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Sample records for interrogans serovar copenhageni

  1. Leptospira interrogans serovar copenhageni harbors two lexA genes involved in SOS response.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Luciane S; da Silva, Josefa B; Milanez, Juliana S; Monteiro-Vitorello, Claudia B; Momo, Leonardo; de Morais, Zenaide M; Vasconcellos, Silvio A; Marques, Marilis V; Ho, Paulo L; da Costa, Renata M A

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria activate a regulatory network in response to the challenges imposed by DNA damage to genetic material, known as the SOS response. This system is regulated by the RecA recombinase and by the transcriptional repressor lexA. Leptospira interrogans is a pathogen capable of surviving in the environment for weeks, being exposed to a great variety of stress agents and yet retaining its ability to infect the host. This study aims to investigate the behavior of L. interrogans serovar Copenhageni after the stress induced by DNA damage. We show that L. interrogans serovar Copenhageni genome contains two genes encoding putative LexA proteins (lexA1 and lexA2) one of them being potentially acquired by lateral gene transfer. Both genes are induced after DNA damage, but the steady state levels of both LexA proteins drop, probably due to auto-proteolytic activity triggered in this condition. In addition, seven other genes were up-regulated following UV-C irradiation, recA, recN, dinP, and four genes encoding hypothetical proteins. This set of genes is potentially regulated by LexA1, as it showed binding to their promoter regions. All these regions contain degenerated sequences in relation to the previously described SOS box, TTTGN 5CAAA. On the other hand, LexA2 was able to bind to the palindrome TTGTAN10TACAA, found in its own promoter region, but not in the others. Therefore, the L. interrogans serovar Copenhageni SOS regulon may be even more complex, as a result of LexA1 and LexA2 binding to divergent motifs. New possibilities for DNA damage response in Leptospira are expected, with potential influence in other biological responses such as virulence.

  2. Molecular characterization, serotyping, and antibiotic susceptibility profile of Leptospira interrogans serovar Copenhageni isolates from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Miraglia, Fabiana; Matsuo, Minekazo; Morais, Zenaide Maria; Dellagostin, Odir Antonio; Seixas, Fabiana Kömmling; Freitas, Julio César; Hartskeerl, Rudy; Moreno, Luisa Zanolli; Costa, Bárbara Letícia; Souza, Gisele Oliveira; Vasconcellos, Silvio Arruda; Moreno, Andrea Micke

    2013-11-01

    Leptospira interrogans serogroup Icterohaemorrhagiae is the major serogroup infecting humans worldwide, and rodents and dogs are the most significant transmission sources in urban environments. Knowledge of the prevalent serovars and their maintenance hosts is essential to understand the epidemiology of leptospirosis. In this study, 20 Leptospira isolates were evaluated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), variable number tandem-repeat analysis (VNTR), serotyping, and determination of antimicrobial resistance profile. Isolates, originated from bovine, canine, human, and rodent sources, were characterized by microscopic agglutination test with polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies and were identified as L. interrogans serogroup Icterohaemorrhagiae serovar Copenhageni. MICs of antimicrobials often used in veterinary medicine were determined by broth microdilution test. Most of tested antibiotics were effective against isolates, including penicillin, ampicillin, and ceftiofur. Higher MIC variability was observed for fluoroquinolones and neomycin; all isolates were resistant to trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and sulphadimethoxine. Isolates were genotyped by PFGE and VNTR; both techniques were unable to discriminate between serovars Copenhageni and Icterohaemorrhagiae, as expected. PFGE clustered all isolates in 1 pulsotype, indicating that these serovars can be transmitted between species and that bovine, rodent, and dogs can maintain them in the environment endangering the human population.

  3. Detection of leptospiral antigen (L. interrogans serovar copenhageni serogroup Icterohaemorrhagiae) by immunoelectron microscopy in the liver and kidney of experimentally infected guinea-pigs.

    PubMed Central

    De Brito, T.; Prado, M. J.; Negreiros, V. A.; Nicastri, A. L.; Sakata, E. E.; Yasuda, P. H.; Santos, R. T.; Alves, V. A.

    1992-01-01

    Guinea-pigs were experimentally infected with L. interrogans serovar copenhageni serogroup Icterohaemorrhagiae and their liver and kidney were studied by immunoelectron microscopy using the post embedding indirect immunogold labelling technique. Primary antibody was a purified rabbit anti-serum produced against the same leptospiral strain used in the inoculum. Gold-labelled leptospiral antigen (LAg) was found close to cell membranes of hepatocytes, kidney tubular cells and endothelial cells of the interstitial capillaries of the kidney. Afterwards it was internalized by hepatic and tubular cells, and eventually found in lysosomes. Phagolysosomes of Kupffer cells were also found to contain remnants of degraded leptospires and gold-labelled LAg. Gold-labelled intact leptospires were detected at the enlarged intercellular spaces between hepatocytes at the areas of hepatic cell plate disarray, showing the potential for leptospiral migration during the septicaemic phase of the disease potentially contributing to the pathogenesis of the lesions. The affinity of leptospiral antigenic material for cell membranes suggests an initial interaction with cell surface proteins followed by its internalization and cell damage. The nature of antigenic material detected, however, remains undefined; it may be a toxin, an enzyme or any other factor/s involved in leptospiral virulence. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 PMID:1419779

  4. [The serovars of Leptospira interrogans isolated from cases of human leptospirosis in São Paulo, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Sakata, E E; Yasuda, P H; Romero, E C; Silva, M V; Lomar, A V

    1992-01-01

    Eighteen strains of L. interrogans isolated from human cases were serotyped by the agglutinin-absorption test at Instituto Adolfo Lutz in São Paulo, Brazil. Fourteen were identified as serovar copenhageni (icterohaemorrhagiae serogroup), 2 as canicola (canicola serogroup), 1 as castellonis (Ballum serogroup) and 1 as pomona serogroup (serovar not yet defined). The frequency of serovar copenhageni in 100% of the isolates in icterohaemorrhagiae serogroup is emphasized and more studies to verify the real serovars prevalence as subsidy to the epidemiology of this infection are suggested by the authors.

  5. Restriction endonuclease DNA analysis of Leptospira interrogans serovars icterohaemorrhagiae and hebdomadis.

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, R B; Winter, P J; Yanagawa, R

    1984-01-01

    Antigenic variants of Leptospira interrogans serovars copenhageni and hebdomadis were examined by bacterial restriction endonuclease DNA analysis with EcoRI, XhoI, SalI, BstEII, and HindIII as the digesting enzymes. The antigenic variants were stable cloned strains which had been cultivated in media containing homologous immune serum. One of the strains examined has been reported elsewhere (R. Yanagawa and J. Takashima, Infect. Immun. 10:1439-1442) as having an antigenic makeup which more closely resembles serovar kremastos than the serovar hebdomadis parent. The closely antigenically related but naturally occurring serovars icterhaemorrhagiae strain RGA and copenhageni strain M20 were examined in parallel. No differences could be shown between the hebdomadis parent and any of its mutants. Serovars copenhageni and icterohaemorrhagiae produced patterns which differed in the high-molecular-weight bands only. The Shibaura parent strain did not differ from copenhageni M20, but the Shibaura M1 strain differed from the other mutants and from icterohaemorrhagiae RGA in its high-molecular-weight bands. Images PMID:6092434

  6. Isolation of leptospira Serovars Canicola and Copenhageni from cattle urine in the state of ParanÁ, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Zacarias, Francielle Gibson da Silva; Vasconcellos, Silvio Arruda; Anzai, Eleine Kuroki; Giraldi, Nilson; de Freitas, Julio Cesar; Hartskeerl, Rudy

    2008-01-01

    In 2001, 698 urine samples were randomly collected from cattle at a slaughterhouse in the State of Paraná, Brazil. Direct examination using dark field microscopy was carried out immediately after collection. Five putative positive samples were cultured in modified EMJH medium, yielding two positive cultures (LO-14 and LO-10). Typing with monoclonal antibodies revealed that the two isolates were similar to Canicola (LO-14) and Copenhageni (LO-10). Microscopic agglutination test results show that Hardjo is the most common serovar in cattle in Brazil. Rats and dogs are the common maintenance hosts of serovars Copenhageni and Canicola. The excretion of highly pathogenic serovars such as Copenhageni and Canicola by cattle can represent an increasing risk for severe leptospirosis is large populations, mainly living in rural areas. PMID:24031301

  7. Isolation of leptospira Serovars Canicola and Copenhageni from cattle urine in the state of ParanÁ, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Zacarias, Francielle Gibson da Silva; Vasconcellos, Silvio Arruda; Anzai, Eleine Kuroki; Giraldi, Nilson; de Freitas, Julio Cesar; Hartskeerl, Rudy

    2008-10-01

    In 2001, 698 urine samples were randomly collected from cattle at a slaughterhouse in the State of Paraná, Brazil. Direct examination using dark field microscopy was carried out immediately after collection. Five putative positive samples were cultured in modified EMJH medium, yielding two positive cultures (LO-14 and LO-10). Typing with monoclonal antibodies revealed that the two isolates were similar to Canicola (LO-14) and Copenhageni (LO-10). Microscopic agglutination test results show that Hardjo is the most common serovar in cattle in Brazil. Rats and dogs are the common maintenance hosts of serovars Copenhageni and Canicola. The excretion of highly pathogenic serovars such as Copenhageni and Canicola by cattle can represent an increasing risk for severe leptospirosis is large populations, mainly living in rural areas.

  8. Cloning of a hemolysin gene from Leptospira interrogans serovar hardjo.

    PubMed Central

    del Real, G; Segers, R P; van der Zeijst, B A; Gaastra, W

    1989-01-01

    A DNA fragment encoding both hemolysin and sphingomyelinase C activity was cloned from the pathogenic bacterium Leptospira interrogans serovar hardjo. Initial clones were obtained by screening a genomic library in EMBL3 for hemolytic activity. Both hemolytic and sphingomyelinase C activities were coded for by a 3.9-kilobase BamHI fragment. The hemolysin was expressed from its own promoter in Escherichia coli K-12. Similar DNA sequences were also present in the serovars tarassovi and ballum. Images PMID:2744864

  9. Copurification of Leptospira interrogans serovar pomona hemolysin and sphingomyelinase C.

    PubMed Central

    Bernheimer, A W; Bey, R F

    1986-01-01

    The hemolytic and sphingomyelinase C activities of supernatants of cultures of Leptospira interrogans serovar pomona tended to copurify when isoelectric fractionation was carried out. Both activities focused primarily at pH 8.1. Considered in conjunction with other circumstantial evidence, the results led to the conclusion that sphingomyelinase C is responsible for hemolysis. PMID:3019890

  10. Complete genome sequence of Leptospira interrogans serovar Bratislava, strain PigK151

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genus Leptospira contains pathogens serologically classified into over 250 serovars, intermediate pathogens and saprophytes with genetic classification into 21 different species. Worldwide, leptospirosis is one of the most widespread zoonoses. L. interrogans serovar Bratislava has been isolated ...

  11. Global Proteome Analysis of Leptospira interrogans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Comparative global proteome analyses were performed on Leptospira interrogans serovar Copenhageni grown under conventional in vitro conditions and those mimicking in vivo conditions (iron limitation and serum presence). Proteomic analyses were conducted using iTRAQ and LC-ESI-tandem mass spectrometr...

  12. Whole Genome Sequencing Allows Better Understanding of the Evolutionary History of Leptospira interrogans Serovar Hardjo

    PubMed Central

    Llanes, Alejandro; Restrepo, Carlos Mario; Rajeev, Sreekumari

    2016-01-01

    The genome of a laboratory-adapted strain of Leptospira interrogans serovar Hardjo was sequenced and analyzed. Comparison of the sequenced genome with that recently published for a field isolate of the same serovar revealed relatively high sequence conservation at the nucleotide level, despite the different biological background of both samples. Conversely, comparison of both serovar Hardjo genomes with those of L. borgpetersenii serovar Hardjo showed extensive differences between the corresponding chromosomes, except for the region occupied by their rfb loci. Additionally, comparison of the serovar Hardjo genomes with those of different L. interrogans serovars allowed us to detect several genomic features that may confer an adaptive advantage to L. interrogans serovar Hardjo, including a possible integrated plasmid and an additional copy of a cluster encoding a membrane transport system known to be involved in drug resistance. A phylogenomic strategy was used to better understand the evolutionary position of the Hardjo serovar among L. interrogans serovars and other Leptospira species. The proposed phylogeny supports the hypothesis that the presence of similar rfb loci in two different species may be the result of a lateral gene transfer event. PMID:27442015

  13. First Genome Sequence of Leptospira interrogans Serovar Pomona, Isolated from a Bovine Abortion

    PubMed Central

    Varni, Vanina; Koval, Ariel; Nagel, Ariel; Ruybal, Paula

    2016-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a widespread zoonosis and a re-emergent disease of global distribution with major relevance in veterinary production. Here, we report the whole-genome sequence of Leptospira interrogans serovar Pomona strain AKRFB, isolated from a bovine abortion during a leptospirosis outbreak in Argentina. PMID:27198013

  14. First Genome Sequence of Leptospira interrogans Serovar Pomona, Isolated from a Bovine Abortion.

    PubMed

    Varni, Vanina; Koval, Ariel; Nagel, Ariel; Ruybal, Paula; Caimi, Karina; Amadio, Ariel F

    2016-05-19

    Leptospirosis is a widespread zoonosis and a re-emergent disease of global distribution with major relevance in veterinary production. Here, we report the whole-genome sequence of Leptospira interrogans serovar Pomona strain AKRFB, isolated from a bovine abortion during a leptospirosis outbreak in Argentina.

  15. Transmission of Leptospira interrogans serovar Balcanica infection among socially housed brushtail possums in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Day, T D; O'Connor, C E; Waas, J R; Pearson, A J; Matthews, L R

    1998-07-01

    Leptospira interrogans serovar balcanica is a potential vector being investigated for spreading a biological control agent among introduced brushtail possums (Trichosurus vulpecula) in New Zealand. As previous studies have shown that possums are unlikely to contract leptospirosis through a contaminated environment alone, the objective was to determine whether L. interrogans serovar balcanica could be transmitted between sexually mature, socially housed possums. Possums were infected experimentally with L. interrogans serovar balcanica and housed in pairs or groups with uninfected possums for either 70 or 140 days, during the breeding or non-breeding seasons. No transmission occurred between any infected and uninfected possums during the non-breeding season. However, transmission occurred between females that had been socially housed in pairs or groups in the breeding season. Mixed sex transmission also occurred in pairs and groups, both from males to females and from females to males. Mixed sex transmission usually occurred rapidly (< 44 days) and was not associated with the production of offspring. No transmission occurred between males during the breeding or the non-breeding seasons. Transmission probably occurs as a result of affiliative or sexual behaviour, but is unlikely to occur through fighting. The social transmission pathways determined in this study suggest that L. interrogans serovar balcanica may have the transmission attributes desired in a vector for biological control.

  16. Leptospira interrogans serovar hardjo in the kidneys and genital tracts of naturally infected sheep.

    PubMed

    Cerri, D; Nuvoloni, R; Ebani, V; Pedrini, A; Mani, P; Andreani, E; Farina, R

    1996-04-01

    A bacteriological study was carried out to identify possible renal and/or genital carriers of Leptospira interrogans serovar hardjo. L. hardjo was found at slaughter in the kidneys of three seropositive ewes, but not in uterus or salpinges of these animals.

  17. Effects of intrauterine challenge with Leptospira interrogans serovar hardjo on fertility in cattle.

    PubMed

    Vahdat, F; Bey, R F; Williamson, N B; Whitmore, H L; Zemjanis, R; Robinson, R A

    1983-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of Leptospira interrogans serovar hardio on fertility in cattle. Twenty seronegative mature dairy cows were assigned to two groups. Group I (challenged cows) was bred by a seronegative bull followed by intrauterine infusion (within 30 minutes) of Leptospira interrogans serovar hardjo. Group II was bred by the same bull followed by intrauterine infusion of 5 ml of sterile culture medium. Blood samples were collected at two-day intervals to monitor serum antibody titers. Daily blood cultures for 10 days and weekly urine cultures for five weeks were performed to monitor the animals for leptospiremia and leptospiuria. Cows were slaughtered 35 days post-breeding, and their reproductive tracts were examined. All animals remained clinically normal following intrauterine challenge. There was no difference in pregnancy rates (Group I, 7/10; Group II, 6/10). All embryos, reproductive tracts, and kidneys appeared normal. A microscopic agglutination test (MA) showed that 4 of 10 challenged cows developed serum antibody titers between 8 and 20 days after challenge. However, on the basis of the hamster passive protection test, all challenged cows had serum antibodies present. All blood and urine cultures were negative through the experimental period, as were the final kidney and uterine cultures. In a second experiment, six seronegative cows were infused with killed microorganisms immediately after insemination. Results of a microscopic agglutination test and a hamster passive protection test indicated that these cows did not develop humoral antibodies against serovar hardjo. These results indicated that intrauterine inoculation of Leptospira interrogans serovar hardjo (hamster-adapted strain) following breeding did not affect pregnancy rates despite an intrauterine challenge which caused the development of humoral antibodies.

  18. Geographical dissemination of Leptospira interrogans serovar Pomona during seasonal migration of California sea lions.

    PubMed

    Zuerner, Richard L; Cameron, Caroline E; Raverty, Stephen; Robinson, John; Colegrove, Kathleen M; Norman, Stephanie A; Lambourn, Dyanna; Jeffries, Steven; Alt, David P; Gulland, Frances

    2009-05-28

    Leptospirosis is one of the most widespread bacterial zoonoses in the world and affects most mammalian species. Although leptospirosis is well documented and characterized in terrestrial species, less information is available regarding the distribution and impact of leptospirosis in marine mammals. Additionally, the role of animal migrations on the geographical spread of leptospirosis has not been reported. Periodic epizootic outbreaks of acute leptospirosis among California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) have been reported since 1971. In this study, we collected samples from California sea lions stranded along the Pacific coast of North America during the most recent epidemic in 2004, and maintained leptospirosis surveillance of the California sea lion population along the California coast through 2007. Several isolates of Leptospira interrogans serovar Pomona were obtained from kidney and urine samples collected during this study, a finding consistent with serological evidence that California sea lions are persistently exposed to this leptospiral serovar. Combined, these data support a model whereby California sea lions are maintenance hosts for L. interrogans serovar Pomona, yet periodically undergo outbreaks of acute infection. During the 2004 outbreak, the incidence of new leptospirosis cases among California sea lions coincided with the seasonal movement of male sea lions from rookeries along the coast of central and southern California north as far as British Columbia. These data show that seasonal animal movement contributes to the distribution of leptospirosis across a large geographical region.

  19. Experimental infection of calves and sheep with Leptospira interrogans serovar balcanica.

    PubMed

    Durfee, P T; Presidente, P J

    1979-10-01

    Two of four calves inoculated with Leptospira interrogans serovar balcanica developed low microscopic agglutinating (MA) titres to serovar hardjo. A third calf had an MA titre of 1:1024 by day 19 post-inoculation (PI). Transient leptospiruria was recorded in one calf on days 12 and 13 PI. An in-contact calf did not seroconvert. None of the calves had fever or other clinical signs of disease. Four ewes inoculated with balcanica developed MA titres to hardjo by day 13 PI, and a transient leptospiruria between days 14 and 25 PI. None of the ewes showed any evidence of clinical disease and three of them delivered healthy lambs 22 to 64 days PI. One ewe had mild lesions of focal interstitial nephritis.

  20. Variable Nucleotide Tandem-Repeat Analysis Revealing a Unique Group of Leptospira interrogans Serovar Pomona Isolates Associated with California Sea Lions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leptospira interrogans serovar Pomona is commonly isolated from a variety of wildlife and domesticated livestock. It is difficult to assess whether disease outbreaks with serovar Pomona in given animal populations are due to endemic infections or accidental exposure. Unlike many leptospiral serovars...

  1. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies specific for Leptospira borgpetersenii serovar hardjo type hardjobovis and Leptospira interrogans serovar hardjo type hardjoprajitno.

    PubMed Central

    Surujballi, O; Howlett, C; Henning, D

    1999-01-01

    Murine monoclonal antibodies were produced by immunizing BALB/c mice with a killed whole-cell antigen prepared from Leptospira borgpetersenii serovar hardjo type hardjobovis. Six of these antibodies recognized epitopes on the homologous antigen and on whole-cell antigen prepared from Leptospira interrogans serovar hardjo type hardjoprajitno. These antibodies did not cross-react with whole-cell antigens prepared from L. borgpetersenii serovar sejroe, 10 other pathogenic Leptospira serovars, or the saprophytic Leptospira biflexa serovar patoc. Three other monoclonal antibodies reacted with antigens prepared from the 2 hardjo serovars and serovar sejroe but not with antigens from the 10 other pathogenic serovars, or serovar patoc. The epitopes recognized by all of the hardjo-specific antibodies and 2 of the 3 hardjo/sejroe-specific antibodies were susceptible to sodium meta-periodate oxidation. All of the antibodies were characterized by Western blots with the hardjobovis whole-cell antigen. Each of the 9 monoclonal antibodies was inhibited from binding to the hardjobovis antigen by bovine sera which were obtained from cattle experimentally infected with hardjobovis and from field cattle, with anti-serovar hardjo microscopic agglutination test antibody titres ranging from 100 to 12800. Some of these antibodies may be suitable for incorporation into competitive enzyme immunoassays for the specific detection of antibodies to either of the hardjo serovars. Images Figure 1. PMID:9918336

  2. Leptospira interrogans serovar hardjo vaccination of pregnant beef cows and subsequent growth rate of progeny.

    PubMed

    Holroyd, R G

    1980-10-01

    Five experiments with Leptospira interrogans serovar hardjo vaccine were carried out over a 6-year period in pregnant Brahman-cross and Sahiwal-cross cows in the dry tropics on northern Queensland. The numbers ranged from 127 breeders aged 2 to 5 years in 1972 to 344 breeders aged 2 to 9 years in 1977. Half of the cows were vaccinated twice in mid-pregnancy except for 1977, when they were vaccinated once. In 1975-1977 inclusive, half of the heifers were given an additional dose of vaccine at commencement of mating. Vaccination caused a significant (P less than 0.01) reduction of prenatal loss but not of perinatal or postnatal losses. Growth rates of calves from vaccinated and unvaccinated dams were similar.

  3. Asymptomatic and chronic carriage of Leptospira interrogans serovar Pomona in California sea lions (Zalophus californianus).

    PubMed

    Prager, K C; Greig, Denise J; Alt, David P; Galloway, Renee L; Hornsby, Richard L; Palmer, Lauren J; Soper, Jennifer; Wu, Qingzhong; Zuerner, Richard L; Gulland, Frances M D; Lloyd-Smith, James O

    2013-05-31

    Since 1970, periodic outbreaks of leptospirosis, caused by pathogenic spirochetes in the genus Leptospira, have caused morbidity and mortality of California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) along the Pacific coast of North America. Yearly seasonal epizootics of varying magnitude occur between the months of July and December, with major epizootics occurring every 3-5 years. Genetic and serological data suggest that Leptospira interrogans serovar Pomona is the infecting serovar and is enzootic in the California sea lion population, although the mechanism of persistence is unknown. We report asymptomatic carriage of Leptospira in 39% (33/85) of wild, free-ranging sea lions sampled during the epizootic season, and asymptomatic seroconversion with chronic asymptomatic carriage in a rehabilitated sea lion. This is the first report of asymptomatic carriage in wild, free-ranging California sea lions and the first example of seroconversion and asymptomatic chronic carriage in a sea lion. Detection of asymptomatic chronic carriage of Leptospira in California sea lions, a species known to suffer significant disease and mortality from the same Leptospira strain, goes against widely-held notions regarding leptospirosis in accidental versus maintenance host species. Further, chronic carriage could provide a mechanism for persistent circulation of Leptospira in the California sea lion population, particularly if these animals shed infectious leptospires for months to years.

  4. Three case studies involving Leptospira interrogans serovar pomona infection in mixed farming units.

    PubMed

    Gummow, B; Myburgh, J G; Thompson, P N; van der Lugt, J J; Spencer, B T

    1999-03-01

    Three case studies involving Leptospira interrogans serovar pomona outbreaks within mixed farming systems in South Africa are described. On 2 farms, pigs constituted the main enterprise with cattle and sheep of secondary importance. On each of these 2 farms, abortion due to L. pomona in sows was confirmed by culture, and antibody titres to pomona were detected in cattle, sheep, horses and dogs. On the 3rd farm, a piggery was of secondary importance to cattle farming. Abortion and death in cows occurred on this farm and serology showed titres to various serovars, including pomona. L. pomona was also isolated from bovine urine, an aborted bovine foetus and kidneys from slaughtered pigs. This particular case study was regarded as clinically atypical in that adult Jersey cattle died of acute leptospirosis in a semiarid region of South Africa. In all 3 case studies, the poor management of pig effluent and of the drinking water and its sources played a pivotal role in the transmission of the disease. Inadequate vaccination of animals against Leptospira and poor record-keeping within the secondary farming enterprises were also contributing factors to the spread of leptospirosis.

  5. Identification and partial characterization of a novel hemolysin from Leptospira interrogans serovar lai.

    PubMed

    Lee, S H; Kim, K A; Park, Y G; Seong, I W; Kim, M J; Lee, Y J

    2000-08-22

    It has been suggested that leptospiral hemolysins are important in the virulence and pathogenesis of leptospirosis. We have isolated an Escherichia coli clone carrying the 7.8kb DNA insert from a genomic library of Leptospira interrogans serovar lai by plaque hybridization using a sequence derived from the sphingomyelinase C gene (sphA) of L. borgpetersenii. The clone showed a clear beta-hemolytic zone on sheep blood agar and high hemolytic activities on both human and sheep erythrocytes in liquid assays. The clone carried at least two genes responsible for the hemolytic activities, encoded by two open reading frames of 1662 and 816 nucleotides, which are named sphH and hap-1 (hemolysis associated protein-1), respectively. The SphH showed 75% homology to the SphA at the amino acid level, and the Hap-1 showed no significant homology in major databases. Interestingly, however, E. coli cells harboring sphH did not show sphingomyelinase or phospholipase activities. Moreover, SphH-mediated hemolysis was osmotically protected by polyethylene glycol 5000, suggesting that the hemolysis is likely to be caused by pore formation on the membrane. The SphH was successfully expressed in E. coli as a histidine (His)-SphH fusion protein. Both sphH and hap-1 were highly conserved among the Leptospira species, except for the absence of sphH in non-pathogenic L. biflexa serovar patoc. We concluded that the SphH is a novel hemolysin of a pathogenic Leptospira species, which may be a putative pore-forming protein.

  6. Sheep as maintenance host for Leptospira interrogans serovar hardjo subtype hardjobovis.

    PubMed

    Gerritsen, M J; Koopmans, M J; Peterse, D; Olyhoek, T

    1994-09-01

    Transmission of Leptospira interrogans serovar hardjo subtype hardjobovis from naturally infected sheep to uninfected sheep and calves was studied. A microscopic agglutination test and ELISA were used to determine specific antibody responses in serum. Polymerase chain reaction was used to detect bacterial shedding in urine. Six sheep were derived from a dairy farm where cows were infected with L hardjobovis. Three of these sheep were seropositive for L hardjobovis, and 1 also shed leptospires in the urine. The other 2 sheep shed leptospires in the urine 7 days after the first observation date. The 6 sheep were placed on an isolated pasture together with a second group of 6 noninfected sheep. During the observation period of 140 days, 1 sheep of the second group became infected with L hardjobovis. On 5 consecutive days, a urine mixture from the 4 infected sheep was sprayed on the heads of 4 noninfected calves. Within 56 days, all calves that had been sprayed with urine shed L hardjobovis in the urine and became seropositive for L hardjobovis.

  7. Whole-Genome Sequence of Leptospira interrogans Serovar Hardjo Subtype Hardjoprajitno Strain Norma, Isolated from Cattle in a Leptospirosis Outbreak in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Cosate, M R V; Soares, S C; Mendes, T A; Raittz, R T; Moreira, E C; Leite, R; Fernandes, G R; Haddad, J P A; Ortega, J Miguel

    2015-11-05

    Leptospirosis is caused by pathogenic bacteria of the genus Leptospira spp. This neglected re-emergent disease has global distribution and relevance in veterinary production. Here, we report the whole-genome sequence and annotation of Leptospira interrogans serovar Hardjo subtype Hardjoprajitno strain Norma, isolated from cattle in a livestock leptospirosis outbreak in Brazil.

  8. Whole-Genome Sequence of Leptospira interrogans Serovar Hardjo Subtype Hardjoprajitno Strain Norma, Isolated from Cattle in a Leptospirosis Outbreak in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Soares, S. C.; Mendes, T. A.; Raittz, R. T.; Moreira, E. C.; Leite, R.; Fernandes, G. R.; Haddad, J. P. A.; Ortega, J. Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Leptospirosis is caused by pathogenic bacteria of the genus Leptospira spp. This neglected re-emergent disease has global distribution and relevance in veterinary production. Here, we report the whole-genome sequence and annotation of Leptospira interrogans serovar Hardjo subtype Hardjoprajitno strain Norma, isolated from cattle in a livestock leptospirosis outbreak in Brazil. PMID:26543126

  9. Management practices as risk factors for the presence of bulk milk antibodies to Salmonella, Neospora caninum and Leptospira interrogans serovar hardjo in Irish dairy herds.

    PubMed

    O' Doherty, E; Berry, D P; O' Grady, L; Sayers, R

    2014-06-01

    A survey of management practices in 309 Irish dairy herds was used to identify risk factors for the presence of antibodies to Salmonella, Neospora caninum and Leptospira interrogans serovar hardjo in extensively managed unvaccinated dairy herds. A previous study documented a herd-level seroprevalence in bulk milk of 49%, 19% and 86% for Salmonella, Neospora caninum and leptospira interrogans serovar hardjo, respectively in the unvaccinated proportion of these 309 herds in 2009. Association analyses in the present study were carried out using multiple logistic regression models. Herds where cattle were purchased or introduced had a greater likelihood of being positive to leptospira interrogans serovar hardjo (P<0.01) and Salmonella (P<0.01). Larger herds had a greater likelihood of recording a positive bulk milk antibody result to leptospira interrogans serovar hardjo (P<0.05). Herds that practiced year round calving were more likely to be positive to Neospora caninum (P<0.05) compared to herds with a spring-calving season, with no difference in risk between herds that practiced split calving compared to herds that practiced spring calving. No association was found between presence of dogs on farms and prevalence of Neospora caninum possibly due to limited access of dogs to infected materials including afterbirths. The information from this study will assist in the design of suitable control programmes for the diseases under investigation in pasture-based livestock systems.

  10. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) as a serological test for detecting antibodies against Leptospira interrogans serovar hardjo in sheep.

    PubMed

    Adler, B; Faine, S; Gordon, L M

    1981-09-01

    The enzyme-liked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was compared with the standard microscopic agglutination test (MAT) as a method for detecting antibodies against Leptospira interrogans serovar hardjo in sheep. Peak antibody levels detected by the 2 tests occurred at different times following experimental infection of sheep. In serums from flocks of sheep with naturally acquired infection there was a 95% correlation between MAT and ELISA with respect to the presence or absence of antibody to serovar hardjo, although the levels of correlation of the titres of the 2 tests was low. The 2 tests appeared to measure different antigen-antibody systems. The ELISA would be a useful test for screening large numbers of serums for antibodies to L. interrogans serovar hardjo.

  11. [Nucleotide sequence analysis of a species specific probe by an inserted fragment from recombinant plasmid pCX7 of L. interrogans sensu stricto serovar lai].

    PubMed

    Dai, B; Xiao, J; Yan, Z; Shen, C; Li, S; Fang, Z

    1998-12-01

    The etiological agents of leptospirosis are the pathogenic leptospires (L. interrogans sensu lato) which can be divided into 223 serovars organized into 23 serogroups. The serovar remains the basic taxon, but serotyping may now be accomplished and recognized by acceptable methods. Complementary molecular approaches are being used extensively to assess genetic relatedness amongst leptospires with restriction endonuclese analysis (REA), pulse field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and DNA-DNA hybridization as well established tools. However, the method is cumbersome and unsuitable for routine application. To develop a sensitive and specific method for identification of pathogenic leptospires, a genomic library of L. interrogans sensu stricto serovar lai was constructed with the plasmid vector pUC9. A recombinant plasmid, designated pCX7 which has homologous fragment of pathogenic leptospires was screened from the bank. pCX7 could recognize pathogenic leptospiral DNA fragment 1.7 kb of strain 017 without cross hybridization to nonpathogenic leptospiral DNA. Inserted fragment of pCX7 DNA sequencing was performed by Dr. Yan Zhengxin (Max-Plank-Institut fur Biology, Tubingen, Germany). Insert fragment was cloned into pBluescript and sequenced by using ABI(Applied Bio. Systems, Model 373A). Nucleotide sequences were analyzed by Dr. Xiao Jianguo (Texas University Medical School and School of Public Health, Center for Infectious Diseases) using a suit of computer program (NIH). One open reading frame of 306 nucleotids were identified. There were identifiable initiation codons, terminators, pribnow box and sextama box within the sequenced regions. These results further confirmed that the little homology between L. interrogans sensu strito and L. borgpeterseni serovar javanica, L. inadai serovar ranarun and serovar manhao (L. genomospecies 2), L. biflexa serovar patoc, L. illini. pCX7 DNA probe could provide a base for identification and classification of leptospires.

  12. Characterization of Leptospira interrogans Serovars by Polymorphism Variable Number Tandem Repeat Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rezasoltani, Sama; Dabiri, Hossein; Khaki, Pejvak; Rostami Nejad, Mohammad; Karimnasab, Nasim; Modirrousta, Shiva

    2015-01-01

    Background: Leptospirosis is recognized as a re-emerging infectious disease; therefore, understanding the epidemiology of the disease is vital for designing intervention programs and diminishing its transmission. Recently, Multilocus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) is used for segregating and identifying Leptospira serovars. The method has potential application in investigating the molecular epidemiology of Leptospira. Objectives: The propose of this study was genomic identification of pathogenic Leptospires in Iran by MLVA. Materials and Methods: Leptospira serovars were obtained from National Reference Laboratory of Leptospira at Razi Vaccine and Serum Research Institute, Karaj, Iran. Serovars were cultured into the liquid EMJH medium and incubated at 28˚C for 7 days. DNA of serovars was extracted using the phenol-chloroform method. PCR was performed with 5 selected variable number tandem repeat analysis (VNTR) loci. The amplified products were analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis. The size of the amplified products was estimated by 100 bp ladder and sequencing analysis. Results: The saprophytic serovar showed no amplified fragments. PCR products in all pathogenic serovars were observed. The 12 reference serovars used for the development of technique displayed distinct patterns. Conclusions: Results showed that MLVA technique with its range of polymorphism is a good marker for identification of pathogenic serovars. Some VNTR loci are more powerful than the other ones with regard to differentiation. Serovars from the same geographical area have more genetic similarity than same serovars from different places. MLVA is a suitable technique for epidemiological survey. PMID:26568805

  13. Experimental infections of brush-tailed possums, common wombats and water rats with Leptospira interrogans serovars balcanica and hardjo.

    PubMed

    Durfee, P T; Presidente, P J

    1979-06-01

    Of 12 brush-tailed possums (Trichosurus vulpecula) inoculated with Leptospira interrogans serovar balcanica 11 developed migroagglutination (MA) antibody to jardjo antigen by 14 days postincubation (PI). Leptospiruria was observed in 2 possums 117 to 145 days PI. Of 6 possums inoculated with serovar hardjo 4 developed low short-lived titres by day 18 PI. Two of 3 wombats (Vombatus ursinus) inoculated with balcanica had high MA titres (greater than or equal to 1:128) by day 16 PI and leptospiruria occurred by day 16. One wombat inoculated with hardjo developed a low MA titre. Low transitory MA titres to hardjo were found in 1 of 3 water rats (Hydromys chrysogaster) after inoculation with balcanica and 1 of 2 given hardjo. Histopathological examination of kidneys revealed mild to moderately severe focal interstitial nephritis in 4 of 8 possums, in 2 wombats and in 2 water rats following experimental infection with balcanica. Similar lesions were observed in 2 of 4 possums, 1 wombat and 2 water rats following experimental infection with hardjo.

  14. [Construction of genomic library of L. interrogans serovar lai using lambda gt11 as the vector and a study of recombiant plasmid pDL121].

    PubMed

    Liu, H; Dai, B; Jing, B; Wu, W; Li, S; Fang, Z; Zhao, H; Ye, D; Yan, R; Liu, J; Song, S; Yang, Y; Zhang, Y; Liu, F; Tu, Y; Yang, H; Huang, Z; Liang, L; Hu, L; Zhao, M

    1997-03-01

    A genomic library of L. interrogans serovar lai strain 017 has been constructed using lambda gt11 as the vector. DNA was partially digested by two blunt-end restriction enzymes, then methylated with EcoR I methylase; after EcoR I linker was added to the DNA, the linker-ended DNA was ligated to the dephosphorylated EcoR I digested lambda gt11 arms. The recombined DNA was packaged in vitro, and used to transduct E. coli Y1090 for amplification. There were 2.1 x 10(6) recombinant bacteriophages as recognized by their ability to form white plaques plated on Lac host in the presence of both IPTG and X-Ga1. A positive clone, designated lambda DL12, was screened with a rabbit anti-serum against L. interrogans serovar lai from the genomic library. The DNA from lambda DL12 was subcloned into plasmid pUC18. A recombinant (designated as pDL121) was obtained. SDS-PAGE analysis indicated that a 23 kd was expressed in E. coli JM 103 harboring pDL121. Western blotting analysis showed that a specific protein band molecular weight of 23 kd could be recognized by the rabbit antiserum against L. interrogans serovar lai strain 017.

  15. SEROPREVALENCE OF NINE LEPTOSPIRA INTERROGANS SEROVARS IN WILD CARNIVORES, UNGULATES, AND PRIMATES FROM A ZOO POPULATION IN A METROPOLITAN REGION OF CHILE.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Beas, Eduardo; Abalos, Pedro; Hidalgo-Hermoso, Ezequiel

    2015-12-01

    Serum samples from 130 individuals representing 42 species of carnivores, ungulates, and primates from a population of captive mammals in Metropolitan Region in Chile were tested for antibodies against nine serovars of Leptospira interrogans using the microscopic agglutination test. Ten percent of the animals were seropositive to one or more serovars. Seroprevalence was significantly higher in ungulates (20.4%) compared to carnivores (3.8%) and primates (3.4%). There were no significant differences in seroprevalence among sex and age ranges. The most frequent serovar detected was Autumnalis, present in 53.4% of antibody-positive animals. Most positive animals had titers of ≤1 : 200, except for a maned wolf ( Chrysocyon brachyurus ) with titers of 1 : 400 against serovar Hardjo. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of Leptospira exposure detected in native endangered pudu ( Pudu puda ) and the first confirmation of exposure to L. interrogans in captive wild mammals in Chile. Leptospirosis should be considered as a differential diagnosis in future disease presentation for hepatitis or abortions in captive mammals in Chile.

  16. Leptospira interrogans serovar canicola: a causal agent of sow abortions in Arequipa, Peru.

    PubMed

    Paz-Soldán, S V; Dianderas, M T; Windsor, R S

    1991-11-01

    An outbreak of abortions, stillbirths, mummified piglets and neonatal deaths in a pig herd in Arequipa, Peru is described. A total of 31 of 240 sows aborted between May and September 1988. When sera were examined 12 of 14 had very high titres of antibody to canicola PC125 and canicola Hond Utrecht, but there were also high titres of antibody to other leptospiral serovars. A detailed investigation was made and serovar canicola PC125 was isolated from the urine of four sows which had aborted and the kidney of one slaughter pig. Antibodies to various serovars of Leptospira were demonstrated in 11 of 17 sows which had aborted, two of six sows which had normal litters, nine of 18 boars, four of 39 slaughter pigs and four of 14 workers on the farm. The outbreak was brought under control by treatment and vaccination coupled with a thorough cleaning of the farm and control of the wild animal population. It is suggested that the infection was brought onto the farm by wild animals and that the disease is more common in Arequipa than was previously supposed.

  17. Dual nuclease activity of a Cas2 protein in CRISPR-Cas subtype I-B of Leptospira interrogans.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Bhuvan; Ghosh, Karukriti Kaushik; Fernandes, Gary; Kumar, Pankaj; Gogoi, Prerana; Kumar, Manish

    2016-04-01

    Leptospira interrogans serovar Copenhageni strain Fiocruz L1-130 carries a set of cas genes associated with CRISPR-Cas subtype I-B. Herein, we report for the first time active transcription of a set of cas genes (cas1 to cas8) of L. interrogans where cas4, cas1, cas2 and cas6, cas3, cas8, cas7, cas5 are clustered together in two independent operons. As an initial step toward comprehensive understanding of CRISPR-Cas system in spirochete, the biochemical study of one of the core Leptospira Cas2 proteins (Lep_Cas2) showed nuclease activity on both DNA and RNA in a nonspecific manner. Additionally, unlike other known Cas2 proteins, Lep_Cas2 showed metal-independent RNase activity and preferential activity on RNA over DNA. These results provide insight for understanding Cas2 diversity existing in the prokaryotic adaptive immune system.

  18. Prozone effects in microscopic agglutination tests for leptospirosis in the sera of mice infected with the pathogenic Leptospira interrogans serovar Canicola

    PubMed Central

    Shimabukuro, Fabio Hiroto; da Costa, Veruska Maia; da Silva, Rodrigo Costa; Langoni, Hélio; da Silva, Aristeu Vieira; de Carvalho, Lídia Raquel; Domingues, Paulo Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Mice experimentally infected with a pathogenic strain of Leptospira interrogans serovar Canicola produced false negative results (prozone effect) in a microscopic agglutination test (MAT). This prozone effect occurred in several serum samples collected at different post-infection times, but it was more prominent in samples collected from seven-42 days post-infection and for 1:50 and 1:100 sample dilutions. This phenomenon was correlated with increased antibody titres in the early post-infection phase. While prozone effects are often observed in serological agglutination assays for the diagnosis of animal brucellosis and human syphilis, they are not widely reported in leptospirosis MATs. PMID:23903987

  19. Bayesian inference for within-herd prevalence of Leptospira interrogans serovar Hardjo using bulk milk antibody testing.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Fraser I; Gunn, George J; McKendrick, Iain J; Murray, Fiona M

    2009-10-01

    Leptospirosis is the most widespread zoonosis throughout the world and human mortality from severe disease forms is high even when optimal treatment is provided. Leptospirosis is also one of the most common causes of reproductive losses in cattle worldwide and is associated with significant economic costs to the dairy farming industry. Herds are tested for exposure to the causal organism either through serum testing of individual animals or through testing bulk milk samples. Using serum results from a commonly used enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) test for Leptospira interrogans serovar Hardjo (L. hardjo) on samples from 979 animals across 12 Scottish dairy herds and the corresponding bulk milk results, we develop a model that predicts the mean proportion of exposed animals in a herd conditional on the bulk milk test result. The data are analyzed through use of a Bayesian latent variable generalized linear mixed model to provide estimates of the true (but unobserved) level of exposure to the causal organism in each herd in addition to estimates of the accuracy of the serum ELISA. We estimate 95% confidence intervals for the accuracy of the serum ELISA of (0.688, 0.987) and (0.975, 0.998) for test sensitivity and specificity, respectively. Using a percentage positivity cutoff in bulk milk of at most 41% ensures that there is at least a 97.5% probability of less than 5% of the herd being exposed to L. hardjo. Our analyses provide strong statistical evidence in support of the validity of interpreting bulk milk samples as a proxy for individual animal serum testing. The combination of validity and cost-effectiveness of bulk milk testing has the potential to reduce the risk of human exposure to leptospirosis in addition to offering significant economic benefits to the dairy industry.

  20. Serovar Diversity of Pathogenic Leptospira Circulating in the French West Indies

    PubMed Central

    Bourhy, Pascale; Herrmann Storck, Cécile; Theodose, Rafaelle; Olive, Claude; Nicolas, Muriel; Hochedez, Patrick; Lamaury, Isabelle; Zinini, Farida; Brémont, Sylvie; Landier, Annie; Cassadou, Sylvie; Rosine, Jacques; Picardeau, Mathieu

    2013-01-01

    Background Leptospirosis is one of the most important neglected tropical bacterial diseases in Latin America and the Caribbean. However, very little is known about the circulating etiological agents of leptospirosis in this region. In this study, we describe the serological and molecular features of leptospires isolated from 104 leptospirosis patients in Guadeloupe (n = 85) and Martinique (n = 19) and six rats captured in Guadeloupe, between 2004 and 2012. Methods and Findings Strains were studied by serogrouping, PFGE, MLVA, and sequencing 16SrRNA and secY. DNA extracts from blood samples collected from 36 patients in Martinique were also used for molecular typing of leptospires via PCR. Phylogenetic analyses revealed thirteen different genotypes clustered into five main clades that corresponded to the species: L. interrogans, L. kirschneri, L. borgpetersenii, L. noguchi, and L. santarosai. We also identified L. kmetyi in at least two patients with acute leptospirosis. This is the first time, to our knowledge, that this species has been identified in humans. The most prevalent genotypes were associated with L. interrogans serovars Icterohaemorrhagiae and Copenhageni, L. kirschneri serovar Bogvere, and L. borgpetersenii serovar Arborea. We were unable to identify nine strains at the serovar level and comparison of genotyping results to the MLST database revealed new secY alleles. Conclusions The overall serovar distribution in the French West Indies was unique compared to the neighboring islands. Typing of leptospiral isolates also suggested the existence of previously undescribed serovars. PMID:23516654

  1. Multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) of Leptospira interrogans serovar Pomona from Argentina reveals four new genotypes.

    PubMed

    Pavan, María Elisa; Cairó, Fabián; Brihuega, Bibiana; Samartino, Luis

    2008-01-01

    Outbreaks of leptospirosis occur regularly in Argentina, but little is known about their epidemiological relationships. We have analyzed the genetic diversity of a collection of 16 strains of Leptospira interrogans serovar Pomona isolated from animals and humans in Argentina during the past 45 years. Genotyping was performed by multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) using the loci VNTR4, VNTR7, VNTR9, VNTR10, VNTR19, VNTR23 and VNTR31, as described by Majed et al. [Identification of variable-number tandem-repeat loci in Leptospira interrogans sensu stricto. J Clin Microbiol 2005;43:539-45]. Clustering analysis revealed four new distinct MLVA genotypes, with a dominant one. Strains with this genotype were consistently isolated since 1960 to the present, mainly from cows and pigs, but also from humans, representing 75% of the total strains studied. These strains coexisted temporally and geographically with isolates presenting the other new genotypes. VNTR4 locus, with four different alleles, presented the highest diversity between the VNTR loci analyzed. MLVA patterns obtained will be useful for future diagnostic and epidemiological tracing analysis.

  2. Response of Leptospira interrogans to physiologic osmolarity: relevance in signaling the environment-to-host transition.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, James; Lo, Miranda; Bulach, Dieter M; Zuerner, Richard L; Adler, Ben; Haake, David A

    2007-06-01

    Transmission of pathogenic Leptospira between mammalian hosts usually involves dissemination via soil or water contaminated by the urine of carrier animals. The ability of Leptospira to adapt to the diverse conditions found inside and outside the host is reflected in its relatively large genome size and high percentage of signal transduction genes. An exception is Leptospira borgpetersenii serovar Hardjo, which is transmitted by direct contact and appears to have lost genes necessary for survival outside the mammalian host. Invasion of host tissues by Leptospira interrogans involves a transition from a low osmolar environment outside the host to a higher physiologic osmolar environment within the host. Expression of the lipoprotein LigA and LigB adhesins is strongly induced by an upshift in osmolarity to the level found in mammalian host tissues. These data suggest that Leptospira utilizes changes in osmolarity to regulate virulence characteristics. To better understand how L. interrogans serovar Copenhageni adapts to osmolar conditions that correspond with invasion of a mammalian host, we quantified alterations in transcript levels using whole-genome microarrays. Overnight exposure in leptospiral culture medium supplemented with sodium chloride to physiologic osmolarity significantly altered the transcript levels of 6% of L. interrogans genes. Repressed genes were significantly more likely to be absent or pseudogenes in L. borgpetersenii, suggesting that osmolarity is relevant in studying the adaptation of L. interrogans to host conditions. Genes induced by physiologic osmolarity encoded a higher than expected number of proteins involved in signal transduction. Further, genes predicted to encode lipoproteins and those coregulated by temperature were overrepresented among both salt-induced and salt-repressed genes. In contrast, leptospiral homologues of hyperosmotic or general stress genes were not induced at physiologic osmolarity. These findings suggest that

  3. Effect of exposure to Neospora caninum, Salmonella, and Leptospira interrogans serovar Hardjo on the economic performance of Irish dairy herds.

    PubMed

    O' Doherty, E; Sayers, R; O' Grady, L; Shalloo, L

    2015-04-01

    The objective of the current study was to quantify the effects of exposure to Salmonella, Neospora caninum, and Leptospira interrogans serovar Hardjo (L. hardjo) on dairy farm profitability and to simulate the effect of vaccination for Salmonella and L. hardjo on dairy farm profitability. The production effects associated with exposure to each of these pathogens in study herds were defined under 3 categories: (1) milk production effects, (2) reproduction effects (including culling), and (3) mortality effects. The production effects associated with exposure to Salmonella, N. caninum, and L. hardjo were incorporated into the Moorepark Dairy Systems Model. In the analysis, herds negative for exposure to Salmonella, N. caninum, and L. hardjo were assumed baseline herds, with all results presented relative to this base. In simulations examining the effect of vaccination for Salmonella and L. hardjo on farm profitability, vaccinated herds (vaccination costs included) were considered as baseline herds and results were presented relative to this base. Total annual profits in unvaccinated herds were reduced by €77.31, €94.71, and €112.11 per cow at milk prices of €0.24, €0.29, and €0.34/L, respectively, as a result of exposure to Salmonella. In the current study, herds positive for exposure to Salmonella recorded a 316-kg reduction in milk yield, whereas no association was detected between exposure to N. caninum or L. hardjo and milk production. Exposure to both N. caninum and L. hardjo was associated with compromised reproductive performance. Herds positive for exposure to N. caninum and Salmonella had greater rates of adult cow mortality and calf mortality, respectively. Vaccination for both Salmonella and L. hardjo was associated with improved performance in study herds. Exposure to N. caninum resulted in a reduction in annual farm profits of €11.55, €12, and €12.44 per cow at each milk price, whereas exposure to L. hardjo resulted in a reduction in

  4. Kinetics of Leptospira interrogans Infection in Hamsters after Intradermal and Subcutaneous Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Coutinho, Mariana L.; Matsunaga, James; Wang, Long-Chieh; de la Peña Moctezuma, Alejandro; Lewis, Michael S.; Babbitt, Jane T.; Aleixo, Jose Antonio G.; Haake, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Leptospirosis is a zoonosis caused by highly motile, helically shaped bacteria that penetrate the skin and mucous membranes through lesions or abrasions, and rapidly disseminate throughout the body. Although the intraperitoneal route of infection is widely used to experimentally inoculate hamsters, this challenge route does not represent a natural route of infection. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we describe the kinetics of disease and infection in hamster model of leptospirosis after subcutaneous and intradermal inoculation of Leptospira interrogans serovar Copenhageni, strain Fiocruz L1-130. Histopathologic changes in and around the kidney, including glomerular and tubular damage and interstitial inflammatory changes, began on day 5, and preceded deterioration in renal function as measured by serum creatinine. Weight loss, hemoconcentration, increased absolute neutrophil counts (ANC) in the blood and hepatic dysfunction were first noted on day 6. Vascular endothelial growth factor, a serum marker of sepsis severity, became elevated during the later stages of infection. The burden of infection, as measured by quantitative PCR, was highest in the kidney and peaked on day 5 after intradermal challenge and on day 6 after subcutaneous challenge. Compared to subcutaneous challenge, intradermal challenge resulted in a lower burden of infection in both the kidney and liver on day 6, lower ANC and less weight loss on day 7. Conclusions/Significance The intradermal and subcutaneous challenge routes result in significant differences in the kinetics of dissemination and disease after challenge with L. interrogans serovar Copenhageni strain Fiocruz L1-130 at an experimental dose of 2×106 leptospires. These results provide new information regarding infection kinetics in the hamster model of leptospirosis. PMID:25411782

  5. In Vivo-Expressed Proteins of Virulent Leptospira interrogans Serovar Autumnalis N2 Elicit Strong IgM Responses of Value in Conclusive Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Raja, Veerapandian; Shanmughapriya, Santhanam; Kanagavel, Murugesan; Artiushin, Sergey C.; Velineni, Sridhar; Timoney, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a serious zoonosis that is underdiagnosed because of limited access to laboratory facilities in Southeast Asia, Central and South America, and Oceania. Timely diagnosis of locally distributed serovars of high virulence is crucial for successful care and outbreak management. Using pooled patient sera, an expression gene library of a virulent Leptospira interrogans serovar Autumnalis strain N2 isolated in South India was screened. The identified genes were characterized, and the purified recombinant proteins were used as antigens in IgM enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) either singly or in combination. Sera (n = 118) from cases of acute leptospirosis along with sera (n = 58) from healthy subjects were tested for reactivity with the identified proteins in an ELISA designed to detect specific IgM responses. We have identified nine immunoreactive proteins, ArgC, RecA, GlpF, FliD, TrmD, RplS, RnhB, Lp28.6, and Lrr44.9, which were found to be highly conserved among pathogenic leptospires. Apparently, the proteins ArgC, RecA, GlpF, FliD, TrmD, and Lrr44.9 are expressed during natural infection of the host and undetectable in in vitro cultures. Among all the recombinant proteins used as antigens in IgM ELISA, ArgC had the highest sensitivity and specificity, 89.8% and 95.5%, respectively, for the conclusive diagnosis of leptospirosis. The use of ArgC and RecA in combination for IgM ELISA increased the sensitivity and specificity to 95.7% and 94.9%, respectively. ArgC and RecA thus elicited specific IgM responses and were therefore effective in laboratory confirmation of Leptospira infection. PMID:26607308

  6. Leptospira interrogans in the genital tract of sheep. Research on ewes and rams experimentally infected with serovar hardjo (hardjobovis).

    PubMed

    Farina, R; Cerri, D; Renzoni, G; Andreani, E; Mani, P; Ebani, V; Pedrini, A; Nuvoloni, R

    1996-07-01

    To verify if Leptospira hardjo can colonize the male and female genital organs of sheep, 9 animals (6 non pregnant ewes and 3 mature rams) were infected with a strain of L. hardjobovis recently recovered from the kidneys of a seropositive ewe. Postinfection controls (bacteriologic, serologic, immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy) failed to disclose the presence of leptospires in the uterus and oviducts, testicles, epididymis, prostate and bulbourethral glands of animals used for the experiment and slaughtered from 37 to 242 postinfection days. All animals showed a renal localization of L. hardjobovis lasting for the entire period of the study (over 8 months). These results emphasize the important role of sheep as maintenance hosts of the serovar.

  7. Safety and efficacy of a new octavalent combined Erysipelas, Parvo and Leptospira vaccine in gilts against Leptospira interrogans serovar Pomona associated disease and foetal death.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, A A C; Harks, F; Hoeijmakers, M; Collell, M; Segers, R P A M

    2015-07-31

    The safety and protective efficacy of a new octavalent combination vaccine containing inactivated Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae, Parvovirus, and Leptospira interrogans (sensu lato) serogroups Canicola, Icterohaemorrhagiae, Australis (Bratislava), Grippotyphosa, Pomona and Tarassovi - Porcilis(®) Ery+Parvo+Lepto - was evaluated in laboratory studies and under field conditions. The safety (2× overdose and repeated dose) was tested in 26 gilts. In this study, neither vaccine related temperature increase nor other systemic reactions were observed after intramuscular vaccination. No local reactions were observed except for one animal that had a small local reaction (2cm diameter) that lasted for 5 days after the third vaccination. Efficacy was tested in 40 gilts. A group of 20 gilts was vaccinated at 20 and 24 weeks of age with Porcilis(®) Ery+Parvo+Lepto and a group of 20 age- and source-matched animals served as the control group. The gilts were inseminated at 41 weeks or 66 weeks of age and were challenged with serovar Pomona 10 weeks after insemination, corresponding to 6 months (n=2×10) and 12 months (n=2×10) after the last vaccination. After both the 6- and 12-month challenges the control animals developed clinical signs (fever, lethargy and anorexia) and leptospiraemia as determined by positive blood culture. In addition, both the 6- and 12-month challenges resulted in death of 21% and 27% of the total number of foetuses in the control groups, respectively. Clinical signs and leptospiraemia were statistically significantly lower in vaccinated gilts after both the 6- and 12-month challenges. In addition, foetal death was statistically significantly lower (3% and 2%, respectively) in vaccinated gilts after both the 6- and 12 month challenges. The vaccine was tested further under field conditions on a Portuguese farm with a history of an increasing abortion rate associated with a Leptospira serovar Pomona infection (confirmed by PCR and serology). This study was

  8. Distribution of Leptospira interrogans by Multispacer Sequence Typing in Urban Norway Rats (Rattus norvegicus): A Survey in France in 2011-2013

    PubMed Central

    Bicout, Dominique J.; Kodjo, Angeli; Artois, Marc; Djelouadji, Zoheira

    2015-01-01

    Background Urban leptospirosis has increasingly been reported in both developing and developed countries. The control of the disease is limited because our understanding of basic aspects of the epidemiology, including the transmission routes of leptospires among rat populations, remains incomplete. Through the ability to distinguish among Leptospira strains in rats, multispacer sequence typing (MST) could provide a modern understanding of Leptospira epidemiology; however, to our knowledge, the distribution of Leptospira strains among urban rat colonies has not been investigated using MST. Aims and Methodology The objective of this study was to identify the Leptospira strains present in rats (Rattus norvegicus) in Lyon (France) using MST and to characterize their spatial distribution. Kidneys and urine were collected from rats trapped live in seven locations in the city and in one suburban location. Each location was considered to represent a rat colony. Bacterial cultures and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays were performed, and the L. interrogans DNA identified was then genotyped using MST. The distributions of Leptospira strains were spatially described. Key Results Among 84 wild rats, MST profiles were obtained in 35 of 37 rats that had a positive result for L. interrogans by bacterial culture and/or qPCR analyses. All of the MST profiles were related to reference strains previously isolated from human patients that belong to the serogroup Icterohaemorrhagiae and the serovars [strain(s)] Copenhageni [Wijinberg or M20] (n = 26), Icterohaemorrhagiae [CHU Réunion] (n = 7), Icterohaemorrhagiae [R1] (n = 1) and Copenhageni [Shibaura 9] (n = 1). Each colony was infected with leptospires having the same MST profile. Major Conclusions This study demonstrated that MST could be used for the purpose of field studies, either on culture isolates or on DNA extracted from kidneys and urine, to distinguish among L. interrogans isolates in rats. MST could

  9. Methylation and in vivo expression of the surface-exposed Leptospira interrogans outer-membrane protein OmpL32

    PubMed Central

    Eshghi, Azad; Pinne, Marija; Haake, David A.; Zuerner, Richard L.; Frank, Ami

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed that bacterial protein methylation is a widespread post-translational modification that is required for virulence in selected pathogenic bacteria. In particular, altered methylation of outer-membrane proteins has been shown to modulate the effectiveness of the host immune response. In this study, 2D gel electrophoresis combined with MALDI-TOF MS identified a Leptospira interrogans serovar Copenhageni strain Fiocruz L1-130 protein, corresponding to ORF LIC11848, which undergoes extensive and differential methylation of glutamic acid residues. Immunofluorescence microscopy implicated LIC11848 as a surface-exposed outer-membrane protein, prompting the designation OmpL32. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy of golden Syrian hamster liver and kidney sections revealed expression of OmpL32 during colonization of these organs. Identification of methylated surface-exposed outer-membrane proteins, such as OmpL32, provides a foundation for delineating the role of this post-translational modification in leptospiral virulence. PMID:22174381

  10. Role of sph2 Gene Regulation in Hemolytic and Sphingomyelinase Activities Produced by Leptospira interrogans

    PubMed Central

    Narayanavari, Suneel A.; Lourdault, Kristel; Sritharan, Manjula; Haake, David A.; Matsunaga, James

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenic members of the genus Leptospira are the causative agents of leptospirosis, a neglected disease of public and veterinary health concern. Leptospirosis is a systemic disease that in its severest forms leads to renal insufficiency, hepatic dysfunction, and pulmonary failure. Many strains of Leptospira produce hemolytic and sphingomyelinase activities, and a number of candidate leptospiral hemolysins have been identified based on sequence similarity to well-characterized bacterial hemolysins. Five of the putative hemolysins are sphingomyelinase paralogs. Although recombinant forms of the sphingomyelinase Sph2 and other hemolysins lyse erythrocytes, none have been demonstrated to contribute to the hemolytic activity secreted by leptospiral cells. In this study, we examined the regulation of sph2 and its relationship to hemolytic and sphingomyelinase activities produced by several L. interrogans strains cultivated under the osmotic conditions found in the mammalian host. The sph2 gene was poorly expressed when the Fiocruz L1-130 (serovar Copenhageni), 56601 (sv. Lai), and L495 (sv. Manilae) strains were cultivated in the standard culture medium EMJH. Raising EMJH osmolarity to physiological levels with sodium chloride enhanced Sph2 production in all three strains. In addition, the Pomona subtype kennewicki strain LC82-25 produced substantially greater amounts of Sph2 during standard EMJH growth than the other strains, and sph2 expression increased further by addition of salt. When 10% rat serum was present in EMJH along with the sodium chloride supplement, Sph2 production increased further in all strains. Osmotic regulation and differences in basal Sph2 production in the Manilae L495 and Pomona strains correlated with the levels of secreted hemolysin and sphingomyelinase activities. Finally, a transposon insertion in sph2 dramatically reduced hemolytic and sphingomyelinase activities during incubation of L. interrogans at physiologic osmolarity

  11. Post-translational Modification of LipL32 during Leptospira interrogans Infection

    PubMed Central

    Witchell, Timothy D.; Eshghi, Azad; Nally, Jarlath E.; Hof, Rebecca; Boulanger, Martin J.; Wunder, Elsio A.; Ko, Albert I.; Haake, David A.; Cameron, Caroline E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Leptospirosis, a re-emerging disease of global importance caused by pathogenic Leptospira spp., is considered the world's most widespread zoonotic disease. Rats serve as asymptomatic carriers of pathogenic Leptospira and are critical for disease spread. In such reservoir hosts, leptospires colonize the kidney, are shed in the urine, persist in fresh water and gain access to a new mammalian host through breaches in the skin. Methodology/Principal Findings Previous studies have provided evidence for post-translational modification (PTM) of leptospiral proteins. In the current study, we used proteomic analyses to determine the presence of PTMs on the highly abundant leptospiral protein, LipL32, from rat urine-isolated L. interrogans serovar Copenhageni compared to in vitro-grown organisms. We observed either acetylation or tri-methylation of lysine residues within multiple LipL32 peptides, including peptides corresponding to regions of LipL32 previously identified as epitopes. Intriguingly, the PTMs were unique to the LipL32 peptides originating from in vivo relative to in vitro grown leptospires. The identity of each modified lysine residue was confirmed by fragmentation pattern analysis of the peptide mass spectra. A synthetic peptide containing an identified tri-methylated lysine, which corresponds to a previously identified LipL32 epitope, demonstrated significantly reduced immunoreactivity with serum collected from leptospirosis patients compared to the peptide version lacking the tri-methylation. Further, a subset of the identified PTMs are in close proximity to the established calcium-binding and putative collagen-binding sites that have been identified within LipL32. Conclusions/Significance The exclusive detection of PTMs on lysine residues within LipL32 from in vivo-isolated L. interrogans implies that infection-generated modification of leptospiral proteins may have a biologically relevant function during the course of infection. Although

  12. Antibodies against Leptospira interrogans in California sea lion pups from Gulf of California.

    PubMed

    Godínez, C R; Zelaya de Romillo, B; Aurioles-Gamboa, D; Verdugo-Rodríguez, A; Rodríguez-Reyes, E A; De la Peña-Moctezuma, A

    1999-01-01

    One hundred and twenty-five serum samples from California sea lion (Zalophus californianus californianus) pups, and one from an adult female from eight reproductive rookeries located in seven islands in the Gulf of California (Mexico), were collected during the 1994-96 reproductive seasons. These were tested for antibodies to 19 serovars of Leptospira interrogans using a Microscopic Agglutination Test (MAT). Forty-one samples (32%) had antibody levels from 1:20 to 1:320 to one or more serovars. The most frequently detected serotypes were Leptospira interrogans hardjo (n = 13), cynopteri (8), ballum (6), and szwajizak (5). Serovars with the highest prevalence were Leptospira interrogans hardjo and serjoe (1:320), ballum (1:160), and cynopteri, girppotyphosa, and tarassovi (1:80). Based on these results, exposure of sea lions to L. interrogans serovar hardjo seems to be relatively common among colonies located in the islands of the Gulf of California in contrast with those located on the Pacific coast, where the most frequently detected serovar is L. interrogans serovar pomona.

  13. Leptospira Protein Expression During Infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We are characterizing protein expression in vivo during experimental leptospirosis using immunofluorescence microscopy. Coding regions for several proteins were identified through analysis of Leptospira interrogans serovar Copenhageni and L. borgpetersenii serovar Hardjo genomes. In addition, codi...

  14. A Comprehensive Approach to Identification of Surface-Exposed, Outer Membrane-Spanning Proteins of Leptospira interrogans

    PubMed Central

    Pinne, Marija; Haake, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a zoonosis with worldwide distribution caused by pathogenic spirochetes belonging to the genus Leptospira. The leptospiral life cycle involves transmission via fresh water and colonization of the renal tubules of their reservoir hosts or infection of accidental hosts, including humans. Bacterial outer membrane proteins (OMPs), particularly those with surface-exposed regions, play crucial roles in virulence mechanisms of pathogens and the adaptation to various environmental conditions, including those of the mammalian host. Little is known about the surface-exposed OMPs in Leptospira, particularly those with outer membrane-spanning domains. Herein, we describe a comprehensive strategy for identification and characterization of leptospiral transmembrane OMPs. The genomic sequence of L. interrogans serovar Copenhageni strain Fiocruz L1–130 allowed us to employ the β-barrel prediction programs, PRED-TMBB and TMBETA-NET, to identify potential transmembrane OMPs. Several complementary methods were used to characterize four novel OMPs, designated OmpL36, OmpL37, OmpL47 and OmpL54. In addition to surface immunofluorescence and surface biotinylation, we describe surface proteolysis of intact leptospires as an improved method for determining the surface exposure of leptospiral proteins. Membrane integration was confirmed using techniques for removal of peripheral membrane proteins. We also demonstrate deficiencies in the Triton X-114 fractionation method for assessing the outer membrane localization of transmembrane OMPs. Our results establish a broadly applicable strategy for the elucidation of novel surface-exposed outer membrane-spanning proteins of Leptospira, an essential step in the discovery of potential virulence factors, diagnostic antigens and vaccine candidates. PMID:19562037

  15. [Presence of IgM antibodies for Leptospira interrogans in wild animals from Tocantins State, 2002].

    PubMed

    de Souza Júnior, Milton Formiga; Lobato, Zélia Inês Portela; Lobato, Francisco Carlos Faria; Moreira, Elvio Carlos; de Oliveira, Rogério Rodrigues; Leite, Geysa Goulart; Freitas, Theonys Diógenes; de Assis, Ronnie Antunes

    2006-01-01

    Four hundred and twenty-seven serum samples of wild animals were tested against 18 serovars of Leptospira interrogans. Of 286 samples of Cebus apella, 46 (16.1%) were positive for the serovars pomona, brasiliensis, mini, swajizak, grippotyphosa, sarmin, fluminense, autumnalis, hebdomadis, guaratuba, javanica and icterohaemorrhagiae. Of 82 samples of Alouatta caraya, 2 (2.4%) were positive for the serovars mangus and fluminense. Of 31 samples of Nasua nasua, 4 (12.9%) were positive for the serovars fluminense and javanica, and of 10 samples of Cerdocyon thous, 2 (20 %) were positive for the serovars fluminense and brasiliensis. Seven samples of Dasyprocta sp, 6 of Tamandua tetradactyla and 5 of Euphractus sexcintus did not present reactivity.

  16. Seroprevalence and risk factors associated with within-flock transmission of Leptospira interrogans in transhumant farming systems in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Arteaga-Troncoso, G; Jiménez-Estrada, J M; Montes De Oca-Jimenez, R; López-Hurtado, M; Luna-Alvarez, M; Hernandez-Andrade, L; Moreno-Alfaro, A; Galan-Herrera, J F; Guerra-Infante, F M

    2015-10-01

    A number of recent reports emphasize the risk of zoonotic diseases and the high degree of prevalence of asymptomatic animals infected with Leptospira interrogans. This report sought to assess the prevalence of antibodies to certain serovars of L. interrogans, and to describe the association between seropositivity and risk factors associated with within-flock transmission in a mountainous region of Mexico. Overall seroprevalence to L. interrogans was 54·5% (95% confidence interval 48·3-60·7); the most frequent serovar was Icterohaemorrhagiae. The accumulation of placentas and fetuses at a site close to lambing paddocks can play a significant role as a risk factor for within-flock transmission of L. interrogans in transhumant farming systems in the municipality of Xalatlaco. The high prevalence of L. interrogans antibodies supports the hypothesis that natural foci of this zoonosis are present in sheep flocks in this area. These findings emphasize the need for planning and implementation of control programmes for ovine leptospirosis in Mexico and elsewhere.

  17. Serovars of Leptospira isolated from dogs and rodents.

    PubMed

    Suepaul, S M; Carrington, C V F; Campbell, M; Borde, G; Adesiyun, A A

    2010-07-01

    We determined the frequency of isolation of Leptospira from dogs and rodents, the serovars of Leptospira, and the clinical, gross and histological manifestations in dogs with leptospirosis in Trinidad. From dogs, samples of urine, blood and kidney were collected while only kidney and blood samples of trapped rodents were used. Isolates were cultured and serotyped using a panel of 23 international serovars and monoclonal antibodies. The risk factors for leptospirosis were also determined in owned dogs using a standard questionnaire. Of a total of 468 animals investigated for Leptospira, 70 (15.0%) were positive, comprising nine (18.0%) of 50 suspected canine leptospirosis cases, seven (3.4%) of 207 stray dogs and 54 (25.6%) of 211 rodents. The observation that rodents have a statistically (P<0.05, chi2) higher frequency of isolation emphasizes the importance of rodents as reservoirs of leptospirosis in the country. Copenhageni was the predominant serovar found in 100.0% (7/7), 33.3% (2/6) and 68.5% (37/54) of isolates from suspected canine leptospirosis cases, stray dogs and rodents, respectively. Serovars Icterohaemorrhagiae and Canicola, the two serovars present in the commercial vaccines used locally, were detected in one (1.5%) and zero (0.0%) isolates respectively of the 67 tested. Data provided suggest that the apparent vaccine failure may be a consequence of the fact that the predominant serovar (Copenhageni) detected in sick, apparently healthy dogs and in rodents is not contained in the vaccines used locally to protect dogs against canine leptospirosis.

  18. Expansion of the in vitro assay for Leptospira potency testing to other serovars: case study with Leptospira Hardjo.

    PubMed

    Alt, David P; Wilson-Welder, Jennifer

    2013-09-01

    Evaluation of leptospiral vaccines for potency against Leptospira interrogans serovars Pomona, Icterohaemorrhagiae, Canicola, and Grippotyphosa is accomplished using the hamster potency test method described in 9 CFR 113.101-104. Applicability of this method to evaluation of bacterins developed for immunization against infection with L. interrogans serovar Hardjo or Leptospira borgpetersenii serovar Hardjo is complicated by several issues. Information from research on target host animal efficacy studies and evaluation of the immune response elicited using effective whole-cell bacterin formulations have revealed problems in relating these studies to either hamster-based or other potency testing methods. Future work on serovar Hardjo vaccines employing recombinant proteins will require preliminary testing methods in models other than the host animal. These models may also prove applicable to evaluation of potency for protein-based vaccines. Both an acute lethal infection model and a chronic infection model have been developed using two different strains of serovar Hardjo and will be described.

  19. Phenotypic and Molecular Characterization of Leptospira interrogans Isolated from Canis familiaris in Southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Jorge, Sérgio; Monte, Leonardo G; De Oliveira, Natasha R; Collares, Thais F; Roloff, Bárbara C; Gomes, Charles K; Hartwig, Daiane D; Dellagostin, Odir A; Hartleben, Cláudia P

    2015-10-01

    Leptospirosis is a zoonotic disease caused by pathogenic spirochetes from the genus Leptospira, which includes 20 species and more than 300 serovars. Canines are important hosts of pathogenic leptospires and can transmit the pathogen to humans via infected urine. Here, we report the phenotypic and molecular characterization of Leptospira interrogans isolated from Canis familiaris in Southern Brazil. The isolated strain was characterized by variable-number tandem-repeats analysis as L. interrogans, serogroup Icterohaemorrhagiae. In addition, the isolate was recognized by antibodies from human and canine serum samples previously tested by microscopic agglutination test. Ultimately, the expression of membrane-associated antigens (LipL32 and leptospiral immunoglobulin-like proteins) from pathogenic leptospires using monoclonal antibodies was detected by indirect immunofluorescence assay. In conclusion, identification of new strains of Leptospira can help in the diagnosis and control of leptospirosis.

  20. First isolation of Leptospira interrogans from Lycalopex griseus (South American gray fox) in Argentina shows new MLVA genotype.

    PubMed

    Scialfa, Exequiel; Brihuega, Bibiana; Venzano, Agustín; Morris, Winston Eduardo; Bolpe, Jorge; Schettino, Mateo

    2013-01-01

    To identify carriers of Leptospira spp. in Argentina, wild animals were trapped in Buenos Aires Province during three nights, capturing 12 Didelphis albiventris (white-eared opossum), six Chaetophractus villosus (big hairy armadillo), five Lycalopex griseus (South American gray fox), and two Conepatus chinga (Molina's hog-nosed skunk). All were tested by microscopic agglutination test, and five (two gray foxes, two armadillos, and one skunk) were positive for Leptospira interrogans serovars Canicola and Icterohaemorrhagiae, L. borgpetersenii serovar Castellonis, and L. kirschneri serovar Grippotyphosa, at titers of 1:50 and 1:100. Kidney tissue from all animals was cultured, and one isolate of L. interrogans from a gray fox was obtained. Hamsters inoculated with the isolate died after 6 days with no macroscopic lesions at necropsy. However, histologic examination revealed glomerulonephritis, interstitial nephritis, and pneumonia. The Leptospira strain from the South American gray fox was analyzed serologically and its pathogenicity was established. Genotyping through multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis showed that the strain was a new genotype related to the L. interrogans serogroup Icterohaemorrhagiae.

  1. Serosurvey for canine distemper virus, canine adenovirus, Leptospira interrogans, and Toxoplasma gondii in free-ranging canids in Scandinavia and Svalbard.

    PubMed

    Akerstedt, Johan; Lillehaug, Atle; Larsen, Inger-Lise; Eide, Nina E; Arnemo, Jon M; Handeland, Kjell

    2010-04-01

    Prevalence of antibodies reactive to canine distemper virus (CDV), canine adenovirus type 1 (CAV-1), Leptospira interrogans serovars Canicola and Icterohaemorrhagiae, and Toxoplasma gondii were examined in free-ranging Scandinavian canids. Sampling included 275 red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) from mainland Norway, 60 arctic foxes (Vulpes lagopus) from the high-arctic islands of Svalbard, and 98 wolves (Canis lupus) from the joint Swedish-Norwegian population. Methods used included virus neutralization tests for CDV and CAV-1, a microscopic agglutination test for L. interrogans, and a direct agglutination test for T. gondii. High prevalence of antibody to CAV-1 was identified in red foxes (59.6%), wolves (67.7%), and arctic foxes (37.8%). The prevalence of antibody to CDV varied between 9.6% and 12.3% in the three species. Antibodies to L. interrogans serovar Icterohaemorrhagiae were found in 9.9% of the red foxes and 8.4% of the wolves sampled, whereas no antibody-positive arctic foxes were found. All animals were antibody-negative for L. interrogans serovar Canicola. Antibodies to T. gondii were found in 66.9, 51.7, and 18.6% of red foxes, arctic foxes and wolves, respectively. Significantly more adults than juveniles were antibody-positive for CDV in red foxes and arctic foxes, for CAV-1 in wolves, and for T. gondii in red foxes and wolves. There was a general tendency for adult female red foxes to have a higher prevalence of antibodies for CDV than adult males; this difference was statistically significant. The results indicate that CDV and CAV-1 are endemic in red foxes and wolves on the Scandinavian mainland and in arctic foxes on Svalbard. Although infection with L. interrogans serovar Icterohaemorrhagiae was relatively common in wild canids on mainland Norway, it was not found on Svalbard, where the maintenance host (Rattus norvegicus) is absent. All three species are commonly exposed to T. gondii through predation on infected intermediate hosts.

