities to meet its IM requirements

  18. Vision for the development of an international nuclear fuel recycling program

    SciTech Connect

    Kok, Kenneth D.

    2007-07-01

    The purpose of the development of an international nuclear fuel recycle program is to: - Demonstrate advanced recycling by working to prove the technologies needed to close the fuel cycle, minimize waste, and obtain more energy benefit for each unit of fuel. - Build a global vision by enlisting partners to limit the spread of sensitive nuclear technologies in a way that enables nuclear power to meet global challenges. The program will begin with the establishment of a smaller scale secure fuel cycle facility that would serve as a model for international nuclear fuel reprocessing centers that would eventually be built in several countries world wide. The operating process plants will provide the secure and safe guarded environment for the recycle of spent fuel from nuclear power stations around the world. The demonstration site will provide for developing and testing processes that would lead to the more complete use of the energy available in nuclear fuels and the minimization of long lived nuclear waste. (author)

  19. Expert system for online surveillance of nuclear reactor coolant pumps

    DOEpatents

    Gross, Kenny C.; Singer, Ralph M.; Humenik, Keith E.

    1993-01-01

    An expert system for online surveillance of nuclear reactor coolant pumps. This system provides a means for early detection of pump or sensor degradation. Degradation is determined through the use of a statistical analysis technique, sequential probability ratio test, applied to information from several sensors which are responsive to differing physical parameters. The results of sequential testing of the data provide the operator with an early warning of possible sensor or pump failure.

  20. Towards a More Complete and Accurate Experimental Nuclear Reaction Data Library (EXFOR). International Collaboration Between Nuclear Reaction Data Centres (NRDC)

    SciTech Connect

    Otuka, N.; Pritychenko, B.; Otuka, N.; Dupont, E.; Semkova, V.; Pritychenko, B.; Blokhin, A. I.; Aikawa, M.; Babykina, S.; Bossant, M.; Chen, G.; Dunaeva, S.; Forrest, R. A.; Fukahori, T.; Furutachi, N.; Ganesan, S.; Ge, Z.; Gritzay, O. O.; Herman, M.; Hlavac, S.; Kato, K.; Lalremruata, B.; Lee, Y. O.; Makinaga, A.; Matsumoto, K.; Mikhaylyukova, M.; Pikulina, G.; Pronyaev, V. G.; Saxena, A.; Schwerer, O.; Simakov, S. P.; Soppera, N.; Suzuki, R.; Takacs, S.; Tao, X.; Taova, S.; Tarkanyi, F.; Varlamov, V. V.; Wang, J.; Yang, S. C.; Zerkin, V.; Zhuang, Y.

    2014-06-01

    The International Network of Nuclear Reaction Data Centres (NRDC) coordinated by the IAEA Nuclear Data Section (NDS) successfully collaborates in the maintenance and development of the EXFOR library. Likewise, as the scope of published data expands (e.g. to higher energy, to heavier projectile) to meet the needs of research and applications, it has become a challenging task to maintain both the completeness and accuracy of the EXFOR library. Evolution of the library highlighting recent developments is described.

  1. Towards a More Complete and Accurate Experimental Nuclear Reaction Data Library (EXFOR): International Collaboration Between Nuclear Reaction Data Centres (NRDC)

    SciTech Connect

    Otuka, N.; Dupont, E.; Semkova, V.; Pritychenko, B.; Blokhin, A.I.; Aikawa, M.; Babykina, S.; Bossant, M.; Chen, G.; Dunaeva, S.; Forrest, R.A.; Fukahori, T.; Furutachi, N.; Ganesan, S.; Ge, Z.; Gritzay, O.O.; Herman, M.; Hlavač, S.; and others

    2014-06-15

    The International Network of Nuclear Reaction Data Centres (NRDC) coordinated by the IAEA Nuclear Data Section (NDS) successfully collaborates in the maintenance and development of the EXFOR library. As the scope of published data expands (e.g. to higher energy, to heavier projectile) to meet the needs of research and applications, it has become a challenging task to maintain both the completeness and accuracy of the EXFOR library. Evolution of the library highlighting recent developments is described.

  2. 10 CFR 1017.8 - Subject areas eligible to be Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Nuclear Information. 1017.8 Section 1017.8 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) IDENTIFICATION AND PROTECTION OF UNCLASSIFIED CONTROLLED NUCLEAR INFORMATION Initially Determining What Information Is Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information § 1017.8 Subject areas eligible to be Unclassified...

