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Sample records for internet support groups

  1. Internet Cancer Support Groups

    PubMed Central

    Chee, Wonshik; Tsai, Hsiu-Min; Lin, Li-Chen; Cheng, Ching-Yu

    2006-01-01

    Internet Cancer Support Groups (ICSGs) are an emerging form of support group on Internet specifically for cancer patients. Previous studies have indicated the effectiveness of ICSGs as a research setting or a data-collection method. Yet recent studies have also indicated that ICSGs tend to serve highly educated, high-income White males who tend to be at an early stage of cancer. In this article, a total of 317 general ICSGs and 229 ethnic-specific ICSGs searched through Google.com, Yahoo.com, http://Msn.com, AOL.com, and ACOR.org are analyzed from a feminist perspective. The written records of group discussions and written memos by the research staff members were also analyzed using content analysis. The idea categories that emerged about these groups include (a) authenticity issues; (b) ethnicity and gender issues; (c) intersubjectivity issues; and (d) potential ethical issues. The findings suggest that (a) researchers adopt multiple recruitment strategies through various Internet sites and/or real settings; (b) researchers raise their own awareness of the potential influences of the health-related resources provided by ICSGs and regularly update their knowledge related to the federal and state standards and/or policies related to ICSGs; and (c) researchers consider adopting a quota-sampling method. PMID:15681976

  2. Internet cancer support groups: a feminist analysis.

    PubMed

    Im, Eun-Ok; Chee, Wonshik; Tsai, Hsiu-Min; Lin, Li-Chen; Cheng, Ching-Yu

    2005-01-01

    Internet Cancer Support Groups (ICSGs) are an emerging form of support group on Internet specifically for cancer patients. Previous studies have indicated the effectiveness of ICSGs as a research setting or a data-collection method. Yet recent studies have also indicated that ICSGs tend to serve highly educated, high-income White males who tend to be at an early stage of cancer. In this article, a total of 317 general ICSGs and 229 ethnic-specific ICSGs searched through Google.com, Yahoo.com, Msn.com, AOL.com, and ACOR.org are analyzed from a feminist perspective. The written records of group discussions and written memos by the research staff members were also analyzed using content analysis. The idea categories that emerged about these groups include (a) authenticity issues; (b) ethnicity and gender issues; (c) intersubjectivity issues; and (d) potential ethical issues. The findings suggest that (a) researchers adopt multiple recruitment strategies through various Internet sites and/or real settings; (b) researchers raise their own awareness of the potential influences of the health-related resources provided by ICSGs and regularly update their knowledge related to the federal and state standards and/or policies related to ICSGs; and (c) researchers consider adopting a quota-sampling method.

  3. The questions on the use of internet cancer support groups: instrument development.

    PubMed

    Im, Eun-Ok; Lee, Bokim; Chee, Wonshik

    2011-06-01

    Recently, with advances in computer technologies, Internet cancer support groups became more popular than ever among people living with cancer. However, there is little information available on cancer patients' use of Internet cancer support groups, which may be partially due to a lack of instruments measuring cancer patients' use of Internet cancer support groups. Indeed, virtually no instrument measuring cancer patients' use of Internet cancer support groups can be identified through searches using multiple databases. In this study, a new instrument measuring the use of Internet cancer support groups was developed, and its psychometric properties were tested among 117 people living with cancer recruited through the Internet using a convenience sampling method. First, the development process of the new instrument, the Questions on the Use of Internet Cancer Support Groups, is described. Then, the pilot study on psychometric properties of the instrument is presented. Reliability was evaluated using internal consistency reliability testing, split-half reliability testing, and item analysis. Validity was assessed by using criterion validity, convergent validity, and face validity. The findings of the pilot study supported the reliability and validity of this new instrument. Based on the findings, some implications for future research are proposed.

  4. Online interaction. Effects of storytelling in an internet breast cancer support group.

    PubMed

    Høybye, Mette Terp; Johansen, Christoffer; Tjørnhøj-Thomsen, Tine

    2005-03-01

    The internet provides new ways of forming social relationships among people with breast cancer and is increasingly used for this purpose. This qualitative study, using ethnographic case-study method, aimed to explore how support groups on the internet can break the social isolation that follows cancer and chronic pain, by analysing the storytelling emerging on the Scandinavian Breast Cancer Mailing list. Using participant observation and face-to-face or online interviews of participants, we investigated the motivations of 15 women who chose the internet to counteract social isolation after breast cancer. The results showed that the women were empowered by the exchanges of knowledge and experience within the support group. The internet was considered a means for finding ways of living with breast cancer. Our study suggests that internet support groups have important potential for the rehabilitation of cancer patients.

  5. Direction to an Internet Support Group Compared With Online Expressive Writing for People With Depression And Anxiety: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Jeremy; Potts, Henry WW

    2016-01-01

    Background Depression and anxiety are common, often comorbid, conditions, and Internet support groups for them are well used. However, little rigorous research has been conducted on the outcome of these groups. Objective This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of an Internet support group in reducing depression and anxiety, and increasing social support and life satisfaction. Methods A randomized trial compared direction to an existing Internet support group for depression and anxiety with an online expressive writing condition. A total of 863 (628 female) United Kingdom, United States, and Canadian volunteers were recruited via the Internet. Online, self-report measures of depression, anxiety, social support, and satisfaction with life were administered at baseline, 3, and 6 months. Results All four outcomes – depression, anxiety, social support, and satisfaction with life – improved over the 6 months of the study (all P<.001). There was no difference in outcome between the two conditions: participants responded similarly to the expressive writing and the Internet support group. Engagement with the Internet support group was low, it had high 6-month attrition (692/795, 87%) and low adherence, and it received mixed and often negative feedback. The main problems reported were a lack of comfort and connection with others, negative social comparisons, and the potential for receiving bad advice. Expressive writing had lower attrition (194/295, 65%) and participants reported that it was more acceptable. Conclusions Until further evidence accumulates, directing people with depression and anxiety to Internet support groups cannot be recommended. On the other hand, online expressive writing seems to have potential, and its use for people with depression and anxiety warrants further investigation. Trial Registration Trial Registration: Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01149265; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01149265 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6h

  6. “Shielded from the Real World”: Perspectives on Internet Cancer Support Groups by Asian Americans

    PubMed Central

    Im, Eun-Ok; Lee, Bok Im; Chee, Wonshik

    2010-01-01

    Background Despite positive reports about Internet cancer support groups (ICSGs), ethnic minorities, including Asian Americans, have been reported to be less likely to use ICSGs. Unique cultural values, beliefs, and attitudes have been considered reasons for the low usage rate of ICSGs among Asian Americans. However, studies have rarely looked at this issue. Objective The purpose of this study was to explore (a) how Asian Americans living with cancer who participated in ICSGs viewed ICSGs, (b) what facilitated or inhibited their participation in ICSGs, and (c) what cultural values and beliefs influenced their participation in ICSGs. Methods The study was a one-month qualitative online forum among 18 Asian American cancer patients recruited through a convenience sampling method. Nine topics on the use of ICSGs organized the forum discussion, and the data were analyzed using thematic analysis. Results Four themes emerged from the data analysis process: (a) “more than just my family,” (b) “part of my family,” (c) “anonymous me,” and (d) “shielded from the real world.” Conclusions The overarching theme was Asian Americans’ marginalized experience in the use of Internet cancer support groups. Implications for Practice Offering the most current information on cancer and cancer treatment is essential for nursing practice in developing a culturally competent ICSG for Asian Americans. Also, emotional familiarity should be incorporated into the design of the ICSG, and the ICSG needs to be based on non-judgmental and non-discriminative interactions. PMID:20357657

  7. Health-related Support Groups on the Internet: Linking Empirical Findings to Social Support and Computer-mediated Communication Theory.

    PubMed

    Wright, Kevin B; Bell, Sally B; Wright, Kevin B; Bell, Sally B

    2003-01-01

    This literature review of research on health-related computer-mediated support groups links features of these groups to existing theory from the areas of social support and computer-mediated communication research. The article exams computer-mediated support groups as weak tie networks, focuses on how these support groups facilitate participant similarity and empathic support and identifies changes in supportive communication due to characteristics of the medium.

  8. Psychological characteristics of people with Parkinson's disease who prematurely drop out of professionally led Internet chat support groups.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, Morton A

    2007-12-01

    Researchers of Internet health interventions have begun to address the problems of high attrition rates. Attrition has been a problem for psychosocial interventions for nearly 50 years. It is ubiquitous no matter what the type of intervention or the modality of delivery. Consistent are the repeated findings that demographic characteristics are the most robust variables. We tested the hypothesis that the greater the fear and apprehension experienced in professionally led Internet support groups, the more likely the participants would not complete the 25-week intervention. The sample consisted of 66 people with Parkinson's disease; each participant was assigned to one of six chat groups. To assess psychological states, we used PCAD, a text analysis program analyzing each person's postings during each chat room session. There was a statistically significant difference between those who terminated the group early and those who completed the intervention on the Anxiety-Fear dimension, F=2.35, (6,63), p=0.03. People who dropped out demonstrated higher death and shame anxiety. A number of possible designs for online groups that may reduce premature attrition are discussed.

  9. Language use in an internet support group for smoking cessation: development of sense of community.

    PubMed

    Vambheim, Sara M; Wangberg, Silje C; Johnsen, Jan-Are K; Wynn, Rolf

    2013-01-01

    The use of the internet for health purposes is increasing, as is the number of sites and online communities aimed at helping people to stop smoking. Some of the effects of online communities may be mediated through a sense of community. By using the computer-program Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count with a Norwegian dictionary, we investigated whether there was a development of sense of community in a forum related to a Norwegian smoking cessation intervention, by examining the use of self-referencing vs. collective referencing words. Data from a 4-year period, including in total 5242 web pages, were included. There was a significant increase in the use of collective words over time and a significant decrease in the use of self-referencing words. The increase in the use of collective words suggests that there appears to be a development of a sense of community in the forum over time. More research is needed to study the importance of an online sense of community.

  10. Attitudes about internet support groups among adolescents and young adults with neurofibromatosis type 1 and their parents.

    PubMed

    Martin, Staci; Wolters, Pamela L; Baldwin, Andrea; Roderick, Marie Claire; Toledo-Tamula, Mary Anne; Gillespie, Andrea; Widemann, Brigitte

    2014-10-01

    Youth with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) have multiple, complex symptoms associated with physical, social-emotional, and cognitive difficulties. In addition, caring for a child with NF1 can be extremely challenging for parents. Since research with other chronic illness populations suggests that social support, including internet support groups (ISGs), can be beneficial, this survey study aimed to determine the attitudes and preferences of adolescents and young adults with NF1 and parents of a child with NF1 regarding ISGs. Thirty patients and 30 caregivers completed a 24-item survey about ISGs. Many patients and parents are not aware of any ISGs for NF1, but are interested in using one in the future for a variety of reasons, including to get answers to their questions about NF1, to find out about research studies, and to discuss problems and concerns about NF1. Specific concerns of interest include physical, social-emotional, and cognitive aspects of NF1. ISGs have potential as a social support intervention within the NF1 community. ISGs for the NF1 population should include patients with NF1 (or parents of children with NF1) as well as a health professional, and both chat rooms and discussion boards likely would be well-received.

  11. Internet Discussion Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bull, Glen; Bull, Gina; Sigmon, Tim

    1997-01-01

    Discusses newsgroups, listservs, and Web-based discussion groups. Highlights include major categories of international USENET discussion groups; newsgroups versus mailing lists; newsreaders; news servers; newsgroup subscriptions; newsgroups versus Web discussion groups; linking newsgroups, mailing lists, and the Web; and setting up a news host. A…

  12. Low carbohydrate diets in family practice: what can we learn from an internet-based support group.

    PubMed

    Feinman, Richard D; Vernon, Mary C; Westman, Eric C

    2006-10-02

    The Active Low-Carber Forums (ALCF) is an on-line support group started in 2000 which currently has more than 86,000 members. Data collected from posts to the forum and from an on-line survey were used to determine the behavior and attitudes of people on low carbohydrate diets. Members were asked to complete a voluntary 27-item questionnaire over the internet. Our major findings are as follows: survey respondents, like the membership at large, were mostly women and mostly significantly overweight, a significant number intending to and, in many cases, succeeding at losing more than 100 lbs. The great majority of members of ALCF identify themselves as following the Atkins diet or some variation of it. Although individual posts on the forum and in the narrative part of our survey are critical of professional help, we found that more than half of respondents saw a physician before or during dieting and, of those who did, about half received support from the physician. Another 28 % found the physician initially neutral but supportive after positive results were produced. Using the same criteria as the National Weight Registry (without follow-up)--30 lbs or more lost and maintained for more than one year--it was found that more than 1400 people had successfully used low carb methods. In terms of food consumed, the perception of more than half of respondents were that they ate less than before the diet and whereas high protein, high fat sources replaced carbohydrate to some extent, the major change indicated by survey-takers is a large increase in green vegetables and a large decrease in fruit intake. Government or health agencies were not sources of information for dieters in this group and a collection of narrative comments indicates a high level of satisfaction, indeed enthusiasm for low carbohydrate dieting. The results provide both a tabulation of the perceived behavior of a significant number of dieters using low carbohydrate strategies as well as a collection of

  13. The ANU WellBeing study: a protocol for a quasi-factorial randomised controlled trial of the effectiveness of an Internet support group and an automated Internet intervention for depression

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Recent projections suggest that by the year 2030 depression will be the primary cause of disease burden among developed countries. Delivery of accessible consumer-focused evidenced-based services may be an important element in reducing this burden. Many consumers report a preference for self-help modes of delivery. The Internet offers a promising modality for delivering such services and there is now evidence that automated professionally developed self-help psychological interventions can be effective. By contrast, despite their popularity, there is little evidence as to the effectiveness of Internet support groups which provide peer-to-peer mutual support. Methods/Design Members of the community with elevated psychological distress were randomised to receive one of the following: (1) Internet Support Group (ISG) intervention, (2) a multi-module automated psychoeducational and skills Internet Training Program (ITP), (3) a combination of the ISG and ITP, or (4) an Internet Attention Control website (IAC) comprising health and wellbeing information and question and answer modules. Each intervention was 12 weeks long. Assessments were conducted at baseline, post-intervention, 6 and 12 months to examine depressive symptoms, social support, self-esteem, quality of life, depression literacy, stigma and help-seeking for depression. Participants were recruited through a screening postal survey sent to 70,000 Australians aged 18 to 65 years randomly selected from four rural and four metropolitan regions in Australia. Discussion To our knowledge this study is the first randomised controlled trial of the effectiveness of a depression ISG. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN65657330. PMID:20211025

  14. An equivalence evaluation of a nurse-moderated group-based internet support program for new mothers versus standard care: a pragmatic preference randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background All mothers in South Australia are offered a clinic or home-visit by a Child and Family Health community nurse in the initial postnatal weeks. Subsequent support is available on request from staff in community clinics and from a telephone helpline. The aim of the present study is to compare equivalence of a single clinic-based appointment plus a nurse-moderated group-based internet intervention when infants were aged 0–6 months versus a single home-visit together with subsequent standard services (the latter support was available to mothers in both study groups). Methods/Design The evaluation utilised a pragmatic preference randomised trial comparing the equivalence of outcomes for mothers and infants across the two study groups. Eligible mothers were those whose services were provided by nurses working in one of six community clinics in the metropolitan region of Adelaide. Mothers were excluded if they did not have internet access, required an interpreter, or their nurse clinician recommended that they not participate due to issues such as domestic violence or substance abuse. Randomisation was based on the service identification number sequentially assigned to infants when referred to the Child and Family Health Services from birthing units (this was done by administrative staff who had no involvement in recruiting mothers, delivering the intervention, or analyzing results for the study). Consistent with design and power calculations, 819 mothers were recruited to the trial. The primary outcomes for the trial are parents’ sense of competence and self-efficacy measured using standard self-report questionnaires. Secondary outcomes include the quality of mother-infant relationships, maternal social support, role satisfaction and maternal mental health, infant social-emotional and language development, and patterns of service utilisation. Maternal and infant outcomes will be evaluated using age-appropriate questionnaires when infants are aged <2 months

  15. Multi-Level Analysis of Peer Support, Internet Self-Efficacy and E-Learning Outcomes--The Contextual Effects of Collectivism and Group Potency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chu, Regina Juchun; Chu, Anita Zichun

    2010-01-01

    The present study intends to explore the role of collectivism and group potency at group level in predicting individual Internet self-efficacy (ISE) and individual e-learning outcomes for people aged over 45. Group learning has been widely discussed in the research into online formats. However, less study has been carried out about how…

  16. Language of motivation and emotion in an internet support group for smoking cessation: explorative use of automated content analysis to measure regulatory focus.

    PubMed

    Johnsen, Jan-Are K; Vambheim, Sara M; Wynn, Rolf; Wangberg, Silje C

    2014-01-01

    The present study describes a novel approach to the identification of the motivational processes in text data extracted from an Internet support group (ISG) for smoking cessation. Based on the previous findings that a "prevention" focus might be more relevant for maintaining behavior change, it was hypothesized that 1) language use (ie, the use of emotional words) signaling a "promotion" focus would be dominant in the initiating stages of the ISG, and 2) that the proportion of words signaling a prevention focus would increase over time. The data were collected from the ISG site, spanning 4 years of forum activity. The data were analyzed using the Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count application. The first hypothesis - of promotion focus dominance in the initiating stages - was not supported during year 1. However, for all the other years measured, the data showed that a prevention failure was more dominant compared with a promotion failure. The results indicate that content analysis could be used to investigate motivational and language-driven processes in ISGs. Understanding the interplay between self-regulation, lifestyle change, and modern communication channels could be of vital importance in providing the public with better health care services and interventions.

  17. INTERNET Groups Allow for Productive Information Gathering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashley, Charles

    1992-01-01

    Explains why Internet groups are a good medium for retrieving and exchanging information. An example of the use of netgroups to obtain information on the Gulf War of 1990-91 is given; the benefits of the informal nature of netgroups are discussed; and a mediated discussion group, Humanist, is described. (LRW)

  18. Supporting fieldwork using the Internet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, C. E.

    1998-08-01

    In the United Kingdom, a number of recent Information Technology projects have been sponsored by the Higher Education Funding Councils to promote efficiency and quality in education. This article describes a project in which the focus is on the development of tools: methods and software to help teachers with limited time and technical ability to produce course support materials for laboratory and field classes. Tools under development to support fieldwork include Web forms interfaces for producing location maps, virtual reality models of field locations and panoramas with sound commentary.

  19. Group Support Systems (GSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamel, Gary P.; Wijesinghe, R.

    1996-01-01

    Groupware is a term describing an emerging computer software technology enhancing the ability of people to work together as a group, (a software driven 'group support system'). This project originated at the beginning of 1992 and reports were issued describing the activity through May 1995. These reports stressed the need for process as well as technology. That is, while the technology represented a computer assisted method for groups to work together, the Group Support System (GSS) technology als required an understanding of the facilitation process electronic meetings demand. Even people trained in traditional facilitation techniques did not necessarily aimlessly adopt groupware techniques. The latest phase of this activity attempted to (1) improve the facilitation process by developing training support for a portable groupware computer system, and (2) to explore settings and uses for the portable groupware system using different software, such as Lotus Notes.

  20. Cellular Manufacturing Internet Performance Support System

    SciTech Connect

    Bohley, M.C.; Schwartz, M.E.

    1998-03-04

    The objective of this project was to develop an Internet-based electronic performance support system (EPSS) for cellular manufacturing providing hardware/software specifications, process descriptions, estimated cost savings, manufacturing simulations, training information, and service resources for government and industry users of Cincinnati Milacron machine tools and products. AlliedSignal Federal Manufacturing and Technologies (ASFM and T) used expertise in the areas of Internet design and multimedia creation to develop a performance support system (PSS) for the Internet with assistance from CM's subject matter experts from engineering, manufacturing, and technical support. Reference information was both created and re-purposed from other existing formats, then made available on the Internet. On-line references on cellular manufacturing operations include: definitions of cells and cellular manufacturing; illustrations on how cellular manufacturing improves part throughput, resource utilization, part quality, and manufacturing flexibility; illustrations on how cellular manufacturing reduces labor and overhead costs; identification of critical factors driving decisions toward cellular manufacturing; a method for identifying process improvement areas using cellular manufacturing; a method for customizing the size of cells for a specific site; a simulation for making a part using cellular manufacturing technology; and a glossary of terms and concepts.

  1. Valuing Support Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graziosi, Elena

    2010-01-01

    For people living with or caring for someone with a disability, being able to talk to someone who can relate to their feelings of frustration during difficult times, offer practical advice on an issue, or even understand the importance of a small success, can make a difference. Support groups are a mainstay for individuals coping with daily…

  2. Internet-based group contingency management to promote smoking abstinence

    PubMed Central

    Dallery, Jesse; Meredith, Steven; Jarvis, Brantley; Nuzzo, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Internet-based group contingencies have been shown to promote brief periods of abstinence from cigarette smoking. Under a group contingency, small teams of smokers must collectively meet abstinence goals to receive monetary consequences. The present study investigated two arrangements, one in which all team members had to meet group treatment goals to receive monetary consequences (Full Group), and one in which team members had to meet some group goals and some individual goals to receive these consequences (Mixed Group). Mōtiv8 Systems, an Internet-based remote monitoring platform, was used to collect video-recorded breath carbon monoxide (CO) samples. All team members could communicate with each other via an online discussion forum. During baseline conditions, only 3.3% of CO samples were negative for smoking, which suggests that self-monitoring and access to the online discussion forum were insufficient to initiate abstinence. When the group contingencies were instituted 41.3% of CO samples were negative. There were no statistically significant differences between the two arrangements in the percentage of negative CO samples or point prevalence at the end of treatment or at the 3-month follow-up. Participants posted an average of 25 comments on the discussion forum, most of which were rated as positive by independent observers. The mean cost of vouchers per participant was lower in the Full Group ($33) relative to the Mixed group ($190). The present results replicate and extend previous findings on group contingencies to promote abstinence and social support. PMID:25821915

  3. The Third Annual NASA Science Internet User Working Group Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lev, Brian S. (Editor); Gary, J. Patrick (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    The NASA Science Internet (NSI) User Support Office (USO) sponsored the Third Annual NSI User Working Group (NSIUWG) Conference March 30 through April 3, 1992, in Greenbelt, MD. Approximately 130 NSI users attended to learn more about the NSI, hear from projects which use NSI, and receive updates about new networking technologies and services. This report contains material relevant to the conference; copies of the agenda, meeting summaries, presentations, and descriptions of exhibitors. Plenary sessions featured a variety of speakers, including NSI project management, scientists, and NSI user project managers whose projects and applications effectively use NSI, and notable citizens of the larger Internet community. The conference also included exhibits of advanced networking applications; tutorials on internetworking, computer security, and networking technologies; and user subgroup meetings on the future direction of the conference, networking, and user services and applications.

  4. Modeling of Internet Influence on Group Emotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czaplicka, Agnieszka; Hołyst, Janusz A.

    Long-range interactions are introduced to a two-dimensional model of agents with time-dependent internal variables ei = 0, ±1 corresponding to valencies of agent emotions. Effects of spontaneous emotion emergence and emotional relaxation processes are taken into account. The valence of agent i depends on valencies of its four nearest neighbors but it is also influenced by long-range interactions corresponding to social relations developed for example by Internet contacts to a randomly chosen community. Two types of such interactions are considered. In the first model the community emotional influence depends only on the sign of its temporary emotion. When the coupling parameter approaches a critical value a phase transition takes place and as result for larger coupling constants the mean group emotion of all agents is nonzero over long time periods. In the second model the community influence is proportional to magnitude of community average emotion. The ordered emotional phase was here observed for a narrow set of system parameters.

  5. 'Intimate mothering publics': comparing face-to-face support groups and Internet use for women seeking information and advice in the transition to first-time motherhood.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Sophia Alice

    2015-01-01

    This paper seeks to contribute to an understanding of the changing nature of support and information-seeking practices for women in the transition to first-time motherhood. In the context of increasing digitalisation, the significance of new virtual spaces for parenting is discussed. The paper demonstrates how women seek out alternative forms of expertise (specifically, non-medical expertise) and social support. The author argues for the importance of 'intimate mothering publics' through which women gather experiential information and practical support. These publics can act as a space for women to 'test' or legitimise their new identity as a mother. Intimate mothering publics are particularly useful for thinking about the meaning-making practices and learning experiences that occur during intimate online and face-to-face interactions. A variety of types of online support may be used during pregnancy. Surreptitious support in particular involves users invisibly receiving advice, information and reassurance that might otherwise be lacking. Access to intimate mothering publics is motivated by a number of factors, including feelings of community or acceptance, the desire to be a good mother or parent, emotional support and the need for practical and experiential advice.

  6. Shared death: self, sociality and internet group suicide in Japan.

    PubMed

    Ozawa-De Silva, Chikako

    2010-07-01

    Existing models for understanding suicide fail to account for the distinctiveness of Internet group suicide, a recent phenomenon in Japan. Drawing from an ethnography of Internet suicide websites, two social commentaries in Japanese popular culture, and the work of developmental psychologist Philippe Rochat, I argue that participation in Internet suicide forums and even the act of Internet group suicide result from both a need for social connectedness and the fear of social rejection and isolation that this need engenders. These needs and fears are especially strong in the case of Japan, where the dominant cultural rhetoric ties selfhood closely to the social self that is the object of perception and experience by others. I show how such an understanding of Internet group suicide helps us to understand some of its basic characteristics, which are otherwise difficult to explain and which have puzzled the Japanese media and popular accounts: the "ordinariness" or casual nature of Internet group suicide, the wish for an easy or comfortable death, the wish to die with others, and the wish to "vanish." Internet group suicide sheds light on questions of Japanese selfhood in modernity and expands our understanding of suicide in Japan in general.

  7. AIDS groups challenge Federal Internet censorship law.

    PubMed

    1996-05-03

    The Communications Decency Act (CDA), a section of the 1996 telecommunications reform law, bans indecent and patently offensive expression from all online systems available to those under the age of 18. AIDS organizations and the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) filed suit in U.S. District Court in Philadelphia, PA,to challenge the law. The ACLU contends that the CDA law is unconstitutional because it criminalizes expression that is protected by the First Amendment, and violates constitutional rights to privacy. The CDA also would impede dissemination of HIV prevention information, according to AIDS online services. Operators of these electronic information systems state that providing explicit language about safe sexual practices is essential if teenagers are to understand how to prevent HIV infection. Additionally, content providers argue that it is almost impossible to know what text or images must be censored in order to avoid government prosecution. Expert witnesses testifying for the U.S. Government stated that there are means available to purge Internet sites of materials that might be regarded as indecent. The ACLU recommends utilizing a software package that would enable parents to control their children's Internet access without requiring broad censorship.

  8. ED's Oasis: Teacher Support for Internet Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Terrie

    1998-01-01

    Describes ED's Oasis, a multifunction Web site funded by the AT&T Foundation, through the AT&T Learning Network program, and developed by a team of educators to help teachers use the Internet with their students. Examples are given of various possible uses, including designing interdisciplinary units. (LRW)

  9. Performance Support in Internet Time: The State of the Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gery, Gloria; Malcolm, Stan; Cichelli, Janet; Christensen, Hal; Raybould, Barry; Rosenberg, Marc J.

    2000-01-01

    Relates a discussion held via teleconference that addressed trends relating to performance support. Topics include computer-based training versus performance support; knowledge management; Internet and Web-based applications; dynamics and human activities; enterprise application integration; intrinsic performance support; and future possibilities.…

  10. Internet-based support programs to alleviate psychosocial and physical symptoms in cancer patients: a literature analysis.

    PubMed

    Bouma, Grietje; Admiraal, Jolien M; de Vries, Elisabeth G E; Schröder, Carolien P; Walenkamp, Annemiek M E; Reyners, Anna K L

    2015-07-01

    In this review the effect of internet-based support programs on psychosocial and physical symptoms resulting from cancer diagnosis and treatment is analyzed. Selection of studies was based on the following criteria: (non-)randomized controlled trials, performed in adult cancer patients, comparing quantitative psychosocial and/or physical outcomes of an internet-based support program with (a) comparison group(s). Literature search yielded 2032 studies of which 16 fulfilled the eligibility criteria. Three different internet-based support programs were identified: social support groups, online therapy for psychosocial/physical symptoms, and online systems integrating information, support, and coaching services. Outcomes improved by these programs in nine studies. Especially fatigue, social support, and distress improved, regardless of the program type. All online systems showed positive effects, mainly for social support and quality of life. This analysis indicates that internet-based support programs are effective in improving psychosocial and physical symptoms in cancer patients.

  11. Characteristics of Midlife Women Recruited Through Internet Communities/Groups

    PubMed Central

    Im, Eun-ok

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore demographic characteristics of a specific online population, midlife women recruited through Internet communities (ICs) or groups, and to provide future direction for Internet research among midlife women. Using a feminist perspective, the study focused on ethnic variations in the characteristics of the midlife women. A total of 192 midlife women were recruited through ICs. The Internet survey included questions on sociodemographic characteristics and health/illness status. The data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. The findings indicated that midlife women recruited through ICs tended to be Caucasian, young, married, and affluent. The findings also indicated significant ethnic differences in sociodemographic characteristics. The findings suggest that researchers need to consider that midlife women recruited from ICs tend to be a specific group of midlife women. PMID:18091620

  12. Software Supports Distributed Operations via the Internet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, Jeffrey; Backers, Paul; Steinke, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Multi-mission Encrypted Communication System (MECS) is a computer program that enables authorized, geographically dispersed users to gain secure access to a common set of data files via the Internet. MECS is compatible with legacy application programs and a variety of operating systems. The MECS architecture is centered around maintaining consistent replicas of data files cached on remote computers. MECS monitors these files and, whenever one is changed, the changed file is committed to a master database as soon as network connectivity makes it possible to do so. MECS provides subscriptions for remote users to automatically receive new data as they are generated. Remote users can be producers as well as consumers of data. Whereas a prior program that provides some of the same services treats disconnection of a user from the network of users as an error from which recovery must be effected, MECS treats disconnection as a nominal state of the network: This leads to a different design that is more efficient for serving many users, each of whom typically connects and disconnects frequently and wants only a small fraction of the data at any given time.

  13. The intergroup protocols: Scalable group communication for the internet

    SciTech Connect

    Berket, Karlo

    2000-12-04

    Reliable group ordered delivery of multicast messages in a distributed system is a useful service that simplifies the programming of distributed applications. Such a service helps to maintain the consistency of replicated information and to coordinate the activities of the various processes. With the increasing popularity of the Internet, there is an increasing interest in scaling the protocols that provide this service to the environment of the Internet. The InterGroup protocol suite, described in this dissertation, provides such a service, and is intended for the environment of the Internet with scalability to large numbers of nodes and high latency links. The InterGroup protocols approach the scalability problem from various directions. They redefine the meaning of group membership, allow voluntary membership changes, add a receiver-oriented selection of delivery guarantees that permits heterogeneity of the receiver set, and provide a scalable reliability service. The InterGroup system comprises several components, executing at various sites within the system. Each component provides part of the services necessary to implement a group communication system for the wide-area. The components can be categorized as: (1) control hierarchy, (2) reliable multicast, (3) message distribution and delivery, and (4) process group membership. We have implemented a prototype of the InterGroup protocols in Java, and have tested the system performance in both local-area and wide-area networks.

  14. Internet-Based Interactive Support for Cancer Patients: Are Integrated Systems Better?

    PubMed Central

    Gustafson, David H.; Hawkins, Robert; McTavish, Fiona; Pingree, Suzanne; Chen, Wei Chih; Volrathongchai, Kanittha; Stengle, William; Stewart, James A.; Serlin, Ronald C.

    2011-01-01

    To compare the benefits of the Internet generally versus a focused system of services, 257 breast cancer patients were randomly assigned to a control group, access to the Internet with links to high-quality breast cancer sites, or access to an eHealth system (Comprehensive Health Enhancement Support System, CHESS) that integrated information, support, and decision and analysis tools. The intervention lasted 5 months, and self-report data on quality of life, health-care competence, and social support were collected at pretest and at 2-, 4-, and 9-month posttests. CHESS subjects logged on more overall than Internet subjects and accessed more health resources, but the latter used non health-related sites more. Subjects with access to the Internet alone experienced no better outcomes than controls at any of the 3 time points, compared to pretest levels. Subjects with CHESS experienced greater social support during the intervention period and had higher scores on all 3 outcomes at 9 months, 4 months after the intervention ended. CHESS subjects also scored higher than those with Internet access during the intervention period but not significantly after the intervention ended. Thus, CHESS (with one simple interface and integrated information, communication, and skills services) helped newly diagnosed breast cancer patients even after computers were removed. In contrast, patients received little benefit from Internet access, despite having links to a variety of high-quality sites. PMID:21804645

  15. Rejuvenated by environmental groups' support

    SciTech Connect

    Kirschner, E.

    1993-05-12

    A letter of conditional support last week from seven environmental groups reinvigorated the North American Free Trade Agreement. The likelihood of NAFTA ratification in Congress seemed to hit its nadir when Office of Management and Budget chief Leon Panetta declared that the Canada-US-Mexico pact was dead. Observers say that ratification, said to be stalled because of a lack of public support, could be jump-started by the proposal. The seven groups offered to back NAFTA on more conciliatory terms than they had previously demanded. They proposed that the North American Commission on the Environment (NACE), which is to be defined by the side agreements, be given power and finances to investigate environmental offenses. The signatories would also negotiate criteria for process standards. Public participation must be built into the side agreements, they said. Non-binding NACE recommendations must then be considered by the governments. The Sierra Club broke ranks, demanding more power for NACE, with a specific emphasis on industry accountability. [open quotes]NAFTA must insure that industries bear the responsibility for their actions,[close quotes] said Sierra trade and environmental program director John Audley. Sierra Club called for funding for cleanup under a [open quotes]polluter pays[close quotes] principle, legal avenues for NACE information gathering, industry-specific sanctions, and consideration of production processes in addition to product qualities.

  16. Research on Group Decision-Making Mechanism of Internet Emergency Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Kefan; Chen, Gang; Qian, Wu; Shi, Zhao

    With the development of information technology, internet has become a popular term and internet emergency has an intensive influence on people's life. This article offers a short history of internet emergency management. It discusses the definition, characteristics, and factor of internet emergency management. A group decision-making mechanism of internet emergency is presented based on the discussion. The authors establish a so-called Rough Set Scenario Flow Graphs (RSSFG) of group decision-making mechanism of internet emergency management and make an empirical analysis based on the RSSFG approach. The experimental results confirm that this approach is effective in internet emergency decision-making.

  17. Supportive monitoring and disease management through the internet: an internet-delivered intervention strategy for recurrent depression.

    PubMed

    Kordy, Hans; Backenstrass, Matthias; Hüsing, Johannes; Wolf, Markus; Aulich, Kai; Bürgy, Martin; Puschner, Bernd; Rummel-Kluge, Christine; Vedder, Helmut

    2013-11-01

    Major depression is a highly prevalent, disabling disorder associated with loss of quality of life and large economic burden for the society. Depressive disorders often follow a chronic or recurrent course. The risk of relapses increases with each additional episode. The internet-deliverable intervention strategy SUMMIT (SUpportive Monitoring and Disease Management over the InTernet) for patients with recurrent depression has been developed with the main objectives to prolong symptom-free phases and to shorten symptom-loaden phases. This paper describes the study design of a six-sites, three-arm, randomized clinical trial intended to evaluate the efficacy of this novel strategy compared to treatment as usual (TAU). Two hundred thirty six patients who had been treated for their (at least) third depressive episode in one of the six participating psychiatric centers were randomized into one of three groups: 1) TAU plus a twelve-month SUMMIT program participation with personal support or 2) TAU plus a twelve-month SUMMIT program participation without personal support, or 3) TAU alone. Primary outcome of this study is defined as the number of "well weeks" over 24months after index treatment assessed by blind evaluators based on the Longitudinal Interval Follow-Up Evaluation. If efficacious, the low monetary and nonmonetary expenditures of this automated, yet individualized intervention may open new avenues for providing an acceptable, convenient, and affordable long-term disease management strategy to people with a chronic mental condition such as recurrent depression.

  18. Teaching Leadership Skills for Support Group Facilitators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickel, C. Timothy; Boytim, James A.

    Evidence in the professional literature that social support in a person's life can lessen the effects of stressful life events makes knowledge of the dynamics of social support and of the workings of the support groups vital for counselors. Social support has been defined by various authors in various ways. Especially helpful to counselors is…

  19. Effect of social support on depression of internet addicts and the mediating role of loneliness

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Many studies have determined the existence of an extremely close association between Internet addiction and depression. However, the reasons for the depression of Internet addicts have not been fully investigated. Aim This cross-sectional study aims to explore the factors that influence depression among Internet addicts. Methods A total of 162 male Internet addicts completed the Emotional and Social Loneliness Scale, Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support, and Self-Rating Depression Scale. Results Loneliness and lack of social support are significantly correlated with depression among Internet addicts. Structural Equation Modeling results indicate that social support partially mediates loneliness and depression. Conclusions Both social support and loneliness were negatively associated with depression of Internet addicts whereas loneliness plays a mediating role between social support and depression. PMID:25147581

  20. Group processes and process evaluations in a new treatment setting: inpatient group psychotherapy followed by internet-chat aftercare groups.

    PubMed

    Haug, Severin; Sedway, Jan; Kordy, Hans

    2008-01-01

    Little is known about processes characterizing therapeutic Internet-chat groups, which offer a novel way of providing group therapy over distances. In this study group processes and group evaluations were examined in a treatment setting where face-to-face inpatient groups are followed by chat aftercare groups. For a sample of 121 patients who participated in both treatment modalities, group processes and group evaluations were modeled using hierarchical linear modeling. The group evaluations followed a consistent upward course from the beginning of therapy until the end of chat aftercare. For the process measures Activity and Emotional Reactivity, the initial scores at the beginning of the chat groups were lower than at the end of the inpatient treatment, but higher than at admission. During chat aftercare, Activity and Emotional Reactivity scores increased less than during the inpatient phase, but on average Activity and Emotional Reactivity were higher during Internet-chat aftercare. The predictive value of the acquaintance of the therapist from inpatient treatment and the course of group evaluations during inpatient treatment on the course of group evaluations during chat aftercare were examined.

  1. Perceived Social Support, Self-Esteem, and Internet Addiction Among Students of Al-Zahra University, Tehran, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Naseri, Laila; Mohamadi, Jalal; Sayehmiri, Koroush; Azizpoor, Yosra

    2015-01-01

    Background: Internet addiction is a global phenomenon that causes serious problems in mental health and social communication. Students form a vulnerable group, since they have free, easy, and daily access to the internet. Objectives: The current study aimed to investigate perceived social support, self-esteem, and internet addiction among Al-Zahra University students. Materials and Methods: In the current descriptive research, the statistical sample consisted of 101 female students residing at AL-Zahra University dormitory, Tehran, Iran. Participants were randomly selected and their identities were classified. Then, they completed the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support, Rosenberg’s Self-esteem Scale, and Yang Internet Addiction Test. After completion of the questionnaires, the data were analyzed using the correlation test and stepwise regression. Results: The Pearson correlation coefficient indicated significant relationships between self-esteem and internet addiction (P < 0.05, r = -0.345), perceived social support (r = 0.224, P < 0.05), and the subscale of family (r = 0.311, P < 0.05). The findings also demonstrated a significant relationship between internet addiction and perceived social support (r = -0.332, P < 0.05), the subscale of family (P < 0.05, r = -0.402), and the other subscales (P < 0.05, r = -0.287). Results of the stepwise regression showed that the scale of internet addiction and the family subscale were predicative variables for self-esteem (r = 0.137, P < 0.01, F2, 96 = 77.7). Conclusions: Findings of the current study showed that persons with low self-esteem were more vulnerable to internet addiction. PMID:26576175

  2. Social support and social interaction ties on internet addiction: integrating online and offline contexts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Edward Shih-Tse; Wang, Michael Chih-Hung

    2013-11-01

    This study explores the relationship between social support and social interaction ties on Internet addiction by integrating both online and offline social encounters. A total of 1,642 members of online social communities participated in this research, for which structural equation modeling was used for analysis. The findings show that social support is positively associated with social interaction ties in both online and offline contexts. In addition, online social support and online social interaction ties are positively associated with Internet addiction, whereas offline social support and social interaction ties on Internet addiction are negatively associated. This finding has important implications not only for understanding the cause of Internet addiction but also for understanding the diminishing Internet addiction due to social support and social interaction ties.

  3. Advanced Group Support Systems and Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K. (Compiler); Malone, John B. (Compiler)

    1999-01-01

    The document contains the proceedings of the Workshop on Advanced Group Support Systems and Facilities held at NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia, July 19-20, 1999. The workshop was jointly sponsored by the University of Virginia Center for Advanced Computational Technology and NASA. Workshop attendees came from NASA, other government agencies, industry, and universities. The objectives of the workshop were to assess the status of advanced group support systems and to identify the potential of these systems for use in future collaborative distributed design and synthesis environments. The presentations covered the current status and effectiveness of different group support systems.

  4. Randomized trial of internet-delivered self-help with telephone support for pathological gamblers.

    PubMed

    Carlbring, Per; Smit, Filip

    2008-12-01

    Although effective therapies for pathological gambling exist, their uptake is limited to 10% of the target population. To lower the barriers for help seeking, the authors tested an online alternative in a randomized trial (N = 66). The participants were pathological gamblers not presenting with severe comorbid depression. A wait-list control was compared with an 8-week Internet-based cognitive behavior therapy program with minimal therapist contact via e-mail and weekly telephone calls of less than 15 min. Average time spent on each participant, including phone conversations, e-mail, and administration, was 4 hr. The Internet-based intervention resulted in favorable changes in pathological gambling, anxiety, depression, and quality of life. Composite between-group effect size (Cohen's d) at posttreatment was 0.83. Follow-ups carried out in the treatment group at 6, 18, and 36 months indicated that treatment effects were sustained (ds = 2.58, 1.96, and 1.98). This evidence is in support of Internet-delivered treatment for pathological gamblers. However, it is not clear how effective the treatment is for more severely depressed individuals.

  5. An Evaluation of Informal Parent Support Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lennon, Lori; And Others

    This study examined the effects of an informal parental support network on parents' perceptions of child behavior, discipline style, and satisfaction in parenting. The parent support group consisted of 38 parents (mostly mothers) who met regularly and had an opportunity to discuss parenting concerns and compare experiences with their children;…

  6. Digital discrimination: Political bias in Internet service provision across ethnic groups.

    PubMed

    Weidmann, Nils B; Benitez-Baleato, Suso; Hunziker, Philipp; Glatz, Eduard; Dimitropoulos, Xenofontas

    2016-09-09

    The global expansion of the Internet is frequently associated with increased government transparency, political rights, and democracy. However, this assumption depends on marginalized groups getting access in the first place. Here we document a strong and persistent political bias in the allocation of Internet coverage across ethnic groups worldwide. Using estimates of Internet penetration obtained through network measurements, we show that politically excluded groups suffer from significantly lower Internet penetration rates compared with those in power, an effect that cannot be explained by economic or geographic factors. Our findings underline one of the central impediments to "liberation technology," which is that governments still play a key role in the allocation of the Internet and can, intentionally or not, sabotage its liberating effects.

  7. Lurking on the Internet: A Small-Group Assignment that Puts a Human Face on Psychopathology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowman, Joseph; Judge, Abigail M.; Wiss, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Lurking on the Internet aims to put a human face on psychopathology for the abnormal psychology course. Student groups are assigned major diagnostic categories and instructed to search the Internet for discussion forums, individual blogs, or YouTube videos where affected individuals discuss their symptoms and lives. After discussing the ethics of…

  8. Using an internet intervention to support self-management of low back pain in primary care: protocol for a randomised controlled feasibility trial (SupportBack)

    PubMed Central

    Geraghty, Adam W A; Stanford, Rosie; Little, Paul; Roberts, Lisa; Foster, Nadine E; Hill, Jonathan C; Hay, Elaine; Stuart, Beth; Turner, David; Yardley, Lucy

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Low back pain (LBP) is a prevalent and costly condition. The majority of patients experiencing LBP are managed in primary care, where first-line care recommendations consist of advice to self-manage and remain active. Internet interventions present a potential means of providing patients with tailored self-management advice and evidence-based support for increasing physical activity. Methods/analysis This protocol describes a single-blind, randomised controlled feasibility trial of an internet intervention developed to support the self-management of LBP in primary care. Patients are being randomised to 1 of 3 groups receiving either usual primary care, usual primary care with the addition of an internet intervention or an internet intervention with physiotherapist telephone support. Patients are followed up at 3 months. Primary outcomes are the feasibility of (1) the trial design/methods, (2) the delivery of the internet intervention and (3) the provision of telephone support by physiotherapists. Secondary outcomes will include exploratory analysis of estimates and variation in clinical outcomes of pain and disability, in order to inform a future main trial. Ethics/dissemination This feasibility trial has undergone ethical scrutiny and been approved by the National Health Service (NHS) Research Ethics Committee, REC Reference 13/SC/0202. The feasibility findings will be disseminated to the research community through presentations at conferences and publication in peer review journals. Broader dissemination will come following a definitive trial. Trial registration number ISRCTN 31034004. PMID:26399575

  9. The role of nurse support within an Internet-delivered weight management intervention: A qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Renouf, Sarah; Bradbury, Katherine; Yardley, Lucy; Little, Paul

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative study explored patients' experiences of nurse support for an Internet-delivered weight management intervention. Eighteen patients who had received either basic or regular nurse support (three or seven contacts, respectively) for the Internet intervention were interviewed. The data were analysed using thematic analysis. The findings suggest that more regular support for Internet interventions may have the potential to inhibit the development of autonomous motivation for weight loss, which might lead to problems in sustaining losses after support ends. Further research is now needed to confirm whether motivation is influenced by frequency of nurse support in Internet interventions in order to inform the development of optimal support which promotes sustained weight loss.

  10. Internet-Supported Physical Exercise Training for Persons with Multiple Sclerosis—A Randomised, Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Tallner, Alexander; Streber, René; Hentschke, Christian; Morgott, Marc; Geidl, Wolfgang; Mäurer, Mathias; Pfeifer, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Physical exercise is effective in improving functional outcomes in persons with multiple sclerosis (pwMS). We evaluated the feasibility and effectiveness of internet-based exercise training (e-training) for pwMS on health-related quality of life (HrQoL). Secondary outcomes were muscle strength, aerobic capacity, lung function, physical activity, and fatigue. This is a randomised, controlled trial with a wait-list control group. Data were collected at baseline, after three and six months, and analysed using a hybrid linear model. One-hundred twenty-six pwMS participated in the home-based aerobic (1×/week) and strength training (2×/week) intervention that was supervised and documented via an internet-platform. The intervention group received e-training for six months, and the control group received e-training after a three months waiting period. Significant differences between the groups were only observed for muscle strength (knee flexion (effect size ES = 0.3, p = 0.003), knee extension (ES = 0.24, p = 0.015)), peak expiratory flow (ES = 0.2, p = 0.039), and sports activity (ES = 0.33, p = 0.001) after three months. E-training had no effect on HrQoL but did on muscle strength, lung function, and physical activity. It is a promising and feasible approach to facilitate large-scale, yet individual, training support. PMID:27706046

  11. Measuring social support for weight loss in an internet weight loss community.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kevin O; Ottenbacher, Allison J; Lucke, Joseph F; Etchegaray, Jason M; Graham, Amanda L; Thomas, Eric J; Bernstam, Elmer V

    2011-02-01

    Although overweight and obese individuals are turning to Internet communities for social support for weight loss, there is no validated online instrument for measuring the subjective social support experiences of participants in these communities. The authors' objective was to determine whether an online version of a validated paper questionnaire, the Weight Management Support Inventory, is appropriate for measuring social support among members of Internet weight loss communities. The authors administered the paper and online versions of the questionnaire in random, counterbalanced fashion to 199 members of a large Internet weight loss community. Scores for the paper and online versions were comparable in between-subjects and within-subjects comparisons. Convergent validity is suggested by the finding that participants who posted messages on Internet forums several times per day reported more social support than those who posted less frequently. However, the instrumental (tangible) support items did not load significantly on the instrumental support factor, suggesting that instrumental support is not relevant to the social support exchanged among participants in these communities. The authors conclude that the online, modified Weight Management Support Inventory, without items for instrumental support, is an appropriate instrument for measuring social support for weight loss among members of Internet weight loss communities.

  12. Making Teaching Public: Supporting Teachers' Inquiry through the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehman, James D.; Warfield, Janet; Palm, Michael; Wood, Terry

    2001-01-01

    Examines the use of the Internet, particularly an online discussion forum, to help elementary mathematics teachers develop their teaching in ways consistent with reform. Though some results were disappointing, findings indicated that this method of discussion helped teachers reflect on their own teaching and see how other teachers do some of the…

  13. Prevalence of Internet addiction and its association with social support and other related factors among adolescents in China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiao-Shuang; Zhang, Zhi-Hua; Zhao, Feng; Wang, Wen-Jing; Li, Yi-Feng; Bi, Linda; Qian, Zhen-Zhong; Lu, Shan-Shan; Feng, Fang; Hu, Cai-Yun; Gong, Feng-Feng; Sun, Ye-Huan

    2016-10-01

    A cross-sectional study design was applied amongst a random sample (n = 10158) of Chinese adolescents. Self-completed questionnaires, including demographic characteristics, Internet use situation, Youth Internet Addiction Test, Youth Social Support Rating Scale and Zung Self-rating Depression Scale were utilized to examine the study objectives. Among the study population, the prevalence rate of Internet addiction was 10.4%, with 1038 (10.2%) moderately and 21 (0.2%) severely addicted to the Internet. Results from the multivariate logistic regression analyses suggested that a variety of related factors have significant effects on Internet addiction (parental control, per capita annual household income, academic performance, the access to Internet, online activities). The correlation coefficients showed that Internet addiction was negatively correlated with social support and positively associated with depression. Social support had a significant negative predictive effect on Internet addiction. The mediating effect of depression between social support and Internet addiction was remarkable.

  14. Group decision support using Toulmin argument structures

    SciTech Connect

    Janssen, T. |; Sage, A.P.

