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Sample records for interspecies nuclear transfer

  1. Cloning Endangered Felids by Interspecies Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Martha C; Pope, C Earle

    2015-01-01

    In 2003, the first wild felid was produced by interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer. Since then other wild felid clone offspring have been produced by using the same technique with minor modifications. This chapter describes detailed protocols used in our laboratory for (1) the isolation, culture, and preparation of fibroblast cells as donor nucleus, and (2) embryo reconstruction with domestic cat enucleated oocytes to produce cloned embryos that develop to the blastocyst stage in vitro and, after transfer into synchronized recipients, establish successful pregnancies.

  2. In vitro development of bison embryos using interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Seaby, R P; Alexander, B; King, W A; Mastromonaco, G F

    2013-12-01

    Interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer (interspecies SCNT) has been explored in many domestic and non-domestic animal species. However, problems arise during the development of these embryos, which may be related to species-specific differences in nuclear-cytoplasmic communication. The objectives of this study were to investigate the possibility of producing bison embryos in vitro using interspecies SCNT and assess the developmental potential of these embryos. Treatment groups consisted of cattle in vitro fertilization (IVF) and cattle SCNT as controls and wood bison SCNT, plains bison SCNT and wisent SCNT as experimental groups. Cleavage and blastocyst rates were assessed, and blastocyst quality was determined using total cell number, apoptotic incidence and relative quantification of mitochondria-related genes NRF1, MT-CYB and TFAM. These results indicate that embryos can be produced by interspecies SCNT in all bison species/subspecies (13.34-33.54% blastocyst rates). Although increased incidence of apoptosis was observed in bison SCNT blastocysts compared to cattle SCNT controls (10.45-12.69 vs 8.76, respectively) that corresponded with significantly lower cell numbers (80-87 cells vs >100 cells, respectively), no major differences were observed in the expression of NRF1, MT-CYB and TFAM. This study is the first to report the production of bison embryos by interspecies SCNT. Blastocyst development in all three bison species/subspecies was greater than the rates obtained in previous studies by IVF, which supports the potential role of SCNT for in vitro embryo production in this species. Yet, further investigation of developmental competence and the factors influencing blastocyst quality and viability is required.

  3. Development of interspecies nuclear transfer embryos reconstructed with argali (Ovis ammon) somatic cells and sheep ooplasm.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Yanli; Guo, Zhiqin; Wang, Feng

    2014-02-01

    Interspecies nuclear transfer has already achieved success in several species, which shows great potential in recovery and conservation of endangered animals. The study was conducted to establish an efficient system for in vitro argali (Ovis ammon)-sheep embryo reconstruction via interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer (iSCNT). The competence of domestic sheep cytoplasts to reprogram the adult argali fibroblast nuclei was evaluated, and the effects of enucleation methods and donor cell passage and cell state on the in vitro development of argali-sheep cloned embryos were also examined. Sheep oocytes could support argali and sheep fibroblast cell nuclei transfer and develop to blastocysts in vitro. Oocytes matured for 21–23 h and enucleated by chemically assisted enucleation (CAE) had a higher enucleation rate than blind enucleation (BE), but the development rate of iSCNTembryos was the same (P>0.05). Moreover, passage numbers of fibroblast cells <10, as well as the cell cycle stages did not affect the development rate of iSCNT reconstructed embryos. Thus sheep cytoplasm successfully supports argali nucleus development to blastocyst stage after optimising the nuclear transfer procedure, which indicates that iSCNT can be used to conserve endangered argali in the near future.

  4. Cloning of an endangered species (Bos gaurus) using interspecies nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Lanza, R P; Cibelli, J B; Diaz, F; Moraes, C T; Farin, P W; Farin, C E; Hammer, C J; West, M D; Damiani, P

    2000-01-01

    Approximately 100 species become extinct a day. Despite increasing interest in using cloning to rescue endangered species, successful interspecies nuclear transfer has not been previously described, and only a few reports of in vitro embryo formation exist. Here we show that interspecies nuclear transfer can be used to clone an endangered species with normal karyotypic and phenotypic development through implantation and the late stages of fetal growth. Somatic cells from a gaur bull (Bos gaurus), a large wild ox on the verge of extinction, (Species Survival Plan < 100 animals) were electrofused with enucleated oocytes from domestic cows. Twelve percent of the reconstructed oocytes developed to the blastocyst stage, and 18% of these embryos developed to the fetal stage when transferred to surrogate mothers. Three of the fetuses were electively removed at days 46 to 54 of gestation, and two continued gestation longer than 180 (ongoing) and 200 days, respectively. Microsatellite marker and cytogenetic analyses confirmed that the nuclear genome of the cloned animals was gaurus in origin. The gaur nuclei were shown to direct normal fetal development, with differentiation into complex tissue and organs, even though the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) within all the tissue types evaluated was derived exclusively from the recipient bovine oocytes. These results suggest that somatic cell cloning methods could be used to restore endangered, or even extinct, species and populations.

  5. Successful cloning of coyotes through interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer using domestic dog oocytes.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Insung; Jeong, Yeon Woo; Kim, Joung Joo; Lee, Hyo Jeong; Kang, Mina; Park, Kang Bae; Park, Jung Hwan; Kim, Yeun Wook; Kim, Woo Tae; Shin, Taeyoung; Hyun, Sang Hwan; Jeung, Eui-Bae; Hwang, Woo Suk

    2013-01-01

    Interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer (iSCNT) is an emerging assisted reproductive technology (ART) for preserving Nature's diversity. The scarcity of oocytes from some species makes utilisation of readily available oocytes inevitable. In the present study, we describe the successful cloning of coyotes (Canis latrans) through iSCNT using oocytes from domestic dogs (Canis lupus familiaris or dingo). Transfer of 320 interspecies-reconstructed embryos into 22 domestic dog recipients resulted in six pregnancies, from which eight viable offspring were delivered. Fusion rate and cloning efficiency during iSCNT cloning of coyotes were not significantly different from those observed during intraspecies cloning of domestic dogs. Using neonatal fibroblasts as donor cells significantly improved the cloning efficiency compared with cloning using adult fibroblast donor cells (P<0.05). The use of domestic dog oocytes in the cloning of coyotes in the present study holds promise for cloning other endangered species in the Canidae family using similar techniques. However, there are still limitations of the iSCNT technology, as demonstrated by births of morphologically abnormal coyotes and the clones' inheritance of maternal domestic dog mitochondrial DNA.

  6. Function of donor cell centrosome in intraspecies and interspecies nuclear transfer embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong Zhisheng; Zhang Gang; Meng Xiaoqian; Zhang Yanling; Chen Dayuan; Schatten, Heide; Sun Qingyuan . E-mail: sunqy1@yahoo.com

    2005-05-15

    Centrosomes, the main microtubule-organizing centers (MTOCs) in most animal cells, are important for many cellular activities such as assembly of the mitotic spindle, establishment of cell polarity, and cell movement. In nuclear transfer (NT), MTOCs that are located at the poles of the meiotic spindle are removed from the recipient oocyte, while the centrosome of the donor cell is introduced. We used mouse MII oocytes as recipients, mouse fibroblasts, rat fibroblasts, or pig granulosa cells as donor cells to construct intraspecies and interspecies nuclear transfer embryos in order to observe centrosome dynamics and functions. Three antibodies against centrin, {gamma}-tubulin, and NuMA, respectively, were used to stain the centrosome. Centrin was not detected either at the poles of transient spindles or at the poles of first mitotic spindles. {gamma}-tubulin translocated into the two poles of the transient spindles, while no accumulated {gamma}-tubulin aggregates were detected in the area adjacent to the two pseudo-pronuclei. At first mitotic metaphase, {gamma}-tubulin was translocated to the spindle poles. The distribution of {gamma}-tubulin was similar in mouse intraspecies and rat-mouse interspecies embryos. The NuMA antibody that we used can recognize porcine but not murine NuMA protein, so it was used to trace the NuMA protein of donor cell in reconstructed embryos. In the pig-mouse interspecies reconstructed embryos, NuMA concentrated between the disarrayed chromosomes soon after activation and translocated to the transient spindle poles. NuMA then immigrated into pseudo-pronuclei. After pseudo-pronuclear envelope breakdown, NuMA was located between the chromosomes and then translocated to the spindle poles of first mitotic metaphase. {gamma}-tubulin antibody microinjection resulted in spindle disorganization and retardation of the first cell division. NuMA antibody microinjection also resulted in spindle disorganization. Our findings indicate that (1) the

  7. Production of transgenic canine embryos using interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Hong, So Gun; Oh, Hyun Ju; Park, Jung Eun; Kim, Min Jung; Kim, Geon A; Koo, Ok Jae; Jang, Goo; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2012-02-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has emerged as an important tool for producing transgenic animals and deriving transgenic embryonic stem cells. The process of SCNT involves fusion of in vitro matured oocytes with somatic cells to make embryos that are transgenic when the nuclear donor somatic cells carry 'foreign' DNA and are clones when all the donor cells are genetically identical. However, in canines, it is difficult to obtain enough mature oocytes for successful SCNT due to the very low efficiency of in vitro oocyte maturation in this species that hinders canine transgenic cloning. One solution is to use oocytes from a different species or even a different genus, such as bovine oocytes, that can be matured easily in vitro. Accordingly, the aim of this study was: (1) to establish a canine fetal fibroblast line transfected with the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene; and (2) to investigate in vitro embryonic development of canine cloned embryos derived from transgenic and non-transgenic cell lines using bovine in vitro matured oocytes. Canine fetal fibroblasts were transfected with constructs containing the GFP and puromycin resistance genes using FuGENE 6®. Viability levels of these cells were determined by the MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide] assay. Interspecies SCNT (iSCNT) embryos from normal or transfected cells were produced and cultured in vitro. The MTT measurement of GFP-transfected fetal fibroblasts (mean OD = 0.25) was not significantly different from non-transfected fetal fibroblasts (mean OD = 0.35). There was no difference between transgenic iSCNT versus non-transgenic iSCNT embryos in terms of fusion rates (73.1% and 75.7%, respectively), cleavage rates (69.7% vs. 73.8%) and development to the 8-16-cell stage (40.1% vs. 42.7%). Embryos derived from the transfected cells completely expressed GFP at the 2-cell, 4-cell, and 8-16-cell stages without mosaicism. In summary, our results demonstrated that

  8. Production of wild buffalo (Bubalus arnee) embryos by interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer using domestic buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) oocytes.

    PubMed

    Priya, D; Selokar, N L; Raja, A K; Saini, M; Sahare, A A; Nala, N; Palta, P; Chauhan, M S; Manik, R S; Singla, S K

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the possibility of producing wild buffalo embryos by interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer (iSCNT) through handmade cloning using wild buffalo somatic cells and domestic buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) oocytes. Somatic cells derived from the ear skin of wild buffalo were found to express vimentin but not keratin and cytokeratin-18, indicating that they were of fibroblast origin. The population doubling time of skin fibroblasts from wild buffalo was significantly (p < 0.05) higher, and the cell proliferation rate was significantly (p < 0.05) lower compared with that of skin fibroblasts from domestic buffalo. Neither the cleavage (92.6 ± 2.0% vs 92.8 ± 2.0%) nor the blastocyst rate (42.4 ± 2.4% vs 38.7 ± 2.8%) was significantly different between the intraspecies cloned embryos produced using skin fibroblasts from domestic buffalo and interspecies cloned embryos produced using skin fibroblasts from wild buffalo. However, the total cell number (TCN) was significantly (p < 0.05) lower (192.0 ± 25.6 vs 345.7 ± 42.2), and the apoptotic index was significantly (p < 0.05) higher (15.1 ± 3.1 vs 8.0 ± 1.4) for interspecies than that for intraspecies cloned embryos. Following vitrification in open-pulled straws (OPS) and warming, although the cryosurvival rate of both types of cloned embryos, as indicated by their re-expansion rate, was not significantly different (34.8 ± 1.5% vs 47.8 ± 7.8), the apoptotic index was significantly (p < 0.05) higher for vitrified-warmed interspecies than that for corresponding intraspecies cloned embryos (48.9 ± 7.2 vs 23.9 ± 2.8). The global level of H3K18ac was significantly (p < 0.05) lower in interspecies cloned embryos than that in intraspecies cloned embryos. The expression level of HDAC1, DNMT3a and CASPASE3 was significantly (p < 0.05) higher, that of P53 was significantly (p < 0.05) lower in interspecies than in intraspecies embryos, whereas that of DNMT1 was similar between the two

  9. Production of rhesus monkey cloned embryos expressing monomeric red fluorescent protein by interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Hai-Ying; Kang, Jin-Dan; Li, Suo; Jin, Jun-Xue; Hong, Yu; Jin, Long; Guo, Qing; Gao, Qing-Shan; Yan, Chang-Guo; Yin, Xi-Jun

    2014-02-21

    Highlights: • Rhesus monkey cells were electroporated with a plasmid containing mRFP1, and an mRFP1-expressing cell line was generated. • For the first time, mRFP1-expressing rhesus monkey cells were used as donor cells for iSCNT. • The effect of VPA on the development of embryos cloned using iSCNT was determined. - Abstract: Interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer (iSCNT) is a promising method to clone endangered animals from which oocytes are difficult to obtain. Monomeric red fluorescent protein 1 (mRFP1) is an excellent selection marker for transgenically modified cloned embryos during somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). In this study, mRFP-expressing rhesus monkey cells or porcine cells were transferred into enucleated porcine oocytes to generate iSCNT and SCNT embryos, respectively. The development of these embryos was studied in vitro. The percentage of embryos that underwent cleavage did not significantly differ between iSCNT and SCNT embryos (P > 0.05; 71.53% vs. 80.30%). However, significantly fewer iSCNT embryos than SCNT embryos reached the blastocyst stage (2.04% vs. 10.19%, P < 0.05). Valproic acid was used in an attempt to increase the percentage of iSCNT embryos that developed to the blastocyst stage. However, the percentages of embryos that underwent cleavage and reached the blastocyst stage were similar between untreated iSCNT embryos and iSCNT embryos treated with 2 mM valproic acid for 24 h (72.12% vs. 70.83% and 2.67% vs. 2.35%, respectively). These data suggest that porcine-rhesus monkey interspecies embryos can be generated that efficiently express mRFP1. However, a significantly lower proportion of iSCNT embryos than SCNT embryos reach the blastocyst stage. Valproic acid does not increase the percentage of porcine-rhesus monkey iSCNT embryos that reach the blastocyst stage. The mechanisms underling nuclear reprogramming and epigenetic modifications in iSCNT need to be investigated further.

  10. Full-term development of gaur-bovine interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos: effect of trichostatin A treatment.

    PubMed

    Srirattana, Kanokwan; Imsoonthornruksa, Sumeth; Laowtammathron, Chuti; Sangmalee, Anawat; Tunwattana, Wanchai; Thongprapai, Thamnoon; Chaimongkol, Chockchai; Ketudat-Cairns, Mariena; Parnpai, Rangsun

    2012-06-01

    Trichostatin A (TSA) has previously been used in somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) to improve the cloning efficiency in several species, which led our team to investigate the effects of TSA on the full-term development of bovine SCNT and gaur-bovine interspecies SCNT (gaur iSCNT; gaur somatic cells as donors and bovine oocytes as recipients) embryos. Treatment with 50 nM TSA for 10 h after fusion had no positive effects on the rates of fusion, cleavage, or the development to eight-cell or morula stages in both bovine SCNT and gaur iSCNT embryos. However, TSA treatment significantly enhanced the blastocyst formation rate in bovine SCNT embryos (44 vs. 32-34% in the TSA-treated and TSA-untreated groups, respectively), but had no effects on gaur iSCNT embryos. The fresh blastocysts derived from bovine SCNT and gaur iSCNT embryos (fresh groups), as well as vitrified bovine SCNT blastocysts (vitrified group), were transferred to bovine recipients. We found that TSA treatment increased the pregnancy rates only in recipients receiving fresh bovine SCNT embryos. In recipients receiving TSA-treated bovine SCNT embryos, three cloned calves from the fresh group and twin cloned calves from the vitrified group were delivered; however, no calf was born from the TSA-untreated bovine SCNT embryos. In contrast, one gaur iSCNT calf was born from a recipient receiving blastocysts from the TSA-untreated group. In summary, TSA improved the preimplantation development and pregnancy rates of bovine SCNT embryos, but did not have any beneficial effect on gaur iSCNT embryos. However, one gaur iSCNT calf reached full-term development.

  11. Absence of nucleolus formation in raccoon dog-porcine interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos results in embryonic developmental failure

    PubMed Central

    JEON, Yubyeol; NAM, Yeong-Hee; CHEONG, Seung-A; KWAK, Seong-Sung; LEE, Eunsong; HYUN, Sang-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer (iSCNT) can be a solution for preservation of endangered species that have limited oocytes. It has been reported that blastocyst production by iSCNT is successful even if the genetic distances between donors and recipients are large. In particular, domestic pig oocytes can support the development of canine to porcine iSCNT embryos. Therefore, we examined whether porcine oocytes may be suitable recipient oocytes for Korean raccoon dog iSCNT. We investigated the effects of trichostatin A (TSA) treatment on iSCNT embryo developmental patterns and nucleolus formation. Enucleated porcine oocytes were fused with raccoon dog fibroblasts by electrofusion and cleavage, and blastocyst development and nucleolus formation were evaluated. To our knowledge, this study is the first in which raccoon dog iSCNT was performed using porcine oocytes; we found that 68.5% of 158 iSCNT embryos had the ability to cleave. However, these iSCNT embryos did not develop past the 4-cell stage. Treatment with TSA did not affect iSCNT embryonic development; moreover, the nuclei failed to form nucleoli at 48 and 72 h post-activation (hpa). In contrast, pig SCNT embryos of the control group showed 18.8% and 87.9% nucleolus formation at 48 and 72 hpa, respectively. Our results demonstrated that porcine cytoplasts efficiently supported the development of raccoon dog iSCNT embryos to the 4-cell stage, the stage of porcine embryonic genome activation (EGA); however, these embryos failed to reach the blastocyst stage and showed defects in nucleolus formation. PMID:27064112

  12. Interspecies nuclear transfer using fibroblasts from leopard, tiger, and lion ear piece collected postmortem as donor cells and rabbit oocytes as recipients.

    PubMed

    Yelisetti, Uma Mahesh; Komjeti, Suman; Katari, Venu Charan; Sisinthy, Shivaji; Brahmasani, Sambasiva Rao

    2016-06-01

    Skin fibroblast cells were obtained from a small piece of an ear of leopard, lion, and tiger collected postmortem and attempts were made to synchronize the skin fibroblasts at G0/G1 of cell cycle using three different approaches. Efficiency of the approaches was tested following interspecies nuclear transfer with rabbit oocytes as recipient cytoplasm. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting revealed that the proportion of G0/G1 cells increased significantly (P < 0.05) when cells subjected to serum starvation, contact inhibition, and 3 mM sodium butyrate (NaBu) treatment when compared with cycling cells. However, 3 mM NaBu treatment caused alterations in cell morphology and increase in dead cells. Thus, interspecies nuclear transfer was carried out using fibroblast cells subjected to contact inhibition for 72 h, serum starvation for 48 h, and cells treated with 1.0 mM NaBu for 48 h. The fusion rates, the proportion of fused couplets that cleaved to two-cell and developed to blastocyst, were highest in all three species when the donor cells were treated with 1.0 mM NaBu for 48 h. But, the blastocyst percentage of interspecies nuclear embryos (5-6%) was significantly lower when compared with rabbit-rabbit nuclear transfer embryos (22.9%). In conclusion, fibroblast cells of leopard, lion, and tiger were successfully synchronized and used for the development of blastocysts using rabbit oocytes as recipient cytoplasm.

  13. Embryo aggregation does not improve the development of interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos in the horse.

    PubMed

    Gambini, Andrés; De Stéfano, Adrián; Jarazo, Javier; Buemo, Carla; Karlanian, Florencia; Salamone, Daniel Felipe

    2016-09-01

    The low efficiency of interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer (iSCNT) makes it necessary to investigate new strategies to improve embryonic developmental competence. Embryo aggregation has been successfully applied to improve cloning efficiency in mammals, but it remains unclear whether it could also be beneficial for iSCNT. In this study, we first compared the effect of embryo aggregation over in vitro development and blastocyst quality of porcine, bovine, and feline zona-free (ZF) parthenogenetic (PA) embryos to test the effects of embryo aggregation on species that were later used as enucleated oocytes donors in our iSCNT study. We then assessed whether embryo aggregation could improve the in vitro development of ZF equine iSCNT embryos after reconstruction with porcine, bovine, and feline ooplasm. Bovine- and porcine-aggregated PA blastocysts had significantly larger diameters compared with nonaggregated embryos. On the other hand, feline- and bovine-aggregated PA embryos had higher blastocyst cell number. Embryo aggregation of equine-equine SCNT was found to be beneficial for embryo development as we have previously reported, but the aggregation of three ZF reconstructed embryos did not improve embryo developmental rates on iSCNT. In vitro embryo development of nonaggregated iSCNT was predominantly arrested around the stage when transcriptional activation of the embryonic genome is reported to start on the embryo of the donor species. Nevertheless, independent of embryo aggregation, equine blastocyst-like structures could be obtained in our study using domestic feline-enucleated oocytes. Taken together, these results reported that embryo aggregation enhance in vitro PA embryo development and embryo quality but effects vary depending on the species. Embryo aggregation also improves, as expected, the in vitro embryo development of equine-equine SCNT embryos; however, we did not observe positive effects on equine iSCNT embryo development. Among oocytes

  14. Promoting Interspecies Electron Transfer with Biochar

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shanshan; Rotaru, Amelia-Elena; Shrestha, Pravin Malla; Malvankar, Nikhil S.; Liu, Fanghua; Fan, Wei; Nevin, Kelly P.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2014-01-01

    Biochar, a charcoal-like product of the incomplete combustion of organic materials, is an increasingly popular soil amendment designed to improve soil fertility. We investigated the possibility that biochar could promote direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) in a manner similar to that previously reported for granular activated carbon (GAC). Although the biochars investigated were 1000 times less conductive than GAC, they stimulated DIET in co-cultures of Geobacter metallireducens with Geobacter sulfurreducens or Methanosarcina barkeri in which ethanol was the electron donor. Cells were attached to the biochar, yet not in close contact, suggesting that electrons were likely conducted through the biochar, rather than biological electrical connections. The finding that biochar can stimulate DIET may be an important consideration when amending soils with biochar and can help explain why biochar may enhance methane production from organic wastes under anaerobic conditions. PMID:24846283

  15. Transcriptomic and Genetic Analysis of Direct Interspecies Electron Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Rotaru, Amelia-Elena; Summers, Zarath M.; Shrestha, Minita; Liu, Fanghua; Lovley, Derek R.

    2013-01-01

    The possibility that metatranscriptomic analysis could distinguish between direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) and H2 interspecies transfer (HIT) in anaerobic communities was investigated by comparing gene transcript abundance in cocultures in which Geobacter sulfurreducens was the electron-accepting partner for either Geobacter metallireducens, which performs DIET, or Pelobacter carbinolicus, which relies on HIT. Transcript abundance for G. sulfurreducens uptake hydrogenase genes was 7-fold lower in cocultures with G. metallireducens than in cocultures with P. carbinolicus, consistent with DIET and HIT, respectively, in the two cocultures. Transcript abundance for the pilus-associated cytochrome OmcS, which is essential for DIET but not for HIT, was 240-fold higher in the cocultures with G. metallireducens than in cocultures with P. carbinolicus. The pilin gene pilA was moderately expressed despite a mutation that might be expected to repress pilA expression. Lower transcript abundance for G. sulfurreducens genes associated with acetate metabolism in the cocultures with P. carbinolicus was consistent with the repression of these genes by H2 during HIT. Genes for the biogenesis of pili and flagella and several c-type cytochrome genes were among the most highly expressed in G. metallireducens. Mutant strains that lacked the ability to produce pili, flagella, or the outer surface c-type cytochrome encoded by Gmet_2896 were not able to form cocultures with G. sulfurreducens. These results demonstrate that there are unique gene expression patterns that distinguish DIET from HIT and suggest that metatranscriptomics may be a promising route to investigate interspecies electron transfer pathways in more-complex environments. PMID:23377933

  16. Direct interspecies electron transfer between Geobacter metallireducens and Methanosarcina barkeri.

    PubMed

    Rotaru, Amelia-Elena; Shrestha, Pravin Malla; Liu, Fanghua; Markovaite, Beatrice; Chen, Shanshan; Nevin, Kelly P; Lovley, Derek R

    2014-08-01

    Direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) is potentially an effective form of syntrophy in methanogenic communities, but little is known about the diversity of methanogens capable of DIET. The ability of Methanosarcina barkeri to participate in DIET was evaluated in coculture with Geobacter metallireducens. Cocultures formed aggregates that shared electrons via DIET during the stoichiometric conversion of ethanol to methane. Cocultures could not be initiated with a pilin-deficient G. metallireducens strain, suggesting that long-range electron transfer along pili was important for DIET. Amendments of granular activated carbon permitted the pilin-deficient G. metallireducens isolates to share electrons with M. barkeri, demonstrating that this conductive material could substitute for pili in promoting DIET. When M. barkeri was grown in coculture with the H2-producing Pelobacter carbinolicus, incapable of DIET, M. barkeri utilized H2 as an electron donor but metabolized little of the acetate that P.carbinolicus produced. This suggested that H2, but not electrons derived from DIET, inhibited acetate metabolism. P. carbinolicus-M. barkeri cocultures did not aggregate, demonstrating that, unlike DIET, close physical contact was not necessary for interspecies H2 transfer. M. barkeri is the second methanogen found to accept electrons via DIET and the first methanogen known to be capable of using either H2 or electrons derived from DIET for CO2 reduction. Furthermore, M. barkeri is genetically tractable,making it a model organism for elucidating mechanisms by which methanogens make biological electrical connections with other cells.

  17. Syntrophic growth via quinone-mediated interspecies electron transfer

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Jessica A.; Nevin, Kelly P.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms by which microbial species exchange electrons are of interest because interspecies electron transfer can expand the metabolic capabilities of microbial communities. Previous studies with the humic substance analog anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) suggested that quinone-mediated interspecies electron transfer (QUIET) is feasible, but it was not determined if sufficient energy is available from QUIET to support the growth of both species. Furthermore, there have been no previous studies on the mechanisms for the oxidation of anthrahydroquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AHQDS). A co-culture of Geobacter metallireducens and G. sulfurreducens metabolized ethanol with the reduction of fumarate much faster in the presence of AQDS, and there was an increase in cell protein. G. sulfurreducens was more abundant, consistent with G. sulfurreducens obtaining electrons from acetate that G. metallireducens produced from ethanol, as well as from AHQDS. Co-cultures initiated with a citrate synthase-deficient strain of G. sulfurreducens that was unable to use acetate as an electron donor also metabolized ethanol with the reduction of fumarate and cell growth, but acetate accumulated over time. G. sulfurreducens and G. metallireducens were equally abundant in these co-cultures reflecting the inability of the citrate synthase-deficient strain of G. sulfurreducens to metabolize acetate. Evaluation of the mechanisms by which G. sulfurreducens accepts electrons from AHQDS demonstrated that a strain deficient in outer-surface c-type cytochromes that are required for AQDS reduction was as effective at QUIET as the wild-type strain. Deletion of additional genes previously implicated in extracellular electron transfer also had no impact on QUIET. These results demonstrate that QUIET can yield sufficient energy to support the growth of both syntrophic partners, but that the mechanisms by which electrons are derived from extracellular hydroquinones require further investigation. PMID

  18. Interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer in Asiatic cheetah using nuclei derived from post-mortem frozen tissue in absence of cryo-protectant and in vitro matured domestic cat oocytes.

