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Sample records for interplanetary scintillation observations

  1. A decametric wavelength radio telescope for interplanetary scintillation observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronyn, W. M.; Shawhan, S. D.

    1975-01-01

    A phased array, electrically steerable radio telescope (with a total collecting area of 18 acres), constructed for the purpose of remotely sensing electron density irregularity structure in the solar wind, is presented. The radio telescope is able to locate, map, and track large scale features of the solar wind, such as streams and blast waves, by monitoring a large grid of natural radio sources subject to rapid intensity fluctuation (interplanetary scintillation) caused by the irregularity structure. Observations verify the performance of the array, the receiver, and the scintillation signal processing circuitry of the telescope.

  2. The wavelet transform function to analyze interplanetary scintillation observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar-Rodriguez, E.; Rodriguez-Martinez, M.; Romero-Hernandez, E.; Mejia-Ambriz, J. C.; Gonzalez-Esparza, J. A.; Tokumaru, M.

    2014-05-01

    Interplanetary scintillation (IPS) observations are useful to remotely sense the inner heliosphere. We present a new technique to analyze IPS observations using a wavelet transform (WT) function. This technique allows us to derive, in a straightforward way, a simple method to obtain the scintillation index (m). We tested this WT technique to analyze IPS observations obtained by the Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory (STEL) radio telescope. The analysis of the m index of the radio source 3C48 detected by STEL over the year 2012 shows the expected decrease with solar elongation reported in previous studies. The WT technique has a great potential for future solar wind studies using IPS observations from contemporary radio telescopes.

  3. Interplanetary plasma scintillation parameters measurements retrieved from the spacecraft observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molera Calvés, Guifré; Pogrebenko, S. V.; Wagner, J.; Maccaferri, G.; Colucci, G.; Kronschnabl, G.; Scilliro, F.; Bianco, G.; Pérez Ayúcar, M.; Cosmovici, C. B.

    2010-05-01

    Measurement of the Interplanetary Scintillations (IPS) of radio signals propagating through the plasma in the Solar System by the radio astronomical instruments is a powerful tool to characterise and study the spatial and temporal variation of the electron density in the Solar wind. Several techniques based on the observation of natural and artificial radio sources have been developed during the last 50 years. Here we report our results of the IPS parameters measurement based on the multi-station observations of the planetary mission spacecraft. The ESA Venus Express spacecraft was observed at X-band (8.4 GHz) by several European VLBI stations - Metsähovi Radio Observatory (Aalto University , FI), Medicina (INAF-RA, IT), Matera (ASI, IT), Wettzell (BKG, DE), Noto (INAF-IRA, IT) and Yebes (OAN-IGN, ES) during a 2008-2010 campaign in a framework of the PRIDE (Planetary Radio Interferometry and Doppler Experiments) project as a preparatory stage for the European Radio Astronomy VLBI facilities participation in the planned ESA planetary missions (EJSM, TESM, EVE and others). Observational data were processed at Metsähovi Radio Observatory with the on-purpose developed high performance, ultra-high spectral resolution and spacecraft tracking capable software spectrometer-correlator and analysed at the Joint Institute for VLBI in Europe (JIVE, NL). High quality of acquired and analysed data enables us to study and define several parameters of the S/C signal and accompanying "ranging" tones with milli-Hz accuracy, among which the phase fluctuations of the spacecraft signal carrier line can be used to characterise the interplanetary plasma density fluctuations along the signal propagation line at different spatial and temporal scales at different Solar elongations and which exhibits a near-Kolmogorov spectrum. Such essential parameters as the phase scintillation index and bandwidth of scintillations and their dependence on the solar elongation, distance to the target

  4. Interplanetary scintillation observations with the Cocoa Cross radio telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronyn, W. M.; Shawhan, S. D.; Erskine, F. T.; Huneke, A. H.; Mitchell, D. G.

    1976-01-01

    Physical and electrical parameters for the 34.3-MHz Cocoa Cross radio telescope are given. The telescope is dedicated to the determination of solar-wind characteristics in and out of the ecliptic plane through measurement of electron-density irregularity structure as determined from IPS (interplanetary scintillation) of natural radio sources. The collecting area (72,000 sq m), angular resolution (0.4 deg EW by 0.6 deg NS), and spatial extent (1.3 km EW by 0.8 km NS) make the telescope well suited for measurements of IPS index and frequency scale for hundreds of weak radio sources without serious confusion effects.

  5. Kinematical properties of interplanetary coronal mass ejections detected by interplanetary scintillation observations during the solar cycle 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iju, T.; Tokumaru, M.; Fujiki, K.

    2011-12-01

    We report kinematical properties of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) detected by interplanetary scintillation (IPS) observations. The IPS observations have been carried out since the early 1980s using the 327MHz radio-telescope system of the Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Nagoya University. These observations allow us to probe into the solar wind between 0.2 and 1 AU with a cadence of 24 hours. In this study, we analyzed the data of solar wind disturbance factor (g-value) derived from IPS observations in 1997-2009 corresponding to the whole period of the solar cycle 23. From this analysis, we made a list of IPS disturbance event days (IDEDs) in the period. Further, we compare our list with that of near-Earth ICMEs compiled by Richardson and Cane [2010] with an assumption that an ICME cause an IDED. From this comparison, we identified 50 ICMEs, which are detected at three locations, i.e. near-Sun, interplanetary space, and near-Earth. Our statistical analyses for kinematical properties of these events yield following results: (1) fast ICMEs are rapidly decelerated, while slow ICMEs are accelerated, and consequently radial speeds converge on the speed of background solar wind during their outward propagation; (2) both of the accelerated and decelerated motions almost finish by 0.8AU with 490km/s of the critical speed for zero acceleration; (3) for the fast ICMEs, aave=k(V-Vbg) is more suited than aave=k(V-Vbg)|V-Vbg| to describes the relationship between average accelerations and speed differences, where aave, k, V, and Vbg are the average acceleration, coefficient, ICME speed, and speed of background solar wind, respectively. These results support a hypothesis that the radial motion of ICME is governed by drag force caused by an interaction with the background solar wind. Our results also suggest that stokes drag is a predominant force for the propagation of fast ICME.

  6. Observations and analysis of phase scintillation of spacecraft signal on the interplanetary plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molera Calvés, G.; Pogrebenko, S. V.; Cimò, G.; Duev, D. A.; Bocanegra-Bahamón, T. M.; Wagner, J. F.; Kallunki, J.; de Vicente, P.; Kronschnabl, G.; Haas, R.; Quick, J.; Maccaferri, G.; Colucci, G.; Wang, W. H.; Yang, W. J.; Hao, L. F.

    2014-04-01

    Aims: The phase scintillation of the European Space Agency's Venus Express (VEX) spacecraft telemetry signal was observed at X-band (λ = 3.6 cm) with a number of radio telescopes of the European Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) Network in the period 2009-2013. Methods: We found a phase fluctuation spectrum along the Venus orbit with a nearly constant spectral index of -2.42 ± 0.25 over the full range of solar elongation angles from 0° to 45°, which is consistent with Kolmogorov turbulence. Radio astronomical observations of spacecraft signals within the solar system give a unique opportunity to study the temporal behaviour of the signal's phase fluctuations caused by its propagation through the interplanetary plasma and the Earth's ionosphere. This gives complementary data to the classical interplanetary scintillation (IPS) study based on observations of the flux variability of distant natural radio sources. Results: We present here our technique and the results on IPS. We compare these with the total electron content for the line of sight through the solar wind. Finally, we evaluate the applicability of the presented technique to phase-referencing VLBI and Doppler observations of currently operational and prospective space missions.

  7. Three-dimensional exploration of the solar wind using observations of interplanetary scintillation

    PubMed Central

    TOKUMARU, Munetoshi

    2013-01-01

    The solar wind, a supersonic plasma flow continuously emanating from the Sun, governs the space environment in a vast region extending to the boundary of the heliosphere (∼100 AU). Precise understanding of the solar wind is of importance not only because it will satisfy scientific interest in an enigmatic astrophysical phenomenon, but because it has broad impacts on relevant fields. Interplanetary scintillation (IPS) of compact radio sources at meter to centimeter wavelengths serves as a useful ground-based method for investigating the solar wind. IPS measurements of the solar wind at a frequency of 327 MHz have been carried out regularly since the 1980s using the multi-station system of the Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory (STEL) of Nagoya University. This paper reviews new aspects of the solar wind revealed from our IPS observations. PMID:23391604

  8. Three-dimensional exploration of the solar wind using observations of interplanetary scintillation.

    PubMed

    Tokumaru, Munetoshi

    2013-01-01

    The solar wind, a supersonic plasma flow continuously emanating from the Sun, governs the space environment in a vast region extending to the boundary of the heliosphere (∼100 AU). Precise understanding of the solar wind is of importance not only because it will satisfy scientific interest in an enigmatic astrophysical phenomenon, but because it has broad impacts on relevant fields. Interplanetary scintillation (IPS) of compact radio sources at meter to centimeter wavelengths serves as a useful ground-based method for investigating the solar wind. IPS measurements of the solar wind at a frequency of 327 MHz have been carried out regularly since the 1980s using the multi-station system of the Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory (STEL) of Nagoya University. This paper reviews new aspects of the solar wind revealed from our IPS observations. PMID:23391604

  9. Three-dimensional exploration of the solar wind using observations of interplanetary scintillation.

    PubMed

    Tokumaru, Munetoshi

    2013-01-01

    The solar wind, a supersonic plasma flow continuously emanating from the Sun, governs the space environment in a vast region extending to the boundary of the heliosphere (∼100 AU). Precise understanding of the solar wind is of importance not only because it will satisfy scientific interest in an enigmatic astrophysical phenomenon, but because it has broad impacts on relevant fields. Interplanetary scintillation (IPS) of compact radio sources at meter to centimeter wavelengths serves as a useful ground-based method for investigating the solar wind. IPS measurements of the solar wind at a frequency of 327 MHz have been carried out regularly since the 1980s using the multi-station system of the Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory (STEL) of Nagoya University. This paper reviews new aspects of the solar wind revealed from our IPS observations.

  10. Murchison Widefield Array Observations of Anomalous Variability: A Serendipitous Night-time Detection of Interplanetary Scintillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, D. L.; Tingay, S. J.; Manoharan, P. K.; Macquart, J. P.; Hancock, P.; Morgan, J.; Mitchell, D. A.; Ekers, R. D.; Wayth, R. B.; Trott, C.; Murphy, T.; Oberoi, D.; Cairns, I. H.; Feng, L.; Kudryavtseva, N.; Bernardi, G.; Bowman, J. D.; Briggs, F.; Cappallo, R. J.; Deshpande, A. A.; Gaensler, B. M.; Greenhill, L. J.; Hurley Walker, N.; Hazelton, B. J.; Johnston Hollitt, M.; Lonsdale, C. J.; McWhirter, S. R.; Morales, M. F.; Morgan, E.; Ord, S. M.; Prabu, T.; Udaya Shankar, N.; Srivani, K. S.; Subrahmanyan, R.; Webster, R. L.; Williams, A.; Williams, C. L.

    2015-08-01

    We present observations of high-amplitude rapid (2 s) variability toward two bright, compact extragalactic radio sources out of several hundred of the brightest radio sources in one of the 30^\\circ × 30^\\circ Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) Epoch of Reionization fields using the MWA at 155 MHz. After rejecting intrinsic, instrumental, and ionospheric origins we consider the most likely explanation for this variability to be interplanetary scintillation (IPS), likely the result of a large coronal mass ejection propagating from the Sun. This is confirmed by roughly contemporaneous observations with the Ooty Radio Telescope. We see evidence for structure on spatial scales ranging from <1000 to \\gt {10}6 km. The serendipitous night-time nature of these detections illustrates the new regime that the MWA has opened for IPS studies with sensitive night-time, wide-field, low-frequency observations. This regime complements traditional dedicated strategies for observing IPS and can be utilized in real-time to facilitate dedicated follow-up observations. At the same time, it allows large-scale surveys for compact (arcsec) structures in low-frequency radio sources despite the 2\\prime resolution of the array.

  11. The Dynamic Spectrum of Interplanetary Scintillation: First Solar Wind Observations on LOFAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallows, R. A.; Asgekar, A.; Bisi, M. M.; Breen, A. R.; ter-Veen, S.

    2013-07-01

    The LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR) is a next-generation radio telescope which uses thousands of stationary dipoles to observe celestial phenomena. These dipoles are grouped in various `stations' which are centred on the Netherlands with additional `stations' across Europe. The telescope is designed to operate at frequencies from 10 to 240 MHz with very large fractional bandwidths (25 - 100 %). Several `beam-formed' observing modes are now operational and the system is designed to output data with high time and frequency resolution, which are highly configurable. This makes LOFAR eminently suited for dynamic spectrum measurements with applications in solar and planetary physics. In this paper we describe progress in developing automated data analysis routines to compute dynamic spectra from LOFAR time-frequency data, including correction for the antenna response across the radio frequency pass-band and mitigation of terrestrial radio-frequency interference (RFI). We apply these data routines to observations of interplanetary scintillation (IPS), commonly used to infer solar wind velocity and density information, and present initial science results.

  12. Observations of micro-turbulence in the solar wind near the sun with interplanetary scintillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamauchi, Y.; Misawa, H.; Kojima, M.; Mori, H.; Tanaka, T.; Takaba, H.; Kondo, T.; Tokumaru, M.; Manoharan, P. K.

    1995-01-01

    Velocity and density turbulence of solar wind were inferred from interplanetary scintillation (IPS) observations at 2.3 GHz and 8.5 GHz using a single-antenna. The observations were made during September and October in 1992 - 1994. They covered the distance range between 5 and 76 solar radii (Rs). We applied the spectrum fitting method to obtain a velocity, an axial ratio, an inner scale and a power-law spectrum index. We examined the difference of the turbulence properties near the Sun between low-speed solar wind and high-speed solar wind. Both of solar winds showed acceleration at the distance range of 10 - 30 Rs. The radial dependence of anisotropy and spectrum index did not have significant difference between low-speed and high-speed solar winds. Near the sun, the radial dependence of the inner scale showed the separation from the linear relation as reported by previous works. We found that the inner scale of high-speed solar wind is larger than that of low-speed wind.

  13. Modeling the solar wind outflow using boundary conditions from interplanetary scintillation observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Tae K.

    The Sun is the source of charged particles called the solar wind that escape the Sun's gravity and transport the solar magnetic field and energy outward. Far beyond the solar system, the solar wind pushes against the interstellar plasma and forms a huge cavity called the heliosphere. Modeling the solar wind outflow to the distant boundary regions with the local interstellar medium (LISM) requires computational resources capable of handling the complex physical processes taking place in the outer heliosphere, particularly near the solar wind-LISM boundary, and a set of time-dependent boundary conditions that closely replicate the cyclical and day-to-day variations in the solar wind parameters. We utilize interplanetary scintillation (IPS) observations from the Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory to construct such boundary conditions for Multi-Scale Fluid-Kinetic Simulations Suite (MS-FLUKSS), which is a set of numerical codes consisting of several modules suitable for simulating the interactions between ions and neutral atoms that characterize the region of our interest. However, since IPS observations contain a line-of-sight integration effect, they must be deconvolved through a tomographic procedure to provide a more accurate, three-dimensional map of the solar wind parameters. At first, we use the MHD-IPS tomography to generate the boundary conditions at 5 AU for an extended period of time to simulate the time-dependent solar wind-LISM interaction. Comparisons of the simulation results with Voyager measurements across the termination shock suggest that the MHD-IPS tomography, which is not capable of reproducing transient structures, needs significant improvements to accurately reproduce the long-term fluctuations in the global solar wind dynamic pressure. Next, we turn to the time-dependent IPS tomography to obtain the inner boundary conditions for our heliospheric MHD model since it boasts remarkable accuracy in its solar wind speed (and density

  14. Parameters of the turbulence of the interplanetary plasma derived from scintillation observations of the quasar 3C 48 at the solar-activity minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glubokova, S. K.; Tyul'bashev, S. A.; Chashei, I. V.; Shishov, V. I.

    2013-08-01

    Temporal spectra of interplanetary scintillations of the strong radio source 3C 48 based on 111 MHz observations on the Large Scanning Antenna of the Lebedev Physical Institute obtained near the solar-activity minimum are analyzed. Measurements of the temporal spectrum of the scintillations are used to estimate the angular size of the source, the velocity of inhomogeneities, and the power-law index for the spatial spectrum of the turbulence in the interplanetary plasma. The mean angular size of the source is θ 0 = 0.326″ ± 0.016″, and the mean index for the three-dimensional turbulence spectrum is n = 3.7 ± 0.2. There is some evidence that n decreases in the transition from the fast, high-speed to the slow, low-latitude solar wind.

  15. Modeling solar wind with boundary conditions from interplanetary scintillations

    SciTech Connect

    Manoharan, P.; Kim, T.; Pogorelov, N. V.; Arge, C. N.

    2015-09-30

    Interplanetary scintillations make it possible to create three-dimensional, time- dependent distributions of the solar wind velocity. Combined with the magnetic field observations in the solar photosphere, they help perform solar wind simulations in a genuinely time-dependent way. Interplanetary scintillation measurements from the Ooty Radio Astronomical Observatory in India provide directions to multiple stars and may assure better resolution of transient processes in the solar wind. In this paper, we present velocity distributions derived from Ooty observations and compare them with those obtained with the Wang-Sheeley-Arge (WSA) model. We also present our simulations of the solar wind flow from 0.1 AU to 1 AU with the boundary conditions based on both Ooty and WSA data.

  16. Modeling solar wind with boundary conditions from interplanetary scintillations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Manoharan, P.; Kim, T.; Pogorelov, N. V.; Arge, C. N.; Manoharan, P. K.

    2015-09-30

    Interplanetary scintillations make it possible to create three-dimensional, time- dependent distributions of the solar wind velocity. Combined with the magnetic field observations in the solar photosphere, they help perform solar wind simulations in a genuinely time-dependent way. Interplanetary scintillation measurements from the Ooty Radio Astronomical Observatory in India provide directions to multiple stars and may assure better resolution of transient processes in the solar wind. In this paper, we present velocity distributions derived from Ooty observations and compare them with those obtained with the Wang-Sheeley-Arge (WSA) model. We also present our simulations of the solar wind flow from 0.1 AUmore » to 1 AU with the boundary conditions based on both Ooty and WSA data.« less

  17. Separating Nightside Interplanetary and Ionospheric Scintillation with LOFAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallows, R. A.; Bisi, M. M.; Forte, B.; Ulich, Th.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Mann, G.; Vocks, C.

    2016-09-01

    Observation of interplanetary scintillation (IPS) beyond Earth-orbit can be challenging due to the necessity to use low radio frequencies at which scintillation due to the ionosphere could confuse the interplanetary contribution. A recent paper by Kaplan et al. presenting observations using the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) reports evidence of nightside IPS on two radio sources within their field of view. However, the low time cadence of 2 s used might be expected to average out the IPS signal, resulting in the reasonable assumption that the scintillation is more likely to be ionospheric in origin. To check this assumption, this Letter uses observations of IPS taken at a high time cadence using the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR). Averaging these to the same as the MWA observations, we demonstrate that the MWA result is consistent with IPS, although some contribution from the ionosphere cannot be ruled out. These LOFAR observations represent the first of nightside IPS using LOFAR, with solar wind speeds consistent with a slow solar wind stream in one observation and a coronal mass ejection expected to be observed in another.

  18. Scintillation of spacecraft radio signals on the interplanetary plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molera Calves, Guifre; Pogrebenko, Sergei; Cimo, Giuseppe; Duev, Dmitry; Bocanegra, Tatiana

    2015-04-01

    Observations of planetary spacecraft radio signals within the solar system give a unique opportunity to study the temporal and spatial behaviour of the signal's phase fluctuations caused by its propagation through the interplanetary plasma and the Earth's ionosphere. The phase scintillation of the telemetry signal of the European Space Agency's (ESA) Venus Express (VEX) and Mars Express (MEX) spacecraft was observed at X-band with a number of radio telescopes of the European VLBI Network (EVN) in the period 2008-15, within the scope of Planetary Radio Interferometry and Doppler Experiment (PRIDE) project. It was found that the phase scintillation spectra follow a Kolmogorov distribution with nearly constant spectral index of -2.42 for a full range of Venus orbital phases, from superior to inferior conjunctions and back. The solar wind plasma dominates the scintillation index and Doppler noise along the orbit from superior conjunction to the greatest elongation. Here, I will present the latest results of these observations, while approaching the inferior conjunction, where the Earth ionosphere starts to dominate, and also at the superior conjunction. Empirical coefficients for both contributions were estimated and compared for VEX and MEX.

  19. Observations of Heliospheric Faraday Rotation (FR) and Interplanetary Scintillation (IPS): Steps Towards Investigating Bz Propagation Between the Sun and the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisi, Mario M.; Fallows, Richard A.; Sobey, Charlotte; Eftekhari, Tarraneh; Jensen, Elizabeth A.; Jackson, Bernard V.; Yu, Hsiu-Shan; Hick, P. Paul; Odstrcil, Dusan; Tokumaru, Munetoshi; Oyuki Chang, M. T.

    2016-04-01

    Space weather - analogous to terrestrial weather (describing the changing pressure, temperature, wind, and humidity conditions on Earth) - is essentially a description of the changes in velocity, density, magnetic field, high-energy particles, and radiation in the near-Earth space environment including the effects of such on the Earth. Space weather can be considered to have two main strands: (i) scientific research, and (ii) applications. The former is self-explanatory, but the latter covers operational aspects including forecasting. Understanding and forecasting space weather near the Earth is of critical importance to protecting our modern-day reliance on satellites, global-communications and navigation networks, high-altitude air travel (radiation concerns particularly on polar routes), long-distance power/oil/gas lines and piping, and for any future human exploration of space to list but a few. This includes both military and commercial considerations. Two ground-based radio-observing techniques that can add to and lead our understanding and forecasting of heliospheric space weather are those of interplanetary scintillation (IPS) and heliospheric Faraday rotation (FR). We present our latest progress using these two radio heliospheric-imaging remote-sensing techniques including the use of three-dimensional (3-D) modelling and reconstruction techniques using other, additional data as input to support and better-interpret individual case-study results.

  20. Observations of Heliospheric Faraday Rotation (FR) and Interplanetary Scintillation (IPS) with the LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR): Steps Towards Improving Space-Weather Forecasting Capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisi, M. M.; Fallows, R. A.; Sobey, C.; Eftekhari, T.; Jensen, E. A.; Jackson, B. V.; Yu, H. S.; Hick, P. P.; Odstrcil, D.; Tokumaru, M.

    2015-12-01

    The phenomenon of space weather - analogous to terrestrial weather which describes the changing pressure, temperature, wind, and humidity conditions on Earth - is essentially a description of the changes in velocity, density, magnetic field, high-energy particles, and radiation in the near-Earth space environment including the effects of such changes on the Earth's magnetosphere, radiation belts, ionosphere, and thermosphere. Space weather can be considered to have two main strands: (i) scientific research, and (ii) applications. The former is self-explanatory, but the latter covers operational aspects which includes its forecasting. Understanding and forecasting space weather in the near-Earth environment is vitally important to protecting our modern-day reliance (militarily and commercially) on satellites, global-communication and navigation networks, high-altitude air travel (radiation concerns particularly on polar routes), long-distance power/oil/gas lines and piping, and for any future human exploration of space to list but a few. Two ground-based radio-observing remote-sensing techniques that can aid our understanding and forecasting of heliospheric space weather are those of interplanetary scintillation (IPS) and heliospheric Faraday rotation (FR). The LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR) is a next-generation 'software' radio telescope centered in The Netherlands with international stations spread across central and northwest Europe. For several years, scientific observations of IPS on LOFAR have been undertaken on a campaign basis and the experiment is now well developed. More recently, LOFAR has been used to attempt scientific heliospheric FR observations aimed at remotely sensing the magnetic field of the plasma traversing the inner heliosphere. We present our latest progress using these two radio heliospheric-imaging remote-sensing techniques including the use of three-dimensional (3-D) modeling and reconstruction techniques using other, additional data as input

  1. IPS limits on very low frequency VLBI. [Interplanetary Scintillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Dayton L.; Williamson, Robert S., III

    1990-01-01

    The ability of a space-based radio interferometer array to make high resolution images at frequencies of only a few MHz will be limited by interplanetary scintillation. Numerical simulations have been used to study the severity of interferometer phase fluctuations caused by the density fluctuations in the solar wind over a range of frequencies and solar elongation angles. The impact of these fluctuations on the quality of radio images produced has also been investigated. The results show that, for baselines up to 100 km, accurate imaging should be possible when nu sin (epsilon/2) is equal to or greater than 2.5, where nu is the observing frequency in MHz and epsilon is the solar elongation angle.

  2. Using Interplanetary Scintillation (IPS) For Space-Weather Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisi, M. M.; Jackson, B. V.; Fallows, R. A.; Tokumaru, M.; Jensen, E. A.; Lee, J.; Harrison, R.; Hapgood, M. A.; Wu, C.; Davies, J.

    2013-12-01

    There have been several recent space-weather events where few or no signatures of an impending Earth-affecting large-scale heliospheric structure have been detected until the structure has impacted the Earth's space environment or is at least in close proximity. In addition, some of these (for example, the late-May/early-June 2013 geomagnetic storm) have been relatively-small coronal mass ejection (CME) ';like' structures complicated by stream-interaction and/or co-rotating features. Significant progress has been made over the last few years on the implementation of, and science resulting from, interplanetary scintillation (IPS) radio remote-sensing observations of the inner heliosphere. These observations of IPS have been undertaken using the European Incoherent SCATter (EISCAT) radar and the LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR) radio-telescope systems, as well as with the Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory (STEL/STELab) IPS arrays and the new IPS system at the Korean Space Weather Center (KSWC). LOFAR is a low-frequency pathfinder for the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), which is expected to be the World's largest ever radio-telescope system. Here, we will primarily use the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) three-dimensional (3-D) tomography by incorporating STELab IPS data along with, where data are available, the use of additional targeted individual observations of IPS from other systems as well as 3-D MHD simulations. The overall aim is to try to ascertain how well current IPS methods can be used for space-weather forecasting (and aftcasting), particularly for events seemingly missed by other extant forecasting methods.

  3. The use of various interplanetary scintillation indices within geomagnetic forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucek, E. A.; Clark, T. D. G.; Moore, V.

    1996-02-01

    Interplanetary scintillation (IPS), the twinkling of small angular diameter radio sources, is caused by the interaction of the signal with small-scale plasma irregularities in the solar wind. The technique may be used to sense remotely the near-Earth heliosphere and observations of a sufficiently large number of sources may be used to track large-scale disturbances as they propagate from close to the Sun to the Earth. Therefore, such observations have potential for use within geomagnetic forecasts. We use daily data from the Mullard Radio Astronomy Observatory, made available through the World Data Centre, to test the success of geomagnetic forecasts based on IPS observations. The approach discussed here was based on the reduction of the information in a map to a single number or series of numbers. The advantages of an index of this nature are that it may be produced routinely and that it could ideally forecast both the occurrence and intensity of geomagnetic activity. We start from an index that has already been described in the literature, INDEX35. On the basis of visual examination of the data in a full skymap format modifications were made to the way in which the index was calculated. It was hoped that these would lead to an improvement in its forecasting ability. Here we assess the forecasting potential of the index using the value of the correlation coefficient between daily Ap and the IPS index, with IPS leading by 1 day. We also compare the forecast based on the IPS index with forecasts of Ap currently released by the Space Environment Services Center (SESC). Although we find that the maximum improvement achieved is small, and does not represent a significant advance in forecasting ability, the IPS forecasts at this phase of the solar cycle are of a similar quality to those made by SESC.

  4. Sensing CMEs Propagating in the Interplanetary Medium. MEXART IPS Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Esparza, A.; Romero Hernandez, E.; Aguilar-Rodriguez, E.; Ontiveros-Hernandez, V.; Rodriguez-Martinez, M. R.; Mejia-Ambriz, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    The Mexican Array Radiotelescope (MEXART) is a ground instrument fully dedicated to perform Interplanetary Scintillation (IPS) observations to track large-scale solar wind disturbances within the Sun and the Earth. The MEXART is located at Michoacan (19 degrees 48' North, 101 degrees 41' West) and has an operation frequency of 140 MHz. The IPS technique is based on the scintillations that interplanetary disturbances (e.g., ICMEs) causes on the signal of small diameter cosmic radio sources detected by a radiotelescope. We report the tracking of the first solar disturbances detected by the instrument during the maximum of solar cycle 24. We estimated solar wind velocities and scintillation indexes (m). We present the first curves of the variation of the scintillating index with respect to the heliocentric distance for some strong radio sources using IPS observations at 140 MHZ. We identified events associated with strong scintilltaion in our data. We combine the IPS data with white light chronograph observations to identify the first CMEs in the interplanetary medium detected by the instrument.

  5. Interplanetary scintillations of the radio source ensemble at the maximum of cycle 24 of solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chashei, I. V.; Shishov, V. I.; Tyul'bashev, S. A.; Subaev, I. A.

    2016-05-01

    The results of the interplanetary scintillation observations performed in the period of the maximum of solar activity from April 2013 to April 2014 on the BSA LPI radio telescope at the frequency 111MHz are presented. Fluctuations of the radio emission flux were recorded round the clock for all sources with a scintillating flux of more than 0.2 Jy falling in a strip of sky with a width of 50° over declinations corresponding to a 96-beam directional pattern of the radio telescope. The total number of sources observed during the day reaches 5000. The processing of the observational data was carried out on the assumption that a set of scintillating sources represents a homogeneous statistical ensemble. Daily two-dimensional maps of the distribution of the level of scintillations, whose analysis shows the strong nonstationarity and large-scale irregularity of the spatial distribution of solar wind parameters, were constructed. According to maps of the distribution of the level of scintillations averaged over monthly intervals, the global structure of the distribution of the solar wind was investigated in the period of the maximum of solar activity, which was found to be on the average close to spherically symmetric. The data show that on a spherically symmetric background an east-west asymmetry is observed, which indicates the presence of a large-scale structure of a spiral type in the solar wind.

  6. Detecting and tracking changes in solar wind conditions using interplanetary scintillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Richard A.; Hapgood, M. A.; Sime, D. G.

    1992-09-01

    A scintillation activity index which provides an objective method for the identification of interplanetary features such as discrete ejecta and corotating streams was developed. Its effectiveness in predicting several sudden impulse events and correlating with geomagnetic activity is demonstrated. Using the Interplanetary Scintillation (IPS) activity index, I35, a data set during Feb. to Apr. 1992 was examined. A good correlation between the activity seen in interplanetary space and geomagnetic activity was found. Apparently, the onset of the most significant event in the geomagnetic index, Ap, is observed several days earlier using the IPS technique. Also, using a prediction technique developed for the IPS index, an 'event approaching' was predicted on six days, all of which occur on either the day of a sudden impulse or within the three days prior to a sudden impulse. One IPS event apparently unrelated to Ap or sudden impulse activity was found. This is proposed to be due to an event missing the Earth or to an event with a northward directed magnetic field which is unlikely to cause a significant impulse to the Earth's magnetic field.

  7. A mathematical analysis of the theory of interplanetary scintillation in the weak scattering approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, D. G.; Roelof, E. C.

    1976-01-01

    A simplified analytical technique is presented for modeling the interplanetary scintillation of radio sources of finite angular size with a power-law electron-density-fluctuation power spectrum. The simplification results from the representation of the scintillation spectrum in confluent hypergeometric functions. The approximations presented allow fast numerical evaluation of a spectrum for a weakly scattering but extended medium with less than 10% error over the entire spectrum. Parameters describing anisotropic electron irregularities as well as anisotropic source structure are included, and the dependence of the spectrum normalization on the scales of the medium is derived explicitly. The parametric description of the domains of convergence of the approximate expansions also provides a simple conceptualization of the relative contributions of the scattered radiation along the line of sight to the observed spectrum. This is particularly useful for sources of finite angular size. This technique is applied to previously published observations.

  8. Remote sensing of interplanetary shocks using a scintillation method

    SciTech Connect

    Hewish, A.

    1987-05-01

    Energetic interplanetary disturbances originating at the Sun cause geomagnetic storms when they reach the Earth. The disturbances affect radio-communications, damage electrical power grid networks, increase the atmospheric density and drag on satellites, and are accompanied by showers of energetic particles which present radiation hazards to manned spacecraft. This paper describes a new ground-based method for locating and tracking transients in interplanetary space long before they reach the Earth. Continuous observations of transients during a two year period near support maximum have demonstrated the potential of the technique for predicting geomagnetic storms and given new information on the zones of the solar disk from which transients originate. The latter contradicts some widely held theories in solar-terrestrial physics and shows that a major revision of ideas is needed. Contrary to expectations, it has been found that open-magnetic field regions known as coronal holes are the dominant sources of the most powerful interplanetary shocks. This result conflicts with the solar flare theory of geomagnetic storms.

  9. Interplanetary phase scintillation and the search for very low frequency gravitational radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. W.; Woo, R.; Estabrook, F. B.

    1979-01-01

    Observations of radio-wave phase scintillation are reported which used the Viking spacecraft having an earth-spacecraft link very similar to that which will be used in very low-frequency (VLF) gravitational-wave searches. The phase power-spectrum level varies by seven orders of magnitude as the sun-earth-spacecraft (elongation) angle changes from 1 to 175 deg. It is noteworthy that a broad minimum in the S-band (2.3 GHz) phase fluctuation occurs in the antisolar direction; the corresponding fractional frequency stability (square root Allan variance) is about 3 x 10 to the -14th for 1000-s integration times. A simultaneous two-frequency two-station observation indicates that the contribution to the phase fluctuation from the ionosphere is significant but dominated by the contribution from the interplanetary medium. Nondispersive tropospheric scintillation was not detected (upper limit to fractional frequency stability about 5 x 10 to the -14th). Evidently, even observations in the antisolar direction will require higher radio frequencies, phase scintillation calibration, and correlation techniques in the data processing, for detection of gravitational bursts at the anticipated strain amplitude levels of no more than 10 to the -15th.

  10. The Effect of Interplanetary Scintillation on Epoch of Reionization Power Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trott, Cathryn M.; Tingay, Steven J.

    2015-11-01

    Interplanetary Scintillation (IPS) induces intensity fluctuations in small angular size astronomical radio sources via the distortive effects of spatially and temporally varying electron density associated with outflows from the Sun. These radio sources are a potential foreground contaminant signal for redshifted HI emission from the Epoch of Reionization (EoR) because they yield time-dependent flux density variations in bright extragalactic point sources. Contamination from foreground continuum sources complicates efforts to discriminate the cosmological signal from other sources in the sky. In IPS, at large angles from the Sun applicable to EoR observations, weak scattering induces spatially and temporally correlated fluctuations in the measured flux density of sources in the field, potentially affecting the detectability of the EoR signal by inducing non-static variations in the signal strength. In this work, we explore the impact of interplanetary weak scintillation on EoR power spectrum measurements, accounting for the instrumental spatial and temporal sampling. We use published power spectra of electron density fluctuations and parameters of EoR experiments to derive the IPS power spectrum in the wavenumber phase space of EoR power spectrum measurements. The contrast of IPS power to expected cosmological power is used as a metric to assess the impact of IPS. We show that IPS has a spectral structure different from power from foregrounds alone, but the additional leakage into the EoR observation parameter space is negligible under typical IPS conditions, unless data are used from deep within the foreground contamination region.

  11. THE EFFECT OF INTERPLANETARY SCINTILLATION ON EPOCH OF REIONIZATION POWER SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Trott, Cathryn M.; Tingay, Steven J.

    2015-11-20

    Interplanetary Scintillation (IPS) induces intensity fluctuations in small angular size astronomical radio sources via the distortive effects of spatially and temporally varying electron density associated with outflows from the Sun. These radio sources are a potential foreground contaminant signal for redshifted HI emission from the Epoch of Reionization (EoR) because they yield time-dependent flux density variations in bright extragalactic point sources. Contamination from foreground continuum sources complicates efforts to discriminate the cosmological signal from other sources in the sky. In IPS, at large angles from the Sun applicable to EoR observations, weak scattering induces spatially and temporally correlated fluctuations in the measured flux density of sources in the field, potentially affecting the detectability of the EoR signal by inducing non-static variations in the signal strength. In this work, we explore the impact of interplanetary weak scintillation on EoR power spectrum measurements, accounting for the instrumental spatial and temporal sampling. We use published power spectra of electron density fluctuations and parameters of EoR experiments to derive the IPS power spectrum in the wavenumber phase space of EoR power spectrum measurements. The contrast of IPS power to expected cosmological power is used as a metric to assess the impact of IPS. We show that IPS has a spectral structure different from power from foregrounds alone, but the additional leakage into the EoR observation parameter space is negligible under typical IPS conditions, unless data are used from deep within the foreground contamination region.

  12. Faraday Rotation (FR) and Interplanetary Scintillation (IPS) Case Studies Using the LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisi, M. M.; Fallows, R. A.; Sobey, C.; Eftekhari, T.; Jensen, E. A.; Jackson, B. V.; Yu, H. S.; Gershman, D. J.; Raines, J. M.; Odstrcil, D.

    2014-12-01

    We present an update on the progress made using the LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR) next-generation radio telescope for space-weather related activities - namely observations of interplanetary scintillation (IPS) and the first tests of observing heliospheric Faraday rotation (FR). The former has been used for half a century for heliospheric science and much progress has been made in recent years for using IPS in space weather science and forecasting. The latter, typically an astrophysical technique that uses pulsars and extragalactic radio sources to study the Galactic magnetic field, is now being investigated for heliospheric studies. The determination of heliospheric FR, combined with observations of IPS, can provide essential information on the Sun's extended magnetic-field structure out into the inner heliosphere, especially when also combined with other forms of remote-sensing/heliospheric imaging data, and in-situ measurements. Here, we will present recent observations of IPS using LOFAR, including preliminary highlights from the first LOFAR joint IPS and heliospheric FR science campaign and investigate pathways for determining Bzfrom, and an overview of the potential of, such observations. LOFAR is an interferometric phased-array radio telescope that can be used to observe between 10 MHz (depending on ionospheric conditions) and 240 MHz, and consists of many relatively-low-cost antennas. These antennas are organised into 'stations' located in an area of ~100km diameter in the Netherlands, with additional international stations spread across central and western Europe with several more in the planning stages.

  13. Multi-Spacecraft Observations of Interplanetary Shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, C. W.; Tokar, R. L.; Skoug, R. M.; Szabo, A.

    1999-01-01

    Using multi-spacecraft observations primarily from ACE and WIND and from IMP 8 and Geotail when available, the 3-dimensional structure of interplanetary shocks on the hundred Earth radii scale will be discussed. The complete magnetic field, and solar wind ion and electron data sets were used to fit the shocks with a full non-linear least squares fitting "Rankine-Hugoniot" technique yielding the local shock surface normals and speeds with associated uncertainties. Multi-spacecraft results reveal that on the distance scale of ACE's L1 halo orbit the shocks deviate from a simple planar geometry. This result has important consequences for the prediction of the exact arrival times of interplanetary shocks at the Earth's magnetosphere, and hence, on the reliability of space weather predictions. It also has implications on the coherence scale of solar wind structures and their evolution from the Sun to Earth.

  14. Exploration of Solar Wind Acceleration Region Using Interplanetary Scintillation of Water Vapor Maser Source and Quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tokumaru, Munetoshi; Yamauchi, Yohei; Kondo, Tetsuro

    2001-01-01

    Single-station observations of interplanetary scintillation UPS) at three microwave frequencies 2, 8, and 22GHz, were carried out between 1989 and 1998 using a large (34-micro farad) radio telescope at the Kashima Space Research Center of the Communications Research Laboratory. The aim of these observations was to explore the near-sun solar wind, which is the key region for the study of the solar wind acceleration mechanism. Strong quasars, 3C279 and 3C273B, were used for the Kashima IPS observations at 2 and 8GHz, and a water-vapor maser source, IRC20431, was used for the IPS observations at 22GHz. Solar wind speeds derived from Kashima IPS data suggest that the solar wind acceleration takes place at radial distances between 10 and 30 solar radii (Rs) from the sun. The properties of the turbulence spectrum (e.g. anisotropy, spectral index, inner scale) inferred from the Kashima data were found to change systematically in the solar wind acceleration region. While the solar wind in the maximum phase appears to be dominated by the slow wind, fast and rarefied winds associated with the coronal holes were found to develop significantly at high latitudes as the solar activity declined. Nevertheless, the Kashima data suggests that the location of the acceleration region is stable throughout the solar cycle.

  15. Exploration of Solar Wind Acceleration Region Using Interplanetary Scintillation of Water Vapor Maser Source and Quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tokumaru, Munetoshi; Yamauchi, Yohei; Kondo, Tetsuro

    2001-01-01

    Single-station observations of interplanetary scintillation (IPS) at three microwave frequencies; 2 GHz, 8 GHz and 22 GHz have been carried out between 1989 and 1998 using a large (34 m farad) radio telescope at the Kashima Space Research Center of the Communications Research Laboratory. The aim of these observations is to explore the near-sun solar wind, which is the key region for the study of the solar wind acceleration mechanism. Strong quasars; 3C279 and 3C273B were used for Kashima IPS observations at 2 GHz and 8 GHz, and a water vapor maser source, IRC20431 was used for the IPS observations at 22 GHz. Solar wind velocities derived from Kashima IPS data suggest that the solar wind acceleration takes place at radial distances between 10 and 30 solar radii (R(sub s)) from the sun. Properties of the turbulence spectrum (e.g. anisotropy, spectral index, inner scale) inferred from Kashima data are found to change systematically in the solar wind acceleration region. While the solar wind in the maximum phase appears to be dominated by the slow wind, fast and rarefied winds associated with coronal holes are found to develop significantly at high latitudes as the solar activity declines. Nevertheless, Kashima data suggests that the location of the acceleration region is stable throughout the solar cycle.

  16. Interplanetary magnetic sector polarity inferred from polar geomagnetic field observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friis-Christensen, E.; Lassen, K.; Wilcox, J. M.; Gonzalez, W.; Colburn, D. S.

    1971-01-01

    In order to infer the interplanetary sector polarity from polar geomagnetic field diurnal variations, measurements were carried out at Godhavn and Thule (Denmark) Geomagnetic Observatories. The inferred interplanetary sector polarity was compared with the polarity observed at the same time by Explorer 33 and 35 magnetometers. It is shown that the polarity (toward or away from the sun) of the interplanetary magnetic field can be reliably inferred from observations of the polar cap geomagnetic fields.

  17. MHD heliosphere with boundary conditions from a tomographic reconstruction using interplanetary scintillation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, T. K.; Pogorelov, N. V.; Borovikov, S. N.; Jackson, B. V.; Yu, H.-S.; Tokumaru, M.

    2014-10-01

    Observations of interplanetary scintillation (IPS) provide a set of data that is used in estimating the solar wind parameters with reasonably good accuracy. Various tomography techniques have been developed to deconvolve the line-of-sight integration effects ingrained in observations of IPS to improve the accuracy of solar wind reconstructions. Among those, the time-dependent tomography developed at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) is well known for its remarkable accuracy in reproducing the solar wind speed and density at Earth by iteratively fitting a kinematic solar wind model to observations of IPS and near-Earth spacecraft measurements. However, the kinematic model gradually breaks down as the distance from the Sun increases beyond the orbit of Earth. Therefore, it would be appropriate to use a more sophisticated model, such as a magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) model, to extend the kinematic solar wind reconstruction beyond the Earth's orbit and to the outer heliosphere. To test the suitability of this approach, we use boundary conditions provided by the UCSD time-dependent tomography to propagate the solar wind outward in a MHD model and compare the simulation results with in situ measurements and also with the corresponding kinematic solution. Interestingly, we find notable differences in proton radial velocity and number density at Earth and various locations in the inner heliosphere between the MHD results and both the in situ data and the kinematic solution. For example, at 1 AU, the MHD velocities are generally larger than the spacecraft data by up to 150 km s-1, and the amplitude of density fluctuations is also markedly larger in the MHD solution. We show that the MHD model can deliver more reasonable results at Earth with an ad hoc adjustment of the inner boundary values. However, we conclude that the MHD model using the inner boundary conditions derived from kinematic simulations has little chance to match IPS and in situ data as well as the

  18. Interplanetary magnetic sector polarity inferred from polar geomagnetic field observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eriss-Christensen, E.; Lassen, K.; Wilcox, J. M.; Gonzalez, W.; Colburn, D. S.

    1971-01-01

    With the use of a prediction technique it is shown that the polarity (toward or away from the sun) of the interplanetary magnetic field can be reliably inferred from observations of the polar geomagnetic field.

  19. Scintillation Hole Observed by FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shih Ping; Yenq Liu, Jann; Krishnanunni Rajesh, Panthalingal

    2013-04-01

    Ionospheric scintillations can significantly disturb satellite positioning, navigation, and communication. FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC provides the first 3-D global observation by solo instrument (radio occultation experiment, GOX). The GPS L-band amplitude fluctuation from 50Hz signal is received and recorded by F3/C GOX to calculate S4-index from 50-800km altitude. The global F3/C S4 index are subdivided and examined in various latitudes, longitudes, altitudes, and seasons during 2007-2012. The F-region scintillations in the equatorial and low-latitude ionosphere start around post-sunset period and often persist till post-midnight hours (0300 MLT, magnetic local time) during the March and September equinox as well as December Solstice seasons. The E-region scintillations reveal a clear solar zenith effect and yield pronounced intensities in mid-latitudes during the Summer Solstice seasons, which are well correlated with occurrences of the sporadic E-layer. It is interesting to find there is no scintillation, which is termed "scintillation hole", in the E region ranging from 80 to 130km altitude over the South Africa region, and become the most pronounced in November-January (December Solstice seasons or summer months). Other space-borne and ground based observations are use to confirm the existence of the scintillation hole.

  20. Global Magnetospheric Response to an Interplanetary Shock: THEMIS Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Hui; Sibeck, David G.; Zong, Q.-G.; McFadden, James P.; Larson, Davin; Glassmeier, K.-H.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the global response of geospace plasma environment to an interplanetary shock at approx. 0224 UT on May 28, 2008 from multiple THEMIS spacecraft observations in the magnetosheath (THEMIS B and C) and the mid-afternoon (THEMIS A) and dusk magnetosphere (THEMIS D and E). The interaction of the transmitted interplanetary shock with the magnetosphere has global effects. Consequently, it can affect geospace plasma significantly. After interacting with the bow shock, the interplanetary shock transmitted a fast shock and a discontinuity which propagated through the magnetosheath toward the Earth at speeds of 300 km/s and 137 km/s respectively. THEMIS A observations indicate that the plasmaspheric plume changed significantly by the interplanetary shock impact. The plasmaspheric plume density increased rapidly from 10 to 100/ cubic cm in 4 min and the ion distribution changed from isotropic to strongly anisotropic distribution. Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves observed by THEMIS A are most likely excited by the anisotropic ion distributions caused by the interplanetary shock impact. To our best knowledge, this is the first direct observation of the plasmaspheric plume response to an interplanetary shock's impact. THEMIS A, but not D or E, observed a plasmaspheric plume in the dayside magnetosphere. Multiple spacecraft observations indicate that the dawn-side edge of the plasmaspheric plume was located between THEMIS A and D (or E).

  1. Scintillation observations near the sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coles, W. A.; Rickett, B. J.; Scott, S. L.

    1978-01-01

    Results on the electron density spectrum, the random velocity and the mean velocity of the solar wind in the region from 5 to 100 solar radii are presented. Results are based on intensity scintillations of incoherent radio sources at different locations and different radio frequencies. The shape of the electron density irregularity spectrum is shown to be well modeled by a power law in wavenumber with a slope that abruptly steepens at higher wavenumbers. This two slope power law model is shown to have a break (defined as the wavenumber of the change of slope) that increases with decreasing distance from the Sun. The fractional random velocity is shown to be insignificant at distances of greater than 40 solar radii, but shows a steady increase with decreasing solar distance inside of 40 solar radii.

  2. Observations of the solar plasma using radio scattering and scintillation methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hewish, A.

    1972-01-01

    Observations of the solar plasma using the interplanetary scintillation technique have been made at radial distances of 0.03 to 1.2 AU. The solar wind is found to be independent of ecliptic latitude and radial distance, except close to the sun where acceleration is observed. Plasma density irregularities on a scale near the proton gyro radius, which modulate the mean density by about 1 percent, are present throughout the observed range of radial distance.

  3. Correlation of scintillation occurrence with interplanetary magnetic field reversals and impact on Global Navigation Satellite System receiver tracking performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aquino, M.; Sreeja, V.

    2013-05-01

    Ionospheric scintillation is characterized by rapid fluctuations in the amplitude and phase of transionospheric radio signals as they pass through small scale ionospheric plasma density irregularities. Over the auroral regions, the occurrence of scintillation is associated with large-scale plasma structures and is mainly enhanced during geomagnetic storms. Scintillation can cause cycle slips and degrade the positioning accuracy in Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) receivers. This paper investigates the correlation between the southward reversals of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) Bz and the occurrence of scintillation, along with the consequential impact on the tracking performance of a GNSS receiver located at a high-latitude station, Bronnoysund (geographic latitude 65°N) in Norway. The analysis revealed that the occurrence of scintillation at this station is largely controlled by the IMF conditions. The receiver tracking performance under strong scintillations is evaluated by the receiver PLL (phase-locked loop) tracking jitter variance. The dependence of the PLL jitter variance on phase scintillation can be best represented by a quadratic fit.

  4. New observations of scintillation climatology from the Scintillation Network Decision Aid (SCINDA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Y.; Caton, R. G.; Wiens, K.; Groves, K. M.

    2012-12-01

    The Scintillation Network Decision Aid (SCINDA) was established with three ground sites in the mid-1990's by the Air Force Research Laboratory and has continued to grow into a global scintillation observation network. This system consists of an array of VHF and GPS receivers which continually measure scintillation in the equatorial region. In the past few years, the extended network of ground stations has expanded into the African sector. Initial results from yearly scintillation data obtained from two VHF receivers in Narobi, Kenya and Bahir Dar, Ethiopia in 2011 indicate the presence of scintillation activity throughout the June-July -August (northern summer) season which is inconsistent with current state-of-the-art ionospheric climatology models. It is well known that seasonal equatorial scintillation patterns vary with longitude based on geographical location. For example, the scintillation activity at VHF frequencies are absent in the Pacific sector during the months of November to February while observations from South America show nearly continuous scintillation during this same time period. With little to no ground-based observations, the scintillation climatology over the African region has not been well understood. In the paper, we will present S4 measurements various longitudinal sectors, including the first look at solar maximum type conditions over the African sector, and provide comparisons with output from a global climatology model.

  5. Energetic Particle Pressure at Interplanetary Shocks: STEREO-A Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lario, D.; Decker, R. B.; Roelof, E. C.; Viñas, A.-F.

    2015-11-01

    We study periods of elevated energetic particle intensities observed by STEREO-A when the partial pressure exerted by energetic (≥83 keV) protons (PEP) is larger than the pressure exerted by the interplanetary magnetic field (PB). In the majority of cases, these periods are associated with the passage of interplanetary shocks. Periods when PEP exceeds PB by more than one order of magnitude are observed in the upstream region of fast interplanetary shocks where depressed magnetic field regions coincide with increases of energetic particle intensities. When solar wind parameters are available, PEP also exceeds the pressure exerted by the solar wind thermal population (PTH). Prolonged periods (>12 hr) with both PEP > PB and PEP > PTH may also occur when energetic particles accelerated by an approaching shock encounter a region well upstream of the shock characterized by low magnetic field magnitude and tenuous solar wind density. Quasi-exponential increases of the sum PSUM = PB + PTH + PEP are observed in the immediate upstream region of the shocks regardless of individual changes in PEP, PB, and PTH, indicating a coupling between PEP and the pressure of the background medium characterized by PB and PTH. The quasi-exponential increase of PSUM implies a radial gradient ∂PSUM/∂r > 0 that is quasi-stationary in the shock frame and results in an outward force applied to the plasma upstream of the shock. This force can be maintained by the mobile energetic particles streaming upstream of the shocks that, in the most intense events, drive electric currents able to generate diamagnetic cavities and depressed solar wind density regions.

  6. Observations of the spectrum of the interplanetary dust emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salama, A.; de Bernardis, P.; Masi, S.; Moreno, G.

    Published data from satellite (IRAS), rocket-borne (ZIP), and balloon-borne (ARGO) spectroscopic observations of interplanetary dust emission in the FIR are compiled and analyzed, extending the spatial-distribution results of Salama et al. (1986) to evaluate the possible role of silicate and graphite grains in determining the FIR spectrum. The zodiacal dust spectra in the ecliptic plane at solar elongations epsilon = 45 and 90 deg are calculated on the basis of theoretical models and compared with the observations. A model based on a flat distribution of 10-micron-diameter silicate grains is shown to reproduce the observed spectrum at epsilon = 45 deg but not at epsilon = 90 deg, where a model with a mixture of silicate and graphite grains gives a better, but still unsatisfactory fit to the observations.

  7. Ionospheric scintillation observations over Kenyan region - Preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olwendo, O. J.; Xiao, Yu; Ming, Ou

    2016-11-01

    Ionospheric scintillation refers to the rapid fluctuations in the amplitude and phase of a satellite signal as it passes through small-scale plasma density irregularities in the ionosphere. By analyzing ionospheric scintillation observation datasets from satellite signals such as GPS signals we can study the morphology of ionospheric bubbles. At low latitudes, the diurnal behavior of scintillation is driven by the formation of large-scale equatorial density depletions which form one to two hours after sunset via the Rayleigh-Taylor instability mechanism near the magnetic equator. In this work we present ionospheric scintillation activity over Kenya using data derived from a newly installed scintillation monitor developed by CRIRP at Pwani University (39.78°E, 3.24°S) during the period August to December, 2014. The results reveal the scintillation activity mainly occurs from post-sunset to post-midnight hours, and ceases around 04:00 LT. We also found that the ionospheric scintillation tends to appear at the southwest and northwest of the station. These locations coincide with the southern part of the Equatorial Ionization Anomaly crest over Kenya region. The occurrence of post-midnight L-band scintillation events which are not linked to pre-midnight scintillation observations raises fundamental question on the mechanism and source of electric fields driving the plasma depletion under conditions of very low background electron density.

  8. Broadband meter-wavelength observations of ionospheric scintillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallows, R. A.; Coles, W. A.; McKay-Bukowski, D.; Vierinen, J.; Virtanen, I. I.; Postila, M.; Ulich, Th.; Enell, C.-F.; Kero, A.; Iinatti, T.; Lehtinen, M.; Orispää, M.; Raita, T.; Roininen, L.; Turunen, E.; Brentjens, M.; Ebbendorf, N.; Gerbers, M.; Grit, T.; Gruppen, P.; Meulman, H.; Norden, M. J.; de Reijer, J.-P.; Schoenmakers, A.; Stuurwold, K.

    2014-12-01

    Intensity scintillations of cosmic radio sources are used to study astrophysical plasmas like the ionosphere, the solar wind, and the interstellar medium. Normally, these observations are relatively narrow band. With Low-Frequency Array (LOFAR) technology at the Kilpisjärvi Atmospheric Imaging Receiver Array (KAIRA) station in northern Finland we have observed scintillations over a three-octave bandwidth. "Parabolic arcs," which were discovered in interstellar scintillations of pulsars, can provide precise estimates of the distance and velocity of the scattering plasma. Here we report the first observations of such arcs in the ionosphere and the first broadband observations of arcs anywhere, raising hopes that study of the phenomenon may similarly improve the analysis of ionospheric scintillations. These observations were made of the strong natural radio source Cygnus-A and covered the entire 30-250 MHz band of KAIRA. Well-defined parabolic arcs were seen early in the observations, before transit, and disappeared after transit although scintillations continued to be obvious during the entire observation. We show that this can be attributed to the structure of Cygnus-A. Initial results from modeling these scintillation arcs are consistent with simultaneous ionospheric soundings taken with other instruments and indicate that scattering is most likely to be associated more with the topside ionosphere than the F region peak altitude. Further modeling and possible extension to interferometric observations, using international LOFAR stations, are discussed.

  9. Observations of Electromagnetic Whistler Precursors at Supercritical Interplanetary Shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, L. B., III; Koval, A.; Szabo, Adam; Breneman, A.; Cattell, C. A.; Goetz, K.; Kellogg, P. J.; Kersten, K.; Kasper, J. C.; Maruca, B. A.; Pulupa, M.

    2012-01-01

    We present observations of electromagnetic precursor waves, identified as whistler mode waves, at supercritical interplanetary shocks using the Wind search coil magnetometer. The precursors propagate obliquely with respect to the local magnetic field, shock normal vector, solar wind velocity, and they are not phase standing structures. All are right-hand polarized with respect to the magnetic field (spacecraft frame), and all but one are right-hand polarized with respect to the shock normal vector in the normal incidence frame. They have rest frame frequencies f(sub ci) < f much < f(sub ce) and wave numbers 0.02 approx < k rho (sub ce) approx <. 5.0. Particle distributions show signatures of specularly reflected gyrating ions, which may be a source of free energy for the observed modes. In one event, we simultaneously observe perpendicular ion heating and parallel electron acceleration, consistent with wave heating/acceleration due to these waves. Al though the precursors can have delta B/B(sub o) as large as 2, fluxgate magnetometer measurements show relatively laminar shock transitions in three of the four events.

  10. Coronal and interplanetary propagation, interplanetary acceleration, cosmic-ray observations by deep space network and anomalous component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, C. K.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose is to provide an overview of the contributions presented in sessions SH3, SH1.5, SH4.6 and SH4.7 of the 19th International Cosmic Ray Conference. These contributed papers indicate that steady progress continues to be made in both the observational and the theoretical aspects of the transport and acceleration of energetic charged particles in the heliosphere. Studies of solar and interplanetary particles have placed emphasis on particle directional distributions in relation to pitch-angle scattering and magnetic focusing, on the rigidity and spatial dependence of the mean free path, and on new propagation regimes in the inner and outer heliosphere. Coronal propagation appears in need of correlative multi-spacecraft studies in association with detailed observation of the flare process and coronal magnetic structures. Interplanetary acceleration has now gone into a consolidation phase, with theories being worked out in detail and checked against observation.

  11. Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections Observed by MESSENGER and Venus Express

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Good, S. W.; Forsyth, R. J.

    2016-01-01

    Interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) observed by the MESSENGER and Venus Express spacecraft have been catalogued and analysed. The ICMEs were identified by a relatively smooth rotation of the magnetic field direction consistent with a flux rope structure, coinciding with a relatively enhanced magnetic field strength. A total of 35 ICMEs were found in the surveyed MESSENGER data (primarily from March 2007 to April 2012), and 84 ICMEs in the surveyed Venus Express data (from May 2006 to December 2013). The ICME flux rope configurations have been determined. Ropes with northward leading edges were about four times more common than ropes with southward leading edges, in agreement with a previously established solar cycle dependence. Ropes with low inclinations to the solar equatorial plane were about four times more common than ropes with high inclinations, possibly an observational effect. Left- and right-handed ropes were observed in almost equal numbers. In addition, data from MESSENGER, Venus Express, STEREO-A, STEREO-B and ACE were examined for multipoint signatures of the catalogued ICMEs. For spacecraft separations below 15° in heliocentric longitude, the second spacecraft observed the ICME flux rope in 82 % of cases; this percentage dropped to 49 % for separations between 15 and 30°, to 18 % for separations between 30 and 45°, and to 12 % for separations between 45 and 60°. As the spacecraft separation increased, it became increasingly likely that only the sheath and not the flux rope of the ICME was observed, in agreement with the notion that ICME flux ropes are smaller in longitudinal extent than the shocks or discontinuities that they often drive. Furthermore, this study has identified 23 ICMEs observed by pairs of spacecraft close to radial alignment. A detailed analysis of these events could lead to a better understanding of how ICMEs evolve during propagation.

  12. 3D Reconstruction of Interplanetary Scintillation (IPS) Remote-Sensing Data: Global Solar Wind Boundaries for Driving 3D-MHD Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, H.-S.; Jackson, B. V.; Hick, P. P.; Buffington, A.; Odstrcil, D.; Wu, C.-C.; Davies, J. A.; Bisi, M. M.; Tokumaru, M.

    2015-09-01

    The University of California, San Diego, time-dependent analyses of the heliosphere provide three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions of solar wind velocities and densities from observations of interplanetary scintillation (IPS). Using data from the Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Japan, these reconstructions provide a real-time prediction of the global solar-wind density and velocity throughout the whole heliosphere with a temporal cadence of about one day (ips.ucsd.edu). Updates to this modeling effort continue: in the present article, near-Sun results extracted from the time-dependent 3D reconstruction are used as inner boundary conditions to drive 3D-MHD models ( e.g. ENLIL and H3D-MHD). This allows us to explore the differences between the IPS kinematic-model data-fitting procedure and current 3D-MHD modeling techniques. The differences in these techniques provide interesting insights into the physical principles governing the expulsion of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Here we detail for the first time several specific CMEs and an induced shock that occurred in September 2011 that demonstrate some of the issues resulting from these analyses.

  13. Plasma distribution of Comet ISON (C/2012 S1) observed using the radio scintillation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iju, Tomoya; Abe, Shinsuke; Tokumaru, Munetoshi; Fujiki, Ken'ichi

    2015-05-01

    We report the electron density in a plasma tail of Comet ISON (C/2012 S1) derived from interplanetary scintillation (IPS) observations during November 1-28, 2013. Comet ISON showed a well-developed plasma tail (longer than 2.98 ×107 km) before its perihelion passage on November 28. We identified a radio source whose line-of-sight approached the ISON's plasma tail in the above period and obtained its IPS data using the Solar Wind Imaging Facility at 327 MHz. We used the Heliospheric Imager onboard the Solar-Terrestrial Relation Observatory to distinguish between the cometary tail and solar eruption origins of their enhanced scintillation. From our examinations, we confirmed three IPS enhancements of a radio source 1148-00 on November 13, 16, and 17, which could be attributed to the disturbance in the cometary tail. Power spectra of 1148-00 had the steeper slope than normal ones during its occultation by the plasma tail. We estimated the electron density in the ISON's plasma tail and found 84 cm-3 around the tail axis at a distance of 3.74 ×107 km from the cometary nucleus and an unexpected variation of the electron density in the vicinity of the tail boundary.

  14. Multi-Spacecraft Observations of Interplanetary Shock Accelerated Particle Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, G. C.; Lario, D.; Decker, R. B.; Desai, M. I.; Hu, Q.; Kasper, J.

    2006-01-01

    We use simultaneous measurements from the Wind and ACE spacecraft to determine the spatial properties of both interplanetary (IP) shocks and the shock-associated energetic particle events. We combine plasma, magnetic field and energetic particle data from ACE and Wind for 124 energetic storm particle (ESP) events from 1998 to 2003 and examine the spatial and temporal variations of these events in the Earth's vicinity. We find that even though the two spacecraft were occasionally separated by more than 400 RE, the plasma, field, and energetic particle time-intensity profiles during the events were very similar. In addition, we find that the ion composition and energy spectra in individual IP shock events are identical at the two spacecraft locations. We also use the fitted shock velocity along the normal from ACE and estimate the shock transit time to Wind location. In general, there is poor agreement between the estimated transit time and the actual measured transit time. Hence, our assumptions that a) the IP shock at 1 AU propagates radially, and/or b) the IP shock is spherically symmetric at 1 AU are not valid. In this paper, we will also study, for the first time, the anisotropy measurements of low-energy IP shock-associated ions at both ACE and Wind. We will then compare these new anisotropy analyses with locally measured shock parameters and identify possible signatures of different shock acceleration processes as predicted by the first-order Fermi and shock-drift models.

  15. Observation and Modeling of Ionospheric Scintillation Associated with Irregularities in the Polar Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priyadarshi, S.; Zhang, Q. H.; Ma, Y. Z.; Wang, Y.; Zanyang, X.

    2015-12-01

    It is well understood that Ionospheric scintillation is a consequence of random electron density fluctuations present in the ionosphere. They appear at all local time of the polar regions therefore, it is essential to understand their evolution and dynamics. Using Madrigal database and South Pole Scintillation Receiver data an empirical model of ionospheric scintillation has been proposed for South Pole. Model has been validated and compared with the observations. We have investigated some interesting scintillation patterns associated with polar patches and structured flux of precipitated electrons. Our results illustrate well the irregularity structures causing ionospheric scintillation at the polar ionosphere. Limitations of our modeling approach is discussed. Keywords: Ionospheric irregularities, polar patches, scintillation.

  16. GPS Observations of Plasma Bubbles and Scintillations over Equatorial Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrano, C. S.; Valladares, C. E.; Semala, G. K.; Bridgwood, C. T.; Adeniyi, J.; Amaeshi, L. L.; Damtie, B.; D'Ujanga Mutonyi, F.; Ndeda, J. D.; Baki, P.; Obrou, O. K.; Okere, B.; Tsidu, G. M.

