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Sample records for international study group

  1. International Study Tour Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Reilly, Frances L.; Matt, John J.; McCaw, William P.; Kero, Patty; Stewart, Courtney; Haddouch, Reda

    2014-01-01

    Using the context of international study tour groups, this study examined the personal and professional transformation that occurred among host faculty and staff at The University of Montana-Missoula as a result of their interactions with traveling academics from other countries. Data were collected from participant responses (n = 27) using a…

  2. International Study Group Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Raubenheimer, Tor O

    2000-07-18

    The focus of the ISG work was on advancing the accelerator design and supporting technologies. This is a complex process which involves a close interaction between theoretical analysis of the collider design and R and D progress on hardware components. The sequence of efforts took place roughly in the following order: (1) Optimization of the collider parameters and definition of system and subsystem requirements, (2) Identification of design strategies and options, and (3) Development of specific technologies to achieve these requirements. Development and testing of the required components, and R and D on manufacturing techniques have been important activities of the ISG. Experiments at the major test facilities such as the ATF at KEK and ASSET at SLAC have also played a significant role in the ISG studies.

  3. International scoping study: accelerator working group report

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, Michael; Zisman, M.S.

    2006-09-30

    During the past several years, an International Scoping Study (ISS) of a Neutrino Factory was carried out, with the aim of developing an internationally accepted baseline facility design. Progress toward that goal will be described. Many of the key technical aspects of a Neutrino Factory facility design are presently being investigated experimentally, and the status of these investigations will be mentioned. Plans for the recently launched International Design Study (IDS), which serves as a follow-on to the ISS, will be briefly described.

  4. International Pediatric MS Study Group Clinical Trials Summit: meeting report.

    PubMed

    Chitnis, Tanuja; Tardieu, Marc; Amato, Maria Pia; Banwell, Brenda; Bar-Or, Amit; Ghezzi, Angelo; Kornberg, Andrew; Krupp, Lauren B; Pohl, Daniela; Rostasy, Kevin; Tenembaum, Silvia; Waubant, Emmanuelle; Wassmer, Evangeline

    2013-03-19

    Pediatric studies for new biological agents are mandated by recent legislation, necessitating careful thought to evaluation of emerging multiple sclerosis (MS) therapies in children with MS. Challenges include a small patient population, the lack of prior randomized clinical trials, and ethical concerns. The goal of this meeting was to assess areas of consensus regarding clinical trial design and outcome measures among academic experts involved in pediatric MS care and research. The Steering Committee of the International Pediatric MS Study Group identified key focus areas for discussion. A total of 69 meeting attendees were assembled, including 35 academic experts. Regulatory and pharmaceutical representatives also attended, and provided input, which informed academic expert consensus decisions. The academic experts agreed that clinical trials were necessary in pediatric MS to obtain pharmacokinetic, safety and efficacy data, and regulatory approval allowing for greater medication access. The academic experts agreed that relapse was an appropriate primary outcome measure for phase III pediatric trials. An international standardized cognitive battery was identified. The pros and cons of various trial designs were discussed. Guidelines surrounding MRI studies, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and registries were developed. The academic experts agreed that given the limited subject pool, a stepwise approach to the launch of clinical trials for the most promising medications is necessary in order to ensure study completion. Alternative approaches could result in unethical exposure of patients to trial conditions without gaining knowledge. Consensus points for conduct of clinical trials in the rare disease pediatric MS were identified amongst a panel of academic experts, informed by regulatory and industry stakeholders.

  5. International Pediatric MS Study Group Clinical Trials Summit

    PubMed Central

    Tardieu, Marc; Amato, Maria Pia; Banwell, Brenda; Bar-Or, Amit; Ghezzi, Angelo; Kornberg, Andrew; Krupp, Lauren B.; Pohl, Daniela; Rostasy, Kevin; Tenembaum, Silvia; Waubant, Emmanuelle; Wassmer, Evangeline

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Pediatric studies for new biological agents are mandated by recent legislation, necessitating careful thought to evaluation of emerging multiple sclerosis (MS) therapies in children with MS. Challenges include a small patient population, the lack of prior randomized clinical trials, and ethical concerns. The goal of this meeting was to assess areas of consensus regarding clinical trial design and outcome measures among academic experts involved in pediatric MS care and research. Methods: The Steering Committee of the International Pediatric MS Study Group identified key focus areas for discussion. A total of 69 meeting attendees were assembled, including 35 academic experts. Regulatory and pharmaceutical representatives also attended, and provided input, which informed academic expert consensus decisions. Results: The academic experts agreed that clinical trials were necessary in pediatric MS to obtain pharmacokinetic, safety and efficacy data, and regulatory approval allowing for greater medication access. The academic experts agreed that relapse was an appropriate primary outcome measure for phase III pediatric trials. An international standardized cognitive battery was identified. The pros and cons of various trial designs were discussed. Guidelines surrounding MRI studies, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and registries were developed. The academic experts agreed that given the limited subject pool, a stepwise approach to the launch of clinical trials for the most promising medications is necessary in order to ensure study completion. Alternative approaches could result in unethical exposure of patients to trial conditions without gaining knowledge. Conclusion: Consensus points for conduct of clinical trials in the rare disease pediatric MS were identified amongst a panel of academic experts, informed by regulatory and industry stakeholders. PMID:23509048

  6. International Pediatric MS Study Group Global Members Symposium report.

    PubMed

    Wassmer, Evangeline; Chitnis, Tanuja; Pohl, Daniela; Amato, Maria Pia; Banwell, Brenda; Ghezzi, Angelo; Hintzen, Rogier Q; Krupp, Lauren B; Makhani, Naila; Rostásy, Kevin; Tardieu, Marc; Tenembaum, Silvia; Waldman, Amy; Waubant, Emmanuelle; Kornberg, Andrew J

    2016-08-30

    The International Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis Study Group held its inaugural educational program, "The World of Pediatric MS: A Global Update," in September 2014 to discuss advances and challenges in the diagnosis and management of pediatric multiple sclerosis (MS) and other neuroinflammatory CNS disorders. Highlights included a discussion on the revised diagnostic criteria, which enable the differentiation of MS, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, neuromyelitis optica, and other neuroinflammatory disorders. While these criteria currently identify clinical and MRI features for a particular diagnosis, advances in biomarkers may prove to be useful in the future. An update was also provided on environmental factors associated with pediatric MS risk and possibly outcomes, notably vitamin D deficiency. However, optimal vitamin D intake and its role in altering MS course in children have yet to be established. Regarding MS outcomes, our understanding of the cognitive consequences of early-onset MS has grown. However, further work is needed to define the course of cognitive function and its long-term outcome in diverse patient samples and to develop strategies for effective cognitive rehabilitation specifically tailored to children and adolescents. Finally, treatment strategies were discussed, including a need to consider additional drug treatment options and paradigms (escalation vs induction), although treatment should be tailored to the individual child. Of critical importance, clinical trials of newer MS agents in children are required. Although our understanding of childhood MS has improved, further research is needed to have a positive impact for children and their families.

  7. International Multicenter Study of Head Injury in Children. ISHIP Group.

    PubMed

    Murgio, A; Andrade, F A; Sanchez Muñoz, M A; Boetto, S; Leung, K M

    1999-07-01

    With the object of evaluating different epidemiological factors in the acute phase of head injury (HI) in the pediatric age group in five countries (Argentina, Brazil, France, Hong-Kong and Spain), we carried out a prospective and descriptive study, in which we analyzed the clinical and radiological risk factors versus management and outcome 7-30 days after trauma. We included all children seen in the emergency department and hospitalized who were aged between 0 and 15 years and had sustained HI. Data were compiled from the clinical records and analyzed for neurological evaluation with the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) and the Glasgow Paediatric Coma Score (GPCS), and also by means of dynamics, symptoms, skull X-rays, CT scans. The total of 2478 patients enrolled in the study was made up of 60.9% boys and 39.1 % girls. Age distribution was as follows: 55.2% aged 0-4 years; 28.3% aged 5-9 years, and 16.4% aged 10-15 years. Most (75.3%, or 1768) of these patients completed follow-up. The total sample included 1058 children (42.7%) who required hospitalization. Skull fractures were identified in 11.8% (298) of the cases, and 6.4% (158) of CT scans were pathologic. Minor HI accounted for 56.4% of these children, moderate HI for 38.9%, and severe HI for the remaining 4.7%. The lethality rate was 1.6%. Our preliminary data reveal that it is very important for new guidelines on the treatment of minor HI to be prepared, because patients with minor HI had undergone the most skull X-rays and also most frequently been admitted to hospital for unnecessarily long periods of time, though the incidence of brain damage (1.6%) was lowest in this group of the study population. We intend to carry out a full analysis of the various risk factors at the end of the study.

  8. Increasing International and Domestic Student Interaction through Group Work: A Case Study from the Humanities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cruickshank, Ken; Chen, Honglin; Warren, Stan

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the use of group work strategies to increase student interaction and learning. Despite the growing linguistic and cultural diversity in tertiary institutions, there is strong evidence of minimal interaction between "domestic" and "international" students in classrooms and in wider university contexts. This study investigates…

  9. Forming and activating an internal facilitation group for successful implementation: A qualitative study.

    PubMed

    McCullough, Megan B; Gillespie, Chris; Petrakis, Beth Ann; Jones, Ellen A; Park, Angela M; Lukas, Carol VanDeusen; Rose, Adam J

    detailing how internal facilitators learn their skills over time, and how a group of internal facilitators can help each other succeed. These findings can guide those who wish to incorporate internal facilitation teams as an implementation strategy, and demonstrate how sites can build capacity for implementation efforts. This study focuses on an implementation facilitation strategy to improve the delivery of anticoagulation care within pharmacy-run clinics across 8 Veterans Health Administration medical centers. Internal facilitators (IFs) guided by and supported by an external facilitators (EF), successfully implemented the clinical innovation. This study examines how the IF group became instrumental in the successful implementation of evidence-based practice change. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. The international epidemiology of disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex infection in AIDS. International MAC Study Group.

    PubMed

    Fordham von Reyn, C; Arbeit, R D; Tosteson, A N; Ristola, M A; Barber, T W; Waddell, R; Sox, C H; Brindle, R J; Gilks, C F; Ranki, A; Bartholomew, C; Edwards, J; Falkinham, J O; O'Connor, G T

    1996-08-01

    To determine rates of disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection among AIDS patients in developed and developing countries, and to determine whether different rates reflect differences in exposure or immunity, or both. Prospective cohort study. University hospitals and outpatient AIDS programs. HIV-infected subjects with CD4 counts < 200 x 10(6)/l were interviewed and had CD4 lymphocyte counts, blood cultures for mycobacteria (baseline and at 6 months), and skin tests with purified protein derivative (PPD) and M. avium sensitin. Among 566 study patients rates of disseminated MAC were 10.5-21.6% in New Hampshire, Boston and Finland compared to 2.4-2.6% in Trinidad and Kenya (P < 0.001). PPD skin test reactions > or = 5 mm were present in 20% of patients from Kenya compared to 1% at other sites (P < 0.001). Among patients from the United States and Finland, multiple logistic regression indicated that occupational exposure to soil and water was associated with a decreased risk of disseminated MAC, whereas the following were associated with an increased risk of disseminated MAC: low CD4 count, swimming in an indoor pool, history of bronchoscopy, regular consumption of raw or partially cooked fish/shellfish and treatment with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor. Rates of disseminated MAC in AIDS are higher in developed than developing countries and are due to both differences in exposure and differences in immunity. These data provide a rationale for prevention of MAC through both active immunization and reduction in exposure to the organism.

  11. Correlative Studies in Clinical Trials: A Position Statement From the International Thyroid Oncology Group

    PubMed Central

    Bible, Keith C.; Cote, Gilbert J.; Demeure, Michael J.; Elisei, Rossella; Jhiang, Sissy

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Patients with progressive thyroid cancer in distant metastatic sites represent a population with a need for new therapeutic options. Aspiring to improve the treatment of such patients, the objective of this position statement from the International Thyroid Oncology Group (ITOG) is to clarify the importance of incorporating high-quality correlative studies into clinical trials. Participants: ITOG was formed to develop and support high-quality multicenter and multidisciplinary clinical trials for patients with aggressive forms of thyroid cancer. The Correlative Sciences Committee of the ITOG focuses on the quality and types of correlative studies included in ITOG-associated clinical trials. Evidence: This document represents expert consensus from ITOG regarding this issue based on extensive collective experience in clinical and translational trials informed by basic science. Consensus Process: The Correlative Studies Committee identified an international writing group representative of diverse specialties, including basic sciences. Drafts were reviewed by all members of the writing group, the larger committee, and the ITOG board. After consideration of all comments by the writing group and modification of the document, the final document was then approved by the authors and the ITOG board. Conclusions: High-quality correlative studies, which include variety in the types of correlates, should be intrinsic to the design of thyroid cancer clinical trials to offer the best opportunity for each study to advance treatment for patients with advanced and progressive thyroid cancer. PMID:26418285

  12. Translation and validation of International Restless Leg Syndrome Study Group rating scale in Hindi language

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ravi; Lahan, Vivekananda; Goel, Deepak

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study is to translate and validate the International Restless Leg Syndrome Study Group rating scale (IRLS) in Hindi language. Materials and Methods: Thirty one consecutive patients diagnosed of Restless Leg Syndrome (RLS) were included in the study. Control group comprised of 31 subjects not having any symptom of RLS. The scale was procured from MAPI research trust; and, permission for the translation was sought. The translation was done according to the guidelines provided by the publisher. After translation, final version of the scale was applied in both the groups to find out the reliability and clinical validity. Results: RLS group had a predominance of females, and they were younger than the male counterparts (Age=36.80 ± 10.46 years vs 45.18 ± 8.34 years; t=2.28; P=0.03). There was no difference in the mean age between groups (RLS=39.77 ± 10.44 years vs Non RLS=38.29 ± 11.29 years; t=-0.53; P=0.59). IRLS scores were significantly different between both groups on all items (P<0.001). Translated version showed high reliability (Cronbach's alpha=0.86). IRLS scores were significantly different between both groups on all items (P<0.001). Conclusion: Hindi version of IRLS is reliable and a clinically valid tool that can be applied in Hindi speaking population. PMID:22346013

  13. Translation and validation of International Restless Leg Syndrome Study Group rating scale in Hindi language.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ravi; Lahan, Vivekananda; Goel, Deepak

    2011-10-01

    The objective of this study is to translate and validate the International Restless Leg Syndrome Study Group rating scale (IRLS) in Hindi language. Thirty one consecutive patients diagnosed of Restless Leg Syndrome (RLS) were included in the study. Control group comprised of 31 subjects not having any symptom of RLS. The scale was procured from MAPI research trust; and, permission for the translation was sought. The translation was done according to the guidelines provided by the publisher. After translation, final version of the scale was applied in both the groups to find out the reliability and clinical validity. RLS group had a predominance of females, and they were younger than the male counterparts (Age=36.80 ± 10.46 years vs 45.18 ± 8.34 years; t=2.28; P=0.03). There was no difference in the mean age between groups (RLS=39.77 ± 10.44 years vs Non RLS=38.29 ± 11.29 years; t=-0.53; P=0.59). IRLS scores were significantly different between both groups on all items (P<0.001). Translated version showed high reliability (Cronbach's alpha=0.86). IRLS scores were significantly different between both groups on all items (P<0.001). Hindi version of IRLS is reliable and a clinically valid tool that can be applied in Hindi speaking population.

  14. Microwave Study of a Hydrogen-Transfer Methyl-Group Internal Rotation in 5-METHYLTROPOLONE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilyushin, Vadim V.; Cloessner, Emily A.; Chou, Yung-Ching; Picraux, Laura B.; Hougen, Jon T.; Lavrich, Richard

    2010-06-01

    We present here the first experimental and theoretical study of the microwave spectrum of 5-methyltropolone, which can be visualized as a 7-membered "aromatic" carbon ring with a five-membered hydrogen-bonded cyclic structure at the top and a methyl group at the bottom. The molecule exhibits two large-amplitude motions, an intramolecular hydrogen transfer and a methyl torsion. The former motion is particularly interesting because transfer of the hydrogen atom from the hydroxyl to the carbonyl group induces a tautomerization in the molecule, which then triggers a 60° internal rotation of the methyl group. Measurements were carried out by Fourier-transform microwave spectroscopy in the 8 to 24 GHz frequency range. Theoretical analysis was carried out using a tunneling-rotational Hamiltonian based on a G12^m extended-group-theory formalism. Our global fit of 1015 transitions to 20 molecular parameters gave a root-mean-square deviation of 1.5 kHz. The tunneling splitting of the two J = 0 levels arising from a hypothetical pure hydrogen transfer motion is calculated to be 1310 MHz. The tunneling splitting of the two J = 0 levels arising from a hypothetical pure methyl-top internal rotation motion is calculated to be 885 MHz. Some theoretical difficulties in interpreting the low-order tunneling parameters in this and the related molecule 2-methylmalonaldehyde will be discussed.

  15. A focus group study of chiropractic students following international service learning experiences

    PubMed Central

    Boysen, James C.; Salsbury, Stacie A.; Derby, Dustin; Lawrence, Dana J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: One objective of chiropractic education is to cultivate clinical confidence in novice practitioners. The purpose of this qualitative study was to describe how participation in a short-term international service learning experience changed perceptions of clinical confidence in senior chiropractic students. Methods: Seventeen senior chiropractic students participated in 4 moderated focus group sessions within 4 months after a clinical educational opportunity held in international settings. Participants answered standard questions on how this educational experience may have changed their clinical confidence. Two investigators performed qualitative thematic analysis of the verbatim transcripts to identify core concepts and supporting themes. Results: The core concept was transformation from an unsure student to a confident doctor. The service learning experience allowed students to deliver chiropractic treatment to patients in a real-world setting, engage in frequent repetitions of technical skills, perform clinical decision-making and care coordination, and communicate with patients and other health professionals. Students described increased clinical confidence in 9 competency areas organized within 3 domains: (1) chiropractic competencies including observation, palpation, and manipulation; (2) clinical competencies including problem solving, clinic flow, and decision-making; and (3) communication competencies, including patient communication, interprofessional communication, and doctor–patient relationship. Students recommended that future service learning programs include debriefing sessions similar to the experience offered by these focus groups to enhance student learning. Conclusion: Senior chiropractic students who participated in an international service learning program gained confidence and valuable practical experience in integrating their chiropractic, clinical, and communication skills for their future practices. PMID:27258817

  16. A focus group study of chiropractic students following international service learning experiences.

    PubMed

    Boysen, James C; Salsbury, Stacie A; Derby, Dustin; Lawrence, Dana J

    2016-10-01

    One objective of chiropractic education is to cultivate clinical confidence in novice practitioners. The purpose of this qualitative study was to describe how participation in a short-term international service learning experience changed perceptions of clinical confidence in senior chiropractic students. Seventeen senior chiropractic students participated in 4 moderated focus group sessions within 4 months after a clinical educational opportunity held in international settings. Participants answered standard questions on how this educational experience may have changed their clinical confidence. Two investigators performed qualitative thematic analysis of the verbatim transcripts to identify core concepts and supporting themes. The core concept was transformation from an unsure student to a confident doctor. The service learning experience allowed students to deliver chiropractic treatment to patients in a real-world setting, engage in frequent repetitions of technical skills, perform clinical decision-making and care coordination, and communicate with patients and other health professionals. Students described increased clinical confidence in 9 competency areas organized within 3 domains: (1) chiropractic competencies including observation, palpation, and manipulation; (2) clinical competencies including problem solving, clinic flow, and decision-making; and (3) communication competencies, including patient communication, interprofessional communication, and doctor-patient relationship. Students recommended that future service learning programs include debriefing sessions similar to the experience offered by these focus groups to enhance student learning. Senior chiropractic students who participated in an international service learning program gained confidence and valuable practical experience in integrating their chiropractic, clinical, and communication skills for their future practices.

  17. Prognostic value of Helix pomatia in breast cancer. International (Ludwig) Breast Cancer Study Group.

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Six hundred and eighty-four primary breast cancers from the International (Ludwig) Breast Cancer Study Group (IBCSG) were studied for Helix pomatia lectin (HPA) binding. There was a weak correlation between lymph node-positive and HPA positive (P = 0.04). In our series there was a large advantage in disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) for node-negative patients (P < 0.0001 DFS and OS). However, there was no such advantage for HPA-negative patients (P = 0.23 DFS and P = 0.32 OS). We conclude that in this randomised patient group HPA is of no clinical predictive value. Images Figure 1 PMID:8318406

  18. Posthepatectomy liver failure: a definition and grading by the International Study Group of Liver Surgery (ISGLS).

    PubMed

    Rahbari, Nuh N; Garden, O James; Padbury, Robert; Brooke-Smith, Mark; Crawford, Michael; Adam, Rene; Koch, Moritz; Makuuchi, Masatoshi; Dematteo, Ronald P; Christophi, Christopher; Banting, Simon; Usatoff, Val; Nagino, Masato; Maddern, Guy; Hugh, Thomas J; Vauthey, Jean-Nicolas; Greig, Paul; Rees, Myrddin; Yokoyama, Yukihiro; Fan, Sheung Tat; Nimura, Yuji; Figueras, Joan; Capussotti, Lorenzo; Büchler, Markus W; Weitz, Jürgen

    2011-05-01

    Posthepatectomy liver failure is a feared complication after hepatic resection and a major cause of perioperative mortality. There is currently no standardized definition of posthepatectomy liver failure that allows valid comparison of results from different studies and institutions. The aim of the current article was to propose a definition and grading of severity of posthepatectomy liver failure. A literature search on posthepatectomy liver failure after hepatic resection was conducted. Based on the normal course of biochemical liver function tests after hepatic resection, a simple and easily applicable definition of posthepatectomy liver failure was developed by the International Study Group of Liver Surgery. Furthermore, a grading of severity is proposed based on the impact on patients' clinical management. No uniform definition of posthepatectomy liver failure has been established in the literature addressing hepatic surgery. Considering the normal postoperative course of serum bilirubin concentration and International Normalized Ratio, we propose defining posthepatectomy liver failure as the impaired ability of the liver to maintain its synthetic, excretory, and detoxifying functions, which are characterized by an increased international normalized ratio and concomitant hyperbilirubinemia (according to the normal limits of the local laboratory) on or after postoperative day 5. The severity of posthepatectomy liver failure should be graded based on its impact on clinical management. Grade A posthepatectomy liver failure requires no change of the patient's clinical management. The clinical management of patients with grade B posthepatectomy liver failure deviates from the regular course but does not require invasive therapy. The need for invasive treatment defines grade C posthepatectomy liver failure. The current definition of posthepatectomy liver failure is simple and easily applicable in clinical routine. This definition can be used in future studies to

  19. Beyond "cirrhosis": a proposal from the International Liver Pathology Study Group.

    PubMed

    Hytiroglou, Prodromos; Snover, Dale C; Alves, Venancio; Balabaud, Charles; Bhathal, Prithi S; Bioulac-Sage, Paulette; Crawford, James M; Dhillon, Amar P; Ferrell, Linda; Guido, Maria; Nakanuma, Yasuni; Paradis, Valerie; Quaglia, Alberto; Theise, Neil D; Thung, Swan N; Tsui, Wilson M S; van Leeuwen, Dirk J

    2012-01-01

    "Cirrhosis" is a morphologic term that has been used for almost 200 years to denote the end stage of a variety of chronic liver diseases. The term implies a condition with adverse prognosis due to the well-known complications of portal hypertension, hepatocellular carcinoma, and liver failure. However, recent advances in the diagnosis and treatment of chronic liver diseases have changed the natural history of cirrhosis significantly. This consensus document by the International Liver Pathology Study Group challenges the usefulness of the word cirrhosis in modern medicine and suggests that this is an appropriate time to consider discontinuing the use of this term. The role of pathologists should evolve to the diagnosis of advanced stage of chronic liver disease, with emphasis on etiology, grade of activity, features suggestive of progression or regression, presence of other diseases, and risk factors for malignancy, within the perspective of an integrated clinicopathologic assessment.

  20. Recommendations for reporting economic evaluations of haemophilia prophylaxis: a nominal groups consensus statement on behalf of the Economics Expert Working Group of The International Prophylaxis Study Group.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, A; Berger, K; Bohn, R; Carcao, M; Fischer, K; Gringeri, A; Hoots, K; Mantovani, L; Schramm, W; van Hout, B A; Willan, A R; Feldman, B M

    2008-01-01

    The need for clearly reported studies evaluating the cost of prophylaxis and its overall outcomes has been recommended from previous literature. To establish minimal ''core standards'' that can be followed when conducting and reporting economic evaluations of hemophilia prophylaxis. Ten members of the IPSG Economic Analysis Working Group participated in a consensus process using the Nominal Groups Technique (NGT). The following topics relating to the economic analysis of prophylaxis studies were addressed; Whose perspective should be taken? Which is the best methodological approach? Is micro- or macro-costing the best costing strategy? What information must be presented about costs and outcomes in order to facilitate local and international interpretation? The group suggests studies on the economic impact of prophylaxis should be viewed from a societal perspective and be reported using a Cost Utility Analysis (CUA) (with consideration of also reporting Cost Benefit Analysis [CBA]). All costs that exceed $500 should be used to measure the costs of prophylaxis (macro strategy) including items such as clotting factor costs, hospitalizations, surgical procedures, productivity loss and number of days lost from school or work. Generic and disease specific quality of lífe and utility measures should be used to report the outcomes of the study. The IPSG has suggested minimal core standards to be applied to the reporting of economic evaluations of hemophilia prophylaxis. Standardized reporting will facilitate the comparison of studies and will allow for more rational policy decisions and treatment choices.

  1. Stroke in Children With Cardiac Disease: Report From the International Pediatric Stroke Study Group Symposium

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, Adriane J.; Fox, Christine K.; Ichord, Rebecca N.; Almond, Christopher S.; Bernard, Timothy J.; Beslow, Lauren A.; Chan, Anthony K.C.; Cheung, Michael; deVeber, Gabrielle; Dowling, Michael M.; Friedman, Neil; Giglia, Therese M.; Guilliams, Kristin P.; Humpl, Tilman; Licht, Daniel J.; Mackay, Mark T.; Jordan, Lori C.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cardiac disease is a leading cause of stroke in children, yet limited data support the current stroke prevention and treatment recommendations. A multidisciplinary panel of clinicians was convened in February 2014 by the International Pediatric Stroke Study group to identify knowledge gaps and prioritize clinical research efforts for children with cardiac disease and stroke. RESULTS Significant knowledge gaps exist, including a lack of data on stroke incidence, predictors, primary and secondary stroke prevention, hyperacute treatment, and outcome in children with cardiac disease. Commonly used diagnostic techniques including brain computed tomography and ultrasound have low rates of stroke detection, and diagnosis is frequently delayed. The challenges of research studies in this population include epidemiologic barriers to research such as small patient numbers, heterogeneity of cardiac disease, and coexistence of multiple risk factors. Based on stroke burden and study feasibility, studies involving mechanical circulatory support, single ventricle patients, early stroke detection strategies, and understanding secondary stroke risk factors and prevention are the highest research priorities over the next 5-10 years. The development of large-scale multicenter and multispecialty collaborative research is a critical next step. The designation of centers of expertise will assist in clinical care and research. CONCLUSIONS There is an urgent need for additional research to improve the quality of evidence in guideline recommendations for cardiogenic stroke in children. Although significant barriers to clinical research exist, multicenter and multispecialty collaboration is an important step toward advancing clinical care and research for children with cardiac disease and stroke. PMID:25532775

  2. An international investigation into O red blood cell unit administration in hospitals: the GRoup O Utilization Patterns (GROUP) study.

    PubMed

    Zeller, Michelle P; Barty, Rebecca; Aandahl, Astrid; Apelseth, Torunn O; Callum, Jeannie; Dunbar, Nancy M; Elahie, Allahna; Garritsen, Henk; Hancock, Helen; Kutner, José Mauro; Manukian, Belinda; Mizuta, Shuichi; Okuda, Makoto; Pagano, Monica B; Pogłód, Ryszard; Rushford, Kylie; Selleng, Kathleen; Sørensen, Claess Henning; Sprogøe, Ulrik; Staves, Julie; Weiland, Thorsten; Wendel, Silvano; Wood, Erica M; van de Watering, Leo; van Wordragen-Vlaswinkel, Maria; Ziman, Alyssa; Jan Zwaginga, Jaap; Murphy, Michael F; Heddle, Nancy M; Yazer, Mark H

    2017-10-01

    Transfusion of group O blood to non-O recipients, or transfusion of D- blood to D+ recipients, can result in shortages of group O or D- blood, respectively. This study investigated RBC utilization patterns at hospitals around the world and explored the context and policies that guide ABO blood group and D type selection practices. This was a retrospective study on transfusion data from the 2013 calendar year. This study included a survey component that asked about hospital RBC selection and transfusion practices and a data collection component where participants submitted information on RBC unit disposition including blood group and D type of unit and recipient. Units administered to recipients of unknown ABO or D group were excluded. Thirty-eight hospitals in 11 countries responded to the survey, 30 of which provided specific RBC unit disposition data. Overall, 11.1% (21,235/191,397) of group O units were transfused to non-O recipients; 22.6% (8777/38,911) of group O D- RBC units were transfused to O D+ recipients, and 43.2% (16,800/38,911) of group O D- RBC units were transfused to recipients that were not group O D-. Disposition of units and hospital transfusion policy varied within and across hospitals of different sizes, with transfusion of group O D- units to non-group O D- patients ranging from 0% to 33%. A significant proportion of group O and D- RBC units were transfused to compatible, nonidentical recipients, although the frequency of this practice varied across sites. © 2017 AABB.

  3. 75 FR 22674 - U.S. Department of State Advisory Committee on Private International Law Study Group Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF STATE U.S. Department of State Advisory Committee on Private International Law Study Group Notice of Meeting on the United Nations Commission on International Trade Law (UNCITRAL) Draft Legislative Guide on...

  4. 75 FR 32834 - U.S. Department of State Advisory Committee on Private International Law Study Group Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE U.S. Department of State Advisory Committee on Private International Law Study Group Notice of Meeting on the United Nations Commission on International Trade Law (UNCITRAL) Draft Legislative Guide on...

  5. Borderline resectable pancreatic cancer: a consensus statement by the International Study Group of Pancreatic Surgery (ISGPS).

    PubMed

    Bockhorn, Maximilian; Uzunoglu, Faik G; Adham, Mustapha; Imrie, Clem; Milicevic, Miroslav; Sandberg, Aken A; Asbun, Horacio J; Bassi, Claudio; Büchler, Markus; Charnley, Richard M; Conlon, Kevin; Cruz, Laureano Fernandez; Dervenis, Christos; Fingerhutt, Abe; Friess, Helmut; Gouma, Dirk J; Hartwig, Werner; Lillemoe, Keith D; Montorsi, Marco; Neoptolemos, John P; Shrikhande, Shailesh V; Takaori, Kyoichi; Traverso, William; Vashist, Yogesh K; Vollmer, Charles; Yeo, Charles J; Izbicki, Jakob R

    2014-06-01

    This position statement was developed to expedite a consensus on definition and treatment for borderline resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (BRPC) that would have worldwide acceptability. An international panel of pancreatic surgeons from well-established, high-volume centers collaborated on a literature review and development of consensus on issues related to borderline resectable pancreatic cancer. The International Study Group of Pancreatic Surgery (ISGPS) supports the National Comprehensive Cancer Network criteria for the definition of BRPC. Current evidence supports operative exploration and resection in the case of involvement of the mesentericoportal venous axis; in addition, a new classification of extrahepatic mesentericoportal venous resections is proposed by the ISGPS. Suspicion of arterial involvement should lead to exploration to confirm the imaging-based findings. Formal arterial resections are not recommended; however, in exceptional circumstances, individual therapeutic approaches may be evaluated under experimental protocols. The ISGPS endorses the recommendations for specimen examination and the definition of an R1 resection (tumor within 1 mm from the margin) used by the British Royal College of Pathologists. Standard preoperative diagnostics for BRPC may include: (1) serum levels of CA19-9, because CA19-9 levels predict survival in large retrospective series; and also (2) the modified Glasgow Prognostic Score and the neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio because of the prognostic relevance of the systemic inflammatory response. Various regimens of neoadjuvant therapy are recommended only in the setting of prospective trials at high-volume centers. Current evidence justifies portomesenteric venous resection in patients with BRPC. Basic definitions were identified, that are currently lacking but that are needed to obtain further evidence and improvement for this important patient subgroup. A consensus for each topic is given. Copyright © 2014

  6. Pediatric restless legs syndrome diagnostic criteria: an update by the International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group.

    PubMed

    Picchietti, Daniel L; Bruni, Oliviero; de Weerd, Al; Durmer, Jeffrey S; Kotagal, Suresh; Owens, Judith A; Simakajornboon, Narong

    2013-12-01

    Specific diagnostic criteria for pediatric restless legs syndrome (RLS) were published in 2003 following a workshop at the National Institutes of Health. Due to substantial new research and revision of the adult RLS diagnostic criteria, a task force was chosen by the International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group (IRLSSG) to consider updates to the pediatric diagnostic criteria. A committee of seven pediatric RLS experts developed a set of 15 consensus questions to review, conducted a comprehensive literature search, and extensively discussed potential revisions. The committee recommendations were approved by the IRLSSG executive committee and reviewed by the IRLSSG membership. The pediatric RLS diagnostic criteria were simplified and integrated with the newly revised adult RLS criteria. Specific recommendations were developed for pediatric application of the criteria, including consideration of typical words used by children to describe their symptoms. Pediatric aspects of differential diagnosis, comorbidity, and clinical significance were then defined. In addition, the research criteria for probable and possible pediatric RLS were updated and criteria for a related condition, periodic limb movement disorder (PLMD), were clarified. Revised diagnostic criteria for pediatric RLS have been developed, which are intended to improve clinical practice and promote further research. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. International tobacco control: a focus group study of U.S. anti-tobacco activists.

    PubMed

    David, S; DeJong, W; Resnick, N

    2001-01-01

    Massachusetts tobacco control activists participated in focus groups to explore their knowledge, beliefs, and attitudes regarding international tobacco control. Initially, each of three focus groups ranked this issue at or near the bottom of important tobacco control issues. Participants ranked ten message concepts for their ability to motivate politically active Americans to contact a government representative about international tobacco issues. The top four message concepts dealt with deliberate marketing of cigarettes to children, dramatic increases in global mortality due to smoking, American hypocrisy in being the world's largest tobacco exporter, and use of overseas profits to finance youth-oriented marketing in the U.S. The rankings revealed little initial concern about U.S. diplomatic pressure to force foreign nations to open up their markets to American tobacco products. Yet during the subsequent discussion this was among the message concepts the generated the most outrage. This suggests that international tobacco control issues would resonate among U.S. opinion leaders once the facts were presented to them through a media advocacy campaign.

  8. A Qualitative Study of the Use of Sand for Counselor Interns in Group Supervision: A Grounded Theory Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrade, Helena Bohn

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore sandtray as a group supervision method in counselor education programs. The research centered on the personal growth and development of counselor interns as they conceptualized and reflected on cases during group supervision. Research questions guiding the process included: What is the experience of…

  9. A Qualitative Study of the Use of Sand for Counselor Interns in Group Supervision: A Grounded Theory Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrade, Helena Bohn

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore sandtray as a group supervision method in counselor education programs. The research centered on the personal growth and development of counselor interns as they conceptualized and reflected on cases during group supervision. Research questions guiding the process included: What is the experience of…

  10. Genetic modifiers of ambulation in the cooperative international Neuromuscular research group Duchenne natural history study

    PubMed Central

    Bello, Luca; Kesari, Akanchha; Gordish-Dressman, Heather; Cnaan, Avital; Morgenroth, Lauren P; Punetha, Jaya; Duong, Tina; Henricson, Erik K; Pegoraro, Elena; McDonald, Craig M; Hoffman, Eric P

    2015-01-01

    Objective We studied the effects of LTBP4 and SPP1 polymorphisms on age at loss of ambulation (LoA) in a multiethnic Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) cohort. Methods We genotyped SPP1 rs28357094 and LTBP4 haplotype in 283 of 340 participants in the Cooperative International Neuromuscular Research Group Duchenne Natural History Study (CINRG-DNHS). Median ages at LoA were compared by Kaplan–Meier analysis and log-rank test. We controlled polymorphism analyses for concurrent effects of glucocorticoid corticosteroid (GC) treatment (time-varying Cox regression) and for population stratification (multidimensional scaling of genome-wide markers). Results Hispanic and South Asian participants (n = 18, 41) lost ambulation 2.7 and 2 years earlier than Caucasian subjects (p = 0.003, <0.001). The TG/GG genotype at SPP1 rs28357094 was associated to 1.2-year-earlier median LoA (p = 0.048). This difference was greater (1.9 years, p = 0.038) in GC-treated participants, whereas no difference was observed in untreated subjects. Cox regression confirmed a significant effect of SPP1 genotype in GC-treated participants (hazard ratio = 1.61, p = 0.016). LTBP4 genotype showed a direction of association with age at LoA as previously reported, but it was not statistically significant. After controlling for population stratification, we confirmed a strong effect of LTBP4 genotype in Caucasians (2.4 years, p = 0.024). Median age at LoA with the protective LTBP4 genotype in this cohort was 15.0 years, 16.0 for those who were treated with GC. Interpretation SPP1 rs28357094 acts as a pharmacodynamic biomarker of GC response, and LTBP4 haplotype modifies age at LoA in the CINRG-DNHS cohort. Adjustment for GC treatment and population stratification appears crucial in assessing genetic modifiers in DMD. PMID:25641372

  11. International medical students' expectations and worries at the beginning of their medical education: a qualitative focus group study.

    PubMed

    Huhn, Daniel; Huber, Julia; Ippen, Franziska M; Eckart, Wolfgang; Junne, Florian; Zipfel, Stephan; Herzog, Wolfgang; Nikendei, Christoph

    2016-01-28

    The number of international students has increased substantially within the last decade. Due to cultural barriers, this specific group faces diverse challenges. In comparison to German colleagues, international medical students perform significantly lower in clinical examinations and exceed the average duration of study; they suffer from personal distress as well as insufficient support. Within the present study, their individual perspectives, expectations, hopes and fears were examined. Four focus groups with first-year international medical students (N = 16) were conducted in October 2013. Each 60- to 90-min discussion was audiotaped, transcribed and analysed using qualitative methods. International medical students go abroad in search of good study-conditions. For the choice of place of study, affordability, social ties as well as an educational system following the achievement principle are decisive factors. While contact with German-students and other international students is seen as beneficial, international medical students are most concerned to encounter problems and social exclusion due to language deficits and intercultural differences. Facilitating the access to university places, the provision of financial aid and, moreover, social support, nurturing cultural integration, would greatly benefit international medical students. Hereby, the establishment of specific medical language courses as well as programs fostering intercultural-relations could prove to be valuable.

  12. Magnetic hyperfine coupling of a methyl group undergoing internal rotation: a case study of methyl formate.

    PubMed

    Tudorie, M; Coudert, L H; Huet, T R; Jegouso, D; Sedes, G

    2011-02-21

    The hyperfine structure of methyl formate was recorded in the 2-20 GHz range. A molecular beam coupled to a Fourier transform microwave spectrometer having an instrumental resolution of 0.46 kHz and limited by a Doppler width of a few kHz was used. A-type lines were found split by the magnetic hyperfine coupling while no splittings were observed for E-type lines. Symmetry considerations were used to account for the internal rotation of the methyl top and to derive effective hyperfine coupling Hamiltonians. Neglecting the spin-rotation magnetic coupling, the vanishing splittings of the E-type lines could be understood and analyses of the hyperfine patterns of the A-type lines were performed. The results are consistent with a hyperfine structure dominated by the magnetic spin-spin coupling due to the three hydrogen atoms of the methyl group.

  13. The 2016 update of the International Study Group (ISGPS) definition and grading of postoperative pancreatic fistula: 11 Years After.

    PubMed

    Bassi, Claudio; Marchegiani, Giovanni; Dervenis, Christos; Sarr, Micheal; Abu Hilal, Mohammad; Adham, Mustapha; Allen, Peter; Andersson, Roland; Asbun, Horacio J; Besselink, Marc G; Conlon, Kevin; Del Chiaro, Marco; Falconi, Massimo; Fernandez-Cruz, Laureano; Fernandez-Del Castillo, Carlos; Fingerhut, Abe; Friess, Helmut; Gouma, Dirk J; Hackert, Thilo; Izbicki, Jakob; Lillemoe, Keith D; Neoptolemos, John P; Olah, Attila; Schulick, Richard; Shrikhande, Shailesh V; Takada, Tadahiro; Takaori, Kyoichi; Traverso, William; Vollmer, Charles R; Wolfgang, Christopher L; Yeo, Charles J; Salvia, Roberto; Buchler, Marcus

    2017-03-01

    In 2005, the International Study Group of Pancreatic Fistula developed a definition and grading of postoperative pancreatic fistula that has been accepted universally. Eleven years later, because postoperative pancreatic fistula remains one of the most relevant and harmful complications of pancreatic operation, the International Study Group of Pancreatic Fistula classification has become the gold standard in defining postoperative pancreatic fistula in clinical practice. The aim of the present report is to verify the value of the International Study Group of Pancreatic Fistula definition and grading of postoperative pancreatic fistula and to update the International Study Group of Pancreatic Fistula classification in light of recent evidence that has emerged, as well as to address the lingering controversies about the original definition and grading of postoperative pancreatic fistula. The International Study Group of Pancreatic Fistula reconvened as the International Study Group in Pancreatic Surgery in order to perform a review of the recent literature and consequently to update and revise the grading system of postoperative pancreatic fistula. Based on the literature since 2005 investigating the validity and clinical use of the original International Study Group of Pancreatic Fistula classification, a clinically relevant postoperative pancreatic fistula is now redefined as a drain output of any measurable volume of fluid with an amylase level >3 times the upper limit of institutional normal serum amylase activity, associated with a clinically relevant development/condition related directly to the postoperative pancreatic fistula. Consequently, the former "grade A postoperative pancreatic fistula" is now redefined and called a "biochemical leak," because it has no clinical importance and is no longer referred to a true pancreatic fistula. Postoperative pancreatic fistula grades B and C are confirmed but defined more strictly. In particular, grade B requires a

  14. Challenges and Opportunities for International Cooperative Studies in Pediatric Hematopoeitic Cell Transplantation: Priorities of the Westhafen Intercontinental Group

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Rudolph Kirk R.; Baker, Kevin Scott; Boelens, Jaap J.; Bollard, Catherine M.; Egeler, R. Maarten; Cowan, Mort; Ladenstein, Ruth; Lankester, Arjan; Locatelli, Franco; Lawitschka, Anita; Levine, John E.; Loh, Mignon; Nemecek, Eneida; Niemeyer, Charlotte; Prasad, Vinod K.; Rocha, Vanderson; Shenoy, Shalini; Strahm, Brigitte; Veys, Paul; Wall, Donna; Bader, Peter; Grupp, Stephan A.; Pulsipher, Michael A.; Peters, Christina

    2014-01-01

    More than 20% of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantations (HCTs) are performed in children and adolescents at a large number of relatively small centers. Unlike adults, at least one-third of HCTs in children are performed for rare, nonmalignant indications. Clinical trials to improve HCT outcomes in children have been limited by small numbers and these pediatric-specific features. The need for a larger number of pediatric HCT centers to participate in trials has led to the involvement of international collaborative groups. Representatives of the Pediatric Blood and Marrow Transplant Consortium, European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation’s Pediatric Working Group, International Berlin-Frankfurt-Munster (iBFm) Stem Cell Transplantation Committee, and Children’s Oncology Group’s Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Discipline Committee met on October 3, 2012, in Frankfurt, Germany to develop a consensus on the highest priorities in pediatric HCT. In addition, it explored the creation of an international consortium to develop studies focused on HCT in children and adolescents. This meeting led to the creation of an international HCT network, dubbed the Westhafen Intercontinental Group, to develop worldwide priorities and strategies to address pediatric HCT issues. This review outlines the priorities of need as identified by this consensus group. PMID:23883618

  15. Renormalization group in internal space

    SciTech Connect

    Polonyi, J.; Sailer, K.

    2005-01-15

    Renormalization group in the internal space consists of the gradual change of the coupling constants. Functional evolution equations corresponding to the change of the mass or the coupling constant are presented in the framework of a scalar model. The evolution in the mass which yields the functional generalization of the Callan-Symanzik equation for the one-particle irreducible effective action is given in its renormalized, cutoff-independent form. The evolution of the coupling constant generates an evolution equation for the two-particle irreducible effective action.

  16. Bensahel et al. and International Clubfoot Study Group evaluation of treated clubfoot: assessment of interobserver and intraobserver reliability.

    PubMed

    Celebi, Levent; Muratli, Hasan H; Aksahin, Ertugrul; Yagmurlu, Mehmet F; Bicimoglu, Ali

    2006-01-01

    In order to assess interobserver and intraobserver reliability of an evaluation system of the International Clubfoot Study Group, 30 children treated for unilateral clubfoot and their radiographs were examined by three different observers. The mean intraobserver kappa value was found to be 0.62. The mean interobserver kappa value was 0.73. These kappa values correlated with a substantial degree of agreement. Interobserver reliability for all subgroup evaluations (morphologic, functional and radiological) and total scores was 90% or over. This also indicates a good interobserver reliability. In conclusion, the Bensahel et al. and International Clubfoot Study Group outcome evaluation system may be used reliably for the assessment of outcome of the treatment of clubfoot.

  17. International Solar Cycle Studies [ISCS] Working Group 2: solar magnetic field variability - from the lower atmosphere through the inner corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Richard A.; Michels, Donald

    This report is a summary of activities and plans relating to the International Solar Cycle Studies (ISCS) Working Group 2, which is concerned with solar magnetic field variability, from the lower atmosphere through the inner corona. Whilst the Working Group carries a rather general title, the activities are focusing on several well defined topics - in particular the onset of coronal mass ejection events. Recognising the large number of scientific meetings worldwide, the working style of this group is aimed at improving communication, information exchange and collaboration making use of existing meetings and with a minimum of red tape. The core of the activity is through the use of the World Wide Web and e-mail. In this way, this Working Group does not introduce extra effort, but provides a better focus for on-going projects.

  18. The International Thymic Malignancy Interest Group thymic initiative: a state-of-the-art study of thymic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Detterbeck, Frank; Korst, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Thymic malignancies are relatively rare tumors. A general lack of knowledge, misconceptions about benignancy, confusion about the definition of terms, and variability in reporting of outcomes have further hampered progress in these diseases. The International Thymic Malignancy Interest Group has emerged to counter these challenges and has brought together a worldwide multidisciplinary community determined to improve outcomes for these patients. Although the organization is young (initiated in 2010), major early accomplishments have created a foundation and infrastructure for scientific research. These include consensus definitions of terms, an unprecedented global database, development of practical clinical resources and, together with the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer, development of proposals for the first formal stage classification of these malignant tumors. Many articles have been published or are under way, and a second phase of projects building on the early success is proceeding. The greatest accomplishment of the International Thymic Malignancy Interest Group lies in the establishment of an open culture of collaboration and the engagement of a broad group of individuals united by a common mission. It is a testament to what can be achieved, despite ongoing and inherent challenges, by determination and a collective effort. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Power Distance and Group Dynamics of an International Project Team: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulus, Trena M.; Bichelmeyer, Barbara; Malopinsky, Larissa; Pereira, Maura; Rastogi, Polly

    2005-01-01

    Project-based team activities are commonly used in higher education. Teams comprised of members from different national cultures can be faced with unique challenges during the creative process. Hofstede's (1991) cultural dimension of power distance was used to examine one such design team's intra- and inter-group interactions in a graduate-level…

  20. Validation of cytogenetic risk groups according to International Prognostic Scoring Systems by peripheral blood CD34+FISH: results from a German diagnostic study in comparison with an international control group

    PubMed Central

    Braulke, Friederike; Platzbecker, Uwe; Müller-Thomas, Catharina; Götze, Katharina; Germing, Ulrich; Brümmendorf, Tim H.; Nolte, Florian; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Giagounidis, Aristoteles A. N.; Lübbert, Michael; Greenberg, Peter L.; Bennett, John M.; Solé, Francesc; Mallo, Mar; Slovak, Marilyn L.; Ohyashiki, Kazuma; Le Beau, Michelle M.; Tüchler, Heinz; Pfeilstöcker, Michael; Nösslinger, Thomas; Hildebrandt, Barbara; Shirneshan, Katayoon; Aul, Carlo; Stauder, Reinhard; Sperr, Wolfgang R.; Valent, Peter; Fonatsch, Christa; Trümper, Lorenz; Haase, Detlef; Schanz, Julie

    2015-01-01

    International Prognostic Scoring Systems are used to determine the individual risk profile of myelodysplastic syndrome patients. For the assessment of International Prognostic Scoring Systems, an adequate chromosome banding analysis of the bone marrow is essential. Cytogenetic information is not available for a substantial number of patients (5%–20%) with dry marrow or an insufficient number of metaphase cells. For these patients, a valid risk classification is impossible. In the study presented here, the International Prognostic Scoring Systems were validated based on fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses using extended probe panels applied to cluster of differentiation 34 positive (CD34+) peripheral blood cells of 328 MDS patients of our prospective multicenter German diagnostic study and compared to chromosome banding results of 2902 previously published patients with myelodysplastic syndromes. For cytogenetic risk classification by fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses of CD34+ peripheral blood cells, the groups differed significantly for overall and leukemia-free survival by uni- and multivariate analyses without discrepancies between treated and untreated patients. Including cytogenetic data of fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses of peripheral CD34+ blood cells (instead of bone marrow banding analysis) into the complete International Prognostic Scoring System assessment, the prognostic risk groups separated significantly for overall and leukemia-free survival. Our data show that a reliable stratification to the risk groups of the International Prognostic Scoring Systems is possible from peripheral blood in patients with missing chromosome banding analysis by using a comprehensive probe panel (clinicaltrials.gov identifier:01355913). PMID:25344522

  1. Childhood diabetes in Arab countries. Diabetes Epidemiology Research International Study Group.

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) is a chronic disease of childhood that is associated with high costs, mortality and morbidity, but which is of unknown etiology. Globally, the incidence and prevalence of the disease are highly variable. Study of IDDM among Arab children, who have similar genetic characteristics, but markedly different environmental backgrounds, could provide important insight into its cause. Few studies of IDDM in Arab populations have been carried out, but the limited data available indicate that there are marked variations in the risk of the disease and in its distribution between the sexes. It is therefore very important that IDDM registries be established in Arab countries since this could lead to a greater understanding of the disease and perhaps its prevention. PMID:2364481

  2. Sutureless Aortic Valve Replacement International Registry (SU-AVR-IR): design and rationale from the International Valvular Surgery Study Group (IVSSG).

    PubMed

    Di Eusanio, Marco; Phan, Kevin; Bouchard, Denis; Carrel, Thierry P; Dapunt, Otto E; Di Bartolomeo, Roberto; Eichstaedt, Harald C; Fischlein, Theodor; Folliguet, Thierry; Gersak, Borut; Glauber, Mattia; Haverich, Axel; Misfeld, Martin; Oberwalder, Peter J; Santarpino, Giuseppe; Shrestha, Malakh Lal; Solinas, Marco; Vola, Marco; Alamanni, Francesco; Albertini, Alberto; Bhatnagar, Gopal; Carrier, Michel; Clark, Stephen; Collart, Federic; Kappert, Utz; Kocher, Alfred; Meuris, Bart; Mignosa, Carmelo; Ouda, Ahmed; Pelletier, Marc; Rahmanian, Parwis Baradaran; Reineke, David; Teoh, Kevin; Troise, Giovanni; Villa, Emmanuel; Wahlers, Thorsten; Yan, Tristan D

    2015-03-01

    Sutureless aortic valve replacement (SU-AVR) is an innovative approach which shortens cardiopulmonary bypass and cross-clamp durations and may facilitate minimally invasive approach. Evidence outlining its safety, efficacy, hemodynamic profile and potential complications is replete with small-volume observational studies and few comparative publications. Minimally invasive aortic valve surgery and high-volume SU-AVR replacement centers were contacted for recruitment into a global collaborative coalition dedicated to sutureless valve research. A Research Steering Committee was formulated to direct research and support the mission of providing registry evidence warranted for SU-AVR. The International Valvular Surgery Study Group (IVSSG) was formed under the auspices of the Research Steering Committee, comprised of 36 expert valvular surgeons from 27 major centers across the globe. IVSSG Sutureless Projects currently proceeding include the Retrospective and Prospective Phases of the SU-AVR International Registry (SU-AVR-IR). The global pooling of data by the IVSSG Sutureless Projects will provide required robust clinical evidence on the safety, efficacy and hemodynamic outcomes of SU-AVR.

  3. Post-hepatectomy haemorrhage: a definition and grading by the International Study Group of Liver Surgery (ISGLS).

    PubMed

    Rahbari, Nuh N; Garden, O James; Padbury, Robert; Maddern, Guy; Koch, Moritz; Hugh, Thomas J; Fan, Sheung Tat; Nimura, Yuji; Figueras, Joan; Vauthey, Jean-Nicolas; Rees, Myrddin; Adam, Rene; Dematteo, Ronald P; Greig, Paul; Usatoff, Val; Banting, Simon; Nagino, Masato; Capussotti, Lorenzo; Yokoyama, Yukihiro; Brooke-Smith, Mark; Crawford, Michael; Christophi, Christopher; Makuuchi, Masatoshi; Büchler, Markus W; Weitz, Jürgen

    2011-08-01

    A standardized definition of post-hepatectomy haemorrhage (PHH) has not yet been established. An international study group of hepatobiliary surgeons from high-volume centres was convened and a definition of PHH was developed together with a grading of severity considering the impact on patients' clinical management. The definition of PHH varies strongly within the hepatic surgery literature. PHH is defined as a drop in haemoglobin level > 3 g/dl post-operatively compared with the post-operative baseline level and/or any post-operative transfusion of packed red blood cells (PRBC) for a falling haemoglobin and/or the need for radiological intervention (such as embolization) and/or re-laparotomy to stop bleeding. Evidence of intra-abdominal bleeding should be obtained by imaging or blood loss via the abdominal drains if present. Transfusion of up to two units of PRBC is considered as being Grade A PHH. Grade B PHH requires transfusion of more than two units of PRBC, whereas the need for invasive re-intervention such as embolization and/ or re-laparotomy defines Grade C PHH. The proposed definition and grading of severity of PHH enables valid comparisons of results from different studies. It is easily applicable in clinical routine and should be applied in future trials to standardize reporting of complications. © 2011 International Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association.

  4. Crystallographic study of hydration of an internal cavity in engineered proteins with buried polar or ionizable groups.

    PubMed

    Schlessman, Jamie L; Abe, Colby; Gittis, Apostolos; Karp, Daniel A; Dolan, Michael A; García-Moreno E, Bertrand

    2008-04-15

    Although internal water molecules are essential for the structure and function of many proteins, the structural and physical factors that govern internal hydration are poorly understood. We have examined the molecular determinants of internal hydration systematically, by solving the crystal structures of variants of staphylococcal nuclease with Gln-66, Asn-66, and Tyr-66 at cryo (100 K) and room (298 K) temperatures, and comparing them with existing cryo and room temperature structures of variants with Glu-66, Asp-66, Lys-66, Glu-92 or Lys-92 obtained under conditions of pH where the internal ionizable groups are in the neutral state. At cryogenic temperatures the polar moieties of all these internal side chains are hydrated except in the cases of Lys-66 and Lys-92. At room temperature the internal water molecules were observed only in variants with Glu-66 and Tyr-66; water molecules in the other variants are probably present but they are disordered and therefore undetectable crystallographically. Each internal water molecule establishes between 3 and 5 hydrogen bonds with the protein or with other internal water molecules. The strength of interactions between internal polar side chains and water molecules seems to decrease from carboxylic acids to amides to amines. Low temperature, low cavity volume, and the presence of oxygen atoms in the cavity increase the positional stability of internal water molecules. This set of structures and the physical insight they contribute into internal hydration will be useful for the development and benchmarking of computational methods for artificial hydration of pockets, cavities, and active sites in proteins.

  5. Discussions and decisions of the 2012–2014 International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV) Filoviridae Study Group, January 2012–June 2013.

    PubMed

    Bukreyev, Alexander A; Chandran, Kartik; Dolnik, Olga; Dye, John M; Ebihara, Hideki; Leroy, Eric M; Mühlberger, Elke; Netesov, Sergey V; Patterson, Jean L; Paweska, Janusz T; Saphire, Erica Ollmann; Smither, Sophie J; Takada, Ayato; Towner, Jonathan S; Volchkov, Viktor E; Warren, Travis K; Kuhn, Jens H

    2014-04-01

    The International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV) Filoviridae Study Group prepares proposals on the classification and nomenclature of filoviruses to reflect current knowledge or to correct disagreements with the International Code of Virus Classification and Nomenclature (ICVCN). In recent years, filovirus taxonomy has been corrected and updated, but parts of it remain controversial, and several topics remain to be debated. This article summarizes the decisions and discussion of the currently acting ICTV Filoviridae Study Group since its inauguration in January 2012.

  6. Post-hepatectomy haemorrhage: a definition and grading by the International Study Group of Liver Surgery (ISGLS)

    PubMed Central

    Rahbari, Nuh N; Garden, O James; Padbury, Robert; Maddern, Guy; Koch, Moritz; Hugh, Thomas J; Fan, Sheung Tat; Nimura, Yuji; Figueras, Joan; Vauthey, Jean-Nicolas; Rees, Myrddin; Adam, Rene; DeMatteo, Ronald P; Greig, Paul; Usatoff, Val; Banting, Simon; Nagino, Masato; Capussotti, Lorenzo; Yokoyama, Yukihiro; Brooke-Smith, Mark; Crawford, Michael; Christophi, Christopher; Makuuchi, Masatoshi; Büchler, Markus W; Weitz, Jürgen

    2011-01-01

    Background: A standardized definition of post-hepatectomy haemorrhage (PHH) has not yet been established. Methods: An international study group of hepatobiliary surgeons from high-volume centres was convened and a definition of PHH was developed together with a grading of severity considering the impact on patients' clinical management. Results: The definition of PHH varies strongly within the hepatic surgery literature. PHH is defined as a drop in haemoglobin level >3 g/dl post-operatively compared with the post-operative baseline level and/or any post-operative transfusion of packed red blood cells (PRBC) for a falling haemoglobin and/or the need for radiological intervention (such as embolization) and/or re-laparotomy to stop bleeding. Evidence of intra-abdominal bleeding should be obtained by imaging or blood loss via the abdominal drains if present. Transfusion of up to two units of PRBC is considered as being Grade A PHH. Grade B PHH requires transfusion of more than two units of PRBC, whereas the need for invasive re-intervention such as embolization and/ or re-laparotomy defines Grade C PHH. Conclusion: The proposed definition and grading of severity of PHH enables valid comparisons of results from different studies. It is easily applicable in clinical routine and should be applied in future trials to standardize reporting of complications. PMID:21762295

  7. Critical Issues in International Group Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bemak, Fred; Chung, Rita Chi-Ying

    2015-01-01

    Three-quarters of the world come from collectivistic group-oriented cultures. As the world becomes more globalized it is inevitable that group counseling will be a major choice of healing and psychological intervention internationally. However, a review of scholarly articles from "The Journal for Specialists in Group Work" and…

  8. Critical Issues in International Group Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bemak, Fred; Chung, Rita Chi-Ying

    2015-01-01

    Three-quarters of the world come from collectivistic group-oriented cultures. As the world becomes more globalized it is inevitable that group counseling will be a major choice of healing and psychological intervention internationally. However, a review of scholarly articles from "The Journal for Specialists in Group Work" and…

  9. Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes Using The International Association of the Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups Criteria: Glycemic Thresholds and Associated Risks.

    PubMed

    Sacks, David A; Black, Mary Helen; Li, Xia; Montoro, Martin N; Lawrence, Jean M

    2015-07-01

    To compare the risks of selected adverse pregnancy outcomes among untreated women who met The International Association of the Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups (IADPSG)-defined glucose criteria at two different thresholds. A retrospective cohort study of women tested for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) with the 75-g 2-hour glucose tolerance test (GTT) who delivered a live singleton neonate. Data of women who were treated because they met institutional criteria defining GDM (at least two GTT results greater than or equal to fasting 100 mg/dL, 1-hour 195 mg/dL, and 2-hour 160 mg/dL) were excluded. The data of the remaining women were analyzed in three groups. The prevalence of selected adverse pregnancy outcomes was compared for those with no GDM ("no GDM," n=7,943); those at least one of whose results were fasting 92-94 mg/dL, 1-hour 180-190 mg/dL, or 2-hour 153-161 mg/dL ("GDM-1," n=771); and those at least one of whose results were greater than or equal to fasting 95 mg/dL, 1-hour 191 mg/dL, or 2-hour 162 mg/dL ("GDM-2," n=1,121). Of the 9,835 women, 1,892 (19.2%) met criteria for GDM, of whom 771 (40.8%) were categorized as GDM-1 and 1,121 (59.2%) GDM-2. After adjustment for confounders, women with GDM-2 were at significantly greater risk for preeclampsia or eclampsia, preterm delivery, primary cesarean delivery, shoulder dystocia, higher birth weight, ponderal index, large for gestational age, transient tachypnea, and neonatal hypoglycemia than women without GDM. Only birth weight and large for gestational age were significantly greater in the GDM-1 compared with the no GDM group. Fewer adverse outcomes are found at lower levels of the IADPSG-defined glucose intolerance spectrum. Determining whether these patients will benefit from treatment will require a randomized controlled trial. II.

  10. Site of primary tumor has a prognostic role in operable breast cancer: the international breast cancer study group experience.

    PubMed

    Colleoni, Marco; Zahrieh, David; Gelber, Richard D; Holmberg, Stig B; Mattsson, Jan E; Rudenstam, Carl-Magnus; Lindtner, Jurij; Erzen, Darja; Snyder, Raymond; Collins, John; Fey, Martin F; Thürlimann, Beat; Crivellari, Diana; Murray, Elizabeth; Mendiola, Caesar; Pagani, Olivia; Castiglione-Gertsch, Monica; Coates, Alan S; Price, Karen; Goldhirsch, Aron

    2005-03-01

    Cancer presenting at the medial site of the breast may have a worse prognosis compared with tumors located in external quadrants. For medial tumors, axillary lymph node staging may not accurately reflect the metastatic potential of the disease. Eight-thousand four-hundred twenty-two patients randomly assigned to International Breast Cancer Study Group clinical trials between 1978 and 1999 were classified as medial site (1,622; 19%) or lateral, central, and other sites (6,800; 81%). Median follow-up was 11 years. A statistically significant difference was observed for patients with medial tumors versus those with nonmedial tumors in disease-free survival (DFS; 10-year DFS, 46% v 48%; HR, 1.10; 95% CI, 1.02 to 1.18; P = .01) and overall survival (10-year OS 59% v 61%; HR, 1.09; 1.01 to 1.19; P = .04). This difference increased after adjustment for other prognostic factors (HR, 1.22; 95% CI, 1.13 to 1.32 for DFS; and HR, 1.24; 95% CI, 1.14 to 1.35 for OS; both P = .0001). The risk of relapse for patients with medial presentation was largest for the node-negative cohort and for patients with tumors larger than 2 cm. In the subgroup of 2,931 patients with negative axillary lymph nodes, 10-year DFS was 61% v 67%, and OS was 73% v 80% for medial versus nonmedial sites, respectively (HR 1.33; 95% CI, 1.15 to 1.54; P = .0001 for DFS; and HR 1.40; 95% CI, 1.17 to 1.67; P = .0003 for OS). Tumor site has a significant prognostic utility, especially for axillary lymph node-negative disease, that should be considered in therapeutic algorithms. New staging procedures such as biopsy of the sentinel internal mammary nodes or novel imaging methods should be further studied in patients with medial tumors.

  11. Impact of SERM adherence on treatment effect: International Breast Cancer Study Group Trials 13-93 and 14-93.

    PubMed

    Pagani, Olivia; Gelber, Shari; Colleoni, Marco; Price, Karen N; Simoncini, Edda

    2013-11-01

    The degree of adherence to oral anticancer agents may influence treatment efficacy. Tamoxifen and toremifene usage data from two International Breast Cancer Study Group (IBCSG) studies were used to evaluate the impact of treatment adherence on the efficacy of these two selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs). Between 1993 and 1999, IBCSG Trial 13-93 randomized premenopausal women with node-positive disease to tamoxifen or no endocrine therapy and IBCSG Trial 14-93 compared tamoxifen and toremifene in postmenopausal women with node-positive disease. 690 women with estrogen-receptor positive enrolled in these two trials were alive and disease-free 4 years after the start of SERM. The median follow up for this analysis was 9.0 years. Using a Kaplan-Meier landmark analysis at 4 years, the 609 women completing at least 4 years of SERM had improved 10-year disease-free survival (DFS) (71 %) compared with the 81 women taking less than 4 years (64 %), but these differences did not reach statistical significance [DFS hazard ratio (<4 year/4+ year) 1.31, 95 % CI 0.86-1.98), p value = 0.20]. Women who completed less than 4 years of SERM treatment (12 %) appeared not to have achieved the full benefit from their therapy. These results suggest that more effort should be made to educate women regarding the benefits of a full course of treatment. This is especially important in light of the results of the recently reported ATLAS and aTTom trials which suggest a benefit of 10 years of tamoxifen.

  12. Impact of SERM adherence on treatment effect: International Breast Cancer Study Group Trials 13-93 and 14-93

    PubMed Central

    Pagani, Olivia; Gelber, Shari; Colleoni, Marco; Price, Karen N.; Simoncini, Edda

    2014-01-01

    The degree of adherence to oral anti-cancer agents may influence treatment efficacy. Tamoxifen and toremifene usage data from two International Breast Cancer Study Group (IBCSG) studies were used to evaluate the impact of treatment adherence on the efficacy of these two selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs). Between 1993 and 1999 IBCSG Trial 13-93 randomized premenopausal women with node-positive disease to tamoxifen or no endocrine therapy and IBCSG Trial 14-93 compared tamoxifen and toremifene in postmenopausal women with node-positive disease. 690 women with estrogen-receptor positive (ER+) enrolled in these two trials were alive and disease-free 4 years after the start of SERM. The median follow up for this analysis was 9.0 years. Using a Kaplan-Meier landmark analysis at 4 years, the 609 women completing at least 4 years of SERM had improved 10-year disease-free survival (DFS) (71%) compared with the 81 women taking less than 4 years (64%), but these differences did not reach statistical significance [DFS hazard ratio (<4yr/4+yr) = 1.31, 95% CI (0.86, 1.98), p-value = 0.20]. Women who completed less than 4 years of SERM treatment (12%) appeared not to have achieved the full benefit from their therapy. These results suggest that more effort should be made to educate women regarding the benefits of a full course of treatment. This is especially important in light of the results of the recently reported ATLAS and aTTom trials which suggest a benefit of 10 years of tamoxifen. PMID:24197662

  13. Critical appraisal of the International Study Group of Pancreatic Surgery (ISGPS) consensus definition of postoperative hemorrhage after pancreatoduodenectomy.

