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Sample records for interpositional gap arthroplasty

  1. Gap Arthroplasty versus Interpositional Arthroplasty for Temporomandibular Joint Ankylosis: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Junli; Liang, Limin; Jiang, Hua; Gu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Gap arthroplasty (GA) and interpositional arthroplasty (IA) are widely used for the treatment of temporomandibular joint ankylosis (TMJA). However, controversy remains as to whether IA is superior to GA. PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, the Web of science and the China National Knowledge Infrastructure were searched for literature regarding these procedures (published from 1946 to July 28, 2014). A study was included in this analysis if it was: (1) a randomized controlled trial or non-randomized observational cohort study; (2) comparing the clinical outcomes between GA and IA with respect to the maximal incisal opening (MIO) and reankylosis; (3) with a follow-up period of at least 12 months. The methodological quality of the included studies was evaluated according to the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale Eight non-randomized observational cohort studies with 272 patients were included. All the statistical analyses were performed using the RevMan 5.3 and Stat 12. The pooled analysis showed no significant difference in the incidence of reankylosis between the IA group (13/120) and the GA group (29/163) (RR= 0.67, 95% CI=0.38 to 1.16; Z=1.43, p=0.15). The IA group showed a significantly larger MIO than the GA group (MD=1.96, 95% CI=0.21 to 3.72, Z=2.19, p=0.03, I2=0%). In conclusion, patients with TMJA could benefit more from IA than GA, with a larger MIO and a similar incidence of reankylosis. IA shows to be an adequate option in the treatment of TMJA based on the results of maximal incisal opening. PMID:26010224

  2. Gap Arthroplasty versus Interpositional Arthroplasty for Temporomandibular Joint Ankylosis: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Junli; Liang, Limin; Jiang, Hua; Gu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Gap arthroplasty (GA) and interpositional arthroplasty (IA) are widely used for the treatment of temporomandibular joint ankylosis (TMJA). However, controversy remains as to whether IA is superior to GA. PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, the Web of science and the China National Knowledge Infrastructure were searched for literature regarding these procedures (published from 1946 to July 28, 2014). A study was included in this analysis if it was: (1) a randomized controlled trial or non-randomized observational cohort study; (2) comparing the clinical outcomes between GA and IA with respect to the maximal incisal opening (MIO) and reankylosis; (3) with a follow-up period of at least 12 months. The methodological quality of the included studies was evaluated according to the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale Eight non-randomized observational cohort studies with 272 patients were included. All the statistical analyses were performed using the RevMan 5.3 and Stat 12. The pooled analysis showed no significant difference in the incidence of reankylosis between the IA group (13/120) and the GA group (29/163) (RR= 0.67, 95% CI=0.38 to 1.16; Z=1.43, p=0.15). The IA group showed a significantly larger MIO than the GA group (MD=1.96, 95% CI=0.21 to 3.72, Z=2.19, p=0.03, I(2)=0%). In conclusion, patients with TMJA could benefit more from IA than GA, with a larger MIO and a similar incidence of reankylosis. IA shows to be an adequate option in the treatment of TMJA based on the results of maximal incisal opening.

  3. TMJ ANKYLOSIS: MANAGEMENT WITH RECONSTRUCTION AND INTERPOSITIONAL ARTHROPLASTY.

    PubMed

    Madhumati, Singh; Shruthi, R; Mitul, Sojitra; Karan, Abhishek; Aziz, Abdul

    2015-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis is a very desolating structural condition that involves fusion of the mandibular condyle to the base of the skull. It causes difficulty in mastication and breathing. Trauma and Infections are usually responsible. If trauma occurs in young age, it leads to disturbance in growth & facial asymmetry. Treatment of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis usually requires adequate excision of the involved ankylotic block (arthroplasty) or interpositional arthroplasty using autogenous or alloplastic materials. Early mobilization, physiotherapy & strict follow up are essential to prevent postop adhesions. In our cases fascia lata was used as an interpositional grafting material. One case was treated by gap arthroplasty, second case by costochondral graft & third case was managed with titanium condylar prosthesis.

  4. TMJ ANKYLOSIS: MANAGEMENT WITH RECONSTRUCTION AND INTERPOSITIONAL ARTHROPLASTY.

    PubMed

    Madhumati, Singh; Shruthi, R; Mitul, Sojitra; Karan, Abhishek; Aziz, Abdul

    2015-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis is a very desolating structural condition that involves fusion of the mandibular condyle to the base of the skull. It causes difficulty in mastication and breathing. Trauma and Infections are usually responsible. If trauma occurs in young age, it leads to disturbance in growth & facial asymmetry. Treatment of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis usually requires adequate excision of the involved ankylotic block (arthroplasty) or interpositional arthroplasty using autogenous or alloplastic materials. Early mobilization, physiotherapy & strict follow up are essential to prevent postop adhesions. In our cases fascia lata was used as an interpositional grafting material. One case was treated by gap arthroplasty, second case by costochondral graft & third case was managed with titanium condylar prosthesis. PMID:27487617

  5. Thumb Carpometacarpal Arthroplasty with Ligament Reconstruction and Interposition Costochondral Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Trumble, Thomas; Rafijah, Gregory; Heaton, Dennis

    2013-01-01

    Background Thumb arthritis at the carpometacarpal (CMC) joint is one of the most common sites of arthritis, especially in women. Thumb arthroplasty is an effective method of relieving pain and improving function. Materials and Methods Qualitative and quantitative outcomes were assessed clinically and radiographically in 58 patients (66 thumbs) with thumb basal joint arthritis limited to the trapeziometacarpal joint, treated with hemiresection arthroplasty of the trapezium, flexor carpi radialis (FCR) ligament reconstruction, and allograft costochondral interposition graft. Description of Technique The thumb CMC joint arthroplasty is performed using an FCR tendon for ligament reconstruction combined with removal of the distal half of the trapezium, which is replaced with a life preserver-shaped spacer that is carved out of allograft cartilage. Results Results of the validated Disability of Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) questionnaire at a mean follow-up time of 56 months (range, 24-103 months) revealed that 90% of the patients had a high level of function with minimal symptoms. Important improvements in web space with increased palmar and radial abduction and grip and pinch strength measurements were observed. The trapeziometacarpal space had decreased 21% after surgery, while trapeziometacarpal subluxation was 14% compared with 21% before surgery. There was an inverse correlation between the loss of trapezial height and subluxation and clinical outcome. Conclusions The results of this study demonstrate that, although the preoperative trapezial height was not maintained, the reconstructed thumbs remained stable, with little subluxation and improved clinical outcomes. Level of Evidence IV, retrospective case series PMID:24436820

  6. Matched hemiresection interposition arthroplasty of the distal radioulnar joint.

    PubMed

    Bain, G I; Pugh, D M; MacDermid, J C; Roth, J H

    1995-11-01

    Since 1986 the senior author has performed a matched hemiresection with retinacular/capsular interposition for patients with painful disorders of the distal radioulnar joint. A retrospective review of 55 wrists was performed by an independent hand surgeon and hand therapist. Forty-nine of 54 wrists in the surviving patients were clinically and radiographically reviewed with an average follow-up interval of 36 months. Subjective assessment included a visual analog rating of pain improvement and satisfaction with treatment. Objective assessment included examination of range of motion, strength, stability, and standardized functional testing with the Jebsen and Minnesota Rate of Manipulation tests. Thirty-five patients reported pain improvement and 41 patients were satisfied. The range of supination and pronation increased from 54 degrees and 67 degrees, respectively, to 72 degrees and 72 degrees. Functional ability as measured by the Jebsen test was similar to the contralateral wrist. Patients had most difficulty turning large objects. The clinical, objective, functional, and x-ray films results correlated poorly with pain improvement and patient satisfaction. Complications included one infection, one reflex sympathetic dystrophy, one neuroma of the dorsal sensory branch of the ulnar nerve, and four cases of ulnar-carpal impaction. Pain relief was the primary determinant of patient satisfaction and should be considered the indication for surgery.

  7. Elbow interposition arthroplasty in children and adolescents: long-term follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Janeth; Oliver, Guillermo

    2007-01-01

    were considered to be excellent, those between 90° and 119° were graded good, from 60° to 89° fair and those 59° or less poor. The ability to attain a hand to mouth position requires a mobility of 120°. We obtained excellent results in two patients, good results in three, fair results in four and poor results in three. The fascia lata was used in 83% of cases, obtaining excellent to good results in five patients (41%). Elbow interposition arthroplasty has its indications in children and adolescents where arthrodesis or total joint replacement cannot be performed. PMID:17308908

  8. Congenital cheek teratoma with temporo-mandibular joint ankylosis managed with ultra-thin silicone sheet interpositional arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, Ankur; Verma, Vinay Kumar; Purohit, Vishal

    2013-01-01

    Primary cheek teratomas are rare with < 5 reported cases. None had associated temporo mandibular joint ankylosis (TMJA). The fundamental aim in the treatment of TMJA is the successful surgical resection of ankylotic bone, prevention of recurrence, and aesthetic improvement by ensuring functional occlusion. Early treatment is necessary to promote proper growth and function of mandible and to facilitate the positive psychological development of child. Inter-positional arthroplasty with ultra-thin silicone sheet was performed. Advantages include short operative time, less foreign material in the joint space leading to negligible foreign body reactions and least chances of implant extrusion. Instead of excising a large bony segment, a thin silicone sheet was interposed and then sutured ensuring preservation of mandibular height. Aggressive post-operative physiotherapy with custom made dynamic jaw exerciser was used to prevent recurrence.

  9. Congenital cheek teratoma with temporo-mandibular joint ankylosis managed with ultra-thin silicone sheet interpositional arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Bhatnagar, Ankur; Verma, Vinay Kumar; Purohit, Vishal

    2013-01-01

    Primary cheek teratomas are rare with < 5 reported cases. None had associated temporo mandibular joint ankylosis (TMJA). The fundamental aim in the treatment of TMJA is the successful surgical resection of ankylotic bone, prevention of recurrence, and aesthetic improvement by ensuring functional occlusion. Early treatment is necessary to promote proper growth and function of mandible and to facilitate the positive psychological development of child. Inter-positional arthroplasty with ultra-thin silicone sheet was performed. Advantages include short operative time, less foreign material in the joint space leading to negligible foreign body reactions and least chances of implant extrusion. Instead of excising a large bony segment, a thin silicone sheet was interposed and then sutured ensuring preservation of mandibular height. Aggressive post-operative physiotherapy with custom made dynamic jaw exerciser was used to prevent recurrence. PMID:24163567

  10. [Clinical and radiologic evaluation of a polylactic acid interposition arthroplasty after trapezectomy].

    PubMed

    Guinet, V; Mure, J-P; Vimont, E

    2013-06-01

    Surgical management of trapeziometacarpal osteoarthritis does not obey to strict rules. The use of interposition implants made of different materials leads to enrichment of surgeon's resources. This prospective study reports the radiological and clinical results of 45 patients treated by total trapeziectomy with polylactic acid interposition implant, with an average follow-up of 31 months. Thirty-seven surgical treatments were carried out after ineffective medical treatment. According to Dell classification, there were five stages II, 30 stages III and two stages IV. Mean age was 66 years. Dominant side was involved in 60%. Thumbs were pain free at 5 months in average and 81% of the patients reported good results (Alnot stages 0 and 1). The average opposition was 9.1/10, the average M1M2 angle was 40°, and the average key pinch strength was 4.4 kg. Six patients suffered from sympathetic dystrophy but neither infection nor local inflammatory reaction was observed. Collapse of the trapezium space was constant and the trapezium space ratio was 76% at the follow-up. Seventy-five per cent of patients returned back to their occupation. The satisfaction rate was 89%. The radioclinical results were very good in our series. The interposition of polylactic acid implant permits to avoid the presumed complications of tendon harvesting, and those of other types of material used in the same indication. Its safety seems excellent.

  11. Is aggressive gap arthroplasty essential in the management of temporomandibular joint ankylosis?-a prospective clinical study of 15 cases.

    PubMed

    Babu, Lokesh; Jain, Manoj Kumar; Ramesh, C; Vinayaka, N

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this three-year, prospective, follow-up study was to evaluate whether aggressive gap arthroplasty is essential in the management of ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Fifteen patients were treated by the creation of a minimal gap of 5-8mm and insertion of an interpositional gap arthroplasty using the temporalis fascia. Eleven patients had unilateral coronoidectomy and 4 bilateral coronoidectomy based on Kaban's protocol. Preoperative assessment included recording of history, clinical and radiological examinations, personal variables, the aetiology of the ankylosis, the side affected, and any other relevant findings. Patients were assessed postoperatively by a surgeon unaware of the treatment given for a minimum of 3 years, which included measurement of the maximal incisal opening, presence of facial nerve paralysis, recurrence, and any other relevant findings. Of the 15 patients (17 joints), 12 had unilateral and three had bilateral involvement, with trauma being the most common cause. The patients were aged between 7 and 29 years (mean (SD) age 20 (8) years). Preoperative maximal incisal opening was 0-2mm in 8 cases and 2-9mm in 9. Postoperatively adequate mouth opening of 30-40mm was achieved in all cases, with no recurrence or relevant malocclusion during 3-year follow up. However, patients will be followed up for 10 years. Aggressive gap arthroplasty is not essential in the management of ankylosis of the TMJ. Minimal gap interpositional arthroplasty with complete removal of the mediolateral ankylotic mass is a feasible and effective method of preventing recurrence. PMID:23219020

  12. Free flap transfer for closure and interposition-arthroplasty in noma defects of the lateral face associated with bony ankylosis.

    PubMed

    Giessler, Goetz A; Schmidt, Andreas B; Deubel, Ute; Cornelius, C-Peter

    2004-09-01

    Noma defects of the anterolateral face are often associated with fibrous or bony ankylosis fusing the mandibula to the skull base. According to the extent of the ankylosis, the temporomandibular joint mobility can be restricted or even completely frozen. In third world conditions the surgical approach to severe forms of bony ankylosis consists of a single linear opening osteotomy (trismus release) and the closure of the noma defect with locoregional flaps. Relapse of jaw immobility is common and may be caused by minor bone resection, the lack of adequate postoperative physiotherapy, or even the scarring of the defect coverage. In 4 years the authors have gained increasing experience with folded free flaps for simultaneous closure of outer and inner lining of large noma defects and the maintenance and training of re-established jaw function by the use of a dynamic external distractor fixed between the zygoma and the mandibular body. The authors report the bony reankylosis can be reduced by extended wedge osteotomies of the bony bridge and tip-like shaping of the ascending mandibular ramus. To preclude the reossification of the osteotomy site and fibrous scar formation, a dermofatty or muscular tail of the free flap is interposed into the bone gap. Two cases were treated according to this concept with a free parascapular and a latissimus dorsi flap in combination with simultaneous arthroplasty. During a 6-month follow-up period, no signs of a recurrent reduction of mandibular movement were noted in either case.

  13. Ligament reconstruction and tendon interposition for thumb basal arthritis.

    PubMed

    Elfar, John C; Burton, Richard I

    2013-02-01

    Arthritis at the base of the thumb is common and debilitating. Arthroplasty has evolved over 3 decades to become a highly refined surgical procedure, with excellent results. This article summarizes the history, method, and expected results of basal joint arthroplasty, and the authors describe their method of ligament reconstruction and tendon interposition for thumb basal arthritis.

  14. Silicone vs temporalis fascia interposition in TMJ ankylosis: A comparison

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sumit; Gupta, Hemant; Mohammad, Shadab; Mehra, Hemant; Natu, Subodh Shankar; Gupta, Niharika

    2016-01-01

    Objective Temporomandibular joint ankylosis (TMJa) is a distressing condition, but can be surgically managed by gap or interpositional arthroplasty, with an aim to restore joint function and prevent re-ankylosis. The aim of this paper is to compare two interposition materials used in management of TMJ ankylosis. Methods 15 patients with TMJa were randomly allocated to two groups: group A (n = 6), interposition material used was medical-grade silicon elastomer, and group B (n = 9) where the interposition material used was temporalis fascia. Patients were followed up at regular intervals of 1 and 2 weeks, 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months and were assessed on following parameters: pain by VAS Scale, maximal mouth opening (MMO), implant rejection, and recurrence. Results The results showed a loss of 4.6% and 7.9% in maximal interincisal mouth opening at 3rd and 6th months in Group A while Group B had a mean loss of 9% and 10% at 3rd and 6th months respectively without any significant difference. None of our cases showed recurrence or implant rejection. Conclusion We conclude that silicone is comparable to temporalis fascia in terms of stability, surgical ease, and adaptability. It not only restores the function of mandible and ensures good maximum interincisal opening but also maintains the vertical ramal height. Also, it requires less operating time and is easy to handle but is not economical. It might be an effective way to restore function and prevent re-ankylosis. PMID:27195207

  15. Versatility of full thickness skin-subcutaneous fat grafts as interpositional material in the management of temporomandibular joint ankylosis.

    PubMed

    Thangavelu, A; Santhosh Kumar, K; Vaidhyanathan, A; Balaji, M; Narendar, R

    2011-01-01

    The authors present a review of seven patients (eight joints) with temporomandibular ankylosis treated between 2007 and 2008. The aim of this retrospective study was to present the experience of using full thickness skin-subcutaneous fat grafts, harvested from the patient's abdomen as interpositional material after gap arthroplasty. All patients presented with osseous ankylosis and were graded according to Topazian's classification. Postoperative follow up ranged from 12 to 24 months. Maximal inter-incisal opening (MIO) on presentation ranged from 0 to 8mm, which stabilized to 27-44mm at follow up. There was no evidence of re-ankylosis. This study found merit in the use of autogenous full thickness skin-subcutaneous fat graft as an interpositional material for up to 2 years following ankylosis release.

  16. Identifying the procedural gap and improved methods for maintaining accuracy during total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Gross, Allan; Muir, Jeffrey M

    2016-09-01

    Osteoarthritis is a ubiquitous condition, affecting 26 million Americans each year, with up to 17% of adults over age 75 suffering from one variation of arthritis. The hip is one of the most commonly affected joints and while there are conservative options for treatment, as symptoms progress, many patients eventually turn to surgery to manage their pain and dysfunction. Early surgical options such as osteotomy or arthroscopy are reserved for younger, more active patients with less severe disease and symptoms. Total hip arthroplasty offers a viable solution for patients with severe degenerative changes; however, post-surgical discrepancies in leg length, offset and component malposition are common and cause significant complications. Such discrepancies are associated with consequences such as low back pain, neurological deficits, instability and overall patient dissatisfaction. Current methods for managing leg length and offset during hip arthroplasty are either inaccurate and susceptible to error or are cumbersome, expensive and lengthen surgical time. There is currently no viable option that provides accurate, real-time data to surgeons regarding leg length, offset and cup position in a cost-effective manner. As such, we hypothesize that a procedural gap exists in hip arthroplasty, a gap into which fall a large majority of arthroplasty patients who are at increased risk of complications following surgery. These complications and associated treatments place significant stress on the healthcare system. The costs associated with addressing leg length and offset discrepancies can be minor, requiring only heel lifts and short-term rehabilitation, but can also be substantial, with revision hip arthroplasty costs of up to $54,000 per procedure. The need for a cost-effective, simple to use and unobtrusive technology to address this procedural gap in hip arthroplasty and improve patient outcomes is of increasing importance. Given the aging of the population, the projected

  17. Flexion-extension gap in cruciate-retaining versus posterior-stabilized total knee arthroplasty: a cadaveric study.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Joshua; Chong, Alexander; McQueen, David; O'Guinn, Justin; Wooley, Paul

    2014-05-01

    We re-examined experimental model results using half-body specimens with intact extensor mechanisms and navigation to evaluate cruciate-retaining (CR) and posterior stabilized (PS) total knee arthroplasty (TKA) component gaps through an entire range of motion. Six sequential testing regimens were conducted with the knee intact, with a CR TKA in place, and with a PS TKA in place, with and without 22 N traction in place at each stage. Each of 10 knees was taken through six full ranges of motion from 0° to 120° at every stage using a navigated knee system to record component gapping. No significant difference was found between loaded and unloaded component gaps, and no significant differences were found in component gapping between CR and PS TKAs throughout a full range of motion. Flexion-extension gap measurements were significantly different from previously published data (at 90° flexion). No difference was found in kinematics when comparing CR and PS TKA component designs. Our results suggest that intact extensor mechanisms may be required to perform proper kinematic studies of TKA. Our findings provide evidence that the extensor mechanism may play a major role in the flexion-extension gaps in cadaveric knees.

  18. Glenohumeral kinematics after soft tissue interposition graft and glenoid reaming: A cadaveric study

    PubMed Central

    Garbis, Nickolas G; Weber, Alexander E; Shewman, Elizabeth F; Cole, Brian J; Romeo, Anthony A; Verma, Nikhil N

    2016-01-01

    Background: The management of young patients with glenohumeral arthritis is controversial. Resurfacing of the glenoid with biologic interposition and reaming of the glenoid have been suggested as potential treatment options. The goal of this study was to determine the change in glenohumeral contact pressures in interposition arthroplasty, as well as glenoid reaming in an arthritis model. We hypothesized that interposition with meniscal allograft will lead to the best normalization of contact pressure throughout the glenohumeral range of motion. Materials and Methods: Eight fresh-frozen cadaveric shoulders were tested in static positions of humeral abduction with a compressive load. Glenohumeral contact area, contact pressure, and peak force were determined sequentially for (1) intact glenoid (2) glenoid with cartilage removed (arthritis model) (3) placement of lateral meniscus allograft (4) placement of Achilles allograft (5) arthritis model with reamed glenoid. Results: The arthritis model demonstrated statistically higher peak pressures than intact glenoid and glenoid with interpositional allograft. Meniscal and Achilles allograft lowered mean contact pressure and increased contact area to a level equal to or more favorable than the control state. In contrast, the reamed glenoid did not show any statistical difference from the arthritis model for any of the recorded measures. Conclusion: Glenohumeral contact pressure is significantly improved with interposition of allograft at time zero compared to an arthritic state. Our findings suggest that concentric reaming did not differ from the arthritic model when compared to normal. These findings favor the use of allograft for interposition as a potential treatment option in patients with glenoid wear. PMID:27293292

  19. Changes in Joint Gap Balances between Intra- and Postoperation in Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Arata; Aoki, Yasuchika; Murakami, Masazumi; Nakagawa, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    Achieving correct soft tissue balance and preparing equal and rectangular extension and flexion joint gaps are crucial goals of TKA. Intraoperative gap balances would change postoperatively; however, changes in joint gap balances between pre- and postoperation remain unclear. To explore these changes associated with TKA, we prospectively investigated 21 posterior cruciate ligament retaining TKAs for varus knees. Intraoperative extension gap balance (iEGB) was 2.6 ± 2.0° varus versus postoperative extension gap balance (pEGB) of 0.77 ± 1.8° valgus (P < 0.01), while no significant difference between intraoperative flexion gap balance (iFGB) and postoperative flexion gap balance (pFGB) was observed. We also explored correlations between intraoperative and postoperative gap balances but found no significant correlations. These observations indicate that (i) surgeons should avoid excessive release of the medial soft tissue during TKA for varus knees and (ii) intraoperative gap balance may not be necessarily reflected on postoperative gap balance.

  20. Retrospective study of absorbable gelatin sponge soaked in triamicinolone acetonide as interpositioning material in temporomandibular joint ankylosis in 350 patients

    PubMed Central

    Pal, U.S.; Singh, Nimisha; Malkunje, Laxman R.; Singh, R.K.; Dhasmana, Satish; Yadav, Arvind Kumar; Chand, Sharad

    2012-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the feasibility and usefulness of absorbable gelatin sponge soaked in triamcinolone acetonide as an interposition material in the treatment of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis. Materials and methods This retrospective study was conducted in 350 patients of TMJ ankylosis who visited our outpatient department between 2000 and 2010, and were treated by the same surgeon. Patients were randomly divided into two groups, where in group 1, absorbable gelatin sponge soaked with triamcinolone acetonide was interposed in the surgical gap created after arthroplasty and in group 2, temporalis fascia was interposed. Preoperative assessment included history and physical examination, along with cause of ankylosis, Postoperative observation were undertaken for maximum mouth opening (MMO), facial nerve paralysis and recurrence. Results At one year follow-up, in group 1 MMO ranged from 35 to 45 mm with no case of re-ankylosis while in the other group 25–43 mm, with re-ankylosis in 20 patients (13.69%). Conclusion The findings of this study showed successful management of TMJ ankylosis using absorbable gelatin sponge soaked in triamcinolone acetonide in cases which did not require condylar reconstruction. PMID:25737875

  1. Colon interposition for oesophageal replacement.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Pascal A; Gilardoni, Adrian; Trousse, Delphine; D'Journo, Xavier B; Avaro, Jean-Philippe; Doddoli, Christophe; Giudicelli, Roger; Fuentes, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    The choice of the colon as an oesophageal substitute results primarily from the unavailability of the stomach. However, given its durability and function, colon interposition keeps elective indications in patients with benign or malignant oesophageal disease who are potential candidates for long survival. The choice of the colonic portion used for oesophageal reconstruction depends on the required length of the graft, and the encountered colonic vascular anatomy, the last being characterised by the near-invariability of the left colonic vessels, in contrast to the vascular pattern of the right side of the colon. Accordingly, the transverse colon with all or part of the ascending colon is the substitute of choice, positioned in the isoperistaltic direction, and supplied either from the left colic vessels for long grafts or middle colic vessels for shorter grafts. Technical key points are: full mobilisation of the entire colon, identification of the main colonic vessels and collaterals, and a prolonged clamping test to ensure the permeability of the chosen nourishing pedicle. Transposition through the posterior mediastinum in the oesophageal bed is the shortest one and thereby offers the best functional results. When the oesophageal bed is not available, the retrosternal route is the preferred alternative option. The food bolus travelling mainly by gravity makes straightness of the conduit of paramount importance. The proximal anastomosis is a single-layer hand-fashioned end-to-end anastomosis to prevent narrowing. When the stomach is available, the distal anastomosis is best performed at the posterior part of the antrum for the reasons of pedicle positioning and reflux prevention, and a gastric drainage procedure is added when the oesophagus and vagus nerves have been removed. In the other cases, a Roux-en-Y jejunal loop is preferable to prevent bile reflux into the colon. Additional procedures include re-establishment of the colonic continuity, a careful closure of

  2. 21 CFR 872.3970 - Interarticular disc prosthesis (interpositional implant).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Interarticular disc prosthesis (interpositional... disc prosthesis (interpositional implant). (a) Identification. An interarticular disc prosthesis... Food and Drug Administration on or before March 30, 1999, for any interarticular disc...

  3. Gastric interposition following transhiatal esophagectomy: CT evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, B.H.; Agha, F.P.; Glazer, G.M.; Orringer, M.B.

    1985-04-01

    Transhiatal esophagectomy without thoracotomy (THE) but with gastric interposition results in less morbidity and mortality than standard transpleural esophagectomy with thoracotomy. Barium examination has been the primary radiographic study following THE for detecting postoperative complications. The authors reviewed computed tomography (CT) scans of 21 patients who had undergone THE and correlated CT appearance with clinical status and with findings of the barium studies. Local mediastinal recurrent neoplasm was detected by CT in seven patients; barium study within 2 weeks of the CT scan failed to detect tumor recurrence in three of these patients. CT is the modality of choice for detecting locally recurrent neoplasm and distant metastases following THE and may also be helpful in patients with postoperative mediastinal abscess. Normal mediastinal CT anatomy after esophagectomy is reviewed in order to warn against pitfalls in scan interpretation.

  4. Radionuclide transit in patients with colon interposition

    SciTech Connect

    Isolauri, J.; Koskinen, M.O.; Markkula, H.

    1987-10-01

    To assess radionuclide transit in interposed segments of the colon, we examined 25 patients with colon interposition for benign esophageal disease. No such assessment has been reported previously. The most common indications for operation were esophageal strictures that developed after lye ingestion and reflux strictures not responding to other treatment. The operations were performed without thoracotomy by blunt esophageal dissection in 80% of the patients. There were 18 antiperistaltic and seven isoperistaltic colon grafts. A large-field gamma camera and computer system were used. Data were collected at time intervals of 0.5 second during the first 30 seconds and at intervals of 30 seconds up to 20 minutes. The 5% and 90% stomach filling times, times to 50% and 25% activity levels, and residual activity levels as a percentage of the maxima were calculated in the upper, middle, and lower thirds of the colon grafts and of the normal esophagus of 10 healthy control subjects. The examinations were performed with the subject in a sitting position. All parameters showed that emptying of the colon graft was markedly slower than that of the normal esophagus. The intra-abdominal third of the graft had a residual activity of 50.5% +/- 15.7% after 20 minutes' observation. No differences between antiperistaltic and isoperistaltic grafts were observed. Reconstruction with proximal cologastric anastomosis and a short intra-abdominal colon graft segments is suggested.

  5. Colonic interposition vs. gastric pull-up after total esophagectomy.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Sadik; Köksal, Hakan; Celayir, Fevzi; Erdem, Levent; Oner, Muharrem; Baykan, Adil

    2004-01-01

    Gastric pull-up is the most frequent reconstruction after esophagectomy. In this report we aimed to compare gastric pull-up with colonic interposition in terms of graft function and patient satisfaction. Of 62 patients undergoing esophagectomy, reconstruction was performed by colonic interposition in 11 and gastric pull-up in 51 (without pyloric drainage in 44 and with pyloric drainage in 7). All esophagectomies were performed transhiatally. Patient follow-up ranged from 6 to 132 months (median 14 months). Follow-up examinations were performed 1, 9, 15, and 24 months postoperatively. The following factors were evaluated: time to the start of oral liquid and solid nutrients without vomiting, frequency of regurgitation, presence of pillow staining (night regurgitation), postprandial fullness, and degree of satisfaction during and after eating compared between groups undergoing colonic interposition and gastric pull-up with or without pyloric drainage. Among patients undergoing gastric pull-up, regurgitation was observed in 22% to 27% during follow-up. None of the patients with colonic interposition had reflux or regurgitation. Twenty-five percent of patients with gastric pull-up without drainage and 66% of patients with gastric pull-up plus drainage had reflux esophagitis at 15 months. No esophagitis was observed in patients with colonic interposition during the same period. Overall satisfaction was superior in patients undergoing colonic interposition followed by gastric pull-up with no drainage. Colonic interposition after esophageal resection is a viable option. Our study suggests that function of the replacement is better in this group of patients.

  6. 21 CFR 872.3970 - Interarticular disc prosthesis (interpositional implant).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... of the mandibular condyle and glenoid fossa. (b) Classification. Class III. (c) Date PMA or notice of completion of a PDP is required. A PMA or a notice of completion of a PDP is required to be filed with the... prosthesis (interpositional implant) shall have an approved PMA or a declared completed PDP in effect...

  7. Trapeziectomy and ligament reconstruction tendon interposition after failed trapeziometacarpal joint replacement.

    PubMed

    Lenoir, H; Erbland, A; Lumens, D; Coulet, B; Chammas, M

    2016-02-01

    Total trapeziometacarpal (TMC) joint replacement is increasingly being performed for the treatment of basal joint arthritis. However, complications such as instability or loosening are also frequent with TMC ball-and-socket joint replacement. Management of these complications lacks consensus. The purpose of this study was to report the results of 12 cases of failed TMC joint replacement that were treated by trapeziectomy with ligament reconstruction and tendon interposition (LRTI) arthroplasty. The follow-up consisted of functional (numerical scale, DASH score, satisfaction), physical (range of motion, strength) and radiological (Barron and Eaton ratio measurement) assessments. At a mean follow-up of 21 months, 11 patients were satisfied or very satisfied after surgery. The mean pain score was 2/10 and the mean DASH score 30/100. Mean thumb palmar and radial abduction was 40°. Thumb opposition measured by the Kapandji technique was 9/10. The height ratio was slightly increased. Trapeziectomy with LRTI after TMC joint replacement appears to be an attractive salvage procedure.

  8. Interposition Porcine Acellular Dermal Matrix Xenograft Successful Alternative in Treatment for Massive Rotator Cuff

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Julie; Zgonis, Miltiadis H.; Reay, Kathleen Dolores; Mayer, Stephanie W.; Boggess, Blake; Toth, Alison P.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Despite advances in the surgical techniques of rotator cuff repair (RCR), the management of massive rotator cuff tears in shoulders without glenohumeral arthritis poses a difficult problem for surgeons. Failure of massive rotator cuff repairs range from 20-90% at one to two years postoperatively using arthrography, ultrasound, or magnetic resonance imaging. Additionally, there are inconsistent outcomes reported with debridement alone of massive rotator cuff tears as well as limitations seen with other current methods of operative intervention including arthroplasty and tendon transfers. The purpose of this prospective, comparative study was to determine if the repair of massive rotator cuff tears using an interposition porcine acellular dermal matrix xenograft improves subjective function, pain, range of motion, and strength at greater than two years follow-up. To our knowledge, this is the largest prospective series reporting outcomes of using porcine acellular dermal matrix xenograft as an interposition graft. Methods: Thirty-seven patients (37 shoulders) with an average age of 66 years (range 51-80 years) were prospectively followed for 33 months (range 23-48) following massive RCR using porcine acellular dermal matrix interposition xenograft. Subjective outcomes were measured using the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) pain score (0-10, 0 = no pain), Modified American Shoulder and Elbow Score (M-ASES), and Short-Form12 (SF-12) scores. Preoperative and postoperative objective outcome measures included active range of motion and supraspinatus and infraspinatus manual muscle strength. Postoperative outcome measures included quantitative muscle strength using a dynamometer and static and dynamic ultrasonography to assess the integrity of the repair. Results: Average VAS pain score decreased from 4.5 to 1.1 (P<0.001). Average postoperative M-ASES was 89.23. Average postoperative SF-12 was 52.6. Mean forward flexion, external and internal rotation significantly

  9. Free jejunum interposition as salvage surgery after cervical esophagus injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhenrong; Guo, Yongqing; Liang, Chaoyang; Feng, Hongxiang

    2016-01-01

    In rare cases when stomach could not be suitable for esophageal replacement, the jejunum should probably be suitable for esophageal reconstruction. However, the widespread prevalence of jejunal interposition is precluded because of its complexity. Here we present a case of a 74-year-old female who underwent free jejunal interposition as salvage surgery. In this case, cervical esophagus was injured during thyroidectomy. Nine months later, replacement of injured part of esophagus with free jejunum was performed. End-to-end and end-to-side anastomosis were used for esophagus-jejunum and vascular-to-vascular anastomosis respectively. This patient was discharged from hospital 15 days postoperatively. No severe postoperative complication happened. Only minor late operation complication (anastomotic stricture) occurred during 13 years of annual follow-up. PMID:27499985

  10. Free jejunum interposition as salvage surgery after cervical esophagus injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenrong; Guo, Yongqing; Liang, Chaoyang; Feng, Hongxiang; Liu, Deruo

    2016-07-01

    In rare cases when stomach could not be suitable for esophageal replacement, the jejunum should probably be suitable for esophageal reconstruction. However, the widespread prevalence of jejunal interposition is precluded because of its complexity. Here we present a case of a 74-year-old female who underwent free jejunal interposition as salvage surgery. In this case, cervical esophagus was injured during thyroidectomy. Nine months later, replacement of injured part of esophagus with free jejunum was performed. End-to-end and end-to-side anastomosis were used for esophagus-jejunum and vascular-to-vascular anastomosis respectively. This patient was discharged from hospital 15 days postoperatively. No severe postoperative complication happened. Only minor late operation complication (anastomotic stricture) occurred during 13 years of annual follow-up. PMID:27499985

  11. Interposition vein graft for giant coronary aneurysm repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Firstenberg, M. S.; Azoury, F.; Lytle, B. W.; Thomas, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    Coronary aneurysms in adults are rare. Surgical treatment is often concomitant to treating obstructing coronary lesions. However, the ideal treatment strategy is poorly defined. We present a case of successful treatment of a large coronary artery aneurysm with a reverse saphenous interposition vein graft. This modality offers important benefits over other current surgical and percutaneous techniques and should be considered as an option for patients requiring treatment for coronary aneurysms.

  12. Colonic Interposition between the Liver and Diaphragm: "The Chilaiditi Sign".

    PubMed

    Nair, Nita; Takieddine, Zeina; Tariq, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    A 90-year-old wheelchair bound male was brought to the emergency department with complaints of worsening abdominal pain over the last 2-3 days. The patient also had difficulty in passing urine. Abdominal examination revealed tenderness in the umbilical and hypogastric area without rebound tenderness or guarding. Computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen showed a loop of colon interpositioned between the liver and the right hemidiaphragm (the Chilaiditi sign), mimicking free air. Foley's catheter was placed and the patient was managed conservatively. The patient clinically improved with improvement of the abdominal pain. PMID:27446829

  13. Transport distraction osteogenesis as a method of reconstruction of the temporomandibular joint following gap arthroplasty for post-traumatic ankylosis in children: a clinical and radiological prospective assessment of outcome.

    PubMed

    Bansal, V; Singh, S; Garg, N; Dubey, P

    2014-02-01

    This clinical and radiographic study investigated the use of transport distraction osteogenesis in unilateral temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis patients. Six patients aged between 4 and 8 years were selected for the study; the mean preoperative maximal inter-incisal opening (MIO) was 3.5mm without lateral and protrusive mandibular movements. The ankylotic mass along with the posterior border of the ascending ramus was exposed via 'lazy-S' incision. A gap arthroplasty was performed, followed by a 'reverse L' osteotomy on the posterior border of the ramus. In-house manufactured extraoral distraction devices were used for this prospective study. Follow-up clinical and radiographic evaluation was carried out for 13-27 months after completion of the activation period. After a mean follow-up of 19 months, the mean MIO was 29.1mm and the lateral and protrusive movements changed from none to slight. Cone beam computed tomography images of all patients showed remodelled neocondyle created by transport distraction osteogenesis with no statistically significant differences observed for average cancellous bone density, trabecular number, and trabecular spacing between the neocondyle of the operated side (test) and the condyle of the non-operated side (control). Neocondyle formation by transport distraction osteogenesis using the in-house distraction device is a promising treatment option for TMJ reconstruction in ankylosis patients.

  14. Bilateral anatomic total shoulder arthroplasty versus reverse shoulder arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Latif, Vaqar; Denard, Patrick J; Young, Allan A; Liotard, Jean-Pierre; Walch, Gllies

    2012-04-01

    The results of anatomic total shoulder arthroplasty and reverse shoulder arthroplasty have previously been reported separately. Although the indications differ, scenarios exist in which a patient may have a total shoulder arthroplasty on 1 shoulder and a reverse shoulder arthroplasty on the contralateral shoulder.Between 1992 and 2009, twelve patients underwent bilateral sequential primary shoulder arthroplasty with a total shoulder arthroplasty on 1 side and reverse shoulder arthroplasty on the contralateral side. Constant score, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, subjective shoulder value, and patient satisfaction were obtained a minimum 1 year postoperatively. Mean postoperative Constant score was 77 after total shoulder arthroplasty and 73 after reverse shoulder arthroplasty (P<.2488). Mean postoperative active forward flexion was similar after total shoulder arthroplasty compared with reverse shoulder arthroplasty (P=.8910). Greater external rotation at the side (43° vs 12°; P<.0001) and internal rotation (T8 vs L1; P<.0001) were observed after total shoulder arthroplasty. Mean ASES score was 89.6 after total shoulder arthroplasty compared with 82.4 after reverse shoulder arthroplasty (P=.0125). Patient satisfaction was 92% for both prostheses, and mean subjective shoulder value was similar (85.4% vs 82.5%; P=.6333).Bilateral shoulder arthroplasty performed with a total shoulder arthroplasty and reverse shoulder arthroplasty on opposite shoulders can provide good functional outcome and high patient satisfaction. Although range of motion is better following total shoulder arthroplasty, no difference was observed in final Constant score or subjective patient assessment. PMID:22495846

  15. SHOULDER ARTHROPLASTY RECORDS

    PubMed Central

    Filho, Geraldo Motta; Galvão, Marcus Vinicius; Monteiro, Martim; Cohen, Marcio; Brandão, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    The study's objective is to evaluate the characteristics and problems of patients who underwent shoulder arthroplasties between July 2004 and November 2006. Methodology: During the period of the study, 145 shoulder arthroplasties were performed. A prospective protocol was used for every patient; demographic, clinical and surgical procedure data were collected. All gathered data were included in the data base. The patients were divided in three major groups: fractures, degenerative diseases and trauma sequels. Information obtained from the data base was correlated in order to determine patients' epidemiologic, injuries, and surgical procedure profiles. Results: Of the 145 shoulder arthroplasties performed, 37% presented trauma sequels, 30% degenerative diseases, and 33% proximal humerus fracture. 12% of the cases required total arthroplasties and 88% partial arthroplasties. Five major complications were observed on early postoperative period. Conclusion: Shoulder arthroplasties have become a common procedure in orthopaedic practice. Surgical records are important in evidencing progressive evolution and in enabling future clinical outcomes evaluation. PMID:26998463

  16. Total Shoulder Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Sotelo, Joaquin

    2011-01-01

    Shoulder arthroplasty has been the subject of marked advances over the last few years. Modern implants provide a wide range of options, including resurfacing of the humeral head, anatomic hemiarthroplasty, total shoulder arthroplasty, reverse shoulder arthroplasty and trauma-specific implants for fractures and nonunions. Most humeral components achieve successful long-term fixation without bone cement. Cemented all-polyethylene glenoid components remain the standard for anatomic total shoulder arthroplasty. The results of shoulder arthroplasty vary depending on the underlying diagnosis, the condition of the soft-tissues, and the type of reconstruction. Total shoulder arthroplasty seems to provide the best outcome for patients with osteoarthritis and inflammatory arthropathy. The outcome of hemiarthroplasty for proximal humerus fractures is somewhat unpredictable, though it seems to have improved with the use of fracture-specific designs, more attention to tuberosity repair, and the selective use of reverse arthroplasty, as well as a shift in indications towards internal fixation. Reverse shoulder arthroplasty has become extremely popular for patients with cuff-tear arthropathy, and its indications have been expanded to the field of revision surgery. Overall, shoulder arthroplasty is a very successful procedure with predictable pain relief and substantial improvements in motion and function. PMID:21584206

  17. Full thickness cartilage palisade tympanoplasty with malleus interposition: a study of the long term results.

    PubMed

    Velepic, Marko M; Manestar, Dubravko; Starcević, Radan; Velepic, Barbara Cesnik; Velepic, Sanja Zubović; Linsak, Zeljko

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this retrospective study is to review long term results of full-thickness cartilage palisade tympanoplasty (FTCPT) with malleus head interposition performed on 51 patients (56 ears); 36 women and 15 men (7-73 years, 44 years average). The pathology of ears which encourages this technique of tympanoplasty is presented. On average 12 years after surgery we have elaborated anatomic and functional results. Anatomic results were categorized based on empiric evaluation of the new tympanic membrane status: 40 (71%) tympanic membranes without anatomic irregularities, 14 (25%) with irregularities and 2 (4%) with secondary perforation. Functional results (tonal audiogram) are based on pure tone average air-bone gap (PTA-ABG) at 4 frequencies. Main functional results of 51 ears (51 audiograms performed): pre- and post-operative average PTA-ABGs were 27.07 +/- 9.98 and 10.77 +/- 7.85 dB (t = 10.36; p < 0.001). In the group of ears with a tympanic membrane with no anatomic irregularities, pre- and post-operative average PTA-ABGs were 27.30 +/- 10.56 and 10.82 +/- 8.33 dB (t = 8.09; p < 0.001). In the group of ears with cartilage resorption, pre- and post-operative PTA-ABGs were 24.92 +/- 8.19 and 9.33 +/- 6.58 dB (t = 6.21; p < 0.001). The differences between the two groups are irrelevant. Postoperative PTA-ABG values of ears after first surgery (N = 34) and revision surgery (N = 17) was significantly different (8.75 +/- 5.75 and 15.16 +/- 9.62 dB) (t = 2.60; p = 0.016). In spite of the thickness of the new tympanal membrane, FTCPT is a successful technique for solving advanced ear pathology.

  18. Stiffness after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Manrique, Jorge; Gomez, Miguel M; Parvizi, Javad

    2015-04-01

    Stiffness after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) adversely affects outcome and impacts patient function. Various risk factors for stiffness after TKA have been identified, including reduced preoperative knee range of motion, history of prior knee surgery, etiology of arthritis, incorrect positioning or oversizing of components, and incorrect gap balancing. Mechanical and associated causes, such as infection, arthrofibrosis, complex regional pain syndrome, and heterotopic ossification, secondary gain issues have also been identified. Management of stiffness following TKA can be challenging. The condition needs to be assessed and treated in a staged manner. A nonsurgical approach is the first step. Manipulation under anesthesia may be considered within the first 3 months after the index TKA, if physical therapy fails to improve the range of motion. Beyond this point, consideration should be given to surgical intervention such as lysis of adhesions, either arthroscopically or by open arthrotomy. If the cause of stiffness is deemed to be surgical error, such as component malpositioning, revision arthroplasty is indicated. The purpose of this article is to evaluate the various aspects of management of stiffness after TKA.

  19. Knee arthroplasty rating.

    PubMed

    Binazzi, R; Soudry, M; Mestriner, L A; Insall, J N

    1992-06-01

    A number of rating systems used to evaluate the results of total knee arthroplasty exist. Many of these systems are based on different concepts, and might be expected to give divergent results. To see if this was so, the authors examined a consecutive series of 235 posterior stabilized knee arthroplasties recording the results according to five rating systems: HSS (The Hospital for Special Surgery), Brigham, Freeman, BOA (British Orthopaedic Association), and the VENN diagram. In spite of their apparent differences, all point systems and the BOA gave almost identical results, while the VENN diagram proved to be the most stringent. The authors suggest that any of the current point systems may be used to "score" arthroplasties, but the results should also be rated with the VENN diagram in order to see the quality of the arthroplasty and a comparison between the different series.

  20. Glenohumeral interposition of rotator cuff stumps: a rare complication of traumatic rotator cuff tear*

    PubMed Central

    Agnollitto, Paulo Moraes; Chu, Marcio Wen King; Lorenzato, Mario Muller; Zatiti, Salomão Chade Assan; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello Henrique

    2016-01-01

    The present report describes a case where typical findings of traumatic glenohumeral interposition of rotator cuff stumps were surgically confirmed. This condition is a rare complication of shoulder trauma. Generally, it occurs in high-energy trauma, frequently in association with glenohumeral joint dislocation. Radiography demonstrated increased joint space, internal rotation of the humerus and coracoid process fracture. In addition to the mentioned findings, magnetic resonance imaging showed massive rotator cuff tear with interposition of the supraspinatus, infraspinatus and subscapularis stumps within the glenohumeral joint. Surgical treatment was performed confirming the injury and the rotator cuff stumps interposition. It is important that radiologists and orthopedic surgeons become familiar with this entity which, because of its rarity, might be neglected in cases of shoulder trauma. PMID:26929462

  1. Bipolar hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Chang, Qing; Liu, Shubing; Guan, Changyong; Yu, Fangyuan; Wu, Shenguang; Jiang, Changliang

    2011-12-01

    Our aim was to compare hip arthroplasty with internal screw fixation in the repair of intertrochanteric fractures in elderly patients with osteoporosis. Of 112 included patient, 70 (81.81 ± 4.88 years) received hip arthroplasty with a prosthesis specially designed for intertrochanteric fractures, and 42 (83.46 ± 5.11 years) underwent plate-screw fixation. The hip arthroplasty group had significantly longer operation time, intraoperative blood loss, and total volume of blood transfused but had shorter time to beginning weight-bearing (5.94 ± 2.76 vs 23.68 ± 22.01 days) and higher postoperative Harris hip score (91.37 ± 4.80 vs 86.14 ± 5.46). In the arthroplasty group, there were 2 dislocations; and in the plate-screw fixation group, there were 5 internal fixation failures. Hip arthroplasty is preferable to internal fixation in elderly patients (age >80 years) with osteoporosis. PMID:21530148

  2. Colon-interposition as replacement for the esophagus. A follow-up study.

    PubMed

    van der Zee, D C; Zwierstra, R P; Kootstra, G; Edens, E T; van der Wagen, A; Bijleveld, C; Jonkers, A

    1981-08-01

    The longterm results of the use of colon-interposition as a substitution for the esophagus have been studied. Colon-interposition was carried out in eleven patients. There was one operative death. A second child died of an unknown cause nine years and eight months after operation. Nine patients could be studied from sixteen years and nine months to thirteen months after the operation. In six patients a satisfactory result has been achieved. One child is staying in a psychiatric infirmary. Feeding problems due to recurrent fistulae have led to growth retardation in another patient, while a third patient has regurgitation symptoms. A study of the case histories gives insight into the many early and late complications which occur in this operative procedure. The colon-interposition is a complicated procedure and should only be carried out in centers for pediatric surgery, because of its specific indication, its technique and the occurrence of complications afterwards. The development of alternative, less complicated, methods leaves a restricted indication for colon-interposition. PMID:7324572

  3. Occult Interpositional Rotator Cuff - an Extremely Rare Case of Traumatic Rotator Cuff Tear

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Cheng-Li; Su, Wei-Ren; Jou, I-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Traumatic interposition of a rotator cuff tendon in the glenohumeral joint without recognizable glenohumeral dislocation is an unusual complication after shoulder trauma. Here we report the clinical and imaging presentations of a 17-year-old man with trapped rotator cuff tendons in the glenohumeral joint after a bicycle accident. The possible trauma mechanism is also discussed. PMID:22247643

  4. Sagittal plane balancing in the total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Manson, Theodore T; Khanuja, Harpal S; Jacobs, Michael A; Hungerford, Marc W

    2009-01-01

    Postoperative stiffness or instability may result from a total knee arthroplasty imbalanced in the sagittal plane. Total knee arthroplasty instrumentation systems differ in the basic strategies used to assure this balance. In an anterior referencing system, changes in femoral size affect flexion gap tightness, and femoral size selection is paramount to assure sagittal plane balance. Conversely, in posterior referencing systems, femoral size changes do not affect the flexion gap but, rather, influence femoral component-patella articulation. Flexion/extension gap systems use calibrated spacer blocks to ensure gap balance but do not guarantee midrange stability; if used incorrectly, they may cause component malposition and joint line elevation. The authors reviewed the strengths and weaknesses of system types and provided system-specific troubleshooting guidelines for clinicians addressing intraoperative sagittal plane imbalance.

  5. Dislocation after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Wazir, N N; Shan, Y; Mukundala, V V; Gunalan, R

    2007-05-01

    Two cases of dislocation of total knee arthroplasty presented to us within the same week. The first patient is a 71-year-old woman who underwent bilateral primary total knee arthroplasty. The left knee dislocated three weeks after the surgery. Due to failure of conservative measures, she underwent revision total knee arthroplasty. The other patient is a 72-year-old woman presenting ten years after primary total knee arthroplasty, with a traumatic dislocation of the knee joint. She was treated as an outpatient with closed manipulative reduction.

  6. Total esophagogastrectomy plus extended lymphadenectomy with transverse colon interposition: A treatment for extensive esophagogastric junction cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ceroni, Marco; Norero, Enrique; Henríquez, Juan Pablo; Viñuela, Eduardo; Briceño, Eduardo; Martínez, Cristian; Aguayo, Gloria; Araos, Fernando; González, Paulina; Díaz, Alfonso; Caracci, Mario

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To review the post-operative morbidity and mortality of total esophagogastrectomy (TEG) with second barrier lymphadenectomy (D2) with interposition of a transverse colon and to determine the oncological outcomes of TEG D2 with interposition of a transverse colon. METHODS: This study consisted of a retrospective review of patients with a cancer diagnosis who underwent TEG between 1997 and 2013. Demographic data, surgery protocols, complications according to Clavien-Dindo classifications, final pathological reports, oncological follow-ups and causes of death were recorded. We used the TNM 2010 and Japanese classifications for nodal dissection of gastric cancer. We used descriptive statistical analysis and Kaplan-Meier survival curves. A P-value of less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. RESULTS: The series consisted of 21 patients (80.9% men). The median age was 60 years. The 2 main surgical indications were extensive esophagogastric junction cancers (85.7%) and double cancers (14.2%). The mean total surgery time was 405 min (352-465 min). Interposition of a transverse colon through the posterior mediastinum was used for replacement in all cases. Splenectomy was required in 13 patients (61.9%), distal pancreatectomy was required in 2 patients (9.5%) and resection of the left adrenal gland was required in 1 patient (4.7%). No residual cancer surgery was achieved in 75.1% of patients. A total of 71.4% of patients had a postoperative complication. Respiratory complications were the most frequently observed complication. Postoperative mortality was 5.8%. Median follow-up was 13.4 mo. Surgery specific survival at 5 years of follow-up was 32.8%; for patients with curative surgery, it was 39.5% at 5 years. CONCLUSION: TEG for cancer with interposition of a transverse colon is a very complex surgery, and it presents high post-operative morbidity and adequate oncological outcomes. PMID:26464757

  7. Reversed gastric tube (RGT) esophagoplasty for failure of colon, jejunum and prosthetic interpositions.

    PubMed Central

    Heimlich, H J

    1975-01-01

    Reversed gastric tube (RGT) esophagoplasty is preferred by the author as the primary procedure for esophageal replacement. Many patients undergoing RGT esophagoplasty, however, have previously had multiple operative procedures. A particularly challenging problem in esophageal reconstruction is the patient who has already had unsuccessful intestinal or prosthetic interposition operations in attempts to reconstruct the esophagus. In such patients, it has been possible to replace the esophagus by means of the RGT operation. Of 67 RGT esophagoplasties, 9 patients (13.4%) had previous interposition operations that had failed. Six had undergone colon interposition; 2 of these had strictured, 1 had partially sloughed leaving a cervical salivary fistula, and in 1 the proximal end was never patent. In each instance, bypass with RGT was performed without resecting the colon transplant. The colon had necrosed and was removed in 2 patients. Of the remaining 3 patients, in 1 a plastic esophageal prothesis had sloughed and two had free jejunal transplants, 1 of which had impaired vascularity and the other had fibrosed. The specific techniques used to reconstruct the esophagus by reversed gastric tube esophagoplasty, as they relate to this particular group of patients, are described. Images Fig. 1a. Fig. 1b. Fig. 1c. Fig. 2a. Fig. 2b. Fig. 3. Figs. 4a and b. Figs. 5a and b. PMID:1211993

  8. Interposition of the Posterior Cruciate Ligament into the Medial Compartment of the Knee Joint on Coronal Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun Su; Park, Ki Jeong; Wang, Joon Ho; Choe, Bong-Keun

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of our study was to evaluate the overall prevalence and clinical significance of interposition of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) into the medial compartment of the knee joint in coronal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed 317 consecutive patients referred for knee MRI at our institution between October 2009 and December 2009. Interposition of the PCL into the medial compartment of the knee joint on proton coronal MRI was evaluated dichotomously (i.e., present or absent). We analyzed the interposition according to its prevalence as well as its relationship with right-left sidedness, gender, age, and disease categories (osteoarthritis, anterior cruciate ligament tear, and medial meniscus tear). Results Prevalence of interposition of PCL into the medial compartment of the knee joint was 47.0% (149/317). There was no right (50.0%, 83/166) to left (43.7%, 66/151) or male (50.3%, 87/173) to female (43.1%, 62/144) differences in the prevalence. There was no significant association between the prevalence and age, or the disease categories. Conclusion Interposition of the PCL into the medial compartment of the knee joint is observed in almost half of patients on proton coronal MRI of the knee. Its presence is not associated with any particular factors including knee pathology and may be regarded as a normal MR finding. PMID:26957909

  9. Arthroplasty in Femoral Head Osteonecrosis

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Dong Cheol; Jung, Kwangyoung

    2014-01-01

    Osteonecrosis of the femoral head is a destructive joint disease requiring early hip arthroplasty. The polyethylene-metal design using a 22-mm femoral head component, introduced by Charnley in 1950, has been widely used for over half a century. Since then, different materials with the capacity to minimize friction between bearing surfaces and various cement or cementless insert fixations have been developed. Although the outcome of second and third generation designs using better bearing materials and technologies has been favorable, less favorable results are seen with total hip arthroplasty in young patients with osteonecrosis. Selection of appropriate materials for hip arthroplasty is important for any potential revisions that might become inevitable due to the limited durability of a prosthetic hip joint. Alternative hip arthroplasties, which include hemiresurfacing arthroplasty and bipolar hemiarthroplasty, have not been found to have acceptable outcomes. Metal-on-metal resurfacing has recently been suggested as a feasible option for young patients with extra physical demands; however, concerns about complications such as hypersensitivity reaction or pseudotumor formation on metal bearings have emerged. To ensure successful long-term outcomes in hip arthroplasty, factors such as insert stabilization and surfaces with less friction are essential. Understanding these aspects in arthroplasty is important to selection of proper materials and to making appropriate decisions for patients with osteonecrosis of the femoral head. PMID:27536561

  10. Radial head arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Kleiner, M T; Ilyas, A M; Jupiter, J B

    2010-02-01

    In conclusion, radial head fractures with 3 or more fragments have a high incidence of complications when treated with ORIF including hardware failure, malunion, nonunion, and the need for re-operation. Radial head arthroplasty has demonstrated good success in the treatment of complex, comminuted radial head fractures which are not amenable to non-opeative treatment or ORIF. Success can be optimized by diligent surgical dissection, avoiding inadvertent nerve injury, placement of an appropriately sized implant, repair of associated injuries, and early protected motion. PMID:20214854

  11. Cementless total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Risitano, Salvatore; Sabatini, Luigi; Giachino, Matteo; Agati, Gabriele; Massè, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Interest for uncemented total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has greatly increased in recent years. This technique, less used than cemented knee replacement in the last decades, sees a revival thanks an advance in prosthetic design, instrumentation and operative technique. The related literature in some cases shows conflicting data on survival and on the revision’s rate, but in most cases a success rate comparable to cemented TKA is reported. The optimal fixation in TKA is a subject of debate with the majority of surgeons favouring cemented fixation. PMID:27162779

  12. Early Attempts at Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Pablo F; Morcuende, Jose A

    2005-01-01

    Over the last three centuries, treatment of hip arthritides has evolved from rudimentary surgery to modern total hip arthroplasty (THA), which is considered one of the most successful surgical interventions ever developed. We here review the history of the early hip arthroplasty procedures for hip arthritis that preceded Charley total hip arthroplasty. An evaluation of such past enterprises is relevant, and reminds us of the ephemeral nature of human industriousness, and how medical research and procedures are not isolated developments, but correlate to the social, economical, and cultural framework of their time. PMID:16089067

  13. Colonic Interposition between the Liver and Diaphragm: “The Chilaiditi Sign”

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Nita; Takieddine, Zeina; Tariq, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    A 90-year-old wheelchair bound male was brought to the emergency department with complaints of worsening abdominal pain over the last 2-3 days. The patient also had difficulty in passing urine. Abdominal examination revealed tenderness in the umbilical and hypogastric area without rebound tenderness or guarding. Computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen showed a loop of colon interpositioned between the liver and the right hemidiaphragm (the Chilaiditi sign), mimicking free air. Foley's catheter was placed and the patient was managed conservatively. The patient clinically improved with improvement of the abdominal pain. PMID:27446829

  14. Post-Operative Malignant Hyperthermia in a Child after Colon Interposition

    PubMed Central

    Şahin, Sevtap Hekimoğlu; İnan, Mustafa; Aksu, Burhan; Öner, Naci; Çolak, Alkin; Güzel, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    Malignant hyperthermia (MH) is a rare and potentially life threatening fatal complication of anaesthesia. We present a 2-year-old boy with late onset MH after colon interposition to replace the oesophagus under sevoflurane anaesthesia. The patient was treated with intravenous dantrolene sodium as well as cooling and controlled ventilation. Despite treatment, the patient developed cardiopulmonary arrest at 21 hours after the operation and died. It should be kept in mind that post-operative MH may develop during these types of operations with ischaemia-reperfusion injuries. PMID:27366542

  15. Unicompartmental knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Murray, D. W.; Liddle, A. D.; Dodd, C. A. F.; Pandit, H.

    2015-01-01

    There is a large amount of evidence available about the relative merits of unicompartmental and total knee arthroplasty (UKA and TKA). Based on the same evidence, different people draw different conclusions and as a result, there is great variability in the usage of UKA. The revision rate of UKA is much higher than TKA and so some surgeons conclude that UKA should not be performed. Other surgeons believe that the main reason for the high revision rate is that UKA is easy to revise and, therefore, the threshold for revision is low. They also believe that UKA has many advantages over TKA such as a faster recovery, lower morbidity and mortality and better function. They therefore conclude that UKA should be undertaken whenever appropriate. The solution to this argument is to minimise the revision rate of UKA, thereby addressing the main disadvantage of UKA. The evidence suggests that this will be achieved if surgeons use UKA for at least 20% of their knee arthroplasties and use implants that are appropriate for these broad indications. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2015;97-B(10 Suppl A):3–8. PMID:26430080

  16. Talocalcaneal Joint Middle Facet Coalition Resection With Interposition of a Juvenile Hyaline Cartilage Graft.

    PubMed

    Tower, Dyane E; Wood, Ryan W; Vaardahl, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    Talocalcaneal joint middle facet coalition is the most common tarsal coalition, occurring in ≤2% of the population. Fewer than 50% of involved feet obtain lasting relief of symptoms after nonoperative treatment, and surgical intervention is commonly used to relieve symptoms, increase the range of motion, improve function, reconstruct concomitant pes planovalgus, and prevent future arthrosis from occurring at the surrounding joints. Several approaches to surgical intervention are available for patients with middle facet coalitions, ranging from resection to hindfoot arthrodesis. We present a series of 4 cases, in 3 adolescent patients, of talocalcaneal joint middle facet coalition resection with interposition of a particulate juvenile hyaline cartilaginous allograft (DeNovo(®) NT Natural Tissue Graft, Zimmer, Inc., Warsaw, IN). With a mean follow-up period of 42.8 ± 2.9 (range 41 to 47) months, the 3 adolescent patients in the present series were doing well with improved subtalar joint motion and decreased pain, and 1 foot showed no bony regrowth on a follow-up computed tomography scan. The use of a particulate juvenile hyaline cartilaginous allograft as interposition material after talocalcaneal middle facet coalition resection combined with adjunct procedures to address concomitant pes planovalgus resulted in good short-term outcomes in 4 feet in 3 adolescent patients. PMID:25922335

  17. Trapeziectomy and ligament reconstruction tendon interposition for isolated scaphotrapeziotrapezoid osteoarthritis of the wrist.

    PubMed

    Langenhan, R; Hohendorff, B; Probst, A

    2014-10-01

    Isolated osteoarthritis of the scaphotrapeziotrapezoid joint is rather rare compared with thumb trapeziometacarpal osteoarthritis. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the outcome of 15 consecutive patients treated with trapeziectomy/ligament reconstruction tendon interposition for isolated scaphotrapeziotrapezoid osteoarthritis of the wrist. After a mean follow-up of 54 months, 14 patients (15 wrists) were available for clinical and radiological examination. The median pain intensity was 0 on a 0-10 visual analogue scale, both at rest and with activity, mean grip strength averaged 24 kg, pinch strength 5 kg. The disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand (DASH) score was 16, and a modified Mayo Wrist Score 84. Correlation between the degree of scaphotrapezoid osteoarthritis and pain at rest, pain with activity, and DASH score was not significant. The findings from our study suggest that trapeziectomy/ligament reconstruction tendon interposition is an effective procedure for treating isolated scaphotrapeziotrapezoid osteoarthritis, and that additional partial trapezoid excision is not necessary.

  18. Usefulness of Cardiac Computed Tomography in the Diagnosis of Prosthetic Coronary Artery Graft with Interposition Procedure

    PubMed Central

    Wake, Ryotaro; Iwata, Shinichi; Nakagawa, Masashi; Doi, Atsushi; Sugioka, Kenichi; Otsuka, Ryo; Hozumi, Takeshi; Takemoto, Yasuhiko; Ehara, Shoichi; Hanatani, Akihisa; Muro, Takashi; Yoshiyama, Minoru

    2010-01-01

    An 80-year-old Japanese man was admitted with orthopnea and pitting edema of both lower legs. We diagnosed congestive heart failure (CHF) on the basis of a chest X-ray and an echocardiogram. An electrocardiogram showed a heart rate of 120 beats/min with atrial fibrillation rhythm (Af). The patient developed aortic valve failure and destruction of the base of right coronary artery (RCA) due to infectious endocarditis at 71 years of age. The patient underwent aortic valve replacement and coronary artery bypass grafting with an interposed graft with polyester vascular graft to RCA. The patient recovered from CHF after the 6 days of treatment with diuretics and verapamil. We confirmed the patency of coronary arteries and bypass grafts using a 64-slice cardiac computed tomography scan (CT) and diagnosed CHF due to Af. Here we describe the estimation of the prosthetic coronary artery graft patency with the interposition procedure using 64-slice cardiac CT. PMID:21079753

  19. Small intestinal submucosa seeded with intestinal smooth muscle cells in a rodent jejunal interposition model

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Harry H.; Dunn, James C.Y.

    2011-01-01

    Background Small intestinal submucosa (SIS) is a porcine-derived, acellular, collagen-based matrix that has been tested without seeded smooth muscle cells (SMCs) for intestinal tissue engineering. We examined the expression patterns of contractile proteins of SIS with SMCs implanted in an in vivo rodent model. Materials and methods Intestinal SMCs were isolated from Lewis rat pups. Four-ply tubular SMCs-seeded SIS or blank SIS scaffolds were implanted in an adult rat jejunal interposition model. Recipients were sacrificed at 2, 4, and 8 weeks following the implantation. The retrieved specimens were examined using antibodies against contractile proteins of SMCs. Results Cultured intestinal SMCs expressed α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), calponin, and less smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (SM-MHC) in vitro. Cell-seeded SIS scaffolds contracted significantly over 8 weeks of implantation but were comparable to SIS scaffolds without cell seeding. Implanted cell-seeded SIS scaffolds at 2 weeks expressed extensive α-SMA, some calponin, and minimal SM-MHC. At 4 weeks, α-SMA-expressing cells decreased significantly, whereas calponin or SM-MHC expressing cells were rarely detected. A small number of α-SMA-expressing cells were present at 8 weeks, whereas more calponin or SM-MHC expressing cells emerged in proximity with the anastomotic interface. Conclusions Cell-seeded SIS contracted significantly after implantation, but the expressions of contractile proteins were present at the site of SIS interposition. No organized smooth muscle was formed at the site of implantation. A better scaffold design is needed to produce structured smooth muscle. PMID:21937060

  20. ASSESSMENT OF THE GASTRO-JEJUNO-DUODENAL TRANSIT AFTER JEJUNAL POUCH INTERPOSITION

    PubMed Central

    da SILVA, Alcino Lázaro; GOMES, Célio Geraldo de Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    Background : The jejunal pouch interposition between the gastric body and the duodenum after the gastrectomy, although not frequent in the surgical practice today, has been successfully employed for the prevention and treatment of the postgastrectomy syndromes. In the latter, it is included the dumping syndrome, which affects 13-58% of the patients who undergo gastrectomy. Aim : Retrospective assessment of the results of this procedure for the prevention of the dumping syndrome. Methods : Fourty patients were selected and treatetd surgically for peptic ulcer, between 1965 and 1970. Of these, 29 underwent vagotomy, antrectomy, gastrojejunalduodenostomy at the lesser curvature level, and the 11 remaining were submitted to vagotomy, antrectomy, gastrojejunal-duodenostomy at the greater curvature level. The gastro-jejuno-duodenal transit was assessed in the immediate or late postoperative with the contrasted study of the esophagus, stomach and duodenum. The clinical evolution was assessed according to the Visick grade. Results : Of the 40 patients, 28 were followed with the contrast evaluation in the late postoperative. Among those who were followed until the first month (n=22), 20 (90%) had slow gastro-jejuno-duodenal transit and in two (10%) the transit was normal. Among those who were followed after the first month (n=16), three (19%) and 13 (81%) had slow and normal gastric emptying, respectively. None had the contrasted exam compatible with the dumping syndrome. Among the 40 patients, 22 underwent postoperative clinical evaluation. Of these, 19 (86,5%) had excellent and good results (Visick 1 and 2, respectively). Conclusions : The jejunal pouch interposition showed to be a very effective surgical procedure for the prevention of the dumping syndrome in gastrectomized patients. PMID:26734789

  1. Robotic-assisted knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Samik; Cherian, Jeffrey J; Elmallah, Randa K; Jauregui, Julio J; Pierce, Todd P; Mont, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    Robotics in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has undergone vast improvements. Although some of the systems have fallen out of favor due to safety concerns, there has been recent increased interest for semi-active haptic robotic systems that provide intraoperative tactile feedback to the surgeon. The potential advantages include improvements in radiographic outcomes, reducing the incidence of mechanical axis malalignment of the lower extremity and better tissue balance. Proponents of robotic technology believe that these improvements may lead to superior functional outcomes and implant survivorship. We aim to discuss robotic technology development, outcomes of unicompartmental and total knee arthroplasty and the future outlook. Short-term follow-up studies on robotic-assisted knee arthroplasty suggest that, although some alignment objectives may have been achieved, more studies regarding functional outcomes are needed. Furthermore, studies evaluating the projected cost-benefit analyses of this new technology are needed before widespread adoption. Nevertheless, the short-term results warrant further evaluation. PMID:26365088

  2. Review of Arthroscopic and Histological Findings Following Knee Inlay Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Markarian, Gregory G; Kambour, Michael T; Uribe, John W

    2016-01-01

    The phenomenon of cartilage rim loading in defects exceeding the threshold diameter of 10 mm is well documented. Contoured defect fill off-loads the perimeter and counteracts further delamination and progression of defects. When biological procedures have failed, inlay arthroplasty follows these concepts. The human biological response to contoured metallic surface implants has not been described. Four patients underwent non-implant-related, second-look arthroscopy following inlay arthroplasty for bi- (n=3) and tricompartmental (n=1) knee arthrosis without subchondral bone collapse. Arthroscopic probing of the implant-cartilage interface of nine prosthetic components did not show signs of implant-cartilage gap formation, loosening, or subsidence. The implant periphery was consistently covered by cartilage confluence leading to a reduction of the original defect size diameter. Femoral condyle cartilage flow appeared to have more hyaline characteristics. Trochlear cartilage flow showed greater histological variability and less organization with fibrocartilage and synovialized scar tissue. This review reconfirmed previous basic science results and demonstrated effective defect fill and rim off-loading with inlay arthroplasty.

