Science.gov

Sample records for international skeleton tables

  1. Technical aspects of double-skeletonized internal mammary artery grafting.

    PubMed

    Gurevitch, J; Kramer, A; Locker, C; Shapira, I; Paz, Y; Matsa, M; Mohr, R

    2000-03-01

    Bilateral internal mammary artery (IMA) grafting is performed to provide complete arterial myocardial revascularization with the intention of decreasing postoperative return of angina and the need for reoperation. We present here technical views of double-skeletonized IMA grafting, and evaluate its clinical outcome. Skeletonized IMA is harvested gently with scissors and silver clips, without use of cauterization, and embedded in a small syringe filled with papaverine. Three strategies for arterial revascularization were employed in 762 consecutive patients: (1) the cross arrangement (242 patients, 32%), where the in situ right internal mammary artery (RIMA) is used for the left anterior descending artery (LAD), in situ left internal mammary artery (LIMA) to circumflex marginal branches and the gastroepiploic artery for the right coronary artery (RCA); (2) the composite arrangement (476 patients, 62%), where free IMA is attached end-to-side to the other in situ IMA; and (3) the natural arrangement (44 patients, 6%), where the in situ RIMA is connected to the RCA and in situ LIMA to LAD. Mean age was 66 years (range 30 to 92). Two hundred ninety-two patients (38%) were older than 70, and 229 (30%) were diabetic. Operative mortality was 2.5% (n = 19). The mortality of urgent and elective cases was 1.2% (8 of 663), and that of emergency operation was 11% (11 of 99). There were 9 (1.2%) perioperative myocardial infarctions, and 10 patients (1.3%) sustained strokes. Sternal wound infection occurred in 14 (1.8%). The three strategies described here provide the surgeon with the versatility required for arterial revascularization with bilateral IMAs in most patients referred for coronary artery bypass grafting.

  2. Educational Statistics Yearbook. Volume I: International Tables.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, Paris (France).

    This publication presents 41 statistical tables containing data on education in member countries of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). This volume presents international comparative data and is intended for use in the comparative study of educational systems, rather than in the study of education in any one country.…

  3. Topical vasodilator response in skeletonized internal mammary artery: Is there really a difference?

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Syed Raza; Shah, Syed Arbab; Jangda, Muhammad Ahmed; Yaqub, Mohammad Danial; Jangda, Ayesha Altaf; Khan, Maham; Khan, Muhammad Asim; Tomkins, Brian

    2017-01-01

    Aim of the Study: Coronary artery bypass graft surgery is the gold standard for the treatment of multivessel and left main coronary artery disease. However, there is considerable debate that whether left internal mammary artery (IMA) should be taken as pedicled or skeletonized. This study was conducted to assess the difference in blood flow after the application of topical vasodilator in skeletonized and pedicled IMA. Materials and Methods: In this study, each patient underwent either skeletonized (n = 25) or pedicled IMA harvesting (n = 25). The type of graft on each individual patient was decided randomly. Intraoperative variables such as conduit length and blood flow were measured by the surgeon himself. The length of the grafted IMA was carefully determined in vivo, with the proximal and distal ends attached, from the first rib to IMA divergence. The IMA flow was measured on two separate occasions, before and after application of topical vasodilator. Known cases of subclavian artery stenosis and previous sternal radiation were excluded from the study. Results: The blood flow before the application of topical vasodilator was similar in both the groups (P = 0.227). However, the flow was significantly less in pedicled than skeletonized IMA after application of vasodilator (P < 0.0001). Similarly, the length of skeletonized graft was significantly higher than the length of pedicled graft (P < 0.0001). Conclusion: Our study signifies that skeletonization of IMA results in increased graft length and blood flow after the application of topical vasodilator. However, we recommend that long-term clinical trials should be conducted to fully determine long-term patency rates of skeletonized IMA. PMID:28182034

  4. Topical vasodilator response in skeletonized internal mammary artery: Is there really a difference?

    PubMed

    Shah, Syed Raza; Shah, Syed Arbab; Jangda, Muhammad Ahmed; Yaqub, Mohammad Danial; Jangda, Ayesha Altaf; Khan, Maham; Khan, Muhammad Asim; Tomkins, Brian

    2017-01-01

    Coronary artery bypass graft surgery is the gold standard for the treatment of multivessel and left main coronary artery disease. However, there is considerable debate that whether left internal mammary artery (IMA) should be taken as pedicled or skeletonized. This study was conducted to assess the difference in blood flow after the application of topical vasodilator in skeletonized and pedicled IMA. In this study, each patient underwent either skeletonized (n = 25) or pedicled IMA harvesting (n = 25). The type of graft on each individual patient was decided randomly. Intraoperative variables such as conduit length and blood flow were measured by the surgeon himself. The length of the grafted IMA was carefully determined in vivo, with the proximal and distal ends attached, from the first rib to IMA divergence. The IMA flow was measured on two separate occasions, before and after application of topical vasodilator. Known cases of subclavian artery stenosis and previous sternal radiation were excluded from the study. The blood flow before the application of topical vasodilator was similar in both the groups (P = 0.227). However, the flow was significantly less in pedicled than skeletonized IMA after application of vasodilator (P < 0.0001). Similarly, the length of skeletonized graft was significantly higher than the length of pedicled graft (P < 0.0001). Our study signifies that skeletonization of IMA results in increased graft length and blood flow after the application of topical vasodilator. However, we recommend that long-term clinical trials should be conducted to fully determine long-term patency rates of skeletonized IMA.

  5. Histologic and physiologic evaluation of skeletonized internal thoracic artery harvesting with an ultrasonic scalpel.

    PubMed

    Higami, T; Maruo, A; Yamashita, T; Shida, T; Ogawa, K

    2000-12-01

    The safety and reliability of a method of skeletonized internal thoracic artery harvesting with an ultrasonic scalpel (Harmonic Scalpel; Ethicon Endo-Surgery, CVG, Cincinnati, Ohio) were evaluated. The mural branches of the internal thoracic artery were cut by means of 3 methods, differentiated by distance from the site of application of the Harmonic Scalpel blade to the internal thoracic artery. A total of 15 branches were cut from the internal thoracic artery at (0 mm) the origin (group I) or at 1 mm (group II) or 2 mm (group III) distal to the origin. Tissue preparations were examined for successful vessel closure and severity of tissue damage. The length of stump (L) and the length of tissue damage from the stump (D) were determined by a computer image analysis system, and pressure testing was performed to evaluate the physical strength of vessel closure. In group I, 8 of the 15 branches exhibited discontinuity of the vascular wall structure, probably because of insufficient sealing of the divided section, and 12 of the 15 branches exhibited tissue denaturation on the internal thoracic artery wall adjacent to areas of origin, which was probably caused by the heat transferred from the branches during the process of coagulation. In groups II and III, continuity of wall structure of stumps suggestive of stable closure of branches was confirmed. The lengths of tissue damage from the stump (D) were 0.96, 0.58, and 0.63 mm in groups I, II, and III, respectively, and the lengths of intact area (L - D) in the corresponding groups were -0.78, 0.61, and 1.51 mm. The negative figure in group I indicates the presence of tissue damage in the internal thoracic artery itself. By contrast, in groups II and III the internal thoracic arteries were intact, with a safety margin of greater than 0.5 mm. On physiologic evaluation of vessel closure, 2 of the 24 (8.3%) branches burst under a pressure lower than 350 mm Hg because of insufficient vessel coagulation, but the remaining 22

  6. Sternal wound infections in patients after coronary artery bypass grafting using bilateral skeletonized internal mammary arteries.

    PubMed Central

    Sofer, D; Gurevitch, J; Shapira, I; Paz, Y; Matsa, M; Kramer, A; Mohr, R

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study evaluated the risks of sternal wound infections in patients undergoing myocardial revascularization using bilateral skeletonized internal mammary arteries (IMAs). BACKGROUND: The skeletonized IMA is longer than the pedicled one, thus providing the cardiac surgeon with increased versatility for arterial myocardial revascularization without the use of vein grafts. It is isolated from the chest wall gently with scissors and silver clips, and no cauterization is employed. Preservation of collateral blood supply to the sternum and avoidance of thermal injury enable more rapid healing and decrease the risk of sternal wound infection. METHODS: From April 1996 to August 1997, 545 patients underwent arterial myocardial revascularization using bilateral skeletonized IMAs. The right gastroepiploic artery was used in 100 patients (18%). The average age of the patients was 65 years; 431 (79%) were men and 114 (21%) were women; 179 (33%) were older than 70 years of age; 166 (30%) were diabetics. The average number of grafts was 3.2 per patient. RESULTS: The 30-day operative mortality rate was 2% (n = 11). There were six perioperative infarcts (1.1%) and six strokes (1.1%); 9 patients had sternal infection (1.7%) and 15 (2.8%) had superficial infection. Risk factors for sternal infection were chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and emergency operation. Superficial sternal wound infections were more common in women and in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, renal failure, or peripheral vascular disease. The 1-year actuarial survival rate was 97%. Two of the six late deaths were not cardiac-related. Late dehiscence occurred in three patients (0.6%). The death rate (early and late) of patients with any sternal complication was higher than that of patients without those complications (33% vs. 2.7%). CONCLUSIONS: Routine arterial myocardial revascularization using bilateral skeletonized IMAs is safe, and postoperative morbidity and mortality

  7. Can We Believe the International League Tables?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilby, Peter

    2012-01-01

    This article, updated and expanded from one written for "The Times Educational Supplement", 10 December 2010, asks whether politicians are right to quote the country's performance in international tests in support of such policies as re-introducing O levels. It finds reasons to doubt that the tests give an adequate picture of children's…

  8. Assessment of the Impact of Skeletonization on Pleuropulmonary Changes after Bilateral Internal Thoracic Artery Harvest for Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting.

    PubMed

    Dennie, C J; Oikonomou, A; Thornhill, R; Rubens, F D

    2016-09-01

    Skeletonization has been proposed as a technique to minimize the risk of sternal devascularization during bilateral internal thoracic artery harvest for coronary artery bypass grafting. The impact of this strategy on late radiologic pleuropulmonary changes has not been addressed. Post-operative chest radiographs from patients (n = 253 per group) undergoing bilateral internal thoracic artery harvest using skeletonized and non-skeletonized techniques were reviewed by blinded radiologists. The primary outcome was the incidence of atelectasis and pleural effusion. Multivariable linear regression models were derived to assess the relationship of radiologic pleuropulmonary outcomes to patients and operative variables. Patients in the skeletonized group were older (p < 0.0001), had a lower preoperative hematocrit (p = 0.014), had higher prevalence of peripheral vascular disease (p = 0.001), were of female gender (p = 0.015), underwent off-pump surgery (p < 0.001), had urgent/emergent status (p = 0.024), and had chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (p = 0.019). There was no difference in the incidence of post-operative complications, ventilation time, or intensive care unit stay. There was no difference in the severity of post-operative atelectasis in both groups. More patients in the non-skeletonized group had a grade 2/3 left pleural effusion on the late post-operative chest X-ray (p = 0.007). The independent effect of skeletonization on the development of a late left pleural effusion was significant (odds ratio = 0.558, 95% confidence interval = 0.359-0.866, p = 0.009). Skeletonization results in a decreased incidence of late post-operative left pleural effusion with no difference in early or late atelectasis. Further studies are warranted to assess the mechanism of these pleuropulmonary changes and the impact of other factors such as pleural violation during surgery. © The Finnish Surgical Society 2015.

  9. A principal component analysis of the relationship between the external body shape and internal skeleton for the upper body.

    PubMed

    Nerot, A; Skalli, W; Wang, X

    2016-10-03

    Recent progress in 3D scanning technologies allows easy access to 3D human body envelope. To create personalized human models with an articulated linkage for realistic re-posturing and motion analyses, an accurate estimation of internal skeleton points, including joint centers, from the external envelope is required. For this research project, 3D reconstructions of both internal skeleton and external envelope from low dose biplanar X-rays of 40 male adults were obtained. Using principal component analysis technique (PCA), a low-dimensional dataset was used to predict internal points of the upper body from the trunk envelope. A least squares method was used to find PC scores that fit the PCA-based model to the envelope of a new subject. To validate the proposed approach, estimated internal points were evaluated using a leave-one-out (LOO) procedure, i.e. successively considering each individual from our dataset as an extra-subject. In addition, different methods were proposed to reduce the variability in data and improve the performance of the PCA-based prediction. The best method was considered as the one providing the smallest errors between estimated and reference internal points with an average error of 8.3mm anterior-posteriorly, 6.7mm laterally and 6.5mm vertically. As the proposed approach relies on few or no bony landmarks, it could be easily applicable and generalizable to surface scans from any devices. Combined with automatic body scanning techniques, this study could potentially constitute a new step towards automatic generation of external/internal subject-specific manikins.

  10. Pedicled and skeletonized single and bilateral internal thoracic artery grafts and the incidence of sternal wound complications: Insights from the Arterial Revascularization Trial.

    PubMed

    Benedetto, Umberto; Altman, Douglas G; Gerry, Stephen; Gray, Alastair; Lees, Belinda; Pawlaczyk, Rafal; Flather, Marcus; Taggart, David P

    2016-07-01

    The question of whether skeletonized internal thoracic artery harvesting reduces the incidence of sternal wound complications in comparison with the pedicled technique, in the context of single or bilateral internal thoracic arteries, remains controversial. We studied the impact of the internal thoracic artery harvesting strategy on sternal wound complication in the Arterial Revascularization Trial. Patients enrolled in the Arterial Revascularization Trial (n = 3102) were randomized to coronary artery bypass grafting with single or bilateral internal thoracic arteries. Sternal wound complication rates were examined according to the harvesting technique that was documented in 2056 patients. The internal thoracic artery harvesting technique, based on the surgeon's preference, resulted in 4 groups: pedicled single internal thoracic artery (n = 607), pedicled bilateral internal thoracic artery (n = 459), skeletonized single internal thoracic artery (n = 512), and skeletonized bilateral internal thoracic artery (n = 478). Propensity scores weighting was used to estimate the impact of the harvesting technique on sternal wound complications. A total of 219 of 2056 patients (10.6%) experienced a sternal wound complication within 1 year from the index operation. Of those, only 25 patients (1.2%) required sternal wound reconstruction. Pedicled bilateral internal thoracic artery (odds ratio [OR], 1.80; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.23-2.63) but not skeletonized bilateral internal thoracic artery (OR, 1.00; 95% CI, 0.65-1.53) or skeletonized single internal thoracic artery (OR, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.57-1.38) was associated with a significantly increased risk of any sternal wound complications compared with pedicled single internal thoracic artery. The present Arterial Revascularization Trial substudy suggests that, with a skeletonization technique, the risk of sternal wound complication with bilateral internal thoracic artery grafting is similar to that after standard

  11. 40 CFR Table 26 to Subpart G of... - Seal Related Factors for Internal Floating Roof Vessels

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Seal Related Factors for Internal..., and Wastewater Pt. 63, Subpt. G, Table 26 Table 26 to Subpart G of Part 63—Seal Related Factors for Internal Floating Roof Vessels Seal type KS n Liquid mounted resilient seal: Primary seal only 3.0 0...

  12. 40 CFR Table 26 to Subpart G of... - Seal Related Factors for Internal Floating Roof Vessels

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Seal Related Factors for Internal..., and Wastewater Pt. 63, Subpt. G, Table 26 Table 26 to Subpart G of Part 63—Seal Related Factors for Internal Floating Roof Vessels Seal type KS n Liquid mounted resilient seal: Primary seal only 3.0 0...

  13. 40 CFR Table 26 to Subpart G of... - Seal Related Factors for Internal Floating Roof Vessels

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Seal Related Factors for Internal..., and Wastewater Pt. 63, Subpt. G, Table 26 Table 26 to Subpart G of Part 63—Seal Related Factors for Internal Floating Roof Vessels Seal type KS n Liquid mounted resilient seal: Primary seal only 3.0 0...

  14. Skeletonized versus pedicled internal thoracic artery and risk of sternal wound infection after coronary bypass surgery: meta-analysis and meta-regression of 4817 patients

    PubMed Central

    Sá, Michel Pompeu Barros de Oliveira; Ferraz, Paulo Ernando; Escobar, Rodrigo Renda; Vasconcelos, Frederico Pires; Ferraz, Álvaro Antonio Bandeira; Braile, Domingo Marcolino; Lima, Ricardo Carvalho

    2013-01-01

    It is suggested that the internal thoracic artery (ITA) harvesting technique influences the incidence of sternal wound infection (SWI) after coronary artery bypass graft (CABG). To determine if there is any real difference between skeletonized vs pedicled ITA, we performed a meta-analysis to determine if there is any real difference between these two established techniques in terms of SWI. We performed a systematic review using MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL/CCTR, SciELO, LILACS, Google Scholar and reference lists of relevant articles to search for studies that compared the incidence of SWI after CABG between skeletonized vs pedicled ITA until June 2012. The principal summary measures were odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) and P values (statistically significant when <0.05). The ORs were combined across studies using the weighted DerSimonian–Laird random effects model and weighted Mantel–Haenszel fixed effects. Meta-analysis, sensitivity analysis and meta-regression were completed using the software Comprehensive Meta-Analysis version 2 (Biostat, Inc., Englewood, NJ, USA). Twenty-two studies involving 4817 patients (2424 skeletonized; 2393 pedicled) met the eligibility criteria. There was no evidence for important heterogeneity of effects among the studies. The overall OR (95% CI) of SWI showed a statistically significant difference in favour of skeletonized ITA (fixed effect model: OR 0.443, 95% CI 0.323–0.608, P < 0.001; random effect model: OR 0.443, 95% CI 0.323–0.608, P < 0.001). In the sensitivity analysis, the difference in favour of skeletonized ITA was also observed in subgroups such as diabetic, bilateral ITA and diabetic with bilateral ITA; we also observed that there was a difference in the type of study, since non-randomized studies together demonstrated the benefit of skeletonized ITA in comparison with pedicled ITA, but the randomized studies together did not show this difference (although close to statistical significance and with

  15. Orbiter's Skeleton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The structure of NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft is constructed from composite panels of carbon layers over aluminum honeycomb, lightweight yet strong. This forms a basic structure or skeleton on which the instruments, electronics, propulsion and power systems can be mounted. The propellant tank is contained in the center of the orbiter's structure. This photo was taken at Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver, during construction of the spacecraft.

  16. [Comparative analysis of cosmonauts skeleton changes after space flights on orbital station Mir and international space station and possibilities of prognosis for interplanetary missions].

    PubMed

    Oganov, V S; Bogomolov, V V; Bakulin, A V; Novikov, V E; Kabitskaia, O E; Murashko, L M; Morgun, V V; Kasparskiĭ, R R

    2010-01-01

    A summary of investigations results of human bone tissue changes in space flight on the orbital station (OS) Mir and international space station (ISS) using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) is given. Results comparative analysis revealed an absence of significant differences in bone mass (BM) changes on the both OS. Theoretically expected BM loss was observed in bone trabecular structure of skeleton low part after space flight lasting 5-7 month. The BM losses are qualified in some cases as quicly developed but reversible osteopenia and generally interpreted as evidence of bone functional adaptation to the alterating mechanical loading. It was demonstrated the high individual variability BM loss amplitudes. Simultaneously was observed the individual pattern of BM loss distribution across different segments of skeleton after repetitive flights independently upon type of OS. In according with the above mentioned individual peculiarities it was impossible to establish the dependence of BM changes upon duration of space missions. Therefore we have not sufficiently data for calculation of probability to achive the critical demineralization level by the augmentation the space mission duration till 1.5-2 years. It is more less possibility of the bone quality changes prognosis, which in the aggregate with BM losses determines the bone fracture risk. It become clearly that DXA technology is unsuffitiently for this purpose. It is considered the main direction which may optimized the elaboration of the interplanetary project meaning the perfectly safe of skeleton mechanical function.

  17. 40 CFR Table 26 to Subpart G of... - Seal Related Factors for Internal Floating Roof Vessels

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Seal Related Factors for Internal Floating Roof Vessels 26 Table 26 to Subpart G of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Internal Floating Roof Vessels Seal type KS n Liquid mounted resilient seal: Primary seal only 3.0 0...

  18. ISTP CDF Skeleton Editor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chimiak, Reine; Harris, Bernard; Williams, Phillip

    2013-01-01

    Basic Common Data Format (CDF) tools (e.g., cdfedit) provide no specific support for creating International Solar-Terrestrial Physics/Space Physics Data Facility (ISTP/SPDF) standard files. While it is possible for someone who is familiar with the ISTP/SPDF metadata guidelines to create compliant files using just the basic tools, the process is error-prone and unreasonable for someone without ISTP/SPDF expertise. The key problem is the lack of a tool with specific support for creating files that comply with the ISTP/SPDF guidelines. There are basic CDF tools such as cdfedit and skeletoncdf for creating CDF files, but these have no specific support for creating ISTP/ SPDF compliant files. The SPDF ISTP CDF skeleton editor is a cross-platform, Java-based GUI editor program that allows someone with only a basic understanding of the ISTP/SPDF guidelines to easily create compliant files. The editor is a simple graphical user interface (GUI) application for creating and editing ISTP/SPDF guideline-compliant skeleton CDF files. The SPDF ISTP CDF skeleton editor consists of the following components: A swing-based Java GUI program, JavaHelp-based manual/ tutorial, Image/Icon files, and HTML Web page for distribution. The editor is available as a traditional Java desktop application as well as a Java Network Launching Protocol (JNLP) application. Once started, it functions like a typical Java GUI file editor application for creating/editing application-unique files.

  19. Comparison of direct effects of clinically available vasodilators; nitroglycerin, nifedipine, cilnidipine and diltiazem, on human skeletonized internal mammary harvested with ultrasonic scalpel.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Shoji; Nakamura, Yuji; Egi, Koso; Fujioka, Shunichiro; Nagasaka, Satoshi; Minh, Pham Ngoc; Toguchi, Koji; Wada, Takeshi; Izumi-Nakaseko, Hiroko; Ando, Kentaro; Mizoue, Tetsuya; Takazawa, Kenji; Hosaka, Shigeru; Sugiyama, Atsushi

    2016-10-01

    Direct vasodilator effects of nitroglycerin, nifedipine, cilnidipine and diltiazem on human skeletonized internal mammary artery graft harvested with ultrasonic scalpel were assessed in the presence of 0.1 or 0.2 µM of noradrenaline. Ring preparations were made of distal end section of the bypass grafts, and those dilated by acetylcholine were used for assessment. Each drug dilated the artery in a concentration-related manner (0.01-10 µM, n = 6 for each drug) with a potency of nitroglycerin > nifedipine = cilnidipine > diltiazem. These results indicate that nitroglycerin can be useful for treating internal mammary artery spasm, that clinical utility of diltiazem may not depend on its vasodilator effect on the bypass graft, and that cilnidipine as well as nifedipine will have anti-spastic action which is in the middle between those of nitroglycerine and diltiazem.

  20. 40 CFR Table 28 to Subpart G of... - Deck Seam Length Factors a (SD) for Internal Floating Roof Tanks

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Deck Seam Length Factors a (SD) for Internal Floating Roof Tanks 28 Table 28 to Subpart G of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL..., and Wastewater Pt. 63, Subpt. G, Table 28 Table 28 to Subpart G of Part 63—Deck Seam Length Factors a...

  1. 40 CFR Table 28 to Subpart G of... - Deck Seam Length Factors a (SD) for Internal Floating Roof Tanks

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Deck Seam Length Factors a (SD) for Internal Floating Roof Tanks 28 Table 28 to Subpart G of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL..., and Wastewater Pt. 63, Subpt. G, Table 28 Table 28 to Subpart G of Part 63—Deck Seam Length Factors a...

  2. 40 CFR Table 28 to Subpart G of... - Deck Seam Length Factors a (SD) for Internal Floating Roof Tanks

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Deck Seam Length Factors a (SD) for Internal Floating Roof Tanks 28 Table 28 to Subpart G of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL..., and Wastewater Pt. 63, Subpt. G, Table 28 Table 28 to Subpart G of Part 63—Deck Seam Length Factors a...

  3. 40 CFR Table 28 to Subpart G of... - Deck Seam Length Factors a (SD) for Internal Floating Roof Tanks

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Deck Seam Length Factors a (SD) for Internal Floating Roof Tanks 28 Table 28 to Subpart G of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL..., and Wastewater Pt. 63, Subpt. G, Table 28 Table 28 to Subpart G of Part 63—Deck Seam Length Factors a...

  4. Dematin, a Component of the Erythrocyte Membrane Skeleton, Is Internalized by the Malaria Parasite and Associates with Plasmodium 14-3-3*

    PubMed Central

    Lalle, Marco; Currà, Chiara; Ciccarone, Fabio; Pace, Tomasino; Cecchetti, Serena; Fantozzi, Luca; Ay, Bernhard; Breton, Catherine Braun; Ponzi, Marta

    2011-01-01

    The malaria parasite invades the terminally differentiated erythrocytes, where it grows and multiplies surrounded by a parasitophorous vacuole. Plasmodium blood stages translocate newly synthesized proteins outside the parasitophorous vacuole and direct them to various erythrocyte compartments, including the cytoskeleton and the plasma membrane. Here, we show that the remodeling of the host cell directed by the parasite also includes the recruitment of dematin, an actin-binding protein of the erythrocyte membrane skeleton and its repositioning to the parasite. Internalized dematin was found associated with Plasmodium 14-3-3, which belongs to a family of conserved multitask molecules. We also show that, in vitro, the dematin-14-3-3 interaction is strictly dependent on phosphorylation of dematin at Ser124 and Ser333, belonging to two 14-3-3 putative binding motifs. This study is the first report showing that a component of the erythrocyte spectrin-based membrane skeleton is recruited by the malaria parasite following erythrocyte infection. PMID:21084299

  5. International board-foot volume tables for trees in the Susitna River Basin, Alaska.

    Treesearch

    Frederic R. Larson

    1990-01-01

    International 1/4-inch board-foot volume equations and tables were derived from fall, buck, and scale data for 374 trees at 78 locations in the Susitna River Basin, Alaska. Tree species included white and black spruce, paper birch, black cottonwood, and quaking aspen.

  6. Language and International Studies. Georgetown University Round Table on Languages and Linguistics 1973.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jankowsky, Kurt R., Ed.

    "Language and International Studies" is the theme of the 20 papers which appear in this volume and which were presented at the 24th annual Round Table meeting held in March 1973. In addition, the paper of one absent panelist, Wolfgang Kuhlwein, is included. The first panel, consisting of Kuhlwein, Leopold Engels, James Harris, Terence Langendoen,…

  7. Language and International Studies. Georgetown University Round Table on Languages and Linguistics 1973.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jankowsky, Kurt R., Ed.

    "Language and International Studies" is the theme of the 20 papers which appear in this volume and which were presented at the 24th annual Round Table meeting held in March 1973. In addition, the paper of one absent panelist, Wolfgang Kuhlwein, is included. The first panel, consisting of Kuhlwein, Leopold Engels, James Harris, Terence Langendoen,…

  8. Erythrocyte membrane skeleton inhibits nanoparticle endocytosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xinli; Yue, Tongtao; Tian, Falin; Liu, Zhiping; Zhang, Xianren

    2017-06-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs), also called erythrocytes, have been experimentally proposed in recent decades as the biological drug delivery systems through entrapping certain drugs by endocytosis. However, the internalization pathway of endocytosis seems to conflict with the robust mechanical properties of RBCs that is induced by the spectrin-actin network of erythrocyte membrane skeleton. In this work, we employed a minimum realistic model and the dissipative particle dynamics method to investigate the influence of the spectrin-actin membrane skeleton on the internalization of nanoparticles (NPs). Our simulations show that the existence of skeleton meshwork indeed induces an inhibiting effect that effectively prevents NPs from internalization. The inhibiting effect is found to depend on the membrane-NP attraction, skeleton tension and relative size of the NP to the membrane skeleton mesh. However, our simulations also demonstrate that there are two possibilities for successful internalization of NPs in the presence of the membrane skeleton. The first case is for NPs that has a much smaller size than the dimension of skeleton meshes, and the other is that the skeleton tension is rather weak so that the formed vesicle can still move inward for NP internalization.

  9. A new way to experience the International Gastric Cancer Association Congress: the Web Round Tables.

    PubMed

    Morgagni, Paolo; Verlato, Giuseppe; Marrelli, Daniele; Roviello, Franco; de Manzoni, Giovanni

    2014-10-01

    In an attempt to attract a wider diversity of professionals to the 10th International Gastric Cancer Association Congress (IGCC) held in June 2013, the Scientific Committee of the conference organized a number of pre-congress Web Round Tables to discuss cutting-edge topics relating to gastric cancer treatment. Twenty Web Round Tables, each coordinated by a different chairman, were proposed on the IGCC Website 1 year before the congress. Each chairman identified a number of studies related to the theme of his/her Round Table and invited corresponding authors to send an update of their conclusions in light of their subsequent experience, which would then form the basis of discussion of the Web Round Tables. The chairmen posted several questions regarding these updates on the web and opened a forum for a period of 1-2 months. The forum was free and specifically intended for congress participants. Fifty-one (9.9 %) of the 516 authors contacted took part in the initiative. Two hundred fifty participants from 21 countries joined the forum discussion and posted 671 comments. The Web Round Tables were viewed 15,810 times while the forum was open. Overall, the Web Round Tables aroused considerable interest, especially among young professionals working in the area of gastric cancer who had the opportunity to contact and interact with experts in what often turned out to be an interesting and lively exchange of views. All the discussions are now freely available for consultation on the IGCC website. The Web Round Table experience was presented, with great success, during the conference at special afternoon sessions.

  10. X-ray - skeleton

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003381.htm X-ray - skeleton To use the sharing features on this page, ... ray views may be uncomfortable. If the whole skeleton is being imaged, the test usually takes 1 ...

  11. Revised tables of airspeed, altitude, and Mach number presented in the International system of units

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benner, M. S.; Sawyer, R. H.

    1973-01-01

    Because inception of a national program to implement the International System of Units (SI) appears to be inevitable and imminent, the tables of airspeed, altitude, and Mach number prepared by Livingston and Gracey to serve for airspeed meter and altimeter calibrations and for the conversion of flight measurements of these quantities to related parameters - Mach number, true airspeed, equivalent airspeed, etc. - have been revised to the SI. Tables of airspeed in knots are also included because of the significance of this quantity in navigation. In addition, the data in the altitude tables have been revised to the U.S. Standard Atmosphere of 1962. The latter data reflect increased knowledge of the higher atmosphere and more precise determination of basic quantities, including the redefinition of the absolute thermodynamic temperature scale by the Tenth General Conference on Weights and Measures in 1954. The U.S. Standard Atmosphere, 1962, corresponds to the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) Standard Atmosphere up to 20 kilometers (geopotential altitude). A table of conversion factors for various pressure units is presented in SI Units.

  12. [Skeleton extractions and applications].

    SciTech Connect

    Quadros, William Roshan

    2010-05-01

    This paper focuses on the extraction of skeletons of CAD models and its applications in finite element (FE) mesh generation. The term 'skeleton of a CAD model' can be visualized as analogous to the 'skeleton of a human body'. The skeletal representations covered in this paper include medial axis transform (MAT), Voronoi diagram (VD), chordal axis transform (CAT), mid surface, digital skeletons, and disconnected skeletons. In the literature, the properties of a skeleton have been utilized in developing various algorithms for extracting skeletons. Three main approaches include: (1) the bisection method where the skeleton exists at equidistant from at least two points on boundary, (2) the grassfire propagation method in which the skeleton exists where the opposing fronts meet, and (3) the duality method where the skeleton is a dual of the object. In the last decade, the author has applied different skeletal representations in all-quad meshing, hex meshing, mid-surface meshing, mesh size function generation, defeaturing, and decomposition. A brief discussion on the related work from other researchers in the area of tri meshing, tet meshing, and anisotropic meshing is also included. This paper concludes by summarizing the strengths and weaknesses of the skeleton-based approaches in solving various geometry-centered problems in FE mesh generation. The skeletons have proved to be a great shape abstraction tool in analyzing the geometric complexity of CAD models as they are symmetric, simpler (reduced dimension), and provide local thickness information. However, skeletons generally require some cleanup, and stability and sensitivity of the skeletons should be controlled during extraction. Also, selecting a suitable application-specific skeleton and a computationally efficient method of extraction is critical.

  13. 40 CFR Table 28 to Subpart G of... - Deck Seam Length Factors a (SD) for Internal Floating Roof Tanks

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Deck Seam Length Factors a (SD) for..., and Wastewater Pt. 63, Subpt. G, Table 28 Table 28 to Subpart G of Part 63—Deck Seam Length Factors a (SD) for Internal Floating Roof Tanks Deck construction Typical deck seam length factor...

  14. INTERNATIONAL NEWS: CPEM 2006 round table discussion 'Proposed changes to the SI'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, Michael; Witt, Thomas J.

    2006-12-01

    This report summarizes a round table session held last July at the CPEM 2006 to discuss recently proposed redefinitions of some base units of the International System of Units (SI) based on defined values of some fundamental constants. The aim of the session was to inform CPEM delegates of the various proposals and to promote a wide discussion of the issues arising from them. An interdisciplinary panel of six experts from national metrology institutes, the academic community and the industrial metrology community briefly presented their views and their concerns. The presentations were followed by a session in which the panel answered questions and heard comments from the audience.

  15. The Skeletons' Halloween

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bourque, Simone

    2010-01-01

    Mexican printer Jose Guadalupe Posada's (1851-1913) numerous prints of "calaveras" gave vast popularity to skeleton figures through his satirical and politically critical renditions of skeletons engaged in daily activities. They are oftentimes represented in festive and playful posturing. Calaveras have now become the most original trait…

  16. The Skeletons' Halloween

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bourque, Simone

    2010-01-01

    Mexican printer Jose Guadalupe Posada's (1851-1913) numerous prints of "calaveras" gave vast popularity to skeleton figures through his satirical and politically critical renditions of skeletons engaged in daily activities. They are oftentimes represented in festive and playful posturing. Calaveras have now become the most original trait…

  17. Making the Best of a World Dominated by League Tables? New Developments in the International Ranking of Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Observatory on Borderless Higher Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Two interesting initiatives have started to develop more balanced international league tables of universities. The first initiative is being taken by UK magazine the Times Higher Education (THE), which recently entered into a collaboration with both the international academic community and research-metrics company Thomsons Reuters to create an…

  18. Making the Best of a World Dominated by League Tables? New Developments in the International Ranking of Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Observatory on Borderless Higher Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Two interesting initiatives have started to develop more balanced international league tables of universities. The first initiative is being taken by UK magazine the Times Higher Education (THE), which recently entered into a collaboration with both the international academic community and research-metrics company Thomsons Reuters to create an…

  19. Development of landsat-5 thematic mapper internal calibrator gain and offset table

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barsi, J.A.; Chander, G.; Micijevic, E.; Markham, B.L.; Haque, Md. O.

    2008-01-01

    The National Landsat Archive Production System (NLAPS) has been the primary processing system for Landsat data since U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Earth Resources Observation and Science Center (EROS) started archiving Landsat data. NLAPS converts raw satellite data into radiometrically and geometrically calibrated products. NLAPS has historically used the Internal Calibrator (IC) to calibrate the reflective bands of the Landsat-5 Thematic Mapper (TM), even though the lamps in the IC were less stable than the TM detectors, as evidenced by vicarious calibration results. In 2003, a major effort was made to model the actual TM gain change and to update NLAPS to use this model rather than the unstable IC data for radiometric calibration. The model coefficients were revised in 2007 to reflect greater understanding of the changes in the TM responsivity. While the calibration updates are important to users with recently processed data, the processing system no longer calculates the original IC gain or offset. For specific applications, it is useful to have a record of the gain and offset actually applied to the older data. Thus, the NLAPS calibration database was used to generate estimated daily values for the radiometric gain and offset that might have been applied to TM data. This paper discusses the need for and generation of the NLAPSIC gain and offset tables. A companion paper covers the application of and errors associated with using these tables.

  20. Proceedings of the International Round Table on Vocational Training and Employment (Turin, Italy, June 17-20, 1991).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Istituto per lo Sviluppo della Formazione Professionale dei Lavoratori, Rome (Italy).

    Eleven papers are presented from the International Round Table on Vocational Training and Employment. Introductory materials are the program and list of participants. The papers are as follows: "Evolution de la Formation Professionnelle en Afrique et Contribution du Ciadfor au Cours de la Derniere Decennie" (in French); "Educacion,…

  1. Proceedings of the International Round Table on Vocational Training and Employment (Turin, Italy, June 17-20, 1991).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Istituto per lo Sviluppo della Formazione Professionale dei Lavoratori, Rome (Italy).

    Eleven papers are presented from the International Round Table on Vocational Training and Employment. Introductory materials are the program and list of participants. The papers are as follows: "Evolution de la Formation Professionnelle en Afrique et Contribution du Ciadfor au Cours de la Derniere Decennie" (in French); "Educacion,…

  2. Investigating the Human Skeleton.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slesnick, Irwin L.

    1982-01-01

    Instructions are provided for assembly of a pull-out, two-sided picture puzzle of the skeleton of a seven-year-old girl. Suggestions for activities using the assembled puzzle and comments on bones and bone morphology are also provided. (Author/JN)

  3. Investigating the Human Skeleton.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slesnick, Irwin L.

    1982-01-01

    Instructions are provided for assembly of a pull-out, two-sided picture puzzle of the skeleton of a seven-year-old girl. Suggestions for activities using the assembled puzzle and comments on bones and bone morphology are also provided. (Author/JN)

  4. 25 CFR 542.12 - What are the minimum internal control standards for table games?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... games? 542.12 Section 542.12 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HUMAN... table games? (a) Computer applications. For any computer applications utilized, alternate documentation... and count. The procedures for the collection of the table game drop and the count thereof shall...

  5. 25 CFR 542.12 - What are the minimum internal control standards for table games?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... games? 542.12 Section 542.12 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HUMAN... table games? (a) Computer applications. For any computer applications utilized, alternate documentation... and count. The procedures for the collection of the table game drop and the count thereof shall...

  6. 25 CFR 542.12 - What are the minimum internal control standards for table games?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... games? 542.12 Section 542.12 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HUMAN... table games? (a) Computer applications. For any computer applications utilized, alternate documentation... and count. The procedures for the collection of the table game drop and the count thereof shall...

  7. 25 CFR 542.12 - What are the minimum internal control standards for table games?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... games? 542.12 Section 542.12 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HUMAN... table games? (a) Computer applications. For any computer applications utilized, alternate documentation... and count. The procedures for the collection of the table game drop and the count thereof shall...

  8. 25 CFR 542.12 - What are the minimum internal control standards for table games?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... games? 542.12 Section 542.12 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HUMAN... table games? (a) Computer applications. For any computer applications utilized, alternate documentation... and count. The procedures for the collection of the table game drop and the count thereof shall...

  9. About the International System of Units (SI) Part III. SI Table

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aubrecht, Gordon J., II; French, Anthony P.; Iona, Mario

    2012-01-01

    Before discussing more details of SI, we will summarize the essentials in a few tables that can serve as ready references. If a unit isn't listed in Tables I-IV, it is not part of SI or specifically allowed for use with SI. The units and symbols that are sufficient for most everyday applications are given in bold.

  10. [Wooden models of human skeleton made in Edo era, Japan, with special reference to Hoshino wooden skeleton].

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Katsuko; Suzaki, Etsuko; Ajima, Noriaki

    2006-03-01

    The wooden model of the human skeleton, called wooden skeleton, is a distinguished original craft object in Edo era (1600-1867), Japan, when medical doctors were unable to keep the human skeleton for their study and teaching purpose. There are three kinds of wooden skeletons, i. e. Hoshino, Kagami and Okuda wooden skeletons made in 1792, 1810 and 1820, respectively. The former two are of adult male and the latter of female. They were made in surprising accuracy as compared with figures appeared in medical books available in Japan at that time, which suggests scientific readiness of the doctors and skills of the craftsmen. A complete set of the skeleton, except for the hyoid bone, has been preserved for Hoshino and Okuda wooden skeletons, while several bones have been missing in Kagami wooden skeleton. Each bone of Hoshino and Kagami wooden skeletons was made separately and connected by a tenon and a corresponding mortise at the articular surface. So it is hardly considered that all wooden bones were assembled into the whole body skeleton on use. Okuda wooden skeleton, on the other hand, was made for being shown in sitting position. The skull of Hoshino wooden skeleton is of special interest: the skull cap is not open, yet the internal structures of the skull, such as the sella turcica, foramina for nerves and vessels, and sulci for venous sinuses were made in considerable accuracy. Moreover, the proper connection of most foramina was proved between the inside and outside of the skull. The skull caps of Kagami and Okuda wooden skeletons are open as those used in the modern medical education.

  11. The Hoshino wooden skeleton, the first wooden model of a human skeleton, made during the Edo era in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Katsuko; Suzaki, Etsuko; Ajima, Noriaki

    2007-03-01

    The wooden model of the human skeleton, called the wooden skeleton, is a distinguished original craft object from the Edo era, in Japan, when medical doctors were unable to keep a human skeleton for study and teaching purposes. There are three types of wooden skeletons: (i) Hoshino made in 1792; (ii) Kagami made by 1810; and (iii) Okuda made around 1820. The former two are of adult males and the latter is of a female. The wooden skeletons were made with surprising accuracy compared with figures that appeared in the medical books available in Japan at that time, which suggests a scientific readiness of the doctors and the skill of the craftsmen. In the cases of the Hoshino and Kagami wooden skeletons, it is hard to consider that all wooden bones were assembled to show the entire body. Conversely, the Okuda wooden skeletons were made for showing in the sitting position. The skull of the Hoshino wooden skeleton is of special interest: the skull cap was not cut, yet the internal structures of the skull, such as the sella turcica, foramina for nerves and vessels, and the sulci for venous sinuses, were made with considerable accuracy. The skull caps of the Kagami and Okuda wooden skeletons were cut, as those used in modern medical education.

  12. 40 CFR Table 27 to Subpart G of... - Summary of Internal Floating Deck Fitting Loss Factors (KF) and Typical Number of Fittings (NF)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Summary of Internal Floating Deck... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL... Vents, Storage Vessels, Transfer Operations, and Wastewater Pt. 63, Subpt. G, Table 27 Table 27 to...

  13. 40 CFR Table 27 to Subpart G of... - Summary of Internal Floating Deck Fitting Loss Factors (KF) and Typical Number of Fittings (NF)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Summary of Internal Floating Deck... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL... Vents, Storage Vessels, Transfer Operations, and Wastewater Pt. 63, Subpt. G, Table 27 Table 27 to...

  14. 40 CFR Table 27 to Subpart G of... - Summary of Internal Floating Deck Fitting Loss Factors (KF) and Typical Number of Fittings (NF)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Summary of Internal Floating Deck... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL... Vents, Storage Vessels, Transfer Operations, and Wastewater Pt. 63, Subpt. G, Table 27 Table 27 to...

  15. 40 CFR Table 27 to Subpart G of... - Summary of Internal Floating Deck Fitting Loss Factors (KF) and Typical Number of Fittings (NF)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Summary of Internal Floating Deck... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL... Vents, Storage Vessels, Transfer Operations, and Wastewater Pt. 63, Subpt. G, Table 27 Table 27 to...

  16. Learning about Skeletons and Other Organ Systems of Vertebrate Animals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tunnicliffe, Sue Dale; Reiss, Michael

    1999-01-01

    Describes students' (n=175) understandings of the structure of animal (including human) skeletons and the internal organs found in them. Finds that older students have a better knowledge of animals' internal anatomies, although knowledge of human internal structure is significantly better than knowledge of rat, bird, and fish internal structure.…

  17. Learning about Skeletons and Other Organ Systems of Vertebrate Animals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tunnicliffe, Sue Dale; Reiss, Michael

    1999-01-01

    Describes students' (n=175) understandings of the structure of animal (including human) skeletons and the internal organs found in them. Finds that older students have a better knowledge of animals' internal anatomies, although knowledge of human internal structure is significantly better than knowledge of rat, bird, and fish internal structure.…

  18. [WHAT SKELETONS TELL US].

    PubMed

    Catalano, Paola

    2015-01-01

    The recent excavations carried out by the Superintendence for the Colosseum, the Roman National Museum and the Archaeological Area of Rome allowed to uncover a large number of burial grounds of Imperial Age. In this work we present the data for 11 cemeteries scattered throughout the Suburbiumn, dating between 1st and 3rd centuries AD. A whole sample of 6061 tombs has been investigated and 5280 skeletons were anthropologically analyzed. All the field data have been scored in appropriate standardized charts in order to make easy their storage and processing in a dedicated database.

  19. The skeleton in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goode, A. W.; Rambaut, P. C.

    1985-01-01

    Calcium loss experience by astronauts under weightless conditions is discussed. I-125 photon absorption measurements on astronauts on the Apollo 14, 15, and 16 flights showed bone density decreases of 6.6 percent in one astronaut and 7.3 percent in another. The estimated total body calcium loss on Apollo 17 was 0.2 percent. The test results indicate that calcium losses occur mainly from the weight-bearing parts of the skeleton. Measures to counteract the losses include 'penguin' suits, maintenance of nutrient intakes at high levels, and extensive exercise on ergometer and treadmill.

  20. Path similarity skeleton graph matching.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xiang; Latecki, Longin Jan

    2008-07-01

    This paper presents a novel framework to for shape recognition based on object silhouettes. The main idea is to match skeleton graphs by comparing the shortest paths between skeleton endpoints. In contrast to typical tree or graph matching methods, we completely ignore the topological graph structure. Our approach is motivated by the fact that visually similar skeleton graphs may have completely different topological structures. The proposed comparison of shortest paths between endpoints of skeleton graphs yields correct matching results in such cases. The skeletons are pruned by contour partitioning with Discrete Curve Evolution, which implies that the endpoints of skeleton branches correspond to visual parts of the objects. The experimental results demonstrate that our method is able to produce correct results in the presence of articulations, stretching, and occlusion.

  1. TOC: Table of Contents Practices of Primary Journals--Recommendations for Monolingual, Multilingual and International Journals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juhasz, Stephen; And Others

    Table of contents (TOC) practices of some 120 primary journals were analyzed. The journals were randomly selected. The method of randomization is described. The samples were selected from a university library with a holding of approximately 12,000 titles published worldwide. A questionnaire was designed. Purpose was to find uniformity and…

  2. Connexins in The Skeleton

    PubMed Central

    Stains, Joseph P.; Civitelli, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Shaping of the skeleton (modeling) and its maintenance throughout life (remodeling) require coordinated activity among bone forming (osteoblasts) and resorbing cells (osteoclasts) and osteocytes (bone embedded cells). The gap junction protein connexin43 (Cx43) has emerged as a key modulator of skeletal growth and homeostasis. The skeletal developmental abnormalities present in oculodentodigital and craniometaphyseal dysplasias, both linked to Cx43 gene (GJA1) mutations, demonstrate that the skeleton is a major site of Cx43 action. Via direct action on osteolineage cells, including altering production of pro-osteoclastogenic factors, Cx43 contributes to peak bone mass acquisition, cortical modeling of long bones, and maintenance of bone quality. Cx43 also contributes in diverse ways to bone responsiveness to hormonal and mechanical signals. Skeletal biology research has revealed the complexity of Cx43 function; in addition to forming gap junctions and “hemichannels”, Cx43 provides a scaffold for signaling molecules. Hence, Cx43 actively participates in generation and modulation of cellular signals driving skeletal development and homeostasis. Pharmacological interference with Cx43 may in the future help remedy deterioration of bone quality occurring with aging, disuse and hormonal imbalances. PMID:26740471

  3. The Skeleton in the Closet: Harvesting a Skeletonized IMA.

    PubMed

    Tribble, Curtis G

    2017-08-28

    There is a considerable amount of data that using more than one arterial graft provides a survival advantage for patients undergoing coronary bypass operations. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons has a set of official guidelines for the use of arterial grafts which include the following recommendations:Internal mammary arteries (IMA's) should be used to bypass the left anterior descending (LAD) artery when bypass of the LAD is indicated.As an adjunct to left internal mammary artery (LIMA), a second arterial graft (right IMA or radial artery [RA]) should be considered in appropriate patients.Use of bilateral IMA's (BIMA's) should be considered in patients who do not have an excessive risk of sternal complications.To reduce the risk of sternal infection with bilateral IMA's, skeletonized grafts should be considered, smoking cessation is recommended, glycemic control should be considered, and enhanced sternal stabilization may be considered.Use of arterial grafts should be a part of the discussion of the heart team in determining the optimal approach for each patient.         [Ann Thorac Surg 2016; 101: 801-9].

  4. Global League Tables, Big Data and the International Transfer of Educational Research Modalities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crossley, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The international transfer of educational policy and practice has long been a key theme in comparative research and scholarship. Recent years have seen renewed attention to the processes of international policy transfer, with new understandings emerging from innovative theorising and analysis. This article examines the nature and implications of…

  5. Global League Tables, Big Data and the International Transfer of Educational Research Modalities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crossley, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The international transfer of educational policy and practice has long been a key theme in comparative research and scholarship. Recent years have seen renewed attention to the processes of international policy transfer, with new understandings emerging from innovative theorising and analysis. This article examines the nature and implications of…

  6. The Milky Way Skeleton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zucker, Catherine; Battersby, Cara; Goodman, Alyssa A.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, Goodman et al. (2014) argued that a very long, very thin infrared dark cloud 'Nessie' lies directly in the Galactic mid-plane and runs along the Scutum-Centaurus arm in position-position-velocity space as traced by low density CO and high density NH3 gas. Nessie was presented as the first 'bone' of the Milky Way, an extraordinarily long, thin, high contrast filament that can be used to map our galaxy's 'skeleton.' We present the first evidence of additional 'bones' in the Milky Way Galaxy, arguing that Nessie is not a curiosity but one of many filaments that could potentially trace galactic structure. Our ten bone candidates are all long, filamentary, mid-infrared extinction features which lie parallel to, and no more than twenty parsecs from, the physical Galactic mid-plane. We use CO, N2H+, and NH3 radial velocity data to establish the location of the candidates in position-velocity space. Of the ten filaments, three candidates have a projected aspect ratio of >50:1 and run along, or extremely close to, the Scutum-Centaurus arm in position-velocity space. Evidence suggests that these three candidates are Nessie-like features which mark the location of the spiral arms in both physical space and position-velocity space. Other candidates could be spurs, feathers, or interarm clouds associated with the Milky Way's galactic structure. As molecular spectral-line and extinction maps cover more of the sky at increasing resolution and sensitivity, we hope to find more bones in future studies, to ultimately create a global-fit to the Galaxy's spiral arms by piecing together individual skeletal features. This work is supported in part by the NSF REU and DOD ASSURE programs under NSF grant no. 1262851 and by the Smithsonian Institution.