    PubMed

    Moulavi, F; Hosseini, S M; Tanhaie-Vash, N; Ostadhosseini, S; Hosseini, S H; Hajinasrollah, M; Asghari, M H; Gourabi, H; Shahverdi, A; Vosough, A D; Nasr-Esfahani, M H

    2017-03-01

    Recent accomplishments in the field of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) hold tremendous promise to prevent rapid loss of animal genetic resources using ex situ conservation technology. Most of SCNT studies use viable cells for nuclear transfer into recipient oocytes. However, preparation of live cells in extreme circumstances, in which post-mortem material of endangered/rare animals is improperly retained frozen, is difficult, if not impossible. This study investigated the possibility of interspecies-SCNT (iSCNT) in Asiatic cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus venaticus), a critically endangered subspecies, using nuclei derived from frozen tissue in absence of cryo-protectant at -20 °C and in vitro matured domestic cat oocytes. No cells growth was detected in primary culture of skin and tendon pieces or following culture of singled cells prepared by enzymatic digestion. Furthermore, no live cells were detected following differential viable staining and almost all cells had ruptured membrane. Therefore, direct injection of donor nuclei into enucleated cat oocytes matured in vitro was carried out for SCNT experiments. Early signs of nuclear remodeling were observed as early as 2 h post-iSCNT and significantly increased at 4 h post-iSCNT. The percentages of iSCNT reconstructs that cleaved and developed to 4-16 cell and morula stages were 32.3 ± 7.3, 18.2 ± 9.8 and 5.9 ± 4.3%, respectively. However, none of the iSCNT reconstructs developed to the blastocyst stage. When domestic cat somatic and oocytes were used for control SCNT and parthenogenetic activation, the respective percentages of oocytes that cleaved (51.3 ± 13.9 and 77.3 ± 4.0%) and further developed to the blastocyst stage (11.3 ± 3.3 and 16.8 ± 3.8%) were comparable. In summary, this study demonstrated that enucleated cat oocytes can partially remodel and reactivate non-viable nuclei of Asiatic cheetah and support its reprogramming back to the embryonic stage. To our knowledge, this is

  19. Cloning endangered felids using heterospecific donor oocytes and interspecies embryo transfer.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Martha C; Pope, C Earle; Ricks, David M; Lyons, Justine; Dumas, Cherie; Dresser, Betsy L

    2009-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) offers the possibility of preserving endangered species. It is one of the few technologies that avoids the loss of genetic variation and provides the prospect of species continuance, rather than extinction. Nonetheless, there has been a debate over the use of SCNT for preserving endangered species because of abnormal nuclear reprogramming, low efficiency and the involvement of extra mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of a different species in live offspring produced by interspecies SCNT. Despite these limitations, live endangered cloned animals have been produced. In the present paper, we describe recent research on the production of cloned embryos derived by fusion of wild felid fibroblast cells with heterospecific domestic cat cytoplasts and their viability after transfer into domestic cat recipients. In addition, we discuss epigenetic events that take place in donor cells and felid cloned embryos and mtDNA inheritance in wild felid clones and their offspring.

  20. Syntrophic anaerobic photosynthesis via direct interspecies electron transfer

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Phuc T.; Lindemann, Stephen R.; Shi, Liang; Dohnalkova, Alice C.; Fredrickson, James K.; Madigan, Michael T.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2017-01-01

    Microbial phototrophs, key primary producers on Earth, use H2O, H2, H2S and other reduced inorganic compounds as electron donors. Here we describe a form of metabolism linking anoxygenic photosynthesis to anaerobic respiration that we call ‘syntrophic anaerobic photosynthesis'. We show that photoautotrophy in the green sulfur bacterium Prosthecochloris aestaurii can be driven by either electrons from a solid electrode or acetate oxidation via direct interspecies electron transfer from a heterotrophic partner bacterium, Geobacter sulfurreducens. Photosynthetic growth of P. aestuarii using reductant provided by either an electrode or syntrophy is robust and light-dependent. In contrast, P. aestuarii does not grow in co-culture with a G. sulfurreducens mutant lacking a trans-outer membrane porin-cytochrome protein complex required for direct intercellular electron transfer. Syntrophic anaerobic photosynthesis is therefore a carbon cycling process that could take place in anoxic environments. This process could be exploited for biotechnological applications, such as waste treatment and bioenergy production, using engineered phototrophic microbial communities. PMID:28067226

  1. Carbon cloth stimulates direct interspecies electron transfer in syntrophic co-cultures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shanshan; Rotaru, Amelia-Elena; Liu, Fanghua; Philips, Jo; Woodard, Trevor L; Nevin, Kelly P; Lovley, Derek R

    2014-12-01

    This study investigated the possibility that the electrical conductivity of carbon cloth accelerates direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) in co-cultures. Carbon cloth accelerated metabolism of DIET co-cultures (Geobacter metallireducens-Geobacter sulfurreducens and G.metallireducens-Methanosarcina barkeri) but did not promote metabolism of co-cultures performing interspecies H2 transfer (Desulfovibrio vulgaris-G.sulfurreducens). On the other hand, DIET co-cultures were not stimulated by poorly conductive cotton cloth. Mutant strains lacking electrically conductive pili, or pili-associated cytochromes participated in DIET only in the presence of carbon cloth. In co-cultures promoted by carbon cloth, cells were primarily associated with the cloth although the syntrophic partners were too far apart for cell-to-cell biological electrical connections to be feasible. Carbon cloth seemingly mediated interspecies electron transfer between the distant syntrophic partners. These results suggest that the ability of carbon cloth to accelerate DIET should be considered in anaerobic digester designs that incorporate carbon cloth.

  2. Analysis of nuclear reprogramming following nuclear transfer to Xenopus oocyte.

    PubMed

    Jullien, Jerome

    2015-01-01

    Germinal vesicle of stage V-VI Xenopus Laevis oocytes (at the prophase I stage of meiosis) can be used to transplant mammalian nuclei. In this type of interspecies nuclear transfer no cell division occurs and no new cell types are generated. However, the transplanted nuclei undergo extensive transcriptional reprogramming. Here, it is first explained how to carry out transplantation of multiple mammalian cell nuclei to Xenopus oocytes. It is then described how to perform RT-qPCR, Western Blot, Chromatin Immunoprecipitation, and live imaging analysis to monitor transcriptional reprogramming of the nuclei transplanted to oocytes.

  3. A modeling approach to direct interspecies electron transfer process in anaerobic transformation of ethanol to methane.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yiwen; Zhang, Yaobin; Zhao, Zhiqiang; Ngo, Huu Hao; Guo, Wenshan; Zhou, Junliang; Peng, Lai; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) plays an important part in contributing to methane production from anaerobic digestion. However, so far anaerobic digestion models that have been proposed only consider two pathways for methane production, namely, acetoclastic methanogenesis and hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis, via indirect interspecies hydrogen transfer, which lacks an effective way for incorporating DIET into this paradigm. In this work, a new mathematical model is specifically developed to describe DIET process in anaerobic digestion through introducing extracellular electron transfer as a new pathway for methane production, taking anaerobic transformation of ethanol to methane as an example. The developed model was able to successfully predict experimental data on methane dynamics under different experimental conditions, supporting the validity of the developed model. Modeling predictions clearly demonstrated that DIET plays an important role in contributing to overall methane production (up to 33 %) and conductive material (i.e., carbon cloth) addition would significantly promote DIET through increasing ethanol conversion rate and methane production rate. The model developed in this work will potentially enhance our current understanding on syntrophic metabolism via DIET.

  4. Analysis of nuclear export using photoactivatable GFP fusion proteins and interspecies heterokaryons.

    PubMed

    Nakrieko, Kerry-Ann; Ivanova, Iordanka A; Dagnino, Lina

    2010-01-01

    In this chapter, we review protocols for the analysis of nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of transcription factors and nuclear proteins, using two different approaches. The first involves the use of photoactivatable forms of the protein of interest by fusion to photoactivatable green fluorescent protein to follow its movement out of the nucleus by live-cell confocal microscopy. This methodology allows for the kinetic characterization of protein movements as well as measurement of steady-state levels. In a second procedure to assess the ability of a nuclear protein to move into and out of the nucleus, we describe the use of interspecies heterokaryon assays, which provide a measurement of steady-state distribution. These technologies are directly applicable to the analysis of nucleocytoplasmic movements not only of transcription factors, but also other nuclear proteins.

  5. Nuclear transfer in rodents.

    PubMed

    Mullins, Linda J; Wilmut, Ian; Mullins, John J

    2004-01-01

    Cloning is the asexual reproduction of an individual, such that the offspring have an essentially identical nuclear genome. Nuclear transfer and cloning have been achieved in a number of species, namely sheep, cows, goats, rabbits, cats and mice, but have been largely unsuccessful, so far, in dogs, primates and rats. Clearly, contributory factors which affect the outcome of successful cloning experiments are not universally applicable to all species. One theme common to all cloning experiments, however, is the overall inefficiency of the process, typically 0-4%. A number of factors contribute to nuclear transfer inefficiency, and we will review mouse cloning experiments, which address these problems, highlighting the importance of donor nucleus choice (somatic or ES cell, fetal or adult, quiescent or actively dividing). Finally, we will summarize the emerging principles which appear to govern nuclear reprogramming and production of clones, and will consider the application of nuclear transfer to the rat.

  6. Assessing functional annotation transfers with inter-species conserved coexpression: application to Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Plasmodium falciparum is the main causative agent of malaria. Of the 5 484 predicted genes of P. falciparum, about 57% do not have sufficient sequence similarity to characterized genes in other species to warrant functional assignments. Non-homology methods are thus needed to obtain functional clues for these uncharacterized genes. Gene expression data have been widely used in the recent years to help functional annotation in an intra-species way via the so-called Guilt By Association (GBA) principle. Results We propose a new method that uses gene expression data to assess inter-species annotation transfers. Our approach starts from a set of likely orthologs between a reference species (here S. cerevisiae and D. melanogaster) and a query species (P. falciparum). It aims at identifying clusters of coexpressed genes in the query species whose coexpression has been conserved in the reference species. These conserved clusters of coexpressed genes are then used to assess annotation transfers between genes with low sequence similarity, enabling reliable transfers of annotations from the reference to the query species. The approach was used with transcriptomic data sets of P. falciparum, S. cerevisiae and D. melanogaster, and enabled us to propose with high confidence new/refined annotations for several dozens hypothetical/putative P. falciparum genes. Notably, we revised the annotation of genes involved in ribosomal proteins and ribosome biogenesis and assembly, thus highlighting several potential drug targets. Conclusions Our approach uses both sequence similarity and gene expression data to help inter-species gene annotation transfers. Experiments show that this strategy improves the accuracy achieved when using solely sequence similarity and outperforms the accuracy of the GBA approach. In addition, our experiments with P. falciparum show that it can infer a function for numerous hypothetical genes. PMID:20078859

  7. Potential for Direct Interspecies Electron Transfer in Methanogenic Wastewater Digester Aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Morita, Masahiko; Malvankar, Nikhil S.; Franks, Ashley E.; Summers, Zarath M.; Giloteaux, Ludovic; Rotaru, Amelia E.; Rotaru, Camelia; Lovley, Derek R.

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mechanisms for electron transfer within microbial aggregates derived from an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor converting brewery waste to methane were investigated in order to better understand the function of methanogenic consortia. The aggregates were electrically conductive, with conductivities 3-fold higher than the conductivities previously reported for dual-species aggregates of Geobacter species in which the two species appeared to exchange electrons via interspecies electron transfer. The temperature dependence response of the aggregate conductance was characteristic of the organic metallic-like conductance previously described for the conductive pili of Geobacter sulfurreducens and was inconsistent with electron conduction through minerals. Studies in which aggregates were incubated with high concentrations of potential electron donors demonstrated that the aggregates had no significant capacity for conversion of hydrogen to methane. The aggregates converted formate to methane but at rates too low to account for the rates at which that the aggregates syntrophically metabolized ethanol, an important component of the reactor influent. Geobacter species comprised 25% of 16S rRNA gene sequences recovered from the aggregates, suggesting that Geobacter species may have contributed to some but probably not all of the aggregate conductivity. Microorganisms most closely related to the acetate-utilizing Methanosaeta concilii accounted for more than 90% of the sequences that could be assigned to methane producers, consistent with the poor capacity for hydrogen and formate utilization. These results demonstrate for the first time that methanogenic wastewater aggregates can be electrically conductive and suggest that direct interspecies electron transfer could be an important mechanism for electron exchange in some methanogenic systems. PMID:21862629

  8. Evaluation on direct interspecies electron transfer in anaerobic sludge digestion of microbial electrolysis cell.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zisheng; Zhang, Yaobin; Quan, Xie; Zhao, Huimin

    2016-01-01

    Increase of methanogenesis in methane-producing microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) is frequently believed as a result of cathodic reduction of CO2. Recent studies indicated that this electromethanogenesis only accounted for a little part of methane production during anaerobic sludge digestion. Instead, direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) possibly plays an important role in methane production. In this study, anaerobic digestion of sludge were investigated in a single-chamber MEC reactor, a carbon-felt supplemented reactor and a common anaerobic reactor to evaluate the effects of DIET on the sludge digestion. The results showed that adding carbon felt into the reactor increased 12.9% of methane production and 17.2% of sludge reduction. Imposing a voltage on the carbon felt further improved the digestion. Current calculation showed that the cathodic reduction only contributed to 27.5% of increased methane production. Microbial analysis indicated that DIET played an important role in the anaerobic sludge digestion in the MEC.

  9. Control of interspecies electron transfer flow during anaerobic digestion: dynamic diffusion reaction models for hydrogen gas transfer in microbial flocs.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, S S; Palsson, B O; Thiele, J H

    1989-02-05

    Dynamic reaction diffusion models were used to analyze the consequences of aggregation for syntrophic reactions in methanogenic ecosystems. Flocs from a whey digestor were used to measure all model parameters under the in situ conditions of a particular defined biological system. Fermentation simulations without adjustable parameters could precisely predict the kinetics of H(2) gas production of digestor flocs during syntrophic methanogenesis from ethanol. The results demonstrated a kinetic compartmentalization of H(2) metabolism inside the flocs. The interspecies electron transfer reaction was mildly diffusion controlled. The H(2) gas profiles across the flocs showed high H (2) concentrations inside the flocs at any time. Simulations of the syntrophic metabolism at low substrate concentrations such as in digestors or sediments showed that it is impossible to achieve high H(2) gas turnovers at simultaneously low steady-state H(2) concentrations. This showed a mechanistic contradiction in the concept of postulated low H(2) microenvironments for the anaerobic digestion process. The results of the computer experiments support the conclusion that syntrophic H(2) production may only be a side reaction of H(2) independent interspecies electron transfer in methanogenic ecosystems.

  10. Small Luggage for a Long Journey: Transfer of Vesicle-Enclosed Small RNA in Interspecies Communication.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, Fabio A; Lécuyer, Eric

    2017-01-01

    In the evolutionary arms race, symbionts have evolved means to modulate each other's physiology, oftentimes through the dissemination of biological signals. Beyond small molecules and proteins, recent evidence shows that small RNA molecules are transferred between organisms and transmit functional RNA interference signals across biological species. However, the mechanisms through which specific RNAs involved in cross-species communication are sorted for secretion and protected from degradation in the environment remain largely enigmatic. Over the last decade, extracellular vesicles have emerged as prominent vehicles of biological signals. They can stabilize specific RNA transcripts in biological fluids and selectively deliver them to recipient cells. Here, we review examples of small RNA transfers between plants and bacterial, fungal, and animal symbionts. We also discuss the transmission of RNA interference signals from intestinal cells to populations of the gut microbiota, along with its roles in intestinal homeostasis. We suggest that extracellular vesicles may contribute to inter-species crosstalk mediated by small RNA. We review the mechanisms of RNA sorting to extracellular vesicles and evaluate their relevance in cross-species communication by discussing conservation, stability, stoichiometry, and co-occurrence of vesicles with alternative communication vehicles.

  11. Intra- and interspecies transfer and expression of Rhizobium japonicum hydrogen uptake genes and autotrophic growth capability

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Grant R.; Cantrell, Michael A.; Hanus, F. Joe; Russell, Sterling A.; Haddad, Karen R.; Evans, Harold J.

    1985-01-01

    Cosmids containing hydrogen uptake genes have previously been isolated in this laboratory. Four new cosmids that contain additional hup gene(s) have now been identified by conjugal transfer of a Rhizobium japonicum 122DES gene bank into a Tn5-generated Hup- mutant and screening for the acquisition of Hup activity. The newly isolated cosmids, pHU50-pHU53, contain part of the previously isolated pHU1 but extend as far as 20 kilobases beyond its border. pHU52 complements five of six Hup- mutants and confers activity on several Hup- wild-type R. japonicum strains in the free-living state and where tested in nodules. Transconjugants obtained from interspecies transfer of pHU52 to Rhizobium meliloti 102F28, 102F32, and 102F51 and Rhizobium leguminosarum 128C53 showed hydrogen-dependent methyleneblue reduction, performed the oxyhydrogen reaction, and showed hydrogen-dependent autotrophic growth by virtue of the introduced genes. The identity of the presumptive transconjugants was confirmed by antibiotic-resistance profiles and by plant nodulation tests. Images PMID:16578786

  12. Small Luggage for a Long Journey: Transfer of Vesicle-Enclosed Small RNA in Interspecies Communication

    PubMed Central

    Lefebvre, Fabio A.; Lécuyer, Eric

    2017-01-01

    In the evolutionary arms race, symbionts have evolved means to modulate each other's physiology, oftentimes through the dissemination of biological signals. Beyond small molecules and proteins, recent evidence shows that small RNA molecules are transferred between organisms and transmit functional RNA interference signals across biological species. However, the mechanisms through which specific RNAs involved in cross-species communication are sorted for secretion and protected from degradation in the environment remain largely enigmatic. Over the last decade, extracellular vesicles have emerged as prominent vehicles of biological signals. They can stabilize specific RNA transcripts in biological fluids and selectively deliver them to recipient cells. Here, we review examples of small RNA transfers between plants and bacterial, fungal, and animal symbionts. We also discuss the transmission of RNA interference signals from intestinal cells to populations of the gut microbiota, along with its roles in intestinal homeostasis. We suggest that extracellular vesicles may contribute to inter-species crosstalk mediated by small RNA. We review the mechanisms of RNA sorting to extracellular vesicles and evaluate their relevance in cross-species communication by discussing conservation, stability, stoichiometry, and co-occurrence of vesicles with alternative communication vehicles. PMID:28360889

  13. Regulation of Product Formation in Bacteroides xylanolyticus X5-1 by Interspecies Electron Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Biesterveld, Steven; Zehnder, Alexander J. B.; Stams, Alfons J. M.

    1994-01-01

    Bacteroides xylanolyticus X5-1 was grown in pure culture and in mixed culture with Methanospirillum hungatei JF-1 under xylose limitation in the chemostat. In the pure culture, ethanol, acetate, CO2, and hydrogen were the products. In the mixed culture, acetate, CO2, and presumably hydrogen were the only products formed by B. xylanolyticus X5-1. The biomass yield of B. xylanolyticus X5-1 increased because of cocultivation. In cell extracts of the pure culture, both NAD- and NADP-dependent acetaldehyde dehydrogenase and ethanol dehydrogenase activities were found. In cell extracts of the mixed culture, activities of these enzymes were not detected. Inhibition of methanogenesis in the mixed culture by the addition of bromoethanosulfonic acid (BES) resulted in an accumulation of H2, ethanol, and formate. Immediately after the addition of BES, NAD-dependent acetaldehyde dehydrogenase and ethanol dehydrogenase activities were detected. After a short lag phase, a NADP-dependent ethanol dehydrogenase was also detectable. The induction of acetaldehyde dehydrogenase and ethanol dehydrogenase was inhibited by chloramphenicol, suggesting de novo synthesis of these enzymes. These results are consistent with a model in which the shift in product formation caused by interspecies electron transfer is regulated at the level of enzyme synthesis. PMID:16349240

  14. Interspecies electron transfer via hydrogen and formate rather than direct electrical connections in cocultures of Pelobacter carbinolicus and Geobacter sulfurreducens.

    PubMed

    Rotaru, Amelia-Elena; Shrestha, Pravin M; Liu, Fanghua; Ueki, Toshiyuki; Nevin, Kelly; Summers, Zarath M; Lovley, Derek R

    2012-11-01

    Direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) is an alternative to interspecies H(2)/formate transfer as a mechanism for microbial species to cooperatively exchange electrons during syntrophic metabolism. To understand what specific properties contribute to DIET, studies were conducted with Pelobacter carbinolicus, a close relative of Geobacter metallireducens, which is capable of DIET. P. carbinolicus grew in coculture with Geobacter sulfurreducens with ethanol as the electron donor and fumarate as the electron acceptor, conditions under which G. sulfurreducens formed direct electrical connections with G. metallireducens. In contrast to the cell aggregation associated with DIET, P. carbinolicus and G. sulfurreducens did not aggregate. Attempts to initiate cocultures with a genetically modified strain of G. sulfurreducens incapable of both H(2) and formate utilization were unsuccessful, whereas cocultures readily grew with mutant strains capable of formate but not H(2) uptake or vice versa. The hydrogenase mutant of G. sulfurreducens compensated, in cocultures, with significantly increased formate dehydrogenase gene expression. In contrast, the transcript abundance of a hydrogenase gene was comparable in cocultures with that for the formate dehydrogenase mutant of G. sulfurreducens or the wild type, suggesting that H(2) was the primary electron carrier in the wild-type cocultures. Cocultures were also initiated with strains of G. sulfurreducens that could not produce pili or OmcS, two essential components for DIET. The finding that P. carbinolicus exchanged electrons with G. sulfurreducens via interspecies transfer of H(2)/formate rather than DIET demonstrates that not all microorganisms that can grow syntrophically are capable of DIET and that closely related microorganisms may use significantly different strategies for interspecies electron exchange.

  15. Interspecies Electron Transfer via Hydrogen and Formate Rather than Direct Electrical Connections in Cocultures of Pelobacter carbinolicus and Geobacter sulfurreducens

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Pravin M.; Liu, Fanghua; Ueki, Toshiyuki; Nevin, Kelly; Summers, Zarath M.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2012-01-01

    Direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) is an alternative to interspecies H2/formate transfer as a mechanism for microbial species to cooperatively exchange electrons during syntrophic metabolism. To understand what specific properties contribute to DIET, studies were conducted with Pelobacter carbinolicus, a close relative of Geobacter metallireducens, which is capable of DIET. P. carbinolicus grew in coculture with Geobacter sulfurreducens with ethanol as the electron donor and fumarate as the electron acceptor, conditions under which G. sulfurreducens formed direct electrical connections with G. metallireducens. In contrast to the cell aggregation associated with DIET, P. carbinolicus and G. sulfurreducens did not aggregate. Attempts to initiate cocultures with a genetically modified strain of G. sulfurreducens incapable of both H2 and formate utilization were unsuccessful, whereas cocultures readily grew with mutant strains capable of formate but not H2 uptake or vice versa. The hydrogenase mutant of G. sulfurreducens compensated, in cocultures, with significantly increased formate dehydrogenase gene expression. In contrast, the transcript abundance of a hydrogenase gene was comparable in cocultures with that for the formate dehydrogenase mutant of G. sulfurreducens or the wild type, suggesting that H2 was the primary electron carrier in the wild-type cocultures. Cocultures were also initiated with strains of G. sulfurreducens that could not produce pili or OmcS, two essential components for DIET. The finding that P. carbinolicus exchanged electrons with G. sulfurreducens via interspecies transfer of H2/formate rather than DIET demonstrates that not all microorganisms that can grow syntrophically are capable of DIET and that closely related microorganisms may use significantly different strategies for interspecies electron exchange. PMID:22923399

  16. Direct interspecies electron transfer accelerates syntrophic oxidation of butyrate in paddy soil enrichments.

    PubMed

    Li, Huijuan; Chang, Jiali; Liu, Pengfei; Fu, Li; Ding, Dewen; Lu, Yahai

    2015-05-01

    Syntrophic interaction occurs during anaerobic fermentation of organic substances forming methane as the final product. H2 and formate are known to serve as the electron carriers in this process. Recently, it has been shown that direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) occurs for syntrophic CH4 production from ethanol and acetate. Here, we constructed paddy soil enrichments to determine the involvement of DIET in syntrophic butyrate oxidation and CH4 production. The results showed that CH4 production was significantly accelerated in the presence of nanoFe3 O4 in all continuous transfers. This acceleration increased with the increase of nanoFe3 O4 concentration but was dismissed when Fe3 O4 was coated with silica that insulated the mineral from electrical conduction. NanoFe3 O4 particles were found closely attached to the cell surfaces of different morphology, thus bridging cell connections. Molecular approaches, including DNA-based stable isotope probing, revealed that the bacterial Syntrophomonadaceae and Geobacteraceae, and the archaeal Methanosarcinaceae, Methanocellales and Methanobacteriales, were involved in the syntrophic butyrate oxidation and CH4 production. Among them, the growth of Geobacteraceae strictly relied on the presence of nanoFe3 O4 and its electrical conductivity in particular. Other organisms, except Methanobacteriales, were present in enrichments regardless of nanoFe3 O4 amendment. Collectively, our study demonstrated that the nanoFe3 O4 -facilitated DIET occurred in syntrophic CH4 production from butyrate, and Geobacter species played the key role in this process in the paddy soil enrichments.

  17. Nuclear propulsion for orbital transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Beale, G.A.; Lawrence, T.J. )

    1989-06-01

    The state of the art in nuclear propulsion for orbital transfer is discussed. Cryogenic propulsion, electric propulsion, solar-thermal propulsion and direct nuclear propulsion are examined in this context. New technologies with exceptional promise are addressed, emphasizing the particle test bed nuclear engine.

  18. Interspecies Transfer of blaIMP-4 in a Patient with Prolonged Colonization by IMP-4-Producing Enterobacteriaceae

    PubMed Central

    Heney, Claire; George, Narelle M.; Nimmo, Graeme R.; Paterson, David L.

    2014-01-01

    A patient was colonized by IMP-4-producing Enterobacter cloacae and Escherichia coli strains for 7 months. IMP-4-producing E. cloacae strains were first and last isolated at day 33 and at 8 months after admission, respectively. IMP-4-producing E. coli strains were first and last isolated at days 88 and 181 after admission, respectively. The E. cloacae and E. coli isolates shared identical genetic features in terms of blaIMP-4, blaTEM-1, qnrB2, aacA4, HI2 plasmids, and ISCR1. This study shows the first prolonged colonization with in vivo interspecies transfer of blaIMP-4. PMID:25056334

  19. [Nuclear transfer and therapeutic cloning].

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiao-Ming; Lei, An-Min; Hua, Jin-Lian; Dou, Zhong-Ying

    2005-03-01

    Nuclear transfer and therapeutic cloning have widespread and attractive prospects in animal agriculture and biomedical applications. We reviewed that the quality of oocytes and nuclear reprogramming of somatic donor cells were the main reasons of the common abnormalities in cloned animals and the low efficiency of cloning and showed the problems and outlets in therapeutic cloning, such as some basic problems in nuclear transfer affected clinical applications of therapeutic cloning. Study on isolation and culture of nuclear transfer embryonic stem (ntES) cells and specific differentiation of ntES cells into important functional cells should be emphasized and could enhance the efficiency. Adult stem cells could help to cure some great diseases, but could not replace therapeutic cloning. Ethics also impeded the development of therapeutic cloning. It is necessary to improve many techniques and reinforce the research of some basic theories, then somatic nuclear transfer and therapeutic cloning may apply to agriculture reproduction and benefit to human life better.