  2. Seasonal prevalence of antibodies to Leptospira interrogans in Antillean manatees from a landlocked lake in Tabasco, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Aragón-Martínez, Arianna; Olivera-Gómez, León D; Jiménez-Domínguez, Darwin

    2014-07-01

    Factors that alter the dynamics of ecologic systems can influence transmission of infectious diseases and may lead to decreases in natural populations. Leptospirosis is a cosmopolitan disease of zoonotic importance that affects most mammals. At the southern Gulf of Mexico, Antillean manatees (Trichechus manatus manatus) inhabit highly variable environments, with extended floods during the rainy season and drought conditions during the dry season that affect food availability and the thermal environment for manatees. We tested for changes in prevalence and titers of antibodies to 12 serovars of Leptospira interrogans in manatees between dry and rainy seasons. We determined titers for L. interrogans through microscopic agglutination tests (MAT) from 10 manatees, six during the dry season (DS), and six during the rainy season (RS) in Laguna de las Ilusiones, a landlocked lake hosting a population of about 20 manatees. All individuals were antibody positive (titers ≥ 100) to at least one serovar. The serovars bataviae, bratislava, canicola, and icterohaemorrhagiae had overall prevalences ≥ 50%; bataviae, bratislava, and canicola had prevalences ≥ 50% during both seasons. Serovars icterohaemorrhagiae and pyrogenes had prevalences ≥ 50% during DS and pomona, tarassovi, wolfii, and autumnalis during RS. Significant differences in prevalence between seasons were found for pomona, tarassovi, and autumnalis. Titers of tarassovi, wolfii, autumnalis, and bataviae were significantly higher during RS. There was a high prevalence of L. interrogans during the RS independent of high availability of plant foods, coinciding with the epizootiology of the bacteria that are endemic to tropical regions. Another factor possibly influencing prevalence is high anthropogenic pressure at the lake, causing an increase in potential sources of infection. Because of possible cross-reaction in MAT, further research is needed on the molecular discrimination of serovars in animals in the

  3. Prevalence of antibodies to Leptospira serovars in sheep and goats in Alto Adige-South Tyrol.

    PubMed

    Ciceroni, L; Lombardo, D; Pinto, A; Ciarrocchi, S; Simeoni, J

    2000-04-01

    Serum samples from 313 sheep and 95 goats were collected during November 1993 in 26 localities in Alto Adige-South Tyrol and tested by microscopic agglutination test for antibodies to 28 serovars of the genus Leptospira. At the time of blood collection all the animals appeared healthy with no clinical sign suggestive of leptospirosis. The observed seroprevalence in sheep was 6.1%, whereas the seropositivity rate for goat serum samples was 2.1%. The highest serological prevalence in sheep was recorded for serovar castellonis, followed by poi, sejroe, hardjo subtype hardjobovis, copenhageni, and cynopteri. Titres to poi were the only ones found in goats. These findings, which are proof of Leptospira infection in Alto Adige-South Tyrol, indicate that foci of several serovars exist in this region.

  4. Genomic Analysis of a New Serovar of Leptospira weilii Serogroup Manhao

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Huajun; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Yuezhu; Zhang, Jinlong; Li, Zhe; Cui, Shenghui; Xin, Xiaofang; Ye, Qiang; Chang, Yung-Fu; Wang, Junzhi

    2017-01-01

    Leptospirosis, caused by pathogenic Leptospira spp., is recognized as an important emerging zoonotic disease throughout the world. In this study, multiple approaches were used to characterize the recently discovered serovar Heyan strain L231. This strain can infect guinea pigs and belonged to the pathogenic species L. weilii. Genome sequencing analysis revealed the draft genome of 4.2 M bp with a G+C content of 40.67% for strain L231, and a total of 4,794 ORFs were identified. The strain L231 genome was found to have a larger LPS biosynthesis locus than that of strains L. interrogans serovar Lai and L. borgpetersenii serovar Hardjobovis. Phylogenomic reconstructions showed that the evolutionary position of L. weilii serovar Heyan was different from that of other serovars from serogroup Manhao. These findings may lead us to a better understanding of Leptospira pathogenesis and evolution. PMID:28210253

  5. Risk factors associated with prevalence of antibodies to Leptospira interrogans in a metapopulation of black-tailed prairie dogs in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Montiel-Arteaga, Ana; Atilano, Daniel; Ayanegui, Alejandra; Ceballos, Gerardo; Suzán, Gerardo

    2015-01-01

    Interest in the study of infectious diseases of wildlife has grown in recent decades and now focuses on understanding host-parasite dynamics and factors involved in disease occurrence. The black-tailed prairie dog (Cynomys ludovicianus) is a useful species for this type of investigation because it lives in heterogeneous landscapes where human activities take place, and its populations are structured as a metapopulation. Our goal was to determine if colony area, density, and proximity to human settlements are associated with prevalence of antibodies to Leptospira interrogans in black-tailed prairie dogs of northwestern Chihuahua State, Mexico. We captured 266 prairie dogs in 11 colonies in 2009 and analyzed 248 serum samples with the microscopic agglutination test (MAT) for antibody to any of the 12 pathogenic serovars of L. interrogans. Serologically positive test results for only serovars Bratislava, Canicola, Celledoni, and Tarassovi were considered for statistical analysis. Almost 80% of sera were positive for at least one pathogenic serovar (MAT titer ≥1∶80). The highest recorded antibody prevalences were to serovars Bratislava and Canicola. Correlation analysis showed a negative relationship between L. interrogans antibody prevalence and colony area (r = -0.125, P<0.005), suggesting that animals living in larger colonies were at a lower risk than those in smaller colonies. The correlation between the serovar Canicola and distance was negative (r = -0.171, P<0.007), and this relationship may be explained by the presence of domestic dogs associated with human dwellings. This is the first study of Leptospira spp. antibody prevalence in prairie dogs, and it provides valuable insights into the dynamics of leptospirosis in threatened wildlife species. Further studies are needed to evaluate the impact of Leptospira serovars in metapopulations of prairie dogs and other domestic and wild mammals in grassland communities.

  6. Immunological and molecular characterization of Leptospira interrogans isolated from a bovine foetus.

    PubMed

    Monte, Leonardo Garcia; Ridieri, Karine Forster; Jorge, Sérgio; Oliveira, Natasha Rodrigues; Hartwig, Daiane Drawanz; Amaral, Marta Gonçalves; Hartleben, Cláudia Pinho; Dellagostin, Odir Antonio

    2015-06-01

    Cattle are commonly infected with pathogenic leptospires, and similarly to rodents, they excrete the bacteria in their urine and can transmit the pathogen from animal to animal or animal to human. Thus, surveillance and monitoring systems for detection of new Leptospira serovars are important for the control of leptospirosis. Here, we report the isolation of a spirochete from a stillborn bovine foetus and its characterization by immunological and molecular techniques. A variable number tandem repeat profile using seven discriminatory primers identified the spirochete as belonging to species Leptospira interrogans serogroup Australis serovar Muenchen. A phenotypic analysis using monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against leptospiral membrane-associated proteins confirmed the expression of important virulence and pathogenicity factors (LipL32 and LigBrep). Out of 120 reference sera tested, 22 positive (36.66%) and 9 negative (15%) also reacted with the new isolate. Furthermore, the serovar Muenchen isolate was virulent in hamster model. The animal inoculated developed acute lethal infection characterized by hepatic, pulmonary and renal lesions. Local isolates exhibited unique characteristics that differed from those of reference strains; therefore, isolation of leptospires is useful in the surveillance of local pathogenic serovars. In conclusion, the data obtained from this study can contribute to the epidemiological understanding and control of leptospirosis in southern Brazil.

  7. High virulence in hamsters of four dominant Leptospira serovars isolated from rats in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Villanueva, Sharon Y A M; Saito, Mitsumasa; Tsutsumi, Yutaka; Segawa, Takaya; Baterna, Rubelia A; Chakraborty, Antara; Asoh, Tatsuma; Miyahara, Satoshi; Yanagihara, Yasutake; Cavinta, Lolita L; Gloriani, Nina G; Yoshida, Shin-ichi

    2014-02-01

    Leptospirosis is caused by pathogenic species of Leptospira. The aim of this study was to determine and characterize the pathogenicity of four dominant Leptospira isolates prevailing among rats in the Philippines. The isolates were Leptospira interrogans serovar Manilae strain K64, L. interrogans serovar Losbanos strain K37, L. interrogans serovar Ratnapura strain K5 and Leptospira borgpetersenii serovar Javanica strain K6. Pathogenicities were studied using hamsters, which reproduce severe human leptospirosis. The minimum lethal doses were 10(0) ( = 1) leptospires for K64, K37 and K5, and 10(1) leptospires for K6. Weight loss amongst the Leptospira-infected hamsters was observed from 1 day before death (K64-, K37- and K5-infected hamsters) to as much as 1 week before death for K6-infected hamsters. Similar and varied gross and microscopic lesions were observed amongst infected hamsters, even for strains belonging to the same species (i.e. L. interrogans). The most significant and common histopathological findings were congestion of the glomerulus, disarrangement of hepatic cords and erythrophagocytosis. Other findings were foamy splenic macrophages for K6, severe petechial pulmonary haemorrhage for K64, and hematuria and severe pulmonary congestion for K37. Immunostaining and culture revealed the presence of leptospires in different organs of the infected hamsters. Based on these results, Leptospira isolates from rats in the Philippines were shown to be highly virulent, causing pulmonary haemorrhage, severe hepato-renal damage and death in hamsters even at lower doses. The present findings on experimental leptospirosis support clinical data showing that patients with severe manifestations of leptospirosis, such as pulmonary haemorrhage, are increasing in the Philippines. These findings may serve as a basis to strengthen the early diagnosis and treatment of human leptospirosis.

  8. Factors Associated with Severe Leptospirosis, Martinique, 2010–2013

    PubMed Central

    Theodose, Rafaelle; Olive, Claude; Bourhy, Pascale; Hurtrel, Guillaume; Vignier, Nicolas; Mehdaoui, Hossein; Valentino, Ruddy; Martinez, Roland; Delord, Jean-Marie; Herrmann, Cécile; Lamaury, Isabelle; Césaire, Raymond; Picardeau, Mathieu; Cabié, André

    2015-01-01

    To identify factors associated with disease severity, we examined 102 patients with quantitative PCR–confirmed leptospirosis in Martinique during 2010–2013. Associated factors were hypotension, chest auscultation abnormalities, icterus, oligo/anuria, thrombocytopenia, prothrombin time <68%, high levels of leptospiremia, and infection with L. interrogans serovar Icterohaemorrhagiae/Copenhageni. PMID:26583702

  9. Seroepidemiology of leptospirosis in Minnesota wolves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Khan, M.A.; Goyal, S.M.; Diesch, S.L.; Mech, L.D.; Fritts, S.H.

    1991-01-01

    Serum samples (n = 457) from wolves (Canis lupus) in northern Minnesota were collected from 1972 through 1986 and were tested for antibodies against Leptospira interrogans using a microtiter agglutination test. Twelve serovars included in the study were: australis, autumnalis, ballum, bataviae, bratislava, canicola, copenhageni, grippotyphosa, hardjo, pomona, pyrogenes, and tarassovi. Fifty-two (11%) sera had antibody titers of greater than or equal to 1:50 against one or more serovars of L. interrogans. The seroprevalence of different serovars in decreasing order was: grippotyphosa, bratislava, autumnalis, canicola, pomona, ballum, pyrogenes, hardjo, and copenhageni. No antibodies were found against australis, bataviae, and tarassovi. These results indicate that L. interrogans infection may occur in wolves of Minnesota.

  10. Leptospira interrogans in Rodents from Cape Verde.

    PubMed

    Plata-Luis, Josué; Foronda, Pilar; Martín-Alonso, Aaron; Feliu, Carlos; Alves, Joana; Gil, Horacio; Valladares, Basilio

    2016-11-01

    Leptospirosis is an important worldwide zoonotic disease that can infect both animals and humans. In most cases, leptospirosis is a nonspecific self-limiting illness, but some patients can develop a severe form with a high mortality. This study was carried out in Santiago Island, Cape Verde, in 2012-2013. A total of 62 wild rodents (Rattus rattus and Mus domesticus) were analyzed. The lipL32 gene, present only in pathogenic Leptospira spp., was amplified by PCR, and 16 samples were positive (25.8%). In both rodent species, Leptospira interrogans was identified. The results show the presence of pathogenic Leptospira in the three localities analyzed in Santiago. The presence of L. interrogans demonstrates a serious health risk for the population, since this species has been associated with the most severe form of leptospirosis, the Weil's disease in humans, a severe infection with jaundice, renal failure, and hemorrhage.

  11. Molecular characterization by LSSP-PCR and DNA sequencing of a pathogenic isolate of Leptospira interrogans from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Cosate, M R V; Barouni, A S; Moreira, E C; Veloso, I F; Gomes, M T R; Salas, C E

    2012-09-01

    We report the initial characterization of a leptospiral isolate, Leptospira interrogans, serogroup Sejroe, serovar Hardjo, genotype Hardjoprajitno, strain Norma, and its relatedness with L. interrogans, serogroup Sejroe, serovar Hardjo, genotype Hardjoprajitno, strain Hardjo and Leptospira borgpetersenii, serogroup Sejroe, serovar Hardjo, genotype Hardjobovis, strain Sponselee. The Norma strain singled out during a leptospirosis outbreak in cattle immunized with antigens from the reference strain Hardjoprajitno (OMS). By applying a microscopic agglutination serological test (MAT) to cattle (n = 2966) with symptoms of leptospirosis between 2003 and 2007, more than 50% of sera were found positive for one of the following serotypes: Hardjoprajitno (31-21%), Hardjo Norma (46-40%), Hardjo hardjobovis (18-10%), Mini (8-4%) and Wolffi (7-4%). In immunization trials using six isolates plus Norma isolate, the remission of MAT in these isolates was observed following 6 months of the initial vaccination. To provide molecular ground for the high MAT Norma frequency found in these isolates, a DNA polymorphic analysis was conducted by comparing the Norma isolate with reference strains Hardjoprajitno and Sponselee. The polymorphic analysis in secY showed five base changes in Norma relative to Hardjoprajitno strain, corresponding to 98% identity, while Sponselee displayed 49 polymorphic sites relative to the Hardjoprajitno strain, representing 80% identity. The alignment of secY translated sequences shows no differences between Hardjoprajitno and Norma, and eight polymorphisms between genotype hardjoprajttno and strain Sponselee. Three-dimensional modelling located these variations within the loop region connecting helices 7 and 8 from secY which is less conserved. DNA sequencing of 23S ribosomal conserved fragment revealed a single polymorphism between Hardjoprajitno and Norma, and 13 polymorphisms between strains Sponselee, Hardjoprajitno and Norma. The differences between

  12. Isolation and characterization of Leptospira interrogans from pigs slaughtered in São Paulo State, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Miraglia, Fabiana; Moreno, Andréa Mike; Gomes, Cleise Ribeiro; Paixão, Renata; Liuson, Esequiel; Morais, Zenaide Maria; Maiorka, Paulo; Seixas, Fabiana Kömmling; Dellagostin, Odir Antonio; Vasconcellos, Silvio Arruda

    2008-01-01

    With the aim of isolating Leptospira spp., blood serum, kidney, liver and genital tract of 137 female swine (40 sows and 97 gilts) and also urine samples from 22 sows were collected in a slaughterhouse in the State of São Paulo, from April 2003 to August 2004. Four isolates were obtained from animals that presented microagglutination test (MAT) titers ≥ 100 for the serovar Pomona and one was obtained from an animal negative by MAT in which Leptospira was isolated from the liver and reproductive tract. The presence of leptospiral DNA was investigated by PCR, and positive results were found in kidneys of 11 females, liver of two, genital tract of two and urine of one of them. Nephrosis, interstitial multifocal nephritis, moderate to severe changing, hyalines cylinders and hemorrhagic focuses, hepatic and uterine horns congestion were histological lesions observed in higher frequency in animals positive for leptospira. The silver impregnation (Warthin Starry) confirmed the presence of spirochetes in renal tubules of four females with positive leptospira cultures from kidneys. The serogroup of the five isolates was identified as Pomona by cross agglutination with reference polyclonal antibodies. Molecular characterization of the isolates was carried out by variable-number tandem-repeats analysis. All the isolates revealed a pattern distinct from the L. interrogans Pomona type strain, but identical to a previously identified pattern from strains isolated in Argentina belonging to serovar Pomona. PMID:24031254

  13. Comparison of Bacterial Burden and Cytokine Gene Expression in Golden Hamsters in Early Phase of Infection with Two Different Strains of Leptospira interrogans.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Rie; Koizumi, Nobuo; Sugiyama, Hiromu; Tomizawa, Rina; Sato, Ryoichi; Ohnishi, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Leptospirosis, a zoonotic infection with worldwide prevalence, is caused by pathogenic spirochaetes of Leptospira spp., and exhibits an extremely broad clinical spectrum in human patients. Although previous studies indicated that specific serovars or genotypes of Leptospira spp. were associated with severe leptospirosis or its outbreak, the mechanism underlying the difference in virulence of the various Leptospira serotypes or genotypes remains unclear. The present study addresses this question by measuring and comparing bacterial burden and cytokine gene expression in hamsters infected with strains of two L. interrogans serovars Manilae (highly virulent) and Hebdomadis (less virulent). The histopathology of kidney, liver, and lung tissues was also investigated in infected hamsters. A significantly higher bacterial burden was observed in liver tissues of hamsters infected with serovar Manilae than those infected with serovar Hebdomadis (p < 0.01). The average copy number of the leptospiral genome was 1,302 and 20,559 in blood and liver, respectively, of hamsters infected with serovar Manilae and 1,340 and 4,896, respectively, in hamsters infected with serovar Hebdomadis. The expression levels of mip1alpha in blood; tgfbeta, il1beta, mip1alpha, il10, tnfalpha and cox2 in liver; and tgfbeta, il6, tnfalpha and cox2 in lung tissue were significantly higher in hamsters infected with serovar Manilae than those infected with serovar Hebdomadis (p < 0.05). In addition, infection with serovar Manilae resulted in a significantly larger number of hamsters with tnfalpha upregulation (p = 0.04). Severe distortion of tubular cell arrangement and disruption of renal tubules in kidney tissues and hemorrhage in lung tissues were observed in Manilae-infected hamsters. These results demonstrate that serovar Manilae multiplied more efficiently in liver tissues and induced significantly higher expression of genes encoding pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines than serovar Hebdomadis

  14. Detecting signals of chronic shedding to explain pathogen persistence: Leptospira interrogans in California sea lions.

    PubMed

    Buhnerkempe, Michael G; Prager, Katherine C; Strelioff, Christopher C; Greig, Denise J; Laake, Jeff L; Melin, Sharon R; DeLong, Robert L; Gulland, Frances M D; Lloyd-Smith, James O

    2017-05-01

    Identifying mechanisms driving pathogen persistence is a vital component of wildlife disease ecology and control. Asymptomatic, chronically infected individuals are an oft-cited potential reservoir of infection, but demonstrations of the importance of chronic shedding to pathogen persistence at the population-level remain scarce. Studying chronic shedding using commonly collected disease data is hampered by numerous challenges, including short-term surveillance that focuses on single epidemics and acutely ill individuals, the subtle dynamical influence of chronic shedding relative to more obvious epidemic drivers, and poor ability to differentiate between the effects of population prevalence of chronic shedding vs. intensity and duration of chronic shedding in individuals. We use chronic shedding of Leptospira interrogans serovar Pomona in California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) as a case study to illustrate how these challenges can be addressed. Using leptospirosis-induced strands as a measure of disease incidence, we fit models with and without chronic shedding, and with different seasonal drivers, to determine the time-scale over which chronic shedding is detectable and the interactions between chronic shedding and seasonal drivers needed to explain persistence and outbreak patterns. Chronic shedding can enable persistence of L. interrogans within the sea lion population. However, the importance of chronic shedding was only apparent when surveillance data included at least two outbreaks and the intervening inter-epidemic trough during which fadeout of transmission was most likely. Seasonal transmission, as opposed to seasonal recruitment of susceptibles, was the dominant driver of seasonality in this system, and both seasonal factors had limited impact on long-term pathogen persistence. We show that the temporal extent of surveillance data can have a dramatic impact on inferences about population processes, where the failure to identify both short- and

  15. Isolation of Leptospira interrogans Hardjoprajitno from vaginal fluid of a clinically healthy ewe suggests potential for venereal transmission.

    PubMed

    Director, A; Penna, B; Hamond, C; Loureiro, A P; Martins, G; Medeiros, M A; Lilenbaum, W

    2014-09-01

    A total of 15 adult ewes from one flock known to be seroreactive for leptospirosis was studied. Urine and vaginal fluid were collected from each animal to test for the presence of leptospires using bacterial culture and conventional PCR methods. One pure culture of Leptospira sp. was obtained from the vaginal fluid sample of a non-pregnant ewe. The isolate was characterized by DNA sequencing of the rrs and secY genes, variable-number of tandem-repeats (VNTR) analysis and serogrouping, and the isolate was typed as Leptospira interrogans serogroup Sejroe serovar Hardjo type Hardjoprajitno. This report indicates the presence of viable Leptospira in the vaginal fluid of a ewe, suggesting the potential for venereal transmission of leptospires in sheep.

  16. Stray dogs as reservoirs of the zoonotic agents Leptospira interrogans, Trypanosoma cruzi, and Aspergillus spp. in an urban area of Chiapas in southern Mexico.

    PubMed

    Jimenez-Coello, Matilde; Ortega-Pacheco, Antonio; Guzman-Marin, Eugenia; Guiris-Andrade, Dario M; Martinez-Figueroa, Laura; Acosta-Viana, Karla Y

    2010-03-01

    This investigation determined the presence and prevalence of the zoonotic agents Leptospira interrogans, Trypanosoma cruzi, and Aspergillus spp. in the stray dog population (a total of 224 stray dogs) in an urban area of Southern Mexico. Blood serum samples were taken from all dogs, and root hair samples were taken from dogs with skin lesions and partial alopecia. IgG antibodies for L. interrogans from 10 serovars were detected using the microscopic agglutination test. Immunofluorescence antibody test and Western blot assay were used for serologic diagnosis of T. cruzi. The Sabouraud medium was used to isolate Aspergillus spp. Prevalence of L. interrogans was 4.9%, which was determined by identifying only serovars Pyrogenes, which accounted for 3.6%, and Tarassovi, which constituted 1.3%, with titers from 1:100 to 1:800. Additionally, T. cruzi antibodies were detected in 4.5% of the dogs. Skin lesions were found in 43% of the dogs (98/224), and 35 cultures were positive for Aspergillus spp. (35.7%, p < 0.05, 95% confidence interval 2.45-3.67), identified as A. niger (82.8%), A. flavus (14.3%), and A. terreus (2.9%). This study demonstrates the presence of certain zoonotic agents (bacteria, protozoa, and fungi) in stray dogs living within the studied area. Dogs play an important role in the transmission of diseases that are potentially harmful to humans. Although the prevalence of canine leptospirosis and trypanosomiasis is not high in Southern Mexico compared with other tropical regions of Mexico, the presence of these zoonotic agents in the stray dog population demonstrates that the stray dog population in this region is a significant reservoir and potential source of infection in humans. Special care should be taken when handling stray dogs that exhibit skin lesions with partial alopecia, since a pathological Aspergillus sp. fungus may be present.

  17. First Observation of Leptospira interrogans in the Lungs of Rattus norvegicus

    PubMed Central

    Belli, Patrick; Artois, Marc; Djelouadji, Zoheira

    2016-01-01

    We report the first two cases of pulmonary presence of leptospires in apparently healthy rats captured in a city park in Lyon (France). Only renal carriage of Leptospira has been described in the literature. Blood serology was performed in parallel with molecular and histological analyses of the kidney and lung samples. We isolated leptospires from the kidneys of two out of three seropositive wild rats. These results were confirmed by specific detection of pathogenic Leptospira by real-time PCR. Moreover, Leptospira DNA was detected in lung tissues. Immunohistochemistry and Warthin-Starry staining revealed that leptospires were present on the surface of the ciliated epithelium of the bronchi. Using PCR of the rrs (16S) gene and Multispacer Sequence Typing, DNA extracts of the kidney and lung were identified as belonging to Leptospira interrogans serovar Icterohaemorrhagiae “CHU Réunion.” This first observation of the presence Leptospira in the lung with simultaneous renal carriage will require further study in future on several target organs to gain a better understanding of the Leptospira infection in wild rat. PMID:27800495

  18. Serologic evidence for selected infectious diseases in Marsican brown bears (Ursus arctos marsicanus) in Italy (2004-09).

    PubMed

    Di Francesco, Cristina Esmeralda; Gentile, Leonardo; Di Pirro, Vincenza; Ladiana, Lara; Tagliabue, Silvia; Marsilio, Fulvio

    2015-01-01

    We tested 30 serum samples collected during 2004-09 from 22 free-ranging Marsican brown bears (Ursus arctos marsicanus) in the National Park of Abruzzo, Lazio, and Molise, Italy, for antibodies against canine distemper virus (CDV), canine adenovirus type 2 (CAV-2), canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV-2), Brucella spp., and eight Leptospira interrogans sensu lato serovars. Antibody to CDV was detected in 11 samples (37%); only two bears (10%) had detectable CAV-2 and Brucella spp. antibodies; three bears were positive for L. interrogans serovar Bratislava; and one sample had antibody against L. interrogans serovar Copenhageni. All samples were positive for CPV-2 antibody. The CPV-2 antibody titers varied from 1∶640 to 1∶10,240, suggesting that transmission was still active. Fifty percent of bears were positive for antibody to two or more pathogens. Our results highlight the need to consider infectious diseases as a potential risk for Marsican brown bear conservation.

  19. Asymptomatic and chronic carriage of Leptospira interrogans serovar Pomona in California sea lions (Zalophus californianus)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Since 1970, periodic outbreaks of leptospirosis, caused by pathogenic spirochetes in the genus Leptospira, have caused morbidity and mortality of California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) along the Pacific coast of North America. Yearly seasonal epizootics of varying magnitude occur between the ...

  20. Severe Leptospira interrogans serovar Icterohaemorrhagiae infection with hepato-renal-pulmonary involvement treated with corticosteroids

    PubMed Central

    Schulze, Marco H; Raschel, Heribert; Langen, Heinz-Jakob; Stich, August; Tappe, Dennis

    2014-01-01

    Key Clinical Message The traditional concept of immediate antibiotic treatment in suspected leptospirosis seems to be especially important for patients up to day 4 of clinical illness. As immune mechanisms probably play a crucial role in advanced leptospirosis with presumed pulmonary hemorrhages, patients might benefit from corticosteroids or other immunosuppressive agents beside antibiotics. PMID:25614810

  1. Isolation and molecular characterization of Leptospira borgpetersenii serovar Hardjo strain Hardjobovis in the urine of naturally infected cattle in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Chideroli, R T; Pereira, U P; Gonçalves, D D; Nakamura, A Y; Alfieri, A A; Alfieri, A F; Freitas, J C

    2016-02-19

    Most epidemiologic studies on bovine leptospirosis are based on serological tests that use antibodies against several serotypes, including the serovar Hardjo, which is widespread and considered to be the most adapted to bovine hosts. However, using only serological studies is not sufficient to identify and distinguish species of leptospires. The aim of this study was report the first isolation in Brazil of two strains serovar Hardjo obtained in urine samples from naturally infected cows in a small Brazilian dairy herd and find the genetic species and consequently the type strain Hardjobovis by molecular characterization. Fifteen dairy cows with a history of reproductive failure, such as abortion and infertility, were selected. Urine samples obtained from each animal were immediately seeded in tubes containing Ellinghausen-McCullough-Johnson-Harris culture medium. The identification of the isolates was performed by Multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) technique and phylogenetic analysis of partial sequence of gene sec Y. From the 15 urine samples evaluated, two Leptospira were found and identified as the Londrina 49 and Londrina 54 strains. The MLVA profiles and sequencing of gene sec Y characterized the isolates as L. borgpetersenii serovar Hardjo strain Hadjobovis because it has different genetic pattern of Leptospira interrogans serovar Hardjo strain Hardjoprajitno. Therefore, more studies are needed including isolation and molecular characterization from regional strains to obtain a better knowledge about epidemiology of serovar Hardjo in bovine which may assist in future strategies of prevention and control of bovine leptospirosis.

  2. Serological survey of leptospirosis in sows with premature birth and stillbirth in Chiba and Gunma prefectures of Japan.

    PubMed

    Kazami, Ayako; Watanabe, Hideki; Hayashi, Tetsu; Kobayashi, Kazuhiko; Ogawa, Yasuki; Yamamoto, Koshi; Adachi, Yoshikazu

    2002-08-01

    In 1996 and 1997, the seroprevalence against Leptospira in parturient sows with premature birth or stillbirth from two herds was investigated. In three out of four sow serum samples obtained in Gunma Prefecture, the antibody titers to Leptospira interrogans serovar copenhageni (M20) were higher than 10,000 (the reciprocal of the serum dilution). Furthermore, the antibody titers to L. interrogans serovar canicola (Hond Utrecht IV) were significantly high in the three sows and the titers ranged from 1,000 to 3,000. In sows obtained in Chiba Prefecture, significantly high antibody titers to serovar copenhageni (M20) were confirmed in eight out of 40 sows, and antibody titers greater than 10,000 in six of them. Significantly high antibody titers to L. interrogans serovar icterohaemorrhagiae (RGA) and L. canicola (Hond Utrecht IV) were confirmed in four and 18 out of the 40 sows, respectively, compared with the titers to the other serovars. These findings may indicate the prevalence of leptospirosis in pig herds in both Gunma and Chiba Prefectures.

  3. New wildlife hosts of Leptospira interrogans in Campeche, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Martínez, Deborah V; Sánchez-Montes, Daniel Sokani; León-Paniagua, Livia; Ríos-Muñoz, César A; Berzunza-Cruz, Miriam; Becker, Ingeborg

    2015-01-01

    Leptospira interrogans has been identified to cause leptospirosis, a widespread zoonotic disease that has been identified in domestic and wild animals. This work analyzed kidneys from two species of wild rodents from the state of Campeche, Mexico. Analyses were made by PCR using specific primers for detection of Leptospira interrogans DNA. The rodent species that tested positive were Heteromys gaumeri and Ototylomys phyllotis, both of which are new hosts for the bacteria in Southeastern Mexico. These records provide new insights into the disease's transmission that should be studied carefully in order to identify other potential host species, including humans, which are at risk of becoming infected if they are in contact with infected wildlife.

  4. NEW WILDLIFE HOSTS OF Leptospira interrogans IN CAMPECHE, MEXICO

    PubMed Central

    ESPINOSA-MARTÍNEZ, Deborah V.; SÁNCHEZ-MONTES, Daniel Sokani; LEÓN-PANIAGUA, Livia; RÍOS-MUÑOZ, César A.; BERZUNZA-CRUZ, Miriam; BECKER, Ingeborg

    2015-01-01

    Leptospira interrogans has been identified to cause leptospirosis, a widespread zoonotic disease that has been identified in domestic and wild animals. This work analyzed kidneys from two species of wild rodents from the state of Campeche, Mexico. Analyses were made by PCR using specific primers for detection of Leptospira interrogans DNA. The rodent species that tested positive were Heteromys gaumeri and Ototylomys phyllotis, both of which are new hosts for the bacteria in Southeastern Mexico. These records provide new insights into the disease’s transmission that should be studied carefully in order to identify other potential host species, including humans, which are at risk of becoming infected if they are in contact with infected wildlife. PMID:25923901

  5. Occurrence of antibodies anti -Toxoplasma gondii, Neospora caninum and Leptospira interrogans in a captive deer herd in Southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Zimpel, Cristina Kraemer; Grazziotin, Ana Laura; de Barros Filho, Ivan Roque; Guimaraes, Ana Marcia de Sa; dos Santos, Leonilda Correia; de Moraes, Wanderlei; Cubas, Zalmir Silvino; de Oliveira, Marcos Jose; Pituco, Edviges Maristela; Lara, Maria do Carmo Custódio de Souza Hunold; Villalobos, Eliana Monteforte Cassaro; Silva, Lília Marcia Paulin; Cunha, Elenice Maria Sequetin; Castro, Vanessa; Biondo, Alexander Welker

    2015-01-01

    A large number of Brazilian zoos keep many endangered species of deer, however, very few disease surveillance studies have been conducted among captive cervids. Blood samples from 32 Brazilian deer (Blastocerus dichotomus, Mazama nana and Mazama americana) kept in captivity at Bela Vista Biological Sanctuary (Foz do Iguaçu, Brazil) were investigated for 10 ruminant pathogens, with the aims of monitoring deer health status and evaluating any potential zoonotic risk. Deer serum samples were tested for Brucella abortus, Leptospira (23 serovars), Toxoplasma gondii, Neospora caninum, bovine viral diarrhea virus, infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus, foot-and-mouth disease virus, western equine encephalitis virus, eastern equine encephalitis virus and Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus. Antibodies against T. gondii (15.6%), N. caninum (6.2%) and L. interrogans serogroup Serjoe (3.1%) were detected. The serological results for all other infectious agents were negative. The deer were considered to be clinically healthy and asymptomatic regarding any disease. Compared with studies on free-ranging deer, the prevalences of the same agents tested among the captive deer kept at the Sanctuary were lower, thus indicating good sanitary conditions and high-quality management practices at the zoo.

  6. Cytotoxic activity and probable apoptotic effect of Sph2, a sphigomyelinase hemolysin from Leptospira interrogans strain Lai.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi-Xuan; Geng, Yan; Yang, Jun-Wei; Guo, Xiao-Kui; Zhao, Guo-Ping

    2008-02-29

    Our previous work confirmed that Sph2/LA1029 was a sphigomyelinase-like hemolyisn of Leptospira interrogans serogroup Icterohaemorrhagiae serovar Lai. Characteristics of both hemolytic and cytotoxic activities of Sph2 were reported in this paper. Sph2 was a heat-labile neutral hemolysin and had similar hemolytic behavior as the typical sphingomyelinase C of Staphylococcus aureus upon sheep erythrocytes. The cytotoxic activity of Sph2 was shown in mammalian cells such as BALB/C mouse lymphocytes and macrophages, as well as human L-02 liver cells. Transmission electron microscopic observation showed that the Sph2 treated BALB/C mouse lymphocytes were swollen and ruptured with membrane breakage. They also demonstrated condensed chromatin as a high-density area. Cytoskeleton changes were observed via fluorescence confocal microscope in Sph2 treated BALB/C mouse lymphocytes and macrophages, where both cytokine IL-1beta and IL-6 were induced. In addition, typical apoptotic morphological features were observed in Sph2 treated L-02 cells via transmission electron microscope and the percentage of apoptotic cells did increase after the Sph2 treatment detected by flow cytometry. Therefore, Sph2 was likely an apoptosis-inducing factor of human L-02 liver cells.

  7. An outbreak of leptospirosis in seals (Phoca vitulina) in captivity.

    PubMed

    Kik, M J L; Goris, M G; Bos, J H; Hartskeerl, R A; Dorrestein, G M

    2006-03-01

    An outbreak of leptospirosis in seals (Phoca vitulina) in captivity is described. In a zoo in The Netherlands 5 adult seals died within 12 days. At necropsy all animals showed signs of acute septicaemia, consistent with acute leptospirosis. Serological examination of one animal was positive for antibodies against Leptospira interrogans serovar Icterohaemorrhagiae and the serologically closely related serovar Copenhageni. Polymerase chain reaction was positive in one other animal. 8 nutria (Myocastor coypus) were examined, serologically, through bacteriological culture and PCR. 81,8% (9/11) were serologically positive for Leptospira. The seals and nutria were housed in the same water system.

  8. Pathogenic Leptospira interrogans Exoproteins Are Primarily Involved in Heterotrophic Processes

    PubMed Central

    Eshghi, Azad; Pappalardo, Elisa; Hester, Svenja; Thomas, Benjamin; Pretre, Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a life-threatening and emerging zoonotic disease with a worldwide annual occurrence of more than 1 million cases. Leptospirosis is caused by spirochetes belonging to the genus Leptospira. The mechanisms of disease manifestation in the host remain elusive, and the roles of leptospiral exoproteins in these processes have yet to be determined. Our aim in this study was to assess the composition and quantity of exoproteins of pathogenic Leptospira interrogans and to construe how these proteins contribute to disease pathogenesis. Label-free quantitative mass spectrometry of proteins obtained from Leptospira spirochetes cultured in vitro under conditions mimicking infection identified 325 exoproteins. The majority of these proteins are conserved in the nonpathogenic species Leptospira biflexa, and proteins involved in metabolism and energy-generating functions were overrepresented and displayed the highest relative abundance in culture supernatants. Conversely, proteins of unknown function, which represent the majority of pathogen-specific proteins (presumably involved in virulence mechanisms), were underrepresented. Characterization of various L. interrogans exoprotein mutants in the animal infection model revealed host mortality rates similar to those of hosts infected with wild-type L. interrogans. Collectively, these results indicate that pathogenic Leptospira exoproteins primarily function in heterotrophic processes (the processes by which organisms utilize organic substances as nutrient sources) to maintain the saprophytic lifestyle rather than the virulence of the bacteria. The underrepresentation of proteins homologous to known virulence factors, such as toxins and effectors in the exoproteome, also suggests that disease manifesting from Leptospira infection is likely caused by a combination of the primary and potentially moonlight functioning of exoproteins. PMID:25987703

  9. Genetic diversity of Leptospira in northwestern Colombia: first report of Leptospira santarosai as a recognised leptospirosis agent

    PubMed Central

    Peláez Sanchez, Ronald Guillermo; Lopez, Juan Álvaro; Pereira, Martha María; Arboleda Naranjo, Margarita; Agudelo-Flórez, Piedad

    2016-01-01

    The region of Antioquia in northeastern Colombia has the highest number of reported leptospirosis cases in the country. It also shows high seroprevalence indexes in the general population and socio-environmental conditions favourable for the transmission of the disease between humans and animals. In this study, 25 Leptospira isolates from Colombia’s Antioquia department were identified to the species level as L. santarosai (12), L. interrogans (9) and L. meyeri (4) using phylogenetic analysis of the Amidohydrolase gene. Typing at the serovar level was performed using multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and monoclonal antibodies. The serovars Canalzonae, Babudieri, Alice, Beye, and Copenhageni have been identified as causing human or animal infections in Antioquia, Colombia. The four environmental isolates were not identified to the serovar level. L. santarosai serovar Canalzonae and Alice were identified as new etiologic agents of human leptospirosis in Antioquia, Colombia. This paper reports species and serovars that were previously unknown in the region. PMID:27982303

  10. Genetic diversity of Leptospira in northwestern Colombia: first report of Leptospira santarosai as a recognised leptospirosis agent.

    PubMed

    Peláez Sanchez, Ronald Guillermo; Lopez, Juan Álvaro; Pereira, Martha María; Arboleda Naranjo, Margarita; Agudelo-Flórez, Piedad

    2016-12-01

    The region of Antioquia in northeastern Colombia has the highest number of reported leptospirosis cases in the country. It also shows high seroprevalence indexes in the general population and socio-environmental conditions favourable for the transmission of the disease between humans and animals. In this study, 25 Leptospira isolates from Colombia's Antioquia department were identified to the species level as L. santarosai (12), L. interrogans (9) and L. meyeri (4) using phylogenetic analysis of the Amidohydrolase gene. Typing at the serovar level was performed using multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and monoclonal antibodies. The serovars Canalzonae, Babudieri, Alice, Beye, and Copenhageni have been identified as causing human or animal infections in Antioquia, Colombia. The four environmental isolates were not identified to the serovar level. L. santarosai serovar Canalzonae and Alice were identified as new etiologic agents of human leptospirosis in Antioquia, Colombia. This paper reports species and serovars that were previously unknown in the region.

  11. Use of luminescent Leptospira interrogans for enumeration in biological assays.

    PubMed

    Murray, Gerald L; King, Amy M; Srikram, Amporn; Sermswan, Rasana W; Adler, Ben

    2010-06-01

    Rapid and reliable in vitro methods for the detection of pathogenic leptospires, such as Leptospira interrogans, are lacking. The present study investigated the use of luminescence to replace the existing enumeration techniques. Transposon TnSC189 was modified to incorporate the luxCDABE cassette from Photorhabdus luminescens and was used to construct luminescent Leptospira spp. There was a linear relationship between luminescence and cell number, with the theoretical detection limit being less than 10(4) leptospires. A comparison of enumeration by a standard method (counting by dark-field microscopy) and enumeration by luminescence was conducted with luminescent L. interrogans. There was a good correlation between the two methods of enumeration (R(2) = 0.766), although variation in the luminescence early and late in growth phase reduced the degree of correlation. To demonstrate the utility of luminescence as a viability and cell number reporter, in vitro assays, including MIC determination, an extracellular matrix binding experiment, and a complement killing experiment, were conducted. In each case, the results obtained by luminescence matched those obtained by traditional means with high correlations (binding assay R(2) = 0.916, complement killing assay R(2) = 0.988). A strain expressing the luxCDABE transposon retained virulence in the hamster model of infection. Despite some variation in luminescence as a result of the growth phase or the particular assay conditions, enumeration by luminescence was found to be a quick, reliable, and highly sensitive method for the in vitro detection of leptospires that has the potential to replace more time-consuming methods of enumeration.

  12. Characterization of two new putative adhesins of Leptospira interrogans.

    PubMed

    Figueredo, Jupciana M; Siqueira, Gabriela H; de Souza, Gisele O; Heinemann, Marcos B; Vasconcellos, Silvio A; Chapola, Erica G B; Nascimento, Ana L T O

    2017-01-01

    We here report the characterization of two novel proteins encoded by the genes LIC11122 and LIC12287, identified in the genome sequences of Leptospira interrogans, annotated, respectively, as a putative sigma factor and a hypothetical protein. The CDSs LIC11122 and LIC12287 have signal peptide SPII and SPI and are predicted to be located mainly at the cytoplasmic membrane of the bacteria. The genes were cloned and the proteins expressed using Escherichia coli. Proteinase K digestion showed that both proteins are surface exposed. Evaluation of interaction of recombinant proteins with extracellular matrix components revealed that they are laminin binding and they were called Lsa19 (LIC11122) and Lsa14 (LIC12287), for Leptospiral-surface adhesin of 19 and 14 kDa, respectively. The bindings were dose-dependent on protein concentration, reaching saturation, fulfilling the ligand-binding criteria. Reactivity of the recombinant proteins with leptospirosis human sera has shown that Lsa19 and, to a lesser extent, Lsa14, are recognized by antibodies, suggesting that, most probably, Lsa19 is expressed during infection. The proteins interact with plasminogen and generate plasmin in the presence of urokinase-type plasminogen activator. Plasmin generation in Leptospira has been associated with tissue penetration and immune evasion strategies. The presence of a sigma factor on the cell surface playing a secondary role, probably mediating host -pathogen interaction, suggests that LIC11122 is a moonlighting protein candidate. Although the biological significance of these putative adhesins will require the generation of mutants, our data suggest that Lsa19 is a potential candidate for future evaluation of its role in adhesion/colonization activities during L. interrogans infection.

  13. Cytotoxic activities of Leptospira interrogans hemolysin SphH as a pore-forming protein on mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seoung Hoon; Kim, Sangduk; Park, Seung Chul; Kim, Min Ja

    2002-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a spirochetal zoonosis that causes an acute febrile systemic illness in humans. Leptospira sp. hemolysins have been shown to be virulence factors for the pathogenesis of leptospirosis. Previously, we cloned a hemolysin SphH of Leptospira interrogans serovar lai, a homologue of L. borgpetersenii sphingomyelinase (SphA), from a genomic library (S. H. Lee, K. A. Kim, Y. K. Kim, I. W. Seong, M. J. Kim, and Y. J. Lee, Gene 254:19-28, 2000). Escherichia coli lysate harboring the sphH showed high hemolytic activities on sheep erythrocytes. However, it neither showed sphingomyelinase nor phospholipase activities, in contrast to SphA which was known to have sphingomyelinase activity. Interestingly, the SphH-mediated hemolysis on erythrocytes was osmotically protected by PEG 5000, suggesting that the SphH might have caused pore formation on the erythrocyte membrane. In the present study, we have prepared the Leptospira hemolysin SphH and investigated its hemolytic and cytotoxic activities on mammalian cells. SphH was shown to be a pore-forming protein on several mammalian cells: When treated with the SphH, the sheep erythrocyte membranes formed pores, which were morphologically confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. Furthermore, the SphH-mediated cytotoxicities on mammalian cells were demonstrated by the release of LDH and by inverted microscopic examinations. Finally, the immune serum against the full-length hemolysin could effectively neutralize the SphH-mediated hemolytic and cytotoxic activities. In conclusion, these results suggest that the virulence of Leptospira SphH was due to the pore formation on mammalian cell membranes.

  14. Characterization of Leptospira isolates from serovar hardjo by ribotyping, arbitrarily primed PCR, and mapped restriction site polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Perolat, P; Merien, F; Ellis, W A; Baranton, G

    1994-08-01

    Leptospira serovar hardjo isolates of the hardjoprajitno and hardjobovis genotypes were characterized by ribotyping, arbitrarily primed PCR (AP-PCR) fingerprinting, and the study of mapped restriction site polymorphisms (MRSPs) in rrs and rrl genes. After restriction of chromosomal DNA with BglII, EcoRI, or HindIII, each genotype was individualized with a distinct ribotype. The fingerprints produced by AP-PCR with seven primers clearly separated the two groups; primers KF and RSP produced species-specific products which assigned hardjoprajitno and hardjobovis isolates to the species L. interrogans sensu stricto and L. borgpetersenii, respectively. Furthermore, AP-PCR fingerprints gave evidence of a considerable genomic heterogeneity at the strain level among the hardjobovis group. Conversely, the hardjoprajitno group was homogeneous. MRSP profiles in ribosomal genes indicated that hardjoprajitno and hardjobovis isolates belonged to L. interrogans MRSP group B and L. borgpetersenii group C, respectively. AP-PCR and determination of MRSPs in ribosomal genes proved to be quick and reliable methods for typing Leptospira strains and for studying intraspecific population structures.

  15. Transcriptional response of Leptospira interrogans to iron limitation and characterization of a PerR homolog

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leptospira interrogans is the causative agent of leptospirosis, a zoonosis of global significance. Iron is essential for growth of most bacterial species. Since availability of iron is low in the host, pathogens have evolved complex iron acquisition mechanisms to survive and establish infection. In ...

  16. Leptospira interrogans catalase is required for resistance to H2O2 and for virulence.

    PubMed

    Eshghi, Azad; Lourdault, Kristel; Murray, Gerald L; Bartpho, Thanatchaporn; Sermswan, Rasana W; Picardeau, Mathieu; Adler, Ben; Snarr, Brendan; Zuerner, Richard L; Cameron, Caroline E

    2012-11-01

    Pathogenic Leptospira spp. are likely to encounter higher concentrations of reactive oxygen species induced by the host innate immune response. In this study, we characterized Leptospira interrogans catalase (KatE), the only annotated catalase found within pathogenic Leptospira species, by assessing its role in resistance to H(2)O(2)-induced oxidative stress and during infection in hamsters. Pathogenic L. interrogans bacteria had a 50-fold-higher survival rate under H(2)O(2)-induced oxidative stress than did saprophytic L. biflexa bacteria, and this was predominantly catalase dependent. We also characterized KatE, the only annotated catalase found within pathogenic Leptospira species. Catalase assays performed with recombinant KatE confirmed specific catalase activity, while protein fractionation experiments localized KatE to the bacterial periplasmic space. The insertional inactivation of katE in pathogenic Leptospira bacteria drastically diminished leptospiral viability in the presence of extracellular H(2)O(2) and reduced virulence in an acute-infection model. Combined, these results suggest that L. interrogans KatE confers in vivo resistance to reactive oxygen species induced by the host innate immune response.

  17. The terminal portion of leptospiral immunoglobulin-like protein LigA confers protective immunity against lethal infection in the hamster model of leptospirosis

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Éverton F.; Medeiros, Marco A.; McBride, Alan J. A.; Matsunaga, Jim; Esteves, Gabriela S.; Ramos, João G. R.; Santos, Cleiton S.; Croda, Júlio; Homma, Akira; Dellagostin, Odir A.; Haake, David A.; Reis, Mitermayer G.; Ko, Albert I.

    2007-01-01

    Subunit vaccines are a potential intervention strategy against leptospirosis, which is a major public health problem in developing countries and a veterinary disease in livestock and companion animals worldwide. Leptospiral immunoglobulin-like (Lig) proteins are a family of surface-exposed determinants that have Ig-like repeat domains found in virulence factors such as intimin and invasin. We expressed fragments of the repeat domain regions of LigA and LigB from Leptospira interrogans serovar Copenhageni. Immunization of Golden Syrian hamsters with Lig fragments in Freund’s adjuvant induced robust antibody responses against recombinant protein and native protein, as detected by ELISA and immunoblot, respectively. A single fragment, LigANI, which corresponds to the six carboxy-terminal Ig-like repeat domains of the LigA molecule, conferred immunoprotection against mortality (67-100%, P <0.05) in hamsters which received a lethal inoculum of L. interrogans serovar Copenhageni. However, immunization with this fragment did not confer sterilizing immunity. These findings indicate that the carboxy-terminal portion of LigA is an immunoprotective domain and may serve as a vaccine candidate for human and veterinary leptospirosis. PMID:17629368

  18. Purification and characterization of a Na+, K+ ATPase inhibitor found in an endotoxin of Leptospira interrogans.

    PubMed Central

    Burth, P; Younes-Ibrahim, M; Gonçalez, F H; Costa, E R; Faria, M V

    1997-01-01

    We showed previously that the glycolipoprotein fraction prepared from Leptospira interrogans inhibited the Na+,K+ ATPase enzyme purified from brain or kidney and in isolated nephron segments (M. Younes-Ibrahim, P. Burth, M. V. Castro Faria, B. Buffin-Meyer, S. Marsy, C. Barlet-Bas, L. Cheval, and A. Doucet, C. R. Acad. Sci. Paris Ser. III 318:619-625, 1995). In the present communication, we have demonstrated that unsaturated fatty acids such as oleic and palmitoleic acids, which are adsorbed to this fraction, are effective inhibitors of the enzyme. PMID:9119504

  19. Generation of mammalian host-adapted Leptospira interrogans by cultivation in peritoneal dialysis membrane chamber implantation in rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leptospira interrogans can infect a myriad of mammalian hosts, including humans (Bharti, Nally et al. 2003, Ko, Goarant et al. 2009). Following acquisition by a suitable host, leptospires disseminate via the bloodstream to multiple tissues, including the kidneys, where they adhere to and colonize th...

  20. A putative regulatory genetic locus modulates virulence in the pathogen Leptospira interrogans.

    PubMed

    Eshghi, Azad; Becam, Jérôme; Lambert, Ambroise; Sismeiro, Odile; Dillies, Marie-Agnès; Jagla, Bernd; Wunder, Elsio A; Ko, Albert I; Coppee, Jean-Yves; Goarant, Cyrille; Picardeau, Mathieu

    2014-06-01

    Limited research has been conducted on the role of transcriptional regulators in relation to virulence in Leptospira interrogans, the etiological agent of leptospirosis. Here, we identify an L. interrogans locus that encodes a sensor protein, an anti-sigma factor antagonist, and two genes encoding proteins of unknown function. Transposon insertion into the gene encoding the sensor protein led to dampened transcription of the other 3 genes in this locus. This lb139 insertion mutant (the lb139(-) mutant) displayed attenuated virulence in the hamster model of infection and reduced motility in vitro. Whole-transcriptome analyses using RNA sequencing revealed the downregulation of 115 genes and the upregulation of 28 genes, with an overrepresentation of gene products functioning in motility and signal transduction and numerous gene products with unknown functions, predicted to be localized to the extracellular space. Another significant finding encompassed suppressed expression of the majority of the genes previously demonstrated to be upregulated at physiological osmolarity, including the sphingomyelinase C precursor Sph2 and LigB. We provide insight into a possible requirement for transcriptional regulation as it relates to leptospiral virulence and suggest various biological processes that are affected due to the loss of native expression of this genetic locus.

  1. Salmonella enterica: Survival, Colonization, and Virulence Differences among Serovars

    PubMed Central

    Andino, A.; Hanning, I.

    2015-01-01

    Data indicate that prevalence of specific serovars of Salmonella enterica in human foodborne illness is not correlated with their prevalence in feed. Given that feed is a suboptimal environment for S. enterica, it appears that survival in poultry feed may be an independent factor unrelated to virulence of specific serovars of Salmonella. Additionally, S. enterica serovars appear to have different host specificity and the ability to cause disease in those hosts is also serovar dependent. These differences among the serovars may be related to gene presence or absence and expression levels of those genes. With a better understanding of serovar specificity, mitigation methods can be implemented to control Salmonella at preharvest and postharvest levels. PMID:25664339

  2. Salmonella enterica: survival, colonization, and virulence differences among serovars.

    PubMed

    Andino, A; Hanning, I

    2015-01-01

    Data indicate that prevalence of specific serovars of Salmonella enterica in human foodborne illness is not correlated with their prevalence in feed. Given that feed is a suboptimal environment for S. enterica, it appears that survival in poultry feed may be an independent factor unrelated to virulence of specific serovars of Salmonella. Additionally, S. enterica serovars appear to have different host specificity and the ability to cause disease in those hosts is also serovar dependent. These differences among the serovars may be related to gene presence or absence and expression levels of those genes. With a better understanding of serovar specificity, mitigation methods can be implemented to control Salmonella at preharvest and postharvest levels.

  3. Leptospira interrogans at the human-wildlife interface in northern Botswana: a newly identified public health threat.

    PubMed

    Jobbins, S E; Sanderson, C E; Alexander, K A

    2014-03-01

    Leptospirosis is the most widespread zoonosis in the world. In northern Botswana, humans live in close proximity to a diversity of wildlife and peridomestic rodents and may be exposed to a variety of zoonotic pathogens. Little is known regarding the occurrence and epidemiology of L. interrogans in Africa despite the recognized global importance of this zoonotic disease and the threat it poses to public health. In Botswana, banded mongooses (Mungos mungo) live in close proximity to humans across protected and unprotected landscapes and may be a useful sentinel species for assessing the occurrence of zoonotic organisms, such as L. interrogans. We utilized PCR to screen banded mongoose kidneys for leptospiral DNA and identified 41.5% prevalence of renal carriage of L. interrogans (exact binomial 95% CI 27.7-56.7%, n = 41). Renal carriage was also detected in one Selous' mongoose (Paracynictis selousi). This is the first published confirmation of carriage of L. interrogans in either species. This is also the first report of L. interrogans occurrence in northern Botswana and the only report of this organism in a wildlife host in the country. Pathogenic Leptospira are usually transmitted indirectly to humans through soil or water contaminated with infected urine. Other avenues, such as direct contact between humans and wildlife, as well as consumption of mongooses and other wildlife as bushmeat, may pose additional exposure risk and must be considered in public health management of this newly identified zoonotic disease threat. There is a critical need to characterize host species involvement and pathogen transmission dynamics, including human-wildlife interactions that may increase human exposure potential and infection risk. We recommend that public health strategy be modified to include sensitization of medical practitioners to the presence of L. interrogans in the region, the potential for human infection, and implementation of clinical screening. This study

  4. Gene inactivation of a chemotaxis operon in the pathogen Leptospira interrogans.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Ambroise; Wong Ng, Jérôme; Picardeau, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    Chemotaxis may have an important role in the infection process of pathogenic Leptospira spp.; however, little is known about the regulation of flagellar-based motility in these atypical bacteria. We generated a library of random transposon mutants of the pathogen L. interrogans, which included a mutant with insertion in the first gene of an operon containing the chemotaxis genes cheA, cheW, cheD, cheB, cheY and mcp. The disrupted gene encodes a putative histidine kinase (HK). The HK mutant was motile and virulent, but swarm plate and capillary assays suggested that chemotaxis was reduced in this mutant. Further analysis of bacterial trajectories by videomicroscopy showed that the ability of this mutant to reverse was significantly impaired in comparison to wild-type strain. Our data therefore show that this operon is required for full chemotaxis of Leptospira spp.

  5. Recovery of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis from hens initially infected with serovar Kentucky

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella enterica serovars Enteritidis and Kentucky differ greatly in epidemiology. We wanted to know if the non-pathogenic serotype Kentucky impacted the recovery of the pathogen Enteritidis from chickens. To explore this issue, 4 groups of hens were treated as follows: i) hens were inoculated or...

  6. Molecular differentiation between Salmonella enterica subsp enterica serovar Pullorum and Salmonella enterica subsp enterica serovar Gallinarum

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Simone Alves Mendes; de Paiva, Jaqueline Boldrin; Zotesso, Fábio; Lemos, Manoel Victor Franco; Berchieri Jánior, Ângelo

    2009-01-01

    S. Pullorum (SP) and S. Gallinarum (SG) are very similar. They are the agents of pullorum disease and fowl typhoid, respectively, and the two diseases are responsible for economic losses in poultry production. Although SP and SG are difficult to be differentiated in routine laboratory procedures, the ability to metabolize ornithine is a biochemical test that may be used to achieve this aim. While SP is able to decarboxylate this amino acid, SG is not. However, the isolation of strains showing atypical biochemical behavior has made this differentiation difficult. One of the genes associated with the metabolization of the amino acid ornithine is called speC, and is found in both serovars. The analysis of 21 SP and 15 SG strains by means of PCR did not enable the differentiation of the two serovars, because fragments produced were identical. However, after enzymatic treatment with restriction enzyme Eco RI, the band pattern of each serovar showed to be different, even in samples of atypical biochemical behavior. This fact enabled the standardization of the technique for a quick and safe differentiation of serovars Pullorum and Gallinarum. PMID:24031341

  7. Genome Sequences of Bacillus thuringiensis Serovar kurstaki Strain BP865 and B. thuringiensis Serovar aizawai Strain HD-133

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Haeyoung

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We report the draft genome sequences of two insecticidal strains against lepidopteran pests, Bacillus thuringiensis serovar kurstaki strain BP865, an isolate from the South Korean phylloplane, and strain HD-133, a reference strain of B. thuringiensis serovar aizawai. PMID:28153898

  8. LruA and LruB, Novel Lipoproteins of Pathogenic Leptospira interrogans Associated with Equine Recurrent Uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Ashutosh; Artiushin, Sergey; Matsunaga, James; Haake, David A.; Timoney, John F.

    2005-01-01

    Recurrent uveitis as a sequela to Leptospira infection is the most common infectious cause of blindness and impaired vision of horses worldwide. Leptospiral proteins expressed during prolonged survival in the eyes of horses with lesions of chronic uveitis were identified by screening a phage library of Leptospira interrogans DNA fragments with eye fluids from uveitic horses. Inserts of reactive phages encoded several known leptospiral proteins and two novel putative lipoproteins, LruA and LruB. LruA was intrinsically labeled during incubation of L. interrogans in medium containing [14C]palmitic acid, confirming that it is a lipoprotein. lruA and lruB were detected by Southern blotting in infectious Leptospira interrogans but not in nonpathogenic Leptospira biflexa. Fractionation data from cultured Leptospira indicate that LruA and LruB are localized in the inner membrane. Uveitic eye fluids contained significantly higher levels of immunoglobulin A (IgA) and IgG specific for each protein than did companion sera, indicating strong local antibody responses. Moreover, LruA- and LruB-specific antisera reacted with equine ocular components, suggesting an immunopathogenic role in leptospiral uveitis. PMID:16239521

  9. Antibodies to Leptospira interrogans in goats and risk factors of the disease in Santa Catarina (West side), Brazil.

    PubMed

    Topazio, Josué; Tonin, Alexandre A; Machado, Gustavo; Noll, Jessica C G; Ribeiro, André; Moura, Anderson B; Carmo, Guilherme M; Grosskopf, Hyolanda M; Martins, Jorge L R; Badke, Manoel R T; Stefani, Lenita M; Lopes, Leandro S; Da Silva, Aleksandro S

    2015-04-01

    Leptospirosis is an infectious disease caused by the bacterium Leptospira spp. In goats, the productive impact of leptospirosis is not well known and totally unknown in Santa Catarina (SC), Brazil. This study aimed to investigate leptospirosis seroprevalence and its risk factors in goats in the west side of SC. A total of 654 blood samples were analyzed using the microscopic agglutination technique and 35.47% (232) of the animals were seropositives. Except for serogroup Autumnalis, positive samples for all other serogroups were found as follows: Sejroe (Hardjo, Wolffi), Grippotyphosa (Grippotyphosa), Canicola (Canicola), Icterohaemorrhagiae (Icterohaemorrhagiae, Copenhageni), Australis (Australis, Bratislava) and Pomona (Pomona). The contact among sheep and goats, and the addition of concentrate as food supplement were found to be risk factors for leptospirosis. Based on these results, we conclude that there is a high occurrence of anti-Leptospira antibodies in goats in the Western part of Santa Catarina State.

  10. Generation of Mammalian Host-adapted Leptospira interrogans by Cultivation in Peritoneal Dialysis Membrane Chamber Implantation in Rats.

    PubMed

    Grassmann, André Alex; McBride, Alan John Alexander; Nally, Jarlath E; Caimano, Melissa J

    2015-07-20

    Leptospira interrogans can infect a myriad of mammalian hosts, including humans (Bharti et al., 2003; Ko et al., 2009). Following acquisition by a suitable host, leptospires disseminate via the bloodstream to multiple tissues, including the kidneys, where they adhere to and colonize the proximal convoluted renal tubules (Athanazio et al., 2008). Infected hosts shed large number of spirochetes in their urine and the leptospires can survive in different environmental conditions before transmission to another host. Differential gene expression by Leptospira spp. permits adaption to these new conditions. Here we describe a protocol for the cultivation of Leptospira interrogans within Dialysis Membrane Chambers (DMCs) implanted into the peritoneal cavities of Sprague-Dawley rats (Caimano et al., 2014). This technique was originally developed to study mammalian adaption by the Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi (Akins et al., 1998; Caimano, 2005). The small pore size (8,000 MWCO) of the dialysis membrane tubing used for this procedure permits access to host nutrients but excludes host antibodies and immune effector cells. Given the physiological and environmental similarities between DMCs and the proximal convoluted renal tubule, we reasoned that the DMC model would be suitable for studying in vivo gene expression by L. interrogans. In a 20 to 30 min procedure, DMCs containing virulent leptospires are surgically-implanted into the rat peritoneal cavity. Nine to 11 days post-implantation, DMCs are explanted and organisms recovered. Typically, a single DMC yields ~10(9) mammalian host-adapted leptospires (Caimano et al., 2014). In addition to providing a facile system for studying the transcriptional and physiologic changes pathogenic L. interrogans undergo within the mammal, the DMC model also provides a rationale basis for selecting new targets for mutagenesis and the identification of novel virulence determinants. Caution: Leptospira interrogans is a BSL-2

  11. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies on 2-dehydro-3-deoxygalactarate aldolase from Leptospira interrogans

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xu; Huang, Hua; Song, Xiaomin; Wang, Yanli; Xu, Hang; Teng, Maikun; Gong, Weimin

    2006-01-01

    2-Dehydro-3-deoxygalactarate (DDG) aldolase is a member of the class II aldolase family and plays an important role in the pyruvate-metabolism pathway, catalyzing the reversible aldol cleavage of DDG to pyruvate and tartronic semialdehyde. As it is a potential novel antibiotic target, it is necessary to elucidate the catalytic mechanism of DDG aldolase. To determine the crystal structure, crystals of DDG aldolase from Leptospira interrogans were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals diffracted to 2.2 Å resolution using a Cu Kα rotating-anode X-ray source. The crystal belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 293.5, b = 125.6, c = 87.6 Å, β = 100.9°. The V M is calculated to be 2.4 Å3 Da−1, assuming there to be 12 protein molecules in the asymmetric unit. PMID:17142914

  12. A Highly Stable Plastidic-Type Ferredoxin-NADP(H) Reductase in the Pathogenic Bacterium Leptospira interrogans

    PubMed Central

    Catalano-Dupuy, Daniela L.; Musumeci, Matías A.; López-Rivero, Arleth; Ceccarelli, Eduardo A.

    2011-01-01

    Leptospira interrogans is a bacterium that is capable of infecting animals and humans, and its infection causes leptospirosis with a range of symptoms from flu-like to severe illness and death. Despite being a bacteria, Leptospira interrogans contains a plastidic class ferredoxin-NADP(H) reductase (FNR) with high catalytic efficiency, at difference from the bacterial class FNRs. These flavoenzymes catalyze the electron transfer between NADP(H) and ferredoxins or flavodoxins. The inclusion of a plastidic FNR in Leptospira metabolism and in its parasitic life cycle is not currently understood. Bioinformatic analyses of the available genomic and proteins sequences showed that the presence of this enzyme in nonphotosynthetic bacteria is restricted to the Leptospira genus and that a [4Fe-4S] ferredoxin (LB107) encoded by the Leptospira genome may be the natural substrate of the enzyme. Leptospira FNR (LepFNR) displayed high diaphorase activity using artificial acceptors and functioned as a ferric reductase. LepFNR displayed cytochrome c reductase activity with the Leptospira LB107 ferredoxin with an optimum at pH 6.5. Structural stability analysis demonstrates that LepFNR is one of the most stable FNRs analyzed to date. The persistence of a native folded LepFNR structure was detected in up to 6 M urea, a condition in which the enzyme retains 38% activity. In silico analysis indicates that the high LepFNR stability might be due to robust interactions between the FAD and the NADP+ domains of the protein. The limited bacterial distribution of plastidic class FNRs and the biochemical and structural properties of LepFNR emphasize the uniqueness of this enzyme in the Leptospira metabolism. Our studies show that in L. interrogans a plastidic-type FNR exchanges electrons with a bacterial-type ferredoxin, process which has not been previously observed in nature. PMID:22039544

  13. Genome-Wide Transcriptional Start Site Mapping and sRNA Identification in the Pathogen Leptospira interrogans

    PubMed Central

    Zhukova, Anna; Fernandes, Luis Guilherme; Hugon, Perrine; Pappas, Christopher J.; Sismeiro, Odile; Coppée, Jean-Yves; Becavin, Christophe; Malabat, Christophe; Eshghi, Azad; Zhang, Jun-Jie; Yang, Frank X.; Picardeau, Mathieu

    2017-01-01

    Leptospira are emerging zoonotic pathogens transmitted from animals to humans typically through contaminated environmental sources of water and soil. Regulatory pathways of pathogenic Leptospira spp. underlying the adaptive response to different hosts and environmental conditions remains elusive. In this study, we provide the first global Transcriptional Start Site (TSS) map of a Leptospira species. RNA was obtained from the pathogen Leptospira interrogans grown at 30°C (optimal in vitro temperature) and 37°C (host temperature) and selectively enriched for 5′ ends of native transcripts. A total of 2865 and 2866 primary TSS (pTSS) were predicted in the genome of L. interrogans at 30 and 37°C, respectively. The majority of the pTSSs were located between 0 and 10 nucleotides from the translational start site, suggesting that leaderless transcripts are a common feature of the leptospiral translational landscape. Comparative differential RNA-sequencing (dRNA-seq) analysis revealed conservation of most pTSS at 30 and 37°C. Promoter prediction algorithms allow the identification of the binding sites of the alternative sigma factor sigma 54. However, other motifs were not identified indicating that Leptospira consensus promoter sequences are inherently different from the Escherichia coli model. RNA sequencing also identified 277 and 226 putative small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) at 30 and 37°C, respectively, including eight validated sRNAs by Northern blots. These results provide the first global view of TSS and the repertoire of sRNAs in L. interrogans. These data will establish a foundation for future experimental work on gene regulation under various environmental conditions including those in the host. PMID:28154810

  14. Fitness of Salmonella enterica serovar Thompson in the cilantro phyllosphere.

    PubMed

    Brandl, Maria T; Mandrell, Robert E

    2002-07-01

    The epiphytic fitness of Salmonella enterica was assessed on cilantro plants by using a strain of S. enterica serovar Thompson that was linked to an outbreak resulting from cilantro. Salmonella serovar Thompson had the ability to colonize the surface of cilantro leaves, where it was detected by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) at high densities on the veins and in natural lesions. The population sizes of two common colonizers of plant surfaces, Pantoea agglomerans and Pseudomonas chlororaphis, were 10-fold higher than that of the human pathogen on cilantro incubated at 22 degrees C. However, Salmonella serovar Thompson achieved significantly higher population levels and accounted for a higher proportion of the total culturable bacterial flora on cilantro leaves when the plants were incubated at warm temperatures, such as 30 degrees C, after inoculation, indicating that the higher growth rates exhibited by Salmonella serovar Thompson at warm temperatures may increase the competitiveness of this organism in the phyllosphere. The tolerance of Salmonella serovar Thompson to dry conditions on plants at 60% relative humidity was at least equal to that of P. agglomerans and P. chlororaphis. Moreover, after exposure to low humidity on cilantro, Salmonella serovar Thompson recovered under high humidity to achieve its maximum population size in the cilantro phyllosphere. Visualization by CLSM of green fluorescent protein-tagged Salmonella serovar Thompson and dsRed-tagged P. agglomerans inoculated onto cilantro revealed that the human pathogen and the bacterial epiphyte formed large heterogeneous aggregates on the leaf surface. Our studies support the hypothesis that preharvest contamination of crops by S. enterica plays a role in outbreaks linked to fresh fruits and vegetables.

  15. Complete genome sequence of Leptospira alstonii serovar room 22, strain GWTS#1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report the complete genome sequence of Leptospira alstonii serovar room 22 strain GWTS#1. This is the first isolate of L. alstonii to be cultured from a mammal, in Western Europe, and represents a new serovar of pathogenic leptospires....

  16. Leptospira interrogans lpxD Homologue Is Required for Thermal Acclimatization and Virulence.

    PubMed

    Eshghi, Azad; Henderson, Jeremy; Trent, M Stephen; Picardeau, Mathieu

    2015-11-01

    Leptospirosis is an emerging disease with an annual occurrence of over 1 million human cases worldwide. Pathogenic Leptospira bacteria are maintained in zoonotic cycles involving a diverse array of mammals, with the capacity to survive outside the host in aquatic environments. Survival in the diverse environments encountered by Leptospira likely requires various adaptive mechanisms. Little is known about Leptospira outer membrane modification systems, which may contribute to the capacity of these bacteria to successfully inhabit and colonize diverse environments and animal hosts. Leptospira bacteria carry two genes annotated as UDP-3-O-[3-hydroxymyristoyl] glucosamine N-acyltransferase genes (la0512 and la4326 [lpxD1 and lpxD2]) that in other bacteria are involved in the early steps of biosynthesis of lipid A, the membrane lipid anchor of lipopolysaccharide. Inactivation of only one of these genes, la0512/lpxD1, imparted sensitivity to the host physiological temperature (37°C) and rendered the bacteria avirulent in an animal infection model. Polymyxin B sensitivity assays revealed compromised outer membrane integrity in the lpxD1 mutant at host physiological temperature, but structural analysis of lipid A in the mutant revealed only minor changes in the lipid A moiety compared to that found in the wild-type strain. In accordance with this, an in trans complementation restored the phenotypes to a level comparable to that of the wild-type strain. These results suggest that the gene annotated as lpxD1 in Leptospira interrogans plays an important role in temperature adaptation and virulence in the animal infection model.

  17. Adipose tissue is the first colonization site of Leptospira interrogans in subcutaneously infected hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Ozuru, Ryo; Saito, Mitsumasa; Kanemaru, Takaaki; Miyahara, Satoshi; Villanueva, Sharon Y. A. M.; Murray, Gerald L.; Adler, Ben; Fujii, Jun; Yoshida, Shin-ichi

    2017-01-01

    Leptospirosis is one of the most widespread zoonoses in the world, and its most severe form in humans, “Weil’s disease,” may lead to jaundice, hemorrhage, renal failure, pulmonary hemorrhage syndrome, and sometimes,fatal multiple organ failure. Although the mechanisms underlying jaundice in leptospirosis have been gradually unraveled, the pathophysiology and distribution of leptospires during the early stage of infection are not well understood. Therefore, we investigated the hamster leptospirosis model, which is the accepted animal model of human Weil’s disease, by using an in vivo imaging system to observe the whole bodies of animals infected with Leptospira interrogans and to identify the colonization and growth sites of the leptospires during the early phase of infection. Hamsters, infected subcutaneously with 104 bioluminescent leptospires, were analyzed by in vivo imaging, organ culture, and microscopy. The results showed that the luminescence from the leptospires spread through each hamster’s body sequentially. The luminescence was first detected at the injection site only, and finally spread to the central abdomen, in the liver area. Additionally, the luminescence observed in the adipose tissue was the earliest detectable compared with the other organs, indicating that the leptospires colonized the adipose tissue at the early stage of leptospirosis. Adipose tissue cultures of the leptospires became positive earlier than the blood cultures. Microscopic analysis revealed that the leptospires colonized the inner walls of the blood vessels in the adipose tissue. In conclusion, this is the first study to report that adipose tissue is an important colonization site for leptospires, as demonstrated by microscopy and culture analyses of adipose tissue in the hamster model of Weil’s disease. PMID:28245231

  18. Leptospira interrogans lpxD Homologue Is Required for Thermal Acclimatization and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Eshghi, Azad; Henderson, Jeremy; Trent, M. Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Leptospirosis is an emerging disease with an annual occurrence of over 1 million human cases worldwide. Pathogenic Leptospira bacteria are maintained in zoonotic cycles involving a diverse array of mammals, with the capacity to survive outside the host in aquatic environments. Survival in the diverse environments encountered by Leptospira likely requires various adaptive mechanisms. Little is known about Leptospira outer membrane modification systems, which may contribute to the capacity of these bacteria to successfully inhabit and colonize diverse environments and animal hosts. Leptospira bacteria carry two genes annotated as UDP-3-O-[3-hydroxymyristoyl] glucosamine N-acyltransferase genes (la0512 and la4326 [lpxD1 and lpxD2]) that in other bacteria are involved in the early steps of biosynthesis of lipid A, the membrane lipid anchor of lipopolysaccharide. Inactivation of only one of these genes, la0512/lpxD1, imparted sensitivity to the host physiological temperature (37°C) and rendered the bacteria avirulent in an animal infection model. Polymyxin B sensitivity assays revealed compromised outer membrane integrity in the lpxD1 mutant at host physiological temperature, but structural analysis of lipid A in the mutant revealed only minor changes in the lipid A moiety compared to that found in the wild-type strain. In accordance with this, an in trans complementation restored the phenotypes to a level comparable to that of the wild-type strain. These results suggest that the gene annotated as lpxD1 in Leptospira interrogans plays an important role in temperature adaptation and virulence in the animal infection model. PMID:26283339

  19. Development of Leptospira in vitro potency assays: EU/industry experience and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Klaasen, H L B M; van der Veen, M; Molkenboer, M J C H; Bruderer, U

    2013-09-01

    Nobivac® Lepto (MSD Animal Health) is a non-adjuvanted canine leptospirosis vaccine containing inactivated whole cells of Leptospira interrogans serogroup Canicola serovar Portlandvere and L. interrogans serogroup Icterohaemorrhagiae serovar Copenhageni. The current standard in vivo potency test is a hamster challenge test associated with major drawbacks such as animal suffering and poor reproducibility. Here, the quantification of antigenic mass by ELISA as a new in vitro potency test is described, supporting the 3Rs concept (replacement, reduction, and refinement of animal tests) and in accordance with European Pharmacopoeia Monograph 0447 (Canine Leptospirosis Vaccine [Inactivated]). The two corresponding sandwich ELISAs are based on monoclonal antibodies specific for immunodominant leptospiral lipopolysaccharide epitopes. Protection in passive immunization experiments demonstrate that these monoclonal antibodies recognize key protective antigens in currently licensed human and veterinary whole cell Leptospira vaccines. The high precision and robustness renders the two ELISAs much more reliable correlates of potency in dogs than the hamster potency test. The recent approval of these assays for a new canine leptospirosis vaccine is an important contribution to the 3Rs in quality control testing of Leptospira vaccines.

  20. Draft genome of the Leptospira interrogans strains, Acegua, RCA, Prea, and Capivara, obtained from wildlife maintenance hosts and infected domestic animals

    PubMed Central

    Kremer, Frederico S; Eslabão, Marcus R; Jorge, Sérgio; Oliveira, Natasha R; Labonde, Julia; Santos, Monize NP; Monte, Leonardo G; Grassmann, André A; Cunha, Carlos EP; Forster, Karine M; Moreno, Luísa Z; Moreno, Andrea M; Campos, Vinicius F; McBride, Alan JA; Pinto, Luciano S; Dellagostin, Odir A

    2016-01-01

    In the present paper, we announce new draft genomes of four Leptospira interrogans strains named Acegua, RCA, Prea, and Capivara. These strains were isolated in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, from cattle, dog, Brazilian guinea pig, and capybara, respectively. PMID:27074260

  1. Draft genome of the Leptospira interrogans strains, Acegua, RCA, Prea, and Capivara, obtained from wildlife maintenance hosts and infected domestic animals.

    PubMed

    Kremer, Frederico S; Eslabão, Marcus R; Jorge, Sérgio; Oliveira, Natasha R; Labonde, Julia; Santos, Monize N P; Monte, Leonardo G; Grassmann, André A; Cunha, Carlos E P; Forster, Karine M; Moreno, Luísa Z; Moreno, Andrea M; Campos, Vinicius F; McBride, Alan J A; Pinto, Luciano S; Dellagostin, Odir A

    2016-04-01

    In the present paper, we announce new draft genomes of four Leptospira interrogans strains named Acegua, RCA, Prea, and Capivara. These strains were isolated in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, from cattle, dog, Brazilian guinea pig, and capybara, respectively.

  2. Protective Immunity and Reduced Renal Colonization Induced by Vaccines Containing Recombinant Leptospira interrogans Outer Membrane Proteins and Flagellin Adjuvant

    PubMed Central

    Monaris, D.; Sbrogio-Almeida, M. E.; Dib, C. C.; Canhamero, T. A.; Souza, G. O.; Vasconcellos, S. A.; Ferreira, L. C. S.