  3. Review of Arthroscopic and Histological Findings Following Knee Inlay Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Markarian, Gregory G; Kambour, Michael T; Uribe, John W

    2016-01-01

    The phenomenon of cartilage rim loading in defects exceeding the threshold diameter of 10 mm is well documented. Contoured defect fill off-loads the perimeter and counteracts further delamination and progression of defects. When biological procedures have failed, inlay arthroplasty follows these concepts. The human biological response to contoured metallic surface implants has not been described. Four patients underwent non-implant-related, second-look arthroscopy following inlay arthroplasty for bi- (n=3) and tricompartmental (n=1) knee arthrosis without subchondral bone collapse. Arthroscopic probing of the implant-cartilage interface of nine prosthetic components did not show signs of implant-cartilage gap formation, loosening, or subsidence. The implant periphery was consistently covered by cartilage confluence leading to a reduction of the original defect size diameter. Femoral condyle cartilage flow appeared to have more hyaline characteristics. Trochlear cartilage flow showed greater histological variability and less organization with fibrocartilage and synovialized scar tissue. This review reconfirmed previous basic science results and demonstrated effective defect fill and rim off-loading with inlay arthroplasty. PMID:27082884

  4. Racial/Ethnic Disparity in Rates and Outcomes of Total Joint Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Shahid, Hania; Singh, Jasvinder A

    2016-04-01

    Racial/ethnic disparity in total joint arthroplasty (TJA) has grown over the last two decades as studies have documented the widening gap between Blacks and Whites in TJA utilization rates despite the known benefits of TJA. Factors contributing to this disparity have been explored and include demographics, socioeconomic status, patient knowledge, patient preference, willingness to undergo TJA, patient expectation of post-arthroplasty outcome, religion/spirituality, and physician-patient interaction. Improvement in patient knowledge by effective physician-patient communication and other methods can possibly influence patient's perception of the procedure. Such interventions can provide patient-relevant data on benefits/risks and dispel myths related to benefits/risks of arthroplasty and possibly reduce this disparity. This review will summarize the literature on racial/ethnic disparity on TJA utilization and outcomes and the factors underlying this disparity. PMID:26984804

  5. Racial/Ethnic Disparity in Rates and Outcomes of Total Joint Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Shahid, Hania; Singh, Jasvinder A

    2016-04-01

    Racial/ethnic disparity in total joint arthroplasty (TJA) has grown over the last two decades as studies have documented the widening gap between Blacks and Whites in TJA utilization rates despite the known benefits of TJA. Factors contributing to this disparity have been explored and include demographics, socioeconomic status, patient knowledge, patient preference, willingness to undergo TJA, patient expectation of post-arthroplasty outcome, religion/spirituality, and physician-patient interaction. Improvement in patient knowledge by effective physician-patient communication and other methods can possibly influence patient's perception of the procedure. Such interventions can provide patient-relevant data on benefits/risks and dispel myths related to benefits/risks of arthroplasty and possibly reduce this disparity. This review will summarize the literature on racial/ethnic disparity on TJA utilization and outcomes and the factors underlying this disparity.

  6. Irreducible volar subluxation of the proximal interphalangeal joint due to radial collateral ligament interposition: case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Jason Pui Yin; Tse, Wing Lim; Ho, Pak Cheong

    2015-01-01

    Irreducible volar subluxation should be considered when assessing a patient with flexion deformity of the proximal interphalangeal finger joint (PIPJ). Primary assessment requires careful examination of the collateral ligaments and extensor tendon. Preoperative imaging such as ultrasound and MRI can help identify the interposed structures and plan the subsequent operation. Although rare, irreducible volar subluxation due to radial collateral ligament interposition is an important entity to be aware of. Prompt and appropriate management can prevent joint stiffness and loss of function.

  7. Functional assessment of colonic interposition with 99Tcm-labeled milk.

    PubMed

    Sutton, R; Sutton, H; Ackery, D M; Freeman, N V

    1989-09-01

    A prospective study was performed to evaluate the use of radionuclide imaging in the assessment of patients who have undergone esophageal reconstruction. Dynamic radionuclide imaging was performed on ten patients aged 11 months to 11 years who had undergone colon interposition via the normal esophageal route for esophageal atresia. Patients were considered clinically unsatisfactory if at the time of imaging feeding was troubled, or if weight gain had fallen to below the third centile before operation and remained below after operation. Each patient underwent erect imaging with a small milk feed labeled with 10 to 20 MBq (250 to 500 muCi) 99Tcm DTPA adjusted according to body surface area; supine studies were subsequently performed on five patients. All five clinically unsatisfactory patients showed conduit emptying delayed beyond 45 minutes and/or spontaneous reflux, significantly different from the clinically satisfactory patients (X2 = 6.4, P less than .02). Conduit complications were subsequently identified in three of the five clinically unsatisfactory patients. Radionuclide imaging with radiolabeled milk was found to be well tolerated, and obtained results that were clinically useful. These results suggest that dynamic radionuclide imaging can be more widely applied in the assessment of esophageal substitutes.

  8. Prosthetic graft interposition of the brachiocephalic veins or superior vena cava combined with resection of malignant tumours: graft patency and risk factors for graft occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Geun Dong; Choi, Se Hoon; Kim, Yong-Hee; Kim, Dong Kwan; Park, Seung-Il

    2016-01-01

    Background We aimed to assess graft patency in patients undergoing prosthetic graft interposition of the brachiocephalic veins (BCVs) or the superior vena cava (SVC) combined with resection of malignant tumours. Methods A retrospective analysis was conducted on 16 patients who underwent prosthetic graft interposition of the BCVs or the SVC between 1998 and 2012. Results Among a total of 20 grafts in 16 patients (unilateral graft interposition in 12, bilateral graft interposition in 4), 8 grafts were occluded in 8 patients. Overall graft patency rate was 64.6%, 42.4% at the 2- and 5-year follow-up. Graft patency rate of the left BCV was significantly lower than that of the right BCV or the SVC (2-year patency, 38.1% vs. 81.8%, P=0.024). In univariate analysis, the superior anastomosis site [left BCV vs. right BCV; hazard ratio (HR) =2.312; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.015–5.265; P=0.046], the inferior anastomosis site (right atrial appendage vs. SVC; HR =2.409; 95% CI, 1.124–5.161; P=0.024), and interruption of warfarin (HR =5.015; 95% CI, 1.106–22.734; P=0.037) were significant risk factors for graft occlusion. Graft occlusive symptoms were identified in 4 patients who underwent unilateral graft interposition. Conclusions Prosthetic graft interposition between the left BCV and the right atrial appendage resulted in a significant rate of graft occlusion. Prosthetic graft interposition of the bilateral BCVs and long-term warfarin therapy may be necessary to prevent graft occlusive symptoms. PMID:26904213

  9. Osteonecrosis: avoiding total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Hungerford, David S

    2002-06-01

    Osteonecrosis of the femoral head afflicts approximately 20,000 new patients per year, at an average age of 38. Of the patients seen in our institution, 25% are <25 years old. Without treatment, most of these patients can be expected to need a total hip arthroplasty. Joint-preserving procedures have a significant failure rate, and some have significant morbidity. It is desirable to avoid or delay total hip arthroplasty because most patients with osteonecrosis outlive the current state-of-the-art prostheses. Four issues need to be weighed to arrive at a reasonable algorithm for the preservative treatment of osteonecrosis: i) patient risk factors, ii) morbidity of the proposed procedure, iii) size of the lesion, and iv) stage of the lesion. All of the issues must be considered to make sense out of a complex clinical situation.

  10. NAVIGATION IN TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY

    PubMed Central

    da Mota e Albuquerque, Roberto Freire

    2015-01-01

    Navigation was the most significant advance in instrumentation for total knee arthroplasty over the last decade. It provides surgeons with a precision tool for carrying out surgery, with the possibility of intraoperative simulation and objective control over various anatomical and surgical parameters and references. Since the first systems, which were basically used to control the alignment of bone cutting referenced to the mechanical axis of the lower limb, many other surgical steps have been incorporated, such as component rotation, ligament balancing and arranging the symmetry of flexion and extension spaces, among others. Its efficacy as a precision tool with an effective capacity for promoting better alignment of the lower-limb axis has been widely proven in the literature, but the real value of optimized alignment and the impact of navigation on clinical results and the longevity of arthroplasty have yet to be established. PMID:27026979

  11. Outcomes Following Radial Head Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Fowler, John R; Henry, Sarah E; Xu, Peter; Goitz, Robert J

    2016-05-01

    Most current series of radial head arthroplasty include small numbers of patients with short- to medium-term follow-up and significant heterogeneity in patients, treatments, and outcome measures. The purpose of this systematic review was to review outcomes for radial head arthroplasty based on injury chronicity, injury pattern, and type of implant used. The authors systematically searched electronic databases for studies containing radial head arthroplasty or radial head replacement and identified 19 studies for inclusion in the analysis. For each included study, a composite mean was obtained for Mayo Elbow Performance Score (MEPS) and range of motion. Outcomes were said to differ significantly if their confidence intervals did not overlap. The MEPS for acute treatment (90) was higher than that for delayed treatment (81). There was no difference in the pooled MEPS between the isolated (89) and complex injury pattern (87) groups or implant material. There was no difference in range of motion between the acute and delayed or isolated and complex groups, but the average degree of pronation was higher in patients treated with titanium implants (76°) compared with cobalt chromium implants (66°). This systematic review suggests that outcomes are improved following acute arthroplasty for treatment of radial head fractures compared with delayed treatment, based on MEPS. The lack of other significant differences detected is likely due to the significant heterogeneity and inadequate power in current studies. Further prospective studies isolating the different variables will be needed to determine their true effect on outcomes. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(3):153-160.]. PMID:27045484

  12. Polyethylene Wear in Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Chakravarty, Rajit; Elmallah, Randa D K; Cherian, Jeffrey Jai; Kurtz, Steven M; Mont, Michael A

    2015-10-01

    Polyethylene (PE) wear and osteolysis are common causes for late revisions of knee arthroplasties. Several implant and surgical factors have been implicated in contributing to the development of wear, such as type of bearing surface used, inaccurate articular geometry, and poor knee kinematics. In addition, patient-related factors, such as younger age and higher activity levels, may also contribute to wear. Our purpose was to evaluate and compare the effect of these variables on wear rates following knee arthroplasty. Recently, technological advancements have been aimed at reducing the incidence of wear by improving the PE manufacturing process, creating implants that minimize contact stresses, and refining our surgical techniques. Furthermore, the development of newer highly cross-linked PEs (HXLPEs) and the introduction of additives, such as vitamin E, to the PEs may improve overall implant survivorship. As a result, with the advent of newer implant and PE designs, wear is no longer the most common cause of early failure, though it remains an important factor in limiting long-term implant survivorship. However, there are a few clinical studies evaluating the long-term outcomes of newer HXLPEs and implant designs, with further evaluations necessary to determine the best implant-PE combination for improved knee arthroplasty survivorship. PMID:26030263

  13. Humeral windows in revision total elbow arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Salama, Amir; Stanley, David

    2016-01-01

    The use of cortical windows for revision elbow arthroplasty has not previously been widely reported. Their use aids safe revision of a well fixed humeral prosthesis and can be used in the setting of dislocation, periprosthetic fracture or aseptic loosening of the ulnar component. We describe our technique and results of cortical windows in the distal humerus for revision elbow arthroplasty surgery. PMID:27583011

  14. Humeral windows in revision total elbow arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Peach, Chris A; Salama, Amir; Stanley, David

    2016-04-01

    The use of cortical windows for revision elbow arthroplasty has not previously been widely reported. Their use aids safe revision of a well fixed humeral prosthesis and can be used in the setting of dislocation, periprosthetic fracture or aseptic loosening of the ulnar component. We describe our technique and results of cortical windows in the distal humerus for revision elbow arthroplasty surgery. PMID:27583011

  15. Reducing arthroplasty costs via vendor contracts

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, D. William C.; Beaupré, Lauren A.; Davies, Donna M.; Hessels, Rick

    1999-01-01

    Objective To describe a method of reducing the costs of implants in hip and knee arthroplasty. Design Implant costs were compared before and after the implementation of a 2-year contract with implant vendors, providing increased volume for decreased implant cost. An additional 20% of arthroplasties could be done outside the contract for research or special purposes. Setting A regional health authority involving 2 acute care hospitals. Method Costs were obtained for 942 hip and knee arthroplasties performed in 1993/94 and compared with costs of 1656 hip and knee arthroplasties performed in 1996/97. Outcome Measures Implant cost and number of joint arthroplasty procedures performed. Results A 40% decrease in the cost per implant for primary knee arthroplasty and an 18% decrease in the cost per implant for primary hip arthroplasty were achieved. A rebate, calculated as a percentage of volume used, was received from the vendor to support general orthopedic research and education. A new contract for 3 years has recently been signed with 3 vendors designated as primary vendors for 80% of the volume. Conclusion The vendor-contract economic strategy effectively reduced the cost of hip and knee arthroplasty and may be useful at other centres looking for cost reduction methods that maintain adequate patient care and support clinical research and education. PMID:10593246

  16. Traumatic hip dislocation with incomplete reduction due to soft-tissue interposition in a 4-year-old boy.

    PubMed

    Burgos, J; Gonzalez-Herranz, P; Ocete, G

    1995-01-01

    The case of a traumatic dislocation of the left hip in a 4-year-old boy is presented. After an initial attempt at reduction under general anesthesia, a permanent deformity in the flexion of the hip remained, and there was radiographic evidence of a nonconcentric reduction. Computed tomography (CT) showed interposition in the posterior part of the joint. Under general anesthesia, the mobilization of the hip reduced the dislocation correctly, removing the necessity of open treatment. This case stresses the need for early diagnosis of this serious complication and closed reduction of the joint, avoiding the poor results of open and deferred treatments.

  17. Implant prosthetic rehabilitation with a free fibula flap and interpositional bone grafting after a mandibulectomy: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Garcia Blanco, M; Ostrosky, M A

    2013-06-01

    This clinical report describes the multidisciplinary treatment of a 16-year-old girl diagnosed with cemento-ossifying fibroma in the mandible. The resection of the lesion and reconstruction with a free osseous fibula flap with microvascular anastomosis was performed. Four months later, interpositional bone grafting of iliac spongy bone was used to gain bone height at the treated site. Twenty-four months later, 5 dental implants were placed. After a 6-month osseointegration period, a partial screw-retained fixed dental prosthesis was fabricated. Prosthodontic planning and treatment considerations are discussed. PMID:23763781

  18. Failure of aseptic revision total knee arthroplasties

    PubMed Central

    Leta, Tesfaye H; Lygre, Stein Håkon L; Skredderstuen, Arne; Hallan, Geir; Furnes, Ove

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose In Norway, the proportion of revision knee arthroplasties increased from 6.9% in 1994 to 8.5% in 2011. However, there is limited information on the epidemiology and causes of subsequent failure of revision knee arthroplasty. We therefore studied survival rate and determined the modes of failure of aseptic revision total knee arthroplasties. Method This study was based on 1,016 aseptic revision total knee arthroplasties reported to the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register between 1994 and 2011. Revisions done for infections were not included. Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses were used to assess the survival rate and the relative risk of re-revision with all causes of re-revision as endpoint. Results 145 knees failed after revision total knee arthroplasty. Deep infection was the most frequent cause of re-revision (28%), followed by instability (26%), loose tibial component (17%), and pain (10%). The cumulative survival rate for revision total knee arthroplasties was 85% at 5 years, 78% at 10 years, and 71% at 15 years. Revision total knee arthroplasties with exchange of the femoral or tibial component exclusively had a higher risk of re-revision (RR = 1.7) than those with exchange of the whole prosthesis. The risk of re-revision was higher for men (RR = 2.0) and for patients aged less than 60 years (RR = 1.6). Interpretation In terms of implant survival, revision of the whole implant was better than revision of 1 component only. Young age and male sex were risk factors for re-revision. Deep infection was the most frequent cause of failure of revision of aseptic total knee arthroplasties. PMID:25267502

  19. Infection after primary hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose The aim of the present study was to assess incidence of and risk factors for infection after hip arthroplasty in data from 3 national health registries. We investigated differences in risk patterns between surgical site infection (SSI) and revision due to infection after primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) and hemiarthroplasty (HA). Materials and methods This observational study was based on prospective data from 2005–2009 on primary THAs and HAs from the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register (NAR), the Norwegian Hip Fracture Register (NHFR), and the Norwegian Surveillance System for Healthcare–Associated Infections (NOIS). The Norwegian Patient Register (NPR) was used for evaluation of case reporting. Cox regression analyses were performed with revision due to infection as endpoint for data from the NAR and the NHFR, and with SSI as the endpoint for data from the NOIS. Results The 1–year incidence of SSI in the NOIS was 3.0% after THA (167/5,540) and 7.3% after HA (103/1,416). The 1–year incidence of revision due to infection was 0.7% for THAs in the NAR (182/24,512) and 1.5% for HAs in the NHFR (128/8,262). Risk factors for SSI after THA were advanced age, ASA class higher than 2, and short duration of surgery. For THA, the risk factors for revision due to infection were male sex, advanced age, ASA class higher than 1, emergency surgery, uncemented fixation, and a National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance (NNIS) risk index of 2 or more. For HAs inserted after fracture, age less than 60 and short duration of surgery were risk factors of revision due to infection. Interpretation The incidences of SSI and revision due to infection after primary hip replacements in Norway are similar to those in other countries. There may be differences in risk pattern between SSI and revision due to infection after arthroplasty. The risk patterns for revision due to infection appear to be different for HA and THA. PMID:22066562

  20. Total Ankle Arthroplasty: An Imaging Overview

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Da-Rae; Potter, Hollis G.; Li, Angela E.; Chun, Ka-Young; Jung, Yoon Young; Kim, Jin-Su; Young, Ki-Won

    2016-01-01

    With advances in implant technology, total ankle arthroplasty (TAA) has become an increasingly popular alternative to arthrodesis for the management of end-stage ankle arthritis. However, reports in the literature do not focus on the imaging features of TAA. Through a literature review, we demonstrate basic design features of the current ankle arthroplasty system, and the normal and abnormal postoperative imaging features associated with such devices. Pre- and postoperative evaluations of ankle arthroplasty mainly include radiography; in addition, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging provide further characterization of imaging abnormalities. Familiarization with multimodal imaging features of frequent procedural complications at various postoperative intervals is important in radiological practice. PMID:27134529

  1. Total Ankle Arthroplasty: An Imaging Overview.

    PubMed

    Kim, Da-Rae; Choi, Yun Sun; Potter, Hollis G; Li, Angela E; Chun, Ka-Young; Jung, Yoon Young; Kim, Jin-Su; Young, Ki-Won

    2016-01-01

    With advances in implant technology, total ankle arthroplasty (TAA) has become an increasingly popular alternative to arthrodesis for the management of end-stage ankle arthritis. However, reports in the literature do not focus on the imaging features of TAA. Through a literature review, we demonstrate basic design features of the current ankle arthroplasty system, and the normal and abnormal postoperative imaging features associated with such devices. Pre- and postoperative evaluations of ankle arthroplasty mainly include radiography; in addition, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging provide further characterization of imaging abnormalities. Familiarization with multimodal imaging features of frequent procedural complications at various postoperative intervals is important in radiological practice.

  2. A Case of Laparoscopic Resection for Carcinoma of the Gastric Remnant following Proximal Gastrectomy Reconstructed with Jejunal Interposition

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, Yoshiaki; Yuu, Ken; Oohinata, Ryouki; Amaki, Misato; Kohira, Yoshinori; Natsume, Souichiro; Ishiyama, Satoshi; Takahashi, Keiichi

    2016-01-01

    A 72-year-old Japanese man had a history of proximal gastrectomy for early gastric cancer located in the upper third of the stomach in 2007. Our usual treatment strategy for early gastric cancer in the upper third of the stomach in 2007 was open proximal gastrectomy reconstructing by jejunal interposition with a 10 cm single loop. Upper gastrointestinal fiberscopy for annual follow-up revealed a type 0-IIc-shaped tumor with ulcer scar, 4.0 cm in size, located in the gastric remnant near the jejunogastrostomy. A clinical diagnosis of cancer of the gastric remnant, clinical T1b(SM)N0M0, Stage IA, following the proximal gastrectomy was made and a laparoscopic approach was selected because of the cancer's early stage. Remnant total gastrectomy with D1 plus lymphadenectomy was carried out with five ports by a pneumoperitoneal method. Complete resection of the reconstructed jejunum was undergone along with the jejunal mesentery. Reconstruction by the Roux-en-Y method via the antecolic route was selected. Total operative time was 395 min and blood loss was 40 mL. Our patient was the first successful case of resection for carcinoma of the gastric remnant following proximal gastrectomy reconstructed with jejunal interposition in a laparoscopic approach. PMID:27034881

  3. Middle cerebral-anterior cerebral-radial artery interposition graft bypass for proximal anterior cerebral artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Kazumata, Ken; Asaoka, Katsuyuki; Yokoyama, Yuka; Osanai, Toshiya; Sugiyama, Taku; Itamoto, Kouji

    2011-01-01

    A 74-year-old man underwent pterional craniotomy to treat a left proximal anterior cerebral artery (ACA) aneurysm. The orifice of the aneurysm was located at the origin of the proximal segment of the ACA, and the right A(1) segment of ACA was hypoplastic. After failed attempts at neck plasty with fenestrated clips, trapping and bypass were performed. Superficial temporal to left frontopolar artery bypass was performed to secure minimal blood supply. The radial artery (RA) was then harvested, and middle cerebral artery (MCA) to A(1) segment of the ACA bypass was performed using the RA interposition graft. Trapping of the aneurysm was successfully achieved without ischemic event. Intracranial-intracranial bypass has been employed in the treatment of complex cerebral aneurysm in an increasing number of selected patients. The present case shows that MCA-ACA-RA interposition graft bypass is an effective procedure to provide blood supply to the ACA territory if a proximal A(1) lesion requires trapping with incompetent contralateral A(1).

  4. Emerging Indications for Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Urch, Ekaterina; Dines, Joshua S; Dines, David M

    2016-01-01

    Historically, reverse shoulder arthroplasty was reserved for older, low-demand patients in whom rotator cuff arthropathy was diagnosed. Other common indications included sequelae of previously treated proximal humerus fractures, failed anatomic total shoulder arthroplasty, tumor resection, and rheumatoid arthritis in the elderly population. Unpredictable implant durability and high complication rates have limited the use of reverse shoulder arthroplasty to a narrow group of patients. Over the past decade, however, research has led to an improved understanding of the biomechanics behind reverse shoulder prostheses, which has improved implant design and surgical techniques. Consequently, orthopaedic surgeons have slowly begun to expand the indications for reverse shoulder arthroplasty to include a wider spectrum of shoulder pathologies. Recent studies have shown promising results for patients who undergo reverse shoulder arthroplasty for the treatment of acute proximal humerus fractures, massive rotator cuff tears without arthropathy, primary osteoarthritis, and chronic anterior dislocation, as well as for younger patients who have rheumatoid arthritis. These data suggest that, with judicious patient selection, reverse shoulder arthroplasty can be an excellent treatment option for a growing patient cohort. PMID:27049188

  5. Lubrication regimes in lumbar total disc arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, A; Shepherd, D E T

    2007-08-01

    A number of total disc arthroplasty devices have been developed. Some concern has been expressed that wear may be a potential failure mode for these devices, as has been seen with hip arthroplasty. The aim of this paper was to investigate the lubrication regimes that occur in lumbar total disc arthroplasty devices. The disc arthroplasty was modelled as a ball-and-socket joint. Elastohydrodynamic lubrication theory was used to calculate the minimum film thickness of the fluid between the bearing surfaces. The lubrication regime was then determined for different material combinations, size of implant, and trunk velocity. Disc arthroplasties with a metal-polymer or metal-metal material combination operate with a boundary lubrication regime. A ceramic-ceramic material combination has the potential to operate with fluid-film lubrication. Disc arthroplasties with a metal-polymer or metal-metal material combination are likely to generate wear debris. In future, it is worth considering a ceramic-ceramic material combination as this is likely to reduce wear.

  6. MR Imaging of Knee Arthroplasty Implants

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Jan; Lurie, Brett

    2015-01-01

    Primary total knee arthroplasty is a highly effective treatment that relieves pain and improves joint function in a large percentage of patients. Despite an initially satisfactory surgical outcome, pain, dysfunction, and implant failure can occur over time. Identifying the etiology of complications is vital for appropriate management and proper timing of revision. Due to the increasing number of knee arthroplasties performed and decreasing patient age at implantation, there is a demand for accurate diagnosis to determine appropriate treatment of symptomatic joints following knee arthroplasty, and for monitoring of patients at risk. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging allows for comprehensive imaging evaluation of the tissues surrounding knee arthroplasty implants with metallic components, including the polyethylene components. Optimized conventional and advanced pulse sequences can result in substantial metallic artifact reduction and afford improved visualization of bone, implant-tissue interfaces, and periprosthetic soft tissue for the diagnosis of arthroplasty-related complications. In this review article, we discuss strategies for MR imaging around knee arthroplasty implants and illustrate the imaging appearances of common modes of failure, including aseptic loosening, polyethylene wear–induced synovitis and osteolysis, periprosthetic joint infections, fracture, patellar clunk syndrome, recurrent hemarthrosis, arthrofibrosis, component malalignment, extensor mechanism injury, and instability. A systematic approach is provided for evaluation of MR imaging of knee implants. MR imaging with optimized conventional pulse sequences and advanced metal artifact reduction techniques can contribute important information for diagnosis, prognosis, risk stratification, and surgical planning. ©RSNA, 2015 PMID:26295591

  7. Return to sports after shoulder arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Christine C; Johnson, Daniel J; Liu, Joseph N; Dines, Joshua S; Dines, David M; Gulotta, Lawrence V; Garcia, Grant H

    2016-01-01

    Many patients prioritize the ability to return to sports following shoulder replacement surgeries, including total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA), reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (RTSA), and hemiarthroplasty (HA). While activity levels after hip and knee replacements have been well-established in the literature, studies on this topic in the field of shoulder arthroplasty are relatively limited. A review of the literature regarding athletic activity after shoulder arthroplasty was performed using the PubMed database. All studies relevant to shoulder arthroplasty and return to sport were included. The majority of patients returned to their prior level of activity within six months following TSA, RTSA, and shoulder HA. Noncontact, low demand activities are permitted by most surgeons postoperatively and generally have higher return rates than contact sports or high-demand activities. In some series, patients reported an improvement in their ability to participate in sports following the arthroplasty procedure. The rates of return to sports following TSA (75%-100%) are slightly higher than those reported for HA (67%-76%) and RTSA (75%-85%). Patients undergoing TSA, RTSA, and shoulder HA should be counseled that there is a high probability that they will be able to return to their preoperative activity level within six months postoperatively. TSA has been associated with higher rates of return to sports than RTSA and HA, although this may reflect differences in patient population or surgical indication.

  8. Return to sports after shoulder arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Christine C; Johnson, Daniel J; Liu, Joseph N; Dines, Joshua S; Dines, David M; Gulotta, Lawrence V; Garcia, Grant H

    2016-09-18

    Many patients prioritize the ability to return to sports following shoulder replacement surgeries, including total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA), reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (RTSA), and hemiarthroplasty (HA). While activity levels after hip and knee replacements have been well-established in the literature, studies on this topic in the field of shoulder arthroplasty are relatively limited. A review of the literature regarding athletic activity after shoulder arthroplasty was performed using the PubMed database. All studies relevant to shoulder arthroplasty and return to sport were included. The majority of patients returned to their prior level of activity within six months following TSA, RTSA, and shoulder HA. Noncontact, low demand activities are permitted by most surgeons postoperatively and generally have higher return rates than contact sports or high-demand activities. In some series, patients reported an improvement in their ability to participate in sports following the arthroplasty procedure. The rates of return to sports following TSA (75%-100%) are slightly higher than those reported for HA (67%-76%) and RTSA (75%-85%). Patients undergoing TSA, RTSA, and shoulder HA should be counseled that there is a high probability that they will be able to return to their preoperative activity level within six months postoperatively. TSA has been associated with higher rates of return to sports than RTSA and HA, although this may reflect differences in patient population or surgical indication. PMID:27672564

  9. The Kaiser Permanente Shoulder Arthroplasty Registry

    PubMed Central

    Ake, Christopher F; Burke, Mary F; Singh, Anshuman; Yian, Edward H; Paxton, Elizabeth W; Navarro, Ronald A

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Shoulder arthroplasty is being performed in the United States with increasing frequency. We describe the medium-term findings from a large integrated healthcare system shoulder arthroplasty registry. Patients and methods Shoulder arthroplasty cases registered between January 2005 and June 2013 were included for analysis. The registry included patient characteristics, surgical information, implant data, attrition, and patient outcomes such as surgical site infections, venous thromboembolism, and revision procedures. Results During the study period, 6,336 primary cases were registered. Median follow-up time for all primaries was 3.3 years; 461 cases were lost to follow-up by ending of health plan membership. Primary cases were predominantly female (56%) and white (81%), with an average age of 70 years. The most common reason for surgery was osteoarthritis in 60% of cases, followed by acute fracture (17%) and rotator cuff tear arthropathy (15%). In elective shoulder arthroplasty procedures, 200 all-cause revisions (4%) were reported, with glenoid wear being the most common reason. Interpretation Most arthroplasties were elective procedures: over half performed for osteoarthritis. Glenoid wear was the most common reason for revision of primary shoulder arthroplasty in elective cases. PMID:25727949

  10. Return to sports after shoulder arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Christine C; Johnson, Daniel J; Liu, Joseph N; Dines, Joshua S; Dines, David M; Gulotta, Lawrence V; Garcia, Grant H

    2016-01-01

    Many patients prioritize the ability to return to sports following shoulder replacement surgeries, including total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA), reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (RTSA), and hemiarthroplasty (HA). While activity levels after hip and knee replacements have been well-established in the literature, studies on this topic in the field of shoulder arthroplasty are relatively limited. A review of the literature regarding athletic activity after shoulder arthroplasty was performed using the PubMed database. All studies relevant to shoulder arthroplasty and return to sport were included. The majority of patients returned to their prior level of activity within six months following TSA, RTSA, and shoulder HA. Noncontact, low demand activities are permitted by most surgeons postoperatively and generally have higher return rates than contact sports or high-demand activities. In some series, patients reported an improvement in their ability to participate in sports following the arthroplasty procedure. The rates of return to sports following TSA (75%-100%) are slightly higher than those reported for HA (67%-76%) and RTSA (75%-85%). Patients undergoing TSA, RTSA, and shoulder HA should be counseled that there is a high probability that they will be able to return to their preoperative activity level within six months postoperatively. TSA has been associated with higher rates of return to sports than RTSA and HA, although this may reflect differences in patient population or surgical indication. PMID:27672564

  11. Joint Line Reconstruction in Navigated Total Knee Arthroplasty Revision

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-05-16

    Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty Because of; Loosening; Instability; Impingement; or Other Reasons Accepted as Indications for TKA Exchange.; The Focus is to Determine the Precision of Joint Line Restoration in Navigated vs. Conventional Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty

  12. Conversion to Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty: Humeral Stem Retention Versus Revision.

    PubMed

    Dilisio, Matthew F; Miller, Lindsay R; Siegel, Elana J; Higgins, Laurence D

    2015-09-01

    As the volume of shoulder arthroplasty procedures performed in the United States continues to increase, the predicted number of revision shoulder arthroplasties grows even higher. Conversion of failed shoulder arthroplasty to reverse total shoulder arthroplasty has become common. Many commercially available shoulder arthroplasty systems now offer a platform humeral stem that is used for both anatomic shoulder arthroplasty and reverse total shoulder arthroplasty. This study investigated whether retaining the humeral stem offers advantages over revising the humeral stem in conversion of failed shoulder arthroplasty to reverse total shoulder arthroplasty. The study included 26 patients (mean age, 68.46 years) with failed shoulder arthroplasty who underwent conversion to reverse total shoulder arthroplasty with a minimum 2-year follow-up (mean, 34.38 months). Patients who had retention of the humeral stem were compared with those who had stem revision. Humeral stem retention was associated with a significantly shorter operative time (178.92 vs 237 minutes, P=.02). Decreases in blood loss, complications, and length of hospitalization were observed, but the differences were not statistically significant. Minimal differences were observed for patient-reported outcomes. Of patients undergoing humeral stem removal, 21.4% had an intraoperative humeral shaft or tuberosity fracture compared with none in the stem retention group. Humeral stem retention was associated with decreased operative time compared with humeral stem revision in the conversion of failed shoulder arthroplasty to reverse total shoulder arthroplasty. The use of a platform shoulder arthroplasty system may benefit patients with failed shoulder arthroplasty undergoing conversion to reverse total shoulder arthroplasty by avoiding humeral stem revision. PMID:26375534

  13. Diagnosis, Causes and Treatments of Instability Following Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Moon Jong; Lim, Hyungtae; Lee, Na Rae

    2014-01-01

    Instability following total knee arthroplasty is one of the major causes of revision surgery. In most cases, it can be prevented by using an appropriate prosthesis and a good surgical technique. Particular attention should be given to confirmation of diagnosis for which thorough history taking, complete physical examination and radiographic evaluation are needed. With regard to treatment, identification of the etiology of instability is crucial for establishing proper treatment plans; instability would persist without correction of the cause of the initial instability. For successful revision surgery, balanced medio-lateral and flexion-extension gaps should be achieved. Constrained or rotating-hinge total knee prosthesis should also be considered as an alternative option for certain subsets of patients with instability. PMID:24944970

  14. [Dislocation-disassembly of bipolar hip arthroplasty--case report].

    PubMed

    Gagała, Jacek; Blacha, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Bipolar hip arthroplasty dislocation is rare. A case of bipolar hip arthroplasty dislocation in patient treated because of femoral neck fracture was described. Patient had neurological problems. The arthroplasty was made with posterolateral approach. Disassembly of bipolar prosthesis occurred during closed reduction. Open reduction with bipolar head exchange was necessary. To avoid this complication reduction should be made in anesthesia with muscles relaxation.

  15. Hip arthroplasty by matching cups.

    PubMed

    Gerard, Y

    1978-01-01

    A total hip surface arthroplasty consisting of matching cups and uncemented prosthetic components is a noteworthy operation. The femoral cup obtains cylindrical support from the femoral head which is reamed in the shape of a cylinder. The acetabular cup is metallic with a polyethylene liner. It is mobile over the bone but its position is constrained by contact with the femoral cup and therefore "self-centering." On the femoral side, the cup must be placed strictly in the axis of the femoral neck. The main consideration in femoral head surface replacement is the vitality of the underlying bone. Necrosis was observed in the earliest clinical trials but there have been no cases of necrosis in the past 3 1/2 years. This is attributed to a more limited surgical approach in which only the anterior part of the gluteus medius is divided and all the posterior elements of the hip are preserved. The acetabulum is sufficiently reamed to receive the cup, which protrudes beyond the external margins of the acetabulum in all positions. Errors have been committed while perfecting the prosthetic material, but the results as determined by a 6 1/2 year follow-up on purely metallic cups are encouraging. Metal-polyethylene cups presently under investigation have almost a 2 year follow-up. The reaction of the acetabulum to an uncemented cup is not yet known. However, the existence of 2 sliding surfaces and the fact that the acetabular cup moves only during the extremes of hip movement, is reason to assume that if the acetabulum is not reamed to expose cancellous bone, the risks of protrusion are minimal or delayed. Total surface arthroplasty by concentric cups has been performed in 335 hips to date. The operation is especially recommended when osteotomy is no longer possible and disabling coxarthrosis is present in relatively young patients. PMID:729253

  16. Differential Reanimation of the Upper and Lower Face Using 2 Interpositional Nerve Grafts in Total Facial Nerve Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Nishibayashi, Akimitsu; Yano, Kenji; Hosokawa, Ko

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Radical parotidectomy often results in complex facial nerve defects involving the main nerve trunk and multiple distal nerve branches. Although cable nerve grafting often leads to good nerve regeneration, severe synkinesis due to aberrant axonal regrowth is inevitable. In such situations, the use of 2 motor sources to differentially reanimate the upper and lower face could minimize synkinesis. Here we describe a method of total facial nerve reconstruction in which the upper and lower face are differentially reconstructed with the hypoglossal nerve and facial nerve, respectively, using 2 interpositional nerve grafts. Reconstruction of the lower face with the facial nerve restored voluntary and coordinated animation, and reconstruction of the upper face with the hypoglossal nerve restored frontalis muscle tone and eye closure. These results suggest that our method could serve as an alternative to conventional techniques that use only the facial or hypoglossal nerve. PMID:26579350

  17. Hepatic encephalopathy verified by psychometric testing and EEG in cirrhotic patients: Effects of mesocaval interposition shunt or sclerotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Thorell, L.-H.; Bengtsson, F.; Rosén, I.; Jeppsson, B.

    2005-01-01

    Background. The aim of this randomised prospective study was to evaluate hepatic encephalopathy after mesocaval interposition shunt operation and after repeated endoscopic sclerotherapy. Methods. Forty-five patients with bleeding oesophageal varices due to liver cirrhosis were randomised to the two treatment groups, 24 to the shunt group and 21 to the sclerotherapy group. The patients were evaluated preoperatively regarding blood tests, hepatic encephalopathy as measured by electroencephalogram with spectral analysis and by a battery of psychometric tests. The direction of portal flow in the shunt group was investigated by shunt phlebography and ultrasonography with Doppler. During follow-up the same investigations were performed twice at median 6.7 and 14.7 months after operation. Results. No statistically significant difference was found during follow-up regarding blood tests and electroencephalography with spectral analysis. Although the preoperative psychometric tests showed that the shunt group performed significantly better than the sclerotherapy group, the first follow-up showed that the shunt group performed statistically worse than the sclerotherapy group in seven of the tests: Synonyms (measuring verbal ability), Block Design Test (measuring visuo-spatial ability), Memory for Design Test, Error Score (measuring memory function), Revised Visual Retention Test, correct answers and the same test error answers (measuring visuo-spatial memory, ability and immediate memory), Digit Symbol Test (measuring perceptual ability) and Trial Making Test B (measuring cognitive motor abilities). Conclusions. Patients treated by mesocaval interposition shunt showed a progressive general reduction in psychometric performance compared with patients treated with repeated sclerotherapy, in whom a general intellectual improvement was observed. This finding corresponds to the reverse direction of the preoperative portal flow to a hepatofugal pattern at first follow-up and at 12

  18. The evaluation of the failed shoulder arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Wiater, Brett P; Moravek, James E; Wiater, J Michael

    2014-05-01

    As the incidence of shoulder arthroplasty continues to rise, the orthopedic shoulder surgeon will be increasingly faced with the difficult problem of evaluating a failed shoulder arthroplasty. The patient is usually dissatisfied with the outcome of the previous arthroplasty as a result of pain, but may complain of poor function due to limited range of motion or instability. A thorough and systematic approach is necessary so that the most appropriate treatment pathway can be initiated. A comprehensive history and physical examination are the first steps in the evaluation. Diagnostic studies are numerous and include laboratory values, plain radiography, computed tomography, ultrasound imaging, joint aspiration, nuclear scans, and electromyography. Common causes of early pain after shoulder arthroplasty include technical issues related to the surgery, such as malposition or improper sizing of the prosthesis, periprosthetic infection, neurologic injury, and complex regional pain syndrome. Pain presenting after a symptom-free interval may be related to chronic periprosthetic infection, component wear and loosening, glenoid erosion, rotator cuff degeneration, and fracture. Poor range of motion may result from inadequate postoperative rehabilitation, implant-related factors, and heterotopic ossification. Instability is generally caused by rotator cuff deficiency and implant-related factors. Unfortunately, determining the cause of a failed shoulder arthroplasty can be difficult, and in many situations, the source of pain and disability is multifactorial.

  19. [Sport activity after hip and knee arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Keren, Amit; Berkovich, Yaron; Berkovitch, Yaron; Soudry, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Joint arthroplasty is one of the commonest surgical procedures in orthopedic surgery. In recent years there was an increase in the number of procedures, patient satisfaction and implant survival. Originally, these operations were designed for old patients in order to relieve pain and to enable ambulation. Over the past few years, these operations have become common in younger patients which desire to return to activity, including sports activities. The importance of physical activity is a well known fact. In recent years it became clear that with the proper physical activity the outcomes of the operations are better. There are several types of arthroplasty. Many factors influence the outcome of the operation apart from the post-surgery physical activity. These factors include patient factors, surgical technique and type of arthroplasty. This review summarizes the recommendations for sports activities after hip and knee arthroplasties. These activities are evaluated according to surgeons' recommendations, stress applied on the implant and long term outcomes. The recommended sports activities after joint arthroplasties are walking, swimming and cycling. Soccer, basketball and jogging are not advised. Tennis, downhill skiing and horse riding are recommended with previous experience. There are many more sports activities that patients can participate in, and it is important that the patient discuss the different options prior to the operation. Since these operations are so common, many non-orthopedic physicians encounter these patients in their practice. They should be acquainted with the recommendations for sports activities and encourage them. PMID:24416822

  20. [Sport activity after hip and knee arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Keren, Amit; Berkovich, Yaron; Berkovitch, Yaron; Soudry, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Joint arthroplasty is one of the commonest surgical procedures in orthopedic surgery. In recent years there was an increase in the number of procedures, patient satisfaction and implant survival. Originally, these operations were designed for old patients in order to relieve pain and to enable ambulation. Over the past few years, these operations have become common in younger patients which desire to return to activity, including sports activities. The importance of physical activity is a well known fact. In recent years it became clear that with the proper physical activity the outcomes of the operations are better. There are several types of arthroplasty. Many factors influence the outcome of the operation apart from the post-surgery physical activity. These factors include patient factors, surgical technique and type of arthroplasty. This review summarizes the recommendations for sports activities after hip and knee arthroplasties. These activities are evaluated according to surgeons' recommendations, stress applied on the implant and long term outcomes. The recommended sports activities after joint arthroplasties are walking, swimming and cycling. Soccer, basketball and jogging are not advised. Tennis, downhill skiing and horse riding are recommended with previous experience. There are many more sports activities that patients can participate in, and it is important that the patient discuss the different options prior to the operation. Since these operations are so common, many non-orthopedic physicians encounter these patients in their practice. They should be acquainted with the recommendations for sports activities and encourage them.

  1. Total Hip Arthroplasty around the Inception of the Interface Bioactive Bone Cement Technique

    PubMed Central

    Oonishi, Hiroyuki; Kawahara, Ikuo

    2016-01-01

    Background To augment cement-bone fixation, Dr. Hironobu Oonishi attempted additional physicochemical bonding through interposition of osteoconductive crystal hydroxyapatite (HA) granules at the cement-bone interface in 1982. He first used the interface bioactive bone cement (IBBC) technique in 12 selected patients (12 hips) in 1982 (first stage) and followed them for 2 years. In 1985, the technique was applied in 25 total hip arthroplasty (THA) patients (second stage) and the effects were investigated by comparing the side with the IBBC technique and the other side without the IBBC technique. He has employed this technique in all THA patients since 1987 (third stage). Methods In the IBBC technique, HA granules (2 to 3 g) were smeared on the bone surface just before the acetabular and femoral components were cemented. In the first stage, 12 hips were operated using the IBBC technique in 1982. In the second stage, THA was performed without the IBBC technique on one side and with the IBBC technique on the other side within 1 year in 25 patients. In the third stage, THA was performed with the IBBC technique in 285 hips in 1987. Results In the first stage patients, implant loosening was not detected at 30 years after operation. In the second stage patients, revision was required in 7 hips without the IBBC technique due to cup loosening (5 hips) and stem loosening (2 hips), whereas no hip was revised after THA with the IBBC technique at 26 years after operation. In the third stage patients, the incidence of radiolucent lines and osteolysis was very few at 25 years after operation. Conclusions The long-term follow-up of THA performed around the inception of the IBBC technique has revealed low incidences of radiolucent lines, osteolysis, and revision surgery. PMID:27583104

  2. Revision of failed humeral head resurfacing arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Streubel, Philipp N.; Simone, Juan P.; Cofield, Robert H.; Sperling, John W.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to assess the outcomes of a consecutive series of patients who underwent revision surgery after humeral head resurfacing (HHR). Our joint registry was queried for all patients who underwent revision arthroplasty for failed HHR at our institution from 2005 to 2010. Eleven consecutive patients (average age 54 years; range 38-69 years) that underwent revision of 11 resurfacing arthroplasties were identified. The primary indication for resurfacing had been osteoarthritis in six, glenoid dysplasia in two, a chondral lesion in two, and postinstability arthropathy in one patient. The indication for revision was pain in 10 and infection in one patient. Seven patients had undergone an average of 1.9 surgeries prior to resurfacing (range 1-3). Materials and Methods: All patients were revised to stemmed arthroplasties, including one hemiarthroplasty, two reverse, and eight anatomic total shoulder arthroplasties at a mean 33 months after primary resurfacing (range 10-131 months). A deltopectoral approach was used in seven patients; four patients required an anteromedial approach due to severe scarring. Subscapularis attenuation was found in four cases, two of which required reverse total shoulder arthroplasty. Bone grafting was required in one glenoid and three humeri. Results: At a mean follow-up of 3.5 years (range 1.6-6.9 years), modified Neer score was rated as satisfactory in five patients and unsatisfactory in six. Abduction and external rotation improved from 73° to 88° (P = 0.32) and from 23° to 32° (P = 0.28) respectively. Reoperation was required in two patients, including one hematoma and one revision for instability. Conclusion: Outcomes of revision of HHR arthroplasty in this cohort did not improve upon those reported for revision of stemmed humeral implants. A comparative study would be required to allow for definitive conclusions to be made. PMID:26980986

  3. Expression of keratan sulfate at the arthroplasty surface after cup arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Yamada, H; Kikuchi, T; Morita, M; Henmi, O; Fujikawa, K; Washimi, O; Terada, N; Seki, T

    2000-01-01

    Fibrous tissue which regenerated on the acetabular arthroplasty surface was obtained from a 52-year-old woman who underwent total hip replacement after cup arthroplasty. The histological features of this newly formed fibrous tissue and expression of keratan sulfate, which is a characteristic matrix component of articular cartilage, were studied. Microscopic observation revealed that the arthroplasty surface consisted mainly of fibrous tissue which did not show metachromasia with toluidine blue staining, but there were many nodular structures communicating with the bone marrow. Immunostaining for keratan sulfate revealed clear positive staining around the cells of the nodular structures communicating with the bone marrow, while only weakly positive staining was observed in the superficial layer of the loose fibrous tissue. The present study revealed marked formation of articular cartilaginous tissue in areas having good communication with the bone marrow, which indicates that maintenance of this communication may be necessary to improve the outcome of cup arthroplasty.

  4. Knee joint arthroplasty after tibial osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    Fosco, Matteo; Cenni, Elisabetta; Tigani, Domenico

    2009-01-01

    A total of 29 consecutive knee joint arthroplasties in 24 patients who underwent previous high tibial osteotomy (HTO) for medial unicompartment osteoarthritis of the knee and followed up for a mean of 97 months were compared with a control group of 28 patients with 29 primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA) without previous HTO. Results for the osteotomy group were satisfactory in 96.5% of cases. In one patient loosening of the implant occurred after 37 months, which required prosthesis revision. Three patients underwent a further operation of secondary patella resurfacing for patella pain. The group without osteotomy reported a similar percentage of satisfactory results. PMID:19882155

  5. Dislocation following total knee arthroplasty: A report of six cases

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva, Manuel; Ríos-Luna, Antonio; Pereiro, Javier; Fahandez-Saddi, Homid; Pérez-Caballer, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Background: Dislocation following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is the worst form of instability. The incidence is from 0.15 to 0.5%. We report six cases of TKA dislocation and analyze the patterns of dislocation and the factors related to each of them. Materials and Methods: Six patients with dislocation of knee following TKA are reported. The causes for the dislocations were an imbalance of the flexion gap (n=4), an inadequate selection of implants (n=1), malrotation of components (n=1) leading to incompetence of the extensor mechanism, or rupture of the medial collateral ligament (MCC). The patients presented complained of pain, giving way episodes, joint effusion and difficulty in climbing stairs. Five patients suffered posterior dislocation while one anterior dislocation. An urgent closed reduction of dislocation was performed under general anaesthesia in all patients. All patients were operated for residual instability by revision arthroplasty after a period of conservative treatment. Results: One patient had deep infection and knee was arthrodesed. Two patients have a minimal residual lag for active extension, including a patient with a previous patellectomy. Result was considered excellent or good in four cases and fair in one, without residual instability. Five out of six patients in our series had a cruciate retaining (CR) TKA designs: four were revised to a posterior stabilized (PS) TKA and one to a rotating hinge design because of the presence of a ruptured MCL. Conclusion: Further episodes of dislocation or instability will be prevented by identifying and treating major causes of instability. The increase in the level of constraint and correction of previous technical mistakes is mandatory. PMID:20924487

  6. [Repair of a facial nerve substance loss by interposition of a collagen neurotube].

    PubMed

    Semere, A; Morand, B; Loury, J; Vuillerme, N; Bettega, G

    2014-08-01

    We are exposing the case of a 22 year-old patient presenting a wound of the right cheek, with a palsy of the right corner of the mouth. He has been sent to us 6 days after the trauma for secondary exploration. A section of the buccal branch of the right facial nerve with a 1cm gap has been brought out. We have bypassed the loss of substance with a collagen absorbable biological conduit. The 6-months clinical and electromyographic follow-up has shown a clear improvement of the function of the orbicularis oris, as well as its reinnervation by the buccal branch of the right facial nerve. PMID:24698336

  7. Tissue-specific differences in the spatial interposition of X-chromosome and 3R chromosome regions in the malaria mosquito Anopheles messeae Fall.

    PubMed

    Artemov, Gleb; Bondarenko, Semen; Sapunov, Gleb; Stegniy, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Spatial organization of a chromosome in a nucleus is very important in biology but many aspects of it are still generally unresolved. We focused on tissue-specific features of chromosome architecture in closely related malaria mosquitoes, which have essential inter-specific differences in polytene chromosome attachments in nurse cells. We showed that the region responsible for X-chromosome attachment interacts with nuclear lamina stronger in nurse cells, then in salivary glands cells in Anopheles messeae Fall. The inter-tissue differences were demonstrated more convincingly in an experiment of two distinct chromosomes interposition in the nucleus space of cells from four tissues. Microdissected DNA-probes from nurse cells X-chromosome (2BC) and 3R chromosomes (32D) attachment regions were hybridized with intact nuclei of nurse cells, salivary gland cells, follicle epithelium cells and imaginal disсs cells in 3D-FISH experiments. We showed that only salivary gland cells and follicle epithelium cells have no statistical differences in the interposition of 2BC and 32D. Generally, the X-chromosome and 3R chromosome are located closer to each other in cells of the somatic system in comparison with nurse cells on average. The imaginal disсs cell nuclei have an intermediate arrangement of chromosome interposition, similar to other somatic cells and nurse cells. In spite of species-specific chromosome attachments there are no differences in interposition of nurse cells chromosomes in An. messeae and An. atroparvus Thiel. Nurse cells have an unusual chromosome arrangement without a chromocenter, which could be due to the special mission of generative system cells in ontogenesis and evolution.

  8. Gait Analysis of Conventional Total Knee Arthroplasty and Bicruciate Stabilized Total Knee Arthroplasty Using a Triaxial Accelerometer.

    PubMed

    Tomite, Takenori; Saito, Hidetomo; Aizawa, Toshiaki; Kijima, Hiroaki; Miyakoshi, Naohisa; Shimada, Yoichi

    2016-01-01

    One component of conventional total knee arthroplasty is removal of the anterior cruciate ligament, and the knee after total knee arthroplasty has been said to be a knee with anterior cruciate ligament dysfunction. Bicruciate stabilized total knee arthroplasty is believed to reproduce anterior cruciate ligament function in the implant and provide anterior stability. Conventional total knee arthroplasty was performed on the right knee and bicruciate stabilized total knee arthroplasty was performed on the left knee in the same patient, and a triaxial accelerometer was fitted to both knees after surgery. Gait analysis was then performed and is reported here. The subject was a 78-year-old woman who underwent conventional total knee arthroplasty on her right knee and bicruciate stabilized total knee arthroplasty on her left knee. On the femoral side with bicruciate stabilized total knee arthroplasty, compared to conventional total knee arthroplasty, there was little acceleration in the x-axis direction (anteroposterior direction) in the early swing phase. Bicruciate stabilized total knee arthroplasty may be able to replace anterior cruciate ligament function due to the structure of the implant and proper anteroposterior positioning. PMID:27648328

  9. Gait Analysis of Conventional Total Knee Arthroplasty and Bicruciate Stabilized Total Knee Arthroplasty Using a Triaxial Accelerometer

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Hidetomo; Aizawa, Toshiaki; Miyakoshi, Naohisa; Shimada, Yoichi

    2016-01-01

    One component of conventional total knee arthroplasty is removal of the anterior cruciate ligament, and the knee after total knee arthroplasty has been said to be a knee with anterior cruciate ligament dysfunction. Bicruciate stabilized total knee arthroplasty is believed to reproduce anterior cruciate ligament function in the implant and provide anterior stability. Conventional total knee arthroplasty was performed on the right knee and bicruciate stabilized total knee arthroplasty was performed on the left knee in the same patient, and a triaxial accelerometer was fitted to both knees after surgery. Gait analysis was then performed and is reported here. The subject was a 78-year-old woman who underwent conventional total knee arthroplasty on her right knee and bicruciate stabilized total knee arthroplasty on her left knee. On the femoral side with bicruciate stabilized total knee arthroplasty, compared to conventional total knee arthroplasty, there was little acceleration in the x-axis direction (anteroposterior direction) in the early swing phase. Bicruciate stabilized total knee arthroplasty may be able to replace anterior cruciate ligament function due to the structure of the implant and proper anteroposterior positioning. PMID:27648328

  10. Gait Analysis of Conventional Total Knee Arthroplasty and Bicruciate Stabilized Total Knee Arthroplasty Using a Triaxial Accelerometer

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Hidetomo; Aizawa, Toshiaki; Miyakoshi, Naohisa; Shimada, Yoichi

    2016-01-01

    One component of conventional total knee arthroplasty is removal of the anterior cruciate ligament, and the knee after total knee arthroplasty has been said to be a knee with anterior cruciate ligament dysfunction. Bicruciate stabilized total knee arthroplasty is believed to reproduce anterior cruciate ligament function in the implant and provide anterior stability. Conventional total knee arthroplasty was performed on the right knee and bicruciate stabilized total knee arthroplasty was performed on the left knee in the same patient, and a triaxial accelerometer was fitted to both knees after surgery. Gait analysis was then performed and is reported here. The subject was a 78-year-old woman who underwent conventional total knee arthroplasty on her right knee and bicruciate stabilized total knee arthroplasty on her left knee. On the femoral side with bicruciate stabilized total knee arthroplasty, compared to conventional total knee arthroplasty, there was little acceleration in the x-axis direction (anteroposterior direction) in the early swing phase. Bicruciate stabilized total knee arthroplasty may be able to replace anterior cruciate ligament function due to the structure of the implant and proper anteroposterior positioning.

  11. Implant Design in Cementless Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Taek

    2016-01-01

    When performing cementless hip arthroplasty, it is critical to achieve firm primary mechanical stability followed by biological fixation. In order to achieve this, it is essential to fully understand characteristics of implant design. In this review, the authors review fixation principles for a variety of implants used for cementless hip replacement and considerations for making an optimal selection. PMID:27536647

  12. Positive Culture Rate in Revision Shoulder Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Hobgood, E. Rhett

    2009-01-01

    We recognized a trend of positive cultures taken from presumably uninfected shoulders during revision arthroplasty. Owing to the indolent nature of common shoulder pathogens such as Propionibacterium acnes, these cultures often become positive several days, even weeks, after surgery. Having concern regarding the potential importance of these positive cultures, we reviewed our revision arthroplasty population to determine the rate of positive intraoperative cultures in patients presumed to be aseptic, to characterize the isolated organisms, and to determine the subsequent development of infection. We retrospectively reviewed 27 patients (28 revisions) presumed to be uninfected between April 2005 and October 2007. Intraoperative cultures were positive in eight (29%) of the 28 revisions. Propionibacterium acnes was isolated in six. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was isolated in one patient and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus aureus was isolated in one patient. One-year followup was available on 24 of the 28 revisions. Two of the eight culture-positive revisions had a subsequent infection develop. Cultures taken at revision surgery for failed shoulder arthroplasty are often positive, and our findings document the importance of these positive cultures. Our data confirm previous reports isolating Propionibacterium acnes as a primary pathogen in revision shoulder arthroplasty. Level of Evidence: Level IV, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:19434469

  13. Gap Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Morten Schak; Axelsen, Lene Nygaard; Sorgen, Paul L.; Verma, Vandana; Delmar, Mario; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Gap junctions are essential to the function of multicellular animals, which require a high degree of coordination between cells. In vertebrates, gap junctions comprise connexins and currently 21 connexins are known in humans. The functions of gap junctions are highly diverse and include exchange of metabolites and electrical signals between cells, as well as functions, which are apparently unrelated to intercellular communication. Given the diversity of gap junction physiology, regulation of gap junction activity is complex. The structure of the various connexins is known to some extent; and structural rearrangements and intramolecular interactions are important for regulation of channel function. Intercellular coupling is further regulated by the number and activity of channels present in gap junctional plaques. The number of connexins in cell-cell channels is regulated by controlling transcription, translation, trafficking, and degradation; and all of these processes are under strict control. Once in the membrane, channel activity is determined by the conductive properties of the connexin involved, which can be regulated by voltage and chemical gating, as well as a large number of posttranslational modifications. The aim of the present article is to review our current knowledge on the structure, regulation, function, and pharmacology of gap junctions. This will be supported by examples of how different connexins and their regulation act in concert to achieve appropriate physiological control, and how disturbances of connexin function can lead to disease. © 2012 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 2:1981-2035, 2012. PMID:23723031

  14. Knee arthroplasty in Denmark, Norway and Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Bizjajeva, Svetlana; Fenstad, Anne Marie; Furnes, Ove; Lidgren, Lars; Mehnert, Frank; Odgaard, Anders; Pedersen, Alma Becic; Havelin, Leif Ivar

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose The number of national arthroplasty registries is increasing. However, the methods of registration, classification, and analysis often differ. Methods We combined data from 3 Nordic knee arthroplasty registers, comparing demographics, methods, and overall results. Primary arthroplasties during the period 1997–2007 were included. Each register produced a dataset of predefined variables, after which the data were combined and descriptive and survival statistics produced. Results The incidence of knee arthroplasty increased in all 3 countries, but most in Denmark. Norway had the lowest number of procedures per hospital—less than half that of Sweden and Denmark. The preference for implant brands varied and only 3 total brands and 1 unicompartmental brand were common in all 3 countries. Use of patellar button for total knee arthroplasty was popular in Denmark (76%) but not in Norway (11%) or Sweden (14%). Uncemented or hybrid fixation of components was also more frequent in Denmark (22%) than in Norway (14%) and Sweden (2%). After total knee arthroplasty for osteoarthritis, the cumulative revision rate (CRR) was lowest in Sweden, with Denmark and Norway having a relative risk (RR) of 1.4 (95% CI: 1.3–1.6) and 1.6 (CI: 1.4–1.7) times higher. The result was similar when only including brands used in more than 200 cases in all 3 countries (AGC, Duracon, and NexGen). After unicompartmental arthroplasty for osteoarthritis, the CRR for all models was also lowest in Sweden, with Denmark and Norway having RRs of 1.7 (CI: 1.4–2.0) and 1.5 (CI: 1.3–1.8), respectively. When only the Oxford implant was analyzed, however, the CRRs were similar and the RRs were 1.2 (CI: 0.9–1.7) and 1.3 (CI: 1.0–1.7). Interpretation We found considerable differences between the 3 countries, with Sweden having a lower revision rate than Denmark and Norway. Further classification and standardization work is needed to permit more elaborate studies. PMID:20180723

  15. Computer-assisted navigation in knee arthroplasty: a critical appraisal.

    PubMed

    Venkatesan, Muralidharan; Mahadevan, Devendra; Ashford, Robert U

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this review was to appraise the use of computer-assisted navigation in total knee arthroplasty and to assess whether this technology has improved clinical outcomes. Studies were identified through searches in MEDLINE, Embase, and PubMed. Numerous studies have shown improved leg and component alignment using navigation systems. However, the better alignment achieved in navigated knee arthroplasty has not been shown to lead to better clinical outcomes. Navigated knee arthroplasty had lower calculated blood loss and lower incidence of fat embolism compared with conventional knee arthroplasty using intramedullary jigs. It may be most valued when dealing with complex knee deformities, revision surgery, or minimally invasive surgery. Navigated knee arthroplasty, however, is only cost-effective in centers with a high volume of joint replacements. Overall, computer-assisted navigated knee arthroplasty provides some advantages over conventional surgery, but its clinical benefits to date are unclear and remain to be defined on a larger scale.

  16. Synovial cutaneous fistula complicating a reverse total shoulder arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Letter, Haley P; Limback, Joseph; Wasyliw, Christopher; Bancroft, Laura; Scherer, Kurt

    2016-06-01

    Reverse total shoulder arthroplasty is becoming a common form of shoulder arthroplasty that is often performed in the setting of rotator cuff pathology. Infection is a rare complication but is more common in reverse total shoulder arthroplasty than in hemiarthroplasty or anatomic total shoulder arthroplasty. We present the case of a 69-year-old patient with a reverse total shoulder arthroplasty who presented with purulent drainage from the skin of his anterior shoulder. Computed tomography arthrogram confirmed the presence of a synovial cutaneous fistula. Synovial cutaneous fistula is a rare variant of periprosthetic infection that, to our knowledge, has not been described previously in the setting of a reverse total shoulder arthroplasty. Computed tomography arthrogram proved to be a reliable method for confirming the diagnosis and was used for operative planning to remove the hardware. PMID:27257460

  17. Popliteal Artery Pseudoaneurysm Following Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Young-Soo; Hwang, Yeok-Gu; Savale, Abhijit Prakash

    2014-01-01

    An early diagnosis of popliteal artery pseudoaneurysm-a sequela of popliteal artery trauma-is difficult owing to its late presentation following total knee arthroplasty. The incidence of a popliteal artery pseudoaneurysm with a hematoma presenting only a peripheral nerve injury after total knee arthroplasty is also uncommon in the absence of common diagnostic features such as a pulsatile swelling with an audible bruit on auscultation. In the present report, we describe popliteal artery pseudoaneurysm following total knee arthroplasty. PMID:24944978

  18. Mycobacterium smegmatis infection of a prosthetic total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Saffo, Zaid; Ognjan, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    The most common organisms causing prosthetic knee joint infections are staphylococci. However, arthroplasty infections with atypical microbial pathogens, such as Mycobacteria can occur. Due to the rarity of mycobacterial prosthetic joint infections, diagnosis, treatment, and management of these atypical infections represent a clinical challenge. A 71-year old female post-operative day 40 after a left total knee arthroplasty was hospitalized secondary to left knee pain and suspected arthroplasty infection. She had failed outpatient oral antimicrobial treatment for superficial stitch abscess; and outpatient IV/Oral antimicrobials for a clinical postoperative septic bursitis. Ultimately, resection arthroplasty with operative tissue acid fast bacterial cultures demonstrated growth of the Mycobacterium smegmatis group. Post-operatively, she completed a combination course of oral doxycycline and levofloxacin and successfully completed a replacement arthroplasty with clinical and microbial resolution of the infection. To our knowledge, literature review demonstrates three case of knee arthroplasty infection caused by the Mycobacterium smegmatis group. Correspondingly, optimal surgical procedures and antimicrobial management including antimicrobial selection, treatment duration are not well defined. Presently, the best treatment options consists of two step surgical management including prosthesis hardware removal followed by extended antimicrobial therapy, followed by consideration for re-implantation arthroplasty. Our case illustrates importance of considering atypical mycobacterial infections in post-operative arthroplasty infections not responding to traditional surgical manipulations and antimicrobials. For an arthroplasty infection involving the atypical Mycobacterium smegmatis group, two step arthroplasty revision, including arthroplasty resection, with a combination of oral doxycycline and levofloxacin can lead to successful infection resolution, allowing for a

  19. Effectively Axonal-supercharged Interpositional Jump-Graft with an Artificial Nerve Conduit for Rat Facial Nerve Paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Niimi, Yosuke; Takeuchi, Yuichi; Sasaki, Ryo; Watanabe, Yorikatsu; Yamato, Masayuki; Miyata, Mariko; Sakurai, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Background: Interpositional jump graft (IPJG) is a nerve graft axonally supercharged from the hypoglossal nerve. However, for using the technique, an autologous nerve, which should contain the great auricular and sural nerves, must be obtained. Depending on the donor site, unavoidable issues such as nerve disorders and postoperative scarring may appear. To reduce the issues, in this study, the authors developed an end-to-side neurorrhaphy technique with the recipient nerve and an artificial nerve conduit and investigated the efficacy of an IPJG with an artificial nerve conduit in a rat facial nerve paresis model. Methods: A ligature clip was used to crush the facial nerve trunk, thereby creating a partial facial nerve paresis model. An artificial nerve conduit was then prepared with a 10-mm-long silicone tube containing 10 μL type I collagen and used to create an IPJG between the facial nerve trunk and the hypoglossal nerve (the silicone tube group). Thirteen weeks after the surgery, the outcome was histologically and physiologically compared with conventional IPJG with autograft using the great auricular nerve. Results: Retrograde tracer test confirmed a double innervation by the facial and hypoglossal nerve nuclei. In the autograft and silicone tube groups, the regeneration of myelinated axons was observed. Conclusion: In this study, the authors successfully developed an end-to-side neurorrhaphy technique with the recipient nerve and an artificial nerve conduit, and revealed that an IPJG in the conduit was effective in the rat facial nerve paresis model. PMID:26180717

  20. Unexpected wear of an unicompartimental knee arthroplasty in oxidized zirconium.

    PubMed

    Luyet, Anais; Fischer, Jean-François; Jolles, Brigitte M; Lunebourg, Alexandre

    2015-12-01

    Unicompartimental knee arthroplasty is a successful procedure for the treatment of localized osteoarthritis to one compartment of the knee with good long-term results. However, several modes of failure of unicompartimental knee arthroplasty have been described, namely aseptic or septic loosening, progression of disease, wear, and instability. Metallosis after unicompartimental knee arthroplasty is rarely reported and is most often related with polyethylene wear or break. We report on a case of rapid failure of unicompartimental knee arthroplasty in oxidized zirconium associated with metallosis secondary to the dislocation of the polyethylene.