  7. Precambrian Skeletonized Microbial Eukaryotes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipps, Jere H.

    2017-04-01

    Skeletal heterotrophic eukaryotes are mostly absent from the Precambrian, although algal eukaryotes appear about 2.2 billion years ago. Tintinnids, radiolaria and foraminifera have molecular origins well back into the Precambrian yet no representatives of these groups are known with certainty in that time. These data infer times of the last common ancestors, not the appearance of true representatives of these groups which may well have diversified or not been preserved since those splits. Previous reports of these groups in the Precambrian are misinterpretations of other objects in the fossil record. Reported tintinnids at 1600 mya from China are metamorphic shards or mineral artifacts, the many specimens from 635-715 mya in Mongolia may be eukaryotes but they are not tintinnids, and the putative tintinnids at 580 mya in the Doushantou formation of China are diagenetic alterations of well-known acritarchs. The oldest supposed foraminiferan is Titanotheca from 550 to 565 mya rocks in South America and Africa is based on the occurrence of rutile in the tests and in a few modern agglutinated foraminifera, as well as the agglutinated tests. Neither of these nor the morphology are characteristic of foraminifera; hence these fossils remain as indeterminate microfossils. Platysolenites, an agglutinated tube identical to the modern foraminiferan Bathysiphon, occurs in the latest Neoproterozoic in Russia, Canada, and the USA (California). Some of the larger fossils occurring in typical Ediacaran (late Neoproterozoic) assemblages may be xenophyophorids (very large foraminifera), but the comparison is disputed and flawed. Radiolaria, on occasion, have been reported in the Precambrian, but the earliest known clearly identifiable ones are in the Cambrian. The only certain Precambrian heterotrophic skeletal eukaryotes (thecamoebians) occur in fresh-water rocks at about 750 mya. Skeletonized radiolaria and foraminifera appear sparsely in the Cambrian and radiate in the Ordovician

  8. Switching skeletons: hydrostatic support in molting crabs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Jennifer R A.; Kier, William M.; Walker, I. D. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Skeletal support systems are essential for support, movement, muscular antagonism, and locomotion. Crustaceans shed their rigid exoskeleton at each molt yet are still capable of forceful movement. We hypothesize that the soft water-inflated body of newly molted crabs may rely on a hydrostatic skeleton, similar to that of worms and polyps. We measured internal hydrostatic pressure and the force exerted during claw adduction and observed a strong correlation between force and hydrostatic pressure, consistent with hydrostatic skeletal support. This alternation between the two basic skeletal types may be widespread among arthropods.

  9. Switching skeletons: hydrostatic support in molting crabs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Jennifer R A.; Kier, William M.; Walker, I. D. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Skeletal support systems are essential for support, movement, muscular antagonism, and locomotion. Crustaceans shed their rigid exoskeleton at each molt yet are still capable of forceful movement. We hypothesize that the soft water-inflated body of newly molted crabs may rely on a hydrostatic skeleton, similar to that of worms and polyps. We measured internal hydrostatic pressure and the force exerted during claw adduction and observed a strong correlation between force and hydrostatic pressure, consistent with hydrostatic skeletal support. This alternation between the two basic skeletal types may be widespread among arthropods.

  10. Counseling the Community and Society. Conference Proceedings of the International Round Table (6th, Cambridge, United Kingdom, April 7-ll, 1974.)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Round Table for the Advancement of Counselling, London (England).

    This paper contains a series of speeches given at the Sixth International Round Table for the Advancement of Counseling Conference and Seminar. The aim of the conference was to provide a forum for interdisciplinary sutdy of questions relating to guidance and counseling at school and university levels as well as in other areas representing…

  11. Qualities Required of Education Today To Meet Foreseeable Demands in the Twenty-first Century. International Symposium and Round Table Proceedings (Beijing, China, November 27-December 2, 1989).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France).

    This report contains proceedings of a United Nations Education, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) international symposium and round table. The main objective of the meeting was to debate long-term goals of education and its role in preparing young people to face the demands of the 21st century. Papers presented include: (1) "Young…

  12. 40 CFR Table 24 to Subpart G of... - Typical Number of Columns as a Function of Tank Diameter for Internal Floating Roof Tanks With...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Typical Number of Columns as a Function of Tank Diameter for Internal Floating Roof Tanks With Column Supported Fixed Roofs a 24 Table 24 to Subpart G of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED)...

  13. ECDC Round Table Report and ProMed-mail most useful international information sources for the Netherlands Early Warning Committee.

    PubMed

    Bijkerk, Paul; Monnier, Annelie A; Fanoy, Ewout B; Kardamanidis, Katina; Friesema, Ingrid Hm; Knol, Mirjam J

    2017-04-06

    The Netherlands Early Warning Committee (NEWC) aims to identify infectious diseases causing a potential threat to Dutch public health. Threats are assessed and published as (information) alerts for public health experts. To identify threats from abroad, the NEWC screens 10 sources reporting disease outbreaks each week. To identify the sources essential for complete and timely reporting, we retrospectively analysed 178 international alerts published between 31 January 2013 and 30 January 2014. In addition, we asked the four NEWC coordinators about the required time to scan the information sources. We documented the date and source in which the signal was detected. The ECDC Round Table (RT) Report and ProMED-mail were the most complete and timely sources, reporting 140 of 178 (79%) and 121 of 178 (68%) threats respectively. The combination of both sources reported 169 (95%) of all threats in a timely manner. Adding any of the other sources resulted in minor increases in the total threats found, but considerable additional time investment per additional threat. Only three potential relevant threats (2%) would have been missed by only using the ECDC RT Report and ProMed-mail. We concluded that using only the ECDC RT Report and ProMed-mail to identify threats from abroad maintains a sensitive Early Warning System. This article is copyright of The Authors, 2017.

  14. The skeleton in the closet.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Frederick S

    2013-10-01

    The origins of fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP) in human history are unknown but the condition has been well described since Freke's account in 1740. Important contributions by physicians and scientists in the past two and a half centuries have converged on the remarkable skeleton of Harry Eastlack at The Mutter Museum of The College of Physicians in Philadelphia.

  15. THE SKELETON IN THE CLOSET

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Frederick S.

    2015-01-01

    The origins of fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP) in human history are unknown but the condition has been well described since Freke’s account in 1740. Important contributions by physicians and scientists in the past two and a half centuries have converged on the remarkable skeleton of Harry Eastlack at The Mutter Museum of The College of Physicians in Philadelphia. PMID:23810943

  16. Making an Inexpensive Skeleton for the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Edward L., Jr.; Pruitt, Nancy E.

    1990-01-01

    Presented is an activity in which a skeleton is built using papier mache' and various household items. The materials; procedures for building each part of the skeleton; and directions for painting, assembling, and varnishing are included. (KR)

  17. Making an Inexpensive Skeleton for the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Edward L., Jr.; Pruitt, Nancy E.

    1990-01-01

    Presented is an activity in which a skeleton is built using papier mache' and various household items. The materials; procedures for building each part of the skeleton; and directions for painting, assembling, and varnishing are included. (KR)

  18. Wavelet-based approach to character skeleton.

    PubMed

    You, Xinge; Tang, Yuan Yan

    2007-05-01

    Character skeleton plays a significant role in character recognition. The strokes of a character may consist of two regions, i.e., singular and regular regions. The intersections and junctions of the strokes belong to singular region, while the straight and smooth parts of the strokes are categorized to regular region. Therefore, a skeletonization method requires two different processes to treat the skeletons in theses two different regions. All traditional skeletonization algorithms are based on the symmetry analysis technique. The major problems of these methods are as follows. 1) The computation of the primary skeleton in the regular region is indirect, so that its implementation is sophisticated and costly. 2) The extracted skeleton cannot be exactly located on the central line of the stroke. 3) The captured skeleton in the singular region may be distorted by artifacts and branches. To overcome these problems, a novel scheme of extracting the skeleton of character based on wavelet transform is presented in this paper. This scheme consists of two main steps, namely: a) extraction of primary skeleton in the regular region and b) amendment processing of the primary skeletons and connection of them in the singular region. A direct technique is used in the first step, where a new wavelet-based symmetry analysis is developed for finding the central line of the stroke directly. A novel method called smooth interpolation is designed in the second step, where a smooth operation is applied to the primary skeleton, and, thereafter, the interpolation compensation technique is proposed to link the primary skeleton, so that the skeleton in the singular region can be produced. Experiments are conducted and positive results are achieved, which show that the proposed skeletonization scheme is applicable to not only binary image but also gray-level image, and the skeleton is robust against noise and affine transform.

  19. Melorheostosis involving the craniofacial skeleton.

    PubMed

    Ethunandan, Madanagopalan; Khosla, Nalin; Tilley, Elizabeth; Webb, Andrew

    2004-11-01

    Melorheostosis is a rare bone disorder, usually affecting the long bones and adjacent soft tissue. It was originally described by Leri and Joanny in 1922, after its classic x-ray features of flowing hyperostosis resembling dripping candle wax. There have been fewer than 10 reported cases of craniofacial involvement, and in most instances these have also involved the appendicular skeleton. The authors report a case of melorheostosis with isolated craniofacial involvement, describe the clinical course and radiologic and histologic features, and review the pertinent literature.

  20. Hamilton-Jacobi skeleton on cortical surfaces.

    PubMed

    Shi, Y; Thompson, P M; Dinov, I; Toga, A W

    2008-05-01

    In this paper, we propose a new method to construct graphical representations of cortical folding patterns by computing skeletons on triangulated cortical surfaces. In our approach, a cortical surface is first partitioned into sulcal and gyral regions via the solution of a variational problem using graph cuts, which can guarantee global optimality. After that, we extend the method of Hamilton-Jacobi skeleton [1] to subsets of triangulated surfaces, together with a geometrically intuitive pruning process that can trade off between skeleton complexity and the completeness of representing folding patterns. Compared with previous work that uses skeletons of 3-D volumes to represent sulcal patterns, the skeletons on cortical surfaces can be easily decomposed into branches and provide a simpler way to construct graphical representations of cortical morphometry. In our experiments, we demonstrate our method on two different cortical surface models, its ability of capturing major sulcal patterns and its application to compute skeletons of gyral regions.

  1. Setting the Periodic Table.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saturnelli, Annette

    1985-01-01

    Examines problems resulting from different forms of the periodic table, indicating that New York State schools use a form reflecting the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry's 1984 recommendations. Other formats used and reasons for standardization are discussed. (DH)

  2. Setting the Periodic Table.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saturnelli, Annette

    1985-01-01

    Examines problems resulting from different forms of the periodic table, indicating that New York State schools use a form reflecting the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry's 1984 recommendations. Other formats used and reasons for standardization are discussed. (DH)

  3. Organic membranous skeleton of the Precambrian metazoans from Namibia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzik, Jerzy

    1999-06-01

    Unlike the celebrated Ediacara fossils, those from the roughly coeval localities of the Kuibis Quarzite of Namibia are preserved not as imprints on the sandstone bedding plane, but three-dimensionally, within the rock matrix. The pattern of deformation and the presence of sand in lower parts of the bodies of Ernietta, the most common and typical of those organisms, indicate that their three-dimensional preservation is a result of a density-controlled sinking of sand-filled organic skeletons within hydrated mud layers. Specimens of Ernietta have preserved various stages of migration across the mud beds. Their wall material, as documented by the mode of deformation, was not only flexible, but also elastic, which makes it unlike chitin. The walls thus seem to be proteinaceous, built probably of a collagenous fabric. The Ernietta skeleton was built of series of parallel chambers, which excludes the possibility that these were external body covers. The chambers apparently represent walls of hydraulic skeleton units, resembling the basement membrane of chaetognaths or the notochord sheath of primitive chordates. Such chambers are widespread among the earliest fossil animals represented by fossils preserved in sandstone. The rise and fall of the Ediacaran faunas thus seem to be partially preservational artifacts. The range of its occurrence is a result of two successive evolutionary events: the origin of an internal hydraulic skeleton enclosed by a strong basement membrane, and the appearance of decomposers with abilities to disintegrate such collagenous sheaths.

  4. Coral Skeletons Defend against Ultraviolet Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Reef, Ruth; Kaniewska, Paulina; Hoegh-Guldberg, Ove

    2009-01-01

    Background Many coral reef organisms are photosynthetic or have evolved in tight symbiosis with photosynthetic symbionts. As such, the tissues of reef organisms are often exposed to intense solar radiation in clear tropical waters and have adapted to trap and harness photosynthetically active radiation (PAR). High levels of ultraviolet radiation (UVR) associated with sunlight, however, represent a potential problem in terms of tissue damage. Methodology/Principal Findings By measuring UVR and PAR reflectance from intact and ground bare coral skeletons we show that the property of calcium carbonate skeletons to absorb downwelling UVR to a significant extent, while reflecting PAR back to the overlying tissue, has biological advantages. We placed cnidarians on top of bare skeletons and a UVR reflective substrate and showed that under ambient UVR levels, UVR transmitted through the tissues of cnidarians placed on top of bare skeletons were four times lower compared to their counterparts placed on a UVR reflective white substrate. In accordance with the lower levels of UVR measured in cnidarians on top of coral skeletons, a similar drop in UVR damage to their DNA was detected. The skeletons emitted absorbed UVR as yellow fluorescence, which allows for safe dissipation of the otherwise harmful radiation. Conclusions/Significance Our study presents a novel defensive role for coral skeletons and reveals that the strong UVR absorbance by the skeleton can contribute to the ability of corals, and potentially other calcifiers, to thrive under UVR levels that are detrimental to most marine life. PMID:19946361

  5. Weighted straight skeletons in the plane.

    PubMed

    Biedl, Therese; Held, Martin; Huber, Stefan; Kaaser, Dominik; Palfrader, Peter

    2015-02-01

    We investigate weighted straight skeletons from a geometric, graph-theoretical, and combinatorial point of view. We start with a thorough definition and shed light on some ambiguity issues in the procedural definition. We investigate the geometry, combinatorics, and topology of faces and the roof model, and we discuss in which cases a weighted straight skeleton is connected. Finally, we show that the weighted straight skeleton of even a simple polygon may be non-planar and may contain cycles, and we discuss under which restrictions on the weights and/or the input polygon the weighted straight skeleton still behaves similar to its unweighted counterpart. In particular, we obtain a non-procedural description and a linear-time construction algorithm for the straight skeleton of strictly convex polygons with arbitrary weights.

  6. Bayesian estimation of the shape skeleton.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Jacob; Singh, Manish

    2006-11-21

    Skeletal representations of shape have attracted enormous interest ever since their introduction by Blum [Blum H (1973) J Theor Biol 38:205-287], because of their potential to provide a compact, but meaningful, shape representation, suitable for both neural modeling and computational applications. But effective computation of the shape skeleton remains a notorious unsolved problem; existing approaches are extremely sensitive to noise and give counterintuitive results with simple shapes. In conventional approaches, the skeleton is defined by a geometric construction and computed by a deterministic procedure. We introduce a Bayesian probabilistic approach, in which a shape is assumed to have "grown" from a skeleton by a stochastic generative process. Bayesian estimation is used to identify the skeleton most likely to have produced the shape, i.e., that best "explains" it, called the maximum a posteriori skeleton. Even with natural shapes with substantial contour noise, this approach provides a robust skeletal representation whose branches correspond to the natural parts of the shape.

  7. Weighted straight skeletons in the plane☆

    PubMed Central

    Biedl, Therese; Held, Martin; Huber, Stefan; Kaaser, Dominik; Palfrader, Peter

    2015-01-01

    We investigate weighted straight skeletons from a geometric, graph-theoretical, and combinatorial point of view. We start with a thorough definition and shed light on some ambiguity issues in the procedural definition. We investigate the geometry, combinatorics, and topology of faces and the roof model, and we discuss in which cases a weighted straight skeleton is connected. Finally, we show that the weighted straight skeleton of even a simple polygon may be non-planar and may contain cycles, and we discuss under which restrictions on the weights and/or the input polygon the weighted straight skeleton still behaves similar to its unweighted counterpart. In particular, we obtain a non-procedural description and a linear-time construction algorithm for the straight skeleton of strictly convex polygons with arbitrary weights. PMID:25648398

  8. Food table on ISS

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-04-08

    ISS043E091650 (04/08/2015) --- A view of the food table located in the Russian Zvezda service module on the International Space Station taken by Expedition 43 Flight Engineer Scott Kelly. Assorted food, drink and condiment packets are visible. Kelly tweeted this image along with the comment: ""Looks messy, but it's functional. Our #food table on the @space station. What's for breakfast? #YearInSpace".

  9. IFLA General Conference, 1985. International Association of Law Libraries (IALL) Round-Table on Access to Information in International Legal Research. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Papers on international access to information pertaining to legal research, which were presented at the 1985 conference of the International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) include: (1) "Materials of European Intergovernmental Organizations and Their Accessibility through Available Research Tools" (Irene Berkey, Northwestern…

  10. IFLA General Conference, 1985. International Association of Law Libraries (IALL) Round-Table on Access to Information in International Legal Research. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Papers on international access to information pertaining to legal research, which were presented at the 1985 conference of the International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) include: (1) "Materials of European Intergovernmental Organizations and Their Accessibility through Available Research Tools" (Irene Berkey, Northwestern…

  11. Dissection and flat-mounting of the threespine stickleback branchial skeleton

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Nicholas A.

    2017-01-01

    SHORT ABSTRACT The branchial skeleton, including gill rakers, pharyngeal teeth, and branchial bones, serves as the primary site of food processing in most fish. Here we describe a protocol to dissect and flat-mount this internal skeleton in threespine sticklebacks. This method is also applicable to a variety of other fish species. LONG ABSTRACT The posterior pharyngeal segments of the vertebrate head give rise to the branchial skeleton, the primary site of food processing in fish. The morphology of the fish branchial skeleton is matched to a species’ diet. Threespine stickleback fish (Gasterosteus aculeatus) have emerged as a model system to study the genetic and developmental basis of evolved differences in a variety of traits. Marine populations of sticklebacks have repeatedly colonized countless new freshwater lakes and creeks. Adaptation to the new diet in these freshwater environments likely underlies a series of craniofacial changes that have evolved repeatedly in independently derived freshwater populations. These include three major patterning changes to the branchial skeleton: reductions in the number and length of gill raker bones, increases in pharyngeal tooth number, and increased branchial bone lengths. Here we describe a detailed protocol to dissect and flat-mount the internal branchial skeleton in threespine stickleback fish. Dissection of the entire three-dimensional branchial skeleton and mounting it flat into a largely two-dimensional prep allows for the easy visualization and quantification of branchial skeleton morphology. This dissection method is inexpensive, fast, relatively easy, and applicable to a wide variety of fish species. In sticklebacks, this efficient method allows the quantification of skeletal morphology in genetic crosses to map genomic regions controlling craniofacial patterning. PMID:27213248

  12. Data for the Reference Man: skeleton content of chemical elements.

    PubMed

    Zaichick, Vladimir

    2013-03-01

    This study was undertaken to provide reference values of chemical element mass fractions in intact bone of Reference (European Caucasian) Man/Woman. The rib bone samples investigated were obtained from autopsies of 84 apparently healthy 15-58-year-old citizens (38 females and 46 males) of a non-industrial region in the Central European part of Russia who had suffered sudden death. The mass fractions (mg/kg given on a wet mass basis) of 69 elements in these bone samples were measured by using neutron activation analysis with high-resolution spectrometry of short-lived and long-lived radionuclides, particle-induced gamma-ray emission, inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry, and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry including necessary quality control measures. Using published and measured data, mass fraction values of the 79 elements for the rib bone have been derived. Based on accepted rib to skeleton mass fractions and reference values of skeleton mass for Reference Man, the elemental burdens in the skeleton were estimated. These results may provide a representative bases for establishing related reference values for the Russian Reference Man/Woman and for revising and adding current reference values for the International Commission on Radiological Protection. The data presented will also be very valuable for many other applications in radiation protection, radiotherapy radiation dosimetry, and other scientific fields.

  13. Histology of the heterostracan dermal skeleton: Insight into the origin of the vertebrate mineralised skeleton.

    PubMed

    Keating, Joseph N; Marquart, Chloe L; Donoghue, Philip C J

    2015-06-01

    Living vertebrates are divided into those that possess a fully formed and fully mineralised skeleton (gnathostomes) versus those that possess only unmineralised cartilaginous rudiments (cyclostomes). As such, extinct phylogenetic intermediates of these living lineages afford unique insights into the evolutionary assembly of the vertebrate mineralised skeleton and its canonical tissue types. Extinct jawless and jawed fishes assigned to the gnathostome stem evidence the piecemeal assembly of skeletal systems, revealing that the dermal skeleton is the earliest manifestation of a homologous mineralised skeleton. Yet the nature of the primitive dermal skeleton, itself, is poorly understood. This is principally because previous histological studies of early vertebrates lacked a phylogenetic framework required to derive evolutionary hypotheses. Nowhere is this more apparent than within Heterostraci, a diverse clade of primitive jawless vertebrates. To this end, we surveyed the dermal skeletal histology of heterostracans, inferred the plesiomorphic heterostracan skeleton and, through histological comparison to other skeletonising vertebrate clades, deduced the ancestral nature of the vertebrate dermal skeleton. Heterostracans primitively possess a four-layered skeleton, comprising a superficial layer of odontodes composed of dentine and enameloid; a compact layer of acellular parallel-fibred bone containing a network of vascular canals that supply the pulp canals (L1); a trabecular layer consisting of intersecting radial walls composed of acellular parallel-fibred bone, showing osteon-like development (L2); and a basal layer of isopedin (L3). A three layered skeleton, equivalent to the superficial layer L2 and L3 and composed of enameloid, dentine and acellular bone, is possessed by the ancestor of heterostracans + jawed vertebrates. We conclude that an osteogenic component is plesiomorphic with respect to the vertebrate dermal skeleton. Consequently, we interpret the

  14. Histology of the heterostracan dermal skeleton: Insight into the origin of the vertebrate mineralised skeleton

    PubMed Central

    Marquart, Chloe L.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Living vertebrates are divided into those that possess a fully formed and fully mineralised skeleton (gnathostomes) versus those that possess only unmineralised cartilaginous rudiments (cyclostomes). As such, extinct phylogenetic intermediates of these living lineages afford unique insights into the evolutionary assembly of the vertebrate mineralised skeleton and its canonical tissue types. Extinct jawless and jawed fishes assigned to the gnathostome stem evidence the piecemeal assembly of skeletal systems, revealing that the dermal skeleton is the earliest manifestation of a homologous mineralised skeleton. Yet the nature of the primitive dermal skeleton, itself, is poorly understood. This is principally because previous histological studies of early vertebrates lacked a phylogenetic framework required to derive evolutionary hypotheses. Nowhere is this more apparent than within Heterostraci, a diverse clade of primitive jawless vertebrates. To this end, we surveyed the dermal skeletal histology of heterostracans, inferred the plesiomorphic heterostracan skeleton and, through histological comparison to other skeletonising vertebrate clades, deduced the ancestral nature of the vertebrate dermal skeleton. Heterostracans primitively possess a four‐layered skeleton, comprising a superficial layer of odontodes composed of dentine and enameloid; a compact layer of acellular parallel‐fibred bone containing a network of vascular canals that supply the pulp canals (L1); a trabecular layer consisting of intersecting radial walls composed of acellular parallel‐fibred bone, showing osteon‐like development (L2); and a basal layer of isopedin (L3). A three layered skeleton, equivalent to the superficial layer L2 and L3 and composed of enameloid, dentine and acellular bone, is possessed by the ancestor of heterostracans + jawed vertebrates. We conclude that an osteogenic component is plesiomorphic with respect to the vertebrate dermal skeleton. Consequently, we

  15. Helium tables.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Havill, Clinton H

    1928-01-01

    These tables are intended to provide a standard method and to facilitate the calculation of the quantity of "Standard Helium" in high pressure containers. The research data and the formulas used in the preparation of the tables were furnished by the Research Laboratory of Physical Chemistry, of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

  16. Dissection and Flat-mounting of the Threespine Stickleback Branchial Skeleton.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Nicholas A; Miller, Craig T

    2016-05-07

    The posterior pharyngeal segments of the vertebrate head give rise to the branchial skeleton, the primary site of food processing in fish. The morphology of the fish branchial skeleton is matched to a species' diet. Threespine stickleback fish (Gasterosteus aculeatus) have emerged as a model system to study the genetic and developmental basis of evolved differences in a variety of traits. Marine populations of sticklebacks have repeatedly colonized countless new freshwater lakes and creeks. Adaptation to the new diet in these freshwater environments likely underlies a series of craniofacial changes that have evolved repeatedly in independently derived freshwater populations. These include three major patterning changes to the branchial skeleton: reductions in the number and length of gill raker bones, increases in pharyngeal tooth number, and increased branchial bone lengths. Here we describe a detailed protocol to dissect and flat-mount the internal branchial skeleton in threespine stickleback fish. Dissection of the entire three-dimensional branchial skeleton and mounting it flat into a largely two-dimensional prep allows for the easy visualization and quantification of branchial skeleton morphology. This dissection method is inexpensive, fast, relatively easy, and applicable to a wide variety of fish species. In sticklebacks, this efficient method allows the quantification of skeletal morphology in genetic crosses to map genomic regions controlling craniofacial patterning.

  17. Distraction Osteogenesis of the Craniofacial Skeleton.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jack C.; Fearon, Jeffrey; Havlik, Robert J.; Buchman, Steve R.; Polley, John W.

    2004-07-01

    LEARNING OBJECTIVES:: After studying this article, the participant should be able to: 1. Review the biomechanical principles and pertinent cellular and molecular biology of distraction osteogenesis of the craniofacial skeleton. 2. Describe the clinical indications and applications of distraction osteogenesis of the craniofacial skeleton. 3. Describe maxillary, mandibular, midface, and calvarial procedures in distraction osteogenesis. 4. Discuss the clinical outcomes and complications of distraction osteogenesis of the craniofacial skeleton.The year 2002 marked the end of the first decade in clinical distraction osteogenesis of the craniofacial skeleton. In this short period, its application has increased exponentially. More than 3000 cases have been performed according to a recent survey, and more than 700 articles have been written on this subject in the MEDLINE database since 1996. It is a powerful surgical tool and enables surgeons to achieve results not previously attainable. Despite all this, distraction osteogenesis is practiced by only a small number of plastic surgeons. This article reviews the biomechanical principles; the pertinent cellular and molecular biology; and the clinical indications, applications, controversies, and complications of distraction osteogenesis of the craniofacial skeleton.

  18. Update on approaches to the craniomaxillofacial skeleton.

    PubMed

    Villwock, Jennifer A; Suryadevara, Amar C

    2014-08-01

    A myriad of surgical approaches to the craniomaxillofacial skeleton exist. Depending on the purpose of the procedure and the anatomic area to be addressed, classically used approaches include coronal approach, midfacial degloving, eyelid incisions, and other cutaneous incisions. Over the last decade, endoscopic approaches have become more popular. Whether external, transoral, or endoscopic, a detailed knowledge of the indications, anatomy, limitations, and potential complications is critical to the successful employment of these approaches. This article reviews the recent literature on classic as well as novel advancements to the craniofacial skeleton. Multiple studies in the last 5 years have investigated the approaches to the craniofacial skeleton. Most of these focus on trauma. Recent advances have concentrated on external versus endoscopic approaches to the mandibular condyle, an endoscopic approach to the midface and orbit, three-dimensional imaging of the facial skeleton, and improving upon the existing classic approaches and techniques. Approaches to the craniomaxillofacial skeleton continue to evolve with the refinement of classic approaches and advent of new technologies and approaches. This study reviews the recent literature and provides a comprehensive review of options for craniofacial exposure and the most up-to-date surgical options.

  19. Bayesian estimation of the shape skeleton

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Jacob; Singh, Manish

    2006-01-01

    Skeletal representations of shape have attracted enormous interest ever since their introduction by Blum [Blum H (1973) J Theor Biol 38:205–287], because of their potential to provide a compact, but meaningful, shape representation, suitable for both neural modeling and computational applications. But effective computation of the shape skeleton remains a notorious unsolved problem; existing approaches are extremely sensitive to noise and give counterintuitive results with simple shapes. In conventional approaches, the skeleton is defined by a geometric construction and computed by a deterministic procedure. We introduce a Bayesian probabilistic approach, in which a shape is assumed to have “grown” from a skeleton by a stochastic generative process. Bayesian estimation is used to identify the skeleton most likely to have produced the shape, i.e., that best “explains” it, called the maximum a posteriori skeleton. Even with natural shapes with substantial contour noise, this approach provides a robust skeletal representation whose branches correspond to the natural parts of the shape. PMID:17101989

  20. A Table! (At the Table).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terry, Robert M.

    A review of French dining habits and table manners outlines: elements of the place setting, courtesies used at the table, serving conventions, restaurant tipping, the size and content of the different meals of the day, subtle differences in common foods, restaurant types, menu types, general wine and cheese choices, waiter-client communication,…

  1. Literacy, Numeracy, and Problem Solving in Technology-Rich Environments among U.S. Adults: Results from the Program for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies 2012. Appendix D: Standard Error Tables. First Look. NCES 2014-008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2013

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides Appendix D, Standard Error tables, for the full report, entitled. "Literacy, Numeracy, and Problem Solving in Technology-Rich Environments among U.S. Adults: Results from the Program for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies 2012. First Look. NCES 2014-008." The full report presents results of the Program…

  2. A Stochastic Skeleton Model for the MJO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    thual, S.; Majda, A.; Stechmann, S.

    2013-12-01

    The Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO) is the dominant mode of variability in the tropical atmosphere on intraseasonal timescales and planetary spatial scales. In recent work by two of the authors, a minimal dynamical model has been proposed that recovers robustly the most fundamental MJO features of (I) a slow eastward speed of roughly 5 ms-1, (II) a peculiar dispersion relation with dω/dk≈ 0, and (III) a horizontal quadrupole vortex structure. This model, the skeleton model, depicts the MJO as a neutrally-stable atmospheric wave that involves a simple multiscale interaction between planetary dry dynamics, planetary lower-tropospheric moisture, and the planetary envelope of synoptic-scale activity. Here, we show that the skeleton model can further account for (IV) the intermittent generation of MJO events and (V) the organization of MJO events into wave trains with growth and demise, as seen in nature. We achieve this goal by developing a simple stochastic parametrization for the unresolved details of synoptic-scale activity, that is coupled to otherwise deterministic processes in the skeleton model. In particular, the intermittent initiation, propagation and shut down of MJO wave trains in the skeleton model occur through these stochastic effects. This includes examples with a background warm-pool where some initial MJO-like disturbances propagate through the western region but stall at the peak of background convection/heating corresponding to the maritime continent in nature.

  3. Amorphous calcium carbonate particles form coral skeletons.

    PubMed

    Mass, Tali; Giuffre, Anthony J; Sun, Chang-Yu; Stifler, Cayla A; Frazier, Matthew J; Neder, Maayan; Tamura, Nobumichi; Stan, Camelia V; Marcus, Matthew A; Gilbert, Pupa U P A

    2017-08-28

    Do corals form their skeletons by precipitation from solution or by attachment of amorphous precursor particles as observed in other minerals and biominerals? The classical model assumes precipitation in contrast with observed "vital effects," that is, deviations from elemental and isotopic compositions at thermodynamic equilibrium. Here, we show direct spectromicroscopy evidence in Stylophora pistillata corals that two amorphous precursors exist, one hydrated and one anhydrous amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC); that these are formed in the tissue as 400-nm particles; and that they attach to the surface of coral skeletons, remain amorphous for hours, and finally, crystallize into aragonite (CaCO3). We show in both coral and synthetic aragonite spherulites that crystal growth by attachment of ACC particles is more than 100 times faster than ion-by-ion growth from solution. Fast growth provides a distinct physiological advantage to corals in the rigors of the reef, a crowded and fiercely competitive ecosystem. Corals are affected by warming-induced bleaching and postmortem dissolution, but the finding here that ACC particles are formed inside tissue may make coral skeleton formation less susceptible to ocean acidification than previously assumed. If this is how other corals form their skeletons, perhaps this is how a few corals survived past CO2 increases, such as the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum that occurred 56 Mya.

  4. Advances in evaluating the fetal skeleton

    PubMed Central

    Noel, Ann-Edwidge; Brown, Richard N

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we discuss aspects of the prenatal diagnosis of fetal skeletal malformations, concentrating on the advantages offered by different imaging techniques and the approaches that are of value in evaluating a suspected skeletal dysplasia. We also briefly address the findings in some of the commoner malformations of the fetal skeleton that may be encountered. PMID:24868173

  5. 3-D vascular skeleton extraction and decomposition.

    PubMed

    Chowriappa, Ashirwad; Seo, Yong; Salunke, Sarthak; Mokin, Maxim; Kan, Peter; Scott, Peter

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a novel vascular skeleton extraction and decomposition technique for computer-assisted diagnosis and analysis. We start by addressing the problem of vascular decomposition as a cluster optimization problem and present a methodology for weighted convex approximations. Decomposed vessel structures are then grouped using the vessel skeleton, extracted using a Laplace-based operator. The method is validated using presegmented sections of vasculature archived for 98 aneurysms in 112 patients. We test first for vascular decomposition and next for vessel skeleton extraction. The proposed method produced promising results with an estimated 80.5% of the vessel sections correctly decomposed and 92.9% of the vessel sections having the correct number of skeletal branches, identified by a clinical radiological expert. Next, the method was validated on longitudinal study data from n = 4 subjects, where vascular skeleton extraction and decomposition was performed. Volumetric and surface area comparisons were made between expert segmented sections and the proposed approach on sections containing aneurysms. Results suggest that the method is able to detect changes in aneurysm volumes and surface areas close to that segmented by an expert.

  6. Amorphous calcium carbonate particles form coral skeletons

    PubMed Central

    Mass, Tali; Giuffre, Anthony J.; Sun, Chang-Yu; Stifler, Cayla A.; Frazier, Matthew J.; Neder, Maayan; Tamura, Nobumichi; Stan, Camelia V.; Marcus, Matthew A.

    2017-01-01

    Do corals form their skeletons by precipitation from solution or by attachment of amorphous precursor particles as observed in other minerals and biominerals? The classical model assumes precipitation in contrast with observed “vital effects,” that is, deviations from elemental and isotopic compositions at thermodynamic equilibrium. Here, we show direct spectromicroscopy evidence in Stylophora pistillata corals that two amorphous precursors exist, one hydrated and one anhydrous amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC); that these are formed in the tissue as 400-nm particles; and that they attach to the surface of coral skeletons, remain amorphous for hours, and finally, crystallize into aragonite (CaCO3). We show in both coral and synthetic aragonite spherulites that crystal growth by attachment of ACC particles is more than 100 times faster than ion-by-ion growth from solution. Fast growth provides a distinct physiological advantage to corals in the rigors of the reef, a crowded and fiercely competitive ecosystem. Corals are affected by warming-induced bleaching and postmortem dissolution, but the finding here that ACC particles are formed inside tissue may make coral skeleton formation less susceptible to ocean acidification than previously assumed. If this is how other corals form their skeletons, perhaps this is how a few corals survived past CO2 increases, such as the Paleocene–Eocene Thermal Maximum that occurred 56 Mya. PMID:28847944

  7. Isotropic microscale mechanical properties of coral skeletons

    PubMed Central

    Pasquini, Luca; Molinari, Alan; Fantazzini, Paola; Dauphen, Yannicke; Cuif, Jean-Pierre; Levy, Oren; Dubinsky, Zvy; Caroselli, Erik; Prada, Fiorella; Goffredo, Stefano; Di Giosia, Matteo; Reggi, Michela; Falini, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Scleractinian corals are a major source of biogenic calcium carbonate, yet the relationship between their skeletal microstructure and mechanical properties has been scarcely studied. In this work, the skeletons of two coral species: solitary Balanophyllia europaea and colonial Stylophora pistillata, were investigated by nanoindentation. The hardness HIT and Young's modulus EIT were determined from the analysis of several load–depth data on two perpendicular sections of the skeletons: longitudinal (parallel to the main growth axis) and transverse. Within the experimental and statistical uncertainty, the average values of the mechanical parameters are independent on the section's orientation. The hydration state of the skeletons did not affect the mechanical properties. The measured values, EIT in the 76–77 GPa range, and HIT in the 4.9–5.1 GPa range, are close to the ones expected for polycrystalline pure aragonite. Notably, a small difference in HIT is observed between the species. Different from corals, single-crystal aragonite and the nacreous layer of the seashell Atrina rigida exhibit clearly orientation-dependent mechanical properties. The homogeneous and isotropic mechanical behaviour of the coral skeletons at the microscale is correlated with the microstructure, observed by electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy, and with the X-ray diffraction patterns of the longitudinal and transverse sections. PMID:25977958

  8. Novel skeleton sesquiterpenoids isolated from guava leaves.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Wen; Zhu, Xiao-ai; Wang, Wei; Chen, Xue-Xiang; Chen, Yun-Jiao; Cao, Yong

    2016-01-01

    A chemical investigation of the plant Psidium guajava L., collected in Guangdong province, afforded two novel skeleton sesquiterpenoids 1 and 2. Compound 2 also known as isocaryolan-9-one was a new natural product. The structure of the novel compound 1 was determined as guavacid A by various spectroscopic methods. A possible biosynthetic pathway for 1 and 2 was proposed.

  9. Amorphous calcium carbonate particles form coral skeletons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mass, Tali; Giuffre, Anthony J.; Sun, Chang-Yu; Stifler, Cayla A.; Frazier, Matthew J.; Neder, Maayan; Tamura, Nobumichi; Stan, Camelia V.; Marcus, Matthew A.; Gilbert, Pupa U. P. A.

    2017-09-01

    Do corals form their skeletons by precipitation from solution or by attachment of amorphous precursor particles as observed in other minerals and biominerals? The classical model assumes precipitation in contrast with observed “vital effects,” that is, deviations from elemental and isotopic compositions at thermodynamic equilibrium. Here, we show direct spectromicroscopy evidence in Stylophora pistillata corals that two amorphous precursors exist, one hydrated and one anhydrous amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC); that these are formed in the tissue as 400-nm particles; and that they attach to the surface of coral skeletons, remain amorphous for hours, and finally, crystallize into aragonite (CaCO3). We show in both coral and synthetic aragonite spherulites that crystal growth by attachment of ACC particles is more than 100 times faster than ion-by-ion growth from solution. Fast growth provides a distinct physiological advantage to corals in the rigors of the reef, a crowded and fiercely competitive ecosystem. Corals are affected by warming-induced bleaching and postmortem dissolution, but the finding here that ACC particles are formed inside tissue may make coral skeleton formation less susceptible to ocean acidification than previously assumed. If this is how other corals form their skeletons, perhaps this is how a few corals survived past CO2 increases, such as the Paleocene–Eocene Thermal Maximum that occurred 56 Mya.

  10. Teens Who Are Lazy Bones Have Weaker Skeletons

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Teens Who Are Lazy Bones Have Weaker Skeletons: Study During crucial bone-building years of youth, ... those years, up to 36 percent of the skeleton is formed, and bone is particularly responsive to ...

  11. Skeleton pruning by contour partitioning with discrete curve evolution.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xiang; Latecki, Longin Jan; Liu, Wen-Yu

    2007-03-01

    In this paper, we introduce a new skeleton pruning method based on contour partitioning. Any contour partition can be used, but the partitions obtained by Discrete Curve Evolution (DCE) yield excellent results. The theoretical properties and the experiments presented demonstrate that obtained skeletons are in accord with human visual perception and stable, even in the presence of significant noise and shape variations, and have the same topology as the original skeletons. In particular, we have proven that the proposed approach never produces spurious branches, which are common when using the known skeleton pruning methods. Moreover, the proposed pruning method does not displace the skeleton points. Consequently, all skeleton points are centers of maximal disks. Again, many existing methods displace skeleton points in order to produces pruned skeletons.

  12. Key functional role of the optical properties of coral skeletons in coral ecology and evolution.

    PubMed

    Enríquez, Susana; Méndez, Eugenio R; Hoegh-Guldberg, Ove; Iglesias-Prieto, Roberto

    2017-04-26

    Multiple scattering of light on coral skeleton enhances light absorption efficiency of coral symbionts and plays a key role in the regulation of their internal diffuse light field. To understand the dependence of this enhancement on skeleton meso- and macrostructure, we analysed the scattering abilities of naked coral skeletons for 74 Indo-Pacific species. Sensitive morphotypes to thermal and light stress, flat-extraplanate and branching corals, showed the most efficient structures, while massive-robust species were less efficient. The lowest light-enhancing scattering abilities were found for the most primitive colonial growth form: phaceloid. Accordingly, the development of highly efficient light-collecting structures versus the selection of less efficient but more robust holobionts to cope with light stress may constitute a trade-off in the evolution of modern symbiotic scleractinian corals, characterizing two successful adaptive solutions. The coincidence of the most important structural modifications with epitheca decline supports the importance of the enhancement of light transmission across coral skeleton in modern scleractinian diversification, and the central role of these symbioses in the design and optimization of coral skeleton. Furthermore, the same ability that lies at the heart of the success of symbiotic corals as coral-reef-builders can also explain the 'Achilles's heel' of these symbioses in a warming ocean. © 2017 The Author(s).

  13. The origin of conodonts and of vertebrate mineralized skeletons.

    PubMed

    Murdock, Duncan J E; Dong, Xi-Ping; Repetski, John E; Marone, Federica; Stampanoni, Marco; Donoghue, Philip C J

    2013-10-24

    Conodonts are an extinct group of jawless vertebrates whose tooth-like elements are the earliest instance of a mineralized skeleton in the vertebrate lineage, inspiring the 'inside-out' hypothesis that teeth evolved independently of the vertebrate dermal skeleton and before the origin of jaws. However, these propositions have been based on evidence from derived euconodonts. Here we test hypotheses of a paraconodont ancestry of euconodonts using synchrotron radiation X-ray tomographic microscopy to characterize and compare the microstructure of morphologically similar euconodont and paraconodont elements. Paraconodonts exhibit a range of grades of structural differentiation, including tissues and a pattern of growth common to euconodont basal bodies. The different grades of structural differentiation exhibited by paraconodonts demonstrate the stepwise acquisition of euconodont characters, resolving debate over the relationship between these two groups. By implication, the putative homology of euconodont crown tissue and vertebrate enamel must be rejected as these tissues have evolved independently and convergently. Thus, the precise ontogenetic, structural and topological similarities between conodont elements and vertebrate odontodes appear to be a remarkable instance of convergence. The last common ancestor of conodonts and jawed vertebrates probably lacked mineralized skeletal tissues. The hypothesis that teeth evolved before jaws and the inside-out hypothesis of dental evolution must be rejected; teeth seem to have evolved through the extension of odontogenic competence from the external dermis to internal epithelium soon after the origin of jaws.

  14. The origin of conodonts and of vertebrate mineralized skeletons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murdock, Duncan J.E.; Dong, Xi-Ping; Repetski, John E.; Marone, Federica; Stampanoni, Marco; Donoghue, Philip C.J.

    2013-01-01

    Conodonts are an extinct group of jawless vertebrates whose tooth-like elements are the earliest instance of a mineralized skeleton in the vertebrate lineage, inspiring the ‘inside-out’ hypothesis that teeth evolved independently of the vertebrate dermal skeleton and before the origin of jaws. However, these propositions have been based on evidence from derived euconodonts. Here we test hypotheses of a paraconodont ancestry of euconodonts using synchrotron radiation X-ray tomographic microscopy to characterize and compare the microstructure of morphologically similar euconodont and paraconodont elements. Paraconodonts exhibit a range of grades of structural differentiation, including tissues and a pattern of growth common to euconodont basal bodies. The different grades of structural differentiation exhibited by paraconodonts demonstrate the stepwise acquisition of euconodont characters, resolving debate over the relationship between these two groups. By implication, the putative homology of euconodont crown tissue and vertebrate enamel must be rejected as these tissues have evolved independently and convergently. Thus, the precise ontogenetic, structural and topological similarities between conodont elements and vertebrate odontodes appear to be a remarkable instance of convergence. The last common ancestor of conodonts and jawed vertebrates probably lacked mineralized skeletal tissues. The hypothesis that teeth evolved before jaws and the inside-out hypothesis of dental evolution must be rejected; teeth seem to have evolved through the extension of odontogenic competence from the external dermis to internal epithelium soon after the origin of jaws.

  15. Extraction and applications of skeletons in finite element mesh generation.

    SciTech Connect

    Quadros, William Roshan

    2010-05-01

    This paper focuses on the extraction of skeletons of CAD models and its applications in finite element (FE) mesh generation. The term 'skeleton of a CAD model' can be visualized as analogous to the 'skeleton of a human body'. The skeletal representations covered in this paper include medial axis transform (MAT), Voronoi diagram (VD), chordal axis transform (CAT), mid surface, digital skeletons, and disconnected skeletons. In the literature, the properties of a skeleton have been utilized in developing various algorithms for extracting skeletons. Three main approaches include: (1) the bisection method where the skeleton exists at equidistant from at least two points on boundary, (2) the grassfire propagation method in which the skeleton exists where the opposing fronts meet, and (3) the duality method where the skeleton is a dual of the object. In the last decade, the author has applied different skeletal representations in all-quad meshing, hex meshing, mid-surface meshing, mesh size function generation, defeaturing, and decomposition. A brief discussion on the related work from other researchers in the area of tri meshing, tet meshing, and anisotropic meshing is also included. This paper concludes by summarizing the strengths and weaknesses of the skeleton-based approaches in solving various geometry-centered problems in FE mesh generation. The skeletons have proved to be a great shape abstraction tool in analyzing the geometric complexity of CAD models as they are symmetric, simpler (reduced dimension), and provide local thickness information. However, skeletons generally require some cleanup, and stability and sensitivity of the skeletons should be controlled during extraction. Also, selecting a suitable application-specific skeleton and a computationally efficient method of extraction is critical.

  16. Enrollment Tables.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    University System of Georgia, Atlanta.

    A set of tables is provided summarizing fall enrollment from 1979 through 1988 in the university system of Georgia. The following types of data are provided: headcount enrollment; joint enrollment; developmental studies, freshmen, sophomores, juniors, seniors, graduate students, professional enrollment, transients, others, EFT enrollment, entering…

  17. Enrollment Tables.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    University System of Georgia, Atlanta.

    A set of tables is provided summarizing fall enrollment from 1979 through 1988 in the university system of Georgia. The following types of data are provided: headcount enrollment; joint enrollment; developmental studies, freshmen, sophomores, juniors, seniors, graduate students, professional enrollment, transients, others, EFT enrollment, entering…

  18. Calcaneal spurs among San and Khoi skeletons.

    PubMed

    Caroline, Cermak; Kirchengast, Sylvia

    2015-01-01

    Only few studies considered the prevalence of calcaneal enthesophytes commonly called heel spurs among historic skeleton samples. In the present study the frequency of plantar calcaneal spurs among 54 19(th) century Khoisan skeletons was analyzed. Five individuals (9.6 %) had a plantar calcaneal spur at the right side or left side. Calcaneal spurs were more likely to occur in older individuals. More than 20 % of the individuals aged between 40 and 60 years (mature) showed plantar spurs, while 6.2 % of the individuals aged between 20 and 40 years had plantar spurs; however this difference was not significant. No sex differences were present in the prevalence of calcaneal spurs. Male and female individuals did not differ in the metric dimensions of the calcanceal spurs significantly.

  19. Performance Measurements for the Microsoft Kinect Skeleton

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    Information Inter- faces and Presentation]: User Interfaces—Input devices and strate- gies; 1 INTRODUCTION The Microsoft Kinect for Xbox 360 (“Kinect...MAR 2012 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2012 to 00-00-2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Performance Measurements for the Microsoft Kinect...8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Performance Measurements for the Microsoft Kinect Skeleton Mark A. Livingston∗ Jay Sebastian† Zhuming Ai

  20. The facial skeleton: Armor to the brain?

    PubMed

    Patil, Satishkumar G; Patil, Bindu S; Joshi, Udupikrishna; Allurkar, Soumya; Japatti, Sharanabasappa; Munnangi, Ashwini

    2016-09-01

    With the development of urban setting worldwide, the major issue of concern is the increase in the mortality rate in the population due to road traffic accidents. The face, being the most exposed region is susceptible to injuries and maybe associated with injuries to the adjacent neuro-cranium. The literature has conflicting views on the relationship between facial fractures and head injuries with some authors opining that the facial skeleton cushions the brain while some other authors claim that the facial fractures act as indicators for head injuries. To analyze the correlation between the facial fractures and head injuries and to assess if the facial skeleton acts to protect the brain from injury. A prospective study that included patients who reported to the emergency department of Basaveswar Teaching and General Hospital, Gulbarga, during 2 years, between August 2013 and July 2015 was conducted. A total of 100 patients with facial fractures were enrolled in the study. Head injuries were sustained by 51 patients in the study. Maximum number of patients was in the age group of 20-29 with a male to female ratio of 10.1:1. The mandible was the most frequently fractured bone in the facial skeleton followed by the zygomatico-maxillary complex. A majority (96%) of patients with head injuries had fractures of either the upper third or the middle third of the face. Contusions and pneumocephalus were the most common head injury encountered. The Glasgow Coma Scale score was significantly lower in patients with associated head injuries as compared to those patients with facial trauma alone. The mortality rate in the study was 2% with both the victims having sustained middle third and upper third fractures respectively with associated head injuries. The facial skeleton does not act to cushion the brain from injury but, in fact, the facial trauma victims should be considered potential head injury patients.

  1. The facial skeleton: Armor to the brain?

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Satishkumar G.; Patil, Bindu S.; Joshi, Udupikrishna; Allurkar, Soumya; Japatti, Sharanabasappa; Munnangi, Ashwini

    2016-01-01

    Background: With the development of urban setting worldwide, the major issue of concern is the increase in the mortality rate in the population due to road traffic accidents. The face, being the most exposed region is susceptible to injuries and maybe associated with injuries to the adjacent neuro-cranium. The literature has conflicting views on the relationship between facial fractures and head injuries with some authors opining that the facial skeleton cushions the brain while some other authors claim that the facial fractures act as indicators for head injuries. Objectives: To analyze the correlation between the facial fractures and head injuries and to assess if the facial skeleton acts to protect the brain from injury. Patients and Methods: A prospective study that included patients who reported to the emergency department of Basaveswar Teaching and General Hospital, Gulbarga, during 2 years, between August 2013 and July 2015 was conducted. A total of 100 patients with facial fractures were enrolled in the study. Results: Head injuries were sustained by 51 patients in the study. Maximum number of patients was in the age group of 20–29 with a male to female ratio of 10.1:1. The mandible was the most frequently fractured bone in the facial skeleton followed by the zygomatico-maxillary complex. A majority (96%) of patients with head injuries had fractures of either the upper third or the middle third of the face. Contusions and pneumocephalus were the most common head injury encountered. The Glasgow Coma Scale score was significantly lower in patients with associated head injuries as compared to those patients with facial trauma alone. The mortality rate in the study was 2% with both the victims having sustained middle third and upper third fractures respectively with associated head injuries. Conclusion: The facial skeleton does not act to cushion the brain from injury but, in fact, the facial trauma victims should be considered potential head injury patients

  2. [Soft tissues, hormones and the skeleton].