    1996-12-31

    This paper addresses the need for sound science, technology, and management assessment relative to environmental policy decision making through an approach that involves a logical structure for evidence, a framed decision-making process, and an environment that encourages group participation. Toulmin-based logic possesses these characteristics and is used as the basis for development of a group decision support system. This system can support several user groups, such as pesticide policy-making experts, who can use the support system to state arguments for or against an important policy issue, and pest management experts, who can use the system to assist in identifying and evaluating alternatives for controlling pests on agricultural commodities. The resulting decision support system assists in improving the clarity of the lines of reasoning used in specific situations; the warrants, grounds, and backings that are used to support claims and specific lines of reasoning; and the contradictions, rebuttals, and arguments surrounding each step in the reasoning process associated with evaluating a claim or counterclaim. Experts and decisions makers with differing views can better understand each other`s thought processes. The net effect is enhanced communications and understanding of the whole picture and, in many cases, consensus on decisions to be taken.

  15. Support Groups: Diverse Programs for Diverse Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockwood, Anne Turnbaugh

    1987-01-01

    This resource bulletin focuses on problems in the lives of adolescents that affect students' engagement in schoolwork (drug abuse, teenage pregnancy, the increasing adolescent suicide rate) and considers the school's role with and responsibility for troubled students. It looks specifically at the high school's use of support groups to help such…

  16. Support Groups for Adults with Asperger Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jantz, Kathryn Mederise

    2011-01-01

    A total of 35 adults (24-77 years; 24 males and 11 females) with Asperger syndrome (AS) who were in, were waiting to get in, or had been in support groups participated in the study. In general, the adults were highly educated but unemployed or underemployed and living alone with family members as friends. The participants were interviewed,…

  17. Internet addiction in a group of medical students: a cross sectional study.

    PubMed

    Pramanik, T; Sherpa, M T; Shrestha, R

    2012-03-01

    The use of Internet for education, recreation and communication is increasing day by day. Nevertheless, the possibility of exploitation and addiction leading to impairment in academic performance and emotional balance cannot be denied, especially among young population. The study was aimed to measure the degree of Internet addiction among a group of medical students. Internet addiction test questionnaire developed by Young was used to assess mild, moderate and severe addiction. Amongst the study population (n=130, age 19-23 years), 40% had mild addiction. Moderate and severe addiction was found in 41.53% and 3.07% of the participants respectively. The study revealed that 24% often and 19.2% always found themselves using Internet longer than they had planned or thought. Late night Internet surfing leading to sleep deprivation was found in 31.53% of the participants. Almost one fourth of them (25.38%) occasionally tried to cut down the time they spent on the Internet but failed and 31.53% sometimes experienced restlessness when deprived of Internet access. Results reflected that a significant number of participants suffered from mild to moderate addiction. The role of counseling and education should be emphasized for prevention of Internet addiction.

  18. An Internet-based program for depressive symptoms using human and automated support: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Mira, Adriana; Bretón-López, Juana; García-Palacios, Azucena; Quero, Soledad; Baños, Rosa María; Botella, Cristina

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to analyze the efficacy of an Internet-based program for depressive symptoms using automated support by information and communication technologies (ICTs) and human support. Patients and methods An Internet-based program was used to teach adaptive ways to cope with depressive symptoms and daily problems. A total of 124 participants who were experiencing at least one stressful event that caused interference in their lives, many of whom had clinically significant depressive symptoms, were randomly assigned into either an intervention group with ICT support (automated mobile phone messages, automated emails, and continued feedback through the program); an intervention group with ICT support plus human support (brief weekly support phone call without clinical content); or a waiting-list control. At pre-, post-, and 12-month follow-up, they completed depression, anxiety, positive and negative effect, and perceived stress measures. Results were analyzed using both intention-to-treat and completers data. The majority were women (67.7%), with a mean age of 35.6 years (standard deviation =9.7). Results The analysis showed that the two intervention groups improved significantly pre- to posttreatment, compared with the control group. Furthermore, improvements were maintained at the 12-month follow-up. Adherence and satisfaction with the program was high in both conditions. Conclusion The Internet-based program was effective and well accepted, with and without human support, showing that ICT-based automated support may be useful. It is essential to continue to study other ICT strategies for providing support.

  19. The effect of support on internet-delivered treatment for insomnia: does baseline depression severity matter?

    PubMed

    Lancee, Jaap; Sorbi, Marjolijn J; Eisma, Maarten C; van Straten, Annemieke; van den Bout, Jan

    2014-07-01

    Internet-delivered cognitive-behavioral treatment is effective for insomnia. However, little is known about the beneficial effects of support. Recently we demonstrated that motivational support moderately improved the effects of Internet-delivered treatment for insomnia. In the present study, we tested whether depressive symptoms at baseline moderate the effect of support on Internet-delivered treatment for insomnia. We performed a multilevel intention-to-treat analysis on 262 participants in a randomized controlled trial. We found that baseline depressive symptoms moderated the effect of support on sleep efficiency, total sleep time, and sleep onset latency (but not on wake after sleep onset, number of nightly awakenings, or the Insomnia Severity Index). This means that for these variables, people with high levels of depressive symptoms benefit from support, whereas people with low levels of depressive symptoms improve regardless of support. The data show that baseline depression severity plays an important role in the way Internet treatments need to be delivered. These findings open up opportunities to personalize the support offered in Internet-delivered treatments.

  20. Motives of cancer patients for using the Internet to seek social support.

    PubMed

    Yli-Uotila, T; Rantanen, A; Suominen, T

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of the study was to describe why Finnish cancer patients choose the internet as a source of social support. The data were collected in May 2010, using an online questionnaire with open-ended questions, through four discussion forums on the websites of the non-profit Cancer Society of Finland. Seventy-four adult patients with cancer participated. The data were analysed using inductive content analysis. The mean age of the participants was 53 years and they were predominantly women. The most common cancer was breast cancer and more than three quarters of the participants had suffered from cancer for less than 5 years. The initial stimuli to use the internet as a source of social support were the ease of communication and access to information as well as the need for emotional and informational support. The actual motives that drove the use of the internet as a source of social support were the requirements for information and peer support, internet technology, a lack of support outside the internet and the negative experiences caused by the illness. The fact that there is an enormous need for information as well as for emotional support and that cancer treatment in Finland is concentrated in major hospitals, to which cancer patients may travel a considerable distance, suggests that nurses should learn to make more frequent virtual contact with their patients.

  1. The Use of the Internet to Support General Aviation Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowbottom, James H.

    1995-01-01

    For the past few years, innovation in the field of General Aviation (GA) has declined. The reason for this decline has not been because of a lack of ideas, but rather a lack of funds necessary to convert these ideas into reality. NASA implemented the Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) program in an effort to promote new technology in General Aviation. Under this program, small business with good ideas present them to NASA who reviews them and determines their value potential in the GA market. If the company's idea proves worthy, NASA subsidizes their research in three phases that include the research, testing, development, and production of their product. The purpose of my internship this summer was to use the Internet to promote the work of SBIR companies globally to prospective investors.

  2. Communicating Social Support: Identifying Supportive Episodes in an HIV/AIDS Support Group.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cawyer, Carol Stringer; Smith-Dupre, Athena

    1995-01-01

    Describes supportive episodes in an HIV/AIDS support group and the role of social support for group members. Finds that members used communication as a healing agent, as a preparatory mechanism for living with AIDS, as an outlet for expressing emotions, and as a means for changing society. Identifies feedback and self-disclosure as essential…

  3. Building Internet-Based Electronic Performance Support for Teaching and Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laffey, James M.; Musser, Dale

    The College of Education, University of Missouri-Columbia is developing and testing a suite of tools that utilize the Internet and work as a system to support learning from field experiences. These tools are built to support preservice teachers, field-based mentors, and college faculty as they collaborate, engage in practice, document their…

  4. Digital Support for Teachers' Teaching. Current Experience on Using Internet Facilities in Virtual University Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gouveia, Luis Manuel Borges

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the use of a personal Web home page and university Internet facilities to support teaching activity at the University Fernando Pessoa (Portugal). Topics include a requirement for students to have laptop computers; local-area networks; changing educational paradigms; the need for user support; and a framework for evaluation. (Author/LRW)

  5. Caregivers of Older Adults: Advantages and Disadvantages of Internet-Based Social Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colvin, Jan; Chenoweth, Lillian; Bold, Mary; Harding, Cheryl

    2004-01-01

    We explored the perceptions of caregivers of older adults using Internet-based social support networks regarding the unique advantages and disadvantages of online social support. Participants were recruited with permission of Web owners through 15 Web sites that offered social networks, and responses from 63 electronically submitted surveys were…

  6. The Internet as Social Support for Older Carers of Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkins, Elizabeth A.; LaMartin, Kimberly M.

    2012-01-01

    Social support is a potentially powerful mediator of well-being for family carers. Given that social engagement often decreases with age, the Internet broadens the opportunities for aging carers of individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) to provide support to one another. This article reviews what constitutes social…

  7. Professional Support of Self-Help Groups: A Support Group Project for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlsen, Benedicte

    2003-01-01

    Study follows a collaborative support group project between a team of health professionals and a Chronic Fatigue Syndrome patients' group. While advantageous for professionals to decide upon the aim of a joint intervention in dialogue with participants, simply asking participants what their aims are does not guarantee actual agreement. Case study…

  8. Chatters on the Internet: a special target group for HIV prevention.

    PubMed

    Hospers, H J; Harterink, P; Van Den Hoek, K; Veenstra, J

    2002-08-01

    This study examined characteristics of men who use gay chat boxes on the Internet, including dating behaviour and sexual risk-taking with sex partners who were initially met through chatting. Men on chat boxes were asked to complete a brief questionnaire on the Internet. The questionnaire contained questions on demographics, chatting-related variables, and dating and risk-taking sexual behaviour. The results show that a large majority of the 190 respondents reported actual encounters as well as sex with men who were initially met through chatting. Almost 30% of the respondents who engaged in sex with chat dates reported inconsistent safe sexual behaviour. The level of unprotected sex increased as the number of sex partners who were met through chatting increased. These results suggest that chatters on the Internet may be a new target group for HIV prevention. Further study is needed to gain insight into the feasibility of prevention efforts for this target group.

  9. Exploration of Support Behavior in Counseling Groups with Counseling Trainees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harel, Yoni; Shechtman, Zipora; Cutrona, Carolyn

    2012-01-01

    The study explores the types of support expressed in counseling groups attended by trainee counselors. Support is a crucial factor in human life in general, and in groups in particular, yet little is known about the type of support presented in counseling groups. Type of support was categorized by means of the Social Support Behavior Code (SSBC;…

  10. Networks, support groups, and domestic violence.

    PubMed

    Sen, P

    1996-11-01

    This article discusses recent preliminary research findings on domestic violence against women in Calcutta, India, during 1994-95 and other evidence from around the world. The Beijing Conference on Women affirmed that physical, sexual, and psychological abuse of women occurs regardless of income, class, or culture. The author found from interviews with 47 abused Indian women from a mixture of backgrounds that middle-class women were the most private and difficult to interview. Findings from interviews suggest that women can resist or challenge the abuse by men, and resolution is the end to abuse. The research aimed to identify factors that enhanced resistance and resolution. Over 66% of abused women responded by informing others or crying or offering resistance. Single women and mothers are vulnerable due to stereotyping and economic insecurity. Women's groups recommend formation of shelters for abused women, income generation programs, and training projects, but funding is frequently limited for such activities. Some abused women are unaware of their rights or do not seek help from agencies. Illiteracy interferes with exchanges of pertinent information. Women in the Indian study did not accept violence as part of marriage. 70% of the women stated that after reporting the violence there was resolution. For sexual violence, resolution did not occur, and Indian law does not treat marital rape as a criminal offense. Most of the abused Indian women had contacts with governmental or other organizations. It appears that outside support is important to resolution and nonviolent relationships. Employment that is home-based isolates women and may not be useful as a resource for achieving resolution. Groups need to focus on capacity-building.

  11. Innovative Approaches to Literacy Education: Using the Internet to Support New Literacies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karchmer, Rachel A.; Mallette, Marla H.; Kara-Soteriou, Julia; Leu, Donald J. Jr.

    2005-01-01

    Teachers will discover new instructional ideas and resources for the classroom, new visions for the school and district, and new ways to view their work. This volume combines two powerful perspectives that will help use the Internet to support literacy learning: (1) The stories of exemplary teachers who successfully use the Web in their…

  12. Cognitive Skills in Internet-Supported Learning Environments in Higher Education: Research Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abate Bekele, Teklu

    2009-01-01

    How did Internet-supported learning environments (ISLE) impact students' critical thinking (CT) and problem solving (PS) skills in higher education? What specific indicators have been used to measure CT? What types of problems and learning approaches were chosen to assess PS skills? This paper qualitatively reviewed studies published in academic…

  13. 76 FR 26331 - Dijji Corp., Hydro Environmental Resources, Inc. (n/k/a EXIM Internet Group, Inc.), Hydrogen...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Dijji Corp., Hydro Environmental Resources, Inc. (n/k/a EXIM Internet Group, Inc.), Hydrogen Power... concerning the securities of Hydro Environmental Resources, Inc. (n/k/a EXIM Internet Group, Inc.) because...

  14. Motivational Interviewing Support for a Behavioral Health Internet Intervention for Drivers with Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ingersoll, Karen S; Banton, Thomas; Gorlin, Eugenia; Vajda, Karen; Singh, Harsimran; Peterson, Ninoska; Gonder-Frederick, Linda; Cox, Daniel J

    2015-05-01

    While Internet interventions can improve health behaviors, their impact is limited by program adherence. Supporting program adherence through telephone counseling may be useful, but there have been few direct tests of the impact of support. We describe a Telephone Motivational Interviewing (MI) intervention targeting adherence to an Internet intervention for drivers with Type 1 Diabetes, DD.com, and compare completion of intervention benchmarks by those randomized to DD.com plus MI vs. DD.com only. The goal of the pre-intervention MI session was to increase the participant's motivation to complete the Internet intervention and all its assignments, while the goal of the post-treatment MI session was to plan for maintaining changes made during the intervention. Sessions were semi-structured and partially scripted to maximize consistency. MI Fidelity was coded using a standard coding system, the MITI. We examined the effects of MI support vs. no support on number of days from enrollment to program benchmarks. Results show that MI sessions were provided with good fidelity. Users who received MI support completed some program benchmarks such as Core 4 (t176 df= -2.25; p<.03) and 11 of 12 monthly driving diaries significantly sooner, but support did not significantly affect time to intervention completion (t177 df= -1.69; p<. 10) or rates of completion. These data suggest that there is little benefit to therapist guidance for Internet interventions including automated email prompts and other automated minimal supports, but that a booster MI session may enhance collection of follow-up data.

  15. Motivational Interviewing Support for a Behavioral Health Internet Intervention for Drivers with Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ingersoll, Karen S.; Banton, Thomas; Gorlin, Eugenia; Vajda, Karen; Singh, Harsimran; Peterson, Ninoska; Gonder-Frederick, Linda; Cox, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    While Internet interventions can improve health behaviors, their impact is limited by program adherence. Supporting program adherence through telephone counseling may be useful, but there have been few direct tests of the impact of support. We describe a Telephone Motivational Interviewing (MI) intervention targeting adherence to an Internet intervention for drivers with Type 1 Diabetes, DD.com, and compare completion of intervention benchmarks by those randomized to DD.com plus MI vs. DD.com only. The goal of the pre-intervention MI session was to increase the participant's motivation to complete the Internet intervention and all its assignments, while the goal of the post-treatment MI session was to plan for maintaining changes made during the intervention. Sessions were semi-structured and partially scripted to maximize consistency. MI Fidelity was coded using a standard coding system, the MITI. We examined the effects of MI support vs. no support on number of days from enrollment to program benchmarks. Results show that MI sessions were provided with good fidelity. Users who received MI support completed some program benchmarks such as Core 4 (t176 df= -2.25; p<.03) and 11 of 12 monthly driving diaries significantly sooner, but support did not significantly affect time to intervention completion (t177 df= -1.69; p<. 10) or rates of completion. These data suggest that there is little benefit to therapist guidance for Internet interventions including automated email prompts and other automated minimal supports, but that a booster MI session may enhance collection of follow-up data. PMID:25774342

  16. Using the Internet to Support Exercise and Diet: A Stratified Norwegian Survey

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, Tove; Andreassen, Hege K

    2015-01-01

    Background Internet is used for a variety of health related purposes. Use differs and has differential effects on health according to socioeconomic status. Objective We investigated to what extent the Norwegian population use the Internet to support exercise and diet, what kind of services they use, and whether there are social disparities in use. We expected to find differences according to educational attainment. Methods In November 2013 we surveyed a stratified sample of 2196 persons drawn from a Web panel of about 50,000 Norwegians over 15 years of age. The questionnaire included questions about using the Internet, including social network sites (SNS), or mobile apps in relation to exercise or diet, as well as background information about education, body image, and health. The survey email was opened by 1187 respondents (54%). Of these, 89 did not click on the survey hyperlink (declined to participate), while another 70 did not complete the survey. The final sample size is thus 1028 (87% response rate). Compared to the Norwegian census the sample had a slight under-representation of respondents under the age of 30 and with low education. The data was weighted accordingly before analyses. Results Sixty-nine percent of women and 53% of men had read about exercise or diet on the Internet (χ2= 25.6, P<.001). More people with higher education (71%, χ2=19.1, P<.001), reported this. The same gender difference was found for using Internet-based interventions with 20% of women compared to14% of men reporting having used these interventions (χ2=7.9, P= .005), for having posted a status about exercise or diet on Facebook or other SNS (23% vs 12%, χ2=18.8, P<.001), and for having kept an online exercise or diet journal (21% vs 15%, χ2=7.0, P=.008). Evaluations of own physical appearance accounted for some of the gender differences in using online exercise or diet journals. Seven percent of the total sample reported having used electronic communication to ask

  17. Internet Group Management Protocol for IPTV Services in Passive Optical Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Eunjo; Park, Sungkwon

    We propose a new Internet group management protocol (IGMP) which can be used in passive optical network (PON) especially for IPTV services which dramatically reduces the channel change response time caused by traditional IGMP. In this paper, the newly proposed IGMP is introduced in detail and performance analysis is also included. Simulation results demonstrated the performance of the newly proposed IGMP, whereby, viewers can watch the shared IPTV channels without the channel change response time when channel request reaches a threshold.

  18. Twelve-Month Outcomes of an Internet-Based Diabetes Self-Management Support Program

    PubMed Central

    Glasgow, Russell E.; Kurz, Deanna; King, Diane; Dickman, Jennifer M.; Faber, Andrew J.; Halterman, Eve; Woolley, Tim; Toobert, Deborah J.; Strycker, Lisa A.; Estabrooks, Paul A.; Osuna, Diego; Ritzwoller, Debra

    2011-01-01

    Objective Internet-based programs offer potential for practical, cost-effective chronic illness self-management programs. Methods We report 12-month results of an Internet-based diabetes self-management program, with and without additional support, compared to enhanced usual care in a 3-arm practical randomized trial. Patients (n= 463) were randomized: 77.3% completed 12-month follow-up. Primary outcomes were changes in health behaviors of healthy eating, physical activity, and medication taking. Secondary outcomes were hemoglobin A1c, body mass index, lipids, blood pressure, and psychosocial factors. Results Internet conditions improved health behaviors significantly vs. usual care over the 12-month period (d for effect size = .09 – .16). All conditions improved moderately on biological and psychosocial outcomes. Latinos, lower literacy, and higher cardiovascular disease risk patients improved as much as other participants. Conclusions The Internet intervention meets the reach and feasibility criteria for a potentially broad public health impact. However, 12-month magnitude of effects was small, suggesting that different or more intensive approaches are necessary to support long-term outcomes. Research is needed to understand the linkages between intervention and maintenance processes and downstream outcomes. Practice Implications Automated self-management interventions should be tailored and integrated into primary care; maintenance of patient self-management can be enhanced through links to community resources. PMID:21924576

  19. Receiving social support online: an analysis of a computer-mediated support group for individuals living with irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Coulson, Neil S

    2005-12-01

    In recent years, the rapid expansion in Internet access and computer-mediated communication has fostered new opportunities for individuals with health-related concerns to participate in supportive communication within a network of individuals dealing with similar issues. The aim of this study was to examine the nature of socially supportive communication that took place within a computer-mediated support network for individuals affected by irritable bowel syndrome. Using deductive thematic analysis, 572 posted messages were examined with reference to five main categories of social support (i.e., emotional, esteem, information, network, and tangible assistance). The analysis suggests that the primary function of this group was the communication of informational support, notably within the areas of symptom interpretation, illness management, and interaction with health care professionals.

  20. Group Coordination Support in Networked Multimedia Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-12-01

    and reaction to turn- taking signals are deemed a high -level social skill rather than a simple stimulus-response mechanism. Turn-yielding and turn...a small group in a high -latency network; (3) a large group in a low-latency network; and ( 4 ) a large group in a high -latency network. We set = 0...the organiza- tion of turn- taking for conversations. Language, 50( 4 ):696{735, 1974. [192] J. H. Saltzer, D. P. Reed, and D. D. Clark. End-to-end

  1. Outcomes of Minimal and Moderate Support Versions of an Internet-Based Diabetes Self-Management Support Program

    PubMed Central

    Kurz, Deanna; King, Diane; Dickman, Jennifer M.; Faber, Andrew J.; Halterman, Eve; Wooley, Tim; Toobert, Deborah J.; Strycker, Lisa A.; Estabrooks, Paul A.; Osuna, Diego; Ritzwoller, Debra

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Internet and other interactive technology-based programs offer great potential for practical, effective, and cost-efficient diabetes self-management (DSM) programs capable of reaching large numbers of patients. This study evaluated minimal and moderate support versions of an Internet-based diabetes self-management program, compared to an enhanced usual care condition. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A three-arm practical randomized trial was conducted to evaluate minimal contact and moderate contact versions of an Internet-based diabetes self-management program, offered in English and Spanish, compared to enhanced usual care. A heterogeneous sample of 463 type 2 patients was randomized and 82.5% completed a 4-month follow-up. Primary outcomes were behavior changes in healthy eating, physical activity, and medication taking. Secondary outcomes included hemoglobin A1c, body mass index, lipids, and blood pressure. RESULTS The Internet-based intervention produced significantly greater improvements than the enhanced usual care condition on three of four behavioral outcomes (effect sizes [d] for healthy eating = 0.32; fat intake = 0.28; physical activity= 0.19) in both intent-to-treat and complete-cases analyses. These changes did not translate into differential improvements in biological outcomes during the 4-month study period. Added contact did not further enhance outcomes beyond the minimal contact intervention. CONCLUSIONS The Internet intervention meets several of the RE-AIM criteria for potential public health impact, including reaching a large number of persons, and being practical, feasible, and engaging for participants, but with mixed effectiveness in improving outcomes, and consistent results across different subgroups. Additional research is needed to evaluate longer-term outcomes, enhance effectiveness and cost-effectiveness, and understand the linkages between intervention processes and outcomes. Electronic supplementary material The online version

  2. Support Groups: Make Connections, Get Help

    MedlinePlus

    ... fees to attend the group Pressure to purchase products or services Disruptive members Judgment of your decisions or actions ... does not endorse any of the third party products and services advertised. Advertising and sponsorship policy Advertising and sponsorship ...

  3. Evaluation of the web-based "home helper" support system using wireless Internet mobile phones.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Hidekuni; Yonezawa, Yoshiharu; Maki, Hiromichi; Sato, Haruhiko; Hahn, Allen W; Caldwell, W Morton

    2002-01-01

    In Japan, Home Helpers provide the home welfare and care services such as cooking, bathing, washing, cleaning, shopping, etc. Last year, we developed the web-based Home Helper support system using wireless Internet mobile phones for improving scheduling and record keeping efficiency and for eliminating unnecessary travel. We have evaluated by questionnaire whether the system can be easily operated. All in all, the system has performed satisfactorily and is in functional use daily.

  4. Internet Interventions to Support Lifestyle Modification for Diabetes Management: A Systematic Review of the Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Cotterez, Alex; Durant, Nefertiti; Agne, April; Cherrington, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Background The Internet presents a widely accessible, 24-hour means to promote chronic disease management. The objective of this review is to identify studies that used Internet based interventions to promote lifestyle modification among adults with type 2 diabetes. Methods We searched PubMed using the terms: [internet, computer, phone, smartphone, mhealth, mobile health, web based, telehealth, social media, text messages] combined with [diabetes management and diabetes control] through January 2013. Studies were included if they described an Internet intervention, targeted adults with type 2 diabetes, focused on lifestyle modification, and included an evaluation component with behavioral outcomes. Results Of the 2803 papers identified, nine met inclusion criteria. Two studies demonstrated improvements in diet and/or physical activity and two studies demonstrated improvements in glycemic control comparing web-based intervention with control. Successful studies were theory-based, included interactive components with tracking and personalized feedback, and provided opportunities for peer support. Website utilization declined over time in all studies that reported on it. Few studies focused on high risk, underserved populations. Conclusion Web-based strategies provide a viable option for facilitating diabetes self-management. Future research is needed on the use of web-based interventions in underserved communities and studies examining website utilization patterns and engagement over time. PMID:24332469

  5. Individuals with eating disorders and the use of online support groups as a form of social support.

    PubMed

    McCormack, Abby

    2010-01-01

    The increase in Internet use in recent years has fostered the development of online support groups to help individuals cope with a number of conditions. Individuals with eating disorders may particularly benefit from such groups as they provide a means of sharing experiences, knowledge, and support with like-minded individuals without the anxiety and worry of others negatively evaluating their appearance. The aim of this study was to examine the nature and types of social support that took place on an anorexia discussion forum. The deductive thematic analysis of 325 messages indicates that the primary function of the group was the communication of encouragement and esteem and information support notably in terms of diagnosis, treatment, and interaction with healthcare specialists. Considering the high rate of relapse among individuals with eating disorders, it is imperative that some form of support is available when they leave treatment centers. Regulated computer-mediated support groups provide a low-cost, easily accessible self-help service to individuals with eating disorders.

  6. An ongoing study of group treatment for men involved in problematic Internet-enabled sexual behavior.

    PubMed

    Orzack, Maressa Hecht; Voluse, Andrew C; Wolf, David; Hennen, John

    2006-06-01

    Exponential advances have been made regarding computer/Internet technology in the past decade. This growth, in large part, can be attributed to greater access to, affordability of, and anonymity while on the computer. However, this progress has also produced negative psychological issues. Problematic Internet-enabled sexual behavior (IESB) has increasingly affected individuals' family relationships, work productivity, and academic success. This article is the first-known, empirically based outcome study regarding the effectiveness of group therapy treatment for men with problematic IESB. These closed-groups, which ran for 16 weeks, used a combination of Readiness to Change (RtC), Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT), and Motivational Interviewing (MI) interventions. Five groups were analyzed for this paper (yielding a total N of 35), with the average member's age being 44.5 years old. Three different scales (the Orzack Time Intensity Survey, the BASIS-32, and the BDI) were used to track participants' progress across time. The results demonstrated that this group treatment intervention significantly increased members' quality of life and decreased the severity of their depressive symptoms. However, the protocol failed to reduce participants' inappropriate computer use. Regarding comorbidity, the results showed the following: members in the "anxiety" category responded best to the current treatment, those in the "mood" cluster responded relatively positively, and those in the "A-D/HD" category failed to respond significantly. It is clear from this report that more attention must be focused on the treatment of problematic IESB, as opposed to exploratory studies.

  7. The prepared patient: information seeking of online support group members before their medical appointments.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xinyi; Bell, Robert A; Kravitz, Richard L; Orrange, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    The authors examined online support group members' reliance on their Internet community and other online and offline health resources as they prepare for a scheduled medical appointment. Adult members of an online support group (N = 505) with an upcoming medical appointment completed an online questionnaire that included measures of illness perceptions, control preference, trust in the physician, and eHealth literacy; a checklist of actions one could take to acquire health information; and demographic questions. A factor analysis identified 4 types of information seeking: reliance on the online support group, use of other online health resources, use of offline health resources, and personal network contacts. Previsit information seeking on the Internet was extensive and typically augmented with offline information. Use of online health resources was highest among those who believed they had control over their illness, who attributed many symptoms and negative emotions to it, and who were more eHealth literate. Reliance on the online support group was highest among those who believed they had personal control over their illness, expected their condition to persist, and attributed negative emotions to it. Trust in the physician and preferences for involvement in decision making were unrelated to online information seeking. Most respondents intended to ask their physician questions and request clinical resources based on online information.

  8. NSI customer service representatives and user support office: NASA Science Internet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The NASA Science Internet, (NSI) was established in 1987 to provide NASA's Offices of Space Science and Applications (OSSA) missions with transparent wide-area data connectivity to NASA's researchers, computational resources, and databases. The NSI Office at NASA/Ames Research Center has the lead responsibility for implementing a total, open networking program to serve the OSSA community. NSI is a full-service communications provider whose services include science network planning, network engineering, applications development, network operations, and network information center/user support services. NSI's mission is to provide reliable high-speed communications to the NASA science community. To this end, the NSI Office manages and operates the NASA Science Internet, a multiprotocol network currently supporting both DECnet and TCP/IP protocols. NSI utilizes state-of-the-art network technology to meet its customers' requirements. THe NASA Science Internet interconnects with other national networks including the National Science Foundation's NSFNET, the Department of Energy's ESnet, and the Department of Defense's MILNET. NSI also has international connections to Japan, Australia, New Zealand, Chile, and several European countries. NSI cooperates with other government agencies as well as academic and commercial organizations to implement networking technologies which foster interoperability, improve reliability and performance, increase security and control, and expedite migration to the OSI protocols.

  9. Evaluation of Work Place Group and Internet Based Physical Activity Interventions on Psychological Variables Associated with Exercise Behavior Change

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Kimberley A.; Tracey, Jill; Berry, Tanya

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to compare group-based and internet-based physical activity interventions in terms of desirability, participant characteristics, exercise self-efficacy, and barrier self-efficacy. Pretest questionnaires were completed prior to voluntary enrollment into either of the ten-week physical activity interventions. Both interventions were based on Social Cognitive Theory and the Transtheoretical Model. Interventions were followed with posttest questionnaires. Results demonstrated that the internet intervention attracted more participants, but only the group-based participants showed significant increases in exercise and barrier self-efficacy. At pretest, participants who selected the internet intervention were significantly lower in life and job satisfaction than those who selected the group intervention. Results suggest that traditional group-based exercise interventions are helpful for improving cognitions associated with exercise behavior change (e.g., exercise self-efficacy) and that the internet intervention may help employees who fall into an “unhappy employee ”typology. Key pointsGroup-based physical activity interventions are capable of improving exercise self-efficacy and barrier self-efficacy.At pretest, participants who selected the internet physical activity intervention were significantly lower in job and life satisfaction than those who selected the group-intervention.While the internet intervention attracted more participants, the group-based physical activity intervention was more successful at changing cognitions associated with successful exercise behavior change. PMID:24149963

  10. STREAMS - Supporting Underrepresented Groups in Earth Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho-Knighton, K.; Johnson, A.

    2009-12-01

    In Fall 2008, STREAMS (Supporting Talented and Remarkable Environmental And Marine Science students) Scholarship initiative began at the University of South Florida St. Petersburg, the only public university in Pinellas County. STREAMS is a partnership between the University of South Florida St. Petersburg’s (USFSP) Environmental Science and Policy Program and University of South Florida’s (USF) College of Marine Science. The STREAMS Student Scholarship Program has facilitated increased recruitment, retention, and graduation of USFSP environmental science and USF marine science majors. The STREAMS program has increased opportunities for minorities and women to obtain undergraduate and graduate degrees, gain valuable research experience and engage in professional development activities. STREAMS scholars have benefited from being mentored by USFSP and USF faculty and as well as MSPhDs students and NSF Florida-Georgia LSAMP Bridge to Doctorate graduate fellows. In addition, STREAMS has facilitated activities designed to prepare student participants for successful Earth system science-related careers. We will elucidate the need for this initiative and vision for the collaboration.

  11. The Empowerment Dynamic: Planning and Implementing a Support Group Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Robin; Haley, Pat

    This handbook describes how to plan and implement a support group for disabled youth in transition from school to work. It was developed from the experiences of a 3-year model program entitled Employability Support Network of Disabled Youth (ESN) which used support groups to accomplish its primary goal of creating "employability readiness" for…

  12. An Internet of Things platform architecture for supporting ambient assisted living environments.

    PubMed

    Tsirmpas, Charalampos; Kouris, Ioannis; Anastasiou, Athanasios; Giokas, Kostas; Iliopoulou, Dimitra; Koutsouris, Dimitris

    2016-11-18

    Internet of Things (IoT) is the logical further development of today's Internet, enabling a huge amount of devices to communicate, compute, sense and act. IoT sensors placed in Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) environments, enable the context awareness and allow the support of the elderly in their daily routines, ultimately allowing an independent and safe lifestyle. The vast amount of data that are generated and exchanged between the IoT nodes require innovative context modeling approaches that go beyond currently used models. Current paper presents and evaluates an open interoperable platform architecture in order to utilize the technical characteristics of IoT and handle the large amount of generated data, as a solution to the technical requirements of AAL applications.

  13. Supporting Unemployed, Middle-Aged Men: A Psychoeducational Group Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphey, Charlotte M.; Shillingford, M. Ann

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a comprehensive group counseling approach to support unemployed, middle-aged men. An inclusive group curriculum designed to provide support and address potential mental health issues related to unemployment is introduced. The focus of the group is divided into 6 major areas that research has shown to have a significant impact…

  14. Support Groups: A Psychological or Social Device for Suicide Bereavement?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pietila, Minna

    2002-01-01

    Examines the psychological studies of bereavement support groups as well as exploring the ways in which people talk about their participation in such groups after their family member's suicide. This paper draws on a study of 16 interviews with bereaved parents and (adult) children, half of whom had attended a bereavement support group after their…

  15. An instrument for measuring cancer patients' preferences for support groups.

    PubMed

    Smoczyk, C M; Zhu, W; Whatley, M H

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a valid and reliable instrument to assess cancer patients' preferences for all types of social support and organizational features of cancer support groups. The content of the instrument was the result of a detailed analysis of four resources: (1) literature relating to cancer support group interventions, (2) program materials from existing groups, (3) interviews with individuals who developed or directed groups, and (4) interviews with patients who have participated in cancer support groups. A jury of six experts was used to establish content validity of the instrument. The reliability of the instrument was examined by measuring a sample of 258 cancer patients. The reliability coefficients of the instrument were all above .80, except for two types of social support (instrumental and informational-educational), which were .72 and .78, respectively. It was concluded that the instrument produces valid and reliable measurements of cancer patients' preferences for cancer support groups.

  16. Taking care of the caregiver: support groups for nephrology nurses.

    PubMed

    Chayu, Tami; Zur, Rabina; Kreitler, Shulamith

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the need for support groups in nephrology nurses (NN) in Israel. A questionnaire with 10 questions and demographic background information was administered to nephrology nurses in different hospitals and different parts of the country. Out of 350 distributed questionnaires, 305 nurses responded. The findings showed that there is a need for support groups among NN in Israel. Conclusions--It is necessary to organise support groups for nurses in every dialysis unit.

  17. Motivational support provided via email improves the effectiveness of internet-delivered self-help treatment for insomnia: a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Lancee, Jaap; van den Bout, Jan; Sorbi, Marjolijn J; van Straten, Annemieke

    2013-12-01

    Internet-delivered treatment is effective for insomnia, but little is known about the beneficial effects of support. The aim of the current study was to investigate the additional effects of low-intensity support to an internet-delivered treatment for insomnia. Two hundred and sixty-two participants were randomized to an internet-delivered intervention for insomnia with (n = 129) or without support (n = 133). All participants received an internet-delivered cognitive behavioral treatment for insomnia. In addition, the participants in the support condition received weekly emails. Assessments were at baseline, post-treatment, and 6-month follow-up. Both groups effectively ameliorated insomnia complaints. Adding support led to significantly higher effects on most sleep measures (d = 0.3-0.5; p < 0.05), self-reported insomnia severity (d = 0.4; p < 0.001), anxiety, and depressive symptoms (d = 0.4; p < 0.01). At the 6-month follow-up, these effects remained significant for sleep efficiency, sleep onset latency, insomnia symptoms, and depressive symptoms (d = 0.3-0.5; p < 0.05). Providing support significantly enhances the benefits of internet-delivered treatment for insomnia on several variables. It appears that motivational feedback increases the effect of the intervention and encourages more participants to complete the intervention, which in turn improves its effectiveness.

  18. Proactive Support of Internet Browsing when Searching for Relevant Health Information.

    PubMed

    Rurik, Clas; Zowalla, Richard; Wiesner, Martin; Pfeifer, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Many people use the Internet as one of the primary sources of health information. This is due to the high volume and easy access of freely available information regarding diseases, diagnoses and treatments. However, users may find it difficult to retrieve information which is easily understandable and does not require a deep medical background. In this paper, we present a new kind of Web browser add-on, in order to proactively support users when searching for relevant health information. Our add-on not only visualizes the understandability of displayed medical text but also provides further recommendations of Web pages which hold similar content but are potentially easier to comprehend.

  19. The Basis for Using the Internet to Support the Information Needs of Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Westberg, Edward E.; Miller, Randolph A.

    1999-01-01

    Synthesizing the state of the art from the published literature, this review assesses the basis for employing the Internet to support the information needs of primary care. The authors survey what has been published about the information needs of clinical practice, including primary care, and discuss currently available information resources potentially relevant to primary care. Potential methods of linking information needs with appropriate information resources are described in the context of previous classifications of clinical information needs. Also described is the role that existing terminology mapping systems, such as the National Library of Medicine's Unified Medical Language System, may play in representing and linking information needs to answers. PMID:9925225

  20. How Cancer Survivors Provide Support on Cancer-Related Internet Mailing Lists

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Elizabeth J; Frydman, Gilles; Forlenza, Michael; Rimer, Barbara K

    2007-01-01

    Background Internet mailing lists are an important and increasingly common way for cancer survivors to find information and support. Most studies of these mailing lists have investigated lists dedicated to one type of cancer, most often breast cancer. Little is known about whether the lessons learned from experiences with breast cancer lists apply to other cancers. Objectives The aim of the study was to compare the structural characteristics of 10 Internet cancer-related mailing lists and identify the processes by which cancer survivors provide support. Methods We studied a systematic 9% sample of email messages sent over five months to 10 cancer mailing lists hosted by the Association of Cancer Online Resources (ACOR). Content analyses were used to compare the structural characteristics of the lists, including participation rates and members’ identities as survivors or caregivers. We used thematic analyses to examine the types of support that list members provided through their message texts. Results Content analyses showed that characteristics of list members and subscriber participation rates varied across the lists. Thematic analyses revealed very little “off topic” discussion. Feedback from listowners indicated that they actively modeled appropriate communication on their lists and worked to keep discussions civil and focused. In all lists, members offered support much more frequently than they requested it; survivors were somewhat more likely than caregivers to offer rather than to ask for support. The most common topics in survivors’ messages were about treatment information and how to communicate with health care providers. Although expressions of emotional support were less common than informational support, they appeared in all lists. Many messages that contained narratives of illness or treatment did not specifically ask for help but provided emotional support by reassuring listmates that they were not alone in their struggles with cancer

  1. A Psychoeducational Support Group for Serious Mental Illness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lefley, Harriet P.

    2009-01-01

    The formation, structure, and goals of an open-ended psychoeducational support group for people with serious and persistent mental illnesses are described, differentiating psychoeducation from psychotherapy, and professional from peer-led support groups. Major goals are to provide education for illness management and help members combat social…

  2. Who Joins Support Groups among Parents of Children with Autism?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandell, David S.; Salzer, Mark S.

    2007-01-01

    This study identified factors associated with support group participation among families of children with autism. A survey was administered to 1005 caregivers of children with autism in Pennsylvania. Two-thirds of respondents (66.4%) had ever participated in an autism-specific support group. In adjusted analyses, demographic characteristics,…

  3. From Victim to Taking Control: Support Group for Bullied Schoolchildren

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kvarme, Lisbeth Gravdal; Aabø, Liv Sandnes; Saeteren, Berit

    2016-01-01

    School bullying is a serious problem affecting the victims in their daily lives at school. The aim of this study was to investigate whether support groups were able to help the victims of bullying to overcome their victim status and to explore what it means to be a member of a support group. An exploratory qualitative design, with individual and…

  4. PEGASUS: Designing a System for Supporting Group Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyprianidou, Maria; Demetriadis, Stavros; Pombortsis, Andreas; Karatasios, George

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present the design and first results of the integration of a web-based system person-centred group-activity support system (PEGASUS) in university instruction, as a means for advancing person-centred learning by supporting group activity. The PEGASUS is expected to help students and teachers in two distinct…

  5. Community Post-Tornado Support Groups: Intervention and Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCammon, Susan; And Others

    Post-tornado support groups were organized by the Greene County, North Carolina disaster coordinators and the Pitt County outreach workers from the Community Mental Health Center sponsored tornado follow-up project. The most significant intervention used was the emphasis on creating a climate of group support by establishing a forum for…

  6. Stress and nurses' horizontal mobbing: moderating effects of group identity and group support.

    PubMed

    Topa, Gabriela; Moriano, Juan A

    2013-01-01

    Horizontal mobbing is a process of systematic and repeated aggression towards a worker by coworkers. Among others, stress has been pointed out as one of the antecedents that favors the onset of horizontal mobbing, whereas group support to the target could act as a buffer. Moreover, the social identity approach emphasizes that group identity is an antecedent of group support. This study explores the interaction of group support and group identity in the explanation of horizontal mobbing in a sample (N = 388) of registered nurses and licensed practical nurses employed at two large hospitals in Madrid and Navarre (Spain). The results show that stress is positively associated to horizontal mobbing, whereas group support and group identity were negative predictors of horizontal mobbing. Furthermore, the combination of low group identity and low group support precipitated HM among nurses.

  7. [Guidelines for internet mailing lists and electronic forums for patient groups].

    PubMed

    Méadel, Cécile; Oziel, David

    2008-12-01

    Internet mailing lists (and other electronic forums) for discussions between patients are places where patient and their family and friends can talk, by e-mail, about their problems, exchange their experiences, and find support. The charter presented here proposes guidelines more specifically appropriate to this particular community--patients having conversations--than are either the general rules of Netiquette or the general guidelines for these lists. Three themes play a primary role in the guidelines set by this charter: the role of the list owners and moderators, the definition of the contents of exchanges, and relationships with doctors and more generally healthcare professionals. This charter is a regulatory instrument for lists that can serve a three-fold purpose: as a governance tool for list owners, as a tool for reflection for the constitution and definition of lists, and as training tools for list moderators.

  8. From Victim to Taking Control: Support Group for Bullied Schoolchildren.

    PubMed

    Kvarme, Lisbeth Gravdal; Aabø, Liv Sandnes; Sæteren, Berit

    2016-04-01

    School bullying is a serious problem affecting the victims in their daily lives at school. The aim of this study was to investigate whether support groups were able to help the victims of bullying to overcome their victim status and to explore what it means to be a member of a support group. An exploratory qualitative design, with individual and focus group interviews, was used. The sample consisted of 19 schoolchildren, aged 12-13 years, 3 of whom were victimized. Six individual interviews and three focus group interviews were conducted. Findings show that support groups contribute to the cessation of bullying and improvements remain 3 months later. The support groups experience feeling important and helping others. It is important for the school nurse and teachers to follow up with victimized children, in collaboration with their parents, to help the victim to no longer be a victim and to take control.

  9. Support through patient internet-communities: Lived experience of Russian in vitro fertilization patients

    PubMed Central

    Isupova, Olga G.

    2011-01-01

    The article is concerned with the life experiences of infertile women going through infertility treatment and their need for social and psychological support, which they try to find in their immediate social environment. The Internet has become one place where everyone can find “people like oneself.” The best support is received from these people who are in the same life situation and are able and willing to share their lived experiences with each other. Communication via the Internet and the formation of a virtual community of patients has both positive and negative aspects, all of which are examined in the article. On the one hand, it creates a psychologically favorable atmosphere and might potentially increase the success rate of IVF treatment. On the other, this leads to the seclusion of patients within the circle of “similar people” and sometimes to negative attitudes towards people outside the circle. The article is based on the author's “netnography” research of a virtual community of Russian In-Vitro Fertilization (IVF)1 patients. PMID:21760835

  10. Gender differences in relationships of actual and virtual social support to Internet addiction mediated through depressive symptoms among college students in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Yu-Chun; Ko, Huei-Chen; Wu, Jo Yung-Wei; Cheng, Chung-Ping

    2008-08-01

    This study examined gender differences in the relationships of actual and virtual social support to Internet addiction mediated through depressive symptoms among college students in Taiwan. Results revealed that in females, both actual and virtual social support directly predicted Internet addiction or were mediated through depressive symptoms. However, in males, while Internet addiction was predicted by virtual social support directly or indirectly mediated through depressive symptoms, the link of actual social support to Internet addiction was only mediated through depressive symptoms. Furthermore, in both genders, lower actual social support and higher virtual social support were associated with higher depressive symptoms.

  11. Exploring an Online Self-Injury Support Group: Perspectives from Group Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haberstroh, Shane; Moyer, Michael

    2012-01-01

    In this qualitative study, the authors explored an online support group for individuals who self-injure. Twenty members of a private and moderated online group responded to questions about their history of self-injury and experiences with the online self-injury support group. Themes emerged related to the relational and emotional aspects of…

  12. Internet Use and Breast Cancer Survivors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muhamad, Mazanah; Afshari, Mojgan; Mohamed, Nor Aini

    2011-01-01

    A survey was administered to 400 breast cancer survivors at hospitals and support group meetings in Peninsular Malaysia to explore their level of Internet use and factors related to the Internet use by breast cancer survivors. Findings of this study indicated that about 22.5% of breast cancer survivors used Internet to get information about breast…

  13. A randomized controlled trial on the role of support in Internet-based problem solving therapy for depression and anxiety.

    PubMed

    Kleiboer, Annet; Donker, Tara; Seekles, Wike; van Straten, Annemieke; Riper, Heleen; Cuijpers, Pim

    2015-09-01

    Internet-based interventions can be effective treatments for anxiety and depression. Meta-analytic evidence suggests that they should be delivered with human support to reach optimal effects. These findings have not consistently been replicated in direct comparisons of supported and unsupported interventions, however. This study examined the role of support in Internet-based problem solving treatment (PST) for symptoms of anxiety and/or depression. Adults with mild to moderate symptoms of anxiety and/or depression were recruited from the general population and randomized to: (1) PST without support (n = 107), (2) PST with support on request (n = 108), (3) PST with weekly support (n = 106), (4) no Internet-based intervention but non-specific chat or email (n = 110), or (5) waitlist control (WLC; n = 106). Primary outcomes were symptoms of anxiety (HADS) and depression (CES-D) measured at baseline and 6 weeks later. Analyses were first based on the intention-to-treat principle (ITT) and repeated with intervention completers. Only participants who received PST with weekly support improved significantly more than WLC for depressive symptoms. Results for anxiety were less robust but in favor of the weekly support condition. The results underscore the importance of structural support in Internet-based interventions for depression and anxiety.

  14. [Pilot study on the effectiveness of a cognitive behavioural group programme for adolescents with pathological internet use].

    PubMed

    Wartberg, Lutz; Thomsen, Monika; Moll, Bettina; Thomasius, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    Excessive Internet use and its severe form, pathological internet use, are currently increasing in many industrial nations in Asia, North America and Europe. According to recent epidemiological studies pathological internet use occurs more frequently in youth than in adults. In Germany between 4 and 6% of the adolescents use the internet in a pathological way. Only few studies have investigated therapeutic interventions and their effectiveness in affected adolescents. In this pilot study, we surveyed over a period of 15 months all minor participants (aged up to 17) of a cognitive behavioural group programme at the beginning and at the end of the treatment (pre-post design) with standardized questionnaires (CIUS, SPS-J). At the second point of measurement the adolescents (n = 18, 75 percent retention rate) reported a significantly lower severity of problematic internet use as well as reduced average usage times during the week and at the weekend. No changes were revealed in psychological well-being of the youth. The results of this pilot study indicate positive effects of a cognitive behavioural group programme with psychoeducative elements in the treatment of youth affected by pathological internet use.

  15. Is the Medium Really the Message? A Comparison of Face-to-Face, Telephone, and Internet Focus Group Venues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gothberg, June; Applegate, Brooks; Reeves, Patricia; Kohler, Paula; Thurston, Linda; Peterson, Lori

    2013-01-01

    With increased use of technology in qualitative research, it is important to understand unintended, unanticipated, and unobvious consequences to the data. Using a side-by-side comparison of face-to-face, telephone, and Internet with video focus groups, we examined the yield differences of focus group venue (medium) to the data (message) rendered…

  16. Theorizing about social support and health communication in a prostate cancer support group.

    PubMed

    Arrington, Michael Irvin

    2010-01-01

    This article inquires into whether and how uncertainty reduction theory and problematic integration theory, two theories relevant to social support as enacted within a chapter of the Man-to-Man prostate cancer support group, inform us of how such groups can assist group members most effectively. Interview data from members of a prostate cancer support group shed light on theoretical assumptions about uncertainty. Although the group applies elements of both theories, prostate cancer survivors likely would benefit from a more comprehensive and flexible treatment of social support theory.