  20. Transfer reactions in nuclear astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardayan, D. W.

    2016-08-01

    To a high degree many aspects of the large-scale behavior of objects in the Universe are governed by the underlying nuclear physics. In fact the shell structure of nuclear physics is directly imprinted into the chemical abundances of the elements. The tranquility of the night sky is a direct result of the relatively slow rate of nuclear reactions that control and determines a star’s fate. Understanding the nuclear structure and reaction rates between nuclei is vital to understanding our Universe. Nuclear-transfer reactions make accessible a wealth of knowledge from which we can extract much of the required nuclear physics information. A review of transfer reactions for nuclear astrophysics is presented with an emphasis on the experimental challenges and opportunities for future development.

  1. Potential for direct interspecies electron transfer in an electric-anaerobic system to increase methane production from sludge digestion

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Yaobin; Wang, Liying; Quan, Xie

    2015-01-01

    Direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) between Geobacter species and Methanosaeta species is an alternative to interspecies hydrogen transfer (IHT) in anaerobic digester, which however has not been established in anaerobic sludge digestion as well as in bioelectrochemical systems yet. In this study, it was found that over 50% of methane production of an electric-anaerobic sludge digester was resulted from unknown pathway. Pyrosequencing analysis revealed that Geobacter species were significantly enriched with electrodes. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) further confirmed that the dominant Geobacter species enriched belonged to Geobacter metallireducens. Together with Methanosaeta species prevailing in the microbial communities, the direct electron exchange between Geobacter species and Methanosaeta species might be an important reason for the “unknown” increase of methane production. Conductivity of the sludge in this electric-anaerobic digester was about 30% higher than that of the sludge in a control digester without electrodes. This study not only revealed for the first time that DIET might be the important mechanism on the methanogenesis of bioelectrochemical system, but also provided a new method to enhance DIET by means of bioelectric enrichment of Geobacter species. PMID:26057581

  2. Interspecies embryo transfer in camelids: the birth of the first Bactrian camel calves (Camelus bactrianus) from dromedary camels (Camelus dromedarius).

    PubMed

    Niasari-Naslaji, A; Nikjou, D; Skidmore, J A; Moghiseh, A; Mostafaey, M; Razavi, K; Moosavi-Movahedi, A A

    2009-01-01

    Interspecies embryo transfer is a possible approach that can be used to conserve endangered species. It could provide a useful technique to preserve the Iranian and wild Bactrian camels, both of which are threatened with extinction. In the present study, one Bactrian camel was superovulated using decreasing doses of FSH (60, 40, 30, 30, 20, 20 mg, b.i.d.; Folltropin-V; Bioniche, London, ON, Canada) for 6 days, followed by a single injection of FSH (20 mg, i.m.) on Day 7. Daily ovarian ultrasonography was performed until most of the growing follicles had reached a mature size of 13-17 mm, at which time the camel was mated twice, 24 h apart, with a fertile male Bactrian camel. At the time of first mating, female camels were given 20 microg, i.v., buserelin (Receptal; Intervet, Boxmeer, The Netherlands). One day after the donor camel had been mated, the dromedary recipients (n = 8) were injected with 25 mg, i.v., porcine LH (Lutropin-V; Bioniche) to induce ovulation. Embryos were recovered on Day 8.5 after the first mating and transferred non-surgically into recipients on Day 7.5 after LH injection. Pregnancy was diagnosed 25 days after embryo transfer. Healthy Bactrian camel calves (n = 4) were born without any particular complications at the time of parturition (e.g. dystocia and neonatal diseases). The present study is the first report of the birth of Bactrian camel calves from dromedary camels, as well as the first report of interspecies embryo transfer in old world camelids.

  3. Potentially direct interspecies electron transfer of methanogenesis for syntrophic metabolism under sulfate reducing conditions with stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Li, Yue; Zhang, Yaobin; Yang, Yafei; Quan, Xie; Zhao, Zhiqiang

    2017-06-01

    Direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) is an alternative to syntrophic metabolism in natural carbon cycle as well as in anaerobic digesters, but its function in anaerobic treatment of sulfate-containing wastewater have not yet to be described. Here, conductive stainless steel was added into anaerobic digesters for treating sulfate-containing wastewater to investigate the potential role of DIET in the response to the sulfate impact. Results showed that adding the conductive stainless steel made the anaerobic digestion less affected by the sulfate reduction than adding insulative plastic material. With adding stainless steel, methane production of the digesters increased by 7.5%-24.6%. Microbial analysis showed that the dissimilatory Fe (III) reducers like Geobacter species were enriched on the surface of the stainless steel. These results implied that the potential DIET of methanogenesis was established associating with stainless steel to outcompete the sulfate reduction.

  4. Interspecies Extrapolation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Interspecies extrapolation encompasses two related but distinct topic areas that are germane to quantitative extrapolation and hence computational toxicology-dose scaling and parameter scaling. Dose scaling is the process of converting a dose determined in an experimental animal ...

  5. Control of interspecies electron flow during anaerobic digestion: significance of formate transfer versus hydrogen transfer during syntrophic methanogenesis in flocs. [Methanobacterium formicicum; Desulfovibrio vulgaris

    SciTech Connect

    Thiele, J.H.; Zeikus, J.G.

    1988-01-01

    Microbial formate production and consumption during syntrophic conversion of ethanol or lactate to methane was examined in purified flocs and digestor contents obtained from a whey-processing digestor. Formate production by digestor contents or purified digestor flocs was dependent on CO/sub 2/ and either ethanol or lactate but not H/sub 2/ gas as an electron donor. Floc preparations accumulated fourfold-higher levels of formate (40 ..mu..M) than digestor contents, and the free flora was the primary site for formate cleavage to CO/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/ (90 ..mu..M formate per h). Inhibition of methanogenesis by CHCl/sub 3/ resulted in formate accumulation and suppression of syntrophic ethanol oxidation. H/sub 2/ gas was an insignificant intermediary metabolite of syntrophic ethanol conversion by flocs, and it exogenous addition neither stimulated methanogenes nor inhibited the initial rate of ethanol oxidation. These results demonstrated that >90% of the syntrophic ethanol conversion to methane by mixed cultures containing primarily Desulfovibrio vulgaris and Methanobacterium formicicum was mediated via interspecies formate transfer and the <10% was mediated via interspecies H/sub 2/ transfer. The results are discussed in relation to biochemical thermodynamics. A model is presented which describes the dynamics of a bicarbonate-formate electron shuttle mechanism for control of carbon and electron flow during syntrophic methanogenesis and provides a novel mechanism for energy conservation by syntrophic acetogens.

  6. Bovine somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Ross, Pablo J; Cibelli, Jose B

    2010-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is a technique by which the nucleus of a differentiated cell is introduced into an oocyte from which its genetic material has been removed by a process called enucleation. In mammals, the reconstructed embryo is artificially induced to initiate embryonic development (activation). The oocyte turns the somatic cell nucleus into an embryonic nucleus. This process is called nuclear reprogramming and involves an important change of cell fate, by which the somatic cell nucleus becomes capable of generating all the cell types required for the formation of a new individual, including extraembryonic tissues. Therefore, after transfer of a cloned embryo to a surrogate mother, an offspring genetically identical to the animal from which the somatic cells where isolated, is born. Cloning by nuclear transfer has potential applications in agriculture and biomedicine, but is limited by low efficiency. Cattle were the second mammalian species to be cloned after Dolly the sheep, and it is probably the most widely used species for SCNT experiments. This is, in part due to the high availability of bovine oocytes and the relatively higher efficiency levels usually obtained in cattle. Given the wide utilization of this species for cloning, several alternatives to this basic protocol can be found in the literature. Here we describe a basic protocol for bovine SCNT currently being used in our laboratory, which is amenable for the use of the nuclear transplantation technique for research or commercial purposes.

  7. Nuclear fuel pellet transfer escalator

    SciTech Connect

    Huggins, T.B. Sr.; Roberts, E.; Edmunds, M.O.

    1991-09-17

    This patent describes a nuclear fuel pellet escalator for loading nuclear fuel pellets into a sintering boat. It comprises a generally horizontally-disposed pellet transfer conveyor for moving pellets in single file fashion from a receiving end to a discharge end thereof, the conveyor being mounted about an axis at its receiving end for pivotal movement to generally vertically move its discharge end toward and away from a sintering boat when placed below the discharge end of the conveyor, the conveyor including an elongated arm swingable vertically about the axis and having an elongated channel recessed below an upper side of the arm and extending between the receiving and discharge ends of the conveyor; a pellet dispensing chute mounted to the arm of the conveyor at the discharge end thereof and extending therebelow such that the chute is carried at the discharge end of the conveyor for generally vertical movement therewith toward and away from the sintering boat.

  8. Interspecies transfer of momentum and energy in disparate-mass gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riesco-Chueca, P.; Fernandez-Feria, R.; Fernandez de La Mora, J.

    1987-01-01

    A determination is made of collision integrals for the rate of exchange of momentum and tensorial energy between components of a neutral gas binary mixture, for the case where said components have very different atomic masses. Collision integral values are obtained for arbitrary temperatures and velocities of the two components, allowing for large departures of the heavy gas from equilibrium conditions. The range of present interest is that in which the system is perturbed within times of the order of magnitude of the slow relaxation time that characterizes energy transfer between unlike molecules; the light gas distribution function is then Maxwellian to lowest order. The computation is conducted in detail for the case of atomic interactions describable in terms of a Lennard-Jones potential; by combining numerical computations with optimal matching of analytical expressions valid for large and small slip velocities, a set of compact formulas is obtained that holds for high and low temperatures.

  9. Interspecies Transfer and Regulation of Pseudomonas stutzeri A1501 Nitrogen Fixation Island in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Han, Yunlei; Lu, Na; Chen, Qinghua; Zhan, Yuhua; Liu, Wei; Lu, Wei; Zhu, Baoli; Lin, Min; Yang, Zhirong; Yan, Yongliang

    2015-08-01

    Until now, considerable effort has been made to engineer novel nitrogen-fixing organisms through the transfer of nif genes from various diazotrophs to non-nitrogen fixers; however, regulatory coupling of the heterologous nif genes with the regulatory system of the new host is still not well understood. In this work, a 49 kb nitrogen fixation island from P. stutzeri A1501 was transferred into E. coli using a novel and efficient transformation strategy, and a series of recombinant nitrogen-fixing E. coli strains were obtained. We found that the nitrogenase activity of the recombinant E. coli strain EN-01, similar to the parent strain P. stutzeri A1501, was dependent on external ammonia concentration, oxygen tension, and temperature. We further found that there existed a regulatory coupling between the E. coli general nitrogen regulatory system and the heterologous P. stutzeri nif island in the recombinant E. coli strain. We also provided evidence that the E. coli general nitrogen regulator GlnG protein was involved in the activation of the nif-specific regulator NifA via a direct interaction with the NifA promoter. To the best of our knowledge, this work plays a groundbreaking role in increasing understanding of the regulatory coupling of the heterologous nitrogen fixation system with the regulatory system of the recipient host. Furthermore, it will shed light on the structure and functional integrity of the nif island and will be useful for the construction of novel and more robust nitrogen-fixing organisms through biosynthetic engineering.

  10. Probable Interspecies Transfer of the bla(VIM-4) Gene between Enterobacter cloacae and Klebsiella pneumoniae in a Single Infant Patient.

    PubMed

    Piekarska, Katarzyna; Zacharczuk, Katarzyna; Rzeczkowska, Magdalena; Wołkowicz, Tomasz; Januszkiewicz, Aleksandra; Podsiadły, Edyta; Demkow, Urszula; Gierczyński, Rafał

    2015-01-01

    We report the interspecies transfer of the bla(VLM-4) gene in MBL-producing Enterobacter cloacae and Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates from a newborn patient who had received meropenem therapy. We show evidence that gene bla(VIM-4) was transmitted as a part of the class-1 integron on a ca. -90 kb conjugative plasmid. High homology of nucleotide sequence was observed between the integron found in VIM-4 producing E. cloacae and K. pneumoniae strains tested and class-1 integrons previously reporteded in Pseudomonas aeruginosa from Hungary and Poland. This finding may suggest P. aeruginosa as a potential source of acquired VIM-4 in Enterobacteriaceae.

  11. Development of a pheasant interspecies primordial germ cell transfer to chicken embryo: effect of donor cell sex on chimeric semen production.

    PubMed

    Kang, S J; Choi, J W; Park, K J; Lee, Y M; Kim, T M; Sohn, S H; Lim, J M; Han, J Y

    2009-09-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate whether the sex of donor primordial germ cells (PGCs) influences production of chimeric semen from recipient hatchlings produced by interspecies transfer between pheasant (Phasianus colchicus) and chicken (Gallus gallus). Pheasant PGCs were retrieved from 7-d-old embryos and subsequently transferred into circulatory blood of 2.5-d-old (Stage 17) embryos. The sex of embryos was discerned 3 to 6 days after laying, and in preliminary study, overall rate of embryo survival after sexing was 74.6% with male-to-female ratio of 0.49 to 0.51. In Experiment 1, magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS) using QCR1 antibody was effective for enriching the population of male and female PGCs in gonadal cells (9.2- to 12.5-fold and 10.8- to 19.5-fold increase, respectively). In Experiment 2, an increase in the number of hatchlings producing chimeric semen was detected after the homosexual transfer of male-to-male compared with that after the heterosexual transfer of female-to-male (68% to 88%). Significant increase was found in the frequency of chimeric semen production (0.96 to 1.68 times); production of pheasant progenies by artificial insemination using chimeric semen was also increased in the homosexual transfer (0 to 3 cases). In conclusion, the homosexual PGC transfer of male-to-male yielded better rate of generating pheasant progenies after test cross-reproduction than that of the heterosexual transfer of female-to-male, which could improve the efficiency of interspecies germ cell transfer system.

  12. Human somatic cell nuclear transfer and cloning.

    PubMed

    2012-10-01

    This document presents arguments that conclude that it is unethical to use somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) for infertility treatment due to concerns about safety; the unknown impact of SCNT on children, families, and society; and the availability of other ethically acceptable means of assisted reproduction. This document replaces the ASRM Ethics Committee report titled, "Human somatic cell nuclear transfer (cloning)," last published in Fertil Steril 2000;74:873-6.

  13. Development of interspecies cloned embryos in yak and dog.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Masao; Otoi, Takeshige; Wongsrikeao, Pimprapar; Agung, Budiyanto; Sambuu, Rentsenkhand; Suzuki, Tatsuyuki

    2005-01-01

    Interspecies nuclear transfer (NT) could be an alternative to replicate animals when supply of recipient oocytes is limited or in vitro embryo production systems are incomplete. In the present study, embryonic development was assessed following interspecies NT of donor cumulus cells derived from yak and dog into the recipient ooplasm of domestic cow. The percentages of fusion and subsequent embryo development to the eight-cell stage of interspecies NT embryos were comparable to those of intraspecies NT embryos (cow-cow NT embryos). The percentage of development to blastocysts was significantly lower (p < 0.05) in yak-cow NT embryos than that in cow-cow NT embryos (10.9% vs. 39.8%). In dog-cow NT embryos, only one embryo (0.4%) developed to the blastocyst stage. These results indicate that interspecies NT embryos possess equally developmental competence to the eight-cell stage as intraspecies NT embryos, but the development to blastocysts is very low when dog somatic cells are used as the donor nuclei.

  14. Dry Transfer Systems for Used Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Brett W. Carlsen; Michaele BradyRaap

    2012-05-01

    The potential need for a dry transfer system (DTS) to enable retrieval of used nuclear fuel (UNF) for inspection or repackaging will increase as the duration and quantity of fuel in dry storage increases. This report explores the uses for a DTS, identifies associated general functional requirements, and reviews existing and proposed systems that currently perform dry fuel transfers. The focus of this paper is on the need for a DTS to enable transfer of bare fuel assemblies. Dry transfer systems for UNF canisters are currently available and in use for transferring loaded canisters between the drying station and storage and transportation casks.

  15. 10 CFR 70.42 - Transfer of special nuclear material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Transfer of special nuclear material. 70.42 Section 70.42 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DOMESTIC LICENSING OF SPECIAL NUCLEAR MATERIAL Acquisition, Use and Transfer of Special Nuclear Material, Creditors' Rights § 70.42 Transfer of...

  16. 10 CFR 70.42 - Transfer of special nuclear material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Transfer of special nuclear material. 70.42 Section 70.42 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DOMESTIC LICENSING OF SPECIAL NUCLEAR MATERIAL Acquisition, Use and Transfer of Special Nuclear Material, Creditors' Rights § 70.42 Transfer of...

  17. 10 CFR 70.42 - Transfer of special nuclear material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Transfer of special nuclear material. 70.42 Section 70.42 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DOMESTIC LICENSING OF SPECIAL NUCLEAR MATERIAL Acquisition, Use and Transfer of Special Nuclear Material, Creditors' Rights § 70.42 Transfer of...

  18. 10 CFR 70.42 - Transfer of special nuclear material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Transfer of special nuclear material. 70.42 Section 70.42 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DOMESTIC LICENSING OF SPECIAL NUCLEAR MATERIAL Acquisition, Use and Transfer of Special Nuclear Material, Creditors' Rights § 70.42 Transfer of...

  19. 10 CFR 70.42 - Transfer of special nuclear material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Transfer of special nuclear material. 70.42 Section 70.42 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DOMESTIC LICENSING OF SPECIAL NUCLEAR MATERIAL Acquisition, Use and Transfer of Special Nuclear Material, Creditors' Rights § 70.42 Transfer of...

  20. Continuum effects in nuclear transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Marta, H. D.; Donangelo, R.; Fernandez Niello, J. O.; Pacheco, A. J.

    2007-02-12

    We develop a semiclassical calculation for nuclear transfer reactions where the continuum is treated in an exact way, and compare the results with those of a treatment in which the continuum is neglected. We conclude that the influence of the continuum is very important for weakly bound reactants.

  1. Sheep: The First Large Animal Model in Nuclear Transfer Research

    PubMed Central

    Czernik, Marta; Zacchini, Federica; Iuso, Domenico; Scapolo, Pier Augusto

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The scope of this article is not to provide an exhaustive review of nuclear transfer research, because many authoritative reviews exist on the biological issues related to somatic and embryonic cell nuclear transfer. We shall instead provide an overview on the work done specifically on sheep and the value of this work on the greater nuclear transfer landscape. PMID:24033140

  2. Rice interspecies hybrids show precocious or delayed developmental transitions in the endosperm without change to the rate of syncytial nuclear division.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Ryo; Ohnishi, Takayuki; Kinoshita, Yuki; Eiguchi, Mitsugu; Kurata, Nori; Kinoshita, Tetsu

    2011-03-01

    In angiosperms, interspecific crosses often display hybrid incompatibilities that are manifested as under-proliferation or over-proliferation of endosperm. Recent analyses using crosses between Arabidopsis thaliana and its related species with different ploidy levels have shown that interspecific hybridization causes delayed developmental transition and increased mitotic activity in the endosperm. In this study, we investigated endosperm development in interspecific crosses between diploid Oryza species. In a cross between female O. sativa and male O. punctata, we found that the hybrid endosperm was reduced in size and this cross was associated with precocious developmental transition. By contrast, the cross between O. sativa and O. longistaminata generated enlarged hybrid endosperm at the mid-point of seed development and this cross was associated with delayed developmental transition. Subsequently, the hybrid endosperm displayed a shriveled appearance at the seed maturation stage. We found that the accumulation of storage products and the expression patterns of several marker genes were also altered in the hybrid endosperm. By contrast, the rate of syncytial mitotic nuclear divisions was not significantly affected. The gene OsMADS87 showed a maternal origin-specific expression pattern in rice endosperm, in contrast to its Arabidopsis homologue PHERES1, which shows paternal origin-specific expression. OsMADS87 expression was decreased or increased depending on the type of developmental transition change in the hybrid rice endosperm. Our results indicate that one of the interspecies hybridization barriers in Oryza endosperm is mediated by precocious or delayed developmental alterations and de-regulation of OsMADS87, without change to the rate of syncytial mitotic nuclear division in the hybrid endosperm.

  3. 48 CFR 970.4402-4 - Nuclear material transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Nuclear material transfers... 970.4402-4 Nuclear material transfers. (a) Management and operating contractors, in preparing... nuclear material, shall be required to assure that each such subcontract or agreement contains a—...

  4. 48 CFR 970.4402-4 - Nuclear material transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Nuclear material transfers... 970.4402-4 Nuclear material transfers. (a) Management and operating contractors, in preparing... nuclear material, shall be required to assure that each such subcontract or agreement contains a—...

  5. 48 CFR 970.4402-4 - Nuclear material transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Nuclear material transfers... 970.4402-4 Nuclear material transfers. (a) Management and operating contractors, in preparing... nuclear material, shall be required to assure that each such subcontract or agreement contains a—...

  6. 48 CFR 970.4402-4 - Nuclear material transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Nuclear material transfers... 970.4402-4 Nuclear material transfers. (a) Management and operating contractors, in preparing... nuclear material, shall be required to assure that each such subcontract or agreement contains a—...

  7. Inter-species horizontal transfer resulting in core-genome and niche-adaptive variation within Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Nigel J; Boonmee, Prawit; Peden, John F; Jarvis, Stephen A

    2005-01-01

    Background Horizontal gene transfer is central to evolution in most bacterial species. The detection of exchanged regions is often based upon analysis of compositional characteristics and their comparison to the organism as a whole. In this study we describe a new methodology combining aspects of established signature analysis with textual analysis approaches. This approach has been used to analyze the two available genome sequences of H. pylori. Results This gene-by-gene analysis reveals a wide range of genes related to both virulence behaviour and the strain differences that have been relatively recently acquired from other sequence backgrounds. These frequently involve single genes or small numbers of genes that are not associated with transposases or bacteriophage genes, nor with inverted repeats typically used as markers for horizontal transfer. In addition, clear examples of horizontal exchange in genes associated with 'core' metabolic functions were identified, supported by differences between the sequenced strains, including: ftsK, xerD and polA. In some cases it was possible to determine which strain represented the 'parent' and 'altered' states for insertion-deletion events. Different signature component lengths showed different sensitivities for the detection of some horizontally transferred genes, which may reflect different amelioration rates of sequence components. Conclusion New implementations of signature analysis that can be applied on a gene-by-gene basis for the identification of horizontally acquired sequences are described. These findings highlight the central role of the availability of homologous substrates in evolution mediated by horizontal exchange, and suggest that some components of the supposedly stable 'core genome' may actually be favoured targets for integration of foreign sequences because of their degree of conservation. PMID:15676066

  8. Culture, characteristics and chromosome complement of Siberian tiger fibroblasts for nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Song, Jimei; Hua, Song; Song, Kai; Zhang, Yong

    2007-01-01

    Tiger (Panthera tigris Linnaeus, 1758) is a characteristic species of Asia, which is in severe danger. Siberian tiger (Panthera tigris altaica) is the largest one of the five existent tiger subspecies. It is extremely endangered. One new way for tiger protection and rescue is to study interspecies cloning. But there is few research data about Siberian tiger. In this study, we cultured Siberian tiger fibroblasts in vitro, analyzed their biological characteristics, chromosomes, and cell cycles, to provide not only nuclear donors with good morphology, normal biological characteristics, and chromosome quantity for tiger interspecies cloning, but also reliable data for further studying Siberian tiger. The results indicated that Siberian tiger ear fibroblasts can be successfully obtained by tissue culture either with or without overnight cold digestion, the cultured cells were typical fibroblasts with normal morphology, growth curve, and chromosome quantity; G0/G1 percentage increased and S percentage decreased with the confluence of cells. G0/G1 and S stage rate was significantly different between 40-50% and 80-90%, 95-100% confluence; there is no distinct difference between 80-90% and 95-100% confluence. The cells at the same density (80-90% confluence) were treated with or without 0.5% serum starving, GO/G1 rate of the former was higher than the latter, but the difference was not significant. GO/G1 proportion of 95-100% confluence was slightly higher than serum starving (80-90% confluence), but no significant difference. Therefore, the Siberian tiger fibroblasts we cultured in vitro can be used as donor cells, and the donor cells do not need to be treated with normal serum starvation during nuclear transfer; if we will just consider the rate of the G0/G1 stage cells, serum starvation can be replaced by confluence inhibition when cultured cells were more than 80-90% confluence.

  9. Interspecies somatic cell nucleus transfer with porcine oocytes as recipients: A novel bioassay system for assessing the competence of canine somatic cells to develop into embryos.

    PubMed

    Sugimura, S; Narita, K; Yamashiro, H; Sugawara, A; Shoji, T; Terashita, Y; Nishimori, K; Konno, T; Yoshida, M; Sato, E

    2009-09-01

    Interspecies somatic cell nucleus transfer (iSCNT) could be a useful bioassay system for assessing the ability of mammalian somatic cells to develop into embryos. To examine this possibility, we performed canine iSCNT using porcine oocytes, allowed to mature in vitro, as recipients. Canine fibroblasts from the tail tips and dewclaws of a female poodle (Fp) and a male poodle (Mp) were used as donors. We demonstrated that the use of porcine oocytes induced blastocyst formation in the iSCNT embryos cultured in porcine zygote medium-3. In Fp and Mp, the rate of blastocyst formation from cleaved embryos (Fp: 6.3% vs. 22.4%; and Mp: 26.1% vs. 52.4%) and the number of cells at the blastocyst stage (Fp: 30.7 vs. 60.0; and Mp: 27.2 vs. 40.1) were higher in the embryos derived from dewclaw cells than in those derived from tail-tip cells (P<0.05). The use of donor cells of any type in later passages decreased the rate of blastocyst formation. Treatment with trichostatin-A did not improve the rate of blastocyst formation from cleaved dewclaw cell-derived embryos but did so in the embryos derived from the tail-tip cells of Fp. Only blastocysts derived from dewclaw cells of Mp developed outgrowths. However, outgrowth formation was retrieved in the embryos derived from dewclaw cells of Fp by aggregation at the 4-cell stage. We inferred that iSCNT performed using porcine oocytes as recipients could represent a novel bioassay system for evaluating the developmental competence of canine somatic cells.

  10. Production of chicken progeny (Gallus gallus domesticus) from interspecies germline chimeric duck (Anas domesticus) by primordial germ cell transfer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chunhai; Khazanehdari, Kamal A; Baskar, Vijaya; Saleem, Shazia; Kinne, Joerg; Wernery, Ulrich; Chang, Il-Kuk

    2012-04-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the differentiation of chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus) primordial germ cells (PGCs) in duck (Anas domesticus) gonads. Chimeric ducks were produced by transferring chicken PGCs into duck embryos. Transfer of 200 and 400 PGCs resulted in the detection of a total number of 63.0 ± 54.3 and 116.8 ± 47.1 chicken PGCs in the gonads of 7-day-old duck embryos, respectively. The chimeric rate of ducks prior to hatching was 52.9% and 90.9%, respectively. Chicken germ cells were assessed in the gonad of chimeric ducks with chicken-specific DNA probes. Chicken spermatogonia were detected in the seminiferous tubules of duck testis. Chicken oogonia, primitive and primary follicles, and chicken-derived oocytes were also found in the ovaries of chimeric ducks, indicating that chicken PGCs are able to migrate, proliferate, and differentiate in duck ovaries and participate in the progression of duck ovarian folliculogenesis. Chicken DNA was detected using PCR from the semen of chimeric ducks. A total number of 1057 chicken eggs were laid by Barred Rock hens after they were inseminated with chimeric duck semen, of which four chicken offspring hatched and one chicken embryo did not hatch. Female chimeric ducks were inseminated with chicken semen; however, no fertile eggs were obtained. In conclusion, these results demonstrated that chicken PGCs could interact with duck germinal epithelium and complete spermatogenesis and eventually give rise to functional sperm. The PGC-mediated germline chimera technology may provide a novel system for conserving endangered avian species.