  1. Addressing glenoid erosion in reverse total shoulder arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Gilot, Gregory J

    2013-01-01

    Severe glenoid wear is technically problematic, has a higher complication rate, and inferior results in the setting of shoulder arthroplasty. This paper introduces four basic strategies for treating glenoid erosion with a reverse shoulder arthroplasty which include; 1. eccentric reaming, 2. bone grafting of glenoid, 3. reaming and bone grafting, and 4. using augmented baseplates. The benefits and shortcomings of each of these techniques are discussed. The reverse shoulder arthroplasty has many advantages over anatomic shoulder arthroplasty when dealing with severe glenoid defects. Augmented baseplates are new and allow the surgeon to treat various different glenoid defects with preservation of glenoid subchondral bone. PMID:24328581

  2. Qualifying CT for wrist arthroplasty: extending techniques for total hip arthroplasty to total wrist arthroplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcala, Yvonne; Olivecrona, Henrik; Olivecrona, Lotta; Noz, Marilyn E.; Maguire, Gerald Q., Jr.; Zeleznik, Michael P.; Sollerman, Christer

    2005-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to extend previous work to detect migration of total wrist arthroplasty non-invasively, and with greater accuracy. Two human cadaverous arms, each with a cemented total wrist implant, were used in this study. In one of the arms, 1 mm tantalum balls were implanted, six in the carpal bones and five in the radius. Five CT scans of each arm were acquired, changing the position of the arm each time to mimic different positions patients might take on repeated examinations. Registration of CT volume data sets was performed using an extensively validated, 3D semi-automatic volume fusion tool in which co-homologous point pairs (landmarks) are chosen on each volume to be registered. Three sets of ten cases each were obtained by placing landmarks on 1) bone only (using only arm one), 2) tantalum implants only, and 3) bone and tantalum implants (both using only arm two). The accuracy of the match was assessed visually in 2D and 3D, and numerically by calculating the distance difference between the actual position of the transformed landmarks and their ideal position (i.e., the reference landmark positions). All cases were matched visually within one width of cortical bone and numerically within one half CT voxel (0.32 mm, p = 0.05). This method matched only the bone/arm and not the prosthetic component per se, thus making it possible to detect prosthetic movement and wear. This method was clinically used for one patient with pain. Loosening of the carpal prosthetic component was accurately detected and this was confirmed at surgery.

  3. Gap Resolution

    2009-06-16

    With the continued improvements of next generation DNA sequencing technologies and their advantages over traditional Sanger sequencing, the Joint Genome Institute (JGI) has modified its sequencing pipeline to take advantage of the benefits of such technologies. Currently, standard 454 Titanium, paired end 454 Titanium, and Illumina GAll data are generated for all microbial projects and then assembled using draft assemblies at a much greater throughput than before. However, it also presents us with new challenges.more » In addition to the increased throughput, we also have to deal with a larger number of gaps in the Newbler genome assemblies. Gaps in these assemblies are usually caused by repeats (Newbler collapses repeat copies into individual contigs, thus creating gaps), strong secondary structures, and artifacts of the PCR process (specific to 454 paired end libraries). Some gaps in draft assemblies can be resolved merely by adding back the collapsed data from repeats. To expedite gap closure and assembly improvement on large numbers of these assemblies, we developed software to address this issue.« less

  4. Cost Analysis in Shoulder Arthroplasty Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Teusink, Matthew J.; Virani, Nazeem A.; Polikandriotis, John A.; Frankle, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Cost in shoulder surgery has taken on a new focus with passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. As part of this law, there is a provision for Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs) and the bundled payment initiative. In this model, one entity would receive a single payment for an episode of care and distribute funds to all other parties involved. Given its reproducible nature, shoulder arthroplasty is ideally situated to become a model for an episode of care. Currently, there is little research into cost in shoulder arthroplasty surgery. The current analyses do not provide surgeons with a method for determining the cost and outcomes of their interventions, which is necessary to the success of bundled payment. Surgeons are ideally positioned to become leaders in ACOs, but in order for them to do so a methodology must be developed where accurate costs and outcomes can be determined for the episode of care. PMID:23243515

  5. Proximal tibial fracture following total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Krause, Heike; Dunleavy, Kim

    2011-09-01

    The patient was a 74-year-old man, with a history of total knee arthoplasty 14 years earlier, after having sustained a pathological fracture of the proximal diaphysis of the left tibia following a fall. Given the unstable nature of the fracture and the severe osteolysis noted below the total knee arthroplasty, surgical management 1 day after the fall entailed packing cancellous bone graft into the defect and realigning the fracture. PMID:21885911

  6. Bladder management after total joint arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Knight, R M; Pellegrini, V D

    1996-12-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the impact of an indwelling Foley catheter on bladder dysfunction and incidence of urinary tract infections after total joint arthroplasty. A prospective randomized controlled trial was conducted assigning use of an indwelling Foley catheter (group 1) or intermittent catheterization (group 2) for 48 hours following operation. Postoperative cultures were obtained on days 2 and 5, and the number of intermittent catheterization events and void and catheterization volumes were recorded. Concurrent cost-effectiveness analysis was conducted. One hundred nineteen of 174 consecutive patients having elective primary total joint arthroplasty completed the study. Five of 62 patients (8%) in group 1 and 7 of 57 patients (12%) in group 2 developed urinary tract infections (NS, P = 45). Twenty patients (35%) in group 2 and 12 (19%) in group 1 required straight catheterization for inability to void 48 hours after surgery (P = .05). Seventeen patients (35%) in group 2 and eight patients (16%) in group 1 required straight catheterization after epidural analgesia was discontinued (P = .024). Bladder management by indwelling Foley catheter saved more than 150 minutes of direct nursing contact per patient and $3,000 in total hospital costs. Indwelling Foley catheters reduced the frequency of postoperative urinary retention, were less labor intensive than intermittent straight catheterization, and were not associated with an increased risk of urinary infection. In the setting of epidural anesthesia and postoperative analgesia for total joint arthroplasty, management by indwelling catheter is a cost-effective strategy to facilitate postoperative return of normal bladder function.

  7. Acetabular Reconstruction in Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Shon, Won Yong; Santhanam, Siva Swaminathan; Choi, Jung Woo

    2016-03-01

    The difficulties encountered in dealing with the bone deficient acetabulum are amongst the greatest challenges in hip surgery. Acetabular reconstruction in revision total hip arthroplasty can successfully be achieved with hemispherical components featuring a porous or roughened ingrowth surface and options for placement of multiple screws for minor acetabular defect. Acetabular component selection is mostly based on the amount of bone loss present. In the presence of combined cavitary and segmental defects without superior acetabular coverage, reconstructions with a structural acetabular allograft protected by a cage or a custom-made triflange cage have been one of preferred surgical options. The use of a cage or ring over structural allograft bone for massive uncontained defects in acetabular revision can restore host bone stock and facilitate subsequent rerevision surgery to a certain extent. But high complication rates have been reported including aseptic loosening, infection, dislocation and metal failure. On the other hand, recent literature is reporting satisfactory outcomes with the use of modular augments combined with a hemispherical shell for major acetabular defect. Highly porous metals have been introduced for clinical use in arthroplasty surgery over the last decade. Their higher porosity and surface friction are ideal for acetabular revision, optimizing biological fixation. The use of trabecular metal cups in acetabular revision has yielded excellent clinical results. This article summarizes author's experience regarding revision acetabular reconstruction options following failed hip surgery including arthroplasty. PMID:27536638

  8. Minimally invasive knee arthroplasty: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Tria, Alfred J; Scuderi, Giles R

    2015-01-01

    Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) for arthroplasty of the knee began with surgery for unicondylar knee arthroplasty (UKA). Partial knee replacements were designed in the 1970s and were amenable to a more limited exposure. In the 1990s Repicci popularized the MIS for UKA. Surgeons began to apply his concepts to total knee arthroplasty. Four MIS surgical techniques were developed: quadriceps sparing, mini-mid vastus, mini-subvastus, and mini-medial parapatellar. The quadriceps sparing technique is the most limited one and is also the most difficult. However, it is the least invasive and allows rapid recovery. The mini-midvastus is the most common technique because it affords slightly better exposure and can be extended. The mini-subvastus technique entirely avoids incising the quadriceps extensor mechanism but is time consuming and difficult in the obese and in the muscular male patient. The mini-parapatellar technique is most familiar to surgeons and represents a good starting point for surgeons who are learning the techniques. The surgeries are easier with smaller instruments but can be performed with standard ones. The techniques are accurate and do lead to a more rapid recovery, with less pain, less blood loss, and greater motion if they are appropriately performed. PMID:26601062

  9. Total hip arthroplasty revision in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Gasbarra, Elena; Perrone, Fabio Luigi; Celi, Monica; Rao, Cecilia; Feola, Maurizio; Cuozzo, Nicola; Tarantino, Umberto

    2013-10-01

    In the last years, the number of total hip arthroplasty is increased both in young patients and elderly with a poor bone quality due to extension of surgical indications. According to this trend, also revision surgery showed a growth of its number, especially in elderly patients, because of implant loosening, failed osseointegration of prosthetic components, errors in biomechanical restoration and infections. The aim of this study is to analyze life quality improvement through evaluation of articular functionality and postoperative pain, and to examine osseointegration of implant components with periprosthetic bone. During total hip arthroplasty revision, the orthopedic surgeon often has to face complex cases, especially in elderly patients with a preexisting status of poor bone quality and sarcopenia. In these cases, a correct planning and a surgical procedure well-executed are able to ensure a good outcome that led to pain relief and functional recovery. Furthermore anti-osteoporotic therapy surely represents a useful resource both in primary total hip arthroplasty and in revisions, mainly for elderly patients with a poor bone quality. PMID:24046034

  10. Reverse-total shoulder arthroplasty cost-effectiveness: A quality-adjusted life years comparison with total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Bachman, Daniel; Nyland, John; Krupp, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To compare reverse-total shoulder arthroplasty (RSA) cost-effectiveness with total hip arthroplasty cost-effectiveness. METHODS: This study used a stochastic model and decision-making algorithm to compare the cost-effectiveness of RSA and total hip arthroplasty. Fifteen patients underwent pre-operative, and 3, 6, and 12 mo post-operative clinical examinations and Short Form-36 Health Survey completion. Short form-36 Health Survey subscale scores were converted to EuroQual Group Five Dimension Health Outcome scores and compared with historical data from age-matched patients who had undergone total hip arthroplasty. Quality-adjusted life year (QALY) improvements based on life expectancies were calculated. RESULTS: The cost/QALY was $3900 for total hip arthroplasty and $11100 for RSA. After adjusting the model to only include shoulder-specific physical function subscale items, the RSA QALY improved to 2.8 years, and its cost/QALY decreased to $8100. CONCLUSION: Based on industry accepted standards, cost/QALY estimates supported both RSA and total hip arthroplasty cost-effectiveness. Although total hip arthroplasty remains the quality of life improvement “gold standard” among arthroplasty procedures, cost/QALY estimates identified in this study support the growing use of RSA to improve patient quality of life. PMID:26925384

  11. Snapping Pes Syndrome after Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Taketomi, Shuji; Yamagami, Ryota; Tahara, Keitaro; Tanaka, Sakae

    2016-01-01

    Snapping pes syndrome is defined as a snapping sensation in the medial knee caused by pes anserinus and rarely occurs. Snapping pes syndrome after unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) has not been reported yet. We experienced two cases with this syndrome after UKA. Conservative treatment was effective in one case, while surgical excision of the gracilis tendon was necessary to relieve painful snapping in the other case. The main cause of the first case might be posteromedial overhang of the tibial tray that reached up to 5 mm. The probable cause of the second case was posteromedial overhang of the mobile bearing. PMID:27274476

  12. Revision of minimal resection resurfacing unicondylar knee arthroplasty to total knee arthroplasty: results compared with primary total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Turlough M P; Abouazza, Omar; Neil, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    We compared a cohort of patients undergoing revision of a minimal resection resurfacing unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) to total knee arthroplasty (TKA) with a cohort of patients undergoing primary TKA. Both cohorts were matched in terms of age, sex, and body mass index. We collected data on preoperative and postoperative range of motion, International Knee Society scores, and radiologic data. We also collected data on the modes of failure of the primary UKA. There were 55 patients in each cohort. The average time the UKA was in place was 48.3 months. The average follow-up period from the time of revision was 39.2 months. The most common reason for revision was subsidence of the tibial base plate (58%). Forty percent of patients required particulate bone grafting for contained defects. Two patients required metal augments, and 1 required stems. There was no significant difference between the 2 groups in terms of range of motion, functional outcome, or radiologic outcomes. Revision of these types of implants to TKA is associated with similar results to primary TKA and is superior to revision of other forms of UKA.

  13. Results of sleeves in revision total knee arthroplasty: an editorial comment on recently published in the Journal of Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Chao

    2015-01-01

    The paper entitled “Direct, cementless, metaphyseal fixation in knee revision arthroplasty with sleeves-short-term results” published in the Journal of Arthroplasty to analyze the short- and mid-term results in revision total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in a largest series so far. This article shown that cementless metaphyseal fixation with sleeves is a promising option for revision TKA implant fixation. The clinical outcomes regarding the range of motion and the KSS are also promising. Based on this article and related literatures about sleeves, we assess the short to mid-term outcomes and the clinical perspectives in revision TKAs. PMID:26697477

  14. The influence of joint line position on knee stability after condylar knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Martin, J W; Whiteside, L A

    1990-10-01

    Using a special knee-testing device, ten knees obtained at autopsy were subjected to varus-valgus, anterior-posterior, and flexion-rotation analysis in the intact state and after total knee arthroplasty. The ten knees showed no significant change in stability after knee replacement when the joint line was maintained in its natural position. When the femoral component was repositioned 5 mm proximally and 5 mm anteriorly, a significant increase in laxity occurred during midflexion. When the joint line was shifted 5 mm distal and 5 mm posterior to its anatomic location, significant tightening occurred in midrange of motion. Coupled rotation of the tibia with knee flexion was decreased after surgery in all knees with no specific relationship to joint line position. Coupled rotation with varus-valgus testing, however, remained within the normal range through the first 30 degrees of flexion only when the joint line was restored to its normal anatomic position. Stability in condylar knee arthroplasty is in part dependent on position of the joint line. Surgical techniques that rely on restoring the flexion and extension gap without regard to joint line position may result in alteration of varus-valgus or anterior-posterior displacement in midrange flexion. PMID:2208849

  15. The Cruciate Ligaments in Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Parcells, Bertrand W; Tria, Alfred J

    2016-01-01

    The early knee replacements were hinge designs that ignored the ligaments of the knee and resurfaced the joint, allowing freedom of motion in a single plane. Advances in implant fixation paved the way for modern designs, including the posterior-stabilized (PS) total knee arthroplasty (TKA) that sacrifices both cruciate ligaments while substituting for the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), and the cruciate-retaining (CR) TKA designs that sacrifice the anterior cruciate ligament but retain the PCL. The early bicruciate retaining (BCR) TKA designs suffered from loosening and early failures. Townley and Cartier designed BCR knees that had better clinical results but the surgical techniques were challenging.Kinematic studies suggest that normal motion relies on preservation of both cruciate ligaments. Unicompartmental knee arthroplasty retains all knee ligaments and closely matches normal motion, while PS and CR TKA deviate further from normal. The 15% to 20% dissatisfaction rate with current TKA has renewed interest in the BCR design. Replication of normal knee kinematics and proprioception may address some of the dissatisfaction.

  16. Dual mobility cups in total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    De Martino, Ivan; Triantafyllopoulos, Georgios Konstantinos; Sculco, Peter Keyes; Sculco, Thomas Peter

    2014-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty (THA) is considered one of the most successful surgical procedures in orthopaedics. With the increase in the number of THAs performed in the world in the next decades, reducing or preventing medical and mechanical complications such as post-operative THA instability will be of paramount importance, particularly in an emerging health care environment based on quality control and patient outcome. Dual mobility acetabular component (also known as unconstrained tripolar implant) was introduced in France at the end of the 1970s as an alternative to standard sockets, to reduce the risk of THA dislocation in patients undergoing primary THA in France. Dual mobility cups have recently gained wider attention in the United States as an alternative option in the prevention and treatment of instability in both primary and revision THA and offer the benefit of increased stability without compromising clinical outcomes and implant longevity. In this article, we review the use of dual mobility cup in total hip arthroplasty in terms of its history, biomechanics, outcomes and complications based on more than 20 years of medical literature. PMID:25035820

  17. [Primary radial head arthroplasty in trauma : Complications].

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Horlohé, K; Buschbeck, S; Wincheringer, D; Weißenberger, M; Hoffmann, R

    2016-10-01

    Radial head fractures are common injuries in elbow trauma. Non-displaced fractures are best treated conservatively. Simple but displaced fractures require anatomic reduction and fixation, typically using screws. The treatment course for complex fractures with multiple fragments is still being debated, as results are less predictable. Radial head resection is not advised if concomitant injuries of the coronoid process or the collateral ligaments with instability are present. Favorable outcomes following open reduction and fixation using plates were reported recently. However, complication rates are very high. Radial head replacement is a valuable tool in treating complex fractures of the radial head with predominantly good and excellent results. Patients who suffer radial head fractures are typically of a younger age, resulting in high functional demands. Certainly, unspecific and specific complications related to radial head arthroplasty were reported in up to 40 % of cases in an acute fracture setting. This article highlights common complications in radial head arthroplasty and aims to present strategies to avoid them. PMID:27600571

  18. Footprint mismatch in lumbar total disc arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Michaela, Gstoettner; Denise, Heider; Liebensteiner, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Lumbar disc arthroplasty has become a popular modality for the treatment of degenerative disc disease. The dimensions of the implants are based on early published geometrical measurements of vertebrae; the majority of these were cadaver studies. The fit of the prosthesis in the intervertebral space is of utmost importance. An undersized implant may lead to subsidence, loosening and biomechanical failure due to an incorrect center of rotation. The aim of the present study was to measure the dimensions of lumbar vertebrae based on CT scans and assess the accuracy of match in currently available lumbar disc prostheses. A total of 240 endplates of 120 vertebrae were included in the study. The sagittal and mediolateral diameter of the upper and lower endplates were measured using a digital measuring system. For the levels L4/L5 and L5/S1, an inappropriate size match was noted in 98.8% (Prodisc L) and 97.6% (Charite) with regard to the anteroposterior diameter. Mismatch in the anterior mediolateral diameter was noted in 79.3% (Prodisc L) and 51.2% (Charite) while mismatch in the posterior mediolateral diameter was observed in 91.5% (Prodisc L) and 78% (Charite) of the endplates. Surgeons and manufacturers should be aware of the size mismatch of currently available lumbar disc prostheses, which may endanger the safety and efficacy of the procedure. Larger footprints of currently available total disc arthroplasties are required. PMID:18791748

  19. Protein-mediated boundary lubrication in arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Heuberger, M P; Widmer, M R; Zobeley, E; Glockshuber, R; Spencer, N D

    2005-04-01

    Wear of articulated surfaces can be a major lifetime-limiting factor in arthroplasty. In the natural joint, lubrication is effected by the body's natural synovial fluid. Following arthroplasty, and the subsequent reformation of the synovial membrane, a fluid of similar composition surrounds the artificial joint. Synovial fluid contains, among many other constituents, a substantial concentration of the readily adsorbing protein albumin. The ability of human serum albumin to act as a boundary lubricant in joint prostheses has been investigated using a pin-on-disc tribometer. Circular dichroism spectroscopy was employed to follow the temperature- and time-dependent conformational changes of human serum albumin in the model lubricant solution. Effects of protein conformation and polymer surface hydrophilicity on protein adsorption and the resulting friction in the boundary lubrication regime have been investigated. Unfolded proteins preferentially adsorb onto hydrophobic polymer surfaces, where they form a compact, passivating layer and increase sliding friction-an effect that can be largely suppressed by rendering the substrate more hydrophilic. A molecular model for protein-mediated boundary friction is proposed to consolidate the observations. The relevance of the results for in vivo performance and ex vivo hip-joint testing are discussed.

  20. Preoperative Planning in Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Tanzer, Michael; Makhdom, Asim M

    2016-04-01

    Preoperative planning is of paramount importance in primary total knee arthroplasty. A thorough preoperative analysis helps the surgeon envision the operation, anticipate any potential issues, and minimize the risk of premature implant failure. Obtaining a thorough history is critical for appropriate patient selection. The physical examination should evaluate the integrity of the soft tissues, the neurovascular status, range of motion, limb deformity, and the status of the collateral ligaments to help determine the soft-tissue balancing and constraint strategy required. Standard radiographs, with a known magnification, should be obtained for preoperative total knee arthroplasty templating. Routine standing AP, lateral, and skyline radiographs of the knee can help the surgeon plan the bone cuts and tibial slope as well as the implant size and position at the time of surgery. In certain circumstances, such as severe coronal deformities, bone deficiencies, and/or extra-articular deformities, additional measures are frequently necessary to successfully reconstruct the knee. Constrained implants, metal augments, and bone graft must be part of the surgeon's armamentarium. PMID:26990712

  1. Assessing hospital cost of joint arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    BONIFORTI, FILIPPO

    2015-01-01

    Purpose total joint replacement is one of the most successful procedures in medicine and cost reimbursements to hospitals for the joint arthroplasty diagnosis-related group are among the largest payments made by a Regional Health Service. Despite the popularity of these procedures, there are few high-quality cost-effectiveness studies on this topic. This study evaluates the cost of total joint arthroplasty performed in a district hospital. Methods direct and indirect costs have been measured and patient procedure pathway was analyzed subdivided into three stages: surgical procedure, inpatient care and outpatient clinic. Results the cost of the surgical procedure stage was calculated as 3,798 euros, while that of the inpatient stage was 2,924 euros. The mean hospital costs per procedure amounted to 6,952 euros. Conclusions although the Health Service tariffs fully reimburse the cost of providing a joint replacement, our data contribute to point out the role of hospital staff’s organization to support sustainable improvements on health care for joint replacement surgery. Level of evidence Level VI, single economic evaluation. PMID:26904524

  2. Painful knee arthroplasty: definition and overview

    PubMed Central

    Carulli, Christian; Villano, Marco; Bucciarelli, Giovanni; Martini, Caterina; Innocenti, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    Summary Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA) is one of the most successful procedures in Orthopaedic Surgery, with good clinical results and high survival rate in more than 90% of the cases at long-term follow-up. Since the increase of population’s mean age, worsening of articular degenerative alterations, and articular sequelae related to previous fractures, there is a persistent growing of the number of knee arthroplasties in every country each year, with expected increase of complications rates. Painful TKA is considered an unusual complication, but several reports focus on this challenging clinical issue. Common causes of painful TKA may be divided as early or late, and in referred, periarticular or intra-articular. Among the early, we recall implant instability (related to surgical and technical mistakes) and problems of extensor mechanism (patella not resurfaced, malalignment of femoral, tibial, or patellar component, tendons failure or degeneration). Late causes of painful TKA are almost related to aseptic loosening and infection, but also, even if unusual, reflex sympathetic dystrophy, synovitis, and hypersensitivity to metal implants are represented. Hypersensitivity to metal is a clinical issue with significative increase, but to date without a specific characterization. The Authors report about incidence, clinical features, and diagnostic pathways of hypersensitivity to metal implants, focusing on the prevention of this challenging problem. PMID:22461811

  3. Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty for Trauma: When, Where, and How.

    PubMed

    Szerlip, Benjamin W; Morris, Brent J; Edwards, T Bradley

    2016-01-01

    Reverse shoulder arthroplasty has become increasingly popular for the treatment of complex shoulder injuries, including proximal humerus fractures and fixed glenohumeral dislocation, in the elderly population. The early to midterm results of reverse shoulder arthroplasty for the treatment of proximal humerus fractures are promising compared with the results of unconstrained humeral head replacement, and patients may have more predictable improvement with less dependence on bone healing and rehabilitation. However, long-term follow-up is needed, and surgeons must be familiar with various complications that are specific to reverse shoulder arthroplasty. To achieve optimal patient outcomes for the management of traumatic shoulder injuries, surgeons must have a comprehensive understanding of the current implant options, indications, and surgical techniques for reverse shoulder arthroplasty. PMID:27049189

  4. Rural vs. urban utilization of total joint arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Devraj; Illingworth, Kenneth David; Novicoff, Wendy M; Scaife, Steven L; Jones, Braden K; Saleh, Khaled J

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the association between patient demographics and hospital demographics on utilization of total joint arthroplasty in rural and urban populations from the National Inpatient Sample database. Any patient that was discharged after a primary total hip or primary total knee arthroplasty was included in this study. Results showed that rural patients living in a Northeastern hospital region compared to West, less than 65 years of age, females, Blacks and Hispanics were less likely to undergo total joint arthroplasty compared to their urban counterparts. Rural patient were more likely to undergo total joint arthroplasty compared to their urban counterparts if they were in the Midwest and had Medicare as their primary payer provider.

  5. Total knee arthroplasty in patients with a previous patellectomy.

    PubMed

    Maslow, Jed; Zuckerman, Joseph D; Immerman, Igor

    2013-01-01

    Post-patellectomy patients represent a specific subgroup of patients that may develop arthritis and persistent knee pain and potentially require treatment with total knee arthroplasty. This article reviews the treatment and functional outcomes following total knee arthroplasty in patients with prior patellectomy. A case report is presented as an example of the clinical management of a post-patellectomy patient with significant knee pain and disability treated with total knee arthroplasty. Emphasis will be placed in decision- making, specifically with the use of a posterior stabilized implant. In addition, postoperative strengthening of the quadriceps is essential to compensate for the lack of the patella and increase the success of total knee arthroplasty in this subgroup of patients. PMID:24151951

  6. Current Approaches in Hip and Knee Arthroplasty Anaesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Güler, Gülen; Atıcı, Şebnem; Kurt, Ercan; Karaca, Saffet; Yılmazlar, Aysun

    2015-01-01

    Risk assesment, preoperative drug regulation, the anesthesia and analgesia techniques are very important and the effectivity on success of surgery is great. So, these topics in arthroplasty were reviewed under current knowledge. PMID:27366493

  7. Resurfacing shoulder arthroplasty for the treatment of severe rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Voorde, Pia C ten; Rasmussen, Jeppe V; Olsen, Bo S; Brorson, Stig

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose There is no consensus on which type of shoulder prosthesis should be used in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We describe patients with RA who were treated with shoulder replacement, regarding patient-reported outcome, prosthesis survival, and causes of revision, and we compare outcome after resurfacing hemi-arthroplasty (RHA) and stemmed hemi-arthroplasty (SHA). Patients and methods We used data from the national Danish Shoulder Arthroplasty Registry and included patients with RA who underwent shoulder arthroplasty in Denmark between 2006 and 2010. Patient-reported outcome was obtained 1-year postoperatively using the Western Ontario Osteoarthritis of the Shoulder index (WOOS), and rates of revision were calculated by checking revisions reported until December 2011. The patient-reported outcome of RHA was compared to that of SHA using regression analysis with adjustment for age, sex, and previous surgery. Results During the study period, 167 patients underwent shoulder arthroplasty because of rheumatoid arthritis, 80 (48%) of whom received RHA and 34 (26%) of whom received SHA. 16 patients were treated with total stemmed shoulder arthroplasty (TSA), and 24 were treated with reverse shoulder arthroplasty (rTSA). 130 patients returned a completed questionnaire, and the total mean WOOS score was 63. The cumulative 5-year revision rate was 7%. Most revisions occurred after RHA, with a revision rate of 14%. Mean WOOS score was similar for RHA and for SHA. Interpretation This study shows that shoulder arthroplasty, regardless of design, is a good option in terms of reducing pain and improving function in RA patients. The high revision rate in the RHA group suggests that other designs may offer better implant survival. However, this should be confirmed in larger studies. PMID:25673155

  8. Acute compartment syndrome of the thigh following total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Boonstra, R H; Haverkamp, D; Campo, M M; van der Vis, H M

    2012-03-01

    A 62year old man developed a compartment syndrome of the thigh after total knee arthroplasty. Twelve years previously he had a HTO of the same knee complicated by a compartment syndrome of the calf. The clinical diagnosis was confirmed with intracompartmental pressure measurement. Following fasciotomy pressures were normalized and further course was uncomplicated. Compartment syndrome of the thigh is a rare, but potentially devastating, complication following total knee arthroplasty. A previous compartment syndrome of the calf is identified as a risk factor.

  9. Use of Oral Mucoperiosteal and Pterygo-Masseteric Muscle Flaps as Interposition Material in Surgery of Temporomandibular Joint Ankylosis: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Anyanechi, CE; Osunde, OD; Bassey, GO

    2015-01-01

    Background: The most common complication of surgery for the release of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis is relapse of the ankylosis. To prevent re-ankylosis, a variety of interpositional materials have been used. Aim: The aim was to compare the surgical outcome of oral mucoperiosteal flap, not hitherto used as interpositional material, with pterygo-masseteric muscles flap after surgical release of TMJ ankylosis. Subjects and Methods: This was a prospective randomized study of all consecutive patients treated for the release of complete TMJ bony ankylosis, from January 2003 to December 2012, at the Oral and Maxillofacial unit of our institution. The patients were randomized into two groups: The pterygo-masseteric group comprises 22 patients while the oral mucoperiosteal group had 23 patients. Information on demographics, clinical characteristics, and postoperative complications over a 5 year follow-up period were obtained, and analyzed using the statistical package for social sciences (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 13, Chicago, IL, USA). A P < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: The age of the patients ranged from 15 to 28 mean 20.3 (3.35) years while the duration of ankylosis ranged from 2 to 16 mean 5.1 (3.4) years. The baseline demographic (gender; P = 0.92; side; P = 0.58) and clinical characteristics in terms of etiology (P = 0.60) and age (P = 0.52) were comparable in both treatment groups. All the patients presented with complete bony TMJ ankylosis with a preoperative inter-incisal distance of <0.5 cm. The intraoperative mouth opening achieved ranged from 4 cm to 5 cm, mean 4.6 (0.27) cm and this was not different for either group (P = 0.51). The patients were followed up postoperatively for a period ranging from 3 to 5 years, mean 3.4 (0.62) years. The mouth opening decreased, over the period of postoperative review, from the initial range of 4–5 cm to 2.9–3.6 cm, and this was not different in both groups (P = 0

  10. Femoral Component Survival in Hybrid Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Perry, Clayton R; Perry, Kevin I

    2016-05-01

    Although the majority of North American surgeons perform total knee arthroplasty by cementing both the femoral and the tibial components, hybrid fixation with a press-fit femur and cemented tibia is an alternative form of total knee arthroplasty performed by some. Currently, there is a paucity of literature evaluating long-term outcomes after hybrid total knee arthroplasty. As such, the purpose of the current study was to describe the long-term results of total knee arthroplasty performed using the hybrid technique. The authors retrospectively reviewed a total of 77 hybrid total knee arthroplasties with at least 12 years of follow-up. Clinical and radiographic evaluations were performed to determine patient function and the incidence of femoral component failure after hybrid total knee arthroplasty. At the time of last follow-up, 76 of 77 (99%) of the femoral components remained in place without evidence of loosening. One femoral component failed due to aseptic loosening and was ultimately revised to a cemented femoral component without further complication. In addition, 1 tibial component and 2 patellar components failed due to aseptic loosening. Four tibial polyethylene liners were revised for polyethylene wear. In conclusion, press-fit fixation of the femoral component is a reliable and durable alternative to cemented fixation. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(3):181-186.].

  11. Femoral Component Survival in Hybrid Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Perry, Clayton R; Perry, Kevin I

    2016-05-01

    Although the majority of North American surgeons perform total knee arthroplasty by cementing both the femoral and the tibial components, hybrid fixation with a press-fit femur and cemented tibia is an alternative form of total knee arthroplasty performed by some. Currently, there is a paucity of literature evaluating long-term outcomes after hybrid total knee arthroplasty. As such, the purpose of the current study was to describe the long-term results of total knee arthroplasty performed using the hybrid technique. The authors retrospectively reviewed a total of 77 hybrid total knee arthroplasties with at least 12 years of follow-up. Clinical and radiographic evaluations were performed to determine patient function and the incidence of femoral component failure after hybrid total knee arthroplasty. At the time of last follow-up, 76 of 77 (99%) of the femoral components remained in place without evidence of loosening. One femoral component failed due to aseptic loosening and was ultimately revised to a cemented femoral component without further complication. In addition, 1 tibial component and 2 patellar components failed due to aseptic loosening. Four tibial polyethylene liners were revised for polyethylene wear. In conclusion, press-fit fixation of the femoral component is a reliable and durable alternative to cemented fixation. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(3):181-186.]. PMID:27135453

  12. A Dutch Survey on Circumpatellar Electrocautery in Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    van Jonbergen, Hans-Peter W.; Barnaart, Alexander F.W.; Verheyen, Cees C.P.M.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Anterior knee pain following total knee arthroplasty is estimated to occur in 4-49% of patients. Some orthopedic surgeons use circumpatellar electrocautery (diathermy) to reduce the prevalence of postsurgical anterior knee pain; however, the extent of its use is unknown. Materials and Methodology: In April 2009, a postal questionnaire was sent to all 98 departments of orthopedic surgery in The Netherlands. The questions focused on the frequency of total knee arthroplasties, patellar resurfacing, and the use of circumpatellar electrocautery. Results: The response rate was 92%. A total of 18,876 TKAs, 2,096 unicompartmental knee arthroplasties, and 215 patellofemoral arthroplasties are performed yearly in The Netherlands by the responding orthopedic surgeons. Of the orthopedic surgeons performing TKA, 13% always use patellar resurfacing in total knee arthroplasty for osteoarthritis, 49% use selective patellar resurfacing, and 38% never use it. Fifty-six percent of orthopedic surgeons use circumpatellar electrocautery when not resurfacing the patella, and 32% use electrocautery when resurfacing the patella. Conclusion: There is no consensus among Dutch orthopedic surgeons on the use of patellar resurfacing or circumpatellar electrocautery in total knee replacement performed for osteoarthritis. A prospective clinical trial is currently underway to fully evaluate the effect of circumpatellar electrocautery on the prevalence of anterior knee pain following total knee arthroplasty. PMID:21228917

  13. MIS unicondylar knee arthroplasty: surgical approach and early results.

    PubMed

    Gesell, Mark W; Tria, Alfred J

    2004-11-01

    Unicondylar arthroplasty of the knee has seen a resurgence of interest in the United States. The principles of unicondylar arthroplasty of the knee are different from those for total knee arthroplasty, allowing replacement of only the affected joint compartment with less bone loss. Minimally invasive surgery allows for less soft tissue dissection with the potential for less morbidity. The key question is: will the changes associated with the minimally invasive surgery procedure improve the clinical results of the standard unicondylar arthroplasty of the knee or will the changes make the procedure too difficult and lead to an increasing failure rate? This study reviews the surgical technique and presents the 2 to 4 year results of the minimally invasive unicondylar arthroplasty of the knee 47 knees in 41 patients. The average range of motion increased from 121 degrees -132 degrees . The Knee Society pain score improved from 45-80 and the function score improved from 47-78. Only one knee has been revised. With proper patient selection, minimally invasive unicondylar arthroplasty of the knee allows for results that are at least equal to those of the standard open procedure at 2 to 4 years after the surgery.

  14. Irreducible Fracture-Dislocation of the Ankle Associated With Interposition of the Tibialis Posterior Tendon in the Syndesmosis: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Lacasse, Jean-Simon; Laflamme, Melissa; Penner, Murray J

    2015-01-01

    Although ankle fracture-dislocations are common orthopedic injuries, it is very uncommon for them to be irreducible, and such cases require special attention. We report the case of a closed fracture-dislocation of the ankle in a 17-year-old male that required 3 surgeries because of persistent anterior subluxation of the talus on the postoperative radiographs. After advanced radiologic investigations, tibialis posterior tendon interposition in the syndesmosis was identified as the cause of the subluxation. This is a very rare event, reported in only 5 patients in published studies. Once the diagnosis was identified by magnetic resonance imaging, the tendon was relocated to its anatomic position, and the tibiofibular and tibiotalar joints were reduced adequately. The patient was then able to regain a satisfactory level of function many months after the initial trauma. PMID:24846161

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Ablation of Uterine Fibroids: Effect of Bowel Interposition on Procedure Feasibility and a Unique Bowel Displacement Technique

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-sun; Lim, Hyo Keun; Rhim, Hyunchul

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the effect of bowel interposition on assessing procedure feasibility, and the usefulness and limiting conditions of bowel displacement techniques in magnetic resonance imaging-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) ablation of uterine fibroids. Materials and Methods Institutional review board approved this study. A total of 375 screening MR exams and 206 MR-HIFU ablations for symptomatic uterine fibroids performed between August 2010 and March 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. The effect of bowel interposition on procedure feasibility was assessed by comparing pass rates in periods before and after adopting a unique bowel displacement technique (bladder filling, rectal filling and subsequent bladder emptying; BRB maneuver). Risk factors for BRB failure were evaluated using logistic regression analysis. Results Overall pass rates of pre- and post-BRB periods were 59.0% (98/166) and 71.7% (150/209), and in bowel-interposed cases they were 14.6% (7/48) and 76.4% (55/72), respectively. BRB maneuver was technically successful in 81.7% (49/60). Through-the-bladder sonication was effective in eight of eleven BRB failure cases, thus MR-HIFU could be initiated in 95.0% (57/60). A small uterus on treatment day was the only significant risk factor for BRB failure (B = 0.111, P = 0.017). Conclusion The BRB maneuver greatly reduces the fraction of patients deemed ineligible for MR-HIFU ablation of uterine fibroids due to interposed bowels, although care is needed when the uterus is small. PMID:27186881

  16. Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty Prosthesis Design Classification System.

    PubMed

    Routman, Howard D; Flurin, Pierre-Henri; Wright, Thomas W; Zuckerman, Joseph D; Hamilton, Matthew A; Roche, Christopher P

    2015-12-01

    Multiple different reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (rTSA) prosthesis designs are available in the global marketplace for surgeons to perform this growing procedure. Subtle differences in rTSA prosthesis design parameters have been shown to have significant biomechanical impact and clinical consequences. We propose an rTSA prosthesis design classification system to objectively identify and categorize different designs based upon their specific glenoid and humeral prosthetic characteristics for the purpose of standardizing nomenclature that will help the orthopaedic surgeon determine which combination of design configurations best suit a given clinical scenario. The impact of each prosthesis classification type on shoulder muscle length and deltoid wrapping are also described to illustrate how each prosthesis classification type impacts these biomechanical parameters. PMID:26631189

  17. Subacute pain after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Sauter, Axel; Breivik, Harald

    2014-06-01

    Acute pain during and immediately after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) can be well controlled by spinal anesthesia, local infiltration analgesia, and peripheral nerve blocks; this enables early or fast-track rehabilitation. However, about half of patients have clinically significant pain in the following weeks. Active movements and rehabilitation of joint function, muscle strength, and ability to maintain balance and prevent falls all become more difficult when the joint is painful on movement. Intensive analgesic and antihyperalgesic treatment during the first few weeks after TKA surgery may reduce the risk of chronic pain after this operation, which is itself intended to remove the patient's chronic osteoarthritis pain. Spinal cord stimulation may be an effective option for patients with mainly neuropathic pain after TKA surgery.

  18. Predictors of Satisfaction Following Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Maratt, Joseph D; Lee, Yuo-yu; Lyman, Stephen; Westrich, Geoffrey H

    2015-07-01

    Despite the success of total knee arthroplasty (TKA), numerous studies report that nearly one in five patients who underwent TKA was unsatisfied with their outcome. The purpose of our study was to identify the preoperative factors predictive of satisfaction following well-performed TKA. Using improvement in patient-reported outcomes less than the minimally clinically important change as an indicator of dissatisfaction in a cohort of primary TKA patients, we found that patients with greater preoperative pain and disability with less severe degradation in health-related quality of life were more likely to be satisfied with the result of TKA. Balancing severity of symptoms and impact to quality of life is important when counseling patients considering TKA.

  19. Metaphyseal bone loss in revision knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Ponzio, Danielle Y; Austin, Matthew S

    2015-12-01

    The etiology of bone loss encountered during revision total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is often multifactorial and can include stress shielding, osteolysis, osteonecrosis, infection, mechanical loss due to a grossly loose implant, and iatrogenic loss at the time of implant resection. Selection of the reconstructive technique(s) to manage bone deficiency is determined by the location and magnitude of bone loss, ligament integrity, surgeon experience, and patient factors including the potential for additional revision, functional demand, and comorbidities. Smaller, contained defects are reliably managed with bone graft, cement augmented with screw fixation, or modular augments. Large metaphyseal defects require more extensive reconstruction such as impaction bone grafting with or without mesh augmentation, prosthetic augmentation, use of bulk structural allografts, or use of metaphyseal cones or sleeves. While each technique has advantages and disadvantages, the most optimal method for reconstruction of large metaphyseal bone defects during revision TKA is not clearly established. PMID:26362647

  20. Blood Management Strategies in Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Dan, Michael; Martinez Martos, Sara; Beller, Elaine

    2016-01-01

    A perioperative blood management program is one of a number of important elements for successful patient care in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and surgeons should be proactive in its application. The aims of blood conservation are to reduce the risk of blood transfusion whilst at the same time maximizing hemoglobin (Hb) in the postoperative period, leading to a positive effect on outcome and cost. An individualized strategy based on patient specific risk factors, anticipated blood loss and comorbidities are useful in achieving this aim. Multiple blood conservation strategies are available in the preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative periods and can be employed in various combinations. Recent literature has highlighted the importance of preoperative Hb optimization, minimizing blood loss and evidence-based transfusion guidelines. Given TKA is an elective procedure, a zero allogenic blood transfusion rate should be the aim and an achievable goal.

  1. Resection arthroplasty for failed patellar components.

    PubMed

    Lavernia, Carlos J; Alcerro, Jose C; Drakeford, Michael K; Tsao, Audrey K; Krackow, Kenneth A; Hungerford, David S

    2009-12-01

    A total of 1,401 primary total knee arthroplasties (TKA) were reviewed; 44 (3.2%) had at least the patellar component revised. Nine of these knees (eight patients) had insufficient bone stock to allow reimplantation of another patellar component. Clinical data on the nine knees were obtained with recent follow-up evaluation, review of their medical records and radiographs. Evaluation included Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) scores. Average follow-up was 4 years and 7 months, 2-year range (2 months to 8 years and 4 months). Common factors found in these nine knees included: thin patella after primary TKR status, osteoarthritis, good range of motion and patella alta. Results were good to excellent in seven knees and fair in two. The untoward associations with patellectomy such as quadriceps lag, extension weakness and anterior knee pain were not experienced. Resection of the patellar component, without reimplantation, is an acceptable alternative in revision TKA lacking adequate remaining bone stock.

  2. Total hip arthroplasty after rotational acetabular osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hideya; Takatori, Yoshio; Moro, Toru; Oshima, Hirofumi; Oka, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Sakae

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we aimed to determine whether the outcomes of total hip arthroplasty (THA) after rotational acetabular osteotomy (RAO) are equal to those of primary THA, and to elucidate the characteristics of THA after RAO. The clinical and radiographic findings of THA after RAO (44 hips), with minimum 24 months of follow-up, were compared with a matched control group of 58 hips without prior RAO. We found that the outcomes in terms of functional scores and complication rates did not differ between THA after RAO and THA without previous pelvic osteotomy, indicating that the results of THA after RAO are equivalent to those of primary THA. Although THA after RAO requires technical considerations, similar clinical outcomes to primary THA can be expected. PMID:25456635

  3. Patellofemoral resurfacing at total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Harwin, S F; Stein, A J; Stern, R E

    1994-10-01

    A retrospective review of 268 primary total knee arthroplasties (TKAs) with a mean follow-up of four years is presented. The patellae were resurfaced in all cases. There were six complications (2.2%) referable to the patellofemoral articulation: three subluxations, one patellar fracture, one loosening of a metal-backed patellar component, and one patellar tendon avulsion. Successful patellofemoral resurfacing (PFR) can be accomplished with minimal complications if the following technical considerations are met: 5-7 degrees of valgus alignment; medial placement of the patellar component; taking care not to increase either the AP diameter of the knee or the thickness of the patella; avoiding internal rotation of either the tibial or femoral components and proper soft tissue balancing. A thorough review of patellofemoral complications after TKA is presented, and technical considerations relevant to the successful performance of PFR are discussed.

  4. Fracture Blisters After Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Halawi, Mohamad J

    2015-08-01

    Fracture blisters are tense vesicles that arise on markedly swollen skin overlying traumatized soft tissue. While this relatively uncommon complication has been well described in the trauma literature, this article reports for the first time a case of fracture blisters after primary total knee arthroplasty. The fracture blisters developed within 36 hours of surgery and were associated with profound swelling and erythema. There was no evidence of vascular injury, compartment syndrome, iatrogenic fracture, or deep venous thrombosis. The patient was treated with leg elevation, loosely applied nonadhesive dressings, and a short course of oral antibiotics after skin desquamation. Blood-filled blisters required longer time to reepithelialization than fluid-filled blisters. Knee stiffness developed because of pain and fear of participation with physical therapy, but the patient was able to resume intensive rehabilitation after resolution of the blisters. Patient factors, surgical factors, and review of the literature are discussed. PMID:26251947

  5. Fixed flexion deformity and total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Su, E P

    2012-11-01

    Fixed flexion deformities are common in osteoarthritic knees that are indicated for total knee arthroplasty. The lack of full extension at the knee results in a greater force of quadriceps contracture and energy expenditure. It also results in slower walking velocity and abnormal gait mechanics, overloading the contralateral limb. Residual flexion contractures after TKA have been associated with poorer functional scores and outcomes. Although some flexion contractures may resolve with time after surgery, a substantial percentage will become permanent. Therefore, it is essential to correct fixed flexion deformities at the time of TKA, and be vigilant in the post-operative course to maintain the correction. Surgical techniques to address pre-operative flexion contractures include: adequate bone resection, ligament releases, removal of posterior osteophytes, and posterior capsular releases. Post-operatively, extension can be maintained with focused physiotherapy, a specially modified continuous passive motion machine, a contralateral heel lift, and splinting.

  6. Trends in total knee arthroplasty implant utilization.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Long-Co L; Lehil, Mandeep S; Bozic, Kevin J

    2015-05-01

    The incidence of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has increased alongside our knowledge of knee physiology, kinematics, and technology resulting in an evolution of TKA implants. This study examines the trends in TKA implant utilization. Data was extracted from The Orthopedic Research Network to evaluate trends in level of constraint, fixed vs. mobile bearing, fixation, and type of polyethylene in primary TKAs. In 2012, 88% used cemented femoral and tibial implants, and 96% involved patellar resurfacing. 38% of implants were cruciate retaining, 53% posterior stabilized or condylar stabilized, 3% constrained. 91% were fixed-bearing, 7% mobile-bearing. 52% of tibial inserts were HXLPE. TKA implant trends demonstrate a preference for cemented femoral and tibial components, patellar resurfacing, fixed-bearing constructs, metal-backed tibial components, patellar resurfacing, and increased usage of HXLPE liners. PMID:25613663

  7. Blood Management Strategies in Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Dan, Michael; Martinez Martos, Sara; Beller, Elaine

    2016-01-01

    A perioperative blood management program is one of a number of important elements for successful patient care in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and surgeons should be proactive in its application. The aims of blood conservation are to reduce the risk of blood transfusion whilst at the same time maximizing hemoglobin (Hb) in the postoperative period, leading to a positive effect on outcome and cost. An individualized strategy based on patient specific risk factors, anticipated blood loss and comorbidities are useful in achieving this aim. Multiple blood conservation strategies are available in the preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative periods and can be employed in various combinations. Recent literature has highlighted the importance of preoperative Hb optimization, minimizing blood loss and evidence-based transfusion guidelines. Given TKA is an elective procedure, a zero allogenic blood transfusion rate should be the aim and an achievable goal. PMID:27595070

  8. Blood Management Strategies in Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Liu, David; Dan, Michael; Martinez Martos, Sara; Beller, Elaine

    2016-09-01

    A perioperative blood management program is one of a number of important elements for successful patient care in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and surgeons should be proactive in its application. The aims of blood conservation are to reduce the risk of blood transfusion whilst at the same time maximizing hemoglobin (Hb) in the postoperative period, leading to a positive effect on outcome and cost. An individualized strategy based on patient specific risk factors, anticipated blood loss and comorbidities are useful in achieving this aim. Multiple blood conservation strategies are available in the preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative periods and can be employed in various combinations. Recent literature has highlighted the importance of preoperative Hb optimization, minimizing blood loss and evidence-based transfusion guidelines. Given TKA is an elective procedure, a zero allogenic blood transfusion rate should be the aim and an achievable goal. PMID:27595070

  9. Minimally invasive total hip arthroplasty: in opposition.

    PubMed

    Hungerford, David S

    2004-06-01

    At the Knee Society Winter Meeting in 2003, Seth Greenwald and I debated about whether there should be new standards (ie, regulations) applied to the release of information to the public on "new developments." I argued for the public's "right to know" prior to the publication of peer-reviewed literature. He argued for regulatory constraint or "proving by peer-reviewed publication" before alerting the public. It is not a contradiction for me to currently argue against the public advertising of minimally invasive (MIS) total hip arthroplasty as not yet being in the best interest of the public. It is hard to remember a concept that has so captured both the public's and the surgical community's fancy as MIS. Patients are "demanding" MIS without knowing why. Surgeons are offering it as the next best, greatest thing without having developed the skill and experience to avoid the surgery's risks. If you put "minimally invasive hip replacement" into the Google search engine (http://www.google.com), you get 5,170 matches. If you put the same words in PubMed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi), referencing the National Library of Medicine database, you get SEVENTEEN; none is really a peer-reviewed article. Most are 1 page papers in orthopedics from medical education meetings. On the other hand, there are over 6,000 peer-reviewed articles on total hip arthroplasty. Dr. Thomas Sculco, my couterpart in this debate, wrote an insightful editorial in the American Journal of Orthopedic Surgery in which he stated: "Although these procedures have generated incredible interest and enthusiasm, I am concerned that they may be performed to the detriment of our patients." I couldn't agree with him more. Smaller is not necessarily better and, when it is worse, it will be the "smaller" that is held accountable.

  10. The role of the popliteus tendon in total knee arthroplasty: a cadaveric study

    PubMed Central

    COTTINO, UMBERTO; BRUZZONE, MATTEO; ROSSO, FEDERICA; DETTONI, FEDERICO; BONASIA, DAVIDE EDOARDO; ROSSI, ROBERTO

    2015-01-01

    Purpose this study was conducted to investigate the influence of the popliteus tendon (PT) on the static stability of total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Methods twenty knees were used. In 10 right knees, a cruciate-retaining (CR) TKA trial prosthesis was implanted; in the other ten knees (left knees), the posterior cruciate ligament was cut and a posterior substitution (PS) TKA trial prosthesis was implanted. Lamina spreaders were set at 100 N of tension, one on the medial and one on the lateral articular space. Gaps were then measured with a caliper before and after PT sectioning. Results the correlation between femoral dimensions and popliteus insertion distance from articular surfaces was measured with the Pearson correlation index and considered significant. In the CR-TKA group, medial and lateral gap measurements showed a significant increase after PT sectioning both in flexion and in extension. In the PS-TKA group, lateral gap measurements showed a significant increase after PT sectioning both in flexion and in extension, while the medial gap measurements increased significantly only in flexion. Conclusions PT sectioning destabilized both the lateral and the medial aspects of the knee. A greater effect was observed in the lateral compartment. The most statistically reliable effect was observed with the knee in flexion. In addition, we observed that preserving the PCL does not prevent lateral gap opening after PT sectioning. Clinical relevance PT should always be preserved when performing a TKA, because its resection can affect gap balancing, in flexion and in extension. Type of study controlled laboratory study. PMID:26151034

  11. Diagnostic Algorithm for Residual Pain After Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Park, Caroline N; White, Peter B; Meftah, Morteza; Ranawat, Amar S; Ranawat, Chitranjan S

    2016-01-01

    Although total knee arthroplasty is a successful and cost-effective procedure, patient dissatisfaction remains as high as 50%. Postoperative residual knee pain after total knee arthroplasty, with or without crepitation, is a major factor that contributes to patient dissatisfaction. The most common location for residual pain after total knee arthroplasty is anteriorly. Because residual pain has been associated with an un-resurfaced patella, this review includes only registry data and total knee arthroplasty with patella replacement. Some suggest that the pathogenesis of residual knee pain may be related to mechanical stimuli that activate free nerve endings around the patellofemoral joint. Various etiologies have been implicated in residual pain, including (1) low-grade infection, (2) midflexion instability, and (3) component malalignment with patellar maltracking. Less common causes include (4) crepitation and patellar clunk syndrome; (5) patellofemoral symptoms, including overstuffing and avascular necrosis of the patella; (6) early aseptic loosening; (7) hypersensitivity to metal or cement; (8) complex regional pain syndrome; and (9) pseudoaneurysm. Because all of these conditions can lead to residual pain, identifying the etiology can be a difficult diagnostic challenge. Often, patients with persistent pain and normal findings on radiographs and laboratory workup may benefit from a diagnostic injection or further imaging. However, up to 10% to 15% of patients with residual pain may have unexplained pain. This literature review summarizes the findings on the causes of residual pain and presents a diagnostic algorithm to facilitate an accurate diagnosis for residual pain after total knee arthroplasty. PMID:26811953

  12. Fretting and Corrosion in Modular Shoulder Arthroplasty: A Retrieval Analysis.

    PubMed

    Eckert, Johannes A; Mueller, Ulrike; Jaeger, Sebastian; Panzram, Benjamin; Kretzer, J Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Tribocorrosion in taper junctions of retrieved anatomic shoulder arthroplasty implants was evaluated. A comparison of the tribocorrosion between cobalt-chromium and titanium alloy stems was conducted and the observations were correlated with the individual's clinical data. Adverse effects caused by metal debris and subsequent elevated serum metal ion levels are frequently reported in total hip arthroplasty. In total shoulder arthroplasty, to date only a small number of retrieval analyses are available and even fewer address the issue of tribocorrosion at the taper junctions. A total of 36 retrieved hemiarthroplasties and total shoulder arthroplasties were assessed using the modified Goldberg score. The prevalence of fretting and corrosion was confirmed in this cohort. Titanium stems seem to be more susceptible to damage caused by tribocorrosion than cobalt-chromium stems. Furthermore, stemless designs offered less tribocorrosion at the taper junction than stemmed designs. A weak correlation between time to revision and increased levels of tribocorrosion was seen. Whether or not tribocorrosion can lead to adverse clinical reactions and causes failure of shoulder arthroplasties remains to be examined. PMID:27433471

  13. Fretting and Corrosion in Modular Shoulder Arthroplasty: A Retrieval Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Panzram, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Tribocorrosion in taper junctions of retrieved anatomic shoulder arthroplasty implants was evaluated. A comparison of the tribocorrosion between cobalt-chromium and titanium alloy stems was conducted and the observations were correlated with the individual's clinical data. Adverse effects caused by metal debris and subsequent elevated serum metal ion levels are frequently reported in total hip arthroplasty. In total shoulder arthroplasty, to date only a small number of retrieval analyses are available and even fewer address the issue of tribocorrosion at the taper junctions. A total of 36 retrieved hemiarthroplasties and total shoulder arthroplasties were assessed using the modified Goldberg score. The prevalence of fretting and corrosion was confirmed in this cohort. Titanium stems seem to be more susceptible to damage caused by tribocorrosion than cobalt-chromium stems. Furthermore, stemless designs offered less tribocorrosion at the taper junction than stemmed designs. A weak correlation between time to revision and increased levels of tribocorrosion was seen. Whether or not tribocorrosion can lead to adverse clinical reactions and causes failure of shoulder arthroplasties remains to be examined. PMID:27433471

  14. Prophylactic antibiotics in elective hip and knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Hickson, C. J.; Metcalfe, D.; Elgohari, S.; Oswald, T.; Masters, J. P.; Rymaszewska, M.; Reed, M. R.; Sprowson†, A. P.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We wanted to investigate regional variations in the organisms reported to be causing peri-prosthetic infections and to report on prophylaxis regimens currently in use across England. Methods Analysis of data routinely collected by Public Health England’s (PHE) national surgical site infection database on elective primary hip and knee arthroplasty procedures between April 2010 and March 2013 to investigate regional variations in causative organisms. A separate national survey of 145 hospital Trusts (groups of hospitals under local management) in England routinely performing primary hip and/or knee arthroplasty was carried out by standard email questionnaire. Results Analysis of 189 858 elective primary hip and knee arthroplasty procedures and 1116 surgical site infections found statistically significant variations for some causative organism between regions. There was a 100% response rate to the prophylaxis questionnaire that showed substantial variation between individual trust guidelines. A number of regimens currently in use are inconsistent with the best available evidence. Conclusions The approach towards antibiotic prophylaxis in elective arthroplasty nationwide reveals substantial variation without clear justification. Only seven causative organisms are responsible for 89% of infections affecting primary hip and knee arthroplasty, which cannot justify such widespread variation between prophylactic antibiotic policies. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2015;4:181–189. PMID:26585304

  15. [Rehabilitation after total knee arthroplasty of hip and knee].

    PubMed

    Jansen, E; Brienza, S; Gierasimowicz-Fontana, A; Matos, C; Reynders-Frederix-Dobre, C; HateM, S M

    2015-09-01

    Numbers of total hip and knee arthroplasties are increasing on a regular basis. Clinical pathways tend to shorten the duration of hospitalization in acute care after surgery. Therefore, the preoperative preparation of the patient and his abilities for postoperative rehabilitation should be carefully addressed. Before the surgical intervention, it is recommended that the patient receives an educational program and a physical preparation. After the surgical intervention, the patient can benefit from a home-based rehabilitation program supervised by a physiotherapist, if there were no preoperative reasons for prolonging the hospital stay and if the surgery took place without complications. Some patients may benefit from postsurgical rehabilitation in a specialized locomotor rehabilitation long-stay care unit. The indications for inpatient multidisciplinary rehabilitation are : two simultaneous arthroplasties, revision of a previous hip or knee arthroplasty, postsurgical complications, advanced age, comorbidities influencing the rehabilitation process, social difficulties, necessity for adaptation of the environment, insufficient or unadapted out-patient (para)medical care. The goals of the rehabilitation treatment depend on the patient's characteristics and environment, on the properties of the prosthesis and on the postsurgical complications. The functional prognosis of a total joint arthroplasty of the knee or hip is excellent, provided that there are no post-surgical complications and that the patient benefits from adequate rehabilitation therapy. The present paper describes the different phases of rehabilitation treatment and the general and specific complications of total hip and knee arthroplasties that may influence the rehabilitation outcome.

  16. [Rehabilitation after total knee arthroplasty of hip and knee].

    PubMed

    Jansen, E; Brienza, S; Gierasimowicz-Fontana, A; Matos, C; Reynders-Frederix-Dobre, C; HateM, S M

    2015-09-01

    Numbers of total hip and knee arthroplasties are increasing on a regular basis. Clinical pathways tend to shorten the duration of hospitalization in acute care after surgery. Therefore, the preoperative preparation of the patient and his abilities for postoperative rehabilitation should be carefully addressed. Before the surgical intervention, it is recommended that the patient receives an educational program and a physical preparation. After the surgical intervention, the patient can benefit from a home-based rehabilitation program supervised by a physiotherapist, if there were no preoperative reasons for prolonging the hospital stay and if the surgery took place without complications. Some patients may benefit from postsurgical rehabilitation in a specialized locomotor rehabilitation long-stay care unit. The indications for inpatient multidisciplinary rehabilitation are : two simultaneous arthroplasties, revision of a previous hip or knee arthroplasty, postsurgical complications, advanced age, comorbidities influencing the rehabilitation process, social difficulties, necessity for adaptation of the environment, insufficient or unadapted out-patient (para)medical care. The goals of the rehabilitation treatment depend on the patient's characteristics and environment, on the properties of the prosthesis and on the postsurgical complications. The functional prognosis of a total joint arthroplasty of the knee or hip is excellent, provided that there are no post-surgical complications and that the patient benefits from adequate rehabilitation therapy. The present paper describes the different phases of rehabilitation treatment and the general and specific complications of total hip and knee arthroplasties that may influence the rehabilitation outcome. PMID:26591319

  17. A biomechanical study on fracture risks in ulnohumeral arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Degreef, I; Van Audekercke, R; Boogmans, T; De Smet, L

    2011-06-01

    In the Outerbridge-Kashiwagi ulnohumeral arthroplasty, bone strength may be weakened significantly as a result of the humeral fenestration. Therefore, fracture risks may be increased, particularly in the immediate postoperative period. The objective of this biomechanical cadaver study is to study the humeral bone strength after ulnohumeral arthroplasty. A biomechanical cadaveric study was done in which differences in force needed to fracture the humerus with and without fenestration was measured. First, the diaphysis of 12 distal humeri was embedded and a posterior force was applied until a fracture occurred. Second, a similar study was done with fixed humeral columns, to specifically compare the column strength. In the first part, the force needed to fracture was reduced by 17% after ulnohumeral arthroplasty, which was not statistically significant. However, a shift in the fracture pattern occurred: from diaphyseal fracture towards column fractures after the arthroplasty. In the second part, the force needed to fracture the columns proved to be significantly reduced by 41% after humeral perforation. Alterations in the biomechanical properties of the distal humerus after ulnohumeral arthroplasty may lead to a shift in fracture patterns from diaphyseal to column fractures. The strength of the columns is strongly reduced by 41%. PMID:21592841

  18. Hip arthroplasty for failed treatment of proximal femoral fractures.

    PubMed

    D'Arrigo, Carmelo; Perugia, Dario; Carcangiu, Alessandro; Monaco, Edoardo; Speranza, Attilio; Ferretti, Andrea

    2010-10-01

    Failed treatment of an intertrochanteric fracture typically leads to profound functional disability and pain. Salvage treatment with hip arthroplasty may be considered. The aim of this study was to evaluate the results and complications of hip arthroplasty performed as a salvage procedure after the failed treatment of an intertrochanteric hip fracture. Twenty-one patients were treated in our hospital with hip arthroplasty for failed treatment of intertrochanteric hip fracture. There were sixteen women and five men with a mean age of 75.8 years (range 61-85 years). Fourteen patients had failure of a previous nail fixation procedure, five had failure of a plate fixation, one of hip screws fixation and one of Ender nail fixation. In 19 out of 21 patients we performed a total hip arthroplasty-14 cases used modular implants with long-stems and five cases used a standard straight stem. In 2 of 21 cases we used a bipolar hemiarthroplasty. A statistically significant improvement was found comparing pre and postoperative conditions (p < 0.05). Our experience confirms that total hip arthroplasty is a satisfactory salvage procedure after failed treatment of an intertrochanteric fracture in elderly patients with few serious orthopaedic complications and acceptable clinical outcomes. PMID:19572131

  19. Pain and Function Recovery Trajectories following Revision Hip Arthroplasty: Short-Term Changes and Comparison with Primary Hip Arthroplasty in the ADAPT Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Whitehouse, Michael R.; Wylde, Vikki; Gooberman-Hill, Rachael; Blom, Ashley W.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Patients report similar or better pain and function before revision hip arthroplasty than before primary arthroplasty but worse results are reported after revision surgery than after primary surgery. The trajectory of post-operative recovery during the first months and any differences by type of surgery have received little attention. We explored the trajectories of change in pain and function after revision hip arthroplasty to 12-months post-operatively and compare them with those observed after primary hip arthroplasty. Methods This study is a prospective cohort study of patients undergoing primary (n = 80 with 92% for an indication of osteoarthritis) and revision (n = 43) hip arthroplasties. WOMAC pain and function scores and walking speed were collected pre-operatively, at 3 and 12-months post-operatively. Multilevel regression models were used to chart and compare the trajectories of change (0–3 months and 3–12 months) between types of surgery. Results The improvements in pain and function following revision arthroplasty occurred within the first 3-months with no evidence of further change beyond this initial period. While the pattern of recovery was similar to the one observed after primary arthroplasty, improvements in the first 3-months were smaller after revision compared to primary arthroplasty. Patients listed for revision surgery reported lower pre-operative pain levels but similar post-operative levels compared to those undergoing primary surgery. At 12-months post-operation patients who underwent a revision arthroplasty had not reached the same level of function achieved by those who underwent primary arthroplasty. Conclusion The post-operative improvements in pain and function are larger following primary hip arthroplasty than following revision hip arthroplasty. Irrespectively of surgery type, most of the improvements occur in the first three post-operative months. More research is required to identify whether the recovery

  20. More than 95% completeness of reported procedures in the population-based Dutch Arthroplasty Register

    PubMed Central

    van Steenbergen, Liza N; Spooren, Anneke; van Rooden, Stephanie M; van Oosterhout, Frank J; Morrenhof, Jan W; Nelissen, Rob G H H

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose A complete and correct national arthroplasty register is indispensable for the quality of arthroplasty outcome studies. We evaluated the coverage, completeness, and validity of the Dutch Arthroplasty Register (LROI) for hip and knee arthroplasty. Patients and methods The LROI is a nationwide population-based registry with information on joint arthroplasties in the Netherlands. Completeness of entered procedures was validated in 2 ways: (1) by comparison with the number of reimbursements for arthroplasty surgeries (Vektis database), and (2) by comparison with data from hospital information systems (HISs). The validity was examined by conducting checks on missing or incorrectly coded values in the LROI. Results The LROI contains over 300,000 hip and knee arthroplasties performed since 2007. Coverage of all Dutch hospitals (n = 100) was reached in 2012. Completeness of registered procedures was 98% for hip arthroplasty and 96% for knee arthroplasty in 2012, based on Vektis data. Based on comparison with data from the HIS, completeness of registered procedures was 97% for primary total hip arthroplasty and 96% for primary knee arthroplasty in 2013. Completeness of revision arthroplasty was 88% for hips and 90% for knees in 2013. The proportion of missing or incorrectly coded values of variables was generally less than 0.5%, except for encrypted personal identity numbers (17% of which were missing) and ASA scores (10% of which were missing). Interpretation The LROI now contains over 300,000 hip and knee arthroplasty procedures, with coverage of all hospitals. It has a good level of completeness (i.e. more than 95% for primary hip and knee arthroplasty procedures in 2012 and 2013) and the database has high validity. PMID:25758646

  1. Arthroscopic bursectomy for recalcitrant trochanteric bursitis after hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Van Hofwegen, Christopher; Baker, Champ L; Savory, Carlton G; Baker, Champ L

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the use of arthroscopic bursectomy for pain relief in patients with trochanteric bursitis after hip arthroplasty. In this retrospective case series of 12 patients undergoing arthroscopic treatment of recalcitrant trochanteric bursitis after hip arthroplasty, outcomes were assessed via phone interview with a numeric pain rating scale from 1 to 10 and were compared with preoperative pain ratings. Patients were asked the percentage of time they had painless hip function and whether they would have the surgery again. At an average 36-month follow-up (range, 4-85 months), the average numeric pain scale rating improved from 9.3 to 3.3. At an average of 62% of the time, patients had painless use of the hip. Ten of 12 patients in the study felt the pain relief gained was substantial enough to warrant having procedure again. In these patients, arthroscopic bursectomy was a viable option for patients with recalcitrant bursitis after hip arthroplasty. PMID:23628567

  2. [Development, terminology, principles, and controversies in minimally invasive knee arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Hofmann, S; Pietsch, M

    2007-12-01

    Minimally invasive total knee arthroplasty is a logical and further improvement of the good results achieved with minimally invasive unicondylar knee arthroplasty. The terminology for minimally invasive surgery (MIS) is confusing and comparison of different techniques is therefore difficult. A simple separation between less invasive and minimally invasive techniques will be presented. Besides the approach, minimally invasive surgical principles are very important. MIS in total knee arthroplasty is discussed very controversially at the moment. The preliminary results of these new techniques are very promising. Up to now there is much more feeling then knowing. Important questions (risk-benefit analysis, which technique for which patient and surgeon, education and cost-effectiveness) must be addressed by the proponents of this MIS technique. Step by step learning of these new techniques (evolution instead of revolution) in specific education centres is strongly recommended. Ultimately, patients and surgeons will have to decide whether these new techniques will only be a modern trend or represent the future.