  17. Internet-based profiler system as integrative framework to support translational research

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Robert; Demichelis, Francesca; Tang, Jeffery; Riva, Alberto; Shen, Ronglai; Gibbs, Doug F; Mahavishno, Vasudeva; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Rubin, Mark A

    2005-01-01

    Background Translational research requires taking basic science observations and developing them into clinically useful tests and therapeutics. We have developed a process to develop molecular biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis by integrating tissue microarray (TMA) technology and an internet-database tool, Profiler. TMA technology allows investigators to study hundreds of patient samples on a single glass slide resulting in the conservation of tissue and the reduction in inter-experimental variability. The Profiler system allows investigator to reliably track, store, and evaluate TMA experiments. Here within we describe the process that has evolved through an empirical basis over the past 5 years at two academic institutions. Results The generic design of this system makes it compatible with multiple organ system (e.g., prostate, breast, lung, renal, and hematopoietic system,). Studies and folders are restricted to authorized users as required. Over the past 5 years, investigators at 2 academic institutions have scanned 656 TMA experiments and collected 63,311 digital images of these tissue samples. 68 pathologists from 12 major user groups have accessed the system. Two groups directly link clinical data from over 500 patients for immediate access and the remaining groups choose to maintain clinical and pathology data on separate systems. Profiler currently has 170 K data points such as staining intensity, tumor grade, and nuclear size. Due to the relational database structure, analysis can be easily performed on single or multiple TMA experimental results. The TMA module of Profiler can maintain images acquired from multiple systems. Conclusion We have developed a robust process to develop molecular biomarkers using TMA technology and an internet-based database system to track all steps of this process. This system is extendable to other types of molecular data as separate modules and is freely available to academic institutions for licensing. PMID:16364175

  18. Changing Group and Organizational Cultures To Support Healthy Lifestyles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Judd

    Group and organizational cultures play an important role in helping people to adopt healthier lifestyles. Culture can be assessed by looking at social expectations for behavior, called group norms. Cultural norms can be changed to support healthy lifestyles through a systematic and participatory process. Such a change effort would modify: (1)…

  19. Enacting Feminist Alliance Principles in a Doctoral Writing Support Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swadener, Beth Blue; Peters, Lacey; Eversman, Kimberly A.

    2015-01-01

    This study utilizes a multivocal narrative approach to analyze the dynamics, accomplishments, and challenges of an interdisciplinary doctoral support group consisting primarily of female members. The authors raise issues of power, alliance, troubling expert-novice models of mentoring, and the role of social justice pedagogy in the group.

  20. Facilitating Support Groups for Professionals Working with People with AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grossman, Arnold H.; Silverstein, Charles

    1993-01-01

    Describes support groups for health care professionals who work with people with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and who are experiencing burnout from excessive demands on their energy, strength, and resources. Discusses group administration, effective intervention techniques, and issues of health…

  1. Learning and Language: Supporting Group Work so Group Work Supports Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mylett, Terri; Gluck, Russell

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports on developments in teaching and learning for first year employment relations students at the University of Wollongong based on creating conditions of learning informed by Vygotsky's "zone of proximal development" theory. Essentially, this meant emphasising collaborative learning (group work) in the lecture theatre and…

  2. A support group for fathers whose partners died from cancer.

    PubMed

    Yopp, Justin Michael; Rosenstein, Donald Lee

    2013-04-01

    Men who are raising dependent children after their spouses or partners have died from cancer face unique challenges adjusting to single parenthood while managing their grief and the grief of their children. Unfortunately, the needs of those widowers have been overlooked in the clinical literature and no published interventions are designed specifically for that population. The current article details the creation and implementation of a peer support group for fathers recently widowed because of their wives' deaths from cancer. Initial observations and emergent themes from the group are described. Group members suggested that they benefited from participation in the support group and that this form of psychosocial support is a promising intervention for fathers in similar circumstances.

  3. Lessons learned from a secret Facebook support group.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Debra Parker; Washington, Karla; Wittenberg-Lyles, Elaine; Gage, Ashley; Mooney, Megan; Demiris, George

    2015-05-01

    The National Association of Social Workers developed practice standards for social workers using technology in their practice. These standards were derived from the foundation of the social work code of ethics and are helpful as social workers explore the use of new tools for the benefit of their clients. Hospice caregivers, both active and bereaved, are in great need of support but are often unable to attend traditional support groups. Facebook secret groups offer social workers a potential tool, given the geographic barriers that exist for traditional face-to-face support groups. The authors' experience with a secret Facebook group indicates that the technology can be useful when managed by a social worker facilitator. As social workers continue to explore helpful ways to use technology with clients, it is critical that they evaluate that practice and assess the clinical outcomes to establish an evidence base behind this practice.

  4. Internet Postings Linked to Student Highlight Interest in "Hate Groups": Experts Say Recruitment Efforts Targeting School-Age Youths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavanagh, Sean

    2005-01-01

    In an Internet forum run by the Libertarian National Socialist Green Party, an organization espousing neo-Nazi views, Jeff Weise made his comments about the group in the year leading up to his deadly armed assault at Red Lake High School in Minnesota. The forum lists 34 postings written by the 16-year-old Native American youth. The commentary Mr.…

  5. Internet-Delivered Targeted Group Intervention for Body Dissatisfaction and Disordered Eating in Adolescent Girls: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heinicke, Brooke E.; Paxton, Susan J.; McLean, Sian A.; Wertheim, Eleanor H.

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluated a targeted intervention designed to alleviate body image and eating problems in adolescent girls that was delivered over the internet so as to increase access to the program. The program consisted of six, 90-minute weekly small group, synchronous on-line sessions and was facilitated by a therapist and manual. Participants were…

  6. A tailored Internet-delivered intervention for smoking cessation designed to encourage social support and treatment seeking: usability testing and user tracing.

    PubMed

    Houston, Tom K; Ford, Daniel E

    2008-03-01

    While Internet technologies show promise for changing behavior, new methods for engaging individuals are needed to maximize effectiveness. The aim of this study is to design and evaluate an Internet-delivered intervention for smoking cessation that encouraged seeking support from family and treatment from doctors. To evaluate different introductions to the Internet site. We conducted usability testing and analyzed server logs to trace user participation in the website. Two groups of users (current smokers) were recruited using Google advertisements. In Phase 1, 58% (75/126) of users accessed the self-management strategies, but few users accessed the social support (28%) and treatment-seeking modules (33%). Then, a brief motivational introduction was added, stating the proven effectiveness of content in the unused modules, low use of these modules, and recommendations by two doctors to use all modules. Compared with Phase 1, in Phase 2 the mean time spent on the website per session increased (8 to 18 min, p = 0.01) and use of the social support (50%) and treatment seeking modules (56%) increased (both p < 0.01). At 1-month follow-up, reports of talking to family about smoking cessation also increased from 84% to 100% (p = 0.038). Changing the rationale and context of Web-based health information using a motivational introduction can change user behavior.

  7. The Process and Effect of Supportive Message Expression and Reception in Online Breast Cancer Support Groups

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eunkyung; Han, Jeong Yeob; Moon, Tae Joon; Shaw, Bret; Shah, Dhavan V.; McTavish, Fiona M.; Gustafson, David H.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To better understand the process and effect of social support exchanges within computer-mediated social support (CMSS) groups for breast cancer patients, this study examines 1) the dynamic interplay between emotional support giving and receiving and 2) the relative effects of emotional support giving and receiving on patients’ psychosocial health outcomes. Methods Data was collected from 177 patients who participated in online cancer support groups within the Comprehensive Health Enhancement Support System (CHESS) during the 4-month intervention. Data included 1) pretest and/or posttest survey scores of demographic, disease-related, and psychosocial factors, 2) automatically collected CHESS usage data, and 3) computer-aided content analysis of social support messages posts. Results Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that those who receive higher levels of support from others have fewer breast cancer-related concerns (β= −.15, p<.05), while those who give higher levels of support to others reframe their own problems in a positive light and adopt more positive strategies for coping (β= .16, p<.05). In addition to these positive effects, partial correlation analysis indicated that these two supportive behaviors are reciprocal. Conclusions We concluded that supportive exchanges of receiving and giving play positive, but different, roles in predicting psychosocial health outcomes. Moreover, emotional support giving and receiving tend to reinforce each other. Our findings help practitioners, health care providers, and health system designers make sense of diverse social support processes among cancer patients participating within CMSS groups. PMID:21416553

  8. Canadian Nurses’ Perspectives on Prostate Cancer Support Groups

    PubMed Central

    Yu Ko, Wellam F.; Oliffe, John L.; Han, Christina S.; Garrett, Bernie; Henwood, Tim; Tuckett, Anthony G.; Sohrevardi, Armin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Prostate cancer support groups (PCSGs) are community-based organizations that offer information and psychosocial support to men who experience prostate cancer and their families. Nurses are well positioned to refer men to a range of psychosocial resources to help them adjust to prostate cancer; however, little is known about nurses’ perspectives on PCSGs. Objective: The aim of this study was to describe nurses’ views about PCSGs as a means to making recommendations for advancing the effectiveness of PCSGs. Methods: A convenience sample of 101 Canadian nurses completed a 43-item Likert-scale questionnaire with the additional option of providing comments in response to an open-ended question. Univariate descriptive statistics and content analysis were used to analyze the quantitative and qualitative data, respectively. Results: Participants held positive views about the roles and potential impact of PCSGs. Participants strongly endorsed the benefits of support groups in disseminating information and providing support to help decrease patient anxiety. Online support groups were endorsed as a practical alternative for men who are reluctant to participate in face-to-face groups. Conclusions: Findings suggest that nurses support the value of Canadian face-to-face and online PCSGs. This is important, given that nurses can help connect individual patients to community-based sources providing psychosocial support. Implications for Practice: Many men benefit from participating in PCSGs. Aside from positively endorsing the work of PCSGs, nurses are important partners for raising awareness of these groups among potential attendees and can directly contribute to information sharing in face-to-face and online PCSGs. PMID:26034877

  9. Cancer support groups: a critical review of empirical studies.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, Benjamin H; Wachala, Elizabeth D

    2007-05-01

    Support groups for adults affected by cancer are widely offered by local community and national agencies in North America. This type of psychosocial intervention is defined in terms of its structure and functions, and its theoretical underpinnings and models of practice are described. Forty-four empirical studies of professionally led cancer support groups are summarized and critically reviewed. These studies include 32 outcome evaluations of randomized controlled trials, two process evaluations, and 10 consumer satisfaction studies. The findings reveal high levels of consumer satisfaction, and the outcome evaluations substantiate the morale and other quality of life benefits short of prolonging life. Discussion centers on priorities for future research and practice.

  10. Toward Effective Group Formation in Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadeghi, Hamid; Kardan, Ahmad A.

    2016-01-01

    Group formation task as a starting point for computer-supported collaborative learning plays a key role in achieving pedagogical goals. Various approaches have been reported in the literature to address this problem, but none have offered an optimal solution. In this research, an online learning environment was modeled as a weighted undirected…

  11. A Mutual Support Group for Young Problem Gamblers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Binde, Per

    2012-01-01

    A Swedish mutual support group for young problem gamblers is described and discussed. During the study period, 116 weekly meetings occurred, usually involving six to ten participants; in total, 69 problem gamblers (66 male and three female), aged 17-25, and 23 partners and friends attended the meetings. Half the gamblers had problems with Internet…

  12. Exploring Technology Supported Collaborative and Cooperative Group Formation Mechanisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carapina, Mia; Boticki, Ivica

    2015-01-01

    This paper reflects on the systematic literature review paper (in progress), which analyzes technology enhanced collaborative and cooperative learning in elementary education worldwide from 2004 to 2015, focusing on the exploration of technology mediated group formation. The review paper reports on only a few cases of technology supported methods…

  13. School Phobic Adolescents and a Peer Support Group.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diamond, Stanley C.

    1985-01-01

    Describes one school's program to deal with school phobic students--those whose emotional problems are often centered on the school setting. Explains how such students formed and ran a peer support group to help each other cope with anxiety. (FL)

  14. The Effect of Frequency and Type of Internet Use on Perceived Social Support and Sense of Well-Being in Individuals with Spinal Cord Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Susan M.

    2008-01-01

    This article examines the effect of frequency and type of Internet use on perceived social support and sense of well-being in persons with spinal cord injury. The results show that Internet use is not significantly related to perceived social support. Bivariate analysis indicates that there is a significant negative association between total…

  15. The Pain Course: a randomised controlled trial examining an internet-delivered pain management program when provided with different levels of clinician support

    PubMed Central

    Dear, Blake F.; Gandy, Milena; Karin, Eyal; Staples, Lauren G.; Johnston, Luke; Fogliati, Vincent J.; Wootton, Bethany M.; Terides, Matthew D.; Kayrouz, Rony; Perry, Kathryn Nicholson; Sharpe, Louise; Nicholas, Michael K.; Titov, Nickolai

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The present study evaluated an internet-delivered pain management program, the Pain Course, when provided with different levels of clinician support. Participants (n = 490) were randomised to 1 of 4 groups: (1) Regular Contact (n = 143), (2) Optional Contact (n = 141), (3) No Contact (n = 131), and (4) a treatment-as-usual Waitlist Control Group (n = 75). The treatment program was based on the principles of cognitive behaviour therapy and comprised 5 internet-delivered lessons provided over 8 weeks. The 3 Treatment Groups reported significant improvements (between-group Cohen's d; avg. reduction) in disability (ds ≥ 0.50; avg. reduction ≥ 18%), anxiety (ds ≥ 0.44; avg. reduction ≥ 32%), depression (ds ≥ 0.73; avg. reduction ≥ 36%), and average pain (ds ≥ 0.30; avg. reduction ≥ 12%) immediately posttreatment, which were sustained at or further improved to 3-month follow-up. High treatment completion rates and levels of satisfaction were reported, and no marked or consistent differences were observed between the Treatment Groups. The mean clinician time per participant was 67.69 minutes (SD = 33.50), 12.85 minutes (SD = 24.61), and 5.44 minutes (SD = 12.38) for those receiving regular contact, the option of contact, and no clinical contact, respectively. These results highlight the very significant public health potential of carefully designed and administered internet-delivered pain management programs and indicate that these programs can be successfully administered with several levels of clinical support. PMID:26039902

  16. Benefits of peer support groups in the treatment of addiction

    PubMed Central

    Tracy, Kathlene; Wallace, Samantha P

    2016-01-01

    Objective Peer support can be defined as the process of giving and receiving nonprofessional, nonclinical assistance from individuals with similar conditions or circumstances to achieve long-term recovery from psychiatric, alcohol, and/or other drug-related problems. Recently, there has been a dramatic rise in the adoption of alternative forms of peer support services to assist recovery from substance use disorders; however, often peer support has not been separated out as a formalized intervention component and rigorously empirically tested, making it difficult to determine its effects. This article reports the results of a literature review that was undertaken to assess the effects of peer support groups, one aspect of peer support services, in the treatment of addiction. Methods The authors of this article searched electronic databases of relevant peer-reviewed research literature including PubMed and MedLINE. Results Ten studies met our minimum inclusion criteria, including randomized controlled trials or pre-/post-data studies, adult participants, inclusion of group format, substance use-related, and US-conducted studies published in 1999 or later. Studies demonstrated associated benefits in the following areas: 1) substance use, 2) treatment engagement, 3) human immunodeficiency virus/hepatitis C virus risk behaviors, and 4) secondary substance-related behaviors such as craving and self-efficacy. Limitations were noted on the relative lack of rigorously tested empirical studies within the literature and inability to disentangle the effects of the group treatment that is often included as a component of other services. Conclusion Peer support groups included in addiction treatment shows much promise; however, the limited data relevant to this topic diminish the ability to draw definitive conclusions. More rigorous research is needed in this area to further expand on this important line of research. PMID:27729825

  17. The Professional Carers' Group: Supporting Group Work for Young Sexual Abusers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, Susanne; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Describes the context, format, and goals of the Professional Carers' Group, a professional network designed to support a centralized treatment project for young people who have sexually abused others. Ways that group-based work with potentially isolated local professionals may help a treatment program maintain a systemic perspective is discussed.…

  18. Therapeutic Affordances of Online Support Group Use in Women With Endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background The Internet has provided women living with endometriosis new opportunities to seek support online. Online support groups may provide a range of therapeutic affordances that may benefit these women. Objective To examine the presence of therapeutic affordances as perceived by women who use endometriosis online support groups. Methods Sixty-nine women (aged 19-50 years, mean 34.2 years; 65.2% (45/69) United Kingdom, 21.7% (15/69) United States) participated in a Web-based interview exploring online support group use. Participants had been using online support groups for an average of 2 years and 4 months (range = 1 month to 14 years, 9 months). Responses were analyzed using inductive thematic analysis. Results The analysis revealed 4 therapeutic affordances related to online support group use: (1) “connection,” that is, the ability to connect in order to support each other, exchange advice, and to try to overcome feelings of loneliness; (2) “exploration,” that is, the ability to look for information, learn, and bolster their knowledge; (3) “narration,” that is, the ability to share their experiences, as well as read about the experiences of others; and (4) “self-presentation,” that is, the ability to manage how they present themselves online. The associated outcomes of use were predominantly positive, such as reassurance and improved coping. However, a number of negative aspects were revealed including the following: concerns about the accuracy of information, arguments between members, overreliance on the group, becoming upset by negative experiences or good news items, and confidentiality of personal information. Conclusions Our findings support the previously proposed SCENA (Self-presentation, Connection, Exploration, Narration, and Adaptation) model and reveal a range of positive aspects that may benefit members, particularly in relation to reassurance and coping. However, negative aspects need to be addressed to maximize the potential

  19. Cost-Effectiveness of Group and Internet Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia in Adolescents: Results from a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    De Bruin, Eduard J.; van Steensel, Francisca J.A.; Meijer, Anne Marie

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: To investigate cost-effectiveness of adolescent cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBTI) in group- and Internet-delivered formats, from a societal perspective with a time horizon of 1 y Methods: Costs and effects data up to 1-y follow-up were obtained from a randomized controlled trial (RCT) comparing Internet CBTI to face-to-face group CBTI. The study was conducted at the laboratory of the Research Institute of Child Development and Education at the University of Amsterdam, and the academic youth mental health care center UvAMinds in Amsterdam. Sixty-two participants meeting Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision criteria for insomnia were randomized to face-to-face group CBTI (GT; n = 31, age = 15.6 y ± 1.8, 71.0% girls) or individual Internet CBTI (IT; n = 31, age = 15.4 y ± 1.5, 83.9% girls). The intervention consisted of six weekly sessions and a 2-mo follow up booster-session of CBTI, consisting of psychoeducation, sleep hygiene, restriction of time in bed, stimulus control, cognitive therapy, and relaxation techniques. GT sessions were held in groups of six to eight adolescents guided by two trained sleep therapists. IT consisted of individual Internet therapy with preprogrammed content similar to GT, and guided by trained sleep therapists. Results: Outcome measures were subjective sleep efficiency (SE) ≥ 85%, and quality-adjusted life-years (QALY). Analyses were conducted from a societal perspective. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) were calculated using bootstrap sampling, and presented in cost-effectiveness planes. Primary analysis showed costs over 1 y were higher for GT but effects were similar for IT and GT. Bootstrapped ICERs demonstrated there is a high probability of IT being cost-effective compared to GT. Secondary analyses confirmed robustness of results. Conclusions: Internet CBTI is a cost-effective treatment compared to group CBTI for adolescents, although

  20. Effect of support group peer facilitator training programmes on peer facilitator and support group member outcomes: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Delisle, Vanessa C; Gumuchian, Stephanie T; Kloda, Lorie A; Boruff, Jill; El-Baalbaki, Ghassan; Körner, Annett; Malcarne, Vanessa L; Thombs, Brett D

    2016-01-01

    Objective Peer facilitators play an important role in determining the success of many support groups for patients with medical illnesses. However, many facilitators do not receive training for their role and report a number of challenges in fulfilling their responsibilities. The objective of this systematic review was to evaluate the effects of training and support programmes for peer facilitators of support groups for people with medical illnesses on (1) the competency and self-efficacy of group facilitators and (2) self-efficacy for disease management, health outcomes and satisfaction with support groups among group members. Methods Searches included the CENTRAL, CINAHL, EMBASE, MEDLINE, PsycINFO and Web of Science databases from inception through 8 April 2016; reference list reviews; citation tracking of included articles; and trial registry reviews. Eligible studies were randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in any language that evaluated the effects of training programmes for peer facilitators compared with no training or alternative training formats on (1) competency or self-efficacy of peer facilitators, and (2) self-efficacy for disease management, health outcomes and satisfaction with groups of group members. The Cochrane Risk of Bias tool was used to assess risk of bias. Results There were 9757 unique titles/abstracts and 2 full-text publications reviewed. 1 RCT met inclusion criteria. The study evaluated the confidence and self-efficacy of cancer support group facilitators randomised to 4 months access to a website and discussion forum (N=23; low resource) versus website, discussion forum and 2-day training workshop (N=29). There were no significant differences in facilitator confidence (Hedges' g=0.16, 95% CI −0.39 to 0.71) or self-efficacy (Hedges' g=0.31, 95% CI −0.24 to 0.86). Risk of bias was unclear or high for 4 of 6 domains. Conclusions Well-designed and well-conducted, adequately powered trials of peer support group facilitator training

  1. An Open Platform for Seamless Sensor Support in Healthcare for the Internet of Things.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Jorge; Cabral, Jorge; Wagner, Stefan Rahr; Fischer Pedersen, Christian; Ravelo, Blaise; Memon, Mukhtiar; Mathiesen, Morten

    2016-12-08

    Population aging and increasing pressure on health systems are two issues that demand solutions. Involving and empowering citizens as active managers of their health represents a desirable shift from the current culture mainly focused on treatment of disease, to one also focused on continuous health management and well-being. Current developments in technological areas such as the Internet of Things (IoT), lead to new technological solutions that can aid this shift in the healthcare sector. This study presents the design, development, implementation and evaluation of a platform called Common Recognition and Identification Platform (CRIP), a part of the CareStore project, which aims at supporting caregivers and citizens to manage health routines in a seamless way. Specifically, the CRIP offers sensor-based support for seamless identification of users and health devices. A set of initial requirements was defined with a focus on usability limitations and current sensor technologies. The CRIP was designed and implemented using several technologies that enable seamless integration and interaction of sensors and people, namely Near Field Communication and fingerprint biometrics for identification and authentication, Bluetooth for communication with health devices and web services for wider integration with other platforms. Two CRIP prototypes were implemented and evaluated in laboratory during a period of eight months. The evaluations consisted of identifying users and devices, as well as seamlessly configure and acquire vital data from the last. Also, the entire Carestore platform was deployed in a nursing home where its usability was evaluated with caregivers. The evaluations helped assess that seamless identification of users and seamless configuration and communication with health devices is feasible and can help enable the IoT on healthcare applications. Therefore, the CRIP and similar platforms could be transformed into a valuable enabling technology for secure and

  2. An Open Platform for Seamless Sensor Support in Healthcare for the Internet of Things

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Jorge; Cabral, Jorge; Wagner, Stefan Rahr; Fischer Pedersen, Christian; Ravelo, Blaise; Memon, Mukhtiar; Mathiesen, Morten

    2016-01-01

    Population aging and increasing pressure on health systems are two issues that demand solutions. Involving and empowering citizens as active managers of their health represents a desirable shift from the current culture mainly focused on treatment of disease, to one also focused on continuous health management and well-being. Current developments in technological areas such as the Internet of Things (IoT), lead to new technological solutions that can aid this shift in the healthcare sector. This study presents the design, development, implementation and evaluation of a platform called Common Recognition and Identification Platform (CRIP), a part of the CareStore project, which aims at supporting caregivers and citizens to manage health routines in a seamless way. Specifically, the CRIP offers sensor-based support for seamless identification of users and health devices. A set of initial requirements was defined with a focus on usability limitations and current sensor technologies. The CRIP was designed and implemented using several technologies that enable seamless integration and interaction of sensors and people, namely Near Field Communication and fingerprint biometrics for identification and authentication, Bluetooth for communication with health devices and web services for wider integration with other platforms. Two CRIP prototypes were implemented and evaluated in laboratory during a period of eight months. The evaluations consisted of identifying users and devices, as well as seamlessly configure and acquire vital data from the last. Also, the entire Carestore platform was deployed in a nursing home where its usability was evaluated with caregivers. The evaluations helped assess that seamless identification of users and seamless configuration and communication with health devices is feasible and can help enable the IoT on healthcare applications. Therefore, the CRIP and similar platforms could be transformed into a valuable enabling technology for secure and

  3. Internet-based self-management support for adults with asthma: a qualitative study among patients, general practitioners and practice nurses on barriers to implementation

    PubMed Central

    van Gaalen, Johanna L; van Bodegom-Vos, Leti; Bakker, Moira J; Snoeck-Stroband, Jiska B; Sont, Jacob K

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to explore barriers among patients, general practitioners (GPs) and practice nurses to implement internet-based self-management support as provided by PatientCoach for asthma in primary care. Setting Primary care within South Holland, the Netherlands. Participants Twenty-two patients (12 women, mean age 38 years), 21 GPs (6 women, mean age 52 years) and 13 practice nurses (all women, mean age 41 years). Design A qualitative study using focus groups and interviews. Outcomes Barriers as perceived by patients, GPs and practice nurses to implementation of PatientCoach. Methods 10 focus groups and 12 interviews were held to collect data: 4 patient focus groups, 4 GP focus groups, 2 practice nurse focus group, 2 patient interviews, 5 GP interviews and 5 practice nurse interviews. A prototype of PatientCoach that included modules for coaching, personalised information, asthma self-monitoring, medication treatment plan, feedback, e-consultations and a forum was demonstrated. A semistructured topic guide was used. Directed content analysis was used to analyse data. Reported barriers were classified according to a framework by Grol and Wensing. Results A variety of barriers emerged among all participant groups. Barriers identified among patients include a lack of a patient–professional partnership in using PatientCoach and a lack of perceived benefit in improving asthma symptoms. Barriers identified among GPs include a low sense of urgency towards asthma care and current work routines. Practice nurses identified a low level of structured asthma care and a lack of support by colleagues as barriers. Among all participant groups, insufficient ease of use of PatientCoach, lack of financial arrangements and patient characteristics such as a lack of asthma symptoms were reported as barriers. Conclusions We identified a variety of barriers to implementation of PatientCoach. An effective implementation strategy for internet-based self

  4. A women's support group for Asian international students.

    PubMed

    Carr, Joetta L; Koyama, Miki; Thiagarajan, Monica

    2003-01-01

    International students underuse counseling services, which are grounded in Western cultural values. The authors describe a support group for Asian international students that they launched at a large midwestern university to help students feel at ease with American university life, address homesickness, language problems, and academic and social stressors. Co-leaders created a safe and culturally sensitive atmosphere where the women could network, socialize, and address their issues. Group treatment offers many advantages over individual counseling and can enhance the health of international students.

  5. Social support and support groups among people with HIV/AIDS in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Abrefa-Gyan, Tina; Wu, Liyun; Lewis, Marilyn W

    2016-01-01

    HIV/AIDS, a chronic burden in Ghana, poses social and health outcome concerns to those infected. Examining the Medical Outcome Study Social Support Survey (MOS-SSS) instrument among 300 Ghanaians from a cross-sectional design, Principal Component Analysis yielded four factors (positive interaction, trust building, information giving, and essential support), which accounted for 85.73% of the total variance in the MOS-SSS. A logistic regression analysis showed that essential support was the strongest predictor of the length of time an individual stayed in the support group, whereas positive interaction indicated negative association. The study's implications for policy, research, and practice were discussed.

  6. Proceedings of the Second Annual NASA Science Internet User Working Group Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Lenore A. (Editor); Gary, J. Patrick (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    Copies of the agenda, list of attendees, meeting summaries, and all presentations and exhibit material are contained. Included are plenary sessions, exhibits of advanced networking applications, and user subgroup meetings on NASA Science Internet policy, networking, security, and user services and applications topics.

  7. "The Hands-On Model of the Internet": Engaging Diverse Groups of Visitors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shea, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Based on ethnographic field research at the Miraikan National Museum of Emerging Science and Innovation in Tokyo, this article uses the "Hands-on Model of the Internet" in the Future, Innovation, and Society section of the museum as a case study in the various issues related to effective public engagement in science museums. Museum…

  8. Simple Automatic File Exchange (SAFE) to Support Low-Cost Spacecraft Operation via the Internet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Paul; Repaci, Max; Sames, David

    1998-01-01

    Various issues associated with Simple Automatic File Exchange (SAFE) are presented in viewgraph form. Specific topics include: 1) Packet telemetry, Internet IP networks and cost reduction; 2) Basic functions and technical features of SAFE; 3) Project goals, including low-cost satellite transmission to data centers to be distributed via an Internet; 4) Operations with a replicated file protocol; 5) File exchange operation; 6) Ground stations as gateways; 7) Lessons learned from demonstrations and tests with SAFE; and 8) Feedback and future initiatives.

  9. Internet safety education for youth: stakeholder perspectives

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Internet use is nearly ubiquitous among US youth; risks to internet use include cyberbullying, privacy violations and unwanted solicitation. Internet safety education may prevent these negative consequences; however, it is unclear at what age this education should begin and what group is responsible for teaching this topic. Methods Surveys were distributed to key stakeholders in youth safety education including public school teachers, clinicians, parents and adolescents. Surveys assessed age at which internet safety education should begin, as well as experiences teaching and learning internet safety. Surveys of adults assessed willingness to teach internet safety. Finally, participants were asked to identify a group whose primary responsibility it should be to teach internet safety. Results A total of 356 participants completed the survey (93.4% response rate), including 77 teachers, 111 clinicians, 72 parents and 96 adolescents. Stakeholders felt the optimal mean age to begin teaching internet safety was 7.2 years (SD = 2.5), range 2-15. Internet safety was regularly taught by some teachers (20.8%), few clinicians (2.6%) and many parents (40.3%). The majority of teachers, clinicians and parents were willing to teach internet safety, but all groups surveyed identified parents as having primary responsibility for teaching this topic. Conclusions Findings suggest agreement among key stakeholders for teaching internet safety at a young age, and for identifying parents as primary teachers of this topic. Clinicians have a unique opportunity to support parents by providing resources, guidance and support. PMID:23738647

  10. An Analysis for an Internet Grid to Support Space Based Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradford, Robert; McNair, Ann R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Currently, and in the past, dedicated communication circuits and "network services" with very stringent performance requirements have been used to support manned and unmanned mission critical ground operations at GSFC, JSC, MSFC, KSC and other NASA facilities. Because of the evolution of network technology, it is time to investigate other approaches to providing mission services for space ground and flight operations. In various scientific disciplines, effort is under way to develop network/komputing grids. These grids consisting of networks and computing equipment are enabling lower cost science. Specifically, earthquake research is headed in this direction. With a standard for network and computing interfaces using a grid, a researcher would not be required to develop and engineer NASA/DoD specific interfaces with the attendant increased cost. Use of the Internet Protocol (IP), CCSDS packet spec, and reed-solomon for satellite error correction etc. can be adopted/standardized to provide these interfaces. Generally most interfaces are developed at least to some degree end to end. This study would investigate the feasibility of using existing standards and protocols necessary to implement a SpaceOps Grid. New interface definitions or adoption/modification of existing ones for the various space operational services is required for voice both space based and ground, video, telemetry, commanding and planning may play a role to some undefined level. Security will be a separate focus in the study since security is such a large issue in using public networks. This SpaceOps Grid would be transparent to users. It would be anagulous to the Ethernet protocol's ease of use in that a researcher would plug in their experiment or instrument at one end and would be connected to the appropriate host or server without further intervention. Free flyers would be in this category as well. They would be launched and would transmit without any further intervention with the researcher or

  11. Summer Support of the Advanced Structures and Measurements Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuber, Alexander Lee

    2010-01-01

    This presentation is my exit presentation summarizing the work that I did this summer during my 10 week summer internship. It is primarily focused on tensile testing of composite coupons including the use of the ARAMIS optical strain measurement system, but it also includes some discussion of other support that I provided for the Dryden composites working group effort. My main efforts in that area were focused on T-joint design for an upcoming hands-on-workshop as well as design of a fixture to test joint coupons. Finally, there is a brief discussion of the other small projects that I worked on, including support of structurally integrated thermal protection system (STIPS) research and the Global Observer wing loads test.

  12. A psychoeducational codependency support group for older adults who reside in the community: friends supporting friends.

    PubMed

    McIinnis-Perry, Gloria J; Good, Jim M

    2006-08-01

    Older adults with loved ones who are dependent on alcohol or drugs often experience the adverse effects of a codependent relationship. Many experience anxiety, low self-esteem, depression, and suicidal thoughts. A pilot psychoeducational codependency support group was developed to promote well-being and reduce the adverse effects of codependency among older persons. The study participants were a voluntary convenience sample of 22 older adults (ages 65 and older) residing in the community. A pretest and posttest were administered. Six 90-minute group sessions based on a curriculum developed by the authors were held during a 2-month period. Yalom's Therapeutic Factors were used to evaluate the group process. Results indicated that older adults benefit from a psychoeducational support group format and that codependency issues can be reduced.

  13. [On the groups of maternal support of breast feeding].

    PubMed

    Abol'ian, L V; Loranskiĭ, D N; Kazakova, L V; Koniaeva, N A; Barabash, N A; Zubkova, N Z

    2010-01-01

    The article deals with the data related to the establishment in Russia of public associations of maternal support of breast feeding initiated by the WHO/UNISEF international initiative "Baby friendly hospital". The breast feeding is mostly a concern of medicine and medical institutions of obstetrics and pediatrics and corresponding specialists such as obstetrician-gynecologist, neonatologist and pediatrician. Hence the issue of appropriateness of existence of such groups, their competence and relationship with medical personnel and forms of activity has to be considered From historical point of view, in Soviet health care accumulated very rich experience of effective cooperation of public activists of Russian Red Cross with public health bodies in implementation of preventive and health improving activities, including health education of population groups. The conclusion is made that to provide effective activities of voluntary mothers? Associations to support breast feeding their interaction is needed with medical personnel, the development of scientific-grounded programs of training of mothers-consultants and informational methodical and health education materials.

  14. Global Internet Video Classroom: A Technology Supported Learner-Centered Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence, Oliver

    2010-01-01

    The Global Internet Video Classroom (GIVC) Project connected Chicago Civil Rights activists of the 1960s with Cape Town Anti-Apartheid activists of the 1960s in a classroom setting where learners from Cape Town and Chicago engaged activists in conversations about their motivation, principles, and strategies. The project was launched in order to…

  15. Starving for Support: How Women with Anorexia Receive "Thinspiration" on the Internet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curry, Jennifer; Ray, Shannon

    2010-01-01

    This article provides the definition of anorexia, prevalence of the disorder, and treatment prognosis. Further, although the Internet provides many helpful resources for identifying problematic eating behavior and resources for persons suffering with eating disorders, Web sites exist that are meant to encourage, promote, and sustain anorexic…

  16. Supporting Students' Transition from Primary School to High School Using the Internet as a Communication Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maher, Damian

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on a transition project where the Internet as a communication tool was used to facilitate interactions between primary school and high school students. The qualitative case study involved capturing the online interactions of the students and teachers as well as the use of questionnaires. Results of the study demonstrate that the…

  17. Connecting Children Internationally for Science Instruction: Using the Internet to Support Learning about Lunar Phases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Walter S.; Cheon, Jongpil; Jabri, Faiza; Reynolds, Stephen; Zebedi, Amira

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effect on children's science understanding of Internet-based instruction in which children from around the world in grades 4 to 8 observed the Moon for several weeks and then shared their lunar data internationally to find global patterns in the Moon's behavior. Students in two American and one Australian class took the…

  18. An Embedded Systems Laboratory to Support Rapid Prototyping of Robotics and the Internet of Things

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamblen, J. O.; van Bekkum, G. M. E.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a new approach for a course and laboratory designed to allow students to develop low-cost prototypes of robotic and other embedded devices that feature Internet connectivity, I/O, networking, a real-time operating system (RTOS), and object-oriented C/C++. The application programming interface (API) libraries provided permit…

  19. Internet Information-Seeking and Its Relation to Support for Access to Government Records

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuillier, David; Piotrowski, Suzanne J.

    2009-01-01

    Public access to government records is essential for democratic self-governance, and attitudes toward that right can facilitate or hinder public policy regarding transparency. As more people use the internet for gathering information about their governments and communities, it is unknown whether such online information-seeking is related to…

  20. Support of Research and Development Activities via the Internet: NASA's Access Mechanism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Denise; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Describes a prototype information access system developed by NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) called NAM (NASA Access Mechanism) to access the Internet for research and development activities. Topics addressed include the Science and Technical Information Program, information needs, networking requirements, functional and…

  1. Software support: Pre-empting the quick question. [User's support group at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Loebel, L.

    1987-09-01

    High energy physicists, researchers and graduate students, from universities all around the world come to Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory to do their experiments. They use our computer facilities to perform all phases of their data-analysis and presentation. We have a large turnover of users and a rather small support group, in a multi-vendor environment. We strive to make our users self-sufficient through the use of well-publicized maintenance procedures, documentation systems, and product support standards. By these pre-emptive measures we attempt to have quick answers at hand for the truly quick questions, leaving us time for the interesting problems.

  2. A practical application combining wireless sensor networks and Internet of Things: Safety Management System for Tower Crane Groups.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Dexing; Lv, Hongqiang; Han, Jiuqiang; Wei, Quanrui

    2014-07-30

    The so-called Internet of Things (IoT) has attracted increasing attention in the field of computer and information science. In this paper, a specific application of IoT, named Safety Management System for Tower Crane Groups (SMS-TC), is proposed for use in the construction industry field. The operating status of each tower crane was detected by a set of customized sensors, including horizontal and vertical position sensors for the trolley, angle sensors for the jib and load, tilt and wind speed sensors for the tower body. The sensor data is collected and processed by the Tower Crane Safety Terminal Equipment (TC-STE) installed in the driver's operating room. Wireless communication between each TC-STE and the Local Monitoring Terminal (LMT) at the ground worksite were fulfilled through a Zigbee wireless network. LMT can share the status information of the whole group with each TC-STE, while the LMT records the real-time data and reports it to the Remote Supervision Platform (RSP) through General Packet Radio Service (GPRS). Based on the global status data of the whole group, an anti-collision algorithm was executed in each TC-STE to ensure the safety of each tower crane during construction. Remote supervision can be fulfilled using our client software installed on a personal computer (PC) or smartphone. SMS-TC could be considered as a promising practical application that combines a Wireless Sensor Network with the Internet of Things.

  3. A Practical Application Combining Wireless Sensor Networks and Internet of Things: Safety Management System for Tower Crane Groups

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Dexing; Lv, Hongqiang; Han, Jiuqiang; Wei, Quanrui

    2014-01-01

    The so-called Internet of Things (IoT) has attracted increasing attention in the field of computer and information science. In this paper, a specific application of IoT, named Safety Management System for Tower Crane Groups (SMS-TC), is proposed for use in the construction industry field. The operating status of each tower crane was detected by a set of customized sensors, including horizontal and vertical position sensors for the trolley, angle sensors for the jib and load, tilt and wind speed sensors for the tower body. The sensor data is collected and processed by the Tower Crane Safety Terminal Equipment (TC-STE) installed in the driver's operating room. Wireless communication between each TC-STE and the Local Monitoring Terminal (LMT) at the ground worksite were fulfilled through a Zigbee wireless network. LMT can share the status information of the whole group with each TC-STE, while the LMT records the real-time data and reports it to the Remote Supervision Platform (RSP) through General Packet Radio Service (GPRS). Based on the global status data of the whole group, an anti-collision algorithm was executed in each TC-STE to ensure the safety of each tower crane during construction. Remote supervision can be fulfilled using our client software installed on a personal computer (PC) or smartphone. SMS-TC could be considered as a promising practical application that combines a Wireless Sensor Network with the Internet of Things. PMID:25196106

  4. How effective is bibliotherapy-based self-help cognitive behavioral therapy with Internet support in clinical settings? Results from a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Högdahl, Louise; Birgegård, Andreas; Björck, Caroline

    2013-03-01

    Cognitive behavioral therapy-based guided self-help (CBT-GSH) via the Internet has been shown to be effective in the treatment of bulimia nervosa (BN) and similar eating disorders (EDs), but it is rarely offered, and little is known about the effects, in clinical settings. The present study investigated the effects of a bibliotherapy-based CBT-GSH with Internet support in a clinical setting. Participants were 48 adult outpatients who were recruited without randomization from a specialized ED clinic, diagnosed with BN or similar eating disorder. Forty-eight patients in an intensive day patient program (DPP) were used as comparison group. The Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire (EDE-Q) and the Eating Disorder Inventory 2 measured pre- and post treatment symptoms. Results showed that both groups attained significant improvements in core- as well as related ED symptoms in both instruments. As expected, treatment effects were larger in the more intensive DPP. Nonetheless, bibliotherapy CBT-GSH appears to be a cost-effective treatment that represents a new way to provide more CBT in clinical settings.

  5. Supporting academic publication: evaluation of a writing course combined with writers' support group.

    PubMed

    Rickard, Claire M; McGrail, Matthew R; Jones, Rebecca; O'Meara, Peter; Robinson, Anske; Burley, Mollie; Ray-Barruel, Gillian

    2009-07-01

    Publication rates are a vital measure of individual and institutional performance, yet many nurse academics publish rarely or not at all. Despite widespread acceptance of the need to increase academic publication rates and the pressure university faculty may experience to fulfil this obligation, little is known about the effectiveness of practical strategies to support academic writing. In this small cohort study (n=8) comprising nurses and other professionals involved in university education, a questionnaire survey was used to evaluate the effectiveness of a one-week "Writing for Publication" course combined with a monthly writers support group to increase publication rates. Two year pre and post submissions increased from 9 to 33 articles in peer-reviewed journals. Publications (in print) per person increased from a baseline of 0.5-1.2 per year. Participants reported increased writing confidence and greater satisfaction with the publishing process. Peer support and receiving recognition and encouragement from line managers were also cited as incentives to publish. Writing for publication is a skill that can be learned. The evaluated model of a formal writing course, followed by informal monthly group support meetings, can effectively increase publication rates.

  6. Validity of the Malay version of the Internet Addiction Test: a study on a group of medical students in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Guan, Ng Chong; Isa, Saramah Mohammed; Hashim, Aili Hanim; Pillai, Subash Kumar; Harbajan Singh, Manveen Kaur

    2015-03-01

    The use of the Internet has been increasing dramatically over the decade in Malaysia. Excessive usage of the Internet has lead to a phenomenon called Internet addiction. There is a need for a reliable, valid, and simple-to-use scale to measure Internet addiction in the Malaysian population for clinical practice and research purposes. The aim of this study was to validate the Malay version of the Internet Addiction Test, using a sample of 162 medical students. The instrument displayed good internal consistency (Cronbach's α = .91), parallel reliability (intraclass coefficient = .88, P < .001), and concurrent validity with the Compulsive Internet Use Scale (Pearson's correlation = .84, P < .001). Receiver operating characteristic analysis showed that 43 was the optimal cutoff score to discriminate students with and without Internet dependence. Principal component analysis with varimax rotation identified a 5-factor model. The Malay version of the Internet Addiction Test appeared to be a valid instrument for assessing Internet addiction in Malaysian university students.

  7. ‘I’m searching for solutions’: why are obese individuals turning to the Internet for help and support with ‘being fat’?

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Sophie; Thomas, Samantha L.; Blood, R. Warwick; Castle, David; Hyde, Jim; Komesaroff, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Introduction  This study explores what types of information obese individuals search for on the Internet, their motivations for seeking information and how they apply it in their daily lives. Method  In‐depth telephone interviews with an Australian community sample of 142 individuals with a BMI ≥ 30 were conducted. Theoretical, purposive and strategic samplings were employed. Data were analysed using a constant comparative method. Results  Of the 142 individuals who participated in the study, 111 (78%) searched for information about weight loss or obesity. Of these, about three quarters searched for weight loss solutions. The higher the individual’s weight, the more they appeared to search for weight loss solutions. Participants also searched for information about health risks associated with obesity (n = 28), how to prevent poor health outcomes (n = 30) and for peer support forums with other obese individuals (n = 25). Whilst participants visited a range of websites, including government‐sponsored sites, community groups and weight loss companies, they overwhelmingly acted upon the advice given on commercial diet websites. However, safe, non‐judgemental spaces such as the Fatosphere (online fat acceptance community) provided much needed solidarity and support. Conclusions  The Internet provides a convenient source of support and information for obese individuals. However, many turn to the same unsuccessful solutions online (e.g. fad dieting) they turn to in the community. Government and community organisations could draw upon some lessons learned in other consumer‐driven online spaces (e.g. the Fatosphere) to provide supportive environments for obese individuals that resonate with their health and social experiences, and address their needs. PMID:21199200

  8. Adherence to physical activity guidelines among cancer support group participants.

    PubMed

    Stevinson, C; Lydon, A; Amir, Z

    2014-03-01

    Physical activity is recommended after cancer diagnosis for physical function, quality of life and survival benefits. This study provided preliminary data on the prevalence of physical activity among adult men and women with cancer in the UK. As part of a national survey of cancer support group participation, questionnaires including items on leisure-time physical activity and demographic information were completed by 748 cancer survivors. Overall, 395 (52.8%) participants reported no weekly moderate or vigorous intensity physical activity, 221 (29.5%) reported some activity but below minimum recommendations and 132 (17.6%) were meeting published guidelines. Gender, health status and socio-economic status were independently associated with meeting guidelines. Among participants in good or fair health who were not meeting guidelines, 59.9% thought that they ought to be more physically active. In conclusion, overall levels of physical activity are low among cancer survivors in the UK. However, the majority of insufficiently active participants showed awareness of the need to increase their activity, and may be receptive to interventions for promoting physical activity in this population.

  9. Quality of internet access: barrier behind internet use statistics.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Harvey; Biscope, Sherry; Poland, Blake

    2003-09-01

    The rapid growth of the Internet is increasingly international with young people being the early adopters in most countries. However, the quality of Internet access looms as a major barrier hidden behind Internet use statistics. The goal of this study was to provide an in-depth evaluation of young people's perspectives on using the Internet to obtain health information and resources (e-health). Using an inductive qualitative research design, 27 focus groups were conducted in Ontario, Canada. The 210 young participants were selected to reflect diversity in age, sex, geographic location, cultural identity and risk. A major finding was how the quality of Internet access influenced young people's ability to obtain health information and resources. Quality of Internet access was affected by four key factors: 1. Privacy, 2. Gate-keeping, 3. Timeliness and 4. Functionality. Privacy was particularly relevant to these young people in getting access to sensitive health information (e.g. sexual activities). Variations in access quality also impacted participation in mutual support, fostering social networks and getting specific health questions answered. These results serve as a warning about using Internet penetration statistics alone as a measure of access. Concerted attention is needed on improving the quality of Internet access for achieving the potential of e-health. This is imperative for addressing the digital divide affecting populations both within countries and globally between countries.

  10. Ubiquitous learning model using interactive internet messenger group (IIMG) to improve engagement and behavior for smart campus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umam, K.; Mardi, S. N. S.; Hariadi, M.

    2017-01-01

    The recent popularity of internet messenger based smartphone technologies has motivated some university lecturers to use them for educational activities. These technologies have enormous potential to enhance the teaching and ubiquitous learning experience for smart campus development. However, the design ubiquitous learning model using interactive internet messenger group (IIMG) and empirical evidence that would favor a broad application of mobile and ubiquitous learning in smart campus settings to improve engagement and behavior is still limited. In addition, the expectation that mobile learning could improve engagement and behavior on smart campus cannot be confirmed because the majority of the reviewed studies followed instructions paradigms. This article aims to present ubiquitous learning model design and showing learners’ experiences in improved engagement and behavior using IIMG for learner–learner and learner–lecturer interactions. The method applied in this paper includes design process and quantitative analysis techniques, with the purpose of identifying scenarios of ubiquitous learning and realize the impressions of learners and lecturers about engagement and behavior aspect, and its contribution to learning.

  11. Virtually supportive: A feasibility pilot study of an online support group for dementia caregivers in a 3D virtual environment

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, Mary-Frances; Arizmendi, Brian J.; Kaszniak, Alfred W.

    2014-01-01

    Caregiver support groups effectively reduce stress from caring for someone with dementia. These same demands can prevent participation in a group. The present feasibility study investigated a virtual online caregiver support group to bring the support group into the home. While online groups have been shown to be helpful, submissions to a message board (vs. live conversation) can feel impersonal. By using avatars, participants interacted via real-time chat in a virtual environment in an 8-week support group. Data indicated lower levels of perceived stress, depression and loneliness across participants. Importantly, satisfaction reports also indicate that caregivers overcame the barriers to participation, and had a strong sense of the group’s presence. This study provides the framework for an accessible and low cost online support group for a dementia caregiver. The study demonstrates the feasibility of interactive group in a virtual environment for engaging members in meaningful interaction. PMID:24984911

  12. Ethnic identity, intergroup contact, and outgroup orientation among diverse groups of adolescents on the Internet.

    PubMed

    Tynes, Brendesha M; Giang, Michael T; Thompson, Geneene N

    2008-08-01

    The relationship among adolescents' (N = 228) ethnic identity, outgroup orientation, and online intergroup experiences was examined across three groups: European Americans, ethnic minorities (i.e., Latino and African Americans), and multiracials. Similar to previous studies, ethnic minorities reported significantly higher ethnic identity than European Americans and multiracials. Although outgroup orientation did not differ among ethnic groups, European Americans reported that they had more online intergroup contact than the other ethnic groups; greater intergroup contact was also related to higher outgroup orientation for this group. These results show that ethnic identity remains stronger for ethnic minorities, but intergroup interaction has become a salient and influential aspect of the online experience for European Americans. Implications are drawn for understanding and improving online and offline intergroup relations.

  13. Internet Censorship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jyotsna; Kapil; Aayush

    2012-09-01

    Censorship on Internet has always wet its hands in the water of controversies, It is said to go in with synonym of "FILTERING THE NET" i.e. Either done to protect minors or for nationís privacy, some take it as snatching their freedom over internet and some take it as an appropriate step to protect minor, It has its supporters as well as opponents.Google has reported a whooping number of requests from Governments of U.K, China, Poland, Spain, and Canada to remove videos and search links that led to harassment, sensitive issues or suspicious people. This paper deals with the cons of censorship on internet and to make people aware of the fact that Internet is not a single body owned by an org. but an open sky of information shared equally by all. Research done has found out many unseen aspects of different people's view point.