    2015-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a global zoonotic disease caused by different Leptospira species, such as Leptospira interrogans, that colonize the renal tubules of wild and domestic animals. Thus far, attempts to develop effective leptospirosis vaccines, both for humans and animals, have failed to induce immune responses capable of conferring protection and simultaneously preventing renal colonization. In this study, we evaluated the protective immunity induced by subunit vaccines containing seven different recombinant Leptospira interrogans outer membrane proteins, including the carboxy-terminal portion of the immunoglobulinlike protein A (LigAC) and six novel antigens, combined with aluminum hydroxide (alum) or Salmonella flagellin (FliC) as adjuvants. Hamsters vaccinated with the different formulations elicited high antigen-specific antibody titers. Immunization with LigAC, either with alum or flagellin, conferred protective immunity but did not prevent renal colonization. Similarly, animals immunized with LigAC or LigAC coadministered with six leptospiral proteins with alum adjuvant conferred protection but did not reduce renal colonization. In contrast, immunizing animals with the pool of seven antigens in combination with flagellin conferred protection and significantly reduced renal colonization by the pathogen. The present study emphasizes the relevance of antigen composition and added adjuvant in the efficacy of antileptospirosis subunit vaccines and shows the complex relationship between immune responses and renal colonization by the pathogen. PMID:26108285

  3. Protective Immunity and Reduced Renal Colonization Induced by Vaccines Containing Recombinant Leptospira interrogans Outer Membrane Proteins and Flagellin Adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Monaris, D; Sbrogio-Almeida, M E; Dib, C C; Canhamero, T A; Souza, G O; Vasconcellos, S A; Ferreira, L C S; Abreu, P A E

    2015-08-01

    Leptospirosis is a global zoonotic disease caused by different Leptospira species, such as Leptospira interrogans, that colonize the renal tubules of wild and domestic animals. Thus far, attempts to develop effective leptospirosis vaccines, both for humans and animals, have failed to induce immune responses capable of conferring protection and simultaneously preventing renal colonization. In this study, we evaluated the protective immunity induced by subunit vaccines containing seven different recombinant Leptospira interrogans outer membrane proteins, including the carboxy-terminal portion of the immunoglobulinlike protein A (LigA(C)) and six novel antigens, combined with aluminum hydroxide (alum) or Salmonella flagellin (FliC) as adjuvants. Hamsters vaccinated with the different formulations elicited high antigen-specific antibody titers. Immunization with LigA(C), either with alum or flagellin, conferred protective immunity but did not prevent renal colonization. Similarly, animals immunized with LigA(C) or LigA(C) coadministered with six leptospiral proteins with alum adjuvant conferred protection but did not reduce renal colonization. In contrast, immunizing animals with the pool of seven antigens in combination with flagellin conferred protection and significantly reduced renal colonization by the pathogen. The present study emphasizes the relevance of antigen composition and added adjuvant in the efficacy of antileptospirosis subunit vaccines and shows the complex relationship between immune responses and renal colonization by the pathogen.

  4. Il-10 deficient mice express IFN-γ mRNA and clear Leptospira interrogans from their kidneys more rapidly than normal C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Devlin, Amy A; Halvorsen, Priya J; Miller, Jennifer C; Laster, Scott M

    2017-02-10

    Leptospira interrogans (L. interrogans), the causative agent of leptospirosis, is a widespread zoonotic spirochete that lives a dual lifestyle. L. interrogans infects mice, rats, and wildlife in a persistent and asymptomatic fashion, while also causing productive and acute infections in other mammals such as humans and hamsters. Infections in humans can be fatal, accompanied by a cytokine storm and shock-like symptoms. Production of IL-10 has been noted in both rodent and human infections which has led a number of investigators to hypothesize that IL-10 plays a role in the pathogenesis of this disease. To test this hypothesis we have compared bacteremia and the cytokine response of normal and IL-10 deficient C57Bl/6 mice following ip infection with L. interrogans. In normal mice bacterial 16s mRNA was detected in both lung and kidney tissues within a day after infection. Levels of 16s mRNA then dropped in both organs with complete elimination from the lung by day 3 but persistence in the kidney for 7days after infection. In contrast, in IL-10 deficient mice, the organism was eliminated more rapidly from the kidney. We found that infection of both control and IL-10 deficient mice produced similar levels of a number of pro-inflammatory cytokine mRNAs. On the other hand, IFN-γ mRNA was only induced in IL-10 deficient mice. These results support the hypothesis that L. interrogans ability to induce IL-10, which in turn prevents production of IFN-γ and inhibits T cell immunity, may contribute to the persistent growth of this microorganism in the murine kidney.

  5. Specificity of Salmonella Typhimurium strain (ATCC 14028) growth responses to Salmonella serovar-generated spent media.

    PubMed

    Calo, Juliany Rivera; Park, Si Hong; Baker, Christopher A; Ricke, Steven C

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica is one of the most prevalent pathogens responsible for foodborne illness worldwide. Numerous Salmonella serovars have been associated with the consumption of a variety of products, and limiting food-borne illness due to Salmonella serovars is a continuing problem for food producers and public health. The emergence and prevalence of Salmonella serovars has been studied but the predominant serovars have varied somewhat over the years. The aims of this research were to compare the aerobic growth responses of selected predominant foodborne Salmonella serovars, and evaluate how the spent media from different serovars affects the growth of a well-characterized Salmonella Typhimurium strain. Growth responses were similar for most strains in spent media except for S. Typhimurium (ATCC 14028), which exhibited a decrease in growth in the presence of Salmonella Heidelberg (ARI-14) spent media. This research will provide a better understanding of the growth differences among several Salmonella serovars in nutrient limited spent media.

  6. Multiple activities of LigB potentiate virulence of Leptospira interrogans: inhibition of alternative and classical pathways of complement.

    PubMed

    Choy, Henry A

    2012-01-01

    Microbial pathogens acquire the immediate imperative to avoid or counteract the formidable defense of innate immunity as soon as they overcome the initial physical barriers of the host. Many have adopted the strategy of directly disrupting the complement system through the capture of its components, using proteins on the pathogen's surface. In leptospirosis, pathogenic Leptospira spp. are resistant to complement-mediated killing, in contrast to the highly vulnerable non-pathogenic strains. Pathogenic L. interrogans uses LenA/LfhA and LcpA to respectively sequester and commandeer the function of two regulators, factor H and C4BP, which in turn bind C3b or C4b to interrupt the alternative or classical pathways of complement activation. LigB, another surface-proximal protein originally characterized as an adhesin binding multiple host proteins, has other activities suggesting its importance early in infection, including binding extracellular matrix, plasma, and cutaneous repair proteins and inhibiting hemostasis. In this study, we used a recent model of ectopic expression of LigB in the saprophyte, L. biflexa, to test the hypothesis that LigB also interacts with complement proteins C3b and C4b to promote the virulence of L. interrogans. The surface expression of LigB partially rescued the non-pathogen from killing by 5% normal human serum, showing 1.3- to 48-fold greater survival 4 to 6 d following exposure to complement than cultures of the non-expressing parental strain. Recombinant LigB7'-12 comprising the LigB-specific immunoglobulin repeats binds directly to human complement proteins, C3b and C4b, with respective K(d)s of 43±26 nM and 69±18 nM. Repeats 9 to 11, previously shown to contain the binding domain for fibronectin and fibrinogen, are also important in LigB-complement interactions, which interfere with the alternative and classical pathways measured by complement-mediated hemolysis of erythrocytes. Thus, LigB is an adaptable interface for L. interrogans

  7. Method for the detection of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis

    DOEpatents

    Agron, Peter G.; Andersen, Gary L.; Walker, Richard L.

    2008-10-28

    Described herein is the identification of a novel Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis locus that serves as a marker for DNA-based identification of this bacterium. In addition, three primer pairs derived from this locus that may be used in a nucleotide detection method to detect the presence of the bacterium are also disclosed herein.

  8. High-Throughput Parallel Sequencing to Measure Fitness of Leptospira interrogans Transposon Insertion Mutants during Acute Infection

    PubMed Central

    Matsunaga, James; Haake, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic species of Leptospira are the causative agents of leptospirosis, a zoonotic disease that causes mortality and morbidity worldwide. The understanding of the virulence mechanisms of Leptospira spp is still at an early stage due to the limited number of genetic tools available for this microorganism. The development of random transposon mutagenesis in pathogenic strains a decade ago has contributed to the identification of several virulence factors. In this study, we used the transposon sequencing (Tn-Seq) technique, which combines transposon mutagenesis with massive parallel sequencing, to study the in vivo fitness of a pool of Leptospira interrogans mutants. We infected hamsters with a pool of 42 mutants (input pool), which included control mutants with insertions in four genes previously analyzed by virulence testing (loa22, ligB, flaA1, and lic20111) and 23 mutants with disrupted signal transduction genes. We quantified the mutants in different tissues (blood, kidney and liver) at 4 days post-challenge by high-throughput sequencing and compared the frequencies of mutants recovered from tissues to their frequencies in the input pool. Control mutants that were less fit in the Tn-Seq experiment were attenuated for virulence when tested separately in the hamster model of lethal leptospirosis. Control mutants with unaltered fitness were as virulent as the wild-type strain. We identified two mutants with the transposon inserted in the same putative adenylate/guanylate cyclase gene (lic12327) that had reduced in vivo fitness in blood, kidney and liver. Both lic12327 mutants were attenuated for virulence when tested individually in hamsters. Growth of the control mutants and lic12327 mutants in culture medium were similar to that of the wild-type strain. These results demonstrate the feasibility of screening large pools of L. interrogans transposon mutants for those with altered fitness, and potentially attenuated virulence, by transposon sequencing. PMID

  9. High-Throughput Parallel Sequencing to Measure Fitness of Leptospira interrogans Transposon Insertion Mutants during Acute Infection.

    PubMed

    Lourdault, Kristel; Matsunaga, James; Haake, David A

    2016-11-01

    Pathogenic species of Leptospira are the causative agents of leptospirosis, a zoonotic disease that causes mortality and morbidity worldwide. The understanding of the virulence mechanisms of Leptospira spp is still at an early stage due to the limited number of genetic tools available for this microorganism. The development of random transposon mutagenesis in pathogenic strains a decade ago has contributed to the identification of several virulence factors. In this study, we used the transposon sequencing (Tn-Seq) technique, which combines transposon mutagenesis with massive parallel sequencing, to study the in vivo fitness of a pool of Leptospira interrogans mutants. We infected hamsters with a pool of 42 mutants (input pool), which included control mutants with insertions in four genes previously analyzed by virulence testing (loa22, ligB, flaA1, and lic20111) and 23 mutants with disrupted signal transduction genes. We quantified the mutants in different tissues (blood, kidney and liver) at 4 days post-challenge by high-throughput sequencing and compared the frequencies of mutants recovered from tissues to their frequencies in the input pool. Control mutants that were less fit in the Tn-Seq experiment were attenuated for virulence when tested separately in the hamster model of lethal leptospirosis. Control mutants with unaltered fitness were as virulent as the wild-type strain. We identified two mutants with the transposon inserted in the same putative adenylate/guanylate cyclase gene (lic12327) that had reduced in vivo fitness in blood, kidney and liver. Both lic12327 mutants were attenuated for virulence when tested individually in hamsters. Growth of the control mutants and lic12327 mutants in culture medium were similar to that of the wild-type strain. These results demonstrate the feasibility of screening large pools of L. interrogans transposon mutants for those with altered fitness, and potentially attenuated virulence, by transposon sequencing.

  10. A Novel Shigella dysenteriae Serovar Isolated in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Melito, P. L.; Woodward, D. L.; Munro, J.; Walsh, J.; Foster, R.; Tilley, P.; Paccagnella, A.; Isaac-Renton, J.; Ismail, J.; Ng, L. K.

    2005-01-01

    The etiological agent most commonly associated with bacillary dysentery is Shigella. As part of its mandate, the Bacteriology and Enteric Disease Program of Health Canada identifies and serotypes unusual isolates of Shigella received from provincial laboratories of public health. In this report, six unusual isolates from three provinces were analyzed biochemically and serologically using slide and tube agglutinations and molecularly using standard pulsed-filed gel electrophoresis (PFGE), PCR, and PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) techniques. All six isolates were identical. PFGE analysis grouped these strains; biochemically, they were mannitol negative and consistent with the profile of Shigella. Serologically, these strains produced weak reactions in Shigella dysenteriae serovars 4 and 16 and Escherichia coli O159 and O173 antisera. Molecular serotyping by PCR-RFLP of the rfb gene produced an S. dysenteriae serovar 2/E. coli O112ac pattern. They were positive by PCR for ipaH and ial enteroinvasive genes but negative for all other genes tested. Antiserum was prepared from one of the isolates and tested against Shigella and E. coli reference strains as well as the other isolates. The antiserum reacted with the five remaining isolates and showed cross-reactivity with S. dysenteriae serovars 1, 4, and 16; Shigella flexneri type 3; and E. coli O118, O159, O168, O172, and O173 antigens. Absorbing the sera with E. coli O159 and S. dysenteriae serovar 4 antigen removed all cross-reactions and only slightly reduced the homologous titer. Based on biochemical, molecular, and complete serological analysis, we propose that these six isolates represent a new provisional serovar of S. dysenteriae, type strain BEDP 02-5104. PMID:15695673

  11. Identification of genes associated with survival of salmonellaenterica serovar enteridis in chicken egg albumen

    SciTech Connect

    Clavijo, Raul I.; Loui, Cindy; Andersen, Gary L.; Riley, Lee W.; Lu, Sangwei

    2005-07-13

    Salmonella enterica consists of over 2,000 serovars that aremajor causes of morbidity and mortality associated with contaminatedfood. Despite similarities among serovars of Salmonella enterica, manydemonstrate unique host specificities, epidemiological characteristics,and clinical manifestations. One of the unique epidemiologicalcharacteristics of the serovar Enteritidis is that it is the onlybacterium routinely transmitted to humans through intact chicken eggs.Therefore, Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis must be able topersist inside chicken eggs to be transmitted to humans, and its survivalin egg is important for its transmission to the human population. Theability of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis to survive in andtransmit through eggs may have contributed to its drastically increasedprevalence in the 1980s and 1990s. In the present study, usingtransposon-mediated mutagenesis, we have identified genes important forthe association of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis with chickeneggs. Our results indicate that genes involved in cell wall structuraland functional integrity, and nucleic acid and amino acid metabolism areimportant for Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis to persist in eggalbumen. Two regions unique toSalmonella enterica serovar Enteritidiswere also identified, one of which enhanced the survival of a Salmonellaenterica serovar Typhimurium isolate in egg albumen. The implication ofour results to the serovar specificity of Salmonella enterica is alsoexplored in the present study.

  12. A live attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium vaccine provides cross-protection against Salmonella serovars to reduce disease severity and pathogen transmission

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A live attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium vaccine was developed to confer broad protection against multiple Salmonella serovars to prevent disease and reduce pathogen colonization and shedding. Two vaccine trials were performed in swine to determine the protection afforded by the vac...

  13. Comparative genomics of Salmonella enterica serovars Derby and Mbandaka, two prevalent serovars associated with different livestock species in the UK

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite the frequent isolation of Salmonella enterica sub. enterica serovars Derby and Mbandaka from livestock in the UK and USA little is known about the biological processes maintaining their prevalence. Statistics for Salmonella isolations from livestock production in the UK show that S. Derby is most commonly associated with pigs and turkeys and S. Mbandaka with cattle and chickens. Here we compare the first sequenced genomes of S. Derby and S. Mbandaka as a basis for further analysis of the potential host adaptations that contribute to their distinct host species distributions. Results Comparative functional genomics using the RAST annotation system showed that predominantly mechanisms that relate to metabolite utilisation, in vivo and ex vivo persistence and pathogenesis distinguish S. Derby from S. Mbandaka. Alignment of the genome nucleotide sequences of S. Derby D1 and D2 and S. Mbandaka M1 and M2 with Salmonella pathogenicity islands (SPI) identified unique complements of genes associated with host adaptation. We also describe a new genomic island with a putative role in pathogenesis, SPI-23. SPI-23 is present in several S. enterica serovars, including S. Agona, S. Dublin and S. Gallinarum, it is absent in its entirety from S. Mbandaka. Conclusions We discovered a new 37 Kb genomic island, SPI-23, in the chromosome sequence of S. Derby, encoding 42 ORFS, ten of which are putative TTSS effector proteins. We infer from full-genome synonymous SNP analysis that these two serovars diverged, between 182kya and 625kya coinciding with the divergence of domestic pigs. The differences between the genomes of these serovars suggest they have been exposed to different stresses including, phage, transposons and prolonged externalisation. The two serovars possess distinct complements of metabolic genes; many of which cluster into pathways for catabolism of carbon sources. PMID:23725633

  14. Live imaging of bioluminescent leptospira interrogans in mice reveals renal colonization as a stealth escape from the blood defenses and antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Ratet, Gwenn; Veyrier, Frédéric J; Fanton d'Andon, Martine; Kammerscheit, Xavier; Nicola, Marie-Anne; Picardeau, Mathieu; Boneca, Ivo G; Werts, Catherine

    2014-12-01

    Leptospira (L.) interrogans are bacteria responsible for a worldwide reemerging zoonosis. Some animals asymptomatically carry L. interrogans in their kidneys and excrete bacteria in their urine, which contaminates the environment. Humans are infected through skin contact with leptospires and develop mild to severe leptospirosis. Previous attempts to construct fluorescent or bioluminescent leptospires, which would permit in vivo visualization and investigation of host defense mechanisms during infection, have been unsuccessful. Using a firefly luciferase cassette and random transposition tools, we constructed bioluminescent chromosomal transformants in saprophytic and pathogenic leptospires. The kinetics of leptospiral dissemination in mice, after intraperitoneal inoculation with a pathogenic transformant, was tracked by bioluminescence using live imaging. For infective doses of 106 to 107 bacteria, we observed dissemination and exponential growth of leptospires in the blood, followed by apparent clearance of bacteria. However, with 2×108 bacteria, the septicemia led to the death of mice within 3 days post-infection. In surviving mice, one week after infection, pathogenic leptospires reemerged only in the kidneys, where they multiplied and reached a steady state, leading to a sustained chronic renal infection. These experiments reveal that a fraction of the leptospiral population escapes the potent blood defense, and colonizes a defined number of niches in the kidneys, proportional to the infective dose. Antibiotic treatments failed to eradicate leptospires that colonized the kidneys, although they were effective against L. interrogans if administered before or early after infection. To conclude, mice infected with bioluminescent L. interrogans proved to be a novel model to study both acute and chronic leptospirosis, and revealed that, in the kidneys, leptospires are protected from antibiotics. These bioluminescent leptospires represent a powerful new tool to

  15. Emergence of novel Leptospira serovars: a need for adjusting vaccination policies for dogs?

    PubMed

    Arent, Z J; Andrews, S; Adamama-Moraitou, K; Gilmore, C; Pardali, D; Ellis, W A

    2013-06-01

    A total of 855 sera from dogs in Greece were tested for antibodies to strains belonging to the Pomona, Grippotyphosa and Australis serogroups of Leptospira to assess exposure levels to these serogroups, possible associations with clinical disease and to evaluate whether these findings support the inclusion of additional serovars in dog vaccines. Antibodies were detected in 110 (12·9%) dogs. The highest seroprevalence (4·9%) was to the proposed novel serovar Altodouro belonging to the Pomona serogroup. This serovar also showed a statistically significant association with clinical disease. Serovar Bratislava antibodies were found in 3·4% of sera. Consideration should be given to the inclusion of serovars belonging to the Pomona serogroup and serovar Bratislava in future dog vaccines for the Greek market.

  16. Draft Genome Sequences of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovars Typhimurium and Nottingham Isolated from Food Products

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jie; Ayers, Sherry; Melka, David C.; Curry, Phillip E.; Payne, Justin S.; Laasri, Anna; Wang, Charles; Hammack, Thomas S.; Brown, Eric W.

    2016-01-01

    A quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) designed to detect Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis, targeting the sdf gene, generated positive results for S. enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium (CFSAN033950) and S. enterica subsp. enterica serovar Nottingham (CFSAN006803) isolated from food samples. Both strains show pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns distinct from those of S. Enteritidis. Here, we report the genome sequences of these two strains. PMID:27445384

  17. Aspartic Peptide Hydrolases in Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Rachel A.; Knox, Tina M.; Miller, Charles G.

    2001-01-01

    Two well-characterized enzymes in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Escherichia coli are able to hydrolyze N-terminal aspartyl (Asp) dipeptides: peptidase B, a broad-specificity aminopeptidase, and peptidase E, an Asp-specific dipeptidase. A serovar Typhimurium strain lacking both of these enzymes, however, can still utilize most N-terminal Asp dipeptides as sources of amino acids, and extracts of such a strain contain additional enzymatic activities able to hydrolyze Asp dipeptides. Here we report two such activities from extracts of pepB pepE mutant strains of serovar Typhimurium identified by their ability to hydrolyze Asp-Leu. Although each of these activities hydrolyzes Asp-Leu at a measurable rate, the preferred substrates for both are N-terminal isoAsp peptides. One of the activities is a previously characterized isoAsp dipeptidase from E. coli, the product of the iadA gene. The other is the product of the serovar Typhimurium homolog of E. coli ybiK, a gene of previously unknown function. This gene product is a member of the N-terminal nucleophile structural family of amidohydrolases. Like most other members of this family, the mature enzyme is generated from a precursor protein by proteolytic cleavage and the active enzyme is a heterotetramer. Based on its ability to hydrolyze an N-terminal isoAsp tripeptide as well as isoAsp dipeptides, the enzyme appears to be an isoAsp aminopeptidase, and we propose that the gene encoding it be designated iaaA (isoAsp aminopeptidase). A strain lacking both IadA and IaaA in addition to peptidase B and peptidase E has been constructed. This strain utilizes Asp-Leu as a leucine source, and extracts of this strain contain at least one additional, as-yet-uncharacterized, peptidase able to cleave Asp dipeptides. PMID:11325937

  18. Aspartic peptide hydrolases in Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Larsen, R A; Knox, T M; Miller, C G

    2001-05-01

    Two well-characterized enzymes in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Escherichia coli are able to hydrolyze N-terminal aspartyl (Asp) dipeptides: peptidase B, a broad-specificity aminopeptidase, and peptidase E, an Asp-specific dipeptidase. A serovar Typhimurium strain lacking both of these enzymes, however, can still utilize most N-terminal Asp dipeptides as sources of amino acids, and extracts of such a strain contain additional enzymatic activities able to hydrolyze Asp dipeptides. Here we report two such activities from extracts of pepB pepE mutant strains of serovar Typhimurium identified by their ability to hydrolyze Asp-Leu. Although each of these activities hydrolyzes Asp-Leu at a measurable rate, the preferred substrates for both are N-terminal isoAsp peptides. One of the activities is a previously characterized isoAsp dipeptidase from E. coli, the product of the iadA gene. The other is the product of the serovar Typhimurium homolog of E. coli ybiK, a gene of previously unknown function. This gene product is a member of the N-terminal nucleophile structural family of amidohydrolases. Like most other members of this family, the mature enzyme is generated from a precursor protein by proteolytic cleavage and the active enzyme is a heterotetramer. Based on its ability to hydrolyze an N-terminal isoAsp tripeptide as well as isoAsp dipeptides, the enzyme appears to be an isoAsp aminopeptidase, and we propose that the gene encoding it be designated iaaA (isoAsp aminopeptidase). A strain lacking both IadA and IaaA in addition to peptidase B and peptidase E has been constructed. This strain utilizes Asp-Leu as a leucine source, and extracts of this strain contain at least one additional, as-yet-uncharacterized, peptidase able to cleave Asp dipeptides.

  19. Evaluation of Molecular Methods for Identification of Salmonella Serovars

    PubMed Central

    Gurnik, Simone; Ahmad, Aaminah; Blimkie, Travis; Murphy, Stephanie A.; Kropinski, Andrew M.; Nash, John H. E.

    2016-01-01

    Classification by serotyping is the essential first step in the characterization of Salmonella isolates and is important for surveillance, source tracking, and outbreak detection. To improve detection and reduce the burden of salmonellosis, several rapid and high-throughput molecular Salmonella serotyping methods have been developed. The aim of this study was to compare three commercial kits, Salm SeroGen (Salm Sero-Genotyping AS-1 kit), Check&Trace (Check-Points), and xMAP (xMAP Salmonella serotyping assay), to the Salmonella genoserotyping array (SGSA) developed by our laboratory. They were assessed using a panel of 321 isolates that represent commonly reported serovars from human and nonhuman sources globally. The four methods correctly identified 73.8% to 94.7% of the isolates tested. The methods correctly identified 85% and 98% of the clinically important Salmonella serovars Enteritidis and Typhimurium, respectively. The methods correctly identified 75% to 100% of the nontyphoidal, broad host range Salmonella serovars, including Heidelberg, Hadar, Infantis, Kentucky, Montevideo, Newport, and Virchow. The sensitivity and specificity of Salmonella serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis ranged from 85% to 100% and 99% to 100%, respectively. It is anticipated that whole-genome sequencing will replace serotyping in public health laboratories in the future. However, at present, it is approximately three times more expensive than molecular methods. Until consistent standards and methodologies are deployed for whole-genome sequencing, data analysis and interlaboratory comparability remain a challenge. The use of molecular serotyping will provide a valuable high-throughput alternative to traditional serotyping. This comprehensive analysis provides a detailed comparison of commercial kits available for the molecular serotyping of Salmonella. PMID:27194688

  20. Occurrence of Salmonella enterica serovar Dublin in Austria.

    PubMed

    Allerberger, F; Liesegang, A; Grif, K; Prager, R; Danzl, J; Höck, F; Ottl, J; Dierich, M P; Berghold, C; Neckstaller, I; Tschäpe, H; Fisher, I

    2002-04-01

    In Austria, Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Dublin, a bovine-adapted serovar, rarely causes infections in humans. In 2000, Austria was within the European mean with an incidence of 0.1 per million inhabitants. Our data show that the vast majority of all serovar Dublin infections (human and non-human) can be traced epidemiologically to two districts in the Tyrol. This concentration of cases can be explained by a particularly traditional aspect of cattle farming in this area, the alpine pasture. There is an increased risk of cross infection due to the communal keeping of animals from various farms. Infected cattle are a source of infection for humans, and transmission usually occurs from eating beef and drinking cows milk. Using pulsed field gel electrophoresis and automated ribotyping, three out of five isolates from human infections could be traced to characteristic Tyrolean Dublin clones. Bacteriological screening for faecal carriage before the transfer of cattle from risk-herds to the alpine pastures and before the return from risk-pastures to the farms would be a possible starting point to prevent cross-contamination of large mixed herds and contamination of pasture through latently infected cattle. Appropriate research is necessary.

  1. Occurrence of Salmonella enterica serovar Dublin in Austria.

    PubMed

    Allerberger, Franz; Liesegang, Almut; Grif, Katharina; Khaschabi, Daryusch; Prager, Rita; Danzl, Johann; Höck, Franz; Ottl, Josef; Dierich, Manfred P; Berghold, Christian; Neckstaller, Ingeborg; Tschäpe, Helmut; Fisher, Ian

    2003-01-01

    In Austria, Salmonella enterica serovar Dublin, a bovine-adapted serovar, rarely causes human infections. In the year 2000, Austria was within the European mean with an incidence of 0.1 per million inhabitants. Our data show that the vast majority of all Austrian serovar Dublin infections can be traced to two Tyrolian districts. This concentration of cases can be explained by a particularly traditional aspect of cattle farming in Tyrol, the alpine pasture. There is increased risk of cross-infection due to the communal keeping of animals from various farms. Infected cattle are a source of infection for people, and contagion usually occurs from eating beef and drinking cow's milk. Using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and automated ribotyping, 3 out of 5 available isolates from human infections could be traced to characteristic Tyrolian S. Dublin clones. Bacteriological screening of herds with a known history of S. Dublin infection would be a start to prevent future contamination of alpine pastures through latently infected cattle excreting potentially infectious feces. Bacteriological screening for fecal carriage before the return of cattle from pastures known to be connected with infections could prevent cross-contamination of large mixed herds.

  2. A Unique Capsule Locus in the Newly Designated Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae Serovar 16 and Development of a Diagnostic PCR Assay.

    PubMed

    Bossé, Janine T; Li, Yanwen; Sárközi, Rita; Gottschalk, Marcelo; Angen, Øystein; Nedbalcova, Katerina; Rycroft, Andrew N; Fodor, László; Langford, Paul R

    2017-03-01

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae causes pleuropneumonia, an economically significant lung disease of pigs. Recently, isolates of A. pleuropneumoniae that were serologically distinct from the previously characterized 15 serovars were described, and a proposal was put forward that they comprised a new serovar, serovar 16. Here we used whole-genome sequencing of the proposed serovar 16 reference strain A-85/14 to confirm the presence of a unique capsular polysaccharide biosynthetic locus. For molecular diagnostics, primers were designed from the capsule locus of strain A-85/14, and a PCR was formulated that differentiated serovar 16 isolates from all 15 known serovars and other common respiratory pathogenic/commensal bacteria of pigs. Analysis of the capsule locus of strain A-85/14 combined with the previous serological data show the existence of a sixteenth serovar-designated serovar 16-of A. pleuropneumoniae.

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Give, Isolated from an Imported Chili Powder Product.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua; Chen, Yi; Ayers, Sherry; Melka, David; Laasri, Anna; Payne, Justin S; Zheng, Jie; Son, Insook; Timme, Ruth; Kastanis, George; Hammack, Thomas S; Strain, Errol; Allard, Marc W; Evans, Peter S; Brown, Eric W

    2015-07-02

    We report the genome sequence of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Give (CFSAN012622), isolated from imported chili powder in 2014. This genome contains genes previously reported to be specific only to S. enterica serovar Enteritidis. This strain shows a unique pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) pattern clustering with serovar Enteritidis (JEG X01.0005).

  4. Draft Genome Sequences of 40 Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Strains Isolated from Humans and Food in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Fernanda; Medeiros, Marta Inês Cazentini; Rodrigues, Dália Prazeres; Payne, Justin; Timme, Ruth E.

    2016-01-01

    Salmonellosis is an important health problem worldwide and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is one of the most common isolated serovars. Here, we reported the draft genomes of 40 S. Typhimurium strains isolated from humans and food in Brazil. These draft genomes will improve phylogenetic analysis and will help enhance our understanding of strains of this serovar isolated in Brazil. PMID:27660768

  5. Draft Genome Sequences of 40 Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Strains Isolated from Humans and Food in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Fernanda; Medeiros, Marta Inês Cazentini; Rodrigues, Dália Prazeres; Payne, Justin; Timme, Ruth E; Allard, Marc W; Falcão, Juliana Pfrimer

    2016-09-22

    Salmonellosis is an important health problem worldwide and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is one of the most common isolated serovars. Here, we reported the draft genomes of 40 S Typhimurium strains isolated from humans and food in Brazil. These draft genomes will improve phylogenetic analysis and will help enhance our understanding of strains of this serovar isolated in Brazil.

  6. Complete Genome Sequence of Leptospira alstonii Serovar Room22 Strain GWTS #1

    PubMed Central

    Bayles, Darrell O.; Hurley, Daniel; Fanning, Séamus; McMahon, Barry J.; Arent, Zbigniew

    2016-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequence of Leptospira alstonii serovar Room22 strain GWTS #1. This is the first isolate of L. alstonii to be cultured from a mammal and in western Europe, and it represents a new serovar of pathogenic leptospires. PMID:27834698

  7. Genome-scale screening and validation of targets for identification of Salmonella enterica and serovar prediction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella enterica is the most common foodborne pathogen worldwide, with a great diversity of 2500 recognized serovars. Detection of S. enterica and its classification into serovars are essential for food safety surveillance and clinical diagnosis. Recently, the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) meth...

  8. Complete Genome Sequence of Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Bacteriophage f18SE, Isolated in Chile

    PubMed Central

    Segovia, Cristopher; Vasquez, Ignacio; Maracaja-Coutinho, Vinicius; Robeson, James

    2015-01-01

    Bacteriophage f18SE was isolated from poultry sewage in Olmue, Chile, and lytic activity was demonstrated against Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis and serovar Pullorum strains. This bacteriophage has a 41,868-bp double-stranded DNA (ds-DNA) genome encoding 53 coding sequences (CDSs) and belongs to the family Siphoviridae, subfamily Jerseyvirinae. PMID:26450716

  9. Differences in attachment of Salmonella enterica serovars to cabbage and lettuce leaves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study investigated the ability of five Salmonella enterica serovars to attach to and colonize intact and cut lettuce (Iceberg, Romaine) and cabbage surfaces. Biofilm assay and attachment of Salmonella serovars to intact and cut leaves were determined. Bacterial populations of loosely and strong...

  10. Development of Hamster Models for Acute and Chronic Infections with Leptospira borgpetersenii serovar Hardjo

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Golden Syrian hamster is frequently used as a small animal model to study acute leptospirosis. However, use of this small animal model to study Leptospira borgpetersenii serovar Hardjo infections has not been well documented. Cattle are the normal maintenance hosts of L. borgpetersenii serovar...

  11. Features of Two New Proteins with OmpA-Like Domains Identified in the Genome Sequences of Leptospira interrogans

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Aline F.; de Morais, Zenaide M.; Kirchgatter, Karin; Romero, Eliete C.; Vasconcellos, Silvio A.; Nascimento, Ana Lucia T. O.

    2015-01-01

    Leptospirosis is an acute febrile disease caused by pathogenic spirochetes of the genus Leptospira. It is considered an important re-emerging infectious disease that affects humans worldwide. The knowledge about the mechanisms by which pathogenic leptospires invade and colonize the host remains limited since very few virulence factors contributing to the pathogenesis of the disease have been identified. Here, we report the identification and characterization of two new leptospiral proteins with OmpA-like domains. The recombinant proteins, which exhibit extracellular matrix-binding properties, are called Lsa46 - LIC13479 and Lsa77 - LIC10050 (Leptospiral surface adhesins of 46 and 77 kDa, respectively). Attachment of Lsa46 and Lsa77 to laminin was specific, dose dependent and saturable, with KD values of 24.3 ± 17.0 and 53.0 ± 17.5 nM, respectively. Lsa46 and Lsa77 also bind plasma fibronectin, and both adhesins are plasminogen (PLG)-interacting proteins, capable of generating plasmin (PLA) and as such, increase the proteolytic ability of leptospires. The proteins corresponding to Lsa46 and Lsa77 are present in virulent L. interrogans L1-130 and in saprophyte L. biflexa Patoc 1 strains, as detected by immunofluorescence. The adhesins are recognized by human leptospirosis serum samples at the onset and convalescent phases of the disease, suggesting that they are expressed during infection. Taken together, our data could offer valuable information to the understanding of leptospiral pathogenesis. PMID:25849456

  12. [Salmonella serovars isolated in Turkey up to the end of year 2011].

    PubMed

    Töreci, Kurtuluş; Erdem, Birsel; Ongen, Betigül

    2013-07-01

    Bacteria in Salmonella genus are separated into more than 2600 serovars. It is important that the isolated serovars and their sources are known in a certain country. This will help the identification of new Salmonella serovars that will be isolated later on. Since there is no Salmonella reference center in Turkey, Salmonella serovars isolated in Turkey were mainly reported by the articles of Aksoycan's manuscripts in various years, and in the list of Töreci and Anğ in 1991. The aim of this meta-analysis was to detect and prepare a list for all the Salmonella serovars isolated from human and non-human samples in Turkey up to the end of 2011. In creating this serovar list, libraries, personal and institutional archives, theses, publication lists, books published after scientific meetings and congresses, and international and local periodicals have been explored, and members of Turkish Microbiology Society are communicated via the web site of the society and personal e-mail addresses, and their publications regarding Salmonella serovars were requested. The list also includes the modifications on the names and antigenic formulae of the serovars that were carried out in recent years. The number of serovars isolated in Turkey up to the end of 2011 is 129. Fifty three of them were isolated from humans, 38 from humans and non-human samples, and 38 from non-human samples. The total number of serovars isolated from humans is 91. Twenty seven serovars from serogrup 0:4 (B); 23 serovars from serogrup 0:7 (C1); 25 serovars from serogrup 0:8 (C2-C3); 16 serovars from serogrup 0:9 (D1); 8 serovars from serogrup 0:3,10 (E1) and 5 serovars from serogrup 0:28 (M) have been reported. Only two of the more than 2600 serovars known were isolated firstly in Turkey: S. Istanbul (8:z10: e,n,x) in 1969 and S. Adana (43:z10:1,5) in 1977. Previously, serovars containing 1 and 25 O antigen of S. Boecker ([1],6,14,[25]) were isolated in 1967 and 1971 for the first time in Turkey. In 1967, a

  13. Characterization of a Monoclonal Antibody Directed against Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium and Serovar [4,5,12:i:−] ▿

    PubMed Central

    Rementeria, A.; Vivanco, A. B.; Ramirez, A.; Hernando, F. L.; Bikandi, J.; Herrera-León, S.; Echeita, A.; Garaizar, J.

    2009-01-01

    Flagellar extracts of Salmonella enterica serovars expressing phase 2 H1 antigenic complex (H:1,2, H:1,5, H:1,6, and H:1,7) and a mutant flagellin obtained by site-directed mutagenesis of the fljB gene from serovar Typhimurium at codon 218, transforming threonine to alanine, expressed in Escherichia coli (fljB218A) were used to analyze the H1 antigenic complex. Cross-reactions were detected by Western blotting and dot blotting using commercial polyclonal antibodies against the different wild-type extracts and mutant FljB218A. Therefore, we produced a monoclonal antibody (MAb), 23D4, isotyped as immunoglobulin M, against H:1,2 S. enterica serovar Typhimurium flagellin. The mutant flagellin was not recognized by this MAb. When a large number of phase 1 and phase 2 flagellin antigens of different serovars were used to characterize the 23D4 MAb, only extracts of serovars Typhimurium and [4,5,12:i:−] reacted. The protein composition of phase 1 and phase 2 extracts and highly purified H:1,2 flagellin from serovar Typhimurium strain LT2 and extract of strain 286 (serovar [4,5,12:i:−]), which reacted with the MAb, was studied. Phase 2 flagellin (FljBH:1,2) was detected in phase 1 and phase 2 flagellar heat extracts of serovar Typhimurium and was the single protein identified in all spots of purified H:1,2 flagellin. FliC, FlgK, and other proteins were detected in some immunoreactive spots and in the flagellar extract of serovar [4,5,12:i:−]. Immunoelectron microscopy of complete bacteria with 23D4 showed MAb attachment at the base of flagella, although the MAb failed to recognize the filament of flagella. Nevertheless, the results obtained by the other immunological tests (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, Western blotting, and dot blotting) indicate a reaction against flagellins. The epitopes could also be shared by other proteins on spots where FljB is not present, such as aminopeptidase B, isocitrate lyase, InvE, EF-TuA, enolase, DnaK, and others. In conclusion

  14. Complete Genome and Methylome Sequences of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Panama (ATCC 7378) and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Sloterdijk (ATCC 15791)

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Kuan; Muruvanda, Tim; Roberts, Richard J.; Payne, Justin; Allard, Marc W.

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica spp. are pathogenic bacteria commonly associated with food-borne outbreaks in human and animals. Salmonella enterica spp. are characterized into more than 2,500 different serotypes, which makes epidemiological surveillance and outbreak control more difficult. In this report, we announce the first complete genome and methylome sequences from two Salmonella type strains associated with food-borne outbreaks, Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Panama (ATCC 7378) and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Sloterdijk (ATCC 15791). PMID:26988049

  15. Complete Genome and Methylome Sequences of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Panama (ATCC 7378) and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Sloterdijk (ATCC 15791).

    PubMed

    Yao, Kuan; Muruvanda, Tim; Roberts, Richard J; Payne, Justin; Allard, Marc W; Hoffmann, Maria

    2016-03-17

    Salmonella enterica spp. are pathogenic bacteria commonly associated with food-borne outbreaks in human and animals. Salmonella enterica spp. are characterized into more than 2,500 different serotypes, which makes epidemiological surveillance and outbreak control more difficult. In this report, we announce the first complete genome and methylome sequences from two Salmonella type strains associated with food-borne outbreaks, Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Panama (ATCC 7378) and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Sloterdijk (ATCC 15791).

  16. Hemagglutinating activity of serovar reference strains of Ornithobacterium rhinotracheale.

    PubMed

    Vega, Vicente; Zepeda, Andrea; Ramírez, Saúl; Morales, Vladimir; Fernández, Pomposo; de Oca, Roberto Montes; Guerra-Infante, Fernando M; de Jesús de Haro-Cruz, María; Blackall, Patrick J; Soriano, Edgardo V

    2008-05-01

    In the present study, the hemagglutinating activity of 9 reference strains (serovars A-I) of Ornithobacterium rhinotracheale was investigated by using fresh erythrocytes from 15 different species: chicken (broiler, rooster, hen), turkey, pigeon, quail, duck, Harris hawk (Parabuteo unicinctus), house finch (Carpodacus mexicanus), cow, sheep, horse, dog, rabbit, pig, human (groups A, B, AB, and O), and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). All 9 strains agglutinated rabbit erythrocytes. None of the strains was able to agglutinate hen, cow, horse, or rainbow trout erythrocytes. The number of positive reactions among the remaining species varied. Results indicate that the use of rabbit erythrocytes is better suited for testing the hemagglutinating activity of O. rhinotracheale.

  17. Gonococcal infection in Edinburgh and Newcastle: serovar prevalence in relation to clinical features and sexual orientation.

    PubMed Central

    Ross, J D; Wardropper, A; Sprott, M; Moyes, A; Young, H

    1994-01-01

    AIMS--The variable distribution of gonococcal serovars in different areas is well recognised but the factors that are important determinants of serovar prevalence are less clear. The aim of this study was to identify relevant clinical variables by comparing serovar prevalence in two cities over the same time period. METHODS--A prospective analysis of serovar prevalence was made between January and December 1992 in Edinburgh and Newcastle with respect to age, sex, sexual orientation, antibiotic sensitivity and presence of symptoms. RESULTS--224 infective episodes of gonorrhoea were studied. The serovar distribution varied between the two cities with serovar 1B-1 being more common in Edinburgh (20/91 cf. 4/133, p < 0.01) and serovar 1B-6 more common in Newcastle (26/133 cf. 2/91, p < 0.01). Serovar 1A-2 was associated with heterosexual infection (35/114 in heterosexuals cf. 0/85 in homosexuals, p < 0.01) and was more sensitive to penicillin than average (39/39 1A-2 strains highly penicillin sensitive cf. 98/184 for all other strains, p < 0.01) whilst 1B-6 was mostly acquired through homosexual contact (22/26 cf. 63/142 for all other strains, p < 0.01) and tended to show reduced penicillin susceptibility (13/28 1B-6 strains less penicillin sensitive cf. 45/195 for all other strains, p < 0.01). Infection with serovar 1A-2 was significantly less often symptomatic in heterosexuals than average (15/33 asymptomatic 1A-2 infections cf. 17/59 for all other serovars, p = 0.015). Subgroup analysis of male heterosexual infections confirms an association between asymptomatic infection and serovar 1A-2 (2/14 asymptomatic 1A-2 infections cf. 1/72 for all other serovars, p = 0.02). The distribution of infections over the year differed between the cities. CONCLUSIONS--A variety of factors including penicillin sensitivity and virulence may be important in determining the prevalence of gonococcal serovars within a given area. PMID:8300098

  18. A Unique Capsule Locus in the Newly Designated Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae Serovar 16 and Development of a Diagnostic PCR Assay

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanwen; Sárközi, Rita; Gottschalk, Marcelo; Angen, Øystein; Nedbalcova, Katerina; Rycroft, Andrew N.; Fodor, László

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae causes pleuropneumonia, an economically significant lung disease of pigs. Recently, isolates of A. pleuropneumoniae that were serologically distinct from the previously characterized 15 serovars were described, and a proposal was put forward that they comprised a new serovar, serovar 16. Here we used whole-genome sequencing of the proposed serovar 16 reference strain A-85/14 to confirm the presence of a unique capsular polysaccharide biosynthetic locus. For molecular diagnostics, primers were designed from the capsule locus of strain A-85/14, and a PCR was formulated that differentiated serovar 16 isolates from all 15 known serovars and other common respiratory pathogenic/commensal bacteria of pigs. Analysis of the capsule locus of strain A-85/14 combined with the previous serological data show the existence of a sixteenth serovar—designated serovar 16—of A. pleuropneumoniae. PMID:28053219

  19. Infection of Mice by Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Involves Additional Genes That Are Absent in the Genome of Serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Cecilia A.; Blondel, Carlos J.; Quezada, Carolina P.; Porwollik, Steffen; Andrews-Polymenis, Helene L.; Toro, Cecilia S.; Zaldívar, Mercedes; Contreras, Inés

    2012-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis causes a systemic, typhoid-like infection in newly hatched poultry and mice. In the present study, a library of 54,000 transposon mutants of S. Enteritidis phage type 4 (PT4) strain P125109 was screened for mutants deficient in the in vivo colonization of the BALB/c mouse model using a microarray-based negative-selection screening. Mutants in genes known to contribute to systemic infection (e.g., Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 [SPI-2], aro, rfa, rfb, phoP, and phoQ) and enteric infection (e.g., SPI-1 and SPI-5) in this and other Salmonella serovars displayed colonization defects in our assay. In addition, a strong attenuation was observed for mutants in genes and genomic islands that are not present in S. Typhimurium or in most other Salmonella serovars. These genes include a type I restriction/modification system (SEN4290 to SEN4292), the peg fimbrial operon (SEN2144A to SEN2145B), a putative pathogenicity island (SEN1970 to SEN1999), and a type VI secretion system remnant SEN1001, encoding a hypothetical protein containing a lysin motif (LysM) domain associated with peptidoglycan binding. Proliferation defects for mutants in these individual genes and in exemplar genes for each of these clusters were confirmed in competitive infections with wild-type S. Enteritidis. A ΔSEN1001 mutant was defective for survival within RAW264.7 murine macrophages in vitro. Complementation assays directly linked the SEN1001 gene to phenotypes observed in vivo and in vitro. The genes identified here may perform novel virulence functions not characterized in previous Salmonella models. PMID:22083712

  20. Kidney allograft pyelonephritis caused by Salmonella enterica serovar Schwarzengrund.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kenta; Nishio, Haruomi; Iwatani, Yuji; Yamada, Ryo; Okawa, Takao; Yamamoto, Takumi; Murakami, Masaaki; Matsuo, Yoko; Matsuo, Ken; Tanaka, Satoshi; Mori, Kiyoshi; Mori, Noriko

    2017-03-13

    Kidney transplant recipients (KTRs) taking immunosuppressive drugs have a 20-fold greater risk of nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) infection than the healthy adult population. Among KTRs, the urinary tract is the most common site of infection. However, few cases of urinary tract infection caused by NTS have been documented in KTRs, and only one in Japan. Furthermore, it frequently induces acute allograft rejection with high mortality. Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Schwarzengrund (S. Schwarzengrund) is now among the more common Salmonella serovars isolated in Japan and is likely to be invasive. We present a case of a 45-year old female with vesicoureteral reflux to her transplanted kidney who developed kidney allograft pyelonephritis caused by S. Schwarzengrund. She was admitted to our hospital with fever, urodynia, lower abdominal pain, gross hematuria, and cloudy urine. Urine cultures were positive for S. Schwarzengrund. Exposure to cats, especially stray cats, were identified as the most likely source. We administered antibiotics for 4 weeks (ceftriaxone then amoxicillin, each for 2 weeks) and educated her about pet safety. She experienced no recurrence of infection or clinical kidney allograft rejection for 3 months post-treatment. NTS should be considered as a possible pathogen of urinary tract infection among KTRs, especially in cases with animal exposure or structural urologic abnormalities. When the pathogen is NTS, appropriate antibiotics and treatment periods are essential for preventing recurrence and allograft rejection after the completion of treatment.

  1. Epidemiology of Leptospira weilii serovar Topaz infections in Australia.

    PubMed

    Slack, Andrew T; Symonds, Meegan L; Dohnt, Michael F; Corney, Bruce G; Smythe, Lee D

    2007-06-01

    Leptospirosis is a zoonotic disease with a worldwide distribution. Leptospira weilii serovar (sv.) Topaz is a newly described serovar first isolated in the far north of Queensland, Australia. The epidemiology of L. weilii sv. Topaz infections in Australia was characterised through the use of surveillance questionnaires and molecular studies. There have been 24 human and 2 animal (bovine and bandicoot) L. weilii sv. Topaz infections diagnosed since 1991. The majority of these infections have occurred in Far North Queensland, with the remaining infections occurring in South East Queensland and in Western Australia. The majority of patients with L. weilii sv. Topaz infections presented with classical leptospirosis symptoms including; fever, headaches, sweats, chills and myalgia. The occupations of human cases of L. weilii sv. Topaz infection included banana farming, dairy and beef cattle production and tourist related activities. Fluorescent amplified fragment length polymorphism (FAFLP) was performed on 15 L. weilii sv. Topaz isolates including 2 animal isolates. Clustering analysis grouped the 15 isolates into 5 main clades with 13 unique FAFLP profiles. A high level of relatedness was demonstrated between 2 animal and 2 human isolates.

  2. Cross-Sectional Study of Leptospira Seroprevalence in Humans, Rats, Mice, and Dogs in a Main Tropical Sea-Port City

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Vivas, Claudia M. E.; Cuello-Pérez, Margarett; Agudelo-Flórez, Piedad; Thiry, Dorothy; Levett, Paul N.; Falconar, Andrew K. I.

    2013-01-01

    Samples were collected from 128 symptomatic humans, 83 dogs, 49 mice, and 20 rats (Rattus rattus: 16; Rattus norvegicus: 4) in neighborhoods where human leptospirosis have been reported within the principal sea-port city of Colombia. Seroprevalences were assessed against 19 pathogenic, 1 intermediate pathogenic, and 1 saprophytic Leptospira serogroups. Pathogenic Leptospira were confirmed using conventional Leptospira-specific polymerase chain-reaction and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis was used for serovar identification. Seroprevalences of 20.4%, 12.5%, 25.0%, 22.9%, and 12.4% were obtained against one to seven different serogroups in mice, R. rattus, R. norvegicus, dogs, and humans, respectively. The DNA was confirmed to be from pathogenic Leptospira by detecting the lipL32 gene in 12.5%, 3.7%, and 0.03% of the R. rattus, dog, and human samples, respectively. The first genetically typed Colombian isolate was obtained from a rat and identified as Leptospira interrogans serovar Icterohaemorrhagiae/Copenhageni. PMID:23149584

  3. Rodents and Leptospira transmission risk in Terceira island (Azores).

    PubMed

    Collares-Pereira, M; Mathias, M L; Santos-Reis, M; Ramalhinho, M G; Duarte-Rodrigues, P

    2000-01-01

    The role of rodents as Leptospira renal carriers in Terceira island was evaluated (1993-1995) through kidney culture and serology [microscopic aglutination test (MAT)] of 94 mice and rats. Fifty-nine animals were positive (n = 41 by serology + culturing; n = 11 serology; n = 7 culturing), presenting a wide distribution in man-made and natural areas. House mice had the highest bacteriological (82.9%) and serological (90.9%) rates, being strictly related to serovar arborea. Black rats were involved in the dispersion of all isolated L. interrogans sensu lato serovars (arborea, copenhageni and icterohaemorrhagiae). Logistic regression analysis and non-metric multi-dimensional scaling, relating Leptospira infection with biological and environmental variables, expressed that adult males Mus domesticus, sexually active and living in humid biotopes, mainly above 500 m, are the most likely reservoirs. This study emphasizes the role of house-mice in the epidemiology of leptospirosis in Terceira and the need of reducing the risk of Leptospira transmission through integrated control programmes, primarily focusing on adult house-mice in peri-domestic environments, before the breeding season.

  4. The distribution of Salmonella enterica serovars and subtypes in surface water from five agricultural regions across Canada.

    PubMed

    Jokinen, C C; Koot, J; Cole, L; Desruisseau, A; Edge, T A; Khan, I U H; Koning, W; Lapen, D R; Pintar, K D M; Reid-Smith, R; Thomas, J L; Topp, E; Wang, L Y; Wilkes, G; Ziebell, K; van Bochove, E; Gannon, V P J

    2015-06-01

    Serovar prevalence of the zoonotic pathogen, Salmonella enterica, was compared among 1624 surface water samples collected previously from five different Canadian agricultural watersheds over multiple years. Phagetyping, pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and antimicrobial resistance subtyping assays were performed on serovars Enteritidis, Typhimurium, and Heidelberg. Serovars and subtypes from surface water were compared with those from animal feces, human sewage, and serovars reported to cause salmonellosis in Canadians. Sixty-five different serovars were identified in surface water; only 32% of these were isolated from multiple watersheds. Eleven of the 13 serovars most commonly reported to cause salmonellosis in Canadians were identified in surface water; isolates of these serovars constituted >40% of the total isolates. Common phagetypes and PFGE subtypes of serovars associated with illness in humans such as S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium were also isolated from surface water and animal feces. Antimicrobial resistance was generally low, but was highest among S. Typhimurium. Monitoring of these rivers helps to identify vulnerable areas of a watershed and, despite a relatively low prevalence of S. enterica overall, serovars observed in surface water are an indication of the levels of specific S. enterica serovars present in humans and animals.

  5. Development of two real-time polymerase chain reaction assays to detect Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serovars 1-9-11 and serovar 2.

    PubMed

    Marois-Créhan, Corinne; Lacouture, Sonia; Jacques, Mario; Fittipaldi, Nahuel; Kobisch, Marylène; Gottschalk, Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    Two real-time, or quantitative, polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays were developed to detect Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serovars 1-9-11 (highly related serovars with similar virulence potential) and serovar 2, respectively. The specificity of these assays was verified on a collection of 294 strains, which included all 16 reference A. pleuropneumoniae strains (including serovars 5a and 5b), 263 A. pleuropneumoniae field strains isolated between 1992 and 2009 in different countries, and 15 bacterial strains other than A. pleuropneumoniae. The detection levels of both qPCR tests were evaluated using 10-fold dilutions of chromosomal DNA from reference strains of A. pleuropneumoniae serovars 1 and 2, and the detection limit for both assays was 50 fg per assay. The analytical sensitivities of the qPCR tests were also estimated by using pure cultures and tonsils experimentally spiked with A. pleuropneumoniae. The detection threshold was 2.5 × 10(4) colony forming units (CFU)/ml and 2.9 × 10(5) CFU/0.1 g of tonsil, respectively, for both assays. These specific and sensitive tests can be used for the serotyping of A. pleuropneumoniae in diagnostic laboratories to control porcine pleuropneumonia.

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Bardo Strain CRJJGF_00099 (Phylum Gammaproteobacteria)

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sushim K.; McMillan, Elizabeth A.; Jackson, Charlene R.; Desai, Prerak T.; Porwollik, Steffen; McClelland, Michael; Hiott, Lari M.; Humayoun, Shaheen B.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report a 4.87-Mbp draft genome sequence of the multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Bardo strain CRJJGF_00099, isolated from dairy cattle in 2005. PMID:27634995

  7. Interlaboratory Agreement of Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis Identification of Leptospira Serovars

    PubMed Central

    Mende, Katrin; Galloway, Renee L.; Becker, Sara J.; Beckius, Miriam L.; Murray, Clinton K.; Hospenthal, Duane R.

    2013-01-01

    Leptospirosis may be caused by > 250 Leptospira serovars. Serovar classification is a complex task that most laboratories cannot perform. We assessed the interlaboratory reproducibility of a pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) identification technique developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Blinded exchange of 93 Leptospiraceae strains occurred between San Antonio Military Medical Center (SAMMC) and the CDC. PFGE was performed and gel images were analyzed and compared with patterns present in each laboratory's database (CDC database: > 800 strain patterns; SAMMC database: > 300 strain patterns). Overall, 93.7% (74 of 79) of strains present in each receiving laboratory's database were correctly identified. Five isolates were misidentified, and two isolates did not match serovar PFGE patterns in the receiving laboratory's database. Patterns for these seven isolates were identical between laboratories; four serovars represented misidentified reference strains. The PFGE methodology studied showed excellent interlaboratory reproducibility, enabling standardization and data sharing between laboratories. PMID:23817329

  8. Serovar identification, antimicrobial sensitivity, and virulence of Avibacterium paragallinarum isolated from chickens in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Chukiatsiri, Kridda; Sasipreeyajan, Jiroj; Blackall, Patrick J; Yuwatanichsampan, Sommai; Chansiripornchai, Niwat

    2012-06-01

    Avibacterium paragallinarum causes infectious coryza in chickens, an acute respiratory disease that has worldwide economic significance. The objectives of this study were to determine the serovars, antimicrobial resistance, and pathogenicity of A. paragallinarum isolated from chickens in Thailand. Eighteen field isolates of A. paragallinarum were confirmed by PCR. When examined by serotyping in a hemagglutination inhibition test, 10 isolates were serovar A, five isolates were serovar B, and three isolates were serovar C. The susceptibility of the isolates to 16 antimicrobial agents was tested by a disk diffusion method. All isolates were susceptible to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid. There was a high level of resistance to lincomycin and erythromycin. All isolates were resistant to cloxacillin and neomycin. A study of bacterial entry into, and survival within, chicken macrophages showed variation between isolates but no clear connection to serovar. A virulence test was performed by challenging 4-wk-old layers via the nasal route with 400 dl of bacteria (10(8) colony-forming units/ml). Clinical signs were observed daily for 7 days, and the birds were subjected to a postmortem necropsy at 7 days postchallenge. All 18 field isolates caused the typical clinical signs of infectious coryza and could be re-isolated at 7 days after challenge. There was no significant difference in the clinical scores of the isolates except that two isolates (112179 and 102984, serovars A and B, respectively) gave a significantly higher score than did isolate CMU1009 (a serovar A isolate). No correlation between serovar and severity of clinical signs was found.

  9. Amino acid sequences of proteins from Leptospira serovar pomona.

    PubMed

    Alves, S F; Lefebvre, R B; Probert, W

    2000-01-01

    This report describes a partial amino acid sequences from three putative outer envelope proteins from Leptospira serovar pomona. In order to obtain internal fragments for protein sequencing, enzymatic and chemical digestion was performed. The enzyme clostripain was used to digest the proteins 32 and 45 kDa. In situ digestion of 40 kDa molecular weight protein was accomplished using cyanogen bromide. The 32 kDa protein generated two fragments, one of 21 kDa and another of 10 kDa that yielded five residues. A fragment of 24 kDa that yielded nineteen residues of amino acids was obtained from 45 kDa protein. A fragment with a molecular weight of 20 kDa, yielding a twenty amino acids sequence from the 40 kDa protein.

  10. Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis, England and Wales, 1945-2011.

    PubMed

    Lane, Christopher R; LeBaigue, Susan; Esan, Oluwaseun B; Awofisyo, Adedoyin A; Adams, Natalie L; Fisher, Ian S T; Grant, Kathie A; Peters, Tansy M; Larkin, Lesley; Davies, Robert H; Adak, Goutam K

    2014-07-01

    In England and Wales, the emergence of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis resulted in the largest and most persistent epidemic of foodborne infection attributable to a single subtype of any pathogen since systematic national microbiological surveillance was established. We reviewed 67 years of surveillance data to examine the features, underlying causes, and overall effects of S. enterica ser. Enteritidis. The epidemic was associated with the consumption of contaminated chicken meat and eggs, and a decline in the number of infections began after the adoption of vaccination and other measures in production and distribution of chicken meat and eggs. We estimate that >525,000 persons became ill during the course of the epidemic, which caused a total of 6,750,000 days of illness, 27,000 hospitalizations, and 2,000 deaths. Measures undertaken to control the epidemic have resulted in a major reduction in foodborne disease in England and Wales.

  11. Osteomyelitis caused by Salmonella enterica serovar derby in boa constrictor.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Suyene O; Casagrande, Renata A; Guerra, Priscila R; Cruz, Cláudio E F; Veit, Evandro; Cardoso, Marisa R I; Driemeier, David

    2014-09-01

    After demonstrating chronic weight loss, prostration, and muscle flaccidness, a captive-bred 9-mo-old boa constrictor (Boa constrictor constrictor) died and was submitted for necropsy. Along the spinal column there were multiple, yellowish white, macroscopic nodules of 1-5 mm in diameter in the ventral side of the vertebral body and in the intervertebral spaces. Severe multifocal necrotizing osteomyelitis associated with granulomatous inflammation was the main histologic finding in the vertebral column. In the liver, there was discrete but similar granulomatous changes. Positive anti-Salmonella immunostaining was observed in the spinal column and in the liver. Salmonella enterica serovar Derby was isolated from fragments of the spinal column. These bacteria are important cause of disease in captive reptiles.

  12. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi and the pathogenesis of typhoid fever.

    PubMed

    Dougan, Gordon; Baker, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi, the cause of typhoid, is host restricted to humans. S. Typhi has a monophyletic population structure, indicating that typhoid in humans is a relatively new disease. Antimicrobial usage is reshaping the current S. Typhi global population and may be driving the emergence of a specific haplotype, H58, that is well adapted to transmission in modern settings and is able to resist antimicrobial killing more efficiently than other S. Typhi. Evidence gathered through genomics and functional studies using the mouse and in vitro cell systems, together with clinical investigations, has provided insight into the mechanisms that underpin the pathogenesis of human typhoid and host restriction. Here we review the latest scientific advances in typhoid research and discuss how these novel approaches are changing our understanding of the disease.

  13. Health assessment of wild lowland tapir (Tapirus terrestris) populations in the Atlantic Forest and Pantanal biomes, Brazil (1996-2012).

    PubMed

    Medici, Emília Patrícia; Mangini, Paulo Rogerio; Fernandes-Santos, Renata Carolina

    2014-10-01

    Abstract The lowland tapir (Tapirus terrestris) is found in South America and is listed as Vulnerable to Extinction by the International Union for Conservation of Nature, Red List of Threatened Species. Health issues, particularly infectious diseases, are potential threats for the species. Health information from 65 wild tapirs from two Brazilian biomes, Atlantic Forest (AF) and Pantanal (PA), were collected during a long-term study (1996-2012). The study included physic, hematologic and biochemical evaluations, microbiologic cultures, urinalysis, and serologic analyses for antibodies against 13 infectious agents (viral and bacterial). The AF and PA tapirs were significantly different for several hematologic and biochemical parameters. Ten bacteria taxa were identified in the AF and 26 in the PA. Antibodies against five viruses were detected: Bluetongue virus, eastern equine encephalitis virus, western equine encephalitis virus, infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus, and porcine parvovirus. A high prevalence of exposure to Leptospira interrogans (10 serovars: Autumnalis, Bratislava, Canicola, Copenhageni, Grippotyphosa, Hardjo, Hebdomadis, Icterohaemorrhagiae, Pomona, and Pyrogenes) was detected in both the AF and PA sites. A greater diversity of serovars and higher antibody titers were found in the PA. Statistically significant differences between sites were found for L. interrogans, equine encephalitis virus, and porcine parvovirus. Based on physical evaluations, both AF and PA populations were healthy. The differences in the overall health profile of the AF and PA tapir populations appear to be associated with environmental factors and infectious diseases ecology. The extensive datasets on hematology, biochemistry, urinalysis, and microbiology results from this paper can be used as reference values for wild tapirs.

  14. The emergence of Leptospira borgpetersenii serovar Arborea as the dominant infecting serovar following the summer of natural disasters in Queensland, Australia 2011.

    PubMed

    Wynwood, S J; Craig, S B; Graham, G C; Blair, B R; Burns, M A; Weier, S L; Collet, T A; McKay, D B

    2014-06-01

    The following research reports the emergence of Leptospira borgpetersenii serovar Arborea as the dominant infecting serovar following the summer of disasters and the ensuing clean up in Queensland, Australia during 2011. For the 12 month period (1 January to 31 December) L. borgpetersenii serovar Arborea accounted for over 49% of infections. In response to a flooding event public health officials need to issue community wide announcements warning the population about the dangers of leptospirosis and other water borne diseases. Communication with physicians working in the affected community should also be increased to update physicians with information such as clinical presentation of leptospirosis and other waterborne diseases. These recommendations will furnish public health officials with considerations for disease management when dealing with future disaster management programs.

  15. Novel haemolysins of Salmonella enterica spp. enterica serovar Gallinarum.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Ravi Kant; Singh, B R; Babu, N; Chandra, Mudit

    2005-07-01

    Haemolysins of Salmonella are important due to their probable role in pathogenesis of systemic salmonellosis and use in sub-serovar level typing. The present study was undertaken to determine haemolytic potential of Salmonella Gallinarum strains through phenotypic and genotypic methods. Amplification of haemolysin gene (clyA) and cytolysin gene (slyA) was attempted in order to determine their role in haemolysin production. Study on 94 strains of S. Gallinarum revealed the production of two types of haemolysis viz., beneath the colony haemolysis (BCH) or contact haemolysis and clear zone haemolysis (CZH). Haemolysis was observed on blood agar prepared with blood of cattle, buffalo, sheep, goat, horse, rabbit, guinea pig, fowl, and human blood group A, B, AB and O. Although, haemolysis was also observed on blood agar prepared with whole blood, clarity of zone was more evident on blood agar made from washed erythrocytes. Clear zone haemolysis was best observed on blood agar prepared with washed erythrocytes of goat and a total of 12% (11 of 94) S. Gallinarum strains under study produced CZH on it. The clyA gene could not be detected in any of the 94 strains under study, while slyA gene could be amplified uniformly irrespective of haemolytic potential (CZH) and haemolytic pattern (BCH) of the strains. The study suggested that the two types of haemolysis (CZH and BCH) observed among S. Gallinarum strains may not be due to either slyA or clyA gene products and thus there may be some other gene responsible for haemolytic trait in Gallinarum serovar. Different haemolytic patterns of strains under study indicated multiplicity of haemolysins in S. Gallinarum.

  16. Intracellular Voyeurism: Examining the Modulation of Host Cell Activities bySalmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Szeto, Jason; Brumell, John H

    2005-11-01

    Salmonella spp. can infect host cells by gaining entry through phagocytosis or by inducing host cell membrane ruffling that facilitates bacterial uptake. With its wide host range, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium has proven to be an important model organism for studying intracellular bacterial pathogenesis. Upon entry into host cells, serovar Typhimurium typically resides within a membrane-bound compartment termed the Salmonella-containing vacuole (SCV). From the SCV, serovar Typhimurium can inject several effector proteins that subvert many normal host cell systems, including endocytic trafficking, cytoskeletal rearrangements, lipid signaling and distribution, and innate and adaptive host defenses. The study of these intracellular events has been made possible through the use of various imaging techniques, ranging from classic methods of transmission electron microscopy to advanced livecell fluorescence confocal microscopy. In addition, DNA microarrays have now been used to provide a "snapshot" of global gene expression in serovar Typhimurium residing within the infected host cell. This review describes key aspects of Salmonella-induced subversion of host cell activities, providing examples of imaging that have been used to elucidate these events. Serovar Typhimurium engages specific host cell machinery from initial contact with the host cell to replication within the SCV. This continuous interaction with the host cell has likely contributed to the extensive arsenal that serovar Typhimurium now possesses, including two type III secretion systems, a range of ammunition in the form of TTSS effectors, and a complex genetic regulatory network that coordinates the expression of hundreds of virulence factors.

  17. Presence of antibodies against Leptospira serovars in Chaetophractus villosus (Mammalia, Dasypodidae), La Pampa province, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Kin, Marta S; Brihuega, Bibiana; Fort, Marcelo; Delgado, Fernando; Bedotti, Daniel; Casanave, Emma B

    2015-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a zoonosis of worldwide distribution. The aim of this study was to examine the presence of antibodies against 21 Leptospira reactive serovars in Chaetophractus villosus in La Pampa province, Argentina, using the microscopic agglutination test (MAT). Pathologic changes compatible with leptospirosis and in situ detection of the agent by immunohistochemistry were studied in 24 and 3 individuals respectively. Only 35/150 (23.3%) serum samples had antibodies against Leptospira sp. Six percent of the samples reacted with serovar Canicola, 4.7% with serovar Castellonis, 1.3% with serovar Icterohemorrhagieae and 0.7% with serovar Hardjo. Sixteen (10.6%) serum samples agglutinated with Castellonis-Icterohemorrhagiae and Canicola-Castellonis serovars, both with 4.7%, and Canicola-Hardjo and Castellonis-Canicola-Icterohemorrhagiae both with 0.6%. Fourteen animals had variable degrees of lesions, which were more severe in animals with higher serological titers (3200), and Leptospira sp. was detected in 3 animals by immunohistochemistry. These results represent the first record of the presence of Leptospira in C. villosus in La Pampa.

  18. Expansion of the in vitro assay for Leptospira potency testing to other Serovars: Case study with Leptospira hardjo

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Code for Federal Regulations (9 CFR 113:101-104) specifies how vaccine potency is evaluated in a hamster model for evaluation of leptospiral vaccines against pomona, icterohaemorrhagiae, canicola, and grippotyphosa serotypes of Leptospira interrogans. There are several issues which complicate th...

  19. Urogenital Chlamydia trachomatis Serovars in Men and Women with a Symptomatic or Asymptomatic Infection: an Association with Clinical Manifestations?

    PubMed Central

    Morré, S. A.; Rozendaal, L.; van Valkengoed, I. G. M.; Boeke, A. J. P.; van Voorst Vader, P. C.; Schirm, J.; de Blok, S.; van den Hoek, J. A. R.; van Doornum, G. J. J.; Meijer, C. J. L. M.; van den Brule, A. J. C.

    2000-01-01

    To determine whether certain Chlamydia trachomatis serovars are preferentially associated with a symptomatic or an asymptomatic course of infection, C. trachomatis serovar distributions were analyzed in symptomatically and asymptomatically infected persons. Furthermore, a possible association between C. trachomatis serovars and specific clinical symptoms was investigated. C. trachomatis-positive urine specimens from 219 asymptomatically infected men and women were obtained from population-based screening programs in Amsterdam. Two hundred twenty-one C. trachomatis-positive cervical and urethral swabs from symptomatically and asymptomatically infected men and women were obtained from several hospital-based departments. Serovars were determined using PCR-based genotyping, i.e., restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the nested-PCR-amplified omp1 gene. The most prevalent C. trachomatis serovars, D, E, and F, showed no association with either a symptomatic or asymptomatic course of infection. The most prominent differences found were (i) the association of serovar Ga with symptoms in men (P = 0.0027), specifically, dysuria (P < 0.0001), and (ii) detection of serovar Ia more often in asymptomatically infected people (men and women) (P = 0.035). Furthermore, in women, serovar K was associated with vaginal discharge (P = 0.002) and serovar variants were found only in women (P = 0.045). PMID:10834991

  20. A serological survey of Leptospira interrogans serotype pomona in Alberta and Saskatchewan striped skunks and possible transmission between cattle and skunks.

    PubMed

    Schowalter, D B; Chalmers, G A; Johnson, G R; Gunson, J R; Wynnyk, W P

    1981-10-01

    The range of known occurrence of Leptospira interrogans serotype pomona is extended to Alberta in striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis); no evidence of L. sejroe was found. Reacting sera from skunks were confined to the southern portion of Alberta and adjacent Saskatchewan, although a number of reactors were found sufficiently further north in Saskatchewan suggesting that a different mode of infection may be functioning there. Of 95 skunk sera from near a dairy farm infected with serotype pomona 40% were reactors. Of 438 skunk sera from other areas only 5.7% were reactors; that difference was suggestive of transmission from cattle to skunks on the dairy farm. Of 22 skunk sera collected near the dairy farm in summer none were reactors, whereas 52% of skunk sera taken the previous and following winters were. That seasonal difference was not evident among sera from other locations.

  1. Expression of leptospiral immunoglobulin-like protein by Leptospira interrogans and evaluation of its diagnostic potential in a kinetic ELISA.

    PubMed

    Palaniappan, Raghavan U M; Chang, Yung-Fu; Hassan, Fahad; McDonough, Sean P; Pough, Margaret; Barr, Stephen C; Simpson, Kenneth W; Mohammed, Hussni O; Shin, Sang; McDonough, Patrick; Zuerner, Richard L; Qu, Jiaxin; Roe, Bruce

    2004-10-01

    The search for novel antigens suitable for improved vaccines and diagnostic reagents against leptospirosis led to the identification of LigA and LigB. LigA and LigB expression were not detectable at the translation level but were detectable at the transcription level in leptospires grown in vitro. Lig genes were present in pathogenic serovars of Leptospira, but not in non-pathogenic Leptospira biflexa. The conserved and variable regions of LigA and LigB (Con, VarA and VarB) were cloned, expressed and purified as GST-fusion proteins. Purified recombinant LigA and LigB were evaluated for their diagnostic potential in a kinetic ELISA (KELA) using sera from vaccinated and microscopic agglutination test (MAT)-positive dogs. Sera from vaccinated dogs showed reactivity to whole-cell antigens of leptospires but did not show reactivity in the KELA assay with recombinant antigens, suggesting a lack of antibodies to Lig proteins in the vaccinated animals. The diagnostic potential of recombinant Lig antigens in the KELA assay was evaluated by using 67 serum samples with MAT > or =1600, which showed reactivity of 76, 41 and 35% to rConA, rVarA and rVarB, respectively. These findings suggest that recombinant antigen to the conserved region of LigA and LigB can differentiate between vaccinated and naturally infected animals.

  2. Population Structure of Salmonella enterica Serovar 4,[5],12:b:− Strains and Likely Sources of Human Infection

    PubMed Central

    Toboldt, Anne; Tietze, Erhard; Helmuth, Reiner; Junker, Ernst; Fruth, Angelika

    2013-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar 4,[5],12:b:− is a monophasic serovar not able to express the second-phase flagellar antigen (H2 antigen). In Germany, the serovar is occasionally isolated from poultry, reptiles, fish, food, and humans. In this study, a selection of 67 epidemiologically unrelated Salmonella enterica serovar 4,[5],12:b:− strains isolated in Germany between 2000 and 2011 from the environment, animal, food, and humans was investigated by phenotypic and genotypic methods to better understand the population structure and to identify potential sources of human infections. Strains of this monophasic serovar were highly diverse. Within the 67 strains analyzed, we identified 52 different pulsed-field gel electrophoresis XbaI profiles, 12 different multilocus sequence types (STs), and 18 different pathogenicity array types. The relatedness of strains based on the pathogenicity gene repertoire (102 markers tested) was in good agreement with grouping by MLST. S. enterica serovar 4,[5],12:b:− is distributed across multiple unrelated eBurst groups and consequently is highly polyphyletic. Two sequence types (ST88 and ST127) were linked to S. enterica serovar Paratyphi B (d-tartrate positive), two single-locus variants of ST1583 were linked to S. enterica serovar Abony, and one sequence type (ST1484) was associated with S. enterica serovar Mygdal, a recently defined, new serovar. From the characterization of clinical isolates and those of nonhuman origin, it can be concluded that the potential sources of sporadic human infections with S. enterica serovar 4,[5],12:b:− most likely are mushrooms, shellfish/fish, and poultry. PMID:23793625

  3. Differences in innate immune responses (in vitro) to HeLa cells infected with nondisseminating serovar E and disseminating serovar L2 of Chlamydia trachomatis.

    PubMed

    Dessus-Babus, Sophie; Darville, Toni L; Cuozzo, Francis P; Ferguson, Kaethe; Wyrick, Priscilla B

    2002-06-01

    The inflammatory response associated with Chlamydia trachomatis genital infections is thought to be initiated by the release of proinflammatory cytokines from infected epithelial cells. This study focuses on the interactions between C. trachomatis-infected HeLa cells and immune cells involved in the early stages of infection, i.e., neutrophils and macrophages. First, we showed that the expression of interleukin-11 (IL-11), an anti-inflammatory cytokine mainly active on macrophages, was upregulated at the mRNA level in the genital tracts of infected mice. Second, incubation of differentiated THP-1 (dTHP-1) cells or monocyte-derived macrophages (MdM) with basal culture supernatants from C. trachomatis serovar E- or serovar L2-infected HeLa cells resulted in macrophage activation with a differential release of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and upregulation of indoleamine 2,3-deoxygenase (IDO) but not of Toll-like receptor 2 and 4 mRNA expression. Third, coculture of infected HeLa cells with dTHP-1 cells resulted in a reduction in chlamydial growth, which was more dramatic for serovar E than for L2 and which was partially reversed by the addition of anti-TNF-alpha antibodies for serovar E or exogenous tryptophan for both serovars but was not reversed by the addition of superoxide dismutase or anti-IL-8 or anti-IL-1beta antibodies. A gamma interferon-independent IDO mRNA upregulation was also detected in dTHP-1 cells from infected cocultures. Lastly, with a two-stage coculture system, we found that (i) supernatants from neutrophils added to the apical side of infected HeLa cell cultures were chlamydicidal and induced MdM to express antichlamydial activity and (ii) although polymorphonuclear leukocytes released more proinflammatory cytokines in response to serovar E- than in response to L2-infected cells, MdM were strongly activated by serovar L2 infection, indicating that the early inflammatory response generated with a nondisseminating or a disseminating

  4. Map-Based Comparative Genomic Analysis of Virulent Haemophilus Parasuis Serovars 4 and 5

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Paulraj; Bey, Russell

    2015-01-01

    Haemophilus parasuis is a commensal bacterium of the upper respiratory tract of healthy pigs. However, in conjunction with viral infections in immunocompromised animals H. parasuis can transform into a pathogen that is responsible for causing Glasser's disease which is typically characterized by fibrinous polyserositis, polyarthritis, meningitis and sometimes acute pneumonia and septicemia in pigs. Haemophilus parasuis serovar 5 is highly virulent and more frequently isolated from respiratory and systemic infection in pigs. Recently a highly virulent H. parasuis serovar 4 was isolated from the tissues of diseased pigs. To understand the differences in virulence and virulence-associated genes between H. parasuis serovar 5 and highly virulent H. parasuis serovar 4 strains, a genomic library was generated by TruSeq preparation and sequenced on Illumina HiSeq 2000 obtaining 50 bp PE reads. A three-way comparative genomic analysis was conducted between two highly virulent H. parasuis serovar 4 strains and H. parasuis serovar 5. Haemophilus parasuis serovar 5 GenBank isolate SH0165 (GenBank accession number CP001321.1) was used as reference strain for assembly. Results of these analysis revealed the highly virulent H. parasuis serovar 4 lacks genes encoding for, glycosyl transferases, polysaccharide biosynthesis protein capD, spore coat polysaccharide biosynthesis protein C, polysaccharide export protein and sialyltransferase which can modify the lipopolysaccharide forming a short-chain LPS lacking O-specific polysaccharide chains often referred to as lipooligosaccharide (LOS). In addition, it can modify the outer membrane protein (OMP) structure. The lack of sialyltransferase significantly reduced the amount of sialic acid incorporated into LOS, a major and essential component of the cell wall and an important virulence determinant. These molecules may be involved in various stages of pathogenesis through molecular mimicry and by causing host cell cytotoxicity, reduced

  5. Circulating serovars of Leptospira in cart horses of central and southern Ethiopia and associated risk factors.

    PubMed

    Tsegay, K; Potts, A D; Aklilu, N; Lötter, C; Gummow, B

    2016-03-01

    Little work has been done on diseases of horses in Ethiopia or tropical regions of the world. Yet, Ethiopia has the largest horse population in Africa and their horses play a pivotal role in their economy as traction animals. A serological and questionnaire survey was therefore conducted to determine the circulating serovars of Leptospira and their association with potential risk factors in the cart horse population of Central and Southern Ethiopia. A total of 184 out of 418 cart horses from 13 districts had antibody titres of 1:100 or greater to at least one of 16 serovars of Leptospira species in Central and Southern Ethiopian horses. A significantly higher seropositivity (62.1%) was noted in horses from the highland agroecology followed by midland (44.4%) and lowland (39.8%). Serovar Bratislava (34.5%) was the predominant serovar followed by serovars Djasiman (9.8%), Topaz (5.98%) and Pomona (5.3%). Age and location proved to be associated with seropositive horses with older horses being more commonly affected and the districts of Ziway (Batu) (Apparent Prevalence (AP)=65.5%), Shashemene (AP=48.3%) and Sebeta (AP=41.4%) having the highest prevalence. Multivariable logistic regression found risk factors significantly associated with Leptospira seropositive horses were drinking river water (OR=2.8) and horses 7-12 years old (OR=5) and risk factors specifically associated with serovar Bratislava seropositive horses were drinking river water (OR=2.5), horses ≥13 years (OR=3.5) and the presence of dogs in adjacent neighbouring properties (OR=0.3). Dogs had a protective effect against seropositivity to serovars Bratislava and Djasiman, which may be due to their ability to control rodents. The high seroprevalence confirm that leptospirosis is endemic among horses of Central and Southern Ethiopia. The predominance of serovar Bratislava supports the idea that serovar Bratislava may be adapted to and maintained by the horse population of Central and Southern Ethiopia

  6. Complete Genome and Methylome Sequences of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovars Typhimurium, Saintpaul, and Stanleyville from the SARA/SARB Collection

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Kuan; Roberts, Richard J.; Allard, Marc W.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT In this announcement, we report the complete genome and methylome sequences of three Salmonella enterica strains from the SARA and SARB collection: S. enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium (SARA13), S. enterica subsp. enterica serovar Saintpaul (SARA26), and S. enterica subsp. enterica serovar Stanleyville (SARB61). PMID:28302778

  7. Rapid multiplex PCR and Real-Time TaqMan PCR assays for detection of Salmonella enterica and the highly virulent serovars Choleraesuis and Paratyphi C

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella enterica is a human pathogen with over 2,500 serovars characterized. S. enterica serovars Choleraesuis (Cs) and Paratyphi C (Pc) are two globally distributed serovars. We have developed a rapid molecular typing method to detect Cs and Pc in food samples by using a comparative genomics ap...

