Science.gov

Sample records for internet informatics gemini

  1. Geo-Engineering through Internet Informatics (GEMINI)

    SciTech Connect

    Doveton, John H.; Watney, W. Lynn

    2003-03-06

    The program, for development and methodologies, was a 3-year interdisciplinary effort to develop an interactive, integrated Internet Website named GEMINI (Geo-Engineering Modeling through Internet Informatics) that would build real-time geo-engineering reservoir models for the Internet using the latest technology in Web applications.

  2. Geo-Engineering through Internet Informatics (GEMINI)

    SciTech Connect

    Watney, W. Lynn; Doveton, John H.; Victorine, John R.; Bohling, Goeffrey C.; Bhattacharya, Saibal; Byers, Alan P.; Carr, Timothy R.; Dubois, Martin K.; Gagnon, Glen; Guy, Willard J.; Look, Kurt; Magnuson, Mike; Moore, Melissa; Olea, Ricardo; Pakalapadi, Jayprakash; Stalder, Ken; Collins, David R.

    2002-06-25

    GEMINI will resolve reservoir parameters that control well performance; characterize subtle reservoir properties important in understanding and modeling hydrocarbon pore volume and fluid flow; expedite recognition of bypassed, subtle, and complex oil and gas reservoirs at regional and local scale; differentiate commingled reservoirs; build integrated geologic and engineering model based on real-time, iterate solutions to evaluate reservoir management options for improved recovery; provide practical tools to assist the geoscientist, engineer, and petroleum operator in making their tasks more efficient and effective; enable evaluations to be made at different scales, ranging from individual well, through lease, field, to play and region (scalable information infrastructure); and provide training and technology transfer to evaluate capabilities of the client.

  3. GEO-ENGINEERING MODELING THROUGH INTERNET INFORMATICS (GEMINI)

    SciTech Connect

    W. Lynn Watney; John H. Doveton

    2004-05-13

    GEMINI (Geo-Engineering Modeling through Internet Informatics) is a public-domain web application focused on analysis and modeling of petroleum reservoirs and plays (http://www.kgs.ukans.edu/Gemini/index.html). GEMINI creates a virtual project by ''on-the-fly'' assembly and analysis of on-line data either from the Kansas Geological Survey or uploaded from the user. GEMINI's suite of geological and engineering web applications for reservoir analysis include: (1) petrofacies-based core and log modeling using an interactive relational rock catalog and log analysis modules; (2) a well profile module; (3) interactive cross sections to display ''marked'' wireline logs; (4) deterministic gridding and mapping of petrophysical data; (5) calculation and mapping of layer volumetrics; (6) material balance calculations; (7) PVT calculator; (8) DST analyst, (9) automated hydrocarbon association navigator (KHAN) for database mining, and (10) tutorial and help functions. The Kansas Hydrocarbon Association Navigator (KHAN) utilizes petrophysical databases to estimate hydrocarbon pay or other constituent at a play- or field-scale. Databases analyzed and displayed include digital logs, core analysis and photos, DST, and production data. GEMINI accommodates distant collaborations using secure password protection and authorized access. Assembled data, analyses, charts, and maps can readily be moved to other applications. GEMINI's target audience includes small independents and consultants seeking to find, quantitatively characterize, and develop subtle and bypassed pays by leveraging the growing base of digital data resources. Participating companies involved in the testing and evaluation of GEMINI included Anadarko, BP, Conoco-Phillips, Lario, Mull, Murfin, and Pioneer Resources.

  4. Distributed medical informatics education using internet2.

    PubMed

    Tidmarsh, Patrica J; Cummings, Joseph; Hersh, William R; Freidman, Charles P

    2002-01-01

    The curricula of most medical informatics training programs are incomplete. We used Internet2-based videoconferencing to expand the educational opportunities of medical informatics students at Oregon Health & Science University and the University of Pittsburgh. Students and faculty in both programs shared extra-curricular research conferences and journal club meetings. A course in Information Retrieval was made available to students in both programs. The conferences, meetings and class were well accepted by participants. A few problems were experienced with the technology, some of which were resolved, and some non-technical challenges to distributing academic conferences, meetings and coursework were also uncovered. We plan to continue our efforts with expanded course and extra-curricular offerings and a more comprehensive evaluation strategy.

  5. Distributed Medical Informatics Education Using Internet2

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, Joseph; Tidmarsh, Patricia; Hersh, William; Friedman, Charles

    2001-01-01

    The subject expertise of most medical informatics training programs funded by the National Library of Medicine (NLM) is incomplete. This not only limits the topical content students from individual sites are taught, but also restricts the project work they can undertake. This goal of this pilot project is to enable students in the informatics programs at two different sites - Oregon Health Sciences University (OHSU) and University of Pittsburgh (UP) - to have access to a broader range of faculty, their subject expertise, and other students with whom to collaborate using high-speed networking and distance learning modalities. Students at OHSU and UP participate in real time training program activities via IP-based/Internet2 videoconferences.

  6. Distributed medical informatics education using internet2.

    PubMed Central

    Tidmarsh, Patrica J.; Cummings, Joseph; Hersh, William R.; Freidman, Charles P.

    2002-01-01

    The curricula of most medical informatics training programs are incomplete. We used Internet2-based videoconferencing to expand the educational opportunities of medical informatics students at Oregon Health & Science University and the University of Pittsburgh. Students and faculty in both programs shared extra-curricular research conferences and journal club meetings. A course in Information Retrieval was made available to students in both programs. The conferences, meetings and class were well accepted by participants. A few problems were experienced with the technology, some of which were resolved, and some non-technical challenges to distributing academic conferences, meetings and coursework were also uncovered. We plan to continue our efforts with expanded course and extra-curricular offerings and a more comprehensive evaluation strategy. PMID:12463932

  7. Medical informatics on the Internet: creating the sci.med. informatics newsgroup.

    PubMed Central

    Zakaria, A M; Sittig, D F

    1995-01-01

    A Usenet newsgroup, sci.med.informatics, has been created to serve as an international electronic forum for discussion of issues related to medical informatics. The creation process follows a set of administrative rules set out by the Usenet administration on the Internet and consists of five steps: 1) informal discussion, 2) request for formal discussion, 3) formal discussion, 4) voting, and 5) posting of results. The newsgroup can be accessed using any news reader via the Internet. PMID:7583645

  8. Gemini

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    Rear view of rendezvous docking simulator. Francis B. Smith wrote: 'The rendezvous and docking operation of the Gemini spacecraft with the Agena and of the Apollo Command Module with the Lunar Excursion Module have been the subject of simulator studies for several years. [This figure] illustrates the Gemini-Agena rendezvous docking simulator at Langley. The Gemini spacecraft was supported in a gimbal system by an overhead crane and gantry arrangement which provided 6 degrees of freedom - roll, pitch, yaw, and translation in any direction - all controllable by the astronaut in the spacecraft. Here again the controls fed into a computer which in turn provided an input to the servos driving the spacecraft so that it responded to control motions in a manner which accurately simulated the Gemini spacecraft.'

  9. Gemini

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    Gemini Rendezvous Docking Simulator suspended from the roof of the Langley Research Center's aircraft hanger closing in on its Agena target. Francis B. Smith wrote in his paper 'Simulators for Manned Space Research,' 'The rendezvous and docking operation of the Gemini spacecraft with the Agena and of the Apollo Command Module with the Lunar Excursion Module have been the subject of simulator studies for several years. [This figure] illustrates the Gemini-Agena rendezvous docking simulator at Langley. The Gemini spacecraft was supported in a gimbal system by an overhead crane and gantry arrangement which provided 6 degrees of freedom - roll, pitch, yaw, and translation in any direction - all controllable by the astronaut in the spacecraft. Here again the controls fed into a computer which in turn provided an input to the servos driving the spacecraft so that it responded to control motions in a manner which accurately simulated the Gemini spacecraft.' This is a photograph of 'the Gemini spacecraft approaching the Agena target in a final docking maneuver.'

  10. Gemini

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    Multiple exposure of Gemini rendezvous docking simulator. Francis B. Smith wrote in his paper 'Simulators for Manned Space Research,' 'The rendezvous and docking operation of the Gemini spacecraft with the Agena and of the Apollo Command Module with the Lunar Excursion Module have been the subject of simulator studies for several years. [This figure] illustrates the Gemini-Agena rendezvous docking simulator at Langley. The Gemini spacecraft was supported in a gimbal system by an overhead crane and gantry arrangement which provided 6 degrees of freedom - roll, pitch, yaw, and translation in any direction - all controllable by the astronaut in the spacecraft. Here again the controls fed into a computer which in turn provided an input to the servos driving the spacecraft so that it responded to control motions in a manner which accurately simulated the Gemini spacecraft.' A.W. Vogeley further described the simulator in his paper 'Discussion of Existing and Planned Simulators For Space Research,' 'Docking operations are considered to start when the pilot first can discern vehicle target size and aspect and terminate, of course, when soft contact is made. ... This facility enables simulation of the docking operation from a distance of 200 feet to actual contact with the target. A full-scale mock-up of the target vehicle is suspended near one end of the track. ... On [the Agena target] we have mounted the actual Agena docking mechanism and also various types of visual aids. We have been able to devise visual aids which have made it possible to accomplish nighttime docking with as much success as daytime docking.'

  11. The next generation Internet and health care: a civics lesson for the informatics community.

    PubMed Central

    Shortliffe, E. H.

    1998-01-01

    The Internet provides one of the most compelling examples of the way in which government research investments can, in time, lead to innovations of broad social and economic impact. This paper reviews the history of the Internet's evolution, emphasizing in particular its relationship to medical informatics and to the nation's health-care system. Current national research programs are summarized and the need for more involvement by the informatics community and by federal health-care agencies is emphasized. PMID:9929176

  12. Realisation of Post-Graduate Training for Teachers of Informatics of Rural Secondary Schools via Internet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavendels, Jurijs; Shitikov, Vjacheslav; Klints, Daile

    2007-01-01

    The Curriculum combining both traditional classrooms and Internet-based activities for regular post-graduate training for the teachers in informatics is developed, approved by the Ministry of Education and Science and implemented in Latvian Republic. The Curriculum is anticipated for teachers from rural schools, excludes embarrassing overnight…

  13. New approaches to health promotion and informatics education using Internet in the Czech Republic.

    PubMed

    Zvárová, J

    2005-01-01

    The paper describes nowadays information technology skills in the Czech Republic. It focuses on informatics education using Internet, ECDL concept and the links between computer literacy among health care professionals and quality of health care. Everyone understands that the main source of wealth of any nation is information management and the efficient transformation of information into knowledge. There appear completely new decisive factors for the economics of the near future based on circulation and exchange information. It is clear that modern health care cannot be built without information and communication technologies. We discuss several approaches how to contribute to some topics of information society in health care, namely the role of electronic health record, structured information, extraction of information from free medical texts and sharing knowledge stored in medical guidelines.

  14. 10 years experience with pioneering open access publishing in health informatics: the Journal of Medical Internet Research (JMIR).

    PubMed

    Eysenbach, Gunther

    2010-01-01

    Peer-reviewed journals remain important vehicles for knowledge transfer and dissemination in health informatics, yet, their format, processes and business models are changing only slowly. Up to the end of last century, it was common for individual researchers and scientific organizations to leave the business of knowledge transfer to professional publishers, signing away their rights to the works in the process, which in turn impeded wider dissemination. Traditional medical informatics journals are poorly cited and the visibility and uptake of articles beyond the medical informatics community remain limited. In 1999, the Journal of Medical Internet Research (JMIR; http://www.jmir.org) was launched, featuring several innovations including 1) ownership and copyright retained by the authors, 2) electronic-only, "lean" non-for-profit publishing, 3) openly accessible articles with a reversed business model (author pays instead of reader pays), 4) technological innovations such as automatic XML tagging and reference checking, on-the-fly PDF generation from XML, etc., enabling wide distribution in various bibliographic and full-text databases. In the past 10 years, despite limited resources, the journal has emerged as a leading journal in health informatics, and is presently ranked the top journal in the medical informatics and health services research categories by impact factor. The paper summarizes some of the features of the Journal, and uses bibliometric and access data to compare the influence of the Journal on the discipline of medical informatics and other disciplines. While traditional medical informatics journals are primarily cited by other Medical Informatics journals (33%-46% of citations), JMIR papers are to a more often cited by "end-users" (policy, public health, clinical journals), which may be partly attributable to the "open access advantage".

  15. Museum Informatics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marty, Paul F.; Rayward, W. Boyd; Twidale, Michael B.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses museum informatics that studies how information science and technology affect the museum environment. Examines digital technology; information organization and access; digitization, personal computers, and the Internet; data sharing; standards; social impacts of new technologies; collaboration; consortia; multimedia exhibits; virtual…

  16. Museum Informatics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marty, Paul F.; Rayward, W. Boyd; Twidale, Michael B.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses museum informatics that studies how information science and technology affect the museum environment. Examines digital technology; information organization and access; digitization, personal computers, and the Internet; data sharing; standards; social impacts of new technologies; collaboration; consortia; multimedia exhibits; virtual…

  17. Informatic nephrology.

    PubMed

    Musso, Carlos; Aguilera, Jerónimo; Otero, Carlos; Vilas, Manuel; Luna, Daniel; de Quirós, Fernán González Bernaldo

    2013-08-01

    Biomedical informatics in Health (BIH) is the discipline in charge of capturing, handling and using information in health and biomedicine in order to improve the processes involved with assistance and management. Informatic nephrology has appeared as a product of the combination between conventional nephrology with BIH and its development has been considerable in the assistance as well as in the academic field. Regarding the former, there is increasing evidence that informatics technology can make nephrological assistance be better in quality (effective, accessible, safe and satisfying), improve patient's adherence, optimize patient's and practitioner's time, improve physical space and achieve health cost reduction. Among its main elements, we find electronic medical and personal health records, clinical decision support system, tele-nephrology, and recording and monitoring devices. Additionally, regarding the academic field, informatics and Internet contribute to education and research in the nephrological field. In conclusion, informatics nephrology represents a new field which will influence the future of nephrology.

  18. Evidence-based Patient Choice and Consumer health informatics in the Internet age

    PubMed Central

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we explore current access to and barriers to health information for consumers. We discuss how computers and other developments in information technology are ushering in the era of consumer health informatics , and the potential that lies ahead. It is clear that we witness a period in which the public will have unprecedented ability to access information and to participate actively in evidence-based health care. We propose that consumer health informatics be regarded as a whole new academic discipline, one that should be devoted to the exploration of the new possibilities that informatics is creating for consumers in relation to health and health care issues. PMID:11720961

  19. Health Informatics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Marie; Brittain, J. Michael

    2002-01-01

    Identifies current trends and issues in health informatics with examples of applications, particularly in English-speaking countries. Topics include health systems, professionals, and patients; consumer health information; electronic medical records; nursing; privacy and confidentiality; finding and using information; the Internet; e-mail;…

  20. Health Informatics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Marie; Brittain, J. Michael

    2002-01-01

    Identifies current trends and issues in health informatics with examples of applications, particularly in English-speaking countries. Topics include health systems, professionals, and patients; consumer health information; electronic medical records; nursing; privacy and confidentiality; finding and using information; the Internet; e-mail;…

  1. Gemini 6 patch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-01-01

    The Gemini 6 patch is hexagonal in shape, reflecting the mission number; and the spacecraft trajectory also traces out the number "6". The Gemini 6 spacecraft is shown superimposed on the "twin stars" Castor and Pollux, for "Gemini".

  2. Gemini Observatory Multi-continental Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, James R.

    2002-11-01

    The Gemini Observatory operates two 8-meter IR/optical telescopes: one in Hawaii and the other in Chile. High-speed network connections among all of the mountain telescopes, their sea-level bases, and a support facility in Tucson are essential to their operation, providing video and audio communications, administrative computing systems, remote telescope operation, scientific data management, and many other applications. All the sites have recently been connected via the Abilene network, through collaborations with more than a dozen astronomy facilities near of the various Gemini sites, with Florida International University's AMPATH program, with various providers, and with grant support for the National Science Foundation. While the bandwidth levels required will change over time, Gemini's current objective is a minimum 10 Mbps presence on Internet2 to and from its principal sites. The Gemini North, Gemini South, and Tucson sites are at this level or better. Gemini North has been upgraded to a burst capability up to 155 Mbps to the US Mainland Internet2. Gemini South has burst capability to 10 Mbps, with 6 Mbps guarantied to the US Mainland Internet2.

  3. Use of XML and Java for collaborative petroleum reservoir modeling on the Internet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Victorine, John; Watney, W. Lynn; Bhattacharya, Saibal

    2005-11-01

    The GEMINI (Geo-Engineering Modeling through INternet Informatics) is a public-domain, web-based freeware that is made up of an integrated suite of 14 Java-based software tools to accomplish on-line, real-time geologic and engineering reservoir modeling. GEMINI facilitates distant collaborations for small company and academic clients, negotiating analyses of both single and multiple wells. The system operates on a single server and an enterprise database. External data sets must be uploaded into this database. Feedback from GEMINI users provided the impetus to develop Stand Alone Web Start Applications of GEMINI modules that reside in and operate from the user's PC. In this version, the GEMINI modules run as applets, which may reside in local user PCs, on the server, or Java Web Start. In this enhanced version, XML-based data handling procedures are used to access data from remote and local databases and save results for later access and analyses. The XML data handling process also integrates different stand-alone GEMINI modules enabling the user(s) to access multiple databases. It provides flexibility to the user to customize analytical approach, database location, and level of collaboration. An example integrated field-study using GEMINI modules and Stand Alone Web Start Applications is provided to demonstrate the versatile applicability of this freeware for cost-effective reservoir modeling.

  4. Use of XML and Java for collaborative petroleum reservoir modeling on the Internet

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Victorine, J.; Watney, W.L.; Bhattacharya, S.

    2005-01-01

    The GEMINI (Geo-Engineering Modeling through INternet Informatics) is a public-domain, web-based freeware that is made up of an integrated suite of 14 Java-based software tools to accomplish on-line, real-time geologic and engineering reservoir modeling. GEMINI facilitates distant collaborations for small company and academic clients, negotiating analyses of both single and multiple wells. The system operates on a single server and an enterprise database. External data sets must be uploaded into this database. Feedback from GEMINI users provided the impetus to develop Stand Alone Web Start Applications of GEMINI modules that reside in and operate from the user's PC. In this version, the GEMINI modules run as applets, which may reside in local user PCs, on the server, or Java Web Start. In this enhanced version, XML-based data handling procedures are used to access data from remote and local databases and save results for later access and analyses. The XML data handling process also integrates different stand-alone GEMINI modules enabling the user(s) to access multiple databases. It provides flexibility to the user to customize analytical approach, database location, and level of collaboration. An example integrated field-study using GEMINI modules and Stand Alone Web Start Applications is provided to demonstrate the versatile applicability of this freeware for cost-effective reservoir modeling. ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Gemini Space Program emblem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    The insignia of the Gemini space program is a disc of dark blue as a background for a gold Zodiac Gemini symbol. A white star on each of the two vertical curves of the Gemini symbol represent the Gemini twins, Pollux and Castor.

  6. Advancing the Gemini Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammel, Heidi B.; Levenson, Nancy A.

    2012-11-01

    Gemini Science and User Meeting; San Francisco, California, 17-20 July 2012 More than 100 astronomers gathered in San Francisco to discuss results from the Gemini Observatory and to plan for its future. The Gemini Observatory consists of twin 8.1 meter diameter optical/infrared telescopes located on mountaintops in Hawai'i and Chile. Gemini was built and is operated by an international partnership that currently includes the United States, the United Kingdom, Canada, Chile, Australia, Brazil, and Argentina.

  7. The Transformation of Observatory Newsletters - A Gemini Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoyu

    2015-08-01

    Astronomical observatories publish newsletters to communicate the observatory’s new discoveries and activities with its user communities, funding agencies, and general public. Gemini Observatory started publishing the newsletter in March 1992. Over the years, it transformed from a no-frills black and white publication to a full-color magazine type newsletter with a special name “GeminiFocus”. Since 2012, the contents of GeminiFocus moved from print to digital with an additional print issue of the Year in Review. The newsletter transformation is in sync with the rapid development of the internet technologies. We discuss here the evolvement of Gemini newsletter and the lessons learned.

  8. [Biomedical informatics].

    PubMed

    Capurro, Daniel; Soto, Mauricio; Vivent, Macarena; Lopetegui, Marcelo; Herskovic, Jorge R

    2011-12-01

    Biomedical Informatics is a new discipline that arose from the need to incorporate information technologies to the generation, storage, distribution and analysis of information in the domain of biomedical sciences. This discipline comprises basic biomedical informatics, and public health informatics. The development of the discipline in Chile has been modest and most projects have originated from the interest of individual people or institutions, without a systematic and coordinated national development. Considering the unique features of health care system of our country, research in the area of biomedical informatics is becoming an imperative.

  9. Informatics Moments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Kate

    2012-01-01

    The informatics moment is the moment when a person seeks help in using some digital technology that is new to him or her. This article examines the informatics moment in people's everyday lives as they sought help at a branch public library. Four types of literacy were involved: basic literacy (reading and writing), computer literacy (use of a…

  10. Informatics Moments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Kate

    2012-01-01

    The informatics moment is the moment when a person seeks help in using some digital technology that is new to him or her. This article examines the informatics moment in people's everyday lives as they sought help at a branch public library. Four types of literacy were involved: basic literacy (reading and writing), computer literacy (use of a…

  11. Gemini Program Mission Report: Gemini IV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    The second manned mission of the Gemini Program, Gemini IV, was launched from Complex 19 at Cape Kennedy, Florida, at 10:16 a.m. e.s.t. on June 3, 1965. The mission was successfully concluded on June 7, 1965, with the recovery of the spacecraft by the prime recovery ship, the aircraft carrier U.S.S. Wasp, at 27 deg 44' N. latitude, 74 deg 11' W. longitude at 2:28 p.m. e.s.t. This manned long-duration flight was accomplished 10 weeks after the three-orbit manned flight which qualified the Gemini spacecraft and systems for orbital flight. The spacecraft was manned by Astronaut James A. McDivitt, command pilot, and Astronaut Edward H. White II, pilot. The flight crew completed the 4-day mission in excellent physical condition, and demonstrated full control of the spacecraft and competent management of all aspects of the mission.

  12. Instrumentation at Gemini Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinman, S. J.; Boccas, Maxime; Goodsell, Stephen J.; Gomez, Percy; Murowinski, Rick; Chené, André-Nicolas; Henderson, David

    2014-07-01

    Gemini South's instrument suite has been completely transformed since our last biennial update. We commissioned the Gemini Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics System (GeMS) and its associated Gemini South Adaptive Optics Imager (GSAOI) as well as Flamingos-2, our long-slit and multi-object infrared imager and spectrograph, and the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI). We upgraded the CCDs in GMOS-S, our multi-object optical imager and spectrograph, with the GMOS-N CCD upgrade scheduled for 2015. Our next instrument, the Gemini High-resolution Optical SpecTrograph (GHOST) is in its preliminary design stage and we are making plans for the instrument to follow:Gen4#3.

  13. Gemini Rendezvous Docking Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    Gemini Rendezvous Docking Simulator suspended from the roof of the Langley Research Center's aircraft hanger. Francis B. Smith wrote: 'The rendezvous and docking operation of the Gemini spacecraft with the Agena and of the Apollo Command Module with the Lunar Excursion Module have been the subject of simulator studies for several years. [This figure] illustrates the Gemini-Agena rendezvous docking simulator at Langley. The Gemini spacecraft was supported in a gimbal system by an overhead crane and gantry arrangement which provided 6 degrees of freedom - roll, pitch, yaw, and translation in any direction - all controllable by the astronaut in the spacecraft. Here again the controls fed into a computer which in turn provided an input to the servos driving the spacecraft so that it responded to control motions in a manner which accurately simulated the Gemini spacecraft.'

  14. Gemini IRAF: Data reduction software for the Gemini telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gemini Observatory; AURA

    2016-08-01

    The Gemini IRAF package processes observational data obtained with the Gemini telescopes. It is an external package layered upon IRAF and supports data from numerous instruments, including FLAMINGOS-2, GMOS-N, GMOS-S, GNIRS, GSAOI, NIFS, and NIRI. The Gemini IRAF package is organized into sub-packages; it contains a generic tools package, "gemtools", along with instrument-specific packages. The raw data from the Gemini facility instruments are stored as Multi-Extension FITS (MEF) files. Therefore, all the tasks in the Gemini IRAF package, intended for processing data from the Gemini facility instruments, are capable of handling MEF files.

  15. The Scope and Direction of Health Informatics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGinnis, Patrick J.

    2001-01-01

    Health Informatics (HI) is a dynamic discipline based upon the medical sciences, information sciences, and cognitive sciences. Its domain is can broadly be defined as medical information management. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of this domain, discuss the current "state of the art" , and indicate the likely growth areas for health informatics. The sources of information utilized in this paper are selected publications from the literature of Health Informatics, HI 5300: Introduction to Health Informatics, which is a course from the Department of Health Informatics at the University of Texas Houston Health Sciences Center, and the author's personal experience in practicing telemedicine and implementing an electronic medical record at the NASA Johnson Space Center. The conclusion is that the direction of Health Informatics is in the direction of data management, transfer, and representation via electronic medical records and the Internet.

  16. The scope and direction of health informatics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGinnis, Patrick J.

    2002-01-01

    Health Informatics (HI) is a dynamic discipline based on the medical sciences, information sciences, and cognitive sciences. Its domain can broadly be defined as medical information management. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of this domain, discuss the current "state of the art," and indicate the likely growth areas for health informatics. The sources of information used in this paper are selected publications from the literature of Health Informatics, HI 5300: Introduction to Health Informatics, which is a course from the Department of Health Informatics at the University of Texas Houston Health Sciences Center, and the author's personal experience in practicing telemedicine and implementing an electronic medical record at the NASA-Johnson Space Center. The conclusion is that the direction of Health Informatics is in the direction of data management, transfer, and representation via electronic medical records and the Internet.

  17. Internet in the Indian Context.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rao, Sizigendi Subba

    This paper presents briefly the concept of the Internet and lists the Internet service providers in India (Education and Research Network from Department of Electronics, National Informatics Network from National Informatics Center, Gateway Internet Access Service from Videsh Sanchar Nigam Limited, and SOFTNET from Software Technology Parks India)…

  18. View of the Gemini 6 and Gemini 7 rendezvous

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-12-15

    S65-63198 (15 Dec. 1965) --- The Gemini-7 spacecraft as seen from the Gemini-6 spacecraft during their rendezvous mission in space. They are approximately 39 feet apart. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  19. Recent advances in gemini surfactants: oleic Acid-based gemini surfactants and polymerizable gemini surfactants.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Kenichi; Sakai, Hideki; Abe, Masahiko

    2011-01-01

    Gemini surfactants recently developed by our research group are introduced from the standpoints of their syntheses, aqueous solution properties, and potential applications. Two series of gemini surfactants are introduced in this short review, the first of which is the oleic acid-based gemini surfactants, and the second is the polymerizable gemini surfactants. These gemini surfactants have been developed not only as environmentally friendly materials (the use of gemini surfactants enables the reduction of the total consumption of surfactants in chemical products owing to their excellent adsorption and micellization capabilities at low concentrations) but also as functional organic materials.

  20. Gemini telescope structure design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raybould, Keith; Gillett, Paul E.; Hatton, Peter; Pentland, Gordon; Sheehan, Mike; Warner, Mark

    1994-06-01

    The Gemini project is an international collaboration to design, fabricate, and assemble two 8 M telescopes, one on Mauna Kea in Hawaii, the other on Cerro Pachon in Chile. The telescopes will be national facilities designed to meet the Gemini Science Requirements (GSR), a document developed by the Gemini Science Committee (GSC) and the national project scientists. The Gemini telescope group, based on Tucson, has developed a telescope structure to meet the GSR. This paper describes the science requirements that have technically driven the design, and the features that have been incorporated to meet these requirements. This is followed by a brief description of the telescope design. Finally, analyses that have been performed and development programs that have been undertaken are described briefly. Only the designs that have been performed by the Gemini Telescope Structure, Building and Enclosure Group are presented here; control, optical systems, acquisition and guiding, active and adaptive optics, Cassegrain rotator and instrumentation issues are designed and managed by others and will not be discussed here, except for a brief description of the telescope configurations to aid subsequent discussions.

  1. GEMINI- INSIGNIA - SPACE PROGRAM - MSC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-08-30

    S65-54354 (30 Aug. 1965) --- The insignia of the Gemini Space Program is a disc of dark blue as a background for a gold Zodiac Gemini symbol. A white star on each of the two vertical curves of the Gemini symbol represent the Gemini twins, Pollux and Castor. The NASA insignia design for Gemini flights is reserved for use by the astronauts and for other official use as the NASA Administrator may authorize. Public availability has been approved only in the form of illustrations by the various news media. When and if there is any change in this policy, which we do not anticipate, it will be publicly announced.

  2. GEMINI-6 - RECOVERY - ATLANTIC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-12-16

    S65-61824 (16 Dec. 1965) --- A helicopter hovers over the Gemini-6 spacecraft after it splashed down 12 miles from the aircraft carrier USS Wasp in the western Atlantic recovery area at 10:29 a.m. Dec. 16, 1965. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  3. Climate Informatics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monteleoni, Claire; Schmidt, Gavin A.; Alexander, Francis J.; Niculescu-Mizil, Alexandru; Steinhaeuser, Karsten; Tippett, Michael; Banerjee, Arindam; Blumenthal, M. Benno; Ganguly, Auroop R.; Smerdon, Jason E.; Tedesco, Marco

    2013-01-01

    The impacts of present and potential future climate change will be one of the most important scientific and societal challenges in the 21st century. Given observed changes in temperature, sea ice, and sea level, improving our understanding of the climate system is an international priority. This system is characterized by complex phenomena that are imperfectly observed and even more imperfectly simulated. But with an ever-growing supply of climate data from satellites and environmental sensors, the magnitude of data and climate model output is beginning to overwhelm the relatively simple tools currently used to analyze them. A computational approach will therefore be indispensable for these analysis challenges. This chapter introduces the fledgling research discipline climate informatics: collaborations between climate scientists and machine learning researchers in order to bridge this gap between data and understanding. We hope that the study of climate informatics will accelerate discovery in answering pressing questions in climate science.

  4. Gemini Instrument Upgrade Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, Ruben; Goodsell, Stephen; Kleinman, Scot

    2016-08-01

    The Gemini Observatory* remains committed to keeping its operational instrumentation competitive and serving the needs of its user community. Currently the observatory operates a 4 instruments + 1 AO system at each site. At Gemini North the GMOS-N, GNIRS, NIFS and NIRI instruments are offered supported by the ALTAIR AO system. In the south, GMOS-S, F-2, GPI and GSAOI are offered instrumentation and GeMS is the provided AO System. This paper reviews our strategy to keep our instrumentation suite competitive, examines both our current funded upgrade projects and our potential future enhancements. We summarize the work done and the results so far obtained within the instrument upgrade program.

  5. ROUNDUP - GEMINI XII - RECOVERY

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-11-01

    S66-59940 (15 Nov. 1966) --- Astronauts James A. Lovell Jr. (right), command pilot, and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., pilot, are welcomed aboard the aircraft carrier USS Wasp after their Gemini-12 spacecraft splashed down in the Atlantic Ocean recovery area at 2:21 p.m. (EST), Nov. 15, 1966, to conclude a four-day mission in space. Photo credit: NASA

  6. Gemini Scout Control Software

    SciTech Connect

    Clinton Hobart, Justin Garretson

    2010-11-23

    The Gemini Scout Control Software consists of two Windows applications that allow the Gemini Scout vehicle to be controlled by an operator. The Embedded application runs on the vehicle's Gemini Scout Control Software onboard computer and controls the vehicle's various motors and sensors. This application reports the vehicle's status and receives vehicle commands overthe local-area-network. The Embedded applicationalso allows the user to control the vehicle using a USB game-pad connected directly to the vehicle. The Operator Control Unit (OCU) application runs on an external PC and communicates with the vehicle via an Ethernet connection. The OCU application sends commands to and receives data from the Embedded application running on the vehicle. The OCU application also communicates directly with the digital video encoders and radios in order to display video from the vehicle's cameras and the status of the radio link. The OCU application has a graphical user interface (GUI) that displays the vehicle's status and allows the user to change various vehicle settings. Finally, the OCU application receives input from a USB game-pad connected to the PC in order to control the vehicle's functions.

  7. GEMINI-9 - EARTH SKY - ATDA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-06-06

    S66-37972 (3 June 1966) ?-- The Augmented Target Docking Adapter (ATDA) is photographed from the Gemini-9 spacecraft during one of three rendezvous occasions in space. The ATDA and Gemini-9 spacecraft are 35.5 feet apart in this view. Failure of the docking adapter protective cover on the ATDA to fully separate prevented the docking of the two spacecraft. The ATDA was described by the Gemini-9 crew members as an ?angry alligator.? Photo credit: NASA

  8. GEMINI-9 - EARTH SKY - ATDA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-06-06

    S66-37943 (3 June 1966) --- The Augmented Target Docking Adapter is photographed against the background of the blackness of space from the Gemini-9 spacecraft during one of their three rendezvous in space. The ATDA and Gemini-9 spacecraft are 71.5 feet apart. Failure of the docking adapter protective cover to fully separate on the ATDA prevented the docking of the two spacecraft. The ATDA was described by the Gemini-9 crew as an ?Angry Alligator.? Photo credit: NASA

  9. Gemini 11 prime crew prepare to enter Gemini 11 spacecraft

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-09-10

    S66-57967 (10 Sept. 1966) --- Gemini-11 prime crew, astronauts Charles Conrad Jr. (right), command pilot, and Richard F. Gordon Jr. (left), pilot, prepare to enter the Gemini-11 spacecraft in the White Room atop Pad 19. Photo credit: NASA

  10. View of the Gemini 6 and Gemini 7 rendezvous

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-12-15

    S65-63113 (15 Dec. 1965) --- This photograph of the Gemini-7 spacecraft was taken from the hatch window of the Gemini-6 spacecraft during rendezvous and station keeping maneuvers at an altitude of approximately 160 miles on Dec. 15, 1965. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  11. GEMINI-9 - EARTH SKY - EVA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-06-05

    S66-38050 (5 June 1966) --- Astronaut Eugene A. Cernan took this close-up view of the Gemini-9A spacecraft during his extravehicular activity (EVA) on the Gemini-9A mission. Taken during the 32nd revolution of the 72-hour, 21-minute spaceflight. Photo credit: NASA

  12. The Gemini Planet Imager

    SciTech Connect

    Macintosh, B; al., e

    2006-05-02

    The next major frontier in the study of extrasolar planets is direct imaging detection of the planets themselves. With high-order adaptive optics, careful system design, and advanced coronagraphy, it is possible for an AO system on a 8-m class telescope to achieve contrast levels of 10{sup -7} to 10{sup -8}, sufficient to detect warm self-luminous Jovian planets in the solar neighborhood. Such direct detection is sensitive to planets inaccessible to current radial-velocity surveys and allows spectral characterization of the planets, shedding light on planet formation and the structure of other solar systems. We have begun the construction of such a system for the Gemini Observatory. Dubbed the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI), this instrument should be deployed in 2010 on the Gemini South telescope. It combines a 2000-actuator MEMS-based AO system, an apodized-pupil Lyot coronagraph, a precision infrared interferometer for real-time wavefront calibration at the nanometer level, and a infrared integral field spectrograph for detection and characterization of the target planets. GPI will be able to achieve Strehl ratios > 0.9 at 1.65 microns and to observe a broad sample of science targets with I band magnitudes less than 8. In addition to planet detection, GPI will also be capable of polarimetric imaging of circumstellar dust disks, studies of evolved stars, and high-Strehl imaging spectroscopy of bright targets. We present here an overview of the GPI instrument design, an error budget highlighting key technological challenges, and models of the system performance.

  13. Genome Informatics

    PubMed Central

    Winslow, Raimond L.; Boguski, Mark S.

    2005-01-01

    This article reviews recent advances in genomics and informatics relevant to cardiovascular research. In particular, we review the status of (1) whole genome sequencing efforts in human, mouse, rat, zebrafish, and dog; (2) the development of data mining and analysis tools; (3) the launching of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Programs for Genomics Applications and Proteomics Initiative; (4) efforts to characterize the cardiac transcriptome and proteome; and (5) the current status of computational modeling of the cardiac myocyte. In each instance, we provide links to relevant sources of information on the World Wide Web and critical appraisals of the promises and the challenges of an expanding and diverse information landscape. PMID:12750305

  14. Gemini experiment S026

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medved, D. B.

    1971-01-01

    The results of the reduction and analysis of data obtained from the S026 experiment from Gemini 10 and 11 flights are presented. The electron and ion sensors were continuously operative throughout both missions from shroud removal (about 6 minutes after Agena liftoff to power-down conditions one week later). Data on ion and electron currents, electron temperature, and vehicle potential were obtained at a sample rate of 32 times per second on positive ions for each of two ion sensors and once every 1.067 seconds for the electron sensor. Only the data reduction of the Gemini plasma wake measurements comprising roughly twenty minutes of data for six maneuvers programed for wake measurements are considered. The intermediate depletion zone, between 1 and 10 vehicle radii downstream from the object, is emphasized. The smallest characteristic radius of interest is 1.34 feet and the largest is 5 feet. This implies a separation span extending from approximately 1.5 feet at the closest approach to at least 50 feet into the far field.

  15. Project Gemini online digital archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2012-01-01

    An archive containing the first high-resolution digital scans of the original flight films from Project Gemini, the second U.S. human spaceflight program, was unveiled by the NASA Johnson Space Center and Arizona State University's (ASU) School of Earth and Space Exploration on 6 January. The archive includes images from 10 flights. Project Gemini, which ran from 1964 to 1966, followed Project Mercury and preceded the Apollo spacecraft. Mercury and Apollo imagery are also available through ASU. For more information, see http://tothemoon.ser.asu.edu/gallery/gemini and http://apollo.sese.asu.edu/index.html.

  16. Gemini VI Mission Image - Rendezvous with Gemini VII

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-12-17

    S65-63189 (15 Dec. 1965) --- The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Gemini-7 spacecraft as seen from the Gemini-6 spacecraft during their rendezvous mission in space. The two spacecraft are approximately 43 feet apart. This image was taken with a modified 70mm Hasselblad camera, using Eastman Kodak, Ektachrome (S.O. 217) color film. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  17. Janus and Gemini Nanoplates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Zhengdong; Mejia, Andres; Chang, Ya-Wen; He, Peng; Diaz, Agustin; Clearfield, Abraham

    2011-03-01

    Janus particles were used to make stable Pickering emulsions (emulsions stabilized by particles). Here we demonstrated a novel method to produce high aspect ratio Janus plates with atomic thickness. Gemini plates with only the edges functionalized are also fabricated. These novel nanoplates are observed to have super surface activity. Most importantly, these particles overcome the two opposite effects in the stabilization of Pickering emulsions using spherical particles: stabilization requires particles as small as possible; but smaller particles are easy to escape the interface due to Brownian motion since the adsorption energy to the oil-water interface is proportional to the diameter of the spheres. Our nanoplates have a large aspect ratio due to the extremely thin thickness, which offers extraordinary stability to the liquid film between two emulsions to prevent coalescence. In the meantime, their large lateral surface area offers strong adsorption energy at the oil-water interface.

  18. Gemini 9 spacecraft recovery operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    The Gemini 9-A spacecraft, with Astronauts Thomas Stafford and Eugene Cernan still inside, in water as the aircraft carrier U.S.S. Wasp, the recovery ship, comes alongside to recover the astronauts and their spaceship.

  19. GEMINI-4 - SPACE FOOD - MSC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-05-01

    Food packages for use on the Gemini-Titan 4 (GT-4) flight. Packages include beef and gravy, peaches, strawberry cereal cubes and beef sandwiches. A water gun is used to reconstitute the dehydrated food. MSC, HOUSTON, TX CN

  20. Portrait - Gemini 11 - Prime Crew

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-01-01

    S65-58504 (4 Nov. 1965) --- Astronauts Charles Conrad Jr., (right) prime crew command pilot, and Richard F. Gordon Jr., prime crew pilot, for the Gemini-Titan XI (GT-11) Earth-orbital mission. Photo credit: NASA

  1. Gemini 9 spacecraft recovery operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    The Gemini 9-A spacecraft, with Astronauts Thomas Stafford and Eugene Cernan still inside, in water as the aircraft carrier U.S.S. Wasp, the recovery ship, comes alongside to recover the astronauts and their spaceship.

  2. Gemini VIII Mission Image - Agena

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-03-16

    S66-25779 (16 March 1966) --? The Agena Target Docking Vehicle seen from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration?s Gemini-8 spacecraft during rendezvous in space. The Agena is approximately 210 feet away from the nose of the spacecraft (lower left). Crewmen for the Gemini-8 mission were astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, command pilot, and David R. Scott, pilot. Photo credit: NASA

  3. Infodemiology and infoveillance: framework for an emerging set of public health informatics methods to analyze search, communication and publication behavior on the Internet.

    PubMed

    Eysenbach, Gunther

    2009-03-27

    Infodemiology can be defined as the science of distribution and determinants of information in an electronic medium, specifically the Internet, or in a population, with the ultimate aim to inform public health and public policy. Infodemiology data can be collected and analyzed in near real time. Examples for infodemiology applications include the analysis of queries from Internet search engines to predict disease outbreaks (eg. influenza), monitoring peoples' status updates on microblogs such as Twitter for syndromic surveillance, detecting and quantifying disparities in health information availability, identifying and monitoring of public health relevant publications on the Internet (eg. anti-vaccination sites, but also news articles or expert-curated outbreak reports), automated tools to measure information diffusion and knowledge translation, and tracking the effectiveness of health marketing campaigns. Moreover, analyzing how people search and navigate the Internet for health-related information, as well as how they communicate and share this information, can provide valuable insights into health-related behavior of populations. Seven years after the infodemiology concept was first introduced, this paper revisits the emerging fields of infodemiology and infoveillance and proposes an expanded framework, introducing some basic metrics such as information prevalence, concept occurrence ratios, and information incidence. The framework distinguishes supply-based applications (analyzing what is being published on the Internet, eg. on Web sites, newsgroups, blogs, microblogs and social media) from demand-based methods (search and navigation behavior), and further distinguishes passive from active infoveillance methods. Infodemiology metrics follow population health relevant events or predict them. Thus, these metrics and methods are potentially useful for public health practice and research, and should be further developed and standardized.

  4. Infodemiology and Infoveillance: Framework for an Emerging Set of Public Health Informatics Methods to Analyze Search, Communication and Publication Behavior on the Internet

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Infodemiology can be defined as the science of distribution and determinants of information in an electronic medium, specifically the Internet, or in a population, with the ultimate aim to inform public health and public policy. Infodemiology data can be collected and analyzed in near real time. Examples for infodemiology applications include: the analysis of queries from Internet search engines to predict disease outbreaks (eg. influenza); monitoring peoples' status updates on microblogs such as Twitter for syndromic surveillance; detecting and quantifying disparities in health information availability; identifying and monitoring of public health relevant publications on the Internet (eg. anti-vaccination sites, but also news articles or expert-curated outbreak reports); automated tools to measure information diffusion and knowledge translation, and tracking the effectiveness of health marketing campaigns. Moreover, analyzing how people search and navigate the Internet for health-related information, as well as how they communicate and share this information, can provide valuable insights into health-related behavior of populations. Seven years after the infodemiology concept was first introduced, this paper revisits the emerging fields of infodemiology and infoveillance and proposes an expanded framework, introducing some basic metrics such as information prevalence, concept occurrence ratios, and information incidence. The framework distinguishes supply-based applications (analyzing what is being published on the Internet, eg. on Web sites, newsgroups, blogs, microblogs and social media) from demand-based methods (search and navigation behavior), and further distinguishes passive from active infoveillance methods. Infodemiology metrics follow population health relevant events or predict them. Thus, these metrics and methods are potentially useful for public health practice and research, and should be further developed and standardized. PMID:19329408

  5. [Current perspectives in nursing informatics].

    PubMed

    Marin, Heimar de Fátima; Cunha, Isabel Cristina Kowal Olm

    2006-01-01

    Nursing Informatics is the area of knowledge that studies the application of technological resources in teaching, in practice, in care, and in the management of care. Resources such as voice recognition, knowledge base, genoma project and even Internet have offered to Nursing a gama of possibilities for a better professional performance and better nursing care to the patient/client. This text reports and exemplifies how these resources are impacting and presenting new oportunities for teaching, research and specially for nursing care, still warns for the importance of humanized care in a high-tech scenario.

  6. The Gemini Planet Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, James R.; Macintosh, Bruce; Perrin, Marshall D.; Ingraham, Patrick; Konopacky, Quinn M.; Marois, Christian; Poyneer, Lisa; Bauman, Brian; Barman, Travis; Burrows, Adam Seth; Cardwell, Andrew; Chilcote, Jeffrey K.; De Rosa, Robert John J.; Dillon, Daren; Doyon, Rene; Dunn, Jennifer; Erikson, Darren; Fitzgerald, Michael P.; Gavel, Donald; Goodsell, Stephen J.; Hartung, Markus; Hibon, Pascale; Kalas, Paul; Larkin, James E.; Maire, Jerome; Marchis, Franck; Marley, Mark S.; McBride, James; Millar-Blanchaer, Max; Morzinski, Kathleen M.; Nielsen, Eric L.; Norton, Andew; Oppenheimer, Rebecca; Palmer, David; Patience, Jenny; Pueyo, Laurent; Rantakyro, Fredrik; Sadakuni, Naru; Saddlemeyer, Leslie; Savransky, Dmitry; Serio, Andrew W.; Soummer, Remi; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand; Song, Inseok; Thomas, Sandrine; Wallace, J. Kent; Wang, Jason; Wiktorowicz, Sloane; Wolff, Schulyer; Gpi/Gpies Team

    2015-01-01

    The Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) is a dedicated facility for directly imaging and spectroscopically characterizing extrasolar planets. It combines a very high-order adaptive optics system, a diffraction-suppressing coronagraph, and an integral field spectrograph with low spectral resolution but high spatial resolution. Every aspect of GPI has been tuned for maximum sensitivity to faint planets near bright stars. GPI has undergone a year of commissioning, verification, and calibration work. We have achieved an estimated H-band contrast (5-sigma) of 106 at 0.75 arcseconds and 105 at 0.35 arcseconds in spectral mode, and suppression of unpolarized starlight by a factor of 800 in imaging polarimetry mode. Early science observations include study of the spectra of β Pic b and HR 8799, orbital investigations of β Pic b and PZ Tel, and observations of the debris disk systems associated with β Pic, AU Mic, and HR 4796A. An 890-hour exoplanet survey with GPI is scheduled to begin in late 2014. A status report for the campaign will be presented.

  7. Gemini 12 spacecraft seen during EVA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-11-13

    S66-63011 (13 Nov. 1966) --- Astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., pilot of the Gemini-12 spaceflight, took this picture of the Gemini-12 spacecraft during standup extravehicular activity (EVA) with the hatch open. Photo credit: NASA

  8. View of the Gemini 6 and Gemini 7 rendezvous

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-12-15

    S65-63220 (15 Dec. 1965) --- This photograph of the Gemini-Titan 7 (GT-7) spacecraft was taken from the Gemini-Titan 6 (GT-6) spacecraft during the historic rendezvous of the two spacecraft on Dec. 15, 1965. The two spacecraft are some 37 feet apart here. Earth can be seen below. Astronauts Walter M. Schirra Jr., command pilot; and Thomas P. Stafford, pilot, were inside the GT-6 spacecraft, while crewmen for the GT-7 mission were astronauts Frank Borman, command pilot, and James A. Lovell Jr., pilot. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  9. Earth Science Informatics Comes of Age

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jodha, Siri; Khalsa, S.; Ramachandran, Rahul

    2014-01-01

    The volume and complexity of Earth science data have steadily increased, placing ever-greater demands on researchers, software developers and data managers tasked with handling such data. Additional demands arise from requirements being levied by funding agencies and governments to better manage, preserve and provide open access to data. Fortunately, over the past 10-15 years significant advances in information technology, such as increased processing power, advanced programming languages, more sophisticated and practical standards, and near-ubiquitous internet access have made the jobs of those acquiring, processing, distributing and archiving data easier. These advances have also led to an increasing number of individuals entering the field of informatics as it applies to Geoscience and Remote Sensing. Informatics is the science and technology of applying computers and computational methods to the systematic analysis, management, interchange, and representation of data, information, and knowledge. Informatics also encompasses the use of computers and computational methods to support decisionmaking and other applications for societal benefits.

  10. RECOVERY - GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-4 - ATLANTIC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-06-07

    S65-33490 (7 June 1965) --- A United States Navy frogman team participates in the recovery of the Gemini-Titan 4 (GT-4) spacecraft. The USS Wasp was the prime recovery ship for the Gemini-4 mission. The crew of the Gemini-4 spaceflight was astronauts James A. McDivitt, command pilot, and Edward H. White II, pilot.