  14. Culture and Embodied Cognition: Moral Discourses in Internet Support Groups for Overeaters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ignatow, Gabriel

    2009-01-01

    This article argues that a modified version of Bourdieu's "habitus" concept can generate insights into moral culture and the ways people use culture to make changes in their lives. If revised in light of recent findings from cognitive neuroscience, the habitus allows for the analysis of culture as embodied cognitive structures linking individuals…

  15. Online Academic Support Peer Groups for Medical Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Best, Avril Christine

    2012-01-01

    As advances in information and communication technologies give way to more innovative opportunities for teaching and learning at a distance, the need to provide supporting structures for online students similar to those offered to on-campus students is becoming more significant. Although a range of support services has been proposed in the past,…

  16. Internet-Based Self-Help with Therapist Feedback and in Vivo Group Exposure for Social Phobia: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andersson, Gerhard; Carlbring, Per; Holmstrom, Annelie; Sparthan, Elisabeth; Furmark, Tomas; Nilsson-Ihrfelt, Elisabeth; Buhrman, Monica; Ekselius, Lisa

    2006-01-01

    Sixty-four individuals with social phobia (social anxiety disorder) were assigned to a multimodal cognitive-behavioral treatment package or to a waiting list control group. Treatment consisted of a 9-week, Internet-delivered, self-help program that was combined with 2 group exposure sessions in real life and minimal therapist contact via e-mail.…

  17. How Family Support and Internet Self-Efficacy Influence the Effects of E-Learning among Higher Aged Adults--Analyses of Gender and Age Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chu, Regina Ju-chun

    2010-01-01

    Gender and age differences in the effects of e-learning, including students' satisfaction and Internet self-efficacy, have been supported in prior research. What is less understood is how these differences are shaped, especially for higher aged adults. This article examines the utility of family support (tangible and emotional) and Internet…

  18. Social support, organizational characteristics, psychological well-being, and group appraisal in three self-help group populations.

    PubMed

    Maton, K I

    1988-02-01

    This study examined the relationship of three social support and three organizational variables to two well-being and two group appraisal variables among 144 members of Compassionate Friends, Multiple Sclerosis, and Overeaters Anonymous self-help groups. An anonymous questionnaire was the major research instrument. Receiving social support was not significantly related to depression or anxiety but was positively related to perceived group benefits and group satisfaction. Providing social support and friendship were each positively related to one well-being and one group appraisal variable. Bidirectional supporters (i.e., individuals high on both receiving and providing support) reported more favorable well-being and group appraisal than Receivers, Providers, and Low Supporters. At the group level of analysis (n = 15 groups), groups with higher levels of role differentiation, greater order and organization, and in which leaders were perceived as more capable contained members who reported more positive well-being and group appraisal. The implications for future research and professional consultation to self-help groups are discussed.

  19. Supporting Controversial CSCL Discussions with Augmented Group Awareness Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buder, Jurgen; Bodemer, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the development of augmented group awareness tools that take mutual user ratings of their online discussion contributions as input, aggregate these data, and visually feed these data back to the members in real time, thereby informing participants about how the group as a whole perceives their contributions. A specific group…

  20. Supporting Alternative Strategies for Learning Chemical Applications of Group Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southam, Daniel C.; Lewis, Jennifer E.

    2013-01-01

    A group theory course for chemists was taught entirely with process oriented guided inquiry learning (POGIL) to facilitate alternative strategies for learning. Students completed a test of one aspect of visuospatial aptitude to determine their individual approaches to solving spatial tasks, and were sorted into groups for analysis on the basis of…

  1. Supporting "Learning by Design" Activities Using Group Blogs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fessakis, Georgios; Tatsis, Konstantinos; Dimitracopoulou, Angelique

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents a case study of the educational exploitation of group blogging for the implementation of a "learning by design" activity. More specifically, a group of students used a blog as a communication and information management tool in the University course of ICT-enhanced Geometry learning activities. The analysis of the designed…

  2. Dynamic Grouping in Collaborative Learning Supported by Wireless Handhelds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zurita, Gustavo; Nussbaum, Miguel; Salinas, Rodrigo

    2005-01-01

    One of the most important decisions to be made in a face-to-face collaborative learning activity is how the participating groups are composed. These compositions produce different learning and social interaction results. The ability to change the group member composition in real time and dynamically enables the leveling up of learning results and…

  3. Group Awareness in Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghadirian, Hajar; Ayub, Ahmad Fauzi Mohd; Silong, Abu Daud; Bakar, Kamariah Binti Abu; Hosseinzadeh, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    It is commonly discussed that a key challenge for online collaboration is to promote group awareness. Although this challenge has gained intensified consideration by scholars, scarce attempt has been devoted into development of a reasonable hypothetical comprehension of what group awareness really is and how it can be studied empirically. This…

  4. Photorealistic rendering over the Internet for restoration support of ancient buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Maurizio; Marini, Daniele; Rizzi, Alessandro

    2000-12-01

    In the field of cultural heritage restoration, experts are extremely interested in the analysis of the large amounts of data describing the condition and history of ancient monuments. In this paper we describe a method and its implementation for providing high quality photorealistic image synthesis of ancient buildings over the Internet through VRML and Java technology. A network-based Java application manages geometric 3D VRML models of an ancient building to provide an interface to add information and to compute high quality photorealistic snapshots of the entire model or any of its parts. The poor quality VRML real time rendering is upheld by a slower but more accurate rendering computed on a radiometric basis. The input data for this advanced rendering is taken form the geometric VRML model. We have also implemented some extensions to provide spectral dat including the measurement of light and materials obtained experimentally. The interface to access the ancient building database is descriptive VRML model itself. The Java application enhances the interaction with the model to provide and manage high quality images that allow visual qualitative evaluation of restoration hypotheses by providing a tool to improve the appearance of the resulting image under assigned lighting conditions.

  5. The Impact of Demographic Characteristics on Awareness and Usage of Support Groups.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Linda Jane; Shah, Nehal; Jain, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    There are support groups established for one's emotional and/or physical health; as a result, marketing has appeared in regards to the needs, benefits, and hesitations regarding these groups. This study addresses several types of individuals and situations that lend themselves to using support groups. The authors conducted a study designed to examine demographic characteristics as they relate to a person's decision to go to support groups for health conditions. Looking at the demographics of users and the types of support groups, the authors discuss diverse opportunities for support groups and their organizations to promote communication, improve marketing strategies, and create influential users.

  6. The Internet as a Safety Net: Findings from a Series of Online Focus Groups with LGB and Non-LGB Young People in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillier, Lynne; Mitchell, Kimberly J.; Ybarra, Michele L.

    2012-01-01

    Lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) youth face special challenges during adolescence including stigma, alienation, and abuse which have been linked with social costs and negative health outcomes. The Internet has been shown to ameliorate the negative impacts of homophobia by providing access to friendships and support, information, romantic partners,…

  7. Implementation of Support Groups in Elementary and Middle School Student Assistance Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rainey, Leslie Martin; Hensley, Fran Austin; Crutchfield, Lori B.

    1997-01-01

    Describes the implementation of Student Assistance Program (SAP) support groups in one middle school and one elementary school. The Health Education department administers the program and licensed school counselors serve in local schools as program counselors. Discusses support group offerings, the procedures used in SAP support groups, and…

  8. Strategies for Organizational Change from Group Homes to Individualized Supports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Pam

    2012-01-01

    Organizations are increasingly looking to convert from facility-based services for adults with developmental disabilities to individualized supports. Such conversion involves not only a change in services but a transformation of organizational culture. This qualitative study involved four organizations that have made sustained efforts to…

  9. Caregiving and Social Support in Two Illness Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monahan, Deborah J.; Hooker, Karen

    1997-01-01

    Examines whether spouse caregivers of people either with noncognitive disorders (Parkinson's disease) or cognitive disorders (Alzheimer's disease) differed in their use and perception of social support resources. Results indicate that caregivers of spouses diagnosed with cognitive disorders were older, had fewer children, and had fewer financial…

  10. Provision of support strategies and services: results from an internet-based survey of community-based breastfeeding counselors.

    PubMed

    Bignell, Whitney E; Sullivan, Elizabeth; Andrianos, Anne; Anderson, Alex Kojo

    2012-02-01

    This study examined the determinants of support strategies and services provided by community-based breastfeeding counselors (CBBCs) and compared differences in extent of support provided by paid and volunteer counselors. Participants (N = 847) in this internet-based survey were mostly White/Caucasian (74.9%), college-educated (59.0%), and paid CBBCs (63.8%). The majority (75.9%) of volunteer CBBCs compared with their paid full-time (52.1%) and paid part-time (47.4%) counterparts had completed college. Being a full-time paid compared with volunteer/unpaid CBBC was associated with face-to-face counseling (OR = 3.69; 95% CI: 1.93, 7.06), use of client-centered counseling skills (OR = 6.23; 95% CI: 3.40, 11.45), making referrals to social service agencies (OR = 13.18; 95% CI: 6.86, 25.32), and helping position baby (OR = 3.77; 95% CI: 1.64, 8.69). Because of the disparities in CBBC usage of breastfeeding support strategies and continuing education between paid and volunteer CBBCs, there is a need to examine differences in training curricula and determine the facilitators and barriers of continuing education.

  11. Strategies for organizational change from group homes to individualized supports.

    PubMed

    Walker, Pam

    2012-10-01

    Organizations are increasingly looking to convert from facility-based services for adults with developmental disabilities to individualized supports. Such conversion involves not only a change in services but a transformation of organizational culture. This qualitative study involved four organizations that have made sustained efforts to transform. Although the approach taken by each organization was unique, there were also some common strategies, which included generating commitment to common values and mission, a turn or return to authentic person-centered planning, shifting power and control, using community supports and relationships, moving away from facility-based settings, and nurturing staff engagement. Ultimately, organizational change is an ongoing process that requires organizational perseverance and commitment.

  12. Dutch Adolescents' Motives, Perceptions, and Reflections Toward Sex-Related Internet Use: Results of a Web-Based Focus-Group Study.

    PubMed

    Doornwaard, Suzan M; den Boer, Fedde; Vanwesenbeeck, Ine; van Nijnatten, Carol H C J; Ter Bogt, Tom F M; van den Eijnden, Regina J J M

    2016-12-16

    The Internet offers adolescents unique opportunities to actively shape their own sexual media environment. The aim of this study was to gain in-depth insight into Dutch adolescents' motives, perceptions, and reflections toward Internet use for (a) finding information or advice related to romance and sexuality; (b) searching for and viewing pornographic or erotic material; and (c) romantic and sexual communication (i.e., cybersex/sexting). Data were collected through 12 Web-based focus groups (36 adolescents aged 16 to 19 years, 72.2% girls) and analyzed through three stages of open, axial, and selective coding. The themes that emerged from the focus-group discussions suggest that sex-related Internet use is a complex and ambivalent experience for adolescents. Sex-related Internet use seems an increasingly normalized and common phenomenon. Participants perceived the Internet as a useful source of sexual information, stimulation, inspiration, and communication. Yet they discussed a range of negative consequences and risks related to sex-related online behaviors, particularly concerning pornography's potential to create unrealistic expectations about sex and sexual attractiveness. Participants generally believed they had the necessary skills to navigate through the online sexual landscape in a responsible way, although they believed other young people could be influenced inadvertently and adversely by sex-related online content.

  13. Virtual working systems to support R&D groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dew, Peter M.; Leigh, Christine; Drew, Richard S.; Morris, David; Curson, Jayne

    1995-03-01

    The paper reports on the progress at Leeds University to build a Virtual Science Park (VSP) to enhance the University's ability to interact with industry, grow its applied research and workplace learning activities. The VSP exploits the advances in real time collaborative computing and networking to provide an environment that meets the objectives of physically based science parks without the need for the organizations to relocate. It provides an integrated set of services (e.g. virtual consultancy, workbased learning) built around a structured person- centered information model. This model supports the integration of tools for: (a) navigating around the information space; (b) browsing information stored within the VSP database; (c) communicating through a variety of Person-to-Person collaborative tools; and (d) the ability to the information stored in the VSP including the relationships to other information that support the underlying model. The paper gives an overview of a generic virtual working system based on X.500 directory services and the World-Wide Web that can be used to support the Virtual Science Park. Finally the paper discusses some of the research issues that need to be addressed to fully realize a Virtual Science Park.

  14. Caring for Others: Internet Video-Conferencing Group Intervention for Family Caregivers of Older Adults with Neurodegenerative Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marziali, Elsa; Donahue, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this pilot feasibility study was to evaluate the effects of an innovative, Internet-based psychosocial intervention for family caregivers of older adults with neurodegenerative disease. Design and Methods: After receiving signed informed consent from each participant, we randomly assigned 66 caregivers to an Internet-based…

  15. Testing Measurement Invariance and Latent Mean Differences across Gender Groups in College Students' Internet-Specific Epistemic Beliefs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiu, Yen-Lin; Tsai, Chin-Chung; Liang, Jyh-Chong

    2015-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to investigate the measurement invariance and gender differences in the Internet-specific epistemic beliefs between male and female undergraduates. A total of 735 university students in Taiwan were surveyed using the Internet-specific epistemic beliefs questionnaire (ISEQ). By conducting structural equation modeling…

  16. Primer for the Assessment, Diagnosis and Delivery of Internet Interventions for (Mainly) Panic Disorder. Lessons Learned from Our Research Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andersson, Gerhard; Ritterband, Lee M.; Carlbring, Per

    2008-01-01

    With the advent of the Internet, delivered assessment applications are likely to make a difference in clinical psychology and in health care in general. The purpose of the present paper was to present an overview of the authors' experience regarding Internet administration of diagnostic interviews, questionnaires, and information processing tests.…

  17. School-Based Support Groups for Traumatized Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Openshaw, Linda Leek

    2011-01-01

    After students experience a traumatic event, group counseling is an effective tool to offset the effects of grief and distress. Following a school crisis, successful school-based intervention requires interdisciplinary coordination between school psychologists, counselors, school social workers, teachers, and administrative staff. Within a short…

  18. The Family Support Group (FSG) Leaders’ Handbook

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-04-01

    get the mistaken idea that the FSG is some form of psychological or psychiatric group therapy. Because they do not consider themselves to be mentally...from the field party • Casino night • Ethnic dinners • Video night • Blue jeans brunch • Road rally • Surprise brown bag

  19. Facebook Groups as a Supporting Tool for Language Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekoc, Arzu

    2014-01-01

    This paper attempts to present a review of Facebook group pages as an educational tool for language learning. One of the primary needs of foreign language learners is to gain the opportunity to use the target language outside the classroom practice. Social media communication provides occasions for learners to receive input and produce output…

  20. Learning from Our Mistakes: The Evolution of a University Harm Reduction Support Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Geri; Quealey-Berge, Diana; Kirkley, Dale; Shuskey, Lisa

    2006-01-01

    This article is a summary of one university's development of two abstinence-based, 12 Step model groups that evolved into a harm reduction support group on its campus. The authors describe their experiences in establishing and facilitating such support groups within a group development stage model. Specific guidelines are provided for the…

  1. African American Adolescents with Sickle Cell Disease: Support Groups and Psychological Well-Being.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Marilyn M.; Telfair, Joseph

    1999-01-01

    Studied the impact of support groups on the psychological well-being of adolescents with sickle cell disease (SCD). Response of 79 adolescent SCD group members show that psychological well-being was best predicted by fewer physical symptoms and greater satisfaction with the group. Findings suggest the beneficial effects of SCD support groups. (SLD)

  2. Voting in Group Support Systems: Theory, Implementation, and Results from an Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Kung-E

    2009-01-01

    Group decision making is essential in organizations. Group Support Systems (GSS) can aide groups in making decisions by providing tools and process support. GSS is especially useful for geographically or temporally distributed groups. Researchers of GSS have pointed out that convergence processes are hard to accomplish in GSS. Voting tools in GSS…

  3. E-Rate to Support Wireless E-Mail, Internet Calling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trotter, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    This article deals with federal E-rate program's support of school leaders' Blackberry habit. The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has cleared the way to allow money from the $2.25 billion program of subsidies for school technology to apply to e-mail service for mobile, wireless devices, such as the BlackBerry, which are increasingly…

  4. Understanding Instructional Support Needs of Emerging Internet Users for Web-Based Information Seeking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gupta, Naman K.; Penstein Rosé, Carolyn

    2010-01-01

    As the wealth of information available on the Web increases, Web-based information seeking becomes a more and more important skill for supporting both formal education and lifelong learning. However, Web-based information access poses hurdles that must be overcome by certain student populations, such as low English competency users, low literacy…

  5. Zwitterionic Group VIII transition metal initiators supported by olefin ligands

    DOEpatents

    Bazan, Guillermo C.; Chen, Yaofeng

    2011-10-25

    A zwitterionic Group VIII transition metal complex containing the simple and relatively small 3-(arylimino)-but-1-en-2-olato ligand that catalyzes the formation of polypropylene and high molecular weight polyethylene. A novel feature of this catalyst is that the active species is stabilized by a chelated olefin adduct. The present invention also provides methods of polymerizing olefin monomers using zwitterionic catalysts, particularly polypropylene and high molecular weight polyethylene.

  6. Training in Basic Internet Skills for Special Target Groups in Non-Formal Educational Settings--Conclusions from Three Pilot Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berger, Andrea; Croll, Jutta

    2012-01-01

    With the progress of Digital Inclusion, it becomes important to address marginalised groups that face specific barriers in being part of the information society. From 2009 to 2011 within the framework of the nation-wide Initiative "Internet erfahren", funded by the German Federal Ministry of Economics, Stiftung Digitale Chancen has…

  7. Construction of Student Groups Using Belbin: Supporting Group Work in Environmental Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Mark; Polglase, Giles; Parry, Carolyn

    2012-01-01

    Belbin team role self and observer perceptions were applied to a large cohort (145) of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences undergraduates in a module assessed through two separate group projects. Students self-selected groups for the first project; for the second, groups were more "balanced." Results show slight improvement in…

  8. Brain networks supporting perceptual grouping and contour selection.

    PubMed

    Volberg, Gregor; Greenlee, Mark W

    2014-01-01

    The human visual system groups local elements into global objects seemingly without effort. Using a contour integration task and EEG source level analyses, we tested the hypothesis that perceptual grouping requires a top-down selection, rather than a passive pooling, of neural information that codes local elements in the visual image. The participants were presented visual displays with or without a hidden contour. Two tasks were performed: a central luminance-change detection task and a peripheral contour detection task. Only in the contour-detection task could we find differential brain activity between contour and non-contour conditions, within a distributed brain network including parietal, lateral occipital and primary visual areas. Contour processing was associated with an inflow of information from lateral occipital into primary visual regions, as revealed from the slope of phase differences between source level oscillations within these areas. The findings suggest that contour integration results from a selection of neural information from lower visual areas, and that this selection is driven by the lateral occipital cortex.

  9. Mothers' Voices on the Internet: Stress, Support and Perceptions of Mothers of Children with Learning Disabilities and Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Margalit, Malka; Raskind, Marshall H.; Higgins, Eleanor L.; Russo-Netzer, Pninit

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this study was to explore maternal stressors, needs, supports, perceptions, and self-identity as expressed by mothers of children with learning disabilities and/or attention deficit/ hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in electronic messages posted on an Internet discussion board. The sample consisted of 316 mothers of children with learning…

  10. Functions of an Adult Sickle Cell Group: Education, Task Orientation, and Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Dennis J.; Beltran, Lou R.

    1993-01-01

    Reports on development of adult sickle cell support group and provides description of psychosocial factors most prevalent in patients' lives (anxiety about death, disruption of social support network, disability, dependence on pain medication, conflicts with health care providers). Notes that support group enhanced participants' knowledge about…

  11. Internet-Savvy Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Horn, Royal

    2003-01-01

    Describes national study of the attitudes and behaviors of middle and high school students who use the Internet. Finds that Internet-savvy students use the Internet as a virtual book and reference library, a tutor and study shortcut, a study group, a guidance counselor, and a locker, backpack, and notebook. Offers several explanations about the…

  12. The Windows to the Universe Project: Using the Internet to Support K-12 Science Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardiner, L.; Johnson, R.; Bergman, J.; Russell, R.; Genyuk, J.; La Grave, M.

    2003-12-01

    The World Wide Web can be a powerful tool for reaching the public as well as students and teachers around the world, supporting both formal and informal science education. The Windows to the Universe Project, initiated in 1995, provides a case study of approaches for the use of the web to support earth and space science education and literacy efforts. Through the use of innovative approaches such as easy to use design, multi-level content, and science concepts presented in a broader background context that includes connections to culture and the humanities, Windows to the Universe is an accessible format for individuals of various ages and learning styles. A large global audience regularly uses the web site to learn about earth and space science as well as related humanities content such as myths from around the world. User surveys show that the site has over 4 millions users per year, 65 percent of which are K-12 teachers and students. Approximately 46 percent of users access the site once per week or more. Recently, we have had the opportunity to expand our efforts while we continue to update existing content based on new scientific findings and events. Earth science content on Windows to the Universe is currently growing with a new geology section and development efforts are underway to expand our space weather content with a new curriculum. Educational games allow users to learn about space in a playful context, and an online journaling tool further integrates literacy into the learning experience. In addition, we are currently translating the entire Windows to the Universe web site into Spanish. We have included educators in the project as co-designers from its inception, and by aggressively utilizing and providing professional development opportunities for teachers, the web site is now used in thousands of classrooms around the world. In the past year we have continued to support K-12 educators by adding to our suite of classroom activities and leading

  13. Islamic Extremists Love the Internet

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-03

    the global Islamic terrorist movement and to increase support for their movement, ranging from ideological support, to fundraising , and ultimately...reflects that particular terrorist groups were exploiting the Internet for their fundraising . Research indicates that as early as July 1999, our...and safeguard Bin Laden.1 Then in May 2001, just four months prior to the 9/11 attacks the fundraising denial objective was reaffirmed during the

  14. A Support Group for Home-Quarantined College Students Exposed to SARS: Learning from Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pan, Peter J. D.; Chang, Shih-Hua; Yu, Yen-Yen

    2005-01-01

    This article is an initial description of a meaningful and valuable clinical experience in interacting with SARS home-quarantined college students in a support group in Taiwan. Information about SARS and home quarantine, the tasks of the Counseling Centers and group work after the SARS outbreak, the support group for home-quarantined members, the…

  15. Logging On: Evaluating an Online Support Group for Parents of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clifford, Tessen; Minnes, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    Twenty mothers participated in an online support group for parents of children with autism spectrum disorders. Twenty-five unrelated parents participated in a no-treatment control group. The participants completed online questionnaires prior to and following the 4-month support group, to evaluate changes in mood, anxiety, parenting stress, and…

  16. Evaluation of an ongoing psychoeducational inflammatory bowel disease support group in an adult outpatient setting.

    PubMed

    McMaster, Kristin; Aguinaldo, Laika; Parekh, Nimisha K

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies assessing efficacy of support groups for patients with inflammatory bowel disease showed mixed results in terms of attendance and overall effectiveness. In this study, researchers evaluated the use of an ongoing open psychoeducational support group for adult patients with inflammatory bowel disease in an outpatient tertiary setting. The sample consisted of 18 adults who have attended more than 2 meetings of the support group. Topics addressed in the support group include complementary medicine, diet and nutrition, the psychological impact of inflammatory bowel disease, medication and side effects, and insurance/disability. Participants were asked to complete the Client Satisfaction Questionnaire, Multidimensional Support Scale, 11 general demographic questions, and a brief open-ended qualitative questionnaire developed by the researchers. Results demonstrated that participants reported very high satisfaction with the support group and rated the adequacy of peer support from others with inflammatory bowel disease higher than support from family/friends and professionals. A majority of group members reported joining the group for mutual support and education; this expectation was met through the psychoeducational structure of the group. This study demonstrates the potential for success of an ongoing psychoeducational inflammatory bowel disease support group for adult patients and their caregivers.

  17. Learning Potentials of the Ubiquitous Internet: Using Mobile Devices to Support the Individual, Social and Physical Context of the Learner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalsgaard, Christian; Pedersen, Nicholai Friis; Aaen, Janus Holst

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to identify the key learning potentials of the ubiquitous internet. Rather than focusing on mobile technology or the mobility of the learner, the paper emphasises the ubiquity of internet access as a paramount catalyst for new learning in the digital age. From a sociocultural perspective the paper discusses different ways…

  18. Interrelations between virtual-world and real-world activities: comparison of genders, age groups, and pathological and nonpathological Internet users.

    PubMed

    Bayraktar, Fatih; Amca, Hasan

    2012-05-01

    After the Internet Revolution, people have started to spend most of their everyday time online carrying out virtual activities. A limited number of studies tried to answer whether virtual activities match our real-world (RW) activities. Moreover, to our knowledge, there was no study that dealt with these interrelations between virtual and RW activities among the pathological and nonpathological users of the Internet (i.e. PIUs and NPIUs). The primary aim of this study was to fill this gap and to investigate the correlations between virtual-world (VW) and RW activities among PIUs and NPIUs. The secondary aim was to examine the perceptions of the Internet and motivations to go online for PIUs and NPIUs. The third aim was to compare virtual and RW activities across gender and age groups. The results indicated that correlations between most of the activities in RW and VW were high among men and women, among age groups, and also among PIUs and NPUs. However, beyond these similarities, perceptions of the Internet and motivations to browse into VW were differed among PIUs and NPIUs. In other words, PIUs, but not NPIUs, perceived VW activities more gratified and had motivations to go online for gratified functions.

  19. Facilitating the Development of Gifted College Students: A Support Group Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedlander, Stephen R.; Watkins, C. Edward, Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Describes a support group for participants in the College Scholars Program at the University of Tennessee (N=8). Students reacted with independence and autonomy in structuring the group, and indicated it was effective in stimulating growth and development. (JAC)

  20. Internet-based remote counseling to support stress management: preventing interruptions to regular exercise in elderly people

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Sayuri; Munakata, Tsunestugu; Hashimoto, Nobuyuki; Okunaka, Jyunzo; Koga, Tatsuzo

    2006-01-01

    Our research showed that a high degree of life-stress has a negative mental health effect that may interrupt regular exercise. We used an internet based, remotely conducted, face to face, preventive counseling program using video monitors to reduce the source of life-stresses that interrupts regular exercise and evaluated the preventative effects of the program in elderly people. NTSC Video signals were converted to the IP protocol and facial images were transmitted to a PC display using the exclusive optical network lines of JGN2. Participants were 22 elderly people in Hokkaido, Japan, who regularly played table tennis. A survey was conducted before the intervention in August 2003. IT remote counseling was conducted on two occasions for one hour on each occasion. A post intervention survey was conducted in February 2004 and a follow-up survey was conducted in March 2005. Network quality was satisfactory with little data loss and high display quality. Results indicated that self-esteem increased significantly, trait anxiety decreased significantly, cognition of emotional support by people other than family members had a tendency to increase, and source of stress had a tendency to decrease after the intervention. Follow-up results indicated that cognition of emotional support by family increased significantly, and interpersonal dependency decreased significantly compared to before the intervention. These results suggest that face to face IT remote counseling using video monitors is useful to keep elderly people from feeling anxious and to make them confident to continue exercising regularly. Moreover, it has a stress management effect.

  1. Making meaning in a burn peer support group: qualitative analysis of attendee interviews.

    PubMed

    Davis, Trevor; Gorgens, Kim; Shriberg, Janet; Godleski, Matthew; Meyer, Laura

    2014-01-01

    There is a paucity of literature on the personal experiences of burn support group members, the members' perceived benefits of group participation, and the meaning the survivors make of the support they receive. In order to provide effective psychosocial rehabilitation services and to meet the needs of burn survivors, it is important to understand the influence a support group has on its members as well as the personal experiences of those individuals who attend these groups. The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of burn survivors in a burn survivor support group. Six self-identified burn survivors were interviewed by using a guided in-depth interview technique to explore their experiences in the support group. Key informant interviews and group observations served to triangulate the findings from the individual interviews. The experiences of the group members coalesced around four main themes: acceptance of self, perspective change, value of community, and reciprocity. The findings demonstrated the overall perceived positive impact the support group had on psychosocial recovery. For these members, the group aided the process of adjustment through the encouragement of adaptive coping strategies and the facilitation of community and relationships. Their experiences mirrored much of the literature on psychological growth from adversity. Burn survivors reported unique opportunities that allowed them to integrate their injury into their identity within an encouraging and safe environment. Using these accounts, the authors generated clinical suggestions that may encourage similar growth in other support group settings.

  2. Adherence to Internet-Based Mobile-Supported Stress Management: A Pooled Analysis of Individual Participant Data From Three Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Lehr, Dirk; Berking, Matthias; Riper, Heleen; Cuijpers, Pim; Ebert, David Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Background Nonadherence to treatment is a prevalent issue in Internet interventions. Guidance from health care professionals has been found to increase treatment adherence rates in Internet interventions for a range of physical and mental disorders. Evaluating different guidance formats of varying intensity is important, particularly with respect to improvement of effectiveness and cost-effectiveness. Identifying predictors of nonadherence allows for the opportunity to better adapt Internet interventions to the needs of participants especially at risk for discontinuing treatment. Objective The goal of this study was to investigate the influence of different guidance formats (content-focused guidance, adherence-focused guidance, and administrative guidance) on adherence and to identify predictors of nonadherence in an Internet-based mobile-supported stress management intervention (ie, GET.ON Stress) for employees. Methods The data from the groups who received the intervention were pooled from three randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that evaluated the efficacy of the same Internet-based mobile-supported stress management intervention (N=395). The RCTs only differed in terms of the guidance format (content-focused guidance vs waitlist control, adherence-focused guidance vs waitlist control, administrative guidance vs waitlist control). Adherence was defined by the number of completed treatment modules (0-7). An ANOVA was performed to compare the adherence rates from the different guidance formats. Multiple hierarchical linear regression analysis was conducted to evaluate predictors of nonadherence, which included gender, age, education, symptom-related factors, and hope for improvement. Results In all, 70.5% (93/132) of the content-focused guidance sample, 68.9% (91/132) of the adherence-focused guidance sample, and 42.0% (55/131) of the participants in the administrative guidance sample completed all treatment modules. Guidance had a significant effect on treatment

  3. Stress Prevention and Mindfulness: A Psychoeducational and Support Group for Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reiser, Jenson E.; Murphy, Susan L.; McCarthy, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    A stress prevention and mindfulness (SPAM) group is described, which is a 6-week psychoeducational and support group for teachers. The group incorporated psychoeducation about stress and utilized elements of Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR). The group was implemented in a public charter school in the Southwest. Preliminary evaluation…

  4. Psychological research online: report of Board of Scientific Affairs' Advisory Group on the Conduct of Research on the Internet.

    PubMed

    Kraut, Robert; Olson, Judith; Banaji, Mahzarin; Bruckman, Amy; Cohen, Jeffrey; Couper, Mick

    2004-01-01

    As the Internet has changed communication, commerce, and the distribution of information, so too it is changing psychological research. Psychologists can observe new or rare phenomena online and can do research on traditional psychological topics more efficiently, enabling them to expand the scale and scope of their research. Yet these opportunities entail risk both to research quality and to human subjects. Internet research is inherently no more risky than traditional observational, survey, or experimental methods. Yet the risks and safeguards against them will differ from those characterizing traditional research and will themselves change over time. This article describes some benefits and challenges of conducting psychological research via the Internet and offers recommendations to both researchers and institutional review boards for dealing with them. ((c) 2004 APA, all rights reserved)

  5. Creating Culturally Relevant Alzheimer's Support Groups for Racial and Ethnic Minorities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Joseph Neil

    Although data indicate that Alzheimer's disease occurs among all racial and ethnic populations, the Alzheimer's disease support group system is used nationally primarily by white, middle-class caregivers. Developing a model ethnic-specific support group for Hispanics requires delineation of formal and informal health care networks in the ethnic…

  6. Themes of a Long-Term AIDS Support Group for Gay Men.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Greig M.; Gregory, Barry C.

    1996-01-01

    Support groups are established psychosocial treatment modalities where clients address particular problems or diagnoses. Discusses a long-term (five year) AIDS support group and examines the following issues: (1) marginality; (2) making choices; (3) coping with emotions; (4) premature confrontation of life issues; (5) chronic illness versus…

  7. A Question of Effectiveness: Recruitment of Special Educators within High School Peer Support Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zascavage, Victoria; Winterman, Kathy; Armstrong, Philip; Schroeder-Steward, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    The present study combines information about support groups for students with disabilities from 187 East Texas high schools with explanatory variables taken from data of the Texas Education Agency Academic Excellence Indicator System. This study is a tangential section of a larger study on the influence of peer support groups in East Texas…

  8. Online support groups for Parkinson's patients: a pilot study of effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, Morton A; Winzelberg, Andre; Golant, Mitch; Wakahiro, Marie; DiMinno, Mariann; Aminoff, Michael; Christine, Chadwick

    2005-01-01

    (A) Will PD patients participate in online, professionally led support groups? (B) What are their demographics characteristics and PD severity? (C) Are such groups beneficial? (D) Should patients be grouped for stage of disease? Depression and quality of life were assessed. Sixty-six people were assigned to a 20-week, professionally facilitated online support group. Participants were assigned to one of 2 group types based on patient similarity: homogeneous and heterogeneous. PD patients appear to readily enroll in online groups. Compared to PD patients in traditional support groups, the online were younger, less depressed and had higher quality of life. Dropouts (39%) were high. Overall, patients showed improved quality of life; no overall changes were observed in depression. Participants in the homogenous groups reported a significant decrease in depression.

  9. Support Groups, Marriage, and the Management of Ambiguity among HIV-Positive Women in Northern Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Rhine, Kathryn A.

    2013-01-01

    In the context of the African HIV epidemic, support groups are not simply spaces for discussions of social and health well-being; neither are they institutions functioning solely to cultivate self-responsible and economically empowered patients. HIV-positive women in northern Nigeria have appropriated a support group to facilitate their marriage arrangements. In this group, women negotiate the threats of stigma and the promises of respectable marriage through what I call the management of ambiguity surrounding their HIV status. I further argue that the practice of support group matchmaking reveals the local political economic dynamics that shape social and illness trajectories in resource-poor settings. PMID:23946544

  10. Some Internet-Based Strategies that Help Solve the Problem of Teaching Large Groups of Engineering Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mompo, Rafael; Redoli, Judith

    2010-01-01

    With this article, we wish to transmit some key factors of success that we have used personally when faced with the structuring of a teaching programme based on e-learning. In particular, this paper reflects the experience of the authors in the usage of Internet tools in their teaching duties at university, in order to solve several problems that…

  11. Evaluation of support group interventions for children in troubled families: study protocol for a quasi-experimental control group study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Support groups for children in troubled families are available in a majority of Swedish municipalities. They are used as a preventive effort for children in families with different parental problems such as addiction to alcohol/other drugs, mental illness, domestic violence, divorce situations, or even imprisonment. Children from families with these problems are a well-known at-risk group for various mental health and social problems. Support groups aim at strengthening children’s coping behaviour, to improve their mental health and to prevent a negative psycho-social development. To date, evaluations using a control-group study design are scarce. The aim of the current study is to evaluate the effects of support groups. This paper describes the design of an effectiveness study, initially intended as a randomized controlled trial, but instead is pursued as a quasi-experimental study using a non-randomized control group. Methods/design The aim is to include 116 children, aged 7–13 years and one parent/another closely related adult, in the study. Participants are recruited via existing support groups in the Stockholm county district and are allocated either into an intervention group or a waiting list control group, representing care as usual. The assessment consists of questionnaires that are to be filled in at baseline and at four months following the baseline. Additionally, the intervention group completes a 12-month follow-up. The outcomes include the Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ S11-16), the Kids Coping Scale, the “Ladder of life” which measures overall life satisfaction, and “Jag tycker jag är” (I think I am) which measures self-perception and self-esteem. The parents complete the SDQ P4-16 (parent-report version) and the Swedish scale “Familjeklimat” (Family Climate), which measures the emotional climate in the family. Discussion There is a need for evaluating the effects of support groups targeted to children from

  12. Special aspects of social support: Qualitative analysis of oncologic rehabilitation through a belly dancing peer support group.

    PubMed

    Szalai, M; Szirmai, A; Füge, K; Makai, A; Erdélyi, G; Prémusz, V; Bódis, J

    2017-02-13

    Tumour-related peer support groups (PSGs) show long-term development in quality of life and coping, and decrease distress in cancer care. To clarify channels of social support in oncologic rehabilitation by combined exercise and psychosocial therapy, individual semi-structured interviews were conducted after 1 year additional belly dance rehabilitation in a closed PSG among 51 patients with malignant tumour diagnosis in Budapest, Hungary. Interview data were transcribed and analysed using qualitative content analysis (ATLAS.ti 6 Win). Results suggest that group experience provides emotional-, practical- and informational support. We could point out specific social effects of "role model" function and extend the coping model. The group dispose all the features of effective suggestion and may be effectively applied as additional therapy for patients with malignancies. The extended coping model and the introduction of "role model" function could be useful for PSGs' efficacy assessment.

  13. An online monogenic diabetes discussion group: supporting families and fueling new research.

    PubMed

    Perrone, Marie E; Carmody, David; Philipson, Louis H; Greeley, Siri Atma W

    2015-11-01

    Many online support groups are available for patients with rare disorders, but scant evidence is available on how effectively such groups provide useful information or valuable psychosocial support to their participants. It is also unclear to what extent physicians and researchers may learn more about these disorders by participating in such groups. To formally assess the utility of the Kovler Monogenic Diabetes Registry online discussion group for patients and families affected by KATP channel-related monogenic neonatal diabetes in providing psychosocial and informational support and in identifying concerns unique to patients with this rare form of diabetes. We qualitatively analyzed all 1,410 messages from the online group that consisted of 64 participants affected by KATP channel monogenic diabetes and 11 researchers. We utilized the Social Behavior Support Code to assign each message to a support category and deductive thematic analysis to identify discussion topics addressed by each message. 44% of messages provided/requested informational support, whereas 31.4% of the messages contained psychosocial/emotional support. The most popular topics of postings to the forums were diabetes treatment (503 messages) and neurodevelopmental concerns (472 messages). Participation in the discussion led researchers to modify survey instruments and design new studies focusing on specific topics of concern, such as sleep. We demonstrate that an online support group for a monogenic form of diabetes is an effective informational tool that also provides psychosocial support. Participation by researchers and care providers can inform future research directions and highlight issues of patient concern.

  14. Internet censorship.

    PubMed

    1996-12-27

    The U.S. Supreme Court agreed to review a lower court ruling that found the Communications Decency Act to be an unconstitutional infringement on free speech. The judges from the U.S. District Court in Philadelphia said that parents should monitor material that children are exposed to on the Internet. AIDS groups that publish information on safer sex, HIV prevention and AIDS treatments are not responsible for censoring content.

  15. The Effectiveness of Support Groups in Asian Breast Cancer Patients: An Integrative Review

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Fang-Yu; Lee-Lin, Frances; Kuang, Lily Y.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer support group has been studied as an intervention to improve patient psychosocial well-being. The effectiveness of support groups among Asian breast cancer (BC) patients has been unclear and received limited attention to the evidence of its effectiveness. The social-cognitive processing theory underlies the principles of support groups and advocates that a positive, supportive social environment can improve cognitive processing. The purpose of this paper is to present an integrative review of research evidence on the effectiveness of cancer support groups with Asian BC patients. Empirical studies related to support group among Asian and Asian American BC patients published between 1982 and April 2014 are reviewed. There are 15 studies selected (12 from the Asian-Pacific region and 3 from Western countries). The review includes 1 qualitative study, 3 descriptive studies, 1 mixed method design, and 10 experimental or quasi-experimental studies. The support group intervention activities include psycho-educational program such as health education, problem-solving, and stress management. These studies support the effectiveness of support group in alleviating psychological distress and supporting quality of life of Asian BC women. Overall, there is limited research on the use and effectiveness of support groups with Asians cancer patients in Asia and in Western countries. Without accounting for Asian immigrants overseas, the Asian population is expected to grow from 4.3 to 5.3 billion by 2050. As cancer patients become more diverse due to global emigration, more rigorous studies examining the effectiveness of psychosocial intervention among transcultural cancer patients are needed. PMID:27981154

  16. The Effectiveness of Support Groups in Asian Breast Cancer Patients: An Integrative Review.

    PubMed

    Chou, Fang-Yu; Lee-Lin, Frances; Kuang, Lily Y

    2016-01-01

    Cancer support group has been studied as an intervention to improve patient psychosocial well-being. The effectiveness of support groups among Asian breast cancer (BC) patients has been unclear and received limited attention to the evidence of its effectiveness. The social-cognitive processing theory underlies the principles of support groups and advocates that a positive, supportive social environment can improve cognitive processing. The purpose of this paper is to present an integrative review of research evidence on the effectiveness of cancer support groups with Asian BC patients. Empirical studies related to support group among Asian and Asian American BC patients published between 1982 and April 2014 are reviewed. There are 15 studies selected (12 from the Asian-Pacific region and 3 from Western countries). The review includes 1 qualitative study, 3 descriptive studies, 1 mixed method design, and 10 experimental or quasi-experimental studies. The support group intervention activities include psycho-educational program such as health education, problem-solving, and stress management. These studies support the effectiveness of support group in alleviating psychological distress and supporting quality of life of Asian BC women. Overall, there is limited research on the use and effectiveness of support groups with Asians cancer patients in Asia and in Western countries. Without accounting for Asian immigrants overseas, the Asian population is expected to grow from 4.3 to 5.3 billion by 2050. As cancer patients become more diverse due to global emigration, more rigorous studies examining the effectiveness of psychosocial intervention among transcultural cancer patients are needed.

  17. Internet use by the socially fearful: addiction or therapy?

    PubMed

    Campbell, Andrew J; Cumming, Steven R; Hughes, Ian

    2006-02-01

    The Internet has often been argued to have adverse psychological consequences, such as depression or anxiety symptoms, among "over-users." The present study offers an alternative understanding, suggesting the Internet may be used as a forum for expanding social networks and consequently enhancing the chance of meaningful relationships, self-confidence, social abilities, and social support. An online sample of 188 people was recruited over the Internet, while paper and pencil tests were administered to an offline sample group of 27 undergraduate university students, who were regular Internet users. Subjects completed the Zung Depression Scale (ZDS), Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scales (DASS), Eysenck Personality Questionnaire?Revised Short Scale (EPQ-R Short), Fear of Negative Evaluation (FNE) scale, Internet Use Questionnaire (IUQ), and an Internet Effects Questionnaire (IEQ). Results suggested that there was no relationship between time spent online and depression, anxiety, or social fearfulness. Those who primarily used the Internet for online chat believed that the Internet is psychologically beneficial to them, but also believed that frequent Internet users are lonely and that the Internet can be addictive. It is argued that "chat" users who are socially fearful may be using the Internet as a form of low-risk social approach and an opportunity to rehearse social behavior and communication skills, which, may help them improve interaction with offline, face-to-face, social environments.

  18. The Structure and Function of Group Training Companies in Australia. Support Document

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Croce, N.; Macdonald, Duncan; Toner, Phillip; Turner, Cathy

    2004-01-01

    This document was produced by the authors based on their research for the report "Group Training in Australia: A Study of Group Training Organisations and Host Employers", and is an added resource for further information. [Full Report available at ED493992.] Support Document 2, titled " Group Training and Host Employers in…

  19. Tagclouds and Group Cognition: Effect of Tagging Support on Students' Reflective Learning in Team Blogs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xie, Ying; Lin, Shu-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effects of supported tagging (a prompting mechanism for students to stop and think about their writing) for team blogging on undergraduate students' reflective learning and the relationship between tagclouds and group cognition. Thirty-nine students were randomly assigned to six groups and blogged for 5 weeks. Three groups were…

  20. Educators and Parents Working Together to Develop Special Education Parent Support Groups. Statewide Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duganne, Mary Ann; And Others

    This handbook documents the ingredients necessary to create successful school-sponsored special education parent support groups. Common characteristics observed in parent groups are outlined, along with principles of effective group functioning, benefits accruing to parents, and benefits for school systems. Also discussed is the assistance offered…

  1. Suicide prevention by online support groups: an action theory-based model of emotional first aid.

    PubMed

    Gilat, Itzhak; Shahar, Golan

    2009-01-01

    In the last two decades, online support groups have become a valuable source of help for individuals in suicidal crisis. Their attractiveness is attributed to features that enhance help-seeking and self-disclosure such as availability, anonymity, and use of written communication. However, online support groups also suffer from limitations and potential risks as agents of suicide prevention. The Israeli Association for Emotional First Aid (ERAN) has developed a practical model that seeks to maximize the benefits and minimize the risks of online suicide prevention. The model applies the Action Theory concepts whereby individuals shape their own environment. The present paper presents the model, which is based on an online support group combined with personal chat and a telephonic help line. The online support group is moderated by paraprofessionals who function as both process regulators and support providers. The principles and practice of the model are described, the theoretical rationale is presented, and directions for future research are suggested.

  2. Adolescents living with cancer: the role of computer-mediated support groups.

    PubMed

    Elwell, Laura; Grogan, Sarah; Coulson, Neil

    2011-03-01

    The present study sought to explore the types of social support being provided to adolescents with cancer accessing a computer-mediated support group. Three hundred and ninety-three messages posted to a computer-mediated support group aimed at adolescents with cancer were coded for instances of informational and emotional support and then subjected to thematic analysis. Analysis revealed frequent instances of both informational and emotional support provision and sub-themes included 'treatment concerns', 'losing friends' and 'struggling with school'. Adolescents were also found to be frequently accessing the group to make requests for social support. It is concluded that health professionals need to tailor the services they provide to adolescent patients more appropriately.

  3. Coping with food allergy: exploring the role of the online support group.

    PubMed

    Coulson, Neil S; Knibb, Rebecca C

    2007-02-01

    The aims of this study were to explore the reasons for participation in an online support group for individuals affected by food allergy, its perceived advantages and disadvantages as well as impact on the relationship with healthcare providers. A total of 32 members of the Food Allergy Survivors Together (F.A.S.T.) online support group completed an online structured interview and responses were analysed using thematic analysis. Group members identified a range of benefits, including accessibility, receipt of social support as well as guidance on coping strategies. The only disadvantages identified revolved around the accuracy and trust in information exchanged via the group bulletin board. Group participation did appear to impact on relationships with healthcare providers with several members reporting greater empowerment through decision-making, though in contrast some experienced difficulties in discussing their online support experiences and information obtained with their healthcare providers.

  4. Online Social Support for Participants of Crohn's and Ulcerative Colitis Groups.

    PubMed

    Britt, Rebecca K

    2016-11-07

    Thousands of people affected by or caring for someone affected by Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis participate in online social support groups today. The diseases, which are often discussed in conjunction due to being similar in nature, have no cure and yet affect over 1 million people in the United States alone. There is a need for health communication scholarship to examine the nature of the messages in Crohn's and UC groups, which can lend insight into the unique struggles and psychosocial benefits that members gain from group participation. To develop an in-depth understanding of social support exchanges on these groups, 2000 posts within a 2-year period were randomly selected and content analyzed. Using a taxonomy of social support, several categories and subcategories of social support emerged. Results showed that informational support (41.1%) and emotional support (36.1%) were most frequently exchanged, followed by esteem support (14.3%) and network support (14.2%). Data suggested that several exchanges, such as symptom management and remission, experiences of extraintestinal manifestations, and relational support, may be contextually unique due to the variety of symptoms and treatments unique to Crohn's and UC. Recommendations are provided for researchers to collaborate with health practitioners and educators, including developing interventions and patient-centered practices to better serve patients and caregivers of Crohn's and UC. Further avenues for research in social support are also recommended.

  5. Measurement of social support across women from four ethnic groups: evidence of factorial invariance.

    PubMed

    Wong, Sabrina T; Nordstokke, David; Gregorich, Steven; Pérez-Stable, Eliseo J

    2010-03-01

    To examine whether a multidimensional social support instrument can be used for comparative research in four diverse ethnic groups of women (African American, Latina, Chinese, non-Latina White). The social support instrument was administered as part of a larger survey to 1,137 women. We tested the reliability and validity of this instrument. A confirmatory factor analytic (CFA) framework was used to test for the invariance of the instrument's psychometric properties across ethnic groups. We used multitrait scaling to eliminate items that did not meet the item-convergence criterion (r > 0.30) and where items were non-convergent items in at least three groups. A series of nested CFA models assessed the level of factorial invariance. One thousand seventy-four women completed the survey; Their mean age was 61 years with Chinese and Latinas reporting lower education compared to non-Latino Whites (p <. 001). A four-factor model (Tangible, Informational, Financial, Emotional/Companionship) fit within each ethnic group separately, suggested good fit. Multi-group CFA supported configural and metric invariance across all ethnic groups. Only partial scalar invariance was supported. This 8-item instrument is a reliable and valid tool that can be used as a multidimensional measure of social support. It can used to examine social support within one ethnic group and for comparative research across diverse ethnic groups of women.

  6. Group Psychotherapeutic Factors and Perceived Social Support Among Veterans With PTSD Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Cox, Daniel W; Owen, Jess J; Ogrodniczuk, John S

    2017-02-01

    One of the most potent protective factors against psychiatric symptoms after military trauma is perceived social support. Although group psychotherapy has been linked with increasing social support, no research has evaluated which therapeutic mechanisms are associated with this increase beyond symptom reduction. We investigated which interpersonal therapeutic factors were related to changes in social support, beyond posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptom reduction. Participants were 117 veterans in a multimodal outpatient group psychotherapy treatment designed to reduce PTSD symptoms and interpersonal difficulties. Generally, therapeutic factors were related to improvements in social support from baseline to posttreatment beyond the effects of PTSD symptom reduction. Specifically, social learning was associated with changes in appraisal support, secure emotional expression was associated with changes in tangible support, and neither was associated with changes in belonging support. Depending on the goals of treatment, understanding these variations are important so clinicians and researchers can appropriately design and target their interventions to facilitate desired changes.

  7. Unmet Supportive Care Needs among Breast Cancer Survivors of Community-Based Support Group in Kuching, Sarawak

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Emmanuel Joseph; Cheah, Whye Lian

    2016-01-01

    Background. Recognizing the needs of cancer survivors is one of the important aspects in healthcare delivery. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of unmet supportive care needs and its associated factors among the breast cancer survivors of community-based support group in Kuching, Sarawak. Materials and Methods. This was a cross-sectional study using Supportive Care Needs Survey (SCNS-SF34). All the members of community-based breast cancer support groups in Kuching were invited. A total of 101 respondents were face-to-face interviewed after the consent was obtained. Data was entered and analyzed using SPSS version 20. Results. The respondents endorsed health system and information domain with the highest mean score (2.48; 95% CI: 2.32–2.64). Top 10 items with “moderate to high” level unmet needs had a prevalence of 14.9% to 34.7% of respondents indicating need. Significantly higher level of unmet needs was associated with survivors who were younger (less than 60 years old), had higher education attainment, were unemployed, had survival duration of up to 5 years, and were undergoing active treatment. Conclusion. Systematic delivery of health information which is targeted, culturally sensitive, and linguistically appropriate for addressing younger age, education level, employment status, length of survivorship, and treatment stage should be considered not only at hospital-based setting but also at the community-based support groups. PMID:27239346

  8. The Shared Experience Help the Bereavement to Flow: A Family Support Group Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Henoch, Ingela; Berg, Christina; Benkel, Inger

    2016-12-01

    When a family member dies, a bereavement period is taking place for all family members. The death of a parent during childhood is a highly stressful event. This study evaluates families' experiences of family support groups when a parent has died. Families were participate in groups for children, teenagers, young adults, and parents in seven sessions. The same topic which was discussed in all groups. The support groups were evaluated qualitatively and quantitatively. The participants were satisfied with the groups and experienced that the shared experience facilitated bereavement to proceed. The results indicate that families' experiences is being more open about feelings in their own family. A support group can be one possibility to help the whole family in the bereavement.