    PubMed

    Welsch, Thilo; Eisele, Hanna; Zschäbitz, Stefanie; Hinz, Ulf; Büchler, Markus W; Wente, Moritz N

    2011-08-01

    Postpancreatectomy hemorrhage (PPH) is one of the most serious complications after pancreatoduodenectomy (PD). This study analyzed and validated the International Study Group of Pancreatic Surgery (ISGPS) definition of PPH and aimed to identify risk factors for early (<24 h) and late PPH. Patients who underwent PD for pancreatic head tumors between 2001 and 2008 were included and complications were prospectively recorded. Factors associated with PPH were assessed by uni- and multivariate analysis. Complete datasets were available for 796 patients. Classic and pylorus-preserving PD was performed in 13.8% and 86.2% of the patients, respectively. According to the ISGPS definition, PPH occurred in 29.1% of the cases (232 of 796 patients): 4.8% grade A, 15.2% grade B, and 9.2% grade C. The definition is based largely on surrogate markers (e.g., transfusion requirement) that are affected by other critical illnesses and more than 97% of patients with mild PPH had no clinical signs of bleeding. The need for postoperative intensive care as well as the incidence of pancreatic fistula, relaparotomy, and mortality rates significantly increased from grades A to C. Thirty-seven patients (4.6%) required interventional (endoscopy or angiography) and/or relaparotomy for PPH. Relaparotomy for PPH was performed in 3.1% of all patients. Independent risk factors for early PPH were preoperative anemia (hemoglobin, <11 mg/dl) and multivisceral resection while advanced age, chronic renal insufficiency, increased blood loss, and long operation time were associated with late PPH. The ISGPS definition of PPH is feasible and applicable but produces a high rate of false positive mild PPH cases. The different grades still significantly correlate with relevant outcome variables, thus the definition discriminates postoperative courses, but a minor modification of the definition of mild PPH is suggested. The new results further demonstrate the need to optimize preoperative anemia and chronic renal

  14. Parenting, identity development, internalizing symptoms, and alcohol use: a cross-sectional study in a group of Italian adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Pellerone, Monica; Tolini, Giacomo; Polopoli, Caterina

    2016-01-01

    Background Literature has demonstrated the adaptive function of identity development and parenting toward manifestation of problem behaviors in adolescence. These dimensions act on both internalizing and externalizing symptoms. Methods The objective is to investigate the relationship between identity status, parenting, and adolescent problems, which may manifest through internalized (phobias, obsessions, depression, eating disorders, entropy) and externalized modes (alcohol use and school discomfort). The research involved 198 Italian students (104 males and 94 females) in the 4th year (mean =16.94 years, standard deviation =0.35) and 5th year (mean =17.94 years, standard deviation =0.43) of senior secondary schools, who live in Caltanissetta, a town located in Sicily, Italy. The research lasted for 1 school year. The general group consisted of 225 students with a mortality rate of 12%. They completed an anamnestic questionnaire to provide 1) basic information, 2) alcohol consumption attitude in the past 30 days, and 3) their beliefs about alcohol; the “Ego Identity Process Questionnaire” to investigate identity development; the “Parental Bonding Instrument” to measure the perception of parenting during childhood; and the “Constraints of Mind” to value the presence of internalizing symptoms. Results Data show that identity status influences alcohol consumption. Low-profile identity and excessive maternal control affect the relational dependence and the tendency to perfectionism in adolescents. Among the predictors of alcohol use, there are socioeconomic status, parental control, and the presence of internalizing symptoms. Conclusion Family is the favored context of learning beliefs, patterns, and values that affect the broader regulatory social environment, and for this reason, it is considered the privileged context on which to intervene to reduce the adolescents’ behavior problems. This deviance could be an external manifestation of the difficulty

  15. Parenting, identity development, internalizing symptoms, and alcohol use: a cross-sectional study in a group of Italian adolescents.

    PubMed

    Pellerone, Monica; Tolini, Giacomo; Polopoli, Caterina

    2016-01-01

    Literature has demonstrated the adaptive function of identity development and parenting toward manifestation of problem behaviors in adolescence. These dimensions act on both internalizing and externalizing symptoms. The objective is to investigate the relationship between identity status, parenting, and adolescent problems, which may manifest through internalized (phobias, obsessions, depression, eating disorders, entropy) and externalized modes (alcohol use and school discomfort). The research involved 198 Italian students (104 males and 94 females) in the 4th year (mean =16.94 years, standard deviation =0.35) and 5th year (mean =17.94 years, standard deviation =0.43) of senior secondary schools, who live in Caltanissetta, a town located in Sicily, Italy. The research lasted for 1 school year. The general group consisted of 225 students with a mortality rate of 12%. They completed an anamnestic questionnaire to provide 1) basic information, 2) alcohol consumption attitude in the past 30 days, and 3) their beliefs about alcohol; the "Ego Identity Process Questionnaire" to investigate identity development; the "Parental Bonding Instrument" to measure the perception of parenting during childhood; and the "Constraints of Mind" to value the presence of internalizing symptoms. Data show that identity status influences alcohol consumption. Low-profile identity and excessive maternal control affect the relational dependence and the tendency to perfectionism in adolescents. Among the predictors of alcohol use, there are socioeconomic status, parental control, and the presence of internalizing symptoms. Family is the favored context of learning beliefs, patterns, and values that affect the broader regulatory social environment, and for this reason, it is considered the privileged context on which to intervene to reduce the adolescents' behavior problems. This deviance could be an external manifestation of the difficulty in management of internalizing symptoms in

  16. Safety and tolerability of dobutamine-atropine stress echocardiography: a prospective, multicentre study. Echo Dobutamine International Cooperative Study Group.

    PubMed

    Picano, E; Mathias, W; Pingitore, A; Bigi, R; Previtali, M

    1994-10-29

    Diagnostic tests that are hazardous or infeasible, or both, may become accepted before inadequacies are recognised; only multicentre trials can provide the necessary information for an unrestricted acceptance of any new diagnostic procedure. We prospectively studied the results obtained in 24 experienced echocardiography laboratories. 2949 tests were done in 2799 patients. In 341 tests (12% of the overall population, 21% of the negative tests) the test could not be completed because of complex ventricular tachyarrhythmias (134, 38% of all submaximal studies); nausea and/or headache (71, 20%); hypotension and/or bradycardia (62, 17%); supraventricular tachyarrhythmias (44, 12%); hypertension (24, 7%); and others (20, 6%). Dangerous events (life-threatening complications or side-effects requiring specific treatment and lasting more than 3 hours, or new hospital admission) occurred in 14 cases (1 every 210 tests)--9 cardiac (3 ventricular tachycardias; 2 ventricular fibrillations; 2 myocardial infarctions; 1 prolonged antidote-resistant myocardial ischaemia; 1 severe, persistent hypotension) and 5 extracardiac (atropine poisoning with hallucinations lasting several hours in the absence of either myocardial ischaemia or hypotension). Life-threatening and/or longlasting complications may occur during dobutamine/atropine stress echocardiography. The test is generally well tolerated, although may be interrupted by minor, self-limiting, usually symptomless side-effects.

  17. Prospective evaluation of the International Study Group for Liver Surgery definition of bile leak after a liver resection and the role of routine operative drainage: an international multicentre study.

    PubMed

    Brooke-Smith, Mark; Figueras, Joan; Ullah, Shahid; Rees, Myrddin; Vauthey, Jean-Nicolas; Hugh, Thomas J; Garden, O James; Fan, Sheung Tat; Crawford, Michael; Makuuchi, Masatoshi; Yokoyama, Yukihiro; Büchler, Marcus; Weitz, Juergen; Padbury, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The International Study Group for Liver Surgery (ISGLS) proposed a definition for bile leak after liver surgery. A multicentre international prospective study was designed to evaluate this definition. Data collected prospectively from 949 consecutive patients on specific datasheets from 11 international centres were collated centrally. Bile leak occurred in 69 (7.3%) of patients, with 31 (3.3%), 32 (3.4%) and 6 (0.6%) classified as grade A, B and C, respectively. The grading system of severity correlated with the Dindo complication classification system (P < 0.001). Hospital length of stay was increased when bile leak occurred, from a median of 7 to 15 days (P < 0.001), as was intensive care stay (P < 0.001), and both correlated with increased severity grading of bile leak (P < 0.001). 96% of bile leaks occurred in patients with intra-operative drains. Drain placement did not prevent subsequent intervention in the bile leak group with a 5-15 times greater risk of intervention required in this group (P < 0.001). The ISGLS definition of bile leak after liver surgery appears robust and intra-operative drain usage did not prevent the need for subsequent drain placement. © 2014 International Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association.

  18. International Group Heterogeneity and Students' Business Project Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ding, Ning; Bosker, Roel J.; Xu, Xiaoyan; Rugers, Lucie; van Heugten, Petra PAM

    2015-01-01

    In business higher education, group project work plays an essential role. The purpose of the present study is to explore the relationship between the group heterogeneity of students' business project groups and their academic achievements at both group and individual levels. The sample consists of 536 freshmen from an International Business School…

  19. International Group Heterogeneity and Students' Business Project Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ding, Ning; Bosker, Roel J.; Xu, Xiaoyan; Rugers, Lucie; van Heugten, Petra PAM

    2015-01-01

    In business higher education, group project work plays an essential role. The purpose of the present study is to explore the relationship between the group heterogeneity of students' business project groups and their academic achievements at both group and individual levels. The sample consists of 536 freshmen from an International Business School…

  20. Introduction of International Microgravity Strategic Planning Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhome, Robert

    1998-01-01

    Established in May 6, 1995, the purpose of this International Strategic Planning Group for Microgravity Science and Applications Research is to develop and update, at least on a biennial basis, an International Strategic Plan for Microgravity Science and Applications Research. The member space agencies have agreed to contribute to the development of a Strategic Plan, and seek the implementation of the cooperative programs defined in this Plan. The emphasis of this plan is the coordination of hardware construction and utilization within the various areas of research including biotechnology, combustion science, fluid physics, materials science and other special topics in physical sciences. The Microgravity Science and Applications International Strategic Plan is a joint effort by the present members - ASI, CNES, CSA, DLR, ESA, NASA, and NASDA. It represents the consensus from a series of discussions held within the International Microgravity Strategic Planning Group (IMSPG). In 1996 several space agencies initiated multilateral discussions on how to improve the effectiveness of international microgravity research during the upcoming Space Station era. These discussions led to a recognition of the need for a comprehensive strategic plan for international microgravity research that would provide a framework for cooperation between international agencies. The Strategic Plan is intended to provide a basis for inter-agency coordination and cooperation in microgravity research in the environment of the International Space Station (ISS) era. This will be accomplished through analysis of the interests and goals of each participating agency and identification of mutual interests and program compatibilities. The Plan provides a framework for maximizing the productivity of space-based research for the benefit of our societies.

  1. Introduction of International Microgravity Strategic Planning Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhome, Robert

    1998-01-01

    Established in May 6, 1995, the purpose of this International Strategic Planning Group for Microgravity Science and Applications Research is to develop and update, at least on a biennial basis, an International Strategic Plan for Microgravity Science and Applications Research. The member space agencies have agreed to contribute to the development of a Strategic Plan, and seek the implementation of the cooperative programs defined in this Plan. The emphasis of this plan is the coordination of hardware construction and utilization within the various areas of research including biotechnology, combustion science, fluid physics, materials science and other special topics in physical sciences. The Microgravity Science and Applications International Strategic Plan is a joint effort by the present members - ASI, CNES, CSA, DLR, ESA, NASA, and NASDA. It represents the consensus from a series of discussions held within the International Microgravity Strategic Planning Group (IMSPG). In 1996 several space agencies initiated multilateral discussions on how to improve the effectiveness of international microgravity research during the upcoming Space Station era. These discussions led to a recognition of the need for a comprehensive strategic plan for international microgravity research that would provide a framework for cooperation between international agencies. The Strategic Plan is intended to provide a basis for inter-agency coordination and cooperation in microgravity research in the environment of the International Space Station (ISS) era. This will be accomplished through analysis of the interests and goals of each participating agency and identification of mutual interests and program compatibilities. The Plan provides a framework for maximizing the productivity of space-based research for the benefit of our societies.

  2. Impact of International Foundations on the Internationalization of Chinese Research Universities: A Case Study of Peking University and the Nippon Foundation Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Zhan

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates two cooperative programs made by Peking University, a leading Chinese research university and the Nippon Foundation Group, an international foundation based in Japan. It attempts to examine the process through which the University collaborates with the Foundation, and explore to what extent the cooperation influenced the…

  3. Impact of International Foundations on the Internationalization of Chinese Research Universities: A Case Study of Peking University and the Nippon Foundation Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Zhan

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates two cooperative programs made by Peking University, a leading Chinese research university and the Nippon Foundation Group, an international foundation based in Japan. It attempts to examine the process through which the University collaborates with the Foundation, and explore to what extent the cooperation influenced the…

  4. Fulbright-Hays Group Projects Abroad Program on International Women's Studies Seminar on Changing Status Roles in India.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoder-Salmon, Marilyn

    In July 1988, 14 Florida scholars traveled to India on a 6-week followup of a 1976 project on the status of women in India. Headquartered in Madras (India), the group also studied in 12 other locations. A pre-departure orientation program included lectures on health and related issues, a discussion of life in an Indian village, films, and slides…

  5. Silsesquioxane nanoparticles with reactive internal functional groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brozek, Eric M.; Washton, Nancy M.; Mueller, Karl T.; Zharov, Ilya

    2017-02-01

    A series of silsesquioxane nanoparticles containing reactive internal organic functionalities throughout the entire particle body have been synthesized using a surfactant-free method with organosilanes as the sole precursors and a base catalyst. The organic functional groups incorporated are vinyl, allyl, mercapto, cyanoethyl, and cyanopropyl groups. The sizes and morphologies of the particles were characterized using SEM and nitrogen adsorption, while the compositions were confirmed using TGA, FT-IR, solid state NMR, and elemental analysis. The accessibility and reactivity of the functional groups inside the particles were demonstrated by performing bromination and reduction reactions in the interior of the particles.

  6. Prospective evaluation of the International Study Group for Liver Surgery definition of bile leak after a liver resection and the role of routine operative drainage: an international multicentre study

    PubMed Central

    Brooke-Smith, Mark; Figueras, Joan; Ullah, Shahid; Rees, Myrddin; Vauthey, Jean-Nicolas; Hugh, Thomas J; Garden, O James; Fan, Sheung Tat; Crawford, Michael; Makuuchi, Masatoshi; Yokoyama, Yukihiro; Büchler, Marcus; Weitz, Juergen; Padbury, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Background The International Study Group for Liver Surgery (ISGLS) proposed a definition for bile leak after liver surgery. A multicentre international prospective study was designed to evaluate this definition. Methods Data collected prospectively from 949 consecutive patients on specific datasheets from 11 international centres were collated centrally. Results Bile leak occurred in 69 (7.3%) of patients, with 31 (3.3%), 32 (3.4%) and 6 (0.6%) classified as grade A, B and C, respectively. The grading system of severity correlated with the Dindo complication classification system (P < 0.001). Hospital length of stay was increased when bile leak occurred, from a median of 7 to 15 days (P < 0.001), as was intensive care stay (P < 0.001), and both correlated with increased severity grading of bile leak (P < 0.001). 96% of bile leaks occurred in patients with intra-operative drains. Drain placement did not prevent subsequent intervention in the bile leak group with a 5–15 times greater risk of intervention required in this group (P < 0.001). Conclusion The ISGLS definition of bile leak after liver surgery appears robust and intra-operative drain usage did not prevent the need for subsequent drain placement. PMID:25059275

  7. Standards of reporting for MRI-targeted biopsy studies (START) of the prostate: recommendations from an International Working Group.

    PubMed

    Moore, Caroline M; Kasivisvanathan, Veeru; Eggener, Scott; Emberton, Mark; Fütterer, Jurgen J; Gill, Inderbir S; Grubb Iii, Robert L; Hadaschik, Boris; Klotz, Laurence; Margolis, Daniel J A; Marks, Leonard S; Melamed, Jonathan; Oto, Aytekin; Palmer, Suzanne L; Pinto, Peter; Puech, Philippe; Punwani, Shonit; Rosenkrantz, Andrew B; Schoots, Ivo G; Simon, Richard; Taneja, Samir S; Turkbey, Baris; Ukimura, Osamu; van der Meulen, Jan; Villers, Arnauld; Watanabe, Yuji

    2013-10-01

    A systematic literature review of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-targeted prostate biopsy demonstrates poor adherence to the Standards for the Reporting of Diagnostic Accuracy (STARD) recommendations for the full and transparent reporting of diagnostic studies. To define and recommend Standards of Reporting for MRI-targeted Biopsy Studies (START). Each member of a panel of 23 experts in urology, radiology, histopathology, and methodology used the RAND/UCLA appropriateness methodology to score a 258-statement premeeting questionnaire. The collated responses were presented at a face-to-face meeting, and each statement was rescored after group discussion. Measures of agreement and consensus were calculated for each statement. The most important statements, based on group median score, the degree of group consensus, and the content of the group discussion, were used to create a checklist of reporting criteria (the START checklist). The strongest recommendations were to report histologic results of standard and targeted cores separately using Gleason score and maximum cancer core length. A table comparing detection rates of clinically significant and clinically insignificant disease by targeted and standard approaches should also be used. It was recommended to report the recruitment criteria for MRI-targeted biopsy, prior biopsy status of the population, a brief description of the MRI sequences, MRI reporting method, radiologist experience, and image registration technique. There was uncertainty about which histologic criteria constitute clinically significant cancer when the prostate is sampled using MRI-targeted biopsy, and it was agreed that a new definition of clinical significance in this setting needed to be derived in future studies. Use of the START checklist would improve the quality of reporting in MRI-targeted biopsy studies and facilitate a comparison between standard and MRI-targeted approaches. Copyright © 2013 European Association of Urology. All

  8. International Space Station Earth Observations Working Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stefanov, William L.; Oikawa, Koki

    2015-01-01

    The multilateral Earth Observations Working Group (EOWG) was chartered in May 2012 in order to improve coordination and collaboration of Earth observing payloads, research, and applications on the International Space Station (ISS). The EOWG derives its authority from the ISS Program Science Forum, and a NASA representative serves as a permanent co-chair. A rotating co-chair position can be occupied by any of the international partners, following concurrence by the other partners; a JAXA representative is the current co-chair. Primary functions of the EOWG include, 1) the exchange of information on plans for payloads, from science and application objectives to instrument development, data collection, distribution and research; 2) recognition and facilitation of opportunities for international collaboration in order to optimize benefits from different instruments; and 3) provide a formal ISS Program interface for collection and application of remotely sensed data collected in response to natural disasters through the International Charter, Space and Major Disasters. Recent examples of EOWG activities include coordination of bilateral data sharing protocols between NASA and TsNIIMash for use of crew time and instruments in support of ATV5 reentry imaging activities; discussion of continued use and support of the Nightpod camera mount system by NASA and ESA; and review and revision of international partner contributions on Earth observations to the ISS Program Benefits to Humanity publication.

  9. Scoring system for renal pathology in Fabry disease: report of the International Study Group of Fabry Nephropathy (ISGFN)

    PubMed Central

    Fogo, Agnes B.; Bostad, Leif; Svarstad, Einar; Cook, William J.; Moll, Solange; Barbey, Federic; Geldenhuys, Laurette; West, Michael; Ferluga, Dusan; Vujkovac, Bojan; Howie, Alexander J.; Burns, Áine; Reeve, Roy; Waldek, Stephen; Noël, Laure-Hélène; Grünfeld, Jean-Pierre; Valbuena, Carmen; Oliveira, João Paulo; Müller, Justus; Breunig, Frank; Zhang, Xiao; Warnock, David G.

    2010-01-01

    Background. In Fabry nephropathy, alpha-galactosidase deficiency leads to accumulation of glycosphingolipids in all kidney cell types, proteinuria and progressive loss of kidney function. Methods. An international working group of nephrologists from 11 Fabry centres identified adult Fabry patients, and pathologists scored histologic changes on renal biopsies. A standardized scoring system was developed with a modified Delphi technique assessing 59 Fabry nephropathy cases. Each case was scored independently of clinical information by at least three pathologists with an average final score reported. Results. We assessed 35 males (mean age 36.4 years) and 24 females (43.9 years) who mostly had clinically mild Fabry nephropathy. The average serum creatinine was 1.3 mg/dl (114.9 μmol/l); estimated glomerular filtration rate was 81.7 ml/min/1.73 m2 and urine protein to creatinine ratio was 1.08 g/g (122.0 mg/mmol). Males had greater podocyte vacuolization on light microscopy (mean score) and glycosphingolipid inclusions on semi-thin sections than females. Males also had significantly more proximal tubule, peritubular capillary and vascular intimal inclusions. Arteriolar hyalinosis was similar, but females had significantly more arterial hyalinosis. Chronic kidney disease stage correlated with arterial and glomerular sclerosis scores. Significant changes, including segmental and global sclerosis, and interstitial fibrosis were seen even in patients with stage 1–2 chronic kidney disease with minimal proteinuria. Conclusions. The development of a standardized scoring system of both disease-specific lesions, i.e. lipid deposition related, and general lesions of progression, i.e. fibrosis and sclerosis, showed a spectrum of histologic appearances even in early clinical stage of Fabry nephropathy. These findings support the role of kidney biopsy in the baseline evaluation of Fabry nephropathy, even with mild clinical disease. The scoring system will be useful for

  10. Multicentre evaluation of reduced-osmolarity oral rehydration salts solution. International Study Group on Reduced-osmolarity ORS solutions.

    PubMed

    1995-02-04

    In developed countries, use of oral rehydration salts (ORS) solution with osmolarity lower than that of plasma has been recommended because of the risk of hypernatraemia. We compared the clinical efficacy of reduced-osmolarity ORS and standard ORS solutions in children with acute diarrhoea in four developing countries. 447 boys aged 1-24 months, admitted to hospitals in four countries with acute diarrhoea and signs of dehydration, were randomly assigned either standard ORS (311 mmol/L) or reduced-osmolarity ORS (224 mmol/L) solution. Total stool output was 39% greater (95% CI 11-75), total ORS intake 18% greater (3-33), and duration of diarrhoea 22% longer (2-45) in the standard ORS group than in the reduced-osmolarity ORS group. The risk of requiring intravenous infusion after completion of the initial oral rehydration was greater in children given standard ORS solution than in those given reduced-osmolarity ORS solution in three of the four countries (all-country relative risk 1.4 [0.9-2.4]). This relative risk was significantly increased only in non-breastfed children (2.0 [1.0-3.8], p < 0.05). In breastfed children, the relative risk of requiring intravenous infusion was not affected by the ORS solution (0.9 [0.4-2.0]). The mean sodium concentration 24 h after admission was significantly lower in the reduced-osmolarity ORS group than in the standard ORS group (135 [134-136] vs 138 [136-139] mmol/L, p < 0.01). Reduced-osmolarity ORS solution has beneficial effects on the clinical course of acute diarrhoea. Our findings support the use of reduced-osmolarity ORS solution in children with acute non-cholera diarrhoea in developing countries. Further studies are needed to find the best formulation and whether such a solution would be satisfactory for the treatment of cholera.

  11. Division II / Working Group International Collaboration in Space Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, David F.; Gopalswamy, Nat; Liu, William; Sibeck, David G.; Schmieder, Brigitte; Wang, Jingxiu; Wang, Chi

    2007-12-01

    The IAU Division II WG on International Collaboration in Space Weather has as its main goal to help coordinate the many activities related to space weather at an international level. The WG currently includes the international activities of the International Heliospheric Year (IHY), the International Living with a Star (ILWS) program, the CAWSES (Climate and Weather of the Sun-Earth System) Working Group on Sources of Geomagnetic Activity, and Space Weather Studies in China. The coordination of IHY activities within the IAU is led by Division II under this working group. The focus of this half-day meeting was on the activities of the IHY program. About 20 people were in attendance. The Chair of the WG, David F. Webb, gave a brief introduction noting that the meeting would have two parts: first, a session on IHY activities emphasizing IHY Regional coordination and, second, a general discussion of the other programs of the WG involving international Space Weather activities.

  12. Synthesis of functionalized Pluronic-b-poly(ε-caprolactone) and the comparative study of their pendant groups on the cellular internalization behavior.

    PubMed

    Du, Zhengzhen; Zhang, Yan; Lang, Meidong

    2015-04-01

    This study focuses on the synthesis of Pluronic-b-poly(ε-caprolactone) bearing benzyl-oxycarbonylmethyl and carboxylic groups and the comparative study to investigate the influence of the different pendant groups on the cellular behavior. The functionalized Pluronic-b-poly(ε-caprolactone) bearing two kinds of pendant groups are synthesized via ring-opening polymerization of ε-caprolactone and 6-(benzyl-oxycarbonyl methyl)-ε-caprolactone and followed by deprotection respectively. The structure of the copolymers is confirmed and the polymeric micelles are formed by an emulsion/solvent evaporation technique. The critical micelle concentrations are improved compared with Pluronic F127, the morphologies of the micelles are spherical with the diameter on nano scale and good colloidal stability. The copolymers have good cytocompatibility and the comparative study reveals that cellular internalization, digesting by lysosome and intracellular distribution are affected by the pendant groups, moreover, the endocytosis pathway is determined by the pendant groups. Therefore, the definite internalization mechanism is beneficial for the design of polymeric micellar carriers to achieve intra- or extracellular modes of drug delivery and provide better access to either cell membrane or intracellular organelles.

  13. Nineteenth International Microgravity Measurements Group Meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLombard, Richard (Compiler)

    2000-01-01

    The Microgravity Measurements Group meetings provide a forum for an exchange of information and ideas about various aspects of microgravity acceleration research in international microgravity research programs. These meetings are sponsored by the PI Microgravity Services (PIMS) project at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The 19th MGMG meeting was held 11-13 July 2000 at the Sheraton Airport Hotel in Cleveland, Ohio. The 44 attendees represented NASA, other space agencies, universities, and commercial companies; 8 of the attendees were international representatives from Japan, Italy, Canada, Russia, and Germany. Twenty-seven presentations were made on a variety of microgravity environment topics including the International Space Station (ISS), acceleration measurement and analysis results, science effects from microgravity accelerations, vibration isolation, free flyer satellites, ground testing, vehicle characterization, and microgravity outreach and education. The meeting participants also toured three microgravity-related facilities at the NASA Glenn Research Center. Contained within the minutes is the conference agenda, which indicates each speaker, the title of their presentation, and the actual time of their presentation. The minutes also include the charts for each presentation, which indicate the authors' name(s) and affiliation. In some cases, a separate written report was submitted and has been Included here

  14. NASA's Internal Space Weather Working Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St. Cyr, O. C.; Guhathakurta, M.; Bell, H.; Niemeyer, L.; Allen, J.

    2011-01-01

    Measurements from many of NASA's scientific spacecraft are used routinely by space weather forecasters, both in the U.S. and internationally. ACE, SOHO (an ESA/NASA collaboration), STEREO, and SDO provide images and in situ measurements that are assimilated into models and cited in alerts and warnings. A number of years ago, the Space Weather laboratory was established at NASA-Goddard, along with the Community Coordinated Modeling Center. Within that organization, a space weather service center has begun issuing alerts for NASA's operational users. NASA's operational user community includes flight operations for human and robotic explorers; atmospheric drag concerns for low-Earth orbit; interplanetary navigation and communication; and the fleet of unmanned aerial vehicles, high altitude aircraft, and launch vehicles. Over the past three years we have identified internal stakeholders within NASA and formed a Working Group to better coordinate their expertise and their needs. In this presentation we will describe this activity and some of the challenges in forming a diverse working group.

  15. Comparison of fluticasone propionate with beclomethasone dipropionate in moderate to severe asthma treated for one year. International Study Group.

    PubMed Central

    Fabbri, L.; Burge, P. S.; Croonenborgh, L.; Warlies, F.; Weeke, B.; Ciaccia, A.; Parker, C.

    1993-01-01

    BACKGROUND--High dose inhaled glucocorticosteroids are increasingly used in the management of patients with moderate to severe asthma. Although effective, they may cause systemic side effects. Fluticasone propionate is a topically active inhaled glucocorticosteroid which has few systemic effects at high doses. METHODS--Fluticasone propionate, 1.5 mg per day, was compared with beclomethasone dipropionate at the same dose for one year in patients with symptomatic moderate to severe asthma; 142 patients received fluticasone propionate and 132 received beclomethasone dipropionate. The study was multicentre, double blind and of a parallel design. For the first three months patients attended the clinic every four weeks and completed daily diary cards. For the next nine months they were only seen at three monthly intervals in the clinic. RESULTS--During the first three months diary card peak expiratory flow (PEF) rate and lung function measurements in the clinic showed significantly greater improvement in patients receiving fluticasone propionate (difference in morning PEF 15 l/min (95% CI 6 to 25)), and these differences were apparent at the end of the first week. The improved lung function was maintained throughout the 12 month period and the number of severe exacerbations in patients receiving fluticasone propionate was reduced by 8% compared with those receiving beclomethasone dipropionate. No significant differences between the two groups were observed in morning plasma cortisol levels, urinary free cortisol levels, or response to synthetic ACTH stimulation. In addition, both the rates of withdrawal and of adverse events were low, and there were fewer exacerbations of asthma with fluticasone propionate than beclomethasone dipropionate. CONCLUSIONS--This study shows that fluticasone propionate in a daily dose of 1.5 mg results in a significantly greater increase in PEF and asthma control than the same dose of beclomethasone dipropionate, with no increase in systemic

  16. Report of the International Telegraph and Telephone Consultative Committee Study Group. XVIII. Group of Experts on ISDN Matters Meeting in Kyoto, Japan.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-02-01

    033 2. Definitions A.033 3. Relationships A.035 Annex B (at page A33) A.035 Annex 9 Proposed Revisions to Draft Recommendation I.XXX A.037 Examples...of Implementation of NT1 and NT2 Functions A.038 Annex 10 Proposed Revisions to Draft Recommendation I.XXY A.042 Annex 8 Reply to SGVII on Number of R...ordination meeting has revised the agenda for the group of experts meeting as shown in Annex 1. In parallel with the meeting of the Group of experts on ISDN

  17. Efficacy and safety of Stealth liposomal doxorubicin in AIDS-related Kaposi's sarcoma. The International SL-DOX Study Group.

    PubMed Central

    Goebel, F. D.; Goldstein, D.; Goos, M.; Jablonowski, H.; Stewart, J. S.

    1996-01-01

    The utility of current chemotherapeutic regimens in the treatment of AIDS-related Kaposi's sarcoma (AIDS-KS) is often compromised by both limited efficacy and substantial toxicity. Pegylated (Stealth) liposomal doxorubicin hydrochloride (SL-DOX) has been demonstrated specifically to deliver high concentrations of doxorubicin to Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) lesions. This phase II study was performed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of SL-DOX in the treatment of moderate to severe AIDS-KS. Patients were treated biweekly with 10, 20, or 40 mg m-2 SL-DOX. Tumour response was assessed according to AIDS Clinical Trials Groups (ACTG) criteria before each cycle. Best response was determined for 238 patients and was achieved after a mean of 2.3 cycles (range 1-20). Fifteen patients (6.3%) had a complete response to SL-DOX, 177 (74.4%) had a partial response, 44 (18.5%) had stable disease and two (0.8%) had disease progression. SL-DOX was well tolerated: ten patients discontinued therapy because of adverse events, in four cases because of neutropenia. Grade 3 or 4 neutropenia occurred after 281 of 2023 cycles (13.9%) but involved 137 of 240 patients (57.1%) for whom data were available. SL-DOX has substantial activity in AIDS-KS. Best response is typically seen after fewer than three cycles of chemotherapy and in some cases may be prolonged. The most important adverse event is neutropenia, which occurs after a minority of cycles but which may occur in over half of all patients. PMID:8611437

  18. 17th International Microgravity Measurements Group Meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLombard, Richard

    1998-01-01

    The Seventeenth International Microgravity Measurements Group (MGMG) meeting was held 24-26 March 1998 at the Ohio Aerospace Institute (OAI) in Brook Park, Ohio. This meeting focused on the transition of microgravity science research from the Shuttle, Mir, and free flyers to the International Space Station. The MGMG series of meetings are conducted by the Principal Investigator Microgravity Services project of the Microgravity Science Division at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The MGMG meetings provide a forum for the exchange of information and ideas about the microgravity environment and microgravity acceleration research in the Microgravity Research Program. The meeting had participation from investigators in all areas of microgravity research. The attendees included representatives from: NASA centers; National Space Development Agency of Japan; European Space Agency; Daimler Benz Aerospace AG; Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt; Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales; Canadian Space Agency, national research institutions; Universities in U.S., Italy, Germany, and Russia; and commercial companies in the U.S. and Russia. Several agencies presented summaries of the measurement, analysis, and characterization of the microgravity environment of the Shuttle, Mir, and sounding rockets over the past fifteen years. This extensive effort has laid a foundation for pursuing a similar course during future microgravity science experiment operations on the ISS. Future activities of microgravity environment characterization were discussed by several agencies who plan to operate on the ISS.

  19. Clinical activity of everolimus in relapsed/refractory marginal zone B-cell lymphomas: results of a phase II study of the International Extranodal Lymphoma Study Group.

    PubMed

    Conconi, Annarita; Raderer, Markus; Franceschetti, Silvia; Devizzi, Liliana; Ferreri, Andrés J M; Magagnoli, Massimo; Arcaini, Luca; Zinzani, Pier Luigi; Martinelli, Giovanni; Vitolo, Umberto; Kiesewetter, Barbara; Porro, Elena; Stathis, Anastasios; Gaidano, Gianluca; Cavalli, Franco; Zucca, Emanuele

    2014-07-01

    The International Extranodal Lymphoma Study Group coordinated a phase II trial to evaluate the activity and safety of everolimus in marginal zone lymphomas (MZLs). Thirty patients with relapsed/refractory MZLs received everolimus for six cycles or until dose-limiting toxicity or progression. Median age was 71 years (range, 51-88 years). Twenty patients had extranodal, six splenic, four nodal MZL. Twenty-four patients had stage III-IV. Median number of prior therapies was two (range 1-5). Seventeen patients had early treatment discontinuation, in most cases due to toxicity. Median number of cycles was 4.5 (range, 1-16). Among the 24 assessable patients, the overall response rate (ORR) was 25% (95% confidence interval: 10-47). Grade 3-4 adverse events were neutropenia and thrombocytopenia (17% of patients, each), infections (17%), mucositis and odontogenic infections (13%) and lung toxicity (3%). The median response duration was 6.8 months (range, 1.4-11.1+). After a median follow-up of 14.5 months, five deaths were reported: four deaths were due to lymphoma, one was due to toxicity. In an intent-to-treat analysis, the projected median progression-free survival was 14 months. The moderate antitumour activity of everolimus in relapsed/refractory MZLs and the observed toxicity limit its therapeutical applicability in these indolent entities. Lower doses of the drug and, perhaps, different strategies including combination with additional agents need to be explored.

  20. How do general practitioners implement decision-making regarding COPD patients with exacerbations? An international focus group study

    PubMed Central

    Laue, Johanna; Melbye, Hasse; Halvorsen, Peder A; Andreeva, Elena A; Godycki-Cwirko, Maciek; Wollny, Anja; Francis, Nick A; Spigt, Mark; Kung, Kenny; Risør, Mette Bech

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To explore the decision-making of general practitioners (GPs) concerning treatment with antibiotics and/or oral corticosteroids and hospitalization for COPD patients with exacerbations. Methods Thematic analysis of seven focus groups with 53 GPs from urban and rural areas in Norway, Germany, Wales, Poland, Russia, the Netherlands, and Hong Kong. Results Four main themes were identified. 1) Dealing with medical uncertainty: the GPs aimed to make clear medical decisions and avoid unnecessary prescriptions and hospitalizations, yet this was challenged by uncertainty regarding the severity of the exacerbations and concerns about overlooking comorbidities. 2) Knowing the patient: contextual knowledge about the individual patient provided a supplementary framework to biomedical knowledge, allowing for more differentiated decision-making. 3) Balancing the patients’ perspective: the GPs considered patients’ experiential knowledge about their own body and illness as valuable in assisting their decision-making, yet felt that dealing with disagreements between their own and their patients’ perceptions concerning the need for treatment or hospitalization could be difficult. 4) Outpatient support and collaboration: both formal and informal caregivers and organizational aspects of the health systems influenced the decision-making, particularly in terms of mitigating potentially severe consequences of “wrong decisions” and concerning the negotiation of responsibilities. Conclusion Fear of overlooking severe comorbidity and of further deteriorating symptoms emerged as a main driver of GPs’ management decisions. GPs consider a holistic understanding of illness and the patients’ own judgment crucial to making reasonable decisions under medical uncertainty. Moreover, GPs’ decisions depend on the availability and reliability of other formal and informal carers, and the health care systems’ organizational and cultural code of conduct. Strengthening the

  1. How do general practitioners implement decision-making regarding COPD patients with exacerbations? An international focus group study.

    PubMed

    Laue, Johanna; Melbye, Hasse; Halvorsen, Peder A; Andreeva, Elena A; Godycki-Cwirko, Maciek; Wollny, Anja; Francis, Nick A; Spigt, Mark; Kung, Kenny; Risør, Mette Bech

    2016-01-01

    To explore the decision-making of general practitioners (GPs) concerning treatment with antibiotics and/or oral corticosteroids and hospitalization for COPD patients with exacerbations. Thematic analysis of seven focus groups with 53 GPs from urban and rural areas in Norway, Germany, Wales, Poland, Russia, the Netherlands, and Hong Kong. Four main themes were identified. 1) Dealing with medical uncertainty: the GPs aimed to make clear medical decisions and avoid unnecessary prescriptions and hospitalizations, yet this was challenged by uncertainty regarding the severity of the exacerbations and concerns about overlooking comorbidities. 2) Knowing the patient: contextual knowledge about the individual patient provided a supplementary framework to biomedical knowledge, allowing for more differentiated decision-making. 3) Balancing the patients' perspective: the GPs considered patients' experiential knowledge about their own body and illness as valuable in assisting their decision-making, yet felt that dealing with disagreements between their own and their patients' perceptions concerning the need for treatment or hospitalization could be difficult. 4) Outpatient support and collaboration: both formal and informal caregivers and organizational aspects of the health systems influenced the decision-making, particularly in terms of mitigating potentially severe consequences of "wrong decisions" and concerning the negotiation of responsibilities. Fear of overlooking severe comorbidity and of further deteriorating symptoms emerged as a main driver of GPs' management decisions. GPs consider a holistic understanding of illness and the patients' own judgment crucial to making reasonable decisions under medical uncertainty. Moreover, GPs' decisions depend on the availability and reliability of other formal and informal carers, and the health care systems' organizational and cultural code of conduct. Strengthening the collaboration between GPs, other outpatient care facilities

  2. Reducing Health Disparity in People with Intellectual Disabilities: A Report from Health Issues Special Interest Research Group of the International Association for the Scientific Study of Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheepers, M.; Kerr, M.; O'Hara, D.; Bainbridge, D.; Cooper, S.-A.; Davis, R.; Fujiura, G.; Heller, T.; Holland, A.; Krahn, G.; Lennox, N.; Meaney, J.; Wehmeyer, M.

    2005-01-01

    Disparities in the health status and care experienced by people with intellectual disabilities are increasingly being recognized. This special report presents the results of an international expert consensus workshop held under the auspices of the Health Issues Special Interest Research Group of the International Association for the Scientific…

  3. [International cohort studies].

    PubMed

    Ahrens, W; Pigeot, I

    2012-06-01

    Among observational studies, cohort studies, i.e. longitudinal observations of selected population groups, provide the highest possible evidence of a causal association between specific risk factors (exposure) and the occurrence of disease in populations. Besides the fact that many exposures cannot be investigated in experimental designs, cohort studies have the advantage over randomized clinical trials that they are conducted in free living populations and not in restrictive, clinical settings. In this paper we describe the aims and features of international cohorts that have been selected because of their impact, their size or their endpoints. We do not only present the study designs and survey instruments used but we also highlight some of the most important results gained by these studies. Most of these prospective studies investigated common chronic diseases in the elderly, such as cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular or neurodegenerative diseases, osteoporosis and ophthalmologic disorders. Newer cohorts and recent reassessments of existing cohorts almost always include the collection and storage of biological samples. In recent years technological developments allowed the implementation of cutting edge measurement procedures, such as imaging techniques for phenotyping. Finally, we discuss on the one hand whether these designs can be transferred to the German situation and on the other hand to what degree the results obtained from foreign cohorts can be generalized for the German population. We conclude with recommendations for future cohort studies.

  4. Evaluation of an algorithm for the treatment of persistent diarrhoea: a multicentre study. International Working Group on Persistent Diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    1996-01-01

    Described are the findings of a multicentre cohort study to test an algorithm for the treatment of persistent diarrhoea relying on the use of locally available, inexpensive foods, vitamin and mineral supplementation, and the selective use of antibiotics to treat associated infections. The initial diet (A) contained cereals, vegetable oil, and animal milk or yoghurt. The diet (B) offered when the patient did not improve with the initial regimen was lactose free, and the energy from cereals was partially replaced by simple sugars. A total of 460 children with persistent diarrhoea, aged 4-36 months, were enrolled at study centres in Bangladesh, India, Mexico, Pakistan, Peru, and Viet Nam. The study population was young (11.5 +/- 5.7 months) and malnourished (mean weight-for-age Z-score, -3.03 +/- 0.86), and severe associated conditions were common (45% required rehydration or treatment of severe infections on admission). The overall success rate of the treatment algorithm was 80% (95% CI, 76-84%). The recovery rate among all children with only diet A was 65% (95% CI, 61-70%), and was 71% (95% CI, 62-81%) for those evaluated after receiving diet B. The children at the greatest risk for treatment failure were those who had acute associated illnesses (including cholera, septicaemia, and urinary tract infections), required intravenous antibiotics, and had the highest initial purging rates. Our results indicate that the short-term treatment of persistent diarrhoea can be accomplished safely and effectively, in the majority of patients, using an algorithm relying primarily on locally available foods and simple clinical guidelines. This study should help establish rational and effective treatment for persistent diarrhoea.

  5. Evaluation of an algorithm for the treatment of persistent diarrhoea: a multicentre study. International Working Group on Persistent Diarrhoea.

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Described are the findings of a multicentre cohort study to test an algorithm for the treatment of persistent diarrhoea relying on the use of locally available, inexpensive foods, vitamin and mineral supplementation, and the selective use of antibiotics to treat associated infections. The initial diet (A) contained cereals, vegetable oil, and animal milk or yoghurt. The diet (B) offered when the patient did not improve with the initial regimen was lactose free, and the energy from cereals was partially replaced by simple sugars. A total of 460 children with persistent diarrhoea, aged 4-36 months, were enrolled at study centres in Bangladesh, India, Mexico, Pakistan, Peru, and Viet Nam. The study population was young (11.5 +/- 5.7 months) and malnourished (mean weight-for-age Z-score, -3.03 +/- 0.86), and severe associated conditions were common (45% required rehydration or treatment of severe infections on admission). The overall success rate of the treatment algorithm was 80% (95% CI, 76-84%). The recovery rate among all children with only diet A was 65% (95% CI, 61-70%), and was 71% (95% CI, 62-81%) for those evaluated after receiving diet B. The children at the greatest risk for treatment failure were those who had acute associated illnesses (including cholera, septicaemia, and urinary tract infections), required intravenous antibiotics, and had the highest initial purging rates. Our results indicate that the short-term treatment of persistent diarrhoea can be accomplished safely and effectively, in the majority of patients, using an algorithm relying primarily on locally available foods and simple clinical guidelines. This study should help establish rational and effective treatment for persistent diarrhoea. PMID:9002328

  6. An international classification and grading system for age-related maculopathy and age-related macular degeneration. The International ARM Epidemiological Study Group.

    PubMed

    Bird, A C; Bressler, N M; Bressler, S B; Chisholm, I H; Coscas, G; Davis, M D; de Jong, P T; Klaver, C C; Klein, B E; Klein, R

    1995-01-01

    A common detection and classification system is needed for epidemiologic studies of age-related maculopathy (ARM). Such a grading scheme for ARM is described in this paper. ARM is defined as a degenerative disorder in persons > or = 50 years of age characterized on grading of color fundus transparencies by the presence of the following abnormalities in the macular area: soft drusen > or = 63 microns, hyperpigmentation and/or hypopigmentation of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), RPE and associated neurosensory detachment, (peri)retinal hemorrhages, geographic atrophy of the RPE, or (peri)retinal fibrous scarring in the absence of other retinal (vascular) disorders. Visual acuity is not used to define the presence of ARM. Early ARM is defined as the presence of drusen and RPE pigmentary abnormalities described above; late ARM is similar to age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and includes dry AMD (geographic atrophy of the RPE in the absence of neovascular AMD) or neovascular AMD (RPE detachment, hemorrhages, and/or scars as described above). Methods to take and grade fundus transparencies are described.

  7. International neurocognitive normative study: neurocognitive comparison data in diverse resource-limited settings: AIDS Clinical Trials Group A5271.

    PubMed

    Robertson, K; Jiang, H; Evans, S R; Marra, C M; Berzins, B; Hakim, J; Sacktor, N; Silva, M Tulius; Campbell, T B; Nair, A; Schouten, J; Kumwenda, J; Supparatpinyo, K; Tripathy, S; Kumarasamy, N; la Rosa, A; Montano, S; Mwafongo, A; Firnhaber, C; Sanne, I; Naini, L; Amod, F; Walawander, A

    2016-08-01

    Infrastructure for conducting neurological research in resource-limited settings (RLS) is limited. The lack of neurological and neuropsychological (NP) assessment and normative data needed for clinical interpretation impedes research and clinical care. Here, we report on ACTG 5271, which provided neurological training of clinical site personnel and collected neurocognitive normative comparison data in diverse settings. At ten sites in seven RLS countries, we provided training for NP assessments. We collected normative comparison data on HIV- participants from Brazil (n = 240), India (n = 480), Malawi (n = 481), Peru (n = 239), South Africa (480), Thailand (n = 240), and Zimbabwe (n = 240). Participants had a negative HIV test within 30 days before standardized NP exams were administered at baseline and 770 at 6 months. Participants were enrolled in eight strata, gender (female and male), education (<10 and ≥10 years), and age (<35 and ≥35 years). Of 2400 enrolled, 770 completed the 6-month follow-up. As expected, significant between-country differences were evident in all the neurocognitive test scores (p < 0.0001). There was variation between the age, gender, and education strata on the neurocognitive tests. Age and education were important variables for all tests; older participants had poorer performance, and those with higher education had better performance. Women had better performance on verbal learning/memory and speed of processing tests, while men performed better on motor tests. This study provides the necessary neurocognitive normative data needed to build infrastructure for future neurological and neurocognitive studies in diverse RLS. These normative data are a much-needed resource for both clinicians and researchers.

  8. International Neurocognitive Normative Study: Neurocognitive Comparison Data in Diverse Resource Limited Settings: AIDS Clinical Trials Group A5271

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, K; Jiang, H; Evans, SR; Marra, CM; Berzins, B; Hakim, J; Sacktor, N; Silva, M Tulius; Campbell, TB; Nair, A; Schouten, J; Kumwenda, J; Supparatpinyo, K; Tripathy, S.; Kumarasamy, N; La Rosa, A; Montano, S; Mwafongo, A; Firnhaber, C; Sanne, I; Naini, L.; Amod, F; Walawander, A

    2016-01-01

    Summary ACTG A5271 collected neurocognitive normative comparison test data in 2400 at-risk HIV seronegative participants from Brazil, India, Malawi, Peru, South Africa, Thailand and Zimbabwe. The participants were enrolled in strata by site (10 levels), age (2 levels), education (2 levels), and gender (2 levels). These data provide necessary normative data infrastructure for future clinical research and care in these diverse resource limited settings. Infrastructure for conducting neurological research in resource limited settings (RLS) is limited. The lack of neurological and neuropsychological (NP) assessment, and normative data needed for clinical interpretation impede research and clinical care. Here we report on ACTG 5271, which provided neurological training of clinical site personnel, and collected neurocognitive normative comparison data in diverse settings. At 10 sites in seven RLS countries, we provided training for NP assessments. We collected normative comparison data on HIV- participants from Brazil (n=240), India (n=480), Malawi (n=481), Peru (n=239), South Africa (480), Thailand (n=240) and Zimbabwe (n=240). Participants had a negative HIV test within 30 days before standardized NP exams were administered at baseline, and 770 at six-months. Participants were enrolled in 8 strata, gender (female and male), education (<10 years and ≥ 10 years), and age (<35 years and ≥35 years). Of 2400 enrolled, 770 completed the six-month follow up. As expected, significant between-country differences were evident in all the neurocognitive test scores (p<.0001). There was variation between the age, gender and education strata on the neurocognitive tests. Age and education were important variables for all tests; older participants had poorer performance and those with higher education had better performance. Women had better performance on verbal learning/memory and speed of processing tests, while men performed better on motor tests. This study provides the

  9. Impact of ethnicity on gestational diabetes identified with the WHO and the modified International Association of Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups criteria: a population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Jenum, Anne K; Mørkrid, Kjersti; Sletner, Line; Vangen, Siri; Vange, Siri; Torper, Johan L; Nakstad, Britt; Voldner, Nanna; Rognerud-Jensen, Odd H; Berntsen, Sveinung; Mosdøl, Annhild; Skrivarhaug, Torild; Vårdal, Mari H; Holme, Ingar; Yajnik, Chittaranjan S; Birkeland, Kåre I

    2012-02-01

    The International Association of Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups (IADPSG) recently proposed new criteria for diagnosing gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). We compared prevalence rates, risk factors, and the effect of ethnicity using the World Health Organization (WHO) and modified IADPSG criteria. This was a population-based cohort study of 823 (74% of eligible) healthy pregnant women, of whom 59% were from ethnic minorities. Universal screening was performed at 28±2 weeks of gestation with the 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Venous plasma glucose (PG) was measured on site. GDM was diagnosed as per the definition of WHO criteria as fasting PG (FPG) ≥7.0 or 2-h PG ≥7.8 mmol/l; and as per the modified IADPSG criteria as FPG ≥5.1 or 2-h PG ≥8.5 mmol/l. OGTT was performed in 759 women. Crude GDM prevalence was 13.0% with WHO (Western Europeans 11%, ethnic minorities 15%, P=0.14) and 31.5% with modified IADPSG criteria (Western Europeans 24%, ethnic minorities 37%, P< 0.001). Using the WHO criteria, ethnic minority origin was an independent predictor (South Asians, odds ratio (OR) 2.24 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.26-3.97); Middle Easterners, OR 2.13 (1.12-4.08)) after adjustments for age, parity, and prepregnant body mass index (BMI). This increased OR was unapparent after further adjustments for body height (proxy for early life socioeconomic status), education and family history of diabetes. Using the modified IADPSG criteria, prepregnant BMI (1.09 (1.05-1.13)) and ethnic minority origin (South Asians, 2.54 (1.56-4.13)) were independent predictors, while education, body height and family history had little impact. GDM prevalence was overall 2.4-times higher with the modified IADPSG criteria compared with the WHO criteria. The new criteria identified many subjects with a relatively mild increase in FPG, strongly associated with South Asian origin and prepregnant overweight.

  10. Effects of Implementing International Association of Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups Gestational Diabetes Screening on Pregnancy Outcomes at a Small Community Teaching Hospital.

    PubMed

    Gerome, Jody M; Bucher, Lucy K M; Dogbey, Godwin

    2017-04-01

    IN BRIEF Traditional methods of screening for and diagnosing gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) have been challenged, leading to the development of new screening guidelines by the International Association of Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups (IADPSG). This study is a retrospective comparison of pregnancy outcomes based on the Carpenter and Coustan (CC) and IADPSG screening guidelines. It demonstrates that adoption of IADPSG guidelines increased the rate of GDM diagnosis and resulted in more women with diet-controlled GDM. However, a decrease in adverse pregnancy outcomes was not noted. Interestingly, women diagnosed by IADPSG criteria who had diet-controlled GDM had less maternal weight gain than those screened with the CC criteria who did not have GDM but did have an elevated 1-hour oral glucose tolerance test result.

  11. Asian international students' barriers to joining group counseling.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji-Yeon

    2014-10-01

    This cross-sectional study examined anticipated reactions to group participation among Asian international students (ISs). Structural equation modeling confirmed that Asian ISs' (n = 180) level of acculturation was associated with their attitude toward joining group counseling, which is partially mediated by their stigma toward help-seeking. The results of multiple regression analyses indicated that ISs who reported higher place dependence, stigma toward help-seeking, and fear of negative evaluation reported more fear about disclosing emotional parts of themselves to other group members in the presence of a group member from the same country of origin. The results showed that ISs' perceived difficulties in providing feedback to a group member in the presence of an IS from the same country of origin were predicted by low place identity, high place dependence, and more stigma. International students' willingness to disclose and provide feedback in a group counseling setting was compared in three different hypothetical situations based on other group members' demographics, and the results showed that ISs are more afraid of self-disclosure in the presence of an international student from the same country.

  12. Group theories: relevance to group safety studies.

    PubMed

    Benevento, A L

    1998-01-01

    Promoting safety in the workplace has been attempted in a variety of ways. Increasingly, industries are using groups such as safety teams and quality circles to promote worker safety. Group influences on individual behavior and attitudes have long been studied in the social psychology literature, but the theories have not been commonly found outside the psychology arena. This paper describes the group theories of group polarization, risky shift, social loafing, groupthink and team think and attempts to apply these theories to existing studies that examine work group influences on safety. Interesting parallels were found but only one study examined group influences as their primary focus of research. Since groups are increasingly used for safety promotion, future research on safety that studies group influences with respect to current group theories is recommended.

  13. Second non-breast primary cancer following adjuvant therapy for early breast cancer: A report from the International Breast Cancer Study Group

    PubMed Central

    Gianni, Lorenzo; Gelber, Shari; Ravaioli, Alberto; Price, Karen N.; Panzini, Ilaria; Fantini, Manuela; Castiglione-Gertsch, Monica; Pagani, Olivia; Simoncini, Edda; Gelber, Richard D.; Coates, Alan S.; Goldhirsch, Aron

    2009-01-01

    The incidence of second non-breast primary cancer following adjuvant treatment was evaluated using data from patients enrolled from 1978 to 1999 in four International Breast Cancer Study Group (IBCSG) trials. The occurrence of these tumours as sites of first failure was assessed separately for two treatment comparisons: toremifene versus tamoxifen for five years in 1035 patients in IBCSG Trials 12-93 and 14-93 with a median follow-up of eight years and endocrine therapy (toremifene or tamoxifen) versus chemoendocrine therapy (CMF or AC plus toremifene or tamoxifen) in 1731 patients from IBCSG Trials III, VII and 12-93, with a combined median follow-up of 14 years. No significant differences in second non-breast primary tumours were observed in either comparison. In particular the incidences of second primary uterine tumours with toremifene and tamoxifen were similar and no significant increase of secondary leukaemias was observed with chemoendocrine therapy compared with endocrine therapy. PMID:19062268

  14. Definition of Sensitive Skin: An Expert Position Paper from the Special Interest Group on Sensitive Skin of the International Forum for the Study of Itch.

    PubMed

    Misery, Laurent; Ständer, Sonja; Szepietowski, Jacek C; Reich, Adam; Wallengren, Joanna; Evers, Andrea W M; Takamori, Kenji; Brenaut, Emilie; Le Gall-Ianotto, Christelle; Fluhr, Joachim; Berardesca, Enzo; Weisshaar, Elke

    2017-01-04

    Sensitive skin is a frequent complaint in the general population, in patients, and among subjects suffering from itch. The International Forum for the Study of Itch (IFSI) decided to initiate a special interest group (SIG) on sensitive skin. Using the Delphi method, sensitive skin was defined as "A syndrome defined by the occurrence of unpleasant sensations (stinging, burning, pain, pruritus, and tingling sensations) in response to stimuli that normally should not provoke such sensations. These unpleasant sensations cannot be explained by lesions attributable to any skin disease. The skin can appear normal or be accompanied by erythema. Sensitive skin can affect all body locations, especially the face". This paper summarizes the background, unresolved aspects of sensitive skin and the process of developing this definition.

  15. Languages and International Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knoll, Samson B.

    1976-01-01

    International studies are defined as multicultural studies and students should be taught awareness and appreciation of diverse cultures as they relate to each other. Language study should be integrated into an interdisciplinary curriculum where languages receive new meaning and make new contributions. (CHK)

  16. Successful Small Study Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francke, Amiel W.; Kaplan, Walter J.

    1977-01-01

    The authors examine their own experiences with the small study group method used in professional continuing education in the optometric profession, offering some observations and tentative conclusions for other professionals considering the method. (WL)

  17. The International Study Group of Pancreatic Surgery definition of delayed gastric emptying and the effects of various surgical modifications on the occurrence of delayed gastric emptying after pancreatoduodenectomy.

    PubMed

    Panwar, Rajesh; Pal, Sujoy

    2017-08-15

    A number of definitions have been used for delayed gastric emptying (DGE) after pancreatoduodenectomy and the reported rates varied widely. The International Study Group of Pancreatic Surgery (ISGPS) definition is the current standard but it is not used universally. In this comprehensive review, we aimed to determine the acceptance rate of ISGPS definition of DGE, the incidence of DGE after pancreatoduodenectomy and the effect of various technical modifications on its incidence. We searched PubMed for studies regarding DGE after pancreatoduodenectomy that were published from 1 January 1980 to 1 July 2015 and extracted data on DGE definition, DGE rates and comparison of DGE rates among different technical modifications from all of the relevant articles. Out of 435 search results, 178 were selected for data extraction. The ISGPS definition was used in 80% of the studies published since 2010 and the average rates of DGE and clinically relevant DGE were 27.7% (range: 0-100%; median: 18.7%) and 14.3% (range: 1.8%-58.2%; median: 13.6%), respectively. Pylorus preservation or retrocolic reconstruction were not associated with increased DGE rates. Although pyloric dilatation, Braun's entero-enterostomy and Billroth II reconstruction were associated with significantly lower DGE rates, pyloric ring resection appears to be most promising with favorable results in 7 out of 10 studies. ISGPS definition of DGE has been used in majority of studies published after 2010. Clinically relevant DGE rates remain high at 14.3% despite a number of proposed surgical modifications. Pyloric ring resection seems to offer the most promising solution to reduce the occurrence of DGE. Copyright © 2017 The Editorial Board of Hepatobiliary & Pancreatic Diseases International. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Modern International Research Groups: Networks and Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katehi, Linda

    2009-05-01

    In a globalized economy, education and research are becoming increasing international in content and context. Academic and research institutions worldwide try to internationalize their programs by setting formal or informal collaborations. An education that is enhanced by international experiences leads to mobility of the science and technology workforce. Existing academic cultures and research structures are at odds with efforts to internationalize education. For the past 20-30 years, the US has recognized the need to improve the abroad experience of our scientists and technologists: however progress has been slow. Despite a number of both federally and privately supported programs, efforts to scale up the numbers of participants have not been satisfactory. The exchange is imbalanced as more foreign scientists and researchers move to the US than the other way around. There are a number of issues that contribute to this imbalance but we could consider the US academic career system, as defined by its policies and practices, as a barrier to internationalizing the early career faculty experience. Strict curricula, pre-tenure policies and financial commitments discourage students, post doctoral fellows and pre-tenure faculty from taking international leaves to participate in research abroad experiences. Specifically, achieving an international experience requires funding that is not provided by the universities. Furthermore, intellectual property requirements and constraints in pre-tenure probationary periods may discourage students and faculty from collaborations with peers across the Atlantic or Pacific or across the American continent. Environments that support early career networking are not available. This presentation will discuss the increasing need for international collaborations and will explore the need for additional programs, more integration, better conditions and improved infrastructures that can encourage and support mobility of scientists. In addition

  19. Molecular structure and internal rotation of CF₃ group of methyl trifluoroacetate: gas electron diffraction, microwave spectroscopy, and quantum chemical calculation studies.

    PubMed

    Kuze, Nobuhiko; Ishikawa, Atsushi; Kono, Maho; Kobayashi, Takayuki; Fuchisawa, Noriyuki; Tsuji, Takemasa; Takeuchi, Hiroshi

    2015-03-05

    The molecular structure of methyl trifluoroacetate (CF3COOCH3) has been determined by gas electron diffraction (GED), microwave spectroscopy (MW), and quantum chemical calculations (QC). QC study provides the optimized geometries and force constants of the molecule. They were used to estimate the structural model for GED study and to calculate the vibrational corrections for GED and MW data. In addition, potential energy curves for the internal rotations of CF3 and CH3 groups have been calculated for anti (dihedral angle of α(CCOC) is 180°) and syn (α(CCOC) = 0°) conformers of methyl trifluoroacetate. Both the GED and MW data revealed the existence of the anti conformer. Molecular constants determined by MW are A0 = 3613.4(3) MHz, B0 = 1521.146(8) MHz, C0 = 1332.264(9) MHz, ΔJ = 0.09(2) kHz, and ΔJK = 0.23(6) kHz. The GED data were well-reproduced by the analysis in which a large-amplitude motion of the CF3 group was taken into account. The barrier of the internal rotation of the CF3 group was determined to be V3 = 2.3(4) kJ mol(-1), where V3 is the potential coefficient of the assumed potential function, V(ϕ) = (V3/2)(1 - cos 3ϕ), and ϕ is a rotational angle for the CF3 group. The values of geometrical parameters (re structure) of the anti conformer of CF3COOCH3 are r((O═)C-O) = 1.326(6) Å, r(O-CH3) = 1.421(4) Å, r(C-H(in-plane)) = 1.083(14) Å, r(C-H(out-of-plane)) = 1.087(14) Å, r(C═O) = 1.190(7) Å, r(C-C) = 1.533(4) Å, r(C-F(in-plane)) = 1.319(4) Å, r(C-F(out-of-plane)) = 1.320(6) Å, ∠COC = 116.3(5)°, ∠OCH(in-plane) = 105.2° (fixed), ∠OCH(out-of-plane) = 110.0° (fixed), ∠O═CC = 123.7° (fixed), ∠O-CC = 111.2(5)°, ∠OCO = 125.2(5)°, ∠CCF = 110.1(3)°, and OCCF (out-of-plane dihedral angles) = ± 121.5(1)°. Numbers in parentheses are three times the standard deviations of the data fit.

  20. Clinical Implications of the 2016 International Study Group on Pancreatic Surgery Definition and Grading of Postoperative Pancreatic Fistula on 775 Consecutive Pancreatic Resections.

    PubMed

    Pulvirenti, Alessandra; Marchegiani, Giovanni; Pea, Antonio; Allegrini, Valentina; Esposito, Alessandro; Casetti, Luca; Landoni, Luca; Malleo, Giuseppe; Salvia, Roberto; Bassi, Claudio

    2017-07-03

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the clinical implications of the 2016 International Study Group for Pancreatic Surgery (ISGPS) definition and classification of postoperative pancreatic fistula (POPF) using a single high-volume institutional cohort of patients undergone pancreatic surgery. The ISGPS definition and grading system of POPF has been recently updated. Although the rationale for the changes was supported by previous studies, the effect of the new definition and classification scheme on surgical series has not been established. A total of 775 patients undergone pancreatic surgery in our institute from 2013 to 2015 were reviewed. The parameters modified in the ISGPS classification were analyzed according to postoperative outcomes. Finally the classification was validated by external clinical and economical outcomes. Applying the 2016 scheme, 17.5% of patients changed classification group compared to the 2015 system. Grade B increased from 11.5% to 22.1%, whereas grade C decreased from 15.2% to 4.6%. Biochemical leak occurred in 7% of patients, and it did not differ from the non-POPF condition in terms of surgical outcomes. Non-POPF group, grades B and C POPF differed significantly in terms of intensive care unit staying (P < 0.001), length of stay (P < 0.001), readmission rate (P < 0.001), and hospital costs (P < 0.001). The present study has confirmed the pertinence of the changes introduced in the 2016 ISGPS POPF definition and grading. This updated classification is effective in identifying three conditions that differ in terms of clinical and economic outcomes. These results suggested the reliability of the new definition and scheme in classifying POPF-related outcomes.

  1. The clinical features, management and prognosis of primary and secondary indolent lymphoma of the bone: a retrospective study of the International Extranodal Lymphoma Study Group (IELSG #14 study).

    PubMed

    Govi, Silvia; Christie, David; Mappa, Silvia; Marturano, Emerenziana; Bruno-Ventre, Marta; Messina, Carlo; Medina, Elías A Gracia; Porter, David; Radford, John; Heo, Dae Seog; Park, Yeon; Pro, Barbara; Jayamohan, Jayasingham; Pavlakis, Nick; Zucca, Emanuele; Gospodarowicz, Mary; Ferreri, Andrés J M

    2014-08-01

    Indolent lymphomas primarily involving the skeleton (iPBL) represent < 1% of all primary bone lymphomas. The management and prognosis have not been previously described. Patients with primary and secondary iPBL were selected from an international database of 499 patients with a histopathological diagnosis of non-Hodgkin lymphoma and skeleton involvement, and clinical features, management and prognosis were analyzed. Twenty-six (5%) patients had an iPBL. Ten patients had small lymphocytic lymphoma, 10 had follicular lymphoma and six had lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma. Eleven patients had limited stage and 15 had advanced disease. The overall response rate was 73% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 57-89%). Median follow-up was 58 months, and the 5- and 10-year progression-free survival (PFS) rates were 37 ± 10% and 25 ± 12%, respectively. Nine patients are alive, with 5- and 10-year overall survival (OS) rates of 46 ± 10% and 29 ± 11%, respectively. Patients with small lymphocytic lymphoma showed significantly better outcome than patients with follicular lymphoma. Performance status and stage of disease were independently associated with OS. The prognosis of patients with primary bone lymphoplasmacytic or follicular lymphoma was less favorable.

  2. Study Canada: International Outlook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monahan, Robert L.; And Others

    This self-contained unit of study on Canada is one of a series which can be used to supplement secondary level courses of social studies, contemporary world problems, government, history, and geography. Developed by teachers, the unit focuses on international relations. A comparative approach is used which stresses understanding Canada from…

  3. International group trains to employ solar energy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The Institute of International Education (IIE) manages the Energy Training Program (ETP) for the US Agency for International Development (USAID) Office of Energy and Infrastructure. In 1992, ETP will be conducting additional renewable energy training courses. These will include in-country Renewable Energy Technology workshops, designed to incorporate US industry representation and technical assistance. Previous courses have had positive impacts on the increase of solar technologies in international markets. Twenty-one energy professionals from eleven countries were in the US from April 18-May 25, as part of the US Program (ETP). The participants, from Africa, Asia, and Latin America, attended the ETP course [open quotes]Solar Electric/Photovoltaic (PV) Technology.[close quotes] Their training program began in Washington, DC with the course orientation and overview, meetings with international organizations involved in PV projects, a field trip to Integrated Power Corporation, and the SOLAR ENERGY FORUM. Participants took part in the Photovoltaic Energy Conversion pre-conference workshop, technical sessions, exhibits, and receptions. The Forum was a good complement to the training since it afforded participants the opportunity to obtain state-of-the-art PV information and establish relationships with US photovoltaic companies. The subsequent four weeks of hands-on, practical training, which took place in Colorado, covered all aspects of PV system design and utilization, including technical and economic analysis. All participants prepared country-specific project papers which they presented at the conclusion of training. The detailed information necessary to complete their project papers was acquired through companies they met at the Forum.

  4. ATLANTIC-DIP: prevalence of metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance in women with previous gestational diabetes mellitus by International Association of Diabetes in Pregnancy Study Groups criteria.