  8. Genomic Comparison of the Closely-Related Salmonella enterica Serovars Enteritidis, Dublin and Gallinarum

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, T. David; Schmieder, Robert; Silva, Genivaldo G. Z.; Busch, Julia; Cassman, Noriko; Dutilh, Bas E.; Green, Dawn; Matlock, Brian; Heffernan, Brian; Olsen, Gary J.; Farris Hanna, Leigh; Schifferli, Dieter M.; Maloy, Stanley; Dinsdale, Elizabeth A.; Edwards, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    The Salmonella enterica serovars Enteritidis, Dublin, and Gallinarum are closely related but differ in virulence and host range. To identify the genetic elements responsible for these differences and to better understand how these serovars are evolving, we sequenced the genomes of Enteritidis strain LK5 and Dublin strain SARB12 and compared these genomes to the publicly available Enteritidis P125109, Dublin CT 02021853 and Dublin SD3246 genome sequences. We also compared the publicly available Gallinarum genome sequences from biotype Gallinarum 287/91 and Pullorum RKS5078. Using bioinformatic approaches, we identified single nucleotide polymorphisms, insertions, deletions, and differences in prophage and pseudogene content between strains belonging to the same serovar. Through our analysis we also identified several prophage cargo genes and pseudogenes that affect virulence and may contribute to a host-specific, systemic lifestyle. These results strongly argue that the Enteritidis, Dublin and Gallinarum serovars of Salmonella enterica evolve by acquiring new genes through horizontal gene transfer, followed by the formation of pseudogenes. The loss of genes necessary for a gastrointestinal lifestyle ultimately leads to a systemic lifestyle and niche exclusion in the host-specific serovars. PMID:26039056

  9. Physiological and Molecular Responses of Lactuca sativa to Colonization by Salmonella enterica Serovar Dublin▿

    PubMed Central

    Klerks, M. M.; van Gent-Pelzer, M.; Franz, E.; Zijlstra, C.; van Bruggen, A. H. C.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the physiological and molecular interactions between the human-pathogenic organism Salmonella enterica serovar Dublin and the commercially available mini Roman lettuce cv. Tamburo. The association of S. enterica serovar Dublin with lettuce plants was first determined, which indicated the presence of significant populations outside and inside the plants. The latter was evidenced from significant residual concentrations after highly efficient surface disinfection (99.81%) and fluorescence microscopy of S. enterica serovar Dublin in cross sections of lettuce at the root-shoot transition region. The plant biomass was reduced significantly compared to that of noncolonized plants upon colonization with S. enterica serovar Dublin. In addition to the physiological response, transcriptome analysis by cDNA amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis also provided clear differential gene expression profiles between noncolonized and colonized lettuce plants. From these, generally and differentially expressed genes were selected and identified by sequence analysis, followed by reverse transcription-PCR displaying the specific gene expression profiles in time. Functional grouping of the expressed genes indicated a correlation between colonization of the plants and an increase in expressed pathogenicity-related genes. This study indicates that lettuce plants respond to the presence of S. enterica serovar Dublin at physiological and molecular levels, as shown by the reduction in growth and the concurrent expression of pathogenicity-related genes. In addition, it was confirmed that Salmonella spp. can colonize the interior of lettuce plants, thus potentially imposing a human health risk when processed and consumed. PMID:17513585

  10. Innate immune control of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium: mechanisms contributing to combating systemic Salmonella infection.

    PubMed

    Wick, Mary Jo

    2011-01-01

    Infections with Salmonella enterica serovars remain a serious problem worldwide. While serovar Typhi causes significant morbidity and mortality that is restricted to humans, serovar Typhimurium causes gastroenteritidis in humans and can also infect other animals. As mice with the susceptible Nramp1 locus get systemic infection with serovar Typhimurium, murine infection models using this serovar have been widely used to decipher the immune mechanisms required to survive systemic Salmonella infection. This review summarizes recent studies in murine infection models that have advanced our understanding of the events that occur during the first days after oral Salmonella infection. The pathways of bacterial penetration across the intestinal epithelium, bacterial spread to draining (mesenteric) lymph nodes and dissemination to systemic tissues is discussed. The response of myeloid cell populations, including dendritic cells, inflammatory monocytes and neutrophils, during the early stage of infection is also discussed. Finally, the mechanisms driving recruitment of myeloid cells to infected intestinal lymphoid tissues and what is known about Toll-like receptor signaling pathways in innate immunity to Salmonella infection is also discussed.

  11. Tissue colonization and circulating T lymphocytes in laying hens upon oral challenge with Salmonella enterica serovars.

    PubMed

    Balan, Kannan V; Bigley, Elmer C; Gaines, Dennis W; Babu, Uma S

    2016-12-01

    Evaluating the potential of Salmonella serovars for tissue colonization and egg contamination in laying hens is critical due to widespread consumption of poultry and egg-containing products. The 2009 FDA Egg Rule was implemented to target the eradication of Salmonella enterica Enteritidis (SE) from layers; however, other Salmonella serovars, such as Heidelberg (SH) and Typhimurium (ST), have also been associated with poultry-related outbreaks. We conducted this study to see if serovars other than SE could colonize in laying hens, cause egg contamination, and modulate circulating T-cell populations. Laying hens were orally gavaged with 10(7) colony forming units (CFU) of SE, SH, or ST and assessed for colonization in spleen, ovaries, and oviduct 10 d postchallenge. Splenic colonization was similar for all the serovars; however, colonization of ovaries and oviducts was significantly higher with SH compared to SE and ST. Furthermore, SH challenge resulted in egg contamination, while SE and ST did not result in contaminated eggs. Phenotypic evaluation of peripheral blood lymphocytes showed significant reduction in CD4 cells in SH-challenged birds and lower CD8α and CD8β cells in SE-challenged birds compared to controls. Our data showed that non-SE serovars have equal or higher potential to colonize reproductive tissues of laying hens and may be accompanied by altered lymphocyte populations.

  12. Genomic comparison of the closely-related Salmonella enterica serovars enteritidis, dublin and gallinarum

    DOE PAGES

    Matthews, T. David; Schmieder, Robert; Silva, Genivaldo G. Z.; ...

    2015-06-03

    The Salmonella enterica serovars Enteritidis, Dublin, and Gallinarum are closely related but differ in virulence and host range. To identify the genetic elements responsible for these differences and to better understand how these serovars are evolving, we sequenced the genomes of Enteritidis strain LK5 and Dublin strain SARB12 and compared these genomes to the publicly available Enteritidis P125109, Dublin CT 02021853 and Dublin SD3246 genome sequences. We also compared the publicly available Gallinarum genome sequences from biotype Gallinarum 287/91 and Pullorum RKS5078. Using bioinformatic approaches, we identified single nucleotide polymorphisms, insertions, deletions, and differences in prophage and pseudogene content betweenmore » strains belonging to the same serovar. Through our analysis we also identified several prophage cargo genes and pseudogenes that affect virulence and may contribute to a host-specific, systemic lifestyle. These results strongly argue that the Enteritidis, Dublin and Gallinarum serovars of Salmonella enterica evolve by acquiring new genes through horizontal gene transfer, followed by the formation of pseudogenes. The loss of genes necessary for a gastrointestinal lifestyle ultimately leads to a systemic lifestyle and niche exclusion in the host-specific serovars.« less

  13. Genotyping, pathogenicity, and immunogenicity of Avibacterium paragallinarum serovar B-1 isolates from the Americas.

    PubMed

    Morales-Erasto, V; Fernández-Rosas, P; Negrete-Abascal, E; Salazar-García, F; Blackall, P J; Soriano-Vargas, E

    2014-06-01

    The bacterium Avibacterium paragallinarum is the etiologic agent of infectious coryza of chickens. Among the nine Kume serovars currently recognized in this bacterium, serovar B-1 is a common serovar in the Americas. In the current study, serovar B-1 isolates from Ecuador (seven isolates), Mexico (seven isolates) and Panama (two isolates) were genotyped. In addition one Panamanian, one Ecuadorian, and two Mexican isolates were used in a vaccination-challenge trial in which the vaccine was based on the 2671 serovar B-1 reference strain. Genotyping by enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus-based PCR (ERIC-PCR) resulted in ten distinguishable ERIC patterns for the 16 isolates and the two reference strains of Av. paragallinarum included in the study. No ERIC patterns were shared among isolates of the three different countries. In the vaccination-challenge trial, one isolate from Panama showed a significantly lower virulence than did the three other isolates. In terms of cross-protection, chickens vaccinated with reference strain 2671 and challenged with an Ecuadorian strain showed 40% protection, a significantly lower protection than the homologous protection level. The other three field isolates gave a similar protection level to the homologous challenge.

  14. Chlamydial conjunctivitis: prevalence and serovar distribution of Chlamydia trachomatis in adults.

    PubMed

    Petrovay, Fruzsina; Németh, István; Balázs, Andrea; Balla, Eszter

    2015-09-01

    The extragenital manifestation of Chlamydia trachomatis infection frequently results in non-specific conjunctivitis among sexually active adults. The aims of the present study were to determine the prevalence of C. trachomatis, to describe the distribution of serovars among patients with conjunctivitis and to characterize the relationship between the prevalence and patient demographics such as age and gender. A total of 245 conjunctival specimens were screened for C. trachomatis DNA targeting the plasmid gene. Serovar determination of the C. trachomatis-positive specimens was carried out by an omp1 PCR-based RFLP analysis method. Statistical analysis was done using a generalized linear model. C. trachomatis was detected in 53 cases (21.6 %) of adult conjunctivitis. Molecular genotyping differentiated seven distinct urogenital serovars, the most prevalent being serovar E (16/53), followed by F (15/53), D (6/53), K (6/53), G (4/53), H (4/53) and J (2/53). Statistical analysis showed higher C. trachomatis prevalence in the younger age groups, and this peaked at younger age in women than in men. The high prevalence of this pathogen found in ocular samples should alert ophthalmologists to focus on the role of C. trachomatis in adult conjunctivitis. The serovar distribution indicated that ocular chlamydial infections usually have a genital source. Nevertheless, conjunctivitis might be the only sign of this sexually transmitted infection. Further comparative genotyping of C. trachomatis in ocular and genital specimens might give more detailed epidemiological information about the aetiology of the disease.

  15. Genomic Comparison of the Closely-Related Salmonella enterica Serovars Enteritidis, Dublin and Gallinarum.

    PubMed

    Matthews, T David; Schmieder, Robert; Silva, Genivaldo G Z; Busch, Julia; Cassman, Noriko; Dutilh, Bas E; Green, Dawn; Matlock, Brian; Heffernan, Brian; Olsen, Gary J; Farris Hanna, Leigh; Schifferli, Dieter M; Maloy, Stanley; Dinsdale, Elizabeth A; Edwards, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    The Salmonella enterica serovars Enteritidis, Dublin, and Gallinarum are closely related but differ in virulence and host range. To identify the genetic elements responsible for these differences and to better understand how these serovars are evolving, we sequenced the genomes of Enteritidis strain LK5 and Dublin strain SARB12 and compared these genomes to the publicly available Enteritidis P125109, Dublin CT 02021853 and Dublin SD3246 genome sequences. We also compared the publicly available Gallinarum genome sequences from biotype Gallinarum 287/91 and Pullorum RKS5078. Using bioinformatic approaches, we identified single nucleotide polymorphisms, insertions, deletions, and differences in prophage and pseudogene content between strains belonging to the same serovar. Through our analysis we also identified several prophage cargo genes and pseudogenes that affect virulence and may contribute to a host-specific, systemic lifestyle. These results strongly argue that the Enteritidis, Dublin and Gallinarum serovars of Salmonella enterica evolve by acquiring new genes through horizontal gene transfer, followed by the formation of pseudogenes. The loss of genes necessary for a gastrointestinal lifestyle ultimately leads to a systemic lifestyle and niche exclusion in the host-specific serovars.

  16. Diverse distribution of Toxin-Antitoxin II systems in Salmonella enterica serovars

    PubMed Central

    Di Cesare, Andrea; Losasso, Carmen; Barco, Lisa; Eckert, Ester M.; Conficoni, Daniele; Sarasini, Giulia; Corno, Gianluca; Ricci, Antonia

    2016-01-01

    Type II Toxin-Antitoxin systems (TAs), known for their presence in virulent and antibiotic resistant bacterial strains, were recently identified in Salmonella enterica isolates. However, the relationships between the presence of TAs (ccdAB and vapBC) and the epidemiological and genetic features of different non-typhoidal Salmonella serovars are largely unknown, reducing our understanding of the ecological success of different serovars. Salmonella enterica isolates from different sources, belonging to different serovars and epidemiologically unrelated according to ERIC profiles, were investigated for the presence of type II TAs, plasmid content, and antibiotic resistance. The results showed the ubiquitous presence of the vapBC gene in all the investigated Salmonella isolates, but a diverse distribution of ccdAB, which was detected in the most widespread Salmonella serovars, only. Analysis of the plasmid toxin ccdB translated sequence of four selected Salmonella isolates showed the presence of the amino acid substitution R99W, known to impede in vitro the lethal effect of CcdB toxin in the absence of its cognate antitoxin CcdA. These findings suggest a direct role of the TAs in promoting adaptability and persistence of the most prevalent Salmonella serovars, thus implying a wider eco-physiological role for these type II TAs. PMID:27357537

  17. Serological studies on British isolates of the Sejroe serogroup of leptospira. II. An evaluation of the factor analysis method of identifying leptospires using strains belonging to the Sejroe serogroup.

    PubMed Central

    Little, T. W.; Stevens, A. E.; Hathaway, S. C.

    1987-01-01

    Twelve British isolates of leptospira belonging to the Sejroe serogroup were examined using a series of six factor sera prepared by a number of different absorption methods. Ten of the isolates were identified as Leptospira interrogans serovar hardjo and two as L. interrogans serovar saxkoebing. These isolates had previously been identified using the cross agglutination absorption method. PMID:3609168

  18. A Leptospira borgpetersenii Serovar Hardjo vaccine induces a Th1 response, activates NK cells, and reduces renal colonization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic infection of cattle with Leptospira borgpetersenii serovar Hardjo reduces animal production through reproductive failure and presents a persistent health threat to workers in the animal industry. Cattle are maintenance hosts for serovar Hardjo and development of a protective vaccine has bee...

  19. Genome Sequences of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Infantis Strains from Hungary Representing Two Peak Incidence Periods in Three Decades

    PubMed Central

    Wilk, Tímea; Szabó, Móni; Szmolka, Ama; Kiss, János

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Four strains of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Infantis isolated from humans (1980 to 1982) and broiler chickens (2016) have been sequenced. They represent the early and recent peak incidences of this serovar in Hungary. Genome sequences of these isolates provide comparative data on the evolution and rise of an endemic S. Infantis clone in Hungary. PMID:28254986

  20. Prevalence, serovars and antimicrobial susceptibility of Salmonella spp. from wild and domestic green iguanas (Iguana iguana) in Grenada, West Indies.

    PubMed

    Sylvester, W R B; Amadi, V; Pinckney, R; Macpherson, C N L; McKibben, J S; Bruhl-Day, R; Johnson, R; Hariharan, H

    2014-09-01

    Cloacal swabs from 62 green iguanas (Iguana iguana), including 47 wild and 15 domestic ones from five parishes of Grenada, were sampled during a 4-month period of January to April 2013 and examined by enrichment and selective culture for the presence of Salmonella spp. Fifty-five per cent of the animals were positive, and eight serovars of Salmonella were isolated. The most common serovar was Rubislaw (58.8%), a serovar found recently in many cane toads in Grenada, followed by Oranienburg (14.7%), a serovar that has been causing serious human disease outbreaks in Japan. Serovar IV:48:g,z51 :- (formerly, S. Marina) highly invasive and known for serious infections in children in the United States, constituted 11.8% of the isolates, all of them being from domestic green iguanas. Salmonella Newport, a serovar recently found in a blue land crab in Grenada, comprised 11.8% of the isolates from the green iguanas. The remaining four less frequent serovars included S. Javiana and S. Glostrup. Antimicrobial susceptibility tests conducted by a disc diffusion method against amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, ampicillin, cefotaxime, ceftazidime, ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin, gentamicin, nalidixic acid, streptomycin, tetracycline and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole showed that drug resistance is minimal, with intermediate susceptibility, mainly to streptomycin, tetracycline and cefotaxime. This is the first report of isolation and antimicrobial susceptibilities of various Salmonella serovars from wild and domestic green iguanas in Grenada, West Indies.

  1. Salmonella enterica serovar Kentucky isolates from dairy cows and poultry demonstrate different evolutionary histories and host-specific polymorphisms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Kentucky is commonly isolated from dairy cows and poultry in the United States. Although it is not among the most frequently isolated serovars from cases of human salmonellosis, its high prevalence in livestock and poultry indicate it is a potential public...

  2. Evaluation of a multiplex PCR to identify and serotype Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serovars 1, 5, 7, 12 and 15.

    PubMed

    Turni, C; Singh, R; Schembri, M A; Blackall, P J

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to validate a multiplex PCR for the species identification and serotyping of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serovars 1, 5, 7, 12 and 15. All 15 reference strains and 411 field isolates (394 from Australia, 11 from Indonesia, five from Mexico and one from New Zealand) of A. pleuropneumoniae were tested with the multiplex PCR. The specificity of this multiplex PCR was validated on 26 non-A. pleuropneumoniae species. The multiplex PCR gave the expected results with all 15 serovar reference strains and agreed with conventional serotyping for all field isolates from serovars 1 (n = 46), 5 (n = 81), 7 (n = 80), 12 (n = 16) and serovar 15 (n = 117). In addition, a species-specific product was amplified in the multiplex PCR with all 411 A. pleuropneumoniae field isolates. Of 25 nontypeable field isolates only two did not yield a serovar-specific band in the multiplex PCR. This multiplex PCR for serovars 1, 5, 7, 12 and 15 is species specific and capable of serotyping isolates from diverse locations. Significance and impact of the study: A multiplex PCR that can recognize serovars 1, 5, 7, 12 and 15 of A. pleuropneumoniae was developed and validated. This novel diagnostic tool will enable frontline laboratories to provide key information (the serovar) to guide targeted prevention and control programmes for porcine pleuropneumonia, a serious economic disease of pigs. The previous technology, traditional serotyping, is typically provided by specialized reference laboratories, limiting the capacity to respond to this key disease.

  3. Refined live attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Enteritidis vaccines mediate homologous and heterologous serogroup protection in mice.

    PubMed

    Tennant, Sharon M; Schmidlein, Patrick; Simon, Raphael; Pasetti, Marcela F; Galen, James E; Levine, Myron M

    2015-12-01

    Invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) infections constitute a major health problem among infants and toddlers in sub-Saharan Africa; these infections also occur in infants and the elderly in developed countries. We genetically engineered a Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain of multilocus sequence type 313, the predominant genotype circulating in sub-Saharan Africa. We evaluated the capacities of S. Typhimurium and Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis ΔguaBA ΔclpX live oral vaccines to protect mice against a highly lethal challenge dose of the homologous serovar and determined protection against other group B and D serovars circulating in sub-Saharan Africa. The vaccines S. Typhimurium CVD 1931 and S. Enteritidis CVD 1944 were immunogenic and protected BALB/c mice against 10,000 50% lethal doses (LD50) of S. Typhimurium or S. Enteritidis, respectively. S. Typhimurium CVD 1931 protected mice against the group B serovar Salmonella enterica serovar Stanleyville (91% vaccine efficacy), and S. Enteritidis CVD 1944 protected mice against the group D serovar Salmonella enterica serovar Dublin (85% vaccine efficacy). High rates of survival were observed when mice were infected 12 weeks postimmunization, indicating that the vaccines elicited long-lived protective immunity. Whereas CVD 1931 did not protect against S. Enteritidis R11, CVD 1944 did mediate protection against S. Typhimurium D65 (81% efficacy). These findings suggest that a bivalent (S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis) vaccine would provide broad protection against the majority of invasive NTS infections in sub-Saharan Africa.

  4. Refined Live Attenuated Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium and Enteritidis Vaccines Mediate Homologous and Heterologous Serogroup Protection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Schmidlein, Patrick; Simon, Raphael; Pasetti, Marcela F.; Galen, James E.; Levine, Myron M.

    2015-01-01

    Invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) infections constitute a major health problem among infants and toddlers in sub-Saharan Africa; these infections also occur in infants and the elderly in developed countries. We genetically engineered a Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain of multilocus sequence type 313, the predominant genotype circulating in sub-Saharan Africa. We evaluated the capacities of S. Typhimurium and Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis ΔguaBA ΔclpX live oral vaccines to protect mice against a highly lethal challenge dose of the homologous serovar and determined protection against other group B and D serovars circulating in sub-Saharan Africa. The vaccines S. Typhimurium CVD 1931 and S. Enteritidis CVD 1944 were immunogenic and protected BALB/c mice against 10,000 50% lethal doses (LD50) of S. Typhimurium or S. Enteritidis, respectively. S. Typhimurium CVD 1931 protected mice against the group B serovar Salmonella enterica serovar Stanleyville (91% vaccine efficacy), and S. Enteritidis CVD 1944 protected mice against the group D serovar Salmonella enterica serovar Dublin (85% vaccine efficacy). High rates of survival were observed when mice were infected 12 weeks postimmunization, indicating that the vaccines elicited long-lived protective immunity. Whereas CVD 1931 did not protect against S. Enteritidis R11, CVD 1944 did mediate protection against S. Typhimurium D65 (81% efficacy). These findings suggest that a bivalent (S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis) vaccine would provide broad protection against the majority of invasive NTS infections in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:26351285

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of Salmonella enterica subsp. diarizonae Serovar 61:k:1,5,(7) Strain CRJJGF_00165 (Phylum Gammaproteobacteria)

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sushim K.; McMillan, Elizabeth A.; Jackson, Charlene R.; Desai, Prerak T.; Porwollik, Steffen; McClelland, Michael; Hiott, Lari M.; Humayoun, Shaheen B.; Barrett, John B.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report a 4.78-Mb draft genome sequence of the Salmonella enterica subsp. diarizonae serovar 61:k:1,5,(7) strain CRJJGF_00165 [also called S. enterica subsp. IIIb serovar 61:k:1,5,(7) strain CRJJGF_00165], isolated from ground beef in 2007. PMID:27881547

  6. Genome Sequences of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Infantis Strains from Hungary Representing Two Peak Incidence Periods in Three Decades.

    PubMed

    Wilk, Tímea; Szabó, Móni; Szmolka, Ama; Kiss, János; Olasz, Ferenc; Nagy, Béla

    2017-03-02

    Four strains of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Infantis isolated from humans (1980 to 1982) and broiler chickens (2016) have been sequenced. They represent the early and recent peak incidences of this serovar in Hungary. Genome sequences of these isolates provide comparative data on the evolution and rise of an endemic S Infantis clone in Hungary.

  7. Rapid determination of lymphogranuloma venereum serovars of Chlamydia trachomatis by quantitative high-resolution melt analysis (HRMA).

    PubMed

    Twin, Jimmy; Stevens, Matthew P; Garland, Suzanne M; Zaia, Angelo M; Tabrizi, Sepehr N

    2012-11-01

    A quantitative high-resolution melt analysis assay was developed to differentiate lymphogranuloma venereum-causing serovars of Chlamydia trachomatis (L1 to L3) from other C. trachomatis serovars (D to K). The detection limit of this assay is approximately 10 copies per reaction, comparable to the limits of other quantitative-PCR-based methods.

  8. Ocular sensitization of mice by live (but not irradiated) Chlamydia trachomatis serovar A

    SciTech Connect

    Colley, D.G.; Goodman, T.G.; Barsoum, I.S.

    1986-10-01

    Ocular exposure of mice to live elementary bodies of Chlamydia trachomatis serovar A results in immunological sensitization of the mice. This reactivity is manifested by the development of early (5 h) and delayed-type (24 h) dermal reactivity and serovar-specific antibody formation against either live or irradiated (100 kilorads) elementary bodies. Parallel ocular exposure of mice to irradiated elementary bodies does not result in this sensitization. The early and late dermal immune responses induced by ocular exposure to live organisms can be transferred to unexposed mice by serum and lymphoid cell transfers, respectively. It appears that successful murine ocular sensitization by human C. trachomatis serovar A elementary bodies is an ability manifested by live organisms and not by inactivated but antigenic organisms.

  9. Repeated isolation of Salmonella enterica Goverdhan, a very rare serovar, from Danish poultry surveillance samples.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Karl; Sørensen, Gitte; Szabo, Istvan; Hächler, Herbert; Le Hello, Simon

    2014-12-05

    We report here the appearance of a very rare serovar of Salmonella, S. enterica subsp. enterica serovar Goverdhan, in routine Salmonella surveillance samples from Danish poultry production. S. Goverdhan was found on nine occasions: in one broiler breeder farm in October 2010, four broiler farms and one broiler breeder farm in June-September 2012, two broiler breeder flocks simultaneously in June 2013, and one layer flock in July 2013. The five isolates from 2012 and the three isolates from 2013 had identical pulsed-field gel electrophoresis profiles, whereas the profile of the isolate from 2010 deviated in a single band. It is the first time this serovar has been described in samples from poultry. The origin of the bacterium is still unknown, but it is suggested that it may have been a pseudo-outbreak caused by contaminated sampling material.

  10. Comparative genomic analysis of Brazilian Leptospira kirschneri serogroup Pomona serovar Mozdok

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Luisa Z; Kremer, Frederico S; Miraglia, Fabiana; Loureiro, Ana P; Eslabao, Marcus R; Dellagostin, Odir A; Lilenbaum, Walter; Moreno, Andrea M

    2016-01-01

    Leptospira kirschneri is one of the pathogenic species of the Leptospira genus. Human and animal infection from L. kirschneri gained further attention over the last few decades. Here we present the isolation and characterisation of Brazilian L. kirschneri serogroup Pomona serovar Mozdok strain M36/05 and the comparative genomic analysis with Brazilian human strain 61H. The M36/05 strain caused pulmonary hemorrhagic lesions in the hamster model, showing high virulence. The studied genomes presented high symmetrical identity and the in silico multilocus sequence typing analysis resulted in a new allelic profile (ST101) that so far has only been associated with the Brazilian L. kirschneri serogroup Pomona serovar Mozdok strains. Considering the environmental conditions and high genomic similarity observed between strains, we suggest the existence of a Brazilian L. kirschneri serogroup Pomona serovar Mozdok lineage that could represent a high public health risk; further studies are necessary to confirm the lineage significance and distribution. PMID:27581124

  11. Cross-protection study of the nine serovars of Haemophilus paragallinarum in the Kume haemagglutinin scheme.

    PubMed

    Soriano, Edgardo V; Garduño, Manuel Longinos; Téllez, Guillermo; Rosas, Pomposo Fernández; Suárez-Güemes, Francisco; Blackall, Patrick J

    2004-10-01

    The cross-protection and haemagglutination-inhibition antibodies present in chickens vaccinated with one of the nine currently recognized Kume haemagglutinin serovars of Haemophilus paragallinarum were investigated. The results confirmed the widely accepted dogma that serogroups A, B, and C represent three distinct immunovars. Within Kume serogroup A, there was generally good cross-protection among all four serovars. However, within Kume serogroup C, there was evidence of a reduced level of cross-protection between some of the four serovars. The haemagglutination-inhibition antibody levels generally showed the same trend as with the cross-protection results. This study suggests that some apparent field failures of infectious coryza vaccines may be due to a lack of cross-protection between the vaccine strains and the field strains. Our results will help guide the selection of strains for inclusion in infectious coryza vaccines.

  12. Same species, different diseases: how and why typhoidal and non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica serovars differ

    PubMed Central

    Gal-Mor, Ohad; Boyle, Erin C.; Grassl, Guntram A.

    2014-01-01

    Human infections by the bacterial pathogen Salmonella enterica represent major disease burdens worldwide. This highly ubiquitous species consists of more than 2600 different serovars that can be divided into typhoidal and non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) serovars. Despite their genetic similarity, these two groups elicit very different diseases and distinct immune responses in humans. Comparative analyses of the genomes of multiple Salmonella serovars have begun to explain the basis of the variation in disease manifestations. Recent advances in modeling both enteric fever and intestinal gastroenteritis in mice will facilitate investigation into both the bacterial- and host-mediated mechanisms involved in salmonelloses. Understanding the genetic and molecular mechanisms responsible for differences in disease outcome will augment our understanding of Salmonella pathogenesis, host immunity, and the molecular basis of host specificity. This review outlines the differences in epidemiology, clinical manifestations, and the human immune response to typhoidal and NTS infections and summarizes the current thinking on why these differences might exist. PMID:25136336

  13. Comparative genomic analysis of Brazilian Leptospira kirschneri serogroup Pomona serovar Mozdok.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Luisa Z; Kremer, Frederico S; Miraglia, Fabiana; Loureiro, Ana P; Eslabao, Marcus R; Dellagostin, Odir A; Lilenbaum, Walter; Moreno, Andrea M

    2016-08-01

    Leptospira kirschneri is one of the pathogenic species of the Leptospira genus. Human and animal infection from L. kirschneri gained further attention over the last few decades. Here we present the isolation and characterisation of Brazilian L. kirschneri serogroup Pomona serovar Mozdok strain M36/05 and the comparative genomic analysis with Brazilian human strain 61H. The M36/05 strain caused pulmonary hemorrhagic lesions in the hamster model, showing high virulence. The studied genomes presented high symmetrical identity and the in silico multilocus sequence typing analysis resulted in a new allelic profile (ST101) that so far has only been associated with the Brazilian L. kirschneri serogroup Pomona serovar Mozdok strains. Considering the environmental conditions and high genomic similarity observed between strains, we suggest the existence of a Brazilian L. kirschneri serogroup Pomona serovar Mozdok lineage that could represent a high public health risk; further studies are necessary to confirm the lineage significance and distribution.

  14. Diversity and antimicrobial susceptibility of Salmonella enterica serovars isolated from pig farms in Ibadan, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Fashae, Kayode; Hendriksen, Rene S

    2014-01-01

    Animals including food animals play a significant role in the epidemiology of Salmonella enterica. The control requires identification of sources and institution of targeted interventions. This study investigates the diversity of S. enterica serovars, antimicrobial susceptibility, and occurrence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes in pigs in Ibadan, Nigeria. Pooled fresh pen floor fecal samples of pigs collected from 31 pig farms were cultured; the Salmonella isolates were serotyped and their antimicrobial susceptibility was determined. PMQR genes were screened by polymerase chain reaction. The 229 Salmonella isolates were made of 50 serovars predominated by rare serovars Salmonella Give (n = 36; 15.7 %), Salmonella Brancaster (n = 17; 7.4 %), Salmonella Colindale (n = 15; 6.6 %), Salmonella Elisaberthville (n = 13; 5.7 %), Salmonella Hillingdon (n = 13; 5.7 %), and Salmonella Kingston (n = 13; 5.7 %). The most widely distributed serovars among the farms were Salmonella Give (six farms) and Salmonella Elisaberthville (six farms). Resistance to chloramphenicol, sulfonamides, nalidixic acid, streptomycin, and tetracycline ranged from 11.6 % (n = 26) to 22.8 % (n = 51). Resistance ciprofloxacin and gentamicin was low (n = 2; 0.9 %). Multiply resistant isolates included Salmonella Kentucky, the most resistant serovar. qnrB19 was found in two isolates of Salmonella Corvallis and one isolate of Salmonella Larochelle, respectively, while qnrS1 was found in two isolates of Salmonella Derby. Other PMQR genes were not detected. Pigs constitute an important source of diverse Salmonella serovars in Ibadan. The isolates were more resistant to old antimicrobials with some multiple resistant. Control measures and regulation of antimicrobials are warranted.

  15. Antibiotic resistance profiles of Salmonella serovars isolated from retail pork and chicken meat in North Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Thai, Truong Ha; Hirai, Takuya; Lan, Nguyen Thi; Yamaguchi, Ryoji

    2012-05-15

    The spread of antibiotic resistance via meat poses a serious public health concerns. During 2007-2009, a total of 586 retail meat samples (318 pork and 268 chicken meats) were collected from three provinces (Bac Ninh, Ha Noi and Ha Tay) of North Vietnam to determine the prevalence of Salmonella. Isolates were characterized by serotyping and antibiotic susceptibility testing. Approximately 39.6% (n=126) of pork and 42.9% (n=115) of chicken samples were Salmonella-positive, and 14 Salmonella serovars were identified. Anatum (15.8%) was the most common serovar, followed by Infantis (13.3%), Emek (10.4%), Derby and Rissen (9.5%), Typhimurium (9.1%), Reading (7.5%) and London (6.2%). The isolation frequency of serovars Enteritidis, Albany, Hadar, Weltevreden, Newport and Blockey ranged from 1.2%-5.8%. Resistance to at least one antibiotic agent was detected in 78.4% of isolates (n=189) and the most frequent resistance were to tetracycline (58.5%), sulphonamides (58.1%), streptomycin (47.3%), ampicillin (39.8%), chloramphenicol (37.3%), trimethoprim (34.0%) and nalidixic acid (27.8%). No Salmonella isolates were resistant to ceftazidime. Chicken isolates had higher resistance to antibiotic agents than pork isolates (P<0.05). It showed that 159 Salmonella isolates belong to the 14 serovars were multidrug resistant (MDR) and 50 MDR patterns were found. This study indicated that Salmonella serovars isolated from retail meat samples were resistant to multiple antibiotics and this resistance was widespread among different serovars. The widespread resistance may have arisen from misuse or overuse of antibiotics during animal husbandry in North Vietnam.

  16. Detection of Vibrio cholerae with monoclonal antibodies specific for serovar O1 lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Adams, L B; Henk, M C; Siebeling, R J

    1988-01-01

    Six hybridoma cell lines, each of which produced a monoclonal antibody (MAb) against Vibrio cholerae O1 lipopolysaccharide (LPS), were established. Each MAb was active serologically by both enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and the slide agglutination test. In the ELISA, each MAb was tested against 7 O1 and 9 non-O1 LPS preparations. Three MAbs reacted with both Inaba and Ogawa serovars (A antigen), two MAbs reacted with the Ogawa serovars only (B antigen), and one MAb reacted with the Inaba serovars only (C antigen). Each MAb was also tested in the ELISA against whole-cell preparations of 37 O1 and 52 non-O1 V. cholerae serovars, 20 heterologous Vibrio species, and 37 heterologous bacterial species. The MAbs reacted with V. cholerae O1 cells only, except for one anti-A antigen MAb which reacted weakly with five V. cholerae non-O1 serovars and Serratia marcescens. Each anti-A antigen MAb was labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) and tested by direct immunofluorescence against selected O1 and non-O1 serovars. Each MAb-FITC conjugate, when tested alone, exhibited O1-specific fluorescence; however, mixtures of the MAb-FITC dramatically enhanced fluorescence intensity on O1 cells. This finding was also visualized by immunoelectron microscopy on both thin-sectioned and negatively stained O1 cells by using an anti-mouse immunoglobulin-colloidal gold conjugate. These results suggest that the A antigen can be described by more than one epitope and that a superior serotyping reagent can be prepared from a defined mixture of MAbs. Images PMID:3053778

  17. Low-stringency PCR with diagnostically useful primers for identification of Leptospira serovars.

    PubMed Central

    de Caballero, O L; Dias Neto, E; Koury, M C; Romanha, A J; Simpson, A J

    1994-01-01

    Primers proposed for the diagnosis of the pathogenic spirochete Leptospira spp. (C. Gravekamp, H. V. D. Kemp, M. Franzen, D. Carrington, G.J. Schoone, G.J.J.M. Van Eys, C. O. R. Everard, R.A. Hartskeel, and W.J. Terpstra, J. Gen. Microbiol. 139:1691-1700, 1993) have been found to produce complex serovar-specific patterns under low-stringency PCR conditions. Such patterns obtained by low-stringency PCR, which maintain the specific band as an internal control, offer, an approach to the standardized identification of Leptospira serovars in clinical laboratories. Images PMID:8051272

  18. Global Genomic Epidemiology of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium DT104

    DOE PAGES

    Leekitcharoenphon, Pimlapas; Hendriksen, Rene S.; Le Hello, Simon; ...

    2016-03-04

    It has been 30 years since the initial emergence and subsequent rapid global spread of multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 (MDR DT104). Nonetheless, its origin and transmission route have never been revealed. In this paper, we used whole-genome sequencing (WGS) and temporally structured sequence analysis within a Bayesian framework to reconstruct temporal and spatial phylogenetic trees and estimate the rates of mutation and divergence times of 315 S. Typhimurium DT104 isolates sampled from 1969 to 2012 from 21 countries on six continents. DT104 was estimated to have emerged initially as antimicrobial susceptible in ~1948 (95% credible interval [CI], 1934more » to 1962) and later became MDR DT104 in ~1972 (95% CI, 1972 to 1988) through horizontal transfer of the 13-kb Salmonella genomic island 1 (SGI1) MDR region into susceptible strains already containing SGI1. This was followed by multiple transmission events, initially from central Europe and later between several European countries. An independent transmission to the United States and another to Japan occurred, and from there MDR DT104 was probably transmitted to Taiwan and Canada. An independent acquisition of resistance genes took place in Thailand in ~1975 (95% CI, 1975 to 1990). In Denmark, WGS analysis provided evidence for transmission of the organism between herds of animals. Interestingly, the demographic history of Danish MDR DT104 provided evidence for the success of the program to eradicate Salmonella from pig herds in Denmark from 1996 to 2000. Finally, the results from this study refute several hypotheses on the evolution of DT104 and suggest that WGS may be useful in monitoring emerging clones and devising strategies for prevention of Salmonella infections.« less

  19. Global Genomic Epidemiology of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium DT104

    SciTech Connect

    Leekitcharoenphon, Pimlapas; Hendriksen, Rene S.; Le Hello, Simon; Weill, François-Xavier; Baggesen, Dorte Lau; Jun, Se-Ran; Ussery, David W.; Lund, Ole; Crook, Derrick W.; Wilson, Daniel J.; Aarestrup, Frank M.

    2016-03-04

    It has been 30 years since the initial emergence and subsequent rapid global spread of multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 (MDR DT104). Nonetheless, its origin and transmission route have never been revealed. In this paper, we used whole-genome sequencing (WGS) and temporally structured sequence analysis within a Bayesian framework to reconstruct temporal and spatial phylogenetic trees and estimate the rates of mutation and divergence times of 315 S. Typhimurium DT104 isolates sampled from 1969 to 2012 from 21 countries on six continents. DT104 was estimated to have emerged initially as antimicrobial susceptible in ~1948 (95% credible interval [CI], 1934 to 1962) and later became MDR DT104 in ~1972 (95% CI, 1972 to 1988) through horizontal transfer of the 13-kb Salmonella genomic island 1 (SGI1) MDR region into susceptible strains already containing SGI1. This was followed by multiple transmission events, initially from central Europe and later between several European countries. An independent transmission to the United States and another to Japan occurred, and from there MDR DT104 was probably transmitted to Taiwan and Canada. An independent acquisition of resistance genes took place in Thailand in ~1975 (95% CI, 1975 to 1990). In Denmark, WGS analysis provided evidence for transmission of the organism between herds of animals. Interestingly, the demographic history of Danish MDR DT104 provided evidence for the success of the program to eradicate Salmonella from pig herds in Denmark from 1996 to 2000. Finally, the results from this study refute several hypotheses on the evolution of DT104 and suggest that WGS may be useful in monitoring emerging clones and devising strategies for prevention of Salmonella infections.

  20. Acid exposure induces multiplication of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi.

    PubMed

    Ahirwar, Suneel Kumar; Pratap, Chandra Bhan; Patel, Saurabh Kumar; Shukla, Vijay K; Singh, Indarjeet Gambhir; Mishra, Om Prakash; Kumar, Kailash; Singh, Tej Bali; Nath, Gopal

    2014-12-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi faces several environmental stresses while going through the stomach (acidic pH) to the small intestine (basic pH) and intracellularly in macrophages (acidic pH) in humans. The acidic pH followed by alkaline pH in the small intestine might be responsible for expression of certain stress-induced genes, resulting in not only better survival but also induction of multiplication and invasion of the bacterium in the small intestine. Based on this hypothesis, we developed a process wherein we exposed the blood, urine, and stool specimens from 90 acute typhoid fever patients and 36 chronic typhoid carriers to acidic pH to see the effect on isolation rate of S. Typhi. About 5 g of freshly passed unpreserved stool, a centrifuged deposit of 15 ml of urine, and 5 ml of blood clot were subjected to 5 ml of Luria-Bertani (LB) broth (pH 3.5) for 20 min, followed by enrichment in bile broth-selenite F broth. When the combined isolation from all 3 specimens, i.e., blood, urine, and stool, after acid exposure was considered, a total of 77.7% of the acute typhoid patients were observed to be positive for the isolation of the S. Typhi serotype, compared to 8.8% by the conventional method. Similarly, 42% (15/36) of chronic carriers yielded positive for S. Typhi growth after acid exposure, compared to 5.5% (2/36) by the conventional method. It therefore can be concluded that acid shock triggers the multiplication of the bacteria, resulting in better isolation rates from blood clot, stool, and urine specimens.

  1. Polyamines Are Required for Virulence in Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Jelsbak, Lotte; Thomsen, Line Elnif; Wallrodt, Inke; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal; Olsen, John Elmerdahl

    2012-01-01

    Sensing and responding to environmental cues is a fundamental characteristic of bacterial physiology and virulence. Here we identify polyamines as novel environmental signals essential for virulence of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, a major intracellular pathogen and a model organism for studying typhoid fever. Central to its virulence are two major virulence loci Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 1 and 2 (SPI1 and SPI2). SPI1 promotes invasion of epithelial cells, whereas SPI2 enables S. Typhimurium to survive and proliferate within specialized compartments inside host cells. In this study, we show that an S. Typhimurium polyamine mutant is defective for invasion, intracellular survival, killing of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and systemic infection of the mouse model of typhoid fever. Virulence of the mutant could be restored by genetic complementation, and invasion and intracellular survival could, as well, be complemented by the addition of exogenous putrescine and spermidine to the bacterial cultures prior to infection. Interestingly, intracellular survival of the polyamine mutant was significantly enhanced above the wild type level by the addition of exogenous putrescine and spermidine to the bacterial cultures prior to infection, indicating that these polyamines function as an environmental signal that primes S. Typhimurium for intracellular survival. Accordingly, experiments addressed at elucidating the roles of these polyamines in infection revealed that expression of genes from both of the major virulence loci SPI1 and SPI2 responded to exogenous polyamines and was reduced in the polyamine mutant. Together our data demonstrate that putrescine and spermidine play a critical role in controlling virulence in S. Typhimurium most likely through stimulation of expression of essential virulence loci. Moreover, our data implicate these polyamines as key signals in S. Typhimurium virulence. PMID:22558361

  2. Characterization of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium aconitase A.

    PubMed

    Baothman, Othman A S; Rolfe, Matthew D; Green, Jeffrey

    2013-06-01

    Aconitases (Acn) are iron-sulfur proteins that catalyse the reversible isomerization of citrate and isocitrate via the intermediate cis-aconitate in the Krebs cycle. Some Acn proteins are bi-functional and under conditions of iron starvation and oxidative stress lose their iron-sulfur clusters and become post-transcriptional regulators by binding specific mRNA targets. Many bacterial species possess two genetically distinct aconitase proteins, AcnA and AcnB. Current understanding of the regulation and functions of AcnA and AcnB in dual Acn bacteria is based on a model developed in Escherichia coli. Thus, AcnB is the major Krebs cycle enzyme expressed during exponential growth, whereas AcnA is a more stable, stationary phase and stress-induced enzyme, and both E. coli Acns are bi-functional. Here a second dual Acn bacterium, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium), has been analysed. Phenotypic traits of S. Typhimurium acn mutants were consistent with AcnB acting as the major Acn protein. Promoter fusion experiments indicated that acnB transcription was ~10-fold greater than that of acnA and that acnA expression was regulated by the cyclic-AMP receptor protein (CRP, glucose starvation), the fumarate nitrate reduction regulator (FNR, oxygen starvation), the ferric uptake regulator (Fur, iron starvation) and the superoxide response protein (SoxR, oxidative stress). In contrast to E. coli, S. Typhimurium acnA was not induced in the stationary phase. Furthermore, acnA expression was enhanced in an acnB mutant, presumably to partially compensate for the lack of AcnB activity. Isolated S. Typhimurium AcnA protein had kinetic and mRNA-binding properties similar to those described for E. coli AcnA. Thus, the work reported here provides a second example of the regulation and function of AcnA and AcnB proteins in a dual Acn bacterium.

  3. Global Genomic Epidemiology of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium DT104

    PubMed Central

    Hendriksen, Rene S.; Le Hello, Simon; Weill, François-Xavier; Baggesen, Dorte Lau; Jun, Se-Ran; Lund, Ole; Crook, Derrick W.; Wilson, Daniel J.; Aarestrup, Frank M.

    2016-01-01

    It has been 30 years since the initial emergence and subsequent rapid global spread of multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 (MDR DT104). Nonetheless, its origin and transmission route have never been revealed. We used whole-genome sequencing (WGS) and temporally structured sequence analysis within a Bayesian framework to reconstruct temporal and spatial phylogenetic trees and estimate the rates of mutation and divergence times of 315 S. Typhimurium DT104 isolates sampled from 1969 to 2012 from 21 countries on six continents. DT104 was estimated to have emerged initially as antimicrobial susceptible in ∼1948 (95% credible interval [CI], 1934 to 1962) and later became MDR DT104 in ∼1972 (95% CI, 1972 to 1988) through horizontal transfer of the 13-kb Salmonella genomic island 1 (SGI1) MDR region into susceptible strains already containing SGI1. This was followed by multiple transmission events, initially from central Europe and later between several European countries. An independent transmission to the United States and another to Japan occurred, and from there MDR DT104 was probably transmitted to Taiwan and Canada. An independent acquisition of resistance genes took place in Thailand in ∼1975 (95% CI, 1975 to 1990). In Denmark, WGS analysis provided evidence for transmission of the organism between herds of animals. Interestingly, the demographic history of Danish MDR DT104 provided evidence for the success of the program to eradicate Salmonella from pig herds in Denmark from 1996 to 2000. The results from this study refute several hypotheses on the evolution of DT104 and suggest that WGS may be useful in monitoring emerging clones and devising strategies for prevention of Salmonella infections. PMID:26944846

  4. Variable Carbon Catabolism among Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Lay Ching; Kong, Boon Hong; Elemfareji, Omar Ismail; Thong, Kwai Lin

    2012-01-01

    Background Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi) is strictly a human intracellular pathogen. It causes acute systemic (typhoid fever) and chronic infections that result in long-term asymptomatic human carriage. S. Typhi displays diverse disease manifestations in human infection and exhibits high clonality. The principal factors underlying the unique lifestyle of S. Typhi in its human host during acute and chronic infections remain largely unknown and are therefore the main objective of this study. Methodology/Principal Findings To obtain insight into the intracellular lifestyle of S. Typhi, a high-throughput phenotypic microarray was employed to characterise the catabolic capacity of 190 carbon sources in S. Typhi strains. The success of this study lies in the carefully selected library of S. Typhi strains, including strains from two geographically distinct areas oftyphoid endemicity, an asymptomatic human carrier, clinical stools and blood samples and sewage-contaminated rivers. An extremely low carbon catabolic capacity (27% of 190 carbon substrates) was observed among the strains. The carbon catabolic profiles appeared to suggest that S. Typhi strains survived well on carbon subtrates that are found abundantly in the human body but not in others. The strains could not utilise plant-associated carbon substrates. In addition, α-glycerolphosphate, glycerol, L-serine, pyruvate and lactate served as better carbon sources to monosaccharides in the S. Typhi strains tested. Conclusion The carbon catabolic profiles suggest that S. Typhi could survive and persist well in the nutrient depleted metabolic niches in the human host but not in the environment outside of the host. These findings serve as caveats for future studies to understand how carbon catabolism relates to the pathogenesis and transmission of this pathogen. PMID:22662115

  5. Flagella-independent surface motility in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sun-Yang; Pontes, Mauricio H.; Groisman, Eduardo A.

    2015-01-01

    Flagella are multiprotein complexes necessary for swimming and swarming motility. In Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, flagella-mediated motility is repressed by the PhoP/PhoQ regulatory system. We now report that Salmonella can move on 0.3% agarose media in a flagella-independent manner when experiencing the PhoP/PhoQ-inducing signal low Mg2+. This motility requires the PhoP-activated mgtA, mgtC, and pagM genes, which specify a Mg2+ transporter, an inhibitor of Salmonella’s own F1Fo ATPase, and a small protein of unknown function, respectively. The MgtA and MgtC proteins are necessary for pagM expression because pagM mRNA levels were lower in mgtA and mgtC mutants than in wild-type Salmonella, and also because pagM expression from a heterologous promoter rescued motility in mgtA and mgtC mutants. PagM promotes group motility by a surface protein(s), as a pagM-expressing strain conferred motility upon a pagM null mutant, and proteinase K treatment eliminated motility. The pagM gene is rarely found outside subspecies I of S. enterica and often present in nonfunctional allelic forms in organisms lacking the identified motility. Deletion of the pagM gene reduced bacterial replication on 0.3% agarose low Mg2+ media but not in low Mg2+ liquid media. Our findings define a form of motility that allows Salmonella to scavenge nutrients and to escape toxic compounds in low Mg2+ semisolid environments. PMID:25624475

  6. Leptospira spp. strain identification by MALDI TOF MS is an equivalent tool to 16S rRNA gene sequencing and multi locus sequence typing (MLST)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In this study mass spectrometry was used for evaluating extracted leptospiral protein samples and results were compared with molecular typing methods. For this, an extraction protocol for Leptospira spp. was independently established in two separate laboratories. Reference spectra were created with 28 leptospiral strains, including pathogenic, non-pathogenic and intermediate strains. This set of spectra was then evaluated on the basis of measurements with well-defined, cultured leptospiral strains and with 16 field isolates of veterinary or human origin. To verify discriminating peaks for the applied pathogenic strains, statistical analysis of the protein spectra was performed using the software tool ClinProTools. In addition, a dendrogram of the reference spectra was compared with phylogenetic trees of the 16S rRNA gene sequences and multi locus sequence typing (MLST) analysis. Results Defined and reproducible protein spectra using MALDI-TOF MS were obtained for all leptospiral strains. Evaluation of the newly-built reference spectra database allowed reproducible identification at the species level for the defined leptospiral strains and the field isolates. Statistical analysis of three pathogenic genomospecies revealed peak differences at the species level and for certain serovars analyzed in this study. Specific peak patterns were reproducibly detected for the serovars Tarassovi, Saxkoebing, Pomona, Copenhageni, Australis, Icterohaemorrhagiae and Grippotyphosa. Analysis of the dendrograms of the MLST data, the 16S rRNA sequencing, and the MALDI-TOF MS reference spectra showed comparable clustering. Conclusions MALDI-TOF MS analysis is a fast and reliable method for species identification, although Leptospira organisms need to be produced in a time-consuming culture process. All leptospiral strains were identified, at least at the species level, using our described extraction protocol. Statistical analysis of the three genomospecies L. borgpetersenii

  7. Salmonella infections in reptiles--prevalence, serovar spectrum and impact on animal health.

    PubMed

    Sting, Reinhard; Ackermann, Dorothee; Blazey, Birgit; Rabsch, Wolfgang; Szabo, Istvan

    2013-01-01

    In a seven year study, 235 lizards, 193 snakes and 111 chelonians were tested for the occurrence of Salmonella enterica. The material for analysis consisted of 251 faecal samples from reptiles suffering from diarrhoea and 288 carcasses of perished or euthanized reptiles. The carcasses were dissected and examined pathohistologically. A total of 35.3% of the lizards, 47.2% of the snakes and 11.7% of the chelonians were found to be Salmonella-positive. Systemic Salmonella infection was detected in 56.1% of the Salmonella-positive lizards and snakes carcasses; 67.4% of these were found to have pathohistological changes of varying severity in the affected organs. The relationship between the systemic Salmonella infection and pathohistological changes was highly significant. Furthermore, systemic Salmonella infections were accompanied by debilitating factors such as parasitic disease, husbandry-associated metabolic or degenerative diseases or viral infection in 63% of the cases. A total of 83 different serovars could be detected, of which 49 occurred in lizards, 36 in snakes and ten in chelonians. Infections with two Salmonella serovars were found in seven cases and in one case with three Salmonella serovars. One infection was associated with a previously undocumented Salmonella serovar in the faecal sample of a water dragon (Subsp. lllb,18:l,v,z13:z).

  8. Swarm and swim motilities of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and role of osmoregulated periplasmic glucans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strains synthesize osmoregulated periplasmic glucans (OPGs) under low osmolarity conditions (< 70 mos mol l-1). OPG synthesis is not observed when cells are grown in iso- or hyper-osmotic media (> 400 mos mol l-1). Mutation in OPG structural gene...

  9. Impact of sporadic reporting of poultry Salmonella serovars from selected developing countries.

    PubMed

    Barbour, Elie K; Ayyash, Danielle B; Alturkistni, Wafa; Alyahiby, Areej; Yaghmoor, Soonham; Iyer, Archana; Yousef, Jehad; Kumosani, Taha; Harakeh, Steve

    2015-01-15

    This review documents the sporadic reporting of poultry Salmonella serovars in South Africa, Egypt, Indonesia, India, and Romania, five countries selected based on the importance of their distribution in different regions of the world and their cumulative significant population size of 1.6 billion. South Africa reported contamination of its poultry carcasses by S. Hadar, S. Blockley, S. Irumu, and S. Anatum. Results from Egypt showed that S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium were predominant in poultry along with other non-typhoid strains, namely S. Infantis, S. Kentucky, S. Tsevie, S. Chiredzi, and S. Heidelberg. In Indonesia, the isolation of Salmonella Typhi was the main focus, while other serovars included S. Kentucky, S. Typhimurium, and S. Paratyhi C. In India, S. Bareilly was predominant compared to S. Enteritidis, S. Typhimurium, S. Paratyphi B, S. Cerro, S. Mbandaka, S. Molade, S. Kottbus, and S. Gallinarum. Romania reported two Salmonella serovars in poultry that affect humans, namely S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium, and other non-typhoid strains including S. Infantis, S. Derby, S. Colindale, S. Rissen, S. Ruzizi, S. Virchow, S. Brandenburg, S. Bredeney, S. Muenchen, S. Kortrijk, and S. Calabar. The results showed the spread of different serovars of Salmonella in those five developing countries, which is alarming and emphasizes the urgent need for the World Health Organization Global Foodborne Infections Network (WHO-GFN) to expand its activities to include more strategic participation and partnership with most developing countries in order to protect poultry and humans from the serious health impact of salmonellosis.

  10. Multiresistant Salmonella enterica serovar 4,[5],12:i:- in Europe: a new pandemic strain?

    PubMed

    Hopkins, K L; Kirchner, M; Guerra, B; Granier, S A; Lucarelli, C; Porrero, M C; Jakubczak, A; Threlfall, E J; Mevius, D J

    2010-06-03

    A marked increase in the prevalence of S. enterica serovar 4,[5],12:i:- with resistance to ampicillin, streptomycin, sulphonamides and tetracyclines (R-type ASSuT) has been noted in food-borne infections and in pigs/pig meat in several European countries in the last ten years. One hundred and sixteen strains of S. enterica serovar 4,[5],12:i:- from humans, pigs and pig meat isolated in England and Wales, France, Germany, Italy, Poland, Spain and the Netherlands were further subtyped by phage typing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multilocus variable number tandem repeat analysis to investigate the genetic relationship among strains. PCR was performed to identify the fljB flagellar gene and the genes encoding resistance to ampicillin, streptomycin, sulphonamides and tetracyclines. Class 1 and 2 integrase genes were also sought. Results indicate that genetically related serovar 4,[5],12:i:- strains of definitive phage types DT193 and DT120 with ampicillin, streptomycin, sulphonamide and tetracycline resistance encoded by blaTEM, strA-strB, sul2 and tet(B) have emerged in several European countries, with pigs the likely reservoir of infection. Control measures are urgently needed to reduce spread of infection to humans via the food chain and thereby prevent the possible pandemic spread of serovar 4,[5],12:i:- of R-type ASSuT as occurred with S. Typhimurium DT104 during the 1990s.

  11. Complete Whole-Genome Sequence of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Java NCTC5706.

    PubMed

    Fazal, Mohammed-Abbas; Alexander, Sarah; Burnett, Edward; Deheer-Graham, Ana; Oliver, Karen; Holroyd, Nancy; Parkhill, Julian; Russell, Julie E

    2016-11-03

    Salmonellae are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality globally. Here, we report the first complete genome sequence for Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Java strain NCTC5706. This strain is of historical significance, having been isolated in the pre-antibiotic era and was deposited into the National Collection of Type Cultures in 1939.

  12. Complete Whole-Genome Sequence of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Java NCTC5706

    PubMed Central

    Fazal, Mohammed-Abbas; Burnett, Edward; Deheer-Graham, Ana; Oliver, Karen; Holroyd, Nancy; Russell, Julie E.

    2016-01-01

    Salmonellae are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality globally. Here, we report the first complete genome sequence for Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Java strain NCTC5706. This strain is of historical significance, having been isolated in the pre-antibiotic era and was deposited into the National Collection of Type Cultures in 1939. PMID:27811100

  13. TRANSCRIPTIONAL RESPONSE OF CHICKEN MACROPHAGES TO SALMONELLA ENTERICA SEROVAR ENTERITIDIS INFECTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The transcriptional profiles of chicken macrophages (HD11) infected with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (SE) were analyzed by using avian macrophage microarray and real time RT-PCR. Out of 4,906 array elements interrogated, 269 genes exhibited a 2-fold change (P < 0.001) over a 24-hour time...

  14. Transcriptional Response of Chicken Macrophages to Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis Infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (SE) continues to be the predominant etiologic agent of salmonellosis, with contaminated egg products being the primary source of infection. At the present time, the molecular and immunological mechanisms involved in SE colonization of chicken hosts are not we...

  15. Antibiotics induce the expression of attachment genes in specific isolates of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    More than 27 percent of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium isolates from humans in the United States are resistant to three or more antibiotics. This presents an important food safety concern as multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella is associated with increased morbidity in humans. It has been...

  16. Polynucleotide phosphorlyase (PNPase) is required for Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium colonization in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The pnp gene encodes polynucleotide phosphorylase, an exoribonuclease involved in RNA degradation. A mutation in the pnp gene was previously identified by our group in a signature-tagged mutagenesis screen designed to search for Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium genes required for survival in...

  17. Tetracycline promotes the expression of ten fimbrial operons in specific Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium isolates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella is associated with increased morbidity in humans and presents an important food safety concern. Antibiotic resistance among isolates of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium has become especially prevalent as over 27 per cent of isolates from humans in the Unit...

  18. Complete Genome Sequence and Methylome of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Cerro, a Frequent Dairy Cow Serovar.

    PubMed

    Haley, Bradd J; Pirone, Cary; Muruvanda, Tim; Brown, Eric; Allard, Marc; Karns, Jeffrey S; Van Kessel, Jo Ann S

    2016-01-28

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Cerro is an infrequent pathogen of humans and other mammals but is frequently isolated from the hindgut of asymptomatic cattle in the United States. To further understand the genomic determinants of S. Cerro specificity for the bovine hindgut, the genome of isolate CFSAN001588 was fully sequenced and deposited in the GenBank database.

  19. Inactivation of Salmonella serovars by Pseudomonas chlororaphis and Pseudomonas fluorescens strains on tomatoes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella enterica and its serovars have been associated with pathogen contamination of tomatoes and numerous outbreaks of Salmonellisis. To improve food safety, pathogen control is of immediate concern. The aim of this reserach was to: 1) Assess the populations of natural microflora (aerobic meso...

  20. Identification of Genes Affecting Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Infection of Chicken Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yixian; Jansen, Ruud; Gaastra, Wim; Arkesteijn, Ger; van der Zeijst, Bernard A. M.; van Putten, Jos P. M.

    2002-01-01

    Screening of 7,680 Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis mutants for attenuation in a chicken macrophage infection model yielded a series of mutants including several with defects in previously unrecognized Salmonella virulence genes. One of the newly identified genes was the pbpA2 gene, belonging to the penicillin binding protein gene family. PMID:12183592

  1. Chlamydia trachomatis serovar G infection in a bisexual male with urethritis.

    PubMed

    Rawre, Jyoti; Dhawan, Benu; Saigal, Karnika; Khanna, Neena

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of Chlamydia trachomatis serovar G urogenital tract infection in a 33-year-old human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) seropositive Indian bisexual male. This case highlights the emergence of a new serovar in India. The patient was tested positive for C. trachomatis by both cryptic plasmid and omp A gene polymerase chain reaction (PCR). On further characterization using polymerase chain reaction - restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and omp A gene sequencing, the strain was found to be C. trachomatis serovar G. His spouse was also found to be infected with C. trachomatis serovar G. Phylogenetic analysis was performed on the clinical isolates obtained from both partners and were found to be identical to the isolates available in GenBank. The sexual network could not be traced further. Detection of a new genotype suggests importation of a new strain into the population probably by sexual contact with a person from a geographical area where the strain is common. Identifying circulating genotypes in the community can assist in developing strategies for improved sexually transmitted disease control.

  2. SALMONELLA ENTERICA SEROVAR ENTERITIDIS INFECTION MODULATES DIVERSE FUNCTIONAL PROCESSES OF CHICKEN MACROPHAGE AT THE TRANSCRIPTIONAL LEVEL

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (SE) is a major etiologic agent of non-typhoid salmonellosis. The organisms colonize adult chicken hosts without causing overt clinical signs. The immunological mechanisms underlying the silent and persistent infection of chickens by SE are not clearly underst...

  3. Comparison of avian Chlamydia psittaci isolates by restriction endonuclease analysis and serovar-specific monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, A A

    1991-01-01

    Avian Chlamydia psittaci isolates were examined by restriction endonuclease analysis and serovar-specific monoclonal antibodies and compared with ovine abortion and polyarthritis isolates. The avian isolates were divided into four serovars (turkey, psittacine, pigeon, and duck) based on their reactivity to the monoclonal antibodies. The DNA digest patterns were similar across the four avian serovars; most bands were identical when the isolates were tested with PstI, BamHI, and EcoRI restriction endonuclease enzymes. The turkey group restriction endonuclease analysis patterns were distinguished from those of the other avian strains by three to four band differences with all enzymes. The duck and pigeon isolates showed only minor DNA pattern differences when compared with the psittacine isolates. Four psittacine isolates from various locations in Texas had an extra band with the EcoRI restriction enzyme, suggesting that they were from a common source; however, they were indistinguishable from the other psittacine isolates when examined with the monoclonal antibodies. The avian isolates were distinctly different from either abortion or polyarthritis isolates by both restriction endonuclease analysis and monoclonal antibody analysis. The data demonstrate that the avian isolates form a distinct group or separate biovar with at least four serovars. Images PMID:1848867

  4. Hydrogen-Stimulated carbon acquisition and conservation in salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium can utilize molecular hydrogen for growth and amino acid transport during anaerobic growth. Via microarray we identified H2 gas-affected gene expression changes in Salmonella. Addition of H2 caused altered expression of 965 genes; 176 genes were H2-up-regulate...

  5. Whole-Genome Shotgun Sequencing of Cephalosporin-Resistant Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Camilla; Kapil, Arti; Sharma, Anita; Devanga Ragupathi, Naveen Kumar; Inbanathan, Francis Yesurajan; Veeraraghavan, Balaji; Kang, Gagandeep

    2017-03-09

    Typhoid is one of the leading causes of mortality in developing countries. Here, we report the draft genome sequences of four Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi strains isolated from bloodstream infections in a tertiary care hospital. The sequence data indicate genomes of ~4.5 Mb for all isolates, with one plasmid in each.

  6. Natural surface coating to inactivate Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium and maintain quality of cherry tomatoes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objectives of the present study were to investigate the effectiveness of zein-based coatings in reducing populations of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and preserving quality of cherry tomatoes. Tomatoes were inoculated with a cocktail of S. Typhimurium LT2 plus three mutants on the smoo...

  7. Genomic heterogeneity of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium bacteriuria from chronic infection.

    PubMed

    Octavia, Sophie; Wang, Qinning; Tanaka, Mark M; Sintchenko, Vitali; Lan, Ruiting

    2017-03-07

    We sequenced the genomes of 14 sequential Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium isolates obtained over a five year period from a patient with persistent Salmonella bacteriuria. The isolates formed five distinct lineages; two of which co-existed over four years. We inferred that the observed within-patient variation resulted from mutation events.

  8. Whole-Genome Shotgun Sequencing of Cephalosporin-Resistant Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Camilla; Kapil, Arti; Sharma, Anita; Devanga Ragupathi, Naveen Kumar; Inbanathan, Francis Yesurajan; Kang, Gagandeep

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Typhoid is one of the leading causes of mortality in developing countries. Here, we report the draft genome sequences of four Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi strains isolated from bloodstream infections in a tertiary care hospital. The sequence data indicate genomes of ~4.5 Mb for all isolates, with one plasmid in each. PMID:28280021

  9. Cytotoxic mechanism of cytolethal distending toxin in nontyphoidal Salmonella serovar (Salmonella Javiana) during macrophage infection.

    PubMed

    Williams, Katherine; Gokulan, Kuppan; Shelman, Diamond; Akiyama, Tatsuya; Khan, Ashraf; Khare, Sangeeta

    2015-02-01

    Cytolethal distending toxin B (cdtB) is a conserved virulence factor in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi. Here we report the presence and functionality of cdtB in some nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) serovars, including Salmonella Javiana (cdtB+wt S. Javiana), isolated from imported food. To understand the role of cdtB in NTS serovars, a deletion mutant (cdtB(-)ΔS. Javiana) was constructed. Macrophages were infected with cdtB+wt S. Javiana (wild type), cdtB(-)Δ S. Javiana (mutant), and cdtB-negative NTS serovar (S. Typhimurium). Cytotoxic activity and transcription level of genes involved in cell death (apoptosis, autophagy, and necrosis) were assessed in infected macrophages. The cdtB+wt S. Javiana caused cellular distension as well as high degree of vacuolization and presence of the autophagosome marker LC3 in infected macrophages as compared with cdtB(-)ΔS. Javiana. The mRNA expression of genes involved in the induction of autophagy in response to toxin (Esr1 and Pik3C3) and coregulators of autophagy and apoptosis (Bax and Cyld) were significantly upregulated in cdtB(+)wt S. Javiana-infected macrophages. As autophagy destroys internalized pathogens in addition to the infected cell, it may reduce the spread of infection.

  10. Whole-Genome Sequencing of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Cubana Strains Isolated from Agricultural Sources

    PubMed Central

    Benahmed, Faiza H.; Gopinath, Gopal R.; Wang, Hua; Jean-Gilles Beaubrun, Junia; Grim, Christopher; Cheng, Chorng-Ming; McClelland, Michael; Ayers, Sherry; Abbott, Jason; Desai, Prerak; Frye, Jonathan G.; Weinstock, George; Hammack, Thomas S.; Hanes, Darcy E.; Rasmussen, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    We report the draft genomes of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Cubana strain CVM42234, isolated from chick feed in 2012, and S. Cubana strain 76814, isolated from swine in 2004. The genome sizes are 4,975,046 and 4,936,251 bp, respectively. PMID:24459266

  11. Differential antibacterial response of chicken granulosa cells to invasion by Salmonella serovars.

    PubMed

    Babu, Uma S; Harrison, Lisa M; Patel, Isha R; Ramirez, Gerardo A; Williams, Kristina M; Pereira, Marion; Balan, Kannan V

    2016-06-01

    In the United States, Salmonella enterica ser. Enteritidis (SE) is among the leading bacterial cause of foodborne illness via consumption of raw or undercooked eggs. The top Salmonella serovars implicated in U.S. foodborne outbreaks associated with chicken consumption include SE, Typhimurium (ST), Heidelberg (SH), Montevideo, Mbandka, Braenderup, and Newport. While enforcement actions target the eradication of SE from layer hens, there is a growing concern that other serovars could occupy this niche and be a cause of egg-transmitted human salmonellosis. Therefore, we tested the invasion and survival of SE, SH, ST, and Salmonella enterica ser. Hadar (S. Hadar) at 4 and 20 h post infection (hpi) in chicken ovarian granulosa cells (cGC); a cellular layer which surrounds the previtelline layer and central yolk in egg-forming follicles. We also evaluated cGC transcriptional changes, using an antibacterial response PCR array, to assess host response to intracellular SalmonellaWe observed that invasion of cGC by SE, SH, and ST was significantly higher than invasion by S. Hadar, with ST showing the highest level of invasion. The Bacterial Survival Index, defined as the ratio of intracellular bacteria at 20 and 4 h, were 18.94, 7.35, and 15.27 for SE, SH, and ST, respectively, with no significant difference in survival between SE or ST compared to SH. Evaluation of cGC anti-Salmonella gene responses indicated that at 4 hpi there was a significant decrease in Toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 mRNA in cGC infected with SE, whereas TLR5 and myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 were significantly down regulated across all serovars. At 4 hpi, invasion by Salmonella serovars resulted in significant upregulation of several antimicrobial genes, and proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines (PICs). At 20 hpi, all the serovars induced PICs with SH being the strongest inducer. Additionally, SE, SH and ST differentially induced signal transduction pathways. Although only a single

  12. Antimicrobial Resistance of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium in Shanghai, China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinyan; Li, Yongrui; Xu, Xuebin; Liang, Beibei; Wu, Fuli; Yang, Xiaoxia; Ma, Qiuxia; Yang, Chaojie; Hu, Xiaofeng; Liu, Hongbo; Li, Hao; Sheng, Chunyu; Xie, Jing; Du, Xinying; Hao, Rongzhang; Qiu, Shaofu; Song, Hongbin

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to analyze the antimicrobial resistance phenotypes and to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying resistance to cephalosporins, ciprofloxacin, and azithromycin in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium isolates identified from patients with diarrhea in Shanghai. The isolates showed high rates of resistance to traditional antimicrobials, and 20.6, 12.7, and 5.5% of them exhibited decreased susceptibility to cephalosporins, ciprofloxacin, and azithromycin, respectively. Notably, 473 (84.6%) isolates exhibited multidrug resistance (MDR), including 161 (28.8%) isolates that showed an ACSSuT profile. Twenty-two MDR isolates concurrently exhibited decreased susceptibility to cephalosporins and ciprofloxacin, and six of them were co-resistant to azithromycin. Of all the 71 isolates with decreased susceptibility to ciprofloxacin, 65 showed at least one mutation (D87Y, D87N, or D87G) in gyrA, among which seven isolates simultaneously had mutations of parC (S80R) (n = 6) or parC (T57S/S80R) (n = 1), while 49 isolates with either zero or one mutation in gyrA contained plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes including qnrB, qnrS, and aac(6′)-Ib-cr. Among the 115 cephalosporin-resistant isolates, the most common ESBL gene was blaCTX-M, followed by blaTEM-1, blaOXA-1, and blaSHV -12. Eight subtypes of blaCTX-M were identified and blaCTX-M-14 (n = 22) and blaCTX-M-55 (n = 31) were found to be dominant. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the presence of blaCTX-M-123 and blaCTX-M-125 in S. Typhimurium. Besides, mphA gene was identified in 15 of the 31 azithromycin-resistant isolates. Among the 22 isolates with reduced susceptibility to cephalosporins and ciprofloxacin, 15 contained ESBL and PMQR genes. Coexistence of these genes lead to the emergence of MDR and the transmission of them will pose great difficulties in S. Typhimurium treatments. Therefore, surveillance for these MDR isolates should be enhanced.

  13. Lipopolysaccharides belonging to different Salmonella serovars are differentially capable of activating Toll-like receptor 4.

    PubMed

    Chessa, Daniela; Spiga, Luisella; De Riu, Nicola; Delaconi, Paola; Mazzarello, Vittorio; Ganau, Giulia; Rubino, Salvatore

    2014-11-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar (serotype) Abortusovis is a member of the Enterobacteriaceae. This serotype is naturally restricted to ovine species and does not infect humans. Limited information is available about the immune response of sheep to S. Abortusovis. S. Abortusovis, like Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhi, causes a systemic infection in which, under natural conditions, animals are not able to raise a rapid immune response. Failure to induce the appropriate response allows pathogens to reach the placenta and results in an abortion. Lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) are pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) that are specific to bacteria and are not synthesized by the host. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are a family of receptors that specifically recognize PAMPs. As a first step, we were able to identify the presence of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) on the ovine placenta by using an immunohistochemistry technique. To our knowledge, this is the first work describing the interaction between S. Abortusovis LPS and TLR4. Experiments using an embryonic cell line (HEK293) transfected with human and ovine TLR4s showed a reduction of interleukin 8 (IL-8) production by S. Abortusovis and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Paratyphi upon LPS stimulation compared to Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium. Identical results were observed using heat-killed bacteria instead of LPS. Based on data obtained with TLR4 in vitro stimulation, we demonstrated that the serotype S. Abortusovis is able to successfully evade the immune system whereas S. Typhimurium and other serovars fail to do so.

  14. Evaluation of the ERIC-PCR as a probable method to differentiate Avibacterium paragallinarum serovars.

    PubMed

    Hellmuth, Julius Eduard; Hitzeroth, Arina Corli; Bragg, Robert Richard; Boucher, Charlotte Enastacia

    2016-11-21

    Infectious coryza an upper respiratory tract-disease in chickens, caused by Avibacterium paragallinarum, leads to huge economic losses. The disease is controlled through vaccination, but vaccination efficacy is dependent on correct identification of the infecting serovar, as limited cross-protection is reported amongst some serovars. Current identification methods include the heamagglutination inhibition (HI) test, which is demanding, and could be subjective. To overcome this, molecular typing methods proposed are the Multiplex PCR and Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP) PCR, but low reproducibility is reported. Enterobacterial Repetitive Intergenic Consensus (ERIC) PCR has been suggested for molecular groupings of various bacterial species. This study focuses on evaluating the ERIC-PCR as probable method to differentiate between different Av. paragallinarum serovars by grouping with reference isolates, based on clonal relations. The ERIC-PCR was performed on 12 reference isolates and 41 field isolates originating from South Africa and South America. The data indicates that the ERIC-PCR is not ideal for the differentiation nor molecular typing of Av. paragallinarum serovars, as no correlation is drawn upon comparison of banding patterns of field isolates and reference strains. However, the results do indicate isolates from the same origin sharing unique banding patterns, indicating potential clonal relationship, but when compared to the reference isolates dominant in the specific area, no correlation could be drawn. Furthermore, although the ERIC-PCR serves a purpose in epidemiological studies, it has proved to have little application in differentiating amongst serovars of Av. paragallinarum and to group untyped field strains with known reference strains.

  15. Clinical and veterinary isolates of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis defective in lipopolysaccharide O-chain polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Guard-Petter, J.; Parker, C.T.; Asokan, K.; Carlson, R.W.