    2010-12-01

    Sponsored in part by the International Heliophysical Year (IHY) program, Boston College, Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), and several universities in Africa have collaborated to deploy a network of GPS receivers throughout equatorial Africa, a region which has been largely devoid of ground-based ionospheric monitoring instruments. High date-rate GPS receivers capable of measuring Total Electron Content (TEC) and GPS scintillations were installed at Abidjan, Ivory Coast (5.3°N, 4.0°W, dip 3.5°S); Addis Ababa (9.0°N, 38.8°E, dip 0.1°N ); Bahir Dar, Ethiopia (26.1°N, 50.6°E, dip 20.1°N); Cape Verde (16.6°S, 22.9°W, dip 4.9°N); Ilorin, Nigeria (8.4°S, 4.7°E, dip 1.9°S); Kampala, Uganda (0.3°S, 32.6°E, dip 9.2°S); Lagos, Nigeria (6.5°N, 3.4°E, dip 3.1°S); Nairobi, Kenya (1.3°S, 36.8°W, dip 10.7°S); Nsukka, Nigeria (6.8°S, 7.4°W, dip 3.0°S); and Zanzibar, Tanzania (6.2°S, 39.2°E, dip 15.9°S). In this paper we report on the longitudinal, local time and seasonal occurrence of plasma bubbles and L band scintillations over equatorial Africa in 2009 and 2010, as a first step toward establishing the climatology of ionospheric irregularities over Africa. The scintillation intensity is obtained by measuring the standard deviation of normalized GPS signal power. The plasma bubbles are detected using an automated technique, whereby the GPS TEC is detrended to remove the diurnal variation and excursions exceeding a particular threshold are extracted for further analysis. A harmonic analysis (FFT) of these extracted events is performed to exclude wavelike features indicative of gravity waves or traveling ionospheric disturbances, and the remaining events are identified as plasma bubbles. Our findings suggest that the occurrence of plasma bubbles and L band scintillations over Africa are well correlated, but that some discrepancies in their morphologies are evident. While plasma bubbles and scintillations are generally observed during equinoctial

  17. Link between interplanetary & cometary dust: Polarimetric observations and space studies with Rosetta & Eye-Sat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levasseur-Regourd, Anny-Chantal; Gaboriaud, Alain; Buil, Christian; Ressouche, Antoine; Lasue, J.; Palun, Adrien; Apper, Fabien; Elmaleh, Marc

    Intensity and linear polarization observations of the solar light scattered by interplanetary dust, the so-called zodiacal light, provide information on properties of the dust particles, such as their spatial density, local changes, morphology and albedo. Earth-based polarimetric observations, with a resolution of 5° or more, have been used to derive the polarization phase curve of interplanetary dust particles and to establish that the polarization at 90° phase angle increases with increasing solar distance, at least up to 1.5 au in the ecliptic, while the albedo decreases [1, 2]. Analysis of such studies will be revisited. Numerical simulations of the polarimetric behavior of interplanetary dust particles strongly suggest that, in the inner solar system, interplanetary dust particles consist of absorbing (e.g., organic compounds) and less absorbing (e.g., silicates) materials, that radial changes originate in a decrease of organics with decreasing solar distance (probably due to alteration processes), and that a significant fraction of the interplanetary dust is of cometary origin, in agreement with dynamical studies [3, 4]. The polarimetric behaviors of interplanetary dust and cometary dust particles seem to present striking similarities. The properties of cometary dust particles, as derived from remote polarimetric observations of comets including 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, the target of the Rosetta rendezvous mission, at various wavelengths, will be summarized [5, 6]. The ground truth expected from Rosetta dust experiments, i.e., MIDAS, COSIMA, GIADA, about dust particles’ morphology, composition, and evolution (with distance to the nucleus before Philae release and with distance to the Sun before and after perihelion passage) over the year and a half of nominal mission, will be discussed. Finally, the Eye-Sat nanosatellite will be presented. This triple cubesat, developed by students from engineering schools working as interns at CNES, is to be launched

  18. Observations of artificially produced scintillations using satellite transmissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pope, J. H.; Fritz, R. B.

    1974-01-01

    The ionospheric modification experiment, utilizing a high-powered transmitter, provides an opportunity to study ionospheric irregularities under relatively known conditions. The irregularities were studied by means of transionospheric signals from the polar-orbiting satellite ESSA 8 transmitting at 137 MHz. These observations show that scintillations occur when the satellite to ground station geometry is such that the ray from the satellite passes through the region in the ionosphere under modification. In general, a cut across the illuminated volume is obtained; thus an active region of about 100 km in diameter is indicated. For the most part, the artificial scintillations appear to be similar to those obtained from naturally occurring irregularities, but a systematic change from 3 to 1 sec in the fluctuation period is usually observed as the satellite traverses from the northern to the southern portions of the active region. The change in period appears to be produced by a systematic change in irregularity scale size from about 4 to about 1 km.

  19. Comparison of Ground Scintillation Spectra with Density Irregularities Observed in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, K. Y.; Su, S. Y.; Liu, C. H.

    The embedded Quasi-Periodic diffraction patterns are extracted from the scintillation data taken at Ascension Island and analyzed with a newly developed time-frequency analysis method of Hilbert-Huang Transform (HHT). The scintillation spectra are studied for cases of strong and weak scintillations and compared with the spectra of plasma density irregularities observed by ROCSA-1/IPEI at 600 km altitude. Interesting results are obtained for the relationships between the locations of the irregularity density structure and the scintillation echoes during weak and strong scintillations.

  20. Observation of Inertial Energy Cascade in Interplanetary Space Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Sorriso-Valvo, L.; Noullez, A.; Bruno, R.; Bavassano, B.

    2007-09-14

    Direct evidence for the presence of an inertial energy cascade, the most characteristic signature of hydromagnetic turbulence (MHD), is observed in the solar wind by the Ulysses spacecraft. After a brief rederivation of the equivalent of Yaglom's law for MHD turbulence, a linear relation is indeed observed for the scaling of mixed third-order structure functions involving Elsaesser variables. This experimental result firmly establishes the turbulent character of low-frequency velocity and magnetic field fluctuations in the solar wind plasma.

  1. Observation of inertial energy cascade in interplanetary space plasma.

    PubMed

    Sorriso-Valvo, L; Marino, R; Carbone, V; Noullez, A; Lepreti, F; Veltri, P; Bruno, R; Bavassano, B; Pietropaolo, E

    2007-09-14

    Direct evidence for the presence of an inertial energy cascade, the most characteristic signature of hydromagnetic turbulence (MHD), is observed in the solar wind by the Ulysses spacecraft. After a brief rederivation of the equivalent of Yaglom's law for MHD turbulence, a linear relation is indeed observed for the scaling of mixed third-order structure functions involving Elsässer variables. This experimental result firmly establishes the turbulent character of low-frequency velocity and magnetic field fluctuations in the solar wind plasma. PMID:17930445

  2. Interplanetary and Interstellar Dust Observed by the Wind/WAVES Electric Field Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malaspina, David; Horanyi, M.; Zaslavsky, A.; Goetz, K.; Wilson, L. B., III; Kersten, K.

    2014-01-01

    Observations of hypervelocity dust particles impacting the Wind spacecraft are reported here for the first time using data from the WindWAVES electric field instrument. A unique combination of rotating spacecraft, amplitude-triggered high-cadence waveform collection, and electric field antenna configuration allow the first direct determination of dust impact direction by any spacecraft using electric field data. Dust flux and impact direction data indicate that the observed dust is approximately micron-sized with both interplanetary and interstellar populations. Nanometer radius dust is not detected by Wind during times when nanometer dust is observed on the STEREO spacecraft and both spacecraft are in close proximity. Determined impact directions suggest that interplanetary dust detected by electric field instruments at 1 AU is dominated by particles on bound trajectories crossing Earths orbit, rather than dust with hyperbolic orbits.

  3. Comparison of inferred and observed interplanetary magnetic field polarities, 1970-1972

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, J. M.; Svalgaard, L.; Hedgecock, P. C.

    1975-01-01

    The inferred polarity (toward or away from the sun) of the interplanetary magnetic field at earth using polar observations of the geomagnetic field has been compared with spacecraft observations. A list published by Svalgaard (1974) of the inferred field polarities in the period from 1970 to 1972 is found to be correct on 82% of the days. A near real-time (same day) method of inferring the polarity of the interplanetary magnetic field using geomagnetic observations at Vostok and Thule is in use at the NOAA Space Environment Laboratory, Boulder, Colorado. During 1972, this method is found to be correct on 87% of the days. A list of 'well-defined' sector boundaries at earth from 1970 to 1972 is given.

  4. Large-Amplitude Electrostatic Waves Observed at a Supercritical Interplanetary Shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, L. B., III; Cattell, C. A.; Kellogg, P. J.; Goetz, K.; Kersten, K.; Kasper, J. C.; Szabo, A.; Wilber, M.

    2010-01-01

    We present the first observations at an interplanetary shock of large-amplitude (> 100 mV/m pk-pk) solitary waves and large-amplitude (approx.30 mV/m pk-pk) waves exhibiting characteristics consistent with electron Bernstein waves. The Bernstein-like waves show enhanced power at integer and half-integer harmonics of the cyclotron frequency with a broadened power spectrum at higher frequencies, consistent with the electron cyclotron drift instability. The Bernstein-like waves are obliquely polarized with respect to the magnetic field but parallel to the shock normal direction. Strong particle heating is observed in both the electrons and ions. The observed heating and waveforms are likely due to instabilities driven by the free energy provided by reflected ions at this supercritical interplanetary shock. These results offer new insights into collisionless shock dissipation and wave-particle interactions in the solar wind.

  5. Interplanetary baseline observations of type III solar radio bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, R. R.; Fitzenreiter, R. J.; Novaco, J. C.; Fainberg, J.

    1977-01-01

    Simultaneous observations of type III radio bursts from spacecraft separated by 0.43 AU have been made using the solar orbiters Helios-A and Helios-B. The burst beginning at 19:22 UT on March 28, 1976, has been located from the intersection of the source directions measured at each spacecraft and from burst arrival-time differences. The source positions range from 0.03 AU from the sun at 3000 kHz to 0.08 AU at 585 kHz. The electron density along the burst trajectory and the exciter velocity (0.13c) were determined directly without the need to assume a density model, as has been done with single-spacecraft observations. The separation of Helios-A and -B has also provided measurements of burst directivity at low frequencies. For the March 28 burst the intensity observed from near the source longitude (Helios-B) was 3-10dB greater than that from 60 deg west of the source (Helios-A)

  6. Solar wind latitude variations and multiple scattering from Galileo interplanetary Lyman-alpha observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ajello, Joseph M.; Pryor, Wayne R.; Barth, Charles A.; Hord, Charles W.; Simmons, Karen E.

    1993-01-01

    The Galileo Ultraviolet Spectrometer Experiment (UVS) obtained a map of the celestial sphere from interplanetary Lyman-alpha (IPLA) on 13, 14 December 1990 during the Earth1 encounter. The Galileo spacecraft was near the downwind interstellar axis during the encounter and the map view directions filled the downwind hemisphere. The ratio between the observation and a single scattering model is attributed to a direct measurement of the multiple scattering correction required to model IPLA in the inner solar system. Analysis of this data set, referred to as an antisun map, shows that the solar wind charge exchange rate with interplanetary gas is 25 percent less over the solar poles than in the ecliptic at solar maximum. A model of the interstellar wind based on the antisun map observation exhibits a number density of atomic hydrogen far from the solar system, inside the heliosphere, of 0.16 +/- 0.05/cu cm.

  7. Electron dropout echoes induced by interplanetary shock: Van Allen Probes observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Y. X.; Zong, Q.-G.; Zhou, X.-Z.; Fu, S. Y.; Rankin, R.; Yuan, C.-J.; Lui, A. T. Y.; Spence, H. E.; Blake, J. B.; Baker, D. N.; Reeves, G. D.

    2016-06-01

    On 23 November 2012, a sudden dropout of the relativistic electron flux was observed after an interplanetary shock arrival. The dropout peaks at ˜1 MeV and more than 80% of the electrons disappeared from the drift shell. Van Allen twin Probes observed a sharp electron flux dropout with clear energy dispersion signals. The repeating flux dropout and recovery signatures, or "dropout echoes", constitute a new phenomenon referred to as a "drifting electron dropout" with a limited initial spatial range. The azimuthal range of the dropout is estimated to be on the duskside, from ˜1300 to 0100 LT. We conclude that the shock-induced electron dropout is not caused by the magnetopause shadowing. The dropout and consequent echoes suggest that the radial migration of relativistic electrons is induced by the strong dusk-dawn asymmetric interplanetary shock compression on the magnetosphere.

  8. Multiple spacecraft observations of interplanetary shocks: Characteristics of the upstream ULF turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.; Smith, E. J.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Gosling, J. T.; Bame, S. J.

    1983-01-01

    All interplanetary shocks observed by ISEE-3 and either ISEE-1 or ISEE-2 or both in 1978 and 1979 are examined for evidence of upstream waves. In order to characterize the properties of these shocks it is necessary to determine accurate shock normals. An overdetermined set of equations were inverted to obtain shock normals, velocities and error estimates for all these shocks. Tests of the method indicate it is quite reliable. Using these normals the Mach number and angle were between the interplanetary magnetic field and the shock normal for each shock. The upstream waves were separated into two classes: whistler mode precursors which occur at low Mach numbers and upstream turbulence whose amplitude at Mach numbers greater than 1.5 is controlled by the angle of the field to the shock normal. The former waves are right hand circularly polarized and quite monochromatic. The latter waves are more linearly polarized and have a broadband featureless spectrum.

  9. Low energy proton bidirectional anisotropies and their relation to transient interplanetary magnetic structures: ISEE-3 observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsden, R. G.; Sanderson, T. R.; Wenzel, K. P.; Smith, E. J.

    1985-01-01

    It is known that the interplanetary medium in the period approaching solar maximum is characterized by an enhancement in the occurrence of transient solar wind streams and shocks and that such systems are often associated with looplike magnetic structures or clouds. There is observational evidence that bidirectional, field aligned flows of low energy particles could be a signature of such looplike structures, although detailed models for the magnetic field configuration and injection mechanisms do not exist at the current time. Preliminary results of a survey of low energy proton bidirectional anisotropies measured on ISEE-3 in the interplanetary medium between August 1978 and May 1982, together with magnetic field data from the same spacecraft are presented.

  10. Comparison Between Predictions & Observations of Induced Radioactive Background in Interplanetary Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyer, Clivea; Truscott, Peter; Evans, Howard; Evans, Larry; Trombka, Jacob

    1997-01-01

    Radioactivity induced in detector materials and their immediate surroundings is the major source of discrete-line, gamma-ray background and an important source of continuum background in the performance of remote-sensing, gamma-ray spectroscopy of planetary bodies. In interplanetary space the dominant sources of particles are cosmic rays and their secondaries arising from interactions with the spacecraft and the surface of the target body. In addition, certain future gamma-ray astronomy missions, such as INTEGRAL, are to be located so as to perform their observations in interplanetary space rather than in the traditional low earth orbits. Such location removes contributions from the earth's atmosphere and inner radiation belt at the expense of increased exposure to cosmic rays and solar particle events. Accurate prediction of the activation of key materials by cosmic rays is of the utmost importance for detector design and data interpretation.

  11. GNSS-based Observations and Simulations of Spectral Scintillation Indices in the Arctic Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durgonics, T.; Hoeg, P.; von Benzon, H. H.; Komjathy, A.

    2015-12-01

    During disturbed times, ionospheric scintillations can be severe and adversely impact satellite-based positioning and radio transmissions. The scintillation occurs in the amplitude, phase, polarization, and angle of arrival of the signal. Precise observation, classification, modeling, forecasting, and development of data-driven methodologies to accurately localize ionospheric irregularities and simulate GNSS scintillation signals are highly desired. Ionospheric scintillations have traditionally been quantified by amplitude (S4) and phase scintillations (σφ). Our study focuses on the Arctic, where scintillations, especially phase scintillations, are prominent. We will present observations acquired from a network of Greenlandic GNSS stations, including 2D amplitude and phase scintillation index maps for representative calm and storm periods. In addition to the traditional indices described above, we are exploring a set of indices derived from the power spectra of the signals. The observed corner frequency of the power spectrum is a function of the Fresnel radius and the drift speed of the irregularities, while the slope of the power spectrum is related to the Fresnel oscillations. We will demonstrate how spectral characteristics of the scintillations act under large total electron content (TEC) gradients and how physical parameters can be extracted from the power spectra, and will present how these parameters of the corner frequencies and power spectra slopes vary during ionospheric storms. The observations will then be compared to properties of simulated GNSS signals computed by the Fast Scintillation Mode (FSM). The FSM was developed to simulate ionospheric scintillations under different geophysical conditions, and is used to simulate GNSS signals with known scintillation characteristics. This comparison could lead to a better understanding of the observed ionospheric state.

  12. Observations of interplanetary energetic charged particles from gamma-ray line solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pesses, M. E.; Klecker, B.; Gloeckler, G.; Hovestadt, D.

    1981-01-01

    Observations of interplanetary energetic ions from the 7 June, 21 June and 1 July 1980 gamma ray line solar flares are presented. The observations are from the Max-Planck-Institut/University of Maryland Ultra Low Energy Wide Angle Telescope aboard the ISEE-3 spacecraft. Both June flares produced relatively low intensity proton events at earth with peak intensities at 10-20 MeV approximately 5 x .01 protons square cm sec sr MeV)-1. Neither flare showed evidence of being enriched in either 3He or Fe at approximately 1 MeV/nucleon. The 1 July flare produced no observable ion or electron enhancements.

  13. Voyager energetic particle observations at interplanetary shocks and upstream of planetary bow shocks - 1977-1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krimigis, S. M.

    1992-01-01

    The Voyager 1 and 2 vehicles include instrumentation that makes comprehensive electron and ion measurements in several energy channels with good energy, temporal, and compositional resolution. Data gathered from 1977 to 1988, including observations downstream and upstream of four planetary bow shocks (earth, Saturn, Uranus, Jupiter) and numerous interplanetary shocks to about 30 AU, are analyzed in the context of the Fermi and shock drift acceleration models. Overall results indicate that electrons and ions observed upstream of planetary bow shocks have their source inside the parent magnetosphere, with first order Fermi acceleration playing a secondary role at best.

  14. The Scintillation Prediction Observations Research Task (SPORT) Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spann, James; Swenson, Charles; Durão, Otavio; Loures, Luis; Heelis, Rod; Bishop, Rebecca; Le, Guan; Abdu, Mangalathayil; Krause, Linda; Nardin, Clezio; Fonseca, Eloi

    2016-04-01

    Structure in the charged particle number density in the equatorial ionosphere can have a profound impact on the fidelity of HF, VHF and UHF radio signals that are used for ground-to-ground and space-to-ground communication and navigation. The degree to which such systems can be compromised depends in large part on the spatial distribution of the structured regions in the ionosphere and the background plasma density in which they are embedded. In order to address these challenges it is necessary to accurately distinguish the background ionospheric conditions that favor the generation of irregularities from those that do not. Additionally we must relate the evolution of those conditions to the subsequent evolution of the irregular plasma regions themselves. The background ionospheric conditions are conveniently described by latitudinal profiles of the plasma density at nearly constant altitude, which describe the effects of ExB drifts and neutral winds, while the appearance and growth of plasma structure requires committed observations from the ground from at least one fixed longitude. This talk will present an international collaborative CubeSat mission called SPORT that stands for the Scintillation Prediction Observations Research Task. This mission will advance our understanding of the nature and evolution of ionospheric structures around sunset to improve predictions of disturbances that affect radio propagation and telecommunication signals. The science goals will be accomplished by a unique combination of satellite observations from a nearly circular middle inclination orbit and the extensive operation of ground based observations from South America near the magnetic equator. This approach promises Explorer class science at a CubeSat price.

  15. The Scintillation Prediction Observations Research Task (SPORT) Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spann, J. F.; Swenson, C.; Durão, O.; Loures, L.; Heelis, R. A.; Bishop, R. L.; Le, G.; Abdu, M. A.; Habash Krause, L.; De Nardin, C. M.; Fonseca, E.

    2015-12-01

    Structure in the charged particle number density in the equatorial ionosphere can have a profound impact on the fidelity of HF, VHF and UHF radio signals that are used for ground-to-ground and space-to-ground communication and navigation. The degree to which such systems can be compromised depends in large part on the spatial distribution of the structured regions in the ionosphere and the background plasma density in which they are embedded. In order to address these challenges it is necessary to accurately distinguish the background ionospheric conditions that favor the generation of irregularities from those that do not. Additionally we must relate the evolution of those conditions to the subsequent evolution of the irregular plasma regions themselves. The background ionospheric conditions are conveniently described by latitudinal profiles of the plasma density at nearly constant altitude, which describe the effects of ExB drifts and neutral winds, while the appearance and growth of plasma structure requires committed observations from the ground from at least one fixed longitude. This talk will present an international collaborative CubeSat mission called SPORT that stands for Scintillation Prediction Observations Research Task. This mission that will advance our understanding of the nature and evolution of ionospheric structures around sunset to improve predictions of disturbances that affect radio propagation and telecommunication signals. The science goals will be accomplished by a unique combination of satellite observations from a nearly circular middle inclination orbit and the extensive operation of ground based observations from South America near the magnetic equator. This approach promises Explorer class science at a CubeSat price.

  16. The Scintillation Prediction Observations Research Task (SPORT) Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spann, James; Le, Guan; Swenson, Charles; Denardini, Clezio Marcos; Bishop, Rebecca L.; Abdu, Mangalathayil A.; Cupertino Durao, Otavio S.; Heelis, Roderick; Loures, Luis; Krause, Linda; Fonseca, Eloi

    2016-07-01

    Structure in the charged particle number density in the equatorial ionosphere can have a profound impact on the fidelity of HF, VHF and UHF radio signals that are used for ground-to-ground and space-to-ground communication and navigation. The degree to which such systems can be compromised depends in large part on the spatial distribution of the structured regions in the ionosphere and the background plasma density in which they are embedded. In order to address these challenges it is necessary to accurately distinguish the background ionospheric conditions that favor the generation of irregularities from those that do not. Additionally we must relate the evolution of those conditions to the subsequent evolution of the irregular plasma regions themselves. The background ionospheric conditions are conveniently described by latitudinal profiles of the plasma density at nearly constant altitude, which describe the effects of ExB drifts and neutral winds, while the appearance and growth of plasma structure requires committed observations from the ground from at least one fixed longitude. This talk will present an international collaborative CubeSat mission called SPORT that stands for the Scintillation Prediction Observations Research Task. This mission will advance our understanding of the nature and evolution of ionospheric structures around sunset to improve predictions of disturbances that affect radio propagation and telecommunication signals. The science goals will be accomplished by a unique combination of satellite observations from a nearly circular middle inclination orbit and the extensive operation of ground based observations from South America near the magnetic equator. This approach promises Explorer class science at a CubeSat price.

  17. Analysis of the interplanetary magnetic field observations at different heliocentric distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khabarova, Olga

    2013-04-01

    Multi-spacecraft measurements of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) from 0.29 AU to 5 AU along the ecliptic plane have demonstrated systematic deviations of the observed IMF strength from the values predicted on the basis of the Parker-like radial extension models (Khabarova, Obridko, 2012). In particular, it was found that the radial IMF component |Br| decreases with a heliocentric distance r with a slope of -5/3 (instead of r-2 expansion law). The current investigation of multi-point observations continues the analysis of the IMF (and, especially, Br) large-scale behaviour, including its latitudinal distribution. Additionally, examples of the mismatches between the expected IMF characteristics and observations at smaller scales are discussed. It is shown that the observed effects may be explained by not complete IMF freezing-in to the solar wind plasma. This research was supported by the Russian Fund of Basic Researches' grants Nos.11-02-00259-a, and 12-02-10008-K. Khabarova Olga, and Obridko Vladimir, Puzzles of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field in the Inner Heliosphere, 2012, Astrophysical Journal, 761, 2, 82, doi:10.1088/0004-637X/761/2/82, http://arxiv.org/pdf/1204.6672v2.pdf

  18. Scintillation Observations and Response of The Ionosphere to Electrodynamics (SORTIE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowley, G.

    2015-12-01

    The Scintillation Observations and Response of The Ionosphere to Electrodynamics, or SORTIE, mission is a 6U NASA Heliophysics CubeSat designed to study the ionosphere at altitudes below 400km. The SORTIE mission is being developed by a team including ASTRA (lead institution), AFRL, University of Texas at Dallas (UTD), COSMIAC (Satellite Integrator), and Boston College. SORTIE will address cutting-edge science in the area of ionospheric dynamics. The SORTIE mission will address the following science questions: Q1) Discover the sources of wave-like plasma perturbations in the F-region ionosphere. Q2) Determine the relative role of dynamo action and more direct mechanical forcing in the formation of wave-like plasma perturbations. To address these questions we plan to fly a CubeSat with novel sensors that measure key plasma parameters in a circular, low to middle inclination orbit near 350-400 km altitude. The sensors include an ion velocity meter (built by UTD) and a Planar Langmuir Probe (built by AFRL). The SORTIE mission plan is to describe the distribution of wave-like structures in the plasma density of the ionospheric F-region. In doing so, the SORTIE team will determine the possible role of these perturbations in aiding the growth of plasma instabilities. SORTIE will provide (1) the initial spectrum of wave perturbations which are the starting point for the RT calculation; (2) measured electric fields which determine the magnitude of the instability growth rate near the region where plasma bubbles are generated; (3) initial observations of irregularities in plasma density which result from RT growth. SORTIE results will be used as input to PBMOD, an assimilative first-principles physical model of the ionosphere, in order to predict evolution of EPBs. In this presentation, we will review the science objectives, provide an overview of the spacecraft and instrument design, and present a concept of operations plan.

  19. Observations of Possible Injection of Interplanetary Oxygen into the Inner Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, J. D.; Manweiler, J. W.; Gerrard, A. J.; Bonnell, J. W.; Bounds, S. R.; Gkioulidou, M.; Mitchell, D. G.; Lanzerotti, L. J.

    2014-12-01

    With the Advanced Composition Explorer's (ACE) Electron Proton and Alpha Monitor (EPAM) instrument being in a halo orbit about L1 and the Van Allen Probe's Radiation Belt Storm Probes Ion Composition Experiment (RBSPICE) instrument being in an eccentric orbit through the inner magnetosphere, the two instruments are situated perfectly for observing the inner magnetospheric response to energetic interplanetary particle events. Both instruments are designed to measure electrons and ions with energies between tens of keV and a few MeV, depending upon particle species. Using a new data analysis technique we've developed, the EPAM instrument can provide high energy-resolution, species-resolved energy spectra for a number of ion species including helium and oxygen which RBSPICE is designed to observe. Between May 22nd and 26th of 2013, EPAM observed an energetic particle event with a nearly flat energy spectra and greatly enhanced helium and oxygen composition. RBSPICE measured a strong surge in oxygen flux, but saw no correspondingly strong increase in the helium flux. We present a detailed analysis and comparison of the energetic ion spectra, composition, and timing measured by the ACE and the Van Allen Probes instruments in conjunction with magnetic field and energetic particle measurements from other spacecraft for this event, and provide a discussion on the injection of interplanetary oxygen into the inner magnetosphere.

  20. Observations of possible injection of interplanetary oxygen into the inner magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, James Douglas; Manweiler, Jerry Wayne; Gerrard, Andrew; Bonnell, John; Bounds, Scott; Gkioulidou, Matina; Mitchell, Donald G.; Lanzerotti, Louis J.

    2015-04-01

    With the Advanced Composition Explorer's (ACE) Electron Proton and Alpha Monitor (EPAM) instrument being in a halo orbit about L1 and the Van Allen Probe's Radiation Belt Storm Probes Ion Composition Experiment (RBSPICE) instrument being in an eccentric orbit through the inner magnetosphere, the two instruments are situated perfectly for observing the inner magnetospheric response to energetic interplanetary particle events. Both instruments are designed to measure electrons and ions with energies between tens of keV and a few MeV, depending upon particle species. Using a new data analysis technique we've developed, the EPAM instrument can provide high energy-resolution, species-resolved energy spectra for a number of ion species including helium and oxygen which RBSPICE is designed to observe. Between May 22nd and 26th of 2013, EPAM observed an energetic particle event with a nearly flat energy spectra and greatly enhanced helium and oxygen composition. RBSPICE measured a strong surge in oxygen flux, but saw no correspondingly strong increase in the helium flux. We present a detailed analysis and comparison of the energetic ion spectra, composition, and timing measured by the ACE and the Van Allen Probes instruments in conjunction with magnetic field and energetic particle measurements from other spacecraft for this event, and provide a discussion on the injection of interplanetary oxygen into the inner magnetosphere.

  1. Ionospheric irregularities during a substorm event: Observations of ULF pulsations and GPS scintillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H.; Clauer, C. R.; Deshpande, K.; Lessard, M. R.; Weatherwax, A. T.; Bust, G. S.; Crowley, G.; Humphreys, T. E.

    2014-07-01

    Plasma instability in the ionosphere is often observed as disturbances and distortions of the amplitude and phase of the radio signals, which are known as ionospheric scintillations. High-latitude ionospheric plasma, closely connected to the solar wind and magnetospheric dynamics, produces very dynamic and short-lived Global Positioning System (GPS) scintillations, making it challenging to characterize them. It is observed that scintillations in the high-latitude ionosphere occur frequently during geomagnetic storms and substorms. In addition, it is well known that Ultra Low Frequency (ULF) pulsations (Pi2 and Pi1B) are closely associated with substorm activity. This study reports simultaneous observations of Pi2 and Pi1B pulsations and GPS phase scintillations during a substorm using a newly designed Autonomous Adaptive Low-Power Instrument Platform (AAL-PIP) installed at the South Pole. The magnetic field and GPS data from the instruments appear to be associated in terms of their temporal and spectral features. Moreover, the scintillation events were observed near the auroral latitudes where Pi1B pulsations are commonly detected. The temporal, spectral and spatial association between the scintillation and geomagnetic pulsation events suggests that the magnetic field perturbations and enhanced electric fields caused by substorm currents could contribute to the creation of plasma instability in the high-latitude ionosphere, leading to GPS scintillations.

  2. Electron beams and Langmuir turbulence in solar type III radio bursts observed in the interplanetary medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, R. P.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented of in situ observations of electron beams, plasma waves, and associated solar type II radio emission in the interplanetary medium near 1 AU, which were provided by the ISEE-3 spacecraft. It is shown that electron beams are formed by the faster electrons arriving before the slower ones, following an impulsive injection at the sun. The resulting bump-on-tail in the reduced 1D distribution function is unstable to the growth of electrostatic electron plasma (Langmuir) waves. The Langmuir waves are observed to be highly impulsive in nature. The onset and temporal variations of the observed plasma waves are in good qualitative agreement with the wave growth expected from the evolution of the measured 1D distribution function. The lack of obvious plateauing of the bump-on-tail suggests that the waves were removed from resonance with the beam electrons by some wave-wave interaction.

  3. Magnetospheric Response to Interplanetary Field Enhancements: Coordinated Space-based and Ground-based Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Peter; Russell, Christopher; Lai, Hairong

    2014-05-01

    In general, asteroids, meteoroids and dust do not interact with the plasma structures in the solar system, but after a collision between fast moving bodies the debris cloud contains nanoscale dust particles that are charged and behave like heavy ions. Dusty magnetic clouds are then accelerated to the solar wind speed. While they pose no threat to spacecraft because of the particle size, the coherency imposed by the magnetization of the cloud allows the cloud to interact with the Earth's magnetosphere as well as the plasma in the immediate vicinity of the cloud. We call these clouds Interplanetary Field Enhancements (IFEs). These IFEs are a unique class of interplanetary field structures that feature cusp-shaped increases and decreases in the interplanetary magnetic field and a thin current sheet. The occurrence of IFEs is attributed to the interaction between the solar wind and dust particles produced in inter-bolide collisions. Previous spacecraft observations have confirmed that IFEs move with the solar wind. When IFEs strike the magnetosphere, they may distort the magnetosphere in several possible ways, such as producing a small indentation, a large scale compression, or a glancing blow. In any event if the IFE is slowed by the magnetosphere, the compression of the Earth's field should be seen in the ground-based magnetic records that are continuously recorded. Thus it is important to understand the magnetospheric response to IFE arrival. In this study, we investigate the IFE structure observed by spacecraft upstream of the magnetosphere and the induced magnetic field perturbations observed by networks of ground magnetometers, including the THEMIS, CARISMA, McMAC arrays in North America and the IMAGE array in Europe. We find that, in a well-observed IFE event on December 24, 2006, all ground magnetometer stations observed an impulse at approximately 1217 UT when the IFE was expected to arrive at the Earth's magnetopause. These ground stations spread across many

  4. Effect of the Interplanetary Medium on Nanodust Observations by the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Chat, G.; Issautier, K.; Zaslavsky, A.; Pantellini, F.; Meyer-Vernet, N.; Belheouane, S.; Maksimovic, M.

    2015-03-01

    Dust particles provide an important part of the matter composing the interplanetary medium; their mass flux at 1 AU is similar to that of the solar wind. Dust grains of nanometer size-scale can be detected using radio and plasma wave instruments because they move at roughly the solar wind speed. The high-velocity impact of a dust particle generates a small crater on the spacecraft: the dust particle and the crater material are vaporized. This produces a plasma cloud whose associated electrical charge induces an electric pulse measured with radio and plasma instruments. Since their first detection in the interplanetary medium, nanodust particles have been routinely measured using the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory/WAVES experiment [S/WAVES]. We present the nanodust properties measured using S/WAVES/ Low Frequency Receiver [LFR] observations between 2007 and 2013, and for the first time present evidence of coronal mass ejection interaction with the nanodust, leading to a higher nanodust flux measured at 1 AU. Finally, possible influences of the inner planets on the nanodust flux are presented and discussed.

  5. EVIDENCE FOR LOCAL ACCELERATION OF SUPRATHERMAL HEAVY ION OBSERVATIONS DURING INTERPLANETARY CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Gruesbeck, Jacob R.; Lepri, Susan T.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; Christian, Eric R.

    2015-01-20

    Suprathermal particles are an important seed population for a variety of energetic particles found throughout the heliosphere, but their origin is in debate. We present, for the first time, high-cadence observations of suprathermal heavy ions during interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs), from the Suprathermal Ion Composition Spectrometer on board the Wind spacecraft, and investigate their ionic composition and compare it to the bulk solar wind plasma composition, observed from the Solar Wind Ion Composition Spectrometer on board the Advanced Composition Explorer. We find that the composition of the suprathermal plasma is related to the local bulk solar wind plasma and not to the plasma upstream of the ICME. This implies that the suprathermal plasma is accelerated from the local bulk solar wind plasma and not the upstream solar wind plasma.

  6. Observations of Interstellar Pickup Ions and their Suprathermal Tails in Interplanetary Space and in the Heliosheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gloeckler, George; Fisk, Len

    2014-10-01

    Since the invention of space-borne time-of-flight mass spectrometers in the late 1990s, distribution functions of singly charged interstellar pickup ions, produced primarily by charge exchange with the solar wind and by photoionization of the interstellar neutral gas, have been observed from 1 to ~5 AU in interplanetary space. Here we summarize observed characteristics of pickup ion spectra (primarily of H+ and He+) as well as of the pickup ion tails that are readily produced in Local Acceleration Regions in space, both at 1 AU and in the heliosheath, and briefly discuss the most likely mechanisms for producing interstellar pickup ions as well as their tails that in the heliosheath extend to high (~10 MeV/nuc) energies.

  7. Redefining the Boundaries of Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections from Observations at the Ecliptic Plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cid, C.; Palacios, J.; Saiz, E.; Guerrero, A.

    2016-09-01

    On 2015 January 6-7, an interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME) was observed at L1. This event, which can be associated with a weak and slow coronal mass ejection, allows us to discuss the differences between the boundaries of the magnetic cloud and the compositional boundaries. A fast stream from a solar coronal hole surrounding this ICME offers a unique opportunity to check the boundaries’ process definition and to explain differences between them. Using Wind and ACE data, we perform a complementary analysis involving compositional, magnetic, and kinematic observations providing relevant information regarding the evolution of the ICME as travelling away from the Sun. We propose erosion, at least at the front boundary of the ICME, as the main reason for the difference between the boundaries, and compositional signatures as the most precise diagnostic tool for the boundaries of ICMEs.

  8. Redefining the Boundaries of Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections from Observations at the Ecliptic Plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cid, C.; Palacios, J.; Saiz, E.; Guerrero, A.

    2016-09-01

    On 2015 January 6–7, an interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME) was observed at L1. This event, which can be associated with a weak and slow coronal mass ejection, allows us to discuss the differences between the boundaries of the magnetic cloud and the compositional boundaries. A fast stream from a solar coronal hole surrounding this ICME offers a unique opportunity to check the boundaries’ process definition and to explain differences between them. Using Wind and ACE data, we perform a complementary analysis involving compositional, magnetic, and kinematic observations providing relevant information regarding the evolution of the ICME as travelling away from the Sun. We propose erosion, at least at the front boundary of the ICME, as the main reason for the difference between the boundaries, and compositional signatures as the most precise diagnostic tool for the boundaries of ICMEs.

  9. Ulysses observations of wave activity at interplanetary shocks and implications for type II radio bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Lengyel-Frey, D. |; Thejappa, G.; MacDowall, R.J.; Stone, R.G.; Phillips, J.L. |

    1997-02-01

    We present the first quantitative investigation of interplanetary type II radio emission in which in situ waves measured at interplanetary shocks are used to compute radio wave intensities for comparison with type II observations. This study is based on in situ measurements of 42 in-ecliptic forward shocks as well as 10 intervals of type II emission observed by the Ulysses spacecraft between 1 AU and 5 AU. The analysis involves comparisons of statistical properties of type II bursts and in situ waves. Most of the 42 shocks are associated with the occurrence of electrostatic waves near the time of shock passage at Ulysses. These waves, which are identified as electron plasma waves and ion acoustic-like waves, are typically most intense several minutes before shock passage. This suggests that wave-wave interactions might be of importance in electromagnetic wave generation and that type II source regions are located immediately upstream of the shocks. We use the in situ wave measurements to compute type II brightness temperatures, assuming that emission at the fundamental of the electron plasma frequency is generated by the merging of electron plasma waves and ion acoustic waves or the decay of electron plasma waves into ion acoustic and transverse waves. Second harmonic emission is assumed to be produced by the merging of electron plasma waves. The latter mechanism requires that a portion of the electron plasma wave distribution is backscattered, presumably by density inhomogeneities in regions of observed ion acoustic wave activity. The computed type II brightness temperatures are found to be consistent with observed values for both fundamental and second harmonic emission, assuming that strong ({approx_equal}10{sup {minus}4}V/m) electron plasma waves and ion acoustic waves are coincident and that the electron plasma waves have phase velocities less than about 10 times the electron thermal velocity. (Abstract Truncated)

  10. Structure of ionospheric irregularities from amplitude and phase scintillation observations

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharyya, A.; Rastogi, R.G. )

    1991-04-01

    The mutual coherence function Gamma 2, or the second moment of the complex amplitude of a radio wave which traverses through equatorial F region irregularities, is computed from amplitude and phase scintillation data. Theoretically, the equation satisfied by the coherence function has an analytic solution over the whole range of scintillation strength. This solution is directly related to the structure function for the phase fluctuations produced by the irregularities. Hence, the shape of the correlation function for variations in the total electron content along the signal path can be derived from the computed values of Gamma 2. With a suitable power-law model for the irregularities, an 'intermediate break scale', this scale, as well as the rms density fluctuation are deduced from a comparison of computed values for short-time lags with those expected from theory. During a postsunset scintillation event, this scale is found to increase with local time. In the context of the generalized Rayleigh-Taylor instability, which is the likely source of the irregularities, this increase may be attributed to a decline in the effective electric field prevailing in the region of the irregularities. 26 refs.

  11. MAVEN observations of the response of Mars to an interplanetary coronal mass ejection.

    PubMed

    Jakosky, B M; Grebowsky, J M; Luhmann, J G; Connerney, J; Eparvier, F; Ergun, R; Halekas, J; Larson, D; Mahaffy, P; McFadden, J; Mitchell, D F; Schneider, N; Zurek, R; Bougher, S; Brain, D; Ma, Y J; Mazelle, C; Andersson, L; Andrews, D; Baird, D; Baker, D; Bell, J M; Benna, M; Chaffin, M; Chamberlin, P; Chaufray, Y-Y; Clarke, J; Collinson, G; Combi, M; Crary, F; Cravens, T; Crismani, M; Curry, S; Curtis, D; Deighan, J; Delory, G; Dewey, R; DiBraccio, G; Dong, C; Dong, Y; Dunn, P; Elrod, M; England, S; Eriksson, A; Espley, J; Evans, S; Fang, X; Fillingim, M; Fortier, K; Fowler, C M; Fox, J; Gröller, H; Guzewich, S; Hara, T; Harada, Y; Holsclaw, G; Jain, S K; Jolitz, R; Leblanc, F; Lee, C O; Lee, Y; Lefevre, F; Lillis, R; Livi, R; Lo, D; Mayyasi, M; McClintock, W; McEnulty, T; Modolo, R; Montmessin, F; Morooka, M; Nagy, A; Olsen, K; Peterson, W; Rahmati, A; Ruhunusiri, S; Russell, C T; Sakai, S; Sauvaud, J-A; Seki, K; Steckiewicz, M; Stevens, M; Stewart, A I F; Stiepen, A; Stone, S; Tenishev, V; Thiemann, E; Tolson, R; Toublanc, D; Vogt, M; Weber, T; Withers, P; Woods, T; Yelle, R

    2015-11-01

    Coupling between the lower and upper atmosphere, combined with loss of gas from the upper atmosphere to space, likely contributed to the thin, cold, dry atmosphere of modern Mars. To help understand ongoing ion loss to space, the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) spacecraft made comprehensive measurements of the Mars upper atmosphere, ionosphere, and interactions with the Sun and solar wind during an interplanetary coronal mass ejection impact in March 2015. Responses include changes in the bow shock and magnetosheath, formation of widespread diffuse aurora, and enhancement of pick-up ions. Observations and models both show an enhancement in escape rate of ions to space during the event. Ion loss during solar events early in Mars history may have been a major contributor to the long-term evolution of the Mars atmosphere. PMID:26542576

  12. MAVEN observations of the response of Mars to an interplanetary coronal mass ejection.

    PubMed

    Jakosky, B M; Grebowsky, J M; Luhmann, J G; Connerney, J; Eparvier, F; Ergun, R; Halekas, J; Larson, D; Mahaffy, P; McFadden, J; Mitchell, D F; Schneider, N; Zurek, R; Bougher, S; Brain, D; Ma, Y J; Mazelle, C; Andersson, L; Andrews, D; Baird, D; Baker, D; Bell, J M; Benna, M; Chaffin, M; Chamberlin, P; Chaufray, Y-Y; Clarke, J; Collinson, G; Combi, M; Crary, F; Cravens, T; Crismani, M; Curry, S; Curtis, D; Deighan, J; Delory, G; Dewey, R; DiBraccio, G; Dong, C; Dong, Y; Dunn, P; Elrod, M; England, S; Eriksson, A; Espley, J; Evans, S; Fang, X; Fillingim, M; Fortier, K; Fowler, C M; Fox, J; Gröller, H; Guzewich, S; Hara, T; Harada, Y; Holsclaw, G; Jain, S K; Jolitz, R; Leblanc, F; Lee, C O; Lee, Y; Lefevre, F; Lillis, R; Livi, R; Lo, D; Mayyasi, M; McClintock, W; McEnulty, T; Modolo, R; Montmessin, F; Morooka, M; Nagy, A; Olsen, K; Peterson, W; Rahmati, A; Ruhunusiri, S; Russell, C T; Sakai, S; Sauvaud, J-A; Seki, K; Steckiewicz, M; Stevens, M; Stewart, A I F; Stiepen, A; Stone, S; Tenishev, V; Thiemann, E; Tolson, R; Toublanc, D; Vogt, M; Weber, T; Withers, P; Woods, T; Yelle, R

    2015-11-01

    Coupling between the lower and upper atmosphere, combined with loss of gas from the upper atmosphere to space, likely contributed to the thin, cold, dry atmosphere of modern Mars. To help understand ongoing ion loss to space, the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) spacecraft made comprehensive measurements of the Mars upper atmosphere, ionosphere, and interactions with the Sun and solar wind during an interplanetary coronal mass ejection impact in March 2015. Responses include changes in the bow shock and magnetosheath, formation of widespread diffuse aurora, and enhancement of pick-up ions. Observations and models both show an enhancement in escape rate of ions to space during the event. Ion loss during solar events early in Mars history may have been a major contributor to the long-term evolution of the Mars atmosphere.

  13. Plasma properties of driver gas following interplanetary shocks observed by ISEE-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwickl, R. D.; Ashbridge, J. R.; Bame, S. J.; Feldman, W. C.; Gosling, J. T.; Smith, E. J.

    1982-01-01

    Plasma fluid parameters calculated from solar wind and magnetic field data obtained on ISEE 3 were studied. The characteristic properties of driver gas following interplanetary shocks was determined. Of 54 shocks observed from August 1978 to February 1980, nine contained a well defined driver gas that was clearly identifiable by a discontinuous decrease in the average proton temperature across a tangential discontinuity. While helium enhancements were present in all of nine of these events, only about half of them contained simultaneous changes in the two quantities. Often the He/H ratio changed over a period of minutes. Simultaneous with the drop in proton temperature the helium and electron temperature decreased abruptly. In some cases the proton temperature depression was accompanied by a moderate increase in magnetic field magnitude with an unusually low variance and by an increase in the ratio of parallel to perpendicular temperature. The drive gas usually displayed a bidirectional flow of suprathermal solar wind electrons at higher energies.

  14. Numerical simulations of solar disturbances and their interplanetary consequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dryer, M.; Wu, S. T.; Detman, T. R.

    1990-01-01

    Time-dependent MHD numerical simulations are used to study responses of the solar atmosphere and interplanetary medium to simulated solar disturbances. A number of 2D and 3D examples of coronal mass ejection (CME) simulations and some current controversies concerning the basic processes of CME initiation are discussed. Footpoint shearing motion is tested to determine whether it can provide a reasonable mechanism for CME development from arch filament configurations. Possible interplanetary consequences to CME-like disturbances are demonstrated by using 3D simulations to determine the dynamic response of the solar wind to a plasmoid injection from an eruptive filament or prominence. The possibility that a plasmoid may be generated in the interplanetary medium by a solar-generated shock that propagates through a heliospheric current sheet is discussed. Application of the 3D model for the interpretation of interplanetary scintillation observations is addressed.

  15. Multi-station Scintillation Observations at Spitzbergen During the NASA Cusp Rocket Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, S.; Kuenzler, H.; Ning, P.; Basu, S.

    2003-12-01

    The plasma density irregularities and their turbulent motion in the cusp following the launch of the NASA Cusp Rocket on December 14, 2002, were studied by the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) from ionospheric scintillation observations by using transmissions from a quasi-stationary satellite at 250 MHz and GPS at 1.5 GHz. The multi-instrumented rocket was launched from Ny Alesund at 11h 16m 48s and the rocket attained 300 km altitude after 2m 27s into the flight and reached its apogee at 760 km after 8m 8s. At this time the 300 km sub-ionospheric locations of UHF scintillation measurements from Ny Alesund (75 MLAT) and from Longyearbyen (74.1 MLAT) on Spitzbergen corresponded closely to the rocket flight path. Scintillations were in a quiescent phase earlier that day, becoming suddenly enhanced to saturation levels prior to 1100 UT and maintaining this increase up to 1250 UT. The rocket was launched during this active phase when a burst of GPS phase fluctuations was also observed. The most significant result was the broadening of the scintillation spectrum at 250 MHz that exceeded 2 Hz indicating at least a 5-fold increase in the turbulent motion of plasma density irregularities compared to that prior to the scintillation enhancement. The enhancement of scintillation was coincident with the enhanced plasma convection and radar backscatter recorded by the SuperDARN radars at Iceland and Finland. The increased spectral width of the backscatter return from these two radars indicating turbulent electric fields agreed very well with that obtained from the broadening of the power spectrum of scintillations. The rocket in-situ observations of electric field fluctuations and plasma density irregularities are being studied in relation to the magnitude of scintillations and their spectra.

  16. Gigahertz scintillation observations at 22. 0 deg N magnetic latitude in the Indian zone

    SciTech Connect

    Dabas, R.S.; Banerjee, P.K.; Bhattacharya, Sumana; Reddy, B.M.; Singh, J. )

    1991-06-01

    The morphological aspect of gigahertz nighttime scintillations is considered, including their characteristics, seasonal and diurnal behavior, and dependence on solar activity. In addition, the association of low-altitude scintillations with the equatorial belt width is analyzed by comparing simultaneous observations from two sites taken during equinoctial months of a high-sunspot year. The intensities of scintillation at these locations are compared and discussed from the point of view of the background ionization and the geometry of ray paths. Scintillation activity is found to be suppressed during geomagnetic disturbances but enhanced in the postmidnight hours of the same night for those magnetic storms whose recovery phase starts between the midnight and dawn local time sector. 45 refs.

  17. Solar cycle variation of interplanetary shocks, coronal mass ejections, and stream interactions observed at 0.7 AU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsay, G. M.; Luhmann, J. G.; Russell, C. T.; Gazis, P.

    1995-01-01

    A survey of the Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) magnetometer and plasma data from 1979-1980, shows that the occurrence frequency of interplanetary shocks, coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and stream interactions observed at 0.7 AU exhibits a solar cycle variation. As previously found at 1 AU, the observed number of both interplanetary shocks and CMEs peaks during solar maximum (approximately 16 and approximately 27 per year, respectively) and reaches a low during solar minimum (approximately 0 and approximately 7 per year, respectively), in phase with the variation in smoothed sunspot number. The number of stream interactions observed varies in the opposite manner, having a minimum during solar maximum (approximately 15 per year) and a maximum during solar minimum (approximately 34 per year). The percentage of CMEs and stream interactions producing interplanetary shocks also varies during the solar-cycle and exhibits interesting behavior during the declining phase. While the number of CMEs observed during this phase is decreasing, the percentage of CMEs producing interplanetary shocks reaches a maximum. Also, while the number of stream interactions observed is increasing, but has not reached maximum during the declining phase, the percentage of stream interactions producing interplanety shocks is at a maximum.

  18. Simultaneous observations of SBAS and GPS amplitude scintillations over the African and American equatorial ionosphere.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akala, Andrew; Oyeyemi, Elijah; Doherty, Patricia

    2016-07-01

    We simultaneously observed the SBAS (EGNOS and WAAS)and GPS amplitude scintillations over the African and American equatorial ionosphere during the solar maximum of year 2013. Data from 4 stations, namely, Addis Ababa (Lat 9.03 deg N, Lon 38.77 deg E, Mag lat 0.18 deg N) ETHIOPIA, Dakar (Lat 14.75 deg N, Lon 17.45 deg W, Mag lat 5.88 deg N) SENEGAL, Cape Verde (Lat 16.73 deg N, Lon 22.93 deg W, Mag lat 4.74 deg N), and Natal (Lat 5.78 deg S, Lon 35.2 deg W, Mag lat 10 deg S) BRAZIL were used for the study. Scintillations were majorly localized within the hours of 2200-2400 LT. On a monthly scale, April and October recorded the highest occurrences of scintillation, while June recorded the least. Seasonally, equinoxes recorded the highest occurrences, while June solstice recorded the least. Lastly, we observed that during active days of scintillations, SBAS satellites' signals scintillated correspondingly with GPS satellites' signals.The SBAS scintillations commenced around the time of local sunset terminator to form plateaus which vanished around local midnight.

  19. TWO-PLASMA MODEL FOR LOW CHARGE STATE INTERPLANETARY CORONAL MASS EJECTION OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Gruesbeck, Jacob R.; Lepri, Susan T.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.

    2012-12-01

    Recent ACE/SWICS observations have revealed that {approx}5% of all in situ observed interplanetary coronal mass ejections include time periods with very low charge state ions found to be associated with prominence eruptions. It was also shown that these low charge state ions are often observed concurrently with very high charge state ions. But, the physical process leading to these mixed charge states is not known and could be caused by either the mixing of plasmas of different temperatures or by non-local freeze-in effects as discussed by Gruesbeck. We provide a detailed and multi-stage analysis that excludes this latter option. We therefore conclude that time periods of very low charge states are the heliospheric remnants of plasmas born in prominences. We further conclude that the contemporaneously observed low and very high charge states are an indication of mixing of plasmas of different temperatures along magnetic field lines, suggesting that silicon and iron are depleted over carbon and oxygen in the cold, prominence-associated plasma. This represents the first experimental determination of elemental composition of prominence-associated plasma.

  20. Polarimetry of Dust in Optically Thin Clouds: Observations and Experimental Simulations of Cometary and Interplanetary Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadamcik, E.; Renard, J.; Levasseur-Regourd, A.; Lasue, J.

    2013-12-01

    Remote polarimetric observations are used to tentatively infer the physical properties of the dust particles in cometary and interplanetary environments. To interpret the results, numerical and experimental simulations are necessary. Light scattering measurements on levitating particles with the PROGRA2 experiment -in dedicated microgravity flights or in the laboratory for low-density particles- provide relevant simulations of the scattering properties of real particles, which can present large size distributions and a large variety of structures and materials (Renard et al., 2002; Hadamcik et al., 2009). Previous systematic experiments, together with numerical models and laboratory analysis of cosmic particles (e.g. Stardust samples) allow to optimize dust particles' properties -such as their structures, sizes, size distributions, and silicate to organics ratios- (Hadamcik et al. 2007a; Zubko et al., 2009; Lasue et al., 2010). We present intensity and polarization images of cometary comae providing evidence for changes in the polarization properties in the internal regions of the coma, linked to the variation of particles properties with nucleus distance and/or rotation phase (Hadamcik et al., 2007a; Hadamcik et al., 2013a; 2013b) and preliminary results of 2013 observations. Associated experimental simulations help us to interpret how particles evolve within different coma regions and at different solar distances (Hadamcik et al. 2007b; 2009; 2011). We expect in situ confirmation of our results during the Rosetta mission to comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko in 2014-2015 (Hadamcik et al., 2010). Analyses of observations of the zodiacal light scattered by the interplanetary dust cloud particles have shown local polarisation changes with the solar distance (Levasseur-Regourd et al., 2001). Such changes are interpreted through numerical models to be related to variations in the composition and physical properties of the particles through various processes including

  1. Characterization of Ionospheric Scintillation Using Simultaneous Formosat-3/COSMIC Radio Occultation Observations and AFRL SCINDA Ground Scintillation Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starks, M. J.; Lin, C. S.; Groves, K. M.; Pedersen, T. R.; Basu, S.; Syndergaard, S.; Rocken, C.

    2007-05-01

    Ionospheric scintillation at low latitudes has been studied using ionospheric radio occultation (RO) measurements by the FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC micro-satellites in conjunction with ground-based data from the Scintillation Network Decision Aid (SCINDA) station at Kwajalein Atoll. The Air Force Research Laboratory has developed the SCINDA network for monitoring low-latitude ionospheric total electron content (TEC) and scintillation associated with equatorial spread F. The network currently consists of sixteen stations distributed around the globe and the data have been used to conduct numerous studies on the characteristics and climatology of equatorial scintillation. The present study focuses on COSMIC RO and SCINDA data during the three COSMIC campaigns in 2006. Radio occultation events are selected by requiring that ionospheric scintillation was detected by the SCINDA VHF scintillation monitor at Kwajalein, and that the occultation ray path intersected the Kwajalein longitude below the satellite altitude, which varied from 500 to 800 km for the six FORMOSAT-3 satellites. In order to exclude tropospheric effects, only GPS signal amplitudes from FORMOSAT-3 with ray path tangent altitudes above 100 km are considered. Locations of ionospheric scintillation are estimated by triangulation using the satellites and the SCINDA ground station. Airglow images at Kwajalein are also used to confirm occurrence of equatorial ionospheric scintillations. For the selected events, large amplitude L1 and L2 scintillations tend to occur at altitudes below 200 km at frequencies around 0.5 Hz. The results are discussed as a potential path toward better specifying the occurrence of equatorial scintillations.

  2. The Bastille Day Magnetic Clouds and Upstream Shocks: Near Earth Interplanetary Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepping, R. P.; Berdichevsky, D. B.; Burlaga, L. F.; Lazarus, A. J.; Kasper, J.; Desch, M. D.; Wu, C.-C.; Reames, D. V.; Singer, H. J.; Singer, H. J.; Vondrak, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The energetic charged particle, interplanetary magnetic field, and plasma characteristics of the 'Bastille Day' shock and ejecta/magnetic cloud events at 1 AU occurring over the days 14-16 July 2000 are described. Profiles of MeV (WIND/LEMT) energetic ions help to organize the overall sequence of events from the solar source to 1 AU. Stressed are analyses of an outstanding magnetic cloud (MC2) starting late on 15 July and its upstream shock about 4 hours earlier in WIND magnetic field and plasma data. Also analyzed is a less certain, but likely, magnetic cloud (MC1) occurring early on 15 July; this was separated from MC2 by its upstream shock and many heliospheric current sheet (HCS) crossings. Other HCS crossings occurred throughout the 3-day period. Overall this dramatic series of interplanetary events caused a large multi-phase magnetic storm with min Dst lower than -300 nT. The very fast solar wind speed (greater than or equal to 1100 km/s) in and around the front of MC2 (for near average densities) was responsible for a very high solar wind ram pressure driving in the front of the magnetosphere to geocentric distances estimated to be as low as approx. 5 R(sub E), much lower than the geosynchronous orbit radius. This was consistent with magnetic field observations from two GOES satellites which indicated they were in the magnetosheath for extended times. A static force free field model is used to fit the two magnetic cloud profiles providing estimates of the clouds' physical and geometrical properties. MC2 was much larger than MCI, but their axes were nearly antiparallel, and their magnetic fields had the same left-handed helicity. MC2's axis and its upstream shock normal were very close to being perpendicular to each other, as might be expected if the cloud were driving the shock at the time of observation. The estimated axial magnetic flux carried by MC2 was 52 x 10(exp 20) Mx, which is about 5 times the typical magnetic flux estimated for other magnetic

  3. Interplanetary shocks and foreshocks observed by STEREO during 2007-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco-Cano, X.; Kajdič, P.; Aguilar-Rodríguez, E.; Russell, C. T.; Jian, L. K.; Luhmann, J. G.

    2016-02-01

    Interplanetary shocks in the heliosphere modify the solar wind through which they pass. In particular, shocks play an important role in particle acceleration. During the extended solar minimum (2007-2010) STEREO observed 65 forward shocks driven by stream interactions (SI), with magnetosonic Mach numbers Mms ≈ 1.1-4.0 and shock normal angles θBN ~ 20-87°. We analyze the waves associated with these shocks and find that the region upstream can be permeated by whistler waves (f ~ 1 Hz) and/or ultra low frequency (ULF) waves (f ~ 10-2-10-1 Hz). While whistlers appear to be generated at the shock, the origin of ULF waves is most probably associated with local kinetic ion instabilities. We find that when the Mach number (Mms) is low and the shock is quasi-perpendicular (θBN > 45°) whistler waves remain close to the shock. As Mms increases, the shock profile changes and can develop a foot and overshoot associated with ion reflection and gyration. Whistler precursors can be superposed on the foot region, so that some quasi-perpendicular shocks have characteristics of both subcritical and supercritical shocks. When the shock is quasi-parallel (θBN < 45°) a large foreshock with suprathermal ions and waves can form. Upstream, there are whistler trains at higher frequencies whose characteristics can be slightly modified probably by reflected and/or leaked ions and by almost circularly polarized waves at lower frequencies that may be locally generated by ion instabilities. In contrast with planetary bow shocks, most of the upstream waves studied here are mainly transverse and no steepening occurs. Some quasi-perpendicular shocks (45° < θBN < 60°) are preceded by ULF waves and ion foreshocks. Fluctuations downstream of quasi-parallel shocks tend to have larger amplitudes than waves in the sheath of quasi-perpendicular shocks. We compare SI-driven shock properties with those of shocks generated by interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs). During the same years

  4. COMPOSITION STRUCTURE OF INTERPLANETARY CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS FROM MULTISPACECRAFT OBSERVATIONS, MODELING, AND COMPARISON WITH NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Reinard, Alysha A.; Mulligan, Tamitha E-mail: blynch@ssl.berkeley.edu

    2012-12-20

    We present an analysis of the ionic composition of iron for two interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) observed on 2007 May 21-23 by the ACE and STEREO spacecraft in the context of the magnetic structure of the ejecta flux rope, sheath region, and surrounding solar wind flow. This analysis is made possible due to recent advances in multispacecraft data interpolation, reconstruction, and visualization as well as results from recent modeling of ionic charge states in MHD simulations of magnetic breakout and flux cancellation coronal mass ejection (CME) initiation. We use these advances to interpret specific features of the ICME plasma composition resulting from the magnetic topology and evolution of the CME. We find that, in both the data and our MHD simulations, the flux ropes centers are relatively cool, while charge state enhancements surround and trail the flux ropes. The magnetic orientations of the ICMEs are suggestive of magnetic breakout-like reconnection during the eruption process, which could explain the spatial location of the observed iron enhancements just outside the traditional flux rope magnetic signatures and between the two ICMEs. Detailed comparisons between the simulations and data were more complicated, but a sharp increase in high iron charge states in the ACE and STEREO-A data during the second flux rope corresponds well to similar features in the flux cancellation results. We discuss the prospects of this integrated in situ data analysis and modeling approach to advancing our understanding of the unified CME-to-ICME evolution.

  5. East-west asymmetric of scintillation occurrence in Indonesia using GPS and GLONASS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abadi, P.; Otsuka, Y.; Shiokawa, K.; Saito, S.; Husin, A.; Dear, V.; Anggarani, S.

    2015-12-01

    By using GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite Systems) receiver to collect amplitude scintillation at L1 frequency from GPS and GLONASS, we investigated ionospheric scintillation occurrence at equator anomaly in Indonesia from July 2014 to June 2015. The receiver is installed at Bandung (6.9 deg S, 107.6 deg E; 9.9 deg S mag. latitude), Indonesia. In this study, we grouped our analysis into two groups based on duration of observation, (1) July-December 2014 (monthly F10.7 ranged from 124.7-158.7) which is named autumn equinox and (2) January-June 2015 (monthly F10.7 ranged from 120.1-141.7) which is named spring equinox. Our preliminary results can be summarized as follows; (1) the intensity of scintillations at spring equinox is higher than at autumn equinox although solar activity at autumn equinox is higher than at spring equinox, see Figure 1 and (2) as shown in Figure 2, the directional distribution of scintillation occurrences at spring equinox mostly concentrate in the western sky, so we see east-west asymmetric, but the distribution at autumn equinox doesn't show clearly east-west asymmetric. Previous studies have reported that occurrence rate of the scintillation at spring equinox season is higher than at autumn equinox. Our results suggest that equinoctial asymmetry of scintillation occurrence can be also as an asymmetric of scintillation intensity and east-west asymmetric of scintillation occurrence between spring and autumn equinox. In general, plasma bubble is tilted westward as it vertically develop due to vertical shear in the eastward plasma drift in F region, and consequently, it will be tilted westward as it extends in latitude. Scintillation intensity will be stronger when signal propagation tend to be parallel with structure of the plasma bubble. Figure 2 also imply that the latitudinal extension of plasma bubble is higher at spring equinox than at autumn equinox. More the bubble extends in latitude, more the bubble structure exists in the western

  6. Observable Effects of Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections on Ground Level Neutron Monitor Count Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco, J. J.; Catalán, E.; Hidalgo, M. A.; Medina, J.; García, O.; Rodríguez-Pacheco, J.

    2013-05-01

    In this work, non-recurrent Forbush decreases (FDs) triggered by the passage of shock-driving interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) have been analyzed. Fifty-nine ICMEs have been studied, but only 25 % of them were associated to a FD. We find that shock-driving magnetic clouds (MCs) produce deeper FDs than shock-driving ejecta. This fact can be explained regarding the observed growing trends between decreases in neutron monitor (NM) count rate and MC/ejecta speed and its associated rigidity. MCs are faster and have higher associated rigidities than ejecta. Also the deceleration of ICMEs seems to be a cause for producing FDs, as can be inferred from the decreasing trend between NM count rate and deceleration. This probably implies that the interaction between the ICME traveling from the corona to the Earth and the solar wind can play an important role in producing deeper FDs. Finally, we conclude that ejecta without flux rope topology are the ones less effective in unchaining FDs.

  7. Reconstruction of Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections Using Multi-spacecraft Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, D. J.; Hu, Q.

    2012-12-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) originating at the solar corona sometimes propagate outward through space in the form of magnetic clouds (MCs). A common model for an MC is a helical magnetic flux rope with uniformity along its axis. These interplanetary CMEs (ICMEs) are characterized as having an elevated magnetic field magnitude, a smooth rotation of magnetic field direction and a decreased plasma beta. Using one-dimensional in-situ data, the geometric and physical properties of a flux rope can be deduced using the Grad-Shafranov (GS) reconstruction technique. Using a GS solver written in MATLAB, we reconstructed three separate ICME events using a cylindrical model. The event used were seen by the ACE spacecraft, positioned at Earth's L1 point, as well as either STEREO A or B, positioned ahead and behind of Earth in its orbit respectively. These events occurred between 2007 and 2009, while the longitudinal separations of the STEREO crafts with respect to each other, as well as with respect to ACE, were increasing. As a means of viewing one event at different points along its axis, reconstructed STEREO data was compared to observed ACE data. As expected, later events had larger disagreements of results because of the larger spatial separation of measurements.

  8. Propagation and Evolution of Interplanetary Magnetic Clouds: Global Simulations and Comparisons with Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, P.; Ben-Nun, M.; Linker, J.; Torok, T.; Lionello, R.; Downs, C.

    2014-12-01

    In this talk, we explore the evolution of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs), and fast magnetic clouds (MCs) in particular. We address three specific issues. First, What are the large-scale forces acting on ejecta as they travel from the Sun to 1 AU through a realistic ambient solar wind, and how does they affect the large-scale structure of the event? Second, what are the dominant waves/shocks associated with fast ICMEs? And third, how are the properties of ICMEs different during cycle 24 than during the previous cycle? To accomplish these objectives, we employ a variety of numerical approaches, including global resistive MHD models that incorporate realistic energy transport processes. We also compare and contrast model results with both remote solar and in-situ measurements of ICMEs at 1 AU and elsewhere, including the so-called ``Bastille Day'' event of July 14, 2000, and the more recent ``extreme ICME'' observed by STEREO-A on July 23, 2012.