    PubMed

    Noctor, Eoin; Crowe, Catherine; Carmody, Louise A; Kirwan, Breda; O'Dea, Angela; Glynn, Liam G; McGuire, Brian E; O'Shea, Paula M; Dunne, Fidelma P

    2015-02-01

    Women with previous gestational diabetes (GDM) are a high-risk group for future development of diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and cardiovascular disease. The new International Association of Diabetes in Pregnancy Study Groups (IADPSG) criteria significantly increase the number of women diagnosed with GDM. The long-term metabolic outcome in these women is unknown. We set out to determine the prevalence of metabolic syndrome, using adult treatment panel-III criteria; and insulin resistance, using HOMA2-IR, in white European women with previous GDM. Using a cohort design, we invited women meeting IADPSG GDM criteria across four Irish antenatal centres between 2007 and 2010 to participate. Two hundred and sixty-five women with previous values meeting IADPSG criteria for GDM participated (44 % of the population eligible for participation). Mean age was 36.7 years (SD 5.0). These women were compared with a randomly selected control group of 378 women (mean age 37.6 years, SD 5.1) known to have normal glucose tolerance (NGT) in pregnancy during the same period. A total of 25.3 % of women with previous IADPSG-defined GDM met metabolic syndrome criteria, compared to 6.6 % of women with NGT [at 2.6 (SD 1.0) vs. 3.3 years (SD 0.7) post-partum]. The prevalence of HOMA2-IR >1.8 was higher in women with previous IADPSG-defined GDM (33.6 vs. 9.1 % with NGT, p < 0.001). Women with previous GDM by IADPSG criteria demonstrate a greater than threefold prevalence of metabolic syndrome compared to women with NGT in pregnancy. Efforts to prevent projected long-term consequences of this should focus on interventions both in the preconception and post-partum periods.

  5. Restless legs syndrome/Willis-Ekbom disease diagnostic criteria: updated International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group (IRLSSG) consensus criteria--history, rationale, description, and significance.

    PubMed

    Allen, Richard P; Picchietti, Daniel L; Garcia-Borreguero, Diego; Ondo, William G; Walters, Arthur S; Winkelman, John W; Zucconi, Marco; Ferri, Raffaele; Trenkwalder, Claudia; Lee, Hochang B

    2014-08-01

    In 2003, following a workshop at the National Institutes of Health, the International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group (IRLSSG) developed updated diagnostic criteria for restless legs syndrome/Willis-Ekbom disease (RLS/WED). These criteria were integral to major advances in research, notably in epidemiology, biology, and treatment of RLS/WED. However, extensive review of accumulating literature based on the 2003 NIH/IRLSSG criteria led to efforts to improve the diagnostic criteria further. The clinical standards workshop, sponsored by the WED Foundation and IRLSSG in 2008, started a four-year process for updating the diagnostic criteria. That process included a rigorous review of research advances and input from clinical experts across multiple disciplines. After broad consensus was attained, the criteria were formally approved by the IRLSSG executive committee and membership. Major changes are: (i) addition of a fifth essential criterion, differential diagnosis, to improve specificity by requiring that RLS/WED symptoms not be confused with similar symptoms from other conditions; (ii) addition of a specifier to delineate clinically significant RLS/WED; (iii) addition of course specifiers to classify RLS/WED as chronic-persistent or intermittent; and (iv) merging of the pediatric with the adult diagnostic criteria. Also discussed are supportive features and clinical aspects that are important in the diagnostic evaluation. The IRLSSG consensus criteria for RLS/WED represent an international, interdisciplinary, and collaborative effort intended to improve clinical practice and promote further research. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. 2016 American College of Rheumatology/European League Against Rheumatism Criteria for Minimal, Moderate, and Major Clinical Response in Juvenile Dermatomyositis: An International Myositis Assessment and Clinical Studies Group/Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation Collaborative Initiative.

    PubMed

    Rider, Lisa G; Aggarwal, Rohit; Pistorio, Angela; Bayat, Nastaran; Erman, Brian; Feldman, Brian M; Huber, Adam M; Cimaz, Rolando; Cuttica, Rubén J; de Oliveira, Sheila Knupp; Lindsley, Carol B; Pilkington, Clarissa A; Punaro, Marilynn; Ravelli, Angelo; Reed, Ann M; Rouster-Stevens, Kelly; van Royen-Kerkhof, Annet; Dressler, Frank; Saad Magalhaes, Claudia; Constantin, Tamás; Davidson, Joyce E; Magnusson, Bo; Russo, Ricardo; Villa, Luca; Rinaldi, Mariangela; Rockette, Howard; Lachenbruch, Peter A; Miller, Frederick W; Vencovsky, Jiri; Ruperto, Nicolino

    2017-05-01

    To develop response criteria for juvenile dermatomyositis (DM). We analysed the performance of 312 definitions that used core set measures from either the International Myositis Assessment and Clinical Studies Group (IMACS) or the Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation (PRINTO) and were derived from natural history data and a conjoint analysis survey. They were further validated using data from the PRINTO trial of prednisone alone compared to prednisone with methotrexate or cyclosporine and the Rituximab in Myositis (RIM) trial. At a consensus conference, experts considered 14 top candidate criteria based on their performance characteristics and clinical face validity, using nominal group technique. Consensus was reached for a conjoint analysis-based continuous model with a total improvement score of 0-100, using absolute per cent change in core set measures of minimal (≥30), moderate (≥45), and major (≥70) improvement. The same criteria were chosen for adult DM/polymyositis, with differing thresholds for improvement. The sensitivity and specificity were 89% and 91-98% for minimal improvement, 92-94% and 94-99% for moderate improvement, and 91-98% and 85-86% for major improvement, respectively, in juvenile DM patient cohorts using the IMACS and PRINTO core set measures. These criteria were validated in the PRINTO trial for differentiating between treatment arms for minimal and moderate improvement (p=0.009-0.057) and in the RIM trial for significantly differentiating the physician's rating for improvement (p<0.006). The response criteria for juvenile DM consisted of a conjoint analysis-based model using a continuous improvement score based on absolute per cent change in core set measures, with thresholds for minimal, moderate, and major improvement. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  7. International Relations as Group Interaction: The Case of Russia and NATO

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-01

    particular, multiple studies have focused on the existence of collective identities for states being part of a same group. In Social Theory of...is 20 Alexander Wendt, Social Theory of International Politics, Cambridge Studies in International...useful notions of social group theories, and builds a framework to understand intergroup and out-group/in-group dynamics. Chapter 3 applies this

  8. The therapeutic potential of mesenchymal stem cell transplantation as a treatment for multiple sclerosis: consensus report of the International MSCT Study Group.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Mark S; Bar-Or, Amit; Atkins, Harold L; Karussis, Dimitrios; Frassoni, Francesco; Lazarus, Hillard; Scolding, Neil; Slavin, Shimon; Le Blanc, Katarina; Uccelli, Antonio

    2010-04-01

    Current therapies for multiple sclerosis effectively reduce inflammation, but do little in terms of repair to the damaged central nervous system. Cell-based therapies may provide a new strategy for bolstering regeneration and repair through neuro-axonal protection or remyelination. Mesenchymal stem cells modulate pathological responses in experimental autoimmune encephalitis, alleviating disease, but also stimulate repair of the central nervous system through the release of soluble factors. Autologous and allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells have been safely administered to individuals with hemato-oncological diseases and in a limited number of patients with multiple sclerosis. It is therefore reasonable to move mesenchymal stem cells transplantation into properly controlled human studies to explore their potential as a treatment for multiple sclerosis. Since it is likely that the first such studies will probably involve only small numbers of patients in a few centers, we formed an international panel comprising multiple sclerosis neurology and stem cell experts, as well as immunologists. The aims were to derive a consensus on the utilization of mesenchymal stem cells for the treatment of multiple sclerosis, along with protocols for the culture of the cells and the treatment of patients. This article reviews the consensus derived from our group on the rationale for mesenchymal stem cell transplantation, the methodology for generating mesenchymal stem cells and the first treatment protocol for multiple sclerosis patients.

  9. Annual Hazard Rates of Recurrence for Breast Cancer During 24 Years of Follow-Up: Results From the International Breast Cancer Study Group Trials I to V

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhuoxin; Price, Karen N.; Karlsson, Per; Forbes, John F.; Thürlimann, Beat; Gianni, Lorenzo; Castiglione, Monica; Gelber, Richard D.; Coates, Alan S.; Goldhirsch, Aron

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Predicting the pattern of recurrence can aid in the development of targeted surveillance and treatment strategies. We identified patient populations that remain at risk for an event at a median follow-up of 24 years from the diagnosis of operable breast cancer. Patients and Methods International Breast Cancer Study Group clinical trials I to V randomly assigned 4,105 patients between 1978 and 1985. Annualized hazards were estimated for breast cancer–free interval (primary end point), disease-free survival, and overall survival. Results For the entire group, the annualized hazard of recurrence was highest during the first 5 years (10.4%), with a peak between years 1 and 2 (15.2%). During the first 5 years, patients with estrogen receptor (ER) – positive disease had a lower annualized hazard compared with those with ER-negative disease (9.9% v 11.5%; P = .01). However, beyond 5 years, patients with ER-positive disease had higher hazards (5 to 10 years: 5.4% v 3.3%; 10 to 15 years: 2.9% v 1.3%; 15 to 20 years: 2.8% v 1.2%; and 20 to 25 years: 1.3% v 1.4%; P < .001). Among patients with ER-positive disease, annualized hazards of recurrence remained elevated and fairly stable beyond 10 years, even for those with no axillary involvement (2.0%, 2.1%, and 1.1% for years 10 to 15, 15 to 20, and 20 to 25, respectively) and for those with one to three positive nodes (3.0%, 3.5%, and 1.5%, respectively). Conclusion Patients with ER-positive breast cancer maintain a significant recurrence rate during extended follow up. Strategies for follow up and treatments to prevent recurrences may be most efficiently applied and studied in patients with ER-positive disease followed for a long period of time. PMID:26786933

  10. International Technical Working Group Round Robin Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Dudder, Gordon B.; Hanlen, Richard C.; Herbillion, Georges M.

    2003-02-01

    The goal of nuclear forensics is to develop a preferred approach to support illicit trafficking investigations. This approach must be widely understood and accepted as credible. The principal objectives of the Round Robin Tests are to prioritize forensic techniques and methods, evaluate attribution capabilities, and examine the utility of database. The HEU (Highly Enriched Uranium) Round Robin, and previous Plutonium Round Robin, have made tremendous contributions to fulfilling these goals through a collaborative learning experience that resulted from the outstanding efforts of the nine participating internal laboratories. A prioritized list of techniques and methods has been developed based on this exercise. Current work is focused on the extent to which the techniques and methods can be generalized. The HEU Round Robin demonstrated a rather high level of capability to determine the important characteristics of the materials and processes using analytical methods. When this capability is combined with the appropriate knowledge/database, it results in a significant capability to attribute the source of the materials to a specific process or facility. A number of shortfalls were also identified in the current capabilities including procedures for non-nuclear forensics and the lack of a comprehensive network of data/knowledge bases. The results of the Round Robin will be used to develop guidelines or a ''recommended protocol'' to be made available to the interested authorities and countries to use in real cases.

  11. Substantiation of International Nanomaterials Security Group Creation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosnov, A.; Sadovnikov, S.; Panfilov, S.; Magarshak, Yu.

    Nanotechnology has achieved the status as one of the critical R&D area. Scientists use the unique properties of atomic and molecular assemblages built at the nanometer scale. The ability to manipulate the physical, chemical, and biological properties of molecules and particles affords to design agents with set up properties. But the technology allows creating not only useful agents. Possible accidental or deliberate creation of new nanoparticles (NPs) with dangerous properties is highly probable minor product of progress in the new area. The article briefly describes some pathways in development and implementation of NPs for medicinal and the similar purposes. Some of NPs can effective facilitate and mask transport of various agents in various environments. Possible creation of new dangerous NPs (e.g. conjugates based on combination of extensively use NPs and chemical, biological and radioactive agents) as well as creation of brand new NPs and nanodevices with unique properties needs creation of international multidiscipline community for security evaluation of nanomaterials and technologies. The community will forecast possible dangerous unexpectedness in the field of nanoscale materials and devices and suggests rational pathways for prevention of the threats.

  12. Homophily of Internalized Distress in Adolescent Peer Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogue, Aaron; Steinberg, Laurence

    1995-01-01

    Examined homophilic mechanisms by which adolescents affect, and are affected by, levels of internalized distress within their immediate peer groups. Found that adolescents tend to associate with peers who report similar levels of internalized distress and that internalizers are no less successful than others at establishing friendships. Selection,…

  13. Multicenter study of street foods in 13 towns on four continents by the food and environmental hygiene study group of the international network of pasteur and associated institutes.

    PubMed

    Garin, B; Aïdara, A; Spiegel, A; Arrive, P; Bastaraud, A; Cartel, J L; Aissa, R Ben; Duval, P; Gay, M; Gherardi, C; Gouali, M; Karou, T G; Kruy, S L; Soares, J L; Mouffok, F; Ravaonindrina, N; Rasolofonirina, N; Pham, M T; Wouafo, M; Catteau, M; Mathiot, C; Mauclere, P; Rocourt, J

    2002-01-01

    An international multicenter study of ready-to-eat foods, sandwiches, and ice creams or sorbets sold in the streets and their vendors was carried out to assess the microbiological quality of these foods and to identify characteristics of the vendors possibly associated with pathogens. Thirteen towns in Africa, America, Asia, and Oceania were involved in the study. A single protocol was used in all 13 centers: representative sampling was by random selection of vendors and a sample of foods bought from each of these vendors at a time and date selected at random. Microbiological analyses were carried out using standardized Association Française de Normalisation methods, and the use of a standardized questionnaire to collect data concerning the characteristics of the vendors. Fifteen surveys were carried out, with 3,003 food samples from 1,268 vendors. The proportion of unsatisfactory food samples was between 12.7 and 82.9% for ice creams and sorbets and between 11.3 and 92% for sandwiches. For ice creams and sorbets, the sale of a large number of units (>80 per day) increased the risk of unsatisfactory food by a factor of 2.8 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.5 to 5.1), lack of training in food hygiene by 6.6 (95% CI: 1.1 to 50). and by a factor of 2.8 (95% CI: 1.4 to 5.4) for mobile vendors. These risk factors were not identified for sandwiches, this difference may be due to the presence of a cooking step in their preparation. These results show that the poor microbiological quality of these street foods constitutes a potential hazard to public health, that the extent of this hazard varies between the cities studied, and that vendors' health education in food safety is a crucial factor in the prevention of foodborne infections.

  14. External branch of the superior laryngeal nerve monitoring during thyroid and parathyroid surgery: International Neural Monitoring Study Group standards guideline statement.

    PubMed

    Barczyński, Marcin; Randolph, Gregory W; Cernea, Claudio R; Dralle, Henning; Dionigi, Gianlorenzo; Alesina, Piero F; Mihai, Radu; Finck, Camille; Lombardi, Davide; Hartl, Dana M; Miyauchi, Akira; Serpell, Jonathan; Snyder, Samuel; Volpi, Erivelto; Woodson, Gayle; Kraimps, Jean Louis; Hisham, Abdullah N

    2013-09-01

    Intraoperative neural monitoring (IONM) during thyroid surgery has gained widespread acceptance as an adjunct to the gold standard of visual identification of the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN). Contrary to routine dissection of the RLN, most surgeons tend to avoid rather than routinely expose and identify the external branch of the superior laryngeal nerve (EBSLN) during thyroidectomy or parathyroidectomy. IONM has the potential to be utilized for identification of the EBSLN and functional assessment of its integrity; therefore, IONM might contribute to voice preservation following thyroidectomy or parathyroidectomy. We reviewed the literature and the cumulative experience of the multidisciplinary International Neural Monitoring Study Group (INMSG) with IONM of the EBSLN. A systematic search of the MEDLINE database (from 1950 to the present) with predefined search terms (EBSLN, superior laryngeal nerve, stimulation, neuromonitoring, identification) was undertaken and supplemented by personal communication between members of the INMSG to identify relevant publications in the field. The hypothesis explored in this review is that the use of a standardized approach to the functional preservation of the EBSLN can be facilitated by application of IONM resulting in improved preservation of voice following thyroidectomy or parathyroidectomy. These guidelines are intended to improve the practice of neural monitoring of the EBSLN during thyroidectomy or parathyroidectomy and to optimize clinical utility of this technique based on available evidence and consensus of experts. 5 Copyright © 2013 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  15. 2016 American College of Rheumatology/European League Against Rheumatism Criteria for Minimal, Moderate, and Major Clinical Response in Juvenile Dermatomyositis: An International Myositis Assessment and Clinical Studies Group/Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation Collaborative Initiative.

    PubMed

    Rider, Lisa G; Aggarwal, Rohit; Pistorio, Angela; Bayat, Nastaran; Erman, Brian; Feldman, Brian M; Huber, Adam M; Cimaz, Rolando; Cuttica, Rubén J; de Oliveira, Sheila Knupp; Lindsley, Carol B; Pilkington, Clarissa A; Punaro, Marilynn; Ravelli, Angelo; Reed, Ann M; Rouster-Stevens, Kelly; van Royen-Kerkhof, Annet; Dressler, Frank; Magalhaes, Claudia Saad; Constantin, Tamás; Davidson, Joyce E; Magnusson, Bo; Russo, Ricardo; Villa, Luca; Rinaldi, Mariangela; Rockette, Howard; Lachenbruch, Peter A; Miller, Frederick W; Vencovsky, Jiri; Ruperto, Nicolino

    2017-05-01

    To develop response criteria for juvenile dermatomyositis (DM). We analyzed the performance of 312 definitions that used core set measures from either the International Myositis Assessment and Clinical Studies Group (IMACS) or the Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation (PRINTO) and were derived from natural history data and a conjoint analysis survey. They were further validated using data from the PRINTO trial of prednisone alone compared to prednisone with methotrexate or cyclosporine and the Rituximab in Myositis (RIM) trial. At a consensus conference, experts considered 14 top candidate criteria based on their performance characteristics and clinical face validity, using nominal group technique. Consensus was reached for a conjoint analysis-based continuous model with a total improvement score of 0-100, using absolute percent change in core set measures of minimal (≥30), moderate (≥45), and major (≥70) improvement. The same criteria were chosen for adult DM/polymyositis, with differing thresholds for improvement. The sensitivity and specificity were 89% and 91-98% for minimal improvement, 92-94% and 94-99% for moderate improvement, and 91-98% and 85-86% for major improvement, respectively, in juvenile DM patient cohorts using the IMACS and PRINTO core set measures. These criteria were validated in the PRINTO trial for differentiating between treatment arms for minimal and moderate improvement (P = 0.009-0.057) and in the RIM trial for significantly differentiating the physician's rating for improvement (P < 0.006). The response criteria for juvenile DM consisted of a conjoint analysis-based model using a continuous improvement score based on absolute percent change in core set measures, with thresholds for minimal, moderate, and major improvement. © 2017, American College of Rheumatology.

  16. Reliability, validity, and responsiveness of the Japanese version of International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group rating scale for restless legs syndrome in a clinical trial setting.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Yuichi; Oka, Yasunori; Kagimura, Tatsuo; Kuroda, Kenji; Hirata, Koichi

    2013-09-01

    This study was conducted to verify the reliability, validity, and responsiveness of the Japanese version of the International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group Rating Scale for restless legs syndrome (J-IRLS) as a sub-study of a clinical trial of pramipexole against restless legs syndrome. After evaluating the test-retest reliability, concurrent validity and construct validity were analyzed. The responsiveness of J-IRLS was confirmed by evaluating the correlations between the changes in J-IRLS total score after treatment, Clinical Global Impression Improvement Scale (CGI-I), and Patient Global Impression. Test-retest reliability of J-IRLS was good (intra-class correlation coefficient, 0.877; 95% confidence interval, 0.802-0.925). The correlation coefficient of J-IRLS total score and CGI-S score for the first and second visit was 0.804 and 0.796, respectively (both P < 0.0001). Factor analysis of J-IRLS itemsalone identified a two-factor structure. Exploratory analysis on 10 items of J-IRLS together with the Japanese version of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index revealed that several items on the Japanese version of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index appeared as the third factor. The correlations of CGI-I and Patient Global Impression with change in J-IRLS total score after treatment were highly significant. Reliability, validity, and responsiveness of J-IRLS were considered adequate. The scale is highly applicable both for evaluating the severity of restless legs syndrome and for assessing drug efficacy. © 2013 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2013 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  17. Pathophysiological Characteristics and Effects of Obesity in Women With Early and Late Manifestation of Gestational Diabetes Diagnosed by the International Association of Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups Criteria

    PubMed Central

    Bozkurt, Latife; Göbl, Christian S.; Pfligl, Lisa; Leitner, Karoline; Bancher-Todesca, Dagmar; Luger, Anton; Baumgartner-Parzer, Sabina; Pacini, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Context: Appropriate risk stratification is essential in gestational diabetes (GDM) diagnosis to optimize therapeutic strategies during pregnancy. However, there are sparse data related to the newly recommended International Association of Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups criteria and their use in early pregnancy. Objective: This study sought to evaluate clinical and pathophysiological characteristics less up to gestational week (GW) 21 in women with early and late GDM onset. Design and Setting: This was a prospective study conducted at the Medical University of Vienna. Patients and Interventions: Pregnant women (n = 211) underwent an oral glucose tolerance test at 16 GW (interquartile range, 14–18 wk) with multiple measurements of glucose, insulin, and C-peptide for evaluation of insulin sensitivity and ß-cell function in addition to detailed obstetrical risk assessment. Clinical followups were performed until end of pregnancy. Main outcome measure: We performed a metabolic characterization of early-onset GDM. Results: Of 81 women, 49 (23%) showed early (GDMEarly ≤ 21 GW) and 32 (15%) later manifestation (GDMLate ≥ 24 GW) whereas 130 (62%) remained normal-glucose-tolerant (NGT). In contrast with GDMLate, GDMEarly were affected by decreased insulin sensitivity (GDMEarly vs NGT, P < .001; GDMEarlyvs GDMLate, P < .001; GDMLate vs NGT, P = .410). However, both early and late manifested subjects showed impairments in ß-cell function. GDMEarly showed highest levels of preconceptional and actual body mass index (BMI), which was related to fasting glucose (r = 0.42, P < .001) and particularly insulin sensitivity (r = −0.51, P < .001). Differences in glucose disposal between the subgroups remained constant in multivariable analysis including the strongest risk factors for GDM, ie, age, history of GDM, and BMI in our population. Conclusions: Early manifestation of GDM is affected by insulin resistance that is partly explained by higher degree in obesity

  18. Multicentre study on inflammatory skin diseases from The International Confocal Working Group: specific confocal microscopy features and an algorithmic method of diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Ardigo, M; Longo, C; Gonzalez, S

    2016-08-01

    The real value of reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) for the evaluation of inflammatory skin conditions remains unclear. A project on RCM for inflammatory skin diseases involving international centres was designed by a coordinating centre and executed under the supervision of the International Confocal Working Group. To identify specific confocal features useful for distinction between the three main groups of superficial inflammatory skin diseases. Nineteen different RCM features were evaluated in a total of 155 lesions, diagnosed as spongiotic (45), interface (52) or psoriasiform (58) dermatitis, collected by a consortium of 19 different centres. Univariate and multivariate analysis identified RCM descriptors for the three main superficial inflammatory disease groups. Later, a multivariate method was employed to define a scoring system to be applied on an algorithmic method of analysis for fast clinical application. Our preliminary evaluation supports the use of RCM for the identification of confocal patterns consistent with the major features of the diagnostic groups of inflammatory skin diseases. Moreover, an efficient multivariate method for clinical in vivo RCM diagnosis using a tree decision diagram has been established. © 2016 British Association of Dermatologists.

  19. Socialization and Selection Effects in the Association between Weight Conscious Peer Groups and Thin-Ideal Internalization: A Co-Twin Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Burt, S. Alexandra; O’Connor, Shannon; Thompson, J. Kevin; Klump, Kelly L.

    2016-01-01

    Affiliation with weight conscious peer groups is theorized to increase thin-ideal internalization through socialization processes. However, selection effects could contribute if genetic and/or environmental predispositions lead to affiliation with weight conscious peers. Co-twin control methodology was used to examine socialization and selection effects in 614 female twins (ages 8–15) from the Michigan State University Twin Registry (MSUTR). Thin-ideal internalization and peer group characteristics were assessed via self-report questionnaires. Results suggested the presence of both socialization and selection effects. In terms of socialization, twins who reported increased exposure to weight conscious peers relative to their co-twins had elevated thin-ideal internalization scores, regardless of zygosity. However, associations between weight conscious peers and thin-ideal internationalization within twin pairs were attenuated, suggesting that genetic and shared environmental selection effects also contribute. Findings significantly extend previous work by confirming the presence of socialization processes and highlighting selection processes to be examined in future longitudinal research. PMID:26859605

  20. Socialization and selection effects in the association between weight conscious peer groups and thin-ideal internalization: A co-twin control study.

    PubMed

    VanHuysse, Jessica L; Burt, S Alexandra; O'Connor, Shannon M; Thompson, J Kevin; Klump, Kelly L

    2016-06-01

    Affiliation with weight conscious peer groups is theorized to increase thin-ideal internalization through socialization processes. However, selection effects could contribute if genetic and/or environmental predispositions lead to affiliation with weight conscious peers. Co-twin control methodology was used to examine socialization and selection effects in 614 female twins (ages 8-15) from the Michigan State University Twin Registry (MSUTR). Thin-ideal internalization and peer group characteristics were assessed via self-report questionnaires. Results suggested the presence of both socialization and selection effects. In terms of socialization, twins who reported increased exposure to weight conscious peers relative to their co-twins had elevated thin-ideal internalization scores, regardless of zygosity. However, associations between weight conscious peers and thin-ideal internationalization within twin pairs were attenuated, suggesting that genetic and shared environmental selection effects also contribute. Findings significantly extend previous work by confirming the presence of socialization processes and highlighting selection processes to be examined in future longitudinal research.

  1. Improved Neuropsychological and Neurological Functioning Across Three Antiretroviral Regimens in Diverse Resource-Limited Settings: AIDS Clinical Trials Group Study A5199, the International Neurological Study

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, K.; Jiang, H.; Kumwenda, J.; Supparatpinyo, K.; Evans, S.; Campbell, T. B.; Price, R.; Tripathy, S.; Kumarasamy, N.; La Rosa, A.; Santos, B.; Silva, M. T.; Montano, S.; Kanyama, C.; Faesen, S.; Murphy, R.; Hall, C.; Marra, C. M.; Marcus, C.; Berzins, B.; Allen, R.; Housseinipour, M.; Amod, F.; Sanne, I.; Hakim, J.; Walawander, A.; Nair, A.

    2012-01-01

    Background. AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG) A5199 compared the neurological and neuropsychological (NP) effects of 3 antiretroviral regimens in participants infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in resource-limited settings. Methods. Participants from Brazil, India, Malawi, Peru, South Africa, Thailand, and Zimbabwe were randomized to 3 antiretroviral treatment arms: A (lamivudine-zidovudine plus efavirenz, n = 289), B (atazanavir, emtricitabine, and didanosine-EC, n = 293), and C (emtricitabine-tenofovir-disoproxil fumarate plus efavirenz, n = 278) as part of the ACTG PEARLS study (A5175). Standardized neurological and neuropsychological (NP) screening examinations (grooved pegboard, timed gait, semantic verbal fluency, and finger tapping) were administered every 24 weeks from February 2006 to May 2010. Associations with neurological and neuropsychological function were estimated from linear and logistic regression models using generalized estimating equations. Results. The median weeks on study was 168 (Q1 = 96, Q3 = 192) for the 860 participants. NP test scores improved (P < .05) with the exception of semantic verbal fluency. No differences in neurological and neuropsychological functioning between treatment regimens were detected (P > .10). Significant country effects were noted on all NP tests and neurological outcomes (P < .01). Conclusions. The study detected no significant differences in neuropsychological and neurological outcomes between randomized ART regimens. Significant improvement occurred in neurocognitive and neurological functioning over time after initiation of ARTs. The etiology of these improvements is likely multifactorial, reflecting reduced central nervous system HIV infection, better general health, and practice effects. This study suggests that treatment with either of the World Health Organization –recommended first-line antiretroviral regimens in resource-limited settings will improve

  2. Electronic spectra of 2- and 3-tolunitrile in the gas phase. I. A study of methyl group internal rotation via rovibronically resolved spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ruiz-Santoyo, José Arturo; Álvarez-Valtierra, Leonardo; Wilke, Josefin; Wilke, Martin; Schmitt, Michael; Yi, John T.; Pratt, David W.

    2016-01-28

    Rotationally resolved fluorescence excitation spectra of the origin bands in the S{sub 1}←S{sub 0} transition of 2-tolunitrile (2TN) and 3-tolunitrile (3TN) have been recorded in the collision-free environment of a molecular beam. Analyses of these data provide the rotational constants of each molecule and the potential energy curves governing the internal rotation of the attached methyl groups in both electronic states. 2TN exhibits much larger barriers along this coordinate than 3TN. Interestingly, the electronic transition dipole moment in both molecules is markedly influenced by the position of the attached methyl group rather than the position of the cyano group; possible reasons for this intriguing behavior are discussed.

  3. Analysis of early and long-term outcomes of acute type A aortic dissection according to the new international aortic arch surgery study group recommendations.

    PubMed

    Colli, Andrea; Carrozzini, Massimiliano; Galuppo, Marco; Comisso, Marina; Toto, Francesca; Gregori, Dario; Gerosa, Gino

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate predictors of early and long-term outcomes of surgical repair of acute Type A aortic dissection. Retrospective single-centre study evaluating patients surgically treated between 1998 and 2013. Clinical follow-up was performed. Complications were classified according to the International Aortic Arch Surgery Study Group recommendations. Statistical analysis included univariate and multivariate analysis of preoperative and operative data. One hundred eighty-five patients were evaluated. The follow-up was complete for 180 patients (97 %). Mean age was 63 years, 82 % had a DeBakey type I aortic dissection, 18 % a type II. Eleven patients (6 %) died intraoperatively, 119 of the remaining (68 %) had postoperative complications. Thirty-day mortality was 21 % (38 patients). Average ICU and hospital stay were 6 and 14 days, respectively. During a mean follow-up time of 6 ± 4 years we observed 44 deaths (31 %). Twenty patients (14 %) needed late thoracic aorta reoperation. Results from the multivariate analysis are as follows. Thirty-day mortality was associated with abdominal pain at presentation (p < 0.01). The incidence of postoperative complications was related to older age at intervention (p < 0.01) and longer cross-clamp time (p < 0.01). Mortality at follow-up was significantly increased by older age at intervention (p < 0.01), with a logarithmic growth after 60 years, female sex (p < 0.01), preoperative limb ischemia (p = 0.02) and DHCA (p < 0.01). The surgical results of type A aortic dissection are affected by age at intervention with a logarithmic increase of late mortality in patients older than 60 years.

  4. Screening for dysglycaemia during pregnancy: Proposals conciliating International Association of Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Group (IADPSG) and US National Institutes of Health (NIH) panels.

    PubMed

    Cosson, E; Valensi, P; Carbillon, L

    2015-06-01

    The International Association of Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Group (IADPSG) has proposed that blood glucose levels for the diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) be the values associated with a 1.75-fold increase in the risk of neonatal complications in the Hyperglycaemia and Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes (HAPO) study. However, this recommendation was not adopted by the US National Institutes of Health (NIH) panel as it would have been responsible for a huge increase in the prevalence of GDM with no clear evidence of a reduction of events at such blood glucose values. Considering this aspect, we now propose the use of a blood glucose threshold combination associated with an odds-ratio of 2.0 for neonatal disorders [fasting plasma glucose (FPG)≥ 95 mg/dL, or a 1-h glucose value after a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT)≥ 191 mg/dL or a 2-h glucose value ≥ 162 mg/dL] for GDM diagnosis. This would lead to a lower prevalence of GDM and concentrate medical resources on those with the highest risk of complications. This would also allow the use of a similar FPG value for both the diagnosis and therapeutic target of GDM. The IADPSG also proposed screening for dysglycaemia during early pregnancy, using FPG measurement with a similar threshold after 24 weeks of gestation. We propose the same strategy considering an FPG value ≥ 95 mg/dL as abnormal, but only after confirmatory measurements. We also believe that an OGTT should not be used before 24 weeks of gestation as normal values during that time are as yet unknown.

  5. Comparison of the COPD Population Screener and International Primary Care Airway Group questionnaires in a general Japanese population: the Hisayama study.

    PubMed

    Tsukuya, Go; Samukawa, Takuya; Matsumoto, Koichiro; Fukuyama, Satoru; Kumamoto, Tomohiro; Uchida, Akifumi; Koriyama, Chihaya; Ninomiya, Toshiharu; Inoue, Hiromasa

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is increasing worldwide. In Japan and other countries, epidemiological studies have found that many patients with COPD are underdiagnosed and untreated, and thus, early detection and treatment of COPD has been emphasized. Screening questionnaires may have utility in the initial detection of COPD. This study aimed to validate and compare the COPD Population Screener (COPD-PS) and the International Primary Care Airway Group (IPAG) questionnaires in a general Japanese population. Eligible subjects 40 years of age and older living in the town of Hisayama were solicited to participate in a health checkup in 2012. All subjects 40-79 years of age without physician-diagnosed asthma or lung resection were recruited, and 2,336 subjects who fully completed both questionnaires and who had valid spirometry measurements were analyzed. Persistent airflow obstruction (AO) was defined by a postbronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 second/forced vital capacity <0.70. Receiver operating characteristic curves, net reclassification improvement, and integrated discrimination improvement were used to examine the ability of the COPD-PS and IPAG questionnaires to discriminate between subjects with and without AO. The overall area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for the COPD-PS questionnaire was 0.747 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.707-0.788) and for the IPAG was 0.775 (95% CI, 0.735-0.816), with no significant difference (P=0.09). The net reclassification improvement and integrated discrimination improvement were -0.107 (95% CI, -0.273-0.058; P=0.203) and -0.014 (95% CI, -0.033-0.006; P=0.182), respectively. The five-item COPD-PS questionnaire was comparable to the eight-item IPAG for discriminating between subjects with and without AO. The COPD-PS is a simple and useful screening questionnaire for persistent AO.

  6. Risk Factors and Mitigation Strategies for Pancreatic Fistula After Distal Pancreatectomy: Analysis of 2026 Resections From the International, Multi-institutional Distal Pancreatectomy Study Group.

    PubMed

    Ecker, Brett L; McMillan, Matthew T; Allegrini, Valentina; Bassi, Claudio; Beane, Joal D; Beckman, Ross M; Behrman, Stephen W; Dickson, Euan J; Callery, Mark P; Christein, John D; Drebin, Jeffrey A; Hollis, Robert H; House, Michael G; Jamieson, Nigel B; Javed, Ammar A; Kent, Tara S; Kluger, Michael D; Kowalsky, Stacy J; Maggino, Laura; Malleo, Giuseppe; Valero, Vicente; Velu, Lavanniya K P; Watkins, Amarra A; Wolfgang, Christopher L; Zureikat, Amer H; Vollmer, Charles M

    2017-08-29

    To identify a clinical fistula risk score following distal pancreatectomy. Clinically relevant pancreatic fistula (CR-POPF) following distal pancreatectomy (DP) is a dominant contributor to procedural morbidity, yet risk factors attributable to CR-POPF and effective practices to reduce its occurrence remain elusive. This multinational, retrospective study of 2026 DPs involved 52 surgeons at 10 institutions (2001-2016). CR-POPFs were defined by 2016 International Study Group criteria, and risk models generated using stepwise logistic regression analysis were evaluated by c-statistic. Mitigation strategies were assessed by regression modeling while controlling for identified risk factors and treating institution. CR-POPF occurred following 306 (15.1%) DPs. Risk factors independently associated with CR-POPF included: age (<60 yrs: OR 1.42, 95% CI 1.05-1.82), obesity (OR 1.54, 95% CI 1.19-2.12), hypoalbuminenia (OR 1.63, 95% CI 1.06-2.51), the absence of epidural anesthesia (OR 1.59, 95% CI 1.17-2.16), neuroendocrine or nonmalignant pathology (OR 1.56, 95% CI 1.18-2.06), concomitant splenectomy (OR 1.99, 95% CI 1.25-3.17), and vascular resection (OR 2.29, 95% CI 1.25-3.17). After adjusting for inherent risk between cases by multivariable regression, the following were not independently associated with CR-POPF: method of transection, suture ligation of the pancreatic duct, staple size, the use of staple line reinforcement, tissue patches, biologic sealants, or prophylactic octreotide. Intraoperative drainage was associated with a greater fistula rate (OR 2.09, 95% CI 1.51-3.78) but reduced fistula severity (P < 0.001). From this large analysis of pancreatic fistula following DP, CR-POPF occurrence cannot be reliably predicted. Opportunities for developing a risk score model are limited for performing risk-adjusted analyses of mitigation strategies and surgeon performance.

  7. Patterns of Recurrence and Outcome According to Breast Cancer Subtypes in Lymph Node–Negative Disease: Results From International Breast Cancer Study Group Trials VIII and IX

    PubMed Central

    Metzger-Filho, Otto; Sun, Zhuoxin; Viale, Giuseppe; Price, Karen N.; Crivellari, Diana; Snyder, Raymond D.; Gelber, Richard D.; Castiglione-Gertsch, Monica; Coates, Alan S.; Goldhirsch, Aron; Cardoso, Fatima

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To retrospectively evaluate the pattern of recurrence and outcome of node-negative breast cancer (BC) according to major subtypes. Patients and Methods In all, 1,951 patients with node-negative, early-stage BC randomly assigned in International Breast Cancer Study Group Trials VIII and IX with centrally reviewed pathology data were included. BC subtypes were defined as triple negative (TN; n = 310), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) positive (n = 369), and hormone receptor positive with high (luminal B–like [LB-like]; n = 763) or low (luminal A–like [LA-like]; n = 509) proliferative activity by Ki-67 labeling index. BC-free interval (BCFI) events were invasive BC recurrence in local, contralateral breast, nodal, bone, or visceral sites. Time to first site–specific recurrence was evaluated by using cumulative incidence and competing risks regression analysis. Results Median follow-up was 12.5 years. The 10-year BCFI was higher for patients with LA-like (86%) BC compared with LB-like (76%), HER2 (73%), and TN (71%; P < .001) BC. TN and HER2 cohorts had higher hazard of BCFI event in the first 4 years after diagnosis (pre-trastuzumab). LB-like cohorts had a continuously higher hazard of BCFI event over time compared with LA-like cohorts. Ten-year overall survival was higher for LA-like (89%) compared with LB-like (83%), HER2 (77%), and TN (75%; P < .001) BC. LB-like subtypes had higher rates of bone as first recurrence site than other subtypes (P = .005). Visceral recurrence as first site was lower for the LA-like subgroup, with similar incidence among the other subgroups when treated with chemotherapy (P = .003). Conclusion BC subtypes have different distant recurrence patterns over time. Defining different patterns of BC recurrence can improve BC care through surveillance guidelines and can guide the design of clinical studies. PMID:23897954

  8. The Development of Nonlinear Surface and Internal Wave Groups.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-11-01

    propagating in groups in near-shore regions. In these regions strong coastal currents, enhanced density gradients from river outflow and from greater influence ...D-A122 103 THE DEVELOPMENT OF NONLINERR SURFACE AND INTERNAL WAVE 1/4 GROUPS (U) WOODS H4OLE OCEANOGRAPHIC INSTITUTION MA T K~ CHERESKIN NOV 82 WHOI...TECHNOLOGY * PROGRAM IN op GOCEANOGRAPHY II!AND OCEAN ENGINEERING -0 DOCTORAL DISSERTATION THE DEVELOPMENT OF NONLINEAR SURFACE AND INTERNAL WAVE GROUPS BY

  9. Central nervous system recurrence of systemic lymphoma in the era of stem cell transplantation--an International Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma Study Group project.

    PubMed

    Bromberg, Jacoline E; Doorduijn, Jeanette K; Illerhaus, Gerald; Jahnke, Kristoph; Korfel, Agniezka; Fischer, Lars; Fritsch, Kristina; Kuittinen, Outti; Issa, Samar; van Montfort, Cees; van den Bent, Martin J

    2013-05-01

    Autologous stem cell transplantation has greatly improved the prognosis of systemic recurrent non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. However, no prospective data are available concerning the feasibility and efficacy of this strategy for systemic lymphoma relapsing in the central nervous system. We, therefore, we performed an international multicenter retrospective study of patients with a central nervous system recurrence of systemic lymphoma to assess the outcome of these patients in the era of stem cell transplantation. We collected clinical and treatment data on patients with a first central nervous system recurrence of systemic lymphoma treated between 2000 and 2010 in one of five centers in four countries. Patient- and treatment-related factors were analyzed and compared descriptively. Primary outcome measures were overall survival and percentage of patients transplanted. We identified 92 patients, with a median age of 59 years and a median Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group/World Health Organization performance status of 2, of whom 76% had diffuse large B-cell histology. The majority (79%) of these patients were treated with systemic chemotherapy with or without intravenous rituximab. Twenty-seven patients (29%) were transplanted; age and insufficient response to induction chemotherapy were the main reasons for not being transplanted in the remaining 65 patients. The median overall survival was 7 months (95% confidence interval 2.6-11.4), being 8 months (95% confidence interval 3.8-5.2) for patients ≤ 65 years old. The 1-year survival rate was 34.8%; of the 27 transplanted patients 62% survived more than 1 year. The Memorial Sloan Kettering Prognostic Index for primary central nervous system lymphoma was prognostic for both undergoing transplantation and survival. In conclusion, despite the availability of autologous stem cell transplantation for patients with central nervous system progression or relapse of systemic lymphoma, prognosis is still poor. Long-term survival

  10. Focus Group Study of Chinese International Students' Knowledge and Beliefs About HPV Vaccination, Before and After Reading an Informational Pamphlet About Gardasil(®).

    PubMed

    Gao, Haijuan; Okoror, Titilayo A; Hyner, Gerald C

    2016-10-01

    An increasing need for Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines in China remains unmet in the mainland and the knowledge and intentions of Chinese youth regarding vaccination is unknown. In the fall of 2013, 44 Chinese international students (CIS) attending a university in the United States Midwest participated in 10 focus group discussions (five female and five male). Result showed that participants have limited awareness and knowledge about HPV infection and vaccination, participants erroneously believed that the causes of cervical cancer are abortion and miscarriage. Participants rely heavily on informal sources such as Chinese-based social media platforms and personal social networks for information on sexually transmitted infections. Sexual cultures and behaviors are perceived differently between CIS born in the 1990s and 1980s. Interestingly, participants' perceived stigma about HPV infection decreased with improving knowledge level during group discussions. In conclusion, HPV vaccine should be further promoted alongside sex education among CIS.

  11. Comparison of the COPD Population Screener and International Primary Care Airway Group questionnaires in a general Japanese population: the Hisayama study

    PubMed Central

    Tsukuya, Go; Samukawa, Takuya; Matsumoto, Koichiro; Fukuyama, Satoru; Kumamoto, Tomohiro; Uchida, Akifumi; Koriyama, Chihaya; Ninomiya, Toshiharu; Inoue, Hiromasa

    2016-01-01

    Background The incidence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is increasing worldwide. In Japan and other countries, epidemiological studies have found that many patients with COPD are underdiagnosed and untreated, and thus, early detection and treatment of COPD has been emphasized. Screening questionnaires may have utility in the initial detection of COPD. Objective This study aimed to validate and compare the COPD Population Screener (COPD-PS) and the International Primary Care Airway Group (IPAG) questionnaires in a general Japanese population. Patients and methods Eligible subjects 40 years of age and older living in the town of Hisayama were solicited to participate in a health checkup in 2012. All subjects 40–79 years of age without physician-diagnosed asthma or lung resection were recruited, and 2,336 subjects who fully completed both questionnaires and who had valid spirometry measurements were analyzed. Persistent airflow obstruction (AO) was defined by a postbronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 second/forced vital capacity <0.70. Receiver operating characteristic curves, net reclassification improvement, and integrated discrimination improvement were used to examine the ability of the COPD-PS and IPAG questionnaires to discriminate between subjects with and without AO. Results The overall area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for the COPD-PS questionnaire was 0.747 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.707–0.788) and for the IPAG was 0.775 (95% CI, 0.735–0.816), with no significant difference (P=0.09). The net reclassification improvement and integrated discrimination improvement were −0.107 (95% CI, −0.273–0.058; P=0.203) and −0.014 (95% CI, −0.033–0.006; P=0.182), respectively. Conclusion The five-item COPD-PS questionnaire was comparable to the eight-item IPAG for discriminating between subjects with and without AO. The COPD-PS is a simple and useful screening questionnaire for persistent AO. PMID

  12. A women's support group for Asian international students.

    PubMed

    Carr, Joetta L; Koyama, Miki; Thiagarajan, Monica

    2003-01-01

    International students underuse counseling services, which are grounded in Western cultural values. The authors describe a support group for Asian international students that they launched at a large midwestern university to help students feel at ease with American university life, address homesickness, language problems, and academic and social stressors. Co-leaders created a safe and culturally sensitive atmosphere where the women could network, socialize, and address their issues. Group treatment offers many advantages over individual counseling and can enhance the health of international students.

  13. International consensus for neuroblastoma molecular diagnostics: report from the International Neuroblastoma Risk Group (INRG) Biology Committee.

    PubMed

    Ambros, P F; Ambros, I M; Brodeur, G M; Haber, M; Khan, J; Nakagawara, A; Schleiermacher, G; Speleman, F; Spitz, R; London, W B; Cohn, S L; Pearson, A D J; Maris, J M

    2009-05-05

    Neuroblastoma serves as a paradigm for utilising tumour genomic data for determining patient prognosis and treatment allocation. However, before the establishment of the International Neuroblastoma Risk Group (INRG) Task Force in 2004, international consensus on markers, methodology, and data interpretation did not exist, compromising the reliability of decisive genetic markers and inhibiting translational research efforts. The objectives of the INRG Biology Committee were to identify highly prognostic genetic aberrations to be included in the new INRG risk classification schema and to develop precise definitions, decisive biomarkers, and technique standardisation. The review of the INRG database (n=8800 patients) by the INRG Task Force finally enabled the identification of the most significant neuroblastoma biomarkers. In addition, the Biology Committee compared the standard operating procedures of different cooperative groups to arrive at international consensus for methodology, nomenclature, and future directions. Consensus was reached to include MYCN status, 11q23 allelic status, and ploidy in the INRG classification system on the basis of an evidence-based review of the INRG database. Standardised operating procedures for analysing these genetic factors were adopted, and criteria for proper nomenclature were developed. Neuroblastoma treatment planning is highly dependant on tumour cell genomic features, and it is likely that a comprehensive panel of DNA-based biomarkers will be used in future risk assignment algorithms applying genome-wide techniques. Consensus on methodology and interpretation is essential for uniform INRG classification and will greatly facilitate international and cooperative clinical and translational research studies.

  14. Focus Groups: An Important Research Technique for Internal Evaluation Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffy, Barbara Poitras

    1993-01-01

    The use of focus groups by the Federal Bureau of Investigation as a tool of internal evaluation is described. Focus groups are used in an environment where credibility is key to achieving meaningful cooperation. Issues for consideration by other evaluators interested in the approach are summarized. (SLD)

  15. Selected Theoretical Studies Group contributions to the 14th International Cosmic Ray conference. [including studies on galactic molecular hydrogen, interstellar reddening, and on the origin of cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The galactic distribution of H2 was studied through gamma radiation and through X-ray, optical, and infrared absorption measurements from SAS-2 and other sources. A comparison of the latitude distribution of gamma-ray intensity with reddening data shows reddening data to give the best estimate of interstellar gas in the solar vicinity. The distribution of galactic cosmic ray nucleons was determined and appears to be identical to the supernova remnant distribution. Interactions between ultrahigh energy cosmic-ray nuclei and intergalactic photon radiation fields were calculated, using the Monte Carlo method.

  16. Direct estimates of cancer mortality due to low doses of ionising radiation: an international study. IARC Study Group on Cancer Risk among Nuclear Industry Workers.

    PubMed

    1994-10-15

    When setting standards for protection against ionising radiation it has been usual to extrapolate from experience with high-dose short-term exposure--studies based on atom bomb survivors and patients exposed to radiation therapeutically. Those who work in the nuclear industry are exposed to low-level predominantly gamma radiation for longer periods, and provide an alternative direct source of information. We have combined mortality data from seven cohort studies on nearly 96,000 nuclear industry workers monitored for external radiation in Canada, UK, and USA to assess directly the carcinogenic effects of protracted low-dose exposure to ionising radiation. The excess relative risk for death from leukaemia, excluding chronic lymphocytic leukaemia, was 2.2 per Sv (90% Cl 0.1 to 5.7). This estimate is intermediate between the linear estimate of 3.7 per Sv and the linear-quadratic estimate (as used in recent leukaemia risk assessments) of 1.4 per Sv derived from Japanese atomic bomb survivors' data. The excess relative risk for death from all cancers, excluding leukaemia, was -0.07 per Sv (90% Cl -0.4 to 0.3). This estimate is consistent with a range of risks varying from negative to nearly twice those estimated from atomic bomb survivors (0.18 per Sv). These are the most precise direct estimates so far made of carcinogenic risk after protracted exposure to low-dose ionising radiation. They provide little evidence that the estimates that form the basis of current radiation protection recommendations are appreciably in error.

  17. Metastatic Neuroblastoma Confined to Distant Lymph Nodes (stage 4N) Predicts Outcome in Patients With Stage 4 Disease: A Study From the International Neuroblastoma Risk Group Database

    PubMed Central

    Morgenstern, Daniel A.; London, Wendy B.; Stephens, Derek; Volchenboum, Samuel L.; Hero, Barbara; Di Cataldo, Andrea; Nakagawara, Akira; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Ambros, Peter F.; Matthay, Katherine K.; Cohn, Susan L.; Pearson, Andrew D.J.; Irwin, Meredith S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The presence of distant metastases is one of the most powerful predictors of outcome in patients with neuroblastoma. However, the pattern of metastatic spread is not incorporated into current risk stratification systems. Small case series have suggested that patients with neuroblastoma who have metastatic disease limited to distant lymph nodes (4N disease) may have improved outcomes. Patients and Methods We analyzed retrospective data from the International Neuroblastoma Risk Group database for patients diagnosed from 1990 to 2002. 4N patients were compared with the remaining stage 4 patients (non-4N), excluding those with missing metastatic site data. Results In all, 2,250 International Neuroblastoma Staging System stage 4 patients with complete data were identified, of whom 146 (6.5%) had 4N disease. For 4N patients, event-free survival (EFS; 5-year, 77% ± 4%) and overall survival (OS; 5-year, 85% ± 3%) were significantly better than EFS (5-year, 35% ± 1%) and OS (5-year, 42% ± 1%) for non-4N stage 4 patients (P < .001). 4N patients were more likely to be younger (P < .001) and have tumors with favorable characteristics, including absence of MYCN amplification (89% v 69%; P < .001). In a multivariable analysis, 4N disease remained a significant predictor of outcome (hazard ratio for non-4N v 4N: 3.40 for EFS and 3.69 for OS). Within subgroups defined by age at diagnosis and tumor MYCN status, 4N disease was significantly associated with improved outcomes. Conclusion 4N represents a subgroup with better outcome than that of other patients with metastatic disease. These findings suggest that the biology and treatment response of 4N tumors differ from other stage 4 tumors, and less intensive therapy should be considered for this cohort. Future exploration of biologic factors determining the pattern of metastatic spread is warranted. PMID:24663047

  18. Metastatic neuroblastoma confined to distant lymph nodes (stage 4N) predicts outcome in patients with stage 4 disease: A study from the International Neuroblastoma Risk Group Database.

    PubMed

    Morgenstern, Daniel A; London, Wendy B; Stephens, Derek; Volchenboum, Samuel L; Hero, Barbara; Di Cataldo, Andrea; Nakagawara, Akira; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Ambros, Peter F; Matthay, Katherine K; Cohn, Susan L; Pearson, Andrew D J; Irwin, Meredith S

    2014-04-20

    The presence of distant metastases is one of the most powerful predictors of outcome in patients with neuroblastoma. However, the pattern of metastatic spread is not incorporated into current risk stratification systems. Small case series have suggested that patients with neuroblastoma who have metastatic disease limited to distant lymph nodes (4N disease) may have improved outcomes. We analyzed retrospective data from the International Neuroblastoma Risk Group database for patients diagnosed from 1990 to 2002. 4N patients were compared with the remaining stage 4 patients (non-4N), excluding those with missing metastatic site data. In all, 2,250 International Neuroblastoma Staging System stage 4 patients with complete data were identified, of whom 146 (6.5%) had 4N disease. For 4N patients, event-free survival (EFS; 5-year, 77% ± 4%) and overall survival (OS; 5-year, 85% ± 3%) were significantly better than EFS (5-year, 35% ± 1%) and OS (5-year, 42% ± 1%) for non-4N stage 4 patients (P < .001). 4N patients were more likely to be younger (P < .001) and have tumors with favorable characteristics, including absence of MYCN amplification (89% v 69%; P < .001). In a multivariable analysis, 4N disease remained a significant predictor of outcome (hazard ratio for non-4N v 4N: 3.40 for EFS and 3.69 for OS). Within subgroups defined by age at diagnosis and tumor MYCN status, 4N disease was significantly associated with improved outcomes. 4N represents a subgroup with better outcome than that of other patients with metastatic disease. These findings suggest that the biology and treatment response of 4N tumors differ from other stage 4 tumors, and less intensive therapy should be considered for this cohort. Future exploration of biologic factors determining the pattern of metastatic spread is warranted.

  19. COSMIC (Cohort Studies of Memory in an International Consortium): An international consortium to identify risk and protective factors and biomarkers of cognitive ageing and dementia in diverse ethnic and sociocultural groups

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A large number of longitudinal studies of population-based ageing cohorts are in progress internationally, but the insights from these studies into the risk and protective factors for cognitive ageing and conditions like mild cognitive impairment and dementia have been inconsistent. Some of the problems confounding this research can be reduced by harmonising and pooling data across studies. COSMIC (Cohort Studies of Memory in an International Consortium) aims to harmonise data from international cohort studies of cognitive ageing, in order to better understand the determinants of cognitive ageing and neurocognitive disorders. Methods/Design Longitudinal studies of cognitive ageing and dementia with at least 500 individuals aged 60 years or over are eligible and invited to be members of COSMIC. There are currently 17 member studies, from regions that include Asia, Australia, Europe, and North America. A Research Steering Committee has been established, two meetings of study leaders held, and a website developed. The initial attempts at harmonising key variables like neuropsychological test scores are in progress. Discussion The challenges of international consortia like COSMIC include efficient communication among members, extended use of resources, and data harmonisation. Successful harmonisation will facilitate projects investigating rates of cognitive decline, risk and protective factors for mild cognitive impairment, and biomarkers of mild cognitive impairment and dementia. Extended implications of COSMIC could include standardised ways of collecting and reporting data, and a rich cognitive ageing database being made available to other researchers. COSMIC could potentially transform our understanding of the epidemiology of cognitive ageing, and have a world-wide impact on promoting successful ageing. PMID:24195705

  20. Toward a Better Understanding of Internal Audiences: A Study of Group Phenomena among Readers of a Company-Wide Newspaper for Employees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quate, Shirley B.

    Data were collected from 734 respondents, employees of a large Midwestern utility organization, to a survey questionnaire which attempted to examine the employees' reactions to the company newspaper. Specifically, the study sought to compare group phenomena among readers with respect to their inclinations to read the newspaper and their…

  1. Burnei's "double X" internal fixation technique for supracondylar humerus fractures in children: indications, technique, advantages and alternative interventions : Study and Research Group in Pediatric Orthopaedics-2012.

    PubMed

    Georgescu, I; Gavriliu, S; Pârvan, A; Martiniuc, A; Japie, E; Ghiță, R; Drăghici, I; Hamei, Ş; Ţiripa, I; El Nayef, T; Dan, D

    2013-06-15

    The Study and Research Group in Pediatric Orthopedics-2012 initated this retrospective study due to the fact that in Romania and in other countries, the numerous procedures do not ensure the physicians a definite point of view related to the therapeutic criteria in the treatment of supracondylar fractures. That is why the number of complications and their severity brought into notice these existent deficiencies. In order to correct some of these complications, cubitus varus or valgus, Prof. Al. Pesamosca communicated a paper called "Personal procedure in the treatment of posttraumatic cubitus varus" at the County Conference from Bacău, in June 24, 1978. This procedure has next been made popular by Prof. Gh. Burnei and his coworkers by operating patients with cubitus varus or valgus due to supracondylar humeral fractures and by presenting papers related to the subject at the national and international congresses. The latest paper regarding this problem has been presented at the 29th Annual Meeting of the European Pediatric Orthopedic Society in Zagreb, Croatia, April 7-10, 2010, being titled "Distal humeral Z-osteotomy for posttraumatic cubitus varus or valgus", having as authors Gh. Burnei, Ileana Georgescu, Ştefan Gavriliu, Costel Vlad and Daniela Dan. As members of this group, based on the performed studies, we wish to make popular this type of osteosynthesis, which ensures a tight fixation, avoids complications and allows a rapid postoperative activity. The acknowledged treatment for these types of fractures is the orthopedic one and it must be accomplished as soon as possible, in the first 6 hours, by reduction and cast immobilization or by closed or open reduction and fixation, using one of the several methods (Judet, Boehler, Kapandji, San Antonio, San Diego, Burnei's double X technique). The exposed treatment is indicated in irreducible supracondylar humeral fractures, in reducible, but unstable type, in polytraumatized patients with supracondylar

  2. Study Groups: Conduit for Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makibbin, Shirley S.; Sprague, Marsha M.

    This conference presentation describes study groups as a mechanism for changing teacher behavior. The history of study groups is discussed, beginning with the first American study groups organized by Benjamin Franklin; the Chautauqua Literary and Scientific Circle; the waning of study groups in the early 20th century as college enrollment…

  3. 76 FR 54800 - International Business Machines (IBM), Software Group Business Unit, Quality Assurance Group, San...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-02

    ... Employment and Training Administration International Business Machines (IBM), Software Group Business Unit...), Software Group Business Unit, Optim Data Studio Tools QA, San Jose, California (subject firm). The... of the workers at IBM, Software Group Business Unit, Optim Data Studio Tools QA, San Jose,...

  4. International Business Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendon, Donald W.

    The new International Business major within the School of Business, begun in fall 1989, is an ongoing, enriched program for highly motivated students of above-average scholastic achievement. Its primary purposes are to (1) prepare students to understand America's trading partners and (2) teach the technical knowledge needed in an international…

  5. International Business Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendon, Donald W.

    The new International Business major within the School of Business, begun in fall 1989, is an ongoing, enriched program for highly motivated students of above-average scholastic achievement. Its primary purposes are to (1) prepare students to understand America's trading partners and (2) teach the technical knowledge needed in an international…

  6. The International Space Life Sciences Strategic Planning Working Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Ronald J.; Rabin, Robert; Lujan, Barbara F.

    1993-01-01

    Throughout the 1980s, ESA and the space agencies of Canada, Germany, France, Japan, and the U.S. have pursued cooperative projects bilaterally and multilaterally to prepare for, and to respond to, opportunities in space life sciences research previously unapproachable in scale and sophistication. To cope effectively with likely future space research opportunities, broad, multilateral, coordinated strategic planning is required. Thus, life scientists from these agencies have allied to form the International Space Life Sciences Strategic Planning Working Group. This Group is formally organized under a charter that specifies the purpose of the Working Group as the development of an international strategic plan for the space life sciences, with periodic revisions as needed to keep the plan current. The plan will be policy-, not operations-oriented. The Working Group also may establish specific implementation teams to coordinate multilateral science policy in specific areas; such teams have been established for space station utilization, and for sharing of flight equipment.

  7. The International Space Life Sciences Strategic Planning Working Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Ronald J.; Rabin, Robert; Lujan, Barbara F.

    1993-01-01

    Throughout the 1980s, ESA and the space agencies of Canada, Germany, France, Japan, and the U.S. have pursued cooperative projects bilaterally and multilaterally to prepare for, and to respond to, opportunities in space life sciences research previously unapproachable in scale and sophistication. To cope effectively with likely future space research opportunities, broad, multilateral, coordinated strategic planning is required. Thus, life scientists from these agencies have allied to form the International Space Life Sciences Strategic Planning Working Group. This Group is formally organized under a charter that specifies the purpose of the Working Group as the development of an international strategic plan for the space life sciences, with periodic revisions as needed to keep the plan current. The plan will be policy-, not operations-oriented. The Working Group also may establish specific implementation teams to coordinate multilateral science policy in specific areas; such teams have been established for space station utilization, and for sharing of flight equipment.

  8. International Research and Studies Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Postsecondary Education, US Department of Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The International Research and Studies Program supports surveys, studies, and instructional materials development to improve and strengthen instruction in modern foreign languages, area studies, and other international fields. The purpose of the program is to improve and strengthen instruction in modern foreign languages, area studies and other…

  9. Introduction of the UNIX International Performance Management Work Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Henry

    1993-01-01

    In this paper we presented the planned direction of the UNIX International Performance Management Work Group. This group consists of concerned system developers and users who have organized to synthesize recommendations for standard UNIX performance management subsystem interfaces and architectures. The purpose of these recommendations is to provide a core set of performance management functions and these functions can be used to build tools by hardware system developers, vertical application software developers, and performance application software developers.

  10. International Group Work Research: Guidelines in Cultural Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guth, Lorraine J.; Asner-Self, Kimberly K.

    2017-01-01

    This article offers 10 guidelines for conducting international group work research. These guidelines include the importance of establishing relationships, conducting a needs assessment, co-constructing the research questions/design, determining the approach, choosing culturally relevant instruments, choosing culturally responsive group…

  11. International Group Work Research: Guidelines in Cultural Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guth, Lorraine J.; Asner-Self, Kimberly K.

    2017-01-01

    This article offers 10 guidelines for conducting international group work research. These guidelines include the importance of establishing relationships, conducting a needs assessment, co-constructing the research questions/design, determining the approach, choosing culturally relevant instruments, choosing culturally responsive group…

  12. Trophoblastic disease review for diagnosis and management: a joint report from the International Society for the Study of Trophoblastic Disease, European Organisation for the Treatment of Trophoblastic Disease, and the Gynecologic Cancer InterGroup.

    PubMed

    Mangili, Giorgia; Lorusso, Domenica; Brown, Jubilee; Pfisterer, Jacobus; Massuger, Leon; Vaughan, Michelle; Ngan, Hextan Y S; Golfier, Francois; Sekharan, Paradan K; Charry, Rafael Cortés; Poveda, Andres; Kim, Jae-Weon; Xiang, Yang; Berkowtiz, Ross; Seckl, Michael J

    2014-11-01

    The objective of this study was to provide a consensus review on gestational trophoblastic disease diagnosis and management from the combined International Society for the Study of Trophoblastic Disease, European Organisation for the Treatment of Trophoblastic Disease, and the Gynecologic Cancer InterGroup. A joint committee representing various groups reviewed the literature obtained from PubMed searches. Guidelines were constructed on the basis of literature review. After initial diagnosis in local centers, centralization of pathology review and ongoing care is recommended to achieve the best outcomes.

  13. International Technical Working Group Cooperation to Counter Illicit Nuclear Trafficking

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D K; Niemeyer, S

    2004-09-18

    The Nuclear Smuggling International Technical Working Group (ITWG) is an international body of nuclear forensic experts that cooperate to deter the illicit trafficking of nuclear materials. The objective of the ITWG is to provide a common approach and effective technical solutions to governments who request assistance in nuclear forensics. The ITWG was chartered in 1996 and since that time more than 28 nations and organizations have participated in 9 international meetings and 2 analytical round-robin trials. Soon after its founding the ITWG adopted a general framework to guide nuclear forensics investigations that includes recommendations for nuclear crime scene security and analysis, the best application of radioanalytical methods, the conduct of traditional forensic analysis of contaminated materials, and effective data analysis to interpret the history of seized nuclear materials. This approach has been adopted by many nations as they respond to incidents of illicit nuclear trafficking.

  14. Paraneoplastic itch: an expert position statement from the Special Interest Group (SIG) of the International Forum on the Study of Itch (IFSI).

    PubMed

    Weisshaar, Elke; Weiss, Melanie; Mettang, Thomas; Yosipovitch, Gil; Zylicz, Zbigniew

    2015-03-01

    In clinical practice, the term "paraneoplastic itch" is used to describe itch in patients with cancer. Patients with hematological or solid tumor malignancies can be affected. In general, paraneoplastic itch is considered a rare disorder. However, paraneoplastic itch in hematological malignancies such as polycythemia vera and lymphoma are relatively frequent while other forms of paraneoplastic itch are in fact extremely rare. The true frequency of this symptom is unclear, epidemiological data in this field are limited. Itch in malignant disease may additionally impair patients' quality of life. A population-based cohort study showed that chronic itch without concomitant skin changes is a risk factor for having undiagnosed hematologic and bile duct malignancies. Paraneoplastic itch is rather resistant to treatment. In 2012, an interdisciplinary interest group of physicians and researchers was founded, aiming to generate a clear definition of paraneoplastic itch. In this paper we briefly review the current knowledge and aim to define what can be summarized under the term "paraneoplastic itch".

  15. Freedom from recurrent ventricular tachycardia after catheter ablation is associated with improved survival in patients with structural heart disease: An International VT Ablation Center Collaborative Group study.