  3. 10 CFR 1017.8 - Subject areas eligible to be Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Nuclear Information. 1017.8 Section 1017.8 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) IDENTIFICATION AND PROTECTION OF UNCLASSIFIED CONTROLLED NUCLEAR INFORMATION Initially Determining What Information Is Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information § 1017.8 Subject areas eligible to be Unclassified...

  4. 10 CFR 1017.8 - Subject areas eligible to be Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Nuclear Information. 1017.8 Section 1017.8 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) IDENTIFICATION AND PROTECTION OF UNCLASSIFIED CONTROLLED NUCLEAR INFORMATION Initially Determining What Information Is Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information § 1017.8 Subject areas eligible to be Unclassified...

  5. 10 CFR 1017.8 - Subject areas eligible to be Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Nuclear Information. 1017.8 Section 1017.8 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) IDENTIFICATION AND PROTECTION OF UNCLASSIFIED CONTROLLED NUCLEAR INFORMATION Initially Determining What Information Is Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information § 1017.8 Subject areas eligible to be Unclassified...

  6. 10 CFR 1017.8 - Subject areas eligible to be Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Nuclear Information. 1017.8 Section 1017.8 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) IDENTIFICATION AND PROTECTION OF UNCLASSIFIED CONTROLLED NUCLEAR INFORMATION Initially Determining What Information Is Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information § 1017.8 Subject areas eligible to be...

  7. An Integrated Safety Assessment Methodology for Generation IV Nuclear Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Timothy J. Leahy

    2010-06-01

    The Generation IV International Forum (GIF) Risk and Safety Working Group (RSWG) was created to develop an effective approach for the safety of Generation IV advanced nuclear energy systems. Early work of the RSWG focused on defining a safety philosophy founded on lessons learned from current and prior generations of nuclear technologies, and on identifying technology characteristics that may help achieve Generation IV safety goals. More recent RSWG work has focused on the definition of an integrated safety assessment methodology for evaluating the safety of Generation IV systems. The methodology, tentatively called ISAM, is an integrated “toolkit” consisting of analytical techniques that are available and matched to appropriate stages of Generation IV system concept development. The integrated methodology is intended to yield safety-related insights that help actively drive the evolving design throughout the technology development cycle, potentially resulting in enhanced safety, reduced costs, and shortened development time.

  8. TOPAZ-2 Nuclear Power System safety assurance

    SciTech Connect

    Nikitin, V.P.; Ogloblin, B.G.; Lutov, Y.I.; Luppov, A.N.; Shalaev, A.I. ); Ponomarev-Stepnoi, N.N.; Usov, V.A.; Nechaev, Y.A. )

    1993-01-15

    TOPAZ-2 Nuclear Power System (NPS) safety philosophy is based on the requirement that the reactor shall not be critical during all kinds of operations prior to its start-up on the safe orbit (except for physical start-up). Potentially dangerous operation were analyzed and both computational and experimental studies were carried out.

  9. Development of a tool for calculating early internal doses in the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident based on atmospheric dispersion simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurihara, Osamu; Kim, Eunjoo; Kunishima, Naoaki; Tani, Kotaro; Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Furuyama, Kazuo; Hashimoto, Shozo; Akashi, Makoto

    2017-09-01

    A tool was developed to facilitate the calculation of the early internal doses to residents involved in the Fukushima Nuclear Disaster based on atmospheric transport and dispersion model (ATDM) simulations performed using Worldwide version of System for Prediction of Environmental Emergency Information 2nd version (WSPEEDI-II) together with personal behavior data containing the history of the whereabouts of individul's after the accident. The tool generates hourly-averaged air concentration data for the simulation grids nearest to an individual's whereabouts using WSPEEDI-II datasets for the subsequent calculation of internal doses due to inhalation. This paper presents an overview of the developed tool and provides tentative comparisons between direct measurement-based and ATDM-based results regarding the internal doses received by 421 persons from whom personal behavior data available.

  10. Space nuclear system expansion joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, W. D.; Shimazki, T. T.

    1973-01-01

    The engineering, design, and fabrication status of the expansion joint unit (EJU) to be employed in the NaK primary coolant piping loop of the 5-kwe Reactor thermoelectric system are described. Four EJU's are needed in the NaK primary coolant piping loop. The four EJU's which will be identical, utilize bellows as the flexing member, are hermetically sealed, and provide double containment. The bellows are of a nested-formed design, and are to be constructed of 1-ply thickness of 0.010-in. Inconel 718. The EJU's provide a minimum piping load margin of safety of +0.22.