  3. Stemless shoulder arthroplasty-current results and designs.

    PubMed

    Churchill, R Sean; Athwal, George S

    2016-03-01

    Stemless shoulder arthroplasty was originally introduced in 2004 by a single manufacturer. Now, over a decade later, numerous designs are available outside the USA, but as yet, only one implant has been cleared by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and is available for use within the USA. Often referred to as "canal sparing," these implants are designed for metaphyseal fixation to minimize humeral bone removal, avoid intraoperative and postoperative humeral fracture complications, and to decrease morbidity associated with revision operations. Recently, the second generation of stemless arthroplasty, a convertible implant allowing use in either anatomic or reverse arthroplasty configuration, was released for use outside the USA. This paper will review the available designs, reported results, and raise potential concerns for this emerging technology.

  4. Radiographic and scintigraphic evaluation of total knee arthroplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, R.; Soudry, M.

    1986-04-01

    Various radiographic and scintigraphic methods are used to supplement clinical findings in the evaluation of total knee arthroplasty and its complications. Serial roentgenograms offer reliable information for diagnosing mechanical loosening. Wide and extensive radiolucency at the cement-bone interface and shift in position and alignment of prosthetic components can be seen in almost all cases by the time revision is necessary. Radiographic abnormalities are usually not present in acute infection, but are often present in chronic infection. Bone scanning has a high sensitivity for diagnosis of infection or loosening, but is nonspecific because increased uptake is often present around asymptomatic total knee arthroplasties with normal radiographs. Differential bone and Gallium scanning and scanning with Indium 111-labeled leukocytes have a greater specificity for diagnosis of infection than does bone or Gallium scanning alone. Routine radiographic and scintigraphic studies have shown a high incidence of deep vein thrombosis in the calf after total knee arthroplasty. Clinically significant pulmonary embolization is infrequent.

  5. Computer-Navigated Total Knee Arthroplasty Utilization.

    PubMed

    Bala, Abiram; Penrose, Colin Thomas; Seyler, Thorsten Markus; Mather, Richard Chad; Wellman, Samuel Secord; Bolognesi, Michael Paul

    2016-07-01

    Computer-navigated total knee arthroplasty (CN-TKA) has been used to improve component alignment, though the evidence is currently mixed on whether there are clinically significant differences in long-term outcomes. Given the established increased costs and operative time, we hypothesized that the utilization rate of CN-TKA would be decreasing relative to standard TKA in the Medicare population given the current health care economic environment. We queried 1,914,514 primary TKAs performed in the entire Medicare database from 2005 to 2012. Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) and International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes were used to identify and separate CN-TKAs. Utilization of TKA was compared by year, gender, and region. Average change in cases per year and compound annual growth rate (CAGR) were used to evaluate trends in utilization of the procedure. We identified 30,773 CN-TKAs performed over this time period. There was an increase in utilization of CN-TKA per year from 984 to 5,352 (average = 572/year, R (2) = 0.85, CAGR = 23.58%) from 2005 to 2012. In contrast, there was a slight decrease in overall TKA utilization from 264,345 to 230,654 (average = 4297/year, R (2) = 0.74, CAGR = - 1.69%). When comparing proportion of CN-TKA to all TKAs, there was an increase from 0.37 to 2.32% (average 0.26%/year, R (2) = 0.88, CAGR = 25.70%). CN-TKA growth in males and females was comparable at 24.42 and 23.11%, respectively. The South region had the highest growth rate at 28.76%, whereas the Midwest had the lowest growth rate at 15.51%. The Midwest was the only region that peaked (2008) with a slow decline in utilization until 2012. Despite increased costs with unclear clinical benefit, CN-TKA is increasing in utilization among Medicare patients. Reasons could include patient preference, advertising, proper of coding the procedure, and increased publicly available information about

  6. Increased Long-Term Cardiovascular Risk After Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Max; Rysinska, Agata; Garland, Anne; Rolfson, Ola; Aspberg, Sara; Eisler, Thomas; Garellick, Göran; Stark, André; Hailer, Nils P.; Sköldenberg, Olof

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Total hip arthroplasty is a common and important treatment for osteoarthritis patients. Long-term cardiovascular effects elicited by osteoarthritis or the implant itself remain unknown. The purpose of the present study was to determine if there is an increased risk of late cardiovascular mortality and morbidity after total hip arthroplasty surgery. A nationwide matched cohort study with data on 91,527 osteoarthritis patients operated on, obtained from the Swedish Hip Arthroplasty Register. A control cohort (n = 270,688) from the general Swedish population was matched 1:3 to each case by sex, age, and residence. Mean follow-up time was 10 years (range, 7–21). The exposure was presence of a hip replacement for more than 5 years. The primary outcome was cardiovascular mortality after 5 years. Secondary outcomes were total mortality and re-admissions due to cardiovascular events. During the first 5 to 9 years, the arthroplasty cohort had a lower cardiovascular mortality risk compared with the control cohort. However, the risk in the arthroplasty cohort increased over time and was higher than in controls after 8.8 years (95% confidence interval [CI] 7.0–10.5). Between 9 and 13 years postoperatively, the hazard ratio was 1.11 (95% CI 1.05–1.17). Arthroplasty patients were also more frequently admitted to hospital for cardiovascular reasons compared with controls, with a rate ratio of 1.08 (95% CI 1.06–1.11). Patients with surgically treated osteoarthritis of the hip have an increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality many years after the operation when compared with controls. PMID:26871792

  7. The utility of bladder catheterization in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Iorio, Richard; Whang, William; Healy, William L; Patch, Douglas A; Najibi, Soheil; Appleby, David

    2005-03-01

    The use of a urinary bladder catheter in patients having a total hip arthroplasty is controversial. Universal insertion of an indwelling catheter before a total hip arthroplasty, and insertion of a catheter postoperatively as necessary, are accepted variations of care. From 1993 to 1999, 719 patients having primary, unilateral total hip arthroplasties were randomized by surgeons into two groups: a group of patients who had universal preoperative insertion of an indwelling bladder catheter (340 patients) and an observation group who had catheterization as needed (379 patients). Catheterization was required for 295 of these 379 patients (77.8%). Patients were followed up using a total hip arthroplasty database, which recorded all complications. Six patients (1.8%) in the universal catheter insertion group had a urinary tract infection develop. Nine patients (2.4%) in the catheter as necessary group had a urinary tract infection develop. There was no significant difference in incidence of urinary tract infections between the two groups. Female gender and increasing age were associated with a higher incidence of urinary tract infection in both groups. The average length of stay in the hospital for the universal catheter group was 4.8 days, and the average length of stay for the catheter as necessary group was 4.5 days. There was no significant difference in length of stay in the hospital between the two groups. The universal catheter group had an average 590 dollars higher hospital cost for their total hip arthroplasties, which was significant. Routine preoperative bladder catheterization may not be warranted in patients having total hip arthroplasties. Postoperative catheterization as necessary may be more cost effective. PMID:15738815

  8. Revision reverse shoulder arthroplasty in failed shoulder arthroplasties for rotator cuff deficiency

    PubMed Central

    RANDELLI, PIETRO; RANDELLI, FILIPPO; COMPAGNONI, RICCARDO; CABITZA, PAOLO; RAGONE, VINCENZA; PULICI, LUCA; BANFI, GIUSEPPE

    2015-01-01

    Purpose the aim of this systematic literature review is to report clinical outcomes of reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA) used as a revision surgery following failure of the primary implant due to rotator cuff insufficiency. Methods a systematic review was performed using the following key words: revision, shoulder, rotator cuff deficiency, outcome assessment, treatment outcome, complications. Studies eligible for inclusion in the review were clinical trials investigating patients in whom a primary shoulder arthroplasty implant with an incompetent rotator cuff was replaced with a reverse shoulder prosthesis. Results nine articles were identified and further reviewed. The results refer to a total of 226 shoulders that were treated with RSA as revision surgery. The patients in the studies had a mean age ranging from 64 to 72 years and the longest follow-up was 3.8 years. Improvements in function and reduction of pain were shown by many studies, but the mean Constant score ranged from 44.2 to 56. High complication rates (of up to 62%) were recorded, and a mean reoperation rate of 27.5%. Conclusions RSA as revision surgery for patients with rotator cuff deficiency is a valid option, and often the only solution available, but it should be limited to elderly patients with poor function and severe pain. Level of evidence level IV, systematic review of level I–IV studies. PMID:26151037

  9. Anatomic Versus Mechanically Aligned Total Knee Arthroplasty for Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty Revision

    PubMed Central

    Toliopoulos, Panagiota; LeBlanc, Marc-Andre; Hutt, Jonathan; Lavigne, Martin; Desmeules, Francois; Vendittoli, Pascal-Andre

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to compare the intra-operative benefits and the clinical outcomes from kinematic or mechanical alignment for total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in patients undergoing revision of failed unicompartmental kneel arthroplasty (UKA) to TKA. Methods: Ten revisions were performed with a kinematic alignment technique and 11 with a mechanical alignment. Measurements of the hip-knee-ankle angle (HKA), the lateral distal femoral angle (LDFA), and the medial proximal tibial angle (MPTA) were performed using long-leg radiographs. The need for augments, stems, and constrained inserts was compared between groups. Clinical outcomes were compared using the WOMAC score along with maximum distance walked as well as knee range of motion obtained prior to discharge. All data was obtained by a retrospective review of patient files. Results: The kinematic group required less augments, stems, and constrained inserts than the mechanical group and thinner polyethylene bearings. There were significant differences in the lateral distal femoral angle (LDFA) and the medial proximal tibial angle (MPTA) between the two groups (p<0.05). The mean WOMAC score obtained at discharge was better in the kinematic group as was mean knee flexion. At last follow up of 34 months for the kinematic group and 58 months for the mechanical group, no orthopedic complications or reoperations were recorded. Conclusion: Although this study has a small patient cohort, our results suggest that kinematic alignment for TKA after UKA revision is an attractive method. Further studies are warranted. PMID:27563365

  10. [Interposition of a full-thickness skin graft in the surgery of temporomandibular joint ankylosis. A study of 31 cases of which 20 had long-term follow-up].

    PubMed

    Guyot, L; Chossegros, C; Cheynet, F; Gola, R; Lachard, J; Blanc, J L

    1995-01-01

    Recurrence is the main problem in temporo-mandibular joint ankylosis treatment. Two therapy are used against this, physiotherapy and surgical joint interposition. Following ankylosis removal, many materials can be interposed but, for us, fullthickness skin graft using Popescu and Vasiliu technique seems to be the best and simplest one. This retrospective study of 31 cases, 20 with long-term follow-up, shows that good results are obtained using this skin graft, with 90% successful rate.

  11. Approach to Decrease Infection Following Total Joint Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Hatz, Daniel; Anoushiravani, Afshin A; Chambers, Monique C; El-Othmani, Mouhanad M; Saleh, Khaled J

    2016-10-01

    Surgical site infection in total joint arthroplasty is a challenging complication that warrants discussion with regard to prevention and management. Limiting postoperative infection rate is a paramount quest in the orthopedic community. Several preoperative risk factors have been identified in orthopedic literature with regards to likelihood of developing postoperative infection. This article evaluates several factors that predispose total joint arthroplasty patients to infection. Methods of patient surgical preparation designed to decrease postoperative infection, decreasing intraoperative traffic during procedural settings, and elaborate intraoperative prophylactic advancements are assessed. Approaches to decrease postoperative infection by discussing means of lowering rates of postoperative transfusion, wound drainage, and hematoma formation are analyzed. PMID:27637652

  12. Bilateral pseudogout 8 years after bilateral total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Levi, Gabriel S; Sadr, Kamran; Scuderi, Giles R

    2012-11-01

    This article presents the clinical features of crystal arthropathy after knee replacement. The current literature on pseudogout and gout after both total and partial knee replacement is summarized. A case of bilateral pseudogout 8 years after initial total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is used to highlight the clinical characteristics and treatment options for this underrecognized condition. Presentation mimicked a late septic joint arthroplasty with sudden onset of pain and effusion. The patient was treated successfully with an arthrotomy, debridement, synovectomy, polyethylene insert exchange, oral steroids, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories. There are no other reported cases of bilateral pseudogout after bilateral TKA.

  13. Fungal prosthetic joint infection after total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Kankanala J; Shah, Jay D; Kale, Rohit V; Reddy, T Jayakrishna

    2013-01-01

    Fungal prosthetic joint infection after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a rare complication. Lacunae exist in the management of this complication. 62 year old lady presented with pain and swelling in left knee and was diagnosed as Candida tropicalis fungal infection after TKA. She underwent debridement, resection arthroplasty and antifungal plus antibiotic loaded cement spacer insertion, antifungal therapy with fluconazole followed by delayed revision TKA and further fluconazole therapy. Total duration of fluconazole therapy was 30 weeks. At 2 year followup, she has pain less range of motion of 10°-90° and there is no evidence of recurrence of infection. PMID:24133317

  14. Alternative bearings in total hip arthroplasty in the young patient.

    PubMed

    Kamath, Atul F; Prieto, Hernan; Lewallen, David G

    2013-10-01

    Total hip arthroplasty is an effective treatment option for advanced hip arthritis in elderly patients. Studies in young patients have traditionally shown less durable results. With current implants, surgical technique, and cementless fixation methods, the durability of total hip arthroplasty may now be related to the wear performance of the bearing surfaces. To improve implant longevity, there are several bearing surface choices currently available for this demanding group of patients. Alternatives must be evaluated in terms of the risks and benefits associated with each articulation, and all new technologies must be carefully monitored over the long term. PMID:24095062

  15. Oxidized Zirconium Bearing Surfaces in Total Knee Arthroplasty: Lessons Learned.

    PubMed

    Schüttler, Karl Friedrich; Efe, Turgay; Heyse, Thomas J; Haas, Steven B

    2015-10-01

    Polyethylene wear in total knee arthroplasty is a still unsolved problem resulting in osteolysis and long-term failure of knee joint replacement. To address the problem of polyethylene wear, research aimed for an optimal implant design and for an optimal combination of bearing surfaces. Oxidized zirconium was introduced to minimize surface wear and thus potentially increase long-term implant survival. This review comprises the current literature related to in vitro and in vivo studies evaluating performance of oxidized zirconium total knee arthroplasty and results from retrieval analyses. PMID:26216647

  16. Oxidized Zirconium Bearing Surfaces in Total Knee Arthroplasty: Lessons Learned.

    PubMed

    Schüttler, Karl Friedrich; Efe, Turgay; Heyse, Thomas J; Haas, Steven B

    2015-10-01

    Polyethylene wear in total knee arthroplasty is a still unsolved problem resulting in osteolysis and long-term failure of knee joint replacement. To address the problem of polyethylene wear, research aimed for an optimal implant design and for an optimal combination of bearing surfaces. Oxidized zirconium was introduced to minimize surface wear and thus potentially increase long-term implant survival. This review comprises the current literature related to in vitro and in vivo studies evaluating performance of oxidized zirconium total knee arthroplasty and results from retrieval analyses.

  17. Does Prior Shoulder Surgery Negatively Impact Shoulder Arthroplasty Outcomes?

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Rachel M.; Aiyash, Sal; Kupfer, Noam; Tilton, Annemarie K.; Cole, Brian J.; Verma, Nikhil N.; Nicholson, Gregory P.; Romeo, Anthony A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Several studies have shown a negative correlation between prior knee arthroscopy and ultimate knee arthroplasty outcomes compared to patients without prior arthroscopy. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of prior shoulder surgery on patients undergoing total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) and reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (rTSA) compared to patients without prior shoulder surgery. Methods: A retrospective review of prospectively collected data was performed on 107 patients undergoing TSA or rTSA. All medical records were analyzed for demographic variables, type of prior shoulder surgery, and type of arthroplasty. All patients underwent a clinical follow-up evaluation, and were evaluated with the American Shoulder and Elbow Society (ASES), Simple Shoulder Test (SST), and Visual Analog Scale (VAS) outcomes scores. Complications, failures, and reoperations were also recorded an analyzed. Results: A total of 107 patients (47 males, 60 females) were included with an average follow-up of 24 months (minimum 12 months). Seventy-one patients (underwent arthroplasty without prior surgery (30 rTSA, 41 TSA) while 50 patients underwent arthroplasty with a history of at least one prior shoulder surgery (27 rTSA, 9 TSA). Prior surgeries included a mix of both open and arthroscopic procedures, including open and arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, open and arthroscopic stabilization (with and without bone augmentation), arthroscopic capsular release, and arthroscopic debridement. Following arthroplasty, both groups experienced significant improvements in ASES, SST, and VAS scores compared to preoperative scores (P<0.05 for all). There was a statistically significant difference in postoperative ASES scores in the no-surgery group compared to the prior-surgery group (84.49 versus 71.67, P=0.0003) as well as in the SST scores (8.97 versus 5.47, P<0.0001); there were no differences in the VAS score (0.83 vs 1.40, P=0.104). Conclusion: Shoulder

  18. Emerging technologies in arthroplasty: additive manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Samik; Kulesha, Gene; Kester, Mark; Mont, Michael A

    2014-06-01

    Additive manufacturing is an industrial technology whereby three-dimensional visual computer models are fabricated into physical components by selectively curing, depositing, or consolidating various materials in consecutive layers. Although initially developed for production of simulated models, the technology has undergone vast improvements and is currently increasingly being used for the production of end-use components in various aerospace, automotive, and biomedical specialties. The ability of this technology to be used for the manufacture of solid-mesh-foam monolithic and coated components of complex geometries previously considered unmanufacturable has attracted the attention of implant manufacturers, bioengineers, and orthopedic surgeons. Currently, there is a paucity of reports describing this fabrication method in the orthopedic literature. Therefore, we aimed to briefly describe this technology, some of the applications in other orthopedic subspecialties, its present use in hip and knee arthroplasty, and concerns with the present form of the technology. As there are few reports of clinical trials presently available, the true benefits of this technology can only be realized when studies evaluating the clinical and radiographic outcomes of cementless implants manufactured with additive manufacturing report durable fixation, less stress shielding, and better implant survivorship. Nevertheless, the authors believe that this technology holds great promise and may potentially change the conventional methods of casting, machining, and tooling for implant manufacturing in the future. PMID:24764230

  19. Patient Satisfaction after Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Young-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is one of the most successful and effective surgical options to reduce pain and restore function for patients with severe osteoarthritis. The purpose of this article was to review and summarize the recent literatures regarding patient satisfaction after TKA and to analyze the various factors associated with patient dissatisfaction after TKA. Patient satisfaction is one of the many patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs). Patient satisfaction can be evaluated from two categories, determinants of satisfaction and components of satisfaction. The former have been described as all of the patient-related factors including age, gender, personality, patient expectations, medical and psychiatric comorbidity, patient's diagnosis leading to TKA and severity of arthropathy. The latter are all of the processes and technical aspects of TKA, ranging from the anesthetic and surgical factors, type of implants and postoperative rehabilitations. The surgeon- and patient-reported outcomes have been shown to be disparate occasionally. Among various factors that contribute to patient satisfaction, some factors can be managed by the surgeon, which should be improved through continuous research. Furthermore, extensive discussion and explanation before surgery will reduce patient dissatisfaction after TKA. PMID:26955608

  20. The femoral sulcus in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Lingaraj, Krishna; Bartlett, John

    2009-05-01

    The position of the femoral sulcus relative to the midline of the distal femoral resection in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) was studied to determine if centralized placement of the femoral component on the distal femur was justified in terms of aligning the prosthetic sulcus with the native femoral sulcus. The location of the femoral sulcus was studied in 112 consecutive patients undergoing TKA. The mean sulcus position was 0.7 mm lateral to the midline of the distal femoral resection (SD 1.4, 95% CI, 0.5-1.0 mm). However, the variation in sulcus positions ranged from 4 mm medial to 4 mm lateral to the midline. The mean sulcus position in valgus knees was 1.0 mm lateral to the midline (SD 1.8), and that in varus knees was 0.7 mm lateral to the midline (SD 1.2) (P = 0.501). It appears prudent to centre the femoral component on the native sulcus rather than the midline of the distal femoral resection, so as to ensure accurate alignment of the prosthetic sulcus with the native sulcus and to encourage normal patella tracking.

  1. Surgical approaches for total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Vaishya, Raju; Vijay, Vipul; Demesugh, Daniel Mue; Agarwal, Amit Kumar

    2016-01-01

    There are various surgical approaches to the knee joint and its surrounding structures and such approaches are generally designed to allow the best access to an area of pathology whilst safeguarding important surrounding structures. Controversy currently surrounds the optimal surgical approach for total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The medial parapatellar arthrotomy, or anteromedial approach, has been the most used and has been regarded as the standard approach for exposure of the knee joint. It provides extensive exposure and is useful for open anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, total knee replacement, and fixation of intra-articular fractures. Because this approach has been implicated in compromise of the patellar circulation, some authors have advocated the subvastus, midvastus, and trivector approaches for exposure of the knee joint. While these approaches expose the knee from the medial side, the anterolateral approach exposes the knee joint from the lateral side. With careful planning and arthrotomy selection, the anterior aspect of the joint can be adequately exposed for TKA in different clinical scenarios. PMID:27182142

  2. Muscular strength after total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Winther, Siri B; Husby, Vigdis S; Foss, Olav A; Wik, Tina S; Svenningsen, Svein; Engdal, Monika; Haugan, Kristin; Husby, Otto S

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Minimizing the decrease in muscular strength after total hip arthroplasty (THA) might allow patients to recover faster. We evaluated muscular strength in patients who were operated on using 3 surgical approaches. Patients and methods In a prospective cohort study, 60 patients scheduled for primary THA were allocated to the direct lateral, posterior, or anterior approach. Leg press and abduction strength were evaluated 2 weeks or less preoperatively, 2 and 8 days postoperatively, and at 6-week and 3-month follow-up. Results Differences in maximal strength change were greatest after 2 and 8 days. The posterior and anterior approaches produced less decrease in muscular strength than the direct lateral approach. 6 weeks postoperatively, the posterior approach produced greater increase in muscular strength than the direct lateral approach, and resulted in a greater increase in abduction strength than the anterior approach. At 3-month follow-up, no statistically significant differences between the groups were found. The operated legs were 18% weaker in leg press and 15% weaker in abduction than the unoperated legs, and the results were similar between groups. Interpretation The posterior and anterior approaches appeared to have the least negative effect on abduction and leg press muscular strength in the first postoperative week; the posterior approach had the least negative effect, even up to 6 weeks postoperatively. THA patients have reduced muscle strength in the operated leg (compared to the unoperated leg) 3 months after surgery. PMID:26141371

  3. Extensor tendon ruptures after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Bonnin, M; Lustig, S; Huten, D

    2016-02-01

    Extensor tendon rupture is a rare but serious complication after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) that impairs active knee extension, thereby severely affecting knee function. Surgery is usually required. Surgical options range from simple suturing to allograft reconstruction of the entire extensor mechanism and include intermediate methods such as reconstruction using neighbouring tendons or muscles, synthetic ligament implantation, and partial allograft repair. Simple suturing carries a high failure rate and should therefore be routinely combined with tissue augmentation using a neighbouring tendon or a synthetic ligament. After allograft reconstruction, outcomes are variable and long-term complications common. Salvage procedures for managing the most severe cases after allograft failure involve reconstruction using gastrocnemius or vastus flaps. Regardless of the technique used, suturing must be performed under tension, with the knee fully extended, and rehabilitation must be conducted with great caution. Weaknesses of available case-series studies include small sample sizes, heterogeneity, and inadequate follow-up duration. All treatment options are associated with substantial failure rates. The patient should be informed of this fact and plans made for a salvage option. Here, the main techniques and their outcomes are discussed, and a therapeutic strategy is suggested.

  4. Chronic Knee Dislocation After Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Ross, John P; Brown, Nicholas M; Levine, Brett R

    2015-12-01

    Knee dislocation after total knee arthroplasty (TKA), although rare, is a dangerous injury that can lead to neurovascular compromise and permanent disability. Chronic dislocation after TKA is even less common and is defined as dislocation that is present for 4 weeks or more. There are few reports of its management. Chronic dislocation may be complicated further by concomitant extensor mechanism disruption, ligamentous instability, and/or capsular contracture. This article describes 3 cases of chronically dislocated TKAs and the challenges encountered in treating this difficult problem. A higher level of constraint was required to maintain knee stability, and an extensor mechanism allograft was needed in 2 of the 3 reported patients. The preferred technique at the authors' institution is a complete allograft composite, tensioned in full extension. In the setting of a chronically dislocated TKA, the authors now recommend revision surgery with an enhanced measure of constraint (constrained condylar device or hinged knee prosthesis), reconstruction of the extensor mechanism when necessary, and restoration of the joint while compensating for concomitant bony defects. Even when surgeons follow these principles, it is important to inform the patient that long-term outcomes will likely be inferior to those of revision surgery for other causes.

  5. Emerging technologies in arthroplasty: additive manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Samik; Kulesha, Gene; Kester, Mark; Mont, Michael A

    2014-06-01

    Additive manufacturing is an industrial technology whereby three-dimensional visual computer models are fabricated into physical components by selectively curing, depositing, or consolidating various materials in consecutive layers. Although initially developed for production of simulated models, the technology has undergone vast improvements and is currently increasingly being used for the production of end-use components in various aerospace, automotive, and biomedical specialties. The ability of this technology to be used for the manufacture of solid-mesh-foam monolithic and coated components of complex geometries previously considered unmanufacturable has attracted the attention of implant manufacturers, bioengineers, and orthopedic surgeons. Currently, there is a paucity of reports describing this fabrication method in the orthopedic literature. Therefore, we aimed to briefly describe this technology, some of the applications in other orthopedic subspecialties, its present use in hip and knee arthroplasty, and concerns with the present form of the technology. As there are few reports of clinical trials presently available, the true benefits of this technology can only be realized when studies evaluating the clinical and radiographic outcomes of cementless implants manufactured with additive manufacturing report durable fixation, less stress shielding, and better implant survivorship. Nevertheless, the authors believe that this technology holds great promise and may potentially change the conventional methods of casting, machining, and tooling for implant manufacturing in the future.

  6. Resection arthroplasty for failed patellar components

    PubMed Central

    Alcerro, Jose C.; Drakeford, Michael K.; Tsao, Audrey K.; Krackow, Kenneth A.; Hungerford, David S.

    2008-01-01

    A total of 1,401 primary total knee arthroplasties (TKA) were reviewed; 44 (3.2%) had at least the patellar component revised. Nine of these knees (eight patients) had insufficient bone stock to allow reimplantation of another patellar component. Clinical data on the nine knees were obtained with recent follow-up evaluation, review of their medical records and radiographs. Evaluation included Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) scores. Average follow-up was 4 years and 7 months, 2-year range (2 months to 8 years and 4 months). Common factors found in these nine knees included: thin patella after primary TKR status, osteoarthritis, good range of motion and patella alta. Results were good to excellent in seven knees and fair in two. The untoward associations with patellectomy such as quadriceps lag, extension weakness and anterior knee pain were not experienced. Resection of the patellar component, without reimplantation, is an acceptable alternative in revision TKA lacking adequate remaining bone stock. PMID:18956182

  7. Patellar malalignment treatment in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Gasparini, Giorgio; Familiari, Filippo; Ranuccio, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Summary The patella, with or without resurfacing, plays a fundamental role in the success of a total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Patellofemoral joint complications are due to problems related to the patient, to the surgical technique, or to the design of the components. Patellar tracking is influenced by several factors: a severe preoperative valgus, the presence of pre-existing patellofemoral dysplasia, the design of the femoral component, the surgical approach, the Q angle, the mechanical alignment of the limb, the tightness of the lateral retinaculum, the positioning of the patellar component in the proximal-distal and medial-lateral directions, the patella height, the patella (native or resurfaced) thickness, the size of the femoral and the tibial components, and the alignment and rotation of the components. Several factors are crucial to prevent patellar maltracking in TKA: the use of an anatomical femoral component, a meticulous surgical technique, careful dynamic intraoperative assessment of patellar tracking, and, if necessary, the achievement of an adequate lateral release. PMID:25606506

  8. Can technology improve alignment during knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Thienpont, Emmanuel; Fennema, Peter; Price, Andrew

    2013-09-01

    Component malalignment remains a concern in total knee arthroplasty (TKA); therefore, a series of technologies have been developed to improve alignment. The authors conducted a systematic review to compare computer-assisted navigation with conventional instrumentation, and assess the current evidence for patient-matched instrumentation and robot-assisted implantation. An extensive search of the PubMed database for relevant meta-analyses, systematic reviews and original articles was performed, with each study scrutinised by two reviewers. Data on study characteristics and outcomes were extracted from each study and compared. In total 30 studies were included: 10 meta-analyses comparing computer-assisted navigation and conventional instrumentation, 13 studies examining patient-matched instrumentation, and seven investigating robot-assisted implantation. Computer-assisted navigation showed significant and reproducible improvements in mechanical alignment over conventional instrumentation. Patient-matched instrumentation appeared to achieve a high degree of mechanical alignment, although the majority of studies were of poor quality. The data for robot-assisted surgery was less indicative. Computer-assisted navigation improves alignment during TKA over conventional instrumentation. For patient-matched instrumentation and robot-assisted implantation, alignment benefits have not been reliably demonstrated. For all three technologies, clinical benefits cannot currently be assumed, and further studies are required. Although current technologies to improve alignment during TKA appear to result in intra-operative benefits, their clinical impact remains unclear, and surgeons should take this into account when considering their adoption.

  9. [Clinical evaluation tools of total hip arthroplasties].

    PubMed

    Hamadouche, M

    2006-10-01

    Total hip arthroplasty is one of the most efficient hip surgery procedures enabling improved function in the vast majority of operated patients. The major long-term complication is aseptic loosening due to an inflammatory response to particle wear debris coming from the bearings. Polyethylene is the key culprit. Currently two solutions are proposed: eliminating polyethylene from the prosthetic articulation or reducing material wear. This leads to the need for reliable tools for evaluating short-term results, predictive of long-term outcome. When the innovation concerns reduction of polyethylene wear, short-term wear should be measured with software methods or radiostereometry. If the innovation concerns improvement of polyethyleneless implants, then short-term migration should be measured with EBRA or radiostereometry. In addition, the long-term retrospective evaluation of large series of patients remains of major interest provided that it is performed with survival analysis. These different methods are detailed in this study, indicating the pros and cons for each solution. PMID:17088755

  10. Scapular notching in reverse shoulder arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Lévigne, Christophe; Boileau, Pascal; Favard, Luc; Garaud, Pascal; Molé, Daniel; Sirveaux, François; Walch, Gilles

    2008-01-01

    The causes and consequences of scapular notching after reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA) were investigated in 326 consecutive patients (337 shoulders) undergoing RSA between 1991 and 2003. Patients underwent 269 (80%) primary RSAs and 68 revisions of unconstrained shoulder prosthesis. At last follow-up (average, 47 months; range, 24-120 months) 62% had scapular notching. Notching frequency and extension were correlated to the length of follow-up (P = .0005). Notching was more frequent in cuff tear arthropathy (P = .0004), grade 3 or 4 fatty infiltration of the infraspinatus (P = .01), and narrowed acromiohumeral distance (P < .0001). Glenoids preoperatively oriented superiorly were more at risk for notching (P = .006). More notching occurred when the RSA was implanted using an anterosuperior approach vs a deltopectoral approach (P < .0001). Notching was correlated with humeral radiolucencies in proximal zones (P < .0001) and with glenoid radiolucent lines (P < .0001). Positioning of the baseplate definitely influences scapular notching. High positioning of the baseplate and superior tilting must be avoided. PMID:18558499

  11. Treatment of esophageal-gastric double primary cancer by pedunculated remnant gastric interposition, esophageal-gastric anastomosis and gastrojejunal Billroth II anastomosis: A case report

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, XIAO TIAN; WANG, WEI; ZHU, QIANG; CAO, MING; JIANG, ZHONG MIN; ZANG, QI

    2015-01-01

    With the continuous advancement of clinical diagnostic techniques, including imaging technology, the incidence of confirmed multiple primary cancers or double primary carcinoma increases yearly. However, studies reporting synchronization surgery performed for primary dual esophageal gastric cancer are rare. The present study reports the case of a patient with double primary esophageal-gastric cancer, located in the thoracic cavity segment of the esophagus and gastric antrum of the stomach, respectively. The gastric cancer was diagnosed by endoscopy biopsy with concomitant esophageal cancer. The patient underwent gastric cancer resection, and pedunculated remnant gastric interposition esophagogastric side anastomosis was performed with gastrojejunostomy Billroth II anastomosis behind the colon. Abdominal cavity lymph node dissection was also performed. The esophageal-gastric double primary cancer was simultaneously excised and the gastric regions were used in the construction of the upper gastrointestinal tract: The surgery was successful. However, two weeks after surgery, upper gastrointestinal imaging revealed esophagogastric anastomotic leakage. Subsequently, an esophageal stent was inserted and antibiotics and additional treatment was administered. Follow-up one year after surgery revealed that the patient was well and remained in a stable condition. PMID:26622590

  12. Smart instrumentation for determination of ligament stiffness and ligament balance in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Hasenkamp, W; Villard, J; Delaloye, J R; Arami, A; Bertsch, A; Jolles, B M; Aminian, K; Renaud, P

    2014-06-01

    Ligament balance is an important and subjective task performed during total knee arthroplasty (TKA) procedure. For this reason, it is desirable to develop instruments to quantitatively assess the soft-tissue balance since excessive imbalance can accelerate prosthesis wear and lead to early surgical revision. The instrumented distractor proposed in this study can assist surgeons on performing ligament balance by measuring the distraction gap and applied load. Also the device allows the determination of the ligament stiffness which can contribute a better understanding of the intrinsic mechanical behavior of the knee joint. Instrumentation of the device involved the use of hall-sensors for measuring the distractor displacement and strain gauges to transduce the force. The sensors were calibrated and tested to demonstrate their suitability for surgical use. Results show the distraction gap can be measured reliably with 0.1mm accuracy and the distractive loads could be assessed with an accuracy in the range of 4N. These characteristics are consistent with those have been proposed, in this work, for a device that could assist on performing ligament balance while permitting surgeons evaluation based on his experience. Preliminary results from in vitro tests were in accordance with expected stiffness values for medial collateral ligament (MCL) and lateral collateral ligament (LCL).

  13. Unfractionated heparin and mechanical thromboprophylaxis in hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Flávio Luís; Marins, Murilo Humberto Tobias; Raddi, Thiago Bortoletto; Picado, Celso Hermínio Ferraz

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of unfractionated heparin associated with mechanical prophylaxis as a method for preventing venous thromboembolism in hip arthroplasty. METHOD: We retrospectively reviewed the records of 181 hip arthroplasties out of 216 consecutive cases performed over a period of 39 months in our hospital. We excluded 35 cases due to non-adherence to the standardized method of thromboprophylaxis or loss to follow-up. All arthroplasties evaluated completed one-year follow-up after surgery with five consultations at predefined periods. Efficacy of the proposed method was evaluated by the occurrence of symptomatic venous thromboembolism confirmed by specific tests and safety was determined by the lack of occurrence of major bleeding according to criteria established by the International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis. RESULTS: There were four cases of symptomatic venous thromboembolism (2.2%), with three cases of deep vein thrombosis (1.65%) and one case of pulmonary embolism (0.55%). We found one case of severe bleeding (0.55%). CONCLUSION: Unfractionated heparin associated with mechanical prophylaxis proved to be an effective and safe method for preventing venous thromboembolism in patients undergoing hip arthroplasty, presenting rates of thromboembolic complications and major bleeding within the range reported with other methods currently used of thromboprophylaxis. Level of Evidence IV, Case Series PMID:26327803

  14. Calcaneal Insufficiency Fracture after Ipsilateral Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Min; Shin, Sung Jin; Kang, Byoung Youl

    2016-01-01

    Insufficiency fracture of the calcaneus is a rare entity. In the absence of trauma, evaluating a painful ankle in an elderly patient can be difficult and also it might be overlook the insufficiency fracture. We experienced a case of insufficiency calcaneus fracture that occurred after ipsilateral total knee arthroplasty. Here, we report our case with a review of literatures. PMID:26981521

  15. Arthroscopic management of the painful total elbow arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Bain, Gregory I

    2015-01-01

    Background Failure of total elbow arthroplasty is more common than after other major joint arthroplasties and is often a result of aseptic loosening, peri-prosthetic infection, fracture and instability. Infection can be a devastating complication, yet there are no established guidelines for the pre-operative diagnosis of total elbow peri-prosthetic infection. This is because pre-operative clinical, radiographic and biochemical tests are often unreliable. Methods Using three case examples, a standardized protocol for the clinical and arthroscopic assessment of the painful total elbow arthroplasty is described. This is used to provide a mechanical and microbiological diagnosis of the patient’s pain. Results There have been no complications resulting from the use of this technique in the three patients described, nor in any other patient to date. Conclusions The staged protocol described in the present study, utilizing arthroscopic assessment, has refined the approach to the painful total elbow arthroplasty because it directly influences the definitive surgical management of the patient. It is recommended that other surgeons follow the principles outlined in the present study when faced with this challenging problem. PMID:27583000

  16. Wear simulation strategies for reverse shoulder arthroplasty implants.

    PubMed

    Langohr, G Daniel G; Athwal, George S; Johnson, James A; Medley, John B

    2016-05-01

    Reverse total shoulder arthroplasty is a clinically accepted surgical procedure; however, its long-term wear performance is not known. The purpose of this work is to review wear simulator testing of reverse total shoulder arthroplasty, to develop a wear simulator protocol for reverse total shoulder arthroplasty, and to test it by performing a pilot study. The review of wear simulator testing in the literature revealed considerable variation in protocols. A combination of our own cadaveric testing and those of other research groups helped in determining the magnitude and direction of joint loading for the development of the present protocol. A MATCO orbital-bearing simulator was adapted using custom fixtures to simulate a circumduction motion of the shoulder under mildly adverse conditions, and a pilot study gave wear rates within the wide range found in the literature. Arguments were presented in support of the currently developed protocol, but it was also suggested that, rather than rely on one protocol, a series of simulator wear protocols should be developed to fully test the implant wear performance in reverse total shoulder arthroplasty.

  17. Exactech Opteon Femoral Component Fracture 12 Years after Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Shaun P.; Antoci, Valentin; Kadzielski, John J.; Vrahas, Mark S.

    2016-01-01

    Arthroplasty implant fracture is a rare but critical complication that requires difficult revision surgery, often with poor results, patient disability, and significant cost. Several reports show component fracture either at the stem or at the neck interface after a relatively short postoperative course. We report such failure after 12 years, suggesting no safe period after which femoral implant fracture does not occur. PMID:26955493

  18. Delayed Axillary Artery Occlusion after Reverse Total Shoulder Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Heitmiller, Richard F.

    2016-01-01

    Axillary artery injury has been associated with shoulder dislocation and surgery. We describe a case of delayed axillary artery occlusion after reverse total shoulder arthroplasty. The injury was confirmed by Doppler and angiography and was treated with angioplasty and stenting. Early recognition and treatment of this injury are mandatory for patients' recovery. PMID:27555975

  19. Total Knee Arthroplasty Failure Induced by Metal Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ryan; Phan, Duy; Schwarzkopf, Ran

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 70 Final Diagnosis: Metal hypersensitivity Symptoms: Joint pain • swelling • instability Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Revision total knee arthroplasty Specialty: Orthopedics and Traumatology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Metal hypersensitivity is an uncommon complication after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) that can lead to significant functional impairment and aseptic prosthesis failure. Case Report: We describe a 70-year-old patient who presented with persistent pain, swelling, and instability 2 years after a primary TKA. The patient had a history of metal hypersensitivity following bilateral metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty (THA) that was revised to ceramic-on-polyethylene implants. Knee radiographs showed severe osteolysis with implant loosening. Serum cobalt was elevated and serum chromium was significantly elevated, while joint aspiration and inflammatory marker levels ruled out a periprosthetic infection. Revision TKA was performed, with intraoperative tissue pathology and postoperative leukocyte transformation testing confirming metal hypersensitivity as the cause for aseptic implant failure. Conclusions: This case report demonstrates the clinical and laboratory signs that suggest metal hypersensitivity in total knee arthroplasty and the potential for joint function restoration with revision surgery. PMID:26278890

  20. Hip arthroplasty after treatment failure in intertrochanteric femoral fractures.

    PubMed

    Gagała, Jacek; Blacha, Jan; Twaróg, Zbigniew

    2005-10-28

    Background. Treatment failure in intertrochanteric fractures of the femur leads to pain and limitations of limb function. Methods of treatment allowing for union in order to preserve the proximal femur are undertaken in younger patients. Older patients who have poor quality bone stock and bone loss in the proximal femur are treated with hip arthroplasty. The aim of our study was to perform a long-range follow-up on patients treated with hip arthroplasty after failure of peritrochanteric fracture treatment. Material and methods. We studied 10 patients (6 men and 4 women, average age 61 years) seen after treatment failure in peritrochanteric fractures during the period 1998 - 2003 in the Orthopedics and Traumatology Departament at the Skubiszewski Medical University of Lublin. Seven patients were treated with hemiarthroplasty, and three with total hip replacement. Three long femoral stems were used. Results. One patent died in the early postoperative period. There were two dislocations of hip replacements. An increase in Harris Hip Score was noted, from an average 25 points preoperatively to an average 85 points in long-term follow-up. There was one revision arthroplasty due to breakage of the ceramic cup and head of a Mittelmeier prosthesis. Conclusions. Patients treated with hip arthroplasty after treatment failures in peritrochanteric fractures of the femur can achieve a pain-free hip and good limb function.

  1. Wear simulation strategies for reverse shoulder arthroplasty implants.

    PubMed

    Langohr, G Daniel G; Athwal, George S; Johnson, James A; Medley, John B

    2016-05-01

    Reverse total shoulder arthroplasty is a clinically accepted surgical procedure; however, its long-term wear performance is not known. The purpose of this work is to review wear simulator testing of reverse total shoulder arthroplasty, to develop a wear simulator protocol for reverse total shoulder arthroplasty, and to test it by performing a pilot study. The review of wear simulator testing in the literature revealed considerable variation in protocols. A combination of our own cadaveric testing and those of other research groups helped in determining the magnitude and direction of joint loading for the development of the present protocol. A MATCO orbital-bearing simulator was adapted using custom fixtures to simulate a circumduction motion of the shoulder under mildly adverse conditions, and a pilot study gave wear rates within the wide range found in the literature. Arguments were presented in support of the currently developed protocol, but it was also suggested that, rather than rely on one protocol, a series of simulator wear protocols should be developed to fully test the implant wear performance in reverse total shoulder arthroplasty. PMID:27160563

  2. Computer assisted surgery for total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Nizard, R

    2002-06-01

    The author has attempted to assess the value of computer-assisted surgery in arthroplasty of the knee. Basic requisites in TKR include adequate alignment and ligament balance. These requisites have become easier to meet as ancillary instrumentations have improved over time. Numerical tools are now available; they are sometimes presented as an essential technical step. The author reviews the various available options, with their advantages and disadvantages. Satisfactory alignment in the three planes classically relies on anatomic landmarks, the reliability of which is limited, and on ligament tension. Targeting systems, intra- or extramedullary, all have a margin of error. Computer-assisted surgery aims at increasing the precision of implant positioning and achieving optimal ligament balance. Among the systems currently available, a distinction must be made between active and passive systems. The former correspond to the "surgical robots", which are capable of performing the various parts of the operation following adequate preparation, at least regarding the bone cuts. Passive systems remain under control from the surgeon and assist him in positioning the cutting jigs. Among localization systems, a distinction must be made between optical and magnetic systems. Certain systems require preoperative imaging--usually CT scan--in order to first reconstruct a 3-D model of the knee. This step is time-consuming, but this will likely improve in the future. Image matching requires the use of a software, with specific landmarks defined preoperatively by the surgeon. Such systems may be used in cases with major deformities; their main drawback is the need for preoperative imaging. Other systems do not require preoperative imaging: a few points are identified by kinematic analysis of the hip, knee and ankle; they are used for 2-D or 3-D reconstruction. Computer-assisted systems may improve the precision in defining anatomic landmarks and achieving accurate location and

  3. Total hip arthroplasty and bone fragility.

    PubMed

    Cherubino, Paolo; Ratti, Chiara; Fagetti, Alessandro; Binda, Tommaso

    2011-04-01

    The number of elderly people is steadily increasing: in the United States it will increase from 12.9% to 20% in 2030 with respect to the total population. Italy, with UK, Denmark and Sweden are the countries with the largest number of octogenarians (about 4% of the population) and it is estimated that this rate will increase by 300% over the next 50 years. The number of people affected by osteoarthritis will increase significantly and therefore the number of total hip arthroplasties will progressively increase. The success of an implant depends firstly by a flawless surgical technique, a correct and stable implant fixation and an optimal preoperative planning that should consider the bone quality of the patient, in order to choose a proper implant design. Different approaches could be followed to achieve adequate fixation: northern Europe surgeons prefer the cemented implant, instead American orthopedics generally use systems that allow a direct biological osteointegration. Elderly patients often present with multiple local and general problems that could affect significantly the normal course of a prosthetic surgery procedure and its results: they have bone tissue changes that lead to increased bone fragility and, consequently, difficulties to obtain primary stability. Osteoporotic bone is characterized by reduction of bone mass, decrease of cancellous bone trabeculae and by increased porosity of cortical bone. The bone fragility implies a greater risk of iatrogenic intraoperative fractures. Furthermore, difficulties linked to bone stock deficiencies become even more significant in revision surgery, where cortical bone thinning is associated with enlargement of the isthmus thus making more difficult to obtain distal fixation of prosthetic stems. At the moment, the role played by the drugs used for the treatment of osteoporosis during implant osteointegration is still not clearly understood and is still under investigation.

  4. Future Bearing Surfaces in Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    One of the most important issues in the modern total hip arthroplasty (THA) is the bearing surface. Extensive research on bearing surfaces is being conducted to seek an ideal bearing surface for THA. The ideal bearing surface for THA should have superior wear characteristics and should be durable, bio-inert, cost-effective, and easy to implant. However, bearing surfaces that are currently being implemented do not completely fulfill these requirements, especially for young individuals for whom implant longevity is paramount. Even though various new bearing surfaces have been investigated, research is still ongoing, and only short-term results have been reported from clinical trials. Future bearing surfaces can be developed in the following ways: (1) change in design, (2) further improvement of polyethylene, (3) surface modification of the metal, (4) improvement in the ceramic, and (5) use of alternative, new materials. One way to reduce wear and impingement in THA is to make changes in its design by using a large femoral head, a monobloc metal shell with preassembled ceramic liner, dual mobility cups, a combination of different bearing surfaces, etc. Polyethylene has improved over time with the development of highly crosslinked polyethylene. Further improvements can be made by reinforcing it with vitamin E or multiwalled carbon nanotubes and by performing a surface modification with a biomembrane. Surface modifications with titanium nitride or titanium niobium nitride are implemented to try to improve the metal bearings. The advance to the fourth generation ceramics has shown relatively promising results, even in young patients. Nevertheless, further improvement is required to reduce fragility and squeaking. Alternative materials like diamond coatings on surfaces, carbon based composite materials, oxidized zirconium, silicon nitride, and sapphire are being sought. However, long-term studies are necessary to confirm the efficacy of these surfaces after enhancements

  5. Future bearing surfaces in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jun-Dong

    2014-03-01

    One of the most important issues in the modern total hip arthroplasty (THA) is the bearing surface. Extensive research on bearing surfaces is being conducted to seek an ideal bearing surface for THA. The ideal bearing surface for THA should have superior wear characteristics and should be durable, bio-inert, cost-effective, and easy to implant. However, bearing surfaces that are currently being implemented do not completely fulfill these requirements, especially for young individuals for whom implant longevity is paramount. Even though various new bearing surfaces have been investigated, research is still ongoing, and only short-term results have been reported from clinical trials. Future bearing surfaces can be developed in the following ways: (1) change in design, (2) further improvement of polyethylene, (3) surface modification of the metal, (4) improvement in the ceramic, and (5) use of alternative, new materials. One way to reduce wear and impingement in THA is to make changes in its design by using a large femoral head, a monobloc metal shell with preassembled ceramic liner, dual mobility cups, a combination of different bearing surfaces, etc. Polyethylene has improved over time with the development of highly crosslinked polyethylene. Further improvements can be made by reinforcing it with vitamin E or multiwalled carbon nanotubes and by performing a surface modification with a biomembrane. Surface modifications with titanium nitride or titanium niobium nitride are implemented to try to improve the metal bearings. The advance to the fourth generation ceramics has shown relatively promising results, even in young patients. Nevertheless, further improvement is required to reduce fragility and squeaking. Alternative materials like diamond coatings on surfaces, carbon based composite materials, oxidized zirconium, silicon nitride, and sapphire are being sought. However, long-term studies are necessary to confirm the efficacy of these surfaces after enhancements

  6. Unicondylar knee arthroplasty: a cementless perspective

    PubMed Central

    Forsythe, Michael E.; Englund, Roy E.; Leighton, Ross K.

    2000-01-01

    Objective To compare the results of cementless unicondylar knee arthroplasty (UKA) with those already reported in a similar study on cemented UKA. Design A case-series cross-sectional study. Setting The Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Centre, Dalhousie University, Halifax. Patients Fifty-one patients who underwent a total of 57 UKAs between May 1989 and May 1997. Inclusion criteria were osteoarthritis involving the predominantly the medial compartment of the knee, relative sparing of the other compartments, less than 15° of varus, minimal knee instability, and attendance at the postoperative clinical visit. Intervention Cementless UKA. Main outcome measures Clinical parameters that included pain, range of motion and the Knee Society Clinical Knee Score. Roentgenographic parameters that included α, β, γ and σ angles and the presence of periprosthetic radiolucency or loose beads. Results Age, weight, gender and follow-up interval did not significantly affect the clinical results in terms of pain, range of motion or knee score. Knees with more than 1 mm of radiolucency had significantly lower knee scores than those with no radiolucency. Knees that radiologically had loose beads also had significantly lower knee scores. The clinical outcomes of cementless UKA were comparable to those already reported on cemented UKA. Cementless femurs had less radiolucency than the cemented femurs, whereas cementless tibias had more radiolucency than their cemented counterparts. Conclusions Cementless UKA seems to be as efficacious as cemented UKA. However, there is some concern about the amount of radiolucency in the cementless tibial components. A randomized clinical trial comparing both cementless and cemented tibial components with a cementless femur (hybrid knee) is needed to further assess this controversial issue in UKA. PMID:11129829

  7. Periprosthetic Bone Remodelling in Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    GEORGEANU, Vlad; ATASIEI, Tudor; GRUIONU, Lucian

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The clinical studies have shown that the displacement of the prosthesis components, especially of the tibial one is higher during the first year, after which it reaches an equilibrum position compatible with a good long term functioning. This displacement takes place due to bone remodelling close to the implant secondary to different loading concentrations over different areas of bone. Material and Method: Our study implies a simulation on a computational model using the finite element analysis. The simulation started taking into account arbitrary points because of non-linear conditions of bone-prosthesis interface and it was iterative.. A hundred consecutive situations corresponding to intermediate bone remodelling phases have been calculated according to given loadings. Bone remodelling was appreciated as a function of time and bone density for each constitutive element of the computational model created by finite element method. For each constitutive element a medium value of stress during the walking cycle was applied. Results: Analyse of proximal epiphysis-prosthesis complex slices showed that bone density increase is maintained all over the stem in the immediately post-operative period. At 10 months, the moment considered to be the end of bone remodelling, areas with increased bone density are fewer and smaller. Meanwhile, their distribution with a concentration toward the internal compartment in the distal metaphysis is preserved. Conclusions: After the total knee arthroplasty the tibial bone suffered a process of remodelling adapted to the new stress conditions. This bone remodelling can influence, sometimes negatively, especially in the cases with tibial component varus malposition, the fixation, respectively the survival of the prosthesis. This process has been demonstrated both by clinical trials and by simulation, using the finite elements method of periprosthetic bone remodelling. PMID:25553127

  8. Salvage arthrodesis for failed total ankle arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Zürcher, Arthur W

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose Total ankle arthroplasty (TAA) has gained popularity in recent years. If it fails, however, salvage arthrodesis must be reliable as a rescue procedure. We therefore investigated the clinical, radiographic, and subjective outcome after salvage arthrodesis in a consecutive group of patients, and concentrated on the influence of the method of fixation on union rate and on salvage in inflammatory joint disease. Patients and methods Between 1994 and 2005, salvage arthrodesis was performed on 18 ankles (18 patients). Diagnosis was inflammatory joint disease (IJD) in 15 cases and osteoarthritis (OA) in 3. Tibio-talar fusion was performed in 7 ankles, and tibio-talocalcaneal fusion in 11. Serial radiographs were studied for time to union. Clinical outcome at latest follow-up was measured by the AOFAS score, the foot function index (FFI) and by VAS scores for pain, function, and satisfaction. Results Blade plates were used in 7 ankles (4 IJD, 3 OA); all united. Nonunion developed in 7 of the 11 rheumatic ankles stabilized by other methods. 11 patients (8 fused ankles, 3 nonunions) were available for clinical evaluation. Their mean AOFAS score was 62 and mean overall FFI was 70. VAS score for pain was 20, for function 64, and for satisfaction 74. The scores were similar in united and non-united ankles. Interpretation Blade plate fixation is successful in salvage arthrodesis for failed TAA. A high nonunion rate was found after salvage ankle arthrodesis in IJD with other methods of fixation. Clinical results were fair to good. PMID:20175648

  9. Current Perspectives on Arthroplasty in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Rates, Outcomes, and Adverse Events.

    PubMed

    Kasturi, Shanthini; Goodman, Susan

    2016-09-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic debilitating condition with significant impact on the musculoskeletal system. Arthroplasty may be indicated for damage related to active lupus or its treatment. As therapies for SLE have advanced, morbidity and mortality have declined, while the rate of joint replacement has increased. The age of SLE patients undergoing arthroplasty is increasing, and the indication for surgery is evolving-while avascular necrosis was previously the predominant indication for arthroplasty, osteoarthritis now accounts for a larger proportion of surgeries. Pain and functional outcomes of arthroplasty in SLE patients are comparable to those of the general population with osteoarthritis, but lupus remains an independent risk factor for post-hip arthroplasty complications and mortality. Further research is needed to characterize the impact of lupus disease activity and severity on arthroplasty outcomes. PMID:27443850

  10. Biomechanics of Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty: 
Current Concepts.

    PubMed

    Lorenzetti, Adam J; Stone, Geoffrey P; Simon, Peter; Frankle, Mark A

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of reverse shoulder arthroplasty has provided surgeons with new solutions for many complex shoulder problems. A primary goal of orthopaedics is the restoration or re-creation of functional anatomy to reduce pain and improve function, which can be accomplished by either repairing injured structures or replacing them as anatomically as possible. If reconstructible tissue is lacking or not available, which is seen in patients who have complex shoulder conditions such as an irreparable rotator cuff-deficient shoulder, cuff tear arthropathy, or severe glenoid bone loss, substantial problems may arise. Historically, hemiarthroplasty or glenoid grafting with total shoulder arthroplasty yielded inconsistent and unsatisfactory results. Underlying pathologies in patients who have an irreparable rotator cuff-deficient shoulder, cuff tear arthropathy, or severe glenoid bone loss can considerably alter the mechanical function of the shoulder and create treatment dilemmas that are difficult to overcome. A better biomechanical understanding of these pathologic adaptations has improved treatment options. In the past three decades, reverse total shoulder arthroplasty was developed to treat these complex shoulder conditions not by specifically re-creating the anatomy but by using the remaining functional tissue to improve shoulder balance. Reverse total shoulder arthroplasty has achieved reliable improvements in both pain and function. Initial implant designs lacked scientific evidence to support the design rationale, and many implants failed because surgeons did not completely understand the forces involved or the pathology being treated. Implant function and clinical results will continue to improve as surgeons' biomechanical understanding of shoulder disease and reverse shoulder arthroplasty implants increases. PMID:27049186

  11. Anatomic shoulder arthroplasty: an update on indications, technique, results and complication rates

    PubMed Central

    MATTEI, LORENZO; MORTERA, STEFANO; ARRIGONI, CHIARA; CASTOLDI, FILIPPO

    2015-01-01

    A shoulder replacement is indicated in patients affected by glenohumeral arthropathy with severely reduced range of motion, persistent pain, especially at night, and loss of strength. There is much discussion in the scientific community about the prosthetic options for these cases: hemiarthroplasty, anatomic total shoulder arthroplasty, and reverse total shoulder arthroplasty. We analyzed the indications for, results of, and complications associated with this kind of surgery, focusing on anatomic arthroplasty and on the concept of modularity. PMID:26605254

  12. Shoulder arthroplasty in osteoarthritis: current concepts in biomechanics and surgical technique

    PubMed Central

    Merolla, G; Nastrucci, G; Porcellini, G

    Shoulder arthroplasty is a technically demanding procedure to restore shoulder function in patients with severe osteoarthritis of the glenohumeral joint. The modern prosthetic system exploit the benefits of modularity and the availibility of additional sizes of the prosthetic components. In this paper we describe the biomechanics of shoulder arthroplasty and the technique for shoulder replacement including total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) with all-polyethylene and metal-backed glenoid component, humeral head resurfacing and stemless humeral replacement. PMID:24251240

  13. Behind the Pay Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dey, Judy Goldberg; Hill, Catherine

    2007-01-01

    Women have made remarkable gains in education during the past three decades, yet these achievements have resulted in only modest improvements in pay equity. The gender pay gap has become a fixture of the U.S. workplace and is so ubiquitous that many simply view it as normal. "Behind the Pay Gap" examines the gender pay gap for college graduates.…

  14. Practice Gaps in Pruritus.

    PubMed

    Silverberg, Jonathan I

    2016-07-01

    There are several practice gaps in the evaluation and management of itch. These gaps include a dearth of objective measures of itch, infrequent use of validated patient-reported outcomes for itch, non-evidence-based treatment, and lack of consensus about the ideal workup for generalized itch. The present article reviews these gaps and presents potential solutions. PMID:27363881

  15. Use of indomethacin as an adjuvant to surgery for recurrent temporomandibular joint ankylosis in adults

    PubMed Central

    Bhatt, Krushna; Pandey, Sandeep; Bhutia, Ongkila; Roychoudhury, Ajoy

    2014-01-01

    Two cases with multiple recurrences of temporomandibular joint ankylosis and multiple failed interposition/gap arthroplasty procedures are presented here. Heterotopic bone formation was thought to be the reason. Indomethacin prophylaxis for prevention of heterotopic new bone formation at the osteoarthrectomy site was used as an adjuvant to surgery, in dosages of 75 mg/day for six weeks. Indomethacin is used frequently in hip and elbow arthroplasties to prevent heterotopic ossification, but its use in temporomandibular joint is not routine. The presented cases did not develop further recurrence and attained stable mouth opening over two-year follow-up after osteoarthrectomy and oral indomethacin. PMID:25937735

  16. Rho/RacGAPs

    PubMed Central

    Csépányi-Kömi, Roland; Lévay, Magdolna; Ligeti, Erzsébet

    2012-01-01

    Regulatory proteins such as guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) and GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) determine the activity of small GTPases. In the Rho/Rac family, the number of GEFs and GAPs largely exceeds the number of small GTPases, raising the question of specific or overlapping functions. In our recent study we investigated the first time ARHGAP25 at the protein level, determined its activity as RacGAP and showed its involvement in phagocytosis. With the discovery of ARHGAP25, the number of RacGAPs described in phagocytes is increased to six. We provide data that indicate the specific functions of selected Rho/RacGAPs and we show an example of differential regulation of a Rho/Rac family GAP by different kinases. We propose that the abundance of Rho/Rac family GAPs is an important element of the fine spatiotemporal regulation of diverse cellular functions. PMID:22751505

  17. Metal-on-Metal Hip Resurfacing Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Sehatzadeh, S; Kaulback, K; Levin, L

    2012-01-01

    Background Metal-on-metal (MOM) hip resurfacing arthroplasty (HRA) is in clinical use as an appropriate alternative to total hip arthroplasty in young patients. In this technique, a metal cap is placed on the femoral head to cover the damaged surface of the bone and a metal cup is placed in the acetabulum. Objectives The primary objective of this analysis was to compare the revision rates of MOM HRA using different implants with the benchmark set by the National Institute of Clinical Excellence (NICE). The secondary objective of this analysis was to review the literature regarding adverse biological effects associated with implant material. Review Methods A literature search was performed on February 13, 2012, to identify studies published from January 1, 2009, to February 13, 2012. Results The revision rates for MOM HRA using 6 different implants were reviewed. The revision rates for MOM HRA with 3 implants met the NICE criteria, i.e., a revision rate of 10% or less at 10 years. Two implants had short-term follow-ups and MOM HRA with one of the implants failed to meet the NICE criteria. Adverse tissue reactions resulting in failure of the implants have been reported by several studies. With a better understanding of the factors that influence the wear rate of the implants, adverse tissue reactions and subsequent implant failure can be minimized. Many authors have suggested that patient selection and surgical technique affect the wear rate and the risk of tissue reactions. The biological effects of high metal ion levels in the blood and urine of patients with MOM HRA implants are not known. Studies have shown an increase in chromosomal aberrations in patients with MOM articulations, but the clinical implications and long-term consequences of this increase are still unknown. Epidemiological studies have shown that patients with MOM HRA implants did not have an overall increase in mortality or risk of cancer. There is insufficient clinical data to confirm the

  18. Conversion of a surgical elbow arthrodesis to total elbow arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Rog, Dominik; Zuckerman, Lee M; Riedel, Barth

    2015-01-01

    Arthrodesis of the elbow joint addresses pain due to intra-articular pathology, but with significant functional limitations. Loss of motion at the elbow is not completely compensated by the wrist and shoulder joints and elbow fusion is thus purely a salvage procedure. Advances in joint arthroplasty have allowed surgeons to address the functional limitations of arthrodesis, but despite these advances the elbow is still one of the joint replacements with higher complication rate. Conversion of a joint fusion to arthroplasty has been reported for the hip, knee, shoulder, and ankle. The takedown of a surgically fused elbow was reported in German literature in 2013. We present the first such case report in the English literature with a 49-year-old male whose status is elbow fusion performed for trauma 31 years prior. PMID:25815223

  19. Thromboembolism Prophylaxis in Hip Arthroplasty: Routine and High Risk Patients.

    PubMed

    Nam, Denis; Nunley, Ryan M; Johnson, Staci R; Keeney, James A; Clohisy, John C; Barrack, Robert L

    2015-12-01

    This study's purpose was to present the use of a risk stratification protocol in which "routine" risk patients receive a mobile compression device with aspirin and "high" risk patients receive warfarin for thromboprophylaxis after hip arthroplasty. 1859 hip arthroplasty patients were prospectively enrolled (1402 routine risk--75.4%, 457 high risk--24.6%). The cumulative rate of venous thromboembolism events was 0.5% in the routine versus 0.5% in the high-risk cohort within 6weeks postoperatively (P=1.00). Patients in the routine risk cohort had a lower rate of major bleeding (0.5% versus 2.0%, P=0.006) and wound complications (0.2% versus 1.2%, P=0.01). Use of our risk stratification protocol allowed the avoidance of more aggressive anticoagulation in 75% of patients while achieving a low overall incidence of symptomatic VTE. PMID:26182980

  20. Discordance between patient and surgeon satisfaction after total joint arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Harris, Ian A; Harris, Anita M; Naylor, Justine M; Adie, Sam; Mittal, Rajat; Dao, Alan T

    2013-05-01

    We surveyed 331 patients undergoing total hip or knee arthroplasty pre-operatively, and patients and surgeons were both surveyed 6 and 12 months post-operatively. We identified variables (demographic factors, operative factors and patient expectations) as possible predictors for discordance in patient-surgeon satisfaction. At 12 months, 94.5% of surgeons and 90.3% of patients recorded satisfaction with the outcome. The discordance between patient and surgeon satisfaction was mainly due to patient dissatisfaction-surgeon satisfaction. In an adjusted analysis, the strongest predictors of discordance in patient-surgeon satisfaction were unmet patient expectations and the presence of complications. Advice to potential joint arthroplasty candidates regarding the decision to proceed with surgery should be informed by patient reported outcomes, rather than the surgeon's opinion of the likelihood of success.

  1. Establishing Realistic Patient Expectations Following Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Husain, Adeel; Lee, Gwo-Chin

    2015-12-01

    Nearly 20% of patients are dissatisfied following well-performed total knee arthroplasty with good functional outcomes. Surgeons must understand the drivers of dissatisfaction to minimize the number of unhappy patients following surgery. Several studies have shown that unfulfilled expectations are a principal source of patient dissatisfaction. Patients contemplating total knee arthroplasty expect pain relief, improved walking ability, return to sports, and improvement in psychological well-being and social interactions. However, patients are typically overly optimistic with regard to expected outcomes following surgery. Patient expectations and satisfaction can be influenced by age, socioeconomic factors, sex, and race. The interplay of these factors can be complex and specific to each person. Published data on clinical and functional outcomes show that persistence of symptoms, such as pain, stiffness, and failure to return to preoperative levels of function, are common and normal. Therefore, the surgeon needs to help the patient to establish realistic expectations. PMID:26493969

  2. Conventional Versus Cross-Linked Polyethylene for Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Surace, Michele F; Monestier, Luca; Vulcano, Ettore; Harwin, Steven F; Cherubino, Paolo

    2015-09-01

    The clinical and radiographic outcomes of 88 patients who underwent primary total hip arthroplasty with either conventional polyethylene or cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) from the same manufacturer were compared. There were no significant differences between the 2 subpopulations regarding average age, gender, side affected, or prosthetic stem and cup size. The average follow-up was 104 months (range, 55 to 131 months). To the authors' knowledge, this is the longest follow-up for this particular insert. Clinical and radiographic evaluations were performed at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months and then annually. Results showed that XLPE has a significantly greater wear reduction than that of standard polyethylene in primary total hip arthroplasty. At the longest available follow-up for these specific inserts, XLPE proved to be effective in reducing wear. PMID:26375527

  3. Learning curve for the anterior approach total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Goytia, Robin N; Jones, Lynne C; Hungerford, Marc W

    2012-01-01

    The anterior approach to total hip arthroplasty has the advantages of using intermuscular and internervous planes, but it is technically demanding. We evaluated the learning curve for this approach with regard to operative parameters and immediate outcomes. From November 2005 through May 2007, 73 patients underwent 81 consecutive primary anterior-approach total hip arthroplasties. We grouped the hips into three consecutive groups of 20 and one of 21, and surgical and fluoroscopy times, estimated blood loss, intraoperative and postoperative complications, patient comorbidities, component position, and leg-length discrepancy were compared (statistical significance, p < 0.05). Comparing Groups 1 and 4, there were only two significant differences: operative time, 124 to 98 minutes, respectively, and estimated blood loss, 596 to 347 mL, respectively. Proficiency improved after Group 2 (40 cases) and was more marked after Group 3 (60 cases), with no major complications. Surgeons considering this approach should expect a substantial learning period.

  4. In vivo determination of total knee arthroplasty kinematics

    SciTech Connect

    Komistek, Richard D; Mahfouz, Mohamed R; Bertin, Kim; Rosenberg, Aaron; Kennedy, William

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if consistent posterior femoral rollback of an asymmetrical posterior cruciate retaining (PCR) total knee arthroplasty was mostly influenced by the implant design, surgical technique, or presence of a well-functioning posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). Three-dimensional femorotibial kinematics was determined for 80 subjects implanted by 3 surgeons, and each subject was evaluated under fluoroscopic surveillance during a deep knee bend. All subjects in this present study having an intact PCL had a well-functioning PCR knee and experienced normal kinematic patterns, although less in magnitude than the normal knee. In addition, a surprising finding was that, on average, subjects without a PCL still achieved posterior femoral rollback from full extension to maximum knee flexion. The findings in this study revealed that implant design did contribute to the normal kinematics demonstrated by subjects having this asymmetrical PCR total knee arthroplasty.