  9. Observations of simultaneous multi-constellation GNSS scintillation in nightside aurora over Svalbard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Meeren, Christer; Oksavik, Kjellmar; Lorentzen, Dag

    2015-04-01

    We present multi-instrument observations of severe GNSS scintillations associated with nightside aurora over Svalbard, using several all-sky imagers and 50 Hz multi-constellation GNSS receivers (GPS, GLONASS, Galileo). Transionospheric signals such as GNSS are impacted by ionospheric scintillations. Such scintillations can cause signal fading and loss of lock in the receiver, potentially impacting the receiver's position solution. At high latitudes, GNSS scintillations are associated mainly with patches in the polar cap and with auroral precipitation and emissions in the auroral oval. Both the polar cap and the auroral oval are highly dynamic systems, making it difficult to predict the impact on GNSS signals and their reliability. In this study we show results from case studies in order to better understand the mechanisms by which auroral precipitation impacts GNSS signals. We investigate phase and amplitude scintillations relative to auroral features. Also, in a similar approach to van der Meeren et al. [2014], who investigated irregularities at the front of a tongue of ionization in the nightside polar cap, we use spectrograms of 50Hz GNSS raw phase to get an indication of the spatial scale sizes of phase variations.

  10. Observations of Particle Acceleration Associated with Small-Scale Magnetic Islands Downstream of Interplanetary Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khabarova, Olga V.; Zank, Gary P.; Li, Gang; Malandraki, Olga E.; le Roux, Jakobus A.; Webb, Gary M.

    2016-04-01

    We have recently shown both theoretically (Zank et al. 2014, 2015; le Roux et al. 2015) and observationally (Khabarova et al. 2015) that dynamical small-scale magnetic islands play a significant role in local particle acceleration in the supersonic solar wind. We discuss here observational evidence for particle acceleration at shock waves that is enhanced by the recently proposed mechanism of particle energization by both island contraction and the reconnection electric field generated in merging or contracting magnetic islands downstream of the shocks (Zank et al. 2014, 2015; le Roux et al. 2015). Both observations and simulations suppose formation of magnetic islands in the turbulent wake of heliospheric or interplanetary shocks (ISs) (Turner et al. 2013; Karimabadi et al. 2014; Chasapis et al. 2015). A combination of the DSA mechanism with acceleration by magnetic island dynamics explain why the spectra of energetic particles that are supposed to be accelerated at heliospheric shocks are sometimes harder than predicted by DSA theory (Zank et al. 2015). Moreover, such an approach allows us to explain and describe other unusual behaviour of accelerated particles, such as when energetic particle flux intensity peaks are observed downstream of heliospheric shocks instead of peaking directly at the shock according to DSA theory. Zank et al. (2015) predicted the peak location to be behind the heliospheric termination shock (HTS) and showed that the distance from the shock to the peak depends on particle energy, which is in agreement with Voyager 2 observations. Similar particle behaviour is observed near strong ISs in the outer heliosphere as observed by Voyager 2. Observations show that heliospheric shocks are accompanied by current sheets, and that IS crossings always coincide with sharp changes in the IMF azimuthal angle and the IMF strength, which is typical for strong current sheets. The presence of current sheets in the vicinity of ISs acts to magnetically

  11. Observation of EAS Core with the Small Scintillation Detector at Taro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakuyama, H.; Kuramochi, Hiroshi; Obara, Hitoshi; Ono, Shunichi; Origasa, Satoru; Mochida, Akinori; Sakayama, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Noboru

    2003-07-01

    We have observed the core structure of extensive air showers(EAS) that primary energy above 1016 eV. To measure the more detail and the correct density of the incident particles near EAS core, we installed 100 small scintillation detectors (using plastic scintillator : 15cm × 15cm × 2.5cm) that are placed on a lattice 10 × 10, and 40cm separation, at Taro Cosmic Ray Lab oratory, at autumn 2002. We report the detail of the small detector, and preliminary results.

  12. Average Spatial Distribution of Cosmic Rays behind the Interplanetary Shock—Global Muon Detector Network Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozai, M.; Munakata, K.; Kato, C.; Kuwabara, T.; Rockenbach, M.; Dal Lago, A.; Schuch, N. J.; Braga, C. R.; Mendonça, R. R. S.; Jassar, H. K. Al; Sharma, M. M.; Duldig, M. L.; Humble, J. E.; Evenson, P.; Sabbah, I.; Tokumaru, M.

    2016-07-01

    We analyze the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) density and its spatial gradient in Forbush Decreases (FDs) observed with the Global Muon Detector Network (GMDN) and neutron monitors (NMs). By superposing the GCR density and density gradient observed in FDs following 45 interplanetary shocks (IP-shocks), each associated with an identified eruption on the Sun, we infer the average spatial distribution of GCRs behind IP-shocks. We find two distinct modulations of GCR density in FDs, one in the magnetic sheath and the other in the coronal mass ejection (CME) behind the sheath. The density modulation in the sheath is dominant in the western flank of the shock, while the modulation in the CME ejecta stands out in the eastern flank. This east-west asymmetry is more prominent in GMDN data responding to ˜60 GV GCRs than in NM data responding to ˜10 GV GCRs, because of the softer rigidity spectrum of the modulation in the CME ejecta than in the sheath. The geocentric solar ecliptic-y component of the density gradient, G y , shows a negative (positive) enhancement in FDs caused by the eastern (western) eruptions, while G z shows a negative (positive) enhancement in FDs caused by the northern (southern) eruptions. This implies that the GCR density minimum is located behind the central flank of IP-shocks and propagating radially outward from the location of the solar eruption. We also confirmed that the average G z changes its sign above and below the heliospheric current sheet, in accord with the prediction of the drift model for the large-scale GCR transport in the heliosphere.

  13. Spatial correlations in intense ionospheric scintillations - comparison between numerical computation and observation

    SciTech Connect

    Kumagai, H.

    1987-06-01

    The spatial correlations in intense ionospheric scintillations were analyzed by comparing numerical results with observational ones. The observational results were obtained by spaced-receiver scintillation measurements of VHF satellite radiowave. The numerical computation was made by using the fourth-order moment equation with fairly realistic ionospheric irregularity models, in which power-law irregularities with spectral index 4, both thin and thick slabs, and both isotropic and anisotropic irregularities, were considered. Evolution of the S(4) index and the transverse correlation function was computed. The numerical result that the transverse correlation distance decreases with the increase in S(4) was consistent with that obtained in the observation, suggesting that multiple scattering plays an important role in the intense scintillations observed. The anisotropy of irregularities proved to act as if the density fluctuation increased. This effect, as well as the effect of slab thickness, was evaluated by the total phase fluctuations that the radiowave experienced in the slab. On the basis of the comparison, the irregularity height and electron-density fluctuation which is necessary to produce a particular strength of scintillation were estimated. 30 references.

  14. First observations of SBAS/WAAS scintillations: Using collocated scintillation measurements and all-sky images to study equatorial plasma bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledvina, B. M.; Makela, J. J.

    2005-07-01

    The first observations of amplitude scintillations on a Space Based Augmentation System (SBAS) satellite signal are presented. The scintillations occurred on the signal transmitted by a Wide Area Augmentation Satellite (WAAS) on 8-9 September 2004 from 2250-0045 LT. The GPS receiver that measured the scintillations is located on Haleakala, Hawaii (geomagnetic: 21.3°N, 271.4°E). With a maximum S4 = 0.35, corresponding to a peak-to-peak SNR variation of 8 dB, the scintillations are relatively weak, which is to be expected for a site poleward of the equatorial anomaly during declining solar conditions. Using a collocated all-sky imager, features of the irregularity structuring in the equatorial plasma bubbles are resolved. The satellite signals scintillate when the ray path intersects the three main bubbles. The scintillation intensity tends to peak near the walls, and decreases slightly in the interior of the bubbles. In this case, the bubbles' leading (east) walls contain smaller-scale-size irregularities than the trailing (west) walls.

  15. Pioneer 10 ultraviolet photometer observations of the interplanetary glow at heliocentric distances from 2 to 14 AU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, F. M.; Judge, D. L.; Suzuki, K.; Carlson, R. W.

    1981-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the observed Pioneer 10 interplanetary data from 1972 to 1977, taking into account the interplanetary glow intensity observed by the Pioneer 10 UV photometer at sun-spacecraft distances of 2-14 AU. On the basis of the obtained data, it was determined that the background intensity for the 200-1400 A band pass of the photometer channel is about 40 + or - 10 R, and that the nearby interstellar density is 0.04 + or - 0.91 per ccm for hydrogen and about 0.01 + or - 0.002 per ccm for helium. Accordingly, the He/H number density is about 0.25 at large distances from the sun. The Pioneer 10 spacecraft is leaving the solar system in the downwind direction, while both Pioneer 11 and Voyager will leave in the upwind direction. The combined UV observations of the interplanetary glow will provide accurate results on the physical status of the inflowing interstellar gas and the variability of background radiation as well.

  16. MESSENGER observations of the response of Mercury's magnetosphere to northward and southward interplanetary magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slavin, James

    M. H. Acũa (2), B. J. Anderson (3), D. N. Baker (4), M. Benna (2), S. A. Boardsen (1), G. n Gloeckler (5), R. E. Gold (3), G. C. Ho (3), H. Korth (3), S. M. Krimigis (3), S. A. Livi (6), R. L. McNutt Jr. (3), J. M. Raines (5), M. Sarantos (1), D. Schriver (7), S. C. Solomon (8), P. Travnicek (9), and T. H. Zurbuchen (5) (1) Heliophysics Science Division, NASA GSFC, Greenbelt, MD 20771, USA, (2) Solar System Exploration Division, NASA GSFC, Greenbelt, MD 20771, USA, (3) The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, MD 20723, USA, (4) Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80303, USA, (5) Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA (6) Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX 28510, USA, (7) Institute for Geophysics and Planetary Physics, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90024, USA, (8) Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution of Washington, DC 20015, USA, and (9) Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Prague, Czech Republic, 14131 MESSENGER's 14 January 2008 encounter with Mercury has provided new observations of the solar wind interaction with this planet. Here we report initial results concerning this miniature magnetosphere's response to the north-south component of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). This is the component of the IMF that is expected to exert the greatest influence over the structure of the magnetopause and the processes responsible for energy transfer into the magnetosphere. The IMF was northward immediately prior to and following the passage of the MESSENGER spacecraft through this small magnetosphere. However, several-minute episodes of southward IMF were observed in the magnetosheath during the inbound portion of the encounter. Evidence for reconnection at the dayside magnetopause in the form of welldeveloped flux transfer events (FTEs) was observed in the magnetosheath following some of

  17. Global control of merging by the interplanetary magnetic field: Cluster observations of dawnside flank magnetopause reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, S.; Elkington, S. R.; Phan, T. D.; Petrinec, S. M.; RèMe, H.; Dunlop, M. W.; Wiltberger, M.; Balogh, A.; Ergun, R. E.; André, M.

    2004-12-01

    Detailed Cluster observations of flank magnetopause reconnection are presented for two events on the Northern and the Southern Hemispheric dawnside flanks when the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) clock angle ? = arctan(By/Bz) is within ˜45° of the equatorial plane. The event selection is based on the relative proximity between the Cluster spacecraft 1 position and the predicted magnetospheric sash where antiparallel merging is expected to develop. MHD simulations performed for the two events indicate that the Cluster spacecraft were passing through the MHD sash region in the Northern Hemisphere on 30 June 2001, while crossing the magnetopause equatorward of the Southern Hemispheric sash on 29 May 2001. Accelerated and decelerated plasma flows relative to the magnetosheath velocity were detected by Cluster on both occasions. The Walén test confirms that the observed ΔV is directly correlated with the predicted magnetic field rotation ΔB/? with the expected direction of the normal magnetic field and so we interpret them as speed changes due to magnetic reconnection. The observed directions of ΔV compare very well with the location of the simulated MHD sash relative to Cluster. The magnetic field shear in the locally tangential plane of the magnetopause ranges between 171° and 177° for the 30 June event in good agreement with antiparallel merging at the MHD sash. The corresponding local field shear for the 29 May event is only 144°, either suggesting a component merging site in the direction of the sash or indicating that Cluster is farther away from the location where the neutral line was initially formed as compared with the 30 June event. A comparison between the projected regions of antiparallel and component merging onto the magnetopause and the quasi-steady direction of plasma acceleration detected by Cluster on 29 May and 30 June support the view that the IMF controls the expected global location of magnetic reconnection at limited regions of the

  18. Observations and modeling of ionospheric scintillations at South Pole during six X-class solar flares in 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priyadarshi, S.; Zhang, Q.-H.; Ma, Y.-Z.; Wang, Y.; Xing, Z.-Y.

    2016-06-01

    Using two B-spline basis functions of degree 4 and the ionospheric scintillation data from a Global Positioning Satellite System (GPS) scintillation receiver at South Pole, we reproduced ionospheric scintillation indices for the periods of the six X-class solar flares in 2013. These reproduced indices have filled the data gaps, and they are serving as a smooth replica of the real observations. In either event, these modeled scintillation indices are minimizing the geometrical effects between GPS satellite and the receiver. Six X-class solar flares have been studied during the summer and winter months, using the produced scintillation indices based on the observations from the GPS receiver at South Pole and the in situ plasma measurement from the associated passing of Defense Meteorological Satellite Program. Our results show that the solar flare peak suppresses the scintillation level and builds time-independent scintillation patterns; however, after a certain time from the solar flare peak, complicated scintillation patterns develop at high-latitude ionosphere and spread toward the polar cap boundary region. Substantial consistency has been found between moderate proton fluxes and scintillation enhancement.

  19. Inferring Sources in the Interplanetary Dust Cloud, from Observations and Simulations of Zodiacal Light and Thermal Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levasseur-Regourd, A. C.; Lasue, J.

    2011-01-01

    Interplanetary dust particles physical properties may be approached through observations of the solar light they scatter, specially its polarization, and of their thermal emission. Results, at least near the ecliptic plane, on polarization phase curves and on the heliocentric dependence of the local spatial density, albedo, polarization and temperature are summarized. As far as interpretations through simulations are concerned, a very good fit of the polarization phase curve near 1.5 AU is obtained for a mixture of silicates and more absorbing organics material, with a significant amount of fluffy aggregates. In the 1.5-0.5 AU solar distance range, the temperature variation suggests the presence of a large amount of absorbing organic compounds, while the decrease of the polarization with decreasing solar distance is indeed compatible with a decrease of the organics towards the Sun. Such results are in favor of the predominance of dust of cometary origin in the interplanetary dust cloud, at least below 1.5 AU. The implication of these results on the delivery of complex organic molecules on Earth during the LHB epoch, when the spatial density of the interplanetary dust cloud was orders of magnitude greater than today, is discussed.

  20. Variations in elemental composition of several MEV/nucleon ions observed in interplanetary space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguire, R. E.; Vonrosenvinge, T. T.; Reames, D. V.

    1985-01-01

    Six years of accumulated ISEE-3 and IMP-8 data to study variations in elemental relative abundances among the different populations of energetic ions seen in interplanetary space are surveyed. Evidence suggesting that heavy ion enrichments may be organized by a rigidity scaling factor A/Z over the range H to Fe is presented. Data to support the hypothesis that shock-associated particles are probably accelerated from ambient energetic fluxes are shown.

  1. Plasma wave phenomena at interplanetary shocks observed by the Ulysses URAP experiment. [Unified Radio and Plasma Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lengyel-Frey, D.; Macdowall, R. J.; Stone, R. G.; Hoang, S.; Pantellini, F.; Harvey, C.; Mangeney, A.; Kellogg, P.; Thiessen, J.; Canu, P.

    1992-01-01

    We present Ulysses URAP observations of plasma waves at seven interplanetary shocks detected between approximately 1 and 3 AU. The URAP data allows ready correlation of wave phenomena from .1 Hz to 1 MHz. Wave phenomena observed in the shock vicinity include abrupt changes in the quasi-thermal noise continuum, Langmuir wave activity, ion acoustic noise, whistler waves and low frequency electrostatic waves. We focus on the forward/reverse shock pair of May 27, 1991 to demonstrate the characteristics of the URAP data.

  2. Observations of solar-wind-driven progression of interplanetary magnetic field B{sub Y}-related dayside ionospheric disturbances

    SciTech Connect

    Stauning, P.; Friis-Christensen, E.; Clauer, C.R.

    1995-05-01

    Observations from August 2, and 3, 1991, of poleward progressing, dayside convection disturbances accompanied by geomagnetic perturbations and ionospheric radio wave absorption have been analyzed and compared to variations in the solar wind parameters as observed from the IMP 8 satellite. The convection disturbances appear to start at dayside cusp latitudes from where they progress antisunward to high latitudes. The reported observations have enabled calculations of the progression directions and velocities and precise estimates of the delays between solar wind variations as measured by the IMP 8 satellite and ionospheric convection changes as observed from an array of polar magnetic observatories. The progressing ionospheric disturbance events occur during intervals of southward interplanetary magnetic fields (negative interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) B{sub Z} component); they are found to be closely related to variations of the east-west component B{sub Y} of the IMF. The close coupling between the solar wind and the polar ionosphere(s) is explained in an open magnetospheric model in which the geomagnetic field extending from a localized region of the dayside polar cap merges with the southward interplanetary field. Variations in the IMF B{sub Y} component are reproduced in corresponding modulations of the east-west component of the plasma flow at the ionospheric foot points of the connecting `open` field lines. The perturbations of the plasma flow persist while the open field lines are convected with the ionospheric plasma across part of the dayside polar cap. The observed geomagnetic perturbations result from the combined effects of field-aligned currents and horizontal ionospheric currents, notably the convection-related Hall currents. The associated radio wave absorption events are explained as the result of E region electron heating by the horizontal electric fields associated with the convection enhancements. 48 refs., 16 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Cosmic-ray scintillation at the lunar surface

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, R.; Duller, N.M.; Green, P.J.

    1981-02-01

    The theory of cosmic-ray scintillations has developed rapidly over the past few years. Cosmic-ray scintillations arise from various irregularities in the magnetic fields through which cosmic-ray particles must travel before being observed. These scintillations are characterized by broad-band fluctuations in intensity over time. We have undertaken a study of the cosmic-ray background as observed with the Rice University Suprathermal Ion Detector Experimental (SIDE) that was deployed on the lunar surface during the Apollo 14 mission. The energy threshold for cosmic-ray protons was approximately 25 MeV in one sensor and 50 MeV in another. We find that the interplanetary cosmic-ray scintillations are observed with the SIDE and these observations are consistent with current theoretical models and with other experimental results.

  4. Statistical analysis of interplanetary shock waves observed during a complete solar activity cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khalisi, E.; Schwenn, R.

    1995-01-01

    During the Helios mission a total of 391 fast forward non-corotating interplanetary shock waves was identified. For most of the 12 years between 1974 and 1986 unique shock detection was possible for more than 80 % of the time. The occurrence rate (in shocks per day) varied from 0.02 at activity minimum in 1976 to 0.17 in 1979 and 0.22 in 1982 with a significant drop to 0.13 in 1980, i.e. right at activity maximum. The average properties of all events as functions of solar distance. phase in the solar cycle, heliographic and -magnetic latitude and others are discussed.

  5. Observations of interplanetary Lyman-alpha with the Galileo Ultraviolet Spectrometer: Multiple scattering effects at solar maximum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ajello, J. M.; Pryor, W. R.; Barth, C. A.; Hord, C. W.; Stewart, A. I. F.; Simmons, K. E.; Hall, D. T.

    1994-01-01

    The Galileo Ultravilet Spectrometer Experiment (UVS) obtained a partial celestial sphere map of interplanetary Lyman-alpha (IP L alpha) on 13-14 December 1990 during the first Earth encounter. The Galileo spacecraft was near the downwind axis of the local interstellar medium flow. These UVS measurements sampled the downwind, anti-sunward hemisphere. The data were modeled using a hot model of the interplanetary hydrogen density distribution with the goal of studying multiple scattering effects in the inner solar system. The derived ratio in the downwind direction of the observed brightness and a single scattering model brightness, both normalized to unity in the upwind direction, is 1.82 +/- 0.2. This brightness ratio requires a multiple scattering correction which is 36% larger than can be accounted for by theoretical calculations. The hot model may require: (1) a temperature perturbation of the interstellar wind velocity distribution or (2) an additional downstream source of interplanetary hydrogen. However, a more likely exlanation which affects the hot model is the latitude dependence of the radiation pressure. This dependence, based on the known solar L alpha flux latitude variation at solar maximum, causes a downwind brightness enhancement by preferential focusing of H-atoms with trajectory planes containing the solar poles. This result implies that radiation pressure near the solar poles is nearly independent of solar cycle and is insufficient to lead to a net repulsion of hydrogen atoms by the sun, as can occur near the ecliptic plane during the solar maximum. In addition, the UVS performed 13 observations of IP L alpha while in cruise between Venus and the Earth in 3 directions fixed in ecliptic coordinates.

  6. Observation and analysis of abrupt changes in the interplanetary plasma velocity and magnetic field.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. N.; Belcher, J. W.; Lazarus, A. J.

    1973-01-01

    This paper presents a limited study of the physical nature of abrupt changes in the interplanetary plasma velocity and magnetic field based on 19 day's data from the Pioneer 6 spacecraft. The period was chosen to include a high-velocity solar wind stream and low-velocity wind. Abrupt events were accepted for study if the sum of the energy density in the magnetic field and velocity changes was above a specified minimum. A statistical analysis of the events in the high-velocity solar wind stream shows that Alfvenic changes predominate. This conclusion is independent of whether steady state requirements are imposed on conditions before and after the event. Alfvenic changes do not dominate in the lower-speed wind. This study extends the plasma field evidence for outwardly propagating Alfvenic changes to time scales as small as 1 min (scale lengths on the order of 20,000 km).

  7. Radio observations of interplanetary magnetic field structures out of the ecliptic. [related to type III solar bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzenreiter, R. J.; Fainberg, J.; Weber, R. R.; Alvarez, H.; Haddock, F. T.; Potter, W. H.

    1977-01-01

    Observations of the out-of-ecliptic trajectories of type III solar radio bursts have been obtained from simultaneous direction-finding measurements in two independent satellite experiments, IMP-6 with spin plane in the ecliptic and RAE-2 with spin plane normal to the ecliptic. Burst-exciter trajectories were observed which originated at the active region and then crossed the ecliptic plane at about 0.8 AU. A considerable large-scale north-south component of the interplanetary magnetic field followed by the exciters is found. The apparent north-south and east-west angular source sizes observed by the two spacecraft are approximately equal, and range from 25 deg at 600 kHz to 110 deg at 80 kHz.

  8. On the acceleration of ions by interplanetary shock waves. 3: High time resolution observations of CIR proton events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pesses, M. E.; Vanallen, J. A.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Smith, E. J.

    1981-01-01

    Observations within + or - 3 hours of corotating interaction region (CIR) shock waves of proton intensities, pitch angle distribution and crude differential energy spectra of the range of 0.6 E sub p 3.4 MeV are presented. The principle result is the evidence for the persistent flow of particles away from the shock. The observations are found to be in good agreement with the hypothesis of local interplanetary shock acceleration by the shock drift and compression mechanisms. The same set of observations strongly suggest that transit time damping does not play an important role in the acceleration of protons to 1 MeV in the immediate vicinity of CIR shocks.

  9. Interplanetary Charged Dust Magnetic Clouds Striking the Magnetosphere: Coordinated Space-based and Ground-based Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, C. T.; Chi, Peter; Lai, Hairong

    In general, asteroids, meteoroids and dust do not interact with the plasma structures in the solar system, but after a collision between fast moving bodies the debris cloud contains nanoscale dust particles that are charged and behave like heavy ions. Dusty magnetic clouds are then accelerated to the solar wind speed. While they pose no threat to spacecraft because of the particle size, the coherency imposed by the magnetization of the cloud allows the cloud to interact with the Earth’s magnetosphere as well as the plasma in the immediate vicinity of the cloud. We call these clouds Interplanetary Field Enhancements (IFEs). These IFEs are a unique class of interplanetary field structures that feature cusp-shaped increases and decreases in the interplanetary magnetic field and a thin current sheet. The occurrence of IFEs is attributed to the interaction between the solar wind and dust particles produced in inter-bolide collisions. Previous spacecraft observations have confirmed that IFEs move with the solar wind. When IFEs strike the magnetosphere, they may distort the magnetosphere in several possible ways, such as producing a small indentation, a large scale compression, or a glancing blow. In any event if the IFE is slowed by the magnetosphere, the compression of the Earth’s field should be seen in the ground-based magnetic records that are continuously recorded. Thus it is important to understand the magnetospheric response to IFE arrival. In this study, we investigate the IFE structure observed by spacecraft upstream of the magnetosphere and the induced magnetic field perturbations observed by networks of ground magnetometers, including the THEMIS, CARISMA, McMAC arrays in North America and the IMAGE array in Europe. We find that, in a well-observed IFE event on December 24, 2006, all ground magnetometer stations observed an impulse at approximately 1217 UT when the IFE was expected to arrive at the Earth’s magnetopause. These ground stations spread across

  10. Retrieving parameters of the anisotropic refractive index fluctuations spectrum in the stratosphere from balloon-borne observations of stellar scintillation.

    PubMed

    Robert, Clélia; Conan, Jean-Marc; Michau, Vincent; Renard, Jean-Baptiste; Robert, Claude; Dalaudier, Francis

    2008-02-01

    Scintillation effects are not negligible in the stratosphere. We present a model based on a 3D model of anisotropic and isotropic refractive index fluctuations spectra that predicts scintillation rates within the so-called small perturbation approximation. Atmospheric observations of stellar scintillation made from the AMON-RA (AMON, Absorption par les Minoritaires Ozone et NO(x); RA, rapid) balloon-borne spectrometer allows us to remotely probe wave-turbulence characteristics in the stratosphere. Data reduction from these observations brings out values of the inner scale of the anisotropic spectrum. We find metric values of the inner scale that are compatible with space-based measurements. We find a major contribution of the anisotropic spectrum relative to the isotropic contribution. When the sight line plunges into the atmosphere, strong scintillation occurs as well as coupled chromatic refraction effects.

  11. Near- and far-infrared observations of interplanetary dust bands from the COBE diffuse infrared background experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiesman, William J.; Hauser, Michael G.; Kelsall, Thomas; Lisse, Carey M.; Moseley, S. Harvey, Jr.; Reach, William T.; Silverberg, Robert F.; Stemwedel, Sally W.; Weiland, Janet L.

    1995-01-01

    Data from the Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) instrument aboard the Cosmic Background Explorer Satellite (COBE) spacecraft have been used to examine the near and far infrared signatures of the interplanetary dust (IPD) bands. Images of the dust band pairs at ecliptic latitudes of +/- 1.4 deg and +/- 10 deg have been produced at DIRBE wavelengths from 1.25 to 100 micrometers. The observations at the shorter wavelengths provide the first evidence of scattered sunlight from particles responsible for the dust bands. It is found that the grains in the bands and those in the smooth IPD cloud have similar spectral energy distributions, suggesting similar compositions and possibly a common origin. The scattering albedos from 1.25 to 3.5 micrometers for the grains in the dust bands and those in the IPD cloud are 0.22 and 0.29, respectively. The 10 deg band pair is cooler (185 +/- 10 K) than the smooth interplanetary dust cloud (259 +/- 10 K). From both parallactic and thermal analyses, the implied location of the grains responsible for the peak brightness of the 10 deg band pair is 2.1 +/- 0.1 AU the Sun A parallactic distance of 1.4 +/- 0.2 AU is found for the peak of the 1.4 deg band pair.

  12. Four years of zodiacal light observations from the Helios space probes - Evidence for a smooth distribution of interplanetary dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leinert, C.; Richter, I.; Pitz, E.; Hanner, M.

    1980-01-01

    Zodiacal light experiments on Helios 2 that has been operating continually since January 1976 are discussed, with the purpose of elucidating the distribution of interplanetary dust. Results for the observed gradient of zodiacal light intensity between 1 A.U. and perihelion at 0.3 A.U. show that for all elongations, from 17.5 deg to 135 deg from the sun, the exponent of intensity increase is -2.3 plus or minus 0.1. Color investigations show no systematic variation with heliocentric distance, but a slight reddening is present, increasing towards small elongations. The degree of polarization is found to be higher at 1 A.U. than given previously and decreases towards the sun, even if no correction for electron scattering is made. All results thus fit the hypothesized power law for radial distribution of dust. It is concluded from the stability of zodiacal intensity that the distribution of interplanetary dust is rather simple in space and quite constant in time.

  13. INTERPLANETARY PROPAGATION OF SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE HEAVY IONS OBSERVED AT 1 AU AND THE ROLE OF ENERGY SCALING

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, G. M.; Haggerty, D. K.; Li, G.; Zank, G. P.; Cohen, C. M. S.; Leske, R. A.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Desai, M. I.

    2012-12-20

    We have studied {approx}0.3 to >100 MeV nucleon{sup -1} H, He, O, and Fe in 17 large western hemisphere solar energetic particle events (SEP) to examine whether the often observed decrease of Fe/O during the rise phase is due to mixing of separate SEP particle populations, or is an interplanetary transport effect. Our earlier study showed that the decrease in Fe/O nearly disappeared if Fe and O were compared at energies where the two species interplanetary diffusion coefficient were equal, and therefore their kinetic energy nucleon{sup -1} was different by typically a factor {approx}2 ({sup e}nergy scaling{sup )}. Using an interplanetary transport model that includes effects of focusing, convection, adiabatic deceleration, and pitch angle scattering we have fit the particle spectral forms and intensity profiles over a broad range of conditions where the 1 AU intensities were reasonably well connected to the source and not obviously dominated by local shock effects. The transport parameters we derive are similar to earlier studies. Our model follows individual particles with a Monte Carlo calculation, making it possible to determine many properties and effects of the transport. We find that the energy scaling feature is preserved, and that the model is reasonably successful at fitting the magnitude and duration of the Fe/O ratio decrease. This along with successfully fitting the observed decrease of the O/He ratio leads us to conclude that this feature is best understood as a transport effect. Although the effects of transport, in particular adiabatic deceleration, are very significant below a few MeV nucleon{sup -1}, the spectral break observed in these events at 1 AU is only somewhat modified by transport, and so the commonly observed spectral breaks must be present at injection. For scattering mean free paths of the order of 0.1 AU adiabatic deceleration is so large below {approx}200 keV nucleon{sup -1} that ions starting with such energies at injection are

  14. Interplanetary trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, J.

    Methods of solving the equations of motion of an interplanetary probe are presented. The notion of sphere of influence is defined. Solving the three body problem by the Jacobi method, and the method of juxtapositioned cones are discussed. The conditions for leaving a planet, and interplanetary transfer are explained. Hohmann's transfer method is outlined. Launch window, maneuvers on approaching a planet, and gravity assist are considered.

  15. Statistics of ionospheric scintillation occurrence over European high latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreeja, V.; Aquino, M.

    2014-12-01

    Rapid fluctuation in the amplitude and phase of transionospheric radio signals caused by small scale ionospheric plasma density irregularities is known as scintillation. Over the high latitudes, irregularities causing scintillation are associated with large scale plasma structures and scintillation occurrence is mainly enhanced during geomagnetic storms. This paper presents a statistical analysis of scintillation occurrence on GPS L1C/A signal at a high latitude station located in Bronnoysund (geographic latitude 65.5°N, geographic longitude 12.2°E; corrected geomagnetic (CGM) latitude 62.77°N), Norway, during the periods around the peaks of solar cycles 23 (2002-2003) and 24 (2011-2013). The analysis revealed that the scintillation occurrence at Bronnoysund during both the solar maximum periods maximises close to the midnight magnetic local time (MLT) sector. A higher occurrence of scintillation is observed on geomagnetically active days during both the solar maximum periods. The seasonal pattern of scintillation occurrence indicated peaks during the summer and equinoctial months. A comparison with the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) components By and Bz showed an association of scintillation occurrence with the southward IMF Bz conditions.

  16. Interferometric observation of Cygnus-A discrete radiosource scintillations at Irkutsk Incoherent Scatter radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Globa, Mariya; Vasilev, Roman; Kushnaryov, Dmitriy; Medvedev, Andrey

    2016-03-01

    We propose a new method for analysis of data from Irkutsk Incoherent Scatter Radar. The method allows us to accomplish interferometric observation of discrete cosmic radio source characteristics. In this study, we analyzed ionospheric scintillations of the radio source Cygnus-A. Observations were made in 2013 during regular radar sessions within 5-15 days for different seasons, and the effective time of observation was 15-30 minutes per day. For interferometric analysis, the properties of correlation (coherence) coefficient of two independent recording channels were used. The statistical analysis of data from independent channels allows us to construct two-dimensional histograms of radio source brightness distribution with period of 18 s and to determine parameters (the maximum position and the histogram width) representing position and angular size of radio source for each histogram. It is shown that the change of statistical characteristics does not correlate with fluctuations in power (scintillations) of the signal caused by radio wave propagation through ionospheric irregularities.

  17. Electron impact ionization rates for interstellar neutral H and He atoms near interplanetary shocks: Ulysses observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, W. C.; Phillips, J. L.; Gosling, J. T.; Isenberg, P. A.

    1995-01-01

    During average solar wind flow conditions at 1 AU, ionization rates of interstellar neutrals that penetrate into the inner heliosphere are dominated by charge exchange with solar wind protons for H atoms, and by photoionization for He atoms. During occurrences of strong, coronal mass ejection (CME)-driven interplanetary shock waves near 1 AU, electron impact ionization can make substantial, if not dominating, contributions to interstellar neutral ionization rates in the regions downstream of the shocks. However, electron impact ionization is expected to be relatively less important with increasing heliocentric distance because of the decrease in electron temperature. Ulysses encountered many CME-driven shocks during its journey to and beyond Jupiter, and in addition, encountered a number of strong corotating interaction region (CIR) shocks. These shocks generally occur only beyond approximately 2 AU. Many of the CIR shocks were very strong rivalling the Earth's bow shock in electron heating. We have compared electron impact ionization rates calculated from electron velocity distributions measured downstream from CIR shocks using the Ulysses SWOOPS experiment to charge-exchange rates calculated from measured proton number fluxes and the photoionization rate estimated from an assumed solar photon spectrum typical of solar maximum conditions. We find that, although normally the ratio of electron-impact ionization rates to charge-exchange (for H) and to photoionization (for He) rates amounts to only about one and a few tens of percent, respectively, downstream of some of the stronger CIR shocks they amount to more than 10% and greater than 100%, respectively.

  18. Correlations between Strong Range Spread-F and GPS L-Band Scintillations Observed in Hainan in 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guo-Jun; Shi, Jian-Kui; Shang, She-Ping; Wang, Xiao

    2009-01-01

    Data from the DPS-4 digisonde and the GPS L-band ionospheric scintillation monitor are employed to study the correlations between strong range spread-F (SSF) and GPS L-band scintillations observed in the ionosphere over Hainan Island, China (19.5°N, 109.1°E geogr., dip lat. 9°N) in 2004. The SSF in the ionogram is different from the general range spread-F because it extends in frequency well beyond FoF2 and makes FoF2 difficult to be determined. The observations show that the SSF phenomenon is frequently accompanied by the occurrence of GPS L-band scintillations. The SSF and GPS L-band scintillations occur frequently in the equinoctial months (March, April, September, and October), but rarely in the winter (January, February, November, and December) and summer (May-August) especially, occurrence variations of the SSF and GPS L-band scintillations nearly have a same trend. The SSF and scintillations may be associated with the occurrence of topside plasma bubbles and could be explained by the generalized Rayleigh-Taylor instability.

  19. Wide longitudinal distribution of interplanetary electrons following the 7 February 2010 solar event: Observations and transport modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dröge, W.; Kartavykh, Y. Y.; Dresing, N.; Heber, B.; Klassen, A.

    2014-08-01

    We analyze 65-105 keV electrons in the 7 February 2010 solar electron event observed simultaneously by STEREO-A, STEREO-B, and ACE. A method to reconstruct the full-electron pitch angle distributions from the four Solar Electron and Proton Telescope sensors on STEREO-A/B and the Solar Electron and Proton Telescope instrument on ACE in the energy range of approximately 60-300 keV for periods of incomplete angular coverage is presented. A transport modeling based on numerical solutions of a three-dimensional particle propagation model which includes pitch angle scattering and focused transport is applied to the intensity and anisotropy profiles measured on all three spacecraft. Based on an analysis of intensity gradients observed between the three spacecraft, we find that the lateral transport of the electrons occurs partially close to the Sun, due to effects of nonradial divergence of magnetic field lines or particle diffusion, and partially in the interplanetary medium. For the mean free paths characterizing the electron diffusion parallel and perpendicular to the interplanetary magnetic field, we derive values of λ∥˜ 0.1 AU and λ⟂˜ 0.01 AU. In comparison with results from other particle events which we had previously analyzed in a similar manner we discuss whether the diffusion mean free paths parallel and perpendicular to the average magnetic field might be related with each other, and whether the particle transport perpendicular to the average magnetic field is more likely due to particles following meandering magnetic field lines, or due to particles being scattered off individual field lines.

  20. On The Collocation of the Cusp Aurora and the GPS Phase Scintillation: A Statistical Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Y.; Moen, J.; Miloch, W.

    2015-12-01

    The climatology map of the GPS phase scintillation identifies two regions of high scintillation occurrences at high latitudes: around magnetic noon and around magnetic midnight. The scintillation occurrence rate is higher around magnetic noon, while the scintillation level is stronger around magnetic midnight. This study focuses on the dayside scintillation region. In order to resolve the role of the cusp auroral processes in the production of irregularities, we put the GPS phase scintillation in the context of the observed auroral morphology. Results show that the occurrence rate of the GPS phase scintillation is highest inside the auroral cusp, regardless of the scintillation strength and the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). On average the scintillation occurrence rate in the cusp region is about 5 times as high as in the region immediately poleward of it. The scintillation occurrence rate is higher when the IMF BZ is negative. When partitioning the scintillation data by the IMF BY, the distribution of the scintillation occurrence rate around magnetic noon is similar to that of the poleward moving auroral form (PMAF) statistics: there is a higher occurrence rate at earlier (later) magnetic local time when the IMF BY is positive (negative). This indicates that the irregularities which give rise to scintillations follow the IMF BY controlled East-West motion of the aurora and plasma. Furthermore, the scintillation occurrence rate is higher when IMF BY is positive when the cusp is shifted towards the post-noon sector where it may get easier access to the higher density plasma. This suggests that the combined auroral activities (e.g., PMAF) and the density of the intake solar EUV ionized plasma are crucial for the production of scintillations.

  1. Thermospheric and geomagnetic responses to interplanetary coronal mass ejections observed by ACE and GRACE: Statistical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauss, S.; Temmer, M.; Veronig, A.; Baur, O.; Lammer, H.

    2015-10-01

    For the period July 2003 to August 2010, the interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME) catalogue maintained by Richardson and Cane lists 106 Earth-directed events, which have been measured in situ by plasma and field instruments on board the ACE satellite. We present a statistical investigation of the Earth's thermospheric neutral density response by means of accelerometer measurements collected by the Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites, which are available for 104 ICMEs in the data set, and its relation to various geomagnetic indices and characteristic ICME parameters such as the impact speed (vmax), southward magnetic field strength (Bz). The majority of ICMEs causes a distinct density enhancement in the thermosphere, with up to a factor of 8 compared to the preevent level. We find high correlations between ICME Bz and thermospheric density enhancements (≈0.9), while the correlation with the ICME impact speed is somewhat smaller (≈0.7). The geomagnetic indices revealing the highest correlations are Dst and SYM-H(≈0.9); the lowest correlations are obtained for Kp and AE (≈0.7), which show a nonlinear relation with the thermospheric density enhancements. Separating the response for the shock-sheath region and the magnetic structure of the ICME, we find that the Dst and SYM-H reveal a tighter relation to the Bz minimum in the magnetic structure of the ICME, whereas the polar cap indices show higher correlations with the Bz minimum in the shock-sheath region. Since the strength of the Bz component—either in the sheath or in the magnetic structure of the ICME—is highly correlated (≈0.9) with the neutral density enhancement, we discuss the possibility of satellite orbital decay estimates based on magnetic field measurements at L1, i.e., before the ICME hits the Earth magnetosphere. These results are expected to further stimulate progress in space weather understanding and applications regarding satellite operations.

  2. Coordinated study of scintillations recorded by Chinese FY-2 geostationary meteorological satellite and VHF coherent radar observations over south china

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Xiaomin; Yu, Tao; Xia, Chunliang; Huang, Jiang; Xu, Jie

    2016-09-01

    The first scintillation observations of Chinese FY-2 geostationary meteorological satellite (86.5°E) observed at Guangzhou (23.2°N, 113.3°E, dip 18°N) and simultaneous VHF (47.5 MHz) coherent radar measurements from Sanya (18.3°N, 109.6°E, dip 13°N) during equinoctial months of 2011 and 2012 have been presented here. The observations are used for a coordinated study for the relationship between the L-band scintillation patches on the propagation path of FY-2 satellite and the extended 3-m irregularity structures known as plumes over South China. The statistical results showed that the plumes and the scintillation patches have nearly a one-to-one correspondence. In case study, the zonal drift velocity of the irregularities was estimated by comparison of the onset times of the scintillation and plume and the irregularities were found to drift eastwards at a speed ranging about tens of meters to one hundred meters per second. From the derived value of drift speed and duration of scintillation events, the irregularity patches were found to have east-west extent about a few hundred kilometers. On the other hand, the scintillation did not always occur following the appearance of plume which might be due to the associated irregularities occurring at lower altitudes failing to reach the region of the ionosphere through which the satellite to ground link passes. In addition, weak scintillations were observed on FY-2 link without any plume structure on radar backscatter maps occasionally.

  3. Studies of Solar Flare and Interplanetary Particle Acceleration and Coordination of Ground-Based Solar Observations in Support of US and International Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiplinger, Alan L.

    1998-01-01

    A primary focus has been to conduct studies of particular types of hard X-ray evolution in solar flares and their associations with high energy interplanetary protons observed near Earth. Previously, two large investigations were conducted that revealed strong associations between episodes of progressive spectral hardening seen in solar events and interplanetary proton events (Kiplinger, 1995). An algorithm was developed for predicting interplanetary protons that is more accurate than those currently in use when hard X-ray spectra are available. The basic research on a third study of the remaining independent subset of Hard X-ray Burst Spectrometer (HXRBS) events randomly not selected by the original studies was completed. This third study involves independent analyses of the data by two analysts. The results echo the success of the earlier studies. Of 405 flares analyzed, 12 events were predicted to have associated interplanetary protons at the Space Environment Service Center (SESC) level. Of these, five events appear to be directly associated with SESC proton events, six other events had lower level associated proton events, and there was only one false alarm with no protons. Another study by Garcia and Kiplinger (1995) established that progressively hardening hard X-ray flares associated with interplanetary proton events are intrinsically cooler and not extremely intense in soft X-rays unless a "contaminating" large impulsive flare accompanies the hardening flare.

  4. Observational study of ionospheric irregularities and GPS scintillations associated with the 2012 tropical cyclone Tembin passing Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhe; Liu, Zhizhao

    2016-05-01

    This study presents the ionospheric responses observed in Hong Kong to a Typhoon, namely, Tembin, from the aspects of the occurrence of ionospheric irregularities and scintillations, using Global Positioning System (GPS) observations from a ground-based GPS scintillation monitoring station in Hong Kong and from GPS receivers on board the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC) satellites. The ionospheric irregularities and scintillations are characterized by the rate of total electron content variation index (ROTI) and the amplitude scintillation index S4, respectively. The typhoon Tembin formed over the western North Pacific during 18-30 August 2012 and approached Hong Kong during 24-27 August 2012 with the closest distance 290 km from Hong Kong at around 17 universal time (UT) on 25 August 2012. The ground-based observations indicate that in the nighttime period of 20:00-02:00 local time (LT = UT + 8 h) on 26 August when Tembin passed closely to Hong Kong, the ionospheric irregularities and scintillations of GPS signals were observed in the south of Hong Kong, over the area of 13°N ~ 23°N in latitude and 110°E ~ 120°E in longitude. From the COSMIC observations, it shows that the number of radio occultation scintillation events peaks on 26 August 2012 during the passage of Tembin. Without the presence of strong geomagnetic or solar activity, it is suspected that gravity waves might be generated in the lower atmosphere and likely seed the formation of ionospheric plasma irregularities. This work for the first time from Hong Kong observes the sign of coupling between the lower atmosphere and ionosphere in a tropical cyclone event, combining both ground- and space-based GPS observation data.

  5. Interplanetary-proton (0. 61 < ep < 3. 41 MeV) events observed with Pioneer 11, 1973-86 and out to 22. 4 AU. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Van Allen, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    A survey of interplanetary-proton events (0.61 to 3.41 MeV) is summarized in graphical and tabular form for the period April 1973-December 1986. The observations were obtained by an effectively continuous data stream from the University of Iowa instrument on the Ames Research Center/NASA spacecraft Pioneer 11 as it moved outward in the solar system from 1.0 to 22.4 AU. Two hundred and sixty-five distinct events are identified. The spectra and intensities of the protons, presumed to be originally of solar origin, are influenced dramatically by propagative and accelerative processes in the interplanetary medium.

  6. Interplanetary dust particles collected in the stratosphere: observations of atmospheric heating and constraints on their interrelationships and sources.

    PubMed

    Sandford, S A; Bradley, J P

    1989-01-01

    The majority of the interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) collected in the stratosphere belong to one of three major classes, the first two dominated by the anhydrous minerals olivine and pyroxene, and the third by hydrous layer-lattice silicates. Infrared spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy studies show that the different IDP classes represent different types of dust that exist as individual particles in interplanetary space. The majority of the collected IDPs smaller than 30 micrometers in diameter in the layer-lattice silicate and pyroxene classes appear not to have been heated to temperatures above 600 degrees C during atmospheric entry. The relatively low maximum temperatures experienced by these IDPs during atmospheric entry imply that they arrive at the top of the atmosphere with low geocentric encounter velocities. This limits the possible encounter trajectories for these particles to relatively circular, prograde orbits. As a result, it is unlikely that these IDPs are from Earth-crossing comets or asteroids. Asteroids, and comets having low inclinations and perihelia outside 1.2 AU, appear to be the best candidates for the parent bodies of the pyroxene and layer-lattice silicate particles. Chemical and mineralogical information suggests that the pyroxene-rich IDPs are from comets and the layer-lattice silicate-rich IDPs are from asteroids. The collected IDPs dominated by olivine appear to include a larger fraction of particles heating above 600 degrees C, suggesting that these particles were captured from more eccentric orbits. This, and the observation of the infrared spectral features of olivine in several comets suggest these particles have a cometary origin. Since much of the collected dust has apparently been captured from nearly circular, prograde orbits and since there are no appropriate parent bodies presently in such orbits, these results provide an experimental confirmation that the Poynting-Robertson effect exists as a

  7. On the interplanetary evolution of CME-driven shocks: a comparison between remote sensing observations and in-situ data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volpes, Laura; Bothmer, Volker

    2015-08-01

    Fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are a prime driver of major space weather effects and strong geomagnetic storms. When the CME propagation speed is higher than the Alfvén speed a shock forms in front of the CME leading edge. CME-driven shocks are observed in in-situ data and, with the advent of increasingly sensitive imaging instruments, also in remote sensing observations in the form of bright fronts ahead of the CMEs.In this work we present the study of 4 Earth-directed CMEs which drove shocks detected in STEREO COR 2 and HI observations. For each event we identify the source region and the signatures of CME eruption such as waves, EUV dimmings, flare and prominence eruptions. The shock and CME interplanetary evolution is determined from COR2 and HI observations via an application of triangulation techniques. Furthermore, propagation speed and arrival times are inferred. The CME geometry is modelled in COR2 via the graduated cylindrical shell (GCS) model and the assumption on self-similar expansion is tested by expanding the flux rope to the HI1 field of view. A combination of these results with models for the shock location allows to infer the time evolution of the compression ratio ρd/ρu across the shock and of the upstream Mach number M at locations where no direct plasma measurements are available. These values, as well as the arrival time and speed, are compared to ACE in-situ measurements to validate the results. For the 03 April 2010 event, e.g., the values of the Mach number and the compression ratio extrapolated to the position of ACE are respectively 2.1 < ρd/ρu < 2.4 and 2.3 < M < 2.5, in good agreement with the in-situ values found in literature, ρd/ρu = 2.84 and M = 2.2. This study is carried out in conjunction to simulations of CME initiation. Combined results from observations and simulations allow to connect the interplanetary and near-Earth properties of CMEs to those of their source regions, and to the mechanisms of CME onset.

  8. Observation of interplanetary magnetic field and of ionospheric plasma convection in the vicinity of the dayside polar cleft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clauer, C. R.; Banks, P. M.; Smith, A. Q.; Jorgensen, T. S.; Friis-Christensen, E.; Vennerstrom, S.; Wickwar, V. B.; Kelly, J. D.; Doupnik, J.

    1984-01-01

    Dayside ionosphere convection at high latitudes has been examined during a series of experiments using the Sondrestrom radar together with ancillary observations of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) by the IMP-8 spacecraft. The radar experiments obtained a latitude coverage of 67.6 to 81.3 deg Lambda and a temporal resolution of between 14 to 25 minutes. A total of 17 rotations through the dayside cleft region during April, June and July, 1983 have been examined. The observations show two convection cells with sunward flow at lower latitudes and antisunward flow at higher latitudes. The flow commonly rotates through a 180 deg angle resulting in the predominant appearance of east-west flows. Rapid temporal variations in the convection velocities are frequently observed. Many of the high latitude variations in convection velocity appear to be directly related to variations in the IMF By component, with eastward (westward) velocity associated with negative (positive) By. This is strong evidence for a direct electrical coupling between the solar wind and dayside high latitude ionosphere.

  9. Direct observations of the full Dungey convection cycle in the polar ionosphere for southward interplanetary magnetic field conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q.-H.; Lockwood, M.; Foster, J. C.; Zhang, S.-R.; Zhang, B.-C.; McCrea, I. W.; Moen, J.; Lester, M.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.

    2015-06-01

    Tracking the formation and full evolution of polar cap ionization patches in the polar ionosphere, we directly observe the full Dungey convection cycle for southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions. This enables us to study how the Dungey cycle influences the patches' evolution. The patches were initially segmented from the dayside storm enhanced density plume at the equatorward edge of the cusp, by the expansion and contraction of the polar cap boundary due to pulsed dayside magnetopause reconnection, as indicated by in situ Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) observations. Convection led to the patches entering the polar cap and being transported antisunward, while being continuously monitored by the globally distributed arrays of GPS receivers and Super Dual Auroral Radar Network radars. Changes in convection over time resulted in the patches following a range of trajectories, each of which differed somewhat from the classical twin-cell convection streamlines. Pulsed nightside reconnection, occurring as part of the magnetospheric substorm cycle, modulated the exit of the patches from the polar cap, as confirmed by coordinated observations of the magnetometer at Tromsø and European Incoherent Scatter Tromsø UHF radar. After exiting the polar cap, the patches broke up into a number of plasma blobs and returned sunward in the auroral return flow of the dawn and/or dusk convection cell. The full circulation time was about 3 h.

  10. Propagation and Evolution of CMEs in the Interplanetary Medium: Analysis of Remote Sensing and In situ Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueroa-Vinas, Adolfo; Nieves-Chinchilla, Teresa; Vourlidas, Angelos; Gomez-Herrero, Raul; Malandraki, Olga; Szabo, Adam; Dresing, Nina; Davila, Joseph M.

    2010-01-01

    EUV disk imagers and white light coronagraphs have provided for many years information on the early formation and evolution of corona) mass ejections (CMEs). More recently, the novel heliospheric imaging instruments aboard the STEREO mission are providing crucial remote sensing information on the interplanetary evolution of these events while in situ instruments complete the overall characterization of the interplanetary CMEs. In this work, we present an analysis of CMEs from the Sun to the interplanetary medium using combined data from THE SOHO, STEREO, WIND, and ACE spacecraft. The events were selected to cover the widest possible spectrum of different ambient solar wind, magnetic field configurations, plasma parameters, etc. to allow uncovering those aspects that are important in understanding the propagation and evolution mechanisms of CMEs in the interplanetary medium.

  11. Observations of quasi-periodic scintillations and their possible relation to the dynamics of Es plasma blobs

    SciTech Connect

    Maruyama, Takashi )

    1991-06-01

    Quasi-periodic scintillations at a mid-latitude station, Wakkanai, Japan, are examined using 136-MHz geostationary satellite transmissions. Observations are compared with the ionospheric parameter obtained at the same station and random scintillation records. The results indicate that the quasi-periodic scintillations are most likely produced by plasma blobs within the sporadic E layers. Discussion focuses on characteristics of the ringing pattern which precedes and follows the primary deep fade-out, in field strength. In the majority of events the ringing pattern tends to develop after the distinct deep fade-out, i.e., the pattern is asymmetric. Quasi-periodic scintillation patterns are produced by the movement of plasma blobs in the case of geostationary satellite experiments. Thus the shape of the blob must be deformed so that a steep density gradient is attained on the backside. When the blob is highly deformed by the plasma instability which grows at the steep density gradient, burstlike random scintillations may be produced by the blob. 16 refs.

  12. Comparison of interplanetary type 2 radio burst observations by ISEE-3, Ulysses, and WIND with applications to space weather prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacDowall, R. J.; Klimas, A. J.; Lengyel-Frey, D.; Stone, R. G.; Thejappa, G.

    1997-01-01

    Interplanetary (IP) type 2 radio bursts are produced by IP shocks driven by solar ejecta, presumably involving shock acceleration of electrons that leads to radio emission. These radio bursts, which can be detected remotely by a sensitive spacecraft radio receiver, provide a method of tracking the leading edge of solar ejecta moving outward from the sun. Consequently, observations of these bursts sometimes provide advance warning of one or more days prior to the onset of geomagnetic activity induced by the solar ejecta. A robust lower limit on the fraction of intense geomagnetic storms, that are preceded by IP type 2 bursts, is provided. It is shown that 41 percent of the geomagnetic storms occurring during the interval September 1978 to February 1983 were preceded by type 2 events in this catalog, and reasons why the fraction is not larger are addressed. Differences in the observing capabilities of the International Sun-Earth Explorer (ISEE) 3, Ulysses, and WIND, to explain why each of these similar spacecraft radio investigations provides a different perspective of IP type 2 emissions are reviewed.

  13. OBSERVATIONS OF THE INTERPLANETARY HYDROGEN DURING SOLAR CYCLES 23 AND 24. WHAT CAN WE DEDUCE ABOUT THE LOCAL INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM?

    SciTech Connect

    Vincent, Frédéric E.; Quémerais, Eric; Koutroumpa, Dimitra; Ben-Jaffel, Lotfi; Harris, Walter M.; Clarke, John

    2014-06-20

    Observations of interstellar helium atoms by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) spacecraft in 2009 reported a local interstellar medium (LISM) velocity vector different from the results of the Ulysses spacecraft between 1991 and 2002. The interplanetary hydrogen (IPH), a population of neutrals that fills the space between planets inside the heliosphere, carries the signatures of the LISM and its interaction with the solar wind. More than 40 yr of space-based studies of the backscattered solar Lyα emission from the IPH provided limited access to the velocity distribution, with the first temporal evolution map of the IPH line-shift during solar cycle 23. This work presents the results of the latest IPH observations made by the Hubble Space Telescope's Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph during solar cycle 24. These results have been compiled with previous measurements, including data from the Solar Wind Anisotropies instrument on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory. The whole set has been compared to physically realistic models to test both sets of LISM physical parameters as measured by Ulysses and IBEX, respectively. This comparison shows that the LISM velocity vector has not changed significantly since Ulysses measurements.

  14. Interplanetary shock waves associated with solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, J. K.; Sakurai, K.

    1974-01-01

    The interaction of the earth's magnetic field with the solar wind is discussed with emphasis on the influence of solar flares. The geomagnetic storms are considerered to be the result of the arrival of shock wave generated by solar flares in interplanetary space. Basic processes in the solar atmosphere and interplanetary space, and hydromagnetic disturbances associated with the solar flares are discussed along with observational and theoretical problems of interplanetary shock waves. The origin of interplanetary shock waves is also discussed.

  15. Interplanetary particles and fields, November 22 - December 6, 1977: Helios, Voyager, and IMP observations between 0.6 AU and 1.6 AU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Lepping, R. P.; Weber, R.; Armstrong, T.; Goodrich, C.; Sullivan, J.; Gurnett, D.; Kellogg, P.; Keppler, E.; Mariani, F.

    1979-01-01

    The principal interplanetary events observed are described and analyzed. Three flow systems were observed: (1) a corotating stream and a stream interface associated with a coronal hole; (2) a shock wave and an energetic particle event associated with a 2-B flare; and (3) an isolated shock wave of uncertain origin. Data from 28 experiments and 6 spacecraft provide measurements of solar wind plasma, magnetic fields, plasma waves, radio waves, energetic electrons, and low energy protons.

  16. Type 2 solar radio events observed in the interplanetary medium. Part 1: General characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cane, H. V.; Stone, R. G.; Fainberg, J.; Steinberg, J. L.; Hoang, S.

    1980-01-01

    Twelve type 2 solar radio events were observed in the 2 MHz to 30 kHz frequency range by the radio astronomy experiment on the ISEE-3 satellite over the period from September 1978 to December 1979. These data provide the most comprehensive sample of type 2 radio bursts observed at kilometer wavelengths. Dynamic spectra of a number of events are presented. Where possible, the 12 events were associated with an initiating flare, ground based radio data, the passage of a shock at the spacecraft, and the sudden commencement of a geomagnetic storm. The general characteristics of kilometric type 2 bursts are discussed.

  17. Ground Observation of the Hayabusa Reentry: The Third Opportunity of Man-made Fireball from Interplanetary Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, Y.; Yamamoto, M.; Hiramatsu, Y.; Furumoto, M.; Fujita, K.

    2010-12-01

    After 7 years and 6,000,000,000 km of challenging cruise in the solar system, the Hayabusa did come back to the Earth on June 13, 2010. The Hayabusa, the first sample-return explorer to NEA, landed on 25243 Itokawa in 2005, capturing surface particles on the S-type asteroid into its sample return capsule (SRC). Following to the reentries of the Genesis in 2004 and the Stardust in 2006, the return of the Hayabusa SRC was the third direct reentry event from the interplanetary transfer orbit to the Earth at a velocity of over 11.2 km/s. In addition, it was world first case of direct reentry of spacecraft from interplanetary transfer orbit. After the successful resumption of the SRC, it was carefully sent to ISAS/JAXA, and at present, small particles expected to be the first sample-return materials from the minor planet are carefully investigated. In order to obtain precise trajectory information to ensure the quick procedure for the Hayabusa SRC resumption team, we observed the Hayabusa SRC reentry by optically in Australian night sky. High-resolution imaging and spectroscopy were carried out with several high-sensitivity instruments to investigate thermal-protection process of thermal protection ablator (TPA) as well as interaction process between SRC surface materials and upper atmospheric neutral and plasma components. Moreover, shockwaves were observed by infrasound/seismic sensor arrays on ground to investigate reentry related shockwaves as well as air-to-ground coupling process at the extremely rare opportunity. With respect to nominal trajectory of the Hayabusa SRC reentry, four optical stations were set inside and near the Woomera Prohibited Area, Australia, targeting on peak-heat and/or front-heat profiles of ablating TPA for engineering aspect. Infrasound and seismic sensors were also deployed as three arrayed stations and three single stations to realize direction findings of sonic boom type shockwaves from the SRC and spacecraft and point source type

  18. UPDATED ANALYSIS OF THE UPWIND INTERPLANETARY HYDROGEN VELOCITY AS OBSERVED BY THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE DURING SOLAR CYCLE 23

    SciTech Connect

    Vincent, Frederic E.; Ben-Jaffel, Lotfi; Harris, Walter M.

    2011-09-10

    The interplanetary hydrogen (IPH), a population of neutrals that fill the space between planets inside the heliosphere, carries the signature of the interstellar medium (ISM) and the heliospheric interface. As the incoming ISM-ionized component deflects at the heliopause, charge exchange reactions decelerate the bulk motion of the neutrals that penetrate the heliosphere. Inside the heliosphere, the IPH bulk velocity is further affected by solar gravity, radiation pressure, and ionization processes, with the latter two processes dependent on solar activity. Solar cycle 23 provided the first partial temporal map of the IPH velocity, including measurements from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) spectrometers (Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS) and Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS)) and the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Solar Wind ANisotropies (SWAN) instrument. We present an updated analysis of IPH velocity measurements from GHRS and STIS and compare these results with those of SWAN and two different time-dependent models. Our reanalysis of STIS data reveals a significant change in IPH velocity relative to earlier reports, because of the contamination by geocoronal oxygen that was not accounted for. While current models of the heliospheric interface predict the observed IPH velocity for solar maximum, they are not consistent with data covering solar minimum. With updates to the HST data points, we now find that all data can be fit by the existing models to within 1{sigma}, with the exception of SWAN observations taken at solar minimum (1997/1998). We conclude that the current data lack the temporal coverage and/or precision necessary to determine the detailed characteristics of the solar cycle dependence. Hence, new observations are merited.

  19. Lagrangian MHD Particle-in-Cell simulations of coronal interplanetary shocks driven by observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapenta, Giovanni; Bacchini, Fabio; Bemporad, Alessandro; Susino, Roberto; Olshevskyi, Vyacheslav

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we compare the spatial distribution of the plasma parameters along the June 11, 1999 CME-driven shock front with the results obtained from a CME-like event simulated with the FLIPMHD3D code, based on the FLIP-MHD Particle-in-Cell (PiC) method. The observational data are retrieved from the combination of white-light (WL) coronagraphic data (for the upstream values) and the application of the Rankine-Hugoniot (RH) equations (for the downstream values). The comparison shows a higher compression ratio X and Alfvénic Mach number MA at the shock nose, and a stronger magnetic field deflection d towards the flanks, in agreement with observations. Then, we compare the spatial distribution of MA with the profiles obtained from the solutions of the shock adiabatic equation relating MA, X, and the angle between the upstream magnetic field and the shock front normal for the special cases of parallel and perpendicular shock, and with a semi-empirical expression for a generically oblique shock. The semi-empirical curve approximates the actual values of MA very well, if the effects of a non-negligible shock thickness and plasma-to magnetic pressure ratio are taken into account throughout the computation. Moreover, the simulated shock turns out to be supercritical at the nose and sub-critical at the flanks. Finally, we develop a new 1D Lagrangian ideal MHD method based on the GrAALE code, to simulate the ion-electron temperature decoupling due to the shock transit. Two models are used, a simple solar wind model and a variable-gamma model. Both produce results in agreement with observations, the second one being capable of introducing the physics responsible for the additional electron heating due to secondary effects (collisions, Alfvén waves, etc.). Work supported by the European Commission under the SWIFF project (swiff.eu)

  20. High spectral resolution observation of extended sources in future interplanetary missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, Sona

    2016-10-01

    The most commonly used technique for high spectral resolution (R) studies are grating spectrometers. They can achieve broad bandpasses but they have small FOV and relatively low étendue so they have to be paired with large aperture telescopes such Keck (10m), Hubble (2.4m) or JWST (6.5m). Fabry-Pérot Interferometers (FPI) and FTS are the other best known types of high étendue, high R spectrometers used in astronomy. But their opto-mechnical tolerances becomes challenging and they use transmitting optics, where transmission drops especially below 130 nm. Spatial Heterodyne Spectrometer (SHS) is a candidate for high étendue, high spectral R spectroscopy in compact low cost, low-mass, low-power architecture using no or small aperture telescope for UV to IR wavelengths. High R spectrometers are usually limited by the telescope aperture size and complicated opto-mechanical tolerances but that's not the case for SHS. SHS provides integrated spectra at high spectral R, over a wide FOV in compact designs in which it offers the ability to make key science measurements for a variety of planetary targets. SHS could be implemented on a dedicated SmallSat or ISS that can sit and stare at its target for long duration of time that cannot be done from the ground or on big missions. SmallSats are lower cost, faster to build, relatively easy to correct and upgrade. For UV observation, currently HST is the only telescope capable of collecting the necessary observations and the next major UV space telescope might be able to fly in 10 years or more. SHS instrument can quickly fill the technology gap for UV space spectrometers.

  1. Impact of Ionospheric Scintillation on Spaceborne SAR Observations Studied Using GNSS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pi, Xiaoqing; Meyer, Franz J.; Chotoo, Kancham; Freeman, Anthony; Caton, Ronald G.; Bridgewood, Christopher T.

    2012-01-01

    A survey of artifacts seen in JAXA's Phase Array type L-band synthetic aperture radar (PALSAR) data over South America during a low solar activity year is reported in this paper. A significant impact on the radar data is revealed: about 14% of the surveyed PALSAR images (totally 2779) are affected by the artifacts during a month and the artifacts occur on 74.2% of the surveyed days. The characteristics of the artifacts have led to a consideration that the artifacts are the effects of ionospheric scintillation. This raises not only a concern about scintillation effects on radar but also a question about active scintillation conditions during a low solar activity year. To assess and verify the scintillation conditions, GPS data collected from the constellation of FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC satellites and three ground-based GPS networks are processed and analyzed. The GPS data provides a global context and regional dense converge, respectively, of ionospheric irregularity and scintillation measurements. It is concluded tat even during a low solar activity year, L-band scintillation at low latitudes can occur frequently and affect L-band SAR significantly.

  2. Solar Sources and Geospace Consequences of Interplanetary Magnetic Clouds Observed During Solar Cycle 23

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Akiyama, S.; Yashiro, S.; Michalek, G.; Lepping, R. P.

    2007-01-01

    We present results of a statistical investigation of 99 magnetic clouds (MCs) observed during 1995-2005. The MC-associated coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are faster and wider on the average and originate within +/-30deg from the solar disk center. The solar sources of MCs also followed the butterfly diagram. The correlation between the magnetic field strength and speed of MCs was found to be valid over a much wider range of speeds. The number of south-north (SN) MCs was dominant and decreased with solar cycle, while the number of north-south (NS) MCs increased confirming the odd-cycle behavior. Two-thirds of MCs were geoeffective; the Dst index was highly correlated with speed and magnetic field in MCs as well as their product. Many (55%) fully northward (FN) MCs were geoeffective solely due to their sheaths. The non-geoeffective MCs were slower (average speed approx. 382 km/s), had a weaker southward magnetic field (average approx. -5.2nT), and occurred mostly during the rise phase of the solar activity cycle.