  11. Nuclear Fuel Cycle Options Evaluation to Inform R&D Planning

    SciTech Connect

    R. Wigeland; T. Taiwo; M. Todosow; H. Ludewig; W. Halsey; J. Gehin; R. Jubin; J. Buelt; S. Stockinger; K. Jenni; B. Oakley

    2014-04-01

    An Evaluation and Screening (E&S) of nuclear fuel cycle options has been conducted in fulfilment of a Charter specified for the study by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy. The E&S study used an objective and independently reviewed evaluation process to provide information about the potential benefits and challenges that could strengthen the basis and provide guidance for the research and development(R&D) activities undertaken by the DOE Fuel Cycle Technologies Program Office. Using the nine evaluation criteria specified in the Charter and associated evaluation metrics and processes developed during the E&S study, a screening was conducted of 40 nuclear fuel cycle evaluation groups to provide answers to the questions: (1) Which nuclear fuel cycle system options have the potential for substantial beneficial improvements in nuclear fuel cycle performance, and what aspects of the options make these improvements possible? (2)Which nuclear material management approaches can favorably impact the performance of fuel cycle options? (3)Where would R&D investment be needed to support the set of promising fuel cycle system options and nuclear material management approaches identified above, and what are the technical objectives of associated technologies?

  12. Defense Energy Information System. Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Carnes, J.

    1990-02-01

    The Manual provides clear, reliable, timely, accurate, and objective energy information; prescribes instructions for the preparation and submission of energy data to support the Defense Energy Information System (DEIS); and furnishes information regarding the use of the DEIS.

  13. 76 FR 22849 - DoD Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information (UCNI)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-25

    ... of form, whether in reactor cores or other items (including nuclear weapons) under the direct control...) Identify information regarding nuclear weapons security and the protection of SNM at DoD nuclear reactor... of the Secretary 32 CFR Part 223 RIN 0790-AI64 DoD Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information...

  14. Safety system augmentation at Russian nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Scerbo, J.A.; Satpute, S.N.; Donkin, J.Y.; Reister, R.A. |

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes the design and procurement of a Class IE DC power supply system to upgrade plant safety at the Kola Nuclear Power Plant (NPP). Kola NPP is located above the Arctic circle at Polyarnie Zorie, Murmansk, Russia. Kola NPP consists of four units. Units 1 and 2 have VVER-440/230 type reactors: Units 3 and 4 have VVER-440/213 type reactors. The VVER-440 reactor design is similar to the pressurized water reactor design used in the US. This project provided redundant, Class 1E DC station batteries and DC switchboards for Kola NPP, Units 1 and 2. The new DC power supply system was designed and procured in compliance with current nuclear design practices and requirements. Technical issues that needed to be addressed included reconciling the requirements in both US and Russian codes and satisfying the requirements of the Russian nuclear regulatory authority. Close interface with ATOMENERGOPROEKT (AEP), the Russian design organization, KOLA NPP plant personnel, and GOSATOMNADZOR (GAN), the Russian version of US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, was necessary to develop a design that would assure compliance with current Russian design requirements. Hence, this project was expected to serve as an example for plant upgrades at other similar VVER-440 nuclear plants. In addition to technical issues, the project needed to address language barriers and the logistics of shipping equipment to a remote section of the Former Soviet Union (FSU). This project was executed by Burns and Roe under the sponsorship of the US DOE as part of the International Safety Program (INSP). The INSP is a comprehensive effort, in cooperation with partners in other countries, to improve nuclear safety worldwide. A major element within the INSP is the improvement of the safety of Soviet-designed nuclear reactors.

  15. Nuclear systems for space power and propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, M.

    1971-01-01

    As exploration and utilization of space proceeds through the 1970s, 1980s, and beyond, spacecraft in earth orbit will become increasingly larger, spacecraft will travel deeper into space, and space activities will involve more complex operations. These trends require increasing amounts of energy for power and propulsion. The role to be played by nuclear energy is presented, including plans for deep space missions using radioisotope generators, the reactor power systems for earth orbiting stations and satellites, and the role of nuclear propulsion in space transportation.

  16. International nuclear societies council vision for the second fifty years of nuclear energy

    SciTech Connect

    Hatcher, S.R.