  5. Catastrophic failure of ceramic-polyethylene bearing total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Needham, Justin; Burns, Travis; Gerlinger, Tad

    2008-06-01

    Complications of ceramic-polyethylene bearing total hip arthroplasty (THA) include osteolysis, loosening, dislocation, and component failure. Catastrophic acetabular component failure involves severe damage to both the polyethylene liner and metal shell. This case study presents the first reported complete wear-through of the acetabular portion of a ceramic-polyethylene arthroplasty presenting as a dislocation and a review of the literature. In this study, a patient's alumina ceramic femoral head penetrated the polyethylene liner and titanium shell and presented as a dislocated THA. The contributing factors for this catastrophic failure include young patient age, high activity level, thin polyethylene liner, backside wear, component positioning, polyethylene sterilization with gamma irradiation in air, and lack of appropriate follow-up. Revision THA was performed without complications. PMID:18514888

  6. [Modern tribology in total hip arthroplasty: pros and cons].

    PubMed

    Gómez-García, F

    2014-01-01

    The wear products and adverse reactions that occur on bearing surfaces represent one of the greatest challenges in prosthetic replacements, as the latter experience increasing demands due to the large number of young and older adult patients that have a long life expectancy and remarkable activity. The purpose of this review is to analyze the pros and cons of the new advances in the bearing components of the articular surfaces of current total hip arthroplasties. We also discuss the strategies used historically, their problems, results and the surgeon's role in prescribing the tribologic couple that best fits each patient's needs. We conclude with practical recommendations for the prescription and management of the latest articular couples for total hip arthroplasty. PMID:26021098

  7. Modular hybrid total hip arthroplasty. Experimental study in dogs

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background This prospective experimental study evaluated the surgical procedure and results of modular hybrid total hip arthroplasty in dogs. Methods Ten skeletally mature healthy mongrel dogs with weights varying between 19 and 27 kg were used. Cemented modular femoral stems and uncemented porous-coated acetabular cups were employed. Clinical and radiographic evaluations were performed before surgery and at 30, 60, 90, 120, 180 and 360 days post-operation. Results Excellent weight bearing was noticed in the operated limb in seven dogs. Dislocation followed by loosening of the prosthesis was noticed in two dogs, which were therefore properly treated with a femoral head osteotomy. Femoral fracture occurred in one dog, which was promptly treated with full implant removal and femoral osteosynthesis. Conclusions The canine modular hybrid total hip arthroplasty provided excellent functionality of the operated limb. PMID:21736758

  8. Knitted outer gloves in primary hip and knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Tanner, J; Wraighte, P; Howard, P

    2006-01-01

    A randomised trial was carried out to determine the rate of perforation to inner gloves when comparing latex with knitted gloves during hip and knee arthroplasty. Members of the surgical team were randomised to wear either two pairs of latex gloves (standard double gloving) or a knitted glove on top of a latex glove. In addition, participants completed a visual analogue assessment of their overall satisfaction with the gloves. A total of 406 inner gloves were tested for perforations over a four-month period: 23% of inner gloves were perforated when latex outer gloves were used and 6% of inner gloves were perforated when knitted outer gloves were used. In total, there were 64 perforations to the inner gloves; only one of these perforations was detected by the glove wearer. Wearing knitted outer gloves during hip and knee arthroplasty statistically significantly reduces the risk of perforation to inner latex gloves (p<0.0001).

  9. Fracture of the Tibial Baseplate in Bicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Stuyts, Bart; Vandenberghe, Melanie; Van der Bracht, Hans; Fortems, Yves; Van den Eeden, Elke; Cuypers, Luc

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Bicompartmental knee arthroplasty (BKA) addresses combined medial and patellofemoral compartment osteoarthritis, which is relatively common, and has been proposed as a bridge between unicompartmental and total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Case Presentation. We present the case report of a young active man treated with BKA after unsuccessful conservative therapy. Four years later, loosening with fracture of the tibial baseplate was identified and the patient was revised to TKA. Discussion. Although our case is only the second fractured tibial baseplate to be reported, we believe that the modular titanium design, with two fixation pegs, is too thin to withstand daily cyclic loading powers. Light daily routine use, rather than high-impact sports, is therefore advised. Failures may also be related to the implant being an early generation and known to be technically complex, with too few implant sizes. We currently use TKA for the treatment of medial and patellofemoral compartment osteoarthritis. PMID:26843998

  10. Fracture of the Tibial Baseplate in Bicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Stuyts, Bart; Vandenberghe, Melanie; Van der Bracht, Hans; Fortems, Yves; Van den Eeden, Elke; Cuypers, Luc

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Bicompartmental knee arthroplasty (BKA) addresses combined medial and patellofemoral compartment osteoarthritis, which is relatively common, and has been proposed as a bridge between unicompartmental and total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Case Presentation. We present the case report of a young active man treated with BKA after unsuccessful conservative therapy. Four years later, loosening with fracture of the tibial baseplate was identified and the patient was revised to TKA. Discussion. Although our case is only the second fractured tibial baseplate to be reported, we believe that the modular titanium design, with two fixation pegs, is too thin to withstand daily cyclic loading powers. Light daily routine use, rather than high-impact sports, is therefore advised. Failures may also be related to the implant being an early generation and known to be technically complex, with too few implant sizes. We currently use TKA for the treatment of medial and patellofemoral compartment osteoarthritis. PMID:26843998

  11. Transesophageal echocardiography in the anesthetic management of total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Johnson, C; Lewis, K D; Steen, S N; Mok, M S; Wu, C C

    2001-09-01

    Total hip arthroplasty is a common procedure in the elderly and thromboembolism continues to be a cause of mortality and morbidity associated with this procedure. When properly diagnosed and treated the mortality rate from pulmonary embolism can be reduced significantly. Transesophageal echocardiograpic (TEE) detection of central pulmonary artery thromboemboli in patients with severe pulmonary embolism has been reported to have a sensitivity of 96.7% and a specificity of 88%. However TEE is not universally available due to its cost and expertise that is required. Taking into consideration its cost/effectiveness we suggest that in patients undergoing the cement type of total hip arthroplasty who are cardiopulmonary compromised, debilitated or elderly the use of TEE is indicated.

  12. Glenoid bone loss in primary and revision shoulder arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Malhas, Amar; Rashid, Abbas; Copas, Dave; Bale, Steve; Trail, Ian

    2016-10-01

    The management of glenoid bone loss is a major challenge in both complex primary and revision arthroplasty surgery. To deal with this problem, a number of techniques have been advocated, although there has been no previous systematic review of the literature. In the present review, we have attempted to identify a coherent strategy for addressing this problem, taking into account the degree of bone loss, the advantages and limits of standard implants, bone reconstruction techniques and the use of customized prostheses. PMID:27660655

  13. Intraoperative Fluoroscopy Improves Component Position During Anterior Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Jennings, John D; Iorio, Justin; Kleiner, Matthew T; Gaughan, John P; Star, Andrew M

    2015-11-01

    The goal of this retrospective review was to determine whether fluoroscopic guidance improves acetabular cup abduction and anteversion alignment during anterior total hip arthroplasty. The authors retrospectively reviewed 199 patients (fluoroscopy group, 98; nonfluoroscopy group, 101) who underwent anterior total hip arthroplasty at a single center with and without C-arm fluoroscopy guidance. Included in the study were patients of any age who underwent primary anterior approach total hip arthroplasty performed by a single surgeon, with 6-month postoperative anteroposterior pelvis radiographs. Acetabular cup abduction and anteversion angles were measured and compared between groups. Mean acetabular cup abduction and anteversion angles were 43.4° (range, 26.0°-57.4°) and 23.1° (range, 17°-28°), respectively, in the fluoroscopy group. Mean abduction and anteversion angles were 45.9° (range, 29.7°-61.3°) and 23.1° (range, 17°-28°), respectively, after anterior total hip arthroplasty without the use of C-arm guidance (nonfluoroscopy group). The use of fluoroscopy was associated with a statistically significant difference in cup abduction (P=.002) but no statistically significant difference in anteversion angles. In the fluoroscopy group, 80% of implants were within the combined safe zone compared with 63% in the nonfluoroscopy group. A significantly higher percentage of both acetabular cup abduction angles and combined anteversion and abduction angles were in the safe zone in the fluoroscopy group. Fluoroscopy is not required for proper anteversion placement of acetabular components, but it may increase ideal safe zone placement of components.

  14. The local effects of metal corrosion in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Cooper, H John

    2014-01-01

    Corrosion has long been recognized to occur in total hip arthroplasty, but the local effects of this process have only recently become better understood. This article provides an overview of corrosion at modular junctions, and discusses the various etiologic factors for corrosion and the biologic response to metal debris released from this junction. Algorithms are provided for diagnosis and treatment, in accordance with the best available data.

  15. Vibroacoustography for the assessment of total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Kamimura, Hermes A. S.; Wang, Liao; Carneiro, Antonio A. O.; Kinnick, Randall R.; An, Kai-Nan; Fatemi, Mostafa

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This paper proposes imaging with 3-dimensional vibroacoustography for postoperatively assessing the uncovered cup area after total hip arthroplasty as a quantitative criterion to evaluate implant fixation. METHODS: A phantom with a bone-like structure covered by a tissue-mimicking material was used to simulate a total hip arthroplasty case. Vibroacoustography images of the uncovered cup region were generated using a two-element confocal ultrasound transducer and a hydrophone inside a water tank. Topological correction based on the geometry of the implant was performed to generate a 3-dimensional representation of the vibroacoustography image and to accurately evaluate the surface. The 3-dimensional area obtained by the vibroacoustography approach was compared to the area evaluated by a 3-dimensional motion capture system. RESULTS: The vibroacoustography technique provided high-resolution, high-contrast, and speckle-free images with less sensitivity to the beam incidence. Using a 3-dimensional-topology correction of the image, we accurately estimated the uncovered area of the implant with a relative error of 8.1% in comparison with the motion capture system measurements. CONCLUSION: Measurement of the cup coverage after total hip arthroplasty has not been well established; however, the covered surface area of the acetabular component is one of the most important prognostic factors. The preliminary results of this study show that vibroacoustography is a 3-dimensional approach that can be used to postoperatively evaluate total hip arthroplasty. The favorable results also provide an impetus for exploring vibroacoustography in other bone or implant surface imaging applications. PMID:23778334

  16. Hip Arthroplasty Pseudotumors: Pathogenesis, Imaging, and Clinical Decision Making

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Derik L; Morrison, James J

    2016-01-01

    Pseudotumors are a complication of hip arthroplasty. The goal of this article is to review the clinical presentation, pathogenesis, histology, and the role of diagnostic imaging in clinical decision making for treatment, and surveillance of pseudotumors. We will discuss the multimodal imaging appearances, differential diagnosis, associated complications, treatment, and prognosis of pseudotumors, as an aid to the assessment of orthopedic prostheses at the hip. PMID:27195183

  17. Spontaneous Knee Ankylosis through Heterotopic Ossification after Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Boulezaz, Samuel; Gibon, Emmanuel; Loriaut, Philippe; Casabianca, Laurent; Rousseau, Romain; Dallaudiere, Benjamin; Pascal-Moussellard, Hugues

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on a case of total ankylosis of the knee after a cruciate-sacrificing cemented total knee arthroplasty (TKA). An 82-year-old female patient previously underwent primary TKA for osteoarthritis twenty years ago in our institution. She had recovered uneventfully and returned to her regular activities. There was no history of postsurgical trauma; however, she progressively lost knee range of motion. Radiographs revealed severe bridging heterotopic ossification. PMID:27119034

  18. Early outcomes of patella resurfacing in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Clements, Warren J; Miller, Lisa; Whitehouse, Sarah L; Graves, Stephen E; Ryan, Philip

    2010-01-01

    Background Patella resurfacing in total knee arthroplasty is a contentious issue. The literature suggests that resurfacing of the patella is based on surgeon preference, and little is known about the role and timing of resurfacing and how this affects outcomes. Methods We analyzed 134,799 total knee arthroplasties using data from the Australian Orthopaedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry. Hazards ratios (HRs) were used to compare rates of early revision between patella resurfacing at the primary procedure (the resurfacing group, R) and primary arthroplasty without resurfacing (no-resurfacing group, NR). We also analyzed the outcomes of NR that were revised for isolated patella addition. Results At 5 years, the R group showed a lower revision rate than the NR group: cumulative per cent revision (CPR) 3.1% and 4.0%, respectively (HR = 0.75, p < 0.001). Revisions for patellofemoral pain were more common in the NR group (17%) than in the R group (1%), and “patella only” revisions were more common in the NR group (29%) than in the R group (6%). Non-resurfaced knees revised for isolated patella addition had a higher revision rate than patella resurfacing at the primary procedure, with a 4-year CPR of 15% and 2.8%, respectively (HR = 4.1, p < 0.001). Interpretation Rates of early revision of primary total knees were higher when the patella was not resurfaced, and suggest that surgeons may be inclined to resurface later if there is patellofemoral pain. However, 15% of non-resurfaced knees revised for patella addition are re-revised by 4 years. Our results suggest an early beneficial outcome for patella resurfacing at primary arthroplasty based on revision rates up to 5 years. PMID:19968604

  19. Patellar fractures following total knee arthroplasty: a review.

    PubMed

    Sayeed, Siraj A; Naziri, Qais; Patel, Yashika D; Boylan, Matthew R; Issa, Kimona; Mont, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    There are several periprosthetic complications associated with total knee arthroplasty, with femoral fracture as the most common and patellar fractures as the second most common. Patellar fractures are challenging complications that occur almost exclusively on the resurfaced patellae, although unresurfaced patellar fractures have been reported in literature. The purpose of this study is to describe the anatomy of the patella, the etiology of patellar fractures, and strategies to treat and manage these fractures following knee arthroplasty. The vascular supply to the patella may be compromised during total knee arthroplasty and special care must be taken to preserve it. Vessel injury may result in further complications, most notably avascular necrosis with subsequent fracture. Other patient-, surgical-, and prosthetic-related factors can contribute to increased risk of patellar fracture. Patellar fractures are classified into three types. Type I fractures have an intact extensor mechanism with a stable implant. Type II fractures have a complete disruption of the extensor mechanism with or without a stable implant. Type III fractures, which are further subclassified into types IIIa and IIIb, have an intact extensor mechanism but a loose patellar component. While type IIIa fractures have reasonable remaining bone stock, type IIIb fractures have poor bone stock. Type I patellar fractures may be best managed nonoperatively, but types II and III patellar fractures often necessitate surgical intervention. Patellectomy should be reserved for comminuted fractures, as well as fractures in patients with poor bone stock. Larger prospective randomized studies are necessary to better evaluate the treatment algorithm for patellar fractures following total knee arthroplasty.

  20. Management of the recalcitrant total-hip arthroplasty wound.

    PubMed

    Meland, N B; Arnold, P G; Weiss, H C

    1991-10-01

    The infection rate for total-hip arthroplasty is around 1 percent. This small group is usually managed by complete removal of the prosthesis and the cement and closure over suction catheters to "collapse" the wound and eventually achieve a girdlestone arthroplasty. Occasionally, there are patients who have a persistent draining wound after this treatment and repeated efforts at wound closure. We present 27 patients who had recalcitrant, noncollapsible wounds of the hip that were present for many months to years. Twenty-eight cases of infected total-hip arthroplasties that did not respond to removal of the prosthesis and cement and closure were seen by the authors between January of 1977 and December of 1988. One patient had bilateral involvement. Average age was 64 years (range 33 to 79 years). There was an average of 4.2 previous surgical attempts at closure (range 1 to 21). Staphylococcus aureus was the most common organism, but the infections were virtually all multiple. Thirty-three muscles were utilized in 27 patients. The rectus femoris was used in 23 cases, the vastus lateralis in 8, tensor fasciae latae in 1, and combined latissimus dorsi-serratus anterior free-tissue transfers were carried out in 2. Multiple combinations of transpositions and free flaps were utilized. Follow-up ranged from 1 to 10 years, with an average of 6.4 years. Eighteen patients were ambulatory with minor degrees of pain, five ambulated with a cane, seven ambulated with a walker, six ambulated with crutches, and four ambulated unassisted, all of whom had reimplantation of their hip arthroplasty at least 12 months following the muscle flap procedure.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Fracture of the Modular Neck in Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, A.; Gargallo-Margarit, A.; Barro, V.; Gallardo-Calero, I.; Sallent, A.

    2015-01-01

    Modularity of the components in total hip arthroplasty has had an increase in popularity in the last decades. We present the case of a 53-year-old man with a history of avascular necrosis of the femoral head due to a hypophyseal adenoma. A total hip modular arthroplasty was implanted. Three and a half years after the surgery the patient attended the emergency room due to acute left hip pain with no prior traumatism. Radiological examination confirmed a fracture of the modular neck. A revision surgery was performed finding an important pseudotumoral well-organized periprosthetic tissue reaction. Through an extended trochanteric osteotomy the femoral component was removed, and a straight-stem revision prosthesis implanted. There are several potential advantages when using modularity in total hip arthroplasty that surgeons may benefit from, but complications have arisen and must be addressed. Various circumstances such as large femoral head with a long varus neck, corrosion, patient's BMI, and activity level may participate in creating the necessary environment for fatigue failure of the implant. PMID:26266069

  2. DIAGNOSTIC AND THERAPEUTIC ARTHROSCOPY IN SYMPTOMATIC PATIENTS AFTER KNEE ARTHROPLASTY

    PubMed Central

    Severino, Fabricio Roberto; Souza, Clodoaldo José Duarte de; Severino, Nilson Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Assess the worthiness of arthroscopy in investigating and treating knee pain after arthroplasty unexplained by clinical and subsidiary examinations. Methods: Among 402 patients submitted to total or unicompartimental arthroplasty between September 2001 and April 2007 at a public university hospital, 17 presented with pain on prosthetic articulation, without clear diagnosis by clinical, X-ray, laboratory, scintiscan, or nuclear magnetic resonance tests. All patients were submitted to arthroscopy and symptoms were assessed by using the Lysholm scale, comparing pre-and post-arthroscopy periods. Peroperative findings have been recorded. Results: The procedure was effective for pain relief in 14 of 17 patients (82.35%). The median for Lysholm scale climbed from 36 points before arthroscopy to 94 points after the procedure (p < 0.001). Most of the patients (12) were arthroscopically diagnosed with fibrosis known as “cyclop”; on the remaining five patients, anterior synovitis was found. All patients were treated by resection. Conclusions: Knee arthroscopy after arthroplasty in patients presenting unclear persistent pain shows localized arthrofibrosis (“cyclops”) or synovitis, which can be treated by using the same procedure, resulting in pain relief. PMID:27022517

  3. [Recovery from total knee arthroplasty through continuous passive motion].

    PubMed

    Sánchez Mayo, B; Rodríguez-Mansilla, J; González Sánchez, B

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to know the effects of continuous passive mobilization in patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty. A search strategy was developed to retrieve all clinical trials, written in English and/or Spanish, published in the electronic search databases PubMed, Cochrane Library Plus, Dialnet, CSIC and PEDro. The inclusion criteria were: clinical trials published from January 2000 until November 2014 in English or Spanish. Out of 537 clinical trials that were potentially relevant, a total of 12 were included in this review. The evaluation of 1,153 patients shows that there is no significant difference in improving the range of the joint, pain, balance, motion, healing and hospital stay using continuous passive mobilization against the regular physiotherapy treatment for total knee arthroplasty. The application of continuous passive mobilization in the long-term does not provide any benefit in terms of the breadth of the range of the joint, pain and improvement of standing and motion in comparison with conventional postoperative physiotherapy treatment in total knee arthroplasty. In the short term an improvement is obtained in the range of joint motion in knee flexion.

  4. Bone anatomy and rotational alignment in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Uehara, K; Kadoya, Y; Kobayashi, A; Ohashi, H; Yamano, Y

    2002-09-01

    The purpose of the current study was to investigate the bone anatomy in determining the rotational alignment in total knee arthroplasty using computed tomography. Axial images of 109 knees in 83 patients with varus osteoarthritis who had total knee arthroplasty were analyzed. On the images of the distal femur and the proximal tibia, a baseline for the anteroposterior axis of each component was drawn based on the epicondylar axis for the femur and the medial (1/3) of the tibial tuberosity for the tibia. The angle between these two lines was analyzed as the rotational mismatch between the components when they were aligned to the anatomic landmarks of each bone. Fifty-four knees (49.5%) had an angle of 5 degrees or greater and 13 knees (11.9%) had an angle of 10 degrees or greater. There was a tendency to align the tibial component in external rotation relative to the femoral component. The results indicated that the landmarks of each bone were the intrinsic cause of the rotational mismatch in knees with varus osteoarthritis. Surgeons doing total knee arthroplasties should be aware of this and check the rotational mismatch between the components. When it is present, the tibial component should be realigned to match the femoral component rotation to minimize problems caused by the mismatch.

  5. Preventing Leg Length Discrepancy and Instability After Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Sculco, Peter K; Austin, Matthew S; Lavernia, Carlos J; Rosenberg, Aaron G; Sierra, Rafael J

    2016-01-01

    Restoration of equal leg lengths and dynamic hip stability are essential elements of a successful total hip arthroplasty. A careful clinical examination, a preoperative plan, and appropriate intraoperative techniques are necessary to achieve these goals. Preoperative identification of patients at risk for residual leg length discrepancy allows surgeons to adjust the surgical approach and/or the type of implant and provide better preoperative patient education. The use of larger femoral heads, high-offset stem options, and enhanced soft-tissue repairs have improved impingement-free range of motion as well as dynamic hip stability and have contributed to an overall reduction in dislocation. Methods for accurate leg length restoration and component positioning include anatomic landmarks, intraoperative radiographs, intraoperative calipers, stability testing, and computer-assisted surgery. If recurrent instability occurs after total hip arthroplasty, the underlying cause for dislocation should be identified and treated; this may include the use of semiconstrained dual-mobility or fully constrained liners, depending on abductor function. Surgeons should be aware of the clinical and surgical techniques for achieving leg length equalization and dynamic hip stability in total hip arthroplasty. PMID:27049193

  6. Oral antibiotics are effective for highly resistant hip arthroplasty infections.

    PubMed

    Cordero-Ampuero, José; Esteban, Jaime; García-Cimbrelo, Eduardo

    2009-09-01

    Infected arthroplasties reportedly have a lower eradication rate when caused by highly resistant and/or polymicrobial isolates and in these patients most authors recommend intravenous antibiotics. We asked whether two-stage revision with interim oral antibiotics could eradicate these infections. We prospectively followed 36 patients (mean age, 71.8 years) with late hip arthroplasty infections. Combinations of oral antibiotics were prescribed according to cultures, biofilm, and intracellular effectiveness. The minimum followup was 1 year (mean, 4.4 years; range, 1-12 years). We presumed eradication in the absence of clinical, serologic, and radiographic signs of infection. Infection was eradicated in all 13 patients with highly resistant bacteria who completed a two-stage protocol (10 with methicillin-resistant Staphylococci) and in eight of 11 patients treated with only the first stage (and six of nine with methicillin-resistant Staphylococci). Infection was eradicated in six of six patients with polymicrobial isolates (of sensitive and/or resistant bacteria) who completed a two-stage protocol and in five of seven with polymicrobial isolates treated with only the first surgery. The Harris hip score averaged 88.1 (range, 70-98) in patients who underwent reimplantation and 56.8 (range, 32-76) in patients who underwent resection arthroplasty. Long cycles of combined oral antibiotics plus a two-stage surgical exchange appear a promising alternative for infections by highly resistant bacteria, methicillin-resistant Staphylococci, and polymicrobial infections.

  7. Prevalence of osteoporosis in patients awaiting total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Domingues, Vitor Rodrigues; de Campos, Gustavo Constantino; Plapler, Pérola Grimberg; de Rezende, Márcia Uchôa

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the prevalence of osteoporosis in patients awaiting total hip arthroplasty. Method: Twenty-nine patients diagnosed with hip osteoarthritis awaiting primary total arthroplasty of the hip answered WOMAC questionnaire, VAS and questions about habits, osteoporosis and related diseases. Bone mineral densitometry of the lumbar spine and hips and laboratory tests (complete blood count and examination of calcium metabolism) were performed. Weight and height were measured to calculate body mass index (BMI). The evaluated quantitative characteristics were compared between patients with and without osteoporosis using the Mann-Whitney tests. Results: Thirteen men and 16 women with a mean age of 61.5 years old, WOMAC 51.4; EVA 6.4 and BMI 27.6 were evaluated. The prevalence of osteoporosis was 20.7%, and 37.9% had osteopenia. Patients with osteoporosis were older than patients without osteoporosis (p=0.006). The mean bone mineral density of the femoral neck without hip osteoarthritis was lower than the affected side (p=0.007). Thirty-five percent of patients did not know what osteoporosis is. Of these, 30% had osteopenia or osteoporosis. Conclusion: osteoarthritis and osteoporosis may coexist and the population waiting for total hip arthroplasty should be considered at risk for the presence of osteoporosis. Level of Evidence III, Observational Study. PMID:26327793

  8. Acrylic bone cement in total joint arthroplasty: A review.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Khaled J; El Othmani, Mouhanad M; Tzeng, Tony H; Mihalko, William M; Chambers, Monique C; Grupp, Thomas M

    2016-05-01

    Acrylic bone cement has a variety of applications in orthopedic surgery. Primary uses in total arthroplasties are limited to prostheses fixation and antibiotic delivery. With the large number of total joint arthroplasties expected to continue to rise, understanding the role bone cement plays in the success of total joint arthroplasty can have a significant impact on daily practice. The literature is inconclusive on whether cemented or cementless fixation technique is superior, and choice of fixation type is mainly determined by surgeon preference and experience. Surgeons should understand that if poor techniques exist, short-term outcomes of the replaced joint may be at risk. Statement of clinical significance: This article attempts to clarify some points of bone cement use through a review of the mechanical properties related to bone cement, a comparison to alternative materials, influence of additives, and the effects on surgical outcomes. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:737-744, 2016. PMID:26852143

  9. [Periprosthetic humeral fractures: Strategies and techniques of revision arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Kirchhoff, C; Beirer, M; Brunner, U

    2016-04-01

    The primary aims when performing revision arthroplasty of periprosthetic humeral fractures (PHF) are preservation of bone stock, achieving fracture healing and preserving a stable prosthesis with the focus on regaining the preoperative shoulder-arm function. The indications for revision arthroplasty are given in PHF in combination with loosening of the stem. In addition, further factors must be independently clarified in the case of an anatomical arthroplasty. In this context secondary glenoid erosion as well as rotator cuff insufficiency are potential factors for an extended revision procedure. For the performance of revision surgery modular revision sets including long stems, revision glenoid and metaglene components as well as plate and cerclage systems are obligatory besides the explantation instrumentation. Despite a loosened prosthesis, a transhumeral removal of the stem along with a subpectoral fenestration are often required. Length as well as bracing of revision stems need to bridge the fracture by at least twice the humeral diameter. Moreover, in many cases a combined procedure using an additional distal open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) plus cable cerclages as well as biological augmentation might be needed. Assuming an adequate preparation, the experienced surgeon is able to achieve a high fracture union rate along with an acceptable or even good shoulder function and to avoid further complications.

  10. [Recovery from total knee arthroplasty through continuous passive motion].

    PubMed

    Sánchez Mayo, B; Rodríguez-Mansilla, J; González Sánchez, B

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to know the effects of continuous passive mobilization in patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty. A search strategy was developed to retrieve all clinical trials, written in English and/or Spanish, published in the electronic search databases PubMed, Cochrane Library Plus, Dialnet, CSIC and PEDro. The inclusion criteria were: clinical trials published from January 2000 until November 2014 in English or Spanish. Out of 537 clinical trials that were potentially relevant, a total of 12 were included in this review. The evaluation of 1,153 patients shows that there is no significant difference in improving the range of the joint, pain, balance, motion, healing and hospital stay using continuous passive mobilization against the regular physiotherapy treatment for total knee arthroplasty. The application of continuous passive mobilization in the long-term does not provide any benefit in terms of the breadth of the range of the joint, pain and improvement of standing and motion in comparison with conventional postoperative physiotherapy treatment in total knee arthroplasty. In the short term an improvement is obtained in the range of joint motion in knee flexion. PMID:26486536

  11. Analysis of the Flexion Gap on In Vivo Knee Kinematics Using Fluoroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Shinichiro; Ito, Hiromu; Yoshitomi, Hiroyuki; Kuriyama, Shinichi; Komistek, Richard D; Matsuda, Shuichi

    2015-07-01

    There is a paucity of information on the relationships between postoperative knee laxity and in vivo knee kinematics. The correlations were analyzed in 22 knees with axial radiographs and fluoroscopy based 3D model fitting approach after a tri-condylar total knee arthroplasty. During deep knee bend activities, the medial flexion gap had significant correlations with the medial contact point (r=0.529, P=0.011) and axial rotation at full extension. During kneeling activities, a greater medial flexion gap caused larger anterior translation at complete contact (r=0.568, P=0.011). Meanwhile, the lateral flexion gap had less effect. In conclusion, laxity of the medial collateral ligament should be avoided because the magnitude of medial flexion stability was crucial for postoperative knee kinematics. PMID:25680453

  12. Venous thromboembolic disease management patterns in total hip arthroplasty and total knee arthroplasty patients: a survey of the AAHKS membership.

    PubMed

    Mesko, J W; Brand, R A; Iorio, R; Gradisar, I; Heekin, R; Leighton, R; Thornberry, R

    2001-09-01

    The American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons (AAHKS) distributed a survey to its members exploring practice patterns implemented to prevent venous thromboembolic disease (VTED) in patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Of 720 (33%) members, 236 responded. Prophylaxis was prescribed for 100% of patients during the course of hospitalization for THA and TKA. Warfarin was the commonest pharmacologic treatment used for THA (66%) and TKA (59%) patients. Low-molecular-weight heparin was used in 16% of THA patients and 18% of TKA patients. The most commonly employed mechanical modality was pneumatic devices in THA (51%) and TKA (50%). Universal acceptance of the need for prophylaxis administration for patients undergoing THA and TKA is shown. The method and duration remain highly variable; although the survey illustrates such variation, it suggests there is no one best method of prophylaxis.

  13. Variations in ESR and CRP in total knee arthroplasty and total hip arthroplasty in Iranian patients from 2009 to 2011

    PubMed Central

    Nazem, Khalilolah; Motififard, Mehdi; Yousefian, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Implantation of joint prosthesis, either in the knee or in the hip, may cause some problems such as an infection, so that a timely treatment is essential. In this respect, discovering a marker detecting the incidence of an infection is one of the requirements of arthroplasty. The present study was conducted to determine variations of two markers in arthroplasty and infection incidence in Iranian patients. Materials and Methods: This prospective study was carried out in Isfahan’s educational treatment centers from 2009 to 2011 on patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and total hip arthroplasty (THA) surgical operations. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) was measured by Sed rate device (Lena) and C-reactive protein (CRP) by autoanalyzer device (Erba) with the unit of ng/dL. The patients underwent ESR and CRP tests the day before operation, the day of operation, and 1, 2, 5, and 15 days and 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after operation. Results: Mean ESR increased during the first 5 days then decreased gradually lasting for 3 months. After 1 year it increased to a level higher than before the operation. The variations in ESR values were 19.1 ± 12.9 before the operation and 21.14 ± 10.8 after 1 year with significant difference (P < 0.001). The level of CRP had an upward trend from the first day after operation and reached its maximum on the second day, then had a downward trend up to 1 month after the operation; however, it did not reach its preoperative level during 1 year. Conclusion: ESR and CRP and their variations can be suitable factors to detect probable infections in patients undergoing TKA and THA operations.

  14. Variations in ESR and CRP in total knee arthroplasty and total hip arthroplasty in Iranian patients from 2009 to 2011

    PubMed Central

    Nazem, Khalilolah; Motififard, Mehdi; Yousefian, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Implantation of joint prosthesis, either in the knee or in the hip, may cause some problems such as an infection, so that a timely treatment is essential. In this respect, discovering a marker detecting the incidence of an infection is one of the requirements of arthroplasty. The present study was conducted to determine variations of two markers in arthroplasty and infection incidence in Iranian patients. Materials and Methods: This prospective study was carried out in Isfahan’s educational treatment centers from 2009 to 2011 on patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and total hip arthroplasty (THA) surgical operations. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) was measured by Sed rate device (Lena) and C-reactive protein (CRP) by autoanalyzer device (Erba) with the unit of ng/dL. The patients underwent ESR and CRP tests the day before operation, the day of operation, and 1, 2, 5, and 15 days and 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after operation. Results: Mean ESR increased during the first 5 days then decreased gradually lasting for 3 months. After 1 year it increased to a level higher than before the operation. The variations in ESR values were 19.1 ± 12.9 before the operation and 21.14 ± 10.8 after 1 year with significant difference (P < 0.001). The level of CRP had an upward trend from the first day after operation and reached its maximum on the second day, then had a downward trend up to 1 month after the operation; however, it did not reach its preoperative level during 1 year. Conclusion: ESR and CRP and their variations can be suitable factors to detect probable infections in patients undergoing TKA and THA operations. PMID:27656617

  15. Clinical experience with novel oral anticoagulants for thromboprophylaxis after elective hip and knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Messerschmidt, Cory; Friedman, Richard J

    2015-04-01

    Anticoagulant medications help to reduce the risk of thromboembolic events after total hip arthroplasty and total knee arthroplasty. Traditionally, this has been accomplished with medications, such as low-molecular-weight heparin and warfarin. However, these traditional anticoagulants possess a variety of shortcomings that leave much room for improvement. A new class of oral anticoagulants is now available, and present a more convenient option for safe and efficacious thromboprophylaxis in post arthroplasty patients, particularly in the outpatient setting. This review focuses on the direct thrombin inhibitor, dabigatran, and the selective factor Xa inhibitors, rivaroxaban and apixaban, and the clinical data to date about their use in total hip arthroplasty and total knee arthroplasty patients. PMID:25767271

  16. Arthroplasty Utilization in the United States is Predicted by Age-Specific Population Groups.

    PubMed

    Bashinskaya, Bronislava; Zimmerman, Ryan M; Walcott, Brian P; Antoci, Valentin

    2012-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a common indication for hip and knee arthroplasty. An accurate assessment of current trends in healthcare utilization as they relate to arthroplasty may predict the needs of a growing elderly population in the United States. First, incidence data was queried from the United States Nationwide Inpatient Sample from 1993 to 2009. Patients undergoing total knee and hip arthroplasty were identified. Then, the United States Census Bureau was queried for population data from the same study period as well as to provide future projections. Arthroplasty followed linear regression models with the population group >64 years in both hip and knee groups. Projections for procedure incidence in the year 2050 based on these models were calculated to be 1,859,553 cases (hip) and 4,174,554 cases (knee). The need for hip and knee arthroplasty is expected to grow significantly in the upcoming years, given population growth predictions.

  17. ELIGIBILITY FOR THE HIP-RESURFACING ARTHROPLASTY PROCEDURE: AN EVALUATION ON 592 HIPS

    PubMed Central

    Queiroz, Roberto Dantas; Faria, Rafael Salomon Silva; Duarte, David Marcelo; Takano, Marcelo Itiro; Sugiyama, Mauricio Morita

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the percentage of ideal patients who would be eligible for hip-resurfacing surgery at a reference service for hip arthroplasty. Methods: Out of all the cases of hip arthroplasty operated at Hospital do Servidor Público Estadual de São Paulo (HSPE) between January 2009 and December 2010, we assessed a total of 592 procedures that would fit the criteria for indication for resurfacing arthroplasty, after clinical and radiological evaluation according to the criteria established by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and by Seyler et al. Results: Among the total number of hip replacement arthroplasty cases, 5.74% of the patients were eligible. Among the patients who underwent primary arthroplasty, we found that 8.23% presented ideal conditions for this procedure. Conclusion: The study demonstrated that this type of surgery still has a limited role among hip surgery methods. PMID:27047851

  18. Narrowing Participation Gaps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hand, Victoria; Kirtley, Karmen; Matassa, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Shrinking the achievement gap in mathematics is a tall order. One way to approach this challenge is to think about how the achievement gap manifests itself in the classroom and take concrete action. For example, opportunities to participate in activities that involve mathematical reasoning and argumentation in a safe and supportive manner are…

  19. The National "Expertise Gap"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Kendra

    2005-01-01

    This article discusses the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation's report, "Diversity and the Ph.D.," released in May, which documents in troubling detail the exact dimensions of what the foundation's president, Dr. Robert Weisbuch, is calling the national "expertise gap." Weisbuch states that the expertise gap extends beyond the…

  20. Confronting the Achievement Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, David

    2007-01-01

    This article talks about the large achievement gap between children of color and their white peers. The reasons for the achievement gap are varied. First, many urban minorities come from a background of poverty. One of the detrimental effects of growing up in poverty is receiving inadequate nourishment at a time when bodies and brains are rapidly…

  1. California: Emigrant Gap

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  Emigrant Gap Fire, California     View Larger ... The most prominent plume arises from the Emigrant Gap Fire, located about 40 kilometers west of Lake Tahoe. The animated panorama ... left is Mount Shasta. As of August 30, 2001, the US Forest Service reported the total year-to-date area burned in Northern ...

  2. Knowledge Gaps, Social Locators, and Media Schemata: Gaps, Reverse Gaps, and Gaps of Disaffection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fredin, Eric S.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Studies a public school controversy and finds a knowledge gap--a gap of disaffection. Finds that, among women only, higher education leads to greater knowledge but does so partly through reduced trust of government and lower perceived fairness of the news media. Shows similar findings with other less powerful groups. (SR)

  3. The Parenting Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeves, Richard V.; Howard, Kimberly

    2013-01-01

    The parenting gap is a big factor in the opportunity gap. The chances of upward social mobility are lower for children with parents struggling to do a good job--in terms of creating a supportive and stimulating home environment. Children lucky enough to have strong parents are more likely to succeed at all the critical life stages, which means…

  4. Anion gap acidosis.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, K; Szerlip, H M

    1998-01-01

    Although an anion gap at less than 20 mEq/L rarely has a defined etiology, significant elevations in the anion gap almost always signify presence of an acidosis that can be easily identified. Anion gap acidoses can be divided into those caused by lactate accumulation, ketoacid production, toxin/drugs, and uremia. Lactic acidoses caused by decreased oxygen delivery or defective oxygen utilization are associated with high mortality. The treatment of lactic acidosis is controversial. The use of bicarbonate to increase pH is rarely successful and, by generating PCO2, may worsen outcome. Ketoacidosis is usually secondary to diabetes or alcohol. Treatment is aimed at turning off ketogenesis and repairing fluid and electrolyte abnormalities. Methanol, ethylene glycol, and salicylates are responsible for the majority of toxin-induced anion gap acidoses. Both methanol and ethylene glycol are associated with severe acidoses and elevated osmolar gaps. Treatment of both is alcohol infusion to decrease formation of toxic metabolites and dialyses to remove toxins. Salicylate toxicity usually is associated with a mild metabolic acidosis and a respiratory alkalosis. Uremia is associated with a mild acidosis secondary to decreased ammonia secretion and an anion gap caused by the retention of unmeasured anions. A decrease in anion gap is caused by numerous mechanisms and thus has little clinical utility.

  5. SPARK GAP SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Neal, R.B.

    1957-12-17

    An improved triggered spark gap switch is described, capable of precisely controllable firing time while switching very large amounts of power. The invention in general comprises three electrodes adjustably spaced and adapted to have a large potential impressed between the outer electrodes. The central electrode includes two separate elements electrically connected togetaer and spaced apart to define a pair of spark gaps between the end electrodes. Means are provided to cause the gas flow in the switch to pass towards the central electrode, through a passage in each separate element, and out an exit disposed between the two separate central electrode elements in order to withdraw ions from the spark gap.

  6. Gaps in Oncology

    Cancer.gov

    The first plenary of the EPEC-O (Education in Palliative and End-of-Life Care for Oncology) Self-Study Original Version provides background for the curriculum and identifies gaps in current and desired comprehensive cancer care.

  7. Fiber optic gap gauge

    DOEpatents

    Wood, Billy E.; Groves, Scott E.; Larsen, Greg J.; Sanchez, Roberto J.

    2006-11-14

    A lightweight, small size, high sensitivity gauge for indirectly measuring displacement or absolute gap width by measuring axial strain in an orthogonal direction to the displacement/gap width. The gap gauge includes a preferably titanium base having a central tension bar with springs connecting opposite ends of the tension bar to a pair of end connector bars, and an elongated bow spring connected to the end connector bars with a middle section bowed away from the base to define a gap. The bow spring is capable of producing an axial strain in the base proportional to a displacement of the middle section in a direction orthogonal to the base. And a strain sensor, such as a Fabry-Perot interferometer strain sensor, is connected to measure the axial strain in the base, so that the displacement of the middle section may be indirectly determined from the measurement of the axial strain in the base.

  8. Photonic band gap materials

    SciTech Connect

    Soukoulis, C.M. |

    1993-12-31

    An overview of the theoretical and experimental efforts in obtaining a photonic band gap, a frequency band in three-dimensional dielectric structures in which electromagnetic waves are forbidden, is presented.

  9. Patient-reported outcome measures in arthroplasty registries

    PubMed Central

    Eresian Chenok, Kate; Bohm, Eric; Lübbeke, Anne; Denissen, Geke; Dunn, Jennifer; Lyman, Stephen; Franklin, Patricia; Dunbar, Michael; Overgaard, Søren; Garellick, Göran; Dawson, Jill

    2016-01-01

    The International Society of Arthroplasty Registries (ISAR) Steering Committee established the Patient-Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs) Working Group to convene, evaluate, and advise on best practices in the selection, administration, and interpretation of PROMs and to support the adoption and use of PROMs for hip and knee arthroplasty in registries worldwide. The 2 main types of PROMs include generic (general health) PROMs, which provide a measure of general health for any health state, and specific PROMs, which focus on specific symptoms, diseases, organs, body regions, or body functions. The establishment of a PROM instrument requires the fulfillment of methodological standards and rigorous testing to ensure that it is valid, reliable, responsive, and acceptable to the intended population. A survey of the 41 ISAR member registries showed that 8 registries administered a PROMs program that covered all elective hip or knee arthroplasty patients and 6 registries collected PROMs for sample populations; 1 other registry had planned but had not started collection of PROMs. The most common generic instruments used were the EuroQol 5 dimension health outcome survey (EQ-5D) and the Short Form 12 health survey (SF-12) or the similar Veterans RAND 12-item health survey (VR-12). The most common specific PROMs were the Hip disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS), the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), the Oxford Hip Score (OHS), the Oxford Knee Score (OKS), the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC), and the University of California at Los Angeles Activity Score (UCLA). PMID:27168175

  10. Patient-reported outcome measures in arthroplasty registries

    PubMed Central

    Bohm, Eric; Franklin, Patricia; Lyman, Stephen; Denissen, Geke; Dawson, Jill; Dunn, Jennifer; Eresian Chenok, Kate; Dunbar, Michael; Overgaard, Søren; Garellick, Göran; Lübbeke, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Abstract — The International Society of Arthroplasty Registries (ISAR) Patient-Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs) Working Group have evaluated and recommended best practices in the selection, administration, and interpretation of PROMs for hip and knee arthroplasty registries. The 2 generic PROMs in common use are the Short Form health surveys (SF-36 or SF-12) and EuroQol 5-dimension (EQ-5D). The Working Group recommends that registries should choose specific PROMs that have been appropriately developed with good measurement properties for arthroplasty patients. The Working Group recommend the use of a 1-item pain question (“During the past 4 weeks, how would you describe the pain you usually have in your [right/left] [hip/knee]?”; response: none, very mild, mild, moderate, or severe) and a single-item satisfaction outcome (“How satisfied are you with your [right/left] [hip/knee] replacement?”; response: very unsatisfied, dissatisfied, neutral, satisfied, or very satisfied). Survey logistics include patient instructions, paper- and electronic-based data collection, reminders for follow-up, centralized as opposed to hospital-based follow-up, sample size, patient- or joint-specific evaluation, collection intervals, frequency of response, missing values, and factors in establishing a PROMs registry program. The Working Group recommends including age, sex, diagnosis at joint, general health status preoperatively, and joint pain and function score in case-mix adjustment models. Interpretation and statistical analysis should consider the absolute level of pain, function, and general health status as well as improvement, missing data, approaches to analysis and case-mix adjustment, minimal clinically important difference, and minimal detectable change. The Working Group recommends data collection immediately before and 1 year after surgery, a threshold of 60% for acceptable frequency of response, documentation of non-responders, and documentation of incomplete or

  11. Clinical Biomechanics of Wear in Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Callaghan, John J; Pedersen, Douglas R; Johnston, Richard C; Brown, Thomas D

    2003-01-01

    Complementary clinical and laboratory studies were performed to identify variables associated with polyethylene wear following total hip replacement, and to elucidate the mechanisms responsible for accelerated wear in the total hip arthroplasty construct. Observational cohort studies were performed using a prospective clinical database of more than 4000 consecutive primary total hip arthroplasties performed by a single surgeon, to identify wear-related variables. These variables included head size, acetabular/femoral component impingement, and third body debris. Novel digital edge detection techniques were developed and employed to accurately measure wear, and to determine the relationships of head size and third body debris to acceleration of wear. A novel slidingdistance-coupled finite element model was formulated and employed to examine the mechanisms responsible for wear. The long-term cohort studies demonstrated smaller head sizes to be associated with less wear. Third body debris generated from cable fretting was associated with an increase in wear, osteolysis, and acetabular loosening, especially with larger head sizes. The sliding-distance-coupled finite element model replicated the wear rates occurring in vitro and in vivo, demonstrating the importance of sliding distance on polyethylene wear following total hip arthroplasty. It also demonstrated substantial increases in wear associated with femoral head scratching from third body debris. Further extension of the finite element formulation demonstrated the potential for acetabular component rim damage from impingement wear, and the enhanced potential for third body ingress to the bearing surface with larger head sizes. Edge detection wear measurement techniques demonstrated that early wear rates were predictive of long-term wear rates. These complementary clinical and laboratory investigations have provided insight into 1) the significance of sliding distance and physiologic loci of motion as contributing

  12. Medialized Versus Lateralized Center of Rotation in Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Streit, Jonathan J; Shishani, Yousef; Gobezie, Reuben

    2015-12-01

    Reverse shoulder arthroplasty may be performed using components that medialize or lateralize the center of rotation. The purpose of this prospective study was to directly compare 2 reverse shoulder arthroplasty designs. Two treatment groups and 1 control group were identified. Group I comprised 9 patients using a medialized Grammont-style (GRM) prosthesis with a neck-shaft angle of 155°. Group II comprised 9 patients using a lateralized (LAT) prosthesis with a neck-shaft angle of 135°. Pre- and postoperative assessment of range of motion, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score, and visual analog scale pain score were performed. Radiographic measurements of lateral humeral offset and acromiohumeral distance were compared. The GRM prosthesis achieved greater forward flexion (143.9° vs 115.6°; P=.05), whereas the LAT achieved greater external rotation (35.0° vs 28.3°; P=.07). The lateral humeral offset was greater for the LAT prosthesis compared with the GRM prosthesis, but this distance was not significantly different from that found in the control group. The acromiohumeral distance was significantly greater in the GRM prosthesis group compared with both the LAT and the control groups. The results of this study confirm that different reverse shoulder arthroplasty designs produce radiographically different anatomy. Whereas the GRM prosthesis significantly alters the anatomy of the shoulder, the LAT design can preserve some anatomic relationships found in the normal shoulder. The clinical outcomes indicate that this may have an effect on range of motion, with traditional designs achieving greater forward flexion and lateralized designs achieving greater external rotation.

  13. Oral Antibiotics are Effective for Highly Resistant Hip Arthroplasty Infections

    PubMed Central

    Esteban, Jaime; García-Cimbrelo, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    Infected arthroplasties reportedly have a lower eradication rate when caused by highly resistant and/or polymicrobial isolates and in these patients most authors recommend intravenous antibiotics. We asked whether two-stage revision with interim oral antibiotics could eradicate these infections. We prospectively followed 36 patients (mean age, 71.8 years) with late hip arthroplasty infections. Combinations of oral antibiotics were prescribed according to cultures, biofilm, and intracellular effectiveness. The minimum followup was 1 year (mean, 4.4 years; range, 1–12 years). We presumed eradication in the absence of clinical, serologic, and radiographic signs of infection. Infection was eradicated in all 13 patients with highly resistant bacteria who completed a two-stage protocol (10 with methicillin-resistant Staphylococci) and in eight of 11 patients treated with only the first stage (and six of nine with methicillin-resistant Staphylococci). Infection was eradicated in six of six patients with polymicrobial isolates (of sensitive and/or resistant bacteria) who completed a two-stage protocol and in five of seven with polymicrobial isolates treated with only the first surgery. The Harris hip score averaged 88.1 (range, 70–98) in patients who underwent reimplantation and 56.8 (range, 32–76) in patients who underwent resection arthroplasty. Long cycles of combined oral antibiotics plus a two-stage surgical exchange appear a promising alternative for infections by highly resistant bacteria, methicillin-resistant Staphylococci, and polymicrobial infections. Level of Evidence: Level IV, prognostic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:19333670

  14. Compartment syndrome after total knee arthroplasty: regarding a clinical case.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Ana Alexandra da Costa; Marques, Pedro Miguel Dantas Costa; Sá, Pedro Miguel Gomes; Oliveira, Carolina Fernandes; da Silva, Bruno Pombo Ferreira; de Sousa, Cristina Maria Varino

    2015-01-01

    Although compartment syndrome is a rare complication of total knee arthroplasty, it is one of the most devastating complications. It is defined as a situation of increased pressure within a closed osteofascial space that impairs the circulation and the functioning of the tissues inside this space, thereby leading to ischemia and tissue dysfunction. Here, a clinical case of a patient who was followed up in orthopedic outpatient consultations due to right gonarthrosis is presented. The patient had a history of arthroscopic meniscectomy and presented knee flexion of 10° before the operation, which consisted of total arthroplasty of the right knee. The operation seemed to be free from intercurrences, but the patient evolved with compartment syndrome of the ipsilateral leg after the operation. Since compartment syndrome is a true surgical emergency, early recognition and treatment of this condition through fasciotomy is crucial in order to avoid amputation, limb dysfunction, kidney failure and death. However, it may be difficult to make the diagnosis and cases may not be recognized if the cause of compartment syndrome is unusual or if the patient is under epidural analgesia and/or peripheral nerve block, which thus camouflages the main warning sign, i.e. disproportional pain. In addition, edema of the limb that underwent the intervention is common after total knee arthroplasty operations. This study presents a review of the literature and signals that the possible rarity of cases is probably due to failure to recognize this condition in a timely manner and to placing these patients in other diagnostic groups that are less likely, such as neuropraxia caused by using a tourniquet or peripheral nerve injury.

  15. Medialized Versus Lateralized Center of Rotation in Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Streit, Jonathan J; Shishani, Yousef; Gobezie, Reuben

    2015-12-01

    Reverse shoulder arthroplasty may be performed using components that medialize or lateralize the center of rotation. The purpose of this prospective study was to directly compare 2 reverse shoulder arthroplasty designs. Two treatment groups and 1 control group were identified. Group I comprised 9 patients using a medialized Grammont-style (GRM) prosthesis with a neck-shaft angle of 155°. Group II comprised 9 patients using a lateralized (LAT) prosthesis with a neck-shaft angle of 135°. Pre- and postoperative assessment of range of motion, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score, and visual analog scale pain score were performed. Radiographic measurements of lateral humeral offset and acromiohumeral distance were compared. The GRM prosthesis achieved greater forward flexion (143.9° vs 115.6°; P=.05), whereas the LAT achieved greater external rotation (35.0° vs 28.3°; P=.07). The lateral humeral offset was greater for the LAT prosthesis compared with the GRM prosthesis, but this distance was not significantly different from that found in the control group. The acromiohumeral distance was significantly greater in the GRM prosthesis group compared with both the LAT and the control groups. The results of this study confirm that different reverse shoulder arthroplasty designs produce radiographically different anatomy. Whereas the GRM prosthesis significantly alters the anatomy of the shoulder, the LAT design can preserve some anatomic relationships found in the normal shoulder. The clinical outcomes indicate that this may have an effect on range of motion, with traditional designs achieving greater forward flexion and lateralized designs achieving greater external rotation. PMID:26652330

  16. Reducing surgical site infection in arthroplasty of the lower limb

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, R.; Jameson, S. S.; Sanders, R. D.; Sargant, N. J.; Muller, S. D.; Meek, R. M. D.; Reed, M. R.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To review the current best surgical practice and detail a multi-disciplinary approach that could further reduce joint replacement infection. Methods Review of relevant literature indexed in PubMed. Results Surgical site infection is a major complication following arthroplasty. Despite its rarity in contemporary orthopaedic practice, it remains difficult to treat and is costly in terms of both patient morbidity and long-term health care resources. Conclusions Emphasis on education of patients and all members of the health-care team and raising awareness in how to participate in preventative efforts is imperative. PMID:23610703

  17. Acute Failure of a Glenoid Component in Anatomic Shoulder Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Boardman, III, Norman D.

    2016-01-01

    Glenoid loosening is the most common cause of failure in primary total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) and often occurs years after the initial surgery. It is rare for a glenoid component to fail acutely. Several case reports of complete glenoid dissociation appear in the literature. It is important to report these failures to identify technical errors or component design flaws to improve outcomes in TSA. In this case report, we present an unrecognized acute failure of a cemented hybrid glenoid component at the time of surgery. PMID:27555976

  18. Hip Arthroplasty in Obese Patients: Rising Prevalence–Standard Procedures?

    PubMed Central

    Skutek, Michael; Wirries, Nils; von Lewinski, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    We examined our experience and, in particular, complications associated with total hip arthroplasty in obese and morbidly obese patients. We prospectively gathered 50 patients in a matched control series including 25 obese and morbidly obese patients. All patients were operated using the direct lateral approach and standard postoperative protocols. Operating room time, complications, dislocations, blood loss, cup position and clinical parameters using the Harris Hip Score and the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index results were compared. Although there were some significant differences in clinical outcomes, standard procedures yielded good overall results and an acceptable rate of complications. Details approaching this patient entity are being discussed. PMID:27433302

  19. Internal iliac artery pseudoaneurysm in primary total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Agarwala, Sanjay; Mohrir, Ganesh; Moonot, Pradeep

    2016-01-01

    Vascular injury is one of the rare complications of primary total hip arthroplasty (THA). We report an unusual case of lobulated pseudoaneurysm arising from one of the branches of the left internal iliac artery during acetabulum preparation in THA, which was successfully treated with coil embolization and multidisciplinary care. After 6 years follow up, patient did not have any symptoms related to the hip replacement. We recommend that surgeons should be extremely cautious while drilling medial wall of the acetabulum for depth assessment. Aggressive multidisciplinary approach, including possible support from an interventional radiologist is required for the treatment of such vascular injuries. PMID:27053814

  20. Hip Arthroplasty in Obese Patients: Rising Prevalence-Standard Procedures?

    PubMed

    Skutek, Michael; Wirries, Nils; von Lewinski, Gabriela

    2016-06-27

    We examined our experience and, in particular, complications associated with total hip arthroplasty in obese and morbidly obese patients. We prospectively gathered 50 patients in a matched control series including 25 obese and morbidly obese patients. All patients were operated using the direct lateral approach and standard postoperative protocols. Operating room time, complications, dislocations, blood loss, cup position and clinical parameters using the Harris Hip Score and the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index results were compared. Although there were some significant differences in clinical outcomes, standard procedures yielded good overall results and an acceptable rate of complications. Details approaching this patient entity are being discussed. PMID:27433302

  1. Two Case Studies Related to Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Hale, David

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Report on Two Case Studies related to Total Knee Arthroplasty Previously Discussed by AKS Members Methods: Case Series Case 1: A 76 year old woman requiring a right total knee replacement in the presence of marked dystrophic calcification affecting the quadriceps tendon on a background of having sustained a post operative quadriceps tendon rupture post left TKR in 2013 Case 2: Management issues related to performing a TKR in a 80 year old woman with a possible past history of TB affecting the joint Conclusion: Both procedures went smoothly and particularly as advice was given by AKS members, these are presented largely for feedback.

  2. Physical rehabilitation after total joint arthroplasty in companion animals.

    PubMed

    Marcellin-Little, Denis J; Doyle, Nancy D; Pyke, Joanna Freeman

    2015-01-01

    Patients who have total joint arthroplasty have varying needs related to rehabilitation. In the short term, rehabilitation should be used in all dogs to identify high-risk patients and to minimize the likelihood of postoperative complications. Many patients undergoing total hip replacement recover uneventfully without needing long-term physiotherapy. All patients undergoing total knee replacement and total elbow replacement need rehabilitation to restore limb use and maximize their functional recovery. This article presents rehabilitation considerations for companion animals undergoing total hip replacement, total knee replacement, and total elbow replacement; postoperative complications and how to mitigate risks; and anticipated patient outcomes.

  3. Acute periprosthetic fractures of the acetabulum after total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Potty, Anish G; Corona, Jacqueline; Manning, Blaine T; Le, Amanda; Saleh, Khaled J

    2014-01-01

    Although periprosthetic fractures of the acetabulum are relatively uncommon after total hip arthroplasty, a variety of patient-, surgeon-, and implant-related risk factors can contribute to the occurrence of this serious complication. These risk factors, combined with the increased use of cementless acetabular cups, will likely result in an increased prevalence of these fractures in the future. By better understanding the risk factors, classification schemes, and treatment options for periprosthetic fractures of the acetabulum, orthopaedic surgeons can achieve better outcomes for their patients.

  4. Acute Failure of a Glenoid Component in Anatomic Shoulder Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Daner Iii, William E; Boardman Iii, Norman D

    2016-01-01

    Glenoid loosening is the most common cause of failure in primary total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) and often occurs years after the initial surgery. It is rare for a glenoid component to fail acutely. Several case reports of complete glenoid dissociation appear in the literature. It is important to report these failures to identify technical errors or component design flaws to improve outcomes in TSA. In this case report, we present an unrecognized acute failure of a cemented hybrid glenoid component at the time of surgery. PMID:27555976

  5. An intramedullary cement spacer in total hip arthroplasty .

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, R G; Thevarajan, K; Kok, C S; Sivapathasundaram, N; George, S V

    1998-02-01

    Revision arthroplasty of the hip is often complicated by infection, bone loss, and perioperative fracture of the femur. A simple, inexpensive spacer that keeps tissue planes intact and prevents soft tissue contracture during the interoperative period of a 2-stage revision is described. This can provide intramedullary support to a fractured or weak femur and enable local antibiotic delivery, as well as permit limited mobilization of the patient. It can be easily fabricated during surgery using universally available materials and can be tailored for specific requirements. Such a spacer was used in 5 cases. The experience is presented, and the technique and pitfalls are discussed. PMID:9526214

  6. PAIN FOLLOWING TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY – A SYSTEMATIC APPROACH

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Wilson Mello; Migon, Eduardo Zaniol; Zabeu, Jose Luis Amim

    2015-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is known to be a successful procedure. The aging of the population and the growing demand for quality of life have greatly increased the indications for the procedure. Nonetheless, TKA presents some complications that still lack definitive resolution. Pain after TKA is caused by a myriad of reasons that need to be systematically studied in order to reach the correct diagnosis and treatment. History, physical examination, laboratory tests and imaging examinations must all be included in the workup and repeated until a plausible reason has been identified, since if pain is the only indication for TKA revision, the results may be catastrophic. PMID:27022583

  7. Innovations in Total Knee Arthroplasty: Improved Technical Precision, But Unclear Clinical Benefits.

    PubMed

    Keeney, James A

    2016-07-01

    Total knee arthroplasty has been an effective treatment for advanced degenerative joint disease. Traditional knee designs and surgical approaches have resulted in consistently high performance, but some patients may remain dissatisfied after their surgery. Several surgical innovations, including accelerometer-based navigation, patient-specific instrumentation, and robotic-assisted total knee arthroplasty, have been developed to improve the accuracy and precision of total knee arthroplasty surgery, with anticipated secondary benefits of improved functional outcomes and implant survivorship. This article reviews the current status of these technologies as reported in contemporary orthopedic literature. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(4):217-220.]. PMID:27434889

  8. Inflammatory pseudotumor of the hip: a complication of arthroplasty to be recognized by the radiologist*

    PubMed Central

    Boas, Raquel de Melo Santos Vilas; Madeira, Ivana Andrade; Lopes, Alexia Abuhid; Paiva, Edson Barreto; Rodrigues, André Soares

    2015-01-01

    Soft tissue complications following hip arthroplasty may occur either in cases of total hip arthroplasty or in hip resurfacing, a technique that has become popular in cases involving young patients. Both orthopedic and radiological literatures are now calling attention to these symptomatic periprosthetic soft tissue masses called inflammatory pseudotumors or aseptic lymphocytic vasculites-associated lesions. Pseudotumors are associated with pain, instability, neuropathy, and premature loosening of prosthetic components, frequently requiring early and difficult reoperation. Magnetic resonance imaging plays a relevant role in the evaluation of soft tissue changes in the painful hip after arthroplasty, ranging from early periprosthetic fluid collections to necrosis and more extensive tissue damage. PMID:26543283

  9. Catastrophic failure of ceramic-on-ceramic total hip arthroplasty presenting as squeaking hip

    PubMed Central

    Malem, David; Nagy, Mathias Thomas; Ghosh, Sabyasachi; Shah, Bhavik

    2013-01-01

    A 68-year-old woman with osteoarthritis had a ceramic-on-ceramic left total hip arthroplasty, including ceramic femoral head and acetabular liner. At 5 years after surgery, the patient developed onset of a very loud squeaking noise, which could be heard 25 m from her, associated with limited hip movement. Findings at revision surgery included a broken ceramic femoral head component, complete wear of the ceramic acetabular component, and black wear debris. Squeaking hip after ceramic-on-ceramic total hip arthroplasty may be associated with catastrophic failure of the arthroplasty components. PMID:23429031

  10. Robotic Tube-Gap Inspector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Jeffrey L.; Gutow, David A.; Maslakowski, John E.

    1993-01-01

    Robotic vision system measures small gaps between nearly parallel tubes. Robot-held video camera examines closely spaced tubes while computer determines gaps between tubes. Video monitor simultaneously displays data on gaps.