  11. Recovery of Gemini 4 spacecraft and astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Recovery of Gemini 4 spacecraft and astronauts. Views include Astronaut James A. McDivitt, command pilot of the Gemini 4 space flight, sitting in life raft awaiting pickup by helicopter from the recovery ship, the aircraft carrier U.S.S. Wasp (33490); Navy frogmen stand on the flotation collar of the Gemini 4 spacecraft during recovery operations (33491).

  12. Index maps for Gemini earth photography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giddings, L. E.

    1975-01-01

    Index maps for the Gemini missions are presented; these are for the Gemini 3 through Gemini 12 missions. The maps are divided into four sections: the whole earth; the Western Hemisphere and eastern Pacific Ocean; Africa, India, and the Near East; and Asia, Australia, and the Pacific Ocean.

  13. Recovery of Gemini 4 spacecraft and astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Recovery of Gemini 4 spacecraft and astronauts. Views include Astronaut James A. McDivitt, command pilot of the Gemini 4 space flight, sitting in life raft awaiting pickup by helicopter from the recovery ship, the aircraft carrier U.S.S. Wasp (33490); Navy frogmen stand on the flotation collar of the Gemini 4 spacecraft during recovery operations (33491).

  14. Structure-function study of gemini derivatives with two different side chains at C-20, Gemini-0072 and Gemini-0097.

    PubMed

    Huet, Tiphaine; Maehr, Hubert; Lee, Hong Jin; Uskokovic, Milan R; Suh, Nanjoo; Moras, Dino; Rochel, Natacha

    2011-01-01

    Derivatives of vitamin D(3) containing a second side-chain emanating at C-20 are known as gemini and act as vitamin D receptor agonists. Recently, two of these, namely Gemini-0072 and the epimeric Gemini-0097, were selected for further studies in view of their high biological activities and lack of hypercalcemic effects. We now show that the two analogs recruit coactivator SRC-1 better than the parental gemini and act as VDR superagonists. The crystal structures of complexes of zVDR with Gemini-0072 and Gemini-0097 indicate that these ligands induce an extra cavity within the ligand-binding pocket similar to gemini and that their superagonistic activity is due to an increased stabilization of helix H12.

  15. [Medical informatics--today and tomorrow].

    PubMed

    Dezelić, Gjuro

    2007-09-01

    The status of medical informatics, a comparatively new biomedical discipline beginning to develop in the second half of the 20th century, is described at the transition into the 21st century. The appearance of new information and communication technologies, among which Internet nas special importance, was a major impulse to the development of medical informatics in its different fields. Health information systems are integrating, while at the same time, by distribution of their parts, they become available to the individual healthcare user. These processes put the problems of interoperability and standardization into the focus of contemporary medical informatics. The electronic health record is recognized as a key instrument of modern healthcare systems, and its development and implementation are being planned at many places. Whereas the research and application of medical decision support systems are stagnating, new disciplines have emerged such as telemedicine, cybermedicine and bioinformatics. The perspectives of the future development of medical informatics are described. In the appendix, a chronology of the development of medical informatics from its beginning to the present time is given.

  16. El Observatorio Gemini - Status actual

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levato, H.

    Se hace una breve descripción de la situación actual del Observatorio Gemini y de las últimas decisiones del Board para incrementar la eficiencia operativa. Se hace también una breve referencia al uso argentino del observatorio.

  17. Clinical Informatics Board Specialty Certification for Physicians: A Global View.

    PubMed

    Gundlapalli, Adi V; Gundlapalli, Aditya V; Greaves, William W; Kesler, Denece; Murray, Peter; Safran, Charles; Lehmann, Christoph U

    2015-01-01

    Clinical informatics workforce development is a high priority for medicine. Professional board certification for physicians is an important tool to demonstrating excellence. The recent recognition of clinical informatics as a subspecialty board in the U.S. has generated interest and excitement among the U.S. informatics community. To determine the extent of similar programs in countries around the world, we performed literature searches with relevant keywords and internet searches of websites of informatics societies around the world for mentions or descriptions of certifications and reviewed publicly available sources. The U.S. certification was prominent in the recent published literature. Germany and Belgium have long-standing certifications with South Korea and Sri Lanka considering similar programs. This is the first global view of clinical informatics board certification for physicians. Training and certification for non-physician informatics professionals in allied areas are widespread. Official recognition and certification for physicians and all informatics professionals represents a key component of capacity building and a means of addressing the shortage of a skilled informatics workforce. Wider adoption of certification programs may further attracting talent and accelerate growth of the field.

  18. Health Informatics: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacDougall, Jennifer; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Reviews literature related to health informatics and health information management. Provides examples covering types of information, library and information services outcomes, training of informatics professionals, areas of application, the impact of evidence based medicine, professional issues, integrated information systems, and the needs of the…

  19. German Experts' Views and Ideas about Information on the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voigt, Kristina; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Reflects ideas about the Internet presented by four German experts: possibilities and applications of chemistry; environmental informatics and documentation on the World Wide Web; views of a research-oriented pharmaceutical company; and the commercialization of the Internet. (LRW)

  20. Press Conference - First Gemini Astronauts

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1964-04-13

    S64-19466 (13 April 1964) --- A press conference was held in the Bldg. 1 auditorium at the NASA Manned Spacecraft Center to announce the first Gemini astronaut selections. Shown left to right are Paul Haney, MSC Public Affairs Officer (standing); astronauts Walter Schirra and Thomas Stafford; Dr. Robert Gilruth, director of MSC; astronauts Virgil Grissom and John Young; and Donald K. Slayton, assistant director of Flight Crew Operations at MSC.

  1. On Informatics Diagnostics and Informatics Therapeutics - Good Medical Informatics Research Is Needed Here.

    PubMed

    Haux, Reinhold

    2017-01-01

    In the era of digitization some new procedures play an increasing role for diagnosis as well as for therapy: informatics diagnostics and informatics therapeutics. Challenges for such procedures are described. It is discussed, when research on such diagnostics and therapeutics can be regarded as good research. Examples are mentioned for informatics diagnostics and informatics therapeutics, which are based on health-enabling technologies.

  2. Origins of Medical Informatics

    PubMed Central

    Collen, Morris F.

    1986-01-01

    Medical informatics is a new knowledge domain of computer and information science, engineering and technology in all fields of health and medicine, including research, education and practice. Medical informatics has evolved over the past 30 years as medicine learned to exploit the extraordinary capabilities of the electronic digital computer to better meet its complex information needs. The first articles on this subject appeared in the 1950s, the number of publications rapidly increased in the 1960s and medical informatics was identified as a new specialty in the 1970s. PMID:3544507

  3. GEMINI-TITAN-8 - PRELAUNCH ACTIVITY

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-03-16

    S66-24439 (16 March 1966) --- The Gemini-8 prime crew, along with several fellow astronauts, have a hearty breakfast of steak and eggs on the morning of the Gemini-8 launch. Seated clockwise around the table, starting at lower left, are Donald K. Slayton, Manned Spaceflight Center (MSC) Assistant Director for Flight Crew Operations; astronaut Neil A. Armstrong, Gemini-8 command pilot; scientist-astronaut F. Curtis Michel; astronaut R. Walter Cunningham; astronaut Alan B. Shepard Jr. (face obscured), Chief, MSC Astronaut Office; astronaut David R. Scott, Gemini-8 pilot; and astronaut Roger B. Chaffee. Photo credit: NASA

  4. The history of pathology informatics: A global perspective

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seung; Parwani, Anil V.; Aller, Raymond D.; Banach, Lech; Becich, Michael J.; Borkenfeld, Stephan; Carter, Alexis B.; Friedman, Bruce A.; Rojo, Marcial Garcia; Georgiou, Andrew; Kayser, Gian; Kayser, Klaus; Legg, Michael; Naugler, Christopher; Sawai, Takashi; Weiner, Hal; Winsten, Dennis; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2013-01-01

    Pathology informatics has evolved to varying levels around the world. The history of pathology informatics in different countries is a tale with many dimensions. At first glance, it is the familiar story of individuals solving problems that arise in their clinical practice to enhance efficiency, better manage (e.g., digitize) laboratory information, as well as exploit emerging information technologies. Under the surface, however, lie powerful resource, regulatory, and societal forces that helped shape our discipline into what it is today. In this monograph, for the first time in the history of our discipline, we collectively perform a global review of the field of pathology informatics. In doing so, we illustrate how general far-reaching trends such as the advent of computers, the Internet and digital imaging have affected pathology informatics in the world at large. Major drivers in the field included the need for pathologists to comply with national standards for health information technology and telepathology applications to meet the scarcity of pathology services and trained people in certain countries. Following trials by a multitude of investigators, not all of them successful, it is apparent that innovation alone did not assure the success of many informatics tools and solutions. Common, ongoing barriers to the widespread adoption of informatics devices include poor information technology infrastructure in undeveloped areas, the cost of technology, and regulatory issues. This review offers a deeper understanding of how pathology informatics historically developed and provides insights into what the promising future might hold. PMID:23869286

  5. An interdisciplinary online course in health care informatics.

    PubMed

    Brock, Tina Penick; Smith, Scott R

    2007-06-15

    To design an interdisciplinary course in health care informatics that enables students to: (1) understand how to incorporate technology into the provision of safe, effective and evidence-based health care; (2) make decisions about the value and ethical application of specific technologies; and (3) appreciate the perspectives and roles of patients and providers when using technology in care. An online, interdisciplinary elective course using a distributive learning model was created. Standard courseware was used to manage teaching and to facilitate student/instructor interactions. Interactive, multimedia lectures were developed using Internet communication software. Upon completion of the course, students demonstrated competency in identifying, analyzing, and applying informatics appropriately in diverse health settings. Online education using multimedia software technology is effective in teaching students about health informatics and providing an innovative opportunity for interdisciplinary learning. In light of the growing need for efficient health care informatics training, additional study of this methodology is warranted.

  6. Informatics in Turkey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cakir, Serhat

    1994-01-01

    In the last twenty years the rapid change in the informatics sector has had economic and social impact on private and government activities. The Supreme Council for Science and Technology of Turkey assigned highest priority to the informatics in its meeting in February 1993. With this advice TUBITAK (The Scientific and Technical Research Council of Turkey) intends to give a strong impulse to development of a research policy in this field.

  7. What is biomedical informatics?

    PubMed

    Bernstam, Elmer V; Smith, Jack W; Johnson, Todd R

    2010-02-01

    Biomedical informatics lacks a clear and theoretically-grounded definition. Many proposed definitions focus on data, information, and knowledge, but do not provide an adequate definition of these terms. Leveraging insights from the philosophy of information, we define informatics as the science of information, where information is data plus meaning. Biomedical informatics is the science of information as applied to or studied in the context of biomedicine. Defining the object of study of informatics as data plus meaning clearly distinguishes the field from related fields, such as computer science, statistics and biomedicine, which have different objects of study. The emphasis on data plus meaning also suggests that biomedical informatics problems tend to be difficult when they deal with concepts that are hard to capture using formal, computational definitions. In other words, problems where meaning must be considered are more difficult than problems where manipulating data without regard for meaning is sufficient. Furthermore, the definition implies that informatics research, teaching, and service should focus on biomedical information as data plus meaning rather than only computer applications in biomedicine.

  8. Clinical microbiology informatics.

    PubMed

    Rhoads, Daniel D; Sintchenko, Vitali; Rauch, Carol A; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2014-10-01

    The clinical microbiology laboratory has responsibilities ranging from characterizing the causative agent in a patient's infection to helping detect global disease outbreaks. All of these processes are increasingly becoming partnered more intimately with informatics. Effective application of informatics tools can increase the accuracy, timeliness, and completeness of microbiology testing while decreasing the laboratory workload, which can lead to optimized laboratory workflow and decreased costs. Informatics is poised to be increasingly relevant in clinical microbiology, with the advent of total laboratory automation, complex instrument interfaces, electronic health records, clinical decision support tools, and the clinical implementation of microbial genome sequencing. This review discusses the diverse informatics aspects that are relevant to the clinical microbiology laboratory, including the following: the microbiology laboratory information system, decision support tools, expert systems, instrument interfaces, total laboratory automation, telemicrobiology, automated image analysis, nucleic acid sequence databases, electronic reporting of infectious agents to public health agencies, and disease outbreak surveillance. The breadth and utility of informatics tools used in clinical microbiology have made them indispensable to contemporary clinical and laboratory practice. Continued advances in technology and development of these informatics tools will further improve patient and public health care in the future. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Clinical Microbiology Informatics

    PubMed Central

    Sintchenko, Vitali; Rauch, Carol A.; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The clinical microbiology laboratory has responsibilities ranging from characterizing the causative agent in a patient's infection to helping detect global disease outbreaks. All of these processes are increasingly becoming partnered more intimately with informatics. Effective application of informatics tools can increase the accuracy, timeliness, and completeness of microbiology testing while decreasing the laboratory workload, which can lead to optimized laboratory workflow and decreased costs. Informatics is poised to be increasingly relevant in clinical microbiology, with the advent of total laboratory automation, complex instrument interfaces, electronic health records, clinical decision support tools, and the clinical implementation of microbial genome sequencing. This review discusses the diverse informatics aspects that are relevant to the clinical microbiology laboratory, including the following: the microbiology laboratory information system, decision support tools, expert systems, instrument interfaces, total laboratory automation, telemicrobiology, automated image analysis, nucleic acid sequence databases, electronic reporting of infectious agents to public health agencies, and disease outbreak surveillance. The breadth and utility of informatics tools used in clinical microbiology have made them indispensable to contemporary clinical and laboratory practice. Continued advances in technology and development of these informatics tools will further improve patient and public health care in the future. PMID:25278581

  10. Gemini Program Mission Report for Gemini-Titan 1 (GT-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    The Gemini-Titan 1 (GT-1) space vehicle was comprised of the Gemini spacecraft and the Gemini launch vehicle. The Gemini launch vehicle is a two-stage modified Titan II ICBM. The major modifications are the addition of a malfunction detection system and a secondary flight controls system. The Gemini spacecraft, designed to carry a crew of two men on earth orbital and rendezvous missions, was unmanned for the flight reported herein (GT-1). There were no complete Gemini flight systems on board; however, the C-band transponder and telemetry transmitters were Gemini flight subsystems. Dummy equipment, having a mass and moment of inertia equal to flight system equipment, was installed in the spacecraft. The Spacecraft was instrumented to obtain data on spacecraft heating, structural loading, vibration, sound pressure levels, and temperature and pressure during the launch phase.

  11. Liftoff of Gemini-Titan 3 mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-03-23

    S65-14150 (23 March 1965) --- Launch view of the Gemini-Titan 3 mission. The GT-3 liftoff was at 9:24 a.m. (EST) on March 23, 1965. The Gemini-3 spacecraft "Molly Brown" carried astronauts Virgil I. Grissom, command pilot, and John W. Young, pilot, on three orbits of Earth.

  12. Portrait - Gemini 12 - Prime and Backup Crews

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-01-01

    S66-46955 (September 1966) --- The Gemini-12 prime crew (in front) is astronauts James A. Lovell Jr. (right), command pilot, and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr. (left), pilot. In the rear is the Gemini-12 backup crew, astronauts L. Gordon Cooper Jr., (right), command pilot, and Eugene A. Cernan, pilot. Photo credit: NASA

  13. Gemini 12 spacecraft seen during EVA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-11-13

    S66-63007 (12 Nov. 1966) --- Astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., pilot of the Gemini-12 spaceflight, took this picture of the Gemini-12 spacecraft during standup extravehicular activity (EVA) with the hatch open. This is a view looking forward showing the adapter section. Photo credit: NASA

  14. Gemini 12 spacecraft seen during EVA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-11-13

    S66-62920 (13 Nov. 1966) --- Astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., pilot of the Gemini-12 spaceflight, took this picture of the Gemini-12 spacecraft during standup extravehicular activity (EVA) with the hatch open. This is a view to the rear showing the adapter section. Photo credit: NASA

  15. Astronaut Collins - Gemini 10 - Young - MSC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-07-18

    S66-46477 (18 July 1966) --- Close-up of astronaut Michael Collins, Gemini-10 pilot, making final adjustments and checks in the Gemini spacecraft during prelaunch countdown. In right background is astronaut John W. Young, command pilot. Photo credit: NASA

  16. EQUIPMENT - GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-6

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-12-07

    S65-61777 (8 Dec. 1965) --- Close-up view of a laser transmitter unit which is being used for the Gemini-7 Optical Communication (MSC-4) experiment. Astronauts Frank Borman, command pilot; and James A. Lovell Jr., pilot, are now orbiting Earth in NASA's Gemini-7 spacecraft. Photo credit: NASA

  17. The Actual Gemini 9 Prime Crew

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    The Gemini 9 backup crew members are, Commander, Thomas P. Stafford and pilot Eugene A. Cernan. The back-up crew became the prime crew when on February 28, 1966 the prime crew for the Gemini 9 mission were killed when their twin seat T- 38 trainer jet aircraft crashed into a building during a landing approach in bad weather.

  18. Earth Science Informatics - Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramapriyan, H. K.

    2015-01-01

    Over the last 10-15 years, significant advances have been made in information management, there are an increasing number of individuals entering the field of information management as it applies to Geoscience and Remote Sensing data, and the field of informatics has come to its own. Informatics is the science and technology of applying computers and computational methods to the systematic analysis, management, interchange, and representation of science data, information, and knowledge. Informatics also includes the use of computers and computational methods to support decision making and applications. Earth Science Informatics (ESI, a.k.a. geoinformatics) is the application of informatics in the Earth science domain. ESI is a rapidly developing discipline integrating computer science, information science, and Earth science. Major national and international research and infrastructure projects in ESI have been carried out or are on-going. Notable among these are: the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS), the European Commissions INSPIRE, the U.S. NSDI and Geospatial One-Stop, the NASA EOSDIS, and the NSF DataONE, EarthCube and Cyberinfrastructure for Geoinformatics. More than 18 departments and agencies in the U.S. federal government have been active in Earth science informatics. All major space agencies in the world, have been involved in ESI research and application activities. In the United States, the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (ESIP), whose membership includes nearly 150 organizations (government, academic and commercial) dedicated to managing, delivering and applying Earth science data, has been working on many ESI topics since 1998. The Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS)s Working Group on Information Systems and Services (WGISS) has been actively coordinating the ESI activities among the space agencies. Remote Sensing; Earth Science Informatics, Data Systems; Data Services; Metadata

  19. Science operations at Gemini Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutten, René; Adamson, Andy; Leggett, Sandy

    2016-07-01

    Gemini Observatory operates two 8m telescopes, one on Cerro Pachón in Chile and one on Maunakea Hawaíi, on behalf of an international partnership. The telescopes, their software and supporting infrastructure (and some of the instrumentation) are identical at the two sites. We describe the operation of the observatory, present some key performance indicators, and discuss the outcomes in terms of publications and program completion rates. We describe how recent initiatives have been introduced into the operation in parallel with accommodating a significant budget reduction and changes in the partnership.

  20. GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-9 - INSIGNIA - MSC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-05-01

    S66-28075 (May 1966) --- Insignia of the Gemini IX spaceflight. Roman numeral indicates ninth flight in the Gemini series. Two spacecraft symbolize rendezvous and docking of Gemini with an Agena. Astronaut and umbilical (tether) line denote planned extravehicular activity (EVA). Astronauts Thomas P. Stafford, command pilot, and Eugene A. Cernan, pilot, are members of the Gemini IX prime crew. The NASA insignia design for Gemini flights is reserved for use by the astronauts and for other official use as the NASA Administrator may authorize. Public availability has been approved only in the form of illustrations by the various news media. When and if there is any change in this policy, which we do not anticipate, it will be publicly announced. Photo credit: NASA

  1. A Paradigm for Medical Informatics

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, John P.

    1982-01-01

    This paper presents a model of the discipline of Medical Informatics. The components of the model are defined and described, and the use of the model in Medical Informatics research, and curriculum development, is discussed.

  2. Multi-Sensory Informatics Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katai, Zoltan; Toth, Laszlo; Adorjani, Alpar Karoly

    2014-01-01

    A recent report by the joint Informatics Europe & ACM Europe Working Group on Informatics Education emphasizes that: (1) computational thinking is an important ability that all people should possess; (2) informatics-based concepts, abilities and skills are teachable, and must be included in the primary and particularly in the secondary school…

  3. Quantum Approach to Informatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenholm, Stig; Suominen, Kalle-Antti

    2005-08-01

    An essential overview of quantum information Information, whether inscribed as a mark on a stone tablet or encoded as a magnetic domain on a hard drive, must be stored in a physical object and thus made subject to the laws of physics. Traditionally, information processing such as computation occurred in a framework governed by laws of classical physics. However, information can also be stored and processed using the states of matter described by non-classical quantum theory. Understanding this quantum information, a fundamentally different type of information, has been a major project of physicists and information theorists in recent years, and recent experimental research has started to yield promising results. Quantum Approach to Informatics fills the need for a concise introduction to this burgeoning new field, offering an intuitive approach for readers in both the physics and information science communities, as well as in related fields. Only a basic background in quantum theory is required, and the text keeps the focus on bringing this theory to bear on contemporary informatics. Instead of proofs and other highly formal structures, detailed examples present the material, making this a uniquely accessible introduction to quantum informatics. Topics covered include: * An introduction to quantum information and the qubit * Concepts and methods of quantum theory important for informatics * The application of information concepts to quantum physics * Quantum information processing and computing * Quantum gates * Error correction using quantum-based methods * Physical realizations of quantum computing circuits A helpful and economical resource for understanding this exciting new application of quantum theory to informatics, Quantum Approach to Informatics provides students and researchers in physics and information science, as well as other interested readers with some scientific background, with an essential overview of the field.

  4. Earth Science Informatics - Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramapriyan, H. K.

    2017-01-01

    Over the last 10-15 years, significant advances have been made in information management, there are an increasing number of individuals entering the field of information management as it applies to Geoscience and Remote Sensing data, and the field of informatics has come to its own. Informatics is the science and technology of applying computers and computational methods to the systematic analysis, management, interchange, and representation of science data, information, and knowledge. Informatics also includes the use of computers and computational methods to support decision making and applications. Earth Science Informatics (ESI, a.k.a. geoinformatics) is the application of informatics in the Earth science domain. ESI is a rapidly developing discipline integrating computer science, information science, and Earth science. Major national and international research and infrastructure projects in ESI have been carried out or are on-going. Notable among these are: the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS), the European Commissions INSPIRE, the U.S. NSDI and Geospatial One-Stop, the NASA EOSDIS, and the NSF DataONE, EarthCube and Cyberinfrastructure for Geoinformatics. More than 18 departments and agencies in the U.S. federal government have been active in Earth science informatics. All major space agencies in the world, have been involved in ESI research and application activities. In the United States, the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (ESIP), whose membership includes over 180 organizations (government, academic and commercial) dedicated to managing, delivering and applying Earth science data, has been working on many ESI topics since 1998. The Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS)s Working Group on Information Systems and Services (WGISS) has been actively coordinating the ESI activities among the space agencies.The talk will present an overview of current efforts in ESI, the role members of IEEE GRSS play, and discuss

  5. Earth Science Informatics - Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramapriyan, H. K.

    2017-01-01

    Over the last 10-15 years, significant advances have been made in information management, there are an increasing number of individuals entering the field of information management as it applies to Geoscience and Remote Sensing data, and the field of informatics has come to its own. Informatics is the science and technology of applying computers and computational methods to the systematic analysis, management, interchange, and representation of science data, information, and knowledge. Informatics also includes the use of computers and computational methods to support decision making and applications. Earth Science Informatics (ESI, a.k.a. geoinformatics) is the application of informatics in the Earth science domain. ESI is a rapidly developing discipline integrating computer science, information science, and Earth science. Major national and international research and infrastructure projects in ESI have been carried out or are on-going. Notable among these are: the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS), the European Commissions INSPIRE, the U.S. NSDI and Geospatial One-Stop, the NASA EOSDIS, and the NSF DataONE, EarthCube and Cyberinfrastructure for Geoinformatics. More than 18 departments and agencies in the U.S. federal government have been active in Earth science informatics. All major space agencies in the world, have been involved in ESI research and application activities. In the United States, the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (ESIP), whose membership includes over 180 organizations (government, academic and commercial) dedicated to managing, delivering and applying Earth science data, has been working on many ESI topics since 1998. The Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS)s Working Group on Information Systems and Services (WGISS) has been actively coordinating the ESI activities among the space agencies.

  6. Gemini

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    (the Twins; abbrev. Gem, gen. Geminorum; area 514 sq. deg.) A northern zodiacal constellation which lies between Auriga and Canis Minor, and culminates at midnight in early January. It represents Castor and Pollux, the twin sons of Leda, Queen of Sparta, in Greek mythology, whose brotherly love was rewarded by a place among the stars. Its brightest stars were cataloged by Ptolemy (c. AD 100-175) ...

  7. Fellow astronauts join Gemini 7 crew for preflight breakfast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Fellow astronauts join the Gemini 7 prime crew for breakfeast in the Manned Spacecraft Operations Building, Merritt Island, on the day of the Gemini 7 launch. Clockwise around table, starting lower left, are Astronauts James A. Lovell Jr., Gemini 7 prime crew pilot; Walter M. Schirra Jr., Donald K. Slayton, MSC Assistant Director for Flight Crew Operations; Richard F. Gordon Jr., Gemini 8 backup crew pilot; Virgil I. Grissom, Charles Conrad Jr., and Frank Borman, Gemini 7 prime crew command pilot.

  8. Gemini surfactants from natural amino acids.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Lourdes; Pinazo, Aurora; Pons, Ramon; Infante, Mrosa

    2014-03-01

    In this review, we report the most important contributions in the structure, synthesis, physicochemical (surface adsorption, aggregation and phase behaviour) and biological properties (toxicity, antimicrobial activity and biodegradation) of Gemini natural amino acid-based surfactants, and some potential applications, with an emphasis on the use of these surfactants as non-viral delivery system agents. Gemini surfactants derived from basic (Arg, Lys), neutral (Ser, Ala, Sar), acid (Asp) and sulphur containing amino acids (Cys) as polar head groups, and Geminis with amino acids/peptides in the spacer chain are reviewed.

  9. MISSION PATCH - GEMINI-5 SPACE FLIGHT - MSC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-01-01

    S66-59530 (August 1965) --- This is the insignia of the Gemini-Titan 5 (GT-5) spaceflight. The Gemini-5 prime crew members are astronauts L. Gordon Cooper Jr., command pilot; and Charles Conrad Jr., pilot. The covered wagon symbolizes pioneer spirit of space exploration. The NASA insignia design for Gemini flights is reserved for use by the astronauts and for other official use as the NASA Administrator may authorize. Public availability has been approved only in the form of illustrations by the various news media. When and if there is any change in this policy, which we do not anticipate, it will be publicly announced.

  10. Gemini 7 backup crew seen in white room during Gemini 7 simulation activity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-11-27

    S65-61837 (27 Nov. 1965) --- The Gemini-7 backup crew seen in the White Room atop Pad 19 during Gemini-7 simulation flight activity. McDonnell Aircraft Corporation technicians assist in the exercise. Astronaut Edward H. White II (in foreground) is the Gemini-7 backup crew command pilot; and astronaut Michael Collins (right background) is the backup crew pilot. Photo credit: NASA

  11. Consumer Health Informatics--integrating patients, providers, and professionals online.

    PubMed

    Klein-Fedyshin, Michele S

    2002-01-01

    Consumer Health Informatics (CHI) means different things to patients, health professionals, and health care systems. A broader perspective on this new and rapidly developing field will enable us to understand and better apply its advances. This article provides an overview of CHI discussing its evolution and driving forces, along with advanced applications such as Personal Health Records, Internet transmission of personal health data, clinical e-mail, online pharmacies, and shared decision-making tools. Consumer Health Informatics will become integrated with medical care, electronic medical records, and patient education to impact the whole process and business of health care.

  12. Training in medical informatics: combining onsite and online instruction.

    PubMed

    Ohno-Machado, L; Marin, H F; Marques, E P; Masssad, E; Greenes, R A

    2001-01-01

    The Internet is promoting active exchange of teaching materials and discussion among geographically distant collaborators. We envision that training in medical informatics can be better achieved if both onsite and online instruction are combined, provided that cultural and technological barriers are anticipated and the training program is prepared accordingly. We describe our Brazil/USA program in medical informatics, which includes components of on-site and online education, and discuss lessons learned during its ongoing implementation. Three onsite courses and one workshop have been planned, and two online courses are being developed.

  13. Biomedical informatics and translational medicine

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Biomedical informatics involves a core set of methodologies that can provide a foundation for crossing the "translational barriers" associated with translational medicine. To this end, the fundamental aspects of biomedical informatics (e.g., bioinformatics, imaging informatics, clinical informatics, and public health informatics) may be essential in helping improve the ability to bring basic research findings to the bedside, evaluate the efficacy of interventions across communities, and enable the assessment of the eventual impact of translational medicine innovations on health policies. Here, a brief description is provided for a selection of key biomedical informatics topics (Decision Support, Natural Language Processing, Standards, Information Retrieval, and Electronic Health Records) and their relevance to translational medicine. Based on contributions and advancements in each of these topic areas, the article proposes that biomedical informatics practitioners ("biomedical informaticians") can be essential members of translational medicine teams. PMID:20187952

  14. Biomedical informatics and translational medicine.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Indra Neil

    2010-02-26

    Biomedical informatics involves a core set of methodologies that can provide a foundation for crossing the "translational barriers" associated with translational medicine. To this end, the fundamental aspects of biomedical informatics (e.g., bioinformatics, imaging informatics, clinical informatics, and public health informatics) may be essential in helping improve the ability to bring basic research findings to the bedside, evaluate the efficacy of interventions across communities, and enable the assessment of the eventual impact of translational medicine innovations on health policies. Here, a brief description is provided for a selection of key biomedical informatics topics (Decision Support, Natural Language Processing, Standards, Information Retrieval, and Electronic Health Records) and their relevance to translational medicine. Based on contributions and advancements in each of these topic areas, the article proposes that biomedical informatics practitioners ("biomedical informaticians") can be essential members of translational medicine teams.

  15. RAS - Target Identification - Informatics

    Cancer.gov

    The RAS Informatics lab group develops tools to track and analyze “big data” from the RAS Initiative, as well as analyzes data from external projects. By integrating internal and external data, this group helps improve understanding of RAS-driven cancers.

  16. Rethinking radiology informatics.

    PubMed

    Kohli, Marc; Dreyer, Keith J; Geis, J Raymond

    2015-04-01

    Informatics innovations of the past 30 years have improved radiology quality and efficiency immensely. Radiologists are groundbreaking leaders in clinical information technology (IT), and often radiologists and imaging informaticists created, specified, and implemented these technologies, while also carrying the ongoing burdens of training, maintenance, support, and operation of these IT solutions. Being pioneers of clinical IT had advantages of local radiology control and radiology-centric products and services. As health care businesses become more clinically IT savvy, however, they are standardizing IT products and procedures across the enterprise, resulting in the loss of radiologists' local control and flexibility. Although this inevitable consequence may provide new opportunities in the long run, several questions arise. What will happen to the informatics expertise within the radiology domain? Will radiology's current and future concerns be heard and their needs addressed? What should radiologists do to understand, obtain, and use informatics products to maximize efficiency and provide the most value and quality for patients and the greater health care community? This article will propose some insights and considerations as we rethink radiology informatics.

  17. Informatics: A Brief Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    He, Shaoyi

    2003-01-01

    Provides a brief survey of informatics, defined as the application of information technology to various fields, with respect to its historical background, disciplinary identity, fundamental aspects, applications, and challenges. Highlights include biological, clinical, dental, environmental, geomatics, health, legal, management, medical, museum,…

  18. Informatics: A Brief Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    He, Shaoyi

    2003-01-01

    Provides a brief survey of informatics, defined as the application of information technology to various fields, with respect to its historical background, disciplinary identity, fundamental aspects, applications, and challenges. Highlights include biological, clinical, dental, environmental, geomatics, health, legal, management, medical, museum,…

  19. Pathology Informatics Essentials for Residents

    PubMed Central

    Karcher, Donald S.; Harrison, James H.; Sinard, John H.; Riben, Michael W.; Boyer, Philip J.; Plath, Sue; Thompson, Arlene; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2016-01-01

    Context: Recognition of the importance of informatics to the practice of pathology has surged. Training residents in pathology informatics has been a daunting task for most residency programs in the United States because faculty often lacks experience and training resources. Nevertheless, developing resident competence in informatics is essential for the future of pathology as a specialty. Objective: To develop and deliver a pathology informatics curriculum and instructional framework that guides pathology residency programs in training residents in critical pathology informatics knowledge and skills, and meets Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Informatics Milestones. Design: The College of American Pathologists, Association of Pathology Chairs, and Association for Pathology Informatics formed a partnership and expert work group to identify critical pathology informatics training outcomes and to create a highly adaptable curriculum and instructional approach, supported by a multiyear change management strategy. Results: Pathology Informatics Essentials for Residents (PIER) is a rigorous approach for educating all pathology residents in important pathology informatics knowledge and skills. PIER includes an instructional resource guide and toolkit for incorporating informatics training into residency programs that vary in needs, size, settings, and resources. PIER is available at http://www.apcprods.org/PIER (accessed April 6, 2016). Conclusions: PIER is an important contribution to informatics training in pathology residency programs. PIER introduces pathology trainees to broadly useful informatics concepts and tools that are relevant to practice. PIER provides residency program directors with a means to implement a standardized informatics training curriculum, to adapt the approach to local program needs, and to evaluate resident performance and progress over time. PMID:28725772

  20. GEMINI 7 - INSIGNIA - EMBLEM - PATCH - MSC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-11-01

    S65-54129 (November 1965) --- Design for the emblem of the Gemini VII spaceflight. At left of hand-held torch is a Gemini spacecraft. Roman numeral indicates the seventh flight in the Gemini series. Prime crew men for the mission are astronauts Frank Borman, command pilot, and James A. Lovell Jr., pilot. The NASA insignia design for Gemini flights is reserved for use by the astronauts and for other official use as the NASA Administrator may authorize. Public availability has been approved only in the form of illustrations by the various news media. When and if there is any change in this policy, which we do not anticipate, it will be publicly announced. Photo credit: NASA

  1. GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-7 - RECOVERY - ATLANTIC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-12-18

    S65-61834 (18 Dec. 1965) --- Astronauts Frank Borman (left), Gemini-7 command pilot, and James A. Lovell Jr., pilot, take time out during their welcoming ceremonies aboard the aircraft carrier USS Wasp to autograph a life preserver. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Gemini-7 spacecraft splashed down in the western Atlantic recovery area at 9:05 a.m. (EST), Dec. 18, 1965, to conclude a highly successful 14-day mission in space. Photo credit: NASA

  2. The Gemini Observatory fast turnaround program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, R. E.; Côté, S.; Kissler-Patig, M.; Levenson, N. A.; Adamson, A.; Emmanuel, C.; Crabtree, D.

    2014-08-01

    Gemini's Fast Turnaround program is intended to greatly decrease the time from having an idea to acquiring the supporting data. The scheme will offer monthly proposal submission opportunities, and proposals will be reviewed by the principal investigators or co-investigators of other proposals submitted during the same round. Here, we set out the design of the system and outline the plan for its implementation, leading to the launch of a pilot program at Gemini North in January 2015.

  3. Schirra, Stafford and Gemini on Deck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Astronaut Walter H. Schirra Jr. (on right), Command pilot, climbs from his Gemini VI spacecraft as he and Astronaut Thomas P. Stafford (not in view) arrive aboard the aircraft carrier U.S.S. Wasp. They are assisted by various McDonell Douglas technicians. The Gemini VI spacecraft splashed down in the western Atlantic recover area at 10:29 a.m. (EST) December 16, 1965, after a successful 25 hr. 52 minute mission in space.

  4. Gemini 9 configured extravehicular spacesuit assembly

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-05-01

    S66-31019 (May 1966) --- Test subject Fred Spross, Crew Systems Division, wears the Gemini-9 configured extravehicular spacesuit assembly. The legs are covered with Chromel R, which is a cloth woven from stainless steel fibers, used to protect the astronaut and suit from the hot exhaust thrust of the Astronaut Maneuvering Unit (AMU). Astronaut Eugene A. Cernan will wear this spacesuit during his Gemini-9A extravehicular activity (EVA). Photo credit: NASA

  5. Consumer health informatics: a consensus description and commentary from American Medical Informatics Association members.

    PubMed Central

    Houston, T. K.; Chang, B. L.; Brown, S.; Kukafka, R.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although interest in Consumer Health Informatics (CHI) has increased, a consensus definition of CHI does not yet exist. PURPOSE: To conduct a hypothesis-generating survey of AMIA members regarding definition and research agenda for CHI. METHODS: We solicited participation among AMIA members in an Internet-based survey focusing on issues related to a definition of CHI. RESULTS: One hundred thirty-five AMIA members responded. Participants indicated a broad spectrum of topics important to CHI including "self-help for disease management" and "patient access to their own medical records." CHI research was felt to rely heavily on public health methods such as epidemiology and outcomes research, a paradigm shift from traditional medical informatics. Responses indicated a perceived lack of funding and need for further research in CHI. CONCLUSIONS: A working definition should emphasize the multidisciplinary nature of CHI, include consumer input into CHI design, and focus on public health approaches to evaluation. PMID:11825193

  6. The exploration of the exhibition informatization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiankang

    2017-06-01

    The construction and management of exhibition informatization is the main task and choke point during the process of Chinese exhibition industry’s transformation and promotion. There are three key points expected to realize a breakthrough during the construction of Chinese exhibition informatization, and the three aspects respectively are adopting service outsourcing to construct and maintain the database, adopting advanced chest card technology to collect various kinds of information, developing statistics analysis to maintain good cutomer relations. The success of Chinese exhibition informatization mainly calls for mature suppliers who can provide construction and maintenance of database, the proven technology, a sense of data security, advanced chest card technology, the ability of data mining and analysis and the ability to improve the exhibition service basing on the commercial information got from the data analysis. Several data security measures are expected to apply during the process of system developing, including the measures of the terminal data security, the internet data security, the media data security, the storage data security and the application data security. The informatization of this process is based on the chest card designing. At present, there are several types of chest card technology: bar code chest card; two-dimension code card; magnetic stripe chest card; smart-chip chest card. The information got from the exhibition data will help the organizers to make relevant service strategies, quantify the accumulated indexes of the customers, and improve the level of the customer’s satisfaction and loyalty, what’s more, the information can also provide more additional services like the commercial trips, VIP ceremonial reception.

  7. Dental Informatics in India: Time to Embrace the Change

    PubMed Central

    Mulla, Salma H.; Deolia, Shravani Govind; Chhabra, Chaya; Singh, Jagjeet; Marwaha, Baldeep Singh

    2016-01-01

    Dental informatics is comparatively a juvenile and new field that has noteworthy potential for supporting clinical care, research, education and management. This field utilizes computer science, information sciences and the application of same to espouse dentistry. However, in the under-developed and developing countries almost most of the dentists are unacquainted about dental informatics, its goals, what it is capable of achieving and by what means they can get involved into it. Despite of emerging advances, certain conflicts also go along with it such as, professional under representation, security issues of the stored information due to universal access to computers high speed internet connections. Endnote software was used as resource material to collect literature which was carefully arranged in a synchronized way. Hence, the purpose of this review was to give an overall scenario of dental informatics, its applications, challenges and recommendations for further enhancement in this area. PMID:27135022

  8. Dental Informatics in India: Time to Embrace the Change.

    PubMed

    Chhabra, Kumar Gaurav; Mulla, Salma H; Deolia, Shravani Govind; Chhabra, Chaya; Singh, Jagjeet; Marwaha, Baldeep Singh

    2016-03-01

    Dental informatics is comparatively a juvenile and new field that has noteworthy potential for supporting clinical care, research, education and management. This field utilizes computer science, information sciences and the application of same to espouse dentistry. However, in the under-developed and developing countries almost most of the dentists are unacquainted about dental informatics, its goals, what it is capable of achieving and by what means they can get involved into it. Despite of emerging advances, certain conflicts also go along with it such as, professional under representation, security issues of the stored information due to universal access to computers high speed internet connections. Endnote software was used as resource material to collect literature which was carefully arranged in a synchronized way. Hence, the purpose of this review was to give an overall scenario of dental informatics, its applications, challenges and recommendations for further enhancement in this area.

  9. Gemini 6 and Gemini 7 capsules aboard the recovery carrier USS Wasp

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-12-20

    S65-65948 (20 Dec. 1965) --- Gemini-7 (left) and Gemini-6 spacecraft meet up once again, this time at Mayport Naval Station near Jacksonville (Fla.) after unloading Dec. 20, 1965, from the carrier USS Wasp. The two spacecraft accomplished a rendezvous and station keeping exercise in space on Dec. 15. Photo credit: NASA

  10. Gemini 11 prime and back-up crews at Gemini Mission Simulator at Cape Kennedy

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-09-08

    S66-50769 (8 Sept. 1966) --- Gemini-11 prime and backup crews are pictured at the Gemini Mission Simulator at Cape Kennedy, Florida. Left to right are astronauts William A. Anders, backup crew pilot; Richard F. Gordon Jr., prime crew pilot; Charles Conrad Jr. (foot on desk), prime crew command pilot; and Neil A. Armstrong, backup crew command pilot. Photo credit: NASA

  11. What is health informatics?

    PubMed

    Sullivan, F

    2001-10-01

    Health informatics is a relatively recent jargon term for a subject that may be of great interest to health services researchers and policy makers. Most countries with highly developed health systems are investing heavily in computer hardware and software in the expectation of higher quality for lower costs. Recent systematic reviews have indeed demonstrated the health benefits of a range of electronic tools, particularly in the areas of prevention and therapeutic monitoring. However, there remains a relative lack of published evaluations of informatics tools and methods. Uncritical adoption of new systems based on the pressures of technological push continue to discredit policy makers who have had to commit significant resources despite inadequate information on what can be realistically expected from a proposed system. There are great opportunities for researchers interested in evaluation to fill the vacuum left by informaticists who are too busy writing their next line of code.

  12. Informatics competencies for nurse practitioners.

    PubMed

    Curran, Christine R

    2003-08-01

    Informatics knowledge and skills are essential if clinicians are to master the large volume of information generated in healthcare today. Thus, it is vital that informatics competencies be defined for nursing and incorporated into both curricula and practice. Staggers, Gassert, and Curran have defined informatics competencies for four general levels of nursing practice. However, informatics competencies by role (eg, those specific for advanced practice nursing) have not been defined and validated. This article presents an initial proposed list of informatics competencies essential for nurse practitioner education and practice. To this list, derived from the work of Staggers et al., 1 has been added informatics competencies related to evidence-based practice. Two nurse informaticists and six nurse practitioners, who are program directors, were involved in the development of the proposed competencies. The next step will be to validate these competencies via research.

  13. Structure–function study of gemini derivatives with two different side chains at C-20, Gemini-0072 and Gemini-0097†‡

    PubMed Central

    Huet, Tiphaine; Maehr, Hubert; Lee, Hong Jin; Uskokovic, Milan R.; Suh, Nanjoo; Moras, Dino

    2011-01-01

    Derivatives of vitamin D3 containing a second side-chain emanating at C-20 are known as gemini and act as vitamin D receptor agonists. Recently, two of these, namely Gemini-0072 and the epimeric Gemini-0097, were selected for further studies in view of their high biological activities and lack of hypercalcemic effects. We now show that the two analogs recruit coactivator SRC-1 better than the parental gemini and act as VDR superagonists. The crystal structures of complexes of zVDR with Gemini-0072 and Gemini-0097 indicate that these ligands induce an extra cavity within the ligand-binding pocket similar to gemini and that their superagonistic activity is due to an increased stabilization of helix H12. PMID:22180837

  14. Women Astronomers at Gemini: A Success Story

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodgers, Bernadette; Jorgensen, I.; Barker, N.; Edwards, M.; Trancho, G.

    2010-01-01

    Gemini Observatory has been very successful at attracting, hiring and retaining female Scientists. We present data on the growth of the scientific staff since the start of the Observatory, and science fellow recruiting from 2006-2008. At Gemini 31% of the Science Staff holding PhDs are female compared with 13.9% within the United States. The Science Management is 75% female, as is 50% of the Gemini Directorate. This critical mass of female representation within the science staff and management appears to have had a positive effect on female recruitment and hiring. The science fellow recruitment during the past 3 years has attracted 21-38% female applicants and 57% of new hires during this period have been female scientists. Perhaps even more significant, the retention rate of female science staff at Gemini is 88%, compared to 64% for male science staff. There are likely many factors that contribute to this success, but the conclusion is that Gemini has earned a reputation in the scientific community as a place where female scientists are valued and can be successful.

  15. Internet 2 Health Sciences Initiative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simco, Greg

    2003-01-01

    The Internet 2 (I2) health sciences initiative (I2HSI) involves the formulation of applications and supporting technologies, and guidelines for their use in the health sciences. Key elements of I2HSI include use of visualization, collaboration, medical informatics, telemedicine, and educational tools that support the health sciences. Specific…

  16. Internet 2 Health Sciences Initiative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simco, Greg

    2003-01-01

    The Internet 2 (I2) health sciences initiative (I2HSI) involves the formulation of applications and supporting technologies, and guidelines for their use in the health sciences. Key elements of I2HSI include use of visualization, collaboration, medical informatics, telemedicine, and educational tools that support the health sciences. Specific…

  17. Summary analysis of the Gemini entry aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitnah, A. M.; Howes, D. B.

    1972-01-01

    The aerodynamic data that were derived in 1967 from the analysis of flight-generated data for the Gemini entry module are presented. These data represent the aerodynamic characteristics exhibited by the vehicle during the entry portion of Gemini 2, 3, 5, 8, 10, 11, and 12 missions. For the Gemini, 5, 8, 10, 11, and 12 missions, the flight-generated lift-to-drag ratios and corresponding angles of attack are compared with the wind tunnel data. These comparisons show that the flight generated lift-to-drag ratios are consistently lower than were anticipated from the tunnel data. Numerous data uncertainties are cited that provide an insight into the problems that are related to an analysis of flight data developed from instrumentation systems, the primary functions of which are other than the evaluation of flight aerodynamic performance.

  18. Antifungal activity of gemini quaternary ammonium salts.

    PubMed

    Obłąk, Ewa; Piecuch, Agata; Krasowska, Anna; Luczyński, Jacek

    2013-12-14

    A series of gemini quaternary ammonium chlorides and bromides with various alkyl chain and spacer lengths was synthesized. The most active compounds against fungi were chlorides with 10 carbon atoms within the hydrophobic chain. Among these compounds were few with no hemolytic activity at minimal inhibitory concentrations. None of the tested compounds were cytotoxic and mutagenic. Cationic gemini surfactants poorly reduced the adhesion of microorganisms to the polystyrene plate, but inhibited the filamentation of Candida albicans. One of the tested compounds eradicated C. albicans and Rodotorula mucilaginosa biofilm, what could be important in overcoming catheter-associated infections. It was also shown that gemini surfactants enhanced the sensitivity of C. albicans to azoles and polyenes, thus they might be potentially used in combined therapy against fungi. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  19. The Original Gemini 9 Prime Crew

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    The original Gemini 9 prime crew, astronauts Elliot M. See Jr. (left), command pilot, and Charles A. Bassett II, pilot, in space suits with their helmets on the table in front of them. On February 28, 1966 the prime crew for the Gemini 9 mission were killed when their twin seat T-38 trainer jet aircraft crashed into a building in which the Gemini spacecraft were being manufactured. They were on final approach to Lambert-Saint Louis Municipal Airport when bad weather conditions hampered pilot See's ability to make a good visual contact with the runway. Noticing the building at the last second as he came out of the low cloud cover, See went to full afterburner and attempted to nose-up the aircraft in an attempt to miss the building. He clipped it and his plane crashed.

  20. Implementing an Education and Outreach Program for the Gemini Observatory in Chile.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, M. A.

    2006-08-01

    Beginning in 2001, the Gemini Observatory began the development of an innovative and aggressive education and outreach program at its Southern Hemisphere site in northern Chile. A principal focus of this effort is centered on local education and outreach to communities surrounding the observatory and its base facility in La Serena Chile. Programs are now established with local schools using two portable StarLab planetaria, an internet-based teacher exchange called StarTeachers and multiple partnerships with local educational institutions. Other elements include a CD-ROM-based virtual tour that allows students, teachers and the public to experience the observatory's sites in Chile and Hawaii. This virtual environment allows interaction using a variety of immersive scenarios such as a simulated observation using real data from Gemini. Pilot projects like "Live from Gemini" are currently being developed which use internet videoconferencing technologies to bring the observatory's facilities into classrooms at universities and remote institutions. Lessons learned from the implementation of these and other programs will be introduced and the challenges of developing educational programming in a developing country will be shared.