    PubMed

    Tung, Roderick; Vaseghi, Marmar; Frankel, David S; Vergara, Pasquale; Di Biase, Luigi; Nagashima, Koichi; Yu, Ricky; Vangala, Sitaram; Tseng, Chi-Hong; Choi, Eue-Keun; Khurshid, Shaan; Patel, Mehul; Mathuria, Nilesh; Nakahara, Shiro; Tzou, Wendy S; Sauer, William H; Vakil, Kairav; Tedrow, Usha; Burkhardt, J David; Tholakanahalli, Venkatakrishna N; Saliaris, Anastasios; Dickfeld, Timm; Weiss, J Peter; Bunch, T Jared; Reddy, Madhu; Kanmanthareddy, Arun; Callans, David J; Lakkireddy, Dhanunjaya; Natale, Andrea; Marchlinski, Francis; Stevenson, William G; Della Bella, Paolo; Shivkumar, Kalyanam

    2015-09-01

    The impact of catheter ablation of ventricular tachycardia (VT) on all-cause mortality remains unknown. The purpose of this study was to examine the association between VT recurrence after ablation and survival in patients with scar-related VT. Analysis of 2061 patients with structural heart disease referred for catheter ablation of scar-related VT from 12 international centers was performed. Data on clinical and procedural variables, VT recurrence, and mortality were analyzed. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to estimate freedom from recurrent VT, transplant, and death. Cox proportional hazards frailty models were used to analyze the effect of risk factors on VT recurrence and mortality. One-year freedom from VT recurrence was 70% (72% in ischemic and 68% in nonischemic cardiomyopathy). Fifty-seven patients (3%) underwent cardiac transplantation, and 216 (10%) died during follow-up. At 1 year, the estimated rate of transplant and/or mortality was 15% (same for ischemic and nonischemic cardiomyopathy). Transplant-free survival was significantly higher in patients without VT recurrence than in those with recurrence (90% vs 71%, P<.001). In multivariable analysis, recurrence of VT after ablation showed the highest risk for transplant and/or mortality [hazard ratio 6.9 (95% CI 5.3-9.0), P<.001]. In patients with ejection fraction <30% and across all New York Heart Association functional classes, improved transplant-free survival was seen in those without VT recurrence. Catheter ablation of VT in patients with structural heart disease results in 70% freedom from VT recurrence, with an overall transplant and/or mortality rate of 15% at 1 year. Freedom from VT recurrence is associated with improved transplant-free survival, independent of heart failure severity. Copyright © 2015 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Which outcomes are most important to people with aphasia and their families? an international nominal group technique study framed within the ICF.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Sarah J; Worrall, Linda; Rose, Tanya; Le Dorze, Guylaine; Cruice, Madeline; Isaksen, Jytte; Kong, Anthony Pak Hin; Simmons-Mackie, Nina; Scarinci, Nerina; Gauvreau, Christine Alary

    2017-07-01

    To identify important treatment outcomes from the perspective of people with aphasia and their families using the ICF as a frame of reference. The nominal group technique was used with people with aphasia and their family members in seven countries to identify and rank important treatment outcomes from aphasia rehabilitation. People with aphasia identified outcomes for themselves; and family members identified outcomes for themselves and for the person with aphasia. Outcomes were analysed using qualitative content analysis and ICF linking. A total of 39 people with aphasia and 29 family members participated in one of 16 nominal groups. Inductive qualitative content analysis revealed the following six themes: (1) Improved communication; (2) Increased life participation; (3) Changed attitudes through increased awareness and education about aphasia; (4) Recovered normality; (5) Improved physical and emotional well-being; and (6) Improved health (and support) services. Prioritized outcomes for both participant groups linked to all ICF components; primary activity/participation (39%) and body functions (36%) for people with aphasia, and activity/participation (49%) and environmental factors (28%) for family members. Outcomes prioritized by family members relating to the person with aphasia, primarily linked to body functions (60%). People with aphasia and their families identified treatment outcomes which span all components of the ICF. This has implications for research outcome measurement and clinical service provision which currently focuses on the measurement of body function outcomes. The wide range of desired outcomes generated by both people with aphasia and their family members, highlights the importance of collaborative goal setting within a family-centred approach to rehabilitation. These results will be combined with other stakeholder perspectives to establish a core outcome set for aphasia treatment research. Implications for Rehabilitation Important

  17. Internal character dictates transition dynamics between isolation and cohesive grouping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manrique, Pedro D.; Hui, Pak Ming; Johnson, Neil F.

    2015-12-01

    We show that accounting for internal character among interacting heterogeneous entities generates rich transition behavior between isolation and cohesive dynamical grouping. Our analytical and numerical calculations reveal different critical points arising for different character-dependent grouping mechanisms. These critical points move in opposite directions as the population's diversity decreases. Our analytical theory may help explain why a particular class of universality is so common in the real world, despite the fundamental differences in the underlying entities. It also correctly predicts the nonmonotonic temporal variation in connectivity observed recently in one such system.

  18. Internal character dictates transition dynamics between isolation and cohesive grouping.

    PubMed

    Manrique, Pedro D; Hui, Pak Ming; Johnson, Neil F

    2015-12-01

    We show that accounting for internal character among interacting heterogeneous entities generates rich transition behavior between isolation and cohesive dynamical grouping. Our analytical and numerical calculations reveal different critical points arising for different character-dependent grouping mechanisms. These critical points move in opposite directions as the population's diversity decreases. Our analytical theory may help explain why a particular class of universality is so common in the real world, despite the fundamental differences in the underlying entities. It also correctly predicts the nonmonotonic temporal variation in connectivity observed recently in one such system.

  19. 76 FR 45878 - Alticor, Inc., Including Access Business Group International LLC and Amway Corporation, Buena...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-01

    ... Employment and Training Administration Alticor, Inc., Including Access Business Group International LLC and Amway Corporation, Buena Park, CA; Alticor, Inc., Including Access Business Group International LLC and..., Ada, MI; Alticor, Inc., Including Access Business Group International LLC and Amway...

  20. 75 FR 32221 - Alticor, Inc., Including Access Business Group International, LLC, and Amway Corporation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-07

    ... Employment and Training Administration Alticor, Inc., Including Access Business Group International, LLC, and..., applicable to workers of Alticor, Inc., including Access Business Group International, LLC and Amway... location of Alticor, Inc., including Access Business Group International, LLC and Amway Corporation....

  1. Clinical Impact of Additional Cytogenetic Aberrations, cKIT and RAS Mutations, and Treatment Elements in Pediatric t(8;21)-AML: Results From an International Retrospective Study by the International Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster Study Group

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Kim; Kaspers, Gertjan; Harrison, Christine J.; Beverloo, H. Berna; Reedijk, Ardine; Bongers, Mathilda; Cloos, Jacqueline; Pession, Andrea; Reinhardt, Dirk; Zimmerman, Martin; Creutzig, Ursula; Dworzak, Michael; Alonzo, Todd; Johnston, Donna; Hirsch, Betsy; Zapotocky, Michal; De Moerloose, Barbara; Fynn, Alcira; Lee, Vincent; Taga, Takashi; Tawa, Akio; Auvrignon, Anne; Zeller, Bernward; Forestier, Erik; Salgado, Carmen; Balwierz, Walentyna; Popa, Alexander; Rubnitz, Jeffrey; Raimondi, Susana; Gibson, Brenda

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This retrospective cohort study aimed to determine the predictive relevance of clinical characteristics, additional cytogenetic aberrations, and cKIT and RAS mutations, as well as to evaluate whether specific treatment elements were associated with outcomes in pediatric t(8;21)-positive patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Patients and Methods Karyotypes of 916 pediatric patients with t(8;21)-AML were reviewed for the presence of additional cytogenetic aberrations, and 228 samples were screened for presence of cKIT and RAS mutations. Multivariable regression models were used to assess the relevance of anthracyclines, cytarabine, and etoposide during induction and overall treatment. End points were the probability of achieving complete remission, cumulative incidence of relapse (CIR), probability of event-free survival, and probability of overall survival. Results Of 838 patients included in final analyses, 92% achieved complete remission. The 5-year overall survival, event-free survival, and CIR were 74%, 58%, and 26%, respectively. cKIT mutations and RAS mutations were not significantly associated with outcome. Patients with deletions of chromosome arm 9q [del(9q); n = 104] had a lower probability of complete remission (P = .01). Gain of chromosome 4 (+4; n = 21) was associated with inferior CIR and survival (P < .01). Anthracycline doses greater than 150 mg/m2 and etoposide doses greater than 500 mg/m2 in the first induction course and high-dose cytarabine 3 g/m2 during induction were associated with better outcomes on various end points. Cumulative doses of cytarabine greater than 30 g/m2 and etoposide greater than 1,500 mg/m2 were associated with lower CIR rates and better probability of event-free survival. Conclusion Pediatric patients with t(8;21)-AML and additional del(9q) or additional +4 might not be considered at good risk. Patients with t(8;21)-AML likely benefit from protocols that have high doses of anthracyclines, etoposide, and

  2. Proceedings of the Twentieth International Microgravity Measurements Group Meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLombard, Richard (Compiler)

    2001-01-01

    The International Microgravity Measurements Group annual meetings provide a forum for an exchange of information and ideas about various aspects of microgravity acceleration research in international microgravity research programs. These meetings are sponsored by the PI Microgravity Services (PIMS) project at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The twentieth MGMG meeting was held 7-9 August 2001 at the Hilton Garden Inn Hotel in Cleveland, Ohio. The 35 attendees represented NASA, other space agencies, universities, and commercial companies; eight of the attendees were international representatives from Canada, Germany, Italy, Japan, and Russia. Seventeen presentations were made on a variety of microgravity environment topics including the International Space Station (ISS), acceleration measurement and analysis results, science effects from microgravity accelerations, vibration isolation, free flyer satellites, ground testing, and microgravity outreach. Two working sessions were included in which a demonstration of ISS acceleration data processing and analyses were performed with audience participation. Contained within the minutes is the conference agenda which indicates each speaker, the title of their presentation, and the actual time of their presentation. The minutes also include the charts for each presentation which indicate the author's name(s) and affiliation. In some cases, a separate written report was submitted and has been included here.

  3. Prognostic and predictive impact of central necrosis and fibrosis in early breast cancer. Results from two International Breast Cancer Study Group randomized trials of chemoendocrine adjuvant therapy

    PubMed Central

    Maiorano, Eugenio; Regan, Meredith M.; Viale, Giuseppe; Mastropasqua, Mauro G.; Colleoni, Marco; Castiglione-Gertsch, Monica; Price, Karen N.; Gelber, Richard D.; Goldhirsch, Aron; Coates, Alan S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose A minority of early invasive breast cancers show a pattern of central necrosis and fibrosis (CNF). Previous studies have documented an adverse prognostic impact and association with other adverse pathological features, but its predictive importance for therapy selection is unknown. Methods We examined the prognostic and predictive value of CNF in two randomized clinical trials comparing chemoendocrine therapy with endocrine therapy alone in patients with node-negative breast cancer. A total of 1850 patients randomly assigned to treatment groups comparing endocrine with chemoendocrine therapy, and with centrally-assessed CNF, ER, PgR and HER2 were included in the analytic cohort. The median follow up was 10 years. Results CNF was present in 84 of 1850 trial patients (4.5%). It was associated with tumor characteristics suggesting poor outcome, but was an independent adverse factor for disease-free survival. In the presence of CNF outcome was worse regardless of tumor grade, whereas in the absence of CNF, patients with grade 3 tumors had poorer outcome than those with grade 1-2 tumors. Among patients with estrogen receptor-absent tumors chemoendocrine therapy was superior to endocrine therapy alone only in the absence of CNF [HR (chemoendocrine:endocrine)=0.46 in CNF-absent, 0.90 in CNF-present], while among those with receptor-positive disease chemoendocrine therapy was beneficial only in the presence of CNF [HR=0.34 CNF-present, 0.96 CNF-absent]. Conclusion The results suggest that the presence of CNF reflects a biological difference in early breast cancer that is important in modulating the efficacy of standard therapies. Accordingly we believe that its presence should be routinely reported. PMID:19280340

  4. Revised International Staging System for Multiple Myeloma: A Report From International Myeloma Working Group

    PubMed Central

    Palumbo, Antonio; Avet-Loiseau, Hervé; Oliva, Stefania; Lokhorst, Henk M.; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Rosinol, Laura; Richardson, Paul; Caltagirone, Simona; Lahuerta, Juan José; Facon, Thierry; Bringhen, Sara; Gay, Francesca; Attal, Michel; Passera, Roberto; Spencer, Andrew; Offidani, Massimo; Kumar, Shaji; Musto, Pellegrino; Lonial, Sagar; Petrucci, Maria T.; Orlowski, Robert Z.; Zamagni, Elena; Morgan, Gareth; Dimopoulos, Meletios A.; Durie, Brian G.M.; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Sonneveld, Pieter; San Miguel, Jésus; Cavo, Michele; Rajkumar, S. Vincent; Moreau, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The clinical outcome of multiple myeloma (MM) is heterogeneous. A simple and reliable tool is needed to stratify patients with MM. We combined the International Staging System (ISS) with chromosomal abnormalities (CA) detected by interphase fluorescent in situ hybridization after CD138 plasma cell purification and serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) to evaluate their prognostic value in newly diagnosed MM (NDMM). Patients and Methods Clinical and laboratory data from 4,445 patients with NDMM enrolled onto 11 international trials were pooled together. The K-adaptive partitioning algorithm was used to define the most appropriate subgroups with homogeneous survival. Results ISS, CA, and LDH data were simultaneously available in 3,060 of 4,445 patients. We defined the following three groups: revised ISS (R-ISS) I (n = 871), including ISS stage I (serum β2-microglobulin level < 3.5 mg/L and serum albumin level ≥ 3.5 g/dL), no high-risk CA [del(17p) and/or t(4;14) and/or t(14;16)], and normal LDH level (less than the upper limit of normal range); R-ISS III (n = 295), including ISS stage III (serum β2-microglobulin level > 5.5 mg/L) and high-risk CA or high LDH level; and R-ISS II (n = 1,894), including all the other possible combinations. At a median follow-up of 46 months, the 5-year OS rate was 82% in the R-ISS I, 62% in the R-ISS II, and 40% in the R-ISS III groups; the 5-year PFS rates were 55%, 36%, and 24%, respectively. Conclusion The R-ISS is a simple and powerful prognostic staging system, and we recommend its use in future clinical studies to stratify patients with NDMM effectively with respect to the relative risk to their survival. PMID:26240224

  5. The International Particle Physics Outreach Group (ippog):. Aims and Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barney, David

    2012-08-01

    The International Particle Physics Outreach Group, IPPOG, is a network of particle physics communication and education experts. IPPOG's principle aim is to maximize the impact of education and outreach efforts related to particle physics through information exchange and the sharing of expertise. IPPOG has initiated several major European and Worldwide activities, such as the "International Particle Physics Masterclasses" where each year thousands of high school students in more than 20 countries come to one of about 120 nearby universities or research centres for a day in order to unravel the mysteries of particle physics. IPPOG has also initiated a global database of education and outreach materials, aimed at supporting other particle physicists and education professionals. The aims and activities of IPPOG will be described, as well as plans to include more countries & laboratories in the network.

  6. International Work Group criteria for the diagnosis of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Cummings, Jeffrey L; Dubois, Bruno; Molinuevo, José L; Scheltens, Philip

    2013-05-01

    Alzheimer-type biomarker changes are identifiable in asymptomatic and mildly symptomatic predementia phases of Alzheimer disease (AD) and AD dementia. The International Work Group (IWG) guidelines for diagnosis identify a unified spectrum of 3 phases. The classic clinical feature that indicates AD is an episodic memory defect of the amnestic type. IWG criteria require biomarker support for the diagnoses of AD at any clinical stage. Pathophysiologic and topographic biomarkers are recognized. These criteria are proposed to allow highly specific diagnosis of AD and assist in identifying patients for clinical trials of AD-related treatments and other types of AD research. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. CCITT (International Telegraph Consultative Committee) Study Groups XI and XVIII Draft Recommendations for ISDN (Integrated Services Digital Networks), November 8-December 2, 1983.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-01

    Electromagnetic interference radiation from ISDN wiring is apt to be fairly significant unless the system is carefully balanced around ground and the...next is received. Each group of bits that might be transmitted from one terminal, such as eight B channel bits, is followed by a balancing bit, called...an L bit, that insures that the d.c. balance is restored to the bus. Since logical Os are alternating pulses, there can never be more than one bit

  8. International strategic minerals inventory summary report: platinum-group metals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sutphin, David M.; Page, Norman J

    1986-01-01

    Major world resources of platinum-group metals are described in this summary report of information in the International Strategic Minerals Inventory {ISMI}. ISMI is a cooperative data-collection effort of earth-science and mineral-resource agencies in Australia, Canada, the Federal Republic of Germany, the Republic of South Africa, and the United States of America. This report, designed to be of benefit to policy analysts, contains two parts. Part I presents an overview of the resources and potential supply of platinum-group metals on the basis of inventory information. Part II contains tables of some of the geologic information and mineral-resource and production data that were collected by ISMI participants.

  9. 76 FR 14105 - International Paper Company, Pineville Mill Industrial Packaging Group; Pineville, LA; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-15

    ... Employment and Training Administration International Paper Company, Pineville Mill Industrial Packaging Group... workers and former workers of International Paper Company, Pineville Mill, Industrial Packaging Group... assistance for workers and former workers of International Paper Company, Pineville Mill, Industrial...

  10. International Piping Integrity Research Group (IPIRG) Program. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkowski, G.; Schmidt, R.; Scott, P.

    1997-06-01

    This is the final report of the International Piping Integrity Research Group (IPIRG) Program. The IPIRG Program was an international group program managed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and funded by a consortium of organizations from nine nations: Canada, France, Italy, Japan, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan, the United Kingdom, and the United States. The program objective was to develop data needed to verify engineering methods for assessing the integrity of circumferentially-cracked nuclear power plant piping. The primary focus was an experimental task that investigated the behavior of circumferentially flawed piping systems subjected to high-rate loadings typical of seismic events. To accomplish these objectives a pipe system fabricated as an expansion loop with over 30 meters of 16-inch diameter pipe and five long radius elbows was constructed. Five dynamic, cyclic, flawed piping experiments were conducted using this facility. This report: (1) provides background information on leak-before-break and flaw evaluation procedures for piping, (2) summarizes technical results of the program, (3) gives a relatively detailed assessment of the results from the pipe fracture experiments and complementary analyses, and (4) summarizes advances in the state-of-the-art of pipe fracture technology resulting from the IPIRG program.

  11. International Instructional Systems: Social Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brant, Jacek; Chapman, Arthur; Isaacs, Tina

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on research conducted as part of the International Instructional System Study that explored five subject areas across nine jurisdictions in six high-performing countries. The Study's overall aim was to understand what, if anything, there is in common in the curricula and assessment arrangements among the high-performing…

  12. International Instructional Systems: Social Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brant, Jacek; Chapman, Arthur; Isaacs, Tina

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on research conducted as part of the International Instructional System Study that explored five subject areas across nine jurisdictions in six high-performing countries. The Study's overall aim was to understand what, if anything, there is in common in the curricula and assessment arrangements among the high-performing…

  13. International Studies Program Procedures Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finkelston, Theodore

    This eleven-part procedures manual provides information on the operations of the International Studies Program (ISP) at St. Louis Community College. After introductory material on the program, which provides off-campus credit courses involving travel and field study of life and the cultures in foreign countries, Section I presents the philosophy…

  14. Leaping into the Unknown: Experience of Counseling Students Participating in Group Work with International Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Kyoung Mi; Protivnak, Jake J.

    2016-01-01

    This research study used qualitative phenomenological methodology to explore counseling graduate students' experiences leading support groups for international students. Participants included 6 master's-level counseling students. The following 4 themes emerged to describe the counseling students' experience as group leaders: (a) individualistic…

  15. Leaping into the Unknown: Experience of Counseling Students Participating in Group Work with International Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Kyoung Mi; Protivnak, Jake J.

    2016-01-01

    This research study used qualitative phenomenological methodology to explore counseling graduate students' experiences leading support groups for international students. Participants included 6 master's-level counseling students. The following 4 themes emerged to describe the counseling students' experience as group leaders: (a) individualistic…

  16. Training improves the interobserver agreement of the expert positron emission tomography review panel in primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma: interim analysis in the ongoing International Extranodal Lymphoma Study Group-37 study.

    PubMed

    Ceriani, Luca; Barrington, Sally; Biggi, Alberto; Malkowski, Bogdan; Metser, Ur; Versari, Annibale; Martelli, Maurizio; Davies, Andrew; Johnson, Peter W; Zucca, Emanuele; Chauvie, Stéphane

    2016-08-22

    The International Extranodal Lymphoma Study Group (IELSG)-37 is a prospective randomized trial assessing the role of consolidation mediastinal radiotherapy after immunochemotherapy to patients with newly diagnosed primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma (PMBCL). It is a positron emission tomography (PET) response-guided study where patients obtaining a complete metabolic response on an end-of-therapy PET-computed tomography (CT) scan evaluated by a central review are randomized to receive radiotherapy or no further treatment. The aims of this study were to measure agreement between reviewers reporting PET-CT scans for this trial and to determine the effect of training upon concordance rates. The review panel comprised 6 experienced nuclear physicians who read PET-CT scans using the 5-point Deauville scale. Interobserver agreement (IOA) was measured at 4 time points: after a blinded review of a "training set" of 20 patients with PMBCL from the previous IELSG-26 study (phase 1); after the first 10 clinical cases enrolled in the IELSG-37 (phase 2); and after 2 further groups of 50 (phase 3) and 40 clinical cases (phase 4). After feedback from the training set and the first 10 cases, a meeting was held to discuss interpretation, and a detailed set of instructions for the review procedure was agreed and acted upon. Between 2012 and 2014, the first 100 patients were reviewed. Using Deauville score 3 as the cutoff for a complete metabolic response, the overall IOA among the reviewers was good (Krippendorff α = 0.72.) The binary concordance between pairs of reviewers (Cohen κ) ranged from 0.60 to 0.78. The IOA, initially moderate, improved progressively from phase 1 to 4 (Krippendorff α from 0.53 to 0.81; Cohen κ from 0.35-0.72 to 0.77-0.87). Our experience indicates that the agreement among "expert" nuclear physicians reporting PMBCL, even using standardized criteria, was only moderate when the study began. However, agreement improved using a harmonization process

  17. Clinical Utility of Microarray-Based Gene Expression Profiling in the Diagnosis and Subclassification of Leukemia: Report From the International Microarray Innovations in Leukemia Study Group

    PubMed Central

    Haferlach, Torsten; Kohlmann, Alexander; Wieczorek, Lothar; Basso, Giuseppe; Kronnie, Geertruy Te; Béné, Marie-Christine; De Vos, John; Hernández, Jesus M.; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Mills, Ken I.; Gilkes, Amanda; Chiaretti, Sabina; Shurtleff, Sheila A.; Kipps, Thomas J.; Rassenti, Laura Z.; Yeoh, Allen E.; Papenhausen, Peter R.; Liu, Wei-min; Williams, P. Mickey; Foà, Robin

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The Microarray Innovations in Leukemia study assessed the clinical utility of gene expression profiling as a single test to subtype leukemias into conventional categories of myeloid and lymphoid malignancies. Methods The investigation was performed in 11 laboratories across three continents and included 3,334 patients. An exploratory retrospective stage I study was designed for biomarker discovery and generated whole-genome expression profiles from 2,143 patients with leukemias and myelodysplastic syndromes. The gene expression profiling–based diagnostic accuracy was further validated in a prospective second study stage of an independent cohort of 1,191 patients. Results On the basis of 2,096 samples, the stage I study achieved 92.2% classification accuracy for all 18 distinct classes investigated (median specificity of 99.7%). In a second cohort of 1,152 prospectively collected patients, a classification scheme reached 95.6% median sensitivity and 99.8% median specificity for 14 standard subtypes of acute leukemia (eight acute lymphoblastic leukemia and six acute myeloid leukemia classes, n = 693). In 29 (57%) of 51 discrepant cases, the microarray results had outperformed routine diagnostic methods. Conclusion Gene expression profiling is a robust technology for the diagnosis of hematologic malignancies with high accuracy. It may complement current diagnostic algorithms and could offer a reliable platform for patients who lack access to today's state-of-the-art diagnostic work-up. Our comprehensive gene expression data set will be submitted to the public domain to foster research focusing on the molecular understanding of leukemias. PMID:20406941

  18. Geographic Considerations in International Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kott, Richard F.

    Based on students' generally shallow knowledge of geographic concepts on the one hand and a new and almost universal awareness of man in his milieu on the other, the author seeks to draw attention to the discipline of geography, and more specifically, political geography as an essential, fundamental component of international studies. The…

  19. Risk of Progression and Survival in Multiple Myeloma Relapsing After Therapy with IMiDs and Bortezomib: A Multicenter International Myeloma Working Group Study

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Shaji; Lee, Jae Hoon; Lahuerta, Juan J.; Morgan, Gareth; Richardson, Paul G.; Crowley, John; Haessler, Jeff; Feather, John; Hoering, Antje; Moreau, Philippe; LeLeu, Xavier; Hullin, Cyrille; Klein, Saskia K.; Sonneveld, Pieter; Siegel, David; Bladé, Joan; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Jagannath, Sundar; San Miguel, Jesus; Orlowski, Robert; Palumbo, Antonio; Sezer, Orhan; Durie, Brian G.M.

    2014-01-01

    Promising new drugs are being evaluated for treatment of multiple myeloma (MM), but their impact should be measured against the expected outcome in patients failing current therapies. However, the natural history of relapsed disease in the current era remains unclear. We studied 286 patients with relapsed MM, who were refractory to bortezomib and were relapsed, refractory, or ineligible, to an IMiD (Immunomodulatory Drug), with measurable disease and ECOG PS of 0, 1 or 2. The date patients satisfied the entry criteria was defined as time zero (T0). The median age at diagnosis was 58 years and time from diagnosis to T0 was 3.3 years. Following T0, 213 (74%) patients had a treatment recorded with one or more regimens (median=1; range 0-8). The first regimen contained bortezomib in 55 (26%) patients and an IMiD in 70 (33%). A minor response or better was seen to at least one therapy after T0 in 94 patients (51%) including >=partial response in 69 (38%). The median overall survival and event free survival from T0 were 9 and 5 months respectively. This study confirms the poor outcome once patients become refractory to current treatments. The results provide context for interpreting ongoing trials of new drugs. PMID:21799510

  20. Three-dimensional Reconstruction of Peripheral Nerve Internal Fascicular Groups

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Yingchun; Wang, Liping; Dong, Jianghui; Zhang, Yi; Luo, Peng; Qi, Jian; Liu, Xiaolin; Xian, Cory J.

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral nerves are important pathways for receiving afferent sensory impulses and sending out efferent motor instructions, as carried out by sensory nerve fibers and motor nerve fibers. It has remained a great challenge to functionally reconnect nerve internal fiber bundles (or fascicles) in nerve repair. One possible solution may be to establish a 3D nerve fascicle visualization system. This study described the key technology of 3D peripheral nerve fascicle reconstruction. Firstly, fixed nerve segments were embedded with position lines, cryostat-sectioned continuously, stained and imaged histologically. Position line cross-sections were identified using a trained support vector machine method, and the coordinates of their central pixels were obtained. Then, nerve section images were registered using the bilinear method, and edges of fascicles were extracted using an improved gradient vector flow snake method. Subsequently, fascicle types were identified automatically using the multi-directional gradient and second-order gradient method. Finally, a 3D virtual model of internal fascicles was obtained after section images were processed. This technique was successfully applied for 3D reconstruction for the median nerve of the hand-wrist and cubital fossa regions and the gastrocnemius nerve. This nerve internal fascicle 3D reconstruction technology would be helpful for aiding peripheral nerve repair and virtual surgery. PMID:26596642

  1. The role of sexuality symptoms in myeloproliferative neoplasm symptom burden and quality of life: An analysis by the MPN QOL International Study Group.

    PubMed

    Geyer, Holly L; Andreasson, Bjorn; Kosiorek, Heidi E; Dueck, Amylou C; Scherber, Robyn M; Martin, Kari A; Butler, Kristina A; Harrison, Claire N; Radia, Deepti H; Cervantes, Francisco; Kiladjian, Jean-Jacques; Reiter, Andreas; Birgegard, Gunnar; Passamonti, Francesco; Senyak, Zhenya; Vannucchi, Alessandro M; Paoli, Chiara; Xiao, Zhijian; Samuelsson, Jan; Mesa, Ruben A

    2016-06-15

    Patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) including polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia, and myelofibrosis, are faced with oppressive symptom profiles that compromise daily functioning and quality of life. Among these symptoms, sexuality-related symptoms have emerged as particularly prominent and largely unaddressed. In the current study, the authors evaluated how sexuality symptoms from MPN relate to other patient characteristics, disease features, treatments, and symptoms. A total of 1971 patients with MPN (827 with essential thrombocythemia, 682 with polycythemia vera, 456 with myelofibrosis, and 6 classified as other) were prospectively evaluated and patient responses to the Myeloproliferative Neoplasm Symptom Assessment Form (MPN-SAF) and the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire Core 30 (EORTC-QLQ C30) were collected, along with information regarding individual disease characteristics and laboratory data. Sexuality scores were compared with an age-matched, healthy control population. Overall, patients with MPN were found to have greater sexual dysfunction compared with the healthy population (MPN-SAF score of 3.6 vs 2.0; P<.001), with 64% of patients with MPN describing some degree of sexual dysfunction and 43% experiencing severe symptoms. The presence of sexual symptoms correlated closely with all domains of patient functionality (physical, social, cognitive, emotional, and role functioning) and were associated with a reduced quality of life. Sexual problems also were found to be associated with other MPN symptoms, particularly depression and nocturnal and microvascular-related symptoms. Sexual dysfunction was more severe in patients aged >65 years and in those with cytopenias and transfusion requirements, and those receiving certain therapies such as immunomodulators or steroids. The results of the current study identify the topic of sexuality as a prominent issue for the MPN population

  2. Impact of new International Association of Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups (IADPSG) diagnostic criteria on perinatal outcomes in a regional tertiary hospital in New South Wales, Australia.

    PubMed

    Tan, Hong Lin Evelyn; Luu, Judy; Caswell, Amanda; Holliday, Elizabeth; Attia, John; Acharya, Shamasunder

    2017-10-06

    We compared the impact of new gestational diabetes (GDM) diagnostic criteria by IADPSG with previous criteria to ascertain concordance between the two criteria; and whether women discordant for GDM between the old and new criteria had increased pregnancy complications. Oral glucose tolerance tests of pregnant women across time periods using old criteria and new criteria were collected. Maternal data and perinatal outcomes were compared between diagnostic concordant and discordant women. In total, 666/5178 (12.9%) women were diagnosed and treated for GDM. There was a significant increase in odds of any complication in concordant positive women (OR 3.91 95%CI 2.71-5.63, p<0.0001); in women only positive by new GDM criteria (OR 2.06, 95% CI 1.41-2.99, p=0.0002); and women only positive by old GDM criteria (OR 2.28, 95% CI 1.42-3.66, p=0.0006); compared to concordant negative women. This is mainly due to macrosomia and nursery admissions. This study confirms that women diagnosed with GDM on both old and new criteria have a higher rate of birth complications than women without GDM. Women who have been missed out due to new criteria may still be at risk. Therefore, combination of both old and new criteria may be optimal for identifying high-risk pregnancies. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. SURGICAL OUTCOMES AND COMPLICATIONS OF RHEGMATOGENOUS RETINAL DETACHMENT IN EYES WITH CHORIORETINAL COLOBOMA: The Results of the KKESH International Collaborative Retina Study Group.

    PubMed

    Abouammoh, Marwan A; Alsulaiman, Sulaiman M; Gupta, Vishali S; Younis, Afnan; Chhablani, Jay; Hussein, Abdullah; Casella, Antonio M; Banker, Alay S; Arevalo, J Fernando

    2017-10-01

    To study the outcomes of management of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment in eyes with chorioretinal colobomas. A retrospective review of 119 patients (119 eyes) with chorioretinal colobomas who underwent surgical repair for rhegmatogenous retinal detachment was performed. Data were collected on the site of the retinal break, type of surgery, anatomical success, and complications. The most common location of the primary retinal break was the intercalary membrane in 58.8% of eyes. The most common surgical intervention was vitrectomy with endolaser and silicone oil tamponade (77.3% of eyes). Final anatomical success was achieved in 87.4% of eyes. Anatomical success was significantly higher in eyes that received long-acting tamponade (P = 0.006). Cryotherapy was significantly associated with failure of primary vitrectomy (P = 0.028). Placement of an encircling band did not affect anatomical outcomes (P = 0.75). Most of the eyes (60%) with recurrent retinal detachment after primary vitrectomy had a primary break within the normal retina. The optimal option for managing retinal detachment in eyes with chorioretinal colobomas is pars plana vitrectomy with long-acting tamponade (silicone oil or octafluoropropane) and retinopexy to the edge of the coloboma and the primary breaks. Cryotherapy is associated with poor anatomical outcomes. An encircling band does not seem to affect the final anatomical outcome.

  4. Pediatric acute myeloid leukemia with t(8;16)(p11;p13), a distinct clinical and biological entity: a collaborative study by the International-Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster AML-study group

    PubMed Central

    Coenen, Eva A.; Zwaan, C. Michel; Reinhardt, Dirk; Harrison, Christine J.; Haas, Oskar A.; de Haas, Valerie; Mihál, Vladimir; De Moerloose, Barbara; Jeison, Marta; Rubnitz, Jeffrey E.; Tomizawa, Daisuke; Johnston, Donna; Alonzo, Todd A.; Hasle, Henrik; Auvrignon, Anne; Dworzak, Michael; Pession, Andrea; van der Velden, Vincent H. J.; Swansbury, John; Wong, Kit-fai; Terui, Kiminori; Savasan, Sureyya; Winstanley, Mark; Vaitkeviciene, Goda; Zimmermann, Martin; Pieters, Rob; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M.

    2013-01-01

    In pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML), cytogenetic abnormalities are strong indicators of prognosis. Some recurrent cytogenetic abnormalities, such as t(8;16)(p11;p13), are so rare that collaborative studies are required to define their prognostic impact. We collected the clinical characteristics, morphology, and immunophenotypes of 62 pediatric AML patients with t(8;16)(p11;p13) from 18 countries participating in the International Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster (I-BFM) AML study group. We used the AML-BFM cohort diagnosed from 1995-2005 (n = 543) as a reference cohort. Median age of the pediatric t(8;16)(p11;p13) AML patients was significantly lower (1.2 years). The majority (97%) had M4-M5 French-American-British type, significantly different from the reference cohort. Erythrophagocytosis (70%), leukemia cutis (58%), and disseminated intravascular coagulation (39%) occurred frequently. Strikingly, spontaneous remissions occurred in 7 neonates with t(8;16)(p11;p13), of whom 3 remain in continuous remission. The 5-year overall survival of patients diagnosed after 1993 was 59%, similar to the reference cohort (P = .14). Gene expression profiles of t(8;16)(p11;p13) pediatric AML cases clustered close to, but distinct from, MLL-rearranged AML. Highly expressed genes included HOXA11, HOXA10, RET, PERP, and GGA2. In conclusion, pediatric t(8;16)(p11;p13) AML is a rare entity defined by a unique gene expression signature and distinct clinical features in whom spontaneous remissions occur in a subset of neonatal cases. PMID:23974201

  5. Dummy Run of Quality Assurance Program in a Phase 3 Randomized Trial Investigating the Role of Internal Mammary Lymph Node Irradiation in Breast Cancer Patients: Korean Radiation Oncology Group 08-06 Study

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Yoonsun; Kim, Jun Won; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Kim, Su Ssan; Ahn, Sung-Ja; Park, Won; Lee, Hyung-Sik; Kim, Dong Won; Lee, Kyu Chan; Suh, Hyun Suk; Kim, Jin Hee; Shin, Hyun Soo; Kim, Yong Bae; Suh, Chang-Ok

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: The Korean Radiation Oncology Group (KROG) 08-06 study protocol allowed radiation therapy (RT) technique to include or exclude breast cancer patients from receiving radiation therapy to the internal mammary lymph node (IMN). The purpose of this study was to assess dosimetric differences between the 2 groups and potential influence on clinical outcome by a dummy run procedure. Methods and Materials: All participating institutions were asked to produce RT plans without irradiation (Arm 1) and with irradiation to the IMN (Arm 2) for 1 breast-conservation treatment case (breast-conserving surgery [BCS]) and 1 mastectomy case (modified radical mastectomy [MRM]) whose computed tomography images were provided. We assessed interinstitutional variations in IMN delineation and evaluated the dose-volume histograms of the IMN and normal organs. A reference IMN was delineated by an expert panel group based on the study guidelines. Also, we analyzed the potential influence of actual dose variation observed in this study on patient survival. Results: Although physicians intended to exclude the IMN within the RT field, the data showed almost 59.0% of the prescribed dose was delivered to the IMN in Arm 1. However, the mean doses covering the IMN in Arm 1 and Arm 2 were significantly different for both cases (P<.001). Due to the probability of overdose in Arm 1, the estimated gain in 7-year disease-free survival rate would be reduced from 10% to 7.9% for BCS cases and 7.1% for MRM cases. The radiation doses to the ipsilateral lung, heart, and coronary artery were lower in Arm 1 than in Arm 2. Conclusions: Although this dummy run study indicated that a substantial dose was delivered to the IMN, even in the nonirradiation group, the dose differences between the 2 groups were statistically significant. However, this dosimetric profile should be studied further with actual patient samples and be taken into consideration when analyzing clinical outcomes according to IMN

  6. Dummy run of quality assurance program in a phase 3 randomized trial investigating the role of internal mammary lymph node irradiation in breast cancer patients: Korean Radiation Oncology Group 08-06 study.

    PubMed

    Chung, Yoonsun; Kim, Jun Won; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Kim, Su Ssan; Ahn, Sung-Ja; Park, Won; Lee, Hyung-Sik; Kim, Dong Won; Lee, Kyu Chan; Suh, Hyun Suk; Kim, Jin Hee; Shin, Hyun Soo; Kim, Yong Bae; Suh, Chang-Ok

    2015-02-01

    The Korean Radiation Oncology Group (KROG) 08-06 study protocol allowed radiation therapy (RT) technique to include or exclude breast cancer patients from receiving radiation therapy to the internal mammary lymph node (IMN). The purpose of this study was to assess dosimetric differences between the 2 groups and potential influence on clinical outcome by a dummy run procedure. All participating institutions were asked to produce RT plans without irradiation (Arm 1) and with irradiation to the IMN (Arm 2) for 1 breast-conservation treatment case (breast-conserving surgery [BCS]) and 1 mastectomy case (modified radical mastectomy [MRM]) whose computed tomography images were provided. We assessed interinstitutional variations in IMN delineation and evaluated the dose-volume histograms of the IMN and normal organs. A reference IMN was delineated by an expert panel group based on the study guidelines. Also, we analyzed the potential influence of actual dose variation observed in this study on patient survival. Although physicians intended to exclude the IMN within the RT field, the data showed almost 59.0% of the prescribed dose was delivered to the IMN in Arm 1. However, the mean doses covering the IMN in Arm 1 and Arm 2 were significantly different for both cases (P<.001). Due to the probability of overdose in Arm 1, the estimated gain in 7-year disease-free survival rate would be reduced from 10% to 7.9% for BCS cases and 7.1% for MRM cases. The radiation doses to the ipsilateral lung, heart, and coronary artery were lower in Arm 1 than in Arm 2. Although this dummy run study indicated that a substantial dose was delivered to the IMN, even in the nonirradiation group, the dose differences between the 2 groups were statistically significant. However, this dosimetric profile should be studied further with actual patient samples and be taken into consideration when analyzing clinical outcomes according to IMN irradiation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  7. Timing of Radiation Therapy and Chemotherapy After Breast-Conserving Surgery for Node-Positive Breast Cancer: Long-Term Results From International Breast Cancer Study Group Trials VI and VII.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Per; Cole, Bernard F; Price, Karen N; Gelber, Richard D; Coates, Alan S; Goldhirsch, Aron; Castiglione, Monica; Colleoni, Marco; Gruber, Günther

    2016-10-01

    To update the previous report from 2 randomized clinical trials, now with a median follow-up of 16 years, to analyze the effect of radiation therapy timing on local failure and disease-free survival. From July 1986 to April 1993, International Breast Cancer Study Group trial VI randomly assigned 1475 pre-/perimenopausal women with node-positive breast cancer to receive 3 or 6 cycles of initial chemotherapy (CT). International Breast Cancer Study Group trial VII randomly assigned 1212 postmenopausal women with node-positive breast cancer to receive tamoxifen for 5 years, or tamoxifen for 5 years with 3 early cycles of initial CT. For patients who received breast-conserving surgery (BCS), radiation therapy (RT) was delayed until initial CT was completed; 4 or 7 months after BCS for trial VI and 2 or 4 months for trial VII. We compared RT timing groups among 433 patients on trial VI and 285 patients on trial VII who received BCS plus RT. Endpoints were local failure, regional/distant failure, and disease-free survival (DFS). Among pre-/perimenopausal patients there were no significant differences in disease-related outcomes. The 15-year DFS was 48.2% in the group allocated 3 months initial CT and 44.9% in the group allocated 6 months initial CT (hazard ratio [HR] 1.12; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.87-1.45). Among postmenopausal patients, the 15-year DFS was 46.1% in the no-initial-CT group and 43.3% in the group allocated 3 months initial CT (HR 1.11; 95% CI 0.82-1.51). Corresponding HRs for local failures were 0.94 (95% CI 0.61-1.46) in trial VI and 1.51 (95% CI 0.77-2.97) in trial VII. For regional/distant failures, the respective HRs were 1.15 (95% CI 0.80-1.63) and 1.08 (95% CI 0.69-1.68). This study confirms that, after more than 15 years of follow-up, it is reasonable to delay radiation therapy until after the completion of standard CT. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Learning Effects of an International Group Competition Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akpinar, Murat; del Campo, Cristina; Eryarsoy, Enes

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of collaboration and competition on students' learning performance in a course of business statistics. The collaboration involved a simultaneously organised group competition project with analysis of real-life business problems among students. Students from the following schools participated: JAMK University of…

  9. Learning Effects of an International Group Competition Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akpinar, Murat; del Campo, Cristina; Eryarsoy, Enes

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of collaboration and competition on students' learning performance in a course of business statistics. The collaboration involved a simultaneously organised group competition project with analysis of real-life business problems among students. Students from the following schools participated: JAMK University of…

  10. Volcanic influences: International working group on volcanogenic sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A conclusion of the Geological Society of America Penrose Conference on Volcanic Influences on Terrestrial Sedimentation (August 28 to September 2, 1988) was that establishment of an informal working group would enhance our understanding of volcanogenic sedimentation. To establish the group, an ad hoc steering committee was formed at the conference and consists of W. J. Fritz (Georgia State University), R. S. Hildebrand (Geological Survey of Canada), R. Iverson (U.S. Geological Survey), P. Kokelaar (Chairman, University of Liverpool), T. C. Pierson (USGS), and G. A. Smith (University of New Mexico). The working group is open to researchers of any nation interested in the study of secondary transport and deposition of volcaniclastic materials in subaerial or subaqueous environments (e.g., transport, deposition, nomenclature, volcanic history, experiment, theory, hazard).

  11. The Kadota Fund International Forum 2004-Clinical group consensus*

    PubMed Central

    van der Zee, J.; Vujaskovic, Z.; Kondo, M.; Sugahara, T.

    2009-01-01

    The results from experimental studies indicate that hyperthermia is both an effective complementary treatment to, and a strong sensitiser of, radiotherapy and many cytotoxic drugs. Since the first international hyperthermia conference in 1975, Washington DC, techniques to increase tumour temperature have been developed and tested clinically. Hyperthermia can be applied by several methods: local hyperthermia by external or internal energy sources, perfusion hyperthermia of organs, limbs, or body cavities, and whole body hyperthermia. The clinical value of hyperthermia in combination with other treatment modalities has been shown by randomised trials. Significant improvement in clinical outcome has been demonstrated for tumours of the head and neck, breast, brain, bladder, cervix, rectum, lung, oesophagus, for melanoma and sarcoma. The addition of hyperthermia resulted in remarkably higher (complete) response rates, accompanied by improved local tumour control rates, better palliative effects, and/or better overall survival rates. Toxicity from hyperthermia cannot always be avoided, but is usually of limited clinical relevance. In spite of these good clinical results, hyperthermia has received little attention. Problems with acceptance concern the limited availability of equipment, the lack of awareness concerning clinical results, and the lack of financial resources. In this paper the most relevant literature describing the clinical effects of hyperthermia is reviewed and discussed, and means to overcome the lack of awareness and use of this modality is described. PMID:18283588

  12. 2016 American College of Rheumatology/European League Against Rheumatism criteria for minimal, moderate, and major clinical response in adult dermatomyositis and polymyositis: An International Myositis Assessment and Clinical Studies Group/Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation Collaborative Initiative.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Rohit; Rider, Lisa G; Ruperto, Nicolino; Bayat, Nastaran; Erman, Brian; Feldman, Brian M; Oddis, Chester V; Amato, Anthony A; Chinoy, Hector; Cooper, Robert G; Dastmalchi, Maryam; Fiorentino, David; Isenberg, David; Katz, James D; Mammen, Andrew; de Visser, Marianne; Ytterberg, Steven R; Lundberg, Ingrid E; Chung, Lorinda; Danko, Katalin; García-De la Torre, Ignacio; Song, Yeong Wook; Villa, Luca; Rinaldi, Mariangela; Rockette, Howard; Lachenbruch, Peter A; Miller, Frederick W; Vencovsky, Jiri

    2017-05-01

    To develop response criteria for adult dermatomyositis (DM) and polymyositis (PM). Expert surveys, logistic regression, and conjoint analysis were used to develop 287 definitions using core set measures. Myositis experts rated greater improvement among multiple pairwise scenarios in conjoint analysis surveys, where different levels of improvement in 2 core set measures were presented. The PAPRIKA (Potentially All Pairwise Rankings of All Possible Alternatives) method determined the relative weights of core set measures and conjoint analysis definitions. The performance characteristics of the definitions were evaluated on patient profiles using expert consensus (gold standard) and were validated using data from a clinical trial. The nominal group technique was used to reach consensus. Consensus was reached for a conjoint analysis-based continuous model using absolute per cent change in core set measures (physician, patient, and extramuscular global activity, muscle strength, Health Assessment Questionnaire, and muscle enzyme levels). A total improvement score (range 0-100), determined by summing scores for each core set measure, was based on improvement in and relative weight of each core set measure. Thresholds for minimal, moderate, and major improvement were ≥20, ≥40, and ≥60 points in the total improvement score. The same criteria were chosen for juvenile DM, with different improvement thresholds. Sensitivity and specificity in DM/PM patient cohorts were 85% and 92%, 90% and 96%, and 92% and 98% for minimal, moderate, and major improvement, respectively. Definitions were validated in the clinical trial analysis for differentiating the physician rating of improvement (p<0.001). The response criteria for adult DM/PM consisted of the conjoint analysis model based on absolute per cent change in 6 core set measures, with thresholds for minimal, moderate, and major improvement. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not

  13. PREFACE: XXXth International Colloquium on Group Theoretical Methods in Physics (ICGTMP) (Group30)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brackx, Fred; De Schepper, Hennie; Van der Jeugt, Joris

    2015-04-01

    The XXXth International Colloquium on Group Theoretical Methods in Physics (ICGTMP), also known as the Group30 conference, took place in Ghent (Belgium) from Monday 14 to Friday 18 July 2014. The conference was organised by Ghent University (Department of Applied Mathematics, Computer Science and Statistics, and Department of Mathematical Analysis). The website http://www.group30.ugent.be is still available. The ICGTMP is one of the traditional conference series covering the most important topics of symmetry which are relevant to the interplay of present-day mathematics and physics. More than 40 years ago a group of enthusiasts, headed by H. Bacry of Marseille and A. Janner of Nijmegen, initiated a series of annual meetings with the aim to provide a common forum for scientists interested in group theoretical methods. At that time most of the participants belonged to two important communities: on the one hand solid state specialists, elementary particle theorists and phenomenologists, and on the other mathematicians eager to apply newly-discovered group and algebraic structures. The conference series has become a meeting point for scientists working at modelling physical phenomena through mathematical and numerical methods based on geometry and symmetry. It is considered as the oldest one among the conference series devoted to geometry and physics. It has been further broadened and diversified due to the successful applications of geometric and algebraic methods in life sciences and other areas. The first four meetings took place alternatively in Marseille and Nijmegen. Soon after, the conference acquired an international standing, especially following the 1975 colloquium in Nijmegen and the 1976 colloquium in Montreal. Since then it has been organized in many places around the world. It has become a bi-annual colloquium since 1990, the year it was organized in Moscow. This was the first time the colloquium took place in Belgium. There were 246 registered

  14. 76 FR 5832 - International Business Machines (IBM), Software Group Business Unit, Optim Data Studio Tools QA...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration International Business Machines (IBM), Software Group Business Unit... at International Business Machines (IBM), Software Group Business Unit, Optim Data Studio Tools...

  15. 2016 American College of Rheumatology/European League Against Rheumatism Criteria for Minimal, Moderate, and Major Clinical Response in Adult Dermatomyositis and Polymyositis: An International Myositis Assessment and Clinical Studies Group/Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation Collaborative Initiative.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Rohit; Rider, Lisa G; Ruperto, Nicolino; Bayat, Nastaran; Erman, Brian; Feldman, Brian M; Oddis, Chester V; Amato, Anthony A; Chinoy, Hector; Cooper, Robert G; Dastmalchi, Maryam; Fiorentino, David; Isenberg, David; Katz, James D; Mammen, Andrew; de Visser, Marianne; Ytterberg, Steven R; Lundberg, Ingrid E; Chung, Lorinda; Danko, Katalin; García-De la Torre, Ignacio; Song, Yeong Wook; Villa, Luca; Rinaldi, Mariangela; Rockette, Howard; Lachenbruch, Peter A; Miller, Frederick W; Vencovsky, Jiri

    2017-05-01

    To develop response criteria for adult dermatomyositis (DM) and polymyositis (PM). Expert surveys, logistic regression, and conjoint analysis were used to develop 287 definitions using core set measures. Myositis experts rated greater improvement among multiple pairwise scenarios in conjoint analysis surveys, where different levels of improvement in 2 core set measures were presented. The PAPRIKA (Potentially All Pairwise Rankings of All Possible Alternatives) method determined the relative weights of core set measures and conjoint analysis definitions. The performance characteristics of the definitions were evaluated on patient profiles using expert consensus (gold standard) and were validated using data from a clinical trial. The nominal group technique was used to reach consensus. Consensus was reached for a conjoint analysis-based continuous model using absolute percent change in core set measures (physician, patient, and extramuscular global activity, muscle strength, Health Assessment Questionnaire, and muscle enzyme levels). A total improvement score (range 0-100), determined by summing scores for each core set measure, was based on improvement in and relative weight of each core set measure. Thresholds for minimal, moderate, and major improvement were ≥20, ≥40, and ≥60 points in the total improvement score. The same criteria were chosen for juvenile DM, with different improvement thresholds. Sensitivity and specificity in DM/PM patient cohorts were 85% and 92%, 90% and 96%, and 92% and 98% for minimal, moderate, and major improvement, respectively. Definitions were validated in the clinical trial analysis for differentiating the physician rating of improvement (P < 0.001). The response criteria for adult DM/PM consisted of the conjoint analysis model based on absolute percent change in 6 core set measures, with thresholds for minimal, moderate, and major improvement. © 2017, American College of Rheumatology.

  16. Comparing International Curriculum Systems: The International Instructional Systems Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creese, Brian; Gonzalez, Alvaro; Isaacs, Tina

    2016-01-01

    This paper sets out the main findings of the International Instructional Systems Study (IISS), conducted by the UCL Institute of Education and funded by the Center on International Education Benchmarking (CIEB). The study examined the instructional systems and intended curricula of six "high performing" countries and two US states. The…

  17. Comparing International Curriculum Systems: The International Instructional Systems Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creese, Brian; Gonzalez, Alvaro; Isaacs, Tina

    2016-01-01

    This paper sets out the main findings of the International Instructional Systems Study (IISS), conducted by the UCL Institute of Education and funded by the Center on International Education Benchmarking (CIEB). The study examined the instructional systems and intended curricula of six "high performing" countries and two US states. The…

  18. 75 FR 26794 - Alticor, Inc., Including Access Business Group International LLC and Amway Corporation, Buena...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-12

    ...-73,420A] Alticor, Inc., Including Access Business Group International LLC and Amway Corporation, Buena Park, CA; Alticor, Inc., Including Access Business Group International LLC, and Amway Corporation..., applicable to workers of Alticor, Inc., including Access Business Group International LLC and...

  19. Chemoimmunotherapy with methotrexate, cytarabine, thiotepa, and rituximab (MATRix regimen) in patients with primary CNS lymphoma: results of the first randomisation of the International Extranodal Lymphoma Study Group-32 (IELSG32) phase 2 trial.

    PubMed

    Ferreri, Andrés J M; Cwynarski, Kate; Pulczynski, Elisa; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Deckert, Martina; Politi, Letterio S; Torri, Valter; Fox, Christopher P; Rosée, Paul La; Schorb, Elisabeth; Ambrosetti, Achille; Roth, Alexander; Hemmaway, Claire; Ferrari, Angela; Linton, Kim M; Rudà, Roberta; Binder, Mascha; Pukrop, Tobias; Balzarotti, Monica; Fabbri, Alberto; Johnson, Peter; Gørløv, Jette Sønderskov; Hess, Georg; Panse, Jens; Pisani, Francesco; Tucci, Alessandra; Stilgenbauer, Stephan; Hertenstein, Bernd; Keller, Ulrich; Krause, Stefan W; Levis, Alessandro; Schmoll, Hans J; Cavalli, Franco; Finke, Jürgen; Reni, Michele; Zucca, Emanuele; Illerhaus, Gerald

    2016-05-01

    Standard treatment for patients with primary CNS lymphoma remains to be defined. Active therapies are often associated with increased risk of haematological or neurological toxicity. In this trial, we addressed the tolerability and efficacy of adding rituximab with or without thiotepa to methotrexate-cytarabine combination therapy (the MATRix regimen), followed by a second randomisation comparing consolidation with whole-brain radiotherapy or autologous stem cell transplantation in patients with primary CNS lymphoma. We report the results of the first randomisation in this Article. For the international randomised phase 2 International Extranodal Lymphoma Study Group-32 (IELSG32) trial, HIV-negative patients (aged 18-70 years) with newly diagnosed primary CNS lymphoma and measurable disease were enrolled from 53 cancer centres in five European countries (Denmark, Germany, Italy, Switzerland, and the UK) and randomly assigned (1:1:1) to receive four courses of methotrexate 3·5 g/m(2) on day 1 plus cytarabine 2 g/m(2) twice daily on days 2 and 3 (group A); or the same combination plus two doses of rituximab 375 mg/m(2) on days -5 and 0 (group B); or the same methotrexate-cytarabine-rituximab combination plus thiotepa 30 mg/m(2) on day 4 (group C), with the three groups repeating treatment every 3 weeks. Patients with responsive or stable disease after the first stage were then randomly allocated between whole-brain radiotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation. A permuted blocks randomised design (block size four) was used for both randomisations, and a computer-generated randomisation list was used within each stratum to preserve allocation concealment. Randomisation was stratified by IELSG risk score (low vs intermediate vs high). No masking after assignment to intervention was used. The primary endpoint of the first randomisation was the complete remission rate, analysed by modified intention to treat. This study is registered with Clinical

  20. Design, conduct, and analyses of Breast International Group (BIG) 1-98: A randomized, double-blind, phase-III study comparing letrozole and tamoxifen as adjuvant endocrine therapy for postmenopausal women with receptor-positive, early breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Giobbie-Hurder, Anita; Price, Karen N; Gelber, Richard D

    2010-01-01

    Background Aromatase inhibitors provide superior disease control when compared with tamoxifen as adjuvant therapy for postmenopausal women with endocrine-responsive early breast cancer. Purpose To present the design, history, and analytic challenges of the Breast International Group (BIG) 1-98 trial: an international, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, phase-III study comparing the aromatase inhibitor letrozole with tamoxifen in this clinical setting. Methods From 1998–2003, BIG 1-98 enrolled 8028 women to receive monotherapy with either tamoxifen or letrozole for 5 years, or sequential therapy of 2 years of one agent followed by 3 years of the other. Randomization to one of four treatment groups permitted two complementary analyses to be conducted several years apart. The first, reported in 2005, provided a head-to-head comparison of letrozole versus tamoxifen. Statistical power was increased by an enriched design, which included patients who were assigned sequential treatments until the time of the treatment switch. The second, reported in late 2008, used a conditional landmark approach to test the hypothesis that switching endocrine agents at approximately 2 years from randomization for patients who are disease-free is superior to continuing with the original agent. Results The 2005 analysis showed the superiority of letrozole compared with tamoxifen. The patients who were assigned tamoxifen alone were unblinded and offered the opportunity to switch to letrozole. Results from other trials increased the clinical relevance about whether or not to start treatment with letrozole or tamoxifen, and analysis plans were expanded to evaluate sequential versus single-agent strategies from randomization. Limitations Due to the unblinding of patients assigned tamoxifen alone, analysis of updated data will require ascertainment of the influence of selective crossover from tamoxifen to letrozole. Conclusions BIG 1-98 is an example of an enriched design, involving

  1. Report from International Lunar Exploration Working Group (ILEWG) to COSPAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foing, Bernard H.

    inputs to future missions, including a gap analysis of needed measurements. Highly resolved global data sets are required. Autonomous landing and hazard avoidance will depend on the best topographic map of the Moon, achievable by combining shared data. - New topics such as life sciences, partial gravity processes on the Moon should be followed in relation to future exploration needs.” http://sci.esa.int/ilewg/ http://sci.esa.int/ilewg/47170-gluc-iceum11-beijing-2010lunar-declaration/ References: [1] 1st International Lunar Workshop, Balsiger H. et al., Editors, European Space Agency, 1994. ESA-SP-1170. [2] 2nd International Lunar Workshop, Kyoto, H. Mizutani, editor, Japan Space Forum Publisher, 1997. [3] 3rd International Lunar Workshop, Moscow 1998, E. Galimov, editor. [4] ICEUM4, ESTEC, 2000, ESA SP-462, B.H. Foing & M. Perry, editors. [5] ICEUM5, Hawaii Nov 2003, Durst S.M. et al, Editors, Vol 108, 1-576 pp, Science and Technology Series, American Astronautical Society, 2004. [6] ICEUM6, Udaipur 2004, Bhandari N., Editor, Journal Earth Sys-tem Science, India, 114, No6, Dec 2005, pp. 573-841. [7] ICEUM7, Toronto Sept 2005, sci.esa.int/ilewg. [8] ICEUM8, Beijing July 2006, Journal of Chinese Society of Astronautics, Vol. 28 Sup., 2007, Ji W., Editor. [9] ICEUM9, Sorrento, Italy, Foing B., Espinasse S., Kosters G., Editors. http://sci.esa.int/iceum9, Dec. 2007), [11] Ehrenfreund, P., Foing, B.H., Cellino, A. Editors, The Moon and Near Earth Objects, ASR Vol 37, 1, 2006. [12] Foing, B.H. et al editors, 'Astronomy and Space Science from the Moon', ASR 14, 6, 1994. [13] Ip W.-H., Foing, B.H., Masson Ph.L., editors, The Moon and Mars, ASR Vol 23, 11, 1999. [14] Foing, B.H. et al, editor, Lunar Exploration, Planetary and Space Science, Vol 50, 14-15, 2002. [15] Foing, B.H., Heather, D. editors, 'Lunar Exploration 2000', ASR Vol 30, Nr 8, 2002. [16] Huntress, W. et al 'The next steps in exploring deep space - A cosmic study by the IAA', Acta Astronautica, Vol 58, Issues 6

  2. Effects of a treatment gap during adjuvant chemotherapy in node-positive breast cancer: results of International Breast Cancer Study Group (IBCSG) Trials 13-93 and 14-93.

    PubMed

    Colleoni, Marco; Gelber, Shari; Simoncini, Edda; Pagani, Olivia; Gelber, Richard D; Price, Karen N; Castiglione-Gertsch, Monica; Coates, Alan S; Goldhirsch, Aron

    2007-07-01

    The International Breast Cancer Study Group (IBCSG) conducted two complementary randomized trials to assess whether a treatment-free gap during adjuvant chemotherapy influenced outcome. From 1993 to 1999, IBCSG Trials 13-93 and 14-93 enrolled 2215 premenopausal and postmenopausal women with axillary node-positive, operable breast cancer. All patients received cyclophosphamide (Cytoxan, C) plus either doxorubicin (Adriamycin, A) or epirubicin (E) for four courses followed immediately (No Gap) or after a 16-week delay (Gap) by classical cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and fluorouracil (CMF) for three courses. The median follow-up was 7.7 years. The Gap and No-Gap groups had similar disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). No identified subgroup showed a statistically significant difference, but exploratory subgroup analysis noted a trend towards decreased DFS for Gap compared with No Gap for women with estrogen receptor (ER)-negative tumors not receiving tamoxifen, especially evident during the first 2 years. A 16-week gap between adjuvant AC/EC and CMF provided no benefit and may have increased early recurrence rates in patients with ER-negative tumors.

  3. Individual case review in a phase 3 randomized trial to investigate the role of internal mammary lymph node irradiation for breast cancer: Korean Radiation Oncology Group 08-06 study.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hong In; Yoon, Jeongmin; Chung, Yoonsun; Nam, Chung Mo; Cha, Hyejung; Choi, Jinhyun; Lee, Jeongshim; Han, Hee Ji; Cho, Yeona; Kim, Yong Bae; Suh, Chang-Ok

    2017-04-01

    This study aimed to assess protocol compliance based on an individual case review (ICR) of the Korean Radiation Oncology Group-0806 trial. For the ICR, 747 participants were divided into eight subgroups based on internal mammary node irradiation (IMNI), tumor laterality, and surgery type. Next, 15% of patients were randomly selected within each subgroup, and corresponding hospitals were subsequently requested to upload information related to radiation therapy (RT) planning. We reviewed the dose distributions of targets and organs at risk to determine protocol compliance. Data of 102 patients were collected. Overall, RT plans were found to be mostly protocol-compliant, with acceptability rates of 60-80% despite deviations in the ipsilateral lung in Arm 2 (IMNI group). However, despite few deviations, a subgroup analysis revealed significant differences in protocol compliance. Among RT techniques, plans using standard and partial wide tangents were most compliant in both Arms. In this ICR, the estimated survival benefits based on IMN doses were 7.7%, 8.4%, and 7.2% for all, breast-conserving surgery, and mastectomy cases, respectively. This ICR demonstrated overall protocol compliance, despite significant differences with regard to IMN irradiation and organs at risk according to subgroups and adopted field arrangements. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Is chemotherapy necessary for premenopausal women with lower-risk node-positive, endocrine responsive breast cancer? 10-year update of International Breast Cancer Study Group Trial 11-93.

    PubMed

    Thürlimann, Beat; Price, Karen N; Gelber, Richard D; Holmberg, Stig B; Crivellari, Diana; Colleoni, Marco; Collins, John; Forbes, John F; Castiglione-Gertsch, Monica; Coates, Alan S; Goldhirsch, Aron

    2009-01-01

    International Breast Cancer Study Group (IBCSG) Trial 11-93 is the largest trial evaluating the role of the addition of chemotherapy to ovarian function suppression/ablation (OFS) and tamoxifen in premenopausal patients with endocrine-responsive early breast cancer. IBCSG Trial 11-93 is a randomized trial comparing four cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy (AC: doxorubicin or epirubicin, plus cyclophosphamide) added to OFS and 5 years of tamoxifen versus OFS and tamoxifen without chemotherapy in premenopausal patients with node-positive, endocrine-responsive early breast cancer. There were 174 patients randomized from May 1993 to November 1998. The trial was closed before the target accrual was reached due to low accrual rate. Patients randomized tended to have lower risk node-positive disease and the median age was 45. After 10 years median follow up, there remains no difference between the two randomized treatment groups for disease-free (hazard ratio=1.02 (0.57-1.83); P=0.94) or overall survival (hazard ratio=0.97 (0.44-2.16); P=0.94). This trial, although small, offers no evidence that AC chemotherapy provides additional disease control for premenopausal patients with lower-risk node-positive endocrine-responsive breast cancer who receive adequate adjuvant endocrine therapy. A large trial is needed to determine whether chemotherapy adds benefit to endocrine therapy for this population.

  5. Is chemotherapy necessary for premenopausal women with lower-risk node-positive, endocrine responsive breast cancer? 10-year update of International Breast Cancer Study Group Trial 11-93

    PubMed Central

    Thürlimann, Beat; Price, Karen N.; Gelber, Richard D.; Holmberg, Stig B.; Crivellari, Diana; Colleoni, Marco; Collins, John; Forbes, John F.; Castiglione-Gertsch, Monica; Coates, Alan S.; Goldhirsch, Aron

    2010-01-01

    Introduction International Breast Cancer Study Group (IBCSG) Trial 11-93 is the largest trial evaluating the role of the addition of chemotherapy to ovarian function suppress/ablation (OFS) and tamoxifen in premenopausal patients with endocrine-responsive early breast cancer. Methods IBCSG Trial 11-93 is a randomized trial comparing 4 cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy (AC: doxorubicin or epirubicin, plus cyclophosphamide) added to OFS and five years of tamoxifen versus OFS and tamoxifen without chemotherapy in premenopausal patients with node-positive, endocrine-responsive early breast cancer. 174 pts were randomized from May, 1993 to Nov, 1998. The trial was closed before the target accrual was reached due to low accrual rate. Results Patients randomized tended to have lower risk node-positive disease and the median age was 45. After 10 years median follow up, there remains no difference between the two randomized treatment groups for disease-free (hazard ratio=1.02 (0.57-1.83); p=0.94) or overall survival (hazard ratio=0.97 (0.44-2.16); p=0.94). Conclusion This trial, although small, offers no evidence that AC chemotherapy provides additional disease control for premenopausal patients with lower-risk node-positive endocrine-responsive breast cancer who receive adequate adjuvant endocrine therapy. A large trial is needed to determine whether chemotherapy adds benefit to endocrine therapy for this population. PMID:18259856

  6. Comparison study of the rates of manual peripheral blood smear review from 3 automated hematology analyzers, Unicel DxH 800, ADVIA 2120i, and XE 2100, using international consensus group guidelines.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sue Jung; Kim, Yoonjung; Shin, Saeam; Song, Jaewoo; Choi, Jong Rak

    2012-11-01

    In the clinical laboratory, it is important both to reduce the number of peripheral blood slide reviews to save time and money and to avoid reporting false results. To determine differences in the slide review rates of 3 widely used automated hematologic analyzers, the Unicel DxH 800 (Beckman Coulter Inc, Fullerton, California), ADVIA 2120i (Siemens Diagnostics, Tarrytown, New York), and XE 2100 (Sysmex, Kobe, Japan), using International Consensus Group for Hematology Review guidelines. A total of 1485 samples were tested, and 300 were manually reviewed. Slide review rates, sensitivity, specificity, and false-positive and false-negative rates were estimated using consensus group rules and compared using χ(2) tests, Fisher exact tests, or generalized estimating equations. Unicel DxH 800, ADVIA 2120i, and XE 2100 showed 22.8%, 20.2%, and 28.6% slide review rates; 14.3%, 14.3%, and 9.7% false-negative rates; and 13.7, 11.3%, and 17.3% false-positive rates, respectively. All analyzers showed significantly higher false-negative rates than that of the consensus group (2.9%). False-negative rates were higher than the recommended levels. Among 3 automated hematologic analyzers, XE 2100 showed the highest rate of slide review. Because the present study clearly shows that the slide review rates have distinct characteristics among the studied analyzers, each individual laboratory should consider selecting the most appropriate analyzer according to clinical characteristics. Analyzers with high sensitivity may be advantageous in outpatient settings for screening patients, whereas analyzers with high specificity may be beneficial in inpatient settings for efficient patient care.