    1994-12-31

    A vision of the future should be in the context of ongoing social and technological development Perhaps the most compelling moral and ethical issue facing the world at the close of the 20th Century is to help the peoples of the poorer countries in their struggle for a reasonable quality of life, while at the saw time they face a dramatic increase in their population. Despite improvements in the efficiency of energy use, world energy demand will continue to grow significantly, driven by: (1) an inevitable population increase; (2) the communications revolution, which will generate global aspirations for a better quality of life; (3) the need to generate wealth to address the new level of aspirations; and (4) environmental protection as a cornerstone of sustainable development. The vision of abundant energy in the service of mankind came a step closer to realisation following the discoveries of the properties of the nucleus in the 1930`s. The achievement of a sustained chain fission reaction in 1942 led to the development of nuclear fission into an electrical energy system that now supplies 7% of the world`s energy. The earth`s resources of uranium and thorium for fission and deuterium for fusion provided a virtually inexhaustible rarely of fuel. Looking at the needs of the world over the next 50 years, one can visualise that an even more important contribution will be demanded of nuclear energy.

  17. Manned space flight nuclear system safety. Volume 5: Nuclear System safety guidelines. Part 1: Space base nuclear safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The design and operations guidelines and requirements developed in the study of space base nuclear system safety are presented. Guidelines and requirements are presented for the space base subsystems, nuclear hardware (reactor, isotope sources, dynamic generator equipment), experiments, interfacing vehicles, ground support systems, range safety and facilities. Cross indices and references are provided which relate guidelines to each other, and to substantiating data in other volumes. The guidelines are intended for the implementation of nuclear safety related design and operational considerations in future space programs.

  18. Information security management system planning for CBRN facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Lenaeu, Joseph D.; O'Neil, Lori Ross; Leitch, Rosalyn M.; Glantz, Clifford S.; Landine, Guy P.; Bryant, Janet L.; Lewis, John; Mathers, Gemma; Rodger, Robert; Johnson, Christopher

    2015-12-01

    The focus of this document is to provide guidance for the development of information security management system planning documents at chemical, biological, radiological, or nuclear (CBRN) facilities. It describes a risk-based approach for planning information security programs based on the sensitivity of the data developed, processed, communicated, and stored on facility information systems.

  19. Proceedings of GLOBAL 2013: International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Conference - Nuclear Energy at a Crossroads

    SciTech Connect

    2013-07-01

    The Global conference is a forum for the discussion of the scientific, technical, social and regulatory aspects of the nuclear fuel cycle. Relevant topics include global utilization of nuclear energy, current fuel cycle technologies, advanced reactors, advanced fuel cycles, nuclear nonproliferation and public acceptance.

  20. Information Foraging in Nuclear Power Plant Control Rooms

    SciTech Connect

    R.L. Boring

    2011-09-01

    nformation foraging theory articulates the role of the human as an 'informavore' that seeks information and follows optimal foraging strategies (i.e., the 'information scent') to find meaningful information. This paper briefly reviews the findings from information foraging theory outside the nuclear domain and then discusses the types of information foraging strategies operators employ for normal and off-normal operations in the control room. For example, operators may employ a predatory 'wolf' strategy of hunting for information in the face of a plant upset. However, during routine operations, the operators may employ a trapping 'spider' strategy of waiting for relevant indicators to appear. This delineation corresponds to information pull and push strategies, respectively. No studies have been conducted to determine explicitly the characteristics of a control room interface that is optimized for both push and pull information foraging strategies, nor has there been empirical work to validate operator performance when transitioning between push and pull strategies. This paper explores examples of control room operators as wolves vs. spiders and con- cludes by proposing a set of research questions to investigate information foraging in control room settings.

  1. International earth science information network for global change decision making

    SciTech Connect

    Autrey-Hunley, C.; Kuhn, W.R.; Kasischke, E.; Trichel, M.T.; Coppola, R.

    1991-01-01

    Effective environmental decision making depends upon the ability to predict physical changes in the environment, societal responses to these changes, and how both the physical changes and societal responses will be affected by changes in government regulations, public perceptions and the environment. Technological advances in remote sensing have provided a wealth of earth science data necessary to study global change problems; the Earth Observatory System will provide an unprecedented data source in the late 1990's. The Consortium for an International Earth Science Information Network (CIESIN) will combine earth science data (both satellite and ground-based) with data on the social sciences (e.g., economics, demographics, public health) to support informed policy decisions and to transfer knowledge on global change and its causes to the public.

  2. Computed Tomography and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance to study the internal structure and measure weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zornoza-Indart, A.; Lopez-Arce, P.; Alvarez de Buergo, M.; Fort, R.