  1. The 2005 Australian Informatics Competition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, David

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the Australian Informatics Competition (AIC), a non-programming competition aimed at identifying students with potential in programming and algorithmic design. It is the first step in identifying students to represent Australia at the International Olympiad in Informatics. The main aim of the AIC is to increase awareness of…

  2. Training Residents in Medical Informatics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jerant, Anthony F.

    1999-01-01

    Describes an eight-step process for developing or refining a family-medicine informatics curriculum: needs assessment, review of expert recommendations, enlisting faculty and local institutional support, espousal of a human-centered approach, integrating informatics into the larger curriculum, easy access to computers, practical training, and…

  3. Gemini-Titan (GT)-9 Test - Training - KSC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-06-10

    S66-33406 (10 May 1966) --- Astronaut Thomas P. Stafford (on left), command pilot, and Eugene A. Cernan, pilot, in Gemini-9 spacecraft in the white room at Pad 19 during a Gemini-9/Agena simultaneous launch demonstration. This test is a coordinated dountdown of the Atlas-Agena and the Gemini-Titan vehicles. Photo credit: NASA

  4. GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-9A - EARTH SKY - ONBOARD

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-06-03

    S66-38080 (3 June 1966) --- Astronaut Thomas P. Stafford, command pilot of the Gemini-9A spaceflight, is photographed during the Gemini-9A mission inside the spacecraft by astronaut Eugene Cernan, Gemini-9A pilot. Photo credit: NASA

  5. RECOVERY - GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-IV - FROGMAN - ATLANTIC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-06-07

    S65-33491 (7 June 1965) --- A United States Navy frogman team participates in the recovery of the Gemini-Titan 4 (GT-4) spacecraft. The USS Wasp was the prime recovery ship for the Gemini-4 mission. The crew of the Gemini-4 spaceflight was astronauts James A. McDivitt, command pilot, and Edward H. White II, pilot.

  6. Astronauts Grissom and Young in Gemini Mission Simulator

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1964-05-22

    S64-25295 (March 1964) --- Astronauts Virgil I. (Gus) Grissom (right) and John W. Young, prime crew for the first manned Gemini mission (GT-3), are shown inside a Gemini mission simulator at McDonnell Aircraft Corp., St. Louis, MO. The simulator will provide Gemini astronauts and ground crews with realistic mission simulation during intensive training prior to actual launch.

  7. Astronaut John Young assisted into Gemini spacecraft in white room

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-03-23

    S65-20604 (23 March 1965) --- Astronaut John W. Young, the pilot of the Gemini-Titan 3 three-orbit mission, is assisted by a McDonnell Aircraft Corp. engineer as he enters the Gemini spacecraft in the white room atop the Gemini launch vehicle.

  8. Innovation without Boundaries: The Gemini. Assistive Technology. Associate Editor's Column.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashton, Tamarah M.

    2001-01-01

    This article describes Gemini, an augmentative and alternative communication device that is also a full-featured Macintosh computer. The Gemini is designed to help individuals of all ages with learning, communication, or computer access difficulties to lead more independent lives. The benefits of Gemini are highlighted, including its weight of…

  9. Innovation without Boundaries: The Gemini. Assistive Technology. Associate Editor's Column.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashton, Tamarah M.

    2001-01-01

    This article describes Gemini, an augmentative and alternative communication device that is also a full-featured Macintosh computer. The Gemini is designed to help individuals of all ages with learning, communication, or computer access difficulties to lead more independent lives. The benefits of Gemini are highlighted, including its weight of…

  10. Live from Gemini: Expanding the Walls of the Classroom Globally

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, J.; Michaud, P.; Valcourt, R.

    2011-09-01

    Live from Gemini has been designed to share Gemini Observatory's resources with a diverse range of learners and expand the walls of the classroom globally. The program is inquiry-based and adaptable to a wide range of learners who participate in a live one-on-one videoconference with an expert astronomer/educator host from one of the Gemini observatory control rooms.

  11. PRESS CONFERENCE - GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-11 - MSC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-08-01

    S66-39895 (1 Aug. 1966) --- Panel members of the Gemini-10 news conference held in the Building 1 auditorium were (from left) Dr. Robert C. Seamans Jr., NASA Deputy Administrator; astronaut John W. Young, Gemini-10 command pilot; astronaut Michael Collins, Gemini-10 pilot; and Dr. Robert R. Gilruth, MSC Director. Photo credit: NASA

  12. The Gemini Instrument Feasibilities Studies project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibon, Pascale; Goodsell, Stephen J.; Hardie, Kayla

    2015-01-01

    The Gemini Instrument Feasibilities Studies (GIFS) project is part of a program that will provide a number of community-created science-driven instrumentation design study reports and presentations to the observatory, conforming to a number of desired principles.By the time of the AAS, Gemini will have received a number of proposals and will be evaluating them shortly afterwards with the expectation of placing 3 or more feasibility study contracts based on a facility instrument costing between USD 8,000,000 and USD 12,000,000. These instrument studies will provide synergies with new capabilities coming online (e.g. LSST, JWST, ALMA, etc)Following the project, Gemini together with the Gemini Science and Technical Advisory Committee (STAC) and input from the wider community will decide on the top-level instrument requirements for the next facility instrument (Gen4#3) and launch a targeted Request for Proposals to design, build, test and deliver a suitable instrument. Gemini expects to release an RfP for Gen4#3 in Q4 2015.Each feasibility study will include fully developed science case(s), optical, mechanical, electronic and software design elements at the conceptual level as needed to demonstrate the technical viability. In particular, each design study will thoroughly identify and mitigate key risks.Each study team will present a status summary presentation at the 2015 Meeting on the Science and Future of Gemini held in Toronto in June 2015. The final GIFS reports and presentations are expected in Sept 2015.We will discuss the status of GIFS and the currently plans for Gen4#3.

  13. Informatics applied to cytology

    PubMed Central

    Hornish, Maryanne; Goulart, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Automation and emerging information technologies are being adopted by cytology laboratories to augment Pap test screening and improve diagnostic accuracy. As a result, informatics, the application of computers and information systems to information management, has become essential for the successful operation of the cytopathology laboratory. This review describes how laboratory information management systems can be used to achieve an automated and seamless workflow process. The utilization of software, electronic databases and spreadsheets to perform necessary quality control measures are discussed, as well as a Lean production system and Six Sigma approach, to reduce errors in the cytopathology laboratory. PMID:19495402

  14. Informatics applied to cytology.

    PubMed

    Pantanowitz, Liron; Hornish, Maryanne; Goulart, Robert A

    2008-12-29

    Automation and emerging information technologies are being adopted by cytology laboratories to augment Pap test screening and improve diagnostic accuracy. As a result, informatics, the application of computers and information systems to information management, has become essential for the successful operation of the cytopathology laboratory. This review describes how laboratory information management systems can be used to achieve an automated and seamless workflow process. The utilization of software, electronic databases and spreadsheets to perform necessary quality control measures are discussed, as well as a Lean production system and Six Sigma approach, to reduce errors in the cytopathology laboratory.

  15. Informatics and Autopsy Pathology.

    PubMed

    Levy, Bruce

    2015-06-01

    Many health care providers believe that the autopsy is no longer relevant in high-technology medicine era. This has fueled a decline in the hospital autopsy rate. Although it seems that advanced diagnostic tests answer all clinical questions, studies repeatedly demonstrate that an autopsy uncovers as many undiagnosed conditions today as in the past. The forensic autopsy rate has also declined, although not as precipitously. Pathologists are still performing a nineteenth century autopsy procedure that remains essentially unchanged. Informatics offers several potential answers that will evolve the low-tech autopsy into the high-tech autopsy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Creating advanced health informatics certification.

    PubMed

    Gadd, Cynthia S; Williamson, Jeffrey J; Steen, Elaine B; Fridsma, Douglas B

    2016-07-01

    In 2005, AMIA leaders and members concluded that certification of advanced health informatics professionals would offer value to individual practitioners, organizations that hire them, and society at large. AMIA's work to create advanced informatics certification began by leading a successful effort to create the clinical informatics subspecialty for American Board of Medical Specialties board-certified physicians. Since 2012, AMIA has been working to establish advanced health informatics certification (AHIC) for all health informatics practitioners regardless of their primary discipline. In November 2015, AMIA completed the first of 3 key tasks required to establish AHIC, with the AMIA Board of Directors' endorsement of proposed eligibility requirements. This AMIA Board white paper describes efforts to establish AHIC, reports on the current status of AHIC components, and provides a context for the proposed AHIC eligibility requirements.

  17. Nursing informatics competencies: bibliometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Kokol, Peter; Blažun, Helena; Vošner, Janez; Saranto, Kaija

    2014-01-01

    Information and communication technology is developing rapidly and it is incorporated in many health care processes, but in spite of that fact we can still notice that nursing informatics competencies had received limited attention in basic nursing education curricula in Europe and especially in Eastern European countries. The purpose of the present paper is to present the results of a bibliometric analysis of the nursing informatics competencies scientific literature production. We applied the bibliometrics analysis to the corpus of 332 papers found in SCOPUS, related to nursing informatics competencies. The results showed that there is a positive trend in the number of published papers per year, indicating the increased research interest in nursing informatics competencies. Despite the fact that the first paper was published in Denmark, the most prolific country regarding the research in nursing informatics competencies is United States as are their institutions and authors.

  18. GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-7 - RECOVERY - ATLANTIC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-12-18

    S65-61823 (18 Dec. 1965) --- Astronauts James A. Lovell Jr. (left), Gemini-7 pilot, and Frank Borman (right), command pilot, slice into a huge cake which was part of their warm welcome after arriving aboard the aircraft carrier USS Wasp. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Gemini-7 spacecraft splashed down in the Western Atlantic recovery area at 9:05 a.m. (EST), Dec. 18, 1965, to conclude a highly successful 14-day mission in space. Sailors gather around close to watch the cake cutting. Photo credit: NASA

  19. Radiation dosimetry for the Gemini program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richmond, R. G.

    1972-01-01

    The principal source of radiation for low-earth-orbit, low inclination space flights is in the area of the South Atlantic magnetic anomaly. None of the Gemini dose measurements reported in the paper are of high enough intensity to be considered hazardous. There is a trend toward larger doses as missions are flown higher and longer. Extended orbital operations between 1400 and 4400 kilometers would encounter high interior radiation levels. Pronounced spacecraft geometry effects have been measured in manned spacecraft. Instrumentation for radiation measurements on Gemini spacecraft is described.

  20. Medical informatics: past, present, future.

    PubMed

    Haux, Reinhold

    2010-09-01

    To reflect about medical informatics as a discipline. To suggest significant future research directions with the purpose of stimulating further discussion. Exploring and discussing important developments in medical informatics from the past and in the present by way of examples. Reflecting on the role of IMIA, the International Medical Informatics Association, in influencing the discipline. Medical informatics as a discipline is still young. Today, as a cross-sectional discipline, it forms one of the bases for medicine and health care. As a consequence considerable responsibility rests on medical informatics for improving the health of people, through its contributions to high-quality, efficient health care and to innovative research in biomedicine and related health and computer sciences. Current major research fields can be grouped according to the organization, application, and evaluation of health information systems, to medical knowledge representation, and to the underlying signal and data analyses and interpretations. Yet, given the fluid nature of many of the driving forces behind progress in information processing methods and their technologies, progress in medicine and health care, and the rapidly changing needs, requirements and expectations of human societies, we can expect many changes in future medical informatics research. Future research fields might range from seamless interactivity with automated data capture and storage, via informatics diagnostics and therapeutics, to living labs with data analysis methodology, involving sensor-enhanced ambient environments. The role of IMIA, the International Medical Informatics Association, for building a cooperative, strongly connected, and research-driven medical informatics community worldwide can hardly be underestimated. Health care continuously changes as the underlying science and practice of health are in continuous transformation. Medical informatics as a discipline is strongly affected by these

  1. Gemini-Titan (GT)-6 - Gemini 6 of 7 - Space Photography - Outer Space

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-12-17

    S65-63194 (15 Dec. 1965) --- This photograph of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Gemini-7 spacecraft was taken through the hatch window of the Gemini-6 spacecraft during rendezvous and station keeping maneuvers at an altitude of approximately 160 miles on Dec. 15, 1965. The photograph was taken with a Hasselblad camera using Kodak SO 217 film with an ASA of 1964. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  2. Trends in publication of nursing informatics research.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeoneui; Ohno-Machado, Lucila; Oh, Janet; Jiang, Xiaoqian

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed 741 journal articles on nursing informatics published in 7 biomedical/nursing informatics journals and 6 nursing journals from 2005 to 2013 to begin to understand publication trends in nursing informatics research and identify gaps. We assigned a research theme to each article using AMIA 2014 theme categories and normalized the citation counts using time from publication. Overall, nursing informatics research covered a broad spectrum of research topics in biomedical informatics and publication topics seem to be well aligned with the high priority research agenda identified by the nursing informatics community. The research themes with highest volume of publication were Clinical Workflow and Human Factors, Consumer Informatics and Personal Health Records, and Clinical Informatics, for which an increasing trend in publication was noted. Articles on Informatics Education and Workforce Development; Data Mining, NLP, Information Extraction; and Clinical Informatics showed steady and high volume of citations.

  3. Trends in Publication of Nursing Informatics Research

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyeoneui; Ohno-Machado, Lucila; Oh, Janet; Jiang, Xiaoqian

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed 741 journal articles on nursing informatics published in 7 biomedical/nursing informatics journals and 6 nursing journals from 2005 to 2013 to begin to understand publication trends in nursing informatics research and identify gaps. We assigned a research theme to each article using AMIA 2014 theme categories and normalized the citation counts using time from publication. Overall, nursing informatics research covered a broad spectrum of research topics in biomedical informatics and publication topics seem to be well aligned with the high priority research agenda identified by the nursing informatics community. The research themes with highest volume of publication were Clinical Workflow and Human Factors, Consumer Informatics and Personal Health Records, and Clinical Informatics, for which an increasing trend in publication was noted. Articles on Informatics Education and Workforce Development; Data Mining, NLP, Information Extraction; and Clinical Informatics showed steady and high volume of citations. PMID:25954387

  4. Proposal of a new Internet standard for DICOM: DICOM-QR URL.

    PubMed

    Sakusabe, T; Shirchin, B; Kimura, M

    1998-01-01

    This paper proposes a new Internet standard that is combination of two standards in different domain, Internet and medical informatics. The both standards are described briefly in this paper. We describe how to combine them into a Internet standard. With a new standard, there are several advantages for medical information systems. The standard should be established by the following way of the Internet standards.

  5. Gemini-Titan (GT)-7 - Recovery - Atlantic

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-12-18

    S65-63646 (18 Dec. 1965) --- The crew of the Gemini-7 spaceflight, astronauts Frank Borman, command pilot, and James A. Lovell Jr., pilot, arrive aboard the aircraft carrier USS Wasp. The astronauts were picked up from the ocean, following successful splashdown, by recovery helicopter and flown to the carrier to begin postflight medical and technical debriefings. Photo credit: NASA

  6. GEMINI-TITAN-IV - SUITED (CLOSEUP) - CAPE

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-05-31

    S65-19528 (1 June 1965) --- Astronauts Edward H. White II (left), Gemini-Titan 4 pilot; and James A. McDivitt, command pilot. EDITOR?S NOTE: Astronaut White died in the Apollo 1/Saturn 204 fire at Cape Kennedy on Jan. 27, 1967.

  7. Dietician prepares Gemini 7 crew preflight breakfast

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-12-04

    S65-56311 (2 Dec. 1965) --- Kennedy Space Center food specialists prepare an Earth-bound meal for Gemini-7 astronauts. Astronauts' diet is strictly controlled before and during spaceflights to avoid interfering with planned medical experiments. Photo credit: NASA

  8. Adsorption of Gemini surfactants onto clathrate hydrates.

    PubMed

    Salako, O; Lo, C; Couzis, A; Somasundaran, P; Lee, J W

    2013-12-15

    This work addresses the adsorption of two Gemini surfactants at the cyclopentane (CP) hydrate-water interface. The Gemini surfactants investigated here are Dowfax C6L and Dowfax 2A1 that have two anionic head groups and one hydrophobic tail group. The adsorption of these surfactants was quantified using adsorption isotherms and the adsorption isotherms were determined using liquid-liquid titrations. Even if the Gemini surfactant adsorption isotherms show multi-layer adsorption, they possess the first Langmuir layer with the second adsorption layer only evident in the 2A1 adsorption isotherm. Zeta potentials of CP hydrate particles in the surfactant solution of various concentrations of Dowfax C6L and Dowfax 2A1 were measured to further explain their adsorption behavior at the CP hydrate-water interface. Zeta potentials of alumina particles as a model particle system in different concentrations of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), Dowfax C6L and Dowfax 2A1 were also measured to confirm the configuration of all the surfactants at the interface. The determination of the isotherms and zeta-potentials provides an understanding framework for the adsorption behavior of the two Gemini surfactants at the hydrate-water interface. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. GEMINI-TITAN-8 - TRAINING - WATER EGRESS

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-01-15

    S66-17253 (15 Jan. 1966) --- Astronauts Neil A. Armstrong (center), command pilot, and David R. Scott (right), pilot of the Gemini-8 prime crew, are suited up for water egress training aboard the NASA Motor Vessel Retriever in the Gulf of Mexico. At left is Dr. Kenneth N. Beers, M.D., Flight Medicine Branch, Center Medical Office. Photo credit: NASA

  10. GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-10 - EARTH - SKY

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-07-01

    S66-46054 (18 July 1966) --- Venezuela, British Guyana, Surinam and Trinidad, as seen from the Gemini-10 spacecraft. On the left is the mouth of the Orinoco River in Venezuela. Mouth of Essequibo River in British Guyana is in right center. Photo credit: NASA

  11. Bioimage Informatics for Big Data.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hanchuan; Zhou, Jie; Zhou, Zhi; Bria, Alessandro; Li, Yujie; Kleissas, Dean Mark; Drenkow, Nathan G; Long, Brian; Liu, Xiaoxiao; Chen, Hanbo

    2016-01-01

    Bioimage informatics is a field wherein high-throughput image informatics methods are used to solve challenging scientific problems related to biology and medicine. When the image datasets become larger and more complicated, many conventional image analysis approaches are no longer applicable. Here, we discuss two critical challenges of large-scale bioimage informatics applications, namely, data accessibility and adaptive data analysis. We highlight case studies to show that these challenges can be tackled based on distributed image computing as well as machine learning of image examples in a multidimensional environment.

  12. Medical Informatics Idle YouTube Potential.

    PubMed

    Hucíková, Anežka; Babic, Ankica

    2017-01-01

    YouTube as an online video-sharing service in the context of Web 2.0 goes beyond the bounds of pure fun, for which the platform was primarily established. Nowadays, commonly to other social media, it serves also educational, informational and last but not least, marketing purposes. The importance of video sharing is supported by several predictions about video reaching over 90% of global internet traffic by 2020. Using qualitative content analysis over selected YouTube videos, paper examines the current situation of the platform's marketing potential usage by medical informatics organizations, researches and other healthcare professionals. Results of the analysis demonstrate several ways in which YouTube is already used to inform, educate or promote above-mentioned medical institutions. However, their engagement in self-promo or spreading awareness of their research projects via YouTube is considered to be low.

  13. A survey of public health and consumer health informatics programmes and courses in Canadian universities and colleges.

    PubMed

    Arocha, Jose F; Hoffman-Goetz, Laurie

    2012-12-01

    As information technology becomes more widely used by people for health-care decisions, training in consumer and public health informatics will be important for health practitioners working directly with the public. Using information from 74 universities and colleges across Canada, we searched websites and online calendars for programmes (undergraduate, graduate) regarding availability and scope of education in programmes, courses and topics geared to public health and/or consumer health informatics. Of the 74 institutions searched, 31 provided some content relevant to health informatics (HI) and 8 institutions offered full HI-related programmes. Of these 8 HI programmes, only 1 course was identified with content relevant to public health informatics and 1 with content about consumer health informatics. Some institutions (n  =  22) - which do not offer HI-degree programmes - provide health informatics-related courses, including one on consumer health informatics. We found few programmes, courses or topic areas within courses in Canadian universities and colleges that focus on consumer or public health informatics education. Given the increasing emphasis on personal responsibility for health and health-care decision-making, skills training for health professionals who help consumers navigate the Internet should be considered in health informatics education.

  14. The origins of informatics.

    PubMed Central

    Collen, M F

    1994-01-01

    This article summarizes the origins of informatics, which is based on the science, engineering, and technology of computer hardware, software, and communications. In just four decades, from the 1950s to the 1990s, computer technology has progressed from slow, first-generation vacuum tubes, through the invention of the transistor and its incorporation into microprocessor chips, and ultimately, to fast, fourth-generation very-large-scale-integrated silicon chips. Programming has undergone a parallel transformation, from cumbersome, first-generation, machine languages to efficient, fourth-generation application-oriented languages. Communication has evolved from simple copper wires to complex fiberoptic cables in computer-linked networks. The digital computer has profound implications for the development and practice of clinical medicine. PMID:7719803

  15. The origins of informatics.

    PubMed

    Collen, M F

    1994-01-01

    This article summarizes the origins of informatics, which is based on the science, engineering, and technology of computer hardware, software, and communications. In just four decades, from the 1950s to the 1990s, computer technology has progressed from slow, first-generation vacuum tubes, through the invention of the transistor and its incorporation into microprocessor chips, and ultimately, to fast, fourth-generation very-large-scale-integrated silicon chips. Programming has undergone a parallel transformation, from cumbersome, first-generation, machine languages to efficient, fourth-generation application-oriented languages. Communication has evolved from simple copper wires to complex fiberoptic cables in computer-linked networks. The digital computer has profound implications for the development and practice of clinical medicine.

  16. Informatics — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    The EDRN provides a comprehensive informatics activity which includes a number of tools and an integrated knowledge environment for capturing, managing, integrating, and sharing results from across EDRN's cancer biomarker research network.

  17. Health Professionals' Views of Informatics Education

    PubMed Central

    Staggers, Nancy; Gassert, Carole A.; Skiba, Diane J.

    2000-01-01

    Health care leaders emphasize the need to include information technology and informatics concepts in formal education programs, yet integration of informatics into health educational programs has progressed slowly. The AMIA 1999 Spring Congress was held to address informatics educational issues across health professions, including the educational needs in the various health professions, goals for health informatics education, and implementation strategies to achieve these goals. This paper presents the results from AMIA work groups focused on informatics education for non-informatics health professionals. In the categories of informatics needs, goals, and strategies, conference attendees suggested elements in these areas: educational responsibilities for faculty and students, organizational responsibilities, core computer skills and informatics knowledge, how to learn informatics skills, and resources required to implement educational strategies. PMID:11062228

  18. Exploration of the e-patient phenomenon in nursing informatics.

    PubMed

    Gee, Perry M; Greenwood, Deborah A; Kim, Katherine K; Perez, Susan L; Staggers, Nancy; DeVon, Holli A

    2012-01-01

    The availability of health information on the Internet has equalized opportunities for knowledge between patients and their health care providers, creating a new phenomenon called the e-patient. E-patients use technology to actively participate in their health care and assume higher levels of responsibility for their own health and wellness. This phenomenon has implications for nursing informatics research related to e-patients and potential collaboration with practitioners in developing a collective wisdom. Nursing informatics can use the data, information, knowledge, and wisdom (DIKW) framework to understand how e-patients and clinicians may achieve this collective wisdom. Nurse informaticists can use constructivism and Gadamerian hermeneutics to bridge each stage of this framework to illustrate the fundamentals of patient and clinician interactions and commonality of language to achieve a collective wisdom. Examining the e-patient phenomenon will help nurse informaticists evaluate, design, develop, and determine the effectiveness of information systems used by e-patients. The Internet can facilitate a partnership between the patient and clinician and cultivate a collective wisdom, enhanced by collaboration between nurse informatics and e-patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Critical advances in bridging personal health informatics and clinical informatics.

    PubMed

    Koch, S; Vimarlund, V

    2012-01-01

    To provide a survey over significant developments in the area of linking personal health informatics and clinical informatics, to give insights into critical advances and to discuss open problems and opportunities in this area. A scoping review over the literature published in scientific journals and relevant conference proceedings in the intersection between personal health informatics and clinical informatics over the years 2010 and 2011 was performed. The publications analyzed are related to two main topics, namely "Sharing information and collaborating through personal health records, portals and social networks" and "Integration of personal health systems with clinical information systems". For the first topic, results are presented according to five different themes: "Patient expectations and attitudes", "Real use experiences", "Changes for care providers", "Barriers to adoption" and "Proposed technical infrastructures". For the second topic, two different themes were found, namely "Technical architectures and interoperability" and "Security, safety and privacy issues". Results show a number of gaps between the information needs of patients and the information care provider organizations provide to them as well as the lack of a trusted technical, ethical and regulatory framework regarding information sharing. Despite recent developments in the areas of personal health informatics and clinical informatics both fields have diverging needs. To support both clinical work processes and empower patients to effectively handle self-care, a number of issues remain unsolved. Open issues include privacy and confidentiality, including trusted sharing of health information and building collaborative environments between patients, their families and care providers. There are further challenges to meet around health and technology literacy as well as to overcome structural and organizational barriers. Frameworks for evaluating personal health informatics applications and

  20. Gemini-4 prime crew after press conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-06-11

    S65-33352 (11 June 1965) --- The Gemini-4 prime crew pose with two NASA officials after a press conference in the MSC auditorium. Left to right, are Dr. Robert R. Gilruth, MSC director; Dr. Robert C. Seamans Jr., associate administrator, National Aeronautics and Space Administration; astronaut James A. McDivitt, command pilot of the Gemini-4 flight; and astronaut Edward H. White II, pilot of the mission. The two astronauts had just returned to Houston following their debriefings at Cape Kennedy. The Gt-4 liftoff was at 10:16 a.m. (EST) on June 3, 1965. Time of splashdown ending the four-day, 62-revolution mission was at 12:12 p.m. on June 7, 1965.

  1. Portrait - Gemini 11 - Prime and Backup Crews

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-01-01

    S66-50772 (7 Sept. 1966) --- The Gemini-Titan XI (GT-11) prime and backup crews pose for a group portrait. Seated is the prime crew, astronauts Charles Conrad Jr. (right), command pilot, and Richard F. Gordon Jr. (left), pilot. The backup crew (standing) is astronauts Neil A. Armstrong (right), command pilot, and William A. Anders (left), pilot. The two crews were suited up for a simulation test at the Kennedy Space Center. Photo credit: NASA

  2. Portrait - Gemini 9 Prime and Backup Crews

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-01-01

    S66-15622 (January 1966) --- Portrait of the Gemini 9 prime and backup crews. Seated are the Prime crew consisting of Astronauts Elliot M. See Jr. (left), command pilot, and Charles A. Bassett II, pilot. Standing are the backup crew consisting of Astronauts Thomas P. Stafford (left), command pilot, and Eugene A. Cernan, pilot. Both crews are in space suits with their helmets on the table in front of them.

  3. The Gemini online data processing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Shane; Gillies, Kim; Brighton, Allan

    2004-09-01

    Processing astronomical images is an inherently resource intensive procedure that is typically time consuming as well. At the same time, first order reductions are particularly important during the observing process since they can provide key quality assessment information. To resolve this conflict, the Online Data Processing (OLDP) system being commissioned at the Gemini Observatory automatically maps reduction sequences onto a cluster of servers during observing, taking advantage of available concurrency where possible. The user constructs a visual representation of the sequence for an observation using the Gemini Observing Tool. No constraints are placed upon the series of steps that comprise the sequence. At runtime, the OLDP reads the reduction sequence from the Observing Database and splits it into smaller pieces for simultaneous execution on the cluster. Recipe steps can be implemented in IRAF, shell scripts, or Java, and other types can be plugged into the architecture without modifying the core of the code base. This paper will introduce the Gemini OLDP and demonstrate how it utilizes modern infrastructure technology like Jini and JavaSpaces to achieve its goals.

  4. Teacher Perception on Educational Informatics Network: A Qualitative Study of a Turkish Anatolian High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karalar, Halit; Dogan, Ugur

    2017-01-01

    FATIH Project carried out by the Turkish government is one of the comprehensive technology integration project in the World. With this project, interactive boards, tablets and multifunctional printers have been distributed to schools and Internet infrastructure of schools improved. EIN (Educational Informatics Network) platform, known as EBA…

  5. Multiple disciplines synergy tools for Ph.D. Students of biomedical informatics at Charles University in Prague.

    PubMed

    Zvarova, Jana; Svacina, Stepan; Dostalova, Tatjana; Seydlova, Michaela; Zvara, Karel

    2012-01-01

    The poster describes doctoral degree studies in biomedical informatics at Charles University in Prague. Particularly important in educational programmes and knowledge dissemination is the role of Internet. Therefore we also describe special activities concerned with the specific research at the First Faculty of Medicine of Charles University in Prague. These are selected tools for blended learning tools, ExaMe system and the role of the European Journal for Biomedical Informatics (EJBI), an official multilingual journal of EFMI, for Ph.D. student's cooperation and understanding the multidisciplinary field of biomedical informatics [1].

  6. GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-9 - RECOVERY - TOUCHDOWN - ATLANTIC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-06-06

    S66-34117 (6 June 1966) --- The 72-hour, 21-minute Gemini-9A spaceflight is concluded as the Gemini spacecraft, with astronaut Thomas P. Stafford and Eugene A. Cernan aboard, touches down in the Atlantic Ocean only 3.5 miles from the prime recovery ship, the aircraft carrier USS Wasp. Gemini-9 splashed down 345 miles east of Cape Kennedy at 9 a.m. (EST), June 6, 1966. Photo credit: NASA

  7. Splashdown - Gemini-Titan (GT-12) Spacecraft - Mission Close - Atlantic

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-11-15

    S66-59986 (15 Nov. 1966) --- The Gemini spaceflight program concludes as the Gemini-12 spacecraft, with astronaut James A. Lovell Jr., command pilot, and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., pilot, aboard, nears touchdown in the Atlantic Ocean 2.5 nautical miles from the prime recovery ship, USS Wasp. Gemini-12 splashed down at 2:21 p.m. (EST), Nov. 11, 1966, to conclude the four-day mission in space. Photo credit: NASA

  8. Gemini 10 prime crew during post flight press conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    At podium during Gemini 10 press conference are (l-r) Dr. Robert C. Seamans, Astronauts John Young and Michael Collins and Dr. Robert R. Gilruth (39895); Wide angle view of the Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC) News Center during the Gemini 10 prime crew post flight press conference (38786); Astronaut Young draws diagram on chalk board of tethered extravehicular activity accomplished during Gemini 10 flight (39897).

  9. Docking - Gemini-Titan (GT)-11 - Outer Space

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-09-14

    S66-54555 (14 Sept. 1966) --- The Gemini-11 spacecraft is docked to the Agena Target Vehicle in this photograph taken by astronaut Richard F. Gordon Jr., pilot, as he stood in the open hatch of the Gemini-11 spacecraft during his extravehicular activity (EVA). Note Agena's L-band antenna. Taken during Gemini-11's 29th revolution of Earth, using a modified 70mm Hasselblad camera, with Eastman Kodak, Ektachrome, MS (S.O. 368) color film. Photo credit: NASA

  10. Gemini 10 prime crew during post flight press conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    At podium during Gemini 10 press conference are (l-r) Dr. Robert C. Seamans, Astronauts John Young and Michael Collins and Dr. Robert R. Gilruth (39895); Wide angle view of the Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC) News Center during the Gemini 10 prime crew post flight press conference (38786); Astronaut Young draws diagram on chalk board of tethered extravehicular activity accomplished during Gemini 10 flight (39897).

  11. High throughput screening informatics.

    PubMed

    Ling, Xuefeng Bruce

    2008-03-01

    High throughput screening (HTS), an industrial effort to leverage developments in the areas of modern robotics, data analysis and control software, liquid handling devices, and sensitive detectors, has played a pivotal role in the drug discovery process, allowing researchers to efficiently screen millions of compounds to identify tractable small molecule modulators of a given biological process or disease state and advance them into high quality leads. As HTS throughput has significantly increased the volume, complexity, and information content of datasets, lead discovery research demands a clear corporate strategy for scientific computing and subsequent establishment of robust enterprise-wide (usually global) informatics platforms, which enable complicated HTS work flows, facilitate HTS data mining, and drive effective decision-making. The purpose of this review is, from the data analysis and handling perspective, to examine key elements in HTS operations and some essential data-related activities supporting or interfacing the screening process, and outline properties that various enabling software should have. Additionally, some general advice for corporate managers with system procurement responsibilities is offered.

  12. Emerging Vaccine Informatics

    PubMed Central

    He, Yongqun; Rappuoli, Rino; De Groot, Anne S.; Chen, Robert T.

    2010-01-01

    Vaccine informatics is an emerging research area that focuses on development and applications of bioinformatics methods that can be used to facilitate every aspect of the preclinical, clinical, and postlicensure vaccine enterprises. Many immunoinformatics algorithms and resources have been developed to predict T- and B-cell immune epitopes for epitope vaccine development and protective immunity analysis. Vaccine protein candidates are predictable in silico from genome sequences using reverse vaccinology. Systematic transcriptomics and proteomics gene expression analyses facilitate rational vaccine design and identification of gene responses that are correlates of protection in vivo. Mathematical simulations have been used to model host-pathogen interactions and improve vaccine production and vaccination protocols. Computational methods have also been used for development of immunization registries or immunization information systems, assessment of vaccine safety and efficacy, and immunization modeling. Computational literature mining and databases effectively process, mine, and store large amounts of vaccine literature and data. Vaccine Ontology (VO) has been initiated to integrate various vaccine data and support automated reasoning. PMID:21772787

  13. Open Access Publishing in the Field of Medical Informatics.

    PubMed

    Kuballa, Stefanie

    2017-05-01

    The open access paradigm has become an important approach in today's information and communication society. Funders and governments in different countries stipulate open access publications of funded research results. Medical informatics as part of the science, technology and medicine disciplines benefits from many research funds, such as National Institutes of Health in the US, Wellcome Trust in UK, German Research Foundation in Germany and many more. In this study an overview of the current open access programs and conditions of major journals in the field of medical informatics is presented. It was investigated whether there are suitable options and how they are shaped. Therefore all journals in Thomson Reuters Web of Science that were listed in the subject category "Medical Informatics" in 2014 were examined. An Internet research was conducted by investigating the journals' websites. It was reviewed whether journals offer an open access option with a subsequent check of conditions as for example the type of open access, the fees and the licensing. As a result all journals in the field of medical informatics that had an impact factor in 2014 offer an open access option. A predominantly consistent pricing range was determined with an average fee of 2.248 € and a median fee of 2.207 €. The height of a journals' open access fee did not correlate with the height of its Impact Factor. Hence, medical informatics journals have recognized the trend of open access publishing, though the vast majority of them are working with the hybrid method. Hybrid open access may however lead to problems in questions of double dipping and the often stipulated gold open access.

  14. Driving the Profession of Health Informatics: The Australasian College of Health Informatics.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Christopher; Veil, Klaus; Williams, Peter; Cording, Andrew; Liaw, Siaw-Teng; Grain, Heather

    2015-01-01

    Across the world, bodies representing health informatics or promoting health informatics are either societies of common interest or universities with health informatics courses/departments. Professional colleges in Health Informatics (similar to the idea of professional colleges in other health fields) are few and far between. The Australasian College of Health Informatics has been in existence since 2001, and has an increasing membership of nearly 100 fellows and members, acting as a national focal point for the promotion of Health Informatics in Australasia. Describing the activities of the college, this article demonstrates a need for increasing professionalization of Health informatics beyond the current structures.

  15. Bioimage informatics for experimental biology

    PubMed Central

    Swedlow, Jason R.; Goldberg, Ilya G.; Eliceiri, Kevin W.

    2012-01-01

    Over the last twenty years there have been great advances in light microscopy with the result that multi-dimensional imaging has driven a revolution in modern biology. The development of new approaches of data acquisition are reportedly frequently, and yet the significant data management and analysis challenges presented by these new complex datasets remains largely unsolved. Like the well-developed field of genome bioinformatics, central repositories are and will be key resources, but there is a critical need for informatics tools in individual laboratories to help manage, share, visualize, and analyze image data. In this article we present the recent efforts by the bioimage informatics community to tackle these challenges and discuss our own vision for future development of bioimage informatics solution. PMID:19416072

  16. Bioimage informatics for experimental biology.

    PubMed

    Swedlow, Jason R; Goldberg, Ilya G; Eliceiri, Kevin W

    2009-01-01

    Over the past twenty years there have been great advances in light microscopy with the result that multidimensional imaging has driven a revolution in modern biology. The development of new approaches of data acquisition is reported frequently, and yet the significant data management and analysis challenges presented by these new complex datasets remain largely unsolved. As in the well-developed field of genome bioinformatics, central repositories are and will be key resources, but there is a critical need for informatics tools in individual laboratories to help manage, share, visualize, and analyze image data. In this article we present the recent efforts by the bioimage informatics community to tackle these challenges, and discuss our own vision for future development of bioimage informatics solutions.

  17. Public Health Platforms: An Emerging Informatics Approach to Health Professional Learning and Development

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    Health informatics has a major role to play in optimising the management and use of data, information and knowledge in health systems. As health systems undergo digital transformation, it is important to consider informatics approaches not only to curriculum content but also to the design of learning environments and learning activities for health professional learning and development. An example of such an informatics approach is the use of large-scale, integrated public health platforms on the Internet as part of health professional learning and development. This article describes selected examples of such platforms, with a focus on how they may influence the direction of health professional learning and development. Significance for public health The landscape of healthcare systems, public health systems, health research systems and professional education systems is fragmented, with many gaps and silos. More sophistication in the management of health data, information, and knowledge, based on public health informatics expertise, is needed to tackle key issues of prevention, promotion and policy-making. Platform technologies represent an emerging large-scale, highly integrated informatics approach to public health, combining the technologies of Internet, the web, the cloud, social technologies, remote sensing and/or mobile apps into an online infrastructure that can allow more synergies in work within and across these systems. Health professional curricula need updating so that the health workforce has a deep and critical understanding of the way that platform technologies are becoming the foundation of the health sector. PMID:27190977

  18. Public Health Platforms: An Emerging Informatics Approach to Health Professional Learning and Development.

    PubMed

    Gray, Kathleen

    2016-04-26

    Health informatics has a major role to play in optimising the management and use of data, information and knowledge in health systems. As health systems undergo digital transformation, it is important to consider informatics approaches not only to curriculum content but also to the design of learning environments and learning activities for health professional learning and development. An example of such an informatics approach is the use of large-scale, integrated public health platforms on the Internet as part of health professional learning and development. This article describes selected examples of such platforms, with a focus on how they may influence the direction of health professional learning and development. Significance for public healthThe landscape of healthcare systems, public health systems, health research systems and professional education systems is fragmented, with many gaps and silos. More sophistication in the management of health data, information, and knowledge, based on public health informatics expertise, is needed to tackle key issues of prevention, promotion and policy-making. Platform technologies represent an emerging large-scale, highly integrated informatics approach to public health, combining the technologies of Internet, the web, the cloud, social technologies, remote sensing and/or mobile apps into an online infrastructure that can allow more synergies in work within and across these systems. Health professional curricula need updating so that the health workforce has a deep and critical understanding of the way that platform technologies are becoming the foundation of the health sector.

  19. Gemini 9 spacecraft during EVA as seen Astronaut Eugene Cernan

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-06-05

    S66-38068 (5 June 1966) --- Astronaut Eugene A. Cernan took this view of the Gemini-9A spacecraft and his umbilical cord (right) over California, Arizona, and Sonora, Mexico, during his extravehicular activity (EVA) on the Gemini-9A mission. Taken during the 32nd revolution of the flight. Photo credit: NASA

  20. Astronaut Eugene Cernan sits in Gemini boilerplate during water egress

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-04-09

    S66-29559 (9 April 1966) --- Astronaut Eugene A. Cernan, prime crew pilot of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration?s Gemini-9 spaceflight, sits in Gemini Boiler-plate during water egress training activity in the Gulf of Mexico. Photo credit: NASA

  1. PRESS CONFERENCE - GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-10 - MSC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-08-01

    S66-39897 (1 Aug. 1966) --- Astronaut John W. Young, Gemini-10 command pilot, uses a chalk drawing on a blackboard to illustrate how astronaut Michael Collins, Gemini-10 pilot, looked when he inspected the Agena Target Docking Vehicle during his extravehicular activity. Young was discussing the mission before a gathering of news media representatives in the Building 1 auditorium. Photo credit: NASA

  2. Agena Target Docking vehicle seen from Gemini 8 spacecraft

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-03-16

    S66-25784 (16 March 1966) --? The Agena Target Docking Vehicle seen from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration?s Gemini adapter of the Agena is approximately two feet from the nose of the spacecraft (lower left). Crewmen for the Gemini-8 mission were astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, command pilot, and David R. Scott, pilot. Photo credit: NASA

  3. Gemini 10 prime crew in White Room preparing for insertion

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-07-18

    S66-42737 (18 July 1966) --- In the White Room atop the Gemini launch vehicle, astronauts Michael Collins (left), pilot, and John W. Young (right), command pilot, prepare to enter the Gemini-10 spacecraft. Engineers and technicians stand by to assist in the insertion. Photo credit: NASA

  4. Gemini 12 equipment jettison during rendezvous mission in space

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-11-13

    S66-62999 (13 Nov. 1966) --- Jettison of the extravehicular life support system (ELSS) and other equipment from the Gemini-12 spacecraft during its rendezvous mission in space. The nose of the Gemini-12 spacecraft is clearly visible at right edge of photo. Photo credit: NASA

  5. Solution properties and electrospinning of phosphonium gemini surfactants.

    PubMed

    Hemp, Sean T; Hudson, Amanda G; Allen, Michael H; Pole, Sandeep S; Moore, Robert B; Long, Timothy E

    2014-06-14

    Bis(diphenylphosphino)alkanes quantitatively react with excess 1-bromododecane to prepare novel phosphonium gemini surfactants with spacer lengths ranging from 2 to 4 methylenes (12-2/3/4-12P). Dodecyltriphenylphosphonium bromide (DTPP), a monomeric surfactant analog, was readily water soluble, however, in sharp contrast, phosphonium gemini surfactants were poorly soluble in water due to two hydrophobic tails and relatively hydrophobic cationic head groups containing phenyl substituents. Isothermal titration calorimetry did not reveal a measurable critical micelle concentration for the 12-2-12P phosphonium gemini surfactant in water at 25 °C. Subsequent studies in 50/50 v/v water-methanol at 25 °C showed a CMC of 1.0 mM for 12-2-12P. All phosphonium gemini surfactants effectively complexed nucleic acids, but failed to deliver nucleic acids in vitro to HeLa cells. The solution behavior of phosphonium gemini surfactants was investigated in chloroform, which is an organic solvent where reverse micellar structures are favored. Solution rheology in chloroform explored the solution behavior of the phosphonium gemini surfactants compared to DTPP. The 12-2-12P and 12-3-12P gemini surfactants were successfully electrospun from chloroform to generate uniform fibers while 12-4-12P gemini surfactant and DTPP only electrosprayed to form droplets.

  6. Personnel discussing Gemini 11 space flight in Mission Control

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-09-12

    S66-52157 (12 Sept. 1966) --- Discussing the Gemini-11 spaceflight in the Mission Control Center are: (left to right) Christopher C. Kraft Jr., (wearing glasses), Director of Flight Operations; Charles W. Mathews (holding phone), Manager, Gemini Program Office; Dr. Donald K. Slayton (center, checked coat), Director of Flight Crew Operations; astronaut William A. Anders, and astronaut John W. Young. Photo credit: NASA

  7. Astronaut Frank Borman looks over the Gemini 7 spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Astronaut Frank Borman, command pilot of the Gemini 7 prime crew, looks over the Gemini 7 spacecraft during weight and balance tests. The tests are conducted in the Pyrotechnic Installation Building, Merritt Island, Kennedy Space Center as part of preflight preparation.

  8. Current and future facility instruments at the Gemini Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Joseph B.; Kleinman, Scot J.; Simons, Douglas A.; Lazo, Manuel; Rigaut, François; White, John K.

    2008-07-01

    At the present time, several new Gemini instruments are being delivered and commissioned. The Near-Infrared Coronagraph has been extensively tested and commissioned on the Gemini-South telescope, and will soon begin a large survey to discover extrasolar planets. The FLAMINGOS-2 near-IR multi-object spectrograph is nearing completion at the University of Florida, and is expected to be delivered to Gemini-South by the end of 2008. Gemini's Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics bench has been successfully integrated and tested in the lab, and now awaits integration with the laser system and the Gemini-South AO Imager on the telescope. We also describe our efforts to repair thermal damage to the Gemini Near-IR Spectrograph that occurred last year. Since the last update, progress has been made on several of Gemini's next generation of ambitious "Aspen" instruments. The Gemini Planet Imager is now in the final design phase, and construction is scheduled to begin shortly. Two competitive conceptual design studies for the Wide-Field Fiber Multi-Object Spectrometer have now started. The Mauna Kea ground layer monitoring campaign has collected data for well over a year in support of the planning process for a future Ground Layer Adaptive Optics system.

  9. Gemini 9 spacecraft during EVA as seen Astronaut Eugene Cernan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Astronaut Eugene A. Cernan took this view of the Gemini 9 spacecraft and his umbilical cord (right) over California, Arizona, and Sonora, Mexico, during his extravehicular activity on the Gemini 9 mission. Taken during the 32nd revolution of the flight.

  10. Gemini-Titan 3 water landing recovery in Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Navy swimmers are shown attaching a flotation collar to the Gemini 3 spacecraft during recovery operations following the successful Gemini-Titan 3 flight. A helicopter hovers in the background. Astronauts Virgil I. Grissom and John W. Young are still in the spacecraft.

  11. MISC. (BREAKFAST)(GEMINI-TITAN [GT]-11) - CAPE

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-09-12

    S66-50723 (12 Sept. 1966) --- The Gemini-11 prime crew enjoys a breakfast of steak and eggs with astronaut Alan B. Shepard Jr. (right), Chief, MSC Astronaut Office, on the morning of the scheduled Gemini-11 launch. On left is astronaut Charles Conrad Jr., command pilot. Astronaut Richard F. Gordon Jr. (center) is the pilot. Photo credit: NASA

  12. Gemini-IFU Spectroscopy of HH 111

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerqueira, A. H.; Vasconcelos, M. J.; Raga, A. C.; Feitosa, J.; Plana, H.

    2015-03-01

    We present new optical observations of the Herbig-Haro (HH) 111 jet using the Gemini Multi Object Spectrograph in its Integral Field Unit mode. Eight fields of 5\\prime\\prime × 3\\buildrel{\\prime\\prime}\\over{.} 5 have been positioned along and across the HH 111 jet, covering the spatial region from knot E to L in HH 111 (namely, knots E, F, G, H, J, K, and L). We present images and velocity channel maps for the [O i] 6300+6360, Hα, [N ii] 6548+6583, and [S ii] 6716+6730 lines, as well as for the [S ii] 6716/6730 line ratio. We find that the HH 111 jet has an inner region with lower excitation and higher radial velocity, surrounded by a broader region of higher excitation and lower radial velocity. Also, we find higher electron densities at lower radial velocities. These results imply that the HH 111 jet has a fast, axial region with lower velocity shocks surrounded by a lower velocity sheath with higher velocity shocks. Based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the Science and Technology Facilities Council (United Kingdom), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia e Inovação (Brazil), and Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Productiva (Argentina).

  13. Translational Bioinformatics and Clinical Research (Biomedical) Informatics.

    PubMed

    Sirintrapun, S Joseph; Zehir, Ahmet; Syed, Aijazuddin; Gao, JianJiong; Schultz, Nikolaus; Cheng, Donavan T

    2016-03-01

    Translational bioinformatics and clinical research (biomedical) informatics are the primary domains related to informatics activities that support translational research. Translational bioinformatics focuses on computational techniques in genetics, molecular biology, and systems biology. Clinical research (biomedical) informatics involves the use of informatics in discovery and management of new knowledge relating to health and disease. This article details 3 projects that are hybrid applications of translational bioinformatics and clinical research (biomedical) informatics: The Cancer Genome Atlas, the cBioPortal for Cancer Genomics, and the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center clinical variants and results database, all designed to facilitate insights into cancer biology and clinical/therapeutic correlations.

  14. Ultraviolet spectrophotometry of Sirius from Gemini 12

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spear, G. G.; Kondo, Y.; Henize, K. G.

    1974-01-01

    The spectral energy distribution of Sirius between 2500 and 3700 A at a resolution of 7 A is obtained from plates taken on Gemini 12. The agreement with other observations and the most recent line-blanketed model atmospheres is good. The equivalent width of the Mg II doublet near 2800 A is 6.0 A, if the continuum level is represented by regions near 2650 and 2910 A. This is consistent with expectations for a hot Am star and implies line blocking of up to 15% in this wavelength region.