  7. Robotic, laparoscopic and open surgery for gastric cancer compared on surgical, clinical and oncological outcomes: a multi-institutional chart review. A study protocol of the International study group on Minimally Invasive surgery for GASTRIc Cancer—IMIGASTRIC

    PubMed Central

    Desiderio, Jacopo; Jiang, Zhi-Wei; Nguyen, Ninh T; Zhang, Shu; Reim, Daniel; Alimoglu, Orhan; Azagra, Juan-Santiago; Yu, Pei-Wu; Coburn, Natalie G; Qi, Feng; Jackson, Patrick G; Zang, Lu; Brower, Steven T; Kurokawa, Yukinori; Facy, Olivier; Tsujimoto, Hironori; Coratti, Andrea; Annecchiarico, Mario; Bazzocchi, Francesca; Avanzolini, Andrea; Gagniere, Johan; Pezet, Denis; Cianchi, Fabio; Badii, Benedetta; Novotny, Alexander; Eren, Tunc; Leblebici, Metin; Goergen, Martine; Zhang, Ben; Zhao, Yong-Liang; Liu, Tong; Al-Refaie, Waddah; Ma, Junjun; Takiguchi, Shuji; Lequeu, Jean-Baptiste; Trastulli, Stefano; Parisi, Amilcare

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Gastric cancer represents a great challenge for healthcare providers and requires a multidisciplinary treatment approach in which surgery plays a major role. Minimally invasive surgery has been progressively developed, first with the advent of laparoscopy and recently with the spread of robotic surgery, but a number of issues are currently being debated, including the limitations in performing an effective extended lymph node dissection, the real advantages of robotic systems, the role of laparoscopy for Advanced Gastric Cancer, the reproducibility of a total intracorporeal technique and the oncological results achievable during long-term follow-up. Methods and analysis A multi-institutional international database will be established to evaluate the role of robotic, laparoscopic and open approaches in gastric cancer, comprising of information regarding surgical, clinical and oncological features. A chart review will be conducted to enter data of participants with gastric cancer, previously treated at the participating institutions. The database is the first of its kind, through an international electronic submission system and a HIPPA protected real time data repository from high volume gastric cancer centres. Ethics and dissemination This study is conducted in compliance with ethical principles originating from the Helsinki Declaration, within the guidelines of Good Clinical Practice and relevant laws/regulations. A multicentre study with a large number of patients will permit further investigation of the safety and efficacy as well as the long-term outcomes of robotic, laparoscopic and open approaches for the management of gastric cancer. Trial registration number NCT02325453; Pre-results. PMID:26482769

  8. New Groups Study Science's Effect on Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Sullivan, Dermot A.

    1973-01-01

    Describes the chief aims of the Council for Science and Society in London and the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis in Vienna. Indicates that both groups are planning to function as a multinational interdisciplinary organization. (CC)

  9. Relation of the International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group rating scale with the Clinical Global Impression severity scale, the restless legs syndrome 6-item questionnaire, and the restless legs syndrome-quality of life questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Allen, Richard; Oertel, Wolfgang; Walters, Arthur; Benes, Heike; Schollmayer, Erwin; Grieger, Frank; Moran, Kimberly; Kohnen, Ralf

    2013-12-01

    The SP790 study (ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT00136045) showed benefits of rotigotine over placebo in improving symptom severity of restless legs syndrome (RLS), also known as Willis-Ekbom disease, on the International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group rating scale (IRLS), Clinical Global Impression item 1 (CGI-1), RLS 6-item questionnaire (RLS-6), and the RLS-quality of life questionnaire (RLS-QoL) in patients with moderate to severe idiopathic RLS. To provide clinical context for the IRLS and to guide the choice of assessment scales for RLS studies, our post hoc analysis of SP790 data evaluated associations between the IRLS and the CGI-1, IRLS and RLS-6, and the IRLS and RLS-QoL. Scale associations were analyzed at baseline and at the end of maintenance (EoM) using data from the safety set (rotigotine and placebo groups combined [n=458]). Changes from baseline to EoM in IRLS score vs comparator scale scores also were analyzed. There was a trend towards increasing IRLS severity category with increasing CGI-1, RLS-6, and RLS-QoL score. Pearson product moment correlation coefficients showed correlations between IRLS and comparator scale scores at baseline and EoM as well as correlations for change from baseline to EoM. Correlations between the IRLS and comparator scales were substantial. These data indicate that the IRLS is clinically meaningful. The IRLS and CGI-1 are generally sufficient to evaluate the overall severity and impact of RLS symptoms in clinical trials. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. 78 FR 66425 - Advisory Group to the Commissioner of Internal Revenue; Renewal of Charter

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-05

    ... Internal Revenue Service Advisory Group to the Commissioner of Internal Revenue; Renewal of Charter AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Charter for the Information... concern as between Internal Revenue Service (``IRS'') officials and ] representatives of the public...

  11. 76 FR 67556 - Advisory Group to the Commissioner of Internal Revenue; Renewal of Charter

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-01

    ... Internal Revenue Service Advisory Group to the Commissioner of Internal Revenue; Renewal of Charter AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Charter for the Information... concern as between Internal Revenue Service (``IRS'') officials and representatives of the public...

  12. Group Counseling with International Students: Practical, Ethical, and Cultural Considerations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yakunina, Elena S.; Weigold, Ingrid K.; McCarthy, Alannah S.

    2011-01-01

    International students in higher education represent a diverse population with unique mental health needs. Foreign students commonly experience a host of adjustment issues, including acculturative stress, language difficulties, cultural misunderstandings, racial discrimination, and loss of social support. Despite their challenges, few…

  13. Group Counseling with International Students: Practical, Ethical, and Cultural Considerations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yakunina, Elena S.; Weigold, Ingrid K.; McCarthy, Alannah S.

    2011-01-01

    International students in higher education represent a diverse population with unique mental health needs. Foreign students commonly experience a host of adjustment issues, including acculturative stress, language difficulties, cultural misunderstandings, racial discrimination, and loss of social support. Despite their challenges, few…

  14. Results of a Quality Assurance Review of External Beam Radiation Therapy in the International Society of Paediatric Oncology (Europe) Neuroblastoma Group's High-risk Neuroblastoma Trial: A SIOPEN Study

    SciTech Connect

    Gaze, Mark N.; Boterberg, Tom; Dieckmann, Karin; Hoermann, Marcus; Gains, Jennifer E.; Sullivan, Kevin P.; Ladenstein, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy is important for local control in neuroblastoma. This study reviewed the compliance of plans with the radiation therapy guidelines of the International Society of Paediatric Oncology (Europe) Neuroblastoma Group (SIOPEN) High-Risk Trial protocol. Methods and Materials: The SIOPEN trial central electronic database has sections to record diagnostic imaging and radiation therapy planning data. Individual centers may upload data remotely, but not all centers involved in the trial chose to use this system. A quality scoring system was devised based on how well the radiation therapy plan matched the protocol guidelines, to what extent deviations were justified, and whether adverse effects may result. Central review of radiation therapy planning was undertaken retrospectively in 100 patients for whom complete diagnostic and treatment sets were available. Data were reviewed and compared against protocol guidelines by an international team of radiation oncologists and radiologists. For each patient in the sample, the central review team assigned a quality assurance score. Results: It was found that in 48% of patients there was full compliance with protocol requirements. In 29%, there were deviations for justifiable reasons with no likely long-term adverse effects resulting. In 5%, deviations had occurred for justifiable reasons, but that might result in adverse effects. In 1%, there was a deviation with no discernible justification, which would not lead to long-term adverse events. In 17%, unjustified deviations were noted, with a risk of an adverse outcome resulting. Conclusions: Owing to concern over the proportion of patients in whom unjustified deviations were observed, a protocol amendment has been issued. This offers the opportunity for central review of radiation therapy plans before the start of treatment and the treating clinician a chance to modify plans.

  15. Cerulean Warbler Technical Group: Coordinating international research and conservation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dawson, D.K.; Wigley, T.B.; Keyser, P.D.

    2012-01-01

    Effective conservation for species of concern requires interchange and collaboration among conservationists and stakeholders. The Cerulean Warbler Technical Group (CWTG) is a consortium of biologists and managers from government agencies, non-governmental organizations, academia, and industry, who are dedicated to finding pro-active, science-based solutions for conservation of the Cerulean Warbler (Setophaga cerulea). Formed in the United States in 2001, CWTG’s scope soon broadened to address the species’ ecology and conservation on both the breeding and non-breeding ranges, in partnership with biologists from South and Central America. In 2004, CWTG launched the Cerulean Warbler Conservation Initiative, a set of activities aimed at addressing information and conservation needs for the species. These include (1) studies in the core breeding range to assess Cerulean Warbler response to forest management practices and to identify mined lands that could be reforested to benefit the species, (2) ecological and demographic studies on the winter range, and (3) surveys of Cerulean Warbler distribution on the breeding and winter ranges and during migration. A rangewide conservation action plan has been completed, along with a more detailed conservation plan for the non-breeding range. CWTG and partners now move forward with on-the-ground conservation, while still addressing unmet information needs.

  16. Internal consistency of the self-reporting questionnaire-20 in occupational groups

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Kionna Oliveira Bernardes; Carvalho, Fernando Martins; de Araújo, Tânia Maria

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To assess the internal consistency of the measurements of the Self-Reporting Questionnaire (SRQ-20) in different occupational groups. METHODS A validation study was conducted with data from four surveys with groups of workers, using similar methods. A total of 9,959 workers were studied. In all surveys, the common mental disorders were assessed via SRQ-20. The internal consistency considered the items belonging to dimensions extracted by tetrachoric factor analysis for each study. Item homogeneity assessment compared estimates of Cronbach’s alpha (KD-20), the alpha applied to a tetrachoric correlation matrix and stratified Cronbach’s alpha. RESULTS The SRQ-20 dimensions showed adequate values, considering the reference parameters. The internal consistency of the instrument items, assessed by stratified Cronbach’s alpha, was high (> 0.80) in the four studies. CONCLUSIONS The SRQ-20 showed good internal consistency in the professional categories evaluated. However, there is still a need for studies using alternative methods and additional information able to refine the accuracy of latent variable measurement instruments, as in the case of common mental disorders. PMID:27007682

  17. Utilization of International Association of Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups criteria vs. a two-step approach to screening for gestational diabetes mellitus in Chinese women with twin pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Liu, X; Chen, Y; Zhou, Q; Shi, H; Cheng, W W

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate prevalence and pregnancy outcomes using the International Association of Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups (IADPSG) criteria and screening protocol vs. a standard two-step screening approach for gestational diabetes mellitus in Chinese twin pregnancies. A retrospective cohort study for pregnancies during 2007-2013 was performed in a tertiary hospital in Shanghai, China. Data were abstracted from the medical records of twin pregnancies delivered at the hospital. During the period 2007-2011, this hospital used a two-step approach with a 50 g screening with a cut-off value of ≥ 7.8 mmol/l followed by a 100 g diagnostic oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) utilizing Carpenter-Coustan criteria. In 2012-2013, the hospital switched to the IADPSG protocol of universal 75 g OGTT. Among 1461 twin pregnancies, 643 were screened utilizing IADPSG criteria and 818 using the two-step protocol. Gestational diabetes mellitus was diagnosed more frequently in the IADPSG group than in the two-step group [20.4% and 7.0%, respectively; adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 3.22; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 2.30-4.52]. During the IADPSG period, the incidence of pre-eclampsia was 38% lower in non-gestational diabetes mellitus affected pregnancies compared with the two-step period (aOR = 0.62; 95% CI = 0.44-0.87). We observed no significant differences in most perinatal outcomes between the two groups. Compared with a standard two-step approach to screening and diagnosis, the IADPSG screening method resulted in a three-fold increase in the incidence of gestational diabetes mellitus in twin pregnancies, with a 38% lower risk of pre-eclampsia but no significant difference in most perinatal outcomes in non-gestational diabetes mellitus affected pregnancies. © 2014 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2014 Diabetes UK.

  18. Spectroscopic investigation of the vibrational quasi-continuum arising from internal rotation of a methyl group

    SciTech Connect

    Hougen, J.T.

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this project is to use spectroscopic techniques to investigate in detail phenomena involving the vibrational quasi-continuum in a simple physical system. Acetaldehyde was chosen for the study because: (i) methyl groups have been suggested to be important promotors of intramolecular vibrational relaxation, (ii) the internal rotation of a methyl group is an easily describle large-amplitude motion, which should retain its simple character even at high levels of excitation, and (iii) the aldehyde carbonyl group offers the possibility of both vibrational and electronic probing. The present investigation of the ground electronic state has three parts: (1) understanding the {open_quotes}isolated{close_quotes} internal-rotation motion below, at, and above the top of the torsional barrier, (2) understanding in detail traditional (bond stretching and bending) vibrational fundamental and overtone states, and (3) understanding interactions involving states with multiquantum excitations of at least one of these two kinds of motion.

  19. Is adjuvant chemotherapy of benefit for postmenopausal women who receive endocrine treatment for highly endocrine-responsive, node-positive breast cancer? International Breast Cancer Study Group Trials VII and 12-93

    PubMed Central

    Pagani, Olivia; Gelber, Shari; Simoncini, Edda; Castiglione-Gertsch, Monica; Price, Karen N.; Gelber, Richard D.; Holmberg, Stig B.; Crivellari, Diana; Collins, John; Lindtner, Jurij; Thürlimann, Beat; Fey, Martin F.; Murray, Elizabeth; Forbes, John F.; Coates, Alan S.; Goldhirsch, Aron

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To compare the efficacy of chemoendocrine treatment with that of endocrine treatment (ET) alone for postmenopausal women with highly endocrine responsive breast cancer. Patients and methods In the International Breast Cancer Study Group (IBCSG) Trials VII and 12-93, postmenopausal women with node-positive, estrogen receptor (ER)-positive or ER-negative, operable breast cancer were randomized to receive either chemotherapy or endocrine therapy or combined chemoendocrine treatment. Results were analyzed overall in the cohort of 893 patients with endocrine-responsive disease, and according to prospectively-defined categories of ER, age and nodal status. STEPP analyses assessed chemotherapy effect. The median follow-up was 13 years. Results Adding chemotherapy reduced the relative risk of a disease-free survival event by 19% (p=0.02) compared with ET alone. STEPP analyses showed little effect of chemotherapy for tumors with high levels of ER expression (p = 0.07), or for the cohort with one positive node (p = 0.03). Conclusions Chemotherapy significantly improves disease-free survival for postmenopausal women with endocrine-responsive breast cancer, but the magnitude of the effect is substantially attenuated if ER levels are high. PMID:18953651

  20. Is adjuvant chemotherapy of benefit for postmenopausal women who receive endocrine treatment for highly endocrine-responsive, node-positive breast cancer? International Breast Cancer Study Group Trials VII and 12-93.

    PubMed

    Pagani, Olivia; Gelber, Shari; Simoncini, Edda; Castiglione-Gertsch, Monica; Price, Karen N; Gelber, Richard D; Holmberg, Stig B; Crivellari, Diana; Collins, John; Lindtner, Jurij; Thürlimann, Beat; Fey, Martin F; Murray, Elizabeth; Forbes, John F; Coates, Alan S; Goldhirsch, Aron

    2009-08-01

    To compare the efficacy of chemoendocrine treatment with that of endocrine treatment (ET) alone for postmenopausal women with highly endocrine responsive breast cancer. In the International Breast Cancer Study Group (IBCSG) Trials VII and 12-93, postmenopausal women with node-positive, estrogen receptor (ER)-positive or ER-negative, operable breast cancer were randomized to receive either chemotherapy or endocrine therapy or combined chemoendocrine treatment. Results were analyzed overall in the cohort of 893 patients with endocrine-responsive disease, and according to prospectively defined categories of ER, age and nodal status. STEPP analyses assessed chemotherapy effect. The median follow-up was 13 years. Adding chemotherapy reduced the relative risk of a disease-free survival event by 19% (P = 0.02) compared with ET alone. STEPP analyses showed little effect of chemotherapy for tumors with high levels of ER expression (P = 0.07), or for the cohort with one positive node (P = 0.03). Chemotherapy significantly improves disease-free survival for postmenopausal women with endocrine-responsive breast cancer, but the magnitude of the effect is substantially attenuated if ER levels are high.

  1. Improved survival of patients with multiple myeloma after the introduction of novel agents and the applicability of the International Staging System (ISS): an analysis of the Greek Myeloma Study Group (GMSG).

    PubMed

    Kastritis, E; Zervas, K; Symeonidis, A; Terpos, E; Delimbassi, S; Anagnostopoulos, N; Michali, E; Zomas, A; Katodritou, E; Gika, D; Pouli, A; Christoulas, D; Roussou, M; Kartasis, Z; Economopoulos, T; Dimopoulos, M A

    2009-06-01

    When the novel agents thalidomide, bortezomib and lenalidomide are administered to patients with myeloma in the context of clinical trials, they are associated with a significant improvement in response, progression-free survival and in some studies, overall survival (OS); however, their effect on the outcome of unselected myeloma patients has not been fully assessed. We compared the outcome of 1376 unselected patients with symptomatic myeloma, who started treatment before or after the introduction of thalidomide. The median OS in patients who started treatment after the introduction of novel agents increased by 12 months (48 vs 36 months, P<0.001). This improvement was more pronounced in patients < or =70 years (from 39 to 74 months, P<0.001), but less evident in patients >70 years (from 26 to 33 months, P=0.27). In patients treated after the introduction of novel agents, the international staging system (ISS) could discriminate three groups with significantly different outcomes (5-year survival for ISS stage I, II and III was 66, 45 and 18%, respectively, P<0.001). ISS was also valid in patients who actually received upfront treatment with novel drugs (4-year survival rate was 85, 61 and 26% for ISS stage I, II and III patients, P=0.001).

  2. Adverse prognostic value of peritumoral vascular invasion: is it abrogated by adequate endocrine adjuvant therapy? Results from two International Breast Cancer Study Group randomized trials of chemoendocrine adjuvant therapy for early breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Viale, G.; Giobbie-Hurder, A.; Gusterson, B. A.; Maiorano, E.; Mastropasqua, M. G.; Sonzogni, A.; Mallon, E.; Colleoni, M.; Castiglione-Gertsch, M.; Regan, M. M.; Brown, R. W.; Golouh, R.; Crivellari, D.; Karlsson, P.; Öhlschlegel, C.; Gelber, R. D.; Goldhirsch, A.; Coates, A. S.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Peritumoral vascular invasion (PVI) may assist in assigning optimal adjuvant systemic therapy for women with early breast cancer. Patients and methods: Patients participated in two International Breast Cancer Study Group randomized trials testing chemoendocrine adjuvant therapies in premenopausal (trial VIII) or postmenopausal (trial IX) node-negative breast cancer. PVI was assessed by institutional pathologists and/or central review on hematoxylin–eosin-stained slides in 99% of patients (analysis cohort 2754 patients, median follow-up >9 years). Results: PVI, present in 23% of the tumors, was associated with higher grade tumors and larger tumor size (trial IX only). Presence of PVI increased locoregional and distant recurrence and was significantly associated with poorer disease-free survival. The adverse prognostic impact of PVI in trial VIII was limited to premenopausal patients with endocrine-responsive tumors randomized to therapies not containing goserelin, and conversely the beneficial effect of goserelin was limited to patients whose tumors showed PVI. In trial IX, all patients received tamoxifen: the adverse prognostic impact of PVI was limited to patients with receptor-negative tumors regardless of chemotherapy. Conclusion: Adequate endocrine adjuvant therapy appears to abrogate the adverse impact of PVI in node-negative disease, while PVI may identify patients who will benefit particularly from adjuvant therapy. PMID:19633051

  3. Diagnostic standards for dopaminergic augmentation of restless legs syndrome: report from a World Association of Sleep Medicine-International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group consensus conference at the Max Planck Institute.

    PubMed

    García-Borreguero, Diego; Allen, Richard P; Kohnen, Ralf; Högl, Birgit; Trenkwalder, Claudia; Oertel, Wolfgang; Hening, Wayne A; Paulus, Walter; Rye, David; Walters, Arthur; Winkelmann, Juliane; Earley, Christopher J

    2007-08-01

    Augmentation of symptom severity is the main complication of dopaminergic treatment of restless legs syndrome (RLS). The current article reports on the considerations of augmentation that were made during a European Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group (EURLSSG)-sponsored Consensus Conference in April 2006 at the Max Planck Institute (MPI) in Munich, Germany, the conclusions of which were endorsed by the International RLS Study Group (IRLSSG) and the World Association of Sleep Medicine (WASM). The Consensus Conference sought to develop a better understanding of augmentation and generate a better operational definition for its clinical identification. Current concepts of the pathophysiology, clinical features, and therapy of RLS augmentation were evaluated by subgroups who presented a summary of their findings for general consideration and discussion. Recent data indicating sensitivity and specificity of augmentation features for identification of augmentation were also evaluated. The diagnostic criteria of augmentation developed at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) conference in 2002 were reviewed in light of current data and theoretical understanding of augmentation. The diagnostic value and criteria for each of the accepted features of augmentation were considered by the group. A consensus was then developed for a revised statement of the diagnostic criteria for augmentation. Five major diagnostic features of augmentation were identified: usual time of RLS symptom onset each day, number of body parts with RLS symptoms, latency to symptoms at rest, severity of the symptoms when they occur, and effects of dopaminergic medication on symptoms. The quantitative data available relating the time of RLS onset and the presence of other features indicated optimal augmentation criteria of either a 4-h advance in usual starting time for RLS symptoms or a combination of the occurrence of other features. A paradoxical response to changes in medication dose also indicates

  4. Indigenous Studies as an International Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pino-Robles, Rodolfo

    This paper proposes the development of Indigenous Studies as an international field, both in the sense of advancing the discipline internationally, wherever there are Indigenous peoples, and in the sense of incorporating international perspectives into curricula. In Canada, Indigenous Studies has been and is still treated as something to be done…

  5. Group Performance in Information Systems Project Groups: An Empirical Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bahli, Bouchaib; Buyukkurt, Meral Demirbag

    2005-01-01

    The importance of teamwork in Information Systems Development (ISD) practice and education has been acknowledged but not studied extensively to date. This paper tests a model of how groups participating in ISD projects perform and examines the relationships between some antecedents of this performance based on group research theory well…

  6. Group Performance in Information Systems Project Groups: An Empirical Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bahli, Bouchaib; Buyukkurt, Meral Demirbag

    2005-01-01

    The importance of teamwork in Information Systems Development (ISD) practice and education has been acknowledged but not studied extensively to date. This paper tests a model of how groups participating in ISD projects perform and examines the relationships between some antecedents of this performance based on group research theory well…

  7. The Iraq Study Group Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    resources in trying to understand the people who fabricate , plant, and explode those devices. 62 We were told that there are fewer than 10 analysts on...Eldredge, Hersh and Jardine , and also a consultant in the Washington, D.C., government relations firm The Tongour, Simpson, Holsclaw Group. He

  8. Effects of Group Work on English Communicative Competence of Chinese International Graduates in United States Institutions of Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xue, Mo

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study investigated 14 Chinese international graduate students' lived experiences with group work and the effects of group work on their English communicative competence. The interview results showed that these participants' attitudes towards group work went through changes from initial inadaptation or dislike to later adaptation…

  9. International Consultation and Training on Group Work in South Asia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ibrahim, Farah A.

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a consultation and training for faculty and graduate students in South Asia under the auspices of the United Nations' Transfer of Knowledge Through Expatriate Nationals (TOKTEN) Program. It describes the development of a consultation relationship and training on group work. Needs assessments focusing on both cultural…

  10. International Consultation and Training on Group Work in South Asia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ibrahim, Farah A.

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a consultation and training for faculty and graduate students in South Asia under the auspices of the United Nations' Transfer of Knowledge Through Expatriate Nationals (TOKTEN) Program. It describes the development of a consultation relationship and training on group work. Needs assessments focusing on both cultural…

  11. International Study of Marketing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liander, Bertil, Ed.

    The International Marketing Federation (IMF), supported by the Marketing Science Institute, has surveyed IMF member countries and a representative scattering of others to determine the current state and future trends in marketing education. This volume presents the findings of the survey of 21 countries--Argentina, Australia, Canada, Denmark,…

  12. Computer-Assisted International Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkenfeld, Jonathan

    1983-01-01

    Describes an interdisciplinary college level program which uses computer simulation exercises to teach about foreign policy and global issues. In the foreign policy simulation, political science and foreign language students role play national decision makers. In the international futures simulation, students debate demographic, economic, energy,…

  13. Evaluation of the Melanocytic Pathology Assessment Tool and Hierarchy for Diagnosis (MPATH-Dx) classification scheme for diagnosis of cutaneous melanocytic neoplasms: Results from the International Melanoma Pathology Study Group.

    PubMed

    Lott, Jason P; Elmore, Joann G; Zhao, Ge A; Knezevich, Stevan R; Frederick, Paul D; Reisch, Lisa M; Chu, Emily Y; Cook, Martin G; Duncan, Lyn M; Elenitsas, Rosalie; Gerami, Pedram; Landman, Gilles; Lowe, Lori; Messina, Jane L; Mihm, Martin C; van den Oord, Joost J; Rabkin, Michael S; Schmidt, Birgitta; Shea, Christopher R; Yun, Sook Jung; Xu, George X; Piepkorn, Michael W; Elder, David E; Barnhill, Raymond L

    2016-08-01

    Pathologists use diverse terminology when interpreting melanocytic neoplasms, potentially compromising quality of care. We sought to evaluate the Melanocytic Pathology Assessment Tool and Hierarchy for Diagnosis (MPATH-Dx) scheme, a 5-category classification system for melanocytic lesions. Participants (n = 16) of the 2013 International Melanoma Pathology Study Group Workshop provided independent case-level diagnoses and treatment suggestions for 48 melanocytic lesions. Individual diagnoses (including, when necessary, least and most severe diagnoses) were mapped to corresponding MPATH-Dx classes. Interrater agreement and correlation between MPATH-Dx categorization and treatment suggestions were evaluated. Most participants were board-certified dermatopathologists (n = 15), age 50 years or older (n = 12), male (n = 9), based in the United States (n = 11), and primary academic faculty (n = 14). Overall, participants generated 634 case-level diagnoses with treatment suggestions. Mean weighted kappa coefficients for diagnostic agreement after MPATH-Dx mapping (assuming least and most severe diagnoses, when necessary) were 0.70 (95% confidence interval 0.68-0.71) and 0.72 (95% confidence interval 0.71-0.73), respectively, whereas correlation between MPATH-Dx categorization and treatment suggestions was 0.91. This was a small sample size of experienced pathologists in a testing situation. Varying diagnostic nomenclature can be classified into a concise hierarchy using the MPATH-Dx scheme. Further research is needed to determine whether this classification system can facilitate diagnostic concordance in general pathology practice and improve patient care. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Chemoendocrine compared with endocrine adjuvant therapies for node-negative breast cancer: predictive value of centrally reviewed expression of estrogen and progesterone receptors--International Breast Cancer Study Group.

    PubMed

    Viale, Giuseppe; Regan, Meredith M; Maiorano, Eugenio; Mastropasqua, Mauro G; Golouh, Rastko; Perin, Tiziana; Brown, Robert W; Kovács, Anikó; Pillay, Komala; Ohlschlegel, Christian; Braye, Stephen; Grigolato, Piergiovanni; Rusca, Tiziana; Gelber, Richard D; Castiglione-Gertsch, Monica; Price, Karen N; Goldhirsch, Aron; Gusterson, Barry A; Coates, Alan S

    2008-03-20

    To centrally assess estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PgR) levels by immunohistochemistry and investigate their predictive value for benefit of chemo-endocrine compared with endocrine adjuvant therapy alone in two randomized clinical trials for node-negative breast cancer. International Breast Cancer Study Group Trial VIII compared cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and fluorouracil (CMF) chemotherapy for 6 cycles followed by endocrine therapy with goserelin with either modality alone in pre- and perimenopausal patients. Trial IX compared three cycles of CMF followed by tamoxifen for 5 years versus tamoxifen alone in postmenopausal patients. Central Pathology Office reviewed 883 (83%) of 1,063 patients on Trial VIII and 1,365 (82%) of 1,669 on Trial IX and determined ER and PgR by immunohistochemistry. Disease-free survival (DFS) was compared across the spectrum of expression of each receptor using the Subpopulation Treatment Effect Pattern Plot methodology. Both receptors displayed a bimodal distribution, with substantial proportions showing no staining (receptor absent) and most of the remainder showing a high percentage of stained cells. Chemo-endocrine therapy yielded DFS superior to endocrine therapy alone for patients with receptor-absent tumors, and in some cases also for those with low levels of receptor expression. Among patients with ER-expressing tumors, additional prediction of benefit was suggested in absent or low PgR in Trial VIII but not in Trial IX. Low levels of ER and PgR are predictive of the benefit of adding chemotherapy to endocrine therapy. Low PgR may add further prediction among pre- and perimenopausal but not postmenopausal patients whose tumors express ER.

  15. Long-term results of International Breast Cancer Study Group Trial VIII: adjuvant chemotherapy plus goserelin compared with either therapy alone for premenopausal patients with node-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, P.; Sun, Z.; Braun, D.; Price, K. N.; Castiglione-Gertsch, M.; Rabaglio, M.; Gelber, R. D.; Crivellari, D.; Collins, J.; Murray, E.; Zaman, K.; Colleoni, M.; Gusterson, B. A.; Viale, G.; Regan, M. M.; Coates, A. S.; Goldhirsch, A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The International Breast Cancer Study Group Trial VIII compared long-term efficacy of endocrine therapy (goserelin), chemotherapy [cyclophosphamide, methotrexate and fluorouracil (CMF)], and chemoendocrine therapy (CMF followed by goserelin) for pre/perimenopausal women with lymph-node-negative breast cancer. Patients and methods: From 1990 to 1999, 1063 patients were randomized to receive (i) goserelin for 24 months (n = 346), (ii) six courses of ‘classical’ CMF (cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, 5-fluorouracil) chemotherapy (n = 360), or (iii) six courses of CMF plus 18 months goserelin (CMF→ goserelin; n = 357). Tumors were classified as estrogen receptor (ER) negative (19%), ER positive (80%), or ER unknown (1%); 19% of patients were younger than 40. Median follow-up was 12.1 years. Results: For the ER-positive cohort, sequential therapy provided a statistically significant benefit in disease-free survival (DFS) (12-year DFS = 77%) compared with CMF alone (69%) and goserelin alone (68%) (P = 0.04 for each comparison), due largely to the effect in younger patients. Patients with ER-negative tumors whose treatment included CMF had similar DFS (12-year DFS CMF = 67%; 12-year DFS CMF→ goserelin = 69%) compared with goserelin alone (12-year DFS = 61%, P= NS). Conclusions: For pre/perimenopausal women with lymph-node-negative ER-positive breast cancer, CMF followed by goserelin improved DFS in comparison with either modality alone. The improvement was the most pronounced in those aged below 40, suggesting an endocrine effect of prolonged CMF-induced amenorrhea. PMID:21325445

  16. Developing International Business Managers through International Study Visits to China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Yiming; Rose, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Globalization is a key factor in the success of business organizations today, impacting many aspects of management performance. Understanding the global business environment has therefore become a key objective in the teaching of international business on Executive MBA programs. Drawing on the theory of experiential learning, this study examines…

  17. Developing International Business Managers through International Study Visits to China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Yiming; Rose, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Globalization is a key factor in the success of business organizations today, impacting many aspects of management performance. Understanding the global business environment has therefore become a key objective in the teaching of international business on Executive MBA programs. Drawing on the theory of experiential learning, this study examines…

  18. 76 FR 54520 - Somerset International Group, Inc.; Order of Suspension of Trading

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Somerset International Group, Inc.; Order of Suspension of Trading August 30, 2011. It appears to... concerning the securities of Somerset International Group, Inc. The Commission is of the opinion that...

  19. 76 FR 55954 - Astralis Ltd., Cavit Sciences, Inc., Crystal International Travel Group, Inc., and Tasker...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Astralis Ltd., Cavit Sciences, Inc., Crystal International Travel Group, Inc., and Tasker Products... accurate information concerning the securities of Crystal International Travel Group, Inc. because it has...

  20. Southeastern Cancer Study Group: breast cancer studies

    SciTech Connect

    Smalley, R.V.; Bartolucci, A.A.; Moore, M.

    1983-12-01

    During the past 10 years, the Southeastern Cancer Study Group (SECSG) has been engaged in one major adjuvant study and three major advanced disease studies for patients with adenocarcinoma of the breast. The adjuvant study is demonstrating that six months of adjuvant CMF is the therapeutic equivalent of 12 months and that post-operative irradiation is of no added therapeutic benefit. In patients with advanced disease, a low dose 5 drug combination of CMFVP induces more objective responses than single agent 5FU, but improves survival only for those patients with liver metastases when compared to the sequential use of the same 5 single agents. The three drug combination, CAF, utilizing doxorubicin, induces more objective responses than low dose CMFVP, but it does not improve overall survival. The addition of a phase active combination, CAMELEON, (i.e., sequentially alternating therapy) of CAF has not improved the duration of disease control and survival for patients with liver metastases, lymphangitic and nodular lung metastases compared to CAF. Aggressive combination chemotherapeutic approaches to patients with advanced disease provide better and longer disease and tumor control but only marginal improvements in overall survival. Adding additional agents to a maximally tolerable regimen has not improved the therapeutic outcome.

  1. World Association of Sleep Medicine (WASM) 2016 standards for recording and scoring leg movements in polysomnograms developed by a joint task force from the International and the European Restless Legs Syndrome Study Groups (IRLSSG and EURLSSG).

    PubMed

    Ferri, R; Fulda, S; Allen, R P; Zucconi, M; Bruni, O; Chokroverty, S; Ferini-Strambi, L; Frauscher, B; Garcia-Borreguero, D; Hirshkowitz, M; Högl, B; Inoue, Y; Jahangir, A; Manconi, M; Marcus, C L; Picchietti, D L; Plazzi, G; Winkelman, J W; Zak, R S

    2016-10-01

    This report presents the results of the work by a joint task force of the International and European Restless Legs Syndrome Study Groups and World Association of Sleep Medicine that revised and updated the current standards for recording and scoring leg movements (LM) in polysomnographic recordings (PSG). First, the background of the decisions made and the explanations of the new rules are reported and then specific standard rules are presented for recording, detecting, scoring and reporting LM activity in PSG. Each standard rule has been classified with a level of evidence. At the end of the paper, Appendix 1 provides algorithms to aid implementation of these new standards in software tools. There are two main changes introduced by these new rules: 1) Candidate LM (CLM), are any monolateral LM 0.5-10 s long or bilateral LM 0.5-15 s long; 2) periodic LM (PLM) are now defined by runs of at least four consecutive CLM with an intermovement interval ≥10 and ≤ 90 s without any CLM preceded by an interval <10 s interrupting the PLM series. There are also new options defining CLM associated with respiratory events. The PLM rate may now first be determined for all CLM not excluding any related to respiration (providing a consistent number across studies regardless of the rules used to define association with respiration) and, subsequently, the PLM rate should also be calculated without considering the respiratory related events. Finally, special considerations for pediatric studies are provided. The expert visual scoringof LM has only been altered by the new standards to require accepting all LM > 0.5 s regardless of duration, otherwise the technician scores the LM as for the old standards. There is a new criterion for the morphology of LM that applies only to computerized LM detection to better match expert visual detection. Available automatic scoring programs will incorporate all the new rules so that the new standards should reduce technician burden for

  2. IMMUNOCHEMICAL STUDIES ON BLOOD GROUPS

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Carlos; Lundblad, Arne; Kabat, Elvin A.

    1971-01-01

    The immunochemical properties of purified A1 and A2 glycoproteins have been compared to ascertain whether their antigenic determinants differ. Quantitative precipitin and complement-fixation studies using several anti-A sera as well as purified γG anti-A antibodies clearly showed a specificity difference. This was also supported by absorption studies: A2 substance specifically removed antibodies reacting with A2 substance leaving anti-A1 activity. A1 substance was more effective than A2 substance in dissolving an A1 anti-A1-specific precipitate. Purified γM anti-A hemolyzed A1 cells more readily than A2 cells. Inhibition studies using mono- and difucosyl type 2 A-active oligosaccharides showed that type 2 difucosyl receptors are present in A2 substance. The structural basis for the specificity difference between A1 and A2 would appear to be that A2 substances lack type 1 A determinants; this would account for the observed higher H and Leb activity in A2 substances. PMID:4104425

  3. International Studies Seminar. Grade 9, First Semester.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Girton, Robert

    This curriculum guide contains the grade 9 course content of the interdisciplinary International Studies Seminar, conducted at Withrow High School in Cincinnati, Ohio. The seminar, part of the school's International Studies Academy, is an alternative education program which emphasizes global studies as the core of its curriculum. The document…

  4. The long-term treatment of restless legs syndrome/Willis-Ekbom disease: evidence-based guidelines and clinical consensus best practice guidance: a report from the International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Borreguero, Diego; Kohnen, Ralf; Silber, Michael H; Winkelman, John W; Earley, Christopher J; Högl, Birgit; Manconi, Mauro; Montplaisir, Jacques; Inoue, Yuichi; Allen, Richard P

    2013-07-01

    A Task Force was established by the International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group (IRLSSG) to develop evidence-based and consensus-based recommendations for the long-term pharmacologic treatment of restless legs syndrome/Willis-Ekbom disease (RLS/WED). The Task Force reviewed the results of all studies of RLS/WED treatments with durations of 6 months or longer presented at meetings over the past 2 years, posted on Web sites of pharmaceutical companies, or published in peer-reviewed journals, asking the questions, "What is the efficacy of this treatment in patients with RLS/WED?" and "What is the safety of this treatment in patients with RLS/WED?" The Task Force developed guidelines based on their review of 61 papers meeting inclusion criteria, and using a modified evidence-grading scheme. Pregabalin has been established as effective for up to 1 year in treating RLS/WED (Level A evidence). Pramipexole, ropinirole, and rotigotine have been established as effective for up to 6 months in treating RLS/WED (Level A). The following drugs have been established as probably effective (Level B) in treating RLS/WED for durations ranging from 1 to 5 years: gabapentin enacarbil, pramipexole, and ropinirole (1 year); levodopa (2 years); and rotigotine (5 years). Because of associated safety concerns, pergolide and cabergoline should not be used in the treatment of RLS/WED unless the benefits clearly outweigh the risks. Other pharmacologic therapies have insufficient evidence to support their long-term use in treating RLS/WED. The IRLSSG Task Force also developed consensus-based strategies for the prevention and treatment of complications (such as augmentation, loss of efficacy, excessive daytime sleepiness, and impulse control disorders) that may develop with the long-term pharmacologic treatment of RLS/WED. The use of either a dopamine-receptor agonist or α2δ calcium-channel ligand is recommended as the first-line treatment of RLS/WED for most patients, with the choice of

  5. The International Neuroblastoma Risk Group (INRG) Classification System: An INRG Task Force Report

    PubMed Central

    Cohn, Susan L.; Pearson, Andrew D.J.; London, Wendy B.; Monclair, Tom; Ambros, Peter F.; Brodeur, Garrett M.; Faldum, Andreas; Hero, Barbara; Iehara, Tomoko; Machin, David; Mosseri, Veronique; Simon, Thorsten; Garaventa, Alberto; Castel, Victoria; Matthay, Katherine K.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Because current approaches to risk classification and treatment stratification for children with neuroblastoma (NB) vary greatly throughout the world, it is difficult to directly compare risk-based clinical trials. The International Neuroblastoma Risk Group (INRG) classification system was developed to establish a consensus approach for pretreatment risk stratification. Patients and Methods The statistical and clinical significance of 13 potential prognostic factors were analyzed in a cohort of 8,800 children diagnosed with NB between 1990 and 2002 from North America and Australia (Children's Oncology Group), Europe (International Society of Pediatric Oncology Europe Neuroblastoma Group and German Pediatric Oncology and Hematology Group), and Japan. Survival tree regression analyses using event-free survival (EFS) as the primary end point were performed to test the prognostic significance of the 13 factors. Results Stage, age, histologic category, grade of tumor differentiation, the status of the MYCN oncogene, chromosome 11q status, and DNA ploidy were the most highly statistically significant and clinically relevant factors. A new staging system (INRG Staging System) based on clinical criteria and tumor imaging was developed for the INRG Classification System. The optimal age cutoff was determined to be between 15 and 19 months, and 18 months was selected for the classification system. Sixteen pretreatment groups were defined on the basis of clinical criteria and statistically significantly different EFS of the cohort stratified by the INRG criteria. Patients with 5-year EFS more than 85%, more than 75% to ≤ 85%, ≥ 50% to ≤ 75%, or less than 50% were classified as very low risk, low risk, intermediate risk, or high risk, respectively. Conclusion By defining homogenous pretreatment patient cohorts, the INRG classification system will greatly facilitate the comparison of risk-based clinical trials conducted in different regions of the world and the

  6. Stage IV and age over 45 years are the only prognostic factors of the International Prognostic Score for the outcome of advanced Hodgkin lymphoma in the Spanish Hodgkin Lymphoma Study Group series.

    PubMed

    Guisado-Vasco, Pablo; Arranz-Saez, Reyes; Canales, Miguel; Cánovas, Araceli; Garcia-Laraña, José; García-Sanz, Ramón; Lopez, Andrés; López, José Luis; Llanos, Marta; Moraleda, José Maria; Rodriguez, José; Rayón, Consuelo; Sabin, Pilar; Salar, Antonio; Marín-Niebla, Ana; Morente, Manuel; Sánchez-Godoy, Pedro; Tomás, José Francisco; Muriel, Alfonso; Abraira, Victor; Piris, Miguel A; Garcia, Juán F; Montalban, Carlos

    2012-05-01

    The International Prognostic Score (IPS) is the most widely used system to date for identifying risk groups for the outcome of patients with advanced Hodgkin lymphoma, although important limitations have been recognized. We analyzed the value of the IPS in a series of 311 patients with advanced classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) (Ann Arbor stage III, IV or stage II with B symptoms and/or bulky masses) treated with first-line chemotherapy including adriamycin (adriamycin, bleomycin, vinblastine, dacarbazine [ABVD] or equivalent variants). In univariate and multivariate analyses, stage IV disease and age ≥ 45 years were the only factors with independent predictive significance for overall survival (OS) (p = 0.002 and p < 0.001, respectively). Stage IV was still significant for freedom from progression (FFP) (p = 0.001) and age ≥ 45 years was borderline significant (p = 0.058). IPS separates prognostic groups, as in the original publication, but this is mainly due to the high statistical significance of stage IV and age ≥ 45 years. Moreover, the combination of these two factors enables a simpler system to be constructed that separates groups with different FFP and OS. In conclusion, in our series, stage IV and age ≥ 45 years are the key prognostic factors for the outcome of advanced cHL.

  7. Methyl Group Internal Rotation in the Pure Rotational Spectrum of 1,1-DIFLUOROACETONE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grubbs, G. S. Grubbs, II; Cooke, S. A.; Groner, P.

    2011-06-01

    We have used chirped pulse Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy to record the pure rotational spectrum of the title molecule. The spectrum was doubled owing to the internal rotation of the methyl group. The spectrum has been assigned and two approaches to the spectral analysis have been performed. In the first case, the A and E components were fit separately using a principal axis method with the SPFIT code of Pickett. In the second case, the A and E states were fit simultaneously using the ERHAM code. For a satisfactory analysis of the spectral data it has been found that the choice of Hamiltonian reduction, i.e. Watson A or S, is very important. The barrier to the internal rotation has been determined to be 261.1(8) Cm-1 and it will be compared to that of acetone and other halogenated acetone species recently studied in our laboratory.

  8. Common Group Problems: A Field Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinberg, Sanford B.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    A field study of a naturally functioning group (N=125) was conducted to identify common group problems. Trained observers attended group meetings and described the problems encountered. Difficulties of cohesion, leadership, sub-group formation, and personality conflict were identified. (RC)

  9. Group work: Facilitating the learning of international and domestic undergraduate nursing students.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Julie; Mitchell, Creina; Del Fabbro, Letitia

    2015-01-01

    Devising innovative strategies to address internationalization is a contemporary challenge for universities. A Participatory Action Research (PAR) project was undertaken to identify issues for international nursing students and their teachers. The findings identified group work as a teaching strategy potentially useful to facilitate international student learning. The educational intervention of structured group work was planned and implemented in one subject of a Nursing degree. Groups of four to five students were formed with one or two international students per group. Structural support was provided by the teacher until the student was learning independently, the traditional view of scaffolding. The group work also encouraged students to learn from one another, a contemporary understanding of scaffolding. Evaluation of the group work teaching strategy occurred via anonymous, self-completed student surveys. The student experience data were analysed using descriptive statistical techniques, and free text comments were analysed using content analysis. Over 85% of respondents positively rated the group work experience. Overwhelmingly, students reported that class discussions and sharing nursing experiences positively influenced their learning and facilitated exchange of knowledge about nursing issues from an international perspective. This evaluation of a structured group work process supports the use of group work in engaging students in learning, adding to our understanding of purposeful scaffolding as a pathway to enhance learning for both international and domestic students. By explicitly using group work within the curriculum, educators can promote student learning, a scholarly approach to teaching and internationalization of the curriculum.

  10. Cognitive Behavioral Principles Within Group Mentoring: A Randomized Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    JENT, JASON F.; NIEC, LARISSA N.

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of a group mentoring program that included components of empirically supported mentoring and cognitive behavioral techniques for children served at a community mental health center. Eighty-six 8- to 12-year-old children were randomly assigned to either group mentoring or a wait-list control group. Group mentoring significantly increased children’s reported social problem-solving skills and decreased parent-reported child externalizing and internalizing behavior problems after controlling for other concurrent mental health services. Attrition from the group mentoring program was notably low (7%) for children. The integration of a cognitive behavioral group mentoring program into children’s existing community mental health services may result in additional reductions in externalizing and internalizing behavior problems. PMID:20582243

  11. Cognitive Behavioral Principles Within Group Mentoring: A Randomized Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Jent, Jason F; Niec, Larissa N

    2009-07-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of a group mentoring program that included components of empirically supported mentoring and cognitive behavioral techniques for children served at a community mental health center. Eighty-six 8- to 12-year-old children were randomly assigned to either group mentoring or a wait-list control group. Group mentoring significantly increased children's reported social problem-solving skills and decreased parent-reported child externalizing and internalizing behavior problems after controlling for other concurrent mental health services. Attrition from the group mentoring program was notably low (7%) for children. The integration of a cognitive behavioral group mentoring program into children's existing community mental health services may result in additional reductions in externalizing and internalizing behavior problems.

  12. IAU Working Group on International Data Access for Solar and Heliospheric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentley, R. D.; Hill, F.; Hurlburt, N.; Roberts, A.

    2004-05-01

    Division II (Sun and Heliosphere) of the IAU has initiated a Working Group to study the archiving, retrieval and distribution of solar and heliospheric data. The goal of the Working Group is to facilitate the use of available solar and heliospheric data that are archived in a large number of computers scattered all over the world. The intent of the Working Group is to help coordinate the existing and growing data exchange through the Internet and work with the virtual observatory initiatives to propose guidelines for exchange at an international level and encourage participation in the projects. The Working Group is working with the virtual observatory initiatives to ensure that they develop standards and employ techniques that are acceptable to the worldwide solar and heliospheric communities and to encourage interoperability between the projects. The EGSO, VSO, CoSEC and VSPO projects are all part of the Working Group and would also like to encourage the communities to help develop standards and participate in the virtual observatory projects. The aims of and objectives the Working Group will be discussed and feedback from the audience is encouraged.

  13. International Space Station Systems Engineering. Case Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    manufacturing, cost and schedule, training and support, and disposal." This case study on the International Space Station considers what many believe to have...over 160 spacewalks-more space activities than NASA had accomplished prior to the 1993 International Space Station decision. Probably more important was

  14. Fostering Collaborative Teaching and Learning Scholarship through an International Writing Group Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marquis, Elizabeth; Healey, Mick; Vine, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    The research presented here explored the experiences of participants in an international collaborative writing group (ICWG) initiative that ran in conjunction with the 2012 International Society for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (ISSoTL) conference. The ICWG sought to cultivate collaborative pedagogical scholarship by bringing together…

  15. Fostering Collaborative Teaching and Learning Scholarship through an International Writing Group Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marquis, Elizabeth; Healey, Mick; Vine, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    The research presented here explored the experiences of participants in an international collaborative writing group (ICWG) initiative that ran in conjunction with the 2012 International Society for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (ISSoTL) conference. The ICWG sought to cultivate collaborative pedagogical scholarship by bringing together…

  16. 75 FR 66795 - International Paper, Pineville Mill, Industrial Packaging Group, Pineville, LA; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration International Paper, Pineville Mill, Industrial Packaging Group, Pineville, LA; Notice of Affirmative Determination Regarding Application for Reconsideration By...

  17. An update from the Chair of the students and new professionals Group of the International Society of Biometeorology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanos, Jennifer

    2017-07-01

    The Students and New Professionals Group of the International Society of Biometeorology is composed of approximately 68 members who are either within 5 years from completing graduate studies or under 35 years of age. The group is represented by 21 countries from around the world and a variety of disciplinary perspectives working within the area of biometeorology. Here, an update from the Chair of the Students and New Professionals Group of the International Society of Biometeorology is provided based on accomplishments and new progress from 2014 to 2017 in advance of the ISB's 60th Anniversary.

  18. An update from the Chair of the students and new professionals Group of the International Society of Biometeorology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanos, Jennifer

    2017-09-01

    The Students and New Professionals Group of the International Society of Biometeorology is composed of approximately 68 members who are either within 5 years from completing graduate studies or under 35 years of age. The group is represented by 21 countries from around the world and a variety of disciplinary perspectives working within the area of biometeorology. Here, an update from the Chair of the Students and New Professionals Group of the International Society of Biometeorology is provided based on accomplishments and new progress from 2014 to 2017 in advance of the ISB's 60th Anniversary.

  19. Towards Understanding Terrorism: A Theoretical Examination of Internal Cohesion in Terrorist Groups and the Negative Dynamic of Violence.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-03-01

    Terrorism, like other forms of political violence, has an organizational context. Few studies, however, have considered the influence of...organizational life upon the outward behavior of the terrorist group. This thesis explores the possibility that terrorism, in addition to its political context...oftentimes be dictated more by the need to satisfy the internal goal of group survival than to directly further the group’s external political agenda

  20. Examining Effectiveness of Group Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Externalizing and Internalizing Disorders in Urban Schools

    PubMed Central

    Eiraldi, Ricardo; Power, Thomas J.; Schwartz, Billie S.; Keiffer, Jackie N.; McCurdy, Barry L.; Mathen, Manju; Jawad, Abbas F.

    2016-01-01

    This article presents outcome data of the implementation of three group cognitive-behavioral therapy (GCBT) interventions for children with externalizing behavior problems, anxiety, and depression. School counselors and graduate students co-led the groups in two low-income urban schools. Data were analyzed to assess pre-treatment to post-treatment changes in diagnostic severity level. Results of the exploratory study indicated that all three GCBT protocols were effective at reducing diagnostic severity level for children who had a primary diagnosis of an externalizing disorder, anxiety disorder, or depressive disorder at the clinical or intermediate (at-risk) level. All three GCBT protocols were implemented with relatively high levels of fidelity. Data on the effectiveness of the interventions for reducing diagnostic severity level for externalizing and internalizing spectrum disorders and for specific disorders are presented. A discussion of implementation of mental health evidence-based interventions in urban schools is provided. PMID:26872957

  1. Examining Effectiveness of Group Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Externalizing and Internalizing Disorders in Urban Schools.

    PubMed

    Eiraldi, Ricardo; Power, Thomas J; Schwartz, Billie S; Keiffer, Jackie N; McCurdy, Barry L; Mathen, Manju; Jawad, Abbas F

    2016-07-01

    This article presents outcome data of the implementation of three group cognitive-behavioral therapy (GCBT) interventions for children with externalizing behavior problems, anxiety, and depression. School counselors and graduate students co-led the groups in two low-income urban schools. Data were analyzed to assess pre-treatment to post-treatment changes in diagnostic severity level. Results of the exploratory study indicated that all three GCBT protocols were effective at reducing diagnostic severity level for children who had a primary diagnosis of an externalizing disorder, anxiety disorder, or depressive disorder at the clinical or intermediate (at-risk) level. All three GCBT protocols were implemented with relatively high levels of fidelity. Data on the effectiveness of the interventions for reducing diagnostic severity level for externalizing and internalizing spectrum disorders and for specific disorders are presented. A discussion of implementation of mental health evidence-based interventions in urban schools is provided. © The Author(s) 2016.

  2. Permeability of different groups of maxillary teeth after 38% hydrogen peroxide internal bleaching.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Lívia Maria; Vansan, Luis Pascoal; Pécora, Jesus Djalma; Marchesan, Melissa Andréia

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of internal tooth bleaching with 38% hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) on the permeability of the coronal dentin in maxillary anterior teeth and premolars. Seventy teeth (14 per group) were used: central incisors (CI), lateral incisor (LI), canines (C), first premolars (1PM) and second premolars (2PM). Pulp chamber access and transversal sectioning at 2 mm from the cementoenamel junction were performed and the specimens were divided into 2 groups (n= 7): a) no treatment and b) bleaching with 38% H2O2. The bleaching agent was applied to the buccal surface and to the pulp chamber for 10 min. This procedure was repeated 3 times. The specimens were processed histochemically with copper sulfate and rubeanic acid, sectioned longitudinally, and digitalized in a scanner. The area of stained dentin was measured using Image Tool software. Data were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey's HSD test (alpha=0.05). There was statistically significant difference (p<0.001) among the untreated groups, CI (0.23 +/- 0.26) having the lowest permeability and LI (10.14 +/- 1.89) the highest permeability. Among the bleached groups, dentin permeability was increased in all groups of teeth except for 2PM. It may be concluded that bleaching with 38% H2O2 affected dentin permeability near the pulp chamber in maxillary anterior teeth and in first and second premolars.

  3. Comparison of the Masaoka-Koga staging and the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer/the International Thymic Malignancies Interest Group proposal for the TNM staging systems based on the Chinese Alliance for Research in Thymomas retrospective database.

    PubMed

    Liang, Guanghui; Gu, Zhitao; Li, Yin; Fu, Jianhua; Shen, Yi; Wei, Yucheng; Tan, Lijie; Zhang, Peng; Han, Yongtao; Chen, Chun; Zhang, Renquan; Chen, Keneng; Chen, Hezhong; Liu, Yongyu; Cui, Youbing; Wang, Yun; Pang, Liewen; Yu, Zhentao; Zhou, Xinming; Liu, Yangchun; Liu, Yuan; Fang, Wentao

    2016-04-01

    To compare the predictive effect of the Masaoka-Koga staging system and the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC)/the International Thymic Malignancies Interest Group (ITMIG) proposal for the new TNM staging on prognosis of thymic malignancies using the Chinese Alliance for Research in Thymomas (ChART) retrospective database. From 1992 to 2012, 2,370 patients in ChART database were retrospectively reviewed. Of these, 1,198 patients with complete information on TNM stage, Masaoka-Koga stage, and survival were used for analysis. Cumulative incidence of recurrence (CIR) was assessed in R0 patients. Overall survival (OS) was evaluated both in an R0 resected cohort, as well as in all patients (any R status). CIR and OS were first analyzed according to the Masaoka-Koga staging system. Then, they were compared using the new TNM staging proposal. Based on Masaoka-Koga staging system, significant difference was detected in CIR among all stages. However, no survival difference was revealed between stage I and II, or between stage II and III. Stage IV carried the highest risk of recurrence and worst survival. According to the new TNM staging proposal, CIR in T1a was significantly lower comparing to all other T categories (P<0.05) and there is a significant difference in OS between T1a and T1b (P=0.004). T4 had the worst OS comparing to all other T categories. CIR and OS were significantly worse in N (+) than in N0 patients. Significant difference in CIR and OS was detected between M0 and M1b, but not between M0 and M1a. OS was almost always statistically different when comparison was made between stages I-IIIa and stages IIIb-IVb. However, no statistical difference could be detected among stages IIIb to IVb. Compared with Masaoka-Koga staging, the IASLC/ITMIG TNM staging proposal not only describes the extent of tumor invasion but also provides information on lymphatic involvement and tumor dissemination. Further study using prospectively recorded

  4. Comparison of the Masaoka-Koga staging and the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer/the International Thymic Malignancies Interest Group proposal for the TNM staging systems based on the Chinese Alliance for Research in Thymomas retrospective database

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Guanghui; Gu, Zhitao; Fu, Jianhua; Shen, Yi; Wei, Yucheng; Tan, Lijie; Zhang, Peng; Han, Yongtao; Chen, Chun; Zhang, Renquan; Chen, Keneng; Chen, Hezhong; Liu, Yongyu; Cui, Youbing; Wang, Yun; Pang, Liewen; Yu, Zhentao; Zhou, Xinming; Liu, Yangchun; Liu, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Background To compare the predictive effect of the Masaoka-Koga staging system and the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC)/the International Thymic Malignancies Interest Group (ITMIG) proposal for the new TNM staging on prognosis of thymic malignancies using the Chinese Alliance for Research in Thymomas (ChART) retrospective database. Methods From 1992 to 2012, 2,370 patients in ChART database were retrospectively reviewed. Of these, 1,198 patients with complete information on TNM stage, Masaoka-Koga stage, and survival were used for analysis. Cumulative incidence of recurrence (CIR) was assessed in R0 patients. Overall survival (OS) was evaluated both in an R0 resected cohort, as well as in all patients (any R status). CIR and OS were first analyzed according to the Masaoka-Koga staging system. Then, they were compared using the new TNM staging proposal. Results Based on Masaoka-Koga staging system, significant difference was detected in CIR among all stages. However, no survival difference was revealed between stage I and II, or between stage II and III. Stage IV carried the highest risk of recurrence and worst survival. According to the new TNM staging proposal, CIR in T1a was significantly lower comparing to all other T categories (P<0.05) and there is a significant difference in OS between T1a and T1b (P=0.004). T4 had the worst OS comparing to all other T categories. CIR and OS were significantly worse in N (+) than in N0 patients. Significant difference in CIR and OS was detected between M0 and M1b, but not between M0 and M1a. OS was almost always statistically different when comparison was made between stages I–IIIa and stages IIIb–IVb. However, no statistical difference could be detected among stages IIIb to IVb. Conclusions Compared with Masaoka-Koga staging, the IASLC/ITMIG TNM staging proposal not only describes the extent of tumor invasion but also provides information on lymphatic involvement and tumor dissemination

  5. Individual and Group Differences in Study Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biggs, J. B.

    Existing research indicates that particular study strategies are deployed with differing success according to certain critical personality factors, most notably a syndrome of characteristics related to internal or external locus of control. Institutional factors that have an effect on study behaviour include Faculty membership (Arts/Science), mode…

  6. NASA plan for international crustal dynamics studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The international activities being planned as part of the NASA geodynamics program are described. Methods of studying the Earth's crustal movements and deformation characteristics are discussed. The significance of the eventual formalations of earthquake predictions methods is also discussed.

  7. International and National Expert Group Evaluations: Biological/Health Effects of Radiofrequency Fields

    PubMed Central

    Vijayalaxmi; Scarfi, Maria R.

    2014-01-01

    The escalated use of various wireless communication devices, which emit non-ionizing radiofrequency (RF) fields, have raised concerns among the general public regarding the potential adverse effects on human health. During the last six decades, researchers have used different parameters to investigate the effects of in vitro and in vivo exposures of animals and humans or their cells to RF fields. Data reported in peer-reviewed scientific publications were contradictory: some indicated effects while others did not. International organizations have considered all of these data as well as the observations reported in human epidemiological investigations to set-up the guidelines or standards (based on the quality of published studies and the “weight of scientific evidence” approach) for RF exposures in occupationally exposed individuals and the general public. Scientists with relevant expertise in various countries have also considered the published data to provide the required scientific information for policy-makers to develop and disseminate authoritative health information to the general public regarding RF exposures. This paper is a compilation of the conclusions, on the biological effects of RF exposures, from various national and international expert groups, based on their analyses. In general, the expert groups suggested a reduction in exposure levels, precautionary approach, and further research. PMID:25211777

  8. International Myeloma Working Group updated criteria for the diagnosis of multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Rajkumar, S Vincent; Dimopoulos, Meletios A; Palumbo, Antonio; Blade, Joan; Merlini, Giampaolo; Mateos, María-Victoria; Kumar, Shaji; Hillengass, Jens; Kastritis, Efstathios; Richardson, Paul; Landgren, Ola; Paiva, Bruno; Dispenzieri, Angela; Weiss, Brendan; LeLeu, Xavier; Zweegman, Sonja; Lonial, Sagar; Rosinol, Laura; Zamagni, Elena; Jagannath, Sundar; Sezer, Orhan; Kristinsson, Sigurdur Y; Caers, Jo; Usmani, Saad Z; Lahuerta, Juan José; Johnsen, Hans Erik; Beksac, Meral; Cavo, Michele; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Terpos, Evangelos; Kyle, Robert A; Anderson, Kenneth C; Durie, Brian G M; Miguel, Jesus F San

    2014-11-01

    This International Myeloma Working Group consensus updates the disease definition of multiple myeloma to include validated biomarkers in addition to existing requirements of attributable CRAB features (hypercalcaemia, renal failure, anaemia, and bone lesions). These changes are based on the identification of biomarkers associated with near inevitable development of CRAB features in patients who would otherwise be regarded as having smouldering multiple myeloma. A delay in application of the label of multiple myeloma and postponement of therapy could be detrimental to these patients. In addition to this change, we clarify and update the underlying laboratory and radiographic variables that fulfil the criteria for the presence of myeloma-defining CRAB features, and the histological and monoclonal protein requirements for the disease diagnosis. Finally, we provide specific metrics that new biomarkers should meet for inclusion in the disease definition. The International Myeloma Working Group recommends the implementation of these criteria in routine practice and in future clinical trials, and recommends that future studies analyse any differences in outcome that might occur as a result of the new disease definition.

  9. The Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC) group - it was 20 years ago today.

    PubMed

    Isenberg, D A; Ramsey-Goldman, R; Gladman, D; Hanly, J G

    2011-11-01

    The Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC) group is 20 years old this year (2011). This brief review traces the origins of the group focussing on its more recent history and reviewing some of its major contributions to lupus research during the past two decades.

  10. Internal Medicine Point-of-Care Ultrasound Curriculum: Consensus Recommendations from the Canadian Internal Medicine Ultrasound (CIMUS) Group.

    PubMed

    Ma, Irene W Y; Arishenkoff, Shane; Wiseman, Jeffrey; Desy, Janeve; Ailon, Jonathan; Martin, Leslie; Otremba, Mirek; Halman, Samantha; Willemot, Patrick; Blouw, Marcus

    2017-05-11

    Bedside point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) is increasingly used to assess medical patients. At present, no consensus exists for what POCUS curriculum is appropriate for internal medicine residency training programs. This document details the consensus-based recommendations by the Canadian Internal Medicine Ultrasound (CIMUS) group, comprising 39 members, representing 14 institutions across Canada. Guiding principles for selecting curricular content were determined a priori. Consensus was defined as agreement by at least 80% of the members on POCUS applications deemed appropriate for teaching and assessment of trainees in the core (internal medicine postgraduate years [PGY] 1-3) and expanded (general internal medicine PGY 4-5) training programs. We recommend four POCUS applications for the core PGY 1-3 curriculum (inferior vena cava, lung B lines, pleural effusion, and abdominal free fluid) and three ultrasound-guided procedures (central venous catheterization, thoracentesis, and paracentesis). For the expanded PGY 4-5 curriculum, we recommend an additional seven applications (internal jugular vein, lung consolidation, pneumothorax, knee effusion, gross left ventricular systolic function, pericardial effusion, and right ventricular strain) and four ultrasound-guided procedures (knee arthrocentesis, arterial line insertion, arterial blood gas sampling, and peripheral venous catheterization). These recommendations will provide a framework for training programs at a national level.

  11. Undertaking cancer research in international settings: report from the american society for preventive oncology special interest group on international issues in cancer.

    PubMed

    Wernli, Karen J; Kitahara, Cari M; Tamers, Sara L; Al-Temimi, Mohammed H; Braithwaite, Dejana

    2013-09-01

    The mission of the American Society for Preventive Oncology Special Interest Group in International Issues in Cancer is to serve as a worldwide cancer prevention resource. At the 2013 annual meeting, we presented three early career investigators who conducted research with international collaborators as part of postdoctoral studies. We present a synopsis of each of the scientific presentations. The investigators also highlight useful strategies to encourage a more successful international collaboration, including seeking out existing collaborations between colleagues and international researchers, maintaining awareness and sensitivity of cultural norms, establishing clear communication about investigator roles and expectations, and persevering in the face of potential challenges due to the nature of these collaborations. Incorporation of these key elements could prove useful for researchers interested in pursuing cross-country projects.

  12. How Our Teacher Study Group Sparks Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matlin, Myna L.; Short, Kathy G.

    1991-01-01

    After replacing its basal readers with a literature series, Tucson (Arizona) schools piloted a study group approach supporting long-term, innovative changes in reading instruction. Study groups gave teachers the chance to consider their beliefs, share ideas, challenge current practices, blend theory and practice, identify professional and personal…

  13. [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography predicts survival after chemoimmunotherapy for primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma: results of the International Extranodal Lymphoma Study Group IELSG-26 Study.

    PubMed

    Martelli, Maurizio; Ceriani, Luca; Zucca, Emanuele; Zinzani, Pier Luigi; Ferreri, Andrés J M; Vitolo, Umberto; Stelitano, Caterina; Brusamolino, Ercole; Cabras, Maria Giuseppina; Rigacci, Luigi; Balzarotti, Monica; Salvi, Flavia; Montoto, Silvia; Lopez-Guillermo, Armando; Finolezzi, Erica; Pileri, Stefano A; Davies, Andrew; Cavalli, Franco; Giovanella, Luca; Johnson, Peter W M

    2014-06-10

    To assess the role of [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose ([18F]FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) after rituximab and anthracycline-containing chemoimmunotherapy in patients with primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma (PMLBCL). Among 125 patients prospectively enrolled, 115 were eligible for central review of PET/CT scans at the completion of standard chemoimmunotherapy, by using a five-point scale. Consolidation radiotherapy (RT) was permitted and given to 102 patients. Fifty-four patients (47%) achieved a complete metabolic response (CMR), defined as a completely negative scan or with residual [18F]FDG activity below the mediastinal blood pool (MBP) uptake. In the remaining 61 patients (53%), the residual uptake was higher than MBP uptake but below the liver uptake in 27 (23%), slightly higher than the liver uptake in 24 (21%), and markedly higher in 10 (9%). CMR after chemoimmunotherapy predicted higher 5-year progression-free survival (PFS; 98% v 82%; P=.0044) and overall survival (OS; 100% v 91%; P=.0298). Patients with residual uptake higher than MBP uptake but below liver uptake had equally good outcomes without any recurrence. Using the liver uptake as cutoff for PET positivity (boundary of score, 3 to 4) discriminated most effectively between high or low risk of failure, with 5-year PFS of 99% versus 68% (P<.001) and 5-year OS of 100% versus 83% (P<.001). More than 90% of patients are projected to be alive and progression-free at 5 years, despite a low CMR rate (47%) after chemoimmunotherapy. This study provides a basis for using PET/CT to define the role of RT in PMLBCL. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  14. Item wording and internal consistency of a measure of cohesion: the group environment questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Eys, Mark A; Carron, Albert V; Bray, Steven R; Brawley, Lawrence R

    2007-06-01

    A common practice for counteracting response acquiescence in psychological measures has been to employ both negatively and positively worded items. However, previous research has highlighted that the reliability of measures can be affected by this practice (Spector, 1992). The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect that the presence of negatively worded items has on the internal reliability of the Group Environment Questionnaire (GEQ). Two samples (N = 276) were utilized, and participants were asked to complete the GEQ (original and revised) on separate occasions. Results demonstrated that the revised questionnaire (containing all positively worded items) had significantly higher Cronbach alpha values for three of the four dimensions of the GEQ. Implications, alternatives, and future directions are discussed.