    2012-04-01

    Outdoor stone heritage is prone to decay due to its direct exposure to weathering agents such us thermal shock caused by isolation processes, salt crystallization phenomena, atmospheric pollutants effects on stone surfaces, freezing and thawing cycles or biodeterioration o decay provoked by biogenic activity. These damages use to affect the surface of the objects or elements causing de-cohesions (flaking, spallings, grain disintegration), material loss or color changes, but also use to affect the internal structure of the objects, although they are not visible, causing internal pressures, fissures and fractures, mineral transformations or inner biodeterioration compromising objects conservation. For this reason, the study of the internal structure of the objects is necessary to establish its weathering and conservation state, to determine its restoration needs and achieve its conservation. Moreover, in cultural heritage where the originality of the objects and their historical or artistic values are so important the use of non-destructive techniques result necessary for their study without causing any damage by sampling. In this work X ray Computed Tomography (CT) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) are used to analyze rock samples (dolostones used in historical buildings from Central Spain and Madrid both in the city and in the province) subjected to different artificial accelerated ageing tests (thermal shock, salt crystallization, freezing and thawing cycles and marine aerosol) to simulate the most common outdoor heritage deterioration scenarios. The changes in the internal structure and pore system modifications are studied with these non-destructive techniques. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (both imaging and relaxometry) experiments were performed in stone specimens to observe and to quantify the location and distribution of water inside the objects, been able to analyze pore size and location. X ray Computed Tomography was used for visualizing and locating

  3. Federal Energy Information Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coyne, Joseph G.; Moneyhun, Dora H.

    1979-01-01

    Describes the Energy Information Administration (EIA) and the Technical Information Center (TIC), and lists databases accessible online to the Department of Energy and its contractors through DOE/RECON. (RAA)

  4. NADS - Nuclear and Atomic Data System

    SciTech Connect

    McKinley, Michael S.; Beck, Bret; McNabb, Dennis

    2005-05-24

    We have developed NADS (Nuclear and Atomic Data System), a web-based graphical interface for viewing pointwise and grouped cross sections and distributions. Our implementation is a client / server model. The client is a Java applet that displays the graphical interface, which has interactive 2-D, 3-D, and 4-D plots and tables. The server, which can serve and perform computations of the data, has been implemented in Python using the FUDGE package developed by Bret Beck at LLNL. Computational capabilities include algebraic manipulation of nuclear evaluated data in databases such as LLNL's ENDL-99, ENDF/B-V, and ENDF/B-VI, as well as user data. Processed data used in LLNL's transport codes are accessible as well. NADS is available from http://nuclear.llnl.gov/.

  5. NADS - Nuclear And Atomic Data System

    SciTech Connect

    McKinley, M S; Beck, B; McNabb, D

    2004-09-17

    We have developed NADS (Nuclear and Atomic Data System), a web-based graphical interface for viewing pointwise and grouped cross-sections and distributions. Our implementation is a client / server model. The client is a Java applet that displays the graphical interface, which has interactive 2-D, 3-D, and 4-D plots and tables. The server, which can serve and perform computations the data, has been implemented in Python using the FUDGE package developed by Bret Beck at LLNL. Computational capabilities include algebraic manipulation of nuclear evaluated data in databases such as LLNL's ENDL-99, ENDF/B-V and ENDF/B-VI as well as user data. Processed data used in LLNL's transport codes are accessible as well. NADS is available from http://nuclear.llnl.gov/

  6. The Phobos information system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karachevtseva, I. P.; Oberst, J.; Zubarev, A. E.; Nadezhdina, I. E.; Kokhanov, A. A.; Garov, A. S.; Uchaev, D. V.; Uchaev, Dm. V.; Malinnikov, V. A.; Klimkin, N. D.

    2014-11-01

    We have developed a Geo-information system (GIS) for Phobos, based on data from the Mars Express and Viking Orbiter missions, which includes orthoimages, global maps, terrain- and gravity field models, all referenced to the Phobos coordinate system. The data are conveniently stored in the ArcGIS software system, which provides an environment for mapping and which allows us to carry out joint data analysis and miscellaneous data cross-comparisons. We have compiled catalogs of Phobos craters using manual and automated techniques, which includes about 5500 and 6400 craters correspondingly. While crater numbers are biased by available image data resolution and illumination, we estimate that our catalog of manually detected craters contains all Phobos craters with diameters D>250 m which is a total of 1072 and catalog of automated detected craters are complete for craters D>400 m (360 craters). Statistical analysis of these large craters reveals a surplus of craters on the anti-Mars hemisphere, whereas differences in crater abundance between leading and trailing hemisphere cannot be confirmed. This in contrast to previous papers, where no such asymmetry was found (Schmedemann et al., 2014). But we cannot rule out remaining biases due to resolution, viewing angles or illumination effects. Using digital terrain model (DTM) derived from photogrammetry image processing we estimate depths of 25 craters larger than 2 km using geometric and dynamic heights (for discussion of Phobos crater morphometry see Kokhanov et al., 2014). We also have compiled catalogs of lineaments, and boulders. In particular, we mapped 546 individual grooves or crater chains, which extend in length from 0.3 km to 16.2 km. We identified and determined the sizes and locations of 1379 boulders near crater Stickney. Cross-comparisons of gravity field models against distribution patterns of grooves and boulders are currently under way and may shed light on their possible origins. Finally, we have developed

  7. Liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor plant system

    DOEpatents

    Hunsbedt, Anstein; Boardman, Charles E.