  15. TRAINING - GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-5 - TX

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-06-18

    S65-35563 (18 June 1965) --- Astronauts L. Gordon Cooper Jr. (left), command pilot; and Charles Conrad Jr., pilot, the prime crew of the Gemini-5 spaceflight, prepare their cameras while aboard a C-130 aircraft flying near Laredo, Texas. The two astronauts are taking part in a series of visual acuity experiments to aid them in learning to identify known terrestrial features under controlled conditions. Knowledge gained from these experiments will have later application for space pilots identifying terrestrial features from space. Dr. John Billingham, chief, Environmental Physiology Branch, Crew Systems Division, is in charge of the Visual Acuity Experiments.

  16. Ultraviolet spectrophotometry of Sirius from Gemini 12

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spear, G. G.; Kondo, Y.; Henize, K. G.

    1974-01-01

    The spectral energy distribution of Sirius between 2500 and 3700 A at a resolution of 7 A is obtained from plates taken on Gemini 12. The agreement with other observations and the most recent line-blanketed model atmospheres is good. The equivalent width of the Mg II doublet near 2800 A is 6.0 A, if the continuum level is represented by regions near 2650 and 2910 A. This is consistent with expectations for a hot Am star and implies line blocking of up to 15% in this wavelength region.

  17. GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-4 - EARTH SKY

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-06-03

    S65-34659 (3-7 June 1965) --- Among the many photographs taken from the Gemini-4 spacecraft during its orbital flight around Earth was this view of the Hahramaut Plateau on the southern portion of the Arabian Peninsula. The Wadi Hahramaut is in the foreground; with the Gulf of Aden (dark blue). This photograph was made with a modified 70mm Hasselblad camera, using Eastman color film, ASA 64, at a lens setting of 250th of a second at f/11.

  18. Emergence of a new consumer health informatics framework: introducing the healthcare organization.

    PubMed

    Reid, Paulette; Borycki, Elizabeth M

    2011-01-01

    Healthcare consumers are increasingly seeking reliable forms of health information on the Internet that can be used to support health related decision-making. Frameworks that have been developed and tested in the field of health informatics have attempted to describe the effects of the Internet upon the health care consumer and physician relationship. More recently, health care organizations are responding by providing information such as hospital wait lists or strategies for self-managing disease, and this information is being provided on organizational web-sites. The authors of this paper propose that current conceptualizations of the relationship between the Internet, physicians and patients are limited from a consumer informatics perspective and may need to be extended to include healthcare organizations.

  19. Manned Space-Flight Experiments: Gemini V Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    This compilation of papers constitutes an interim report on the results of experiments conducted during the Gemini V manned space flight. The results of experiments conducted on Gemini III and IV manned space flights have been published previously in a similar interim report, "Manned Space Flight Experiments Symposium, Gemini Missions III and IV," which is available upon request from MSC Experiments Program Office, Houston, Texas (Code EX, Attention of R. Kinard). The Gemini V mission provided the greatest opportunity to date for conducting experiments; the increased mission duration of eight days provided this added capability. The total mission experiment complement was seventeen. Five experiments were designed to obtain basic scientific knowledge, five were medical, and seven were technological and engineering in nature. Six of the experiments had flown previously on Gemini IV, and eleven were new. The results of the experiments, including real-time modification to preflight plans made necessary by abnormal spacecraft system operation, are presented.

  20. Gemini-Titan (GT)-6 - Prelaunch Activity - Cape

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-12-12

    S65-61789 (12 Dec. 1965) --- Astronauts Walter M. Schirra Jr. (right), Gemini-6 command pilot; and Thomas P. Stafford (center), pilot, enjoy a prelaunch breakfast on the morning of the proposed launch of NASA's two-day Gemini-6 spaceflight. At left is astronaut L. Gordon Cooper Jr., command pilot of the Gemini-5 space mission. An attempt was made to launch Gemini-6 from Pad 19 at 9:54 a.m. (EST) on Dec. 12, 1965. However, seconds after ignition, the first stage engine of the Gemini-6 launch vehicle shut down due to a faulty release of a liftoff umbilical plug. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  1. ROUNDUP - EMBLEM - GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-11 - MSC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-09-01

    S66-44308 (September 1966) --- Insignia of the Gemini-Titan XI (GT-11) spaceflight. Roman numeral indicates eleventh flight in the Gemini series. Two spacecraft symbolize rendezvous and docking of Gemini with an Agena. Astronaut and umbilical (tether) line denotes planned extravehicular activity. Astronauts Charles Conrad Jr., command pilot, and Richard F. Gordon Jr., pilot, are members of the Gemini-11 prime crew. The NASA insignia design for Gemini flights is reserved for use by the astronauts and for other official use as the NASA Administrator may authorize. Public availability has been approved only in the form of illustrations by the various news media. When and if there is any change in this policy, which we do not anticipate, it will be publicly announced. Photo credit: NASA

  2. A repository of codes of ethics and technical standards in health informatics.

    PubMed

    Samuel, Hamman W; Zaïane, Osmar R

    2014-01-01

    We present a searchable repository of codes of ethics and standards in health informatics. It is built using state-of-the-art search algorithms and technologies. The repository will be potentially beneficial for public health practitioners, researchers, and software developers in finding and comparing ethics topics of interest. Public health clinics, clinicians, and researchers can use the repository platform as a one-stop reference for various ethics codes and standards. In addition, the repository interface is built for easy navigation, fast search, and side-by-side comparative reading of documents. Our selection criteria for codes and standards are two-fold; firstly, to maintain intellectual property rights, we index only codes and standards freely available on the internet. Secondly, major international, regional, and national health informatics bodies across the globe are surveyed with the aim of understanding the landscape in this domain. We also look at prevalent technical standards in health informatics from major bodies such as the International Standards Organization (ISO) and the U. S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Our repository contains codes of ethics from the International Medical Informatics Association (IMIA), the iHealth Coalition (iHC), the American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA), the Australasian College of Health Informatics (ACHI), the British Computer Society (BCS), and the UK Council for Health Informatics Professions (UKCHIP), with room for adding more in the future. Our major contribution is enhancing the findability of codes and standards related to health informatics ethics by compilation and unified access through the health informatics ethics repository.

  3. A Repository of Codes of Ethics and Technical Standards in Health Informatics

    PubMed Central

    Zaïane, Osmar R.

    2014-01-01

    We present a searchable repository of codes of ethics and standards in health informatics. It is built using state-of-the-art search algorithms and technologies. The repository will be potentially beneficial for public health practitioners, researchers, and software developers in finding and comparing ethics topics of interest. Public health clinics, clinicians, and researchers can use the repository platform as a one-stop reference for various ethics codes and standards. In addition, the repository interface is built for easy navigation, fast search, and side-by-side comparative reading of documents. Our selection criteria for codes and standards are two-fold; firstly, to maintain intellectual property rights, we index only codes and standards freely available on the internet. Secondly, major international, regional, and national health informatics bodies across the globe are surveyed with the aim of understanding the landscape in this domain. We also look at prevalent technical standards in health informatics from major bodies such as the International Standards Organization (ISO) and the U. S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Our repository contains codes of ethics from the International Medical Informatics Association (IMIA), the iHealth Coalition (iHC), the American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA), the Australasian College of Health Informatics (ACHI), the British Computer Society (BCS), and the UK Council for Health Informatics Professions (UKCHIP), with room for adding more in the future. Our major contribution is enhancing the findability of codes and standards related to health informatics ethics by compilation and unified access through the health informatics ethics repository. PMID:25422725

  4. Informatics for Precision Medicine and Healthcare.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiajia; Lin, Yuxin; Shen, Bairong

    2017-01-01

    The past decade has witnessed great advances in biomedical informatics. Biomedical informatics is an emerging field of healthcare that aims to translate the laboratory observation into clinical practice. Smart healthcare has also developed rapidly with ubiquitous sensor and communication technologies. It is able to capture the online patient-centric phenotypic variables, thus providing a rich information base for translational biomedical informatics. Biomedical informatics and smart healthcare represent two interrelated disciplines. On one hand, biomedical informatics translates the bench discoveries into bedside, and, on the other hand, it is reciprocally informed by clinical data generated from smart healthcare. In this chapter, we will introduce the major strategies and challenges in the application of biomedical informatics technology in precision medicine and healthcare. We highlight how the informatics technology will promote the precision medicine and therefore promise the improvement of healthcare.

  5. Deep Learning for Health Informatics.

    PubMed

    Ravi, Daniele; Wong, Charence; Deligianni, Fani; Berthelot, Melissa; Andreu-Perez, Javier; Lo, Benny; Yang, Guang-Zhong

    2017-01-01

    With a massive influx of multimodality data, the role of data analytics in health informatics has grown rapidly in the last decade. This has also prompted increasing interests in the generation of analytical, data driven models based on machine learning in health informatics. Deep learning, a technique with its foundation in artificial neural networks, is emerging in recent years as a powerful tool for machine learning, promising to reshape the future of artificial intelligence. Rapid improvements in computational power, fast data storage, and parallelization have also contributed to the rapid uptake of the technology in addition to its predictive power and ability to generate automatically optimized high-level features and semantic interpretation from the input data. This article presents a comprehensive up-to-date review of research employing deep learning in health informatics, providing a critical analysis of the relative merit, and potential pitfalls of the technique as well as its future outlook. The paper mainly focuses on key applications of deep learning in the fields of translational bioinformatics, medical imaging, pervasive sensing, medical informatics, and public health.

  6. Policy Implications of Education Informatics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Jo Ann; O'Brien, Nancy P.

    2010-01-01

    Background/Context: This concluding article identifies the policy implications of education informatics and explores impacts of current copyright laws, legislative structures, publishing practices, and education organizations. Synthesizing the discussions in the preceding articles, this article highlights the importance of designing information…

  7. Policy Implications of Education Informatics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Jo Ann; O'Brien, Nancy P.

    2010-01-01

    Background/Context: This concluding article identifies the policy implications of education informatics and explores impacts of current copyright laws, legislative structures, publishing practices, and education organizations. Synthesizing the discussions in the preceding articles, this article highlights the importance of designing information…

  8. Use of the Internet by Patients: Not a Threat to Nursing, but an Opportunity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timmons, Stephen

    2001-01-01

    Patients' use of Internet health information raises concerns about reliability, access to information meant for clinicians, and self-diagnosis and treatment. Nurses should become informed and undertake patient education about consumer health informatics. (Contains 25 references.) (SK)

  9. Use of the Internet by Patients: Not a Threat to Nursing, but an Opportunity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timmons, Stephen

    2001-01-01

    Patients' use of Internet health information raises concerns about reliability, access to information meant for clinicians, and self-diagnosis and treatment. Nurses should become informed and undertake patient education about consumer health informatics. (Contains 25 references.) (SK)

  10. First light of the Gemini Planet imager.

    PubMed

    Macintosh, Bruce; Graham, James R; Ingraham, Patrick; Konopacky, Quinn; Marois, Christian; Perrin, Marshall; Poyneer, Lisa; Bauman, Brian; Barman, Travis; Burrows, Adam S; Cardwell, Andrew; Chilcote, Jeffrey; De Rosa, Robert J; Dillon, Daren; Doyon, Rene; Dunn, Jennifer; Erikson, Darren; Fitzgerald, Michael P; Gavel, Donald; Goodsell, Stephen; Hartung, Markus; Hibon, Pascale; Kalas, Paul; Larkin, James; Maire, Jerome; Marchis, Franck; Marley, Mark S; McBride, James; Millar-Blanchaer, Max; Morzinski, Katie; Norton, Andrew; Oppenheimer, B R; Palmer, David; Patience, Jennifer; Pueyo, Laurent; Rantakyro, Fredrik; Sadakuni, Naru; Saddlemyer, Leslie; Savransky, Dmitry; Serio, Andrew; Soummer, Remi; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand; Song, Inseok; Thomas, Sandrine; Wallace, J Kent; Wiktorowicz, Sloane; Wolff, Schuyler

    2014-09-02

    The Gemini Planet Imager is a dedicated facility for directly imaging and spectroscopically characterizing extrasolar planets. It combines a very high-order adaptive optics system, a diffraction-suppressing coronagraph, and an integral field spectrograph with low spectral resolution but high spatial resolution. Every aspect of the Gemini Planet Imager has been tuned for maximum sensitivity to faint planets near bright stars. During first-light observations, we achieved an estimated H band Strehl ratio of 0.89 and a 5-σ contrast of 10(6) at 0.75 arcseconds and 10(5) at 0.35 arcseconds. Observations of Beta Pictoris clearly detect the planet, Beta Pictoris b, in a single 60-s exposure with minimal postprocessing. Beta Pictoris b is observed at a separation of 434 ± 6 milliarcseconds (mas) and position angle 211.8 ± 0.5°. Fitting the Keplerian orbit of Beta Pic b using the new position together with previous astrometry gives a factor of 3 improvement in most parameters over previous solutions. The planet orbits at a semimajor axis of [Formula: see text] near the 3:2 resonance with the previously known 6-AU asteroidal belt and is aligned with the inner warped disk. The observations give a 4% probability of a transit of the planet in late 2017.

  11. First light of the Gemini Planet Imager

    SciTech Connect

    Macintosh, Bruce; Graham, James R.; Ingraham, Patrick; Konopacky, Quinn; Marois, Christian; Perrin, Marshall; Poyneer, Lisa; Bauman, Brian; Barman, Travis; Burrows, Adam S.; Cardwell, Andrew; Chilcote, Jeffrey; De Rosa, Robert J.; Dillon, Daren; Doyon, Rene; Dunn, Jennifer; Erikson, Darren; Fitzgerald, Michael P.; Gavel, Donald; Goodsell, Stephen; Hartung, Markus; Hibon, Pascale; Kalas, Paul; Larkin, James; Maire, Jerome; Marchis, Franck; Marley, Mark S.; McBride, James; Millar-Blanchaer, Max; Morzinski, Katie; Norton, Andrew; Oppenheimer, B. R.; Palmer, David; Patience, Jennifer; Pueyo, Laurent; Rantakyro, Fredrik; Sadakuni, Naru; Saddlemyer, Leslie; Savransky, Dmitry; Serio, Andrew; Soummer, Remi; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand; Song, Inseok; Thomas, Sandrine; Wallace, J. Kent; Wiktorowicz, Stone; Wolff, Schuyler

    2014-05-12

    The Gemini Planet Imager is a dedicated facility for directly imaging and spectroscopically characterizing extrasolar planets. It combines a very high-order adaptive optics system, a diffraction-suppressing coronagraph, and an integral field spectrograph with low spectral resolution but high spatial resolution. Every aspect of the Gemini Planet Imager has been tuned for maximum sensitivity to faint planets near bright stars. During first-light observations, we achieved an estimated H band Strehl ratio of 0.89 and a 5-σ contrast of 106 at 0.75 arcseconds and 105 at 0.35 arcseconds. Observations of Beta Pictoris clearly detect the planet, Beta Pictoris b, in a single 60-s exposure with minimal postprocessing. Beta Pictoris b is observed at a separation of 434 ± 6 milliarcseconds (mas) and position angle 211.8 ± 0.5°. Fitting the Keplerian orbit of Beta Pic b using the new position together with previous astrometry gives a factor of 3 improvement in most parameters over previous solutions. The planet orbits at a semimajor axis of 9.0+0.8–0.4 AU near the 3:2 resonance with the previously known 6-AU asteroidal belt and is aligned with the inner warped disk. In conclusion, the observations give a 4% probability of a transit of the planet in late 2017.

  12. Gemini Planet Imager Coronagraph Testbed Results

    SciTech Connect

    Sivaranmakrishnan, A.; Carr, G.; Soummer, R.; Oppenheimer, B.R.; Mey, J.L.; Brenner, D.; Mandeville, C.W.; Zimmerman, N. Macintosh, B.A.; Graham, J.R.; Saddlemyer, L.; Bauman, B.; Carlotti, A.; Pueyo, L.; Tuthill, P.G.; Dorrer, C.; Roberts, R.; Greenbaum, A.

    2010-12-08

    The Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) is an extreme AO coronagraphic integral field unit YJHK spectrograph destined for first light on the 8m Gemini South telescope in 2011. GPI fields a 1500 channel AO system feeding an apodized pupil Lyot coronagraph, and a nIR non-common-path slow wavefront sensor. It targets detection and characterizion of relatively young (<2GYr), self luminous planets up to 10 million times as faint as their primary star. We present the coronagraph subsystem's in-lab performance, and describe the studies required to specify and fabricate the coronagraph. Coronagraphic pupil apodization is implemented with metallic half-tone screens on glass, and the focal plane occulters are deep reactive ion etched holes in optically polished silicon mirrors. Our JH testbed achieves H-band contrast below a million at separations above 5 resolution elements, without using an AO system. We present an overview of the coronagraphic masks and our testbed coronagraphic data. We also demonstrate the performance of an astrometric and photometric grid that enables coronagraphic astrometry relative to the primary star in every exposure, a proven technique that has yielded on-sky precision of the order of a milliarsecond.

  13. First light of the Gemini Planet Imager

    DOE PAGES

    Macintosh, Bruce; Graham, James R.; Ingraham, Patrick; ...

    2014-05-12

    The Gemini Planet Imager is a dedicated facility for directly imaging and spectroscopically characterizing extrasolar planets. It combines a very high-order adaptive optics system, a diffraction-suppressing coronagraph, and an integral field spectrograph with low spectral resolution but high spatial resolution. Every aspect of the Gemini Planet Imager has been tuned for maximum sensitivity to faint planets near bright stars. During first-light observations, we achieved an estimated H band Strehl ratio of 0.89 and a 5-σ contrast of 106 at 0.75 arcseconds and 105 at 0.35 arcseconds. Observations of Beta Pictoris clearly detect the planet, Beta Pictoris b, in a singlemore » 60-s exposure with minimal postprocessing. Beta Pictoris b is observed at a separation of 434 ± 6 milliarcseconds (mas) and position angle 211.8 ± 0.5°. Fitting the Keplerian orbit of Beta Pic b using the new position together with previous astrometry gives a factor of 3 improvement in most parameters over previous solutions. The planet orbits at a semimajor axis of 9.0+0.8–0.4 AU near the 3:2 resonance with the previously known 6-AU asteroidal belt and is aligned with the inner warped disk. In conclusion, the observations give a 4% probability of a transit of the planet in late 2017.« less

  14. First light of the Gemini Planet Imager

    PubMed Central

    Macintosh, Bruce; Graham, James R.; Ingraham, Patrick; Konopacky, Quinn; Marois, Christian; Perrin, Marshall; Poyneer, Lisa; Bauman, Brian; Barman, Travis; Burrows, Adam S.; Cardwell, Andrew; Chilcote, Jeffrey; De Rosa, Robert J.; Dillon, Daren; Doyon, Rene; Dunn, Jennifer; Erikson, Darren; Fitzgerald, Michael P.; Gavel, Donald; Goodsell, Stephen; Hartung, Markus; Hibon, Pascale; Kalas, Paul; Larkin, James; Maire, Jerome; Marchis, Franck; Marley, Mark S.; McBride, James; Millar-Blanchaer, Max; Morzinski, Katie; Norton, Andrew; Oppenheimer, B. R.; Palmer, David; Patience, Jennifer; Pueyo, Laurent; Rantakyro, Fredrik; Sadakuni, Naru; Saddlemyer, Leslie; Savransky, Dmitry; Serio, Andrew; Soummer, Remi; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand; Song, Inseok; Thomas, Sandrine; Wallace, J. Kent; Wiktorowicz, Sloane; Wolff, Schuyler

    2014-01-01

    The Gemini Planet Imager is a dedicated facility for directly imaging and spectroscopically characterizing extrasolar planets. It combines a very high-order adaptive optics system, a diffraction-suppressing coronagraph, and an integral field spectrograph with low spectral resolution but high spatial resolution. Every aspect of the Gemini Planet Imager has been tuned for maximum sensitivity to faint planets near bright stars. During first-light observations, we achieved an estimated H band Strehl ratio of 0.89 and a 5-σ contrast of 106 at 0.75 arcseconds and 105 at 0.35 arcseconds. Observations of Beta Pictoris clearly detect the planet, Beta Pictoris b, in a single 60-s exposure with minimal postprocessing. Beta Pictoris b is observed at a separation of 434 ± 6 milliarcseconds (mas) and position angle 211.8 ± 0.5°. Fitting the Keplerian orbit of Beta Pic b using the new position together with previous astrometry gives a factor of 3 improvement in most parameters over previous solutions. The planet orbits at a semimajor axis of 9.0−0.4+0.8 AU near the 3:2 resonance with the previously known 6-AU asteroidal belt and is aligned with the inner warped disk. The observations give a 4% probability of a transit of the planet in late 2017. PMID:24821792

  15. Gemini Planet Imager coronagraph testbed results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivaramakrishnan, Anand; Soummer, Rémi; Oppenheimer, Ben R.; Carr, G. Lawrence; Mey, Jacob L.; Brenner, Doug; Mandeville, Charles W.; Zimmerman, Neil; Macintosh, Bruce A.; Graham, James R.; Saddlemyer, Les; Bauman, Brian; Carlotti, Alexis; Pueyo, Laurent; Tuthill, Peter G.; Dorrer, Christophe; Roberts, Robin; Greenbaum, Alexandra

    2010-07-01

    The Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) is an extreme AO coronagraphic integral field unit YJHK spectrograph destined for first light on the 8m Gemini South telescope in 2011. GPI fields a 1500 channel AO system feeding an apodized pupil Lyot coronagraph, and a nIR non-common-path slow wavefront sensor. It targets detection and characterizion of relatively young (<2GYr), self luminous planets up to 10 million times as faint as their primary star. We present the coronagraph subsystem's in-lab performance, and describe the studies required to specify and fabricate the coronagraph. Coronagraphic pupil apodization is implemented with metallic half-tone screens on glass, and the focal plane occulters are deep reactive ion etched holes in optically polished silicon mirrors. Our JH testbed achieves H-band contrast below a million at separations above 5 resolution elements, without using an AO system. We present an overview of the coronagraphic masks and our testbed coronagraphic data. We also demonstrate the performance of an astrometric and photometric grid that enables coronagraphic astrometry relative to the primary star in every exposure, a proven technique that has yielded on-sky precision of the order of a milliarsecond.

  16. The Gemini Planet Imager coronagraph testbed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soummer, Rémi; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand; Oppenheimer, Ben R.; Roberts, Robin; Brenner, Douglas; Carlotti, Alexis; Pueyo, Laurent; Macintosh, Bruce; Bauman, Brian; Saddlemyer, Les; Palmer, David; Erickson, Darren; Dorrer, Christophe; Caputa, Kris; Marois, Christian; Wallace, Kent; Griffiths, Emily; Mey, Jacob

    2009-08-01

    The Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) is a new facility instrument to be commissioned at the 8-m Gemini South telescope in early 2011. It combines of several subsystems including a 1500 subaperture Extreme Adaptive Optics system, an Apodized Pupil Lyot Coronagraph, a near-infrared high-accuracy interferometric wavefront sensor, and an Integral Field Unit Spectrograph, which serves as the science instrument. GPI's main scientific goal is to detect and characterize relatively young (<2GYr), self luminous planets with planet-star brightness ratios of <= 10-7 in the near infrared. Here we present an overview of the coronagraph subsystem, which includes a pupil apodization, a hard-edged focal plane mask and a Lyot stop. We discuss designs optimization, masks fabrication and testing. We describe a near infrared testbed, which achieved broadband contrast (H-band) below 10-6 at separations > 5λ/D, without active wavefront control (no deformable mirror). We use Fresnel propagation modeling to analyze the testbed results.

  17. Tumbling and spaceflight: the Gemini VIII experience.

    PubMed

    Mohler, S R; Nicogossian, A E; McCormack, P D; Mohler, S R

    1990-01-01

    A malfunctioning orbital flight attitude thruster during the flight of Gemini VIII led to acceleration forces on astronauts Neil Armstrong (commander) and David Scott (pilot) that created the potential for derogation of oculo-vestibular and eye-hand coordination effects. The spacecraft attained an axial tumbling rotation of 50 rpm and would have exceeded this had not the commander accurately diagnosed the problem and taken immediate corrective action. By the time counter-measure controls were applied, both astronauts were experiencing vertigo and the physiological effects of the tumbling acceleration. Data from the recorders reveal that one astronaut experienced -Gy of 0.92 G-units, and the other +Gy of 0.92 for approximately 46 s. Both received a -Gz of 0.89 G-units from the waist up with a +Gz of 0.05 from the waist down. A substantial increase of time and/or an increase in rpm would ultimately have produced incapacitation of both astronauts. NASA corrected the Gemini thruster problem by changing the ignition system wiring. Future space-craft undertaking long-term missions could be equipped with unambiguous thruster fault displays and could have computer-controlled automatic cutoffs to control excessive thruster burns.

  18. Astrometric Calibration of the Gemini Planet Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Debby; Konopacky, Quinn M.; GPIES Team

    2017-01-01

    The Gemini Planet Imager (GPI), housed on the 8-meter Gemini South telescope in Chile, is an instrument designed to detect Jupiter-like extrasolar planets by direct imaging. It relies on adaptive optics to correct the effects of atmospheric turbulence, along with an advanced coronagraph and calibration system. One of the scientific goals of GPI is to measure the orbital properties of the planets it discovers. Because these orbits have long periods, precise measurements of the relative position between the star and the planet (relative astrometry) are required. In this poster, I will present the astrometric calibration of GPI. We constrain the plate scale and orientation of the camera by observing different binary star systems with both GPI and another well-calibrated instrument, NIRC2, at the Keck telescope in Hawaii. We measure their separations with both instruments and use that information to calibrate the plate scale. By taking these calibration measurements over the course of one year, we have measured the plate scale to 0.05% and shown that it is stable across multiple epochs. We also examined the effects of the point spread function on the positions of the binaries as well as their separations, the results of which I will discuss.

  19. Mechanically selflocked chiral gemini-catenanes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sheng-Hua; Zhang, Heng-Yi; Xu, Xiufang; Liu, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Mechanically interlocked and entangled molecular architectures represent one of the elaborate topological superstructures engineered at a molecular resolution. Here we report a methodology for fabricating mechanically selflocked molecules (MSMs) through highly efficient one-step amidation of a pseudorotaxane derived from dual functionalized pillar[5]arene (P[5]A) threaded by α,ω-diaminoalkane (DA-n; n=3–12). The monomeric and dimeric pseudo[1]catenanes thus obtained, which are inherently chiral due to the topology of P[5]A used, were isolated and fully characterized by NMR and circular dichroism spectroscopy, X-ray crystallography and DFT calculations. Of particular interest, the dimeric pseudo[1]catenane, named ‘gemini-catenane', contained stereoisomeric meso-erythro and dl-threo isomers, in which two P[5]A moieties are threaded by two DA-n chains in topologically different patterns. This access to chiral pseudo[1]catenanes and gemini-catenanes will greatly promote the practical use of such sophisticated chiral architectures in supramolecular and materials science and technology. PMID:26126502

  20. Clinical health informatics education for a 21st Century World.

    PubMed

    Liaw, Siaw Teng; Gray, Kathleen

    2010-01-01

    This chapter gives an educational overview of: * health informatics competencies in medical, nursing and allied clinical health professions * health informatics learning cultures and just-in-time health informatics training in clinical work settings * major considerations in selecting or developing health informatics education and training programs for local implementation * using elearning effectively to meet the objectives of health informatics education.

  1. People and ideas in medical informatics - a half century review.

    PubMed

    van Bemmel, J H

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. Reviewing the onset and the rapid changes to make realistic predictions on the future of medical informatics. METHODS. Pointing to the contributions of the early pioneers, who had their roots in other disciplines and by illustrating that from the onset an interdisciplinary approach was characteristic for our field. RESULTS. Some of the reasons for the changes in medical informatics are that nobody was able to predict the advent of the personal computer in the 1970s, the world-wide web in 1991, and the public start of the Internet in 1992, but foremost that nobody expected that it was not primarily the hardware or the software, but human factors that would be crucial for successful applications of computers in health care. In the past sometimes unrealistic expectations were held, such as on the impact of medical decision-support systems, or on the overly optimistic contributions of electronic health records. Although the technology is widely available, some applications appear to be far more complex than expected. Health care processes can seldom be fully standardized. Humans enter at least in two very different roles in the loop of information processing: as subjects conducting care - the clinicians - and as subjects that are the objects of care - the patients. CONCLUSIONS. Medical informatics lacks a specific methodology; methods are borrowed from adjacent disciplines such as physics, mathematics and, of course, computer science. Human factors play a major role in applying computers in health care. Everyone pursuing a career in biomedical informatics needs to be very aware of this. It is to be expected that the quality of health care will increasingly be assessed by computer systems to fulfill the requirements of medical evidence.

  2. Net-based reasoning informatics for civil infrastructure monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Stuart S.; Lamanna, Michael F.

    1997-06-01

    The informatics of instrumented infrastructure will require multi-level computational abstractions that not only collect and declutter the data but also support higher-level automated reasoning capabilities relevant to decision support needs of both owners responsible for the safe operation of the facilities and users of those facilities. This paper describes the appeal and implemented demonstration of Internet-based paradigms for higher-level automated reasoning about condition of instrumented infrastructure using the Java computing language. This enables interactive program execution from a web page. These notions are presented and demonstrated in the context of illustrative application scenarios involving fatigue monitoring, overweight vehicle detection, and bridge deck surface travel condition monitoring. By means of this demonstration, it is suggested that there is an important role for Java-based expert systems in handling key aspects of the data fusion requirements associated with intelligent, internet-mediated post-processing of data obtained from instrumented civil infrastructure.

  3. Gemini Observatory Operations and Software for the 2020s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Bryan W.; Stephens, Andrew W.; Nunez, Arturo; Schirmer, Mischa

    2017-01-01

    Gemini Observatory is planning several major software upgrades to improve usability and maintenance and to help prepare Gemini for the LSST, ELT, and JWST era. Gemini is currently a leader in target-of-opportunity (ToO) observing (e.g. SNe and GRB follow-up, solar system objects, eclipses, occultations) due to the dominant queue mode of observing. In the era of large transient surveys (e.g. iPTF, Catalina, Pan-STARRS, and especially LSST) and other transient surveys we expect that the follow-up of faint transient sources will become a very significant, if not dominant, use of Gemini. The next Gemini instrument, Gen4#3, is being designed for transient follow-up. However, much of Gemini's software infrastructure is now more than 15 years old is not sufficiently user-friendly, scalable, or maintainable. Therefore, we are embarking on a series of upgrade projects with the goals of making Gemini easier to use, making the system more scalable and flexible, and ensuring that the system is maintainable for the next 15 years. This poster will describe the ongoing projects and future plans to upgrade the real-time control systems, develop a new Observatory Control System (including a potential rewrite of the Observing Tool and an automated scheduling capability), and integrate into future ToO networks. Feedback on requirements for new user software, in particular, is requested.

  4. Photometric Calibration of the Gemini South Adaptive Optics Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, Sarah Anne; Rodrigo Carrasco Damele, Eleazar; Thomas-Osip, Joanna

    2017-01-01

    The Gemini South Adaptive Optics Imager (GSAOI) is an instrument available on the Gemini South telescope at Cerro Pachon, Chile, utilizing the Gemini Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics System (GeMS). In order to allow users to easily perform photometry with this instrument and to monitor any changes in the instrument in the future, we seek to set up a process for performing photometric calibration with standard star observations taken across the time of the instrument’s operation. We construct a Python-based pipeline that includes IRAF wrappers for reduction and combines the AstroPy photutils package and original Python scripts with the IRAF apphot and photcal packages to carry out photometry and linear regression fitting. Using the pipeline, we examine standard star observations made with GSAOI on 68 nights between 2013 and 2015 in order to determine the nightly photometric zero points in the J, H, Kshort, and K bands. This work is based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, processed using the Gemini IRAF and gemini_python packages, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Productiva (Argentina), and Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia e Inovação (Brazil).

  5. The Biodiversity Informatics Potential Index

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Biodiversity informatics is a relatively new discipline extending computer science in the context of biodiversity data, and its development to date has not been uniform throughout the world. Digitizing effort and capacity building are costly, and ways should be found to prioritize them rationally. The proposed 'Biodiversity Informatics Potential (BIP) Index' seeks to fulfill such a prioritization role. We propose that the potential for biodiversity informatics be assessed through three concepts: (a) the intrinsic biodiversity potential (the biological richness or ecological diversity) of a country; (b) the capacity of the country to generate biodiversity data records; and (c) the availability of technical infrastructure in a country for managing and publishing such records. Methods Broadly, the techniques used to construct the BIP Index were rank correlation, multiple regression analysis, principal components analysis and optimization by linear programming. We built the BIP Index by finding a parsimonious set of country-level human, economic and environmental variables that best predicted the availability of primary biodiversity data accessible through the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF) network, and constructing an optimized model with these variables. The model was then applied to all countries for which sufficient data existed, to obtain a score for each country. Countries were ranked according to that score. Results Many of the current GBIF participants ranked highly in the BIP Index, although some of them seemed not to have realized their biodiversity informatics potential. The BIP Index attributed low ranking to most non-participant countries; however, a few of them scored highly, suggesting that these would be high-return new participants if encouraged to contribute towards the GBIF mission of free and open access to biodiversity data. Conclusions The BIP Index could potentially help in (a) identifying countries most likely to

  6. The Biodiversity Informatics Potential Index.

    PubMed

    Ariño, Arturo H; Chavan, Vishwas; King, Nick

    2011-01-01

    Biodiversity informatics is a relatively new discipline extending computer science in the context of biodiversity data, and its development to date has not been uniform throughout the world. Digitizing effort and capacity building are costly, and ways should be found to prioritize them rationally. The proposed 'Biodiversity Informatics Potential (BIP) Index' seeks to fulfill such a prioritization role. We propose that the potential for biodiversity informatics be assessed through three concepts: (a) the intrinsic biodiversity potential (the biological richness or ecological diversity) of a country; (b) the capacity of the country to generate biodiversity data records; and (c) the availability of technical infrastructure in a country for managing and publishing such records. Broadly, the techniques used to construct the BIP Index were rank correlation, multiple regression analysis, principal components analysis and optimization by linear programming. We built the BIP Index by finding a parsimonious set of country-level human, economic and environmental variables that best predicted the availability of primary biodiversity data accessible through the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF) network, and constructing an optimized model with these variables. The model was then applied to all countries for which sufficient data existed, to obtain a score for each country. Countries were ranked according to that score. Many of the current GBIF participants ranked highly in the BIP Index, although some of them seemed not to have realized their biodiversity informatics potential. The BIP Index attributed low ranking to most nonparticipant countries; however, a few of them scored highly, suggesting that these would be high-return new participants if encouraged to contribute towards the GBIF mission of free and open access to biodiversity data. The BIP Index could potentially help in (a) identifying countries most likely to contribute to filling gaps in digitized

  7. Gemini-Titan (GT)-7 of GT-6 Space Photography - Outer Space

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-12-04

    S65-64040 (15 Dec. 1965) --- Nose-on view of the Gemini-6 spacecraft against the blackness of space as seen from Gemini-7 spacecraft. The two spacecraft were approximately 38 feet apart. Astronauts Walter M. Schirra and Thomas P. Stafford were onboard the Gemini-6 spacecraft. Astronauts Frank Borman and James A. Lovell Jr. were aboard the Gemini-7 spacecraft. A "Beat Army" sign can be seen in the Gemini-6 window. Photo credit: NASA

  8. GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-8 - INSIGNIA - COLOR DESIGN - MSC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-03-01

    S66-23978 (March 1966) --- Color design for the emblem of the Gemini-8 spaceflight. Roman numeral indicates the eighth flight in the Gemini series. Prime crewmen for the mission are astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, command pilot; and David R. Scott, pilot. The NASA insignia design for Gemini flights is reserved for use by the astronauts and for other official use as the NASA Administrator may authorize. Public availability has been approved only in the form of illustrations by the various news media. When and if there is any change in this policy, which we do not anticipate, it will be publicly announced. Photo credit: NASA

  9. Translational informatics: an industry perspective.

    PubMed

    Cantor, Michael N

    2012-01-01

    Translational informatics (TI) is extremely important for the pharmaceutical industry, especially as the bar for regulatory approval of new medications is set higher and higher. This paper will explore three specific areas in the drug development lifecycle, from tools developed by precompetitive consortia to standardized clinical data collection to the effective delivery of medications using clinical decision support, in which TI has a major role to play. Advancing TI will require investment in new tools and algorithms, as well as ensuring that translational issues are addressed early in the design process of informatics projects, and also given higher weight in funding or publication decisions. Ultimately, the source of translational tools and differences between academia and industry are secondary, as long as they move towards the shared goal of improving health.

  10. Translational informatics: an industry perspective

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Translational informatics (TI) is extremely important for the pharmaceutical industry, especially as the bar for regulatory approval of new medications is set higher and higher. This paper will explore three specific areas in the drug development lifecycle, from tools developed by precompetitive consortia to standardized clinical data collection to the effective delivery of medications using clinical decision support, in which TI has a major role to play. Advancing TI will require investment in new tools and algorithms, as well as ensuring that translational issues are addressed early in the design process of informatics projects, and also given higher weight in funding or publication decisions. Ultimately, the source of translational tools and differences between academia and industry are secondary, as long as they move towards the shared goal of improving health. PMID:22237867

  11. Informatics competencies for healthcare professionals: the Technology Informatics Guiding Education Reform (TIGER) Initiative model.

    PubMed

    Hebda, Toni L; Calderone, Terri L

    2012-01-01

    A growing awareness exists that informatics competencies are essential skills for healthcare professionals today, yet the development of these competencies lags behind the need. The Technology Informatics Guiding Education Reform (TIGER) Initiative represents a comprehensive, interdisciplinary effort that is well suited to the integration of informatics into education, practice, administration, and research environments. This article briefly discusses the background and significance of the TIGER Initiative and why it may be used as a model to instill informatics among the healthcare professionals globally.

  12. Geological interpretation of a Gemini photo

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hemphill, William R.; Danilchik, Walter

    1968-01-01

    Study of the Gemini V photograph of the Salt Range and Potwar Plateau, West Pakistan, indicates that small-scale orbital photographs permit recognition of the regional continuity of some geologic features, particularly faults and folds that could he easily overlooked on conventional air photographs of larger scale. Some stratigraphic relationships can also be recognized on the orbital photograph, but with only minimal previous geologic knowledge of the area, these interpretations are less conclusive or reliable than the interpretation of structure. It is suggested that improved atmospheric penetration could be achieved through the use of color infrared film. Photographic expression of topography could also be improved by deliberately photographing some areas during periods of low sun angle.

  13. Maintaining the Telescope Bibliography at Gemini Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.

    2010-10-01

    The library profession benefits tremendously from ever-changing web technologies. In maintaining a telescope bibliography, web-publishing revolutionized the way librarians track relevant publications. Thanks to the search abilities provided by the NASA Astrophysics Data System, arXiv, publishers, as well as Google Scholar, and other such resources, online searching for Gemini-based publications has replaced the tedious perusing of print journals. However, we should keep in mind that online searching is neither flawless nor simple — different content providers require different search strategies. Sometimes the retrievals are not as complete as one expects. Information providers should be constantly improving their searching abilities in order to make the task of electronic publication tracking more reliable and efficient.

  14. Gemini: A long-range cargo transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The proposed Gemini, a long-range cargo transport, is designed as a high capacity, dedicated cargo transporter of 8'x8'x20' inter-modal containers, and long-range design. These requirements will result in a design that is larger than any existing aircraft. Due to the size, a conventional configuration would result in an aircraft unable to operate economically at existing airports. It is necessary to design for a minimum possible empty weight, wingspan, and landing gear track. After considering both a single fuselage biplane and a double fuselage biplane configuration, the design team choose the double fuselage biplane configuration. Both of these configuration choices result in a reduced wing root bending moment and subsequently in substantial savings in the wing weight. An overall decrease in the weight of the airplane, its systems, and fuel will be a direct result of the wing weight savings.

  15. Response to major earthquakes affecting Gemini twins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Hoeven, Michiel; Rogers, Rolando; Rippa, Mathew; Perez, Gabriel; Montes, Vanessa; Moreno, Cristian

    2016-07-01

    Both Gemini telescopes, in Hawaii and Chile, are located in highly seismic active areas. That means that the seismic protection is included in the structural design of the telescope, instruments and auxiliary structure. We will describe the specific design features to reduce permanent damage in case of major earthquakes. At this moment both telescopes have been affected by big earthquakes in 2006 and 2015 respectively. There is an opportunity to compare the original design to the effects that are caused by these earthquakes and analyze their effectiveness. The paper describes the way the telescopes responded to these events, the damage that was caused, how we recovered from it, the modifications we have done to avoid some of this damage in future occasions, and lessons learned to face this type of events. Finally we will cover on how we pretend to upgrade the limited monitoring tools we currently have in place to measure the impact of earthquakes.

  16. The Gemini Planet Imager Exoplanet Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macintosh, Bruce

    The Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) is a next-generation coronagraph constructed for the Gemini Observatory. GPI will see first light this fall. It will be the most advanced planet-imaging system in operation - an order of magnitude more sensitive than any current instrument, capable of detecting and spectroscopically characterizing young Jovian planets 107 times fainter than their parent star at separations of 0.2 arcseconds. GPI was built from the beginning as a facility-class survey instrument, and the observatory will employ it that way. Our team has been selected by Gemini Observatory to carry out an 890-hour program - the GPI Exoplanet Survey (GPIES) campaign from 2014-2017. We will observe 600 stars spanning spectral types A-M. We will use published young association catalogs and a proprietary list in preparation that adds several hundred new young (<100 Myr, <75 pc) and adolescent (<300 Myr, <35 pc) stars. The range of separations studied by GPI is completely inaccessible to Doppler and transit techniques (even with Kepler or TESS)— GPI offers a new window into planet formation. We will use GPI to produce the first-ever robust census of giant planet populations in the 5-50 AU range, allowing us to: 1) illuminate the formation pathways of Jovian planets; 2) reconstruct the early dynamical evolution of systems, including migration mechanisms and the interaction with disks and belts of debris; and 3) bridge the gap between Jupiter and the brown dwarfs with the first examples of cool low- gravity planetary atmospheres. Simulations predict this survey will discover approximately 50 exoplanets, increasing the number of exoplanet images by an order of magnitude, enough for statistical investigation. This Origins of Solar Systems proposal will support the execution of the GPI Exoplanet Survey campaign. We will develop tools needed to execute the survey efficiently. We will refine the existing GPI data pipeline to a final version that robustly removes residual speckle

  17. Wavefront control for the Gemini Planet Imager

    SciTech Connect

    Poyneer, L A; Veran, J; Dillon, D; Severson, S; Macintosh, B

    2006-04-14

    The wavefront control strategy for the proposed Gemini Planet Imager, an extreme adaptive optics coronagraph for planet detection, is presented. Two key parts of this strategy are experimentally verified in a testbed at the Laboratory for Adaptive Optics, which features a 32 x 32 MEMS device. Detailed analytic models and algorithms for Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor alignment and calibration are presented. It is demonstrated that with these procedures, the spatially filtered WFS and the Fourier Transform reconstructor can be used to flatten to the MEMS to 1 nm RMS in the controllable band. Performance is further improved using the technique of modifying the reference slopes using a measurement of the static wavefront error in the science leg.

  18. Algeria- Gemini 7, Earth-Sky View

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-12-05

    S65-63830 (5 Dec. 1965) --- Algeria, south-southeast of the Colomb Bechar area, as seen from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Gemini-7 spacecraft. Sand dunes are 200 to 300 feet high in the Grand Erg Occidental area. The Quod Sacura River can be seen in the upper left corner. The white spot in the middle of the picture is the Sebcha el Malah salt beds. It should be noted that the area had just experienced very heavy rains (first in many years) and the stream and salt flat are inundated. This photograph was taken with a modified 70mm Hasselblad camera, with Eastman Kodak, Ektachrome MS (S.O. 217) color film. Photo credit: NASA

  19. The Gemini 8-m Telescopes Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osmer, P. S.

    1992-05-01

    The Gemini Project is an international collaboration of Canada, the United Kingdom, and the United States to construct and operate twin 8-m telescopes in Hawaii and Chile. The principal goal of the Gemini project is to give astronomers access to the whole sky with an unprecedented combination of superb image quality and high light gathering power over the entire range of optical and infrared wavelengths observable from the ground. Main features of the draft science requirements include: 1) Image quality of 0.1 arcsec in the near infrared over a 1 arcmin field, through the use of active optics and wavefront-tilt correction; 2) Wavelength coverage with high throughput over the range 0.3 to at least 30 microns (which will require capability for different mirror coatings); 3) An IR-optimized configuration with emissivity in the 2 - 4 \\ covering a 45 arcmin diameter field; 5) An optical/UV Nasmyth configuration to provide direct beam feeding of instruments requiring a gravity stable location; 6) Observing modes that will support the astronomer at the telescope and also provide for service observing, remote observing, and queue scheduling; and 7) Provision of capability for rapid switching between instruments to take advantage of changing weather conditions. The telescopes are to be as similar as possible, consistent with the science requirements. They are to have provision for future upgrades or modifications, so that they will remain frontline facilities over a lifetime expected to exceed fifty years. The project is to include an initial suite of instruments for each telescope, which will be procured from institutions within the partner countries on a competitive basis. The telescopes will also include provision for adaptive optics; the current plan is to begin with a system for low-order correction.

  20. First light of the Gemini Planet Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macintosh, Bruce; Graham, James R.; Ingraham, Patrick; Konopacky, Quinn; Marois, Christian; Perrin, Marshall; Poyneer, Lisa; Bauman, Brian; Barman, Travis; Burrows, Adam S.; Cardwell, Andrew; Chilcote, Jeffrey; De Rosa, Robert J.; Dillon, Daren; Doyon, Rene; Dunn, Jennifer; Erikson, Darren; Fitzgerald, Michael P.; Gavel, Donald; Goodsell, Stephen; Hartung, Markus; Hibon, Pascale; Kalas, Paul; Larkin, James; Maire, Jerome; Marchis, Franck; Marley, Mark S.; McBride, James; Millar-Blanchaer, Max; Morzinski, Katie; Norton, Andrew; Oppenheimer, B. R.; Palmer, David; Patience, Jennifer; Pueyo, Laurent; Rantakyro, Fredrik; Sadakuni, Naru; Saddlemyer, Leslie; Savransky, Dmitry; Serio, Andrew; Soummer, Remi; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand; Song, Inseok; Thomas, Sandrine; Wallace, J. Kent; Wiktorowicz, Sloane; Wolff, Schuyler

    2014-09-01

    The Gemini Planet Imager is a dedicated facility for directly imaging and spectroscopically characterizing extrasolar planets. It combines a very high-order adaptive optics system, a diffraction-suppressing coronagraph, and an integral field spectrograph with low spectral resolution but high spatial resolution. Every aspect of the Gemini Planet Imager has been tuned for maximum sensitivity to faint planets near bright stars. During first-light observations, we achieved an estimated H band Strehl ratio of 0.89 and a 5-σ contrast of 106 at 0.75 arcseconds and 105 at 0.35 arcseconds. Observations of Beta Pictoris clearly detect the planet, Beta Pictoris b, in a single 60-s exposure with minimal postprocessing. Beta Pictoris b is observed at a separation of 434 ± 6 milliarcseconds (mas) and position angle 211.8 ± 0.5°. Fitting the Keplerian orbit of Beta Pic b using the new position together with previous astrometry gives a factor of 3 improvement in most parameters over previous solutions. The planet orbits at a semimajor axis of 9.0-0.4+0.8AU near the 3:2 resonance with the previously known 6-AU asteroidal belt and is aligned with the inner warped disk. The observations give a 4% probability of a transit of the planet in late 2017.

  1. Cognitive hacking and intelligence and security informatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Paul

    2004-08-01

    This paper describes research on cognitive and semantic attacks on computer systems and their users. Several countermeasures against such attacks are described, including a description of a prototype News Verifier system. It is argued that because misinformation and deception play a much more significant role in intelligence and security informatics than in other informatics disciplines such as science, medicine, and the law, a new science of intelligence and security informatics must concern itself with semantic attacks and countermeasures.