  9. Overcoming Workplace Barriers: A Focus Group Study Exploring African American Mothers' Needs for Workplace Breastfeeding Support

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Angela Marie; Kirk, Rosalind; Muzik, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Background Persistent racial disparities in breastfeeding show that African American women breastfeed at the lowest rates. Return to work is a critical breastfeeding barrier for African American women who return to work sooner than other ethnic groups and more often encounter unsupportive work environments. They also face psychosocial burdens that make breastfeeding at work uniquely challenging. Participants share personal struggles with combining paid employment and breastfeeding and suggest workplace and personal support strategies that they believe will help continue breastfeeding after a return to work. Objective To explore current perspectives on ways to support African American mothers' workplace breastfeeding behavior. Methods Pregnant African American women (n = 8), African American mothers of infants (n = 21), and lactation support providers (n = 9) participated in 1 of 6 focus groups in the Greater Detroit area. Each focus group audiotape was transcribed verbatim. Thematic analysis was used to inductively analyze focus group transcripts and field notes. Focus groups explored thoughts, perceptions, and behavior on interventions to support African American women's breastfeeding. Results Participants indicate that they generally believed breastfeeding was a healthy option for the baby; however, paid employment is a critical barrier to successful breastfeeding for which mothers receive little help. Participants felt breastfeeding interventions that support working African American mothers should include education and training for health care professionals, regulation and enforcement of workplace breastfeeding support policies, and support from peers who act as breastfeeding role models. Conclusion Culturally appropriate interventions are needed to support breastfeeding among working African American women. PMID:25714345

  10. Internet use and web communication networks, sources of social support, and forms of suicidal and nonsuicidal self-injury among adolescents: different patterns between genders.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Fang-Yi; Yang, Hao-Jan

    2015-04-01

    The relationships of Internet use, web communication, and sources of social support with adolescent self-injurious thoughts and behaviors (SITBs) in Taiwan were investigated. The study sample of 391 12 to 18-year-olds was selected from nine public high schools. Findings show that girls are more likely to have SITBs, except for suicide gestures. Web communication is a risk factor for SITBs in boys but not in girls. Family support is protective in both genders. Support from friends is protective and support from significant others was a risk factor for suicide plans in girls. Support from virtual social communities can have both positive and negative effects on adolescent SITBs, with different effects by gender.

  11. Denunciation and the construction of norms in group conflict: examples from an Al-Qaeda-supporting group.

    PubMed

    Finlay, W M L

    2014-12-01

    In situations of violent group conflict, group members often argue about how to deal with the outgroup. While some argue for aggression, force, and separation, others argue for negotiation and cooperation. Each side attempts to persuade the group that their own position is normative and is most in line with the interests and essence of the group. These arguments often involve denunciations of opponents as disloyal or deviant. In such situations, definitions of group identities and norms, and what counts as loyalty and deviance, are therefore disputed. This article analyses how a UK-based Al-Qaeda-supporting organization denounces 'moderate' Muslims in the United Kingdom who engage with secular institutions and who ally themselves with non-Muslims in political disputes. Drawing on theological, historical, and political arguments, a prescriptive norm is constructed whereby the correct behaviour of Muslims in the West is to avoid participation in secular political systems and to avoid political cooperation with non-Muslims. Muslims who are seen as breaking these norms are denounced and denigrated in a variety of ways by assigning them a range of deviant identity positions. Denunciations involve explanatory accounts which construct opponents as unworthy representatives of the group based on their deviation from Islam, or from ignorance, cowardice, mental weakness, or self-interest. This article illustrates that the practice of denunciation is an important aspect of the organization of group conflict. Finally, it argues that it is dangerous for social psychologists to treat group norms and prototypes as consensual.

  12. Munchausen by Internet: Current Research and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Jacqui

    2012-01-01

    Background The Internet has revolutionized the health world, enabling self-diagnosis and online support to take place irrespective of time or location. Alongside the positive aspects for an individual’s health from making use of the Internet, debate has intensified on how the increasing use of Web technology might have a negative impact on patients, caregivers, and practitioners. One such negative health-related behavior is Munchausen by Internet. Objective Munchausen by Internet occurs when medically well individuals fake recognized illnesses in virtual environments, such as online support groups. This paper focuses on the aspect of Munchausen by Internet in which individuals actively seek to disrupt groups for their own satisfaction, which has not yet been associated with the wider phenomena of Internet trolls (users who post with the intention of annoying someone or disrupting an online environment). Methods A wide-ranging review was conducted to investigate the causes and impacts of online identity deception and Munchausen by Internet drawing on academic research and case studies reported online and in the media. Results The limited research relating to motivation, opportunity, detection, effects, and consequences of Munchausen by Internet is highlighted and it is formally linked to aspects of trolling. Case studies are used to illustrate the phenomenon. What is particularly worrying is the ease with which the deception can be carried out online, the difficulty in detection, and the damaging impact and potential danger to isolated victims. Conclusions We suggest ways to deal with Munchausen by Internet and provide advice for health group facilitators. We also propose that Munchausen by Internet and Munchausen by Internet trolling should be formally acknowledged in a revised version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual DSM-5. This will assist in effectively identifying and minimizing the growth of this behavior as more people seek reassurance and support

  13. Post-Polio Directory 2014: Post-Polio Clinics, Health Professionals, Support Groups

    MedlinePlus

    ... Siegel, MD Rush University Medical Center 1725 W Harrison St Ste 1106 Chicago, IL 60612-3841 312- ... Michigan Post-Polio Support Group Ethel Jean Iutzi Harrison 989-539-3781, hnjutzi12@ejourney.com Lansing Area ...

  14. Work-family conflict in work groups: social information processing, support, and demographic dissimilarity.

    PubMed

    Bhave, Devasheesh P; Kramer, Amit; Glomb, Theresa M

    2010-01-01

    We used social information processing theory to examine the effect of work-family conflict (WFC) at the work group level on individuals' experience of WFC. Consistent with hypotheses, results suggest that WFC at the work group level influences individual WFC over and above the shared work environment and job demands. It was also observed that work group support and demographic dissimilarity moderate this relationship. Moderator analyses suggest that work group social support buffers WFC for individuals but is also associated with a stronger effect of work group WFC on individuals' WFC. Moreover, the work group effect on individuals' WFC was shown to be stronger for individuals who were demographically dissimilar to the work group in terms of sex and number of dependents. The interpretations and implications of these findings are discussed.

  15. Technology and Curriculum Standards: How Well Do Internet-Based Learning Games Support Common Core Standards for Mathematics?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bingham, Teri; Ray, Jan

    2013-01-01

    In an effort to keep up with the new generation of digital learners, educators are integrating multiple forms of technology into their teaching, including online learning game applications. The purpose of this study was to determine the degree to which internet-based learning game applications selected by preservice teachers were aligned with the…

  16. Supporting the Thesis Writing Process of International Research Students through an Ongoing Writing Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Linda Y.; Vandermensbrugghe, Joelle

    2011-01-01

    Evidence from research suggests writing support is particularly needed for international research students who have to tackle the challenges of thesis writing in English as their second language in Western academic settings. This article reports the development of an ongoing writing group to support the thesis writing process of international…

  17. A WWW software development environment to support cooperative and spread working groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maidantchik, C.; Xexéo, G. B.; Rocha, A. R. C.

    1998-05-01

    This article presents a software development environment based on hypertext techniques to support object-oriented software construction performed by cooperative working groups spread all over the world. The environment uses the World-Wide Web to support distributed software development.

  18. Developing a Software for Fuzzy Group Decision Support System: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baba, A. Fevzi; Kuscu, Dincer; Han, Kerem

    2009-01-01

    The complex nature and uncertain information in social problems required the emergence of fuzzy decision support systems in social areas. In this paper, we developed user-friendly Fuzzy Group Decision Support Systems (FGDSS) software. The software can be used for multi-purpose decision making processes. It helps the users determine the main and…

  19. The Effectiveness of Lecture-Integrated, Web-Supported Case Studies in Large Group Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azzawi, May; Dawson, Maureen M.

    2007-01-01

    The effectiveness of lecture-integrated and web-supported case studies in supporting a large and academically diverse group of undergraduate students was evaluated in the present study. Case studies and resource (web)-based learning were incorporated as two complementary interactive learning strategies into the traditional curriculum. A truncated…

  20. Constructing Our Identities through a Writing Support Group: Bridging from Doctoral Students to Teacher Educator Researchers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Shelley; McGlynn-Stewart, Monica; Ghafouri, Farveh

    2014-01-01

    We are recent graduates of a graduate faculty of education in a research-based university in Canada. Our aspirations to become successful teacher educators and to write our dissertations brought us together to form a writing support group. During the 2010-2011 academic year, we conducted a self-study to better understand how the support group…

  1. Group Awareness and Self-Presentation in Computer-Supported Information Exchange

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimmerle, Joachim; Cress, Ulrike

    2008-01-01

    A common challenge in many situations of computer-supported collaborative learning is increasing the willingness of those involved to share their knowledge with other group members. As a prototypical situation of computer-supported information exchange, a shared-database setting was chosen for the current study. This information-exchange situation…

  2. Impact of an Educational Support Group on Family Participants Who Take Care of Their Schizophrenic Relatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abramowitz, Ira A.; Coursey, Robert D.

    1989-01-01

    Compared participants (N=24) in six-session educational support group offering family caregivers information about schizophrenia, training in problem-solving skills for managing patient behavior, and greater access to social support and community resources with matched controls (N=24). Participant caregivers reported significantly reduced anxiety…

  3. Group cohesion and social support in exercise classes: results from a danish intervention study.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Ulla; Schmidt, Lone; Budtz-Jørgensen, Esben; Avlund, Kirsten

    2006-10-01

    This study examines the formation of group cohesion and social support in exercise classes among former sedentary adults, participating in a Danish community-based intervention. Furthermore, the aim is to analyze the impact of this process on exercise activity among the participants. A multimethod approach was used, analyzing both survey data and 18 personal interviews collected among 87 participants who completed the intervention project. Analysis was performed according to the grounded theory method. The formation of group cohesion was conditioned by the social composition of the group, the teaching ability by the instructors, and the activity by itself. The cohesive group was characterized by an attitude of mutual support toward exercise activities. This mutual support facilitated development of self-efficacy beliefs among the participants improving their mastery expectation regarding exercise. Manipulating group dynamics may be a promising intervention tool in the promotion of leisure-time physical activity.

  4. Internet AIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filjar, Renato; Desic, Sasa; Pokrajac, Danijela; Cubic, Ivica

    2005-05-01

    Automatic Identification System (AIS) has recently become the leading issue in maritime navigation and traffic management worldwide. The present AIS solution, based on a VHF data communications scheme, provides AIS functionalities for SOLAS (AIS Class A) vessels only in a limited environment defined by radio propagation properties. Here we present a novel approach in AIS development based on current mobile communication technologies. It utilises existing mobile communications equipment that the majority of targetted end-users own and are familiar with. A novel AIS concept aims to offer a transition of AIS data traffic to mobile Internet. An innovative AIS architecture supports AIS data processing, storing and transferring to authorised parties. This enhances not only the operational area, but also provides the global AIS with data transfer security and an improved aids-for-navigation service, with all legally traceable vessels (both AIS Class A and AIS Class B) included in the system. In order to provide the development framework for Internet AIS, a set of essential four use-cases, a communication protocol and the first Internet AIS prototype have been recently developed and are briefly introduced in this article.

  5. An Exploration of Flow during Internet Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rettie, Ruth

    2001-01-01

    Uses focus groups to facilitate identification and discussion of respondents' Internet experience. Explores respondents' awareness and experience of flow-identified in research as a key characteristic of Internet consumer behavior. Finds half the respondents recognized Internet flow experience and Internet flow seems to prolong Internet and Web…

  6. An Online Monogenic Diabetes Discussion Group: Supporting Families and Fueling New Research

    PubMed Central

    Perrone, Marie E.; Carmody, David; Philipson, Louis H.; Greeley, Siri Atma W

    2016-01-01

    Many online support groups are available for patients with rare disorders, but scant evidence is available on how effectively such groups provide useful information or valuable psychosocial support to their participants. It is also unclear to what extent physicians and researchers may learn more about these disorders by participating in such groups. To formally assess the utility of the Kovler Monogenic Diabetes Registry online discussion group for patients and families affected by KATP channel-related monogenic neonatal diabetes in providing psychosocial and informational support, and in identifying concerns unique to patients with this rare form of diabetes. We qualitatively analyzed all 1,410 messages from the online group that consisted of 64 participants affected by KATP channel monogenic diabetes and 11 researchers. We utilized the Social Behavior Support Code to assign each message to a support category and deductive thematic analysis to identify discussion topics addressed by each message. 44% of messages provided/requested informational support, whereas 31.4% of the messages contained psychosocial/emotional support. The most popular topics of postings to the forums were diabetes treatment (503 messages) and neurodevelopmental concerns (472 messages). Participation in the discussion led researchers to modify survey instruments as well as design new studies focusing on specific topics of concern, such as sleep. We demonstrate that an online support group for a monogenic form of diabetes is an effective informational tool that also provides psychosocial support. Participation by researchers and care providers can inform future research directions and highlight issues of patient concern. PMID:26184072

  7. Use of a multiparty web based videoconference support group for family caregivers: Innovative practice.

    PubMed

    Austrom, Mary Guerriero; Geros, Kristin N; Hemmerlein, Kimberly; McGuire, Siobhan M; Gao, Sujuan; Brown, Steven A; Callahan, Christopher M; Clark, Daniel O

    2015-09-01

    This article describes a pilot of a weekly web based videoconference support group for five caregivers of persons with dementia. All participants reported positive views of the group and videoconference medium. Improvements in caregiver anxiety, depression, and physical health scores were observed. Depression scores remained the same with difficulties experienced by the caregiver increasing slightly. Self-efficacy for controlling upsetting thoughts and responding to disruptive behavior improved but worsened slightly for obtaining respite. We concluded that web based support was a positive experience for caregivers, providing them with an acceptable, feasible, low-cost technological alternative to in person support that reduced barriers to attendance by being available in homes.

  8. Finding Your New Normal: Outcomes of a Wellness-Oriented Psychoeducational Support Group for Cancer Survivors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shannonhouse, Laura; Myers, Jane; Barden, Sejal; Clarke, Philip; Weimann, Rochelle; Forti, Allison; Moore-Painter, Terry; Knutson, Tami; Porter, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Group interventions have been useful for survivors to overcome the challenges of cancer. This study employed a pre/post, mixed-methods design to explore the influence of an 8-week support group on the holistic wellness of 14 breast cancer survivors. Pairing experiential activities with wellness-centered psychoeducation was viewed positively by…

  9. Linguistic Predictors of Peer Responsiveness in an Online Cancer Support Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewallen, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Little is known about how group cohesion develops in online support group communities. Previous research suggests that message content, self-disclosure, and emotional expression may be central to this process. The purpose of this study was to identify linguistic and qualitative characteristics of participants' messages that…

  10. Enhancing Women's Lives: The Role of Support Groups among Breast Cancer Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gore-Felton, Cheryl; Spiegel, David

    1999-01-01

    Reviews research indicating that group psychotherapy is an effective adjunctive therapy to medical treatment for women with breast cancer. States that Supportive-Expressive group therapy has been effective in assisting patients in reducing anxiety related to death and dying, strengthening interpersonal relationships, and improving the quality of…

  11. Understanding the Experience of Girls with EBD in a Gender-Responsive Support Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Srsic, Amy; Rice, Elisabeth Hess

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the perceptions of adolescent girls with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) who were participating in a support group. The focus of the study was to explore the perceptions of the girls' friendships, connectedness with others, ability to establish and maintain relationships, and self-perceptions within the group. The…

  12. Architecture, Design, and Development of an HTML/JavaScript Web-Based Group Support System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romano, Nicholas C., Jr.; Nunamaker, Jay F., Jr.; Briggs, Robert O.; Vogel, Douglas R.

    1998-01-01

    Examines the need for virtual workspaces and describes the architecture, design, and development of GroupSystems for the World Wide Web (GSWeb), an HTML/JavaScript Web-based Group Support System (GSS). GSWeb, an application interface similar to a Graphical User Interface (GUI), is currently used by teams around the world and relies on user…

  13. Recommendations for the design, implementation and evaluation of social support in online communities, networks, and groups.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Jacob B; Berner, Eta S; Johnson, Kevin B; Giuse, Dario A; Murphy, Barbara A; Lorenzi, Nancy M

    2013-12-01

    A new model of health care is emerging in which individuals can take charge of their health by connecting to online communities and social networks for personalized support and collective knowledge. Web 2.0 technologies expand the traditional notion of online support groups into a broad and evolving range of informational, emotional, as well as community-based concepts of support. In order to apply these technologies to patient-centered care, it is necessary to incorporate more inclusive conceptual frameworks of social support and community-based research methodologies. This paper introduces a conceptualization of online social support, reviews current challenges in online support research, and outlines six recommendations for the design, evaluation, and implementation of social support in online communities, networks, and groups. The six recommendations are illustrated by CanConnect, an online community for cancer survivors in middle Tennessee. These recommendations address the interdependencies between online and real-world support and emphasize an inclusive framework of interpersonal and community-based support. The applications of these six recommendations are illustrated through a discussion of online support for cancer survivors.

  14. Illustrating the Multi-Faceted Dimensions of Group Therapy and Support for Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Giese-Davis, Janine; Brandelli, Yvonne; Kronenwetter, Carol; Golant, Mitch; Cordova, Matthew; Twirbutt, Suzanne; Chang, Vickie; Kraemer, Helena C.; Spiegel, David

    2016-01-01

    In cancer support groups, choice of therapy model, leadership style, and format can impact patients’ experiences and outcomes. Methodologies that illustrate the complexity of patients’ group experiences might aid in choosing group style, or testing therapeutic mechanisms. We used this naturalistic study as a beginning step to explore methods for comparing cancer group contexts by first modifying a group-experience survey to be cancer-specific (Group Experience Questionnaire (GEQ)). Hypothesizing that therapist-led (TL) would differ from non-therapist-led (NTL), we explored the GEQ’s multiple dimensions. A total of 292 patients attending three types of groups completed it: 2 TL groups differing in therapy style ((1) Supportive-Expressive (SET); (2) The Wellness Community (TWC/CSC)); (3) a NTL group. Participants rated the importance of “Expressing True Feelings” and “Discussing Sexual Concerns” higher in TL than NTL groups and “Discussing Sexual Concerns” higher in SET than other groups. They rated “Developing a New Attitude” higher in TWC/CSC compared to NTL. In addition, we depict the constellation of group qualities using radar-charts to assist visualization. These charts facilitate a quick look at a therapy model’s strengths and weaknesses. Using a measure like the GEQ and this visualization technique could enable health-service decision making about choice of therapy model to offer. PMID:27490581

  15. Client satisfaction with a new group-based model of case management for supported housing services.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jack; Reddy, Navin; Rosenheck, Robert A

    2014-04-01

    Supportive housing typically offers rental subsidies and individual intensive community-based case management and has become a predominant service model for homeless adults. Alternative case management models have not been adequately explored. This study evaluates satisfaction with a novel group-intensive peer support (GIPS) model of case management for the Housing and Urban Development-Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing (HUD-VASH) program. A total of 95 HUD-VASH clients rated their satisfaction with services and responded to open-ended questions about what they liked best and least about the program. Quantitative and qualitative analyses compared clients who attended groups as part of the GIPS model and those who did not. No significant difference in satisfaction between group and non-group attenders were found. Clients reported what they liked best about the program was the staff; those who attended groups reported what they liked best was the social interaction and peer support. These findings suggest clients who attend groups for their primary source of case management may be as satisfied as those who receive only individual case management. GIPS offers a feasible and acceptable service model and should be further explored along with other alternative models of care in supportive housing services.

  16. Internet Communities for Recruitment of Cancer Patients into an Internet Survey: A Discussion Paper

    PubMed Central

    Im, Eun-Ok; Chee, Wonshik; Tsai, Hsiu-Min; Bender, Melinda; Lim, Hyun Ju

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide future directions for the usage of Internet communities (ICs) for recruitment of research participants based on issues raised in an Internet survey among 132 cancer patients. 317 general and 233 ethnic-specific Internet Cancer Support Groups and 1,588 ethnic-specific ICs were contacted to recruit cancer patients. Research staff recorded issues and wrote memos during the recruitment process. The written memos and records were later analyzed using content analysis. The issues included: (a) difficulty in identifying appropriate ICs and potential participants, (b) meta-tags, (c) dominant white and women groups, (d) dynamics inside ICs, (e) difficulty in trust building, and (f) potential selection bias. The findings suggest that researchers thoroughly review the ICs’ information, be recognizant of potential gender and ethnic issues and current trends in Internet interaction, and consider potential selection bias. PMID:16962122

  17. Munchausen by Internet: detecting factitious illness and crisis on the Internet.

    PubMed

    Feldman, M D

    2000-07-01

    Within the past few years, the Internet has exploded into a medium of choice for those interested in health and medicine. Along with the promise of immediate access to authoritative resources via websites, the Internet offers "virtual support groups" through formats such as chat rooms and newsgroups. These person-to-person exchanges, typically focusing on a specific topic, can be invaluable sources of information and compassion for patients and their families. However, individuals may misuse these Internet groups at times, offering false stories of personal illness or crisis for reasons such as garnering attention, mobilizing sympathy, acting out anger, or controlling others. I present four such cases and, based on experience with these and other cases of "virtual" factitious disorder and Munchausen by proxy, summarize indicators of factitious Internet claims and the reactions that participants usually experience once the ruse is recognized.

  18. Educational and Psychosocial Support Needs in Lynch Syndrome: Implementation and Assessment of an Educational Workshop and Support Group.

    PubMed

    Corines, Marina J; Hamilton, Jada G; Glogowski, Emily; Anrig, Chris A; Goldberg, Rachael; Niehaus, Kate; Salo-Mullen, Erin; Harlan, Megan; Sheehan, Margaret R; Trottier, Magan; Ahsraf, Asad; Tran, Christina; Jacobs, Lauren; Rau-Murthy, Rohini; Lincoln, Anne G; Robson, Mark E; Guillem, Jose G; Markowitz, Arnold J; Offit, Kenneth; Stadler, Zsofia K

    2017-04-01

    Few reports of educational and counseling support resources exist for Lynch syndrome (LS), a disorder requiring multi-organ cancer screening and specialized medical care throughout adult life. Here we describe the development and efficacy of two resources designed to address this need, the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center Clinical Genetics Service annual Lynch Syndrome Educational Workshop (LSEW), and a quarterly Lynch Syndrome Patient Advocacy Network (LSPAN) support group. The LSEW and LSPAN were implemented beginning in 2012. Participant survey data evaluating satisfaction, clarity, and unmet needs for each event were retrospectively analyzed and summarized using descriptive statistics. Annual LSEW attendance ranged from 53 to 75 total participants. LSEW year 1 participants indicated a need for a support group, and preferred in-person meetings at a frequency of every 3-6 months. For LSEW year 2-5 participants, >96 % reported satisfaction with the LSEW, and >82 % expressed interest in secure online support. Common themes for improvement included increased time for question and answer sessions and additional introductory genetics education. Responding LSPAN participants (n = 57 total survey responses in 11 meetings) found the meetings helpful (100 %), information clear (91 %), and presence of a genetic counselor useful (67 %). Desired discussion topics included coping with stress and anxiety, development of a support network, family communication about LS, genetic testing decisions, and bereavement. Following genetic counseling, a need exists for ongoing educational and emotional support in LS. Implementation of resources such as the LSEW and LSPAN is feasible and perceived as helpful by participants.

  19. Internet2 Formalities: University Corporation for Advanced Internet Development (UCAID).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Machovec, George S.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the history, goals, and partnerships of the University Corporation for Advanced Internet Development (UCAID) created in October 1997 and the hiring of Doug Van Houweling as CEO. UCAID supports Internet2 (or Internet II) a collaborative effort between higher education and industry to facilitate and coordinate the development of advanced…

  20. Social representations about support for breastfeeding in a group of breastfeeding women.

    PubMed

    Müller, Fabiana Swain; Silva, Isilia Aparecida

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to get to know the social representations about support for breastfeeding in a group of breastfeeding women, as well as to identify the actions in their social environment these women perceive as supportive in their breastfeeding processes. Data were collected through a qualitative approach, using recorded semistructured interviews, organized in accordance with the Collective Subject Discourse and analyzed under the premises of Social Representations Theory. Results showed that the representations of women in this study about support for breastfeeding consist of actions available in the hospital, family and work contexts. In these women's perspective, support is a broad phenomenon that involves aspects of encouragement, promotion and protection to breastfeeding.

  1. Dissecting an Online Intervention for Cancer Survivors: Four Exploratory Analyses of Internet Engagement and Its Effects on Health Status and Health Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Zhenghao; Koh, Pang Wei; Ritter, Philip L.; Lorig, Kate; Bantum, Erin O'Carroll; Saria, Suchi

    2015-01-01

    The Internet has been used extensively to offer health education content and also for social support. More recently, we have seen the advent of Internet-based health education interventions that combine content with structured social networking. In many ways this is the Internet equivalent to small group interventions. While we have some knowledge…

  2. A systematic review of peer-support programs for smoking cessation in disadvantaged groups.

    PubMed

    Ford, Pauline; Clifford, Anton; Gussy, Kim; Gartner, Coral

    2013-10-28

    The burden of smoking is borne most by those who are socially disadvantaged and the social gradient in smoking contributes substantially to the health gap between the rich and poor. A number of factors contribute to higher tobacco use among socially disadvantaged populations including social (e.g., low social support for quitting), psychological (e.g., low self-efficacy) and physical factors (e.g., greater nicotine dependence). Current evidence for the effectiveness of peer or partner support interventions in enhancing the success of quit attempts in the general population is equivocal, largely due to study design and lack of a theoretical framework in this research. We conducted a systematic review of peer support interventions for smoking cessation in disadvantaged groups. The eight studies which met the inclusion criteria showed that interventions that improve social support for smoking cessation may be of greater importance to disadvantaged groups who experience fewer opportunities to access such support informally. Peer-support programs are emerging as highly effective and empowering ways for people to manage health issues in a socially supportive context. We discuss the potential for peer-support programs to address the high prevalence of smoking in vulnerable populations and also to build capacity in their communities.

  3. Forming a support group for people affected by inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Swarup, Nidhi; Nayak, Saumya; Lee, Jessie; Pai Raikar, Srinivas; Hou, David; Sockalingam, Senthil; Lee, Ken J

    2017-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) – primarily Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis – is a debilitating lifelong condition with significant health and economic costs. From diagnosis to management, IBD can cause huge psychosocial concerns to patients and their caregivers. This study reports an experience of a Crohn’s patient, leading to the formation of the first IBD patient support group in Singapore and how this group has evolved in the last 4 years in supporting other IBD patients. IBD patient advocacy and/or support groups facilitate open conversations on patients’ fears, concerns, preferences and needs, and may potentially improve disease knowledge and quality of life for individuals with the condition or their families. PMID:28255233

  4. Promoting resilience and recovery in a Buddhist mental health support group.

    PubMed

    Phoenix, Bethany

    2014-04-01

    Communities of faith are important arenas for psychiatric mental health nurses to promote emotional well-being and support recovery for persons with mental health problems. This article describes an innovative faith-based mental health group, based on Buddhist philosophy and practice and established by an advanced practice psychiatric nurse, that uses psychoeducation, peer support, and faith encouragement to help participants find hope and meaning in the experience of mental health problems. A brief overview of Buddhism and selected concepts relevant to the philosophical framework of the Buddhist mental health support group is followed by a review of the common themes of the group discussions. These include: finding value in the illness experience; differentiating the proper role of treatment from that of Buddhist practice in optimizing mental health; and experiencing a deeper sense of joy, despite current suffering.

  5. The language barrier?: context, identity, and support for political goals in minority ethnolinguistic groups.

    PubMed

    Livingstone, Andrew G; Manstead, Antony S R; Spears, Russell; Bowen, Dafydd

    2011-12-01

    In two studies, we tested the hypothesis that not having a potentially group-defining attribute (e.g., in-group language) can affect social identification and support for group goals (e.g., national autonomy). Focusing on the Welsh minority in the UK, Study 1 provided evidence that Welsh language fluency predicted Welsh identification and support for national autonomy, and that identification accounted for the language-autonomy association. Study 2 extended this by (1) examining British and English as well as Welsh identification; and (2) quasi-manipulating the surrounding context (Welsh speaking vs. non-Welsh speaking). As predicted, low Welsh language fluency predicted stronger British and English identification, but only where language was criterial (Welsh-speaking regions). British identification, in turn, predicted lower support for national autonomy. Implications and prospects for future research are discussed.

  6. Randomised feasibility study of a novel experience-based internet intervention to support self-management in chronic asthma

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Angela; Jawad, Sena; Davoudianfar, Mina; Locock, Louise; Ziebland, Sue; Powell, John

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the feasibility of a randomised controlled trial (RCT) assessing the effects of an experience-based website as a resource for the self-management of chronic asthma. Design and setting Feasibility, single-blind RCT in 2 regions of England. Randomisation used computer-generated random number sequence in a 1:1 ratio, after baseline data collection, to website access for 2 weeks. Participants Adults (age ≥18 years), with clinically diagnosed asthma as coded in their primary care electronic record, prescribed inhaled corticosteroids for at least 3 months in the previous year, were recruited from 9 general practices. Intervention The EXPERT asthma intervention is an interactive PC/laptop/tablet/smartphone compatible website designed with extensive input from adults with asthma. It provides experience-based information and aims to support subjective perception of self-efficacy, self-management and improve health status. Outcome measures Primary outcomes were consent/recruitment, website usage and completion of outcome measures. Secondary outcomes included Partners in Health (PIH) questionnaire, the Chronic Disease Self-Efficacy Scale, the SF36 and the E-Health Impact Questionnaire. Participant blinding postrandomisation was not possible. The analysis was blind to allocation. Results Recruitment target exceeded. 148 participants randomised (73 intervention group). Age range 19–84 years; 59% female. 121 of 148 (84%; 62 intervention group) followed up. The median number of logins was 2 (IQR 2–3, range 1–48). Minimal differences of change from baseline between groups; both showed improvement in health state or management of their condition with no significant differences between arms. No adverse events. Conclusions Recruitment and retention confirmed feasibility. The trends towards improved outcomes suggest that further research on digital interventions based on exposure to others’ personal experiences may be of value in the self

  7. Talking with text: communication in therapist-led, live chat cancer support groups.

    PubMed

    Stephen, Joanne; Collie, Kate; McLeod, Deborah; Rojubally, Adina; Fergus, Karen; Speca, Michael; Turner, Jill; Taylor-Brown, Jill; Sellick, Scott; Burrus, Kimberly; Elramly, Mai

    2014-03-01

    CancerChatCanada is a pan-Canadian initiative with a mandate to make professionally led cancer support groups available to more people in Canada. Although online support groups are becoming increasingly popular, little is known about therapist-led, synchronous groups using live chat. The purpose of this study was to generate a rich descriptive account of communication experiences in CancerChatCanada groups and to gain an understanding of processes associated with previously-reported benefits. We used interpretive description to analyze interview segments from 102 patients, survivors and family caregivers who participated in CancerChatCanada groups between 2007 and 2011. The analysis yielded four inter-related process themes (Reaching Out From Home, Feeling Safe, Emotional Release, and Talking With Text) and one outcome theme (Resonance and Kinship). The findings extend previous research about text-only online support groups and provide novel insights into features of facilitated, live chat communication that are valued by group members.

  8. Grieving online: newcomers' constructions of grief in an online support group.

    PubMed

    Varga, Mary Alice; Paulus, Trena M

    2014-01-01

    Research into peer conversations in online grief support groups remains scarce. The authors used discourse analysis to examine 107 initial posts to one such group to examine how newcomers constructed their initial posts to display their eligibility for membership. The authors identified three discursive features: formulating unusual stories of loss, describing uncontrollable emotional and physical states, and engaging in "troubles telling." These discursive patterns illustrate how grief is constructed in ways that may simultaneously conform to and resist norms around grief that exist offline. Implications for practitioners include the need to support individuals through validation of their "nonnormal" grief.

  9. The Structure of Social Exchange in Self-Help Support Groups: Development of a Measure

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Louis D.; Tang, Xiaohui; Hollman, Ruth L.

    2014-01-01

    Self-help support groups are indigenous community resources designed to help people manage a variety of personal challenges, from alcohol abuse to xeroderma pigmentosum. The social exchanges that occur during group meetings are central to understanding how people benefit from participation. This paper examines the different types of social exchange behaviors that occur during meetings, using two studies to develop empirically distinct scales that reliably measure theoretically important types of exchange. Resource theory informed the initial measurement development efforts. Exploratory factor analyses from the first study led to revisions in the factor structure of the social exchange scales. The revised measure captured the exchange of emotional support, experiential information, humor, unwanted behaviors, and exchanges outside meetings. Confirmatory factor analyses from a follow-up study with a different sample of self-help support groups provided good model fit, suggesting the revised structure accurately represented the data. Further, the scales demonstrated good convergent and discriminant validity with related constructs. Future research can use the scales to identify aspects of social exchange that are most important in improving health outcomes among self-help support group participants. Groups can use the scales in practice to celebrate strengths and address weaknesses in their social exchange dynamics. PMID:24398622

  10. Exploring the communication of social support within virtual communities: a content analysis of messages posted to an online HIV/AIDS support group.

    PubMed

    Mo, Phoenix K H; Coulson, Neil S

    2008-06-01

    The present study examined the nature of social support exchanged within an online HIV/AIDS support group. Content analysis was conducted with reference to five types of social support (information support, tangible assistance, esteem support, network support, and emotional support) on 85 threads (1,138 messages). Our analysis revealed that many of the messages offered informational and emotional support, followed by esteem support and network support, with tangible assistance the least frequently offered. Results suggest that this online support group is a popular forum through which individuals living with HIV/AIDS can offer social support. Our findings have implications for health care professionals who support individuals living with HIV/AIDS.

  11. Group support for parents of high risk neonates: an interdisciplinary approach.

    PubMed

    Macnab, A J; Sheckter, L A; Hendry, N J; Pendray, M R; Macnab, G

    1985-01-01

    Many parents are unable to develop a satisfying relationship with their sick newborn. Although data are divided over the critical nature of the attachment process, measures to assist parents and reduce socio-environmental stresses are considered desirable. Group support is one such measure which can provide parents with a commonly needed component of neonatal intensive care. In the group described, weekly sessions are informal, encouraging discussion, an understanding of neonatal care and recognition that some emotional and coping disturbance is normal. Staff involved are an interdisciplinary team (social worker, doctor and nurse). The group requires no special funding and time commitment is low considering the support provided. We have met weekly for five years with sustained attendance. No control group exists but parents appear increasingly comfortable in the nursery and able to achieve more meaningful and ongoing interaction with their infant and the staff.

  12. Importance of support groups for intersex (disorders of sex development) patients, families and the medical profession.

    PubMed

    Cull, M L; Simmonds, M

    2010-09-01

    Taboo still surrounds intersex/disorders of sex development, in spite of more openness in society regarding sex. Peer support is valuable in providing information and emotional support to those affected. Support groups also work with clinicians to promote better care, to assist with research studies and to increase clinical awareness and expertise by helping to stage symposia. They also foster greater public understanding via media involvement and training videos; and play an advocacy role, providing one voice to channel the concerns of a scattered population with these rare conditions.

  13. Refugees, Post-Migration Stress, and Internet Use: A Qualitative Analysis of Intercultural Adjustment and Internet Use Among Iraqi and Sudanese Refugees to the United States.

    PubMed

    Mikal, Jude P; Woodfield, Braden

    2015-10-01

    Post-migration stressors represent significant obstacle to refugee adjustment, and continued exposure to post-migration stressors can negatively affect mental and physical health. Communities of support maintained over the Internet may provide a sense of constancy and reliability that may insulate against the negative effects of stress. We conducted five focus group interviews with Iraqi and Sudanese refugees to understand how refugees use the Internet to access support in their daily lives. Four trends were observed: (a) Internet use was related to culture of origin, (b) refugees were reluctant to explore online, (c) children served as brokers of online knowledge, and (d) limited Internet access is associated with increased time and financial obligations. This study aims to contribute to theory on Internet-mediated social support and to refugee health by creating smoother pathways to self-sufficiency and allowing refugees to exhibit agency in constructing and maintaining online networks of support.

  14. Efficacy of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia in Adolescents: A Randomized Controlled Trial with Internet Therapy, Group Therapy and A Waiting List Condition

    PubMed Central

    de Bruin, Eduard J.; Bögels, Susan M.; Oort, Frans J.; Meijer, Anne Marie

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: To investigate the efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBTI) in adolescents. Design: A randomized controlled trial of CBTI in group therapy (GT), guided internet therapy (IT), and a waiting list (WL), with assessments at baseline, directly after treatment (post-test), and at 2 months follow-up. Setting: Diagnostic interviews were held at the laboratory of the Research Institute of Child Development and Education at the University of Amsterdam. Treatment for GT occurred at the mental health care center UvAMinds in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Participants: One hundred sixteen adolescents (mean age = 15.6 y, SD = 1.6 y, 25% males) meeting DSM-IV criteria for insomnia, were randomized to IT, GT, or WL. Interventions: CBTI of 6 weekly sessions, consisted of psychoeducation, sleep hygiene, restriction of time in bed, stimulus control, cognitive therapy, and relaxation techniques. GT was conducted in groups of 6 to 8 adolescents, guided by 2 trained sleep therapists. IT was applied through an online guided self-help website with programmed instructions and written feedback from a trained sleep therapist. Measurements and Results: Sleep was measured with actigraphy and sleep logs for 7 consecutive days. Symptoms of insomnia and chronic sleep reduction were measured with questionnaires. Results showed that adolescents in both IT and GT, compared to WL, improved significantly on sleep efficiency, sleep onset latency, wake after sleep onset, and total sleep time at post-test, and improvements were maintained at follow-up. Most of these improvements were found in both objective and subjective measures. Furthermore, insomnia complaints and symptoms of chronic sleep reduction also decreased significantly in both treatment conditions compared to WL. Effect sizes for improvements ranged from medium to large. A greater proportion of participants from the treatment conditions showed high end-state functioning and clinically significant

  15. Efficiency of Nuclear and Mitochondrial Markers Recovering and Supporting Known Amniote Groups

    PubMed Central

    Lambret-Frotté, Julia; Perini, Fernando Araújo; de Moraes Russo, Claudia Augusta

    2012-01-01

    We have analysed the efficiency of all mitochondrial protein coding genes and six nuclear markers (Adora3, Adrb2, Bdnf, Irbp, Rag2 and Vwf) in reconstructing and statistically supporting known amniote groups (murines, rodents, primates, eutherians, metatherians, therians). The efficiencies of maximum likelihood, Bayesian inference, maximum parsimony, neighbor-joining and UPGMA were also evaluated, by assessing the number of correct and incorrect recovered groupings. In addition, we have compared support values using the conservative bootstrap test and the Bayesian posterior probabilities. First, no correlation was observed between gene size and marker efficiency in recovering or supporting correct nodes. As expected, tree-building methods performed similarly, even UPGMA that, in some cases, outperformed other most extensively used methods. Bayesian posterior probabilities tend to show much higher support values than the conservative bootstrap test, for correct and incorrect nodes. Our results also suggest that nuclear markers do not necessarily show a better performance than mitochondrial genes. The so-called dependency among mitochondrial markers was not observed comparing genome performances. Finally, the amniote groups with lowest recovery rates were therians and rodents, despite the morphological support for their monophyletic status. We suggest that, regardless of the tree-building method, a few carefully selected genes are able to unfold a detailed and robust scenario of phylogenetic hypotheses, particularly if taxon sampling is increased. PMID:23032608

  16. Design, Development, and Feasibility of a Spanish-Language Cancer Survivor Support Group

    PubMed Central

    Ceballos, Rachel M.; Molina, Yamile; Malen, Rachel C.; Ibarra, Genoveva; Escareño, Monica; Marchello, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Latino cancer survivors experience lower psychosocial well-being compared to Non-Latino Whites. This study describes the development of a culturally-appropriate support group and reports on feasibility of implementation and preliminary outcomes. Methods Promotores (lay health workers) conducted all aspects of data collection and program implementation. Participants were 29 Spanish-speaking Latino cancer survivors (n=12 men, 17 women) who took part in one of three study phases. Phase 1 included one-on-one interviews and focus groups (n=14) to investigate psychosocial needs of survivors. During Phase 2, a 10-week program was developed that integrated data from Phase 1 and culturally-relevant concepts. Session topics included stress, nutrition, physical activity, body image, sexuality, medical advocacy and social support. In Phase 3, the program was implemented within gender-specific groups (n=15). Within-group pre-post comparisons of distress (distress thermometer, salivary cortisol) and quality of life (FACIT) were conducted. Follow-up focus groups assessed participant experience Results Phase 1 activities identified survivor needs and interests (e.g., isolation, family and spirituality, supporting other Latinos with cancer). Evidence of program feasibility was demonstrated (e.g., 90%–100% attendance, 100% data completion). While interpretation of significance is limited due to sample size, improvements in quality of life [functional (p=0.05), social (p=0.02), and meaning/purpose (p=0.05)] were observed among women but not men. Qualitative follow-up revealed high satisfaction with group participation, but discomfort with the topic of sexuality in women. Conclusions This project demonstrates development and feasibility outcomes for providing culturally-appropriate psychosocial support to Latino cancer survivors. Limitations, including lack of control group, and future directions are discussed. PMID:25556609

  17. Searching Scientific Information on the Internet: A Dutch Academic User Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voorbij, Henk J.

    1999-01-01

    This study examined the use and perceived importance of the Internet among students and faculty in the Netherlands through questionnaires and focus-group interviews. Highlights include electronic journals, learning to use the Internet, search engines, needed library support, and problems with subject searching. A copy of the questionnaire is…

  18. The Effect of Telephone Support Groups on Costs of Care for Veterans with Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wray, Laura O.; Shulan, Mollie D.; Toseland, Ronald W.; Freeman, Kurt E.; Vasquez, Bob Edward; Gao, Jian

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Few studies have addressed the effects of caregiver interventions on the costs of care for the care recipient. This study evaluated the effects of a caregiver education and support group delivered via the telephone on care recipient health care utilization and cost. Design and Methods: The Telehealth Education Program (TEP) is a…

  19. Goal Attainment Scaling: A Vehicle for Group Support in Career and Life Issues Exploration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    deRosenroll, David A.

    Goal setting is a necessary component to any change-oriented counseling. Support groups are logical additions to and often replacements for direct professional interventions. Typically clients who see counselors are dissatisfied with aspects of their personal lives. Along with their perceptions of their present states are their desires to alter or…

  20. A Traumatic Death Support Group Program: Applying an Integrated Conceptual Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walijarvi, Corrine M.; Weiss, Ann H.; Weinman, Maxine L.

    2012-01-01

    This article describes an 8-week, curriculum-based traumatic death support group program that is offered at Bo's Place, a grief and bereavement center in Houston, Texas. The program was implemented in 2006 in an effort to help family members who had experienced a death in the family by suicide, murder, accident, or sudden medical problem. The…

  1. Educational Support Group in Changing Caregivers' Psychological Elder Abuse Behavior toward Caring for Institutionalized Elders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsieh, Hsiu-Fang; Wang, Jing-Jy; Yen, Maiofen; Liu, Tzu-Ti

    2009-01-01

    Institutionalized elderly who are frail and dependent are vulnerable to be abused by overwhelmed caregivers especially caregiver psychological abusive behavior is a growing but hidden problem with few evidence-based interventions. The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of an educational support group in alleviating caregiver's…

  2. Community Post-Tornado Support Groups: Conceptual Issues and Personal Themes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Thomas E.; Richard, Wayne C.

    Crisis intervention and post-disaster practitioners have recommended nontraditional services such as action oriented strategies and the building of new social support networks. Guidelines for establishing and operating such groups are sparse and not organized into a comprehensive approach. A literature search did identify several rationales to…

  3. An Education-Support-Group Program for Visually Impaired People with Diabetes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caditz, J.

    1992-01-01

    This article describes the Diabetes Education/Support Group Program for people with diabetes and visual impairment. It analyzes some of the common problems that participants have reported (such as fear of insulin reactions and of long-term complications) and discusses methods of reducing anxiety and depression related to the two conditions.…

  4. Student Conversations: How Diverse Groups of Students Perceive College Culture, Supports, and Challenges in College Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Kimberly Ann

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and examine student perceptions of the lived experience of college and what supported or challenged their adaptation to college culture. Focus groups divided by gender and race or ethnicity served as the primary "self-contained" data collection method. Although the questions surrounding this…

  5. Detecting Emotional Expression in Face-to-Face and Online Breast Cancer Support Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liess, Anna; Simon, Wendy; Yutsis, Maya; Owen, Jason E.; Piemme, Karen Altree; Golant, Mitch; Giese-Davis, Janine

    2008-01-01

    Accurately detecting emotional expression in women with primary breast cancer participating in support groups may be important for therapists and researchers. In 2 small studies (N = 20 and N = 16), the authors examined whether video coding, human text coding, and automated text analysis provided consistent estimates of the level of emotional…

  6. School-Based Mutual Support Groups for Parents: An Intervention Guidebook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simoni, Jane M.

    This handbook focuses on steps and tasks related to establishing mutual support groups for parents in a school setting. A sequential approach is described that involves: working within the school to get started; recruiting members; training parents how to run their own meetings; and offering off-site consultation as requested. The first section…

  7. School-Based Mutual Support Groups for Low-Income Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simoni, Jane M.; Adelman, Howard S.

    1993-01-01

    School-based mutual support groups (MSGs) are proposed to enhance school involvement of parents from lower socioeconomic and ethnic minority backgrounds. A school-based MSG format is presented with results of a survey of interests from 62 parents (36 respondents and 26 nonrespondents) and a discussion of a pilot demonstration in 3 urban elementary…

  8. Using "Lectio Divina" (Divine Reading) in a Support Group for Pre-Seminarians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoang, Dung Ngoc

    2012-01-01

    Nowadays, living in the communist society in Vietnam, two of the main issues that need attention in preparation of the candidates in the one-year pre-seminary program are developing their habits of prayer and strengthening their skills needed for a rich community life. For this reason, the project Using "Lectio Divina in a Support Group for…

  9. The Value of Telephone Support Groups among Ethnically Diverse Caregivers of Persons with Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bank, Adam L.; Arguelles, Soledad; Rubert, Mark; Eisdorfer, Carl; Czaja, Sara J.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Dementia caregiving is a rapidly growing public health problem. Logistical problems prevent many caregivers from utilizing available interventions. This article provides a demonstration of the usefulness of technology for conducting telephone-based support groups in ethnically diverse dementia caregivers. Design and Methods: Participants…

  10. The Race Gap in Support Group Participation by Breast Cancer Survivors: Real or Artifact?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michalec, Barret; Van Willigen, Marieke; Wilson, Kenneth; Schreier, Ann; Williams, Susan

    2004-01-01

    Addressing methodological weaknesses of previous research, this study assesses whether African American women are, in fact, less likely to participate in breast cancer support groups than are White women. Of the breast cancer survivors, 958 (26% African Americans, 73% Caucasian) completed interviews concerning demographic characteristics, other…

  11. Realising Graduate Attributes in the Research Degree: The Role of Peer Support Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stracke, Elke; Kumar, Vijay

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses the role of peer support groups (PSGs) in realising graduate attributes in the research degree. The literature indicates that top-down embedding of graduate attributes has met with only limited success. By taking a bottom-up approach, this paper shows that PSGs offer an opportunity to improve the graduate attribute outcomes of…

  12. Group Cohesion, Collective Efficacy, and Motivational Climate As Predictors of Conductor Support in Music Ensembles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Wendy K.; Kitsantas, Anastasia

    2007-01-01

    In the present study, we examined whether collective efficacy, group cohesion (task and social), and perceived motivational climate (task-involving and ego-involving orientations) in a music ensemble predict instrumentalists' perceived conductor support. Ninety-one (N = 91) skilled high school instrumentalists participated in the study. To assess…

  13. Group Cohesion and Social Support in Exercise Classes: Results from a Danish Intervention Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Ulla; Schmidt, Lone; Budtz-Jorgensen, Esben; Avlund, Kirsten

    2006-01-01

    This study examines the formation of group cohesion and social support in exercise classes among former sedentary adults, participating in a Danish community-based intervention. Furthermore, the aim is to analyze the impact of this process on exercise activity among the participants. A multimethod approach was used, analyzing both survey data and…

  14. A Comparison of Support for Two Groups of Young Adults with Mild Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soenen, Sarah; van Berckelaer-Onnes, Ina; Scholte, Evert

    2016-01-01

    Young adults with mild to borderline intellectual disability (MBID) have varying profiles of cognitive, adaptive and behavioural functioning. There is also variability in their educational and therapeutic needs. This study compares recommended and actual provision of support for two groups of young adults with MBID and looks at young adults'…

  15. Group Supervision: Supporting Practitioners in Their Work with Children and Families in Children's Centres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soni, Anita

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses how group supervision can be used to support the Continuing Professional Development (CPD) of those working with children and families in early years provision in England. It is based on research conducted in 2008 with a cluster of four Children's Centres in the West Midlands in England, UK. The research evaluated group…

  16. Universal parent support groups for parents of adolescents: Which parents participate and why?

    PubMed

    Alfredsson, Elin K; Broberg, Anders G

    2016-04-01

    Leader-led parent support groups, offered universally to parents of adolescents, are increasingly common, yet little is known of the parents who use this support. The study presented here explored the characteristics of parents of 10- to 17-year-olds (N = 192) who had enlisted in universal support groups and their reasons for enrollment. Sociodemographic factors (parents' country of origin, educational level, long-term sick-leave or unemployment, and marital status) were compared to the general population (Statistics Sweden, 2012) and parents' psychological health and children's psychiatric symptoms were compared to a control group (the BITA study). Results showed that support group parents reported more psychosocial difficulties, such as higher frequency of long-term sick-leave or unemployment, more symptoms of anxiety and depression and more psychiatric symptoms in their children than parents in general. While about a fifth of the parents had problem-oriented (targeted) reasons for enrollment, most parents had general (universal) reasons. Thus, the universal approach does seem to reach its intended recipients.