  11. Resolution of a Protracted Serogroup B Meningococcal Outbreak with Whole-Genome Sequencing Shows Interspecies Genetic Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Brehony, Carina; O'Connor, Lois; Meyler, Kenneth; Jolley, Keith A.; Bray, James; Bennett, Desiree; Maiden, Martin C. J.; Cunney, Robert

    2016-01-01

    A carriage study was undertaken (n = 112) to ascertain the prevalence of Neisseria spp. following the eighth case of invasive meningococcal disease in young children (5 to 46 months) and members of a large extended indigenous ethnic minority Traveller family (n = 123), typically associated with high-occupancy living conditions. Nested multilocus sequence typing (MLST) was employed for case specimen extracts. Isolates were genome sequenced and then were assembled de novo and deposited into the Bacterial Isolate Genome Sequencing Database (BIGSdb). This facilitated an expanded MLST approach utilizing large numbers of loci for isolate characterization and discrimination. A rare sequence type, ST-6697, predominated in disease specimens and isolates that were carried (n = 8/14), persisting for at least 44 months, likely driven by the high population density of houses (n = 67/112) and trailers (n = 45/112). Carriage for Neisseria meningitidis (P < 0.05) and Neisseria lactamica (P < 0.002) (2-sided Fisher's exact test) was more likely in the smaller, more densely populated trailers. Meningococcal carriage was highest in 24- to 39-year-olds (45%, n = 9/20). Evidence of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) was observed in four individuals cocolonized by Neisseria lactamica and Neisseria meningitidis. One HGT event resulted in the acquisition of 26 consecutive N. lactamica alleles. This study demonstrates how housing density can drive meningococcal transmission and carriage, which likely facilitated the persistence of ST-6697 and prolonged the outbreak. Whole-genome MLST effectively distinguished between highly similar outbreak strain isolates, including those isolated from person-to-person transmission, and also highlighted how a few HGT events can distort the true phylogenetic relationship between highly similar clonal isolates. PMID:27629899

  12. Resolution of a Protracted Serogroup B Meningococcal Outbreak with Whole-Genome Sequencing Shows Interspecies Genetic Transfer.

    PubMed

    Mulhall, Robert M; Brehony, Carina; O'Connor, Lois; Meyler, Kenneth; Jolley, Keith A; Bray, James; Bennett, Desiree; Maiden, Martin C J; Cunney, Robert

    2016-12-01

    A carriage study was undertaken (n = 112) to ascertain the prevalence of Neisseria spp. following the eighth case of invasive meningococcal disease in young children (5 to 46 months) and members of a large extended indigenous ethnic minority Traveller family (n = 123), typically associated with high-occupancy living conditions. Nested multilocus sequence typing (MLST) was employed for case specimen extracts. Isolates were genome sequenced and then were assembled de novo and deposited into the Bacterial Isolate Genome Sequencing Database (BIGSdb). This facilitated an expanded MLST approach utilizing large numbers of loci for isolate characterization and discrimination. A rare sequence type, ST-6697, predominated in disease specimens and isolates that were carried (n = 8/14), persisting for at least 44 months, likely driven by the high population density of houses (n = 67/112) and trailers (n = 45/112). Carriage for Neisseria meningitidis (P < 0.05) and Neisseria lactamica (P < 0.002) (2-sided Fisher's exact test) was more likely in the smaller, more densely populated trailers. Meningococcal carriage was highest in 24- to 39-year-olds (45%, n = 9/20). Evidence of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) was observed in four individuals cocolonized by Neisseria lactamica and Neisseria meningitidis One HGT event resulted in the acquisition of 26 consecutive N. lactamica alleles. This study demonstrates how housing density can drive meningococcal transmission and carriage, which likely facilitated the persistence of ST-6697 and prolonged the outbreak. Whole-genome MLST effectively distinguished between highly similar outbreak strain isolates, including those isolated from person-to-person transmission, and also highlighted how a few HGT events can distort the true phylogenetic relationship between highly similar clonal isolates.

  13. Interspecies transfer of the penicillin-binding protein 3-encoding gene ftsI between Haemophilus influenzae and Haemophilus haemolyticus can confer reduced susceptibility to β-lactam antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Søndergaard, Annette; Witherden, Elizabeth A; Nørskov-Lauritsen, Niels; Tristram, Stephen G

    2015-07-01

    Mutations in ftsI, encoding penicillin-binding protein 3, can cause decreased β-lactam susceptibility in Haemophilus influenzae. Sequencing of ftsI from clinical strains has indicated interspecies recombination of ftsI between H. influenzae and Haemophilus haemolyticus. This study documented apparently unrestricted homologous recombination of ftsI between H. influenzae and H. haemolyticus in vitro. Transfer of ftsI from resistant isolates conferred similar but not identical increases in the MICs of susceptible strains of H. influenzae and H. haemolyticus.

  14. Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer in the Mouse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishigami, Satoshi; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has become a unique and powerful tool for epigenetic reprogramming research and gene manipulation in animals since “Dolly,” the first animal cloned from an adult cell was reported in 1997. Although the success rates of somatic cloning have been inefficient and the mechanism of reprogramming is still largely unknown, this technique has been proven to work in more than 10 mammalian species. Among them, the mouse provides the best model for both basic and applied research of somatic cloning because of its abounding genetic resources, rapid sexual maturity and propagation, minimal requirements for housing, etc. This chapter describes a basic protocol for mouse cloning using cumulus cells, the most popular cell type for NT, in which donor nuclei are directly injected into the oocyte using a piezo-actuated micromanipulator. In particular, we focus on a new, more efficient mouse cloning protocol using trichostatin A (TSA), a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, which increases both in vitro and in vivo developmental rates from twofold to fivefold. This new method including TSA will be helpful to establish mouse cloning in many laboratories.

  15. Amphibian interorder nuclear transfer embryos reveal conserved embryonic gene transcription, but deficient DNA replication or chromosome segregation.

    PubMed

    Narbonne, Patrick; Gurdon, John B

    2012-01-01

    Early interspecies nuclear transfer (iNT) experiments suggested that a foreign nucleus may become permanently damaged after a few rounds of cell division in the cytoplasm of another species. That is, in some distant species combinations, nucleocytoplasmic hybrid (cybrid) blastula nuclei can no longer support development, even if they are back-transferred into their own kind of egg cytoplasm. We monitored foreign DNA amplification and RNA production by quantitative PCR (qPCR) and RT-qPCR in interorder amphibian hybrids and cybrids formed by the transfer of newt (Pleurodeles waltl) embryonic nuclei into intact and enucleated frog (Xenopus laevis) eggs. We found a dramatic reduction in the expansion of foreign DNA and cell numbers in developing cybrid embryos that correlated with reduced gene transcription. Interestingly, expansion in cell numbers was rescued by the recipient species (Xenopus) maternal genome in iNT hybrids, but it did not improve P. waltl DNA expansion or gene transcription. Also, foreign gene transcripts, normalized to DNA copy numbers, were mostly normal in both iNT hybrids and cybrids. Thus, incomplete foreign DNA replication and/or chromosome segregation during cell division may be the major form of nuclear damage occurring as a result of nuclear replication in a foreign cytoplasmic environment. It also shows that the mechanisms of embryonic gene transcription are highly conserved across amphibians and may not be a major cause of cybrid lethality.

  16. Transgenic chicken, mice, cattle, and pig embryos by somatic cell nuclear transfer into pig oocytes.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Mukesh Kumar; Das, Ziban Chandra; Heo, Young Tae; Joo, Jin Young; Chung, Hak-Jae; Song, Hyuk; Kim, Jae-Hwan; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Lee, Hoon Taek; Ko, Dae Hwan; Uhm, Sang Jun

    2013-08-01

    This study explored the possibility of producing transgenic cloned embryos by interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer (iSCNT) of cattle, mice, and chicken donor cells into enucleated pig oocytes. Enhanced green florescent protein (EGFP)-expressing donor cells were used for the nuclear transfer. Results showed that the occurrence of first cleavage did not differ significantly when pig, cattle, mice, or chicken cells were used as donor nuclei (p>0.05). However, the rate of blastocyst formation was significantly higher in pig (14.9±2.1%; p<0.05) SCNT embryos than in cattle (6.3±2.5%), mice (4.2±1.4%), or chicken (5.1±2.4%) iSCNT embryos. The iSCNT embryos also contained a significantly less number of cells per blastocyst than those of SCNT pig embryos (p<0.05). All (100%) iSCNT embryos expressed the EGFP gene, as evidenced by the green florescence under ultraviolet (UV) illumination. Microinjection of purified mitochondria from cattle somatic cells into pig oocytes did not have any adverse effect on their postfertilization in vitro development and embryo quality (p>0.05). Moreover, NCSU23 medium, which was designed for in vitro culture of pig embryos, was able to support the in vitro development of cattle, mice, and chicken iSCNT embryos up to the blastocyst stage. Taken together, these data suggest that enucleated pig oocytes may be used as a universal cytoplast for production of transgenic cattle, mice, and chicken embryos by iSCNT. Furthermore, xenogenic transfer of mitochondria to the recipient cytoplast may not be the cause for poor embryonic development of cattle-pig iSCNT embryos.

  17. Reproduction of wild birds via interspecies germ cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kang, Seok Jin; Choi, Jin Won; Kim, Sun Young; Park, Kyung Je; Kim, Tae Min; Lee, Young Mok; Kim, Heebal; Lim, Jeong Mook; Han, Jae Yong

    2008-11-01

    The present study was conducted to apply an interspecies germ cell transfer technique to wild bird reproduction. Pheasant (Phasianus colchicus) primordial germ cells (PGCs) retrieved from the gonads of 7-day-old embryos were transferred to the bloodstream of 2.5-day-old chicken (Gallus gallus) embryos. Pheasant-to-chicken germline chimeras hatched from the recipient embryos, and 10 pheasants were derived from testcross reproduction of the male chimeras with female pheasants. Gonadal migration of the transferred PGCs, their involvement in spermatogenesis, and production of chimeric semen were confirmed. The phenotype of pheasant progenies derived from the interspecies transfer was identical to that of wild pheasants. The average efficiency of reproduction estimated from the percentage of pheasants to total progenies was 17.5%. In conclusion, interspecies germ cell transfer into a developing embryo can be used for wild bird reproduction, and this reproductive technology may be applicable in conserving endangered bird species.

  18. Nuclear-transfer spectroscopy using radioactive targets

    SciTech Connect

    Naumann, R.A.; Dewberry, R.; Kouzes, R.T.; Hoff, R.; Boerner, H.; Lanier, R.G.; Mann, L.; Struble, G.L.

    1981-06-01

    The feasibiity and techniques for carrying out transfer spectroscopic experiments with radioactive targets having half lives down to a fraction of a year are reviewed. The use of such radioactive targets is illustrated by recent studies of the spectroscopy of /sup 149/Sm, /sup 174/Lu and /sup 247/Bk using (p,t) transfer spectroscopy.

  19. Electronic and Nuclear Factors in Charge and Excitation Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Piotr Piotrowiak

    2004-09-28

    We report the and/or state of several subprojects of our DOE sponsored research on Electronic and Nuclear Factors in Electron and Excitation Transfer: (1) Construction of an ultrafast Ti:sapphire amplifier. (2) Mediation of electronic interactions in host-guest molecules. (3) Theoretical models of electrolytes in weakly polar media. (4) Symmetry effects in intramolecular excitation transfer.

  20. Orbital transfer of large space structures with nuclear electric rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, T. H.; Byers, D. C.

    1980-01-01

    This paper discusses the potential application of electric propulsion for orbit transfer of a large spacecraft structure from low earth orbit to geosynchronous altitude in a deployed configuration. The electric power was provided by the spacecraft nuclear reactor space power system on a shared basis during transfer operations. Factors considered with respect to system effectiveness included nuclear power source sizing, electric propulsion thruster concept, spacecraft deployment constraints, and orbital operations and safety. It is shown that the favorable total impulse capability inherent in electric propulsion provides a potential economic advantage over chemical propulsion orbit transfer vehicles by reducing the number of Space Shuttle flights in ground-to-orbit transportation requirements.

  1. Handmade cloning: the future way of nuclear transfer?

    PubMed

    Vajta, Gábor

    2007-06-01

    The topic of this review is an alternative technique for somatic cell nuclear transfer. Removal of the zona pellucida facilitates manipulations of mammalian oocytes and early embryos, and problems related to their subsequent culture are commonly overestimated. This approach enables radical modifications to somatic cell nuclear transfer, and the handmade cloning (HMC) technique is now successfully applied to an increasing numbers of species. HMC radically decreases costs and the need for a skilled workforce; furthermore, it increases productivity, enables cryopreservation, and results in birth rates comparable, or even higher, than those achievable by micromanipulation-based traditional cloning (TC). The new technique can accelerate technology transfer and standardization and, eventually, might contribute to the widespread application of cloning. Additionally, HMC offers unique possibilities for the automation of somatic cell nuclear transfer.

  2. The analysis of chromatin remodeling and the staining for DNA methylation and histone acetylation do not provide definitive indicators of the developmental ability of inter-species cloned embryos.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eugine; Kim, Ji Hye; Park, Seon Mi; Jeong, Yeon Ik; Lee, Jong Yun; Park, Sun Woo; Choi, Jiho; Kim, Huen Suk; Jeong, Yeon Woo; Kim, Sue; Hyun, Sang Hwan; Hwang, Woo Suk

    2008-05-01

    The restricted supply of oocytes in the domestic dog limits the development of reproductive biotechnologies in this species. Inter-species somatic cell nuclear transfer could be an alternative for cloning animals whose oocytes are difficult to obtain. In this study, the possibility of cloning dog embryos using pig oocytes was investigated by evaluating nuclear remodeling. Chromatin remodeling, assessed by premature chromosome condensation, pseudo-pronuclei formation, DNA methylation and histone acetylation, along with the developmental ability was compared between intra- and inter-species cloned embryos. The incidence of premature chromosome condensation was significantly higher in intra-species cloned embryos relative to inter-species cloned embryos (87.2% vs. 61.7%; P<0.05), but comparable pseudo-pronuclei formation was observed in both (85.3% vs. 75.8%). None of the inter-species cloned embryos developed beyond the 8-cell stage while 18.3% of intra-species cloned embryos developed to the blastocyst stage. The relative level of both DNA methylation and histone acetylation was similar between intra- and inter-species cloned embryos at all times examined. These results suggest that although partial chromatin remodeling occurs, further investigation is needed to be able to use pig oocytes as recipient oocytes in dog cloning.

  3. The development and expression of pluripotency genes in embryos derived from nuclear transfer and in vitro fertilization.

    PubMed

    Ma, Li-Bing; He, Xiao-Ying; Wang, Feng-Mei; Cao, Jun-Wei; Cheng, Teng

    2014-11-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer can be used to produce embryonic stem (ES) cells, cloned animals, and can even increase the population size of endangered animals. However, the application of this technique is limited by the low developmental rate of cloned embryos, a situation that may result from abnormal expression of some zygotic genes. In this study, sheep-sheep intra-species cloned embryos, goat-sheep inter-species cloned embryos, or sheep in vitro fertilized embryos were constructed and cultured in vitro and the developmental ability and expression of three pluripotency genes, SSEA-1, Nanog and Oct4, were examined. The results showed firstly that the developmental ability of in vitro fertilized embryos was significantly higher than that of cloned embryos. In addition, the percentage of intra-species cloned embryos that developed to morula or blastocyst stages was also significantly higher than that of the inter-species cloned embryos. Secondly, all three types of embryos expressed SSEA-1 at the 8-cell and morula stages. At the 8-cell stage, a higher percentage of in vitro fertilized embryos expressed SSEA-1 than occurred for cloned embryos. However, at the morula stage, all detected embryos could express SSEA-1. Thirdly, the three types of embryos expressed Oct4 mRNA at the morula and blastocyst stages, and embryos at the blastocyst stage expressed Nanog mRNA. The rate of expression of Oct4 and Nanog mRNA at these developmental stages was higher in in vitro fertilized embryos than in cloned embryos. These results indicated that, during early development, the failure to reactivate some pluripotency genes maybe is a reason for the low cloning efficiency found with cloned embryos.

  4. Nuclear Waste Cross Site Transfer Pump Operational Resonance Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    HAUCK, F.M.

    1999-12-01

    Two single-volute, multi-stage centrifugal pumps are installed at a nuclear waste transfer station operated by the Department of Energy in Hanford, WA. The two parallel 100% pumps are Variable Frequency Drive operated and designed to transport waste etc.

  5. Human embryonic stem cells derived by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Masahito; Amato, Paula; Sparman, Michelle; Gutierrez, Nuria Marti; Tippner-Hedges, Rebecca; Ma, Hong; Kang, Eunju; Fulati, Alimujiang; Lee, Hyo-Sang; Sritanaudomchai, Hathaitip; Masterson, Keith; Larson, Janine; Eaton, Deborah; Sadler-Fredd, Karen; Battaglia, David; Lee, David; Wu, Diana; Jensen, Jeffrey; Patton, Phillip; Gokhale, Sumita; Stouffer, Richard L; Wolf, Don; Mitalipov, Shoukhrat

    2013-06-06

    Reprogramming somatic cells into pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has been envisioned as an approach for generating patient-matched nuclear transfer (NT)-ESCs for studies of disease mechanisms and for developing specific therapies. Past attempts to produce human NT-ESCs have failed secondary to early embryonic arrest of SCNT embryos. Here, we identified premature exit from meiosis in human oocytes and suboptimal activation as key factors that are responsible for these outcomes. Optimized SCNT approaches designed to circumvent these limitations allowed derivation of human NT-ESCs. When applied to premium quality human oocytes, NT-ESC lines were derived from as few as two oocytes. NT-ESCs displayed normal diploid karyotypes and inherited their nuclear genome exclusively from parental somatic cells. Gene expression and differentiation profiles in human NT-ESCs were similar to embryo-derived ESCs, suggesting efficient reprogramming of somatic cells to a pluripotent state.

  6. Interspecies Scaling in Blast Neurotrauma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-27

    in vivo animal model research, and the effects of interspecies scaling on current and future in vivo animal model experimentation for blast trauma...and gut. To improve FE modeling capabilities, brain tissue mechanics in common blast TBI animal model species were investigated experimentally and...importance of interspecies scaling for investigation of blast neurotrauma. This work looks at existing in vivo animal model data to derive appropriate

  7. Electron-Nuclear Spin Transfer in Triple Quantum Dot Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prada, Marta; Toonen, Ryan; Harrison, Paul

    2005-03-01

    We investigate the conductance spectra of coupled quantum dots to study systematically the nuclear spin relaxation of delta- and y-junction networks and observe spin blockade dependence on the electronic configurations. We derive the conductance using the Beenakker approach generalised to an array of quantum dots where we consider the nuclear spin transfer to electrons by hyperfine coupling. This allows us to predict the relevant memory effects on the different electronic states by studying the evolution of the single electron resonances in presence of nuclear spin relaxation. We find that the gradual depolarisation of the nuclear system is imprinted in the conductance spectra of the multidot system. Our calculations of the temporal evolution of the conductance resonance reveal that spin blockade can be lifted by hyperfine coupling.

  8. Electron nuclear spin transfer in quantum-dot networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prada, M.; Toonen, R. C.; Blick, R. H.; Harrison, P.

    2005-05-01

    We investigate the conductance spectra of coupled quantum dots to study systematically the nuclear spin relaxation of different geometries of a two-dimensional network of quantum dots and observe spin blockade dependence on the electronic configurations. We derive the conductance using the Beenakker approach generalized to an array of quantum dots where we consider the nuclear spin transfer to electrons by hyperfine coupling. This allows us to predict the relevant memory effects on the different electronic states by studying the evolution of the single electron resonances in the presence of nuclear spin relaxation. We find that the gradual depolarization of the nuclear system is imprinted in the conductance spectra of the multidot system. Our calculations of the temporal evolution of the conductance resonance reveal that spin blockade can be lifted by hyperfine coupling.

  9. Intermediate filaments promote nuclear mechanical constraints during somatic cell nuclear transfer in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Gall, Laurence; Brochard, Vincent; Ruffini, Sylvie; Laffont, Ludivine; Fleurot, Renaud; Lavin, Tiphaine Aguirre; Jouneau, Alice; Beaujean, Nathalie

    2012-12-01

    The somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) procedure requires nuclear remodeling to return differentiated somatic nuclei to the totipotent undifferentiated stage. We hypothesize that mechanical constraints might occur upon SCNT and thereby affect nuclear remodeling. Therefore, we analyzed the nuclear structures upon SCNT using as donors either wild-type fibroblasts with a dense vimentin network or vimentin-deprived cells [embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and fibroblasts invalidated for vimetin]. We demonstrated that following nuclear transfer of wild-type fibroblasts, vimentin intermediate filaments (IFs) persisted around the transplanted nuclei and 88% of them presented severe distortions. We also showed that the presence of vimentin filaments in the reconstructed embryos was correlated with DNA damage, as evidenced by γH2A.X foci. On the other hand, when ESCs or vimentin-null (Vim(-/-)) fibroblasts devoid of IFs were used as nuclear donors, no nuclear distortion and less DNA damage were observed. Altogether we believe that the introduction of vimentin into recipient oocytes during SCNT induces a mechanical constraint on the transplanted nucleus that is responsible for nuclear distortions and DNA damage. This could lead to incomplete reprogramming that would be detrimental to further embryonic development.

  10. Ethical aspects of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA transfer.

    PubMed

    Blesa, José Rafael; Tudela, Julio; Aznar, Justo

    2016-05-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) (cloning), as a reproductive or therapeutic method, and mitochondrial DNA transfer, as a method to prevent the transmission of mitochondrial diseases, are analyzed in this paper from a bioethics perspective. The licit purpose of being able to treat certain diseases, as in the case of SCNT, cannot justify, in any case, resorting to illicit means such as the manipulation, selection, and elimination of human embryos in the blastocyst phase, by using cell lines obtained from them. Crossing this line paves the way (as utilitarian ethics advocates) to assuming any cost in scientific experimentation so long as satisfactory results are obtained. With mitochondrial replacement, either human embryos are directly manipulated (pronuclear transfer) or germline cells are manipulated (maternal spindle transfer); changes in these could be transmitted to the offspring.

  11. Nuclear Effects in Neutrino Interactions at Low Momentum Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Miltenberger, Ethan Ryan

    2015-05-01

    This is a study to identify predicted effects of the carbon nucleus environment on neutrino - nucleus interactions with low momentum transfer. A large sample of neutrino interaction data collected by the MINERvA experiment is analyzed to show the distribution of charged hadron energy in a region with low momentum transfer. These distributions reveal a major discrepancy between the data and a popular interaction model with only the simplest Fermi gas nuclear effects. Detailed analysis of systematic uncertainties due to energy scale and resolution can account for only a little of the discrepancy. Two additional nuclear model effects, a suppression/screening effect (RPA), and the addition of a meson exchange current process (MEC), are shown to improve the description of the data.

  12. Heat Transfer Modeling of Dry Spent Nuclear Fuel Storage Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.Y.

    1999-01-13

    The present work was undertaken to provide heat transfer model that accurately predicts the thermal performance of dry spent nuclear fuel storage facilities. One of the storage configurations being considered for DOE Aluminum-clad Spent Nuclear Fuel (Al-SNF), such as the Material and Testing Reactor (MTR) fuel, is in a dry storage facility. To support design studies of storage options a computational and experimental program has been conducted at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The main objective is to develop heat transfer models including natural convection effects internal to an interim dry storage canister and to geological codisposal Waste Package (WP). Calculated temperatures will be used to demonstrate engineering viability of a dry storage option in enclosed interim storage and geological repository WP and to assess the chemical and physical behaviors of the Al-SNF in the dry storage facilities. The current paper describes the modeling approaches and presents the computational results along with the experimental data.

  13. Nuclear effects in neutrino interactions at low momentum transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miltenberger, Ethan

    This is a study to identify predicted effects of the carbon nucleus environment on neutrino - nucleus interactions with low momentum transfer. A large sample of neutrino interaction data collected by the MINERvA experiment is analyzed to show the distribution of charged hadron energy in a region with low momentum transfer. These distributions reveal a major discrepancy between the data and a popular interaction model with only the simplest Fermi gas nuclear effects. Detailed analysis of systematic uncertainties due to energy scale and resolution can account for only a little of the discrepancy. Two additional nuclear model effects, a suppression/screening effect (RPA), and the addition of a meson exchange current process (MEC), are shown to improve the description of the data.

  14. Nucleon Transfer Reactions in Few-Body Nuclear Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deltuva, A.

    2017-03-01

    Three- and four-body scattering is described solving Faddeev-Yakubovsky or equivalent Alt-Grassberger-Sandhas integral equations for transition operators in momentum-space. Several realistic nuclear interaction models are used; the Coulomb force between charged particles is taken into account via the screening and renormalization method. Differential cross sections and spin observables for various nucleon transfer reactions are calculated and compared with experimental data.

  15. Nuclear reactor power for an electrically powered orbital transfer vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, L.; Beatty, R.; Bhandari, P.; Chow, E.; Deininger, W.; Ewell, R.; Fujita, T.; Grossman, M.; Kia, T.; Nesmith, B.

    1987-01-01

    To help determine the systems requirements for a 300-kWe space nuclear reactor power system, a mission and spacecraft have been examined which utilize electric propulsion and this nuclear reactor power for multiple transfers of cargo between low earth orbit (LEO) and geosynchronous earth orbit (GEO). A propulsion system employing ion thrusters and xenon propellant was selected. Propellant and thrusters are replaced after each sortie to GEO. The mass of the Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV), empty and dry, is 11,000 kg; nominal propellant load is 5000 kg. The OTV operates between a circular orbit at 925 km altitude, 28.5 deg inclination, and GEO. Cargo is brought to the OTV by Shuttle and an Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV); the OTV then takes it to GEO. The OTV can also bring cargo back from GEO, for transfer by OMV to the Shuttle. OTV propellant is resupplied and the ion thrusters are replaced by the OMV before each trip to GEO. At the end of mission life, the OTV's electric propulsion is used to place it in a heliocentric orbit so that the reactor will not return to earth. The nominal cargo capability to GEO is 6000 kg with a transit time of 120 days; 1350 kg can be transferred in 90 days, and 14,300 kg in 240 days. These capabilities can be considerably increased by using separate Shuttle launches to bring up propellant and cargo, or by changing to mercury propellant.

  16. Nuclear reactor fuel element having improved heat transfer

    DOEpatents

    Garnier, J.E.; Begej, S.; Williford, R.E.; Christensen, J.A.

    1982-03-03

    A nuclear reactor fuel element having improved heat transfer between fuel material and cladding is described. The element consists of an outer cladding tube divided into an upper fuel section containing a central core of fissionable or mixed fissionable and fertile fuel material, slightly smaller in diameter than the inner surface of the cladding tube and a small lower accumulator section, the cladding tube being which is filled with a low molecular weight gas to transfer heat from fuel material to cladding during irradiation. A plurality of essentially vertical grooves in the fuel section extend downward and communicate with the accumulator section. The radial depth of the grooves is sufficient to provide a thermal gradient between the hot fuel surface and the relatively cooler cladding surface to allow thermal segregation to take place between the low molecular weight heat transfer gas and high molecular weight fission product gases produced by the fuel material during irradiation.