  2. Person-generated Data in Self-quantification. A Health Informatics Research Program.

    PubMed

    Gray, Kathleen; Martin-Sanchez, Fernando J; Lopez-Campos, Guillermo H; Almalki, Manal; Merolli, Mark

    2017-01-09

    The availability of internet-connected mobile, wearable and ambient consumer technologies, direct-to-consumer e-services and peer-to-peer social media sites far outstrips evidence about the efficiency, effectiveness and efficacy of using them in healthcare applications. The aim of this paper is to describe one approach to build a program of health informatics research, so as to generate rich and robust evidence about health data and information processing in self-quantification and associated healthcare and health outcomes. The paper summarises relevant health informatics research approaches in the literature and presents an example of developing a program of research in the Health and Biomedical Informatics Centre (HaBIC) at the University of Melbourne. The paper describes this program in terms of research infrastructure, conceptual models, research design, research reporting and knowledge sharing. The paper identifies key outcomes from integrative and multiple-angle approaches to investigating the management of information and data generated by use of this Centre's collection of wearable, mobiles and other devices in health self-monitoring experiments. These research results offer lessons for consumers, developers, clinical practitioners and biomedical and health informatics researchers. Health informatics is increasingly called upon to make sense of emerging self-quantification and other digital health phenomena that are well beyond the conventions of healthcare in which the field of informatics originated and consolidated. To make a substantial contribution to optimise the aims, processes and outcomes of health self-quantification needs further work at scale in multi-centre collaborations for this Centre and for health informatics researchers generally.

  3. Perspectives from nurse managers on informatics competencies.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li; Cui, Dan; Zhu, Xuemei; Zhao, Qiuli; Xiao, Ningning; Shen, Xiaoying

    2014-01-01

    Nurse managers are in an excellent position for providing leadership and support within the institutions they serve and are often responsible for accessing information that is vital to the improvement of health facility processes and patients' outcomes. Therefore, competency in informatics is essential. The purposes of this study are to examine current informatics competency levels of nurse managers and to identify the variables that influence these competencies. A questionnaire designed to assess demographic information and nursing informatics competency was completed by 68 nurse managers. Multiple linear regression analysis was conducted to analyze the factors influencing informatics competency. Descriptive analysis of the data revealed that informatics competency of these nurse managers was in the moderate range (77.65 ± 8.14). Multiple linear regression analysis indicated that level of education, nursing administration experience, and informatics education/training were significant factors affecting competency levels. The factors identified in this study can serve as a reference for nurse managers who were wishing to improve their informatics competency, hospital administrators seeking to provide appropriate training, and nursing educators who were making decisions about nursing informatics curricula. These findings suggest that efforts to enhance the informatics competency of nurse managers have marked potential benefits.

  4. Perspectives from Nurse Managers on Informatics Competencies

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Dan; Zhu, Xuemei; Zhao, Qiuli; Xiao, Ningning; Shen, Xiaoying

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose. Nurse managers are in an excellent position for providing leadership and support within the institutions they serve and are often responsible for accessing information that is vital to the improvement of health facility processes and patients' outcomes. Therefore, competency in informatics is essential. The purposes of this study are to examine current informatics competency levels of nurse managers and to identify the variables that influence these competencies. Methods. A questionnaire designed to assess demographic information and nursing informatics competency was completed by 68 nurse managers. Multiple linear regression analysis was conducted to analyze the factors influencing informatics competency. Results. Descriptive analysis of the data revealed that informatics competency of these nurse managers was in the moderate range (77.65 ± 8.14). Multiple linear regression analysis indicated that level of education, nursing administration experience, and informatics education/training were significant factors affecting competency levels. Conclusion. The factors identified in this study can serve as a reference for nurse managers who were wishing to improve their informatics competency, hospital administrators seeking to provide appropriate training, and nursing educators who were making decisions about nursing informatics curricula. These findings suggest that efforts to enhance the informatics competency of nurse managers have marked potential benefits. PMID:24790565

  5. The emerging role of educational informatics.

    PubMed

    Weiner, Elizabeth E; Trangenstein, Patricia A

    2009-01-01

    Initial growth in the field of nursing informatics has centered primarily on the clinical setting. Much has been written about the systems developed and evaluated and possible new roles that one can play in the clinical environment. The educational arena has not fared as well. Early attention has been focused on the integration of educational technology or on competency-based skills in informatics according to program levels of students. This paper will focus on the emerging role of educational informatics. Examples will provide nurses with a better understanding of the roles played by the educational informaticist in crafting the science of nursing informatics to produce better nursing education outcomes.

  6. GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-9A - EARTH SKY - ONBOARD

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-06-03

    S66-38082 (3 June 1966) --- Astronaut Eugene A. Cernan, pilot of the Gemini-9A spaceflight, is photographed inside the spacecraft by the command pilot, astronaut Thomas P. Stafford during the flight. Photo credit: NASA

  7. Florida, Bahama Islands, Cuba as seen from Gemini 12 spacecraft

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-11-13

    S66-63418 (13 Nov. 1966) --- Florida (south half), Bahamas Islands (Andros-Grand Bahamas-Bimini), and Cuba, looking south as seen from Gemini-12 spacecraft on its 15th revolution of Earth. Photo credit: NASA

  8. Gemini enclosure and support facility design philosophy and design description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raybould, Keith; Ford, Robert M.; Gillett, Paul E.; Hardash, Steven G.; Pentland, Gordon

    1994-06-01

    The Gemini project is an international collaboration between the USA, United Kingdom, Canada, Chile, Argentina, and Brazil, to design, fabricate and assemble two 8 M telescopes, one on Mauna Kea in Hawaii, the other on Cerro Pachon in Chile. The telescopes will be national facilities designed to meet the Gemini Science Requirements, a document developed by the Gemini Science Committee. This paper describes the design considerations that influence the scientific performance of the enclosure and support facility, and the features that have been incorporated to meet the demanding science requirements, particularly the 0.026 arc sec allowance for `enclosure seeing'. A description of the Gemini enclosure, support facilities and site plans for Mauna Kea is given here together with a brief description of the analysis and testing that has been performed to establish the performance of the facility.

  9. Food packets for use on the Gemini 3 flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Food packets for use on the Gemini 3 flight including dehydrated beef pot roast, bacon and egg bites, toasted bread cubes, orange juice and a wet wipe. Water is being inserted into the pouch of dehydrated food.

  10. Earth-Sky - Gemini-Titan (GT)-6 - Africa

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-12-16

    S65-63130 (16 Dec. 1965) --- Ras Hafum, coast of Somali Republic, northeast Africa, as seen from the Gemini-6 spacecraft during its 13th revolution of Earth. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  11. China, India, and Nepal as seen from Gemini 11

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-09-14

    S66-54839 (14 Sept. 1966) --- China, India, and Nepal, looking east, as seen from the Gemini-11 spacecraft during its 37th revolution of Earth. The Great Himalaya Mountain Range is clearly visible. Photo credit: NASA

  12. Food packets for use on the Gemini 3 flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Food packets for use on the Gemini 3 flight including dehydrated beef pot roast, bacon and egg bites, toasted bread cubes, orange juice and a wet wipe. Water is being inserted into the pouch of dehydrated food.

  13. Food packages for use on the Gemini 4 flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Food packages for use on the Gemini 4 flight. Packages include beef and gravy, peaches, strawberry cereal cubes and beef sandwiches. Water gun is used to reconstitute dehydrated food. Scissors are used to open the packages.

  14. GEMINI-6 - EARTH-SKY - CANARY ISLANDS - OUTER SPACE

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-12-16

    S65-63150 (16 Dec. 1965) --- Eddies in stratocumulus clouds over the Canary Islands as seen from the Gemini-6 spacecraft during its 14th revolution of Earth. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  15. Diagram of Weightlessness effects at cell level aboard Gemini Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Diagram of experimemt on weightlessness effects at cell level aboard Gemini spacecraft. The round canister (top) shows the experiment package. The bottom portion of the diagram shows the breakdown of the experiment package, and how the experiment will proceed.

  16. View of Gemini 11 experiment S-13 Ultraviolet Astronomical Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    View of Gemini 11 experiment S-13 Ultraviolet Astronomical Camera before flight. Its object was to obtain data on ultraviolet radiation of hot stars and to develop and evaluate basic techniques for photography of celestial objects from manned spacecraft.

  17. Food packages for use on the Gemini 4 flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Food packages for use on the Gemini 4 flight. Packages include beef and gravy, peaches, strawberry cereal cubes and beef sandwiches. Water gun is used to reconstitute dehydrated food. Scissors are used to open the packages.

  18. MISSION CONTROL CENTER (MCC) - GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-7 - MSC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-12-07

    S65-60039 (7 Dec. 1965) --- Christopher C. Kraft Jr. (left), assistant director for Flight Operations, monitors his console in the Mission Control Center during the Gemini-7 spaceflight. Photo credit: NASA

  19. GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-3 - EARTH - SKY VIEW - AFRICA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-03-23

    S65-18750 (23 March 1965) --- Astronaut John W. Young took this picture over eastern Africa during the Gemini-Titan 3 three-orbit mission on March 23, 1965. The altitude of the Gemini spacecraft "Molly Brown" was 90 miles. Young used a hand-held modified 70mm Hasselblad camera with color film. The lens setting was 250th of a second at f/11.

  20. Astronaut Gene Cernan poses in front of Gemini Mission Simulator

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-08-09

    S66-32698 (17 June 1966) --- Astronaut Eugene A. Cernan discusses his Gemini-9A extravehicular activity before a gathering of news media representatives in the MSC auditorium. In the background is an Astronaut Maneuvering Unit (AMU) mock-up mounted in a mock-up of a Gemini spacecraft adapter equipment section. Astronauts Cernan and Thomas P. Stafford completed their three-day mission in space on June 6, 1966. Photo credit: NASA

  1. Agena Target Docking vehicle seen from Gemini 8 spacecraft

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-03-16

    S66-25778 (16 March 1966) --? The Agena Target Docking Vehicle seen from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration?s Gemini-8 spacecraft during rendezvous in space. The Agena is approximately 260 feet away from the nose of the spacecraft (lower left). Crewmen for the Gemini-8 mission are astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, command pilot, and David R. Scott, pilot. Photo credit: NASA

  2. Dicationic alkylammonium bromide gemini surfactants. Membrane perturbation and skin irritation.

    PubMed

    Almeida, João A S; Faneca, Henrique; Carvalho, Rui A; Marques, Eduardo F; Pais, Alberto A C C

    2011-01-01

    Dicationic alkylammonium bromide gemini surfactants represent a class of amphiphiles potentially effective as skin permeation enhancers. However, only a limited number of studies has been dedicated to the evaluation of the respective cytotoxicity, and none directed to skin irritation endpoints. Supported on a cell viability study, the cytotoxicity of gemini surfactants of variable tail and spacer length was assessed. For this purpose, keratinocyte cells from human skin (NCTC 2544 cell line), frequently used as a model for skin irritation, were employed. The impact of the different gemini surfactants on the permeability and morphology of model vesicles was additionally investigated by measuring the leakage of calcein fluorescent dye and analyzing the NMR spectra of ³¹P, respectively. Detail on the interaction of gemini molecules with model membranes was also provided by a systematic differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. An irreversible impact on the viability of the NCTC 2544 cell line was observed for gemini concentrations higher than 25 mM, while no cytotoxicity was found for any of the surfactants in a concentration range up to 10 mM. A higher cytotoxicity was also found for gemini surfactants presenting longer spacer and shorter tails. The same trend was obtained in the calorimetric and permeability studies, with the gemini of longest spacer promoting the highest degree of membrane destabilization. Additional structural and dynamical characterization of the various systems, obtained by ³¹P NMR and MD, provide some insight on the relationship between the architecture of gemini surfactants and the respective perturbation mechanism.

  3. Dicationic Alkylammonium Bromide Gemini Surfactants. Membrane Perturbation and Skin Irritation

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, João A. S.; Faneca, Henrique; Carvalho, Rui A.; Marques, Eduardo F.; Pais, Alberto A. C. C.

    2011-01-01

    Dicationic alkylammonium bromide gemini surfactants represent a class of amphiphiles potentially effective as skin permeation enhancers. However, only a limited number of studies has been dedicated to the evaluation of the respective cytotoxicity, and none directed to skin irritation endpoints. Supported on a cell viability study, the cytotoxicity of gemini surfactants of variable tail and spacer length was assessed. For this purpose, keratinocyte cells from human skin (NCTC 2544 cell line), frequently used as a model for skin irritation, were employed. The impact of the different gemini surfactants on the permeability and morphology of model vesicles was additionally investigated by measuring the leakage of calcein fluorescent dye and analyzing the NMR spectra of 31P, respectively. Detail on the interaction of gemini molecules with model membranes was also provided by a systematic differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. An irreversible impact on the viability of the NCTC 2544 cell line was observed for gemini concentrations higher than 25 mM, while no cytotoxicity was found for any of the surfactants in a concentration range up to 10 mM. A higher cytotoxicity was also found for gemini surfactants presenting longer spacer and shorter tails. The same trend was obtained in the calorimetric and permeability studies, with the gemini of longest spacer promoting the highest degree of membrane destabilization. Additional structural and dynamical characterization of the various systems, obtained by 31P NMR and MD, provide some insight on the relationship between the architecture of gemini surfactants and the respective perturbation mechanism. PMID:22102870

  4. Press Conference - Gemini-Titan (GT)-12 - Postflight - MSC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-11-23

    S66-65190 (23 Nov. 1966) --- Two key NASA officials and the Gemini-12 crew explain the Gemini-12 space mission to news media representatives at a postflight press conference in the MSC auditorium. Left to right, are Dr. Robert C. Seamans Jr., NASA Deputy Administrator; astronaut James A. Lovell Jr., command pilot; astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., pilot; and Dr. Robert R. Gilruth, MSC Director. Photo credit: NASA

  5. Medical Imaging Informatics: Towards a Personalized Computational Patient.

    PubMed

    Ayache, N

    2016-05-20

    Medical Imaging Informatics has become a fast evolving discipline at the crossing of Informatics, Computational Sciences, and Medicine that is profoundly changing medical practices, for the patients' benefit.

  6. Integrating Health Information Technology Safety into Nursing Informatics Competencies.

    PubMed

    Borycki, Elizabeth M; Cummings, Elizabeth; Kushniruk, Andre W; Saranto, Kaija

    2017-01-01

    Nursing informatics competencies are constantly changing in response to advances in the health information technology (HIT) industry and research emerging from the fields of nursing and health informatics. In this paper we build off the work of Staggers and colleagues in defining nursing informatics competencies at five levels: the beginning nurse, the experienced nurse, the nursing informatics specialist, the nursing informatics innovator and the nursing informatics researcher in the area of HIT safety. The work represents a significant contribution to the literature in the area of nursing informatics competency development as it extends nursing informatics competencies to include those focused on the area of technology-induced errors and HIT safety.

  7. GEMINI: Integrative Exploration of Genetic Variation and Genome Annotations

    PubMed Central

    Paila, Umadevi; Chapman, Brad A.; Kirchner, Rory; Quinlan, Aaron R.

    2013-01-01

    Modern DNA sequencing technologies enable geneticists to rapidly identify genetic variation among many human genomes. However, isolating the minority of variants underlying disease remains an important, yet formidable challenge for medical genetics. We have developed GEMINI (GEnome MINIng), a flexible software package for exploring all forms of human genetic variation. Unlike existing tools, GEMINI integrates genetic variation with a diverse and adaptable set of genome annotations (e.g., dbSNP, ENCODE, UCSC, ClinVar, KEGG) into a unified database to facilitate interpretation and data exploration. Whereas other methods provide an inflexible set of variant filters or prioritization methods, GEMINI allows researchers to compose complex queries based on sample genotypes, inheritance patterns, and both pre-installed and custom genome annotations. GEMINI also provides methods for ad hoc queries and data exploration, a simple programming interface for custom analyses that leverage the underlying database, and both command line and graphical tools for common analyses. We demonstrate GEMINI's utility for exploring variation in personal genomes and family based genetic studies, and illustrate its ability to scale to studies involving thousands of human samples. GEMINI is designed for reproducibility and flexibility and our goal is to provide researchers with a standard framework for medical genomics. PMID:23874191

  8. New serine-derived gemini surfactants as gene delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Ana M; Morais, Catarina M; Cruz, A Rita; Silva, Sandra G; do Vale, M Luísa; Marques, Eduardo F; de Lima, Maria C Pedroso; Jurado, Amália S

    2015-01-01

    Gemini surfactants have been extensively used for in vitro gene delivery. Amino acid-derived gemini surfactants combine the special aggregation properties characteristic of the gemini surfactants with high biocompatibility and biodegradability. In this work, novel serine-derived gemini surfactants, differing in alkyl chain lengths and in the linker group bridging the spacer to the headgroups (amine, amide and ester), were evaluated for their ability to mediate gene delivery either per se or in combination with helper lipids. Gemini surfactant-based DNA complexes were characterized in terms of hydrodynamic diameter, surface charge, stability in aqueous buffer and ability to protect DNA. Efficient formulations, able to transfect up to 50% of the cells without causing toxicity, were found at very low surfactant/DNA charge ratios (1/1-2/1). The most efficient complexes presented sizes suitable for intravenous administration and negative surface charge, a feature known to preclude potentially adverse interactions with serum components. This work brings forward a new family of gemini surfactants with great potential as gene delivery systems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. GEMINI: integrative exploration of genetic variation and genome annotations.

    PubMed

    Paila, Umadevi; Chapman, Brad A; Kirchner, Rory; Quinlan, Aaron R

    2013-01-01

    Modern DNA sequencing technologies enable geneticists to rapidly identify genetic variation among many human genomes. However, isolating the minority of variants underlying disease remains an important, yet formidable challenge for medical genetics. We have developed GEMINI (GEnome MINIng), a flexible software package for exploring all forms of human genetic variation. Unlike existing tools, GEMINI integrates genetic variation with a diverse and adaptable set of genome annotations (e.g., dbSNP, ENCODE, UCSC, ClinVar, KEGG) into a unified database to facilitate interpretation and data exploration. Whereas other methods provide an inflexible set of variant filters or prioritization methods, GEMINI allows researchers to compose complex queries based on sample genotypes, inheritance patterns, and both pre-installed and custom genome annotations. GEMINI also provides methods for ad hoc queries and data exploration, a simple programming interface for custom analyses that leverage the underlying database, and both command line and graphical tools for common analyses. We demonstrate GEMINI's utility for exploring variation in personal genomes and family based genetic studies, and illustrate its ability to scale to studies involving thousands of human samples. GEMINI is designed for reproducibility and flexibility and our goal is to provide researchers with a standard framework for medical genomics.

  10. The Chief Clinical Informatics Officer (CCIO)

    PubMed Central

    Sengstack, Patricia; Thyvalikakath, Thankam Paul; Poikonen, John; Middleton, Blackford; Payne, Thomas; Lehmann, Christoph U

    2016-01-01

    Summary Introduction The emerging operational role of the “Chief Clinical Informatics Officer” (CCIO) remains heterogeneous with individuals deriving from a variety of clinical settings and backgrounds. The CCIO is defined in title, responsibility, and scope of practice by local organizations. The term encompasses the more commonly used Chief Medical Informatics Officer (CMIO) and Chief Nursing Informatics Officer (CNIO) as well as the rarely used Chief Pharmacy Informatics Officer (CPIO) and Chief Dental Informatics Officer (CDIO). Background The American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA) identified a need to better delineate the knowledge, education, skillsets, and operational scope of the CCIO in an attempt to address the challenges surrounding the professional development and the hiring processes of CCIOs. Discussion An AMIA task force developed knowledge, education, and operational skillset recommendations for CCIOs focusing on the common core aspect and describing individual differences based on Clinical Informatics focus. The task force concluded that while the role of the CCIO currently is diverse, a growing body of Clinical Informatics and increasing certification efforts are resulting in increased homogeneity. The task force advised that 1.) To achieve a predictable and desirable skillset, the CCIO must complete clearly defined and specified Clinical Informatics education and training. 2.) Future education and training must reflect the changing body of knowledge and must be guided by changing day-to-day informatics challenges. Conclusion A better defined and specified education and skillset for all CCIO positions will motivate the CCIO workforce and empower them to perform the job of a 21st century CCIO. Formally educated and trained CCIOs will provide a competitive advantage to their respective enterprise by fully utilizing the power of Informatics science. PMID:27081413

  11. The new Gemini Observatory archive: a fast and low cost observatory data archive running in the cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirst, Paul; Cardenes, Ricardo

    2016-08-01

    We have developed and deployed a new data archive for the Gemini Observatory. Focused on simplicity and ease of use, the archive provides a number of powerful and novel features including automatic association of calibration data with the science data, and the ability to bookmark searches. A simple but powerful API allows programmatic search and download of data. The archive is hosted on Amazon Web Services, which provides us excellent internet connectivity and significant cost savings in both operations and development over more traditional deployment options. The code is written in python, utilizing a PostgreSQL database and Apache web server.

  12. Measuring nursing informatics competencies of practicing nurses in Korea: Nursing Informatics Competencies Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Chung, Seon Yoon; Staggers, Nancy

    2014-12-01

    Informatics competencies are a necessity for contemporary nurses. However, few researchers have investigated informatics competencies for practicing nurses. A full set of Informatics competencies, an instrument to measure these competencies, and potential influencing factors have yet to be identified for practicing nurses. The Nursing Informatics Competencies Questionnaire was designed, tested for psychometrics, and used to measure beginning and experienced levels of practice. A pilot study using 54 nurses ensured item comprehension and clarity. Internal consistency and face and content validity were established. A cross-sectional survey was then conducted on 230 nurses in Seoul, Korea, to determine construct validity, describe a complete set of informatics competencies, and explore possible influencing factors on existing informatics competencies. Principal components analysis, descriptive statistics, and multiple regression were used for data analysis. Principal components analysis gives support for the Nursing Informatics Competencies Questionnaire construct validity. Survey results indicate that involvement in a managerial position and self-directed informatics-related education may be more influential for improving informatics competencies, whereas general clinical experience and workplace settings are not. This study provides a foundation for understanding how informatics competencies might be integrated throughout nurses' work lives and how to develop appropriate strategies to support nurses in their informatics practice in clinical settings.

  13. The Teaching of Informatics for Business Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sora, Sebastian A.

    2008-01-01

    Informatics is a branch of computer science that concerns itself, in actuality, with the use of information systems. The objective of this paper is to focus on the business curriculum for graduate students and their gaining proficiency in informatics so that they can understand the concept of information, the access of information, the use of…

  14. Teaching Some Informatics Concepts Using Formal System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Sojung; Park, Seongbin

    2014-01-01

    There are many important issues in informatics and many agree that algorithms and programming are most important issues that need to be included in informatics education (Dagiene and Jevsikova, 2012). In this paper, we propose how some of these issues can be easily taught using the notion of a formal system which consists of axioms and inference…

  15. The Teaching of Informatics for Business Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sora, Sebastian A.

    2008-01-01

    Informatics is a branch of computer science that concerns itself, in actuality, with the use of information systems. The objective of this paper is to focus on the business curriculum for graduate students and their gaining proficiency in informatics so that they can understand the concept of information, the access of information, the use of…

  16. Medical Informatics: Market for IS/IT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Theodore Allan

    2002-01-01

    Uses co-occurrence analysis of INSPEC classification codes and thesaurus terms assigned to medical informatics (biomedical information) journal articles and proceedings papers to reveal a more complete perspective of how information science and information technology (IS/IT) authors view medical informatics. Discusses results of cluster analysis…

  17. Medical Informatics in Academic Health Science Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frisse, Mark E.

    1992-01-01

    An analysis of the state of medical informatics, the application of computer and information technology to biomedicine, looks at trends and concerns, including integration of traditionally distinct enterprises (clinical information systems, financial information, scholarly support activities, infrastructures); informatics career choice and…

  18. The Impact of Medical Informatics on Librarianship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalrymple, Prudence W.

    The thesis of this paper is that the growth of the field of medical informatics, while seemingly a potential threat to medical librarianship, is in fact an opportunity for librarianship to both extend its reach and also to further define its unique characteristics in contrast to those of medical informatics. Furthermore, because medical…

  19. Medical Informatics: Market for IS/IT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Theodore Allan

    2002-01-01

    Uses co-occurrence analysis of INSPEC classification codes and thesaurus terms assigned to medical informatics (biomedical information) journal articles and proceedings papers to reveal a more complete perspective of how information science and information technology (IS/IT) authors view medical informatics. Discusses results of cluster analysis…

  20. Informatics Education in Italian Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bellettini, Carlo; Lonati, Violetta; Malchiodi, Dario; Monga, Mattia; Morpurgo, Anna; Torelli, Mauro; Zecca, Luisa

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the state of informatics education in the Italian secondary schools, highlighting how the learning objectives set up by the Ministry of Education are difficult to meet, due to the fact that the subject is often taught by teachers not holding an informatics degree, the lack of suitable teaching material and the expectations…

  1. Medical Informatics in Academic Health Science Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frisse, Mark E.

    1992-01-01

    An analysis of the state of medical informatics, the application of computer and information technology to biomedicine, looks at trends and concerns, including integration of traditionally distinct enterprises (clinical information systems, financial information, scholarly support activities, infrastructures); informatics career choice and…

  2. Informatics Education in Italian Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bellettini, Carlo; Lonati, Violetta; Malchiodi, Dario; Monga, Mattia; Morpurgo, Anna; Torelli, Mauro; Zecca, Luisa

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the state of informatics education in the Italian secondary schools, highlighting how the learning objectives set up by the Ministry of Education are difficult to meet, due to the fact that the subject is often taught by teachers not holding an informatics degree, the lack of suitable teaching material and the expectations…

  3. The Gemini Deep Planet Survey - GDPS

    SciTech Connect

    Lafreniere, D; Doyon, R; Marois, C; Nadeau, D; Oppenheimer, B R; Roche, P F; Rigaut, F; Graham, J R; Jayawardhana, R; Johnstone, D; Kalas, P G; Macintosh, B; Racine, R

    2007-06-01

    We present the results of the Gemini Deep Planet Survey, a near-infrared adaptive optics search for giant planets and brown dwarfs around nearby young stars. The observations were obtained with the Altair adaptive optics system at the Gemini North telescope and angular differential imaging was used to suppress the speckle noise of the central star. Detection limits for the 85 stars observed are presented, along with a list of all faint point sources detected around them. Typically, the observations are sensitive to angular separations beyond 0.5-inch with 5{sigma} contrast sensitivities in magnitude difference at 1.6 {micro}m of 9.6 at 0.5-inch, 12.9 at 1-inch, 15 at 2-inch, and 16.6 at 5-inch. For the typical target of the survey, a 100 Myr old K0 star located 22 pc from the Sun, the observations are sensitive enough to detect planets more massive than 2 M{sub Jup} with a projected separation in the range 40-200 AU. Depending on the age, spectral type, and distance of the target stars, the minimum mass that could be detected with our observations can be {approx}1 M{sub Jup}. Second epoch observations of 48 stars with candidates (out of 54) have confirmed that all candidates are unrelated background stars. A detailed statistical analysis of the survey results, which provide upper limits on the fractions of stars with giant planet or low mass brown dwarf companions, is presented. Assuming a planet mass distribution dn/dm {proportional_to} m{sup -1.2} and a semi-major axis distribution dn/da {proportional_to} a{sup -1}, the upper limits on the fraction of stars with at least one planet of mass 0.5-13 M{sub Jup} are 0.29 for the range 10-25 AU, 0.13 for 25-50 AU, and 0.09 for 50-250 AU, with a 95% confidence level; this result is weakly dependent on the semi-major axis distribution power-law index. Without making any assumption on the mass and semi-major axis distributions, the fraction of stars with at least one brown dwarf companion having a semi-major axis in the

  4. Clinical informatics in critical care.

    PubMed

    Martich, G Daniel; Waldmann, Carl S; Imhoff, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Health care information systems have the potential to enable better care of patients in much the same manner as the widespread use of the automobile and telephone did in the early 20th century. The car and phone were rapidly accepted and embraced throughout the world when these breakthroughs occurred. However, the automation of health care with use of computerized information systems has not been as widely accepted and implemented as computer technology use in all other sectors of the global economy. In this article, the authors examine the need, risks, and rewards of clinical informatics in health care as well as its specific relationship to critical care medicine.

  5. Medical informatics between technology, philosophy and science.

    PubMed

    Masic, Izet

    2004-01-01

    Medical (health) informatics occupies the central place in all the segments of modern medicine in the past thirty years--in practical work, education and scientific research. In all that, computers have taken over the most important role and are used intensively for the development of the health information systems. Following activities develop within the area of health informatics: health-documentation, health-statistics, health-informatics and biomedical scientific and professional information. The medical informatics as the separate medical discipline very quickly gets developed, both in Bosnia and Herzegovina. In our country, the medical informatics is a separate subject for the last ten years, regarding to the Medical curriculum at the biomedical faculties in Bosnia and Herzegovina is in accordance with the project of the education related to Bologna declaration and the project EURO MEDICINA.

  6. What informatics is and isn't.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Charles P

    2013-01-01

    The term informatics is currently enveloped in chaos. One way to clarify the meaning of informatics is to identify the competencies associated with training in the field, but this approach can conceal the whole that the competencies atomistically describe. This work takes a different approach by offering three higher-level visions of what characterizes the field, viewing informatics as: (1) cross-training between basic informational sciences and an application domain, (2) the relentless pursuit of making people better at what they do, and (3) a field encompassing four related types of activities. Applying these perspectives to describe what informatics is, one can also conclude that informatics is not: tinkering with computers, analysis of large datasets per se, employment in circumscribed health IT workforce roles, the practice of health information management, or anything done using a computer.

  7. Translational Bioinformatics and Clinical Research (Biomedical) Informatics.

    PubMed

    Sirintrapun, S Joseph; Zehir, Ahmet; Syed, Aijazuddin; Gao, JianJiong; Schultz, Nikolaus; Cheng, Donavan T

    2015-06-01

    Translational bioinformatics and clinical research (biomedical) informatics are the primary domains related to informatics activities that support translational research. Translational bioinformatics focuses on computational techniques in genetics, molecular biology, and systems biology. Clinical research (biomedical) informatics involves the use of informatics in discovery and management of new knowledge relating to health and disease. This article details 3 projects that are hybrid applications of translational bioinformatics and clinical research (biomedical) informatics: The Cancer Genome Atlas, the cBioPortal for Cancer Genomics, and the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center clinical variants and results database, all designed to facilitate insights into cancer biology and clinical/therapeutic correlations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Five Periods in Development of Medical Informatics

    PubMed Central

    Masic, Izet

    2014-01-01

    Medical informatics, as scientific discipline, has to do with all aspects of understanding and promoting the effective organization, analysis, management, and use of information in health care. While the field of Medical informatics shares the general scope of these interests with some other health care specialities and disciplines, Medical (Health) informatics has developed its own areas of emphasis and approaches that have set it apart from other disciplines and specialities. For the last fifties of 20th century and some more years of 21st century, Medical informatics had the five time periods of characteristic development. In this paper author shortly described main scientific innovations and inventors who created development of Medical informatics. PMID:24648619

  9. Experience with a new approach for instrument software at Gemini

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Núñez, Arturo; Walker, Shane; Goodsell, Stephen; Dunn, Jennifer; Gillies, Kim

    2010-07-01

    Gemini Observatory is using a new approach with instrument software that takes advantage of the strengths of our instrument builders and at the same time better supports our own operational needs. A lightweight software library in conjunction with modern agile software development methodologies is being used to ameliorate the problems encountered with the development of the first and second-generation Gemini instruments. Over the last two years, Gemini and the team constructing the software for the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) have been using an agile development process to implement the Gemini Instrument Application Interface (GIAPI) and the highlevel control software for the GPI instrument. The GPI is being tested and exercised with the GIAPI, and this has allowed us to perform early end-to-end testing of the instrument software. Early in 2009 for the first time in our development history, we were able to move instrument mechanisms with Gemini software during early instrument construction. As a result of this approach, we discovered and fixed software interface issues between Gemini and GPI. Resolving these problems at this stage is simpler and less expensive than when the full instrument is completed. GPI is currently approaching its integration and testing phase, which will occur in 2010. We expect that utilizing this new approach will yield a more robust software implementation resulting in smoother instrument integration, testing, and commissioning phases. In this paper we describe the key points of our approach and results of applying the new instrument API approach together with agile development methodologies. The paper concludes with lessons learned and suggestions for adapting agile approaches in other astronomy development projects.

  10. The Gemini Planet Imager Exoplanet Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Eric L.; Macintosh, Bruce; Graham, James R.; Barman, Travis S.; Doyon, Rene; Fabrycky, Daniel; Fitzgerald, Michael P.; Kalas, Paul; Konopacky, Quinn M.; Marchis, Franck; Marley, Mark S.; Marois, Christian; Patience, Jenny; Perrin, Marshall D.; Oppenheimer, Rebecca; Song, Inseok; GPIES Team

    2017-01-01

    The Gemini Planet Imager Exoplanet Survey (GPIES) is one of the largest most sensitive direct imaging searches for exoplanets conducted to date, and having observed more than 300 stars the survey is halfway complete. We present highlights from the first half of the survey, including the discovery and characterization of the young exoplanet 51 Eri b and the brown dwarf HR 2562 B, new imaging of multiple disks, and resolving the young stellar binary V343 Nor for the first time. GPI has also provided new spectra and orbits of previous known planets and brown dwarfs and polarization measurements of a wide range of disks. Finally, we discuss the constraints placed by the first half of the GPIES campaign on the population of giant planets at orbital separations beyond that of Jupiter. Supported by NSF grants AST-0909188 and AST-1313718, AST-1411868, AST 141378, NNX11AF74G, and DGE-1232825, and by NASA grants NNX15AD95G/NEXSS and NNX11AD21G.

  11. Gemini-IFU spectroscopy of HH 111

    SciTech Connect

    Cerqueira, A. H.; Vasconcelos, M. J.; Feitosa, J.; Plana, H.; Raga, A. C.

    2015-03-01

    We present new optical observations of the Herbig–Haro (HH) 111 jet using the Gemini Multi Object Spectrograph in its Integral Field Unit mode. Eight fields of 5{sup ′′}×3.{sup ′′}5 have been positioned along and across the HH 111 jet, covering the spatial region from knot E to L in HH 111 (namely, knots E, F, G, H, J, K, and L). We present images and velocity channel maps for the [O i] 6300+6360, Hα, [N ii] 6548+6583, and [S ii] 6716+6730 lines, as well as for the [S ii] 6716/6730 line ratio. We find that the HH 111 jet has an inner region with lower excitation and higher radial velocity, surrounded by a broader region of higher excitation and lower radial velocity. Also, we find higher electron densities at lower radial velocities. These results imply that the HH 111 jet has a fast, axial region with lower velocity shocks surrounded by a lower velocity sheath with higher velocity shocks.

  12. Testing of the Gemini secondary mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, Wolfgang

    1999-09-01

    The first 1-m secondary mirror for the Gemini 8-m telescopes project was delivered by Zeiss in 1998, and 2nd mirror will be delivered in the summer of 1999. For first use during commissioning we produced an extreme lightweight Zerodur solution prefabricated at Schott. To reach the 85 percent weight reduction a novel etching technique was used. INterferometric testing was done performing full aperture measurements using a concave matrix. In progress with the fabrication process of the matrix we applied 3D-mechanical measurements, IR-interferometry, and VIS-interferometry using null lenses to reach the final intrinsic quality of 6 nm rms. For interferometric testing of the secondaries phase shifting interferometry with a tunable laser diode was applied. The optical test results of the secondaries show, that the mirrors are well within specification. The finally achieved intrinsic surface quality is 17 nm rms for Unit 1 and 13 nm rms for Unit 2, dominated by cutting effects which were introduced by removing the oversize at the inner and outer edge of the mirror after the final polishing step.

  13. Health informatics 3.0.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Dipak

    2011-01-01

    Web 3.0 promises us smart computer services that will interact with each other and leverage knowledge about us and our immediate context to deliver prioritised and relevant information to support decisions and actions. Healthcare must take advantage of such new knowledge-integrating services, in particular to support better co-operation between professionals of different disciplines working in different locations, and to enable well-informed co-operation between clinicians and patients. To grasp the potential of Web 3.0 we will need well-harmonised semantic resources that can richly connect virtual teams and link their strategies to real-time and tailored evidence. Facts, decision logic, care pathway steps, alerts, education need to be embedded within components that can interact with multiple EHR systems and services consistently. Using Health Informatics 3.0 a patient's current situation could be compared with the outcomes of very similar patients (from across millions) to deliver personalised care recommendations. The integration of EHRs with biomedical sciences ('omics) research results and predictive models such as the Virtual Physiological Human could help speed up the translation of new knowledge into clinical practice. The mission, and challenge, for Health Informatics 3.0 is to enable healthy citizens, patients and professionals to collaborate within a knowledge-empowered social network in which patient specific information and personalised real-time evidence are seamlessly interwoven.

  14. Australian Nursing Informatics Competency Project.

    PubMed

    Foster, Joanne; Bryce, Julianne

    2009-01-01

    A study of Australian nurses on their use of information technology in the workplace was undertaken by the Australian Nursing Federation (ANF) in 2007. This study of over 4000 nurses highlighted that nurses recognise benefits to adopting more information technology in the workplace although there are significant barriers to their use. It also identified gross deficits in the capacity of the nursing workforce to engage in the digital processing of information. Following the release of the study last year, the ANF commenced work on a number of key recommendations from the report in order to overcome identified barriers and provide opportunities for nurses to better utilise information technology and information management systems. One of these recommendations was to seek research funding to develop national information technology and information management competency standards for nurses. This project has now received Federal Government funding to undertake this development. This project is being developed in collaboration with the ANF and the Queensland University of Technology. This paper will discuss the methodology, development and publication of the Australian Nursing Informatics Competency Standards Project which is currently underway and due for completion in May 2009. The Australian Nursing Informatics Competencies will be presented at the conference.

  15. Sky Background Variability Measured on Maunakea at Gemini North Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Adam B.; Roth, Katherine; Stephens, Andrew W.

    2016-01-01

    Gemini North has recently implemented a Quality Assessment Pipeline (QAP) that automatically reduces images in realtime to determine sky condition quantities, including background sky brightness from the optical to near-infrared. Processing archived images through the QAP and mining the results allows us to look for trends and systematic issues with the instruments and optics during the first decade of Gemini.Here we present the results of using the QAP calculated values to quantify how airglow affects the background sky brightness of images taken with Gemini's imaging instruments, GMOS and NIRI, as well as searching for other factors that may cause changes in the sky brightness. By investigating the dependence of measured sky brightness as a function of a variety of variables, including time after twilight, airmass, season, distance from the moon, air temperature, etc., we quantify the effect of sky brightness and its impact on the sensitivity of Gemini optical and near-infrared imaging data. These measurements will be used to determine new sky background relationships for Maunakea, and to improve the Gemini Integration Time Calculators (ITCs).

  16. Novel gemini cationic lipids with carbamate groups for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yi-Nan; Qureshi, Farooq; Zhang, Shu-Biao; Cui, Shao-Hui; Wang, Bing; Chen, Hui-Ying; Lv, Hong-Tao; Zhang, Shu-Fen; Huang, Leaf

    2014-05-21

    To obtain efficient non-viral vectors, a series of Gemini cationic lipids with carbamate linkers between headgroups and hydrophobic tails were synthesized. They have the hydrocarbon chains of 12, 14, 16 and 18 carbon atoms as tails, designated as G12, G14, G16 and G18, respectively. These Gemini cationic lipids were prepared into cationic liposomes for the study of the physicochemical properties and gene delivery. The DNA-bonding ability of these Gemini cationic liposomes was much better than their mono-head counterparts (designated as M12, M14, M16 and M18, respectively). In the same series of liposomes, bonding ability declined with an increase in tail length. They were tested for their gene-transferring capabilities in Hep-2 and A549 cells. They showed higher transfection efficiency than their mono-head counterparts and were comparable or superior in transfection efficiency and cytotoxicity to the commercial liposomes, DOTAP and Lipofectamine 2000. Our results convincingly demonstrate that the gene-transferring capabilities of these cationic lipids depended on hydrocarbon chain length. Gene transfection efficiency was maximal at a chain length of 14, as G14 can silence about 80 % of luciferase in A549 cells. Cell uptake results indicate that Gemini lipid delivery systems could be internalised by cells very efficiently. Thus, the Gemini cationic lipids could be used as synthetic non-viral gene delivery carriers for further study.

  17. Gemini, a Bifunctional Enzymatic and Fluorescent Reporter of Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Endy, Drew

    2009-01-01

    Background The development of collections of quantitatively characterized standard biological parts should facilitate the engineering of increasingly complex and novel biological systems. The existing enzymatic and fluorescent reporters that are used to characterize biological part functions exhibit strengths and limitations. Combining both enzymatic and fluorescence activities within a single reporter protein would provide a useful tool for biological part characterization. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we describe the construction and quantitative characterization of Gemini, a fusion between the β-galactosidase (β-gal) α-fragment and the N-terminus of full-length green fluorescent protein (GFP). We show that Gemini exhibits functional β-gal activity, which we assay with plates and fluorometry, and functional GFP activity, which we assay with fluorometry and microscopy. We show that the protein fusion increases the sensitivity of β-gal activity and decreases the sensitivity of GFP. Conclusions/Significance Gemini is therefore a bifunctional reporter with a wider dynamic range than the β-gal α-fragment or GFP alone. Gemini enables the characterization of gene expression, screening assays via enzymatic activity, and quantitative single-cell microscopy or FACS via fluorescence activity. The analytical flexibility afforded by Gemini will likely increase the efficiency of research, particularly for screening and characterization of libraries of standard biological parts. PMID:19888458

  18. Novel gemini cationic lipids with carbamate groups for gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yi-Nan; Qureshi, Farooq; Zhang, Shu-Biao; Cui, Shao-Hui; Wang, Bing; Chen, Hui-Ying; Lv, Hong-Tao; Zhang, Shu-Fen; Huang, Leaf

    2014-01-01

    To obtain efficient non-viral vectors, a series of Gemini cationic lipids with carbamate linkers between headgroups and hydrophobic tails were synthesized. They have the hydrocarbon chains of 12, 14, 16 and 18 carbon atoms as tails, designated as G12, G14, G16 and G18, respectively. These Gemini cationic lipids were prepared into cationic liposomes for the study of the physicochemical properties and gene delivery. The DNA-bonding ability of these Gemini cationic liposomes was much better than their mono-head counterparts (designated as M12, M14, M16 and M18, respectively). In the same series of liposomes, bonding ability declined with an increase in tail length. They were tested for their gene-transferring capabilities in Hep-2 and A549 cells. They showed higher transfection efficiency than their mono-head counterparts and were comparable or superior in transfection efficiency and cytotoxicity to the commercial liposomes, DOTAP and Lipofectamine 2000. Our results convincingly demonstrate that the gene-transferring capabilities of these cationic lipids depended on hydrocarbon chain length. Gene transfection efficiency was maximal at a chain length of 14, as G14 can silence about 80 % of luciferase in A549 cells. Cell uptake results indicate that Gemini lipid delivery systems could be internalised by cells very efficiently. Thus, the Gemini cationic lipids could be used as synthetic non-viral gene delivery carriers for further study. PMID:25045521

  19. A training network for introducing telemedicine, telecare and hospital informatics in the Adriatic-Danube-Black Sea region.

    PubMed

    Anogeianaki, Antonia; Ilonidis, George; Anogianakis, George; Lianguris, John; Katsaros, Kyriakos; Pseftogianni, Dimitra; Klisarova, Anelia; Negrev, Negrin

    2004-01-01

    DIMNET is a training mechanism for a region of central Europe. The aim is to upgrade the information technology skills of local hospital personnel and preserve their employability following the introduction of medical informatics. DIMNET uses Internet-based virtual classrooms to provide a 200-hour training course in medical informatics. Training takes place in the cities of Drama, Kavala, Xanthi and Varna. So far, more than 600 people have benefited from the programme. Initial results are encouraging. DIMNET promotes a new vocational training culture in the Balkans and is supported by local governments that perceive health-care as a fulcrum for economic development.

  20. An Approach for All in Pharmacy Informatics Education.

    PubMed

    Fox, Brent I; Flynn, Allen; Clauson, Kevin A; Seaton, Terry L; Breeden, Elizabeth

    2017-03-25

    Computerization is transforming health care. All clinicians are users of health information technology (HIT). Understanding fundamental principles of informatics, the field focused on information needs and uses, is essential if HIT is going to support improved patient outcomes. Informatics education for clinicians is a national priority. Additionally, some informatics experts are needed to bring about innovations in HIT. A common approach to pharmacy informatics education has been slow to develop. Meanwhile, accreditation standards for informatics in pharmacy education continue to evolve. A gap remains in the implementation of informatics education for all pharmacy students and it is unclear what expert informatics training should cover. In this article, we propose the first of two complementary approaches to informatics education in pharmacy: to incorporate fundamental informatics education into pharmacy curricula for all students. The second approach, to train those students interested in becoming informatics experts to design, develop, implement, and evaluate HIT, will be presented in a subsequent issue of the Journal.

  1. An Approach for All in Pharmacy Informatics Education

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Allen; Clauson, Kevin A.; Seaton, Terry L.; Breeden, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    Computerization is transforming health care. All clinicians are users of health information technology (HIT). Understanding fundamental principles of informatics, the field focused on information needs and uses, is essential if HIT is going to support improved patient outcomes. Informatics education for clinicians is a national priority. Additionally, some informatics experts are needed to bring about innovations in HIT. A common approach to pharmacy informatics education has been slow to develop. Meanwhile, accreditation standards for informatics in pharmacy education continue to evolve. A gap remains in the implementation of informatics education for all pharmacy students and it is unclear what expert informatics training should cover. In this article, we propose the first of two complementary approaches to informatics education in pharmacy: to incorporate fundamental informatics education into pharmacy curricula for all students. The second approach, to train those students interested in becoming informatics experts to design, develop, implement, and evaluate HIT, will be presented in a subsequent issue of the Journal. PMID:28381898

  2. GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-8 - TRAINING - WATER EGRESS - COMMAND PILOT - GULF

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-01-15

    S66-17153 (15 Jan. 1966) --- Astronaut Neil A. Armstrong. Gemini-8 command pilot, climbs into a boilerplate model of the Gemini spacecraft during water egress training on the Gulf of Mexico. Photo credit: NASA

  3. A Framework for the Biomedical Informatics Curriculum

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Stephen B.

    2003-01-01

    The problem of developing a curriculum for biomedical informatics is highly dependent on how we choose to define and practice the field. Numerous authors have questioned how to position biomedical informatics along the continuum of formal, empirical and engineering disciplines. A concern with current educational programs in biomedical informatics is that students finish without a clear understanding of the relation between theory and practice, or worse, with the impression that the field does not possess any theoretical basis. In this paper, we propose that biomedical informatics curricula explicitly address skills and competencies at three levels: formal, empirical, and applied. We posit that that knowledge of formalization is necessary to build testable empirical models, and that model-driven approaches are necessary for deploying information systems that can be evaluated in a meaningful way. A curricular framework is proposed that identifies a set of methods, techniques and theories that have broad applicability within the domain of biomedicine, and which can span a wide range of application areas: bioinformatics, imaging informatics, clinical informatics and public health informatics. A stronger linkage between theory and practice will result in students who are empowered to create effective and lasting solutions to biomedical problems. PMID:14728189

  4. A framework for the biomedical informatics curriculum.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Stephen B

    2003-01-01

    The problem of developing a curriculum for biomedical informatics is highly dependent on how we choose to define and practice the field. Numerous authors have questioned how to position biomedical informatics along the continuum of formal, empirical and engineering disciplines. A concern with current educational programs in biomedical informatics is that students finish without a clear understanding of the relation between theory and practice, or worse, with the impression that the field does not possess any theoretical basis. In this paper, we propose that biomedical informatics curricula explicitly address skills and competencies at three levels: formal, empirical, and applied. We posit that that knowledge of formalization is necessary to build testable empirical models, and that model-driven approaches are necessary for deploying information systems that can be evaluated in a meaningful way. A curricular framework is proposed that identifies a set of methods, techniques and theories that have broad applicability within the domain of biomedicine, and which can span a wide range of application areas: bioinformatics, imaging informatics, clinical informatics and public health informatics. A stronger linkage between theory and practice will result in students who are empowered to create effective and lasting solutions to biomedical problems.

  5. Science Data Platforms: Informatics Architectures at the Forefront.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, P. A.

    2012-12-01

    As Earth and space science research organizations try to adapt to the pace of Web and Internet technology change, they also seek to utilize new means of managing complex data and information streams. Whether the people in these organizations serve their own needs, those of external communities, or both, the inevitable challenge to balance a stable working environment with the evolving ecosystems of highly heterogeneous data and information repositories and networks of people and organizations, remains. In addition, as we become increasingly aware that people and other organizational entities and resources never really should have become decoupled from our data and information environments, architects are turning to an increasing set of common informatics approaches to co-design and co-evolve the needed platforms for science data. In this contribution, we present the current state-of-the-art informatics methods for modeling, implementing and evolving data science and information architectures in the context of a new and ambitious decade-long activity; the Deep Carbon Observatory (funded by the AP Sloan Foundation). We conclude by presenting a discussion of how interworkability (cf. interoperability) may be an essential shift in thinking about the embedded role of people in science data platforms.