    1999-05-01

    Twelve human and chicken isolates of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis belonging to phage types 4, 8, 13a, and 23 were characterized for variability in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) composition. Isolates were differentiated into two groups, i.e., those that lacked immunoreactive O-chain, termed rough isolates, and those that had immunoreactive O-chain, termed smooth isolates. Isolates within these groups could be further differentiated by LPS compositional differences as detected by gel electrophoresis and gas liquid chromatography of samples extracted with water, which yielded significantly more LPS in comparison to phenol-chloroform extraction. The rough isolates were of two types, the O-antigen synthesis mutants and the O-antigen polymerization (wzy) mutants. Smooth isolates were also of two types, one producing low-molecular-weight (LMW) LPS and the other producing high-molecular-weight (HMW) LPS. To determine the genetic basis for the O-chain variability of the smooth isolates, the authors analyzed the effects of a null mutation in the O-chain length determinant gene, wzz (cld) of serovar Typhimurium. This mutation results in a loss of HMW LPS; however, the LMW LPS of this mutant was longer and more glucosylated than that from clinical isolates of serovar Enteritidis. Cluster analysis of these data and of those from two previously characterized isogenic strains of serovar Enteritidis that had different virulence attributes indicated that glucosylation of HMW LPS (via oafR function) is variable and results in two types of HMW structures, one that is highly glucosylated and one that is minimally glucosylated. These results strongly indicate that naturally occurring variability in wzy, wzz, and oafR function can be used to subtype isolates of serovar Enteritidis during epidemiological investigations.

  16. Molecular modeling and in-silico engineering of Cardamom mosaic virus coat protein for the presentation of immunogenic epitopes of Leptospira LipL32.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vikram; Damodharan, S; Pandaranayaka, Eswari P J; Madathiparambil, Madanan G; Tennyson, Jebasingh

    2016-01-01

    Expression of Cardamom mosaic virus (CdMV) coat protein (CP) in E. coli forms virus-like particles. In this study, the structure of CdMV CP was predicted and used as a platform to display epitopes of the most abundant surface-associated protein, LipL32 of Leptospira at C, N, and both the termini of CdMV CP. In silico, we have mapped sequential and conformational B-cell epitopes from the crystal structure of LipL32 of Leptospira interrogans serovar Copenhageni str. Fiocruz L1-130 using IEDB Elipro, ABCpred, BCPRED, and VaxiJen servers. Our results show that the epitopes displayed at the N-terminus of CdMV CP are promising vaccine candidates as compared to those displayed at the C-terminus or at both the termini. LipL32 epitopes, EP2, EP3, EP4, and EP6 are found to be promising B-cell epitopes for vaccine development. Based on the type of amino acids, length, surface accessibility, and docking energy with CdMV CP model, the order of antigenicity of the LipL32 epitopes was found to be EP4 > EP3 > EP2 > EP6.

  17. Outcome of leptospirosis in children.

    PubMed

    Marotto, P C; Marotto, M S; Santos, D L; Souza, T N; Seguro, A C

    1997-03-01

    We conducted a retrospective analysis of 43 consecutive children (35 boys and 8 girls), 4-14 years of age and living in an urban area, who were hospitalized at the Instituto de Infectologia Emilio Ribas (Sao Paulo, Brazil) from January 1989 to December 1995 with an acute illness subsequently diagnosed as leptospirosis. Epidemiologic data indicated contact with contaminated water in most cases (88%). The patient sera reacted most strongly with Leptospira interrogans serovars copenhageni (45%) and icterohaemorrhagiae (32.7%). Jaundice was present in 70% of the patients, elevated transaminase levels in 56%, renal failure in 79%, meningitis in 23%, thrombocytopenia in 65%, and hemorrhagic manifestations in 11.6%. Three children had pulmonary hemorrhage with respiratory failure and one death occurred as a consequence of respiratory failure. We also observed that antimicrobial therapy reduced the extent of renal failure and thrombocytopenia. These data indicate that antibiotics benefit children with late, severe leptospirosis and that severe disease also occurs in children and should be considered in the differential diagnosis.

  18. Analysis of a Spontaneous Non-Motile and Avirulent Mutant Shows That FliM Is Required for Full Endoflagella Assembly in Leptospira interrogans

    PubMed Central

    Fontana, Célia; Lambert, Ambroise; Benaroudj, Nadia; Gasparini, David; Gorgette, Olivier; Cachet, Nathalie; Bomchil, Natalia; Picardeau, Mathieu

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic Leptospira strains are responsible for leptospirosis, a worldwide emerging zoonotic disease. These spirochetes are unique amongst bacteria because of their corkscrew-like cell morphology and their periplasmic flagella. Motility is reported as an important virulence determinant, probably favoring entry and dissemination of pathogenic Leptospira in the host. However, proteins constituting the periplasmic flagella and their role in cell shape, motility and virulence remain poorly described. In this study, we characterized a spontaneous L. interrogans mutant strain lacking motility, correlated with the loss of the characteristic hook-shaped ends, and virulence in the animal model. Whole genome sequencing allowed the identification of one nucleotide deletion in the fliM gene resulting in a premature stop codon, thereby preventing the production of flagellar motor switch protein FliM. Genetic complementation restored cell morphology, motility and virulence comparable to those of wild type cells. Analyses of purified periplasmic flagella revealed a defect in flagella assembly, resulting in shortened flagella compared to the wild type strain. This also correlated with a lower amount of major filament proteins FlaA and FlaB. Altogether, these findings demonstrate that FliM is required for full and correct assembly of the flagella which is essential for motility and virulence. PMID:27044038

  19. Precipitation of Iron on the Surface of Leptospira interrogans Is Associated with Mutation of the Stress Response Metalloprotease HtpX

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Rebekah; Lo, Miranda; Khoo, Chenai; Zhang, Hailong; Boysen, Reinhard I.; Picardeau, Mathieu; Murray, Gerald L.; Bulach, Dieter M.

    2013-01-01

    High concentrations of free metal ions in the environment can be detrimental to bacterial survival. However, bacteria utilize strategies, including the activation of stress response pathways and immobilizing chemical elements on their surface, to limit this toxicity. In this study, we characterized LA4131, the HtpX-like M48 metalloprotease from Leptospira interrogans, with a putative role in bacterial stress response and membrane homeostasis. Growth of the la4131 transposon mutant strain (L522) in 360 μM FeSO4 (10-fold the normal in vitro concentration) resulted in the production of an amorphous iron precipitate. Atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy analysis of the strain demonstrated that precipitate production was associated with the generation and release of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) from the leptospiral surface. Transcriptional studies indicated that inactivation of la4131 resulted in altered expression of a subset of metal toxicity and stress response genes. Combining these findings, this report describes OMV production in response to environmental stressors and associates OMV production with the in vitro activity of an HtpX-like metalloprotease. PMID:23709510

  20. Whole Genome Analysis of Leptospira licerasiae Provides Insight into Leptospiral Evolution and Pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Selengut, Jeremy D.; Harkins, Derek M.; Patra, Kailash P.; Moreno, Angelo; Lehmann, Jason S.; Purushe, Janaki; Sanka, Ravi; Torres, Michael; Webster, Nicholas J.; Vinetz, Joseph M.; Matthias, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    The whole genome analysis of two strains of the first intermediately pathogenic leptospiral species to be sequenced (Leptospira licerasiae strains VAR010 and MMD0835) provides insight into their pathogenic potential and deepens our understanding of leptospiral evolution. Comparative analysis of eight leptospiral genomes shows the existence of a core leptospiral genome comprising 1547 genes and 452 conserved genes restricted to infectious species (including L. licerasiae) that are likely to be pathogenicity-related. Comparisons of the functional content of the genomes suggests that L. licerasiae retains several proteins related to nitrogen, amino acid and carbohydrate metabolism which might help to explain why these Leptospira grow well in artificial media compared with pathogenic species. L. licerasiae strains VAR010T and MMD0835 possess two prophage elements. While one element is circular and shares homology with LE1 of L. biflexa, the second is cryptic and homologous to a previously identified but unnamed region in L. interrogans serovars Copenhageni and Lai. We also report a unique O-antigen locus in L. licerasiae comprised of a 6-gene cluster that is unexpectedly short compared with L. interrogans in which analogous regions may include >90 such genes. Sequence homology searches suggest that these genes were acquired by lateral gene transfer (LGT). Furthermore, seven putative genomic islands ranging in size from 5 to 36 kb are present also suggestive of antecedent LGT. How Leptospira become naturally competent remains to be determined, but considering the phylogenetic origins of the genes comprising the O-antigen cluster and other putative laterally transferred genes, L. licerasiae must be able to exchange genetic material with non-invasive environmental bacteria. The data presented here demonstrate that L. licerasiae is genetically more closely related to pathogenic than to saprophytic Leptospira and provide insight into the genomic bases for its infectiousness

  1. IS200 and multilocus sequence typing for the identification of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi strains from Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Gamboa, Areli; Silva, Claudia; Fernández-Mora, Marcos; Wiesner, Magdalena; Ponce de León, Alfredo; Calva, Edmundo

    2015-06-01

    In this work, IS200 and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) were used to analyze 19 strains previously serotyped as Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi and isolated in Indonesia (16 strains), Mexico (2 strains), and Switzerland (1 strain). Most of the strains showed the most common Typhi sequence types, ST1 and ST2, and a new Typhi genotype (ST1856) was described. However, one isolate from Mexico and another from Indonesia were of the ST365 and ST426 sequence types, indicating that they belonged to serovars Weltevreden and Aberdeen, respectively. These results were supported by the amplification of IS200 fragments, which rapidly distinguish Typhi from other serovars. Our results demonstrate the utility of IS200 and MLST in the classification of Salmonella strains into serovars. These methods provide information on the clonal relatedness of strains isolated worldwide.

  2. Draft Genome Sequences of 18 Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Oranienburg Strains Isolated from Rivers in Northwestern Mexico.

    PubMed

    Casteñeda-Ruelas, Gloria M; Carreón-Gaxiola, César; Castelán-Sánchez, Hugo G; Acatzi-Silva, Abraham; Romero-Martínez, Salvador; García-Molina, Alejandra; Jiménez-Edeza, Maribel

    2017-03-09

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Oranienburg is recognized as a foodborne pathogen widely distributed in the environment. Here, we report 18 draft genomes of S Oranienburg strains isolated from rivers in the northwestern region of Mexico.

  3. Integrative analysis of Salmonellosis in Israel reveals association of Salmonella enterica Serovar 9,12:l,v:- with extraintestinal infections, dissemination of endemic S. enterica Serovar Typhimurium DT104 biotypes, and severe underreporting of outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Marzel, Alex; Desai, Prerak T; Nissan, Israel; Schorr, Yosef Ilan; Suez, Jotham; Valinsky, Lea; Reisfeld, Abraham; Agmon, Vered; Guard, Jean; McClelland, Michael; Rahav, Galia; Gal-Mor, Ohad

    2014-06-01

    Salmonella enterica is the leading etiologic agent of bacterial food-borne outbreaks worldwide. This ubiquitous species contains more than 2,600 serovars that may differ in their host specificity, clinical manifestations, and epidemiology. To characterize salmonellosis epidemiology in Israel and to study the association of nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) serovars with invasive infections, 48,345 Salmonella cases reported and serotyped at the National Salmonella Reference Center between 1995 and 2012 were analyzed. A quasi-Poisson regression was used to identify irregular clusters of illness, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis in conjunction with whole-genome sequencing was applied to molecularly characterize strains of interest. Three hundred twenty-nine human salmonellosis clusters were identified, representing an annual average of 23 (95% confidence interval [CI], 20 to 26) potential outbreaks. We show that the previously unsequenced S. enterica serovar 9,12:l,v:- belongs to the B clade of Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica, and we show its frequent association with extraintestinal infections, compared to other NTS serovars. Furthermore, we identified the dissemination of two prevalent Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 clones in Israel, which are genetically distinct from other global DT104 isolates. Accumulatively, these findings indicate a severe underreporting of Salmonella outbreaks in Israel and provide insights into the epidemiology and genomics of prevalent serovars, responsible for recurring illness.

  4. Multiplex PCR Assay for Detection of Vibrio vulnificus Biotype 2 and Simultaneous Discrimination of Serovar E Strains▿

    PubMed Central

    Sanjuán, Eva; Amaro, Carmen

    2007-01-01

    In the present work we develop a multiplex PCR assay for the detection and identification of the fish pathogen Vibrio vulnificus biotype 2 with discriminating potential for zoonotic strains (serovar E). The PCR assay allowed the identification of two new biotype 2 serovar E human isolates from culture collections. Finally, the multiplex was successfully applied to both diagnosis and carrier detection in field samples. PMID:17277209

  5. Prevalence, numbers and antimicrobial susceptibilities of Salmonella serovars and Campylobacter spp. in retail poultry in Phnom Penh, Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Lay, Kruy Sun; Vuthy, Yith; Song, Ping; Phol, Khem; Sarthou, Jean Louis

    2011-03-01

    Salmonella and Campylobacter are common bacterial pathogens associated with human gastro-enteritis; and raw poultry is considered to be an important source of these bacteria. To evaluate whether the Salmonella serovars and Campylobacter spp. bacteria could be monitored for the purpose of microbial presence, enumeration and antimicrobial resistance in raw poultry, 152 poultry carcasses were randomly selected from 10 markets in retail outlets of Phnom Penh during March 2006 to February 2007. The majority of poultry samples was contaminated by Salmonella serovars (88.2%) and Campylobacter spp. (80.9%). A very high contamination of Salmonella was found at 3-4 log₁₀ CFU/g for 22.4% of samples and of Campylobacter at 7-8 log₁₀ CFU/g for 1.3% of samples. Fifty nine different Salmonella serovars contaminated 134 poultry carcasses; five most prevalent serovars covered 29.1% of serovars isolates (Anatum, Typhimurium, Corvallis, Stanley and Enteritidis). Three Campylobacter species contaminating 123 raw poultry were Campylobacter jejuni (50.0%), Campylobacter coli (29.0%) and Campylobacter lari (21.0%). High antibiotic resistance percentages were found among Salmonella serovars and Campylobacter spp. isolates. This study revealed that raw poultry at the retail outlets in Phnom Penh markets are contaminated with high prevalences of food-borne pathogens, and communicating the importance of minimizing this risk in reducing human infections.

  6. Leptospira Serovars for Diagnosis of Leptospirosis in Humans and Animals in Africa: Common Leptospira Isolates and Reservoir Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Mgode, Georgies F.; Machang’u, Robert S.; Mhamphi, Ginethon G.; Katakweba, Abdul; Mulungu, Loth S.; Durnez, Lies; Leirs, Herwig; Hartskeerl, Rudy A.; Belmain, Steven R.

    2015-01-01

    The burden of leptospirosis in humans and animals in Africa is higher than that reported from other parts of the world. However, the disease is not routinely diagnosed in the continent. One of major factors limiting diagnosis is the poor availability of live isolates of locally circulating Leptospira serovars for inclusion in the antigen panel of the gold standard microscopic agglutination test (MAT) for detecting antibodies against leptospirosis. To gain insight in Leptospira serovars and their natural hosts occurring in Tanzania, concomitantly enabling the improvement of the MAT by inclusion of fresh local isolates, a total of 52 Leptospira isolates were obtained from fresh urine and kidney homogenates, collected between 1996 and 2006 from small mammals, cattle and pigs. Isolates were identified by serogrouping, cross agglutination absorption test (CAAT), and molecular typing. Common Leptospira serovars with their respective animal hosts were: Sokoine (cattle and rodents); Kenya (rodents and shrews); Mwogolo (rodents); Lora (rodents); Qunjian (rodent); serogroup Grippotyphosa (cattle); and an unknown serogroup from pigs. Inclusion of local serovars particularly serovar Sokoine in MAT revealed a 10-fold increase in leptospirosis prevalence in Tanzania from 1.9% to 16.9% in rodents and 0.26% to 10.75% in humans. This indicates that local serovars are useful for diagnosis of human and animal leptospirosis in Tanzania and other African countries. PMID:26624890

  7. The Type III Secretion System Effector SptP of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Rebecca; Byrne, Alexander; Berger, Cedric N.; Klemm, Elizabeth; Crepin, Valerie F.; Dougan, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Strains of the various Salmonella enterica serovars cause gastroenteritis or typhoid fever in humans, with virulence depending on the action of two type III secretion systems (Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 [SPI-1] and SPI-2). SptP is a Salmonella SPI-1 effector, involved in mediating recovery of the host cytoskeleton postinfection. SptP requires a chaperone, SicP, for stability and secretion. SptP has 94% identity between S. enterica serovar Typhimurium and S. Typhi; direct comparison of the protein sequences revealed that S. Typhi SptP has numerous amino acid changes within its chaperone-binding domain. Subsequent comparison of ΔsptP S. Typhi and S. Typhimurium strains demonstrated that, unlike SptP in S. Typhimurium, SptP in S. Typhi was not involved in invasion or cytoskeletal recovery postinfection. Investigation of whether the observed amino acid changes within SptP of S. Typhi affected its function revealed that S. Typhi SptP was unable to complement S. Typhimurium ΔsptP due to an absence of secretion. We further demonstrated that while S. Typhimurium SptP is stable intracellularly within S. Typhi, S. Typhi SptP is unstable, although stability could be recovered following replacement of the chaperone-binding domain with that of S. Typhimurium. Direct assessment of the strength of the interaction between SptP and SicP of both serovars via bacterial two-hybrid analysis demonstrated that S. Typhi SptP has a significantly weaker interaction with SicP than the equivalent proteins in S. Typhimurium. Taken together, our results suggest that changes within the chaperone-binding domain of SptP in S. Typhi hinder binding to its chaperone, resulting in instability, preventing translocation, and therefore restricting the intracellular activity of this effector. IMPORTANCE Studies investigating Salmonella pathogenesis typically rely on Salmonella Typhimurium, even though Salmonella Typhi causes the more severe disease in humans. As such, an understanding of

  8. Immunization with truncated recombinant protein SpaC of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae strain 715 serovar 18 confers protective immunity against challenge with various serovars.

    PubMed

    To, Ho; Someno, Shuichi; Nagai, Shinya; Koyama, Tomohiro; Nagano, Tetsuji

    2010-12-01

    Previously, we showed that surface protective antigen (Spa) proteins of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae can be classified into three molecular species-SpaA, SpaB, and SpaC-and that SpaC is the most broadly cross-protective antigen among the three Spa proteins. In this study, we examined the ability of the α-helical domain, which comprises the N-terminal half of SpaC, to elicit cross-protective immunity in mice and pigs. Mice actively immunized with the full-length protein (rSpaC664) or the α-helical domain (rSpaC427), but not the C-terminal domain (rSpaC253), were protected against challenge with E. rhusiopathiae serovars 1a, 2, 6, 19, and 18 expressing heterologous (SpaA or SpaB) and homologous (SpaC) Spas. The α-helical domain seemed to provide better protection than rSpaC664, although the differences did not reach statistical significance. Similarly, mice passively immunized with rabbit anti-rSpaC664 or anti-rSpaC427 sera, but not anti-rSpaC253 serum, were protected from challenge with various serovars. Pigs immunized with SpaC427 also developed specific antibodies against Spa proteins and were protected from challenge with the highly virulent heterologous E. rhusiopathiae strain Fujisawa (serovar 1a). Taken together, these results demonstrate for the first time the striking protective efficacy of the α-helical domain-mediated immunization in both mice and pigs, thereby highlighting its utility as the most promising candidate for the development of a safe and effective vaccine against erysipelas.

  9. Chromosome-Directed PCR-Based Detection and Quantification of Bacillus cereus Group Members with Focus on B. thuringiensis Serovar israelensis Active against Nematoceran Larvae.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Salome; Hendriksen, Niels B; Melin, Petter; Lundström, Jan O; Sundh, Ingvar

    2015-08-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis serovar israelensis is a wide-spread soil bacterium affiliated with the B. cereus group (Bcg) and is widely used in biocontrol products applied against mosquito and black fly larvae. For monitoring and quantification of applied B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis and its effect on indigenous B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis and Bcg assemblages, efficient and reliable tools are essential. The abundance and properties of B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis strains in the environment traditionally have been investigated with cultivation-dependent techniques, which are hampered by low sensitivity and the morphological similarity between B. cereus and B. thuringiensis. Currently available PCR-based detection and quantification tools target markers located on plasmids. In this study, a new cultivation-independent PCR-based method for efficient and specific quantification of B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis and Bcg is presented, utilizing two sets of PCR primers targeting the bacterial chromosome. Sequence database searches and empirical tests performed on target and nontarget species, as well as on bulk soil DNA samples, demonstrated that this diagnostic tool is specific for B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis and Bcg. The method will be useful for comparisons of Bcg and B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis abundances in the same samples. Moreover, the effect of B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis-based insecticide application on the total Bcg assemblages, including indigenous populations, can be investigated. This type of information is valuable in risk assessment and policy making for use of B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis in the environment.

  10. Chromosome-Directed PCR-Based Detection and Quantification of Bacillus cereus Group Members with Focus on B. thuringiensis Serovar israelensis Active against Nematoceran Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Hendriksen, Niels B.; Melin, Petter; Lundström, Jan O.; Sundh, Ingvar

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis serovar israelensis is a wide-spread soil bacterium affiliated with the B. cereus group (Bcg) and is widely used in biocontrol products applied against mosquito and black fly larvae. For monitoring and quantification of applied B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis and its effect on indigenous B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis and Bcg assemblages, efficient and reliable tools are essential. The abundance and properties of B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis strains in the environment traditionally have been investigated with cultivation-dependent techniques, which are hampered by low sensitivity and the morphological similarity between B. cereus and B. thuringiensis. Currently available PCR-based detection and quantification tools target markers located on plasmids. In this study, a new cultivation-independent PCR-based method for efficient and specific quantification of B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis and Bcg is presented, utilizing two sets of PCR primers targeting the bacterial chromosome. Sequence database searches and empirical tests performed on target and nontarget species, as well as on bulk soil DNA samples, demonstrated that this diagnostic tool is specific for B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis and Bcg. The method will be useful for comparisons of Bcg and B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis abundances in the same samples. Moreover, the effect of B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis-based insecticide application on the total Bcg assemblages, including indigenous populations, can be investigated. This type of information is valuable in risk assessment and policy making for use of B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis in the environment. PMID:25979887

  11. Poultry as a possible source of non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica serovars in humans in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Barua, Himel; Biswas, Paritosh Kumar; Talukder, Kaisar Ali; Olsen, Katharina E P; Christensen, Jens Peter

    2014-01-31

    We investigated Salmonella enterica isolates from human clinical cases of gastroenteritis to determine the distribution of non-typhoidal Salmonella serovars in the human population, and compared them to isolates originating from poultry by serotyping, phage typing, plasmid profiling, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) to evaluate the potential role of poultry in human non-typhoidal salmonellosis in Bangladesh. Nine different serovars were identified among the human isolates of which Salmonella Paratyphi B var Java (S. Java), S. Kentucky, S. Enteritidis, S. Virchow and S. Weltevreden also were commonly isolated from poultry. The poultry isolates belonging to S. Java, S. Kentucky and S. Enteritidis were indistinguishable from human isolates or genetically closely related, based on PFGE profiles and MLST. S. Kentucky clone ST198 and S. Java clone ST43 both well-known cause of human infections were also isolated from poultry.

  12. The Vi capsular polysaccharide enables Salmonella enterica serovar typhi to evade microbe-guided neutrophil chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Wangdi, Tamding; Lee, Cheng-Yuk; Spees, Alanna M; Yu, Chenzhou; Kingsbury, Dawn D; Winter, Sebastian E; Hastey, Christine J; Wilson, R Paul; Heinrich, Volkmar; Bäumler, Andreas J

    2014-08-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi) causes typhoid fever, a disseminated infection, while the closely related pathogen S. enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) is associated with a localized gastroenteritis in humans. Here we investigated whether both pathogens differ in the chemotactic response they induce in neutrophils using a single-cell experimental approach. Surprisingly, neutrophils extended chemotactic pseudopodia toward Escherichia coli and S. Typhimurium, but not toward S. Typhi. Bacterial-guided chemotaxis was dependent on the presence of complement component 5a (C5a) and C5a receptor (C5aR). Deletion of S. Typhi capsule biosynthesis genes markedly enhanced the chemotactic response of neutrophils in vitro. Furthermore, deletion of capsule biosynthesis genes heightened the association of S. Typhi with neutrophils in vivo through a C5aR-dependent mechanism. Collectively, these data suggest that expression of the virulence-associated (Vi) capsular polysaccharide of S. Typhi obstructs bacterial-guided neutrophil chemotaxis.

  13. Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium and Escherichia coli Contamination of Root and Leaf Vegetables Grown in Soils with Incorporated Bovine Manure

    PubMed Central

    Natvig, Erin E.; Ingham, Steven C.; Ingham, Barbara H.; Cooperband, Leslie R.; Roper, Teryl R.

    2002-01-01

    Bovine manure, with or without added Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (three strains), was incorporated into silty clay loam (SCL) and loamy sand (LS) soil beds (53- by 114-cm surface area, 17.5 cm deep) and maintained in two controlled-environment chambers. The S. enterica serovar Typhimurium inoculum was 4 to 5 log CFU/g in manure-fertilized soil. The conditions in the two environmental chambers, each containing inoculated and uninoculated beds of manure-fertilized soil, simulated daily average Madison, Wis., weather conditions (hourly temperatures, rainfall, daylight, and humidity) for a 1 March or a 1 June manure application and subsequent vegetable growing seasons ending 9 August or 28 September, respectively. Core soil samples were taken biweekly from both inoculated and uninoculated soil beds in each chamber. Radishes, arugula, and carrots were planted in soil beds, thinned, and harvested. Soils, thinned vegetables, and harvested vegetables were analyzed for S. enterica serovar Typhimurium and Escherichia coli (indigenous in manure). After the 1 March manure application, S. enterica serovar Typhimurium was detected at low levels in both soils on 31 May, but not on vegetables planted 1 May and harvested 12 July from either soil. After the 1 June manure application, S. enterica serovar Typhimurium was detected in SCL soil on 7 September and on radishes and arugula planted in SCL soil on 15 August and harvested on 27 September. In LS soil, S. enterica serovar Typhimurium died at a similar rate (P ≥ 0.05) after the 1 June manure application and was less often detected on arugula and radishes harvested from this soil compared to the SCL soil. Pathogen levels on vegetables were decreased by washing. Manure application in cool (daily average maximum temperature of <10°C) spring conditions is recommended to ensure that harvested vegetables are not contaminated with S. enterica serovar Typhimurium. Manure application under warmer (daily average maximum

  14. Detection of Salmonella serovars from clinical samples by enrichment broth cultivation-PCR procedure.

    PubMed Central

    Stone, G G; Oberst, R D; Hays, M P; McVey, S; Chengappa, M M

    1994-01-01

    To overcome problems associated with application of PCR to clinical samples, we have combined a short cultivation procedure with a Salmonella-specific PCR-hybridization assay to specifically identify Salmonella serovars from clinical samples of various animal species. The technique was investigated by using fecal samples seeded with known numbers of Salmonella organisms and cultivated for different lengths of time in assorted selective and nonselective enrichment media. The ability of PCR to amplify a Salmonella-specific DNA product (457-bp sequence covering the Salmonella invE and invA genes) was examined in Southern hybridizations with an internal oligonucleotide probe. Forty-seven Salmonella isolates representing 32 serovars were evaluated, and all Salmonella isolates resulted in a 457-bp product that hybridized with the oligonucleotide probe, whereas no hybridizations were evident with 53 non-Salmonella organisms. The assay detected as few as 9 CFU of Salmonella organisms in pure culture and as little as 300 fg of purified chromosomal DNA. Rappaport-Vassiliadis and tetrathionate broths were inhibitory to PCR, whereas brain heart infusion and selenite-cystine broths were not. The PCR-hybridization assay coupled with a brain heart infusion enrichment culture incubated for 2 h detected as few as 80 CFU of Salmonella organisms in seeded feces. We have successfully identified Salmonella serovars in clinical samples from swine, horses, and cattle more rapidly than with conventional culture techniques. The sensitivity and specificity of this assay were both 100% compared with culture results. These results indicate that a combined cultivation-PCR-hybridization assay could be applicable and advantageous in the rapid identification of Salmonella serovars in routine diagnostic situations. Images PMID:7929768

  15. Intermediate Susceptibility to Ciprofloxacin among Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi Isolates in Lima, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Lejon, Veerle; Horna, Gertrudis; Astocondor, Lizeth; Vanhoof, Raymond; Bertrand, Sophie; Jacobs, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Thirty-three Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi blood isolates from Lima, Peru (2008 to 2012), were fully susceptible to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, chloramphenicol, ceftriaxone, and tetracycline; 8/33 (24.2%) showed intermediate susceptibility to ciprofloxacin carrying mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining region of the gyrA gene (Ser83-Phe and Asp87-Asn) and in the gyrB gene (Ser464-Phe). PMID:24371234

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of the Tumor-Targeting Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Strain SL7207

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Síle A.; Ormsby, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain SL7207 is a genetically modified derivative of strain SL1344, which preferentially accumulates in tumors and can be used as a vehicle for tissue-specific gene delivery in vivo. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of SL7207, confirming a purported aroA deletion and four single-nucleotide polymorphisms compared to SL1344. PMID:28153911

  17. Induction and Resuscitation of Viable but Nonculturable Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium DT104†

    PubMed Central

    Gupte, A. R.; de Rezende, C. L. E.; Joseph, S. W.

    2003-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 11601was tested for its ability to maintain viability in minimal, chemically defined solutions. Periodic monitoring of growth and survival in microcosms of different ion concentrations, maintained at various temperatures, showed a gradual decline in culturable organisms (∼235 days) at 5°C. Organisms maintained at a higher temperature (21°C) showed continuous, equivalent CFU per milliliter (∼106) up to 400 days after inoculation. Fluorescence microscopy with Baclight revealed that nonculturable cells were actually viable, while observations with scanning electron microscopy showed that the cells had retained their structural integrity. Temperature upshift (56°C ± 0.5, 15 s) of the nonculturable organisms (5°C) in Trypticase soy broth followed by immediate inoculation onto Trypticase soy agar (TSA) gave evidence of resuscitation. Interestingly, S. enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 from the microcosms at either 5°C (1 to 200 days) or 21°C (1 to 250 days) did not show enhanced growth after intermittent inoculation onto catalase-supplemented TSA. Furthermore, cells from 21°C microcosms exposed to oxidative and osmotic stress showed greater resistance to stresses over increasing times of exposure than did recently grown cells. It is possible that the exceptional survivability and resilience of this particular strain may in part reflect the growing importance of this multidrug-resistant organism, in general, as a cause of intestinal disease in humans. The fact that S. enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 11601 is capable of modifying its physiological characteristics, including entry into and recovery from the viable but nonculturable state, suggests the overall possibility that S. enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 may be able to respond uniquely to various adverse environmental conditions. PMID:14602627

  18. Antibiotic resistance and diversity of Salmonella enterica serovars associated with broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Diarra, Moussa Sory; Delaquis, Pascal; Rempel, Heidi; Bach, Susan; Harlton, Colleen; Aslam, Mueen; Pritchard, Jane; Topp, Edward

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the antibiotic resistance phenotype and genotype of Salmonella isolated from broiler production facilities. A total of 193 Salmonella isolates recovered from commercial farms in British Columbia, Canada, were evaluated. Susceptibility to antibiotics was determined with the Sensititre system. Virulence and antibiotic resistance genes were detected by PCR assay. Genetic diversity was determined by pulse-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) typing. Seventeen serovars of Salmonella were identified. The most prevalent Salmonella serovars were Kentucky (29.0% of isolates), Typhimurium (23.8%), Enteritidis (13.5%), and Hadar (11.9%); serovars Heidelberg, Brandenburg, and Thompson were identified in 7.7, 4.1, and 3.6% of isolates, respectively. More than 43% of the isolates were simultaneously resistant to ampicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, ceftiofur, cefoxitim, and ceftriaxone. This β-lactam resistance pattern was observed in 33 (58.9%) of the Salmonella Kentucky isolates; 2 of these isolates were also resistant to chloramphenicol, streptomycin, sulfisoxazole, and tetracycline. Genes associated with resistance to aminoglycosides (aadA1, aadA2, and strA), β-lactams (blaCMY-2, blaSHV, and blaTEM), tetracycline (tetA and tetB), and sulfonamide (sul1) were detected among corresponding resistant isolates. The invasin gene (invA) and the Salmonella plasmid virulence gene (spvC) were found in 97.9 and 25.9% of the isolates, respectively, with 33 (71.7%) of the 46 Salmonella Typhimurium isolates and 17 (65.4%) of the 26 Salmonella Enteritidis isolates carrying both invA and spvC. PGFE typing revealed that the antibiotic-resistant serovars were genetically diverse. These data confirm that broiler chickens can be colonized by genetically diverse antibiotic-resistant Salmonella isolates harboring virulence determinants. The presence of such strains is highly relevant to food safety and public health.

  19. Differences in attachment of Salmonella enterica serovars to cabbage and lettuce leaves.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jitendra; Sharma, Manan

    2010-04-30

    This study investigated the ability of five Salmonella enterica serovars to attach to and colonize intact and cut lettuce (Iceberg, Romaine) and cabbage surfaces. Biofilm formation and attachment of Salmonella serovars to intact and cut leaves were determined. Populations of loosely and strongly attached Salmonella were obtained to calculate the attachment strength (S(R)). Biofilm formation, as determined by microtiter plate assay, varied with strain and growth medium used. Salmonella Tennessee and S. Thompson produced stronger biofilms compared to S. Newport, S. Negev, and S. Braenderup. Biofilm formation was also stronger when Salmonella spp. were grown in diluted TSB (1:10). S. Tennessee, which produced strong biofilms, attached to produce surfaces at significantly higher numbers than the populations of S. Negev. Overall, S. Tennessee displayed more biofilm formation in vitro and attached more strongly to lettuce than other serovars. All Salmonella serovars attached rapidly on intact and cut produce surfaces. Salmonella spp. attached to Romaine lettuce at significantly higher numbers than those attached to Iceberg lettuce or cabbage. Salmonella attached preferentially to cut surface of all produce; however, the difference between Salmonella populations attached to intact and cut surfaces was similar (P>0.05). Salmonella attachment to both intact and cut produce surfaces increased with time. The overall attachment strength of Salmonella was significantly lower on cabbage (0.12) followed by Iceberg (0.23) and Romaine lettuce (0.34). Cabbage, intact or cut, did not support attachment of Salmonella as well as Romaine lettuce. Understanding the attachment mechanisms of Salmonella to produce may be useful in developing new intervention strategies to prevent produce outbreaks.

  20. Salmonella contamination, serovars and antimicrobial resistance profiles of cattle slaughtered in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Madoroba, Evelyn; Kapeta, Daniel; Gelaw, Awoke K

    2016-05-26

    Antimicrobial resistant Salmonella are among the leading causes of foodborne infections. Our aim was to determine Salmonella contamination during cattle slaughter in South African rural abattoirs (n = 23) and environmental samples. Furthermore, antimicrobial resistance patterns of the Salmonella isolates were determined. Samples of cattle faeces (n = 400), carcass sponges (n = 100), intestinal contents (n = 62), hides (n = 67), and water from the abattoirs (n = 75) were investigated for Salmonella species using microbiological techniques and species-specific polymerase chain reaction targeting the invA gene. In total 92 Salmonella species isolates were recovered. The Salmonella mean frequency of occurrence on hides, carcasses, and intestinal contents was 35.37% (n = 81). Eleven faecal samples (2.75%) tested positive for Salmonella. The predominant serovar was Salmonella Enteritidis. Diverse serovars that were identified on carcasses were not necessarily found on the hides and intestinal contents. The inconsistent occurrence of the diverse Salmonella serovars on hides, carcasses, and intestinal contents implies that in addition to carriage on hides and in intestinal contents, other external factors also play an important role regarding carcass contamination. The 92 Salmonella were serotyped and tested for susceptibility towards the following antimicrobials: ampicillin, cefotaxime, enrofloxacin, kanamycin, and oxytetracycline using the disk diffusion method. Most Salmonella (n = 66; 71.7%) isolates were resistant to at least one antimicrobial with highest resistance observed towards oxytetracycline (51.90%), which highlights the need for strict hygiene during slaughter and prudent antimicrobial use during animal production. In conclusion, cattle slaughtered in South African rural abattoirs harbour diverse Salmonella serovars that are resistant to antimicrobials, which could be a public health risk. The findings should assist policymakers with improving implementation

  1. Salmonella contamination, serovars and antimicrobial resistance profiles of cattle slaughtered in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Madoroba, Evelyn; Kapeta, Daniel; Gelaw, Awoke K

    2016-05-26

    Antimicrobial resistant Salmonella are among the leading causes of foodborne infections. Our aim was to determine Salmonella contamination during cattle slaughter in South African rural abattoirs (n = 23) and environmental samples. Furthermore, antimicrobial resistance patterns of the Salmonella isolates were determined. Samples of cattle faeces (n = 400), carcass sponges (n = 100), intestinal contents (n = 62), hides (n = 67), and water from the abattoirs (n = 75) were investigated for Salmonella species using microbiological techniques and species-specific polymerase chain reaction targeting the invA gene. In total 92 Salmonella species isolates were recovered. The Salmonella mean frequency of occurrence on hides, carcasses, and intestinal contents was 35.37% (n = 81). Eleven faecal samples (2.75%) tested positive for Salmonella. The predominant serovar was Salmonella Enteritidis. Diverse serovars that were identified on carcasses were not necessarily found on the hides and intestinal contents. The inconsistent occurrence of the diverse Salmonella serovars on hides, carcasses, and intestinal contents implies that in addition to carriage on hides and in intestinal contents, other external factors also play an important role regarding carcass contamination. The 92 Salmonella were serotyped and tested for susceptibility towards the following antimicrobials: ampicillin, cefotaxime, enrofloxacin, kanamycin, and oxytetracycline using the disk diffusion method. Most Salmonella (n = 66; 71.7%) isolates were resistant to at least one antimicrobial with highest resistance observed towards oxytetracycline (51.90%), which highlights the need for strict hygiene during slaughter and prudent antimicrobial use during animal production. In conclusion, cattle slaughtered in South African rural abattoirs harbour diverse Salmonella serovars that are resistant to antimicrobials, which could be a public health risk. The findings should assist policymakers with improving implementation

  2. mcr-1−Harboring Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Sequence Type 34 in Pigs, China

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Linxian; Wang, Jing; Gao, Yanling; Liu, Yiyun; Doi, Yohei; Wu, Renjie; Zeng, Zhenling; Liang, Zisen

    2017-01-01

    We detected the mcr-1 gene in 21 (14.8%) Salmonella isolates from pigs at slaughter; 19 were serovar Typhimurium sequence type 34. The gene was located on IncHI2-like plasmids that also harbored IncF replicons and lacked a conjugative transfer region. These findings highlight the need to prevent further spread of colistin resistance in animals and humans. PMID:28098547

  3. Salmonella enterica Serovar Virchow with CTX-M-Like β-Lactamase in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Simarro, Encarna; Navarro, Ferrán; Ruiz, Joaquín; Miró, Elisenda; Gómez, Joaquín; Mirelis, Beatriz

    2000-01-01

    Four Salmonella enterica serovar Virchow strains resistant to broad-spectrum cephalosporins were isolated from patients with gastroenteritis in 1997 and 1998 in Murcia and Barcelona, Spain. The isolates expressed a β-lactamase with a pI of about 8 and a positive PCR when specific primers for CTX-M-9 were used. These results suggest the presence of a CTX-M-9 β-lactamase in these strains. PMID:11101623

  4. Anti-infective mechanisms induced by a probiotic Lactobacillus strain against Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection.

    PubMed

    de LeBlanc, Alejandra de Moreno; Castillo, Natalia A; Perdigon, Gabriela

    2010-04-15

    The prevention of pathogen infections is one of the most extensively studied effects of probiotics. L. casei CRL 431 is a probiotic bacterium and its effects on the gut immune cells have been extensively studied. The aim of the present study was to determine, using a mouse model, the preventive and therapeutic effect of L. casei CRL 431 to achieve protection against Salmonella enteritidis serovar Typhimurium infection. In both previous and continuous (previous and post-infection) probiotic administration, the mechanisms induced by this lactic acid bacteria on the first line of intestinal defense (non-specific barrier and the innate immune cells associated to the gut), as a way to understand some of the mechanisms involved in the protection against Salmonella enteritidis serovar Typhimurium, were analyzed. The results obtained demonstrated that 7 days L. casei CRL 431 administration before infection decreased the severity of the infection with Salmonella enteritidis serovar Typhimurium, demonstrating that the continuous administration (even after infection) had the best effect. This continuous administration diminished the counts of the pathogen in the intestine as well as its spread outside this organ. Several mechanisms and cells are involved in this protective effect against Salmonella enteritidis serovar Typhimurium. L. casei CRL 431 acted on cells of the innate and adaptive immune response. The probiotic administration decreased the neutrophil infiltration with the consequent diminution of intestinal inflammation; activated the macrophage phagocytic activity in different sites such as Peyer's patches, spleen and peritoneum; and increased the number of IgA+cells in the lamina propria of the small intestine which was correlated with increased release of s-IgA specific against the pathogen in the intestinal fluids. The mechanism of the inhibition of cellular apoptosis was not involved.

  5. Infections by Leptospira interrogans, Seoul virus, and Bartonella spp. among Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) from the urban slum environment in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Costa, Federico; Porter, Fleur Helena; Rodrigues, Gorete; Farias, Helena; de Faria, Marcus Tucunduva; Wunder, Elsio A; Osikowicz, Lynn M; Kosoy, Michael Y; Reis, Mitermayer Galvão; Ko, Albert I; Childs, James E

    2014-01-01

    Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) are reservoir hosts for zoonotic pathogens that cause significant morbidity and mortality in humans. Studies evaluating the prevalence of zoonotic pathogens in tropical Norway rat populations are rare, and data on co-infection with multiple pathogens are nonexistent. Herein, we describe the prevalence of leptospiral carriage, Seoul virus (SEOV), and Bartonella spp. infection independently, in addition to the rates of co-infection among urban, slum-dwelling Norway rats in Salvador, Brazil, trapped during the rainy season from June to August of 2010. These data were complemented with previously unpublished Leptospira and SEOV prevalence information collected in 1998. Immunofluorescence staining of kidney impressions was used to identify Leptospira interrogans in 2010, whereas isolation was used in 1998, and western blotting was used to detect SEOV antibodies in 2010, whereas enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used in 1998: in 2010, Bartonella spp. were isolated from a subsample of rats. The most common pathogen in both years was Leptospira spp. (83%, n=142 in 1998, 63%, n=84 in 2010). SEOV was detected in 18% of individuals in both 1998 and 2010 (n=78 in 1998; n=73 in 2010), and two species of Bartonella were isolated from 5 of 26 rats (19%) tested in 2010. The prevalence of all agents increased significantly with rat mass/age. Acquisition of Leptospira spp. occurred at a younger mass/age than SEOV and Bartonella spp. infection, suggesting differences in the transmission dynamics of these pathogens. These data indicate that Norway rats in Salvador serve as reservoir hosts for all three of these zoonotic pathogens and that the high prevalence of leptospiral carriage in Salvador rats poses a high degree of risk to human health.

  6. Infections by Leptospira interrogans, Seoul Virus, and Bartonella spp. Among Norway Rats (Rattus norvegicus) from the Urban Slum Environment in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Fleur Helena; Rodrigues, Gorete; Farias, Helena; de Faria, Marcus Tucunduva; Wunder, Elsio A.; Osikowicz, Lynn M.; Kosoy, Michael Y.; Reis, Mitermayer Galvão; Ko, Albert I.; Childs, James E.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) are reservoir hosts for zoonotic pathogens that cause significant morbidity and mortality in humans. Studies evaluating the prevalence of zoonotic pathogens in tropical Norway rat populations are rare, and data on co-infection with multiple pathogens are nonexistent. Herein, we describe the prevalence of leptospiral carriage, Seoul virus (SEOV), and Bartonella spp. infection independently, in addition to the rates of co-infection among urban, slum-dwelling Norway rats in Salvador, Brazil, trapped during the rainy season from June to August of 2010. These data were complemented with previously unpublished Leptospira and SEOV prevalence information collected in 1998. Immunofluorescence staining of kidney impressions was used to identify Leptospira interrogans in 2010, whereas isolation was used in 1998, and western blotting was used to detect SEOV antibodies in 2010, whereas enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used in 1998: in 2010, Bartonella spp. were isolated from a subsample of rats. The most common pathogen in both years was Leptospira spp. (83%, n=142 in 1998, 63%, n=84 in 2010). SEOV was detected in 18% of individuals in both 1998 and 2010 (n=78 in 1998; n=73 in 2010), and two species of Bartonella were isolated from 5 of 26 rats (19%) tested in 2010. The prevalence of all agents increased significantly with rat mass/age. Acquisition of Leptospira spp. occurred at a younger mass/age than SEOV and Bartonella spp. infection, suggesting differences in the transmission dynamics of these pathogens. These data indicate that Norway rats in Salvador serve as reservoir hosts for all three of these zoonotic pathogens and that the high prevalence of leptospiral carriage in Salvador rats poses a high degree of risk to human health. PMID:24359425

  7. Characterization of Leptospira santarosai Serogroup Grippotyphosa Serovar Bananal Isolated from Capybara ( Hydrochaeris hydrochaeris ) in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Luisa Z; Miraglia, Fabiana; Marvulo, Maria F V; Silva, Jean C R; Paula, Catia D; Costa, Barbara L P; Morais, Zenaide M; Ferreira, Fernando; Neto, José S Ferreira; Dellagostin, Odir A; Hartskeerl, Rudy A; Vasconcellos, Silvio A; Moreno, Andrea M

    2016-07-01

    Leptospirosis is a widespread zoonosis caused by bacteria of the genus Leptospira. Rodents appear to be the most important reservoirs of infection. They contaminate the environment and food and can transmit the pathogen when they are consumed by carnivores. Capybara ( Hydrochaeris hydrochaeris ) are efficient reservoirs of Leptospira, and because they are in close contact with farm animals and are found in semiurban areas, they represent a risk to public health. We isolated five Leptospira strains from capybara kidneys in Sao Paulo State, Brazil, in 2001 and typed them using serologic and molecular techniques. These strains include the Leptospira santarosai serogroup Grippotyphosa serovar Bananal. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis resulted in a unique pattern distinct from the reference strains, and the isolates clustered with greater than 85% similarity. The isolates also presented higher growth rates than other Leptospira serovars, with high minimal inhibitory concentration values for most of the tested antibiotics, with the exception of penicillin and ampicillin. This isolation and characterization of the L. santarosai serogroup Grippotyphosa serovar Bananal from capybara, highlights the importance of wild and sinantropic rodents as carriers of pathogenic leptospires.

  8. Prevalence and characterization of Salmonella serovars isolated from oysters served raw in restaurants.

    PubMed

    Brillhart, Crystal D; Joens, Lynn A

    2011-06-01

    To determine if Salmonella-contaminated oysters are reaching consumer tables, a survey of raw oysters served in eight Tucson restaurants was performed from October 2007 to September 2008. Salmonella spp. were isolated during 7 of the 8 months surveyed and were present in 1.2% of 2,281 oysters tested. This observed prevalence is lower than that seen in a previous study in which U.S. market oysters were purchased from producers at bays where oysters are harvested. To test whether the process of refrigerating oysters in restaurants for several days reduces Salmonella levels, oysters were artificially infected with Salmonella and kept at 4°C for up to 13 days. Direct plate counts of oyster homogenate showed that Salmonella levels within oysters did not decrease during refrigeration. Six different serovars of Salmonella enterica were found in the restaurant oysters, indicating multiple incidences of Salmonella contamination of U.S. oyster stocks. Of the 28 contaminated oysters, 12 (43%) contained a strain of S. enterica serovar Newport that matched by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis a serovar Newport strain seen predominantly in the study of bay oysters performed in 2002. The repeated occurrence of this strain in oyster surveys is concerning, since the strain was resistant to seven antimicrobials tested and thus presents a possible health risk to consumers of raw oysters.

  9. The flagellar regulator TviA reduces pyroptosis by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi.

    PubMed

    Winter, Sebastian E; Winter, Maria G; Atluri, Vidya; Poon, Victor; Romão, Everton L; Tsolis, Renée M; Bäumler, Andreas J

    2015-04-01

    To discern virulent from innocuous microbes, the innate immune system senses events associated with bacterial access to immunoprivileged sites such as the host cell cytosol. One such pathway is triggered by the cytosolic delivery of flagellin, the major subunit of the flagellum, by bacterial secretion systems. This leads to inflammasome activation and subsequent proinflammatory cell death (pyroptosis) of the infected phagocyte. In this study, we demonstrate that the causative agent of typhoid fever, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi, can partially subvert this critical innate immune recognition event. The transcriptional regulator TviA, which is absent from Salmonella serovars associated with human gastroenteritis, repressed the expression of flagellin during infection of human macrophage-like (THP-1) cells. This mechanism allowed S. Typhi to dampen inflammasome activation, leading to reduced interleukin-1β (IL-1β) secretion and diminished cell death. Likewise, the introduction of the tviA gene in nontyphoidal Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium reduced flagellin-induced pyroptosis. These data suggest that gene regulation of virulence factors enables S. Typhi to evade innate immune recognition by concealing a pathogen-induced process from being sensed by the inflammasome.

  10. Salmonella DNA Adenine Methylase Mutants Elicit Protective Immune Responses to Homologous and Heterologous Serovars in Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Dueger, E. L.; House, J. K.; Heithoff, D. M.; Mahan, M. J.

    2001-01-01

    Salmonella DNA adenine methylase (Dam) mutants that lack or overproduce Dam are highly attenuated for virulence in mice and confer protection against murine typhoid fever. To determine whether vaccines based on Dam are efficacious in poultry, a Salmonella Dam− vaccine was evaluated in the protection of chicken broilers against oral challenge with homologous and heterologous Salmonella serovars. A Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium Dam− vaccine strain was attenuated for virulence in day-of-hatch chicks more than 100,000-fold. Vaccination of chicks elicited cross-protective immune responses, as evidenced by reduced colonization (10- to 10,000-fold) of the gastrointestinal tract (ileum, cecum, and feces) and visceral organs (bursa and spleen) after challenge with homologous (Typhimurium F98) and heterologous (Enteritidis 4973 and S. enterica O6,14,24: e,h-monophasic) Salmonella serovars that are implicated in Salmonella infection of poultry. The protection conferred was observed for the organ or the maximum CFU/tissue/bird as a unit of analysis, suggesting that Dam mutant strains may serve as the basis for the development of efficacious poultry vaccines for the containment of Salmonella. PMID:11705984

  11. Characterization of the ELPhiS prophage from Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis strain LK5.

    PubMed

    Hanna, L Farris; Matthews, T David; Dinsdale, Elizabeth A; Hasty, David; Edwards, Robert A

    2012-03-01

    Phages are a primary driving force behind the evolution of bacterial pathogens by transferring a variety of virulence genes into their hosts. Similar to other bacterial genomes, the Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis LK5 genome contains several regions that are homologous to phages. Although genomic analysis demonstrated the presence of prophages, it was unable to confirm which phage elements within the genome were viable. Genetic markers were used to tag one of the prophages in the genome to allow monitoring of phage induction. Commonly used laboratory strains of Salmonella were resistant to phage infection, and therefore a rapid screen was developed to identify susceptible hosts. This approach showed that a genetically tagged prophage, ELPhiS (Enteritidis lysogenic phage S), was capable of infecting Salmonella serovars that are diverse in host range and virulence and has the potential to laterally transfer genes between these serovars via lysogenic conversion. The rapid screen approach is adaptable to any system with a large collection of isolates and may be used to test the viability of prophages found by sequencing the genomes of various bacterial pathogens.

  12. Temperature and Oxygen Dependent Metabolite Utilization by Salmonella enterica Serovars Derby and Mbandaka

    PubMed Central

    Hayward, Matthew R.; AbuOun, Manal; Woodward, Martin J.; Jansen, Vincent A. A.

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica is a zoonotic pathogen of clinical and veterinary significance, with over 2500 serovars. In previous work we compared two serovars displaying host associations inferred from isolation statistics. Here, to validate genome sequence data and to expand on the role of environmental metabolite constitution in host range determination we use a phenotypic microarray approach to assess the ability of these serovars to metabolise ~500 substrates at 25°C with oxygen (aerobic conditions) to represent the ex vivo environment and at 37°C with and without oxygen (aerobic/anaerobic conditions) to represent the in vivo environment. A total of 26 substrates elicited a significant difference in the rate of metabolism of which only one, D-galactonic acid-g-lactone, could be explained by the presence (S. Mbandaka) or the absence (S. Derby) of metabolic genes. We find that S. Mbandaka respires more efficiently at ambient temperatures and under aerobic conditions on 18 substrates including: glucosominic acid, saccharic acid, trehalose, fumaric acid, maltotriose, N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, N-acetyl-beta-D-mannosamine, fucose, L-serine and dihydroxy-acetone; whereas S. Derby is more metabolically competent anaerobically at 37°C for dipeptides, glutamine-glutamine, alanine-lysine, asparagine-glutamine and nitrogen sources glycine and nitrite. We conclude that the specific phenotype cannot be reliably predicted from the presence of metabolic genes directly relating to the metabolic pathways under study. PMID:25798944

  13. The inositol phosphatase SHIP controls Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection in vivo.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Jennifer L; Sly, Laura M; Krystal, Gerald; Finlay, B Brett

    2008-07-01

    The SH2 domain-containing inositol 5'-phosphatase, SHIP, negatively regulates various hematopoietic cell functions and is critical for maintaining immune homeostasis. However, whether SHIP plays a role in controlling bacterial infections in vivo remains unknown. Salmonella enterica causes human salmonellosis, a disease that ranges in severity from mild gastroenteritis to severe systemic illness, resulting in significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. The susceptibility of ship(+/+) and ship(-/-) mice and bone marrow-derived macrophages to S. enterica serovar Typhimurium infection was compared. ship(-/-) mice displayed an increased susceptibility to both oral and intraperitoneal serovar Typhimurium infection and had significantly higher bacterial loads in intestinal and systemic sites than ship(+/+) mice, indicating a role for SHIP in the gut-associated and systemic pathogenesis of serovar Typhimurium in vivo. Cytokine analysis of serum from orally infected mice showed that ship(-/-) mice produce lower levels of Th1 cytokines than do ship(+/+) animals at 2 days postinfection, and in vitro analysis of supernatants taken from infected bone marrow-derived macrophages derived to mimic the in vivo ship(-/-) alternatively activated (M2) macrophage phenotype correlated with these data. M2 macrophages were the predominant population in vivo in both oral and intraperitoneal infections, since tissue macrophages within the small intestine and peritoneal macrophages from ship(-/-) mice showed elevated levels of the M2 macrophage markers Ym1 and Arginase 1 compared to ship(+/+) cells. Based on these data, we propose that M2 macrophage skewing in ship(-/-) mice contributes to ineffective clearance of Salmonella in vivo.

  14. Serovars of Salmonella isolated from Danish turkeys between 1995 and 2000 and their antimicrobial resistance.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, K; Hansen, H C; Jørgensen, J C; Borck, B

    2002-04-13

    The prevalence of Salmonella serovars and their antimicrobial resistance patterns were investigated among Danish turkeys between 1995 and 2000, by sampling the flocks approximately 14 days before they were slaughtered. Within the flocks, the prevalence of salmonella varied from 7.1 per cent to 25 per cent, and 24 different serovars were detected. The five most prevalent, which accounted for 58.5 per cent of the isolates were Salmonella Heidelberg (16.2 per cent of the isolates), Salmonella Agona (15.8 per cent), Salmonella Derby (12.4 per cent), Salmonella Muenster (7.3 per cent) and Salmonella Anatum (6.8 per cent). In addition, a few rough isolates and isolates belonging to the antigenically incomplete formulae 6,7:-:- and 4,12:b:- were found. The level of antimicrobial resistance was low; the highest resistance was recorded to ampicillin (13.7 per cent) and streptomycin (9.0 per cent) followed by tetracycline (8.5 per cent), sulphonamides (7.7 per cent) and spectinomycin (4.7 per cent). Resistance to quinolones was very low: four isolates were resistant to nalidixic acid, and only one was resistant to enrofloxacin. No resistance was recorded to colistin, apramycin, ceftiofur, florfenicol, or amoxycillin with clavulanic acid. Only 24 isolates were resistant to two or more compounds in various combinations of up to six compounds; one Salmonella Havana isolate was resistant to six compounds. Six isolates were serovar Typhimurium, but none of them belonged to phage type DT104.

  15. Shoot Injury Increases the Level of Persistence of Salmonella enterica Serovar Sofia and Listeria innocua on Cos Lettuce and of Salmonella enterica Serovar Sofia on Chive.

    PubMed

    Harapas, Dean; Premier, Robert; Tomkins, Bruce; Hepworth, Graham; Ajlouni, Said

    2015-12-01

    Minor shoot injury significantly (P < 0.05) increased the level at which Salmonella enterica serovar Sofia persisted on cos lettuce in the greenhouse. Initial mean counts of the Salmonella on the injured and uninjured cos lettuce were on the order of 6 log CFU/g. After 3 days, the mean count decreased to 4.8 log CFU/g on the injured plants compared with the significantly (P < 0.05) smaller count of 3.4 log CFU/g on the uninjured plants. By the end of the 3-week experiment, the count from the injured plants was 2.9 log CFU/g compared with a count of below the level of detection from the uninjured plants. A similar pattern of bacterial persistence was observed on injured versus uninjured plants by using Listeria innocua on cos lettuce and S. enterica serovar Sofia on chive. The findings reaffirm earlier results with Escherichia coli and increase the impetus to avoid shoot injury during the production of cos lettuce and chive, if bacteria of food safety concern are present.

  16. Investigation on predominant Leptospira serovars and its distribution in humans and livestock in Thailand, 2010-2015

    PubMed Central

    Chadsuthi, Sudarat; Bicout, Dominique J.; Wiratsudakul, Anuwat; Suwancharoen, Duangjai; Petkanchanapong, Wimol; Modchang, Charin; Triampo, Wannapong; Ratanakorn, Parntep; Chalvet-Monfray, Karine

    2017-01-01

    Background Leptospirosis is a worldwide zoonotic bacterial disease caused by infection with leptospires. Leptospirosis in humans and livestock is an endemic and epidemic disease in Thailand. Livestock may act as reservoirs for leptospires and source for human infection. Methodology/Principal findings Data on leptospirosis infection in humans and livestock (Buffaloes, Cattle, and Pigs) species during 2010 to 2015 were analyzed. Serum samples were examined using Microscopic Agglutination Test (MAT) to identify antibodies against Leptospira serovars using a cut-off titer ≥ 1:100. The seroprevalence was 23.7% in humans, 24.8% in buffaloes, 28.1% in cattle, and 11.3% in pigs. Region specific prevalence among humans and livestock was found in a wide range. The most predominant serovars were Shermani, followed by Bratislava, Panama, and Sejroe in human, Shermani, Ranarum, and Tarassovi in buffaloes, and Shermani and Ranarum in cattle and pigs. Equally highest MAT titers against multiple serovars per one sample were found mainly in buffaloes and cattle showing equally titers against Ranarum and Shermani. The correlations of distribution of serovars across Thailand’s regions were found to be similar in pattern for cattle but not for buffaloes. In humans, the serovar distribution in the south differed from other regions. By logistic regression, the results indicated that livestock is more susceptible to infection by serovar Shermani when compared to humans. Conclusions/Significance This study gives a detailed picture of the predominance of Leptospira serovars in relation to region, humans and typical livestock. The broad spatial distribution of seroprevalence was analyzed across and within species as well as regions in Thailand. Our finding may guide public health policy makers to implement appropriate control measures and help to reduce the impact of leptospirosis in Thailand. PMID:28182662

  17. Seroepidemiologic study of three zoonoses (leptospirosis, Q fever, and tularemia) among trappers in Québec, Canada.

    PubMed Central

    Lévesque, B; De Serres, G; Higgins, R; D'Halewyn, M A; Artsob, H; Grondin, J; Major, M; Garvie, M; Duval, B

    1995-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the prevalence of antibodies against Francisella tularensis, Coxiella burnetii, and certain serovars of Leptospira interrogans among trappers in Québec, Canada. Muskrat trapping was identified as a risk factor for F. tularensis infection, whereas having a cat at home apparently protected trappers against infection by L. interrogans. High percentages of control sera were positive for antibodies against C. burnetii (15%) and L. interrogans (5%), most frequently serovar bratislava. This is the first report of human infection by serovar bratislava in North America. PMID:7583933

  18. Multilocus sequence analysis of Bacillus thuringiensis serovars navarrensis, bolivia and vazensis and Bacillus weihenstephanensis reveals a common phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Soufiane, Brahim; Baizet, Mathilde; Côté, Jean-Charles

    2013-01-01

    The Bacillus cereus group sensu lato includes six closely-related bacterial species: Bacillus cereus, Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus thuringiensis, Bacillus mycoides, Bacillus pseudomycoides and Bacillus weihenstephanensis. B. thuringiensis is distinguished from the other species mainly by the appearance of an inclusion body upon sporulation. B. weihenstephanensis is distinguished based on its psychrotolerance and the presence of specific signature sequences in the 16S rRNA gene and cspA genes. A total of seven housekeeping genes (glpF, gmK, ilvD, pta, purH, pycA and tpi) from different B. thuringiensis serovars and B. weihenstephanensis strains were amplified and their nucleotide sequences determined. A maximum likelihood phylogenetic tree was inferred from comparisons of the concatenated sequences. B. thuringiensis serovars navarrensis, bolivia and vazensis clustered not with the other B. thuringiensis serovars but rather with the B. weihenstephanensis strains, indicative of a common phylogeny. In addition, specific signature sequences and single nucleotide polymorphisms common to B. thuringiensis serovars navarrensis, bolivia and vazensis and the B. weihenstephanensis strains, and absent in the other B. thuringiensis serovars, were identified.

  19. Genomic comparison of the closely-related Salmonella enterica serovars enteritidis, dublin and gallinarum

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, T. David; Schmieder, Robert; Silva, Genivaldo G. Z.; Busch, Julia; Cassman, Noriko; Dutilh, Bas E.; Green, Dawn; Matlock, Brian; Heffernan, Brian; Olsen, Gary J.; Hanna, Leigh Farris; Schifferli, Dieter M.; Maloy, Stanley; Dinsdale, Elizabeth A.; Edwards, Robert A.; Cloeckaert, Axel

    2015-06-03

    The Salmonella enterica serovars Enteritidis, Dublin, and Gallinarum are closely related but differ in virulence and host range. To identify the genetic elements responsible for these differences and to better understand how these serovars are evolving, we sequenced the genomes of Enteritidis strain LK5 and Dublin strain SARB12 and compared these genomes to the publicly available Enteritidis P125109, Dublin CT 02021853 and Dublin SD3246 genome sequences. We also compared the publicly available Gallinarum genome sequences from biotype Gallinarum 287/91 and Pullorum RKS5078. Using bioinformatic approaches, we identified single nucleotide polymorphisms, insertions, deletions, and differences in prophage and pseudogene content between strains belonging to the same serovar. Through our analysis we also identified several prophage cargo genes and pseudogenes that affect virulence and may contribute to a host-specific, systemic lifestyle. These results strongly argue that the Enteritidis, Dublin and Gallinarum serovars of Salmonella enterica evolve by acquiring new genes through horizontal gene transfer, followed by the formation of pseudogenes. The loss of genes necessary for a gastrointestinal lifestyle ultimately leads to a systemic lifestyle and niche exclusion in the host-specific serovars.

  20. Human migration is important in the international spread of exotic Salmonella serovars in animal and human populations.

    PubMed

    Iveson, J B; Bradshaw, S D; How, R A; Smith, D W

    2014-11-01

    The exposure of indigenous humans and native fauna in Australia and the Wallacea zoogeographical region of Indonesia to exotic Salmonella serovars commenced during the colonial period and has accelerated with urbanization and international travel. In this study, the distribution and prevalence of exotic Salmonella serovars are mapped to assess the extent to which introduced infections are invading native wildlife in areas of high natural biodiversity under threat from expanding human activity. The major exotic Salmonella serovars, Bovismorbificans, Derby, Javiana, Newport, Panama, Saintpaul and Typhimurium, isolated from wildlife on populated coastal islands in southern temperate areas of Western Australia, were mostly absent from reptiles and native mammals in less populated tropical areas of the state. They were also not recorded on the uninhabited Mitchell Plateau or islands of the Bonaparte Archipelago, adjacent to south-eastern Indonesia. Exotic serovars were, however, isolated in wildlife on 14/17 islands sampled in the Wallacea region of Indonesia and several islands off the west coast of Perth. Increases in international tourism, involving islands such as Bali, have resulted in the isolation of a high proportion of exotic serovar infections suggesting that densely populated island resorts in the Asian region are acting as staging posts for the interchange of Salmonella infections between tropical and temperate regions.

  1. Leptospira weilii serovar Topaz, a new member of the Tarassovi serogroup isolated from a bovine source in Queensland, Australia.

    PubMed

    Corney, B G; Slack, A T; Symonds, M L; Dohnt, M F; McClintock, C S; McGowan, M R; Smythe, L D

    2008-10-01

    This paper reports on a Leptospira isolate of bovine origin and its identification as belonging to a previously unknown serovar, for which the name Topaz is proposed. The isolate (94-79970/3) was cultured from bovine urine from a north Queensland dairy farm in Australia. Strain 94-79970/3 grew at 30 degrees C in Ellinghausen McCullough Johnson Harris (EMJH) medium but failed to grow at 13 degrees C in EMJH medium or in the presence of 8-azaguanine. Serologically, strain 94-79970/3 produced titres against the Leptospira borgpetersenii serovar Tarassovi, the reference strain for the Tarassovi serogroup; however, no significant titres to any other serovars within the serogroup were obtained. Using 16S rRNA and DNA gyrase subunit B gene analysis, strain 94-79970/3 was identified as a member of the species Leptospira weilii. We propose that the serovar be named Topaz, after the location where the original isolate was obtained. The reference strain for this serovar is 94-79970/3 (=KIT 94-79970/3=LT722).

  2. Chloramphenicol and tetracycline decrease motility and increase invasion and attachment gene expression in specific isolates of multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) is one of the most common serovars isolated from humans and livestock, and over 35 percent of these isolates are resistant to three or more antibiotics. Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella is a public health concern as it is associated with i...

  3. Antimicrobial resistance-conferring plasmids with similarity to virulence plasmids from avian pathogenic Escherichia coli strains in Salmonella enterica serovar Kentucky isolates from poultry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella enterica, a leading cause of food-borne gastroenteritis worldwide, may be found in any raw food of animal, vegetable, or fruit origin. Salmonella serovars differ in distribution, virulence, and host specificity. Salmonella enterica serovar Kentucky, though often found in the food supply, ...

  4. Poultry-Associated Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar 4,12:d:− Reveals High Clonality and a Distinct Pathogenicity Gene Repertoire ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Huehn, Stephan; Bunge, Cornelia; Junker, Ernst; Helmuth, Reiner; Malorny, Burkhard

    2009-01-01

    A European baseline survey during the years 2005 and 2006 has revealed that the monophasic Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar 4,12:d:− was, with a prevalence of 23.6%, the most frequently isolated serovar in German broiler flocks. In Denmark and the United Kingdom, its serovar prevalences were 15.15% and 2.8%, respectively. Although poultry is a major source of human salmonellosis, serovar 4,12:d:− is rarely isolated in humans (approximately 0.09% per year). Molecular typing studies using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and DNA microarray analysis show that the serovar is highly clonal and lacks genes with known contributions to pathogenicity. In contrast to other poultry-associated serovars, all strains were susceptible to 17 antimicrobial agents tested and did not encode any resistance determinant. Furthermore, serovar 4,12:d:− lacked the genes involved in galactonate metabolism and in the glycolysis and glyconeogenesis important for energy production in the cells. The conclusion of the study is that serovar 4,12:d:− seems to be primarily adapted to broilers and therefore causes only rare infections in humans. PMID:19114530

  5. A comparative study on invasion, survival, modulation of oxidative burst, and nitric oxide responses of macrophages (HD11), and systemic infection in chickens by prevalent poultry Salmonella serovars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Poultry is a major reservoir for foodborne Salmonella serovars. Salmonella Typhimurium, S. Enteritidis, S. Heidelberg, S. Kentucky, and S. Senftenberg are the most prevalent serovars in poultry. Information concerning the interactions between different Salmonella species and host cells in poultry i...

  6. The role of flagella and chemotaxis genes in host pathogen interaction of the host adapted Salmonella enterica serovar Dublin compared to the broad host range serovar S. Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The importance of flagella and chemotaxis genes in host pathogen interaction in Salmonella enterica is mainly based on studies of the broad host range serovar, S. Typhimurium, while little is known on the importance in host specific and host adapted serovars, such as S. Dublin. In the current study we have used previously characterized insertion mutants in flagella and chemotaxis genes to investigate this and possible differences in the importance between the two serovars. Results fliC (encoding the structural protein of the flagella) was essential for adhesion and fliC and cheB (CheB restores the chemotaxis system to pre-stimulus conformation) were essential for invasion of S. Dublin into epithelial Int407 cells. In S. Typhimurium, both lack of flagella (fliC/fljB double mutant) and cheB influenced adhesion, and invasion was influenced by lack of both cheA (the histidine-kinase of the chemotaxis system), fliC/fljB and cheB mutation. Uptake in J774A.1 macrophage cells was significantly reduced in cheA, cheB and fliC mutants of S. Dublin, while cheA was dispensable in S. Typhimurium. Removal of flagella in both serotypes caused an increased ability to propagate intracellular in J774 macrophage cells and decreased cytotoxicity toward these cells. Flagella and chemotaxis genes were found not to influence the oxidative response. The induction of IL-6 from J774A-1 cells depended on the presence of flagella in S. Typhimurium, whilst this was not the case following challenge with S. Dublin. Addition of fliC from S. Typhimurium in trans to a fliC mutant of S. Dublin increased cytotoxicity but it did not increase the IL-6 production. Flagella were demonstrated to contribute to the outcome of infection following oral challenge of mice in S. Dublin, while an S. Typhimurium fliC/fljB mutant showed increased virulence following intra peritoneal challenge. Conclusions The results showed that flagella and chemotaxis genes differed in their role in host pathogen

  7. Prevalence of Salmonella Isolates from Chicken and Pig Slaughterhouses and Emergence of Ciprofloxacin and Cefotaxime Co-Resistant S. enterica Serovar Indiana in Henan, China

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Li; Lan, Ruiting; Zhang, Xiuli; Cui, Shenghui; Xu, Jin; Guo, Yunchang; Li, Fengqin; Zhang, Ding

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of Salmonella from chicken and pig slaughterhouses in Henan, China and antimicrobial susceptibility of these isolates to antibiotics was determined. From 283 chicken samples and 240 pig samples collected, 128 and 70 Salmonella isolates were recovered with an isolation rate of 45.2 and 29.2% respectively. The predominant serovars in chicken samples were S. enterica serovar Enteritidis, S. enterica serovar Hadar and S. enterica serovar Indiana, while those in pig samples were S. enterica serovar Typhimurium, S. enterica serovar Derby and S. enterica serovar Enteritidis. Resistance to ciprofloxacin was 8.6 and 10.0% for isolates from chickens and pigs respectively, whereas resistance to cefotaxime was 5.5 and 8.6%, respectively. Multidrug resistance (resistance to three or more classes of antimicrobial agent) was markedly higher in pig isolates (57.1%) than in chicken isolates (39.8%). Of particular concern was the detection of ciprofloxacin and cefotaxime co-resistant S. enterica serovar Indiana isolates, which pose risk to public health. All 16 S. enterica serovar Indiana isolates detected were resistant to ciprofloxacin, among which 11 were co-resistant to cefotaxime. The S. enterica serovar Indiana isolates accumulated point mutations in quinolone resistance determination regions of gyrA (S83F/D87G or S83F/D87N) and parC (T57S/S80R). Two plasmid mediated quinolone resistant determinants were found with aac (6')-Ib-cr and oqxAB in 16 and 12 S. enterica serovar Indiana isolates respectively. Cefotaxime-resistance of S. enterica serovar Indiana was associated with the acquisition of a blaCTX-M-65 gene. The potential risk of ciprofloxacin and cefotaxime co-resistant S. enterica serovar Indiana infection is a significant concern due to limited alternative treatment options. Reduction of Salmonella in chicken and pig slaughterhouses, in particular, ciprofloxacin and cefotaxime co-resistant S. enterica serovar Indiana will be an important measure to reduce

  8. Salmonella enterica serovar Minnesota urosepsis in a patient with Crohn's disease in the absence of recent or current gastrointestinal symptoms.

    PubMed

    Steinebrunner, Niels; Sandig, Catharina; Zimmermann, Stefan; Stremmel, Wolfgang; Eisenbach, Christoph; Mischnik, Alexander

    2013-09-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Minnesota is a rarely isolated organism in clinical samples mainly grown from stool cultures. Sepsis due to Salmonella is known in severely immunocompromised patients, but so far urosepsis due to S. enterica serovar Minnesota has not been described. We report a case of a 31-year-old patient suffering from Crohn's disease treated with infliximab and azathioprine, in whom was implanted a double-J ureteric catheter for urolithiasis. The patient presented with urinary tract infection and severe sepsis. S. enterica serovar Minnesota was grown from urine and blood cultures. After empiric antimicrobial treatment with meropenem and vancomycin, treatment was changed to ceftriaxone. Antimicrobial treatment was continued for a total of 3 weeks without evidence of Salmonella recurrence on follow-up visits. Salmonella spp. rarely cause urinary tract infection and sepsis. However, in immunocompromised patients, non-typhoidal salmonellosis merits a thorough clinical and microbiological evaluation.

  9. Proteolytic Inhibition of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium-Induced Activation of the Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases ERK and JNK in Cultured Human Intestinal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mynott, Tracey L.; Crossett, Ben; Prathalingam, S. Radhika

    2002-01-01

    Bromelain, a mixture of cysteine proteases from pineapple stems, blocks signaling by the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases extracellular regulated kinase 1 (ERK-1) and ERK-2, inhibits inflammation, and protects against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli infection. In this study, we examined the effect of bromelain on Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection, since an important feature of its pathogenesis is its ability to induce activation of ERK-1 and ERK-2, which leads to internalization of bacteria and induction of inflammatory responses. Our results show that bromelain dose dependently blocks serovar Typhimurium-induced ERK-1, ERK-2, and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) activation in Caco-2 cells. Bromelain also blocked signaling induced by carbachol and anisomycin, pharmacological MAP kinase agonists. Despite bromelain inhibition of serovar Typhimurium-induced MAP kinase signaling, it did not prevent subsequent invasion of the Caco-2 cells by serovar Typhimurium or alter serovar Typhimurium -induced decreases in resistance across Caco-2 monolayers. Surprisingly, bromelain also did not block serovar Typhimurium-induced interleukin-8 (IL-8) secretion but synergized with serovar Typhimurium to enhance IL-8 production. We also found that serovar Typhimurium does not induce ERK phosphorylation in Caco-2 cells in the absence of serum but that serovar Typhimurium-induced invasion and decreases in monolayer resistance are unaffected. Collectively, these data indicate that serovar Typhimurium-induced invasion of Caco-2 cells, changes in the resistance of epithelial cell monolayers, and IL-8 production can occur independently of the ERK and JNK signaling pathways. Data also confirm that bromelain is a novel inhibitor of MAP kinase signaling pathways and suggest a novel role for proteases as inhibitors of signal transduction pathways in intestinal epithelial cells. PMID:11748167

  10. Proteolytic inhibition of Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium-induced activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases ERK and JNK in cultured human intestinal cells.

    PubMed

    Mynott, Tracey L; Crossett, Ben; Prathalingam, S Radhika

    2002-01-01

    Bromelain, a mixture of cysteine proteases from pineapple stems, blocks signaling by the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases extracellular regulated kinase 1 (ERK-1) and ERK-2, inhibits inflammation, and protects against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli infection. In this study, we examined the effect of bromelain on Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection, since an important feature of its pathogenesis is its ability to induce activation of ERK-1 and ERK-2, which leads to internalization of bacteria and induction of inflammatory responses. Our results show that bromelain dose dependently blocks serovar Typhimurium-induced ERK-1, ERK-2, and c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) activation in Caco-2 cells. Bromelain also blocked signaling induced by carbachol and anisomycin, pharmacological MAP kinase agonists. Despite bromelain inhibition of serovar Typhimurium-induced MAP kinase signaling, it did not prevent subsequent invasion of the Caco-2 cells by serovar Typhimurium or alter serovar Typhimurium -induced decreases in resistance across Caco-2 monolayers. Surprisingly, bromelain also did not block serovar Typhimurium-induced interleukin-8 (IL-8) secretion but synergized with serovar Typhimurium to enhance IL-8 production. We also found that serovar Typhimurium does not induce ERK phosphorylation in Caco-2 cells in the absence of serum but that serovar Typhimurium-induced invasion and decreases in monolayer resistance are unaffected. Collectively, these data indicate that serovar Typhimurium-induced invasion of Caco-2 cells, changes in the resistance of epithelial cell monolayers, and IL-8 production can occur independently of the ERK and JNK signaling pathways. Data also confirm that bromelain is a novel inhibitor of MAP kinase signaling pathways and suggest a novel role for proteases as inhibitors of signal transduction pathways in intestinal epithelial cells.

  11. [Occurrence of Leptospira spp. soropositive stray dogs in Itapema, Santa Catarina, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Blazius, Renê Darela; Romão, Pedro Roosevelt Torres; Blazius, Ester Meire Costa Gouveia; da Silva, Onilda Santos

    2005-01-01

    This study aimed to verify Leptospira spp. serovar infections in stray dogs in Itapema, Santa Catarina, Brazil. Serum samples were collected from 590 stray dogs and tested against 25 Leptospira spp. serovars using the microscopic agglutination test. Prevalence of anti-leptospiral antibodies against one or more serovars was 10.5%. The most frequent serovar was pyrogenes, positive in 26 (18.0%) samples, followed by canicola with 20 (13.8%) and icterohaemorragiae and copenhageni with 18 (12.5%, with antibody titers from 1:100 to 1:3,200). Significant prevalence (10.4 to 11.1%) was also detected against serovars castellonis, butembo, and grippothyphosa.