  17. Cloning of bovine embryos by multiple nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Takano, H; Kozai, C; Shimizu, S; Kato, Y; Tsunoda, Y

    1997-05-01

    The in vitro development of multiple generation bovine nuclear transferred embryos to blastocysts and their survival ability after freezing and thawing were examined. Parent donor embryos which had 20 to 50 cells were recovered from superovulated cows. Follicular oocytes matured in vitro were used as recipient oocytes. The recipient oocytes enucleated at 22 to 24 h after the onset of maturation were preactivated at 33 h. Enucleated oocytes with a donor blastomere were fused 9 h after activation by an electric stimulus and the fused oocytes were cultured in vitro (first generation). Reconstituted oocytes that had developed to the 8- to 16-cell stage 3 to 4 d after fusion were used as donor embryos for the next generation. Recloning procedures were performed twice (second and third generations). The proportion of recipient oocytes successfully fused with a blastomere increased with the cycle of nuclear transfer. Eighty to 86% of fused oocytes developed to the 2-cell stage and there was no significant difference with the generation. The proportion of reconstituted embryos receiving blastomeres derived from first generation embryos had higher developmental ability in vitro, than those derived from other generations (43 vs 31% for 8 to 16-cell stage, 37 vs 20 and 21% for blastocyst stage). The number of cloned blastocysts increased with repeated nuclear transfer (once: 6.2 +/- 4.3, twice: 19.8 +/- 9.2 and three times: 30.0 +/- 14.7) but varied greatly with each parent donor embryo. The in vitro viability of cloned blastocysts after freezing and thawing (59%) was low but not significantly different from that obtained for in vitro fertilized blastocysts (72%). After transfer of either fresh or frozen-thawed cloned blastocysts to 21 recipients, 10 of them were pregnant on Day 60. Four and 3 offspring were produced from 20 fresh and 14 frozen-thawed blastocysts,respectively.

  18. Somatic cell nuclear transfer in mammals: progress and applications.

    PubMed

    Colman, A

    Somatic nuclear transfer has been performed with frogs since the early 1960s, yet it has proved impossible to generate an adult frog using an adult cell as nuclear donor. After some initial skepticism, the birth of sheep, cows, goats, and mice using this technique with fetal or adult cell donors is now established fact. The success with adult mammalian cell donors extends the historic work in frogs by attesting to the totipotency of nuclei in at least some adult, differentiated cell types. Because the technique offers a developmental read out of the totality of genetic and molecular lifetime changes accumulated by the nucleus of a single somatic cell, basic research applications are seen in the fields of ageing, cancer, X chromosome inactivation, and imprinting. The prospect of a method for gene targeting in livestock holds particular promise for commercial applications; whilst for humans, the use of nuclear transfer to provide diverse populations of customized stem cells for therapeutic purposes presents a tantalizing future goal.

  19. Interspecies Dissemination of a Mobilizable Plasmid Harboring blaIMP-19 and the Possibility of Horizontal Gene Transfer in a Single Patient

    PubMed Central

    Gomi, Ryota; Matsuda, Tomonari; Tanaka, Michio; Nagao, Miki; Takakura, Shunji; Uemoto, Shinji; Ichiyama, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Carbapenemase-producing Gram-negative bacilli have been a global concern over the past 2 decades because these organisms can cause severe infections with high mortality rates. Carbapenemase genes are often carried by mobile genetic elements, and resistance plasmids can be transferred through conjugation. We conducted whole-genome sequencing (WGS) to demonstrate that the same plasmid harboring a metallo-β-lactamase gene was detected in two different species isolated from a single patient. Metallo-β-lactamase-producing Achromobacter xylosoxidans (KUN4507), non-metallo-β-lactamase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (KUN4843), and metallo-β-lactamase-producing K. pneumoniae (KUN5033) were sequentially isolated from a single patient and then analyzed in this study. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing, molecular typing (pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing), and conjugation analyses were performed by conventional methods. Phylogenetic and molecular clock analysis of K. pneumoniae isolates were performed with WGS, and the nucleotide sequences of plasmids detected from these isolates were determined using WGS. Conventional molecular typing revealed that KUN4843 and KUN5033 were identical, whereas the phylogenetic tree analysis revealed a slight difference. These two isolates were separated from the most recent common ancestor 0.74 years before they were isolated. The same resistance plasmid harboring blaIMP-19 was detected in metallo-β-lactamase-producing A. xylosoxidans and K. pneumoniae. Although this plasmid was not self-transferable, the conjugation of this plasmid from A. xylosoxidans to non-metallo-β-lactamase-producing K. pneumoniae was successfully performed. The susceptibility patterns for metallo-β-lactamase-producing K. pneumoniae and the transconjugant were similar. These findings supported the possibility of the horizontal transfer of plasmid-borne blaIMP-19 from A. xylosoxidans to K. pneumoniae in a single patient. PMID

  20. Secondary heat transfer circuit for a nuclear reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Brachet, A.; Figuet, J.; Guidez, J.; Lions, N.

    1985-05-28

    The invention relates to a secondary heat transfer circuit for a liquid metal nuclear reactor. Each loop of the main circuit has in order a steam generator, a pump, and at least one heat exchanger positioned in the reactor vessel. A downstream buffer tank is located in the pipe connecting the generator to the pump, whilst the upstream buffer tank can be positioned either in the generator, or outside the latter. Application to the generation of electric power by means of a fast neutron reactor.

  1. Recent progress in bovine somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Akagi, Satoshi; Geshi, Masaya; Nagai, Takashi

    2013-03-01

    Bovine somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos can develop to the blastocyst stage at a rate similar to that of embryos produced by in vitro fertilization. However, the full-term developmental rate of SCNT embryos is very low, owing to the high embryonic and fetal losses after embryo transfer. In addition, increased birth weight and postnatal mortality are observed at high rates in cloned calves. The low efficiency of SCNT is probably attributed to incomplete reprogramming of the donor nucleus and most of the developmental problems of clones are thought to be caused by epigenetic defects. Applications of SCNT will depend on improvement in the efficiency of production of healthy cloned calves. In this review, we discuss problems and recent progress in bovine SCNT.

  2. Nuclear transfer to study the nuclear reprogramming of human stem cells.

    PubMed

    Saito, Shigeo; Sawai, Ken; Murayama, Yoshinobu; Fukuda, Keiichi; Yokoyama, Kazunari

    2008-01-01

    Research of stem cells will enable us to understand the development and function of tissues and organs in mammals. The ability to induce regeneration of new tissues from embryonic stem (ES) cells derived from cloned blastocysts via nuclear transfer can be expected in the not-too-distant future. The fact that there is no way except nuclear cloning for the return of differentiated cells to undifferentiated cells remains an interesting problem to be solved. We describe protocols for the production of cloned calves from bovine ES cells to study nuclear reprogramming ability of stem cells. The frequency of term pregnancies for blastocysts from ES cells is higher than those of early pregnancies and maintained pregnancies after nuclear transfer with bovine somatic cells. We also describe protocols for gene introduction into bovine ES cells in vitro, particularly the human leukocyte antigens (HLA). Bovine ES cells provide a powerful tool for the generation of transgenic clonal offspring. This technique, when perfected for humans, may be critical for neural stem cell transplantation.

  3. Effect of donor cell type on nuclear remodelling in rabbit somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos.

    PubMed

    Tian, J; Song, J; Li, H; Yang, D; Li, X; Ouyang, H; Lai, L

    2012-08-01

    Cloned rabbits have been produced for many years by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). The efficiency of cloning by SCNT, however, has remained extremely low. Most cloned embryos degenerate in utero, and the few that develop to term show a high incidence of post-natal death and abnormalities. The cell type used for donor nuclei is an important factor in nuclear transfer (NT). As reported previously, NT embryos reconstructed with fresh cumulus cells (CC-embryos) have better developmental potential than those reconstructed with foetal fibroblasts (FF-embryos) in vivo and in vitro. The reason for this disparity in developmental capacity is still unknown. In this study, we compared active demethylation levels and morphological changes between the nuclei of CC-embryos and FF-embryos shortly after activation. Anti-5-methylcytosine immunofluorescence of in vivo-fertilized and cloned rabbit embryos revealed that there was no detectable active demethylation in rabbit zygotes or NT-embryos derived from either fibroblasts or CC. In the process of nuclear remodelling, however, the proportion of nuclei with abnormal appearance in FF-embryos was significantly higher than that in CC-embryos during the first cell cycle. Our study demonstrates that the nuclear remodelling abnormality of cloned rabbit embryos may be one important factor for the disparity in developmental success between CC-embryos and FF-embryos.

  4. Reshaping the transcriptional frontier: epigenetics and somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Long, Charles R; Westhusin, Mark E; Golding, Michael C

    2014-02-01

    Somatic-cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) experiments have paved the way to the field of cellular reprogramming. The demonstrated ability to clone over 20 different species to date has proven that the technology is robust but very inefficient, and is prone to developmental anomalies. Yet, the offspring from cloned animals exhibit none of the abnormalities of their parents, suggesting the low efficiency and high developmental mortality are epigenetic in origin. The epigenetic barriers to reprogramming somatic cells into a totipotent embryo capable of developing into a viable offspring are significant and varied. Despite their intimate relationship, chromatin structure and transcription are often not uniformly reprogramed after nuclear transfer, and many cloned embryos develop gene expression profiles that are hybrids between the donor cell and an embryonic blastomere. Recent advances in cellular reprogramming suggest that alteration of donor-cell chromatin structure towards that found in an normal embryo is actually the rate-limiting step in successful development of SCNT embryos. Here we review the literature relevant to the transformation of a somatic-cell nucleus into an embryo capable of full-term development. Interestingly, while resetting somatic transcription and associated epigenetic marks are absolutely required for development of SCNT embryos, life does not demand perfection.

  5. Fibroblast cell line establishment, cryopreservation and interspecies embryos reconstruction in red panda ( Ailurus fulgens).

    PubMed

    Tao, Yong; Liu, Jianming; Zhang, Yunhai; Zhang, Meiling; Fang, Junshun; Han, Wei; Zhang, Zhizhong; Liu, Ya; Ding, Jianping; Zhang, Xiaorong

    2009-05-01

    In evolution, the red panda (Ailurus fulgens) plays a pivotal role in the higher level phylogeny of arctoides carnivore mammals. The red panda inhabits certain Asian countries only and its numbers are decreasing. Therefore, the development of feasible ways to preserve this species is necessary. Genetic resource cryopreservation and somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) have been used extensively to rescue this endangered species. The present study describes the establishment, for the first time, of a red panda ear fibroblast cell line, which was then cryopreserved, thawed and cultured. Through micromanipulation, interspecies embryos were reconstructed using the cryopreserved-thawed fibroblasts of the red panda as the donor and rabbit oocytes as recipients. A total of 194 enucleated rabbit oocytes were reconstructed with red panda ear fibroblasts; enucleated oocytes were activated without fusion as the control. The results show that the fibroblast cell line was established successfully by tissue culture and then cryopreserved in liquid nitrogen. Supplementation with 20% fetal bovine serum and 8% dimethyl sulphoxide in basic medium facilitated the cryopreservation. The interspecies embryos were successfully reconstructed. The cleavage, morulae and blastocyst rates after in vitro culture were 71, 47 and 23% (31/194), respectively. This study indicated that a somatic cell line could be established and cryopreserved from red panda and that rabbit cytoplast supports mitotic cleavage of the red panda karyoplasts and is capable of reprogramming the nucleus to achieve blastocysts.

  6. Birth of Beagle dogs by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Hossein, Mohammad Shamim; Jeong, Yeon Woo; Park, Sun Woo; Kim, Joung Joo; Lee, Eugine; Ko, Kyeong Hee; Hyuk, Park; Hoon, Song Seung; Kim, Yeun Wook; Hyun, Sang Hwan; Shin, Taeyoung; Hwang, Woo Suk

    2009-09-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate two enucleation methods for somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), and to standardize the optimum number of embryos for transfer to each recipient for canines. Oocytes retrieved from outbreed dogs were reconstructed with adult somatic cells from a male Beagle dog. A total of 134 or 267 oocytes were enucleated either by aspiration or squeezing method, fused with two DC pulses of 1.75 kV/cm for 15 micros electrical stimulation, chemically activated after 1h of fusion using 10 microM calcium ionophore for 4 min and cultured 4h in 1.9 mM 6-dimethylaminopurine. Finally, 103 or 214 embryos for aspiration or squeezing method were transferred to 6 or 11 naturally synchronized recipients, respectively. A total of 53, 317 and 342 embryos were transferred to 7, 17 and 12 recipients for the group of 4-10, 11-25 and 26-40 embryos, respectively. There was no difference between fusion rate (76.87% vs. 80.15%), full term pregnancy rate (16.66% vs. 27.27%) and percent of live puppies born (0.97% vs. 1.87%) for aspiration and squeezing method (P>0.05). Production efficiency of cloned dogs was significantly affected by the number of embryos transferred to each recipient. No pregnancy was established for the group of 4-10 embryos (n=7) and 26-40 embryos (n=12) while pregnancy was detected in 23.53% recipients received a group of 11-25 embryos (n=17). Among them, five (1.76%) live puppies were born (P<0.05). These data show an increase in the overall efficiency of SCNT in canine species.

  7. 78 FR 11904 - Zion Nuclear Power Station, Units 1 and 2; ZionSolutions, LLC; Consideration of Indirect Transfer

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Zion Nuclear Power Station, Units 1 and 2; ZionSolutions, LLC; Consideration of Indirect Transfer AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Request for license transfer; opportunity to...

  8. Propagation of elite rescue dogs by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Oh, Hyun Ju; Choi, Jin; Kim, Min Jung; Kim, Geon A; Jo, Young Kwang; Choi, Yoo Bin; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to compare the efficiency of two oocyte activation culture media to produce cloned dogs from an elite rescue dog and to analyze their behavioral tendencies. In somatic cell nuclear transfer procedure, fused couplets were activated by calcium ionophore treatment for 4 min, cultured in two media: modified synthetic oviduct fluid (mSOF) with 1.9 mmol/L 6-dimethylaminopyridine (DMAP) (SOF-DMAP) or porcine zygote medium (PZM-5) with 1.9 mmol/L DMAP (PZM-DMAP) for 4 h, and then were transferred into recipients. After embryo transfer, pregnancy was detected in one out of three surrogate mothers that received cloned embryos from the PZM-DMAP group (33.3%), and one pregnancy (25%) was detected in four surrogate mothers receiving cloned embryos from the SOF-DMAP group. Each pregnant dog gave birth to one healthy cloned puppy by cesarean section. We conducted the puppy aptitude test with two cloned puppies; the two cloned puppies were classified as the same type, accepting humans and leaders easily. The present study indicated that the type of medium used in 6-DMAP culture did not increase in cloning efficiency and dogs cloned using donor cells derived from one elite dog have similar behavioral tendencies.

  9. Dogs cloned from fetal fibroblasts by nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Hong, So Gun; Jang, Goo; Kim, Min Kyu; Oh, Hyun Ju; Park, Jung Eun; Kang, Jung Taek; Koo, Ok Jae; Kim, Dae Yong; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2009-10-01

    Fetal fibroblasts have been considered as the prime candidate donor cells for the canine reproductive cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) in regard to the future production of transgenic dogs, mainly due to their higher developmental competence and handling advantage in gene targeting. In this study, the cloning efficiency with canine fetal fibroblasts as donor cells was determined. A total of 50 presumptive cloned embryos were reconstructed, activated and transferred into the oviducts of naturally synchronous recipient bitches. While the fusion rate (76.9%) was similar to those of our earlier studies with adult fibroblasts as donor cells (73.9-77.1%), a high cloning efficiency (4.0%; 2 births/50 embryos transferred) was found compared to the previous success rate with adult fibroblasts (0.2-1.8%). The cloned beagles were healthy and genotypically identical to the donor fibroblast cells. This study shows that a fetal fibroblast cell would be an excellent donor for future production of transgenic dogs via gene targeting in this cell followed cloning using SCNT technology.

  10. Factors affecting the development of somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos in Cattle.

    PubMed

    Akagi, Satoshi; Matsukawa, Kazutsugu; Takahashi, Seiya

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear transfer is a complex multistep procedure that includes oocyte maturation, cell cycle synchronization of donor cells, enucleation, cell fusion, oocyte activation and embryo culture. Therefore, many factors are believed to contribute to the success of embryo development following nuclear transfer. Numerous attempts to improve cloning efficiency have been conducted since the birth of the first sheep by somatic cell nuclear transfer. However, the efficiency of somatic cell cloning has remained low, and applications have been limited. In this review, we discuss some of the factors that affect the developmental ability of somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos in cattle.

  11. Nuclear Transparency in Large Momentum Transfer Quasielastic Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mardor, I.; Durrant, S.; Aclander, J.; Alster, J.; Barton, D.; Bunce, G.; Carroll, A.; Christensen, N.; Courant, H.; Gushue, S.; Heppelmann, S.; Kosonovsky, E.; Mardor, Y.; Marshak, M.; Makdisi, Y.; Minor, E. D.; Navon, I.; Nicholson, H.; Piasetzky, E.; Roser, T.; Russell, J.; Sutton, C. S.; Tanaka, M.; White, C.; Wu, J.-Y.

    1998-12-01

    We measured simultaneously pp elastic and quasielastic \\(p,2p\\) scattering in hydrogen, deuterium, and carbon for momentum transfers of 4.8 to 6.2 \\(GeV/c\\)2 at incoming momenta of 5.9 and 7.5 GeV/c and center-of-mass scattering angles in the range θc.m. = 83.7°-90°. The nuclear transparency is defined as the ratio of the quasielastic cross section to the free pp cross section. At incoming momentum of 5.9 GeV/c, the transparency of carbon decreases by a factor of 2 from θc.m.~=85° to θc.m.~=89°. At the largest angle the transparency of carbon increases from 5.9 to 7.5 GeV/c by more than 50%. The transparency in deuterium does not depend on incoming momentum nor on θc.m..

  12. Cloning of ES cells and mice by nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Wakayama, Sayaka; Kishigami, Satoshi; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2009-01-01

    We have been able to develop a stable nuclear transfer (NT) method in the mouse, in which donor nuclei are directly injected into the oocyte using a piezo-actuated micromanipulator. Although the piezo unit is a complex tool, once mastered it is of great help not only in NT experiments, but also in almost all other forms of micromanipulation. Using this technique, embryonic stem (ntES) cell lines established from somatic cell nuclei can be generated relatively easily from a variety of mouse genotypes and cell types. Such ntES cells can be used not only for experimental models of human therapeutic cloning but also as a means of preserving mouse genomes instead of preserving germ cells. Here, we describe our most recent protocols for mouse cloning.

  13. Recent advancements in cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer

    PubMed Central

    Ogura, Atsuo; Inoue, Kimiko; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2013-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) cloning is the sole reproductive engineering technology that endows the somatic cell genome with totipotency. Since the first report on the birth of a cloned sheep from adult somatic cells in 1997, many technical improvements in SCNT have been made by using different epigenetic approaches, including enhancement of the levels of histone acetylation in the chromatin of the reconstructed embryos. Although it will take a considerable time before we fully understand the nature of genomic programming and totipotency, we may expect that somatic cell cloning technology will soon become broadly applicable to practical purposes, including medicine, pharmaceutical manufacturing and agriculture. Here we review recent progress in somatic cell cloning, with a special emphasis on epigenetic studies using the laboratory mouse as a model. PMID:23166393

  14. Recent advancements in cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Atsuo; Inoue, Kimiko; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2013-01-05

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) cloning is the sole reproductive engineering technology that endows the somatic cell genome with totipotency. Since the first report on the birth of a cloned sheep from adult somatic cells in 1997, many technical improvements in SCNT have been made by using different epigenetic approaches, including enhancement of the levels of histone acetylation in the chromatin of the reconstructed embryos. Although it will take a considerable time before we fully understand the nature of genomic programming and totipotency, we may expect that somatic cell cloning technology will soon become broadly applicable to practical purposes, including medicine, pharmaceutical manufacturing and agriculture. Here we review recent progress in somatic cell cloning, with a special emphasis on epigenetic studies using the laboratory mouse as a model.

  15. Gnotobiotic Miniature Pig Interbreed Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer for Xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jeong Ho; Kim, Sang Eun; Gupta, Mukesh Kumar; Lee, HoonTaek

    2016-08-01

    Transgenic animal producing technology has improved consistently over the last couple of decades. Among the available methods, somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) technology was officially the most popular. However, SCNT has low efficiency and requires a highly skilled individual. Additionally, the allo-SCNT nuclear reprogramming mechanism is poorly understood in the gnotobiotic miniature pig, which is a candidate for xenotransplantation, making sampling in oocytes very difficult compared to commercial hybrid pigs. Therefore, interbreed SCNT (ibSCNT), which is a combination of miniature pig and commercial pig (Landrace based), was analyzed and was found to be similar to SCNT in terms of the rate of blastocyst formation (12.6% ± 2.9% vs. 15.5% ± 2.2%; p > 0.05). However, a significantly lower fusion rate was observed in the ibSCNT compared to normal SCNT with Landrace pig somatic cells (29.6% ± 0.8% vs. 65.0% ± 4.9%). Thus, the optimization of fusion parameters was necessary for efficient SCNT. Our results further revealed that ibSCNT by the whole-cell intracytoplasmic injection (WCICI) method had a significantly higher blastocyst forming efficiency than the electrofusion method (31.1 ± 8.5 vs. 15.5% ± 2.2%). The nuclear remodeling and the pattern of changes in acetylation at H3K9 residue were similar in both SCNT and ibSCNT embryos.

  16. HEAT TRANSFER ANALYSIS FOR NUCLEAR WASTE SOLIDIFICATION CONTAINER

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.

    2009-06-01

    The Nuclear Nonproliferation Programs Design Authority is in the design stage of the Waste Solidification Building (WSB) for the treatment and solidification of the radioactive liquid waste streams generated by the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF) and Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF). The waste streams will be mixed with a cementitious dry mix in a 55-gallon waste container. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has been performing the testing and evaluations to support technical decisions for the WSB. Engineering Modeling & Simulation Group was requested to evaluate the thermal performance of the 55-gallon drum containing hydration heat source associated with the current baseline cement waste form. A transient axi-symmetric heat transfer model for the drum partially filled with waste form cement has been developed and heat transfer calculations performed for the baseline design configurations. For this case, 65 percent of the drum volume was assumed to be filled with the waste form, which has transient hydration heat source, as one of the baseline conditions. A series of modeling calculations has been performed using a computational heat transfer approach. The baseline modeling results show that the time to reach the maximum temperature of the 65 percent filled drum is about 32 hours when a 43 C initial cement temperature is assumed to be cooled by natural convection with 27 C external air. In addition, the results computed by the present model were compared with analytical solutions. The modeling results will be benchmarked against the prototypic test results. The verified model will be used for the evaluation of the thermal performance for the WSB drum. Detailed results and the cases considered in the calculations will be discussed here.

  17. Activation of equine nuclear transfer oocytes: methods and timing of treatment in relation to nuclear remodeling.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young-Ho; Love, Linda B; Westhusin, Mark E; Hinrichs, Katrin

    2004-01-01

    Early development of embryos produced by transfer of equine nuclei to bovine cytoplasts is superior to that of intraspecies equine nuclear transfer embryos. This may be related to differences in chromatin remodeling or efficiency of activation between the two oocyte types. The pattern of donor nucleus remodeling was examined in equine-equine and equine-bovine reconstructed oocytes. Chromosome condensation occurred in equine cytoplasts by 2 h but was not seen in bovine cytoplasts until 4 h. We investigated the effect of activation of equine-equine reconstructed oocytes at <30 min or at 2 h after reconstruction. Four activation treatments were evaluated at each time point: injection of sperm extract alone, or in combination with 6-dimethylaminopurine (6-DMAP), cytochalasin B, or 1% dimethylsulphoxide. There was no significant difference in normal cleavage rate or average nucleus number of embryos between equine oocytes activated <30 min or at 2 h after reconstruction. The combination of 6-DMAP with sperm extract significantly (P < 0.01) improved cleavage rate compared with the other three treatments. Activation with sperm extract and 6-DMAP 2 h after donor nucleus injection gave the highest cleavage (79%) and the highest cleavage with normal nuclei (40%). Sperm extract and 6-DMAP also effectively activated oocytes parthenogenetically, yielding 83% cleavage and 73% cleavage with normal nuclei. These results indicate that although nuclear remodeling occurs rapidly in equine cytoplasts, early activation does not improve embryonic development after reconstruction.

  18. Improvement of canine somatic cell nuclear transfer procedure.

    PubMed

    Jang, G; Oh, H J; Kim, M K; Fibrianto, Y H; Hossein, M S; Kim, H J; Kim, J J; Hong, S G; Park, J E; Kang, S K; Lee, B C

    2008-01-15

    The purpose of the present study on canine somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) was to evaluate the effects of fusion strength, type of activation, culture media and site of transfer on developmental potential of SCNT embryos. We also examined the potential of enucleated bovine oocytes to serve as cytoplast recipients of canine somatic cells. Firstly, we evaluated the morphological characteristics of in vivo-matured canine oocytes collected by retrograde flushing of the oviducts 72 h after ovulation. Secondly, the effectiveness of three electrical strengths (1.8, 2.3 and 3.3 kV/cm), used twice for 20 micros, on fusion of canine cytoplasts with somatic cells were compared. Then, we compared: (1) chemical versus electrical activation (a) after parthenogenetic activation or (b) after reconstruction of canine oocytes with somatic cells; (2) culture of resulting intergeneric (IG) embryos in either (a) mSOF or (b) TCM-199. The exposure time to 6-DMAP was standardized by using bovine oocytes reconstructed with canine somatic cells. Bovine oocytes were used for SCNT after a 22 h in vitro maturation interval. The fusion rate was significantly higher in the 3.3 kV/cm group than in the 1.8 and 2.3 kV/cm treatment groups. After parthenogenesis or SCNT with chemical activation, 3.4 and 5.8%, respectively, of the embryos developed to the morula stage, as compared to none of the embryos produced using electrical activation. Later developmental stages (8-16 cells) were transferred to the uterine horn of eight recipients, but no pregnancy was detected. However, IG cloned embryos (bovine cytoplast/canine somatic cell) were capable of in vitro blastocyst development. In vitro developmental competence of IG cloned embryos was improved after exposure to 6-DMAP for 4 h as compared to 0, 2 or 6h exposure, although the increase was not significantly different among culture media. In summary, for production of canine SCNT embryos, we recommend fusion at 3.3 kV/cm, chemical activation

  19. The effect of the number of transferred embryos, the interval between nuclear transfer and embryo transfer, and the transfer pattern on pig cloning efficiency.