  6. Military medical informatics: accessing information in the deployed environment.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Mark B; Von Thun, Annette M

    2009-03-01

    Physicians use multiple sources of information to search for answers to clinical questions. These sources include textbooks, journals, colleagues, and electronic resources, including the Internet. To explore what sources are most commonly used by staff military physicians, we distributed a survey asking them to describe sources of medical information they used most frequently while in garrison and while on deployment. Most military physicians use the Internet to access medical information every day while in garrison. The frequency and pattern of use of medical resources differs while on deployment. The most common sources of electronic medical information are general Internet search engines (Google). Open-domain sites (PubMed and MEDLINE) are more commonly used by military surgeons, while filtered secondary information sources (UptoDate, MD Consult) appear to be more commonly used by military primary care physicians. Younger physicians use electronic resources more commonly than do older physicians. Knowing what sources of medical information military physicians use to search for answers to their clinical questions can help guide allocation of medical informatics resources, particularly to deployed military physicians providing in-theater care.

  7. Informatics and the Clinical Laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Richard G; Johnson, Owen A; Batstone, Gifford

    2014-01-01

    The nature of pathology services is changing under the combined pressures of increasing workloads, cost constraints and technological advancement. In the face of this, laboratory systems need to meet new demands for data exchange with clinical electronic record systems for test requesting and results reporting. As these needs develop, new challenges are emerging especially with respect to the format and content of the datasets which are being exchanged. If the potential for the inclusion of intelligent systems in both these areas is to be realised, the continued dialogue between clinicians and laboratory information specialists is of paramount importance. Requirements of information technology (IT) in pathology, now extend well beyond the provision of purely analytical data. With the aim of achieving seamless integration of laboratory data into the total clinical pathway, ‘Informatics’ – the art and science of turning data into useful information – is becoming increasingly important in laboratory medicine. Informatics is a powerful tool in pathology – whether in implementing processes for pathology modernisation, introducing new diagnostic modalities (e.g. proteomics, genomics), providing timely and evidence-based disease management, or enabling best use of limited and often costly resources. Providing appropriate information to empowered and interested patients – which requires critical assessment of the ever-increasing volume of information available – can also benefit greatly from appropriate use of informatics in enhancing self-management of long term conditions. The increasing demands placed on pathology information systems in the context of wider developmental change in healthcare delivery are explored in this review. General trends in medical informatics are reflected in current priorities for laboratory medicine, including the need for unified electronic records, computerised order entry, data security and recovery, and audit. We conclude that

  8. Case-based medical informatics.

    PubMed

    Pantazi, Stefan V; Arocha, José F; Moehr, Jochen R

    2004-11-08

    The "applied" nature distinguishes applied sciences from theoretical sciences. To emphasize this distinction, we begin with a general, meta-level overview of the scientific endeavor. We introduce the knowledge spectrum and four interconnected modalities of knowledge. In addition to the traditional differentiation between implicit and explicit knowledge we outline the concepts of general and individual knowledge. We connect general knowledge with the "frame problem," a fundamental issue of artificial intelligence, and individual knowledge with another important paradigm of artificial intelligence, case-based reasoning, a method of individual knowledge processing that aims at solving new problems based on the solutions to similar past problems. We outline the fundamental differences between Medical Informatics and theoretical sciences and propose that Medical Informatics research should advance individual knowledge processing (case-based reasoning) and that natural language processing research is an important step towards this goal that may have ethical implications for patient-centered health medicine. We focus on fundamental aspects of decision-making, which connect human expertise with individual knowledge processing. We continue with a knowledge spectrum perspective on biomedical knowledge and conclude that case-based reasoning is the paradigm that can advance towards personalized healthcare and that can enable the education of patients and providers. We center the discussion on formal methods of knowledge representation around the frame problem. We propose a context-dependent view on the notion of "meaning" and advocate the need for case-based reasoning research and natural language processing. In the context of memory based knowledge processing, pattern recognition, comparison and analogy-making, we conclude that while humans seem to naturally support the case-based reasoning paradigm (memory of past experiences of problem-solving and powerful case matching

  9. Case-based medical informatics

    PubMed Central

    Pantazi, Stefan V; Arocha, José F; Moehr, Jochen R

    2004-01-01

    Background The "applied" nature distinguishes applied sciences from theoretical sciences. To emphasize this distinction, we begin with a general, meta-level overview of the scientific endeavor. We introduce the knowledge spectrum and four interconnected modalities of knowledge. In addition to the traditional differentiation between implicit and explicit knowledge we outline the concepts of general and individual knowledge. We connect general knowledge with the "frame problem," a fundamental issue of artificial intelligence, and individual knowledge with another important paradigm of artificial intelligence, case-based reasoning, a method of individual knowledge processing that aims at solving new problems based on the solutions to similar past problems. We outline the fundamental differences between Medical Informatics and theoretical sciences and propose that Medical Informatics research should advance individual knowledge processing (case-based reasoning) and that natural language processing research is an important step towards this goal that may have ethical implications for patient-centered health medicine. Discussion We focus on fundamental aspects of decision-making, which connect human expertise with individual knowledge processing. We continue with a knowledge spectrum perspective on biomedical knowledge and conclude that case-based reasoning is the paradigm that can advance towards personalized healthcare and that can enable the education of patients and providers. We center the discussion on formal methods of knowledge representation around the frame problem. We propose a context-dependent view on the notion of "meaning" and advocate the need for case-based reasoning research and natural language processing. In the context of memory based knowledge processing, pattern recognition, comparison and analogy-making, we conclude that while humans seem to naturally support the case-based reasoning paradigm (memory of past experiences of problem-solving and

  10. A National Agenda for Public Health Informatics

    PubMed Central

    Yasnoff, William A.; Overhage, J. Marc; Humphreys, Betsy L.; LaVenture, Martin

    2001-01-01

    The AMIA 2001 Spring Congress brought together members of the the public health and informatics communities to develop a national agenda for public health informatics. Discussions of funding and governance; architecture and infrastructure; standards and vocabulary; research, evaluation, and best practices; privacy, confidentiality, and security; and training and workforce resulted in 74 recommendations with two key themes—that all stakeholders need to be engaged in coordinated activities related to public health information architecture, standards, confidentiality, best practices, and research; and that informatics training is needed throughout the public health workforce. Implementation of this consensus agenda will help promote progress in the application of information technology to improve public health. PMID:11687561

  11. Career development initiatives in biomedical health informatics.

    PubMed

    Wagholikar, Amol

    2012-01-01

    The disciplines of biomedical engineering and health informatics complement each other. These two scientific fields sometimes strive independently to deliver better health care services. The rapid evolution in data-intensive methods has made practitioners to think about reviewing the educational needs of the biomedical health informatics workforces. This paper discusses the changing skills requirements in biomedical health informatics discipline. The author reports on the challenges faced by IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology (EMBS) in the context of continuous career development of the EMBS members. This paper discusses Queensland chapter's initiative towards an integrated career development to address challenges faced by IEEE EMBS.

  12. Gemini imidazolium surfactants: synthesis and their biophysiochemical study.

    PubMed

    Kamboj, Raman; Singh, Sukhprit; Bhadani, Avinash; Kataria, Hardeep; Kaur, Gurcharan

    2012-08-21

    New gemini imidazolium surfactants 9-13 have been synthesized by a regioselective epoxy ring-opening reaction under solvent-free conditions. The surface properties of these new gemini surfactants were evaluated by surface tension and conductivity measurements. These surfactants have been found to have low critical micelle concentration (cmc) values as compared to other categories of gemini cationic surfactants and also showed the tendency to form premicellar aggregates in solution at sufficiently low concentration below their cmc values. The thermal degradation of these surfactants was determined by thermograviometry analysis (TGA). These new cationic surfactants have a good DNA binding capability as determined by agarose gel electrophoresis and ethidium bromide exclusion experiments. They have also been found to have low cytotoxicity by MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay on the C6 glioma cell line.

  13. Polyladderane Constructed from a Gemini Monomer through Photoreaction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhihan; Miller, Benjamin; Butz, Jonathan; Randazzo, Katelyn; Wang, Zijun D; Chu, Qianli R

    2017-09-25

    Polyladderane, the first polymer to contain the ladderane functional group, was synthesized from a gemini monomer through photoreaction in the solid state. The modular design of the gemini monomers used to create polyladderane allowed specific structural modification, resulting in the formation of two distinct polymer products. Monomers were synthesized by connecting two photoreactive units, either sorbic acids (monomer I) or 2-furanacrylic acids (monomer II), with a 1,4-butanediol linker. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis of the monomers confirmed that they packed in the desired head-to-tail orientation and within a viable distance for photoreaction by electronically complementary interaction. Pre-organized gemini monomers were irradiated with UV light and monitored by FT-IR. Two polyladderanes with cis,anti,cis-[3]-ladderane as a characteristic functional group were constructed stereospecifically in 24-36 hours. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. 78 FR 70097 - Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel GEMINI; Invitation for Public...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Maritime Administration Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel GEMINI... of the vessel GEMINI is: Intended Commercial Use Of Vessel: ``S/V Gemini to be used as an Uninspected...

  15. U.S.S. Intrepid alongside Gemini 3 spacecraft after landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    The U.S.S. Intrepid pulls up alongside the Gemini 3 spacecraft during recovery operations following the successful Gemini-Titan 3 flight. Navy swimmers stand on the spacecraft's flotation collar waiting to hook a hoist line to the Gemini 3.

  16. GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-10 (BREAKFAST) - ASTRONAUT YOUNG, JOHN W. - MISC. - CAPE

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-07-18

    S66-42748 (18 July 1966) --- The Gemini-10 prime crew, astronauts John W. Young (left), command pilot, and Michael Collins, pilot, enjoy a breakfast of steak and eggs on the day of the Gemini-10 launch. The Gemini-10 liftoff was at 5:20 p.m. (EST), July 18, 1966. Photo credit: NASA

  17. Consumer Informatics in Chronic Illness

    PubMed Central

    Tetzlaff, Linda

    1997-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To explore the informatic requirements in the home care of chronically ill patients. Design: A number of strategies were deployed to help evoke a picture of home care informatics needs: A detailed questionnaire evaluating informational needs and assessing programmable technologies was distributed to a clinic population of parents of children with cancer. Open ended questionnaires were distributed to medical staff and parents soliciting a list of questions asked of medical staff. Parent procedure training was observed to evaluate the training dialog, and parents were observed interacting with a prototype information and education computer offering. Results: Parents' concerns ranged from the details of managing day to day, to conceptual information about disease and treatment, to management of psychosocial problems. They sought information to solve problems and to provide emotional support, which may create conflicts of interest when the material is threatening. Whether they preferred to be informed by a doctor, nurse, or another parent depended on the nature of the information. Live interaction was preferred to video, which was preferred to text for all topics. Respondents used existing technologies in a straightforward way but were enthusiastic about the proposed use of computer technology to support home care. Multimedia solutions appear to complement user needs and preferences. Conclusion: Consumers appear positively disposed toward on-line solutions. On-line systems can offer breadth, depth and timeliness currently unattainable. Patients should be involved in the formation and development process in much the same way that users are involved in usercentered computer interface design. A generic framework for patient content is presented that could be applied across multiple disorders. PMID:9223035

  18. Gemini 4 astronauts relax aboard Navy helicopter after recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Gemini 4 astronauts, James A. McDivitt (right), command pilot, and Edward H. White II, (left), pilot, relax aboard a U.S. Navy helicopter on their way to the aircraft carrier U.S.S. Wasp after recovery from the Gemini 4 spacecraft. They had been picked up out of the Atlantic Ocean following a successful splashdown (33532); White (left) and McDivitt listen to the voice of President Lyndon B. Johnson as he congratulated them by telephone on the successful mission. They are shown aboard the carrier U.S.S. Wasp just after their recovery (33533).

  19. Thermal emissivity analysis of a GEMINI 8-meter telescopes design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St. Clair Dinger, Ann

    1993-01-01

    The GEMINI 8-meter Telescopes Project is designing twin 8-meter telescopes to be located in Hawaii and Chile. The GEMINI telescopes will have interchangeable secondary mirrors for use in the visible and IR. The APART/PADE program is being used to evaluate the effective IR emissivity of the IR configuration plus enclosure as a function of mirror contamination at three IR wavelengths. The goal is to design a telescope whose effective IR emissivity is no more than 2 percent when the mirrors are clean.

  20. Performance of the Gemini Planet Imager's adaptive optics system.

    PubMed

    Poyneer, Lisa A; Palmer, David W; Macintosh, Bruce; Savransky, Dmitry; Sadakuni, Naru; Thomas, Sandrine; Véran, Jean-Pierre; Follette, Katherine B; Greenbaum, Alexandra Z; Ammons, S Mark; Bailey, Vanessa P; Bauman, Brian; Cardwell, Andrew; Dillon, Daren; Gavel, Donald; Hartung, Markus; Hibon, Pascale; Perrin, Marshall D; Rantakyrö, Fredrik T; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand; Wang, Jason J

    2016-01-10

    The Gemini Planet Imager's adaptive optics (AO) subsystem was designed specifically to facilitate high-contrast imaging. A definitive description of the system's algorithms and technologies as built is given. 564 AO telemetry measurements from the Gemini Planet Imager Exoplanet Survey campaign are analyzed. The modal gain optimizer tracks changes in atmospheric conditions. Science observations show that image quality can be improved with the use of both the spatially filtered wavefront sensor and linear-quadratic-Gaussian control of vibration. The error budget indicates that for all targets and atmospheric conditions AO bandwidth error is the largest term.

  1. Thermal emissivity analysis of a GEMINI 8-meter telescopes design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St. Clair Dinger, Ann

    1993-01-01

    The GEMINI 8-meter Telescopes Project is designing twin 8-meter telescopes to be located in Hawaii and Chile. The GEMINI telescopes will have interchangeable secondary mirrors for use in the visible and IR. The APART/PADE program is being used to evaluate the effective IR emissivity of the IR configuration plus enclosure as a function of mirror contamination at three IR wavelengths. The goal is to design a telescope whose effective IR emissivity is no more than 2 percent when the mirrors are clean.

  2. The Gemini Planet Imager: From Science to Design to Construction

    SciTech Connect

    Macintosh, B; Graham, J R; Palmer, D; Doyon, R; Dunn, J; Gavel, D; Larkin, J; Oppenheimer, B; Saddlemyer, L; Sivaramakrishnan, A; Wallace, J K; Bauman, B; Erickson, D; Marois, C; Poyneer, L; Soummer, R

    2008-07-01

    The Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) is a facility instrument under construction for the 8-m Gemini South telescope. It combines a 1500 subaperture AO system using a MEMS deformable mirror, an apodized-pupil Lyot coronagraph, a high-accuracy IR interferometer calibration system, and a near-infrared integral field spectrograph to allow detection and characterization of self-luminous extrasolar planets at planet/star contrast ratios of 10{sup -7}. I will discuss the evolution from science requirements through modeling to the final detailed design, provide an overview of the subsystems and show models of the instrument's predicted performance.

  3. Gemini 4 astronauts relax aboard Navy helicopter after recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Gemini 4 astronauts, James A. McDivitt (right), command pilot, and Edward H. White II, (left), pilot, relax aboard a U.S. Navy helicopter on their way to the aircraft carrier U.S.S. Wasp after recovery from the Gemini 4 spacecraft. They had been picked up out of the Atlantic Ocean following a successful splashdown (33532); White (left) and McDivitt listen to the voice of President Lyndon B. Johnson as he congratulated them by telephone on the successful mission. They are shown aboard the carrier U.S.S. Wasp just after their recovery (33533).

  4. Distributed user support and the Gemini Observatory help desk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Simon; Puxley, Phil J.

    2000-07-01

    The Gemini Observatory HelpDesk was activated early in 2000 to aid in the rapid and accurate resolution of queries concerning the Gemini telescopes and their capabilities. This system co- ordinates user support amongst staff within the Observatory and at National Offices in each partner country. The HelpDesk is based on a commercial product from Remedy Corporation that logs, tracks, forwards and escalates queries and self- generates a knowledgebase of previously asked questions. Timestamping of these events in the life cycle of a request and analysis of associated information provides valuable feedback on the static web content and performance of user support.

  5. Online cancer communities as informatics intervention for social support: conceptualization, characterization, and impact

    PubMed Central

    O’Carroll Bantum, Erin; Owen, Jason; Bakken, Suzanne; Elhadad, Noémie

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: The Internet and social media are revolutionizing how social support is exchanged and perceived, making online health communities (OHCs) one of the most exciting research areas in health informatics. This paper aims to provide a framework for organizing research of OHCs and help identify questions to explore for future informatics research. Based on the framework, we conceptualize OHCs from a social support standpoint and identify variables of interest in characterizing community members. For the sake of this tutorial, we focus our review on online cancer communities. Target audience: The primary target audience is informaticists interested in understanding ways to characterize OHCs, their members, and the impact of participation, and in creating tools to facilitate outcome research of OHCs. OHC designers and moderators are also among the target audience for this tutorial. Scope: The tutorial provides an informatics point of view of online cancer communities, with social support as their leading element. We conceptualize OHCs according to 3 major variables: type of support, source of support, and setting in which the support is exchanged. We summarize current research and synthesize the findings for 2 primary research questions on online cancer communities: (1) the impact of using online social support on an individual's health, and (2) the characteristics of the community, its members, and their interactions. We discuss ways in which future research in informatics in social support and OHCs can ultimately benefit patients. PMID:27402140

  6. Nursing informatics, outcomes, and quality improvement.

    PubMed

    Charters, Kathleen G

    2003-08-01

    Nursing informatics actively supports nursing by providing standard language systems, databases, decision support, readily accessible research results, and technology assessments. Through normalized datasets spanning an entire enterprise or other large demographic, nursing informatics tools support improvement of healthcare by answering questions about patient outcomes and quality improvement on an enterprise scale, and by providing documentation for business process definition, business process engineering, and strategic planning. Nursing informatics tools provide a way for advanced practice nurses to examine their practice and the effect of their actions on patient outcomes. Analysis of patient outcomes may lead to initiatives for quality improvement. Supported by nursing informatics tools, successful advance practice nurses leverage their quality improvement initiatives against the enterprise strategic plan to gain leadership support and resources.

  7. Biomedical informatics in Switzerland: need for action.

    PubMed

    Lovis, Christian; Blaser, Jürg

    2015-01-01

    Biomedical informatics (BMI) is an umbrella scientific field that covers many domains, as defined several years ago by the International Medical Informatics Association and the American Medical Informatics Association, two leading players in the field. For example, one of the domains of BMI is clinical informatics, which has been formally recognised as a medical subspecialty by the American Board of Medical Specialty since 2011. Most OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development) countries offer very strong curricula in the field of BMI, strong research and development funding with clear tracks and, for most of them, inclusion of BMI in the curricula of health professionals, but BMI remains only marginally recognised in Switzerland. Recent major changes, however, such as the future federal law on electronic patient records, the personalised health initiative or the growing empowerment of citizens towards their health data, are adding much weight to the need for BMI capacity-building in Switzerland.

  8. Moving toward a United States strategic plan in primary care informatics: a White Paper of the Primary Care Informatics Working Group, American Medical Informatics Association.

    PubMed

    Little, David R; Zapp, John A; Mullins, Henry C; Zuckerman, Alan E; Teasdale, Sheila; Johnson, Kevin B

    2003-01-01

    The Primary Care Informatics Working Group (PCIWG) of the American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA) has identified the absence of a national strategy for primary care informatics. Under PCIWG leadership, major national and international societies have come together to create the National Alliance for Primary Care Informatics (NAPCI), to promote a connection between the informatics community and the organisations that support primary care. The PCIWG clinical practice subcommittee has recognised the necessity of a global needs assessment, and proposed work in point-of-care technology, clinical vocabularies, and ambulatory electronic medical record development. Educational needs include a consensus statement on informatics competencies, recommendations for curriculum and teaching methods, and methodologies to evaluate their effectiveness. The research subcommittee seeks to define a primary care informatics research agenda, and to support and disseminate informatics research throughout the primary care community. The AMIA board of directors has enthusiastically endorsed the conceptual basis for this White Paper.

  9. Evolution of Trends in European Medical Informatics

    PubMed Central

    I. Mihalas, George

    2014-01-01

    This presentation attempts to analyze the trends in Medical Informatics along half a century, in the European socio-political and technological development context. Based on the major characteristics which seem dominant in some periods, a staging is proposed, with a description of each period – the context, major ideas, views and events. A summary of major features of each period is also added. This paper has an original presentation of the evolution of major trends in medical informatics. PMID:24648618

  10. Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit Informatics Software Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Theodore

    2014-01-01

    This is a description of the software design for the 2013 edition of the Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit (AEMU) Informatics computer assembly. The Informatics system is an optional part of the space suit assembly. It adds a graphical interface for displaying suit status, timelines, procedures, and caution and warning information. In the future it will display maps with GPS position data, and video and still images captured by the astronaut.

  11. Nursing Informatics Education: Latino America & Caribe.

    PubMed

    Hullin, Carol

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this panel is to share the current status of Nursing Informatics education at the national (Chile) and regional level. All the panelists are involved in different educational programs by face to face, online and small workshops. The scope is to anyone who is interested in the education in nursing informatics in Spanish, since the entire panelists participate in the design & development of educational programs from certificate, diploma, bachelor, master and PhD curriculums.

  12. *informatics: Identifying and Tracking Informatics Sub-Discipline Terms in the Literature.

    PubMed

    Chen, E S; Sarkar, I N

    2015-01-01

    To identify the breadth of informatics sub-discipline terms used in the literature for enabling subsequent organization and searching by sub-discipline. Titles in five literature sources were analyzed to extract terms for informatics sub-disciplines: 1) United States (U.S.) Library of Congress Online Catalog, 2) English Wikipedia, 3) U.S. National Library of Medicine (NLM) Catalog, 4) PubMed, and 5) PubMed Central. The extracted terms were combined and standardized with those in four vocabulary sources to create an integrated list: 1) Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH), 2) Medical Subject Headings (MeSH), 3) U.S. National Cancer Institute Thesaurus (NCIt), and 4) EMBRACE Data and Methods (EDAM). Searches for terms in titles from each literature source were conducted to obtain frequency counts and start years for characterizing established and potentially emerging sub-disciplines. Analysis of 6,949 titles from literature sources and 67 terms from vocabulary sources resulted in an integrated list of 382 terms for informatics sub-disciplines mapped to 292 preferred terms. In the last five decades, "bioinformatics", "medical informatics", "health informatics", "nursing informatics", and "biomedical informatics" were associated with the most literature. In the current decade, potentially emerging sub-disciplines include "disability informatics", "neonatal informatics", and "nanoinformatics" based on literature from the last five years. As the field of informatics continues to expand and advance, keeping up-to-date with historical and current trends will become increasingly challenging. The ability to track the accomplishments and evolution of a particular sub-discipline in the literature could be valuable for supporting informatics research, education, and training.

  13. Gemini Observatory base facility operations: systems engineering process and lessons learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serio, Andrew; Cordova, Martin; Arriagada, Gustavo; Adamson, Andy; Close, Madeline; Coulson, Dolores; Nitta, Atsuko; Nunez, Arturo

    2016-08-01

    Gemini North Observatory successfully began nighttime remote operations from the Hilo Base Facility control room in November 2015. The implementation of the Gemini North Base Facility Operations (BFO) products was a great learning experience for many of our employees, including the author of this paper, the BFO Systems Engineer. In this paper we focus on the tailored Systems Engineering processes used for the project, the various software tools used in project support, and finally discuss the lessons learned from the Gemini North implementation. This experience and the lessons learned will be used both to aid our implementation of the Gemini South BFO in 2016, and in future technical projects at Gemini Observatory.

  14. Skills and knowledge of informatics, and training needs of hospital pharmacists in Thailand: A self-assessment survey.

    PubMed

    Chonsilapawit, Teeraporn; Rungpragayphan, Suang

    2016-10-01

    Because hospital pharmacists have to deal with large amounts of health information and advanced information technology in practice, they must possess adequate skills and knowledge of informatics to operate efficiently. However, most current pharmacy curricula in Thailand barely address the principles and skills concerned with informatics, and Thai pharmacists usually acquire computer literacy and informatics skills through personal-interest training and self-study. In this study, we aimed to assess the skills and knowledge of informatics and the training needs of hospital pharmacists in Thailand, in order to improve curricular and professional development. A self-assessment postal survey of 73 questions was developed and distributed to the pharmacy departments of 601 hospitals throughout the country. Practicing hospital pharmacists were requested to complete and return the survey voluntarily. Within the 3 months of the survey period, a total of 805 out of 2002 surveys were returned. On average, respondents rated themselves as competent or better in the skills of basic computer operation, the Internet, information management, and communication. Understandably, they rated themselves at novice level for information technology and database design knowledge/skills, and at advanced beginner level for project, risk, and change management skills. Respondents believed that skills and knowledge of informatics were highly necessary for their work, and definitely needed training. Thai hospital pharmacists were confident in using computers and the Internet. They realized and appreciated their lack of informatics knowledge and skills, and needed more training. Pharmacy curricula and training should be developed accordingly. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Antibacterial activity and characteristics of modified ferrite powder coated with a gemini pyridinium salt molecule.

    PubMed

    Shirai, Akihiro; Maeda, Takuya; Ohkita, Motoaki; Nagamune, Hideaki; Kourai, Hiroki

    2007-09-01

    This report describes the synthesis of an antibacterial material consisting of a gemini quaternary ammonium salt (gemini-QUAT) immobilized on ferrite powder, and its antibacterial activity. A gemini-QUAT containing two pyridinium residues per molecule, 4,4'-[1,3-(2,2-dihydroxylmethyl-1,3-dithiapropane)]bis (1-octylpyridinium bromide), was immobilized on ferrite powder by a reaction between the hydroxyl group of the QUAT and trimethoxysilane. Immobilization of the gemini-QUAT on ferrite (F-gemini-QUAT) was confirmed when the dye, bromophenol blue, was released from F-gemini-QUAT-dye after contact between ferrite and the dye. Elemental analysis of the QUAT-ferrite determined the molar amount of QUAT on the ferrite. The antibacterial effect of the ferrite was investigated using a batch treatment system, and this effect was compared with that of another QUAT-ferrite (F-mono-QUAT) binding a mono-QUAT, which possesses one pyridinium residue, prepared by the same immobilization method as F-gemini-QUAT. Results indicated the F-gemini QUAT possessed a higher bactericidal potency and broader antibacterial spectrum compared to F-mono-QUAT. In addition, this study suggested that gemini-QUATs possessed high bactericidal potency without being influenced by immobilization to materials, and the antibacterial activity and characteristics of F-gemini-QUAT could be attributed to the unique structure of the immobilized gemini-QUAT.

  16. A novel type of highly effective nonionic gemini alkyl O-glucoside surfactants: a versatile strategy of design.

    PubMed

    Liu, Songbai; Sang, Ruocheng; Hong, Shan; Cai, Yujing; Wang, Hua

    2013-07-09

    A novel type of highly effective gemini alkyl glucosides has been rationally designed and synthesized. The gemini surfactants have been readily prepared by glycosylation of the gemini alkyl chains that are synthesized with regioselective ring-opening of ethylene glycol epoxides by the alkyl alcohols. The new gemini alkyl glucosides exhibit significantly better surface activity than the known results. Then rheological, DLS, and TEM studies have revealed the intriguing self-assembly behavior of the novel gemini surfactants. This study has proved the effectiveness of the design of gemini alkyl glucosides which is modular, extendable, and synthetically simple. The new gemini surfactants have great potential as nano carriers in drug and gene delivery.

  17. Classification of 3 DES supernovae by Gemini-North

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Y.-C.; Foley, R. J.; Maartens, R.; Gupta, R.; Kovacs, E.; Kuhlmann, S.; Spinka, H.; Ahn, E.; Finley, D. A.; Frieman, J.; Marriner, J.; Wester, W.; Aldering, G.; Kim, A. G.; Thomas, R. C.; Barbary, K.; Bloom, J. S.; Goldstein, D.; Nugent, P.; Perlmutter, S.; Casas, R.; Castander, F. J.; Desai, S.; Paech, K.; Smith, R. C.; Schubnell, M.; Kessler, R.; Lasker, J.; Scolnic, D.; Brout, D. J.; Gladney, L.; Sako, M.; Wolf, R. C.; Brown, P. J.; Krisciunas, K.; Suntzeff, N.; Nichol, R.; Papadopoulos, A.; Childress, M.; D'Andrea, C.; Smith, M.; Sullivan, M.

    2015-11-01

    We report optical spectroscopy of 3 supernovae discovered by the Dark Energy Survey. The spectra (380-820nm) were obtained using GMOS on Gemini-North. Object classification was performed using SNID (Blondin & Tonry, 2007, ApJ, 666, 1024) and superfit (Howell et al, 2005, ApJ, 634, 119), the details of which are reported in the table below.

  18. Gemini 12 crew arrives aboard U.S.S. Wasp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    A happy Gemini 12 prime crew arrives aboard the aircraft carrier, U.S.S. Wasp. Astronauts James A. Lovell Jr. (left), command pilot, and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., pilot, had just been picked up from the splashdown area by helicopter.

  19. Gemini-Titan (GT)-6 - Breakfast - Prime Crew - Cape

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-10-25

    S65-56159 (15 Dec. 1965) --- Astronauts Walter M. Schirra Jr. (left), command pilot, and Thomas P. Stafford, pilot, look at a cartoon presented to them by the other astronauts on the morning of the scheduled Gemini-6 launch. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  20. Astronaut David Scott practicing for Gemini 8 EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Astronaut David R. Scott practicing for Gemini 8 extravehicular acitivity (EVA) in bldg 4 of the Manned Spacecraft Center on the air bearing floor. He is wearing the the Hand-Held Maneuvering Unit which he will use during the EVA.

  1. GEMINI-7 - EARTH-SKY VIEW - LIMB - OUTER SPACE

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-12-07

    S65-65257 (4-18 Dec. 1965) --- Sunrise and Earth's limb, as photographed by astronauts Frank Borman and James A. Lovell Jr. during their Earth-orbital 14-day mission in the Gemini-7 (GT-7) spacecraft. Photo credit: NASA

  2. View of food packets for the Gemini 7 space flight

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-12-10

    S65-61653 (1 Dec. 1965) --- Complete food supply for the two-man crew of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Gemini-7 spaceflight as it appears prior to stowage in the spacecraft. The food packages are tied in sequence for 28-manned days or a complete supply for two men for a 14-day mission. Photo credit: NASA

  3. GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-10 - EARTH - SKY - OUTER SPACE

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-07-01

    S66-45951 (18-21 July 1966) --- China, Fukien and Kwangtung provinces, Formosa Strait, Pescadores Island, Quemoy Island, as seen from the Gemini-10 spacecraft. Taken with a J.A. Maurer 70mm camera, using Eastman Kodak, Ektachrome, MS (S.O. 217) color film. Photo credit: NASA

  4. Gemini 8 crew stands on deck of recovery vessel

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-03-17

    S66-18609 (17 March 1966) --- Astronauts David R. Scott (left), Gemini-8 pilot, and Neil A. Armstrong, command pilot, stand on the deck of the destroyer USS Leonard F. Mason upon its arrival at Nahs, Okinawa. Photo credit: NASA

  5. View of the Gemini-Titan 4 spacecraft launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-06-03

    S65-29639 (3 June 1965) --- The Gemini-Titan 4 (GT-4) spaceflight launches from Cape Kennedy's Pad 19 at 10:16 a.m. (EST) on June 3, 1965. The GT-4 spacecraft carried astronauts James A. McDivitt, command pilot, and Edward H. White II, pilot, on a four-day, 62-revolution mission.

  6. GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-10 - EARTH - SKY - MOROCCO, SPAIN, PORTUGAL

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-07-18

    S66-46044 (18-21 July 1966) --- Straits of Gibraltar and Spain ? Portugal (left), Morocco (right), Atlantic Ocean (foreground), and unique vortex, as seen from the Gemini-10 spacecraft. Taken with J.A. Maurer 70mm camera, using Eastman Kodak, Ektachrome, MS (S.O. 217) color film. Photo credit: NASA

  7. GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-11 - EARTH SKY - OUTER SPACE

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-09-14

    S66-54643 (14 Sept. 1966) --- Western half of Australia, including the coastline from Perth to Port Darwin, looking west, as seen from the Gemini-11 spacecraft at a record-high apogee of 740 nautical miles during its 26th revolution of Earth. Photo credit: NASA

  8. GEMINI-6 - EARTH-SKY - ETHIOPIA - OUTER SPACE

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-12-16

    S65-63162 (16 Dec. 1965) --- Central area of Ethiopia, south of Addis Ababa, showing Lakes Zwai, Langana, and Shala, as seen from the Gemini-6 spacecraft during its 14th revolution of Earth. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  9. Gemini 10 prime crew participate in Simultaneous Launch Demonstration

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-07-12

    S66-42702 (12 July 1966) --- Gemini-10 prime crew, astronauts John W. Young (left), command pilot, and Michael Collins (right), pilot, check equipment in the White Room atop Pad 19 where they participated in a Simultaneous Launch Demonstration. Photo credit: NASA

  10. Agena Target Docking vehicle seen from Gemini 8 spacecraft

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-03-16

    S66-25774 (16 March 1966) --- The Agena Target Docking vehicle seen from the Gemini-8 spacecraft during rendezvous in space. The Agena is approximately 1,000 feet away from the nose of the spacecraft (lower left). Photo credit: NASA

  11. Gemini Series Experiment Data Reduction and Storage Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    R. A. Berglin

    2011-11-01

    The presentation covers data formats expected from Gemini experiments; data quick look vs. in-depth analysis; iPDV object-oriented data storage; iPDV's traceability of analysis results; optimizing object memory usage in iPDV; and long-term archival of data objects by iPDV.

  12. Designing Scalable PGAS Communication Subsystems on Cray Gemini Interconnect

    SciTech Connect

    Vishnu, Abhinav; Daily, Jeffrey A.; Palmer, Bruce J.

    2012-12-26

    The Cray Gemini Interconnect has been recently introduced as a next generation network architecture for building multi-petaflop supercomputers. Cray XE6 systems including LANL Cielo, NERSC Hopper, ORNL Titan and proposed NCSA BlueWaters leverage the Gemini Interconnect as their primary Interconnection network. At the same time, programming models such as the Message Passing Interface (MPI) and Partitioned Global Address Space (PGAS) models such as Unified Parallel C (UPC) and Co-Array Fortran (CAF) have become available on these systems. Global Arrays is a popular PGAS model used in a variety of application domains including hydrodynamics, chemistry and visualization. Global Arrays uses Aggregate Re- mote Memory Copy Interface (ARMCI) as the communication runtime system for Remote Memory Access communication. This paper presents a design, implementation and performance evaluation of scalable and high performance communication subsystems on Cray Gemini Interconnect using ARMCI. The design space is explored and time-space complexities of commu- nication protocols for one-sided communication primitives such as contiguous and uniformly non-contiguous datatypes, atomic memory operations (AMOs) and memory synchronization is presented. An implementation of the proposed design (referred as ARMCI-Gemini) demonstrates the efficacy on communication primitives, application kernels such as LU decomposition and full applications such as Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) application.

  13. Illustration of relative sizes of Mercury, Gemini and Apollo spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Artist concept illustrating the relative sizes of the one-man Mercury spacecraft, the two-man Gemini spacecraft, and the three-man Apollo spacecraft. Also shows line drawing of launch vehichles to show their relative size in relation to each other.

  14. Gemini photographs of the world: A complete index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giddings, L. E.

    1977-01-01

    The most authoritative catalogs of photographs of all Gemini missions are assembled. Included for all photographs are JSC (Johnson Space Center) identification number, percent cloud cover, geographical area in sight, and miscellaneous information. In addition, details are given on cameras, filters, films, and other technical details.

  15. Indonesian Islands as seen from Gemini 11 spacecraft

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-09-14

    S66-54692 (14 Sept. 1966) --- Indonesian Islands (partial cloud cover): Sumatra, Java, Bali, Borneo, and Sumbawa, as photographed from the Gemini-11 spacecraft during its 26th revolution of Earth, at an altitude of 570 nautical miles. Photo credit: NASA

  16. GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-4 - EARTH-SKY - OUTER SPACE

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-06-03

    S65-34776 (3-7 June 1965) --- This photograph shows the Nile Delta, Egypt, the Suez Canal, Israel, Jordan, Syria, Saudi Arabia, and Iraq as seen from the Gemini-Titan 4 (GT-4) spacecraft during its 12th revolution of Earth.

  17. Gemini high-resolution optical spectrograph conceptual design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szeto, Kei; McConnachie, Alan; Anthony, André; Bohlender, David; Crampton, David; Desaulniers, Pierre; Dunn, Jennifer; Hardy, Tim; Hill, Alexis; Monin, Dmitry; Pazder, John; Schwab, Christian; Spano, Paola; Starkenburg, Else; Thibault, Simon; Walker, Gordon; Venn, Kim; Zhang, Hu

    2012-09-01

    A multiplexed moderate resolution (R = 34,000) and a single object high resolution (R = 90,000) spectroscopic facility for the entire 340 - 950nm wavelength region has been designed for Gemini. The result is a high throughput, versatile instrument that will enable precision spectroscopy for decades to come. The extended wavelength coverage for these relatively high spectral resolutions is achieved by use of an Echelle grating with VPH cross-dispersers and for the R = 90,000 mode utilization of an image slicer. The design incorporates a fast, efficient, reliable system for acquiring targets over the7 arcmin field of Gemini. This paper outlines the science case development and requirements flow-down process that leads to the configuration of the HIA instrument and describes the overall GHOS conceptual design. In addition, this paper discusses design trades examined during the conceptual design study instrument group of the Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics has been commissioned by the Gemini Observatory as one of the three competing organizations to conduct a conceptual design study for a new Gemini High-Resolution Optical Spectrograph (GHOS). This paper outlines the science case development and requirements flow-down process that leads to the configuration of the HIA instrument and describes the overall GHOS conceptual design. In addition, this paper discusses design trades examined during the conceptual design study.

  18. Remote Operations of Laser Guide Star Systems: Gemini Observatory.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oram, Richard J.; Fesquet, Vincent; Wyman, Robert; D'Orgeville, Celine

    2011-03-01

    The Gemini North telescope, equipped with a 14W laser, has been providing Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics (LGS AO) regular science queue observations for worldwide astronomers since February 2007. The new 55W laser system for MCAO was installed on the Gemini South telescope in May 2010. In this paper, we comment on how Gemini Observatory developed regular remote operation of the Laser Guide Star Facility and high-power solid-state laser as routine normal operations. Fully remote operation of the LGSF from the Hilo base facility HBF was initially trialed and then optimized and became the standard operating procedure (SOP) for LGS operation in December 2008. From an engineering perspective remote operation demands stable, well characterized and base-lined equipment sets. In the effort to produce consistent, stable and controlled laser parameters (power, wavelength and beam quality) we completed a failure mode effect analysis of the laser system and sub systems that initiated a campaign of hardware upgrades and procedural improvements to the routine maintenance operations. Finally, we provide an overview of normal operation procedures during LGS runs and present a snapshot of data accumulated over several years that describes the overall LGS AO observing efficiency at the Gemini North telescope.

  19. Overhead view of the Gemini spacecraft during final inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    McDonnell Aircraft Corp, technicians can be seen making final adjustments and inspection prior to leaving the white room atop the Titan launch vehicle at Pad 19, Cape Kennedy. The Gemini-Titan 3 spacecraft is being prepared for launch.

  20. TRAINING - GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-11 - WATER EGRESS - GULF

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-07-13

    S66-44511 (13 July 1966) --- The Gemini-11 prime crew, astronauts Richard F. Gordon Jr. (left), pilot, and Charles Conrad Jr., command pilot, relax on deck of the NASA Motor Vessel Retriever after suiting up for water egress training in the Gulf of Mexico. Photo credit: NASA

  1. Gemini 12 crew arrives aboard U.S.S. Wasp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    A happy Gemini 12 prime crew arrives aboard the aircraft carrier, U.S.S. Wasp. Astronauts James A. Lovell Jr. (left), command pilot, and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., pilot, had just been picked up from the splashdown area by helicopter.

  2. GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-4 - EARTH-SKY - OUTER SPACE

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-06-01

    S65-34670 (3-7 June 1965) --- Richat crater in northwest Africa taken from the Gemini-4 spacecraft. Photograph was taken with a modified 70mm Hasselblad camera, using Eastman color film, ASA 64, at a lens setting of 250th of a second at f/11.

  3. GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-9 TEST - TRAINING - GULF OF MEXICO

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-05-20

    S65-22656 (14 April 1965) --- The Gemini-Titan 4 prime crew, astronauts Edward H. White II (left), pilot, and James A. McDivitt, command pilot, pictured aboard the NASA Motor Vessel Retriever in the Gulf of Mexico.

  4. Characterizing the vibration environments of the Gemini telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayward, T. L.; Rippa, M.; Bonnet, H.; Cavedoni, C.; Galvez, R.; Gausachs, G.; Cho, M.

    2016-07-01

    We report the results of a multi-year program to measure the vibration characteristics of the two Gemini telescopes. Measurements with fast-guiding wavefront sensors and networks of accelerometers show a correlation between image motion and optical vibrations induced mostly by instrument cryocoolers. We have mitigated the strongest vibrations by fast-guiding compensation and active cancellation of vibration sources.

  5. Gemini-Titan (GT)-4 Foods - Documentary Use

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-01-07

    S65-10971 (March 1965 ) --- Food packets for use on the Gemini-3 flight including dehydrated beef pot roast, bacon and egg bites, toasted bread cubes, orange juice and a wet wipe. Water is being inserted into the pouch of dehydrated food.

  6. Illustration of relative sizes of Mercury, Gemini and Apollo spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Artist concept illustrating the relative sizes of the one-man Mercury spacecraft, the two-man Gemini spacecraft, and the three-man Apollo spacecraft. Also shows line drawing of launch vehichles to show their relative size in relation to each other.

  7. MISSION CONTROL CENTER (MCC) ACTIVITY - GEMINI-12 SPLASHDOWN - MSC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-11-15

    S66-64884 (15 Nov. 1966) --- Watching console activity in the Mission Control Center in Houston during the Gemini-12 splashdown (left to right), are Dr. Charles A. Berry, Director of Medical Research and Operations; astronaut John H. Glenn Jr.; James C. Elms, Director, NASA Electronics Research Center; and Dr. Robert R. Gilruth, Manned Spaceflight Center (MSC) Director. Photo credit: NASA

  8. GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-3 - RECOVERY (HELICOPTER) - ATLANTIC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-03-23

    S65-19229 (23 March 1965) --- The Gemini-Titan 3 spacecraft is shown in the water after the March 23rd four-hour and 53-minute flight. Two helicopters from the recovery ship, the USS Intrepid, hover over the scene for the pickup of the astronauts.

  9. Astronaut David Scott practicing for Gemini 8 EVA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-02-01

    S66-19284 (1 Feb. 1966) --- Astronaut David R. Scott practicing for Gemini-8 extravehicular activity (EVA) in building 4 of the Manned Spacecraft Center on the air bearing floor. He is wearing the Hand-Held Maneuvering Unit which he will use during the EVA. Photo credit: NASA

  10. Pathology Informatics Essentials for Residents: A Flexible Informatics Curriculum Linked to Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Milestones.

    PubMed

    Henricks, Walter H; Karcher, Donald S; Harrison, James H; Sinard, John H; Riben, Michael W; Boyer, Philip J; Plath, Sue; Thompson, Arlene; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2017-01-01

    -Recognition of the importance of informatics to the practice of pathology has surged. Training residents in pathology informatics has been a daunting task for most residency programs in the United States because faculty often lacks experience and training resources. Nevertheless, developing resident competence in informatics is essential for the future of pathology as a specialty. -To develop and deliver a pathology informatics curriculum and instructional framework that guides pathology residency programs in training residents in critical pathology informatics knowledge and skills, and meets Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Informatics Milestones. -The College of American Pathologists, Association of Pathology Chairs, and Association for Pathology Informatics formed a partnership and expert work group to identify critical pathology informatics training outcomes and to create a highly adaptable curriculum and instructional approach, supported by a multiyear change management strategy. -Pathology Informatics Essentials for Residents (PIER) is a rigorous approach for educating all pathology residents in important pathology informatics knowledge and skills. PIER includes an instructional resource guide and toolkit for incorporating informatics training into residency programs that vary in needs, size, settings, and resources. PIER is available at http://www.apcprods.org/PIER (accessed April 6, 2016). -PIER is an important contribution to informatics training in pathology residency programs. PIER introduces pathology trainees to broadly useful informatics concepts and tools that are relevant to practice. PIER provides residency program directors with a means to implement a standardized informatics training curriculum, to adapt the approach to local program needs, and to evaluate resident performance and progress over time.

  11. Biomedical informatics: we are what we publish.

    PubMed

    Elkin, P L; Brown, S H; Wright, G

    2013-01-01

    This article is part of a For-Discussion-Section of Methods of Information in Medicine on "Biomedical Informatics: We are what we publish". It is introduced by an editorial and followed by a commentary paper with invited comments. In subsequent issues the discussion may continue through letters to the editor. Informatics experts have attempted to define the field via consensus projects which has led to consensus statements by both AMIA. and by IMIA. We add to the output of this process the results of a study of the Pubmed publications with abstracts from the field of Biomedical Informatics. We took the terms from the AMIA consensus document and the terms from the IMIA definitions of the field of Biomedical Informatics and combined them through human review to create the Health Informatics Ontology. We built a terminology server using the Intelligent Natural Language Processor (iNLP). Then we downloaded the entire set of articles in Medline identified by searching the literature by "Medical Informatics" OR "Bioinformatics". The articles were parsed by the joint AMIA / IMIA terminology and then again using SNOMED CT and for the Bioinformatics they were also parsed using HGNC Ontology. We identified 153,580 articles using "Medical Informatics" and 20,573 articles using "Bioinformatics". This resulted in 168,298 unique articles and an overlap of 5,855 articles. Of these 62,244 articles (37%) had titles and abstracts that contained at least one concept from the Health Informatics Ontology. SNOMED CT indexing showed that the field interacts with most all clinical fields of medicine. Further defining the field by what we publish can add value to the consensus driven processes that have been the mainstay of the efforts to date. Next steps should be to extract terms from the literature that are uncovered and create class hierarchies and relationships for this content. We should also examine the high occurring of MeSH terms as markers to define Biomedical Informatics

  12. Digital Libraries and Recent Medical Informatics Research. Findings from the IMIA Yearbook of Medical Informatics 2001.

    PubMed

    Ammenwerth, E; Knaup, P; Maier, C; Mludek, V; Singer, R; Skonetzki, S; Wolff, A C; Haux, R; Kulikowski, C

    2001-05-01

    The Yearbook of Medical Informatics is published annually by the International Medical Informatics Association (IMIA) and contains a selection of recent excellent papers on medical informatics research (http://www.med.uni-heidelberg.de/mi/yearbook/index.htm). The special topic of the just published Yearbook 2001 is "Digital Libraries and Medicine". Digital libraries have changed dramatically and will continue to change the way we work with medical knowledge. The selected papers present recent research and new results on digital libraries. As usual, the Yearbook 2001 also contains a variety of papers on other subjects relevant to medical informatics, such as Electronic Patient Records, Health Information Systems, Health and Clinical Management, Decision Support Systems, Education, as well as Image and Signal Processing. This paper will briefly introduce the contributions covering digital libraries and will show how medical informatics research contributes to this important topic.

  13. Novel fluorinated gemini surfactants with γ-butyrolactone segments.

    PubMed

    Kawase, Tokuzo; Okada, Kazuyuki; Oida, Tatsuo

    2015-01-01

    In this work, novel γ-butyrolactone-type monomeric and dimeric (gemini) surfactants with a semifluoroalkyl group [Rf- (CH2)3-; Rf = C4F9, C6F13, C8F17] as the hydrophobic group were successfully synthesized. Dimethyl malonate was dimerized or connected using Br(CH2)sBr (s = 0, 1, 2, 3) to give tetraesters, and they were bis-allylated. Radical addition of fluoroalkyl using Rf-I and an initiator, i.e., 2,2'-azobisisobutyronitrile for C4F9 or di-t-butyl peroxide for C6F13 and C8F17, was perform at high temperature, with prolonged heating, to obtain bis(semifluoroalkyl)-dilactone diesters. These dilactone diesters were hydrolyzed using KOH/EtOH followed by decarboxylation in AcOH to afford γ-butyrolactonetype gemini surfactants. Common 1 + 1 semifluoroalkyl lactone surfactants were synthesized using the same method. Their surfactant properties [critical micelle concentration (CMC), γCMC, pC20, ΓCMC, and AG] were investigated by measuring the surface tension of the γ-hydroxybutyrate form prepared in aqueous tetrabutylammonium hydroxide solution. As expected, the CMC values of the gemini surfactants were more than one order of magnitude smaller than those of the corresponding 1 + 1 surfactants. Other properties also showed the excellent ability of the gemini structure to reduce the surface tension. These surfactants were easily and quantitatively recovered by acidification. The monomeric surfactant was recovered in the γ-hydroxybutyric acid form, and the gemini surfactant as a mixture of γ-butyrolactone and γ-hydroxybutyric acid forms.