  3. Proceedings of the Symposium on the Study of the Sun and Interplanetary Medium in Three Dimensions. [space mission planning and interplanetary trajectories by NASA and ESA to better observe the sun and solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisk, L. A. (Editor); Axford, W. I. (Editor)

    1976-01-01

    A series of papers are presented from a symposium attended by over 200 European and American scientists to examine the importance of exploring the interplanetary medium and the sun by out-of-the-ecliptic space missions. The likely scientific returns of these missions in the areas of solar, interplanetary, and cosmic ray physics is examined. Theoretical models of the solar wind and its interaction with interplanetary magnetic fields are given.

  4. Study of equatorial scintillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pomalaza, J.; Woodman, R.; Tisnado, G.; Nakasone, E.

    1972-01-01

    Observations of the amplitude scintillations produced by the F-region in equatorial areas are presented. The equipment used for conducting the observations is described. The use of transmissions from the ATS-1, ATS-3, and ATS-5 for obtaining data is described. The two principal subjects discussed are: (1) correlation between satellite and incoherent radar observations of scintillations and (2) simultaneous observations of scintillations at 136 MHz and 1550 MHz.

  5. Disturbed time observations of the temporal dependence and dynamics of TEC, scintillation, and ionospheric irregularity zonal drifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muella, Marcio; de Paula, Eurico; Kintner, Paul; Kantor, Ivan; Cerruti, Alessandro; Mitchell, Cathryn; Crowley, Geoff; Smorigo, Paulo; Batista, Inez

    GPS amplitude scintillations at the L1 frequency (1.575 GHz) and integral data of total electron content (TEC) obtained from measurements of the Brazilian ground-based GPS network are used to study specific relationships between TEC, scintillations and ionospheric electron density imaged at near the southern crest of the Equatorial Ionization Anomaly (EIA). Using a time-dependent tomographic model, 3-dimensional images are created to couple the geophysical quantities measured by the GPS receivers during the storm time period of November 18-23. It allows studying large variations in the temporal and spatial evolution of the electron density affecting the behavior and dynamics of the scintillations. Estimations of the ionospheric irregularity zonal drift velocities at 350 km obtained from two-spaced GPS receivers observations, and the coupling of the neutral atmosphere and the ionosphere obtained from the ASPEN- TIMEGCM model results are also used in the investigation. The model is used to analyze the north-south symmetry/asymmetry conditions in the ionization distribution of the equatorial anomaly produced by a meridional/transequatorial wind, and its effect to the development and evolution of the scintillations associated to the ionospheric irregularities. In this work we present some relevant aspects of the ionospheric dynamics and the thermosphere-ionosphere coupling system, which are some of the most important topics of study during the occurrence of geomagnetic storms.

  6. Measurements of the magnetic field orientation in the Jovian ionosphere deduced from Pioneer 10 and 11 scintillation observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, R.; Yang, F.-C.

    1978-01-01

    In this paper the S band scintillations observed during the Pioneer 10 and 11 occultation measurements of Jupiter are analyzed. It is found that while the electron density irregularities are isotropic in the collision-dominated lower ionosphere, they are anisotropic in the upper ionosphere because of alignment along the magnetic field. By using Rytov's approximation the frequency spectrum of the log-amplitude scintillations is derived for a wave propagating in an anisotropic turbulent medium. It is shown that the spectrum depends to a large extent on the direction of anisotropy and is therefore useful for measuring the orientation of the magnetic field in regions that have not yet been probed by direct measurements. This new technique is applied to the Pioneer 10 and 11 observations, and is used to deduce the first measurements of magnetic field orientation in the ionosphere of Jupiter.

  7. Excitonic processes and their contribution to nonproportionality observed in the light yield of inorganic scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Jai; Koblov, Alexander

    2013-02-01

    Using the derived expression for the light yield in a scintillator, the influence of linear radiative and non-radiative (quenching) rates on the nonproportionality in light yield is studied. It is found that if the excitation created within the electron track initiated by a γ-photon incident on a scintillator remains mainly excitonic, then nonproportionality can be minimised by inventing a scintillator material with linear radiative rate >107 s-1, linear quenching rate <106 s-1 and track radius ≥70 nm along with maintaining the rates of other nonlinear processes as discovered earlier. If one can increase the linear radiative rate to 109 s-1, then the nonproportionality can be eliminated at a track radius >20 nm.

  8. Using ionospheric scintillation observations for studying the morphology of equatorial ionospheric bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dandekar, B. S.; Groves, K. M.

    2004-06-01

    For a study of the equatorial ionosphere, ionospheric scintillation data at VHF and L-band frequencies have been routinely collected by ground-based receivers at Ancon, Peru, Antofagasta, Chile, and Ascension Island, UK, since May 1994. The receivers routinely monitor VHF transmissions from two geosynchronous satellites located at 100°W longitude and 23°W longitude, and L-band signals from satellites located at 75°W longitude and 15°W longitude. This combination provides a network of seven usable, reasonably separated links for monitoring ionospheric equatorial bubble activity in the South American longitude sector. A data set of seven years covering the period from 1995 to 2001 was studied to determine the temporal, diurnal, and seasonal behavior of equatorial bubbles. The results of our statistical study are presented here. In general the equatorial ionospheric bubble activity shows a strong systematic and primary dependence in temporal, diurnal, and seasonal variation, and a secondary weak dependence on geomagnetic and solar flux activity. At present, the dependence on solar and magnetic activity is not usable for near-time and short-term prediction of the equatorial bubble activity. Equatorial bubbles usually start 1 hour after sunset, the activity peaks before local midnight, and vanishes by early morning. The activity peaks in the months of November and January-February and is practically absent (weak) from May to August. On a daily basis on the average one sees 1 to 3 bubbles. The duration of bubbles is about 70 min, and the time spacing between the bubbles is 1 to 2 hours. The bubble activity in general follows the phase of solar cycle activity. The observed systematic behavior of the equatorial bubbles allows for a now cast and short-term forecast of the bubble activity in the South American sector.

  9. Scintillation noise power spectrum and its impact on high-redshift 21-cm observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedantham, H. K.; Koopmans, L. V. E.

    2016-05-01

    Visibility scintillation resulting from wave propagation through the turbulent ionosphere can be an important source of noise at low radio frequencies (ν ≲ 200 MHz). Many low-frequency experiments are underway to detect the power spectrum of brightness temperature fluctuations of the neutral-hydrogen 21-cm signal from the Epoch of Reionization (EoR: 12 ≳ z ≳ 7, 100 ≲ ν ≲ 175 MHz). In this paper, we derive scintillation noise power spectra in such experiments while taking into account the effects of typical data processing operations such as self-calibration and Fourier synthesis. We find that for minimally redundant arrays such as LOFAR and MWA, scintillation noise is of the same order of magnitude as thermal noise, has a spectral coherence dictated by stretching of the snapshot uv-coverage with frequency, and thus is confined to the well-known wedge-like structure in the cylindrical (two-dimensional) power spectrum space. Compact, fully redundant (dcore ≲ rF ≈ 300 m at 150 MHz) arrays such as HERA and SKA-LOW (core) will be scintillation noise dominated at all baselines, but the spatial and frequency coherence of this noise will allow it to be removed along with spectrally smooth foregrounds.

  10. L-Band Ionosphere Scintillations Observed by A Spaced GPS Receiver Array during Recent Active Experiments at HAARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, Y.; Pelgrum, W.; van Graas, F.; Gunawardena, S.; Charney, D.; Peng, S.; Triplett, J.; Vikram, P.; Vemuru, A.

    2010-12-01

    L-Band Ionosphere Scintillations Observed by A Spaced GPS Receiver Array during Recent Active Experiments at HAARP Jade Morton*, Wouter Pelgrum**, Sanjeev Gunawardena**, Frank van Graas**, Dan Charney*, Senlin Peng***, Jeff Triplett*, Ajay Vemuru** * Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Miami University ** Avionics Engineering Center, Ohio University *** Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Virginia Tech Ionosphere irregularities can cause scintillation of satellite-based radio communication, navigation, and surveillance signals. While these scintillation effects will impact the corresponding receiver and system performance, carefully recovered signal parameters serve as a means of studying the background state and dynamics of the ionosphere. In this presentation, we will describe our recent effort in establishing a unique spaced GNSS receiver array at HAARP, Alaska to collect GPS and GLONASS satellite signals at various stages of the GNSS receiver processing. Preliminary receiver processing results as well as additional on-site diagnostic instrumentation measurements obtained from two active heating experiment campaigns will be presented to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of our experimental data collection system in providing insightful details of ionosphere responses to active perturbations.

  11. Turbulence-induced scintillation on Gaussian-beam waves: theoretical predictions and observations from a laser-illuminated satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelton, John D.

    1995-10-01

    Expressions for the variance and the power spectral density of turbulence-induced log-amplitude fluctuations are derived for Gaussian-beam waves in the regime of weak scattering. This formulation includes effects that are due to turbulence strength variations along the propagation path, offset of the observation point from the beam axis, and sensitivity to focus and beam diameter. Comparison of theoretical results with observed scintillation during experiments with a laser-illuminated satellite reveals good agreement. Copyright (c) 1995 Optical Society of America

  12. Skylab experiments. Volume 5: Astronomy and space physics. [Skylab observations of galactic radiation, solar energy, and interplanetary composition for high school level education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The astronomy and space physics investigations conducted in the Skylab program include over 20 experiments in four categories to explore space phenomena that cannot be observed from earth. The categories of space research are as follows: (1) phenomena within the solar system, such as the effect of solar energy on Earth's atmosphere, the composition of interplanetary space, the possibility of an inner planet, and the X-ray radiation from Jupiter, (2) analysis of energetic particles such as cosmic rays and neutrons in the near-earth space, (3) stellar and galactic astronomy, and (4) self-induced environment surrounding the Skylab spacecraft.

  13. Analysis of the interplanetary origin of the largest Forbush decreases from 2007-2013 observed by three neutron monitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdés-Galicia, Jose F.; Gonzalez-Esparza, Americo; Musalem, Omar; Ontiveros, Veronica

    2016-07-01

    We developed a database of Forbush decreases (Fds), during the period 2007-2013. To analyze the Fds, we used data from three neutron monitors representing low, medium and high cutoff rigidities: Oulu (Finland), Moscow (Russia) and Mexico City. To consider the events to be analyzed in detail, we took a decrease lower limit of 5.5% in Oulu, since this station has the lowest cutoff. In this manner we found 9 events, from those we selected 3 to make a detailed discussion in the paper, these were: the two largest in the period, and the most complex. With the available Interplanetary data (near-Earth data from OMNI), we identified that the 9 events are associated with Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs), even the most complex. We additionally found that for these large events, the two crucial factors are a parameter we defined as the radial thickness of the sheath and ICME interaction with the Earth and the intensity of the magnetic field (considering that the maximum could be in the sheath or in the ICME). A general overview for the causes and a discussion of the nine events will be presented.

  14. Lyman-alpha observations of the interplanetary hydrogen: support of a NASA sounding rocket program and study of the local interstellar medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, Frederic

    2013-10-01

    Our proposal is to use the Hubble Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph {HST /STIS} over a single orbit to make Lyman-alpha observations of the interplanetary hydrogen {IPH} during the April period of this year {2014}.These measurements will provide wavelength and flux calibration, in order to support the HYPE instrument {Hydrogen Polarimetric Explorer} that is planned to make spectro-polarimetric observations in April during a suborbital flight of a NASA sounding rocket {grant NNX08AI98G}. Cross-calibration will also be made with the SWAN instrument {Solar Wind Anisotropies} on the SOHO satellite {Solar and Heliospheric Observatory}. SWAN can provide flux calibration but without any spectral information, so only HST/STIS can provide the wavelength calibration.Moreover the scientific controversy on the physical properties of the local interstellar medium {LISM} is still going on. The recent observations of interstellar helium atoms by IBEX {Interstellar Boundaries Explorer} suggest that the LISM velocity vector may vary over time. Such a change should impact the bulk velocity of interplanetary hydrogen and should be detected by HST /STIS.

  15. Dual-Frequency Observations of 140 Compact, Flat-Spectrum Active Galactic Nuclei for Scintillation-Induced Variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koay, J. Y.; Macquart, J.- P.; Rickett, B. J.; Bignall, H. E.; Lovell, J. E. J.; Reynolds, C.; Jauncey, D. L.; Pursimo, T.; Kedziora-Chudczer, L.; Ojha, R.

    2012-01-01

    The 4.9 GHz Micro-Arcsecond Scintillation-Induced Variability (MASIV) Survey detected a drop in Interstellar Scintillation (ISS) for sources at red shifts z > or approx. 2, indicating an apparent increase in angular diameter or a decrease in flux density of the most compact components of these sources, relative to their extended emission. This can result from intrinsic source size effects or scatter broadening in the Intergalactic Medium (IGM) , in excess of the expected (1+z)1/2 angular diameter scaling of brightness temperature limited sources resulting from cosmological expansion. We report here 4.9 GHz and 8.4 GHz observations and data analysis for a sample of 140 compact, fiat-spectrum sources which may allow us to determine the origin of this angular diameter-redshift relation by exploiting their different wavelength dependences. In addition to using ISS as a cosmological probe, the observations provide additional insight into source morphologies and the characteristics of ISS. As in the MASIV Survey, the variability of the sources is found to be significantly correlated with line-of-sight H(alpha) intensities, confirming its link with ISS. For 25 sources, time delays of about 0.15 to 3 days are observed between the scintillation patterns at both frequencies, interpreted as being caused by a shift in core positions when probed at different optical depths. Significant correlation is found between ISS amplitudes and source spectral index; in particular, a large drop in ISS amplitudes is observed at alpha < -0.4 confirming that steep spectrum sources scintillate less. We detect a weakened redshift dependence of ISS at 8.4 GHz over that at 4.9 GHz, with the mean variance at 4-day timescales reduced by a factor of 1.8 in the z > 2 sources relative to the z < 2 sources, as opposed to the factor of 3 decrease observed at 4.9 GHz. This suggests scatter broadening in the IGM, but the interpretation is complicated by subtle selection effects that will be explored

  16. GPS scintillations over Vietnam on April 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfonsi, Lucilla; Spogli, Luca; Tong, Jenna R.; de Franceschi, Giorgiana; Romano, Vincenzo; Bourdillon, Alain; Le Huy, Minh; Mitchell, Cathryn N.

    2010-05-01

    In Vietnam, at Hue (16.4°N, 107.6°E) and Hoc Mon (10.9°N, 106.6°E), are located two GPS receivers specially modified for recording, at a sampling rate of 50 Hz, the phase and the amplitude of the L1 signal and the Total Electron Content (TEC) from L1 and L2. In April 2006 both the receivers have observed post-sunset scintillation inhibition when moderate magnetic storms occurred. These measurements together with a 3D plus time imaging of the ionosphere produced by the Multi-Instrument Data Analysis System (MIDAS) have revealed interesting features that will be described in the present paper. In particular, the results confirm the role of the ring current on the generation of the equatorial F layer irregularities of scale size from less than a hundred meters to a few kilometers, highlighting also its important role in inhibiting scintillation during the storm. The characterization of the different conditions of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) will be illustrated, as well, to attempt a description of the scintillation effects over a region scarcely investigated in the open literature.

  17. The Galileo and Pioneer Venus ultraviolet spectrometer experiments - Solar Lyman-alpha latitude variation at solar maximum from interplanetary Lyman-alpha observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pryor, W. R.; Ajello, J. M.; Barth, C. A.; Hord, C. W.; Stewart, A. I. F.; Simmons, K. E.; Mcclintock, W. E.; Sandel, B. R.; Shemansky, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    Solar Ly-alpha latitude variation at solar maximum is examined on the basis of interplanetary Ly-alpha observations made during the Galileo and Pioneer Venus UV spectrometer experiments. A comparison is made of the latitude variation of the interplanetary (IP) Ly-alpha signal in 1986 at solar minimum from Pioneer Venus and in 1990 at solar maximum from Galileo. The Galileo EUV spectrometer shows that a large enhancement of the IP Ly-alpha emission occurred over the intervening four years near the solar equator. An IP Ly-alpha model is developed which considers the latitude variation of the solar Ly-alpha flux. The model fit to the data shows a 25-percent decrease of the full disk solar Ly-alpha flux from solar equator to solar pole in 1990. A detailed study of the Galileo IP Ly-alpha observations on day-of-year 190, 193, 197, and 200 in 1990 reveals that large variations occur in response to the 27-d solar variation. Analysis of these data shows that a maximum variation of 20 percent can be expected in the IP Ly-alpha upwind intensity over this 27-d period.

  18. Observed light yield of scintillation pixels: Extending the two-ray model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantorski, Igor; Jurkowski, Jacek; Drozdowski, Winicjusz

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we propose an extended, two dimensional model describing the propagation of scintillation photons inside a cuboid crystal until they reach a PMT window. In the simplest approach the model considers two main reasons for light losses: standard absorption obeying the classical Lambert-Beer law and non-ideal reflectivity of the "mummy" covering formed by several layers of Teflon tape wrapping the sample. Results of the model calculations are juxtaposed with experimental data as well as with predictions of an earlier, one dimensional model.

  19. Dependence of the location of the Martian magnetic lobes on the interplanetary magnetic field direction: Observations from Mars Global Surveyor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanelli, N.; Bertucci, C.; Gómez, D.; Mazelle, C.

    2015-09-01

    We use magnetometer data from the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft during portions of the premapping orbits of the mission to study the variability of the Martian-induced magnetotail as a function of the orientation of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). The time spent by MGS in the magnetotail lobes during periods with positive solar wind flow-aligned IMF component B∥IMF suggests that their location as well as the position of the central polarity reversal layer (PRL) are displaced in the direction antiparallel to the IMF cross-flow component B⊥IMF. Analogously, in the cases where B∥IMF is negative, the lobes are displaced in the direction of B⊥IMF. This behavior is compatible with a previously published analytical model of the IMF draping, where for the first time, the displacement of a complementary reversal layer (denoted as IPRL for inverse polarity reversal layer) is deduced from first principles.

  20. Equatorial plasma bubble rise velocities in the Indian sector determined from multistation scintillation observations

    SciTech Connect

    Dabas, R.S.; Reddy, B.M. )

    1990-04-01

    The velocity of plasma-bubble rise over the magnetic equator is calculated on the basis of simultaneous measurements of the onset times of postsunset VHF scintillations from the Japanese satellite ETS-2, obtained at a meridian array of four Indian stations during February 1980. The data and calculation results are presented in tables and graphs and discussed in detail. It is found that bubble velocities increase with altitude, varying in the ranges 128-416, 38-327, and 15-200 m/sec at altitudes 450-550, 550-1140, and 1140-1270 km, respectively. These results are shown to be in good agreement with satellite and radar measurements and with F-layer vertical drift velocities. 17 refs.

  1. Analyses of Phase Scintillation Observations Made by a Static Triple Frequency GPS-based Monitor Located Near the Equatorial Ionization Anomaly Peak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paula, E. R.; Moraes, A. D. O.; Costa, E.; Rodrigues, F. S.; Abdu, M. A.; Oliveira, K.

    2015-12-01

    We present analyses of phase scintillation measurements made during a 5-month period (November 2014 - March 2015) by a triple-frequency (L1, L2C and L5) GPS receiver located in São José dos Campos, Brazil near the peak of the Equatorial Ionization Anomaly. The location of the receiver and the large number of observations available for this study provide an opportunity to investigate different scintillation scenarios, including those associated with highly disturbed ionospheric events. Phase scintillation has been widely investigated at high latitudes but little has been reported in terms of observations at equatorial and low latitudes. We characterize the observed phase scintillation events according to the σφ index and investigate its relation with the amplitude scintillation index S4. The correlation between σφ for the three different frequencies are also investigated. We will present and discuss the results of our analysis and the likely implications for the GPS receivers under similar ionospheric conditions.

  2. Prediction of magnetic orientation in driver gas associated -Bz events. [in interplanetary medium observed at earth when solar source is identified

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoeksema, J. T.; Zhao, Xuepu

    1992-01-01

    The source regions of five strong -Bz events detected at 1 AU for which solar sources were identified by Tang et al. (1989) and Tsurutani et al. (1992) are investigated in order to determine whether the magnetic orientation of driver gas in the interplanetary medium observed at the earth can be predicted when its solar source is identified. Three -Bz events were traced to flare-associated coronal mass ejections (CMEs), one to an eruptive prominence associated CME, and one to three possible solar sources. The computed magnetic orientations at the candidate 'release height' (the height where the front of a CME ceases to accelerate) above the flare sites associated with CMEs show the existence of the expected southward field component. It is concluded that the magnetic orientation in flare-associated CME generated driver gas may be predictable.

  3. Measuring the Relationship between Stellar Scintillation and Altitude: A Simple Discovery-Based Observational Exercise Used in College Level Non-Major Astronomy Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sampson, Russell D.

    2013-01-01

    A simple naked eye observational exercise is outlined that teaches non-major astronomy students basic observational and critical thinking skills but does not require complex equipment or extensive knowledge of the night sky. Students measure the relationship between stellar scintillation and the altitude of a set of stars. Successful observations…

  4. Interplanetary magnetic holes - Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Lemaire, J. F.

    1978-01-01

    Magnetic holes in the interplanetary medium are explained as stationary nonpropagating equilibrium structures in which there are field-aligned enhancements of the plasma density and/or temperature. Magnetic antiholes are considered to be associated with depressions in the plasma pressure. In this model the observed changes in the magnetic field intensity and direction are due to diamagnetic currents that are carried by ions which drift in a sheath as the result of gradients in the magnetic field and in the plasma pressure within the sheath. The thickness of the sheaths that we consider is approximately a few ion Larmor radii. An electric field is normal to the magnetic field in the sheath. Solutions of Vlasov's equation and Maxwell's equations are presented which account for several types of magnetic holes, including 'null sheets,' that have been observed.

  5. Interplanetary magnetic holes: Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Lemaire, J. F.

    1978-01-01

    Magnetic holes in the interplanetary medium are explained as stationary, non-propagating, equilibrium structures in which there are field-aligned enhancements of the plasma density and/or temperature. Magnetic anti-holes are considered to be associated with depressions in the plasma pressure. In this model, the observed changes in the magnetic field intensity and direction are due to diamagnetic currents that are carried by ions which drift in a sheath as the result of gradients in the magnetic field and in the plasma pressure within the sheath. The thickness of the sheaths considered is approximately a few ion Larmor radii. An electric field is normal to the magnetic field in the sheath. Solutions of Vlasov's equation and Maxwell's equations are presented which account for several types of magnetic holes, including null-sheets, that were observed.

  6. Scintillator material

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F.; Kross, Brian J.

    1994-01-01

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography.

  7. Scintillator material

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F.; Kross, Brian J.

    1992-01-01

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography.

  8. Scintillator material

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, D.F.; Kross, B.J.

    1994-06-07

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography. 4 figs.

  9. Scintillator material

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, D.F.; Kross, B.J.

    1992-07-28

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography. 4 figs.

  10. Scintillation Counters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Zane W.

    Scintillators find wide use in radiation detection as the detecting medium for gamma/X-rays, and charged and neutral particles. Since the first notice in 1895 by Roentgen of the production of light by X-rays on a barium platinocyanide screen, and Thomas Edison's work over the following 2 years resulting in the discovery of calcium tungstate as a superior fluoroscopy screen, much research and experimentation have been undertaken to discover and elucidate the properties of new scintillators. Scintillators with high density and high atomic number are prized for the detection of gamma rays above 1 MeV; lower atomic number, lower-density materials find use for detecting beta particles and heavy charged particles; hydrogenous scintillators find use in fast-neutron detection; and boron-, lithium-, and gadolinium-containing scintillators are used for slow-neutron detection. This chapter provides the practitioner with an overview of the general characteristics of scintillators, including the variation of probability of interaction with density and atomic number, the characteristics of the light pulse, a list and characteristics of commonly available scintillators and their approximate cost, and recommendations regarding the choice of material for a few specific applications. This chapter does not pretend to present an exhaustive list of scintillators and applications.

  11. Interplanetary Type IV Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillaris, A.; Bouratzis, C.; Nindos, A.

    2016-08-01

    We study the characteristics of moving type IV radio bursts that extend to hectometric wavelengths (interplanetary type IV or type {IV}_{{IP}} bursts) and their relationship with energetic phenomena on the Sun. Our dataset comprises 48 interplanetary type IV bursts observed with the Radio and Plasma Wave Investigation (WAVES) instrument onboard Wind in the 13.825 MHz - 20 kHz frequency range. The dynamic spectra of the Radio Solar Telescope Network (RSTN), the Nançay Decametric Array (DAM), the Appareil de Routine pour le Traitement et l' Enregistrement Magnetique de l' Information Spectral (ARTEMIS-IV), the Culgoora, Hiraso, and the Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation (IZMIRAN) Radio Spectrographs were used to track the evolution of the events in the low corona. These were supplemented with soft X-ray (SXR) flux-measurements from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) and coronal mass ejections (CME) data from the Large Angle and Spectroscopic Coronagraph (LASCO) onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). Positional information of the coronal bursts was obtained by the Nançay Radioheliograph (NRH). We examined the relationship of the type IV events with coronal radio bursts, CMEs, and SXR flares. The majority of the events (45) were characterized as compact, their duration was on average 106 minutes. This type of events was, mostly, associated with M- and X-class flares (40 out of 45) and fast CMEs, 32 of these events had CMEs faster than 1000 km s^{-1}. Furthermore, in 43 compact events the CME was possibly subjected to reduced aerodynamic drag as it was propagating in the wake of a previous CME. A minority (three) of long-lived type {IV}_{{IP}} bursts was detected, with durations from 960 minutes to 115 hours. These events are referred to as extended or long duration and appear to replenish their energetic electron content, possibly from electrons escaping from the corresponding coronal

  12. Helium in interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nier, A. O.; Schlutter, D. J.

    1993-01-01

    Helium and neon were extracted from fragments of individual stratosphere-collected interplanetary dust particles (IDP's) by subjecting them to increasing temperature by applying short-duration pulses of power in increasing amounts to the ovens containing the fragments. The experiment was designed to see whether differences in release temperatures could be observed which might provide clues as to the asteroidal or cometary origin of the particles. Variations were observed which show promise for elucidating the problem.

  13. Comparison of interplanetary CME arrival times and solar wind parameters based on the WSA-ENLIL model with three cone types and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Soojeong; Moon, Y.-J.; Lee, Jae-Ok; Na, Hyeonock

    2014-09-01

    We have made a comparison between coronal mass ejection (CME)-associated shock propagations based on the Wang-Sheeley-Arge (WSA)-ENLIL model using three cone types and in situ observations. For this we use 28 full-halo CMEs, whose cone parameters are determined and their corresponding interplanetary shocks were observed at the Earth, from 2001 to 2002. We consider three different cone types (an asymmetric cone model, an ice cream cone model, and an elliptical cone model) to determine 3-D CME cone parameters (radial velocity, angular width, and source location), which are the input values of the WSA-ENLIL model. The mean absolute error of the CME-associated shock travel times for the WSA-ENLIL model using the ice-cream cone model is 9.9 h, which is about 1 h smaller than those of the other models. We compare the peak values and profiles of solar wind parameters (speed and density) with in situ observations. We find that the root-mean-square errors of solar wind peak speed and density for the ice cream and asymmetric cone model are about 190 km/s and 24/cm3, respectively. We estimate the cross correlations between the models and observations within the time lag of ± 2 days from the shock travel time. The correlation coefficients between the solar wind speeds from the WSA-ENLIL model using three cone types and in situ observations are approximately 0.7, which is larger than those of solar wind density (cc ˜0.6). Our preliminary investigations show that the ice cream cone model seems to be better than the other cone models in terms of the input parameters of the WSA-ENLIL model.

  14. Observations of the interplanetary magnetic field between 0.46 and 1 A.U. by the Mariner 10 spacecraft. Ph.D. Thesis - Catholic Univ. of Am.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behannon, K. W.

    1976-01-01

    Almost continuous measurement of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) at a sampling rate of 25 vectors/sec was performed by the magnetic field experiment onboard the Mariner 10 spacecraft during the period November 3, 1973 to April 14, 1974, comprising approximately 5-2/3 solar rotations and extending in radial distance from the sun from 1 to 0.46 AU. A clearly discernible two-sector pattern of field polarity was observed during the last 3-1/2 months of the period, with the dominant polarity toward the sun below the solar equatorial plane. Two compound high-speed solar wind streams were also present during this period, one in each magnetic field sector. Relative fluctuations of the field in magnitude and direction were found to have large time variations, but on average the relative magnitude fluctuations were approximately constant over the range of heliocentric distance covered while the relative directional fluctuations showed a slight decrease on average with increasing distance. The occurrence rate of directional discontinuities was also found to decrease with increasing radial distance from the sun.

  15. Lunar components in Lunping scintillations

    SciTech Connect

    Koster, J.R.; Lue, H.Y.; Wu, Hsi-Shu; Huang, Yinn-Nien

    1993-08-01

    The authors report on an anlysis of a 14 year data set of ionospheric scintillation data for 136 MHz signals transmitted from a Japanese satellite. They use a lunar age superposition method to analyze this data, breaking the data into blocks by seasons of the year. They observe a number of different scintillation types in the record, as well as impacts of lunar tides on the time record. They attempt to provide an origin for the different scintillation types.

  16. High-latitude dayside electric fields and currents during strong northward interplanetary magnetic field - Observations and model simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clauer, C. Robert; Friis-Christensen, Eigil

    1988-01-01

    On July 23, 1983 the IMF turned strongly northward, becoming about 22 nT for several hours. Using a combined data set of ionospheric convection measurements made by the Sondre Stromfjord incoherent scatter radar and convection inferred from Greenland magnetometer measurements, the onset of the reconfiguration of the high-latitude ionospheric currents is found to occur about 3 min after the northward IMF encounters the magnetopause. The large-scale reconfiguration of currents, however, appears to evolve over a period of about 22 min. These observations and the results of numerical simulations indicate that the dayside polar-cap electric field observed during strong northward IMF is produced by a direct electrical current coupling with the solar wind.

  17. Relationship of the interplanetary electric field to the high-latitude ionospheric electric field and currents Observations and model simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clauer, C. R.; Banks, P. M.

    1986-01-01

    The electrical coupling between the solar wind, magnetosphere, and ionosphere is studied. The coupling is analyzed using observations of high-latitude ion convection measured by the Sondre Stromfjord radar in Greenland and a computer simulation. The computer simulation calculates the ionospheric electric potential distribution for a given configuration of field-aligned currents and conductivity distribution. The technique for measuring F-region in velocities at high time resolution over a large range of latitudes is described. Variations in the currents on ionospheric plasma convection are examined using a model of field-aligned currents linking the solar wind with the dayside, high-latitude ionosphere. The data reveal that high-latitude ionospheric convection patterns, electric fields, and field-aligned currents are dependent on IMF orientation; it is observed that the electric field, which drives the F-region plasma curve, responds within about 14 minutes to IMF variations in the magnetopause. Comparisons of the simulated plasma convection with the ion velocity measurements reveal good correlation between the data.

  18. Observations of the Flux Density of Some Interplanetary Type II and Type III Radio Bursts and Initial Comparisons With Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cairns, I. H.; Mohamed, A. A. A.; Hillan, D.; Robinson, P. A.

    2015-12-01

    The measured intensity of a radio signal depends on the effective antenna length, which may vary with (at least) the plasma properties and radiation frequency. Here the effective antenna lengths are estimated as a function of frequency for the RAD1 and RAD2 instruments on the WIND spacecraft when in SUM mode. This is done by calibrating against the known galactic background radiation spectrum after removal of receiver noise and thermal plasma noise where possible. Flux density spectra and lower limits to the maximum brightness temperature are determined for three type II and three type III radio bursts based on two calibration methods, one of which uses the effective antenna lengths as a function of frequency. The second calibration method uses Wind data for the relative flux in dB to equate the minimum flux observed with the galactic background and receiver noise. The results emphasize that the second method is more successful in obtaining calibrated type II and III fluxes. Calibrated flux densities obtained show that The type IIs have similar maximum flux densities to the type III events in this sample, but the type IIs are much more variable in frequency and time. Theoretical predictions are obtained for shocks moving with a suitable range of initial speeds and accelerations. Dynamic spectra are then predicted for the three selected type II events using the theory of Knock et al. [2001] and a simple, unstructured, solar wind model. Because of the continuous emission of 24-26 August 1998 that is present in a wide range from 100 MHz to 21 kHz, albeit with strongly varying intensity, a comparison between its observed and predicted dynamic spectra is presented. The agreement between theory and data is discussed and the implications described for future modeling.

  19. Simultaneous observations of ionospheric quasiperiodic scintillations from short and long meridional baselines using VHF transmissions from Transit satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajkowicz, Lech A.; Minakoshi, Hisamitsu

    2003-02-01

    For the first time it was possible to observe regular quasiperiodic scintillations (QPS) in VHF radio-satellite transmissions from orbiting satellites simultaneously at short (2.1km) and long (121km) meridional baselines in the vicinity of a typical mid-latitude station (Brisbane; /27.5°S and /152.9°E geog. and /35.6° invar.lat.), using three sites (St. Lucia-S, Taringa-T in Brisbane and Boreen Pt.-B, north of Brisbane). A few pronounced quasiperiodic (QP) events were recorded showing unambiguous regular structures at the sites which made it possible to deduce a time displacement of the regular fading minimum at S, T and B. The QP structure is highly dependent on the geometry of the ray-path from a satellite to the observer which is manifested as a change of a QP event from symmetrical to non-symmetrical for stations separated by 2.1km, and to a radical change in the structure of the event over a distance of 121km. It is suggested the short-duration intense QP events are due to a Fresnel diffraction (or a reflection mechanism) of radio-satellite signals by a single ionospheric irregularity in a form of an ellipsoid with a large ionization gradient along the major axis. The structure of a QP event depends on the angle of viewing of the irregular blob from a radio-satellite. In view of this it is suggested that the reported variety of the ionization formation, responsible for different types of QPS, is only apparent but not real.

  20. The First in situ Observation of Kelvin-Helmholtz Waves at High-Latitude Magnetopause during Strongly Dawnward Interplanetary Magnetic Field Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, K.-J.; Goldstein, M. L.; Kuznetsova, M. M.; Wang, Y.; Vinas, A. F.; Sibeck, D. G.

    2012-01-01

    We report the first in situ observation of high-latitude magnetopause (near the northern duskward cusp) Kelvin-Helmholtz waves (KHW) by Cluster on January 12, 2003, under strongly dawnward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions. The fluctuations unstable to Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) are found to propagate mostly tailward, i.e., along the direction almost 90 deg. to both the magnetosheath and geomagnetic fields, which lowers the threshold of the KHI. The magnetic configuration across the boundary layer near the northern duskward cusp region during dawnward IMF is similar to that in the low-latitude boundary layer under northward IMF, in that (1) both magnetosheath and magnetospheric fields across the local boundary layer constitute the lowest magnetic shear and (2) the tailward propagation of the KHW is perpendicular to both fields. Approximately 3-hour-long periods of the KHW during dawnward IMF are followed by the rapid expansion of the dayside magnetosphere associated with the passage of an IMF discontinuity that characterizes an abrupt change in IMF cone angle, Phi = acos (B(sub x) / absolute value of Beta), from approx. 90 to approx. 10. Cluster, which was on its outbound trajectory, continued observing the boundary waves at the northern evening-side magnetopause during sunward IMF conditions following the passage of the IMF discontinuity. By comparing the signatures of boundary fluctuations before and after the IMF discontinuity, we report that the frequencies of the most unstable KH modes increased after the discontinuity passed. This result demonstrates that differences in IMF orientations (especially in f) are associated with the properties of KHW at the high-latitude magnetopause due to variations in thickness of the boundary layer, and/or width of the KH-unstable band on the surface of the dayside magnetopause.

  1. ARRIVAL TIME CALCULATION FOR INTERPLANETARY CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS WITH CIRCULAR FRONTS AND APPLICATION TO STEREO OBSERVATIONS OF THE 2009 FEBRUARY 13 ERUPTION

    SciTech Connect

    Moestl, C.; Rollett, T.; Temmer, M.; Veronig, A. M.; Biernat, H. K.; Lugaz, N.; Farrugia, C. J.; Galvin, A. B.; Davies, J. A.; Harrison, R. A.; Crothers, S.; Luhmann, J. G.; Zhang, T. L.; Baumjohann, W.

    2011-11-01

    One of the goals of the NASA Solar TErestrial RElations Observatory (STEREO) mission is to study the feasibility of forecasting the direction, arrival time, and internal structure of solar coronal mass ejections (CMEs) from a vantage point outside the Sun-Earth line. Through a case study, we discuss the arrival time calculation of interplanetary CMEs (ICMEs) in the ecliptic plane using data from STEREO/SECCHI at large elongations from the Sun in combination with different geometric assumptions about the ICME front shape [fixed-{Phi} (FP): a point and harmonic mean (HM): a circle]. These forecasting techniques use single-spacecraft imaging data and are based on the assumption of constant velocity and direction. We show that for the slow (350 km s{sup -1}) ICME on 2009 February 13-18, observed at quadrature by the two STEREO spacecraft, the results for the arrival time given by the HM approximation are more accurate by 12 hr than those for FP in comparison to in situ observations of solar wind plasma and magnetic field parameters by STEREO/IMPACT/PLASTIC, and by 6 hr for the arrival time at Venus Express (MAG). We propose that the improvement is directly related to the ICME front shape being more accurately described by HM for an ICME with a low inclination of its symmetry axis to the ecliptic. In this case, the ICME has to be tracked to >30{sup 0} elongation to obtain arrival time errors < {+-} 5 hr. A newly derived formula for calculating arrival times with the HM method is also useful for a triangulation technique assuming the same geometry.

  2. Observations of the 3-D distribution of interplanetary electrons and ions from solar wind plasma to low energy cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, R. P.; Anderson, K. A.; Ashford, S.; Carlson, C.; Curtis, D.; Ergun, R.; Larson, D.; McFadden, J.; McCarthy, M.; Parks, G. K.

    1995-01-01

    The 3-D Plasma and Energetic Particle instrument on the GGS Wind spacecraft (launched November 1, 1994) is designed to make measurements of the full three-dimensional distribution of suprathermal electrons and ions from solar wind plasma to low energy cosmic rays, with high sensitivity, wide dynamic range, good energy and angular resolution, and high time resolution. Three pairs of double-ended telescopes, each with two or three closely sandwiched passivated ion implanted silicon detectors measure electrons and ions from approximately 20 keV to greater than or equal to 300 keV. Four top-hat symmetrical spherical section electrostatic analyzers with microchannel plate detectors, a large and a small geometric factor analyzer for electrons and a similar pair for ions, cover from approximately 3 eV to 30 keV. We present preliminary observations of the electron and ion distributions in the absence of obvious solar impulsive events and upstream particles. The quiet time electron energy spectrum shows a smooth approximately power law fall-off extending from the halo population at a few hundred eV to well above approximately 100 keV The quiet time ion energy spectrum also shows significant fluxes over this energy range. Detailed 3-D distributions and their temporal variations will be presented.

  3. Solar Wind observations using the Mexican Array Radio Telescope (MEXART)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero-Hernandez, E.; Gonzalez-Esparza, A.; Villanueva, P.; Aguilar-Rodriguez, E.; Mejia-Ambriz, J. C.; Mexart

    2013-05-01

    The Mexican Array Radiotelescope (MEXART) is an instrument devoted to observations of radio sources to study large-scale structures in the solar wind employing the Interplanetary Scintillation (IPS) technique. We report recent IPS observations, from January to April of 2013, including an analysis of the scintillation index and the estimation of solar wind velocities for a set of radio sources. We track the first ICMEs registered by the MEXART. We are initiating a continuos operation for a complete monitoring of IPS radio sources that will complement solar wind studies based on in-situ observations.

  4. Interplanetary Scintiallation (IPS) of the Radio Source 3C48 During Periods of Low and High Solar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar-Rodriguez, E.; Tyul'bashev, S. A.; Chashei, I. V.; Romero-Hernandez, E.

    2015-09-01

    We present a comparative study of three techniques used to estimate the scintillation index using interplanetary scintillation (IPS) observations carried out by the Big Scanning Array (BSA), which operates at a frequency of 111 MHz. These techniques are based on: rms analysis on-source and off-source (classic), Fourier, and wavelet transforms. IPS data are analyzed separately for the period of low solar activity (2007 - 2009), and for the year 2013, near the solar-activity maximum. Our results show that, in general, these methods are equivalent. We analyze the radial dependence of the scintillation index at meter wavelengths during these two periods. It is found that the observed radial dependence of the scintillation index during both periods of U.C. cycle 24 is flatter than the theoretical dependence expected for the case of solar-wind spherical symmetry. This flattening can be explained in terms of the influence of the heliospheric current sheet during the low solar-activity period, and the influence of solar disturbances, such as coronal mass ejections (CMEs), for the high solar-activity period.

  5. Study of cosmic ray scintillations from 5-minute data of the scintillations telescope Izmran and world-wide network stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulinsky, O. V.; Dorman, L. I.; Libin, I. Y.; Prilutsky, R. E.; Yudakhin, K. F.

    1985-01-01

    During cosmic ray propagation in interplanetary space there appear characteristic cosmic-ray intensity scintillations which are due to charged particle scattering on random inhomogeneities of the interplanetary magnetic field. The power spectra of cosmic ray scintillations on the Earth during some intervals from 1977 to 1982 (for quiet periods, for solar flares and Forbush decreases due to power shock waves) have been calculated from five-minute, one and two-hour values of the cosmic-ray intensity measured by the scintillator supertelescope IZMIRAN. The spectra were estimated by the methods of spectral analysis and by autoregressive methods which mutually control each other and make it possible not only to analyze scintillation powers at distinguished frequencies, but also to determine the behavior of spectrum slopes in some frequency ranges.

  6. Interplanetary Fast Shocks and Associated Drivers Observed through the Twenty-Third Solar Minimum by WIND Over its First 2.5 Years

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mariani, F.; Berdichevsky, D.; Szabo, A.; Lepping, R. P.; Vinas, A. F.

    1999-01-01

    A list of the interplanetary (IP) shocks observed by WIND from its launch (in November 1994) to May 1997 is presented. Forty two shocks were identified. The magnetohydrodynamic nature of the shocks is investigated, and the associated shock parameters and their uncertainties are accurately computed using a practical scheme which combines two techniques. These techniques are a combination of the "pre-averaged" magnetic-coplanarity, velocity-coplanarity, and the Abraham-Schrauner-mixed methods, on the one hand, and the Vinas and Scudder [1986] technique for solving the non-linear least-squares Rankine-Hugoniot shock equations, on the other. Within acceptable limits these two techniques generally gave the same results, with some exceptions. The reasons for the exceptions are discussed. It is found that the mean strength and rate of occurrence of the shocks appears to correlated with the solar cycle. Both showed a decrease in 1996 coincident with the time of the lowest ultraviolet solar radiance, indicative of solar minimum and start of solar cycle 23, which began around June 1996. Eighteen shocks appeared to be associated with corotating interaction regions (CIRs). The distribution of their shock normals showed a mean direction peaking in the ecliptic plane and with a longitude (phi(sub n)) in that plane between perpendicular to the Parker spiral and radial from the Sun. When grouped according to the sense of the direction of propagation of the shocks the mean azimuthal (longitude) angle in GSE coordinates was approximately 194 deg for the fast-forward and approximately 20 deg for the fast-reverse shocks. Another 16 shocks were determined to be driven by solar transients, including magnetic clouds. These shocks had a broader distribution of normal directions than those of the CIR cases with a mean direction close to the Sun-Earth line. Eight shocks of unknown origin had normal orientation well off the ecliptic plane. No shock propagated with longitude phi(sub n) >= 220

  7. Radio Tracking of Solar Energetic Particles through Interplanetary Space.

    PubMed

    Fainberg, J; Evans, L G; Stone, R G

    1972-11-17

    Energetic particles ejected from the sun generate radio waves as they travel out through the interplanetary medium. Satellite observations of this emission at long radio wavelengths provide a means of investigating properties of the interplanetary medium, including the gross magnetic field configuration over distances of 1 astronomical unit. Results of such observations are illustrated.

  8. Liquid Scintillator Purification

    SciTech Connect

    Kishimoto, Y.

    2005-09-08

    The KamLAND collaboration has studied background requirements and purification methods needed to observe the 7Be neutrino from the sun. First we will discuss the present background situation in KamLAND where it is found that the main background components are 210Pb and 85Kr. It is then described how to purify the liquid scintillator. The present status and results on how to remove 210Pb from the liquid scintillator are discussed. Specifically, the detailed analysis of the effects of distillation and adsorption techniques are presented.

  9. GPS scintillation and TEC gradients at equatorial latitudes in April 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfonsi, L.; Spogli, L.; Tong, J. R.; de Franceschi, G.; Romano, V.; Bourdillon, A.; Le Huy, M.; Mitchell, C. N.

    2011-05-01

    We use observations of ionospheric scintillation at equatorial latitudes from two GPS receivers specially modified for recording, at a sampling rate of 50 Hz, the phase and the amplitude of the L1 signal and the Total Electron Content (TEC) from L1 and L2. The receivers, called GISTM (GPS Ionospheric Scintillation and TEC Monitor), are located in Vietnam (Hue, 16.4°N, 107.6°E; Hoc Mon, 10.9°N, 106.6°E). These experimental observations are analysed together with the tomographic reconstruction of the ionosphere produced by the Multi-Instrument Data Analysis System (MIDAS) for investigating the moderate geomagnetic storm which occurred on early April 2006, under low solar activity. The synergic adoption of the ionospheric imaging and of the GISTM measurements supports the identification of the scale-sizes of the ionospheric irregularities causing scintillations and helps the interpretation of the physical mechanisms generating or inhibiting the appearance of the equatorial F layer irregularities. In particular, our study attributes to the turning of the IMF (Interplanetary Magnetic Field) between northward and southward direction an important role in the inhibition of the generation of spread F irregularities resulting in a lack of scintillation enhancement in the post-sunset hours.

  10. GPS phase scintillation at high latitudes during geomagnetic storms of 7-17 March 2012 - Part 2: Interhemispheric comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prikryl, P.; Ghoddousi-Fard, R.; Spogli, L.; Mitchell, C. N.; Li, G.; Ning, B.; Cilliers, P. J.; Sreeja, V.; Aquino, M.; Terkildsen, M.; Jayachandran, P. T.; Jiao, Y.; Morton, Y. T.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Thomas, E. G.; Zhang, Y.; Weatherwax, A. T.; Alfonsi, L.; De Franceschi, G.; Romano, V.

    2015-06-01

    During the ascending phase of solar cycle 24, a series of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) in the period 7-17 March 2012 caused geomagnetic storms that strongly affected high-latitude ionosphere in the Northern and Southern Hemisphere. GPS phase scintillation was observed at northern and southern high latitudes by arrays of GPS ionospheric scintillation and TEC monitors (GISTMs) and geodetic-quality GPS receivers sampling at 1 Hz. Mapped as a function of magnetic latitude and magnetic local time (MLT), the scintillation was observed in the ionospheric cusp, the tongue of ionization fragmented into patches, sun-aligned arcs in the polar cap, and nightside auroral oval and subauroral latitudes. Complementing a companion paper (Prikryl et al., 2015a) that focuses on the high-latitude ionospheric response to variable solar wind in the North American sector, interhemispheric comparison reveals commonalities as well as differences and asymmetries between the northern and southern high latitudes, as a consequence of the coupling between the solar wind and magnetosphere. The interhemispheric asymmetries are caused by the dawn-dusk component of the interplanetary magnetic field controlling the MLT of the cusp entry of the storm-enhanced density plasma into the polar cap and the orientation relative to the noon-midnight meridian of the tongue of ionization.

  11. Interplanetary Proton Model: JPL 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feynman, J.; Spitale, G.; Wang, J.

    1993-01-01

    This study was carried out to increase the acuracy and energy range of predictive models of interplanetary proton fluences. Such an estimate is often needed when spacecraft spend a signigicant amount of time in the interplanetary environmnet.

  12. SCINTILLATION SPECTROMETER

    DOEpatents

    Bell, P.R.; Francis, J.E.

    1960-06-21

    A portable scintillation spectrometer is described which is especially useful in radio-biological studies for determining the uptake and distribution of gamma -emitting substances in tissue. The spectrometer includes a collimator having a plurality of apertures that are hexagonal in cross section. Two crystals are provided: one is activated to respond to incident rays from the collimator; the other is not activated and shields the first from external radiation.

  13. Observations of IPS radio sources at 140 MHz with the Mexican Array Radio Telescope (MEXART)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mejia-Ambriz, Julio-Cesar; Villanueva-Hernandez, Pablo; Gonzalez-Esparza, Americo; Aguilar-Rodriguez, Ernesto; Mendoza-Torrez, Jose Eduardo; Carrillo-Vargas, Armando; Andrade-Mascote, Ernesto

    The MEXART is a dedicated transit station to perform Interplanetary Scintillation (IPS) ob-servations. The array of 4096 full wavelenght dipoles has a collecting area of 9600 square meters, the operation frequency is 140 MHz with a bandwidth of 2 MHz. Recently we began the IPS observations with the instrument. We report a list of IPS radio sources observed at 140 MHz. We perform an analysis of the scintillation index (m) versus the elongation angle to obtain the first g values given by the instrument for some radio sources. We report the single station solar wind velocity fitting model adapted at 140 MHz based on Manoharan and Ananthakrishnan (1990).

  14. Plastic scintillation dosimetry: Optimal selection of scintillating fibers and scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Archambault, Louis; Arsenault, Jean; Gingras, Luc; Sam Beddar, A.; Roy, Rene; Beaulieu, Luc

    2005-07-15

    Scintillation dosimetry is a promising avenue for evaluating dose patterns delivered by intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans or for the small fields involved in stereotactic radiosurgery. However, the increase in signal has been the goal for many authors. In this paper, a comparison is made between plastic scintillating fibers and plastic scintillator. The collection of scintillation light was measured experimentally for four commercial models of scintillating fibers (BCF-12, BCF-60, SCSF-78, SCSF-3HF) and two models of plastic scintillators (BC-400, BC-408). The emission spectra of all six scintillators were obtained by using an optical spectrum analyzer and they were compared with theoretical behavior. For scintillation in the blue region, the signal intensity of a singly clad scintillating fiber (BCF-12) was 120% of that of the plastic scintillator (BC-400). For the multiclad fiber (SCSF-78), the signal reached 144% of that of the plastic scintillator. The intensity of the green scintillating fibers was lower than that of the plastic scintillator: 47% for the singly clad fiber (BCF-60) and 77% for the multiclad fiber (SCSF-3HF). The collected light was studied as a function of the scintillator length and radius for a cylindrical probe. We found that symmetric detectors with nearly the same spatial resolution in each direction (2 mm in diameter by 3 mm in length) could be made with a signal equivalent to those of the more commonly used asymmetric scintillators. With augmentation of the signal-to-noise ratio in consideration, this paper presents a series of comparisons that should provide insight into selection of a scintillator type and volume for development of a medical dosimeter.

  15. Plastic scintillation dosimetry: optimal selection of scintillating fibers and scintillators.

    PubMed

    Archambault, Louis; Arsenault, Jean; Gingras, Luc; Beddar, A Sam; Roy, René; Beaulieu, Luc

    2005-07-01

    Scintillation dosimetry is a promising avenue for evaluating dose patterns delivered by intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans or for the small fields involved in stereotactic radiosurgery. However, the increase in signal has been the goal for many authors. In this paper, a comparison is made between plastic scintillating fibers and plastic scintillator. The collection of scintillation light was measured experimentally for four commercial models of scintillating fibers (BCF-12, BCF-60, SCSF-78, SCSF-3HF) and two models of plastic scintillators (BC-400, BC-408). The emission spectra of all six scintillators were obtained by using an optical spectrum analyzer and they were compared with theoretical behavior. For scintillation in the blue region, the signal intensity of a singly clad scintillating fiber (BCF-12) was 120% of that of the plastic scintillator (BC-400). For the multiclad fiber (SCSF-78), the signal reached 144% of that of the plastic scintillator. The intensity of the green scintillating fibers was lower than that of the plastic scintillator: 47% for the singly clad fiber (BCF-60) and 77% for the multiclad fiber (SCSF-3HF). The collected light was studied as a function of the scintillator length and radius for a cylindrical probe. We found that symmetric detectors with nearly the same spatial resolution in each direction (2 mm in diameter by 3 mm in length) could be made with a signal equivalent to those of the more commonly used asymmetric scintillators. With augmentation of the signal-to-noise ratio in consideration, this paper presents a series of comparisons that should provide insight into selection of a scintillator type and volume for development of a medical dosimeter.

  16. Interplanetary medium data book

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, J. H.

    1977-01-01

    Unresolved questions on the physics of solar wind and its effects on magnetospheric processes and cosmic ray propagation were addressed with hourly averaged interplanetary plasma and magnetic field data. This composite data set is described with its content and extent, sources, limits of validity, and the mutual consistency studies and normalizations to which the input data were subjected. Hourly averaged parameters were presented in the form of digital listings and 27-day plots. The listings are contained in a separately bound appendix.

  17. Outflow structure of the quiet sun corona probed by spacecraft radio scintillations in strong scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Imamura, Takeshi; Ando, Hiroki; Toda, Tomoaki; Nakamura, Masato; Tokumaru, Munetoshi; Shiota, Daikou; Isobe, Hiroaki; Asai, Ayumi; Miyamoto, Mayu; Häusler, Bernd; Pätzold, Martin; Nabatov, Alexander; Yaji, Kentaro; Yamada, Manabu

    2014-06-20

    Radio scintillation observations have been unable to probe flow speeds in the low corona where the scattering of radio waves is exceedingly strong. Here we estimate outflow speeds continuously from the vicinity of the Sun to the outer corona (heliocentric distances of 1.5-20.5 solar radii) by applying the strong scattering theory to radio scintillations for the first time, using the Akatsuki spacecraft as the radio source. Small, nonzero outflow speeds were observed over a wide latitudinal range in the quiet-Sun low corona, suggesting that the supply of plasma from closed loops to the solar wind occurs over an extended area. The existence of power-law density fluctuations down to the scale of 100 m was suggested, which is indicative of well-developed turbulence which can play a key role in heating the corona. At higher altitudes, a rapid acceleration typical of radial open fields is observed, and the temperatures derived from the speed profile show a distinct maximum in the outer corona. This study opened up a possibility of observing detailed flow structures near the Sun from a vast amount of existing interplanetary scintillation data.

  18. Multipoint study of interplanetary shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco-Cano, Xochitl; Kajdic, Primoz; Russell, Christopher T.; Aguilar-Rodriguez, Ernesto; Jian, Lan K.; Luhmann, Janet G.

    2016-04-01

    Interplanetary (IP) shocks are driven in the heliosphere by Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs) and Stream Interaction Regions (SIRs). These shocks perturb the solar wind plasma, and play an active role in the acceleration of ions to suprathermal energies. Shock fronts evolve as they move from the Sun. Their surfaces can be far from uniform and be modulated by changes in the ambient solar wind (magnetic field orientation, flow velocity), shocks rippling, and perturbations upstream and downstream from the shocks, i.e., electromagnetic waves. In this work we use multipoint observations from STEREO, WIND, and MESSENGER missions to study shock characteristics at different helio-longitudes and determine the properties of the waves near them. We also determine shock longitudinal extensions and foreshock sizes. The variations of geometry along the shock surface can result in different extensions of the wave and ion foreshocks ahead of the shocks, and in different wave modes upstream and downtream of the shocks. We find that the ion foreshock can extend up to 0.2 AU ahead of the shock, and that the upstream region with modified solar wind/waves can be very asymmetric.

  19. Observations of celestial X-ray sources above 20 keV with the high-energy scintillation spectrometer on board OSO 8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crannell, C. J.; Dennis, B. R.; Dolan, J. H.; Frost, K. J.; Orwig, L. E.; Beall, J. H.; Maurer, G. S.

    1977-01-01

    High-energy X-ray spectra of the Crab Nebula, Cyg- XR-1, and Cen A were determined from observations with the scintillation spectrometer on board the OSO-8 satellite, launched in June, 1975. Each of these sources was observed over two periods of 8 days or more, enabling a search for day-to-day and year to year variations in the spectral and temporal characteristics of the X-ray emission. No variation in the light curve of the Crab pulsar was found from observations which span a 15-day period in March 1976, with demonstrable phase stability. Transitions associated with the binary phase of Cyg XR-1 and a large change in the emission from Con A are reported.

  20. Ion Acceleration and Wave-Particle Interaction at the Interplanetary Shocks Associated with the Halloween 2003 and the 20 January 2005 Events: SOHO/HSTOF, SOHO/EPHIN, and ACE/MAG Observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bamert, K.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.; Kallenbach, R.; Hilchenbach, M.; Müller-Mellin, R.; Klassen, A.; Smith, C. W.

    2005-12-01

    We analyze suprathermal and energetic ions associated with three large coronal mass ejection events during the two most active time periods in the declining phase of this solar cycle. The CMEs and associated flares were observed on Nov. 2 and Nov. 4, 2003 (Halloween events) and on January 20, 2005, by SOHO/LASCO and SOHO/EIT. The second event was accompanied by the largest flare (X28) ever observed. In particular, we focus our study on the upstream regions of the interplanetary shocks driven by these CMEs. By combining data of HSTOF and EPHIN we are able to analyze the ions in a large energy range. HSTOF measures H, He, CNO, and Fe ions in the energy range from 80 keV/e up to 100 MeV/e (for heavy ions). The EPHIN sensor detects protons and the helium isotopes in the energy range 4 to 53 MeV/amu. The temporal evolution of the spectra is resolved in steps of 2 hours corresponding to a spatial resolution in the solar wind frame of 0.02 AU. We compare these results to those associated with the Bastille Day event in 2000, and discuss them in the context of models based of quasi-linear theory of ion acceleration and wave-particle interaction at interplanetary traveling shocks.

  1. Infrared emission from interplanetary dust

    SciTech Connect

    Temi, P.; De Bernardis, P.; Masi, S.; Moreno, G.; Salama, A.

    1989-02-01

    Standard models of the interplanetary dust emission fail to account satisfactorily for IR observations. A new model of the dust, based on very simple assumptions on the grain structure (spherical and homogeneous) and chemical composition (astronomical silicates, graphite, blackbodies) is developed. Updated values of the refractive indexes have been included in the analysis. The predictions of the model (absolute values of the fluxes, spectral shape, elongation dependence of the emission) have then been compared with all the available IR observations performed by the ARGO (balloon-borne experiment by University of Rome), AFGL and Zodiacal Infrared Project (ZIP) (rocket experiments by Air Force Geophysics Laboratory, Bedford, Mass.), and IRAS satellite. Good agreement is found when homogeneous data sets from single experiments (e.g., ZIP and ARGO) are considered separately. 19 references.

  2. The interplanetary and solar magnetic field sector structures, 1962 - 1968

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, D. E.

    1972-01-01

    The interplanetary magnetic field sector structure was observed from late 1962 through 1968. During this time it has been possible to study the manner in which the sector pattern and its relation to the photospheric magnetic field configuration changes from solar minimum to solar maximum. Observations were also made relating sector boundaries to specific regions on the solar disk. These and other observations related to the solar origin of the interplanetary field are briefly reviewed.

  3. Morphology of auroral zone radio wave scintillation

    SciTech Connect

    Rino, C.L.; Matthews, S.J.

    1980-08-01

    This paper describes the morphology of midnight sector and morning sector auroral zone scintillation observations made over a two-year period using the Wideband satelite, which is in a sun-synchronous, low-altitude orbit. No definitive seasonal variation was found. The nighttime data showed the highest scintillation ocurrence levels, but significant amounts of morning scintillation were observed. For the most part the scintillation activity followed the general pattern of local magnetic activity. The most prominent feature in the nightime data is a localized amplitude and phase scintillation enhancement at the point where the propagation vector lies within an L shell. A geometrical effect due to a dynamic slab of sheetlike structures in the F region is hypothesized as the source of his enhancement. The data have been sorted by magnetic activity, proximity to local midnight, and season. The general features of the data are in agreement with the accepted morphology of auroral zone scintillation.

  4. Interplanetary Field Enhancements: The Interaction between Solar Wind and Interplanetary Dusty Plasma Released by Interplanetary Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Hairong

    Interplanetary field enhancements (IFEs) are unique large-scale structures in the solar wind. During IFEs, the magnetic-field strength is significantly enhanced with little perturbation in the solar-wind plasma. Early studies showed that IFEs move at nearly the solar-wind speed and some IFEs detected at 0.72AU by Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) are associated with material co-orbiting with asteroid Oljato. To explain the observed IFE features, we develop and test an IFE formation hypothesis: IFEs result from interactions between the solar wind and clouds of nanoscale charged dust particles released in interplanetary collisions. This hypothesis predicts that the magnetic field drapes and the solar wind slows down in the upstream. Meanwhile the observed IFE occurrence rate should be comparable with the detectable interplanetary collision rate. Based on this hypothesis, we can use the IFE occurrence to determine the spatial distribution and temporal variation of interplanetary objects which produce IFEs. To test the hypothesis, we perform a systematic survey of IFEs in the magnetic-field data from many spacecraft. Our datasets cover from 1970s to present and from inner than 0.3AU to outer than 5 AU. In total, more than 470 IFEs are identified and their occurrences show clustering features in both space and time. We use multi-spacecraft simultaneous observations to reconstruct the magnetic-field geometry and find that the magnetic field drapes in the upstream region. The results of a superposed epoch study show that the solar wind slows down in the upstream and there is a plasma depletion region near the IFE centers. In addition, the solar-wind slowdown and plasma depletion feature are more significant in larger IFEs. The mass contained in IFEs can be estimated by balancing the solar-wind pressure force exerted on the IFEs against the solar gravity. The solar-wind slowdown resultant from the estimated mass is consistent with the result in superposed epoch study. The

  5. Radio wave scintillations at equatorial regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poularikas, A. D.

    1972-01-01

    Radio waves, passing through the atmosphere, experience amplitude and phase fluctuations know as scintillations. A characterization of equatorial scintillation, which has resulted from studies of data recorded primarily in South America and equatorial Africa, is presented. Equatorial scintillation phenomena are complex because they appear to vary with time of day (pre-and postmidnight), season (equinoxes), and magnetic activity. A wider and more systematic geographical coverage is needed for both scientific and engineering purposes; therefore, it is recommended that more observations should be made at earth stations (at low-geomagnetic latitudes) to record equatorial scintillation phenomena.

  6. Large-scale properties of the interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatten, K. H.

    1972-01-01

    Early theoretical work of Parker is presented along with the observational evidence supporting his Archimedes spiral model. Variations present in the interplanetary magnetic field from the spiral angle are related to structures in the solar wind. The causes of these structures are found to be either nonuniform radial solar wind flow or the time evolution of the photospheric field. Coronal magnetic models are related to the connection between the solar magnetic field and the interplanetary magnetic field. Direct extension of the solar field-magnetic nozzle controversy is discussed along with the coronal magnetic models. Effects of active regions on the interplanetary magnetic field is discussed with particular reference to the evolution of interplanetary sectors. Interplanetary magnetic field magnitude variations are shown throughout the solar cycle. The percentage of time the field magnitude is greater than 10 gamma is shown to closely parallel sunspot number. The sun's polar field influence on the interplanetary field and alternative views of the magnetic field structure out of the ecliptic plane are presented. In addition, a variety of significantly different interplanetary field structures are discussed.

  7. Ionosphere scintillations associated with features of equatorial ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandra, H.; Vats, H. O.; Sethia, G.; Deshpande, M. R.; Rastogi, R. G.; Sastri, J. H.; Murthy, B. S.

    1979-01-01

    Amplitude scintillations of radio beacons aboard the ATS-6 satellite on 40 MHz, 140 MHz and 360 MHz recorded during the ATS-6 phase II at an equatorial station Ootacamund (dip 4 deg N) and the ionograms at a nearby station Kodaikanal (dip 3.5 deg N) are examined for scintillation activity. Only sporadic E events, other than Es-q, Es-c or normal E are found to be associated with intense daytime scintillations. Scintillations are also observed during night Es conditions. The amplitude spread is associated with strong scintillations on all frequencies while frequency spread causes weaker scintillations and that mainly at 40 MHz.

  8. Spacecraft Radio Scintillation and Solar System Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, Richard

    1993-01-01

    When a wave propagates through a turbulent medium, scattering by the random refractive index inhomogeneities can lead to a wide variety of phenomena that have been the subject of extensive study. The observed scattering effects include amplitude or intensity scintillation, phase scintillation, angular broadening, and spectral broadening, among others. In this paper, I will refer to these scattering effects collectively as scintillation. Although the most familiar example is probably the twinkling of stars (light wave intensity scintillation by turbulence in the Earth's atmosphere), scintillation has been encountered and investigated in such diverse fields as ionospheric physics, oceanography, radio astronomy, and radio and optical communications. Ever since planetary spacecraft began exploring the solar system, scintillation has appeared during the propagation of spacecraft radio signals through planetary atmospheres, planetary ionospheres, and the solar wind. Early studies of these phenomena were motivated by the potential adverse effects on communications and navigation, and on experiments that use the radio link to conduct scientific investigations. Examples of the latter are radio occultation measurements (described below) of planetary atmospheres to deduce temperature profiles, and the search for gravitational waves. However,these concerns soon gave way to the emergence of spacecraft radio scintillation as a new scientific tool for exploring small-scale dynamics in planetary atmospheres and structure in the solar wind, complementing in situ and other remote sensing spacecraft measurements, as well as scintillation measurements using natural (celestial) radio sources. The purpose of this paper is to briefly describe and review the solar system spacecraft radio scintillation observations, to summarize the salient features of wave propagation analyses employed in interpreting them, to underscore the unique remote sensing capabilities and scientific relevance of

  9. Relating the equatorial electrojet strength inferred from multi-satellite magnetic observations to ExB drift and equatorial scintillation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimbrel, A.; Maus, S.