    PubMed

    Rim, Chol Ho; Fu, Zhixin; Bao, Lei; Chen, Haide; Zhang, Dan; Luo, Qiong; Ri, Hak Chol; Huang, Hefeng; Luan, Zhidong; Zhang, Yan; Cui, Chun; Xiao, Lei; Jong, Ui Myong

    2013-12-01

    To improve the efficiency of producing cloned pigs, we investigated the influence of the number of transferred embryos, the culturing interval between nuclear transfer (NT) and embryo transfer, and the transfer pattern (single oviduct or double oviduct) on cloning efficiency. The results demonstrated that transfer of either 150-200 or more than 200NT embryos compared to transfer of 100-150 embryos resulted in a significantly higher pregnancy rate (48 ± 16, 50 ± 16 vs. 29 ± 5%, p<0.05) and average litter size (4.1 ± 2.3, 7 ± 3.6 vs. 2.5 ± 0.5). In vitro culture of reconstructed embryos for a longer time (40 h vs. 20 h) resulted in higher (p<0.05) pregnancy rate (44 ± 9 vs. 31 ± 3%) and delivery rate (44 ± 9 vs. 25 ± 9%). Furthermore, double oviductal transfer dramatically increased pregnancy rate (83 ± 6 vs. 27+8%, p<0.05), delivery rate (75 ± 2 vs. 27+8%, p<0.05) and average litter size (6.5 ± 2.8 vs. 2.6 ± 1.2) compared to single oviductal transfer. Our study demonstrated that an improvement in pig cloning efficiency is achieved by adjusting the number and in vitro culture time of reconstructed embryos as well as the embryo transfer pattern.

  20. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 4: Heat Transfer and Fluid Flow.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  1. 10 CFR 73.28 - Security background checks for secure transfer of nuclear materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Security background checks for secure transfer of nuclear materials. 73.28 Section 73.28 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) PHYSICAL PROTECTION OF PLANTS AND MATERIALS Physical Protection of Special Nuclear Material in Transit § 73.28...

  2. 10 CFR 73.28 - Security background checks for secure transfer of nuclear materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Security background checks for secure transfer of nuclear materials. 73.28 Section 73.28 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) PHYSICAL PROTECTION OF PLANTS AND MATERIALS Physical Protection of Special Nuclear Material in Transit § 73.28...

  3. 10 CFR 73.28 - Security background checks for secure transfer of nuclear materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Security background checks for secure transfer of nuclear materials. 73.28 Section 73.28 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) PHYSICAL PROTECTION OF PLANTS AND MATERIALS Physical Protection of Special Nuclear Material in Transit § 73.28...

  4. 10 CFR 73.28 - Security background checks for secure transfer of nuclear materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Security background checks for secure transfer of nuclear materials. 73.28 Section 73.28 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) PHYSICAL PROTECTION OF PLANTS AND MATERIALS Physical Protection of Special Nuclear Material in Transit § 73.28...

  5. 10 CFR 73.28 - Security background checks for secure transfer of nuclear materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Security background checks for secure transfer of nuclear materials. 73.28 Section 73.28 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) PHYSICAL PROTECTION OF PLANTS AND MATERIALS Physical Protection of Special Nuclear Material in Transit § 73.28...

  6. Natural convection heat transfer within horizontal spent nuclear fuel assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Canaan, R.E.

    1995-12-01

    Natural convection heat transfer is experimentally investigated in an enclosed horizontal rod bundle, which characterizes a spent nuclear fuel assembly during dry storage and/or transport conditions. The basic test section consists of a square array of sixty-four stainless steel tubular heaters enclosed within a water-cooled rectangular copper heat exchanger. The heaters are supplied with a uniform power generation per unit length while the surrounding enclosure is maintained at a uniform temperature. The test section resides within a vacuum/pressure chamber in order to subject the assembly to a range of pressure statepoints and various backfill gases. The objective of this experimental study is to obtain convection correlations which can be used in order to easily incorporate convective effects into analytical models of horizontal spent fuel systems, and also to investigate the physical nature of natural convection in enclosed horizontal rod bundles in general. The resulting data consist of: (1) measured temperatures within the assembly as a function of power, pressure, and backfill gas; (2) the relative radiative contribution for the range of observed temperatures; (3) correlations of convective Nusselt number and Rayleigh number for the rod bundle as a whole; and (4) correlations of convective Nusselt number as a function of Rayleigh number for individual rods within the array.

  7. Somatic cell nuclear transfer cloning: practical applications and current legislation.

    PubMed

    Niemann, H; Lucas-Hahn, A

    2012-08-01

    Somatic cloning is emerging as a new biotechnology by which the opportunities arising from the advances in molecular genetics and genome analysis can be implemented in animal breeding. Significant improvements have been made in SCNT protocols in the past years which now allow to embarking on practical applications. The main areas of application of SCNT are: Reproductive cloning, therapeutic cloning and basic research. A great application potential of SCNT based cloning is the production of genetically modified (transgenic) animals. Somatic cell nuclear transfer based transgenic animal production has significant advances over the previously employed microinjection of foreign DNA into pronuclei of zygotes. This cell based transgenesis is compatible with gene targeting and allows both, the addition of a specific gene and the deletion of an endogenous gene. Efficient transgenic animal production provides numerous opportunities for agriculture and biomedicine. Regulatory agencies around the world have agreed that food derived from cloned animals and their offspring is safe and there is no scientific basis for questioning this. Commercial application of somatic cloning within the EU is via the Novel Food regulation EC No. 258/97. Somatic cloning raises novel questions regarding the ethical and moral status of animals and their welfare which has prompted a controversial discussion in Europe which has not yet been resolved.

  8. From cloned frogs to patient matched stem cells: induced pluripotency or somatic cell nuclear transfer?

    PubMed

    Yamada, Mitsutoshi; Byrne, James; Egli, Dieter

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear transfer has seen a remarkable comeback in the past few years. Three groups have independently reported the derivation of stem cell lines by somatic cell nuclear transfer, from either adult, neonatal or fetal cells. Though the ability of human oocytes to reprogram somatic cells to stem cells had long been anticipated, success did not arrive on a straightforward path. Little was known about human oocyte biology, and nuclear transfer protocols developed in animals required key changes to become effective with human eggs. By overcoming these challenges, human nuclear transfer research has contributed to a greater understanding of oocyte biology, provided a point of reference for the comparison of induced pluripotent stem cells, and delivered a method for the generation of personalized stem cells with therapeutic potential.

  9. Epigenetic reprogramming by somatic cell nuclear transfer: questions and potential solutions.

    PubMed

    Huili, Ji; Haosheng, Lu; Dengke, Pan

    2014-12-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is a technology by which a highly differentiated somatic nucleus is transferred into an enucleated oocyte to generate a reconstructed embryo that subsequently develops to an offspring. However, to date, the efficiency of cloned animal is still low. The major reason is incomplete nuclear reprogramming of donor cells after nuclear transfer, which results in abnormal epigenetic modifications, including DNA methylation, histone acetylation, gene imprinting, X-chromosome inactivation, and telomere length. Most improvements have been made in somatic epigenetic reprogramming with small molecules and manipulating expression of specific genes. It is expected that SCNT will soon have broad applications in both basic research and practical production. In this review, we summarize the recent progress in epigenetic reprogramming by somatic cell nuclear transfer; in particular, we focus on strategies for rescuing the epigenetic errors occurring during SCNT.

  10. INTERSPECIES DOSIMETRY MODELS FOR PULMONARY PHARMACOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Interspecies Dosimetry Models for Pulmonary Pharmacology

    Ted B. Martonen, Jeffry D. Schroeter, and John S. Fleming

    Experimental Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangl...

  11. Molten Chloride Salts for Heat Transfer in Nuclear Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrosek, James Wallace

    2011-12-01

    A forced convection loop was designed and constructed to examine the thermal-hydraulic performance of molten KCl-MgCl2 (68-32 at %) salt for use in nuclear co-generation facilities. As part of this research, methods for prediction of the thermo-physical properties of salt mixtures for selection of the coolant salt were studied. In addition, corrosion studies of 10 different alloys were exposed to the KCl-MgCl2 to determine a suitable construction material for the loop. Using experimental data found in literature for unary and binary salt systems, models were found, or developed to extrapolate the available experimental data to unstudied salt systems. These property models were then used to investigate the thermo-physical properties of the LINO3-NaNO3-KNO 3-Ca(NO3), system used in solar energy applications. Using these models, the density, viscosity, adiabatic compressibility, thermal conductivity, heat capacity, and melting temperatures of higher order systems can be approximated. These models may be applied to other molten salt systems. Coupons of 10 different alloys were exposed to the chloride salt for 100 hours at 850°C was undertaken to help determine with which alloy to construct the loop. Of the alloys exposed, Haynes 230 had the least amount of weight loss per area. Nickel and Hastelloy N performed best based on maximum depth of attack. Inconel 625 and 718 had a nearly uniform depletion of Cr from the surface of the sample. All other alloys tested had depletion of Cr along the grain boundaries. The Nb in Inconel 625 and 718 changed the way the Cr is depleted in these alloys. Grain-boundary engineering (GBE) of Incoloy 800H improved the corrosion resistance (weight loss and maximum depth of attack) by nearly 50% as compared to the as-received Incoloy 800H sample. A high temperature pump, thermal flow meter, and pressure differential device was designed, constructed and tested for use in the loop, The heat transfer of the molten chloride salt was found to

  12. Human somatic cell nuclear transfer and reproductive cloning: an Ethics Committee opinion.

    PubMed

    2016-04-01

    This document presents arguments that conclude that it is unethical to use somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) for infertility treatment due to concerns about safety; the unknown impact of SCNT on children, families, and society; and the availability of other ethically acceptable means of assisted reproduction. This document replaces the ASRM Ethics Committee report titled, "Human somatic cell nuclear transfer and cloning," last published in Fertil Steril 2012;98:804-7.

  13. Heat Transfer Phenomena in Supercritical Water Nuclear Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Mark H. Anderson; MichaelL. Corradini; Riccardo Bonazza; Jeremy R. Licht

    2007-10-03

    A supercritical water heat transfer facility has been built at the University of Wisconsin to study heat transfer in ancircular and square annular flow channel. A series of integral heat transfer measurements has been carried out over a wide range of heat flux, mas velocity and bulk water temperatures at a pressure of 25 MPa. The circular annular test section geometry is a 1.07 cm diameter heater rod within a 4.29 diameter flow channel.

  14. Generation of cloned mice and nuclear transfer embryonic stem cell lines from urine-derived cells

    PubMed Central

    Mizutani, Eiji; Torikai, Kohei; Wakayama, Sayaka; Nagatomo, Hiroaki; Ohinata, Yasuhide; Kishigami, Satoshi; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2016-01-01

    Cloning animals by nuclear transfer provides the opportunity to preserve endangered mammalian species. However, there are risks associated with the collection of donor cells from the body such as accidental injury to or death of the animal. Here, we report the production of cloned mice from urine-derived cells collected noninvasively. Most of the urine-derived cells survived and were available as donors for nuclear transfer without any pretreatment. After nuclear transfer, 38–77% of the reconstructed embryos developed to the morula/blastocyst, in which the cell numbers in the inner cell mass and trophectoderm were similar to those of controls. Male and female cloned mice were delivered from cloned embryos transferred to recipient females, and these cloned animals grew to adulthood and delivered pups naturally when mated with each other. The results suggest that these cloned mice had normal fertility. In additional experiments, 26 nuclear transfer embryonic stem cell lines were established from 108 cloned blastocysts derived from four mouse strains including inbreds and F1 hybrids with relatively high success rates. Thus, cells derived from urine, which can be collected noninvasively, may be used in the rescue of endangered mammalian species by using nuclear transfer without causing injury to the animal. PMID:27033801

  15. Nuclear transfer to prevent mitochondrial DNA disorders: revisiting the debate on reproductive cloning.

    PubMed

    Bredenoord, A L; Dondorp, W; Pennings, G; De Wert, G

    2011-02-01

    Preclinical experiments are currently performed to examine the feasibility of several types of nuclear transfer to prevent mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) disorders. Whereas the two most promising types of nuclear transfer to prevent mtDNA disorders, spindle transfer and pronuclear transfer, do not amount to reproductive cloning, one theoretical variant, blastomere transfer does. This seems the most challenging both technically and ethically. It is prohibited by many jurisdictions and also the scientific community seems to avoid it. Nevertheless, this paper examines the moral acceptability of blastomere transfer as a method to prevent mtDNA disorders. The reason for doing so is that most objections against reproductive cloning refer to reproductive adult cloning, while blastomere transfer would amount to reproductive embryo cloning. After clarifying this conceptual difference, this paper examines whether the main non-safety objections brought forward against reproductive cloning also apply in the context of blastomere transfer. The conclusion is that if this variant were to become safe and effective, dismissing it because it would involve reproductive cloning is unjustified. Nevertheless, as it may lead to more complex ethical appraisals than the other variants, researchers should initially focus on the development of the other types of nuclear transfer to prevent mtDNA disorders.

  16. A background to nuclear transfer and its applications in agriculture and human therapeutic medicine*

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Keith HS

    2002-01-01

    The development of a single celled fertilized zygote to an animal capable of reproduction involves not only cell division but the differentiation or specialization to numerous cell types forming each tissue and organ of the adult animal. The technique of nuclear transfer allows the reconstruction of an embryo by the transfer of genetic material from a single donor cell, to an unfertilized egg from which the genetic material has been removed. Successful development of live offspring from such embryos demonstrates that the differentiated state of the donor nucleus is not fixed and can be reprogrammed by the egg cytoplasm to control embryo and fetal development. Nuclear transfer has many applications in agriculture and human medicine. This article will review some of the factors associated with the success of embryo development following nuclear transfer and outline the potential uses of the technology. PMID:12033731

  17. Thermoacoustic sensor for nuclear fuel temperaturemonitoring and heat transfer enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    James A. Smith; Dale K. Kotter; Randall A. Alli; Steven L. Garrett

    2013-05-01

    A new acoustical sensing system for the nuclear power industry has been developed at The Pennsylvania State University in collaboration with Idaho National Laboratories. This sensor uses the high temperatures of nuclear fuel to convert a nuclear fuel rod into a standing-wave thermoacoustic engine. When a standing wave is generated, the sound wave within the fuel rod will be propagated, by acoustic radiation, through the cooling fluid within the reactor or spent fuel pool and can be monitored a remote location external to the reactor. The frequency of the sound can be correlated to an effective temperature of either the fuel or the surrounding coolant. We will present results for a thermoacoustic resonator built into a Nitonic-60 (stainless steel) fuel rod that requires only one passive component and no heat exchangers.

  18. An improved heat transfer configuration for a solid-core nuclear thermal rocket engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, John S.; Walton, James T.; Mcguire, Melissa L.

    1992-01-01

    Interrupted flow, impingement cooling, and axial power distribution are employed to enhance the heat-transfer configuration of a solid-core nuclear thermal rocket engine. Impingement cooling is introduced to increase the local heat-transfer coefficients between the reactor material and the coolants. Increased fuel loading is used at the inlet end of the reactor to enhance heat-transfer capability where the temperature differences are the greatest. A thermal-hydraulics computer program for an unfueled NERVA reactor core is employed to analyze the proposed configuration with attention given to uniform fuel loading, number of channels through the impingement wafers, fuel-element length, mass-flow rate, and wafer gap. The impingement wafer concept (IWC) is shown to have heat-transfer characteristics that are better than those of the NERVA-derived reactor at 2500 K. The IWC concept is argued to be an effective heat-transfer configuration for solid-core nuclear thermal rocket engines.

  19. Fatal attraction: Explaining Russia's sensitive nuclear transfers to Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuchinsky, Leah R.

    This paper explores Russia's sensitive nuclear assistance to Iran in an effort to determine why a supplier state might proliferate against its own apparent security interests. The goal is to help readers understand the supply-side dynamics of nuclear proliferation. Through careful reconstruction of the historical narrative, using open source data, this study tests the plausibility of a "fatalistic calculus" explanation, identified by Stephen Sestanovich as a possible driver for Russia's behavior. According to the hypothesis, Russia has cooperated with Iran as a way both to stay in the good graces of a neighbor that is suspected of developing nuclear weapons and to win short-term influence and profits. The paper also examines the role of other factors advanced in the existing supply-side literature, such as economic motives identified by physicist and nonproliferation scholar David Albright. The findings show that bureaucratic, economic and fatalistic factors have each played a role in motivating Russia's cooperation with Iran, with their relative importance shifting over time. Fatalism begets a strategy of Russian "minimaxing," in the lexicon of Russia scholar Robert Freedman, wherein Russia attempts to minimize damage to its relationship with the U.S. while maximizing influence in Iran via nuclear cooperation. Fatalism, as actualized by minimaxing, best explains Russia's behavior after former Russian president Vladmir Putin came to power, when the bureaucratic and economic arguments become less cogent.

  20. Modeling transient heat transfer in nuclear waste repositories.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shaw-Yang; Yeh, Hund-Der

    2009-09-30

    The heat of high-level nuclear waste may be generated and released from a canister at final disposal sites. The waste heat may affect the engineering properties of waste canisters, buffers, and backfill material in the emplacement tunnel and the host rock. This study addresses the problem of the heat generated from the waste canister and analyzes the heat distribution between the buffer and the host rock, which is considered as a radial two-layer heat flux problem. A conceptual model is first constructed for the heat conduction in a nuclear waste repository and then mathematical equations are formulated for modeling heat flow distribution at repository sites. The Laplace transforms are employed to develop a solution for the temperature distributions in the buffer and the host rock in the Laplace domain, which is numerically inverted to the time-domain solution using the modified Crump method. The transient temperature distributions for both the single- and multi-borehole cases are simulated in the hypothetical geological repositories of nuclear waste. The results show that the temperature distributions in the thermal field are significantly affected by the decay heat of the waste canister, the thermal properties of the buffer and the host rock, the disposal spacing, and the thickness of the host rock at a nuclear waste repository.

  1. Ultrafast Charge Transfer of a Valence Double Hole in Glycine Driven Exclusively by Nuclear Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zheng; Vendrell, Oriol; Santra, Robin

    2015-10-01

    We explore theoretically the ultrafast transfer of a double electron hole between the functional groups of glycine after K -shell ionization and subsequent Auger decay. Although a large energy gap of about 15 eV initially exists between the two electronic states involved and coherent electronic dynamics play no role in the hole transfer, we find that the double hole is transferred within 3 to 4 fs between both functional ends of the glycine molecule driven solely by specific nuclear displacements and non-Born-Oppenheimer effects. The nuclear displacements along specific vibrational modes are of the order of 15% of a typical chemical bond between carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen atoms and about 30% for bonds involving hydrogen atoms. The time required for the hole transfer corresponds to less than half a vibrational period of the involved nuclear modes. This finding challenges the common wisdom that nuclear dynamics of the molecular skeleton are unimportant for charge transfer processes at the few-femtosecond time scale and shows that they can even play a prominent role. It also indicates that in x-ray imaging experiments, in which ionization is unavoidable, valence electron redistribution caused by nuclear dynamics might be much faster than previously anticipated. Thus, non-Born-Oppenheimer effects may affect the apparent electron densities extracted from such measurements.

  2. Cloned embryos from semen. Part 2: intergeneric nuclear transfer of semen-derived eland (Taurotragus oryx) epithelial cells into bovine oocytes.

    PubMed

    Nel-Themaat, Liesl; Gómez, Martha C; Pope, C Earle; Lopez, Monica; Wirtu, Gemechu; Jenkins, Jill A; Cole, Alex; Dresser, Betsy L; Bondioli, Kenneth R; Godke, Robert A

    2008-03-01

    The production of cloned offspring by nuclear transfer (NT) of semen-derived somatic cells holds considerable potential for the incorporation of novel genes into endangered species populations. Because oocytes from endangered species are scarce, domestic species oocytes are often used as cytoplasts for interspecies NT. In the present study, epithelial cells isolated from eland semen were used for intergeneric transfer (IgNT) into enucleated bovine oocytes and compared with bovine NT embryos. Cleavage rates of bovine NT and eland IgNT embryos were similar (80 vs. 83%, respectively; p > 0.05); however, development to the morula and blastocyst stage was higher for bovine NT embryos (38 and 21%, respectively; p < 0.0001), than for eland IgNT embryos (0.5 and 0%, respectively). DNA synthesis was not observed in either bovine NT or eland IgNT cybrids before activation, but in 75 and 70% of bovine NT and eland igNT embryos, respectively, cell-cycle resumption was observed at 16 h postactivation (hpa). For eland IgNT embryos, 13% had > or = 8 cells at 84 hpa, while 32% of the bovine NT embryos had > or = 8 cells at the same interval. However, 100 and 66% of bovine NT and eland IgNT embryos, respectively, that had > or = 8 cells synthesized DNA. From these results we concluded that (1) semen-derived epithelial cell nuclei can interact and be transcriptionally controlled by bovine cytoplast, (2) the first cell-cycle occurred in IgNT embryos, (3) a high frequency of developmental arrest occurs before the eight-cell stage in IgNT embryos, and (4) IgNT embryos that progress through the early cleavage stage arrest can (a) synthesize DNA, (b) progress through subsequent cell cycles, and (c) may have the potential to develop further.

  3. Cloned embryos from semen. Part 2: Intergeneric nuclear transfer of semen-derived eland (Taurotragus oryx) epithelial cells into bovine oocytes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nel-Themaat, L.; Gomez, M.C.; Pope, C.E.; Lopez, M.; Wirtu, G.; Jenkins, J.A.; Cole, A.; Dresser, B.L.; Bondioli, K.R.; Godke, R.A.

    2008-01-01

    The production of cloned offspring by nuclear transfer (NT) of semen-derived somatic cells holds considerable potential for the incorporation of novel genes into endangered species populations. Because oocytes from endangered species are scarce, domestic species oocytes are often used as cytoplasts for interspecies NT. In the present study, epithelial cells isolated from eland semen were used for intergeneric transfer (IgNT) into enucleated bovine oocytes and compared with bovine NT embryos. Cleavage rates of bovine NT and eland IgNT embryos were similar (80 vs. 83%, respectively; p > 0.05); however, development to the morula and blastocyst stage was higher for bovine NT embryos (38 and 21%, respectively; p < 0.0001), than for eland IgNT embryos (0.5 and 0%, respectively). DNA synthesis was not observed in either bovine NT or eland IgNT cybrids before activation, but in 75 and 70% of bovine NT and eland igNT embryos, respectively, cell-cycle resumption was observed at 16 h postactivation (hpa). For eland IgNT embryos, 13% had ???8 cells at 84 hpa, while 32% of the bovine NT embryos had ???8 cells at the same interval. However, 100 and 66% of bovine NT and eland IgNT embryos, respectively, that had ???8 cells synthesized DNA. From these results we concluded that (1) semen-derived epithelial cell nuclei can interact and be transcriptionally controlled by bovine cytoplast, (2) the first cell-cycle occurred in IgNT embryos, (3) a high frequency of developmental arrest occurs before the eight-cell stage in IgNT embryos, and (4) IgNT embryos that progress through the early cleavage stage arrest can (a) synthesize DNA, (b) progress through subsequent cell cycles, and (c) may have the potential to develop further. ?? 2008 Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

  4. Pig transgenesis by piggyBac transposition in combination with somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhenfang; Xu, Zhiqian; Zou, Xian; Zeng, Fang; Shi, Junsong; Liu, Dewu; Urschitz, Johann; Moisyadi, Stefan; Li, Zicong

    2013-12-01

    The production of animals by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is inefficient, with approximately 2% of micromanipulated oocytes going to term and resulting in live births. However, it is the most commonly used method for the generation of cloned transgenic livestock as it facilitates the attainment of transgenic animals once the nuclear donor cells are stably transfected and more importantly as alternatives methods of transgenesis in farm animals have proven even less efficient. Here we describe piggyBac-mediated transposition of a transgene into porcine primary cells and use of these genetically modified cells as nuclear donors for the generation of transgenic pigs by SCNT. Gene transfer by piggyBac transposition serves to provide an alternative approach for the transfection of nuclear donor cells used in SCNT.

  5. Genomic instability during reprogramming by nuclear transfer is DNA replication dependent.

    PubMed

    Chia, Gloryn; Agudo, Judith; Treff, Nathan; Sauer, Mark V; Billing, David; Brown, Brian D; Baer, Richard; Egli, Dieter

    2017-04-01

    Somatic cells can be reprogrammed to a pluripotent state by nuclear transfer into oocytes, yet developmental arrest often occurs. While incomplete transcriptional reprogramming is known to cause developmental failure, reprogramming also involves concurrent changes in cell cycle progression and nuclear structure. Here we study cellular reprogramming events in human and mouse nuclear transfer embryos prior to embryonic genome activation. We show that genetic instability marked by frequent chromosome segregation errors and DNA damage arise prior to, and independent of, transcriptional activity. These errors occur following transition through DNA replication and are repaired by BRCA1. In the absence of mitotic nuclear remodelling, DNA replication is delayed and errors are exacerbated in subsequent mitosis. These results demonstrate that independent of gene expression, cell-type-specific features of cell cycle progression constitute a barrier sufficient to prevent the transition from one cell type to another during reprogramming.

  6. Dynamics of lamin A/C in porcine embryos produced by nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kiho; Fodor, William L; Machaty, Zoltan

    2007-09-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the presence of lamin A/C in porcine nuclear transfer embryos and to determine whether lamin A/C can serve as a potential marker for nuclear reprogramming. First, lamin A/C was studied in oocytes and embryos produced by fertilization or parthenogenetic oocyte activation. We found that lamin A/C was present in the nuclear lamina of oocytes at the germinal vesicle stage while it was absent in mature oocytes. Lamin A/C was detected throughout preimplantation development in both in vivo-derived and parthenogenetic embryos. Incubation of the activated oocytes in the presence of alpha-amanitin (an inhibitor of RNA polymerase II), or cycloheximide (a protein synthesis inhibitor) did not perturb lamin A/C assembly, indicating that the assembly resulted from solubilized lamins dispersed in the cytoplasm. In nuclear transfer embryos, the lamin A/C signal that had previously been identified in fibroblast nuclei disappeared soon after fusion. It became detectable again after the formation of the pronucleus-like structure, and all nuclear transfer embryos displayed lamin A/C staining during early development. Olfactory bulb progenitor cells lacked lamin A/C; however, when such cells were fused with enucleated oocytes, the newly formed nuclear envelopes stained positive for lamin A/C. These findings suggest that recipient oocytes remodel the donor nuclei using type A lamins dispersed in the ooplasm. The results also indicate that lamin A/C is present in the nuclear envelope of pig oocytes and early embryos and unlike in some other species, its presence after nuclear transfer is not an indicator of erroneous reprogramming.

  7. Nuclear electric propulsion system utilization for earth orbit transfer of large spacecraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, T. H.; Byers, D. C.

    1980-01-01

    The paper discusses a potential application of electric propulsion to perform orbit transfer of a large spacecraft structure to geosynchronous orbit (GEO) from LEO, utilizing a nuclear reactor space power source in the spacecraft on a shared basis. The discussions include spacecraft, thrust system, and nuclear reactor space power system concepts. Emphasis is placed on orbiter payload arrangements, spacecraft launch constraints, and spacecraft LEO assembly and deployment sequences.

  8. Cell-mediated transgenesis in rabbits: chimeric and nuclear transfer animals.

    PubMed

    Zakhartchenko, V; Flisikowska, T; Li, S; Richter, T; Wieland, H; Durkovic, M; Rottmann, O; Kessler, B; Gungor, T; Brem, G; Kind, A; Wolf, E; Schnieke, A

    2011-02-01

    The ability to perform precise genetic engineering such as gene targeting in rabbits would benefit biomedical research by enabling, for example, the generation of genetically defined rabbit models of human diseases. This has so far not been possible because of the lack of functional rabbit embryonic stem cells and the high fetal and perinatal mortality associated with rabbit somatic cell nuclear transfer. We examined cultured pluripotent and multipotent cells for their ability to support the production of viable animals. Rabbit putative embryonic stem (ES) cells were derived and shown capable of in vitro and in vivo pluripotent differentiation. We report the first live born ES-derived rabbit chimera. Rabbit mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were derived from bone marrow, and multipotent differentiation was demonstrated in vitro. Nuclear transfer was carried out with both cell types, and embryo development was assessed in vitro and in vivo. Rabbit MSCs were markedly more successful than ES cells as nuclear donors. MSCs were transfected with fluorescent reporter gene constructs and assessed for nuclear transfer competence. Transfected MSCs supported development with similar efficiency as normal MSCs and resulted in the first live cloned rabbits from genetically manipulated MSCs. Reactivation of fluorescence reporter gene expression in reconstructed embryos was investigated as a means of identifying viable embryos in vitro but was not a reliable predictor. We also examined serial nuclear transfer as a means of rescuing dead animals.