  12. SEROVARS AND ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE OF Salmonella spp. ISOLATED FROM TURKEY AND BROILER CARCASSES IN SOUTHERN BRAZIL BETWEEN 2004 AND 2006

    PubMed Central

    PALMEIRA, Andre; dos SANTOS, Luciana Ruschel; BORSOI, Anderlise; RODRIGUES, Laura Beatriz; CALASANS, Max; do NASCIMENTO, Vladimir Pinheiro

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella spp. causes diseases in fowls, when species-specific serovars (Salmonella Pullorum and S.Gallinarum) are present in flocks, and public health problems, when non-typhoid serovars are isolated, as well as possible bacterial resistance induced by the preventive and therapeutic use of antimicrobials in animal production. This study describes the serovars and bacterial resistance of 280Salmonella spp. strains isolated from turkey and broiler carcasses in Southern Brazil between 2004 and 2006. SalmonellaEnteritidis was the most prevalent serovar (55.7%), followed by Heidelberg (5.0%), Agona (4.3%), Bredeney (3.9%), Hadar (3.2%), and Typhimurium (2.9%). Tennessee and S. Enterica subspecies enterica(O: 4.5) were isolated only in turkeys, and Hadar (18.6%) was the most prevalent serovar in this species. Antimicrobial susceptibility tests were performed in 178 isolates (43 from turkeys and 135 from broilers). All isolates were sensitive to amoxicillin + clavulanic acid, polymyxin B, ciprofloxacin, and norfloxacin, and were resistant to bacitracin and penicillin. Broiler carcass isolates showed resistance to nalidixic acid (48.9%), nitrofurantoin (34.3%), neomycin (9.6%), tetracycline (5.2%), and kanamycin (8.9%); and turkey carcass isolates were resistant to nalidixic acid (62.8%), tetracycline (34.9%), and neomycin (30.2%), with a significant difference in turkeys when compared to broiler carcass isolates. These results indicate the need for judicious use of antimicrobials in livestock production, given that the serovars identified are potential causes of food poisoning. PMID:27007562

  13. Increased efficacy of inactivated vaccine candidates prepared with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strains of predominant genotypes in ducks.

    PubMed

    Youn, S Y; Kwon, Y K; Song, C S; Lee, H J; Jeong, O M; Choi, B K; Jung, S C; Kang, M S

    2016-08-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium has been a major causative agent of food-borne human disease, mainly due to consumption of contaminated food animal products. In particular, ducks serve as a reservoir of serovar Typhimurium, and are one of the common sources of human infection. To prevent infection of ducks, and therefore minimize human infection, it is critical to control the persistent epidemic strains in ducks. Here, we analyzed the genetic diversity and virulence of serovar Typhimurium isolates from ducks in Korea to identify the predominant strains that might be used as efficient vaccine candidates for ducks. Among the isolates, 2 representative isolates (ST26 and ST76) of predominant genotypes were selected as vaccine strains on the basis of genotypic analysis by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and DNA microarrays. Two-week-old ducks were then injected intramuscularly with inactivated vaccine candidates prepared using ST26 or ST76 (10(8) cfu/0.5 mL/duck or 10(9) cfu/0.5 mL/duck), and oral challenge with a highly virulent serovar Typhimurium strain (10(9) cfu/0.5 mL/duck) was carried out 2 wk later. Shedding of the challenge strain was significantly decreased in group 2 after vaccination. The antibody levels by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in all vaccinated groups were enhanced significantly (P < 0.05) compared to the unvaccinated control group. Overall, vaccination with ST26 or ST76 reduced bacterial shedding and colonization in internal organs, and induced elevated antibody response. In particular, serovar Typhimurium ST26 (10(8) cfu/0.5 mL/duck) was the most effective vaccine candidate, which can provide efficient protection against serovar Typhimurium in ducks with higher effectiveness compared to a commercial vaccine currently used worldwide.

  14. SEROVARS AND ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE OF Salmonella spp. ISOLATED FROM TURKEY AND BROILER CARCASSES IN SOUTHERN BRAZIL BETWEEN 2004 AND 2006.

    PubMed

    Palmeira, Andre; Santos, Luciana Ruschel dos; Borsoi, Anderlise; Rodrigues, Laura Beatriz; Calasans, Max; Nascimento, Vladimir Pinheiro do

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella spp. causes diseases in fowls, when species-specific serovars (Salmonella Pullorum and S.Gallinarum) are present in flocks, and public health problems, when non-typhoid serovars are isolated, as well as possible bacterial resistance induced by the preventive and therapeutic use of antimicrobials in animal production. This study describes the serovars and bacterial resistance of 280 Salmonella spp. strains isolated from turkey and broiler carcasses in Southern Brazil between 2004 and 2006. Salmonella Enteritidis was the most prevalent serovar (55.7%), followed by Heidelberg (5.0%), Agona (4.3%), Bredeney (3.9%), Hadar (3.2%), and Typhimurium (2.9%). Tennessee and S. Enterica subspecies enterica(O: 4.5) were isolated only in turkeys, and Hadar (18.6%) was the most prevalent serovar in this species. Antimicrobial susceptibility tests were performed in 178 isolates (43 from turkeys and 135 from broilers). All isolates were sensitive to amoxicillin + clavulanic acid, polymyxin B, ciprofloxacin, and norfloxacin, and were resistant to bacitracin and penicillin. Broiler carcass isolates showed resistance to nalidixic acid (48.9%), nitrofurantoin (34.3%), neomycin (9.6%), tetracycline (5.2%), and kanamycin (8.9%); and turkey carcass isolates were resistant to nalidixic acid (62.8%), tetracycline (34.9%), and neomycin (30.2%), with a significant difference in turkeys when compared to broiler carcass isolates. These results indicate the need for judicious use of antimicrobials in livestock production, given that the serovars identified are potential causes of food poisoning.

  15. Attachment of Salmonella serovars and Listeria monocytogenes to stainless steel and plastic conveyor belts.

    PubMed

    Veluz, G A; Pitchiah, S; Alvarado, C Z

    2012-08-01

    In poultry industry, cross-contamination due to processing equipment and contact surfaces is very common. This study examined the extent of bacterial attachment to 6 different types and design of conveyor belts: stainless steel-single loop, stainless steel-balance weave, polyurethane with mono-polyester fabric, acetal, polypropylene mesh top, and polypropylene. Clean conveyor belts were immersed separately in either a cocktail of Salmonella serovars (Salmonella Typhimurium and Salmonella Enteritidis) or Listeria monocytogenes strains (Scott A, Brie 1, ATCC 6744) for 1 h at room temperature. Soiled conveyor chips were dipped in poultry rinses contaminated with Salmonella or Listeria cocktail and incubated at 10°C for 48 h. The polyurethane with mono-polyester fabric conveyor belt and chip exhibited a higher (P<0.05) mean number of attached Salmonella serovars (clean: 1.6 to 3.6 cfu/cm2; soiled: 0.8 to 2.4 cfu/cm2) and L. monocytogenes (clean: 4.0 to 4.3 cfu/cm2; soiled: 0.3 to 2.1 cfu/cm2) in both clean and soiled conditions. The stainless steel conveyor belt attached a lower (P<0.05) number of Salmonella serovars (clean: 0 to 2.6 cfu/cm2; soiled: 0.4 to 1.3 cfu/cm2) and L. monocytogenes (clean: 0.4 to 2.9 cfu/cm2; soiled: 0 to 0.7 cfu/cm2) than the polymeric materials, indicating weaker adhesion properties. Plastic conveyor belts exhibited stronger bacterial adhesion compared with stainless steel. The result suggests the importance of selecting the design and finishes of conveyor belt materials that are most resistant to bacterial attachment.

  16. Genomic Evidence Reveals Numerous Salmonella enterica Serovar Newport Reintroduction Events in Suwannee Watershed Irrigation Ponds

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Scott A.; Gangiredla, Jayanthi; Wang, Weimin; Liu, Huanli; Tall, Ben D.; Beaubrun, Junia Jean-Gilles; Jay-Russell, Michele; Vellidis, George; Elkins, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    Our previous work indicated a predominance (56.8%) of Salmonella enterica serovar Newport among isolates recovered from irrigation ponds used in produce farms over a 2-year period (B. Li et al., Appl Environ Microbiol 80:6355–6365, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AEM.02063-14). This observation provided a valuable set of metrics to explore an underaddressed issue of environmental survival of Salmonella by DNA microarray. Microarray analysis correctly identified all the isolates (n = 53) and differentiated the S. Newport isolates into two phylogenetic lineages (S. Newport II and S. Newport III). Serovar distribution analysis showed no instances where the same serovar was recovered from a pond for more than a month. Furthermore, during the study, numerous isolates with an indistinguishable genotype were recovered from different ponds as far as 180 km apart for time intervals as long as 2 years. Although isolates within either lineage were phylogenetically related as determined by microarray analysis, subtle genotypic differences were detected within the lineages, suggesting that isolates in either lineage could have come from several unique hosts. For example, strains in four different subgroups (A, B, C, and D) possessed an indistinguishable genotype within their subgroups as measured by gene differences, suggesting that strains in each subgroup shared a common host. Based on this comparative genomic evidence and the spatial and temporal factors, we speculated that the presence of Salmonella in the ponds was likely due to numerous punctuated reintroduction events associated with several different but common hosts in the environment. These findings may have implications for the development of strategies for efficient and safe irrigation to minimize the risk of Salmonella outbreaks associated with fresh produce. PMID:26386063

  17. Preliminary Investigations on the Distribution of Leptospira Serovars in Domestic Animals in North-west Morocco.

    PubMed

    Benkirane, A; Noury, S; Hartskeerl, R A; Goris, M G A; Ahmed, A; Nally, J E

    2016-04-01

    Leptospirosis is a neglected zoonosis of global importance with a complex epidemiology that affects humans, domestic and wild mammals. However, due to the diversity of clinical signs and difficulties of establishing a confirmatory laboratory diagnosis, the disease remains poorly investigated, particularly in the developing world. In Morocco, a descriptive study of the seroprevalence of Leptospira infection in animals has never been undertaken. To fill this gap, the current study was conducted on a subset of animals in north-west Morocco as a preliminary step towards understanding the epidemiological patterns of animal leptospirosis in the country. The study was conducted on 289 serum samples collected between January and April 2012 from dogs, cattle, sheep, goats and donkeys in the areas of Rabat-Temara, Sidi Kacem and Oulmes. All serum samples were tested by the MAT with 14 reference strains of the most prevalent pathogenic serovars of Leptospira and two serovars of non-pathogenic Leptospira. The overall seroprevalence of Leptospira in cattle, sheep, goats, dogs and donkeys was 15%, 18%, 20%, 21% and 20%, respectively. The most prevalent serogroups found in each species were Ballum, Sejroe, and Australis in cattle, Ballum, Australis and Sejroe in sheep, Australis and Ballum in goats, Javanica and Australis in donkey and Australis, Ballum and Canicola in dogs. Of all the serogroups tested in this study, Icterohaemorrhagiae, the only serogroup which has been previously reported in humans in Morocco, was rarely reactive. The majority of reactive sera were collected from low land areas. A large number of sera samples classified as seronegative when tested against pathogenic leptospires were positive when tested against non-pathogenic leptospires; this is suggestive of possible novel, as yet unclassified, Leptospira serovars in Morocco. Eleven of thirteen sheep urine samples were positive by real-time PCR confirming their role as Leptospira carriers in Morocco.

  18. Epidemiology of a Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium strain associated with a songbird outbreak.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Sonia M; Keel, Kevin; Sanchez, Susan; Trees, Eija; Gerner-Smidt, Peter; Adams, Jennifer K; Cheng, Ying; Ray, Al; Martin, Gordon; Presotto, Andrea; Ruder, Mark G; Brown, Justin; Blehert, David S; Cottrell, Walter; Maurer, John J

    2012-10-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium is responsible for the majority of salmonellosis cases worldwide. This Salmonella serovar is also responsible for die-offs in songbird populations. In 2009, there was an S. Typhimurium epizootic reported in pine siskins in the eastern United States. At the time, there was also a human outbreak with this serovar that was associated with contaminated peanuts. As peanuts are also used in wild-bird food, it was hypothesized that the pine siskin epizootic was related to this human outbreak. A comparison of songbird and human S. Typhimurium pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns revealed that the epizootic was attributed not to the peanut-associated strain but, rather, to a songbird strain first characterized from an American goldfinch in 1998. This same S. Typhimurium strain (PFGE type A3) was also identified in the PulseNet USA database, accounting for 137 of 77,941 total S. Typhimurium PFGE entries. A second molecular typing method, multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA), confirmed that the same strain was responsible for the pine siskin epizootic in the eastern United States but was distinct from a genetically related strain isolated from pine siskins in Minnesota. The pine siskin A3 strain was first encountered in May 2008 in an American goldfinch and later in a northern cardinal at the start of the pine siskin epizootic. MLVA also confirmed the clonal nature of S. Typhimurium in songbirds and established that the pine siskin epizootic strain was unique to the finch family. For 2009, the distribution of PFGE type A3 in passerines and humans mirrored the highest population density of pine siskins for the East Coast.

  19. The Type III Secretion System Effector SptP of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Rebecca; Byrne, Alexander; Berger, Cedric N; Klemm, Elizabeth; Crepin, Valerie F; Dougan, Gordon; Frankel, Gad

    2017-02-15

    Strains of the various Salmonella enterica serovars cause gastroenteritis or typhoid fever in humans, with virulence depending on the action of two type III secretion systems (Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 [SPI-1] and SPI-2). SptP is a Salmonella SPI-1 effector, involved in mediating recovery of the host cytoskeleton postinfection. SptP requires a chaperone, SicP, for stability and secretion. SptP has 94% identity between S. enterica serovar Typhimurium and S Typhi; direct comparison of the protein sequences revealed that S Typhi SptP has numerous amino acid changes within its chaperone-binding domain. Subsequent comparison of ΔsptP S Typhi and S. Typhimurium strains demonstrated that, unlike SptP in S. Typhimurium, SptP in S Typhi was not involved in invasion or cytoskeletal recovery postinfection. Investigation of whether the observed amino acid changes within SptP of S Typhi affected its function revealed that S Typhi SptP was unable to complement S. Typhimurium ΔsptP due to an absence of secretion. We further demonstrated that while S. Typhimurium SptP is stable intracellularly within S Typhi, S Typhi SptP is unstable, although stability could be recovered following replacement of the chaperone-binding domain with that of S. Typhimurium. Direct assessment of the strength of the interaction between SptP and SicP of both serovars via bacterial two-hybrid analysis demonstrated that S Typhi SptP has a significantly weaker interaction with SicP than the equivalent proteins in S. Typhimurium. Taken together, our results suggest that changes within the chaperone-binding domain of SptP in S Typhi hinder binding to its chaperone, resulting in instability, preventing translocation, and therefore restricting the intracellular activity of this effector.

  20. Salmonella enterica Serovar Kentucky Flagella Are Required for Broiler Skin Adhesion and Caco-2 Cell Invasion.

    PubMed

    Salehi, Sanaz; Howe, Kevin; Lawrence, Mark L; Brooks, John P; Bailey, R Hartford; Karsi, Attila

    2017-01-15

    Nontyphoidal Salmonella strains are the main source of pathogenic bacterial contamination in the poultry industry. Recently, Salmonella enterica serovar Kentucky has been recognized as the most prominent serovar on carcasses in poultry-processing plants. Previous studies showed that flagella are one of the main factors that contribute to bacterial attachment to broiler skin. However, the precise role of flagella and the mechanism of attachment are unknown. There are two different flagellar subunits (fliC and fljB) expressed alternatively in Salmonella enterica serovars using phase variation. Here, by making deletions in genes encoding flagellar structural subunits (flgK, fliC, and fljB), and flagellar motor (motA), we were able to differentiate the role of flagella and their rotary motion in the colonization of broiler skin and cellular attachment. Utilizing a broiler skin assay, we demonstrated that the presence of FliC is necessary for attachment to broiler skin. Expression of the alternative flagellar subunit FljB enables Salmonella motility, but this subunit is unable to mediate tight attachment. Deletion of the flgK gene prevents proper flagellar assembly, making Salmonella significantly less adherent to broiler skin than the wild type. S Kentucky with deletions in all three structural genes, fliC, fljB, and flgK, as well as a flagellar motor mutant (motA), exhibited less adhesion and invasion of Caco-2 cells, while an fljB mutant was as adherent and invasive as the wild-type strain.

  1. Epidemiology of a Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Typhimurium Strain Associated with a Songbird Outbreak

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Sonia M.; Keel, Kevin; Sanchez, Susan; Trees, Eija; Gerner-Smidt, Peter; Adams, Jennifer K.; Cheng, Ying; Ray, Al; Martin, Gordon; Presotto, Andrea; Ruder, Mark G.; Brown, Justin; Blehert, David S.; Cottrell, Walter

    2012-01-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium is responsible for the majority of salmonellosis cases worldwide. This Salmonella serovar is also responsible for die-offs in songbird populations. In 2009, there was an S. Typhimurium epizootic reported in pine siskins in the eastern United States. At the time, there was also a human outbreak with this serovar that was associated with contaminated peanuts. As peanuts are also used in wild-bird food, it was hypothesized that the pine siskin epizootic was related to this human outbreak. A comparison of songbird and human S. Typhimurium pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns revealed that the epizootic was attributed not to the peanut-associated strain but, rather, to a songbird strain first characterized from an American goldfinch in 1998. This same S. Typhimurium strain (PFGE type A3) was also identified in the PulseNet USA database, accounting for 137 of 77,941 total S. Typhimurium PFGE entries. A second molecular typing method, multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA), confirmed that the same strain was responsible for the pine siskin epizootic in the eastern United States but was distinct from a genetically related strain isolated from pine siskins in Minnesota. The pine siskin A3 strain was first encountered in May 2008 in an American goldfinch and later in a northern cardinal at the start of the pine siskin epizootic. MLVA also confirmed the clonal nature of S. Typhimurium in songbirds and established that the pine siskin epizootic strain was unique to the finch family. For 2009, the distribution of PFGE type A3 in passerines and humans mirrored the highest population density of pine siskins for the East Coast. PMID:22885752

  2. Extracellular polysaccharides associated with thin aggregative fimbriae of Salmonella enterica serovar enteritidis.

    PubMed

    White, A P; Gibson, D L; Collinson, S K; Banser, P A; Kay, W W

    2003-09-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) O polysaccharide was identified as the principle factor impeding intercellular formation of intact thin aggregative fimbriae (Tafi) in Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis. The extracellular nucleation-precipitation assembly pathway for these organelles was investigated by quantifying fimbrial formation between deltaagfA (AgfA recipient) and deltaagfB (AgfA donor) cells harboring mutations in LPS (galE::Tn10) and/or cellulose (deltabcsA) synthesis. Intercellular complementation could be detected between deltaagfA and deltaagfB strains only when both possessed the galE mutation. LPS O polysaccharide appears to be an impenetrable barrier to AgfA assembly between cells but not within individual cells. The presence of cellulose did not restrict Tafi formation between cells. Transmission electron microscopy of w+ S. enterica serovar Enteritidis 3b cells revealed diffuse Tafi networks without discernible fine structure. In the absence of cellulose, however, individual Tafi fibers were clearly visible, appeared to be occasionally branched, and showed the generally distinctive appearance described for Escherichia coli K-12 curli. A third extracellular matrix component closely associated with cellulose and Tafi was detected on Western blots by using immune serum raised to whole, purified Tafi aggregates. Cellulose was required to tightly link this material to cells. Antigenically similar material was also detected in S. enterica serovar Typhimurium and one diarrheagenic E. coli isolate. Preliminary analysis indicated that this material represented an anionic, extracellular polysaccharide that was distinct from colanic acid. Therefore, Tafi in their native state appear to exist as a complex with cellulose and at least one other component.

  3. Immunological characterization of recombinant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi FliC protein expressed in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Like any other enteric pathogen, Salmonella also encounters acidic stress in the stomach as well as within the host macrophage milieu. However, the pathogen is reported to combat this stress through acid tolerance response (ATR), expressing a number of genes and eventually the proteins. Recently, an acid induced outer membrane phenotype encoded by fliC gene in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi has been identified. In the present study, fliC gene was cloned to study its biological implications. The recombinant FliC (rFliC) protein was observed to stimulate the production of antibodies. These antibodies could also recognize the FliC protein (antigen) in the clinical samples i.e. blood samples from typhoid patents as well as healthy blood samples spiked with serovar Typhi. Moreover, the rFliC also reacted with the sera from patients suffering with typhoid fever indicating its in-vivo immunogenicity. Ex-vivo study revealed that rFliC has the potential to stimulate the macrophages to generate higher levels of inflammatory mediators such as malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitrite. The inflammatory potential of FliC was also confirmed in-vivo, by the paw oedema test as well as by flicking response of the inflamed paw indicating hyperalgesia occurring during inflammatory response. The findings of the present study indicate that acid induced FliC might be one of the factors enhancing the virulence of serovar Typhi under the host acidic conditions and may prove to be helpful in designing the prophylactic measures. PMID:23067582

  4. Genomic evidence reveals numerous Salmonella enterica serovar Newport reintroduction events in Suwannee watershed irrigation ponds.

    PubMed

    Li, Baoguang; Jackson, Scott A; Gangiredla, Jayanthi; Wang, Weimin; Liu, Huanli; Tall, Ben D; Beaubrun, Junia Jean-Gilles; Jay-Russell, Michele; Vellidis, George; Elkins, Christopher A

    2015-12-01

    Our previous work indicated a predominance (56.8%) of Salmonella enterica serovar Newport among isolates recovered from irrigation ponds used in produce farms over a 2-year period (B. Li et al., Appl Environ Microbiol 80:6355-6365, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AEM.02063-14). This observation provided a valuable set of metrics to explore an underaddressed issue of environmental survival of Salmonella by DNA microarray. Microarray analysis correctly identified all the isolates (n = 53) and differentiated the S. Newport isolates into two phylogenetic lineages (S. Newport II and S. Newport III). Serovar distribution analysis showed no instances where the same serovar was recovered from a pond for more than a month. Furthermore, during the study, numerous isolates with an indistinguishable genotype were recovered from different ponds as far as 180 km apart for time intervals as long as 2 years. Although isolates within either lineage were phylogenetically related as determined by microarray analysis, subtle genotypic differences were detected within the lineages, suggesting that isolates in either lineage could have come from several unique hosts. For example, strains in four different subgroups (A, B, C, and D) possessed an indistinguishable genotype within their subgroups as measured by gene differences, suggesting that strains in each subgroup shared a common host. Based on this comparative genomic evidence and the spatial and temporal factors, we speculated that the presence of Salmonella in the ponds was likely due to numerous punctuated reintroduction events associated with several different but common hosts in the environment. These findings may have implications for the development of strategies for efficient and safe irrigation to minimize the risk of Salmonella outbreaks associated with fresh produce.

  5. Epidemiology of a Salmonella enterica subsp. Enterica serovar Typhimurium strain associated with a songbird outbreak.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blehert, David S.; Hernandez, Sonia M.; Keel, Kevin; Sanchez, Susan; Trees, Eija; ,

    2012-01-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium is responsible for the majority of salmonellosis cases worldwide. This Salmonella serovar is also responsible for die-offs in songbird populations. In 2009, there was an S. Typhimurium epizootic reported in pine siskins in the eastern United States. At the time, there was also a human outbreak with this serovar that was associated with contaminated peanuts. As peanuts are also used in wild-bird food, it was hypothesized that the pine siskin epizootic was related to this human outbreak. A comparison of songbird and human S. Typhimurium pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns revealed that the epizootic was attributed not to the peanut-associated strain but, rather, to a songbird strain first characterized from an American goldfinch in 1998. This same S. Typhimurium strain (PFGE type A3) was also identified in the PulseNet USA database, accounting for 137 of 77,941 total S. Typhimurium PFGE entries. A second molecular typing method, multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA), confirmed that the same strain was responsible for the pine siskin epizootic in the eastern United States but was distinct from a genetically related strain isolated from pine siskins in Minnesota. The pine siskin A3 strain was first encountered in May 2008 in an American goldfinch and later in a northern cardinal at the start of the pine siskin epizootic. MLVA also confirmed the clonal nature of S. Typhimurium in songbirds and established that the pine siskin epizootic strain was unique to the finch family. For 2009, the distribution of PFGE type A3 in passerines and humans mirrored the highest population density of pine siskins for the East Coast.

  6. ramR mutations affecting fluoroquinolone susceptibility in epidemic multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Kentucky ST198.

    PubMed

    Baucheron, Sylvie; Le Hello, Simon; Doublet, Benoît; Giraud, Etienne; Weill, François-Xavier; Cloeckaert, Axel

    2013-01-01

    A screening for non-target mutations affecting fluoroquinolone susceptibility was conducted in epidemic multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Kentucky ST198. Among a panel of representative isolates (n = 27), covering the epidemic, only three showed distinct mutations in ramR resulting in enhanced expression of genes encoding the AcrAB-TolC efflux system and low increase in ciprofloxacin MIC. No mutations were detected in other regulatory regions of this efflux system. Ciprofloxacin resistance in serovar Kentucky ST198 is thus currently mainly due to multiple target gene mutations.

  7. Genomic Comparison of Non-Typhoidal Salmonella enterica Serovars Typhimurium, Enteritidis, Heidelberg, Hadar and Kentucky Isolates from Broiler Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Dhanani, Akhilesh S.; Block, Glenn; Dewar, Ken; Forgetta, Vincenzo; Topp, Edward; Beiko, Robert G.; Diarra, Moussa S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica serovars, associated with different foods including poultry products, are important causes of bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide. The colonization of the chicken gut by S. enterica could result in the contamination of the environment and food chain. The aim of this study was to compare the genomes of 25 S. enterica serovars isolated from broiler chicken farms to assess their intra- and inter-genetic variability, with a focus on virulence and antibiotic resistance characteristics. Methodology/Principal Finding The genomes of 25 S. enterica isolates covering five serovars (ten Typhimurium including three monophasic 4,[5],12:i:, four Enteritidis, three Hadar, four Heidelberg and four Kentucky) were sequenced. Most serovars were clustered in strongly supported phylogenetic clades, except for isolates of serovar Enteritidis that were scattered throughout the tree. Plasmids of varying sizes were detected in several isolates independently of serovars. Genes associated with the IncF plasmid and the IncI1 plasmid were identified in twelve and four isolates, respectively, while genes associated with the IncQ plasmid were found in one isolate. The presence of numerous genes associated with Salmonella pathogenicity islands (SPIs) was also confirmed. Components of the type III and IV secretion systems (T3SS and T4SS) varied in different isolates, which could explain in part, differences of their pathogenicity in humans and/or persistence in broilers. Conserved clusters of genes in the T3SS were detected that could be used in designing effective strategies (diagnostic, vaccination or treatments) to combat Salmonella. Antibiotic resistance genes (CMY, aadA, ampC, florR, sul1, sulI, tetAB, and srtA) and class I integrons were detected in resistant isolates while all isolates carried multidrug efflux pump systems regardless of their antibiotic susceptibility profile. Conclusions/Significance This study showed that the predominant

  8. The complete genome sequence of Bacillus thuringiensis serovar Hailuosis YWC2-8.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jun; Zhang, Qinbin; Cao, Ye; Li, Qiao; Zhu, Zizhong; Wang, Linxia; Li, Ping

    2016-02-10

    Bacillus thuringiensis, a typical aerobic, Gram-positive, spore-forming bacterium, is an important microbial insecticide widely used in the control of agricultural pests. B. thuringiensis serovar Hailuosis YWC2-8 with high insecticidal activity against Diptera and Lepidoptera insects has three insecticidal crystal protein genes, such as cry4Cb2, cry30Ea2, and cry56Aa1. In this study, the complete genome sequence of B. thuringiensis YWC2-8 was analyzed, which contains one circular gapless chromosome and six circular plasmids.

  9. Salmonella serovars and antimicrobial resistance in strains isolated from wild animals in captivity in Sinaloa, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Silva-Hidalgo, Gabriela; López-Valenzuela, Martin; Juárez-Barranco, Felipe; Montiel-Vázquez, Edith; Valenzuela-Sánchez, Beatriz

    2014-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the frequency of antibiotic resistance in Salmonella spp. strains from wild animals in captivity at the Culiacan Zoo and the Mazatlan Aquarium in Sinaloa, Mexico. We identified 17 different Salmonella enterica serovars at a prevalence of 19.90% (Culiacan Zoo) and 6.25% (Mazatlan Aquarium). Antibiotic sensitivity tests revealed that, of the 83 strains studied, 100% were multidrug resistant (MDR). The drugs against which the greatest resistance was observed were: penicillin, erythromycin, dicloxacillin, ampicillin, cephalothin, and chloramphenicol. We therefore conclude that MDR is common among Salmonella isolates originating from wild animals in captivity in Sinaloa.

  10. Correlation of Phenotype with the Genotype of Egg-Contaminating Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Cesar A.; Porwollik, Steffen; Frye, Jonathan G.; Kinde, Hailu; McClelland, Michael; Guard-Bouldin, Jean

    2005-01-01

    The genotype of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis was correlated with the phenotype using DNA-DNA microarray hybridization, ribotyping, and Phenotype MicroArray analysis to compare three strains that differed in colony morphology and phage type. No DNA hybridization differences were found between two phage type 13A (PT13A) strains that varied in biofilm formation; however, the ribotype patterns were different. Both PT13A strains had DNA sequences similar to that of bacteriophage Fels2, whereas the PT4 genome to which they were compared, as well as a PT4 field isolate, had a DNA sequence with some similarity to the bacteriophage ST64b sequence. Phenotype MicroArray analysis indicated that the two PT13A strains and the PT4 field isolate had similar respiratory activity profiles at 37°C. However, the wild-type S. enterica serovar Enteritidis PT13A strain grew significantly better in 20% more of the 1,920 conditions tested when it was assayed at 25°C than the biofilm-forming PT13A strain grew. Statistical analysis of the respiratory activity suggested that S. enterica serovar Enteritidis PT4 had a temperature-influenced dimorphic metabolism which at 25°C somewhat resembled the profile of the biofilm-forming PT13A strain and that at 37°C the metabolism was nearly identical to that of the wild-type PT13A strain. Although it is possible that lysogenic bacteriophage alter the balance of phage types on a farm either by lytic competition or by altering the metabolic processes of the host cell in subtle ways, the different physiologies of the S. enterica serovar Enteritidis strains correlated most closely with minor, rather than major, genomic changes. These results strongly suggest that the pandemic of egg-associated human salmonellosis that came into prominence in the 1980s is primarily an example of bacterial adaptive radiation that affects the safety of the food supply. PMID:16085829

  11. Pleural empyema due to Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis in an immunocompetent elderly patient: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Karachalios, Kostis; Siagris, Dimitrios; Lekkou, Alexandra; Anastassiou, Evangelos D.; Spiliopoulou, Iris; Gogos, Charalambos

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Pleural empyema as a focal infection due to Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is rare and most commonly described among immunosuppressed patients or patients who suffer from sickle cell anaemia and lung malignancies. Case presentation: Here, we present an 81-year-old immunocompetent Greek woman with bacteraemia and pleural empyema due to Salmonella Enteritidis without any gastrointestinal symptoms. Conclusion: In our case, we suggest that patient’s pleural effusion secondary to heart failure was complicated by empyema and that focal intravascular infection was the cause of bacteraemia. PMID:28348773

  12. Studies on the presence and persistence of Pasteurella multocida serovars and genotypes in fowl cholera outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Singh, Reema; Blackall, Patrick J; Remington, Bruce; Turni, Conny

    2013-12-01

    Pasteurella multocida was isolated from poultry on six farms (one free-range duck farm, one free-range turkey farm, one conventional enclosed turkey farm, and three free-range layer farms) suffering fowl cholera outbreaks. In addition, historical isolates from previous outbreaks were available for the conventional turkey farm and the three free-range layer farms. The isolates were serotyped using the Heddleston scheme and genotyped using multi-locus sequencing typing. In the current outbreaks, two of the farms had two different sequence types (STs) of P. multocida in the investigated outbreak (the free-range turkey farm and one of the free-range layer farms). The remaining four farms had one ST within the investigated outbreak. In looking at the historical isolates, two of the four farms had multiple genotypes involved. On the four farms with historical isolates from previous outbreaks, at least one new genotype was present in the investigated outbreak as compared with the historical isolates. On one layer farm, one genotype persisted over a 10-year period. Serotyping revealed the presence of multiple serovars in the current and historical outbreaks, with serovars sometimes changing over time. This study has shown that several STs of P. multocida can be present during some outbreaks of fowl cholera, although other outbreaks involve a single ST. Also, the STs present on a property suffering repeated fowl cholera can both persist and change over time.

  13. Requirement for cobalamin by Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium, Pullorum, Gallinarum and Enteritidis during infection in chickens

    PubMed Central

    Vaz, Jacqueline Boldrin; Penha Filho, Rafael Antonio Casarin; Junior, Angelo Berchieri; Lemos, Manoel Victor Franco

    2011-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium synthesizes cobalamin (vitamin B12) only during anaerobiosis. Two percent of the S. Typhimurium genome is devoted to the synthesis and uptake of vitamin B12 and to B12-dependent reactions. To understand the requirement for cobalamin synthesis better, we constructed mutants of Salmonella serovars Enteritidis and Pullorum that are double-defective in cobalamin biosynthesis (ΔcobSΔcbiA). We compared the virulence of these mutants to that of their respective wild type strains and found no impairment in their ability to cause disease in chickens. We then assessed B12 production in these mutants and their respective wild type strains, as well as in S. Typhimurium ΔcobSΔcbiA, Salmonella Gallinarum ΔcobSΔcbiA, and their respective wild type strains. None of the mutants was able to produce detectable B12. B12 was detectable in S. Enteritidis, S. Pullorum and S. Typhimurium wild type strains but not in S. Gallinarum. In conclusion, the production of vitamin B12in vitro differed across the tested Salmonella serotypes and the deletion of the cbiA and cobS genes resulted in different levels of alteration in the host parasite interaction according to Salmonella serotype tested. PMID:24031771

  14. Interaction between Host Cells and Septicemic Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Isolates from Pigs ▿

    PubMed Central

    Bergeron, Nadia; Corriveau, Jonathan; Letellier, Ann; Daigle, France; Lessard, Louise; Quessy, Sylvain

    2009-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is an important pathogen in swine and is also a frequently reported zoonotic agent. The objective of this study was to characterize isolates of S. enterica serovar Typhimurium associated with septicemia in swine and to compare them to isolates recovered from clinically healthy pigs. We were particularly interested in comparing the two groups of isolates for their ability to adhere to and invade host cells, to be phagocytized and survive in monocyte cells, to induce apoptosis, and to adhere to intestinal mucus. Their surface properties were also evaluated by interactions with solvents. The isolates recovered from diseased animals were shown to invade intestinal epithelial cell lines at a higher rate (P = 0.003) than isolates from healthy pigs. Septicemic isolates were phagocytized by human monocytes at a higher rate than isolates from healthy pigs (P = 0.009). The mean percentages of phagocytosis were significantly lower for human monocytes than for porcine monocytes (P = 0.02 and P = 0.008, respectively) for isolates from both diseased and healthy animals. Healthy animal isolates were phagocytized more by porcine monocytes at 15 min (P = 0.02) than septicemic isolates. No difference between isolates from septicemic pigs and isolates from healthy pigs was detected for other tested parameters. These results suggest that septicemic isolates have a particular pattern of invasion. PMID:19710281

  15. Cattle-derived Salmonella enterica serovar Dublin Infections in Red Foxes ( Vulpes vulpes ) in Tyrol, Austria.

    PubMed

    Glawischnig, Walter; Lazar, Judit; Wallner, Alice; Kornschober, Christian

    2017-01-31

    Salmonella enterica serovar Dublin is endemic in the cattle population in some areas of the Austrian province Tyrol, and each year single dairy farms have experienced clinical infections. To ascertain if Tyrolean red foxes ( Vulpes vulpes ) act as a reservoir for Salmonella spp., we tested hepatic tissue and intestinal content from foxes hunted in the years 2015-2016 by using microbiological methods. In addition, we included several fox fecal samples collected on a mountain pasture near chamois carcasses in the investigation. Of 434 foxes tested, nine animals (2.1%) were positive for Salmonella spp. Serotyping revealed five foxes positive with S. Dublin, demonstrating that this serovar exists in the Tyrolean fox population. The fecal samples collected in the area surrounding skeletonized chamois ( Rupicapra rupicapra ) also tested positive for S. Dublin. These chamois were probably victims of a waterborne outbreak caused by S. Dublin-shedding cattle. Our results indicate that the S. Dublin infections in red foxes were primarily acquired through ingestion of infected cattle material such as abortion tissues, but also by feeding on dead chamois. The findings underline the importance of interspecies transmission in this domestic/wildlife interface.

  16. Interaction of Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Typhimurium and mung bean (Phaseolus aureus) plants.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bhoj Raj; Chandra, Mudit; Agarwal, Ravikant

    2005-03-01

    The effect of Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Typhimurium, a zoonotic serovar, on mung bean (Phaseolus aureus) cultivar Pant Mung-3 plants was studied. Inoculation of mung bean seeds with Salmonella Typhimurium (7.2 x 10(5) CFU/ml) reduced sprouting rate (P < 0.07). This effect was more pronounced at higher levels of contamination. In the soil inoculated with Salmonella Typhimurium (7.2 x 10(6) CFU/g), germination was retarded and the number of defective sprouts was also significantly higher (P < 0.002). Salmonella Typhimurium grew inside germinating seeds and plant tissues and persisted in seedlings, adult plants, and harvested seedlings dried and stored at room temperature (30 degrees C) up to 45 days. Phaseolus aureus plants grown in sterile soil was resistant to Salmonella Typhimurium infection at 15 days of age and cleared Salmonella from all the aerial parts within 3 h of infection. However, Salmonella Typhimurium could be reisolated from the basal area of the stem and from soil even after 45 days of exposure to the pathogen.

  17. Hyperinvasiveness of Salmonella enterica serovar Choleraesuis linked to hyperexpression of type III secretion systems in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Kuan-Yeh; Wang, Yi-Hsin; Chien, Kun-Yi; Janapatla, Rajendra Prasad; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovars Choleraesuis and Typhimurium are among the non-typhoid Salmonella serovars that are important zoonotic pathogens. In clinical observation, S. Typhimurium typically causes diarrheal diseases; however, S. Choleraesuis shows high predilection to cause bacteremia. The mechanism why S. Choleraesuis is more invasive to humans remains unknown. In this study, we compared the S. Typhimurium LT2 and S. Choleraesuis SC-B67 proteomes through stable isotope labeling of amino acid in cell culture (SILAC). In SILAC, the expression of many virulence proteins in two type III secretion systems (T3SSs) were significantly higher in S. Choleraesuis than in S. Typhimurium. Similar differences were also found at the transcriptional level. Compared to S. Typhimurium, S. Choleraesuis showed a higher penetration level to Caco-2 (>100-fold) and MDCK (>10-fold) monolayers. In mice after oral challenge, the invasion of spleen and liver was also higher in S. Choleraesuis than in S. Typhimurium. The transcription of hilD in S. Choleraesuis was increased in physiological (1 mM) or high (10 mM) concentrations of Mg2+, but not in low (8 μM) concentration. We conclude that S. Choleraesuis showed hyperinvasiveness in cellular as well as mouse models due to hyperexpression of T3SS genes. PMID:27886215

  18. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi impairs CD4 T cell responses by reducing antigen availability.

    PubMed

    Atif, Shaikh M; Winter, Sebastian E; Winter, Maria G; McSorley, Stephen J; Bäumler, Andreas J

    2014-06-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi is associated with a disseminated febrile illness in humans, termed typhoid fever, while Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium causes localized gastroenteritis in immunocompetent individuals. One of the genetic differences between both pathogens is the presence in S. Typhi of TviA, a regulatory protein that shuts down flagellin (FliC) expression when bacteria transit from the intestinal lumen into the intestinal mucosa. Here we investigated the consequences of TviA-mediated flagellum gene regulation on flagellin-specific CD4 T cell responses in a mouse model of S. Typhimurium infection. Introduction of the S. Typhi tviA gene into S. Typhimurium suppressed antigen presentation of dendritic cells to flagellin-specific CD4 T cells in vitro. Furthermore, TviA-mediated repression of flagellin expression impaired the activation and proliferation of naive flagellin-specific CD4 T cells in Peyer's patches and mesenteric lymph nodes, which was accompanied by increased bacterial dissemination to the spleen. We conclude that TviA-mediated repression of flagellin expression reduces antigen availability, thereby weakening flagellin-specific CD4 T cell responses.

  19. Regulation of fucose and 1,2-propanediol utilization by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Staib, Lena; Fuchs, Thilo M

    2015-01-01

    After ingestion, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) encounters a densely populated, competitive environment in the gastrointestinal tract. To escape nutrient limitation caused by the intestinal microbiota, this pathogen has acquired specific metabolic traits to use compounds that are not metabolized by the commensal bacteria. For example, the utilization of 1,2-propanediol (1,2-PD), a product of the fermentation of L-fucose, which is present in foods of herbal origin and is also a terminal sugar of gut mucins. Under anaerobic conditions and in the presence of tetrathionate, 1,2-PD can serve as an energy source for S. Typhimurium. Comprehensive database analysis revealed that the 1,2-PD and fucose utilization operons are present in all S. enterica serovars sequenced thus far. The operon, consisting of 21 genes, is expressed as a single polycistronic mRNA. As demonstrated here, 1,2-PD was formed and further used when S. Typhimurium strain 14028 was grown with L-fucose, and the gene fucA encoding L-fuculose-1-phosphate aldolase was required for this growth. Using promoter fusions, we monitored the expression of the propanediol utilization operon that was induced at very low concentrations of 1,2-PD and was inhibited by the presence of D-glucose.

  20. Ceftiofur Resistance in Salmonella enterica Serovar Heidelberg from Chicken Meat and Humans, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, Rebecca; Finley, Rita; Ng, Lai King; Avery, Brent; Boerlin, Patrick; Bourgault, Anne-Marie; Cole, Linda; Daignault, Danielle; Desruisseau, Andrea; Demczuk, Walter; Hoang, Linda; Horsman, Greg B.; Ismail, Johanne; Jamieson, Frances; Maki, Anne; Pacagnella, Ana; Pillai, Dylan R.

    2010-01-01

    The Canadian Integrated Program for Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance describes a strong correlation (r = 0.9, p<0.0001) between ceftiofur-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Heidelberg isolated from retail chicken and incidence of ceftiofur-resistant Salmonella serovar Heidelberg infections in humans across Canada. In Québec, changes of ceftiofur resistance in chicken Salmonella Heidelberg and Escherichia coli isolates appear related to changing levels of ceftiofur use in hatcheries during the study period, from highest to lowest levels before and after a voluntary withdrawal, to increasing levels after reintroduction of use (62% to 7% to 20%, and 34% to 6% to 19%, respectively). These events provide evidence that ceftiofur use in chickens results in extended-spectrum cephalosporin resistance in bacteria from chicken and humans. To ensure the continued effectiveness of extended-spectrum cephalosporins for treating serious infections in humans, multidisciplinary efforts are needed to scrutinize and, where appropriate, limit use of ceftiofur in chicken production in Canada. PMID:20031042

  1. Resistance to essential oils affects survival of Salmonella enterica serovars in growing and harvested basil.

    PubMed

    Kisluk, Guy; Kalily, Emmanuel; Yaron, Sima

    2013-10-01

    The number of outbreaks of food-borne illness associated with consumption of fresh products has increased. A recent and noteworthy outbreak occurred in 2007. Basil contaminated with Salmonella enterica serovar Senftenberg was the source of this outbreak. Since basil produces high levels of antibacterial compounds the aim of this study was to investigate if the emerging outbreak reflects ecological changes that occurred as a result of development of resistance to ingredients of the basil oil. We irrigated basil plants with contaminated water containing two Salmonella serovars, Typhimurium and Senftenberg, and showed that Salmonella can survive on the basil plants for at least 100 days. S. Senftenberg counts in the phyllosphere were significantly higher than S. Typhimurium, moreover, S. Senftenberg was able to grow on stored harvested basil leaves. Susceptibility experiments demonstrated that S. Senftenberg is more resistant to basil oil and to its antimicrobial constituents: linalool, estragole and eugenol. This may indicate that S. Senftenberg had adapted to the basil environment by developing resistance to the basil oil. The emergence of resistant pathogens has a significant potential to change the ecology, and opens the way for pathogens to survive in new niches in the environment such as basil and other plants.

  2. Prevalence of ColE1-like plasmids and kanamycin resistance genes in Salmonella enterica serovars.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chin-Yi; Lindsey, Rebecca L; Strobaugh, Terence P; Frye, Jonathan G; Meinersmann, Richard J

    2010-10-01

    Multi-antimicrobial-resistant Salmonella enterica strains frequently carry resistance genes on plasmids. Recent studies focus heavily on large conjugative plasmids, and the role that small plasmids play in resistance gene transfer is largely unknown. To expand our previous studies in assessing the prevalence of the isolates harboring ColE1-like plasmids carrying the aph gene responsible for kanamycin resistance (Kan(r)) phenotypes, 102 Kan(r) Salmonella isolates collected through the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System (NARMS) in 2005 were screened by PCR using ColE1 primer sets. Thirty isolates were found to be positive for ColE1-like replicon. Plasmids from 23 isolates were able to propagate in Escherichia coli and were subjected to further characterization. Restriction mapping revealed three major plasmid groups found in three or more isolates, with each group consisting of two to three subtypes. The aph genes from the Kan(r) Salmonella isolates were amplified by PCR, sequenced, and showed four different aph(3')-I genes. The distribution of the ColE1 plasmid groups in association with the aph gene, Salmonella serovar, and isolate source demonstrated a strong linkage of the plasmid with S. enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104. Due to their high copy number and mobility, the ColE1-like plasmids may play a critical role in transmission of antibiotic resistance genes among enteric pathogens, and these findings warrant a close monitoring of this plasmid incompatibility group.

  3. A comparison of dense transposon insertion libraries in the Salmonella serovars Typhi and Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Barquist, Lars; Langridge, Gemma C.; Turner, Daniel J.; Phan, Minh-Duy; Turner, A. Keith; Bateman, Alex; Parkhill, Julian; Wain, John; Gardner, Paul P.

    2013-01-01

    Salmonella Typhi and Typhimurium diverged only ∼50 000 years ago, yet have very different host ranges and pathogenicity. Despite the availability of multiple whole-genome sequences, the genetic differences that have driven these changes in phenotype are only beginning to be understood. In this study, we use transposon-directed insertion-site sequencing to probe differences in gene requirements for competitive growth in rich media between these two closely related serovars. We identify a conserved core of 281 genes that are required for growth in both serovars, 228 of which are essential in Escherichia coli. We are able to identify active prophage elements through the requirement for their repressors. We also find distinct differences in requirements for genes involved in cell surface structure biogenesis and iron utilization. Finally, we demonstrate that transposon-directed insertion-site sequencing is not only applicable to the protein-coding content of the cell but also has sufficient resolution to generate hypotheses regarding the functions of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) as well. We are able to assign probable functions to a number of cis-regulatory ncRNA elements, as well as to infer likely differences in trans-acting ncRNA regulatory networks. PMID:23470992

  4. Prevalence and Antimicrobial Resistance of Salmonella enterica Serovar Indiana in China (1984-2016).

    PubMed

    Gong, J; Kelly, P; Wang, C

    2016-12-23

    Salmonella enterica serovar Indiana, first described in 1955, is generally regarded as having a low frequency worldwide with outbreaks of gastroenteritis and abortions described in North America and Europe. In China, S. Indiana was first reported in 1984 and in the subsequent 71 surveys in 35 cities/municipalities from 18 provinces, 70% of which were after 2012, S. Indiana has been shown to have become widely prevalent in people, animals, food and the environment around abattoirs and meat processing facilities. The organism is now one of the most common serovars found in livestock and raw meat in China with S. Indiana isolates having high levels of drug resistance, especially against tetracyclines, quinolones, folate pathway inhibitors, phenicols, penicillins, monobactams and nitrofurans. Further, S. Indiana isolates that are concurrently resistant to ciprofloxacin and ceftriaxone/cefotaxime have emerged. Studies have suggested the high levels of multidrug resistance of S. Indiana might be associated with the presence of class 1 integrons and plasmids. Unfortunately, information on the high prevalence of S. Indiana and its extensive drug resistance in China has largely escaped international recognition as it largely appears in local reports written in Chinese. To address this situation, we reviewed all the available local Chinese and international publications on the organism in China and report our findings in this review.

  5. Genome Sequences of Multidrug-Resistant Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Infantis Strains from Broiler Chicks in Hungary

    PubMed Central

    Wilk, Tímea; Szabó, Móni; Szmolka, Ama; Kiss, János; Barta, Endre; Nagy, Tibor

    2016-01-01

    Three strains of Salmonella enterica serovar Infantis isolated from healthy broiler chickens from 2012 to 2013 have been sequenced. Comparison of these and previously published S. Infantis genome sequences of broiler origin in 1996 and 2004 will provide new insight into the genome evolution and recent spread of S. Infantis in poultry. PMID:27979950

  6. Clinical isolates of Salmonella enterica serovar Agona producing NDM-1 metallo-β-lactamase: first report from Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Irfan, Seema; Khan, Erum; Jabeen, Kauser; Bhawan, Pushpa; Hopkins, Katie L; Day, Martin; Nasir, Amna; Meunier, Daniele; Woodford, Neil

    2015-01-01

    We report two cases of infantile diarrhea due to multidrug-resistant, NDM-1 metallo-β-lactamase-producing Salmonella enterica serovar Agona from Pakistan. This study alerts toward possible risk of NDM-1 transmission to enteric fever pathogens and encourages microbiologists to consider active screening of carbapenem resistance in nontyphoidal Salmonella isolates.

  7. Complete Genome Sequences of Two Outbreak Strains of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Thompson Associated with Cilantro

    PubMed Central

    Huynh, Steven; Gorski, Lisa; Cooper, Kerry K.; Miller, William G.

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Thompson strains RM1984 (CADPH-99A2334) and RM1986 (CADPH-99A2345) are associated with a 1999 outbreak in contaminated cilantro. We report here the complete genome sequences and annotation of these two S. Thompson strains. These genomes are distinct and provide additional data for our understanding of S. enterica. PMID:26586897

  8. Genome Sequences of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Lubbock Strains Isolated from Liver Abscesses of Feedlot Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Amachawadi, Raghavendra G.; Thomas, Milton

    2016-01-01

    The genome sequencing of 13 Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Lubbock strains isolated from liver abscesses of feedlot cattle is reported here. The availability of these genomes will help to further understand the etiologic role of Salmonella strains in liver abscesses of cattle and will serve as references in microbial trace-back studies to improve food safety. PMID:27151794

  9. Emergence and serovar profiling of non-typhoidal Salmonellae (NTS) isolated from gastroenteritis cases-A study from South India.

    PubMed

    Ballal, Mamatha; Devadas, Suganthi Martena; Shetty, Vignesh; Bangera, Sohan Rodney; Ramamurthy, Thandavarayan; Sarkar, Anirban

    2016-01-01

    Human infection with non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) serovars is often a neglected and undiagnosed infection in the developing world. Invasive NTS is now being established as having a new and emerging pathogenic role. There is not sufficient data on the prevalence of NTS serovars and their antibiotic susceptibility pattern from India. Faecal specimens collected from patients with acute gastroenteritis were processed to isolate Salmonella according to the standard protocol for a period from January 2011-December 2014. Salmonella isolates were serotyped and tested for antibiotic susceptibility. Of the total 320 (10.04%) bacterial enteric pathogens isolated, 64 (20%) were non-typhoidal Salmonella. Among the serogroup, O:4 (B) (n = 26; 40.6%) was found to be the commonest followed by O:7 (C1) (n = 11; 17.1%) and O:3,10 (E1) (n = 11; 17.1%). NTS infection in cancer patients could also be termed as nosocomial NTS diarrhoea due to primary community infection with prolonged incubation periods, consumption of contaminated food during hospital stay or Nosocomially acquired infection. Serovar Oslo has been predominant (9/17) in NTS isolates from cancer patients, whereas serovars Bovismorbificans, Wangata and Schleissheim have been reported for the first time in the country. The isolates were mostly susceptible to antibiotics except Salmonella ser Kentucky, which showed resistance to ciprofloxacin is reported for the first time in the country. Continuous surveillance is required to monitor resistance of NTS isolates.

  10. Tetracycline accelerates the temporally-regulated invasion response in specific isolates of multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella is associated with increased morbidity compared to antibiotic-sensitive strains and is an important health and safety concern in both humans and animals. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is a prevalent cause of foodborne disease, and a consider...

  11. Differences in the motility phenotype of multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium exposed to various antibiotics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) is one of the most prevalent foodborne-associated bacteria in humans and livestock, and over 35 per cent of these isolates are resistant to three or more antibiotics. This is a concern as multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella has been associat...

  12. Molecular profiling: Catecholamine modulation of gene expression in Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Investigations of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium have demonstrated that these bacterial pathogens can respond to the presence of catecholamines including norepinephrine and/or epinephrine in their environment by modulating gene expression and exhibiting various ...

  13. Critical role of glycogen synthase kinase-3ß in regulating the avian heterophil response to Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A microarray-assisted gene expression screen of chicken heterophils revealed glycogen synthase kinase-3ß (GSK-3ß), a multifunctional Ser/Thr kinase, to be consistently up-regulated 30-180 min following stimulation with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis). The present study was ...

  14. Genome Sequences of Four Nonhuman/Nonclinical Salmonella enterica Serovar Kentucky ST198 Isolates Recovered between 1972 and 1973

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seon-Woo; Haley, Bradd J.; Roberson, Dwayne; Allard, Marc; Hammack, Thomas S.; Brown, Eric W.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Salmonella enterica serovar Kentucky is a polyphyletic member of S. enterica subclade A1 with multiple sequence types that often colonize the same hosts but in different frequencies on different continents. To evaluate the genomic features involved in S. Kentucky host specificity, we sequenced the genomes of four isolates recovered in the 1970s. PMID:28302786

  15. Whole-Genome Sequence and Annotation of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Enteritidis Phage Type 8 Strain EN1660

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Benjamin J.; Fitzgerald, Stephen F.; Kröger, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The genome of Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Enteritidis phage type 8 strain EN1660, isolated from an outbreak in Thunder Bay, Canada, was sequenced to 46-fold coverage using an Illumina MiSeq with 300-bp paired-end sequencing chemistry to produce 28 contigs with an N50 value of 490,721 bp. PMID:28126943

  16. Public health significance of major genotypes of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis present in both human and chicken isolates in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kang, Min-Su; Oh, Jae-Young; Kwon, Yong-Kuk; Lee, Deog-Yong; Jeong, Ok-Mi; Choi, Byung-Kook; Youn, So-Youn; Jeon, Byung-Woo; Lee, Hye-Jin; Lee, Hee-Soo

    2017-02-17

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is one of the most common serotypes implicated in Salmonella infections in both humans and poultry worldwide. It has been reported that human salmonellosis is mainly associated with the consumption of poultry products contaminated with serovar Enteritidis. The present study was to extensively analyze the public health risk of serovar Enteritidis isolates from chickens in Korea. A total of 127 chicken isolates were collected from clinical cases, on-farm feces, and chicken meat between 1998 and 2012 and 20 human clinical isolates were obtained from patients with diarrhea between 2000 and 2006 in Korea. To characterize the isolates from chickens and humans, we compared the pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns and multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) profiles of the isolates. We further characterized representative isolates of different genotypes using a DNA microarray. PFGE revealed 28 patterns and MLVA identified 16 allelic profiles. The DNA microarray showed high genetic variability in plasmid regions and other fimbrial subunits of the isolates although the virulence gene contents of isolates from the same source and/or of the same genotype were unrelated. PFGE and MLVA showed that major genotypes were present in both human and chicken isolates. This result suggests that chickens in Korea pose a significant risk to public health as a source of serovar Enteritidis as has been noted in other countries.

  17. Molecular identification of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Gallinarum biovars Gallinarum and Pullorum by a duplex PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Batista, Diego Felipe Alves; de Freitas Neto, Oliveiro Caetano; de Almeida, Adriana Maria; Barrow, Paul Andrew; de Oliveira Barbosa, Fernanda; Berchieri Junior, Angelo

    2016-07-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Gallinarum biovar Gallinarum (S Gallinarum) and biovar Pullorum (S Pullorum) are 2 poultry pathogens that cause major economic losses to the poultry industry worldwide. Control of both diseases mainly relies on the adoption of biosecurity programs, and success is dependent on accurate and fast detection. Based on this concept, we developed a duplex PCR assay, targeting 2 chromosomal sequences, which allowed us to precisely identify and differentiate S Gallinarum and S Pullorum field strains. This assay was validated by testing genomic DNA from 40 S Gallinarum and 29 S Pullorum field strains, 87 other Salmonella serovars, and 7 non-Salmonella strains. The serovar identifier region (SIR) primers produced a fragment only in S Gallinarum and S Pullorum strains, whereas the fragment from the ratA coding sequence, which was previously demonstrated to differentiate the 2 biovars, was also amplified from other Salmonella serovars. Our results showed that the combination of both SIR and ratA amplifications could be used to identify as well as to differentiate colonies of S Gallinarum and S Pullorum reliably. Thus, we believe this methodology can be a useful ancillary tool for routine veterinary diagnostic laboratories by providing rapid, accurate results.

  18. Prevalence of nontyphoidal Salmonella and Salmonella strains with conjugative antimicrobial-resistant serovars contaminating animal feed in Texas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to characterize 365 nontyphoidal Salmonella enterica isolates from animal feed. Among the 365 isolates, 78 serovars were identified. Twenty-four isolates (7.0%) were recovered from three of six medicated feed types. Three of these isolates derived from the medicate...

  19. The complete genome sequence and methylome of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Cerro, a frequent dairy cow strain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Cerro is an infrequent pathogen of humans and other mammals, but is frequently isolated from the hindgut of asymptomatic cattle in the United States. To further understand the genomic determinants of S. Cerro specificity for the bovine hindgut, the genome ...

  20. Complete, Closed Genome Sequences of 10 Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Typhimurium Strains Isolated from Human and Bovine Sources

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Scott V.; Bono, James L.; Smith, Timothy P. L.; Fields, Patricia I.; Dinsmore, Blake A.; Santovenia, Monica; Kelley, Christy M.; Wang, Rong; Bosilevac, Joseph M.; Harhay, Gregory P.

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica is a leading cause of enterocolitis for humans and animals. S. enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium infects a broad range of hosts. To facilitate genomic comparisons among isolates from different sources, we present the complete genome sequences of 10 S. Typhimurium strains, 5 each isolated from human and bovine sources. PMID:27811097

  1. Complete Genome Sequence of Bacteriophage MA12, Which Infects both Campylobacter jejuni and Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sunjin; Kwon, Taesoo; Chae, Su-Jin; Kim, Jong-Hyun; Kang, Yeon Ho; Chung, Gyung Tae

    2016-01-01

    Here, we announce the complete genome sequence of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) bacteriophage MA12, a 41-Kb chromosome. The strain can infect both Campylobacter jejuni (C. jejuni) and S. Enteritidis and can be used in phage therapy experiments with poultry and poultry meat. PMID:27932636

  2. Draft Genome Sequences of Two Strains of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Displaying Different Virulence in an Experimental Chicken Model

    PubMed Central

    Blais, Burton; Huang, Hongsheng; Wang, Linru; Elmufti, Mohamed; Allain, Ray; Hazelwood, Jennifer; Grenier, Chris; Amoako, Kingsley; Savic, Mirjana; Fattahi Ghazi, Nashmil

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strains 22495 and 22792, obtained from wild birds, were found to display different virulence attributes in an experimental chicken model. Closed genome sequences were assembled after sequencing with the Roche 454 and Illumina MiSeq platforms. An additional plasmid was present in the more virulent strain 22495. PMID:28183752

  3. Correlating Blood Immune Parameters and a CCT7 Genetic Variant with the Shedding of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium in Swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the current study, 40 crossbred pigs were intranasally inoculated with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and monitored for Salmonella fecal shedding and blood immune parameters at 2, 7, 14 and 20 days post-inoculation (dpi). Using a multivariate permutation test, a positive correlation was...

  4. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of a new fish-virulent Vibrio vulnificus serovar that lacks potential to infect humans.

    PubMed

    Fouz, Belén; Roig, Francisco J; Amaro, Carmen

    2007-06-01

    Vibrio vulnificus is a bacterial species that is virulent for humans and fish. Human isolates are classified into biotypes 1 and 3 (BT1 and BT3) and fish isolates into biotype 2 (BT2). However, a few human infections caused by BT2 isolates have been reported worldwide (zoonosis). These BT2 human isolates belong to serovar E (SerE), which is also present in diseased fish. The aim of the present work was to characterize a new BT2 serovar [serovar A (SerA)], which emerged in the European fish-farming industry in 2000, by means of phenotypic, serological and genetic [plasmid profiling, ribotyping and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)] methodologies. The results confirmed that SerA constitutes a homogeneous O-serogroup within the species that shares plasmidic information with SerE. Like SerE, this new serogroup was resistant to fresh fish serum, as well as being highly virulent for fish. In contrast, it was sensitive to human serum and avirulent for mice, even after pretreatment with iron. The two serovars presented different biochemical profiles as well as specific patterns by ribotyping and RAPD analysis. In conclusion, SerA seems to constitute a different clonal group that has recently emerged within the species V. vulnificus, with pathogenic potential for fish but not for humans.

  5. Inactivation of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and quality maintenance of cherry tomatoes treated with gaseous essential oils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The antimicrobial activity of the essential oils (EOs) from cinnamon bark, oregano, mustard and of their major components cinnamaldehyde, carvacrol, and allyl isothiocyanate (AIT) were evaluated as a gaseous treatment to reduce Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in vitro and on tomatoes. In dif...

  6. Draft Genome Sequences of 18 Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Oranienburg Strains Isolated from Rivers in Northwestern Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Casteñeda-Ruelas, Gloria M.; Carreón-Gaxiola, César; Castelán-Sánchez, Hugo G.; Acatzi-Silva, Abraham; Romero-Martínez, Salvador; García-Molina, Alejandra

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Oranienburg is recognized as a foodborne pathogen widely distributed in the environment. Here, we report 18 draft genomes of S. Oranienburg strains isolated from rivers in the northwestern region of Mexico. PMID:28280020

  7. In situ evaluation of Paenibacillus alvei in reducing carriage of Salmonella enterica serovar newport on whole tomato plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recently, tomatoes have been implicated as a primary vehicle in foodborne outbreaks of Salmonella Newport and other Salmonella serovars. Long-term intervention measures to reduce Salmonella prevalence on tomatoes remain elusive for growing and post-harvest environments. A naturally-occurring bacter...

  8. Complete, closed genome sequences of 10 Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium strains isolated from human and bovine sources

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella enterica are a leading cause of enterocolitis for humans and animals. S. enterica serovar Typhimurium infects a broad range of hosts. To facilitate genomic comparisons among isolates from different sources, we present the complete genome sequences of ten S. Typhimurium strains, five each...

  9. Complete genomic sequences of two outbreak strains of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Thompson associated with cilantro

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Thompson strains RM1984 (CADPH-99A2334) and RM1986 (CADPH -99A2345) are clinical isolates from 1999, putatively related to an outbreak in California from contaminated cilantro. We report the complete genome sequences and annotation of these two S. Thompson...

  10. A comparative study of thermal and acid inactivation kinetics in fruit juices of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Salmonella enterica serovar Senftenberg grown at acidic conditions.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Ordóñez, Avelino; Fernández, Ana; Bernardo, Ana; López, Mercedes

    2009-11-01

    Acid and heat inactivation in orange and apple juices of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium Colección Española de Cultivos Tipo (i.e., Spanish Type Culture Collection) 443 (CECT 443) (Salmonella Typhimurium) and S. enterica serovar Senftenberg CECT 4384 (Salmonella Senftenberg) grown in buffered brain heart infusion (pH 7.0) and acidified brain heart infusion up to pH 4.5 with acetic, citric, lactic, and hydrochloric acids was evaluated. Acid adaptation induced an adaptive response that increased the subsequent resistance to extreme pH conditions (pH 2.5) and to heat, although the magnitude of these responses differed between the two isolates and fruit juices. The acid resistance in orange juice for acid-adapted cells (D-values of 28.3-34.5 min for Salmonella Senftenberg and 30.0-39.2 min for Salmonella Typhimurium) resulted to be about two to three times higher than that corresponding to non-acid-adapted cells. In apple juice, acid-adapted Salmonella Senftenberg cells survived better than those of Salmonella Typhimurium, obtaining mean D-values of 114.8 +/- 12.3 and 41.9 +/- 2.5 min, respectively. The thermotolerance of non-acid-adapted Salmonella Typhimurium in orange (D(58)-value: 0.028 min) and apple juices (D(58)-value: 0.10 min) was approximately double for acid-adapted cells. This cross-protection to heat was more strongly expressed in Salmonella Senftenberg. D(58)-values obtained for non-acid-adapted cells in orange (0.11 min) and apple juices (0.19 min) increased approximately 10 and 5 times, respectively, after their growth in acidified media. The conditions prevailing during bacterial growth and heat treatment did not significantly influence the z-values observed (6.0 +/- 0.3 degrees C for Salmonella Typhimurium and 7.0 +/- 0.3 degrees C for Salmonella Senftenberg). The enhanced acid resistance found for both isolates could enable them to survive for prolonged time periods in the gastrointestinal tract, increasing the risk of illness. Further, it

  11. Prevalence and characterization of multi-drug resistant Salmonella Enterica serovar Gallinarum biovar Pullorum and Gallinarum from chicken

    PubMed Central

    Parvej, Md. Shafiullah; Nazir, K. H. M. Nazmul Hussain; Rahman, M. Bahanur; Jahan, Mueena; Khan, Mohammad Ferdousur Rahman; Rahman, Marzia

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Salmonella is an important zoonotic pathogen responsible for animal and human diseases. The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence and stereotyping of Salmonella isolates isolated from apparently healthy poultry. Furthermore, the clonal relatedness among the isolated Salmonella serovars was assessed. Materials and Methods: A total of 150 cloacal swab samples from apparently healthy chickens were collected, and were subjected for the isolation and identification of associated Salmonella organisms. The isolated colonies were identified and characterized on the basis of morphology, cultural characters, biochemical tests, slide agglutination test, polymerase chain reaction, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Antibiotic sensitivity patterns were also investigated using commonly used antibiotics. Results: Of the 150 samples, 11 (7.33%) produced characteristics pink colony with black center on XLD agar medium, and all were culturally and biochemically confirmed to be Salmonella. All possessed serovar-specific gene SpeF and reacted uniformly with group D antisera, suggesting that all of the isolates were Salmonella Enterica serovar Gallinarum, biovar Pullorum and/or Gallinarum. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing revealed that 54.54% of the isolated Salmonella Enterica serovars were highly sensitive to ciprofloxacin, whereas the 81.81% isolates were resistant to amoxycillin, doxycycline, kanamycin, gentamycin, and tetracycline. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of the XbaI-digested genomic DNA exhibited identical banding patterns, suggesting that the multidrug resistant Salmonella Enterica serovars occurring in commercial layers are highly clonal in Bangladesh. Conclusion: The present study was conducted to find out the prevalence of poultry Salmonella in layer chicken and to find out the clonal relationship among them. The data in this study suggest the prevalence of Salmonella Enterica, which is multidrug resistant and highly clonal for

  12. Construction, Genotypic and Phenotypic Characterization, and Immunogenicity of Attenuated ΔguaBA Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi Strain CVD 915

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jin Yuang; Pasetti, Marcela F.; Noriega, Fernando R.; Anderson, Richard J.; Wasserman, Steven S.; Galen, James E.; Sztein, Marcelo B.; Levine, Myron M.

    2001-01-01

    A promising live attenuated typhoid vaccine candidate strain for mucosal immunization was developed by introducing a deletion in the guaBA locus of pathogenic Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi strain Ty2. The resultant ΔguaBA mutant, serovar Typhi CVD 915, has a gene encoding resistance to arsenite replacing the deleted sequence within guaBA, thereby providing a marker to readily identify the vaccine strain. CVD 915 was compared in in vitro and in vivo assays with wild-type strain Ty2, licensed live oral typhoid vaccine strain Ty21a, or attenuated serovar Typhi vaccine strain CVD 908-htrA (harboring mutations in aroC, aroD, and htrA). CVD 915 was less invasive than CVD 908-htrA in tissue culture and was more crippled in its ability to proliferate after invasion. In mice inoculated intraperitoneally with serovar Typhi and hog gastric mucin (to estimate the relative degree of attenuation), the 50% lethal dose of CVD 915 (7.7 × 107 CFU) was significantly higher than that of wild-type Ty2 (1.4 × 102 CFU) and was only slightly lower than that of Ty21a (1.9 × 108 CFU). Strong serum O and H antibody responses were recorded in mice inoculated intranasally with CVD 915, which were higher than those elicited by Ty21a and similar to those stimulated by CVD 908-htrA. CVD 915 also elicited potent proliferative responses in splenocytes from immunized mice stimulated with serovar Typhi antigens. Used as a live vector, CVD 915(pTETlpp) elicited high titers of serum immunoglobulin G anti-fragment C. These encouraging preclinical data pave the way for phase 1 clinical trials with CVD 915. PMID:11447145

  13. The global regulator ArcA controls resistance to reactive nitrogen and oxygen intermediates in Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Sangwei; Killoran, Patrick B; Fang, Ferric C; Riley, Lee W

    2002-02-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is a major cause of food-borne diseases associated with consumption of shell eggs. Clinical isolates of S. enterica serovar Enteritidis exhibit a wide spectrum of virulence in mice. A highly virulent isolate (SE2472) was previously shown to be more resistant in vitro than other clinical isolates to acidified sodium nitrite (ASN), a generator of reactive nitrogen and oxygen intermediates (RNI/ROI). SE2472 is also more resistant to S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) than an ASN-susceptible isolate of S. enterica serovar Enteritidis (SE8743). To investigate the molecular basis for the RNI/ROI resistance of S. enterica serovar Enteritidis, we transformed a genomic DNA library of SE2472 into SE8743. A plasmid clone conferred upon SE8743 enhanced resistance to ASN, GSNO, and H(2)O(2). The DNA insert in the clone encoded ArcA, a global regulator. An arcA mutant of SE2472 was constructed and was found to be more susceptible to GSNO and hydrogen peroxide but not more susceptible to ASN than wild-type SE2472. The susceptibility of the arcA mutant to GSNO and H(2)O(2) was complemented by a plasmid harboring arcA. The coding sequence of the arcA gene in SE2472 and the coding sequence of the arcA gene in SE8743 were identical, suggesting that the difference in resistance to RNI/ROI maybe due to the activity of genes regulated by ArcA. No significant difference in virulence between the wild type and the arcA mutant of SE2472 was observed in mice. These observations show that arcA is essential for resistance of S. enterica serovar Enteritidis to nitrosative and oxidative stress. However, additional genetic loci may contribute to the resistance to RNI/ROI and unusually high virulence for mice of SE2472.

  14. Sensitivity of pathogenic and free-living Leptospira spp. to UV radiation and mitomycin C.

    PubMed Central

    Stamm, L V; Charon, N W

    1988-01-01

    The habitats for the two major Leptospira spp. differ. The main habitat of L. biflexa is soil and water, whereas L. interrogans primarily resides in the renal tubules of animals. We investigated whether these two species, along with L. illini (species incertae sedis), differ with respect to their sensitivity to UV radiation. The doses of UV resulting in 37, 10, and 1% survival were determined for representative serovars from each species. L. interrogans serovar pomona was 3.0 to 4.8 times more sensitive to UV than the other Leptospira species under the 37, 10, and 1% survival parameters. In comparison to other bacteria, L. interrogans serovar pomona is among the most sensitive to UV. In a qualitative UV sensitivity assay, L. interrogans serovars were found to be in general more sensitive than L. biflexa serovars. All three species were found to have a photoreactivation DNA repair mechanism. Since organisms that are resistant to UV are often resistant to the DNA cross-linking agent mitomycin C, we tested the relative sensitivity of several Leptospira serovars to this compound. With few exceptions, L. biflexa and L. illini serovars were considerably more resistant to mitomycin C than the L. interrogans serovars. The mitomycin C sensitivity assay could be a useful addition to current characterization tests used to differentiate the Leptospira species. PMID:3132098

  15. Sensitivity of pathogenic and free-living Leptospira spp. to UV radiation and mitomycin C

    SciTech Connect

    Stamm, L.V.; Charon, N.W.

    1988-03-01

    The habitats for the two major Leptospira spp. differ. The main habitat of L. biflexa is soil and water, whereas L. interrogans primarily resides in the renal tubules of animals. We investigated whether these two species, along with L. illini (species incertae sedis), differ with respect to their sensitivity to UV radiation. The doses of UV resulting in 37, 10 and 1% survival were determined for representive serovars from each species. L. interrogans serovar pomona was 3.0 to 4.8 times more sensitive to UV than the other Leptospira species under the 37, 10, and 1% survival parameters. In comparison to other bacteria, L. interrogans serovar pomona is among the most sensitive to UV. In a qualitative UV sensitivity assay., L. interrogans serovars were found to be in general more sensitive than L. biflexa serovars. All three species were found to have a photoreactivation DNA repair mechanism. Since organisms that are resistant to UV are often resistant to the DNA cross-linking agent mitomycin C, we tested the relative sensitivity of several Leptospira serovars to this compound. With few exceptions, L. biflexa and L. illini serovars were considerably more resistant to mitomycin C than the L. interrogans serovars. The mitomycin C sensitivity assay could be a useful addition to current characterization tests used to differentiate the Leptospira species.

  16. Colonization of internal organs by Salmonella serovars Heidelberg and Typhimurium in experimentally infected laying hens housed in enriched colony cages at different stocking densities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Contaminated eggs produced by infected commercial laying flocks are often implicated as sources of human infections with Salmonella Enteritidis, but Salmonella serovars Heidelberg and Typhimurium have also been significantly associated with egg-transmitted illness. Contamination of the edible conten...

  17. Microgravity as a novel environmental signal affecting Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium virulence.

    PubMed

    Nickerson, C A; Ott, C M; Mister, S J; Morrow, B J; Burns-Keliher, L; Pierson, D L

    2000-06-01

    The effects of spaceflight on the infectious disease process have only been studied at the level of the host immune response and indicate a blunting of the immune mechanism in humans and animals. Accordingly, it is necessary to assess potential changes in microbial virulence associated with spaceflight which may impact the probability of in-flight infectious disease. In this study, we investigated the effect of altered gravitational vectors on Salmonella virulence in mice. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium grown under modeled microgravity (MMG) were more virulent and were recovered in higher numbers from the murine spleen and liver following oral infection compared to organisms grown under normal gravity. Furthermore, MMG-grown salmonellae were more resistant to acid stress and macrophage killing and exhibited significant differences in protein synthesis than did normal-gravity-grown cells. Our results indicate that the environment created by simulated microgravity represents a novel environmental regulatory factor of Salmonella virulence.