    PubMed

    Zofková, I

    2012-02-01

    Mechanical load activates bone modeling and increases bone strength. Thus physical activity is extremely important for overall bone health. Muscle volume and muscle contraction are closely related to bone mineral density in men and women, although these relationships are more significat in men. The muscle-bone unit has been defined as a functional system, in which both components are under control of the somatotropin-IGF-I system, androgens and D hormone. These endocrine systems play, via the muscle-bone unit, an important role in development of the skeleton and its stability in adulthood. That is why deficiency of any of these hormonal systems, or reduced physical activity (mainly in childhood) could seriously affect bone density and quality. Bone is also under control of adipose tissue, which modulates its metabolism via mechanical load and more importantly via adipocytokines (leptin, adiponectin and rezistin). Leptin increases bone formation by activation of osteoblasts. This direct effect of leptin is amplified by stimulation of the β-1 adrenergic system, which inhibits the negative osteotropic effects of neuropeptide Y. On the other hand, leptin also activates β-2 adrenergic receptors, which increase bone resorption. In humans, the overall osteo-anabolic effect of leptin tends to be dominant. Furthermore, leptin has a principal role in the start of puberty in girls and maturation, remodeling and development of the female skeleton. Adiponectin (and probably rezistin) has an unambiguous deteriorating effect on the skeleton. Further studies are needed to confirm the clinical importance of soft tissues relative to the integrity of the skeleton.

  3. Naked Stony Corals: Skeleton Loss in Scleractinia

    SciTech Connect

    Medina, Monica; Collins, Allen G.; Takaoka, Tori L.; Kuehl,Jennifer; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2005-12-01

    Hexacorallia includes the Scleractinia, or stony corals, characterized by having an external calcareous skeleton made of aragonite, and the Corallimorpharia, or mushroom corals, that lack such a skeleton. Although each group has traditionally been considered monophyletic, some molecular phylogenetic analyses have challenged this, suggesting that skeletal features are evolutionarily plastic, and reviving notions that the scleractinian skeleton may be ephemeral and that the group itself may be polyphyletic. Nevertheless, the most comprehensive phylogenetic study of Hexacorallia supported scleractinian monophyly (REF), and so this remains controversial. In order to resolve this contentious issue, we sequenced the complete mitochondrial genome sequences of nine scleractinians and four corallimorpharians and performed phylogenetic analysis that also included three outgroups (an octocoral and two sea anemones). Our data provide the first strong evidence that Scleractinia is paraphyletic and that the Corallimorpharia is derived from within the group, from which we conclude that skeletal loss has occurred in the latter group secondarily. It is possible that a driving force in such skeletal loss could be the high levels of CO{sub 2} in the ocean during the mid-Cretaceous, which would have impacted aragonite solubility. We estimate from molecular divergence measures that the Corallimorpharia arose in the mid-Cretaceous, approximately 87 million years ago (Ma), supporting this view. These data also permit us to date the origin of Scleractinia to 265 Ma, narrowing the gap between the group's phylogenetic origin and its earliest fossil record.

  4. Skeleton-based active catheter navigation.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yili; Liu, Hao; Wang, Shuguo; Deng, Wei; Li, Xianling; Liang, Zhaoguang

    2009-06-01

    The emergence of the active catheter has prompted the development of catheterization in minimally invasive surgery. However, it is still operated using only the physician's vision; information supplied by the guiding image and tracking sensors has not been fully utilized. In order to supply the active catheter with more useful information for automatic navigation, we extract the skeleton of blood vessels by means of an improved distance transform method, and then present the crucial geometric information determining navigation. With the help of tracking sensors' position and pose information, two operations, advancement in the proximal end and direction selection in the distal end, are alternately implemented to insert the active catheter into a target blood vessel. The skeleton of the aortic arch reconstructed from slice images is extracted fast and automatically. A navigation path is generated on the skeleton by manually selecting the start and target points, and smoothed with the cubic cardinal spline curve. Crucial geometric information determining navigation is presented, as well as requirements for the catheter entering the target blood vessel. Using a shape memory alloy active catheter integrated with magnetic sensors, an experiment is carried out in a vascular model, in which the catheter is successfully inserted from the ascending aorta, via the aortic arch, into the brachiocephalic trunk. The navigation strategy proposed in this paper is feasible and has the advantage of increasing the automation of catheterization, enhancing the manoeuvrability of the active catheter and providing the guiding image with desirable interactivity.

  5. A skeleton family generator via physics-based deformable models.

    PubMed

    Krinidis, Stelios; Chatzis, Vassilios

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a novel approach for object skeleton family extraction. The introduced technique utilizes a 2-D physics-based deformable model that parameterizes the objects shape. Deformation equations are solved exploiting modal analysis, and proportional to model physical characteristics, a different skeleton is produced every time, generating, in this way, a family of skeletons. The theoretical properties and the experiments presented demonstrate that obtained skeletons match to hand-labeled skeletons provided by human subjects, even in the presence of significant noise and shape variations, cuts and tears, and have the same topology as the original skeletons. In particular, the proposed approach produces no spurious branches without the need of any known skeleton pruning method.

  6. Naked corals: Skeleton loss in Scleractinia

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Mónica; Collins, Allen G.; Takaoka, Tori L.; Kuehl, Jennifer V.; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2006-01-01

    Stony corals, which form the framework for modern reefs, are classified as Scleractinia (Cnidaria, Anthozoa, and Hexacorallia) in reference to their external aragonitic skeletons. However, persistent notions, collectively known as the “naked coral” hypothesis, hold that the scleractinian skeleton does not define a natural group. Three main lines of evidence have suggested that some stony corals are more closely related to one or more of the soft-bodied hexacorallian groups than they are to other scleractinians: (i) morphological similarities; (ii) lack of phylogenetic resolution in molecular analyses of scleractinians; and (iii) discrepancy between the commencement of a diverse scleractinian fossil record at 240 million years ago (Ma) and a molecule-based origination of at least 300 Ma. No molecular evidence has been able to clearly reveal relationships at the base of a well supported clade composed of scleractinian lineages and the nonskeletonized Corallimorpharia. We present complete mitochondrial genome data that provide strong evidence that one clade of scleractinians is more closely related to Corallimorpharia than it is to a another clade of scleractinians. Thus, the scleractinian skeleton, which we estimate to have originated between 240 and 288 Ma, was likely lost in the ancestry of Corallimorpharia. We estimate that Corallimorpharia originated between 110 and 132 Ma during the late- to mid-Cretaceous, coinciding with high levels of oceanic CO2, which would have impacted aragonite solubility. Corallimorpharians escaped extinction from aragonite skeletal dissolution, but some modern stony corals may not have such fortunate fates under the pressure of increased anthropogenic CO2 in the ocean. PMID:16754865

  7. Identification of a membrane skeleton in platelets

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    Platelets have previously been shown to contain actin filaments that are linked, through actin-binding protein, to the glycoprotein (GP) Ib- IX complex, GP Ia, GP IIa, and an unidentified GP of Mr 250,000 on the plasma membrane. The objective of the present study was to use a morphological approach to examine the distribution of these membrane- bound filaments within platelets. Preliminary experiments showed that the Triton X-100 lysis buffers used previously to solubilize platelets completely disrupt the three-dimensional organization of the cytoskeletons. Conditions were established that minimized these postlysis changes. The cytoskeletons remained as platelet-shaped structures. These structures consisted of a network of long actin filaments and a more amorphous layer that outlined the periphery. When Ca2+ was present, the long actin filaments were lost but the amorphous layer at the periphery remained; conditions were established in which this amorphous layer retained the outline of the platelet from which it originated. Immunocytochemical experiments showed that the GP Ib-IX complex and actin-binding protein were associated with the amorphous layer. Analysis of the amorphous material on SDS-polyacrylamide gels showed that it contained actin, actin-binding protein, and all actin- bound GP Ib-IX. Although actin filaments could not be visualized in thin section, the actin presumably was in a filamentous form because it was solubilized by DNase I and bound phalloidin. These studies show that platelets contain a membrane skeleton and suggest that it is distinct from the network of cytoplasmic actin filaments. This membrane skeleton exists as a submembranous lining that, by analogy to the erythrocyte membrane skeleton, may stabilize the plasma membrane and contribute to determining its shape. PMID:3372587

  8. Visualization of the ultrastructural interface of cells with the outer and inner-surface of coral skeletons.

    PubMed

    Jeger, Rina; Lichtenfeld, Yona; Peretz, Hagit; Shany, Boaz; Vago, Razi; Baranes, Danny

    2009-04-01

    Crystalline, porous biomaterials, such as marine invertebrate skeletons, have been widely used for functional reconstruction of human tissues like bone and dental implants. Since in such an abrasive microenvironment adequate cell-material interactions are crucial for a successful treatment, it is of great importance to improve the means to examine these interactions. We developed a method that reveals the ultrastructure of the interface between coral skeletons and cultured neural cells to a higher quality than do traditional methods as it does not include damaging procedures like decalcification or sectioning non-decalcified skeletons. It is rather based on generating two electron opacity distinct Araldite masks, of the skeleton and its surrounding, by polymerizing them to different durations. The contrast created at the border of the two masks outlined the fine and fragile crystals of the coral skeleton's outer and inner surfaces and their contact sites with the cells. The skeleton's internal structure contains a mesh of narrow (few microns wide) and large channel-shaped gaps interrupted by irregular-shaped crystalline material. Neural cells grew on the skeleton surface by stretching between crystal tips, with occasional rearrangements of cytoskeletal fibers located near the anchorage focal adherence points. Cell processes infiltrated the skeleton interior by stretching between inter-surface crystals and by adjusting their volume to the space of the conduits they grew into. The technique advances the study of coral biology and of neural cells-hard biomaterial interaction; it can be applied to other biomaterials and cell types and open new ways for studying tissue development and engineering.

  9. Skeleton-Based Abnormal Gait Detection.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Trong-Nguyen; Huynh, Huu-Hung; Meunier, Jean

    2016-10-26

    Human gait analysis plays an important role in musculoskeletal disorder diagnosis. Detecting anomalies in human walking, such as shuffling gait, stiff leg or unsteady gait, can be difficult if the prior knowledge of such a gait pattern is not available. We propose an approach for detecting abnormal human gait based on a normal gait model. Instead of employing the color image, silhouette, or spatio-temporal volume, our model is created based on human joint positions (skeleton) in time series. We decompose each sequence of normal gait images into gait cycles. Each human instant posture is represented by a feature vector which describes relationships between pairs of bone joints located in the lower body. Such vectors are then converted into codewords using a clustering technique. The normal human gait model is created based on multiple sequences of codewords corresponding to different gait cycles. In the detection stage, a gait cycle with normality likelihood below a threshold, which is determined automatically in the training step, is assumed as an anomaly. The experimental results on both marker-based mocap data and Kinect skeleton show that our method is very promising in distinguishing normal and abnormal gaits with an overall accuracy of 90.12%.

  10. Skeleton-Based Abnormal Gait Detection

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Trong-Nguyen; Huynh, Huu-Hung; Meunier, Jean

    2016-01-01

    Human gait analysis plays an important role in musculoskeletal disorder diagnosis. Detecting anomalies in human walking, such as shuffling gait, stiff leg or unsteady gait, can be difficult if the prior knowledge of such a gait pattern is not available. We propose an approach for detecting abnormal human gait based on a normal gait model. Instead of employing the color image, silhouette, or spatio-temporal volume, our model is created based on human joint positions (skeleton) in time series. We decompose each sequence of normal gait images into gait cycles. Each human instant posture is represented by a feature vector which describes relationships between pairs of bone joints located in the lower body. Such vectors are then converted into codewords using a clustering technique. The normal human gait model is created based on multiple sequences of codewords corresponding to different gait cycles. In the detection stage, a gait cycle with normality likelihood below a threshold, which is determined automatically in the training step, is assumed as an anomaly. The experimental results on both marker-based mocap data and Kinect skeleton show that our method is very promising in distinguishing normal and abnormal gaits with an overall accuracy of 90.12%. PMID:27792181

  11. [Okuda wooden human skeleton made in Edo era, Japan].

    PubMed

    Baba, Hisao

    2006-03-01

    Probably in 1820 (late Edo era), a human skeleton for medical education was carved from cypress wood, based on a criminal's skeleton under the supervision of a medical doctor, Banri Okuda in Osaka City. The skeleton is called "Okuda wooden skeleton" and is now housed in the National Science Museum, Tokyo. The bones can be assembled into a skeleton by metal pivots or bamboo sticks. The thorax and pelvis were made of several pieces of wood and combined together, respectively. By and large, the wooden skeleton shows morphological characteristics usually seen in early middle-aged females of the Edo era. But the claviculae, distal ends of the femora, and the patellae are exceptionally larger than those of a female, implying that these bones of the original skeleton had already been lost or were deformed before the wooden skeleton was made. Actually the wooden skeleton might not have been used for medical education but rather for the promotion of European medicine, which was gradually developing in the Edo era.

  12. 40 CFR Table 24 to Subpart G of... - Typical Number of Columns as a Function of Tank Diameter for Internal Floating Roof Tanks With...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Typical Number of Columns as a Function... Subpart G of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... for Process Vents, Storage Vessels, Transfer Operations, and Wastewater Pt. 63, Subpt. G, Table 24...

  13. 40 CFR Table 24 to Subpart G of... - Typical Number of Columns as a Function of Tank Diameter for Internal Floating Roof Tanks With...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Typical Number of Columns as a Function... Subpart G of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... for Process Vents, Storage Vessels, Transfer Operations, and Wastewater Pt. 63, Subpt. G, Table 24...

  14. Real time observation of mouse fetal skeleton using a high resolution X-ray synchrotron

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Dong Woo; Kim, Bora; Shin, Jae Hoon; Yun, Young Min; Je, Jung Ho; Hwu, Yeu kuang; Yoon, Jung Hee

    2011-01-01

    The X-ray synchrotron is quite different from conventional radiation sources. This technique may expand the capabilities of conventional radiology and be applied in novel manners for special cases. To evaluate the usefulness of X-ray synchrotron radiation systems for real time observations, mouse fetal skeleton development was monitored with a high resolution X-ray synchrotron. A non-monochromatized X-ray synchrotron (white beam, 5C1 beamline) was employed to observe the skeleton of mice under anesthesia at embryonic day (E)12, E14, E15, and E18. At the same time, conventional radiography and mammography were used to compare with X-ray synchrotron. After synchrotron radiation, each mouse was sacrificed and stained with Alizarin red S and Alcian blue to observe bony structures. Synchrotron radiation enabled us to view the mouse fetal skeleton beginning at gestation. Synchrotron radiation systems facilitate real time observations of the fetal skeleton with greater accuracy and magnification compared to mammography and conventional radiography. Our results show that X-ray synchrotron systems can be used to observe the fine structures of internal organs at high magnification. PMID:21586868

  15. Comparison of premortem and postmortem estimates of plutonium deposited in the skeleton and liver of six individuals

    SciTech Connect

    Sula, M.J.; Bihl, D.E.; Carbaugh, E.H.; Kathren, R.L.

    1988-04-01

    Assessment of organ burdens after internal exposures to radionuclides is often necessary to evaluate the health and regulatory implications of the exposure. The assessment of plutonium activity in skeleton and liver is usually estimated from measurements of plutonium excreted via urine. As part of the overall evaluation of internal dose assessment techniques, it is useful to compare the results of organ burden estimates made from evaluation of urinary excretion data with those made at death from tissue samples collected posthumously from the individual. Estimates of plutonium in the skeleton and liver, based on postmortem analysis of tissue samples for six individuals, were obtained from the US Transuranium Registry (USTR). Bioassay data and other radiation exposure information obtained from the individuals' files were used to estimate their skeleton and liver burdens at the times of their deaths, and these estimates were compared to those obtained through tissue analysis. 6 refs., 2 tabs.

  16. DeepSkeleton: Learning Multi-Task Scale-Associated Deep Side Outputs for Object Skeleton Extraction in Natural Images.

    PubMed

    Shen, Wei; Zhao, Kai; Jiang, Yuan; Wang, Yan; Bai, Xiang; Yuille, Alan

    2017-11-01

    Object skeletons are useful for object representation and object detection. They are complementary to the object contour, and provide extra information, such as how object scale (thickness) varies among object parts. But object skeleton extraction from natural images is very challenging, because it requires the extractor to be able to capture both local and non-local image context in order to determine the scale of each skeleton pixel. In this paper, we present a novel fully convolutional network with multiple scale-associated side outputs to address this problem. By observing the relationship between the receptive field sizes of the different layers in the network and the skeleton scales they can capture, we introduce two scale-associated side outputs to each stage of the network. The network is trained by multi-task learning, where one task is skeleton localization to classify whether a pixel is a skeleton pixel or not, and the other is skeleton scale prediction to regress the scale of each skeleton pixel. Supervision is imposed at different stages by guiding the scale-associated side outputs toward the ground-truth skeletons at the appropriate scales. The responses of the multiple scale-associated side outputs are then fused in a scale-specific way to detect skeleton pixels using multiple scales effectively. Our method achieves promising results on two skeleton extraction datasets, and significantly outperforms other competitors. In addition, the usefulness of the obtained skeletons and scales (thickness) are verified on two object detection applications: foreground object segmentation and object proposal detection.

  17. Mesa = Table

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    10 August 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows two mesas on the northern plains of Mars. 'Mesa' is the Spanish word for 'table,' and that is a very good description of the two elliptical features captured in this MOC image. In both cases, the mesa tops and the material beneath them, down to the level of the surrounding, rugged plain, are remnants of a once more extensive layer (or layers) of material that has been largely eroded away. The circular feature near the center of the larger mesa is the site of a filled and buried impact crater.

    Location near: 53.5oN, 153.5oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Spring

  18. Mesa = Table

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    10 August 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows two mesas on the northern plains of Mars. 'Mesa' is the Spanish word for 'table,' and that is a very good description of the two elliptical features captured in this MOC image. In both cases, the mesa tops and the material beneath them, down to the level of the surrounding, rugged plain, are remnants of a once more extensive layer (or layers) of material that has been largely eroded away. The circular feature near the center of the larger mesa is the site of a filled and buried impact crater.

    Location near: 53.5oN, 153.5oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Spring

  19. Skeleton-based cerebrovascular quantitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xingce; Liu, Enhui; Wu, Zhongke; Zhai, Feifei; Zhu, Yi-Cheng; Shui, Wuyang; Zhou, Mingquan

    2016-12-20

    Cerebrovascular disease is the most common cause of death worldwide, with millions of deaths annually. Interest is increasing toward understanding the geometric factors that influence cerebrovascular diseases, such as stroke. Cerebrovascular shape analyses are essential for the diagnosis and pathological identification of these conditions. The current study aimed to provide a stable and consistent methodology for quantitative Circle of Willis (CoW) analysis and to identify geometric changes in this structure. An entire pipeline was designed with emphasis on automating each step. The stochastic segmentation was improved and volumetric data were obtained. The L1 medial axis method was applied to vessel volumetric data, which yielded a discrete skeleton dataset. A B-spline curve was used to fit the skeleton, and geometric values were proposed for a one-dimensional skeleton and radius. The calculations used to derive these values were illustrated in detail. In one example(No. 47 in the open dataset) all values for different branches of CoW were calculated. The anterior communicating artery(ACo) was the shortest vessel, with a length of 2.6mm. The range of the curvature of all vessels was (0.3, 0.9) ± (0.1, 1.4). The range of the torsion was (-12.4,0.8) ± (0, 48.7). The mean radius value range was (3.1, 1.5) ± (0.1, 0.7) mm, and the mean angle value range was (2.2, 2.9) ± (0, 0.2) mm. In addition to the torsion variance values in a few vessels, the variance values of all vessel characteristics remained near 1. The distribution of the radii of symmetrical posterior cerebral artery(PCA) and angle values of the symmetrical posterior communicating arteries(PCo) demonstrated a certain correlation between the corresponding values of symmetrical vessels on the CoW. The data verified the stability of our methodology. Our method was appropriate for the analysis of large medical image datasets derived from the automated pipeline for populations. This method was applicable to

  20. The origin of the vertebrate skeleton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pivar, Stuart

    2011-01-01

    The anatomy of the human and other vertebrates has been well described since the days of Leonardo da Vinci and Vesalius. The causative origin of the configuration of the bones and of their shapes and forms has been addressed over the ensuing centuries by such outstanding investigators as Goethe, Von Baer, Gegenbauer, Wilhelm His and D'Arcy Thompson, who sought to apply mechanical principles to morphogenesis. However, no coherent causative model of morphogenesis has ever been presented. This paper presents a causative model for the origin of the vertebrate skeleton, based on the premise that the body is a mosaic enlargement of self-organized patterns engrained in the membrane of the egg cell. Drawings illustrate the proposed hypothetical origin of membrane patterning and the changes in the hydrostatic equilibrium of the cytoplasm that cause topographical deformations resulting in the vertebrate body form.

  1. The skeleton as an endocrine organ.

    PubMed

    DiGirolamo, Douglas J; Clemens, Thomas L; Kousteni, Stavroula

    2012-11-01

    Surprising new discoveries in the field of skeletal biology show that bone cells produce endocrine hormones that regulate phosphate and glucose homeostasis. In this Review, we examine the features of these new endocrine pathways and discuss their physiological importance in the context of our current understanding of energy metabolism and mineral homeostasis. Consideration of evolutionary and comparative biology provides clues that a key driving force for the emergence of these hormonal pathways was the development of a large, energy-expensive musculoskeletal system. Specialized bone cells also evolved and produced endocrine hormones to integrate the skeleton in global mineral and nutrient homeostasis. The recognition of bone as a true endocrine organ represents a fertile area for further research and should improve the diagnosis and treatment of metabolic diseases such as osteoporosis and diabetes mellitus.

  2. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries in Growing Skeleton

    PubMed Central

    AlHarby, Saleh W.

    2010-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries in the adult patients are thoroughly studied and published in orthopedic literature. Until recently, little was known about similar injuries in skeletally growing patients. The more frequent involvement of this age group in various athletic activities and the improved diagnostic modalities have increased the awareness and interest of ACL injuries in skeletally immature patients. ACL reconstruction in growing skeleton is controversial and carries some risks to the tibial and femoral growth plate. A guarded approach to ACL reconstruction is recommended in skeletally immature patients. Modification of activity of ACL injured young patient, proper rehabilitation and prudent planning of adolescent age ACL reconstruction carries the least risks of growth plate violation. PMID:21475528

  3. DEVELOPMENTAL PALEOBIOLOGY OF THE VERTEBRATE SKELETON

    PubMed Central

    RÜCKLIN, MARTIN; DONOGHUE, PHILIP C. J.; CUNNINGHAM, JOHN A.; MARONE, FEDERICA; STAMPANONI, MARCO

    2015-01-01

    Studies of the development of organisms can reveal crucial information on homology of structures. Developmental data are not peculiar to living organisms, and they are routinely preserved in the mineralized tissues that comprise the vertebrate skeleton, allowing us to obtain direct insight into the developmental evolution of this most formative of vertebrate innovations. The pattern of developmental processes is recorded in fossils as successive stages inferred from the gross morphology of multiple specimens and, more reliably and routinely, through the ontogenetic stages of development seen in the skeletal histology of individuals. Traditional techniques are destructive and restricted to a 2-D plane with the third dimension inferred. Effective non-invasive methods of visualizing paleohistology to reconstruct developmental stages of the skeleton are necessary. In a brief survey of paleohistological techniques we discuss the pros and cons of these methods. The use of tomographic methods to reconstruct development of organs is exemplified by the study of the placoderm dentition. Testing evidence for the presence of teeth in placoderms, the first jawed vertebrates, we compare the methods that have been used. These include inferring the development from morphology, and using serial sectioning, microCT or synchrotron X-ray tomographic microscopy (SRXTM) to reconstruct growth stages and directions of growth. The ensuing developmental interpretations are biased by the methods and degree of inference. The most direct and reliable method is using SRXTM data to trace sclerochronology. The resulting developmental data can be used to resolve homology and test hypotheses on the origin of evolutionary novelties. PMID:26306050

  4. Anatomy of the red cell membrane skeleton: unanswered questions.

    PubMed

    Lux, Samuel E

    2016-01-14

    The red cell membrane skeleton is a pseudohexagonal meshwork of spectrin, actin, protein 4.1R, ankyrin, and actin-associated proteins that laminates the inner membrane surface and attaches to the overlying lipid bilayer via band 3-containing multiprotein complexes at the ankyrin- and actin-binding ends of spectrin. The membrane skeleton strengthens the lipid bilayer and endows the membrane with the durability and flexibility to survive in the circulation. In the 36 years since the first primitive model of the red cell skeleton was proposed, many additional proteins have been discovered, and their structures and interactions have been defined. However, almost nothing is known of the skeleton's physiology, and myriad questions about its structure remain, including questions concerning the structure of spectrin in situ, the way spectrin and other proteins bind to actin, how the membrane is assembled, the dynamics of the skeleton when the membrane is deformed or perturbed by parasites, the role lipids play, and variations in membrane structure in unique regions like lipid rafts. This knowledge is important because the red cell membrane skeleton is the model for spectrin-based membrane skeletons in all cells, and because defects in the red cell membrane skeleton underlie multiple hemolytic anemias.

  5. Variability in magnesium content in Arctic echinoderm skeletons.

    PubMed

    Iglikowska, A; Najorka, J; Voronkov, A; Chełchowski, M; Kukliński, P

    2017-08-01

    In this study, 235 measurements of magnesium concentration in echinoderm's skeletons were compiled, including 30 species and 216 specimens collected from northern and western Barents Sea. We aimed to reveal the scale of Mg variation in the skeletons of Arctic echinoderms. Furthermore, we attempted to examine whether the Mg concentration in echinoderm skeletons is determined primarily by biological factors or is a passive result of environmental influences. We found that the Mg concentration in echinoderm skeletons was characteristic for particular echinoderm classes or was even species-specific. The highest Mg contents were observed in asteroids, followed by ophiuroids, crinoids, and holothuroids, with the lowest values in echinoids. These results strongly imply that biological factors play an important role in controlling the incorporation of Mg into the skeletons of the studied individuals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Dynamic Transport and Cementation of Skeletal Elements Build Up the Pole-and-Beam Structured Skeleton of Sponges.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Sohei; Arima, Kazushi; Kawai, Kotoe; Mohri, Kurato; Inui, Chihiro; Sugano, Wakana; Koba, Hibiki; Tamada, Kentaro; Nakata, Yudai J; Kishimoto, Kouji; Arai-Shindo, Miyuki; Kojima, Chiaki; Matsumoto, Takeo; Fujimori, Toshihiko; Agata, Kiyokazu; Funayama, Noriko

    2015-10-05

    Animal bodies are shaped by skeletons, which are built inside the body by biomineralization of condensed mesenchymal cells in vertebrates [1, 2] and echinoderms [3, 4], or outside the body by apical secretion of extracellular matrices by epidermal cell layers in arthropods [5]. In each case, the skeletons' shapes are a direct reflection of the pattern of skeleton-producing cells [6]. Here we report a newly discovered mode of skeleton formation: assembly of sponges' mineralized skeletal elements (spicules) in locations distant from where they were produced. Although it was known that internal skeletons of sponges consist of spicules assembled into large pole-and-beam structures with a variety of morphologies [7-10], the spicule assembly process (i.e., how spicules become held up and connected basically in staggered tandem) and what types of cells act in this process remained unexplored. Here we found that mature spicules are dynamically transported from where they were produced and then pierce through outer epithelia, and their basal ends become fixed to substrate or connected with such fixed spicules. Newly discovered "transport cells" mediate spicule movement and the "pierce" step, and collagen-secreting basal-epithelial cells fix spicules to the substratum, suggesting that the processes of spiculous skeleton construction are mediated separately by specialized cells. Division of labor by manufacturer, transporter, and cementer cells, and iteration of the sequential mechanical reactions of "transport," "pierce," "raise up," and "cementation," allows construction of the spiculous skeleton spicule by spicule as a self-organized biological structure, with the great plasticity in size and shape required for indeterminate growth, and generating the great morphological diversity of individual sponges.

  7. International.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoover, Linn

    1979-01-01

    The International Geological Correlation Project has attained scientific maturity and broad support and participation by geologists world wide. Its purpose is to provide a mechanism for international cooperation and information exchange about geological problems that transcend national boundaries. (Author/BB)

  8. Proteome analysis of the triton-insoluble erythrocyte membrane skeleton.

    PubMed

    Basu, Avik; Harper, Sandra; Pesciotta, Esther N; Speicher, Kaye D; Chakrabarti, Abhijit; Speicher, David W

    2015-10-14

    Erythrocyte shape and membrane integrity is imparted by the membrane skeleton, which can be isolated as a Triton X-100 insoluble structure that retains the biconcave shape of intact erythrocytes, indicating isolation of essentially intact membrane skeletons. These erythrocyte "Triton Skeletons" have been studied morphologically and biochemically, but unbiased proteome analysis of this substructure of the membrane has not been reported. In this study, different extraction buffers and in-depth proteome analyses were used to more fully define the protein composition of this functionally critical macromolecular complex. As expected, the major, well-characterized membrane skeleton proteins and their associated membrane anchors were recovered in good yield. But surprisingly, a substantial number of additional proteins that are not considered in erythrocyte membrane skeleton models were recovered in high yields, including myosin-9, lipid raft proteins (stomatin, flotillin1 and 2), multiple chaperone proteins (HSPs, protein disulfide isomerase and calnexin), and several other proteins. These results show that the membrane skeleton is substantially more complex than previous biochemical studies indicated, and it apparently has localized regions with unique protein compositions and functions. This comprehensive catalog of the membrane skeleton should lead to new insights into erythrocyte membrane biology and pathogenic mutations that perturb membrane stability. Biological significance Current models of erythrocyte membranes describe fairly simple homogenous structures that are incomplete. Proteome analysis of the erythrocyte membrane skeleton shows that it is quite complex and includes a substantial number of proteins whose roles and locations in the membrane are not well defined. Further elucidation of interactions involving these proteins and definition of microdomains in the membrane that contain these proteins should yield novel insights into how the membrane skeleton

  9. Automatic and hierarchical segmentation of the human skeleton in CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yabo; Liu, Shi; Li, H. Harold; Yang, Deshan

    2017-04-01

    Accurate segmentation of each bone of the human skeleton is useful in many medical disciplines. The results of bone segmentation could facilitate bone disease diagnosis and post-treatment assessment, and support planning and image guidance for many treatment modalities including surgery and radiation therapy. As a medium level medical image processing task, accurate bone segmentation can facilitate automatic internal organ segmentation by providing stable structural reference for inter- or intra-patient registration and internal organ localization. Even though bones in CT images can be visually observed with minimal difficulty due to the high image contrast between the bony structures and surrounding soft tissues, automatic and precise segmentation of individual bones is still challenging due to the many limitations of the CT images. The common limitations include low signal-to-noise ratio, insufficient spatial resolution, and indistinguishable image intensity between spongy bones and soft tissues. In this study, a novel and automatic method is proposed to segment all the major individual bones of the human skeleton above the upper legs in CT images based on an articulated skeleton atlas. The reported method is capable of automatically segmenting 62 major bones, including 24 vertebrae and 24 ribs, by traversing a hierarchical anatomical tree and by using both rigid and deformable image registration. The degrees of freedom of femora and humeri are modeled to support patients in different body and limb postures. The segmentation results are evaluated using the Dice coefficient and point-to-surface error (PSE) against manual segmentation results as the ground-truth. The results suggest that the reported method can automatically segment and label the human skeleton into detailed individual bones with high accuracy. The overall average Dice coefficient is 0.90. The average PSEs are 0.41 mm for the mandible, 0.62 mm for cervical vertebrae, 0.92 mm for thoracic

  10. Automatic and hierarchical segmentation of the human skeleton in CT images.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yabo; Liu, Shi; Li, Harold; Yang, Deshan

    2017-04-07

    Accurate segmentation of each bone of the human skeleton is useful in many medical disciplines. The results of bone segmentation could facilitate bone disease diagnosis and post-treatment assessment, and support planning and image guidance for many treatment modalities including surgery and radiation therapy. As a medium level medical image processing task, accurate bone segmentation can facilitate automatic internal organ segmentation by providing stable structural reference for inter- or intra-patient registration and internal organ localization. Even though bones in CT images can be visually observed with minimal difficulty due to the high image contrast between the bony structures and surrounding soft tissues, automatic and precise segmentation of individual bones is still challenging due to the many limitations of the CT images. The common limitations include low signal-to-noise ratio, insufficient spatial resolution, and indistinguishable image intensity between spongy bones and soft tissues. In this study, a novel and automatic method is proposed to segment all the major individual bones of the human skeleton above the upper legs in CT images based on an articulated skeleton atlas. The reported method is capable of automatically segmenting 62 major bones, including 24 vertebrae and 24 ribs, by traversing a hierarchical anatomical tree and by using both rigid and deformable image registration. The degrees of freedom of femora and humeri are modeled to support patients in different body and limb postures. The segmentation results are evaluated using the Dice coefficient and point-to-surface error (PSE) against manual segmentation results as the ground-truth. The results suggest that the reported method can automatically segment and label the human skeleton into detailed individual bones with high accuracy. The overall average Dice coefficient is 0.90. The average PSEs are 0.41 mm for the mandible, 0.62 mm for cervical vertebrae, 0.92 mm for thoracic

  11. Building Up the Milky Way's Skeleton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-09-01

    A team of scientistshas now uncovered half of theentire skeleton of the Milky Way, using an automated method to identify large filaments of gas and dust hiding between stars in the galactic plane.Galactic distribution of 54 newly discovered filaments, plotted along with colored lines indicating six relevant spiral arms in our galaxy. The upper two plots show the consistency of the filaments motion with the spiral arms, while the lower shows their location within the galactic plane. [Wang et al. 2016]The Search for Nessie and FriendsThe Milky Ways interstellar medium is structured hierarchically into filaments. These structures are difficult to observe since they largely lie in the galactic plane, but if we can discover the distribution and properties of these filaments, we can better understand how our galaxy formed, and how the filaments affect star formation in our galaxy today.Some of the largest of the Milky Ways filaments are hundreds of light-years long like the infrared dark cloud nicknamed Nessie, declared in 2013 to be one of the bones of the Milky Way because of its position along the center of the Scutum-Centaurus spiral arm.Follow-up studies since the discovery of Nessie (like this one, or this) have found a number of additional large-scale filaments, but these studies all use different search methods and selection criteria, and the searches all start with visual inspection by humans to identify candidates.What if we could instead automate the detection process and build a homogeneous sample of the large filaments making up the skeleton of the Milky Way?Automated DetectionThis is exactly what a team of astronomers led by Ke Wang (European Southern Observatory) has done. The group used a customization of an algorithm called a minimum spanning tree the technique used to optimize the cost of internet networks, road networks, and electrical grids in our communities to perform an automated search of data from the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey. The search was

  12. Acid-Base and the Skeleton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bushinsky, David A.

    2008-09-01

    Chronic metabolic acidosis increases urine calcium (Ca) excretion in the absence of a concomitant increase in intestinal Ca absorption resulting in a net loss of total body. The source of this additional urine Ca is almost certainly the skeleton, the primary reservoir of body Ca. In vitro metabolic acidosis, modeled as a primary reduction in medium bicarbonate concentration, acutely (<24 h) stimulates Ca efflux primarily through physicochemical mineral dissolution while at later time periods (>24 h) cell-mediated mechanisms predominate. In cultured neonatal mouse calvariae, acidosis-induced, cell-mediated Ca efflux is mediated by effects on both osteoblasts and osteoclasts. Metabolic acidosis inhibits extracellular matrix production by osteoblasts, as determined by measurement of collagen levels and levels for the non-collagenous matrix proteins osteopontin and matrix gla protein. Metabolic acidosis upregulates osteoblastic expression of RANKL (Receptor Activator of NFκB Ligand), an important osteoclastogenic and osteoclast-activating factor. Acidosis also increases osteoclastic activity as measured by release of β-glucuronidase, an enzyme whose secretion correlates with osteoclast-mediated bone resorption.

  13. Giant cell tumors of the axial skeleton.

    PubMed

    Balke, Maurice; Henrichs, Marcel P; Gosheger, Georg; Ahrens, Helmut; Streitbuerger, Arne; Koehler, Michael; Bullmann, Viola; Hardes, Jendrik

    2012-01-01

    Background. We report on 19 cases of giant cell tumor of bone (GCT) affecting the spine or sacrum and evaluate the outcome of different treatment modalities. Methods. Nineteen patients with GCT of the spine (n = 6) or sacrum (n = 13) have been included in this study. The mean followup was 51.6 months. Ten sacral GCT were treated by intralesional procedures of which 4 also received embolization, and 3 with irradiation only. All spinal GCT were surgically treated. Results. Two (15.4%) patients with sacral and 4 (66.7%) with spinal tumors had a local recurrence, two of the letter developed pulmonary metastases. One local recurrence of the spine was successfully treated by serial arterial embolization, a procedure previously described only for sacral tumors. At last followup, 9 patients had no evidence of disease, 8 had stable disease, 1 had progressive disease, 1 died due to disease. Six patients had neurological deficits. Conclusions. GCT of the axial skeleton have a high local recurrence rate. Neurological deficits are common. En-bloc spondylectomy combined with embolization is the treatment of choice. In case of inoperability, serial arterial embolization seems to be an alternative not only for sacral but also for spinal tumors.

  14. Giant Cell Tumors of the Axial Skeleton

    PubMed Central

    Balke, Maurice; Henrichs, Marcel P.; Gosheger, Georg; Ahrens, Helmut; Streitbuerger, Arne; Koehler, Michael; Bullmann, Viola; Hardes, Jendrik

    2012-01-01

    Background. We report on 19 cases of giant cell tumor of bone (GCT) affecting the spine or sacrum and evaluate the outcome of different treatment modalities. Methods. Nineteen patients with GCT of the spine (n = 6) or sacrum (n = 13) have been included in this study. The mean followup was 51.6 months. Ten sacral GCT were treated by intralesional procedures of which 4 also received embolization, and 3 with irradiation only. All spinal GCT were surgically treated. Results. Two (15.4%) patients with sacral and 4 (66.7%) with spinal tumors had a local recurrence, two of the letter developed pulmonary metastases. One local recurrence of the spine was successfully treated by serial arterial embolization, a procedure previously described only for sacral tumors. At last followup, 9 patients had no evidence of disease, 8 had stable disease, 1 had progressive disease, 1 died due to disease. Six patients had neurological deficits. Conclusions. GCT of the axial skeleton have a high local recurrence rate. Neurological deficits are common. En-bloc spondylectomy combined with embolization is the treatment of choice. In case of inoperability, serial arterial embolization seems to be an alternative not only for sacral but also for spinal tumors. PMID:22448122

  15. Discovery of a Cretaceous Scleractinian Coral with a Calcitic Skeleton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolarski, J.; Meibom, A.; Przenioslo, R.; Mazur, M.

    2007-12-01

    It has been generally thought that scleractinian corals form purely aragonitic skeletons. We show that a well- preserved fossil coral, Coelosmilia sp. from the Upper Cretaceous (ca. 70 Ma), has preserved skeletal structural features identical to those observed in present day scleractinians. However, the skeleton of Coelosmilia sp. is entirely calcitic. Its fine-scale structure and chemistry indicate that the calcite is primary and did not from via diagenetic alteration of aragonite. This result implies that corals, like other groups of marine, calcium carbonate- producing organisms, can form skeletons of different carbonate polymorphs. Implications for coral biomineralization and evolution will be discussed.

  16. Interpolation of 3-D binary images based on morphological skeletonization.

    PubMed

    Chatzis, V; Pitas, I

    2000-07-01

    In this paper, the morphological skeleton interpolation (MSI) algorithm is presented. It is an efficient, shape-based interpolation method used for interpolating slices in a three-dimensional (3-D) binary object. It is based on morphological skeletonization, which is used for two-dimensional (2-D) slice representation. The proposed morphological skeleton matching process provides translation, rotation, and scaling information at the same time. The interpolated slices preserve the shape of the original object slices, when the slices have similar shapes. It can also modify the shape of an object when the successive slices do not have similar shapes. Applications on artificial and real data are also presented.

  17. Harmonic skeleton guided evaluation of stenoses in human coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yan; Zhu, Lei; Haker, Steven; Tannenbaum, Allen R; Giddens, Don P

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a novel approach that three-dimensionally visualizes and evaluates stenoses in human coronary arteries by using harmonic skeletons. A harmonic skeleton is the center line of a multi-branched tubular surface extracted based on a harmonic function, which is the solution of the Laplace equation. This skeletonization method guarantees smoothness and connectivity and provides a fast and straightforward way to calculate local cross-sectional areas of the arteries, and thus provides the possibility to localize and evaluate coronary artery stenosis, which is a commonly seen pathology in coronary artery disease.

  18. Skeleton-based shape analysis of protein models.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhong; Qin, Shengwei; Yu, Zeyun; Jin, Yao

    2014-09-01

    In order to compare the similarity between two protein models, a shape analysis algorithm based on skeleton extraction is presented in this paper. It firstly extracts the skeleton of a given protein surface by an improved Multi-resolution Reeb Graph (MRG) method. A number of points on the model surface are then collected to compute the local diameter (LD) according to the skeleton. Finally the LD frequency is calculated to build up the line chart, which is employed to analyze the shape similarity between protein models. Experimental results show that the similarity comparison using the proposed shape descriptor is more accurate especially for protein models with large deformations.

  19. Harmonic Skeleton Guided Evaluation of Stenoses in Human Coronary Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yan; Zhu, Lei; Haker, Steven; Tannenbaum, Allen R.; Giddens, Don P.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a novel approach that three-dimensionally visualizes and evaluates stenoses in human coronary arteries by using harmonic skeletons. A harmonic skeleton is the center line of a multi-branched tubular surface extracted based on a harmonic function, which is the solution of the Laplace equation. This skeletonization method guarantees smoothness and connectivity and provides a fast and straightforward way to calculate local cross-sectional areas of the arteries, and thus provides the possibility to localize and evaluate coronary artery stenosis, which is a commonly seen pathology in coronary artery disease. PMID:16685882

  20. Performance of skeleton-reinforced biomembranes in locomotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Qiang; Shoele, Kourosh

    2008-11-01

    Skeleton-reinforced biomembranes are ubiquitous in nature and play critical roles in many biological functions. Representative examples include insect wings, cell membranes, and mollusk nacres. In this study we focus on the ray fins of fish and investigate the effects of anisotropic flexibility on their performance. Employing a fluid-structure interaction algorithm by coupling a boundary-element model with a nonlinear structural model, we examined the dynamics of a membrane that is geometrically and structurally similar to a caudal fin. Several locomotion modes that closely resemble caudal fin kinematics reported in the literature are applied. Our results show that the flexibility of the fin significantly increases its capacity of thrust generation, manifested as increased efficiency, reduced transverse force, and reduced sensitivity to kinematic parameters. This design also makes the fin more controllable and deployable. Despite simplifications made in this model in terms of fin geometry, internal structure, and kinematics, detailed features of the simulated flow field are consistent with observations and speculations based upon Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements of flow around live fish.

  1. Canaliculi in the tessellated skeleton of cartilaginous fishes

    SciTech Connect

    Dean, M.N.; Socha, J.J.; Hall, B.K.; Summers, A.P.

    2010-08-04

    The endoskeletal elements of sharks and rays are comprised of an uncalcified, hyaline cartilage-like core overlain by a thin fibro-ceramic layer of mineralized hexagonal tiles (tesserae) adjoined by intertesseral fibers. The basic spatial relationships of the constituent tissues (unmineralized cartilage, mineralized cartilage, fibrous tissue) are well-known - endoskeletal tessellation is a long-recognized synapomorphy of elasmobranch fishes - but a high-resolution and three-dimensional (3D) understanding of their interactions has been hampered by difficulties in sample preparation and lack of technologies adequate for visualizing microstructure and microassociations. We used cryo-electron microscopy and synchrotron radiation tomography to investigate tessellated skeleton ultrastructure but without damage to the delicate relationships between constituent tissues or to the tesserae themselves. The combination of these techniques allowed visualization of never before appreciated internal structures, namely passages connecting the lacunar spaces within tesserae. These intratesseral 'canaliculi' link consecutive lacunar spaces into long lacunar strings, radiating outward from the center of tesserae. The continuity of extracellular matrix throughout the canalicular network may explain how chondrocytes in tesserae remain vital despite encasement in mineral. Extracellular fluid exchange may also permit transmission of nutrients, and mechanical and mineralization signals among chondrocytes, in a manner similar to the canalicular network in bone. These co-adapted mechanisms for the facilitated exchange of extracellular material suggest a level of parallelism in early chondrocyte and osteocyte evolution.

  2. Tables for technical writers

    Treesearch

    E. vH. Larson

    1947-01-01

    Practically every publication we issue contains tables of some sort. Tables offer a convenient way of presenting many kinds of information. And tables are badly abused. There are few places a writer can go to find out how to construct clear, compact, easy-to-read tables, and how to use them.

  3. 26 CFR 53.4958-0 - Table of contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 17 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Table of contents. 53.4958-0 Section 53.4958-0 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES (CONTINUED) FOUNDATION AND SIMILAR EXCISE TAXES Second Tier Excise Taxes § 53.4958-0 Table...

  4. 26 CFR 53.4958-0 - Table of contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 17 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Table of contents. 53.4958-0 Section 53.4958-0 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES (CONTINUED) FOUNDATION AND SIMILAR EXCISE TAXES Second Tier Excise Taxes § 53.4958-0 Table...

  5. 26 CFR 53.4958-0 - Table of contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 17 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Table of contents. 53.4958-0 Section 53.4958-0 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES (CONTINUED) FOUNDATION AND SIMILAR EXCISE TAXES Second Tier Excise Taxes § 53.4958-0 Table...

  6. 26 CFR 53.4958-0 - Table of contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 17 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Table of contents. 53.4958-0 Section 53.4958-0 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES (CONTINUED) FOUNDATION AND SIMILAR EXCISE TAXES Second Tier Excise Taxes § 53.4958-0 Table...

  7. 26 CFR 20.2056A-0 - Table of contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Table of contents. 20.2056A-0 Section 20.2056A-0 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ESTATE AND GIFT TAXES ESTATE TAX; ESTATES OF DECEDENTS DYING AFTER AUGUST 16, 1954 Taxable Estate § 20.2056A-0 Table of...

  8. 26 CFR 20.2031-0 - Table of contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Table of contents. 20.2031-0 Section 20.2031-0 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ESTATE AND GIFT TAXES ESTATE TAX; ESTATES OF DECEDENTS DYING AFTER AUGUST 16, 1954 Gross Estate § 20.2031-0 Table of contents...

  9. 26 CFR 20.2056A-0 - Table of contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Table of contents. 20.2056A-0 Section 20.2056A-0 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ESTATE AND GIFT TAXES ESTATE TAX; ESTATES OF DECEDENTS DYING AFTER AUGUST 16, 1954 Taxable Estate § 20.2056A-0 Table of...

  10. 26 CFR 20.2056A-0 - Table of contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Table of contents. 20.2056A-0 Section 20.2056A-0 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ESTATE AND GIFT TAXES ESTATE TAX; ESTATES OF DECEDENTS DYING AFTER AUGUST 16, 1954 Taxable Estate § 20.2056A-0 Table of...

  11. 26 CFR 20.2031-0 - Table of contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Table of contents. 20.2031-0 Section 20.2031-0 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ESTATE AND GIFT TAXES ESTATE TAX; ESTATES OF DECEDENTS DYING AFTER AUGUST 16, 1954 Gross Estate § 20.2031-0 Table of contents...

  12. 26 CFR 20.2031-0 - Table of contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Table of contents. 20.2031-0 Section 20.2031-0 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ESTATE AND GIFT TAXES ESTATE TAX; ESTATES OF DECEDENTS DYING AFTER AUGUST 16, 1954 Gross Estate § 20.2031-0 Table of contents...

  13. 26 CFR 20.2056A-0 - Table of contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Table of contents. 20.2056A-0 Section 20.2056A-0 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ESTATE AND GIFT TAXES ESTATE TAX; ESTATES OF DECEDENTS DYING AFTER AUGUST 16, 1954 Taxable Estate § 20.2056A-0 Table of...

  14. 26 CFR 20.2056A-0 - Table of contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Table of contents. 20.2056A-0 Section 20.2056A-0 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ESTATE AND GIFT TAXES ESTATE TAX; ESTATES OF DECEDENTS DYING AFTER AUGUST 16, 1954 Taxable Estate § 20.2056A-0 Table of...

  15. 26 CFR 301.7216-0T - Table of contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Table of contents. 301.7216-0T Section 301.7216-0T Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION Crimes, Other Offenses, and Forfeitures Crimes § 301.7216-0T Table...

  16. 26 CFR 301.7216-0T - Table of contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Table of contents. 301.7216-0T Section 301.7216-0T Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION Crimes, Other Offenses, and Forfeitures Crimes § 301.7216-0T Table...

  17. 26 CFR 301.7216-0T - Table of contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Table of contents. 301.7216-0T Section 301.7216-0T Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION Crimes, Other Offenses, and Forfeitures Crimes § 301.7216-0T Table...

  18. 26 CFR 1.436-0 - Table of contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Table of contents. 1.436-0 Section 1.436-0 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Certain Stock Options § 1.436-0 Table of contents. This section contains a listing of...

  19. Penetrating trauma to the facial skeleton by pickaxe - case report.

    PubMed

    Neskoromna-Jędrzejczak, Aneta; Bogusiak, Katarzyna; Przygoński, Aleksander; Timler, Dariusz

    2016-01-01

    Number of deaths related with injuries suffered as a result of experienced traumas is increasing. Penetrating traumas of the facial skeleton occur relatively rarely and much more often concern rather children than adults. Epidemiology relating this kind of trauma differs depending on the region of the world. In Poland, gunshot injuries as well as traumas caused by explosions of firecrackers or fireworks amount only to a slight percentage among all facial skeleton traumas, and the most common reason for penetrating traumas lies in accidents or assault with the use of sharp, narrow and long objects that easily enter bones of the facial skeleton. The present study reported the case of 50-year-old man who suffered from trauma of the facial skeleton, which resulted from foreign body (pickaxe) penetration into the subtemporal area, zygomatic arch and the right orbital cavity. The surgical treatment method and final outcome was presented and discussed.

  20. A method for finding three-dimensional magnetic skeletons

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, A. L.; Parnell, C. E.

    2010-09-15

    Magnetic fields are an essential component of a plasma. In many astrophysical, solar, magnetospheric, and laboratory situations the magnetic field in the plasma can be very dynamic and form highly complex structures. One approach to unraveling these structures is to determine the magnetic skeleton of the field, a set of topological features that divide the magnetic field into topologically distinct domains. In general, the features of the magnetic skeleton are difficult to locate, in particular those given by numerical experiments. In this paper, we propose a new set of tools to find the skeleton of general magnetic fields including null points, spines, separatrix surfaces, and separators. This set of tools is found to be considerably better at finding the skeleton than the currently favored methods used in magnetohydrodynamics.

  1. 41. Ground level photograph of two floors of skeleton complete ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. Ground level photograph of two floors of skeleton complete with 3rd and 4th floors being started,upper floors of county bldg visible - Chicago City Hall, 121 North LaSalle Street, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  2. Soluble organic matrices of aragonitic skeletons of Merulinidae (Cnidaria, Anthozoa).