  9. Numerical Modeling of Heat and Mass Transfer Processes in the Transfer of Spent Nuclear Fuel from "Wet" to "Dry" Cask Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karyakin, Yu. E.; Pletnev, A. A.; Fedorovich, E. D.

    2017-01-01

    The paper describes in brief the heat and mass transfer processes in the transfer of spent nuclear fuel of the RBMK-100 reactor from "wet" to "dry" cask storage. The algorithms are described and the results are presented of the "through" calculation of the heat and mass transfer processes in ampoules and in a metal-concrete cask at various stages of spent nuclear fuel management.

  10. Passive heat-transfer means for nuclear reactors. [LMFBR

    DOEpatents

    Burelbach, J.P.

    1982-06-10

    An improved passive cooling arrangement is disclosed for maintaining adjacent or related components of a nuclear reactor within specified temperature differences. Specifically, heat pipes are operatively interposed between the components, with the vaporizing section of the heat pipe proximate the hot component operable to cool it and the primary condensing section of the heat pipe proximate the other and cooler component operable to heat it. Each heat pipe further has a secondary condensing section that is located outwardly beyond the reactor confinement and in a secondary heat sink, such as air ambient the containment, that is cooler than the other reactor component. By having many such heat pipes, an emergency passive cooling system is defined that is operative without electrical power.

  11. Significant improvement of pig cloning efficiency by treatment with LBH589 after somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jun-Xue; Li, Suo; Gao, Qing-Shan; Hong, Yu; Jin, Long; Zhu, Hai-Ying; Yan, Chang-Guo; Kang, Jin-Dan; Yin, Xi-Jun

    2013-10-01

    The low success rate of animal cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) associates with epigenetic aberrancy, including the abnormal acetylation of histones. Altering the epigenetic status by histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) enhances the developmental potential of SCNT embryos. In the current study, we examined the effects of LBH589 (panobinostat), a novel broad-spectrum HDACi, on the nuclear reprogramming and development of pig SCNT embryos in vitro. In experiment 1, we compared the in vitro developmental competence of nuclear transfer embryos treated with different concentrations of LBH589. Embryos treated with 50 nM LBH589 for 24 hours showed a significant increase in the rate of blastocyst formation compared with the control or embryos treated with 5 or 500 nM LBH589 (32.4% vs. 11.8%, 12.1%, and 10.0%, respectively, P < 0.05). In experiment 2, we examined the in vitro developmental competence of nuclear transfer embryos treated with 50 nM LBH589 for various intervals after activation and 6-dimethylaminopurine. Embryos treated for 24 hours had higher rates of blastocyst formation than the other groups. In experiment 3, when the acetylation of H4K12 was examined in SCNT embryos treated for 6 hours with 50 nM LBH589 by immunohistochemistry, the staining intensities of these proteins in LBH589-treated SCNT embryos were significantly higher than in the control. In experiment 4, LBH589-treated nuclear transfer and control embryos were transferred into surrogate mothers, resulting in three (100%) and two (66.7%) pregnancies, respectively. In conclusion, LBH589 enhances the nuclear reprogramming and developmental potential of SCNT embryos by altering the epigenetic status and expression, and increasing blastocyst quality.

  12. Real-time electron dynamics simulation of two-electron transfer reactions induced by nuclear motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yasumitsu; Yamashita, Koichi

    2012-04-01

    Real-time electron dynamics of two-electron transfer reactions induced by nuclear motion is calculated by three methods: the numerically exact propagation method, the time-dependent Hartree (TDH) method and the Ehrenfest method. We find that, as long as the nuclei move as localized wave packets, the TDH and Ehrenfest methods can reproduce the exact electron dynamics of a simple charge transfer reaction model containing two electrons qualitatively well, even when nonadiabatic transitions between adiabatic states occur. In particular, both methods can reproduce the cases where a complete two-electron transfer reaction occurs and those where it does not occur.

  13. Increased cleavage rate of human nuclear transfer embryos after 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine treatment.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lei; Wu, Ke-Liang; Zhang, Di; Wang, Hong-Yan; Wang, Yue; Xu, Zhen-Yu; Huang, Xiu-Ying; Chen, Zi-Jiang; Liu, Hou-Qi

    2012-10-01

    As an abundant source that involves fewer ethical considerations, human abnormally fertilized zygotes are superior to oocytes as therapeutic cloning recipients of nuclear transfer. However, more effective manipulation conditions should be developed for somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) studies using human abnormally fertilized zygotes as recipients. The present study found that the use of cytochalasin B was not necessary for, and even harmful to, the enucleation of human zygotes. This study also decreased the DNA methylation levels in reconstructed embryos using a DNA methyltransferase inhibitor, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC), in an attempt to correct the abnormalities in DNA methylation that might play an important role in the failure of embryo development. After 5-aza-dC treatment and nuclear transfer (NT-Aza group), 32.7% of reconstructed embryos developed to the 8-cell stage, which is a much higher percentage than that of the nuclear transfer only (NT) group (11.1%). The DNA methylation level in the NT-Aza group was significantly lower than that of the NT group, as determined by 5-methylcytosine immunodetection. Based on the present results, this study recommends performing the enucleation procedure without cytochalasin B treatment and using 5-aza-dC in the culture of reconstructed embryos in human SCNT studies.

  14. 78 FR 67925 - Transfer of Real Property at Defense Nuclear Facilities for Economic Development

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-13

    ... / Wednesday, November 13, 2013 / Rules and Regulations#0;#0; ] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 10 CFR Part 770 RIN 1901-AA82 Transfer of Real Property at Defense Nuclear Facilities for Economic Development AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Department of Energy (DOE) is adopting the...

  15. Tie Tube Heat Transfer Modeling for Bimodal Nuclear Thermal Rockets

    SciTech Connect

    Clough, Joshua A.; Starkey, Ryan P.; Lewis, Mark J.; Lavelle, Thomas M.

    2007-01-30

    Bimodal nuclear thermal rocket systems have been shown to reduce the weight and cost of space vehicles to Mars and beyond by utilizing the reactor for power generation in the relatively long duration between burns in an interplanetary trajectory. No information, however, is available regarding engine and reactor-level operation of such bimodal systems. The purpose of this project is to generate engine and reactor models with sufficient fidelity and flexibility to accurately study the component-level effects of operating a propulsion-designed reactor at power generation levels. Previous development of a 1-D reactor and tie tube model found that ignoring heat generation inside of the tie tube leads to under-prediction of the temperature change and over-prediction of pressure change across the tie tube. This paper will present the development and results of a tie tube model that has been extended to account for heat generation, specifically in the moderator layer. This model is based on a 1-D distribution of power in the fuel elements and tie tubes, as a precursor to an eventual neutron-driven reactor model.

  16. One-two step transfer observed in 16O+11B nuclear system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamada, Sh.; Burtebayev, N.

    2015-06-01

    The angular distribution measurements for 16O ion beam elastically scattered from 11B target of thickness 32.9μg/cm2 at energy 22.4 MeV had been performed in the cyclotron DC-60 INP NNC RK. The previous measurements for 16O+11B nuclear system at energies 27, 30, 32.5 and 35 MeV showed an increase in the differential cross-section at backward angles due to the contribution of cluster transfer. Such transfer process could not be described in terms of optical model (OM); it could be described within the framework of distorted wave Born approximation method implemented in FRESCO code. Both one (5Li) and two-step transfer (proton transfer followed by Alpha transfer) were taken into considerations. We have extracted the spectroscopic amplitude (SA) for the configuration 16O→11B+5Li.

  17. High-fidelity transfer and storage of photon states in a single nuclear spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Sen; Wang, Ya; Rao, D. D. Bhaktavatsala; Hien Tran, Thai; Momenzadeh, Ali S.; Markham, M.; Twitchen, D. J.; Wang, Ping; Yang, Wen; Stöhr, Rainer; Neumann, Philipp; Kosaka, Hideo; Wrachtrup, Jörg

    2016-08-01

    Long-distance quantum communication requires photons and quantum nodes that comprise qubits for interaction with light and good memory capabilities, as well as processing qubits for the storage and manipulation of photons. Owing to the unavoidable photon losses, robust quantum communication over lossy transmission channels requires quantum repeater networks. A necessary and highly demanding prerequisite for these networks is the existence of quantum memories with long coherence times to reliably store the incident photon states. Here we demonstrate the high-fidelity (˜98%) coherent transfer of a photon polarization state to a single solid-state nuclear spin that has a coherence time of over 10 s. The storage process is achieved by coherently transferring the polarization state of a photon to an entangled electron-nuclear spin state of a nitrogen-vacancy centre in diamond. The nuclear spin-based optical quantum memory demonstrated here paves the way towards an absorption-based quantum repeater network.

  18. Modularization and nuclear power. Report by the Technology Transfer Modularization Task Team

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-06-01

    This report describes the results of the work performed by the Technology Transfer Task Team on Modularization. This work was performed as part of the Technology Transfer work being performed under Department of Energy Contract 54-7WM-335406, between December, 1984 and February, 1985. The purpose of this task team effort was to briefly survey the current use of modularization in the nuclear and non-nuclear industries and to assess and evaluate the techniques available for potential application to nuclear power. A key conclusion of the evaluation was that there was a need for a study to establish guidelines for the future development of Light Water Reactor, High Temperature Gas Reactor and Liquid Metal Reactor plants. The guidelines should identify how modularization can improve construction, maintenance, life extension and decommissioning.

  19. E-learning modules for nuclear reactor heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayaram, Praveen Bharadwaj

    E learning in engineering education is becoming popular at several universities as it allows instructors to create content that the students may view and interact with at his/her own convenience. Web-based simulation and what-if analysis are examples of such educational content and has proved to be extremely beneficial for engineering students. Such pedagogical content promote active learning and encourage students to experiment and be more creative. The main objective of this project is to develop web based learning modules, in the form of analytical simulations, for the Reactor Thermal Hydraulics course offered by the College of Engineering at UT Arlington. These modules seek to comprehensively transform the traditional education structure. The simulations are built to supplement the class lectures and are divided into categories like Fundamentals, Heat generation, Heat transfer and Heat removal categories. Each category contains modules which are sub-divided chapter wise and further into section wise. Some of the important sections from the text book are taken and calculations for a particular functionality are implemented. Since it is an interactive tool, it allows user to input certain values, which are then processed with the traditional equations, and output results either in the form of a number or graphs.

  20. 10 CFR 770.8 - May DOE transfer real property at defense nuclear facilities for economic development at less...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false May DOE transfer real property at defense nuclear facilities for economic development at less than fair market value? 770.8 Section 770.8 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY TRANSFER OF REAL PROPERTY AT DEFENSE NUCLEAR FACILITIES FOR ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT § 770.8 May...

  1. 10 CFR 770.7 - What procedures are to be used to transfer real property at defense nuclear facilities for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false What procedures are to be used to transfer real property at defense nuclear facilities for economic development? 770.7 Section 770.7 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY TRANSFER OF REAL PROPERTY AT DEFENSE NUCLEAR FACILITIES FOR ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT § 770.7...

  2. 10 CFR 770.7 - What procedures are to be used to transfer real property at defense nuclear facilities for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false What procedures are to be used to transfer real property at defense nuclear facilities for economic development? 770.7 Section 770.7 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY TRANSFER OF REAL PROPERTY AT DEFENSE NUCLEAR FACILITIES FOR ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT § 770.7...

  3. 10 CFR 770.8 - May DOE transfer real property at defense nuclear facilities for economic development at less...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false May DOE transfer real property at defense nuclear facilities for economic development at less than fair market value? 770.8 Section 770.8 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY TRANSFER OF REAL PROPERTY AT DEFENSE NUCLEAR FACILITIES FOR ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT § 770.8 May...

  4. 10 CFR 770.8 - May DOE transfer real property at defense nuclear facilities for economic development at less...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false May DOE transfer real property at defense nuclear facilities for economic development at less than fair market value? 770.8 Section 770.8 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY TRANSFER OF REAL PROPERTY AT DEFENSE NUCLEAR FACILITIES FOR ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT § 770.8 May...

  5. 10 CFR 770.7 - What procedures are to be used to transfer real property at defense nuclear facilities for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false What procedures are to be used to transfer real property at defense nuclear facilities for economic development? 770.7 Section 770.7 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY TRANSFER OF REAL PROPERTY AT DEFENSE NUCLEAR FACILITIES FOR ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT § 770.7...

  6. 10 CFR 770.8 - May DOE transfer real property at defense nuclear facilities for economic development at less...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false May DOE transfer real property at defense nuclear facilities for economic development at less than fair market value? 770.8 Section 770.8 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY TRANSFER OF REAL PROPERTY AT DEFENSE NUCLEAR FACILITIES FOR ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT § 770.8 May...

  7. Spin coherence effects in the electron—nuclear polarization transfer process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macho, V.; Stehlik, D.; Vieth, H.-M.

    1991-05-01

    The nuclear spin polarization resulting from optical pumping of molecular triplet states, ONP, has been studied in a time-resolving experiment by synchronized irradiation of light and rf pulses. After laser flash excitation of T 1 triplet states of acridine doped into a fluorene crystal, an rf pulse of variable intensity and duration is applied near the resonance of an electronic spin transition. It leads to partial transfer of optically generated electronic polarization to the nuclear spin reservoir (rf-ONP). For sufficiently high rf-intensity, the polarization transfer shows an oscillatory behaviour when varying the pulse length in the submicrosecond range, which reflects the initial coherence among the spins. Critical tests for the analysis are provided by experiments under different rf excitation conditions and for various isotopic compositions. The transfer process is shown to involve two steps on different time scales, the first of which is closely related to nutations of electron spins about the rotating B1 field.

  8. Nuclear-mitochondrial incompatibility in interorder rhesus monkey-cow embryos derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Daekee; Koo, Ok-Jae; Kim, Min-Jung; Jang, Goo; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2016-10-01

    Monkey interorder somatic cell nuclear transfer (iSCNT) using enucleated cow oocytes yielded poor blastocysts development and contradictory results among research groups. Determining the reason for this low blastocyst development is a prerequisite for optimizing iSCNT in rhesus monkeys. The aim of this study was to elucidate nuclear-mitochondrial incompatibility of rhesus monkey-cow iSCNT embryos and its relationship to low blastocyst development. Cytochrome b is a protein of complex III of the electron transport chain (ETC). According to meta-analysis of amino acid sequences, the homology of cytochrome b is 75 % between rhesus monkeys and cattle. To maintain the function of ETC after iSCNT, 4n iSCNT embryos were produced by fusion of non-enucleated cow oocytes and rhesus monkey somatic cells. The blastocyst development rate of 4n iSCNT embryos was higher than that of 2n embryos (P < 0.01). Formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is an indirect indicator of ETC activity of cells. The ROS levels of 4n iSCNT embryos was higher than that of 2n embryos (P < 0.01). Collectively, rhesus monkey iSCNT embryos reconstructed with cow oocytes have nuclear-mitochondrial incompatibility due to fundamental species differences between rhesus monkeys and cattle. Nuclear-mitochondrial incompatibility seems to correlate with low ETC activity and extremely low blastocyst development of rhesus monkey-cow iSCNT embryos.

  9. Nuclear reprogramming: the strategy used in normal development is also used in somatic cell nuclear transfer and parthenogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Tianlong; Zheng, Junke; Xing, Fengying; Fang, Haiyan; Sun, Feng; Yan, Ayong; Gong, Xun; Ding, Hui; Tang, Fan; Sheng, Hui Z

    2007-02-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) and parthenogenesis are alternative forms of reproduction and development, building new life cycles on differentiated somatic cell nuclei and duplicated maternal chromatin, respectively. In the preceding paper (Sun F, et al., Cell Res 2007; 17:117-134.), we showed that an "erase-and-rebuild" strategy is used in normal development to transform the maternal gene expression profile to a zygotic one. Here, we investigate if the same strategy also applies to SCNT and parthenogenesis. The relationship between chromatin and chromatin factors (CFs) during SCNT and parthenogenesis was examined using immunochemical and GFP-fusion protein assays. Results from these studies indicated that soon after nuclear transfer, a majority of CFs dissociated from somatic nuclei and were redistributed to the cytoplasm of the egg. The erasure process in oogenesis is recaptured during the initial phase in SCNT. Most CFs entered pseudo-pronuclei shortly after their formation. In parthenogenesis, all parthenogenotes underwent normal oogenesis, and thus had removed most CFs from chromosomes before the initiation of development. The CFs were subsequently re-associated with female pronuclei in time and sequence similar to that in fertilized embryos. Based on these data, we conclude that the "erase-and-rebuild" process observed in normal development also occurs in SCNT and in parthenogenesis, albeit in altered fashions. The process is responsible for transcription reprogramming in these procedures. The "erase" process in SCNT is compressed and the efficiency is compromised, which likely contribute to the developmental defects often observed in nuclear transfer (nt) embryos. Furthermore, results from this study indicated that the cytoplasm of an egg contains most, if not all, essential components for assembling the zygotic program and can assemble them onto appropriate diploid chromatin of distinct origins.

  10. Cytoskeletal to Nuclear Strain Transfer Regulates YAP Signaling in Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Driscoll, Tristan P.; Cosgrove, Brian D.; Heo, Su-Jin; Shurden, Zach E.; Mauck, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical forces transduced to cells through the extracellular matrix are critical regulators of tissue development, growth, and homeostasis, and can play important roles in directing stem cell differentiation. In addition to force-sensing mechanisms that reside at the cell surface, there is growing evidence that forces transmitted through the cytoskeleton and to the nuclear envelope are important for mechanosensing, including activation of the Yes-associated protein (YAP)/transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ) pathway. Moreover, nuclear shape, mechanics, and deformability change with differentiation state and have been likewise implicated in force sensing and differentiation. However, the significance of force transfer to the nucleus through the mechanosensing cytoskeletal machinery in the regulation of mesenchymal stem cell mechanobiologic response remains unclear. Here we report that actomyosin-generated cytoskeletal tension regulates nuclear shape and force transmission through the cytoskeleton and demonstrate the differential short- and long-term response of mesenchymal stem cells to dynamic tensile loading based on the contractility state, the patency of the actin cytoskeleton, and the connections it makes with the nucleus. Specifically, we show that while some mechanoactive signaling pathways (e.g., ERK signaling) can be activated in the absence of nuclear strain transfer, cytoskeletal strain transfer to the nucleus is essential for activation of the YAP/TAZ pathway with stretch. PMID:26083918

  11. Significant improvement of mouse cloning technique by treatment with trichostatin A after somatic nuclear transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Kishigami, Satoshi . E-mail: kishigami@cdb.riken.jp; Mizutani, Eiji; Ohta, Hiroshi; Hikichi, Takafusa; Thuan, Nguyen Van; Wakayama, Sayaka; Bui, Hong-Thuy; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2006-02-03

    The low success rate of animal cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is believed to be associated with epigenetic errors including abnormal DNA hypermethylation. Recently, we elucidated by using round spermatids that, after nuclear transfer, treatment of zygotes with trichostatin A (TSA), an inhibitor of histone deacetylase, can remarkably reduce abnormal DNA hypermethylation depending on the origins of transferred nuclei and their genomic regions [S. Kishigami, N. Van Thuan, T. Hikichi, H. Ohta, S. Wakayama. E. Mizutani, T. Wakayama, Epigenetic abnormalities of the mouse paternal zygotic genome associated with microinsemination of round spermatids, Dev. Biol. (2005) in press]. Here, we found that 5-50 nM TSA-treatment for 10 h following oocyte activation resulted in more efficient in vitro development of somatic cloned embryos to the blastocyst stage from 2- to 5-fold depending on the donor cells including tail tip cells, spleen cells, neural stem cells, and cumulus cells. This TSA-treatment also led to more than 5-fold increase in success rate of mouse cloning from cumulus cells without obvious abnormality but failed to improve ES cloning success. Further, we succeeded in establishment of nuclear transfer-embryonic stem (NT-ES) cells from TSA-treated cloned blastocyst at a rate three times higher than those from untreated cloned blastocysts. Thus, our data indicate that TSA-treatment after SCNT in mice can dramatically improve the practical application of current cloning techniques.

  12. Nuclear transfer of embryonic cell nuclei to non-enucleated eggs in zebrafish, Danio rerio.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Manabu; Hashimoto, Hisashi; Bubenshchikova, Ekaterina; Wakamatsu, Yuko

    2011-04-15

    We previously established a novel method for nuclear transfer in medaka (Oryzias latipes) using non-enucleated, diploidized eggs as recipients for adult somatic cell nuclei. Here we report the first attempt to apply this method to another fish species. To examine suitability of using non-enucleated eggs as recipients for nuclear transfer in the zebrafish (Danio rerio), we transferred blastula cell nuclei from a wild-type donor strain to non-enucleated, unfertilized eggs from a golden recipient strain. As a result, 31 of 184 (16.8%) operated eggs developed normally and reached the adult stage. Twenty-eight (15.2%) of these transplants showed wild-type phenotype and the remaining three (1.6%) were golden. Except for one individual that exhibited diploid/tetraploid mosaicism, all of the wild-type nuclear transplants were either triploid or diploid. While all of 19 triploid transplants were infertile, a total of six transplants (21.4%) were fertile (five of the eight diploid transplants and one transplant exhibiting ploidy mosaicism). Except for one diploid individual, all of the fertile transplants transferred both the wild-type golden gene allele (slc24a5) as well as the phenotype, the wild-type body color, to their F(1) and F(2) progeny in a typical Mendelian fashion. PCR analysis of slc24a5 suggested that triploidy originated from a fused nucleus in the diploid donor and haploid recipient nuclei, and that the sole origin of diploidy was the diploid donor nucleus. The results of the present study demonstrated the suitability of using non-enucleated eggs as recipients for nuclear transfer experiments in zebrafish.

  13. 10 CFR 770.7 - What procedures are to be used to transfer real property at defense nuclear facilities for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What procedures are to be used to transfer real property... ENERGY TRANSFER OF REAL PROPERTY AT DEFENSE NUCLEAR FACILITIES FOR ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT § 770.7 What... congressional defense committees through the Secretary of Energy. (d) Transfer. After the...

  14. Neonatal Care and Management of Foals Derived by Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Aime K; Hinrichs, Katrin

    2015-01-01

    There are few reports on the birth of foals resulting from equine adult somatic cell nuclear transfer (NT). On evaluation of reports of 28 live-born adult somatic-cell NT (clone) foals, 3 died within 2 weeks of birth of complications. Approximately 50 % of all reported cloned foals had complications, some requiring aggressive supportive care. The most common abnormalities reported were neonatal maladjustment syndrome, enlarged umbilical remnant, and angular deformity of the forelimbs, similar to problems described in cloned cattle. In contrast, large offspring syndrome and gross abnormalities of the fetal membranes which are described in cloned cattle are not reported in cloned foals. Reports of the health of foals produced by nuclear transfer suggest that NT foals should be treated aggressively as at-risk foals until all parameters are normal.

  15. Cloning mice and ES cells by nuclear transfer from somatic stem cells and fully differentiated cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhongde

    2011-01-01

    Cloning animals by nuclear transfer (NT) has been successful in several mammalian species. In addition to cloning live animals (reproductive cloning), this technique has also been used in several species to establish cloned embryonic stem (ntES) cell lines from somatic cells. It is the latter application of this technique that has been heralded as being the potential means to produce isogenic embryonic stem cells from patients for cell therapy (therapeutic cloning). These two types of cloning differ only in the steps after cloned embryos are produced: for reproductive cloning the cloned embryos are transferred to surrogate mothers to allow them to develop to full term and for therapeutic cloning the cloned embryos are used to derive ntES cells. In this chapter, a detailed NT protocol in mouse by using somatic stem cells (neuron and skin stem cells) and fully differentiated somatic cells (cumulus cells and fibroblast cells) as nuclear donors is described.

  16. Artificial intelligence and nuclear power. Report by the Technology Transfer Artificial Intelligence Task Team

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-06-01

    The Artificial Intelligence Task Team was organized to review the status of Artificial Intelligence (AI) technology, identify guidelines for AI work, and to identify work required to allow the nuclear industry to realize maximum benefit from this technology. The state of the nuclear industry was analyzed to determine where the application of AI technology could be of greatest benefit. Guidelines and criteria were established to focus on those particular problem areas where AI could provide the highest possible payoff to the industry. Information was collected from government, academic, and private organizations. Very little AI work is now being done to specifically support the nuclear industry. The AI Task Team determined that the establishment of a Strategic Automation Initiative (SAI) and the expansion of the DOE Technology Transfer program would ensure that AI technology could be used to develop software for the nuclear industry that would have substantial financial payoff to the industry. The SAI includes both long and short term phases. The short-term phase includes projects which would demonstrate that AI can be applied to the nuclear industry safely, and with substantial financial benefit. The long term phase includes projects which would develop AI technologies with specific applicability to the nuclear industry that would not be developed by people working in any other industry.

  17. Ion engine propelled Earth-Mars cycler with nuclear thermal propelled transfer vehicle, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Rudolf X.; Baker, Myles; Melko, Joseph

    1994-01-01

    The goal of this project was to perform a preliminary design of a long term, reusable transportation system between earth and Mars which would be capable of providing both artificial gravity and shelter from solar flare radiation. The heart of this system was assumed to be a Cycler spacecraft propelled by an ion propulsion system. The crew transfer vehicle was designed to be propelled by a nuclear-thermal propulsion system. Several Mars transportation system architectures and their associated space vehicles were designed.

  18. Neutron transfer reactions: Surrogates for neutron capture for basic and applied nuclear science

    SciTech Connect

    Cizewski, J. A.; Jones, K. L.; Kozub, R. L.; Pain, Steven D; Peters, W. A.; Adekola, Aderemi S; Allen, J.; Bardayan, Daniel W; Becker, J.; Blackmon, Jeff C; Chae, K. Y.; Chipps, K.; Erikson, Luke; Gaddis, A. L.; Harlin, Christopher W; Hatarik, Robert; Howard, Joshua A; Jandel, M.; Johnson, Micah; Kapler, R.; Krolas, W.; Liang, J Felix; Livesay, Jake; Ma, Zhanwen; Matei, Catalin; Matthews, C.; Moazen, Brian; Nesaraja, Caroline D; O'Malley, Patrick; Patterson, N. P.; Paulauskas, Stanley; Pelham, T.; Pittman, S. T.; Radford, David C; Rogers, J.; Schmitt, Kyle; Shapira, Dan; ShrinerJr., J. F.; Sissom, D. J.; Smith, Michael Scott; Swan, T. P.; Thomas, J. S.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wilson, Gemma L

    2009-04-01

    Neutron capture reactions on unstable nuclei are important for both basic and applied nuclear science. A program has been developed at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to study single-neutron transfer (d,p) reactions with rare isotope beams to provide information on neutron-induced reactions on unstable nuclei. Results from (d,p) studies on {sup 130,132}Sn, {sup 134}Te and {sup 75}As are discussed.