  17. Social Influence in Online Health Discussions: An Evaluation of Online Graduate Student Support Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maloney, Erin Kay

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on the results of a field experimental design assessing online support groups testing hypotheses derived from the social identification model of deindividuation effects (SIDE; Lea & Spears, 1992) and social information processing theory (SIP; Walther, 1992). Specifically, it is predicted that individuals in an online support…

  18. The Relationships among Group Size, Participation, and Performance of Programming Language Learning Supported with Online Forums

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Ruey-Shiang

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the relationships among group size, participation, and learning performance factors when learning a programming language in a computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) context. An online forum was used as the CSCL environment for learning the Microsoft ASP.NET programming language. The collaborative-learning experiment…

  19. Reducing Dropouts in Online Education-Group Tutoring in Virtual Seminars and Support Structures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmgren, Robert; Johansson, Sigurd

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a development project aimed at reducing the large number of dropouts in online degree project courses. The idea was that the introduction of group tutorials in virtual seminars, combined with extensive support materials, would reduce dropout rates. Among the students who participated, the dropout rate was reduced by 50%…

  20. Group Formation in Mobile Computer Supported Collaborative Learning Contexts: A Systematic Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amara, Sofiane; Macedo, Joaquim; Bendella, Fatima; Santos, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Learners are becoming increasingly divers. They may have much personal, social, cultural, psychological, and cognitive diversity. Forming suitable learning groups represents, therefore, a hard and time-consuming task. In Mobile Computer Supported Collaborative Learning (MCSCL) environments, this task is more difficult. Instructors need to consider…

  1. Group interactions in SFINCSS-99: lessons for improving behavioral support programs.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Natsuhiko; Matsuzaki, Ichiyo; Ohshima, Hiroshi

    2004-07-01

    Human factors can significantly influence successful mission completion of prolonged space missions such as ISS expeditions or future Mars missions. This paper describes group dynamics and group interactions during SFINCSS-99, a very unique international long-term confinement study in a space mission analog environment. Many interpersonal or inter-group conflicts occurred, and these caused the early retirement of a Japanese subject. This paper cites examples of these conflicts, and analyzes their causes with our results. The international cooperation to extract lessons learned, which could be used to refine behavioral support programs for the ISS or similar international studies, is also introduced.

  2. Music-supported motor training after stroke reveals no superiority of synchronization in group therapy

    PubMed Central

    Van Vugt, Floris T.; Ritter, Juliane; Rollnik, Jens D.; Altenmüller, Eckart

    2014-01-01

    Background: Music-supported therapy has been shown to be an effective tool for rehabilitation of motor deficits after stroke. A unique feature of music performance is that it is inherently social: music can be played together in synchrony. Aim: The present study explored the potential of synchronized music playing during therapy, asking whether synchronized playing could improve fine motor rehabilitation and mood. Method: Twenty-eight patients in neurological early rehabilitation after stroke with no substantial previous musical training were included. Patients learned to play simple finger exercises and familiar children's songs on the piano for 10 sessions of half an hour. Patients first received three individual therapy sessions and then continued in pairs. The patient pairs were divided into two groups. Patients in one group played synchronously (together group) whereas the patients in the other group played one after the other (in-turn group). To assess fine motor skill recovery the patients performed standard clinical tests such as the nine-hole-pegboard test (9HPT) and index finger-tapping speed and regularity, and metronome-paced finger tapping. Patients' mood was established using the Profile of Mood States (POMS). Results: Both groups showed improvements in fine motor control. In metronome-paced finger tapping, patients in both groups improved significantly. Mood tests revealed reductions in depression and fatigue in both groups. During therapy, patients in the in-turn group rated their partner as more sympathetic than the together-group in a visual-analog scale. Conclusions: Our results suggest that music-supported stroke rehabilitation can improve fine motor control and mood not only individually but also in patient pairs. Patients who were playing in turn rather than simultaneously tended to reveal greater improvement in fine motor skill. We speculate that patients in the former group may benefit from the opportunity to learn from observation. PMID

  3. Social positioning by people with Alzheimer's disease in a support group.

    PubMed

    Hedman, Ragnhild; Hellström, Ingrid; Ternestedt, Britt-Marie; Hansebo, Görel; Norberg, Astrid

    2014-01-01

    People with Alzheimer's disease (AD) are often negatively positioned by others, resulting in difficulties upholding a positive sense of self. This might cause them to withdraw socially and apparently 'lose their minds'. Conversely, the sense of self can be strengthened with the support from others. This study aimed to describe, in accordance with positioning theory, how people with moderate AD positioned themselves and each other in a support group for people with AD. We describe five first-order positions; the project manager, the storyteller, the moral agent, the person burdened with AD, and the coping person. In the interactions that followed among the support group participants, those positions were mainly affirmed. This enabled participants to construct strong and agentic personae, and to have the severity of their illness acknowledged. Despite their language impairment participants managed to position and reposition themselves and others by assistance of the trained facilitator.

  4. The Effect of Support Group Method on Quality of Life in Post-menopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Yazdkhasti, M; Keshavarz, M; Khoei, ES Merghaati; Hosseini, AF; ESmaeilzadeh, S; Pebdani, M Amiri; Jafarzadeh, H

    2012-01-01

    Background Quality of life in post-menopausal women and menopausal symptoms are closely related concepts. Influence health education policy in order to promote health and adopt a menopause lifestyle requires alternative strategies, including health training programs with community – based interventions. The current study aims to survey the effects of support groups on quality of life of post-menopausal women. Methods: A blind field trial (2010) was conducted at Saadatmandii Clinical Center (Robat Karim, Iran). 110 women were selected randomly divided into test and control groups (consisting of 55 ones). Menopause specific quality of life questionnaire (MENQOL) was used for evaluation of life quality before and three months after intervention; there was no intervention in the control group. Data were analyzed by using SPSS/16. Qualitative variables were analyzed using chi-square tests and quantitative variables were analyzed using Mann-Whitney and Wilcoxon test, paired T-test and independent t-test. Results: There was significant difference between vasomotor, psychosocial, physical, sexual aspects and life quality of this group pf women (P<0.001). There was no statistically significant difference in the quality of life of women in control group. Conclusion: According to the results method of support group can lead to improved quality of life for post-menopausal ones and it can be appropriate healthcare policy to promote health and improve life quality of this group of women. PMID:23304680

  5. The Buried in Treasures Workshop: waitlist control trial of facilitated support groups for hoarding.

    PubMed

    Frost, Randy O; Ruby, Dylan; Shuer, Lee J

    2012-11-01

    Hoarding is a serious form of psychopathology that has been associated with significant health and safety concerns, as well as the source of social and economic burden (Tolin, Frost, Steketee, & Fitch, 2008; Tolin, Frost, Steketee, Gray, & Fitch, 2008). Recent developments in the treatment of hoarding have met with some success for both individual and group treatments. Nevertheless, the cost and limited accessibility of these treatments leave many hoarding sufferers without options for help. One alternative is support groups that require relatively few resources. Frost, Pekareva-Kochergina, and Maxner (2011) reported significant declines in hoarding symptoms following a non-professionally run 13-week support group (The Buried in Treasures [BIT] Workshop). The BIT Workshop is a highly structured and short term support group. The present study extended these findings by reporting on the results of a waitlist control trial of the BIT Workshop. Significant declines in all hoarding symptom measures were observed compared to a waitlist control. The treatment response rate for the BIT Workshop was similar to that obtained by previous individual and group treatment studies, despite its shorter length and lack of a trained therapist. The BIT Workshop may be an effective adjunct to cognitive behavior therapy for hoarding disorder, or an alternative when cognitive behavior therapy is inaccessible.

  6. Social support within a mother and child group: An ethnographic study situated in the UK.

    PubMed

    Peters, Jane; Skirton, Heather

    2013-06-01

    Social support has been associated with positive outcomes regarding the mothering experience, and professional interventions have therefore been developed in formal settings to promote this. An ethnographic approach was used to consider the subjective experiences of mothers attending a professionally-facilitated group for parents and children aged 0-4 years, focusing on relationships within the group and their importance within existing social networks. Qualitative data were collected from seven participants using interviews and participant observation. These were analyzed by the constant comparison method into codes, categories, and themes. Three themes emerged: past history, being a mother, and function of the group. To ensure mothers and children benefit from such groups, nurses who participate in developing and leading community interventions for mothers and their children need to be aware of the importance of maternal identity and the factors that can impact the relationships between mothers within group settings.

  7. Processor-Group Aware Runtime Support for Shared-and Global-Address Space Models

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, Manoj Kumar; Tipparaju, Vinod; Palmer, Bruce; Nieplocha, Jarek

    2004-12-07

    Exploiting multilevel parallelism using processor groups is becoming increasingly important for programming on high-end systems. This paper describes a group-aware run-time support for shared-/global- address space programming models. The current effort has been undertaken in the context of the Aggregate Remote Memory Copy Interface (ARMCI) [5], a portable runtime system used as a communication layer for Global Arrays [6], Co-Array Fortran (CAF) [9], GPSHMEM [10], Co-Array Python [11], and also end-user applications. The paper describes the management of shared memory, integration of shared memory communication and RDMA on clusters with SMP nodes, and registration. These are all required for efficient multi- method and multi-protocol communication on modern systems. Focus is placed on techniques for supporting process groups while maximizing communication performance and efficiently managing global memory system-wide.

  8. Influence of group cohesion on maternal well-being among participants in a support/education group program for single mothers.

    PubMed

    Lipman, Ellen L; Waymouth, Marjorie; Gammon, Tara; Carter, Patricia; Secord, Margaret; Leung, Olivia; Mills, Brenda; Hicks, Frances

    2007-10-01

    Single mothers are at increased risk of psychosocial disadvantage, social isolation and physical and mental health difficulties. The authors present (1) the results of group cohesion assessments completed by mothers participating in a trial of community-based support/education groups, and (2) assessments of the association between group cohesion ratings and intervention outcomes of maternal self-evaluations of well-being (mood, self-esteem, and social support) and parenting. Mothers participating in groups completed the Group Atmosphere Scale, a measure of group cohesion, post-group. Overall, most participants provided strong ratings of group cohesion. Significant associations were found between group cohesion and specific positive outcomes. This suggests a positive association between group cohesion and mood, self-esteem, social support, and parenting, in this trial.

  9. "I Feel I Mean Something to Someone:" Solution-Focused Brief Therapy Support Groups for Bullied Schoolchildren

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kvarme, Lisbeth Gravdal; Aabø, Liv Sandnes; Saeteren, Berit

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate how bullied schoolchildren experience solution-focused brief therapy support groups, and to examine how members of the support group experience their participation in the group. An explorative qualitative design, with individual and focus group interviews, was used. The sample consisted of 19…

  10. Easing reintegration: telephone support groups for spouses of returning Iraq and Afghanistan service members.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Linda Olivia; Martindale-Adams, Jennifer; Graney, Marshall J; Zuber, Jeffrey; Burns, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Spouses of returning Iraq (Operation Iraqi Freedom, OIF) and Afghanistan (Operation Enduring Freedom, OEF) military service members report increased depression and anxiety post deployment as they work to reintegrate the family and service member. Reconnecting the family, renegotiating roles that have shifted, reestablishing communication patterns, and dealing with mental health concerns are all tasks that spouses must undertake as part of reintegration. We tested telephone support groups focusing on helping spouses with these basic reintegration tasks. Year-long telephone support groups focused on education, skills building (communication skills, problem solving training, cognitive behavioral techniques, stress management), and support. Spouse depression and anxiety were decreased and perceived social support was increased during the course of the study. In subgroup analyses, spouses with husbands whose injuries caused care difficulties had a positive response to the intervention. However, they were more likely to be depressed, be anxious, and have less social support compared to participants who had husbands who had no injury or whose injury did not cause care difficulty. Study findings suggest that this well-established, high-access intervention can help improve quality of life for military spouses who are struggling with reintegration of the service member and family.

  11. Design of an internet-based health economic evaluation of a preventive group-intervention for children of parents with mental illness or substance use disorders

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Preventive interventions are developed for children of parents with mental and substance use disorders (COPMI), because these children have a higher risk of developing a psychological or behavioral disorder in the future. Mental health and substance use disorders contribute significantly to the global burden of disease. Although the exact number of parents with a mental illness is unclear, the subject of mentally ill parents is gaining attention. Moreover there is a lack of interventions for COPMI-children, as well of (cost-) effectiveness studies evaluating COPMI interventions. Innovative interventions such as e-health provide a new field for exploration. There is no knowledge about the opportunities for using the internet to prevent problems in children at risk. In the current study we will focus on the (cost-) effectiveness of an online health prevention program for COPMI-children. Methods/Design We designed a randomized controlled trial to examine the (cost-) effectiveness of the Kopstoring intervention. Kopstoring is an online intervention for COPMI-children to strengthen their coping skills and prevent behavioral and psychological problems. We will compare the Kopstoring intervention with (waiting list) care as usual. This trial will be conducted entirely over the internet. An economic evaluation, from a societal perspective will be conducted, to examine the trial's cost-effectiveness. Power calculations show that 214 participants are needed, aged 16-25. Possible participants will be recruited via media announcements and banners on the internet. After screening and completing informed consent procedures, participants will be randomized. The main outcome is internalizing and externalizing symptoms as measured by the Youth Self Report. For the economic evaluation, healthcare costs and costs outside the healthcare sector will be measured at the same time as the clinical measures, at baseline, 3, 6 and 9 months. An extended measure for the intervention

  12. Supportive relationships--psychological effects of group counselling in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS).

    PubMed

    Roessler, Kirsten K; Glintborg, Dorte; Ravn, Pernille; Birkebaek, Camilla; Andersen, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to examine the psychological impact of a group-oriented approach to disease management and health behaviour in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Seventeen overweight PCOS women were randomised in a crossover design of eight weeks high-intensity aerobic exercise followed by eight weeks of group counselling (n=8) or vice versa (n=9). Interpersonal communication, emotional and relational aspects were observed and analysed throughout the period focusing on changes in health behaviour. The most salient findings showed supportive relationships expressed as group cohesion, exchange of narratives of illness and of disorder-specific aspects. Individual relationships between the participants were important for changes in behaviour, especially those generating feedback from the other participants and reducing social isolation. The results were most encouraging in the group that had initial counselling sessions before the physical intervention. It can be concluded that group counselling sessions focusing on supportive relationships followed by high-intensity aerobic training have beneficial effects on wellbeing, health and exercise behaviour.

  13. Providing mentorship support to general surgery residents: a model for structured group facilitation

    PubMed Central

    Champion, Caitlin; Bennett, Sean; Carver, David; El Tawil, Karim; Fabbro, Sarah; Howatt, Neil; Noei, Farahnaz; Rae, Rachel; Haggar, Fatima; Arnaout, Angel

    2015-01-01

    Summary Mentorship is foundational to surgical training, with recognized benefits for both mentees and mentors. The University of Ottawa General Surgery Mentorship Program was developed as a module-based group facilitation program to support inclusive personal and professional development of junior general surgery residents. The group format provided an opportunity for both vertical and horizontal mentorship relationships between staff mentors and resident mentees. Perceived benefits of program participants were evaluated at the conclusion of the first year of the program. The program was well-received by staff and resident participants and may provide a time-efficient and inclusive mentorship structure with the additional benefit of peer support. We review the development and implementation of the program to date and share our mentorship experience to encourage the growth of formal mentorship opportunities within general surgery training programs. PMID:26424687

  14. Facing the times: A young onset dementia support group: Facebook™ style.

    PubMed

    Craig, Denise; Strivens, Edward

    2016-03-01

    Young onset dementia accounts for up to 1 in 10 dementia diagnoses. Those diagnosed face premature transition into the realm of aged care services and adjustment to an illness of ageing prior to age 65. To help elicit communication of the perceived psychosocial needs of this group, provide a platform to gain peer support and advocate for increased awareness, the Young Onset Dementia Support Group was established on the social networking site, Facebook™ . Followers post comments, read educational or otherwise interesting news feeds, share inspirational quotes and access others living with dementia worldwide. Facebook provides a means of rapid global reach in a way that allows people with dementia to increase their communications and potentially reduce isolation. This paper was authored by the page administrators. We aim to highlight the promising utility of a social network platform just entering its stride amongst health communication initiatives.

  15. Empathic Exchanges in Online Cancer Support Groups: Distinguishing Message Expression and Reception Effects

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jeong Yeob; Shah, Dhavan V.; Kim, Eunkyung; Namkoong, Kang; Lee, Sun-Young; Moon, Tae Joon; Cleland, Rich; Bu, Q. Lisa; McTavish, Fiona M.; Gustafson, David H.

    2013-01-01

    Past studies on the efficacy of participation in online cancer support groups have primarily focused on the role of expression in the accrual of health benefits for participants. Unfortunately, few steps have been taken to determine whether this observed effect arises solely from the internal mental processes underlying the act of expressing or, perhaps, owes something to a nuanced, multidimensional understanding of expression that includes reception of responses to what is expressed. To test for the multilayered effect, we attend to one of the key concepts in the online support community scholarship: empathy. Our findings suggest that it is a combination of empathy expression and reception that is crucial to attaining optimal benefits for cancer patients. Further, our finding supports the buffering hypothesis that empathic expression provides a salutary effect for patients who experienced a higher degree of concern associated with their cancer diagnosis and follow-up treatments. PMID:21318917

  16. Genomic data do not support comb jellies as the sister group to all other animals.

    PubMed

    Pisani, Davide; Pett, Walker; Dohrmann, Martin; Feuda, Roberto; Rota-Stabelli, Omar; Philippe, Hervé; Lartillot, Nicolas; Wörheide, Gert

    2015-12-15

    Understanding how complex traits, such as epithelia, nervous systems, muscles, or guts, originated depends on a well-supported hypothesis about the phylogenetic relationships among major animal lineages. Traditionally, sponges (Porifera) have been interpreted as the sister group to the remaining animals, a hypothesis consistent with the conventional view that the last common animal ancestor was relatively simple and more complex body plans arose later in evolution. However, this premise has recently been challenged by analyses of the genomes of comb jellies (Ctenophora), which, instead, found ctenophores as the sister group to the remaining animals (the "Ctenophora-sister" hypothesis). Because ctenophores are morphologically complex predators with true epithelia, nervous systems, muscles, and guts, this scenario implies these traits were either present in the last common ancestor of all animals and were lost secondarily in sponges and placozoans (Trichoplax) or, alternatively, evolved convergently in comb jellies. Here, we analyze representative datasets from recent studies supporting Ctenophora-sister, including genome-scale alignments of concatenated protein sequences, as well as a genomic gene content dataset. We found no support for Ctenophora-sister and conclude it is an artifact resulting from inadequate methodology, especially the use of simplistic evolutionary models and inappropriate choice of species to root the metazoan tree. Our results reinforce a traditional scenario for the evolution of complexity in animals, and indicate that inferences about the evolution of Metazoa based on the Ctenophora-sister hypothesis are not supported by the currently available data.

  17. Genomic data do not support comb jellies as the sister group to all other animals

    PubMed Central

    Pisani, Davide; Pett, Walker; Dohrmann, Martin; Feuda, Roberto; Rota-Stabelli, Omar; Philippe, Hervé; Lartillot, Nicolas; Wörheide, Gert

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how complex traits, such as epithelia, nervous systems, muscles, or guts, originated depends on a well-supported hypothesis about the phylogenetic relationships among major animal lineages. Traditionally, sponges (Porifera) have been interpreted as the sister group to the remaining animals, a hypothesis consistent with the conventional view that the last common animal ancestor was relatively simple and more complex body plans arose later in evolution. However, this premise has recently been challenged by analyses of the genomes of comb jellies (Ctenophora), which, instead, found ctenophores as the sister group to the remaining animals (the “Ctenophora-sister” hypothesis). Because ctenophores are morphologically complex predators with true epithelia, nervous systems, muscles, and guts, this scenario implies these traits were either present in the last common ancestor of all animals and were lost secondarily in sponges and placozoans (Trichoplax) or, alternatively, evolved convergently in comb jellies. Here, we analyze representative datasets from recent studies supporting Ctenophora-sister, including genome-scale alignments of concatenated protein sequences, as well as a genomic gene content dataset. We found no support for Ctenophora-sister and conclude it is an artifact resulting from inadequate methodology, especially the use of simplistic evolutionary models and inappropriate choice of species to root the metazoan tree. Our results reinforce a traditional scenario for the evolution of complexity in animals, and indicate that inferences about the evolution of Metazoa based on the Ctenophora-sister hypothesis are not supported by the currently available data. PMID:26621703

  18. Human action recognition with group lasso regularized-support vector machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Huiwu; Lu, Huanzhang; Wu, Yabei; Zhao, Fei

    2016-05-01

    The bag-of-visual-words (BOVW) and Fisher kernel are two popular models in human action recognition, and support vector machine (SVM) is the most commonly used classifier for the two models. We show two kinds of group structures in the feature representation constructed by BOVW and Fisher kernel, respectively, since the structural information of feature representation can be seen as a prior for the classifier and can improve the performance of the classifier, which has been verified in several areas. However, the standard SVM employs L2-norm regularization in its learning procedure, which penalizes each variable individually and cannot express the structural information of feature representation. We replace the L2-norm regularization with group lasso regularization in standard SVM, and a group lasso regularized-support vector machine (GLRSVM) is proposed. Then, we embed the group structural information of feature representation into GLRSVM. Finally, we introduce an algorithm to solve the optimization problem of GLRSVM by alternating directions method of multipliers. The experiments evaluated on KTH, YouTube, and Hollywood2 datasets show that our method achieves promising results and improves the state-of-the-art methods on KTH and YouTube datasets.

  19. A comparative study of uses of the Internet among college students with and without Internet addiction.

    PubMed

    Kesici, Sahin; Sahin, Ismail

    2009-12-01

    The current study examined uses of the Internet among college students classified as addicted to the Internet or not. Data were gathered from 384 college students. Students classified as Internet Addicted used the Internet more for social functions, leisure functions, and virtual emotional functions, when compared to students considered as Internet Nonaddicted. Effect sizes were large, indicating important group differences in uses of the Internet.

  20. Health-Related Quality of Life Among Cancer Survivors Attending Support Groups

    PubMed Central

    Castañeda, Sheila F.; Gonzalez, Patricia; Rodríguez, Bárbara; Buelna, Christina; West, Demy; Talavera, Gregory A.

    2014-01-01

    There is limited research on the relationship between Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and socioeconomic status (SES) among long-term cancer survivors. The goal of this study was to assess Global HRQoL among 102 adult cancer survivors attending support groups in San Diego County and to examine differences by SES and acculturation. Community-based participatory research methods were followed to recruit a purposive sample of English and Spanish-speaking adult cancer survivors attending cancer support groups. Self-report questionnaires assessing age, acculturation (i.e., language), SES (i.e., income and education), cancer history, and Global HRQoL measured by the FACT-G were administered. Multivariate regression examined the relationship between SES and acculturation with HRQoL, adjusting for covariates. Participants were 58.8 years on average (SD=10.06) and varied in terms of SES. Most participants (91.5 %) were women, 51.7 % were non-Hispanic white, and 48.3 % were Hispanic/Latino. Global HRQoL scores in the study sample were lower compared to previously reported studies. After adjusting for covariates, SES and acculturation were not significantly related to HRQoL. Stage at diagnosis was significantly related to HRQoL measures in adjusted analyses. HRQoL did not vary by SES or acculturation. There is a need to increase access to linguistically and culturally appropriate cancer care and supportive care services. Future studies may find existing support group settings useful for targeting psychosocial issues for more advanced stage cancer survivors. PMID:25066251

  1. Health-Related Quality of Life Among Cancer Survivors Attending Support Groups.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, Elizabeth A; Castañeda, Sheila F; Gonzalez, Patricia; Rodríguez, Bárbara; Buelna, Christina; West, Demy; Talavera, Gregory A

    2015-09-01

    There is limited research on the relationship between Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and socioeconomic status (SES) among long-term cancer survivors. The goal of this study was to assess Global HRQoL among 102 adult cancer survivors attending support groups in San Diego County and to examine differences by SES and acculturation. Community-based participatory research methods were followed to recruit a purposive sample of English and Spanish-speaking adult cancer survivors attending cancer support groups. Self-report questionnaires assessing age, acculturation (i.e., language), SES (i.e., income and education), cancer history, and Global HRQoL measured by the FACT-G were administered. Multivariate regression examined the relationship between SES and acculturation with HRQoL, adjusting for covariates. Participants were 58.8 years on average (SD = 10.06) and varied in terms of SES. Most participants (91.5 %) were women, 51.7 % were non-Hispanic white, and 48.3 % were Hispanic/Latino. Global HRQoL scores in the study sample were lower compared to previously reported studies. After adjusting for covariates, SES and acculturation were not significantly related to HRQoL. Stage at diagnosis was significantly related to HRQoL measures in adjusted analyses. HRQoL did not vary by SES or acculturation. There is a need to increase access to linguistically and culturally appropriate cancer care and supportive care services. Future studies may find existing support group settings useful for targeting psychosocial issues for more advanced stage cancer survivors.

  2. Older Adults' Knowledge of Internet Hazards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grimes, Galen A.; Hough, Michelle G.; Mazur, Elizabeth; Signorella, Margaret L.

    2010-01-01

    Older adults are less likely to be using computers and less knowledgeable about Internet security than are younger users. The two groups do not differ on trust of Internet information. The younger group shows no age or gender differences. Within the older group, computer users are more trusting of Internet information, and along with those with…

  3. Internet-based video-group delivery of Healthy Relationships--a "prevention with positives" intervention: report on a single group pilot test among women living with HIV.

    PubMed

    Marhefka, Stephanie L; Iziduh, Sharon; Fuhrmann, Hollie J; Lopez, Bernice; Glueckauf, Robert; Lynn, Vickie; Baldwin, Julie

    2013-01-01

    Women living with HIV (WLH) face challenges related to stigma, disclosure of HIV status, and negotiating safer sex. Several effective behavioral interventions, such as Healthy Relationships (HR), help WLH address these challenges and are disseminated by the USA Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) Diffusion of Effective Behavioral Interventions project. However, many WLH living in poor urban or rural locations cannot access interventions such as HR because implementation is not feasible. Video-conferencing technology holds promise for expanding access to effective behavioral interventions for WLH. Following a systematic adaptation to the video-conferencing format, this pilot study tested the delivery of HR via video-group (VG) among WLH. The video-conferencing-based intervention, HR-VG, consisted of six, two-hour sessions led by two facilitators, and used structured activities and video-clips to build disclosure and safer sex skills. Four minority WLH received HR-VG at four different community-based intervention sites in a private room equipped with a video-phone for participating in HR-VG and a desktop computer for completing assessments via Audio Computer-Assisted Self Interview. Participants completed a baseline assessment prior to HR-VG and post-session assessment after each HR-VG session. The post-intervention assessment and video-focus group were completed following the last HR-VG session. Facilitators completed an assessment after each HR-VG session and an open-ended questionnaire following HR-VG. HR-VG was implemented in its entirety with minimal challenges. Both participants and facilitators reported feeling either "very comfortable" or "completely comfortable" with the technology and the overall intervention. Participants also reported high levels of unity and togetherness among the group. These preliminary findings suggest VG delivery of HR for WLH is both feasible and highly valued by participants. A follow-up randomized controlled trial

  4. Phylogenomic Analyses of Echinodermata Support the Sister Groups of Asterozoa and Echinozoa

    PubMed Central

    Reich, Adrian; Dunn, Casey; Akasaka, Koji; Wessel, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Echinoderms (sea urchins, sea stars, brittle stars, sea lilies and sea cucumbers) are a group of diverse organisms, second in number within deuterostome species to only the chordates. Echinoderms serve as excellent model systems for developmental biology due to their diverse developmental mechanisms, tractable laboratory use, and close phylogenetic distance to chordates. In addition, echinoderms are very well represented in the fossil record, including some larval features, making echinoderms a valuable system for studying evolutionary development. The internal relationships of Echinodermata have not been consistently supported across phylogenetic analyses, however, and this has hindered the study of other aspects of their biology. In order to test echinoderm phylogenetic relationships, we sequenced 23 de novo transcriptomes from all five clades of echinoderms. Using multiple phylogenetic methods at a variety of sampling depths we have constructed a well-supported phylogenetic tree of Echinodermata, including support for the sister groups of Asterozoa (sea stars and brittle stars) and Echinozoa (sea urchins and sea cucumbers). These results will help inform developmental and evolutionary studies specifically in echinoderms and deuterostomes in general. PMID:25794146

  5. Phylogenomic analyses of Echinodermata support the sister groups of Asterozoa and Echinozoa.

    PubMed

    Reich, Adrian; Dunn, Casey; Akasaka, Koji; Wessel, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Echinoderms (sea urchins, sea stars, brittle stars, sea lilies and sea cucumbers) are a group of diverse organisms, second in number within deuterostome species to only the chordates. Echinoderms serve as excellent model systems for developmental biology due to their diverse developmental mechanisms, tractable laboratory use, and close phylogenetic distance to chordates. In addition, echinoderms are very well represented in the fossil record, including some larval features, making echinoderms a valuable system for studying evolutionary development. The internal relationships of Echinodermata have not been consistently supported across phylogenetic analyses, however, and this has hindered the study of other aspects of their biology. In order to test echinoderm phylogenetic relationships, we sequenced 23 de novo transcriptomes from all five clades of echinoderms. Using multiple phylogenetic methods at a variety of sampling depths we have constructed a well-supported phylogenetic tree of Echinodermata, including support for the sister groups of Asterozoa (sea stars and brittle stars) and Echinozoa (sea urchins and sea cucumbers). These results will help inform developmental and evolutionary studies specifically in echinoderms and deuterostomes in general.

  6. Polymer-supported organotin reagent for prosthetic group labeling of biological macromolecules with radioiodine.

    PubMed

    Gifford, Andrew N; Kuschel, Sonja; Shea, Colleen; Fowler, Joanna S

    2011-03-16

    In this study, we investigated the use of poly-mer-bound precursor for generating a radiolabeled prosthetic group to be used for conjugate labeling of biological macromolecules. For the approach, a trialkyltin chloride in which the tin was bound to a hydrophilic PEG-based resin support via one of the alkyl groups was synthesized. This resin was then used to prepare a resin-bound trialkyltin benzoic acid, which in some cases was further derivatized on-resin by converting it to a succinimidyl ester. Exposure of the resin-bound compounds to electrophilic radioiodine (¹²⁵I) in either an aqueous or methanol solvent liberated either free radiolabeled [¹²⁵I]iodobenzoic acid or its succinimidyl ester without co-release of the resin-bound precursors. Radiochemical yield was between 35% and 75%, depending on the solvent system and precursor. As example applications for the released compounds, the amine-reactive N-succinimidyl-[¹²⁵I]iodobenzoate prosthetic group was used for conjugate radiolabeling of a peptide, tomato plant systemin, and two proteins, albumin and IgG antibody. These results demonstrate that resin-bound organotin precursors in which the compound to be labeled is tethered to the support via the tin group to be substituted can be used to produce radioiodine-labeled aromatic prosthetic groups in good specific activity without the need for HPLC purification. This solid-phase approach is potentially adaptable to kit-formulation for performing conjugate radiolabeling of biological macromolecules.

  7. Peer-support writing group in a community family medicine teaching unit

    PubMed Central

    Al-Imari, Lina; Yang, Jaisy; Pimlott, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Problem addressed Aspiring physician writers need an environment that promotes self-reflection and can help them improve their skills and confidence in writing. Objective of program To create a peer-support writing group for physicians in the Markham-Stouffville community in Ontario to promote professional development by encouraging self-reflection and fostering the concept of physician as writer. Program description The program, designed based on a literature review and a needs assessment, was conducted in 3 sessions over 6 months. Participants included an emergency physician, 4 family physicians, and 3 residents. Four to 8 participants per session shared their projects with guest physician authors. Eight pieces of written work were brought to the sessions, 3 of which were edited. A mixed quantitative and qualitative evaluation model was used with preprogram and postprogram questionnaires and a focus group. Conclusion This program promoted professional development by increasing participants’ frequency of self-reflection and improving their proficiency in writing. Successful elements of this program include creating a supportive group environment and having a physician-writer expert facilitate the peer-feedback sessions. Similar programs can be useful in postgraduate education or continuing professional development. PMID:27965348

  8. The Community-based Organizations Working Group of the Space Science Education Support Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, J. H.; Lowes, L. L.; Asplund, S.

    2004-12-01

    The NASA Space Science Support Network Community-based Organizations Working Group (CBOWG) has been working for the past two years on issues surrounding afterschool programs and programs for youth (e.g., Girl Scouts, Boy Scouts, Boys and Girls Clubs, 4-H, summer camps, afterschool and weekend programs for various ages, programs with emphases on minority youth). In this session the co-leaders of the CBOWG will discuss the challenges of working with community-based organizations on a regional or national level. We will highlight some ties that we have forged with the National Institute for Out of School Time (NIOST) and the National Afterschool Association (NAA). We will also talk about efforts to coordinate how various entities within NASA cooperate with community-based organizations to serve the best interests of these groups. We will give a couple of examples of how NASA space science organizations have partnered with community-based organizations. The session will include some handouts of information and resources that the CBOWG has found useful in developing an understanding of this segment of informal education groups. We would like to thank NASA for providing resources to support the work of the CBOWG.

  9. Social networking in online support groups for health: how online social networking benefits patients.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jae Eun

    2014-01-01

    An increasing number of online support groups (OSGs) have embraced the features of social networking. So far, little is known about how patients use and benefit from these features. By implementing the uses-and-gratifications framework, the author conducted an online survey with current users of OSGs to examine associations among motivation, use of specific features of OSG, and support outcomes. Findings suggest that OSG users make selective use of varied features depending on their needs, and that perceptions of receiving emotional and informational support are associated more with the use of some features than others. For example, those with strong motivation for social interaction use diverse features of OSG and make one-to-one connections with other users by friending. In contrast, those with strong motivation for information seeking limit their use primarily to discussion boards. Results also show that online social networking features, such as friending and sharing of personal stories on blogs, are helpful in satisfying the need for emotional support. The present study sheds light on online social networking features in the context of health-related OSGs and provides practical lessons on how to improve the capacity of OSGs to serve the needs of their users.

  10. Giving and receiving peer advice in an online breast cancer support group.

    PubMed

    Sillence, Elizabeth

    2013-06-01

    People have access to experiential information and advice about health online. The types of advice exchanged affect the nature of online communities and potentially patient decision making. The aim of this study was to examine the ways in which peers exchange advice within an online health forum in order to better understand online groups as a resource for decision making. Messages collected over a one-month period from an online breast cancer support forum were analyzed for examples of advice exchange. The majority of the messages solicited advice through problem disclosure or requests for information and opinion. A novel form of advice solicitation-"anyone in the same boat as me"-was noted as was the use of personal experience as a form of advice giving. Women construct their advice requests to target like-minded people. The implications in terms of decision making and support are discussed.

  11. The impact of size of cooperative group on achievement, social support, and self-esteem.

    PubMed

    Bertucci, Andrea; Conte, Stella; Johnson, David W; Johnson, Roger T

    2010-01-01

    The effect of cooperative learning in pairs and groups of 4 and in individualistic learning were compared on achievement, social support, and self-esteem. Sixty-two Italian 7th-grade students with no previous experience with cooperative learning were assigned to conditions on a stratified random basis controlling for ability, gender, and self-esteem. Students participated in 1 instructional unit for 90 min for 6 instructional days during a period of about 6 weeks. The results indicate that cooperative learning in pairs and 4s promoted higher achievement and greater academic support from peers than did individualistic learning. Students working in pairs developed a higher level of social self-esteem than did students learning in the other conditions.

  12. Parents, ADHD and the internet.

    PubMed

    Terbeck, Sylvia; Chesterman, L Paul

    2012-09-01

    The objective of this study is to examine the potential impact of using the internet on medical consultations by analysing the attitudes, attributions, and emotional responses of parents who have been informed by specialists that their child does not have attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and to examine the nature of the feedback they obtained from members of online internet support groups. Over 40,000 messages from the five most popular international internet forums discussing children with ADHD were analysed. Messages from parents who reported that they had seen at least one specialist (e.g. paediatrician, psychiatrist or psychologist) because of their concerns that their child had ADHD were identified. The children included boys and girls with an age range from 2 to 16 years. Of these, we analysed messages where the parents additionally reported that the specialist had excluded a diagnosis of ADHD. Using these criteria, 91 messages from parents who had consulted over 200 different specialists and 398 replies to these messages were identified for content analysis. The replies to concerned parents were analysed to determine whether they were offered impartial advice. A majority of the parents reported that they did not believe the specialist and were unhappy about their child not being diagnosed with ADHD. They expressed dissatisfaction with the professional's opinions and the implication that their child's conduct was caused by their poor parenting skills. Importantly, 87.6 % of the responses that these parents received, from other members of online forums, reinforced the parent's negative attitude towards the professional's judgement. It was generally suggested that the parents should not believe the expert and should seek a further opinion. The use of the internet may encourage "doctor shopping" and mistrust in health services. Medical professionals and others may need to be aware of this, and parents may need more support than is generally

  13. Informal and Formal Support Groups Retain Women and Minorities in Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, Maria

    2005-10-01

    Ten U.S. minority female undergraduates who aspire to become physicists were followed over an 8-year period. Participant observation and in-depth interviews recorded the strategies they used to earn bachelor's degrees in physics or physics-related fields, and then go on to graduate school and/or careers in science. One significant strategy these women of color employed was participating in small subcommunities with other women or underrepresented ethnic minorities at the margins of their local physics community. The study found that informal peer groups offered safe spaces to counter negative experiences, to normalize their social realities, and to offer practical guidance for persevering in the field. Formal women- and minority-serving programs in physics provided foundations for community building, stronger curriculum and instruction, networking, and role models. The positive effects of informal and formal support groups on these students' experiences challenge a standard application of Pierre Bourdieu's framework of social and cultural capital. Women of color in the study initially lacked traditional capital of "acceptable" appearance, cultural background and habits, and networks that are more easily acquired by white males and are rewarded by the U.S. physics culture. However, instead of failing or leaving, as Bourdieu's theory would predict, the minority women persisted and achieved in science. The marginal communities contributed to their retention by offering safe spaces in which they could learn and share alternative ways of "accruing capital." Moreover, as these women made strides along their academic and career paths, they also engaged in social justice work in efforts to change the physics culture to be more welcoming of nontraditional members. The outcomes of the study offer empirical confirmation of the critical need for informal and institutionally supported women's and minorities' support groups to promote diversity in science.

  14. Internet Based Remote Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, James

    1999-01-01

    This is the Final Report for the Internet Based Remote Operations Contract, has performed payload operations research support tasks March 1999 through September 1999. These tasks support the GSD goal of developing a secure, inexpensive data, voice, and video mission communications capability between remote payload investigators and the NASA payload operations team in the International Space Station (ISS) era. AZTek has provided feedback from the NASA payload community by utilizing its extensive payload development and operations experience to test and evaluate remote payload operations systems. AZTek has focused on use of the "public Internet" and inexpensive, Commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) Internet-based tools that would most benefit "small" (e.g., $2 Million or less) payloads and small developers without permanent remote operations facilities. Such projects have limited budgets to support installation and development of high-speed dedicated communications links and high-end, custom ground support equipment and software. The primary conclusions of the study are as follows: (1) The trend of using Internet technology for "live" collaborative applications such as telescience will continue. The GSD-developed data and voice capabilities continued to work well over the "public" Internet during this period. 2. Transmitting multiple voice streams from a voice-conferencing server to a client PC to be mixed and played on the PC is feasible. 3. There are two classes of voice vendors in the market: - Large traditional phone equipment vendors pursuing integration of PSTN with Internet, and Small Internet startups.The key to selecting a vendor will be to find a company sufficiently large and established to provide a base voice-conferencing software product line for the next several years.

  15. Internet access to ionosondes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galkin, I. A.; Kitrosser, D. F.; Kecic, Z.; Reinisch, B. W.

    1999-01-01

    Connecting ionosondes to the Internet gives easy access to real-time information on ionospheric conditions. Some of the ionosonde sites provide just the ionogram displays, others give in addition the scaled ionospheric characteristics directly usable for frequency management and HF channel assessment. Some sounders also store days or months of station data, which makes it possible remotely to evaluate the time history of geophysical events. The Internet link is also a convenient means for remote system maintenance and control. The paper addresses various aspects of the Internet ionosonde scenario, including data base support, WWW publishing, user interface, security, and data format. A list of Internet accessible ionosonde stations is provided with a brief description.

  16. Physician and consumer attitudes and behaviors regarding self-help health support groups as an adjunct to traditional medical care.

    PubMed

    Fridinger, F; Goodwin, G; Chng, C L

    1992-01-01

    This study assessed the creditability of self-help health support groups as an adjunct to traditional medical care among a sampling of physicians (N = 120) and group members (N = 73) located in the Dallas/Ft. Worth Metropolitan area. Findings suggest a general lack of awareness of local groups among physicians, referral to only a few select groups, as well as little communication between health care professionals and their patients. Physicians in group practice, surgical specialties, and having never referred patients to support groups responded less favorably. Several benefits were reported by the group members, although for a majority their patient-physician relationship remained relatively unchanged.

  17. The role of illness factors and patient satisfaction in using online health support groups.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yinjiao

    2014-01-01

    Drawing on the behavioral model of health services use and the PRECEDE-PROCEED model, this research explores various correlates of participation in online health support groups based on the 2007 Health Information National Trend Survey data. Results show that controlling for demographics, emotional health and family cancer history were significant correlates, whereas perceived general health status approached statistical significance, and personal cancer history and cancer worry were not significant. Moreover, patient-provider communication satisfaction approached statistical significance, and patient satisfaction with received health care was not statistically significant. Theoretical and practical implications of these results are discussed.

  18. Addendum to Air Quality: Decision Support Tools, Partner Plans, Working Groups, Committees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holekamp, Kara; Frisbie, Troy; Estep, Lee

    2005-01-01

    In the original report dated February 11, 2005, the utility of the NASA Earth science data in the air quality activities of other agencies and organizations was assessed by reviewing strategic and mission plans and by conducting personal interviews with agency experts to identify and investigate agencies with the potential for partnership with NASA. The overarching agency strategic plans were reviewed and commonalities such as the desire for partnerships and technology development were noted. The addendum to the original report contains such information about the Tennessee Valley Authority and will be inserted in Section 2.6 of "Air Quality Decision Support Tools, Partner Plans, Working Groups, Committees".

  19. Addendum to Air Quality: Decision Support Tools, Partner Plans, Working Groups, Committees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holekamp, Kara; Frisbie, Troy; Estep, Lee

    2005-01-01

    In the original report dated February 11, 2005, the utility of NASA Earth science data in the air quality activities of other agencies and organizations was assessed by reviewing strategic and mission plans and by conducting personal interviews with agency experts to identify and investigate agencies with the potential for partnership with NASA. The overarching agency strategic plans were reviewed and commonalities such as the desire for partnerships and technology development were noted. This addendum to the original report contains such information about the Tennessee Valley Authority and will be inserted as Section 2.6 of "Air Quality: Decision Support Tools, Partner Plans, Working Groups, Committees."

  20. Internet addiction in young people.

    PubMed

    Ong, Say How; Tan, Yi Ren

    2014-07-01

    In our technology-savvy population, mental health professionals are seeing an increasing trend of excessive Internet use or Internet addiction. Researchers in China, Taiwan and Korea have done extensive research in the field of Internet addiction. Screening instruments are available to identify the presence of Internet addiction and its extent. Internet addiction is frequently associated with mental illnesses such as anxiety, depression, conduct disorder and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Treatment modalities include individual and group therapies, cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), family therapy and psychotropic medications. A significant proportion of Singapore adolescents engaging in excessive Internet use are also diagnosed to have concomitant Internet addiction. Despite the presence of a variety of treatment options, future research in this area is needed to address its growing trend and to minimise its negative psychological and social impact on the individuals and their families.

  1. Ericksonian hypnosis in chronic care support groups: a Rogerian exploration of power and self-defined health-promoting goals.

    PubMed

    Larkin, Dorothy M

    2007-10-01

    This Rogerian study examined how traditional and Ericksonian hypnotherapeutic support groups facilitated self-defined health-promoting goals and power as knowing participation in change for 49 participants with chronic physical illness. The participants were randomly assigned to either a traditional support group or an Ericksonian hypnotherapeutic support group. Measurements of power and self-defined health-promoting goals were obtained seven times over a 10-week period. The results indicated that both the traditional support groups and the Ericksonian hypnotherapeutic support groups experienced significantly enhanced power and progressed significantly toward their health-promoting goals. Correlations for the self-defined health-promoting goals and power progressively and significantly increased through time. This study supports Barrett's claim that power relates to health.

  2. Hydrodeoxygenation of vicinal OH groups over heterogeneous rhenium catalyst promoted by palladium and ceria support.

    PubMed

    Ota, Nobuhiko; Tamura, Masazumi; Nakagawa, Yoshinao; Okumura, Kazu; Tomishige, Keiichi

    2015-02-02

    Heterogeneous ReOx-Pd/CeO2 catalyst showed excellent performance for simultaneous hydrodeoxygenation of vicinal OH groups. High yield (>99%), turnover frequency (300 h(-1)), and turnover number (10,000) are achieved in the reaction of 1,4-anhydroerythritol to tetrahydrofuran. This catalyst can be applied to sugar alcohols, and mono-alcohols and diols are obtained in high yields (≥85%) from substrates with even and odd numbers of OH groups, respectively. The high catalytic performance of ReOx-Pd/CeO2 can be assigned to rhenium species with +4 or +5 valence state, and the formation of this species is promoted by H2/Pd and the ceria support.

  3. Establishing a group of endpoints to support collective operations without specifying unique identifiers for any endpoints

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles J.; Blocksom, Michael A.; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian E.; Xue, Hanghon

    2016-02-02

    A parallel computer executes a number of tasks, each task includes a number of endpoints and the endpoints are configured to support collective operations. In such a parallel computer, establishing a group of endpoints receiving a user specification of a set of endpoints included in a global collection of endpoints, where the user specification defines the set in accordance with a predefined virtual representation of the endpoints, the predefined virtual representation is a data structure setting forth an organization of tasks and endpoints included in the global collection of endpoints and the user specification defines the set of endpoints without a user specification of a particular endpoint; and defining a group of endpoints in dependence upon the predefined virtual representation of the endpoints and the user specification.

  4. The genesis of 'the Neophytes': a writing support group for clinical nurses.

    PubMed

    Stone, Teresa; Levett-Jones, Tracy; Harris, Margaret; Sinclair, Peter M

    2010-10-01

    This paper profiles the establishment and evaluation of the Neophyte Writers' Group, run by nurse academics in collaboration with clinical nurses. The growing demand for nurses to write, publish and present their work had inspired the introduction of a series of workshops designed to develop and improve writing and presentation skills, which eventuated in formation of the Neophytes. The group was founded on the basis of Bandura's theory of self-efficacy (1997), a concept which has been discussed extensively in social psychology literature to explain motivation and learning theory. People with high assurance in their capabilities regard difficult tasks as challenges to be mastered rather than as threats to be avoided (Bandura, 1994). The Neophytes' group employs a collaborative approach intended to increase and reinforce members' self-confidence; the underlying philosophy is to promote and enhance writers' motivation, capacity and self-efficacy in order to achieve future publication goals confidently and independently. Support which engenders these strengths through a program relevant to participants' needs is likely, as this group found, to increase publication productivity. Additional unexpected outcomes resulted, such as engagement by clinical nurses' in academic work, and an increase in research higher degree enrolments.

  5. Social Support in a Virtual Community: Analysis of a Clinic-Affiliated Online Support Group for Persons Living with HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Flickinger, Tabor E; DeBolt, Claire; Waldman, Ava Lena; Reynolds, George; Cohn, Wendy F; Beach, Mary Catherine; Ingersoll, Karen; Dillingham, Rebecca

    2016-10-21

    Social support can improve outcomes for people living with HIV (PLWH) and could be provided through online support groups. The Positive Links smartphone app is a multicomponent intervention that allows users to interact in a clinic-affiliated anonymous online support group. We investigated how social support was exchanged in a group of 55 participants over 8 months, using an adaptation of the Social Support Behavior Code. Participant interviews assessed their experiences and perceptions of the app. Of 840 posts analyzed, 115 (14 %) were coded as eliciting social support and 433 (52 %) as providing social support. Messages providing support were predominantly emotional (41 %), followed by network (27 %), esteem (24 %), informational (18 %), and instrumental (2 %) support. Participants perceived connection and support as key benefits of the app. Technical issues and interpersonal barriers limited some participants in fully using the app. Mobile technology offers a useful tool to reach populations with barriers to in-person support and may improve care for PLWH.

  6. The Use of Applications in Distance Education Specialization Course as a Support Tool for Students Living in Remote Areas Without Internet.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Ana Emília F; França, Rômulo M; Castro Júnior, Eurides F; Baesse, Deborah C L; Maia, Mariana F L; Ferreira, Elza B

    2015-01-01

    The world is experiencing the popularization of mobile devices. This was made possible by the increasing technological advances and the advent of the Internet as a communication and information tool. These facts demonstrate that the development of applications compatible with such devices is an effective way to provide content to diverse audiences. In the educational field, these devices can be seen as technological support artifacts for distance education, serving as strategy for continuous and permanent education for health professionals. The Open University of Brazilian National Health System (UNA-SUS) offers distance learning courses, including specializating on free access. In order to increase the public reach, UNA-SUS developed mobile applications as supporting material for students. These applications can be accessed in offline mode, increasing the accessibility and therefore, improving the efficiency of the material. The 28 applications developed with responsive online books format currently reached the milestone of over 6,000 downloads. This number shows the positive acceptance of the format used, accentuated by the ease of having material downloaded from the device, not requiring the user to be connected to access content.