  14. X-Informatics: Practical Semantic Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borne, K. D.

    2009-12-01

    The discipline of data science is merging with multiple science disciplines to form new X-informatics research disciplines. They are almost too numerous to name, but they include geoinformatics, bioinformatics, cheminformatics, biodiversity informatics, ecoinformatics, materials informatics, and the emerging discipline of astroinformatics. Within any X-informatics discipline, the information granules are unique to that discipline -- e.g., gene sequences in bio, the sky object in astro, and the spatial object in geo (such as points, lines, and polygons in the vector model, and pixels in the raster model). Nevertheless the goals are similar: transparent data re-use across subdisciplines and within education settings, information and data integration and fusion, personalization of user interactions with the data collection, semantic search and retrieval, and knowledge discovery. The implementation of an X-informatics framework enables these semantic e-science research goals. We describe the concepts, challenges, and new developments associated with the new discipline of astroinformatics, and how geoinformatics provides valuable lessons learned and a model for practical semantic science within a traditional science discipline through the accretion of data science methodologies (such as formal metadata creation, data models, data mining, information retrieval, knowledge engineering, provenance, taxonomies, and ontologies). The emerging concept of data-as-a-service (DaaS) builds upon the concept of smart data (or data DNA) for intelligent data management, automated workflows, and intelligent processing. Smart data, defined through X-informatics, enables several practical semantic science use cases, including self-discovery, data intelligence, automatic recommendations, relevance analysis, dimension reduction, feature selection, constraint-based mining, interdisciplinary data re-use, knowledge-sharing, data use in education, and more. We describe these concepts within the

  15. A Paradigm for Space Science Informatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borne, K. D.; Eastman, T. E.

    2006-05-01

    Informatics can be defined as the discipline of structuring, storing, accessing, and distributing information describing complex systems. In the fields of Bioinformatics and Geoinformatics, specific tools have been developed through wide community requirements analysis and consensus. In Geoinformatics, the GIS toolset is nearly universal. In Bioinformatics, tools such as BLAST and FASTA are commonly used. One of the key enablers of these science research and analysis systems is a nearly universal acceptance (hence, standardization) of the basic data unit in each field. In Bioinformatics, the gene sequence is the basic data unit. In GIS, the basic unit is gridded data consisting of points, vectors, and polygons. We believe that the time has come for a robust Space Science Informatics field of research, parallel to that of Bioinformatics in the fields of Biology and Medicine, and to that of Geoinformatics in the fields of Geography and Earth Science. In particular, we are investigating the specific case of Astroinformatics as a new paradigm for science research in Astronomy. Any Space Science Informatics discipline must include common methods and standards for spatio-temporal data, metadata, taxonomies, ontologies, data structures, data integration, data cleansing and preparation, data transmission and handling, and more. The need for informatics is driven and motivated by the flood of data coming now and the avalanche of data coming soon within all of our science disciplines. The two traditional approaches to science research (experiment and theory) are making room now for this third stream of research - informatics - which is data-driven and information-centric. We discuss the modalities of space science data that form the basis of informatics: raster (images), spectroscopic, time series, distribution functions, and catalogs. We then discuss specific concepts for Astroinformatics. Finally, we present our emerging view of how a field of Space Science Informatics

  16. Gemini Planet Imager: Preliminary Design Report

    SciTech Connect

    Macintosh, B

    2007-05-10

    For the first time in history, direct and indirect detection techniques have enabled the exploration of the environments of nearby stars on scales comparable to the size of our solar system. Precision Doppler measurements have led to the discovery of the first extrasolar planets, while high-contrast imaging has revealed new classes of objects including dusty circumstellar debris disks and brown dwarfs. The ability to recover spectrophotometry for a handful of transiting exoplanets through secondary-eclipse measurements has allowed us to begin to study exoplanets as individual entities rather than points on a mass/semi-major-axis diagram and led to new models of planetary atmospheres and interiors, even though such measurements are only available at low SNR and for a handful of planets that are automatically those most modified by their parent star. These discoveries have galvanized public interest in science and technology and have led to profound new insights into the formation and evolution of planetary systems, and they have set the stage for the next steps--direct detection and characterization of extrasolar Jovian planets with instruments such as the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI). As discussed in Volume 1, the ability to directly detect Jovian planets opens up new regions of extrasolar planet phase space that in turn will inform our understanding of the processes through which these systems form, while near-IR spectra will advance our understanding of planetary physics. Studies of circumstellar debris disks using GPI's polarimetric mode will trace the presence of otherwise-invisible low-mass planets and measure the build-up and destruction of planetesimals. To accomplish the science mission of GPI will require a dedicated instrument capable of achieving contrast of 10{sup -7} or more. This is vastly better than that delivered by existing astronomical AO systems. Currently achievable contrast, about 10{sup -5} at separations of 1 arc second or larger, is

  17. [Informatics in the Croatian health care system].

    PubMed

    Kern, Josipa; Strnad, Marija

    2005-01-01

    Informatization process of the Croatian health care system started relatively early. Computer processing of data of persons not covered by health insurance started in 1968 in Zagreb. Remetinec Health Center served as a model of computer data processing (CDP) in primary health care and Sveti Duh General Hospital in inpatient CDP, whereas hospital administration and health service were first introduced to Zagreb University Hospital Center and Sestre Milosrdnice University Hospital. At Varazdin Medical Center CDP for health care services started in 1970. Several registries of chronic diseases have been established: cancer, psychosis, alcoholism, and hospital registries as well as pilot registries of lung tuberculosis patients and diabetics. Health statistics reports on healthcare services, work accidents and sick-leaves as well as on hospital mortality started to be produced by CDP in 1977. Besides alphanumeric data, the modern information technology (IT) can give digital images and signals. Communication in health care system demands a standardized format of all information, especially for telemedicine. In 2000, Technical Committee for Standardization in Medical Informatics was founded in Croatia, in order to monitor the activities of the International Standardization Organization (ISO) and Comite Européen de Normalisation (CEN), and to implement their international standards in the Croatian standardization procedure. The HL7 Croatia has also been founded to monitor developments in the communication standard HL7. So far, the Republic of Croatia has a number of acts regulating informatization in general and consequently the informatization of the health care system (Act on Personal Data Confidentiality, Act on Digital Signature, Act of Standardization) enacted. The ethical aspect of data security and data protection has been covered by the Code of Ethics for medical informaticians. It has been established by the International Medical Informatics Association (IMIA

  18. Medical Informatics Education & Research in Greece

    PubMed Central

    Chouvarda, I.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objectives This paper aims to present an overview of the medical informatics landscape in Greece, to describe the Greek ehealth background and to highlight the main education and research axes in medical informatics, along with activities, achievements and pitfalls. Methods With respect to research and education, formal and informal sources were investigated and information was collected and presented in a qualitative manner, including also quantitative indicators when possible. Results Greece has adopted and applied medical informatics education in various ways, including undergraduate courses in health sciences schools as well as multidisciplinary postgraduate courses. There is a continuous research effort, and large participation in EU-wide initiatives, in all the spectrum of medical informatics research, with notable scientific contributions, although technology maturation is not without barriers. Wide-scale deployment of eHealth is anticipated in the healthcare system in the near future. While ePrescription deployment has been an important step, ICT for integrated care and telehealth have a lot of room for further deployment. Conclusions Greece is a valuable contributor in the European medical informatics arena, and has the potential to offer more as long as the barriers of research and innovation fragmentation are addressed and alleviated. PMID:26123910

  19. Chapter 17: bioimage informatics for systems pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Li, Fuhai; Yin, Zheng; Jin, Guangxu; Zhao, Hong; Wong, Stephen T C

    2013-04-01

    Recent advances in automated high-resolution fluorescence microscopy and robotic handling have made the systematic and cost effective study of diverse morphological changes within a large population of cells possible under a variety of perturbations, e.g., drugs, compounds, metal catalysts, RNA interference (RNAi). Cell population-based studies deviate from conventional microscopy studies on a few cells, and could provide stronger statistical power for drawing experimental observations and conclusions. However, it is challenging to manually extract and quantify phenotypic changes from the large amounts of complex image data generated. Thus, bioimage informatics approaches are needed to rapidly and objectively quantify and analyze the image data. This paper provides an overview of the bioimage informatics challenges and approaches in image-based studies for drug and target discovery. The concepts and capabilities of image-based screening are first illustrated by a few practical examples investigating different kinds of phenotypic changes caEditorsused by drugs, compounds, or RNAi. The bioimage analysis approaches, including object detection, segmentation, and tracking, are then described. Subsequently, the quantitative features, phenotype identification, and multidimensional profile analysis for profiling the effects of drugs and targets are summarized. Moreover, a number of publicly available software packages for bioimage informatics are listed for further reference. It is expected that this review will help readers, including those without bioimage informatics expertise, understand the capabilities, approaches, and tools of bioimage informatics and apply them to advance their own studies.

  20. Informatics at the National Institues of Health

    PubMed Central

    Hendee, William R.

    1999-01-01

    Biomedical informatics, imaging, and engineering are major forces driving the knowledge revolutions that are shaping the agendas for biomedical research and clinical medicine in the 21st century. These disciplines produce the tools and techniques to advance biomedical research, and continually feed new technologies and procedures into clinical medicine. To sustain this force, an increased investment is needed in the physics, biomedical science, engineering, mathematics, information science, and computer science undergirding biomedical informatics, engineering, and imaging. This investment should be made primarily through the National Institutes of Health (NIH). However, the NIH is not structured to support such disciplines as biomedical informatics, engineering, and imaging that cross boundaries between disease- and organ-oriented institutes. The solution to this dilemma is the creation of a new institute or center at the NIH devoted to biomedical imaging, engineering, and informatics. Bills are being introduced into the 106th Congress to authorize such an entity. The pathway is long and arduous, from the introduction of bills in the House and Senate to the realization of new opportunities for biomedical informatics, engineering, and imaging at the NIH. There are many opportunities for medical informaticians to contribute to this realization. PMID:10428000

  1. The experience of informatics nurses in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chia-Hui; Lee, Ting-Ting; Mills, Mary Etta

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent progress in information technology, health care institutions are constantly confronted with the need to adapt to the resulting new processes of information management and use. Facilitating an effective technology implementation requires dedication from informatics nurses (INs) to bridge the gap between clinical care and technology. The purpose of this study was to explore the working experiences of INs, and alternatives to assist the growth and development of the specialty. This qualitative study recruited 8 participants, and data were collected in 2009 by use of interview guides related to work roles, responsibilities, competencies, and challenges. The emerged themes included (a) diversified roles and functions, (b) vague job description, (c) no decision-making authority, (d) indispensable management support, and (e) searching resources for work fulfillment. Findings indicate that for organizations where nursing informatics development is ongoing, the IN role should be clearly defined as a specialist with identified support resources and decision-making authority. Nursing informatics interest groups should further develop training and certification programs to validate the professional image of the role. Concepts of nursing informatics should be included seamlessly throughout the educational curricula and informatics competency-based courses designed to strengthen student's technology use and data management capabilities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Military Research Needs in Biomedical Informatics

    PubMed Central

    Reifman, Jaques; Gilbert, Gary R.; Fagan, Lawrence; Satava, Richard

    2002-01-01

    The 2001 U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command (USAMRMC) Biomedical Informatics Roadmap Meeting was devoted to developing a strategic plan in four focus areas: Hospital and Clinical Informatics, E-Health, Combat Health Informatics, and Bioinformatics and Biomedical Computation. The driving force of this Roadmap Meeting was the recent accelerated pace of change in biomedical informatics in which emerging technologies have the potential to affect significantly the Army research portfolio and investment strategy in these focus areas. The meeting was structured so that the first two days were devoted to presentations from experts in the field, including representatives from the three services, other government agencies, academia, and the private sector, and the morning of the last day was devoted to capturing specific biomedical informatics research needs in the four focus areas. This white paper summarizes the key findings and recommendations and should be a powerful tool for the crafting of future requests for proposals to help align USAMRMC new strategic research investments with new developments and emerging technologies. PMID:12223503

  3. Towards health informatics 3.0. Editorial.

    PubMed

    Kulikowski, Casimir A; Geissbuhler, Antoine

    2011-01-01

    To provide an editorial introduction to the 2011 IMIA Yearbook of Medical Informatics with an overview of its contents and contributors. A brief overview of the main theme, and an outline of the purposes, contents, format, and acknowledgment of contributions for the 2011 IMIA Yearbook. This 2011 issue of the IMIA Yearbook highlights important developments in the development of Web 3.0 capabilities that are increasing in Health Informatics, impacting the activities in research, education and practice in this interdisciplinary field. There has been steady progress towards introducing semantics into informatics systems through more sophisticated representations of knowledge in their underlying information. Health Informatics 3.0 capabilities are identified from the recent literature, illustrated by selected papers published during the past 12 months, and articles reported by IMIA Working Groups. Surveys of the main research sub-fields in biomedical informatics in the Yearbook provide an overview of progress and current challenges across the spectrum of the discipline, focusing on Web 3.0 challenges and opportunities.

  4. IMIA Accreditation of Health Informatics Programs.

    PubMed

    Hasman, A

    2012-01-01

    To develop a procedure for accrediting health informatics programs. Development of a procedure for accreditation. Test of the accreditation procedure via a trial including four or five health informatics programs. A site visit committee consisting of three members evaluates the program based on a self-assessment report written by the program and the experiences and observations of the site visit committee during the site visit. A procedure for accreditation has been developed. The instructions for health informatics programs have been written and a checklist for the site visit committee members is available. In total six subjects are considered, each one consisting of one or more facets. Each facet is judged using its corresponding criterion. Five health informatics programs volunteered. One health informatics program in Finland has already been visited and a report has been produced by the site visit committee. The next site visits are in June and July 2012. The site visit in Finland showed that English summaries of master theses are not enough to get a first impression of the methods used in the thesis. A table of contents is also needed. This information then can be used to select theses written in a language other than English for discussion. The accreditation procedure document with instructions about writing the self-assessment report was very well structured and the instructions were clear according to the Finnish program. The site visit team could work well with the checklist. Self-assessment report model was very well structured and the instructions were clear.

  5. Medical Informatics Education & Research in Greece.

    PubMed

    Chouvarda, I; Maglaveras, N

    2015-08-13

    This paper aims to present an overview of the medical informatics landscape in Greece, to describe the Greek ehealth background and to highlight the main education and research axes in medical informatics, along with activities, achievements and pitfalls. With respect to research and education, formal and informal sources were investigated and information was collected and presented in a qualitative manner, including also quantitative indicators when possible. Greece has adopted and applied medical informatics education in various ways, including undergraduate courses in health sciences schools as well as multidisciplinary postgraduate courses. There is a continuous research effort, and large participation in EU-wide initiatives, in all the spectrum of medical informatics research, with notable scientific contributions, although technology maturation is not without barriers. Wide-scale deployment of eHealth is anticipated in the healthcare system in the near future. While ePrescription deployment has been an important step, ICT for integrated care and telehealth have a lot of room for further deployment. Greece is a valuable contributor in the European medical informatics arena, and has the potential to offer more as long as the barriers of research and innovation fragmentation are addressed and alleviated.

  6. Biomedical informatics training at Stanford in the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Altman, Russ B; Klein, Teri E

    2007-02-01

    The Stanford Biomedical Informatics training program began with a focus on clinical informatics, and has now evolved into a general program of biomedical informatics training, including clinical informatics, bioinformatics and imaging informatics. The program offers PhD, MS, distance MS, certificate programs, and is now affiliated with an undergraduate major in biomedical computation. Current dynamics include (1) increased activity in informatics within other training programs in biology and the information sciences (2) increased desire among informatics students to gain laboratory experience, (3) increased demand for computational collaboration among biomedical researchers, and (4) interaction with the newly formed Department of Bioengineering at Stanford University. The core focus on research training-the development and application of novel informatics methods for biomedical research-keeps the program centered in the midst of this period of growth and diversification.

  7. NASA Biomedical Informatics Capabilities and Needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson-Throop, Kathy A.

    2009-01-01

    To improve on-orbit clinical capabilities by developing and providing operational support for intelligent, robust, reliable, and secure, enterprise-wide and comprehensive health care and biomedical informatics systems with increasing levels of autonomy, for use on Earth, low Earth orbit & exploration class missions. Biomedical Informatics is an emerging discipline that has been defined as the study, invention, and implementation of structures and algorithms to improve communication, understanding and management of medical information. The end objective of biomedical informatics is the coalescing of data, knowledge, and the tools necessary to apply that data and knowledge in the decision-making process, at the time and place that a decision needs to be made.

  8. Image informatics in systems biology applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Stephen T. C.

    2005-02-01

    Digital optical microscopy, coupled with parallel processing and a large arsenal of labeling techniques, offers tremendous values to localize, identify, and characterize cells and molecules. This generates many image informatics challenges in requiring new algorithms and tools to extract, classify, correlate, and model image features and content from massive amounts of cellular and molecular images acquired. Image informatics aims to fill this gap. Coupling automated microscopy and image analysis with biostatistical and data mining techniques to provide a system biologic approach in studying the cells, the basic unit of life, potentially leads to many exciting applications in life and health sciences. In this presentation, we describe certain new system biology applications enabled by image informatics technology.

  9. Healthcare professional's demand for knowledge in informatics.

    PubMed

    Vimarlund, V; Timpka, T; Hallberg, N

    1999-01-01

    To develop an economic model of health care professional demand for knowledge capital in health informatics. Case study with application of the contingent valuation method to develop a small-scale model. Specialized clinic at a university Hospital in Sweden. The model displays the economic rationale behind an individual choice to spend leisure time for obtaining knowledge in health informatics. This decision reduces the total leisure time, but does not increase salary. Instead, it may increase the personal well-being by higher satisfaction gained from using information systems and by being recognized as a computer expert. Individuals have preferences over all uses of time and for activities they can choose to engage in. Support of health care staff's investment in health informatics knowledge capital may benefit both the individuals and indirectly the health care organization.

  10. Software engineering education in medical informatics.

    PubMed

    Leven, F J

    1989-11-01

    Requirements and approaches of Software Engineering education in the field of Medical Informatics are described with respect to the impact of (1) experiences characterizing the "software misery", (2) status and tendencies in software methodology, and (3) educational status and needs in computer science education influenced by the controversy "theoretical versus practical education". Special attention is directed toward the growing importance of analysis, design methods, and techniques in the professional spectrum of Medical Informatics, the relevance of general principles of systems engineering in health care, the potential of non-procedural programming paradigms, and the intersection of Artificial Intelligence and education. Realizations of and experiences with programs in the field of Software Engineering are reported with respect to special requirements in Medical Informatics.

  11. Nursing undergraduates' technical competence in informatics.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Nathalia Santos da; Soares, Danielle Karen Socorro; Bernardes, Andrea; Gabriel, Carmen Silvia; Pereira, Marta Cristiane Alves; Evora, Yolanda Dora Martinez

    2011-12-01

    Nurses in the information age need to build their knowledge and abilities in order to be competent in this area. The objective of this study was to verify the knowledge of nursing freshmen (1st semester) and seniors (8th semester) registered in 2008 and 2007, respectively, regarding their ability to use informatics resources. This is a non-experimental, descriptive, exploratory survey. Data collection was performed using a questionnaire based on a set of competences in informatics. The results revealed a low rate of informatics knowledge among the freshmen. However, regarding the applications that students had the most difficulty to operate, between the two periods, seniors had the worst performance, which shows it is necessary to include computer classes in the preparation of these new professional, in order to prepare them for the work market.

  12. Core content for the subspecialty of clinical informatics.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Reed M; Overhage, J Marc; Steen, Elaine B; Munger, Benson S; Holmes, John H; Williamson, Jeffrey J; Detmer, Don E

    2009-01-01

    The Core Content for Clinical Informatics defines the boundaries of the discipline and informs the Program Requirements for Fellowship Education in Clinical Informatics. The Core Content includes four major categories: fundamentals, clinical decision making and care process improvement, health information systems, and leadership and management of change. The AMIA Board of Directors approved the Core Content for Clinical Informatics in November 2008.

  13. Core Content for the Subspecialty of Clinical Informatics

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Reed M.; Overhage, J. Marc; Steen, Elaine B.; Munger, Benson S.; Holmes, John H.; Williamson, Jeffrey J.; Detmer, Don E.

    2009-01-01

    The Core Content for Clinical Informatics defines the boundaries of the discipline and informs the Program Requirements for Fellowship Education in Clinical Informatics. The Core Content includes four major categories: fundamentals, clinical decision making and care process improvement, health information systems, and leadership and management of change. The AMIA Board of Directors approved the Core Content for Clinical Informatics in November 2008. PMID:19074296

  14. Health informatics: moving from a discipline to a science.

    PubMed

    Turley, James P

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines the historical definitions of Health (Biomedical) Informatics. It is clear that a majority of the definitions refer to Health Informatics as a discipline. Rather it can be argued that the maturation of Health Informatics is beginning to culminate in a distinct science. This progress need to be reflected in academic programs as well as our conferences and publications.

  15. IPHIE: an International Partnership in Health Informatics Education.

    PubMed

    Jaspers, M W; Gardner, R M; Gatewood, L C; Haux, R; Leven, F J; Limburg, M; Ravesloot, J H; Schmidt, D; Wetter, T

    2000-01-01

    Medical informatics contributes significantly to high quality and efficient health care and medical research. The need for well educated professionals in the field of medical informatics therefore is now worldwide recognized. Students of medicine, computer science/informatics are educated in the field of medical informatics and dedicated curricula on medical informatics have emerged. To advance and further develop the beneficial role of medical informatics in the medical field, an international orientation of health and medical informatics students seems an indispensable part of their training. An international orientation and education of medical informatics students may help to accelerate the dissemination of acquired knowledge and skills in the field and the promotion of medical informatics research results on a more global level. Some years ago, the departments of medical informatics of the university of Heidelberg/university of applied sciences Heilbronn and the university of Amsterdam decided to co-operate in the field of medical informatics. Now, this co-operation has grown out to an International Partnership of Health Informatics Education (IPHIE) of 5 universities, i.e. the university of Heidelberg, the university of Heilbronn, the university of Minnesota, the university of Utah and the university of Amsterdam. This paper presents the rationale behind this international partnership, the state of the art of the co-operation and our future plans for expanding this international co-operation.

  16. Internet Policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehr, William H.; Pupillo, Lorenzo Maria

    The Internet is now widely regarded as essential infrastructure for our global economy and society. It is in our homes and businesses. We use it to communicate and socialize, for research, and as a platform for E-commerce. In the late 1990s, much was predicted about what the Internet has become at present; but now, we have actual experience living with the Internet as a critical component of our everyday lives. Although the Internet has already had profound effects, there is much we have yet to realize. The present volume represents a third installment in a collaborative effort to highlight the all-encompassing, multidisciplinary implications of the Internet for public policy. The first installment was conceived in 1998, when we initiated plans to organize an international conference among academic, industry, and government officials to discuss the growing policy agenda posed by the Internet. The conference was hosted by the European Commission in Brussels in 1999 and brought together a diverse mix of perspectives on what the pressing policy issues would be confronting the Internet. All of the concerns identified remain with us today, including how to address the Digital Divide, how to modify intellectual property laws to accommodate the new realities of the Internet, what to do about Internet governance and name-space management, and how to evolve broadcast and telecommunications regulatory frameworks for a converged world.

  17. Informatics approaches to understanding TGFβ pathway regulation

    PubMed Central

    Kahlem, Pascal; Newfeld, Stuart J.

    2009-01-01

    Summary In recent years, informatics studies have predicted several new ways in which the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) signaling pathway can be post-translationally regulated. Subsequently, many of these predictions were experimentally validated. These approaches include phylogenetic predictions for the phosphorylation, sumoylation and ubiquitylation of pathway components, as well as kinetic models of endocytosis, phosphorylation and nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling. We review these studies and provide a brief `how to' guide for phylogenetics. Our hope is to stimulate experimental tests of informatics-based predictions for TGFβ signaling, as well as for other signaling pathways, and to expand the number of developmental pathways that are being analyzed computationally. PMID:19855015

  18. Improving Bridging from Informatics Practice to Theory.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, C U; Gundlapalli, A V

    2015-01-01

    In 1962, Methods of Information in Medicine ( MIM ) began to publish papers on the methodology and scientific fundamentals of organizing, representing, and analyzing data, information, and knowledge in biomedicine and health care. Considered a companion journal, Applied Clinical Informatics ( ACI ) was launched in 2009 with a mission to establish a platform that allows sharing of knowledge between clinical medicine and health IT specialists as well as to bridge gaps between visionary design and successful and pragmatic deployment of clinical information systems. Both journals are official journals of the International Medical Informatics Association. As a follow-up to prior work, we set out to explore congruencies and interdependencies in publications of ACI and MIM. The objectives were to describe the major topics discussed in articles published in ACI in 2014 and to determine if there was evidence that theory in 2014 MIM publications was informed by practice described in ACI publications in any year. We also set out to describe lessons learned in the context of bridging informatics practice and theory and offer opinions on how ACI editorial policies could evolve to foster and improve such bridging. We conducted a retrospective observational study and reviewed all articles published in ACI during the calendar year 2014 (Volume 5) for their main theme, conclusions, and key words. We then reviewed the citations of all MIM papers from 2014 to determine if there were references to ACI articles from any year. Lessons learned in the context of bridging informatics practice and theory and opinions on ACI editorial policies were developed by consensus among the two authors. A total of 70 articles were published in ACI in 2014. Clinical decision support, clinical documentation, usability, Meaningful Use, health information exchange, patient portals, and clinical research informatics emerged as major themes. Only one MIM article from 2014 cited an ACI article. There

  19. Sketching the future: trends influencing nursing informatics.

    PubMed

    Cassey, M Z; Savalle-Dunn, J

    1994-02-01

    Technologies emerging in the fields of telecommunications, video and digital imaging, and microprocessing are shaping the future of nursing practice. To measure up to the future needs of nursing, nurses of today must have the vision and desire to become computer aware and technologically literate. Hypothetical future situations pose challenges related to current nursing informatics and artificial intelligence issues. Discussion includes technology issues related to the lifetime clinical health record. Areas that the Center for Nursing Research considers priorities for informatics suggest directions for nursing technology efforts. This article calls on all nurses to become active in designing and molding future clinical practice systems.

  20. Astrometric Calibration of the Gemini NICI Planet-Finding Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayward, Thomas L.; Biller, Beth A.; Liu, Michael C.; Nielsen, Eric L.; Wahhaj, Zahed; Chun, Mark; Ftaclas, Christ; Hartung, Markus; Toomey, Douglas W.

    2014-12-01

    We describe the astrometric calibration of the Gemini NICI Planet-Finding Campaign. The Campaign requires a relative astrometric accuracy of $\\approx$ 20 mas across multi-year timescales in order to distinguish true companions from background stars by verifying common proper motion and parallax with their parent stars. The calibration consists of a correction for instrumental optical image distortion, plus on-sky imaging of astrometric fields to determine the pixel scale and image orientation. We achieve an accuracy of $\\lesssim 7$ mas between the center and edge of the 18$''$ NICI field, meeting the 20 mas requirement. Most of the Campaign data in the Gemini Science Archive are accurate to this level but we identify a number of anomalies and present methods to correct the errors.

  1. Measurements of airglow on Maunakea at Gemini Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Katherine C.; Smith, Adam; Stephens, Andrew; Smirnova, Olesja

    2016-07-01

    Gemini Observatory on Maunakea has been collecting optical and infrared science data for almost 15 years. We have begun a program to analyze imaging data from two of the original facility instruments, GMOS and NIRI, in order to measure sky brightness levels in multiple infrared and optical broad-band filters. The present work includes data from mid-2016 back through late-2008. We present measured background levels as a function of several operational quantities (e.g. moon phase, hours from twilight, season). We find that airglow is a significant contributor to background levels in several filters. Gemini is primarily a queue scheduled telescope, with observations being optimally executed in order to provide the most efficient use of telescope time. We find that while most parameters are well-understood, the atmospheric airglow remains challenging to predict. This makes it difficult to schedule observations which require dark skies in these filters, and we suggest improvements to ensure data quality.

  2. Aqueous Gemini Surfactant Self-Assembly into Complex Lyotropic Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahanthappa, Mahesh; Sorenson, Gregory

    2012-02-01

    In spite of the potentially wide-ranging applications of aqueous bicontinuous lyotropic liquid crystals (LLCs), the discovery of amphiphiles that reliably form these non-constant mean curvature morphologies over large phase windows remains largely serendipitous. Recent work has established that cationic gemini surfactants exhibit a pronounced tendency to form bicontinuous cubic (e.g. gyroid) phases as compared to their parent single-tail amphiphiles. The universality of this phenomenon in other surfactant systems remains untested. In this paper, we will report the aqueous LLC phase behavior of a new class of anionic gemini surfactants derived from long chain carboxylic acids. Our studies show that these new surfactants favor the formation of non-constant mean curvature gyroid and primitive (``Plumber's Nightmare'') structures over amphiphile concentration windows up to 20 wt% wide. Based on these observations, we will discuss insights gained into the delicate force balance governing the self-assembly of these surfactants into aqueous bicontinuous LLCs.

  3. Antibacterial Activity of Alanine-Derived Gemini Quaternary Ammonium Compounds.

    PubMed

    Piecuch, Agata; Obłąk, Ewa; Guz-Regner, Katarzyna

    The antibacterial activity of alanine-derived gemini quaternary ammonium salts (chlorides and bromides) with various spacer and alkyl chain lengths was investigated. The studied compounds exhibited a strong bactericidal effect, especially bromides with 10 and 12 carbon alkyl chains and 3 carbon spacer groups (TMPAL-10 Br and TMPAL-12 Br), with a short contact time. Both salts dislodged biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus epidermidis, and were lethal to adherent cells of S. epidermidis. Bromide with 2 carbon spacer groups and 12 carbon alkyl chains (TMEAL-12 Br) effectively reduced microbial adhesion by coating polystyrene and silicone surfaces. The results obtained suggest that, after further studies, gemini QAS might be considered as antimicrobial agents in medicine or industry.

  4. Observations of Beta Pictoris b with the Gemini Planet Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilcote, J.; Graham, J.; Barman, T.; Fitzgerald, M.; Larkin, J.; Macintosh, B.; Bauman, B.; Burrows, A.; Cardwell, A.; De Rosa, R.; Dillon, D.; Doyon, R.; Dunn, J.; Erikson, D.; Gavel, D.; Goodsell, S.; Hartung, M.; Hibon, P.; Ingraham, P.; Kalas, P.; Konopacky, Q.; Maire, J.; Marchis, F.; Marley, M.; Mcbride, J.; Millar-Blanchaer, M.; Morzinski, K.; Norton, A.; Oppenheimer, B.; Palmer, D.; Patience, J.; Pueyo, L.; Rantakyro, F.; Sadakuni, N.; Saddlemyer, L.; Savransky, D.; Serio, A.; Soummer, R.; Sivaramakrishnan, A.; Song, I.; Thomas, S.; Wallace, K.; Wiktorowicz, S.; Wolff, S.

    2014-09-01

    Using the recently installed Gemini Planet Imager (GPI), we present measurements of the planetary companion to the nearby young star beta Pic. GPI is a facility class instrument located at Gemini South designed to image and provide low-resolution spectra of Jupiter sized, self-luminous planetary companions around young nearby stars. We present the current imaged spectrum and atmospheric models of the planet based upon GPI's R ˜50 integral field spectrograph. Further, we present a joint analysis of the GPI and NACO astrometry, and the Snellen et al. (2014) radial velocity measurement of beta Pic b that provides the first constraint on the argument of periastron, providing a causal link to the infalling, evaporating bodies.

  5. The Gemini Planet Imager Coronagraph Testbed Preliminary Performance Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Robin

    2010-01-01

    The Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) is a new science instrument being developed and slated for first light early 2011 on the twin 8m Gemini telescopes. Operating in the near infrared, this ground-based, extreme Adaptive Optics (ExAO) coronographic instrument will provide the ability to detect, characterize and analyze young (< 2GYr), self-luminous, extrasolar planets with brightness contrast ratios ≤ 10-7 when compared to their parent star. The coronagraph subsystem includes a pupil apodization, a hard-edged focal plane mask as well as a Lyot stop. Preliminary results indicate that the testbed is performing at very high contrast, having achieved broadband contrasts (H-band) below 10-6 at separations > 5λ/D. Fraunhoffer and Fresnel propagation modeling were used to analyze the testbed results.

  6. Gemini's instrumentation program: latest results and long-range plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boccas, Maxime; Kleinman, S. J.; Goodsell, Stephen; Tollestrup, Eric; Adamson, Andrew; Arriagada, Gustavo; Christou, Julian; Gonzalez, Patricio; Hanna, Kevin; Hartung, Markus; Lazo, Manuel; Mason, Rachel; Neichel, Benoît; Perez, Gabriel; Simons, Doug; Walls, Brian; White, John

    2012-09-01

    The Gemini Observatory is going through an extraordinary time with astronomical instrumentation. New powerful capabilities are delivered and are soon entering scientific operations. In parallel, new instruments are being planned and designed to align the strategy with community needs and enhance the competitiveness of the Observatory for the next decade. We will give a broad overview of the instrumentation program, focusing on achievements, challenges and strategies within a scientific, technical and management perspective. In particular we will discuss the following instruments and projects (some will have dedicated detailed papers in this conference): GMOS-CCD refurbishment, FLAMINGOS-2, GeMS (MCAO system and imager GSAOI), GPI, new generation of A&G, GRACES (fiber feed to CFHT ESPaDOnS) and GHOS (Gemini High-resolution Optical Spectrograph), and provide some updates about detector controllers, mid-IR instruments, Altair, GNIRS, GLAO and future workhorse instruments.

  7. Characterizing Dusty Debris Disks with the Gemini Planet Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Christine; Arriaga, Pauline; Bruzzone, Sebastian; Choquet, Elodie; Debes, John H.; Donaldson, Jessica; Draper, Zachary; Duchene, Gaspard; Esposito, Thomas; Fitzgerald, Michael P.; Golimowski, David A.; Hines, Dean C.; Hinkley, Sasha; Hughes, A. Meredith; Kalas, Paul; Kolokolova, Ludmilla; Lawler, Samantha; Matthews, Brenda C.; Mazoyer, Johan; Metchev, Stanimir A.; Millar-Blanchaer, Max; Moro-Martin, Amaya; Nesvold, Erika; Padgett, Deborah; Patience, Jenny; Perrin, Marshall D.; Pueyo, Laurent; Rantakyro, Fredrik; Rodigas, Timothy; Schneider, Glenn; Soummer, Remi; Song, Inseok; Stark, Chris; Weinberger, Alycia J.; Wilner, David J.

    2017-01-01

    We have been awarded 87 hours of Gemini Observatory time to obtain multi-wavelength observations of HST resolved debris disks using the Gemini Planet Imager. We have executed ~51 hours of telescope time during the 2015B-2016B semesters observing 12 nearby, young debris disks. We have been using the GPI Spec and Pol modes to better constrain the properties of the circumstellar dust, specifically, measuring the near-infrared total intensity and polarization fraction colors, and searching for solid-state spectral features of nearby beta Pic-like disks. We expect that our observations will allow us to break the degeneracy among the particle properties such as composition, size, porosity, and shape. We present some early results from our observations.

  8. Gemini surfactants mediate efficient mitochondrial gene delivery and expression.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Ana M; Morais, Catarina M; Cruz, A Rita; Cardoso, Ana L; Silva, Sandra G; do Vale, M Luísa; Marques, Eduardo F; Pedroso de Lima, Maria C; Jurado, Amália S

    2015-03-02

    Gene delivery targeting mitochondria has the potential to transform the therapeutic landscape of mitochondrial genetic diseases. Taking advantage of the nonuniversal genetic code used by mitochondria, a plasmid DNA construct able to be specifically expressed in these organelles was designed by including a codon, which codes for an amino acid only if read by the mitochondrial ribosomes. In the present work, gemini surfactants were shown to successfully deliver plasmid DNA to mitochondria. Gemini surfactant-based DNA complexes were taken up by cells through a variety of routes, including endocytic pathways, and showed propensity for inducing membrane destabilization under acidic conditions, thus facilitating cytoplasmic release of DNA. Furthermore, the complexes interacted extensively with lipid membrane models mimicking the composition of the mitochondrial membrane, which predicts a favored interaction of the complexes with mitochondria in the intracellular environment. This work unravels new possibilities for gene therapy toward mitochondrial diseases.

  9. Astronaut Ed White - Gemini-4 Extravehicular Activity (EVA)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-01-01

    S65-30432 (3 June 1965) --- Astronaut Edward H. White II, pilot of the Gemini IV four-day Earth-orbital mission, floats in the zero gravity of space outside the Gemini IV spacecraft. White wears a specially designed spacesuit; and the visor of the helmet is gold plated to protect him against the unfiltered rays of the sun. He wears an emergency oxygen pack, also. He is secured to the spacecraft by a 25-feet umbilical line and a 23-feet tether line, both wrapped in gold tape to form one cord. In his right hand is a Hand-Held Self-Maneuvering Unit (HHSMU) with which he controls his movements in space. Astronaut James A. McDivitt, command pilot of the mission, remained inside the spacecraft. EDITOR'S NOTE: Astronaut White died in the Apollo/Saturn 204 fire at Cape Kennedy on Jan. 27, 1967.

  10. Astronaut Edward White - Gemini IV Extravehicular Activity (EVA)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-01-01

    S65-30429 (3 June 1965) --- Astronaut Edward H. White II, pilot of the Gemini IV four-day Earth-orbital mission, floats in the zero gravity of space outside the Gemini IV spacecraft. White wears a specially designed spacesuit; and the visor of the helmet is gold plated to protect him against the unfiltered rays of the sun. He wears an emergency oxygen pack, also. He is secured to the spacecraft by a 25-feet umbilical line and a 23-feet tether line, both wrapped in gold tape to form one cord. In his right hand is a Hand-Held Self-Maneuvering Unit (HHSMU) with which he controls his movements in space. Astronaut James A. McDivitt, command pilot of the mission, remained inside the spacecraft. Photo credit: NASA EDITOR'S NOTE: Astronaut White died in the Apollo/Saturn 204 fire at Cape Kennedy on Jan. 27, 1967.

  11. Kinetics of aqueous lubrication in the hydrophilic hydrogel Gemini interface.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Alison C; Pitenis, Angela A; Urueña, Juan M; Schulze, Kyle D; Angelini, Thomas E; Sawyer, W Gregory

    2015-12-01

    The exquisite sliding interfaces in the human body share the common feature of hydrated dilute polymer mesh networks. These networks, especially when they constitute a sliding interface such as the pre-corneal tear film on the ocular interface, are described by the molecular weight of the polymer chains and a characteristic size of a minimum structural unit, the mesh size, ξ. In a Gemini interface where hydrophilic hydrogels are slid against each other, the aqueous lubrication behavior has been shown to be a function of sliding velocity, introducing a sliding timescale competing against the time scales of polymer fluctuation and relaxation at the surface. In this work, we examine two recent studies and postulate that when the Gemini interface slips faster than the single-chain relaxation time, chains must relax, suppressing the amplitude of the polymer chain thermal fluctuations.

  12. Gemini Observatory Takes its Local Communities on an Expanding Journey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, Janice; Michaud, Peter

    2012-08-01

    Currently in its 7th year (2011) Hawaii's annual Journey through the Universe (JttU) program is a flagship Gemini Observatory public education/outreach initiative involving a broad cross-section of the local Hawai'i Island astronomical community, the public, educators, businesses, local government officials, and thousands of local students. This paper describes the program, its history, planning, implementation, as well as the program's objectives and philosophy. The success of this program is documented here, as measured by continuous and expanding engagement of educators, the community, and the public, along with formal evaluation feedback and selected informal verbal testimony. The program's success also serves as justification for the planned adaptation of a version of the program in Chile in 2011 (adapted for Chilean educational and cultural differences). Finally, lessons learned are shared which have refined the program for Gemini's host communities but can also apply to any institution wishing to initiate a similar program.

  13. GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-11 - EARTH SKY - OUTER SPACE

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-09-14

    S66-54706 (14 Sept. 1966) --- Western half of Australia, including the coastline from Perth to Port Darwin, looking west, as seen from the Gemini-11 spacecraft during its 26th revolution of Earth. Photograph was made while the spacecraft was at a record-high apogee of 740 nautical miles. Taken with a modified 70mm Hasselblad camera, using Eastman Kodak, Ektachrome, MS (S.O. 368) color film. Photo credit: NASA

  14. Space Food Package - Gemini-Titan (GT)-4 Flight - MSC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-05-01

    Food packages of beef and gravy fully reconstituted and ready to eat. An astronaut would squeeze food through opening at right side of package. Water gun is used to reconstitute dehydrated food. Scissors are used to open packages. This is the type of space food which will be used on the Gemini-Titan 4 spaceflight. MSC, Houston, TX *S65-24895 thru S65-24899

  15. GEMINI-6 - EARTH-SKY VIEW - AUSTRALIA - OUTER SPACE

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-12-16

    S65-63136 (16 Dec. 1965) --- Shark Bay area on the western coast of Western Australia as seen from the Gemini-6 spacecraft during its 16th revolution of Earth. City of Carnarven, where NASA has a tracking station, is located near the bottom of picture in lower left corner, near mouth of stream. Indian Ocean is body of water at upper right. South is toward top of picture. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  16. Manned Space Flight Experiments Symposium: Gemini Missions III and IV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    This is a compilation of papers on in-flight experiments presented at the first symposium of a series, Manned Space Flight Experiments Symposium, sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The results of experiments conducted during the Gemini Missions III and IV are covered. These symposiums are to be conducted for the scientific community at regular intervals on the results of experiments carried out in conjunction with manned space flights.

  17. Gemini 8 crew stands on deck of recovery vessel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    The Gemini 8 crew stands on the deck of the recovery vessel, the U.S.S. Leonard F. Mason, with three U.S. Air Force pararescue men. Left to right (standing) are Astronaut Neil A. Armstrong, command pilot; A/2C Glenn M. Moore; Astronaut David R. Scott, pilot; kneeling, left to right are A/1C Eldridge M. Neal; and S/Sgt Larry D. Huyett.

  18. Intra-Extra Vehicular Activity (IEVA) Russian and Gemini Spacesuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Kenneth S.

    2016-01-01

    Kenneth Thomas will discuss the Intra-Extra Vehicular Activity Russian and Gemini spacesuits. While the United States and Russia adapted to existing launch- and reentry-type suits to allow the first human ventures into the vacuum of space, there were differences in execution and capabilities. Mr. Thomas will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of this approach compared to exclusively intra-vehicular or extra-vehicular suit systems.

  19. Northwestern Mexico as seen from the Gemini 12 spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Area of northwestern Mexico as seen from the Gemini 12 spacecraft during its 16th revolution of the earth. View is looking northwest. Body of water in foreground is Gulf of California. Pacific Ocean is in background. Peninsula in center of picture is Baja California. States of Sonora (upper right) and Sinaloa (lower center) of Mexican mainland is in right foreground. City of Guaymas, Sonora, is near center of picture.

  20. Early Results from the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, K. C.; Jorgensen, I.; Hook, I. M.; Takamiya, M. Y.

    2001-12-01

    We present examples of early science results achieved with the newly commissioned Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph (GMOS) on the Gemini North 8-m Telescope. GMOS provides long- and multi-slit spectroscopy and imaging over a 5.5 arcmin field of view, and these three modes were successfully commissioned during the second half of 2001. GMOS was built by a collaboration between the UK (Astronomical Technology Centre at ROE and University of Durham) and Canada (HIA). As part of System Verification (SV) we have executed several imaging, long-slit, and multi-object spectroscopic programs designed to test and demonstrate the scientific capabilities of GMOS. Two of these programs, for which we present the imaging and preliminary MOS results, target the fields around RXJ0142.0+2131 and UM224. The first program is aimed at investigating galaxy evolution through observations of a rich cluster at intermediate redshift (z=0.28) and measuring stellar populations and dynamics of the member galaxies. The goal of the second program is to measure redshifts of galaxies in the field of a high redshift QSO (z=2.08) with intervening metal-line absorption in order to identify which galaxies may be responsible for the absorption and investigate their group/clustering properties. All data obtained as part of SV will become public within a few months. We are currently in the final stages of SV observations including full commissioning of the IFU, and have begun obtaining data for the community as of November 2001. The Gemini Observatory is operated by AURA, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: NSF (United States), PPARC (United Kingdom), NRC (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), ARC (Australia), CNPq (Brazil) and CONICET (Argentina).

  1. Gemini surfactants affect the structure, stability, and activity of ribonuclease Sa.

    PubMed

    Amiri, Razieh; Bordbar, Abdol-Khalegh; Laurents, Douglas V

    2014-09-11

    Gemini surfactants have important advantages, e.g., low micromolar CMCs and slow millisecond monomer ↔ micelle kinetics, for membrane mimetics and for delivering nucleic acids for gene therapy or RNA silencing. However, as a prerequisite, it is important to characterize interactions occurring between Gemini surfactants and proteins. Here NMR and CD spectroscopies are employed to investigate the interactions of cationic Gemini surfactants with RNase Sa, a negatively charged ribonuclease. We find that RNase Sa binds Gemini surfactant monomers and micelles at pH values above 4 to form aggregates. Below pH 4, where the protein is positively charged, these aggregates dissolve and interactions are undetectable. Thermal denaturation experiments show that surfactant lowers RNase Sa's conformational stability, suggesting that surfactant binds the protein's denatured state preferentially. Finally, Gemini surfactants were found to bind RNA, leading to the formation of large complexes. Interestingly, Gemini surfactant binding did not prevent RNase Sa from cleaving RNA.

  2. Aggregation behavior of gemini surfactants and their interaction with macromolecules in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Han, Yuchun; Wang, Yilin

    2011-02-14

    Gemini surfactants are constructed by two hydrophobic chains and two polar/ionic head groups covalently connected by a spacer group at the level of the head groups. Gemini surfactants possess unique structural variations and display special aggregate transitions. Their aggregation ability and aggregate structures can be more effectively adjusted through changing their molecular structures compared with the corresponding monomeric surfactants. Moreover, gemini surfactants exhibit special and useful properties while interacting with polymers and biomacromolecules. Their strong self-aggregation ability can be applied to effectively influence the aggregation behavior of both polymers and biomacromolecules. This short review is focused on the performances of gemini surfactants in aqueous solutions investigated in the last few years, and summarizes the effects of molecular structures on aggregation behavior of gemini surfactants in aqueous solution as well as the interaction of gemini surfactants with polymers and biomacromolecules respectively.

  3. Visible Spectroscopic Observation Of Asteroid 162173 (1999ju3) With The Gemini-s Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugita, Seiji; Kuroda, D.; Kameda, S.; Hasegawa, S.; Kamata, S.; Abe, M.; Ishiguro, M.; Takato, N.; Yoshikawa, M.

    2012-10-01

    Asteroid 162173 (1999JU3; hereafter JU3) is the target of the Hayabusa-2 mission. Its visible reflectance spectra have been observed a few times [1,2], and obtained spectra exhibit a wide variety of spectral patterns ranging from a spectra with absorption in the UV region (May 1999) to a flat spectrum with a faint broad absorption centered around 0.6 microns (September 2007) and that with UV absorption and strong broad absorption centered around 0.7 micron (July 2007). The apparent large spectral variation may be due to variegation on the asteroid surface. Such variegation would make a large influence on remote sensing strategy for Hayabusa-2 before its sampling operations. In order to better constraint the spectral properties of JU3, we conducted visible spectroscopic observations at the GEMINI-South observatory 8.1-m telescope with the GMOS instrument. We could obtain three different sets of data in June and July 2012. Although the JU3 rotation phases of two of the observation are close to each other, the other is about 120 degrees away from the two. Our preliminary analyses indicate that these three spectra are slightly reddish but generally flat across the observed wavelength range (0.47 - 0.89 microns). The observed flat spectra are most similar to the spectrum obtained in September 2007, which probably has the highest signal-to-noise ratio among the previous three spectra. This result suggests that material with a flat spectrum probably covers a dominant proportion of the JU3 surface and that the other two types of previously obtained spectra may not cover a very large fraction of the JU3 surface. [1] Binzel, R. P. et al. (2001) Icarus, 151, 139-149; [2] Vilas, F. (2008) AJ, 135, 1101-1105.

  4. The Future Impact of Healthcare Services Digitalization on Health Workforce: The Increasing Role of Medical Informatics.

    PubMed

    Lapão, Luís Velez

    2016-01-01

    The digital revolution is gradually transforming our society. What about the effects of digitalization and Internet of Things in healthcare? Among researchers two ideas are dominating, opposing each other. These arguments will be explored and analyzed. A mix-method approach combining literature review with the results from a focus group on eHealth impact on employment is used. Several experts from the WHO and from Health Professional Associations contributed for this analysis. Depending on the type of service it will entail reductions or more need of healthcare workers, yet whatever the scenario medical informatics will play an increasing role.