    2006-12-01

    The dayside eastward electric field drives a strong electric current along the magnetic equator. This equatorial electrojet (EEJ) follows a narrow band in the ionospheric E-region, the Cowling channel. The strength of the EEJ is essentially the product of the eastward electric field with the Cowling conductivity. Observations of the electrojet strength could therefore provide valuable information on the eastward electric field, as well as on ionospheric conductivity. It is already known that the EEJ strength inferred from magnetic observatory measurements correlates well with the ExB drift observed by equatorial radars. Potentially, the EEJ strength could also be an indicator for the occurrence of equatorial plasma instabilities. To investigate these possibilities we use a dataset of 76,000 EEJ strengths, inferred from equator-crossings of the magnetic field measuring satellites CHAMP, Oersted and SAC-C. These EEJ strengths correlate well with the corresponding Julia ExB radar observations. Since the eastward electric field is ultimately responsible for building up the equatorial plasma anomaly, one can go one step further and correlate the EEJ strengths with the occurrence of night-time equatorial scintillations. An initial attempt to directly relate EEJ strength to SCINDA observations did not show any obvious correlation, though. In the next step, we plan to account for variations in the Cowling conductivity in order to obtain cleaner correlations with the ExB radar drifts. Possibly, this will also help to establish a relationship with the SCINDA observations.

  10. Scintillators and applications thereof

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Richard T.

    2015-09-01

    Scintillators of various constructions and methods of making and using the same are provided. In some embodiments, a scintillator comprises at least one radiation absorption region and at least one spatially discrete radiative exciton recombination region.

  11. Scintillators and applications thereof

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Richard T.

    2014-07-15

    Scintillators of various constructions and methods of making and using the same are provided. In some embodiments, a scintillator comprises at least one radiation absorption region and at least one spatially discrete radiative exciton recombination region.

  12. The Analysis of Data from Voyager's Ultraviolet Spectrometers: The Trend of Observed Interplanetary Lyman-alpha Intensity with Increasing Heliocentric Distance for Multiple Viewing Directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, C. R.; Fayock, B.; Heerikhuisen, J.; Zank, G. P.

    2014-12-01

    The motivation for this project was simple: to reduce raw data from the Ultraviolet Spectrometers on both Voyager Spacecraft to verify the results of a simulation of Lyman-alpha radiative transfer within a 3D MHD kinetic-neutral model of the heliosphere created at the University of Alabama in Huntsville. The heliospheric model, which self-consistently includes the interaction between ionized and neutral hydrogen, outputs a density map of neutral hydrogen. The Monte Carlo radiative transfer model then simulates the propagation and scattering of millions of photons through this density map and outputs the relative number of photons that should be seen by spacecraft at any point within 1000 AU of the sun. My project was to learn how to analyze the raw Voyager data and compare it to these simulations. There were several stages of analysis necessary to reduce to useful data. Records containing signals from sources other than the interplanetary medium, such as stars and planets, were discarded. The remaining records were averaged along regional lines of sight to achieve better signal to noise. The spectra were then corrected for inherent device flaws, such as channel-to-channel variations in sensitivity (fixed-pattern noise), dark counts due to the radioisotope thermal electric generator, and imperfections in the scattering of the diffraction grating. Records were then sorted and averaged to create a full-sky map consisting of 18 regions for each specified radial bin to match the cell spacing of the radiative transfer model. The results were then normalized to solar minimum to reduce variations in the data due to solar cycle oscillations. Initial results indicate an unexpected deviation from the models, but more analysis must be performed to determine if the discrepancy comes from the normalization of the data, insufficient angular resolution of the radiative transfer model, or the physics of the models themselves. Future work involves increasing the resolution of the

  13. Tin in a chondritic interplanetary dust particle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rietmeijer, Frans J. M.

    1989-01-01

    Submicron platey Sn-rich grains are present in chondritic porous interplanetary dust particle (IDP) W7029 A and it is the second occurrence of a tin mineral in a stratospheric micrometeorite. Selected Area Electron Diffraction data for the Sn-rich grains match with Sn2O3 and Sn3O4. The oxide(s) may have formed in the solar nebula when tin metal catalytically supported reduction of CO or during flash heating on atmospheric entry of the IDP. The presence of tin is consistent with enrichments for other volatile trace elements in chondritic IDPs and may signal an emerging trend toward nonchondritic volatile element abundances in chondritic IDPs. The observation confirms small-scale mineralogical heterogeneity in fine-grained chondritic porous interplanetary dust.

  14. Autonomous interplanetary constellation design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, Cornelius Channing, II

    According to NASA's integrated space technology roadmaps, space-based infrastructures are envisioned as necessary ingredients to a sustained effort in continuing space exploration. Whether it be for extra-terrestrial habitats, roving/cargo vehicles, or space tourism, autonomous space networks will provide a vital communications lifeline for both future robotic and human missions alike. Projecting that the Moon will be a bustling hub of activity within a few decades, a near-term opportunity for in-situ infrastructure development is within reach. This dissertation addresses the anticipated need for in-space infrastructure by investigating a general design methodology for autonomous interplanetary constellations; to illustrate the theory, this manuscript presents results from an application to the Earth-Moon neighborhood. The constellation design methodology is formulated as an optimization problem, involving a trajectory design step followed by a spacecraft placement sequence. Modeling the dynamics as a restricted 3-body problem, the investigated design space consists of families of periodic orbits which play host to the constellations, punctuated by arrangements of spacecraft autonomously guided by a navigation strategy called LiAISON (Linked Autonomous Interplanetary Satellite Orbit Navigation). Instead of more traditional exhaustive search methods, a numerical continuation approach is implemented to map the admissible configuration space. In particular, Keller's pseudo-arclength technique is used to follow folding/bifurcating solution manifolds, which are otherwise inaccessible with other parameter continuation schemes. A succinct characterization of the underlying structure of the local, as well as global, extrema is thus achievable with little a priori intuition of the solution space. Furthermore, the proposed design methodology offers benefits in computation speed plus the ability to handle mildly stochastic systems. An application of the constellation design

  15. Measurement of radiation damage of water-based liquid scintillator and liquid scintillator

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bignell, L. J.; Diwan, M. V.; Hans, S.; Jaffe, D. E.; Rosero, R.; Vigdor, S.; Viren, B.; Worcester, E.; Yeh, M.; Zhang, C.

    2015-10-19

    Liquid scintillating phantoms have been proposed as a means to perform real-time 3D dosimetry for proton therapy treatment plan verification. We have studied what effect radiation damage to the scintillator will have upon this application. We have performed measurements of the degradation of the light yield and optical attenuation length of liquid scintillator and water-based liquid scintillator after irradiation by 201 MeV proton beams that deposited doses of approximately 52 Gy, 300 Gy, and 800 Gy in the scintillator. Liquid scintillator and water-based liquid scintillator (composed of 5% scintillating phase) exhibit light yield reductions of 1.74 ± 0.55 % andmore » 1.31 ± 0.59 % after ≈ 800 Gy of proton dose, respectively. Some increased optical attenuation was observed in the irradiated samples, the measured reduction to the light yield is also due to damage to the scintillation light production. Based on our results and conservative estimates of the expected dose in a clinical context, a scintillating phantom used for proton therapy treatment plan verification would exhibit a systematic light yield reduction of approximately 0.1% after a year of operation.« less

  16. Measurement of radiation damage of water-based liquid scintillator and liquid scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Bignell, L. J.; Diwan, M. V.; Hans, S.; Jaffe, D. E.; Rosero, R.; Vigdor, S.; Viren, B.; Worcester, E.; Yeh, M.; Zhang, C.

    2015-10-19

    Liquid scintillating phantoms have been proposed as a means to perform real-time 3D dosimetry for proton therapy treatment plan verification. We have studied what effect radiation damage to the scintillator will have upon this application. We have performed measurements of the degradation of the light yield and optical attenuation length of liquid scintillator and water-based liquid scintillator after irradiation by 201 MeV proton beams that deposited doses of approximately 52 Gy, 300 Gy, and 800 Gy in the scintillator. Liquid scintillator and water-based liquid scintillator (composed of 5% scintillating phase) exhibit light yield reductions of 1.74 ± 0.55 % and 1.31 ± 0.59 % after ≈ 800 Gy of proton dose, respectively. Some increased optical attenuation was observed in the irradiated samples, the measured reduction to the light yield is also due to damage to the scintillation light production. Based on our results and conservative estimates of the expected dose in a clinical context, a scintillating phantom used for proton therapy treatment plan verification would exhibit a systematic light yield reduction of approximately 0.1% after a year of operation.

  17. Laboratory studies of interplanetary dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, R. M.

    1986-01-01

    Interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) are a form of primitive extraterrestrial material. In spite of the formidable experimental problems in working with particles that are too small to be seen with the naked eye, it has proven possible to obtain considerable information concerning their properties and possible origins. Dust particles collected in the stratosphere were reviewed. These particles are the best available samples of interplanetary dust and were studied using a variety of analytical techniques.

  18. Lead carbonate scintillator materials

    DOEpatents

    Derenzo, Stephen E.; Moses, William W.

    1991-01-01

    Improved radiation detectors containing lead carbonate or basic lead carbonate as the scintillator element are disclosed. Both of these scintillators have been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to other known scintillator materials. The radiation detectors disclosed are favorably suited for use in general purpose detection and in medical uses.

  19. New interplanetary proton fluence model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feynman, Joan; Armstrong, T. P.; Dao-Gibner, L.; Silverman, S.

    1990-01-01

    A new predictive engineering model for the interplanetary fluence of protons with above 10 MeV and above 30 MeV is described. The data set used is a combination of observations made from the earth's surface and from above the atmosphere between 1956 and 1963 and observations made from spacecraft in the vicinity of earth between 1963 and 1985. The data cover a time period three times as long as the period used in earlier models. With the use of this data set the distinction between 'ordinary proton events' and 'anomalously large events' made in earlier work disappears. This permitted the use of statistical analysis methods developed for 'ordinary events' on the entire data set. The greater than 10 MeV fluences at 1 AU calculated with the new model are about twice those expected on the basis of models now in use. At energies above 30 MeV, the old and new models agree. In contrast to earlier models, the results do not depend critically on the fluence from any one event and are independent of sunspot number. Mission probability curves derived from the fluence distribution are presented.

  20. Characterization of ionospheric scintillation at a geomagnetic equatorial region station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seba, Ephrem Beshir; Gogie, Tsegaye Kassa

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we analyzed ionospheric scintillation at Bahir Dar station, Ethiopia (11.6°N, 37.38°E) using GPS-SCINDA data between August 2010 and July 2011. We found that small scale variation in TEC caused high ionospheric scintillation, rather than large scale variation. We studied the daily and monthly variations in the scintillation index S4 during this year, which showed that scintillation was a post-sunset phenomenon on equinoctial days, with high activity during the March equinox. The scintillation activity observed on solstice days was relatively low and almost constant throughout the day with low post-sunset activity levels. Our analysis of the seasonal and annual scintillation characteristics showed that intense activity occurred in March and April. We also studied the dependence of the scintillation index on the satellite elevation angle and found that scintillation was high for low angles but low for high elevation angles.

  1. Scintillation Arcs in Low-frequency Observations of the Timing-array Millisecond Pulsar PSR J0437-4715

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, N. D. R.; Ord, S. M.; Tremblay, S. E.; McSweeney, S. J.; Tingay, S. J.

    2016-02-01

    Low-frequency observations of pulsars provide a powerful means for probing the microstructure in the turbulent interstellar medium (ISM). Here we report on high-resolution dynamic spectral analysis of our observations of the timing-array millisecond pulsar PSR J0437-4715 with the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA), enabled by our recently commissioned tied-array beam processing pipeline for voltage data recorded from the high time resolution mode of the MWA. A secondary spectral analysis reveals faint parabolic arcs akin to those seen in high-frequency observations of pulsars with the Green Bank and Arecibo telescopes. Data from Parkes observations at a higher frequency of 732 MHz reveal a similar parabolic feature with a curvature that scales approximately as the square of the observing wavelength (λ2) to the MWA's frequency of 192 MHz. Our analysis suggests that scattering toward PSR J0437-4715 predominantly arises from a compact region about 115 pc from the Earth, which matches well with the expected location of the edge of the Local Bubble that envelopes the local Solar neighborhood. As well as demonstrating new and improved pulsar science capabilities of the MWA, our analysis underscores the potential of low-frequency pulsar observations for gaining valuable insights into the local ISM and for characterizing the ISM toward timing-array pulsars.

  2. Scintillator reflective layer coextrusion

    DOEpatents

    Yun, Jae-Chul; Para, Adam

    2001-01-01

    A polymeric scintillator has a reflective layer adhered to the exterior surface thereof. The reflective layer comprises a reflective pigment and an adhesive binder. The adhesive binder includes polymeric material from which the scintillator is formed. A method of forming the polymeric scintillator having a reflective layer adhered to the exterior surface thereof is also provided. The method includes the steps of (a) extruding an inner core member from a first amount of polymeric scintillator material, and (b) coextruding an outer reflective layer on the exterior surface of the inner core member. The outer reflective layer comprises a reflective pigment and a second amount of the polymeric scintillator material.

  3. High Amplitude Events in relation to Interplanetary disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Rajesh Kumar; Agarwal Mishra, Rekha

    2012-07-01

    The Sun emits the variable solar wind which interacts with the very local interstellar medium to form the heliosphere. Hence variations in solar activity strongly influence interplanetary space, from the Sun's surface out to the edge of the heliosphere. Superimposed on the solar wind are mass ejections from the Sun and/or its corona which, disturb the interplanetary medium - hence the name "interplanetary disturbances". Interplanetary disturbances are the sources of large-scale particle acceleration, of disturbances in the Earth's magnetosphere, of modulations of galactic cosmic rays in short, they are the prime focus for space weather studies. The investigation deals with the study of cosmic ray intensity, solar wind plasma and interplanetary magnetic field parameters variation due to interplanetary disturbances (magnetic clouds) during an unusual class of days i.e. high amplitude anisotropic wave train events. The high amplitude anisotropic wave train events in cosmic ray intensity has been identified using the data of ground based Goose Bay neutron monitor and studied during the period 1981-94. Even though, the occurrence of high amplitude anisotropic wave trains does not depend on the onset of interplanetary magnetic clouds. But the possibility of occurrence of these events cannot be overlooked during the periods of interplanetary magnetic cloud events. It is observed that solar wind velocity remains higher (> 300) than normal and interplanetary magnetic field B remains lower than normal on the onset of interplanetary magnetic cloud during the passage of these events. It is also noted from the superposed epoch analysis of cosmic ray intensity and geomagnetic activity for high amplitude anisotropic wave train events during the onset of interplanetary magnetic clouds that the increase in cosmic ray intensity and decrease in geomagnetic activity start not at the onset of magnetic clouds but after few days. The north south component of IMF (Bz), IMF (B), proton

  4. Discovery of nuclear tracks in interplanetary dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, J. P.; Brownlee, D. E.

    1984-01-01

    Prior to capture by the Earth's atmosphere individual interplanetary dust particles (IDP's) have allegedly spent up to 10 to the 5th power years as discrete bodies within the interplanetary medium. Observation of tracks in IDP's in the form of solar flare tracks would provide hitherto unknown data about micrometeorites such as: (1) whether an IDP existed in space as an individual particle or as part of a larger meteroid; (2) the degree to which a particle was heated during the trauma of atmospheric entry; (3) residence time of an IDP within the interplanetary medium; and (4) possible hints as to the pre-accretional exposure of component mineral grains to solar or galactic irradiation. Using transmission electron microscopy tracks in several micrometeorites have been successfully identified. All of the studied particles had been retrieved from the stratosphere by U-2 aircraft. Three pristine IDP's (between 5 and 15 micro m diameter) have so far been searched for solar flare tracks, and they have been found in the two smaller particles U2-20B11 (11 micro m) and U2-20B37 (8 micro m).

  5. Dusty Plasma Effects in the Interplanetary Medium?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Ingrid; Issautier, Karine; Meyer-Vernet, Nicole; Le Chat, Gaétan; Czechowski, Andrzej; Zaslavsky, Arnaud; Zouganelis, Yannis; Belheouane, Soraya

    Cosmic dust particles exist in a variety of compositions and sizes in the interplanetary medium. There is little direct information on the composition, but those interplanetary dust particles that are collected in the upper Earth’s atmosphere and can be studied in the laboratory typically have an irregular, sometimes porous structure on scales <100 nm. They contain magnesium-rich silicates and silicon carbide, iron-nickel and iron-sulfur compounds, calcium- and aluminum oxides, and chemical compounds that contain a large mass fraction of carbon (e.g. carbonaceous species). A fraction of the dust originates from comets, but because of their bulk material temperature of about 280 K near 1 AU, most icy compounds have disappeared. The dust particles are embedded in the solar wind, a hot plasma with at 1 AU kinetic temperatures around 100 000 K and flow direction nearly radial outward from the Sun at supersonic bulk velocities around 400 km/s. Since the dust particles carry an electric surface charge they are subject to electromagnetic forces and the nanodust particles are efficiently accelerated to velocities of order of solar wind speed. The acceleration of the nanodust is similar, but not identical to the formation of pick-up ions. The S/WAVES radio wave instrument on STEREO measured a flux of nanodust at 1 AU [1]. The nanodust probably forms in the region inward of 1 AU and is accelerated by the solar wind as discussed. We also discuss the different paths of dust - plasma interactions in the interplanetary medium and their observations with space experiments. Comparing these interactions we show that the interplanetary medium near 1 AU can in many cases be described as “dust in plasma" rather than "dusty plasma”. [1] S. Belheouane, N. Meyer-Vernet, K. Issautier, G. Le Chat, A. Zaslavsky, Y. Zouganelis, I. Mann, A. Czechowski: Dynamics of nanoparticles detected at 1 AU by S/WAVES onboard STEREO spacecraft, in this session.

  6. Radio scintillations observed during atmospheric occultations of Voyager: Internal gravity waves at Titan and magnetic field orientations at Jupiter and Saturn. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinson, D. P.

    1983-01-01

    The refractive index of planetary atmospheres at microwave frequencies is discussed. Physical models proposed for the refractive irregularities in the ionosphere and neutral atmosphere serve to characterize the atmospheric scattering structures, and are used subsequently to compute theoretical scintillation spectra for comparison with the Voyager occultation measurements. A technique for systematically analyzing and interpreting the signal fluctuations observed during planetary occultations is presented and applied to process the dual-wavelength data from the Voyager radio occultations by Jupiter, Saturn, and Titan. Results concerning the plasma irregularities in the upper ionospheres of Jupiter and Saturn are reported. The measured orientation of the irregularities is used to infer the magnetic field direction at several locations in the ionospheres of these two planets; the occultation measurements conflict with the predictions of Jovian magnetic field models, but generally confirm current models of Saturn's field. Wave parameters, including the vertical fluxes of energy and momentum, are estimated, and the source of the internal gravity waves discovered in Titan's upper atmosphere is considered.

  7. Interplanetary Microlaser Transponders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degnan, John J.

    1999-01-01

    The feasibility of an asynchronous (i.e. independently firing) interplanetary laser transponder, capable of ranging between Earth and Mars and using the automated SLR2000 Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) system as an Earth base station, has been suggested. Since that time, we have received a small amount of discretionary funding to further explore the transponder concept and to develop and test an engineering breadboard. Candidate operational scenarios for acquiring and tracking the opposite laser terminal over interplanetary distances have been developed, and breadboard engineering parameters were chosen to reflect the requirements of an Earth-Mars link Laboratory tests have been devised to simulate the Earth- Mars link between two independent SLR2000 transceivers and to demonstrate the transfer of range and time in single photon mode. The present paper reviews the concept of the asynchronous microlaser transponder, the transponder breadboard design, an operational scenario recently developed for an asteroid rendezvous, and the laboratory test setup. The optical head of the transponder breadboard fits within a cylinder roughly 15 cm in diameter and 32 cm in length and is mounted in a commercial two axis gimbal driven by two computer-controlled stepper motors which allows the receiver optical axis to be centered on a simulated Earth image. The optical head is built around a small optical bench which supports a 14.7 cm diameter refractive telescope, a prototype 2 kHz SLR2000 microlaser transmitter, a quadrant microchannel plate photomultiplier (MCP/PMT), a CCD array camera, spatial and spectral filters, assorted lenses and mirrors, and protective covers and sun shields. The microlaser is end-pumped by a fiber-coupled diode laser array. An annular mirror is employed as a passive transmit/receive (T/R) switch in an aperture-sharing arrangement wherein the transmitted beam passes through the central hole and illuminates only the central 2.5 cm of the common telescope

  8. Interplanetary sector boundaries, 1971 - 1973

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, L.; Burlaga, L. F.

    1979-01-01

    Eighteen interplanetary sector boundary crossings observed at 1 AU by the magnetometer on the IMP-6 spacecraft are discussed. The events were examined on many different time scales ranging from days on either side of the boundary to high resolution measurements of 12.5 vectors per second. Two categories of boundaries were found, one group being relatively thin and the other being thick. In many cases the field vector rotated in a plane from one polarity to the other. Only two of the transitions were null sheets. Using the minimum variance analysis to determine the normals to the plane of rotation, and assuming that this is the same as the normal to the sector boundary surface, it was found that the normals were close to the ecliptic plane. An analysis of tangential discontinuities contained in 4-day periods about the events showed that their orientations were generally not related to the orientations of the sector boundary surface, but rather their characteristics were about the same as those for discontinuities outside the sector boundaries.

  9. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of scintillation processes in NaI(Tl)

    SciTech Connect

    Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Wang, Zhiguo; Williams, Richard; Grim, Joel; Gao, Fei

    2014-04-26

    Developing a comprehensive understanding of the processes that govern the scintillation behavior of inorganic scintillators provides a pathway to optimize current scintillators and allows for the science-driven search for new scintillator materials. Recent experimental data on the excitation density dependence of the light yield of inorganic scintillators presents an opportunity to incorporate parameterized interactions between excitations in scintillation models and thus enable more realistic simulations of the nonproportionality of inorganic scintillators. Therefore, a kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) model of elementary scintillation processes in NaI(Tl) is developed in this work to simulate the kinetics of scintillation for a range of temperatures and Tl concentrations as well as the scintillation efficiency as a function of excitation density. The ability of the KMC model to reproduce available experimental data allows for elucidating the elementary processes that give rise to the kinetics and efficiency of scintillation observed experimentally for a range of conditions.

  10. Scintillation Effects on Space Shuttle GPS Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, John L.; Kramer, Leonard

    2001-01-01

    Irregularities in ionospheric electron density result in variation in amplitude and phase of Global Positioning System (GPS) signals, or scintillation. GPS receivers tracking scintillated signals may lose carrier phase or frequency lock in the case of phase sc intillation. Amplitude scintillation can cause "enhancement" or "fading" of GPS signals and result in loss of lock. Scintillation can occur over the equatorial and polar regions and is a function of location, time of day, season, and solar and geomagnetic activity. Mid latitude regions are affected only very rarely, resulting from highly disturbed auroral events. In the spring of 1998, due to increasing concern about scintillation of GPS signals during the upcoming solar maximum, the Space Shuttle Program began to assess the impact of scintillation on Collins Miniaturized Airborne GPS Receiver (MAGR) units that are to replace Tactical Air Control and Navigation (TACAN) units on the Space Shuttle orbiters. The Shuttle Program must determine if scintillation effects pose a threat to safety of flight and mission success or require procedural and flight rule changes. Flight controllers in Mission Control must understand scintillation effects on GPS to properly diagnose "off nominal" GPS receiver performance. GPS data from recent Space Shuttle missions indicate that the signals tracked by the Shuttle MAGR manifest scintillation. Scintillation is observed as anomalous noise in velocity measurements lasting for up to 20 minutes on Shuttle orbit passes and are not accounted for in the error budget of the MAGR accuracy parameters. These events are typically coincident with latitude and local time occurrence of previously identified equatorial spread F within about 20 degrees of the magnetic equator. The geographic and seasonal history of these events from ground-based observations and a simple theoretical model, which have potential for predicting events for operational purposes, are reviewed.

  11. Energy resolution of scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moszyński, M.; Syntfeld-Każuch, A.; Swiderski, L.; Grodzicka, M.; Iwanowska, J.; Sibczyński, P.; Szczęśniak, T.

    2016-01-01

    According to current knowledge, the non-proportionality of the light yield of scintillators appears to be a fundamental limitation of energy resolution. A good energy resolution is of great importance for most applications of scintillation detectors. Thus, its limitations are discussed below; which arise from the non-proportional response of scintillators to gamma rays and electrons, being of crucial importance to the intrinsic energy resolution of crystals. The important influence of Landau fluctuations and the scattering of secondary electrons (δ-rays) on intrinsic resolution is pointed out here. The study on undoped NaI and CsI at liquid nitrogen temperature with a light readout by avalanche photodiodes strongly suggests that the non-proportionality of many crystals is not their intrinsic property and may be improved by selective co-doping. Finally, several observations that have been collected in the last 15 years on the influence of the slow components of light pulses on energy resolution suggest that more complex processes are taking place in the scintillators. This was observed with CsI(Tl), CsI(Na), ZnSe(Te), and undoped NaI at liquid nitrogen temperature and, finally, for NaI(Tl) at temperatures reduced below 0 °C. A common conclusion of these observations is that the highest energy resolution, and particularly intrinsic resolution measured with the scintillators, characterized by two or more components of the light pulse decay, is obtainable when the spectrometry equipment integrates the whole light of the components. In contrast, the slow components observed in many other crystals degrade the intrinsic resolution. In the limiting case, afterglow could also be considered as a very slow component that spoils the energy resolution. The aim of this work is to summarize all of the above observations by looking for their origin.

  12. Critical component of the interplanetary magnetic field responsible for large geomagnetic effects in the polar cap.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friis-Christensen, E.; Lassen, K.; Wilhjelm, J.; Wilcox, J. M.; Gonzalez, W.; Colburn, D. S.

    1972-01-01

    An observed influence of the interplanetary magnetic-sector structure on the geomagnetic variations in the polar cap appears to be due to the component of the interplanetary magnetic field near the ecliptic perpendicular to the earth-sun direction. This suggests that the observed effect on the ground originates in the front of the magnetosphere.

  13. Critical component of the interplanetary magnetic field responsible for large geomagnetic effects in the polar cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friis-Christensen, E.; Lassen, K.; Wilhjelm, J.; Wilcox, J. M.; Gonzalez, W.; Colburn, D. S.

    1972-01-01

    An observed influence is studied of the interplanetary magnetic sector structure on the geomagnetic variations in the polar cap which appears to be due to the component of the interplanetary magnetic field near the ecliptic perpendicular to the earth-sun direction. It is suggested that the observed effect on the ground originates in the front of the magnetosphere.

  14. Worst-Case GPS Scintillations on the Ground Estimated from Radio Occultation Observations of FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC During 2007-2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J. Y.; Chen, S. P.; Yeh, W. H.; Tsai, H. F.; Rajesh, P. K.

    2016-07-01

    The FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC (F3/C) satellite probes the S4 scintillation index profile of GPS signals by using the radio occultation (RO) technique. In this study, for practical use on the Earth's surface, a method is developed to convert and integrate the probed RO S4 index, so obtaining the scintillation on the ground. To estimate the worst case, the maximum value on each profile probed by F3/C, which is termed S4max, is isolated. The isolated data are further used to construct the global three-dimensional distributions of S4max for various local times, seasons, solar activities, and locations. The converted S4max for the first time estimates the global distribution of ionospheric scintillations in the GPS L1 band C/A code signal on the ground. The results show that the worst-case scintillations appear within the low-latitude region of ±30°N, peaking around ±20°N magnetic latitude; they begin at 1900 MLT, reach their maximum at 2100 MLT, and vanish by about 0200-0300 MLT. The most pronounced low-latitude scintillation occurs over the South American and African sectors.

  15. Density fluctuations in solar wind flow types at 1 AU: Comparison to Doppler scintillation measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huddleston, D. E.; Woo, R.; Neugebauer, M.

    1995-01-01

    Density fluctuations with periods 10 minutes to 1 hour have been investigated in ISEE 3 plasma measurements of solar wind flows at l AU. Coronal hole, interstream, plasma sheet, coronal mass ejection, and interaction region flow types are considered. The ISEE 3 results support the interpretation of the large-scale variations in density fluctuations observed by Doppler scintillation measurement techniques inside 0.2 AU. The highest absolute and relative density fluctuations occur ahead of and within the plasma from coronal mass ejections, with the maximum values occurring between the associated interplanetary shocks and the driver gas. For the quasi-stationary solar wind, density and relative density fluctuations are highest around the heliospheric current sheet and lowest in the high-speed coronal flow. Superposed epoch analysis shows that the region of enhanced density fluctuations and its abrupt boundaries observed in the vicinity of the heliospheric current sheet near the Sun persists to l AU, providing further support for the filamentary nature of the extensions of coronal streamers. The results of this study confirm the advantages of using density fluctuations rather than density as a tracer of solar wind flows with differing origins at the Sun and as a detector of propagating interplanetary disturbances.

  16. Equatorial scintillations: advances since ISEA-6

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    Our understanding of the morphology of equatorial scintillations has advanced due to more intensive observations at the equatorial anomaly locations in the different longitude zones. The unmistakable effect of the sunspot cycle in controlling irregularity belt width and electron concentration responsible for strong scintillation in the controlling the magnitude of scintillations has been recognized by interpreting scintillation observations inthe light of realistic models of total electron content at various longitudes. A hypothesis based on the alignment of the solar terminator with the geomagnetic flux tubes as an indicator of enhanced scintillation occurrence and another based on the influence of a transequatorial thermospheric neutral wind have been postulated to describe the observed longitudinal variation. A distinct class of equatorial irregularities known as the bottomside sinusoidal (BSS) type was identified. These irregularities occur in very large patches, sometimes in excess of several thousand kilometers in the E-W direction and are associated with frequency spread on ionograms. Scintillations caused by such irregularities exist only in the VHF band, exhibit Fresnel oscillations in intensity spectra and are found to give rise to extremely long durations (approx. several hours) of uninterrrupted scintillations.

  17. Towards a new model of the interplanetary meteoroid environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dikarev, Valeri; Jehn, Rüdiger; Grün, Eberhard

    Improved models of the interplanetary meteoroid environment enjoy the interest of both spacecraft engineers and dust researchers. The engineers need it for risk assessments for their spacecraft instruments. Modelling dynamical and collisional evolution of interplanetary dust should lead to a match with observations, and an empirical model can be a good mediator between physical models and sparse observational data. Our current effort is directed towards the construction of a new model of the interplanetary meteoroid environment based on a number of observational data sets including in-situ dust flux measurements onboard spacecraft, radar meteor surveys and thermal emission of zodiacal dust. In contrast to earlier models, we use long-term particle dynamics to define populations for the new model. Based on these populations, we have constructed a prototype model which reasonably fits in-situ impact counts by Galileo and Ulysses dust experiments.

  18. Polarization of the Interplanetary Dust Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasue, J.; Levasseur-Regourd, A. C.; Hadamcik, E.

    2015-12-01

    The interplanetary dust cloud is visible through its scattered light (the zodiacal light) at visible wavelengths. Brightness observations lead to equilibrium temperature and albedo of the particles and their variation as a function of the heliocentric distance. The light scattered by this optically thin medium is linearly polarized with negative values of the degree of linear polarization, PQ, in the backscattering region. We will review the zodiacal light photopolarimetric observations from the whole line-of-sight integrated values to the local values retrieved by inversion. Whenever available, the local PQ variation as a function of the phase angle presents a phase curve with a small negative branch and large positive branch similar to comets or asteroids. PQ does not seem to show a wavelength variation. The maximum of polarization decreases with decreasing heliocentric distance. A circular polarization signal may be present in parts of the sky. Both numerical simulations and laboratory experiments of light scattering by irregular particles have been performed to constrain the interplanetary dust properties based on their polarimetric signature. These studies indicate that mixtures of low-absorption (Mg-silicates) and high-absorption (carbonaceous) particles can explain the intensity and polarimetric observations of the zodiacal cloud. The variations with the heliocentric distance may be due to decreasing carbonaceous content of the dust cloud. Such models would favor a significant proportion of aggregates and absorbing particles in the interplanetary dust medium, indicative of a major cometary dust contribution. The exact origin (asteroidal, cometary, interstellar) and physical properties of the dust particles contributing to the zodiacal cloud is still debated and will be more constrained with future observations. New high-resolution systems will monitor the zodiacal light from the ground and new results are expected from upcoming space missions.

  19. Shifting scintillator neutron detector

    SciTech Connect

    Clonts, Lloyd G; Cooper, Ronald G; Crow, Jr., Morris Lowell; Hannah, Bruce W; Hodges, Jason P; Richards, John D; Riedel, Richard A

    2014-03-04

    Provided are sensors and methods for detecting thermal neutrons. Provided is an apparatus having a scintillator for absorbing a neutron, the scintillator having a back side for discharging a scintillation light of a first wavelength in response to the absorbed neutron, an array of wavelength-shifting fibers proximate to the back side of the scintillator for shifting the scintillation light of the first wavelength to light of a second wavelength, the wavelength-shifting fibers being disposed in a two-dimensional pattern and defining a plurality of scattering plane pixels where the wavelength-shifting fibers overlap, a plurality of photomultiplier tubes, in coded optical communication with the wavelength-shifting fibers, for converting the light of the second wavelength to an electronic signal, and a processor for processing the electronic signal to identify one of the plurality of scattering plane pixels as indicative of a position within the scintillator where the neutron was absorbed.

  20. Lead carbonate scintillator materials

    DOEpatents

    Derenzo, S.E.; Moses, W.W.

    1991-05-14

    Improved radiation detectors containing lead carbonate or basic lead carbonate as the scintillator element are disclosed. Both of these scintillators have been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to other known scintillator materials. The radiation detectors disclosed are favorably suited for use in general purpose detection and in medical uses. 3 figures.

  1. Finite Time Shock Acceleration at Interplanetary Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Channok, C.; Ruffolo, D.; Desai, M. I.; Mason, G. M.

    2004-05-01

    Observations of energetic ion acceleration at interplanetary shocks sometimes indicate a spectral rollover at ˜ 0.1 to 1 MeV nucl-1. This rollover is not well explained by finite shock width or thickness effects. At the same time, a typical timescale of diffusive shock acceleration is several days, implying that the process of shock acceleration at an interplanetary shock near Earth usually gives only a mild increase in energy to an existing seed particle population. This is consistent with a recent analysis of ACE observations that argues for a seed population at substantially higher energies than the solar wind. Therefore an explanation of typical spectra of interplanetary shock-accelerated ions requires a theory of finite-time shock acceleration, which for long times (or an unusually fast acceleration timescale) tends to the steady-state result of a power-law spectrum. We present analytic and numerical models of finite-time shock acceleration. For a given injection momentum p0, after a very short time there is only a small boost in momentum, at intermediate times the spectrum is a power law with a hump and steep cutoff at a critical momentum, and at longer times the critical momentum increases and the spectrum approaches the steady-state power law. The composition dependence of the critical momentum is different from that obtained for other cutoff mechanisms. The results are compared with observed spectra. Work in Thailand was supported by the Commission for Higher Education, the Rachadapisek Sompoj Fund of Chulalongkorn University, and the Thailand Research Fund. Work at the University of Maryland was supported by NASA contract NAS5-30927 and NASA grant PC 251428.

  2. Search Coil vs. Fluxgate Magnetometer Measurements at Interplanetary Shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, L.B., III

    2012-01-01

    We present magnetic field observations at interplanetary shocks comparing two different sample rates showing significantly different results. Fluxgate magnetometer measurements show relatively laminar supercritical shock transitions at roughly 11 samples/s. Search coil magnetometer measurements at 1875 samples/s, however, show large amplitude (dB/B as large as 2) fluctuations that are not resolved by the fluxgate magnetometer. We show that these fluctuations, identified as whistler mode waves, would produce a significant perturbation to the shock transition region changing the interpretation from laminar to turbulent. Thus, previous observations of supercritical interplanetary shocks classified as laminar may have been under sampled.

  3. The Distribution of Interplanetary Dust between 0.96 and 1.04 au as Inferred from Impacts on the STEREO Spacecraft Observed by the Heliospheric Imagers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, C. J.; Davis, J. A.; Meyer-Vernet, Nicole; Crothers, S.; Lintott, C.; Smith, A.; Bamford, S.; Baeten, E. M. L.; SaintCyr, O. C.; Campbell-Brown, M.; Skelt, A.; Kaiser, M.

    2012-01-01

    The distribution of dust in the ecliptic plane between 0.96 and 1.04 au has been inferred from impacts on the two Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) spacecraft through observation of secondary particle trails and unexpected off-points in the heliospheric imager (HI) cameras. This study made use of analysis carried out by members of a distributed webbased citizen science project Solar Stormwatch. A comparison between observations of the brightest particle trails and a survey of fainter trails shows consistent distributions. While there is no obvious correlation between this distribution and the occurrence of individual meteor streams at Earth, there are some broad longitudinal features in these distributions that are also observed in sources of the sporadic meteor population. The different position of the HI instrument on the two STEREO spacecraft leads to each sampling different populations of dust particles. The asymmetry in the number of trails seen by each spacecraft and the fact that there are many more unexpected off-points in the HI-B than in HI-A indicates that the majority of impacts are coming from the apex direction. For impacts causing off-points in the HI-B camera, these dust particles are estimated to have masses in excess of 10 (exp-17) kg with radii exceeding 0.1 µm. For off-points observed in the HI-A images, which can only have been caused by particles travelling from the anti-apex direction, the distribution is consistent with that of secondary 'storm' trails observed by HI-B, providing evidence that these trails also result from impacts with primary particles from an anti-apex source. Investigating the mass distribution for the off-points of both HI-A and HI-B, it is apparent that the differential mass index of particles from the apex direction (causing off-points in HI-B) is consistently above 2. This indicates that the majority of the mass is within the smaller particles of this population. In contrast, the differential mass

  4. Investigation of interplanetary dust from out-of-ecliptic space probes. [astronomical models of interplanetary dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fechtig, H.; Giese, R. H.; Hanner, M. S.; Zook, H. A.

    1976-01-01

    Measurements of interplanetary dust via zodiacal light observations and direct detection are discussed for an out-of-ecliptic space probe. Particle fluxes and zodiacal light brightnesses were predicted for three models of the dust distribution. These models predict that most of the information will be obtained at space probe distances less than 1 A.U. from the ecliptic plane. Joint interpretation of the direct particle measurements and the zodiacal light data can yield the best knowledge of the three-dimensional particle dynamics, spatial distribution, and physical characteristics of the interplanetary dust. Such measurements are important for an understanding of the origin and role of the dust in relation to meteoroids, asteroids, and comets, as well as the interaction of the dust with solar forces.

  5. Microstructure of the Interplanetary Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.

    1972-01-01

    High time resolution measurements of the interplanetary magnetic field and plasma reveal a complex microstructure which includes hydromagnetic wave and discontinuities. The identification of hydromagnetic waves and discontinuities, their statistical properties, their relation to large-scale structure, and their relative contribution to power spectra are discussed.

  6. Interplanetary Trajectories, Encke Method (ITEM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitlock, F. H.; Wolfe, H.; Lefton, L.; Levine, N.

    1972-01-01

    Modified program has been developed using improved variation of Encke method which avoids accumulation of round-off errors and avoids numerical ambiguities arising from near-circular orbits of low inclination. Variety of interplanetary trajectory problems can be computed with maximum accuracy and efficiency.

  7. Three-dimensional Features of the Outer Heliosphere due to Coupling between the Interstellar and Interplanetary Magnetic Fields. IV. Solar Cycle Model Based on Ulysses Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogorelov, N. V.; Suess, S. T.; Borovikov, S. N.; Ebert, R. W.; McComas, D. J.; Zank, G. P.

    2013-07-01

    The solar cycle has a profound influence on the solar wind (SW) interaction with the local interstellar medium (LISM) on more than one timescales. Also, there are substantial differences in individual solar cycle lengths and SW behavior within them. The presence of a slow SW belt, with a variable latitudinal extent changing within each solar cycle from rather small angles to 90°, separated from the fast wind that originates at coronal holes substantially affects plasma in the inner heliosheath (IHS)—the SW region between the termination shock (TS) and the heliopause (HP). The solar cycle may be the reason why the complicated flow structure is observed in the IHS by Voyager 1. In this paper, we show that a substantial decrease in the SW ram pressure observed by Ulysses between the TS crossings by Voyager 1 and 2 contributes significantly to the difference in the heliocentric distances at which these crossings occurred. The Ulysses spacecraft is the source of valuable information about the three-dimensional and time-dependent properties of the SW. Its unique fast latitudinal scans of the SW regions make it possible to create a solar cycle model based on the spacecraft in situ measurements. On the basis of our analysis of the Ulysses data over the entire life of the mission, we generated time-dependent boundary conditions at 10 AU from the Sun and applied our MHD-neutral model to perform a numerical simulation of the SW-LISM interaction. We analyzed the global variations in the interaction pattern, the excursions of the TS and the HP, and the details of the plasma and magnetic field distributions in the IHS. Numerical results are compared with Voyager data as functions of time in the spacecraft frame. We discuss solar cycle effects which may be reasons for the recent decrease in the TS particles (ions accelerated to anomalous cosmic-ray energies) flux observed by Voyager 1.

  8. THREE-DIMENSIONAL FEATURES OF THE OUTER HELIOSPHERE DUE TO COUPLING BETWEEN THE INTERSTELLAR AND INTERPLANETARY MAGNETIC FIELDS. IV. SOLAR CYCLE MODEL BASED ON ULYSSES OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Pogorelov, N. V.; Zank, G. P.; Suess, S. T.; Borovikov, S. N.; Ebert, R. W.; McComas, D. J.

    2013-07-20

    The solar cycle has a profound influence on the solar wind (SW) interaction with the local interstellar medium (LISM) on more than one timescales. Also, there are substantial differences in individual solar cycle lengths and SW behavior within them. The presence of a slow SW belt, with a variable latitudinal extent changing within each solar cycle from rather small angles to 90 Degree-Sign , separated from the fast wind that originates at coronal holes substantially affects plasma in the inner heliosheath (IHS)-the SW region between the termination shock (TS) and the heliopause (HP). The solar cycle may be the reason why the complicated flow structure is observed in the IHS by Voyager 1. In this paper, we show that a substantial decrease in the SW ram pressure observed by Ulysses between the TS crossings by Voyager 1 and 2 contributes significantly to the difference in the heliocentric distances at which these crossings occurred. The Ulysses spacecraft is the source of valuable information about the three-dimensional and time-dependent properties of the SW. Its unique fast latitudinal scans of the SW regions make it possible to create a solar cycle model based on the spacecraft in situ measurements. On the basis of our analysis of the Ulysses data over the entire life of the mission, we generated time-dependent boundary conditions at 10 AU from the Sun and applied our MHD-neutral model to perform a numerical simulation of the SW-LISM interaction. We analyzed the global variations in the interaction pattern, the excursions of the TS and the HP, and the details of the plasma and magnetic field distributions in the IHS. Numerical results are compared with Voyager data as functions of time in the spacecraft frame. We discuss solar cycle effects which may be reasons for the recent decrease in the TS particles (ions accelerated to anomalous cosmic-ray energies) flux observed by Voyager 1.

  9. Interplanetary particles and fields, November 22 to December 6, 1977 - Helios, Voyager and Imp observations between 0.6 and 1.6 AU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L.; Lepping, R.; Weber, R.; Armstrong, T.; Goodrich, C.; Sullivan, J.; Gurnett, D.; Kellogg, P.; Keppler, E.; Mariani, F.

    1980-01-01

    The paper presents a wealth of data obtained at approximately 0.6, 1, and 1.6 AU by Helios 1 and 2, Voyager 1 and 2, and Imp 7 and 8, describing the evolution and interactions of particles, flows, and fields in the period 22 November to 6 December 1977. Three flow systems were observed in the period under consideration: (1) a corotating stream and a stream interface associated with a coronal hole; (2) a shock wave and an energetic particle event associated with a 2B flare; and (3) an isolated shock wave of uncertain origin. These phenomena are discussed in some detail.

  10. Magnetic Reconnection in Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fermo, R. L.; Opher, M.; Drake, J. F.

    2014-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a ubiquitous phenomenon in many varied space and astrophysical plasmas, and as such plays an important role in the dynamics of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs). It is widely regarded that reconnection is instrumental in the formation and ejection of the initial CME flux rope, but reconnection also continues to affect the dynamics as it propagates through the interplanetary medium. For example, reconnection on the leading edge of the ICME, by which it interacts with the interplanetary medium, leads to flux erosion. However, recent in situ observations by Gosling et al. found signatures of reconnection exhausts in the interior. In light of this data, we consider the stability properties of systems with this flux rope geometry with regard to their minimum energy Taylor state. Variations from this state will result in the magnetic field relaxing back towards the minimum energy state, subject to the constraints that the toroidal flux and magnetic helicity remain invariant. In reversed field pinches, this relaxation is mediated by reconnection in the interior of the system, as has been shown theoretically and experimentally. By treating the ICME flux rope in a similar fashion, we show analytically that the the elongation of the flux tube cross section in the latitudinal direction will result in a departure from the Taylor state. The resulting relaxation of the magnetic field causes reconnection to commence in the interior of the ICME, in agreement with the observations of Gosling et al. We present MHD simulations in which reconnection initiates at a number of rational surfaces, and ultimately produces a stochastic magnetic field. If the time scales for this process are shorter than the propagation time to 1 AU, this result explains why many ICME flux ropes no longer exhibit the smooth, helical flux structure characteristic of a magnetic cloud.

  11. Observed distribution functions of H, He, C, O, and Fe in corotating energetic particle streams: Implications for interplanetary acceleration and propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gloeckler, G.; Hovestadt, D.; Fisk, L. A.

    1979-01-01

    Distribution functions for H, He, C, O, and Fe derived from our IMP 8 measurements of approximately 0.15 to approximately 8 MeV/nucleon particles in three corotating streams observed near earth are shown to have a simple exponential dependence on the particle speed. The e-folding speed, v sub o, is typically 0.01c, is found to be the same for the distribution functions of all elements examined, and varies little from one corotating event to the next. The relative abundances of energetic particles in these events resemble most closely the solar coronal composition and, thus, presumably that of the solar wind. These results may imply that the acceleration of these particles, which occurs in corotating interaction regions at several AU from the sun, is by a statistical process.

  12. USING COORDINATED OBSERVATIONS IN POLARIZED WHITE LIGHT AND FARADAY ROTATION TO PROBE THE SPATIAL POSITION AND MAGNETIC FIELD OF AN INTERPLANETARY SHEATH

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Ming; Feng, Xueshang; Liu, Ying D.; Davies, Jackie A.; Harrison, Richard A.; Owens, Mathew J.; Davis, Chris J.

    2013-11-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) can be continuously tracked through a large portion of the inner heliosphere by direct imaging in visible and radio wavebands. White light (WL) signatures of solar wind transients, such as CMEs, result from Thomson scattering of sunlight by free electrons and therefore depend on both viewing geometry and electron density. The Faraday rotation (FR) of radio waves from extragalactic pulsars and quasars, which arises due to the presence of such solar wind features, depends on the line-of-sight magnetic field component B{sub ∥} and the electron density. To understand coordinated WL and FR observations of CMEs, we perform forward magnetohydrodynamic modeling of an Earth-directed shock and synthesize the signatures that would be remotely sensed at a number of widely distributed vantage points in the inner heliosphere. Removal of the background solar wind contribution reveals the shock-associated enhancements in WL and FR. While the efficiency of Thomson scattering depends on scattering angle, WL radiance I decreases with heliocentric distance r roughly according to the expression I∝r {sup –3}. The sheath region downstream of the Earth-directed shock is well viewed from the L4 and L5 Lagrangian points, demonstrating the benefits of these points in terms of space weather forecasting. The spatial position of the main scattering site r{sub sheath} and the mass of plasma at that position M{sub sheath} can be inferred from the polarization of the shock-associated enhancement in WL radiance. From the FR measurements, the local B{sub ∥sheath} at r{sub sheath} can then be estimated. Simultaneous observations in polarized WL and FR can not only be used to detect CMEs, but also to diagnose their plasma and magnetic field properties.

  13. Effects of Interplanetary Structures on the Earth's Outer Radiation Belt Dynamics Observed During September 12-26, 2014: I) Coronal Mass Ejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, V. M. C. E. S.; Alves, L. R.; Da Silva, L. A.; Sibeck, D. G.; Jauer, P. R.; Vieira, L. E. A.; Walsh, B.; Silveira, M. D.; Marchezi, J.; Rockenbach, M.; Dal Lago, A.; Mendes, O., Jr.; Tsurutani, B.; Koga, D.; Kanekal, S. G.; Baker, D. N.; Wygant, J. R.; Kletzing, C.

    2015-12-01

    Solar wind variations and magnetospheric processes result in a dynamic electron population within the outer Van Allen radiation belt, where electron energies range from several 10's to several 1000's KeV . Geomagnetic storms and various solar wind-magnetosphere interaction processes including convection cause both dramatic particle flux increase or decreases. Here we analyze the occurrence of a drop out of ~ 0.04 - 4.5 MeV electron fluxes measured by NASA's Van Allen Probes, THEMIS and NOAA's GOES during a magnetic cloud-driven geomagnetic storm which started at September 12, 2014. The ~3-day storm left a steady low flux of outer belt energetic electrons that lasted for twelve days (Figure 1). At higher energy levels, electron fluxes decreased by ~1 order of magnitude throughout the vast region from L* ~3 to 6.6. Simulation of a 2 MeV relativistic electron orbit, with 90◦ pitch angle, during the most compressed magnetosphere period shows that magnetopause shadowing can be responsible for the electron dropout observed at radial distances larger than ~ 6 RE). Wave-particle interaction are associated with loss occurring at L < 4. We discuss the solar wind drivers, in particular the contribution of the magnetic cloud parameters for magnetospheric dynamics during the whole period analyzed, i.e., September 13-24, 2014.

  14. Phase and coherence of longitudinally separated equatorial ionospheric scintillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shume, E. B.; Mannucci, A. J.

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents the first calculation of phase and coherence of cross-wavelet transform applied on longitudinally separated VHF and L-band equatorial ionospheric scintillation. The cross-wavelet analysis has utilized scintillation observations made over equatorial South America and Christmas Island. Part of the results of this study has been reported recently in the Geophysical Research Letters by Shume and Mannucci (2013). The phase and coherence analysis were employed on pairs of scintillation observations separated by longitudes thereby to develop VHF and L-band scintillation (and equatorial spread F) forecast tools west of observation sites.

  15. Phase and coherence analysis of VHF scintillation over Christmas Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shume, E. B.; Mannucci, A. J.; Caton, R.

    2014-03-01

    This short paper presents phase and coherence data from the cross-wavelet transform applied on longitudinally separated very high frequency (VHF) equatorial ionospheric scintillation observations over Christmas Island. The phase and coherence analyses were employed on a pair of scintillation observations, namely, the east-looking and west-looking VHF scintillation monitors at Christmas Island. Our analysis includes 3 years of peak season scintillation data from 2008, 2009 (low solar activity), and 2011 (moderate solar activity). In statistically significant and high spectral coherence regions of the cross-wavelet transform, scintillation observations from the east-looking monitor lead those from the west-looking monitor by about 20 to 60 (40 ± 20) min (most frequent lead times). Using several years (seasons and solar cycle) of lead (or lag) and coherence information of the cross-wavelet transform, we envisage construction of a probability model for forecasting scintillation in the nighttime equatorial ionosphere.

  16. Interplanetary Dust Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, J. P.

    2003-12-01

    micrometeorites) containing layer silicates indicative of parent-body aqueous alteration and the more distant anhydrous P and D asteroids exhibiting no evidence of (aqueous) alteration (Gradie and Tedesco, 1982). This gradation in spectral properties presumably extends several hundred AU out to the Kuiper belt, the source region of most short-period comets, where the distinction between comets and outer asteroids may simply be one of the orbital parameters ( Luu, 1993; Brownlee, 1994; Jessberger et al., 2001). The mineralogy and petrography of meteorites provides direct confirmation of aqueous alteration, melting, fractionation, and thermal metamorphism among the inner asteroids ( Zolensky and McSween, 1988; Farinella et al., 1993; Brearley and Jones, 1998). Because the most common grains in the ISM (silicates and carbonaceous matter) are not as refractory as those found in meteorites, it is unlikely that they have survived in significant quantities in meteorites. Despite a prolonged search, not a single presolar silicate grain has yet been identified in any meteorite.Interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) are the smallest and most fine-grained meteoritic objects available for laboratory investigation (Figure 1). In contrast to meteorites, IDPs are derived from a broad range of dust-producing bodies extending from the inner main belt of the asteroids to the Kuiper belt (Flynn, 1996, 1990; Dermott et al., 1994; Liou et al., 1996). After release from their asteroidal or cometary parent bodies the orbits of IDPs evolve by Poynting-Robertson (PR) drag (the combined influence of light pressure and radiation drag) ( Dermott et al., 2001). Irrespective of the location of their parent bodies nearly all IDPs under the influence of PR drag can eventually reach Earth-crossing orbits. IDPs are collected in the stratosphere at 20-25 km altitude using NASA ER2 aircraft ( Sandford, 1987; Warren and Zolensky, 1994). Laboratory measurements of implanted rare gases, solar flare tracks ( Figure 2

  17. Association between interplanetary shock waves and delayed solar particle events.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Datlowe, D.

    1972-01-01

    In studying the propagation of energetic charged particles from a large solar flare, we can no longer regard the interplanetary medium as remaining in a steady state; disturbances in the flow of solar wind from these flares may have great effects on the observed fluxes of charged particles. Delayed particle events, also known as 'energetic storm particle' events, may exhibit an increase by an order of magnitude or greater in the flux of protons above 10 MeV over a period of the order of 6 hours. These events are seen in association with the passage of an interplanetary shock past the earth. It is proposed that the particles are accelerated locally at the time of the passage of the interplanetary blast wave.

  18. Optical spectroscopy of interplanetary dust collected in the earth's stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fraundorf, P.; Patel, R. I.; Shirck, J.; Walker, R. M.; Freeman, J. J.

    1980-01-01

    Optical absorption spectra of interplanetary dust particles 2-30 microns in size collected in the atmosphere at an altitude of 20 km by inertial impactors mounted on NASA U-2 aircraft are reported. Fourier transform absorption spectroscopy of crushed samples of the particles reveals a broad feature in the region 1300-800 kaysers which has also been found in meteorite and cometary dust spectra, and a weak iron crystal field absorption band at approximately 9800 kaysers, as is observed in meteorites. Work is currently in progress to separate the various components of the interplanetary dust particles in order to evaluate separately their contributions to the absorption.

  19. Characterizing Interplanetary Structures of Long-Lasting Ionospheric Storm Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tandoi, C.; Dong, Y.; Ngwira, C. M.; Damas, M. C.

    2015-12-01

    Geomagnetic storms can result in periods of heightened TEC (Total Electron Content) in Earth's ionosphere. These periods of change in TEC (dTEC) can have adverse impacts on a technological society, such as scintillation of radio signals used by communication and navigation satellites. However, it is unknown which exact properties of a given storm cause dTEC. We are comparing different solar wind properties that result in a significant long-lasting dTEC to see if there are any patterns that remain constant in these storms. These properties, among others, include the interplanetary magnetic field By and Bz components, the proton density, and the flow speed. As a preliminary investigation, we have studied 15 solar storms. Preliminary results will be presented. In the future, we hope to increase our sample size and analyze over 80 different solar storms, which result in significant dTEC.

  20. Scintillations of partially coherent Laguerre Gaussian beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yüceer, M.; Eyyuboğlu, H. T.; Lukin, I. P.

    2010-12-01

    Scintillations of Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) beams for weak atmospheric turbulence conditions are derived for on-axis receiver positions by using Huygens-Fresnel (HF) method in semi-analytic fashion. Numerical evaluations indicate that at the fully coherent limit, higher values of radial mode numbers will give rise to more scintillations, at medium and low partial coherence levels, particularly at longer propagation distances, scintillations will fall against rises in radial mode numbers. At small source sizes, the scintillations of LG beams having full coherence will initially rise, reaching saturation at large source sizes. For LG beams with low partial coherence levels, a steady fall toward the larger source sizes is observed. Partially coherent beams of medium levels generally exhibit a rising trend toward the large source sizes, also changing the respective positions of the related curves. Beams of low coherence levels will be less affected by the variations in the refractive index structure constant.

  1. Interplanetary magnetic field data book

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    An interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) data set is presented that is uniform with respect to inclusion of cislunar IMF data only, and which has as complete time coverage as presently possible over a full solar cycle. Macroscale phenomena in the interplanetary medium (sector structure, heliolatitude variations, solar cycle variations, etc.) and other phenomena (e.g., ground level cosmic-ray events) for which knowledge of the IMF with hourly resolution is necessary, are discussed. Listings and plots of cislunar hourly averaged IMP parameters over the period November 27, 1963, to May 17, 1974, are presented along with discussion of the mutual consistency of the IMF data used herein. The magnetic tape from which the plots and listings were generated, which is available from the National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC), is also discussed.

  2. Interplanetary Disturbances Affecting Space Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.

    2014-01-01

    The Sun somehow accelerates the solar wind, an incessant stream of plasma originating in coronal holes and some, as yet unidentified, regions. Occasionally, coronal, and possibly sub-photospheric structures, conspire to energize a spectacular eruption from the Sun which we call a coronal mass ejection (CME). These can leave the Sun at very high speeds and travel through the interplanetary medium, resulting in a large-scale disturbance of the ambient background plasma. These interplanetary CMEs (ICMEs) can drive shocks which in turn accelerate particles, but also have a distinct intrinsic magnetic structure which is capable of disturbing the Earth's magnetic field and causing significant geomagnetic effects. They also affect other planets, so they can and do contribute to space weather throughout the heliosphere. This paper presents a historical review of early space weather studies, a modern-day example, and discusses space weather throughout the heliosphere.

  3. Interplanetary Dust Particles and Asrobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molster, F. J.

    2004-07-01

    Interplanetary Dust Particles are amongst the most pristine materials of the Solar System that can be studied gore on Earth. The study of these primitive particles gives a lot of information about the evolution or our solar system and about the delivery of (pre-)biothic material on Earth. Although the sample size of IDP's is small, typically 10-9 gram, this does not prevent the study of them and several techniques are available. At the moment the possibilities fro detailed astrobiology research are limited. But with the present day evolution of the different instruments, the time for detailed astrobiology research are limited. But with the present day evolution of the different instruments, the time for detailed astrobiology research of interplanetary dust particles is near.

  4. Scintillation near the F-layer trough over Northern Europe

    SciTech Connect

    Kersley, L.; Pryse, S.E.; Russell, C.D.

    1990-05-03

    Results are presented of scintillation observations made during a two and a half year period at Lerwick in the Shetland Islands using more than 19000 passes of NNSS satellites. Examples of scintillation morphology, in the region near the scintillation boundary and the F-layer trough, for both amplitude and phase are discussed using exceedence levels for the S sub 4 and sigma sub psi indices respectively. The equatorwards advancement of the scintillation boundary in response to enhanced solar activity during the increasing phase of the solar cycle is shown to be a dominant feature in the observations.

  5. Interplanetary medium data book, appendix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, J. H.

    1977-01-01

    Computer generated listings of hourly average interplanetary plasma and magnetic field parameters are given. Parameters include proton temperature, proton density, bulk speed, an identifier of the source of the plasma data for the hour, average magnetic field magnitude and cartesian components of the magnetic field. Also included are longitude and latitude angles of the vector made up of the average field components, a vector standard deviation, and an identifier of the source of magnetic field data.

  6. The Interplanetary Exchange of Photosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cockell, Charles S.

    2008-02-01

    Panspermia, the transfer of organisms from one planet to another, either through interplanetary or interstellar space, remains speculation. However, its potential can be experimentally tested. Conceptually, it is island biogeography on an interplanetary or interstellar scale. Of special interest is the possibility of the transfer of oxygenic photosynthesis between one planet and another, as it can initiate large scale biospheric productivity. Photosynthetic organisms, which must live near the surface of rocks, can be shown experimentally to be subject to destruction during atmospheric transit. Many of them grow as vegetative cells, which are shown experimentally to be susceptible to destruction by shock during impact ejection, although the effectiveness of this dispersal filter can be shown to be mitigated by the characteristics of the cells and their local environment. Collectively these, and other, experiments reveal the particular barriers to the cross-inoculation of photosynthesis. If oxygen biosignatures are eventually found in the atmospheres of extrasolar planets, understanding the potential for the interplanetary exchange of photosynthesis will aid in their interpretation.

  7. The interplanetary exchange of photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Cockell, Charles S

    2008-02-01

    Panspermia, the transfer of organisms from one planet to another, either through interplanetary or interstellar space, remains speculation. However, its potential can be experimentally tested. Conceptually, it is island biogeography on an interplanetary or interstellar scale. Of special interest is the possibility of the transfer of oxygenic photosynthesis between one planet and another, as it can initiate large scale biospheric productivity. Photosynthetic organisms, which must live near the surface of rocks, can be shown experimentally to be subject to destruction during atmospheric transit. Many of them grow as vegetative cells, which are shown experimentally to be susceptible to destruction by shock during impact ejection, although the effectiveness of this dispersal filter can be shown to be mitigated by the characteristics of the cells and their local environment. Collectively these, and other, experiments reveal the particular barriers to the cross-inoculation of photosynthesis. If oxygen biosignatures are eventually found in the atmospheres of extrasolar planets, understanding the potential for the interplanetary exchange of photosynthesis will aid in their interpretation.

  8. Electromagnetic Whistler Precursors at Supercritical Interplanetary Shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, L. B., III

    2012-01-01

    We present observations of electromagnetic precursor waves, identified as whistler mode waves, at supercritical interplanetary shocks using the Wind search coil magnetometer. The precursors propagate obliquely with respect to the local magnetic field, shock normal vector, solar wind velocity, and they are not phase standing structures. All are right-hand polarized with respect to the magnetic field (spacecraft frame), and all but one are right-hand polarized with respect to the shock normal vector in the normal incidence frame. Particle distributions show signatures of specularly reflected gyrating ions, which may be a source of free energy for the observed modes. In one event, we simultaneously observe perpendicular ion heating and parallel electron acceleration, consistent with wave heating/acceleration due to these waves.

  9. Suprathermal protons in the interplanetary solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, C. C.; Lazarus, A. J.

    1976-01-01

    Using the Mariner 5 solar wind plasma and magnetic field data, we present observations of field-aligned suprathermal proton velocity distributions having pronounced high-energy shoulders. These observations, similar to the interpenetrating stream observations of Feldman et al. (1974), are clear evidence that such proton distributions are interplanetary rather than bow shock associated phenomena. Large Alfven speed is found to be a requirement for the occurrence of suprathermal proton distribution; further, we find the proportion of particles in the shoulder to be limited by the magnitude of the Alfven speed. It is suggested that this last result could indicate that the proton thermal anisotropy is limited at times by wave-particle interactions

  10. IPS observations of the solar wind speed out of the ecliptic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coles, W. A.; Rickett, B. J.

    1976-01-01

    Interplanetary scintillation observations from 1971-1975 show that the average solar wind speed increases away from the solar equator, with a mean gradient of 2.1 km/s per degree. These results are compared with spacecraft observations over the + or - 7 deg attainable in the ecliptic and with those deduced from comet tails. The role of temporal variations, especially those caused by latitude dependent solar wind streams, is emphasized, and this points to the need for extensive ecliptic and ground-based observations during an out-of-the-ecliptic spacecraft mission.

  11. The interplanetary gamma ray burst network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cline, T.

    The Interplanetary Gamma-Ray Burst Network (IPN) is providing gamma-ray burst (GRB) alerts and localizations at the maximum rate anticipated before the launch of the Swift mission. The arc-minute source precision of the IPN is again permitting searches for GRB afterglows in the radio and optical regimes with delays of only hours up to 2 days. The successful addition of the Mars Odyssey mission has compensated for the loss of the asteroid mission NEAR, to reconstitute a fully long- baseline interplanetary network, with Ulysses at > 5 AU and Konus-Wind and HETE-2 near the Earth. In addition to making unassisted GRB localizations that enable a renewed supply of counterpart observations, the Mars/Ulysses/Wind IPN is confirming and reinforcing GRB source localizations with HETE-2. It has also confirmed and reinforced localizations with the BeppoSAX mission before the BeppoSAX termination in May and has detected and localized both SGRs and an unusual hard x-ray transient that is neither an SGR nor a GRB. This IPN is expected to operate until at least 2004.

  12. Multi-GNSS for Ionospheric Scintillation Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, Y.

    2015-12-01

    presentation will summarize progress and current state of the event-driven multi-GNSS data collection systems, GNSS receiver architectures designed to capture and preserve scintillation features, and scintillation effects observations derived from this unique set of data and processing algorithms.

  13. Suprathermal ions upstream from interplanetary shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosling, J. T.; Bame, S. J.; Feldman, W. C.; Paschmann, G.; Sckopke, N.; Russell, C. T.

    1984-01-01

    Low energy (10 eV-30 keV) observations of suprathermal ions ahead of outward propagating interplanetary shock waves (ISQ) are reported. The data were taken with the fast plasma experiment on ISEE 1 and 2 during 17 events. Structure was more evident in the suprathermal ion distribution in the earth bow shock region than in the upstream region. Isotropic distributions were only observed ahead of ISW, although field alignment, kidney-bean distributions, ion shells in velocity space and bunches of gyrating ions were not. The data suggest that the solar wind ions are accelerated to suprathermal energies in the vicinity of the shocks, which feature low and subcritical Mach numbers at 1 AU.

  14. Suprathermal ions upstream from interplanetary shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosling, J. T.; Bame, S. J.; Feldman, W. C.; Paschmann, G.; Sckopke, N.; Russell, C. T.