  11. Better survival of hybrid total knee arthroplasty compared to cemented arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Petursson, Gunnar; Fenstad, Anne Marie; Havelin, Leif Ivar; Gøthesen, Øystein; Lygre, Stein Håkon Låstad; Röhrl, Stephan M; Furnes, Ove

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose — There have been few comparative studies on total knee replacement (TKR) with cemented tibia and uncemented femur (hybrid TKR). Previous studies have not shown any difference in revision rate between cemented and hybrid fixation, but these studies had few hybrid prostheses. We have evaluated the outcome of hybrid TKR based on data from the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register (NAR). Patients and methods — We compared 4,585 hybrid TKRs to 20,095 cemented TKRs with risk of revision for any cause as the primary endpoint. We included primary TKRs without patella resurfacing that were reported to the NAR during the years 1999–2012. To minimize the possible confounding effect of prosthesis brands, only brands that were used both as hybrids and cemented in more than 200 cases were included. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Cox regression analysis were done with adjustment for age, sex, and preoperative diagnosis. To include death as a competing risk, cumulative incidence function estimates were calculated. Results — Estimated survival at 11 years was 94.3% (95% CI: 93.9–94.7) in the cemented TKR group and 96.3% (CI: 95.3–97.3) in the hybrid TKR group. The adjusted Cox regression analysis showed a lower risk of revision in the hybrid group (relative risk = 0.58, CI: 0.48–0.72, p < 0.001). The hybrid group included 3 brands of prostheses: LCS classic, LCS complete, and Profix. Profix hybrid TKR had lower risk of revision than cemented TKR, but the LCS classic and LCS complete did not. Kaplan-Meier estimated survival at 11 years was 96.8% (CI: 95.6–98.0) in the hybrid Profix group and 95.2% (CI: 94.6–95.8) in the cemented Profix group. Mean operating time was 17 min longer in the cemented group. Interpretation — Survivorship of the hybrid TKR at 11 years was better than that for cemented TKR, or the same, depending on the brand of prosthesis. Hybrid fixation appears to be a safe and time-efficient alternative to cemented fixation in

  12. Metal-on-Metal Total Hip Resurfacing Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The objective of this review was to assess the safety and effectiveness of metal on metal (MOM) hip resurfacing arthroplasty for young patients compared with that of total hip replacement (THR) in the same population. Clinical Need Total hip replacement has proved to be very effective for late middle-aged and elderly patients with severe degenerative diseases of the hips. As indications for THR began to include younger patients and those with a more active life style, the longevity of the implant became a concern. Evidence suggests that these patients experience relatively higher rates of early implant failure and the need for revision. The Swedish hip registry, for example, has demonstrated a survival rate in excess of 80% at 20 years for those aged over 65 years, whereas this figure was 33% by 16 years in those aged under 55 years. Hip resurfacing arthroplasty is a bone-conserving alternative to THR that restores normal joint biomechanics and load transfer. The technique has been used around the world for more than 10 years, specifically in the United Kingdom and other European countries. The Technology Metal-on-metal hip resurfacing arthroplasty is an alternative procedure to conventional THR in younger patients. Hip resurfacing arthroplasty is less invasive than THR and addresses the problem of preserving femoral bone stock at the initial operation. This means that future hip revisions are possible with THR if the initial MOM arthroplasty becomes less effective with time in these younger patients. The procedure involves the removal and replacement of the surface of the femoral head with a hollow metal hemisphere, which fits into a metal acetabular cup. Hip resurfacing arthroplasty is a technically more demanding procedure than is conventional THR. In hip resurfacing, the femoral head is retained, which makes it much more difficult to access the acetabular cup. However, hip resurfacing arthroplasty has several advantages over a

  13. Metal ion levels and functional results after either resurfacing hip arthroplasty or conventional metal-on-metal hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Modern metal-on-metal hip resurfacing was introduced as a bone-preserving method of joint reconstruction for young and active patients; however, the large diameter of the bearing surfaces is of concern for potentially increased metal ion release. Patients and methods 71 patients (< 65 years old) were randomly assigned to receive either a resurfacing (R) hip arthroplasty (n = 38) or a conventional metal-on-metal (C) hip arthroplasty (n = 33). Functional outcomes were assessed preoperatively and at 6, 12, and 24 months. Cobalt and chromium blood levels were analyzed preoperatively and at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months. Results All functional outcome scores improved for both groups. At 12 and 24 months, the median UCLA activity score was 8 in the R patients and 7 in the C patients (p < 0.05). At 24 months, OHS was median 16 in C patients and 13 in R patients (p < 0.05). However, in spite of randomization, UCLA scores also appeared to be higher in R patients at baseline. Satisfaction was similar in both groups at 24 months. Cobalt concentrations were statistically significantly higher for R patients only at 3 and 6 months. Chromium levels remained significantly higher for R patients until 24 months. No pseudotumors were encountered in either group. One R patient was revised for early aseptic loosening and in 2 C patients a cup insert was exchanged for recurrent dislocation. Interpretation R patients scored higher on UCLA, OHS, and satisfaction at some time points; however, as for the UCLA, preoperative levels were already in favor of R. The differences, although statistically significant, were of minor clinical importance. Chromium blood levels were statistically significantly higher for R patients at all follow-up measurements, whereas for cobalt this was only observed up to 6 months. The true value of resurfacing hip arthroplasty over conventional metal-on-metal hip arthroplasty will be determined by longer follow-up and a possible shift of balance between their

  14. Difference in clinical outcome between total shoulder arthroplasty and reverse shoulder arthroplasty used in hemiarthroplasty revision surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hartel, Bas Pieter; Alta, Tjarco D.; Sewnath, Miguel E.; Willems, Willem J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The increase of shoulder replacements will lead to a higher revision rate of shoulder arthroplasties. The aim of this study is to evaluate the clinical results of revision surgery performed in our hospital, distinguish the differences in clinical outcome according to revision indication and differences between total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) and reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA) in hemiarthroplasty (HA) revision surgery. Materials and Methods: All patients with an indication for revision of HA were retrospectively included. Clinical evaluation consisted of pre- and post-operative constant scores, disability of arm-shoulder-hand-score (DASH), Dutch translation of the simple shoulder test ((D)SST), Oxford shoulder score test (OSS), short form (SF-36) and the complication rate. Results: From July 1994 to July 2008, 39 patients (40 shoulders) underwent revision arthroplasty. Of 19 patients (19 shoulders) we obtained a complete follow-up. The mean age at revision surgery 69 ± 10 years (range: 46-83) and the mean follow-up 41 ± 31 months (range: 10-113). In 7 cases TSA was used for revision when the cuff was intact, 12 times RSA was performed. The indications for the revision were glenoid erosion (n = 4), humeral component malposition (n = 2), cuff-pathology (n = 12) and infection (n = 1). Postoperative constant score 51.7 ± 11.4 for TSA and 31.1 ± 18.7 for RSA (P = 0.008). The DASH was 48.3 ± 25.1 and 68.7 ± 17.5, respectively (P = 0.09). DSST showed 6 ± 4 and 4 ± 4 (P = 0.414). OSS 41.3 ± 10.1 and 28.1 ± 10.3 (P = 0.017). SF-36 43.3 ± 22.1 and 24.5 ± 12.8 (P = 0.072). Four shoulders (21%) presented four complications. Conclusions: In this study, revision surgery showed poor to reasonable postoperative results and better clinical outcome for TSA. When a revision after HA was needed, and the soft-tissue component of the shoulder was intact, a TSA proved to be a preferable solution. PMID:26288535

  15. Gap Cycling for SWIFT

    PubMed Central

    Corum, Curtis A.; Idiyatullin, Djaudat; Snyder, Carl J.; Garwood, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Purpose SWIFT (SWeep Imaging with Fourier Transformation) is a non-Cartesian MRI method with unique features and capabilities. In SWIFT, radiofrequency (RF) excitation and reception are performed nearly simultaneously, by rapidly switching between transmit and receive during a frequency-swept RF pulse. Because both the transmitted pulse and data acquisition are simultaneously amplitude-modulated in SWIFT (in contrast to continuous RF excitation and uninterrupted data acquisition in more familiar MRI sequences), crosstalk between different frequency bands occurs in the data. This crosstalk leads to a “bulls-eye” artifact in SWIFT images. We present a method to cancel this inter-band crosstalk by cycling the pulse and receive gap positions relative to the un-gapped pulse shape. We call this strategy “gap cycling.” Methods We carry out theoretical analysis, simulation and experiments to characterize the signal chain, resulting artifacts, and their elimination for SWIFT. Results Theoretical analysis reveals the mechanism for gap-cycling’s effectiveness in canceling inter-band crosstalk in the received data. We show phantom and in-vivo results demonstrating bulls-eye artifact free images. Conclusion Gap cycling is an effective method to remove bulls-eye artifact resulting from inter-band crosstalk in SWIFT data. PMID:24604286

  16. Waiting for hip arthroplasty: economic costs and health outcomes.

    PubMed

    Fielden, Jann M; Cumming, J M; Horne, J G; Devane, P A; Slack, A; Gallagher, L M

    2005-12-01

    This prospective cohort study of 153 patients aimed to determine the economic and health costs of waiting for total hip arthroplasty (THA). Health-related quality of life, using self-completed WOMAC and EQ-5D questionnaires, was assessed monthly from enrolment preoperatively to 6 months postsurgery. Monthly cost diaries were used to record costs. The mean waiting time was 5.1 months and mean total cost of waiting for surgery was NZ 4305 dollars(US 2876 dollars) per person (pp) (NZ 1 dollar = US 0.668 dollar). Waiting more than 6 months was associated with a higher total mean cost (NZ 4278 dollars/US 2858 dollars pp) than waiting less than 6 months (NZ 2828 dollars/US 1889 dollars pp; P < .01). Improvements from preoperative to postoperative WOMAC and EQ-5D scores were identified (P < or = .01). Waiting longer led to poorer physical function preoperatively (P < or = .01). Those with poor initial health status showed greater improvement in WOMAC (P = .0001) and EQ-5D (P = .003) measures by 6 months after surgery. Longer waits for total hip arthroplasty incur greater economic costs and deterioration in physical function while waiting. PMID:16376253

  17. Heterotopic Ossification Causing Radiculopathy after Lumbar Total Disc Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Keith L; Hire, Justin M; Jacobs, Jeremy M; Key, Charles C; DeVine, John G

    2015-06-01

    To date, no reports have presented radiculopathy secondary to heterotopic ossification following lumbar total disc arthroplasty. The authors present a previously unpublished complication of lumbar total disk arthroplasty (TDA) secondary to heterotopic ossification (HO) in the spinal canal, and they propose a modification to the McAfee classification of HO. The patient had undergone an L5/S1 lumbar TDA two years prior due to discogenic back pain. His preoperative back pain was significantly relieved, but he developed new, atraumatic onset radiculopathy. Radiographs and a computed tomography myelogram revealed an implant malposition posteriorly with heterotopic bone formation in the canal, causing an impingement of the traversing nerve root. Revision surgery was performed with implant extraction, L5/S1 anterior lumbar interbody fusion, supplemental posterior decompression, and pedicle screw fixation. The patient tolerated the procedure well, with complete resolution of the radicular leg pain. At a two-year follow up, the patient had a solid fusion without subsidence or recurrence of heterotopic bone. This case represents a novel pattern of heterotopic ossification, and it describes a previously unreported cause for implant failure in lumbar disc replacement surgery-reinforcing the importance of proper intraoperative component positioning. We propose a modification to the existing McAfee classification of HO after TDA with the addition of Class V and VI HO. PMID:26097664

  18. Propionibacterium in Shoulder Arthroplasty: What We Think We Know Today.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Jason E; Bumgarner, Roger E; Matsen, Frederick A

    2016-04-01

    ➤ Propionibacterium is a slow-growing gram-positive rod that is part of the normal skin microbiome but can be found on culture of specimens from a large number of patients having revision shoulder arthroplasty performed for pain, stiffness, and component loosening. ➤ Propionibacterium infections do not present with obvious signs of infection, such as swelling, erythema, drainage, or tenderness, but rather are of the so-called stealth type, presenting with unexplained pain, stiffness, or component loosening months to years after the index arthroplasty. ➤ Not all propionibacteria are the same: certain subtypes of Propionibacterium are enriched with virulence factors that may enhance deep infection. ➤ Because propionibacteria typically reside in the pilosebaceous glands of the oily skin of the chest and back, standard surgical skin preparation solutions and even perioperative intravenous antibiotics are often inadequate at sterilizing the incision site; therefore, other prophylactic measures such as meticulous implant handling to avoid contact with dermal structures need to be considered. ➤ Recovery of Propionibacterium from the surgical wounds requires that multiple specimens for culture be taken from different areas of the shoulder to reduce sampling error, and cultures should be held for two weeks on multiple culture media. ➤ Future research efforts can be focused on reducing the risk of implant infection and point-of-care methods for identifying Propionibacterium infections. PMID:27053589

  19. Early recovery after fast-track Oxford unicompartmental knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose After total knee arthroplasty with conventional surgical approach, more than half of the quadriceps extension strength is lost in the first postoperative month. Unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) operated with minimally invasive surgery (MIS) results in less operative trauma. We investigated changes in leg-extension power (LEP) in the first month after MIS Oxford UKA and its relation to pain, knee motion, functional performance, and knee function. Patients and methods In 35 consecutive Oxford UKA patients, LEP was measured 1 week before and 1 month after surgery together with knee motion, knee swelling, the 30-second chair-stand test, and Oxford knee score. Assessment of knee pain at rest and walking was done using a visual analog scale. Results 30 patients were discharged on the day after surgery, and 5 on the second day after surgery. LEP and functional performance reached the preoperative level after 1 month. Only slight postoperative knee swelling was observed with rapid restoration of knee flexion and function. A high level of pain during the first postoperative night and day fell considerably thereafter. None of the patients needed physiotherapy supervision in the first month after discharge. Interpretation Fast-track MIS Oxford UKA with discharge on the day after surgery is safe and leads to early recovery of knee motion and strength even when no physiotherapy is used. PMID:22313368

  20. Heterotopic Ossification Causing Radiculopathy after Lumbar Total Disc Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Keith L.; Jacobs, Jeremy M.; Key, Charles C.; DeVine, John G.

    2015-01-01

    To date, no reports have presented radiculopathy secondary to heterotopic ossification following lumbar total disc arthroplasty. The authors present a previously unpublished complication of lumbar total disk arthroplasty (TDA) secondary to heterotopic ossification (HO) in the spinal canal, and they propose a modification to the McAfee classification of HO. The patient had undergone an L5/S1 lumbar TDA two years prior due to discogenic back pain. His preoperative back pain was significantly relieved, but he developed new, atraumatic onset radiculopathy. Radiographs and a computed tomography myelogram revealed an implant malposition posteriorly with heterotopic bone formation in the canal, causing an impingement of the traversing nerve root. Revision surgery was performed with implant extraction, L5/S1 anterior lumbar interbody fusion, supplemental posterior decompression, and pedicle screw fixation. The patient tolerated the procedure well, with complete resolution of the radicular leg pain. At a two-year follow up, the patient had a solid fusion without subsidence or recurrence of heterotopic bone. This case represents a novel pattern of heterotopic ossification, and it describes a previously unreported cause for implant failure in lumbar disc replacement surgery-reinforcing the importance of proper intraoperative component positioning. We propose a modification to the existing McAfee classification of HO after TDA with the addition of Class V and VI HO. PMID:26097664

  1. The First 50 Years of Total Hip Arthroplasty: Lessons Learned

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Fifty years have passed since the first total hip arthroplasty of the modern era was performed. At this, the vantage point, it is reasonable to review these five decades, inquiring behind the single dominating observation that, in its current form, this operation is one of the most successful of all surgical procedures for the management of end-stage human disease. What are the generic lessons that can be derived from the experience? Succinctly, five major observations appear valuable. They are “skunk works,” “Pasteur’s motto,” “the totally unexpected,” “research solutions,” and “the role of alternatives.” “Skunk works,” an industrial management term, might be characterized as an innovative endeavor that is offline and off-budget resulting from the relentless pursuit of a vivid dream by creative zealots who eschew defeat. Pasteur’s motto dealt with serendipity, which was crucial to total hip arthroplasty progress. The totally unexpected is represented by an entirely new manmade disease, “periprosthetic osteolysis.” The research solutions are represented by the complex, sophisticated contemporary research that has unraveled periprosthetic osteolysis and suggested modes of correction. Finally, the application of “alternatives” has characterized major progress. Importantly, these, or similar generic observations, may provide insights into important progress in the future. PMID:18982399

  2. Analysis and Treatment of Complications after Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Song; Lee, Jae Il; Kim, Jin Woo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To analyze the causes and types of complications after unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) and determine proper prevention and treatment methods. Materials and Methods A total of 1,576 UKAs were performed for osteoarthritis of the knee from January 2002 to December 2014 at one institution. We analyzed complications after UKA retrospectively and investigated proper methods of treatment. Results A total of 89 complications (5.6%) occurred after UKA. Regarding the type of complications after UKA, there were 42 cases of dislocation of the mobile bearing, 23 cases of loosening of the prosthesis, 6 cases of periprosthetic fracture, 3 cases of polyethylene wear, 3 cases of progression of arthritis in the contralateral compartment, 2 cases of medial collateral ligament injury, 2 cases of impingement, 5 cases of infection, 1 case of arthrofibrosis, and 2 cases of failure due to unexplained pain. The most common complication after UKA was mobile bearing dislocation in the mobile-bearing knees and loosening of the prosthesis in the fixed-bearing knees, but polyethylene wear and progression of arthritis were relatively rare. The complications were treated with conversion to total knee arthroplasty in 58 cases and simple bearing change in 21 cases. Conclusions The most common complication after UKA was dislocation of the mobile bearing. When a complication occurs after UKA, appropriate treatment should be performed after accurate analysis of the cause of complication. PMID:26952551

  3. Perioperative Pain Management in Total Hip Arthroplasty: Korean Hip Society Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeesuk; Cho, Hong-Man; Park, Kyung-Soon; Yoon, Pil Whan; Nho, Jae-Hwi; Kim, Sang-Min; Lee, Kyung-Jae; Moon, Kyong-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Effective perioperative pain management techniques and accelerated rehabilitation programs can improve health-related quality of life and functional status of patients after total hip arthroplasty. Traditionally, postoperative analgesia following arthroplasty was provided by intravenous patient-controlled analgesia or epidural analgesia. Recently, peripheral nerve blockade has emerged alternative analgesic approach. Multimodal analgesia strategy combines analgesics with different mechanisms of action to improve pain management. Intraoperative periarticular injection of multimodal drugs is one of the most important procedures in perioperative pain control for total hip arthroplasty. The goal of this review article is to provide a concise overview of the principles of multimodal pain management regimens as a practical guide for the perioperative pain management for total hip arthroplasty. PMID:27536639

  4. Patellofemoral arthroplasty: a multi-centre study with minimum 2-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Leadbetter, Wayne B.; Kolisek, Frank R.; Levitt, Richard L.; Brooker, Andrew F.; Zietz, Patrick; Marker, David R.; Bonutti, Peter M.

    2008-01-01

    Recently, patellofemoral arthroplasty has attracted increased interest as a salvage treatment for isolated patellofemoral arthritis. However, there are very few reports of the experience with modern generation patellofemoral arthroplasties. This investigation describes a collective experience of four centres reporting on the outcome in patients of the use of one patellofemoral arthroplasty device. There were 70 patients (79 knees) who had failed an extensive non-operative treatment regimen and/or various conventional alternative surgical treatments. At a mean follow-up of three years (range: 2–6 years), there were 66 knees that had Knee Society Scores greater than 80 points (84%). Seventy-one knees (90%) functioned without pain in daily activity and stair climbing. Symptomatic isolated patellofemoral arthritis was successfully treated with a patellofemoral arthroplasty in the short term. We are encouraged by these excellent early results and await longer follow-up. PMID:19057900

  5. Perioperative Pain Management in Total Hip Arthroplasty: Korean Hip Society Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Min, Byung-Woo; Kim, Yeesuk; Cho, Hong-Man; Park, Kyung-Soon; Yoon, Pil Whan; Nho, Jae-Hwi; Kim, Sang-Min; Lee, Kyung-Jae; Moon, Kyong-Ho

    2016-03-01

    Effective perioperative pain management techniques and accelerated rehabilitation programs can improve health-related quality of life and functional status of patients after total hip arthroplasty. Traditionally, postoperative analgesia following arthroplasty was provided by intravenous patient-controlled analgesia or epidural analgesia. Recently, peripheral nerve blockade has emerged alternative analgesic approach. Multimodal analgesia strategy combines analgesics with different mechanisms of action to improve pain management. Intraoperative periarticular injection of multimodal drugs is one of the most important procedures in perioperative pain control for total hip arthroplasty. The goal of this review article is to provide a concise overview of the principles of multimodal pain management regimens as a practical guide for the perioperative pain management for total hip arthroplasty. PMID:27536639

  6. Delayed Femoral Nerve Palsy Associated with Iliopsoas Hematoma after Primary Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Femoral nerve neuropathy after total hip arthroplasty is rare but catastrophic complication. Pain and quadriceps muscle weakness caused by this complication can significantly affect the functional outcome. Here we present a case report, describing delayed onset femoral nerve palsy associated with iliopsoas hematoma following pseudoaneurysm of a branch of profunda femoris artery after 3 months of primary total hip arthroplasty in an 80-year-old female patient with single kidney. Hip arthroplasty was done for painful primary osteoarthritis of left hip. Diagnosis of femoral nerve palsy was made by clinical examination and computed tomography imaging of pelvis. Patient was managed by surgical evacuation of hematoma and physiotherapy. The patient's clinical symptoms were improved after surgical evacuation of hematoma. This is the first case report of its kind in English literature regarding delayed onset femoral nerve palsy after primary total hip arthroplasty due to pseudoaneurysm of a branch of profunda femoris artery without any obvious precipitating factor. PMID:27752378

  7. Malnutrition in Joint Arthroplasty: Prospective Study Indicates Risk of Unplanned ICU Admission

    PubMed Central

    Kamath, Atul F.; McAuliffe, Caitlin L.; Kosseim, Laura M.; Pio, Finnah; Hume, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Background: Malnutrition has been linked to poor outcomes after elective joint arthroplasty, but the risk of unplanned postoperative intensive care unit (ICU) admission in malnourished arthroplasty patients is unknown. Methods: 1098 patients were followed as part of a prospective risk stratification program at a tertiary, high-volume arthroplasty center. Chronic malnutrition was defined as preoperative albumin <3.5 g/dL. Results: The overall incidence of malnutrition was 16.9% (primary and revision arthroplasty patients). Average BMI was highest for patients in albumin category 3.0-3.5 (BMI 35.7). Preoperative albumin <3.0 and <3.5 g/dL translated to 15.4% and 3.8% rates of unplanned ICU admission, respectively, indicating nutritional status to be a factor in postoperative ICU admission. Conclusion: Patients with poor nutritional status must be counseled on the risks of adverse medical complications. PMID:27200389

  8. MULTIPLE SPARK GAP SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Schofield, A.E.

    1958-07-22

    A multiple spark gap switch of unique construction is described which will permit controlled, simultaneous discharge of several capacitors into a load. The switch construction includes a disc electrode with a plurality of protuberances of generally convex shape on one surface. A firing electrode is insulatingly supponted In each of the electrode protuberances and extends substantially to the apex thereof. Individual electrodes are disposed on an insulating plate parallel with the disc electrode to form a number of spark gaps with the protuberances. These electrodes are each connected to a separate charged capacitor and when a voltage ls applied simultaneously between the trigger electrodes and the dlsc electrode, each spark gap fires to connect its capacitor to the disc electrode and a subsequent load.

  9. Precision gap particle separator

    DOEpatents

    Benett, William J.; Miles, Robin; Jones, II., Leslie M.; Stockton, Cheryl

    2004-06-08

    A system for separating particles entrained in a fluid includes a base with a first channel and a second channel. A precision gap connects the first channel and the second channel. The precision gap is of a size that allows small particles to pass from the first channel into the second channel and prevents large particles from the first channel into the second channel. A cover is positioned over the base unit, the first channel, the precision gap, and the second channel. An port directs the fluid containing the entrained particles into the first channel. An output port directs the large particles out of the first channel. A port connected to the second channel directs the small particles out of the second channel.

  10. Bridging NCL research gaps.

    PubMed

    Stehr, Frank; van der Putten, Herman

    2015-10-01

    The neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses, collectively called NCLs, are rare and fatal lysosomal storage diseases that mainly affect children. Due to the fact that NCLs are both rare and heterogeneous (mutations in thirteen different genes) significant gaps exist in both preclinical and clinical research. Altogether, these gaps are major hurdles to bring therapies to patients while the need for new therapies is urgent to help them and their families. To define gaps and discuss solutions, a round table discussion involving teams and different stake holders took place during the 14th International Conference on Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinoses (Batten Disease) in Cordóba, Argentina. Topics covered by the teams and their leaders (in parentheses) included basic and translational research gaps with regard to large animal models (I. Tammen, D.N. Palmer), human NCL pathology and access to human tissue (J.D. Cooper, H.H. Goebel), rare NCLs (S. Hofman, I. Noher), links of NCLs to other diseases (F.M. Platt), gaps between clinic and clinical trials (H. Adams, A. Schulz), international collaborative efforts working towards a cure (S.E. Mole, H. Band) perspectives on palliative care from patient organizations (M. Frazier, A. West), and issues NCL researchers face when progressing to independent career in academia (M. Bond). Thoughts presented by the team leaders include previously unpublished opinions and information on the lack of understanding of disease pathomechanisms, gene function, assays for drug discovery and target validation, natural history of disease, and biomarkers for monitoring disease progression and treatment effects. This article is not intended to review the NCL literature. It includes personal opinions of the authors and it provides the reader with a summary of gaps discussed and solutions proposed by the teams. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Current Research on the Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinoses (Batten Disease). PMID:26056946

  11. Mind the Gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litim, Daniel F.

    We discuss an optimisation criterion for the exact renormalisation group based on the inverse effective propagator, which displays a gap. We show that a simple extremisation of the gap stabilises the flow, leading to better convergence of approximate solutions towards the physical theory. This improves the reliability of truncations, most relevant for any high precision computation. These ideas are closely linked to the removal of a spurious scheme dependence and a minimum sensitivity condition. The issue of predictive power and a link to the Polchinski RG are discussed as well. We illustrate our findings by computing critical exponents for the Ising universality class.

  12. Spark gap electrode erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krompholz, H.; Kristiansen, M.

    1984-12-01

    The results of a one-year contract on electrode erosion phenomena are summarized. The arc voltage drop in a spark gap was measured for various electrode, gas, and pressure combinations. A previously developed model of self breakdown voltage distribution was extended. A jet model for electrode erosion was proposed and an experimental arrangement for testing the model was constructed. The effects of inhomogeneities and impurities in the electrodes were investigated. Some of the work described here is scheduled for completion in 1985 under a current grant (AFOSR 84-0032). The areas of investigation described here include: (1) Self breakdown voltage distributions; (2) Electrode erosion; (3) Spark gap voltage recovery.

  13. Surgical treatment algorithm for infected shoulder arthroplasty: a retrospective analysis of 17 cases.

    PubMed

    Ghijselings, Stijn; Stuyck, José; Debeer, Philippe

    2013-12-01

    There is no consensus regarding treatment of periprosthetic shoulder infections. We retrospectively reviewed 17 patients diagnosed with a periprosthetic shoulder infection. Patient demographics, preoperative diagnostics, therapeutic management and functional outcome were evaluated. The Constant-Murley score (CMS), Simple Shoulder Test (SST), Visual Analogue Score (VAS) and Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand score (DASH) were used to assess clinical outcome. Pre-and intraoperative culture results and laboratory data, including C-reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), were analyzed. Three patients were treated by two-stage revision arthroplasty, 5 by resection arthroplasty with implantation of a cement spacer, 8 by resection arthroplasty without spacer and one patient underwent polyethylene exchange and serial debridement. The mean follow-up was 4.7 years (range : 1-93). The CMS was 27.8 for the resection arthroplasty group, 22.7 for the two-stage revision group and 20.6 for the resection arthroplasty with spacer group. No patients received chronic antibiotic suppression. Mean CRP value was 3.7 mg/L (range: 0.2 -11.1). Infection was monobacterial in 8 patients and polymicrobial in 9. The most common organisms were Coagulase negative staphylococcus (CNS) (13/17) and Propionibacterium spp. (7/17). Complications included two humeral fractures. At a mean follow-up of 4.7 years, all but one patient were considered free of infection. Worst functional results were seen with the implantation of a definitive cement spacer. Two-stage revision arthroplasty remains the gold standard in chronic infections, but is associated with a high complication rate. One-stage revision to a reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA) is an attractive alternative in selected cases. A surgical treatment algorithm for infected shoulder arthroplasty is proposed.

  14. Conversion of Total Wrist Arthroplasty to Arthrodesis with a Custom-Made Peg

    PubMed Central

    Reigstad, Ole; Røkkum, Magne

    2014-01-01

    Conversion of a failed total wrist arthroplasty to arthrodesis can be difficult. A custom-made titanium alloy peg was constructed to enable arthrodesis with the original arthroplasty components in situ. Two out of three patients were especially challenging cases with little bone available. Bony union was achieved in 2 to 3 months. The peg simplified a difficult revision situation and gave good, predictable results at follow-up. PMID:25097817

  15. Optimizing perioperative outcomes for older patients with rheumatoid arthritis undergoing arthroplasty: emphasis on medication management.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Susan M

    2015-05-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis continue to undergo arthroplasty despite widespread use of potent disease-modifying drugs (DMARDs), including the biologic tumor necrosis-α inhibitors. In fact, over 80 % of RA patients are taking DMARDs or biologics at the time of arthroplasty. While many RA-specific factors including disease activity and disability may contribute to the increase in infection in RA patients undergoing arthroplasty, immunosuppressant medications may also play a role. As the age of patients with RA undergoing arthroplasty is rising, and the incidence of arthroplasty among the older population is increasing, optimal perioperative management of DMARDs and biologics in older patients with RA is an increasing challenge. Although evidence is sparse, most evidence supports withholding tumor necrosis-α inhibitors and other biologics prior to surgery based on the dosing interval, and continuing methotrexate and hydroxychloroquine through the perioperative period. There is no consensus regarding leflunomide, and rituximab risk does not appear related to the interval between infusion and surgery. This paper reviews arthroplasty outcomes including complications in patients with RA, and discusses the rationale for strategies for the optimal medication management of DMARDs and biologics in the perioperative period to minimize complications and improve outcomes.

  16. Characterization of hip and knee arthroplasties and factors associated with infection☆

    PubMed Central

    da Silva Pinto, Cibele Zdebsky; Alpendre, Francine Taporosky; Stier, Christiane Johnscher Niebel; Maziero, Eliane Cristina Sanches; de Alencar, Paulo Gilberto Cimbalista; de Almeida Cruz, Elaine Drehmer

    2015-01-01

    Objective To characterize arthroplasty procedures, calculate the surgical infection rate and identify related risk factors. Methods This was a retrospective cohort study. Data on operations performed between 2010 and 2012 were gathered from documental sources and were analyzed with the aid of statistical software, using Fisher's exact test, Student's t test and the nonparametric Mann–Whitney and Wilcoxon tests. Results 421 total arthroplasty procedures performed on 346 patients were analyzed, of which 208 were on the knee and 213 on the hip. It was found that 18 patients (4.3%) were infected. Among these, 15 (83.33%) were reoperated and 2 (15.74%) died. The prevalence of infection in primary total hip arthroplasty procedures was 3%; in primary total knee arthroplasty, 6.14%; and in revision of total knee arthroplasty, 3.45%. Staphylococcus aureus was prevalent. The length of the surgical procedure showed a tendency toward being a risk factor (p = 0.067). Conclusion The prevalence of infection in cases of primary total knee arthroplasty was greater than in other cases. No statistically significant risk factors for infection were identified. PMID:27218082

  17. The Academic Generation Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dronzek, Anna

    2008-01-01

    The current generation gap in academia is different--fundamentally shaped by the structural problems of academic employment. The job market has especially exacerbated tensions between senior and junior faculty by ratcheting up expectations and requirements at every stage of the academic career. The disparities have been mentioned often enough to…

  18. Graphene: Mind the gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novoselov, Kostya

    2007-10-01

    Research now shows that interaction with silicon carbide substrate leads to the opening of a semiconductor gap in epitaxial graphene. This is an important first step towards bandgap engineering in this two-dimensional crystal, and its incorporation in electronic devices.

  19. Estimating Gender Wage Gaps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Judith A.; Thornton, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Course research projects that use easy-to-access real-world data and that generate findings with which undergraduate students can readily identify are hard to find. The authors describe a project that requires students to estimate the current female-male earnings gap for new college graduates. The project also enables students to see to what…

  20. Crossing the Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockette, Tim

    2009-01-01

    In a nation where education is funded largely by local property taxes, schools in wealthy communities have plenty of funds to spend on programs that get their kids ready for college. Schools in poor communities scrimp and save to get the job done--or hope that funding from the state will help fill in the gap. This article describes how students…

  1. Closing the Performance Gap.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riggins, Cheryl G.

    2002-01-01

    Describes how the principal of a K-2, 400-student suburban elementary school near Flint, Michigan, worked with her staff and superintendent to develop and implement a strategic plan to close the student achievement gap. Reports significant improvement in reading and math scores after 1 year. (PKP)

  2. STEMMING the Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahler, Jim; Valentine, Nancy

    2011-01-01

    America has a gap when it comes to youth pursuing science and technology careers. In an effort to improve the knowledge and application of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM), after-school programs can work in conjunction with formal in-school curriculum to improve science education. One organization that actively addresses this…

  3. Gaining on the Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Robert G.

    2010-01-01

    About three-quarters of the 2009 graduates of the highly diverse Arlington, Virginia, Public Schools completed one or more Advanced Placement or International Baccalaureate courses during their high school careers. That figure serves as one indicator of a decade-long initiative to eliminate achievement gaps while raising achievement for all…

  4. Multiple gap photovoltaic device

    DOEpatents

    Dalal, Vikram L.

    1981-01-01

    A multiple gap photovoltaic device having a transparent electrical contact adjacent a first cell which in turn is adjacent a second cell on an opaque electrical contact, includes utilizing an amorphous semiconductor as the first cell and a crystalline semiconductor as the second cell.

  5. Cost utility analysis of reverse total shoulder arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Renfree, Kevin J.; Hattrup, Steven J.; Chang, Yu-Hui H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Reverse shoulder arthroplasty provides satisfactory outcomes, but its cost-effectiveness is unproven. We prospectively analyzed outcomes and costs for primary reverse shoulder arthroplasty. Methods Thirty serial patients (16 women and 14 men; mean age, 74.1 years [range, 61.1–87.3 years]) with rotator cuff arthropathy had active motion recorded and completed function tests (visual pain analog scale; Simple Shoulder Test; American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Shoulder Outcome score; EuroQol; and Short Form-36 Health Survey) preoperatively and postoperatively at 1 and 2 years. Costs included professional fees, operating room and supply costs, and hospital care. Changes were compared by the Wilcoxon signed rank test, and quality-adjusted life-years were calculated preoperatively and postoperatively. Results Twenty-seven patients completed the study. Clinical and functional outcomes demonstrated significant improvement (P < .05). Significantly improved (P < .05) Short Form-36 subgroups included physical functioning, role limitations due to physical health, bodily pain, vitality, and physical composite score. EuroQol dimensions of usual activities and pain/discomfort improved significantly (P <.05). Calculations with the SF-6D showed that median QALYs improved from 6.56 preoperatively to 7.43 at 1-year follow-up (P <.09) and from 6.56 preoperatively to 7.58 at 2-year follow-up (P <.003). The increase in QALYs calculated from the EQ-5D was somewhat greater, changing from 6.21 preoperatively to 7.69 at 1-year follow-up (P <.0001) and from 6.13 to 8.10 at 2-year follow-up (P <.04). Mean cost was $21,536. Cost utility at 2 years was $26,920/quality-adjusted life-year by the Short Form 6 Dimensions and $16,747/quality-adjusted life-year by the EuroQol. Conclusion EuroQol and Short Form-36 results demonstrated modestly cost-effective (<$50,000/quality-adjusted life-year) improvement for cuff tear arthropathy patients after primary reverse shoulder arthroplasty

  6. Early Infection Following Arthroplasty – Are Patients Protected?

    PubMed Central

    Young, Simon W; Zhu, Mark; Ravi, Saiprasad; Luey, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Prophylactic antibiotics significantly reduce prosthetic joint infection (PJI) rates after hip and knee arthroplasty. However, the rise of antibiotic resistance has raised concern over the adequacy of conventional prophylaxis. This study aimed to identify organisms causing early PJI in hip and knee arthroplasties and their sensitivity to current prophylactic antibiotics. Method: We performed a multicentre audit of 4009 primary hip and knee arthroplasties (1852 hips and 2157 knees) at three tertiary referral hospitals. PJIs were identified according to the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) definition and all patients were followed for two years. For patients with confirmed PJIs, causative bacteria and their antibiotic sensitivities were identified. Results: Thirty-five PJI cases in total were identified in the follow-up period of two years, consisting of 13 hips and 22 knees. The overall definite prosthetic joint infection rate was 0.87% (0.7% for hips, 1.0% for knees). 51.4% of PJIs occurred within the first 6 weeks, 62.9% within the first 3 months and 82.9% during the first year. Ninety-six percent (96%) of patients were given cefazolin as prophylaxis. Thirty-four percent (34%) of patients were infected with Coagulase-negative staphylococci, which were the most common infective organisms. 91.7% of these organisms were resistant to cefazolin. Twenty-five percent (25%) of patients were infected with Staphylococcus aureus, 9.1% of which were methicillin resistant. Overall, 58% of organisms were resistant to cefazolin. Sixty percent (60%) of patients who were treated with cefazolin and had available sensitivities for infective organism(s) were infected with cefazolin-resistant organisms. Conclusions: The majority of bacteria causing early PJI are resistant to the antibiotic prophylaxis given at the time of surgery. Whilst all the organisms cultured were sensitive to vancomycin, concerns regarding antibiotic stewardship remain and there is

  7. Deterministic multidimensional nonuniform gap sampling.

    PubMed

    Worley, Bradley; Powers, Robert

    2015-12-01

    Born from empirical observations in nonuniformly sampled multidimensional NMR data relating to gaps between sampled points, the Poisson-gap sampling method has enjoyed widespread use in biomolecular NMR. While the majority of nonuniform sampling schemes are fully randomly drawn from probability densities that vary over a Nyquist grid, the Poisson-gap scheme employs constrained random deviates to minimize the gaps between sampled grid points. We describe a deterministic gap sampling method, based on the average behavior of Poisson-gap sampling, which performs comparably to its random counterpart with the additional benefit of completely deterministic behavior. We also introduce a general algorithm for multidimensional nonuniform sampling based on a gap equation, and apply it to yield a deterministic sampling scheme that combines burst-mode sampling features with those of Poisson-gap schemes. Finally, we derive a relationship between stochastic gap equations and the expectation value of their sampling probability densities.

  8. Deterministic multidimensional nonuniform gap sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worley, Bradley; Powers, Robert

    2015-12-01

    Born from empirical observations in nonuniformly sampled multidimensional NMR data relating to gaps between sampled points, the Poisson-gap sampling method has enjoyed widespread use in biomolecular NMR. While the majority of nonuniform sampling schemes are fully randomly drawn from probability densities that vary over a Nyquist grid, the Poisson-gap scheme employs constrained random deviates to minimize the gaps between sampled grid points. We describe a deterministic gap sampling method, based on the average behavior of Poisson-gap sampling, which performs comparably to its random counterpart with the additional benefit of completely deterministic behavior. We also introduce a general algorithm for multidimensional nonuniform sampling based on a gap equation, and apply it to yield a deterministic sampling scheme that combines burst-mode sampling features with those of Poisson-gap schemes. Finally, we derive a relationship between stochastic gap equations and the expectation value of their sampling probability densities.

  9. Tantalum cones and bone defects in revision total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Boureau, F; Putman, S; Arnould, A; Dereudre, G; Migaud, H; Pasquier, G

    2015-04-01

    Management of bone loss is a major challenge in revision total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The development of preformed porous tantalum cones offers new possibilities, because they seem to have biological and mechanical qualities that facilitate osseointegration. Compared to the original procedure, when metaphyseal bone defects are too severe, a single tantalum cone may not be enough and we have developed a technique that could extend the indications for this cone in these cases. We used 2 cones to fill femoral bone defects in 7 patients. There were no complications due to wear of the tantalum cones. Radiological follow-up did show any migration or loosening. The short-term results confirm the interest of porous tantalum cones and suggest that they can be an alternative to allografts or megaprostheses in case of massive bone defects.

  10. Predictors of bone loss in revision total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Bloomfield, Michael R; Klika, Alison K; Lee, Ho H; Joyce, David M; Mehta, Priyesh; Barsoum, Wael K

    2010-03-01

    Revision total knee arthroplasty (RTKA) requires preoperative planning to enable the reconstruction of bony deficiencies. The objective of this project was to identify predictors of bone loss management at RTKA based on the preoperative failure mode and patient demographics known preoperatively. We retrospectively reviewed 245 consecutive RTKA procedures in which the same revision knee system was utilized. Patient demographic and treatment data were recorded, and locations of bone loss were identified based on the reconstructive management. We identified significant predictors for use of femoral augments at all four positions. Several predictors significantly predisposed to use of a thick (>19 mm) polyethylene; however, no predictors of tibial augments were significant. Although the reconstruction of bone loss is primarily based on the intraoperative assessment, these findings may provide additional information to help the surgeon prepare for difficult revision procedures. PMID:20812582

  11. Head-neck taper corrosion in hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Hussenbocus, S; Kosuge, D; Solomon, L B; Howie, D W; Oskouei, R H

    2015-01-01

    Modularity at the head-neck junction of the femoral component in THA became popular as a design feature with advantages of decreasing implant inventory and allowing adjustment of leg length, offset, and soft tissue balancing through different head options. The introduction of a new modular interface to femoral stems that were previously monoblock, or nonmodular, comes with the potential for corrosion at the taper junction through mechanically assisted crevice corrosion. The incidence of revision hip arthroplasty is on the rise and along with improved wear properties of polyethylene and ceramic, use of larger femoral head sizes is becoming increasingly popular. Taper corrosion appears to be related to all of its geometric parameters, material combinations, and femoral head size. This review article discusses the pathogenesis, risk factors, clinical assessment, and management of taper corrosion at the head-neck junction.

  12. Alumina-on-Polyethylene Bearing Surfaces in Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Yup Lee; Kim, Shin-Yoon

    2010-01-01

    The long-term durability of polyethylene lining total hip arthroplasty (THA) mainly depends on periprosthetic osteolysis due to wear particles, especially in young active patients. In hip simulator study, reports revealed significant wear reduction of the alumina ceramic-on-polyethylene articulation of THA compared with metal-on-polyethylene bearing surfaces. However, medium to long-term clinical studies of THA using the alumina ceramic-on-polyethylene are few and the reported wear rate of this articulation is variable. We reviewed the advantages and disadvantages of ceramicon- polyethylene articulation in THA, hip simulator study and retrieval study for polyethylene wear, in vivo clinical results of THA using alumina ceramic-on-polyethylene bearing surfaces in the literature, and new trial alumina ceramic-onhighly cross linked polyethylene bearing surfaces. PMID:20224739

  13. Hydrotherapy after total knee arthroplasty. A follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Giaquinto, S; Ciotola, E; Dall'Armi, V; Margutti, F

    2010-01-01

    The study evaluated the subjective functional outcome following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in participants who underwent hydrotherapy (HT) six months after discharge from a rehabilitation unit. A total of 70 subjects, 12 of which were lost at follow-up, were randomly assigned to either a conventional gym treatment (N=30) or HT (N=28). A prospective design was performed. Participants were interviewed with Western-Ontario McMasters Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) at admission, at discharge and six months later. Kruskal-Wallis and Wilcoxon tests were applied for statistical analysis. Both groups improved. The WOMAC subscales, namely pain, stiffness and function, were all positively affected. Statistical analysis indicates that scores on all subscales were significantly lower for the HT group. The benefits gained by the time of discharge were still found after six months. HT is recommended after TKA in a geriatric population.

  14. The fundamentals of biotribology and its application to spine arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Megan L.; Dooris, Andrew; Paré, Philippe E.

    2009-01-01

    The biological effect of wear of articulating surfaces is a continued concern with large joint replacements and, likewise, of interest for total disc replacements. There are a number of important biotribological testing parameters that can greatly affect the outcome of a wear study in addition to the implant design and material selection. The current ASTM and ISO wear testing standards/guides for spine arthroplasty leave many choices as testing parameters. These factors include but are not limited to the sequence of kinematics and load, phasing, type of lubricant, and specimen preparation (sterilization and artificial aging). The spinal community should critically assess wear studies and be cognizant of the influence of the selected parameters on the test results. PMID:25802638

  15. Head-Neck Taper Corrosion in Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Hussenbocus, S.; Kosuge, D.; Solomon, L. B.; Howie, D. W.; Oskouei, R. H.

    2015-01-01

    Modularity at the head-neck junction of the femoral component in THA became popular as a design feature with advantages of decreasing implant inventory and allowing adjustment of leg length, offset, and soft tissue balancing through different head options. The introduction of a new modular interface to femoral stems that were previously monoblock, or nonmodular, comes with the potential for corrosion at the taper junction through mechanically assisted crevice corrosion. The incidence of revision hip arthroplasty is on the rise and along with improved wear properties of polyethylene and ceramic, use of larger femoral head sizes is becoming increasingly popular. Taper corrosion appears to be related to all of its geometric parameters, material combinations, and femoral head size. This review article discusses the pathogenesis, risk factors, clinical assessment, and management of taper corrosion at the head-neck junction. PMID:25954757

  16. Pathogenesis of bone loss after total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Rubash, H E; Sinha, R K; Shanbhag, A S; Kim, S Y

    1998-04-01

    Bone loss with or without evidence of aseptic loosening is a long term complication after total hip arthroplasty (THA). It occurs with all materials and in all prosthetic systems in use or that have been used to date. Bone loss after THA can be a serious problem in revision surgery because bone deficiencies may limit reconstructive options, increase the difficulty of surgery, and necessitate autogenous or allogenic bone grafting. There are three factors adversely affecting maintenance of bone mass after THA: (1) bone loss secondary to particulate debris; (2) adaptive bone remodeling and stress shielding secondary to size, material properties, and surface characteristics of contemporary prostheses; and (3) bone loss as a consequence of natural aging. This chapter reviews the mechanisms of the primary causes of bone loss after THA.

  17. The Validity of Administrative BMI Data in Total Joint Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Lau, Edmund C; Son, Min-Sun; Mossad, David; Toossi, Nader; Johanson, Norman A; Gonzalez, Mark H; Meller, Menachem M

    2015-10-01

    Identifying BMI via administrative data is a useful way to evaluate outcomes in total joint arthroplasty (TJA) for varying degrees of obesity. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the concordance between BMI coding in administrative claims data and actual clinical BMI measurements in the medical record for patients undergoing TJA. Clinical BMI value was shown to be a significant determinant of whether ICD-9 codes were used to report the patient's obesity status (P<0.01). Although a higher clinical BMI strongly increased the likelihood of having either of the ICD-9 diagnosis codes used to identify obesity status, only the accuracy of the V85 code increased with increasing levels of BMI. PMID:26088396

  18. The difficult primary total knee arthroplasty: a review.

    PubMed

    Baldini, A; Castellani, L; Traverso, F; Balatri, A; Balato, G; Franceschini, V

    2015-10-01

    Primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a reliable procedure with reproducible long-term results. Nevertheless, there are conditions related to the type of patient or local conditions of the knee that can make it a difficult procedure. The most common scenarios that make it difficult are discussed in this review. These include patients with many previous operations and incisions, and those with severe coronal deformities, genu recurvatum, a stiff knee, extra-articular deformities and those who have previously undergone osteotomy around the knee and those with chronic dislocation of the patella. Each condition is analysed according to the characteristics of the patient, the pre-operative planning and the reported outcomes. When approaching the difficult primary TKA surgeons should use a systematic approach, which begins with the review of the existing literature for each specific clinical situation.

  19. Profunda Femoris Pseudoaneurysm following Total Hip Arthroplasty Revision

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Katharine; Iorio, Justin; Balasubramanian, Easwaran

    2015-01-01

    Vascular injuries following total hip arthroplasty (THA) are very rare, with pseudoaneurysm being a small subset. We report a case of profunda femoris artery (PFA) pseudoaneurysm in a 61-year-old male following a posterior approach revision left THA. Presentation involved continued blood transfusion requirements several weeks postoperatively. Diagnosis of the pseduoaneurysm was made by contrast CT of the lower extremity, with confirmation via IR angiography. Successful embolization was achieved with selective coiling and Gelfoam. Presenting complaints of such complications are often vague and therefore lead to delayed diagnosis. Causes of such complications are not completely understood, particularly with PFA injuries in THA. Possible mechanisms are discussed in this paper. Vascular complications following THA can be difficult to diagnose. High suspicion in the setting of continued postoperative pain or bleeding may allow prompt diagnosis and avoidance of serious limb-threatening complications. PMID:26347839

  20. Variations in hospital billing for total joint arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Stryker, Louis S; Odum, Susan M; Fehring, Thomas K

    2014-09-01

    Although regional variations in Medicare spending are known, it is not clear whether regional variations exist in hospital charges for total joint arthroplasty. Data from Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) on Diagnosis Related Groups 469 and 470 (Major Joint with and without Major Complicating or Comorbid Condition) from 2011 were analyzed for variation by region. Drastic variations in charges between institutions were apparent with significant differences between regions for hospital charges and payments. The median hospital charge nationwide was $71,601 and $46,219 for Diagnosis Related Groups 469 and 470, respectively, with corresponding median payments of $21,231 and $13,743. Weak to no correlation was found between hospital charges and payments despite adjustments for wage index, cost of living, low-income care and teaching institution status. PMID:24973930

  1. Bilateral Femoral Nutrient Foraminal Cement Penetration during Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Coomber, Ross; Bhumbra, Rej S; Marston, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Cement pressurisation is important for the insertion of both the acetabular and femoral components during Total Hip Arthroplasty (THA). Secondary to pressurization the rare phenomenon of unilateral cement incursion into the nutrient foramen has previously been reported. No bilateral case has been reported to date. This has implications both for misdiagnosis of periprosthetic fractures and for medico-legal consequences due to a presumed adverse intra-operative event. Case Report: We present a case report of a 59 year old, caucasian female who underwent staged bilateral cemented Stanmore THA. The post-operative radiographs demonstrate evidence of bilateral nutrient foramen penetration intra-operatively by standard viscosity cement. The patient suffered no adverse consequences. Conclusions: In summary, cement extravasation into the nutrient foramen is an important differential to be considered in presence of posterior-medial cement in the diaphysis of femur following THA. This requires no further intervention and has no effect on the outcome.

  2. Rotational alignment of the tibial component in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Graceffa, Angelo; Marcucci, Massimiliano; Baldini, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Many surgical techniques, correlated to different anatomical landmarks, have been proposed to allow a satisfactory rotational alignment of the tibial component in primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Unfortunately, an accurate landmark has not yet been established although many computer models using CT reconstructions and standard radiologic studies have been performed. In this review article, the authors propose a new anatomical rotational reference for a correct positioning of the tibial component during primary TKA; the authors compared the results of their studies with the current literature on rotational alignment references and previously proposed surgical techniques. The authors also analyzed the correlation between classic and newer tibial baseplate designs and different tibial rotational landmarks. PMID:26855939

  3. Genu Recurvatum versus Fixed Flexion after Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Amila; Chong, Hwei Chi; Chin, Pak Lin; Chia, Shi Lu; Lo, Ngai Ngung; Yeo, Seng Jin

    2016-01-01

    Background To date, there is no study comparing outcomes between post-total knee replacement genu recurvatum and fixed flexion. This study aims to provide data that will help in deciding which side to err on when neutral extension is not achieved. Methods A prospective cohort study of primary total knee arthroplasties was performed, which compared the 6-month and 2-year clinical outcomes between fixed flexion and genu recurvatum deformities at 6 months. Results At 6 months, knees in genu recurvatum did better than knees in fixed flexion deformity in terms of knee flexion. However, at 2 years, knees in fixed flexion deformity did better in terms of knee scores and showed better improvement in the degree of deformity. Conclusions We conclude that it is better to err on the side of fixed flexion deformity if neutral alignment cannot be achieved. PMID:27583106

  4. Pyrocarbon proximal interphalangeal joint arthroplasty: outcomes of a cohort study.

    PubMed

    McGuire, D T; White, C D; Carter, S L; Solomons, M W

    2012-07-01

    Pyrocarbon arthroplasty of the proximal interphalangeal joint is a relatively new concept. Early studies have been encouraging, reporting improved pain and function, but a largely unchanged arc of motion. Subsidence of the implant is common, but how it relates to outcome has not been analyzed. This study was performed to review the results of 57 pyrocarbon proximal interphalangeal implanted joints. Results showed a statistically significant increase in the arc of motion, excellent pain relief, and improved function. Subsidence was observed on radiographs in 40% of joints, but no correlation was found compared with arc of motion or function. The incidence of complications is fairly high and usually related to the peri-articular soft tissues, but they are usually minor and do not require further treatment. From this review, we can recommend the use of this implant for treatment of arthritis of the proximal interphalangeal joint.

  5. [Biomechanical principles, indications and early results of bipolar hip arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Bednarek, A; Gagała, J; Blacha, J

    1998-01-01

    The authors present indications and early results of bipolar hip arthroplasty in 58 patients (46 females, 12 males) aged 38-84 (mean 65 years). Femoral neck fracture in 51 patients, femoral neck pseudoarthrosis in 3, pathological fracture of the femoral neck in 2 and early type of hip osteoarthritis constituted the indication for bipolar hip replacement. No infection or dislocation has occurred. Mean follow-up was 1.5 years (6-36 months). Revision of the replacement was necessary in one patient due to faulty size of chosen implant. Results in remaining patients were rated excellent to good (mean Harris Hip Score was 93 points) with great range of movement in the operated hip. No signs of acetabular cartilage deterioration or prosthetic protrusion was observed.

  6. Porous metals and alternate bearing surfaces in shoulder arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Shannon R; Urits, Ivan; Murthi, Anand M

    2016-03-01

    Total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) provides an effective solution for the treatment of glenohumeral arthritis. However, long-term outcomes have been limited by glenoid component aseptic loosening and polyethylene (PE) wear. Previous attempts to improve glenoid fixation with metal-backed glenoids resulted in inferior results. Newer component designs that contain porous metal allow for biological ingrowth of the prosthesis, potentially improving longevity and overall outcomes. Porous metal can also improve humeral component fixation, obviating the need for cement and simplifying revision surgery. Advances such as highly cross-linked polyethylene (HXLPE), vitamin E-doped HXLPE, and alternate bearing surfaces like ceramics and pyrolytic carbon have proven to provide superior wear characteristics in other joint replacements and may prove beneficial in the shoulder as well. PMID:26797775

  7. Mobile bearing and fixed bearing total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Capella, Marcello; Dolfin, Marco; Saccia, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    The mobile bearing (MB) concept in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) was developed as an alternative to fixed bearing (FB) implants in order to reduce wear and improve range of motion (ROM), especially focused on younger patients. Unfortunately, its theoretical advantages are still controversial. In this paper we exhibit a review of the more recent literature available comparing FB and MB designs in biomechanical and clinical aspects, including observational studies, clinical trials, national and international registries analyses, randomized controlled trials, meta-analyses and Cochrane reviews. Except for some minor aspects, none of the studies published so far has reported a significant improvement related to MBs regarding patient satisfaction, clinical, functional and radiological outcome or medium and long-term survivorship. Thus the presumed superiority of MBs over FBs appears largely inconsistent. The routine use of MB is not currently supported by adequate evidences; implant choice should be therefore made on the basis of other factors, including cost and surgeon experience. PMID:27162777

  8. Overview of Total Knee Arthroplasty and Modern Pain Control Strategies.

    PubMed

    Lavie, Lacey Giambelluca; Fox, M Patricia; Dasa, Vinod

    2016-11-01

    Perioperative pain management of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) remains a challenge for physicians and anesthesiologists. Reducing postoperative pain is an essential component of patient satisfaction, functional outcomes, and hospital length of stay. Multimodal pain management regimens have been demonstrated to be superior to monotherapy in achieving adequate pain control, as well as an effective method of limiting side effects of analgesics. In the present investigation, we present literature published over the last year relating to new advancements in perioperative pain management for TKA. While it is widely accepted that methods including peripheral nerve blocks and local anesthetic injections are essential to pain protocols, there is still conflicting evidence over what modalities provide superior relief. The incorporation of cryoneurolysis preoperatively is a new modality which has been incorporated and has been shown to improve pain control in patients undergoing TKA.

  9. Current surgical strategies for total arthroplasty in valgus knee

    PubMed Central

    Nikolopoulos, Dimitrios; Michos, Ioannis; Safos, George; Safos, Petros

    2015-01-01

    The majority of orthopaedic surgeons even currently agree that primary total arthroplasty in valgus knees with a deformity of more than ten degrees may prove challenging. The unique sets of bone and soft tissue abnormalities that must be addressed at the time of the operation make accurate axis restoration, component orientation and joint stability attainment a difficult task. Understanding the specific pathologic anatomic changes associated with the valgus knee is a prerequisite so as to select the proper surgical method, to optimize component position and restore soft-tissue balance. The purpose of this article is to review the valgus knee anatomical variations, to assess the best pre-operative planning and to evaluate how to choose the grade of constraint of the implant. It will also be underlying the up-to-date main approaches and surgical techniques be proposed in the English literature both for bone cuts and soft tissue management of valgus knees. PMID:26191494

  10. Gross trunnion failure after primary total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Samik; Cherian, Jeffrey J; Bono, James V; Kurtz, Steven M; Geesink, Rudolph; Meneghini, R Michael; Delanois, Ronald E; Mont, Michael A

    2015-04-01

    Unfavorable outcomes from trunnion fretting and corrosion damage have been reported in the literature, gross failures of tapers in primary total hip arthroplasties have been less frequently reported. We report on 5 patients, who presented with gross trunnion failures of modular metal-on-polyethylene or ceramic-on-polyethylene bearings from 5 implant manufacturers, all necessitating revision surgery. None of these patients had an antecedent history of trauma, and the majority presented with pain or instability. No common factor was identified that may be predictive of these type of failures. Since there were 5 different stem designs, this suggests that it may be a rare generic phenomenon occurring with multiple designs. Currently, further investigations are necessary, including retrieval analysis, to identify risk factors that may predispose to such failures.

  11. Factors determining discharge destination for patients undergoing total joint arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Sharareh, Behnam; Le, Natasha B; Hoang, Melinda T; Schwarzkopf, Ran

    2014-07-01

    Discharge destination to skilled nursing facilities (SNF) following total joint arthroplasty (TJA) plays an important role in healthcare costs. The pre-operative, intra-operative, and post-operative factors of 50 consecutive patients discharged to an SNF following TJA were compared to that of 50 consecutive patients discharged to home. Patients discharged to SNFs had slower pre-operative Get Up and Go scores (TGUG), lower pre-operative EQ-5D scores, higher ASA scores, increased hospital length of stay, increased self-reported post-operative pain, and decreased physical therapy achievements. We believe that the results of this study indicate that patients who get discharged to SNFs fit a certain criteria and this may be used to guide post-operative discharge destination during pre-operative planning, which can help lower costs while helping decrease the length of inpatient stay.

  12. Total Ankle Arthroplasty: An Overview of the Canadian Experience.

    PubMed

    Latham, Warren C W; Lau, Johnny T C

    2016-06-01

    Total ankle arthroplasty use has increased across Canada over the last two decades. Multiple implant designs are readily available and implanted across Canada. Although arthrodesis is a reliable procedure for treating end-stage ankle arthritis, ankle replacement is often the preferred surgical treatment by patients. A recent prospective study evaluated intermediate-term outcomes of ankle replacement and arthrodesis at multiple centers across Canada, with variability in prosthesis type, surgeon, and surgical technique. Intermediate-term clinical outcomes of total ankle replacement and ankle arthrodesis were comparable in a diverse cohort in which treatment was tailored to patient presentation; however, rates of reoperation and major complications were higher after ankle replacement.

  13. Mechanical thromboembolic prophylaxis with risk stratification in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, William G; Reeves, James D; Fricka, Kevin B; Goyal, Nitin; Engh, Gerard A; Parks, Nancy L

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the rate of thromboembolic and bleeding complications when using mechanical prophylaxis with preoperative risk stratification following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Between 1994 and 2007, 4037 TKAs were performed on 3144 patients at our institution. Mechanical VTE prophylaxis was used for standard risk patients, which included AV impulse foot pumps, thigh high stockings, and early mobilization. Chemoprophylaxis was only given to patients who were at increased thromboembolic risk. The incidence of DVT identified by ultrasound following TKA was 2.1%. A retrospective review showed 1 patient had a fatal pulmonary embolism, and 5 patients had bleeding complications in the knee. We conclude that mechanical thromboembolic prophylaxis using risk stratification is safe and effective following TKA.

  14. Mobile bearing and fixed bearing total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Dolfin, Marco; Saccia, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    The mobile bearing (MB) concept in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) was developed as an alternative to fixed bearing (FB) implants in order to reduce wear and improve range of motion (ROM), especially focused on younger patients. Unfortunately, its theoretical advantages are still controversial. In this paper we exhibit a review of the more recent literature available comparing FB and MB designs in biomechanical and clinical aspects, including observational studies, clinical trials, national and international registries analyses, randomized controlled trials, meta-analyses and Cochrane reviews. Except for some minor aspects, none of the studies published so far has reported a significant improvement related to MBs regarding patient satisfaction, clinical, functional and radiological outcome or medium and long-term survivorship. Thus the presumed superiority of MBs over FBs appears largely inconsistent. The routine use of MB is not currently supported by adequate evidences; implant choice should be therefore made on the basis of other factors, including cost and surgeon experience. PMID:27162777

  15. Total hip arthroplasty: areview of advances, advantages and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xin-Wei; Zi, Ying; Xiang, Liang-Bi; Wang, Yu

    2015-01-01

    The therapeutic outcomes of Osteoarthritis (OA) has been unsatisfactory and often surgeries such as total hip arthroplasty (THA) is required. THA is an effective treatment for patients with end-stage arthritic hip conditions. Cemented THA has been the treatment of choice for elderly patients with OA. An improvement in Timed “Up and Go” (TUG) before surgery might contribute to a decrease in the occurrence of DVT after THA, though post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS), a chronic condition in the lower extremity does not appear to be a major complication after DVT in patients undergoing THA. For OA, four domains to be evaluated: pain, physical function, joint imaging, and patient global assessment. Thus, THA can be cost saving or, at least cost- effective in improving quality-adjusted life expectancy. The purpose of this review is to discuss the recent advances as well as advantages and limitations of THA. PMID:25784971

  16. Current Strategies in Anesthesia and Analgesia for Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Moucha, Calin Stefan; Weiser, Mitchell C; Levin, Emily J

    2016-02-01

    Total knee arthroplasty is associated with substantial postoperative pain that may impair mobility, reduce the ability to participate in rehabilitation, lead to chronic pain, and reduce patient satisfaction. Traditional general anesthesia with postoperative epidural and patient-controlled opioid analgesia is associated with an undesirable adverse-effect profile, including postoperative nausea and vomiting, hypotension, urinary retention, respiratory depression, delirium, and an increased infection rate. Multimodal anesthesia--incorporating elements of preemptive analgesia, neuraxial perioperative anesthesia, peripheral nerve blockade, periarticular injections, and multimodal oral opioid and nonopioid medications during the perioperative and postoperative periods--can provide superior pain control while minimizing opioid-related adverse effects, improving patient satisfaction, and reducing the risk of postoperative complications.

  17. Short term outcomes of revision total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Dieterich, James D; Fields, Adam C; Moucha, Calin S

    2014-11-01

    Few studies have assessed postoperative complications in revision total knee arthroplasty (rTKA). The aim of this study was to assess which preoperative factors are associated with postoperative complications in rTKA. Using the National Surgical Quality Improvement (NSQIP) database, we identified patients undergoing rTKA from 2010 to 2012. Patient demographics, comorbidities, and complications within thirty days of surgery were analyzed. A total of 3421 patients underwent rTKA. After adjusted analysis, dialysis (P = 0.016) was associated with minor complications. Male gender (P = 0.03), older age (P = 0.029), ASA class >2 (P = 0.017), wound class >2 (P < 0.0001), emergency operation (P = 0.038), and pulmonary comorbidity (P = 0.047) were associated with major complications.

  18. Rotational stability of a posterior stabilized total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Whiteside, L A; Amador, D D

    1989-05-01

    The effect of the posterior stabilizing mechanism on rotational stability in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) was investigated in six cadaver knees using a special knee-testing device. The device evaluated varus-valgus, rotational, and anteroposterior (AP) stability in the normal knee compared to a posterior stabilized TKA with either a rotationally constrained or an unconstrained articular surface. None of the stability parameters was significantly different from normal in either configuration of the tibial surface, but the constrained surface did decrease rotational deflection compared to the rotationally unconstrained surfaces. These findings show that rotational constraint in a posterior stabilized TKA is not necessary to achieve rotational stability as long as varus-valgus stability is achieved by appropriately tensioning the collateral ligaments. PMID:2706852

  19. Load transfer characteristics of a noncemented total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Whiteside, L A; Pafford, J

    1989-02-01

    This study evaluated load transfer characteristics of femoral and tibial components of a total knee prosthesis that was designed to achieve distal femoral and proximal tibial compressive load-bearing. Strain gauge readings were highest on the cortex of the tibial metaphyseal flare. Roentgenograms of 110 patients with noncemented total knee arthroplasty (TKA) with follow-up periods of 12-24 months were evaluated. Cancellous bone hypertrophy bridging from the undersurface of the tibial component to the metaphyseal cortical bone was noted on all roentgenograms at six months, suggesting stress transfer through cancellous bone to this area. Anterolateral sinking was noted in six of the first 46 patients but was not seen again in the series after a design change was made to more rigidly fix the stem in the bone of the upper tibia. Roentgenograms of the femoral components demonstrated distal bone hypertrophy suggesting compressive load bearing. None of the femoral components migrated or sank. PMID:2912617

  20. High-impact sports after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Mont, Michael A; Marker, David R; Seyler, Thorsten M; Jones, Lynne C; Kolisek, Frank R; Hungerford, David S

    2008-09-01

    Many patients will attempt high-impact loading activities after total knee arthroplasty. This study analyzed the clinical and radiographic results of these high-demand sports patients. A total of 31 patients (33 knees) were identified who participated in high-impact sports on average 4 times per week (range, 1-7 times per week) for a mean of 3.5 hours per week (range, 1 to 10 hours), including jogging, downhill skiing, singles tennis, racquetball, squash, and basketball. At 4 years mean follow-up (range, 2-9 years), 32 of 33 knees had successful clinical and radiographic outcomes. Overall satisfaction was a mean of 9.1 points on a scale of 0 to 10 points. These results indicate that some patients will participate in high-impact sports and enjoy excellent clinical outcomes at a minimum 4 years after surgery.

  1. Cementless large-head metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty in patients younger than 60 years--a multicenter early result.

    PubMed

    Wu, Po-Ting; Wang, Chih-Jen; Yen, Cheng-Yo; Jian, Ji-Shen; Lai, Kuo-An

    2012-01-01

    Large-head metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty has the theoretical advantages of less wear and better range of motion than traditional polyethylene bearings and seems to be a better choice for young and active patients. We conducted a retrospective study and reported the early results of using such prostheses in 59 patients (70 hips) with a mean age of 43.1 years (range, 23-59 years) at the time of surgery. Osteonecrosis of the femoral head accounted for most diagnoses. Harris Hip Scores and hip range of motion both significantly improved (p<0.001) at an average follow-up of 32.6 months (range, 24-48 months). Only one intraoperative calcar fissure was encountered, and it was fixated by cerclage wiring; there was no infection, dislocation, or osteolysis around either the cup or the stem at the latest follow-up. A postoperative gap in the acetabular component was noted in 24 hips, with a mean depth of 1.11 mm, but this was not correlated with the functional score (p=0.291). Transient thigh pain, which resolved after 6 months, was observed in six patients but was not related to either the postoperative gap or cup inclination (p=1.000 and p=0.664, respectively). All patients resumed their original jobs and recreational activities with little discomfort. Thus far, large-head metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty has shown excellent early results. The long-term results and the effects of metal debris and potentially elevated serum metal ion levels require further observation.

  2. Door Opening Affects Operating Room Pressure During Joint Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Mears, Simon C; Blanding, Renee; Belkoff, Stephen M

    2015-11-01

    Many resources are expended to ensure a sterile operating room environment. Efforts are made to prevent exposure of patients to personnel and to achieve positive room pressure to keep out airborne contaminants. Foot traffic into and out of the operating room during surgery can undermine these efforts. The authors investigated the number and duration of operating room door openings during hip and knee arthroplasty procedures and the effect of the door openings on room pressure. They tested the hypothesis that door openings defeat positive pressure, permitting air flow into the room. Room pressure and door status were monitored electronically during 191 hip and knee arthroplasty procedures. Operating room staff were unaware that data were being collected. The authors evaluated the data with regression analysis to determine whether the number and duration of door openings had an effect on room pressure. Significance was set at P<.05. Doors were open, on average, 9.5 minutes per case. In 77 of 191 cases, positive pressure was defeated, allowing air flow to reverse into the operating room. Total time with the door open significantly affected the minimum pressure recorded in the room (P<.02), but did not significantly affect average room pressure (P=.7). This finding suggested that the loss of positive pressure was a transient event from which the room recovered. The number and duration of door openings showed a significant association with length of surgery. Door openings threaten positive pressure, potentially jeopardizing operating room sterility. The causes of excessive operating room traffic must be evaluated to identify ways to reduce this traffic and the associated risks.

  3. Predicting early clinical function after hip or knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Poitras, S.; Wood, K. S.; Savard, J.; Dervin, G. F.; Beaule, P. E.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Patient function after arthroplasty should ideally quickly improve. It is not known which peri-operative function assessments predict length of stay (LOS) and short-term functional recovery. The objective of this study was to identify peri-operative functions assessments predictive of hospital LOS and short-term function after hospital discharge in hip or knee arthroplasty patients. Methods In total, 108 patients were assessed peri-operatively with the timed-up-and-go (TUG), Iowa level of assistance scale, post-operative quality of recovery scale, readiness for hospital discharge scale, and the Western Ontario and McMaster Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC). The older Americans resources and services activities of daily living (ADL) questionnaire (OARS) was used to assess function two weeks after discharge. Results Following multiple regressions, the pre- and post-operative day two TUG was significantly associated with LOS and OARS score, while the pre-operative WOMAC function subscale was associated with the OARS score. Pre-operatively, a cut-off TUG time of 11.7 seconds for LOS and 10.3 seconds for short-term recovery yielded the highest sensitivity and specificity, while a cut-off WOMAC function score of 48.5/100 yielded the highest sensitivity and specificity. Post-operatively, a cut-off day two TUG time of 31.5 seconds for LOS and 30.9 seconds for short-term function yielded the highest sensitivity and specificity. Conclusions The pre- and post-operative day two TUG can indicate hospital LOS and short-term functional capacities, while the pre-operative WOMAC function subscale can indicate short-term functional capacities. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2015;4:145–151. PMID:26336897

  4. Spontaneous modular femoral head dissociation complicating total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Talmo, Carl T; Sharp, Kinzie G; Malinowska, Magdalena; Bono, James V; Ward, Daniel M; LaReau, Justin

    2014-06-01

    Modular femoral heads have been used successfully for many years in total hip arthroplasty. Few complications have been reported for the modular Morse taper connection between the femoral head and trunnion of the stem in metal-on-polyethylene bearings. Although there has always been some concern over the potential for fretting, corrosion, and generation of particulate debris at the modular junction, this was not considered a significant clinical problem. More recently, concern has increased because fretting and corrosive debris have resulted in rare cases of pain, adverse local tissue reaction, pseudotumor, and osteolysis. Larger femoral heads, which have gained popularity in total hip arthroplasty, are suspected to increase the potential for local and systemic complications of fretting, corrosion, and generation of metal ions because of greater torque at the modular junction. A less common complication is dissociation of the modular femoral heads. Morse taper dissociation has been reported in the literature, mainly in association with a traumatic event, such as closed reduction of a dislocation or fatigue fracture of the femoral neck of a prosthesis. This report describes 3 cases of spontaneous dissociation of the modular prosthetic femoral head from the trunnion of the same tapered titanium stem because of fretting and wear of the Morse taper in a metal-on-polyethylene bearing. Continued clinical and scientific research on Morse taper junctions is warranted to identify and prioritize implant and surgical factors that lead to this and other types of trunnion failure to minimize complications associated with Morse taper junctions as hip implants and surgical techniques continue to evolve.

  5. Traditions and myths in hip and knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Husted, Henrik; Gromov, Kirill; Malchau, Henrik; Freiberg, Andrew; Gebuhr, Peter; Troelsen, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose — Traditions are passed on from experienced surgeons to younger fellows and become “the right way to do it”. Traditions associated with arthroplasty surgery may, however, not be evidence-based and may be potentially deleterious to both patients and society, increasing morbidity and mortality, slowing early functional recovery, and increasing cost. Methods — We identified selected traditions and performed a literature search using relevant search criteria (June 2014). We present a narrative review grading the studies according to evidence, and we suggest some lines of future research. Results — We present traditions and evaluate them against the published evidence. Preoperative removal of hair, urine testing for bacteria, use of plastic adhesive drapes intraoperatively, and prewarming of the operation room should be abandoned—as should use of a tourniquet, a space suit, a urinary catheter, and closure of the knee in extension. The safety and efficacy of tranexamic acid is supported by meta-analyses. Postoperatively, there is no evidence to support postponement of showering or postponement of changing of dressings to after 48 h. There is no evidence to recommend routine dental antibiotic prophylaxis, continuous passive motion (CPM), the use of compression stockings, cooling for pain control or reduction of swelling, flexion of at least 90 degrees as a discharge criterion following TKA, or having restrictions after THA. We present evidence supporting the use of NSAIDs, early mobilization, allowing early travel, and a low hemoglobin trigger for transfusion. Interpretation — Revision of traditions and myths surrounding hip and knee arthroplasty towards more contemporary evidence-based principles can be expected to improve early functional recovery, thus reducing morbidity, mortality, and costs. PMID:25285615

  6. Meralgia paresthetica of the contralateral leg after total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Weier, Chris A; Jones, Lynne C; Hungerford, Marc W

    2010-04-01

    In the United States, total hip arthroplasty (THA) is typically performed with the patient in the lateral decubitus position. Positioning of the morbidly obese patient can be technically challenging and may require special positioning equipment. Although the increased incidence of complications after THA in obese patients has been well documented, neurologic complications in the contralateral limb are rare. This article describes a case of a patient with impairment of the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve in the contralateral leg after THA.A 55-year-old woman with a body mass index of 34.24 kg/m(2) underwent THA in the right lateral decubitus position. Because of her body habitus, a bean-bag positioner was used. Total hip arthroplasty was performed using a direct lateral approach. Intraoperative surgical time was 2.5 hours, and total anesthesia time was 3.5 hours. A few days postoperatively, the patient began to experience "burning and shooting" pain in the contralateral hip, but she did not report this pain until 6 weeks postoperatively. She was treated initially with a single lidocaine injection. When this was ineffective, she was treated with topiramate (100 mg daily) and vitamin B6 (100 mg orally twice daily). The symptoms lessened markedly at 5 months and resolved completely at 9 months postoperatively.Meralgia paresthetica is an uncommon, but known, complication of THA. To our knowledge, it has been reported only in the operative limb. This report reinforces the need for careful positioning to avoid pressure over the anterior superior iliac spine intraoperatively.