    1993-01-01

    A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a passive cooling system for removing residual heat resulting for fuel decay during reactor shutdown, or heat produced during a mishap. The reactor system is enhanced with sealing means for excluding external air from contact with the liquid metal coolant leaking from the reactor vessel during an accident. The invention also includes a silo structure which resists attack by leaking liquid metal coolant, and an added unique cooling means.

  8. Integrated nuclear data utilisation system for innovative reactors.

    PubMed

    Yamano, N; Hasegawa, A; Kato, K; Igashira, M

    2005-01-01

    A five-year research and development project on an integrated nuclear data utilisation system was initiated in 2002, for developing innovative nuclear energy systems such as accelerator-driven systems. The integrated nuclear data utilisation system will be constructed as a modular code system, which consists of two sub-systems: the nuclear data search and plotting sub-system, and the nuclear data processing and utilisation sub-system. The system will be operated with a graphical user interface in order to enable easy utilisation through the Internet by both nuclear design engineers and nuclear data evaluators. This paper presents an overview of the integrated nuclear data utilisation system, describes the development of a prototype system to examine the operability of the user interface and discusses specifications of the two sub-systems.

  9. ECONOMIC COMPARABILITY OF INFORMATION SYSTEMS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    not only on the probability distributions of channel in and outputs (events and messages) characterizing the information systems . This remains true when... information systems are interpreted as statistical experiments used to test hypotheses. Some pairs of information systems are, however, comparable...in the sense that one is preferable to another irrespective of the payoff function. There exists thus a partial ordering of information systems according

  10. NUCLEAR DATA NEEDS FOR ADVANCED REACTOR SYSTEMS. A NEA NUCLEAR SCIENCE COMMITTEE INITIATIVE.

    SciTech Connect

    SALVATORES,J.M.; ALIBERTI, G.; PALMIOTTI, G.; ROCHMAN, D.; OBLOZINSKY, P.; HERMANN, M.; TALOU, P.; KAWANO, T.; LEAL, L.; KONING, A.; KODELI, I.

    2007-04-22

    The Working Party on Evaluation Cooperation (WPEC) of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency Nuclear Science Committee has established an International Subgroup to perform an activity in order to develop a systematic approach to define data needs for Gen-IV and, in general, for advanced reactor systems. A methodology, based on sensitivity analysis has been agreed and representative core configurations for Sodium, Gas and Lead cooled Fast Reactors (SFR, GFR, LFR) have been defined as well as a high burn-up VHTR and a high burn-up PWR. In the case of SFRs, both a TRU burner (called in fact SFR) and a core configuration with homogeneous recycling of not separated TRU (called EFR) have been considered.

  11. Manufacturing information system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, D. K.; Smith, P. R.; Smart, M. J.

    1983-12-01

    The size and cost of manufacturing equipment has made it extremely difficult to perform realistic modeling and simulation of the manufacturing process in university research laboratories. Likewise the size and cost factors, coupled with many uncontrolled variables of the production situation has even made it difficult to perform adequate manufacturing research in the industrial setting. Only the largest companies can afford manufacturing research laboratories; research results are often held proprietary and seldom find their way into the university classroom to aid in education and training of new manufacturing engineers. It is the purpose for this research to continue the development of miniature prototype equipment suitable for use in an integrated CAD/CAM Laboratory. The equipment being developed is capable of actually performing production operations (e.g. drilling, milling, turning, punching, etc.) on metallic and non-metallic workpieces. The integrated CAD/CAM Mini-Lab is integrating high resolution, computer graphics, parametric design, parametric N/C parts programmings, CNC machine control, automated storage and retrieval, with robotics materials handling. The availability of miniature CAD/CAM laboratory equipment will provide the basis for intensive laboratory research on manufacturing information systems.