    1984-07-01

    Low energy (10 eV-30 keV) observations of suprathermal ions ahead of outward propagating interplanetary shock waves (ISQ) are reported. The data were taken with the fast plasma experiment on ISEE 1 and 2 during 17 events. Structure was more evident in the suprathermal ion distribution in the earth bow shock region than in the upstream region. Isotropic distributions were only observed ahead of ISW, although field alignment, kidney-bean distributions, ion shells in velocity space and bunches of gyrating ions were not. The data suggest that the solar wind ions are accelerated to suprathermal energies in the vicinity of the shocks, which feature low and subcritical Mach numbers at 1 AU.

  15. Fine-scale characteristics of interplanetary sector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behannon, K. W.; Neubauer, F. M.; Barnstoff, H.

    1980-01-01

    The structure of the interplanetary sector boundaries observed by Helios 1 within sector transition regions was studied. Such regions consist of intermediate (nonspiral) average field orientations in some cases, as well as a number of large angle directional discontinuities (DD's) on the fine scale (time scales 1 hour). Such DD's are found to be more similar to tangential than rotational discontinuities, to be oriented on average more nearly perpendicular than parallel to the ecliptic plane to be accompanied usually by a large dip ( 80%) in B and, with a most probable thickness of 3 x 10 to the 4th power km, significantly thicker previously studied. It is hypothesized that the observed structures represent multiple traversals of the global heliospheric current sheet due to local fluctuations in the position of the sheet. There is evidence that such fluctuations are sometimes produced by wavelike motions or surface corrugations of scale length 0.05 - 0.1 AU superimposed on the large scale structure.

  16. Solar and interplanetary dynamics; Proceedings of the Symposium, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass., August 27-31, 1979

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dryer, M. (Editor); Tandberg-Hanssen, E.

    1980-01-01

    The symposium focuses on solar phenomena as the source of transient events propagating through the solar system, and theoretical and observational assessments of the dynamic processes involved in these events. The topics discussed include the life history of coronal structures and fields, coronal and interplanetary responses to long time scale phenomena, solar transient phenomena affecting the corona and interplanetary medium, coronal and interplanetary responses to short time scale phenomena, and future directions.

  17. Separation of scintillation and Cherenkov lights in linear alkyl benzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mohan; Guo, Ziyi; Yeh, Minfang; Wang, Zhe; Chen, Shaomin

    2016-09-01

    To separate scintillation and Cherenkov lights in water-based liquid scintillator detectors is a desired feature for future neutrino and proton decay experiments. Linear alkyl benzene (LAB) is one important ingredient of a water-based liquid scintillator currently under development. In this paper we report on the separation of scintillation and Cherenkov lights observed in an LAB sample. The rise and decay times of the scintillation light are measured to be (7.7 ± 3.0) ns and (36.6 ± 2.4) ns , respectively, while the full width [-3σ, 3σ] of the Cherenkov light is 12 ns and is dominated by the time resolution of the photomultiplier tubes. The scintillation light yield was measured to be (1.01 ± 0.12) ×103 photons / MeV .

  18. Interplanetary density models as inferred from solar Type III bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oppeneiger, Lucas; Boudjada, Mohammed Y.; Lammer, Helmut; Lichtenegger, Herbert

    2016-04-01

    We report on the density models derived from spectral features of solar Type III bursts. They are generated by beams of electrons travelling outward from the Sun along open magnetic field lines. Electrons generate Langmuir waves at the plasma frequency along their ray paths through the corona and the interplanetary medium. A large frequency band is covered by the Type III bursts from several MHz down to few kHz. In this analysis, we consider the previous empirical density models proposed to describe the electron density in the interplanetary medium. We show that those models are mainly based on the analysis of Type III bursts generated in the interplanetary medium and observed by satellites (e.g. RAE, HELIOS, VOYAGER, ULYSSES,WIND). Those models are confronted to stereoscopic observations of Type III bursts recorded by WIND, ULYSSES and CASSINI spacecraft. We discuss the spatial evolution of the electron beam along the interplanetary medium where the trajectory is an Archimedean spiral. We show that the electron beams and the source locations are depending on the choose of the empirical density models.

  19. A synoptic study of Doppler scintillation transients in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, Richard

    1988-01-01

    This paper conducts the first synoptic study of Doppler scintillation transients caused by interplanetary disturbances. The Doppler scintillation data used are part of the 2.3-GHz navigation data collected by the NASA Deep Space Network when tracking planetary spacecraft during 1979-1983, a period that includes solar maximum. A total of 148 separate transients covering a heliocentric distance range of 5-179 solar radii were detected, including 26 transients detected by more than one spacecraft. The frequency of occurrence was highest near the sun and decreased with radial distance, a reflection of the radial evolution of the transients and the sensitivity of the Doppler scintillation measurements to transients. Since transients can be disruptive, as was demonstrated during the encounter of Saturn by Pioneer 11 in 1979, information on Doppler scintillation transients is essential.

  20. Development of polystyrene-based scintillation materials and its mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Hidehito; Kitamura, Hisashi; Shinji, Osamu; Saito, Katashi; Shirakawa, Yoshiyuki; Takahashi, Sentaro

    2012-12-01

    Scintillation materials based on polystyrene (PS) have been investigated. Para-terphenyl was employed as a fluorescent molecule (fluor) that functions as a wavelength shifter. A clear increase in photon yield of the scintillation materials relative to the pure PS was observed, which cannot be explained by the conventional theory of scintillation mechanism. Furthermore, the photon yield increased with flour concentration in accordance with a power-law. Here we reveal the emergence of a luminescence of PS-based scintillation materials and demonstrate that their photon yields can be controlled by the fluor concentration.

  1. Scintillation Monitoring Using Asymmetry Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaikh, Muhammad Mubasshir; Mahrous, Ayman; Abdallah, Amr; Notarpietro, Riccardo

    station in Cairo, Egypt (lat= 29.8641 °, long= 31.3172 °). It was observed that the level of asymmetry was significantly increased during the main phase of the geomagnetic storm. This was due to the changes in ionization, which in turn produced large gradients along occulted ray path in the ionosphere. A very good correlation was found between the evaluated ionospheric asymmetry index and the S4 scintillation index. Additionally, the correlation between evaluated ionospheric asymmetry and errors related to the RO inversion products such as peak electron density (delta NmF2) and Vertical TEC (delta VTEC) estimates also showed promising results. This work is carried out under the framework of the TRANSMIT project (Training Research and Applications Network to Support the Mitigation of Ionospheric Threats - www.transmit-ionosphere.net). [1]Basu Sa. and Basu Su., (1981), ‘Equatorial Scintillation - A Review’, Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics, 43, p. 473. [2]Davies K., (1990), ‘Ionospheric Radio’, IEEE Electromagnetic Waves Series 31, Peter Peregrinus Ltd. [3]Spencer, P., Mitchell, C.N., (2007) ‘Imaging of fast moving electron-density structures in the polar cap’, Annals of Geophysics, vol. 50, no. 3, pp. 427-434. [4]Shaikh, M.M., Notarpietro, R., Nava, B., (2013) ‘The Impact of Spherical Symmetry Assumption on Radio Occultation Data Inversion in the Ionosphere: An Assessment Study’, Advances in Space Research, doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.asr.2013.10.025.

  2. Probabilistic Forecasting of Ionospheric Scintillation and GNSS Receiver Signal Tracking Performance at High Latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prikryl, P.; Sreeja, V.; Aquino, M.; Jayachandran, P. T.

    2012-12-01

    At high latitudes, phase scintillation occurs predominantly on the dayside in the ionospheric footprint of magnetospheric cusp and in the nightside auroral oval. A new technique of probabilistic forecast of phase scintillation occurrence relative to arrival time of high-speed solar wind (HSSW) from coronal holes and interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) has recently been proposed [Prikryl et al., 2012]. Cumulative probability distribution functions for the phase scintillation occurrence that are obtained can be specified for low and high (below- and above-median) values of various solar wind plasma parameters. Recent advances in solar wind modeling of HSSW and ICMEs combined with the probabilistic forecasting of scintillation will lead to improved operational space weather forecasting applications. Scintillation forecasting and mitigation techniques need to be developed to avoid potential costly failures of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS)-based technology in the near future, in particular during the upcoming solar maximum. GNSS receiver tracking performance during severe scintillation conditions can be assessed by the analysis of receiver phase lock loop (PLL) jitter variance. Tracking jitter variance maps [Sreeja et al, 2011] offer a potentially useful tool to provide users with expected tracking conditions, if based on scintillation prediction as proposed above. Scintillation indices are obtained from L1 GPS data collected with the Canadian High Arctic Ionospheric Network (CHAIN). Combined with high rate amplitude and phase data they can be used as input to receiver tracking models to develop scintillation mitigation techniques. References Prikryl, P., P. T. Jayachandran, S. C. Mushini, and I. G. Richardson (2012), Towards the Probabilistic Forecasting of High-Latitude GPS Phase Scintillation, Space Weather, doi:10.1029/2012SW000800, in press. Sreeja, V., M. Aquino, and Z. G. Elmas (2011), Impact of ionospheric scintillation on GNSS receiver

  3. Ionospheric Scintillation Explorer (ISX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iuliano, J.; Bahcivan, H.

    2015-12-01

    NSF has recently selected Ionospheric Scintillation Explorer (ISX), a 3U Cubesat mission to explore the three-dimensional structure of scintillation-scale ionospheric irregularities associated with Equatorial Spread F (ESF). ISX is a collaborative effort between SRI International and Cal Poly. This project addresses the science question: To what distance along a flux tube does an irregularity of certain transverse-scale extend? It has been difficult to measure the magnetic field-alignment of scintillation-scale turbulent structures because of the difficulty of sampling a flux tube at multiple locations within a short time. This measurement is now possible due to the worldwide transition to DTV, which presents unique signals of opportunity for remote sensing of ionospheric irregularities from numerous vantage points. DTV spectra, in various formats, contain phase-stable, narrowband pilot carrier components that are transmitted simultaneously. A 4-channel radar receiver will simultaneously record up to 4 spatially separated transmissions from the ground. Correlations of amplitude and phase scintillation patterns corresponding to multiple points on the same flux tube will be a measure of the spatial extent of the structures along the magnetic field. A subset of geometries where two or more transmitters are aligned with the orbital path will be used to infer the temporal development of the structures. ISX has the following broad impact. Scintillation of space-based radio signals is a space weather problem that is intensively studied. ISX is a step toward a CubeSat constellation to monitor worldwide TEC variations and radio wave distortions on thousands of ionospheric paths. Furthermore, the rapid sampling along spacecraft orbits provides a unique dataset to deterministically reconstruct ionospheric irregularities at scintillation-scale resolution using diffraction radio tomography, a technique that enables prediction of scintillations at other radio frequencies, and

  4. Solar Sources of ``Driverless'' Interplanetary Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Mäkelä, P.; Xie, H.; Akiyama, S.; Yashiro, S.

    2010-03-01

    We identify the solar sources of a large number of interplanetary (IP) shocks that do not have a discernible driver as observed by spacecraft along the Sun-Earth line. At the Sun, these ``driverless'' shocks are associated with fast and wide CMEs. Most of the CMEs were also driving shocks near the Sun, as evidenced by the association of IP type II radio bursts. Thus, all these shocks are driven by CMEs and they are not blast waves. Normally limb CMEs produce driverless shocks at 1 AU. But some disk-center CMEs also result in driverless shocks because of deflection by nearby coronal holes. We estimate the angular deflection to be in the range 20°-60°. We also compared the influence of nearby coronal holes on a set of CMEs that resulted in magnetic clouds. The influence is nearly three times larger in the case of driverless shocks, confirming the large deflection required.

  5. IPShocks: Database of Interplanetary Shock Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isavnin, Alexey; Lumme, Erkka; Kilpua, Emilia; Lotti, Mikko; Andreeova, Katerina; Koskinen, Hannu; Nikbakhsh, Shabnam

    2016-04-01

    Fast collisionless shocks are one of the key interplanetary structures, which have also paramount role for solar-terrestrial physics. In particular, coronal mass ejection driven shocks accelerate particles to high energies and turbulent post-shock flows may drive intense geomagnetic storms. We present comprehensive Heliospheric Shock Database (ipshocks.fi) developed and hosted at University of Helsinki. The database contains currently over 2000 fast forward and fast reverse shocks observed by Wind, ACE, STEREO, Helios, Ulysses and Cluster spacecraft. In addition, the database has search and sort tools based on the spacecraft, time range, and several key shock parameters (e.g., shock type, shock strength, shock angle), data plots for each shock and data download options. These features allow easy access to shocks and quick statistical analyses. All current shocks are identified visually and analysed using the same procedure.

  6. Interplanetary diffusion coefficients for cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cummings, A. C.; Stone, E. C.; Vogt, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    Information on the cosmic-ray diffusion coefficient, kappa, derived from near-earth observations of the solar modulation of galactic electron fluxes and from the near-earth power spectra of the interplanetary magnetic field, has been used to study the heliocentric radial dependence of kappa, and to derive limits on the spatial extent of the solar modulation region. Representing kappa, as a separable function of radius r and rigidity, and assumming kappa(r) proportional to r to the n-th power, we can place a limit on the power law exponent, n not greater than 1.2. The distance of the modulation boundary is a function of n, and, e.g., for n = 0, falls into the range of 6-25 AU.

  7. Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections detected by HAWC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lara, Alejandro

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) observatory is being constructed at the volcano Sierra Negra (4100 m a.s.l.) in Mexico. HAWC’s primary purpose is the study of both: galactic and extra-galactic sources of high energy gamma rays. HAWC will consist of 300 large water Cherenkov detectors (WCD), instrumented with 1200 photo-multipliers. The Data taking has already started while construction continues, with the completion projected for late 2014. The HAWC counting rate will be sensitive to cosmic rays with energies above the geomagnetic cutoff of the site (˜ 8 GV). In particular, HAWC will detect solar energetic particles known as Ground Level Enhancements (GLEs), and the effects of Coronal Mass Ejections on the galactic cosmic ray flux, known as Forbush Decreases. In this paper, we present a description of the instrument and its response to interplanetary coronal mass ejections, and other solar wind large scale structures, observed during the August-December 2013 period.

  8. Fractal structure of the interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Klein, L. W.

    1985-01-01

    Under some conditions, time series of the interplanetary magnetic field strength and components have the properties of fractal curves. Magnetic field measurements made near 8.5 AU by Voyager 2 from June 5 to August 24, 1981 were self-similar over time scales from approximately 20 sec to approximately 3 x 100,000 sec, and the fractal dimension of the time series of the strength and components of the magnetic field was D = 5/3, corresponding to a power spectrum P(f) approximately f sup -5/3. Since the Kolmogorov spectrum for homogeneous, isotropic, stationary turbulence is also f sup -5/3, the Voyager 2 measurements are consistent with the observation of an inertial range of turbulence extending over approximately four decades in frequency. Interaction regions probably contributed most of the power in this interval. As an example, one interaction region is discussed in which the magnetic field had a fractal dimension D = 5/3.

  9. Infrared Spectroscopy of Anhydrous Interplanetary Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, L. P.; Flynn, G. J.

    2003-01-01

    Infrared (IR) spectroscopy is the primary means of mineralogical analysis of materials outside our solar system. The identity and properties of circumstellar grains are inferred from spectral comparisons between astronomical observations and laboratory data from natural and synthetic materials. These comparisons have been facilitated by the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO), which obtained IR spectra from numerous astrophysical objects over a wide spectral range (out to 50/cm) where crystalline silicates and other phases have distinct features. The anhydrous interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) are particularly important comparison materials because some IDPs contain carbonaceous material with non-solar D/H and N-15/N-14 ratios and amorphous and crystalline silicates with non-solar 0- isotopic ratios, demonstrating that these IDPs contain preserved interstellar material. Here, we report on micro- Fourier transform (FT) IR spectrometry of IDPs, focusing on the inorganic components of primitive IDPs (FTIR spectra from the organic/carbonacecous materials in IDPs are described elsewhere).

  10. Interplanetary shock waves and the structure of solar wind disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hundhausen, A. J.

    1972-01-01

    Observations and theoretical models of interplanetary shock waves are reviewed, with emphasis on the large-scale characteristics of the associated solar wind disturbances and on the relationship of these disturbances to solar activity. The sum of observational knowledge indicates that shock waves propagate through the solar wind along a broad, roughly spherical front, ahead of plasma and magnetic field ejected from solar flares. Typically, the shock front reaches 1 AU about two days after its flare origin, and is of intermediate strength. Not all large flares produce observable interplanetary shock waves; the best indicator of shock production appears to be the generation of both type 2 and type 4 radio bursts by a flare. Theoretical models of shock propagation in the solar wind can account for the typically observed shock strength, transit time, and shape.

  11. Energy Transfer Based Nanocomposite Scintillator for Radiation Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslam, Soha; Sahi, Sunil; Chen, Wei; Ma, Lun; Kenarangui, Rasool

    2014-09-01

    Scintillators are the materials that emit light upon irradiation with high energy radiation like X-ray or gamma-ray. Inorganic single crystal and organic (plastic and liquid) are the two most used scintillator types. Both of these scintillator kinds have advantages and disadvantages. Inorganic single crystals are expensive and difficult to grow in desire shape and size. Also, single crystal scintillator such as NaI and CsI are very hygroscopic. On the other hand, organic scintillators have low density which limits their applications in gamma spectroscopy. Due to high quantum yield and size dependent emission, nanoparticles have attracted interested in various field of research. Here, we have studies the nanoparticles for radiation detection. We have synthesized nanoparticles of Cerium fluoride (CeF3), Zinc Oxide (ZnO), Cadmium Telluride (CdTe), Copper complex and Zinc sulfide (ZnS). We have used Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) principle to enhance the luminescence properties of nanocomposite scintillator. Nanocomposites scintillators are structurally characterized with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Optical properties are studied using Photoluminescence, UV-Visible and X-ray. Enhancements in the luminescence are observed under UV and X-ray excitation. Preliminary studies shows nanocomposite scintillators are promising for radiation detection. Scintillators are the materials that emit light upon irradiation with high energy radiation like X-ray or gamma-ray. Inorganic single crystal and organic (plastic and liquid) are the two most used scintillator types. Both of these scintillator kinds have advantages and disadvantages. Inorganic single crystals are expensive and difficult to grow in desire shape and size. Also, single crystal scintillator such as NaI and CsI are very hygroscopic. On the other hand, organic scintillators have low density which limits their applications in gamma spectroscopy. Due to high quantum

  12. Irregularity anisotropy and drifts from polar-cap scintillations during the current solar maximum

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, S.; Basu, S.; Costa, E.

    1990-05-03

    Spaced receiver scintillation measurements made at Thule, Greenland during two sunspot maximum CEDAR High Latitude Plasma Structure (HLPS) campaigns in Dec 1988 and Nov 1989 have been analyzed to yield phase and amplitude scintillation magnitude, decorrelation time, irregularity drifts and anisotropy of the ground diffraction pattern during well defined polar cap patch and sun-aligned arc events. It is found that all these parameters tend to be different in these two classes of events which are controlled by the Bz component of the interplanetary magnetic field.

  13. Magnetic Storms and Associated Interplanetary Phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsurutani, B. T.; Gonzalez, W. D.

    1996-01-01

    The physical mechanism for energy transfer from the solar wind to the magnetosphere is magnetic reconnection between the interplanetary field and the Earth's field. From Intro: It is the purpose of this paper to review the sources of such interplanetary magnetic fields distinguishing between the solar maximum and the declining phases of the solar cycle.

  14. Scintillator Measurements for SNO+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaptanoglu, Tanner; SNO+ Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    SNO+ is a neutrino detector located 2km underground in the SNOLAB facility with the primary goal of searching for neutrinoless double beta decay. The detector will be filled with a liquid scintillator target primarily composed of linear alkyl benzene (LAB). As charged particles travel through the detector the LAB produces scintillation light which is detected by almost ten thousand PMTs. The LAB is loaded with Te130, an isotope known to undergo double beta decay. Additionally, the LAB is mixed with an additional fluor and wavelength shifter to improve the light output and shift the light to a wavelength regime in which the PMTs are maximally efficient. The precise scintillator optics drastically affect the ultimate sensitivity of SNO+. I will present work being done to measure the optical properties of the SNO+ scintillator cocktail. The measured properties are used as input to a scintillation model that allows us to extrapolate to the SNO+ scale and ultimately predict the sensitivity of the experiment. Additionally, I will present measurements done to characterize the R5912 PMT, a candidate PMT for the second phase of SNO+ that provides better light collection, improved charge resolution, and a narrower spread in timing.

  15. Interplanetary meteoroid debris in LDEF metal craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brownlee, D. E.; Horz, F.; Bradley, J.

    1992-01-01

    The extraterrestrial meteoroid residue found lining craters in the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) aluminum and gold targets is highly variable in both quantity and type. In typical craters only a minor amount of residue is found and for these craters it is evident that most of the impacting projectile was ejected during crater formation. Less than 10 percent of the craters greater than 100 microns contain abundant residue consistent with survival of a major fraction of the projectile. In these cases the residue can be seen optically as a dark liner and it can easily be analyzed by SEM-EDX techniques. Because they are rare, the craters with abundant residue must be a biased sampling of the meteoroids reaching the earth. Factors that favor residue retention are low impact velocity and material properties such as high melting point. In general, the SEM-EDX observations of crater residues are consistent with the properties of chondritic meteorites and interplanetary dust particles collected in the stratosphere. Except for impacts by particles dominated by single minerals such as FeS and olivine, most of the residue compositions are in broad agreement with the major element compositions of chondrites. In most cases the residue is a thin liner on the crater floor and these craters are difficult to quantitatively analyze by EDX techniques because the electron beam excites both residue and underlying metal substrate. In favorable cases, the liner is thick and composed of vesicular glass with imbedded FeNi, sulfide and silicate grains. In the best cases of meteoroid preservation, the crater is lined with large numbers of unmelted mineral grains. The projectiles fragmented into micron sized pieces but the fragments survived without melting. In one case, the grains contain linear defects that appear to be solar flare tracks. Solar flare tracks are common properties of small interplanetary particles and their preservation during impact implies that the fragments were

  16. The interplanetary magnetic structure that guides solar relativistic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson, S.; Démoulin, P.; Dasso, S.; Klein, K.-L.

    2012-02-01

    Context. Relating in-situ measurements of relativistic solar particles to their parent activity in the corona requires understanding the magnetic structures that guide them from their acceleration site to the Earth. Relativistic particle events are observed at times of high solar activity, when transient magnetic structures such as interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) often shape the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). They may introduce interplanetary paths that are longer than nominal, and magnetic connections rooted far from the nominal Parker spiral. Aims: We present a detailed study of the IMF configurations during ten relativistic solar particle events of the 23rd activity cycle to elucidate the actual IMF configuration that guides the particles to the Earth, where they are measured by neutron monitors. Methods: We used magnetic field (MAG) and plasma parameter measurements (SWEPAM) from the ACE spacecraft and determined the interplanetary path lengths of energetic particles through a modified version of the velocity dispersion analysis based on energetic particle measurements with SoHO/ERNE. Results: We find that the majority (7/10) of the events is detected in the vicinity of an ICME. Their interplanetary path lengths are found to be longer (1.5-2.6 AU) than those of the two events propagating in the slow solar wind (1.3 AU). The longest apparent path length is found in an event within the fast solar wind, probably caused by enhanced pitch angle scattering. The derived path lengths imply that the first energetic and relativistic protons are released at the Sun at the same time as electron beam emitting type III radio bursts. Conclusions: The timing of the first high-energy particle arrival on Earth is mainly determined by the type of IMF in which the particles propagate. Initial arrival times are as expected from Parker's model in the slow solar wind, and significantly longer in or near transient structures such as ICMEs.

  17. Testing Scintillators for Homeland Security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourbeau, James; Brandt, Andrew; Kenarangui, Rasool; Weiss, Alex; Chen, Wei

    2011-10-01

    Scintillating nanoparticles have a bright future in radiation detection, especially in the area of detecting nuclear devices. As part of a UTA nanoparticle scintillator development team funded by the Department of Homeland Security, I have been developing a scintillator test stand using various radioactive sources and a Hamamatsu S3590 photodiode. I will present initial test results.

  18. The impact of interplanetary transport on the charge spectra of heavy ions accelerated in SEP events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartavykh, J.; Kovaltsov, G.; Ostryakov, V.; Droege, W.

    We investigate the effects of interplanetary propagation on charge spectra of heavy ions observed at 1 AU. A Monte-Carlo approach is applied to solve the transport equation which takes into account spatial diffusion as well as convection and adiabatic deceleration. It is shown that interplanetary propagation results in a shift of charge spectra towards lower energies due to adiabatic deceleration. This fact should be taken into account when experimental data are interpreted. A broadening of charge distributions caused by interplanetary propagation might explain rather wide charge distributions observed in a number of SEP events. We explain the available charge spectra of iron for several impulsive SEP events making use of our model of interplanetary propagation assuming different values of the mean free path.

  19. CFDP for Interplanetary Overlay Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burleigh, Scott C.

    2011-01-01

    The CCSDS (Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems) File Delivery Protocol for Interplanetary Overlay Network (CFDP-ION) is an implementation of CFDP that uses IO' s DTN (delay tolerant networking) implementation as its UT (unit-data transfer) layer. Because the DTN protocols effect automatic, reliable transmission via multiple relays, CFDP-ION need only satisfy the requirements for Class 1 ("unacknowledged") CFDP. This keeps the implementation small, but without loss of capability. This innovation minimizes processing resources by using zero-copy objects for file data transmission. It runs without modification in VxWorks, Linux, Solaris, and OS/X. As such, this innovation can be used without modification in both flight and ground systems. Integration with DTN enables the CFDP implementation itself to be very simple; therefore, very small. Use of ION infrastructure minimizes consumption of storage and processing resources while maximizing safety.

  20. Magnetic sails and interplanetary travel

    SciTech Connect

    Zubrin, R.M.; Andrews, D.G.

    1989-01-01

    A new concept, the magnetic sail, or 'magsail' is proposed which propels spacecraft by using the magnetic field generated by a loop of superconducting cable to deflect interplanetary or interstellar plasma winds. The performance of such a device is evaluated using both a plasma particle model and a fluid model, and the results of a series of investigations are presented. It is found that a magsail sailing on the solar wind at a radius of one astronautical unit can attain accelerations on the order of 0.01 m/sec squared, much greater than that available from a conventional solar lightsail, and also greater than the acceleration due to the sun's gravitational attraction. A net tangential force, or 'lift' can also be generated. Lift to drag ratios of about 0.3 appear attainable. Equations are derived whereby orbital transfers using magsail propulsion can be calculated analytically.

  1. Solar Energetic Particle transport along meandering interplanetary magnetic field lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laitinen, Timo; Kopp, Andreas; Effenberger, Frederic; Dalla, Silvia; Marsh, Mike

    2016-04-01

    Recent multi-spacecraft Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) observations have challenged the traditional view of SEP production and interplanetary transport. In several events, the SEP intensities rise fast even at 180 degree longitudinal distance from the flare location. For many events the anisotropy of the SEPs has been found to depend on the observer's longitude, being stronger at locations that are well magnetically connected to the assumed SEP source region, as compared to wider longitudinal reaches. This suggests that interplanetary transport is an important factor for the SEP cross-field extent. The traditional modelling approach, with diffusive cross-field propagation, however, requires diffusion across the mean magnetic field much faster than that supported by current theories. We study the temporal and spatial evolution of SEP intensities and anisotropy using a new SEP transport model, FP+FLRW, which incorporates field-line random walk (FLRW) into the Fokker-Planck (FP) transport modelling framework. The FP+FLRW model was introduced by Laitinen et al (2013), who found using full-orbit simulations that the cross-field propagation of particles early in an SEP event is not diffusive, but dominated by deterministic propagation along stochastically meandering turbulent field-lines. We have extended the FP+FLRW model to a Parker spiral geometry, and show that it is able to reproduce the observed fast access of SEPs to a wide range of longitudes. The observed Gaussian shaped distribution of peak intensities versus longitude, having a sigma=30-50 degrees, is reproduced already for a narrow source region, while using realistic interplanetary transport conditions. We compare the anisotropy evolution of an SEP event given by the FP+FLRW model to that given by the traditional FP approach, and discuss the implications of our findings for the SEP event origins, source width and the role of interplanetary turbulence in the interpretation of the SEP observations.

  2. Testing Gravity Using Pulsar Scintillation Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Huan; Nishizawa, Atsushi; Pen, Ue-Li

    2016-03-01

    We propose to use pulsar scintillation measurements to test predictions of alternative theories of gravity. Comparing to single-path pulsar timing measurements, the scintillation measurements can achieve a factor of 104 ~105 improvement in timing accuracy, due to the effect of multi-path interference. The self-noise from pulsar also does not affect the interference pattern, where the data acquisition timescale is 103 seconds instead of years. Therefore it has unique advantages in measuring gravitational effect or other mechanisms (at mHz and above frequencies) on light propagation. We illustrate its application in constraining scalar gravitational-wave background and measuring gravitational-wave speed, in which cases the sensitivities are greatly improved with respect to previous limits. We expect much broader applications in testing gravity with existing and future pulsar scintillation observations.

  3. Infrared spectroscopy of interplanetary dust in the laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fraundorf, P.; Patel, R. I.; Freeman, J. J.

    1981-01-01

    A mount containing three crushed chondritic interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) collected in the earth's stratosphere and subjected to infrared spectroscopic measurements shows features near 1000 and 500/cm, suggesting crystalline pyroxene rather than crystalline olivine, amorphous olivine, or meteoritic clay minerals. Chondritic IDP structural diversity and atmospheric heating effects must be considered when comparing this spectrum with interplanetary and cometary dust astrophysical spectra. TEM and infrared observations of one member of the rare subset of IDPs resembling hydrated carbonaceous chondrite matrix material shows a close infrared spectrum resemblance between 4000 and 400/cm to the C2 meteorite Murchison. TEM observations suggest that this class of particles may be used as an atmospheric entry heating-process thermometer.

  4. The solar origins of two high-latitude interplanetary disturbances

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, H.S.; Acton, L.W.; Alexander, D.; Harvey, K.L.; Kurokawa, H.; Kahler, S.; Lemen, J.R. ||||

    1995-06-01

    Two extremely similar interplanetary forward/reverse shock events, with bidirectional electron streaming were detected by Ulysses in 1994. Ground-based and Yohkoh/SXT observations show two strikingly different solar events that could be associated with them: an LDE flare on 20 Feb. 1994, and a extremely large-scale eruptive event on 14 April 1994. Both events resulted in geomagnetic storms and presumably were associated with coronal mass ejections. The sharply contrasting nature of these solar events argues against an energetic causal relationship between them and the bidirectional streaming events observed by Ulysses during its S polar passage. The authors suggest instead that for each pair of events. a common solar trigger may have caused independent instabilities leading to the solar and interplanetary phenomena.

  5. Identification of configuration and boundaries of interplanetary magnetic clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, H. Q.; Wu, D. J.; Chao, J. K.

    2006-07-01

    To study interplanetary magnetic clouds (IMCs), it is important to find their configurations and boundaries from the observed magnetic field data. This paper presents a novel method of identifying the configuration and boundaries of IMCs, wherein the interplanetary magnetic field data, which are measured in the Geocentric Solar Ecliptic (GSE) coordinate system, are converted into an IMC natural coordinate system that can more clearly display the configuration and boundaries of the IMC as a flux tube. The establishment of the natural coordinate system is based on the idea that the IMC is a flux rope with approximately constant α force-free field configuration. We also apply this method to analyze four IMCs observed by the Wind spacecraft. Two of them are identified as having the flux rope configuration lying in the ecliptic plane, and the other two are flux ropes vertical to the ecliptic plane. The results demonstrate that our method can work well for real IMCs.

  6. SCINTILLATION EXPOSURE RATE DETECTOR

    DOEpatents

    Spears, W.G.

    1960-11-01

    A radiation detector for gamma and x rays is described. The detector comprises a scintillation crystal disposed between a tantalum shield and the input of a photomultiplier tube, the crystal and the shield cooperating so that their combined response to a given quantity of radiation at various energy levels is substantially constant.

  7. Polysiloxane scintillator composition

    DOEpatents

    Walker, J.K.

    1992-05-05

    A plastic scintillator useful for detecting ionizing radiation comprising a matrix which comprises an optically transparent polysiloxane having incorporated therein at least one ionizing radiation-hard fluor capable of converting electromagnetic energy produced in the polysiloxane upon absorption of ionizing radiation to detectable light.

  8. Boron loaded scintillator

    DOEpatents

    Bell, Zane William [Oak Ridge, TN; Brown, Gilbert Morris [Knoxville, TN; Maya, Leon [Knoxville, TN; Sloop, Jr., Frederick Victor; Sloop, Jr., Frederick Victor [Oak Ridge, TN

    2009-10-20

    A scintillating composition for detecting neutrons and other radiation comprises a phenyl containing silicone rubber with carborane units and at least one phosphor molecule. The carbonate units can either be a carborane molecule dispersed in the rubber with the aid of a compatibilization agent or can be covalently bound to the silicone.

  9. Polysiloxane scintillator composition

    DOEpatents

    Walker, James K.

    1992-01-01

    A plastic scintillator useful for detecting ionizing radiation comprising a matrix which comprises an optically transparent polysiloxane having incorporated therein at least one ionizing radiation-hard fluor capable of converting electromagnetic energy produced in the polysiloxane upon absorption of ionizing radiation to detectable light.

  10. Scintillator requirements for medical imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, William W.

    1999-09-01

    Scintillating materials are used in a variety of medical imaging devices. This paper presents a description of four medical imaging modalities that make extensive use of scintillators: planar x-ray imaging, x-ray computed tomography (x-ray CT), SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) and PET (positron emission tomography). The discussion concentrates on a description of the underlying physical principles by which the four modalities operate. The scintillator requirements for these systems are enumerated and the compromises that are made in order to maximize imaging performance utilizing existing scintillating materials are discussed, as is the potential for improving imaging performance by improving scintillator properties.

  11. Scintillator Waveguide For Sensing Radiation

    DOEpatents

    Bliss, Mary; Craig, Richard A.; Reeder; Paul L.

    2003-04-22

    The present invention is an apparatus for detecting ionizing radiation, having: a waveguide having a first end and a second end, the waveguide formed of a scintillator material wherein the therapeutic ionizing radiation isotropically generates scintillation light signals within the waveguide. This apparatus provides a measure of radiation dose. The apparatus may be modified to permit making a measure of location of radiation dose. Specifically, the scintillation material is segmented into a plurality of segments; and a connecting cable for each of the plurality of segments is used for conducting scintillation signals to a scintillation detector.

  12. Workshop on the Analysis of Interplanetary Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolensky, Michael E. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    Great progress has been made in the analysis of interplanetary dust particles (IDP's) over the past few years. This workshop provided a forum for the discussion of the following topics: observation and modeling of dust in the solar system, mineralogy and petrography of IDP's, processing of IDP's in the solar system and terrestrial atmosphere, comparison of IDP's to meteorites and micrometeorites, composition of IDP's, classification, and collection of IDP's.

  13. Associations between coronal mass ejections and interplanetary shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheeley, N. R., Jr.; Howard, R. A.; Koomen, M. J.; Michels, D. J.; Schwenn, R.; Muhlhauser, K. H.; Rosenbauer, H.

    1983-01-01

    Nearly continuous complementary coronal observations and interplanetary plasma measurements for the years 1979-1982 are compared. It is shown that almost all low latitude high speed coronal mass ejections (CME's) were associated with shocks at HELIOS 1. Some suitably directed low speed CME's were clearly associated with shocks while others may have been associated with disturbed plasma (such as NCDE's) without shocks. A few opposite hemisphere CME's associated with great flares seem to be associated with shocks at HELIOS.

  14. On fragmentation of meteoroids in interplanetary space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porubčan, V.; Tóth, J.; Yano, H.

    2002-10-01

    A possible fragmentation of meteoroids in interplanetary space inferred from grouping of particles in meteor streams is discussed. There is a conviction maintained by many observers that meteors within the streams are observed to be clustered in pairs or larger groups more frequently than one could expect from random distribution. The rate of dispersive effects indicates that the lifetime of any such a group of meteoroids is very limited. Therefore, if real, the pairs or groups must be due to recent fragmentation of larger meteoroids. Analyses based on visual observations of meteor streams lead to contradictory results. More conclusive are analyses based on radio measurements, which present a negative result concerning the permanent meteor showers with the stream structures at their middle and late evolutionary stages, and an indication of a positive result for younger dense stream structures of recent origin. Analysis of the 1969 Leonid display obtained by the Springhill high-power radar shows that about 10% of the population around the shower maximum is associated in close groups, within a distance up to of about 10 km and confined to an effective stream width comparable to the diameter of the Earth. The recent Leonid returns with the storm in 1999 provided a possibility to verify a non-random grouping of particles within this young filament of the stream. The analysis and results based on TV observations of the storm are presented and discussed.

  15. GPS scintillation and TEC depletion near the northern crest of equatorial anomaly over South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Baichang; Huang, Jiang; Liu, Weifeng; Xu, Jie; Huang, Lingfeng

    2013-02-01

    This study presents a statistical analysis of GPS L-band scintillation with data observed from July 2008 to March 2012 at the northern crest of equatorial anomaly stations in Guangzhou and Shenzhen of South China. The variations of the scintillation with local time, season, solar activity and duration of scintillation patches were investigated. The relationship between the scintillation and TEC depletion was also reported. Our results revealed that GPS scintillation occurred from 19:30 LT (pre-midnight) to 03:00 LT (post-midnight). During quiet solar activity years, the scintillation was only observed in pre-midnight hours of equinox months and patches durations were mostly less than 60 min. During high solar activity years, more scintillation occurred in the pre-midnight hours of equinox and winter months; and GPS scintillation started to occur in the post-midnight hours of summer and winter. The duration of scintillation patches extended to 180 min in high solar activity years. Solar activity had a larger effect to strong scintillations (S4 > 0.6) than to weak scintillations (0.6 ⩾ S4 > 0.2). Strong scintillations were accompanied by TEC depletion especially in equinox months. We also discussed the relationship between TEC depletion and plasma bubble.

  16. Statistical characteristics of low-latitude ionospheric scintillation over China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kangkang; Li, Guozhu; Ning, Baiqi; Hu, Lianhuan; Li, Hongke

    2015-03-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) L-band ionospheric scintillation produced by electron density irregularities in the ionospheric E- and F-regions, is mainly a low- and high-latitude phenomenon. In this study, the statistical behavior of GPS ionospheric scintillation over a Chinese low-latitude station Sanya (18.3°N, 109.6°E; dip lat: 12.8°N) has been investigated. A detailed study on the seasonal and solar activity dependence of scintillation occurrence during July 2004-December 2012 show that the amplitude scintillation pattern, with a maximum occurrence during equinox of solar maximum, agrees with plasma bubble observations by in situ satellites in this longitude. A few daytime periodic scintillation events are found during June solstice months of solar minimum. Interestingly, a significant equinoctial asymmetry of scintillation onset time is found in 2011-2012. The initiation of scintillation during September-October is on average earlier than that of March-April about 25 min. Meanwhile, the zonal drifts of irregularities estimated using two spatially separated GPS receivers over Sanya show a similar behavior during the two equinoxes, slowly decreasing from 150 m/s at post-sunset to 50 m/s near midnight. The possible mechanisms responsible for the occurrence characteristics of GPS scintillation over Sanya, and relevant aspects of the zonal drifts of the irregularities are discussed.

  17. Characterizing Properties and Performance of 3D Printed Plastic Scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCormick, Jacob

    2015-10-01

    We are determining various characteristics of the performance of 3D printed scintillators. A scintillator luminesces when an energetic particle raises electrons to an excited state by depositing some of its energy in the atom. When these excited electrons fall back down to their stable states, they emit the excess energy as light. We have characterized the transmission spectrum, emission spectrum, and relative intensity of light produced by 3D printed scintillators. We are also determining mechanical properties such as tensile strength and compressibility, and the refractive index. The emission and transmission spectra were measured using a monochromator. By observing the transmission spectrum, we can see which optical wavelengths are absorbed by the scintillator. This is then used to correct the emission spectrum, since this absorption is present in the emission spectrum. Using photomultiplier tubes in conjunction with integration hardware (QDC) to measure the intensity of light emitted by 3D printed scintillators, we compare with commercial plastic scintillators. We are using the characterizations to determine if 3D printed scintillators are a viable alternative to commercial scintillators for use at Jefferson Lab in nuclear and accelerated physics detectors. I would like to thank Wouter Deconinck, as well as the Parity group at the College of William and Mary for all advice and assistance with my research.

  18. Interplanetary Physics Laboratory (IPL): A concept for an interplanetary mission in the mid-eighties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Ogilvie, K. W.; Feldman, W.

    1977-01-01

    A concept for a near-earth interplanetary mission in the mid-eighties is described. The proposed objectives would be to determine the composition of the interplanetary constituents and its dependence on source-conditions and to investigate energy and momentum transfer processes in the interplanetary medium. Such a mission would accomplish three secondary objectives: (1) provide a baseline for deep space missions, (2) investigate variations of the solar wind with solar activity, and (3) provide input functions for magnetospheric studies.

  19. Energetic protons associated with interplanetary active regions 1-5 AU from the sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pesses, M. E.; Van Allen, J. A.; Goertz, C. K.

    1978-01-01

    Pioneer 11 has yielded data on approximately 100 energetic proton events at heliocentric distances between 1 and 2 AU. Measurements of absolute intensities, anisotropies, and crude energy spectra are studied in connection with interplanetary active regions (IAR's). It is found that in close vicinity to IAR's, the number of events observed per unit time interval is 10 times greater than in other areas of interplanetary space, and that the frequency of events has a maximum at plus or minus 5 hours of the time IAR edges are crossed. It is also noted that events in IAR vicinity have greater particle densities, softer energy spectra, and smaller time widths than other events. For many events associated with IAR's, particle anisotropies correspond to the net flow of particles along the interplanetary magnetic field toward the sun. This suggests that a mechanism in MHD shocks is responsible for local acceleration in the interplanetary medium.

  20. Operating CFDP in the Interplanetary Internet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burleigh, S.

    2002-01-01

    This paper examines the design elements of CCSDS File Delivery Protocol and Interplanetary Internet technologies that will simplify their integration and discusses the resulting new capabilities, such as efficient transmission of large files via multiple relay satellites operating in parallel.

  1. Hypersonic Interplanetary Flight: Aero Gravity Assist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowers, Al; Banks, Dan; Randolph, Jim

    2006-01-01

    The use of aero-gravity assist during hypersonic interplanetary flights is highlighted. Specifically, the use of large versus small planet for gravity asssist maneuvers, aero-gravity assist trajectories, launch opportunities and planetary waverider performance are addressed.

  2. Study of Travelling Interplanetary Phenomena (STIP) workshop travel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.

    1986-01-01

    Thirty six abstracts are provided from the SCOSTEP/STIP Symposium on Retrospective Analyses and Future Coordinated Intervals held in Switzerland on June 10 to 12, 1985. Six American scientists participated in the symposium and their abstracts are also included. The titles of their papers are: (1) An analysis of near surface and coronal activity during STIP interval 12, by T. E. Gergely; (2) Helios images of STIP intervals 6, B. V. Jackson; (3) Results from the analysis of solar and interplanetary observations during STIP interval 7, S. R. Kane; (4) STIP interval 19, E. Cliver; (5) Hydrodynamic buoyancy force in the solar atmosphere, T. Yeh; and (6) A combined MHD modes for the energy and momentum transport from solar surface to interplanetary space, S. T. Wu.

  3. Development of coronal mass ejections and association with interplanetary events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pick, M.; Maia, D.; Howard, R.; Thompson, B.; Lanzerotti, L. J. L.; Bothmer, V.; Lamy, P.

    1997-01-01

    Results are presented on the development of two coronal mass ejections (CMEs) obtained by comparing the observations of the large angle spectroscopic coronagraph (LASCO) and the extreme ultraviolet imaging telescope (EIT) instrument onboard the SOHO with those of the Nancay radioheliograph. The radioheliograph provides images at five levels in the corona. An excellent spatial association is found between the position and extent of the type 4 radio sources and the CMEs seen by LASCO. One result is the existence for these two events of discrete successive phases in their development. For these events, Ulysses and SOHO missions measured interplanetary particles of coronal origin. The coronal acceleration site was attempted to be identified, as well as the path of these particles from the corona to the interplanetary medium.

  4. The effects of Interplanetary Shocks on Energetic Storm Particle Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preisser, L.; Blanco-Cano, X.; Kajdic, P.

    2015-12-01

    Solar Energetic particles (SEPs) travel across the interplanetary medium with energies of the order of MeV. These events can be classified as impulsive or gradual depending on some characteristics of the flux spectra profile. Impulsive events are commonly associated to flares, and gradual SEPs are commonly associated to Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejection (ICME) driving shocks. The physical process by which these particles are accelerated is not completely understood. A subset of gradual SEP events, known as Energetic Storm Particle (ESP) show flux enhancements near the time of shock crossing. In this work we use STEREO plasma and magnetic field data from 2011-2014 to study ESP characteristics and relate them to the parameters of the associated shock. We also study the properties of the waves observed upstream and downstream of the shocks.

  5. Angle scintillations in the laser return from a retroreflector.

    PubMed

    Hansen, J P; Madhu, S

    1972-02-01

    Angle scintillations of the laser return from a retroreflector were observed to exceed the value expected because of atmospheric turbulence. The observations and a theoretical analysis of a possible mechanism are presented. The experimental work was performed with a pulsed, 1.06-micro laser illuminating a corner cube. Angular scintillations of the laser return were measured to be eight times greater than that of a reference beacon. The theoretical analysis assumes phase fluctuations in the illuminating laser beam. An expression is derived for the scintillation angle as a function of a phase fluctuation parameter.

  6. IPS observation system for the Miyun 50 m radio telescope and its commissioning observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xin-Ying; Zhang, Xi-Zhen; Zhang, Hong-Bo; Kong, De-Qing; Qu, Hui-Peng

    2012-07-01

    Ground-based observation of Interplanetary Scintillation (IPS) is an important approach for monitoring solar wind. A ground-based IPS observation system has been newly implemented on a 50 m radio telescope at Miyun station, managed by the National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences. This observation system has been constructed for the purpose of observing solar wind speed and the associated scintillation index by using the normalized cross-spectrum of a simultaneous dual-frequency IPS measurement. The system consists of a universal dual-frequency front-end and a dual-channel multi-function back-end specially designed for IPS. After careful calibration and testing, IPS observations on source 3C 273B and 3C 279 have been successfully carried out. The preliminary observation results show that this newly-developed observation system is capable of performing IPS observation. The system's sensitivity for IPS observation can reach over 0.3 Jy in terms of an IPS polarization correlator with 4 MHz bandwidth and 2 s integration time.

  7. Equatorial anomaly effects on GPS scintillations in brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Paula, E. R.; Rodrigues, F. S.; Iyer, K. N.; Kantor, I. J.; Abdu, M. A.; Kintner, P. M.; Ledvina, B. M.; Kil, H.

    In a collaborative study, INPE and Cornell University have installed several Global Positioning System (GPS) based scintillation monitors over the Brazilian territory in order to study L Band scintillation. These scintillation monitors were developed by Cornell University to measure the amplitude scintillation observed at L1 (1.575 GHz) GPS signal and are sensitive to ionospheric irregularities of about 400 meters scale size. This paper describes some characteristics of the intensity of scintillations observed at three observation sites in Brazil: (1) São Luís (2.33 ° S, 44 ° W, dip latitude 1.3 ° S), located at magnetic equator, (2) São José dos Campos (23.21 ° S, 45.86 ° W, dip latitude 17.8 ° S), located under the equatorial anomaly peak and (3) Cuiabá (15.33 ° S, 56.46 ° W, dip latitude 6.1 ° S), an intermediate observation site located in between the magnetic equator and the equatorial anomaly peak. Analysis of data from January to March of 2000 showed that the occurrence percentage as well as the magnitude of the L Band scintillation increase with latitude from the magnetic equator to the equatorial anomaly crest as previously reported by Basu et al. (1988). Strong scintillation with S 4 index exceeding 0.5 only has been observed under equatorial anomaly peak while at magnetic equator scintillation intensity (S 4 index) did not exceed 0.3. Such studies from the network of stations set up by INPE and Cornell University in Brazil, where the effect of large declination controls the ESF statistics, will be very useful for developing a regional scintillation model for use in IRI.

  8. Synoptic IPS and Yohkoh soft X-ray observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hick, P.; Jackson, B. V.; Rappoport, S.; Woan, G.; Slater, G.; Strong, K.; Uchida, Y.

    1995-01-01

    Interplanetary scintillation measurements of the disturbance factor, g, from October 1991 to October 1992 are used to construct synoptic Carrington maps. These maps, which show the structure of the quiet solar wind, are compared with X-ray Carrington maps from the Yohkoh Soft X-ray Telescope (SXT) instrument. For the period studied the global structure outlined by (weakly) enhanced g-values apparent in the interplanetary scintillation (IPS) maps tend to match the active regions (as shown in the X-ray maps) significantly better than the heliospheric current sheet. Contrary to traditional opinion, which views active regions as magnetically closed structures that do not have any significant impact on the solar wind flow, our results suggest that density fluctuations in the solar wind are significantly enhanced over active regions. These results support the suggestion by Uchida et al. (1992), based on Yohkoh observations of expanding active regions, that active regions play a role in feeding mass into the quiet solar wind.

  9. Dynamics of the Solar Plasma Events and Their Interplanetary Consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushik, Subhash Chandra

    2016-07-01

    In the present study we have analyzed the interplanetary plasma / field parameter, which have initiated the complex nature intense and highly geo-effective events in the magnetosphere. It is believed that Solar wind velocity V. interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) B and Bz are the crucial drivers of these activities. However, sometimes strong geomagnetic disturbance is associated with the interaction between slow and fast solar wind originating from coronal holes leads to create co-rotating plasma interaction region (CIR). Thus the dynamics of the magnetospheric plasma configuration is the reflection of measured solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions. While the magnetospheric plasma anomalies are generally represented by geomagnetic storms and sudden ionosphere disturbance (SIDs). The study considers geomagnetic storms associated with disturbance storm time (Dst) decreases of more than -50 nT to -300 nT, observed during solar cycle 23 and the ascending phase of solar cycle 24. These have been analyzed and studied statistically. The spacecraft data those provided by SOHO, ACE and geomagnetic stations like WDC-Kyoto are utilized in the study. It is observed that the yearly occurrences of geomagnetic storm are strongly correlated with 11-year sunspot cycle, but no significant correlation between the maximum and minimum phase of solar cycle have been found. It is also found that solar cycle-23 is remarkable for occurrence of intense geomagnetic storms during its declining phase. The detailed results are discussed in this paper.

  10. Radiowave Phase Scintillation and Precision Doppler Tracking of Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. W.

    1997-01-01

    Phase scintillation cause by propagation through irregularities in the solar wind, ionosphere, and tropospher, introduces noise in spacecraft radio science experiments. The observations reported here are uses to refine the propagation noise model for Doppler tracking of deep space probes.

  11. Cerium compounds as scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Wojtowicz, A.J.; Berman, E.; Koepke, C.; Lempicki, A.

    1991-01-01

    Stoichiometric Ce-materials with negligible Ce-Ce interactions should have superior scintillator properties. We present two materials: CeF{sub 3} and Ce{sub x}La{sub 1-x}P{sub 5}O{sub 14}. While cerium trifluoride is a known scintillator, pentaphosphate is of a limited usefulness, except as a remarkable model material. We show that quenching in fluoride is responsible for loss of 50% of the light output and is the cause of the, so-called, ultra fast component (2 ns). Light output of fluoride (about 50% of BGO) could be significantly improved. Deeper understanding of Ce-systems is needed to fully exploit their potentials. 10 figs., 6 refs.

  12. Cerium compounds as scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Wojtowicz, A.J.; Berman, E.; Koepke, C.; Lempicki, A.

    1991-12-31

    Stoichiometric Ce-materials with negligible Ce-Ce interactions should have superior scintillator properties. We present two materials: CeF{sub 3} and Ce{sub x}La{sub 1-x}P{sub 5}O{sub 14}. While cerium trifluoride is a known scintillator, pentaphosphate is of a limited usefulness, except as a remarkable model material. We show that quenching in fluoride is responsible for loss of 50% of the light output and is the cause of the, so-called, ultra fast component (2 ns). Light output of fluoride (about 50% of BGO) could be significantly improved. Deeper understanding of Ce-systems is needed to fully exploit their potentials. 10 figs., 6 refs.

  13. Toward the Probabilistic Forecasting of High-latitude GPS Phase Scintillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prikryl, P.; Jayachandran, P.T.; Mushini, S. C.; Richardson, I. G.

    2012-01-01

    The phase scintillation index was obtained from L1 GPS data collected with the Canadian High Arctic Ionospheric Network (CHAIN) during years of extended solar minimum 2008-2010. Phase scintillation occurs predominantly on the dayside in the cusp and in the nightside auroral oval. We set forth a probabilistic forecast method of phase scintillation in the cusp based on the arrival time of either solar wind corotating interaction regions (CIRs) or interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs). CIRs on the leading edge of high-speed streams (HSS) from coronal holes are known to cause recurrent geomagnetic and ionospheric disturbances that can be forecast one or several solar rotations in advance. Superposed epoch analysis of phase scintillation occurrence showed a sharp increase in scintillation occurrence just after the arrival of high-speed solar wind and a peak associated with weak to moderate CMEs during the solar minimum. Cumulative probability distribution functions for the phase scintillation occurrence in the cusp are obtained from statistical data for days before and after CIR and ICME arrivals. The probability curves are also specified for low and high (below and above median) values of various solar wind plasma parameters. The initial results are used to demonstrate a forecasting technique on two example periods of CIRs and ICMEs.

  14. Composite scintillator screen

    DOEpatents

    Zeman, Herbert D.

    1994-01-01

    A scintillator screen for an X-ray system includes a substrate of low-Z material and bodies of a high-Z material embedded within the substrate. By preselecting the size of the bodies embedded within the substrate, the spacial separation of the bodies and the thickness of the screen, the sensitivity of the screen to X-rays within a predetermined energy range can be predicted.

  15. Detection of Solar Wind Disturbances: Mexican Array Radio Telescope IPS Observations at 140 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero-Hernandez, E.; Gonzalez-Esparza, J. A.; Aguilar-Rodriguez, E.; Ontiveros-Hernandez, V.; Villanueva-Hernandez, P.

    2015-09-01

    The interplanetary scintillation (IPS) technique is a remote-sensing method for monitoring solar-wind perturbations. The Mexican Array Radio Telescope (MEXART) is a single-station instrument operating at 140 MHz, fully dedicated to performing solar-wind studies employing the IPS technique. We report MEXART solar-wind measurements (scintillation indices and solar-wind velocities) using data obtained during the 2013 and 2014 campaigns. These solar-wind measurements were calculated employing a new methodology based on the wavelet transform (WT) function. We report the variation of the scintillation indices versus the heliocentric distance for two IPS sources (3C48 and 3C147). We found different average conditions of the solar-wind density fluctuations in 2013 and 2014. We used the fittings of the radial dependence of the scintillation index to calculate g-indices. Based on the g-index value, we identified 17 events that could be associated with strong compression regions in the solar wind. We present the first ICME identifications in our data. We associated 14 IPS events with preceding CME counterparts by employing white-light observations from the Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) spacecraft. We found that most of the IPS events, detected during the solar maximum of Cycle 24 were associated with complex CME events. For the IPS events associated with single CME counterparts, we found a deceleration tendency of the CMEs as they propagate in the interplanetary medium. These results show that the instrument detects solar-wind disturbances, and the WT methodology provides solar-wind information with good accuracy. The MEXART observations will complement solar-wind IPS studies using other frequencies, and the tracking of solar-wind disturbances by other stations located at different longitudes.

  16. Interplanetary Consequences of Coronal Mass Ejection Events Occurred During 18-25 June 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manoharan, P. K.; Maia, D.; Johri, A.; Induja, M. S.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we review the preliminary results on the propagation effects and interplanetary consequences of fast and wide coronal mass ejection (CME) events, occurred during 18-25 June 2015, in the Sun-Earth distance range. The interplanetary scintillation (IPS) images reveal that the large-scale structures of CME-driven disturbances filled nearly the entire inner heliosphere with a range of speeds, ˜300-1000 km s-1. The comparison of speed data sets, from IPS technique results in the inner heliosphere and in-situ measurements at 1 AU, indicates that the drag force imposed by the low-speed wind dominated heliosphere on the propagation of CMEs may not be effective. The arrival of shocks at 1 AU suggests that a shock can be driven in the interplanetary medium by the central part of the moving CME and also by a different part away from its centre. The increased flux of proton at energies >10 MeV is consistent with the acceleration of particles by the shock ahead of the CME.

  17. Superdiffusive shock acceleration and short acceleration times at interplanetary shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perri, Silvia; Zimbardo, Gaetano

    2016-04-01

    The analysis of time profiles of particles accelerated at interplanetary shock waves has shown evidence for superdiffusive transport in the upstream region. Superdiffusive transport is characterized by a mean square displacement that grows faster than linearly in time and by non Gaussian statistics for the distribution of the particle jump lengths. In the superdiffusive framework it has been shown that particle time profiles upstream of a planar shock decay as power laws, at variance with exponential particle time profiles predicted in the case of diffusive transport. A large number of interplanetary shocks, including coronal mass ejection driven shocks, exhibit energetic particle time profiles that decay as power laws far upstream. In order to take this evidence into account, we have extended the standard theory of diffusive shock acceleration to the case of particle superdiffusive transport (superdiffusive shock acceleration). This has allowed us to derive both hard energy spectral indices and short acceleration times. This new theory has been tested for a number of interplanetary shock waves, observed by the Ulysses and the ACE spacecraft, and for the termination shock. The superdiffusive shock acceleration leads to a strong reduction of the acceleration times (even of about one order of magnitude) with respect to the diffusive shock acceleration. Thus, this new framework provides a substantial advancement in the understanding of the processes of particle acceleration and particle transport, which are among the main objectives of the new Solar Probe and Solar Orbiter space missions.

  18. Latitudinal Dependence of the Radial IMF Component - Interplanetary Imprint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suess, S. T.; Smith, E. J.; Phillips, J.; Goldstein, B. E.; Nerney, S.

    1996-01-01

    Ulysses measurements have confirmed that there is no significant gradient with respect to heliomagnetic latitude in the radial component, B(sub r,), of the interplanetary magnetic field. There are two processes responsible for this observation. In the corona, the plasma beta is much less than 1, except directly above streamers, so both longitudinal and latitudinal (meridional) gradients in field strength will relax, due to the transverse magnetic pressure gradient force, as the solar wind carries magnetic flux away from the Sun. This happens so quickly that the field is essentially uniform by 5 solar radius. Beyond 10 solar radius, beta is greater than 1 and it is possible for a meridional thermal pressure gradient to redistribute magnetic flux - an effect apparently absent in Ulysses and earlier ICE and Interplanetary Magnetic Physics (IMP) data. We discuss this second effect here, showing that its absence is mainly due to the perpendicular part of the anisotropic thermal pressure gradient in the interplanetary medium being too small to drive significant meridional transport between the Sun and approx. 4 AU. This is done using a linear analytic estimate of meridional transport. The first effect was discussed in an earlier paper.

  19. Statistical analysis of scintillation data

    SciTech Connect

    Chua, S.; Noonan, J.P.; Basu, S.

    1981-09-01

    The Nakagami-m distribution has traditionally been used successfully to model the probability characteristics of ionospheric scintillations at UHF. This report investigates the distribution properties of scintillation data in the L-band range. Specifically, the appropriateness of the Nakagami-m and lognormal distributions is tested. Briefly the results confirm that the Nakagami-m is appropriate for UHF but not for L-band scintillations. The lognormal provides a better fit to the distribution of L-band scintillations and is an adequate model allowing for an error of + or - 0.1 or smaller in predicted probability with a sample size of 256.

  20. Neutron crosstalk between liquid scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbeke, J. M.; Prasad, M. K.; Snyderman, N. J.

    2015-09-01

    A method is proposed to quantify the fractions of neutrons scattering between liquid scintillators. Using a spontaneous fission source, this method can be utilized to quickly characterize an array of liquid scintillators in terms of crosstalk. The point model theory due to Feynman is corrected to account for these multiple scatterings. Using spectral information measured by the liquid scintillators, fractions of multiple scattering can be estimated, and mass reconstruction of fissile materials under investigation can be improved. Monte Carlo simulations of mono-energetic neutron sources were performed to estimate neutron crosstalk. A californium source in an array of liquid scintillators was modeled to illustrate the improvement of the mass reconstruction.

  1. Neutron crosstalk between liquid scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Verbeke, J. M.; Prasad, M. K.; Snyderman, N. J.

    2015-05-01

    We propose a method to quantify the fractions of neutrons scattering between liquid scintillators. Using a spontaneous fission source, this method can be utilized to quickly characterize an array of liquid scintillators in terms of crosstalk. The point model theory due to Feynman is corrected to account for these multiple scatterings. Using spectral information measured by the liquid scintillators, fractions of multiple scattering can be estimated, and mass reconstruction of fissile materials under investigation can be improved. Monte Carlo simulations of mono-energetic neutron sources were performed to estimate neutron crosstalk. A californium source in an array of liquid scintillators was modeled to illustrate the improvement of the mass reconstruction.

  2. Origins and Dynamics of Interplanetary Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dermott, Stanley F.

    2005-01-01

    This is a final report for research supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration issued through the Office of Space Science Planetary Geology and Geophysics Program, covering all relevant activities during its 3-year period of funding from 02/01/2002 through to 01/31/2005. The ongoing aim of the research supported through this grant, and now through a successor award, is to investigate the origin of interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and their dynamical and collisional evolution, in order to: (1) understand the provenance of zodiacal cloud particles and their transport from their source regions to the inner solar system; (2) produce detailed models of the zodiacal cloud and its constituent components; (3) determine the origin of the dust particles accreted by the Earth; (4) ascertain the level of temporal variations in the dust environment of the inner solar system and the accretion rate of IDPs by the Earth, and evaluate potential effects on global climate; and to (5) exploit this research as a basis for interpreting the structure observed in exozodiacal clouds that may result from the collisional evolution of planetesimals and the presence of unseen planets.

  3. Impact Angle Control of Interplanetary Shock Geoeffectiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, D.; Raeder, J.

    2014-12-01

    We use OpenGGCM global MHD simulations to study the nightside magnetospheric/ magnetotail/ ionospheric responses to interplanetary (IP) fast foward shocks. Three cases are presented in this study: two inclined oblique shocks, hereafter IOS-1 and IOS-2, where the latter has a Mach number twice stronger than the former. Both shocks have impact angles of 30o in relation to the Sun-Earth line. Lastly, we choose a frontal perpendicular shock, FPS, whose shock normal is along th Sun-Earth line, with the same Mach number as IOS-1. We find that, in the IOS-1 case, due to the north-south asymmetry, the magnetotail is deflected southward, leading to a mild compression. The geomagnetic activity observed in the nightside ionosphere is then weak. On the other hand, in the head-on case, the FPS compresses the magnetotail on both sides symmetrically. This compression triggers a substorm allowing a larger amount of stored energy in the magnetotail to be released to the nightside ionosphere, resulting in a larger geomagnetic activity there. By comparing IOS-2 and FPS, we find that, despite the IOS-2 having a larger Mach number, the FPS leads to larger geomagnetic responses in the ionosphere nightside. As a result, we conclude that IP shocks with similar upstream conditions, such as magnetic field, speed, density, and even Mach number, can be differently geoeffective, depending on their shock normal orientation.

  4. Impact angle control of interplanetary shock geoeffectiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, D. M.; Raeder, J.

    2014-10-01

    We use Open Geospace General Circulation Model global MHD simulations to study the nightside magnetospheric, magnetotail, and ionospheric responses to interplanetary (IP) fast forward shocks. Three cases are presented in this study: two inclined oblique shocks, hereafter IOS-1 and IOS-2, where the latter has a Mach number twice stronger than the former. Both shocks have impact angles of 30° in relation to the Sun-Earth line. Lastly, we choose a frontal perpendicular shock, FPS, whose shock normal is along the Sun-Earth line, with the same Mach number as IOS-1. We find that, in the IOS-1 case, due to the north-south asymmetry, the magnetotail is deflected southward, leading to a mild compression. The geomagnetic activity observed in the nightside ionosphere is then weak. On the other hand, in the head-on case, the FPS compresses the magnetotail from both sides symmetrically. This compression triggers a substorm allowing a larger amount of stored energy in the magnetotail to be released to the nightside ionosphere, resulting in stronger geomagnetic activity. By comparing IOS-2 and FPS, we find that, despite the IOS-2 having a larger Mach number, the FPS leads to a larger geomagnetic response in the nightside ionosphere. As a result, we conclude that IP shocks with similar upstream conditions, such as magnetic field, speed, density, and Mach number, can have different geoeffectiveness, depending on their shock normal orientation.

  5. N-(2-Ethylhexyl)carbazole: A New Fluorophore Highly Suitable as a Monomolecular Liquid Scintillator.

    PubMed

    Montbarbon, Eva; Sguerra, Fabien; Bertrand, Guillaume H V; Magnier, Élodie; Coulon, Romain; Pansu, Robert B; Hamel, Matthieu

    2016-08-16

    The synthesis, photophysical properties, and applications in scintillation counting of N-(2-ethylhexyl)carbazole (EHCz) are reported. This molecule displays all of the required characteristics for an efficient liquid scintillator (emission wavelength, scintillation yield), and can be used without any extra fluorophores. Thus, its scintillation properties are discussed, as well as its fast neutron/gamma discrimination. For the latter application, the material is compared with the traditional liquid scintillator BC-501 A, and other liquid fluorescent molecules classically used as scintillation solvents, such as xylene, pseudocumene (PC), linear alkylbenzenes (LAB), diisopropylnaphthalene (DIN), 1-methylnaphthalene (1-MeNapht), and 4-isopropylbiphenyl (iPrBiph). For the first time, an excimeric form of a molecule has been advantageously used in scintillation counting. A moderate discrimination between fast neutrons and gamma rays was observed in bulk EHCz, with an apparent neutron/gamma discrimination potential half of that of BC-501 A. PMID:27406840

  6. A Generic Receiver Tracking Model for GPS Ionospheric Amplitude Scintillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paula, E. R.; Moraes, A. D.; Perrella, W. J.; Galera Monico, J. F.