    PubMed

    Dauphin, Yannicke; Cuif, Jean-Pierre; Williams, C Terry

    2008-05-01

    Our interpretation of the overall taxonomy and evolution of the Scleractinia, the most important reef builders in tropical areas, has long depended exclusively on morphology of the calcareous skeletons. The reported series of physical and biochemical characterizations of skeletons and the mineralizing matrices extracted from the skeletons allow, for the first time, the level of biochemical diversity among corallites of the same family to be estimated. Similarities and differences observed in the micro- and nanostructures of the skeletons reflect those of the soluble organic matrices. Sulphur is mainly associated with sulphated acidic sugars. The role of sulphated sugars on the biomineralization processes is still underestimated. The resulting data suggest that environmental conditions may act on the mineralization process through the detailed compositions of the mineralizing matrices.

  3. Skeleton extraction based on the topology and Snakes model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Yuanxue; Ming, Chengguo; Qin, Yueting

    A new skeleton line extraction method based on topology and flux is proposed by analyzing the distribution characteristics of the gradient vector field in the Snakes model. The distribution characteristics of the skeleton line are accurately obtained by calculating the eigenvalues of the critical points and the flux of the gradient vector field. Then the skeleton lines can be effectively extracted. The results also show that there is no need for the pretreatment or binarization of the target image. The skeleton lines of complex gray images such as optical interference patterns can be effectively extracted by using this method. Compared to traditional methods, this method has many advantages, such as high extraction accuracy and fast processing speed.

  4. Regulation of glucose metabolism and the skeleton.

    PubMed

    Ng, Kong Wah

    2011-08-01

    Complex interactions occur among adipose tissue, the central nervous system, bone and pancreas to integrate bone remodelling, glucose, lipid and energy metabolism. Data obtained largely from the judicious use of gain-of-function and loss-of-function genetic mouse models show that leptin, an adipocyte-secreted product, indirectly inhibits bone accrual through a central pathway comprising the hypothalamus and central nervous system. Increased sympathetic output acting via β2-adrenergic receptors present in osteoblasts decreases bone formation and causes increased bone resorption. Insulin is a key molecular link between bone remodelling and energy metabolism. Insulin signalling in the osteoblasts increases bone formation and resorption as well as the release of undercarboxylated osteocalcin. An increase in the release of bone-derived undercarboxylated osteocalcin into the systemic circulation enables it to act as a circulating hormone to stimulate insulin production and secretion by pancreatic β-cells and adiponectin by adipocytes. Insulin sensitivity increases, lipolysis and fat accumulation decreases while energy expenditure increases. Whether this model of integrative physiology involving the skeleton, pancreas and adipose tissue, so elegantly demonstrated in rodents, is applicable to humans is controversial. The mouse Esp gene, encoding an intracellular tyrosine phosphatase that negatively regulates insulin signalling in osteoblasts, is a pseudogene in humans, and a homolog for the Esp gene has so far not been identified in humans. A close homologue of Esp, PTP1B, is expressed in human osteoblasts and could take the role of Esp in humans. Data available from the limited number of clinical studies do not provide a sufficient body of evidence to determine whether osteocalcin or undercarboxylated osteocalcin affects glucose metabolism in humans. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. The Skeleton of the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zucker, Catherine; Battersby, Cara; Goodman, Alyssa

    2015-12-01

    Recently, Goodman et al. argued that the very long, very thin infrared dark cloud “Nessie” lies directly in the Galactic midplane and runs along the Scutum-Centaurus Arm in position-position-velocity (p-p-v) space as traced by lower-density {{CO}} and higher-density {{NH}}3 gas. Nessie was presented as the first “bone” of the Milky Way, an extraordinarily long, thin, high-contrast filament that can be used to map our Galaxy’s “skeleton.” Here we present evidence for additional bones in the Milky Way, arguing that Nessie is not a curiosity but one of several filaments that could potentially trace Galactic structure. Our 10 bone candidates are all long, filamentary, mid-infrared extinction features that lie parallel to, and no more than 20 pc from, the physical Galactic mid-plane. We use {{CO}}, {{{N}}}2{{{H}}}+, {{{HCO}}}+, and {{NH}}3 radial velocity data to establish the three-dimensional location of the candidates in p-p-v space. Of the 10 candidates, 6 also have a projected aspect ratio of ≥50:1 run along, or extremely close to, the Scutum-Centaurus Arm in p-p-v space; and exhibit no abrupt shifts in velocity. The evidence presented here suggests that these candidates mark the locations of significant spiral features, with the bone called filament 5 (“BC_18.88-0.09”) being a close analog to Nessie in the northern sky. As molecular spectral-line and extinction maps cover more of the sky at increasing resolution and sensitivity, it should be possible to find more bones in future studies.

  6. Fracture occurrence from radionuclides in the skeleton

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, R.D.; Taylor, G.N.; Miller, S.C.

    2000-06-01

    Because skeletal fractures were an important finding among persons contaminated with {sup 226}Ra, experience with fractures among dogs in the colony was summarized to determine the projected significance for persons contaminated with bone-seeking radionuclides. Comparison by Fisher's Exact Test of lifetime fracture occurrence in the skeletons of beagles injected as young adults suggested that for animals given {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra, {sup 228}Th, or {sup 239}Pu citrate, there was probably an excess over controls in fractures of the ribs, leg bones, spinous processes, and pelvis (os coxae) plus the mandible for dogs given {sup 226}Ra and the scapulae for dogs given {sup 228}Ra or 228 Th. Regression analysis indicated that significantly elevated fracture occurrence was especially notable at the higher radiation doses, at about 50 Gy average skeletal dose for {sup 239}Pu, 140 Gy for {sup 226}Ra, about 40 Gy for {sup 228}Ra, and more than 15 Gy for {sup 228}Th. The average number of fractures per dog was significantly elevated over that noted in controls for the highest radiation doses of {sup 239}Pu and {sup 226}Ra and for the higher doses of {sup 228}Ra and {sup 228}Th. For those dogs given {sup 90}Sr citrate, there was virtually no important difference from control beagles not given radionuclides, even at group mean cumulative skeletal radiation doses up to 101 Gy. Because of a large proportion of dogs with fractures that died with bone malignancy (even at dosage levels lower than those exhibiting an excess average number of fractures per dog), they conclude that fracture would not be an important endpoint at lower levels of plutonium contamination in humans such as would be expected to occur from occupational or environmental exposure.

  7. A Geometric Investigation of the Skeleton of CSG Objects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-02-14

    picture the four conical surface extensions have been clipped almost entiicly. 14 4 Voronoi Surfaces between Surface Pairs We now consider the geometry of...analysis of Voronoi surfaces from which the skeleton is composed. ( 1 Introduction A common design paradigm in mechanical engineering is to create complex...objects as a first step in mesh generation [10]. The balance of this section defines the skeleton and its constituent elements, Voronoi surfaces and

  8. Ultrastructure of the intact skeleton of the human erythrocyte membrane.

    PubMed

    Shen, B W; Josephs, R; Steck, T L

    1986-03-01

    Filamentous skeletons were liberated from isolated human erythrocyte membranes in Triton X-100, spread on fenestrated carbon films, negatively stained, and viewed intact and unfixed in the transmission electron microscope. Two forms of the skeleton were examined: (a) basic skeletons, stripped of accessory proteins with 1.5 M NaCl so that they contain predominantly polypeptide bands 1, 2, 4.1, and 5; and (b) unstripped skeletons, which also bore accessory proteins such as ankyrin and band 3 and small plaques of residual lipid. Freshly prepared skeletons were highly condensed. Incubation at low ionic strength and in the presence of dithiothreitol for an hour or more caused an expansion of the skeletons, which greatly increased the visibility of their elements. The expansion may reflect the opening of spectrin from a compact to an elongated disposition. Expanded skeletons appeared to be organized as networks of short actin filaments joined by multiple (5-8) spectrin tetramers. In unstripped preparations, globular masses were observed near the centers of the spectrin filaments, probably corresponding to complexes of ankyrin with band 3 oligomers. Some of these globules linked pairs of spectrin filaments. Skeletons prepared with a minimum of perturbation had thickened actin protofilaments, presumably reflecting the presence of accessory proteins. The length of these actin filaments was highly uniform, averaging 33 +/- 5 nm. This is the length of nonmuscle tropomyosin. Since there is almost enough tropomyosin present to saturate the F-actin, our data support the hypothesis that tropomyosin may determine the length of actin protofilaments in the red cell membrane.

  9. Biology of bone and how it orchestrates the form and function of the skeleton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sommerfeldt, D. W.; Rubin, C. T.

    2001-01-01

    The principal role of the skeleton is to provide structural support for the body. While the skeleton also serves as the body's mineral reservoir, the mineralized structure is the very basis of posture, opposes muscular contraction resulting in motion, withstands functional load bearing, and protects internal organs. Although the mass and morphology of the skeleton is defined, to some extent, by genetic determinants, it is the tissue's ability to remodel--the local resorption and formation of bone--which is responsible for achieving this intricate balance between competing responsibilities. The aim of this review is to address bone's form-function relationship, beginning with extensive research in the musculoskeletal disciplines, and focusing on several recent cellular and molecular discoveries which help understand the complex interdependence of bone cells, growth factors, physical stimuli, metabolic demands, and structural responsibilities. With a clinical and spine-oriented audience in mind, the principles of bone cell and molecular biology and physiology are presented, and an attempt has been made to incorporate epidemiologic data and therapeutic implications. Bone research remains interdisciplinary by nature, and a deeper understanding of bone biology will ultimately lead to advances in the treatment of diseases and injuries to bone itself.

  10. Biology of bone and how it orchestrates the form and function of the skeleton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sommerfeldt, D. W.; Rubin, C. T.

    2001-01-01

    The principal role of the skeleton is to provide structural support for the body. While the skeleton also serves as the body's mineral reservoir, the mineralized structure is the very basis of posture, opposes muscular contraction resulting in motion, withstands functional load bearing, and protects internal organs. Although the mass and morphology of the skeleton is defined, to some extent, by genetic determinants, it is the tissue's ability to remodel--the local resorption and formation of bone--which is responsible for achieving this intricate balance between competing responsibilities. The aim of this review is to address bone's form-function relationship, beginning with extensive research in the musculoskeletal disciplines, and focusing on several recent cellular and molecular discoveries which help understand the complex interdependence of bone cells, growth factors, physical stimuli, metabolic demands, and structural responsibilities. With a clinical and spine-oriented audience in mind, the principles of bone cell and molecular biology and physiology are presented, and an attempt has been made to incorporate epidemiologic data and therapeutic implications. Bone research remains interdisciplinary by nature, and a deeper understanding of bone biology will ultimately lead to advances in the treatment of diseases and injuries to bone itself.

  11. [Characteristics of local human skeleton reactions to microgravity and drug treatment of osteoporosis in clinic].

    PubMed

    Oganov, V S; Skripnikova, I A; Novikov, V E; Bakulin, A V; Kabitskaia, O E; Murashko, L M

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of the results of long-term investigations of bones in cosmonauts flown on the orbital station MIR and International space station (n = 80) was performed. Theoretically predicted (evolutionary predefined) change in mass of different skeleton bones was found to correlate (r = 0.904) with position relatively the Earth's gravity vector. Vector dependence of bone loss ensues from local specificity of expression of bone metabolism genes which reflects mechanic prehistory of skeleton structures in the evolution of Homo erectus. Genetic polymorphism is accountable for high individual variability of bone loss attested by the dependence of bone loss rate on polymorphism of certain bone metabolism markers. Parameters of one and the other orbital vehicle did not modulate individual-specific stability of the bone loss ratio in different segments of the skeleton. This fact is considered as a phenotype fingerprint of local metabolism in the form of a locus-unique spatial structure of distribution of noncollagenous proteins responsible for position regulation of endosteal metabolism. Drug treatment of osteoporosis (n = 107) evidences that recovery rate depends on bone location; the most likely reason is different effectiveness of local osteotrophic intervention into areas of bustling resorption.

  12. 40 CFR Table 27 to Subpart G of... - Summary of Internal Floating Deck Fitting Loss Factors (KF) and Typical Number of Fittings (NF)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Summary of Internal Floating Deck... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL... Automatic gauge float well 1. Bolted cover, gasketed 5.1 Unbolted cover, gasketed 15 Unbolted...

  13. 26 CFR 1.41-0T - Table of contents (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Table of contents (temporary). 1.41-0T Section 1.41-0T Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY INCOME TAX INCOME TAXES Credits Against Tax § 1.41-0T Table of contents (temporary). This section lists the table of contents for...

  14. 26 CFR 1.41-0T - Table of contents (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Table of contents (temporary). 1.41-0T Section 1.41-0T Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY INCOME TAX INCOME TAXES Credits Against Tax § 1.41-0T Table of contents (temporary). This section lists the table of contents for...

  15. Tabled Execution in Scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Willcock, J J; Lumsdaine, A; Quinlan, D J

    2008-08-19

    Tabled execution is a generalization of memorization developed by the logic programming community. It not only saves results from tabled predicates, but also stores the set of currently active calls to them; tabled execution can thus provide meaningful semantics for programs that seemingly contain infinite recursions with the same arguments. In logic programming, tabled execution is used for many purposes, both for improving the efficiency of programs, and making tasks simpler and more direct to express than with normal logic programs. However, tabled execution is only infrequently applied in mainstream functional languages such as Scheme. We demonstrate an elegant implementation of tabled execution in Scheme, using a mix of continuation-passing style and mutable data. We also show the use of tabled execution in Scheme for a problem in formal language and automata theory, demonstrating that tabled execution can be a valuable tool for Scheme users.

  16. Bones in the heart skeleton of the otter (Lutra lutra)

    PubMed Central

    EGERBACHER, MONIKA; WEBER, HEIKE; HAUER, SILKE

    2000-01-01

    In most mammalian species the cardiac skeleton is composed of coarse collagen fibres, fibrocartilage, and pieces of hyaline cartilage. Bone, the os cordis, is a regular constituent of the ruminant heart. The cardiac skeleton of the otter (Lutra lutra) has not previously been described. The skeleton in 30 otter hearts was studied by x-ray analysis and light microscopy. Serial sections were cut parallel to the atrioventricular plane and histochemical staining methods were performed to identify connective tissue fibres, glycosaminoglycans, mineral deposits, and bone. Age and sex of the animals under investigation were considered. The otter heart skeleton was composed of coarse collagen fibres with intercalated pieces of fibrous and/or hyaline cartilage, calcified cartilage, and lamellar bone with red or white marrow. Pieces of hyaline cartilage were not clearly defined: a perichondrial layer was missing and coarse connective tissue continuously transformed into fibrous and hyaline cartilage. In both sexes the amount of cartilage and bone were found to increase with age. Our results establish the presence of bony material in the heart skeleton of the otter, a small mammalian species. This finding indicates that differentiation of bone is not exclusively related to the size of the organ. Increasing amounts of calcified cartilage and bone correlated with increasing age. PMID:10853970

  17. Anatomical changes in the East Asian midface skeleton with aging.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Anna; Sung, Ki Hyuk; Kim, Sang Duck; Lee, U-Young; Lee, Je-Hun; Han, Seung-Ho; Sui, Hong-Jin

    2017-03-29

    Understanding the aging process of the midface skeleton is considered crucial for correct facial rejuvenation. However, the canine fossa, an important morphological feature of the midface skeleton, has not yet been observed in connection with aging, despite the fact that it is the most main part of the maxillary bone. Here, the authors focus on the depression of the canine fossa to evaluate the Asian midface skeleton. Computed tomography (CT) scans of the facial skeleton of 114 Koreans (59 males and 55 females) were reconstructed to three-dimensional (3-D) images using a 3-D analysis software program. The study subjects included 27 young males, 32 old males, 28 young females and 27 old females. The angular measurements of 3 bony regions were measured for each 3-D model: the canine fossa angle (assessing depth of the canine fossa), the maxillary angle (assessing orientation of the lateral maxilla) and the piriform angle (assessing orientation of the medial maxilla). The canine fossa angle showed a statistically significant decrease with aging in both sexes, indicating the canine fossa actually becomes more concave with age. In contrast, the maxillary and piriform angle showed statistically insignificant changes with aging in female subjects. These results suggest that the canine fossa may be one of the effective markers to evaluate the anatomical changes to the facial skeleton with midface aging.

  18. Taphonomy of the Tianyuandong human skeleton and faunal remains.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Jalvo, Yolanda; Andrews, Peter; Tong, HaoWen

    2015-06-01

    Tianyuan Cave is an Upper Palaeolithic site, 6 km from the core area of the Zhoukoudian Site Complex. Tianyuandong (or Tianyuan Cave) yielded one ancient (though not the earliest) fossil skeleton of Homo sapiens in China (42-39 ka cal BP). Together with the human skeleton, abundant animal remains were found, but no stone tools were recovered. The animal fossil remains are extremely fragmentary, in contrast to human skeletal elements that are, for the most part, complete. We undertook a taphonomic study to investigate the circumstances of preservation of the human skeleton in Tianyuan Cave, and in course of this we considered four hypotheses: funerary ritual, cannibalism, carnivore activity or natural death. Taphonomic results characterize the role of human action in the site and how these agents acted in the past. Because of disturbance of the human skeleton during its initial excavation, it is not known if it was in a grave cut or if there was any funerary ritual. No evidence was found for cannibalism or carnivore activity in relation to the human skeleton, suggesting natural death as the most reasonable possibility. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Skeleton deformation of red blood cells during tank treading motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Qiang; Peng, Zhangli

    2012-11-01

    By coupling a fluid-structure interaction algorithm with a three-level multiscale structural model, we simulate the tank treading responses of erythrocytes (red blood cells, or RBC) in shear flows. The fluid motion is depicted within the Stokes-flow framework, and is mathematically formulated with the boundary integral equations. The structural model takes into account the flexible connectivity between the lipid bilayer and the protein skeleton as well as the viscoelastic responses. The concentration of this study is on the transient process involving the development of the local area deformation of the protein skeleton. Under the assumption that the protein skeleton is stress-free in the natural biconcave configuration, our simulations indicate the following properties: (1) During tank treading motions it takes long time for significant area deformations to establish. For cells with diminished connectivity between the lipid bilayer and the protein skeleton (e.g. cells with mutations or defects), the relaxation time will be greatly reduced; (2) Deformations of the skeleton depend on the initial orientation of the cell with respect to the incoming flow; (3) The maximum area expansion occurs around the regions corresponding to the dimples in the original biconcave state; (4) Oscillations in cell geometry (breathing) and orientation (e.g. swinging) are observed. This work was supported by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute under award number R01HL092793.

  20. Micro- to nanostructure and geochemistry of extant crinoidal echinoderm skeletons.

    PubMed

    Gorzelak, P; Stolarski, J; Mazur, M; Meibom, A

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports the results of micro- to nanostructural and geochemical analyses of calcitic skeletons from extant deep-sea stalked crinoids. Fine-scale (SEM, FESEM, AFM) observations show that the crinoid skeleton is composed of carbonate nanograins, about 20-100 nm in diameter, which are partly separated by what appears to be a few nm thick organic layers. Sub-micrometre-scale geochemical mapping of crinoid ossicles using a NanoSIMS ion microprobe, combined with synchrotron high-spatial-resolution X-ray micro-fluorescence (μ-XRF) maps and X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy (XANES) show that high Mg concentration in the central region of the stereom bars correlates with the distribution of S-sulphate, which is often associated with sulphated polysaccharides in biocarbonates. These data are consistent with biomineralization models suggesting a close association between organic components (including sulphated polysaccharides) and Mg ions. Additionally, geochemical analyses (NanoSIMS, energy dispersive spectroscopy) reveal that significant variations in Mg occur at many levels: within a single stereom trabecula, within a single ossicle and within a skeleton of a single animal. Together, these data suggest that physiological factors play an important role in controlling Mg content in crinoid skeletons and that great care should be taken when using their skeletons to reconstruct, for example, palaeotemperatures and Mg/Ca palaeo-variations of the ocean. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Periodic Table of Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Mike

    1998-01-01

    Presents an exercise in which an eighth-grade science teacher decorated the classroom with a periodic table of students. Student photographs were arranged according to similarities into vertical columns. Students were each assigned an atomic number according to their placement in the table. The table is then used to teach students about…

  2. Periodic Table of Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Mike

    1998-01-01

    Presents an exercise in which an eighth-grade science teacher decorated the classroom with a periodic table of students. Student photographs were arranged according to similarities into vertical columns. Students were each assigned an atomic number according to their placement in the table. The table is then used to teach students about…

  3. Food Composition Tables of Japan and the Nutrient Table/Database.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Tomoko

    2015-01-01

    A global food composition database has been constructed by the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) based on food composition tables from every country in the world. To improve this database, the FAO has organized the International Network of Food Data Systems (INFOODS). The most recent version of the food composition table for Japan was published by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology and is presented in three books: "Standard Tables of Food Composition Japan-2010-," "Fatty Acid Composition of Foods-2005-," and "Amino Acid Composition of Foods-2010-." The Standard Tables of Food Composition in Japan-2015- (Energy, General Components, Minerals, Vitamins, etc. Section; Fatty Acids Section; Amino Acids Section; Carbohydrates Section) will be published in 2015 and is expected to play an important role as one of the main tables of the East Asia food composition tables.

  4. 26 CFR 1.1561-0 - Table of contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) Definitions. (b) Special rules. (1) S Corporation. (2) 52-53-week taxable year. (c) Tax avoidance. (d... Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Certain Controlled Corporations § 1.1561-0 Table of contents. This section lists the table...

  5. SAR image segmentation using skeleton-based fuzzy clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yun Yi; Chen, Yan Qiu

    2003-06-01

    SAR image segmentation can be converted to a clustering problem in which pixels or small patches are grouped together based on local feature information. In this paper, we present a novel framework for segmentation. The segmentation goal is achieved by unsupervised clustering upon characteristic descriptors extracted from local patches. The mixture model of characteristic descriptor, which combines intensity and texture feature, is investigated. The unsupervised algorithm is derived from the recently proposed Skeleton-Based Data Labeling method. Skeletons are constructed as prototypes of clusters to represent arbitrary latent structures in image data. Segmentation using Skeleton-Based Fuzzy Clustering is able to detect the types of surfaces appeared in SAR images automatically without any user input.

  6. A vanished history of skeletonization in Cambrian comb jellies

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Qiang; Xiao, Shuhai; Han, Jian; Sun, Ge; Zhang, Fang; Zhang, Zhifei; Shu, Degan

    2015-01-01

    Ctenophores are traditionally regarded as “lower” metazoans, sharing with cnidarians a diploblastic grade of organization. Unlike cnidarians, where skeletonization (biomineralization and sclerotization) evolved repeatedly among ecologically important taxa (for example, scleractinians and octocorals), living ctenophores are characteristically soft-bodied animals. We report six sclerotized and armored ctenophores from the early Cambrian period. They have diagnostic ctenophore features (for example, an octamerous symmetry, oral-aboral axis, aboral sense organ, and octaradially arranged ctene rows). Unlike most modern counterparts, however, they lack tentacles, have a sclerotized framework, and have eight pairs of ctene rows. They are resolved as a monophyletic group (Scleroctenophora new class) within the ctenophores. This clade reveals a cryptic history and sheds new light on the early evolution of this basal animal phylum. Skeletonization also occurs in some other Cambrian animal groups whose extant members are exclusively soft-bodied, suggesting the ecological importance of skeletonization in the Cambrian explosion. PMID:26601209

  7. A vanished history of skeletonization in Cambrian comb jellies.

    PubMed

    Ou, Qiang; Xiao, Shuhai; Han, Jian; Sun, Ge; Zhang, Fang; Zhang, Zhifei; Shu, Degan

    2015-07-01

    Ctenophores are traditionally regarded as "lower" metazoans, sharing with cnidarians a diploblastic grade of organization. Unlike cnidarians, where skeletonization (biomineralization and sclerotization) evolved repeatedly among ecologically important taxa (for example, scleractinians and octocorals), living ctenophores are characteristically soft-bodied animals. We report six sclerotized and armored ctenophores from the early Cambrian period. They have diagnostic ctenophore features (for example, an octamerous symmetry, oral-aboral axis, aboral sense organ, and octaradially arranged ctene rows). Unlike most modern counterparts, however, they lack tentacles, have a sclerotized framework, and have eight pairs of ctene rows. They are resolved as a monophyletic group (Scleroctenophora new class) within the ctenophores. This clade reveals a cryptic history and sheds new light on the early evolution of this basal animal phylum. Skeletonization also occurs in some other Cambrian animal groups whose extant members are exclusively soft-bodied, suggesting the ecological importance of skeletonization in the Cambrian explosion.

  8. Hot cell examination table

    DOEpatents

    Gaal, Peter S.; Ebejer, Lino P.; Kareis, James H.; Schlegel, Gary L.

    1991-01-01

    A table for use in a hot cell or similar controlled environment for use in examining specimens. The table has a movable table top that can be moved relative to a table frame. A shaft is fixedly mounted to the frame for axial rotation. A shaft traveler having a plurality of tilted rollers biased against the shaft is connected to the table top such that rotation of the shaft causes the shaft traveler to roll along the shaft. An electromagnetic drive is connected to the shaft and the frame for controllably rotating the shaft.

  9. Mortality table construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutawanir

    2015-12-01

    Mortality tables play important role in actuarial studies such as life annuities, premium determination, premium reserve, valuation pension plan, pension funding. Some known mortality tables are CSO mortality table, Indonesian Mortality Table, Bowers mortality table, Japan Mortality table. For actuary applications some tables are constructed with different environment such as single decrement, double decrement, and multiple decrement. There exist two approaches in mortality table construction : mathematics approach and statistical approach. Distribution model and estimation theory are the statistical concepts that are used in mortality table construction. This article aims to discuss the statistical approach in mortality table construction. The distributional assumptions are uniform death distribution (UDD) and constant force (exponential). Moment estimation and maximum likelihood are used to estimate the mortality parameter. Moment estimation methods are easier to manipulate compared to maximum likelihood estimation (mle). However, the complete mortality data are not used in moment estimation method. Maximum likelihood exploited all available information in mortality estimation. Some mle equations are complicated and solved using numerical methods. The article focus on single decrement estimation using moment and maximum likelihood estimation. Some extension to double decrement will introduced. Simple dataset will be used to illustrated the mortality estimation, and mortality table.

  10. Medical History: Arthritis in Saxon and mediaeval skeletons

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Juliet; Watt, Iain; Dieppe, Paul

    1981-01-01

    Examination of 400 Saxon, Romano-British, and mediaeval skeletons from seven archaeological excavations in the west of England showed an unexpectedly high incidence of osteoarthritis and osteophytosis. Three skeletons had evidence of an erosive peripheral arthritis—one with probable gout, one probable psoriatic arthropathy, and one with possible rheumatoid arthritis. The pattern and types of rheumatic disease, and the resultant disability, were apparently different. An exuberant form of large joint osteoarthritis was common and rheumatoid arthritis and similar diseases rare. ImagesFIGS 1-2FIGS 3-4FIGS 5-6 PMID:6797606

  11. Chemical transformations on botryane skeleton. Effect on the cytotoxic activity.

    PubMed

    Reino, José L; Durán-Patrón, Rosa; Segura, Inmaculada; Hernández-Galán, Rosario; Riese, Hans H; Collado, Isidro G

    2003-03-01

    Eighteen compounds with a botryane skeleton have been obtained through chemical transformations of various toxins from the fungus Botrytis cinerea. During the course of these transformations, the C-10 carbon of the botryane skeleton was found to exhibit an interesting high regioselectivity to oxidizing and reducing agents. In addition, the cytotoxicity of 27 botryane derivatives was determined in vitro against Hs578T, MDA-MB-231, HT-1080, U87-MG, IMR-90, and HUVEC cell lines. The results of this study confirm that the cytotoxicity of botrydial (1) and its derivatives is related to the presence of a 1,5-dialdehyde functionality.

  12. Anatomy-based 3D skeleton extraction from femur model.

    PubMed

    Gharenazifam, Mina; Arbabi, Ehsan

    2014-11-01

    Using 3D models of bones can highly improve accuracy and reliability of orthopaedic evaluation. However, it may impose excessive computational load. This article proposes a fully automatic method for extracting a compact model of the femur from its 3D model. The proposed method works by extracting a 3D skeleton based on the clinical parameters of the femur. Therefore, in addition to summarizing a 3D model of the bone, the extracted skeleton would preserve important clinical and anatomical information. The proposed method has been applied on 3D models of 10 femurs and the results have been evaluated for different resolutions of data.

  13. Synthesis of Novel Basic Skeletons Derived from Naltrexone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagase, Hiroshi; Fujii, Hideaki

    We will describe eight interesting reactions using naltrexone derivatives. Almost all these reactions are characteristic of naltrexone derivatives, and can lead to the synthesis of many novel skeletons that provide new interesting pharmacological data. Some of the new reactions that were found with naltrexone derivatives were expanded into general reactions. For example, the reaction of 6α-hydroxyaldehyde derived from naltrexone led to the oxazoline dimer and the 1,3,5-trioxazatriquinane skeleton (triplet drug); this reaction was applied to general ketones which were converted to α-hydroxyaldehydes, followed by conversion to dimers and trimers, as described in Sect. 7.

  14. Caterpillars use the substrate as their external skeleton

    PubMed Central

    Trimmer, Barry

    2010-01-01

    Animals that lack rigid structures often employ pressurization to maintain body form and posture. Structural stability is then provided by incompressible fluids or tissues and the inflated morphology is called a hydrostatic skeleton. However, new ground reaction force data from the caterpillar, Manduca sexta suggest an alternate strategy for large soft animals moving in complex three dimensional structures. When crawling, Manduca can keep its body primarily in tension and transmit compressive deformation using the substrate. This effectively allows the caterpillar to minimize reliance on a hydrostatic skeleton and helps it conform to the environment. We call this alternative strategy an “environmental skeleton”. PMID:21057644

  15. Shedding Light on the Cosmic Skeleton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-11-01

    Astronomers have tracked down a gigantic, previously unknown assembly of galaxies located almost seven billion light-years away from us. The discovery, made possible by combining two of the most powerful ground-based telescopes in the world, is the first observation of such a prominent galaxy structure in the distant Universe, providing further insight into the cosmic web and how it formed. "Matter is not distributed uniformly in the Universe," says Masayuki Tanaka from ESO, who led the new study. "In our cosmic vicinity, stars form in galaxies and galaxies usually form groups and clusters of galaxies. The most widely accepted cosmological theories predict that matter also clumps on a larger scale in the so-called 'cosmic web', in which galaxies, embedded in filaments stretching between voids, create a gigantic wispy structure." These filaments are millions of light years long and constitute the skeleton of the Universe: galaxies gather around them, and immense galaxy clusters form at their intersections, lurking like giant spiders waiting for more matter to digest. Scientists are struggling to determine how they swirl into existence. Although massive filamentary structures have been often observed at relatively small distances from us, solid proof of their existence in the more distant Universe has been lacking until now. The team led by Tanaka discovered a large structure around a distant cluster of galaxies in images they obtained earlier. They have now used two major ground-based telescopes to study this structure in greater detail, measuring the distances from Earth of over 150 galaxies, and, hence, obtaining a three-dimensional view of the structure. The spectroscopic observations were performed using the VIMOS instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope and FOCAS on the Subaru Telescope, operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan. Thanks to these and other observations, the astronomers were able to make a real demographic study of this structure

  16. Tensegrity and mechanoregulation: from skeleton to cytoskeleton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. S.; Ingber, D. E.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To elucidate how mechanical stresses that are applied to the whole organism are transmitted to individual cells and transduced into a biochemical response. DESIGN: In this article, we describe fundamental design principles that are used to stabilize the musculoskeletal system at many different size scales and show that these design features are embodied in one particular form of architecture that is known as tensegrity. RESULTS: Tensegrity structures are characterized by use of continuous tension and local compression; architecture, prestress (internal stress prior to application of external force), and triangulation play the most critical roles in terms of determining their mechanical stability. In living organisms, use of a hierarchy of tensegrity networks both optimizes structural efficiency and provides a mechanism to mechanically couple the parts with the whole: mechanical stresses applied at the macroscale result in structural rearrangements at the cell and molecular level. CONCLUSION: Due to use of tensegrity architecture, mechanical stress is concentrated and focused on signal transducing molecules that physically associate with cell surface molecules that anchor cells to extracellular matrix, such as integrins, and with load-bearing elements within the internal cytoskeleton and nucleus. Mechanochemical transduction may then proceed through local stress-dependent changes in molecular mechanics, thermodynamics, and kinetics within the cell. In this manner, the entire cellular response to stress may be orchestrated and tuned by altering the prestress in the cell, just as changing muscular tone can alter mechanical stability and structural coordination throughout the whole musculoskeletal system.

  17. Reconstruction of body height from the skeleton: Testing a dozen different methods for consistency of their results.

    PubMed

    Sierp, Ingrid; Henneberg, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    There are a number of methods of physical anthropology available to reconstruct living stature from skeletal remains. Some methods use dimensions of just a few bones, together with regression equations (mathematical, see Table 1: 1-7), while other methods require the whole skeleton and simply add the heights of specific skeletal components (anatomical, see Table 1: 8-11). This study investigates the consistency that mathematical and anatomical methods can provide in the determination of stature from skeletal remains. A significant difference was found between average heights of the same 20 individuals determined from seven mathematical and four anatomical methods (paired t-test, p < 0.001, df = 19). Mathematical methods provided taller height estimates than anatomical methods; the average difference was 47 mm. A repeated measures ANOVA indicated significant differences in the heights determined by all methods (p < 0.0001). Analysis of variance indicated significant differences in the heights determined by various mathematical methods (p < 0.03), whereas there were no significant differences in the heights amongst various anatomical methods (p < 0.77). When simple proportions of the length of the long bones to stature are used for reconstruction (see Table 1: 12), a bias is shown by mathematical methods to overestimate statures of short individuals and underestimate statures of taller individuals. To reduce this bias of linear regressions, we suggest that alternate methods, such as reduced major axis or organic correlation, should be employed (see Table 1: 13-15).

  18. A synthesis of the carbon skeleton of maoecrystal V.

    PubMed

    Krawczuk, Paul J; Schöne, Niklas; Baran, Phil S

    2009-11-05

    An enantioselective synthesis of the maoecrystal V (1) carbon skeleton is described. The key transformations include arylation of a 1,3-dicarbonyl compound with a triarylbismuth(V) dichloride species, oxidative dearomatization of a phenol, and a subsequent intramolecular Diels-Alder reaction.

  19. A Synthesis of the Carbon Skeleton of Maoecrystal V

    PubMed Central

    Krawczuk, Paul J.; Schöne, Niklas; Baran, Phil S.

    2009-01-01

    An enantioselective synthesis of the maoecrystal V (1) carbon skeleton is described. The key transformations include arylation of a 1,3-dicarbonyl compound with a triarylbismuth(V)dichloride species, oxidative dearomatization of a phenol, and a subsequent intramolecular Diels-Alder reaction. PMID:19795876

  20. A practical introduction to skeletons for the plant sciences1

    PubMed Central

    Bucksch, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Before the availability of digital photography resulting from the invention of charged couple devices in 1969, the measurement of plant architecture was a manual process either on the plant itself or on traditional photographs. The introduction of cheap digital imaging devices for the consumer market enabled the wide use of digital images to capture the shape of plant networks such as roots, tree crowns, or leaf venation. Plant networks contain geometric traits that can establish links to genetic or physiological characteristics, support plant breeding efforts, drive evolutionary studies, or serve as input to plant growth simulations. Typically, traits are encoded in shape descriptors that are computed from imaging data. Skeletons are one class of shape descriptors that are used to describe the hierarchies and extent of branching and looping plant networks. While the mathematical understanding of skeletons is well developed, their application within the plant sciences remains challenging because the quality of the measurement depends partly on the interpretation of the skeleton. This article is meant to bridge the skeletonization literature in the plant sciences and related technical fields by discussing best practices for deriving diameters and approximating branching hierarchies in a plant network. PMID:25202645

  1. The ocular skeleton through the eye of evo-devo.

    PubMed

    Franz-Odendaal, Tamara Anne

    2011-09-15

    An evolutionary developmental (evo-devo) approach to understanding the evolution, homology, and development of structures has proved important for unraveling complex integrated skeletal systems through the use of modules, or modularity. An ocular skeleton, which consists of cartilage and sometimes bone, is present in many vertebrates; however, the origin of these two components remains elusive. Using both paleontological and developmental data, I propose that the vertebrate ocular skeleton is neural crest derived and that a single cranial neural crest module divided early in vertebrate evolution, possibly during the Ordovician, to give rise to an endoskeletal component and an exoskeletal component within the eye. These two components subsequently became uncoupled with respect to timing, placement within the sclera and inductive epithelia, enabling them to evolve independently and to diversify. In some extant groups, these two modules have become reassociated with one another. Furthermore, the data suggest that the endoskeletal component of the ocular skeleton was likely established and therefore evolved before the exoskeletal component. This study provides important insights into the evolution of the ocular skeleton, a region with a long evolutionary history among vertebrates.

  2. The origin of a new fin skeleton through tinkering.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Thomas A

    2015-07-01

    Adipose fins are positioned between the dorsal and caudal fins of many teleost fishes and primitively lack skeleton. In at least four lineages, adipose fins have evolved lepidotrichia (bony fin rays), co-opting the developmental programme for the dermal skeleton of other fins into this new territory. Here I provide, to my knowledge, the first description of lepidotrichia development in an adipose fin, characterizing the ontogeny of the redtail catfish, Phractocephalus hemioliopterus. Development of these fin rays differs from canonical lepidotrich development in the following four ways: skeleton begins developing in adults, not in larvae; rays begin developing at the fin's distal tip, not proximally; the order in which rays ossify is variable, not fixed; and lepidotrichia appear to grow both proximally and distally, not exclusively proximodistally. Lepidotrichia are often wavy, of irregular thickness and exhibit no regular pattern of segmentation or branching. This skeleton is among the most variable observed in a vertebrate appendage, offering a unique opportunity to explore the basis of hypervariation, which is generally assumed to reflect an absence of function. I argue that this variation reflects a lack of canalization as compared with other, more ancient lepidotrichs and suggest developmental context can affect the morphology of serial homologues.

  3. Bone density and the lightweight skeletons of birds.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Elizabeth R

    2010-07-22

    The skeletons of birds are universally described as lightweight as a result of selection for minimizing the energy required for flight. From a functional perspective, the weight (mass) of an animal relative to its lift-generating surfaces is a key determinant of the metabolic cost of flight. The evolution of birds has been characterized by many weight-saving adaptations that are reflected in bone shape, many of which strengthen and stiffen the skeleton. Although largely unstudied in birds, the material properties of bone tissue can also contribute to bone strength and stiffness. In this study, I calculated the density of the cranium, humerus and femur in passerine birds, rodents and bats by measuring bone mass and volume using helium displacement. I found that, on average, these bones are densest in birds, followed closely by bats. As bone density increases, so do bone stiffness and strength. Both of these optimization criteria are used in the design of strong and stiff, but lightweight, manmade airframes. By analogy, increased bone density in birds and bats may reflect adaptations for maximizing bone strength and stiffness while minimizing bone mass and volume. These data suggest that both bone shape and the material properties of bone tissue have played important roles in the evolution of flight. They also reconcile the conundrum of how bird skeletons can appear to be thin and delicate, yet contribute just as much to total body mass as do the skeletons of terrestrial mammals.

  4. A practical introduction to skeletons for the plant sciences.

    PubMed

    Bucksch, Alexander

    2014-08-01

    Before the availability of digital photography resulting from the invention of charged couple devices in 1969, the measurement of plant architecture was a manual process either on the plant itself or on traditional photographs. The introduction of cheap digital imaging devices for the consumer market enabled the wide use of digital images to capture the shape of plant networks such as roots, tree crowns, or leaf venation. Plant networks contain geometric traits that can establish links to genetic or physiological characteristics, support plant breeding efforts, drive evolutionary studies, or serve as input to plant growth simulations. Typically, traits are encoded in shape descriptors that are computed from imaging data. Skeletons are one class of shape descriptors that are used to describe the hierarchies and extent of branching and looping plant networks. While the mathematical understanding of skeletons is well developed, their application within the plant sciences remains challenging because the quality of the measurement depends partly on the interpretation of the skeleton. This article is meant to bridge the skeletonization literature in the plant sciences and related technical fields by discussing best practices for deriving diameters and approximating branching hierarchies in a plant network.

  5. Table of radioactive elements

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, N.E.

    1985-01-01

    As has been the custom in the past, the Commission publishes a table of relative atomic masses and halflives of selected radionuclides. The information contained in this table will enable the user to calculate the atomic weight for radioactive materials with a variety of isotopic compositions. The atomic masses have been taken from the 1984 Atomic Mass Table. Some of the halflives have already been documented.

  6. Multi-chelation approach towards natural product-like skeletons: one-pot access to a nitrogen-containing tetracyclic framework from AlaAla dipeptide.

    PubMed

    Vellaisamy, Kasipandi; Napoleon, John Victor; Venkatachalam, Ramkumar; Manheri, Muraleedharan Kannoth

    2010-12-28

    Reductive transformation of the dipeptide BocAlaAlaOMe to a complex, internally charge-stabilized, natural product-like skeleton in one synthetic step is discussed. Stepwise replacement of the B-H bonds in borane by B-N or B-O resulted in incorporation of three boron atoms in a tetracyclic framework whereby one is stereogenic!

  7. The skeleton of postmetamorphic echinoderms in a changing world.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Philippe

    2014-06-01

    Available evidence on the impact of acidification and its interaction with warming on the skeleton of postmetamorphic (juvenile and adult) echinoderms is reviewed. Data are available on sea urchins, starfish, and brittle stars in 33 studies. Skeleton growth of juveniles of all sea urchin species studied so far is affected from pH 7.8 to 7.6 in seawater, values that are expected to be reached during the 21st century. Growth in adult sea urchins (six species studied) is apparently only marginally affected at seawater pH relevant to this century. The interacting effect of temperature differed according to studies. Juvenile starfish as well as adults seem to be either not impacted or even boosted by acidification. Brittle stars show moderate effects at pH below or equal to 7.4. Dissolution of the body wall skeleton is unlikely to be a major threat to sea urchins. Spines, however, due to their exposed position, are more prone to this threat, but their regeneration abilities can probably ensure their maintenance, although this could have an energetic cost and induce changes in resource allocation. No information is available on skeleton dissolution in starfish, and the situation in brittle stars needs further assessment. Very preliminary evidence indicates that mechanical properties in sea urchins could be affected. So, although the impact of ocean acidification on the skeleton of echinoderms has been considered as a major threat from the first studies, we need a better understanding of the induced changes, in particular the functional consequences of growth modifications and dissolution related to mechanical properties. It is suggested to focus studies on these aspects.

  8. Ocean acidification and warming scenarios increase microbioerosion of coral skeletons.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Nivia, Catalina; Diaz-Pulido, Guillermo; Kline, David; Guldberg, Ove-Hoegh; Dove, Sophie

    2013-06-01

    Biological mediation of carbonate dissolution represents a fundamental component of the destructive forces acting on coral reef ecosystems. Whereas ocean acidification can increase dissolution of carbonate substrates, the combined impact of ocean acidification and warming on the microbioerosion of coral skeletons remains unknown. Here, we exposed skeletons of the reef-building corals, Porites cylindrica and Isopora cuneata, to present-day (Control: 400 μatm - 24 °C) and future pCO2 -temperature scenarios projected for the end of the century (Medium: +230 μatm - +2 °C; High: +610 μatm - +4 °C). Skeletons were also subjected to permanent darkness with initial sodium hypochlorite incubation, and natural light without sodium hypochlorite incubation to isolate the environmental effect of acidic seawater (i.e., Ωaragonite <1) from the biological effect of photosynthetic microborers. Our results indicated that skeletal dissolution is predominantly driven by photosynthetic microborers, as samples held in the dark did not decalcify. In contrast, dissolution of skeletons exposed to light increased under elevated pCO2 -temperature scenarios, with P. cylindrica experiencing higher dissolution rates per month (89%) than I. cuneata (46%) in the high treatment relative to control. The effects of future pCO2 -temperature scenarios on the structure of endolithic communities were only identified in P. cylindrica and were mostly associated with a higher abundance of the green algae Ostreobium spp. Enhanced skeletal dissolution was also associated with increased endolithic biomass and respiration under elevated pCO2 -temperature scenarios. Our results suggest that future projections of ocean acidification and warming will lead to increased rates of microbioerosion. However, the magnitude of bioerosion responses may depend on the structural properties of coral skeletons, with a range of implications for reef carbonate losses under warmer and more acidic oceans. © 2013

  9. Visualization of the hexagonal lattice in the erythrocyte membrane skeleton.

    PubMed

    Liu, S C; Derick, L H; Palek, J

    1987-03-01

    The isolated membrane skeleton of human erythrocytes was studied by high resolution negative staining electron microscopy. When the skeletal meshwork is spread onto a thin carbon film, clear images of a primarily hexagonal lattice of junctional F-actin complexes crosslinked by spectrin filaments are obtained. The regularly ordered network extends over the entire membrane skeleton. Some of the junctional complexes are arranged in the form of pentagons and septagons, approximately 3 and 8%, respectively. At least five forms of spectrin crosslinks are detected in the spread skeleton including a single spectrin tetramer linking two junctional complexes, three-armed Y-shaped spectrin molecules linking three junctional complexes, three-armed spectrin molecules connecting two junctional complexes with two arms bound to one complex and the third arm bound to the adjacent complex, double spectrin filaments linking two junctional complexes, and four-armed spectrin molecules linking two junctional complexes. Of these, the crosslinks of single spectrin tetramers and three-armed molecules are the most abundant and represent 84 and 11% of the total crosslinks, respectively. These observations are compatible with the presence of spectrin tetramers and oligomers in the erythrocyte membrane skeleton. Globular structures (9-12 nm in diameter) are attached to the majority of the spectrin tetramers or higher order oligomer-like molecules, approximately 80 nm from the distal ends of the spectrin tetramers. These globular structures are ankyrinor ankyrin/band 3-containing complexes, since they are absent when ankyrin and residual band 3 are extracted from the skeleton under hypertonic conditions.

  10. The International Multidisciplinary Consensus Conference on Multimodality Monitoring in Neurocritical Care: evidentiary tables: a statement for healthcare professionals from the Neurocritical Care Society and the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine.

    PubMed

    Le Roux, Peter; Menon, David K; Citerio, Giuseppe; Vespa, Paul; Bader, Mary Kay; Brophy, Gretchen; Diringer, Michael N; Stocchetti, Nino; Videtta, Walter; Armonda, Rocco; Badjatia, Neeraj; Bösel, Julian; Chesnut, Randall; Chou, Sherry; Claassen, Jan; Czosnyka, Marek; De Georgia, Michael; Figaji, Anthony; Fugate, Jennifer; Helbok, Raimund; Horowitz, David; Hutchinson, Peter; Kumar, Monisha; McNett, Molly; Miller, Chad; Naidech, Andrew; Oddo, Mauro; Olson, DaiWai; O'Phelan, Kristine; Provencio, J Javier; Puppo, Corinna; Riker, Richard; Roberson, Claudia; Schmidt, Michael; Taccone, Fabio

    2014-12-01

    A variety of technologies have been developed to assist decision-making during the management of patients with acute brain injury who require intensive care. A large body of research has been generated describing these various technologies. The Neurocritical Care Society (NCS) in collaboration with the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine (ESICM), the Society for Critical Care Medicine (SCCM), and the Latin America Brain Injury Consortium (LABIC) organized an international, multidisciplinary consensus conference to perform a systematic review of the published literature to help develop evidence-based practice recommendations on bedside physiologic monitoring. This supplement contains a Consensus Summary Statement with recommendations and individual topic reviews on physiologic processes important in the care of acute brain injury. In this article we provide the evidentiary tables for select topics including systemic hemodynamics, intracranial pressure, brain and systemic oxygenation, EEG, brain metabolism, biomarkers, processes of care and monitoring in emerging economies to provide the clinician ready access to evidence that supports recommendations about neuromonitoring.

  11. Open glenohumeral dislocation: skeletonization of the proximal humerus without associated fracture.

    PubMed

    Maroney, Samuel S; Devinney, D Scott

    2011-11-09

    Shoulder dislocations are common injuries. In the realm of high-energy trauma, enough force can be dissipated to violate the entire soft tissue envelope surrounding the shoulder girdle, generating an open injury. This article presents a case of a young man involved in a motorcycle accident in which he sustained an open glenohumeral dislocation with complete skeletonization of the proximal humerus. There were no associated fractures with his injury. Our patient underwent staged irrigation and debridement of his shoulder with delayed tendoligamentous reconstruction of the skeletonized proximal humerus. After reconstruction, he was immobilized for 3 weeks and then began a progressive shoulder rehabilitation protocol. He healed with no evidence of infection, residual instability, or avascular necrosis at his 4-month follow-up examination. At that point, he had regained functional use of his shoulder for activities of daily living and had no pain. His range of active motion was limited to 90° of flexion and abduction, 0° of external rotation, and internal rotation to the L4. He had complete resolution of a sensory and motor axillary neuropraxia that resulted from his initial injury. It was felt that the patient had potential for continued gains in range of motion and strength.Our patient is only the second description of an open glenohumeral dislocation with no associated fractures of the proximal humerus. This skeletonization of the proximal humerus represents a complex soft tissue injury that severely compromises the functional capacity of the shoulder. Understanding the nature of the injury and the involved structures and maintaining a sound treatment algorithm allow orthopedic surgeons to maximize the patient's functional outcome.

  12. Table tennis dystonia.

    PubMed

    Le Floch, Anne; Vidailhet, Marie; Flamand-Rouvière, Constance; Grabli, David; Mayer, Jean-Michel; Gonce, Michel; Broussolle, Emmanuel; Roze, Emmanuel

    2010-02-15

    Focal task-specific dystonia (FTSD) occurs exclusively during a specific activity that usually involves a highly skilled movement. Classical FTSD dystonias include writer's cramp and musician's dystonia. Few cases of sport-related dystonia have been reported. We describe the first four cases of FTSD related to table tennis (TT), two involving professional international competitors. We also systematically analyzed the literature for reports of sport-related dystonia including detailed clinical descriptions. We collected a total of 13 cases of sport-related dystonia, including our four TT players. Before onset, all the patients had trained for many years, for a large number of hours per week. Practice time had frequently increased significantly in the year preceding onset. As TT is characterized by highly skilled hand/forearm movements acquired through repetitive exercises, it may carry a higher risk of FTSD than other sports. Intensive training may result in maladaptive responses and overwhelm homeostatic mechanisms that regulate cortical plasticity in vulnerable individuals. Our findings support the importance of environmental risk factors in sport-related FTSD, as also suggested in classical FTSD, and have important implications for clinical practice. (c) 2010 Movement Disorder Society.