  12. Systems for the Intermodal Routing of Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Steven K; Liu, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    The safe and secure movement of spent nuclear fuel from shutdown and active reactor facilities to intermediate or long term storage sites may, in some instances, require the use of several modes of transportation to accomplish the move. To that end, a fully operable multi-modal routing system is being developed within Oak Ridge National Laboratory s (ORNL) WebTRAGIS (Transportation Routing Analysis Geographic Information System). This study aims to provide an overview of multi-modal routing, the existing state of the TRAGIS networks, the source data needs, and the requirements for developing structural relationships between various modes to create a suitable system for modeling the transport of spent nuclear fuel via a multimodal network. Modern transportation systems are comprised of interconnected, yet separate, modal networks. Efficient transportation networks rely upon the smooth transfer of cargoes at junction points that serve as connectors between modes. A key logistical impediment to the shipment of spent nuclear fuel is the absence of identified or designated transfer locations between transport modes. Understanding the potential network impacts on intermodal transportation of spent nuclear fuel is vital for planning transportation routes from origin to destination. By identifying key locations where modes intersect, routing decisions can be made to prioritize cost savings, optimize transport times and minimize potential risks to the population and environment. In order to facilitate such a process, ORNL began the development of a base intermodal network and associated routing code. The network was developed using previous intermodal networks and information from publicly available data sources to construct a database of potential intermodal transfer locations with likely capability to handle spent nuclear fuel casks. The coding development focused on modifying the existing WebTRAGIS routing code to accommodate intermodal transfers and the selection of

  13. An Intelligent Pictorial Information System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Edward T.; Chang, B.

    1987-05-01

    In examining the history of computer application, we discover that early computer systems were developed primarily for applications related to scientific computation, as in weather prediction, aerospace applications, and nuclear physics applications. At this stage, the computer system served as a big calculator to perform, in the main, manipulation of numbers. Then it was found that computer systems could also be used for business applications, information storage and retrieval, word processing, and report generation. The history of computer application is summarized in Table I. The complexity of pictures makes picture processing much more difficult than number and alphanumerical processing. Therefore, new techniques, new algorithms, and above all, new pictorial knowledge, [1] are needed to overcome the limitatins of existing computer systems. New frontiers in designing computer systems are the ways to handle the representation,[2,3] classification, manipulation, processing, storage, and retrieval of pictures. Especially, the ways to deal with similarity measures and the meaning of the word "approximate" and the phrase "approximate reasoning" are an important and an indispensable part of an intelligent pictorial information system. [4,5] The main objective of this paper is to investigate the mathematical foundation for the effective organization and efficient retrieval of pictures in similarity-directed pictorial databases, [6] based on similarity retrieval techniques [7] and fuzzy languages [8]. The main advantage of this approach is that similar pictures are stored logically close to each other by using quantitative similarity measures. Thus, for answering queries, the amount of picture data needed to be searched can be reduced and the retrieval time can be improved. In addition, in a pictorial database, very often it is desired to find pictures (or feature vectors, histograms, etc.) that are most similar to or most dissimilar [9] to a test picture (or feature

  14. Zone approaches to international safeguards of a nuclear fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Fishbone, L.G.; Higinbotham, W.A.

    1986-01-01

    At present the IAEA designs its safeguards approach with regard to each type of nuclear facility so that the safeguards activities and effort are essentially the same for a given type and size of nuclear facility wherever it may be located. Conclusions regarding a state are derived by combining the results of safeguards verifications for the individual facilities within it. We have examined safeguards approaches for a state nuclear fuel cycle that take into account the existence of all of the nuclear facilities in the state. We have focussed on the fresh-fuel zone of an advanced nuclear fuel cycle, the several facilities of which use or process low-enriched uranium. At one extreme, flows and inventories would be verified at each material balance area. At the other extreme, the flows into and out of the zone and the inventory of the whole zone would be verified. The intention is to develop an approach which will make it possible to compare the technical effectiveness and the inspection effort for the facility-oriented approach, for the zone approach and for some reasonable intermediate safeguards approaches. Technical effectiveness, in these cases, means an estimate of the assurance that all nuclear material has been accounted for.

  15. Nuclear Hybrid Energy Systems: Challenges and Opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    P. Sabharwall; S.B. Sitton; S.J. Yoon; C. Stoots

    2014-07-01

    With growing demand of energy and costs of the fossil fuels, coupled with the environmental concerns have resulted in an increased interest in alternative energy sources. Nuclear hybrid energy systems (NHES) are being considered which incorporates renewable energy sources such as solar and wind energy combined with nuclear reactor and energy storage to meet the peak hours demand imposed on the grid, along with providing process heat for other potential industrial applications. This concept could potentially satisfy various energy demands and improve reliability, robustness and resilience for the entire system as a whole, along with economic and net efficiency gains. This paper provides a brief understanding of potential NHES system and architecture along with the challenges

  16. International Computer and Information Literacy Study: ICILS 2013 User Guide for the International Database

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jung, Michael, Ed.; Carstens, Ralph, Ed.