  15. Facebook Groups as LMS: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meishar-Tal, Hagit; Kurtz, Gila; Pieterse, Efrat

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a pilot study in using Facebook as an alternative to a learning management system (LMS). The paper reviews the current research on the use of Facebook in academia and analyzes the differences between a Facebook group and a regular LMS. The paper reports on a precedent-setting attempt to use a Facebook group as a course…

  16. Effectiveness of Group Activity Play Therapy on Internalizing and Externalizing Behavior Problems of Preadolescent Orphans in Uganda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ojiambo, Deborah

    2011-01-01

    This pilot study investigated the impact of group activity play therapy (GAPT) on displaced orphans aged 10 to 12 years living in a large children's village in Uganda. Teachers and housemothers identified 60 preadolescents exhibiting clinical levels of internalizing and externalizing behavior problems. The participants' ethnicity was African and…

  17. Determination of HDV ribozyme N(-1) nucleobase and functional group specificity using internal competition kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Kellerman, Daniel L; Simmons, Kandice S; Pedraza, Mayra; Piccirilli, Joseph A; York, Darrin M; Harris, Michael E

    2015-01-01

    Biological catalysis involves interactions distant from the site of chemistry that can position the substrate for reaction. Catalysis of RNA 2′-O-transphosphorylation by the HDV ribozyme is sensitive to the identity of the N(-1) nucleotide flanking the reactive phosphoryl group. However, the interactions that affect the conformation of this position, and in turn the 2′O nucleophile, are unclear. Here, we describe the application of multiple substrate internal competition kinetic analyses to understand how the N(-1) nucleobase contributes to HDV catalysis, and to test the utility of this approach for RNA structure-function studies. Internal competition reactions containing all four substrate sequence variants at the N(-1) position in reactions using ribozyme active site mutations at A77 and A78 were used to test a proposed basepairing interaction. Mutants A78U, A78G and A79G retain significant catalytic activity, but do not alter the specificity for the N(-1) nucleobase. Effects of nucleobase analog substitutions at N(-1) indicate that U is preferred due to the ability to donate an H-bond in the Watson-Crick face and avoid minor groove steric clash. The results provide information essential for evaluating models of the HDV active site, and illustrate multiple-substrate kinetic analyses as a practical approach for characterizing structure-function relationships in RNA reactions. PMID:25937290

  18. GEMS: A Study Group to Update Dietitians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gobberdiel, Linda

    1983-01-01

    Discusses study group technique to update dietitians. Includes objectives (such as providing opportunities for sharing of information among area hospitals' dietetic departments and creating greater exposure to nutritional care philosophies/methods), subgroup responsibilities, and journals used. (JN)

  19. GEMS: A Study Group to Update Dietitians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gobberdiel, Linda

    1983-01-01

    Discusses study group technique to update dietitians. Includes objectives (such as providing opportunities for sharing of information among area hospitals' dietetic departments and creating greater exposure to nutritional care philosophies/methods), subgroup responsibilities, and journals used. (JN)

  20. Internalized stigma in psoriasis: A multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Alpsoy, Erkan; Polat, Mualla; FettahlıoGlu-Karaman, Bilge; Karadag, Ayse Serap; Kartal-Durmazlar, Pelin; YalCın, Basak; Emre, Selma; Didar-Balcı, Didem; Bilgic-Temel, Asli; Arca, Ercan; Koca, Rafet; Gunduz, Kamer; Borlu, Murat; Ergun, Tulin; Dogruk-Kacar, Seval; Cordan-Yazici, Ayca; Dursun, Pınar; BilgiC, Ozlem; Gunes-Bilgili, Serap; Sendur, Neslihan; Baysal, Ozge; Halil-Yavuz, Ibrahim; Yagcioglu, Gizem; Yilmaz, Ertan; Kavuzlu, Ufuk; Senol, Yesim

    2017-08-01

    Internalized stigma is the adoption of negative attitudes and stereotypes of the society regarding a person's illness. It causes decreased self-esteem and life-satisfaction, increased depression and suicidality, and difficulty in coping with the illness. The primary aim of this study was to investigate the internalized stigma state of psoriatic patients and to identify the factors influencing internalized stigma. The secondary aim was to identify the correlation of internalized stigma with quality of life and perceived health status. This multicentre, cross-sectional study comprised 1485 patients. There was a significant positive correlation between mean values of Psoriasis Internalized Stigma Scale (PISS) and Psoriasis Area and Severity Index, Body Surface Area, Dermatological Life Quality Index and General Health Questionnaire-12 (P < 0.001 in all). Lower percieved health score (P = 0.001), early onset psoriasis (P = 0.016), family history of psoriasis (P = 0.0034), being illiterate (P < 0.001) and lower income level (P < 0.001) were determinants of high PISS scores. Mean PISS values were higher in erythrodermic and generalized pustular psoriasis. Involvement of scalp, face, hand, genitalia and finger nails as well as arthropathic and inverse psoriasis were also related to significantly higher PISS scores (P = 0.001). Our findings imply that psoriatic patients experience high levels of internalized stigma which are associated with psoriasis severity, involvement of visible body parts, genital area, folds or joints, poorer quality of life, negative perceptions of general health and psychological illnesses. Therefore, internalized stigma may be one of the major factors responsible from psychosocial burden of the disease. © 2017 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  1. Rationale and design of the HepZero study: a prospective, multicenter, international, open, randomized, controlled clinical study with parallel groups comparing heparin-free dialysis with heparin-coated dialysis membrane (Evodial) versus standard care: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Anticoagulation for chronic dialysis patients with contraindications to heparin administration is challenging. Current guidelines state that in patients with increased bleeding risks, strategies that can induce systemic anticoagulation should be avoided. Heparin-free dialysis using intermittent saline flushes is widely adopted as the method of choice for patients at risk of bleeding, although on-line blood predilution may also be used. A new dialyzer, Evodial (Gambro, Lund, Sweden), is grafted with unfractionated heparin during the manufacturing process and may allow safe and efficient heparin-free hemodialysis sessions. In the present trial, Evodial was compared to standard care with either saline flushes or blood predilution. Methods The HepZero study is the first international (seven countries), multicenter (10 centers), randomized, controlled, open-label, non-inferiority (and if applicable subsequently, superiority) trial with two parallel groups, comprising 252 end-stage renal disease patients treated by maintenance hemodialysis for at least 3 months and requiring heparin-free dialysis treatments. Patients will be treated during a maximum of three heparin-free dialysis treatments with either saline flushes or blood predilution (control group), or Evodial. The first heparin-free dialysis treatment will be considered successful when there is: no complete occlusion of air traps or dialyzer rendering dialysis impossible; no additional saline flushes to prevent clotting; no change of dialyzer or blood lines because of clotting; and no premature termination (early rinse-back) because of clotting. The primary objectives of the study are to determine the effectiveness of the Evodial dialyzer, compared with standard care in terms of successful treatments during the first heparin-free dialysis. If the non-inferiority of Evodial is demonstrated then the superiority of Evodial over standard care will be tested. The HepZero study results may have major clinical

  2. Factorial and Item-Level Invariance of an Emotional Intelligence Scale across Groups of International Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Chuang; Kim, Do-Hong; Ng, Kok-Mun

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the factorial and item-level invariance of Wong and Law's emotional intelligence scale (WLEIS) in a sample of 375 international students in U.S. universities. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and differential item functioning (DIF) analysis were employed at the test and item level, respectively. International students from…

  3. Factorial and Item-Level Invariance of an Emotional Intelligence Scale across Groups of International Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Chuang; Kim, Do-Hong; Ng, Kok-Mun

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the factorial and item-level invariance of Wong and Law's emotional intelligence scale (WLEIS) in a sample of 375 international students in U.S. universities. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and differential item functioning (DIF) analysis were employed at the test and item level, respectively. International students from…

  4. Expert group meetings in preparation for the 1984 International Conference on Population.

    PubMed

    1983-01-01

    4 expert group meetings were organized in preparation for the 1984 International Conference on Population for the purpose of discussing, assessing, and reviewing population issues to form a basis for documentation for the Conference. The meetings were as follows: Fertility and Family held in New Delhi, India, 5-11 January 1983; Population Distribution, Migration, and development held in Hammamet, Tunisia, 21-25 March 1983; Population, Resources, Environment, and Development held in Geneva, Switzerland, 25-29 April 1983; and Mortality and Health Policy held in Rome, Italy, 30 May to 3 June 1983. This discussion summarizes the last 3 meetings. Leon Tabah, Director of the UN Population Division pointed out in the keynote address of the expert group meeting on population distribution, migration, and development that the problems of population distribution and international migration did not receive sufficient attention at Bucharest. Themes covered at the meeting included: internal and international migration; conceptual approaches and patterns; migration and rural developement; migration, urbanization and development in both developing and developed countries; population distribution policies; and trends and policies in international migration in relation to development. Some of the views emphasized at the expert group meeting on population, resources, environment, and development are reviewed here, focusing on food and nutrition, employment and income distribution, health and education, resources and the environment, and integrated planning.

  5. Integrated Assessments and Policy Evaluation group and Center for International Energy Development. Program summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-04-01

    This report summarizes programmatic accomplishments since 1981 in two staff groups of the Energy and Environmental Systems Division: the Integrated Assessments and Policy Evaluation (IAPE) group and the Center for International Energy Development (CIED). This summary, presented in Sections 2-4, provides background information on major accomplishments. The introduction presents an overview of staffing and programs, and Section 5 lists recent publications. 38 figs., 13 tabs.

  6. THE COOPERATIVE INTERNATIONAL NEUROMUSCULAR RESEARCH GROUP DUCHENNE NATURAL HISTORY STUDY: GLUCOCORTICOID TREATMENT PRESERVES CLINICALLY MEANINGFUL FUNCTIONAL MILESTONES AND REDUCES RATE OF DISEASE PROGRESSION AS MEASURED BY MANUAL MUSCLE TESTING AND OTHER COMMONLY USED CLINICAL TRIAL OUTCOME MEASURES

    PubMed Central

    HENRICSON, ERIK K.; ABRESCH, R. TED; CNAAN, AVITAL; HU, FENGMING; DUONG, TINA; ARRIETA, ADRIENNE; HAN, JAY; ESCOLAR, DIANA M.; FLORENCE, JULAINE M.; CLEMENS, PAULA R.; HOFFMAN, ERIC P.; McDONALD, CRAIG M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Glucocorticoid (GC) therapy in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) has altered disease progression, necessitating contemporary natural history studies. Methods The Cooperative Neuromuscular Research Group (CINRG) DMD Natural History Study (DMD-NHS) enrolled 340 DMD males, ages 2–28 years. A comprehensive battery of measures was obtained. Results A novel composite functional “milestone” scale scale showed clinically meaningful mobility and upper limb abilities were significantly preserved in GC-treated adolescents/young adults. Manual muscle test (MMT)-based calculations of global strength showed that those patients <10 years of age treated with steroids declined by 0.4±0.39 MMT unit/year, compared with −0.4±0.39 MMT unit/year in historical steroid-naive subjects. Pulmonary function tests (PFTs) were relatively preserved in steroid-treated adolescents. The linearity and magnitude of decline in measures were affected by maturational changes and functional status. Conclusions In DMD, long-term use of GCs showed reduced strength loss and preserved functional capabilities and PFTs compared with previous natural history studies performed prior to the widespread use of GC therapy. PMID:23649481

  7. International Relations, Social Studies: 6448.20.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coe, Rose Marie

    The forces affecting relations among nations as well as the effectiveness of decision making processes in international politics are examined and analyzed by 10th through 12th grade students in the elective quinmester course clustering around political studies. Goals emphasize helping students to understand state interaction and the variables…

  8. An international nomenclature for forest work study

    Treesearch

    Rolf Björheden; Michael A.  Thompson

    2000-01-01

    Knowledge gained in the study of forest work is used to improve operational efficiency through better planning and control of future work. Internationally recognized standard methods for recording, evaluating and reporting performance in forest work will greatly enhance the usefulness of this information to managers and planners. A subcommittee of IUFRO Working Party $...

  9. An international nomenclature for forest work study

    Treesearch

    Rolf Bjorheden; Michael A. Thompson

    2000-01-01

    Knowledge gained in the study of forest work is used to improve operational efficiency through better planning and control of future work. Internationally recognized standard methods for recording, evaluating and reporting performance in forest work will greatly enhance the usefulness of this information to managers and planners. A subcommittee of IUFRO Working Party...

  10. Fluid Studies on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Motil, Brian J.

    2016-01-01

    Will discuss the recent activities on the international space station, including the adiabatic two phase flow, capillary flow and interfacial phenomena, and boiling and condensation. Will also give a historic introduction to Microgravity Studies at Glenn Research Center. Talk will be given to students and faculty at University of Louisville.

  11. Internal Consistency and Power When Comparing Total Scores from Two Groups.

    PubMed

    Barchard, Kimberly A; Brouwers, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Researchers now know that when theoretical reliability increases, power can increase, decrease, or stay the same. However, no analytic research has examined the relationship of power to the most commonly used type of reliability-internal consistency-and the most commonly used measures of internal consistency, coefficient alpha and ICC(A,k). We examine the relationship between the power of independent samples t tests and internal consistency. We explicate the mathematical model upon which researchers usually calculate internal consistency, one in which total scores are calculated as the sum of observed scores on K measures. Using this model, we derive a new formula for effect size to show that power and internal consistency are influenced by many of the same parameters but not always in the same direction. Changing an experiment in one way (e.g., lengthening the measure) is likely to influence multiple parameters simultaneously; thus, there are no simple relationships between such changes and internal consistency or power. If researchers revise measures to increase internal consistency, this might not increase power. To increase power, researchers should increase sample size, select measures that assess areas where group differences are largest, and use more powerful statistical procedures (e.g., ANCOVA).

  12. Supporting the Thesis Writing Process of International Research Students through an Ongoing Writing Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Linda Y.; Vandermensbrugghe, Joelle

    2011-01-01

    Evidence from research suggests writing support is particularly needed for international research students who have to tackle the challenges of thesis writing in English as their second language in Western academic settings. This article reports the development of an ongoing writing group to support the thesis writing process of international…

  13. Development and Implementation of an International Counseling Outreach Effort in Bhutan: A Group Stage Conceptualization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guth, Lorraine J.; Lorelle, Sonya; Hinkle, J. Scott; Remley, Theodore P.

    2015-01-01

    This article highlights the development and implementation of an international counseling outreach program in Bhutan using a group stage conceptualization that includes the initial, transition, working, and final stages. The initial stage included a counseling initiative started by one of the queens as well as meetings with key leaders from the…

  14. Experiences of a support group for interns in the setting of war and political turmoil.

    PubMed

    El Jamil, Fatima; Hamadeh, Ghassan N; Osman, Hibah

    2007-10-01

    Intern support groups have been instituted in many residency programs to improve resident well-being. In this article, we discuss the themes that emerged in intern support group meetings in a family medicine program operating in a setting of war and political instability. We held support groups, led by a family physician and a psychologist, that met monthly. Participants were residents in the family medicine program at the American University of Beirut. These residents began their training days after the commencement of the 34-day war between Israel and Hizbollah in 2006. Themes and issues discussed by the residents were noted and are reported in this article. We found that despite the stressors of the political situation, our interns focused on the usual stress of internship, such as the difficulties of functioning as interns in other departments and dealing with the time demands of internship as their main sources of stress at the beginning of internship. The stresses associated with the war did not emerge in the group until later in the year. These included tension with patients and political confrontations with staff, as well as personal struggles with the lack of political stability and depressed mood. This paper serves to share our experience and highlight some areas of concern that residents experience when training in a country or region that is at war.

  15. The International Research Training Group (GRK532): Practicing Cross-Border Postgraduate Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehses, Markus; Veith, Michael

    2009-01-01

    In 1999, the International Research Training Group "GRK532" was founded as a pilot project for cross-border European postgraduate education along the German/French/Luxembourg borders. The project consists of an interdisciplinary research programme on synthesis, isolation and characterization of new materials accompanied by an ambitious…

  16. Supporting the Thesis Writing Process of International Research Students through an Ongoing Writing Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Linda Y.; Vandermensbrugghe, Joelle

    2011-01-01

    Evidence from research suggests writing support is particularly needed for international research students who have to tackle the challenges of thesis writing in English as their second language in Western academic settings. This article reports the development of an ongoing writing group to support the thesis writing process of international…

  17. 78 FR 29199 - Avani International Group, Inc., Birch Mountain Resources Ltd., Capital Reserve Canada Ltd...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Avani International Group, Inc., Birch Mountain Resources Ltd., Capital Reserve Canada Ltd... information concerning the securities of Birch Mountain Resources Ltd. because it has not filed any periodic...

  18. New Developments in Wood-Destroying Organisms from the International Research Group on Wood Preservation \\t

    Treesearch

    Elmer L. Schmidt

    1991-01-01

    New developments in wood-destroying organisms and in wood protection from the 20th annual meeting (May 1989 at Lappeenranta, Finland) of the International Research Group on Wood Preservation (IRG) are highlighted in the areas of biological control of fungi, dry rot, decay mechanisms and product problems, new techniques, insect problems and control, and developments in...

  19. The International Research Training Group (GRK532): Practicing Cross-Border Postgraduate Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehses, Markus; Veith, Michael

    2009-01-01

    In 1999, the International Research Training Group "GRK532" was founded as a pilot project for cross-border European postgraduate education along the German/French/Luxembourg borders. The project consists of an interdisciplinary research programme on synthesis, isolation and characterization of new materials accompanied by an ambitious…

  20. Hanford single-shell tank grouping study

    SciTech Connect

    Remund, K.M.; Anderson, C.M.; Simpson, B.C.

    1995-10-01

    A tank grouping study has been conducted to find Hanford single-shell tanks with similar waste properties. The limited sampling resources of the characterization program could be allocated more effectively by having a better understanding of the groups of tanks that have similar waste types. If meaningful groups of tanks can be identified, tank sampling requirements may be reduced, and the uncertainty of the characterization estimates may be narrowed. This tank grouping study considers the analytical sampling information and the historical information that is available for all single-shell tanks. The two primary sources of historical characterization estimates and information come from the Historical Tank Content Estimate (HTCE) Model and the Sort on Radioactive Waste Tanks (SORWT) Model. The sampling and historical information are used together to come up with meaningful groups of similar tanks. Based on the results of analyses presented in this report, credible tank grouping looks very promising. Some groups defined using historical information (HTCE and SORWT) correspond well with those based on analytical data alone.

  1. Theoretical Studies Of Group IVA And Group IVB Chemistry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-20

    reaction paths. The R(-7) dispersion terms was also derived and coded. While most workers ignore the odd power dispersion terms, these terms can be...second order perturbation theory (MP2) to help explain the experimental results of the Fayer group on phenol migration dynamics. An exhaustive...2013) 3. L. Kocia, S. Young, Y. Kholod, M. Gordon, M. Fayer, and A. Rappe, “Theoretical Examination of Picosecond Phenol Migration Dynamics in

  2. The Second International Piping Integrity Research Group (IPIRG-2) program. Final report, October 1991--April 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Hopper, A.; Wilowski, G.; Scott, P.; Olson, R.

    1997-03-01

    The IPIRG-2 program was an international group program managed by the US NRC and funded by organizations from 15 nations. The emphasis of the IPIRG-2 program was the development of data to verify fracture analyses for cracked pipes and fittings subjected to dynamic/cyclic load histories typical of seismic events. The scope included: (1) the study of more complex dynamic/cyclic load histories, i.e., multi-frequency, variable amplitude, simulated seismic excitations, than those considered in the IPIRG-1 program, (2) crack sizes more typical of those considered in Leak-Before-Break (LBB) and in-service flaw evaluations, (3) through-wall-cracked pipe experiments which can be used to validate LBB-type fracture analyses, (4) cracks in and around pipe fittings, such as elbows, and (5) laboratory specimen and separate effect pipe experiments to provide better insight into the effects of dynamic and cyclic load histories. Also undertaken were an uncertainty analysis to identify the issues most important for LBB or in-service flaw evaluations, updating computer codes and databases, the development and conduct of a series of round-robin analyses, and analyst`s group meetings to provide a forum for nuclear piping experts from around the world to exchange information on the subject of pipe fracture technology. 17 refs., 104 figs., 41 tabs.

  3. Standardization of bleeding assessment in immune thrombocytopenia: report from the International Working Group.

    PubMed

    Rodeghiero, Francesco; Michel, Marc; Gernsheimer, Terry; Ruggeri, Marco; Blanchette, Victor; Bussel, James B; Cines, Douglas B; Cooper, Nichola; Godeau, Bertrand; Greinacher, Andreas; Imbach, Paul; Khellaf, Mehdi; Klaassen, Robert J; Kühne, Thomas; Liebman, Howard; Mazzucconi, Maria Gabriella; Newland, Adrian; Pabinger, Ingrid; Tosetto, Alberto; Stasi, Roberto

    2013-04-04

    In a previous publication on new terminology, definitions, and outcome criteria for immune thrombocytopenia (ITP), the International Working Group (IWG) on ITP acknowledged that response to treatment should consist of clinically meaningful end points such as bleeding manifestations and that platelet count may not be the ideal parameter for capturing the benefits of therapy. The IWG now proposes a consensus-based ITP-specific bleeding assessment tool (ITP-BAT) with definitions and terminology consistent with those adopted for other bleeding disorders. Bleeding manifestations were grouped into three major domains: skin (S), visible mucosae (M), and organs (O), with gradation of severity (SMOG). Each bleeding manifestation is assessed at the time of examination. Severity is graded from 0 to 3 or 4, with grade 5 for any fatal bleeding. Bleeding reported by the patient without medical documentation is graded 1. Within each domain, the same grade is assigned to bleeding manifestations of similar clinical impact. The "worst bleeding manifestation since the last visit" (observation period) is graded (a suitable database collection form is provided), and the highest grade within each domain is recorded. The SMOG system provides a consistent description of the bleeding phenotype in ITP, and the IWG unanimously supports its adoption and validation in future clinical studies.

  4. Absence of synergy for monosynaptic Group I inputs between abdominal and internal intercostal motoneurons

    PubMed Central

    Ford, T. W.; Meehan, C. F.

    2014-01-01

    Internal intercostal and abdominal motoneurons are strongly coactivated during expiration. We investigated whether that synergy was paralleled by synergistic Group I reflex excitation. Intracellular recordings were made from motoneurons of the internal intercostal nerve of T8 in anesthetized cats, and the specificity of the monosynaptic connections from afferents in each of the two main branches of this nerve was investigated. Motoneurons were shown by antidromic excitation to innervate three muscle groups: external abdominal oblique [EO; innervated by the lateral branch (Lat)], the region of the internal intercostal muscle proximal to the branch point (IIm), and muscles innervated from the distal remainder (Dist). Strong specificity was observed, only 2 of 54 motoneurons showing excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) from both Lat and Dist. No EO motoneurons showed an EPSP from Dist, and no IIm motoneurons showed one from Lat. Expiratory Dist motoneurons fell into two groups. Those with Dist EPSPs and none from Lat (group A) were assumed to innervate distal internal intercostal muscle. Those with Lat EPSPs (group B) were assumed to innervate abdominal muscle (transversus abdominis or rectus abdominis). Inspiratory Dist motoneurons (assumed to innervate interchondral muscle) showed Dist EPSPs. Stimulation of dorsal ramus nerves gave EPSPs in 12 instances, 9 being in group B Dist motoneurons. The complete absence of heteronymous monosynaptic Group I reflex excitation between muscles that are synergistically activated in expiration leads us to conclude that such connections from muscle spindle afferents of the thoracic nerves have little role in controlling expiratory movements but, where present, support other motor acts. PMID:24920027

  5. Absence of synergy for monosynaptic Group I inputs between abdominal and internal intercostal motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Ford, T W; Meehan, C F; Kirkwood, P A

    2014-09-01

    Internal intercostal and abdominal motoneurons are strongly coactivated during expiration. We investigated whether that synergy was paralleled by synergistic Group I reflex excitation. Intracellular recordings were made from motoneurons of the internal intercostal nerve of T8 in anesthetized cats, and the specificity of the monosynaptic connections from afferents in each of the two main branches of this nerve was investigated. Motoneurons were shown by antidromic excitation to innervate three muscle groups: external abdominal oblique [EO; innervated by the lateral branch (Lat)], the region of the internal intercostal muscle proximal to the branch point (IIm), and muscles innervated from the distal remainder (Dist). Strong specificity was observed, only 2 of 54 motoneurons showing excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) from both Lat and Dist. No EO motoneurons showed an EPSP from Dist, and no IIm motoneurons showed one from Lat. Expiratory Dist motoneurons fell into two groups. Those with Dist EPSPs and none from Lat (group A) were assumed to innervate distal internal intercostal muscle. Those with Lat EPSPs (group B) were assumed to innervate abdominal muscle (transversus abdominis or rectus abdominis). Inspiratory Dist motoneurons (assumed to innervate interchondral muscle) showed Dist EPSPs. Stimulation of dorsal ramus nerves gave EPSPs in 12 instances, 9 being in group B Dist motoneurons. The complete absence of heteronymous monosynaptic Group I reflex excitation between muscles that are synergistically activated in expiration leads us to conclude that such connections from muscle spindle afferents of the thoracic nerves have little role in controlling expiratory movements but, where present, support other motor acts. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  6. Teaching the Japanese American Internment: A Case Study of Social Studies Curriculum Conflict and Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camicia, Steven P.

    2009-01-01

    This article examines a case of curriculum conflict in order to understand how the social studies curriculum is changed by such conflicts. In the case, a small group of activists challenged a local sixth grade history curriculum, which claimed that the WWII internment of Japanese Americans was a mistake. Activists claimed that the internment was…

  7. Teaching the Japanese American Internment: A Case Study of Social Studies Curriculum Conflict and Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camicia, Steven P.

    2009-01-01

    This article examines a case of curriculum conflict in order to understand how the social studies curriculum is changed by such conflicts. In the case, a small group of activists challenged a local sixth grade history curriculum, which claimed that the WWII internment of Japanese Americans was a mistake. Activists claimed that the internment was…

  8. Space Station concept development group studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, L. E.

    1984-01-01

    The NASA study activities in preparation for a Space Station began in the early 1970's. The early studies included many in-house NASA and contracted studies. A group of representatives from all the NASA Centers, titled the Space Station Concept Development Group (CDG) was involved in the studies which led to the initiation of the Space Station Program. The CDG studies were performed over a period of approximately one year and consisted of four phases. The initial phase had the objective to determine the functions required of the station as opposed to a configuration. The activities of the second phase were primarily concerned with a sizing of the facilities required for payloads and the resources necessary to support these mission payloads. The third phase of studies was designed to develop a philosophical approach to a number of areas related to autonomy, maintainability, operations and logistics, and verification. The fourth phase of the study was to be concerned with configuration assessment activities.

  9. Cross-year peer tutoring on internal medicine wards: results of a qualitative focus group analysis.

    PubMed

    Krautter, Markus; Andreesen, Sven; Köhl-Hackert, Nadja; Hoffmann, Katja; Herzog, Wolfgang; Nikendei, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Peer-assisted learning (PAL) has become a well-accepted teaching method within medical education. However, descriptions of on-ward PAL programs are rare. A focus group analysis of a newly established PAL program on an internal medicine ward was conducted to provide insights into PAL teaching from a student perspective. To provide insights into students' experiences regarding their on-ward training with and without accompanying PAL tutors. A total of N=168 medical students in their sixth semester participated in the investigation (intervention group: N=88; control group: N=80). The intervention group took part in the PAL program, while the control group received standard on-ward training. There were seven focus groups with N=43 participants (intervention group: four focus groups, N=28 participants; control group: three focus groups, N=15 participants). The discussions were analyzed using content analysis. The intervention group emphasized the role of the tutors as competent and well-trained teachers, most beneficial in supervising clinical skills. Tutors motivate students, help them to integrate into the ward team, and provide a non-fear-based working relationship whereby students' anxiety regarding working on ward decreases. The control group had to rely on autodidactic learning strategies when neither supervising physicians nor final-year students were available. On-ward PAL programs represent a particularly valuable tool for students' support in training clinical competencies on ward. The tutor-student working alliance acts through its flat hierarchy. Nevertheless, tutors cannot represent an adequate substitute for experienced physicians.

  10. Study of Contractor Internal Reward Structures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-15

    Incentive Systems Negotiations 20) 149TRACT (Continue an reverse side It necessary and identify by block number) ~ a: -mhe overall objective of this study...Inc. to begin work on August 14, 1981 to collect data on contractor internal motivation systems in specified defense corporations. Study Focus The...awards. While we have already gathered somes data on your firm’s incentive program as reported In SEC filings, informtion on the award criteria was not

  11. Women's Participation in Physics Internationally: the IUPAP Working Group on Women

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franz, Judy

    2001-04-01

    In 1999 the General Assembly of the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP) voted to establish a Working Group on Women in Physics with the following charge: to survey the situation for women in physics in IUPAP member countries; to analyze and report the data collected along with suggestions on how to improve the situation; to suggest ways that women can become more involved in IUPAP, including the Liaison Committees, the Commissions, the Council, and the General Assemblies; and to report all findings at the next General Assembly in 2002. The Working Group was established in 2000 with 11 members representing North and South America, Europe, Asia and the Middle East/Africa. The Group has been gathering data on women in physics and is planning to hold an International Conference on Women in Physics at UNESCO Headquarters in Paris in March, 2002. I will discuss some of the findings and the plans for the future.

  12. Space station group activities habitability module study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nixon, David

    1986-01-01

    This study explores and analyzes architectural design approaches for the interior of the Space Station Habitability Module (originally defined as Habitability Module 1 in Space Station Reference Configuration Decription, JSC-19989, August 1984). In the Research Phase, architectural program and habitability design guidelines are specified. In the Schematic Design Phase, a range of alternative concepts is described and illustrated with drawings, scale-model photographs and design analysis evaluations. Recommendations are presented on the internal architectural, configuration of the Space Station Habitability Module for such functions as the wardroom, galley, exercise facility, library and station control work station. The models show full design configurations for on-orbit performance.

  13. Design of an international multicentre RCT on group schema therapy for borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Wetzelaer, Pim; Farrell, Joan; Evers, Silvia M A A; Jacob, Gitta A; Lee, Christopher W; Brand, Odette; van Breukelen, Gerard; Fassbinder, Eva; Fretwell, Heather; Harper, R Patrick; Lavender, Anna; Lockwood, George; Malogiannis, Ioannis A; Schweiger, Ulrich; Startup, Helen; Stevenson, Teresa; Zarbock, Gerhard; Arntz, Arnoud

    2014-11-18

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is a severe and highly prevalent mental disorder. Schema therapy (ST) has been found effective in the treatment of BPD and is commonly delivered through an individual format. A group format (group schema therapy, GST) has also been developed. GST has been found to speed up and amplify the treatment effects found for individual ST. Delivery in a group format may lead to improved cost-effectiveness. An important question is how GST compares to treatment as usual (TAU) and what format for delivery of schema therapy (format A; intensive group therapy only, or format B; a combination of group and individual therapy) produces the best outcomes. An international, multicentre randomized controlled trial (RCT) will be conducted with a minimum of fourteen participating centres. Each centre will recruit multiple cohorts of at least sixteen patients. GST formats as well as the orders in which they are delivered to successive cohorts will be balanced. Within countries that contribute an uneven number of sites, the orders of GST formats will be balanced within a difference of one. The RCT is designed to include a minimum of 448 patients with BPD. The primary clinical outcome measure will be BPD severity. Secondary clinical outcome measures will include measures of BPD and general psychiatric symptoms, schemas and schema modes, social functioning and quality of life. Furthermore, an economic evaluation that consists of cost-effectiveness and cost-utility analyses will be performed using a societal perspective. Lastly, additional investigations will be carried out that include an assessment of the integrity of GST, a qualitative study on patients' and therapists' experiences with GST, and studies on variables that might influence the effectiveness of GST. This trial will compare GST to TAU for patients with BPD as well as two different formats for the delivery of GST. By combining an evaluation of clinical effectiveness, an economic evaluation

  14. Metacognition and Group Differences: A Comparative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Hilawani, Yasser A.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, metacognition refers to performing visual analysis and discrimination of real life events and situations in naïve psychology, naïve physics, and naïve biology domains. It is used, along with measuring reaction time, to examine differences in the ability of four groups of students to select appropriate pictures that correspond with…

  15. Metacognition and Group Differences: A Comparative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Hilawani, Yasser A.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, metacognition refers to performing visual analysis and discrimination of real life events and situations in naïve psychology, naïve physics, and naïve biology domains. It is used, along with measuring reaction time, to examine differences in the ability of four groups of students to select appropriate pictures that correspond with…

  16. Report of the Public Cryptography Study Group.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Council on Education, Washington, DC.

    Concerns of the National Security Agency (NSA) that information contained in some articles about cryptography in learned and professional journals and in monographs might be inimical to the national security are addressed. The Public Cryptography Study Group, with one dissenting opinion, recommends that a voluntary system of prior review of…

  17. Trueness verification of actual creatinine assays in the European market demonstrates a disappointing variability that needs substantial improvement. An international study in the framework of the EC4 creatinine standardization working group.

    PubMed

    Delanghe, Joris R; Cobbaert, Christa; Galteau, Marie-Madeleine; Harmoinen, Aimo; Jansen, Rob; Kruse, Rolf; Laitinen, Päivi; Thienpont, Linda M; Wuyts, Birgitte; Weykamp, Cas; Panteghini, Mauro

    2008-01-01

    The European In Vitro Diagnostics (IVD) directive requires traceability to reference methods and materials of analytes. It is a task of the profession to verify the trueness of results and IVD compatibility. The results of a trueness verification study by the European Communities Confederation of Clinical Chemistry (EC4) working group on creatinine standardization are described, in which 189 European laboratories analyzed serum creatinine in a commutable serum-based material, using analytical systems from seven companies. Values were targeted using isotope dilution gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Results were tested on their compliance to a set of three criteria: trueness, i.e., no significant bias relative to the target value, between-laboratory variation and within-laboratory variation relative to the maximum allowable error. For the lower and intermediate level, values differed significantly from the target value in the Jaffe and the dry chemistry methods. At the high level, dry chemistry yielded higher results. Between-laboratory coefficients of variation ranged from 4.37% to 8.74%. Total error budget was mainly consumed by the bias. Non-compensated Jaffe methods largely exceeded the total error budget. Best results were obtained for the enzymatic method. The dry chemistry method consumed a large part of its error budget due to calibration bias. Despite the European IVD directive and the growing needs for creatinine standardization, an unacceptable inter-laboratory variation was observed, which was mainly due to calibration differences. The calibration variation has major clinical consequences, in particular in pediatrics, where reference ranges for serum and plasma creatinine are low, and in the estimation of glomerular filtration rate.

  18. Findings of an international study on burnup credit

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, M.C.; Takano, M.; Okuno, H.; DeHart, M.D.; Nouri, A.; Sartori, E.

    1996-08-01

    Findings from a four year study by an international benchmarking group in the comparison of computational methods for evaluating burnup credit in criticality safety analyses are presented in this paper. Approximately 20 participants from 11 countries have provided results for most problems. Four detailed benchmark problems for Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel have been completed and are summarized in this paper. Preliminary results from current work addressing burnup credit for Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) fuel will also be discussed as well as planned activities for additional benchmarks including Mixed-Oxide (MOX) fuels, subcritical benchmarks, international databases, and other activities.

  19. Consensus statement update on posttraumatic stress disorder from the international consensus group on depression and anxiety.

    PubMed

    Ballenger, James C; Davidson, Jonathan R T; Lecrubier, Yves; Nutt, David J; Marshall, Randall D; Nemeroff, Charles B; Shalev, Arieh Y; Yehuda, Rachel

    2004-01-01

    To provide an update to the "Consensus Statement on Posttraumatic Stress Disorder From the International Consensus Group on Depression and Anxiety" that was published in a supplement to The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry (2000) by presenting important developments in the field, the latest recommendations for patient care, and suggestions for future research. The 4 members of the International Consensus Group on Depression and Anxiety were James C. Ballenger (chair), Jonathan R. T. Davidson, Yves Lecrubier, and David J. Nutt. Other faculty who were invited by the chair were Randall D. Marshall, Charles B. Nemeroff, Arieh Y. Shalev, and Rachel Yehuda. The consensus statement is based on the 7 review articles in this supplement and the related scientific literature. Group meetings were held over a 2-day period. On day 1, the group discussed topics to be represented by the 7 review articles in this supplement, and the chair identified key issues for further debate. On day 2, the group discussed these issues to arrive at a consensus view. After the group meetings, the consensus statement was drafted by the chair and approved by all faculty. There have been advancements in the science and treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder. Attention to this disorder has increased with recent world events; however, continued efforts are needed to improve diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of posttraumatic stress disorder.

  20. Video-Assisted Thoracic Surgery Study Group.

    PubMed

    LoCicero, J

    1993-09-01

    Both patients and the medical profession are quick to embrace new technology, particularly when it may replace an existing surgical procedure. Unfortunately, the rapidity of acceptance is rarely associated with careful evaluation. Laparoscopy is a recent example of such widely embraced technology. Studies of laparoscopy that yielded good comparative data to more traditional methods were slow to accrue. This led to the exposure of its shortcomings through governmental reports and the lay press. To prevent this from happening in thoracoscopy, two types of studies are required so that valid conclusions about the new technology can be drawn. The first is an accounting of the new technology as procedures evolve around it. The data collected in such a study should contain basic information, including the indications for the procedure, how it was performed, procedure length, associated complications, and patient outcome. Such information provides a broad profile of the technology, emphasizing from the outset its potential strengths and weaknesses. The second type of study involves a more detailed concurrent comparison of the specific procedures utilizing this technology to the established traditional methods. Such randomized studies help to firmly establish through scientific process the place of the new technology. The Video-Assisted Thoracic Surgery Study Group was organized in early 1992 to address these concerns. From an initial four surgeons the group has grown to include more than 41 institutions. Currently the group is collecting data in a registry and has established three clinical trials to evaluate video-assisted thoracic surgery.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. ICC-dementia (International Centenarian Consortium - dementia): an international consortium to determine the prevalence and incidence of dementia in centenarians across diverse ethnoracial and sociocultural groups.

    PubMed

    Brodaty, Henry; Woolf, Claudia; Andersen, Stacy; Barzilai, Nir; Brayne, Carol; Cheung, Karen Siu-Lan; Corrada, Maria M; Crawford, John D; Daly, Catriona; Gondo, Yasuyuki; Hagberg, Bo; Hirose, Nobuyoshi; Holstege, Henne; Kawas, Claudia; Kaye, Jeffrey; Kochan, Nicole A; Lau, Bobo Hi-Po; Lucca, Ugo; Marcon, Gabriella; Martin, Peter; Poon, Leonard W; Richmond, Robyn; Robine, Jean-Marie; Skoog, Ingmar; Slavin, Melissa J; Szewieczek, Jan; Tettamanti, Mauro; Viña, José; Perls, Thomas; Sachdev, Perminder S

    2016-04-21

    Considerable variability exists in international prevalence and incidence estimates of dementia. The accuracy of estimates of dementia in the oldest-old and the controversial question of whether dementia incidence and prevalence decline at very old age will be crucial for better understanding the dynamics between survival to extreme old age and the occurrence and risk for various types of dementia and comorbidities. International Centenarian Consortium - Dementia (ICC-Dementia) seeks to harmonise centenarian and near-centenarian studies internationally to describe the cognitive and functional profiles of exceptionally old individuals, and ascertain the trajectories of decline and thereby the age-standardised prevalence and incidence of dementia in this population. The primary goal of the ICC-Dementia is to establish a large and thorough heterogeneous sample that has the power to answer epidemiological questions that small, separate studies cannot. A secondary aim is to examine cohort-specific effects and differential survivorship into very old age. We hope to lay the foundation for further investigation into risk and protective factors for dementia and healthy exceptional brain ageing in centenarians across diverse ethnoracial and sociocultural groups. Studies focusing on individuals aged ≥95 years (approximately the oldest 1 percentile for men, oldest 5th percentile for women), with a minimum sample of 80 individuals, including assessment of cognition and functional status, are invited to participate. There are currently seventeen member or potential member studies from Asia, Europe, the Americas, and Oceania. Initial attempts at harmonising key variables are in progress. General challenges facing large, international consortia like ICC-Dementia include timely and effective communication among member studies, ethical and practical issues relating to human subject studies and data sharing, and the challenges related to data harmonisation. A specific challenge for

  2. Community Report and Recommendations from International Lunar Exploration Working Group (ILEWG)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foing, Bernard H.

    2016-07-01

    The International Lunar Exploration Working Group (ILEWG) was established in April 1995 at a meeting in Hamburg, Germany. As established in its charter, this working group reports to COSPAR and is charged with developing an international strategy for the exploration of the Moon. It discusses coordination between missions, and a road map for future international lunar exploration and utilisation. It fosters information exchange or potential and real future lunar robotic and human missions, as well as for new scientific and exploration information about the Moon. We refer to COSPAR and ILEWG ICEUM and lunar conferences and declarations [1-18], present the GLUC/ICEUM11 declaration and give a report on ongoing relevant ILEWG community activities. ILEWG supported community forums, ILEWG EuroMoonMars field campaigns and technology validation activities, as well as Young Lunar Explorers events, and activities with broad stakeholders. We discuss how lunar missions SMART-1, Kaguya, Chang'E1&2, Chandrayaan-1, LCROSS, LRO, GRAIL, LADEE, Chang'E3 and upcoming missions contribute to lunar exploration objectives & roadmap towards the Moon Village. GLUC/ICEUM11 declaration: "467 International Lunar Explorers, registered delegates from 26 countries, assembled at GLUC Global Lunar Conference including the 11th ILEWG Conference on Exploration and Utilisation of the Moon (ICEUM11) in Beijing. The conference engaged scientists, engineers, enthusiast explorers, agencies and organisations in the discussion of recent results and activities and the review of plans for exploration. Space agencies representatives gave the latest reports on their current lunar activities and programmes. GLUC-ICEUM11 was a truly historical meeting that demonstrated the world-wide interest in lunar exploration, discovery, and science. More than 400 abstracts were accepted for oral and poster presentations in the technical sessions, organised in 32 sessions within 4 symposia: Science and Exploration; Technology

  3. Assessment of Proficiency in Japanese as a Foreign Language. Conference Proceedings of an International Working Group Sponsored by the Asian Studies Council (Canberra, Australia, June 12-14, 1990).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wylie, Elaine, Ed.

    The proceedings of a working group conference on proficiency testing of Japanese as a second language contain a brief background paper distributed to conference invitees, a list of items included in the pre-conference portfolio, an advance organizer of potential discussion topics, a 77-item annotated list of bibliographies on second language…

  4. Assessment of Proficiency in Japanese as a Foreign Language. Conference Proceedings of an International Working Group Sponsored by the Asian Studies Council (Canberra, Australia, June 12-14, 1990).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wylie, Elaine, Ed.

    The proceedings of a working group conference on proficiency testing of Japanese as a second language contain a brief background paper distributed to conference invitees, a list of items included in the pre-conference portfolio, an advance organizer of potential discussion topics, a 77-item annotated list of bibliographies on second language…

  5. International geomagnetic reference field 1980: a report by IAGA Division I working group.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peddie, N.W.

    1982-01-01

    Describes the recommendations of the working group, which suggested additions to IGRF because of the cumulative effect of the inevitable uncertainties in the secular variation models which had led to unacceptable inaccuracies in the IGRF by the late 1970's. The recommendations were accepted by the International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy on August 15, 1981 at the 4th Scientific Assembly, Edinburgh. An extended table sets out spherical harmonic coefficients of the IGRF 1980.-R.House

  6. The International Dermatology Outcome Measures Group: formation of patient-centered outcome measures in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, Alice B; Levin, Adriane A; Armstrong, April W; Abernethy, April; Duffin, Kristina Callis; Bhushan, Reva; Garg, Amit; Merola, Joseph F; Maccarone, Mara; Christensen, Robin

    2015-02-01

    As quality standards are increasingly in demand throughout medicine, dermatology needs to establish outcome measures to quantify the effectiveness of treatments and providers. The International Dermatology Outcome Measures Group was established to address this need. Beginning with psoriasis, the group aims to create a tool considerate of patients and providers using the input of all relevant stakeholders in assessment of disease severity and response to treatment. Herein, we delineate the procedures through which consensus is being reached and the future directions of the project.

  7. Definition of a COPD self-management intervention: International Expert Group consensus.

    PubMed

    Effing, Tanja W; Vercoulen, Jan H; Bourbeau, Jean; Trappenburg, Jaap; Lenferink, Anke; Cafarella, Paul; Coultas, David; Meek, Paula; van der Valk, Paul; Bischoff, Erik W M A; Bucknall, Christine; Dewan, Naresh A; Early, Frances; Fan, Vincent; Frith, Peter; Janssen, Daisy J A; Mitchell, Katy; Morgan, Mike; Nici, Linda; Patel, Irem; Walters, Haydn; Rice, Kathryn L; Singh, Sally; Zuwallack, Richard; Benzo, Roberto; Goldstein, Roger; Partridge, Martyn R; van der Palen, Job

    2016-07-01

    There is an urgent need for consensus on what defines a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) self-management intervention. We aimed to obtain consensus regarding the conceptual definition of a COPD self-management intervention by engaging an international panel of COPD self-management experts using Delphi technique features and an additional group meeting.In each consensus round the experts were asked to provide feedback on the proposed definition and to score their level of agreement (1=totally disagree; 5=totally agree). The information provided was used to modify the definition for the next consensus round. Thematic analysis was used for free text responses and descriptive statistics were used for agreement scores.In total, 28 experts participated. The consensus round response rate varied randomly over the five rounds (ranging from 48% (n=13) to 85% (n=23)), and mean definition agreement scores increased from 3.8 (round 1) to 4.8 (round 5) with an increasing percentage of experts allocating the highest score of 5 (round 1: 14% (n=3); round 5: 83% (n=19)).In this study we reached consensus regarding a conceptual definition of what should be a COPD self-management intervention, clarifying the requisites for such an intervention. Operationalisation of this conceptual definition in the near future will be an essential next step. The content of this work is not subject to copyright. Design and branding are copyright ©ERS 2016.

  8. International Space Station Air Quality Assessed According to Toxicologically-Grouped Compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.; Limero, Thomas F.; Beck, Steve; Cheng, Patti F.; deVera, Vanessa J.; Hand, Jennifer; Macatangay, Ariel

    2010-01-01

    Scores of compounds are found in the International Space Station (ISS) atmospheric samples that are returned to the Johnson Space Center Toxicology Laboratory for analysis. Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations (SMACs) are set with the view that each compound is present as if there were no other compounds present. In order to apply SMACs to the interpretation of the analytical data, the toxicologist must employ some method of combining the potential effects of the aggregate of compounds found in the atmospheric samples. The simplest approach is to assume that each quantifiable compound has the potential for some effect in proportion to the applicable SMAC, and then add all the proportions. This simple paradigm disregards the fact that most compounds have potential to adversely affect only a few physiological systems, and their effects would be independent rather than additive. An improved approach to dealing with exposure to mixtures is to add the proportions only for compounds that adversely affect the same physiological system. For example, toxicants that cause respiratory irritation are separated from those that cause neurotoxicity or cardio-toxicity. Herein we analyze ISS air quality data according to toxicological groups with a view that this could be used for understanding any crew symptoms occurring at the time of the sample acquisition. In addition, this approach could be useful in post-flight longitudinal surveys where the flight surgeon may need to identify post-flight, follow-up medical studies because of on-orbit exposures that target specific physiological systems.

  9. International Space Station Air Quality Assessed According to Toxicologically-Grouped Compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.; Limero, Tom; DeVera, Vanessa; Cheng, Patti; Hand, Jennifer; Macatangay, Ariel; Beck, Steve

    2009-01-01

    Scores of compounds are found in the International Space Station (ISS) atmospheric samples that are returned to the Johnson Space Center Toxicology Laboratory for analysis. Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations (SMACs) are set with the view that each compound is present as if there were no other compounds present. In order to apply SMACs to the interpretation of the analytical data, the toxicologist must employ some method of combining the potential effects of the aggregate of compounds found in the atmospheric samples. The simplest approach is to assume that each quantifiable compound has the potential for some effect in proportion to the applicable SMAC, and then add all the proportions. This simple paradigm disregards the fact that most compounds have potential to adversely affect only a few physiological systems, and their effects would be independent rather than additive. An improved approach to dealing with exposure to mixtures is to add the proportions only for compounds that adversely affect the same physiological system. For example, toxicants that cause respiratory irritation are separated from those that cause neurotoxicity or cardio-toxicity. Herein we analyze ISS air quality data according to toxicological groups with a view that this could be used for understanding any crew symptoms occurring at the time of the sample. In addition, this approach could be useful in post-flight longitudinal surveys where the flight surgeon may need to identify post-flight, follow-up medical studies because of on-orbit exposures that target specific physiological systems.

  10. International Space Station Air Quality Assessed According to Toxicologically-Grouped Compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.; Limero, Tom; DeVera, Vanessa; Cheng, Patti; Hand, Jennifer; Macatangay, Ariel; Beck, Steve

    2009-01-01

    Scores of compounds are found in the International Space Station (ISS) atmospheric samples that are returned to the Johnson Space Center Toxicology Laboratory for analysis. Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations (SMACs) are set with the view that each compound is present as if there were no other compounds present. In order to apply SMACs to the interpretation of the analytical data, the toxicologist must employ some method of combining the potential effects of the aggregate of compounds found in the atmospheric samples. The simplest approach is to assume that each quantifiable compound has the potential for some effect in proportion to the applicable SMAC, and then add all the proportions. This simple paradigm disregards the fact that most compounds have potential to adversely affect only a few physiological systems, and their effects would be independent rather than additive. An improved approach to dealing with exposure to mixtures is to add the proportions only for compounds that adversely affect the same physiological system. For example, toxicants that cause respiratory irritation are separated from those that cause neurotoxicity or cardio-toxicity. Herein we analyze ISS air quality data according to toxicological groups with a view that this could be used for understanding any crew symptoms occurring at the time of the sample. In addition, this approach could be useful in post-flight longitudinal surveys where the flight surgeon may need to identify post-flight, follow-up medical studies because of on-orbit exposures that target specific physiological systems.

  11. Progression-free survival of early interim PET-positive patients with advanced stage Hodgkin's lymphoma treated with BEACOPPescalated alone or in combination with rituximab (HD18): an open-label, international, randomised phase 3 study by the German Hodgkin Study Group.

    PubMed

    Borchmann, Peter; Haverkamp, Heinz; Lohri, Andreas; Mey, Ulrich; Kreissl, Stefanie; Greil, Richard; Markova, Jana; Feuring-Buske, Michaela; Meissner, Julia; Dührsen, Ulrich; Ostermann, Helmut; Keller, Ulrich; Maschmeyer, Georg; Kuhnert, Georg; Dietlein, Markus; Kobe, Carsten; Eich, Hans; Baues, Christian; Stein, Harald; Fuchs, Michael; Diehl, Volker; Engert, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    Advanced stage Hodgkin's lymphoma represents a heterogeneous group of patients with different risk profiles. Data suggests that interim PET assessment during chemotherapy is superior to baseline international prognostic scoring in terms of predicting long-term treatment outcome in patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma. We therefore hypothesised that early interim PET-imaging after two courses of bleomycin, etoposide, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, procarbazine, and prednisone (BEACOPP) might be suitable for guiding treatment in patients with advanced stage Hodgkin's lymphoma. We aimed to assess whether intensifying standard chemotherapy (BEACOPPescalated) by adding rituximab would improve progression-free survival in patients with positive PET after two courses of chemotherapy. In this open-label, international, randomised, phase 3 study, we recruited patients aged 18-60 years with newly diagnosed, advanced stage Hodgkin's lymphoma from 160 hospitals and 77 private practices in Germany, Switzerland, Austria, the Netherlands, and the Czech Republic. Interim PET-imaging was done after two cycles of BEACOPPescalated and centrally assessed by an expert panel. Patients with a positive PET after 2 cycles of BEACOPPescalated chemotherapy (PET-2) were randomly assigned (1:1) to receive six additional courses of either BEACOPPescalated (BEACOPPescalated group) or BEACOPPescalated plus rituximab (R-BEACOPPescalated group). PET-2 was assessed using a 5-point scale with (18)FDG uptake higher than the mediastinal blood pool (corresponding to Deauville scale 3) defined as positive. BEACOPPescalated was given as previously described; rituximab was given intravenously at a dose of 375 mg/m(2) (maximum total dose 700 mg), the first administration starting 24 h before starting the fourth cycle of BEACOPPescalated (day 0 and day 3 in cycle 4, day 1 in cycles 5-8). Randomisation was done centrally and used the minimisation method including a random component, stratified

  12. Analysis of Adult Female Mouse (Mus musculus) Group Behavior on the International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomides, P.; Moyer, E. L.; Talyansky, Y.; Choi, S.; Gong, C.; Globus, R. K.; Ronca, A. E.

    2016-01-01

    As interest in long duration effects of space habitation increases, understanding the behavior of model organisms living within the habitats engineered to fly them is vital for designing, validating, and interpreting future spaceflight studies. A handful of papers have previously reported behavior of mice and rats in the weightless environment of space. The Rodent Research Hardware and Operations Validation (Rodent Research-1; RR1) utilized the Rodent Habitat (RH) developed at NASA Ames Research Center to fly mice on the ISS (International Space Station). Ten adult (16-week-old) female C57BL/6 mice were launched on September 21st, 2014 in an unmanned Dragon Capsule, and spent 37 days in microgravity. Here we report group behavioral phenotypes of the RR1 Flight (FLT) and environment-matched Ground Control (GC) mice in the Rodent Habitat (RH) during this long-duration flight. Video was recorded for 33 days on the ISS, permitting daily assessments of overall health and well-being of the mice, and providing a valuable repository for detailed behavioral analysis. We previously reported that, as compared to GC mice, RR1 FLT mice exhibited the same range of behaviors, including eating, drinking, exploration, self- and allo-grooming, and social interactions at similar or greater levels of occurrence. Overall activity was greater in FLT as compared to GC mice, with spontaneous ambulatory behavior, including organized 'circling' or 'race-tracking' behavior that emerged within the first few days of flight following a common developmental sequence, and comprised the primary dark cycle activity persisting throughout the remainder of the experiment. Participation by individual mice increased dramatically over the course of the flight. Here we present a detailed analysis of 'race-tracking' behavior in which we quantified: (1) Complete lap rotations by individual mice; (2) Numbers of collisions between circling mice; (3) Lap directionality; and (4) Recruitment of mice into a group

  13. Toy Libraries and Lekotek in an International Perspective. Handicap Research Group Report No. 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bjorck-Akesson, Eva; Brodin, Jane

    This study surveyed knowledgeable persons in 37 countries in order to describe, from an international perspective, toy libraries and lekoteks serving children with disabilities. The study showed that there are more than 4,500 toy libraries or lekoteks in 31 countries, with preliminary planning activities taking place in still more countries. Three…

  14. 75 FR 59049 - International Education Programs Service; Fulbright-Hays Group Projects Abroad Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-24

    ... Kindergarten-grade 12 (K-12) level with skills in a second language and knowledge of other cultures around the... courses in foreign languages and international area studies as part of a teacher education curriculum... second priority supports projects that will help increase the study abroad opportunities for in-service...

  15. How Do Internal and External CSR Affect Employees' Organizational Identification? A Perspective from the Group Engagement Model.

    PubMed

    Hameed, Imran; Riaz, Zahid; Arain, Ghulam A; Farooq, Omer

    2016-01-01

    The literature examines the impact of firms' corporate social responsibility (CSR) activities on employees' organizational identification without considering that such activities tend to have different targets. This study explores how perceived external CSR (efforts directed toward external stakeholders) and perceived internal CSR (efforts directed toward employees) activities influence employees' organizational identification. In so doing, it examines the alternative underlying mechanisms through which perceived external and internal CSR activities build employees' identification. Applying the taxonomy prescribed by the group engagement model, the study argues that the effects of perceived external and internal CSR flow through two competing mechanisms: perceived external prestige and perceived internal respect, respectively. Further, it is suggested that calling orientation (how employees see their work contributions) moderates the effects induced by these alternative forms of CSR. The model draws on survey data collected from a sample of 414 employees across five large multinationals in Pakistan. The results obtained using structural equation modeling support these hypotheses, reinforcing the notion that internal and external CSR operate through different mediating mechanisms and more interestingly employees' calling orientation moderates these relationships to a significant degree. Theoretical contributions and practical implications of results are discussed in detail.

  16. How Do Internal and External CSR Affect Employees' Organizational Identification? A Perspective from the Group Engagement Model

    PubMed Central

    Hameed, Imran; Riaz, Zahid; Arain, Ghulam A.; Farooq, Omer

    2016-01-01

    The literature examines the impact of firms' corporate social responsibility (CSR) activities on employees' organizational identification without considering that such activities tend to have different targets. This study explores how perceived external CSR (efforts directed toward external stakeholders) and perceived internal CSR (efforts directed toward employees) activities influence employees' organizational identification. In so doing, it examines the alternative underlying mechanisms through which perceived external and internal CSR activities build employees' identification. Applying the taxonomy prescribed by the group engagement model, the study argues that the effects of perceived external and internal CSR flow through two competing mechanisms: perceived external prestige and perceived internal respect, respectively. Further, it is suggested that calling orientation (how employees see their work contributions) moderates the effects induced by these alternative forms of CSR. The model draws on survey data collected from a sample of 414 employees across five large multinationals in Pakistan. The results obtained using structural equation modeling support these hypotheses, reinforcing the notion that internal and external CSR operate through different mediating mechanisms and more interestingly employees' calling orientation moderates these relationships to a significant degree. Theoretical contributions and practical implications of results are discussed in detail. PMID:27303345

  17. Reports and recommendations from COSPAR Planetary Exploration Committee (PEX) & International Lunar Exploration Working Group (ILEWG)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Foing, Bernard

    2014-05-01

    In response to the growing importance of space exploration, the objectives of the COSPAR Panel on Exploration (PEX) are to provide high quality, independent science input to support the development of a global space exploration program while working to safeguard the scientific assets of solar system bodies. PEX engages with COSPAR Commissions and Panels, science foundations, IAA, IAF, UN bodies, and IISL to support in particular national and international space exploration working groups and the new era of planetary exploration. COSPAR's input, as gathered by PEX, is intended to express the consensus view of the international scientific community and should ultimately provide a series of guidelines to support future space exploration activities and cooperative efforts, leading to outstanding scientific discoveries, opportunities for innovation, strategic partnerships, technology progression, and inspiration for people of all ages and cultures worldwide. We shall focus on the lunar exploration aspects, where the COSPAR PEX is building on previous COSPAR, ILEWG and community conferences. An updated COSPAR PEX report is published and available online (Ehrenfreund P. et al, COSPAR planetary exploration panel report, http://www.gwu.edu/~spi/assets/COSPAR_PEX2012.pdf). We celebrate 20 years after the 1st International Conference on Exploration and Utilisation of the Moon at Beatenberg in June 1994. The International Lunar Exploration Working Group (ILEWG) was established the year after in April 1995 at an EGS meeting in Hamburg, Germany. As established in its charter, this working group reports to COSPAR and is charged with developing an international strategy for the exploration of the Moon (http://sci.esa.int/ilewg/ ). It discusses coordination between missions, and a road map for future international lunar exploration and utilisation. It fosters information exchange or potential and real future lunar robotic and human missions, as well as for new scientific and

  18. A Comparative Study of Family Bereavement Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopmeyer, Estelle; Werk, Annette

    1994-01-01

    Examined five bereavement support groups, three of which focused on widows, family survivors of suicide, and family survivors of death of family member by cancer. Members of three groups tended to report strong satisfaction with group experience. Reasons for joining group and most valuable aspects of group experience varied as function of group…

  19. Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group = Groupe Canadien d'etude en didactique des mathematiques. Proceedings of the 1994 Annual Meeting (Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada, June 3-7, 1994).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quigley, Martyn, Ed.

    These proceedings contain papers from the 1994 annual meeting of the Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group. Papers are divided into the following sections: (1) invited lectures; (2) working groups; (3) topic groups; (4) ad hoc groups; and (5) reports on ICMI (International Committee on Mathematical Instruction) studies. Papers include: (1)…

  20. Professional Development in International Schools; Issues of Inclusion Identified by a Group of International School Teaching Assistants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarry, Estelle; Cox, Anna

    2014-01-01

    With the growth in numbers of teaching assistants (TAs) in the UK, it has been identified through research carried out on behalf of the Council of British International Schools (COBIS) research that TAs in British international schools have specific and unmet training needs. Following the development of a course for TAs in international contexts,…

  1. Professional Development in International Schools; Issues of Inclusion Identified by a Group of International School Teaching Assistants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarry, Estelle; Cox, Anna

    2014-01-01

    With the growth in numbers of teaching assistants (TAs) in the UK, it has been identified through research carried out on behalf of the Council of British International Schools (COBIS) research that TAs in British international schools have specific and unmet training needs. Following the development of a course for TAs in international contexts,…

  2. Computer calculation of the Van Vleck second moment for materials with internal rotation of spin groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goc, Roman

    2004-09-01

    This paper describes m2rc3, a program that calculates Van Vleck second moments for solids with internal rotation of molecules, ions or their structural parts. Only rotations about C 3 axes of symmetry are allowed, but up to 15 axes of rotation per crystallographic unit cell are permitted. The program is very useful in interpreting NMR measurements in solids. Program summaryTitle of the program: m2rc3 Catalogue number: ADUC Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADUC Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland License provisions: none Computers: Cray SV1, Cray T3E-900, PCs Installation: Poznań Supercomputing and Networking Center ( http://www.man.poznan.pl/pcss/public/main/index.html) and Faculty of Physics, A. Mickiewicz University, Poznań, Poland ( http://www.amu.edu.pl/welcome.html.en) Operating system under which program has been tested: UNICOS ver. 10.0.0.6 on Cray SV1; UNICOS/mk on Cray T3E-900; Windows98 and Windows XP on PCs. Programming language: FORTRAN 90 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 757 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 9730 Distribution format: tar.gz Nature of physical problem: The NMR second moment reflects the strength of the nuclear magnetic dipole-dipole interaction in solids. This value can be extracted from the appropriate experiment and can be calculated on the basis of Van Vleck formula. The internal rotation of molecules or their parts averages this interaction decreasing the measured value of the NMR second moment. The analysis of the internal dynamics based on the NMR second moment measurements is as follows. The second moment is measured at different temperatures. On the other hand it is also calculated for different models and frequencies of this motion. Comparison of experimental and calculated values permits the building of the most probable model of internal dynamics in the studied material. The program described

  3. Global standard for the composition of infant formula: recommendations of an ESPGHAN coordinated international expert group.

    PubMed

    Koletzko, Berthold; Baker, Susan; Cleghorn, Geoff; Neto, Ulysses Fagundes; Gopalan, Sarath; Hernell, Olle; Hock, Quak Seng; Jirapinyo, Pipop; Lonnerdal, Bo; Pencharz, Paul; Pzyrembel, Hildegard; Ramirez-Mayans, Jaime; Shamir, Raanan; Turck, Dominique; Yamashiro, Yuichiro; Zong-Yi, Ding

    2005-11-01

    The Codex Alimentarius Commission of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and the World Health Organization (WHO) develops food standards, guidelines and related texts for protecting consumer health and ensuring fair trade practices globally. The major part of the world's population lives in more than 160 countries that are members of the Codex Alimentarius. The Codex Standard on Infant Formula was adopted in 1981 based on scientific knowledge available in the 1970s and is currently being revised. As part of this process, the Codex Committee on Nutrition and Foods for Special Dietary Uses asked the ESPGHAN Committee on Nutrition to initiate a consultation process with the international scientific community to provide a proposal on nutrient levels in infant formulae, based on scientific analysis and taking into account existing scientific reports on the subject. ESPGHAN accepted the request and, in collaboration with its sister societies in the Federation of International Societies on Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, invited highly qualified experts in the area of infant nutrition to form an International Expert Group (IEG) to review the issues raised. The group arrived at recommendations on the compositional requirements for a global infant formula standard which are reported here.

  4. Outcomes after HLA-matched sibling transplantation or chemotherapy in children with B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia in a second remission: a collaborative study of the Children's Oncology Group and the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research

    PubMed Central

    Eapen, Mary; Raetz, Elizabeth; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Muehlenbein, Catherine; Devidas, Meenakshi; Abshire, Thomas; Billett, Amy; Homans, Alan; Camitta, Bruce; Carroll, William L.; Davies, Stella M.

    2006-01-01

    The best treatment approach for children with B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in second clinical remission (CR) after a marrow relapse is controversial. To address this question, we compared outcomes in 188 patients enrolled in chemotherapy trials and 186 HLA-matched sibling transplants, treated between 1991 and 1997. Groups were similar except that chemotherapy recipients were younger (median age, 5 versus 8 years) and less likely to have combined marrow and extramedullary relapse (19% versus 30%). To adjust for time-to-transplant bias, treatment outcomes were compared using left-truncated Cox regression models. The relative efficacy of chemotherapy and transplantation depended on time from diagnosis to first relapse and the transplant conditioning regimen used. For children with early first relapse (< 36 months), risk of a second relapse was significantly lower after total body irradiation (TBI)–containing transplant regimens (relative risk [RR], 0.49; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.33-0.71, P < .001) than chemotherapy regimens. In contrast, for children with a late first relapse (≥ 36 months), risks of second relapse were similar after TBI-containing regimens and chemotherapy (RR, 0.92; 95% CI, 0.49-1.70, P = .78). These data support HLA-matched sibling donor transplantation using a TBI-containing regimen in second CR for children with ALL and early relapse. PMID:16493003

  5. A Global Study of International Teacher Recruitment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Dale S.

    2012-01-01

    International teacher recruiting is a complex, high stakes process that is crucial to schools' success. Competition for teachers is intensifying as the number of international schools increases globally. The number of international schools has more than doubled in recent years. With candidates and schools scattered throughout the world,…

  6. Human Factor Studies on a Mars Analogue During Crew 100b International Lunar Exploration Working Group EuroMoonMars Crew: Proposed New Approaches for Future Human Space and Interplanetary Missions

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Balwant; Kaur, Jasdeep

    2012-01-01

    Knowing the risks, costs, and complexities associated with human missions to Mars, analogue research can be a great (low-risk) tool for exploring the challenges associated with the preparation for living, operating, and undertaking research in interplanetary missions. Short-duration analogue studies, such as those being accomplished at the Mars Desert Research Station (MDRS), offer the chance to study mission operations and human factors in a simulated environment, and therefore contribute to exploration of the Moon and Mars in planned future missions. This article is based upon previously published articles, abstracts, and presentations by a series of independent authors, human factor studies performed on mars analogue station by Crew 100B. The MDRS Crew 100B performed studies over 15 days providing a unique insight into human factor issues in simulated short-duration Mars mission. In this study, 15 human factors were evaluated and analyzed by subjective and objective means, and from the summary of results it was concluded that optimum health of an individual and the crew as a whole is a necessity in order to encourage and maintain high performance and the satisfaction of project goals. PMID:23181225

  7. Human Factor Studies on a Mars Analogue During Crew 100b International Lunar Exploration Working Group EuroMoonMars Crew: Proposed New Approaches for Future Human Space and Interplanetary Missions.

    PubMed

    Rai, Balwant; Kaur, Jasdeep

    2012-11-01

    Knowing the risks, costs, and complexities associated with human missions to Mars, analogue research can be a great (low-risk) tool for exploring the challenges associated with the preparation for living, operating, and undertaking research in interplanetary missions. Short-duration analogue studies, such as those being accomplished at the Mars Desert Research Station (MDRS), offer the chance to study mission operations and human factors in a simulated environment, and therefore contribute to exploration of the Moon and Mars in planned future missions. This article is based upon previously published articles, abstracts, and presentations by a series of independent authors, human factor studies performed on mars analogue station by Crew 100B. The MDRS Crew 100B performed studies over 15 days providing a unique insight into human factor issues in simulated short-duration Mars mission. In this study, 15 human factors were evaluated and analyzed by subjective and objective means, and from the summary of results it was concluded that optimum health of an individual and the crew as a whole is a necessity in order to encourage and maintain high performance and the satisfaction of project goals.