  13. An Interactive Exhibition about Animal Skeletons: Did the Visitors Learn Any Zoology?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tunnicliffe, Sue Dale; Laterveer-de Beer, Manon

    2002-01-01

    Explores museum visitors' understanding of skeleton exhibits and whether such exhibits increase their understanding of the zoology displayed. The exhibition under study focused on the diversity of vertebrae skeletons which were arranged according to the mode of locomotion. (DDR)

  14. An Interactive Exhibition about Animal Skeletons: Did the Visitors Learn Any Zoology?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tunnicliffe, Sue Dale; Laterveer-de Beer, Manon

    2002-01-01

    Explores museum visitors' understanding of skeleton exhibits and whether such exhibits increase their understanding of the zoology displayed. The exhibition under study focused on the diversity of vertebrae skeletons which were arranged according to the mode of locomotion. (DDR)

  15. Interactions between Plasmodium falciparum skeleton-binding protein 1 and the membrane skeleton of malaria-infected red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Kats, Lev M; Proellocks, Nicholas I; Buckingham, Donna W; Blanc, Lionel; Hale, John; Guo, Xinhua; Pei, Xinhong; Herrmann, Susann; Hanssen, Eric G; Coppel, Ross L; Mohandas, Narla; An, Xiuli; Cooke, Brian M

    2015-07-01

    During development inside red blood cells (RBCs), Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasites export proteins that associate with the RBC membrane skeleton. These interactions cause profound changes to the biophysical properties of RBCs that underpin the often severe and fatal clinical manifestations of falciparum malaria. P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) is one such exported parasite protein that plays a major role in malaria pathogenesis since its exposure on the parasitised RBC surface mediates their adhesion to vascular endothelium and placental syncytioblasts. En route to the RBC membrane skeleton, PfEMP1 transiently associates with Maurer's clefts (MCs), parasite-derived membranous structures in the RBC cytoplasm. We have previously shown that a resident MC protein, skeleton-binding protein 1 (SBP1), is essential for the placement of PfEMP1 onto the RBC surface and hypothesised that the function of SBP1 may be to target MCs to the RBC membrane. Since this would require additional protein interactions, we set out to identify binding partners for SBP1. Using a combination of approaches, we have defined the region of SBP1 that binds specifically to defined sub-domains of two major components of the RBC membrane skeleton, protein 4.1R and spectrin. We show that these interactions serve as one mechanism to anchor MCs to the RBC membrane skeleton, however, while they appear to be necessary, they are not sufficient for the translocation of PfEMP1 onto the RBC surface. The N-terminal domain of SBP1 that resides within the lumen of MCs clearly plays an essential, but presently unknown role in this process.

  16. Interactions between Plasmodium falciparum skeleton-binding protein 1 and the membrane skeleton of malaria-infected red blood cells

    PubMed Central

    Buckingham, Donna W.; Blanc, Lionel; Hale, John; Guo, Xinhua; Pei, Xinhong; Herrmann, Susann; Hanssen, Eric G.; Coppel, Ross L.; Mohandas, Narla; An, Xiuli; Cooke, Brian M.

    2015-01-01

    During development inside red blood cells (RBCs), Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasites export proteins that associate with the RBC membrane skeleton. These interactions cause profound changes to the biophysical properties of RBCs that underpin the often severe and fatal clinical manifestations of falciparum malaria. P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) is one such exported parasite protein that plays a major role in malaria pathogenesis since its exposure on the parasitised RBC surface mediates their adhesion to vascular endothelium and placental syncytioblasts. En route to the RBC membrane skeleton, PfEMP1 transiently associates with Maurer's clefts (MCs), parasite-derived membranous structures in the RBC cytoplasm. We have previously shown that a resident MC protein, skeleton-binding protein 1 (SBP1), is essential for the placement of PfEMP1 onto the RBC surface and hypothesised that the function of SBP1 may be to target MCs to the RBC membrane. Since this would require additional protein interactions, we set out to identify binding partners for SBP1. Using a combination of approaches, we have defined the region of SBP1 that binds specifically to defined subdomains of two major components of the RBC membrane skeleton, protein 4.1R and spectrin. We show that these interactions serve as one mechanism to anchor MCs to the RBC membrane skeleton, however, while they appear to be necessary, they are not sufficient for the translocation of PfEMP1 onto the RBC surface. The N-terminal domain of SBP1 that resides within the lumen of MCs clearly plays an essential, but presently unknown role in this process. PMID:25883090

  17. 26 CFR 1.410(b)-0 - Table of contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Table of contents. 1.410(b)-0 Section 1.410(b)-0 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.410(b)-0 Table of contents. This section contains a listing of the...

  18. 26 CFR 1.45D-0 - Table of contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Table of contents. 1.45D-0 Section 1.45D-0 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY INCOME TAX INCOME TAXES Rules for Computing Credit for Investment in Certain Depreciable Property § 1.45D-0 Table of contents. This section lists the paragraphs contained in § 1.45D-1....

  19. 26 CFR 1.45D-0 - Table of contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Table of contents. 1.45D-0 Section 1.45D-0 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY INCOME TAX INCOME TAXES Rules for Computing Credit for Investment in Certain Depreciable Property § 1.45D-0 Table of contents. This section lists the paragraphs contained in § 1.45D-1. ...

  20. 26 CFR 1.197-0 - Table of contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Table of contents. 1.197-0 Section 1.197-0 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED...) Mortgage servicing rights. (7) Computer software acquired for internal use. (f) Computation of...

  1. 26 CFR 1.197-0 - Table of contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Table of contents. 1.197-0 Section 1.197-0 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED...) Mortgage servicing rights. (7) Computer software acquired for internal use. (f) Computation of...

  2. The Ratio Table.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middleton, James A.; Heuvel-Panhuizen, Marja van den

    1995-01-01

    Examines the use of a ratio table for developing students' conceptual understanding of rational number. The ratio table is an alternative to cross-multiplication and can utilize both additive and multiplicative strategies. It organizes numbers and keeps track of operations and results, which aids the teacher in assessment. (MLB)

  3. The Living Periodic Table

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nahlik, Mary Schrodt

    2005-01-01

    To help make the abstract world of chemistry more concrete eighth-grade students, the author has them create a living periodic table that can be displayed in the classroom or hallway. This display includes information about the elements arranged in the traditional periodic table format, but also includes visual real-world representations of the…

  4. The Living Periodic Table

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nahlik, Mary Schrodt

    2005-01-01

    To help make the abstract world of chemistry more concrete eighth-grade students, the author has them create a living periodic table that can be displayed in the classroom or hallway. This display includes information about the elements arranged in the traditional periodic table format, but also includes visual real-world representations of the…

  5. 1992 tubing tables

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This paper is helpful to those designing oil well completions or purchasing tubing with proprietary or premium connections. Tables contain specifications and application data for over 100 different tubing joints, including those used with fiberglass pipe. The tables this year contain dimensional and performance data for coiled tubing.

  6. Apatite mineralization in elasmobranch skeletons via a polyphosphate intermediate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omelon, Sidney; Lacroix, Nicolas; Lildhar, Levannia; Variola, Fabio; Dean, Mason

    2014-05-01

    All vertebrate skeletons are stiffened with apatite, a calcium phosphate mineral. Control of apatite mineralization is essential to the growth and repair of the biology of these skeletons, ensuring that apatite is deposited in the correct tissue location at the desired time. The mechanism of this biochemical control remains debated, but must involve increasing the localized apatite saturation state. It was theorized in 1923 that alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity provides this control mechanism by increasing the inorganic phosphate (Pi) concentration via dephosphorylation of phosphorylated molecules. The ALP substrate for biological apatite is not known. We propose that polyphosphates (polyPs) produced by mitochondria may be the substrate for biological apatite formation by ALP activity. PolyPs (PO3-)n, also known as condensed phosphates, represent a concentrated, bioavailable Pi-storage strategy. Mitochondria import Pi and synthesize phosphate polymers through an unknown biochemical mechanism. When chelated with calcium and/or other cations, the effective P-concentration of these neutrally charged, amorphous, polyP species can be very high (~ 0.5 M), without inducing phosphate mineral crystallization. This P-concentration in the low Pi-concentration biological environment offers a method of concentrating P well above an apatite supersaturation required for nucleation. Bone is the most studied mineralized skeletal tissue. However, locating and analyzing active mineralizing areas is challenging. We studied calcified cartilage skeletons of elasmobranch fishes (sharks, stingrays and relatives) to analyse the phosphate chemistry in this continually mineralizing skeleton. Although the majority of the elasmobranch skeleton is unmineralized cartilage, it is wrapped in an outer layer of mineralized tissue comprised of small tiles called tesserae. These calcified tesserae continually grow through the formation of new mineral on their borders. Co-localization of ALP and

  7. Transport osteogenesis in the maxillofacial skeleton: outcomes of a versatile reconstruction method following tumor ablation.

    PubMed

    González-García, Raúl; Naval-Gías, Luis

    2010-03-01

    To report our clinical experience using bifocal distraction osteogenesis (BDO) with internal devices to treat patients having bony defects of the maxillofacial skeleton following tumor ablation and to focus on outcomes of dental implant placement in patients having maxillomandibular segmental defects. Retrospective case series. Academic research. Patients were selected according to the following inclusion criteria: a bony defect in the maxillofacial skeleton, moderate soft-tissue defect, local or general conditions that preclude more aggressive surgery, and adequate patient compliance. Types of BDO included horizontal mandibular or maxillar alveolar, bilateral alveolar, vertical mandibular or maxillar, ramus and body, mandibular angle, symphysis, the 2-step procedure, temporalis muscle flap reconstruction, vascularized free-fibular flap reconstruction, radial forearm free-flap reconstruction, and pectoralis muscle flap reconstruction. The latency period was 10 days, after which distraction was initiated at a rate of 0.5 mm/d. The distraction period continued until the transport disk reached the distal stump. The consolidation period ranged from 8 to 48 weeks. Seven patients required additional bone grafting to complete union with the residual bone. Twenty-eight patients having bony defects of the maxillofacial skeleton underwent BDO. The mean (SD) bony defect length was 47.0 (20.1) mm. The mean (SD) distracted bone lengthening was 36.5 (20.0) mm, with a mean (SD) consolidation period of 16.4 (8.0) weeks. The bony defect involved the hemimandibular body in 12 patients, with greater involvement of the body and symphysis in 4 patients and of the bilateral mandibular body in 2 patients. Complications after BDO included the following: discomfort in 8 patients, complete intraoral exposure and infection in 3 patients, partial cutaneous exposure in 1 patient, premature consolidation in 1 patient, and temporomandibular joint ankylosis in 1 patient. Overall, BDO for

  8. Analysis of the retroauricular transmeatal approach: a novel transfacial access to the mandibular skeleton.

    PubMed

    Arcuri, Francesco; Brucoli, Matteo; Benech, Arnaldo

    2012-03-01

    In 2005 experimental work was published about the successful surgical management of fractures of the condylar head through a retroauricular approach. There were two reports in German, and later publications have not mentioned this route to open reduction and internal fixation of such fractures. The approach was studied in Germany but was poorly described and illustrated; later reports in English do not mention this route to the mandible. The aim of this study was to illustrate the retroauricular transmeatal approach, and briefly to review current surgical approaches to the mandibular skeleton and their technical variants. We exposed the mandibular skeleton by a retroauricular transmeatal route with transection of the external ear, dissection of the parotid gland, isolation of the retromandibular vein, and protection of the frontal branch of the facial nerve and the auriculotemporal nerve within the substance of the anteriorly retracted flap. Although we cannot draw any significant conclusions, the retroauricular transmeatal approach ensures extremely low risk of injury to the facial nerve, and leaves an invisible scar. The morbidity is low in terms of facial nerve lesions, vascular injuries, aesthetic deformity, auditory stenosis, salivary fistulas, sialocele and Frey syndrome. We think that further prospective clinical trials are needed better to assess and eventually develop this approach.

  9. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Zzzz of... - Subsequent Performance Tests

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Stationary Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines Pt. 63, Subpt. ZZZZ, Table 3 Table 3 to Subpart ZZZZ of Part 63—Subsequent...

  10. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Zzzz of... - Subsequent Performance Tests

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Stationary Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines Pt. 63, Subpt. ZZZZ, Table 3 Table 3 to Subpart ZZZZ of Part 63—Subsequent...

  11. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Zzzz of... - Subsequent Performance Tests

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Stationary Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines Pt. 63, Subpt. ZZZZ, Table 3 Table 3 to Subpart ZZZZ of Part 63—Subsequent...

  12. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Zzzz of... - Subsequent Performance Tests

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Stationary Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines Pt. 63, Subpt. ZZZZ, Table 3 Table 3 to Subpart ZZZZ of Part 63—Subsequent...

  13. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Zzzz of... - Continuous Compliance With Emission Limitations and Operating Limitations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Pollutants for Stationary Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines Pt. 63, Subpt. ZZZZ, Table 6 Table 6 to... maintenance and operation of the engine in a manner consistent with good air pollution control practice...

  14. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Zzzz of... - Subsequent Performance Tests

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Stationary Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines Pt. 63, Subpt. ZZZZ, Table 3 Table 3 to Subpart ZZZZ of Part 63—Subsequent...

  15. Computerized tomography and skeletal density of coral skeletons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosscher, Hemmo

    1993-07-01

    In this paper I describe and discuss the use of medical X-ray computerized tomography (CT) in the study of coral skeletons. CT generates X-ray images along freely chosen sections through the skeleton and offers, as well, the possibility of density measurements based on X-ray attenuation. This method has been applied to measure the skeletal density of the Caribbean reef-building coral Montastrea annularis, from Curaçao, Netherlands Antilles. The observed, non-linear increase of skeletal density with depth can be attributed to decreasing photo-synthetic rates with increasing water depth. A comparison with extension rate measurements shows the inverse relationship between extension rate and skeletal density. CT proves to be aquick and non-destructive method to reveal growth structures (density banding) since it measures skeletal density.

  16. Aneurysm identification by analysis of the blood-vessel skeleton.

    PubMed

    Kohout, Josef; Chiarini, Alessandro; Clapworthy, Gordon J; Klajnšek, Gregor

    2013-01-01

    At least 1% of the general population have an aneurysm (or possibly more) in their cerebral blood vessels. If an aneurysm ruptures, it kills the patient in up to 60% of cases. In order to choose the optimal treatment, clinicians have to monitor the development of the aneurysm in time. Nowadays, aneurysms are typically identified manually, which means that the monitoring is often imprecise since the identification is observer dependent. As a result, the number of misdiagnosed cases may be large. This paper proposes a fast semi-automatic method for the identification of aneurysms which is based on the analysis of the skeleton of blood vessels. Provided that the skeleton is accurate, the results achieved by our method have been deemed acceptable by expert clinicians.

  17. Dynamic Hand Gesture Recognition Using the Skeleton of the Hand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionescu, Bogdan; Coquin, Didier; Lambert, Patrick; Buzuloiu, Vasile

    2005-12-01

    This paper discusses the use of the computer vision in the interpretation of human gestures. Hand gestures would be an intuitive and ideal way of exchanging information with other people in a virtual space, guiding some robots to perform certain tasks in a hostile environment, or interacting with computers. Hand gestures can be divided into two main categories: static gestures and dynamic gestures. In this paper, a novel dynamic hand gesture recognition technique is proposed. It is based on the 2D skeleton representation of the hand. For each gesture, the hand skeletons of each posture are superposed providing a single image which is the dynamic signature of the gesture. The recognition is performed by comparing this signature with the ones from a gesture alphabet, using Baddeley's distance as a measure of dissimilarities between model parameters.

  18. A metrical study of the laryngeal skeleton in adult Nigerians.

    PubMed

    Ajmani, M L

    1990-08-01

    Laryngeal cartilages were studied in 40 dissection room specimens of adult age groups ranging from 17 to 50 years in both the sexes. Various dimensions of the laryngeal skeleton were measured and statistical analysis of the data for male and female were evaluated separately. Conspicuous and highly significant differences of the dimensions between male and female laryngeal cartilages were observed. The incidence of the cuneiform cartilage and cartilago triticea was greater in the female than in the male.

  19. A metrical study of the laryngeal skeleton in adult Nigerians.

    PubMed Central

    Ajmani, M L

    1990-01-01

    Laryngeal cartilages were studied in 40 dissection room specimens of adult age groups ranging from 17 to 50 years in both the sexes. Various dimensions of the laryngeal skeleton were measured and statistical analysis of the data for male and female were evaluated separately. Conspicuous and highly significant differences of the dimensions between male and female laryngeal cartilages were observed. The incidence of the cuneiform cartilage and cartilago triticea was greater in the female than in the male. PMID:2081705

  20. A short synthetic route towards merosesquiterpenes with a benzoxanthene skeleton.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Antonio; Alvarez, Esteban; Alvarez-Manzaneda, Ramón; Chahboun, Rachid; Alvarez-Manzaneda, Enrique

    2014-11-07

    A short synthetic sequence for the preparation of merosesquiterpenes with a benzoxanthene skeleton starting from commercial (-)-sclareol is reported. The D ring of the target compound is obtained through a Diels-Alder cycloaddition, involving a dienoldiether derived from a tricyclic α,β-enone synthesized in two steps from the starting diterpene. Utilizing this procedure, the preparation of (+)-hongoquercin A and the first synthesis of (+)-cyclospongiaquinone-1 were achieved.

  1. The Minotaur syndrome: plastic surgery of the facial skeleton.

    PubMed

    Morselli, P G

    1993-01-01

    This article remarks on the possibility of recontouring the face by working on the facial skeleton with the sole purpose of softening the facial appearance. The author describes a one-step surgical procedure performed on a 38-year-old man who had serious social problems because of his aggressive and threatening facial appearance that contrasted with his gentle personality. The author coins the term Minotaur Syndrome to describe the discrepancy between the patient's true personality versus his negative facial appearance.

  2. Skeleton Reassignment of Type C Polycyclic Polyprenylated Acylphloroglucinols.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xing-Wei; Yang, Jing; Xu, Gang

    2017-01-27

    The previous assignment of the type C skeleton of polycyclic polyprenylated acylphloroglucinols (PPAPs) was controversial and proved to be incorrect in this study. The structures of the type C PPAPs (3-6) were revised to corresponding type A structures (3a-6a) via (13)C NMR spectroscopic analysis and a quantum computational chemistry method. Therefore, only types A and B PPAPs are likely present in plants of the family Clusiaceae.

  3. A new conceptual model of the formation of coral skeleton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juillet-Leclerc, A.

    2006-12-01

    Scleractinian corals constitute one of the major groups of calcifying animals. During a long time their skeleton has been considered as purely mineral and all the features not consistent with this concept were called " vital effects ". However, biology plays a key role in the skeleton genesis. Recent technological advances provided enough evidences to propose a new conceptual model of coral skeleton growth. Ion microprobe carried out both trace element and isotope analyses, which stressed the high variability of these geochemical tracers. It indicates that all measurements obtained at millimeter-length scale, especially data used for paleoclimatic purpose, are bulk data. The analyses performed on individual microstructures previously identified by SEMS observation revealed that the two different microstructures highlighted in coral skeleton present a specific geochemical signature. We have thus to explain how two specific microstructures could derive from a unique calcifying fluid. On the other hand, several methods converged to show that a thin organic matrix surrounds growth units at micro/nanometer size scale. The presence of organic compounds could alter the equilibrium thermodynamics of the mineral growth surface by modifying energy landscape. Knowing that chemical environment of each microstructure could be different according the nature of the growth units we assume that it induces different mechanism of deposition. By combining results from different approaches we deduce that kinetics is not restricted to isotopic fractionation. We conclude that coral aragonite deposit is dominated by a kinetic chemical disequilibrium and governed by supersaturation law. We demonstrate that this conceptual model is consistent with the observations and measurements earlier performed and coral remains the most relevant archive of the tropical ocean than ever.

  4. Melorheostosis of the axial skeleton with associated fibrolipomatous lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Garver, P.; Resnick, D.; Haghighi, P.; Guerra, J.

    1982-11-01

    Two patients with melorheostotic-like lesions of the axial skeleton are described. In each case adjacent soft tissue masses containing both fatty and fibrous tissues were evident. The presence of such soft tissue tumors as well as other soft tissue abnormalities in melorheostosis emphasizes that the diesease should not be regarded as one confined to bone. The precise pathogenesis of the osseous and soft tissue abnormalities in melorheostosis remains obscure.

  5. How NASA KSC Controls Interfaces with the use of Motion Skeletons and Product Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Corey

    2013-01-01

    This presentation will show how NASA KSC controls interfaces for Modular Product Architecture (MPA) using Locator Skeletons, Interface Skeletons, and Product Structure, to be combined together within a Motion Skeleton. The user will learn how to utilize skeleton models to communicate interface data, as successfully done at NASA KSC in their use of Motion Skeletons to control interfaces for multi-launch systems. There will be discussion of the methodology used to control design requirements through WTParts, and how to utilize product structure for non-CAD documents.

  6. Efficient synthesis of a multi-substituted diphenylmethane skeleton as a steroid mimetic.

    PubMed

    Misawa, Takashi; Tanaka, Katsuya; Demizu, Yosuke; Kurihara, Masaaki

    2017-03-24

    Steroids are important components of cell membranes and are involved in several physiological functions. A diphenylmethane (DPM) skeleton has recently been suggested to act as a mimetic of the steroid skeleton. However, difficulties are associated with efficiently introducing different substituents between two phenyl rings of the DPM skeleton, and, thus, further structural development based on the DPM skeleton has been limited. We herein developed an efficient synthetic method for introducing different substituents into two phenyl rings of the DPM skeleton. We also synthesized DPM-based estrogen receptor (ER) modulators using our synthetic method and evaluated their ER transcriptional activities.

  7. Empirical field tables for Michigan.

    Treesearch

    Jerold T. Hahn; Joan M. Stelman

    1984-01-01

    Describes the tables derived from the 1980 Forest Survey of Michigan and presents ways the tables can be used. These tables are broken down according to Michigan's four Forest Survey Units, 14 forest types, and 5 site-index classes.

  8. Real-time skeleton tracking for embedded systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleca, Foti; Klement, Sascha; Martinetz, Thomas; Barth, Erhardt

    2013-03-01

    Touch-free gesture technology is beginning to become more popular with consumers and may have a significant future impact on interfaces for digital photography. However, almost every commercial software framework for gesture and pose detection is aimed at either desktop PCs or high-powered GPUs, making mobile implementations for gesture recognition an attractive area for research and development. In this paper we present an algorithm for hand skeleton tracking and gesture recognition that runs on an ARM-based platform (Pandaboard ES, OMAP 4460 architecture). The algorithm uses self-organizing maps to fit a given topology (skeleton) into a 3D point cloud. This is a novel way of approaching the problem of pose recognition as it does not employ complex optimization techniques or data-based learning. After an initial background segmentation step, the algorithm is ran in parallel with heuristics, which detect and correct artifacts arising from insufficient or erroneous input data. We then optimize the algorithm for the ARM platform using fixed-point computation and the NEON SIMD architecture the OMAP4460 provides. We tested the algorithm with two different depth-sensing devices (Microsoft Kinect, PMD Camboard). For both input devices we were able to accurately track the skeleton at the native framerate of the cameras.

  9. Limited Trabecular Bone Density Heterogeneity in the Human Skeleton.

    PubMed

    Chirchir, Habiba

    2016-01-01

    There is evidence for variation in trabecular bone density and volume within an individual skeleton, albeit in a few anatomical sites, which is partly dependent on mechanical loading. However, little is known regarding the basic variation in trabecular bone density throughout the skeleton in healthy human adults. This is because research on bone density has been confined to a few skeletal elements, which can be readily measured using available imaging technology particularly in clinical settings. This study comprehensively investigates the distribution of trabecular bone density within the human skeleton in nine skeletal sites (femur, proximal and distal tibia, third metatarsal, humerus, ulna, radius, third metacarpal, and axis) in a sample of N = 20 individuals (11 males and 9 females). pQCT results showed that the proximal ulna (mean = 231.3 mg/cm(3)) and axis vertebra (mean = 234.3 mg/cm(3)) displayed significantly greater (p < 0.01) trabecular bone density than other elements, whereas there was no significant variation among the rest of the elements (p > 0.01). The homogeneity of the majority of elements suggests that these sites are potentially responsive to site-specific genetic factors. Secondly, the lack of correlation between elements (p > 0.05) suggests that density measurements of one anatomical region are not necessarily accurate measures of other anatomical regions.

  10. Limited Trabecular Bone Density Heterogeneity in the Human Skeleton

    PubMed Central

    Chirchir, Habiba

    2016-01-01

    There is evidence for variation in trabecular bone density and volume within an individual skeleton, albeit in a few anatomical sites, which is partly dependent on mechanical loading. However, little is known regarding the basic variation in trabecular bone density throughout the skeleton in healthy human adults. This is because research on bone density has been confined to a few skeletal elements, which can be readily measured using available imaging technology particularly in clinical settings. This study comprehensively investigates the distribution of trabecular bone density within the human skeleton in nine skeletal sites (femur, proximal and distal tibia, third metatarsal, humerus, ulna, radius, third metacarpal, and axis) in a sample of N = 20 individuals (11 males and 9 females). pQCT results showed that the proximal ulna (mean = 231.3 mg/cm3) and axis vertebra (mean = 234.3 mg/cm3) displayed significantly greater (p < 0.01) trabecular bone density than other elements, whereas there was no significant variation among the rest of the elements (p > 0.01). The homogeneity of the majority of elements suggests that these sites are potentially responsive to site-specific genetic factors. Secondly, the lack of correlation between elements (p > 0.05) suggests that density measurements of one anatomical region are not necessarily accurate measures of other anatomical regions. PMID:27148458

  11. Quantifying the osteocyte network in the human skeleton.

    PubMed

    Buenzli, Pascal R; Sims, Natalie A

    2015-06-01

    Osteocytes form an extensive cellular network throughout the hard tissue matrix of the skeleton, which is known to regulate skeletal structure. However due to limitations in imaging techniques, the magnitude and complexity of this network remain undefined. We have used data from recent papers obtained by new imaging techniques, in order to estimate absolute and relative quantities of the human osteocyte network and form a more complete understanding of the extent and nature of this network. We estimate that the total number of osteocytes within the average adult human skeleton is ~42 billion and that the total number of osteocyte dendritic projections from these cells is ~3.7 trillion. Based on prior measurements of canalicular density and a mathematical model of osteocyte dendritic process branching, we calculate that these cells form a total of 23 trillion connections with each other and with bone surface cells. We estimate the total length of all osteocytic processes connected end-to-end to be 175,000 km. Furthermore, we calculate that the total surface area of the lacuno-canalicular system is 215 m(2). However, the residing osteocytes leave only enough space for 24 mL of extracellular fluid. Calculations based on measurements in lactation-induced murine osteocytic osteolysis indicate a potential total loss of ~16,000 mm(3) (16 mL) of bone by this process in the human skeleton. Finally, based on the average speed of remodelling in the adult, we calculate that 9.1 million osteocytes are replenished throughout the skeleton on a daily basis, indicating the dynamic nature of the osteocyte network. We conclude that the osteocyte network is a highly complex communication network, and is much more vast than commonly appreciated. It is at the same order of magnitude as current estimates of the size of the neural network in the brain, even though the formation of the branched network differs between neurons and osteocytes. Furthermore, continual replenishment of large

  12. The Periodic Table CD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banks, Alton J.; Holmes, Jon L.

    1995-01-01

    Describes the characteristics of the digitized version of The Periodic Table Videodisc. Provides details about the organization of information and access to the data via Macintosh and Windows computers. (DDR)

  13. The Periodic Table CD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banks, Alton J.; Holmes, Jon L.

    1995-01-01

    Describes the characteristics of the digitized version of The Periodic Table Videodisc. Provides details about the organization of information and access to the data via Macintosh and Windows computers. (DDR)

  14. Building Materials Property Table

    SciTech Connect

    2010-04-16

    This information sheet describes a table of some of the key technical properties of many of the most common building materials taken from ASHRAE Fundamentals - 2001, Moisture Control in Buildings, CMHC, NRC/IRC, IEA Annex 24, and manufacturer data.

  15. Fee Reduction Tables

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Under PRIA 3, refunds for a portion of the registration service fee are provided following the withdrawal of a PRIA covered application and at the request of an applicant. These tables provide the information for each registering division.

  16. A comprehensive insight into the combined effects of Fenton's reagent and skeleton builders on sludge deep dewatering performance.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huan; Yang, Jiakuan; Zhu, Nairuo; Zhang, Hao; Li, Ye; He, Shu; Yang, Changzhu; Yao, Hong

    2013-08-15

    Conditioning sewage sludge with Fenton's reagent and skeleton builders has been proved to be an effective mean to achieve deep dewatering. This work aimed to give a comprehensive insight into the mechanism involved. The results show that significant synergistic effect existed between Fenton's reagent and skeleton builders. With the optimum dosage, water content of dewatered sludge cake could be reduced to 49.5±0.5%. Furthermore, raw sludge existed in the form of zoogloea and its flocs surface was plate-like. After Fenton oxidation, partial of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) was destroyed and the amounts of protein and polysaccharide dissolved in filtrate increased. Meanwhile, sludge flocs turned into smaller ones. After adding skeleton builders, constantly-changing environment promoted senescence and death of microorganism. A large area of plate-like structure disappeared, instead of which were holes. Irregular non-living things inlayed or pierced microbial cells, promoting the conversion from bound water to free water as well as further reduction of the sludge particle size. Additionally, these irregular substances could form a rigid porous structure under high pressure, which could transmit the stresses to the sludge internal parts and provide outflow channels for free water. Consequently, conditioned sludge was suitable for high pressure deep dewatering. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Shepherd in Service Module working on ward room table

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-03-30

    ISS01-E-5129 (December 2000) --- Astronaut William M. (Bill) Shepherd, Expedition One commander, works on the Ward Room table in the Zvezda Service Module aboard the International Space Station (ISS).

  18. 75 FR 36629 - Floor-Standing, Metal-Top Ironing Tables and Certain Parts Thereof from the People's Republic of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-28

    ... International Trade Administration A-570-888 Floor-Standing, Metal-Top Ironing Tables and Certain Parts Thereof..., metal-top ironing tables and certain parts thereof (ironing tables) from the People's Republic of China... Floor-Standing, Metal-Top Ironing Tables and Certain Parts Thereof from the People's Republic of...

  19. A Skeleton-Based 3D Shape Reconstruction of Free-Form Objects with Stereo Vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saini, Deepika; Kumar, Sanjeev

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, an efficient approach is proposed for recovering the 3D shape of a free-form object from its arbitrary pair of stereo images. In particular, the reconstruction problem is treated as the reconstruction of the skeleton and the external boundary of the object. The reconstructed skeleton is termed as the line-like representation or curve-skeleton of the 3D object. The proposed solution for object reconstruction is based on this evolved curve-skeleton. It is used as a seed for recovering shape of the 3D object, and the extracted boundary is used for terminating the growing process of the object. NURBS-skeleton is used to extract the skeleton of both views. Affine invariant property of the convex hulls is used to establish the correspondence between the skeletons and boundaries in the stereo images. In the growing process, a distance field is defined for each skeleton point as the smallest distance from that point to the boundary of the object. A sphere centered at a skeleton point of radius equal to the minimum distance to the boundary is tangential to the boundary. Filling in the spheres centered at each skeleton point reconstructs the object. Several results are presented in order to check the applicability and validity of the proposed algorithm.

  20. 26 CFR 1.475-0 - Table of contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Table of contents. 1.475-0 Section 1.475-0 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED... cash flows. (iii) Accounting for costs and risks. (4) Examples. (e) Compliance with other rules....

  1. 26 CFR 1.475-0 - Table of contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Table of contents. 1.475-0 Section 1.475-0 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED...) Recognition at the mark. (iii) Recognition on disposition. (iv) Fair value standard. (3) Limitations. (i)...

  2. 26 CFR 301.6159-0 - Table of contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Table of contents. 301.6159-0 Section 301.6159-0 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION Time and Place for Paying Tax Place and Due Date for Payment of Tax...

  3. 26 CFR 1.42-0 - Table of contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... of Housing and Urban Development or the Farmers' Home Administration (4) No prior credit allowed (d... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Table of contents. 1.42-0 Section 1.42-0 Internal... § 1.42-0 Table of contents. This section lists the paragraphs contained in §§ 1.42-1 and 1.42-2. §...

  4. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Jjjj of... - Requirements for Performance Tests

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... for Stationary Spark Ignition Internal Combustion Engines Pt. 60, Subpt. JJJJ, Table 2 Table 2 to... must Using According to the following requirements 1. Stationary SI internal combustion engine... concentration of the stationary internal combustion engine exhaust at the sampling port location; (2) Method...

  5. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Jjjj of... - Requirements for Performance Tests

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... for Stationary Spark Ignition Internal Combustion Engines Pt. 60, Subpt. JJJJ, Table 2 Table 2 to... requirements 1. Stationary SI internal combustion engine demonstrating compliance according to § 60.4244. a. limit the concentration of NOX in the stationary SI internal combustion engine exhaust. i. Select...

  6. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Jjjj of... - Requirements for Performance Tests

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... for Stationary Spark Ignition Internal Combustion Engines Pt. 60, Subpt. JJJJ, Table 2 Table 2 to... following requirements 1. Stationary SI internal combustion engine demonstrating compliance according to § 60.4244. a. limit the concentration of NOX in the stationary SI internal combustion engine exhaust...

  7. 26 CFR 1.401(a)(26)-0 - Table of contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Table of contents. 1.401(a)(26)-0 Section 1.401(a)(26)-0 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.401(a)(26)-0 Table...

  8. Shedding light into the function of the earliest vertebrate skeleton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Perez, Carlos; Purnell, Mark; Rayfield, Emily; Donoghue, Philip

    2016-04-01

    Conodonts are an extinct group of jawless vertebrates, the first in our evolutionary lineage to develop a biomineralized skeleton. As such, the conodont skeleton is of great significance because of the insights it provides concerning the biology and function of the primitive vertebrate skeleton. Conodont function has been debated for a century and a half on the basis of its paleocological importance in the Palaezoic ecosystems. However, due to the lack of extanct close representatives and the small size of the conodont element (under a milimiter in length) strongly limited their functional analysis, traditional restricted to analogy. More recently, qualitative approaches have been developed, facilitating tests of element function based on occlusal performance and analysis of microwear and microstructure. In this work we extend these approaches using novel quantitative experimental methods including Synchrotron Radiation X-ray Tomographic Microscopy or Finite Element Analysis to test hypotheses of conodont function. The development of high resolution virtual models of conodont elements, together with biomechanical approaches using Finite Element analysis, informed by occlusal and microwear analyses, provided conclusive support to test hypothesis of structural adaptation within the crown tissue microstructure, showing a close topological co-variation patterns of compressive and tensile stress distribution with different crystallite orientation. In addition, our computational analyses strongly support a tooth-like function for many conodont species. Above all, our study establishes a framework (experimental approach) in which the functional ecology of conodonts can be read from their rich taxonomy and phylogeny, representing an important attempt to understand the role of this abundant and diverse clade in the Phanerozoic marine ecosystems.

  9. Weightlessness and the human skeleton: A new perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holick, Michael F.

    1994-01-01

    It is now clear after more than two decades of space exploration that one of the major short- and long-term effects of microgravity on the human body is the loss of bone. The purpose of this presentation will be to review the data regarding the impact of microgravity and bed rest on calcium and bone metabolism. The author takes the position in this Socratic debate that the effect of microgravity on bone metabolism can be either reversed or mitigated. As we begins to contemplate long-duration space flight and habitation of Space Station Freedom and the moon, one of the issues that needs to be addressed is whether humans need to maintain a skeleton that has been adapted for the one-g force on earth. Clearly, in the foreseeable future, a healthy and structurally sound skeleton will be required for astronauts to shuttle back and forth from earth to the moon, space station, and Mars. Based on most available data from bed-rest studies and the short- and long-duration microgravity experiences by astronauts and cosmonauts, bone loss is a fact of life in this environment. With the rapid advances in understanding of bone physiology it is now possible to contemplate measures that can prevent or mitigate microgravity-induced bone loss. Will the new therapeutic approaches for enhancing bone mineralization be useful for preventing significant bone loss during long-term space flight? Are there other approaches such as exercise and electrical stimulation that can be used to mitigate the impact of microgravity on the skeleton? A recent study that evaluated the effect of microgravity on bone modeling in developing chick embryos may perhaps provide a new perspective about the impact of microgravity on bone metabolism.

  10. The integumentary skeleton of tetrapods: origin, evolution, and development

    PubMed Central

    Vickaryous, Matthew K; Sire, Jean-Yves

    2009-01-01

    Although often overlooked, the integument of many tetrapods is reinforced by a morphologically and structurally diverse assemblage of skeletal elements. These elements are widely understood to be derivatives of the once all-encompassing dermal skeleton of stem-gnathostomes but most details of their evolution and development remain confused and uncertain. Herein we re-evaluate the tetrapod integumentary skeleton by integrating comparative developmental and tissue structure data. Three types of tetrapod integumentary elements are recognized: (1) osteoderms, common to representatives of most major taxonomic lineages; (2) dermal scales, unique to gymnophionans; and (3) the lamina calcarea, an enigmatic tissue found only in some anurans. As presently understood, all are derivatives of the ancestral cosmoid scale and all originate from scleroblastic neural crest cells. Osteoderms are plesiomorphic for tetrapods but demonstrate considerable lineage-specific variability in size, shape, and tissue structure and composition. While metaplastic ossification often plays a role in osteoderm development, it is not the exclusive mode of skeletogenesis. All osteoderms share a common origin within the dermis (at or adjacent to the stratum superficiale) and are composed primarily (but not exclusively) of osseous tissue. These data support the notion that all osteoderms are derivatives of a neural crest-derived osteogenic cell population (with possible matrix contributions from the overlying epidermis) and share a deep homology associated with the skeletogenic competence of the dermis. Gymnophionan dermal scales are structurally similar to the elasmoid scales of most teleosts and are not comparable with osteoderms. Whereas details of development are lacking, it is hypothesized that dermal scales are derivatives of an odontogenic neural crest cell population and that skeletogenesis is comparable with the formation of elasmoid scales. Little is known about the lamina calcarea. It is

  11. Coevolution of caudal skeleton and tail feathers in birds.

    PubMed

    Felice, Ryan N

    2014-12-01

    Birds are capable of a wide range of aerial locomotor behaviors in part because of the derived structure and function of the avian tail. The tail apparatus consists of a several mobile (free) caudal vertebrae, a terminal skeletal element (the pygostyle), and an articulated fan of tail feathers that may be spread or folded, as well as muscular and fibroadipose structures that facilitate tail movements. Morphological variation in both the tail fan and the caudal skeleton that supports it are well documented. The structure of the tail feathers and the pygostyle each evolve in response to functional demands of differing locomotor behaviors. Here, I test whether the integument and skeleton coevolve in this important locomotor module. I quantified feather and skeletal morphology in a diverse sample of waterbirds and shorebirds using a combination of linear and geometric morphometrics. Covariation between tail fan shape and skeletal morphology was then tested using phylogenetic comparative methods. Pygostyle shape is found to be a good predictor of tail fan shape (e.g., forked, graduated), supporting the hypothesis that the tail fan and the tail skeleton have coevolved. This statistical relationship is used to reconstruct feather morphology in an exemplar fossil waterbird, Limnofregata azygosternon. Based on pygostyle morphology, this taxon is likely to have exhibited a forked tail fan similar to that of its extant sister clade Fregata, despite differing in inferred ecology and other aspects of skeletal anatomy. These methods may be useful in reconstructing rectricial morphology in other extinct birds and thus assist in characterizing the evolution of flight control surfaces in birds.

  12. The integumentary skeleton of tetrapods: origin, evolution, and development.

    PubMed

    Vickaryous, Matthew K; Sire, Jean-Yves

    2009-04-01

    Although often overlooked, the integument of many tetrapods is reinforced by a morphologically and structurally diverse assemblage of skeletal elements. These elements are widely understood to be derivatives of the once all-encompassing dermal skeleton of stem-gnathostomes but most details of their evolution and development remain confused and uncertain. Herein we re-evaluate the tetrapod integumentary skeleton by integrating comparative developmental and tissue structure data. Three types of tetrapod integumentary elements are recognized: (1) osteoderms, common to representatives of most major taxonomic lineages; (2) dermal scales, unique to gymnophionans; and (3) the lamina calcarea, an enigmatic tissue found only in some anurans. As presently understood, all are derivatives of the ancestral cosmoid scale and all originate from scleroblastic neural crest cells. Osteoderms are plesiomorphic for tetrapods but demonstrate considerable lineage-specific variability in size, shape, and tissue structure and composition. While metaplastic ossification often plays a role in osteoderm development, it is not the exclusive mode of skeletogenesis. All osteoderms share a common origin within the dermis (at or adjacent to the stratum superficiale) and are composed primarily (but not exclusively) of osseous tissue. These data support the notion that all osteoderms are derivatives of a neural crest-derived osteogenic cell population (with possible matrix contributions from the overlying epidermis) and share a deep homology associated with the skeletogenic competence of the dermis. Gymnophionan dermal scales are structurally similar to the elasmoid scales of most teleosts and are not comparable with osteoderms. Whereas details of development are lacking, it is hypothesized that dermal scales are derivatives of an odontogenic neural crest cell population and that skeletogenesis is comparable with the formation of elasmoid scales. Little is known about the lamina calcarea. It is

  13. A skeleton model for the MJO with refined vertical structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thual, Sulian; Majda, Andrew J.

    2016-05-01

    The Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO) is the dominant mode of variability in the tropical atmosphere on intraseasonal timescales and planetary spatial scales. The skeleton model is a minimal dynamical model that recovers robustly the most fundamental MJO features of (I) a slow eastward speed of roughly 5 {ms}^{-1}, (II) a peculiar dispersion relation with dω /dk ≈ 0, and (III) a horizontal quadrupole vortex structure. This model depicts the MJO as a neutrally-stable atmospheric wave that involves a simple multiscale interaction between planetary dry dynamics, planetary lower-tropospheric moisture and the planetary envelope of synoptic-scale activity. Here we propose and analyse an extended version of the skeleton model with additional variables accounting for the refined vertical structure of the MJO in nature. The present model reproduces qualitatively the front-to-rear vertical structure of the MJO found in nature, with MJO events marked by a planetary envelope of convective activity transitioning from the congestus to the deep to the stratiform type, in addition to a front-to-rear structure of moisture, winds and temperature. Despite its increased complexity the present model retains several interesting features of the original skeleton model such as a conserved energy and similar linear solutions. We further analyze a model version with a simple stochastic parametrization for the unresolved details of synoptic-scale activity. The stochastic model solutions show intermittent initiation, propagation and shut down of MJO wave trains, as in previous studies, in addition to MJO events with a front-to-rear vertical structure of varying intensity and characteristics from one event to another.

  14. Anabolic effects of IGF-1 signaling on the skeleton

    PubMed Central

    Tahimic, Candice G. T.; Wang, Yongmei; Bikle, Daniel D.

    2013-01-01

    This review focuses on the anabolic effects of IGF-1 signaling on the skeleton, emphasizing the requirement for IGF-1 signaling in normal bone formation and remodeling. We first discuss the genomic context, splicing variants, and species conservation of the IGF-1 locus. The modulation of IGF-1 action by growth hormone (GH) is then reviewed while also discussing the current model which takes into account the GH-independent actions of IGF-1. Next, the skeletal phenotypes of IGF-1-deficient animals are described in both embryonic and postnatal stages of development, which include severe dwarfism and an undermineralized skeleton. We then highlight two mechanisms by which IGF-1 exerts its anabolic action on the skeleton. Firstly, the role of IGF-1 signaling in the modulation of anabolic effects of parathyroid hormone (PTH) on bone will be discussed, presenting in vitro and in vivo studies that establish this concept and the proposed underlying molecular mechanisms involving Indian hedgehog (Ihh) and the ephrins. Secondly, the crosstalk of IGF-1 signaling with mechanosensing pathways will be discussed, beginning with the observation that animals subjected to skeletal unloading by hindlimb elevation are unable to mitigate cessation of bone growth despite infusion with IGF-1 and the failure of IGF-1 to activate its receptor in bone marrow stromal cell cultures from unloaded bone. Disrupted crosstalk between IGF-1 signaling and the integrin mechanotransduction pathways is discussed as one of the potential mechanisms for this IGF-1 resistance. Next, emerging paradigms on bone-muscle crosstalk are examined, focusing on the potential role of IGF-1 signaling in modulating such interactions. Finally, we present a future outlook on IGF research. PMID:23382729

  15. Nonlinear traveling wave solution for the MJO skeleton model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S.; Stechmann, S. N.

    2014-12-01

    Recently, a minimal dynamical model is presented for capturing MJO's fundamental features. The model is a nonlinear oscillator model for the MJO skeleton and it involves interactions between convection, moisture and circulation. I will present the exact nonlinear traveling wave solutions for the model based on its energy conservation. The exact nonlinear solution provides for an explicit comparison of features between linear and nonlinear waves such as dispersion relations and traveling wave speeds. Moreover, the nonlinear solutions, compared with the linear ones, produce a narrow region of active convection and a wider region of suppressed convection. These predictions offer nonlinear MJO features that could potentially be targets of observational investigations.

  16. The complete skull and skeleton of an early dinosaur.

    PubMed

    Sereno, P C; Novas, F E

    1992-11-13

    The unearthing of a complete skull and skeleton of the early dinosaur Herrerasaurus ischigualastensis sheds light on the early evolution of dinosaurs. Discovered in the Upper Triassic Ischigualasto Formation of Argentina, the fossils show that Herrerasaurus, a primitive theropod, was an agile, bipedal predator with a short forelimb specialized for grasping and raking. The fossils clarify anatomical features of the common ancestor of all dinosaurs. Herrerasaurus and younger dinosaurs from Upper Triassic beds in Argentina suggest that the dinosaurian radiation was well under way before dinosaurs dominated terrestrial vertebrate communities in taxonomic diversity and abundance.

  17. Bioactive acylphloroglucinols with adamantyl skeleton from Hypericum sampsonii.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hucheng; Chen, Chunmei; Yang, Jing; Li, Xiao-Nian; Liu, Junjun; Sun, Bin; Huang, Sheng-Xiong; Li, Dongyan; Yao, Guangmin; Luo, Zengwei; Li, Yan; Zhang, Jinwen; Xue, Yongbo; Zhang, Yonghui

    2014-12-19

    Hyperisampsins A-D (1-4), with tetracyclo[6.3.1.1(3,10).0(3,7)]tridecane skeletons and seven biogenetically related congeners (5-11), were isolated from Hypericum sampsonii. Their structures were elucidated by comprehensive spectroscopic techniques. The absolute configuration of 1 was established by ECD calculations, and those of 5 and 9 were confirmed by single X-ray crystallographic analyses. Hyperisampsins A and D showed potent anti-HIV activities with EC50 of 2.97 and 0.97 μM and selectivity index of 4.80 and 7.70, respectively.

  18. [Princess Anna Vasa--her fascinating life story and skeleton].

    PubMed

    During, Ebba

    2005-01-01

    The Princess Anna Vasa was born in Sweden in 1568 and spent her first 19 years there. She was the daughter of the Swedish king Johan III and his wife, the Polish Royal Princess Katarina Jagellonica. She was brought up as a Catholic but converted to be a Protestant already in 1583 and remained a fervent Protestant to the end of her life. She was an exceptionally intelligent and extensively educated woman. When her brother became king, Sigismund III of Poland, she accompanied him there. She exerted great influence on Sigismund who was brought up to be a Catholic. She was persistent in her religion, yet working for religious liberty. "The Swedish Princess" was also named "the Queen of Polish Botany". She was never married and she died 57 years old in 1625. For religious reasons her body had to wait 11 years for a funeral of royal standing. The funeral took place in 1636 in St Mary's Church in Torun, Poland. During restoration work at the church in April 1994, Anna Vasa's skeleton was removed from the tomb, and an antropological investigation in order to establish her identity was carried by Dr Andrzej Florkowski at the Dept of Anthrop, Nicholas Copernicus University of Torun. I was invited to Torun to examine her remains in May 1995. The skeleton was in a rather good state of preservation. However, her grave had been plundered at least twice. Her skeleton lacked the right forearm and hand, probably as the result of the pillage of her rings and bracelets. Some other bones and teeth were also missing. At our ocular examination the skeleton revealed a number of anatomical deformations and pathological changes. A conventional radiography and CT of Anna Vasa's skeletal remains was later carried out in 1995 by M. Grzegorzewski, Z. Boron and W. Lasek at the Dept of Radiology, Med. Acad. of Bydgoszcz, Polen. A DNA-analysis was carried out by Dr Anders Götherström at the Archaeol. Res. Lab., Stockholm Univ. An odontological and radiological study was performed by Dr Sigrid I

  19. Synthesis of the Acyclic Carbon Skeleton of Filipin III.

    PubMed

    Brun, Elodie; Bellosta, Véronique; Cossy, Janine

    2016-09-16

    The synthesis of the carbon skeleton of filipin III, a polyenic macrolactone possessing 11 stereogenic centers, was achieved using a convergent strategy with the longest linear sequence of 19 steps starting from hexanal. Construction of the polyene was realized using two successive Heck couplings as the key steps. Control of the stereogenic centers of the polyol fragment was performed by utilizing an Evans aldolization, a 1,3-syn aldolization, enantio- and diastereoselective allylations, a hemiacetalization/oxa-Michael sequence, and a 1,3-syn reduction. The polyol and polyenic fragments were coupled using a 1,5-anti diastereoselective aldolization followed by a 1,3-anti reduction.

  20. p-Coumaric acid - a monomer in the sporopollenin skeleton.

    PubMed

    Wehling, K; Niester, C; Boon, J J; Willemse, M T; Wiermann, R

    1989-10-01

    Sporopollenin obtained from wings of Pinus mugo (Turra) pollen was analysed by pyrolysis mass spectrometry. In the spectrum, mass peaks which are characteristic for p-coumaric acid were dominant. p-Coumaric acid was the main degradation compound when the wing material was treated by a gentle method using AII3, and also when the remaining residue of the treated sporopollenin material was saponified. It is therefore assumed that p-coumaric acid is a genuine structural unit in the sporopollenin skeleton. In addition, the effects of AII3 treatment indicate that the p-coumaric acid might be bound by ether linkages.

  1. Fractality in complex networks: critical and supercritical skeletons.

    PubMed

    Kim, J S; Goh, K-I; Salvi, G; Oh, E; Kahng, B; Kim, D

    2007-01-01

    Fractal scaling--a power-law behavior of the number of boxes needed to tile a given network with respect to the lateral size of the box--is studied. We introduce a box-covering algorithm that is a modified version of the original algorithm introduced by Song [Nature (London) 433, 392 (2005)]; this algorithm enables easy implementation. Fractal networks are viewed as comprising a skeleton and shortcuts. The skeleton, embedded underneath the original network, is a special type of spanning tree based on the edge betweenness centrality; it provides a scaffold for the fractality of the network. When the skeleton is regarded as a branching tree, it exhibits a plateau in the mean branching number as a function of the distance from a root. For nonfractal networks, on the other hand, the mean branching number decays to zero without forming a plateau. Based on these observations, we construct a fractal network model by combining a random branching tree and local shortcuts. The scaffold branching tree can be either critical or supercritical, depending on the small worldness of a given network. For the network constructed from the critical (supercritical) branching tree, the average number of vertices within a given box grows with the lateral size of the box according to a power-law (an exponential) form in the cluster-growing method. The critical and supercritical skeletons are observed in protein interaction networks and the World Wide Web, respectively. The distribution of box masses, i.e., the number of vertices within each box, follows a power law Pm(M) approximately M(-eta). The exponent eta depends on the box lateral size l(B). For small values of l(B), eta is equal to the degree exponent gamma of a given scale-free network, whereas eta approaches the exponent tau=gamma/(gamma-1) as l(B) increases, which is the exponent of the cluster-size distribution of the random branching tree. Finally, we study the perimeter H(alpha) of a given box alpha, i.e., the number of edges

  2. National Nuclear Security Administration Knowledge Base Core Table Schema Document

    SciTech Connect

    CARR,DORTHE B.