    2015-01-01

    The International Computer and Information Literacy Study (ICILS) 2013, conducted by the International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IEA), studied how students in different countries develop the knowledge, understanding, attitudes, dispositions, and skills that comprise computer and information literacy (CIL). The aim…

  17. The DOE CTBT R&D effort at Livermore: calibrating to enhance international monitoring for clandestine nuclear explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, S; Harris, D; Mayeda, K; Rodgers, A; Schultz, C; Walters, W; Zucca, J

    1999-04-01

    The Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT), which was signed in 1996 and still needs to be ratified by the US, forbids all nuclear tests and creates an international monitoring system (IMS) to search for evidence of clandestine nuclear explosions. As specified in the treaty, the IMS will consist of 170 seismic stations that record underground elastic waves, 60 infrasound stations to record low-frequency sound waves in the air, 11 hydroacoustic stations to record underwater sound waves, and 80 radionuclide stations to record airborne radionuclide gases or particles. The International Data Center (IDC), located in Vienna, receives data from the IMS system and applies standard event screening criteria to any detected events with the objective of characterizing and highlighting events considered to be consistent with natural phenomena or a non-nuclear man made phenomena. The National Data Center (NDC) for each country must go a step further than the IDC and identify events as consistent with natural phenomena, non-nuclear manmade phenomena, or a banned nuclear test using these monitoring technologies.

  18. Systems and methods for dismantling a nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Heim, Robert R; Adams, Scott Ryan; Cole, Matthew Denver; Kirby, William E; Linnebur, Paul Damon

    2014-10-28

    Systems and methods for dismantling a nuclear reactor are described. In one aspect the system includes a remotely controlled heavy manipulator ("manipulator") operatively coupled to a support structure, and a control station in a non-contaminated portion of a workspace. The support structure provides the manipulator with top down access into a bioshield of a nuclear reactor. At least one computing device in the control station provides remote control to perform operations including: (a) dismantling, using the manipulator, a graphite moderator, concrete walls, and a ceiling of the bioshield, the manipulator being provided with automated access to all internal portions of the bioshield; (b) loading, using the manipulator, contaminated graphite blocks from the graphite core and other components from the bioshield into one or more waste containers; and (c) dispersing, using the manipulator, dust suppression and contamination fixing spray to contaminated matter.

  19. Applied Information Systems. Course Five. Information Systems Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neil, Sharon Lund; Everett, Donna R.

    This course is the fifth of seven in the Information Systems curriculum. The purpose of the course is to build on skills acquired in the earlier courses. It reviews the importance of information to management and the organization and information systems concepts within an office. These components are provided for each task area: behavioral…

  20. Nuclear data needs for advanced reactor systems. A NEA nuclear science committee initiative.

    SciTech Connect

    Salvatores, M.; Aliberti, G.; Palmiotti, G.; Rochman, D.; Oblozinsky, P.; Hermann, M.; Talou, P.; Kawano, T.; Leal, L.; Koning, A.; Kodeli, I.; Nuclear Engineering Division; CEA Cadarache; BNL; LANL; ORNL; NRG-Petten; NEA-Databank

    2008-01-01

    The Working Party on Evaluation Cooperation (WPEC) of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency Nuclear Science Committee has established an International Subgroup to perform an activity in order to develop a systematic approach to define data needs for Gen-IV and, in general, for advanced reactor systems. A methodology, based on sensitivity analysis has been agreed and representative core configurations for Sodium, Gas and Lead cooled Fast Reactors (SFR, GFR, LFR) have been defined as well as a high burn-up VHTR and a high burn-up PWR. In the case of SFRs, both a TRU burner (called in fact SFR) and a core configuration with homogeneous recycling of not separated TRU (called EFR) have been considered. The methodology, the systems considered and the sensitivity approach are consistent with the work reported in ref. [1]. For the present study, the approach has been extended to the ABTR Na-cooled core, recently studied within the GNEP initiative [2]. Sensitivity coefficients (in a 15 energy group structure) have been calculated at ANL with the ERANOS code system [3] for all reactors and for the parameters most sensitive to nuclear data uncertainties: Multiplication factor, Power peak, Burn-up {Delta}k/k, Coolant void reactivity coefficient, Doppler reactivity coefficient, Nuclide density at end of cycle (transmutation potential), Neutron source at fuel fabrication, Dose in a repository.