  8. An Exploratory Study on International Students' Study Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khoshlessan, Rezvan; El-Houbi, Ashraf

    2015-01-01

    This study examines international students' study anxiety in a mid-sized university in Southeast Texas comparing their existing study anxiety along lines of nationality, gender, age, major, degree, and stage of education. It focuses on the students' perceptions and the dominant goal of this research was to investigate whether there is a…

  9. Whom to Group with--A Bourdieusian Narrative Analysis of International Students in an Australian University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Isadora Jung-Hsiu

    2012-01-01

    Increasing degree-seeking international students from affluent Asian countries, who use English as an additional language (EAL), have contributed to cultural and linguistic diversity in Australian universities. However, such diversity posed challenges in pedagogy and assessment. Drawn from a larger interview study, exploring what resources helped…

  10. STUDIES ON THE HEMOPHILUS GROUP OF ORGANISMS

    PubMed Central

    Gilder, H.; Granick, S.

    1947-01-01

    The porphin requirements of the Hemophilus organisms have been studied. Organisms of the parainfluenzae group show quantitative differences in their ability to synthesize heme. The ability of the parainfluenzae organisms to grow appears to depend on the rate with which they synthesize heme and in part at least on the properties of the medium to protect the heme from peroxidative breakdown. Quantitative studies of the growth of H. influenzae Turner on various iron porphins have been made. Iron protoporphin gives greatest growth when supplied in excess, although iron mesoporphin appears more efficient at lower concentrations. Iron deutero- and iron hematoporphin are much less effective. This suggests that although the vinyl groups are not essential for growth of the Turner organism they may be required for some particular enzymes which aid in attaining maximum growth. A number of substances potentiate the growth-promoting properties of iron porphins. These substances include reducing agents and agents which destroy H2O2. E. influenzae Turner appears to require heme for anaerobic as well as aerobic growth. The possibility of an essential heme enzyme functioning under anaerobic conditions must therefore be considered. PMID:18896933

  11. 77 FR 36031 - ROK Entertainment Group, Inc., RussOil Corp., Tricell, Inc., Tunex International, Inc. (n/k/a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION ROK Entertainment Group, Inc., RussOil Corp., Tricell, Inc., Tunex International, Inc. (n/k/a Aone Dental International Group, Inc.), and Wireless Age Communications, Inc.; Order of Suspension of Trading June 13, 2012. It appears to the...

  12. Sector-Wide Approaches in Education: Issues for Donor Agencies Arising from Case Studies of Zambia and Mozambique. A Report from the Meeting of the International Working Group on Education (IWGE) (Lisbon, Portugal, November 19-21, 2001).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riddell, Abby

    This book contains two case studies--one from Zambia, one from Mozambique--of the implications for donors of pursuing sector-wide approaches (SWAps) in education. (A sector-wide approach is characterized as a sustained partnership led by national authorities involving different arms of government and, where relevant, donor agencies, with the goals…

  13. Environmental studies group. Annual report for 1978

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, D. C.; Hurley, J. D.

    1980-08-21

    Group projects included radioecological studies of aquatic and terrestrial systems, land management activities, foodstuff monitoring, dust transport studies including fugitive dust measurements and modeling, and several support programs involving evaluation of the plant's ambient air samplers and airborne tritium monitoring techniques. Some salient results from the several project reports include determination of an appropriate model for mechanically generated fugitive dust dispersion, a radionuclide inventory of Smart Ditch Pond (Pond D-1), a coefficient of community determination for two terrestrial sample plots on the plant site buffer zone, a natality and mortality rate determination for fawns in the plant deer herd (including one positive coyote-kill determination), inlet loss and filter paper collection efficiencies for the plant ambient air samplers, and differential tritium sampling measurements of the vapor in Building 771 stack effluent.

  14. A Canadian Critical Care Trials Group project in collaboration with the international forum for acute care trialists - Collaborative H1N1 Adjuvant Treatment pilot trial (CHAT): study protocol and design of a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Swine origin influenza A/H1N1 infection (H1N1) emerged in early 2009 and rapidly spread to humans. For most infected individuals, symptoms were mild and self-limited; however, a small number developed a more severe clinical syndrome characterized by profound respiratory failure with hospital mortality ranging from 10 to 30%. While supportive care and neuraminidase inhibitors are the main treatment for influenza, data from observational and interventional studies suggest that the course of influenza can be favorably influenced by agents not classically considered as influenza treatments. Multiple observational studies have suggested that HMGCoA reductase inhibitors (statins) can exert a class effect in attenuating inflammation. The Collaborative H1N1 Adjuvant Treatment (CHAT) Pilot Trial sought to investigate the feasibility of conducting a trial during a global pandemic in critically ill patients with H1N1 with the goal of informing the design of a larger trial powered to determine impact of statins on important outcomes. Methods/Design A multi-national, pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT) of once daily enteral rosuvastatin versus matched placebo administered for 14 days for the treatment of critically ill patients with suspected, probable or confirmed H1N1 infection. We propose to randomize 80 critically ill adults with a moderate to high index of suspicion for H1N1 infection who require mechanical ventilation and have received antiviral therapy for ≤ 72 hours. Site investigators, research coordinators and clinical pharmacists will be blinded to treatment assignment. Only research pharmacy staff will be aware of treatment assignment. We propose several approaches to informed consent including a priori consent from the substitute decision maker (SDM), waived and deferred consent. The primary outcome of the CHAT trial is the proportion of eligible patients enrolled in the study. Secondary outcomes will evaluate adherence to medication administration

  15. IGORR-IV -- Proceedings of the fourth meeting of the International Group on Research Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenbalm, K.F.

    1995-12-31

    The International Group on Research Reactors was formed to facilitate the sharing of knowledge and experience among those institutions and individuals who are actively working to design, build, and promote new research reactors or to make significant upgrades to existing facilities. Twenty-nine papers were presented in five sessions and written versions of the papers or hard copies of the vugraphs used are published in these proceedings. The five sessions were: (1) Operating Research Reactors and Facility Upgrades; (2) Research Reactors in Design and Construction; (3) ANS Closeout Activities; (4) and (5) Research, Development, and Analysis Results.

  16. [International reporting of adverse drug reactions. Final report of CIOMS ADR Working Group].

    PubMed

    Royer, R J; Benichou, C

    1991-01-01

    Under the auspices of the Council for International Organizations of Medical Sciences, a working group composed of representatives of seven multinational pharmaceutical manufacturers and six regulatory authorities developed and implemented a standardized method for reporting post-approval adverse drug reactions (ADR). The method is based on a set of uniform definitions and procedures and a single reporting form, and has been demonstrated to be feasible and effective. Regulators and manufacturers, in establishing requirements and systems for reporting of adverse drug reactions, should consider adopting this method.

  17. International Pediatric Otolaryngology Group (IPOG) consensus recommendations: Hearing loss in the pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Liming, Bryan J; Carter, John; Cheng, Alan; Choo, Daniel; Curotta, John; Carvalho, Daniela; Germiller, John A; Hone, Stephen; Kenna, Margaret A; Loundon, Natalie; Preciado, Diego; Schilder, Anne; Reilly, Brian J; Roman, Stephane; Strychowsky, Julie; Triglia, Jean-Michel; Young, Nancy; Smith, Richard J H

    2016-11-01

    To provide recommendations for the workup of hearing loss in the pediatric patient. Expert opinion by the members of the International Pediatric Otolaryngology Group. Consensus recommendations include initial screening and diagnosis as well as the workup of sensorineural, conductive and mixed hearing loss in children. The consensus statement discusses the role of genetic testing and imaging and provides algorithms to guide the workup of children with hearing loss. The workup of children with hearing loss can be guided by the recommendations provided herein. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  18. Leading a Successful International Sports Tour. Handbook for Leaders, Coaches and Managers of American Sports Groups and Teams Participating in International Athletic Exchanges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of State, Washington, DC.

    This is a handbook for leaders, coaches, and managers of American sports groups and teams participating in international athletic exchanges. Chapter one presents information on financing international sports tours. Chapter two covers the basic preparations necessary prior to going abroad. It includes information on tickets, passports, visas,…

  19. Diversity and strength of internal outward-oriented promoters in group IIC-attC introns

    PubMed Central

    Léon, Grégory; Quiroga, Cecilia; Centrón, Daniela; Roy, Paul H.

    2010-01-01

    Integrons are genetic elements that incorporate mobile gene cassettes by site-specific recombination and express them as an operon from a promoter (Pc) located upstream of the cassette insertion site. Most gene cassettes found in integrons contain only one gene followed by an attC recombination site. We have recently shown that a specific lineage of group IIC introns, named group IIC-attC introns, inserts into the bottom strand sequence of attC sites. Here, we show that S.ma.I2, a group IIC-attC intron inserted in an integron cassette array of Serratia marcescens, impedes transcription from Pc while allowing expression of the following antibiotic resistance cassette using an internal outward-oriented promoter (Pout). Bioinformatic analyses indicate that one or two putative Pout, which have sequence similarities with the Escherichia coli consensus promoters, are conserved in most group IIC-attC intron sequences. We show that Pout with different versions of the −35 and −10 sequences are functionally active in expressing a promoterless chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (cat) reporter gene in E. coli. Pout in group IIC-attC introns may therefore play a role in the expression of one or more gene cassettes whose transcription from Pc would otherwise be impeded by insertion of the intron. PMID:20716518

  20. Multicultural Influences on Group Learning: A Qualitative Higher Education Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweeney, Arthur; Weaven, Scott; Herington, Carmel

    2008-01-01

    Although the literature examining the usefulness of group projects is extensive, the link between cooperative learning, group performance and skills transfer in multicultural contexts remains unclear. Focus groups were conducted with a sample of 107 international and domestic postgraduate and undergraduate marketing students to investigate this…

  1. Multicultural Influences on Group Learning: A Qualitative Higher Education Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweeney, Arthur; Weaven, Scott; Herington, Carmel

    2008-01-01

    Although the literature examining the usefulness of group projects is extensive, the link between cooperative learning, group performance and skills transfer in multicultural contexts remains unclear. Focus groups were conducted with a sample of 107 international and domestic postgraduate and undergraduate marketing students to investigate this…

  2. Bayesian Model Selection for Group Studies

    PubMed Central

    Stephan, Klaas Enno; Penny, Will D.; Daunizeau, Jean; Moran, Rosalyn J.; Friston, Karl J.

    2009-01-01

    approaches in the presence of outliers. We expect that this new random effects method will prove useful for a wide range of group studies, not only in the context of DCM, but also for other modelling endeavours, e.g. comparing different source reconstruction methods for EEG/MEG or selecting among competing computational models of learning and decision-making. PMID:19306932

  3. Beyond Group-Threat: Temporal Dynamics of International Migration and Linkages to Anti-Foreigner Sentiment

    PubMed Central

    DeWaard, Jack

    2014-01-01

    Prior research on the association between country-level patterns of international migration and anti-foreigner sentiment shows that larger foreign-born concentrations increase perceptions of threat among native-born individuals in receiving countries, which, in turn, give rise to exclusionary preferences. While recent work has assembled a list of limiting conditions that shape the strength of this association, I argue that these efforts are premature because they are based on a narrow way of conceptualising and measuring international migration. In contrast to concepts and measures privileging the size of the foreign-born population in receiving countries, I draw from other literatures highlighting the temporal dynamics of migration. In considering the role of the temporal dynamics of international migration in explaining variation in anti-foreigner sentiment, the question is whether and how the temporal stability of the foreign-born population in receiving countries matters. My results suggest that it does. The size and temporal stability of the foreign-born population play opposing roles in aggravating and ameliorating anti-foreigner sentiment, respectively, with each operating via different pathways at the individual level. My work thus breaks new ground by challenging existing theoretical constructs and operationalisations in the group-threat literature. PMID:26146481

  4. Acute Exacerbation of Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis. An International Working Group Report.

    PubMed

    Collard, Harold R; Ryerson, Christopher J; Corte, Tamera J; Jenkins, Gisli; Kondoh, Yasuhiro; Lederer, David J; Lee, Joyce S; Maher, Toby M; Wells, Athol U; Antoniou, Katerina M; Behr, Juergen; Brown, Kevin K; Cottin, Vincent; Flaherty, Kevin R; Fukuoka, Junya; Hansell, David M; Johkoh, Takeshi; Kaminski, Naftali; Kim, Dong Soon; Kolb, Martin; Lynch, David A; Myers, Jeffrey L; Raghu, Ganesh; Richeldi, Luca; Taniguchi, Hiroyuki; Martinez, Fernando J

    2016-08-01

    Acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis has been defined as an acute, clinically significant, respiratory deterioration of unidentifiable cause. The objective of this international working group report on acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis was to provide a comprehensive update on the topic. A literature review was conducted to identify all relevant English text publications and abstracts. Evidence-based updates on the epidemiology, etiology, risk factors, prognosis, and management of acute exacerbations of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis are provided. Finally, to better reflect the current state of knowledge and improve the feasibility of future research into its etiology and treatment, the working group proposes a new conceptual framework for acute respiratory deterioration in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and a revised definition and diagnostic criteria for acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

  5. Factors Associated with Lack of Viral Suppression at Delivery among HAART-Naïve HIV-Positive Women in the International Maternal Pediatric Adolescent AIDS Clinical Trials Group (IMPAACT) P1025 Study

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Ingrid T.; Leister, Erin; Kacanek, Deborah; Hughes, Michael D.; Bardeguez, Arlene; Livingston, Elizabeth; Stek, Alice; Shapiro, David E.; Tuomala, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    Background High delivery maternal plasma HIV-1 RNA level (viral load, VL) is a risk factor for mother to child transmission and poor maternal health. Objective To identify factors associated with detectable VL at delivery despite initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) during pregnancy. Design Multicenter observational study. Setting 67 US AIDS clinical research sites. Patients HIV-1-positive pregnant women who initiated HAART during pregnancy. Measurements Descriptive summaries and associations between socio-demographic, HIV disease, treatment and pregnancy-related risk factors and detectable VL (>400copies/mL) at delivery. Results Between October 2002 and December 2011, 671 women met inclusion criteria and 13% had detectable VL at delivery. Factors associated with detectable VL included multiparity (16.4% vs 8% nulliparous, p=0.002), black non-Hispanic ethnicity (17.6% vs 6.6% Hispanic and 6.6% white/non-Hispanic, p<0.001), 11th grade or less education (17.6% vs.12.1% high school graduate and 6.7% some college or higher, p=0.013), and initiation of HAART in third trimester (23.9% vs 12.3% second and 8.6% first, p=0.002), timing of HIV diagnosis prior to current pregnancy (16.1% vs 11% during current pregnancy, p=0.051), and timing of first prenatal visit in 3rd trimester (33.3% vs 14.3% second and 10.5% first, p=0.002). Women who experienced treatment interruptions or reported poor medication adherence during pregnancy were more likely to have detectable VL at delivery than women with no interruptions or who reported better adherence. Limitations Women entered the study at varying times during pregnancy and for this and other reasons there was incomplete data on many covariates. Conclusions In this large U.S.-based cohort of HIV-1 positive women, 13% of women who initiated HAART during pregnancy had detectable VL at delivery. The timing of HAART initiation and prenatal care along with medication adherence during pregnancy appear to be

  6. Extrahepatic manifestations associated with hepatitis C virus infection. A prospective multicenter study of 321 patients. The GERMIVIC. Groupe d'Etude et de Recherche en Medecine Interne et Maladies Infectieuses sur le Virus de l'Hepatite C.

    PubMed

    Cacoub, P; Renou, C; Rosenthal, E; Cohen, P; Loury, I; Loustaud-Ratti, V; Yamamoto, A M; Camproux, A C; Hausfater, P; Musset, L; Veyssier, P; Raguin, G; Piette, J C

    2000-01-01

    From January 1996 to January 1997, 321 patients with an average age of 46 +/- 16 years and chronically infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) were prospectively enrolled in a study designed to determine the prevalence of extrahepatic manifestations associated with HCV infection in a large cohort of HCV patients, to identify associations between clinical and biologic manifestations, and to compare the results obtained in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive versus HIV-negative subsets. In a cross-sectional study, clinical extrahepatic manifestations, viral coinfections with HIV and/or hepatitis B virus, connective tissue diseases, and a wide panel of autoantibodies were assessed. Thirty-eight percent (122/321) of patients presented at least 1 clinical extrahepatic manifestation including arthralgia (60/321, 19%), skin manifestations (55/321, 17%), xerostomia (40/321, 12%), xerophthalmia (32/321, 10%), and sensory neuropathy (28/321, 9%). Main biologic abnormalities were mixed cryoglobulins (110/196, 56%), thrombocytopenia (50/291, 17%), and the presence of the following autoantibodies: antinuclear (123/302, 41%), rheumatoid factor (107/280, 38%), anticardiolipin (79/298, 27%), antithyroglobulin (36/287, 13%) and antismooth muscle cell (27/288, 9%). At least 1 autoantibody was present in 210/302 (70%) of sera. By multivariate logistic regression analysis, 4 parameters were significantly associated with cryoglobulin positivity: systemic vasculitis (p = 0.01, odds ratio OR[ = 17.3), HIV positivity (p = 0.0006, OR = 10.2), rheumatoid factor positivity (p = 0.01, OR = 2.8), and sicca syndrome (p = 0.03, OR = 0.27). A definite connective tissue disease was noted in 44 patients (14%), mainly symptomatic mixed cryoglobulinemia and systemic vasculitis, HIV coinfection (23%) was associated with 3 parameters: anticardiolipin (p = 0.003, OR = 4.18), thrombocytopenia (p = 0.01, OR = 3.56), and arthralgia or myalgia (p = 0.017, OR = 0.23). HIV-positive patients presented

  7. The effect of endocrine responsiveness on high-risk breast cancer treated with dose-intensive chemotherapy: results of International Breast Cancer Study Group Trial 15-95 after prolonged follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Colleoni, M.; Sun, Z.; Martinelli, G.; Basser, R. L.; Coates, A. S.; Gelber, R. D.; Green, M. D.; Peccatori, F.; Cinieri, S.; Aebi, S.; Viale, G.; Price, K. N.; Goldhirsch, A.

    2009-01-01

    Background: The role of adjuvant dose-intensive chemotherapy and its efficacy according to baseline features has not yet been established. Patients and methods: Three hundred and forty-four patients were randomized to receive seven courses of standard-dose chemotherapy (SD-CT) or three cycles of dose-intensive epirubicin and cyclophosphamide (epirubicin 200 mg/m2 plus cyclophosphamide 4 mg/m2 with filgrastim and progenitor cell support). All patients were assigned tamoxifen at the completion of chemotherapy. The primary end point was disease-free survival (DFS). This paper updates the results and explores patterns of recurrence according to predicting baseline features. Results: At 8.3-years median follow-up, patients assigned DI-EC had a significantly better DFS compared with those assigned SD-CT [8-year DFS percent 47% and 37%, respectively, hazard ratio (HR) 0.76; 95% confidence interval 0.58–1.00; P = 0.05]. Only patients with estrogen receptor (ER)-positive disease benefited from the DI-EC (HR 0.61; 95% confidence interval 0.39, 0.95; P = 0.03). Conclusions: After prolonged follow-up, DI-EC significantly improved DFS, but the effect was observed only in patients with ER-positive disease, leading to the hypothesis that efficacy of DI-EC may relate to its endocrine effects. Further studies designed to confirm the importance of endocrine responsiveness in patients treated with dose-intensive chemotherapy are encouraged. PMID:19468030

  8. World disparities in risk definition and management of retinoblastoma: a report from the International Retinoblastoma Staging Working Group.

    PubMed

    Chantada, Guillermo L; Doz, François; Orjuela, Manuela; Qaddoumi, Ibrahim; Sitorus, Rita S; Kepak, Tomas; Furmanchuk, Anna; Castellanos, Mauricio; Sharma, Tarun; Chevez-Barrios, Patricia; Rodriguez-Galindo, Carlos

    2008-03-01

    Following from the publication of the International Retinoblastoma Staging System, an open internet discussion group was created at the www.cure4kids.org resource. The results of a survey distributed among participants are discussed. Although most patients with retinoblastoma were treated under prospective protocols, there was a wide variation in the definition of risk criteria and in the criteria for giving adjuvant chemotherapy following enucleation. Definition of high-risk histological features and the criteria for use of adjuvant therapy will be standardized in future studies. Internet meetings are a valuable mechanism for enabling participation from under-resourced countries in the development of cooperative studies.

  9. IGORR-1: Proceedings of the first meeting of the international group on research reactors

    SciTech Connect

    West, C.D.

    1990-05-01

    Many organizations, in several countries, are planning or implementing new or upgraded research reactor projects, but there has been no organized forum devoted entirely to discussion and exchange of information in this field. Over the past year or so, informal discussions resulted in widespread agreement that such a forum would serve a useful purpose. Accordingly, a proposal to form a group was submitted to the leading organizations known to be involved in projects to build or upgrade reactor facilities. Essentially all agreed to join in the formation of the International Group on Research Reactors (IGORR) and nominated a senior staff member to serve on its international organizing committee. The first IGORR meeting took place on February 28--March 2, 1990. It was very successful and well attended; some 52 scientists and engineers from 25 organizations in 10 countries participated in 2-1/2 days of open and informative presentations and discussions. Two workshop sessions offered opportunities for more detailed interaction among participants and resulted in identification of common R D needs, sources of data, and planned new facilities. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  10. Internal medicine interns' and residents' pressure ulcer prevention and assessment attitudes and abilities: results of an exploratory study .

    PubMed

    Suen, Winnie; Parker, Victoria A; Harney, Lauren; Nevin, Siobhan; Jansen, Jane; Alexander, Linda; Berlowitz, Dan

    2012-04-01

     To evaluate and determine differences between attitudes of internal medicine interns and residents toward pressure ulcer (PU) prevention and to evaluate the interns' abilities to accurately identify wounds and stage PUs, an exploratory, quantitative study was conducted in a 639-bed, safety net academic center. Participants (21 internal medicine interns and 21 internal medicine residents) attending an educational session on PU prevention and care were eligible to participate. The 1-hour conference session was prepared and provided by a physician and wound care nurses. Before the lecture, participants were asked to complete an 11-question paper-and-pencil PU attitude survey. Following the lecture, they were asked to identify 11 wounds and stage PUs using the inpatient admission history and physical template used in the hospital's electronic medical record. An audience response system was used to record correct and incorrect responses. Nineteen (19) interns and 20 residents completed the survey. Twenty-one (21) interns successfully completed the wound assessment quiz. Descriptive statistics were used to examine the survey data and residents' and interns' average attitude scores were compared using independent group t-test. The results suggest that interns and residents have a positive attitude toward and are concerned about PU prevention. The significantly higher overall score among interns compared to residents (average 43.8 versus 38.8 respectively, P = 0.002) suggests interns have a more positive attitude than residents. Statistically significant differences between item scores showed that, compared to residents, interns perceived PU prevention to be more time-consuming (P = 0.01), less of a concern in practice (P = 0.02), and a lower priority than other areas of care (P = 0.003). Compared to residents, interns also were more likely to agree to with statement, "In my opinion, patients tend to not get as many pressure

  11. International Cultural Immersion: Assessing the Influence of a Group Intervention on Intercultural Sensitivity for Counselor Trainees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barden, Sejal M.; Shannonhouse, Laura; Mobley, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Scholars (e.g., Bemak & Chung, 2004) underscore the need for group workers to be culturally sensitive. One group training strategy, cultural immersion, is often employed to develop cultural sensitivity. However, no studies have utilized quasi-experimental methodologies to assess differences in cultural sensitivity between trainees that immerse…

  12. International Cultural Immersion: Assessing the Influence of a Group Intervention on Intercultural Sensitivity for Counselor Trainees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barden, Sejal M.; Shannonhouse, Laura; Mobley, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Scholars (e.g., Bemak & Chung, 2004) underscore the need for group workers to be culturally sensitive. One group training strategy, cultural immersion, is often employed to develop cultural sensitivity. However, no studies have utilized quasi-experimental methodologies to assess differences in cultural sensitivity between trainees that immerse…

  13. Development of a standardised training curriculum for robotic surgery: a consensus statement from an international multidisciplinary group of experts.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Kamran; Khan, Reenam; Mottrie, Alexandre; Lovegrove, Catherine; Abaza, Ronny; Ahlawat, Rajesh; Ahlering, Thomas; Ahlgren, Goran; Artibani, Walter; Barret, Eric; Cathelineau, Xavier; Challacombe, Ben; Coloby, Patrick; Khan, Muhammad S; Hubert, Jacques; Michel, Maurice Stephan; Montorsi, Francesco; Murphy, Declan; Palou, Joan; Patel, Vipul; Piechaud, Pierre-Thierry; Van Poppel, Hendrik; Rischmann, Pascal; Sanchez-Salas, Rafael; Siemer, Stefan; Stoeckle, Michael; Stolzenburg, Jens-Uwe; Terrier, Jean-Etienne; Thüroff, Joachim W; Vaessen, Christophe; Van Der Poel, Henk G; Van Cleynenbreugel, Ben; Volpe, Alessandro; Wagner, Christian; Wiklund, Peter; Wilson, Timothy; Wirth, Manfred; Witt, Jörn; Dasgupta, Prokar

    2015-07-01

    To explore the views of experts about the development and validation of a robotic surgery training curriculum, and how this should be implemented. An international expert panel was invited to a structured session for discussion. The study was of a mixed design, including qualitative and quantitative components based on focus group interviews during the European Association of Urology (EAU) Robotic Urology Section (ERUS) (2012), EAU (2013) and ERUS (2013) meetings. After introduction to the aims, principles and current status of the curriculum development, group responses were elicited. After content analysis of recorded interviews generated themes were discussed at the second meeting, where consensus was achieved on each theme. This discussion also underwent content analysis, and was used to draft a curriculum proposal. At the third meeting, a quantitative questionnaire about this curriculum was disseminated to attendees to assess the level of agreement with the key points. In all, 150 min (19 pages) of the focus group discussion was transcribed (21 316 words). Themes were agreed by two raters (median agreement κ 0.89) and they included: need for a training curriculum (inter-rater agreement κ 0.85); identification of learning needs (κ 0.83); development of the curriculum contents (κ 0.81); an overview of available curricula (κ 0.79); settings for robotic surgery training ((κ 0.89); assessment and training of trainers (κ 0.92); requirements for certification and patient safety (κ 0.83); and need for a universally standardised curriculum (κ 0.78). A training curriculum was proposed based on the above discussions. This group proposes a multi-step curriculum for robotic training. Studies are in process to validate the effectiveness of the curriculum and to assess transfer of skills to the operating room. © 2015 The Authors BJU International © 2015 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Measurement Invariance and the Five-Factor Model of Personality: Asian International and Euro American Cultural Groups.

    PubMed

    Rollock, David; Lui, P Priscilla

    2016-10-01

    This study examined measurement invariance of the NEO Five-Factor Inventory (NEO-FFI), assessing the five-factor model (FFM) of personality among Euro American (N = 290) and Asian international (N = 301) students (47.8% women, Mage = 19.69 years). The full 60-item NEO-FFI data fit the expected five-factor structure for both groups using exploratory structural equation modeling, and achieved configural invariance. Only 37 items significantly loaded onto the FFM-theorized factors for both groups and demonstrated metric invariance. Threshold invariance was not supported with this reduced item set. Groups differed the most in the item-factor relationships for Extraversion and Agreeableness, as well as in response styles. Asian internationals were more likely to use midpoint responses than Euro Americans. While the FFM can characterize broad nomothetic patterns of personality traits, metric invariance with only the subset of NEO-FFI items identified limits direct group comparisons of correlation coefficients among personality domains and with other constructs, and of mean differences on personality domains.

  15. An International Study of Research Misconduct Policies

    PubMed Central

    Resnik, David B.; Rasmussen, Lisa M.; Kissling, Grace E.

    2015-01-01

    Research misconduct is an international concern. Misconduct policies can play a crucial role in preventing and policing research misconduct, and many institutions have developed their own policies. While institutional policies play a key role in preventing and policing misconduct, national policies are also important to ensure consistent promulgation and enforcement of ethical standards. The purpose of this study was to obtain more information about research misconduct policies across the globe. We found that twenty-two of the top forty research and development funding countries (55%) had a national misconduct policy. Four countries (18.2%) are in the process of developing a policy, and four (18.2%) have a national research ethics code but no misconduct policy. All twenty-two countries (100%) with national policies included fabrication, falsification, and plagiarism in the definition of misconduct, but beyond that there was considerable diversity. Unethical authorship was mentioned in 54.6% of the misconduct definitions, followed by unethical publication practices (36.4%), conflict of interest mismanagement (36.4%), unethical peer review (31.8%), misconduct related to misconduct investigations (27.3%), poor record keeping (27.3%), other deception (27.3%), serious deviations (22.7%), violating confidentiality (22.7%), and human or animal research violations (22.7%). Having a national policy was positively associated with research and development funding ranking and intensiveness. To promote integrity in international research collaborations, countries should seek to harmonize and clarify misconduct definitions and develop procedures for adjudicating conflicts when harmonization does not occur. PMID:25928177

  16. An international study of research misconduct policies.

    PubMed

    Resnik, David B; Rasmussen, Lisa M; Kissling, Grace E

    2015-01-01

    Research misconduct is an international concern. Misconduct policies can play a crucial role in preventing and policing research misconduct, and many institutions have developed their own policies. While institutional policies play a key role in preventing and policing misconduct, national policies are also important to ensure consistent promulgation and enforcement of ethical standards. The purpose of this study was to obtain more information about research misconduct policies across the globe. We found that twenty-two of the top forty research and development funding countries (55%) had a national misconduct policy. Four countries (18.2%) are in the process of developing a policy, and four (18.2%) have a national research ethics code but no misconduct policy. All twenty-two countries (100%) with national policies included fabrication, falsification, and plagiarism in the definition of misconduct, but beyond that there was considerable diversity. Unethical authorship was mentioned in 54.6% of the misconduct definitions, followed by unethical publication practices (36.4%), conflict of interest mismanagement (36.4%), unethical peer review (31.8%), misconduct related to misconduct investigations (27.3%), poor record keeping (27.3%), other deception (27.3%), serious deviations (22.7%), violating confidentiality (22.7%), and human or animal research violations (22.7%). Having a national policy was positively associated with research and development funding ranking and intensiveness. To promote integrity in international research collaborations, countries should seek to harmonize and clarify misconduct definitions and develop procedures for adjudicating conflicts when harmonization does not occur.

  17. Group heterogeneity increases the risks of large group size: a longitudinal study of productivity in research groups.

    PubMed

    Cummings, Jonathon N; Kiesler, Sara; Bosagh Zadeh, Reza; Balakrishnan, Aruna D

    2013-06-01

    Heterogeneous groups are valuable, but differences among members can weaken group identification. Weak group identification may be especially problematic in larger groups, which, in contrast with smaller groups, require more attention to motivating members and coordinating their tasks. We hypothesized that as groups increase in size, productivity would decrease with greater heterogeneity. We studied the longitudinal productivity of 549 research groups varying in disciplinary heterogeneity, institutional heterogeneity, and size. We examined their publication and citation productivity before their projects started and 5 to 9 years later. Larger groups were more productive than smaller groups, but their marginal productivity declined as their heterogeneity increased, either because their members belonged to more disciplines or to more institutions. These results provide evidence that group heterogeneity moderates the effects of group size, and they suggest that desirable diversity in groups may be better leveraged in smaller, more cohesive units.

  18. Alzheimer Disease International's 10/66 Dementia Research Group - one model for action research in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Prince, Martin; Graham, Nori; Brodaty, Henry; Rimmer, Elizabeth; Varghese, Mathew; Chiu, Helen; Acosta, Daisy; Scazufca, Marcia

    2004-02-01

    The 10/66 Dementia Research Group (10/66) founded in 1998, is a network of over 100 researchers from mainly developing countries. 10/66 is committed to encourage more good quality research in those regions, where an estimated two-thirds of all those with dementia live. It represents a collaboration of academics, clinicians, and an international non-governmental organization, Alzheimer's Disease International (ADI). 10/66 pilot studies in 26 centres in Latin America, India, Africa and China and SE Asia suggest that education and culture-fair diagnosis is an attainable aim. Despite extended family care networks, these studies also identified high levels of practical, psychological and economic strain upon caregivers. Population-based studies in six centres will now estimate prevalence, describe impact and seek to identify genetic and environmental risk factors in novel settings. At a practical level, 10/66 has studied ways to circumvent the lack of help-seeking in developing countries, and has developed a low-level intervention to educate and train caregivers. The links with ADI and its international networks, and the volunteerism of ADIs members have fostered the rapid growth of 10/66. The partnership facilitates both the raising of awareness and influence upon policy, as 10/66 research evidence can be used by ADI and national Alzheimer's Associations to direct and support advocacy. Copyright 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Using Post-Study-Abroad Experiences to Enhance International Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Kevin W.; Jendzurski, Michael B.

    2013-01-01

    Many study abroad experiences offer opportunities for a broadened global perspective gleaned from interpersonal engagement with cultural others in an international setting. Unfortunately, and far too often, the campus majority who do not have this firsthand travel experience remain disengaged and might feel excluded. This article contends that…

  20. Curriculum as environment: a focus group study.

    PubMed

    Lange, Bernadette; Purnell, Marguerite J

    2011-01-01

    Curricula development is critical for the advancement and evolution of holistic nursing education. Although the American Holistic Nurses Association offers advanced practice board certification for graduate nurses, there is a scarcity of available graduate holistic nursing courses and curricula. The researchers developed a curriculum for an advanced holistic nursing program at a university college of nursing in South Florida. The curriculum and process of development were presented at a workshop during a national holistic nursing conference. A portion of the workshop included an opportunity for attendees to voluntarily participate in a focus group research study. The specific aim of the research was to determine the best approaches for the development of curricula for the promotion of graduate holistic nurse education based on the insights of holistic nurses, nurse educators, nurse practitioners, and scholars. A content analysis identified 3 themes that addressed holistic nursing curriculum: (1) consider curriculum as an evolving blueprint for personal and professional growth; (2) embrace the uniqueness of students; and (3) encourage faculty to co-create the learning environment.

  1. Association of American Geographers, Remote Sensing Specialty Group Special Issue of Geocarto International

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Thomas R. (Editor); Emerson, Charles W. (Editor); Quattrochi, Dale A. (Editor); Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This special issue continues the precedence of the Association of American Geographers (AAG), Remote Sensing Specialty Group (RSSG) for publishing selected articles in Geocarto International as a by-product from the AAG annual meeting. As editors, we issued earlier this year, a solicitation for papers to be published in a special issue of Geocarto International that were presented in RSSG-sponsored sessions at the 2001 AAG annual meeting held in New York City on February 27-March 3. Although not an absolute requisite for publication, the vast majority of the papers in this special issue were presented at this year's AAG meeting in New York. Other articles in this issue that were not part of a paper or poster session at the 2001 AAG meeting are authored by RSSG members. Under the auspices of the RSSG, this special Geocarto International issue provides even more compelling evidence of the inextricable linkage between remote sensing and geography. The papers in this special issue fall into four general themes: 1) Urban Analysis and Techniques for Urban Analysis; 2) Land Use/Land Cover Analysis; 3) Fire Modeling Assessment; and 4) Techniques. The first four papers herein are concerned with the use of remote sensing for analysis of urban areas, and with use or development of techniques to better characterize urban areas using remote sensing data. As the lead paper in this grouping, Rashed et al., examine the usage of spectral mixture analysis (SMA) for analyzing satellite imagery of urban areas as opposed to more 'standard' methods of classification. Here SMA has been applied to IRS-1C satellite multispectral imagery to extract measures that better describe the 'anatomy' of the greater Cairo, Egypt region. Following this paper, Weng and Lo describe how Landsat TM data have been used to monitor land cover types and to estimate biomass parameters within an urban environment. The research reported in this paper applies an integrated GIS (Geographic Information System

  2. Association of American Geographers, Remote Sensing Specialty Group Special Issue of Geocarto International

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Thomas R. (Editor); Emerson, Charles W. (Editor); Quattrochi, Dale A. (Editor); Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This special issue continues the precedence of the Association of American Geographers (AAG), Remote Sensing Specialty Group (RSSG) for publishing selected articles in Geocarto International as a by-product from the AAG annual meeting. As editors, we issued earlier this year, a solicitation for papers to be published in a special issue of Geocarto International that were presented in RSSG-sponsored sessions at the 2001 AAG annual meeting held in New York City on February 27-March 3. Although not an absolute requisite for publication, the vast majority of the papers in this special issue were presented at this year's AAG meeting in New York. Other articles in this issue that were not part of a paper or poster session at the 2001 AAG meeting are authored by RSSG members. Under the auspices of the RSSG, this special Geocarto International issue provides even more compelling evidence of the inextricable linkage between remote sensing and geography. The papers in this special issue fall into four general themes: 1) Urban Analysis and Techniques for Urban Analysis; 2) Land Use/Land Cover Analysis; 3) Fire Modeling Assessment; and 4) Techniques. The first four papers herein are concerned with the use of remote sensing for analysis of urban areas, and with use or development of techniques to better characterize urban areas using remote sensing data. As the lead paper in this grouping, Rashed et al., examine the usage of spectral mixture analysis (SMA) for analyzing satellite imagery of urban areas as opposed to more 'standard' methods of classification. Here SMA has been applied to IRS-1C satellite multispectral imagery to extract measures that better describe the 'anatomy' of the greater Cairo, Egypt region. Following this paper, Weng and Lo describe how Landsat TM data have been used to monitor land cover types and to estimate biomass parameters within an urban environment. The research reported in this paper applies an integrated GIS (Geographic Information System

  3. Fracture-related infection: A consensus on definition from an international expert group.

    PubMed

    Metsemakers, W J; Morgenstern, M; McNally, M A; Moriarty, T F; McFadyen, I; Scarborough, M; Athanasou, N A; Ochsner, P E; Kuehl, R; Raschke, M; Borens, O; Xie, Z; Velkes, S; Hungerer, S; Kates, S L; Zalavras, C; Giannoudis, P V; Richards, R G; Verhofstad, M H J

    2017-08-24

    Fracture-related infection (FRI) is a common and serious complication in trauma surgery. Accurately estimating the impact of this complication has been hampered by the lack of a clear definition. The absence of a working definition of FRI renders existing studies difficult to evaluate or compare. In order to address this issue, an expert group comprised of a number of scientific and medical organizations has been convened, with the support of the AO Foundation, in order to develop a consensus definition. The process that led to this proposed definition started with a systematic literature review, which revealed that the majority of randomized controlled trials in fracture care do not use a standardized definition of FRI. In response to this conclusion, an international survey on the need for and key components of a definition of FRI was distributed amongst all registered AOTrauma users. Approximately 90% of the more than 2000 surgeons who responded suggested that a definition of FRI is required. As a final step, a consensus meeting was held with an expert panel. The outcome of this process led to a consensus definition of FRI. Two levels of certainty around diagnostic features were defined. Criteria could be confirmatory (infection definitely present) or suggestive. Four confirmatory criteria were defined: Fistula, sinus or wound breakdown; Purulent drainage from the wound or presence of pus during surgery; Phenotypically indistinguishable pathogens identified by culture from at least two separate deep tissue/implant specimens; Presence of microorganisms in deep tissue taken during an operative intervention, as confirmed by histopathological examination. Furthermore, a list of suggestive criteria was defined. These require further investigations in order to look for confirmatory criteria. In the current paper, an overview is provided of the proposed definition and a rationale for each component and decision. The intention of establishing this definition of FRI was

  4. 76 FR 44491 - Group Health Plans and Health Insurance Issuers: Rules Relating to Internal Claims and Appeals...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-26

    ...-AQ66 Group Health Plans and Health Insurance Issuers: Rules Relating to Internal Claims and Appeals and... amendment to the interim final rules (76 FR 37208) entitled, ``Group Health Plans and Health Insurance... rule with request for comments entitled, ``Group Health Plans and Health Insurance Issuers:...

  5. Women Physicists Speak: The 2001 International Study of Women in Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivie, Rachel; Czujko, Roman; Stowe, Katie

    The Working Group on Women in Physics of the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP) subcontracted with the American Institute of Physics to conduct an international study of women in physics in two phases. The first part was a benchmarking study to identify reliable sources and collect data on the representation of women in…

  6. International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies

    MedlinePlus

    ... in Trauma Research Research Resources and Links Trauma Research Methods Trauma Blog Search White Papers A Public Health Approach to Trauma Membership Join ISTSS New Member ... & Events Public Resources About ISTSS International ...

  7. Geometric focusing of internal waves: Experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shmakova, Natalia; Ermanyuk, Evgeny; Voisin, Bruno; Flór, Jan-Bert

    2015-11-01

    Mixing of the abyssal ocean plays a decisive role in large-scale ocean circulation and is believed to be caused by the nonlinear breaking of internal tides. Previous studies of two- and three-dimensional cases considered the generation of diverging waves by simple oscillating bodies such as a cylinder (e.g. Mowbray and Rarity 1967) or a sphere (e.g. King et al. 2009, Ermanyuk et al. 2011). We here consider converging waves as generated by a horizontally oscillating torus. The energy focuses and therefore the waves are more susceptible to overturning and breaking. LIF and PIV techniques are used to measure respectively the isopycnal displacement and the velocity. We have considered linear and nonlinear wave generation as a function of the Keulegan-Carpenter number, here adapted to the focusing waves. For small oscillation amplitude strong velocity amplification is observed in the focal zone, consistent with linear theory. Increasing the oscillation amplitude causes nonlinear effects and in particular the generation of higher harmonics and overturning in the focal zone. In addition, the focal zone acts as a wave source. Increase of the Stokes and Reynolds numbers leads to wave turbulence in the focal zone. Supported by LabEx Osug@2020 (Investissements d'avenir - ANR10LABX56).

  8. Tobacco in prisons: a focus group study.

    PubMed

    Richmond, R; Butler, T; Wilhelm, K; Wodak, A; Cunningham, M; Anderson, I

    2009-06-01

    To examine the role of tobacco use in prison and possible influences of the prison environment on smoking among inmates in the context of developing inmate smoking cessation programmes. Qualitative study based on seven focus groups with prisoners and ex-prisoners. A maximum security prison in rural New South Wales (NSW), Australia, and a community justice restorative centre and accommodation service for ex-prisoners in Sydney, NSW, Australia. 40 participants (28 men and 12 women) comprising nine prisoners (including four Indigenous inmates) and 31 ex-prisoners. Prisoners reported that tobacco serves as a de facto currency in correctional settings and can be exchanged for goods, used to pay debts and for gambling. Smoking helps manage the stressful situations such as transfers, court appearances and prison visits. Inmate smoking cessation programmes need to address the enmeshment of tobacco in prison life, improve availability of pharmacotherapies (for example, nicotine patches, bupropion) and the quitline (a free telephone helpline providing information on stopping smoking), provide non-smoking cells and areas within prisons, encourage physical activity for inmates and maintain monitoring of smoking cessation status after release. Tobacco is integrally bound up in the prison "culture". Our findings are relevant to inform prison health authorities concerned with improving the health of prisoners, and for support organisations attempting to facilitate smoking cessation both in prison and after release. Smoking cessation programmes in prisons should be tailored to the unique stresses of the prison environment. Programmes need to acknowledge the difficulties of quitting smoking in prison arising from the stresses posed by this setting.

  9. The Impact of Conflict on International Student Mobility: A Case Study of International Students Studying in Israel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ben-Tsur, Dalia

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores the impact of conflict on international student mobility. Through an examination of undergraduate, international students studying in Israel, this case study questions how and if a situation of ongoing violent conflict affects international student travel decisions to study in a host country. Contrary to assumptions of…

  10. Computer Simulation in the Teaching of Translation and International Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brecht, Richard D.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Describes the National Simulation in International Studies and Translation Program which links international studies and foreign languages programs at a number of universities. This program provides a natural context for the exercise of translation for the language student and an authenticity of experience for students of international politics.…

  11. Internal NASA Study: NASAs Protoflight Research Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coan, Mary R.; Hirshorn, Steven R.; Moreland, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Protoflight Research Initiative is an internal NASA study conducted within the Office of the Chief Engineer to better understand the use of Protoflight within NASA. Extensive literature reviews and interviews with key NASA members with experience in both robotic and human spaceflight missions has resulted in three main conclusions and two observations. The first conclusion is that NASA's Protoflight method is not considered to be "prescriptive." The current policies and guidance allows each Program/Project to tailor the Protoflight approach to better meet their needs, goals and objectives. Second, Risk Management plays a key role in implementation of the Protoflight approach. Any deviations from full qualification will be based on the level of acceptable risk with guidance found in NPR 8705.4. Finally, over the past decade (2004 - 2014) only 6% of NASA's Protoflight missions and 6% of NASA's Full qualification missions experienced a publicly disclosed mission failure. In other words, the data indicates that the Protoflight approach, in and of it itself, does not increase the mission risk of in-flight failure. The first observation is that it would be beneficial to document the decision making process on the implementation and use of Protoflight. The second observation is that If a Project/Program chooses to use the Protoflight approach with relevant heritage, it is extremely important that the Program/Project Manager ensures that the current project's requirements falls within the heritage design, component, instrument and/or subsystem's requirements for both the planned and operational use, and that the documentation of the relevant heritage is comprehensive, sufficient and the decision well documented. To further benefit/inform this study, a recommendation to perform a deep dive into 30 missions with accessible data on their testing/verification methodology and decision process to research the differences between Protoflight and Full Qualification

  12. 76 FR 56490 - In the Matter of Amerex Group, Inc., AmeriChip International, Inc., Amish Naturals, Inc., Banker...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION In the Matter of Amerex Group, Inc., AmeriChip International, Inc., Amish Naturals, Inc., Banker's... is a lack of current and accurate information concerning the securities of AmeriChip International...

  13. A Functional MRI Study of Language Function in International Adoptees

    PubMed Central

    Rajagopal, Akila; Holland, Scott K.; Walz, Nicolay C.; Staat, Mary Allen; Altaye, Mekibib; Wade, Shari

    2013-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis that international adoption of Chinese and Eastern European girls after 9 months of age results in long term changes in the neural circuitry supporting monolingual English in later childhood. Study design Functional MRI (fMRI) was used to test this hypothesis by comparison with a control group of American-born English speakers (n=13). Girls now age 6–10 years adopted from China (n = 13) and Eastern Europe (n = 12) by English-speaking families were recruited through a pediatric hospital-based international adoption center after spending more than 6 months in an orphanage or other institution, a measure of early environmental deprivation. FMRI scans were performed on a 3 Tesla MRI scanner using a verb generation language fluency task. Composite activation maps were computed for each group using a general linear model with random effects analysis. Results Chinese born adoptees demonstrate atypical lateralization of language function with an apparent shift of Temporal-Parietal and Frontal areas of brain activity toward the right hemisphere. Eastern European adoptees exhibited a rightward shift relative to controls in both Frontal and Temporal-Parietal brain regions. Conclusions Significant differences in lateralization between the Chinese and American-born groups in Temporal-Parietal language areas highlight the possible impact of early tonal Asian language exposure on neural circuitry. Findings suggest that exposure to an Asian language during infancy can leave a long-term imprint on the neural circuitry supporting English language development. PMID:23896183

  14. 75 FR 36455 - SSE Telecom, Inc., Strategic Alliance Group, Inc., (n/k/a CruiseCam International, Inc...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-25

    ... Group, Inc., Synergy Renewable Resources, Inc., and Syntech International, Inc. (n/k/a Avalon Technology... Renewable Resources, Inc. because it has not filed any periodic reports since the period ended December 31...

  15. Teachers' Stances towards Chinese International Students: An Australian Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Love, Kristina; Arkoudis, Sophie

    2006-01-01

    The international marketing of school education has gathered momentum in the Asia Pacific region, where an English medium education is prized by many parents. This paper investigates the responses of a group of teachers in Australia to the needs of international students in their school. The analysis of a 1 h professional discussion between four…

  16. Teachers' Stances towards Chinese International Students: An Australian Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Love, Kristina; Arkoudis, Sophie

    2006-01-01

    The international marketing of school education has gathered momentum in the Asia Pacific region, where an English medium education is prized by many parents. This paper investigates the responses of a group of teachers in Australia to the needs of international students in their school. The analysis of a 1 h professional discussion between four…

  17. International multi-site survey on the use of online support groups in bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Rita; Conell, Jörn; Glenn, Tasha; Alda, Martin; Ardau, Raffaella; Baune, Bernhard T; Berk, Michael; Bersudsky, Yuly; Bilderbeck, Amy; Bocchetta, Alberto; Bossini, Letizia; Castro, Angela M Paredes; Cheung, Eric Y W; Chillotti, Caterina; Choppin, Sabine; Zompo, Maria Del; Dias, Rodrigo; Dodd, Seetal; Duffy, Anne; Etain, Bruno; Fagiolini, Andrea; Hernandez, Miryam Fernández; Garnham, Julie; Geddes, John; Gildebro, Jonas; Gonzalez-Pinto, Ana; Goodwin, Guy M; Grof, Paul; Harima, Hirohiko; Hassel, Stefanie; Henry, Chantal; Hidalgo-Mazzei, Diego; Kapur, Vaisnvy; Kunigiri, Girish; Lafer, Beny; Larsen, Erik R; Lewitzka, Ute; Licht, Rasmus W; Hvenegaard Lund, Anne; Misiak, Blazej; Piotrowski, Patryk; Monteith, Scott; Munoz, Rodrigo; Nakanotani, Takako; Nielsen, René E; O'donovan, Claire; Okamura, Yasushi; Osher, Yamima; Reif, Andreas; Ritter, Philipp; Rybakowski, Janusz K; Sagduyu, Kemal; Sawchuk, Brett; Schwartz, Elon; Scippa, Ângela M; Slaney, Claire; Sulaiman, Ahmad H; Suominen, Kirsi; Suwalska, Aleksandra; Tam, Peter; Tatebayashi, Yoshitaka; Tondo, Leonardo; Vieta, Eduard; Vinberg, Maj; Viswanath, Biju; Volkert, Julia; Zetin, Mark; Whybrow, Peter C; Bauer, Michael

    2017-08-01

    Peer support is an established component of recovery from bipolar disorder, and online support groups may offer opportunities to expand the use of peer support at the patient's convenience. Prior research in bipolar disorder has reported value from online support groups. To understand the use of online support groups by patients with bipolar disorder as part of a larger project about information seeking. The results are based on a one-time, paper-based anonymous survey about information seeking by patients with bipolar disorder, which was translated into 12 languages. The survey was completed between March 2014 and January 2016 and included questions on the use of online support groups. All patients were diagnosed by a psychiatrist. Analysis included descriptive statistics and general estimating equations to account for correlated data. The survey was completed by 1222 patients in 17 countries. The patients used the Internet at a percentage similar to the general public. Of the Internet users who looked online for information about bipolar disorder, only 21.0% read or participated in support groups, chats, or forums for bipolar disorder (12.8% of the total sample). Given the benefits reported in prior research, clarification of the role of online support groups in bipolar disorder is needed. With only a minority of patients using online support groups, there are analytical challenges for future studies.

  18. Geriatric assessment predicts survival and toxicities in elderly myeloma patients: an International Myeloma Working Group report

    PubMed Central

    Bringhen, Sara; Mateos, Maria-Victoria; Larocca, Alessandra; Facon, Thierry; Kumar, Shaji K.; Offidani, Massimo; McCarthy, Philip; Evangelista, Andrea; Lonial, Sagar; Zweegman, Sonja; Musto, Pellegrino; Terpos, Evangelos; Belch, Andrew; Hajek, Roman; Ludwig, Heinz; Stewart, A. Keith; Moreau, Philippe; Anderson, Kenneth; Einsele, Hermann; Durie, Brian G. M.; Dimopoulos, Meletios A.; Landgren, Ola; San Miguel, Jesus F.; Richardson, Paul; Sonneveld, Pieter; Rajkumar, S. Vincent

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a pooled analysis of 869 individual newly diagnosed elderly patient data from 3 prospective trials. At diagnosis, a geriatric assessment had been performed. An additive scoring system (range 0-5), based on age, comorbidities, and cognitive and physical conditions, was developed to identify 3 groups: fit (score = 0, 39%), intermediate fitness (score = 1, 31%), and frail (score ≥2, 30%). The 3-year overall survival was 84% in fit, 76% in intermediate-fitness (hazard ratio [HR], 1.61; P = .042), and 57% in frail (HR, 3.57; P < .001) patients. The cumulative incidence of grade ≥3 nonhematologic adverse events at 12 months was 22.2% in fit, 26.4% in intermediate-fitness (HR, 1.23; P = .217), and 34.0% in frail (HR, 1.74; P < .001) patients. The cumulative incidence of treatment discontinuation at 12 months was 16.5% in fit, 20.8% in intermediate-fitness (HR, 1.41; P = .052), and 31.2% in frail (HR, 2.21; P < .001) patients. Our frailty score predicts mortality and the risk of toxicity in elderly myeloma patients. The International Myeloma Working group proposes this score for the measurement of frailty in designing future clinical trials. These trials are registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01093136 (EMN01), #NCT01190787 (26866138MMY2069), and #NCT01346787 (IST-CAR-506). PMID:25628469

  19. PREFACE: Seventh International Workshop: Group Analysis of Differential Equations and Integrable Systems (GADEISVII)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaneeva, Olena; Sophocleous, Christodoulos; Popovych, Roman; Boyko, Vyacheslav; Damianou, Pantelis

    2015-06-01

    The Seventh International Workshop "Group Analysis of Differential Equations and Integrable Systems" (GADEIS-VII) took place at Flamingo Beach Hotel, Larnaca, Cyprus during the period June 15-19, 2014. Fifty nine scientists from nineteen countries participated in the Workshop, and forty one lectures were presented. The Workshop topics ranged from theoretical developments of group analysis of differential equations, hypersymplectic structures, theory of Lie algebras, integrability and superintegrability to their applications in various fields. The Series of Workshops is a joint initiative by the Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Cyprus, and the Department of Applied Research of the Institute of Mathematics, National Academy of Sciences, Ukraine. The Workshops evolved from close collaboration among Cypriot and Ukrainian scientists. The first three meetings were held at the Athalassa campus of the University of Cyprus (October 27, 2005, September 25-28, 2006, and October 4-5, 2007). The fourth (October 26-30, 2008), the fifth (June 6-10, 2010) and the sixth (June 17-21, 2012) meetings were held at the coastal resort of Protaras. We would like to thank all the authors who have published papers in the Proceedings. All of the papers have been reviewed by at least two independent referees. We express our appreciation of the care taken by the referees. Their constructive suggestions have improved most of the papers. The importance of peer review in the maintenance of high standards of scientific research can never be overstated. Olena Vaneeva, Christodoulos Sophocleous, Roman Popovych, Vyacheslav Boyko, Pantelis Damianou

  20. The Effects of Size, Shape, and Surface Functional Group of Gold Nanostructures on Their Adsorption and Internalization by Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Eun Chul; Au, Leslie; Zhang, Qiang; Xia, Younan

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we examined the effects of size, shape, and surface chemistry of gold nanostructures on their uptake (including both adsorption and internalization) by SK-BR-3 breast cancer cells. We used both spherical and cubic Au nanostructures (nanospheres and nanocages, respectively) of two different sizes, and their surface was modified with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), antibody anti-HER2, or poly(allyamine hydrochloride) (PAA). Our results showed that the size of the Au nanostructures influenced their uptake by the cells in a similar way regardless of the surface chemistry, while the shape dependency could vary depending on the surface functional group. In addition, the cells preferred to take up the Au nanostructures covered by different surface groups in the following order: PAA>> anti-HER2> PEG. The fraction of Au nanostructures attached to the cell surface was also dependent on the aforementioned parameters. PMID:20029850

  1. International Myeloma Working Group Recommendations for the Diagnosis and Management of Myeloma-Related Renal Impairment.

    PubMed

    Dimopoulos, Meletios A; Sonneveld, Pieter; Leung, Nelson; Merlini, Giampaolo; Ludwig, Heinz; Kastritis, Efstathios; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Joshua, Douglas; Orlowski, Robert Z; Powles, Raymond; Vesole, David H; Garderet, Laurent; Einsele, Hermann; Palumbo, Antonio; Cavo, Michele; Richardson, Paul G; Moreau, Philippe; San Miguel, Jesús; Rajkumar, S Vincent; Durie, Brian G M; Terpos, Evangelos

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the International Myeloma Working Group was to develop practical recommendations for the diagnosis and management of multiple myeloma-related renal impairment (RI). Recommendations were based on published data through December 2015, and were developed using the system developed by the Grading of Recommendation, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation Working Group. All patients with myeloma at diagnosis and at disease assessment should have serum creatinine, estimated glomerular filtration rate, and electrolytes measurements as well as free light chain, if available, and urine electrophoresis of a sample from a 24-hour urine collection (grade A). The Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration, preferably, or the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease formula should be used for the evaluation of estimated glomerular filtration rate in patients with stabilized serum creatinine (grade A). International Myeloma Working Group criteria for renal reversibility should be used (grade B). For the management of RI in patients with multiple myeloma, high fluid intake is indicated along with antimyeloma therapy (grade B). The use of high-cutoff hemodialysis membranes in combination with antimyeloma therapy can be considered (grade B). Bortezomib-based regimens remain the cornerstone of the management of myeloma-related RI (grade A). High-dose dexamethasone should be administered at least for the first month of therapy (grade B). Thalidomide is effective in patients with myeloma with RI, and no dose modifications are needed (grade B). Lenalidomide is effective and safe, mainly in patients with mild to moderate RI (grade B); for patients with severe RI or on dialysis, lenalidomide should be given with close monitoring for hematologic toxicity (grade B) with dose reduction as needed. High-dose therapy with autologous stem cell transplantation (with melphalan 100 mg/m(2) to 140 mg/m(2)) is feasible in patients with RI (grade C). Carfilzomib can be safely

  2. The International Transporter Consortium: a collaborative group of scientists from academia, industry, and the FDA.

    PubMed

    Huang, S-M; Zhang, L; Giacomini, K M

    2010-01-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration-led Critical Path Initiative, launched in 2004, has resulted in an array of activities focused on the sciences that support the development of human medical products.(1) These activities include the development of new scientific tools, such as in vitro testing, qualified biomarkers of drug safety, and innovative new methods in study design and data analysis.(2) As a result of the Critical Path Initiative and enormous advances in the field of membrane transporters, the International Transporter Consortium was formed.

  3. National facilities study. Volume 4: Space operations facilities task group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The principal objectives of the National Facilities Study (NFS) were to: (1) determine where U.S. facilities do not meet national aerospace needs; (2) define new facilities required to make U.S. capabilities 'world class' where such improvements are in the national interest; (3) define where consolidation and phase-out of existing facilities is appropriate; and (4) develop a long-term national plan for world-class facility acquisition and shared usage. The Space Operations Facilities Task Group defined discrete tasks to accomplish the above objectives within the scope of the study. An assessment of national space operations facilities was conducted to determine the nation's capability to meet the requirements of space operations during the next 30 years. The mission model used in the study to define facility requirements is described in Volume 3. Based on this model, the major focus of the Task Group was to identify any substantive overlap or underutilization of space operations facilities and to identify any facility shortfalls that would necessitate facility upgrades or new facilities. The focus of this initial study was directed toward facility recommendations related to consolidations, closures, enhancements, and upgrades considered necessary to efficiently and effectively support the baseline requirements model. Activities related to identifying facility needs or recommendations for enhancing U.S. international competitiveness and achieving world-class capability, where appropriate, were deferred to a subsequent study phase.

  4. An International Strategy for Human Exploration of the Moon: The International Space Exploration Coordination Group (ISECG) Reference Architecture for Human Lunar Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laurini, Kathleen C.; Hufenbach, Bernhard; Junichiro, Kawaguchi; Piedboeuf, Jean-Claude; Schade, Britta; Lorenzoni, Andrea; Curtis, Jeremy; Hae-Dong, Kim

    2010-01-01

    The International Space Exploration Coordination Group (ISECG) was established in response to The Global Exploration Strategy: The Framework for Coordination developed by fourteen space agencies and released in May 2007. Several ISECG participating space agencies have been studying concepts for human exploration of the moon that allow individual and collective goals and objectives to be met. This 18 month study activity culminated with the development of the ISECG Reference Architecture for Human Lunar Exploration. The reference architecture is a series of elements delivered over time in a flexible and evolvable campaign. This paper will describe the reference architecture and how it will inform near-term and long-term programmatic planning within interested agencies. The reference architecture is intended to serve as a global point of departure conceptual architecture that enables individual agency investments in technology development and demonstration, International Space Station research and technology demonstration, terrestrial analog studies, and robotic precursor missions to contribute towards the eventual implementation of a human lunar exploration scenario which reflects the concepts and priorities established to date. It also serves to create opportunities for partnerships that will support evolution of this concept and its eventual realization. The ISECG Reference Architecture for Human Lunar Exploration (commonly referred to as the lunar gPoD) reflects the agency commitments to finding an effective balance between conducting important scientific investigations of and from the moon, as well as demonstrating and mastering the technologies and capabilities to send humans farther into the Solar System. The lunar gPoD begins with a robust robotic precursor phase that demonstrates technologies and capabilities considered important for the success of the campaign. Robotic missions will inform the human missions and buy down risks. Human exploration will start

  5. An International Strategy for Human Exploration of the Moon: The International Space Exploration Coordination Group (ISECG) Reference Architecture for Human Lunar Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laurini, Kathleen C.; Hufenbach, Bernhard; Junichiro, Kawaguchi; Piedboeuf, Jean-Claude; Schade, Britta; Lorenzoni, Andrea; Curtis, Jeremy; Hae-Dong, Kim

    2010-01-01

    The International Space Exploration Coordination Group (ISECG) was established in response to The Global Exploration Strategy: The Framework for Coordination developed by fourteen space agencies and released in May 2007. Several ISECG participating space agencies have been studying concepts for human exploration of the moon that allow individual and collective goals and objectives to be met. This 18 month study activity culminated with the development of the ISECG Reference Architecture for Human Lunar Exploration. The reference architecture is a series of elements delivered over time in a flexible and evolvable campaign. This paper will describe the reference architecture and how it will inform near-term and long-term programmatic planning within interested agencies. The reference architecture is intended to serve as a global point of departure conceptual architecture that enables individual agency investments in technology development and demonstration, International Space Station research and technology demonstration, terrestrial analog studies, and robotic precursor missions to contribute towards the eventual implementation of a human lunar exploration scenario which reflects the concepts and priorities established to date. It also serves to create opportunities for partnerships that will support evolution of this concept and its eventual realization. The ISECG Reference Architecture for Human Lunar Exploration (commonly referred to as the lunar gPoD) reflects the agency commitments to finding an effective balance between conducting important scientific investigations of and from the moon, as well as demonstrating and mastering the technologies and capabilities to send humans farther into the Solar System. The lunar gPoD begins with a robust robotic precursor phase that demonstrates technologies and capabilities considered important for the success of the campaign. Robotic missions will inform the human missions and buy down risks. Human exploration will start

  6. Effects of knowledge and internal locus of control in groups of health care workers judging likelihood of pathogen transfer.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Anne Collins; Walsh, Fran; Bryant, Michelle

    2013-08-01

    A study was conducted to measure the effects of attitudes and beliefs on the risk judgments of health care workers. Lack of hand hygiene compliance is a worldwide issue in health care, contributing to infections, fatalities, and increased health care costs. Human factors methods are a promising solution to the problem of compliance, although thus far, the concentration has been on process and engineering methods, such as the design of no-touch sinks. Factors internal to the health care worker, such as their attitudes and beliefs about hand hygiene, have received less attention. For this study, three groups of health care workers completed measures of attitudes, control beliefs, and hand hygiene knowledge. They then provided risk judgments of touching various surfaces via a factorial survey. Attitudes, knowledge, control beliefs, and surface type all predicted the risk judgments of the sample of health care workers, with differences between professional groups. Health care workers perceive less risk when touching surfaces,which may explain historically low rates of hand hygiene compliance after surface contact. Although more research is needed to directly connect risk judgments to failures of hand hygiene, the current results can inform interventions targeting the internal attitudes and beliefs of health care workers.

  7. International Computer and Information Literacy Study: ICILS 2013 User Guide for the International Database

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jung, Michael, Ed.; Carstens, Ralph, Ed.

    2015-01-01

    The International Computer and Information Literacy Study (ICILS) 2013, conducted by the International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IEA), studied how students in different countries develop the knowledge, understanding, attitudes, dispositions, and skills that comprise computer and information literacy (CIL). The aim…

  8. International reasons for joint learning and studying.

    PubMed

    Tschudin, V

    2000-01-01

    That medical and nursing students should learn at least certain subjects together has long been discussed. The implementation of such learning is becoming more important. The reasons are cultural diversity and differing values. Evidence points to conflicting values among health care personnel. It is by listening to each other that we learn of our own and others' values. The international scene is so accessible now that international joint learning is becoming imperative, otherwise the person of the patient gets excluded. Because people--and patients--matter, we cannot ignore the need to hear and respond to their values.

  9. Integrated thermal treatment systems study. Internal review panel report

    SciTech Connect

    Cudahy, J.; Escarda, T.; Gimpel, R.

    1995-04-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development (OTD) commissioned two studies to evaluate nineteen thermal treatment technologies for treatment of DOE mixed low-level waste. These studies were called the Integrated Thermal Treatment System (ITTS) Phase I and Phase II. With the help of the DOE Office of Environmental Management (EM) Mixed Waste Focus Group, OTD formed an ITTS Internal Review Panel to review and comment on the ITTS studies. This Panel was composed of scientists and engineers from throughout the DOE complex, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the California EPA, and private experts. The Panel met from November 15-18, 1994 to review the ITTS studies and to make recommendations on the most promising thermal treatment systems for DOE mixed low-level wastes and on research and development necessary to prove the performance of the technologies. This report describes the findings and presents the recommendations of the Panel.

  10. Challenges and opportunities in international molecular cancer prevention research: An ASPO Molecular Epidemiology and the Environment and International Cancer Prevention Interest Groups Report.

    PubMed

    Epplein, Meira; Bostick, Roberd M; Mu, Lina; Ogino, Shuji; Braithwaite, Dejana; Kanetsky, Peter A

    2014-11-01

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer estimates that over half of the new cancer cases and almost two-thirds of the cancer deaths in 2012 occurred in low and middle income countries. To discuss the challenges and opportunities to reducing the burden of cancer worldwide, the Molecular Epidemiology and the Environment and the International Issues in Cancer Special Interest Groups joined forces to hold a session during the 38th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Preventive Oncology (March 2014, Arlington, Virginia). The session highlighted three topics of particular interest to molecular cancer prevention researchers working internationally, specifically: 1) biomarkers in cancer research; 2) environmental exposures and cancer; and 3) molecular pathological epidemiology. A major factor for successful collaboration illuminated during the discussion was the need for strong, committed, and reliable international partners. A key element of establishing such relationships is to thoroughly involve individual international collaborators in the development of the research question; engaged international collaborators are particularly motivated to champion and shepherd the project through all necessary steps, including issues relating to institutional review boards, political sensitivity, laboratory-based assays, and tumor subtyping. Also essential is allotting time for the building, maintaining, and investing in such relationships so that successful international collaborations may take root and bloom. While there are many challenges inherent to international molecular cancer research, the opportunities for furthering the science and prevention of cancer worldwide are great, particularly at this time of increasing cancer incidence and prevalence in low and middle income countries.