    2002-09-01

    The National Nuclear Security Administration is creating a Knowledge Base to store technical information to support the United States nuclear explosion monitoring mission. This document defines the core database tables that are used in the Knowledge Base. The purpose of this document is to present the ORACLE database tables in the NNSA Knowledge Base that on modifications to the CSS3.0 Database Schema developed in 1990. (Anderson et al., 1990). These modifications include additional columns to the affiliation table, an increase in the internal ORACLE format from 8 integers to 9 integers for thirteen IDs, and new primary and unique key definitions for six tables. It is intended to be used as a reference by researchers inside and outside of NNSA/DOE as they compile information to submit to the NNSA Knowledge Base. These ''core'' tables are separated into two groups. The Primary tables are dynamic and consist of information that can be used in automatic and interactive processing (e.g. arrivals, locations). The Lookup tables change infrequently and are used for auxiliary information used by the processing. In general, the information stored in the core tables consists of: arrivals; events, origins, associations of arrivals; magnitude information; station information (networks, site descriptions, instrument responses); pointers to waveform data; and comments pertaining to the information. This document is divided into four sections, the first being this introduction. Section two defines the sixteen tables that make up the core tables of the NNSA Knowledge Base database. Both internal (ORACLE) and external formats for the attributes are defined, along with a short description of each attribute. In addition, the primary, unique and foreign keys are defined. Section three of the document shows the relationships between the different tables by using entity-relationship diagrams. The last section, defines the columns or attributes of the various tables. Information that is

  3. Surface and curve skeletonization of large 3D models on the GPU.

    PubMed

    Jalba, Andrei C; Kustra, Jacek; Telea, Alexandru C

    2013-06-01

    We present a GPU-based framework for extracting surface and curve skeletons of 3D shapes represented as large polygonal meshes. We use an efficient parallel search strategy to compute point-cloud skeletons and their distance and feature transforms (FTs) with user-defined precision. We regularize skeletons by a new GPU-based geodesic tracing technique which is orders of magnitude faster and more accurate than comparable techniques. We reconstruct the input surface from skeleton clouds using a fast and accurate image-based method. We also show how to reconstruct the skeletal manifold structure as a polygon mesh and the curve skeleton as a polyline. Compared to recent skeletonization methods, our approach offers two orders of magnitude speed-up, high-precision, and low-memory footprints. We demonstrate our framework on several complex 3D models.

  4. 26 CFR 1.431(c)(6)-1 - Mortality tables used to determine current liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mortality tables used to determine current... tables used to determine current liability. (a) Mortality tables used to determine current liability. The...) and § 1.430(h)(3)-1(a)(2) are used to determine a multiemployer plan's current liability for purposes...

  5. 26 CFR 1.431(c)(6)-1 - Mortality tables used to determine current liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Mortality tables used to determine current... Mortality tables used to determine current liability. (a) Mortality tables used to determine current... section 430(h)(3)(A) and § 1.430(h)(3)-1(a)(2) are used to determine a multiemployer plan's current...

  6. 26 CFR 1.430(h)(3)-1 - Mortality tables used to determine present value.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Mortality tables used to determine present value... Mortality tables used to determine present value. (a) Basis for mortality tables—(1) In general. This section sets forth rules for the mortality tables to be used in determining present value or making any...

  7. 26 CFR 1.1298-0T - Passive foreign investment company-table of contents (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Passive foreign investment company-table of... Capital Gains and Losses § 1.1298-0T Passive foreign investment company—table of contents (temporary). This section lists the table of contents for § 1.1298-1T. § 1.1298-1TSection 1298(f) annual reporting...

  8. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart IIIi of... - Emission Standards for Stationary Fire Pump Engines

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... of Performance for Stationary Compression Ignition Internal Combustion Engines Part 60, Subpt. IIII, Table 4 Table 4 to Subpart IIII of Part 60—Emission Standards for Stationary Fire Pump Engines Maximum... Pump Engines 4 Table 4 to Subpart IIII of Part 60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...

  9. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart IIIi of... - Emission Standards for Stationary Fire Pump Engines

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... of Performance for Stationary Compression Ignition Internal Combustion Engines Part 60, Subpt. IIII, Table 4 Table 4 to Subpart IIII of Part 60—Emission Standards for Stationary Fire Pump Engines Maximum... Pump Engines 4 Table 4 to Subpart IIII of Part 60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...

  10. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart IIIi of... - Certification Requirements for Stationary Fire Pump Engines

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Standards of Performance for Stationary Compression Ignition Internal Combustion Engines Pt. 60, Subpt. IIII, Table 3 Table 3 to Subpart IIII of Part 60—Certification Requirements for Stationary Fire Pump Engines... Stationary Fire Pump Engines 3 Table 3 to Subpart IIII of Part 60 Protection of Environment...

  11. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart IIIi of... - Emission Standards for Stationary Fire Pump Engines

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... of Performance for Stationary Compression Ignition Internal Combustion Engines Pt. 60, Subpt. IIII, Table 4 Table 4 to Subpart IIII of Part 60—Emission Standards for Stationary Fire Pump Engines Maximum... Pump Engines 4 Table 4 to Subpart IIII of Part 60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...

  12. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart IIIi of... - Emission Standards for Stationary Fire Pump Engines

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... of Performance for Stationary Compression Ignition Internal Combustion Engines Pt. 60, Subpt. IIII, Table 4 Table 4 to Subpart IIII of Part 60—Emission Standards for Stationary Fire Pump Engines Maximum... Pump Engines 4 Table 4 to Subpart IIII of Part 60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...

  13. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart IIIi of... - Certification Requirements for Stationary Fire Pump Engines

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Standards of Performance for Stationary Compression Ignition Internal Combustion Engines Pt. 60, Subpt. IIII, Table 3 Table 3 to Subpart IIII of Part 60—Certification Requirements for Stationary Fire Pump Engines... Stationary Fire Pump Engines 3 Table 3 to Subpart IIII of Part 60 Protection of Environment...

  14. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart IIIi of... - Certification Requirements for Stationary Fire Pump Engines

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Standards of Performance for Stationary Compression Ignition Internal Combustion Engines Pt. 60, Subpt. IIII, Table 3 Table 3 to Subpart IIII of Part 60—Certification Requirements for Stationary Fire Pump Engines... Stationary Fire Pump Engines 3 Table 3 to Subpart IIII of Part 60 Protection of Environment...

  15. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart IIIi of... - Emission Standards for Stationary Fire Pump Engines

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... of Performance for Stationary Compression Ignition Internal Combustion Engines Pt. 60, Subpt. IIII, Table 4 Table 4 to Subpart IIII of Part 60—Emission Standards for Stationary Fire Pump Engines Maximum... Pump Engines 4 Table 4 to Subpart IIII of Part 60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...

  16. 26 CFR 1.408A-0 - Roth IRAs; table of contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Roth IRAs; table of contents. 1.408A-0 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.408A-0 Roth IRAs; table of contents. This table of contents lists the regulations relating to Roth IRAs under section 408A of...

  17. 26 CFR 1.408A-0 - Roth IRAs; table of contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Roth IRAs; table of contents. 1.408A-0 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.408A-0 Roth IRAs; table of contents. This table of contents lists the regulations relating to Roth IRAs under section...

  18. 26 CFR 1.408A-0 - Roth IRAs; table of contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Roth IRAs; table of contents. 1.408A-0 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.408A-0 Roth IRAs; table of contents. This table of contents lists the regulations relating to Roth IRAs under section...

  19. 26 CFR 1.408A-0 - Roth IRAs; table of contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Roth IRAs; table of contents. 1.408A-0 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.408A-0 Roth IRAs; table of contents. This table of contents lists the regulations relating to Roth IRAs under section...

  20. 26 CFR 1.408A-0 - Roth IRAs; table of contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Roth IRAs; table of contents. 1.408A-0 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.408A-0 Roth IRAs; table of contents. This table of contents lists the regulations relating to Roth IRAs under section...

  1. 26 CFR 1.431(c)(6)-1 - Mortality tables used to determine current liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Mortality tables used to determine current... Mortality tables used to determine current liability. (a) Mortality tables used to determine current... section 430(h)(3)(A) and § 1.430(h)(3)-1(a)(2) are used to determine a multiemployer plan's current...

  2. 26 CFR 1.431(c)(6)-1 - Mortality tables used to determine current liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Mortality tables used to determine current... Mortality tables used to determine current liability. (a) Mortality tables used to determine current... section 430(h)(3)(A) and § 1.430(h)(3)-1(a)(2) are used to determine a multiemployer plan's current...

  3. 26 CFR 1.431(c)(6)-1 - Mortality tables used to determine current liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Mortality tables used to determine current... Mortality tables used to determine current liability. (a) Mortality tables used to determine current... section 430(h)(3)(A) and § 1.430(h)(3)-1(a)(2) are used to determine a multiemployer plan's current...

  4. Space station wardroom table

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Marc M. (Inventor); Kaplicky, Jan (Inventor); Nixon, David A. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A table top for use in constricted areas has a plurality of support arms abutting at one end to form a hub. The support arms are arranged in equidistant, spaced-apart relation to each other at the ends distal to the hub. A plurality of work surface leaf sections mounted between the support arms are individually pivotable through 360 degrees about their longitudinal axes. The table top additionally has a plurality of distal leaves, each distal leaf being attached to the distal end of one of the arms. The distal leaves are pivotable between an upright position level with the support arms and a stored position below the support arms.

  5. DNA and bone structure preservation in medieval human skeletons.

    PubMed

    Coulson-Thomas, Yvette M; Norton, Andrew L; Coulson-Thomas, Vivien J; Florencio-Silva, Rinaldo; Ali, Nadir; Elmrghni, Samir; Gil, Cristiane D; Sasso, Gisela R S; Dixon, Ronald A; Nader, Helena B

    2015-06-01

    Morphological and ultrastructural data from archaeological human bones are scarce, particularly data that have been correlated with information on the preservation of molecules such as DNA. Here we examine the bone structure of macroscopically well-preserved medieval human skeletons by transmission electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry, and the quantity and quality of DNA extracted from these skeletons. DNA technology has been increasingly used for analyzing physical evidence in archaeological forensics; however, the isolation of ancient DNA is difficult since it is highly degraded, extraction yields are low and the co-extraction of PCR inhibitors is a problem. We adapted and optimised a method that is frequently used for isolating DNA from modern samples, Chelex(®) 100 (Bio-Rad) extraction, for isolating DNA from archaeological human bones and teeth. The isolated DNA was analysed by real-time PCR using primers targeting the sex determining region on the Y chromosome (SRY) and STR typing using the AmpFlSTR(®) Identifiler PCR Amplification kit. Our results clearly show the preservation of bone matrix in medieval bones and the presence of intact osteocytes with well preserved encapsulated nuclei. In addition, we show how effective Chelex(®) 100 is for isolating ancient DNA from archaeological bones and teeth. This optimised method is suitable for STR typing using kits aimed specifically at degraded and difficult DNA templates since amplicons of up to 250bp were successfully amplified. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Genetic analysis of 7 medieval skeletons from the Aragonese Pyrenees.

    PubMed

    Núnéz, Carolina; Sosa, Cecilia; Baeta, Miriam; Geppert, Maria; Turnbough, Meredith; Phillips, Nicole; Casalod, Yolanda; Bolea, Miguel; Roby, Rhonda; Budowle, Bruce; Martínez-Jarreta, Begona

    2011-06-01

    To perform a genetic characterization of 7 skeletons from medieval age found in a burial site in the Aragonese Pyrenees. Allele frequencies of autosomal short tandem repeats (STR) loci were determined by 3 different STR systems. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and Y-chromosome haplogroups were determined by sequencing of the hypervariable segment 1 of mtDNA and typing of phylogenetic Y chromosome single nucleotide polymorphisms (Y-SNP) markers, respectively. Possible familial relationships were also investigated. Complete or partial STR profiles were obtained in 3 of the 7 samples. Mitochondrial DNA haplogroup was determined in 6 samples, with 5 of them corresponding to the haplogroup H and 1 to the haplogroup U5a. Y-chromosome haplogroup was determined in 2 samples, corresponding to the haplogroup R. In one of them, the sub-branch R1b1b2 was determined. mtDNA sequences indicated that some of the individuals could be maternally related, while STR profiles indicated no direct family relationships. Despite the antiquity of the samples and great difficulty that genetic analyses entail, the combined use of autosomal STR markers, Y-chromosome informative SNPs, and mtDNA sequences allowed us to genotype a group of skeletons from the medieval age.

  7. XANES mapping of organic sulfate in three scleractinian coral skeletons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuif, Jean-Pierre; Dauphin, Yannicke; Doucet, Jean; Salome, Murielle; Susini, Jean

    2003-01-01

    The presence and localization of organic sulfate within coral skeletons are studied by using X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy (XANES) fluorescence. XANES spectra are recorded from four reference sulfur-bearing organic molecules: three amino acids (H-S-C bonds in cysteine; C-S-C bonds in methionine; one disulfide bond C-S-S-C bonds in cystine) and a sulfated sugar (C-SO 4 bonds in chondroitin sulfate). Spectral responses of three coral skeletons show that the sulfated form is extremely dominant in coral aragonite, and practically exclusive within both centres of calcification and the surrounding fibrous tissues of coral septa. Mapping of S-sulfate concentrations in centres and fibres gives us direct evidence of high concentration of organic sulfate in centres of calcification. Additionally, a banding pattern of S-sulfate is visible in fibrous part of the coral septa, evidencing a biochemical zonation that corresponds to the step-by-step growth of fibres.

  8. The skeleton as an intracrine organ for vitamin D metabolism.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Paul H; Atkins, Gerald J

    2008-12-01

    The endocrine hormone, 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) (1,25D) is an important regulator of calcium and phosphorus homeostasis. In this context, 1,25D is generally recognized as necessary for the maintenance of a healthy skeleton through its actions on the small intestine. In this review, we highlight the direct effects of 1,25D on the constituent cells of the bone, actions that are independent of effects on the intestine and kidney. We also consider the evidence that 25D levels, not 1,25D levels, correlate best with parameters of bone health, and that the bone itself is a site of metabolic conversion of 25D into 1,25D, by virtue of its expression of the 25-hydroxyvitamin D 1alpha-hydroxylase, CYP27B1. We review the evidence that at least osteoblasts and chondrocytes, and possibly also bone resorbing osteoclasts, are capable of such metabolic conversion, and therefore that these cells likely participate in autocrine and paracrine loops of vitamin D metabolism. We conclude that the skeleton is an intracrine organ for vitamin D metabolism, challenging the long-held notion that 1,25D is solely an endocrine hormone.

  9. Genetic analysis of 7 medieval skeletons from Aragonese Pyrenees

    PubMed Central

    Núńez, Carolina; Sosa, Cecilia; Baeta, Miriam; Geppert, Maria; Turnbough, Meredith; Phillips, Nicole; Casalod, Yolanda; Bolea, Miguel; Roby, Rhonda; Budowle, Bruce; Martínez-Jarreta, Begońa

    2011-01-01

    Aim To perform a genetic characterization of 7 skeletons from medieval age found in a burial site in the Aragonese Pyrenees. Methods Allele frequencies of autosomal short tandem repeats (STR) loci were determined by 3 different STR systems. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and Y-chromosome haplogroups were determined by sequencing of the hypervariable segment 1 of mtDNA and typing of phylogenetic Y chromosome single nucleotide polymorphisms (Y-SNP) markers, respectively. Possible familial relationships were also investigated. Results Complete or partial STR profiles were obtained in 3 of the 7 samples. Mitochondrial DNA haplogroup was determined in 6 samples, with 5 of them corresponding to the haplogroup H and 1 to the haplogroup U5a. Y-chromosome haplogroup was determined in 2 samples, corresponding to the haplogroup R. In one of them, the sub-branch R1b1b2 was determined. mtDNA sequences indicated that some of the individuals could be maternally related, while STR profiles indicated no direct family relationships. Conclusions Despite the antiquity of the samples and great difficulty that genetic analyses entail, the combined use of autosomal STR markers, Y-chromosome informative SNPs, and mtDNA sequences allowed us to genotype a group of skeletons from the medieval age. PMID:21674829

  10. Minimum convex hull mass estimations of complete mounted skeletons.

    PubMed

    Sellers, W I; Hepworth-Bell, J; Falkingham, P L; Bates, K T; Brassey, C A; Egerton, V M; Manning, P L

    2012-10-23

    Body mass is a critical parameter used to constrain biomechanical and physiological traits of organisms. Volumetric methods are becoming more common as techniques for estimating the body masses of fossil vertebrates. However, they are often accused of excessive subjective input when estimating the thickness of missing soft tissue. Here, we demonstrate an alternative approach where a minimum convex hull is derived mathematically from the point cloud generated by laser-scanning mounted skeletons. This has the advantage of requiring minimal user intervention and is thus more objective and far quicker. We test this method on 14 relatively large-bodied mammalian skeletons and demonstrate that it consistently underestimates body mass by 21 per cent with minimal scatter around the regression line. We therefore suggest that it is a robust method of estimating body mass where a mounted skeletal reconstruction is available and demonstrate its usage to predict the body mass of one of the largest, relatively complete sauropod dinosaurs: Giraffatitan brancai (previously Brachiosaurus) as 23200 kg.

  11. [Study of skeleton gravitation physiology and problem of osteoporosis].

    PubMed

    Oganov, V S

    2003-03-01

    Main osteoporosis definitions and some results of bone tissue research in Russian astronauts, patients, and healthy subjects, using modern osteodensitometry, are presented. Bone mineral density (BMD) was regularly decreased at lower segments of skeleton. In the skull bone and some other sites of upper part of skeleton, a tendency was revealed for an increase of the bone mineral content (BMC). The mean value of bone loss was within the normal range and not correlated with duration of space flight; it revealed a high individual variability and in some cases was clinically qualified as local osteopenia. On the ground of analysis of own results and animal and bone cultural experiments data in microgravity conditions, the described changes seem to be reflecting a deceleration of bone formation as an adaptive response of bone tissue to the mechanical unloading. The response is realized mainly on the tissue level. It does not exclude bone resorption activity as a result of changes in hierarchy of water and electrolytes metabolism as reflected by body fluid redistribution in cranial direction. The results obtained broaden our notions on pathogenesis of some types of osteoporosis in clinic.

  12. Navigable points estimation for mobile robots using binary image skeletonization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez S., Fernando; Jacinto G., Edwar; Montiel A., Holman

    2017-02-01

    This paper describes the use of image skeletonization for the estimation of all the navigable points, inside a scene of mobile robots navigation. Those points are used for computing a valid navigation path, using standard methods. The main idea is to find the middle and the extreme points of the obstacles in the scene, taking into account the robot size, and create a map of navigable points, in order to reduce the amount of information for the planning algorithm. Those points are located by means of the skeletonization of a binary image of the obstacles and the scene background, along with some other digital image processing algorithms. The proposed algorithm automatically gives a variable number of navigable points per obstacle, depending on the complexity of its shape. As well as, the way how the algorithm can change some of their parameters in order to change the final number of the resultant key points is shown. The results shown here were obtained applying different kinds of digital image processing algorithms on static scenes.

  13. Methods for tracking athletes' competitive performance in skeleton.

    PubMed

    Bullock, Nicola; Hopkins, Will G

    2009-07-01

    In many sports, changes in performance time between races arising from differences in venues and weather far exceed changes in an athlete's true ability. Here we compare three methods to track performance of individual athletes in one such sport, skeleton. We developed the methods with official times of 33 male and 34 female athletes competing in three or more of 26 World Cup races over 4 years leading up to, but not including, the 2006 Winter Olympics. For two methods accessible to coaches, we fitted simple quadratic trajectories to each athlete's race placing and to percent behind the winning time. For a more sensitive method, we fitted similar quadratic trajectories to race time using a mixed model to adjust for mean race times. Correlations between predicted and observed performance in the races used to develop the methods were all similar ( approximately 0.7). Correlations between predicted and observed performance in the Olympics clearly favoured race placing (0.78) over race time (0.65) and percent behind the winner (0.63) for women, whereas race placing was clearly inferior (0.14) to percent behind the winner (0.30) and race time (0.46) for men. All three methods are potentially useful and need further investigation in skeleton and other sports.

  14. Reduction of absorbed doses in radiography of the facial skeleton

    SciTech Connect

    Julin, P.; Kraepelien, T.

    1984-11-01

    Radiation absorbed doses from radiography of the paranasal sinuses and the facial skeleton were measured with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) on a phantom head using high-sensitivity screens in an Orbix stand. The entrance doses to the skin of the head ranged from 0.31 to 2.9 mGy per exposure. The absorbed dose from a full series of sinus exposures averaged 0.33 mGy for the oral mucous membrane, 0.33 mGy for the maxillary sinus mucous membrane, 0.11 mGy for the parotid gland, 0.15 mGy for the submandibular gland, 0.61 mGy for the eye lens, and 0.75 mGy for the thyroid gland region. A leaded soft collar adapted to the thyroid region reduced the thyroid doses by more than one order of magnitude, but also reduced the image field. The mean energy imparted from a full series of paranasal sinus projections was 4.8 mJ and from a total series of the facial skeleton, 7.9 mJ.

  15. Minimum convex hull mass estimations of complete mounted skeletons

    PubMed Central

    Sellers, W. I.; Hepworth-Bell, J.; Falkingham, P. L.; Bates, K. T.; Brassey, C. A.; Egerton, V. M.; Manning, P. L.

    2012-01-01

    Body mass is a critical parameter used to constrain biomechanical and physiological traits of organisms. Volumetric methods are becoming more common as techniques for estimating the body masses of fossil vertebrates. However, they are often accused of excessive subjective input when estimating the thickness of missing soft tissue. Here, we demonstrate an alternative approach where a minimum convex hull is derived mathematically from the point cloud generated by laser-scanning mounted skeletons. This has the advantage of requiring minimal user intervention and is thus more objective and far quicker. We test this method on 14 relatively large-bodied mammalian skeletons and demonstrate that it consistently underestimates body mass by 21 per cent with minimal scatter around the regression line. We therefore suggest that it is a robust method of estimating body mass where a mounted skeletal reconstruction is available and demonstrate its usage to predict the body mass of one of the largest, relatively complete sauropod dinosaurs: Giraffatitan brancai (previously Brachiosaurus) as 23200 kg. PMID:22675141

  16. Miocene Coral Skeleton Rare Earth Element Patterns Reflect River Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertz-Kraus, R.; Brachert, T. C.; Jochum, K. P.

    2010-12-01

    Rare Earth Element (REE) patterns of modern coral skeletons usually reflect the REE composition of ambient seawater which is characterized by heavy REE enriched relative to light REE with NASC (North American Shale Composite) normalized La/Lu ratios of typically <0.4. The REE concentration in coral aragonite is enriched by 3 to 4 orders of magnitude compared to ambient seawater. Here we report trace element data including REE of coral skeletons of Late Miocene age (~9 Ma, Tortonian) from Crete (Eastern Mediterranean). Analyses were done using a 213 nm Nd:YAG laser coupled to an Element2 ICP-MS along the growth axis of the coral skeletons. The profiles show that Ba/Ca ratios have a seasonally induced pattern with high values around the winter months which are identified by δ18O analyses. REE/Ca ratios co-vary with Ba/Ca ratios. Since the Ba/Ca ratio is a proxy used to monitor river discharge, the co-variation suggests the REE/Ca ratio to be a proxy of comparable quality. NASC-normalized REE patterns of the Tortonian corals have negative Ce anomalies like modern corals. However, the Tortonian corals have REE patterns highly enriched in LREE with (La/Lu)N ratios of 4 to 30 which is 1 to 2 orders of magnitude higher compared to modern corals. Al concentrations are low (<10 ppm) and do not correlate with REE concentrations indicating an insignificant fraction of terrigenous material included in the skeleton. Applying distribution coefficients typical for modern corals, the REE composition of the Tortonian ambient water yields (La/Lu)N of about 2 to 16. This range can be explained by binary mixing of modern Eastern Mediterranean sea surface water ((La/Lu)N=0.35, sea surface salinity (SSS) ~38 ‰) with highly LREE-enriched river water ((La/Lu)N >3, salinity ~0.5 ‰) transporting suspended and colloid phases, also highly enriched, especially in LREE, at a ratio of ~9 (seawater):1 (river water). The river water component is considered because paleoenvironmental

  17. Evolutionary exploitation of design options by the first animals with hard skeletons.

    PubMed

    Thomas, R D; Shearman, R M; Stewart, G W

    2000-05-19

    The set of viable design elements available for animals to use in building skeletons has been fully exploited. Analysis of animal skeletons in relation to the multivariate, theoretical "Skeleton Space" has shown that a large proportion of these options are used in each phylum. Here, we show that structural elements deployed in the skeletons of Burgess Shale animals (Middle Cambrian) incorporate 146 of 182 character pairs defined in this morphospace. Within 15 million years of the appearance of crown groups of phyla with substantial hard parts, at least 80 percent of skeletal design elements recognized among living and extinct marine metazoans were exploited.

  18. The Dynamic Force Table

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geddes, John B.; Black, Kelly

    2008-01-01

    We examine an experimental apparatus that is used to motivate the connections between the basic properties of vectors, potential functions, systems of nonlinear equations, and Newton's method for nonlinear systems of equations. The apparatus is an adaptation of a force table where we remove the center-pin and allow the center-ring to move freely.…

  19. NEW APPROACHES: Pool table

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parry, Malcolm

    1998-05-01

    This article explains a novel way of demonstrating the principle of conservation of energy. This can be difficult to demonstrate in the laboratory, but if students have been convinced of the conservation of momentum, two-dimensional collisions on a pool table may be used.

  20. A Modern Periodic Table.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrenden-Harker, B. D.

    1997-01-01

    Presents a modern Periodic Table based on the electron distribution in the outermost shell and the order of filling of the sublevels within the shells. Enables a student to read off directly the electronic configuration of the element and the order in which filling occurs. (JRH)

  1. Guide to the Table

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Occupational Outlook Quarterly, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a table that provides a snapshot of how employment is expected to change in 289 occupations. For each occupation, it shows estimated employment in 2008, the projected numeric change in employment (that is, how many jobs are expected to be gained or lost) over the 2008-18 decade, and the projected percent change in employment…

  2. A Modern Periodic Table.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrenden-Harker, B. D.

    1997-01-01

    Presents a modern Periodic Table based on the electron distribution in the outermost shell and the order of filling of the sublevels within the shells. Enables a student to read off directly the electronic configuration of the element and the order in which filling occurs. (JRH)

  3. The Aerodynamic Plane Table

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahm, A F

    1924-01-01

    This report gives the description and the use of a specially designed aerodynamic plane table. For the accurate and expeditious geometrical measurement of models in an aerodynamic laboratory, and for miscellaneous truing operations, there is frequent need for a specially equipped plan table. For example, one may have to measure truly to 0.001 inch the offsets of an airfoil at many parts of its surface. Or the offsets of a strut, airship hull, or other carefully formed figure may require exact calipering. Again, a complete airplane model may have to be adjusted for correct incidence at all parts of its surfaces or verified in those parts for conformance to specifications. Such work, if but occasional, may be done on a planing or milling machine; but if frequent, justifies the provision of a special table. For this reason it was found desirable in 1918 to make the table described in this report and to equip it with such gauges and measures as the work should require.

  4. The Dynamic Force Table

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geddes, John B.; Black, Kelly

    2008-01-01

    We examine an experimental apparatus that is used to motivate the connections between the basic properties of vectors, potential functions, systems of nonlinear equations, and Newton's method for nonlinear systems of equations. The apparatus is an adaptation of a force table where we remove the center-pin and allow the center-ring to move freely.…

  5. Spine and axial skeleton injuries in the National Football League.

    PubMed

    Mall, Nathan A; Buchowski, Jacob; Zebala, Lukas; Brophy, Robert H; Wright, Rick W; Matava, Matthew J

    2012-08-01

    The majority of previous literature focusing on spinal injuries in American football players is centered around catastrophic injuries; however, this may underestimate the true number of these injuries in this athletic cohort. The goals of this study were to (1) report the incidence of spinal and axial skeleton injuries, both minor and severe, in the National Football League (NFL) over an 11-year period; (2) determine the incidence of spinal injury by injury type, anatomic location, player position, mechanism of injury, and type of exposure (practice vs game); and (3) determine the average number of practices and days missed because of injury for each injury type. Descriptive epidemiological study. All documented injuries to the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine; pelvis; ribs; and spinal cord were retrospectively analyzed using the NFL's injury surveillance database over a period of 11 seasons from 2000 through 2010. The data were analyzed by the number of injuries per athlete-exposure, the anatomic location and type of injury, player position, mechanism of injury, and number of days missed per injury. A total of 2208 injuries occurred to the spine or axial skeleton over an 11-season interval in the NFL, with a mean loss of 25.7 days per injury. This represented 7% of the total injuries during this time period. Of these 2208 injuries, 987 (44.7%) occurred in the cervical spine. Time missed from play was greatest for thoracic disc herniations (189 days/injury). Other injuries that had a mean time missed greater than 30 days included (in descending order) cervical fracture (120 days/injury), cervical disc degeneration/herniation (85 days/injury), spinal cord injury (77 days/injury), lumbar disc degeneration/herniation (52 days/injury), thoracic fracture (34 days/injury), and thoracic nerve injury (30 days/injury). Offensive linemen were the most likely to suffer a spinal injury, followed by defensive backs, defensive linemen, and linebackers. Blocking and tackling

  6. Endocrine regulation of male fertility by the skeleton

    PubMed Central

    Oury, Franck; Sumara, Grzegorz; Sumara, Olga; Ferron, Mathieu; Chang, Haixin; Smith, Charles E.; Hermo, Louis; Suarez, Susan; Roth, Bryan L.; Ducy, Patricia; Karsenty, Gerard

    2011-01-01

    Although the endocrine capacity of bone is widely recognized, interactions between bone and the reproductive system have until now focused on the gonads as a regulator of bone remodeling. We now show that in males, bone acts as a regulator of fertility. Using co-culture assays, we demonstrate that osteoblasts are able to induce testosterone production by the testes, while they fail to influence estrogen production by the ovaries. Analyses of cell-specific loss- and gain-of-function models reveal that the osteoblast-derived hormone osteocalcin performs this endocrine function. By binding to a G-protein coupled receptor expressed in the Leydig cells of the testes, osteocalcin regulates in a CREB-dependent manner the expression of enzymes required for testosterone synthesis, promoting germ cell survival. This study expands the physiological repertoire of osteocalcin, and provides the first evidence that the skeleton is an endocrine regulator of reproduction. PMID:21333348

  7. Companions for ``Nessie'' in the Milky Way's Skeleton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-12-01

    The recent discovery of a purported bone of the Milky Way, a dark cloud nicknamed Nessie, has provided us with new clues for mapping out the spiral structure of our galaxy. It turns out that Nessie may not be alone: a follow-up study has identified more bones, potentially making up a skeleton of the Milky Way that traces out the densest parts of its spiral arms.Inconvenient Vantage PointHow many spiral arms does the Milky Way have? Where are they located? What does the structure look like between the arms? It may seem surprising that these fundamental questions dont yet have clear answers. But because were stuck in the galaxys disk, were forced to piece together our understanding of the Milky Ways structure based primarily on measurements of position and radial velocity of structures within the galactic plane.The discovery of Nessie presents an intriguing new tool to identify the layout of the galaxy. Nessie is a very long, thin, infrared-dark filament that runs along the modeled position of the Scutum-Centaurus arm and is believed therefore to trace the structure of the arm. In a new study led by Catherine Zucker (University of Virginia, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics), the authors have searched for additional bones like Nessie, hoping to use them to map out the skeleton of the Milky Way.New Bones DiscoveredIn this map of radial velocity vs. galactic longitude, the bone candidates are indicated by the numbered points. The colored lines indicate the positions of two of the galactic spiral arms, according to various models. Click for a closer look! [Zucker et al. 2015]Zucker and collaborators began by using World Wide Telescope, a tool that facilitates visualization of multiple layers of data at a variety of scales, to search through Spitzer infrared data for additional structures like Nessie. Searching specifically along the predicted positions of galactic arms, they found 15 initial bone candidates.Next, the team obtained radial-velocity data for the

  8. Mineralized cartilage in the skeleton of chondrichthyan fishes.

    PubMed

    Dean, Mason N; Summers, Adam P

    2006-01-01

    The cartilaginous endoskeleton of chondrichthyan fishes (sharks, rays, and chimaeras) exhibits complex arrangements and morphologies of calcified tissues that vary with age, species, feeding behavior, and location in the body. Understanding of the development, evolutionary history and function of these tissue types has been hampered by the lack of a unifying terminology. In order to facilitate reciprocal illumination between disparate fields with convergent interests, we present levels of organization in which crystal orientation/size delimits three calcification types (areolar, globular, and prismatic) that interact in two distinct skeletal types, vertebral and tessellated cartilage. The tessellated skeleton is composed of small blocks (tesserae) of calcified cartilage (both prismatic and globular) overlying a core of unmineralized cartilage, while vertebral cartilage usually contains all three types of calcification.

  9. The oldest known primate skeleton and early haplorhine evolution.

    PubMed

    Ni, Xijun; Gebo, Daniel L; Dagosto, Marian; Meng, Jin; Tafforeau, Paul; Flynn, John J; Beard, K Christopher

    2013-06-06

    Reconstructing the earliest phases of primate evolution has been impeded by gaps in the fossil record, so that disagreements persist regarding the palaeobiology and phylogenetic relationships of the earliest primates. Here we report the discovery of a nearly complete and partly articulated skeleton of a primitive haplorhine primate from the early Eocene of China, about 55 million years ago, the oldest fossil primate of this quality ever recovered. Coupled with detailed morphological examination using propagation phase contrast X-ray synchrotron microtomography, our phylogenetic analysis based on total available evidence indicates that this fossil is the most basal known member of the tarsiiform clade. In addition to providing further support for an early dichotomy between the strepsirrhine and haplorhine clades, this new primate further constrains the age of divergence between tarsiiforms and anthropoids. It also strengthens the hypothesis that the earliest primates were probably diurnal, arboreal and primarily insectivorous mammals the size of modern pygmy mouse lemurs.

  10. Regulation of energy metabolism by the skeleton: osteocalcin and beyond.

    PubMed

    Ferron, Mathieu; Lacombe, Julie

    2014-11-01

    The skeleton has recently emerged as an endocrine organ implicated in the regulation of glucose and energy metabolism. This function of bone is mediated, at least in part, by osteocalcin, an osteoblast-derived protein acting as a hormone stimulating insulin sensitivity, insulin secretion and energy expenditure. Osteocalcin secretion and bioactivity is in turn regulated by several hormonal cues including insulin, leptin, the sympathetic nervous system and glucocorticoids. Recent findings support the notion that osteocalcin functions and regulations are conserved between mice and humans. Moreover, studies in mice suggest that osteocalcin could represent a viable therapeutic approach for the treatment of obesity and insulin resistance. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on osteocalcin functions, its various modes of action and the mechanisms implicated in the control of this hormone.

  11. Visualization of the Protein Associations in the Erythrocyte Membrane Skeleton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byers, Timothy J.; Branton, Daniel

    1985-09-01

    We have obtained clear images of the erythrocyte membrane skeleton from negatively stained preparations that originate directly from the intact cell but in which the spectrin meshwork is artificially spread to allow close inspection. Our procedure requires less than 2 min at 5 degrees C in phosphate buffers. We find 200-nm-long spectrin tetramers crosslinked by junctional complexes. Each junction contains a regular 37-nm rod, probably an actin oligomer of approximately 13 monomers. Densities appear at variable places in the meshwork but distinct globules occur with great frequency 78 nm from the spectrin tetramer's junctional insertion end, very close to the known binding site for ankyrin. Most frequently, five or six spectrin tetramers insert into each junction, producing a meshwork that displays remarkably regular long range order.

  12. Classification of pelvic ring fractures in skeletonized human remains.

    PubMed

    Báez-Molgado, Socorro; Bartelink, Eric J; Jellema, Lyman M; Spurlock, Linda; Sholts, Sabrina B

    2015-01-01

    Pelvic ring fractures are associated with high rates of mortality and thus can provide key information about circumstances surrounding death. These injuries can be particularly informative in skeletonized remains, yet difficult to diagnose and interpret. This study adapted a clinical system of classifying pelvic ring fractures according to their resultant degree of pelvic stability for application to gross human skeletal remains. The modified Tile criteria were applied to the skeletal remains of 22 individuals from the Cleveland Museum of Natural History and Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México that displayed evidence of pelvic injury. Because these categories are tied directly to clinical assessments concerning the severity and treatment of injuries, this approach can aid in the identification of manner and cause of death, as well as interpretations of possible mechanisms of injury, such as those typical in car-to-pedestrian and motor vehicle accidents. © 2014 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  13. Non-metric variation of the infracranial skeleton.

    PubMed Central

    Finnegan, M

    1978-01-01

    196 skeletons of known age, sex and rac from the Terry Collection were studied in order to document 30 non-metric infracranial traits. Each trait had the ability to be expressed bilaterally, although significant side dimorphism was not observed. Sex differences were statistically significant for some of the traits within a racial group, but these differences were not as pronounced as the differences generated by non-metric cranial traits in the same populations, and were not effective in all racial groups. In general, these infracranial traits show some age dependency when correlation statistics are used, but this dependency is lost when the more robust chi 2 statistic is used. These data suggest that infracranial non-metric traits may be superior to cranial non-metric traits for population comparisons. Infracranial traits may be more durable than cranial traits having regard to the nature of most archaeological material. PMID:632214

  14. Genetic Disorders of the Skeleton: A Developmental Approach

    PubMed Central

    Kornak, Uwe; Mundlos, Stefan

    2003-01-01

    Although disorders of the skeleton are individually rare, they are of clinical relevance because of their overall frequency. Many attempts have been made in the past to identify disease groups in order to facilitate diagnosis and to draw conclusions about possible underlying pathomechanisms. Traditionally, skeletal disorders have been subdivided into dysostoses, defined as malformations of individual bones or groups of bones, and osteochondrodysplasias, defined as developmental disorders of chondro-osseous tissue. In light of the recent advances in molecular genetics, however, many phenotypically similar skeletal diseases comprising the classical categories turned out not to be based on defects in common genes or physiological pathways. In this article, we present a classification based on a combination of molecular pathology and embryology, taking into account the importance of development for the understanding of bone diseases. PMID:12900795

  15. Simultaneous drag and flow measurements of Olympic skeleton athletes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Yae Eun; Digiulio, David; Peters, Steve; Wei, Timothy

    2009-11-01

    The Olympic sport of skeleton involves an athlete riding a small sled face first down a bobsled track at speeds up to 130 km/hr. In these races, the difference between gold and missing the medal stand altogether can be hundredths of a second per run. As such, reducing aerodynamic drag through proper body positioning is of first order importance. To better study the flow behavior and to improve the performance of the athletes, we constructed a static force balance system on a mock section of a bobsled track. Athlete and the sled are placed on the force balance system which is positioned at the exit of an open loop wind tunnel. Simultaneous drag force and DPIV velocity field measurements were made along with video recordings of body position to aid the athletes in determining their optimal aerodynamic body position.

  16. Reduction of absorbed doses in radiography of the facial skeleton

    SciTech Connect

    Julin, P.; Kraepelien, T.

    1984-11-01

    Radiation absorbed doses from radiography of the paranasal sinuses and the facial skeleton were measured with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) on a phantom head using high-sensitivity screens in an Orbix stand. The entrance doses to the skin of the head ranged from 0.31 to 2.9 mGy per exposure. The absorbed dose from a full series of sinus exposures averaged 0.33 mGy for the oral mucous membrane, 0.33 mGy for the maxillary sinus mucous membrane, 0.11 MgY for the parotid gland, 0.15 MgY for the submandibular gland, 0.61 mGy for the eye lens, and 0.75 mGy for the thyroid gland region. A leaded soft collar adapted to the thyroid region reduced the thyroid doses by more than one order of magnitude, but also reduced the image field.

  17. The carbon-skeleton rearrangement in tropane alkaloid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Sandala, Gregory M; Smith, David M; Radom, Leo

    2008-08-13

    High-level quantum chemistry calculations have been performed to examine the carbon-skeleton rearrangement of the tropane alkaloid littorine to hyoscyamine. Two pathways involving radical and carbocation intermediates have been investigated in this regard, namely, stepwise (or fragmentation-recombination) and concerted. The fragmentation products are calculated to be of high energy for both the radical- and carbocation-based mechanisms (136.3 and 170.9 kJ mol(-1), respectively). Similarly, the rearrangement barrier for the radical-based concerted pathway is calculated to be quite high (135.6 kJ mol(-1)). In contrast, the carbocation-based concerted pathway is found to be associated with a relatively low barrier (47.4 kJ mol(-1)). The ionization energy of the substrate-derived radical 3a is calculated to be 7.01 eV, suggesting that its oxidation to generate the substrate-derived carbocation 3b ought to be facile. In an attempt to investigate how an enzyme might modulate the rearrangement barriers, the separate and combined influences of partially protonating the migrating group and partially deprotonating the spectator OH group of the substrate were investigated. Such interactions can lead to significant reductions in the rearrangement barrier for both the radical- and carbocation-based concerted pathways, although the carbocation pathway continues to have significantly lower energy requirements. Also, the relatively high (gas-phase) acidity of the OH group of the product-related carbocation 4b indicates that the direct formation of hyoscyamine aldehyde (6) is a highly exothermic process. Although we would not wish to rule out alternative possibilities, our calculations suggest that a concerted rearrangement mechanism involving carbocations constitutes a viable low-energy pathway for the carbon-skeleton rearrangement in tropane alkaloid biosynthesis.

  18. Biogenesis of erythrocyte membrane skeleton in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Hanspal, M; Prchal, J T; Palek, J

    1993-05-01

    To study the biogenesis of red cell membrane skeleton at various stages of erythroid differentiation, we have chosen the following model systems: a) Rauscher erythroleukemia cell line representing the early stages of differentiation, b) Friend erythroleukemia cells, and c) in vitro cultured human erythroblasts. The latter two systems represent terminally differentiated erythroblasts. Using these model systems, we have shown asynchronous synthesis of membrane proteins during erythroid differentiation. At the early stages of erythroid development, the synthesis of spectrin, ankyrin and band 4.1 proteins is initiated before that of the band 3 protein. Following erythroid induction with erythropoietin and dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), there is a dramatic increase in the synthesis of the band 3 protein without noticeable changes in the synthesis of other membrane proteins. This increase in band 3 synthesis is accompanied by increased stability and recruitment of the skeletal proteins into the membrane skeleton, leading to increased steady state levels. The progressive increase in band 3 synthesis continues during terminal maturation of erythroblasts. This is accompanied by increased stability and assembly of spectrin and ankyrin on the membrane, despite their reduced synthesis. These results point to a key role for the band 3 protein in anchoring and stabilizing these proteins into the permanent skeletal network. Finally, to detect defects of skeletal biosynthesis, we have extended these studies to a patient with severe hereditary spherocytosis characterized by a combined deficiency of spectrin and ankyrin. We have shown that this combined deficiency is a consequence of reduced ankyrin synthesis and mRNA content representing a thalassemia-like membrane protein mutation.

  19. Effects of heat and freeze on isolated erythrocyte submembrane skeletons.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Ivan T; Paarvanova, Boyana K; Ivanov, Veselin; Smuda, Kathrin; Bäumler, Hans; Georgieva, Radostina

    2017-04-01

    In this study we heated insoluble residues, obtained after Triton-X-100 (0.1 v/v%) extraction of erythrocyte ghost membranes (EGMs). Specific heat capacity, electric capacitance and resistance, and optical transmittance (280 nm) sustained sharp changes at 49°C (TA) and 66°C (TC), the known denaturation temperatures of spectrin and band 3, respectively. The change at TA was selectively inhibited by diamide (1 mM) and taurine mustard (1 mM) while its inducing temperature was selectively decreased by formamide in full concert with the assumed involvement of spectrin denaturation. In the residues of EGMs, pretreated with 4,4'-diiso-thiocyanato stilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (DIDS), the change at TC was shifted from 66 to 78°C which indicated the involvement of band 3 denaturation. The freeze and rapid thaw of EGM residues resulted in a strong reduction of cooperativity of band 3 denaturation while the slow thaw completely eliminated the peak of this denaturation. These effects of freeze-thaw were prevented in residues obtained from DIDS-treated EGMs. The freeze-thaw of residues slightly affected spectrin denaturation at 49°C although an additional denaturation appeared at 55°C. The results indicate preserved molecular structure and dynamics of the membrane skeleton in Triton-X-100 extracts of EGMs. The freeze-thaw inflicted strong damage on band 3 and spectrin-actin skeleton of EGM extracts which is relevant to cryobiology, cryosurgery and cryopreservation of cells.

  20. The proteome of the insoluble Schistosoma mansoni eggshell skeleton.

    PubMed

    Dewalick, Saskia; Bexkens, Michiel L; van Balkom, Bas W M; Wu, Ya-Ping; Smit, Cornelis H; Hokke, Cornelis H; de Groot, Philip G; Heck, Albert J R; Tielens, Aloysius G M; van Hellemond, Jaap J

    2011-04-01

    In schistosomiasis, the majority of symptoms of the disease is caused by the eggs that are trapped in the liver. These eggs elicit an immune reaction that leads to the formation of granulomas. The eggshell, which is a rigid insoluble structure built from cross-linked proteins, is the site of direct interaction between the egg and the immune system. However, the exact protein composition of the insoluble eggshell was previously unknown. To identify the proteins of the eggshell of Schistosoma mansoni we performed LC-MS/MS analysis, immunostaining and amino acid analysis on eggshell fragments. For this, eggshell protein skeleton was prepared by thoroughly cleaning eggshells in a four-step stripping procedure of increasing strength including urea and SDS to remove all material that is not covalently linked to the eggshell itself, but is part of the inside of the egg, such as Reynold's layer, von Lichtenberg's envelope and the miracidium. We identified 45 proteins of which the majority are non-structural proteins and non-specific for eggs, but are house-keeping proteins that are present in large quantities in worms and miracidia. Some of these proteins are known to be immunogenic, such as HSP70, GST and enolase. In addition, a number of schistosome-specific proteins with unknown function and no homology to any known annotated protein were found to be incorporated in the eggshell. Schistosome-specific glycoconjugates were also shown to be present on the eggshell protein skeleton. This study also confirmed that the putative eggshell protein p14 contributes largely to the eggshell. Together, these results give new insights into eggshell composition as well as eggshell formation. Those proteins that are present at the site and time of eggshell formation are incorporated in the cross-linked eggshell and this cross-linking does no longer occur when the miracidium starts secreting proteins. Copyright © 2011 Australian Society for Parasitology Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd

  1. Historic timber skeleton structures and the local seismic culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostenaru, M.

    2009-04-01

    This presentation deals with the employment of timber skeleton structure and the local seismic culture. After the 1755 earthquake in the reconstruction of Lisbon a type of building with timber skeleton and masonry infill called "gaiola pombalina" was promoted, since this was designed to better resists earthquakes. "Gaiola" means cage, and it was also named after the Marques de Pombal who introduced it in the reconstruction following the earthquake. The „gaiola pombalina" presents a timber skeleton with Saint Andrew crosses in the interior walls with masonry infill and thick masonry load bearing walls loosing in thickness to the upper floors in the exterior walls. The masonry can fall out during earthquakes but the building remains staying given the interior timber skeleton. The type of buildings with timber structure and (masonry) infill behaved well in earthquakes in various parts of the earth, like Nepal (the dhaji dewary type), Pakistan, Turkey (the himiş type after the 1999 earthquake) [both latter types were researched by Langenbach, www.conservationtech.com and www.traditional-is-modern.net] and also in Germany after the 1356 earthquake (the Southern German subtype of Fachwerk). Also in Italy a subtype called "casa baraccata" was promoted in a construction code to a similar time (following the 1783 earthquake in Southern Italy, see Tobriner 1983) as that of the "gaiola pombalina", the time of the Baroque, when town planning acquired another status. Unlike at the "gaiola pombalina" the "casa baraccata" the timber skeleton is at the exterior walls. For this reason this type of buildings is considered to be an expression of the local seismic culture. However, this type of buildings is common also for areas where seismic risk is not an issue, like half-timbered in England and the northern subtype of Fachwerk in Northern Germany, and in some high seismic risk regions with mountains and timber resources like Romania is not spread. Given these premises the author

  2. The technical aspect of the gastroepiploic artery graft skeletonization with the harmonic scalpel: the samurai technique.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Go; Tomita, Shigeyuki; Takemura, Hirofumi; Nagamine, Hiroshi; Nishida, Satoru

    2005-01-01

    A novel skeletonization technique using the scissors-type harmonic scalpel (Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Cincinnati, OH, USA) is presented. This "samurai technique," which uses the harmonic scalpel by frequently turning over the scissors, facilitates the handling of the gastroepiploic artery, enlarges the caliber size, and allows easy skeletonization without any vessel injury.

  3. Technetium-99m-methylene diphosphonate uptake in the fetal skeleton at 30 weeks gestation

    SciTech Connect

    McKenzie, A.F.; Budd, R.S.; Yang, C.

    1994-08-01

    Retention of {sup 99m}Tc-MDP in the fetal skeleton and placenta at 30 and 32 wk gestation was observed during bone scan examination of the maternal skeleton for staging of malignant tumors. The implications and significance of these observations are discussed. 8 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  4. A simple algorithm for computing positively weighted straight skeletons of monotone polygons.

    PubMed

    Biedl, Therese; Held, Martin; Huber, Stefan; Kaaser, Dominik; Palfrader, Peter

    2015-02-01

    We study the characteristics of straight skeletons of monotone polygonal chains and use them to devise an algorithm for computing positively weighted straight skeletons of monotone polygons. Our algorithm runs in [Formula: see text] time and [Formula: see text] space, where n denotes the number of vertices of the polygon.

  5. Biology Notes: How the Skeleton Functions in the Movement of Animals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worsley, C. J.

    1972-01-01

    Argues that the term skeleton is not a word denoting a structure but a word denoting a function--that of allowing animals the freedom of self-motivated purposive local motion. Indeed a skeleton is a necessary prerequisite for there to be locomotion at all.'' (Author/AL)

  6. Application of Skeleton Method in Interconnection of Cae Programs Used in Vehicle Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucha, Jozef; Gavačová, Jana; Milesich, Tomáš

    2014-12-01

    This paper deals with the application of the skeleton method as the main element of interconnection of CAE programs involved in the process of vehicle design. This article focuses on the utilization of the skeleton method for mutual connection of CATIA V5 and ADAMS/CAR. Both programs can be used simultaneously during various stages of vehicle design.

  7. Biology Notes: How the Skeleton Functions in the Movement of Animals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worsley, C. J.