    2012-12-01

    Ionospheric scintillations result in rapid variations in phase and amplitude of the radio signal, which propagates through the ionosphere. Depending on the temporal and spatial situation, the scintillation can represent a problem in the availability and precision of the Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS). Scintillations affect the receiver performance, specially the tracking loop level. Depending on the scintillation level, the receiver might increase the measurement errors or even can lead to a loss of lock of the carrier and code loops. In extreme cases, the scintillation can result in full disrupting of the receiver. In this work we introduce a generic model to evaluate the effects of ionospheric amplitude scintillation on GPS receiver tracking loops. This model is based on α-μ distribution, which can be seen as a generalized fading model, that includes a variety of distributions such as Gamma, Nakagami-m, Exponential, Weibull, one-sided Gaussian and Rayleigh. Differently from the model based only on Nakagami-m, this one is not limited to S4< 0,71 which allows using it to predict amplitude scintillation effects for stronger scenarios. The estimation of α-μ coefficients, the empirical parameterization based on field measurements and the typical values estimated based on observations made during the last solar maximum are presented and discussed.

  7. Interplanetary round trip mission design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wertz, James R.

    2004-08-01

    This paper defines the basic constraints for interplanetary round trip travel or, equivalently, for round trip travel from and to a natural or artificial satellite, such as round trips from the International Space Station to another satellite and back. While the constraints are straightforward, they do not seem to have been discussed previously in the literature, perhaps because round trip travel has not been a realistic option for most missions. We call the location that we are leaving and returning to the home planet or satellite and the spacecraft which makes the round trip the traveler. In round trip space travel, the traveler and the home planet must begin and end at the same true anomaly. Consequently, the fundamental constraint for mission design is as follows: Over the duration of the mission the difference in the change in true anomaly for the home planet and the change in true anomaly for the traveler must be an integral number of revolutions. This fundamental constraint implies a number of interesting properties for round trip travel to other locations in the solar system. For example: For Hohmann minimum energy transfers, going to nearby objects takes longer than going to some which are further. The shortest Hohmann round trip to a destination further from the Sun is a 2-yr trip to a heliocentric distance of 2.2 AU, i.e., 1.2 AU outward from the Earth. Increasing the transfer velocity has only a very small effect on total trip time, except at discrete "jumps" where the total trip time can change by a year or more. One way to reduce the round trip time is to go beyond the target planet and visit the target "on the way back". Some scenarios that go above a Δ V threshold can dramatically reduce the total round trip time, i.e., a reduction in round trip time for a Mars mission from the traditional 2.5 yr to less than 6 months. This paper discusses the general constraint equations and the resulting implications for round trip mission design. These equations

  8. International Launch Vehicle Selection for Interplanetary Travel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrone, Kristine; Nguyen, Lori T.

    2010-01-01

    In developing a mission strategy for interplanetary travel, the first step is to consider launch capabilities which provide the basis for fundamental parameters of the mission. This investigation focuses on the numerous launch vehicles of various characteristics available and in development internationally with respect to upmass, launch site, payload shroud size, fuel type, cost, and launch frequency. This presentation will describe launch vehicles available and in development worldwide, then carefully detail a selection process for choosing appropriate vehicles for interplanetary missions focusing on international collaboration, risk management, and minimization of cost. The vehicles that fit the established criteria will be discussed in detail with emphasis on the specifications and limitations related to interplanetary travel. The final menu of options will include recommendations for overall mission design and strategy.

  9. Lithium-loaded liquid scintillators

    DOEpatents

    Dai, Sheng; Kesanli, Banu; Neal, John S.

    2012-05-15

    The invention is directed to a liquid scintillating composition containing (i) one or more non-polar organic solvents; (ii) (lithium-6)-containing nanoparticles having a size of up to 10 nm and surface-capped by hydrophobic molecules; and (iii) one or more fluorophores. The invention is also directed to a liquid scintillator containing the above composition.

  10. Hybrid scintillators for neutron discrimination

    DOEpatents

    Feng, Patrick L; Cordaro, Joseph G; Anstey, Mitchell R; Morales, Alfredo M

    2015-05-12

    A composition capable of producing a unique scintillation response to neutrons and gamma rays, comprising (i) at least one surfactant; (ii) a polar hydrogen-bonding solvent; and (iii) at least one luminophore. A method including combining at least one surfactant, a polar hydrogen-bonding solvent and at least one luminophore in a scintillation cell under vacuum or an inert atmosphere.

  11. Free liquid scintillation counting bibliography

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    Packard Instrument Company announces the availability of its newly updated Bibliography of Packard Tri-Carb Liquid Scintillation Analyzers. This unique new booklet lists 628 references in which Packard Tri-Carb{reg_sign} liquid scintillation analyzers have been used in life science, environmental, nuclear power and archaeological measurements. All listings are cross-referenced by radionuclide, specific field of study and author.

  12. Extruding plastic scintillator at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Anna Pla-Dalmau; Alan D. Bross; Victor V. Rykalin

    2003-10-31

    An understanding of the costs involved in the production of plastic scintillators and the development of a less expensive material have become necessary with the prospects of building very large plastic scintillation detectors. Several factors contribute to the high cost of plastic scintillating sheets, but the principal reason is the labor-intensive nature of the manufacturing process. In order to significantly lower the costs, the current casting procedures had to be abandoned. Since polystyrene is widely used in the consumer industry, the logical path was to investigate the extrusion of commercial-grade polystyrene pellets with dopants to yield high quality plastic scintillator. This concept was tested and high quality extruded plastic scintillator was produced. The D0 and MINOS experiments are already using extruded scintillator strips in their detectors. An extrusion line has recently been installed at Fermilab in collaboration with NICADD (Northern Illinois Center for Accelerator and Detector Development). This new facility will serve to further develop and improve extruded plastic scintillator. This paper will discuss the characteristics of extruded plastic scintillator and its raw materials, the different manufacturing techniques and the current R&D program at Fermilab.

  13. Scintillation detector for carbon-14

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knoll, G. F.; Rogers, W. L.

    1971-01-01

    Detector consists of plastic, cylindrical double-wall scintillation cell, which is filled with gas to be analyzed. Thin, inner cell wall is isolated optically from outer (guard) scintillator wall by evaporated-aluminum coating. Bonding technique provides mechanical support to cell wall when device is exposed to high temperatures.

  14. Development of intrinsic IPT scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Bross, A.D.

    1989-07-31

    We report on the development of a new polystyrene based plastic scintillator. Optical absorption, fluorescence and light output measurements are presented. Preliminary results of radiation damage effects are also given and compared to the effects on a commercial plastic scintillator, NE 110. 6 refs., 12 figs.

  15. In-situ Measurements of Interplanetary and Interstellar Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grün, E.

    2008-09-01

    Dust is finely dispersed solid material in interplanetary space. It derives from a number of sources: larger meteoroids, comets, asteroids, the planets, and satellites, and there is interstellar dust sweeping through the solar system. These dust particles range in size from assemblages of a few molecules to tenth millimetre-sized grains. Dust particles absorb and scatter solar radiation and emit thermal radiation giving rise to Zodiacal light at visible and thermal emission at infrared wavelengths. Astronomical observations of both emissions provide information on the average properties of very large number of particles and their spatial distribution. Information on the physical and chemical properties and the orbital motion is obtained by direct methods. Direct methods include: (1) collection of dust particles (Fig. 1) on collectors on spacecraft returned to Earth and on airplanes in the stratosphere, (2) investigations of dust impacts craters on lunar samples and manmade impact plates returned from space, and (3) insitu measurements of individual particles by instruments on board satellites and space probes. Dust particles collected in the upper atmosphere provide the morphology and chemical and mineralogical composition of extraterrestrial particles of 5 to 50 microns in diameter but no information on the source of these particles is obtained. The NASA Stardust mission was the first space mission that returned dust from a comet. The study of impact craters on man-made and lunar surface samples exposed to space is used to characterize the flux of interplanetary micrometeoroids and their size distribution. Microcraters have been found ranging from 0.02 μm to millimetres in diameter. In-situ detectors on board of satellites and spaceprobes for the measurement of interplanetary dust have been used in the ecliptic plane from inside Mercury's orbit to the Kuiper belt and in space above and below the solar poles. Penetration detectors have a detection threshold of

  16. Interplanetary Magnetic Field Guiding Relativistic Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masson, S.; Demoulin, P.; Dasso, S.; Klein, K. L.

    2011-01-01

    The origin and the propagation of relativistic solar particles (0.5 to few Ge V) in the interplanetary medium remains a debated topic. These relativistic particles, detected at the Earth by neutron monitors have been previously accelerated close to the Sun and are guided by the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) lines, connecting the acceleration site and the Earth. Usually, the nominal Parker spiral is considered for ensuring the magnetic connection to the Earth. However, in most GLEs the IMF is highly disturbed, and the active regions associated to the GLEs are not always located close to the solar footprint of the nominal Parker spiral. A possible explanation is that relativistic particles are propagating in transient magnetic structures, such as Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs). In order to check this interpretation, we studied in detail the interplanetary medium where the particles propagate for 10 GLEs of the last solar cycle. Using the magnetic field and the plasma parameter measurements (ACE/MAG and ACE/SWEPAM), we found widely different IMF configurations. In an independent approach we develop and apply an improved method of the velocity dispersion analysis to energetic protons measured by SoHO/ERNE. We determined the effective path length and the solar release time of protons from these data and also combined them with the neutron monitor data. We found that in most of the GLEs, protons propagate in transient magnetic structures. Moreover, the comparison between the interplanetary magnetic structure and the interplanetary length suggest that the timing of particle arrival at Earth is dominantly determined by the type of IMF in which high energetic particles are propagating. Finally we find that these energetic protons are not significantly scattered during their transport to Earth.

  17. Mars Science Laboratory Interplanetary Navigation Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin-Mur, Tomas J.; Kruizinga, Gerhard; Wong, Mau

    2013-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft, carrying the Curiosity rover to Mars, hit the top of the Martian atmosphere just 200 meters from where it had been predicted more than six days earlier, and 2.6 million kilometers away. This un-expected level of accuracy was achieved by a combination of factors including: spacecraft performance, tracking data processing, dynamical modeling choices, and navigation filter setup. This paper will describe our best understanding of what were the factors that contributed to this excellent interplanetary trajectory prediction performance. The accurate interplanetary navigation contributed to the very precise landing performance, and to the overall success of the mission.

  18. Scintillator based beta batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rensing, Noa M.; Tiernan, Timothy C.; Shirwadkar, Urmila; O'Dougherty, Patrick; Freed, Sara; Hawrami, Rastgo; Squillante, Michael R.

    2013-05-01

    Some long-term, remote applications do not have access to conventional harvestable energy in the form of solar radiation (or other ambient light), wind, environmental vibration, or wave motion. Radiation Monitoring Devices, Inc. (RMD) is carrying out research to address the most challenging applications that need power for many months or years and which have undependable or no access to environmental energy. Radioisotopes are an attractive candidate for this energy source, as they can offer a very high energy density combined with a long lifetime. Both large scale nuclear power plants and radiothermal generators are based on converting nuclear energy to heat, but do not scale well to small sizes. Furthermore, thermo-mechanical power plants depend on moving parts, and RTG's suffer from low efficiency. To address the need for compact nuclear power devices, RMD is developing a novel beta battery, in which the beta emissions from a radioisotope are converted to visible light in a scintillator and then the visible light is converted to electrical power in a photodiode. By incorporating 90Sr into the scintillator SrI2 and coupling the material to a wavelength-matched solar cell, we will create a scalable, compact power source capable of supplying milliwatts to several watts of power over a period of up to 30 years. We will present the latest results of radiation damage studies and materials processing development efforts, and discuss how these factors interact to set the operating life and energy density of the device.

  19. Characteristics of High-latitude and Equatorial Ionospheric Scintillation of GNSS Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, Y.; Jiao, Y.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, several years of multi-constellation global navigation satellite scintillation data collected at Alaska, Peru, and Ascension Island are analyzed to characterize scintillation features observed at high latitude and equatorial locations during the current solar maximum. Recognizing that strong scintillation data are often lost due to the lack of robustness in conventional GPS receivers used for ionosphere scintillation monitoring (ISM), an autonomous event driven scintillation data collection system using software-defined raw RF sampling devices have been developed deployed at a number of strategically selected high latitude and equatorial locations since 2009. This unique scintillation data recording system is triggered by indicators computed from a continuously operating ISM receiver and the raw RF data is post processed using advanced receiver signal processing algorithms designed to minimize carrier phase cycle slips and loss of lock of signals during strong scintillations. Based on scintillation events extracted from the raw data, several statistical distributions are established to characterize the intensity, duration and occurrence frequency of scintillation. Results confirm that scintillation at low latitudes is generally more intense and longer lasting, while high-latitude scintillation is milder and usually dominated by phase fluctuations. Results also reveal the impacts of solar activity, geomagnetic activity and seasons on scintillation in different areas. Combining measurements from a co-located geo-magnetometer and corresponding global geomagnetic activities, qualitative and quantitative correlations between scintillation and both local and global geomagnetic activities have been obtained. Results show that in Alaska, the occurrence frequency and intensity of scintillation, especially phase fluctuations, have strong correlations with geomagnetic field intensity disturbances, while in equatorial stations, the correlation is not obvious.

  20. Heliocentric distance dependence of the interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behannon, K. W.

    1977-01-01

    Recent and ongoing planetary missions have provided extensive observations of the variations of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) both in time and with heliocentric distance from the sun. Large time variations in both the IMF and its fluctuations were observed. These are produced predominantly by dynamical processes in the interplanetary medium associated with stream interactions. Magnetic field variations near the sun are propagated to greater heliocentric distances, also contributing to the observed variablity of the IMF. Temporal variations on a time-scale comparable to or less than the corotation period complicate attempts to deduce radial gradients of the field and its fluctuations from the various observations. However, recent measurements inward to 0.46 AU and outward to 5 AU suggest that the radial component of the field on average decreases approximately as r to the minus second power, while the azimuthal component decreases more rapidly than the r to the minum first power dependence predicted by simple theory. This, and other observations, are discussed.

  1. Physical properties of interplanetary dust: laboratory and numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadamcik, Edith; Lasue, Jeremie; Levasseur-Regourd, Anny-Chantal; Renard, Jean-Baptiste; Buch, Arnaud; Carrasco, Nathalie; Cottin, Hervé; Fray, Nicolas; Guan, Yuan Yong; Szopa, Cyril

    Laboratory light scattering measurements with the PROGRA2 experiment, in A300-CNES and ESA dedicated microgravity flights or in ground based configurations, offer an alternative to models for exploring the scattering properties of particles with structures too complex to be easily handled by computer simulations [1,2]. The technique allows the use of large size distributions (nanometers to hundreds of micrometers) and a large variety of materials, similar to those suspected to compose the interplanetary particles [3]. Asteroids are probably the source of compact particles, while comets have been shown to eject compact and fluffy materials [4]. Moreover giant planets provide further a small number of interplanetary particles. Some interstellar particles are also present. To choose the best samples and size distributions, we consider previous numerical models for the interplanetary particles and their evolution with solar distance. In this model, fluffy particles are simulated by fractal aggregates and compact particles by ellipsoids. The materials considered are silicates and carbonaceous compound. The silicate grains can be coated by the organics. Observations are fitted with two parameters: the size distribution of the particles and the ratio of silicates over carbonaceous compounds. From the light scattering properties of the particles, their equilibrium temperature can be calculated for different structures and composition. The variation of their optical properties and temperatures are studied with the heliocentric distance [5,6]. Results on analogs of cometary particles [7] and powdered meteorites as asteroidal particles will be presented and compared to numerical simulations as well as observations. Organics on cometary grains can constitute distributed sources if degraded by solar UV and heat [8, 9]. The optical properties of CxHyNz compounds are studied after thermal evolution [10]. As a first approach, they are used to simulate the evolution of cometary or

  2. A fundamental limit on timing performance with scintillation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Clinthorne, N.H.; Petrick, N.A.; Rogers, W.L. . Div. of Nuclear Medicine); Hero, A.O. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science)

    1990-04-01

    A new lower bound on the mean-squared error of post-detection {gamma}-ray time-of-flight estimators have been derived. Previously, the Cramer-Rao bound has been applied, but for nearly exponentially decaying scintillation pulses it gives an extremely optimistic picture of the achievable performance, depending critically on the dark current and photomultiplier characteristics. The new bound has been derived under the assumption that excited states in the scintillator leading to the emission of scintillation photons have an exponential lifetime density. The bound is a function of the mean state lifetime, the spectrum of energy deposited, and the energy conversion efficiency of the scintillator, and is exact for the observation of a mono-exponentially decaying photoelectron rate at the first dynode of the PMT given the {gamma}-ray arrival time.

  3. Energetic electron response to ULF waves induced by interplanetary shocks in the outer radiation belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zong, Q.-G.; Zhou, X.-Z.; Wang, Y. F.; Li, X.; Song, P.; Baker, D. N.; Fritz, T. A.; Daly, P. W.; Dunlop, M.; Pedersen, A.

    2009-10-01

    Strong interplanetary shock interactions with the Earth's magnetosphere have great impacts on energetic particle dynamics in the magnetosphere. An interplanetary shock on 7 November 2004 (with the maximum solar wind dynamic pressure of ˜70 nPa) was observed by the Cluster constellation to induce significant ULF waves in the plasmasphere boundary, and energetic electrons (up to 2 MeV) were almost simultaneously accelerated when the interplanetary shock impinged upon the magnetosphere. In this paper, the relationship between the energetic electron bursts and the large shock-induced ULF waves is studied. It is shown that the energetic electrons could be accelerated and decelerated by the observed ULF wave electric fields, and the distinct wave number of the poloidal and toroidal waves at different locations also indicates the different energy ranges of electrons resonating with these waves. For comparison, a rather weak interplanetary shock on 30 August 2001 (dynamic pressure ˜2.7 nPa) is also investigated. It is found that interplanetary shocks or solar wind pressure pulses with even small dynamic pressure change can have a nonnegligible role in the radiation belt dynamics.

  4. Carbon and nitrogen isotopic anomalies in an anhydrous interplanetary dust particle.

    PubMed

    Floss, Christine; Stadermann, Frank J; Bradley, John; Dai, Zu Rong; Bajt, Sasa; Graham, Giles

    2004-02-27

    Because hydrogen and nitrogen isotopic anomalies in interplanetary dust particles have been associated with carbonaceous material, the lack of similar anomalies in carbon has been a major conundrum. We report here the presence of a 13C depletion associated with a 15N enrichment in an anhydrous interplanetary dust particle. Our observations suggest that the anomalies are carried by heteroatomic organic compounds. Theoretical models indicate that low-temperature formation of organic compounds in cold interstellar molecular clouds can produce carbon and nitrogen fractionations, but it remains to be seen whether the specific effects observed here can be reproduced.

  5. Hydrated interplanetary dust particle linked with carbonaceous chondrites?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomeoka, K.; Buseck, P. R.

    1985-01-01

    The results of transmission electron microscope observations of a hydrated interplanetary dust particle (IDP) containing Fe-, Mg-rich smectite or mica as a major phase are reported. The sheet silicate appears to have formed by alteration of anhydrous silicates. Fassaite, a Ca, Al clinopyroxene, also occurs in this particle, and one of the crystals exhibits solar-flare tracks, clearly indicating that it is extraterrestrial. Fassaite is a major constituent of the Ca-, Al-rich refractory inclusions found in the carbonaceous chondrites, so its presence in this particle suggests that there may be a link between hydrated IDPs and carbonaceous chondrites in the early history of the solar system.

  6. Research to Operations of Ionospheric Scintillation Detection and Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, J.; Scro, K.; Payne, D.; Ruhge, R.; Erickson, B.; Andorka, S.; Ludwig, C.; Karmann, J.; Ebelhar, D.

    Ionospheric Scintillation refers to random fluctuations in phase and amplitude of electromagnetic waves caused by a rapidly varying refractive index due to turbulent features in the ionosphere. Scintillation of transionospheric UHF and L-Band radio frequency signals is particularly troublesome since this phenomenon can lead to degradation of signal strength and integrity that can negatively impact satellite communications and navigation, radar, or radio signals from other systems that traverse or interact with the ionosphere. Although ionospheric scintillation occurs in both the equatorial and polar regions of the Earth, the focus of this modeling effort is on equatorial scintillation. The ionospheric scintillation model is data-driven in a sense that scintillation observations are used to perform detection and characterization of scintillation structures. These structures are then propagated to future times using drift and decay models to represent the natural evolution of ionospheric scintillation. The impact on radio signals is also determined by the model and represented in graphical format to the user. A frequency scaling algorithm allows for impact analysis on frequencies other than the observation frequencies. The project began with lab-grade software and through a tailored Agile development process, deployed operational-grade code to a DoD operational center. The Agile development process promotes adaptive promote adaptive planning, evolutionary development, early delivery, continuous improvement, regular collaboration with the customer, and encourage rapid and flexible response to customer-driven changes. The Agile philosophy values individuals and interactions over processes and tools, working software over comprehensive documentation, customer collaboration over contract negotiation, and responding to change over following a rigid plan. The end result was an operational capability that met customer expectations. Details of the model and the process of

  7. Hummingbird: Dramatically Reducing Interplanetary Mission Cost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wertz, J. R.; Van Allen, R. E.; Sarzi-Amade, N.; Shao, A.; Taylor, C.

    2012-06-01

    The Hummingbird interplanetary spacecraft has an available delta V of 2 to 4 km/sec and a recurring cost of 2 to 3 million, depending on the payload and configuration. The baseline telescope has a resolution of 30 cm at a distance of 100 km.

  8. Interplanetary monitoring platform engineering history and achievements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, P. M.

    1980-01-01

    In the fall of 1979, last of ten Interplanetary Monitoring Platform Satellite (IMP) missions ended a ten year series of flights dedicated to obtaining new knowledge of the radiation effects in outer space and of solar phenomena during a period of maximum solar flare activity. The technological achievements and scientific accomplishments from the IMP program are described.

  9. Proton recoil scintillator neutron rem meter

    DOEpatents

    Olsher, Richard H.; Seagraves, David T.

    2003-01-01

    A neutron rem meter utilizing proton recoil and thermal neutron scintillators to provide neutron detection and dose measurement. In using both fast scintillators and a thermal neutron scintillator the meter provides a wide range of sensitivity, uniform directional response, and uniform dose response. The scintillators output light to a photomultiplier tube that produces an electrical signal to an external neutron counter.

  10. Magnetic Reconnection in the Interior of Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fermo, R. L.; Opher, M.; Drake, J. F.

    2014-07-01

    Recent in situ observations of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) found signatures of reconnection exhausts in their interior or trailing edge. Whereas reconnection on the leading edge of an ICME would indicate an interaction with the coronal or interplanetary environment, this result suggests that the internal magnetic field reconnects with itself. In light of this data, we consider the stability properties of flux ropes first developed in the context of astrophysics, then further elaborated upon in the context of reversed field pinches (RFPs). It was shown that the lowest energy state of a flux rope corresponds to ∇×B=λB with λ a constant, the so-called Taylor state. Variations from this state will result in the magnetic field trying to reorient itself into the Taylor state solution, subject to the constraints that the toroidal flux and magnetic helicity are invariant. In reversed field pinches, this relaxation is mediated by the reconnection of the magnetic field, resulting in a sawtooth crash. If we likewise treat the ICME as a flux rope, any deviation from the Taylor state will result in reconnection within the interior of the flux tube, in agreement with the observations by Gosling et al. Such a departure from the Taylor state takes place as the flux tube cross section expands in the latitudinal direction, as seen in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of flux tubes propagating through the interplanetary medium. We show analytically that this elongation results in a state which is no longer in the minimum energy Taylor state. We then present magnetohydrodynamic simulations of an elongated flux tube which has evolved away from the Taylor state and show that reconnection at many surfaces produces a complex stochastic magnetic field as the system evolves back to a minimum energy state configuration.

  11. Ionospheric scintillation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rino, C. L.; Freemouw, E. J.

    1973-01-01

    The diffracted field of a monochromatic plane wave was characterized by two complex correlation functions. For a Gaussian complex field, these quantities suffice to completely define the statistics of the field. Thus, one can in principle calculate the statistics of any measurable quantity in terms of the model parameters. The best data fits were achieved for intensity statistics derived under the Gaussian statistics hypothesis. The signal structure that achieved the best fit was nearly invariant with scintillation level and irregularity source (ionosphere or solar wind). It was characterized by the fact that more than 80% of the scattered signal power is in phase quadrature with the undeviated or coherent signal component. Thus, the Gaussian-statistics hypothesis is both convenient and accurate for channel modeling work.

  12. Fast scintillation counter system and performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sasaki, H.; Nishioka, A.; Ohmori, N.; Kusumose, M.; Nakatsuka, T.; Horiki, T.; Hatano, Y.

    1985-01-01

    An experimental study of the fast scintillation counter (FS) system to observe a shower disk structure at Mt. Norikura is described, especially the system performance and a pulse wave-form by a single charge particles. The photomultiplier tube (PT) pulse appears at the leading edge of the main pulse. To remove this PT-pulse from the main pulse, the frame of the scintillator vessel was changed. The fast triggering system was made to decrease the dead time which came from the use of the function of the self triggering of the storage oscilloscope (OSC). To provide a new field on the multi-parameter study of the cosmic ray showers, the system response of the FS system also improved as a result of many considerations.

  13. Scintillator materials containing lanthanum fluorides

    DOEpatents

    Moses, William W.

    1991-01-01

    An improved radiation detector containing a crystalline mixture of LaF.sub.3 and CeF.sub.3 as the scintillator element is disclosed. Scintillators made with from 25% to 99.5% LaF.sub.3 and the remainder CeF.sub.3 have been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is equal to or superior to other known scintillator materials, and which may be processed from natural starting materials containing both rare earth elements. The radiation detectors disclosed are favorably suited for use in general purpose detection and in positron emission tomography.

  14. Scintillator materials containing lanthanum fluorides

    DOEpatents

    Moses, W.W.

    1991-05-14

    An improved radiation detector containing a crystalline mixture of LaF[sub 3] and CeF[sub 3] as the scintillator element is disclosed. Scintillators made with from 25% to 99.5% LaF[sub 3] and the remainder CeF[sub 3] have been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is equal to or superior to other known scintillator materials, and which may be processed from natural starting materials containing both rare earth elements. The radiation detectors disclosed are favorably suited for use in general purpose detection and in positron emission tomography. 2 figures.

  15. Interplanetary gas. XXII - Plasma tail disconnection events in comets - Evidence for magnetic field line reconnection at interplanetary sector boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niedner, M. B., Jr.; Brandt, J. C.

    1978-01-01

    Attention is focused on a form of cometary activity which has been known for some time but is poorly understood: the discarding of a plasma tail by a comet. A link is found between plasma-tail rejections and conditions in the solar wind. A model is presented in which a disconnected tail is the end result of magnetic-field-line reconnection in the cometary ionosphere caused by the traversal of a magnetic sector boundary. Observations of plasma tails appear to be the best and only method at present of mapping the interplanetary sector structure out of the ecliptic plane.

  16. Interstellar Scintillation of Extragalactic Radio Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rickett, Barney

    1998-05-01

    Interstellar scintillation (ISS) causes a Galactic seeing problem for radio astronomy. Thus the flux density from a very compact radio source appears to scintillate on a time scale that ranges from days to minutes depending on the wavelength and Galactic path length. I will review the observed variations from various sources, which are among the most compact cores of active galactic nuclei (AGN). An ISS interpretation of the observed variations yields estimates of the source sizes in the range 0.01 to 10 milliarcsec, often much smaller than the resolution from earth-based VLBI. The recognition of such variations as apparent reduces the implied brightness temperature by a factor as large as one million, compared to the extreme values deduced by interpreting the variations as intrinsic. Some such intraday variable sources also exhibit partially correlated variations in their polarized flux and angle. The changes in interstellar Faradya rotation are too slow to cause such variations by many orders of magnitude. I will report on attempts to model the polarized flux variations as due to independent ISS from polarized components with intrinsic polarization structure in the source at a level of tens of microarcseconds. I will also discuss how Frail et al. (Nature, 389, 261, 1997) used interstellar scintillation to estimate the size of the expanding fireball in the radio afterglow of gamma-ray burst 970508.

  17. CLIpSAT for Interplanetary Missions: Common Low-cost Interplanetary Spacecraft with Autonomy Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasso, C.

    2015-10-01

    Blue Sun Enterprises, Inc. is creating a common deep space bus capable of a wide variety of Mars, asteroid, and comet science missions, observational missions in and near GEO, and interplanetary delivery missions. The spacecraft are modular and highly autonomous, featuring a common core and optional expansion for variable-sized science or commercial payloads. Initial spacecraft designs are targeted for Mars atmospheric science, a Phobos sample return mission, geosynchronous reconnaissance, and en-masse delivery of payloads using packetized propulsion modules. By combining design, build, and operations processes for these missions, the cost and effort for creating the bus is shared across a variety of initial missions, reducing overall costs. A CLIpSAT can be delivered to different orbits and still be able to reach interplanetary targets like Mars due to up to 14.5 km/sec of delta-V provided by its high-ISP Xenon ion thruster(s). A 6U version of the spacecraft form fits PPOD-standard deployment systems, with up to 9 km/s of delta-V. A larger 12-U (with the addition of an expansion module) enables higher overall delta-V, and has the ability to jettison the expansion module and return to the Earth-Moon system from Mars orbit with the main spacecraft. CLIpSAT utilizes radiation-hardened electronics and RF equipment, 140+ We of power at earth (60 We at Mars), a compact navigation camera that doubles as a science imager, and communications of 2000 bps from Mars to the DSN via X-band. This bus could form the cornerstone of a large number asteroid survey projects, comet intercept missions, and planetary observation missions. The TugBot architecture uses groups of CLIpSATs attached to payloads lacking innate high-delta-V propulsion. The TugBots use coordinated trajectory following by each individual spacecraft to move the payload to the desired orbit - for example, a defense asset might be moved from GEO to lunar transfer orbit in order to protect and hide it, then returned

  18. Solar and Interplanetary Disturbances Causing Moderate Geomagnetic Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratap Yadav, Mahendra; Kumar, Santosh

    2003-07-01

    The effect of solar and interplanetary disturbances on geomagnetospheric conditions leading to one hundred twenty one moderate geomagnetic storms (MGSs) with planetary index, Ap ≥ 20 and horizontal component of earth's magnetic field, H ≤ 250γ have been investigated using solar geophysical data (SGD), solar wind plasma (SWP) and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) data during the period 1978-99. It is observed statistically that 64%, 36%, MGSs have occurred during maximum and minimum phase of solar cycle 21st and 22nd respectively. Further, it is observed that Hα, X-ray solar flares and active prominences and disapp earing filaments (APDFs) have occurred within lower helio latitude region associated with larger number of MGSs. No significant correlation between the intensity of GMSs and importance of Hα, X-ray solar flares have been observed. Maximum number of MGSs are associated with solar flares of lower importance of solar flare faint (SF). The lower importance in association with some specific characteristics i.e. location, region, duration of occurrence of event may also cause MGSs. The correlation coefficient between MGSs and sunspot numbers (SSNs) using Karl Pearson method, has been obtained 0.37 during 1978-99.

  19. Effects of interplanetary transport on derived energetic particle source strengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chollet, E. E.; Giacalone, J.; Mewaldt, R. A.

    2010-06-01

    We study the transport of solar energetic particles (SEPs) in the inner heliosphere in order to relate observations made by an observer at 1 AU to the number and total energy content of accelerated particles at the source, assumed to be near the Sun. We use a numerical simulation that integrates the trajectories of a large number of individual particles moving in the interplanetary magnetic field. We model pitch angle scattering and adiabatic cooling of energetic ions with energies from 50 keV nucleon-1 to 100 MeV nucleon-1. Among other things, we determine the number of times that particles of a given energy cross 1 AU and the average energy loss that they suffer because of adiabatic deceleration in the solar wind. We use a number of different forms of the interplanetary spatial diffusion coefficient and a wide range of scattering mean-free paths and consider a number of different ion species in order to generate a wide range of simulation results that can be applied to individual SEP events. We apply our simulation results to observations made at 1 AU of the 20 February 2002 solar energetic particle event, finding the original energy content of several species. We find that estimates of the source energy based on SEP measurements at 1 AU are relatively insensitive to the mean-free path and scattering scheme if adiabatic cooling and multiple crossings are taken into account.

  20. Effects of Interplanetary Transport on Derived Energetic Particle Source Strengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chollet, E. E.; Giacalone, J.; Mewaldt, R. A.

    2009-12-01

    We study the transport of solar energetic particles (SEPs) in the inner heliosphere in order to relate observations made by an observer at 1 AU to the total energy content of particles at the source, assumed to be near the Sun. We use a numerical simulation that integrates the trajectories of a large number of individual particles moving in the interplanetary magnetic field. We model pitch-angle scattering and adiabatic cooling of energetic ions with energies from 50 keV/nucleon to 100 MeV/nucleon. Among other things, we determine the number of times that particles of a given energy cross 1 AU and the average energy loss that they suffer due to adiabatic deceleration in the solar wind. We use a number of different forms of the interplanetary spatial diffusion coefficient, a wide range of scattering mean-free paths, and consider a number of different ion species in order to generate a wide range of simulation results that can be applied to individual SEP events. Our results are used to estimate the total energy needed to accelerate particles for an event on 20 February 2002 based on observations made at 1 AU. We find that estimates of the source energy based on SEP measurements at 1 AU are relatively insensitive to mean free path and scattering scheme.

  1. IPS observations of heliospheric density structures associated with active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hick, P.; Jackson, B. V.; Altrock, R.; Woan, G.; Slater, G.

    1996-01-01

    Interplanetary scintillation (IPS) measurements of the 'disturbance factor' g, obtained with the Cambridge (UK) array can be used to explore the heliospheric density structure. We have used these data to construct synoptic (Carrington) maps, representing the large-scale enhancements of the g-factor in the inner heliosphere. These maps emphasize the stable corotating, rather than the transient heliospheric density enhancements. We have compared these maps with Carrington maps of Fe XIV observations National Solar Observatory ((NSO), Sacramento Peak) and maps based on Yohkoh Soft X-Ray Telescope (SXT) X-ray observations. Our results indicate that the regions of enhanced g tend to map to active regions rather than the current sheet. The implication is that act ve regions are the dominant source of the small-scale (approximately equal 200 km) density variations present in the quiet solar wind.

  2. The space weather of the global ionosphere S4 scintillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jann-Yenq; Chen, Shih-Ping; Yeh, Wen-Hao

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, a method is introduced which converts S4 index observations by radio occultation of FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC (F3/C) to the scintillation on the ground. To carry out the conversion, three dimensional (3D) structures of S4max, the maximum value on each profile probed by F3/C, are constructed, which allows us to understand GPS scintillation variations at various local times, seasons, and solar activity conditions, as well as the geographical distribution from the space-based point of view. By applying the method to data of the 3D structure, maps of the worst case scenario on the ground as functions of geomagnetic local time and geographic coordinates are constructed and reported here. The converted S4max for the first time estimates the global distribution of ionospheric scintillations in the GPS L1 band C/A code signal on the ground. The results show that the worst-case scintillations appear within the low latitude region of ±30°N, peaking around ±20°N magnetic latitude; they begin at 1900 MLT, reach their maximum at 2100 MLT, and vanish by about 0200-0300 MLT. The most pronounced low-latitude scintillation occurs over the South American and African sectors. Finally, based on the above the above data, an empirical model is constructed. For a given time, location, and solar activity, the model forecasts the ionospheric S4 scintillation in the L1 band signal on the ground.

  3. Scintillator fiber optic long counter

    DOEpatents

    McCollum, Tom; Spector, Garry B.

    1994-01-01

    A flat response position sensitive neutron detector capable of providing neutron spectroscopic data utilizing scintillator fiber optic filaments embedded in a neutron moderating housing having an open end through which neutrons enter to be detected.

  4. Scintillator fiber optic long counter

    DOEpatents

    McCollum, T.; Spector, G.B.

    1994-03-29

    A flat response position sensitive neutron detector capable of providing neutron spectroscopic data utilizing scintillator fiber optic filaments embedded in a neutron moderating housing having an open end through which neutrons enter to be detected is described. 11 figures.

  5. Neutron crosstalk between liquid scintillators

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Verbeke, J. M.; Prasad, M. K.; Snyderman, N. J.

    2015-05-01

    We propose a method to quantify the fractions of neutrons scattering between liquid scintillators. Using a spontaneous fission source, this method can be utilized to quickly characterize an array of liquid scintillators in terms of crosstalk. The point model theory due to Feynman is corrected to account for these multiple scatterings. Using spectral information measured by the liquid scintillators, fractions of multiple scattering can be estimated, and mass reconstruction of fissile materials under investigation can be improved. Monte Carlo simulations of mono-energetic neutron sources were performed to estimate neutron crosstalk. A californium source in an array of liquid scintillators wasmore » modeled to illustrate the improvement of the mass reconstruction.« less

  6. Transmission electron microscopy of the 'LOW-CA' hydrated interplanetary dust particle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomeoka, K.; Buseck, P. R.

    1984-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy of a hydrated interplanetary dust particle indicates that it consists largely of a poorly crystalline phyllosilicate containing Fe, Mg and Al with an interlayer spacing of 10 to 12 A and so is distinct from the major phyllosilicate in CI and CM carbonaceous chondrites. The silicate is probably an Fe- and Mg-rich smectite or mica. Submicron, spherical to euhedral pyrrhotite and pentlandite are prominent. Unusual, low-Ni pentlandite is also common and typically occurs as rectangular platelets. Unlike many chondritic interplanetary dust particles, olivine is rare and pyroxene was not observed. Other less abundant phases are magnetite, chromite, and an unidentified phase containing Fe, Mg, Si, Ca, and Mn. This particle differs from a hydrated micrometeorite described previously by Brownlee (1978), indicating there are mineralogically different subsets of hydrated interplanetary dust particles. Despite gross similarities in mineralogy between the particle and the carbonaceous chondrites, they show appreciable differences in detail.

  7. Three dimensional aspects of interplanetary shock waves. [and the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siscoe, G. L.

    1976-01-01

    Most of the interplanetary shock waves observed with 1 AU of the sun originate from some short lived solar event, such as a solar flare, and then propagate out as a more-or-less spherical shock wave until they leave the solar system. Beyond 1 AU another class of interplanetary shock wave becomes common--the corotating shock pair formed by the interaction of long lived solar wind streams. The three dimensional geometry of these two classes of interplanetary shocks is discussed. Also discussed are how these geometries can be statistically studied with an out-of-the-ecliptic mission. Diagrams of shock wave propagation are shown. Also given are numerical examples of shock wave propagation.

  8. Interplanetary magnetic field control of the Mars bow shock - Evidence for Venuslike interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, T. L.; Schwingenschuh, K.; Lichtenegger, H.; Riedler, W.; Russell, C. T.

    1991-01-01

    The Mars bow shock location and shape have been determined by examining the Phobos spacecraft magnetometer data. Observations show that the position of the terminator bow shock varies with interplanetary magnetic field orientation in the same way as at Venus. The shock is farthest from Mars in the direction of the interplanetary electric field, consistent with the idea that mass loading plays an important role in the solar wind interaction with Mars. The shock cross section at the terminator plane is asymmetric and is controlled by the interplanetary magnetic field. The shock is farther from Mars during solar maximum. Thus the solar wind interaction with Mars appears to be Venuslike, with a magnetic moment too small to affect significantly the solar wind interaction.

  9. Direct Measurements of Interplanetary Dust Particles in the Vicinity of Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCracken, C. W.; Alexander, W. M.; Dubin, M.

    1961-01-01

    The direct measurements made by the Explorer VIII satellite provide the first sound basis for analyzing all available direct measurements of the distribution of interplanetary dust particles. The model average distribution curve established by such an analysis departs significantly from that predicted by the (uncertain) extrapolation of results from meteor observations. A consequence of this difference is that the daily accretion of interplanetary particulate matter by the earth is now considered to be mainly dust particles of the direct measurements range of particle size. Almost all the available direct measurements obtained with microphone systems on rockets, satellites, and spacecraft fit directly on the distribution curve defined by Explorer VIII data. The lack of reliable datum points departing significantly from the model average distribution curve means that available direct measurements show no discernible evidence of an appreciable geocentric concentration of interplanetary dust particles.

  10. Interplanetary magnetic field control of the Mars bow shock: Evidence for Venuslike interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, T.L.; Schwingenschuh, K.; Lichtenegger, H.; Riedler, W. ); Russell, C.T.; Luhmann, J.G. )

    1991-07-01

    The Mars bow shock location and shape have been determined by examining the PHOBOS spacecraft magnetometer data. Observations show that the position of the terminator bow shock varies with interplanetary magnetic field orientation in the same way as at Venus. The shock is farthest from Mars in the direction of the interplanetary electric field, consistent with the idea that mass loading plays an important role in the solar wind interaction with Mars. The authors also find that the shock cross section at the terminator plane is asymmetric and is controlled by the interplanetary magnetic field as expected from the asymmetric propagation velocity of the fast magnetosonic wave. Comparing with earlier mission data, they show that the Mars shock location varies with solar activity. The shock is farther from Mars during solar maximum. Thus the solar wind interaction with Mars appears to be Venuslike, with a magnetic moment too small to affect significantly the solar wind interaction.

  11. About NICADD extruded scintillating strips

    SciTech Connect

    Dyshkant, A.; Beznosko, D.; Blazey, G.; Chakraborty, D.; Francis, K.; Kubik, D.; Lima, J.G.; Rykalin, V.; Zutshi, v.; Baldina, E.; Bross, A.; Deering, P.; Nebel, T.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; Schellpfeffer, J.; Serritella, C.; Zimmerman, J.; /Fermilab

    2005-04-01

    The results of control measurements of extruded scintillating strip responses to a radioactive source Sr-90 are provided, and details of strip choice, preparation, and method of measurement are included. About four hundred one meter long extruded scintillating strips were measured at four different points. These results were essential for prototyping a tail catcher and muon tracker for a future international electron positron linear collider detector.

  12. Radio Emmision during the interaction of two Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lara, Alejandro; Niembro, Tatiana; González, Ricardo

    2016-07-01

    We show that some sporadic radio emission observed by the WIND/WAVES experiment in the decametric/kilometric bands are due to the interaction of two interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections. We have performed hydrodynamic simulations of the evolution of two consecutive Coronal Mass ejections in the interplanetary medium. With these simulations it is possible to follow the density evolution of the merged structure, and therefore, compute the frequency limits of the possible plasma emission. We study four well documented ICME interaction events, and found radio emission at the time and frequencies predicted by the simulations. This emission may help to anticipate the complexity of the merged region before it reaches one AU.

  13. Helicity transport from solar convection zone to interplanetary space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Mei

    2013-07-01

    Magnetic helicity is a physical quantity that describes field topology. It is also a conserved quantity as Berger in 1984 demonstrated that the total magnetic helicity is still conserved in the corona even when there is a fast magnetic reconnection. It is generally believed that solar magnetic fields, together with their helicity, are created in the convection zone by various dynamo processes. These fields and helicity are transported into the corona through solar photosphere and finally released into the interplanetary space via various processes such as coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and solar winds. Here I will give a brief review on our recent works, first on helicity observations on the photosphere and how to understand these observations via dynamo models. Mostly, I will talk about what are the possible consequences of magnetic helicity accumulation in the corona, namely, the formation of magnetic flux ropes, CMEs taking place as an unavoidable product of coronal evolution, and flux emergences as a trigger of CMEs. Finally, I will address on in what a form magnetic field in the interplanetary space would accommodate a large amount of magnetic helicity that solar dynamo processes have been continuously producing.

  14. Counterstreaming electrons in small interplanetary magnetic flux ropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, H. Q.; Zhao, G. Q.; Wang, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Small interplanetary magnetic flux ropes (SIMFRs) are commonly observed by spacecraft at 1 AU, and their origin still remains disputed. We investigated the counterstreaming suprathermal electron (CSE) signatures of 106 SIMFRs measured by Wind during 1995-2005. We found that 79 (75%) of the 106 flux ropes contain CSEs, and the percentages of counterstreaming vary from 8% to 98%, with a mean value of 51%. CSEs are often observed in magnetic clouds (MCs), and this indicates these MCs are still attached to the Sun at both ends. CSEs are also related to heliospheric current sheets (HCSs) and the Earth's bow shock. We divided the SIMFRs into two categories: The first category is far from HCSs, and the second category is in the vicinity of HCSs. The first category has 57 SIMFRs, and only 7 of 57 ropes have no CSEs. This ratio is similar to that of MCs. The second category has 49 SIMFRs; however, 20 of the 49 events have no CSEs. This ratio is larger than that of MCs. These two categories have different origins. One category originates from the solar corona, and most ropes are still connected to the Sun at both ends. The other category is formed near HCSs in the interplanetary space.

  15. Ionospheric Scintillation Effects on GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steenburgh, R. A.; Smithtro, C.; Groves, K.

    2007-12-01

    . Ionospheric scintillation of Global Positioning System (GPS) signals threatens navigation and military operations by degrading performance or making GPS unavailable. Scintillation is particularly active, although not limited to, a belt encircling the earth within 20 degrees of the geomagnetic equator. As GPS applications and users increases, so does the potential for detrimental impacts from scintillation. We examined amplitude scintillation data spanning seven years from Ascension Island, U.K.; Ancon, Peru; and Antofagasta, Chile in the Atlantic/Americas longitudinal sector at as well as data from Parepare, Indonesia; Marak Parak, Malaysia; Pontianak, Indonesia; Guam; and Diego Garcia, U.K.; in the Pacific longitudinal sector. From these data, we calculate percent probability of occurrence of scintillation at various intensities described by the S4 index. Additionally, we determine Dilution of Precision at one minute resolution. We examine diurnal, seasonal and solar cycle characteristics and make spatial comparisons. In general, activity was greatest during the equinoxes and solar maximum, although scintillation at Antofagasta, Chile was higher during 1998 rather than at solar maximum.

  16. Comparing the response of PSD-capable plastic scintillator to standard liquid scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolf, Richard S.; Hutcheson, Anthony L.; Gwon, Chul; Phlips, Bernard F.; Wulf, Eric A.

    2015-06-01

    This work discusses a test campaign to characterize the response of the recently developed plastic scintillator with pulse shape discrimination (PSD) capabilities (EJ-299-33). PSD is a property exhibited by certain types of scintillating material in which incident stimuli (fast neutrons or γ rays) can be separated by exploiting differences in the scintillation light pulse tail. Detector geometries used were: a 10 cm×10 cm×10 cm cube and a 10-cm diameter×10-cm long cylinder. EJ-301 and EJ-309 liquid scintillators with well-known responses were also tested. The work was conducted at the University of Massachusetts Lowell Van De Graaff accelerator. The facility accelerated protons on a thin Li target to yield quasi-monoenergetic neutrons from the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction (Q-value: -1.644 MeV). Collimated fast neutrons were obtained by placing detectors behind a neutron spectrometer. Rotating the spectrometer, and thus changing the neutron energy, allowed us to achieve 0.5-3.2 MeV neutrons in 200-300 keV steps. Data were acquired through a flash analog-to-digital converter (ADC) capable of performing digital PSD measurements. By using the PSD technique to separate the neutron events from unwanted γ background, we constructed a pulse height spectrum at each energy. Obtaining a relationship of the relative light output versus energy allowed us to construct the response function for the EJ-299-33 and liquid scintillator. The EJ-299-33 response in terms of electron equivalent energy (Ee.e.) vs. proton equivalent energy (Ep.e.), how it compared with the standard xylene-based EJ-301 (or, NE-213/BC-501 A equivalent) and EJ-309 liquid scintillator response, and how the EJ-301 and EJ-309 compared, are presented. We find that the EJ-299-33 demonstrated a lower light output by up to 40% for <1.0 MeV neutrons; and ranging between a 5-35% reduction for 2.5-3.0 MeV neutrons compared to the EJ-301/309, depending on the scintillator and geometry. Monte Carlo modeling techniques were

  17. Measurement of Scintillation and Ionization Yield and Scintillation Pulse Shape from Nuclear Recoils in Liquid Argon

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cao, H.

    2015-05-26

    We have measured the scintillation and ionization yield of recoiling nuclei in liquid argon as a function of applied electric field by exposing a dual-phase liquid argon time projection chamber (LAr-TPC) to a low energy pulsed narrow band neutron beam produced at the Notre Dame Institute for Structure and Nuclear Astrophysics. Liquid scintillation counters were arranged to detect and identify neutrons scattered in the TPC and to select the energy of the recoiling nuclei. We also report measurements of the scintillation yields for nuclear recoils with energies from 10.3 to 57.3 keV and for median applied electric fields from 0more » to 970 V/cm. For the ionization yields, we report measurements from 16.9 to 57.3 keV and for electric fields from 96.4 to 486 V/cm. Furthermore, we report the observation of an anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from nuclear recoils, which is similar to the anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from electron recoils. Assuming that the energy loss partitions into excitons and ion pairs from 83mKr internal conversion electrons is comparable to that from 207Bi conversion electrons, we obtained the numbers of excitons (Nex) and ion pairs (Ni) and their ratio (Nex/Ni) produced by nuclear recoils from 16.9 to 57.3 keV. Motivated by arguments suggesting direction sensitivity in LAr-TPC signals due to columnar recombination, a comparison of the light and charge yield of recoils parallel and perpendicular to the applied electric field is presented for the first time.« less

  18. Measurement of scintillation and ionization yield and scintillation pulse shape from nuclear recoils in liquid argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, H.; Alexander, T.; Aprahamian, A.; Avetisyan, R.; Back, H. O.; Cocco, A. G.; Dejongh, F.; Fiorillo, G.; Galbiati, C.; Grandi, L.; Guardincerri, Y.; Kendziora, C.; Lippincott, W. H.; Love, C.; Lyons, S.; Manenti, L.; Martoff, C. J.; Meng, Y.; Montanari, D.; Mosteiro, P.; Olvitt, D.; Pordes, S.; Qian, H.; Rossi, B.; Saldanha, R.; Sangiorgio, S.; Siegl, K.; Strauss, S. Y.; Tan, W.; Tatarowicz, J.; Walker, S.; Wang, H.; Watson, A. W.; Westerdale, S.; Yoo, J.; Scene Collaboration

    2015-05-01

    We have measured the scintillation and ionization yield of recoiling nuclei in liquid argon as a function of applied electric field by exposing a dual-phase liquid argon time projection chamber (LAr-TPC) to a low energy pulsed narrow band neutron beam produced at the Notre Dame Institute for Structure and Nuclear Astrophysics. Liquid scintillation counters were arranged to detect and identify neutrons scattered in the TPC and to select the energy of the recoiling nuclei. We report measurements of the scintillation yields for nuclear recoils with energies from 10.3 to 57.3 keV and for median applied electric fields from 0 to 970 V /cm . For the ionization yields, we report measurements from 16.9 to 57.3 keV and for electric fields from 96.4 to 486 V /cm . We also report the observation of an anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from nuclear recoils, which is similar to the anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from electron recoils. Assuming that the energy loss partitions into excitons and ion pairs from Krm83 internal conversion electrons is comparable to that from 207Bi conversion electrons, we obtained the numbers of excitons (Nex) and ion pairs (Ni) and their ratio (Nex/Ni ) produced by nuclear recoils from 16.9 to 57.3 keV. Motivated by arguments suggesting direction sensitivity in LAr-TPC signals due to columnar recombination, a comparison of the light and charge yield of recoils parallel and perpendicular to the applied electric field is presented for the first time.

  19. Measurement of Scintillation and Ionization Yield and Scintillation Pulse Shape from Nuclear Recoils in Liquid Argon

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, H.

    2015-05-26

    We have measured the scintillation and ionization yield of recoiling nuclei in liquid argon as a function of applied electric field by exposing a dual-phase liquid argon time projection chamber (LAr-TPC) to a low energy pulsed narrow band neutron beam produced at the Notre Dame Institute for Structure and Nuclear Astrophysics. Liquid scintillation counters were arranged to detect and identify neutrons scattered in the TPC and to select the energy of the recoiling nuclei. We also report measurements of the scintillation yields for nuclear recoils with energies from 10.3 to 57.3 keV and for median applied electric fields from 0 to 970 V/cm. For the ionization yields, we report measurements from 16.9 to 57.3 keV and for electric fields from 96.4 to 486 V/cm. Furthermore, we report the observation of an anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from nuclear recoils, which is similar to the anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from electron recoils. Assuming that the energy loss partitions into excitons and ion pairs from 83mKr internal conversion electrons is comparable to that from 207Bi conversion electrons, we obtained the numbers of excitons (Nex) and ion pairs (Ni) and their ratio (Nex/Ni) produced by nuclear recoils from 16.9 to 57.3 keV. Motivated by arguments suggesting direction sensitivity in LAr-TPC signals due to columnar recombination, a comparison of the light and charge yield of recoils parallel and perpendicular to the applied electric field is presented for the first time.

  20. Extruded plastic scintillator including inorganic powders

    DOEpatents

    Bross, Alan D.; Mellott, Kerry L.; Pla-Dalmau, Anna

    2006-06-27

    A method for producing a plastic scintillator is disclosed. A plurality of nano-sized particles and one or more dopants can be combined with a plastic material for the formation of a plastic scintillator thereof. The nano-sized particles, the dopant and the plastic material can be combined within the dry inert atmosphere of an extruder to produce a reaction that results in the formation of a plastic scintillator thereof and the deposition of energy within the plastic scintillator, such that the plastic scintillator produces light signifying the detection of a radiative element. The nano-sized particles can be treated with an inert gas prior to processing the nano-sized particles, the dopant and the plastic material utilizing the extruder. The plastic scintillator can be a neutron-sensitive scintillator, x-ray sensitive scintillator and/or a scintillator for the detection of minimum ionizing particles.

  1. Raman spectra of seven interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Yin-Lin; Yu, Min; Fan, Chang-Yun

    1992-01-01

    The Raman shift spectra of seven interplanetary dust particles, U2034(F10), U2034(F8), U2022(B1), W7074 18, W7074 C15, W7074 C3 and W7074 A7, were measured with a Spex-1403 Raman spectrograph. The exciting radiations were the 488 nm and 514 nm line of a 5W argon ion laser. All seven spectra exhibit the 1350 and 1600 Delta/cm arbon bands, implying that the Interplanetary dust particles were coated with hydrocarbon and incompletely crystallized carbon, the part of which may be the residue of hydrocarbon contents in the particles after water loss by the heating during their entry into the earth's atmosphere. A weak band structure in the 520-610/cm range could be caused by cyclosilicates, and a weak band at 2900/cm is tentatively identified as due to hydrocarbon molecules.

  2. Do interplanetary Alfven waves cause auroral activity?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, D. Aaron; Goldstein, Melvyn L.

    1990-01-01

    A recent theory holds that high-intensity, long-duration, continuous auroral activity (HILDCAA) is caused by interplanetary Alfven waves propagating outward from the sun. A survey of Alfvenic intervals in over a year of ISEE 3 data shows that while Alfvenic intervals often accompany HILDCAAs, the reverse is often not true. There are many Alfvenic intervals during which auroral activity (measured by high values of the AE index) is very low, as well as times of high auroral activity that are not highly Alfvenic. This analysis supports the common conclusion that large AE values are associated with a southward interplanetary field of sufficient strength and duration. This field configuration is independent of the presence of Alfven waves (whether solar generated or not) and is expected to occur at random intervals in the large-amplitude stochastic fluctuations in the solar wind.

  3. Software Risk Identification for Interplanetary Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dougherty, Robert J.; Papadopoulos, Periklis E.

    2005-01-01

    The need for a systematic and effective software risk identification methodology is critical for interplanetary probes that are using increasingly complex and critical software. Several probe failures are examined that suggest more attention and resources need to be dedicated to identifying software risks. The direct causes of these failures can often be traced to systemic problems in all phases of the software engineering process. These failures have lead to the development of a practical methodology to identify risks for interplanetary probes. The proposed methodology is based upon the tailoring of the Software Engineering Institute's (SEI) method of taxonomy-based risk identification. The use of this methodology will ensure a more consistent and complete identification of software risks in these probes.

  4. Unique Views of Scintillation and Density Structures from the CORISS GPS Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, R. L.; Straus, P. R.

    2015-12-01

    After eight years in orbit the Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite is scheduled to re-enter in the fall of 2015. During the last year of its life, the orbit often brought the satellite to altitudes below the F-peak. The C/NOFS Occultation Receiver for Ionospheric Sensing (CORISS) GPS sensor provided TEC and scintillation observations via GPS occultation for most of the C/NOFS mission. Once the C/NOFS orbit is lower than the F-peak, radio occultation observations cannot be used to probe the ionosphere. However, CORISS also tracks signals above the horizon that can provide TEC and scintillation observations. The low C/NOFS orbit provides a unique vantage point for CORISS to look up into regions of scintillation. This presentation explores scintillation as observed below the low F-region, its occurrence, intensity variations, and its distribution. We compare statistically the measurements to occulting scintillation measurements.

  5. Role of solar wind speed and interplanetary magnetic field during two-step Forbush decreases caused by Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhaskar, Ankush; Vichare, Geeta; Arunbabu, K. P.; Raghav, Anil

    2016-07-01

    The relationship of Forbush decreases (FDs) observed in Moscow neutron monitor with the interplanetary magnetic field (B) and solar wind speed (Vsw) is investigated in detail for the FDs associated with Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs) during 2001-2004. The classical two-step FD events are selected, and characteristics of the first step (mainly associated with shock), as well as of complete decrease (main phase) and recovery phase, are studied here. It is observed that the onset of FD occurs generally after zero to a few hours of shock arrival, indicating in the post-shock region that mainly sheath and ICME act as important drivers of FD. A good correlation is observed between the amplitude of B and associated FD magnitude observed in the neutron count rate of the main phase. The duration of the main phase observed in the neutron count rate also shows good correlation with B. This might indicate that stronger interplanetary disturbances have a large dimension of magnetic field structure which causes longer fall time of FD main phase when they transit across the Earth. It is observed that Vsw and neutron count rate time profiles show considerable similarity with each other during complete FD, especially during the recovery phase of FD. Linear relationship is observed between time duration/e-folding time of FD recovery phase and Vsw. These observations indicate that the FDs are influenced by the inhibited diffusion of cosmic rays due to the enhanced convection associated with the interplanetary disturbances. We infer that the inhibited cross-field diffusion of the cosmic rays due to enhanced B is mainly responsible for the main phase of FD whereas the expansion of ICME contributes in the early recovery phase and the gradual variation of Vsw beyond ICME boundaries contributes to the long duration of FD recovery through reduced convection-diffusion.

  6. Integrated shielding systems for manned interplanetary spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Jeffrey A.

    1992-01-01

    The radiation environment encountered by manned interplanetary missions can have a severe impact on both vehicle design and mission performance. This study investigates the potential impact of radiation protection on interplanetary vehicle design for a manned Mars mission. A systems approach was used to investigate the radiation protection requirements of the sum interplanetary environment. Radiation budgets were developed which result in minimum integrated shielding system masses for both nuclear and non-nuclear powered missions. A variety of system configurations and geometries were assessed over a range of dose constraints. For an annual dose equivalent rate limit of 50 rem/yr, an environmental shielding system composed of a habitat shield and storm shelter was found to result in the lowest total mass. For a limit of 65 rem/yr, a system composed of a sleeping quarters shield was least massive, and resulted in significantly reduced system mass. At a limit of 75 rem/yr, a storm shelter alone was found to be sufficient, and exhibited a further mass reduction. Optimal shielding system results for 10 MWe nuclear powered missions were found to follow along similar lines, with the addition of a reactor shadow shield. A solar minimum galactic cosmic ray spectrum and one anomalously large solar particle event during the course of a two year mission were assumed. Water was assumed for environmental radiation shielding.

  7. Periodicities of Interplanetary Solar Type III radio bursts occurrence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksimovic, Milan; Navrer-Agasson, Anyssa; Sperone-Longin, Damien; Bonnin, Xavier

    2015-04-01

    We have analyzed 15 years of solar radio observations by the Wind spacecraft in order to detect automatically the Interplanetary Solar Type III radio bursts occurrence. We then compare the daily number of type III radio emissions with the daily number of sunspots. We find, as expected, a very good correlation between the two quantities. We investigate then for periodicities in the daily occurrence of type III bursts by applying a wavelet analysis and compare these periodicities to the ones obtained with the sunspots. We observe a typical Rieger-Type period of about 150 days for both the Type IIIs and the sunspots, with a temporal location of the maximum of this periodicity which is however different for the two data sets. We discuss this difference and compare our results to previous similar studies applied on ground based observations of Type III activity.

  8. Whistler Waves Associated with Weak Interplanetary Shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Velez, J. C. Ramirez; Blanco-Cano, X.; Aguilar-Rodriguez, E.; Russell, C. T.; Kajdic, P.; Jian,, L. K.; Luhmann, J. G.

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the properties of 98 weak interplanetary shocks measured by the dual STEREO spacecraft over approximately 3 years during the past solar minimum. We study the occurrence of whistler waves associated with these shocks, which on average are high beta shocks (0.2 < Beta < 10). We have compared the waves properties upstream and downstream of the shocks. In the upstream region the waves are mainly circularly polarized, and in most of the cases (approx. 75%) they propagate almost parallel to the ambient magnetic field (<30 deg.). In contrast, the propagation angle with respect to the shock normal varies in a broad range of values (20 deg. to 90 deg.), suggesting that they are not phase standing. We find that the whistler waves can extend up to 100,000 km in the upstream region but in most cases (88%) are contained in a distance within 30,000 km from the shock. This corresponds to a larger region with upstream whistlers associated with IP shocks than previously reported in the literature. The maximum amplitudes of the waves are observed next to the shock interface, and they decrease as the distance to the shock increases. In most cases the wave propagation direction becomes more aligned with the magnetic field as the distance to the shock increases. These two facts suggest that most of the waves in the upstream region are Landau damping as they move away from the shock. From the analysis we also conclude that it is likely that the generation mechanism of the upstream whistler waves is taking place at the shock interface. In the downstream region, the waves are irregularly polarized, and the fluctuations are very compressive; that is, the compressive component of the wave clearly dominates over the transverse one. The majority of waves in the downstream region (95%) propagate at oblique angles with respect to the ambient magnetic field (>60 deg.). The wave propagation with respect to the shock-normal direction has no preferred direction and varies similarly to

  9. Water and organics in interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, John P.

    2015-08-01

    Interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and larger micrometeorites (MMs) impinge on the upper atmosphere where they decelerate at ~90 km altitude and settle to the Earth’s surface. Comets and asteroids are the major sources and the flux, 30,000-40,000 tons/yr, is comparable to the mass of larger meteorites impacting the Earth’s surface. The sedimentary record suggests that the flux was much higher on the early Earth. The chondritic porous (CP) subset of IDPs together with their larger counterparts, ultracarbonaceous micrometeorites (UCMMs), appear to be unique among known meteoritic materials in that they are composed almost exclusively of anhydrous minerals, some of them contain >> 50% organic carbon by volume as well as the highest abundances of presolar silicate grains including GEMS. D/H and 15N abundances implicate the Oort Cloud or presolar molecular cloud as likely sources of the organic carbon. Prior to atmospheric entry, IDPs and MMs spend ~104-105 year lifetimes in solar orbit where their surfaces develop amorphous space weathered rims from exposure to the solar wind (SW). Similar rims are observed on lunar soil grains and on asteroid Itokawa regolith grains. Using valence electron energy-loss spectroscopy (VEELS) we have detected radiolytic water in the rims on IDPs formed by the interaction of solar wind protons with oxygen in silicate minerals. Therefore, IDPs and MMs continuously deliver both water and organics to the earth and other terrestrial planets. The interaction of protons with oxygen-rich minerals to form water is a universal process.Affiliations:a University of Hawaii at Manoa, Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, 1680 East-West Road, Honolulu, HI 96822, USA.b National Center for Electron Microscopy, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA.c Materials Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA.d Department of Materials Science & Engineering, University of California

  10. Linked Autonomous Interplanetary Satellite Orbit Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Jeffrey S.; Anderson, Rodney L.; Born, George H.; Leonard, Jason M.; McGranaghan, Ryan M.; Fujimoto, Kohei

    2013-01-01

    A navigation technology known as LiAISON (Linked Autonomous Interplanetary Satellite Orbit Navigation) has been known to produce very impressive navigation results for scenarios involving two or more cooperative satellites near the Moon, such that at least one satellite must be in an orbit significantly perturbed by the Earth, such as a lunar halo orbit. The two (or more) satellites track each other using satellite-to-satellite range and/or range-rate measurements. These relative measurements yield absolute orbit navigation when one of the satellites is in a lunar halo orbit, or the like. The geometry between a lunar halo orbiter and a GEO satellite continuously changes, which dramatically improves the information content of a satellite-to-satellite tracking signal. The geometrical variations include significant out-of-plane shifts, as well as inplane shifts. Further, the GEO satellite is almost continuously in view of a lunar halo orbiter. High-fidelity simulations demonstrate that LiAISON technology improves the navigation of GEO orbiters by an order of magnitude, relative to standard ground tracking. If a GEO satellite is navigated using LiAISON- only tracking measurements, its position is typically known to better than 10 meters. If LiAISON measurements are combined with simple radiometric ground observations, then the satellite s position is typically known to better than 3 meters, which is substantially better than the current state of GEO navigation. There are two features of LiAISON that are novel and advantageous compared with conventional satellite navigation. First, ordinary satellite-to-satellite tracking data only provides relative navigation of each satellite. The novelty is the placement of one navigation satellite in an orbit that is significantly perturbed by both the Earth and the Moon. A navigation satellite can track other satellites elsewhere in the Earth-Moon system and acquire knowledge about both satellites absolute positions and velocities

  11. Magnetic field line lengths inside interplanetary magnetic flux ropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Qiang; Qiu, Jiong; Krucker, Sam

    2015-07-01

    We report on the detailed and systematic study of field line twist and length distributions within magnetic flux ropes embedded in interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs). The Grad-Shafranov reconstruction method is utilized together with a constant-twist nonlinear force-free (Gold-Hoyle) flux rope model to reveal the close relation between the field line twist and length in cylindrical flux ropes, based on in situ Wind spacecraft measurements. We show that the field line twist distributions within interplanetary flux ropes are inconsistent with the Lundquist model. In particular, we utilize the unique measurements of magnetic field line lengths within selected ICME events as provided by Kahler et al. () based on energetic electron burst observations at 1 AU and the associated type III radio emissions detected by the Wind spacecraft. These direct measurements are compared with our model calculations to help assess the flux rope interpretation of the embedded magnetic structures. By using the different flux rope models, we show that the in situ direct measurements of field line lengths are consistent with a flux rope structure with spiral field lines of constant and low twist, largely different from that of the Lundquist model, especially for relatively large-scale flux ropes.