  7. Complications in primary total hip arthroplasty: avoidance and management: wear.

    PubMed

    Ries, Michael D

    2003-01-01

    Many factors, including polyethylene processing, sterilization method, counterface material, femoral head size, femoral offset, acetabular component position, implant design, and patient activity level, affect the rate of wear in total hip arthroplasty. For patients with life expectancy that exceeds the longevity of the conventional implant materials, an alternative bearing surface (highly cross-linked polyethylene, metal-on-metal, or ceramic-on-ceramic) may be considered. Although laboratory wear tests with these materials are very favorable, clinical outcomes have not been clearly established. When osteolysis does develop in response to particulate debris, the location and progression of the lesions may be quite variable. Asymptomatic stable lesions can be followed clinically and radiographically while symptomatic or enlarging lesions or those that may compromise the integrity of the periprosthetic bone stock require surgery. If acetabular component revision is necessary and an adequate rim of host bone is maintained to support a revision acetabular component, defects can be filled with particulate bone graft. Large segmental defects generally require structural allografts. If the acetabular shell is well fixed in good position and the osteolytic defects are accessible, treatment with curettage and bone grafting of the lesions with liner revision is appropriate to avoid use of a structural allograft. Proximal femoral defects around a well-fixed stem can be managed in a similar manner with curettage and bone grafting. Distal lesions associated with risk of periprosthetic femur fracture or implant loosening require stem revision. Osteoclastic resportion of bone in response to particulate debris can be impaired with use of some drugs such as alendronate. However, the safety and efficacy of alendronate in the clinical management of osteolysis associated with total hip arthroplasty has not been established. PMID:12690853

  8. Surgical waste audit of 5 total knee arthroplasties

    PubMed Central

    Stall, Nathan M.; Kagoma, Yoan K.; Bondy, Jennifer N.; Naudie, Douglas

    2013-01-01

    Background Operating rooms (ORs) are estimated to generate up to one-third of hospital waste. At the London Health Sciences Centre, prosthetics and implants represent 17% of the institution’s ecological footprint. To investigate waste production associated with total knee arthroplasties (TKAs), we performed a surgical waste audit to gauge the environmental impact of this procedure and generate strategies to improve waste management. Methods We conducted a waste audit of 5 primary TKAs performed by a single surgeon in February 2010. Waste was categorized into 6 streams: regular solid waste, recyclable plastics, biohazard waste, laundered linens, sharps and blue sterile wrap. Volume and weight of each stream was quantified. We used Canadian Joint Replacement Registry data (2008–2009) to estimate annual weight and volume totals of waste from all TKAs performed in Canada. Results The average surgical waste (excluding laundered linens) per TKA was 13.3 kg, of which 8.6 kg (64.5%) was normal solid waste, 2.5 kg (19.2%) was biohazard waste, 1.6 kg (12.1%) was blue sterile wrap, 0.3 kg (2.2%) was recyclables and 0.3 kg (2.2%) was sharps. Plastic wrappers, disposable surgical linens and personal protective equipment contributed considerably to total waste. We estimated that landfill waste from all 47 429 TKAs performed in Canada in 2008–2009 was 407 889 kg by weight and 15 272 m3 by volume. Conclusion Total knee arthroplasties produce substantial amounts of surgical waste. Environmentally friendly surgical products and waste management strategies may allow ORs to reduce the negative impacts of waste production without compromising patient care. Level of evidence Level IV, case series. PMID:23351497

  9. Does rural residence impact total ankle arthroplasty utilization and outcomes?

    PubMed

    Singh, Jasvinder A; Ramachandaran, Rekha

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to compare total ankle arthroplasty (TAA) utilization and outcomes by patient residence. We used the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) from 2003 to 2011 to compare utilization and outcomes (post-arthroplasty discharge disposition, length of hospitalization, and mortality) by rural vs. urban residence. Ten thousand eight hundred thirty-three patients in urban and 3,324 patients in rural area underwent TAA. Compared to rural residents, urban residents had: lower mean age, 62.4 vs. 61.8 years (p < 0.0001); higher percent of women, 49 vs. 56 % (p = 0.0008); and lower proportion of Whites, 93 vs. 86 % (p = 0.0005). There were rural-urban disparities in TAA utilization in 2003 (0.32 vs. 0.39/100,000; p = 0.021), but not in 2011 (1.19 vs. 1.17/100,00; p = 0.80). TAA outcomes did not differ by rural vs. urban residence: (1) 11.3 % rural vs. 14.2 % urban residents were discharged to an inpatient facility (p = 0.098); (2) length of hospital stay above the median stay, was 44.8 vs. 42.2 % (p = 0.30); and (3) mortality was 0.2 vs. 0.1 %, respectively (p = 0.81). Multivariable-adjusted logistic regression models did not show any significant differences in discharge to home, length of stay, or mortality, by residence. Our study demonstrated an absence of any evidence of rural-urban differences in TAA outcomes. The rural-urban differences in TAA utilization noted in 2003 were no longer significant in 2011.

  10. Humeral fracture between a total elbow and total shoulder arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Angelini, Andrea; Guerra, Enrico; Rotini, Roberto

    2011-04-01

    This article presents a case of a 71-year-old woman with a humeral fracture between a cementless reverse total shoulder arthroplasty and a cemented total elbow arthroplasty and discusses our treatment plan. Surgical treatment was performed after the patient was informed of possible complications and the benefits of surgery including: early, complete restoration of arm anatomy, greater functional improvement of the adjacent joints, and increased risk of nonunion with nonoperative treatment.The fracture was comminuted and extended proximally around the shoulder prosthesis. Through the posterior approach, the radial nerve was identified and protected. Both prostheses were found firmly fixed to bone. The fracture around the shoulder prosthesis was reduced first using a strut allograft and reduction clamps. Next, arm alignment restoration and distal humerus reduction were performed. The construct was neutralized with a 3.5-mm locking plate spanning the whole length of the humerus. The locking plate was positioned posterolaterally and the strut medially in a 90° to 90° configuration secured with wires and cables.A hinged elbow brace was applied for 6 weeks postoperatively. Active range of motion exercises of the wrist and hand and passive motion of the elbow and shoulder were started at 4 to 5 days postoperatively. At 2 weeks postoperatively, passive motion of the elbow and shoulder progressed to strengthening exercises. Thereafter, the patient underwent several weeks of physical therapy to restore motion, strength, and function of the upper extremity with instructions not to overload the arm and avoid heavy work and sports for as long as 1 year. At 10 months postoperatively, radiographs of the arm showed a stable construct; the patient had resumed full activities of daily living. PMID:21469626

  11. Mind the Gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staedter, Tracy

    2007-03-01

    A new finding gets scientists one step closer to understanding what causes the gap in the Van Allen radiation belts. The discovery could help better predict fluxes of energetic particles that have the potential for damaging spacecraft and satellites and harming astronauts. An improved understanding could also give space physicists better insight into the radiation belts of other planets, including Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune, all of which have strong magnetic fields.

  12. Air-gap heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Heyn, Ch.; Schmidt, M.; Schwaiger, S.; Stemmann, A.; Mendach, S.; Hansen, W.

    2011-01-17

    We demonstrate the fabrication of thin GaAs layers which quasi hover above the underlying GaAs substrate. The hovering layers have a perfect epitaxial relationship to the substrate crystal lattice and are connected to the substrate surface only by lattice matched nanopillars of low density. These air-gap heterostructures are created by combining in situ molecular beam epitaxy compatible self-assembled droplet-etching and ex situ selective wet-chemical etching.

  13. Minding the Gap

    SciTech Connect

    Firestone, Millicent Anne

    2015-02-23

    Neutron & X-ray scattering provides nano- to meso-scale details of complex fluid structure; 1D electronic density maps dervied from SAXS yield molecular level insights; Neutron reflectivity provides substructure details of substrate supported complex fluids; Complex fluids composition can be optimized to support a wide variety of both soluble and membrane proteins; The water gap dimensions can be finely tuned through polymer component.

  14. Gender gaps within management.

    PubMed

    Ronk, L L

    1993-05-01

    Traditional roles need not become self-fulfilling prophecies if managers can bridge the gender gap. Feminine, as well as masculine, characteristics can be incorporated into managerial styles to enhance effective leadership. Autonomy, decision-making and assertiveness are as important as nurturing and caring. What are little girls made of? Little girls are made of sugar and spice and everything nice. What are little boys made of? Little boys are made of rats and snails and puppy dog tails.

  15. GapBlaster-A Graphical Gap Filler for Prokaryote Genomes.

    PubMed

    de Sá, Pablo H C G; Miranda, Fábio; Veras, Adonney; de Melo, Diego Magalhães; Soares, Siomar; Pinheiro, Kenny; Guimarães, Luis; Azevedo, Vasco; Silva, Artur; Ramos, Rommel T J

    2016-01-01

    The advent of NGS (Next Generation Sequencing) technologies has resulted in an exponential increase in the number of complete genomes available in biological databases. This advance has allowed the development of several computational tools enabling analyses of large amounts of data in each of the various steps, from processing and quality filtering to gap filling and manual curation. The tools developed for gap closure are very useful as they result in more complete genomes, which will influence downstream analyses of genomic plasticity and comparative genomics. However, the gap filling step remains a challenge for genome assembly, often requiring manual intervention. Here, we present GapBlaster, a graphical application to evaluate and close gaps. GapBlaster was developed via Java programming language. The software uses contigs obtained in the assembly of the genome to perform an alignment against a draft of the genome/scaffold, using BLAST or Mummer to close gaps. Then, all identified alignments of contigs that extend through the gaps in the draft sequence are presented to the user for further evaluation via the GapBlaster graphical interface. GapBlaster presents significant results compared to other similar software and has the advantage of offering a graphical interface for manual curation of the gaps. GapBlaster program, the user guide and the test datasets are freely available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/gapblaster2015/. It requires Sun JDK 8 and Blast or Mummer.

  16. GapBlaster-A Graphical Gap Filler for Prokaryote Genomes.

    PubMed

    de Sá, Pablo H C G; Miranda, Fábio; Veras, Adonney; de Melo, Diego Magalhães; Soares, Siomar; Pinheiro, Kenny; Guimarães, Luis; Azevedo, Vasco; Silva, Artur; Ramos, Rommel T J

    2016-01-01

    The advent of NGS (Next Generation Sequencing) technologies has resulted in an exponential increase in the number of complete genomes available in biological databases. This advance has allowed the development of several computational tools enabling analyses of large amounts of data in each of the various steps, from processing and quality filtering to gap filling and manual curation. The tools developed for gap closure are very useful as they result in more complete genomes, which will influence downstream analyses of genomic plasticity and comparative genomics. However, the gap filling step remains a challenge for genome assembly, often requiring manual intervention. Here, we present GapBlaster, a graphical application to evaluate and close gaps. GapBlaster was developed via Java programming language. The software uses contigs obtained in the assembly of the genome to perform an alignment against a draft of the genome/scaffold, using BLAST or Mummer to close gaps. Then, all identified alignments of contigs that extend through the gaps in the draft sequence are presented to the user for further evaluation via the GapBlaster graphical interface. GapBlaster presents significant results compared to other similar software and has the advantage of offering a graphical interface for manual curation of the gaps. GapBlaster program, the user guide and the test datasets are freely available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/gapblaster2015/. It requires Sun JDK 8 and Blast or Mummer. PMID:27171416

  17. Early outcomes of twin-peg mobile-bearing unicompartmental knee arthroplasty compared with primary total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Lum, Z. C.; Lombardi, A. V.; Hurst, J. M.; Morris, M. J.; Adams, J. B.; Berend, K. R.

    2016-01-01

    Aims Since redesign of the Oxford phase III mobile-bearing unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) femoral component to a twin-peg design, there has not been a direct comparison to total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Thus, we explored differences between the two cohorts. Patients and Methods A total of 168 patients (201 knees) underwent medial UKA with the Oxford Partial Knee Twin-Peg. These patients were compared with a randomly selected group of 177 patients (189 knees) with primary Vanguard TKA. Patient demographics, Knee Society (KS) scores and range of movement (ROM) were compared between the two cohorts. Additionally, revision, re-operation and manipulation under anaesthesia rates were analysed. Results The mean follow-up for UKA and TKA groups was 5.4 and 5.5 years, respectively. Six TKA (3.2%) versus three UKAs (1.5%) were revised which was not significant (p = 0.269). Manipulation was more frequent after TKA (16; 8.5%) versus none in the UKA group (p < 0.001). UKA patients had higher post-operative KS function scores versus TKA patients (78 versus 66, p < 0.001) with a trend toward greater improvement, but there was no difference in ROM and KS clinical improvement (p = 0.382 and 0.420, respectively). Conclusion We found fewer manipulations, and higher functional outcomes for patients treated with medial mobile-bearing UKA compared with TKA. TKA had twice the revision rate as UKA although this did not reach statistical significance with the numbers available. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2016;98-B(10 Suppl B):28–33. PMID:27694513

  18. Periprosthetic humeral fracture after Copeland resurfacing and the role of revision arthroplasty: A report of three cases

    PubMed Central

    MacLean, Simon Bruce Murdoch; Mangat, Karanjit; Nandra, Rajpal; Kalogrianitis, Socrates

    2015-01-01

    Follow-up series of the Copeland resurfacing hemiarthroplasty have reported few postoperative fractures around the prosthesis. We report three cases of periprosthetic fracture around a Copeland resurfacing arthroplasty. Due to prosthetic loosening and tuberosity comminution, all cases were managed with revision shoulder arthroplasty. All patients had good functional outcome and range of movement on early follow-up. PMID:26622129

  19. SOUTHWEST REGIONAL GAP LAND COVER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Gap Analysis Program is a national inter-agency program that maps the distribution

    of plant communities and selected animal species and compares these distributions with land

    stewardship to identify gaps in biodiversity protection. GAP uses remote satellite imag...

  20. Skills Gaps in Australian Firms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindorff, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a survey of more than 2000 managers examining perceptions of skills gaps in a range of Australian firms. It finds that three quarters report a skills gap, and almost one third report skills gaps across the whole organisation. Firm size and industry differences exist in perceptions of the effect of the skills gap…

  1. Bridging Gaps Between Refractory Tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haney, J. W. J.

    1982-01-01

    Excessively large gaps between tiles on Space Shuttle eliminated without time-consuming and costly procedure of removing and replacing tiles. Ceramic tile silver is bonded in gap. Bonded silver prevents airframe under gap from getting too hot during reentry and presents aerodynamically smooth exterior surface.

  2. Effect of body mass index on functional outcomes following arthroplasty procedures

    PubMed Central

    Polat, Gokhan; Ceylan, Hasan Huseyin; Sayar, Safak; Kucukdurmaz, Fatih; Erdil, Mehmet; Tuncay, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the body mass index (BMI) change in arthroplasty patients and its impact on the patients’ functional results. METHODS: Between October 2010 and May 2013, 606 patients who were operated due to gonarthrosis, coxarthrosis, aseptic loosening of the total knee and hip prosthesis were evaluated prospectively. Patients were operated by three surgeons in three medical centers. Patients who were between 30-90 years of age and who were underwent total knee arthroplasty, total hip arthroplasty, revision knee arthroplasty, or revision hip arthroplasty were included in the study. We excluded the patients who cannot tolerate our standard postoperative rehabilitation program. Additionally, patients who had systemic inflammatory diseases, diabetes mellitus, or endochrinopathies were excluded from the study. The remaining 513 patients comprised our study group. Preoperative functional joint scores, height, weight and BMI of all patients were recorded. We used the Knee Society Score (KSS) for knee and Harris Hip Score (HHS) for hip patients. Postoperative functional scores were measured at 1st, 6th and 12th months and recorded separately at outpatient visits. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients was 64.7 (range: 30-90) years (207 males/306 females) and the mean follow-up duration was 14.3 (range: 12-26) mo. We found that arthroplasty patients had weight gain and had an increase in BMI at the postoperative 1st, 6th and 12th months. The mean BMI of the patients was 27.7 preoperatively, 27.8 at the postoperative 1st month, 28.1 at the 6th month and 28.6 at the 12th month (P < 0.01). At the last visit, the mean postoperative HHS of the hip arthroplasty patients was 82.2 ± 7.12 (preoperatively, 52.3; 1st month, 78.2; 6th month, 81.1; 12th month, 82.2), and the mean KSS of the knee arthroplasty patients was 79.3 ± 4.31 (preoperatively, 35.8; 1st month, 75.2; 6th month, 79.1; 12th month, 79.3). Worse functional results were noted in the patients who had a BMI increase

  3. Can tranexamic acid change preoperative anemia management during total joint arthroplasty?

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Duy L; Rinehart, Joseph B; Schwarzkopf, Ran

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the postoperative transfusion and complication rates of anemic and nonanemic total joint arthroplasty patients given tranexamic acid (TXA). METHODS: A cross-sectional prospective study was conducted of primary hip and knee arthroplasty cases performed from 11/2012 to 6/2014. Exclusion criteria included revision arthroplasty, bilateral arthroplasty, acute arthroplasty after fracture, and contraindication to TXA. Patients were screened prior to surgery, with anemia was defined as hemoglobin of less than 12 g/dL for females and of less than 13 g/dL for males. Patients were divided into four different groups, based on the type of arthroplasty (total hip or total knee) and hemoglobin status (anemic or nonanemic). Intraoperatively, all patients received 2 g of intravenous TXA during surgery. Postoperatively, allogeneic blood transfusion (ABT) was directed by both clinical symptoms and relative hemoglobin change. Complications were recorded within the first two weeks after surgery and included thromboembolism, infection, and wound breakdown. The differences in transfusion and complication rates, as well as the relative hemoglobin change, were compared between anemic and nonanemic groups. RESULTS: A total of 232 patients undergoing primary joint arthroplasty were included in the study. For the total hip arthroplasty cohort, 21% (18/84) of patients presented with preoperative anemia. Two patients in the anemic group and two patients in the nonanemic group needed ABTs; this was not significantly different (P = 0.20). One patient in the anemic group presented with a deep venous thromboembolism while no patients in the nonanemic group had an acute complication; this was not significantly different (P = 0.21). For nonanemic patients, the average change in hemoglobin was 2.73 ± 1.17 g/dL. For anemic patients, the average change in hemoglobin was 2.28 ± 0.96 g/dL. Between the two groups, the hemoglobin difference of 0.45 g/dL was not significant (P = 0

  4. Achieving ligament stability and correct rotational alignment of the femur in knee arthroplasty: a study using the Medial Pivot knee.

    PubMed

    Shakespeare, David; Kinzel, Vera; Ledger, Michael

    2005-12-01

    In a series of 90 Medial Pivot arthroplasties rotational alignment of the femur was achieved by provisionally reconstructing the lateral side of the joint and tensioning the medial side with feeler gauges. Axial CT scans were employed to measure the rotational alignment relative to surgical epicondylar axis. In valgus knees the cutting block was externally rotated to adjust for posterolateral bone loss. The mean rotational alignment of the femur was 0.6 degrees of external rotation (S.D. 1.3, range 3 degrees of ER to 4 degrees of IR). The mean laxity of the medial ligament was 1 mm in flexion (SD 1, range 0-5 mm) and 0.5 mm in flexion (S.D. 0.5, range 0-2 mm) In those knees in which the medial ligament had been released the CT alignment was perfect, but when internally rotated against the hip 3-4 mm of gapping was noted. In valgus knees the mean rotation of the femoral component was 0.8 degrees of internal rotation (S.D. 1.5, range 1 degrees of IR to 4 degrees of ER). In spite of externally rotating the cutting block there was still a tendency to internally rotate the femur in some knees. This simple technique achieves the two goals of ligament stability and correct rotational alignment in a high proportion of cases. It may be applicable to any instrument system which employs posterior referencing.

  5. Mind the gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhagwat, M. S.; Krassnigg, A.; Maris, P.; Roberts, C. D.

    2007-03-01

    In this summary of the application of Dyson-Schwinger equations to the theory and phenomenology of hadrons, some deductions following from a nonperturbative, symmetry-preserving truncation are highlighted, notable amongst which are results for pseudoscalar mesons. We also describe inferences from the gap equation relating to the radius of convergence of a chiral expansion, applications to heavy-light and heavy-heavy mesons, and quantitative estimates of the contribution of quark orbital angular momentum in pseudoscalar mesons; and recapitulate upon studies of nucleon electromagnetic form factors.

  6. Photonic band gap materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassagne, D.

    Photonic band gap materials Photonic band gap materials are periodic dielectric structures that control the propagation of electromagnetic waves. We describe the plane wave method, which allows to calculate the band structures of photonic crystals. By symmetry analysis and a perturbative approach, we predict the appearance of the low energy photonic band gaps of hexagonal structures. We propose new two-dimensional structures called graphite and boron nitride. Using a transfer matrix method, we calculate the transmission of the graphite structure and we show the crucial role of the coupling with external modes. We study the appearance of allowed modes in the photonic band gap by the introduction of localized defects in the periodicity. Finally, we discuss the properties of opals formed by self-organized silica microspheres, which are very promising for the fabrication of three-dimensional photonic crystals. Les matériaux à bandes interdites photoniques sont des structures diélectriques périodiques qui contrôlent la propagation des ondes électromagnétiques. Nous décrivons la méthode des ondes planes qui permet de calculer les structures de bandes des cristaux photoniques. Par une analyse de la symétrie et une approche perturbative, nous précisons les conditions d'existence des bandes interdites de basse énergie. Nous proposons de nouvelles structures bidimensionnelles appelées graphite et nitrure de bore. Grâce à une méthode de matrices de transfert, nous calculons la transmission de la structure graphite et nous mettons en évidence le rôle fondamental du couplage avec les modes extérieurs. Nous étudions l'apparition de modes permis dans la bande interdite grâce à l'introduction de défauts dans la périodicité. Enfin, nous discutons les propriétés des opales constituées de micro-billes de silice auto-organisées, qui sont très prometteuses pour la fabrication de cristaux photoniques tridimensionnels.

  7. Bilateral custom-fit total knee arthroplasty in a patient with poliomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Tardy, Nicolas; Chambat, Pierre; Murphy, Colin G; Fayard, Jean-Marie

    2014-09-01

    In limbs affected by poliomyelitis, total knee arthroplasty results in satisfactory pain relief. However, the risk of failure is high, especially if the preoperative quadriceps power is low. Therefore, treating osteoarthritis in the current patient represented a challenging procedure. A 66-year-old man presented with tricompartmental osteoarthritis of both knees, with valgus deformity of 14° on the left knee and 11° on the right knee. He walked with a bilateral knee recurvatum of 30° and a grade 1 quadriceps power. The authors treated both knees with cemented custom-fit hinged total knee arthroplasty with 30° of recurvatum in the tibial keel. Clinical scores showed good results 1 year postoperatively, especially on the subjective data of quality of life and function. At follow-up, radiographs showed good total knee arthroplasty positioning on the right side and a small mechanical loosening at the end of the tibial keel on the left side. Only 5 studies (Patterson and Insall; Moran; Giori and Lewallen; Jordan et al; and Tigani et al) have reported total knee arthroplasty results in patients with poliomyelitis. This study reports an original case of bilateral custom-fit hinged total knee arthroplasty in a patient with poliomyelitis. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of this type of procedure in the literature. The key point is the degree of recurvatum that is needed to allow walking, avoiding excessive constraints on the implants that can lead to early mechanical failure.

  8. Postoperative pain following primary lower limb arthroplasty and enhanced recovery pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wagstaff, KJ; Sanghera, S; Kerry, RM

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Enhanced recovery is a concept that has become increasingly popular for arthroplasty surgery over the last ten years. This study was designed to assess the analgesia requirements, pain levels and time to discharge for patients having primary arthroplasty in the enhanced recovery pathway. Methods A multidisciplinary prospective cohort study was carried out between January 2012 and March 2012. Data were collected for patients undergoing primary arthroplasty in one hospital during this time. Details of anaesthesia, local infiltration, additional medications and analgesia were recorded. A visual analogue scale pain score was obtained from each patient at time of mobilisation on days 0, 1, 2 and 3 postoperatively. Results Ninety-six patients were included in the study. Of these, 34 underwent total hip arthroplasty and 62 total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Pain was the greatest contributor for delayed discharge in TKA patients. The patients who had TKA and did not receive non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) had significantly higher pain scores (day 0, p<0.01; day 1, p<0.001; day 2, p<0.01) and significantly increased opiate demands compared with those patients who did receive NSAIDs. Conclusions There are unacceptably high pain scores in patients undergoing TKA without the use of NSAIDs. There should be focused intervention with this group of patients to improve their pain scores and reduce their length of stay. PMID:24780024

  9. Reverse arthroplasty of the shoulder for treating rotator cuff arthropathy☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Amaral, Marcus Vinicius Galvão; de Faria, José Leonardo Rocha; Siqueira, Gláucio; Cohen, Marcio; Brandão, Bruno; Moraes, Rickson; Monteiro, Martim; Motta, Geraldo

    2014-01-01

    Objective to present a retrospective analysis on the clinical-functional results and complications among patients with rotator cuff arthropathy (RCA) who underwent reverse arthroplasty of the shoulder. Methods patients with a diagnosis of RCA associated with pseudoparalysis of anterior elevation who underwent reverse arthroplasty of the shoulder with a minimum follow-up of one year were selected. Results preoperative information was gathered from our shoulder and elbow arthroplasty register, comprising age, sex, laterality, history of previous procedures, Constant's functional scores and the preoperative range of motion as described in the protocol of the American Academy of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery (ASES). After a mean follow-up of 44 months, 17 patients (94%) were satisfied with the result from the procedure. Conclusion reverse arthroplasty for treating RCA in patients with pseudoparalysis of the shoulder was shown to be effective in achieving a statistically significant improvement in range of motion regarding anterior flexion and abduction. However, in this series, there was no improvement in range of motion regarding external and internal rotation. Reverse arthroplasty is a procedure that reestablishes shoulder joint function in patients who previously did not present any therapeutic possibilities. PMID:26229813

  10. New Joints, Same Old Weight: Weight Changes After Total Hip and Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Hurwit, Daniel J; Trehan, Samir K; Cross, Michael B

    2016-07-01

    Obesity is a well-known risk factor for postoperative complications following total joint arthroplasty. However, because the operation is often successful, orthopedic surgeons continue to operate on obese individuals, and many surgeons do so under the assumption that patients will lose weight after they are able to walk and exercise without pain. In this article, we review a recent study by Ast et al., who performed a retrospective review, using a single-center institutional registry, to determine (1) whether patients do actually lose weight after total hip and/or total knee arthroplasty, (2) whether there are predictors of postoperative weight change, and (3) whether postoperative weight changes affect patient-reported clinical outcomes. The principle conclusion was that most patients maintained their body mass index (BMI) after total hip and total knee arthroplasty (73 and 69%, respectively). However, patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty, patients who had a higher preoperative BMI, and female patients were more likely to lose weight postoperatively. When examined in the context of the current literature, this study provides valuable information for the preoperative counseling of total joint arthroplasty candidates, especially in the setting of obesity. PMID:27385952

  11. Perioperative Pulmonary Circulatory Changes During Bilateral Total Hip Arthroplasty Under Regional Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Memtsoudis, Stavros G.; Salvati, Eduardo A.; Go, George; Ma, Yan; Sharrock, Nigel E.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Objectives The transient and rarely clinically relevant effect of bone and cement embolization during unilateral joint arthroplasty is a known phenomenon. However, available studies do not address events surrounding bilateral total hip arthroplasties, during which embolic load is presumably doubled. To elucidate events surrounding this increasingly utilized procedure and assess the effect on the pulmonary hemodynamics in the intra- and postoperative period, we studied 24 subjects undergoing cemented bilateral total hip arthroplasty during the same anesthetic session. Materials Twenty four patients without previous pulmonary history undergoing cemented bilateral total hip arthroplasty under controlled epidural hypotension were enrolled. Pulmonary artery catheters were inserted and hemodynamic variables were recorded at baseline, 5 minutes after the implantation of each hip joint, 1 hour and 1 day postoperatively. Mixed venous blood gases and complete blood counts were analyzed at every time point. Results An increase in pulmonary vascular resistance was observed after the second but not the first hip implantation when compared to values at incision. Pulmonary vascular resistance remained elevated 1 hour postoperatively. Pulmonary artery pressures were significantly elevated on post operative day 1 compared to baseline values. The white blood cell count increased in response to the second hip implantation but not the first compared to incision. Conclusion The embolization of material during bilateral total hip arthroplasty is associated with prolonged increases in pulmonary artery pressures and vascular resistance, particularly after the second side. The performance of bilateral procedures should be cautiously considered in patients with diseases suggesting decreased right ventricular reserve. PMID:20814281

  12. Failed Reverse Total Shoulder Arthroplasty Caused by Recurrent Candida glabrata Infection with Prior Serratia marcescens Coinfection

    PubMed Central

    Skedros, John G.; Keenan, Kendra E.; Updike, Wanda S.; Oliver, Marquam R.

    2014-01-01

    This report describes a 58-year-old insulin-dependent diabetic male patient who initially sustained a proximal humerus fracture from a fall. The fracture fixation failed and then was converted to a humeral hemiarthroplasty, which became infected with Candida glabrata and Serratia marcescens. After these infections were believed to be cured with antibacterial and antifungal treatments and two-stage irrigation and debridement, he underwent conversion to a reverse total shoulder arthroplasty. Unfortunately, the C. glabrata infection recurred and, nearly 1.5 years after implantation of the reverse total shoulder, he had a resection arthroplasty (removal of all implants and cement). His surgical and pharmacologic treatment concluded with (1) placement of a tobramycin-impregnated cement spacer also loaded with amphotericin B, with no plan for revision arthroplasty (i.e., the spacer was chronically retained), and (2) chronic use of daily oral fluconazole. We located only three reported cases of Candida species causing infection in shoulder arthroplasties (two C. albicans, one C. parapsilosis). To our knowledge, a total shoulder arthroplasty infected with C. glabrata has not been reported, nor has a case of a C. glabrata and S. marcescens periprosthetic coinfection in any joint. In addition, it is well known that S. marcescens infections are uncommon in periprosthetic joint infections. PMID:25431708

  13. Cervical Arthroplasty for Moderate to Severe Disc Degeneration: Clinical and Radiological Assessments after a Minimum Follow-Up of 18 Months: Pfirrmann Grade and Cervical Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Chang Hyun; Kim, Do Yeon; Ji, Gyu Yeul; Kim, Yeo Ju; Hyun, Dongkeun; Kim, Eun Young; Park, Hyeonseon; Park, Hyeong-Chun

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Clinical outcomes and radiologic results after cervical arthroplasty have been reported in many articles, yet relatively few studies after cervical arthroplasty have been conducted in severe degenerative cervical disc disease. Materials and Methods Sixty patients who underwent cervical arthroplasty (Mobi-C®) between April 2006 and November 2011 with a minimum follow-up of 18 months were enrolled in this study. Patients were divided into two groups according to Pfirrmann classification on preoperative cervical MR images: group A (Pfirrmann disc grade III, n=38) and group B (Pfirrmann disc grades IV or V, n=22). Visual analogue scale (VAS) scores of neck and arm pain, modified Oswestry Disability Index (mODI) score, and radiological results including cervical range of motion (ROM) were assessed before and after surgery. Results VAS and mean mODI scores decreased after surgery from 5.1 and 57.6 to 2.7 and 31.5 in group A and from 6.1 and 59.9 to 3.7 and 38.4 in group B, respectively. In both groups, VAS and mODI scores significantly improved postoperatively (p<0.001), although no significant intergroup differences were found. Also, cervical dynamic ROM was preserved or gradually improved up to 18 months after cervical arthroplasty in both groups. Global, segmental and adjacent ROM was similar for both groups during follow-up. No cases of device subsidence or extrusion were recorded. Conclusion Clinical and radiological results following cervical arthroplasty in patients with severe degenerative cervical disc disease were no different from those in patients with mild degenerative cervical disc disease after 18 months of follow-up. PMID:24954339

  14. Gapped domain walls, gapped boundaries, and topological degeneracy.

    PubMed

    Lan, Tian; Wang, Juven C; Wen, Xiao-Gang

    2015-02-20

    Gapped domain walls, as topological line defects between (2+1)D topologically ordered states, are examined. We provide simple criteria to determine the existence of gapped domain walls, which apply to both Abelian and non-Abelian topological orders. Our criteria also determine which (2+1)D topological orders must have gapless edge modes, namely, which (1+1)D global gravitational anomalies ensure gaplessness. Furthermore, we introduce a new mathematical object, the tunneling matrix W, whose entries are the fusion-space dimensions W(ia), to label different types of gapped domain walls. By studying many examples, we find evidence that the tunneling matrices are powerful quantities to classify different types of gapped domain walls. Since a gapped boundary is a gapped domain wall between a bulk topological order and the vacuum, regarded as the trivial topological order, our theory of gapped domain walls inclusively contains the theory of gapped boundaries. In addition, we derive a topological ground state degeneracy formula, applied to arbitrary orientable spatial 2-manifolds with gapped domain walls, including closed 2-manifolds and open 2-manifolds with gapped boundaries.

  15. A prospective evaluation of 2 different pain management protocols for total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Post, Zachary D; Restrepo, Camilo; Kahl, Lauren K; van de Leur, Tim; Purtill, James J; Hozack, William J

    2010-04-01

    Pain management after total hip arthroplasty has improved dramatically in the past decade. However, most protocols use opioid medications for pain control. In the current study, 100 patients were prospectively selected to receive a traditional narcotic-based patient-controlled analgesia protocol or a nonnarcotic oral protocol for pain management after primary total hip arthroplasty. Therapy programs were similar for both groups. Postoperatively, patients were followed daily for opioid use, medication adverse effects, pain control, and overall satisfaction. The nonnarcotic oral group showed lower mean pain scores during the first 24 hours after surgery. The satisfaction rate was high in both groups. Both protocols provided adequate pain control after total hip arthroplasty; the nonnarcotic pain management protocol resulted in significantly decreased opioid consumption and fewer adverse effects.

  16. Direct Costs of Aspirin versus Warfarin for Venous Thromboembolism Prophylaxis after Total Knee or Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Gutowski, Christina J; Zmistowski, Benjamin M; Lonner, Jess H; Purtill, James J; Parvizi, Javad

    2015-09-01

    Interest in aspirin as an alternative strategy for venous thromboembolism prophylaxis after arthroplasty has grown, as studies have suggested improved clinical efficacy and lower complication rates with aspirin compared to warfarin. The goal of this study was to compare the direct costs of an episode of arthroplasty care, when using aspirin instead of warfarin. The charts of patients who either received aspirin or warfarin after arthroplasty from January 2008 to March 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. Charges were recorded for their index admission, and for subsequent admissions related to either VTE or complications of prophylaxis. Multivariate analysis revealed that aspirin was an independent predictor of decreased cost of index hospitalization, and total episode of care charges, achieved largely through a shorter length of hospitalization. PMID:26073347

  17. Comparison of arthroplasty trial publications after registration in ClinicalTrials.gov.

    PubMed

    Smith, Holly N; Bhandari, Mohit; Mahomed, Nizar N; Jan, Meryam; Gandhi, Rajiv

    2012-08-01

    In 2005, the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors established a mandatory trial registration before study enrollment for publication in member journals. Our primary objective was to evaluate the publication rates of arthroplasty trials registered with ClinicalTrials.gov (CTG). We further aimed to examine the consistency of registration summaries with that of final publications. We searched CTG for all trials related to joint arthroplasty and conducted a thorough search for publications resulting from registered closed trials. Of 101 closed and completed trials, we found 23 publications, for an overall publication rate of 22.8%. Registration of arthroplasty trials in CTG does not consistently result in publication or disclosure of results. In addition, changes are frequently made to the final presentation of the data that are not reflected in the trial registry.

  18. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PATELLAR HEIGHT AND RANGE OF MOTION AFTER TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY

    PubMed Central

    Júnior, Lúcio Honório de Carvalho; Soares, Luiz Fernando Machado; Gonçalves, Matheus Braga Jacques; Pereira, Marcelo Lobo; Lessa, Rodrigo Rosa; Costa, Lincoln Paiva

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate whether, after total knee arthroplasty, there is any correlation between patellar height and range of motion (ROM) achieved by patients six months after the operation. Methods: Forty-five patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty were assessed at least 12 months after the operation (total of 54 knees). The maximum and minimum ROM of all the knees was recorded under fluoroscopy, along with patellar height according to the Blackburne and Peel ratio. Two possible correlations were evaluated: patellar height and ROM; and patellar height and ROM variation from before to after the operation. Results: A correlation was found between patellar height and postoperative ROM (p = 0.04). There was no correlation between patellar height and ROM variation (p = 0.182). Conclusion: After total knee arthroplasty, the lower the patella is, the worse the ROM is. PMID:27027029

  19. Anterior Longitudinal Osteotomy of the Greater Trochanter in Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Surace, Michele F; Regazzola, Gianmarco M V; Vulcano, Ettore; Monestier, Luca; Cherubino, Paolo

    2015-08-01

    The extra-articular impingement of the greater trochanter against the ileum is an underrated cause of early dislocation in total hip arthroplasty. In this preliminary study, the authors assess the effectiveness of an anterior longitudinal osteotomy of the greater trochanter for preventing dislocation. A total of 115 patients underwent a total hip arthroplasty through a posterolateral approach. All patients underwent clinical and radiological follow-up at 1, 3, and 6 months. No dislocation was reported. All patients demonstrated fast recovery of range of motion and walking. No trochanter fractures were observed. The osteotomy of the greater trochanter is an effective surgical technique that decreases anterior impingement and consequently lowers the dislocation rate in primary total hip arthroplasty. [Orthopedics. 2015; 38(8):490-493.]. PMID:26313167

  20. Current Evidence for the Use of Laminar Flow in Reducing Infection Rates in Total Joint Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    James, M; Khan, W.S; Nannaparaju, M.R; Bhamra, J.S; Morgan-Jones, R

    2015-01-01

    Since the introduction of laminar air flow in orthopaedic theatres by Sir John Charnley, it has widely become accepted as the standard during orthopaedic procedures such as joint arthroplasty. We present a review of available current literature for the use of laminar flow operating theatre ventilation during total joint arthroplasty and examines the effectiveness of laminar flow ventilated operating theatres in preventing post-operative wound infection. Results of our findings suggest that while bacterial and air particulate is reduced by laminar air flow systems, there is no conclusive effect on the reduction of post-operative wound infections following total joint arthroplasty. We conclude that a combination of strict aseptic technique, prophylactic antibiotics and good anaesthetic control during surgery remains crucial to reduce post-operative surgical infections. PMID:26587068

  1. Tranexamic Acid Decreases Incidence of Blood Transfusion in Simultaneous Bilateral Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Bagsby, Deren T; Samujh, Christopher A; Vissing, Jacqueline L; Empson, Janene A; Pomeroy, Donald L; Malkani, Arthur L

    2015-12-01

    Blood management for simultaneous bilateral total knee arthroplasty (TKA) patients is more challenging than in unilateral arthroplasty. We examined if administration of tranexamic acid (TXA) to patients undergoing simultaneous bilateral TKA would reduce blood loss and decrease allogeneic blood transfusion requirements. A retrospective review of 103 patients, 57 in the control and 46 in the TXA group, was performed. There was higher postoperative day 1 hemoglobin in patients receiving TXA (2.95±1.33 versus 4.33±1.19, P<0.0001). There was also a decrease in the transfusion incidence with administration of TXA (17.4% versus 57.9%, P<0.0001). In conclusion, we have shown that TXA is an effective tool in reducing the transfusion rates by almost 70% in simultaneous bilateral total knee arthroplasty.

  2. Medicare Reimbursement Attributable to Periprosthetic Joint Infection Following Primary Hip and Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Yi, Sarah H; Baggs, James; Culler, Steven D; Berríos-Torres, Sandra I; Jernigan, John A

    2015-06-01

    This study estimated Medicare reimbursement attributable to periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) across the continuum of covered services four years following hip or knee arthroplasty. Using 2001-2008 Medicare claims data, total and annual attributable reimbursements were assessed using generalized linear regression, adjusting for potential confounders. Within one year following arthroplasty, 109 (1.04%) of 10,418 beneficiaries were diagnosed with PJI. Cumulative Medicare reimbursement in the PJI arm was 2.2-fold (1.9-2.6, P<.0001) or $53,470 ($39,575-$68,221) higher than that of the non-PJI arm. The largest difference in reimbursement occurred the first year (3.2-fold); differences persisted the second (2.3-fold) and third (1.9-fold) follow up years. PJI following hip or knee arthroplasty appears costly to Medicare, with cost traversing several years and health care service areas.

  3. Direct Costs of Aspirin versus Warfarin for Venous Thromboembolism Prophylaxis after Total Knee or Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Gutowski, Christina J; Zmistowski, Benjamin M; Lonner, Jess H; Purtill, James J; Parvizi, Javad

    2015-09-01

    Interest in aspirin as an alternative strategy for venous thromboembolism prophylaxis after arthroplasty has grown, as studies have suggested improved clinical efficacy and lower complication rates with aspirin compared to warfarin. The goal of this study was to compare the direct costs of an episode of arthroplasty care, when using aspirin instead of warfarin. The charts of patients who either received aspirin or warfarin after arthroplasty from January 2008 to March 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. Charges were recorded for their index admission, and for subsequent admissions related to either VTE or complications of prophylaxis. Multivariate analysis revealed that aspirin was an independent predictor of decreased cost of index hospitalization, and total episode of care charges, achieved largely through a shorter length of hospitalization.

  4. Wrist joint arthroplasty in rheumatoid arthritis: a comparison between the Meuli and Swanson prostheses.

    PubMed

    Summers, B; Hubbard, M J

    1984-06-01

    A personal series of twelve wrist arthroplasties performed on ten patients with rheumatoid arthritis of the radio-carpal joint were reviewed in retrospect. Six arthroplasties were of the Meuli metal/plastic/metal design and six were of the Swanson silastic type with an additional silastic ulnar head prosthesis. Both prostheses were successful in giving a pain free stable joint with some degree of useful movement. The Meuli appeared to give a greater range of movement than the more constrained Swanson prosthesis. Although complications were encountered it is concluded that wrist arthroplasty does have a place in the management of patients with rheumatoid arthritis of the radio-carpal joint. Our present policy is to continue with the use of the Swanson design because of the advantages of a cement free prosthesis.

  5. Revision total knee arthroplasty: infection should be ruled out in all cases.

    PubMed

    Rasouli, Mohammad R; Harandi, Armin Aalami; Adeli, Bahar; Purtill, James J; Parvizi, Javad

    2012-06-01

    We hypothesized that some aseptic revision total knee arthroplasty failures are indeed caused by occult infection. This prospective study recruited 65 patients undergoing revision total knee arthroplasty. The mean follow-up period was 19 months. Collected synovial fluid was analyzed by Ibis T5000 biosensor (Abbott Molecular Inc, Ill; a multiplex polymerase chain reaction technology). Cases were considered as infected or aseptic based on the surgeon's judgment and Ibis findings. Based on Ibis biosensor, 17 aseptic cases were indeed infected that had been missed. Of these 17 cases, 2 developed infection after the index revision. A considerable number of so-called aseptic failures seem to be occult infections that were not adequately investigated and/or miscategorized as aseptic failure. We recommend that all patients undergoing revision arthroplasty be investigated for periprosthetic joint infection. PMID:22386605

  6. Treatment of Humeral Fracture after Shoulder Arthroplasty using Functional Brace: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Terabayashi, Nobuo; Matsumoto, Kazu; Takigami, Iori; Ito, Yoshiki

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: A periprosthetic humeral fracture is rare after shoulder arthroplasty, and such cases have considerable problems. Patients with this kind of fracture are often complicated by osteopenia, other types of severe disease, or are elderly. Surgical treatment of this fracture type carries some risk, and surgeons may be unsure about the most appropriate approach to adopt. Case report: The present case occurred in a 78-year-old woman with an osteoporotic humeral bone, and chronic dislocation of shoulder after shoulder arthroplasty. There were many risk factors for revision surgery or ostheosynthesis. Therefore, we decided to treat the patient by functional bracing. Fortunately, complete radiographic union was confirmed at 17 weeks. She returned to daily life with good functional activity. Conclusion: In our opinion, it is acceptable to select functional bracing for periprosthetic humeral fractures after shoulder arthroplasty without stem loosening in elderly patients with an osteoporotic humeral bone. PMID:27299112

  7. Arthroscopic Resection Arthroplasty of the Radial Column for SLAC Wrist

    PubMed Central

    Cobb, Tyson K.; Walden, Anna L.; Wilt, Jessica M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Symptomatic advanced scapholunate advanced collapse (SLAC) wrists are typically treated with extensive open procedures, including but not limited to scaphoidectomy plus four-corner fusion (4CF) and proximal row carpectomy (PRC). Although a minimally invasive arthroscopic option would be desirable, no convincing reports exist in the literature. The purpose of this paper is to describe a new surgical technique and outcomes on 14 patients who underwent arthroscopic resection arthroplasty of the radial column (ARARC) for arthroscopic stage II through stage IIIB SLAC wrists and to describe an arthroscopic staging classification of the radiocarpal joint for patients with SLAC wrist. Patients and Methods Data were collected prospectively on 17 patients presenting with radiographic stage I through III SLAC wrist who underwent ARARC in lieu of scaphoidectomy and 4CF or PRC. Fourteen patients (12 men and 2 women) subject to 1-year follow-up were included. The average age was 57 years (range 41 to 78). The mean follow-up was 24 months (range 12 to 61). Arthroscopic resection arthroplasty of the radial column is described for varying stages of arthritic changes of the radioscaphoid joint. Midcarpal resection was not performed. Results The mean Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) score was 66 preoperatively and 28 at final follow-up. The mean satisfaction (0 = not satisfied, 5 = completely satisfied) at final follow-up was 4.5 (range 3 to 5). The pain level (on 0–10 scale) improved from 6.6 to 1.3. The total arc of motion changed from 124° preoperatively to 142° postoperatively following an ARARC. Grip was 16 kg preoperatively and 18 kg postoperatively. Radiographic stages typically underestimated arthroscopic staging. Although four of our patients appeared to be radiographic stage I, all were found to have arthritis involving some or all of the radioscaphoid articulation at the time of arthroscopy. Clinical Relevance

  8. Failure of total knee arthroplasty with or without patella resurfacing

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose Patella resurfacing during primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is disputed and new prosthesis designs have been introduced without documentation of their survival. We assessed the impact on prosthesis survival of patella resurfacing and of prosthesis brand, based on data from the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register. Patients and methods 5 prosthesis brands in common use with and without patella resurfacing from 1994 through 2009 were included n = 11,887. The median follow-up times were 9 years for patella-resurfaced implants and 7 years for implants without patella resurfacing. For comparison of prosthesis brands, also brands in common use with only one of the two treatment options were included in the study population (n = 25,590). Cox regression analyses were performed with different reasons for revision as endpoints with adjustment for potential confounders. Results We observed a reduced overall risk of revision for patella resurfaced (PR) TKAs, but the statistical significance was borderline (RR = 0.84, p = 0.05). At 15 years, 92% of PR and 91% of patella non resurfaced (NR) prostheses were still unrevised. However, PR implants had a lower risk of revision due to pain alone (RR = 0.1, p < 0.001), but a higher risk of revision due to loosening of the tibial component (RR = 1.4, p = 0.03) and due to a defective polyethylene insert (RR = 3.2, p < 0.001). At 10 years, the survival for the reference NR brand AGC Universal was 93%. The NR brands Genesis I, Duracon, and Tricon (RR = 1.4–1.7) performed statistically significantly worse than NR AGC Universal, while the NR prostheses e.motion, Profix, and AGC Anatomic (RR = 0.1–0.7), and the PR prostheses NexGen and AGC Universal (RR = 0.4–0.5) performed statistically significantly better. LCS, NexGen, LCS Complete (all NR), and Tricon, Genesis I, LCS, and Kinemax (all PR) showed no differences in this respect from the reference brand. A lower risk of revision (crude) was found for TKAs

  9. Assessment of asymmetric leg loading before and after total hip arthroplasty using instrumented shoes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Total hip arthroplasty is a successful surgical treatment in patients with osteoarthritis of the hip. Different questionnaires are used by the clinicians to assess functional capacity and the patient's pain, despite these questionnaires are known to be subjective. Furthermore, many studies agree that kinematic and kinetic parameters are crucial to evaluate and to provide useful information about the patient’s evolution for clinicians and rehabilitation specialists. However, these quantities can currently only be obtained in a fully equipped gait laboratory. Instrumented shoes can quantify gait velocity, kinetic, kinematic and symmetry parameters. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the instrumented shoes is a sufficiently sensitive instrument to show differences in mobility performance before and after total hip arthroplasty. Methods In this study, patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty were measured before and 6–8 months after total hip arthroplasty. Both measurement sessions include 2 functional mobility tasks while the subject was wearing instrumented shoes. Before each measurement the Harris Hip Score and the Traditional Western Ontario and McMaster Universities osteoarthritis index were administered as well. Results The stance time and the average vertical ground reaction force measured with the instrumented shoes during walking, and their symmetry index, showed significant differences before and after total hip arthroplasty. However, the data obtained with the sit to stand test did not reveal this improvement after surgery. Conclusions Our results show that inter-limb asymmetry during a walking activity can be evaluated with the instrumented shoes before and after total hip arthroplasty in an outpatient clinical setting. PMID:24581227

  10. Efficacy and safety of rivaroxaban thromboprophylaxis after arthroplasty of the hip or knee: retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Loganathan, L; Hua, A; Patel, S; Gibbons, C; Vizcaychipi, M P

    2016-09-01

    Introduction Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a potentially fatal complication of hip arthroplasty and knee arthroplasty. The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence recommend rivaroxaban for VTE prevention. Amid concerns over bleeding complications, the modified thromboprophylaxis policy of Chelsea and Westminster Hospital (CWH; London, UK) advises enoxaparin given after surgery in the inpatient setting followed by rivaroxaban upon hospital discharge. This retrospective study investigated the efficacy and safety of rivaroxaban in this novel, modified venous-prophylaxis regimen in a surgical orthopaedic cohort at CWH. Methods A total of 479 patients who received modified thromboprophylaxis treatment at CWH after hip arthroplasty or knee arthroplasty between April 2013 and October 2014 formed the study cohort. Seven outcomes based on efficacy and safety while undergoing treatment with rivaroxaban were investigated: symptomatic deep-vein thrombosis (DVT), pulmonary embolism (PE), death, stroke, myocardial infarction (MI), major bleeding episodes (MBEs) and non-major bleeding episodes (NMBEs). Median follow-up was 369 days. Fisher's exact and Mann-Whitney U-tests were adopted to identify associations with these outcomes. Results Prevalence of symptomatic PE, DVT, death, stroke and MI during treatment was zero. One (0.2%) MBE and nine (1.9%) NMBEs occurred. The MBE (a wound haematoma) required a return to theatre for aspiration. Off-treatment VTEs occurred in four (0.8%) patients after completion of a course of rivaroxaban, and were associated with known risk factors. Conclusions Rivaroxaban is an effective and safe anticoagulant for thromboprophylaxis after hip arthroplasty or knee arthroplasty if used in a modified regimen involving enoxaparin administered in the inpatient setting followed by rivaroxaban upon hospital discharge. PMID:27580310

  11. Long head of the biceps pathology as a cause of anterior shoulder pain after shoulder arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Tuckman, David V; Dines, David M

    2006-01-01

    The use of shoulder arthroplasty has been increasing over the last decade, with nearly 20,000 shoulder arthroplasties being performed each year. Although many patients have excellent results, there exists a subset of patients in whom anterior catching shoulder pain develops after arthroplasty. The purpose of this study was to examine this group of patients and explore treatment options and outcomes for this condition. We undertook a review of 8 shoulders in 7 patients who were treated for anterior shoulder pain radiating into the biceps muscle after shoulder arthroplasty. Three patients had a hemiarthroplasty for fracture, and five had a total shoulder arthroplasty. All patients had anterior shoulder pain with physical examination findings consistent with biceps tendon pathology. Definitive diagnosis and treatment consisted of either arthroscopy, in 7 of 8 shoulders, or an open procedure, in 1 of 8 shoulders. The range of motion improved in all shoulders. The hemiarthroplasty group showed an increase in flexion of 36 degrees (range, 68 degrees -104 degrees ), external rotation of 23 degrees (range, 11 degrees -34 degrees ), and internal rotation to L4. The total shoulder group demonstrated an increase in flexion of 50 degrees (range, 66 degrees -166 degrees ), external rotation of 27 degrees (range, 22 degrees -39 degrees ), and internal rotation to L3. The Hospital for Special Surgery score improved in all shoulders, with all patients being satisfied with their final outcome. Pain scores improved from a mean of 6.9 (range, 4-9) preoperatively to 1.4 (range, 0.5-2) postoperatively on a scale of 1 to 10, with 10 indicating the most pain. The role of the biceps tendon in the pathology of anterior shoulder pain after shoulder arthroplasty appears to be consistent with fibrosis and inflammation. Initial results, achieved with arthroscopic debridement or tenodesis, were encouraging.

  12. Efficacy and safety of rivaroxaban thromboprophylaxis after arthroplasty of the hip or knee: retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Loganathan, L; Hua, A; Patel, S; Gibbons, C; Vizcaychipi, M P

    2016-09-01

    Introduction Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a potentially fatal complication of hip arthroplasty and knee arthroplasty. The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence recommend rivaroxaban for VTE prevention. Amid concerns over bleeding complications, the modified thromboprophylaxis policy of Chelsea and Westminster Hospital (CWH; London, UK) advises enoxaparin given after surgery in the inpatient setting followed by rivaroxaban upon hospital discharge. This retrospective study investigated the efficacy and safety of rivaroxaban in this novel, modified venous-prophylaxis regimen in a surgical orthopaedic cohort at CWH. Methods A total of 479 patients who received modified thromboprophylaxis treatment at CWH after hip arthroplasty or knee arthroplasty between April 2013 and October 2014 formed the study cohort. Seven outcomes based on efficacy and safety while undergoing treatment with rivaroxaban were investigated: symptomatic deep-vein thrombosis (DVT), pulmonary embolism (PE), death, stroke, myocardial infarction (MI), major bleeding episodes (MBEs) and non-major bleeding episodes (NMBEs). Median follow-up was 369 days. Fisher's exact and Mann-Whitney U-tests were adopted to identify associations with these outcomes. Results Prevalence of symptomatic PE, DVT, death, stroke and MI during treatment was zero. One (0.2%) MBE and nine (1.9%) NMBEs occurred. The MBE (a wound haematoma) required a return to theatre for aspiration. Off-treatment VTEs occurred in four (0.8%) patients after completion of a course of rivaroxaban, and were associated with known risk factors. Conclusions Rivaroxaban is an effective and safe anticoagulant for thromboprophylaxis after hip arthroplasty or knee arthroplasty if used in a modified regimen involving enoxaparin administered in the inpatient setting followed by rivaroxaban upon hospital discharge.

  13. Increased Long-Term Cardiovascular Risk After Total Hip Arthroplasty: A Nationwide Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Max; Rysinska, Agata; Garland, Anne; Rolfson, Ola; Aspberg, Sara; Eisler, Thomas; Garellick, Göran; Stark, André; Hailer, Nils P; Sköldenberg, Olof

    2016-02-01

    Total hip arthroplasty is a common and important treatment for osteoarthritis patients. Long-term cardiovascular effects elicited by osteoarthritis or the implant itself remain unknown. The purpose of the present study was to determine if there is an increased risk of late cardiovascular mortality and morbidity after total hip arthroplasty surgery.A nationwide matched cohort study with data on 91,527 osteoarthritis patients operated on, obtained from the Swedish Hip Arthroplasty Register. A control cohort (n = 270,688) from the general Swedish population was matched 1:3 to each case by sex, age, and residence. Mean follow-up time was 10 years (range, 7-21).The exposure was presence of a hip replacement for more than 5 years. The primary outcome was cardiovascular mortality after 5 years. Secondary outcomes were total mortality and re-admissions due to cardiovascular events.During the first 5 to 9 years, the arthroplasty cohort had a lower cardiovascular mortality risk compared with the control cohort. However, the risk in the arthroplasty cohort increased over time and was higher than in controls after 8.8 years (95% confidence interval [CI] 7.0-10.5). Between 9 and 13 years postoperatively, the hazard ratio was 1.11 (95% CI 1.05-1.17). Arthroplasty patients were also more frequently admitted to hospital for cardiovascular reasons compared with controls, with a rate ratio of 1.08 (95% CI 1.06-1.11).Patients with surgically treated osteoarthritis of the hip have an increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality many years after the operation when compared with controls. PMID:26871792

  14. Nerve Injury in Patients Following Hip and Knee Arthroplasties and Knee Arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yacub, Jennifer N.; Rice, J. Bradford; Dillingham, Timothy R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine the reporting of lower limb neuropathy within 90 days of surgery for patients undergoing hip arthroplasty, knee arthroplasty or knee arthroscopy. Design This was a retrospective study utilizing data from the 1998 MarketScan Commercial Claims and Encounter Database (The MEDSTAT Group) to identify lower limb neuropathy following these surgeries. The sample was selected within the first nine months of 1998 using ICD-9 and CPT codes for hip and knee surgical procedures. Lower limb nerve injuries as determined by ICD-9 codes within 90 days post surgery were the main outcome measures. The influence of diabetes on the rates of nerve injuries following surgery was also examined. Results 14,979 patients underwent these surgical procedures, 10 of whom were reported to have sustained a nerve injury post surgery (0.07%). A majority (53.1%) of the sample was male and the largest age groups consisted of those aged 45–54 years (27.0%) and those aged 55–64 years (27.7%). Nerve injury occurred at a rate of 0.03% after hip arthroplasty, 0.01% following knee arthroplasty and 0.02% within three months of arthroscopic knee surgery. Overall, nerve injuries were two times more prevalent in the diabetic vs. non-diabetic population (0.11% vs. 0.06%); however, this difference did not meet conventional levels of statistical significance. Specific to knee arthroplasty, there were ten-fold differences in nerve injury rates between diabetics and non-diabetics, 0.11% vs. 0.01% respectively (p ≤ 0.01) – although the overall risks were small. Conclusion Nerve injuries following hip and knee arthroplasty, and knee arthroscopy were rare in a large population of patients younger than 65 years. Although the overall rates were low, there was an increased occurrence of nerve injuries in the diabetic population. This information is useful when counseling patients and benchmarking surgical complication rates. PMID:19620828

  15. Effect of anterior translation of the talus on outcomes of three-component total ankle arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ankle osteoarthritis commonly involves sagittal malalignment with anterior translation of the talus relative to the tibia. Total ankle arthroplasty has become an increasingly popular treatment for patients with symptomatic ankle osteoarthritis. However, no comprehensive study has been conducted on the outcomes of total ankle arthroplasty for osteoarthritis with preoperative sagittal malalignment. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of anterior translation of the talus on outcomes of three-component total ankle arthroplasty. Methods One hundred and four osteoarthritic ankles in 104 patients who underwent three-component total ankle arthroplasty were included in this study. The 104 ankles were divided into 2 groups: ankles with anteriorly translated talus (50 ankles), and ankles with non-translated talus (54 ankles). Clinical and radiographic outcomes were assessed in both groups. The mean follow-up duration was 42.8 ± 17.9 months (range, 24 to 95 months). Results Forty-six (92%) of 50 ankles with anterior translation of the talus showed relocation of the talus within the mortise at 6 months, and 48 (96%) ankles were relocated at 12 months after total ankle arthroplasty. But, 2 (4%) ankles were not relocated until the final follow-up. The AOFAS scores, ankle range of motion, and radiographic outcomes showed no significant difference between the two groups at the final follow-up (p > 0.05 for each). Conclusions In majority of cases, the anteriorly translated talus in osteoarthritic ankles was restored to an anatomical position within 6 months after successful three-component total ankle arthroplasty. The clinical and radiographic outcomes in the osteoarthritic ankles with anteriorly translated talus group were comparable with those in non-translated talus group. PMID:24007555

  16. The Gap-Tpc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, B.; Anastasio, A.; Boiano, A.; Catalanotti, S.; Cocco, A. G.; Covone, G.; Di Meo, P.; Longo, G.; Vanzanella, A.; Walker, S.; Wang, H.; Wang, Y.; Fiorillo, G.

    2016-02-01

    Several experiments have been conducted worldwide, with the goal of observing low-energy nuclear recoils induced by WIMPs scattering off target nuclei in ultra-sensitive, low-background detectors. In the last few decades noble liquid detectors designed to search for dark matter in the form of WIMPs have been extremely successful in improving their sensitivities and setting the best limits. One of the crucial problems to be faced for the development of large size (multi ton-scale) liquid argon experiments is the lack of reliable and low background cryogenic PMTs: their intrinsic radioactivity, cost, and borderline performance at 87 K rule them out as a possible candidate for photosensors. We propose a brand new concept of liquid argon-based detector for direct dark matter search: the Geiger-mode Avalanche Photodiode Time Projection Chamber (GAP-TPC) optimized in terms of residual radioactivity of the photosensors, energy and spatial resolution, light and charge collection efficiency.

  17. Undecidability of the spectral gap.

    PubMed

    Cubitt, Toby S; Perez-Garcia, David; Wolf, Michael M

    2015-12-10

    The spectral gap--the energy difference between the ground state and first excited state of a system--is central to quantum many-body physics. Many challenging open problems, such as the Haldane conjecture, the question of the existence of gapped topological spin liquid phases, and the Yang-Mills gap conjecture, concern spectral gaps. These and other problems are particular cases of the general spectral gap problem: given the Hamiltonian of a quantum many-body system, is it gapped or gapless? Here we prove that this is an undecidable problem. Specifically, we construct families of quantum spin systems on a two-dimensional lattice with translationally invariant, nearest-neighbour interactions, for which the spectral gap problem is undecidable. This result extends to undecidability of other low-energy properties, such as the existence of algebraically decaying ground-state correlations. The proof combines Hamiltonian complexity techniques with aperiodic tilings, to construct a Hamiltonian whose ground state encodes the evolution of a quantum phase-estimation algorithm followed by a universal Turing machine. The spectral gap depends on the outcome of the corresponding 'halting problem'. Our result implies that there exists no algorithm to determine whether an arbitrary model is gapped or gapless, and that there exist models for which the presence or absence of a spectral gap is independent of the axioms of mathematics.

  18. Malassezia species infection of the synovium after total knee arthroplasty surgery

    PubMed Central

    Leylabadlo, Hamed Ebrahimzadeh; Zeinalzadeh, Elham; Akbari, Najibeh Asl Rahnemaii; Kafil, Hossein Samadi

    2016-01-01

    Infection is a serious complication after implantation of total knee-prostheses. However, fungal infection is rarely found in periprosthetic joints, and in most reports, the infecting organism is a Candida species. This is a case report of infection after left knee total arthroplasty caused by Malassezia species. The patient is still undergoing antifungal therapy with voriconazole and is still being followed-up. To the authors’ knowledge, the present case is the first report of Malassezia species in a patient after total knee arthroplasty. PMID:27730027

  19. Iliopsoas Irritation as Presentation of Head-Neck Corrosion After Total Hip Arthroplasty: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Matsen Ko, Laura; Coleman, Jacob J; Stas, Venessa; Duwelius, Paul J

    2015-10-01

    Corrosion of modular components at the femoral neck remains a complication of total hip arthroplasty (THA). The authors have found the iliopsoas sign (pain on resisted flexion of the hip) to be suggestive of femoral component corrosion. These cases represented 8 of 120 revision hip arthroplasties (7%) performed at the authors' institution. After the revisions, all iliopsoas tendonitis symptoms resolved. Based on the authors' experience and the recent literature, they recommend that the iliopsoas sign or presentation of a sterile iliopsoas abscess in a previously well-functioning THA be concern for corrosion of the femoral component of the total hip.

  20. Revision Arthroplasty Using a MUTARS® Prosthesis in Comminuted Periprosthetic Fracture of the Distal Femur.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyung Suk; Nho, Jae Hwi; Kim, Chung Hyun; Kwon, Sai Won; Park, Jong Seok; Suh, You Sung

    2016-11-01

    Periprosthetic fractures after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) are gradually increasing, reflecting extended lifespan, osteoporosis, and the increasing proportion of the elderly during the past decade. Supracondylar periprosthetic femoral fracture is a potential complication after TKA. Generally, open reduction and internal fixation are the conventional option for periprosthetic fracture after TKA. However, the presence of severe comminution with component loosening can cause failure of internal fixation. Although the current concept for periprosthetic fracture is open reduction and internal fixation, we introduce an unusual case of revision arthroplasty using a MUTARS® prosthesis for a comminuted periprosthetic fracture in the distal femur after TKA, with technical tips. PMID:27593884

  1. Analgesic Techniques in Hip and Knee Arthroplasty: From the Daily Practice to Evidence-Based Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Anastase, Denisa Madalina; Cionac Florescu, Simona; Munteanu, Ana Maria; Ursu, Traian; Stoica, Cristian Ioan

    2014-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA) are major orthopedic surgery models, addressing mainly ageing populations with multiple comorbidities and treatments, ASA II–IV, which may complicate the perioperative period. Therefore effective management of postoperative pain should allow rapid mobilization of the patient with shortening of hospitalization and social reintegration. In our review we propose an evaluation of the main analgesics models used today in the postoperative period. Their comparative analysis shows the benefits and side effects of each of these methods and guides us to how to use evidence-based medicine in our daily practice. PMID:25484894

  2. Liposomal Bupivacaine: A Comparative Study of More Than 1000 Total Joint Arthroplasty Cases.

    PubMed

    Barrington, John W; Olugbode, Oluseun; Lovald, Scott; Ong, Kevin; Watson, Heather; Emerson, Roger H

    2015-10-01

    Pain after total joint arthroplasty (TJA) can be severe and difficult to control. A single-dose local analgesic delivers bupivacaine in a liposomal time-release platform. In 2248 consecutive patients with hip and knee arthroplasty, half (Pre) were treated using a well-established multimodal analgesia, including periarticular injection (PAI), and half had the PAI substituted for a liposomal bupivacaine injection technique (Post). Pain scores were significantly lower for patients in the Post group for both hip and knee procedures. A large series of patients who had TJA experienced pain relief after the introduction of liposomal bupivacaine as part of an established multimodal protocol.