  7. Internet International.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodard, Colin

    1995-01-01

    The unexpectedly rapid expansion of the Internet in Eastern and Central Europe is having a significant effect on institutions of higher education, still suffering from decades of isolation. The benefits include global access to information and cost-effective communications. A number of international efforts are under way to expand Internet access,…

  8. Internet Policy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-11-17

    activities. F. Responsibilities 1. The CIO shall: a. Approve, for the OIG, DoD, policies implementing laws and guidelines on Internet use . IGDINST 4630.2 3 b...Provide leadership to manage Internet use within the OIG, DoD. c. Authorize monitoring. d. Oversee the promulgation of policies and guidance to ensure

  9. All Aboard the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Descy, Don E.

    1993-01-01

    This introduction to the Internet with examples for Macintosh computer users demonstrates the ease of using e-mail, participating on discussion group listservs, logging in to remote sites using Telnet, and obtaining resources using the File Transfer Protocol (FTP). Included are lists of discussion groups, Telnet sites, and FTP Archive sites. (EA)

  10. Class-Wide Positive Behavior Support and Group Contingencies: Examining a Positive Variation of the Good Behavior Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Robert A.; McCurdy, Barry L.

    2012-01-01

    The Good Behavior Game (GBG) is a powerful group contingency with a history of documented empirical support. The purpose of this study was to compare two interdependent group contingencies, the GBG and a positive variation, the Caught Being Good Game (CBGG), in a school implementing school-wide positive behavior support. A kindergarten and…

  11. A Large and Consistent Phylogenomic Dataset Supports Sponges as the Sister Group to All Other Animals.

    PubMed

    Simion, Paul; Philippe, Hervé; Baurain, Denis; Jager, Muriel; Richter, Daniel J; Di Franco, Arnaud; Roure, Béatrice; Satoh, Nori; Quéinnec, Éric; Ereskovsky, Alexander; Lapébie, Pascal; Corre, Erwan; Delsuc, Frédéric; King, Nicole; Wörheide, Gert; Manuel, Michaël

    2017-04-03

    Resolving the early diversification of animal lineages has proven difficult, even using genome-scale datasets. Several phylogenomic studies have supported the classical scenario in which sponges (Porifera) are the sister group to all other animals ("Porifera-sister" hypothesis), consistent with a single origin of the gut, nerve cells, and muscle cells in the stem lineage of eumetazoans (bilaterians + ctenophores + cnidarians). In contrast, several other studies have recovered an alternative topology in which ctenophores are the sister group to all other animals (including sponges). The "Ctenophora-sister" hypothesis implies that eumetazoan-specific traits, such as neurons and muscle cells, either evolved once along the metazoan stem lineage and were then lost in sponges and placozoans or evolved at least twice independently in Ctenophora and in Cnidaria + Bilateria. Here, we report on our reconstruction of deep metazoan relationships using a 1,719-gene dataset with dense taxonomic sampling of non-bilaterian animals that was assembled using a semi-automated procedure, designed to reduce known error sources. Our dataset outperforms previous metazoan gene superalignments in terms of data quality and quantity. Analyses with a best-fitting site-heterogeneous evolutionary model provide strong statistical support for placing sponges as the sister-group to all other metazoans, with ctenophores emerging as the second-earliest branching animal lineage. Only those methodological settings that exacerbated long-branch attraction artifacts yielded Ctenophora-sister. These results show that methodological issues must be carefully addressed to tackle difficult phylogenetic questions and pave the road to a better understanding of how fundamental features of animal body plans have emerged.

  12. An Exploration of Closure as a Factor Influencing Group Member Satisfaction: Implications for Applications of Group Support Technology in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Small, Ruth V.; Venkatesh, Murali

    Research that identifies factors that facilitate information processing and enhance performance without reducing group confidence and decision satisfaction may influence future development of groupwork systems. This paper contains a review of the literature on cognitive and motivational issues in both group decision-making and learning contexts…

  13. Multicultural Resources on the Internet: An Introduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Trudi E.

    1995-01-01

    Explores the Internet system and Internet resources for particular culture groups. The author provides some Internet definitions as well as descriptions of available resources listed by cultural group including resources for African American, Chicano/Latino, Native American, Middle Eastern/Jewish/Islamic, and Asian American/Asian people. (GR)

  14. Restricted Gene Flow among Lineages of Thrips tabaci Supports Genetic Divergence Among Cryptic Species Groups

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Alana L.; Nault, Brian A.; Vargo, Edward L.; Kennedy, George G.

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the relative influence of population- versus species-level genetic variation is important to understand patterns of phenotypic variation and ecological relationships that exist among and within morphologically indistinguishable cryptic species and subspecies. In the case of cryptic species groups that are pests, such knowledge is also essential for devising effective population management strategies. The globally important crop pest Thrips tabaci is a taxonomically difficult group of putatively cryptic species. This study examines population genetic structure of T. tabaci and reproductive isolation among lineages of this species complex using microsatellite markers and mitochondrial COI sequences. Overall, genetic structure supports T. tabaci as a cryptic species complex, although limited interbreeding occurs between different clonal groups from the same lineage as well as between individuals from different lineages. These results also provide evidence that thelytoky and arrhenotoky are not fixed phenotypes among members of different T. tabaci lineages that have been generally associated with either reproductive mode. Possible biological and ecological factors contributing to these observations are discussed. PMID:27690317

  15. Pollutant Assessments Group Procedures Manual: Volume 1, Administrative and support procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    This manual describes procedures currently in use by the Pollutant Assessments Group. The manual is divided into two volumes: Volume 1 includes administrative and support procedures, and Volume 2 includes technical procedures. These procedures are revised in an ongoing process to incorporate new developments in hazardous waste assessment technology and changes in administrative policy. Format inconsistencies will be corrected in subsequent revisions of individual procedures. The purpose of the Pollutant Assessments Groups Procedures Manual is to provide a standardized set of procedures documenting in an auditable manner the activities performed by the Pollutant Assessments Group (PAG) of the Health and Safety Research Division (HASRD) of the Environmental Measurements and Applications Section (EMAS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The Procedures Manual ensures that the organizational, administrative, and technical activities of PAG conform properly to protocol outlined by funding organizations. This manual also ensures that the techniques and procedures used by PAG and other contractor personnel meet the requirements of applicable governmental, scientific, and industrial standards. The Procedures Manual is sufficiently comprehensive for use by PAG and contractor personnel in the planning, performance, and reporting of project activities and measurements. The Procedures Manual provides procedures for conducting field measurements and includes program planning, equipment operation, and quality assurance elements. Successive revisions of this manual will be archived in the PAG Document Control Department to facilitate tracking of the development of specific procedures.

  16. A Safety Net for the Internet: Protecting Our Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armagh, Daniel

    1998-01-01

    Addresses the need to educate children about the dangers of exchanges with strangers on the Internet. Discusses child pornography and exploitative "support groups"; chat room risks; the need for parents to protect their children; and cyberfilters. Suggests protective measures for parents. (AEF)

  17. Performance analysis of a concatenated erbium-doped fiber amplifier supporting four mode groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Zujun; Fan, Di; Zhang, Wentao; Xiong, Xianming

    2016-05-01

    An erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA) supporting four mode groups has been theoretically designed by concatenating two sections of erbium-doped fibers (EDFs). Each EDF has a simple erbium doping profile for the purpose of reducing its fabrication complexity. We propose a modified genetic algorithm (GA) to provide detailed investigations on the concatenated amplifier. Both the optimal fiber length and erbium doping radius in each EDF have been found to minimize the gain difference between signal modes. Results show that the parameters of the central-doped EDF have a greater impact on the amplifier performance compared to those of the annular-doped one. We then investigate the influence of the small deviations of the erbium fiber length, doping radius and doping concentration of each EDF from their optimal values upon the amplifier performance, and discuss their design tolerances in obtaining a desirable amplification characteristics.

  18. Steam dealkylation of aromatic hydrocarbons. II. Role of the support and kinetic pathway of oxygenated species in toluene steam dealkylation over group VIII metal catalysts. [Catalyst support comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Duprez, D.; Pereira, P.; Miloudi, A.; Maurel, R.

    1982-05-01

    The role of support in steam dealkylation (SDA) is studied on a series of Group VIII metal catalysts supported on alumina, silica, and titania. When possible turnover frequencies are given on the basis of the free metal fraction during the reaction, the values are generally constant with time-on-steam and represent the actual turnover frequency of the catalysts. Metals can be classified into two groups, namely, support-sensitive metals (Pt,Rh,Pd) and support-insensitive metals (Ni,Co,Ru and to a certain extent Ir). Support sensitivity is related to the oxidizability of the metallic surface. For metals of the first group, the reaction is probably governed by a noncompetitive mechanism in which the metal coverage by the oxygenated species is negligible. Kinetic derivation leads to a rate law where there is at once intervention of the support site concentration and of the specific perimeter of the metal/support interface. One can thus explain the support effect for this metal group and the slight sensitivity to the crystallite size observed in the Rh/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ series. For metals of the second group, a competitive mechanism probably takes place on the metal. Kinetic derivation leads to a rate law independent of the support site concentration and accounting for the slight negative order with respect to toluene as previously reported. The conspicuous parallelism between the selectivities of the various metals in SDA, in hydrodealkylation , and in hydrogenolysis is also discussed. In addition to the metal, the support and the crystallite size are determining factors of the selectivity to benzene in SDA.

  19. Role of patient-support groups in the Thailand transplant program.

    PubMed

    Luvira, U; Supaporn, T

    2004-09-01

    Thailand started kidney transplantation in 1972 when vascular and nonvascular transplant programs were first established. Presently, we have 27 kidney, 6 liver, and 6 intrathoracic private or governmental transplantation centers, all approved and members of the Organ Donation Centres Thai Red Cross Society (ODC). They also provide organ procurement teams to the ODC. The Thai Medical Council has issued and supervised the criterion of brain death and ethical rules of transplantation to all practicing physicians since 1989. All recipients must register at these selected transplantation centers and at the ODC. When the potential donor arrives from any hospital in Thailand, the donor hospital notifies the ODC and organ procurement teams are sent out to harvest organs and transfer them to the recipient transplantation centers. The ODC computerizes and shares organs according to ABO, HLA typing, and crossmatching results. After transplantation all patients register with the Thai Transplantation Society (TTS) and the ODC. The TTS, the Thai Transplant Coordinator Society, and the ODC are responsible for the education of surgeons, physicians, nurses, patients, the public, and mass media to improve our transplant program. Bone marrow transplantation has separate regulations. Pooled, nonrelated bone marrow donors are registered at the blood-bank of the Thai Red Cross Society to provide donors for bone marrow transplantation. Financially, government support recipients only if they are state enterprise workers or civil servants. Public fund support through the ODC for organ procurement and the Kidney Foundation of Thailand is available for kidney transplantation. The ODC and the transplantation centers are the main patient-support groups for transplant programs in Thailand.

  20. Disability and Family in the People's Republic of China: Implementation, Benefits, and Comparison of Two Mutual Support Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCabe, Helen; McCabe, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Background: The authors and 2 Chinese parents established 2 support groups in China. One group was for parents of children with autism, and the other was for young adults with either mental health issues or intellectual disability, and their parents. The purpose of this study was to examine the meaning and effectiveness of these groups from the…

  1. Internet Connections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindroth, Linda K.

    1996-01-01

    Lists Internet sites related to articles in this issue. Topics include a first-grade unit on voting, student-created theme binders, techniques for student motivation, and involving parents in the middle school. (KDFB)

  2. Features of Effective Medical Knowledge Resources to Support Point of Care Learning: A Focus Group Study

    PubMed Central

    Cook, David A.; Sorensen, Kristi J.; Hersh, William; Berger, Richard A.; Wilkinson, John M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Health care professionals access various information sources to quickly answer questions that arise in clinical practice. The features that favorably influence the selection and use of knowledge resources remain unclear. We sought to better understand how clinicians select among the various knowledge resources available to them, and from this to derive a model for an effective knowledge resource. Methods We conducted 11 focus groups at an academic medical center and outlying community sites. We included a purposive sample of 50 primary care and subspecialist internal medicine and family medicine physicians. We transcribed focus group discussions and analyzed these using a constant comparative approach to inductively identify features that influence the selection of knowledge resources. Results We identified nine features that influence users' selection of knowledge resources, namely efficiency (with sub-features of comprehensiveness, searchability, and brevity), integration with clinical workflow, credibility, user familiarity, capacity to identify a human expert, reflection of local care processes, optimization for the clinical question (e.g., diagnosis, treatment options, drug side effect), currency, and ability to support patient education. No single existing resource exemplifies all of these features. Conclusion The influential features identified in this study will inform the development of knowledge resources, and could serve as a framework for future research in this field. PMID:24282535

  3. Internet Technology on Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rash, James; Parise, Ron; Hogie, Keith; Criscuolo, Ed; Langston, Jim; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Operating Missions as Nodes on the Internet (OMNI) project has shown that Internet technology works in space missions through a demonstration using the UoSAT-12 spacecraft. An Internet Protocol (IP) stack was installed on the orbiting UoSAT-12 spacecraft and tests were run to demonstrate Internet connectivity and measure performance. This also forms the basis for demonstrating subsequent scenarios. This approach provides capabilities heretofore either too expensive or simply not feasible such as reconfiguration on orbit. The OMNI project recognized the need to reduce the risk perceived by mission managers and did this with a multi-phase strategy. In the initial phase, the concepts were implemented in a prototype system that includes space similar components communicating over the TDRS (space network) and the terrestrial Internet. The demonstration system includes a simulated spacecraft with sample instruments. Over 25 demonstrations have been given to mission and project managers, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Department of Defense (DoD), contractor technologists and other decisions makers, This initial phase reached a high point with an OMNI demonstration given from a booth at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) Inspection Day 99 exhibition. The proof to mission managers is provided during this second phase with year 2000 accomplishments: testing the use of Internet technologies onboard an actual spacecraft. This was done with a series of tests performed using the UoSAT-12 spacecraft. This spacecraft was reconfigured on orbit at very low cost. The total period between concept and the first tests was only 6 months! On board software was modified to add an IP stack to support basic IP communications. Also added was support for ping, traceroute and network timing protocol (NTP) tests. These tests show that basic Internet functionality can be used onboard spacecraft. The performance of data was measured to show no degradation from current

  4. AN INTERNET TOOL TO NORMALIZE GRIEF*

    PubMed Central

    DOMINICK, SALLY A.; IRVINE, A. BLAIR; BEAUCHAMP, NATASHA; SEELEY, JOHN R.; NOLEN-HOEKSEMA, SUSAN; DOKA, KENNETH J.; BONANNO, GEORGE A.

    2009-01-01

    This research evaluated the efficacy of a psycho-educational Internet self-help tool to educate and support recently (1–6 months) bereaved individuals. The goal of the website was to help users normalize their grief to enhance their adaptive adjustment. A randomized controlled trial evaluated the gains in social cognitive theory constructs and state anxiety. Compared to the control group (N = 34), treatment participants (N = 33) reported significant multivariate gains (eta-square = .191). Significant program effects were obtained on all three outcome measures: attitude (eta-square = .177), self-efficacy (eta-square = .106), and state anxiety (eta-square = .083). These findings suggest the potential efficacy of an Internet-based grief support tool to enhance adaptive adjustment of the bereaved. PMID:20039532

  5. Observations from practice: support group membership as a process of social capital formation among female survivors of domestic violence.

    PubMed

    Larance, Lisa Young; Porter, Maryann Lane

    2004-06-01

    This article explores the authors' practice observations of female domestic violence survivors' journey from first agency contact to active participation in a support group process. The authors have witnessed female victims of domestic violence challenging the social isolation imposed by their dominant partners as they search for meaning in their lives. As practitioners, they have observed women building trustful relationships and establishing supportive networks during the group process. In this article, the authors suggest that the support group process facilitates trust and network formation indicative of social capital.

  6. Facilitating Internet-Scale Code Retrieval

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bajracharya, Sushil Krishna

    2010-01-01

    Internet-Scale code retrieval deals with the representation, storage, and access of relevant source code from a large amount of source code available on the Internet. Internet-Scale code retrieval systems support common emerging practices among software developers related to finding and reusing source code. In this dissertation we focus on some…

  7. University Faculty Use of the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Yu-mei; Cohen, Arlene

    This exploratory study was designed to investigate the use of services available on the Internet by faculty in a public university in the United States. It examined the manner and frequency of faculty use of the Internet, their perception of the role of different Internet services in support of teaching and research, and the factors associated…

  8. Community ART Support Groups in Mozambique: The Potential of Patients as Partners in Care

    PubMed Central

    Malimane, Inacio; Samo Gudo, Paula; Decroo, Tom; Macome, Vania; Couto, Aleny

    2016-01-01

    Background High rates of attrition are stymying Mozambique’s national HIV Program’s efforts to achieve 80% treatment coverage. In response, Mozambique implemented a national pilot of Community Adherence and Support Groups (CASG). CASG is a model in which antiretroviral therapy (ART) patients form groups of up to six patients. On a rotating basis one CASG group member collects ART medications at the health facility for all group members, and distributes those medications to the other members in the community. Patients also visit their health facility bi-annually to receive clinical services. Methods A matched retrospective cohort study was implemented using routinely collected patient-level data in 68 health facilities with electronic data systems and CASG programs. A total of 129,938 adult ART patients were registered in those facilities. Of the 129,938 patients on ART, 6,760 were CASG members. A propensity score matched analysis was performed to assess differences in mortality and loss to follow-up (LTFU) between matched CASG and non-CASG members. Propensity scores were estimated using a random-effects logistic regression model. The following covariates where included in the model: sex, educational status, WHO stage, year of ART initiation, age, CASG eligibility, CD4 cell count category, weight, and employment status. Results Non-CASG participants had higher LTFU rates (HR 2.356; p = 0.04) than matched CASG participants; however, there were no significant mortality differences between CASG and non-CASG participants. Compared with the full cohort of non-CASG members, CASG members were more likely to be female (74% vs. 68%), tended to have a lower median CD4 counts at ART initiation (183 cells/m3 vs. 200cells/m3) and be less likely to have a secondary school education (15% vs. 23%). Conclusion ART patients enrolled in CASG were significantly less likely to be LTFU compared to matched patients who did not join CASG. CASG appears to be an effective strategy to

  9. Notes from the Field: Developing a Support Group for Older Lesbian and Gay Community Members Who Have Lost a Partner.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Anne K; Waters, Petra; Herrick, Christie D; Pelon, Sally

    2014-12-01

    While bereavement support groups have been shown to be helpful in assisting older adults with spousal loss, many lesbian and gay older adults would not be comfortable in these groups. Lack of recognition of same sex relationships and fear of judgment are barriers that some older lesbian and gay people face when considering these services. In this report we discuss a community-university collaboration to develop a support group for the older lesbian and gay community in our area. We share lessons we learned in developing and conducting a group for older lesbian and gay adults experiencing partner loss.

  10. When do high and low status group members support confrontation? The role of perceived pervasiveness of prejudice.

    PubMed

    Kahn, Kimberly Barsamian; Barreto, Manuela; Kaiser, Cheryl R; Rego, Marco Silva

    2016-03-01

    This paper examines how perceived pervasiveness of prejudice differentially affects high and low status group members' support for a low status group member who confronts. In Experiment 1 (N = 228), men and women read a text describing sexism as rare or as pervasive and subsequently indicated their support for a woman who confronted or did not confront a sexist remark. Experiment 2 (N = 324) specified the underlying process using a self-affirmation manipulation. Results show that men were more supportive of confrontation when sexism was perceived to be rare than when it was pervasive. By contrast, women tended to prefer confrontation when sexism was pervasive relative to when it was rare. Personal self-affirmation decreased men's and increased women's support for confrontation when prejudice was rare, suggesting that men's and women's support for confrontation when prejudice is rare is driven by personal impression management considerations. Implications for understanding how members of low and high status groups respond to prejudice are discussed.

  11. Measuring the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molyneux, Robert E.; Williams, Robert V.

    1999-01-01

    Examines the literature that measures characteristics of the Internet. Discusses: conclusions about the Internet measurement literature; definition of the Internet from a technical standpoint; history of Internet measurement; nature of the Internet data environment; Internet technical characteristics; information measurement and the Internet;…

  12. Immersion and the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birch, Gary; Matas, Cristina Poyatos

    1999-01-01

    Discusses a research project that aims to study the grammatical development of two groups of language immersion students, one that is participating in an Internet project involving collaboration with learners in France and Canada, and another that is exposed to the teaching of grammar that has been integrated with content area studies. (Author/VWL)

  13. Reading the Internet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McPherson, Keith

    2005-01-01

    Similar trends are occurring in schools. Lenhart, Simoin, and Graziano (2001) found that 94% of teens online use the Internet for school research projects, and according to the U.S. Department of Education (2004), "even students from low-income groups without access to technology at home seek and find it-using computers at schools, libraries, or…

  14. Xeroderma pigmentosum family support group: Helping families and promoting clinical initiatives.

    PubMed

    Milota, Michele; Jones, Debby Livingstone; Cleaver, James; Jamall, Ijaz S

    2011-07-15

    The past two decades of research into Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), an autosomal recessive disease, has been marked by significant progress in understanding the molecular basis of this rare disease. More importantly, especially from the perspective of the affected families, is that this knowledge has been applied to diagnose the condition both in utero as well as in the very early days of life. The eight known XP genes and their different phenotypes present a number of challenges that the XP Workshop sponsored by the NIH in 2010 has highlighted. There is little current treatment specifically designed for any of the XP types other than standard dermatological and neurological evaluations and care. The Xeroderma Pigmentosum Family Support Group (XPFSG) is dedicated to serving families with children and adults with all forms of XP and to help them better understand the condition, to identify practical measures which can be taken by the XP patients and their families to mitigate the effects of the disease, and to serve as patient advocates to help families discuss issues with their physicians. We summarize our efforts in terms of outreach within the US and abroad to affected families and discuss XPFSG-sponsored clinical initiatives that include molecular diagnoses, treatment, and initial proof-of-concept studies that can, if successful, improve the lives of XP patients in the near term.

  15. [Nutritional support groups at a hospital setting. Size, composition, relationships and actions].

    PubMed

    Santana Porbén, S; Barreto Penié, J

    2007-01-01

    The hospital Nutricional Support Group (NSG) represents the ultimate step in the evolution of the forms of provision of nutritional and feeding care to hospitalized patients. The NSG outdoes other preceeding forms for its harmony and cohesion among its members, the multi-, inter- and transdisciplinarity, the dedication to the activity on a full time basis, and the capability to self-finance by means of the savings derived from the implementation of a nutritional policy consistent with the Good Practices of Feeding and Nutrition. It is to be expected that the inception and operation of a NSG in a hospital environment allows the realization of the benefits embedded into the Metabolic, Nutritional and Feeding Intervention Programs. Guidelines and recommendations for the definition of the size and composition of an hospital NSG are presented in this article, along with the responsabilities, functions and tasks to be assumed by its members, and a timetable for its implementation, always from the experiencies of the authors after conducting a NSG in a tertiary-care hospital in Havana (Cuba).

  16. Support and intervention groups for adolescents with cancer in two Ontario communities.

    PubMed

    Barrera, Maru; Damore-Petingola, Sheila; Fleming, Carly; Mayer, Judy

    2006-10-01

    Adolescents who are treated for cancer must learn to negotiate challenging developmental tasks in the context of their treatment and adverse effects. Adverse affects of disease and treatment may prevent some of these adolescents from achieving full psychosocial development. Two programs developed independently to address the psychosocial and unique contextual needs of adolescents and young adults from different geographic regions in Ontario, Central urban and Northeastern rural, are described. The program in the urban area consists of eight 2-h sessions that combined structured creative activities and informal discussions of issues generated by adolescents; it includes a pre- post- intervention evaluation with standardized questionnaires. The Northeastern rural program consists of a monthly support open group that encourages sharing personal experiences and an annual expressive art retreat; both components include informal evaluation. Formal evaluation of these programs is in progress. Informal feedback from participants and parents suggest positive effects. These distinct and unique programs continue to evolve, as they address the unique psychosocial needs of adolescents and young adults in urban and rural areas.

  17. Effect of Support Group Intervention Applied to the Caregivers of Individuals With Heart Failure on Caregiver Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Barutcu, Canan Demir; Mert, Hatice

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of support group intervention applied to the caregivers of individuals with heart failure on caregiver outcomes. Quasi-experimental research was conducted with 69 caregivers as control (n = 35) and intervention (n = 34) groups in the cardiology outpatient clinic of a university hospital. The intervention group participated in support group meetings structured according to the Neuman Systems Model, and the data were collected from both the intervention and control groups before the intervention and 3 and 6 months later. Caregivers in the intervention group had significantly lower burden scores compared with the control group in all subdimensions except objective personal care, in terms of the group × time interaction in a statistical way (P < .05). Caregivers in the intervention and control groups had similar scores of depression symptoms (P > .05). The burden of caregivers in the intervention group showed a statistically significant decrease compared with the preintervention in all dimensions at 3 months. Thus, it is suggested to extend the support group interventions for caregivers of patients with heart failure and conduct these interventions in a longer period.

  18. Support and Control among "Friends" and "Special Friends": Peer Groups' Social Resources as Emotional and Moral Performances amidst Teenagers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korkiamaki, Riikka

    2011-01-01

    Children are often regarded as being supported and controlled by adults, rather than their peer groups. In contrast, drawing on research carried out in Finland, this article considers peers as a resource. Using mainly a 14-year-old's oral narratives, it is shown how the spatial and social context enables and inhibits children's mutual support and…

  19. Computer-Mediated Social Support, Older Adults, and Coping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Kevin

    2000-01-01

    Investigates social support for older adults in the computer-mediated environment. Finds that: satisfaction with Internet providers of social support was significantly higher for high Internet users than for low Internet users, whereas low Internet users were more satisfied with their non-Internet support networks than high Internet users; and…

  20. Internet Access to Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rash, James; Parise, Ron; Hogie, Keith; Criscuolo, Ed; Langston, Jim; Jackson, Chris; Price, Harold; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Operating Missions as Nodes on the Internet (OMNI) project at NASA's Goddard Space flight Center (GSFC), is demonstrating the use of standard Internet protocols for spacecraft communication systems. This year, demonstrations of Internet access to a flying spacecraft have been performed with the UoSAT-12 spacecraft owned and operated by Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd. (SSTL). Previously, demonstrations were performed using a ground satellite simulator and NASA's Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS). These activities are part of NASA's Space Operations Management Office (SOMO) Technology Program, The work is focused on defining the communication architecture for future NASA missions to support both NASA's "faster, better, cheaper" concept and to enable new types of collaborative science. The use of standard Internet communication technology for spacecraft simplifies design, supports initial integration and test across an IP based network, and enables direct communication between scientists and instruments as well as between different spacecraft, The most recent demonstrations consisted of uploading an Internet Protocol (IP) software stack to the UoSAT- 12 spacecraft, simple modifications to the SSTL ground station, and a series of tests to measure performance of various Internet applications. The spacecraft was reconfigured on orbit at very low cost. The total period between concept and the first tests was only 3 months. The tests included basic network connectivity (PING), automated clock synchronization (NTP), and reliable file transfers (FTP). Future tests are planned to include additional protocols such as Mobile IP, e-mail, and virtual private networks (VPN) to enable automated, operational spacecraft communication networks. The work performed and results of the initial phase of tests are summarized in this paper. This work is funded and directed by NASA/GSFC with technical leadership by CSC in arrangement with SSTL, and Vytek Wireless.

  1. The internet and social life.

    PubMed

    Bargh, John A; McKenna, Katelyn Y A

    2004-01-01

    The Internet is the latest in a series of technological breakthroughs in interpersonal communication, following the telegraph, telephone, radio, and television. It combines innovative features of its predecessors, such as bridging great distances and reaching a mass audience. However, the Internet has novel features as well, most critically the relative anonymity afforded to users and the provision of group venues in which to meet others with similar interests and values. We place the Internet in its historical context, and then examine the effects of Internet use on the user's psychological well-being, the formation and maintenance of personal relationships, group memberships and social identity, the workplace, and community involvement. The evidence suggests that while these effects are largely dependent on the particular goals that users bring to the interaction-such as self-expression, affiliation, or competition-they also interact in important ways with the unique qualities of the Internet communication situation.

  2. Mindfulness-Based Cancer Recovery (MBCR) versus Supportive Expressive Group Therapy (SET) for distressed breast cancer survivors: evaluating mindfulness and social support as mediators.

    PubMed

    Schellekens, Melanie P J; Tamagawa, Rie; Labelle, Laura E; Speca, Michael; Stephen, Joanne; Drysdale, Elaine; Sample, Sarah; Pickering, Barbara; Dirkse, Dale; Savage, Linette Lawlor; Carlson, Linda E

    2016-10-08

    Despite growing evidence in support of mindfulness as an underlying mechanism of mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs), it has been suggested that nonspecific therapeutic factors, such as the experience of social support, may contribute to the positive effects of MBIs. In the present study, we examined whether change in mindfulness and/or social support mediated the effect of Mindfulness-Based Cancer Recovery (MBCR) compared to another active intervention (i.e. Supportive Expressive Group Therapy (SET)), on change in mood disturbance, stress symptoms and quality of life. A secondary analysis was conducted of a multi-site randomized clinical trial investigating the impacts of MBCR and SET on distressed breast cancer survivors (MINDSET). We applied the causal steps approach with bootstrapping to test mediation, using pre- and post-intervention questionnaire data of the participants who were randomised to MBCR (n = 69) or SET (n = 70). MBCR participants improved significantly more on mood disturbance, stress symptoms and social support, but not on quality of life or mindfulness, compared to SET participants. Increased social support partially mediated the impact of MBCR versus SET on mood disturbance and stress symptoms. Because no group differences on mindfulness and quality of life were observed, no mediation analyses were performed on these variables. Findings showed that increased social support was related to more improvement in mood and stress after MBCR compared to support groups, whereas changes in mindfulness were not. This suggests a more important role for social support in enhancing outcomes in MBCR than previously thought.

  3. An Introduction to the Internet 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simco, Greg

    2000-01-01

    Describes the work of the University Corporation for Advanced Internet Development (UCAID) to create Internet 2, with high speed networks, quality applications, and group collaboration. Topics include the Internet 2 technologies; advanced applications; middleware; the advanced network initiative; and partnerships between the academic, corporate,…

  4. Predicting long-term outcome of Internet-delivered cognitive behavior therapy for social anxiety disorder using fMRI and support vector machine learning.

    PubMed

    Månsson, K N T; Frick, A; Boraxbekk, C-J; Marquand, A F; Williams, S C R; Carlbring, P; Andersson, G; Furmark, T

    2015-03-17

    Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) is an effective treatment for social anxiety disorder (SAD), but many patients do not respond sufficiently and a substantial proportion relapse after treatment has ended. Predicting an individual's long-term clinical response therefore remains an important challenge. This study aimed at assessing neural predictors of long-term treatment outcome in participants with SAD 1 year after completion of Internet-delivered CBT (iCBT). Twenty-six participants diagnosed with SAD underwent iCBT including attention bias modification for a total of 13 weeks. Support vector machines (SVMs), a supervised pattern recognition method allowing predictions at the individual level, were trained to separate long-term treatment responders from nonresponders based on blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) responses to self-referential criticism. The Clinical Global Impression-Improvement scale was the main instrument to determine treatment response at the 1-year follow-up. Results showed that the proportion of long-term responders was 52% (12/23). From multivariate BOLD responses in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) together with the amygdala, we were able to predict long-term response rate of iCBT with an accuracy of 92% (confidence interval 95% 73.2-97.6). This activation pattern was, however, not predictive of improvement in the continuous Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale-Self-report version. Follow-up psychophysiological interaction analyses revealed that lower dACC-amygdala coupling was associated with better long-term treatment response. Thus, BOLD response patterns in the fear-expressing dACC-amygdala regions were highly predictive of long-term treatment outcome of iCBT, and the initial coupling between these regions differentiated long-term responders from nonresponders. The SVM-neuroimaging approach could be of particular clinical value as it allows for accurate prediction of treatment outcome at the level of the individual.

  5. A Controlled Comparison of Cognitive Therapy and Self-Help Support Groups in the Treatment of Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payne, Annette; Blanchard, Edward B.

    1995-01-01

    Patients with irritable bowel syndrome (n=34) were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 treatment conditions for 8 weeks: individualized cognitive treatment, support group, or control. Results indicated significantly greater reductions in gastrointestinal symptoms and amelioration of depression and anxiety for the cognitive therapy group, and these results…

  6. The Impact of Perceived Group Support on the Effectiveness of an HIV Prevention Intervention for African American Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belgrave, Faye Z.; Corneille, Maya; Hood, Kristina; Foster-Woodson, Julia; Fitzgerald, Angela

    2010-01-01

    The enormous HIV/AIDS disparity among African American women and women in other ethnic groups dictates the need to implement the most effective HIV prevention interventions. This study examined the impact of perceived group support on HIV protective behaviors (i.e., attitudes and behaviors related to condom use, alcohol, and drugs) of African…

  7. Perceived Institutional Support among Young Indigenous and Mestizo Students from Chiapas (México): A Group Vitality Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esteban-Guitart, Moisès; Viladot, Maria Àngels; Giles, Howard

    2015-01-01

    Ethnolinguistic Vitality Theory (EVT) asserts that status, demographic and institutional support (IS) factors make up the vitality of ethnolinguistic groups within intergroup relations. Specifically, IS factor refers to the extent to which a language group enjoys representation in the various institutions of a society, in particular, mass media,…

  8. 78 FR 68030 - Possible Models for the Administration and Support of Discipline-Specific Guidance Groups for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-13

    ... Discipline- Specific Guidance Groups for Forensic Science AGENCY: National Institute of Standards and... Administration and Support of Discipline-Specific Guidance Groups for Forensic Science. Due to the lack of...; email susan.ballou@nist.gov . Please direct media inquiries to the NIST's Office of Public...

  9. Internet bullying.

    PubMed

    Donnerstein, Ed

    2012-06-01

    There is substantial literature on the impact of the mass media on children's and adolescents' health and development. The question of what role new technology plays in the media's influence is now a subject of both review and discussion, particularly regarding health risks and intervention. This article takes a brief look at online usage and the theoretical mechanisms that might make Internet access more problematic in terms of risks, compared with more traditional media such as television and film. One of these risks, known today as cyberbullying or Internet harassment, is scrutinized in detail.

  10. Internet Sexualities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döring, Nicola

    The term “internet sexuality” (or OSA, online sexual activities) refers to sexual-related content and activities observable on the internet (cf. Adams, Oye, & Parker, 2003; Cooper, McLoughlin, & Campbell, 2000; Leiblum & Döring, 2002). It designates a variety of sexual phenomena (e.g., pornography, sex education, sexual contacts) related to a wide spectrum of online services and applications (e.g., websites, online chat rooms, peer-to-peer networks). If an even broader range of computer networks - such as the Usenet or bulletin board systems - is included in this extensional definition, one speaks of “online sexuality” or “cybersexuality.”

  11. Supporting the Child's Development by Developing the Group Dynamics Experiences from the Supervision of Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buttner, Christian

    This report, the third annual study of primary program implementation, outlines case study observations of learning groups and of teachers relations to groups. The learning atmosphere of a learning group is determined by presence of conducive or disruptive elements, input of children, and relation of the group to the teacher, in addition to good…

  12. The spinal cord supports of vertebrae in the crown-group salamanders (Caudata, Urodela).

    PubMed

    Skutschas, Pavel P; Baleeva, Nataly V

    2012-09-01

    The development of spinal cord supports (bony thickenings which extend into the vertebral canal of vertebrae) in primitive (Salamandrella keyserlingii) and derived (Lissotriton vulgaris) salamanders were described. The spinal cord supports develop as the protuberances of periostal bone of the neural arches in the anteroproximal part of the septal collagenous fibers which connect a transverse myoseptum with the notochord and spinal cord, in the septal bundle inside the vertebral canal. Spinal cord supports were also found in some teleostean (Salmo salar, Oncorhynchus mykiss) and dipnoan (Protopterus sp.) fishes. The absence of the spinal cord supports in vertebrates with cartilaginous vertebrae (lampreys, chondrichthyan, and chondrostean fishes) corresponds to the fact that the spinal cord supports are bone structures. The absence of the spinal cord supports in frogs correlates with the lack of the well developed septal bundles inside the vertebral canal. The spinal cord supports are, presumably, a synapomorphic character for salamanders which originated independently of those observed in teleostean and dipnoan fishes.

  13. Parent Training and Parent Support: The Efficacy of a Parent-Focused Parent Training Support Group for Parents of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Disruptive Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gattuso, Jonna L.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the impact of parents' participation in a supplemental parent-focused parent education/support group following participation in a pre-existing parent training program. For the purpose of this study, the term "parent" will be used for the child's primary caregiver(s). Parents participated in a…

  14. The internet

    PubMed Central

    Al-Shahi, R; Sadler, M; Rees, G; Bateman, D

    2002-01-01

    The growing use of email and the world wide web (WWW), by the public, academics, and clinicians—as well as the increasing availability of high quality information on the WWW—make a working knowledge of the internet important. Although this article aims to enhance readers' existing use of the internet and medical resources on the WWW, it is also intelligible to someone unfamiliar with the internet. A web browser is one of the central pieces of software in modern computing: it is a window on the WWW, file transfer protocol sites, networked newsgroups, and your own computer's files. Effective use of the internet for professional purposes requires an understanding of the best strategies to search the WWW and the mechanisms for ensuring secure data transfer, as well as a compendium of online resources including journals, textbooks, medical portals, and sites providing high quality patient information. This article summarises these resources, available to incorporate into your web browser as downloadable "Favorites" or "Bookmarks" from www.jnnp.com, where there are also freely accessible hypertext links to the recommended sites. PMID:12438460

  15. Internet Ethics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emmans, Cindy

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on the issue of ethical use of the Internet in schools, and suggests that by devising and implementing acceptable use policies, and providing students with a set of ethical guidelines, schools and libraries can deal with the situation before it becomes a problem. Discusses and the need for parents to be included in policy formation and to…

  16. Effectiveness of preventive support groups for children of mentally ill or addicted parents: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    van Santvoort, Floor; Hosman, Clemens M H; van Doesum, Karin T M; Janssens, Jan M A M

    2014-06-01

    In various countries preventive support groups are offered to children of mentally ill and/or addicted parents to reduce the risk that they will develop problems themselves. This study assessed the effectiveness of Dutch support groups for children aged 8-12 years old in terms of reducing negative cognitions; improving social support, competence, and parent-child interaction (direct intervention goals); and reducing emotional and behavioural problems (ultimate intervention aim). Children from 254 families were randomly assigned to the intervention or a control condition. Parents and children completed questionnaires at baseline and 3 and 6 months later. Emotional and behavioural problems of intervention group children were also assessed 1 year after the start. Univariate analyses of variance showed that children in the intervention group experienced a greater decrease in negative cognitions and sought more social support, immediately after participation and 3 months later, as compared to control group children. They also remained stable in their feelings of social acceptance (competence aspect) immediately after the intervention, whereas these feelings declined in control group children. The intervention and control groups both improved over time in terms of cognitions, competence, parent-child interaction and emotional and behavioural problem scores. Additional improvement in terms of problem scores was found in the intervention group 1 year after baseline. Further enhancement of effectiveness requires re-consideration of the support group goals; it should be studied whether the goals reflect the most important and influential risk and protective factors for this specific population. Besides, effects should be studied over a longer period.

  17. Delivering a support group for siblings of children with learning disabilities.

    PubMed

    Sykes, Marcella

    This article describes the development of a group for siblings of children with learning disabilities. It looks at issues relating to setting up and running the group and gives examples of the problems that maybe encountered by the children.

  18. Setting up and Running a Loss and Bereavement Support Group for Adults with Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyden, Paul; Freeman, Adele; Offen, Liz

    2010-01-01

    Following evidence based literature, the Birmingham Clinical Psychology Service for People with Learning Disabilities ran a Loss and Bereavement Psychotherapy Group. The group consisted of five adults with mild learning disabilities, who met for 8 consecutive weeks. This paper reports the process of setting up a bereavement group for people with…

  19. An evaluation of Cognitive Stimulation Therapy sessions for people with dementia and a concomitant support group for their carers.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Jan; Kingston, Paul; Alford, Simon; Taylor, Louise; Tolhurst, Edward

    2016-01-18

    This research aimed to ascertain the impact of a pragmatic Cognitive Stimulation Therapy course of 10 sessions on the cognitive function of people living with dementia and whether attending a concomitant carers support group was beneficial to carers. A mixed method quasi-experimental approach was adopted; data were collected pre- and post-intervention. The quantitative arm utilised three validated questionnaires rated by the carers. Qualitative data were collected via semi-structured interviews with carers regarding their perceptions of the impact of Cognitive Stimulation Therapy and the carers support group. Quantitative data analysis found no statistically significant differences within or between groups. The qualitative data demonstrated that carers perceived Cognitive Stimulation Therapy had some benefits for the people living with dementia, especially social benefits. Carers also perceived that attending the carers support group was beneficial for them in terms of gaining a better understanding of dementia, developing coping skills and having peer support. The study was limited in scale and further research with a larger sample, using direct measures of the impact of Cognitive Stimulation Therapy with people living with dementia and supplementary research exploring which characteristic of carers support groups are effective would be worthwhile.

  20. Effects of Minority Stress, Group-Level Coping, and Social Support on Mental Health of German Gay Men

    PubMed Central

    Sattler, Frank A.; Wagner, Ulrich; Christiansen, Hanna

    2016-01-01

    Objective According to epidemiological studies, gay men are at a higher risk of mental disorders than heterosexual men. In the current study, the minority stress theory was investigated in German gay men: 1) it was hypothesized that minority stressors would positively predict mental health problems and that 2) group-level coping and social support variables would moderate these predictions negatively. Methods Data from 1,188 German self-identified gay men were collected online. The questionnaire included items about socio-demographics, minority stress (victimization, rejection sensitivity, and internalized homonegativity), group-level coping (disclosure of sexual orientation, homopositivity, gay affirmation, gay rights support, and gay rights activism), and social support (gay social support and non-gay social support). A moderated multiple regression was conducted. Results Minority stressors positively predicted mental health problems. Group-level coping did not interact with minority stressors, with the exception of disclosure and homopositivity interacting marginally with some minority stressors. Further, only two interactions were found for social support variables and minority stress, one of them marginal. Gay and non-gay social support inversely predicted mental health problems. In addition, disclosure and homopositivity marginally predicted mental health problems. Conclusions The findings imply that the minority stress theory should be modified. Disclosure does not have a relevant effect on mental health, while social support variables directly influence mental health of gay men. Group-level coping does not interact with minority stressors relevantly, and only one relevant interaction between social support and minority stress was found. Further longitudinal or experimental replication is needed before transferring the results to mental health interventions and prevention strategies for gay men. PMID:26943785

  1. Cross-sectional survey of users of Internet depression communities

    PubMed Central

    Powell, John; McCarthy, Noel; Eysenbach, Gunther

    2003-01-01

    Background Internet-based depression communities provide a forum for individuals to communicate and share information and ideas. There has been little research into the health status and other characteristics of users of these communities. Methods Online cross-sectional survey of Internet depression communities to identify depressive morbidity among users of Internet depression communities in six European countries; to investigate whether users were in contact with health services and receiving treatment; and to identify user perceived effects of the communities. Results Major depression was highly prevalent among respondents (varying by country from 40% to 64%). Forty-nine percent of users meeting criteria for major depression were not receiving treatment, and 35% had no consultation with health services in the previous year. Thirty-six percent of repeat community users who had consulted a health professional in the previous year felt that the Internet community had been an important factor in deciding to seek professional help. Conclusions There are high levels of untreated and undiagnosed depression in users of Internet depression communities. This group represents a target for intervention. Internet communities can provide information and support for stigmatizing conditions that inhibit more traditional modes of information seeking. PMID:14664725

  2. How to create more supportive supervision for primary healthcare: lessons from Ngamiland district of Botswana: co-operative inquiry group

    PubMed Central

    Nkomazana, Oathokwa; Mash, Robert; Wojczewski, Silvia; Kutalek, Ruth; Phaladze, Nthabiseng

    2016-01-01

    Background Supportive supervision is a way to foster performance, productivity, motivation, and retention of health workforce. Nevertheless there is a dearth of evidence of the impact and acceptability of supportive supervision in low- and middle-income countries. This article describes a participatory process of transforming the supervisory practice of district health managers to create a supportive environment for primary healthcare workers. Objective The objective of the study was to explore how district health managers can change their practice to create a more supportive environment for primary healthcare providers. Design A facilitated co-operative inquiry group (CIG) was formed with Ngamiland health district managers. CIG belongs to the participatory action research paradigm and is characterised by a cyclic process of observation, reflection, planning, and action. The CIG went through three cycles between March 2013 and March 2014. Results Twelve district health managers participated in the inquiry group. The major insights and learning that emerged from the inquiry process included inadequate supervisory practice, perceptions of healthcare workers’ experiences, change in the managers’ supervision paradigm, recognition of the supervisors’ inadequate supervisory skills, and barriers to supportive supervision. Finally, the group developed a 10-point consensus on what they had learnt regarding supportive supervision. Conclusion Ngamiland health district managers have come to appreciate the value of supportive supervision and changed their management style to be more supportive of their subordinates. They also developed a consensus on supportive supervision that could be adapted for use nationally. Supportive supervision should be prioritised at all levels of the health system, and it should be adequately resourced. PMID:27345024

  3. Chechen Use of the Internet in the Russo-Chechen Conflict

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    via the Internet, to conduct information warfare, recruitment, mobilization, fundraising , communication, and to generate public support? Chapter 1...communities allow for widespread dissemination of news, opinions, recruitment, and fundraising . Criminal groups or insurgent groups can readily engage in...tool; BORZIK chat exists for networking Fundraising Tool? Y Instructions on how to make a donation to help Chechens Types of currency? Y US& Canada

  4. The role of support staff as people move from congregated settings to group homes and personalized arrangements in Ireland.

    PubMed

    García Iriarte, Edurne; Stockdale, Janine; McConkey, Roy; Keogh, Fiona

    2016-06-01

    The movement of people with intellectual disabilities into the community is increasingly endorsed by public policy. Whilst staff are critical to a successful transition to the community, there is only scattered research on their role in supporting people to move. In this study, 32 staff and the 16 people with intellectual disabilities they supported to move from congregated settings to group homes or personalized living arrangements in the community were interviewed on two occasions, before (time 1) and after (time 2) the move. In congregated settings, staff steered the move to community living, they helped them to settle in community group homes and supported them to increase control over their lives in personalized community arrangements, where they support became increasingly more personalized and geared towards community participation and development of social relationships. Implications for staff training are drawn.

  5. Measuring Parental Support for Children’s Physical Activity in White and African American Parents: The Activity Support Scale for Multiple Groups (ACTS-MG)

    PubMed Central

    Davison, Kirsten K.; Li, Kaigang; Baskin, Monica L.; Cox, Tiffany; Affuso, Olivia

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The Activity Support Scale (ACTS) was expanded for use with African American families. Its factorial invariance and internal reliability were examined for non-Hispanic white and African American parents. Methods The ACTS was modified to improve its applicability to African American families based on information from five focus groups with 27 African American parents of elementary school-aged children. Between 2006 and 2008, the revised scale was administered to 119 African American and 117 non-Hispanic white parents in northeastern NY and Alabama. Its factorial invariance across race/ethnicity and internal consistency were examined. Results Factor analysis of the revised scale, the Activity Support Scale for Multiple Groups (ACTS-MG), identified four parenting factors in white and African American parents including logistic support, modeling, use of community resources to promote physical activity (PA), and restriction of sedentary behaviors. Results supported the scale’s internal reliability and factorial invariance across race/ethnicity. Conclusion The ACTS-MG is appropriate for use with non-Hispanic white and African American families and will enable the extension of current research with white families to the examination of strategies supporting PA in African American families. Additional psychometric work with the ACTS-MG is encouraged. PMID:21111755

  6. The impact of self-transcendence on physical health status promotion in multiple sclerosis patients attending peer support groups.

    PubMed

    JadidMilani, Maryam; Ashktorab, Tahereh; AbedSaeedi, Zhila; AlaviMajd, Hamid

    2015-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of self-transcendence on the physical health of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients attending peer support groups. This study was a quasi-experimental before-and-after design including 33 MS patients in three groups: 10 men in the men-only group, 11 women in the women-only group, and 12 men and women in the mixed group. Participants were required to attend eight weekly sessions of 2 h each. Instruments included the physical health section of the Multiple Sclerosis Quality of Life Inventory and Reed's Self-Transcendence Scale. Peer support group attendance was found to have a significant positive effect on the physical health and self-transcendence of MS patients when comparing average scores before and after attendance. Regression analysis showed that improvement in self-transcendence predicted improvement in physical health. Results show the positive effects of peer support groups on self-transcendence and physical health in MS patients, and suggest that improvement in well-being can be gained by promoting self-transcendence and physical health.

  7. A Comparative Study of GDSS (Group Decision Support System) Use: Empirical Evidence and Model Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-01

    judgments, pressure involving the status of group members, conformity pressure , domineering personalities, expenditure of additional effort to maintain the... conformity , it can also heighten conflict because users become more blunt with each other [Ref. 33: p. 12]. Group leadership is another factor that can...e•EMENTARY NOTATION COSAT’ COWES IS SUBJECT TERAAS (C*ntWu on revevw of netessav and Eepgnt.fv by Iet* nLEPRU’r ,LO GRou, I sueB.toup ’ Group Decision

  8. 75 FR 28298 - Avaya Inc., Worldwide Services Group, Global Support Services (GSS) Organization, Including On...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-20

    ... Interactive LLC., Sapphire Technologies, Highlands Ranch, CO; Including Employees in Support of Avaya Inc... Consulting, Inc., Case Interactive LLC., and Sapphire Technologies, Highlands Ranch, Colorado. The notice was..., CCSI Inc., ICONMA LLC, MGD Consulting, Inc., Case Interactive LLC., and Sapphire...