    1972-01-01

    Argues that the term skeleton is not a word denoting a structure but a word denoting a function--that of allowing animals the freedom of self-motivated purposive local motion. Indeed a skeleton is a necessary prerequisite for there to be locomotion at all.'' (Author/AL)

  8. Taper tables for western hemlock.

    Treesearch

    Floyd A. Johnson; Wilbur. Engstrom

    1949-01-01

    In 1947 the West Coast Forestry procedures Committee recommended several mensuration projects, one of which called for the construction of taper tables for Western hemlock. In response the present tables were prepared. Basic data for these tables consist of measurements of 912 trees taken a number of years ago by members of the Pacific Northwest Forest & Range...

  9. Histology of “placoderm” dermal skeletons: Implications for the nature of the ancestral gnathostome

    PubMed Central

    Giles, Sam; Rücklin, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The vertebrate dermal skeleton has long been interpreted to have evolved from a primitive condition exemplified by chondrichthyans. However, chondrichthyans and osteichthyans evolved from an ancestral gnathostome stem‐lineage in which the dermal skeleton was more extensively developed. To elucidate the histology and skeletal structure of the gnathostome crown‐ancestor we conducted a histological survey of the diversity of the dermal skeleton among the placoderms, a diverse clade or grade of early jawed vertebrates. The dermal skeleton of all placoderms is composed largely of a cancellar architecture of cellular dermal bone, surmounted by dermal tubercles in the most ancestral clades, including antiarchs. Acanthothoracids retain an ancestral condition for the dermal skeleton, and we record its secondary reduction in antiarchs. We also find that mechanisms for remodeling bone and facilitating different growth rates between adjoining plates are widespread throughout the placoderms. J. Morphol., 2013. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:23378262

  10. Morphological plasticity of the coral skeleton under CO2-driven seawater acidification.

    PubMed

    Tambutté, E; Venn, A A; Holcomb, M; Segonds, N; Techer, N; Zoccola, D; Allemand, D; Tambutté, S

    2015-06-12

    Ocean acidification causes corals to calcify at reduced rates, but current understanding of the underlying processes is limited. Here, we conduct a mechanistic study into how seawater acidification alters skeletal growth of the coral Stylophora pistillata. Reductions in colony calcification rates are manifested as increases in skeletal porosity at lower pH, while linear extension of skeletons remains unchanged. Inspection of the microstructure of skeletons and measurements of pH at the site of calcification indicate that dissolution is not responsible for changes in skeletal porosity. Instead, changes occur by enlargement of corallite-calyxes and thinning of associated skeletal elements, constituting a modification in skeleton architecture. We also detect increases in the organic matrix protein content of skeletons formed under lower pH. Overall, our study reveals that seawater acidification not only causes decreases in calcification, but can also cause morphological change of the coral skeleton to a more porous and potentially fragile phenotype.

  11. Shape similarity comparison of protein CPK models based on improved L₁-medial skeleton.

    PubMed

    Qin, S W; Li, Z; Jin, Y; Zhang, S P

    2014-01-01

    We propose a new method to analyse the similarity of protein CPK models. In the proposed method we first construct the skeleton of protein models by an improved L1-medial skeleton extraction. The skeleton information is then used to form a local radius descriptor. Finally, the shape similarity of protein models is compared by using the local radius descriptor based on the absolute degree of grey incidence. Experimental results show that the improved L1-medial skeleton of protein models can describe the shapes of the protein models well. The local descriptor based on the skeleton combined with the absolute degree of grey incidence shows satisfactory performance for comparing the shape similarity of protein CPK models.

  12. Morphological plasticity of the coral skeleton under CO2-driven seawater acidification

    PubMed Central

    Tambutté, E.; Venn, A. A.; Holcomb, M.; Segonds, N.; Techer, N.; Zoccola, D.; Allemand, D.; Tambutté, S.

    2015-01-01

    Ocean acidification causes corals to calcify at reduced rates, but current understanding of the underlying processes is limited. Here, we conduct a mechanistic study into how seawater acidification alters skeletal growth of the coral Stylophora pistillata. Reductions in colony calcification rates are manifested as increases in skeletal porosity at lower pH, while linear extension of skeletons remains unchanged. Inspection of the microstructure of skeletons and measurements of pH at the site of calcification indicate that dissolution is not responsible for changes in skeletal porosity. Instead, changes occur by enlargement of corallite-calyxes and thinning of associated skeletal elements, constituting a modification in skeleton architecture. We also detect increases in the organic matrix protein content of skeletons formed under lower pH. Overall, our study reveals that seawater acidification not only causes decreases in calcification, but can also cause morphological change of the coral skeleton to a more porous and potentially fragile phenotype. PMID:26067341

  13. Rock fracture skeleton tracing by image processing and quantitative analysis by geometry features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yanjie

    2016-06-01

    In rock engineering, fracture measurement is important for many applications. This paper proposes a novel method for rock fracture skeleton tracing and analyzing. As for skeleton localizing, the curvilinear fractures are multiscale enhanced based on a Hessian matrix, after image binarization, and clutters are post-processed by image analysis; subsequently, the fracture skeleton is extracted via ridge detection combined with a distance transform and thinning algorithm, after which gap sewing and burrs removal repair the skeleton. In regard to skeleton analyzing, the roughness and distribution of a fracture network are respectively described by the fractal dimensions D s and D b; the intersection and fragmentation of a fracture network are respectively characterized by the average number of ends and junctions per fracture N average and the average length per fracture L average. Three rock fracture surfaces are analyzed for experiments and the results verify that both the fracture tracing accuracy and the analysis feasibility are satisfactory using the new method.

  14. Pyrolysis of Table Sugar

    PubMed Central

    Karagöz, Selhan

    2013-01-01

    Table sugars were pyrolyzed at different temperatures (300, 400, and 500°C) in a fixed-bed reactor. The effect of pyrolysis temperature on yields of liquid, solid, and gaseous products was investigated. As expected the yield of liquid products gradually increased and the yield of solid products gradually decreased when the pyrolysis temperature was raised. The yield of liquid products was greatest (52 wt%) at 500°C. The composition of bio-oils extracted with diethyl ether was identified by means of gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS), nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The following compounds were observed in bio-oils produced from the pyrolysis of table sugar at 500°C: 1,4:3,6-dianhydro-α-d-glucopyranose, 5-(hydroxymethyl) furfural, 5-acetoxymethyl-2-furaldehyde, and cyclotetradecane liquid product. The relative concentration of 5-(hydroxymethyl) furfural was the highest in bio-oils obtained from pyrolysis of table sugars at 500°C. PMID:24223500

  15. Pyrolysis of table sugar.

    PubMed

    Bulut, Adnan; Karagöz, Selhan

    2013-01-01

    Table sugars were pyrolyzed at different temperatures (300, 400, and 500°C) in a fixed-bed reactor. The effect of pyrolysis temperature on yields of liquid, solid, and gaseous products was investigated. As expected the yield of liquid products gradually increased and the yield of solid products gradually decreased when the pyrolysis temperature was raised. The yield of liquid products was greatest (52 wt%) at 500°C. The composition of bio-oils extracted with diethyl ether was identified by means of gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS), nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H-NMR), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The following compounds were observed in bio-oils produced from the pyrolysis of table sugar at 500°C: 1,4:3,6-dianhydro- α -d-glucopyranose, 5-(hydroxymethyl) furfural, 5-acetoxymethyl-2-furaldehyde, and cyclotetradecane liquid product. The relative concentration of 5-(hydroxymethyl) furfural was the highest in bio-oils obtained from pyrolysis of table sugars at 500°C.

  16. League tables for orthodontists

    PubMed Central

    Richmond, Stephen; Phillips, Ceri; Durning, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the complexities in constructing league tables purporting to measure orthodontic clinical outcomes. Eighteen orthodontists were invited to participate in a cost-effectiveness study. Each orthodontist was asked to provide information on 100 consecutively treated patients. The Index of Complexity, Outcome, and Need (ICON) was used to assess treatment need, complexity, and outcome prior to, and on completion of, orthodontic treatment. The 18 orthodontists were ranked based on achieving a successful orthodontic outcome (ICON score less than or equal to 30) and the uncertainty in both the success rates and rankings was also quantified using confidence intervals. Successful outcomes were achieved in 62 per cent of the sample (range 19–94 per cent); four of the 18 orthodontists failed to achieve more than a 50 per cent success rate. In developing league tables, it is imperative that factors such as case mix are identified and accounted for in producing rankings. Bayesian hierarchical modelling was used to achieve this and to quantify uncertainty in the rankings produced. When case mix was taken into account, the four with low success rates were clearly not as good as the top four performing orthodontists. League tables can be valuable for the individual orthodontist, groups of orthodontists, payment/insurance agencies, and the public to enable informed choice for orthodontic provision but must be correctly constructed so that users can have confidence in them. PMID:18687990

  17. 26 CFR 1.641(c)-0 - Table of contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) Dividend income under section 1368(c)(2). (3) Interest on installment obligations. (4) Charitable deduction... Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Estates, Trusts, and Beneficiaries § 1.641(c)-0 Table of contents. This section...

  18. 26 CFR 1.817A-0 - Table of contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... contract. (b) Applicable interest rates for non-equity-indexed modified guaranteed contracts. (1) Tax... Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Miscellaneous Provisions § 1.817A-0 Table of contents. This section lists the captions that...

  19. 26 CFR 1.817A-0 - Table of contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... guaranteed contract. (b) Applicable interest rates for non-equity-indexed modified guaranteed contracts. (1... Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Miscellaneous Provisions § 1.817A-0 Table of contents. This section lists the...

  20. 26 CFR 1.641(c)-0 - Table of contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) Dividend income under section 1368(c)(2). (3) Interest on installment obligations. (4) Charitable deduction... Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Estates, Trusts, and Beneficiaries § 1.641(c)-0 Table of contents. This section...

  1. 26 CFR 1.6050P-0 - Table of contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) Certain bankruptcy discharges. (i) In general. (ii) Business or investment debt. (2) Interest. (3) Non... Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Information Returns § 1.6050P-0 Table of contents. This section lists the major...

  2. 26 CFR 1.641(c)-0 - Table of contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) Dividend income under section 1368(c)(2). (3) Interest on installment obligations. (4) Charitable deduction... Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Estates, Trusts, and Beneficiaries § 1.641(c)-0 Table of contents. This section...

  3. 26 CFR 1.817A-0 - Table of contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... guaranteed contract. (b) Applicable interest rates for non-equity-indexed modified guaranteed contracts. (1... Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Miscellaneous Provisions § 1.817A-0 Table of contents. This section lists the...

  4. 26 CFR 1.817A-0 - Table of contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... guaranteed contract. (b) Applicable interest rates for non-equity-indexed modified guaranteed contracts. (1... Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Miscellaneous Provisions § 1.817A-0 Table of contents. This section lists the...

  5. 26 CFR 1.641(c)-0 - Table of contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) Dividend income under section 1368(c)(2). (3) Interest on installment obligations. (4) Charitable deduction... Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Estates, Trusts, and Beneficiaries § 1.641(c)-0 Table of contents. This section...

  6. 26 CFR 1.817A-0 - Table of contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... guaranteed contract. (b) Applicable interest rates for non-equity-indexed modified guaranteed contracts. (1... Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Miscellaneous Provisions § 1.817A-0 Table of contents. This section lists the...

  7. 26 CFR 1.641(c)-0 - Table of contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... the S portion under section 1367. (g) Taxation of non-S portion. (1) In general. (2) Dividend income... Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Estates, Trusts, and Beneficiaries § 1.641(c)-0 Table of contents. This section lists the...

  8. 26 CFR 1.6050P-0 - Table of contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) Certain bankruptcy discharges. (i) In general. (ii) Business or investment debt. (2) Interest. (3) Non... Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Information Returns § 1.6050P-0 Table of contents. This section lists the major...

  9. 26 CFR 1.453A-0 - Table of contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Taxable Year for Which Items of Gross Income Included § 1.453A-0 Table of contents. This...-1Installment method of reporting income by dealers in personal property. (a) In general. (b) Effect of security...

  10. 26 CFR 1.453A-0 - Table of contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Taxable Year for Which Items of Gross Income Included § 1.453A-0 Table of.... § 1.453A-1Installment method of reporting income by dealers in personal property. (a) In general. (b...

  11. 26 CFR 25.2702-0 - Table of contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ESTATE AND GIFT TAXES GIFT TAX; GIFTS MADE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 1954 Special Valuation Rules § 25.2702-0 Table of contents. This section lists the major paragraphs contained in §§ 25.2702-1 through 25.2702-7. §...

  12. 26 CFR 25.2512-0 - Table of contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ESTATE AND GIFT TAXES GIFT TAX; GIFTS MADE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 1954 Transfers § 25.2512-0 Table of contents. This section lists the section headings that appear in the regulations under section 2512. § 25.2512-1Valuation...

  13. 26 CFR 25.2512-0 - Table of contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ESTATE AND GIFT TAXES GIFT TAX; GIFTS MADE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 1954 Transfers § 25.2512-0 Table of contents. This section lists the section headings that appear in the regulations under section 2512. § 25.2512-1Valuation...

  14. 26 CFR 25.2702-0 - Table of contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ESTATE AND GIFT TAXES GIFT TAX; GIFTS MADE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 1954 Special Valuation Rules § 25.2702-0 Table of contents. This section lists the major paragraphs contained in §§ 25.2702-1 through 25.2702-7. §...

  15. 26 CFR 25.2701-0 - Table of contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ESTATE AND GIFT TAXES GIFT TAX; GIFTS MADE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 1954 Special Valuation Rules § 25.2701-0 Table of contents. This section lists the major paragraphs contained in §§ 25.2701-1 through 25.2701-8. §...

  16. 26 CFR 25.2701-0 - Table of contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ESTATE AND GIFT TAXES GIFT TAX; GIFTS MADE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 1954 Special Valuation Rules § 25.2701-0 Table of contents. This section lists the major paragraphs contained in §§ 25.2701-1 through 25.2701-8. §...

  17. 26 CFR 1.402(g)-0 - Limitation on exclusion for elective deferrals, table of contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., table of contents. 1.402(g)-0 Section 1.402(g)-0 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT... Plans, Etc. § 1.402(g)-0 Limitation on exclusion for elective deferrals, table of contents. This section contains the captions that appear in § 1.402(g)-1. § 1.402(g)-1Limitation on exclusion for elective...

  18. Kepler Certified False Positive Table

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryson, Stephen T.; Batalha, Natalie Marie; Colon, Knicole Dawn; Coughlin, Jeffrey Langer; Haas, Michael R.; Henze, Chris; Huber, Daniel; Morton, Tim; Rowe, Jason Frank; Mullally, Susan Elizabeth; hide

    2017-01-01

    This document describes the Kepler Certied False Positive table hosted at the Exoplanet Archive1, herein referred to as the CFP table. This table is the result of detailed examination by the Kepler False Positive Working Group (FPWG) of declared false positives in the Kepler Object of Interest (KOI) tables (see, for example, Batalha et al. (2012); Burke et al.(2014); Rowe et al. (2015); Mullally et al. (2015); Coughlin et al. (2015b)) at the Exoplanet Archive. A KOI is considered a false positive if it is not due to a planet orbiting the KOI's target star. The CFP table contains all KOIs in the Exoplanet Archive cumulative KOI table. The purpose of the CFP table is to provide a list of certified false positive KOIs. A KOI is certified as a false positive when, in the judgement of the FPWG, there is no plausible planetary interpretation of the observational evidence, which we summarize by saying that the evidence for a false positive is compelling. This certification process involves detailed examination using all available data for each KOI, establishing a high-reliability ground truth set. The CFP table can be used to estimate the reliability of, for example, the KOI tables which are created using only Kepler photometric data, so the disposition of individual KOIs may differ in the KOI and CFP tables. Follow-up observers may find the CFP table useful to avoid observing false positives.

  19. Data Tables Related to TOR-2015-00893

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-08

    AEROSPACE REPORT NO. TOR -2016-00142 Data Tables Related to TOR -2015-00893 October 8, 2015 Joshua P. Davis Vehicle Concepts Department...2 1 1. Introduction The data tables in this TOR are generated from the AE9/AP9 v1.20.001 model...and searching for this TOR name or number; or by contacting the Aerospace library or the author for a CD. Internally at Aerospace, employees can go to

  20. 26 CFR 1.6694-0 - Table of contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Table of contents. 1.6694-0 Section 1.6694-0...) INCOME TAXES Additions to the Tax, Additional Amounts, and Assessable Penalties § 1.6694-0 Table of contents. This section lists the captions that appear in §§ 1.6694-1 through 1.6694-4. § 1.6694-1Section...

  1. 26 CFR 1.401(m)-0 - Table of contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Table of contents. 1.401(m)-0 Section 1.401(m)-0...) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.401(m)-0 Table of contents... section in §§ 1.401(m)-1 through 1.401(m)-5. List of Sections § 1.401(m)-1Employee contributions...

  2. 26 CFR 1.414(r)-0 - Table of contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Table of contents. 1.414(r)-0 Section 1.414(r)-0...) INCOME TAXES Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.414(r)-0 Table of contents. (a) In general. Sections 1.414(r)-1 through 1.414(r)-11 provide rules for determining whether an employer...

  3. 26 CFR 1.56(g)-0 - Table of Contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Table of Contents. 1.56(g)-0 Section 1.56(g)-0... Applicable to Taxable Years Beginning in 1969 and Ending in 1970 § 1.56(g)-0 Table of Contents. This section lists the paragraphs contained in § 1.56(g)-1. § 1.56(g)-1Adjusted current earnings. (a) Adjustment for...

  4. 26 CFR 1.401(l)-0 - Table of contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Table of contents. 1.401(l)-0 Section 1.401(l)-0...) INCOME TAXES Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.401(l)-0 Table of contents. This section contains a listing of the headings of §§ 1.401(l)-1 through 1.401(l)-6. §...

  5. 26 CFR 1.7701(l)-0 - Table of contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Table of contents. 1.7701(l)-0 Section 1.7701(l... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES General Actuarial Valuations § 1.7701(l)-0 Table of contents. This section lists captions that appear in §§ 1.7701(l)-1 and 1.7701(l)-3: § 1.7701(l)-1Conduit financing arrangements. § 1...

  6. 26 CFR 1.6694-0 - Table of contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Table of contents. 1.6694-0 Section 1.6694-0...) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Additions to the Tax, Additional Amounts, and Assessable Penalties § 1.6694-0 Table of contents. This section lists the captions that appear in §§ 1.6694-1 through 1.6694-4. §...

  7. 26 CFR 1.6694-0 - Table of contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Table of contents. 1.6694-0 Section 1.6694-0...) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Additions to the Tax, Additional Amounts, and Assessable Penalties § 1.6694-0 Table of contents. This section lists the captions that appear in §§ 1.6694-1 through 1.6694-4. §...

  8. 26 CFR 1.414(r)-0 - Table of contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Table of contents. 1.414(r)-0 Section 1.414(r)-0...) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.414(r)-0 Table of contents. (a) In general. Sections 1.414(r)-1 through 1.414(r)-11 provide rules for determining whether an...

  9. 26 CFR 1.414(r)-0 - Table of contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Table of contents. 1.414(r)-0 Section 1.414(r)-0...) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.414(r)-0 Table of contents. (a) In general. Sections 1.414(r)-1 through 1.414(r)-11 provide rules for determining whether an...

  10. 26 CFR 1.7701(l)-0 - Table of contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Table of contents. 1.7701(l)-0 Section 1.7701(l... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) General Actuarial Valuations § 1.7701(l)-0 Table of contents. This section lists captions that appear in §§ 1.7701(l)-1 and 1.7701(l)-3: § 1.7701(l)-1Conduit financing...

  11. 26 CFR 1.401(l)-0 - Table of contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Table of contents. 1.401(l)-0 Section 1.401(l)-0...) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.401(l)-0 Table of contents. This section contains a listing of the headings of §§ 1.401(l)-1 through 1.401(l)-6. § 1.401(l...

  12. 26 CFR 1.7701(l)-0 - Table of contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Table of contents. 1.7701(l)-0 Section 1.7701(l... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) General Actuarial Valuations § 1.7701(l)-0 Table of contents. This section lists captions that appear in §§ 1.7701(l)-1 and 1.7701(l)-3: § 1.7701(l)-1Conduit financing...

  13. 26 CFR 1.7701(l)-0 - Table of contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Table of contents. 1.7701(l)-0 Section 1.7701(l... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) General Actuarial Valuations § 1.7701(l)-0 Table of contents. This section lists captions that appear in §§ 1.7701(l)-1 and 1.7701(l)-3: § 1.7701(l)-1Conduit financing...

  14. 26 CFR 1.401(l)-0 - Table of contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Table of contents. 1.401(l)-0 Section 1.401(l)-0...) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.401(l)-0 Table of contents. This section contains a listing of the headings of §§ 1.401(l)-1 through 1.401(l)-6. § 1.401(l...

  15. 26 CFR 1.401(l)-0 - Table of contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Table of contents. 1.401(l)-0 Section 1.401(l)-0...) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.401(l)-0 Table of contents. This section contains a listing of the headings of §§ 1.401(l)-1 through 1.401(l)-6. § 1.401(l...

  16. 26 CFR 1.7701(l)-0 - Table of contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Table of contents. 1.7701(l)-0 Section 1.7701(l... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) General Actuarial Valuations § 1.7701(l)-0 Table of contents. This section lists captions that appear in §§ 1.7701(l)-1 and 1.7701(l)-3: § 1.7701(l)-1Conduit financing...

  17. 26 CFR 1.401(l)-0 - Table of contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Table of contents. 1.401(l)-0 Section 1.401(l)-0...) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.401(l)-0 Table of contents. This section contains a listing of the headings of §§ 1.401(l)-1 through 1.401(l)-6. § 1.401(l...

  18. 26 CFR 1.414(r)-0 - Table of contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Table of contents. 1.414(r)-0 Section 1.414(r)-0...) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.414(r)-0 Table of contents. (a) In general. Sections 1.414(r)-1 through 1.414(r)-11 provide rules for determining whether...

  19. Porous membrane with high curvature, three-dimensional heat-resistance skeleton: a new and practical separator candidate for high safety lithium ion battery

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Junli; Xia, Yonggao; Yuan, Zhizhang; Hu, Huasheng; Li, Xianfeng; Zhang, Huamin; Liu, Zhaoping

    2015-01-01

    Separators with high reliability and security are in urgent demand for the advancement of high performance lithium ion batteries. Here, we present a new and practical porous membrane with three-dimension (3D) heat-resistant skeleton and high curvature pore structure as a promising separator candidate to facilitate advances in battery safety and performances beyond those obtained from the conventional separators. The unique material properties combining with the well-developed structural characteristics enable the 3D porous skeleton to own several favorable properties, including superior thermal stability, good wettability with liquid electrolyte, high ion conductivity and internal short-circuit protection function, etc. which give rise to acceptable battery performances. Considering the simply and cost-effective preparation process, the porous membrane is deemed to be an interesting direction for the future lithium ion battery separator. PMID:25653104

  20. Porous membrane with high curvature, three-dimensional heat-resistance skeleton: a new and practical separator candidate for high safety lithium ion battery.

    PubMed

    Shi, Junli; Xia, Yonggao; Yuan, Zhizhang; Hu, Huasheng; Li, Xianfeng; Zhang, Huamin; Liu, Zhaoping

    2015-02-05

    Separators with high reliability and security are in urgent demand for the advancement of high performance lithium ion batteries. Here, we present a new and practical porous membrane with three-dimension (3D) heat-resistant skeleton and high curvature pore structure as a promising separator candidate to facilitate advances in battery safety and performances beyond those obtained from the conventional separators. The unique material properties combining with the well-developed structural characteristics enable the 3D porous skeleton to own several favorable properties, including superior thermal stability, good wettability with liquid electrolyte, high ion conductivity and internal short-circuit protection function, etc. which give rise to acceptable battery performances. Considering the simply and cost-effective preparation process, the porous membrane is deemed to be an interesting direction for the future lithium ion battery separator.

  1. Dual embryonic origin and patterning of the pharyngeal skeleton in the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum).

    PubMed

    Sefton, Elizabeth M; Piekarski, Nadine; Hanken, James

    2015-01-01

    The impressive morphological diversification of vertebrates was achieved in part by innovation and modification of the pharyngeal skeleton. Extensive fate mapping in amniote models has revealed a primarily cranial neural crest derivation of the pharyngeal skeleton. Although comparable fate maps of amphibians produced over several decades have failed to document a neural crest derivation of ventromedial elements in these vertebrates, a recent report provides evidence of a mesodermal origin of one of these elements, basibranchial 2, in the axolotl. We used a transgenic labeling protocol and grafts of labeled cells between GFP+ and white embryos to derive a fate map that describes contributions of both cranial neural crest and mesoderm to the axolotl pharyngeal skeleton, and we conducted additional experiments that probe the mechanisms that underlie mesodermal patterning. Our fate map confirms a dual embryonic origin of the pharyngeal skeleton in urodeles, including derivation of basibranchial 2 from mesoderm closely associated with the second heart field. Additionally, heterotopic transplantation experiments reveal lineage restriction of mesodermal cells that contribute to pharyngeal cartilage. The mesoderm-derived component of the pharyngeal skeleton appears to be particularly sensitive to retinoic acid (RA): administration of exogenous RA leads to loss of the second basibranchial, but not the first. Neural crest was undoubtedly critical in the evolution of the vertebrate pharyngeal skeleton, but mesoderm may have played a central role in forming ventromedial elements, in particular. When and how many times during vertebrate phylogeny a mesodermal contribution to the pharyngeal skeleton evolved remain to be resolved. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Quantifying the deformation of the red blood cell skeleton in shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhangli; Zhu, Qiang

    2012-02-01

    To quantitatively predict the response of red blood cell (RBC) membrane in shear flow, we carried out multiphysics simulations by coupling a three-level multiscale approach of RBC membranes with a Boundary Element Method (BEM) for surrounding flows. Our multiscale approach includes a model of spectrins with the domain unfolding feature, a molecular-based model of the junctional complex with detailed protein connectivity and a whole cell Finite Element Method (FEM) model with the bilayer-skeleton friction derived from measured transmembrane protein diffusivity based on the Einstein-Stokes relation. Applying this approach, we investigated the bilayer-skeleton slip and skeleton deformation of healthy RBCs and RBCs with hereditary spherocytosis anemia during tank-treading motion. Compared with healthy cells, cells with hereditary spherocytosis anemia sustain much larger skeleton-bilayer slip and area deformation of the skeleton due to deficiency of transmembrane proteins. This leads to extremely low skeleton density and large bilayer-skeleton interaction force, both of which may cause bilayer loss. This finding suggests a possible mechanism of the development of hereditary spherocytosis anemia.

  3. Experimental Approach Reveals the Role of alx1 in the Evolution of the Echinoderm Larval Skeleton.

    PubMed

    Koga, Hiroyuki; Fujitani, Haruka; Morino, Yoshiaki; Miyamoto, Norio; Tsuchimoto, Jun; Shibata, Tomoko F; Nozawa, Masafumi; Shigenobu, Shuji; Ogura, Atsushi; Tachibana, Kazunori; Kiyomoto, Masato; Amemiya, Shonan; Wada, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Over the course of evolution, the acquisition of novel structures has ultimately led to wide variation in morphology among extant multicellular organisms. Thus, the origins of genetic systems for new morphological structures are a subject of great interest in evolutionary biology. The larval skeleton is a novel structure acquired in some echinoderm lineages via the activation of the adult skeletogenic machinery. Previously, VEGF signaling was suggested to have played an important role in the acquisition of the larval skeleton. In the present study, we compared expression patterns of Alx genes among echinoderm classes to further explore the factors involved in the acquisition of a larval skeleton. We found that the alx1 gene, originally described as crucial for sea urchin skeletogenesis, may have also played an essential role in the evolution of the larval skeleton. Unlike those echinoderms that have a larval skeleton, we found that alx1 of starfish was barely expressed in early larvae that have no skeleton. When alx1 overexpression was induced via injection of alx1 mRNA into starfish eggs, the expression patterns of certain genes, including those possibly involved in skeletogenesis, were altered. This suggested that a portion of the skeletogenic program was induced solely by alx1. However, we observed no obvious external phenotype or skeleton. We concluded that alx1 was necessary but not sufficient for the acquisition of the larval skeleton, which, in fact, requires several genetic events. Based on these results, we discuss how the larval expression of alx1 contributed to the acquisition of the larval skeleton in the putative ancestral lineage of echinoderms.

  4. Experimental Approach Reveals the Role of alx1 in the Evolution of the Echinoderm Larval Skeleton

    PubMed Central

    Koga, Hiroyuki; Fujitani, Haruka; Morino, Yoshiaki; Miyamoto, Norio; Tsuchimoto, Jun; Shibata, Tomoko F.; Nozawa, Masafumi; Shigenobu, Shuji; Ogura, Atsushi; Tachibana, Kazunori; Kiyomoto, Masato; Amemiya, Shonan; Wada, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Over the course of evolution, the acquisition of novel structures has ultimately led to wide variation in morphology among extant multicellular organisms. Thus, the origins of genetic systems for new morphological structures are a subject of great interest in evolutionary biology. The larval skeleton is a novel structure acquired in some echinoderm lineages via the activation of the adult skeletogenic machinery. Previously, VEGF signaling was suggested to have played an important role in the acquisition of the larval skeleton. In the present study, we compared expression patterns of Alx genes among echinoderm classes to further explore the factors involved in the acquisition of a larval skeleton. We found that the alx1 gene, originally described as crucial for sea urchin skeletogenesis, may have also played an essential role in the evolution of the larval skeleton. Unlike those echinoderms that have a larval skeleton, we found that alx1 of starfish was barely expressed in early larvae that have no skeleton. When alx1 overexpression was induced via injection of alx1 mRNA into starfish eggs, the expression patterns of certain genes, including those possibly involved in skeletogenesis, were altered. This suggested that a portion of the skeletogenic program was induced solely by alx1. However, we observed no obvious external phenotype or skeleton. We concluded that alx1 was necessary but not sufficient for the acquisition of the larval skeleton, which, in fact, requires several genetic events. Based on these results, we discuss how the larval expression of alx1 contributed to the acquisition of the larval skeleton in the putative ancestral lineage of echinoderms. PMID:26866800

  5. A calcium-binding, asparagine-linked oligosaccharide is involved in skeleton formation in the sea urchin embryo

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    We have previously identified a 130-kD cell surface protein that is involved in calcium uptake and skeleton formation by gastrula stage embryos of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus (Carson et al., 1985. Cell. 41:639-648). A monoclonal antibody designated mAb 1223 specifically recognizes the 130-kD protein and inhibits Ca+2 uptake and growth of the CaCO3 spicules produced by embryonic primary mesenchyme cells cultured in vitro. In this report, we demonstrate that the epitope recognized by mAb 1223 is located on an anionic, asparagine- linked oligosaccharide chain on the 130-kD protein. Combined enzymatic and chemical treatments indicate that the 1223 oligosaccharide contains fucose and sialic acid that is likely to be O-acetylated. Moreover, we show that the oligosaccharide chain containing the 1223 epitope specifically binds divalent cations, including Ca+2. We propose that one function of this negatively charged oligosaccharide moiety on the surfaces of primary mesenchyme cells is to facilitate binding and sequestration of Ca+2 ions from the blastocoelic fluid before internalization and subsequent deposition into the growing CaCO3 skeleton. PMID:2475510

  6. MRI of enthesitis of the appendicular skeleton in spondyloarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Eshed, Iris; Bollow, Matthias; McGonagle, Dennis G; Tan, Ai Lyn; Althoff, Christian E; Asbach, Patrick; Hermann, Kay‐Geert A

    2007-01-01

    Entheses are sites where tendons, ligaments, joint capsules or fascia attach to bone. Inflammation of the entheses (enthesitis) is a well‐known hallmark of spondyloarthritis (SpA). As entheses are associated with adjacent, functionally related structures, the concepts of an enthesis organ and functional entheses have been proposed. This is important in interpreting imaging findings in entheseal‐related diseases. Conventional radiographs and CT are able to depict the chronic changes associated with enthesitis but are of very limited use in early disease. In contrast, MRI is sensitive for detecting early signs of enthesitis and can evaluate both soft‐tissue changes and intraosseous abnormalities of active enthesitis. It is therefore useful for the early diagnosis of enthesitis‐related arthropathies and monitoring therapy. Current knowledge and typical MRI features of the most commonly involved entheses of the appendicular skeleton in patients with SpA are reviewed. The MRI appearances of inflammatory and degenerative enthesopathy are described. New options for imaging enthesitis, including whole‐body MRI and high‐resolution microscopy MRI, are briefly discussed. PMID:17526551

  7. Novel nonsecosteroidal VDR agonists with phenyl-pyrrolyl pentane skeleton.

    PubMed

    Shen, Wei; Xue, Jingwei; Zhao, Zekai; Zhang, Can

    2013-11-01

    In order to find the vitamin D receptor (VDR) ligand whose VDR agonistic activity is separated from the calcemic activity sufficiently, novel nonsecosteroidal analogs with phenyl-pyrrolyl pentane skeleton were synthesized and evaluated for the VDR binding affinity, antiproliferative activity in vitro and serum calcium raising ability in vivo (tacalcitol used as control). Among them, several compounds showed varying degrees of VDR agonistic and growth inhibition activities of the tested cell lines. The most effective compound 2g (EC₅₀: 1.06 nM) exhibited stronger VDR agonistic activity than tacalcitol (EC₅₀: 7.05 nM), inhibited the proliferations of HaCaT and MCF-7 cells with IC₅₀ of 2.06 μM and 0.307 μM (tacalcitol: 2.07 μM and 0.057 μM) and showed no significant effect on serum calcium. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Ocean acidification causes structural deformities in juvenile coral skeletons.

    PubMed

    Foster, Taryn; Falter, James L; McCulloch, Malcolm T; Clode, Peta L

    2016-02-01

    Rising atmospheric CO2 is causing the oceans to both warm and acidify, which could reduce the calcification rates of corals globally. Successful coral recruitment and high rates of juvenile calcification are critical to the replenishment and ultimate viability of coral reef ecosystems. Although elevated Pco2 (partial pressure of CO2) has been shown to reduce the skeletal weight of coral recruits, the structural changes caused by acidification during initial skeletal deposition are unknown. We show, using high-resolution three-dimensional x-ray microscopy, that ocean acidification (Pco2 ~900 μatm, pH ~7.7) not only causes reduced overall mineral deposition but also a deformed and porous skeletal structure in newly settled coral recruits. In contrast, elevated temperature (+3°C) had little effect on skeletal formation except to partially mitigate the effects of elevated Pco2. The striking structural deformities we observed show that new recruits are at significant risk, being unable to effectively build their skeletons in the Pco2 conditions predicted to occur for open ocean surface waters under a "business-as-usual" emissions scenario [RCP (representative concentration pathway) 8.5] by the year 2100.

  9. Hyperostosis frontalis interna: criteria for sexing and aging a skeleton.

    PubMed

    May, Hila; Peled, Nathan; Dar, Gali; Cohen, Haim; Abbas, Janan; Medlej, Bahaa; Hershkovitz, Israel

    2011-09-01

    Estimation of sex and age in skeletons is essential in anthropological and forensic medicine investigations. The aim of the current study was to examine the potential of hyperostosis frontalis interna (HFI) as a criterion for determining sex and age in forensic cases. Macroscopic examination of the inner aspect of the frontal bone of 768 skulls (326 males and 442 females) aged 1 to 103, which had undergone a head computerized tomography scan, was carried out using the volume rendering technique. HFI was divided into two categories: minor and major. HFI is a sex- and age-dependent phenomena, with females manifesting significantly higher prevalence than males (p<0.01). In both females and males, prevalence of HFI increases as age increases (p<0.01). We present herein the probabilities of designating an unknown skull to a specific sex and age cohort according to the presence of HFI (standardized to age distribution in an Israeli population). Moreover, we present the probability of an individual belonging to a specific sex or age cohort according to age or sex (respectively) and severity of HFI. We suggest a valid, reliable, and easy method for sex and age identification of unknown skulls.

  10. Ocean acidification causes structural deformities in juvenile coral skeletons

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Taryn; Falter, James L.; McCulloch, Malcolm T.; Clode, Peta L.

    2016-01-01

    Rising atmospheric CO2 is causing the oceans to both warm and acidify, which could reduce the calcification rates of corals globally. Successful coral recruitment and high rates of juvenile calcification are critical to the replenishment and ultimate viability of coral reef ecosystems. Although elevated Pco2 (partial pressure of CO2) has been shown to reduce the skeletal weight of coral recruits, the structural changes caused by acidification during initial skeletal deposition are unknown. We show, using high-resolution three-dimensional x-ray microscopy, that ocean acidification (Pco2 ~900 μatm, pH ~7.7) not only causes reduced overall mineral deposition but also a deformed and porous skeletal structure in newly settled coral recruits. In contrast, elevated temperature (+3°C) had little effect on skeletal formation except to partially mitigate the effects of elevated Pco2. The striking structural deformities we observed show that new recruits are at significant risk, being unable to effectively build their skeletons in the Pco2 conditions predicted to occur for open ocean surface waters under a “business-as-usual” emissions scenario [RCP (representative concentration pathway) 8.5] by the year 2100. PMID:26989776

  11. Skeleton Graph Matching vs. Maximum Weight Cliques aorta registration techniques.

    PubMed

    Czajkowska, Joanna; Feinen, C; Grzegorzek, M; Raspe, M; Wickenhöfer, R

    2015-12-01

    Vascular diseases are one of the most challenging health problems in developed countries. Past as well as ongoing research activities often focus on efficient, robust and fast aorta segmentation, and registration techniques. According to this needs our study targets an abdominal aorta registration method. The investigated algorithms make it possible to efficiently segment and register abdominal aorta in pre- and post-operative Computed Tomography (CT) data. In more detail, a registration technique using the Path Similarity Skeleton Graph Matching (PSSGM), as well as Maximum Weight Cliques (MWCs) are employed to realise the matching based on Computed Tomography data. The presented approaches make it possible to match characteristic voxels belonging to the aorta from different Computed Tomography (CT) series. It is particularly useful in the assessment of the abdominal aortic aneurysm treatment by visualising the correspondence between the pre- and post-operative CT data. The registration results have been tested on the database of 18 contrast-enhanced CT series, where the cross-registration analysis has been performed producing 153 matching examples. All the registration results achieved with our system have been verified by an expert. The carried out analysis has highlighted the advantage of the MWCs technique over the PSSGM method. The verification phase proves the efficiency of the MWCs approach and encourages to further develop this methods.

  12. Origin and genetic evolution of the vertebrate skeleton.

    PubMed

    Wada, Hiroshi

    2010-02-01

    The current understanding of the origin and evolution of the genetic cassette for the vertebrate skeletal system is reviewed. Molecular phylogenetic analyses of fibrillar collagen genes, which encode the main component of both cartilage and mineralized bone, suggest that genome duplications in vertebrate ancestors were essential for producing distinct collagen fibers for cartilage and mineralized bone. Several data Indicate co-expression of the ancestral copy of fibrillar collagen with the SoxE and Runx transcription factors. Therefore, the genetic cassette may have already existed in protochordate ancestors, and may operate in the development of the pharyngeal gill skeleton. Accompanied by genome duplications in vertebrate ancestors, this genetic cassette may have also been duplicated and co-opted for cartilage and bone. Subsequently, the genetic cassette for cartilage recruited novel genetic material via domain shuffling. Aggrecan, acquired by means of domain shuffling, performs an essential role in cartilage as a shock absorber. In contrast, the cassette for bone recruited new genetic material produced by tandem duplication of the SPARC/osteonectin genes. Some of the duplicated copies of SPARC/osteonectin became secretory Cabinding phosphoproteins (SCPPs) performing a central role in mineralization by regulating the calcium phosphate concentration. Comparative genome analysis revealed similar molecular evolutionary histories for the genetic cassettes for cartilage and bone, namely duplication of the ancestral genetic cassette and recruitment of novel genetic material.

  13. The effect of chemotherapy on the growing skeleton.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, B L; Kamps, W A; Jansen, H W; Hoekstra, H J

    2000-10-01

    With the increasing use of high dose (poly)chemotherapy schedules in the treatment of childhood cancer it is particularly important to know the adverse effects of these treatments. Growth is a complex mechanism affected not only by chemotherapy but also by the malignancy itself as well as nutritional status, the use of corticosteroids and (cranial) radiation. In vitro and animal studies are often the most useful in determining the effect of a single chemotherapeutic agent on the growing skeleton. In vitro studies have shown doxorubicin, actinomycin D and cisplatin to have a direct effect on growth plate chondrocytes that in animals results in decreased growth and final height. Clinical studies with multiagent chemotherapy have demonstrated that antimetabolites decrease bone growth and final height. Childhood cancer survivors are at risk of a reduced bone mineral density, mainly due to methotrexate, ifosfamide and corticosteroids. This reduced bone mineral density persists into adult life and may increase bone fracture risk at an older age. Copyright 2000 Harcourt Publishers Ltd.

  14. Effects of alkyl substitutions of xanthine skeleton on bronchodilation.

    PubMed

    Sakai, R; Konno, K; Yamamoto, Y; Sanae, F; Takagi, K; Hasegawa, T; Iwasaki, N; Kakiuchi, M; Kato, H; Miyamoto, K

    1992-10-30

    Structure-activity relationships in a series of 1,3,7-trialkyl-xanthine were studied with guinea pigs. Relaxant actions in the tracheal muscle were increased with alkyl chain length at the 1- and 3-positions of the xanthine skeleton, but decreased by alkylation at the 7-position. Positive chronotropic actions in the right atrium were potentiated with 3-alkyl chain length but tended to decrease with 1-alkylation and diminish by 7-substitution. Consequently, while the 1- and 3-substitutions were equally important for the tracheal smooth muscle relaxation, the substitution at the 1-position was more important than the 3-substitution for bronchoselectivity. The 7-alkylation may be significant to cancel heart stimulation. There were good correlations between the smooth muscle relaxant action and the cyclic AMP-PDE inhibitory activity in 3-substituents and the affinity for adenosine (A1) receptors in 1-, 3-, and 7-substituents. This suggests that not only the cyclic AMP-PDE inhibitory activity but also the adenosine antagonistic activity is important in the bronchodilatory effects of alkylxanthines. Among these xanthine derivatives, 1-butyl-3-propylxanthine and its 7-methylated derivative showed high bronchoselectivity in the in vitro and in vivo experiments compared to theophylline and enprofylline and may be new candidates for bronchodilator.

  15. Developmental mechanism of the periodic membrane skeleton in axons

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Guisheng; He, Jiang; Zhou, Ruobo; Lorenzo, Damaris; Babcock, Hazen P; Bennett, Vann; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2014-01-01

    Actin, spectrin, and associated molecules form a periodic sub-membrane lattice structure in axons. How this membrane skeleton is developed and why it preferentially forms in axons are unknown. Here, we studied the developmental mechanism of this lattice structure. We found that this structure emerged early during axon development and propagated from proximal regions to distal ends of axons. Components of the axon initial segment were recruited to the lattice late during development. Formation of the lattice was regulated by the local concentration of βII spectrin, which is higher in axons than in dendrites. Increasing the dendritic concentration of βII spectrin by overexpression or by knocking out ankyrin B induced the formation of the periodic structure in dendrites, demonstrating that the spectrin concentration is a key determinant in the preferential development of this structure in axons and that ankyrin B is critical for the polarized distribution of βII spectrin in neurites. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04581.001 PMID:25535840

  16. The many facets of PPARγ: novel insights for the skeleton

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Masanobu; Sousa, Kyle M.; MacDougald, Ormond A.

    2010-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) is a nuclear receptor that functions as a master transcriptional regulator of adipocyte conversion. During PPARγ transactivation, multiple signaling pathways interact with one another, leading to the differentiation of both white and brown adipose tissue. Ligand activation of the PPARγ-RXR heterodimer complex also enhances insulin sensitivity, and this property has been heavily exploited to develop effective pharmacotherapies for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. PPARγ is also expressed in stem cells and plays a critical role in mesenchymal stromal cell differentiation and lineage determination events. The many facets of PPARγ activity within the bone marrow niche where adipocytes, osteoblasts, and hematopoietic cells reside make this molecule an attractive target for pharmacological investigation. Additional findings that osteoblasts can alter energy metabolism by influencing adiposity and insulin sensitivity, and observations of decreased bone turnover in diabetic subjects, underscore the contribution of the skeleton to systemic energy requirements. Studies into the role of PPARγ in skeletal acquisition and maintenance may lead to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms governing stromal cell differentiation in the mesenchyme compartment and whether PPARγ activity can be manipulated to benefit skeletal remodeling events and energy metabolism. PMID:20407009

  17. The life cycle of chondrocytes in the developing skeleton.

    PubMed

    Shum, Lillian; Nuckolls, Glen

    2002-01-01

    Cartilage serves multiple functions in the developing embryo and in postnatal life. Genetic mutations affecting cartilage development are relatively common and lead to skeletal malformations, dysfunction or increased susceptibility to disease or injury. Characterization of these mutations and investigation of the molecular pathways in which these genes function have contributed to an understanding of the mechanisms regulating skeletal patterning, chondrogenesis, endochondral ossification and joint formation. Extracellular growth and differentiation factors including bone morphogenetic proteins, fibroblast growth factors, parathyroid hormone-related peptide, extracellular matrix components, and members of the hedgehog and Wnt families provide important signals for the regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. Transduction of these signals within the developing mesenchymal cells and chondrocytes results in changes in gene expression mediated by transcription factors including Smads, Msx2, Sox9, signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT), and core-binding factor alpha 1. Further investigation of the interactions of these signaling pathways will contribute to an understanding of cartilage growth and development, and will allow for the development of strategies for the early detection, prevention and treatment of diseases and disorders affecting the skeleton.

  18. Dipole relaxation in erythrocyte membrane: involvement of spectrin skeleton.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, I T; Paarvanova, B; Slavov, T

    2012-12-01

    Polarization of spectrin-actin undermembrane skeleton of red blood cell (RBC) plasma membranes was studied by impedance spectroscopy. Relatedly, dielectric spectra of suspensions that contained RBCs of humans, mammals (bovine, horse, dog, cat) and birds (turkey, pigeon, duck), and human RBC ghost membranes were continuously obtained during heating from 20 to 70°C. Data for the complex admittance and capacitance were used to derive the suspension resistance, R, and capacitance, C, as well as the energy loss as a function of temperature. As in previous studies, two irreversible temperature-induced transitions in the human RBC plasma membrane were detected at 49.5°C and at 60.7°C (at low heating rate). The transition at 49.5°C was evident from the abrupt changes in R, and C and the fall in the energy loss, due to dipole relaxation. For the erythrocytes of indicated species the changes in R and C displayed remarkable and similar frequency profiles within the 0.05-13MHz domain. These changes were subdued after cross-linking of membranes by diamide (0.3-1.3mM) and glutaraldehyde (0.1-0.4%) and at the presence of glycerol (10%). Based on the above results and previous reports, the dielectric changes at 49.5°C were related to dipole relaxation and segmental mobility of spectrin cytoskeleton. The results open the possibility for selective dielectric thermolysis of cell cytoskeleton.

  19. The dynamics of secretion during sea urchin embryonic skeleton formation

    SciTech Connect

    Wilt, Fred H.

    2008-05-01

    Skeleton formation involves secretion of massive amounts of mineral precursor, usually a calcium salt, and matrix proteins, many of which are deposited on, or even occluded within, the mineral. The cell biological underpinnings of this secretion and subsequent assembly of the biomineralized skeletal element is not well understood. We ask here what is the relationship of the trafficking and secretion of the mineral and matrix within the primary mesenchyme cells of the sea urchin embryo, cells that deposit the endoskeletal spicule. Fluorescent labeling of intracellular calcium deposits show mineral precursors are present in granules visible by light microscopy, from whence they are deposited in the endoskeletal spicule, especially at its tip. In contrast, two different matrix proteins tagged with GFP are present in smaller post-Golgi vesicles only seen by electron microscopy, and the secreted protein are only incorporated into the spicule in the vicinity of the cell of origin. The matrix protein, SpSM30B, is post-translationally modified during secretion, and this processing continues after its incorporation into the spicule. Our findings also indicate that the mineral precursor and two well characterized matrix proteins are trafficked by different cellular routes.

  20. [Anatomical names of foramina and canales in skeleton].

    PubMed

    Shikano, S; Yamashita, Y

    1998-03-01

    Latin anatomical names of Foramina and Canales in skeleton were analyzed and compared with Japanese anatomical names for better understanding of the structures of the human body and for possible revision in the future. The conclusions were as follows: 1. In general, short tunnels were called Foramina (singular: Foramen), and long tunnels Canales (singular: Canalis). 2. One end of Canalis was sometimes called Foramen. In this case, Canalis and Foramen were usually modified by the same words. 3. Each name of Foramina contained the word which means form, state, absolute size, region of existence, one of the contents or function of Foramina. 4. Each name of Canales contained the word which means region of existence, one of the contents or function of Canales. 5. Some names of Foramina and Canales that were supposed to mean the region of existence meant one of the contents of the structures. 6. As for Latin anatomical names, the relation between words were relatively clear by the proper use of noun, adjective, nominative, and genitive. 7. Since different Chinese characters were sometimes pronounced similarly in Japanese anatomical names, different structures might be confused. 8. It seemed that some Japanese anatomical names needed partial correction.

  1. Piecewise recognition of bone skeleton profiles via an iterative Hough transform approach without re-voting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricca, Giorgio; Beltrametti, Mauro C.; Massone, Anna Maria

    2015-03-01

    Many bone shapes in the human skeleton are characterized by profiles that can be associated to equations of algebraic curves. Fixing the parameters in the curve equation, by means of a classical pattern recognition procedure like the Hough transform technique, it is then possible to associate an equation to a specific bone profile. However, most skeleton districts are more accurately described by piecewise defined curves. This paper utilizes an iterative approach of the Hough transform without re-voting, to provide an efficient procedure for describing the profile of a bone in the human skeleton as a collection of different but continuously attached curves.

  2. Late Pleistocene human skeleton and mtDNA link Paleoamericans and modern Native Americans.

    PubMed

    Chatters, James C; Kennett, Douglas J; Asmerom, Yemane; Kemp, Brian M; Polyak, Victor; Blank, Alberto Nava; Beddows, Patricia A; Reinhardt, Eduard; Arroyo-Cabrales, Joaquin; Bolnick, Deborah A; Malhi, Ripan S; Culleton, Brendan J; Erreguerena, Pilar Luna; Rissolo, Dominique; Morell-Hart, Shanti; Stafford, Thomas W

    2014-05-16

    Because of differences in craniofacial morphology and dentition between the earliest American skeletons and modern Native Americans, separate origins have been postulated for them, despite genetic evidence to the contrary. We describe a near-complete human skeleton with an intact cranium and preserved DNA found with extinct fauna in a submerged cave on Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula. This skeleton dates to between 13,000 and 12,000 calendar years ago and has Paleoamerican craniofacial characteristics and a Beringian-derived mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroup (D1). Thus, the differences between Paleoamericans and Native Americans probably resulted from in situ evolution rather than separate ancestry.