  3. Revision Arthroplasty Using a MUTARS® Prosthesis in Comminuted Periprosthetic Fracture of the Distal Femur

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hyung-Suk; Kim, Chung-Hyun; Kwon, Sai-Won; Park, Jong-Seok; Suh, You-Sung

    2016-01-01

    Periprosthetic fractures after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) are gradually increasing, reflecting extended lifespan, osteoporosis, and the increasing proportion of the elderly during the past decade. Supracondylar periprosthetic femoral fracture is a potential complication after TKA. Generally, open reduction and internal fixation are the conventional option for periprosthetic fracture after TKA. However, the presence of severe comminution with component loosening can cause failure of internal fixation. Although the current concept for periprosthetic fracture is open reduction and internal fixation, we introduce an unusual case of revision arthroplasty using a MUTARS® prosthesis for a comminuted periprosthetic fracture in the distal femur after TKA, with technical tips. PMID:27593884

  4. An Insight into Methods and Practices in Hip Arthroplasty in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Mosleh-shirazi, Mohammad Saeed; Ibrahim, Mazin; Pastides, Philip; Khan, Wasim; Rahman, Habib

    2015-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty (THA) has improved the quality of life of patients with hip arthritis. Orthopedic community is striving for excellence to improve surgical techniques and postoperative care. Despite these efforts, patients continue facing postoperative complications. In particular, patients with rheumatoid arthritis display a higher risk of certain complications such as dislocation, periprosthetic infection, and shorter prosthesis durability. In this review we present the current knowledge of hip arthroplasty in patients with rheumatoid arthritis with more insight into common practices and interventions directed at enhancing recovery of these patients and current shortfalls. PMID:26236339

  5. Three-step sequential management for knee arthroplasty after severe ballistic injury: Two cases.

    PubMed

    Herry, Y; Boucher, F; Neyret, P; Ferry, T; Lustig, S

    2016-02-01

    Management of knee bone loss after gunshot trauma requires a multidisciplinary approach. Two cases of knee arthroplasty after devastating ballistic trauma are reported. Treatment comprised several steps: sampling, bone resection, reinforced cement spacer, latent sepsis control, and prosthetic reconstruction. The patients showed no neurovascular disorder and had a functioning extensor mechanism. At follow-up of at least 2 years, results were satisfactory, with return to unaided walking and mean International Knee Society (IKS) score improved from 18 to 59 points. In light of these observations, knee reconstruction arthroplasty using a sequential strategy can provide satisfactory functional outcome after severe ballistic trauma. PMID:26774900

  6. Durability of highly cross-linked polyethylene in total hip and total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Dion, Neil T; Bragdon, Charles; Muratoglu, Orhun; Freiberg, Andrew A

    2015-07-01

    This article reviews the history of the development of highly cross-linked polyethylene and provides an in-depth review of the clinical results regarding the durability of highly cross-linked polyethylene (HXLPE) used in total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The use of polyethylene as a bearing surface has contributed to the success of THA and TKA; however, polyethylene wear and osteolysis can lead to failure. Ongoing clinical and retrieval studies are required to analyze outcomes at longer-term follow-up.

  7. Role of Surgical Dressings in Total Joint Arthroplasty: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Springer, Bryan D; Beaver, Walter B; Griffin, William L; Mason, J Bohannon; Odum, Susan M

    2015-09-01

    We conducted a randomized controlled trial to compare efficacy of an occlusive antimicrobial barrier dressing and a standard surgical dressing in patients who underwent primary total joint arthroplasty. Two hundred sixty-two patients were randomized to receive either an occlusive dressing or a standard dressing. Wounds were closed in identical fashion. Outcomes included wound complications, dressing changes, and patient satisfaction. With use of occlusive dressing (vs standard dressing), wound complications (including skin blistering) were significantly (P = 0.15) reduced; there were significantly (P < .0001) fewer dressing changes; and patient satisfaction was significantly (P < .0001) higher. Use of occlusive dressings can reduce wound complications and promote wound healing after total joint arthroplasty.

  8. Use of a Bone Graft Drill Harvester to Create the Fenestration During Arthroscopic Ulnohumeral Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Wijeratna, Malin D; Ek, Eugene T; Hoy, Gregory A; Chehata, Ash

    2015-10-01

    The Outerbridge-Kashiwagi procedure, or ulnohumeral arthroplasty, was described in 1978 as a method of treating elbow arthritis by creating a fenestration in the olecranon fossa. This fenestration diminishes the likelihood of recurrent spurs in the olecranon fossa and coronoid fossa, without loss of structural bony strength. Arthroscopic techniques have now been developed to perform this procedure. We describe an efficient method of creating the fenestration between the olecranon fossa and coronoid fossa during an arthroscopic ulnohumeral arthroplasty, or Outerbridge-Kashiwagi procedure, that also reduces the amount of residual bone debris produced during the resection.

  9. Dynamic splinting for knee flexion contracture following total knee arthroplasty: a case report.

    PubMed

    Finger, Eric; Willis, F Buck

    2008-01-01

    Total Knee Arthroplasty operations are increasing in frequency, and knee flexion contracture is a common pathology, both pre-existing and post-operative. A 61-year-old male presented with knee flexion contracture following a total knee arthroplasty. Physical therapy alone did not fully reduce the contracture and dynamic splinting was then prescribed for daily low-load, prolonged-duration stretch. After 28 physical therapy sessions, the active range of motion improved from -20 degrees to -12 degrees (stiff knee still lacking full extension), and after eight additional weeks with nightly wear of dynamic splint, the patient regained full knee extension, (active extension improved from -12 degrees to 0 degrees ).

  10. Durability of highly cross-linked polyethylene in total hip and total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Dion, Neil T; Bragdon, Charles; Muratoglu, Orhun; Freiberg, Andrew A

    2015-07-01

    This article reviews the history of the development of highly cross-linked polyethylene and provides an in-depth review of the clinical results regarding the durability of highly cross-linked polyethylene (HXLPE) used in total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The use of polyethylene as a bearing surface has contributed to the success of THA and TKA; however, polyethylene wear and osteolysis can lead to failure. Ongoing clinical and retrieval studies are required to analyze outcomes at longer-term follow-up. PMID:26043046

  11. Three-step sequential management for knee arthroplasty after severe ballistic injury: Two cases.

    PubMed

    Herry, Y; Boucher, F; Neyret, P; Ferry, T; Lustig, S

    2016-02-01

    Management of knee bone loss after gunshot trauma requires a multidisciplinary approach. Two cases of knee arthroplasty after devastating ballistic trauma are reported. Treatment comprised several steps: sampling, bone resection, reinforced cement spacer, latent sepsis control, and prosthetic reconstruction. The patients showed no neurovascular disorder and had a functioning extensor mechanism. At follow-up of at least 2 years, results were satisfactory, with return to unaided walking and mean International Knee Society (IKS) score improved from 18 to 59 points. In light of these observations, knee reconstruction arthroplasty using a sequential strategy can provide satisfactory functional outcome after severe ballistic trauma.

  12. Femoral nerve block for patient undergoing total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Bong Ha; Lee, Hyeon Jung; Lee, Hyung Gon; Kim, Man Young; Park, Keun Suk; Choi, Jeong Il; Yoon, Myung Ha; Kim, Woong Mo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: The existence of peripheral opioid receptors and its effectiveness in peripheral nerve block remain controversial. The aim of this prospective, randomized, double-blinded study was to examine the analgesic effects of adding fentanyl to ropivacaine for continuous femoral nerve block (CFNB) using patient-controlled analgesia after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Methods: The patients were divided into 2 groups, each with n = 40 in ropivacaine (R) group and n = 42 in R with fentanyl (R + F) group. After operation, the patients in each group received R + F and R alone via a femoral nerve catheter, respectively. We assessed the visual analog scale (VAS) pain immediately before administration (baseline) and at 15, 30, and 60 minutes on postanesthesia care unit (PACU), and resting and ambulatory VAS score up to 24 hours. Results: Overall, the average VAS scores in the R + F group were slightly lower than those of the R group. However, the VAS score differences between groups were not statistically significant, except for 30 minutes (P = 0.009) in PACU. R group showed higher supplemental analgesics consumption in average compared with R + F group, but not significant. Conclusion: Additional fentanyl did not show prominent enhancement of analgesic effect in the field of CFNB after TKA. PMID:27603376

  13. Posterior Cruciate Ligament Function Following Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Emodi, George J; Callaghan, John J; Pedersen, Douglas R; Brown, Thomas D

    1999-01-01

    One of the most commonly cited reasons for retaining the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) during total knee arthroplasty is to preserve femoral rollback and theoretically improve extensor mechanism efficiency (lengthening the moment arm). This study was undertaken to assess PCL function in this regard and to delineate the effects of joint line elevation that can be manipulated intraoperatively by the surgeon. The anterior movement of tibiofemoral contact following PCL resection at flexion angles 60 degrees demonstrated the beneficial effect of the PCL on extensor function. This anterior translation and the concomitant increases in quadriceps tendon load and patellofemoral contact pressures were consistently observed. This study demonstrated that small changes of the joint line position significantly influenced PCL strain and knee kinematics. In order to preserve the desired functions that would be lost with an overly lax PCL and to avoid the potential adverse effects of an overly tight PCL (posterior edge loading and increased tibiofemoral contact), the surgeon should make every effort to restore the preoperative joint line. If this is not possible, consideration should be given to posterior cruciate recession or use of a posterior cruciate substituting design. PMID:10847521

  14. Primary posterior stabilized total knee arthroplasty: analysis of different instrumentation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Intercondylar femoral bone removal during posterior stabilized (PS) total knee arthroplasty (TKA) makes many cruciate substituting implant designs less appealing than cruciate retaining implants. Bone stock conservation is considered fundamental in the prevision of future revision surgeries. The purpose of this study was to compare the quantity of intercondylar bone removable during PS housing preparation using three contemporary PS TKA instrumentations. Method We compared different box cutting jigs which were utilized for the PS housing of three popular PS knee prostheses. The bone removal area from every PS box cutting jig was three-dimensionally measured. Results Independently from the implant size, the cutting jig for a specific PS TKA always resected significantly less bone than the others: this difference was statistically significant, especially for small- to medium-sized total knee femoral components. Conclusion This study does not establish a clinical relevance of removing more or less bone at primary TKA, but suggests that if a PS design is indicated, it is preferable to select a model which possibly resects less distal femoral bone. PMID:25037275

  15. Predicting poor physical performance after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Bade, Michael J; Wolfe, Pamela; Zeni, Joseph A; Stevens-Lapsley, Jennifer E; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a preliminary decision algorithm predicting functional performance outcomes to aid in the decision of when to undergo total knee arthroplasty (TKA). One hundred and nineteen patients undergoing primary unilateral TKA were evaluated before and 6 months after TKA. A regression tree analysis using a recursive partitioning function was performed with the Timed Up and Go (TUG) time, Six-Minute Walk (6MW) distance, and Stair Climbing Test (SCT) time as measured 6 months after TKA as the primary outcomes. Preoperative measures of functional performance, joint performance, anthropometrics, demographics, and self-reported status were evaluated as predictors of the primary outcomes 6 months after surgery. Individuals taking ≥10.1 s on the TUG and aged 72 years or older before surgery had the poorest performance on the TUG 6 months after surgery. Individuals walking <314 meters on the 6MW before surgery had the poorest performance on the 6MW test 6 months after surgery. Individuals taking ≥17 s to complete the SCT and scoring <40 on the SF-36 mental component score before surgery had the poorest performance on the SCT 6 months after surgery. Poorer performance preoperatively on the 6MW, SCT, and TUG, was related to poorer performance in the same measure after TKA. Age and decreased mental health were secondary predictors of poorer performance at 6 months on the TUG and SCT, respectively. These measures may help further develop models predicting thresholds for poor outcomes after TKA.

  16. Fibrosis is a common outcome following total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Abdul, Nicole; Dixon, David; Walker, Andrew; Horabin, Joanna; Smith, Nick; Weir, David J.; Brewster, Nigel T.; Deehan, David J.; Mann, Derek A.; Borthwick, Lee A.

    2015-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is one of the most successful orthopaedic procedures that alleviates pain and restores function in patients with degenerative knee joint diseases. Arthrofibrosis, abnormal scarring in which dense fibrous tissue prevents normal range of motion, develops in ~3–10% of TKA patients. No prophylactic intervention is available and treatment is restricted to aggressive physiotherapy or revision surgery. Tissue was collected from patients undergoing primary (n = 30) or revision (n = 27) TKA. Revision patients were stratified as non-arthrofibrotic and arthrofibrotic. Tissue was macroscopically and histologically compared to improve our understanding of the pathophysiology of arthrofibrosis. Macroscopically, tissue from primary TKA presents as homogenous, fatty tissue whereas tissue from revision TKA presents as dense, pigmented tissue. Histologically, there was dramatic tissue remodelling, increased collagen deposition and increased (myo)fibroblast staining in tissue from revision TKA. Significantly, tissue architecture was similar between revision patients regardless of clinically diagnosis. There are significant differences in architecture and composition of tissue from revision TKA over primary TKA. Surprisingly, whether revision TKA were clinically diagnosed as arthrofibrotic or non-arthrofibrotic there were still significant differences in fibrotic markers compared to primary TKA suggesting an ongoing fibrotic process in all revision knees. PMID:26553967

  17. Gonyautoxins: First evidence in pain management in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Hinzpeter, Jaime; Barrientos, Cristián; Zamorano, Álvaro; Martinez, Álvaro; Palet, Miguel; Wulf, Rodrigo; Barahona, Maximiliano; Sepúlveda, Joaquín M; Guerra, Matias; Bustamante, Tamara; Del Campo, Miguel; Tapia, Eric; Lagos, Nestor

    2016-09-01

    Improvements in pain management techniques in the last decade have had a major impact on the practice of total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Gonyautoxin are phycotoxins, whose molecular mechanism of action is a reversible block of the voltage-gated sodium channels at the axonal level, impeding nerve impulse propagation. This study was designed to evaluate the clinical efficacy of Gonyautoxin infiltration, as a long acting pain blocker in TKA. Fifteen patients received a total dose of 40 μg of Gonyautoxin during the TKA operation. Postoperatively, all patients were given a standard painkiller protocol: 100 mg of intravenous ketoprofen and 1000 mg of oral acetaminophen every 8 hours for 3 days. The Visual Analog Scale (VAS) pain score and range of motion were recorded 12, 36, and 60 hours post-surgery. All patients reported pain of 2 or less on the VAS 12 and 36 hours post-surgery. Moreover, all scored were less than 4 at 60 hours post-surgery. All patients achieved full knee extension at all times. No side effects or adverse reactions to Gonyautoxin were detected in the follow-up period. The median hospital stay was 3 days. For the first time, this study has shown the effect of blocking the neuronal transmission of pain by locally infiltrating Gonyautoxin during TKA. All patients successfully responded to the pain control. The Gonyautoxin infiltration was safe and effective, and patients experienced pain relief without the use of opioids. PMID:27317871

  18. BLEEDING OF FEMORAL HEAD DURING TOTAL HIP ARTHROPLASTY FOR OSTEOARTHROSIS

    PubMed Central

    Schwartsmann, Carlos Roberto; Spinelli, Leandro de Freitas; Sotomayor, Marco Yánez; Yépez, Anthony Kerbes; Boschin, Leonardo Carbonera; Silva, Marcelo Faria

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the bleeding of the femoral head on hip osteoarthritis in patients who underwent total hip arthroplasty. Methods: One hundred and three hips affected by primary hip osteoarthritis were evaluated. After surgical dislocation, the femoral head was divided into four quadrants, and micro perforations were made in order to observe and assess the presence of bleeding, as early type (EB), late type (LB) or without bleeding (WB). Results: We observed early bleeding (EB) in the upper quadrant in 16 hips (15.5%), late bleeding in 14 hips (13.6%) and no bleeding (WB) in 73 hips (70.9%). The anterior quadrant showed EB in 24 hips (23.3%), LB in 7 hips (6.8%) and WB in 72 hips (69.9%). The lower quadrant presented EB in 40 hips (38.8%), LB 14 hips (13.6%) and WB in 49 hips (47.6%). The posterior quadrant showed EB in 39 hips (37.9%), LB 19 hips (18.4%) and WB in 45 hips (43.7%). Comparing BMI and gender, we found no association between these parameters (p> 0.05). Conclusions: The inferior and posterior quadrant had the highest bleeding levels, following the path of the medial circumflex artery. Level of Evidence III, Therapeutic Study. PMID:26981036

  19. Is tantalum protective against infection in revision total hip arthroplasty?

    PubMed

    Tokarski, A T; Novack, T A; Parvizi, J

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesised that the use of tantalum (Ta) acetabular components in revision total hip arthroplasty (THA) was protective against subsequent failure due to infection. We identified 966 patients (421 men, 545 women and 990 hips) who had undergone revision THA between 2000 and 2013. The mean follow up was 40.2 months (3 months to 13.1 years). The mean age of the men and women was 62.3 years (31 to 90) and 65.1 years (25 to 92), respectively. Titanium (Ti) acetabular components were used in 536 hips while Ta components were used in 454 hips. In total, 73 (7.3%) hips experienced subsequent acetabular failure. The incidence of failure was lower in the Ta group at 4.4% (20/454) compared with 9.9% (53/536) in the Ti group (p < 0.001, odds ratio 2.38; 95% CI 1.37 to 4.27). Among the 144 hips (64 Ta, 80 Ti) for which revision had been performed because of infection, failure due to a subsequent infection was lower in the Ta group at 3.1% (2/64) compared with 17.5% (14/80) for the Ti group (p = 0.006). Thus, the use of Ta acetabular components during revision THA was associated with a lower incidence of failure from all causes and Ta components were associated with a lower incidence of subsequent infection when used in patients with periprosthetic joint infection.

  20. Successful hip arthroplasty using cementless titanium implants in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Effenberger, Harald; Ramsauer, Thomas; Böhm, Gerhard; Hilzensauer, Gerhard; Dorn, Ulrich; Lintner, Felix

    2002-03-01

    Over a period of eight years, we implanted a total of 76 cementless hip prostheses in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The clinical results of 47 patients (70 hips) increased from a mean Harris Hip Score of 33 to 85 after an average of 49 months (range 1-11 years). One threaded cup has had to be revised because of loosening, and one stem because of femoral fracture. At the latest follow-up, 88% of Hofer-Imhof threaded cups had complete bone ingrowth (Type 0); 10% had near-complete bone ingrowth with minimal radiolucency in one third of the bone contact area (Type 1), and 2% had radiolucency in two thirds of the bone contact area (Type 2). Hemispherical push-in cups showed significantly more radiolucency around the cup. For the stems (Uni, Zweymüller SL), 83% showed no radiolucency (Type 0); 17% had radiolucency only very proximally (Type 1). Minor remodelling (Type 1) occurred in 60% of the femoral shafts; 30% had moderate femoral density loss (Type 2), and 10% had severe bone loss and cortical thinning (Type 3). There was no correlation between marked shaft atrophy and clinical symptoms. With regard to radiolucency and remodelling, there was no significant difference between the two types of stem used. Cementless hip arthroplasty using titanium implants has an excellent outcome in the medium term. PMID:11880907

  1. No clinical benefit of gender-specific total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Chen; Wang, Jiaxing; Cheng, Mengqi; Peng, Xiaochun; Wang, Qi; Zhang, Xianlong

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose There is no consensus regarding the clinical relevance of gender-specific prostheses in total knee arthroplasty (TKA). We summarize the current best evidence in a comparison of clinical and radiographic outcomes between gender-specific prostheses and standard unisex prostheses in female patients. Methods We used the PubMed, Embase, Cochrane, Science Citation Index, and Scopus databases. We included randomized controlled trials published up to January 2013 that compared gender-specific prostheses with standard unisex prostheses in female patients who underwent primary TKAs. Results 6 trials involving 423 patients with 846 knee joints met the inclusion criteria. No statistically significant differences were observed between the 2 designs regarding pain, range of motion (ROM), knee scores, satisfaction, preference, complications, and radiographic results. The gender-specific design (Gender Solutions; Zimmer Inc, Warsaw, Indiana) reduced the prevalence of overhang. However, it had less overall coverage of the femoral condyles compared to the unisex group. In fact, the femoral prosthesis in the standard unisex group matched better than that in the gender-specific group. Interpretation Gender-specific prostheses do not appear to confer any benefit in terms of clinician- and patient-reported outcomes for the female knee. PMID:24954488

  2. Anterior knee pain following primary total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Shervin, David; Pratt, Katelyn; Healey, Travis; Nguyen, Samantha; Mihalko, William M; El-Othmani, Mouhanad M; Saleh, Khaled J

    2015-11-18

    Despite improvements in technique and technology for total knee arthroplasty (TKA), anterior knee pain impacts patient outcomes and satisfaction. Addressing the prosthetic and surgical technique related causes of pain after TKA, specifically as it relates to anterior knee pain, can aid surgeons in addressing these issues with their patients. Design features of the femoral and patellar components which have been reported as pain generators include: Improper femoral as well as patellar component sizing or designs that result in patellofemoral stuffing; a shortened trochlear groove distance from the flange to the intercondylar box; and then surgical technique related issues resulting in: Lateral patellar facet syndrome; overstuffed patella/flange combination; asymmetric patellar resurfacing, improper transverse plane component rotation resulting in patellar subluxation/tilt. Any design consideration that allows impingement of extensor mechanism anatomical elements has the possibility of impacting outcome by becoming a pain generator. As the number of TKA procedures continues to increase, it is increasingly critical to develop improved, evidence based prostheses that maximize function and patient satisfaction while minimizing pain and other complications. PMID:26601061

  3. Patients' perception of leg length discrepancy post total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Sykes, Alice; Hill, Janet; Orr, John; Humphreys, Patricia; Rooney, Aidan; Morrow, Esther; Beverland, David

    2015-01-01

    Perception of a leg length discrepancy post total hip arthroplasty (THA) is one of the most common sources of patient dissatisfaction and can have a direct influence on the considered success of the operation.This research examined postoperative perception of imposed limb discrepancies in a group of THA patients compared to a group of participants with no previous hip surgery. Two subgroups of THA patients were involved: those who did not perceive a difference in limb length following THA and those that did.Discrepancies were imposed in 2.5 mm increments. For discrepancies ≥5 mm, a significant number of participants were aware of a difference (74%). There was no significant difference in perception of imposed discrepancies between THA patients and participants with no previous hip surgery. THA patients who perceived a difference in their limb lengths postoperatively had significantly worse pain and oxford scores when compared to THA patients who perceived their limb lengths to be equal. Knowing the boundaries between LLDs that go undetected and those that patients are aware of could guide surgeons when evaluating the balance between correct soft tissue tension and the resulting unequal leg length. From these findings, discrepancies >5 mm are likely to be perceived. Whether this perception would lead directly to a negative outcome score and patient dissatisfaction is more complex to project and likely to be patient specific. Intraoperative methods to aid the controlled positioning of implanted components could help maintain and restore leg length to within an acceptable amount that patients cannot perceive.

  4. Acromial and scapular spine fractures after reverse total shoulder arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Mayne, Ian P; Bell, Simon N; Wright, Warwick; Coghlan, Jennifer A

    2016-04-01

    Acromial and scapular spine fractures after reverse total shoulder arthroplasty occur predominantly as a result of bony insufficiency secondary to patient and intra-operative technical factors. The spectrum of the pathology can range from a stress reaction to an undisplaced or displaced fracture. Prompt diagnosis of these fractures requires a high suspicion in the postoperative patient with a clinical presentation of acute onset of pain along the acromion or scapular spine and/or deterioration of shoulder function. Conventional shoulder radiographs are frequently unreliable in identifying these fractures, especially if they are undisplaced. Computed tomography (CT) and/or single photon emission computed tomography/CT scans are useful imaging modalities for obtaining a definitive diagnosis. Early diagnosis and non-operative treatment of a stress reaction or undisplaced fracture is essential for preventing further displacement and potential disability. The management of displaced fractures is challenging for the orthopaedic surgeon as a result of high rates of mal-union or non-union, decreased functional outcomes, and variable results after open reduction and internal fixation. Strategies for preventing these fractures include optimizing the patient's bone health, correct glenoid baseplate screw length and position, and avoiding excessive deltoid tension. Further research is required to identify the specific patient and fracture characteristics that will benefit from conservative versus operative management. PMID:27583005

  5. Predicting Poor Physical Performance after Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Bade, Michael J; Wolfe, Pamela; Zeni, Joseph A; Stevens-Lapsley, Jennifer E.; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a preliminary decision algorithm predicting functional performance outcomes to aid in the decision of when to undergo total knee arthroplasty (TKA). One hundred nineteen patients undergoing primary unilateral TKA were evaluated before and 6 months after TKA. A regression tree analysis using a recursive partitioning function was performed with the Timed Up and Go (TUG) time, Six-Minute Walk (6MW) distance, and Stair Climbing Test (SCT) time as measured 6 months after TKA as the primary outcomes. Preoperative measures of functional performance, joint performance, anthropometrics, demographics, and self reported status were evaluated as predictors of the primary outcomes 6 months after surgery. Individuals taking ≥ 10.1 seconds on the TUG and aged 72 years or older before surgery had the poorest performance on the TUG 6 months after surgery. Individuals walking < 314 meters on the 6MW before surgery had the poorest performance on the 6MW test 6 months after surgery. Individuals taking ≥ 17 seconds to complete the SCT and scoring < 40 on the SF-36 mental component score before surgery had the poorest performance on the SCT 6 months after surgery. Poorer performance preoperatively on the 6MW, SCT, and TUG, was related to poorer performance in the same measure after TKA. Age and decreased mental health were secondary predictors of poorer performance at 6 months on the TUG and SCT, respectively. These measures may help further develop models predicting thresholds for poor outcomes after TKA. PMID:22539338

  6. Full versus surface tibial baseplate cementation in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Galasso, Olimpio; Jenny, Jean-Yves; Saragaglia, Dominique; Miehlke, Rolf K

    2013-02-01

    The use of a keel in the tibial component during modern primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has become common, and its cementation may affect the future performance of the prosthesis. Although proponents of cementing the entire tibial component argue that this technique provides better initial fixation and may prevent aseptic loosening, reasons exist to apply cement only to the tibial baseplate. In this study, 232 patients who underwent TKA using full or surface cementation of the tibial baseplate were evaluated at an average 5.6-year follow-up to assess survivorship and clinical results. The cumulative survival rate at 8 years was 97.1%. With revision of either component for any reason considered the endpoint, no significant difference was noted between full and surface cemented groups. Knee Society Score, range of motion, and femoro-tibial mechanical angle significantly increased postoperatively. Multivariate analysis revealed that good preoperative range of motion and Knee Society Scores were related to good postoperative range of motion and Knee Society Scores. Follow-up length was a negative predictor of postoperative Knee Society Score. The use of full or surface cementation of the baseplate was unrelated to the postoperative clinical outcomes. Clinical outcomes did not differ according to the tibial component cementation technique. The results of this study suggest that cementing the keel of the tibial component during primary TKA has no advantage for patients. Longer-term follow-up and proper patient randomization are required to confirm these findings.

  7. Can Tibial Cementation Be Enhanced in Knee Arthroplasty Surgery?

    PubMed

    Westerman, Richard W

    2016-07-01

    Aseptic loosening of the tibial component continues to be a significant mode of failure in total knee arthroplasty surgery. Surface cemented components preserve tibial bone stock, but are reliant on a strong bone-cement interface. This study compares standard surface cemented tibial component design to a tibial component with the addition of an undersurface cement containment skirt. The hypothesis was that the addition of a 2-mm underside skirt would allow cement containment and pressurization during implantation, which might improve the overall survival. Two identical tibial components were used, out of which one had the 2-mm underside skirt removed for the purposes of this study. Overall, 12 tibial Sawbones were prepared identically and transducers placed in the medial and lateral plateau. Each component was implanted six times, according to the manufacturer's operative technique. The series of implantation experiments showed no difference in cement pressurization (p = 0.86) regardless of the tibial component design used, with a wide variation in pressure measurements occurring in both groups. The tibial component skirt has not demonstrated any enhancement in cement pressurization. The cement containment skirt might still be advantageous by increasing the cement mantle thickness without causing excessive bone penetration; however, the biological effects cannot be predicted without further clinical evaluation.

  8. Elbow arthroplasty: where are we today? A narrative review.

    PubMed

    Degreef, Ilse

    2016-04-01

    Background The elbow joint is a complex compound articulation, with a linking role within the upper limb kinematics. Its hinge function allows for proper placement of our working instrument (the hand) in the space surrounding us, directed by the shoulder joint. Both reliable mobility and stability are essential elements to allow for consistent bridging of the distance we aim to achieve in common daily activities. Sufficient flexion and extension are required to ensure both the patients' independence and the dignity. Next to the hinge, a radio-ulnar rotation with precise co-operation of forearm and wrist spin enhances the linking function with accurate precision instrument manipulation. Arthritis of the elbow joint or cubarthritis, whether primary or secondary, may not be as highly prevalent as hip or knee arthritis, but its impact on daily live certainly cannot be underestimated. Methods Current treatment options for failing cubarthritis are reviewed. Results Surgical techniques to reconstruct or replace the elbow joint are currently increasingly efficient with mounting long-term outcome reports. Debridement techniques including open or arthroscopic Outerbridge-Kashiwaghi procedure often delays joint replacement. Implants for joint arthroplasty focus on the ulna-humeral joint mostly with semi-constrained linked techniques, but there is a trend towards total joint replacement including the radiocapitellar joint. Conclusion In this independent review article, elbow joint failure due to cubarthritis and an overview of its current state-of-the-art orthopaedic treatment algorithm is presented, with its indications, advantages, risks and outcome. PMID:27385293

  9. Acute hypotension after total knee arthroplasty and its nursing strategy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu-Mei; He, Jie; Zhou, Chang; Li, Yu; Yi, De-Kun; Zhang, Xia

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the factors affecting postoperative acute hypotension after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and provide a basis for guiding the clinical prevention. Methods: Between May 2001 and May 2013, a total of 495 patients undergoing routine TKA were analyzed retrospectively. Independent risk factors related to postoperative acute hypotension after TKA were determined by univariate and multivariate analysis. Results: Of the 495 patients undergoing TKA, 61 (12.32%) developed postoperative acute hypotension after surgery. Univariate analysis showed that preoperative Neu, time of surgery, time of anesthesia, pressure of tourniquet, time of using tourniquet, preoperative hypertension, age and type of surgery were significant influencing factors, whereas by multivariate analysis, only age, pressure of tourniquet and type of surgery were significant influencing factors. Conclusion: Factors those were associated with a significantly increased postoperative acute hypotension after TKA included age, pressure of tourniquet and type of surgery. Achieving a good preoperative and postoperative evaluation and monitoring vital signs and disease change contribute to the detection, intervention and salvage for the acute hypotension. PMID:26550351

  10. Patient-reported outcome measures after total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Ramkumar, P. N.; Harris, J. D.; Noble, P. C.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives A lack of connection between surgeons and patients in evaluating the outcome of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has led to the search for the ideal patient-reported outcome measure (PROM) to evaluate these procedures. We hypothesised that the desired psychometric properties of the ideal outcome tool have not been uniformly addressed in studies describing TKA PROMS. Methods A systematic review was conducted investigating one or more facets of patient-reported scores for measuring primary TKA outcome. Studies were analysed by study design, subject demographics, surgical technique, and follow-up adequacy, with the ‘gold standard’ of psychometric properties being systematic development, validity, reliability, and responsiveness. Results A total of 38 articles reported outcomes from 47 different PROMS to 85 541 subjects at 26.3 months (standard deviation 30.8) post-operatively. Of the 38, eight developed new scores, 20 evaluated existing scores, and ten were cross-cultural adaptation of existing scores. Only six of 38 surveyed studies acknowledged all ‘gold standard’ psychometric properties. The most commonly studied PROMS were the Oxford Knee Score, New Knee Society Score, Osteoarthritis Outcome Score, and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index. Conclusions A single, validated, reliable, and responsive PROM addressing TKA patients’ priorities has not yet been identified. Moreover, a clear definition of a successful procedure remains elusive. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2015;4:120–127 PMID:26220999

  11. Acromial and scapular spine fractures after reverse total shoulder arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Simon N; Wright, Warwick; Coghlan, Jennifer A

    2016-01-01

    Acromial and scapular spine fractures after reverse total shoulder arthroplasty occur predominantly as a result of bony insufficiency secondary to patient and intra-operative technical factors. The spectrum of the pathology can range from a stress reaction to an undisplaced or displaced fracture. Prompt diagnosis of these fractures requires a high suspicion in the postoperative patient with a clinical presentation of acute onset of pain along the acromion or scapular spine and/or deterioration of shoulder function. Conventional shoulder radiographs are frequently unreliable in identifying these fractures, especially if they are undisplaced. Computed tomography (CT) and/or single photon emission computed tomography/CT scans are useful imaging modalities for obtaining a definitive diagnosis. Early diagnosis and non-operative treatment of a stress reaction or undisplaced fracture is essential for preventing further displacement and potential disability. The management of displaced fractures is challenging for the orthopaedic surgeon as a result of high rates of mal-union or non-union, decreased functional outcomes, and variable results after open reduction and internal fixation. Strategies for preventing these fractures include optimizing the patient’s bone health, correct glenoid baseplate screw length and position, and avoiding excessive deltoid tension. Further research is required to identify the specific patient and fracture characteristics that will benefit from conservative versus operative management. PMID:27583005

  12. Anterior knee pain following primary total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Shervin, David; Pratt, Katelyn; Healey, Travis; Nguyen, Samantha; Mihalko, William M; El-Othmani, Mouhanad M; Saleh, Khaled J

    2015-01-01

    Despite improvements in technique and technology for total knee arthroplasty (TKA), anterior knee pain impacts patient outcomes and satisfaction. Addressing the prosthetic and surgical technique related causes of pain after TKA, specifically as it relates to anterior knee pain, can aid surgeons in addressing these issues with their patients. Design features of the femoral and patellar components which have been reported as pain generators include: Improper femoral as well as patellar component sizing or designs that result in patellofemoral stuffing; a shortened trochlear groove distance from the flange to the intercondylar box; and then surgical technique related issues resulting in: Lateral patellar facet syndrome; overstuffed patella/flange combination; asymmetric patellar resurfacing, improper transverse plane component rotation resulting in patellar subluxation/tilt. Any design consideration that allows impingement of extensor mechanism anatomical elements has the possibility of impacting outcome by becoming a pain generator. As the number of TKA procedures continues to increase, it is increasingly critical to develop improved, evidence based prostheses that maximize function and patient satisfaction while minimizing pain and other complications. PMID:26601061

  13. Influence of body mass index in revision total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho, Rogério Teixeira; Santos, Diego Benone; Chammas, Victor; Arrebola, Lucas Simões; Colombo, Mauricio Lebre; Scalizi, Caetano

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE : To evaluate the influence of the body mass index (BMI) on the functional assessment of patients who underwent revision total knee arthroplasty (RTKA). METHODS : Thirty patients who un-derwent RTKA between January 2008 and January 2012 were retrospectively assessed using the WOMAC questionnaire. The patients were divided into three groups according to the BMI ca-tegories defined by the World Health Organization (WHO): Group I with normal BMI (18-24.9 Kg/m2), with eight patients; Group II, overweight (BMI 25-29.9 Kg/m2), with 15 patients, and Group III obesity with BMI ≥ 30 Kg/m2, with seven patients. The post-ope-rative function scores obtained through the WOMAC questionnaire were compared with the BMI of each group. The statistical analysis between BMI and WOMAC scores was performed with the Spe-arman correlation test. RESULTS : The average functional WOMAC score for individuals in Group I was 16.7; in Group II it was 47.7; and in Group III it was 69.9, with a statistically significant differen-ce between groups I, II and III (p< 0.0001). CONCLUSION : Patients with BMI > 25 Kg/m2 had a worse functional evaluation through WOMAC scores when compared to patients with normal BMI after RTKA. Level of Evidence III, Tranversal Retrospective Study. PMID:27057139

  14. Anatomic variations should be considered in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Nagamine, R; Miura, H; Bravo, C V; Urabe, K; Matsuda, S; Miyanishi, K; Hirata, G; Iwamoto, Y

    2000-01-01

    The effect of anatomic variations on the operative techniques used in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) was assessed. In 133 Japanese patients with medial osteoarthritis (OA), six parameters were measured on anteroposterior radiographs of the lower extremities taken with the patients in the supine position. The results showed that the characteristics of the knees were bowing of the femoral shaft and proximal tibia vara, with lateral offset of the tibial shaft with respect to the center of the tibial plateau. The angle between a perpendicular to the mechanical axis and the tangent to the distal femoral condyles can be used in determining the external rotation of the femoral component. This angle was more than 3 degrees in 20% of the patients. The femoral component should therefore be externally rotated more than 3 degrees relative to the posterior condylar line in such patients. Because the center of the tibial plateau is located medial to the central line of the tibial shaft in knees with medial OA, the central point of the tibial articular surface should not be used for alignment of the tibial component. The medial offset stem of the tibial component may impinge against the medial wall. Anatomic variations should be evaluated before TKA is attempted. PMID:10982663

  15. Computed tomography in evaluation of revision hip arthroplasty outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kochman, Andrzej; Morawska-Kochman, Monika; Guziński, Maciej; Drobniewski, Marek; Sibiński, Marcin; Synder, Marek

    2014-01-01

    Background. This study aimed to assess contact between Recon Shell reinforcement cages used in revision hip arthroplasty and the bony base. Radiographic examinations were performed with the use of multi-energy computed tomography. Material and methods. We tentatively assess the fixation of Burch-Schneider reinforcement cages (Recon Shell made by Aesculap company) implanted in 10 patients, using two methods of evaluation. An analysis of dual energy CT scans enabled us to assess contact between the reinforcement cages and the bony base. Results. The two methods of evaluation produced different results. The evaluation method based on the division of the acetabular component into a weight-bearing zone and a non-weight-bearing zone (accounting for screw fixation) showed lack of support in the weight-bearing zone in 6 out of 10 cases and direct contact with the implant bed in only one case. The assessment of contact at anchorage holes of reinforcement cages fixed at primary procedures revealed no such support in only one case and the presence of direct contact in 5 cases. There was no correlation between the radiological outcomes and clinical results based on the Harris Hip Score. Conclusions. 1. Multi-energy computed tomography (MARS) is useful in evaluating results of revision hip allo-plasty. 2. The introduction of new imaging techniques for the evaluation of revision procedures demonstrates a need for new, unified methods of outcome assessment adjusted to the characteristics of a particular procedure. PMID:25406920

  16. Polyethylene Oxidation in Total Hip Arthroplasty: Evolution and New Advances

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Barrena, Enrique; Medel, Francisco; Puértolas, José Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) remains the gold standard acetabular bearing material for hip arthroplasty. Its successful performance has shown consistent results and survivorship in total hip replacement (THR) above 85% after 15 years, with different patients, surgeons, or designs. As THR results have been challenged by wear, oxidation, and liner fracture, relevant research on the material properties in the past decade has led to the development and clinical introduction of highly crosslinked polyethylenes (HXLPE). More stress on the bearing (more active, overweighted, younger patients), and more variability in the implantation technique in different small and large Hospitals may further compromise the clinical performance for many patients. The long-term in vivo performance of these materials remains to be proven. Clinical and retrieval studies after more than 5 years of in vivo use with HXLPE in THR are reviewed and consistently show a substantial decrease in wear rate. Moreover, a second generation of improved polyethylenes is backed by in vitro data and awaits more clinical experience to confirm the experimental improvements. Also, new antioxidant, free radical scavengers, candidates and the reinforcement of polyethylene through composites are currently under basic research. Oxidation of polyethylene is today significantly reduced by present formulations, and this forgiving, affordable, and wellknown material is still reliable to meet today’s higher requirements in total hip replacement. PMID:20111694

  17. Surgical exposure and cement removal in revision total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Mallory, T H

    1992-10-01

    The surgical approach in revision total hip arthroplasty (THA) must conform to the preoperative goals of revision surgery. Factors to be considered include adequate visualization, assessment of remaining bone stock, presence or absence of cement, status of the trochanter, leg length discrepancies, and previous surgical approaches. To maintain neurovascular structures, blood supply to the involved bone, postoperative abductor function, stability, and gait normalcy, an anterolateral approach is best used. Three anterolateral approaches are used to address various aspects of revision THA. Approach 1 allows for exposure of the acetabulum and proximal femur. The associated abductor muscle split allows for excellent proximal exposure. Approach 2 is performed when acetabular reconstruction is neither complex nor involved, and when extended access to the femur is necessary. The lateral-distal incision is determined by the need for adequate femur exposure for implant removal, cement removal, and any bone grafting procedures to reconstitute osseous structures. Approach 3 is further developed proximally to expose necessary anatomic regions of the acetabulum while preserving the underlying neurovascular structures. Using special instrumentation and controlled femoral perforations, cement mantles are quickly removed, minimizing damage to the bone and preserving the osseous structures. For all three approaches, abductor muscle separation repair and/or reattachment is performed with a heavy, no. 5, nonabsorbable suture. Postoperative patient management depends on the degree of dissection and extent of reconstruction. PMID:10147935

  18. Review of 10-year results of PCA hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Hastings, David E.; Tobin, Helen; Sellenkowitsch, Marilyn

    1998-01-01

    Objective To assess the long-term results of the PCA uncemented total hip replacement. Design A prospective nonrandomized clinical trial. Follow-up ranged from 8 to 11 years (mean 10.3 years). Setting A university hospital. Patients One hundred consecutive PCA arthroplasties were performed on 89 patients. All operations were supervised by a single surgeon. The patients’ status was reviewed between September and November 1996 by an independent observer. Seventy-three total hip replacements were available for review. Intervention PCA uncemented acetabular and femoral replacement through a lateral surgical approach. Main outcome measures The need for revision, which was classified as failure, and definite 3-zone acetabular radiolucency, which was considered radiologic evidence of loosening. Results The time to failure of the acetabulum averaged 8 years. Femoral failure occurred in 3 patients an average of 4 years postoperatively. The overall failure rate for the acetabulum was 13% and for the femur 7%. Conclusions The acetabular failure rate is unacceptably high. Patients who have had hip replacement with the PCA prosthesis should be followed over the long term. PMID:9492747

  19. Conversion Total Knee Arthroplasty after Failed High Tibial Osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    Song, Sang Jun; Kim, Kang Il; Lee, Chung Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Clinical results of high tibial osteotomy (HTO) deteriorate over time despite the initial satisfactory results. Several knees may require a conversion to total knee arthroplasty (TKA) because of failure such as the progression of degenerative osteoarthritis and the loss of the correction angle. It is important to know the long-term survival rate and common reason of failure in HTO to inform patients of postoperative expectations before surgery and to prevent surgical errors during surgery. In addition, it has been reported that clinical and radiological results, revision rate, and complication rate were poorer than those in patients without a previous HTO. There are few review articles that describe why conversion TKA after HTO is surgically difficult and the results are poor. Surgeons have to avoid the various complications and surgical errors in this specific situation. We would like to present the considering factors and technical difficulties during conversion TKA after HTO with a review of the literature. We could conclude through the review that the correction of deformity, lower amount of tibial bone resection, and sufficient polyethylene insert thickness, restoration of the joint line height, and adequate ligament balancing can be helpful in overcoming the technical challenges encountered during TKA following HTO. PMID:27274465

  20. RESULTS FROM BI-CONTACT® TOTAL ELBOW ARTHROPLASTY: MULTICENTER STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Benegas, Eduardo; Malavolta, Eduardo Angeli; Gracitelli, Mauro Emilio Conforto; de Sousa, Augusto Tadeu Barros; Miyazaki, Alberto Naoki; Fregoneze, Marcelo; Ikemoto, Roberto Yukio; Murachovsky, Joel; Matsumoto, Marcelo Hide; Tamaoki, Marcel Jun Sugawara; Neto, Arnaldo Amado Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To describe the initial experience of four orthopedic clinics from using Bi-Contact® total elbow arthroplasty (TEA), reporting the results and complications of the procedure. Methods: This was a retrospective study, through analysis on the medical records of patients who underwent primary TEA using a prosthesis model developed in conjunction with IOT-HCFMUSP. Forty-six elbows (45 patients) that were operated at four orthopedic clinics between 2000 and 2009 were evaluated. Results: The majority of the patients were female (74%), and the median age was 62.5 years. The diagnoses encountered were trauma sequelae (47.83%), rheumatoid arthritis (32.61%), primary osteoarthrosis (8.7%), acute fractures (6.52%) and heterotopic ossification (2.17%). The median length of follow-up was 2.08 years (0.25-9). The procedure significantly alleviated pain and improved range of motion. It was observed that at least one complication was present in 69.57% of the cases, and the main ones were infection (28.26%), need for revision (28.26%), intraoperative fracture (15.22%) and aseptic loosening (15.22%). Conclusion: Bi-Contact® TEA provided significant alleviation of pain and improvement of range of motion in the present series. The complication rate was high, and the most frequently observed complications were infection, aseptic loosening and intraoperative fracture. PMID:27027055

  1. Gonyautoxins: First evidence in pain management in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Hinzpeter, Jaime; Barrientos, Cristián; Zamorano, Álvaro; Martinez, Álvaro; Palet, Miguel; Wulf, Rodrigo; Barahona, Maximiliano; Sepúlveda, Joaquín M; Guerra, Matias; Bustamante, Tamara; Del Campo, Miguel; Tapia, Eric; Lagos, Nestor

    2016-09-01

    Improvements in pain management techniques in the last decade have had a major impact on the practice of total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Gonyautoxin are phycotoxins, whose molecular mechanism of action is a reversible block of the voltage-gated sodium channels at the axonal level, impeding nerve impulse propagation. This study was designed to evaluate the clinical efficacy of Gonyautoxin infiltration, as a long acting pain blocker in TKA. Fifteen patients received a total dose of 40 μg of Gonyautoxin during the TKA operation. Postoperatively, all patients were given a standard painkiller protocol: 100 mg of intravenous ketoprofen and 1000 mg of oral acetaminophen every 8 hours for 3 days. The Visual Analog Scale (VAS) pain score and range of motion were recorded 12, 36, and 60 hours post-surgery. All patients reported pain of 2 or less on the VAS 12 and 36 hours post-surgery. Moreover, all scored were less than 4 at 60 hours post-surgery. All patients achieved full knee extension at all times. No side effects or adverse reactions to Gonyautoxin were detected in the follow-up period. The median hospital stay was 3 days. For the first time, this study has shown the effect of blocking the neuronal transmission of pain by locally infiltrating Gonyautoxin during TKA. All patients successfully responded to the pain control. The Gonyautoxin infiltration was safe and effective, and patients experienced pain relief without the use of opioids.

  2. TOTAL ANKLE ARTHROPLASTY: BRAZILIAN EXPERIENCE WITH THE HINTEGRA PROSTHESIS.

    PubMed

    Nery, Caio; Fernandes, Túlio Diniz; Réssio, Cibele; Fuchs, Mauro Luiz; Godoy Santos, Alexandre Leme de; Ortiz, Rafael Trevisan

    2010-01-01

    Ankle arthrosis is becoming more and more common. The search for solutions that preserve joint function has led to a new generation of prosthesis with three components and more degrees of freedom. This paper presents the results achieved for ten patients treated with the HINTEGRA Prosthesis (Integra, New Deal), through collaborative action between the Foot and Ankle Groups of the Orthopedics and Traumatology divisions of Escola Paulista de Medicina, Unifesp, and the School of Medicine of the University of São Paulo (USP). The ten patients (six women and four men, aged between 29 and 66 years), underwent a surgical procedure consisting of Hintermann's technique, between January and June 2005. They were evaluated at prearranged intervals, and the data were subjected to statistical analysis. The surgery led to a significant improvement in ankle mobility. Radiological evaluation showed no signs of loosening or failure in the prosthetic components in any of the patients studied. Although the complication rate in our sample was high, it was equivalent to the rates found by other authors, and directly represents the learning curve associate with this kind of procedure. Four years after the procedure, it was found that the patients pain levels had significantly decreased, and that their functional patterns had significantly improved, with AOFAS and Hintermann scores indicating results that were excellent for 20%, good for 70% and poor for 10%. Treatment of ankle arthritis by means of total arthroplasty using the HINTEGRA prosthesis was capable of providing good results over an average observation period of four years.

  3. Ballooning osteolysis in 71 failed total ankle arthroplasties.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gurpal; Reichard, Theresa; Hameister, Rita; Awiszus, Friedemann; Schenk, Katja; Feuerstein, Bernd; Roessner, Albert; Lohmann, Christoph

    2016-08-01

    Background and purpose - Aseptic loosening is a major cause of failure in total ankle arthroplasty (TAA). In contrast to other total joint replacements, large periarticular cysts (ballooning osteolysis) have frequently been observed in this context. We investigated periprosthetic tissue responses in failed TAA, and performed an element analysis of retrieved tissues in failed TAA. Patients and methods - The study cohort consisted of 71 patients undergoing revision surgery for failed TAA, all with hydroxyapatite-coated implants. In addition, 5 patients undergoing primary TAA served as a control group. Radiologically, patients were classified into those with ballooning osteolysis and those without, according to defined criteria. Histomorphometric, immunohistochemical, and elemental analysis of tissues was performed. Von Kossa staining and digital microscopy was performed on all tissue samples. Results - Patients without ballooning osteolysis showed a generally higher expression of lymphocytes, and CD3+, CD11c+, CD20+, and CD68+ cells in a perivascular distribution, compared to diffuse expression. The odds of having ballooning osteolysis was 300 times higher in patients with calcium content >0.5 mg/g in periprosthetic tissue than in patients with calcium content ≤0.5 mg/g (p < 0.001). Interpretation - There have been very few studies investigating the pathomechanisms of failed TAA and the cause-effect nature of ballooning osteolysis in this context. Our data suggest that the hydroxyapatite coating of the implant may be a contributory factor.

  4. Hip Squeaking after Ceramic-on-ceramic Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Guo-Liang; Zhu, Wei; Zhao, Yan; Ma, Qi; Weng, Xi-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The present study aimed to review the characteristics and influencing factors of squeaking after ceramic-on-ceramic (CoC) total hip arthroplasty (THA) and to analyze the possible mechanisms of the audible noise. Data Sources: The data analyzed in this review were based on articles from PubMed and Web of Science. Study Selection: The articles selected for review were original articles and reviews found based on the following search terms: “total hip arthroplasty”, “ceramic-on-ceramic”, “hip squeaking”, and “hip noise.” Results: The mechanism of the squeaking remains unknown. The possible explanations included stripe wear, edge loading, a third body, fracture of the ceramic liner, and resonance of the prosthesis components. Squeaking occurrence is influenced by patient, surgical, and implant factors. Conclusions: Most studies indicated that squeaking after CoC THA was the consequence of increasing wear or impingement, caused by prosthesis design, patient characteristics, or surgical factors. However, as conflicts exist among different articles, the major reasons for the squeaking remain to be identified. PMID:27453238

  5. Cementless Revision Total Hip Arthroplasty with Ceramic Articulation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jong-Hyuck; Yang, Seong-Jo; Kang, Joon-Soon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The results of ceramic-on-ceramic (CoC) bearing surfaces in primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) were well known. However, it was not known in revision THA. The purpose of this study is to report the results of revision THA with ceramic articulation. Materials and Methods A total of 112 revision THAs were evaluated. The mean age at the time of surgery was 51.6 years (27.7 to 84.2 years). The mean duration of the follow-up periods was 6.3 years (2.3 to 11.4 years). Results The Harris hip scores improved from an average of 56.2 at the index surgery to an average of 93.3 at the last follow-up (P<0.001). None of hips showed osteolysis or ceramic head fracture. One hip showed aseptic loosening in the acetabular component with squeaking that caused a re-revision. There were nine cases of dislocation. The survivorship at 5 years was 94.5% (95% confidence interval, 87.9% to 97.6%) with revision for any reason as the endpoint and 100% with femoral revision. Conclusion The ceramic articulation is one of good bearing options for revision THA in patients with a long life expectancy. PMID:27536630

  6. Rapid rehabilitation and recovery with minimally invasive total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Berger, Richard A; Jacobs, Joshua J; Meneghini, R Michael; Della Valle, Craig; Paprosky, Wayne; Rosenberg, Aaron G

    2004-12-01

    To assess the potential recovery rate of a minimally invasive total hip replacement technique with minimal soft tissue disruption, an accelerated rehabilitation protocol was implemented with weightbearing as tolerated on the day of surgery. One hundred consecutive patients were enrolled in this prospective study. Ninety-seven patients (97%) met all the inpatient physical therapy goals required for discharge to home on the day of surgery; 100% of patients achieved these goals within 23 hours of surgery. Outpatient therapy was initiated in 9% of patients immediately, 62% of patients by 1 week, and all patients by 2 weeks. The mean time to discontinued use of crutches, discontinued use of narcotic pain medications, and resumed driving was 6 days postoperatively. The mean time to return to work was 8 days, discontinued use of any assistive device was 9 days, and resumption of all activities of daily living was 10 days. The mean time to walk (1/2) mile was 16 days. Furthermore, there were no readmissions, no dislocations, and no reoperations. Therefore, a rapid rehabilitation protocol is safe and fulfills the potential benefits of a rapid recovery with minimally invasive total hip arthroplasty. PMID:15577494

  7. Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty in Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Gee, Edward C.A.; Hanson, Emma K.; Saithna, Adnan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Anatomical shoulder replacement for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is complicated by a high incidence of rotator cuff tears and glenoid erosion. This can lead to poor function and early failure. Reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA) has gained popularity as an alternative. This systematic review attempts to further define the role of RSA in RA. Methods: A systematic review identified seven studies reporting outcomes of RSA in RA patients. Studies were critically appraised, and data on outcomes, complications and technical considerations were extracted and analysed. Results: One hundred and twenty one shoulders were included (mean follow up 46.9 months). Consistent improvements in the main outcome measures were noted between studies. Ninety five percent of patients described excellent to satisfactory outcomes. The minimum mean forward elevation reported in each study was 115 degrees. Symptomatic glenoid loosening (1.7%), deep infection (3.3%) and revision surgery (5%) rates were no higher than for a population of mixed aetiologies. Discussion: Previous concerns regarding high pre- and peri-operative complication and revision rates in RA patients were not shown to be valid by the results of this review. Although associated cuff tears are common and glenoid bone loss can increase the technical complexity of surgery, RSA provides consistent and predictable improvements in key outcome measures and the revision and complication rates do not appear to be higher than reported in a large population of mixed aetiologies. Conclusion: The contemporary literature shows that RSA is a safe, effective and reliable treatment option in RA patients. PMID:26448802

  8. Calibration Markers for Digital Templating in Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Boese, Christoph Kolja; Lechler, Philipp; Rose, Leonard; Dargel, Jens; Oppermann, Johannes; Eysel, Peer; Geiges, Hansjörg; Bredow, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Digital templating with external calibration markers is the standard method for planning total hip arthroplasty. We determined the geometrical basis of the magnification effect, compared magnification with external and internal calibration markers, and examined the influence on magnification of the position of the calibration markers, patient weight, and body mass index (BMI). A formula was derived to calculate magnification with internal and external calibration markers, informed by 100 digital radiographs of the pelvis. Intraclass correlations between the measured and calculated values and the strength of relationships between magnification, position and distance of calibration markers and height, weight, and BMI were sought. There was a weak correlation between magnification of internal and external calibration markers (r = 0.297–0.361; p < 0.01). Intraclass correlations were 0.882–1.000 (p = 0.000) for all parameters. There were also weak correlations between magnification of internal and external calibration markers and weight and BMI (r = 0.420, p = 0.000; r = 0.428, p = 0.000, respectively). The correlation between external and internal calibration markers was poor, indicating the need for more accurate calibration methods. While weight and BMI weakly correlated with the magnification of markers, future studies should examine this phenomenon in more detail. PMID:26168410

  9. Calibration Markers for Digital Templating in Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Boese, Christoph Kolja; Lechler, Philipp; Rose, Leonard; Dargel, Jens; Oppermann, Johannes; Eysel, Peer; Geiges, Hansjörg; Bredow, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Digital templating with external calibration markers is the standard method for planning total hip arthroplasty. We determined the geometrical basis of the magnification effect, compared magnification with external and internal calibration markers, and examined the influence on magnification of the position of the calibration markers, patient weight, and body mass index (BMI). A formula was derived to calculate magnification with internal and external calibration markers, informed by 100 digital radiographs of the pelvis. Intraclass correlations between the measured and calculated values and the strength of relationships between magnification, position and distance of calibration markers and height, weight, and BMI were sought. There was a weak correlation between magnification of internal and external calibration markers (r = 0.297-0.361; p < 0.01). Intraclass correlations were 0.882-1.000 (p = 0.000) for all parameters. There were also weak correlations between magnification of internal and external calibration markers and weight and BMI (r = 0.420, p = 0.000; r = 0.428, p = 0.000, respectively). The correlation between external and internal calibration markers was poor, indicating the need for more accurate calibration methods. While weight and BMI weakly correlated with the magnification of markers, future studies should examine this phenomenon in more detail.

  10. Ceramic on ceramic hip arthroplasty in fused hips

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyung-Soon; Yoon, Taek-Rim; Lee, Tae-Min; Ahn, Yeong-Seub

    2015-01-01

    Background: Most literature in the field of total hip arthroplasty (THA) for fused hips, until date has reported the results of using metal on polyethylene and ceramic on polyethylene bearings. Results of THA using ceramic on ceramic (CoC) bearings in fused hips have not been published in literature. This study reports the results of cementless THA using CoC articulation perfomed in fused hips. Materials and Methods: Twenty-three patients (25 hips) with fused hips underwent conversion to THA using CoC bearings and were followed up for a mean 5.4 years. The conventional posterolateral approach was used in 15 hips, a modified two incision technique in 7 hips and a direct lateral approach with greater trochanteric osteotomy in 3 hips. Postoperatively, range of motion exercises were encouraged after 2–3 days of bed rest and subsequent gradual weight bearing using crutches was begun. Results: Mean Harris hip score improved from 42.4 to 84.2 and mean leg lengthening of 36.6 mm was achieved. In the average 5.4 years (range 2.8-9.1 years) followup there were no cases with osteolysis around acetabular cup and femoral stem. In this study, there was no case of ceramic fracture. There was one case of squeaking. Conclusion: This study suggests that cementless THA performed for fused hips with CoC bearings can provide good early clinical results. PMID:26015635

  11. Elbow arthroplasty: where are we today? A narrative review.

    PubMed

    Degreef, Ilse

    2016-04-01

    Background The elbow joint is a complex compound articulation, with a linking role within the upper limb kinematics. Its hinge function allows for proper placement of our working instrument (the hand) in the space surrounding us, directed by the shoulder joint. Both reliable mobility and stability are essential elements to allow for consistent bridging of the distance we aim to achieve in common daily activities. Sufficient flexion and extension are required to ensure both the patients' independence and the dignity. Next to the hinge, a radio-ulnar rotation with precise co-operation of forearm and wrist spin enhances the linking function with accurate precision instrument manipulation. Arthritis of the elbow joint or cubarthritis, whether primary or secondary, may not be as highly prevalent as hip or knee arthritis, but its impact on daily live certainly cannot be underestimated. Methods Current treatment options for failing cubarthritis are reviewed. Results Surgical techniques to reconstruct or replace the elbow joint are currently increasingly efficient with mounting long-term outcome reports. Debridement techniques including open or arthroscopic Outerbridge-Kashiwaghi procedure often delays joint replacement. Implants for joint arthroplasty focus on the ulna-humeral joint mostly with semi-constrained linked techniques, but there is a trend towards total joint replacement including the radiocapitellar joint. Conclusion In this independent review article, elbow joint failure due to cubarthritis and an overview of its current state-of-the-art orthopaedic treatment algorithm is presented, with its indications, advantages, risks and outcome.

  12. Gap and stripline combined monitor

    DOEpatents

    Yin, Y.

    1986-08-19

    A combined gap and stripline monitor device for measuring the intensity and position of a charged particle beam bunch in a beam pipe of a synchrotron radiation facility is disclosed. The monitor has first and second beam pipe portions with an axial gap therebetween. An outer pipe cooperates with the first beam pipe portion to form a gap enclosure, while inner strips cooperate with the first beam pipe portion to form a stripline monitor, with the stripline length being the same as the gap enclosure length. 4 figs.

  13. Axial gap rotating electrical machine

    DOEpatents

    None

    2016-02-23

    Direct drive rotating electrical machines with axial air gaps are disclosed. In these machines, a rotor ring and stator ring define an axial air gap between them. Sets of gap-maintaining rolling supports bear between the rotor ring and the stator ring at their peripheries to maintain the axial air gap. Also disclosed are wind turbines using these generators, and structures and methods for mounting direct drive rotating electrical generators to the hubs of wind turbines. In particular, the rotor ring of the generator may be carried directly by the hub of a wind turbine to rotate relative to a shaft without being mounted directly to the shaft.

  14. Undecidability of the spectral gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubitt, Toby S.; Perez-Garcia, David; Wolf, Michael M.

    2015-12-01

    The spectral gap—the energy difference between the ground state and first excited state of a system—is central to quantum many-body physics. Many challenging open problems, such as the Haldane conjecture, the question of the existence of gapped topological spin liquid phases, and the Yang-Mills gap conjecture, concern spectral gaps. These and other problems are particular cases of the general spectral gap problem: given the Hamiltonian of a quantum many-body system, is it gapped or gapless? Here we prove that this is an undecidable problem. Specifically, we construct families of quantum spin systems on a two-dimensional lattice with translationally invariant, nearest-neighbour interactions, for which the spectral gap problem is undecidable. This result extends to undecidability of other low-energy properties, such as the existence of algebraically decaying ground-state correlations. The proof combines Hamiltonian complexity techniques with aperiodic tilings, to construct a Hamiltonian whose ground state encodes the evolution of a quantum phase-estimation algorithm followed by a universal Turing machine. The spectral gap depends on the outcome of the corresponding ‘halting problem’. Our result implies that there exists no algorithm to determine whether an arbitrary model is gapped or gapless, and that there exist models for which the presence or absence of a spectral gap is independent of the axioms of mathematics.

  15. Gap and stripline combined monitor

    DOEpatents

    Yin, Y.

    1984-02-16

    A combined gap and stripline monitor device for measuring the intensity and position of a charged particle beam bunch in a beam pipe of a synchrotron radiation facility. The monitor has first and second beam pipe portions with an axial gap therebetween. An outer pipe cooperates with the first beam pipe portion to form a gap enclosure, while inner strips cooperate with the first beam pipe portion to form a stripline monitor, with the stripline length being the same as the gap enclosure length.

  16. Gap and stripline combined monitor

    DOEpatents

    Yin, Yan

    1986-01-01

    A combined gap and stripline monitor device (10) for measuring the intensity and position of a charged particle beam bunch in a beam pipe of a synchotron radiation facility. The monitor has first and second beam pipe portions (11a, 11b) with an axial gap (12) therebetween. An outer pipe (14) cooperates with the first beam pipe portion (11a) to form a gap enclosure, while inner strips (23a-d) cooperate with the first beam pipe portion (11a) to form a stripline monitor, with the stripline length being the same as the gap enclosure length.

  17. Higher comorbidity, poor functional status and higher health care utilization in veterans with prevalent total knee arthroplasty or total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Sloan, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare comorbidity, functional ability, and health care utilization in veterans with total knee arthroplasty (TKA) or total hip arthroplasty (THA) versus matched control populations. A cohort of veterans using Veterans Affairs (VA) healthcare system reported limitations in six activities of daily living (ADLs; bathing, dressing, eating, walking, transferring, and using the toilet), demographics, and physician-diagnosed comorbidity. VA databases provided healthcare utilization and International Classification of Diseases-9/Common procedure terminology codes for TKA/THA. Patients were classified as: (1) primary TKA; (2) primary THA; (3) combination group (≤1 procedure); and (4) control veteran population (no THA/TKA). Multivariable regression analyses compared the risk or counts of ADL limitation and in-/out-patient visits. After multivariable adjustment, TKA, THA or combination groups had significantly higher prevalence of the following compared to veteran controls: arthritis, diabetes, or heart disease (p<0.0001 each), severe (≥3) ADL limitation (33%, 42%, 42% vs. 24%; p<0.0001), and annual hospitalization rate (24%, 19%, 26% vs. 16%, p<0.0001). Annual outpatient surgery visits were more (2.5, 2.3, 2.3 vs. 2, p=0.01) and risk of any mental health outpatient visit was lower (12%, 11%, 12% vs. 18%, p=0.0039). All ADLs, except eating, were significantly more limited in arthroplasty groups (p= 0.0009). Severe ADL limitation was more prevalent in veterans with arthroplasty than in two age-matched US cohorts: 13.4 times in ≥65 years; and 1.2-, 1.6-, and 4-fold in ≥85, 75–84, and 65–74 years. Poorer function and higher comorbidity and utilization in veterans with TKA/THA suggest that this group is appropriate for interventions targeted at improving function and decreasing utilization. PMID:19517157

  18. Higher comorbidity, poor functional status and higher health care utilization in veterans with prevalent total knee arthroplasty or total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jasvinder A; Sloan, Jeffrey

    2009-09-01

    The objective of this study was to compare comorbidity, functional ability, and health care utilization in veterans with total knee arthroplasty (TKA) or total hip arthroplasty (THA) versus matched control populations. A cohort of veterans using Veterans Affairs (VA) healthcare system reported limitations in six activities of daily living (ADLs; bathing, dressing, eating, walking, transferring, and using the toilet), demographics, and physician-diagnosed comorbidity. VA databases provided healthcare utilization and International Classification of Diseases-9/Common procedure terminology codes for TKA/THA. Patients were classified as: (1) primary TKA; (2) primary THA; (3) combination group (>or=1 procedure); and (4) control veteran population (no THA/TKA). Multivariable regression analyses compared the risk or counts of ADL limitation and in-/out-patient visits. After multivariable adjustment, TKA, THA or combination groups had significantly higher prevalence of the following compared to veteran controls: arthritis, diabetes, or heart disease (p < 0.0001 each), severe (>or=3) ADL limitation (33%, 42%, 42% vs. 24%; p < 0.0001), and annual hospitalization rate (24%, 19%, 26% vs. 16%, p < 0.0001). Annual outpatient surgery visits were more (2.5, 2.3, 2.3 vs. 2, p = 0.01) and risk of any mental health outpatient visit was lower (12%, 11%, 12% vs. 18%, p = 0.0039). All ADLs, except eating, were significantly more limited in arthroplasty groups (p arthroplasty than in two age-matched US cohorts: 13.4 times in >or=65 years; and 1.2-, 1.6-, and 4-fold in >or=85, 75-84, and 65-74 years. Poorer function and higher comorbidity and utilization in veterans with TKA/THA suggest that this group is appropriate for interventions targeted at improving function and decreasing utilization.

  19. Revision hip arthroplasty activity in a single UK health region: an audit of 1265 cases.

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, T.; Birtwistle, S.; Power, R. A.; Harper, W. M.

    2000-01-01

    Revision hip arthroplasty is an operation which is steadily increasing in number and can often be technically challenging. We have utilised a regional hip register (the Trent Regional Arthroplasty Study) to analyse the epidemiology of revision hip arthroplasties in a single UK health region. The study shows that of the large number (1265) of procedures performed over a 7-year period (1991-1997), the majority were performed by general orthopaedic surgeons, with 91 different surgeons performing the operation and only two surgeons performing more than 20 procedures per year. Of more than 100 prosthetic combinations used for the procedure, the Charnley prosthesis was the most common (38.3% of acetabular revisions and 37.5% of femoral revisions). The same component was also the most commonly explanted (43%). There was an even geographical spread across the region with revision hip arthroplasty being performed in all hospitals with an orthopaedic in-patient facility. Prospective audit of this large and varied cohort is necessary to determine differences in outcome (if any) between 'specialist' hip surgeons and general orthopaedic surgeons. Images Figure 1 PMID:10932666

  20. Single-dose radiation therapy for prevention of heterotopic ossification after total hip arthroplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Healy, W.L.; Lo, T.C.; Covall, D.J.; Pfeifer, B.A.; Wasilewski, S.A. )

    1990-12-01

    Single-dose radiation therapy was prospectively evaluated for its efficacy in prevention of heterotopic ossification in patients at high risk after total hip arthroplasty. Thirty-one patients (34 hips) were treated between 1981 and 1988. Risk factors for inclusion in the protocol included prior evidence of heterotopic ossification, ankylosing spondylitis, and diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis. Patients with hypertrophic osteoarthritis or traumatic arthritis with osteophytes were not included. Operations on 34 hips included 19 primary total and 11 revision total hip arthroplasties and 4 excisions of heterotopic ossification. All patients received radiotherapy to the hip after operation with a single dose of 700 centigray. Radiotherapy is recommended on the first postoperative day. After this single-dose radiation treatment, no patient had clinically significant heterotopic ossification. Recurrent disease developed in two hips (6%), as seen on radiography (grades 2 and 3). This series documents a 100% clinical success rate and a 94% radiographic success rate in preventing heterotopic ossification in patients at high risk after total hip arthroplasty. Single-dose radiotherapy is as effective as other radiation protocols in preventing heterotopic ossification after total hip arthroplasty. It is less expensive and easier to administer than multidose radiotherapy.