  5. Easier Phase IIs: Recent Improvements to the Gemini User Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Bryan; Nuñez, A.

    2013-01-01

    During 2011 and 2012 Gemini Observatory undertook a significant project to improve the software tools used by investigators to propose for and prepare observations. The main goal was to make the definition of observation details (the Phase II process) easier and faster. The main initiatives included rewriting the observing proposal tool (Phase I Tool) and making several major improvements to the Observing Tool, including automatic settings for arc and flat exposures, automatic guide star selection for all instruments and wavefront sensors, and more complete initial template observations with capabilities for simultaneous editing of many observations. This poster explains these major changes as well as outlines future development plans. The Gemini Observatory is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the Science and Technology Facilities Council (United Kingdom), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia e Inovação (Brazil), and Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Productiva (Argentina).

  6. Photometric Calibrations of Gemini Images of NGC 6253

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, Sean; Jeffery, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    We present preliminary results of our analysis of the metal-rich open cluster NGC 6253 using imaging data from GMOS on the Gemini-South Observatory. These data are part of a larger project to observe the effects of high metallicity on white dwarf cooling processes, especially the white dwarf cooling age, which have important implications on the processes of stellar evolution. To standardize the Gemini photometry, we have also secured imaging data of both the cluster and standard star fields using the 0.6-m SARA Observatory at CTIO. By analyzing and comparing the standard star fields of both the SARA data and the published Gemini zero-points of the standard star fields, we will calibrate the data obtained for the cluster. These calibrations are an important part of the project to obtain a standardized deep color-magnitude diagram to analyze the cluster. We present the process of verifying our standardization process. With a standardized CMD, we also present an analysis of the cluster's main sequence turn off age.

  7. Target positioning and alignment on the Astra-Gemini facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, N.; Ettlinger, O.; Neely, D.; Pattathil, R.; Sellers, A.; Symes, D.

    2013-09-01

    The drive to ever higher intensities and the move to shorter focal length reflective optics for focussing in solid target interactions are increasingly important for studies into high intensity secondary source generation, QED and high field studies. To ensure reproducible optimum interaction conditions, presents a significant problem for accurate target positioning. Commercial optical systems exist to aid the imaging and positioning of targets. However, these are often expensive and difficult to situate within the limited space usually available inside the interaction chamber. At the Astra-Gemini system of the Central Laser Facility, the push for intensities above I = 1021 Wcm-2 with f/2 and f/1 focussing optics means positioning targets within the Rayleigh range of < few microns. Here, we present details of two systems to be implemented on the Astra-Gemini system to cheaply and accurately position targets with ≈ micron accuracy. These involve:- (i) a multi-wavelength interferometer to enable sub-micron accuracy in the positioning of the front surface at the interaction point within the Rayleigh range and (ii) a small, low cost near field/far field microscope with illumination at 800nm (the same as the Gemini IR beam) for imaging the rear of the target and the focal plane with high resolution. The combination of these two systems significantly improves our accuracy in target positioning and also results in a decrease in the time required to align targets between shots.

  8. Slab laser development at MSNW - The Gemini and Centurion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggleston, J. M.; Albrecht, G. F.

    Two, zig-zag-optical-path, slab-geometry, solid-state lasers, referred to as Gemini and Centurion, are described. The Nd:glass laser (Gemini) uses a pump geometry in which the flash lamps are located between two slabs in the same laser head. The dimensions and functions of the glass slabs are studied and the single-sided pumping of the Nd:glass laser is examined. The system is verified using the Nd:YAG laser system (Centurion). The Centurion system uses four flash lamps to pump a single 6 mm x 2 cm x 15.5 cm Nd:YAG slab; the reflector structure of the system is analyzed. The thermal-optical model for the Nd:glass laser and the Trace 3D, a three-dimensional flashlamp-slab coupling code, are evaluated. The oscillation performance and defocusing of a single-pass beam are measured; it is observed that the single-sided pump output is 30 percent more efficient than the standard configuration and no major defocusing effect is detected. The use of the Trace 3D code to design a reflector system for Gemini is discussed.

  9. On the Shoulders of Titans: A History of Project Gemini

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hacker, B. C.

    1977-01-01

    Gemini was the intermediate manned space flight program between America's first steps into space with Mercury and the manned lunar expeditions of Apollo. Because of its position between these two other efforts, Gemini is probably less remembered. Still, it more than had its place in man's progress into this new frontier. Gemini accomplishments were manyfold. They included many firsts: first astronaut-controlled maneuvering in space; first rendezvous in space of one spacecraft with another; first docking of one spacecraft with a propulsive stage and use of that stage to transfer man to high altitude; first traverse of man into the earth's radiation belts; first extended manned flights of a week or more in duration; first extended stays of man outside his spacecraft; first controlled reentry and precision landing; and many more. These achievements were significant in ways one cannot truly evaluate even today, but two things stand out: (1) it was the time when America caught up and surpassed the Soviet Union in manned space flight, and (2) these demonstrations of capability were an absolute prerequisite to the phenomenal Apollo accomplishments then yet to come.

  10. A Virtual Field Trip to the Gemini Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, R. Scott; Michaud, P. D.

    2010-01-01

    Live from Gemini (LfG) is a virtual field trip using video conferencing technology to connect primary, secondary and post-secondary students with scientists and educators at the Gemini Observatory. As a pilot project, LfG is rapidly becoming one of the observatory's most often-requested educational programs for learners of all ages. The program aligns exceptionally well with national science (and technology) standards, as well as existing school curricula. This combination makes it easy for teachers to justify participation in the program, especially as the necessary video conferencing technology becomes ever more ubiquitous in classrooms and technology learning centers around the world. In developing and testing this pilot project, a programmatic approach and philosophy evolved that includes post-field-trip educational materials, multi-disciplinary subject matter (astronomy, geology, mathematics, meteorology, engineering and even language - the program is offered in Spanish from Gemini South in Chile), and the establishment of a personal connection and rapport with students. The presenters work to create a comfortable interaction despite the perceived technological barriers. The authors’ experiences with the LfG pilot project convince us that this model is viable for almost any astronomical observatory and should be considered by any dynamic, technology- and education-oriented facility.

  11. The Informatics Opportunities at the Intersection of Patient Safety and Clinical Informatics

    PubMed Central

    Kilbridge, Peter M.; Classen, David C.

    2008-01-01

    Health care providers have a basic responsibility to protect patients from accidental harm. At the institutional level, creating safe health care organizations necessitates a systematic approach. Effective use of informatics to enhance safety requires the establishment and use of standards for concept definitions and for data exchange, development of acceptable models for knowledge representation, incentives for adoption of electronic health records, support for adverse event detection and reporting, and greater investment in research at the intersection of informatics and patient safety. Leading organizations have demonstrated that health care informatics approaches can improve safety. Nevertheless, significant obstacles today limit optimal application of health informatics to safety within most provider environments. The authors offer a series of recommendations for addressing these challenges. PMID:18436896

  12. Gemini 9-A spacecraft touches down in the Atlantic at end of mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Gemini 9-A space flight is concluded as the Gemini 9 spacecraft touches down in the Atlantic. In this view its parachute is still deployed as the spacecraft hits the water (34117); Astronauts Thomas Stafford (right) and Eugene Cernan wave to the crowd aboard the aircraft carrier U.S.S. Wasp as they emerge from their Gemini 9 capsule. John C. Stonesifer (far right), with the Manned Spacecraft Center's Landing and Recovery Division, was on board to greet the astronauts (34118).

  13. Gemini 9-A spacecraft touches down in the Atlantic at end of mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Gemini 9-A space flight is concluded as the Gemini 9 spacecraft touches down in the Atlantic. In this view its parachute is still deployed as the spacecraft hits the water (34117); Astronauts Thomas Stafford (right) and Eugene Cernan wave to the crowd aboard the aircraft carrier U.S.S. Wasp as they emerge from their Gemini 9 capsule. John C. Stonesifer (far right), with the Manned Spacecraft Center's Landing and Recovery Division, was on board to greet the astronauts (34118).

  14. Gemini 7 prime crew during suiting up procedures at Launch Complex 16

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Astronaut James A. Lovell Jr. (left), Gemini 7 prime crew pilot, talks with NASA space suit technician Clyde Teague during suiting up procedures at Launch Complex 16, Kennedy Space Center. Lovell wears the new lightweight space suit planned for use during the Gemini 7 mission (61756); Astronaut Frank Borman, comand pilot of the Gemini 7 space flight, undergoes suiting up operations in Launch Complex 16 during prelaunch countdown. Medical biosensors are attached to his scalp (61757).

  15. GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-9 - EARTH-SKY - AUGMENTED TARGET DOCKING ADAPTER (ATDA) - MSC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-06-06

    S66-37923 (3 June 1966) --- The Augmented Target Docking Adapter (ATDA) as seen from the Gemini-9 spacecraft during one of their three rendezvous in space. The ATDA and Gemini-9 spacecraft are 66.5 feet apart. Failure of the docking adapter protective cover to fully separate on the ATDA prevented the docking of the two spacecraft. The ATDA was described by the Gemini-9 crew as an "angry alligator." Photo credit: NASA

  16. Internet International.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodard, Colin

    1995-01-01

    The unexpectedly rapid expansion of the Internet in Eastern and Central Europe is having a significant effect on institutions of higher education, still suffering from decades of isolation. The benefits include global access to information and cost-effective communications. A number of international efforts are under way to expand Internet access,…

  17. Internet Policy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-11-17

    activities. F. Responsibilities 1. The CIO shall: a. Approve, for the OIG, DoD, policies implementing laws and guidelines on Internet use . IGDINST 4630.2 3 b...Provide leadership to manage Internet use within the OIG, DoD. c. Authorize monitoring. d. Oversee the promulgation of policies and guidance to ensure

  18. Novel Synthesis of Anionic Gemini Surfactants from 1, 4-Diol as a Key Block Material.

    PubMed

    Kawase, Tokuzo; Nakagawa, Mami; Higuchi, Yuuya; Oida, Tatsuo

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a series of all-hydrocarbon anionic gemini surfactants containing COOH (adipic acid-type and suberic acid-type), SO3Na, OSO3Na, and OP=O(OH)2 functional groups was developed from 1,4-diol and 1,4-diketone as a key block material. The effect of the surfactant head groups on the surface properties was investigated by surface tension and surface pressure-area (π-A) measurements. We found that the critical micelle concentrations (CMC) of the studied geminis were smaller by one order of magnitude than those of the corresponding 1+l-type surfactants. From π-A measurements, the limiting areas of COOH-type geminis were less than twofold of the area of the corresponding 1+1-type, which indicates that the gemini structure enabled tighter packing than is possible in surfactants of the 1+l-type. In contrast, the limiting area of the OP=O(OH)2-type gemini was larger than those of the COOH-type geminis. Furthermore, the suberic acid-type gemini showed a smaller limiting area than that of adipic acid-type gemini. Therefore, we can conclude that the flexibility of the gemini at the connecting position has a significant effect on formation of the monolayer at the air/water interface.

  19. Informatics and Standards for Nanomedicine Technology

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Dennis G.; Klaessig, Fred; Harper, Stacey L.; Fritts, Martin; Hoover, Mark D.; Gaheen, Sharon; Stokes, Todd H.; Reznik-Zellen, Rebecca; Freund, Elaine T.; Klemm, Juli D.; Paik, David S.; Baker, Nathan A.

    2011-01-01

    There are several issues to be addressed concerning the management and effective use of information (or data), generated from nanotechnology studies in biomedical research and medicine. These data are large in volume, diverse in content, and are beset with gaps and ambiguities in the description and characterization of nanomaterials. In this work, we have reviewed three areas of nanomedicine informatics: information resources; taxonomies, controlled vocabularies, and ontologies; and information standards. Informatics methods and standards in each of these areas are critical for enabling collaboration, data sharing, unambiguous representation and interpretation of data, semantic (meaningful) search and integration of data; and for ensuring data quality, reliability, and reproducibility. In particular, we have considered four types of information standards in this review, which are standard characterization protocols, common terminology standards, minimum information standards, and standard data communication (exchange) formats. Currently, due to gaps and ambiguities in the data, it is also difficult to apply computational methods and machine learning techniques to analyze, interpret and recognize patterns in data that are high dimensional in nature, and also to relate variations in nanomaterial properties to variations in their chemical composition, synthesis, characterization protocols, etc. Progress towards resolving the issues of information management in nanomedicine using informatics methods and standards discussed in this review will be essential to the rapidly growing field of nanomedicine informatics. PMID:21721140

  20. Medical informatics and bioinformatics: a bibliometric study

    PubMed Central

    Bansard, Jean-Yves; Rebholz-Schuhman, Dietrich; Cameron, Graham; Clark, Dominic; van Mulligen, Erik; Beltrame, Francesco; Del Hoyo Barbolla, Eva; Martin-Sanchez, Fernando; Milanesi, Luciano; Tollis, Ioannis; Van der Lei, Johan; Coatrieux, Jean-Louis

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports on an analysis of the bioinformatics and medical informatics literature with the objective to identify upcoming trends that are shared among both research fields to derive benefits from potential collaborative initiatives for their future. Our results present the main characteristics of the two fields and show that these domains are still relatively separated. PMID:17521073

  1. Optimizing Clinical Research Participant Selection with Informatics.

    PubMed

    Weng, Chunhua

    2015-11-01

    Clinical research participants are often not reflective of real-world patients due to overly restrictive eligibility criteria. Meanwhile, unselected participants introduce confounding factors and reduce research efficiency. Biomedical informatics, especially Big Data increasingly made available from electronic health records, offers promising aids to optimize research participant selection through data-driven transparency.

  2. Peculiarities of Teaching Medical Informatics and Statistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glushkov, Sergey

    2017-01-01

    The article reviews features of teaching Medical Informatics and Statistics. The course is referred to the disciplines of Mathematical and Natural sciences. The course is provided in all the faculties of I. M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University. For students of Preventive Medicine Department the time frame allotted for studying the…

  3. Pharmacy informatics in controlled substances research.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jia-Ling; Vahabzadeh, Massoud; Mezghanni, Mustapha; Na, Paul J; Leff, Michelle; Contoreggi, Carlo

    2008-11-06

    Pharmacies have become essential components in support of clinical research. Their operations become highly complex when preponderance of prescriptions is composed of controlled substances. Application of informatics will result in more efficient operations. We present the Pharmacy Information Management System (PIMS) that includes a set of decision support systems to address the pharmacy challenges and is integrated into our electronic health record system.

  4. Discovering anomalous events from urban informatics data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayarajah, Kasthuri; Subbaraju, Vigneshwaran; Weerakoon, Dulanga; Misra, Archan; Tam, La Thanh; Athaide, Noel

    2017-05-01

    Singapore's "smart city" agenda is driving the government to provide public access to a broader variety of urban informatics sources, such as images from traffic cameras and information about buses servicing different bus stops. Such informatics data serves as probes of evolving conditions at different spatiotemporal scales. This paper explores how such multi-modal informatics data can be used to establish the normal operating conditions at different city locations, and then apply appropriate outlier-based analysis techniques to identify anomalous events at these selected locations. We will introduce the overall architecture of sociophysical analytics, where such infrastructural data sources can be combined with social media analytics to not only detect such anomalous events, but also localize and explain them. Using the annual Formula-1 race as our candidate event, we demonstrate a key difference between the discriminative capabilities of different sensing modes: while social media streams provide discriminative signals during or prior to the occurrence of such an event, urban informatics data can often reveal patterns that have higher persistence, including before and after the event. In particular, we shall demonstrate how combining data from (i) publicly available Tweets, (ii) crowd levels aboard buses, and (iii) traffic cameras can help identify the Formula-1 driven anomalies, across different spatiotemporal boundaries.

  5. Cognitive informatics in biomedicine and healthcare.

    PubMed

    Patel, Vimla L; Kannampallil, Thomas G

    2015-02-01

    Cognitive Informatics (CI) is a burgeoning interdisciplinary domain comprising of the cognitive and information sciences that focuses on human information processing, mechanisms and processes within the context of computing and computer applications. Based on a review of articles published in the Journal of Biomedical Informatics (JBI) between January 2001 and March 2014, we identified 57 articles that focused on topics related to cognitive informatics. We found that while the acceptance of CI into the mainstream informatics research literature is relatively recent, its impact has been significant - from characterizing the limits of clinician problem-solving and reasoning behavior, to describing coordination and communication patterns of distributed clinical teams, to developing sustainable and cognitively-plausible interventions for supporting clinician activities. Additionally, we found that most research contributions fell under the topics of decision-making, usability and distributed team activities with a focus on studying behavioral and cognitive aspects of clinical personnel, as they performed their activities or interacted with health information systems. We summarize our findings within the context of the current areas of CI research, future research directions and current and future challenges for CI researchers.

  6. Medical informatics and telemedicine: A vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clemmer, Terry P.

    1991-01-01

    The goal of medical informatics is to improve care. This requires the commitment and harmonious collaboration between the computer scientists and clinicians and an integrated database. The vision described is how medical information systems are going to impact the way medical care is delivered in the future.

  7. Informatics and Small Computers in Latin America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvarez, Jose; And Others

    1985-01-01

    This paper highlights potential benefits and more pressing social and legal problems facing Latin American nations in the area of informatics and small computers. Discussion covers potential uses (education, office applications, agriculture, national planning); role of central governments; implications for economic development; and transborder…

  8. A business case for health informatics standards.

    PubMed Central

    Amatayakul, M.; Heller, E. E.; Johnson, G.

    1994-01-01

    The acceleration of health informatics standards development has both value to health care delivery as well as economic value to the nation's economy. This paper describes the business case for standards development to enable development and implementation of computer-based patient record systems. PMID:7949976

  9. Current Status of Nursing Informatics Education in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Eunjoo; Kim, Jeongeun; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Jungha; Jin, Meiling; Ahn, Shinae; Jun, Jooyeon; Song, Healim; On, Jeongah; Jung, Hyesil; Hong, Yeong Joo; Yim, Suran

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study presents the current status of nursing informatics education, the content covered in nursing informatics courses, the faculty efficacy, and the barriers to and additional supports for teaching nursing informatics in Korea. Methods A set of questionnaires consisting of an 18-item questionnaire for nursing informatics education, a 6-item questionnaire for faculty efficacy, and 2 open-ended questions for barriers and additional supports were sent to 204 nursing schools via email and the postal service. Nursing schools offering nursing informatics were further asked to send their syllabuses. The subjects taught were analyzed using nursing informatics competency categories and other responses were tailed using descriptive statistics. Results A total of 72 schools (35.3%) responded to the survey, of which 38 reported that they offered nursing informatics courses in their undergraduate nursing programs. Nursing informatics courses at 11 schools were taught by a professor with a degree majoring in nursing informatics. Computer technology was the most frequently taught subject (27 schools), followed by information systems used for practice (25 schools). The faculty efficacy was 3.76 ± 0.86 (out of 5). The most frequently reported barrier to teaching nursing informatics (n = 9) was lack of awareness of the importance of nursing informatics. Training and educational opportunities was the most requested additional support. Conclusions Nursing informatics education has increased during the last decade in Korea. However, the proportions of faculty with degrees in nursing informatics and number of schools offering nursing informatics courses have not increased much. Thus, a greater focus is needed on training faculty and developing the courses. PMID:27200224

  10. Current Status of Nursing Informatics Education in Korea.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Eunjoo; Kim, Jeongeun; Park, Hyeoun-Ae; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Jungha; Jin, Meiling; Ahn, Shinae; Jun, Jooyeon; Song, Healim; On, Jeongah; Jung, Hyesil; Hong, Yeong Joo; Yim, Suran

    2016-04-01

    This study presents the current status of nursing informatics education, the content covered in nursing informatics courses, the faculty efficacy, and the barriers to and additional supports for teaching nursing informatics in Korea. A set of questionnaires consisting of an 18-item questionnaire for nursing informatics education, a 6-item questionnaire for faculty efficacy, and 2 open-ended questions for barriers and additional supports were sent to 204 nursing schools via email and the postal service. Nursing schools offering nursing informatics were further asked to send their syllabuses. The subjects taught were analyzed using nursing informatics competency categories and other responses were tailed using descriptive statistics. A total of 72 schools (35.3%) responded to the survey, of which 38 reported that they offered nursing informatics courses in their undergraduate nursing programs. Nursing informatics courses at 11 schools were taught by a professor with a degree majoring in nursing informatics. Computer technology was the most frequently taught subject (27 schools), followed by information systems used for practice (25 schools). The faculty efficacy was 3.76 ± 0.86 (out of 5). The most frequently reported barrier to teaching nursing informatics (n = 9) was lack of awareness of the importance of nursing informatics. Training and educational opportunities was the most requested additional support. Nursing informatics education has increased during the last decade in Korea. However, the proportions of faculty with degrees in nursing informatics and number of schools offering nursing informatics courses have not increased much. Thus, a greater focus is needed on training faculty and developing the courses.

  11. Nursing Informatics Certification Worldwide: History, Pathway, Roles, and Motivation.

    PubMed

    Séroussi, B; Soualmia, L F; Holmes, J H

    2016-11-10

    Official recognition and certification for informatics professionals are essential aspects of workforce development. To describe the history, pathways, and nuances of certification in nursing informatics across the globe; compare and contrast those with board certification in clinical informatics for physicians. (1) A review of the representative literature on informatics certification and related competencies for nurses and physicians, and relevant websites for nursing informatics associations and societies worldwide; (2) similarities and differences between certification processes for nurses and physicians, and (3) perspectives on roles for nursing informatics professionals in healthcare Results: The literature search for 'nursing informatics certification' yielded few results in PubMed; Google Scholar yielded a large number of citations that extended to magazines and other non-peer reviewed sources. Worldwide, there are several nursing informatics associations, societies, and workgroups dedicated to nursing informatics associated with medical/health informatics societies. A formal certification program for nursing informatics appears to be available only in the United States. This certification was established in 1992, in concert with the formation and definition of nursing informatics as a specialty practice of nursing by the American Nurses Association. Although informatics is inherently interprofessional, certification pathways for nurses and physicians have developed separately, following long-standing professional structures, training, and pathways aligned with clinical licensure and direct patient care. There is substantial similarity with regard to the skills and competencies required for nurses and physicians to obtain informatics certification in their respective fields. Nurses may apply for and complete a certification examination if they have experience in the field, regardless of formal training. Increasing numbers of informatics nurses are pursuing

  12. Pathology Informatics Essentials for Residents: A flexible informatics curriculum linked to Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education milestones.

    PubMed

    Henricks, Walter H; Karcher, Donald S; Harrison, James H; Sinard, John H; Riben, Michael W; Boyer, Philip J; Plath, Sue; Thompson, Arlene; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2016-01-01

    Recognition of the importance of informatics to the practice of pathology has surged. Training residents in pathology informatics have been a daunting task for most residency programs in the United States because faculty often lacks experience and training resources. Nevertheless, developing resident competence in informatics is essential for the future of pathology as a specialty. The objective of the study is to develop and deliver a pathology informatics curriculum and instructional framework that guides pathology residency programs in training residents in critical pathology informatics knowledge and skills and meets Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Informatics Milestones. The College of American Pathologists, Association of Pathology Chairs, and Association for Pathology Informatics formed a partnership and expert work group to identify critical pathology informatics training outcomes and to create a highly adaptable curriculum and instructional approach, supported by a multiyear change management strategy. Pathology Informatics Essentials for Residents (PIER) is a rigorous approach for educating all pathology residents in important pathology informatics knowledge and skills. PIER includes an instructional resource guide and toolkit for incorporating informatics training into residency programs that vary in needs, size, settings, and resources. PIER is available at http://www.apcprods.org/PIER (accessed April 6, 2016). PIER is an important contribution to informatics training in pathology residency programs. PIER introduces pathology trainees to broadly useful informatics concepts and tools that are relevant to practice. PIER provides residency program directors with a means to implement a standardized informatics training curriculum, to adapt the approach to local program needs, and to evaluate resident performance and progress over time.

  13. Pathology Informatics Essentials for Residents: A flexible informatics curriculum linked to Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education milestones

    PubMed Central

    Henricks, Walter H; Karcher, Donald S; Harrison, James H; Sinard, John H; Riben, Michael W; Boyer, Philip J; Plath, Sue; Thompson, Arlene; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2016-01-01

    Context: Recognition of the importance of informatics to the practice of pathology has surged. Training residents in pathology informatics have been a daunting task for most residency programs in the United States because faculty often lacks experience and training resources. Nevertheless, developing resident competence in informatics is essential for the future of pathology as a specialty. Objective: The objective of the study is to develop and deliver a pathology informatics curriculum and instructional framework that guides pathology residency programs in training residents in critical pathology informatics knowledge and skills and meets Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Informatics Milestones. Design: The College of American Pathologists, Association of Pathology Chairs, and Association for Pathology Informatics formed a partnership and expert work group to identify critical pathology informatics training outcomes and to create a highly adaptable curriculum and instructional approach, supported by a multiyear change management strategy. Results: Pathology Informatics Essentials for Residents (PIER) is a rigorous approach for educating all pathology residents in important pathology informatics knowledge and skills. PIER includes an instructional resource guide and toolkit for incorporating informatics training into residency programs that vary in needs, size, settings, and resources. PIER is available at http://www.apcprods.org/PIER (accessed April 6, 2016). Conclusions: PIER is an important contribution to informatics training in pathology residency programs. PIER introduces pathology trainees to broadly useful informatics concepts and tools that are relevant to practice. PIER provides residency program directors with a means to implement a standardized informatics training curriculum, to adapt the approach to local program needs, and to evaluate resident performance and progress over time. PMID:27563486

  14. Impact of phospholipids on plasmid packaging and toxicity of gemini nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Chilbert; Badea, Ildiko; Poorghorban, Masoomeh; Verrall, Ronald; Foldvari, Marianna

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the relationship of structural modifications on the assembly and disassembly of synthetic or non-viral gene delivery is crucial with regard to their rational development. This study describes the use of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), as a new tool, to investigate the effect of systematic chemical modifications to dicationic N,N-bis(dimethylalkyl)-α,ω-alkanediammonium surfactants (gemini surfactants) on the self-assembly and physical properties of a series of gemini nanoparticles (gemini NPs). A systematic screening of 27 gemini-plasmid (GP) complexes and gemini NPs showed that their final morphology is governed by the pre-compaction of plasmid by the gemini surfactants. The assembly process of gemini-plasmid intermediate complex (GP) and the final gemini NP (or gemini-plasmid-lipid complex, GPL) was monitored by the tracking of the Cy5-labeled plasmid. Based on diffusion properties, GP complexes were larger than gemini NPs (300–500 nm for GP and 200–300 nm for GPLs). Stoichiometric analysis of the raw intensity histograms showed that both GPs and GPLs particles were composed of multiple plasmids. The final GPLs contain fewer plasmids (2–20 per particle) compared to the intermediate GP (5–35 per particle). The addition of phospholipids dispersed and stabilized GPs to form GPL, but the type of phospholipid (DOPE or DD 1:3) had little effect on the final size of the particles. The FCS data were both validated and complemented by the results of studies of dynamic light scattering (DLS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray scattering and dye-exclusion assays. A model for gemini NP assembly involving supramolecular aggregate intermediates is proposed. PMID:26693021

  15. Impact of phospholipids on plasmid packaging and toxicity of gemini nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Dong, Chilbert; Badea, Ildiko; Poorghorban, Masoomeh; Verrall, Ronald; Foldvari, Marianna

    2015-12-07

    Understanding the relationship of structural modifications on the assembly and disassembly of synthetic or non-viral gene delivery is crucial with regard to their rational development. This study describes the use of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), as a new tool, to investigate the effect of systematic chemical modifications to dicationic N,N-bis(dimethylalkyl)-α,ω-alkanediammonium surfactants (gemini surfactants) on the self-assembly and physical properties of a series of gemini nanoparticles (gemini NPs). A systematic screening of 27 gemini-plasmid (GP) complexes and gemini NPs showed that their final morphology is governed by the pre-compaction of plasmid by the gemini surfactants. The assembly process of gemini-plasmid intermediate complex (GP) and the final gemini NP (or gemini-plasmid-lipid complex, GPL) was monitored by the tracking of the Cy5-labeled plasmid. Based on diffusion properties, GP complexes were larger than gemini NPs (300-500 nm for GP and 200-300 nm for GPLs). Stoichiometric analysis of the raw intensity histograms showed that both GPs and GPLs particles were composed of multiple plasmids. The final GPLs contain fewer plasmids (2-20 per particle) compared to the intermediate GP (5-35 per particle). The addition of phospholipids dispersed and stabilized GPs to form GPL, but the type of phospholipid (DOPE or DD 1:3) had little effect on the final size of the particles. The FCS data were both validated and complemented by the results of studies of dynamic light scattering (DLS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray scattering and dye-exclusion assays. A model for gemini NP assembly involving supramolecular aggregate intermediates is proposed.

  16. Synergistic adsorption of mixtures of cationic gemini and nonionic sugar-based surfactant on silica.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qiong; Somasundaran, P

    2009-03-15

    Adsorption behavior of cationic C(12)-C(4)-C(12) gemini surfactant on silica has been investigated, along with that of nonionic surfactant n-dodecyl-beta-D-maltoside (DM). While DM alone shows meager adsorption on silica, because of the lack of any electrostatic adsorption, cationic gemini adsorbs significantly on the oppositely charged silica surface. Due to the electrostatic nature of cationic gemini adsorption on silica, solution pH affects adsorption of C(12)-C(4)-C(12) gemini dramatically. Meanwhile, C(12)-C(4)-C(12) gemini hemimicelle size at silica/water interface does not seem to change with solution pH. For the mixtures of DM and cationic C(12)-C(4)-C(12) gemini, there is a sharp increase of DM adsorption at silica/water interface, up to 100 times more than DM alone. After mixing with DM, saturation adsorption of cationic C(12)-C(4)-C(12) gemini decreases, due to competition for adsorption sites from DM. At the same time, in its mixture with DM, there is an increased adsorption of C(12)-C(4)-C(12) gemini in the rising part of the adsorption isotherm. Hydrophobic chain-chain interactions, especially with two hydrophobic chains in one C(12)-C(4)-C(12) gemini molecule, and adsorbed C(12)-C(4)-C(12) gemini molecule acting as an anchor or nucleation sites for forming mixed aggregates with DM on silica surface, are attributed to the marked adsorption synergy between DM and cationic C(12)-C(4)-C(12) gemini. The adsorption of surfactants and their mixtures has a marked effect on silica surface charge and silica's wettability.

  17. The Use of RESTful Web Services in Medical Informatics and Clinical Research and Its Implementation in Europe.

    PubMed

    Aerts, Jozef

    2017-01-01

    RESTful web services nowadays are state-of-the-art in business transactions over the internet. They are however not very much used in medical informatics and in clinical research, especially not in Europe. To make an inventory of RESTful web services that can be used in medical informatics and clinical research, including those that can help in patient empowerment in the DACH region and in Europe, and to develop some new RESTful web services for use in clinical research and regulatory review. A literature search on available RESTful web services has been performed and new RESTful web services have been developed on an application server using the Java language. Most of the web services found originate from institutes and organizations in the USA, whereas no similar web services could be found that are made available by European organizations. New RESTful web services have been developed for LOINC codes lookup, for UCUM conversions and for use with CDISC Standards. A comparison is made between "top down" and "bottom up" web services, the latter meant to answer concrete questions immediately. The lack of RESTful web services made available by European organizations in healthcare and medical informatics is striking. RESTful web services may in short future play a major role in medical informatics, and when localized for the German language and other European languages, can help to considerably facilitate patient empowerment. This however requires an EU equivalent of the US National Library of Medicine.

  18. Internet Connections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindroth, Linda K.

    1996-01-01

    Lists Internet sites related to articles in this issue. Topics include a first-grade unit on voting, student-created theme binders, techniques for student motivation, and involving parents in the middle school. (KDFB)

  19. Internet Connections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindroth, Linda K.

    1996-01-01

    Lists Internet sites related to articles in this issue. Topics include a first-grade unit on voting, student-created theme binders, techniques for student motivation, and involving parents in the middle school. (KDFB)

  20. Internet Censorship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jyotsna; Kapil; Aayush

    2012-09-01

    Censorship on Internet has always wet its hands in the water of controversies, It is said to go in with synonym of "FILTERING THE NET" i.e. Either done to protect minors or for nationís privacy, some take it as snatching their freedom over internet and some take it as an appropriate step to protect minor, It has its supporters as well as opponents.Google has reported a whooping number of requests from Governments of U.K, China, Poland, Spain, and Canada to remove videos and search links that led to harassment, sensitive issues or suspicious people. This paper deals with the cons of censorship on internet and to make people aware of the fact that Internet is not a single body owned by an org. but an open sky of information shared equally by all. Research done has found out many unseen aspects of different people's view point.

  1. Factors influencing medical informatics examination grade--can biorhythm, astrological sign, seasonal aspect, or bad statistics predict outcome?

    PubMed

    Petrovecki, Mladen; Rahelić, Dario; Bilić-Zulle, Lidija; Jelec, Vjekoslav

    2003-02-01

    To investigate whether and to what extent various parameters, such as individual characteristics, computer habits, situational factors, and pseudoscientific variables, influence Medical Informatics examination grade, and how inadequate statistical analysis can lead to wrong conclusions. The study included a total of 382 second-year undergraduate students at the Rijeka University School of Medicine in the period from 1996/97 to 2000/01 academic year. After passing the Medical Informatics exam, students filled out an anonymous questionnaire about their attitude toward learning medical informatics. They were asked to grade the course organization and curriculum content, and provide their date of birth; sex; study year; high school grades; Medical Informatics examination grade, type, and term; and describe their computer habits. From these data, we determined their zodiac signs and biorhythm. Data were compared by the use of t-test, one-way ANOVA with Tukey's honest significance difference test, and randomized complete block design ANOVA. Out of 21 variables analyzed, only 10 correlated with the average grade. Students taking Medical Informatics examination in the 1998/99 academic year earned lower average grade than any other generation. Significantly higher Medical Informatics exam grade was earned by students who finished a grammar high school; owned and regularly used a computer, Internet, and e-mail (p< or =0.002 for all items); passed an oral exam without taking a written test (p=0.004), or did not repeat the exam (p<0.001). Better high-school students and students with better grades from high-school informatics course also scored significantly better (p=0.032 and p<0.001, respectively). Grade in high-school mathematics, student's sex, and time of year when the examination was taken were not related to the grade, and neither were pseudoscientific parameters, such as student zodiac sign, zodiac sign quality, or biorhythm cycles, except when intentionally

  2. Transforming healthcare in the Internet Era.

    PubMed

    Detmer, D E

    2001-01-01

    Healthcare services will be transformed in the Internet Era by developments in biotechnology, bioinformatics, health informatics, assimilation of modern business processes, and changing policy expectations. Discoveries in biology and communications technology offer the potential for improvements in health status of individuals and populations. Improved access to information about health and disease will typify early progress. Care in hospitals will shift toward palliation and end-of-life care; curing and prevention will increase in outpatient settings and/or within the home or workplace. Barriers include resistance to change and a lack of a global health information infrastructure that includes financing, standards, and coherent policy.

  3. Cancer communication and informatics research across the cancer continuum.

    PubMed

    Hesse, Bradford W; Beckjord, Ellen; Rutten, Lila J Finney; Fagerlin, Angela; Cameron, Linda D

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decade, dramatic changes brought about by a rapid diffusion of Internet technologies, cellular telephones, mobile devices, personal digital assistants, electronic health records, and data visualization have helped to create a revolution in health communication. To understand the implications of this communication revolution for cancer care, the National Cancer Institute launched an ambitious set of research priorities under its "extraordinary opportunities" program. We present an overview of some of the relevant behavioral research being conducted within the perspective of this extraordinary opportunity in cancer communication research. We begin by tracing the implications of this research for behavioral scientists across the continuum of cancer care from primary prevention (e.g., tobacco control, diet, exercise, sun protection, and immunization against human papilloma virus), to secondary prevention (e.g., screening for polyps, lesions, and early stage neoplasms), to diagnosis and treatment, posttreatment survivorship, and end of life. Along each point of the continuum, we describe a natural evolution of knowledge from studies on the traditional role of media to research on the changing role of new media and informatics, and we carefully highlight the role that psychological research has played in improving communication- and health-related outcomes along the way. We conclude with an appeal to psychologists of many different backgrounds to join with biomedical researchers, engineers, clinical practitioners, and others to accelerate progress against cancer.

  4. Clinical Research Informatics for Big Data and Precision Medicine.

    PubMed

    Weng, C; Kahn, M G

    2016-11-10

    To reflect on the notable events and significant developments in Clinical Research Informatics (CRI) in the year of 2015 and discuss near-term trends impacting CRI. We selected key publications that highlight not only important recent advances in CRI but also notable events likely to have significant impact on CRI activities over the next few years or longer, and consulted the discussions in relevant scientific communities and an online living textbook for modern clinical trials. We also related the new concepts with old problems to improve the continuity of CRI research. The highlights in CRI in 2015 include the growing adoption of electronic health records (EHR), the rapid development of regional, national, and global clinical data research networks for using EHR data to integrate scalable clinical research with clinical care and generate robust medical evidence. Data quality, integration, and fusion, data access by researchers, study transparency, results reproducibility, and infrastructure sustainability are persistent challenges. The advances in Big Data Analytics and Internet technologies together with the engagement of citizens in sciences are shaping the global clinical research enterprise, which is getting more open and increasingly stakeholder-centered, where stakeholders include patients, clinicians, researchers, and sponsors.

  5. Psycho-informatics: Big Data shaping modern psychometrics.

    PubMed

    Markowetz, Alexander; Błaszkiewicz, Konrad; Montag, Christian; Switala, Christina; Schlaepfer, Thomas E

    2014-04-01

    For the first time in history, it is possible to study human behavior on great scale and in fine detail simultaneously. Online services and ubiquitous computational devices, such as smartphones and modern cars, record our everyday activity. The resulting Big Data offers unprecedented opportunities for tracking and analyzing behavior. This paper hypothesizes the applicability and impact of Big Data technologies in the context of psychometrics both for research and clinical applications. It first outlines the state of the art, including the severe shortcomings with respect to quality and quantity of the resulting data. It then presents a technological vision, comprised of (i) numerous data sources such as mobile devices and sensors, (ii) a central data store, and (iii) an analytical platform, employing techniques from data mining and machine learning. To further illustrate the dramatic benefits of the proposed methodologies, the paper then outlines two current projects, logging and analyzing smartphone usage. One such study attempts to thereby quantify severity of major depression dynamically; the other investigates (mobile) Internet Addiction. Finally, the paper addresses some of the ethical issues inherent to Big Data technologies. In summary, the proposed approach is about to induce the single biggest methodological shift since the beginning of psychology or psychiatry. The resulting range of applications will dramatically shape the daily routines of researches and medical practitioners alike. Indeed, transferring techniques from computer science to psychiatry and psychology is about to establish Psycho-Informatics, an entire research direction of its own. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Gemini Model in the 10- by 10-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1962-09-21

    A researcher at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Lewis Research Center examines a small-scale model of the Gemini capsule in the 10- by 10-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel test section. Gemini was added to NASA’s manned space program after its predecessor, Mercury, and its antecedent, Apollo, were already established. Gemini was a transitional mission designed provide the astronauts with practice docking with other spacecraft and withstanding durations in space up to two weeks. The program was officially announced on December 7, 1961, but planning began in mid-1959. It was named Gemini after the zodiac twins because of the spacecraft’s two passenger capacity. The Gemini Program was the first program to start at the new Manned Spacecraft Center in Houston, now the Johnson Space Center. Unlike Mercury and Apollo, Lewis had very little involvement with the Gemini Program. This model was tested in the 10- by 10 tunnel for several weeks in September 1962. Lewis began managing the Agena second-stage rocket program shortly after this photograph was taken. Agenas were used to launch a variety of spacecraft and satellites in the 1960s. They were also used on several Gemini missions to provide targets for the astronauts to practice their rendezvous maneuvers. Gemini had two unmanned and ten manned flights in 1965 and 1966. These yielded the first spacewalks, long-duration space missions, first onboard computer, docking with a second spacecraft, and rendezvous maneuvers.

  7. GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-9 TEST - ASTRONAUT EUGENE A. CERNAN - TRAINING - MSC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-05-19

    S66-27376 (19 Feb. 1966) --- Astronaut Eugene A. Cernan, pilot of the Gemini-9 spaceflight, practices with the Astronaut Maneuvering Unit during tests in Chamber B, Environmental Test Laboratory, Building 32. The AMU consists of a chest pack and a backpack. It is scheduled for use during Gemini-9 extravehicular activity (EVA). Photo credit: NASA

  8. Gemini 8 spacecraft hoisted aboard the U.S.S. Leonard F. Mason

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    The Gemini 8 spacecraft, with Astronauts Neil A. Armstrong and David R. Scott still aboard, is hoisted aboard the destroyer U.S.S. Leonard F. Mason. Trouble with the Gemini 8 Orbit Attitude and Maneuvering System (OAMS) forced an early termination of the mission.

  9. Overall view of Mission Control Center, Houston, Tx during Gemini 5

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-08-21

    S65-45280 (21-29 Aug. 1965) --- Overall view of the Mission Control Center (MCC), Houston, Texas, during the Gemini-5 flight. Note the screen at the front of the MCC which is used to track the progress of the Gemini spacecraft.

  10. Gemini amphiphiles regulated photopolymerization of diacetylene acid in organized molecular films.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Ling; Jiao, Tifeng; Liu, Minghua

    2009-07-02

    In this paper, we have investigated the photopolymerization of an amphiphilic diacetylene, 10,12-pentacosadiynoic acid (PCDA), in organized molecular films in the presence of a series of gemini amphiphiles with different spacer lengths. It has been found that, when gemini amphiphiles were mixed with the diacetylene, the film-forming properties were greatly improved and the photopolymerization could be regulated by the gemini amphiphiles. Miscibility and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) investigations revealed that the polymerization of PCDA in a mixed film was regulated by the mixing ratio and spacer length of the gemini amphiphiles. Although a slight amount of gemini amphiphile did not make the PCDA polymerize into blue films, the increment of the gemini amphiphile with the short spacer length in the mixed film caused the formation of a red film, and the intensity of red phase to blue phase can be modulated by changing the mixing ratios. When gemini amphiphiles with longer spacer lengths were mixed, blue films were predominantly obtained in all mixing ratios. A mechanism including the interaction between the headgroup of the gemini amphiphiles and the diacetylene and the regulation of the spacer was proposed.

  11. Adsorptive removal of naphthalene induced by structurally different Gemini surfactants in a soil-water system.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jia; Li, Jun; Huang, Guohe; Wang, Xiujie; Chen, Guanghui; Zhao, Baihang

    2016-09-01

    A new generation of surfactant, Gemini surfactants, have been synthesized and have attracted the attention of various industrial and academic research groups. This study focused on the use of symmetric and dissymmetric quaternary ammonium Gemini surfactants to immobilize naphthalene onto soil particles, and is used as an example of an innovative application to remove HOC in situ using the surfactant-enhanced sorption zone. The sorption capacity of modified soils by Gemini surfactant and natural soils was compared and the naphthalene sorption efficiency, in the absence and presence of Gemini surfactants with different alkyl chain lengths, was investigated in the soil-water system. The results have shown that the increased added Gemini surfactant formed admicelles at the interface of soil/water having superior capability to retard contaminant. Symmetric and dissymmetric Gemini surfactants have opposite effect on the aspect of removing of PAH attributing to their solubilization and sorption behavior in soil-water system. Compared with the natural soil, sorption of naphthalene by Gemini-modified soil is noticeably enhanced following the order of C12-2-16 < C12-2-12 < C12-2-8. However, the symmetric Gemini surfactant C12-2-12 is the optimized one for in situ barrier remediation, which is not only has relative high retention ability but also low dosage.

  12. Gemini 8 spacecraft hoisted aboard the U.S.S. Leonard F. Mason

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-03-16

    S66-26037 (16 March 1966) --- The Gemini-8 spacecraft, with astronauts Neil A. Armstrong and David R. Scott still aboard, is hoisted aboard the destroyer USS Leonard F. Mason. Trouble with the Gemini-8 Orbit Attitude and Maneuvering System (OAMS) forced an early termination of the mission. Photo credit: NASA

  13. GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-8 - RECOVERY - SPACECRAFT (S/C) HOISTED ABOARD - PACIFIC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-03-16

    S66-18613 (16 March 1966) --- The Gemini-8 spacecraft, with astronauts Neil A. Armstrong and David R. Scott still aboard, is hoisted aboard the destroyer USS Leonard F. Mason. Trouble with the Gemini-8 Orbit Attitude and Maneuvering System (OAMS) forced an early termination of the mission. Photo credit: NASA

  14. GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-12 - EARTH SKY - NORTHERN SONORA, MEXICO - OUTER SPACE

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-11-13

    S66-62794 (13 Nov. 1966) --- Northern portion of Sonora, Mexico; southeastern Arizona and southwestern New Mexico, as seen from the Gemini-12 spacecraft during its 30th revolution of Earth. Includes the Tucson, Phoenix, Mogollon Rim, and Painted Desert areas. A 100-foot tether line connects the Agena Target Docking Vehicle with the Gemini-12 spacecraft. Photo credit: NASA.

  15. GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-9 TEST - ASTRONAUT EDWARD A. CERNAN - MISCELLANEOUS - CAPE

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-06-03

    S66-34069 (3 June 1966) --- Gemini-9A prime crew enjoy a breakfast of steak and eggs on the morning of the Gemini-9A launch. Left to right, are astronaut Eugene A. Cernan, pilot; Donald K. Slayton, MSC Director of Flight Crew Operations; Charles Buckley, KSC Security; and astronaut Thomas P. Stafford, command pilot. Photo credit: NASA

  16. Organizational transformation to improve operational efficiency at Gemini South

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Hoeven, M.; Maltes, Diego; Rogers, Rolando

    2016-07-01

    In this paper we will describe how the Gemini South Engineering team has been reorganized from different functional units into a cross-disciplinary team while executing a transition plan that imposes several staff reductions, driven by budget reductions. Several factors are of critical importance to the success of any change in organization. Budgetary processes, staff diversity, leadership style, skill sets and planning are all important factors to take into account to achieve a successful outcome. We will analyze the organizational alignment by using some proven management models and concepts.

  17. Gemini-Titan (GT)-3 - Prelaunch Activities - Cape

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-03-23

    S65-21093 (23 March 1965) --- Astronaut Virgil I. Grissom (facing camera at right), command pilot of the Gemini-Titan 3 flight, is shown during a steak breakfast which he was served about two hours prior to the 9:24 a.m. (EST) GT-3 launch on March 23, 1965. Pictured in the foreground are Donald K. Slayton (right), assistant director for Flight Crew Operations; and Walter Burke, general manager of McDonnell Aircraft Corporation Spacecraft and Missiles. Pictured in the background are astronaut Alan B. Shepard Jr. (left) and Walter C. Williams, former deputy director of the Manned Spacecraft Center, now with a private aerospace firm.

  18. GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-11 - EARTH - SKY - DOCKING - OUTER SPACE

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-07-18

    S66-46144 (18 July 1966) --- The Gemini-10 spacecraft is successfully docked with the Agena Target Docking Vehicle 5005. The Agena display panel is clearly visible. After docking with the Agena, astronauts John W. Young, command pilot, and Michael Collins, pilot, fired the 16,000-pound thrust engine of Agena-10's primary propulsion system to boost the combined vehicles into an orbit with an apogee of 413 nautical miles to set a new altitude record for manned spaceflight. Photo credit: NASA

  19. Post-Coronagraph Wavefront Sensor for Gemini Planet Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, J. Kent; Burruss, Rick; Pueyo, Laurent; Soummer, Remi; Shelton, Chris; Bartos, Randall; Fregoso, Felipe; Nemati, Bijan; Best, Paul; Angione, John

    2009-01-01

    The calibration wavefront system for the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) will measure the complex wavefront at the apodized pupil and provide slow phase errors to the AO system to mitigate against image plane speckles that would cause a loss in contrast. This talk describes both the low-order and high-order sensors in the calibration wavefront sensor and how the information is combined to form the wavefront estimate before the coronagraph. We will show laboratory results from our calibration testbed that demonstrate the subsystem performance at levels commensurate with those required on the final instrument.

  20. GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-3 - EARTH-SKY VIEWS - CA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-03-23

    S65-18741 (23 March 1965) --- Astronaut John W. Young took this picture during the Gemini-Titan 3 three-orbit mission as the spacecraft "Molly Brown" passed over Northern Mexico. The large light-brown area is the Sonoran Desert. The Colorado River runs from upper right to lower left. The lower portion of the picture is Mexico, the upper left is California, and the upper right is Arizona. The altitude of the spacecraft was 90 miles. Young used a hand-held modified 70mm Hasselblad camera with color film. The lens setting was 250th of a second at f/11.