  18. Identification of Salmonella abortusovis by PCR amplification of a serovar-specific IS200 element.

    PubMed Central

    Beuzón, C R; Schiaffino, A; Leori, G; Cappuccinelli, P; Rubino, S; Casadesús, J

    1997-01-01

    Field and collection isolates of Salmonella abortusovis carry one IS200 element in a distinct chromosome location. IS200 is not found in the corresponding region of the chromosome of other Salmonella serovars. Sequencing of the boundaries of the S. abortusovis-specific IS200 insertion permitted the design of primers for the amplification of this IS200 element by PCR. Isolates of S. abortusovis are identified by the amplification of a DNA fragment of about 900 bp or larger. PCR amplification of DNA from salmonellae other than S. abortusovis yields either a fragment of about 200 bp or no product. The high specificity of the assay is confirmed by the absence of cross-reactivity with the following templates: (i) sheep DNA, (ii) DNAs from abortion-causing agents other than S. abortusovis, and (iii) DNAs from microorganisms that do not cause abortion but are common in flocks. PMID:9143137

  19. Coexpression of chitinase and the cry11Aa1 toxin genes in Bacillus thuringiensis serovar israelensis.

    PubMed

    Sirichotpakorn, N; Rongnoparut, P; Choosang, K; Panbangred, W

    2001-10-01

    At the spore stage, a cloned chitinase gene was coexpressed with the regulatory gene p19 and the toxin gene cry11Aa1 in the hosts Bacillus thuringiensis serovar israelensis strains 4Q2-72 and c4Q2-72. The chitinase gene was derived from a high-chitinase producer, Bacillus licheniformis TP-1. Two transcriptional fusion plasmids between the p19 or p19-cry11Aa1 genes and the promoterless chitinase gene were constructed. In transcription order, the p16-19CHI construct contained the p19 gene together with the chitinase gene only while the p16-1968CHI construct contained p19 together with the toxin gene cry11Aa1 and the chitinase gene. The inserted sequences were regulated by a spore-specific promoter located upstream of p19. The recombinant chitinase of all transformed B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis strains was initially synthesized at low level at about 9 h of growth when a portion of the cells started to sporulate. It increased thereafter and reached maximum levels of 5.5, 4.9, and 4.7 mU/ml at 48 h, for strain 4Q2-72 transformed with p16-19CHI and p16-1968CHI and strain c4Q2-72 transformed with p16-19CHI, respectively. This activity was approximately 2 times higher than the maximum activity (2.7 mU/ml) of the parental strain, B. licheniformis TP-1. Although crude chitinase alone from B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis c4Q2-72 (p16-19CHI) at 4.5 mU/ml caused 40% mortality in second instar Aedes aegypti larvae, transformants containing the chitinase alone or in combination with cry11Aa1 resulted in lower toxicity to A. aegypti larvae than the untransformed 4Q2-72 host. For example the LC(50) for the transformed 4Q2-72 harboring the chitinase gene only (p16-19CHI) was 5.6 x 10(4) +/- 0.7 x 10(4) cells, 40 times higher than that of the untransformed host at 1.4 x 10(3) +/- 0.19 x 10(3). The lower toxicity correlated with poor sporulation in the transformants (i.e., 35 times lower than that in the untransformed host). However, the transformed 4Q2-72 strain

  20. An extended genotyping framework for Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi, the cause of human typhoid

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Vanessa K.; Baker, Stephen; Connor, Thomas R.; Pickard, Derek; Page, Andrew J.; Dave, Jayshree; Murphy, Niamh; Holliman, Richard; Sefton, Armine; Millar, Michael; Dyson, Zoe A.; Dougan, Gordon; Holt, Kathryn E.; Parkhill, Julian; Feasey, Nicholas A.; Kingsley, Robert A.; Thomson, Nicholas R.; Keane, Jacqueline A.; Weill, François- Xavier; Le Hello, Simon; Hawkey, Jane; Edwards, David J.; Harris, Simon R.; Cain, Amy K.; Hadfield, James; Hart, Peter J.; Thieu, Nga Tran Vu; Klemm, Elizabeth J.; Breiman, Robert F.; Watson, Conall H.; Edmunds, W. John; Kariuki, Samuel; Gordon, Melita A.; Heyderman, Robert S.; Okoro, Chinyere; Jacobs, Jan; Lunguya, Octavie; Msefula, Chisomo; Chabalgoity, Jose A.; Kama, Mike; Jenkins, Kylie; Dutta, Shanta; Marks, Florian; Campos, Josefina; Thompson, Corinne; Obaro, Stephen; MacLennan, Calman A.; Dolecek, Christiane; Keddy, Karen H.; Smith, Anthony M.; Parry, Christopher M.; Karkey, Abhilasha; Dongol, Sabina; Basnyat, Buddha; Arjyal, Amit; Mulholland, E. Kim; Campbell, James I.; Dufour, Muriel; Bandaranayake, Don; Toleafoa, Take N.; Singh, Shalini Pravin; Hatta, Mochammad; Newton, Paul N.; Dance, David; Davong, Viengmon; Onsare, Robert S.; Isaia, Lupeoletalalelei; Thwaites, Guy; Wijedoru, Lalith; Crump, John A.; De Pinna, Elizabeth; Nair, Satheesh; Nilles, Eric J.; Thanh, Duy Pham; Turner, Paul; Soeng, Sona; Valcanis, Mary; Powling, Joan; Dimovski, Karolina; Hogg, Geoff; Farrar, Jeremy; Mather, Alison E.; Amos, Ben

    2016-01-01

    The population of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi), the causative agent of typhoid fever, exhibits limited DNA sequence variation, which complicates efforts to rationally discriminate individual isolates. Here we utilize data from whole-genome sequences (WGS) of nearly 2,000 isolates sourced from over 60 countries to generate a robust genotyping scheme that is phylogenetically informative and compatible with a range of assays. These data show that, with the exception of the rapidly disseminating H58 subclade (now designated genotype 4.3.1), the global S. Typhi population is highly structured and includes dozens of subclades that display geographical restriction. The genotyping approach presented here can be used to interrogate local S. Typhi populations and help identify recent introductions of S. Typhi into new or previously endemic locations, providing information on their likely geographical source. This approach can be used to classify clinical isolates and provides a universal framework for further experimental investigations. PMID:27703135

  1. Prevalence of the Leptospira serovars bratislava, grippotyphosa, mozdok and pomona in French dogs.

    PubMed

    Renaud, Claire; Andrews, Stuart; Djelouadji, Zorée; Lecheval, Sandrine; Corrao-Revol, Nadine; Buff, Samuel; Demont, Pierre; Kodjo, Angeli

    2013-04-01

    Although most French dogs are correctly vaccinated against leptospirosis with inactivated strains of canicola and icterohaemorrhagiae, the disease is still very prevalent in France raising the question of whether the vaccines used require updating. The aim of the present study was to provide serological data regarding circulation of the Leptospira serovars: grippotyphosa, bratislava, pomona and mozdok, which are contained in vaccines available in other parts of the world and which could be rapidly adapted for France. Results indicated that the epidemiology was consistent with the circulation of Leptospira belonging to the serogroups Australis and Grippotyphosa and that the case to support the inclusion of either pomona or mozdok in a dog vaccine for France was weak.

  2. Microgravity as a novel environmental signal affecting Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium virulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nickerson, C. A.; Ott, C. M.; Mister, S. J.; Morrow, B. J.; Burns-Keliher, L.; Pierson, D. L.

    2000-01-01

    The effects of spaceflight on the infectious disease process have only been studied at the level of the host immune response and indicate a blunting of the immune mechanism in humans and animals. Accordingly, it is necessary to assess potential changes in microbial virulence associated with spaceflight which may impact the probability of in-flight infectious disease. In this study, we investigated the effect of altered gravitational vectors on Salmonella virulence in mice. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium grown under modeled microgravity (MMG) were more virulent and were recovered in higher numbers from the murine spleen and liver following oral infection compared to organisms grown under normal gravity. Furthermore, MMG-grown salmonellae were more resistant to acid stress and macrophage killing and exhibited significant differences in protein synthesis than did normal-gravity-grown cells. Our results indicate that the environment created by simulated microgravity represents a novel environmental regulatory factor of Salmonella virulence.

  3. Effect of EDTA on Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium involves a component not assignable to lipopolysaccharide release.

    PubMed

    Alakomi, H-L; Saarela, M; Helander, I M

    2003-08-01

    The effect of EDTA on Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium was studied in different growth phases with cells grown with or without Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) supplementation. EDTA affected the outer membrane much more strongly in the early exponential phase than in the mid- or late exponential phase, as indicated by uptake of 1-N-phenylnaphthylamine (a nonpolar hydrophobic probe, M(r) 219), and detergent (SDS) susceptibility. This effect was, however, not paralleled by LPS release (determined by measuring LPS-specific fatty acids or 14C-labelled LPS in cell-free supernatants, per a standardized cell density), which remained unchanged as a function of the growth curve. The conclusion from these results is that in the early exponential phase the effect of EDTA in S. enterica involves a component that is independent of LPS release.

  4. Salmonella Enterica Serovar Pomona Infection in Farmed Juvenile American Alligators ( Alligator Mississippiensis).

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, K; Nevarez, J G; Del Piero, F

    2017-03-01

    A fatal epizootic of salmonellosis occurred in farmed juvenile American alligators in Louisiana. Six animals were examined. Gross lesions included severe fibrinonecrotizing enterocolitis, necrotizing splenitis, coelomic effusion, and perivisceral and pulmonary edema. Microscopic examination revealed severe necrotizing enterocolitis and splenitis with intralesional bacteria and pneumocyte necrosis with fibrin thrombi. Salmonella enterica serovar Pomona was isolated from intestine and lung. Clinical salmonellosis is a rare finding in reptiles and salmonellosis caused by S. Pomona is not previously reported in American alligators. Since S. Pomona is a commonly isolated Salmonella serotype from patients with reptile-associated salmonellosis in the United States, and since alligator meat is consumed and the skin is exported to numerous countries, risk of human and animal infection should be considered.

  5. Analysis and construction of pathogenicity island regulatory pathways in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi.

    PubMed

    Ong, Su Yean; Ng, Fui Ling; Badai, Siti Suriawati; Yuryev, Anton; Alam, Maqsudul

    2010-09-23

    Signal transduction through protein-protein interactions and protein modifications are the main mechanisms controlling many biological processes. Here we described the implementation of MedScan information extraction technology and Pathway Studio software (Ariadne Genomics Inc.) to create a Salmonella specific molecular interaction database. Using the database, we have constructed several signal transduction pathways in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi which causes Typhoid Fever, a major health threat especially in developing countries. S. Typhi has several pathogenicity islands that control rapid switching between different phenotypes including adhesion and colonization, invasion, intracellular survival, proliferation, and biofilm formation in response to environmental changes. Understanding of the detailed mechanism for S. Typhi survival in host cells is necessary for development of efficient detection and treatment of this pathogen. The constructed pathways were validated using publically available gene expression microarray data for Salmonella.

  6. Interaction of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium with Intestinal Organoids Derived from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Forbester, Jessica L; Goulding, David; Vallier, Ludovic; Hannan, Nicholas; Hale, Christine; Pickard, Derek; Mukhopadhyay, Subhankar; Dougan, Gordon

    2015-07-01

    The intestinal mucosa forms the first line of defense against infections mediated by enteric pathogens such as salmonellae. Here we exploited intestinal "organoids" (iHOs) generated from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hIPSCs) to explore the interaction of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium with iHOs. Imaging and RNA sequencing were used to analyze these interactions, and clear changes in transcriptional signatures were detected, including altered patterns of cytokine expression after the exposure of iHOs to bacteria. S. Typhimurium microinjected into the lumen of iHOs was able to invade the epithelial barrier, with many bacteria residing within Salmonella-containing vacuoles. An S. Typhimurium invA mutant defective in the Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 invasion apparatus was less capable of invading the iHO epithelium. Hence, we provide evidence that hIPSC-derived organoids are a promising model of the intestinal epithelium for assessing interactions with enteric pathogens.

  7. Identification of in vivo-induced genes during infection of chickens with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Geng, Shizhong; Liu, Zhicheng; Lin, Zhijie; Barrow, Paul; Pan, Zhiming; Li, Qiuchun; Jiao, Xinan

    2015-06-01

    Chickens are an important source of food worldwide and are often infected with food-poisoning serovars of Salmonella enterica, frequently Salmonella Enteritidis (SE), without exhibiting clinical signs of disease. Ivi (in vivo induced) genes identified using in vivo-induced antigen technology (IVIAT) are expressed only during bacterial infection and have the potential value of identifying epidemic strains and antigens which can form the basis for sub-unit vaccine development. We applied IVIAT to SE strain 50041 and identified 42 ivi genes. Eight representative ivi genes were further confirmed by qRT-PCR as being expressed only in vivo within 48 h of infection compared with that of in vitro-cultured. Although our results indicated that the identified ivi genes are expressed only in vivo, further research is needed to elucidate the exact roles of these genes during infection and pathogenesis.

  8. Salmonella on Raw Poultry in Retail Markets in Guatemala: Levels, Antibiotic Susceptibility, and Serovar Distribution.

    PubMed

    Jarquin, Claudia; Alvarez, Danilo; Morales, Oneida; Morales, Ana Judith; López, Beatriz; Donado, Pilar; Valencia, Maria F; Arévalo, Alejandra; Muñoz, Fredy; Walls, Isabel; Doyle, Michael P; Alali, Walid Q

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to determine Salmonella numbers on retail raw chicken carcasses in Guatemala and to phenotypically characterize the isolates (serotyping and antibiotic susceptibility). In total, 300 chicken carcasses were collected from seven departments in Guatemala. Salmonella numbers were determined using the most-probable-number method following the U. S. Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service protocol. In total, 103 isolates were obtained, all of which were tested for antibiotic susceptibility, whereas 46 isolates were serotyped. Overall, Salmonella prevalence and mean number (mean log most probable number per carcass) was 34.3% and 2.3 (95% confidence interval: 2.1 to 2.5), respectively. Significant differences (P < 0.05) in Salmonella prevalence were found by storage condition (refrigerated or ambient temperature), market type (wet markets, supermarkets, and independent poultry stores), chicken production system (integrated or nonintegrated production company), and chicken skin color (white or yellow). Chickens produced by integrated companies had lower Salmonella numbers (P < 0.05) than nonintegrated companies, and white-skin carcasses had lower numbers (P < 0.05) than yellow-skin carcasses. Among 13 different Salmonella serovars identified, Paratyphi B (34.8%) was most prevalent, followed by Heidelberg (16.3%) and Derby (11.6%). Of all the Salmonella isolates, 59.2% were resistant to one to three antibiotics and 13.6% to four or more antibiotics. Among all the serovars obtained, Salmonella Paratyphi B and Heidelberg were the most resistant to the antibiotics tested. Salmonella levels and antibiotic resistant profiles among isolates from raw poultry at the retail market level were high relative to other reports from North and South America. These data can be used by Guatemalan stakeholders to develop risk assessment models and support further research opportunities to control transmission of Salmonella spp. and

  9. Salmonella serovars and their distribution in Nigerian commercial chicken layer farms

    PubMed Central

    Fagbamila, Idowu Oluwabunmi; Barco, Lisa; Mancin, Marzia; Kwaga, Jacob; Ngulukun, Sati Samuel; Zavagnin, Paola; Lettini, Antonia Anna; Lorenzetto, Monica; Abdu, Paul Ayuba; Kabir, Junaidu; Umoh, Jarlath; Ricci, Antonia; Muhammad, Maryam

    2017-01-01

    Commercial poultry farms (n° 523), located in all the six regions of Nigeria were sampled with a view to generate baseline information about the distribution of Salmonella serovars in this country. Five different matrices (litter, dust, faeces, feed and water) were collected from each visited farm. Salmonella was isolated from at least one of the five matrices in 228 farms, with a farm prevalence of 43.6% (CI95[39.7–48.3%]). Altogether, 370 of 2615 samples collected (14.1%, CI95[12.8; 15.5%]) contained Salmonella. Considering the number of positive farms and the number of positive samples, it was evident that for the majority of the sampled farms, few samples were positive for Salmonella. With regard to the matrices, there was no difference in Salmonella prevalence among the five matrices considered. Of the 370 isolates serotyped, eighty-two different serotypes were identified and Salmonella Kentucky was identified as having the highest isolation rate in all the matrices sampled (16.2%), followed by S. Poona and S. Elisabethville. S. Kentucky was distributed across the country, whereas the other less frequent serovars had a more circumscribed diffusion. This is one of few comprehensive studies on the occurrence and distribution of Salmonella in commercial chicken layer farms from all the six regions of Nigeria. The relatively high prevalence rate documented in this study may be attributed to the generally poor infrastructure and low biosecurity measures in controlling stray animals, rodents and humans. Data collected could be valuable for instituting effective intervention strategies for Salmonella control in Nigeria and also in other developing countries with a similar poultry industry structure, with the final aim of reducing Salmonella spread in animals and ultimately in humans. PMID:28278292

  10. Comparative proteome analysis of Chlamydia trachomatis serovar A, D and L2.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Allan C; Gevaert, Kris; Demol, Hans; Hoorelbeke, Bart; Vandekerckhove, Joël; Larsen, Martin R; Roepstorff, Peter; Holm, Arne; Christiansen, Gunna; Birkelund, Svend

    2002-02-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis represents a group of human pathogenic obligate intracellular and gram-negative bacteria. The genome of C. trachomatis D comprises 894 open reading frames (ORFs). In this study the global expression of genes in C. trachomatis A, D and L2, which are responsible for different chlamydial diseases, was investigated using a proteomics approach. Based on silver stained two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE), gels with purified elementary bodies (EB) and auto-radiography of gels with 35S-labeled C. trachomatis proteins up to 700 protein spots were detectable within the range of the immobilized pH gradient (IPG) system used. Using mass spectrometry and N-terminal sequencing followed by database searching we identified 250 C. trachomatis proteins from purified EB of which 144 were derived from different genes representing 16% of the ORFs predicted from the C. trachomatis D genome and the 7.5 kb C. trachomatis plasmid. Important findings include identification of proteins from the type III secretion apparatus, enzymes from the central metabolism and confirmation of expression of 25 hypothetical ORFs and five polymorphic membrane proteins. Comparison of serovars generated novel data on genetic variability as indicated by electrophoretic variation and potentially important examples of serovar specific differences in protein abundance. The availability of the complete genome made it feasible to map and to identify proteins of C. trachomatis on a large scale and the integration of our data in a 2-D PAGE database will create a basis for post genomic research, important for the understanding of chlamydial development and pathogenesis.

  11. Prevalence of Salmonella serovars and antimicrobial resistance profiles in poultry of Savar area, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Mahmud, Md Showkat; Bari, Md Latiful; Hossain, M Anwar

    2011-10-01

    Salmonellosis is one of the major concerns in the poultry industry and some serovars of Salmonella involve in zoonosis. This study determines the seroprevalence of Salmonella in poultry and their drug-resistant patterns, variability in infectivity and mortality rate of birds, and predilection of some serovars to cause zoonoses. The average seroprevalance of Salmonella in three different age groups was found to be 37.9%. A total of 503 samples were examined over a period of 1 year from five different poultry farms of a semiurban area of Savar, Dhaka, Bangladesh. The prevalence of Salmonella was recorded to be 21.1%. Salmonella was found high in dead birds (31.2%) than live birds (18.1%). Salmonella infection was higher (23.6%) in summer than in winter (12.9%) season. Among the 106 isolates, 46 belong to serogroup B (43%) and 60 isolates to serogroup D (57%). The highest Salmonella infection was recorded as 47.9% on the 30-35-week-old birds. A total of 106 Salmonella isolates were used for antimicrobial susceptibility test against 10 common antibiotics and 17 multiple drug resistance patterns were found. Among the isolates, 69 (65%) harbored plasmids 1-4 with size variation between >1.63 and >40 kb and rest 37 (35%) isolates were plasmid free but showed resistance against 5-10 antibiotics. The results of the present investigation suggested that multiple drug resistance is common among the Salmonella isolates of poultry and some of these isolates may have zoonotic implications.

  12. Effect of farm type on within-herd Salmonella prevalence, serovar distribution, and antimicrobial resistance.

    PubMed

    Rasschaert, G; Michiels, J; Arijs, D; Wildemauwe, C; De Smet, S; Heyndrickx, M

    2012-05-01

    Salmonella represents a major challenge to the pig industry, as pork presents a risk for human salmonellosis. In this study, we have examined the effect of farm type on the prevalence of fattening pigs shedding Salmonella on 12 farms at risk for harboring Salmonella. On six open (grow-to-finish) and six closed (farrow-to-finish) farms, the prevalence of pigs shedding Salmonella was determined on two occasions approximately 2 months apart. The serovar, phage type, and antimicrobial resistance of the obtained Salmonella isolates were determined. On all farms, pigs shedding Salmonella were detected on at least one of the two sampling days. The mean within-herd prevalence was 7.8%. Closed farms were two times less likely to have pigs shedding Salmonella than open farms. On open farms, the odds of finding Salmonella shedding in pigs were 1.9 times higher when sampling was performed at slaughter age than when samples were taken halfway through the fattening period. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium was the most predominant serotype, with a prevalence of 62 to 63% on both farm types. Of all the Salmonella Typhimurium isolates, 65% had the tetraresistant profile ASSuT (ampicillin, streptomycin, sulfonamide, and tetracycline) with or without additional resistance to trimethoprim-sulfonamide. Phage type DT120 seemed to be especially associated with this antimicrobial-resistant profile. The prevalence of Salmonella Typhimurium isolates showing resistance to ampicillin, streptomycin, tetracycline, sulfonamide, trimethoprim-sulfonamide, and lincomycin hydrochloride and spectinomycin sulfate tetrahydrate was significantly higher on open farms than on closed farms.

  13. Emergence of Ciprofloxacin-Resistant Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi in Italy.

    PubMed

    García-Fernández, Aurora; Gallina, Silvia; Owczarek, Slawomir; Dionisi, Anna Maria; Benedetti, Ildo; Decastelli, Lucia; Luzzi, Ida

    2015-01-01

    In developed countries, typhoid fever is often associated with persons who travel to endemic areas or immigrate from them. Typhoid fever is a systemic infection caused by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi. Because of the emergence of antimicrobial resistance to standard first-line drugs, fluoroquinolones are the drugs of choice. Resistance to ciprofloxacin by this Salmonella serovar represents an emerging public health issue. Two S. enterica ser. Typhi strains resistant to ciprofloxacin (CIP) were reported to the Italian surveillance system for foodborne and waterborne diseases (EnterNet-Italia) in 2013. The strains were isolated from two Italian tourists upon their arrival from India. A retrospective analysis of 17 other S. enterica ser. Typhi strains isolated in Italy during 2011-2013 was performed to determine their resistance to CIP. For this purpose, we assayed for susceptibility to antimicrobial agents and conducted PCR and nucleotide sequence analyses. Moreover, all strains were typed using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis to evaluate possible clonal relationships. Sixty-eight percent of the S. enterica ser. Typhi strains were resistant to CIP (MICs, 0.125-16 mg/L), and all isolates were negative for determinants of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance. Analysis of sequences encoding DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV subunits revealed mutations in gyrA, gyrB, and parC. Thirteen different clonal groups were detected, and the two CIP-resistant strains isolated from the individuals who visited India exhibited the same PFGE pattern. Because of these findings, the emergence of CIP-resistant S. enterica ser. Typhi isolates in Italy deserves attention, and monitoring antibiotic susceptibility is important for efficiently managing cases of typhoid fever.

  14. Differential Killing of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi by Antibodies Targeting Vi and Lipopolysaccharide O:9 Antigen.

    PubMed

    Hart, Peter J; O'Shaughnessy, Colette M; Siggins, Matthew K; Bobat, Saeeda; Kingsley, Robert A; Goulding, David A; Crump, John A; Reyburn, Hugh; Micoli, Francesca; Dougan, Gordon; Cunningham, Adam F; MacLennan, Calman A

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi expresses a capsule of Vi polysaccharide, while most Salmonella serovars, including S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium, do not. Both S. Typhi and S. Enteritidis express the lipopolysaccharide O:9 antigen, yet there is little evidence of cross-protection from anti-O:9 antibodies. Vaccines based on Vi polysaccharide have efficacy against typhoid fever, indicating that antibodies against Vi confer protection. Here we investigate the role of Vi capsule and antibodies against Vi and O:9 in antibody-dependent complement- and phagocyte-mediated killing of Salmonella. Using isogenic Vi-expressing and non-Vi-expressing derivatives of S. Typhi and S. Typhimurium, we show that S. Typhi is inherently more sensitive to serum and blood than S. Typhimurium. Vi expression confers increased resistance to both complement- and phagocyte-mediated modalities of antibody-dependent killing in human blood. The Vi capsule is associated with reduced C3 and C5b-9 deposition, and decreased overall antibody binding to S. Typhi. However, purified human anti-Vi antibodies in the presence of complement are able to kill Vi-expressing Salmonella, while killing by anti-O:9 antibodies is inversely related to Vi expression. Human serum depleted of antibodies to antigens other than Vi retains the ability to kill Vi-expressing bacteria. Our findings support a protective role for Vi capsule in preventing complement and phagocyte killing of Salmonella that can be overcome by specific anti-Vi antibodies, but only to a limited extent by anti-O:9 antibodies.

  15. A defective mutant of Salmonella enterica Serovar Gallinarum in cobalamin biosynthesis is avirulent in chickens

    PubMed Central

    de Paiva, Jacqueline Boldrin; Penha Filho, Rafael Antonio Casarin; Arguello, Yuli Melisa Sierra; Berchieri Junior, Ângelo; Lemos, Manuel Victor Franco; Barrow, Paul A.

    2009-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Gallinarum (SG) is a fowl typhoid agent in chickens and is a severe disease with worldwide economic impact as its mortality may reach up to 80%. It is one of a small group of serovars that typically produces typhoid-like infections in a narrow range of host species and which therefore represents a good model for human typhoid. The survival mechanisms are not considered to be virulent mechanisms but are essential for the life of the bacterium. Mutants of Salmonella Gallinarum containing defective genes, related to cobalamin biosynthesis and which Salmonella spp. has to be produced to survive when it is in an anaerobic environment, were produced in this study. Salmonella Gallinarum is an intracellular parasite. Therefore, this study could provide information about whether vitamin B12 biosynthesis might be essential to its survival in the host. The results showed that the singular deletion in cbiA or cobS genes did not interfere in the life of Salmonella Gallinarum in the host, perhaps because single deletion is not enough to impede vitamin B12 biosynthesis. It was noticed that diluted SG mutants with single deletion produced higher mortality than the wild strain of SG. When double mutation was carried out, the Salmonella Gallinarum mutant was unable to provoke mortality in susceptible chickens. This work showed that B12 biosynthesis is a very important step in the metabolism of Salmonella Gallinarum during the infection of the chickens. Further research on bacterium physiology should be carried out to elucidate the events described in this research and to assess the mutant as a vaccine strain. PMID:24031393

  16. Adaptive Resistance and Differential Protein Expression of Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Biofilms Exposed to Benzalkonium Chloride▿

    PubMed Central

    Mangalappalli-Illathu, Anil K.; Korber, Darren R.

    2006-01-01

    The development of adaptive resistance of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis ATCC 4931 biofilms following exposure to benzalkonium chloride (BC) either continuously (1 μg ml−1) or intermittently (10 μg ml−1 for 10 min daily) was examined. Biofilms adapted to BC over a 144-h period could survive a normally lethal BC challenge (500 μg ml−1 for 10 min) and then regrow, as determined by increases in biofilm thickness, total biomass, and the ratio of the viable biomass to the nonviable biomass. Exposure of untreated control biofilms to the lethal BC challenge resulted in biofilm erosion and cell death. Proteins found to be up-regulated following BC adaptation were those involved in energy metabolism (TpiA and Eno), amino acid and protein biosynthesis (WrbA, TrxA, RplL, Tsf, Tuf, DsbA, and RpoZ), nutrient binding (FruB), adaptation (CspA), detoxification (Tpx, SodB, and a probable peroxidase), and degradation of 1,2-propanediol (PduJ and PduA). A putative universal stress protein (YnaF) was also found to be up-regulated. Proteins involved in proteolysis (DegQ), cell envelope formation (RfbH), adaptation (UspA), heat shock response (DnaK), and broad regulatory functions (Hns) were found to be down-regulated following adaptation. An overall increase in cellular protein biosynthesis was deduced from the significant up-regulation of ribosomal subunit proteins, translation elongation factors, and amino acid biosynthesis protein and down-regulation of serine endoprotease. The cold shock response, stress response, and detoxification are suggested to play roles in the adaptive resistance of Salmonella serovar Enteritidis biofilms to BC. PMID:16940079

  17. Prevalence of antimicrobial resistance of non-typhoidal Salmonella serovars in retail aquaculture products.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianmin; Yang, Xiaowei; Kuang, Dai; Shi, Xianming; Xiao, Wenjia; Zhang, Jing; Gu, Zhen; Xu, Xuebin; Meng, Jianghong

    2015-10-01

    Aquaculture products can become sources of Salmonella by exposure to contaminated water or through processing practices, thus representing a public health hazard. A study was conducted on Salmonella contamination in aquaculture products sampled from marketplaces and retailers in Shanghai, China. A total of 730 samples (including fish, shellfish, bullfrog, clam, shrimp and others) were obtained from 2006 to 2011. Among them, 217 (29.7%) were positive for Salmonella. Thirty-eight serovars were identified in the 217 Salmonella isolates. The most prevalent were Salmonella Aberdeen (18.4%), S. Wandsworth (12.0%), S. Thompson (9.2%), S. Singapore (5.5%), S. Stanley (4.6%), S. Schwarzengrund (4.6%), S. Hvittingfoss (4.1%) and S. Typhimurium (4.1%). Many resistant isolates were detected, with 69.6% resistant to at least one antimicrobial drug. We observed high resistance to sulfonamides (56.5%), tetracycline (34.1%), streptomycin (28.6%), ampicillin (23.5%) and nalidixic acid (21.2%). Lower levels of resistance were found for gentamicin (3.2%), ciprofloxacin (2.3%), ceftiofur (1.3%), cefotaxime (0.9%), ceftazidime (0.5%) and cefepime (0.5%). A total of 43.3% of the Salmonella isolates were multidrug-resistant and 44 different resistance patterns were found. This study provided data on the prevalence, serovars and antimicrobial resistance of Salmonella from retail aquaculture products in Shanghai, and indicated the need for monitoring programs for microbiologic safety in such projects and for more prudent drug use in aquaculture production in order to reduce the risk of development and spread of antimicrobial resistance.

  18. Salmonella serovars and their distribution in Nigerian commercial chicken layer farms.

    PubMed

    Fagbamila, Idowu Oluwabunmi; Barco, Lisa; Mancin, Marzia; Kwaga, Jacob; Ngulukun, Sati Samuel; Zavagnin, Paola; Lettini, Antonia Anna; Lorenzetto, Monica; Abdu, Paul Ayuba; Kabir, Junaidu; Umoh, Jarlath; Ricci, Antonia; Muhammad, Maryam

    2017-01-01

    Commercial poultry farms (n° 523), located in all the six regions of Nigeria were sampled with a view to generate baseline information about the distribution of Salmonella serovars in this country. Five different matrices (litter, dust, faeces, feed and water) were collected from each visited farm. Salmonella was isolated from at least one of the five matrices in 228 farms, with a farm prevalence of 43.6% (CI95[39.7-48.3%]). Altogether, 370 of 2615 samples collected (14.1%, CI95[12.8; 15.5%]) contained Salmonella. Considering the number of positive farms and the number of positive samples, it was evident that for the majority of the sampled farms, few samples were positive for Salmonella. With regard to the matrices, there was no difference in Salmonella prevalence among the five matrices considered. Of the 370 isolates serotyped, eighty-two different serotypes were identified and Salmonella Kentucky was identified as having the highest isolation rate in all the matrices sampled (16.2%), followed by S. Poona and S. Elisabethville. S. Kentucky was distributed across the country, whereas the other less frequent serovars had a more circumscribed diffusion. This is one of few comprehensive studies on the occurrence and distribution of Salmonella in commercial chicken layer farms from all the six regions of Nigeria. The relatively high prevalence rate documented in this study may be attributed to the generally poor infrastructure and low biosecurity measures in controlling stray animals, rodents and humans. Data collected could be valuable for instituting effective intervention strategies for Salmonella control in Nigeria and also in other developing countries with a similar poultry industry structure, with the final aim of reducing Salmonella spread in animals and ultimately in humans.

  19. Adaptive resistance and differential protein expression of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis biofilms exposed to benzalkonium chloride.

    PubMed

    Mangalappalli-Illathu, Anil K; Korber, Darren R

    2006-11-01

    The development of adaptive resistance of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis ATCC 4931 biofilms following exposure to benzalkonium chloride (BC) either continuously (1 microg ml(-1)) or intermittently (10 microg ml(-1) for 10 min daily) was examined. Biofilms adapted to BC over a 144-h period could survive a normally lethal BC challenge (500 microg ml(-1) for 10 min) and then regrow, as determined by increases in biofilm thickness, total biomass, and the ratio of the viable biomass to the nonviable biomass. Exposure of untreated control biofilms to the lethal BC challenge resulted in biofilm erosion and cell death. Proteins found to be up-regulated following BC adaptation were those involved in energy metabolism (TpiA and Eno), amino acid and protein biosynthesis (WrbA, TrxA, RplL, Tsf, Tuf, DsbA, and RpoZ), nutrient binding (FruB), adaptation (CspA), detoxification (Tpx, SodB, and a probable peroxidase), and degradation of 1,2-propanediol (PduJ and PduA). A putative universal stress protein (YnaF) was also found to be up-regulated. Proteins involved in proteolysis (DegQ), cell envelope formation (RfbH), adaptation (UspA), heat shock response (DnaK), and broad regulatory functions (Hns) were found to be down-regulated following adaptation. An overall increase in cellular protein biosynthesis was deduced from the significant up-regulation of ribosomal subunit proteins, translation elongation factors, and amino acid biosynthesis protein and down-regulation of serine endoprotease. The cold shock response, stress response, and detoxification are suggested to play roles in the adaptive resistance of Salmonella serovar Enteritidis biofilms to BC.

  20. Horizontal Gene Transfer of a ColV Plasmid Has Resulted in a Dominant Avian Clonal Type of Salmonella enterica Serovar Kentucky

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Timothy J.; Thorsness, Jessica L.; Anderson, Cole P.; Lynne, Aaron M.; Foley, Steven L.; Han, Jing; Fricke, W. Florian; McDermott, Patrick F.; White, David G.; Khatri, Mahesh; Stell, Adam L.; Flores, Cristian; Singer, Randall S.

    2010-01-01

    Salmonella enterica continues to be a significant cause of foodborne gastrointestinal illness in humans. A wide variety of Salmonella serovars have been isolated from production birds and from retail poultry meat. Recently, though, S. enterica subsp. enterica serovar Kentucky has emerged as one of the prominent Salmonella serovars isolated from broiler chickens. Recent work suggests that its emergence apparently coincides with its acquisition of a ColV virulence plasmid. In the present study, we examined 902 Salmonella isolates belonging to 59 different serovars for the presence of this plasmid. Of the serovars examined, the ColV plasmid was found only among isolates belonging to the serovars Kentucky (72.9%), Typhimurium (15.0%) and Heidelberg (1.7%). We demonstrated that a single PFGE clonal type of S. Kentucky harbors this plasmid, and acquisition of this plasmid by S. Kentucky significantly increased its ability to colonize the chicken cecum and cause extraintestinal disease. Comparison of the completed sequences of three ColV plasmids from S. Kentucky isolated from different geographical locales, timepoints and sources revealed a nearly identical genetic structure with few single nucleotide changes or insertions/deletions. Overall, it appears that the ColV plasmid was recently acquired by a single clonal type S. Kentucky and confers to its host enhanced colonization and fitness capabilities. Thus, the potential for horizontal gene transfer of virulence and fitness factors to Salmonella from other enteric bacteria exists in poultry, representing a potential human health hazard. PMID:21203520

  1. Sensitive detection and serovar differentiation of typhoidal and nontyphoidal Salmonella enterica species using 16S rRNA Gene PCR coupled with high-resolution melt analysis.

    PubMed

    Masek, Billie J; Hardick, Justin; Won, Helen; Yang, Samuel; Hsieh, Yu-Hsiang; Rothman, Richard E; Gaydos, Charlotte A

    2014-03-01

    Salmonella enterica species infections are a significant public health problem causing high morbidity rates worldwide and high mortality rates in the developing world. These infections are not always rapidly diagnosed as a cause of bloodstream infections because of the limitations of blood culture, which greatly affects clinical care as a result of treatment delays. A molecular diagnostic assay that could rapidly detect and identify S. enterica species infections as a cause of sepsis is needed. Nine typhoidal and nontyphoidal S. enterica serovars were used to establish the limit of detection (LOD) of a previously published 16S rRNA gene PCR (16S PCR) in mock whole blood specimens. In addition, 16 typhoidal and nontyphoidal S. enterica serovars were used to evaluate the serovar differentiation capability of 16S PCR coupled with high-resolution melt analysis. The overall LOD of 16S PCR for the nine typhoidal and nontyphoidal S. enterica serovars analyzed was <10 colony-forming units per milliliter (CFU/mL) in mock whole blood specimens, with the lowest and highest LOD at <1 CFU/mL and 9 CFU/mL, respectively. By high-resolution melt analysis, the typhoidal and nontyphoidal S. enterica serovar groups analyzed each generated a unique grouping code, allowing for serovar-level identification. 16S PCR coupled with high-resolution melt analysis could be a useful molecular diagnostic that could enhance the current diagnostic, treatment, and surveillance methods of S. enterica bloodstream infections.

  2. Prevalence of leptospira species among farmed and domestic animals in Greece.

    PubMed

    Burriel, A R; Dalley, C; Woodward, M J

    2003-08-02

    A total of 1527 serum samples from pigs, goats, sheep, cattle and dogs in Greece were examined by the microscopic agglutination test and 11-8 per cent of them had antibodies against one or more Leptospira serovars at titres of 1/100 or more. The predominant serovar affecting farm animal species was Bratislava, and Copenhageni was common among dogs and the second most important serovar when all animals were considered together. Another prevalent serovar was Australis, but antibodies to Pomona were detected only in goats and cattle.

  3. Protective immunity conferred by a DNA adenine methylase deficient Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium vaccine when delivered in-water to sheep challenged with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Mohler, V L; Heithoff, D M; Mahan, M J; Walker, K H; Hornitzky, M A; Gabor, L; Thomson, P C; Thompson, A; House, J K

    2011-04-27

    Stimulation of acquired immunity to Salmonella in livestock is not feasible in neonates (which can be infected within 24h of birth) and is challenging in feedlots, which typically source animals from diverse locations and vendors. Induction of innate immune mechanisms through mass vaccination of animals upon arrival to feedlots is an alternative approach. Transport, environmental conditions, changes in social grouping, and further handling during feedlot assembly are significant stressors. These factors, as well as concurrent exposure to a diversity of pathogens, contribute to the risk of disease. We have shown that oral immunization of calves with a modified live Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium vaccine strain, which lacks the DNA adenine methylase gene (S. Typhimurium dam), attenuates the severity of clinical disease, reduces fecal shedding, and promotes clearance of salmonellae following virulent homologous and heterologous challenge. This study examines the safety and efficacy of a S. Typhimurium dam vaccine in sheep via oral delivery in drinking water (ad libitum), as a means to effectively vaccinate large groups of animals. Adult merino sheep were vaccinated in drinking water -28 days, -7 days and 24h pre and 24h post-virulent Salmonella Typhimurium challenge which was administered via the oral route. Significant attenuation of clinical disease (temperature, appetite, and attitude) and reduction in mortality and virulent Salmonella Typhimurium fecal shedding and tissue colonization was observed in animals that received the vaccine 28 and 7 days pre-challenge. Further, vaccination did not pose a risk to stock previously infected with virulent salmonellae as mortalities and clinical disease in sheep vaccinated prior to or following virulent challenge did not differ significantly from the non-vaccinated controls. The capacity of S. Typhimurium dam vaccines delivered in drinking water to protect livestock from virulent Salmonella challenge offers an

  4. Chronic proliferative rhinitis associated with Salmonella enterica subspecies diarizonae serovar 61:k:1, 5, (7) in sheep in Spain.

    PubMed

    Lacasta, D; Ferrer, L M; Ramos, J J; Bueso, J P; Borobia, M; Ruiz de Arcaute, M; Figueras, L; González-Sainz, J M; De Las Heras, M

    2012-11-01

    A chronic proliferative rhinitis in sheep associated with Salmonella enterica subspecies diarizonae serovar 61:k:1, 5, (7) is described. Ten adult sheep from eight traditionally managed Rasa Aragonesa flocks located in Aragon (Spain) were studied. Clinical signs began with bilateral thick mucus nasal discharge, wheezing and snoring and progressed to partial or complete obstruction of the nostrils. Necropsy examination revealed swollen ventral nasal turbinates with a roughened mucosal surface partially covered by small polyps. Histopathology revealed chronic proliferative rhinitis with a predominant population of neutrophils that infiltrated the mucosal epithelium. Plasma cells and macrophages were present in the lamina propria. Organisms expressing Salmonella antigen immunohistochemically were detected within epithelial cells. Salmonella enterica subspecies diarizonae serovar 61:k:1, 5, (7) was isolated as a sole microorganism from nasal swabs taken from five animals. The implication of finding this bacterium in various diseases in sheep and its role as a potential zoonosis are discussed.

  5. Complete genome sequence of Bacillus thuringiensis serovar alesti BGSC 4C1, a typical strain with toxicity to Lepidoptera insects.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yueying; Fu, Jingjing; Zhu, Qian; Zhu, Lei; Zheng, Jinshui; Liu, Hualin; Peng, Donghai; Ruan, Lifang; Sun, Ming

    2016-12-10

    Bacillus thuringiensis serovar alesti was used to control caterpillars from 1970s. Here we reported the complete genome of BGSC 4C1, the type strain of this serovar. It has a circular chromosome and six plasmids. The largest plasmid pBMB267 contains five insecticidal crystal protein genes (two copies of cry1Ae, cry1Gb, cry2Ab, and a novel cry1M-type gene) and three vegetative insecticidal protein genes (a novel binary toxin gene operon vip1-vip2 and vip3Aa). Besides, the strain also has many genes encodeing virulence factors, and some secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene clusters involved in synthesis of antimicrobial peptides and bacteriocins. In addition, there is a poly γ-glutamate synthesis gene cluster, whose product is a candidate to control inflammasome-mediated disorders and potential in many other fields.

  6. Characterization of the yehUT two-component regulatory system of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi and Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Wong, Vanessa K; Pickard, Derek J; Barquist, Lars; Sivaraman, Karthikeyan; Page, Andrew J; Hart, Peter J; Arends, Mark J; Holt, Kathryn E; Kane, Leanne; Mottram, Lynda F; Ellison, Louise; Bautista, Ruben; McGee, Chris J; Kay, Sally J; Wileman, Thomas M; Kenney, Linda J; MacLennan, Calman A; Kingsley, Robert A; Dougan, Gordon

    2013-01-01

    Proteins exhibiting hyper-variable sequences within a bacterial pathogen may be associated with host adaptation. Several lineages of the monophyletic pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi) have accumulated non-synonymous mutations in the putative two-component regulatory system yehUT. Consequently we evaluated the function of yehUT in S. Typhi BRD948 and S. Typhimurium ST4/74. Transcriptome analysis identified the cstA gene, encoding a carbon starvation protein as the predominantly yehUT regulated gene in both these serovars. Deletion of yehUT had no detectable effect on the ability of these mutant Salmonella to invade cultured epithelial cells (S. Typhi and S. Typhimurium) or induce colitis in a murine model (S. Typhimurium only). Growth, metabolic and antimicrobial susceptibility tests identified no obvious influences of yehUT on these phenotypes.

  7. Contribution of Target Gene Mutations and Efflux to Decreased Susceptibility of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium to Fluoroquinolones and Other Antimicrobials▿

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sheng; Cui, Shenghui; McDermott, Patrick F.; Zhao, Shaohua; White, David G.; Paulsen, Ian; Meng, Jianghong

    2007-01-01

    The mechanisms involved in fluoroquinolone resistance in Salmonella enterica include target alterations and overexpression of efflux pumps. The present study evaluated the role of known and putative multidrug resistance efflux pumps and mutations in topoisomerase genes among laboratory-selected and naturally occurring fluoroquinolone-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strains. Strains with ciprofloxacin MICs of 0.25, 4, 32, and 256 μg/ml were derived in vitro using serovar Typhimurium S21. These mutants also showed decreased susceptibility or resistance to many nonfluoroquinolone antimicrobials, including tetracycline, chloramphenicol, and several β-lactams. The expression of efflux pump genes acrA, acrB, acrE, acrF, emrB, emrD, and mdlB were substantially increased (≥2-fold) among the fluoroquinolone-resistant mutants. Increased expression was also observed, but to a lesser extent, with three other putative efflux pumps: mdtB (yegN), mdtC (yegO), and emrA among mutants with ciprofloxacin MICs of ≥32 μg/ml. Deletion of acrAB or tolC in S21 and its fluoroquinolone-resistant mutants resulted in increased susceptibility to fluoroquinolones and other tested antimicrobials. In naturally occurring fluoroquinolone-resistant serovar Typhimurium strains, deletion of acrAB or tolC increased fluoroquinolone susceptibility 4-fold, whereas replacement of gyrA double mutations (S83F D87N) with wild-type gyrA increased susceptibility >500-fold. These results indicate that a combination of topoisomerase gene mutations, as well as enhanced antimicrobial efflux, plays a critical role in the development of fluoroquinolone resistance in both laboratory-derived and naturally occurring quinolone-resistant serovar Typhimurium strains. PMID:17043131

  8. Identification by PCR of Non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica Serovars Associated with Invasive Infections among Febrile Patients in Mali

    PubMed Central

    Tennant, Sharon M.; Diallo, Souleymane; Levy, Haim; Livio, Sofie; Sow, Samba O.; Tapia, Milagritos; Fields, Patricia I.; Mikoleit, Matthew; Tamboura, Boubou; Kotloff, Karen L.; Nataro, James P.; Galen, James E.; Levine, Myron M.

    2010-01-01

    Background In sub-Saharan Africa, non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) are emerging as a prominent cause of invasive disease (bacteremia and focal infections such as meningitis) in infants and young children. Importantly, including data from Mali, three serovars, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Dublin, account for the majority of non-typhoidal Salmonella isolated from these patients. Methods We have extended a previously developed series of polymerase chain reactions (PCRs) based on O serogrouping and H typing to identify Salmonella Typhimurium and variants (mostly I 4,[5],12:i:-), Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Dublin. We also designed primers to detect Salmonella Stanleyville, a serovar found in West Africa. Another PCR was used to differentiate diphasic Salmonella Typhimurium and monophasic Salmonella Typhimurium from other O serogroup B, H:i serovars. We used these PCRs to blind-test 327 Salmonella serogroup B and D isolates that were obtained from the blood cultures of febrile patients in Bamako, Mali. Principal Findings We have shown that when used in conjunction with our previously described O-serogrouping PCR, our PCRs are 100% sensitive and specific in identifying Salmonella Typhimurium and variants, Salmonella Enteritidis, Salmonella Dublin and Salmonella Stanleyville. When we attempted to differentiate 171 Salmonella Typhimurium (I 4,[ 5],12:i:1,2) strains from 52 monophasic Salmonella Typhimurium (I 4,[5],12:i:-) strains, we were able to correctly identify 170 of the Salmonella Typhimurium and 51 of the Salmonella I 4,[5],12:i:- strains. Conclusion We have described a simple yet effective PCR method to support surveillance of the incidence of invasive disease caused by NTS in developing countries. PMID:20231882

  9. In Vitro Development of Ciprofloxacin Resistance of Salmonella enterica Serovars Typhimurium, Enteritidis, and Indiana Isolates from Food Animals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen-Hui; Zhang, Chuan-Zhen; Liu, Zhi-Jie; Gu, Xi-Xi; Li, Wan; Yang, Ling; Liu, Ya-Hong; Zeng, Zhen-Ling; Jiang, Hong-Xia

    2017-01-13

    Difference in the development of resistance may be associated with the epidemiological spread and drug resistance of different Salmonella enterica serovar strains. In the present study, three susceptible S. enterica serovars, Typhimurium (ST), Enteritidis (SE), and Indiana (SI) strains, were subjected to stepwise selection with increasing ciprofloxacin concentrations. The results indicated that the mutation frequencies of the SI group were 10(1)-10(4) higher and developed resistance to ciprofloxacin more rapidly compared with the ST and SE groups. Ciprofloxacin accumulation in the SI strain was also higher than the other two strains in the presence of an efflux pump inhibitor. The development of ciprofloxacin resistance was quite different among the three serovar strains. In SI, increasing AcrAB-TolC efflux pump expression and single or double mutations in gyrA with or without a single parC mutation (T57S) were found in the development of ciprofloxacin resistance. In SE, an increase in the AcrAB-TolC efflux pump regulatory gene ramA gradually decreased as resistant bacteria developed; then resistance resulted from gyrA D87G and gyrB E466D mutations and/or in other active efflux pumps besides AcrAB-TolC. For ST, ramA expression increased rapidly along with gyrA D87 N and/or gyrB S464F mutations. In conclusion, persistent use of ciprofloxacin may aggravate the resistance of different S. enterica serovars and prudent use of the fluoroquinolones is needed. The quicker resistance and higher mutation frequency of the SI isolates present a potential public health threat.

  10. Microfluidic Chip-Based Detection and Intraspecies Strain Discrimination of Salmonella Serovars Derived from Whole Blood of Septic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Adriana S.; Heithoff, Douglas M.; Ferguson, Brian S.; Soh, H. Tom; Mahan, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Salmonella is a zoonotic pathogen that poses a considerable public health and economic burden in the United States and worldwide. Resultant human diseases range from enterocolitis to bacteremia to sepsis and are acutely dependent on the particular serovar of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica, which comprises over 99% of human-pathogenic S. enterica isolates. Point-of-care methods for detection and strain discrimination of Salmonella serovars would thus have considerable benefit to medical, veterinary, and field applications that safeguard public health and reduce industry-associated losses. Here we describe a single, disposable microfluidic chip that supports isothermal amplification and sequence-specific detection and discrimination of Salmonella serovars derived from whole blood of septic mice. The integrated microfluidic electrochemical DNA (IMED) chip consists of an amplification chamber that supports loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP), a rapid, single-temperature amplification method as an alternative to PCR that offers advantages in terms of sensitivity, reaction speed, and amplicon yield. The amplification chamber is connected via a microchannel to a detection chamber containing a reagentless, multiplexed (here biplex) sensing array for sequence-specific electrochemical DNA (E-DNA) detection of the LAMP products. Validation of the IMED device was assessed by the detection and discrimination of S. enterica subsp. enterica serovars Typhimurium and Choleraesuis, the causative agents of enterocolitis and sepsis in humans, respectively. IMED chips conferred rapid (under 2 h) detection and discrimination of these strains at clinically relevant levels (<1,000 CFU/ml) from whole, unprocessed blood collected from septic animals. The IMED-based chip assay shows considerable promise as a rapid, inexpensive, and portable point-of-care diagnostic platform for the detection and strain-specific discrimination of microbial pathogens. PMID:23354710

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of Bacillus thuringiensis Serovar Tolworthi Strain Na205-3, an Isolate Toxic for Helicoverpa armigera

    PubMed Central

    Palma, Leopoldo; Muñoz, Delia; Murillo, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    We report here the complete annotated 6,510,053-bp draft genome sequence of Bacillus thuringiensis serovar tolworthi strain Na205-3, which is toxic for Helicoverpa armigera. This strain potentially contains nine insecticidal toxin genes homologous to cry1Aa12, cry1Ab1, cry1Ab8, cry1Ba1, cry1Af1, cry1Ia10, vip1Bb1, vip2Ba2, and vip3Aa6. PMID:24625875

  12. Platform for identification of Salmonella serovar differentiating bacterial proteins by top-down mass spectrometry: S. Typhimurium vs S. Heidelberg.

    PubMed

    McFarland, Melinda A; Andrzejewski, Denis; Musser, Steven M; Callahan, John H

    2014-07-15

    Intact protein expression profiling has proven to be a powerful tool for bacterial subspecies differentiation. To facilitate typing, epidemiology, and trace-back of Salmonella contamination in the food supply, a minimum of serovar level differentiation is required. Subsequent identification and validation of marker proteins is integral to rapid screening development and to determining which proteins are subject to environmental pressure. Bacterial sequencing efforts have expanded the number of sequenced genomes available for single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analyses, but annotation is often missing, start site errors are not uncommon, and the likelihood of expression is not known. In this work we show that the combination of intact protein expression profiles and top-down liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) facilitates the identification of proteins that result from expressed serovar specific nonsynonymous SNPs. Combinations of these marker proteins can be used in assays for rapid differentiation of bacteria. LC-MS generated intact protein expression profiles establish which bacterial protein masses differ across samples and can be determined without prior knowledge of the sample. Subsequent top-down LC-MS/MS is used to identify expressed proteins and their post-translational modifications (PTM), identify serovar specific markers, and validate genomic predicted orthologues as expressed biomarkers.

  13. Pathogenic Role of SEF14, SEF17, and SEF21 Fimbriae in Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Infection of Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Rajashekara, Gireesh; Munir, Shirin; Alexeyev, Mikhail F.; Halvorson, David A.; Wells, Carol L.; Nagaraja, Kakambi V.

    2000-01-01

    Very little is known about the contribution of surface appendages of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis to pathogenesis in chickens. This study was designed to clarify the role of SEF14, SEF17, and SEF21 fimbriae in serovar Enteritidis pathogenesis. Stable, single, defined sefA (SEF14), agfA (SEF17), and fimA (SEF21) insertionally inactivated fimbrial gene mutants of serovar Enteritidis were constructed. All mutant strains invaded Caco-2 and HT-29 enterocytes at levels similar to that of the wild type. Both mutant and wild-type strains were ingested equally well by chicken macrophage cell lines HD11 and MQ-NCSU. There were no significant differences in the abilities of these strains to colonize chicken ceca. The SEF14− strain was isolated in lower numbers from the livers of infected chickens and was cleared from the spleens faster than other strains. No significant differences in fecal shedding of these strains were observed. PMID:10742278

  14. Genetic and Phenotypic Characterization of a Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis Emerging Strain with Superior Intra-macrophage Replication Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Shomer, Inna; Avisar, Alon; Desai, Prerak; Azriel, Shalhevet; Smollan, Gill; Belausov, Natasha; Keller, Nathan; Glikman, Daniel; Maor, Yasmin; Peretz, Avi; McClelland, Michael; Rahav, Galia; Gal-Mor, Ohad

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is one of the ubiquitous Salmonella serovars worldwide and a major cause of food-born outbreaks, which are often associated with poultry and poultry derivatives. Here we report a nation-wide S. Enteritidis clonal outbreak that occurred in Israel during the last third of 2015. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis and whole genome sequencing identified genetically related strains that were circulating in Israel as early as 2008. Global comparison linked this outbreak strain to several clinical and marine environmental isolates that were previously isolated in California and Canada, indicating that similar strains are prevalent outside of Israel. Phenotypic comparison between the 2015 outbreak strain and other clinical and reference S. Enteritidis strains showed only limited intra-serovar phenotypic variation in growth in rich medium, invasion into Caco-2 cells, uptake by J774.1A macrophages, and host cell cytotoxicity. In contrast, significant phenotypic variation was shown among different S. Enteritidis isolates when biofilm-formation, motility, invasion into HeLa cells and uptake by THP-1 human macrophages were studied. Interestingly, the 2015 outbreak clone was found to possess superior intra-macrophage replication ability within both murine and human macrophages in comparison to the other S. Enteritidis strains studied. This phenotype is likely to play a role in the virulence and host-pathogen interactions of this emerging clone. PMID:27695450

  15. Prevalence, serovars, and antimicrobial susceptibility of Salmonella isolated from blue land crabs (Cardisoma guanhumi) in Grenada, West Indies.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Ross; Hariharan, Harry; Matthew, Vanessa; Chappell, Sam; Davies, Rob; Parker, Regina; Sharma, Andravindra

    2013-07-01

    Samples of intestine and hepatopancreas from 65 blue land crabs (Cardisoma guanhumi), a crustacean commonly consumed as a food item in Grenada, were collected from six geographic sites in Grenada and tested for Salmonella by enrichment and selective culture. The individual animal prevalence of Salmonella based on isolation was 17% (11 of 65), and all infected crabs were from three of the six sampled locations. Isolates were identified by serotyping as Salmonella enterica serovars Saintpaul (n = 6), Montevideo (n = 4), and Newport (n = 1). The intestines of all 11 infected crabs were positive for Salmonella, but only 7 of 11 hepatopancreas samples were positive for Salmonella, and these isolates were the same serovar as isolated from the matching intestine. These three Salmonella serovars are known to cause human illness in many countries, and in the Caribbean Salmonella Saintpaul has been frequently isolated from humans. In a disc diffusion assay, all isolates were susceptible to all 11 drugs tested: amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, ampicillin, cephalothin, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, imipenem, neomycin, streptomycin, tetracycline, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. To our knowledge, this report is the first concerning isolation and antimicrobial susceptibilities of Salmonella serotypes from the blue land crab.

  16. Application of molecular methods for identification of strains classified as Salmonella enterica serovar 6, 7:-:- by conventional serotyping.

    PubMed

    Chadfield, M S; Christensen, J P; Madsen, M; Sonne-Hansen, J; Bisgaard, M

    2002-06-01

    An increased prevalence of Salmonella enterica serovar Tennessee (6, 7: z(29):-) was observed in broiler flocks in Denmark in 1994 and a parallel increase in the prevalence of Salmonella enterica serovar 6, 7:-:- was demonstrated, albeit at a lower level. Plasmid profiling and ribotyping revealed similar genotypes and it was speculated that serovar 6, 7:-:- could represent a non-motile variant of Salmonella Tennessee. Re-testing of the Salmonella 6, 7:-:- isolates demonstrated the presence of flagella through positive motility. All isolates but one demonstrated motility using both tube tests and light microscopy of overnight broth cultures. Molecular characterization indicated that all but two isolates previously classified as Salmonella 6, 7:-:, were isolates of Salmonella Tennessee and Salmonella Infantis, exhibiting reduced motility. Re-serotyping and multiplex polymerase chain reaction analysis for the phase 2 gene fljB demonstrated variants of Salmonella Infantis (6, 7: r: z(49)) expressing the R-phase antigen (Rz(49)) and possessing the gene for normal phase 2 antigen H: 1, 5. One of the two undefined strains demonstrated genotypic identity with a Salmonella Livingstone reference strain. The remaining putative 6, 7:-:- strain could not be identified and was genuinely non-motile. Diagnostic procedures performed initially were thus insufficient to differentiate between the different levels of motility and also resulted in mis-serotyping. As similar observations were made with two of 14 isolates received from a foreign laboratory, this may represent a general diagnostic problem.

  17. Loss of Very-Long O-Antigen Chains Optimizes Capsule-Mediated Immune Evasion by Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Robert W.; Wangdi, Tamding; Spees, Alanna M.; Xavier, Mariana N.; Tsolis, Renée M.; Bäumler, Andreas J.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Expression of capsular polysaccharides is a variable trait often associated with more-virulent forms of a bacterial species. For example, typhoid fever is caused by the capsulated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi, while nontyphoidal Salmonella serovars associated with gastroenteritis are noncapsulated. Here we show that optimization of the immune evasive properties conferred by the virulence-associated (Vi) capsular polysaccharide involved an additional alteration to the cell envelope of S. Typhi, namely inactivation of the fepE gene, encoding the regulator of very-long O-antigen chains. Introduction of the capsule-encoding viaB locus into the nontyphoidal S. enterica serovar Typhimurium reduced complement deposition in vitro and intestinal inflammation in a mouse colitis model. However, both phenotypes were markedly enhanced when the viaB locus was introduced into an S. Typhimurium fepE mutant, which lacks very-long O-antigen chains. Collectively, these data suggest that during the evolution of the S. Typhi lineage, loss of very-long O-antigen chains by pseudogene formation was an adaptation to maximize the anti-inflammatory properties of the Vi capsular polysaccharide. PMID:23860765

  18. Increased secretion of exopolysaccharide and virulence potential of a mucoid variant of Salmonella enterica serovar Montevideo under environmental stress.

    PubMed

    Jean-Gilles Beaubrun, J; Tall, Ben D; Flamer, M-L; Patel, I; Gopinath, G; Auguste, Winny; Jean, Catherine; George, Melvin; Tartera, Carmen; Ewing, L; Hanes, D E

    2017-02-01

    During an investigation to increase the recovery of Salmonella enterica from Oregano, an increased expression of exopolysaccharide was induced in Salmonella serovar Montevideo. The atypical mucoid (SAL242S) and the non-mucoid (SAL242) strains of Montevideo were compared and characterized using various methods. Serotyping analysis demonstrated that both strains are the same serovar Montevideo. Electron microscopy (EM) of cultured SAL242S cells revealed the production of a prominent EPS-like structure enveloping aggregates of cells that are composed of cellulose. Mucoid cells possessed a higher binding affinity for Calcofluor than that of the non-mucoid strain. Genotypic analysis revealed no major genomic differences between these morphotypes, while expression analyses using a DNA microarray shows that the mucoid variant exhibited heightened expression of genes encoding proteins produced by the SPI-1 type III secretion system. This increased expression of SPI1 genes may play a role in protecting Salmonella from environmental stressors. Based on these observations, Salmonella serovar Montevideo mucoid variant under stressful or low-nutrient environments presented atypical growth patterns and phenotypic changes, as well as an upregulated expression of virulence factors. These findings are significant in the understanding of survival abilities of Salmonella in a various food matrices.

  19. Bacillus thuringiensis serovar israelensis is highly toxic to the coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei Ferr. (Coleoptera: Scolytidae).

    PubMed

    Méndez-López, Ismael; Basurto-Ríos, Regina; Ibarra, Jorge E

    2003-09-12

    A native collection of Bacillus thuringiensis strains was screened, once a reliable bioassay technique to assess the toxicity against the coffee berry borer (CBB) first-instar larvae was developed. A first round of bioassays with 170 strains indicated that the great majority of them showed no or very little insecticidal activity and that very few showed significant levels of toxicity. Interestingly, only those strains that had previously been associated with mosquitocidal activity were also toxic to CBB. Qualitative bioassays (using one high dose) were carried out only with those native mosquitocidal strains, corroborating their significant toxicity towards the CBB first-instar larvae. Most of these strains belong to serovar israelensis. In a second approach, strains from the Institut Pasteur type collection, whose mosquitocidal activity had been previously demonstrated, were also subjected to bioassays. Only those strains that showed a comparable protein content in their parasporal crystals to the israelensis type strain also showed high levels of toxicity towards CBB. Finally, an accurate LC(50) was estimated, using purified parasporal crystals from B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis type strain, at 219.5 ng cm(-2) of diet. All the statistical requirements for a reliable estimator were fulfilled. This is the first report of B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis being active against a coleopteran species.

  20. Excision of an unstable pathogenicity island in Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is induced during infection of phagocytic cells.

    PubMed

    Quiroz, Tania S; Nieto, Pamela A; Tobar, Hugo E; Salazar-Echegarai, Francisco J; Lizana, Rodrigo J; Quezada, Carolina P; Santiviago, Carlos A; Araya, Daniela V; Riedel, Claudia A; Kalergis, Alexis M; Bueno, Susan M

    2011-01-01

    The availability of the complete genome sequence of several Salmonella enterica serovars has revealed the presence of unstable genetic elements in these bacteria, such as pathogenicity islands and prophages. This is the case of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis), a bacterium that causes gastroenteritis in humans and systemic infection in mice. The whole genome sequence analysis for S. Enteritidis unveiled the presence of several genetic regions that are absent in other Salmonella serovars. These regions have been denominated "regions of difference" (ROD). In this study we show that ROD21, one of such regions, behaves as an unstable pathogenicity island. We observed that ROD21 undergoes spontaneous excision by two independent recombination events, either under laboratory growth conditions or during infection of murine cells. Importantly, we also found that one type of excision occurred at higher rates when S. Enteritidis was residing inside murine phagocytic cells. These data suggest that ROD21 is an unstable pathogenicity island, whose frequency of excision depends on the environmental conditions found inside phagocytic cells.

  1. Molecular epidemiology of Salmonella enterica serovar Agona: characterization of a diffuse outbreak caused by aniseed-fennel-caraway infusion.

    PubMed

    Rabsch, W; Prager, R; Koch, J; Stark, K; Roggentin, P; Bockemühl, J; Beckmann, G; Stark, R; Siegl, W; Ammon, A; Tschäpe, H

    2005-10-01

    During 2002-2003 increased numbers of notified salmonellosis due to S. enterica serovar Agona were observed in Germany. In order to understand the recent spread of this serovar and to trace the route of infection to its source, a new phage-typing scheme and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) were used to analyse these isolates. By using 14 bacteriophages, 52 phage types were distinguished among the S. Agona strains. PFGE also differentiated 52 different patterns. A combination of both methods generated 94 clonal types among 165 S. Agona strains originating from Germany and other countries including the United States, United Arab Emirates, Turkey, India, Austria and Finland, indicating a great biological diversity within this serovar. However, 36 recent S. Agona isolates from infantile gastroenteritis in Germany, from an untreated batch of aniseed imported from Turkey and from fennel-aniseed-caraway infusion (packed in tea bags) revealed clonal identity indicating their epidemiological relatedness as a new source of infection. It is suggested that strains of S. Agona will continue to be of public health concern, and that phage typing together with PFGE typing should be applied as reliable and rapid tools for epidemiological subtyping and future monitoring.

  2. Leptospiral Outer Membrane Protein Microarray, a Novel Approach to Identification of Host Ligand-Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Matsunaga, James; Haake, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a zoonosis with worldwide distribution caused by pathogenic spirochetes belonging to the genus Leptospira. The leptospiral life cycle involves transmission via freshwater and colonization of the renal tubules of their reservoir hosts. Infection requires adherence to cell surfaces and extracellular matrix components of host tissues. These host-pathogen interactions involve outer membrane proteins (OMPs) expressed on the bacterial surface. In this study, we developed an Leptospira interrogans serovar Copenhageni strain Fiocruz L1-130 OMP microarray containing all predicted lipoproteins and transmembrane OMPs. A total of 401 leptospiral genes or their fragments were transcribed and translated in vitro and printed on nitrocellulose-coated glass slides. We investigated the potential of this protein microarray to screen for interactions between leptospiral OMPs and fibronectin (Fn). This approach resulted in the identification of the recently described fibronectin-binding protein, LIC10258 (MFn8, Lsa66), and 14 novel Fn-binding proteins, denoted Microarray Fn-binding proteins (MFns). We confirmed Fn binding of purified recombinant LIC11612 (MFn1), LIC10714 (MFn2), LIC11051 (MFn6), LIC11436 (MFn7), LIC10258 (MFn8, Lsa66), and LIC10537 (MFn9) by far-Western blot assays. Moreover, we obtained specific antibodies to MFn1, MFn7, MFn8 (Lsa66), and MFn9 and demonstrated that MFn1, MFn7, and MFn9 are expressed and surface exposed under in vitro growth conditions. Further, we demonstrated that MFn1, MFn4 (LIC12631, Sph2), and MFn7 enable leptospires to bind fibronectin when expressed in the saprophyte, Leptospira biflexa. Protein microarrays are valuable tools for high-throughput identification of novel host ligand-binding proteins that have the potential to play key roles in the virulence mechanisms of pathogens. PMID:22961849

  3. Distinct antibody responses of patients with mild and severe leptospirosis determined by whole proteome microarray analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lessa-Aquino, Carolina; Lindow, Janet C.; Randall, Arlo; Wunder, Elsio; Pablo, Jozelyn; Nakajima, Rie; Jasinskas, Algis; Cruz, Jaqueline S.; Damião, Alcineia O.; Nery, Nívison; Ribeiro, Guilherme S.; Costa, Federico; Hagan, José E.; Reis, Mitermayer Galvão; Ko, Albert I.; Medeiros, Marco Alberto; Felgner, Philip L.

    2017-01-01

    Background Leptospirosis is an important zoonotic disease worldwide. Humans usually present a mild non-specific febrile illness, but a proportion of them develop more severe outcomes, such as multi-organ failure, lung hemorrhage and death. Such complications are thought to depend on several factors, including the host immunity. Protective immunity is associated with humoral immune response, but little is known about the immune response mounted during naturally-acquired Leptospira infection. Methods and principal findings Here, we used protein microarray chip to profile the antibody responses of patients with severe and mild leptospirosis against the complete Leptospira interrogans serovar Copenhageni predicted ORFeome. We discovered a limited number of immunodominant antigens, with 36 antigens specific to patients, of which 11 were potential serodiagnostic antigens, identified at acute phase, and 33 were potential subunit vaccine targets, detected after recovery. Moreover, we found distinct antibody profiles in patients with different clinical outcomes: in the severe group, overall IgM responses do not change and IgG responses increase over time, while both IgM and IgG responses remain stable in the mild patient group. Analyses of individual patients’ responses showed that >74% of patients in the severe group had significant IgG increases over time compared to 29% of patients in the mild group. Additionally, 90% of IgM responses did not change over time in the mild group, compared to ~51% in the severe group. Conclusions In the present study, we detected antibody profiles associated with disease severity and speculate that patients with mild disease were protected from severe outcomes due to pre-existing antibodies, while patients with severe leptospirosis demonstrated an antibody profile typical of first exposure. Our findings represent a significant advance in the understanding of the humoral immune response to Leptospira infection, and we have identified new

  4. Evaluation of a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of immunoglobulin M antibody in diagnosis of human leptospiral infection.

    PubMed Central

    Winslow, W E; Merry, D J; Pirc, M L; Devine, P L

    1997-01-01

    The PanBio Leptospira immunoglobulin M (IgM) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is a commercially available screening test for the diagnosis of acute leptospiral infection. The ability of the test to diagnose early or recent Leptospira interrogans infection was assessed by testing sera with known microagglutination test (MAT) titers to serovars pomona, hardjo, copenhageni, and australis. The IgM ELISA detected all 41 cases of early or recent leptospiral infection (sensitivity, 100%), with a positive ELISA result seen in many cases before MAT antibody titers reached 1:50. Thirty-eight of 41 patients showed seroconversion (fourfold or greater increase in titer by MAT, 2 of 41 patients had a single sample with elevated titer, and 1 patient from whom leptospires were isolated from a blood sample failed to show MAT titers, despite a seroconversion (negative to positive result) in the ELISA. Follow-up sera obtained from 8 of 12 patients (67%) for 3 to 48 months after the acute stage of illness showed persisting IgM antibody. However, the range of levels detected in these samples (maximum ELISA ratio, 2.0) was lower than the range seen when infection was recent. Reactivity in the IgM ELISA was observed for only 1 of 59 serum samples from asymptomatic donors (specificity, 98%) and 16 of 233 serum samples from patients with Ross River virus, brucella, Epstein-Barr virus, cytomegalovirus, mycoplasma, Q-fever, toxoplasma, hepatitis A virus, Treponema pallidum, or Borrelia burgdorferi infection (specificity, 93%), with the majority of these patients showing lower levels of IgM in comparison to those in patients with leptospiral infection. We conclude that this ELISA is sufficiently sensitive for use as an initial screen for leptospiral infections, with subsequent confirmation of positive test results by MAT. PMID:9230359

  5. Detection of Multidrug-Resistant Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Phage Types DT102, DT104, and U302 by Multiplex PCR

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Cheng-Hsun; Su, Lin-Hui; Chu, Chi-Hong; Wang, Mei-Hwei; Yeh, Chia-Ming; Weill, Francois-Xavier; Chu, Chishih

    2006-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is a common cause of nontyphoidal salmonellosis in humans and animals. Multidrug-resistant serovar Typhimurium phage type DT104, which emerged in the 1990s, has become widely distributed in many countries. A total of 104 clinical isolates of Salmonella serogroup B were collected from three major hospitals in Taiwan during 1997 to 2003 and were examined by a multiplex PCR targeting the resistance genes and the spv gene of the virulence plasmid. A total of 51 isolates (49%) were resistant to all drugs (ACSSuT [resistance to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, streptomycin, sulfonamide, and tetracycline]), and all contained a 1.25-kb PCR fragment of integron that is part of the 43-kb Salmonella genomic island 1 (SGI1). The second group was resistant to SSu (28%), and the third was susceptible to all five drugs (13%). Fifty-nine isolates were serotyped to be serovar Typhimurium by the tube agglutination method using H antisera. The virulence plasmid was found in 54 (91.5%) of the 59 serovar Typhimurium isolates. A majority (94.1%) of the Salmonella serogroup B isolates with the ACSSuT resistance pattern harbored a virulence plasmid. Phage typing identified three major phage types: DT104, DT120, and U302. Analysis of the isolates by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis showed six genotypes. We found two genotypes in DT104 strains, two in DT120, and the other two in U302. The presence of a monophasic serovar (4,5,12:i:−) has added difficulty in the determination of the serovars of multidrug-resistant Salmonella serogroup B isolates. Nevertheless, the multiplex PCR devised in the present study appears to be efficient and useful in the rapid identification of ACSSuT-type serovar Typhimurium with SGI1, irrespective of their phage types. PMID:16825349

  6. Associations between Heat-Stable (O) and Heat-Labile (HL) Serogroup Antigens of Campylobacter jejuni: Evidence for Interstrain Relationships within Three O/HL Serovars

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, C. J.; Fox, A. J.; Jones, D. M.; Wareing, D. R. A.; Hutchinson, D. N.

    1998-01-01

    A comparative examination of the heat-stable (O) and heat-labile (HL) serogrouping results for 9,024 sporadic human isolates of Campylobacter jejuni revealed conserved associations between specific O and HL antigens (O/HL serovars). Forty-nine percent of the isolates which grouped for both O and HL antigens belonged to one of three serovars: O 4 complex/HL 1 (17.9%), O 1/HL 2 (16.8%), or O 50/HL 7 (14.5%). Other common serovars were O 2/HL 4 (8.3%), O 6/HL 6 (8.1%), O 53/HL 11 (4.5%), O 19/HL 17 (3.3%), O 5/HL 9 (3.3%), O 9/HL 9 (3.2%), and O 23/HL 5 (3.1%). These 10 serovars accounted for 83.1% of the serogroupable isolates. A large number of strains (41.3%) could be typed by only one of the two methods or could not be serogrouped (11%). Strains belonging to three serovars, O 2/HL 4, O 50/HL 7, and O 23/HL 5, were further characterized by combining data from expressed features (O/HL serogroups, phage groups, and biotypes) with restriction fragment length polymorphism genotypes. These polyphasic data demonstrated that within each serovar, individual isolates showed substantial conservation of both genomic and phenotypic characteristics. The essentially clonal nature of the three serovars confirmed the potential of combined O and HL serogrouping as a practical and phylogenetically valid method for investigating the epidemiology of sporadic C. jejuni infection. PMID:9665996

  7. Efflux Pump Overexpression Contributes to Tigecycline Heteroresistance in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi; Hu, Daxing; Zhang, Qijing; Liao, Xiao-Ping; Liu, Ya-Hong; Sun, Jian

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial heteroresistance has been identified in several combinations of bacteria and antibiotics, and it complicated the therapeutic strategies. Tigecycline is being used as one of the optimal options for the treatment of infections caused by multidrug-resistant Salmonella. This study investigated whether heterorresistance to tigecycline exists in a Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain harboring the oqxAB-bearing IncHI2 plasmid pHXY0908. MIC and population analyses were performed to evaluate population-wide susceptibility to tigecycline. The effects of efflux pumps on MIC levels were assessed using the efflux pump inhibitor Phe-Arg-β-naphthylamide, measuring intracellular tigecycline accumulation as well as mRNA levels of regulatory and efflux pump genes. DNA sequencing of regulatory regions were performed and plasmid curing from a resistant strain provided an appropriate control. Results showed that MICs of a parental strain with and without pHXY0908 as well as a plasmid-cured strain 14028/Δp52 were 0.5, 1, and 1 μg/mL, respectively. Population analysis profiling (PAP) illustrated that only the pHXY0908-containg strain was heteroresistant to tigecycline. A fraction of colonies exhibited stable profiles with 4- to 8-fold increases in MIC. The frequencies of emergence of these isolates were higher in the plasmid-containing strain pHXY0908 than either the parental or the 14028/Δp52 strain. Phe-Arg-β-naphthylamide addition restored tigecycline susceptibility of these isolates and intracellular tigecycline accumulation was reduced. Heteroresistant isolates of the strain containing pHXY0908 also had elevated expression of acrB, ramA, and oqxB. DNA sequencing identified numerous mutations in RamR that have been shown to lead to ramA overexpression. In conclusions, heteroresistance to tigecycline in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium was manifested in a plasmid-bearing strain. Our results suggest that this phenotype was associated with overexpression

  8. Efflux Pump Overexpression Contributes to Tigecycline Heteroresistance in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi; Hu, Daxing; Zhang, Qijing; Liao, Xiao-Ping; Liu, Ya-Hong; Sun, Jian

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial heteroresistance has been identified in several combinations of bacteria and antibiotics, and it complicated the therapeutic strategies. Tigecycline is being used as one of the optimal options for the treatment of infections caused by multidrug-resistant Salmonella. This study investigated whether heterorresistance to tigecycline exists in a Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain harboring the oqxAB-bearing IncHI2 plasmid pHXY0908. MIC and population analyses were performed to evaluate population-wide susceptibility to tigecycline. The effects of efflux pumps on MIC levels were assessed using the efflux pump inhibitor Phe-Arg-β-naphthylamide, measuring intracellular tigecycline accumulation as well as mRNA levels of regulatory and efflux pump genes. DNA sequencing of regulatory regions were performed and plasmid curing from a resistant strain provided an appropriate control. Results showed that MICs of a parental strain with and without pHXY0908 as well as a plasmid-cured strain 14028/Δp52 were 0.5, 1, and 1 μg/mL, respectively. Population analysis profiling (PAP) illustrated that only the pHXY0908-containg strain was heteroresistant to tigecycline. A fraction of colonies exhibited stable profiles with 4- to 8-fold increases in MIC. The frequencies of emergence of these isolates were higher in the plasmid-containing strain pHXY0908 than either the parental or the 14028/Δp52 strain. Phe-Arg-β-naphthylamide addition restored tigecycline susceptibility of these isolates and intracellular tigecycline accumulation was reduced. Heteroresistant isolates of the strain containing pHXY0908 also had elevated expression of acrB, ramA, and oqxB. DNA sequencing identified numerous mutations in RamR that have been shown to lead to ramA overexpression. In conclusions, heteroresistance to tigecycline in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium was manifested in a plasmid-bearing strain. Our results suggest that this phenotype was associated with overexpression

  9. Influence of a probiotic strain of Enterococcus faecium on Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 infection in a porcine animal infection model.

    PubMed

    Szabó, István; Wieler, Lothar H; Tedin, Karsten; Scharek-Tedin, Lydia; Taras, David; Hensel, Andreas; Appel, Bernd; Nöckler, Karsten

    2009-05-01

    The beneficial effects of probiotic Enterococcus spp. in different hosts, such as mice and humans, have previously been reported in several studies. However, studies of large domestic animals, as well as challenge studies with pathogenic microorganisms, are very rare. Here, we investigated the influence of oral treatment of pigs with the probiotic bacterium Enterococcus faecium NCIMB 10415 on Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 infections in weaning piglets. Clinical symptoms, fecal excretion, the organ distribution of Salmonella, and the humoral immune response (immunoglobulin G [IgG], IgM, and IgA levels) in serum were examined. A pool of 89 piglets was randomly divided into probiotic and control groups. The probiotic group received a feed supplement containing E. faecium starting on day 14 postpartum prior to challenge with Salmonella serovar Typhimurium DT104 at 28 days postpartum. After challenge with Salmonella serovar Typhimurium DT104, piglets in both groups showed no severe clinical signs of salmonellosis. However, fecal excretion and colonization of Salmonella in organs were significantly greater in piglets fed E. faecium. Likewise, the humoral immune response against Salmonella (serum IgM and IgA levels) was significantly greater in the probiotic group animals than in control animals. The results of this study suggest that E. faecium NCIMB 10415 treatment enhanced the course of infection in weaning piglets challenged with Salmonella serovar Typhimurium DT104. However, the probiotic treatment also appeared to result in greater production of specific antibodies against Salmonella serovar Typhimurium DT104.