  11. Multicenter Patch Testing With a Resol Resin Based on Phenol and Formaldehyde Within the International Contact Dermatitis Research Group.

    PubMed

    Isaksson, Marléne; Ale, Iris; Andersen, Klaus; Diepgen, Thomas; Elsner, Peter; Goossens, An; Goh, Chee-Leok; Jerajani, Hemangi; Maibach, Howard; Matsunaga, Kayoko; McFadden, John; Nixon, Rosemary; Sasseville, Denis; Bruze, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Contact allergy to phenol-formaldehyde resins (PFRs) based on phenol and formaldehyde is not detected by a p-tertiary-butylphenol-formaldehyde resin included in most baseline patch test series. The aims of this study were to investigate the contact allergy rate to PFR-2 in an international population and to investigate associated simultaneous allergic reactions. Thirteen centers representing the International Contact Dermatitis Research Group included PFR-2 into their patch test baseline series during a period of 6 months in 2012. Of 2259 patients tested, 28 (1.2%) reacted to PFR-2. Of those 28 individuals, one had a positive reaction to formaldehyde and 2 to p-tertiary-butylphenol-formaldehyde resin. Simultaneous allergic reactions were noted to colophonium in 3, to Myroxylon pereirae in 5, and to fragrance mix I in 8. The contact allergy frequency in the tested population (1.2%) merits its inclusion into the international baseline series and possibly also into other baseline series after appropriate investigations. Significantly, overrepresented simultaneous allergic reactions were noted for M. pereirae and fragrance mix I.

  12. International Students' Networks: A Case Study in a UK University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taha, Nashrawan; Cox, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    The great influx of international students into UK universities has led to internationalisation becoming an important issue. Previous studies have focused on the integration of home and international students, illustrating a lack of intercultural interaction. Yet there has been a lack of research investigating international students' networks and…

  13. International Students' Networks: A Case Study in a UK University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taha, Nashrawan; Cox, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    The great influx of international students into UK universities has led to internationalisation becoming an important issue. Previous studies have focused on the integration of home and international students, illustrating a lack of intercultural interaction. Yet there has been a lack of research investigating international students' networks and…

  14. Study Abroad Ghana: An International Experiential Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boateng, Alice; Thompson, Abigail Mercy

    2013-01-01

    The global nature of social problems indicates how important it is for social workers to be involved in international issues. For example, overseas experience in social work programs is in consonance with the Council on Social Work Education's emphasis on global context of social work practice. In view of this, some schools of social work are…

  15. Study Abroad Ghana: An International Experiential Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boateng, Alice; Thompson, Abigail Mercy

    2013-01-01

    The global nature of social problems indicates how important it is for social workers to be involved in international issues. For example, overseas experience in social work programs is in consonance with the Council on Social Work Education's emphasis on global context of social work practice. In view of this, some schools of social work are…

  16. A Guide. Planning and Funding International Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harari, Maurice

    How can colleges and universities best plan for international programs? Where are applications made for funding? This brochure is an attempt to provide an initial response to these questions and to offer some general guidelines. The list of sources of funding are suggestive, not exhaustive. It is geared to the institution that has not been…

  17. Group Processes and EFL Learners' Motivation: A Study of Group Dynamics in EFL Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Lilian Ya-Hui

    2010-01-01

    This study explores how group processes, such as group cohesiveness and group norms, influence an individual EFL learner's motivation. The uniqueness of this research lies in shifting the focus from an analysis of the individual's experience being seen as apart from the group to considering the individual's experience in relation to the social…

  18. Children's Learning Groups: A Study of Emergent Leadership, Dominance, and Group Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yamaguchi, Ryoko

    This study explores the importance of the group context in the emergence of leadership, dominance, and group effectiveness in children's collaborative learning groups. Ten 3-person work groups performed a collaborative math activity. Using achievement goal orientation (Ames, 1992; Maehr and Midgley, 1996; Pintrich and Schunk, 1996) as a framework,…

  19. Group Work Experiences: Domestic MBA Student Experiences and Outcomes when Working with International Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rafferty, Patricia D.

    2013-01-01

    This article forms part of an exploration into the results of a single-case, embedded study that was conducted to explore how domestic part-time graduate business students in the United States experience group work for summative assessment. Multiple information collection methods were utilised, including open-ended and semi-structured interviews,…

  20. 75 FR 66796 - Pricewaterhousecoopers LLP (“PwC”), Internal Firm Services Client Account Administrators Group...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-29

    ... Assistance on May 20, 2010, applicable to workers of PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP, Division of Internal Firm... subject firm should read PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP (``PwC''), Internal Firm Services Client Account... subject firm to read PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP (``PwC''), Internal Firm Services Client Account...

  1. Early Risk Indicators of Internalizing Problems in Late Childhood: A 9-Year Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashford, Janka; Smit, Filip; van Lier, Pol A. C.; Cuijpers, Pim; Koot, Hans M.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Longitudinal studies on risk indicators of internalizing problems in childhood are in short supply, but could be valuable to identify target groups for prevention. Methods: Standardized assessments of 294 children's internalizing problems at the age of 2-3 years (parent report), 4-5 years (parent and teacher report) and 11 years…

  2. International Students' Employment Search in the United States: A Phenomenological Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sangganjanavanich, Varunee Faii; Lenz, A. Stephen; Cavazos, Javier, Jr.

    2011-01-01

    After completing their academic degree, international student populations face unique situations in their search for employment in the United States. This study used a phenomenological examination to identify the perceptions and the experiences of eight undergraduate international students who participated in a 10-week support group during the…

  3. Conformations and Barriers to Methyl Group Internal Rotation in Two Asymmetric Ethers: Propyl Methyl Ether and Butyl Methyl Ether

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, B. E.; Dechirico, F.; Cooke, S. A.

    2012-06-01

    The conformational preferences of the O-C-C-C unit are important in many biological systems with the unit generally preferring a gauche configuration compared to an anti configuration. Butyl methyl ether and propyl methyl ether provide very simple systems for this phenomenom to manifest. Pure rotational spectra of the title molecules have been recorded using chirped pulse Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy (CP-FTMW). In the case of butyl methyl ether, only one conformer has been observed. This conformer has torsional angles of COCC = 180°, OCCC = 62° and CCCC = 180° (anti-gauche-anti) and rotational constants of A = 10259.4591(33) MHz, B = 1445.6470(13) MHz, and C = 1356.2944(14) MHz. The rotational spectrum was doubled and has been analyzed to produce an effective barrier to methyl group internal rotation of 780(35) cm-1. A prior rotational spectroscopic study on propyl methyl ether had focused only on the high energy anti-anti conformer. We have analyzed spectra from the lowest energy anti-gauche conformer and the spectroscopic constants will be presented. A summary of the differences in conformational energies and methyl group internal rotation barriers for the class of aliphatic asymmetric ethers will be presented. K. N. Houk, J. E. Eksterowicz, Y.-D. Wu, C. D. Fuglesang, D. B. Mitchell. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 115 (4170), 1993. Hiroshi Kato, Jun Nakagawa, Michiro Hayashi. J. Mol. Spectrosc. 80 (272), 1980.

  4. An international literature survey of "IARC Group I carcinogens" reported in mainstream cigarette smoke.

    PubMed

    Smith, C J; Livingston, S D; Doolittle, D J

    1997-01-01

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) currently lists 44 individual chemical agents, 12 groups or mixtures of chemicals and 13 exposure circumstances as "Group 1 human carcinogens". A comprehensive search of the published literature revealed that nine of the 44 chemical agents classified as "Group I carcinogens" by IARC have been reported to occur in mainstream cigarette smoke. The other 35 have never been reported to occur in cigarette smoke. The nine agents reported are benzene, cadmium, arsenic, nickel, chromium, 2-naphthyl-amine, vinyl chloride, 4-aminobiphenyl and beryllium. The reported yields of each of these nine agents in mainstream smoke varies widely. The range of yields reported for a given compound is influenced by the type of cigarette tested and when the analysis was conducted. In micrograms/cigarette, the ranges that have been reported for each of the nine compounds are: benzene (0.05-104), cadmium (0-6.67), arsenic (0-1.4), nickel (0-0.51), chromium (0.0002-0.5), 2-naphthylamine (0.0002-0.022), vinyl chloride (0.0013-0.0158), 4-aminobiphenyl (0.00019-0.005) and beryllium (0-0.0005). Although some of the variation in reported yields may be due to differences in analytical methodology, several correlations between the yield of a particular chemical in mainstream smoke and certain cigarette characteristics were observed. For example, charcoal filtration was associated with reduced vinyl chloride, and the concentration of sodium nitrate in the tobacco was positively correlated with the mainstream yield of both 2-naphthylamine and 4-aminobiphenyl. Benzene yield in mainstream cigarette smoke was correlated with the amount of tobacco burned and with the 'tar' level. Agronomic factors such as production practices and soil characteristics, and environmental conditions such as rainfall, reportedly influence the accumulation of metals, for example, cadmium, beryllium, chromium, nickel and arsenic, in the leaf. The use of fertilizers low in

  5. Development and dematerialization: an international study.

    PubMed

    Steinberger, Julia K; Krausmann, Fridolin; Getzner, Michael; Schandl, Heinz; West, Jim

    2013-01-01

    Economic development and growth depend on growing levels of resource use, and result in environmental impacts from large scale resource extraction and emissions of waste. In this study, we examine the resource dependency of economic activities over the past several decades for a set of countries comprising developing, emerging and mature industrialized economies. Rather than a single universal industrial development pathway, we find a diversity of economic dependencies on material use, made evident through cluster analysis. We conduct tests for relative and absolute decoupling of the economy from material use, and compare these with similar tests for decoupling from carbon emissions, both for single countries and country groupings using panel analysis. We show that, over the longer term, emerging and developing countries tend to have significantly larger material-economic coupling than mature industrialized economies (although this effect may be enhanced by trade patterns), but that the contrary is true for short-term coupling. Moreover, we demonstrate that absolute dematerialization limits economic growth rates, while the successful industrialization of developing countries inevitably requires a strong material component. Alternative development priorities are thus urgently needed both for mature and emerging economies: reducing absolute consumption levels for the former, and avoiding the trap of resource-intensive economic and human development for the latter.

  6. Development and Dematerialization: An International Study

    PubMed Central

    Steinberger, Julia K.; Krausmann, Fridolin; Getzner, Michael; Schandl, Heinz; West, Jim

    2013-01-01

    Economic development and growth depend on growing levels of resource use, and result in environmental impacts from large scale resource extraction and emissions of waste. In this study, we examine the resource dependency of economic activities over the past several decades for a set of countries comprising developing, emerging and mature industrialized economies. Rather than a single universal industrial development pathway, we find a diversity of economic dependencies on material use, made evident through cluster analysis. We conduct tests for relative and absolute decoupling of the economy from material use, and compare these with similar tests for decoupling from carbon emissions, both for single countries and country groupings using panel analysis. We show that, over the longer term, emerging and developing countries tend to have significantly larger material-economic coupling than mature industrialized economies (although this effect may be enhanced by trade patterns), but that the contrary is true for short-term coupling. Moreover, we demonstrate that absolute dematerialization limits economic growth rates, while the successful industrialization of developing countries inevitably requires a strong material component. Alternative development priorities are thus urgently needed both for mature and emerging economies: reducing absolute consumption levels for the former, and avoiding the trap of resource-intensive economic and human development for the latter. PMID:24204555

  7. Overlap syndromes: the International Autoimmune Hepatitis Group (IAIHG) position statement on a controversial issue.

    PubMed

    Boberg, Kirsten Muri; Chapman, Roger W; Hirschfield, Gideon M; Lohse, Ansgar W; Manns, Michael P; Schrumpf, Erik

    2011-02-01

    Some patients present with overlapping features between disorders within the spectrum of autoimmune liver diseases (i.e. autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC)) and are commonly classified as having an "overlap syndrome". Standardized definitions of "overlap syndromes" are lacking. The aim of this report by the International Autoimmune Hepatitis Group (IAIHG) is to evaluate if there are important reasons to classify conditions with overlapping features between autoimmune liver diseases as separate diagnostic entities. Definition of diagnostic criteria for overlap conditions can only be arbitrary. The IAIHG scoring system for diagnosis of AIH has been widely used to diagnose "overlap syndromes", but was not intended for such use and has not proven to be an efficient tool for this purpose. Some patients with overlapping features between a cholestatic and hepatitic disorder appear to benefit from treatment with a combination of ursodeoxycholic acid and immunosuppressants, but this strategy is not evidence-based, and it seems unjustified to define new diagnostic groups in this regard. The IAIHG suggests that patients with autoimmune liver disease should be categorized according to the predominating feature(s) as AIH, PBC, and PSC/small duct PSC, respectively, and that those with overlapping features are not considered as being distinct diagnostic entities. The IAIHG scoring system should not be used to establish subgroups of patients. Patients with PBC and PSC with features of AIH should be considered for immunosuppressive treatment. Due to the low prevalence of such "overlap syndromes", prospective interventional therapeutic trials cannot be expected in the foreseeable future.

  8. Perioperative fluid therapy: a statement from the international Fluid Optimization Group.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Lais Helena Camacho; Bloomstone, Joshua A; Auler, Jose Otavio Costa; Cannesson, Maxime; Rocca, Giorgio Della; Gan, Tong J; Kinsky, Michael; Magder, Sheldon; Miller, Timothy E; Mythen, Monty; Perel, Azriel; Reuter, Daniel A; Pinsky, Michael R; Kramer, George C

    2015-01-01

    Perioperative fluid therapy remains a highly debated topic. Its purpose is to maintain or restore effective circulating blood volume during the immediate perioperative period. Maintaining effective circulating blood volume and pressure are key components of assuring adequate organ perfusion while avoiding the risks associated with either organ hypo- or hyperperfusion. Relative to perioperative fluid therapy, three inescapable conclusions exist: overhydration is bad, underhydration is bad, and what we assume about the fluid status of our patients may be incorrect. There is wide variability of practice, both between individuals and institutions. The aims of this paper are to clearly define the risks and benefits of fluid choices within the perioperative space, to describe current evidence-based methodologies for their administration, and ultimately to reduce the variability with which perioperative fluids are administered. Based on the abovementioned acknowledgements, a group of 72 researchers, well known within the field of fluid resuscitation, were invited, via email, to attend a meeting that was held in Chicago in 2011 to discuss perioperative fluid therapy. From the 72 invitees, 14 researchers representing 7 countries attended, and thus, the international Fluid Optimization Group (FOG) came into existence. These researches, working collaboratively, have reviewed the data from 162 different fluid resuscitation papers including both operative and intensive care unit populations. This manuscript is the result of 3 years of evidence-based, discussions, analysis, and synthesis of the currently known risks and benefits of individual fluids and the best methods for administering them. The results of this review paper provide an overview of the components of an effective perioperative fluid administration plan and address both the physiologic principles and outcomes of fluid administration. We recommend that both perioperative fluid choice and therapy be individualized

  9. Transformation of Air Quality Monitor Data from the International Space Station into Toxicological Effect Groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.; Zalesak, Selina M.

    2011-01-01

    The primary reason for monitoring air quality aboard the International Space Station (ISS) is to determine whether air pollutants have collectively reached a concentration where the crew could experience adverse health effects. These effects could be near-real-time (e.g. headache, respiratory irritation) or occur late in the mission or even years later (e.g. cancer, liver toxicity). Secondary purposes for monitoring include discovery that a potentially harmful compound has leaked into the atmosphere or that air revitalization system performance has diminished. Typical ISS atmospheric trace pollutants consist of alcohols, aldehydes, aromatic compounds, halo-carbons, siloxanes, and silanols. Rarely, sulfur-containing compounds and alkanes are found at trace levels. Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations (SMACs) have been set in cooperation with a subcommittee of the National Research Council Committee on Toxicology. For each compound and time of exposure, the limiting adverse effect(s) has been identified. By factoring the analytical data from the Air Quality Monitor (AQM), which is in use as a prototype instrument aboard the ISS, through the array of compounds and SMACs, the risk of 16 specific adverse effects can be estimated. Within each adverse-effect group, we have used an additive model proportioned to each applicable 180-day SMAC to estimate risk. In the recent past this conversion has been performed using archival data, which can be delayed for months after an air sample is taken because it must be returned to earth for analysis. But with the AQM gathering in situ data each week, NASA is in a position to follow toxic-effect groups and correlate these with any reported crew symptoms. The AQM data are supplemented with data from real-time CO2 instruments aboard the ISS and from archival measurements of formaldehyde, which the AQM cannot detect.

  10. Case study for international remote machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Grier C. I.; Kao, Yung-Chou

    1995-08-01

    Owing to the more enhanced networking, the designed data for manufacturing can be transmitted internationally. Therefore, the production of the potential product at one side of the world according to the design requirement at the other side of the world is possible and quicker than ever before. The shipment can be eliminated by producing the product at the potential market place. This paper demonstrates the development of a machining system showing the manufacture of a product based on this idea. Unix, Microsoft Windows, and NFS under the LAN and Internet environment are adopted for data communication and message passing in the devised international remote machining system. The personal computer is the server of the machining center. A C program is developed for the direct control of the machining center through DNC2 interface. The command of machining process is issued from Sun Sparc station to the personal computer through Internet. The devised system structure can also be extended to link with an automatic workpiece loading system, e.g., robot an AGV, to form an automatic machining cell for CIM. The requirements of achieving such an international remote machining cell that links machining center and robot are also discussed.

  11. Core Competencies for Shared Decision Making Training Programs: Insights From an International, Interdisciplinary Working Group

    PubMed Central

    Légaré, France; Moumjid-Ferdjaoui, Nora; Drolet, Renée; Stacey, Dawn; Härter, Martin; Bastian, Hilda; Beaulieu, Marie-Dominique; Borduas, Francine; Charles, Cathy; Coulter, Angela; Desroches, Sophie; Friedrich, Gwendolyn; Gafni, Amiram; Graham, Ian D.; Labrecque, Michel; LeBlanc, Annie; Légaré, Jean; Politi, Mary; Sargeant, Joan; Thomson, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Shared decision making is now making inroads in health care professionals’ continuing education curriculum, but there is no consensus on what core competencies are required by clinicians for effectively involving patients in health-related decisions. Ready-made programs for training clinicians in shared decision making are in high demand, but existing programs vary widely in their theoretical foundations, length, and content. An international, interdisciplinary group of 25 individuals met in 2012 to discuss theoretical approaches to making health-related decisions, compare notes on existing programs, take stock of stakeholders concerns, and deliberate on core competencies. This article summarizes the results of those discussions. Some participants believed that existing models already provide a sufficient conceptual basis for developing and implementing shared decision making competency-based training programs on a wide scale. Others argued that this would be premature as there is still no consensus on the definition of shared decision making or sufficient evidence to recommend specific competencies for implementing shared decision making. However, all participants agreed that there were 2 broad types of competencies that clinicians need for implementing shared decision making: relational competencies and risk communication competencies. Further multidisciplinary research could broaden and deepen our understanding of core competencies for shared decision making training. PMID:24347105

  12. Core competencies for shared decision making training programs: insights from an international, interdisciplinary working group.

    PubMed

    Légaré, France; Moumjid-Ferdjaoui, Nora; Drolet, Renée; Stacey, Dawn; Härter, Martin; Bastian, Hilda; Beaulieu, Marie-Dominique; Borduas, Francine; Charles, Cathy; Coulter, Angela; Desroches, Sophie; Friedrich, Gwendolyn; Gafni, Amiram; Graham, Ian D; Labrecque, Michel; LeBlanc, Annie; Légaré, Jean; Politi, Mary; Sargeant, Joan; Thomson, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Shared decision making is now making inroads in health care professionals' continuing education curriculum, but there is no consensus on what core competencies are required by clinicians for effectively involving patients in health-related decisions. Ready-made programs for training clinicians in shared decision making are in high demand, but existing programs vary widely in their theoretical foundations, length, and content. An international, interdisciplinary group of 25 individuals met in 2012 to discuss theoretical approaches to making health-related decisions, compare notes on existing programs, take stock of stakeholders concerns, and deliberate on core competencies. This article summarizes the results of those discussions. Some participants believed that existing models already provide a sufficient conceptual basis for developing and implementing shared decision making competency-based training programs on a wide scale. Others argued that this would be premature as there is still no consensus on the definition of shared decision making or sufficient evidence to recommend specific competencies for implementing shared decision making. However, all participants agreed that there were 2 broad types of competencies that clinicians need for implementing shared decision making: relational competencies and risk communication competencies. Further multidisciplinary research could broaden and deepen our understanding of core competencies for shared decision making training. Copyright © 2013 The Alliance for Continuing Education in the Health Professions, the Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education, and the Council on CME, Association for Hospital Medical Education.

  13. Management of relapsed multiple myeloma: recommendations of the International Myeloma Working Group.

    PubMed

    Laubach, J; Garderet, L; Mahindra, A; Gahrton, G; Caers, J; Sezer, O; Voorhees, P; Leleu, X; Johnsen, H E; Streetly, M; Jurczyszyn, A; Ludwig, H; Mellqvist, U-H; Chng, W-J; Pilarski, L; Einsele, H; Hou, J; Turesson, I; Zamagni, E; Chim, C S; Mazumder, A; Westin, J; Lu, J; Reiman, T; Kristinsson, S; Joshua, D; Roussel, M; O'Gorman, P; Terpos, E; McCarthy, P; Dimopoulos, M; Moreau, P; Orlowski, R Z; Miguel, J S; Anderson, K C; Palumbo, A; Kumar, S; Rajkumar, V; Durie, B; Richardson, P G

    2016-05-01

    The prognosis for patients multiple myeloma (MM) has improved substantially over the past decade with the development of new, more effective chemotherapeutic agents and regimens that possess a high level of anti-tumor activity. In spite of this important progress, however, nearly all MM patients ultimately relapse, even those who experience a complete response to initial therapy. Management of relapsed MM thus represents a vital aspect of the overall care for patients with MM and a critical area of ongoing scientific and clinical research. This comprehensive manuscript from the International Myeloma Working Group provides detailed recommendations on management of relapsed disease, with sections dedicated to diagnostic evaluation, determinants of therapy, and general approach to patients with specific disease characteristics. In addition, the manuscript provides a summary of evidence from clinical trials that have significantly impacted the field, including those evaluating conventional dose therapies, as well as both autologous and allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Specific recommendations are offered for management of first and second relapse, relapsed and refractory disease, and both autologous and allogeneic transplant. Finally, perspective is provided regarding new agents and promising directions in management of relapsed MM.

  14. Clinical outcome measures for trials in Duchenne muscular dystrophy: report from International Working Group meetings

    PubMed Central

    Bushby, Kate; Connor, Edward

    2012-01-01

    In June 2010, 25 representatives from Europe and the US met in Washington, DC, USA, to discuss clinical outcome measures in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) in the context of clinical trial design and analysis. The workshop was organized in response to a September 2009 European Medicines Agency meeting where a clear directive was given that an international consensus needs to be developed that provides a foundation for age-appropriate clinical outcome measures for use in clinical trials of emerging therapeutics for DMD. Data were presented from eight multicenter longitudinal datasets, representing nearly 1900 patients over a 20-year time period. This experience confirmed the feasibility of repeated evaluations performed at multiple sites and addressed several core issues in drug development for DMD, such as the ‘new’ natural history in the steroidera, reliability and sensitivity of specific outcome measures, as well as disease staging and patient selection. These data form a valuable asset for academic investigators, pharmaceutical sponsors and regulatory agencies involved in DMD therapeutics. The group remains committed working together on a number of collaborative goals to support the therapeutics development effort in this orphan disease and to make these data available to stakeholders working in the field. PMID:22639722

  15. Report of the School Finance Study Group.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin State Dept. of Public Instruction, Madison.

    This document reports the findings of a study assessing the status of school finance in Wisconsin and recommending preferred methods for funding the public schools. Seventy-nine topics were considered in five areas: state support, general aid, categorical aid, factors affecting school costs, and other topics. The study's recommendations regarding…

  16. Watching MOOCs Together: Investigating Co-Located MOOC Study Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Nan; Verma, Himanshu; Skevi, Afroditi; Zufferey, Guillaume; Blom, Jan; Dillenbourg, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Research suggests that massive open online course (MOOC) students prefer to study in groups, and that social facilitation within the study groups may render the learning of difficult concepts a pleasing experience. We report on a longitudinal study that investigates how co-located study groups watch and study MOOC videos together. The study was…

  17. Watching MOOCs Together: Investigating Co-Located MOOC Study Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Nan; Verma, Himanshu; Skevi, Afroditi; Zufferey, Guillaume; Blom, Jan; Dillenbourg, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Research suggests that massive open online course (MOOC) students prefer to study in groups, and that social facilitation within the study groups may render the learning of difficult concepts a pleasing experience. We report on a longitudinal study that investigates how co-located study groups watch and study MOOC videos together. The study was…

  18. Reinventing US Internal Migration Studies in the Age of International Migration.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Mark

    2012-03-01

    I argue that researchers have sidelined attention to issues raised by US internal migration as they shifted focus to the questions posed by the post-1960s rise in US immigration. In this paper, I offer some reasons about why immigration has garnered more attention and why there needs to be greater consideration of US internal migration and its significant and myriad social, economic, political, and cultural impacts. I offer three ideas for motivating more research into US internal geographic mobility that would foreground its empirical and conceptual connections to international migration. First, there should be more work on linked migration systems investigating the connections between internal and international flows. Second, the questions asked about immigrant social, cultural, and economic impacts and adaptations in host societies should also be asked about internal migrants. Third, and more generally, migration researchers should jettison the assumption that the national scale is the pre-eminent delimiter of migration types and processes. Some groups can move easily across borders; others are constrained in their moves within countries. These subnational scales and constraints will become more visible if migration research decentres the national from its theory and empirics.

  19. Reinventing US Internal Migration Studies in the Age of International Migration

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Mark

    2014-01-01

    I argue that researchers have sidelined attention to issues raised by US internal migration as they shifted focus to the questions posed by the post-1960s rise in US immigration. In this paper, I offer some reasons about why immigration has garnered more attention and why there needs to be greater consideration of US internal migration and its significant and myriad social, economic, political, and cultural impacts. I offer three ideas for motivating more research into US internal geographic mobility that would foreground its empirical and conceptual connections to international migration. First, there should be more work on linked migration systems investigating the connections between internal and international flows. Second, the questions asked about immigrant social, cultural, and economic impacts and adaptations in host societies should also be asked about internal migrants. Third, and more generally, migration researchers should jettison the assumption that the national scale is the pre-eminent delimiter of migration types and processes. Some groups can move easily across borders; others are constrained in their moves within countries. These subnational scales and constraints will become more visible if migration research decentres the national from its theory and empirics. PMID:24839406

  20. The effect of personal and group discrimination on the subjective well-being of people with mental illness: the role of internalized stigma and collective action intention.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Garín, Daniel; Molero, Fernando; Bos, Arjan E R

    2017-04-01

    The goal of this study is to test a model in which personal discrimination predicts internalized stigma, while group discrimination predicts a greater willingness to engage in collective action. Internalized stigma and collective action, in turn, are associated to positive and negative affect. A cross-sectional study with 213 people with mental illness was conducted. The model was tested using path analysis. Although the data supported the model, its fit was not sufficiently good. A respecified model, in which a direct path from collective action to internalized stigma was added, showed a good fit. Personal and group discrimination appear to impact subjective well-being through two different paths: the internalization of stigma and collective action intentions, respectively. These two paths, however, are not completely independent, as collective action predicts a lower internalization of stigma. Thus, collective action appears as an important tool to reduce internalized stigma and improve subjective well-being. Future interventions to reduce the impact of stigma should fight the internalization of stigma and promote collective action are suggested.

  1. Characteristics of Highly Talented International Business Professionals Defined: Qualitative Study among International Business Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Heugten, Petra; Heijne-Penninga, Marjolein; Paans, Wolter; Wolfensberger, Marca

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the characteristics of talent in relation to international business to facilitate selection and development of talent in human resources (HR) and human resource development (HRD). Design/methodology/approach: A mixed method design was used: focus groups with business professionals to identify the…

  2. Characteristics of Highly Talented International Business Professionals Defined: Qualitative Study among International Business Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Heugten, Petra; Heijne-Penninga, Marjolein; Paans, Wolter; Wolfensberger, Marca

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the characteristics of talent in relation to international business to facilitate selection and development of talent in human resources (HR) and human resource development (HRD). Design/methodology/approach: A mixed method design was used: focus groups with business professionals to identify the…

  3. The Women in the Army Study Group

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-12-01

    order to facilitate the above, several initiatives are ongoing or have been completed. As part of the study effort, a new methodology for...Research Institute for the Behavioral and Social Sciences has been tasked to validate maximum female content levels recommended by Training and...This point is supported throughout the study . It is clear that the original intent of Congress and, by extension, the intent of the American people

  4. An International Ki67 Reproducibility Study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In breast cancer, immunohistochemical assessment of proliferation using the marker Ki67 has potential use in both research and clinical management. However, lack of consistency across laboratories has limited Ki67’s value. A working group was assembled to devise a strategy to harmonize Ki67 analysis and increase scoring concordance. Toward that goal, we conducted a Ki67 reproducibility study. Methods Eight laboratories received 100 breast cancer cases arranged into 1-mm core tissue microarrays—one set stained by the participating laboratory and one set stained by the central laboratory, both using antibody MIB-1. Each laboratory scored Ki67 as percentage of positively stained invasive tumor cells using its own method. Six laboratories repeated scoring of 50 locally stained cases on 3 different days. Sources of variation were analyzed using random effects models with log2-transformed measurements. Reproducibility was quantified by intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), and the approximate two-sided 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the true intraclass correlation coefficients in these experiments were provided. Results Intralaboratory reproducibility was high (ICC = 0.94; 95% CI = 0.93 to 0.97). Interlaboratory reproducibility was only moderate (central staining: ICC = 0.71, 95% CI = 0.47 to 0.78; local staining: ICC = 0.59, 95% CI = 0.37 to 0.68). Geometric mean of Ki67 values for each laboratory across the 100 cases ranged 7.1% to 23.9% with central staining and 6.1% to 30.1% with local staining. Factors contributing to interlaboratory discordance included tumor region selection, counting method, and subjective assessment of staining positivity. Formal counting methods gave more consistent results than visual estimation. Conclusions Substantial variability in Ki67 scoring was observed among some of the world’s most experienced laboratories. Ki67 values and cutoffs for clinical decision-making cannot be transferred between laboratories without

  5. International Space Station Electrodynamic Tether Reboost Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, L.; Herrmann, M.

    1998-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) will require periodic reboost due to atmospheric aerodynamic drag. This is nominally achieved through the use of thruster firings by the attached Progress M spacecraft. Many Progress flights to the ISS are required annually. Electrodynamic tethers provide an attractive alternative in that they can provide periodic reboost or continuous drag cancellation using no consumables, propellant, nor conventional propulsion elements. The system could also serve as an emergency backup reboost system used only in the event resupply and reboost are delayed for some reason.

  6. Psychological Distress in International University Students: An Australian Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khawaja, Nigar Gohar; Dempsey, Jenny

    2007-01-01

    Australia is a much sought-after destination of study for many thousands of international university students. However, tertiary study brings with it many challenges that may potentially precipitate psychological distress in international students. Psychological distress may be experienced in various ways. The aim of this study was to investigate…

  7. Mongolism, Ciba Foundation Study Group Number 25.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolstenholme, G. E. W., Ed.; Porter, Ruth, Ed.

    Resulting from a 1-day conference on mongolism, the book contains research studies and discussion summaries. Papers include "Parental Age, Live-Birth Order, and Pregnancy-Free Interval in Down's Syndrome in Japan" by E. Matsunaga, "Consanguineous Marriages and Mongolism" by H. Foressman and H. O. Akesson, "Correlation of Dermal Patterns on…

  8. Mongolism, Ciba Foundation Study Group Number 25.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolstenholme, G. E. W., Ed.; Porter, Ruth, Ed.

    Resulting from a 1-day conference on mongolism, the book contains research studies and discussion summaries. Papers include "Parental Age, Live-Birth Order, and Pregnancy-Free Interval in Down's Syndrome in Japan" by E. Matsunaga, "Consanguineous Marriages and Mongolism" by H. Foressman and H. O. Akesson, "Correlation of Dermal Patterns on…

  9. Cluster Analysis in Minority Group Poverty Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, E. Lamar

    This paper, one of a series which arose out of data gathered on Choctaw Indians, Negroes, and whites in a low income area of Mississippi, expands upon one aspect of a recently completed analysis by the author. In the study, an attempt was made to distinguish between the characteristics associated with income levels and those related to ethnic…

  10. International photonics training: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sporea, Dan; Massa, Nicholas; Donnelly, Judith F.; Hanes, Fenna

    2007-06-01

    From 2004, the Center for Science Education and Training (CSET) participated to the European Union-funded educational network "Hands-on Science". The aim of the Romanian team was to transform teachers and students from end-users of educational aids to active designers and developers of instructional materials. Several science fields were identified, including photonics. The team at CSET is now focusing on: lasers and their applications, optical fiber communications, solar energy as a sustainable source, and the use of optical spectroscopy in physics and chemistry. CSET initiated an international collaboration with the New England Board of Higher Education (NEBHE) in Boston, Mass., when the Center enrolled an experienced Romanian high school science teacher in a twelve-week "Introduction to Photonics" laboratory-based professional development course. The course was developed by NEBHE through an Advanced Technological Education (ATE) program grant from National Science Foundation and is designed for high school and community college educators from both science and technology instructional areas. The paper reports the experience of this international participation which was made possible since the course is delivered via the Internet by Three Rivers Community College, Norwich, Conn. Its impact on photonics education in Romania and the USA is analyzed, as the participant teacher shares her experiences with teachers and faculty in the "Introduction to Photonics" course and with those enrolled into the Romanian "Hands-on-Science" program.

  11. Acculturation Needs of Pediatric International Medical Graduates: A Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    Osta, Amanda D; Barnes, Michelle M; Pessagno, Regina; Schwartz, Alan; Hirshfield, Laura E

    2017-01-01

    Phenomenon: International medical graduates (IMGs) play a key role in host countries' health systems but face unique challenges, which makes effective, tailored support for IMGs essential. Prior literature describing the acculturation needs of IMGs focused primarily on communication content and style. We conducted a qualitative study to explore acculturation that might be specific to IMG residents who care for children. In a study conducted from November 2011 to April 2012, we performed four 90-minute semistructured focus groups with 26 pediatric IMG residents from 12 countries. The focus group transcripts were analyzed using open and focused coding methodology. The focus groups and subsequent analysis demonstrated that pediatric IMG residents' socialization to their home culture impacts their transition to practice in the United States; they must adjust not only to a U.S. culture, different from their own, but also to the culture of medicine in the United States. We identified the following new acculturation themes: understanding the education system and family structure, social determinants of health, communication with African American parents, contraception, physician handoffs, physicians' role in prevention, adolescent health, and physicians' role in child advocacy. We further highlight the acculturation challenges faced by pediatric IMG residents and offer brief recommendations for the creation of a deliberate acculturation curriculum for pediatric IMG residents. Insight: Residency training is a unique period in physicians' personal and professional development and can be particularly challenging for IMGs. There is a significant gap in the identified acculturation needs and the current curricula available to IMG residents who care for children.

  12. A Qualitative Study of Health Care Experiences Among International Students.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Anna; Kitsos, Jewel; Miller, Andrea; Abraham, Sam

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the health care experiences of international students at a college in Indiana. The study answered the following research question: What are the lived experiences of international students while seeking health care? This research question was identified after a literature review, which showed a lack of research regarding international students' health care experiences. The data in this study were collected through in-depth interviews with 5 participants who resided at the college. After the interviews, the identification of themes and the analysis of results revealed the international students' lived experiences and perceptions of health care in the United States.

  13. The distinct effects of internalizing weight bias: An experimental study.

    PubMed

    Pearl, Rebecca L; Puhl, Rebecca M

    2016-06-01

    Both experiencing and internalizing weight bias are associated with negative mental and physical health outcomes, but internalization may be a more potent predictor of these outcomes. The current study aimed to differentiate between causal effects of experiencing versus internalizing weight bias on emotional responses and psychological well-being. Adults with overweight/obesity (N=260) completed an online experiment in which they were randomly assigned to focus on either the experience or internalization of weight bias, and completed measures of affect, self-esteem, and body dissatisfaction. Results indicated that the Internalization condition led to more negative affect, less positive affect, and lower self-esteem than the Experience condition. The Internalization condition also led to heightened body dissatisfaction among men, but not women. These findings suggest that weight bias internalization may be a stronger predictor of poor mental and physical health than experiences alone, and carry implications for developing weight bias interventions.

  14. International Myeloma Working Group Recommendations for the Treatment of Multiple Myeloma–Related Bone Disease

    PubMed Central

    Terpos, Evangelos; Morgan, Gareth; Dimopoulos, Meletios A.; Drake, Matthew T.; Lentzsch, Suzanne; Raje, Noopur; Sezer, Orhan; García-Sanz, Ramón; Shimizu, Kazuyuki; Turesson, Ingemar; Reiman, Tony; Jurczyszyn, Artur; Merlini, Giampaolo; Spencer, Andrew; Leleu, Xavier; Cavo, Michele; Munshi, Nikhil; Rajkumar, S. Vincent; Durie, Brian G.M.; Roodman, G. David

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the International Myeloma Working Group was to develop practice recommendations for the management of multiple myeloma (MM) –related bone disease. Methodology An interdisciplinary panel of clinical experts on MM and myeloma bone disease developed recommendations based on published data through August 2012. Expert consensus was used to propose additional recommendations in situations where there were insufficient published data. Levels of evidence and grades of recommendations were assigned and approved by panel members. Recommendations Bisphosphonates (BPs) should be considered in all patients with MM receiving first-line antimyeloma therapy, regardless of presence of osteolytic bone lesions on conventional radiography. However, it is unknown if BPs offer any advantage in patients with no bone disease assessed by magnetic resonance imaging or positron emission tomography/computed tomography. Intravenous (IV) zoledronic acid (ZOL) or pamidronate (PAM) is recommended for preventing skeletal-related events in patients with MM. ZOL is preferred over oral clodronate in newly diagnosed patients with MM because of its potential antimyeloma effects and survival benefits. BPs should be administered every 3 to 4 weeks IV during initial therapy. ZOL or PAM should be continued in patients with active disease and should be resumed after disease relapse, if discontinued in patients achieving complete or very good partial response. BPs are well tolerated, but preventive strategies must be instituted to avoid renal toxicity or osteonecrosis of the jaw. Kyphoplasty should be considered for symptomatic vertebral compression fractures. Low-dose radiation therapy can be used for palliation of uncontrolled pain, impending pathologic fracture, or spinal cord compression. Orthopedic consultation should be sought for long-bone fractures, spinal cord compression, and vertebral column instability. PMID:23690408

  15. A Study of Group Dynamics in Educational Leadership Cohort and Non-Cohort Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenlee, Bobbie J.; Karanxha, Zorka

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine group dynamics of educational leadership students in cohorts and make comparisons with the group dynamics characteristics of non-cohort students. Cohorts have emerged as dynamic and adaptive entities with attendant group dynamic processes that shape collective learning and action. Cohort (n=42) and…

  16. Dialogical Approach Applied in Group Counselling: Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koivuluhta, Merja; Puhakka, Helena

    2013-01-01

    This study utilizes structured group counselling and a dialogical approach to develop a group counselling intervention for students beginning a computer science education. The study assesses the outcomes of group counselling from the standpoint of the development of the students' self-observation. The research indicates that group counselling…

  17. Dialogical Approach Applied in Group Counselling: Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koivuluhta, Merja; Puhakka, Helena

    2013-01-01

    This study utilizes structured group counselling and a dialogical approach to develop a group counselling intervention for students beginning a computer science education. The study assesses the outcomes of group counselling from the standpoint of the development of the students' self-observation. The research indicates that group counselling…

  18. International Space Station (ISS) Anomalies Trending Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beil, Robert J.; Brady, Timothy K.; Foster, Delmar C.; Graber, Robert R.; Malin, Jane T.; Thornesbery, Carroll G.; Throop, David R.

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) set out to utilize data mining and trending techniques to review the anomaly history of the International Space Station (ISS) and provide tools for discipline experts not involved with the ISS Program to search anomaly data to aid in identification of areas that may warrant further investigation. Additionally, the assessment team aimed to develop an approach and skillset for integrating data sets, with the intent of providing an enriched data set for discipline experts to investigate that is easier to navigate, particularly in light of ISS aging and the plan to extend its life into the late 2020s. This report contains the outcome of the NESC Assessment.

  19. Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education (19th, Recife, Brazil, July 22-27, 1995), Volume 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meira, Luciano, Ed.; Carraher, David, Ed.

    This proceedings of the annual conference of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education (PME) includes the following research papers: "The Impact of Meaning on Students' Ability to Negate Statements" (T. Barnard); "A Study of the Secondary Teaching System about the Concept of Limit" (L. Espinosa & C. Azcarate);…

  20. Proceedings of the Conference of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education (21st, Lahti, Finland, July 14-19, 1997). Volume 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pehkonen, Erkki, Ed.

    The fourth volume of the proceedings of 21st annual meeting of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education contains the following papers: (1) "A Model for Discriminating amongst Student Teachers of Mathematics" (P. Perks); (2) "A Study of Teachers' Conceptions about Mathematics" (G.N. Philippou and C.…

  1. Proceedings of the Conference of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education (29th, Melbourne, Australia, July 10-15, 2005). Volume 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chick, Helen L., Ed.; Vincent, Jill L., Ed.

    2005-01-01

    The third volume of the 29th annual conference of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education contains full research report papers. Papers include: (1) Students' Use of ICT Tools: Choices and Reasons (Anne Berit Fuglestad); (2) Interaction of Modalities in Cabri: A Case Study (Fulvia Furinghetti, Francesca Morselli, and…

  2. Independent Senior Women Who Travel Internationally: A Collective Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarrett, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Nine independent women over age 55 who traveled internationally were investigated through a qualitative case study. The purpose of the study was to explore the women's attitudes, actions, and motivations during and after their international travel experiences. The adult, aging, experiential, and transformational theories of researchers such as…

  3. Independent Senior Women Who Travel Internationally: A Collective Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarrett, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Nine independent women over age 55 who traveled internationally were investigated through a qualitative case study. The purpose of the study was to explore the women's attitudes, actions, and motivations during and after their international travel experiences. The adult, aging, experiential, and transformational theories of researchers such as…

  4. International Civic and Citizenship Education Study: Assessment Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schulz, Wolfram; Fraillon, Julian; Ainley, John; Losito, Bruno; Kerr, David

    2008-01-01

    This document outlines the framework and assessment design for the International Civic and Citizenship Education Study (ICCS) sponsored by the International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IEA). Over the past 50 years, IEA has conducted comparative research studies focusing on educational policies, practices, and…

  5. Internal versus external motivation in referral of primary care patients with depression to an internet support group: randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Van Voorhees, Benjamin W; Hsiung, Robert C; Marko-Holguin, Monika; Houston, Thomas K; Fogel, Joshua; Lee, Royce; Ford, Daniel E

    2013-03-12

    Depressive disorders and symptoms affect more than one-third of primary care patients, many of whom do not receive or do not complete treatment. Internet-based social support from peers could sustain depression treatment engagement and adherence. We do not know whether primary care patients will accept referral to such websites nor do we know which methods of referral would be most effective. We conducted a randomized clinical trial to determine whether (1) a simple generic referral card (control), (2) a patient-oriented brochure that provided examples of online postings and experience (internal motivation), or (3) a physician letter of recommendation (external motivation) would generate the greatest participation in a primary care Internet depression treatment support portal focused around an Internet support group (ISG). We used 3 offline methods to identify potential participants who had not used an ISG in the past 6 months. Eligibility was determined in part by a brief structured psychiatric interview based on the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9). After consent and enrollment, participants were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups (control, internal motivation, or external motivation). We constructed a portal to connect primary care patients to both fact-based information and an established ISG (Psycho-Babble). The ISG allowed participants to view messages and then decide if they actually wished to register there. Participation in the portal and the ISG was assessed via automated activity tracking. Fifty participants were assigned to the 3 groups: a motivation-neutral control group (n=18), an internal motivation group (n=19), and an external motivation group (n=13). Of these participants, 31 (62%) visited the portal; 27 (54%) visited the ISG itself. The internal motivation group showed significantly greater participation than the control group on several measures. The external motivation group spent significantly less time logged onto the portal than the

  6. Modern radiation therapy for extranodal lymphomas: field and dose guidelines from the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group.

    PubMed

    Yahalom, Joachim; Illidge, Tim; Specht, Lena; Hoppe, Richard T; Li, Ye-Xiong; Tsang, Richard; Wirth, Andrew

    2015-05-01

    Extranodal lymphomas (ENLs) comprise about a third of all non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL). Radiation therapy (RT) is frequently used as either primary therapy (particularly for indolent ENL), consolidation after systemic therapy, salvage treatment, or palliation. The wide range of presentations of ENL, involving any organ in the body and the spectrum of histological sub-types, poses a challenge both for routine clinical care and for the conduct of prospective and retrospective studies. This has led to uncertainty and lack of consistency in RT approaches between centers and clinicians. Thus far there is a lack of guidelines for the use of RT in the management of ENL. This report presents an effort by the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group (ILROG) to harmonize and standardize the principles of treatment of ENL, and to address the technical challenges of simulation, volume definition and treatment planning for the most frequently involved organs. Specifically, detailed recommendations for RT volumes are provided. We have applied the same modern principles of involved site radiation therapy as previously developed and published as guidelines for Hodgkin lymphoma and nodal NHL. We have adopted RT volume definitions based on the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU), as has been widely adopted by the field of radiation oncology for solid tumors. Organ-specific recommendations take into account histological subtype, anatomy, the treatment intent, and other treatment modalities that may be have been used before RT. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Modern Radiation Therapy for Extranodal Lymphomas: Field and Dose Guidelines From the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group

    SciTech Connect

    Yahalom, Joachim; Illidge, Tim; Specht, Lena; Hoppe, Richard T.; Li, Ye-Xiong; Tsang, Richard; Wirth, Andrew

    2015-05-01

    Extranodal lymphomas (ENLs) comprise about a third of all non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL). Radiation therapy (RT) is frequently used as either primary therapy (particularly for indolent ENL), consolidation after systemic therapy, salvage treatment, or palliation. The wide range of presentations of ENL, involving any organ in the body and the spectrum of histological sub-types, poses a challenge both for routine clinical care and for the conduct of prospective and retrospective studies. This has led to uncertainty and lack of consistency in RT approaches between centers and clinicians. Thus far there is a lack of guidelines for the use of RT in the management of ENL. This report presents an effort by the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group (ILROG) to harmonize and standardize the principles of treatment of ENL, and to address the technical challenges of simulation, volume definition and treatment planning for the most frequently involved organs. Specifically, detailed recommendations for RT volumes are provided. We have applied the same modern principles of involved site radiation therapy as previously developed and published as guidelines for Hodgkin lymphoma and nodal NHL. We have adopted RT volume definitions based on the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU), as has been widely adopted by the field of radiation oncology for solid tumors. Organ-specific recommendations take into account histological subtype, anatomy, the treatment intent, and other treatment modalities that may be have been used before RT.

  8. Factors associated with pharmacy student interest in international study.

    PubMed

    Owen, Chelsea; Breheny, Patrick; Ingram, Richard; Pfeifle, William; Cain, Jeff; Ryan, Melody

    2013-04-12

    OBJECTIVES. To examine the interest of pharmacy students in international study, the demographic factors and involvement characteristics associated with that interest, and the perceived advantages and barriers of engaging in international opportunities during pharmacy school. METHODS. A self-administered electronic survey instrument was distributed to first-, second-, and third-year pharmacy students at the University of Kentucky College of Pharmacy. RESULTS. There were 192 total respondents, for a response rate of 50.9%. Seventy-two percent reported interest in international study. Previous international study experience (p=0.001), previous international travel experience (p=0.002), year in pharmacy school (p=0.03), level of academic involvement (p<0.001), and level of diversity involvement (p<0.001) were associated with international study interest. Positive influences to international study included desire to travel and availability of scholarships. Perceived barriers included an inability to pay expenses and lack of foreign language knowledge. CONCLUSIONS. The needs and interests of pharmacy students should be considered in the development and expansion of internationalization programs in order to effectively optimize global partnerships and available international experiences. Colleges and schools of pharmacy should engage students early in the curriculum when interest in study-abroad opportunities is highest and seek to alleviate concerns about expenses as a primary influence on study-abroad decisions through provision of financial assistance.

  9. Factors Associated With Pharmacy Student Interest in International Study

    PubMed Central

    Owen, Chelsea; Breheny, Patrick; Ingram, Richard; Pfeifle, William; Cain, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. To examine the interest of pharmacy students in international study, the demographic factors and involvement characteristics associated with that interest, and the perceived advantages and barriers of engaging in international opportunities during pharmacy school. Methods. A self-administered electronic survey instrument was distributed to first-, second-, and third-year pharmacy students at the University of Kentucky College of Pharmacy. Results. There were 192 total respondents, for a response rate of 50.9%. Seventy-two percent reported interest in international study. Previous international study experience (p=0.001), previous international travel experience (p=0.002), year in pharmacy school (p=0.03), level of academic involvement (p<0.001), and level of diversity involvement (p<0.001) were associated with international study interest. Positive influences to international study included desire to travel and availability of scholarships. Perceived barriers included an inability to pay expenses and lack of foreign language knowledge. Conclusions. The needs and interests of pharmacy students should be considered in the development and expansion of internationalization programs in order to effectively optimize global partnerships and available international experiences. Colleges and schools of pharmacy should engage students early in the curriculum when interest in study-abroad opportunities is highest and seek to alleviate concerns about expenses as a primary influence on study-abroad decisions through provision of financial assistance. PMID:23610472

  10. 2nd International Gliomatosis Cerebri Working Group Conference | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    On June 22-23, the NIH hosted the 2nd Gliomatosis Cerebri International Conference that brought together leading neuro-oncologists, neuroscientists and families who have lost a child to the disease. Learn more...

  11. Working Group 4 of international standardization organization Experience of developing the standards of space environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panasyuk, M. I.

    2006-01-01

    Over the past decade space environment international standards have been developed within the scope of ISO WG4 activities. This has been the first attempt to develop international standards of physical phenomena of natural environment such as galactic cosmic rays, solar energetic particles, the Earth’s magnetic field, the ionosphere, the plasmasphere, etc. The main difficulty faced when developing the international standards is the lack of common methods for characterizing many natural phenomena. However, if methods have been successfully developed, such standards can play an outstanding role in the engineering requirements for spacecraft designs. This report is a survey of the current status of the international standards under development within the scope of the WG4 activity plan.

  12. Debt cancellation tops agenda of international groups. Issue receives increasing political clout.

    PubMed

    2002-11-01

    International AIDS activists have begun to succeed in bringing the issue of debt relief/cancellation to the attention of political leaders--and the general public--and express optimism that some major changes have begun.

  13. The Experiences of Expert Group Work Supervisors: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atieno Okech, Jane E.; Rubel, Deborah

    2009-01-01

    Evaluation of group work supervision literature suggests that description of expert group work supervisors' experiences could be useful for expanding existing group work supervision practices and models. This study provided a systematic exploration of the experiences of expert group work supervisors during the supervision process. Results indicate…

  14. The International Team in NanosafeTy (TITNT): A Multidisciplinary group for an improvement of Nanorisk Assessment and Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emond, C.; Rolando, C.; Hirano, S.; Schuster, F.; Jolliet, O.; Maghni, K.; Meyer-Plath, A.; Hallé, S.; Vandelac, L.; Sentein, C.; Torkaski, C.

    2011-07-01

    Nanotechnology allows the ability to design many new materials and devices with multiple applications, such as in medicine, electronics, and energy production. However, nanotechnology also raises several concerns about the toxicity and environmental impact of nanomaterials. A report published by the Council of Canadian Academies points out the necessity to respond about many uncertainties associated with risk assessment for ensuring the safety of health and environment. Nanotoxicology (or Nanosafety) is a part of the toxicology science that aims to study adverse effects of nanomaterials or nanoparticles on living organisms. This field includes different aspects from workers prevention to the environment protection. Group of researchers have initiated an international powerful interactive milieu for researchers to work in concert for a global and integrated study of many aspects of nanotoxicology. The International Team in NanosafeTy (TITNT) is composed of research scientists from 5 different countries (Canada, USA, Japan, France and Germany) working together on 6 different specific thematics, and organized as 9 different technology platforms (www.titnt.com). TITNT aims to study different features of nanomaterials related to nanosafety, such as in vivo and in vitro studies, life cycle, occupational protections and monitoring, early biomarkers detection, characterization and nanotoxicokinetic/dynamic assessment during and after nanoparticles synthesis and the societal, public policy and environmental aspects. While the rapid growth of nanotechnology is opening up a floodgate of opportunities, the legislation related is lagging behind mainly because of a lack of knowledge in the biosafety of most nanomaterials. The main goal of TITNT is to improve knowledge in nanosafety science for the benefit of the discipline, for better public policies and for the public itself.

  15. International Learning Adventures: A Phenomenological Exploration of International Backpacker Style Study Abroad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thatcher, Chad Alan

    2010-01-01

    Self-awareness, cultural competency, environmental consciousness, and economic empathy are often achieved through study abroad travel experiences. This phenomenological study was intended to shed light on the international backpacking study abroad experiences for college students, describing the phenomenon from the perspective of the participants…

  16. International Learning Adventures: A Phenomenological Exploration of International Backpacker Style Study Abroad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thatcher, Chad Alan

    2010-01-01

    Self-awareness, cultural competency, environmental consciousness, and economic empathy are often achieved through study abroad travel experiences. This phenomenological study was intended to shed light on the international backpacking study abroad experiences for college students, describing the phenomenon from the perspective of the participants…

  17. Brace Classification Study Group (BCSG): part one - definitions and atlas.

    PubMed

    Grivas, Theodoros B; de Mauroy, Jean Claude; Wood, Grant; Rigo, Manuel; Hresko, Michael Timothy; Kotwicki, Tomasz; Negrini, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    The current increase in types of scoliosis braces defined by a surname or a town makes scientific classification essential. Currently, it is a challenge to compare braces and specify the indications of each brace. A precise definition of the characteristics of current braces is needed. As such, the International Society for Scoliosis Orthopedic and Rehabilitation Treatment (SOSORT) mandated the Brace Classification Study Group (BCSG) to address the pertinent terminology and brace classification. As such, the following study represents the first part of the SOSORT consensus in addressing the definitions and providing a visual atlas of bracing. After a short introduction on the braces, the aim of the BCSG is described and its policies/general consideration are outlined. The BSCG endeavor embraces the very important SOSORT - Scoliosis Research Society cooperation, the history of which is also briefly narrated. This report contains contributions from a multidisciplinary panel of 17 professionals who are part of the BCSG. The BCSG introduced several pertinent domains to characterize bracing systems. The domains are defined to allow for analysis of each brace system. A first approach to brace classification based on some of these proposed domains is presented. The BCSG has reached a consensus on 139 terms related to bracing and has provided over 120 figures to serve as an atlas for educational purposes. This is the first clinical terminology tool for bracing related to scoliosis based on the current scientific evidence and formal multidisciplinary consensus. A visual atlas of various brace types is also provided.

  18. Effectively Integrating an International Field Study into the EMBA Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotner, John; Jones, Raymond; Kashlak, Roger

    2003-01-01

    An international field study (IFS) is an integral part of the EMBA program because of the various critical roles it plays. This international travel experience is a value-added activity not only as "stand alone" vehicle for understanding macro-level environments and firm-level strategic initiatives, but also as a tool that integrates other pieces…

  19. Integrating Material on the Internment into Anthropology and Women's Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sacks, Karen B.

    1993-01-01

    Describes plans to use material from a seminar on integrating material about the Japanese-American internment in World War II into the curriculum of the University of California Los Angeles. Describes efforts to develop a unit on the gender and racial dimensions of internment for a women's studies course. (SLD)

  20. Motivating the Study of International Trade: A Classroom Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Sherry

    2016-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a classroom activity for use in introductory economics courses to motivate the study of international trade. The learning activity highlights the importance of international trade in students' everyday lives by having students inventory their on-hand belongings and identify where the items were manufactured.…

  1. International Standards. U.S. Metric Study Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huntoon, Robert D.; And Others

    In this first interim report on the feasibility of a United States changeover to a metric system stems from the U.S. Metric Study, a series of conclusions and recommendations, based upon a national survey of the role of SI (System's International) units in international trade and other areas of foreign relations, includes the following…

  2. Motivating the Study of International Trade: A Classroom Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Sherry

    2016-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a classroom activity for use in introductory economics courses to motivate the study of international trade. The learning activity highlights the importance of international trade in students' everyday lives by having students inventory their on-hand belongings and identify where the items were manufactured.…

  3. A Program for High School Social Studies: International Relations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloomington Public Schools, MN.

    GRADES OR AGES: High school. SUBJECT MATTER: Social studies, International relations. ORGANIZATION AND PHYSICAL APPEARANCE: The introductory material covers the school district philosophy, a description of the program, major concepts for international relations, and techniques for evaluating objectives. Material is provided for six units…

  4. Cosmos, an international center for advanced studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryzhov, Iurii; Alifanov, Oleg; Sadin, Stanley; Coleman, Paul

    1990-01-01

    The concept of Cosmos, a Soviet operating center for aerospace activities, is presented. The main Cosmos participants are the Institute for Aerospace Education, the Institute for Research and Commercial Development, and the Department of Space Policy and Socio-Economic Studies. Cosmos sponsors a number of educational programs, basic research, and studies of the social impact of space-related technologies.

  5. Using Case Studies: An International Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClam, Tricia; Woodside, Marianne

    2005-01-01

    Case studies as an instructional strategy have been used in many disciplines, including law, teacher education, science, medicine, and business. Among the benefits of this method of instruction are involving students in learning, developing their critical thinking skills, promoting communication, and engaging in critical analysis. Case studies are…

  6. Cosmos, an international center for advanced studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryzhov, Iurii; Alifanov, Oleg; Sadin, Stanley; Coleman, Paul

    1990-01-01

    The concept of Cosmos, a Soviet operating center for aerospace activities, is presented. The main Cosmos participants are the Institute for Aerospace Education, the Institute for Research and Commercial Development, and the Department of Space Policy and Socio-Economic Studies. Cosmos sponsors a number of educational programs, basic research, and studies of the social impact of space-related technologies.

  7. Collaboration in Distance Education. International Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moran, Louise, Ed.; Mugridge, Ian, Ed.

    This book contains nine case studies of collaboration in distance education. The case studies focus on such aspects of collaboration in distance education as the following: roles of individual institutional partners; importance of personal relationships; benefits of collaboration to individual partners; conflicts between collaboration and…

  8. Impact of Training on Change in Practice for Education Assistants in a Group of International Private Schools in Hong Kong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Richard; Forlin, Chris

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports research that evaluated the efficacy of training for education assistants and its impact upon changing practices in a group of private international schools in Hong Kong, China. Two cohorts of education assistants received training through an education institute. The focus was on supporting and fostering inclusive practices in…

  9. 76 FR 37037 - Requirements for Group Health Plans and Health Insurance Issuers Relating to Internal Claims and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-24

    ... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 54 RIN 1545-BJ62 Requirements for Group Health Plans and Health..., Health care, Health insurance, Pensions, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements. Proposed Amendments to... the Center for Consumer Information & Insurance Oversight of the U.S. Department of Health and Human...

  10. 75 FR 43109 - Requirements for Group Health Plans and Health Insurance Issuers Relating to Internal Claims and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-23

    ... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 54 RIN 1545-BJ62 Requirements for Group Health Plans and Health... taxes, Health care, Health insurance, Pensions, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements. Proposed... Insurance Oversight of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services are issuing substantially similar...

  11. A Mathematical Model of the Effects of Internal Group Pressures, of Group Communication, and of Out-Group Communication on Attitude Change in Human Communication Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, J. David

    A mathematical model that describes attitude change in human communication networks is developed in this paper. The parameters of the model are drawn from a review of the literature related to network analysis, small group influence, mass communication, and attitude change. The literature review identifies key variables that influence attitude…

  12. International.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoover, Linn

    1979-01-01

    The International Geological Correlation Project has attained scientific maturity and broad support and participation by geologists world wide. Its purpose is to provide a mechanism for international cooperation and information exchange about geological problems that transcend national boundaries. (Author/BB)

  13. International Educational Interactions and Students' Critical Consciousness: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Aldrich, Rebecca M; Grajo, Lenin C

    Online technologies facilitate connections between students around the world, but their impact on occupational science and occupational therapy students' critical consciousness about culture is underexplored. In this article we present research on five groups of occupational science and occupational therapy students across two cohorts at one Midwestern university. We used a pretest-posttest group design and the Multicultural Experiences Questionnaire to investigate the potential influence of students' exposure to international educational interactions on their multicultural experiences and desires. Of 157 students surveyed, those who experienced the greatest number of international educational interactions demonstrated statistically significant increases in their desire to become acquainted with other people of different backgrounds and to explore their own prejudices and biases. Given the transformative potential of international educational interactions, future research must assess the ways in which such interactions affect critical cultural consciousness apart from other educational content and design. Copyright © 2017 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  14. International Study of Chaplains' Attitudes About Research.

    PubMed

    Snowden, Austyn; Fitchett, George; Grossoehme, Daniel H; Handzo, George; Kelly, Ewan; King, Stephen D W; Telfer, Iain; Tan, Heather; Flannelly, Kevin J

    2017-01-01

    An online survey was conducted by twelve professional chaplain organizations to assess chaplains' attitudes about and involvement in research. A total of 2,092 chaplains from 23 countries responded to the survey. Over 80% thought research was definitely important and nearly 70% thought chaplains should definitely be research literate. Just over 40% said they regularly read research articles and almost 60% said they occasionally did. The respondents rated their own research literacy as 6.5 on a 0-10 scale. Significant positive inter-correlations were found among all four measures: importance of (a) research and (b) research literacy; (c) frequency of reading articles; and (d) research literacy rating. Approximately 35% were never involved, 37% had been involved, 17% were currently involved, and 11% expected to be involved in research. The last three groups were significantly more likely to think research and research literacy were important and to read research articles than chaplains who were never involved in research. Given chaplains' interest in research, actions should be undertaken to facilitate further research engagement.

  15. Building International Sustainable Partnerships in Occupational Therapy: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Tupe, Debra Ann; Kern, Stephen B; Salvant, Sabrina; Talero, Pamela

    2015-09-01

    Occupational therapy practitioners frequently identify opportunities for international practice. The World Health Organization and the World Federation of Occupational Therapists have encouraged occupational therapists to address transnational issues, social inclusion, and equal access to opportunities grounded in meaningful occupation (WFOT, 2012). This case study describes a partnership between two U.S. schools of occupational therapy and a Cuban community based pediatric clinic. It examines the dynamics that have sustained the partnership despite political, economic, and logistical barriers. The literature is scrutinized to show how this case study fits into other accounts of collaborative international partnerships. Particularly, it investigates structural and institutional conditions that shape international sustainable partnerships. In doing so, we answer the following questions: (1) Under which circumstances do international partnerships emerge and flourish? (2) What structural and institutional conditions shape international sustainable partnerships? And (3) How do partners perceive and experience the bilateral international partnership? It also discusses and illustrates the foundations and development of international partnerships that succeed. Through the use of a case study we illustrate the development of this partnership. Finally, we consider the next steps of this particular sustainable and collaborative international partnership.

  16. Study Abroad: The Reality of Building Dynamic Group Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ransbury, Molly K.; Harris, Sandra A.

    1994-01-01

    The collaborative effort of a professor of human development with expertise in group process and a general education professor with expertise in Greek mythology and culture uses a case study format to apply theoretical models of group dynamics to the travel and learning experience of study abroad. Implications for course design and group process…

  17. Professional Development within Collaborative Teacher Study Groups: Pitfalls and Promises

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanley, Ann Marie

    2011-01-01

    Teacher study groups are often thought to be effective professional development structures. Such teacher communities may foster teacher learning through a collaborative culture and the codification of group members' collective knowledge. However, not all study groups are effective professional development. This article is a discussion of factors…

  18. CHOP-like chemotherapy with or without rituximab in young patients with good-prognosis diffuse large-B-cell lymphoma: 6-year results of an open-label randomised study of the MabThera International Trial (MInT) Group.

    PubMed

    Pfreundschuh, Michael; Kuhnt, Evelyn; Trümper, Lorenz; Osterborg, Anders; Trneny, Marek; Shepherd, Lois; Gill, Devinder S; Walewski, Jan; Pettengell, Ruth; Jaeger, Ulrich; Zinzani, Pier-Luigi; Shpilberg, Ofer; Kvaloy, Stein; de Nully Brown, Peter; Stahel, Rolf; Milpied, Noel; López-Guillermo, Armando; Poeschel, Viola; Grass, Sandra; Loeffler, Markus; Murawski, Niels

    2011-10-01

    The MInT study was the first to show improved 3-year outcomes with the addition of rituximab to a CHOP (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone)-like regimen in young patients with good-prognosis diffuse large-B-cell lymphoma. Extended follow-up was needed to establish long-term effects. In the randomised open-label MInT study, patients from 18 countries (aged 18-60 years with none or one risk factor according to the age-adjusted International Prognostic Index [IPI], stage II-IV disease or stage I disease with bulk) were randomly assigned to receive six cycles of a CHOP-like chemotherapy with or without rituximab. Bulky and extranodal sites received additional radiotherapy. Randomisation was done centrally with a computer-based tool and was stratified by centre, bulky disease, age-adjusted IPI, and chemotherapy regimen by use of a modified minimisation algorithm that incorporated a stochastic component. Patients and investigators were not masked to treatment allocation. The primary endpoint was event-free survival. Analyses were by intention to treat. This observational study is a follow-up of the MInT trial, which was stopped in 2003, and is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00400907. The intention-to-treat population included 410 patients assigned to chemotherapy alone and 413 assigned to chemotherapy plus rituximab. After a median follow-up of 72 months (range 0·03-119), 6-year event-free survival was 55·8% (95% CI 50·4-60·9; 166 events) for patients assigned to chemotherapy alone and 74·3% (69·3-78·6; 98 events) for those assigned to chemotherapy plus rituximab (difference between groups 18·5%, 11·5-25·4, log-rank p<0·0001). Multivariable analyses showed that event-free survival was affected by treatment group, presence of bulky disease, and age-adjusted IPI and that overall survival was affected by treatment group and presence of bulky disease only. After chemotherapy and rituximab, a favourable subgroup (IPI=0, no bulk

  19. Research studies with the International Ultraviolet Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The IUE research studies comprises 118 separate research programs involving observations, data analysis, and research conducted of the IUE satellite and the NASA Astrophysics Data Program. Herein are presented 92 programs. For each program there is a title, program ID, name of the investigator, statement of work, summary of results, and list of publications.

  20. A Group Approach in a Community Empowerment: A Case Study of Waste Recycling Group in Jakarta

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadiyanti, Puji

    2016-01-01

    This study reviews a group approach in empowering the community through waste recycling activities related to the development of human resources in Jakarta. The specific objectives to be achieved are the wish to understand and find: (1) Conditions of waste recycling empowerment in Jakarta, (2) Mechanisms of a group approach in empowering…