  3. Tailoring of fuzzy nanostructures on porous tungsten skeleton by helium plasma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajita, Shin; Tanaka, Hirohiko; Ohno, Noriyasu

    2017-03-01

    Porous tungsten skeleton, which was fabricated by sintering of tungsten powder, was exposed to helium plasmas, and the fuzzy nanostructures were tailored on the surface. The hemispherical optical reflectance of the samples was measured at the wavelength of 633 nm. It was shown that the optical reflectance of the porous tungsten skeleton was lower than that of flat tungsten samples. The minimum reflectance was ∼0.4%, suggesting that the darkest metallic material was fabricated. The advantage of the porous tungsten skeleton with nanostructures for optical application is discussed.

  4. Skil: An imperative language with algorithmic skeletons for efficient distributed programming

    SciTech Connect

    Botorog, G.H.; Kuchen, H.

    1996-12-31

    In this paper we present Skil, an imperative language enhanced with higher-order functions and currying, as well as with a polymorphic type system. The high level of Skil allows the integration of algorithmic skeletons, i.e. of higher-order functions representing parallel computation patterns. At the same time, the language can be efficiently implemented. After describing a series of skeletons which work with distributed arrays, we give two examples of parallel programs implemented on the basis of skeletons, namely shortest paths in graphs and Gaussian elimination. Runtime measurements show that we approach the efficiency of message-passing C up to a factor between 1 and 2.5.

  5. [The effect of weightlessness on amphibians. The skeleton and mineral metabolism].

    PubMed

    Besova, N V; Savel'ev, S V; Chernikov, V P

    1993-07-01

    The visceral and somatic skeleton of Pleurodeles waltilii was investigated after a series of two-week space flights on the biosatellites. It was shown that under conditions of weightlessness osteoporosis of the skeleton and its demineralisation were stimulated. In weightlessness, calcium, phosphorus and sulfur were lost and potassium accumulated. Trabeculae of endochondral part of the extremity bones were destroyed by osteoclasts. Proliferation of osteoclasts was disrupted, appositional growth stopped, and the cartilage of hyoid system was resorbed. Skeleton readaptation during two months did not result in the complete regeneration of morphological structure of the bones.

  6. Deployable video conference table

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Marc M. (Inventor); Lissol, Peter (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A deployable table is presented. The table is stowed in and deployed from a storage compartment based upon a non-self rigidizing, 4-hinge, arch support structure that folds upon itself to stow and that expands to deploy. The work surfaces bypass each other above and below to allow the deployment mechanism to operate. This assembly includes the following: first and second primary pivot hinges placed at the opposite ends of the storage compartment; first and second lateral frame members with proximal ends connected to the first and second pivot hinges; a medial frame member offset from and pivotally connected to distal ends of the first and second members through third and fourth medial pivot hinges; and left-side, right-side, and middle trays connected respectively to the first, second, and third frame members and being foldable into and out of the storage compartment by articulation of the first, second, third, and fourth joints. At least one of the third and fourth joints are locked to set the first, second, and third frame members in a desired angular orientation with respect to each other.

  7. Replication of ancient Egyptian osteotomies of the facial skeleton: insights into the mummification process.

    PubMed

    Peacock, Z S; Chapman, P H; Gupta, R; Kaban, L B

    2011-11-01

    A recent radiographic study of an Egyptian mummified head from the Middle Kingdom revealed methodical mutilations of the facial skeleton that were performed after death and prior to wrapping the corpse for burial. These mutilations consisted of removal of the coronoid processes of the mandible and portions of the zygomas presumably via an intraoral approach. They are unique in the archaeological record. The authors hypothesize that the procedures were carried out to facilitate jaw opening and may be related to a ritual known as the 'Opening of the Mouth' ceremony. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of performing these remarkable osteotomies on two human cadavers using instruments similar to those available to the ancient embalmer. Bilateral osteotomies of the zygomas and coronoid processes were carried out transorally and the bones removed. Pre- and postoperative maximal incisal opening measured 25 mm and 53 mm, respectively. Postoperative high-resolution computed tomographic (CT) scans were obtained. Comparison of the postoperative cadaver and mummy CT scans demonstrate remarkable similarity between the resections. Results of this study demonstrate that the ancient skeletal mutilations could have been performed transorally during the mummification process and would have enhanced jaw opening. Copyright © 2011 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Cadmium measurements in coral skeleton using isotope dilution-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Kathryn A.; McDonough, William F.; Grottoli, AndréA. G.

    2006-11-01

    Here a method for the precise analysis of Cd/Ca in coral skeleton using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is presented. Isotope dilution and gravimetric standards with internal standardization were used for Cd and Ca determination, respectively. Separation of alkaline earth metals from Cd using ion chromatography reduced the high total dissolved solids while maintaining a strong Cd signal. Repeated Cd/Ca measurements of a coral standard yielded a precision of ±2.2% (one standard deviation as a fraction of signal). Analyses of reference materials (BCR-1, BHVO-1, W-2, GSR-3, GSR-6, CACB-1, JCp-1, and JCt-1) fell within established ranges, with a precision comparable to other ICP-MS measurements. Advantages of this approach over existing methods for corals are as follows: (1) reduced introduction of high-concentration elements into the mass spectrometer, (2) sample requirements as low as 15 mg (i.e., ≥1 pmol Cd/sample), and (3) determination of multiple element ratios on the same sample aliquot with a precision of ±7% or better.

  9. The constructal-law origin of the wheel, size, and skeleton in animal design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bejan, Adrian

    2010-07-01

    This paper shows that the emergence of body organs is predictable as an integral part of the design for moving animal mass more easily on Earth, in accord with the constructal law of design in nature: For a finite-size open system to persist in time (to live), it must evolve such that it provides easier access to the imposed (global) currents that flow through it. Every organ destroys useful energy in two ways: Internally by thermodynamic irreversibilities and by having to be carried. From the constructal law follows the necessity of characteristic-size organs and the emergence of solid columns (legs) to facilitate the flow of stresses. This natural "wheel" endows the body with rolling (falling-forward) locomotion, with predicted speeds that agree with the observed speeds in the body mass range of 10-6-103 kg. The constructal law also accounts for animal design features for changing speeds. Skeletons (bones and legs) are solid organs that emerge in accordance with the constructal-law design of moving animal mass: More and stronger material emerges along the lines of highest stresses. A connection between animal wheel movement and swimming, water waves, and tsunamis is also made.

  10. Deriving Extensional Spatial Composition Tables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Geresy, Baher; Abdelmoty, Alia I.; Ware, Andrew J.

    Spatial composition tables are fundamental tools for the realisation of qualitative spatial reasoning techniques. Studying the properties of these tables in relation to the spatial calculi they are based on is essential for understanding the applicability of these calculi and how they can be extended and generalised. An extensional interpretation of a spatial composition table is an important property that has been studied in the literature and is used to determine the validity of the table for the models it is proposed for. It provides means for consistency checking of ground sets of relations and for addressing spatial constraint satisfaction problems. Furthermore, two general conditions that can be used to test for extensionality of spatial composition tables are proposed and applied to the RCC8 composition table to verify the allowable models in this calculus.

  11. Sandia Unstructured Triangle Table Generator

    SciTech Connect

    2013-09-16

    The software generates data tables for thermodynamic and transport properties of materials as described by a set of input models. For each input model parameterization, an associated table is created on an unstructured triangular grid. These grids all conform to the same topology. A statistical accuracy guarantee is provided for the tabular representation of the model. Details of the model and table specification are given in a XML input deck.

  12. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart IIIi of... - Optional 3-Mode Test Cycle for Stationary Fire Pump Engines

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Standards of Performance for Stationary Compression Ignition Internal Combustion Engines Pt. 60, Subpt. IIII, Table 6 Table 6 to Subpart IIII of Part 60—Optional 3-Mode Test Cycle for Stationary Fire Pump Engines... Stationary Fire Pump Engines 6 Table 6 to Subpart IIII of Part 60 Protection of Environment...

  13. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart IIIi of... - Optional 3-Mode Test Cycle for Stationary Fire Pump Engines

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Standards of Performance for Stationary Compression Ignition Internal Combustion Engines Pt. 60, Subpt. IIII, Table 6 Table 6 to Subpart IIII of Part 60—Optional 3-Mode Test Cycle for Stationary Fire Pump Engines... Stationary Fire Pump Engines 6 Table 6 to Subpart IIII of Part 60 Protection of Environment...

  14. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart IIIi of... - Optional 3-Mode Test Cycle for Stationary Fire Pump Engines

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Standards of Performance for Stationary Compression Ignition Internal Combustion Engines Pt. 60, Subpt. IIII, Table 6 Table 6 to Subpart IIII of Part 60—Optional 3-Mode Test Cycle for Stationary Fire Pump Engines... Stationary Fire Pump Engines 6 Table 6 to Subpart IIII of Part 60 Protection of Environment...

  15. 75 FR 20983 - Folding Metal Tables and Chairs from the People's Republic of China: Extension of Time Limit for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-22

    ... International Trade Administration Folding Metal Tables and Chairs from the People's Republic of China... metal tables and chairs from the People's Republic of China (``PRC''). See Initiation of Antidumping and... of the administrative reviews of the antidumping duty order. See Folding Metal Tables and Chairs from...

  16. 75 FR 81212 - Floor-Standing Metal-Top Ironing Tables and Certain Parts Thereof from the People's Republic of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-27

    ... International Trade Administration Floor--Standing Metal--Top Ironing Tables and Certain Parts Thereof from the... floor- standing, metal-top ironing tables and certain parts thereof from the People's Republic of China. See Floor-Standing, Metal-Top Ironing Tables and Certain Parts Thereof From the People's Republic of...

  17. 75 FR 69400 - Folding Metal Tables and Chairs From the People's Republic of China: Extension of Time Limit for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-12

    ... International Trade Administration Folding Metal Tables and Chairs From the People's Republic of China... the initiation of the administrative review of the antidumping duty order on folding metal tables and... 14, 2010, the Department published the preliminary results of review. See Folding Metal Tables and...

  18. 75 FR 11120 - Folding Metal Tables and Chairs from the People's Republic of China: Notice of Extension of Time...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-10

    ... International Trade Administration Folding Metal Tables and Chairs from the People's Republic of China: Notice... metal tables and chairs from the People's Republic of China (``PRC''). See Initiation of Antidumping and... practicable to complete the preliminary results of the administrative reviews of folding metal tables and...

  19. 76 FR 15295 - Floor-Standing, Metal-Top Ironing Tables and Certain Parts Thereof From the People's Republic of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-21

    ... International Trade Administration Floor-Standing, Metal-Top Ironing Tables and Certain Parts Thereof From the...) on floor-standing, metal-top ironing tables from the People's Republic of China (PRC). See Floor-Standing, Metal-Top Ironing Tables and Certain Parts Thereof From the People's Republic of...

  20. 76 FR 72903 - Folding Metal Tables and Chairs From the People's Republic of China: Notice of Correction to the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-28

    ... International Trade Administration Folding Metal Tables and Chairs From the People's Republic of China: Notice... the antidumping duty order on folding metal tables and chairs from the People's Republic of China...'').'' \\2\\ \\1\\ See Folding Metal Tables and Chairs From the People's Republic of China: Final Results...

  1. 76 FR 774 - Folding Metal Tables and Chairs From the People's Republic of China: Notice of Extension of Time...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-06

    ... International Trade Administration Folding Metal Tables and Chairs From the People's Republic of China: Notice...'') published the initiation of the new shipper review of the antidumping duty order on folding metal tables and chairs from the People's Republic of China (``PRC''). See Folding Metal Tables and Chairs: Initiation...

  2. 75 FR 44767 - Folding Metal Tables and Chairs From the People's Republic of China: Initiation of New Shipper...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-29

    ... International Trade Administration Folding Metal Tables and Chairs From the People's Republic of China... metal tables and chairs (``FMTCs'') from the People's Republic of China (``PRC''), received on June 30... published in the Federal Register on June 27, 2002. See Antidumping Duty Order: Folding Metal Tables...

  3. 76 FR 15297 - Floor-Standing, Metal-Top Ironing Tables and Certain Parts Thereof From the People's Republic of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-21

    ... International Trade Administration Floor-Standing, Metal-Top Ironing Tables and Certain Parts Thereof From the... administrative review of the antidumping duty order on floor-standing, metal-top ironing tables from the People's Republic of China (PRC). See Floor-Standing, Metal-Top Ironing Tables and Certain Parts Thereof From...

  4. TableSeer: Automatic Table Extraction, Search, and Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Ying

    2009-01-01

    Tables are ubiquitous with a history that pre-dates that of sentential text. Authors often report a summary of their most important findings using tabular structure in documents. For example, scientists widely use tables to present the latest experimental results or statistical data in a condensed fashion. Along with the explosive development of…

  5. Symbol Tables and Branch Tables: Linking Applications Together

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handler, Louis M.

    2011-01-01

    This document explores the computer techniques used to execute software whose parts are compiled and linked separately. The computer techniques include using a branch table or indirect address table to connect the parts. Methods of storing the information in data structures are discussed as well as differences between C and C++.

  6. TableSeer: Automatic Table Extraction, Search, and Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Ying

    2009-01-01

    Tables are ubiquitous with a history that pre-dates that of sentential text. Authors often report a summary of their most important findings using tabular structure in documents. For example, scientists widely use tables to present the latest experimental results or statistical data in a condensed fashion. Along with the explosive development of…

  7. Skeletons Out of the Closet: The Case of the Missing 162%.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pressnall, Bob

    1995-01-01

    Describes one teacher's difficulty in getting his eighth-grade students to revise their writing. Discusses his successful use of writing "skeletons" to help define what revision is and to teach a structure for one type of revision. (SR)

  8. Development of the viscerocranial skeleton during embryogenesis of the sea lamprey, Petromyzon Marinus.

    PubMed

    Martin, Wendy M; Bumm, Lloyd A; McCauley, David W

    2009-12-01

    Evolution of the skeleton was a key transition in early vertebrates. Lampreys lack a mineralized skeleton but possess cartilaginous neurocranial and viscerocranial elements. In lampreys, the visceral skeleton develops as a fused branchial basket supporting the pharynx. Here, we have adapted Alcian blue staining of lamprey cartilage and show this method results in cartilage fluorescence that we used to describe development of the branchial skeleton in Petromyzon marinus between 17 and 63 days of development. We show that skeletal rods develop from condensations of flattened discoidal chondrocytes and may involve cellular intercalation. Lamprey trabecular, parachordal, and subchordal cartilages consist of aggregations of polygonal chondrocytes positioned on the ventral and lateral surfaces of the notochord. We speculate that morphological differences relate to functional differences in the cartilage. We show that differentiated skeletal rods are derived from neural crest. Finally, we show how branchial muscles intercalate with skeletal rods of the branchial basket. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Skeletons Out of the Closet: The Case of the Missing 162%.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pressnall, Bob

    1995-01-01

    Describes one teacher's difficulty in getting his eighth-grade students to revise their writing. Discusses his successful use of writing "skeletons" to help define what revision is and to teach a structure for one type of revision. (SR)

  10. Skeleton extraction and phase interpolation for single ESPI fringe pattern based on the partial differential equations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fang; Wang, Danyu; Xiao, Zhitao; Geng, Lei; Wu, Jun; Xu, Zhenbei; Sun, Jiao; Wang, Jinjiang; Xi, Jiangtao

    2015-11-16

    A novel phase extraction method for single electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI) fringes is proposed. The partial differential equations (PDEs) are used to extract the skeletons of the gray-scale fringe and to interpolate the whole-field phase values based on skeleton map. Firstly, the gradient vector field (GVF) of the initial fringe is adjusted by an anisotropic PDE. Secondly, the skeletons of the fringe are extracted combining the divergence property of the adjusted GVF. After assigning skeleton orders, the whole-field phase information is interpolated by the heat conduction equation. The validity of the proposed method is verified by computer-simulated and experimentally obtained poor-quality ESPI fringe patterns.

  11. Development and evaluation of an articulated registration algorithm for human skeleton registration.

    PubMed

    Yip, Stephen; Perk, Timothy; Jeraj, Robert

    2014-03-21

    Accurate registration over multiple scans is necessary to assess treatment response of bone diseases (e.g. metastatic bone lesions). This study aimed to develop and evaluate an articulated registration algorithm for the whole-body skeleton registration in human patients. In articulated registration, whole-body skeletons are registered by auto-segmenting into individual bones using atlas-based segmentation, and then rigidly aligning them. Sixteen patients (weight = 80-117 kg, height = 168-191 cm) with advanced prostate cancer underwent the pre- and mid-treatment PET/CT scans over a course of cancer therapy. Skeletons were extracted from the CT images by thresholding (HU>150). Skeletons were registered using the articulated, rigid, and deformable registration algorithms to account for position and postural variability between scans. The inter-observers agreement in the atlas creation, the agreement between the manually and atlas-based segmented bones, and the registration performances of all three registration algorithms were all assessed using the Dice similarity index-DSIobserved, DSIatlas, and DSIregister. Hausdorff distance (dHausdorff) of the registered skeletons was also used for registration evaluation. Nearly negligible inter-observers variability was found in the bone atlases creation as the DSIobserver was 96 ± 2%. Atlas-based and manual segmented bones were in excellent agreement with DSIatlas of 90 ± 3%. Articulated (DSIregsiter = 75 ± 2%, dHausdorff = 0.37 ± 0.08 cm) and deformable registration algorithms (DSIregister = 77 ± 3%, dHausdorff = 0.34 ± 0.08 cm) considerably outperformed the rigid registration algorithm (DSIregsiter = 59 ± 9%, dHausdorff = 0.69 ± 0.20 cm) in the skeleton registration as the rigid registration algorithm failed to capture the skeleton flexibility in the joints. Despite superior skeleton registration performance, deformable registration algorithm failed to preserve the local rigidity of bones as over 60% of the skeletons

  12. Development and evaluation of an articulated registration algorithm for human skeleton registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yip, Stephen; Perk, Timothy; Jeraj, Robert

    2014-03-01

    Accurate registration over multiple scans is necessary to assess treatment response of bone diseases (e.g. metastatic bone lesions). This study aimed to develop and evaluate an articulated registration algorithm for the whole-body skeleton registration in human patients. In articulated registration, whole-body skeletons are registered by auto-segmenting into individual bones using atlas-based segmentation, and then rigidly aligning them. Sixteen patients (weight = 80-117 kg, height = 168-191 cm) with advanced prostate cancer underwent the pre- and mid-treatment PET/CT scans over a course of cancer therapy. Skeletons were extracted from the CT images by thresholding (HU>150). Skeletons were registered using the articulated, rigid, and deformable registration algorithms to account for position and postural variability between scans. The inter-observers agreement in the atlas creation, the agreement between the manually and atlas-based segmented bones, and the registration performances of all three registration algorithms were all assessed using the Dice similarity index—DSIobserved, DSIatlas, and DSIregister. Hausdorff distance (dHausdorff) of the registered skeletons was also used for registration evaluation. Nearly negligible inter-observers variability was found in the bone atlases creation as the DSIobserver was 96 ± 2%. Atlas-based and manual segmented bones were in excellent agreement with DSIatlas of 90 ± 3%. Articulated (DSIregsiter = 75 ± 2%, dHausdorff = 0.37 ± 0.08 cm) and deformable registration algorithms (DSIregister = 77 ± 3%, dHausdorff = 0.34 ± 0.08 cm) considerably outperformed the rigid registration algorithm (DSIregsiter = 59 ± 9%, dHausdorff = 0.69 ± 0.20 cm) in the skeleton registration as the rigid registration algorithm failed to capture the skeleton flexibility in the joints. Despite superior skeleton registration performance, deformable registration algorithm failed to preserve the local rigidity of bones as over 60% of the

  13. Descriptions of the lower limb skeleton of Homo floresiensis.

    PubMed

    Jungers, W L; Larson, S G; Harcourt-Smith, W; Morwood, M J; Sutikna, T; Due Awe, Rokhus; Djubiantono, T

    2009-11-01

    Bones of the lower extremity have been recovered for up to nine different individuals of Homo floresiensis - LB1, LB4, LB6, LB8, LB9, LB10, LB11, LB13, and LB14. LB1 is represented by a bony pelvis (damaged but now repaired), femora, tibiae, fibulae, patellae, and numerous foot bones. LB4/2 is an immature right tibia lacking epiphyses. LB6 includes a fragmentary metatarsal and two pedal phalanges. LB8 is a nearly complete right tibia (shorter than that of LB1). LB9 is a fragment of a hominin femoral diaphysis. LB10 is a proximal hallucal phalanx. LB11 includes pelvic fragments and a fragmentary metatarsal. LB13 is a patellar fragment, and LB14 is a fragment of an acetabulum. All skeletal remains recovered from Liang Bua were extremely fragile, and some were badly damaged when they were removed temporarily from Jakarta. At present, virtually all fossil materials have been returned, stabilized, and hardened. These skeletal remains are described and illustrated photographically. The lower limb skeleton exhibits a uniquely mosaic pattern, with many primitive-like morphologies; we have been unable to find this combination of ancient and derived (more human-like) features in either healthy or pathological modern humans, regardless of body size. Bilateral asymmetries are slight in the postcranium, and muscle markings are clearly delineated on all bones. The long bones are robust, and the thickness of their cortices is well within the ranges seen in healthy modern humans. LB1 is most probably a female based on the shape of her greater sciatic notch, and the marked degree of lateral iliac flaring recalls that seen in australopithecines such as "Lucy" (AL 288-1). The metatarsus has a human-like robusticity formula, but the proximal pedal phalanges are relatively long and robust (and slightly curved). The hallux is fully adducted, but we suspect that a medial longitudinal arch was absent.

  14. Spaceflight and the skeleton: lessons for the earthbound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bikle, D. D.; Halloran, B. P.; Morey-Holton, E.

    1997-01-01

    Loss of bone during extended space flight has long been a concern that could limit the ability of humans to explore the universe. Surprisingly the available data do not support the concept that weightlessness leads inexorably to a depleted skeleton unable to withstand the stress of a return to a 1g environment. Nevertheless, some bone loss does occur especially in those bones most stressed by gravity prior to flight, providing confirmation of the proposal formulated over a century ago by Julius Wolff that mechanical stress determines the form and function of bone. Although the phenomenon of bone loss with skeletal unloading, whether by space flight or immobilization or just taking a load off your feet (literally) is well established, the mechanisms by which bone senses load and adjusts to it are not so clear. What actually is the stimulus and what are the sensors? What are the target cells? How do the sensors communicate the message into the cells, and by what pathways do the cells respond? What is the role of endocrine factors versus paracrine or autocrine factors in mediating or modulating the response? None of these questions has been answered with certainty, but as will become apparent in this review, we have some clues directing us to the answers. Although the focus of this review concerns space flight, it seems highly likely that the mechanisms mediating the transmission of mechanical load to changes in bone formation and resorption apply equally well to all forms of disuse osteoporosis, and are likely to be the same mechanisms affected by other etiologies of osteoporosis.

  15. Beta-catenin--a supporting role in the skeleton.

    PubMed

    Case, Natasha; Rubin, Janet

    2010-06-01

    In the last 5 years a role for beta-catenin in the skeleton has been cemented. Beginning with mutations in the Lrp5 receptor that control beta-catenin canonical downstream signals, and progressing to transgenic models with bone-specific alteration of beta-catenin, research has shown that beta-catenin is required for normal bone development. A cell critical to bone in which beta-catenin activity determines function is the marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell (MSC), where sustained beta-catenin prevents its distribution into adipogenic lineage. beta-Catenin actions are less well understood in mature osteoblasts: while beta-catenin contributes to control of osteoclastic bone resorption via alteration of the osteoprotegerin/RANKL ratio, a specific regulatory role during osteoblast bone synthesis has not yet been determined. The proven ability of mechanical factors to prevent beta-catenin degradation and induce nuclear translocation through Lrp-independent mechanisms suggests processes by which exercise might modulate bone mass via control of lineage allocation, in particular, by preventing precursor distribution into the adipocyte pool. Effects resulting from mechanical activation of beta-catenin in mature osteoblasts and osteocytes likely modulate bone resorption, but whether beta-catenin is involved in osteoblast synthetic function remains to be proven for both mechanical and soluble mediators. As beta-catenin appears to support the downstream effects of multiple osteogenic factors, studies clarifying when and where beta-catenin effects occur will be relevant for translational approaches aimed at preventing bone loss and terminal adipogenic conversion.

  16. Space flight and the skeleton: lessons for the earthbound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bikle, D. D.; Halloran, B. P.; Morey-Holton, E.

    1997-01-01

    Loss of bone during extended space flight has long been a concern that could limit the ability of humans to explore the universe. Surprisingly, the available data do not support the concept that weightlessness leads inexorably to a depleted skeleton unable to withstand the stress of a return to a 1-g environment. Nevertheless, some bone loss does occur, especially in those bones most stressed by gravity prior to flight, which provides confirmation of the proposal formulated over a century ago by Julius Wolff that mechanical stress determines the form and function of bone. Although the phenomenon of bone loss with skeletal unloading, whether by space flight or immobilization or just taking a load off your feet (literally) is well established, the mechanisms by which bone senses load and adjusts to it are not so clear. What actually is the stimulus, and what are the sensors? What are the target cells? How do the sensors communicate the message into the cells, and by what pathways do the cells respond? What is the role of endocrine, factors vs. paracrine or autocrine factors in mediating or modulating the response? None of these questions has been answered with certainty, but, as will become apparent in this review, we have some clues directing us to the answers. Although the focus of this review concerns space flight, it seems highly likely that the mechanisms mediating the transmission of mechanical load to changes in bone formation and resorption apply equally well to all forms of disuse osteoporosis and are likely to be the same mechanisms affected by other etiologies of osteoporosis.

  17. Scaling of the appendicular skeleton of the giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis).

    PubMed

    van Sittert, Sybrand; Skinner, John; Mitchell, Graham

    2015-05-01

    Giraffes have remarkably long and slender limb bones, but it is unknown how they grow with regard to body mass, sex, and neck length. In this study, we measured the length, mediolateral (ML) diameter, craniocaudal (CC) diameter and circumference of the humerus, radius, metacarpus, femur, tibia, and metatarsus in 10 fetuses, 21 females, and 23 males of known body masses. Allometric exponents were determined and compared. We found the average bone length increased from 340 ± 50 mm at birth to 700 ± 120 mm at maturity, while average diameters increased from 30 ± 3 to 70 ± 11 mm. Fetal bones increased with positive allometry in length (relative to body mass) and in diameter (relative to body mass and length). In postnatal giraffes bone lengths and diameters increased iso- or negatively allometric relative to increases in body mass, except for the humerus CC diameter which increased with positive allometry. Humerus circumference also increased with positive allometry, that of the radius and tibia isometrically and the femur and metapodials with negative allometry. Relative to increases in bone length, both the humerus and femur widened with positive allometry. In the distal limb bones, ML diameters increased isometrically (radius, metacarpus) or positively allometric (tibia, metatarsus) while the corresponding CC widths increased with negative allometry and isometrically, respectively. Except for the humerus and femur, exponents were not significantly different between corresponding front and hind limb segments. We concluded that the patterns of bone growth in males and females are identical. In fetuses, the growth of the appendicular skeleton is faster than it is after birth which is a pattern opposite to that reported for the neck. Allometric exponents seemed unremarkable compared to the few species described previously, and pointed to the importance of neck elongation rather than leg elongation during evolution. Nevertheless, the front limb bones

  18. Aging of the facial skeleton: aesthetic implications and rejuvenation strategies.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Robert B; Katzel, Evan B; Koltz, Peter F; Yaremchuk, Michael J; Girotto, John A; Kahn, David M; Langstein, Howard N

    2011-01-01

    Facial aging is a dynamic process involving the aging of soft-tissue and bony structures. In this study, the authors demonstrate how the facial skeleton changes with age in both male and female subjects and what impact these structural changes may have on overall facial aesthetics. Facial bone computed tomographic scans were obtained from 60 female and 60 male Caucasian subjects. Twenty male and 20 female subjects were placed in three age categories (20 to 40 years, 41 to 64 years, and 65 years and older). Each computed tomographic scan underwent three-dimensional reconstruction with volume rendering. Edentulous patients were excluded. The following measurements were obtained: upper face (orbital aperture area, orbital aperture width, and curvilinear analysis of the superior and inferior orbital rims), midface (glabellar angle, pyriform angle, maxillary angle, and pyriform aperture area), and lower face (bigonial width, ramus breadth, ramus height, mandibular body height, mandibular body length, and mandibular angle). The orbital aperture width and orbital aperture area increased significantly with age for both sexes. There was a significant increase in orbital aperture size (increase in height of the superomedial and inferolateral orbital rim) in both sexes. The glabellar and maxillary angles decreased significantly with age for both sexes, whereas the pyriform aperture area significantly increased for both sexes with age. Mandibular length and height both decreased significantly for each sex. The mandibular angle significantly increased with age for both sexes. These results suggest that the skeletal morphology of the face changes with age. This change in skeletal morphology may contribute to the appearance of the aging face.

  19. Dressed skeleton expansion and the coupling scale ambiguity problem

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Hung Jung

    1992-09-01

    Perturbative expansions in quantum field theories are usually expressed in powers of a coupling constant. In principle, the infinite sum of the expansion series is independent of the renormalization scale of the coupling constant. In practice, there is a remnant dependence of the truncated series on the renormalization scale. This scale ambiguity can severely restrict the predictive power of theoretical calculations. The dressed skeleton expansion is developed as a calculational method which avoids the coupling scale ambiguity problem. In this method, physical quantities are expressed as functional expansions in terms of a coupling vertex function. The arguments of the vertex function are given by the physical momenta of each process. These physical momenta effectively replace the unspecified renormalization scale and eliminate the ambiguity problem. This method is applied to various field theoretical models and its main features and limitations are explored. For quantum chromodynamics, an expression for the running coupling constant of the three-gluon vertex is obtained. The effective coupling scale of this vertex is shown to be essentially given by {mu}{sup 2} {approximately} Q{sub min}{sup 2}Q{sub med}{sup 2}/Q{sub max}{sup 2} where Q{sub min}{sup 2}Q{sub med}{sup 2}/Q{sub max}{sup 2} are respectively the smallest, the next-to-smallest and the largest scale among the three gluon virtualities. This functional form suggests that the three-gluon vertex becomes non-perturbative at asymmetric momentum configurations. Implications for four-jet physics is discussed.

  20. Sexual dimorphism in the postcranial skeleton of New World primates.

    PubMed

    Leutenegger, W; Larson, S

    1985-01-01

    This study examines sexual dimorphism in 24 dimensions of the postcranial skeleton of four platyrrhine species: Callithrix jacchus, Saguinus nigricollis, Saimiri sciureus, and Cebus albifrons. The two callitrichid species show a relatively small amount of variation in the degree of sexual dimorphism among the different dimensions. Variation is considerably higher in the two cebid species as reflected by a mosaic pattern of sexual dimorphisms with males being significantly larger than females in some dimensions, and females significantly larger than males in others. In dimensions of the pectoral girdle and limb bones, males and females in each of the two cebid species are essentially scaled versions of each other, with males being peramorphic compared to females. This pattern is primarily the result of time hypermorphosis, i.e. an extension of the growth period in time in males. Rate hypermorphosis, i.e. an increase in the rate of growth in time in males, appears to play an additional role, however, in S. sciureus. By contrast, in dimensions of the true pelvis, sex differences in shape are dissociated from those in size. They are interpreted as the result of acceleration, i.e. increase in rate of shape change in females, as an adaptation to obstetrical functions. Interspecific analyses indicate positive allometry of mean degree of postcranial dimorphism with respect to body size. This coincides with previous findings by Leutenegger and Cheverud [1982, 1985] on the scaling of sexual dimorphism in body weight and canine size, and thus supports their model which posits selection on body size as the prime mover for the evolution of sexual dimorphism.

  1. Space flight and the skeleton: lessons for the earthbound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bikle, D. D.; Halloran, B. P.; Morey-Holton, E.

    1997-01-01

    Loss of bone during extended space flight has long been a concern that could limit the ability of humans to explore the universe. Surprisingly, the available data do not support the concept that weightlessness leads inexorably to a depleted skeleton unable to withstand the stress of a return to a 1-g environment. Nevertheless, some bone loss does occur, especially in those bones most stressed by gravity prior to flight, which provides confirmation of the proposal formulated over a century ago by Julius Wolff that mechanical stress determines the form and function of bone. Although the phenomenon of bone loss with skeletal unloading, whether by space flight or immobilization or just taking a load off your feet (literally) is well established, the mechanisms by which bone senses load and adjusts to it are not so clear. What actually is the stimulus, and what are the sensors? What are the target cells? How do the sensors communicate the message into the cells, and by what pathways do the cells respond? What is the role of endocrine, factors vs. paracrine or autocrine factors in mediating or modulating the response? None of these questions has been answered with certainty, but, as will become apparent in this review, we have some clues directing us to the answers. Although the focus of this review concerns space flight, it seems highly likely that the mechanisms mediating the transmission of mechanical load to changes in bone formation and resorption apply equally well to all forms of disuse osteoporosis and are likely to be the same mechanisms affected by other etiologies of osteoporosis.

  2. Enzalutamide Reduces the Bone Mass in the Axial But Not the Appendicular Skeleton in Male Mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianyao; Movérare-Skrtic, Sofia; Börjesson, Anna E; Lagerquist, Marie K; Sjögren, Klara; Windahl, Sara H; Koskela, Antti; Grahnemo, Louise; Islander, Ulrika; Wilhelmson, Anna S; Tivesten, Åsa; Tuukkanen, Juha; Ohlsson, Claes

    2016-02-01

    Testosterone is a crucial regulator of the skeleton, but the role of the androgen receptor (AR) for the maintenance of the adult male skeleton is unclear. In the present study, the role of the AR for bone metabolism and skeletal growth after sexual maturation was evaluated by means of the drug enzalutamide, which is a new AR antagonist used in the treatment of prostate cancer patients. Nine-week-old male mice were treated with 10, 30, or 100 mg/kg·d of enzalutamide for 21 days or were surgically castrated and were compared with vehicle-treated gonadal intact mice. Although orchidectomy reduced the cortical bone thickness and trabecular bone volume fraction in the appendicular skeleton, these parameters were unaffected by enzalutamide. In contrast, both enzalutamide and orchidectomy reduced the bone mass in the axial skeleton as demonstrated by a reduced lumbar spine areal bone mineral density (P < .001) and trabecular bone volume fraction in L5 vertebrae (P < .001) compared with vehicle-treated gonadal intact mice. A compression test of the L5 vertebrae revealed that the mechanical strength in the axial skeleton was significantly reduced by enzalutamide (maximal load at failure -15.3% ± 3.5%; P < .01). The effects of enzalutamide in the axial skeleton were associated with a high bone turnover. In conclusion, enzalutamide reduces the bone mass in the axial but not the appendicular skeleton in male mice after sexual maturation. We propose that the effect of testosterone on the axial skeleton in male mice is mainly mediated via the AR.

  3. TRIzol and Alu qPCR-based quantification of metastatic seeding within the skeleton.

    PubMed

    Preston Campbell, J; Mulcrone, P; Masood, S K; Karolak, M; Merkel, A; Hebron, K; Zijlstra, A; Sterling, J; Elefteriou, F

    2015-08-14

    Current methods for detecting disseminated tumor cells in the skeleton are limited by expense and technical complexity. We describe a simple and inexpensive method to quantify, with single cell sensitivity, human metastatic cancer in the mouse skeleton, concurrently with host gene expression, using TRIzol-based DNA/RNA extraction and Alu sequence qPCR amplification. This approach enables precise quantification of tumor cells and corresponding host gene expression during metastatic colonization in xenograft models.

  4. Porous nuclear fuel element with internal skeleton for high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors

    DOEpatents

    Youchison, Dennis L.; Williams, Brian E.; Benander, Robert E.

    2013-09-03

    Porous nuclear fuel elements for use in advanced high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors (HTGR's), and to processes for fabricating them. Advanced uranium bi-carbide, uranium tri-carbide and uranium carbonitride nuclear fuels can be used. These fuels have high melting temperatures, high thermal conductivity, and high resistance to erosion by hot hydrogen gas. Tri-carbide fuels, such as (U,Zr,Nb)C, can be fabricated using chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) to simultaneously deposit each of the three separate carbides, e.g., UC, ZrC, and NbC in a single CVI step. By using CVI, the nuclear fuel may be deposited inside of a highly porous skeletal structure made of, for example, reticulated vitreous carbon foam.

  5. At the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Expedition 48-49 crewmembers Anatoly Ivanishin of Roscosmos (foreground) and Takuya Onishi of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency conduct tests of their vestibular system on tilt tables June 30 as part of pre-launch activities. They and Kate Rubins of NASA will launch July 7, Baikonur time, on the Soyuz MS-01 spacecraft for a planned four-month mission on the International Space Station...NASA/Alexander Vysotsky.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-06-30

    At the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Expedition 48-49 crewmembers Anatoly Ivanishin of Roscosmos (foreground) and Takuya Onishi of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency conduct tests of their vestibular system on tilt tables June 30 as part of pre-launch activities. They and Kate Rubins of NASA will launch July 7, Baikonur time, on the Soyuz MS-01 spacecraft for a planned four-month mission on the International Space Station. NASA/Alexander Vysotsky

  6. At the Cosmonaut Hotel crew quarters in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Expedition 46-47 crewmember Tim Kopra of NASA took a turn on a tilt table to test his vestibular system Dec. 9 as part of his pre-launch training. Kopra, Tim Peake of the European Space Agency and Yuri Malenchenko of the Russian Federal Space Agency will launch Dec. 15 on their Soyuz TMA-19M spacecraft for a six-month mission on the International Space Station...NASA/Victor Zelentsov.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-12-09

    At the Cosmonaut Hotel crew quarters in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Expedition 46-47 crewmember Tim Kopra of NASA took a turn on a tilt table to test his vestibular system Dec. 9 as part of his pre-launch training. Kopra, Tim Peake of the European Space Agency and Yuri Malenchenko of the Russian Federal Space Agency will launch Dec. 15 on their Soyuz TMA-19M spacecraft for a six-month mission on the International Space Station. NASA/Victor Zelentsov

  7. Histology and affinity of anaspids, and the early evolution of the vertebrate dermal skeleton.

    PubMed

    Keating, Joseph N; Donoghue, Philip C J

    2016-03-16

    The assembly of the gnathostome bodyplan constitutes a formative episode in vertebrate evolutionary history, an interval in which the mineralized skeleton and its canonical suite of cell and tissue types originated. Fossil jawless fishes, assigned to the gnathostome stem-lineage, provide an unparalleled insight into the origin and evolution of the skeleton, hindered only by uncertainty over the phylogenetic position and evolutionary significance of key clades. Chief among these are the jawless anaspids, whose skeletal composition, a rich source of phylogenetic information, is poorly characterized. Here we survey the histology of representatives spanning anaspid diversity and infer their generalized skeletal architecture. The anaspid dermal skeleton is composed of odontodes comprising spheritic dentine and enameloid, overlying a basal layer of acellular parallel fibre bone containing an extensive shallow canal network. A recoded and revised phylogenetic analysis using equal and implied weights parsimony resolves anaspids as monophyletic, nested among stem-gnathostomes. Our results suggest the anaspid dermal skeleton is a degenerate derivative of a histologically more complex ancestral vertebrate skeleton, rather than reflecting primitive simplicity. Hypotheses that anaspids are ancestral skeletonizing lampreys, or a derived lineage of jawless vertebrates with paired fins, are rejected. © 2016 The Authors.

  8. Stress-free state of the red blood cell membrane and the deformation of its skeleton.

    PubMed

    Svelc, Tjaša; Svetina, Saša

    2012-06-01

    The response of a red blood cell (RBC) to deformation depends on its membrane, a composite of a lipid bilayer and a skeleton, which is a closed, two-dimensional network of spectrin tetramers as its bonds. The deformation of the skeleton and its lateral redistribution are studied in terms of the RBC resting state for a fixed geometry of the RBC, partially aspirated into a micropipette. The geometry of the RBC skeleton in its initial state is taken to be either two concentric circles, a references biconcave shape or a sphere. It is assumed that in its initial state the skeleton is distributed laterally in a homogeneous manner with its bonds either unstressed, presenting its stress-free state, or prestressed. The lateral distribution was calculated using a variational calculation. It was assumed that the spectrin tetramer bonds exhibit a linear elasticity. The results showed a significant effect of the initial skeleton geometry on its lateral distribution in the deformed state. The proposed model is used to analyze the measurements of skeleton extension ratios by the method of applying two modes of RBC micropipette aspiration.

  9. Topology adaptive vessel network skeleton extraction with novel medialness measuring function.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wen-Bo; Li, Bin; Tian, Lian-Fang; Li, Xiang-Xia; Chen, Qing-Lin

    2015-09-01

    Vessel tree skeleton extraction is widely applied in vascular structure segmentation, however, conventional approaches often suffer from the adjacent interferences and poor topological adaptability. To avoid these problems, a robust, topology adaptive tree-like structure skeleton extraction framework is proposed in this paper. Specifically, to avoid the adjacent interferences, a local message passing procedure called Gaussian affinity voting (GAV) is proposed to realize adaptive scale-growing of vessel voxels. Then the medialness measuring function (MMF) based on GAV, namely GAV-MMF, is constructed to extract medialness patterns robustly. In order to improve topological adaptability, a level-set graph embedded with GAV-MMF is employed to build initial curve skeletons without any user interaction. Furthermore, the GAV-MMF is embedded in stretching open active contours (SOAC) to drive the initial curves to the expected location, maintaining smoothness and continuity. In addition, to provide an accurate and smooth final skeleton tree topology, topological checks and skeleton network reconfiguration is proposed. The continuity and scalability of this method is validated experimentally on synthetic and clinical images for multi-scale vessels. Experimental results show that the proposed method achieves acceptable topological adaptability for skeleton extraction of vessel trees.

  10. Histology and affinity of anaspids, and the early evolution of the vertebrate dermal skeleton

    PubMed Central

    Keating, Joseph N.; Donoghue, Philip C. J.

    2016-01-01

    The assembly of the gnathostome bodyplan constitutes a formative episode in vertebrate evolutionary history, an interval in which the mineralized skeleton and its canonical suite of cell and tissue types originated. Fossil jawless fishes, assigned to the gnathostome stem-lineage, provide an unparalleled insight into the origin and evolution of the skeleton, hindered only by uncertainty over the phylogenetic position and evolutionary significance of key clades. Chief among these are the jawless anaspids, whose skeletal composition, a rich source of phylogenetic information, is poorly characterized. Here we survey the histology of representatives spanning anaspid diversity and infer their generalized skeletal architecture. The anaspid dermal skeleton is composed of odontodes comprising spheritic dentine and enameloid, overlying a basal layer of acellular parallel fibre bone containing an extensive shallow canal network. A recoded and revised phylogenetic analysis using equal and implied weights parsimony resolves anaspids as monophyletic, nested among stem-gnathostomes. Our results suggest the anaspid dermal skeleton is a degenerate derivative of a histologically more complex ancestral vertebrate skeleton, rather than reflecting primitive simplicity. Hypotheses that anaspids are ancestral skeletonizing lampreys, or a derived lineage of jawless vertebrates with paired fins, are rejected. PMID:26962140

  11. Evaluation of physiological FDG uptake in the skeleton in adults: is it uniformly distributed?

    PubMed

    Aras, Mustafa; Dede, Fuat; Ones, Tunc; Inanır, Sabahat; Erdıl, Tanju Yusuf; Turoglu, Halil Turgut

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to study whether FDG was uniformly distributed throughout the skeleton and whether age and gender affected this biodistribution. A total of 158 patients were included in this retrospective study. None of the patients had received prior treatment that had affected the bone marrow and patients with bone metastases, trauma, benign and/or malignant hematologic disorders were excluded from the study. The SUVmax from the 24 different locations in the skeleton was obtained and all the values were compared with each other. FDG uptake in the skeleton was not uniform in both sexes. While the highest FDG uptake was seen in the L3 vertebra, the lowest glucose metabolism was observed in the diaphysis of the femur. Concerning the vertebral column, FDG uptakes were also non-uniform and the SUVmax gradually increased from the cervix to the lumbar spine. The mean skeletal SUVmax was decreased in accordance with age in both genders. FDG was not uniformly distributed throughout the skeleton in both sexes. It had a tendency to increase from the appendicular to axial skeleton and from cervical to lumbar spine in the vertebral column that may be related with the normal distribution of the red bone marrow. Additionally, the glycolytic metabolism of the whole skeleton was gradually decreased in accordance with the age in both sexes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  12. Efficient curve-skeleton computation for the analysis of biomedical 3d images - biomed 2010.

    PubMed

    Brun, Francesco; Dreossi, Diego

    2010-01-01

    Advances in three dimensional (3D) biomedical imaging techniques, such as magnetic resonance (MR) and computed tomography (CT), make it easy to reconstruct high quality 3D models of portions of human body and other biological specimens. A major challenge lies in the quantitative analysis of the resulting models thus allowing a more comprehensive characterization of the object under investigation. An interesting approach is based on curve-skeleton (or medial axis) extraction, which gives basic information concerning the topology and the geometry. Curve-skeletons have been applied in the analysis of vascular networks and the diagnosis of tracheal stenoses as well as a 3D flight path in virtual endoscopy. However curve-skeleton computation is a crucial task. An effective skeletonization algorithm was introduced by N. Cornea in [1] but it lacks in computational performances. Thanks to the advances in imaging techniques the resolution of 3D images is increasing more and more, therefore there is the need for efficient algorithms in order to analyze significant Volumes of Interest (VOIs). In the present paper an improved skeletonization algorithm based on the idea proposed in [1] is presented. A computational comparison between the original and the proposed method is also reported. The obtained results show that the proposed method allows a significant computational improvement making more appealing the adoption of the skeleton representation in biomedical image analysis applications.

  13. Observations of the tissue-skeleton interface in the scleractinian coral Stylophora pistillata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tambutté, E.; Allemand, D.; Zoccola, D.; Meibom, A.; Lotto, S.; Caminiti, N.; Tambutté, S.

    2007-09-01

    Recent micro-analytical studies of coral skeletons have led to the discovery that the effects of biology on the skeletal chemical and isotopic composition are not uniform over the skeleton. The aim of the present work was to provide histological observations of the coral tissue at the interface with the skeleton, using Stylophora pistillata as a model, and to discuss these observations in the context of skeletal ultra-structural organization and composition. Several important observations are reported: (1) At all scales of observation, there was a precise morphological correspondence between the tissues and the skeleton. The morphological features of the calicoblastic ectoderm correspond exactly to the shape of individual crystal fiber bundles in the underlying skeleton, indicating that the calicoblastic cell layer is in direct physical contact with the skeletal surface. This is consistent with the previously observed chemical and isotopic composition of the ultra-structural components in the skeleton. (2) The distribution and density of desmocyte cells, which anchor the calicoblastic ectoderm to the skeletal surface, vary spatially and temporally during skeletal growth. (3) The tissue above the coenosteal spines lack endoderm and consists only of ectodermal cell-layers separated by mesoglea. These findings have important implications for models of vital effects in coral skeletal chemistry and isotope composition.

  14. 26 CFR 1.401(a)(4)-0 - Table of contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Table of contents. 1.401(a)(4)-0 Section 1.401(a)(4)-0 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.401(a)(4)-0 Table of contents. This section contains a listing of...

  15. Determining the Technical Standards of Ping Pong Table by Using Close Range Photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acar, U.; Bayram, B.; Cetin, H. I.; Sanlı, F. B.

    2012-07-01

    In the presented study, quality measurements were made regarding three different ping pong tables that were produced with three different materials. Measurements were made on the purpose of confirming whether the tables can be used as a match table that is in the standard of International Table Tennis Federation or not. For this confirmation, bouncing height of the table tennis ball is measured which is approved by ITTF. Average bouncing height that is required by federation standards is minimum 23 cm for free falling table tennis ball from 30 cm. In order to locate the bounce on the tables, the table tennis ball is released from 30cm in free fall with equipment was. In the meantime, 24 video frames videos were shot with a Full HD (1920 × 1080) camera. Each frame of videos that were taken is separated from each other. Each frame is analyzed and highest bounce is measured. As a result of the study, the bouncing heights of the three tables were measured as 23.04 cm, 23.33 cm, 22.91 cm for table1, for table2 and for table3 respectively.

  16. Aerogels with 3D ordered nanofiber skeletons of liquid-crystalline nanocellulose derivatives as tough and transparent insulators.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yuri; Saito, Tsuguyuki; Isogai, Akira

    2014-09-22

    Aerogels of high porosity and with a large internal surface area exhibit outstanding performances as thermal, acoustic, or electrical insulators. However, most aerogels are mechanically brittle and optically opaque, and the structural and physical properties of aerogels strongly depend on their densities. The unfavorable characteristics of aerogels are intrinsic to their skeletal structures consisting of randomly interconnected spherical nanoparticles. A structurally new type of aerogel with a three-dimensionally ordered nanofiber skeleton of liquid-crystalline nanocellulose (LC-NCell) is now reported. This LC-NCell material is composed of mechanically strong, surface-carboxylated cellulose nanofibers dispersed in a nematic LC order. The LC-NCell aerogels are transparent and combine mechanical toughness and good insulation properties. These properties of the LC-NCell aerogels could also be readily controlled. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Recent Advances in Imaging of the Axial Skeleton in Spondyloarthritis for Diagnosis, Assessment of Treatment Effect, and Prognostication.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Susanne Juhl; Maksymowych, Walter P

    2015-09-01

    In the last few years, many studies have investigated the role of imaging for improved diagnosis, assessment of treatment effects, and determining prognosis in patients with axial spondyloarthritis (SpA). Recent research has primarily focused on the utility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for improved diagnosis of patients with non-radiographic axial SpA, and in particular on the classification utility of the MRI criteria as defined by the Assessment of Spondyloarthritis International Society (ASAS). New and more sensitive methods for evaluation of MRI of the sacroiliac joints have been developed and have provided insight into effects of treatment on structural progression and the interrelationships between different lesions visualized by MRI. This review gives an overview of the recent advances in imaging of the axial skeleton in axial SpA from a clinical perspective.

  18. Information tables with neighborhood semantics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yiyu

    2000-04-01

    Information tables provide a convenient and useful tool for representing a set of objects using a group of attributes. This notion is enriched by introducing neighborhood systems on attribute values. The neighborhood systems represent the semantics relationships between, and knowledge about, attribute values. With added semantics, neighborhood based information tables may provide a more general framework for knowledge discovery, data mining, and information retrieval.

  19. Volume tables for red alder.

    Treesearch

    Floyd A. Johnson; R. M. Kallander; Paul G. Lauterbach

    1949-01-01

    The increasing importance of red alder as a commercial species in the Pacific Northwest has prompted the three agencies listed above to pool their tree measurement data for the construction of standard regional red alder volume tables. The tables included here were based on trees from a variety of sites and form classes. Approximately one quarter of the total number of...

  20. Constructing aerial photo volume tables.

    Treesearch

    Robert B. Pope

    1962-01-01

    Although most foresters are familiar with the use of aerial photo volume tables, little has been written on how to make them. Certain pitfalls in the construction process have either been ignored or only casually mentioned in the existing literature. The forester tackling his first photo volume table is likely to bypass some of the important considerations without...