  10. Enteric fever in Cambodian children is dominated by multidrug-resistant H58 Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi with intermediate susceptibility to ciprofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Emary, Kate; Moore, Catrin E; Chanpheaktra, Ngoun; An, Khun Peng; Chheng, Kheng; Sona, Soeng; Duy, Pham Thanh; Nga, Tran Vu Thieu; Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn; Amornchai, Premjit; Kumar, Varun; Wijedoru, Lalith; Stoesser, Nicole E; Carter, Michael J; Baker, Stephen; Day, Nicholas P J; Parry, Christopher M

    2012-12-01

    Infections with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi isolates that are multidrug resistant (MDR: resistant to chloramphenicol, ampicillin, trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole) with intermediate ciprofloxacin susceptibility are widespread in Asia but there is little information from Cambodia. We studied invasive salmonellosis in children at a paediatric hospital in Siem Reap, Cambodia. Between 2007 and 2011 Salmonella was isolated from a blood culture in 162 children. There were 151 children with enteric fever, including 148 serovar Typhi and three serovar Paratyphi A infections, and 11 children with a non-typhoidal Salmonella infection. Of the 148 serovar Typhi isolates 126 (85%) were MDR and 133 (90%) had intermediate ciprofloxacin susceptibility. Inpatient antimicrobial treatment was ceftriaxone alone or initial ceftriaxone followed by a step-down to oral ciprofloxacin or azithromycin. Complications developed in 37/128 (29%) children admitted with enteric fever and two (1.6%) died. There was one confirmed relapse. In a sample of 102 serovar Typhi strains genotyped by investigation of a subset of single nucleotide polymorphisms, 98 (96%) were the H58 haplotype, the majority of which had the common serine to phenylalanine substitution at codon 83 in the DNA gyrase. We conclude that antimicrobial-resistant enteric fever is common in Cambodian children and therapeutic options are limited.

  11. Evidence of Bacillus thuringiensis intra-serovar diversity revealed by Bacillus cereus group-specific repetitive extragenic palindromic sequence-based PCR genomic fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Sauka, Diego H; Basile, Juan I; Benintende, Graciela

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis is classified into serovars on the basis of H-flagellar antigens. Several alternative typing methods have been described. Among them, a B. cereus group-specific repetitive extragenic palindromic (Rep)-PCR fingerprinting technique was shown to be discriminative and able to identify B. thuringiensis serovars. The aim of this study was to investigate the genomic diversity and relationship among B. thuringiensis strains collected from different Argentinean ecosystems. Thirty-seven B. thuringiensis reference strains and 131 Argentinean isolates were analyzed using a B. cereus group-specific Rep-PCR. Fourteen different patterns were identified among the Argentinean isolates. Eight could not be associated to any pattern obtained from a reference strain. The pattern identical to the serovar kurstaki HD-1 strain was the most frequently identified in 68 native isolates. The profiles allowed tracing a single dendrogram with two groups and eight main lineages. Some strains showed distinctive patterns despite belonging to the same serovar. An intraspecific diversity resulted from this analysis that was highlighted by this technique since strains from a given serovar showed distinct profiles. This study may help to establish a system of B. thuringiensis classification with a higher discrimination level than established by the H antigen serotyping.

  12. Influence of a Probiotic Strain of Enterococcus faecium on Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium DT104 Infection in a Porcine Animal Infection Model▿

    PubMed Central

    Szabó, István; Wieler, Lothar H.; Tedin, Karsten; Scharek-Tedin, Lydia; Taras, David; Hensel, Andreas; Appel, Bernd; Nöckler, Karsten

    2009-01-01

    The beneficial effects of probiotic Enterococcus spp. in different hosts, such as mice and humans, have previously been reported in several studies. However, studies of large domestic animals, as well as challenge studies with pathogenic microorganisms, are very rare. Here, we investigated the influence of oral treatment of pigs with the probiotic bacterium Enterococcus faecium NCIMB 10415 on Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 infections in weaning piglets. Clinical symptoms, fecal excretion, the organ distribution of Salmonella, and the humoral immune response (immunoglobulin G [IgG], IgM, and IgA levels) in serum were examined. A pool of 89 piglets was randomly divided into probiotic and control groups. The probiotic group received a feed supplement containing E. faecium starting on day 14 postpartum prior to challenge with Salmonella serovar Typhimurium DT104 at 28 days postpartum. After challenge with Salmonella serovar Typhimurium DT104, piglets in both groups showed no severe clinical signs of salmonellosis. However, fecal excretion and colonization of Salmonella in organs were significantly greater in piglets fed E. faecium. Likewise, the humoral immune response against Salmonella (serum IgM and IgA levels) was significantly greater in the probiotic group animals than in control animals. The results of this study suggest that E. faecium NCIMB 10415 treatment enhanced the course of infection in weaning piglets challenged with Salmonella serovar Typhimurium DT104. However, the probiotic treatment also appeared to result in greater production of specific antibodies against Salmonella serovar Typhimurium DT104. PMID:19270131

  13. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in Mauritius linked to consumption of marlin mousse.

    PubMed

    Issack, Mohammad I; Hendriksen, Rene S; Lun, Phimy Lan Keng; Lutchun, Ram K S; Aarestrup, Frank M

    2009-01-01

    We report the first outbreak of salmonellosis caused by consumption of contaminated marlin mousse. Between 29 October and 5 November 2008, at least 53 persons developed diarrheal illness, all with a history of eating marlin mousse. Salmonella spp. that did not produce gas from glucose was isolated from stools of 26 affected patients and blood culture from one patient. Salmonella sp. isolates with the same phenotype were isolated in three samples of marlin mousse manufactured on 27 October 2008. The constituents of the mousse were smoked marlin, raw eggs, bovine gelatin, oil, and cream. A laboratory investigation of one sample of marlin mousse manufactured 3 days later, and the individual ingredients sampled a week after production of the contaminated batch were all negative for Salmonella. Serotyping and minimum inhibitory concentration determination were performed on 12 patient isolates related to the outbreak and two mousse isolates. All isolates belonged to Salmonella serovar Typhimurium and were pansusceptible to all antimicrobials tested. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis revealed that all the isolates were indistinguishable, thus implicating the mousse as the vehicle of the outbreak.

  14. aroA-Deficient Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Is More Than a Metabolically Attenuated Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Frahm, Michael; Kocijancic, Dino; Rohde, Manfred; Eckweiler, Denitsa; Bielecka, Agata; Bueno, Emilio; Cava, Felipe; Abraham, Wolf-Rainer; Curtiss, Roy; Häussler, Susanne; Erhardt, Marc; Weiss, Siegfried

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Recombinant attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strains are believed to act as powerful live vaccine carriers that are able to elicit protection against various pathogens. Auxotrophic mutations, such as a deletion of aroA, are commonly introduced into such bacteria for attenuation without incapacitating immunostimulation. In this study, we describe the surprising finding that deletion of aroA dramatically increased the virulence of attenuated Salmonella in mouse models. Mutant bacteria lacking aroA elicited increased levels of the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) after systemic application. A detailed genetic and phenotypic characterization in combination with transcriptomic and metabolic profiling demonstrated that ΔaroA mutants display pleiotropic alterations in cellular physiology and lipid and amino acid metabolism, as well as increased sensitivity to penicillin, complement, and phagocytic uptake. In concert with other immunomodulating mutations, deletion of aroA affected flagellin phase variation and gene expression of the virulence-associated genes arnT and ansB. Finally, ΔaroA strains displayed significantly improved tumor therapeutic activity. These results highlight the importance of a functional shikimate pathway to control homeostatic bacterial physiology. They further highlight the great potential of ΔaroA-attenuated Salmonella for the development of vaccines and cancer therapies with important implications for host-pathogen interactions and translational medicine. PMID:27601574

  15. Rescuing chemotaxis of the anticancer agent Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium VNP20009.

    PubMed

    Broadway, Katherine M; Denson, Elizabeth A P; Jensen, Roderick V; Scharf, Birgit E

    2015-10-10

    The role of chemotaxis and motility in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium tumor colonization remains unclear. We determined through swim plate assays that the well-established anticancer agent S. Typhimurium VNP20009 is deficient in chemotaxis, and that this phenotype is suppressible. Through genome sequencing, we revealed that VNP20009 and four selected suppressor mutants had a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in cheY causing a mutation in the conserved proline residue at position 110. CheY is the response regulator that interacts with the flagellar motor-switch complex and modulates rotational bias. The four suppressor mutants additionally carried non-synonymous SNPs in fliM encoding a flagellar switch protein. The CheY-P110S mutation in VNP20009 likely rendered the protein unable to interact with FliM, a phenotype that could be suppressed by mutations in FliM. We replaced the mutated cheY in VNP20009 with the wild-type copy and chemotaxis was partially restored. The swim ring of the rescued strain, VNP20009 cheY(+), was 46% the size of the parental strain 14028 swim ring. When tested in capillary assays, VNP20009 cheY(+) was 69% efficient in chemotaxis towards the attractant aspartate as compared to 14028. Potential reasons for the lack of complete restoration and implications for bacterial tumor colonization will be discussed.

  16. Increased persistence of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi in the presence of Acanthamoeba castellanii.

    PubMed

    Douesnard-Malo, Frédéric; Daigle, France

    2011-11-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi) is the etiological agent of the systemic disease typhoid fever. Transmission occurs via ingestion of contaminated food or water. S. Typhi is specific to humans, and no animal or environmental reservoirs are known. As the free-living amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii is an environmental host for many pathogenic bacteria, this study investigates interactions between S. Typhi and A. castellanii by using cocultures. Growth of both organisms was estimated by cell count, viable count, flow cytometry, and fluorescence microscopy. Results indicate that S. Typhi can survive at least 3 weeks when grown with A. castellanii, as opposed to less than 10 days when grown as singly cultured bacteria under the same conditions. Interestingly, growth rates of amoebae after 14 days were similar in cocultures or when amoebae were singly cultured, suggesting that S. Typhi is not cytotoxic to A. castellanii. Bacteria surviving in coculture were not intracellular and did not require a physical contact with amoebae for their survival. These results suggest that S. Typhi may have a selective advantage when it is associated with A. castellanii and that amoebae may contribute to S. Typhi persistence in the environment.

  17. Root internalization, transport and in-planta survival of Salmonella enterica serovar Newport in sweet basil.

    PubMed

    Gorbatsevich, Elena; Sela Saldinger, Shlomo; Pinto, Riky; Bernstein, Nirit

    2013-02-01

    It is now acknowledged that food-borne pathogens present in the irrigation water or soil can become associated with crop plants in the field, penetrate internal plant tissues via the root, translocate and survive inside plants. Only little information is available concerning interaction between enteric pathogens and plants. The present study evaluated the potential for contamination of the aromatic plant, sweet basil during cultivation, by Salmonella enterica serovar Newport. Root internalization was plant-age-dependent, with the highest susceptibility occurring at the beginning of the rapid growth phase of the root. Higher incidence of internalization was detected in vegetative than reproductive plant organs, pointing at bacterial transport in the transpiration stream. Internalized Salmonella survived only < 30 h in the phyllosphere. In contrast, survival of Salmonella on the leaf surface was much pronounced (at least 8 days), and the initial decay rate was lower at the abaxial (lower) compared with the adaxial (upper) side of the leaf. Although the experiments were conducted with high concentration of Salmonella unlikely to happen in the field, internalization occurred at a low frequency and in-planta survival was limited to less than 30 h. These findings imply that leaf surface contamination, rather than root internalization, may pose higher risk for human infection following consumption of contaminated basil.

  18. ACUTE CLINICAL LEPTOSPIROSIS (GRIPPOTYPHOSA SEROVAR) IN AN ADULT DROMEDARY CAMEL (CAMELUS DROMEDARIUS).

    PubMed

    Gyimesi, Zoltan S; Burns, Roy B; Erol, Erdal; Bolin, Steven R

    2015-09-01

    A 9-yr-old castrated male dromedary camel (Camelus dromedarius) presented with lethargy and partial anorexia. A diagnostic examination revealed fever, and further workup revealed a neutrophilia, hyperfibrinogenemia, renal azotemia, and a rapid onset of a high Leptospira antibody titer during the acute clinical period (Grippotyphosa serovar). The camel responded clinically to antimicrobial treatment with ceftiofur crystalline free acid injections, but renal azotemia persisted, presumably secondary to chronic renal damage. Subsequent Leptospira polymerase chain reaction testing on urine samples obtained over the following 4 mo revealed no evidence of urinary shedding, so a persistent infection was unlikely. Although often mentioned as a potential cause of reproductive loss, well-documented case reports of clinical leptospirosis in camelids are very rare. In this case, native wildlife contamination of a small watering hole is suspected to have been the source of infection. In response to this experience, the camel and two conspecifics were prescribed a vaccination regimen using an inactivated pentavalent Leptospira vaccine licensed for cattle.

  19. Emergence of Clinical Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Isolates with Concurrent Resistance to Ciprofloxacin, Ceftriaxone, and Azithromycin

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Marcus Ho Yin; Yan, Meiying; Chan, Edward Wai Chi; Biao, Kan

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella infection is an important public health issue for which the needs of antimicrobial treatment are increasing. A total of 546 human clinical S. enterica serovar Typhimurium isolates were recovered from patients in hospitals in China during the period of 2005 to ∼2011. Twenty percent of the isolates exhibited resistance to ciprofloxacin, and 4% were resistant to ceftriaxone. Importantly, for the first time, 12 (2%) S. Typhimurium isolates resistant to both ciprofloxacin and ceftriaxone were recovered; among these 12 isolates, two were also resistant to azithromycin, and one was resistant to all other drugs tested. The combined effects of various transferrable extended-spectrum β-lactamase determinants and a novel efflux-based ciprofloxacin resistance mechanism encoded by the mobile efflux gene oqxAB were responsible for the emergence of these extremely (highly) drug-resistant (XDR) S. Typhimurium isolates. The dissemination of resistance genes, such as those encoding ESBLs and the OqxAB pump, among Salmonella organisms will speed up the selection of XDR Salmonella, posing a huge threat to public health and Salmonella infection control. PMID:24752251

  20. Genomic Analysis of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium from Wild Passerines in England and Wales.

    PubMed

    Mather, Alison E; Lawson, Becki; de Pinna, Elizabeth; Wigley, Paul; Parkhill, Julian; Thomson, Nicholas R; Page, Andrew J; Holmes, Mark A; Paterson, Gavin K

    2016-11-15

    Passerine salmonellosis is a well-recognized disease of birds in the order Passeriformes, which includes common songbirds such as finches and sparrows, caused by infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. Previous research has suggested that some subtypes of S Typhimurium-definitive phage types (DTs) 40, 56 variant, and 160-are host adapted to passerines and that these birds may represent a reservoir of infection for humans and other animals. Here, we have used the whole-genome sequences of 11 isolates from British passerines, five isolates of similar DTs from humans and a domestic cat, and previously published S Typhimurium genomes that include similar DTs from other hosts to investigate the phylogenetic relatedness of passerine salmonellae to other S Typhimurium isolates and investigate possible genetic features of the distinct disease pathogenesis of S Typhimurium in passerines. Our results demonstrate that the 11 passerine isolates and 13 other isolates, including those from nonpasserine hosts, were genetically closely related, with a median pairwise single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) difference of 130 SNPs. These 24 isolates did not carry antimicrobial resistance genetic determinants or the S Typhimurium virulence plasmid. Although our study does not provide evidence of Salmonella transmission from passerines to other hosts, our results are consistent with the hypothesis that wild birds represent a potential reservoir of these Salmonella subtypes, and thus, sensible personal hygiene precautions should be taken when feeding or handling garden birds.

  1. Molecular characterization of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium DT1 isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Lindqvist, N.; Heinikainen, S.; Siitonen, A.; Pelkonen, S.

    2004-01-01

    Salmonella Typhimurium DT1 is endemic to Finland and has caused human outbreaks since the 1960s. Domestic DT1 isolates (n=235) from 1972 to 1999 from human cases, animals and other sources, as well as foreign DT1 isolates from human cases (n=20) were analysed by molecular methods. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) yielded 38 XbaI profiles. Of these, XbaI profile 10 was seen in 49% (125/255) of the isolates. Twelve IS200 profiles were obtained; the most common IS200 profile D was seen in 64% (33/52) of the isolates. Two clusters were formed by compilation of the XhaI-, BlnI- and SpeI-PFGE and IS200 profiles and possession of the serovar-specific virulence plasmid. The major cluster contained eight IS200 profiles, including IS200 profile D and XhaI profile 10, and had no virulence plasmid, and can be regarded as typical of the endemic Typhimurium DT1 infection. PMID:15061501

  2. Inactivation of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium on fresh produce by cold atmospheric gas plasma technology.

    PubMed

    Fernández, A; Noriega, E; Thompson, A

    2013-02-01

    Cold atmospheric gas plasma treatment (CAP) is an alternative approach for the decontamination of fresh and minimally processed food. In this study, the effects of growth phase, growth temperature and chemical treatment regime on the inactivation of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) by Nitrogen CAP were examined. Furthermore, the efficacy of CAP treatment for decontaminating lettuce and strawberry surfaces and potato tissue inoculated with S. Typhimurium was evaluated. It was found that the rate of inactivation of S. Typhimurium was independent of the growth phase, growth temperature and chemical treatment regime. Under optimal conditions, a 2 min treatment resulted in a 2.71 log-reduction of S. Typhimurium viability on membrane filters whereas a 15 min treatment was necessary to achieve 2.72, 1.76 and 0.94 log-reductions of viability on lettuce, strawberry and potato, respectively. We suggest that the differing efficiency of CAP treatment on the inactivation of S. Typhimurium on these different types of fresh foods is a consequence of their surface features. Scanning electron microscopy of the surface structures of contaminated samples of lettuce, strawberry and potato revealed topographical features whereby S. Typhimurium cells could be protected from the active species generated by plasma.

  3. Biochemical and molecular characterization of Salmonella enterica serovar berta, and comparison of methods for typing.

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, J. E.; Brown, D. J.; Baggesen, D. L.; Bisgaard, M.

    1992-01-01

    Strains of Salmonella enterica serovar berta (S. berta) from Denmark and seven other countries have been characterized with the aim of developing a rational typing strategy in connection with outbreak investigations. Biotyping divided the strains into H2S-positive (90%) and H2S-negative (10%) biovars. Six percent of the strains were resistant to one or more antimicrobial agents. Eighty-eight percent of the strains carried plasmids and 52 different plasmid profiles were recognized. Six of the common plasmid sizes in these profiles were shown by restriction enzyme analyses to contain more than one plasmid species. More than 90% of the strains had the same ribotype with the restriction enzymes Sma I and EcoR I and the same whole cell protein profile. Outer membrane protein profiles and isoenzyme profiles were identical in all S. berta analysed. Plasmid profiling in combination with restriction enzyme analysis of plasmids seemed to be the most rational typing strategy for S. berta. The results indicated that S. berta strains regardless of geographical source or host are possibly clonal in nature. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:1582467

  4. Biofilm formation ability of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium acrAB mutants.

    PubMed

    Schlisselberg, Dov B; Kler, Edna; Kisluk, Guy; Shachar, Dina; Yaron, Sima

    2015-10-01

    Recent studies offer contradictory findings about the role of multidrug efflux pumps in bacterial biofilm development. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the involvement of the AcrAB efflux pump in biofilm formation by investigating the ability of AcrB and AcrAB null mutants of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium to produce biofilms. Three models were used to compare the ability of S. Typhimurium wild-type and its mutants to form biofilms: formation of biofilm on polystyrene surfaces; production of biofilm (mat model) on the air/liquid interface; and expression of curli and cellulose on Congo red-supplemented agar plates. All three investigated genotypes formed biofilms with similar characteristics. However, upon exposure to chloramphenicol, formation of biofilms on solid surfaces as well as the production of curli were either reduced or were delayed more significantly in both mutants, whilst there was no visible effect on pellicle formation. It can be concluded that when no selective pressure is applied, S. Typhimurium is able to produce biofilms even when the AcrAB efflux pumps are inactivated, implying that the use of efflux pump inhibitors to prevent biofilm formation is not a general solution and that combined treatments might be more efficient. Other factors that affect the ability to produce biofilms depending on efflux pump activity are yet to be identified.

  5. Salmonella Enterica Serovar Typhimurium BipA Exhibits Two Distinct Ribosome Binding Modes

    SciTech Connect

    deLivron, M.; Robinson, V

    2008-01-01

    BipA is a highly conserved prokaryotic GTPase that functions to influence numerous cellular processes in bacteria. In Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, BipA has been implicated in controlling bacterial motility, modulating attachment and effacement processes, and upregulating the expression of virulence genes and is also responsible for avoidance of host defense mechanisms. In addition, BipA is thought to be involved in bacterial stress responses, such as those associated with virulence, temperature, and symbiosis. Thus, BipA is necessary for securing bacterial survival and successful invasion of the host. Steady-state kinetic analysis and pelleting assays were used to assess the GTPase and ribosome-binding properties of S. enterica BipA. Under normal bacterial growth, BipA associates with the ribosome in the GTP-bound state. However, using sucrose density gradients, we demonstrate that the association of BipA and the ribosome is altered under stress conditions in bacteria similar to those experienced during virulence. The data show that this differential binding is brought about by the presence of ppGpp, an alarmone that signals the onset of stress-related events in bacteria.

  6. Genomic Variability of Serial Human Isolates of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Associated with Prolonged Carriage.

    PubMed

    Octavia, Sophie; Wang, Qinning; Tanaka, Mark M; Sintchenko, Vitali; Lan, Ruiting

    2015-11-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is an important foodborne human pathogen that often causes self-limiting but severe gastroenteritis. Prolonged excretion of S. Typhimurium after the infection can lead to secondary transmissions. However, little is known about within-host genomic variation in bacteria associated with asymptomatic shedding. Genomes of 35 longitudinal isolates of S. Typhimurium recovered from 11 patients (children and adults) with culture-confirmed gastroenteritis were sequenced. There were three or four isolates obtained from each patient. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were analyzed in these isolates, which were recovered between 1 and 279 days after the initial diagnosis. Limited genomic variation (5 SNPs or fewer) was associated with short- and long-term carriage of S. Typhimurium. None of the isolates was shown to be due to reinfection. SNPs occurred randomly, and the majority of the SNPs were nonsynonymous. Two nonsense mutations were observed. A nonsense mutation in flhC rendered the isolate nonmotile, whereas the significance of a nonsense mutation in yihV is unknown. The estimated mutation rate is 1.49 × 10(-6) substitution per site per year. S. Typhimurium isolates excreted in stools following acute gastroenteritis in children and adults demonstrated limited genomic variability over time, regardless of the duration of carriage. These findings have important implications for the detection of possible transmission events suspected by public health genomic surveillance of S. Typhimurium infections.

  7. Interaction of Chlamydia trachomatis serovar L2 with the host autophagic pathway.

    PubMed

    Al-Younes, Hesham M; Brinkmann, Volker; Meyer, Thomas F

    2004-08-01

    Chlamydiae are obligate intracellular pathogens that replicate within a membrane-bound compartment (the inclusion) and are associated with important human diseases, such as trachoma, pneumonia, and atherosclerosis. We have examined the interaction of the host autophagic pathway with Chlamydia trachomatis serovar L2 by using the specific autophagosomal stain monodansylcadaverine, antibodies to autophagosome-associated markers, and traditionally used autophagic inhibitors, particularly 3-methyladenine and amino acids. Chlamydial inclusions did not sequester monodansylcadaverine, suggesting absence of fusion with autophagosomes. Interestingly, exposure of cultures infected for 19 h to 3-methyladenine or single amino acids until the end of infection (44 h) caused various degrees of abnormalities in the inclusion maturation and in the progeny infectivity. Incubation of host cells with chemicals throughout the entire period of infection modulated the growth of Chlamydia even more dramatically. Remarkably, autophagosomal markers MAP-LC3 and calreticulin were redistributed to the inclusion of Chlamydia, a process that appears to be sensitive to 3-methyladenine and some amino acids. The present data indicate the lack of autophagosomal fusion with the inclusion because it was devoid of monodansylcadaverine and no distinct rim of autophagosomal protein-specific staining around the inclusion could be observed. However, high sensitivity of Chlamydia to conditions that could inhibit host autophagic pathway and the close association of MAP-LC3 and calreticulin with the inclusion membrane still suggest a potential role of host autophagy in the pathogenesis of Chlamydia.

  8. MarA and ramA regulate virulence in Salmonella enterica serovar Choleraesuis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jen-Jie; Hsuan, Shih-Ling; Kuo, Chih-Jung; Wu, Ying-Chen; Chen, Ter-Hsin

    2015-12-31

    Salmonella enterica serovar Choleraesuis is considered as an important porcine pathogen that causes serious systemic infections and exhibits poor response to treatment because of an increase in multidrug resistance (MDR). Among the various regulators of resistance, multiple antibiotic resistance factor A (marA) and regulator of acetate metabolism A (ramA) are the most effective in conferring antibiotic tolerance by activation of multidrug efflux pumps. Here we investigated the regulation of virulence in Salmonella Choleraesuis through these two transcriptional regulators. We showed that marA andramA are important for the survival of Salmonella Choleraesuis in an environment of acid and bile salts, since marA- or ramA-deficient Salmonella Choleraesuis strains failed to increase protective responses, as observed by quantitative RT-PCR (qPCR). Further, reduced invasion and survival in host cells was observed in the marA and ramA mutant strains. The results from in vitrostudies with marA- and ramA-deficient strains showed attenuated characteristics in comparison to those in the wild-type strain of Salmonella Choleraesuis when it was used to challenge BALB/c mice. The mutant strains had higher LD50 and presented poor clearance efficiency compared to the parental strain. These findings indicate that MarA and RamA not only regulate drug resistance but also play a role in the virulence of SalmonellaCholeraesuis.

  9. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi and gallbladder cancer: a case-control study and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Koshiol, Jill; Wozniak, Aniela; Cook, Paz; Adaniel, Christina; Acevedo, Johanna; Azócar, Lorena; Hsing, Ann W; Roa, Juan C; Pasetti, Marcela F; Miquel, Juan F; Levine, Myron M; Ferreccio, Catterina

    2016-11-01

    In Chile, where gallbladder cancer (GBC) rates are high and typhoid fever was endemic until the 1990s, we evaluated the association between Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi) antibodies and GBC. We tested 39 GBC cases, 40 gallstone controls, and 39 population-based controls for S. Typhi Vi antibodies and performed culture and quantitative polymerase chain reaction for the subset with bile, gallstone, tissue, and stool samples available. We calculated gender and education-adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association with GBC. We also conducted a meta-analysis of >1000 GBC cases by combining our results with previous studies. GBC cases were more likely to have high Vi antibody titer levels than combined controls (OR: 4.0, 95% CI: 0.9-18.3), although S. Typhi was not recovered from bile, gallstone, tissue, or stool samples. In our meta-analysis, the summary relative risk was 4.6 (95% CI: 3.1-6.8, Pheterogeneity =0.6) for anti-Vi and 5.0 (95% CI: 2.7-9.3, Pheterogeneity  = 0.2) for bile or stool culture. Our results are consistent with the meta-analysis. Despite differences in study methods (e.g., S. Typhi detection assay), most studies found a positive association between S. Typhi and GBC. However, the mechanism underlying this association requires further investigation.

  10. SufC may promote the survival of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Qi, Lin; Xiao, Yan; Wang, Min; Qin, Chenhao; Zhang, Haifang; Sheng, Yongmei; Du, Hong

    2015-08-01

    The sufC gene of Escherichia coli (E. coli) is required for the biogenesis of iron-sulfur (Fe-S) cluster under oxidative stress conditions. In order to investigate the roles of sufC in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi), isogenic S. Typhi strain GIFU10007 harboring a non-polar mutation of sufC (ΔsufC) was constructed and the results showed that the sufC deleted mutant grew more slowly than the wild type strain when encounter oxidative stresses. Moreover, the deletion of sufC gene decreased S. Typhi survival within macrophages. After macrophages infected by sufC deleted mutant and wild type strain, we detected IL-6 and TNF-α released into the supernatant, and found the expression of IL-6 and TNF-α decreased in the supernatant of sufC deleted mutant infected groups than the wild type strain infected ones. In summary, our results showed that SufC may promote S. Typhi coping oxidative stress and help S. Typhi survival in macrophages.

  11. Antimicrobial resistance in Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi isolates from Bangladesh, Indonesia, Taiwan, and Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Chiou, Chien-Shun; Lauderdale, Tsai-Ling; Phung, Dac Cam; Watanabe, Haruo; Kuo, Jung-Che; Wang, Pei-Jen; Liu, Yen-Yi; Liang, Shiu-Yun; Chen, Pei-Chen

    2014-11-01

    We characterized Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi isolates from Bangladesh, Indonesia, Taiwan, and Vietnam to investigate their genetic relatedness and antimicrobial resistance. The isolates from Bangladesh and Vietnam were genetically closely related but were distant from those from Indonesia and Taiwan. All but a few isolates from Indonesia and Taiwan were susceptible to all antimicrobials tested. The majority of isolates from Bangladesh and Vietnam were multidrug resistant (MDR) and belonged to the widespread haplotype H58 clone. IncHI1 plasmids were detected in all MDR S. Typhi isolates from Vietnam but in only 15% of MDR isolates from Bangladesh. Resistance genes in the majority of MDR S. Typhi isolates from Bangladesh should reside in the chromosome. Among the isolates from Bangladesh, 82% and 40% were resistant to various concentrations of nalidixic acid and ciprofloxacin, respectively. Several resistance mechanisms, including alterations in gyrase A, the presence of QnrS, and enhanced efflux pumps, were involved in the reduced susceptibility and resistance to fluoroquinolones. Intensive surveillance is necessary to monitor the spread of chromosome-mediated MDR and fluoroquinolone-resistant S. Typhi emerging in Bangladesh.

  12. Direct ROS Scavenging Activity of CueP from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Bo-Young; Yeom, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Jin-Sik; Um, Si-Hyeon; Jo, Inseong; Lee, Kangseok; Kim, Yong-Hak; Ha, Nam-Chul

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) is an intracellular pathogen that has evolved to survive in the phagosome of macrophages. The periplasmic copper-binding protein CueP was initially known to confer copper resistance to S. Typhimurium. Crystal structure and biochemical studies on CueP revealed a putative copper binding site surrounded by the conserved cysteine and histidine residues. A recent study reported that CueP supplies copper ions to periplasmic Cu, Zn-superoxide dismutase (SodCII) at a low copper concentration and thus enables the sustained SodCII activity in the periplasm. In this study, we investigated the role of CueP in copper resistance at a high copper concentration. We observed that the survival of a cueP-deleted strain of Salmonella in macrophage phagosome was significantly reduced. Subsequent biochemical experiments revealed that CueP specifically mediates the reduction of copper ion using electrons released during the formation of the disulfide bond. We observed that the copper ion-mediated Fenton reaction in the presence of hydrogen peroxide was blocked by CueP. This study provides insight into how CueP confers copper resistance to S. Typhimurium in copper-rich environments such as the phagosome of macrophages. PMID:24598994

  13. Structural and Functional Characterization of Three DsbA Paralogues from Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium*

    PubMed Central

    Heras, Begoña; Totsika, Makrina; Jarrott, Russell; Shouldice, Stephen R.; Gunčar, Gregor; Achard, Maud E. S.; Wells, Timothy J.; Argente, M. Pilar; McEwan, Alastair G.; Schembri, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    In prototypic Escherichia coli K-12 the introduction of disulfide bonds into folding proteins is mediated by the Dsb family of enzymes, primarily through the actions of the highly oxidizing protein EcDsbA. Homologues of the Dsb catalysts are found in most bacteria. Interestingly, pathogens have developed distinct Dsb machineries that play a pivotal role in the biogenesis of virulence factors, hence contributing to their pathogenicity. Salmonella enterica serovar (sv.) Typhimurium encodes an extended number of sulfhydryl oxidases, namely SeDsbA, SeDsbL, and SeSrgA. Here we report a comprehensive analysis of the sv. Typhimurium thiol oxidative system through the structural and functional characterization of the three Salmonella DsbA paralogues. The three proteins share low sequence identity, which results in several unique three-dimensional characteristics, principally in areas involved in substrate binding and disulfide catalysis. Furthermore, the Salmonella DsbA-like proteins also have different redox properties. Whereas functional characterization revealed some degree of redundancy, the properties of SeDsbA, SeDsbL, and SeSrgA and their expression pattern in sv. Typhimurium indicate a diverse role for these enzymes in virulence. PMID:20233716

  14. DNA Adenine Methylation Regulates Virulence Gene Expression in Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium▿

    PubMed Central

    Balbontín, Roberto; Rowley, Gary; Pucciarelli, M. Graciela; López-Garrido, Javier; Wormstone, Yvette; Lucchini, Sacha; García-del Portillo, Francisco; Hinton, Jay C. D.; Casadesús, Josep

    2006-01-01

    Transcriptomic analyses during growth in Luria-Bertani medium were performed in strain SL1344 of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and in two isogenic derivatives lacking Dam methylase. More genes were repressed than were activated by Dam methylation (139 versus 37). Key genes that were differentially regulated by Dam methylation were verified independently. The largest classes of Dam-repressed genes included genes belonging to the SOS regulon, as previously described in Escherichia coli, and genes of the SOS-inducible Salmonella prophages ST64B, Gifsy-1, and Fels-2. Dam-dependent virulence-related genes were also identified. Invasion genes in pathogenicity island SPI-1 were activated by Dam methylation, while the fimbrial operon std was repressed by Dam methylation. Certain flagellar genes were repressed by Dam methylation, and Dam− mutants of S. enterica showed reduced motility. Altered expression patterns in the absence of Dam methylation were also found for the chemotaxis genes cheR (repressed by Dam) and STM3216 (activated by Dam) and for the Braun lipoprotein gene, lppB (activated by Dam). The requirement for DNA adenine methylation in the regulation of specific virulence genes suggests that certain defects of Salmonella Dam− mutants in the mouse model may be caused by altered patterns of gene expression. PMID:16997949

  15. A proposed mouse model to study male infertility provoked by genital serovar E, Chlamydia trachomatis.

    PubMed

    Sellami, Hanen; Gdoura, Radhouane; Mabrouk, Imed; Frikha-Gargouri, Olfa; Keskes, Leila; Mallek, Zohair; Aouni, Mahjoub; Hammami, Adnane

    2011-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is a common sexually transmitted pathogen. The impact of chlamydial infection on male infertility is controversial. The aim of this study was to assess the role of C trachomatis human genital serovar E on sperm function, induction of apoptosis in spermatozoa, and reproductive performance, using the Swiss male mice model. Fertile mice were inoculated in the meatus urethra with 10(6) C trachomatis inclusion-forming units at day 0. The studied parameters were evaluated 7, 15, 21, and 30 days postinoculation (pi) in infected and sham-infected controls. Semen parameters of the infected mice groups were significantly lower than those of the control groups at the different days pi. DNA fragmentation study indicated that the mean percentages of apoptotic spermatozoa in the infected mice groups were significantly higher than those in the control groups 7 and 15 days pi, whereas the mean percentages of necrotic spermatozoa in the infected mice groups were significantly higher than those in the control group on the 30th day pi. A decrease in reproductive performance was observed at different days pi in infected male mice groups when compared to the control groups. Furthermore, a statistically significant decrease in the mean number of infant mice was observed at 21 and 30 days pi. In conclusion, our data showed that inoculation of fertile male Swiss mice in the meatus urethra with C trachomatis could lead to alteration of semen parameters, induction of apoptosis in spermatozoa, and decrease of the reproductive performance of male mice.

  16. Mechanism and Fitness Costs of PR-39 Resistance in Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium LT2 ▿

    PubMed Central

    Pränting, Maria; Negrea, Aurel; Rhen, Mikael; Andersson, Dan I.

    2008-01-01

    PR-39 is a porcine antimicrobial peptide that kills bacteria with a mechanism that does not involve cell lysis. Here, we demonstrate that Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium can rapidly acquire mutations that reduce susceptibility to PR-39. Resistant mutants appeared at a rate of 0.4 × 10−6 per cell per generation. These mutants were about four times more resistant than the wild type and showed a greatly reduced rate of killing. Genetic analysis revealed mutations in the putative transport protein SbmA as being responsible for the observed resistance. These sbmA mutants were as fit as the wild-type parental strain as measured by growth rates in culture medium and mice and by long-term survival in stationary phase. These results suggest that resistance to certain antimicrobial peptides can rapidly develop without an obvious fitness cost for the bacteria and that resistance development could become a threat to the efficacy of antimicrobial peptides if used in a clinical setting. PMID:18519732

  17. Curcumin increases the pathogenicity of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in murine model.

    PubMed

    Marathe, Sandhya A; Ray, Seemun; Chakravortty, Dipshikha

    2010-07-09

    Curcumin has gained immense importance for its vast therapeutic and prophylactic applications. Contrary to this, our study reveals that it regulates the defense pathways of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) to enhance its pathogenicity. In a murine model of typhoid fever, we observed higher bacterial load in Peyer's patches, mesenteric lymph node, spleen and liver, when infected with curcumin-treated Salmonella. Curcumin increased the resistance of S. Typhimurium against antimicrobial agents like antimicrobial peptides, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. This increased tolerance might be attributed to the up-regulation of genes involved in resistance against antimicrobial peptides--pmrD and pmrHFIJKLM and genes with antioxidant function--mntH, sodA and sitA. We implicate that iron chelation property of curcumin have a role in regulating mntH and sitA. Interestingly, we see that the curcumin-mediated modulation of pmr genes is through the PhoPQ regulatory system. Curcumin downregulates SPI1 genes, required for entry into epithelial cells and upregulates SPI2 genes required to intracellular survival. Since it is known that the SPI1 and SPI2 system can be regulated by the PhoPQ system, this common regulator could explain curcumin's mode of action. This data urges us to rethink the indiscriminate use of curcumin especially during Salmonella outbreaks.

  18. Inactivation of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis on shell eggs by pulsed light technology.

    PubMed

    Hierro, Eva; Manzano, Susana; Ordóñez, Juan A; de la Hoz, Lorenzo; Fernández, Manuela

    2009-10-31

    This is a study on the efficacy of pulsed light (PL) technology for the inactivation of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis on shell eggs. In preliminary studies on noble agar, a PL treatment of 0.7 J/cm(2) gave an inactivation of 6.7 log CFU/cm(2). Photoreactivation of Salmonella (0.5-0.7 log CFU/cm(2)) was observed. Different results were obtained in eggs according to the state of the cuticle. When unwashed eggs were pulsed, 24 to 80% of the samples showed the maximum decontamination (3.6 log CFU/egg), depending on the fluence applied. This maximum was not obtained on washed eggs, in which the highest reduction was 1.8 log CFU/egg with a fluence of 12 J/cm(2). PL can be a useful method for egg processing since the integrity of the cuticle is preserved, and requires that the treatment should be applied as soon as possible after laying and on unwashed eggs. As Salmonella has shown the capability of photoreactivation, it is advisable to keep eggs protected from light once they have been pulsed.

  19. Dam methylation is required for efficient biofilm production in Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Aya Castañeda, María del Rosario; Sarnacki, Sebastián Hernán; Noto Llana, Mariángeles; López Guerra, Adriana Gabriela; Giacomodonato, Mónica Nancy; Cerquetti, María Cristina

    2015-01-16

    The ecological success of Salmonella enterica to survive in different environments is due, in part, to the ability to form biofilms, something which is especially important for food industry. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the involvement of Dam methylation in biofilm production in S. Enteritidis strains. The ability to generate biofilms was analyzed in wild type and dam mutant strains. In S. Enteritidis, the absence of Dam affected the capacity to develop pellicles at the air-liquid interface and reduced the ability to form biofilm on polystyrene surfaces. Curli and cellulose production, determined by Congo red and calcofluor assays, were affected in dam mutant strains. Relative quantitative real-time PCR experiments showed that the expression of csgD and csgA genes is reduced in mutants lacking dam gene with respect to the wild type strains, whereas transcript levels of bcsA are not affected in the absence of Dam. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the participation of Dam methylation on biofilm production in Enteritidis or any other serovar of S. enterica. Results presented here suggest that changes in gene expression required for biofilm production are finely regulated by Dam methylation. Thus, Dam methylation could modulate csgD expression and upregulate the expression of factors related with biofilm production, including curli and cellulose. This study contributes to the understanding of biofilm regulation in Salmonella spp. and to the design of new strategies to prevent food contamination and humans and animals infections.

  20. Temperature-Sensitive Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis PT13a Expressing Essential Proteins of Psychrophilic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Duplantis, Barry N.; Puckett, Stephanie M.; Rosey, Everett L.; Ameiss, Keith A.; Hartman, Angela D.; Pearce, Stephanie C.

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic genes based on deduced amino acid sequences of the NAD-dependent DNA ligase (ligA) and CTP synthetase (pyrG) of psychrophilic bacteria were substituted for their native homologues in the genome of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis phage type 13a (PT13a). The resulting strains were rendered temperature sensitive (TS) and did not revert to temperature resistance at a detectable level. At permissive temperatures, TS strains grew like the parental strain in broth medium and in macrophage-like cells, but their growth was slowed or stopped when they were shifted to a restrictive temperature. When injected into BALB/c mice at the base of the tail, representing a cool site of the body, the strains with restrictive temperatures of 37, 38.5, and 39°C persisted for less than 1 day, 4 to 7 days, and 20 to 28 days, respectively. The wild-type strain persisted at the site of inoculation for at least 28 days. The wild-type strain, but not the TS strains, was also found in spleen-plus-liver homogenates within 1 day of inoculation of the tail and was detectable in these organs for at least 28 days. Intramuscular vaccination of White Leghorn chickens with the PT13a strain carrying the psychrophilic pyrG gene provided some protection against colonization of the reproductive tract and induced an anti-S. enterica antibody response. PMID:26187965

  1. Identification and functional analysis of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium PmrA-regulated genes.

    PubMed

    Tamayo, Rita; Prouty, Angela M; Gunn, John S

    2005-02-01

    The PmrA-PmrB two-component regulatory system of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is activated in vivo and plays an important role in resistance to cationic antimicrobial peptides. Resistance is partly mediated by modifications to the lipopolysaccharide. To identify new PmrA-regulated genes, microarray analysis was undertaken comparing cDNA derived from PmrA-constitutive and PmrA-null strains. A combination of RT-PCR and transcriptional analysis confirmed the inclusion of six new loci in the PmrA-PmrB regulon: STM1253, STM1269, STM4118, STM0459, STM3968 and STM4568. These loci did not affect the ability to grow in high iron conditions, the ability to modify lipid A with aminoarabinose, or virulence. STM4118, a putative phosphoethanolamine phosphotransferase, had a minor effect on polymyxin resistance, whereas the remaining genes had no role in polymyxin resistance. Although several of the identified loci lacked the consensus PmrA binding site, PmrA was demonstrated to bind the promoter of a PmrA-activated gene lacking the consensus site. A more complete definition of the PmrA-PmrB regulon will provide a better understanding of its role in host and non-host environments.

  2. Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Exploits Inflammation to Modify Swine Intestinal Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Drumo, Rosanna; Pesciaroli, Michele; Ruggeri, Jessica; Tarantino, Michela; Chirullo, Barbara; Pistoia, Claudia; Petrucci, Paola; Martinelli, Nicola; Moscati, Livia; Manuali, Elisabetta; Pavone, Silvia; Picciolini, Matteo; Ammendola, Serena; Gabai, Gianfranco; Battistoni, Andrea; Pezzotti, Giovanni; Alborali, Giovanni L.; Napolioni, Valerio; Pasquali, Paolo; Magistrali, Chiara F.

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is an important zoonotic gastrointestinal pathogen responsible for foodborne disease worldwide. It is a successful enteric pathogen because it has developed virulence strategies allowing it to survive in a highly inflamed intestinal environment exploiting inflammation to overcome colonization resistance provided by intestinal microbiota. In this study, we used piglets featuring an intact microbiota, which naturally develop gastroenteritis, as model for salmonellosis. We compared the effects on the intestinal microbiota induced by a wild type and an attenuated S. Typhimurium in order to evaluate whether the modifications are correlated with the virulence of the strain. This study showed that Salmonella alters microbiota in a virulence-dependent manner. We found that the wild type S. Typhimurium induced inflammation and a reduction of specific protecting microbiota species (SCFA-producing bacteria) normally involved in providing a barrier against pathogens. Both these effects could contribute to impair colonization resistance, increasing the host susceptibility to wild type S. Typhimurium colonization. In contrast, the attenuated S. Typhimurium, which is characterized by a reduced ability to colonize the intestine, and by a very mild inflammatory response, was unable to successfully sustain competition with the microbiota. PMID:26835435

  3. Assessment of antibiotic resistance phenotype and integrons in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium isolated from swine.

    PubMed

    Rayamajhi, Nabin; Kang, Sang Gyun; Kang, Mi Lan; Lee, Hee Soo; Park, Kyung Yoon; Yoo, Han Sang

    2008-10-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) isolated and identified from swine were subjected for the analysis of antibiotic resistance pattern and clinically important class 1 and 2 integrons. In addition, S. Typhimurium isolates exhibiting ampicillin, chloramphenicol, streptomycin, sulfamethoxazole, tetracycline and florfenicol (ACSSuTF) resistance pattern as described in most Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium definitive type 104 (DT104) were characterized by polymerase chain reaction. All the isolates were resistant to more than four antibiotics and showed the highest resistance to streptomycin (94.1%), followed by tetracycline (90.1%), ampicillin (64.7%), chloramphenicol (56.8%) and gentamicin (54.9%). MIC value for the ten isolates ranged between 0.125-2 mug/ml for ciprofloxacin. Among the beta-lactams used, only one of the isolate exhibited resistance to ceftiofur (MIC 8 microg/ml). Sixty eight percent of these multi drug resistance (MDR) S. Typhimurium isolates carried clinically important class 1 integron with 1kb (aadA) and/or 2kb (dhfrXII-orfF-aadA2) resistance gene cassettes. This study reports the increasing trend of multi drug resistance (MDR) S. Typhimurium with clinically important class 1 integron in pigs. In addition, emergence of the ACSSuTF-type resistance in S. Typhimurium PT other than DT104 may limit the use of resistance gene markers in its detection methods by PCR.

  4. Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Skills To Succeed in the Host: Virulence and Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Fàbrega, Anna

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is a primary enteric pathogen infecting both humans and animals. Infection begins with the ingestion of contaminated food or water so that salmonellae reach the intestinal epithelium and trigger gastrointestinal disease. In some patients the infection spreads upon invasion of the intestinal epithelium, internalization within phagocytes, and subsequent dissemination. In that case, antimicrobial therapy, based on fluoroquinolones and expanded-spectrum cephalosporins as the current drugs of choice, is indicated. To accomplish the pathogenic process, the Salmonella chromosome comprises several virulence mechanisms. The most important virulence genes are those located within the so-called Salmonella pathogenicity islands (SPIs). Thus far, five SPIs have been reported to have a major contribution to pathogenesis. Nonetheless, further virulence traits, such as the pSLT virulence plasmid, adhesins, flagella, and biofilm-related proteins, also contribute to success within the host. Several regulatory mechanisms which synchronize all these elements in order to guarantee bacterial survival have been described. These mechanisms govern the transitions from the different pathogenic stages and drive the pathogen to achieve maximal efficiency inside the host. This review focuses primarily on the virulence armamentarium of this pathogen and the extremely complicated regulatory network controlling its success. PMID:23554419

  5. Stress-induced prophage DNA replication in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Russell, Nathalie; Elrod, Brandon; Dominguez, Katrina

    2009-09-01

    Salmonella Typhimurium, a foodborne pathogen, is the cause of new outbreaks every year. The virulence of new pathogens is determined by their virulence genes, many of them carried on transferable elements, such as prophages. In bacteria harboring multiple prophages such as Salmonella, the reassortment of these genes plays a major role in the emergence of new pathogens and consequently new epidemics. This gene transfer depends on prophage induction and the initiation of the phage lytic cycle. In the present study we have tested the effects of bacterial extracytoplasmic stress on prophage induction. We developed a quantitative real-time PCR assay to quantify variations in phage genes copy number, representative of phage DNA replication associated with the initiation of the lytic cycle. The induction of the four Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium LT2 prophages (Fels-1, Fels-2, Gifsy-1 and Gifsy-2) was measured during exponential growth, stationary phase, starvation, as well as after treatment with Mitomycin C, Ampicillin or heat. Our results show that the four prophages respond differently to each treatment. Gifsy-2 showed constant low level of induction independently of the extracytoplasmic stress, Fels-1 was strongly induced after DNA damage, Fels-2 showed spontaneous induction only during optimal bacterial growth, and Gifsy-1 was repressed in all conditions. These findings show that the transfer of virulence genes can respond to and depend on variations of the bacterial surrounding conditions, and help to explain the appearance of new Salmonella outbreaks.

  6. Spatial Segregation of Virulence Gene Expression during Acute Enteric Infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Laughlin, Richard C.; Knodler, Leigh A.; Barhoumi, Roula; Payne, H. Ross; Wu, Jing; Gomez, Gabriel; Pugh, Roberta; Lawhon, Sara D.; Bäumler, Andreas J.; Steele-Mortimer, Olivia; Adams, L. Garry

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT To establish a replicative niche during its infectious cycle between the intestinal lumen and tissue, the enteric pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium requires numerous virulence genes, including genes for two type III secretion systems (T3SS) and their cognate effectors. To better understand the host-pathogen relationship, including early infection dynamics and induction kinetics of the bacterial virulence program in the context of a natural host, we monitored the subcellular localization and temporal expression of T3SS-1 and T3SS-2 using fluorescent single-cell reporters in a bovine, ligated ileal loop model of infection. We observed that the majority of bacteria at 2 h postinfection are flagellated, express T3SS-1 but not T3SS-2, and are associated with the epithelium or with extruding enterocytes. In epithelial cells, S. Typhimurium cells were surrounded by intact vacuolar membranes or present within membrane-compromised vacuoles that typically contained numerous vesicular structures. By 8 h postinfection, T3SS-2-expressing bacteria were detected in the lamina propria and in the underlying mucosa, while T3SS-1-expressing bacteria were in the lumen. Our work identifies for the first time the temporal and spatial regulation of T3SS-1 and -2 expression during an enteric infection in a natural host and provides further support for the concept of cytosolic S. Typhimurium in extruding epithelium as a mechanism for reseeding the lumen. PMID:24496791

  7. Letter to the Editor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We would like to express several concerns regarding the article “Efficacy of vaccination of cattle with the Leptospira interrogans serovar Hardjo type hardjoprajitno component of a pentavalent Leptospira bacterin against experimental challenge with Leptospira borgpetersenii serovar Hardjo type hardj...

  8. Three cases of canine leptospirosis in Quebec.

    PubMed Central

    Kalin, M; Devaux, C; DiFruscia, R; Lemay, S; Higgins, R

    1999-01-01

    Three dogs from different locations with acute renal failure were hospitalized in autumn 1996 and 1997. Leptospira interrogans serovar pomona was detected by the microscopic agglutination test. All dogs recovered after antibiotic treatment. The importance of the development of vaccines adapted to emerging serovars in dogs should be addressed. PMID:10086220

  9. Leptospirosis in raccoons in Quebec: 2 case reports and seroprevalence in a recreational area.

    PubMed Central

    Mikaelian, I; Higgins, R; Lequient, M; Major, M; Lefebvre, F; Martineau, D

    1997-01-01

    Raccoons may represent a source of leptospires for humans and domestic animals. We describe a case of severe interstitial nephritis associated with the serovar bratislava of Leptospira interrogans (1st report in wildlife), and the seroprevalence to 4 leptospire serovars in a recreational area in Quebec. Images Figure 1. p442-a PMID:9220134

  10. Serological studies of British leptospiral isolates of the Sejroe serogroup. III. The distribution of leptospires of the Sejroe serogroup in the British Isles.

    PubMed Central

    Little, T. W.; Stevens, A. E.; Hathaway, S. C.

    1987-01-01

    Some 94 strains of leptospires belonging to the Sejroe serogroup isolated in the British Isles were identified to the serovar level using specific factor sera. Seventy strains were identified as Leptospira interrogans serovar hardjo, 66 from cattle, 2 from pigs and 1 each from a sheep foetus and a human. Twenty-four strains were identified as L. interrogans serovar saxkoebing, most strains were isolated from either wood mice, bank or field voles but strains were also isolated from badgers, a fox and a dog. PMID:3609169

  11. Differentiation of Salmonella enterica serovars and strains in cultures and food using infrared spectroscopic and microspectroscopic techniques combined with soft independent modeling of class analogy pattern recognition analysis.

    PubMed

    Männig, Annegret; Baldauf, Nathan A; Rodriguez-Romo, Luis A; Yousef, Ahmed E; Rodríguez-Saona, Luis E

    2008-11-01

    Detection of pathogenic microorganisms in food is often a tedious and time-consuming exercise. Developing rapid and cost-effective techniques for identifying pathogens to subspecies is critical for tracking causes of foodborne disease outbreaks. The objective of this study was to develop a method for rapid identification and differentiation of Salmonella serovars and strains within these serovars through isolation on hydrophobic grid membrane filters (HGMFs), examination by infrared (IR) spectroscopy and microspectroscopy, and data analysis by multivariate statistical techniques. Salmonella serovars (Anatum, Enteritidis, Heidelberg, Kentucky, Muenchen, and Typhimurium), most of which were represented by multiple strains, were grown in tryptic soy broth (24 h at 42 degrees C), diluted to 10(2) to 10(3) CFU/ml, and filtered using HGMFs. The membranes were incubated on Miller-Mallinson agar (24 h at 42 degrees C), and typical Salmonella colonies were sonicated in 50% acetonitrile and centrifuged. Resulting pellets were vacuum dried on a ZnSe crystal and analyzed using IR spectroscopy. Alternatively, the membranes containing Salmonella growth were removed from the agar, vacuum dried, and colonies were analyzed directly by IR microspectroscopy. Soft independent modeling of class analogy (SIMCA) models were developed from spectra. The method was validated by analyzing Salmonella-inoculated tomato juice, eggs, milk, and chicken. Salmonella serovars exhibited distinctive and reproducible spectra in the fingerprint region (1,200 to 900 cm(-1)) of the IR spectrum. SIMCA permitted distinguishing Salmonella strains from each other through differences in bacterial lipopolysaccharides and other membrane components. The model correctly predicted Salmonella in foods at serovar (100%) and strain (90%) levels. Isolation of Salmonella on HGMF and selective agar followed by IR spectroscopic analysis resulted in rapid and efficient isolation, identification, and differentiation of

  12. A comparative study on invasion, survival, modulation of oxidative burst, and nitric oxide responses of macrophages (HD11), and systemic infection in chickens by prevalent poultry Salmonella serovars.

    PubMed

    He, Haiqi; Genovese, Kenneth J; Swaggerty, Christina L; Nisbet, David J; Kogut, Michael H

    2012-12-01

    Poultry is a major reservoir for foodborne Salmonella serovars. Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Enteritidis, Salmonella Heidelberg, Salmonella Kentucky, and Salmonella Senftenberg are the most prevalent serovars in U.S. poultry. Information concerning the interactions between different Salmonella species and host cells in poultry is lacking. In the present study, the above mentioned Salmonella serovars were examined for invasion, intracellular survival, and their ability to modulate oxidative burst and nitric oxide (NO) responses in chicken macrophage HD11 cells. All Salmonella serovars demonstrated similar capacity to invade HD11 cells. At 24 h post-infection, a 36-43% reduction of intracellular bacteria, in log(10)(CFU), was observed for Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Heidelberg, Salmonella Kentucky, and Salmonella Senftenberg, whereas a significantly lower reduction (16%) was observed for Salmonella Enteritidis, indicating its higher resistance to the killing by HD11 cells. Production of NO was completely diminished in HD11 cells infected with Salmonella Typhimurium and Salmonella Enteritidis, but remained intact when infected with Salmonella Heidelberg, Salmonella Kentucky, and Salmonella Senftenberg. Phorbol myristate acetate-stimulated oxidative burst in HD11 cells was greatly impaired after infection by each of the five serovars. When newly hatched chickens were challenged orally, a high rate (86-98%) of systemic infection (Salmonella positive in liver/spleen) was observed in birds challenged with Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Enteritidis, Salmonella Heidelberg, and Salmonella Kentucky, while only 14% of the birds were Salmonella Senftenberg positive. However, there was no direct correlation between systemic infection and in vitro differential intracellular survival and modulation of NO response among the tested serovars.

  13. Multiplication and motility of Salmonella enterica serovars enteritidis, infantis, and montevideo in in vitro contamination models of eggs.

    PubMed

    Murase, Toshiyuki; Fujimoto, Kazuhiko; Nakayama, Rui; Otsuki, Koichi

    2006-05-01

    The invasive ability of Salmonella enterica serovars Enteritidis, Infantis, and Montevideo in eggs was examined. Strains of these serovars originating from egg contents, laying chicken houses, and human patients were experimentally inoculated (0.1-ml dose containing 78 to 178 cells) onto the vitelline membrane of eggs collected from specific-pathogen-free chickens and incubated at 25 degrees C. The test strains were detected in 25 of 138 yolk contents by day 6, indicating the penetration of Salmonella organisms through the vitelline membrane. There were no significant differences in overall rates of penetration between serovars. The organisms were also detected in the albumen from 125 of 138 eggs tested by day 6. Growth to more than 10(6) CFU/ml was observed in 48 of the 125 albumen samples. An inoculum of 1000 Salmonella cells was added to 15 ml of albumen at the edge of a petri plate. A 10-mm-diameter cylindrical well, the bottom of which was sealed with a polycarbonate membrane with 3.0-microm pores, was filled with egg yolk and placed into the albumen at the center of the dish, which was maintained at 25 degrees C. Experiments were performed in triplicate with each strain. Salmonella organisms in all the albumen samples were detected by day 11. However, motility of the organisms toward the yolk was observed in only two dishes inoculated with the Salmonella Enteritidis strain from a human patient and in one dish inoculated with the Salmonella Infantis strain from liquid egg. The albumen samples obtained from the dishes inoculated with the Salmonella Enteritidis strain had high numbers of bacteria (>10(8) CFU/ml). The present study suggests that Salmonella organisms in egg albumen are unlikely to actively move toward the yolk, although depositionon or near the vitelline membrane can be advantageous for proliferation.

  14. Development and Evaluation of a Multiplex Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction Procedure to Clinically Type Prevalent Salmonella enterica Serovars

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Nélida; Diaz-Osorio, Miguel; Moreno, Jaime; Sánchez-Jiménez, Miryan; Cardona-Castro, Nora

    2010-01-01

    A multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction procedure was developed to identify the most prevalent clinical isolates of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica. Genes from the rfb, fliC, fljB, and viaB groups that encode the O, H, and Vi antigens were used to design 15 primer pairs and TaqMan probes specific for the genes rfbJ, wzx, fliC, fljB, wcdB, the sdf-l sequence, and invA, which was used as an internal amplification control. The primers and probes were variously combined into six sets. The first round of reactions used two of these sets to detect Salmonella O:4, O:9, O:7, O:8, and O:3,10 serogroups. Once the serogroups were identified, the results of a second round of reactions that used primers and probes for the flagellar antigen l genes, 1,2; e,h; g,m; d; e,n,x; and z10, and the Vi gene were used to identify individual serovars. The procedure was standardized using 18 Salmonella reference strains and other enterobacteria. The procedure's reliability and sensitivity was evaluated using 267 randomly chosen serotyped Salmonella clinical isolates. The procedure had a sensitivity of 95.5% and was 100% specific. Thus, our technique is a quick, sensitive, reliable, and specific means of identifying S. enterica serovars and can be used in conjunction with traditional serotyping. Other primer and probe combinations could be used to increase the number of identifiable serovars. PMID:20110454

  15. Constitutive Expression of the Vi Polysaccharide Capsular Antigen in Attenuated Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi Oral Vaccine Strain CVD 909

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jin Yuan; Noriega, Fernando R.; Galen, James E.; Barry, Eileen; Levine, Myron M.

    2000-01-01

    Live oral Ty21a and parenteral Vi polysaccharide vaccines provide significant protection against typhoid fever, albeit by distinct immune mechanisms. Vi stimulates serum immunoglobulin G Vi antibodies, whereas Ty21a, which does not express Vi, elicits humoral and cell-mediated immune responses other than Vi antibodies. Protection may be enhanced if serum Vi antibody as well as cell-mediated and humoral responses can be stimulated. Disappointingly, several new attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi oral vaccines (e.g., CVD 908-htrA and Ty800) that elicit serum O and H antibody and cell-mediated responses following a single dose do not stimulate serum Vi antibody. Vi expression is regulated in response to environmental signals such as osmolarity by controlling the transcription of tviA in the viaB locus. To investigate if Vi antibodies can be stimulated if Vi expression is rendered constitutive, we replaced PtviA in serovar Typhi vaccine CVD 908-htrA with the constitutive promoter Ptac, resulting in CVD 909. CVD 909 expresses Vi even under high-osmolarity conditions and is less invasive for Henle 407 cells. In mice immunized with a single intranasal dose, CVD 909 was more immunogenic than CVD 908-htrA in eliciting serum Vi antibodies (geometric mean titer of 160 versus 49, P = 0.0007), whereas O antibody responses were virtually identical (geometric mean titer of 87 versus 80). In mice challenged intraperitoneally with wild-type serovar Typhi 4 weeks after a single intranasal immunization, the mortality of those immunized with CVD 909 (3 of 8) was significantly lower than that of control mice (10 of 10, P = 0.043) or mice given CVD 908-htrA (9 of 10, P = 0.0065). PMID:10899868

  16. Genomic diversity and adaptation of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium from analysis of six genomes of different phage types

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (or simply Typhimurium) is the most common serovar in both human infections and farm animals in Australia and many other countries. Typhimurium is a broad host range serovar but has also evolved into host-adapted variants (i.e. isolated from a particular host such as pigeons). Six Typhimurium strains of different phage types (defined by patterns of susceptibility to lysis by a set of bacteriophages) were analysed using Illumina high-throughput genome sequencing. Results Variations between strains were mainly due to single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with an average of 611 SNPs per strain, ranging from 391 SNPs to 922 SNPs. There were seven insertions/deletions (indels) involving whole or partial gene deletions, four inactivation events due to IS200 insertion and 15 pseudogenes due to early termination. Four of these inactivated or deleted genes may be virulence related. Nine prophage or prophage remnants were identified in the six strains. Gifsy-1, Gifsy-2 and the sopE2 and sspH2 phage remnants were present in all six genomes while Fels-1, Fels-2, ST64B, ST104 and CP4-57 were variably present. Four strains carried the 90-kb plasmid pSLT which contains several known virulence genes. However, two strains were found to lack the plasmid. In addition, one strain had a novel plasmid similar to Typhi strain CT18 plasmid pHCM2. Conclusion The genome data suggest that variations between strains were mainly due to accumulation of SNPs, some of which resulted in gene inactivation. Unique genetic elements that were common between host-adapted phage types were not found. This study advanced our understanding on the evolution and adaptation of Typhimurium at genomic level. PMID:24138507

  17. Serovar, pathogenicity and antimicrobial susceptibility of erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae isolates from farmed wild boars (Sus scrofa) affected with septicemic erysipelas in Japan.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, K; Kijima, M; Takahashi, T; Yoshimura, H; Tani, O; Kojyou, T; Yamawaki, Y; Tanimoto, T

    1999-12-01

    Six strains of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae were isolated from farmed wild boars with acute septicemic erysipelas during the period from 1983 to 1998 in Japan. All isolates belonged to serovar 1a or 2 (predominant serovars in swine). The 50 per cent lethal dose values of those isolates ranged from 10(1.3)to 10(6.2)colony forming units in mice. In swine, all isolates were virulent, capable of inducing localized or generalized urticarial lesions after intradermal inoculation. All of the isolates were resistant to oxytetracycline and/or dihydrostreptomycin. These observations suggest that E. rhusiopathiae strains isolated from wild boars may have aetiological significance in swine erysipelas.

  18. Complete genome sequence of Bacillus thuringiensis serovar galleriae strain HD-29, a typical strain of commercial biopesticide.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lei; Tian, Long-Jun; Zheng, Jinshui; Gao, Qiu-Ling; Wang, Yue-Ying; Peng, Dong-Hai; Ruan, Li-Fang; Sun, Ming

    2015-02-10

    Bacillus thuringiensis serovar galleriae is highly toxic to Lepidoptera insect pests, and has been widely used as Bt biopesticide in many countries. Here we reported the complete genome of strain HD-29, a standard serotype strain in galleriae serovariety. More than previous work reported, it harbors ten plasmids, and three large ones carry eight insecticidal protein genes (cry1Aa, cry1Ac, cry1Ca, cry1Da, cry1Ia, cry2Ab, cry9Ea and vip3Aa) and an intact zwittermicin A biosynthetic gene cluster.

  19. Intragastric immunization with recombinant Lactobacillus casei expressing flagellar antigen confers antibody-independent protective immunity against Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Kajikawa, Akinobu; Satoh, Eiichi; Leer, Rob J; Yamamoto, Shigeki; Igimi, Shizunobu

    2007-05-04

    A recombinant Lactobacillus casei expressing a flagellar antigen from Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis was constructed and evaluated as a mucosal vaccine. Intragastric immunization of the recombinant strain conferred protective immunity against Salmonella infection in mice. This immunization did not result in antigen-specific antibody in either feces or sera but induced the release of IFN-gamma on restimulation of primed lymphocytes ex vivo. The results suggested that the protective efficacy provided by flagellin-expressing L. casei is mainly attributable to cell-mediated immune responses. In addition, an adjuvant-type effect of the antigen delivery system with L. casei was also observed.

  20. Salmonella enterica serovar Gallinarum: addressing fundamental questions in bacteriology sixty years on from the 9R vaccine.

    PubMed

    Wigley, Paul

    2017-04-01

    Sixty years on from Smith's seminal work on Fowl Typhoid vaccines, there is renewed interest in experimental avian salmonellosis and in particular the use of Salmonella enterica serovar Gallinarum as a tool to understand key features of bacterial evolution and host adaptation. In this short review we outline some of the recent advances in avian salmonellosis research that have coupled both the power of whole genome analysis and new tools to understand the host response to existing experimental infection models. These approaches are underpinning a fundamental understanding of Salmonella biology relevant to both the chicken and other avian and mammalian species.

  1. Unique lipid anchor attaches Vi antigen capsule to the surface of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi

    PubMed Central

    Liston, Sean D.; Ovchinnikova, Olga G.

    2016-01-01

    Polysaccharide capsules are surface structures that are critical for the virulence of many Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi is the etiological agent of typhoid fever. It produces a capsular polysaccharide known as “Vi antigen,” which is composed of nonstoichiometrically O-acetylated α-1,4-linked N-acetylgalactosaminuronic acid residues. This glycan is a component of currently available vaccines. The genetic locus for Vi antigen production is also present in soil bacteria belonging to the genus Achromobacter. Vi antigen assembly follows a widespread general strategy with a characteristic glycan export step involving an ATP-binding cassette transporter. However, Vi antigen producers lack the enzymes that build the conserved terminal glycolipid characterizing other capsules using this method. Achromobacter species possess a Vi antigen-specific depolymerase enzyme missing in S. enterica Typhi, and we exploited this enzyme to isolate acylated Vi antigen termini. Mass spectrometry analysis revealed a reducing terminal N-acetylhexosamine residue modified with two β-hydroxyl acyl chains. This terminal structure resembles one half of lipid A, the hydrophobic portion of bacterial lipopolysaccharides. The VexE protein encoded in the Vi antigen biosynthesis locus shares similarity with LpxL, an acyltransferase from lipid A biosynthesis. In the absence of VexE, Vi antigen is produced, but its physical properties are altered, its export is impaired, and a Vi capsule structure is not assembled on the cell surface. The structure of the lipidated terminus dictates a unique assembly mechanism and has potential implications in pathogenesis and vaccine production. PMID:27226298

  2. Effect of essential oil compound on shedding and colonization of Salmonella enterica serovar Heidelberg in broilers.

    PubMed

    Alali, W Q; Hofacre, C L; Mathis, G F; Faltys, G

    2013-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the effect of an essential oil blend (EO; carvacrol, thymol, eucalyptol, lemon) administered in drinking water on the performance, mortality, water consumption, pH of crop and ceca, and Salmonella enterica serovar Heidelberg fecal shedding and colonization in broiler birds following Salmonella Heidelberg challenge and feed withdrawal. Chicks were randomly assigned to water treatments containing 0.05, 0.025, or 0.0125% EO or untreated controls. Treatments were administered in drinking water on 0 to 7 and 35 to 42 d. One-half of the chicks were challenged with Salmonella Heidelberg and placed in pens with unchallenged chicks on d 1. Performance, mortality, water consumption, and pH were determined during the 42-d study. Prevalence of Salmonella Heidelberg was determined on drag swabs (0, 14, and 42 d) and in the ceca and crops (42 d). The 0.05% EO administered in drinking water significantly (P < 0.05) reduced Salmonella Heidelberg colonization in crops of challenged birds, significantly lowered the feed conversion ratio, and increased weight gain compared with controls. The 0.025% and 0.015% EO in drinking water significantly lowered the feed conversion ratio and increased weight gain compared with controls, but did not significantly reduce Salmonella Heidelberg colonization in the crops. The EO in drinking water did not significantly reduce Salmonella Heidelberg colonization in ceca or fecal shedding in broilers. The EO used in the study may control Salmonella Heidelberg contamination in crops of broilers when administered in drinking water and therefore may reduce the potential for cross-contamination of the carcass when the birds are processed.

  3. Genetic Characterization of the Galactitol Utilization Pathway of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Nolle, Nicoletta; Felsl, Angela; Heermann, Ralf; Fuchs, Thilo M

    2017-02-15

    Galactitol degradation by salmonellae remains underinvestigated, although this metabolic capability contributes to growth in animals (R. R. Chaudhuri et al., PLoS Genet 9:e1003456, 2013, https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pgen.1003456). The genes responsible for this metabolic capability are part of a 9.6-kb gene cluster that spans from gatY to gatR (STM3253 to STM3262) and encodes a phosphotransferase system, four enzymes, and a transporter of the major facilitator superfamily. Genome comparison revealed the presence of this genetic determinant in nearly all Salmonella strains. The generation time of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain ST4/74 was higher in minimal medium with galactitol than with glucose. Knockout of STM3254 and gatC resulted in a growth-deficient phenotype of S Typhimurium, with galactitol as the sole carbon source. Partial deletion of gatR strongly reduced the lag phase of growth with galactitol, whereas strains overproducing GatR exhibited a near-zero growth phenotype. Luciferase reporter assays demonstrated strong induction of the gatY and gatZ promoters, which control all genes of this cluster except gatR, in the presence of galactitol but not glucose. Purified GatR bound to these two main gat gene cluster promoters as well as to its own promoter, demonstrating that this autoregulated repressor controls galactitol degradation. Surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy revealed distinct binding properties of GatR toward the three promoters, resulting in a model of differential gat gene expression. The cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) bound these promoters with similarly high affinities, and a mutant lacking crp showed severe growth attenuation, demonstrating that galactitol utilization is subject to catabolite repression. Here, we provide the first genetic characterization of galactitol degradation in Salmonella, revealing novel insights into the regulation of this dissimilatory pathway.

  4. Isolation of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis in blue-fronted Amazon parrot (Amazona aestiva).

    PubMed

    Marietto-Gonçalves, Guilherme Augusto; de Almeida, Sílvia Maria; de Lima, Edna Tereza; Okamoto, Adriano Sakai; Pinczowski, Pedro; Andreatti Filho, Raphael Lucio

    2010-03-01

    Avian salmonellosis is a disease caused by bacteria of the genus Salmonella that can cause three distinct diseases in birds: pullorum diseases, fowl typhoid, and paratyphoid infection. Various wildlife species are susceptible to infections by Salmonella, regardless of whether they live in captivity or freely in the wild. The present study verified the presence of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis in three captive specimens of Amazona aestiva. The study involved a total of 103 birds undergoing rehabilitation to prepare for living in the wild, after having been captured from animal traffickers and delivered to the Centrofauna Project of the Floravida Institute in Sao Paulo, Brazil. This is the first report of Salmonella Enteritidis isolation in A. aestiva that originated from capture associated with animal trafficking; Salmonella was detected during the study by the serologic method of rapid serum agglutination on a plate with bacterial isolate. The antimicrobial profile exam of the isolated samples demonstrated sensitivity to ampicillin, cefaclor, ciprofloxacin, and cloranfenicol. The three samples also presented resistance to more than four antibiotics. The presence of the genes invA and spvC was verified by PCR technique and was associated with virulence and absence of class 1 integron, a gene related to antimicrobial resistance. The commercial antigen for pullorum disease was shown to be a useful tool for rapid detection in the screening of Salmonella of serogroup D1 in Psittaciformes. New studies on Salmonella carriage in birds involved in trafficking must be performed to better understand their participation in the epidemiologic cycle of salmonellosis in humans and other animals.

  5. Characterization of quinolone resistance in Salmonella enterica serovar Indiana from chickens in China.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yan; Zhao, Hongyu; Liu, Yuqi; Zhou, Xuping; Wang, Jinyuan; Liu, Tiantian; Beier, Ross C; Hou, Xiaolin

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the quinolone resistance of Salmonella enterica serovar Indiana isolated from chickens in China. A total of 293 Salmonella strains were isolated from chicken farms and slaughterhouses in Shandong province of China, and 130 (44.4%) were characterized as Salmonella enterica Indiana (chicken farms, n=52 strains; slaughter houses, n=78 strains). All isolate serotypes were tested with the Kauffmann-White classification system and examined for susceptibility to the quinolones: nalidixic acid, enrofloxacin, norfloxacin, and ciprofloxacin. The resistance of the Salmonella Indiana strains to nalidixic acid, enrofloxacin, norfloxacin, and ciprofloxacin were 100, 73.1, 71.2, and 82.7%, and 100, 59.0, 79.5, and 80.2%, respectively. Selected quinolone resistant strains were evaluated for mutations in genes (gyrA, gyrB, parC, and marA) by DNA sequencing. The gyrA mutation was found in all isolates, the parC mutation was only found in some isolates, and the gyrB and marA mutations were not observed. Quinolone resistance was evaluated in the representative isolates by screening for the quinolone resistance determinants, qnrA, qnrB, qnrS, qepA, and aac (6 ')-Ib-cr using PCR technology. The quinolone resistance determinants in Salmonella, qnrA, qnrB, qnrS, and qepA were negative by PCR, but aac(6 ')-Ib-cr had high detection rates of 90.4 and 96.2% in chicken farms and slaughterhouses, respectively. Salmonella Indiana containing the gyrA mutation was prevalent in farms and slaughterhouses and possessed a high frequency of the quinolone resistance determinant aac(6 ')-Ib-cr. These bacteria may have originated from the same source.

  6. Natural surface coating to inactivate Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and maintain quality of cherry tomatoes.

    PubMed

    Yun, Juan; Fan, Xuetong; Li, Xihong; Jin, Tony Z; Jia, Xiaoyu; Mattheis, James P

    2015-01-16

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the effectiveness of zein-based coatings in reducing populations of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and preserving quality of cherry tomatoes. Tomatoes were inoculated with a cocktail of S. Typhimurium LT2 plus three attenuated strains on the smooth skin surface and stem scar area. The zein-based coatings with and without cinnamon (up to 20%) and mustard essential oil or a commercial wax formulation were applied onto tomatoes and the treated fruits were stored at 10 °C for up to 3 weeks. Populations of S. Typhimurium decreased with increased essential oil concentration and storage duration. S. Typhimurium populations on the smooth skin surface were reduced by 4.6 and 2.8 log colony forming units(CFU)/g by the zein coatings with 20% cinnamon and 20% mustard oil, respectively, 5h after coating. The same coating reduced populations of S. Typhimurium to levels below detection limit (1.0 log CFU/g) on the stem scar area of tomato during 7 days of storage at 10 °C. Salmonella populations were not reduced on fruit coated with the commercial wax. All of the coatings resulted in reduced weight loss compared with uncoated control. Compared with the control, loss of firmness and ascorbic acid during storage was prevented by all of the coatings except the zein coating with 20% mustard oil which enhanced softening. Color was not consistently affected by any of the coating treatments during 21 days of storage at 10°C. The results suggest that the zein-based coating containing cinnamon oil might be used to enhance microbial safety and quality of tomato.

  7. RpoE is a Putative Antibiotic Resistance Regulator of Salmonella enteric Serovar Typhi.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiaofang; Zhang, Haifang; Zheng, Yi; Li, Aiqing; Wang, Min; Zhou, Huiqin; Zhu, Xueming; Schneider, Zachary; Chen, Liang; Kreiswirth, Barry N; Du, Hong

    2016-04-01

    Bacterial antimicrobial resistance has been associated with the up regulation of genes encoding efflux pumps and the down regulation of genes encoding outer membrane proteins (OMPs). Gene expression in bacteria is primarily initiated by sigma factors (σ factors) such as RpoE, which plays an important role in responding to many environmental stresses. Here, we report the first observation that RpoE serves as an antibiotic resistance regulator in Salmonella enteric serovar Typhi (S. Typhi). In this study, we found that the rpoE mutant (ΔrpoE) of S. Typhi GIFU10007 has elevated resistance to several antimicrobial agents, including β-lactams, quinolones, and aminoglycosides. Genomic DNA microarray analysis was used to investigate the differential gene expression profiles between a wild type and rpoE mutant in response to ampicillin. The results showed that a total of 57 genes displayed differential expression (two-fold increase or decrease) in ΔrpoE versus the wild-type strain. The expressions of two outer membrane protein genes, ompF and ompC, were significantly down-regulated in ΔrpoE (six and seven-fold lower in comparison to wild-type strain) and RamA, a member of the efflux pump AraC/XylS family, was up-regulated about four-fold in the ΔrpoE. Our results suggest RpoE is a potential antimicrobial regulator in S. Typhi, controlling both the down regulation of the OMP genes and up-regulating the efflux system.

  8. Unique lipid anchor attaches Vi antigen capsule to the surface of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi.

    PubMed

    Liston, Sean D; Ovchinnikova, Olga G; Whitfield, Chris

    2016-06-14

    Polysaccharide capsules are surface structures that are critical for the virulence of many Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi is the etiological agent of typhoid fever. It produces a capsular polysaccharide known as "Vi antigen," which is composed of nonstoichiometrically O-acetylated α-1,4-linked N-acetylgalactosaminuronic acid residues. This glycan is a component of currently available vaccines. The genetic locus for Vi antigen production is also present in soil bacteria belonging to the genus Achromobacter Vi antigen assembly follows a widespread general strategy with a characteristic glycan export step involving an ATP-binding cassette transporter. However, Vi antigen producers lack