  9. Psychometric Validation of Internet Addiction Test with Indian Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dhir, Amandeep; Chen, Sufen; Nieminen, Marko

    2015-01-01

    The past few years have witnessed great developments in Internet infrastructure, which have led to increased Internet usage among people of various age groups. However, at the same time, there have been some negative implications associated with increased Internet usage for some individuals. "Internet addiction" (IA) is one such negative…

  10. Instructional Utilization of the Internet in Public School Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milheim, William D.

    1997-01-01

    Discussion of use of the Internet in educational settings focuses on providing specific information for elementary and secondary school personnel to increase their awareness and utilization of the Internet. Topics include accessing the Internet; school access; origins of the Internet; electronic mail; discussion groups, or listservs; newsgroups;…

  11. Stimulant Use and HIV Risk Behavior: The Influence of Peer Support Group Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyons, Thomas; Chandra, Gopika; Goldstein, Jerome

    2006-01-01

    This study examines 12-step groups for recovery from methamphetamine and cocaine use that are attended by men having sex with men and the impact of attendance on HIV risk behavior. Participants in Crystal Meth Anonymous and other 12-step groups were interviewed up to 3 months since their last substance use. Sixty-two initial interviews, and…

  12. Family group psychotherapy to support the disclosure of HIV status to children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Nicastro, Emanuele; Continisio, Grazia Isabella; Storace, Cinzia; Bruzzese, Eugenia; Mango, Carmela; Liguoro, Ilaria; Guarino, Alfredo; Officioso, Annunziata

    2013-06-01

    Disclosure of the HIV status to infected children is often delayed due to psychosocial problems in their families. We aimed at improving the quality of life in families of HIV-infected children, thus promoting disclosure of the HIV status to children by parents. Parents of 17 HIV-infected children (4.2-18 years) followed at our Center for pediatric HIV, unaware of their HIV status, were randomly assigned to the intervention group (8 monthly sessions of family group psychotherapy, FGP) or to the control group not receiving psychotherapy. Changes in the Psychological General Well-Being Index (PGWB-I) and in the Short-Form State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (Sf-STAI), as well as the HIV status disclosure to children by parents, were measured. Ten parents were assigned to the FGP group, while 7 parents to the controls. Psychological well-being increased in 70% of the FGP parents and none of the control group (p=0.017), while anxiety decreased in the FGP group but not in controls (60% vs. 0%, p=0.03). HIV disclosure took place for 6/10 children of the intervention group and for 1/7 of controls. Family group psychotherapy had a positive impact on the environment of HIV-infected children, promoting psychological well-being and the disclosure of the HIV status to children.

  13. The Potential of a Mobile Group Blog to Support Cultural Learning among Overseas Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shao, Yinjuan; Crook, Charles

    2015-01-01

    We explored the use of mobile social software, in the form of a mobile group blog, to assist cultural learning. The potential of using this technology for cultural adaptation among overseas students was examined as those students adapted to the everyday life of studying abroad. Two pilot studies and a successful field study of a mobile group blog…

  14. Group Work in Elementary Science: Towards Organisational Principles for Supporting Pupil Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Christine; Tolmie, Andy; Thurston, Allen; Topping, Keith; Christie, Donald; Livingston, Kay; Jessiman, Emma; Donaldson, Caroline

    2007-01-01

    Group work has been promoted in many countries as a key component of elementary science. However, little guidance is given as to how group work should be organized, and because previous research has seldom been conducted in authentic classrooms, its message is merely indicative. A study is reported, which attempts to address these limitations.…

  15. Enhancing the Doctoral Journey: The Role of Group Supervision in Supporting Collaborative Learning and Creativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenge, Lee-Ann

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the role of group supervision within doctoral education, offering an exploration of the experience of group supervision processes through a small-scale study evaluating both student and staff experience across three cohorts of one professional doctorate programme. There has been very little research to date exploring…

  16. Attention deficit hyperactivity symptoms and internet addiction.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Hee Jeong; Cho, Soo Churl; Ha, Jihyun; Yune, Sook Kyung; Kim, Seog Ju; Hwang, Jaeuk; Chung, Ain; Sung, Young Hoon; Lyoo, In Kyoon

    2004-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship between attention deficit-hyperactivity/impulsivity symptoms and Internet addiction. In total, 535 elementary school students (264 boys, 271 girls; mean age, 11.0 +/- 1.0 years) were recruited. The presence or severity of Internet addiction was assessed by the Young's Internet Addiction test. Parents and teachers of the children completed the DuPaul's attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) rating scale (ARS; Korean version, K-ARS) and Child Behavior Checklists. Children with the highest and lowest quartiles in K-ARS scores were defined to be in ADHD and non-ADHD groups, respectively. Five children (0.9%) met criteria for a definite Internet addiction and 75 children (14.0%) met criteria for a probable Internet addiction. K-ARS scores had significant positive correlations with Young's Internet Addiction test scores. The Internet addiction group had higher total scores of K-ARS and ADHD-related subcategories in the Child Behavior Checklists than the non-addiction group. The ADHD group had higher Internet addiction scores compared with the non-ADHD group. Therefore, significant associations have been found between the level of ADHD symptoms and the severity of Internet addiction in children. In addition, current findings suggest that the presence of ADHD symptoms, both in inattention and hyperactivity-impulsivity domains, may be one of the important risk factors for Internet addiction.

  17. LANL Institutional Decision Support By Process Modeling and Analysis Group (AET-2)

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, Steven Richard

    2016-04-04

    AET-2 has expertise in process modeling, economics, business case analysis, risk assessment, Lean/Six Sigma tools, and decision analysis to provide timely decision support to LANS leading to continuous improvement. This capability is critical during the current tight budgetary environment as LANS pushes to identify potential areas of cost savings and efficiencies. An important arena is business systems and operations, where processes can impact most or all laboratory employees. Lab-wide efforts are needed to identify and eliminate inefficiencies to accomplish Director McMillan’s charge of “doing more with less.” LANS faces many critical and potentially expensive choices that require sound decision support to ensure success. AET-2 is available to provide this analysis support to expedite the decisions at hand.

  18. The Internet Initiative: Libraries Providing Internet Services and How They Plan, Pay, and Manage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valauskas, Edward J., Ed.; John, Nancy R., Ed.

    This book examines real-life projects involving Internet access, use, and financing in libraries. It focuses on how becoming an Internet provider has improved many libraries' public visibility, level of service, and communication with other educational or community institutions. Chapters include: (1) "Setting Up an Internet Users Group in the…

  19. Emotional Literacy Support Assistants' Views on Supervision Provided by Educational Psychologists: What EPs Can Learn from Group Supervision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osborne, Cara; Burton, Sheila

    2014-01-01

    The Educational Psychology Service in this study has responsibility for providing group supervision to Emotional Literacy Support Assistants (ELSAs) working in schools. To date, little research has examined this type of inter-professional supervision arrangement. The current study used a questionnaire to examine ELSAs' views on the supervision…

  20. Self-Reported Needs and Expectations of Parents of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders Who Participate in Support Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papageorgiou, Vaya; Kalyva, Efrosini

    2010-01-01

    Many parents of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) participate in support groups, but very few studies have explored their motives to do so. The present study aims to explore the self-reported needs and expectations that parents express according to their gender and education and according to the age and gender of their child with ASD.…

  1. A Peer Support and Personal Growth Group for Parents with a Child Who Is Developmentally Disabled or Delayed.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Pelt, Jeff

    The manual describes development of a personal growth and peer support group for parents of developmentally delayed or disabled children which was designed to help parents adjust expectations about their infant or young child and to accommodate the handicap. Initial decisions regarding leader and participant characteristics and frequency and…

  2. Supporting Small-Group Learning Using Multiple Web 2.0 Tools: A Case Study in the Higher Education Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laru, Jari; Naykki, Piia; Jarvela, Sanna

    2012-01-01

    In this single-case study, small groups of learners were supported by use of multiple social software tools and face-to-face activities in the context of higher education. The aim of the study was to explore how designed learning activities contribute to students' learning outcomes by studying probabilistic dependencies between the variables.…

  3. Promoting Child Development through Group-Based Parent Support within a Cash Transfer Program: Experimental Effects on Children's Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernald, Lia C. H.; Kagawa, Rose M. C.; Knauer, Heather A.; Schnaas, Lourdes; Guerra, Armando Garcia; Neufeld, Lynnette M.

    2017-01-01

    We examined effects on child development of a group-based parenting support program ("Educación Inicial" - EI) when combined with Mexico's conditional cash transfer (CCT) program ("Prospera," originally 'Oportunidades" and "Progresa"). This cluster-randomized trial included 204 communities (n = 1,113 children in…

  4. Observations From Practice: Support Group Membership as a Process of Social Capital Formation Among Female Survivors of Domestic Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larance, Lisa Young; Porter, Maryann Lane

    2004-01-01

    This article explores the authors' practice observations of female domestic violence survivors' journey from first agency contact to active participation in a support group process. The authors have witnessed female victims of domestic violence challenging the social isolation imposed by their dominant partners as they search for meaning in their…

  5. The empirical evidence that does not support cultural group selection models for the evolution of human cooperation.

    PubMed

    Lamba, Shakti

    2016-01-01

    I outline key empirical evidence from my research and that of other scholars, testing the role of cultural group selection (CGS) in the evolution of human cooperation, which Richerson et al. failed to mention and which fails to support the CGS hypothesis.

  6. Similarities in Diabetes and Addiction: An Exploration of the Efficacy of Specialized Support Groups in Treating Diabetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keane, Stephanie A.; Young, Suzanne; Loos, Michael

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether a specialized addiction support group model might enhance treatment adherence among diabetic women. Charlotte Kasl's Sixteen Step Empowerment Model was chosen for the study. The 17 volunteers in the study were primarily Caucasian women living in a university town located in a frontier Rocky…

  7. Dielectric waveguide with transverse index variation that support a zero group velocity mode at a non-zero longitudinal wavevector

    DOEpatents

    Ibanescu, Mihai; Joannopoious, John D.; Fink, Yoel; Johnson, Steven G.; Fan, Shanhui

    2005-06-21

    Optical components including a laser based on a dielectric waveguide extending along a waveguide axis and having a refractive index cross-section perpendicular to the waveguide axis, the refractive index cross-section supporting an electromagnetic mode having a zero group velocity for a non-zero wavevector along the waveguide axis.

  8. "Leaders," "Followers" and Collective Group Support in Learning "Art Music" in an Amateur Composer-Oriented Bach Choir

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Einarsdottir, Sigrun Lilja

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how amateur choral singers experience collective group support as a method of learning "art music" choral work. Findings are derived from a grounded-theory based, socio-musical case study of an amateur "art music" Bach Choir, in the process of rehearsing and performing the Mass in B…

  9. Supporting Students from Underrepresented Groups in Mathematics for Alternative Certification Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Brian R.

    2013-01-01

    It is important for new teachers in alternative certification programs to ensure all of their students receive quality education, particularly in mathematics education. Mathematics is a gatekeeper subject in which strong quantitative skills lead to increased opportunities. This article addressed support new alternative certification teachers need…

  10. Can a Social Networking Site Support Afterschool Group Learning of Mandarin?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Yang; Crook, Charles; O'Malley, Claire

    2014-01-01

    Schools are often encouraged to facilitate extra-curricular learning within their own premises. This study addresses the potential of social networking sites (SNS) for supporting such out-of-class study. Given concerns that learning on these sites may happen at a surface level, we adopted self-determination theory for designing a social networking…

  11. Status of ASME Section III Task Group on Graphite Support Core Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Robert L. Bratton; Tim D. Burchell

    2005-08-01

    This report outlines the roadmap that the ASME Project Team on Graphite Core Supports is pursuing to establish design codes for unirradiated and irradiated graphite core components during its first year of operation. It discusses the deficiencies in the proposed Section III, Division 2, Subsection CE graphite design code and the different approaches the Project Team has taken to address those deficiencies.

  12. Schematic Pedagogy: Supporting One Child's Learning at Home and in a Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atherton, Frances; Nutbrown, Cathy

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we identify ways in which the learning of very young children can be supported by practitioners developing a schematic pedagogy which focuses on structures of children's thinking. First, we provide a critical overview of relevant literature on schemas and schematic approaches to pedagogy. We then outline an original study undertaken…

  13. Children's Sociometric Membership Group and Computer-Supported Interaction in School Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koivusaari, Ritva

    2004-01-01

    This study analyzed what kind of role sociometric status has in non-real time computer conversations. Computer-supported conversations were investigated by using two local area networks. Participants were 52 9 to 10-year-old schoolchildren selected from three sociometric strata: rejected, average, and popular. Children's preferred friends, school…

  14. Support Needs of the Most Vulnerable Student Groups in Non-University Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tamuliene, Rasa

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the research on support needs of the most vulnerable students in nonuniversity higher education. The research results have revealed that older, part-time students who have family and/or work responsibilities focus on academic information and counselling, foreign language training, distance study centre, legal counselling and…

  15. Community-Based Learning to Support South African Early Group Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casper, Virginia; Lamb-Parker, Faith

    2012-01-01

    The Developing Families Project-South Africa (DFP-SA) is a community-based model of education and training for the care, support and education of vulnerable children birth-to-three and their caregivers, guardians and families in rural and peri-urban townships. The approach fosters interactive learning among community members about early care and…

  16. Mourning Child Grief Support Group Curriculum: Preschool Edition. Denny the Duck Stories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehmann, Linda; Jimerson, Shane R.; Gaasch, Ann

    The Mourning Child Preschool grief support curriculum is intended for use with preschool children who have experienced the death of someone special to them. It is designed for use by professionals who work in schools, hospitals, hospices, mental health agencies, or any setting that serves bereaved children. The curriculum contains lesson plans for…

  17. How Undergraduate Students Use Social Media Technologies to Support Group Project Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAliney, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Technology continues to evolve and become accessible to students in higher education. Concurrently, teamwork has become an important skill in academia and the workplace and students have adopted established technologies to support their learning in both individual and team project work. Given the emergence of social media technologies, I examined…

  18. Collaborative Group Engagement in a Computer-Supported Inquiry Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinha, Suparna; Rogat, Toni Kempler; Adams-Wiggins, Karlyn R.; Hmelo-Silver, Cindy E.

    2015-01-01

    Computer-supported collaborative learning environments provide opportunities for students to collaborate in inquiry-based practices to solve authentic problems, using technological tools as a resource. However, we have limited understanding of the quality of engagement fostered in these contexts, in part due to the narrowness of engagement…

  19. Social support and negative and positive outcomes of experienced traumatic events in a group of male emergency service workers.

    PubMed

    Ogińska-Bulik, Nina

    2015-01-01

    The paper investigates the relationship between perceived social support in the workplace and both negative (post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms) and positive outcomes (post-traumatic growth) of experienced traumatic events in a group of male emergency service workers. Data of 116 workers representing emergency services (37.1% firefighters, 37.1%, police officers and 30% medical rescue workers) who have experienced a traumatic event in their worksite were analyzed. The range of age of the participants was 21-57 years (M=35.27; SD=8.13). Polish versions of the Impact of Event Scale--Revised and the Post-traumatic Growth Inventory were used to assess the negative and positive outcomes of the experienced event. A perceived social support scale was measured by the scale What support you can count on. The data obtained from the study revealed the negative dependence of social support from supervisors with PTSD symptoms and positive--social support from co-workers with post-traumatic growth. Moreover the results of the study indicate the positive relationship between negative and positive outcomes of experienced traumatic events in the workplace. Perceived social support plays a more important role in gaining benefits from trauma than preventing negative outcomes of the experienced traumatic event. Support from co-workers, compared to support from supervisors, has greater importance.

  20. Social support and negative and positive outcomes of experienced traumatic events in a group of male emergency service workers

    PubMed Central

    Ogińska-Bulik, Nina

    2015-01-01

    The paper investigates the relationship between perceived social support in the workplace and both negative (post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms) and positive outcomes (post-traumatic growth) of experienced traumatic events in a group of male emergency service workers. Data of 116 workers representing emergency services (37.1% firefighters, 37.1%, police officers and 30% medical rescue workers) who have experienced a traumatic event in their worksite were analyzed. The range of age of the participants was 21–57 years (M = 35.27; SD = 8.13). Polish versions of the Impact of Event Scale – Revised and the Post-traumatic Growth Inventory were used to assess the negative and positive outcomes of the experienced event. A perceived social support scale was measured by the scale What support you can count on. The data obtained from the study revealed the negative dependence of social support from supervisors with PTSD symptoms and positive – social support from co-workers with post-traumatic growth. Moreover the results of the study indicate the positive relationship between negative and positive outcomes of experienced traumatic events in the workplace. Perceived social support plays a more important role in gaining benefits from trauma than preventing negative outcomes of the experienced traumatic event. Support from co-workers, compared to support from supervisors, has greater importance. PMID:26323770

  1. Reforming with a catalyst containing a group VIII noble metal a group VIII non-noble metal and gallium on separate support particles

    SciTech Connect

    Sorrentino, C. M.; Bertolacini, R. J.; Pellet, R. J.

    1984-11-13

    The catalyst comprises a physical particle-form mixture of a Componet A, a Component B, and a Component C, said Component A comprising at least one Group VIII noble metal, preferably platinum, deposed on a solid catalyst support material providing acidic catalytic sites, said Component B comprising a small amount of a non-noble metal of Group VIII selected from cobalt, nickel, and mixtures thereof, preferably cobalt, on a solid catalyst support material providing acidic catalytic sites, said Component C comprising a small amount of gallium deposed on a solid catalyst support material providing acidic catalytic sites, and said catalyst having been prepared by thoroughly and intimately blending finely-divided particles of said Component A, B, and C to provide a thoroughly-blended composite. The catalyst can be employed suitably in a hydrocarbon conversion process. In particular, the catalyst can be employed in a process for the reforming of a hydrocarbon stream, which process comprises contacting said stream in a reforming zone under reforming conditions and in the presence of hydrogen with said catalyst. The process can be used advantageously to reform a hydrocarbon stream that contains up to 80 ppm sulfur.

  2. Internet 2 Health Sciences Initiative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simco, Greg

    2003-01-01

    The Internet 2 (I2) health sciences initiative (I2HSI) involves the formulation of applications and supporting technologies, and guidelines for their use in the health sciences. Key elements of I2HSI include use of visualization, collaboration, medical informatics, telemedicine, and educational tools that support the health sciences. Specific…

  3. The Effects of Text Message Content on the Use of an Internet-Based Physical Activity Intervention in Hong Kong Chinese Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Lau, Erica Y; Lau, Patrick W C; Cai, Bo; Archer, Edward

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the effects of text message content (generic vs. culturally tailored) on the login rate of an Internet physical activity program in Hong Kong Chinese adolescent school children. A convenience sample of 252 Hong Kong secondary school adolescents (51% female, 49% male; M age = 13.17 years, SD = 1.28 years) were assigned to one of 3 treatments for 8 weeks. The control group consisted of an Internet physical activity program. The Internet plus generic text message group consisted of the same Internet physical activity program and included daily generic text messages. The Internet plus culturally tailored text message group consisted of the Internet physical activity program and included daily culturally tailored text messages. Zero-inflated Poisson mixed models showed that the overall effect of the treatment group on the login rates varied significantly across individuals. The login rates over time were significantly higher in the Internet plus culturally tailored text message group than the control group (β = 46.06, 95% CI 13.60, 156.02; p = .002) and the Internet plus generic text message group (β = 15.80, 95% CI 4.81, 51.9; p = .021) after adjusting for covariates. These findings suggest that culturally tailored text messages may be more advantageous than generic text messages on improving adolescents' website login rate, but effects varied significantly across individuals. Our results support the inclusion of culturally tailored messaging in future online physical activity interventions.

  4. Actionable findings and the role of IT support: report of the ACR Actionable Reporting Work Group.

    PubMed

    Larson, Paul A; Berland, Lincoln L; Griffith, Brent; Kahn, Charles E; Liebscher, Lawrence A

    2014-06-01

    The ACR formed the Actionable Reporting Work Group to address the potential role of IT in the communication of imaging findings, especially in cases that require nonroutine communication because of the urgency of the findings or their unexpected nature. These findings that require special communication with referring clinicians are classified as "actionable findings." The work group defines 3 categories of actionable findings that require, respectively, communication and clinical decision within minutes (category 1), hours (category 2), or days (category 3). Although the work group does not believe that there can be definitive lists of such findings, it developed lists in each category that would apply in most general hospital settings. For each category, the work group discusses ways in which IT can assist interpreting radiologists in successfully communicating to the relevant clinicians to ensure optimal patient care. IT systems can also help document the communication and facilitate auditing of the documentation. The work group recommends that vendors develop platforms that can be customized on the basis of local preferences and needs. Whatever system is used, it should be highly reliable and fit seamlessly into radiologists' workflow.

  5. Evaluation of internet access and utilization by medical students in Lahore, Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The internet is increasingly being used worldwide in imparting medical education and improving its delivery. It has become an important tool for healthcare professionals training but the data on its use by medical students in developing countries is lacking with no study on the subject from Pakistan. This study was, therefore, carried out with an aim to evaluate the pattern of internet access and utilization by medical students in Pakistan. Methods A structured pre-tested questionnaire was administered to a group of 750 medical students in clinical years studying at various public and private medical colleges in Lahore. The questions were related to patterns of internet access, purpose of use and self reported confidence in performing various internet related tasks, use of health related websites to supplement learning and the problems faced by students in using internet at the institution. Results A total of 532 medical students (70.9%) returned the questionnaire. The mean age of study participants was 21.04 years (SD 1.96 years). Majority of the respondents (84.0%) reported experience with internet use. About half of the students (42.1%) were using internet occasionally with 23.1%, 20.9% and 13.9% doing so frequently, regularly and rarely respectively. About two third of the students (61.0%) stated that they use internet for both academic and professional activities. Most of the participants preferred to use internet at home (70.5%). Self reported ability to search for required article from PubMed and PakMedinet was reported by only 34.0% of the entire sample. Students were moderately confident in performing various internet related tasks including downloading medical books from internet, searching internet for classification of diseases and downloading full text article. Health related websites were being accessed by 55.1% students to supplement their learning process. Lack of time, inadequate number of available computers and lack of support from

  6. Caring for the caregiver: evaluation of support groups for guardians of orphans and vulnerable children in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Thurman, Tonya R; Jarabi, Ben; Rice, Janet

    2012-01-01

    HIV and AIDS have altered the context in which millions of children in sub-Saharan Africa are raised. Many are under the care of a widowed or ill parent, and others are residing with their extended family. Caregivers of orphans and other vulnerable children (OVC) face a variety of stressors that may adversely affect children. This study explores potential benefits of caregivers' membership in support groups on their own psychosocial wellbeing, and on the treatment and psychosocial well-being of OVC aged 8-14 under their care. A post-test study design comparing members and non-members was applied, drawing upon random samples of current and prospective beneficiaries from a rural community in Kenya. With up to two children per caregiver eligible for study inclusion, the sample comprised 766 caregivers and 1028 children. Three-quarters of children had lost at least one parent. Nearly 90% were cared for by a female, often their natural mother or grandmother. Half of the caregivers were widowed and one-fifth had a chronic illness. Over one-third of caregivers were members of support groups, more commonly female caregivers. Regression analyses assessed the effect of support group membership after controlling for household, caregiver and child characteristics. Members reported less social marginalization, better family functioning and more positive feelings towards the children in their care than nonmembers. Children with caregivers in support groups exhibited fewer behavioral problems, higher rates of prosocial behavior and reported lower incidence of abuse from adults in their household. The psychological state of caregivers, however, was not associated with support group membership. Results underscore that quality care of vulnerable children hinges on interventions that address the psychosocial challenges facing their caregivers.

  7. Summary of Internet Terms and Resources. NRC Fact Sheet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zubal, Rachael; Hall, Mair

    2010-01-01

    What is the Internet? The Internet is a worldwide network of computers communicating with each other. This paper offers some basic, easy-to-understand meanings of words about the Internet that individuals may have questions about.[The preparation of this fact sheet was supported in part by the National Resource Center on Supported Living and…

  8. Internet Governance and National Security

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    during preparations for the World Summit for the Information Society ( WSIS ),54 when significant opposition to the current Internet governance began to...on the basis of concerns from the developing world that the ICANN required further reform. Throughout the WSIS process, and continuing in other...Information Society will occur in 2015. 52. H.Zhao,“ITUandInternetGovernance—Inputtothe7thmeetingoftheITUCouncilWork­ ing Group on WSIS , 12–14 December 2004

  9. Spirituality and meaning in supportive care: spirituality- and meaning-centered group psychotherapy interventions in advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Breitbart, William

    2002-05-01

    Existential and spiritual issues are at the frontier of new clinical and research focus in palliative and supportive care of cancer patients. As concepts of adequate supportive care expand beyond a focus on pain and physical symptom control, existential and spiritual issues such as meaning, hope and spirituality in general have received increased attention from supportive care clinicians and clinical researchers. This paper reviews the topics of spirituality and end-of-life care, defines spirituality, and suggests measures of spirituality that deal with two of its main components: faith/religious beliefs and meaning/spiritual well-being. These two constructs of spirituality are reviewed in terms of their role in supportive care. Finally, a review of existing psychotherapeutic interventions for spiritual suffering are reviewed and a novel meaning-centered group psychotherapy for advanced cancer patients is described.

  10. The Effect of Prostate Cancer Support Groups on Uncertainty in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-05-01

    iv DISCLAIMER STATEMENT Department of Defense This work was supported by the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences Protocol No. TA061AQ...of the Department of Defense or the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences. v COPYRIGHT STATEMENT The author herby certifies that the...excerpts is with the permission of the copyright owner, and will save and hold harmless the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences from any

  11. Research and Development Strategies for Human Centered and Group Support Technologies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-01

    23640 INSTITUTE FOR DEFENSE ANALYSES , 1801 N. Beauregard Street. Alexandria. Virginia 223 1 1-1772 14 92 IDA Log No. HO 92-41177 I I I DEFINITIONS IDA...with CALS functions (Figure 1-1). Spcf j~k Anal Tasks _ounn Tak CeD Graphics Logistics Support Record C Record D Knowledge CaptureII fRD 11 IFigure 1

  12. [se-atlas - the health service information platform for people with rare diseases : Supporting research on medical care institutions and support groups].

    PubMed

    Haase, Johanna; Wagner, Thomas O F; Storf, Holger

    2017-03-08

    se-atlas - the health service information platform for rare diseases - is part of the German National Action Plan for People with Rare Diseases and is funded by the German Federal Ministry of Health. The objective of se-atlas as a web-based platform is to illustrate those medical care institutions that are linked to rare diseases, in a transparent and user-friendly way. The website provides an overview of medical care institutions and support groups focusing on rare diseases in Germany. The primary target groups of se-atlas are affected patients, their relatives and physicians but can also include non-medical professionals and the general public. In order to make it easier to look up medical care institutions or support groups and optimize the search results displayed, various strategies are being developed and evaluated. Hence, the allocation of diseases to appropriate medical care institutions and support groups is currently a main focus. Since its launch in 2015, se-atlas has grown continuously and now incorporates five times more entries than were included 20 months prior. Among this data are the current rare diseases centres in Germany, which play a major role in providing patient-centred healthcare by acting as primary contact points for people with rare diseases. Further expansion and maintenance of the data base raises several organisational and software-related challenges. For one, the data should be completed by adding more high-quality information, while not neglecting the existing entries and maintaining their high level of quality in the long term.

  13. Integrating Identities: Facilitating a Support Group for LGBTQ Students on a Christian College Campus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vespone, Brianna M.

    2016-01-01

    College can be a challenging time for young adults, as many are experiencing life on their own for the first time, adjusting to new lifestyles, new social groups, and new ways to express themselves. For lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) college students, the challenges are increased as they face harassment, discrimination, and…

  14. The Impact of Biblio Group Counseling Supported with the Story of "The Little Prince" upon Mindfulness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ilbay, Azmi Bayram

    2016-01-01

    Using books for healing psychological health is becoming popular day by day. In this process bibliotherapy brings forward suggestions of psychological insight, relieving by identification, relieving from suppressed feelings by discharging and reflecting emotions. The aim of this research is to analyse the effect of biblio group counseling…

  15. Big Data in the Campus Landscape: Basic Infrastructure Support. ECAR Working Group Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almes, Guy T.; Zottola, Ralph J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper is part of series of the EDUCAUSE Center for Analysis and Research Campus Cyberinfrastructure (ECAR-CCI) Working Group. The topic of big data continues to receive a great deal of publicity because of its promise for opening new avenues of scholarly discovery and commercial opportunity. The ability to sift rapidly through massive amounts…

  16. 75 FR 55793 - Cooperative Agreement to Support the Foodborne Disease Burden Epidemiology Reference Group of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-14

    ... capacity found nowhere else. As part of the implementation of the WHO Global Strategy for Food Safety, WHO... to Estimate the Global Burden of Foodborne Diseases--Foodborne Disease Burden Epidemiology Reference... global foodborne disease epidemiology. FERG consists of the following groups: a Core (or Steering)...

  17. The Use of Therapeutic Storywriting Groups to Support Pupils with Emotional Difficulties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, Trisha

    2008-01-01

    Trisha Waters presents the theoretical basis for Therapeutic Storywriting Groups, an outline of how they work in practice and a summary of the research report commissioned by SERSEN to evaluate their impact on pupils' learning. The article finishes with a short case study of a nine-year-old boy who is on the special educational needs register for…

  18. Web-Support for Activating Use of Theory in Group-Based Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Veen, Jan; van Riemsdijk, Maarten; Laagland, Eelco; Gommer, Lisa; Jones, Val

    This paper describes a series of experiments conducted within the context of a course on organizational theory that is taught at the Department of Management Sciences at the University of Twente (Netherlands). In 1997, a group-based learning approach was adopted, but after the first year it was apparent that acquisition and application of theory…

  19. Using Professional Teaching Assistants to Support Large Group Business Communication Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rieber, Lloyd J.

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author reports on the use of classroom instructors and full-time professional teaching assistants called "course tutors" for teaching business communication to large groups at an undergraduate university. The author explains how to recruit course tutors, what course tutors do in the classroom, and the advantages and…

  20. Sal Adelante Mujer!: Support Group for Latina First-Year College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segura-Malady, Evelyn E.

    2014-01-01

    Latinas are at a disadvantage when it comes to earning a college degree, as is evidenced by the fact that they take longer to complete their degrees than Black, Asian, and white college students and have the lowest graduation rates in comparison to these respective groups (Fry, 2004; Fry, 2012; Rodriguez, Guido-Brito, Torres, & Talbot, 2000).…

  1. The Use of a Group Blog to Actively Support Learning Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duarte, Paulo

    2015-01-01

    Despite the widespread use of blogs in higher education, there remains a lack of knowledge and consensus about the use and value of blogging in higher education, particularly when used for long periods. This article investigates the use of a group blog to assist traditional teaching activities and foster collaborative learning through the…

  2. Internet Use Among Older Adults: Association With Health Needs, Psychological Capital, and Social Capital

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous studies have identified socioeconomic status and health status as predictors of older adults’ computer and Internet use, but researchers have not examined the relationships between older adults’ health needs and psychological capital (emotional well-being and self-efficacy) and social capital (social integration/ties and support networks) to different types of Internet use. Objective This study examined (1) whether older adults’ health conditions and psychological and social capital differentiate Internet users from nonusers, and (2) whether the Internet users differed in their types of Internet use on the basis of their health conditions and psychological and social capital. Methods Data for this study came from the National Health and Aging Trends Study, which is based on a nationally representative sample of US Medicare beneficiaries aged 65 years and older. The sample for this study were those who resided in the community in their own or others’ homes (N=6680). Binary logistic regression analysis was used to compare health needs, psychological capital, and social capital among (1) any type of Internet users and nonusers, (2) Internet users who engaged in health-related tasks and Internet users who did not, (3) Internet users who engaged in shopping/banking tasks and Internet users who did not, and (4) Internet users only used the Internet for email/texting and all other Internet users. Results Depressive and anxiety symptoms, measures of psychological capital, were negatively associated with Internet use among older adults (odds ratio [OR] 0.83, 95% CI 0.70-0.98, P=.03 and OR 0.79, 95% CI 0.65-0.97, P=.03, respectively), whereas most measures of social capital were positively associated with Internet use. Having more chronic medical conditions and engaging in formal volunteering increased the odds of Internet use for health-related tasks by 1.15 (95% CI 1.08-1.23, P<.001) and 1.28 (95% CI 1.05-1.57, P=.02), respectively, but anxiety

  3. Internet-Based Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gernsbacher, Morton Ann

    2014-01-01

    Google the question, "How is the Internet changing the way we communicate?," and you will find no shortage of opinions, or fears, about the Internet altering the way we communicate. Although the Internet is not necessarily making communication briefer (neither is the Internet making communication less formal), the Internet is manifesting…

  4. The Internet and You.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smigielski, Alan

    1997-01-01

    This issue of "Art to Zoo" examines the "mysteries" surrounding the Internet and offers simple "pointers" on how to access the Smithsonian's teaching materials. Many of the materials are available online. Articles include: (1) "What is the Internet?"; (2) "Connecting to the Internet"; (3) "Internet Shopping List"; (4) "Internet Terms"; (5) "A…

  5. From thought to action: young parents' reasons for participation in parenting support groups at child welfare centers.

    PubMed

    Hjelte, Jan; Sjöberg, Magdalena; Westerberg, Kristina; Hyvönen, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    In this article the focus is on young parents' engagement process in relation to participation in parenting support groups carried out at child welfare centers. This qualitative study focuses not only on young parents' reasons for participating or not participating in parenting support groups during different phases in their engagement process, but also on examining the circumstances that may contribute to such changes. The results show that these reasons can be divided into four categories: the staff, other participants, the social network, and practical circumstances. It also appears that these reasons change between different phases of their engagement process. Primarily three different circumstances contributed to variation in parents' reasons: difficulty in predicting the value of participation, increased closeness in relationships with staff and other parents, and the specific life phase in which young parents find themselves. The results have important implications for policy makers and practitioners in their work in formulating and updating parenting support; they also indicate what may be important to focus on in the recruitment of young parents, and also what may be crucial in regard to them completing their engagement in parent support groups.

  6. An overview of internet biosurveillance.

    PubMed

    Hartley, D M; Nelson, N P; Arthur, R R; Barboza, P; Collier, N; Lightfoot, N; Linge, J P; van der Goot, E; Mawudeku, A; Madoff, L C; Vaillant, L; Walters, R; Yangarber, R; Mantero, J; Corley, C D; Brownstein, J S

    2013-11-01

    Internet biosurveillance utilizes unstructured data from diverse web-based sources to provide early warning and situational awareness of public health threats. The scope of source coverage ranges from local media in the vernacular to international media in widely read languages. Internet biosurveillance is a timely modality that is available to government and public health officials, healthcare workers, and the public and private sector, serving as a real-time complementary approach to traditional indicator-based public health disease surveillance methods. Internet biosurveillance also supports the broader activity of epidemic intelligence. This overview covers the current state of the field of Internet biosurveillance, and provides a perspective on the future of the field.

  7. An Overview of Internet biosurveillance

    SciTech Connect

    Hartley, David M.; Nelson, Noele P.; Arthur, Ray; Barboza, P.; Collier, Nigel; Lightfoot, Nigel; Linge, J. P.; van der Goot, E.; Mawudeku, A.; Madoff, Lawrence; Vaillant, L.; Walters, Ronald A.; Yangarber, Roman; Mantero, Jas; Corley, Courtney D.; Brownstein, John S.

    2013-06-21

    Internet biosurveillance utilizes unstructured data from diverse Web-based sources to provide early warning and situational awareness of public health threats. The scope of source coverage ranges from local based media in the vernacular to international media in widely read languages. Internet biosurveillance is a timely modality available to government and public health officials, health care workers, and the public and private sector, serving as a real-time complementary approach to traditional indicator-based public health disease surveillance methods. Internet biosurveillance also supports the broader activity of epidemic intelligence. This review covers the current state of the field of Internet biosurveillance and provides a perspective on the future of the field.

  8. Development and evaluation of a hospital-based peer support group for younger individuals with stroke.

    PubMed

    Muller, Melissa; Toth-Cohen, Susan; Mulcahey, M J

    2014-07-01

    The incidence of stroke in younger individuals is rising, producing unique challenges due to loss of productive roles and long-term impact in the survivor's life. This paper reports the results of a hospital-based program based on occupational therapy principles that was designed to provide support and education for 13 younger individuals (<65) with stroke. Participants demonstrated improved socialization, healthy coping, and role attainment as measured by the Stroke Impact Scale (SIS), the Community Integration Questionnaire (CIQ), and a member satisfaction questionnaire. Key factors for successful implementation and considerations for future programs to meet the needs of younger adults with stroke are discussed.

  9. Oncology information on the Internet.

    PubMed

    Goto, Yasushi; Nagase, Takahide

    2012-05-01

    Owing to new developments in Internet technologies, the amount of available oncology information is growing. Both patients and caregivers are increasingly using the Internet to obtain medical information. However, while it is easy to provide information, ensuring its quality is always a concern. Thus, many instruments for evaluating the quality of health information have been created, each with its own advantages and disadvantages. The increasing importance of online search engines such as Google warrants the examination of the correlation between their rankings and medical quality. The Internet also mediates the exchange of information from one individual to another. Mailing lists of advocate groups and social networking sites help spread information to patients and caregivers. While text messages are still the main medium of communication, audio and video messages are also increasing rapidly, accelerating the communication on the Internet. Future health information developments on the Internet include merging patients' personal information on the Internet with their traditional health records and facilitating the interaction among patients, caregivers and health-care providers. Through these developments, the Internet is expected to strengthen the mutually beneficial relationships among all stakeholders in the field of medicine.

  10. Establishing support groups for HIV-infected women: using experiences to develop guiding principles for project implementation.

    PubMed

    Visser, Maretha J; Mundell, Jonathan P

    2008-07-01

    HIV-infected women need support to deal with their diagnosis as well as with the stigma attached to HIV. As part of their practical training, Master's-level psychology students negotiated with the staff of four clinics in townships in Tshwane, South Africa, to establish support groups for HIV+ women and offered to assist them in facilitating the groups. This study aimed to understand why the implementation of groups was successful in one clinic and not other clinics. The student reports on their experiences and interaction with clinic staff and clients were used as sources of data. Using qualitative data analysis, different dynamics and factors that could affect project implementation were identified in each clinic. The socio-ecological and systems theories were used to understand implementation processes and obstacles in implementation. The metaphor of building a bridge over a gorge was used to describe the different phases in and obstacles to the implementation of the intervention. Valuable lessons were learnt, resulting in the development of guiding principles for the implementation of support groups in community settings.

  11. Internet gaming addiction: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Kuss, Daria J

    2013-01-01

    In the 2000s, online games became popular, while studies of Internet gaming addiction emerged, outlining the negative consequences of excessive gaming, its prevalence, and associated risk factors. The establishment of specialized treatment centers in South-East Asia, the US, and Europe reflects the growing need for professional help. It is argued that only by understanding the appeal of Internet gaming, its context, and neurobiologic correlates can the phenomenon of Internet gaming addiction be understood comprehensively. The aim of this review is to provide an insight into current perspectives on Internet gaming addiction using a holistic approach, taking into consideration the mass appeal of online games, the context of Internet gaming addiction, and associated neuroimaging findings, as well as the current diagnostic framework adopted by the American Psychiatric Association. The cited research indicates that the individual’s context is a significant factor that marks the dividing line between excessive gaming and gaming addiction, and the game context can gain particular importance for players, depending on their life situation and gaming preferences. Moreover, the cultural context is significant because it embeds the gamer in a community with shared beliefs and practices, endowing their gaming with particular meaning. The cited neuroimaging studies indicate that Internet gaming addiction shares similarities with other addictions, including substance dependence, at the molecular, neurocircuitry, and behavioral levels. The findings provide support for the current perspective of understanding Internet gaming addiction from a disease framework. The benefits of an Internet gaming addiction diagnosis include reliability across research, destigmatization of individuals, development of efficacious treatments, and the creation of an incentive for public health care and insurance providers. The holistic approach adopted here not only highlights empirical research that

  12. Internet gaming addiction: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Kuss, Daria J

    2013-01-01

    In the 2000s, online games became popular, while studies of Internet gaming addiction emerged, outlining the negative consequences of excessive gaming, its prevalence, and associated risk factors. The establishment of specialized treatment centers in South-East Asia, the US, and Europe reflects the growing need for professional help. It is argued that only by understanding the appeal of Internet gaming, its context, and neurobiologic correlates can the phenomenon of Internet gaming addiction be understood comprehensively. The aim of this review is to provide an insight into current perspectives on Internet gaming addiction using a holistic approach, taking into consideration the mass appeal of online games, the context of Internet gaming addiction, and associated neuroimaging findings, as well as the current diagnostic framework adopted by the American Psychiatric Association. The cited research indicates that the individual's context is a significant factor that marks the dividing line between excessive gaming and gaming addiction, and the game context can gain particular importance for players, depending on their life situation and gaming preferences. Moreover, the cultural context is significant because it embeds the gamer in a community with shared beliefs and practices, endowing their gaming with particular meaning. The cited neuroimaging studies indicate that Internet gaming addiction shares similarities with other addictions, including substance dependence, at the molecular, neurocircuitry, and behavioral levels. The findings provide support for the current perspective of understanding Internet gaming addiction from a disease framework. The benefits of an Internet gaming addiction diagnosis include reliability across research, destigmatization of individuals, development of efficacious treatments, and the creation of an incentive for public health care and insurance providers. The holistic approach adopted here not only highlights empirical research that

  13. Connecting internet use with gaps in cancer knowledge.

    PubMed

    Shim, Minsun

    2008-09-01

    This study applies the knowledge gap hypothesis to the specific domain of Internet use for cancer information. In particular, this study examines disparities in online information seeking by education and ethnicity, and subsequent gaps in cancer knowledge. Perceived risk of cancer and ease of connection to the Internet are concerned as contingent factors influencing knowledge gaps. A subsample of the 2003 Health Information National Trends Survey-t-hose who have ever been online--was analyzed. Data supported the hypothesis that high education groups and White Americans were more likely to use the Internet for cancer information than were their counterparts, and online information seeking enlarged to some degree the cancer knowledge gaps between education groups. Perceived cancer risk had a weak but significant three-way interaction effect with ethnicity and online seeking on cancer knowledge, which suggests the importance of motivation in attenuating the knowledge gaps. The moderating role of ease of connection to the Internet was not supported. Discussion about the findings and further suggestions are offered.

  14. Internet dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukose, Rajan Mathew

    The World Wide Web and the Internet are rapidly expanding spaces, of great economic and social significance, which offer an opportunity to study many phenomena, often previously inaccessible, on an unprecedented scale and resolution with relative ease. These phenomena are measurable on the scale of tens of millions of users and hundreds of millions of pages. By virtue of nearly complete electronic mediation, it is possible in principle to observe the time and ``spatial'' evolution of nearly all choices and interactions. This cyber-space therefore provides a view into a number of traditional research questions (from many academic disciplines) and creates its own new phenomena accessible for study. Despite its largely self-organized and dynamic nature, a number of robust quantitative regularities are found in the aggregate statistics of interesting and useful quantities. These regularities can be understood with the help of models that draw on ideas from statistical physics as well as other fields such as economics, psychology and decision theory. This thesis develops models that can account for regularities found in the statistics of Internet congestion and user surfing patterns and discusses some practical consequences. practical consequences.

  15. [Shared web-based data center for multi-institutional clinical trials: evaluation of UMIN-INDICE (university hospital medical information network-internet data and information center for medical research)in clinical trials of JIVROSG (Japan interventional radiology in oncology study group)].

    PubMed

    Sone, Miyuki; Arai, Yasuaki; Kiuchi, Takahiro; Ishikawa, Hirono; Aoki, Noriaki; Inaba, Yoshitaka; Yoshioka, Tetsuya; Aramaki, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Matsuoka, Toshiyuki; Anai, Hiroshi; Tanigawa, Noboru; Osuga, Keigo; Takeuchi, Yoshito; Okusaka, Takushi; Kanazawa, Susumu; Matsui, Osamu; Endo, Keigo

    2012-04-01

    A patient registration system is mandatory for establishing the scientific credibility of the multi-center clinical trials. The Japan Interventional Radiology in Oncology Study Group (JIVROSG) was organized in 2002 to establish evidence supporting the procedures used in interventional radiology. The Internet Data and Information Center for Medical Research (INDICE), provided by the University Hospital Medical Information Network(UMIN), has been utilized for patient registration in the clinical trials of JIVROSG. In this study, the safety and efficacy of UMIN-INDICE were evaluated. From 2002 to 2010, 18 clinical trials, including one international trial, were conducted. A total of 736 patients were enrolled from 51 institutions. No significant trouble was encountered during this period. A questionnaire survey demonstrated that 90% of participating researchers could use this system without difficulties. UMIN-INDICE may contribute to promoting clinical trials as an infrastructure of multicenter studies.

  16. Interpreting support vector machine models for multivariate group wise analysis in neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Gaonkar, Bilwaj; T Shinohara, Russell; Davatzikos, Christos

    2015-08-01

    Machine learning based classification algorithms like support vector machines (SVMs) have shown great promise for turning a high dimensional neuroimaging data into clinically useful decision criteria. However, tracing imaging based patterns that contribute significantly to classifier decisions remains an open problem. This is an issue of critical importance in imaging studies seeking to determine which anatomical or physiological imaging features contribute to the classifier's decision, thereby allowing users to critically evaluate the findings of such machine learning methods and to understand disease mechanisms. The majority of published work addresses the question of statistical inference for support vector classification using permutation tests based on SVM weight vectors. Such permutation testing ignores the SVM margin, which is critical in SVM theory. In this work we emphasize the use of a statistic that explicitly accounts for the SVM margin and show that the null distributions associated with this statistic are asymptotically normal. Further, our experiments show that this statistic is a lot less conservative as compared to weight based permutation tests and yet specific enough to tease out multivariate patterns in the data. Thus, we can better understand the multivariate patterns that the SVM uses for neuroimaging based classification.

  17. Interpreting support vector machine models for multivariate group wise analysis in neuroimaging

    PubMed Central

    Gaonkar, Bilwaj; Shinohara, Russell T; Davatzikos, Christos

    2015-01-01

    Machine learning based classification algorithms like support vector machines (SVMs) have shown great promise for turning a high dimensional neuroimaging data into clinically useful decision criteria. However, tracing imaging based patterns that contribute significantly to classifier decisions remains an open problem. This is an issue of critical importance in imaging studies seeking to determine which anatomical or physiological imaging features contribute to the classifier’s decision, thereby allowing users to critically evaluate the findings of such machine learning methods and to understand disease mechanisms. The majority of published work addresses the question of statistical inference for support vector classification using permutation tests based on SVM weight vectors. Such permutation testing ignores the SVM margin, which is critical in SVM theory. In this work we emphasize the use of a statistic that explicitly accounts for the SVM margin and show that the null distributions associated with this statistic are asymptotically normal. Further, our experiments show that this statistic is a lot less conservative as compared to weight based permutation tests and yet specific enough to tease out multivariate patterns in the data. Thus, we can better understand the multivariate patterns that the SVM uses for neuroimaging based classification. PMID:26210913

  18. Substance abuse precedes Internet addiction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Sik; Han, Doug Hyun; Kim, Sun Mi; Renshaw, Perry F

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of the current study was to evaluate possible overlapping substance abuse and internet addiction in a large, uniformly sampled population, ranging in age from 13 to 18 years. Participants (N=73,238) in the current study were drawn from the 6th Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey (KYRBWS-V) for students from 400 middle schools and 400 high schools in 16 cities within South Korea. Of adolescent internet users, 85.2% were general users (GU), 11.9% were users with potential risk for internet addiction (PR), and 3.0% were users with high risk for internet addiction (HR). There was a difference in the number of students with alcohol drinking among the GU, PR, and HR groups (20.8% vs 23.1% vs 27.4%). There was a difference in the number of students who smoked among the GS, PR, and HR groups (11.7% vs 13.5% vs 20.4%). There was a difference in the number of students with drug use among the GU, PR, and HR groups (1.7% vs 2.0% vs 6.5%). After adjusting for sex, age, stress, depressed mood, and suicidal ideation, smoking may predict a high risk for internet addiction (OR=1.203, p=0.004). In addition, drug use may predict a high risk for internet addiction (OR=2.591, p<0.001). Because students with a high risk for internet addiction have vulnerability for addictive behaviors, co-morbid substance abuse should be evaluated and, if found, treated in adolescents with internet addiction.

  19. The Dark Side of Internet Use: Two Longitudinal Studies of Excessive Internet Use, Depressive Symptoms, School Burnout and Engagement Among Finnish Early and Late Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Salmela-Aro, Katariina; Upadyaya, Katja; Hakkarainen, Kai; Lonka, Kirsti; Alho, Kimmo

    2017-02-01

    Recent research shows an increased concern with well-being at school and potential problems associated with students' use of socio-digital technologies, i.e., the mobile devices, computers, social media, and the Internet. Simultaneously with supporting creative social activities, socio-digital participation may also lead to compulsive and addictive behavioral patterns affecting both general and school-related mental health problems. Using two longitudinal data waves gathered among 1702 (53 % female) early (age 12-14) and 1636 (64 % female) late (age 16-18) Finnish adolescents, we examined cross-lagged paths between excessive internet use, school engagement and burnout, and depressive symptoms. Structural equation modeling revealed reciprocal cross-lagged paths between excessive internet use and school burnout among both adolescent groups: school burnout predicted later excessive internet use and excessive internet use predicted later school burnout. Reciprocal paths between school burnout and depressive symptoms were also found. Girls typically suffered more than boys from depressive symptoms and, in late adolescence, school burnout. Boys, in turn, more typically suffered from excessive internet use. These results show that, among adolescents, excessive internet use can be a cause of school burnout that can later spill over to depressive symptoms.

  20. Next Generation Internet Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    desJardins, R.

    1998-01-01

    Various issues associated with next generation Internet are presented in viewgraph form. Specific topics include: 1) Internet architecture; 2) NASA's advanced networking; 3) Internet capability, capacity and applications; and 4) Systems engineering.