  12. Spectral analysis of magnetohydrodynamic fluctuations near interplanetary schocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinas, A. F.; Goldstein, M. L.; Acuna, M. H.

    1983-01-01

    Evidence for two types of relatively large amplitude MHD waves upstream and downstream of quasi-parallel forward and reverse interplanetary shocks is presented. The first mode is an Alfven wave with frequencies (in the spacecraft frame) in the range of 0.025 to 0.07 Hz. This is a left-hand polarized mode and propagates within a few degrees of the ambient magnetic field. The second is a fast MHD mode with frequencies in the range of 0.025 to 0.17 Hz, right-hand polarization and propagating along the magnetic field. These waves are detected principally in association with quasi-parallel shock. The Alfven waves are found to have plasma rest frame frequencies in the range of 1.1 to 6.3 mHz with wavelengths in the order of 4.8 x 10 to the 8th power to 2.7 x 10 to the 9th power cm. Similarly, the fast MHD modes have rest frame frequencies in the range 1.6 to 26 mHz with typical wavelengths about 2.19 x 10 to the 8th power cm. The magnetic field power spectrum in the vicinity of these interplanetary shocks is much steeper than f to the -s/3 at high frequencies. The observed spectra have a high frequency dependence of f to the -2/5 to f to the -4.

  13. First Taste of Hot Channel in Interplanetary Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, H. Q.; Zhang, J.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, X.; Li, G.; Wang, Y. M.

    2015-04-01

    A hot channel (HC) is a high temperature (˜10 MK) structure in the inner corona first revealed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. Eruptions of HCs are often associated with flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Results of previous studies have suggested that an HC is a good proxy for a magnetic flux rope (MFR) in the inner corona as well as another well known MFR candidate, the prominence-cavity structure, which has a normal coronal temperature (˜1-2 MK). In this paper, we report a high temperature structure (HTS, ˜1.5 MK) contained in an interplanetary CME induced by an HC eruption. According to the observations of bidirectional electrons, high temperature and density, strong magnetic field, and its association with the shock, sheath, and plasma pile-up region, we suggest that the HTS is the interplanetary counterpart of the HC. The scale of the measured HTS is around 14 R ⊙ , and it maintained a much higher temperature than the background solar wind even at 1 AU. It is significantly different from the typical magnetic clouds, which usually have a much lower temperature. Our study suggests that the existence of a corotating interaction region ahead of the HC formed a magnetic container to inhibit expansion of the HC and cool it down to a low temperature.

  14. First Taste of Hot Channel in Interplanetary Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, H. Q.; Zhang, J.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, X.; Li, G.; Wang, Y. M.

    2015-04-01

    A hot channel (HC) is a high temperature (∼10 MK) structure in the inner corona first revealed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. Eruptions of HCs are often associated with flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Results of previous studies have suggested that an HC is a good proxy for a magnetic flux rope (MFR) in the inner corona as well as another well known MFR candidate, the prominence-cavity structure, which has a normal coronal temperature (∼1–2 MK). In this paper, we report a high temperature structure (HTS, ∼1.5 MK) contained in an interplanetary CME induced by an HC eruption. According to the observations of bidirectional electrons, high temperature and density, strong magnetic field, and its association with the shock, sheath, and plasma pile-up region, we suggest that the HTS is the interplanetary counterpart of the HC. The scale of the measured HTS is around 14 R ȯ , and it maintained a much higher temperature than the background solar wind even at 1 AU. It is significantly different from the typical magnetic clouds, which usually have a much lower temperature. Our study suggests that the existence of a corotating interaction region ahead of the HC formed a magnetic container to inhibit expansion of the HC and cool it down to a low temperature.

  15. Scintillations during occultations by planets. 1. An approximate theory. [fresnel region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, A. T.

    1975-01-01

    Scintillations observed during occultations of both stars and spacecraft by planetary atmospheres are discussed theoretically. The effects of severe flattening of the Fresnel zone or source image by defocusing on occultations are presented, along with temporal power spectra. Other topics discussed include atmospheric turbulence, saturation of scintillation, effects of saturation on occultation curves, and some methods for a more accurate determination of atmospheric structure.

  16. Ionospheric Disturbances and Their Impact on IPS Using MEXART Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Martínez, M.; Pérez-Enríquez, H. R.; Carrillo-Vargas, A.; López-Montes, R.; Araujo-Pradere, E. A.; Casillas-Pérez, G. A.; Cruz-Abeyro, J. A. L.

    2014-07-01

    We study the impact of ionospheric disturbances on the Earth's environment caused by the solar events that occurred from 20 April to 31 May 2010, using observations from the Mexican Array Radio Telescope (MEXART). During this period of time, several astronomical sources presented fluctuations in their radio signals. Wavelet analysis, together with complementary information such as the vertical total electron content ( vTEC) and the Dst index, were used to identify and understand when the interplanetary scintillation (IPS) could be contaminated by ionospheric disturbances (IOND). We find that radio signal perturbations were sometimes associated with IOND and/or IPS fluctuations; however, in some cases, it was not possible to clearly identify their origin. Our Fourier and wavelet analyses showed that these fluctuations had frequencies in the range ≈ 0.01 Hz - ≈ 1.0 Hz (periodicities of 100 s to 1 s).

  17. FNAL-NICADD extruded scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Beznosko, D.; Bross, A.; Dyshkant, A.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; Rykalin, V.; /Northern Illinois U.

    2005-09-01

    The possibility to produce a scintillator that satisfies the demands of physicists from different science areas has emerged with the installation of an extrusion line at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL). The extruder is the product of the fruitful collaboration between FNAL and Northern Illinois Center for Accelerator and Detector Development (NICADD) at Northern Illinois University (NIU). The results from the light output, light attenuation length and mechanical tolerance indicate that FNAL-NICADD scintillator is of high quality. Improvements in the extrusion die will yield better scintillator profiles and decrease the time needed for initial tuning. This paper will present the characteristics of the FNAL-NICADD scintillator based on the measurements performed. They include the response to MIPs from cosmic rays for individual extruded strips and irradiation studies where extruded samples were irradiated up to 1 Mrad. We will also discuss the results achieved with a new die design. The attractive perspective of using the extruded scintillator with MRS (Metal Resistive Semiconductor) photodetector readout will also be shown.

  18. High-latitude irregularity spectra deduced from scintillation measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wernik, A.W.; Gola, M.; Liu, C.H.; Franke, S.J. Illinois Univ., Urbana )

    1990-10-01

    High-latitude scintillation data show that the strength and spectral index of intensity scintillation are dependent on the propagation geometry. It is shown here that anisotropic irregularity spectra, with different indices along and across the magnetic field, lead to geometrical effects similar to those observed. In general, the spectrum along the magnetic field is steeper than that across the field, and the difference is more pronounced for nighttime conditions. Spectral anisotropy can be interpreted as a size-dependent irregularity anisotropy. It is found that large-scale irregularities in the daytime and nighttime ionosphere are almost isotropic, while small-scale irregularities are anisotropic and considerably more so at night than during the day. It is shown that anisotropic irregularity spectra could account for the observed scintillation and in situ temporal spectra with frequency-dependent slope. 26 refs.

  19. Interplanetary double-shock ensembles with anomalous electrical conductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dryer, M.

    1972-01-01

    Similarity theory is applied to the case of constant velocity, piston-driven, shock waves. This family of solutions, incorporating the interplanetary magnetic field for the case of infinite electric conductivity, represents one class of experimentally observed, flare-generated shock waves. This paper discusses the theoretical extension to flows with finite conductivity (presumably caused by unspecified modes of wave-particle interactions). Solutions, including reverse shocks, are found for a wide range of magnetic Reynolds numbers from one to infinity. Consideration of a zero and nonzero ambient flowing solar wind (together with removal of magnetic considerations) enables the recovery of earlier similarity solutions as well as numerical simulations. A limited comparison with observations suggests that flare energetics can be reasonably estimated once the shock velocity, ambient solar wind velocity and density, and ambient azimuthal Alfven Mach number are known.

  20. Radiopure metal-loaded liquid scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Rosero, Richard; Yeh, Minfang

    2015-08-17

    Metal-loaded liquid scintillator plays a key role in particle and nuclear physics experiments. The applications of metal ions in various neutrino experiments and the purification methods for different scintillator components are discussed in this paper.

  1. Radiopure Metal-Loaded Liquid Scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Rosero, Richard; Yeh, Minfang

    2015-03-18

    Metal-loaded liquid scintillator plays a key role in particle and nuclear physics experiments. The applications of metal ions in various neutrino experiments and the purification methods for different scintillator components are discussed in this paper.

  2. In situ wave phenomena in the upstream and downstream regions of interplanetary shocks: Implications for type 2 burst theories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thejappa, G.; MacDowall, R. J.; Vinas, A. F.

    1997-01-01

    The results are presented of in situ waves observed by the Ulyssess unified radio and plasma wave experiment (URAP) in the upstream and downstream regions of a large number of interplanetary shocks. The Langmuir waves which are the most essential ingredients for the type 2 radio emission are observed only in the upstream regions of a limited number of shocks. On the other hand, the ion-acoustic-like waves (0.5 to 5 kHz) are observed near most of the interplanetary shocks. Implications of observations made for the electron acceleration mechanisms at the collisionless shocks and for type 2 burst theories are presented.

  3. Unitary scintillation detector and system

    DOEpatents

    McElhaney, S.A.; Chiles, M.M.

    1994-05-31

    The invention is a unitary alpha, beta, and gamma scintillation detector and system for sensing the presence of alpha, beta, and gamma radiations selectively or simultaneously. The scintillators are mounted in a light-tight housing provided with an entrance window for admitting alpha, beta, and gamma radiation and excluding ambient light from the housing. Light pulses from each scintillator have different decay constants that are converted by a photosensitive device into corresponding differently shaped electrical pulses. A pulse discrimination system identifies the electrical pulses by their respective pulse shapes which are determined by decay time. The identified electrical pulses are counted in separate channel analyzers to indicate the respective levels of sensed alpha, beta, and gamma radiations. 10 figs.

  4. Unitary scintillation detector and system

    DOEpatents

    McElhaney, Stephanie A.; Chiles, Marion M.

    1994-01-01

    The invention is a unitary alpha, beta, and gamma scintillation detector and system for sensing the presence of alpha, beta, and gamma radiations selectively or simultaneously. The scintillators are mounted in a light-tight housing provided with an entrance window for admitting alpha, beta, and gamma radiation and excluding ambient light from the housing. Light pulses from each scintillator have different decay constants that are converted by a photosensitive device into corresponding differently shaped electrical pulses. A pulse discrimination system identifies the electrical pulses by their respective pulse shapes which are determined by decay time. The identified electrical pulses are counted in separate channel analyzers to indicate the respective levels of sensed alpha, beta, and gamma radiations.

  5. Scintillation at two optical frequencies.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, W B; Reitsema, H J

    1981-09-15

    Stellar scintillation data were obtained on a single night at a variety of zenith distances and azimuths, using a photon-counting photometer recording at 100 Hz simultaneously at wavelengths of 0.475 microm and 0.870 microm. Orientable apertures of 42-cm diam separated by 1 m were used to establish the average upper atmosphere wind direction and velocity. Dispersion in the earth's atmosphere separate the average optical paths at the two wavelengths, permitting a reconstruction of the spatial cross-correlation function for scintillations, independent of assumptions about differential fluid motions. Although there is clear evidence of a complicated velocity field, scintillation power was predominantly produced by levels at pressures of 130 +/- 30 mbar. The data are not grossly inconsistent with layers of isotropic Kolmogorov turbulence, but there is some evidence for deviation from the Kolmogorov spectral index and/or anisotropy.

  6. Fracture-resistant lanthanide scintillators

    DOEpatents

    Doty, F. Patrick

    2011-01-04

    Lanthanide halide alloys have recently enabled scintillating gamma ray spectrometers comparable to room temperature semiconductors (<3% FWHM energy resolutions at 662 keV). However brittle fracture of these materials upon cooling hinders the growth of large volume crystals. Efforts to improve the strength through non-lanthanide alloy substitution, while preserving scintillation, have been demonstrated. Isovalent alloys having nominal compositions of comprising Al, Ga, Sc, Y, and In dopants as well as aliovalent alloys comprising Ca, Sr, Zr, Hf, Zn, and Pb dopants were prepared. All of these alloys exhibit bright fluorescence under UV excitation, with varying shifts in the spectral peaks and intensities relative to pure CeBr.sub.3. Further, these alloys scintillate when coupled to a photomultiplier tube (PMT) and exposed to .sup.137Cs gamma rays.

  7. Scintillation-Hardened GPS Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Donald R.

    2015-01-01

    CommLargo, Inc., has developed a scintillation-hardened Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver that improves reliability for low-orbit missions and complies with NASA's Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS) architecture standards. A software-defined radio (SDR) implementation allows a single hardware element to function as either a conventional radio or as a GPS receiver, providing backup and redundancy for platforms such as the International Space Station (ISS) and high-value remote sensing platforms. The innovation's flexible SDR implementation reduces cost, weight, and power requirements. Scintillation hardening improves mission reliability and variability. In Phase I, CommLargo refactored an open-source GPS software package with Kalman filter-based tracking loops to improve performance during scintillation and also demonstrated improved navigation during a geomagnetic storm. In Phase II, the company generated a new field-programmable gate array (FPGA)-based GPS waveform to demonstrate on NASA's Space Communication and Navigation (SCaN) test bed.

  8. Development of radiation hard scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Markley, F.; Woods, D.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; Foster, G. ); Blackburn, R. )

    1992-05-01

    Substantial improvements have been made in the radiation hardness of plastic scintillators. Cylinders of scintillating materials 2.2 cm in diameter and 1 cm thick have been exposed to 10 Mrads of gamma rays at a dose rate of 1 Mrad/h in a nitrogen atmosphere. One of the formulations tested showed an immediate decrease in pulse height of only 4% and has remained stable for 12 days while annealing in air. By comparison a commercial PVT scintillator showed an immediate decrease of 58% and after 43 days of annealing in air it improved to a 14% loss. The formulated sample consisted of 70 parts by weight of Dow polystyrene, 30 pbw of pentaphenyltrimethyltrisiloxane (Dow Corning DC 705 oil), 2 pbw of p-terphenyl, 0.2 pbw of tetraphenylbutadiene, and 0.5 pbw of UVASIL299LM from Ferro.

  9. An improved model for interplanetary dust fluxes in the outer Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppe, Andrew R.

    2016-01-01

    We present an improved model for interplanetary dust grain fluxes in the outer Solar System constrained by in situ dust density observations. A dynamical dust grain tracing code is used to establish relative dust grain densities and three-dimensional velocity distributions in the outer Solar System for four main sources of dust grains: Jupiter-family comets, Halley-type comets, Oort-Cloud comets, and Edgeworth-Kuiper Belt objects. Model densities are constrained by in situ dust measurements by the New Horizons Student Dust Counter, the Pioneer 10 meteoroid detector, and the Galileo Dust Detection System (DDS). The model predicts that Jupiter-family comet grains dominate the interplanetary dust grain mass flux inside approximately 10 AU, Oort-Cloud cometary grains may dominate between 10 and 25 AU, and Edgeworth-Kuiper Belt grains are dominant outside 25 AU. The model also predicts that while the total interplanetary mass flux at Jupiter roughly matches that inferred by the analysis of the Galileo DDS measurements, mass fluxes to Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune are at least one order-of-magnitude lower than that predicted by extrapolations of dust grain flux models from 1 AU. Finally, we compare the model predictions of interplanetary dust oxygen influx to the giant planet atmospheres with various observational and photochemical constraints and generally find good agreement, with the exception of Jupiter, which suggests the possibility of additional chemical pathways for exogenous oxygen in Jupiter's atmosphere.

  10. A DATABASE OF >20 keV ELECTRON GREEN'S FUNCTIONS OF INTERPLANETARY TRANSPORT AT 1 AU

    SciTech Connect

    Agueda, N.; Sanahuja, B.; Vainio, R.

    2012-10-15

    We use interplanetary transport simulations to compute a database of electron Green's functions, i.e., differential intensities resulting at the spacecraft position from an impulsive injection of energetic (>20 keV) electrons close to the Sun, for a large number of values of two standard interplanetary transport parameters: the scattering mean free path and the solar wind speed. The nominal energy channels of the ACE, STEREO, and Wind spacecraft have been used in the interplanetary transport simulations to conceive a unique tool for the study of near-relativistic electron events observed at 1 AU. In this paper, we quantify the characteristic times of the Green's functions (onset and peak time, rise and decay phase duration) as a function of the interplanetary transport conditions. We use the database to calculate the FWHM of the pitch-angle distributions at different times of the event and under different scattering conditions. This allows us to provide a first quantitative result that can be compared with observations, and to assess the validity of the frequently used term beam-like pitch-angle distribution.

  11. Interplanetary stream magnetism - Kinematic effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Barouch, E.

    1976-01-01

    The particle density and the magnetic-field intensity and direction are calculated for volume elements of the solar wind as a function of the initial magnetic-field direction and the initial speed gradient. It is assumed that the velocity is constant and radial. These assumptions are approximately valid between about 0.1 and 1.0 AU for many streams. Time profiles of the particle density, field intensity, and velocity are calculated for corotating streams, neglecting effects of pressure gradients. The compression and rarefaction of the magnetic field depend sensitively on the initial field direction. By averaging over a typical stream, it is found that the average radial field intensity is inversely proportional to the square of the heliocentric distance, whereas the average intensity in the direction of the planets' motion does not vary in a simple way, consistent with deep space observations. Changes of field direction may be very large, depending on the initial angle; but when the initial angle at 0.1 AU is such that the base of the field line corotates with the sun, the spiral angle is the preferred direction at 1 AU. The theory is also applicable to nonstationary flows.

  12. The influence of interplanetary shocks on solar protons measured in the stratosphere.

    PubMed

    Bazilevskaya, G A; Stozhkov YuI; Struminsky, A B

    1994-10-01

    Since the beginning of the 22nd solar cycle twenty solar proton events were observed by the regular balloon measurements of cosmic rays. Temporal changes of intensities and energy spectra of solar protons with energy 100-500 MeV were obtained. The strong influence of interplanetary shock waves on the proton flux characteristics near the Earth was observed. Possible effects of solar proton transport in the vicinity of shock fronts are discussed to explain the observational data.

  13. Statistical study of the GPS phase scintillation associated with plasma blobs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yaqi; Miloch, Wojciech; Moen, Joran

    2016-04-01

    We present a study of the space weather effect of GNSS scintillation in the auroral/polar cap ionosphere with multi-instrument observations, including GNSS scintillation receiver, all-sky imager, and EISCAT radar. We focus on the period when polar cap patches (islands of high density F region plasma with density enhanced more than twice above the surrounding) exit the polar cap. When the patch exits into the nightside auroral region (and then it is termed blob), the GNSS phase scintillation can be enhanced; indicating that the blob is important for the scintillation study [Jin et al., 2014]. In the present study, we expand the data set to see how representative it is. From November of 2010 to February of 2014, 41.4 hours of data from all-sky imager were collected in 16 days when the airglow patches were observed to hit the nightside aurora and when the aurora covered a quarter of the all-sky imager field of view at Ny-Ålesund. The collocated GNSS scintillation receiver is used to study the scintillation impact. This study clearly shows that the scintillation level of a blob is higher than the scintillation level of the corresponding patch. However, no clear relation between the blob scintillation and the pre-conditioning of polar cap patches is found. Furthermore, the aurora alone did not produce strong scintillation. This implies that the aurora plays a role in structuring of the blob and increases its scintillation level. We also look into possible instability mechanisms which produce the plasma density irregularities.

  14. Three-dimensional printing of scintillating materials.

    PubMed

    Mishnayot, Y; Layani, M; Cooperstein, I; Magdassi, S; Ron, G

    2014-08-01

    We demonstrate, for the first time, the applicability of three-dimensional printing techniques to the manufacture of scintillation detectors. We report on the development of a formulation, usable in stereolithographic printing, that exhibits scintillation efficiency on the order of 30% of that of commercial polystyrene based scintillators. We discuss the applicability of these techniques and propose future enhancements that will allow tailoring the printed scintillation detectors to various applications.

  15. Nanophosphor composite scintillator with a liquid matrix

    DOEpatents

    McKigney, Edward Allen; Burrell, Anthony Keiran; Bennett, Bryan L.; Cooke, David Wayne; Ott, Kevin Curtis; Bacrania, Minesh Kantilal; Del Sesto, Rico Emilio; Gilbertson, Robert David; Muenchausen, Ross Edward; McCleskey, Thomas Mark

    2010-03-16

    An improved nanophosphor scintillator liquid comprises nanophosphor particles in a liquid matrix. The nanophosphor particles are optionally surface modified with an organic ligand. The surface modified nanophosphor particle is essentially surface charge neutral, thereby preventing agglomeration of the nanophosphor particles during dispersion in a liquid scintillator matrix. The improved nanophosphor scintillator liquid may be used in any conventional liquid scintillator application, including in a radiation detector.

  16. Hygroscopicity Evaluation of Halide Scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuravleva, M; Stand, L; Wei, H; Hobbs, C. L.; Boatner, Lynn A; Ramey, Joanne Oxendine; Burger, Arnold; Rowe, E; Bhattacharya, P.; Tupitsyn, E; Melcher, Charles L

    2014-01-01

    A collaborative study of relative hygroscopicity of anhydrous halide scintillators grown at various laboratories is presented. We have developed a technique to evaluate moisture sensitivity of both raw materials and grown crystals, in which the moisture absorption rate is measured using a gravimetric analysis. Degradation of the scintillation performance was investigated by recording gamma-ray spectra and monitoring the photopeak position, count rate and energy resolution. The accompanying physical degradation of the samples exposed to ambient atmosphere was photographically recorded as well. The results were compared with ben

  17. Nightime VHF and GHz scintillations in the East-Asian sector of the equatorial anomaly

    SciTech Connect

    Wernik, A.W.; Franke, S.; Liu, C.H.; Fang, D.J.

    1983-02-01

    Measurements made during solar maximum years in the East Asian sector of the equatorial anomaly show different seasonal patterns of night-time scintillation occurrence at 137 MHz at Lunping and 4 GHz at Hong Kong. These seasonal variations are very similar to that observed at the equatorial station in Guam, indicating strong coupling between equatorial and anomaly irregularities. Model computations indicate that the GHz scintillation observed at Hong Kong is much stronger than one would expect based on VHF scintillation measured at Lunping. It is suggested that this might be an indication of strong latitudinal dependence of scintillation in the anomaly region. We also discuss the possible difference in local ionospheric conditions that were responsible for generating GHz scintillation causing irregularities in the anomaly region and at the equator.

  18. Type III radio bursts in the interplanetary medium - The role of propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinberg, J. L.; Hoang, S.; Lecacheux, A.; Aubier, M. G.; Dulk, G. A.

    1984-01-01

    Interplanetary type III radio burst observations are analyzed in order to ascertain the role played by propagation effects between the true source and the observer. Large source altitudes are noted, together with an increasing angular size of sources with increasing angular distance from the sun's center. These and other observations furnish strong evidence for the theory that propagation effects, group delays, ducting and/or scattering significantly affect the observed heights, sizes, and brightness temperatures of interplanetary type III bursts. This would be true irrespective of whether the bursts are due to plasma radiation at the fundamental or at the harmonic, and the effects would extend to the arrival times of the radiation to a greater or lesser extent, depending on the path from the source to the observer.

  19. Composite scintillators for detection of ionizing radiation

    DOEpatents

    Dai, Sheng [Knoxville, TN; Stephan, Andrew Curtis [Knoxville, TN; Brown, Suree S [Knoxville, TN; Wallace, Steven A [Knoxville, TN; Rondinone, Adam J [Knoxville, TN

    2010-12-28

    Applicant's present invention is a composite scintillator having enhanced transparency for detecting ionizing radiation comprising a material having optical transparency wherein said material comprises nano-sized objects having a size in at least one dimension that is less than the wavelength of light emitted by the composite scintillator wherein the composite scintillator is designed to have selected properties suitable for a particular application.

  20. Photonic crystal scintillators and methods of manufacture

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, Ricardo D.; Sexton, Lindsay T.; Fuentes, Roderick E.; Cortes-Concepcion, Jose

    2015-08-11

    Photonic crystal scintillators and their methods of manufacture are provided. Exemplary methods of manufacture include using a highly-ordered porous anodic alumina membrane as a pattern transfer mask for either the etching of underlying material or for the deposition of additional material onto the surface of a scintillator. Exemplary detectors utilizing such photonic crystal scintillators are also provided.

  1. Ionosphere Scintillation at Low and High Latitudes (Modelling vs Measurement)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béniguel, Yannick

    2016-04-01

    This paper will address the problem of scintillations characteristics, focusing on the parameters of interest for a navigation system. Those parameters are the probabilities of occurrence of simultaneous fading, the bubbles surface at IPP level, the cycle slips and the fades duration statistics. The scintillation characteristics obtained at low and high latitudes will be compared. These results correspond to the data analysis performed after the ESA Monitor ionosphere measurement campaign [1], [2]. A second aspect of the presentation will be the modelling aspect. It has been observed that the phase scintillation dominates at high latitudes while the intensity scintillation dominates at low latitudes. The way it can be reproduced and implemented in a propagation model (e.g. GISM model [3]) will be presented. Comparisons of measurements with results obtained by modelling will be presented on some typical scenarios. References [1] R. Prieto Cerdeira, Y. Beniguel, "The MONITOR project: architecture, data and products", Ionospheric Effects Symposium, Alexandria (Va), May 2011 [2] Y. Béniguel, R Orus-Perez , R. Prieto-Cerdeira , S. Schlueter , S. Scortan, A. Grosu "MONITOR 2: ionospheric monitoring network in support to SBAS and other GNSS and scientific purposes", IES Conference, Alexandria (Va), May 2015-05-22 [3] Y. Béniguel, P. Hamel, "A Global Ionosphere Scintillation Propagation Model for Equatorial Regions", Journal of Space Weather Space Climate, 1, (2011), doi: 10.1051/swsc/2011004

  2. Discovery of nuclear tracks in interplanetary dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, J. P.; Brownlee, D. E.; Fraundorf, P.

    1984-01-01

    Nuclear tracks have been identified in interplanetary dust particles (IDP's) collected from the stratosphere. The presence of tracks unambiguously confirms the extraterrestrial nature of IDP's, and the high track densities (10 to the 10th to 10 to the 11th per square centimeter) suggest an exposure age of approximately 10,000 years within the inner solar system. Tracks also provide an upper temperature limit for the heating of IDP's during atmospheric entry, thereby making it possible to distinguish between pristine and thermally modified micrometeorites.

  3. Interplanetary exploration-A challenge for photovoltaics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stella, P. M.

    1985-01-01

    Future U.S. interplanetary missions will be less complex and costly than past missions such as Voyager and the soon to be launched, Galileo. This is required to achieve a balanced exploration program that can be sustained within the context of a limited budget. Radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) have served as the power source for missions beyond the orbit of Mars. It is indicated that the cost to the user of these power sources will significantly increase. Solar arrays can provide a low cost alternative for a number of missions. Potential missions are identified along with concerns for implementation, and some array configurations under present investigation are reviewed.

  4. Gasolines as primary solvents in liquid scintillation counting

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, A.; Ma Pinto, R.; Sillero, A.

    1986-11-01

    Gasolines from several commercial sources have been used as primary solvents in liquid scintillation counting of dry and aqueous samples of either /sup 3/H- or /sup 14/C-labeled compounds. Dry samples can be counted only by the addition of fluors to the gasolines, and compared to a standard liquid scintillator, efficiencies of around 75% were attained. For the counting of aqueous samples, gasolines must also be supplemented with secondary solvents (i.e., 10% naphthalene, 5% Triton X-100, or 10% methanol). Simply with Triton X-100, efficiencies similar to those obtained with a dioxane-based liquid scintillator were observed in the case of some gasolines. Drawbacks to gasoline are the higher toxicity and the variation of efficiency, probably depending on the presence of color markers. On the positive side is the low price of the gasolines, compared with either toluene or dioxane, and the facility of purchasing.

  5. Tilt Estimation in Moderate-to-Strong Scintillation.

    PubMed

    Burl, J B; Roggemann, M C; Welsh, B

    2001-06-20

    Adaptive optics systems are being applied in ever more challenging environments, for example, the projection of lasers over long horizontal paths through the atmosphere. These long atmospheric paths corrupt the signal received from the beacon and typically yield highly scintillated received wave fronts. Tilt estimation for controlling the fast steering mirror in these systems is complicated by the presence of branch points in the scintillated received wave fronts. In particular, correlation between the tilt and the projected beam's centroid error at the target has been observed in horizontal laser beam projection experiments. The presence of this correlation indicates that better tracking performance should be achievable. We compare the performance of four estimation schemes applied to tilt estimation in a horizontal laser projection system. It is demonstrated that all four schemes underestimate the tilt required to return the laser beam to a target in highly scintillated environments. A method of correcting this tilt is presented, and the expected performance improvement is quantified.

  6. Computer model of high-latitude scintillation. [WBMOD program

    SciTech Connect

    Fremouw, E.J.

    1982-01-01

    The DNA Wideband satellite experiment provided extensive data on scintillation produced in high-altitude structured plasmas. A computer program, WBMOD, is being developed to summarize those data in an applications-oriented way. The program contains the phase-screen scattering theory of Rino and a morphological description of ionospheric irregularities (thus far only at auroral latitudes) based on Wideband observations. It permits a user to compute scintillation indices for both phase and intensity as a function of system operating parameters and solar-ionospheric disturbance level. Correction is made for multiple scatter, and the user may choose either one-way (communication) or two-way (radar) propagation.

  7. DECLINE AND RECOVERY OF THE INTERPLANETARY MAGNETIC FIELD DURING THE PROTRACTED SOLAR MINIMUM

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Charles W.; Schwadron, Nathan A.; DeForest, Craig E. E-mail: N.Schwadron@unh.edu

    2013-09-20

    The interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) is determined by the amount of solar magnetic flux that passes through the top of the solar corona into the heliosphere, and by the dynamical evolution of that flux. Recently, it has been argued that the total flux of the IMF evolves over the solar cycle due to a combination of flux that extends well outside of 1 AU and is associated with the solar wind, and additionally, transient flux associated with coronal mass ejections (CMEs). In addition to the CME eruption rate, there are three fundamental processes involving conversion of magnetic flux (from transient to wind-associated), disconnection, and interchange reconnection that control the levels of each form of magnetic flux in the interplanetary medium. This is distinct from some earlier models in which the wind-associated component remains steady across the solar cycle. We apply the model of Schwadron et al. that quantifies the sources, interchange, and losses of magnetic flux to 50 yr of interplanetary data as represented by the Omni2 data set using the sunspot number as a proxy for the CME eruption rate. We do justify the use of that proxy substitution. We find very good agreement between the predicted and observed interplanetary magnetic flux. In the absence of sufficient CME eruptions, the IMF falls on the timescale of ∼6 yr. A key result is that rising toroidal flux resulting from CME eruption predates the increase in wind-associated IMF.

  8. Interaction between solar energetic particles and interplanetary grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strazzulla, G.; Calcagno, L.; Foti, G.; Sheng, K. L.

    Some laboratory-studied effects induced by the fluence of fast ions on frosts of astrophysical interest are summarized. The results are applied to the interaction between energetic solar ions and interplanetary dust grains assumed to be cometary debris which spends about one-million yr before being collected in the earth's atmosphere or colliding on the moon's surface. The importance of erosion by particles to the stability of ice grains is confirmed. The build up of carbonaceous material by ion fluence on hydrocarbon containing grains is discussed. It is suggested that these new materials could be the glue which cements submicron silicate particles to form a complex agglomeration whose density increases with increasing proton fluence (packing effect). The IR spectra of laboratory synthesized carbonaceous material are compared with those observed in some carbonaceous meteoritic extracts.

  9. Experimental Determination of Infrared Extinction Coefficients of Interplanetary Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, J. F., Jr.; Abbas, M. M.

    1998-01-01

    This technique is based on irradiating a single isolated charged dust particle suspended in balance by an electric field, and measuring the scattered radiation as a function of angle. The observed scattered intensity profile at a specific wavelength obtained for a dust particle of known composition is compared with Mie theory calculations, and the variable parameters relating to the particle size and complex refractive index are adjusted for a best fit between the two profiles. This leads to a simultaneous determination of the particle radius, the complex refractive index, and the scattering and extinction coefficients. The results of these experiments can be utilized to examine the IRAS and DIRBE (Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment) infrared data sets in order to determine the dust particle physical characteristics and distributions by using infrared models and inversion techniques. This technique may also be employed for investigation of the rotational bursting phenomena whereby large size cosmic and interplanetary particles are believed to fragment into smaller dust particles.

  10. Nitrogen Isotopic Anomalies in a Hydrous Interplanetary Dust Particle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. B.; Dai, Z. R.; Weber, P. K.; Graham, G. A.; Hutcheon, I. D.; Bajt, S.; Ishii, H.; Bradley, J. P.

    2005-01-01

    Interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) collected in the stratosphere are the fine-grained end member (5 - 50 microns in size) of the meteoritic material available for investigation in the laboratory. IDPs are derived from either cometary or asteroidal sources. Some IDPs contain cosmically primitive materials with isotopic signatures reflecting presolar origins. Recent detailed studies using the NanoSIMS have shown there is a wide variation of isotopic signatures within individual IDPs; grains with a presolar signature have been observed surrounded by material with a solar isotopic composition. The majority of IDPs studied have been anhydrous. We report here results from integrated NanoSIMS/FIB/TEM/Synchrotron IR studies of a hydrous IDP, focused on understanding the correlations between the isotopic, mineralogical and chemical compositions of IDPs.

  11. Adiabatic Deceleration Effects on the Formation of Heavy Ion Charge Spectra in Interplanetary Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartavykh, J. J.; Dröge, W.; Kovaltsov, G. A.; Ostryakov, V. M.

    2005-03-01

    We investigate the effects of interplanetary propagation on the energy dependence of the mean ionic charge of ~0.1 1 MeV/n iron observed during impulsive solar particle events at 1 AU. A Monte-Carlo approach is applied to solve the transport equation which takes into account spatial diffusion as well as convection and adiabatic deceleration. We find that interplanetary propagation results in a shift of charge spectra observed at 1 AU towards lower energies due to adiabatic deceleration. Taking the above effect into account, we compare predictions of our model of charge-consistent stochastic acceleration with recent ACE observations. A detailed analysis of two particle events shows that our model can give a consistent explanation of the observed iron charge and energy spectra, and allows one to put constraints on the temperature, density, and the acceleration and escape time scales in the acceleration region.

  12. SNO+ Scintillator Purification and Assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, R.; Chen, M.; Chkvorets, O.; Hallman, D.; Vázquez-Jáuregui, E.

    2011-04-01

    We describe the R&D on the scintillator purification and assay methods and technology for the SNO+ neutrino and double-beta decay experiment. The SNO+ experiment is a replacement of the SNO heavy water with liquid scintillator comprised of 2 g/L PPO in linear alkylbenzene (LAB). During filling the LAB will be transported underground by rail car and purified by multi-stage distillation and steam stripping at a flow rate of 19 LPM. While the detector is operational the scintillator can be recirculated at 150 LPM (full detector volume in 4 days) to provide repurification as necessary by either water extraction (for Ra, K, Bi) or by functional metal scavenger columns (for Pb, Ra, Bi, Ac, Th) followed by steam stripping to remove noble gases and oxygen (Rn, O2, Kr, Ar). The metal scavenger columns also provide a method for scintillator assay for ex-situ measurement of the U and Th chain radioactivity. We have developed "natural" radioactive spikes of Pb and Ra in LAB and use these for purification testing. Lastly, we present the planned operating modes and purification strategies and the plant specifications and design.

  13. SNO+ Scintillator Purification and Assay

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, R.; Vazquez-Jauregui, E.; Chen, M.; Chkvorets, O.; Hallman, D.

    2011-04-27

    We describe the R and D on the scintillator purification and assay methods and technology for the SNO+ neutrino and double-beta decay experiment. The SNO+ experiment is a replacement of the SNO heavy water with liquid scintillator comprised of 2 g/L PPO in linear alkylbenzene (LAB). During filling the LAB will be transported underground by rail car and purified by multi-stage distillation and steam stripping at a flow rate of 19 LPM. While the detector is operational the scintillator can be recirculated at 150 LPM (full detector volume in 4 days) to provide repurification as necessary by either water extraction (for Ra, K, Bi) or by functional metal scavenger columns (for Pb, Ra, Bi, Ac, Th) followed by steam stripping to remove noble gases and oxygen (Rn, O{sub 2}, Kr, Ar). The metal scavenger columns also provide a method for scintillator assay for ex-situ measurement of the U and Th chain radioactivity. We have developed ''natural'' radioactive spikes of Pb and Ra in LAB and use these for purification testing. Lastly, we present the planned operating modes and purification strategies and the plant specifications and design.

  14. Scintillation materials for medical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lempicki, A.; Wojtowicz, A.J.

    1992-01-01

    Scintillators are beginning to attract renewed attention because modern High Energy Physics accelerators are placing unprecedented demands of quantity and quality of detector materials and Positron Emission Tomography (PET), used by the medical field. Both applications required materials for scintillator detectors with properties beyond those delivered by traditional scintillators. Thallium doped halides are very efficient, but slow and chemically unstable. Two modern developments, namely the very fast BaF[sub 2], which owed its success to the newly discovered crossover transitions, and CeF[sub 3], which carried a promise of fast components, more practical wavelengths and attractive efficiency. Since traditional scintillators (Tl doped halides) are very efficient, and could be even more efficient at larger concentrations of Tl, if it were not for concentration quenching. However Tl transitions are spin forbidden and slow. Both ills could be remedied by replacing Tl with Ce, whose transitions are allowed and which is known to form fully concentrated compounds of high photoluminescent efficiency and no quenching. These materials, plus new Ce-doped materials, exhibiting highly promising properties for medical applications, became the target of our studies.

  15. The velocity and the density spectrum of the solar wind from simultaneous three-frequency IPS observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, S. L.; Rickett, B. J.; Armstrong, J. W.

    1983-01-01

    Density inhomogeneities in the solar wind cause fluctuations regarding the emission of small diameter radio sources. Such fluctuations are called interplanetary scintillation (IPS). IPS has been studied to obtain information on both the solar wind and on the radio sources. In the present investigation it is attempted to extract information about the solar wind from simultaneous IPS observations at three radio frequencies and a single antenna. Data were recorded at frequencies of 270 MHz, 340 MHz, and 470 MHz on a 91 m telescope. Five different radio sources were observed. The observations are compared with theoretical predictions for spectra, cross-spectra, and cross-correlations using weak scattering theory and various models for the wavenumber spectrum of density inhomogeneities in the solar wind. Good fits are obtained over the observed wavenumbers to a spectrum modeled as a power law.

  16. Method of making a scintillator waveguide

    DOEpatents

    Bliss, Mary; Craig, Richard A.; Reeder, Paul L.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is an apparatus for detecting ionizing radiation, having: a waveguide having a first end and a second end, the waveguide formed of a scintillator material wherein the therapeutic ionizing radiation isotropically generates scintillation light signals within the waveguide. This apparatus provides a measure of radiation dose. The apparatus may be modified to permit making a measure of location of radiation dose. Specifically, the scintillation material is segmented into a plurality of segments; and a connecting cable for each of the plurality of segments is used for conducting scintillation signals to a scintillation detector.

  17. Extruded plastic scintillator for MINERvA

    SciTech Connect

    Pla-Dalmau, Anna; Bross, Alan D.; Rykalin, Victor V.; Wood, Brian M.; /NICADD, DeKalb

    2005-11-01

    An extrusion line has recently been installed at Fermilab in collaboration with NICADD (Northern Illinois Center for Accelerator and Detector Development). This new facility will serve to further develop and improve extruded plastic scintillator. Since polystyrene is widely used in the consumer industry, the logical path was to investigate the extrusion of commercial-grade polystyrene pellets with dopants to yield high quality plastic scintillator. The D0 and MINOS experiments are already using extruded scintillator strips in their detectors. A new experiment at Fermilab is pursuing the use of extruded plastic scintillator. A new plastic scintillator strip is being tested and its properties characterized. The initial results are presented here.

  18. ENERGETIC CHARGED PARTICLES ASSOCIATED WITH STRONG INTERPLANETARY SHOCKS

    SciTech Connect

    Giacalone, Joe

    2012-12-10

    We analyze observations of energetic charged particles associated with many strong interplanetary shocks seen by Advanced Composition Explorer. We focus primarily on 47-187 keV suprathermal protons and restrict our analysis to strong interplanetary shocks (Alfven Mach number >3 and the shock density compression >2.5). Eighteen shocks meeting this criterion from 1998 to 2003 were analyzed. All 18 had enhancements of the 47-65 keV proton intensity above the intensity seen one day before the shock. In 17 events, the particle intensity either rose to a quasi-plateau or peaked within 10 minutes of the shock. Most had intensities at the shock exceeding 100 times more than that seen the day before the shock arrived. The time-intensity profiles of the energetic proton events in many cases reveal a rise before the shock passage reaching a quasi-plateau or local peak at the shock, followed by a gradual decline. This suggests that the shock itself is the source of energetic particles. Energy spectra behind the shock were fit to an assumed power law over the interval from 46 to 187 keV, and the resulting spectral index was compared to the plasma density jump across each shock. Most events agree with the prediction of diffusive shock acceleration theory to within the observational uncertainties. We also analyzed a few selected events to determine the particle spatial diffusion coefficients and acceleration timescales. We find that the time to accelerate protons to {approx}50 keV is of the order of an hour.

  19. Characterizing Daytime GHZ Scintillation at Equatorial Regions Using Gnss Radio Occultation Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seif, A.; Zhang, K.; Tsunoda, R. T.; Abdullah, M.; Carter, B. A.; Norman, R.; Wu, S.

    2015-12-01

    Ionospheric scintillation of radio waves can behave differently at different locations with a strong diurnal dependence; particularly in the equatorial regions. Ionospheric scintillations at gigahertz (GHz) frequencies have been observed during both daytime and nighttime. It is believed that daytime scintillation is associated with blanketing sporadic E (Esb), whereas nighttime scintillation is attributed to F layer irregularities. Scintillation events associated with Esbduring daytime are of our primary interest. Recent studies show that in the ionosphere, electron density profiles from Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) Radio Occultation (RO) provide valuable information to help better understand the physics of the ionosphere. In particular, GNSS RO observations of GHz scintillation in the proximity of the E-layer have been interpreted as being caused by sporadic E. In this paper the characteristics of daytime scintillations at 1.5 GHz recorded simultaneously from two stations (i) Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM) (2.55°N, 101.461°E; dip latitude 5.78°S), and (ii) Langkawi (6.19°N, 99.51°E; dip latitude 1.90°S) during November and December 2010 are analyzed. The characteristics of daytime GHz scintillation and its relationship with E region irregularities at equatorial regions are investigated. Ground-based scintillation and Total Electron Content (TEC) data recorded by the GSV4004 receivers were utilized in combination with the amplitude scintillation measurements in terms of GPS C/A code SNR fluctuations during a ground-based GPS and space-borne GNSS RO experiment at the two equatorial stations. Scintillation activity was found to be more prominent at UKM. Moreover, strong scintillation with the S4 index exceeding 0.6 has only been observed at UKM, while at Langkawi the scintillation intensity (S4 index) did not exceed 0.3. Signal-to-noise measurements obtained from GNSS RO indicate that daytime scintillations are very likely caused by Esb. Our

  20. GPS scintillation effects associated with polar cap patches, auroral arcs and blobs in European Arctic sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yaqi; Moen, Jøran; Miloch, Wojciech

    2014-05-01

    Both polar cap patches and auroral arcs are associated with irregularities that can affect the propagation of radio waves and thus disrupt the navigation system in the high latitudes. But which is the worst case remains unanswered. This study focuses on the direct comparison of the relative scintillation effects associated with different phenomena in high latitudes. The All Sky Camera located at Ny-Alesund, Svalbard observed six polar cap patches on January 13, 2013. The patches exited into the nightside auroral region in response to the ongoing substorms and then they are termed blobs. The collocated GPS scintillation monitor is used to study the scintillations produced by these different phenomena which are frequently observed at high latitudes. The amplitude scintillation index (S_4) was very low during this period, while the phase scintillation index (sigma_phi) indicated a disturbed ionospheric condition but responded differently to these three types of phenomena. Comparisons of the associated scintillation effects indicate that the blobs are the most violent scintillation source. Moreover, polar cap patches produce scintillation more effectively than auroral arcs do. Five of the six polar cap patches were observed to produce significant scintillations either on the edges or on the center of the patches, which imply most of the polar cap patches are associated with strong small scale irregularities. All of the scintillations produced by the pure auroral arcs were below 0.2 rad in this period. This study highlights the compound effects of the particle precipitations (auroral arcs) and high density plasma islands (patches) in developing the small scale irregularities. From the space weather forecasting perspective, particular attention is to be paid to polar cap patches exiting the polar cap at night in the European sector.

  1. Ionospheric and tropospheric scintillation as a form of noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fremouw, E. J.; Rino, C. L.

    1975-01-01

    Recent tests of signals observed through the ionosphere, the solar wind, and a laboratory plasma have revealed a surprising consistency in parameters describing the first order statistics of a signal caused to scintillate by a randomly structured plasma. This paper describes a means for exploiting these new findings in a transionospheric communication channel model.

  2. Counterintuitive MCNPX Results for Scintillator Surface Roughness Effect

    SciTech Connect

    2012-08-12

    We have reported on our recent MCNPX simulation results of energy deposition for a group of 8 scintillation detectors, coupled with various rough surface patterns. The MCNPX results generally favored the detectors with various rough surface patterns. The observed MCNPX results are not fully explained by this work.

  3. The Interplanetary Overlay Networking Protocol Accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pang, Jackson; Torgerson, Jordan L.; Clare, Loren P.

    2008-01-01

    A document describes the Interplanetary Overlay Networking Protocol Accelerator (IONAC) an electronic apparatus, now under development, for relaying data at high rates in spacecraft and interplanetary radio-communication systems utilizing a delay-tolerant networking protocol. The protocol includes provisions for transmission and reception of data in bundles (essentially, messages), transfer of custody of a bundle to a recipient relay station at each step of a relay, and return receipts. Because of limitations on energy resources available for such relays, data rates attainable in a conventional software implementation of the protocol are lower than those needed, at any given reasonable energy-consumption rate. Therefore, a main goal in developing the IONAC is to reduce the energy consumption by an order of magnitude and the data-throughput capability by two orders of magnitude. The IONAC prototype is a field-programmable gate array that serves as a reconfigurable hybrid (hardware/ firmware) system for implementation of the protocol. The prototype can decode 108,000 bundles per second and encode 100,000 bundles per second. It includes a bundle-cache static randomaccess memory that enables maintenance of a throughput of 2.7Gb/s, and an Ethernet convergence layer that supports a duplex throughput of 1Gb/s.

  4. Scintillators for positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, W.W.; Derenzo, S.E.

    1995-09-01

    Like most applications that utilize scintillators for gamma detection, Positron Emission Tomography (PET) desires materials with high light output, short decay time, and excellent stopping power that are also inexpensive, mechanically rugged, and chemically inert. Realizing that this ``ultimate`` scintillator may not exist, this paper evaluates the relative importance of these qualities and describes their impact on the imaging performance of PET. The most important PET scintillator quality is the ability to absorb 511 keV photons in a small volume, which affects the spatial resolution of the camera. The dominant factor is a short attenuation length ({le} 1.5 cm is required), although a high photoelectric fraction is also important (> 30% is desired). The next most important quality is a short decay time, which affects both the dead time and the coincidence timing resolution. Detection rates for single 511 keV photons can be extremely high, so decay times {le} 500 ns are essential to avoid dead time losses. In addition, positron annihilations are identified by time coincidence so {le}5 ns fwhm coincidence pair timing resolution is required to identify events with narrow coincidence windows, reducing contamination due to accidental coincidences. Current trends in PET cameras are toward septaless, ``fully-3D`` cameras, which have significantly higher count rates than conventional 2-D cameras and so place higher demands on scintillator decay time. Light output affects energy resolution, and thus the ability of the camera to identify and reject events where the initial 511 keV photon has undergone Compton scatter in the patient. The scatter to true event fraction is much higher in fully-3D cameras than in 2-D cameras, so future PET cameras would benefit from scintillators with a 511 keV energy resolution < 10--12% fwhm.

  5. An analytical model of nonproportional scintillator light yield in terms of recombination rates

    SciTech Connect

    Bizarri, G.; Moses, W. W.; Singh, J.; Vasil'ev, A. N.; Williams, R. T.

    2009-02-15

    Analytical expressions for the local light yield as a function of the local deposited energy (-dE/dx) and total scintillation yield integrated over the track of an electron of initial energy E are derived from radiative and/or nonradiative rates of first through third order in density of electronic excitations. The model is formulated in terms of rate constants, some of which can be determined independently from time-resolved spectroscopy and others estimated from measured light yield efficiency as a constraint assumed to apply in each kinetic order. The rates and parameters are used in the theory to calculate scintillation yield versus primary electron energy for comparison to published experimental results on four scintillators. Influence of the track radius on the yield is also discussed. Results are found to be qualitatively consistent with the observed scintillation light yield. The theory can be applied to any scintillator if the rates of the radiative and nonradiative processes are known.

  6. Photoluminescence and radiation response properties of Ce3+-doped CsCaCl3 crystalline scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Yutaka; Saeki, Keiichiro; Tanaka, Hironori; Yahaba, Takuma; Yanagida, Takayuki; Koshimizu, Masanori; Asai, Keisuke

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we report on the photoluminescence and scintillation properties of a newly developed CsCaCl3:Ce (0.5 mol%) crystalline scintillator grown by the vertical Bridgman method. The fluorescence quantum efficiency for the Ce3+ characteristic emission bands centered at around 350–400 nm was 76% under excitation at 330 nm light. The photoluminescence decay time of the Ce3+ was approximately 32 ns. When x-ray excited the crystal, intense emission bands were observed at 350–400 nm, and could be attributed to the Ce3+ emission. The scintillation light yield of the developed crystal was ∼7600 ph MeV‑1 compared to a NaI:Tl commercial scintillator, and the principal scintillation decay time was approximately 340 ns plus two fast components of around 1.6 ns and 45 ns.

  7. Photoluminescence and radiation response properties of Ce3+-doped CsCaCl3 crystalline scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Yutaka; Saeki, Keiichiro; Tanaka, Hironori; Yahaba, Takuma; Yanagida, Takayuki; Koshimizu, Masanori; Asai, Keisuke

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we report on the photoluminescence and scintillation properties of a newly developed CsCaCl3:Ce (0.5 mol%) crystalline scintillator grown by the vertical Bridgman method. The fluorescence quantum efficiency for the Ce3+ characteristic emission bands centered at around 350-400 nm was 76% under excitation at 330 nm light. The photoluminescence decay time of the Ce3+ was approximately 32 ns. When x-ray excited the crystal, intense emission bands were observed at 350-400 nm, and could be attributed to the Ce3+ emission. The scintillation light yield of the developed crystal was ˜7600 ph MeV-1 compared to a NaI:Tl commercial scintillator, and the principal scintillation decay time was approximately 340 ns plus two fast components of around 1.6 ns and 45 ns.

  8. PARTICLE ENERGY SPECTRA AT TRAVELING INTERPLANETARY SHOCK WAVES

    SciTech Connect

    Reames, Donald V.

    2012-09-20

    We have searched for evidence of significant shock acceleration of He ions of {approx}1-10 MeV amu{sup -1} in situ at 258 interplanetary traveling shock waves observed by the Wind spacecraft. We find that the probability of observing significant acceleration, and the particle intensity observed, depends strongly upon the shock speed and less strongly upon the shock compression ratio. For most of the 39 fast shocks with significant acceleration, the observed spectral index agrees with either that calculated from the shock compression ratio or with the spectral index of the upstream background, when the latter spectrum is harder, as expected from diffusive shock theory. In many events the spectra are observed to roll downward at higher energies, as expected from Ellison-Ramaty and from Lee shock-acceleration theories. The dearth of acceleration at {approx}85% of the shocks is explained by (1) a low shock speed, (2) a low shock compression ratio, and (3) a low value of the shock-normal angle with the magnetic field, which may cause the energy spectra that roll downward at energies below our observational threshold. Quasi-parallel shock waves are rarely able to produce measurable acceleration at 1 AU. The dependence of intensity on shock speed, seen here at local shocks, mirrors the dependence found previously for the peak intensities in large solar energetic-particle events upon speeds of the associated coronal mass ejections which drive the shocks.

  9. Effects of Standard and Modified Gravity on Interplanetary Ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iorio, L.

    We numerically investigate the impact on the two-body range of several Newtonian and non-Newtonian dynamical effects for some Earth-planet (Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn) pairs, in view of the expected cm-level accuracy in some future planned or proposed interplanetary ranging operations. The general relativistic gravitomagnetic Lense-Thirring effect should be modeled and solved for in future accurate ranging tests of Newtonian and post-Newtonian gravity, because it falls within their measurability domain. It could a priori "imprint" the determination of some of the target parameters of the tests considered. Moreover, the ring of the minor asteroids, Ceres, Pallas, Vesta (and also many other asteroids if Mars is considered) and the trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs) act as sources of nonnegligible systematic uncertainty on the larger gravitoelectric post-Newtonian signals from which it is intended to determine the parameters γ and β of the parametrized post-Newtonian (PPN) formalism with very high precision (several orders of magnitude better than the current 10-4-10-5 levels). Also, other putative, nonconventional gravitational effects, like a violation of the strong equivalence principle (SEP), a secular variation of the Newtonian constant of gravitation G, and the Pioneer anomaly, are considered. The presence of a hypothetical, distant planetary-sized body X could be detectable with future high-accuracy planetary ranging. Our analysis can, in principle, be extended to future interplanetary ranging scenarios in which one or more spacecrafts in heliocentric orbits are involved. The impact of fitting the initial conditions, and of the noise in the observations, on the actual detectability of the dynamical signatures investigated, which may be partly absorbed in the estimation process, should be quantitatively addressed in further studies.

  10. Predicting cosmic ray fluxes for the interplanetary space missions needs.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nymmik, Rikho

    One of the main claims for the planning forthcoming interplanetary missions is the prediction of radiation threatening that effects on both astronauts and onboard instrumentation. It is caused by the SEP and GCR particle fluxes which always present in space and depend on solar activity level. The GCR and SEP fluxes' quantitative models developed at moment in Moscow University are based on the analysis of experimental data set for the four previous solar cycles, and establish a connection between particle fluxes and solar activity (Wolf numbers) for noted radiation fields. The GCR fluxes model (see for example, International Standard ISO 15390, Space environment (natural and artificial) - Galactic cosmic ray model) establishes an accordance between GCR fluxes and smoothed (over 13 months) month-averaged Wolf numbers. For the SEP fluxes which subordinates to quite defined statistical laws, the model developed enables to calculate a total fluxes that to be occurred probably with some given probability during a long time period under any solar activity level. This report presents examples of GCR and SEP fluxes occurred under different solar activity levels as well as energy spectra calculated for various probabilities of SEP flux occurrences. The data presented shows that SEP fluxes observed and their spectra are never exceed the bounds of probabilities, set by the model input. Thus, the MSU's models of GCR and SEP fluxes allows one to take account of solar activity effect on the probable value of fluxes that formed by radiation environment particles for an interplanetary mission of any period. The accuracy of such a prediction depends above all on the solar activity's (e.g., Wolf numbers)prediction reliability.

  11. Comparisons of COSMIC and C/NOFS GPS Occultation Ionospheric Scintillation Measurements with Ground-based Radar and VHF Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggiero, F. H.; Groves, K. M.; Straus, P. R.; Caton, R. G.; Starks, M. J.; Tanyi, K. L.; Verlinden, M.

    2009-12-01

    Ionospheric irregularities are known to cause scintillation of trans-ionospheric radio signals and can affect space-based UHF/VHF communications, causing outages, and degrading GPS accuracy and precision. Current capability for characterizing and predicting ionospheric scintillation utilizes a network of ground-based receivers to detect scintillation and then extrapolate for short-term forecasts. Practical limits on deploying the ground receivers limits the accuracy and spatial coverage one can achieve with this approach. A more global approach is to use a set of space-based satellites equipped with GPS receivers, such as the COSMIC satellite constellation, to measure scintillations observed during so-called occultations with GPS satellites. In this paper the signal-to-noise values of GPS L1 signals received on the COSMIC and C/NOFS satellites for the portions of the occultations that are not affected by the terrestrial atmosphere are examined to help identify areas of ionospheric scintillation. Three years of S4 scintillation index values from COSMIC occultations are compared with near-zenith ground-based VHF S4 scintillation measurements from the AFRL SCIntillation Network Decision Aid (SCINDA) network stations. The data are correlated to ascertain the viability of using space-based scintillation measurements to characterize and predict scintillation to ground-based receivers. Several days of COSMIC and C/NOFS data are compared with each other and the ALTAIR radar located on Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands to examine how occultation geometry affects observed scintillation and also to verify techniques that provide an upper bound on the spatial location of the ionospheric irregularities contributing to scintillations observed in the occultations.

  12. Rotational bursting of interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paddack, S. J.; Rhee, J. W.

    1976-01-01

    Rotationally induced bursting of interplanetary dust particles by a windmill effect stemming from solar radiation pressure, and eventual elimination of the particles from the solar system, is discussed. A life span on the order of 100,000 years for stony meteoritic material or tektite glass with radii of about 1 cm is arrived at for this process. A life span of a million years is computed for particles containing Fe, Ni, or Al with spin damping effects taken into cognizance. This depletion mechanism operates at a rate two orders of magnitude greater than that of the Poynting-Robertson effect in the case of nonmetallic particles and one order of magnitude greater in the case of metallic particles.

  13. Interplanetary space transport using inertial fusion propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Orth, C.D.

    1998-04-20

    In this paper, we indicate how the great advantages that ICF offers for interplanetary propulsion can be accomplished with the VISTA spacecraft concept. The performance of VISTA is expected to surpass that from other realistic technologies for Mars missions if the energy gain achievable for ICF targets is above several hundred. Based on the good performance expected from the U. S. National Ignition Facility (NIF), the requirements for VISTA should be well within the realm of possibility if creative target concepts such as the fast ignitor can be developed. We also indicate that a 6000-ton VISTA can visit any planet in the solar system and return to Earth in about 7 years or less without any significant physiological hazards to astronauts. In concept, VISTA provides such short-duration missions, especially to Mars, that the hazards from cosmic radiation and zero gravity can be reduced to insignificant levels. VISTA therefore represents a significant step forward for space-propulsion concepts.

  14. Interplanetary Particle Environment. Proceedings of a Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feynman, Joan (Editor); Gabriel, Stephen (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    A workshop entitled the Interplanetary Charged Particle Environment was held at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) on March 16 and 17, 1987. The purpose of the Workshop was to define the environment that will be seen by spacecraft operating in the 1990s. It focused on those particles that are involved in single event upset, latch-up, total dose and displacement damage in spacecraft microelectronic parts. Several problems specific to Magellan were also discussed because of the sensitivity of some electronic parts to single-event phenomena. Scientists and engineers representing over a dozen institutions took part in the meeting. The workshop consisted of two major activities, reviews of the current state of knowledge and the formation of working groups and the drafting of their reports.

  15. Laser-fusion rocket for interplanetary propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Hyde, R.A.

    1983-09-27

    A rocket powered by fusion microexplosions is well suited for quick interplanetary travel. Fusion pellets are sequentially injected into a magnetic thrust chamber. There, focused energy from a fusion Driver is used to implode and ignite them. Upon exploding, the plasma debris expands into the surrounding magnetic field and is redirected by it, producing thrust. This paper discusses the desired features and operation of the fusion pellet, its Driver, and magnetic thrust chamber. A rocket design is presented which uses slightly tritium-enriched deuterium as the fusion fuel, a high temperature KrF laser as the Driver, and a thrust chamber consisting of a single superconducting current loop protected from the pellet by a radiation shield. This rocket can be operated with a power-to-mass ratio of 110 W gm/sup -1/, which permits missions ranging from occasional 9 day VIP service to Mars, to routine 1 year, 1500 ton, Plutonian cargo runs.

  16. MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS OF INTERPLANETARY CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Lionello, Roberto; Downs, Cooper; Linker, Jon A.; Török, Tibor; Riley, Pete; Mikić, Zoran E-mail: cdowns@predsci.com E-mail: tibor@predsci.com E-mail: mikic@predsci.com

    2013-11-01

    We describe a new MHD model for the propagation of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) in the solar wind. Accurately following the propagation of ICMEs is important for determining space weather conditions. Our model solves the MHD equations in spherical coordinates from a lower boundary above the critical point to Earth and beyond. On this spherical surface, we prescribe the magnetic field, velocity, density, and temperature calculated typically directly from a coronal MHD model as time-dependent boundary conditions. However, any model that can provide such quantities either in the inertial or rotating frame of the Sun is suitable. We present two validations of the technique employed in our new model and a more realistic simulation of the propagation of an ICME from the Sun to Earth.

  17. Interplanetary approach optical navigation with applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jerath, N.

    1978-01-01

    The use of optical data from onboard television cameras for the navigation of interplanetary spacecraft during the planet approach phase is investigated. Three optical data types were studied: the planet limb with auxiliary celestial references, the satellite-star, and the planet-star two-camera methods. Analysis and modelling issues related to the nature and information content of the optical methods were examined. Dynamic and measurement system modelling, data sequence design, measurement extraction, model estimation and orbit determination, as relating optical navigation, are discussed, and the various error sources were analyzed. The methodology developed was applied to the Mariner 9 and the Viking Mars missions. Navigation accuracies were evaluated at the control and knowledge points, with particular emphasis devoted to the combined use of radio and optical data. A parametric probability analysis technique was developed to evaluate navigation performance as a function of system reliabilities.

  18. Stardust Abundance Variations among Interplanetary Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messenger, S.; Keller, L. P.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Nguyen, A. N.; Walker, Robert M.

    2009-01-01

    Presolar grain abundances reflect the degree of processing primitive materials have experienced. This is evidenced by the wide range of silicate stardust abundances among primitive meteorites (10 to 300 ppm) [1], attributable to parent body hydrothermal processing. Stardust abundance variations are also pronounced in anhydrous interplanetary dust particles (CPIDPs), that have not experienced parent body processing (300 to > 10,000 ppm) [2-4]. The large range in stardust abundances among CP IDPs thus reflect nebular processing. Here we present results of a systematic search for stardust among cluster CP IDPs. Our goals are to establish mineralogical trends among IDPs with different stardust abundances. This may shed light into the nature of isotopically normal presolar grains (GEMS grains?; 5) if their abundances vary similarly to that of isotopically exotic stardust grains.

  19. Silicon photomultipliers for scintillating trackers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabaioli, S.; Berra, A.; Bolognini, D.; Bonvicini, V.; Bosisio, L.; Ciano, S.; Iugovaz, D.; Lietti, D.; Penzo, A.; Prest, M.; Rashevskaya, I.; Reia, S.; Stoppani, L.; Vallazza, E.

    2012-12-01

    In recent years, silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) have been proposed as a new kind of readout device for scintillating detectors in many experiments. A SiPM consists of a matrix of parallel-connected pixels, which are independent photon counters working in Geiger mode with very high gain (∼106). This contribution presents the use of an array of eight SiPMs (manufactured by FBK-irst) for the readout of a scintillating bar tracker (a small size prototype of the Electron Muon Ranger detector for the MICE experiment). The performances of the SiPMs in terms of signal to noise ratio, efficiency and time resolution will be compared to the ones of a multi-anode photomultiplier tube (MAPMT) connected to the same bars. Both the SiPMs and the MAPMT are interfaced to a VME system through a 64 channel MAROC ASIC.

  20. LHCb Upgrade: Scintillating Fibre Tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, Mark

    2016-07-01

    The LHCb detector will be upgraded during the Long Shutdown 2 (LS2) of the LHC in order to cope with higher instantaneous luminosities and to read out the data at 40 MHz using a trigger-less read-out system. All front-end electronics will be replaced and several sub-detectors must be redesigned to cope with higher occupancy. The current tracking detectors downstream of the LHCb dipole magnet will be replaced by the Scintillating Fibre (SciFi) Tracker. The SciFi Tracker will use scintillating fibres read out by Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs). State-of-the-art multi-channel SiPM arrays are being developed to read out the fibres and a custom ASIC will be used to digitise the signals from the SiPMs. The evolution of the design since the Technical Design Report in 2014 and the latest R & D results are presented.