  19. Somatic cell nuclear transfer: origins, the present position and future opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Wilmut, Ian; Bai, Yu; Taylor, Jane

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear transfer that involves the transfer of the nucleus from a donor cell into an oocyte or early embryo from which the chromosomes have been removed was considered first as a means of assessing changes during development in the ability of the nucleus to control development. In mammals, development of embryos produced by nuclear transfer depends upon coordination of the cell cycles of donor and recipient cells. Our analysis of nuclear potential was completed in 1996 when a nucleus from an adult ewe mammary gland cell controlled development to term of Dolly the sheep. The new procedure has been used to target the first precise genetic modification into livestock; however, the greatest inheritance of the Dolly experiment was to make biologists think differently. If unknown factors in the recipient oocyte could reprogramme the nucleus to a stage very early in development then there must be other ways of making that change. Within 10 years, two laboratories working independently established protocols by which the introduction of selected transcription factors changes a small proportion of the treated cells to pluripotent stem cells. This ability to produce ‘induced pluripotent stem cells’ is providing revolutionary new opportunities in research and cell therapy. PMID:26416677

  20. Production of human CD59-transgenic pigs by embryonic germ cell nuclear transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, Kwang Sung; Won, Ji Young; Park, Jin-Ki; Sorrell, Alice M.; Heo, Soon Young; Kang, Jee Hyun; Woo, Jae-Seok; Choi, Bong-Hwan; Chang, Won-Kyong; Shim, Hosup

    2010-10-01

    Research highlights: {yields} Human CD59 (hCD59) gene was introduced into porcine embryonic germ (EG) cells. {yields} hCD59-transgenic EG cells were resistant to hyperacute rejection in cytolytic assay. {yields} hCD59-transgenic pigs were produced by EG cell nuclear transfer. -- Abstract: This study was performed to produce transgenic pigs expressing the human complement regulatory protein CD59 (hCD59) using the nuclear transfer (NT) of embryonic germ (EG) cells, which are undifferentiated stem cells derived from primordial germ cells. Because EG cells can be cultured indefinitely in an undifferentiated state, they may provide an inexhaustible source of nuclear donor cells for NT to produce transgenic pigs. A total of 1980 NT embryos derived from hCD59-transgenic EG cells were transferred to ten recipients, resulting in the birth of fifteen piglets from three pregnancies. Among these offspring, ten were alive without overt health problems. Based on PCR analysis, all fifteen piglets were confirmed as hCD59 transgenic. The expression of the hCD59 transgene in the ten living piglets was verified by RT-PCR. Western analysis showed the expression of the hCD59 protein in four of the ten RT-PCR-positive piglets. These results demonstrate that hCD59-transgenic pigs could effectively be produced by EG cell NT and that such transgenic pigs may be used as organ donors in pig-to-human xenotransplantation.

  1. Somatic cell nuclear transfer: origins, the present position and future opportunities.

    PubMed

    Wilmut, Ian; Bai, Yu; Taylor, Jane

    2015-10-19

    Nuclear transfer that involves the transfer of the nucleus from a donor cell into an oocyte or early embryo from which the chromosomes have been removed was considered first as a means of assessing changes during development in the ability of the nucleus to control development. In mammals, development of embryos produced by nuclear transfer depends upon coordination of the cell cycles of donor and recipient cells. Our analysis of nuclear potential was completed in 1996 when a nucleus from an adult ewe mammary gland cell controlled development to term of Dolly the sheep. The new procedure has been used to target the first precise genetic modification into livestock; however, the greatest inheritance of the Dolly experiment was to make biologists think differently. If unknown factors in the recipient oocyte could reprogramme the nucleus to a stage very early in development then there must be other ways of making that change. Within 10 years, two laboratories working independently established protocols by which the introduction of selected transcription factors changes a small proportion of the treated cells to pluripotent stem cells. This ability to produce 'induced pluripotent stem cells' is providing revolutionary new opportunities in research and cell therapy.

  2. Heat transfer analysis of fuel assemblies in a heterogeneous gas core nuclear rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watanabe, Yoichi; Appelbaum, Jacob; Diaz, Nils; Maya, Isaac

    1991-01-01

    Heat transfer problems of a heterogeneous gaseous core nuclear rocket were studied. The reactor core consists of 1.5-m long hexagonal fuel assemblies filled with pressurized uranium tetrafluoride (UF4) gas. The fuel gas temperature ranges from 3500 to 7000 K at a nominal operating condition of 40 atm. Each fuel assembly has seven coolant tubes, through which hydrogen propellant flows. The propellant temperature is not constrained by the fuel temperature but by the maximum temperature of the graphite coolant tube. For a core achieving a fission power density of 1000 MW/cu m, the propellant core exit temperature can be as high as 3200 K. The physical size of a 1250 MW gaseous core nuclear rocket is comparable with that of a NERVA-type solid core nuclear rocket. The engine can deliver a specific impulse of 1020 seconds and a thrust of 330 kN.

  3. Nuclear transfer from sexed parent embryos in cattle: efficiency and birth of offspring.

    PubMed

    Le Bourhis, D; Chesne, P; Nibart, M; Marchal, J; Humblot, P; Renard, J P; Heyman, Y

    1998-07-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the efficiency and reliability of embryo sexing from isolated single blastomeres, and after nuclear transfer to examine the influence of the sex of donor embryos on development in vitro and in vivo up to calving. The sex of the donor embryo was determined by revealing a specific Y DNA sequence by PCR and electrophoresis after isolation of one, two, three, or more than five cells. The efficiency of sex determination was over 90% and reliability was 100% independent of the number of blastomeres used. In a second experiment, sex was determined from a single cell and the other cells were used for nuclear transfer. The effect of sex on in vitro development was studied in 386 male and 314 female reconstructed embryos derived from 19 male and 14 female parent embryos, respectively. Developmental competence in vitro of male and female constructs over 7 days was not statistically different (25.2 and 23.1% blastocysts on day 7, respectively; P > 0.05). After the transfer of predetermined male (n = 30) and female (n = 27) cloned embryos into recipient heifers, no effect of sex was observed on pregnancy rates at day 21, 35 and 90, or on calving rates (P > 0.05). These rates did not differ between single and twin transfer (P > 0.05). The sex of the calves born always corresponded to that determined from a single blastomere. These results show that sex can be determined accurately when using a single blastomere before nuclear transfer and that the sex of the parent embryo does not affect in vitro development or in vivo survival rates of cloned embryos.

  4. Rabbit embryonic stem cell lines derived from fertilized, parthenogenetic or somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Zhen F.; Gai, Hui; Huang, You Z.; Li, Shan G.; Chen, Xue J.; Shi, Jian J.; Wu, Li; Liu, Ailian; Xu, Ping; Sheng, Hui Z. . E-mail: hzsheng2003@yahoo.com

    2006-11-01

    Embryonic stem cells were isolated from rabbit blastocysts derived from fertilization (conventional rbES cells), parthenogenesis (pES cells) and nuclear transfer (ntES cells), and propagated in a serum-free culture system. Rabbit ES (rbES) cells proliferated for a prolonged time in an undifferentiated state and maintained a normal karyotype. These cells grew in a monolayer with a high nuclear/cytoplasm ratio and contained a high level of alkaline phosphate activity. In addition, rbES cells expressed the pluripotent marker Oct-4, as well as EBAF2, FGF4, TDGF1, but not antigens recognized by antibodies against SSEA-1, SSEA-3, SSEA-4, TRA-1-10 and TRA-1-81. All 3 types of ES cells formed embryoid bodies and generated teratoma that contained tissue types of all three germ layers. rbES cells exhibited a high cloning efficiency, were genetically modified readily and were used as nuclear donors to generate a viable rabbit through somatic cell nuclear transfer. In combination with genetic engineering, the ES cell technology should facilitate the creation of new rabbit lines.

  5. PRESTO polarization transfer to quadrupolar nuclei: Implications for dynamic nuclear polarization

    DOE PAGES

    Perras, Frederic A.; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Pruski, Marek

    2015-08-04

    In this study, we show both experimentally and numerically on a series of model systems that in experiments involving transfer of magnetization from 1H to the quadrupolar nuclei under magic-angle-spinning (MAS), the PRESTO technique consistently outperforms traditionally used cross polarization (CP), affording more quantitative intensities, improved lineshapes, better overall sensitivity, and straightforward optimization. This advantage derives from the fact that PRESTO circumvents the convoluted and uncooperative spin dynamics during the CP transfer under MAS, by replacing the spin-locking of quadrupolar nuclei with a single central transition selective 90° pulse and using a symmetry-based recoupling sequence in the 1H channel. Thismore » is important in the context of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) NMR of quadrupolar nuclei, where the efficient transfer of enhanced 1H polarization is desired to obtain the highest sensitivity.« less

  6. PRESTO polarization transfer to quadrupolar nuclei: Implications for dynamic nuclear polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Perras, Frederic A.; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Pruski, Marek

    2015-08-04

    In this study, we show both experimentally and numerically on a series of model systems that in experiments involving transfer of magnetization from 1H to the quadrupolar nuclei under magic-angle-spinning (MAS), the PRESTO technique consistently outperforms traditionally used cross polarization (CP), affording more quantitative intensities, improved lineshapes, better overall sensitivity, and straightforward optimization. This advantage derives from the fact that PRESTO circumvents the convoluted and uncooperative spin dynamics during the CP transfer under MAS, by replacing the spin-locking of quadrupolar nuclei with a single central transition selective 90° pulse and using a symmetry-based recoupling sequence in the 1H channel. This is important in the context of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) NMR of quadrupolar nuclei, where the efficient transfer of enhanced 1H polarization is desired to obtain the highest sensitivity.

  7. ICESluvan, a 94-Kilobase Mosaic Integrative Conjugative Element Conferring Interspecies Transfer of VanB-Type Glycopeptide Resistance, a Novel Bacitracin Resistance Locus, and a Toxin-Antitoxin Stabilization System

    PubMed Central

    Bjørkeng, Eva K.; Hjerde, Erik; Pedersen, Torunn; Sundsfjord, Arnfinn

    2013-01-01

    A 94-kb integrative conjugative element (ICESluvan) transferable to Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis from an animal isolate of Streptococcus lutetiensis consists of a mosaic of genetic fragments from different Gram-positive bacteria. A variant of ICESluvan was confirmed in S. lutetiensis from a patient. A complete Tn5382/Tn1549 with a vanB2 operon is integrated into a streptococcal ICESde3396-like region harboring a putative bacteriophage exclusion system, a putative agglutinin receptor precursor, and key components of a type IV secretion system. Moreover, ICESluvan encodes a putative MobC family mobilization protein and a relaxase and, thus, in total has all genetic components essential for conjugative transfer. A 9-kb element within Tn5382/Tn1549 encodes, among others, putative proteins similar to the TnpX site-specific recombinase in Faecalibacterium and VanZ in Paenibacillus, which may contribute to the detected low-level teicoplanin resistance. Furthermore, ICESluvan encodes a novel bacitracin resistance locus that is associated with reduced susceptibility to bacitracin when transferred to E. faecium. The expression of a streptococcal pezAT toxin-antitoxin-encoding operon of ICESluvan in S. lutetiensis, E. faecium, and E. faecalis was confirmed by reverse transcription (RT)-PCR, indicating an active toxin-antitoxin system which may contribute to stabilizing ICESluvan within new hosts. Junction PCR and DNA sequencing confirmed that ICESluvan excised to form a circular intermediate in S. lutetiensis, E. faecalis, and E. faecium. Transfer between E. faecalis cells was observed in the presence of helper plasmid pIP964. Sequence analysis of the original S. lutetiensis donor and enterococcal transconjugants showed that ICESluvan integrates in a site-specific manner into the C-terminal end of the chromosomal tRNA methyltransferase gene rumA. PMID:24078615

  8. Preliminary assessment of somatic cell nuclear transfer in the dromedary (Camelus dromedarius).

    PubMed

    Khatir, H; Anouassi, A

    2008-12-01

    Somatic cloning may enable the maintenance/expansion of the population of camels with the highest potential for milk production or the best racing performances. However, there have been no reports of embryonic or somatic nuclear transfer in camels. The aim of this study was to produce dromedary embryos by nuclear transfer using in vitro matured oocytes and two somatic cells from two sources (adult fibroblasts or granulosa cells). A total of 58 adult females were superstimulated by a single dose of eCG (3500 IU). Ten days later, their ovaries were collected postmortem. Cumulus-oocytes-complexes (COCs) were aspirated from stimulated follicles and were matured in vitro for 30 h. Fibroblasts (from live adult male) and granulosa cells (from slaughtered adult females) were used as donor karyoplasts and injected into mature enucleated dromedary oocytes. The cleavage rate was significantly higher (P<0.05) for embryos reconstructed with fibroblasts (59%) versus those with granulosa cells (45%). However, there was no difference between the two groups in the proportion of cloned embryos reaching the blastocyst stage (fibroblasts: 14% vs. granulosa cells: 15%) or those that hatched (fibroblasts: 10% vs. granulosa cells: 12%). The viability of reconstructed dromedary embryos from the two sources of donor cells (fibroblasts; n=5 vs. granulosa cells; n=7) was examined by transferring them to synchronized recipients. Two females (fibroblasts: 1/5; 20%, granulosa cells: 1/7; 14%) were confirmed pregnant by ultrasonography at 15 and 25 days following transfer. Later, the pregnancies were followed by pregnancy empirical-symptoms. These two pregnancies were lost between 25 and 60 days following transfer, respectively. In conclusion, the present study shows for the first time that the development of dromedary NT embryos derived from either adult fibroblasts or granulosa cells can occur in vitro and the transfer of these cloned embryos to recipients can result in pregnancies.

  9. Interspecies implantation and mitochondria fate of panda-rabbit cloned embryos.

    PubMed

    Chen, Da-Yuan; Wen, Duan-Cheng; Zhang, Ya-Ping; Sun, Qing-Yuan; Han, Zhi-Ming; Liu, Zhong-Hua; Shi, Peng; Li, Jin-Song; Xiangyu, Jing-Gong; Lian, Li; Kou, Zhao-Hui; Wu, Yu-Qi; Chen, Yu-Cun; Wang, Peng-Yan; Zhang, He-Min

    2002-08-01

    Somatic cell nuclei of giant pandas can dedifferentiate in enucleated rabbit ooplasm, and the reconstructed eggs can develop to blastocysts. In order to observe whether these interspecies cloned embryos can implant in the uterus of an animal other than the panda, we transferred approximately 2300 panda-rabbit cloned embryos into 100 synchronized rabbit recipients, and none became pregnant. In another approach, we cotransferred both panda-rabbit and cat-rabbit interspecies cloned embryos into the oviducts of 21 cat recipients. Fourteen recipients exhibited estrus within 35 days; five recipients exhibited estrus 43-48 days after embryo transfer; and the other two recipients died of pneumonia, one of which was found to be pregnant with six early fetuses when an autopsy was performed. Microsatellite DNA analysis of these early fetuses confirmed that two were from giant panda-rabbit cloned embryos. The results demonstrated that panda-rabbit cloned embryos can implant in the uterus of a third species, the domestic cat. By using mitochondrial-specific probes of panda and rabbit, we found that mitochondria from both panda somatic cells and rabbit ooplasm coexisted in early blastocysts, but mitochondria from rabbit ooplasm decreased, and those from panda donor cells dominated in early fetuses after implantation. Our results reveal that mitochondria from donor cells may substitute those from recipient oocytes in postimplanted, interspecies cloned embryos.

  10. Coherent transfer of nuclear spin polarization in field-cycling NMR experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Pravdivtsev, Andrey N.; Yurkovskaya, Alexandra V.; Ivanov, Konstantin L.; Vieth, Hans-Martin

    2013-12-28

    Coherent polarization transfer effects in a coupled spin network have been studied over a wide field range. The transfer mechanism is based on exciting zero-quantum coherences between the nuclear spin states by means of non-adiabatic field jump from high to low magnetic field. Subsequent evolution of these coherences enables conversion of spin order in the system, which is monitored after field jump back to high field. Such processes are most efficient when the spin system passes through an avoided level crossing during the field variation. The polarization transfer effects have been demonstrated for N-acetyl histidine, which has five scalar coupled protons; the initial spin order has been prepared by applying RF-pulses at high magnetic field. The observed oscillatory transfer kinetics is taken as a clear indication of a coherent mechanism; level crossing effects have also been demonstrated. The experimental data are in very good agreement with the theoretical model of coherent polarization transfer. The method suggested is also valid for other types of initial polarization in the spin system, most notably, for spin hyperpolarization.

  11. Coherent transfer of nuclear spin polarization in field-cycling NMR experiments.

    PubMed

    Pravdivtsev, Andrey N; Yurkovskaya, Alexandra V; Vieth, Hans-Martin; Ivanov, Konstantin L

    2013-12-28

    Coherent polarization transfer effects in a coupled spin network have been studied over a wide field range. The transfer mechanism is based on exciting zero-quantum coherences between the nuclear spin states by means of non-adiabatic field jump from high to low magnetic field. Subsequent evolution of these coherences enables conversion of spin order in the system, which is monitored after field jump back to high field. Such processes are most efficient when the spin system passes through an avoided level crossing during the field variation. The polarization transfer effects have been demonstrated for N-acetyl histidine, which has five scalar coupled protons; the initial spin order has been prepared by applying RF-pulses at high magnetic field. The observed oscillatory transfer kinetics is taken as a clear indication of a coherent mechanism; level crossing effects have also been demonstrated. The experimental data are in very good agreement with the theoretical model of coherent polarization transfer. The method suggested is also valid for other types of initial polarization in the spin system, most notably, for spin hyperpolarization.

  12. Coupled electron-nuclear dynamics: Charge migration and charge transfer initiated near a conical intersection

    SciTech Connect

    Mendive-Tapia, David; Vacher, Morgane; Bearpark, Michael J.; Robb, Michael A.

    2013-07-28

    Coupled electron-nuclear dynamics, implemented using the Ehrenfest method, has been used to study charge migration with fixed nuclei, together with charge transfer when nuclei are allowed to move. Simulations were initiated at reference geometries of neutral benzene and 2-phenylethylamine (PEA), and at geometries close to potential energy surface crossings in the cations. Cationic eigenstates, and the so-called sudden approximation, involving removal of an electron from a correlated ground-state wavefunction for the neutral species, were used as initial conditions. Charge migration without coupled nuclear motion could be observed if the Ehrenfest simulation, using the sudden approximation, was started near a conical intersection where the states were both strongly coupled and quasi-degenerate. Further, the main features associated with charge migration were still recognizable when the nuclear motion was allowed to couple. In the benzene radical cation, starting from the reference neutral geometry with the sudden approximation, one could observe sub-femtosecond charge migration with a small amplitude, which results from weak interaction with higher electronic states. However, we were able to engineer large amplitude charge migration, with a period between 10 and 100 fs, corresponding to oscillation of the electronic structure between the quinoid and anti-quinoid cationic electronic configurations, by distorting the geometry along the derivative coupling vector from the D{sub 6h} Jahn-Teller crossing to lower symmetry where the states are not degenerate. When the nuclear motion becomes coupled, the period changes only slightly. In PEA, in an Ehrenfest trajectory starting from the D{sub 2} eigenstate and reference geometry, a partial charge transfer occurs after about 12 fs near the first crossing between D{sub 1}, D{sub 2} (N{sup +}-Phenyl, N-Phenyl{sup +}). If the Ehrenfest propagation is started near this point, using the sudden approximation without coupled

  13. Identification of nuclear effects in neutrino-carbon interactions at low three-momentum transfer

    DOE PAGES

    Rodrigues, P. A.

    2016-02-17

    Two different nuclear-medium effects are isolated using a low three-momentum transfer subsample of neutrino-carbon scattering data from the MINERvA neutrino experiment. The observed hadronic energy in charged-current νμ interactions is combined with muon kinematics to permit separation of the quasielastic and Δ(1232) resonance processes. First, we observe a small cross section at very low energy transfer that matches the expected screening effect of long-range nucleon correlations. Second, additions to the event rate in the kinematic region between the quasielastic and Δ resonance processes are needed to describe the data. The data in this kinematic region also have an enhanced populationmore » of multiproton final states. Contributions predicted for scattering from a nucleon pair have both properties; the model tested in this analysis is a significant improvement but does not fully describe the data. We present the results as a double-differential cross section to enable further investigation of nuclear models. Furthermore, improved description of the effects of the nuclear environment are required by current and future neutrino oscillation experiments.« less

  14. Identification of Nuclear Effects in Neutrino-Carbon Interactions at Low Three-Momentum Transfer.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, P A; Demgen, J; Miltenberger, E; Aliaga, L; Altinok, O; Bellantoni, L; Bercellie, A; Betancourt, M; Bodek, A; Bravar, A; Budd, H; Cai, T; Carneiro, M F; Chvojka, J; Devan, J; Dytman, S A; Díaz, G A; Eberly, B; Elkins, M; Felix, J; Fields, L; Fine, R; Gago, A M; Galindo, R; Gallagher, H; Ghosh, A; Golan, T; Gran, R; Harris, D A; Higuera, A; Hurtado, K; Kiveni, M; Kleykamp, J; Kordosky, M; Le, T; Leistico, J R; Lovlein, A; Maher, E; Manly, S; Mann, W A; Marshall, C M; Martinez Caicedo, D A; McFarland, K S; McGivern, C L; McGowan, A M; Messerly, B; Miller, J; Mislivec, A; Morfín, J G; Mousseau, J; Muhlbeier, T; Naples, D; Nelson, J K; Norrick, A; Nuruzzaman; Osta, J; Paolone, V; Patrick, C E; Perdue, G N; Ramirez, M A; Ransome, R D; Ray, H; Ren, L; Rimal, D; Ruterbories, D; Schellman, H; Schmitz, D W; Solano Salinas, C J; Tagg, N; Tice, B G; Valencia, E; Walton, T; Wolcott, J; Wospakrik, M; Zavala, G; Zhang, D

    2016-02-19

    Two different nuclear-medium effects are isolated using a low three-momentum transfer subsample of neutrino-carbon scattering data from the MINERvA neutrino experiment. The observed hadronic energy in charged-current ν_{μ} interactions is combined with muon kinematics to permit separation of the quasielastic and Δ(1232) resonance processes. First, we observe a small cross section at very low energy transfer that matches the expected screening effect of long-range nucleon correlations. Second, additions to the event rate in the kinematic region between the quasielastic and Δ resonance processes are needed to describe the data. The data in this kinematic region also have an enhanced population of multiproton final states. Contributions predicted for scattering from a nucleon pair have both properties; the model tested in this analysis is a significant improvement but does not fully describe the data. We present the results as a double-differential cross section to enable further investigation of nuclear models. Improved description of the effects of the nuclear environment are required by current and future neutrino oscillation experiments.

  15. Somatic cell nuclear transfer and derivation of embryonic stem cells in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Markoulaki, Styliani; Meissner, Alexander; Jaenisch, Rudolf

    2008-06-01

    Addressing the fundamental questions of nuclear equivalence in somatic cells has fascinated scientists for decades and has resulted in the development of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) or animal cloning. SCNT involves the transfer of the nucleus of a somatic cell into the cytoplasm of an egg whose own chromosomes have been removed. In the mouse, SCNT has not only been successfully used to address the issue of nuclear equivalence, but has been used as a model system to test the hypothesis that embryonic stem cells (ESCs) derived from NT blastocysts have the potential to correct--through genetic manipulations--degenerative diseases. This paper aims to provide a comprehensive description of SCNT in the mouse and the derivation of ESCs from blastocysts generated by this technique. SCNT is a very challenging and inefficient procedure because it is technically complex, it bypasses the normal events of gamete interactions and egg activation, and it depends on adequate reprogramming of the somatic cell nucleus in vivo. Improvements in any or all those aspects may enhance the efficiency and applicability of SCNT. ESC derivation from SCNT blastocysts, on the other hand, requires the survival of only a few successfully reprogrammed cells, which have the capacity to proliferate indefinitely in vitro, maintain correct genetic and epigenetic status, and differentiate into any cell type in the body--characteristics that are essential for transplantation therapy or any other in vivo application.

  16. Identification of nuclear effects in neutrino-carbon interactions at low three-momentum transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, P. A.

    2016-02-17

    Two different nuclear-medium effects are isolated using a low three-momentum transfer subsample of neutrino-carbon scattering data from the MINERvA neutrino experiment. The observed hadronic energy in charged-current νμ interactions is combined with muon kinematics to permit separation of the quasielastic and Δ(1232) resonance processes. First, we observe a small cross section at very low energy transfer that matches the expected screening effect of long-range nucleon correlations. Second, additions to the event rate in the kinematic region between the quasielastic and Δ resonance processes are needed to describe the data. The data in this kinematic region also have an enhanced population of multiproton final states. Contributions predicted for scattering from a nucleon pair have both properties; the model tested in this analysis is a significant improvement but does not fully describe the data. We present the results as a double-differential cross section to enable further investigation of nuclear models. Furthermore, improved description of the effects of the nuclear environment are required by current and future neutrino oscillation experiments.

  17. Identification of Nuclear Effects in Neutrino-Carbon Interactions at Low Three-Momentum Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, P. A.; Demgen, J.; Miltenberger, E.; Aliaga, L.; Altinok, O.; Bellantoni, L.; Bercellie, A.; Betancourt, M.; Bodek, A.; Bravar, A.; Budd, H.; Cai, T.; Carneiro, M. F.; Chvojka, J.; Devan, J.; Dytman, S. A.; Díaz, G. A.; Eberly, B.; Elkins, M.; Felix, J.; Fields, L.; Fine, R.; Gago, A. M.; Galindo, R.; Gallagher, H.; Ghosh, A.; Golan, T.; Gran, R.; Harris, D. A.; Higuera, A.; Hurtado, K.; Kiveni, M.; Kleykamp, J.; Kordosky, M.; Le, T.; Leistico, J. R.; Lovlein, A.; Maher, E.; Manly, S.; Mann, W. A.; Marshall, C. M.; Martinez Caicedo, D. A.; McFarland, K. S.; McGivern, C. L.; McGowan, A. M.; Messerly, B.; Miller, J.; Mislivec, A.; Morfín, J. G.; Mousseau, J.; Muhlbeier, T.; Naples, D.; Nelson, J. K.; Norrick, A.; Nuruzzaman; Osta, J.; Paolone, V.; Patrick, C. E.; Perdue, G. N.; Ramirez, M. A.; Ransome, R. D.; Ray, H.; Ren, L.; Rimal, D.; Ruterbories, D.; Schellman, H.; Schmitz, D. W.; Solano Salinas, C. J.; Tagg, N.; Tice, B. G.; Valencia, E.; Walton, T.; Wolcott, J.; Wospakrik, M.; Zavala, G.; Zhang, D.; Minerva Collaboration

    2016-02-01

    Two different nuclear-medium effects are isolated using a low three-momentum transfer subsample of neutrino-carbon scattering data from the MINERvA neutrino experiment. The observed hadronic energy in charged-current νμ interactions is combined with muon kinematics to permit separation of the quasielastic and Δ (1232 ) resonance processes. First, we observe a small cross section at very low energy transfer that matches the expected screening effect of long-range nucleon correlations. Second, additions to the event rate in the kinematic region between the quasielastic and Δ resonance processes are needed to describe the data. The data in this kinematic region also have an enhanced population of multiproton final states. Contributions predicted for scattering from a nucleon pair have both properties; the model tested in this analysis is a significant improvement but does not fully describe the data. We present the results as a double-differential cross section to enable further investigation of nuclear models. Improved description of the effects of the nuclear environment are required by current and future neutrino oscillation experiments.

  18. Technological requirements of nuclear electric propulsion systems for fast Earth-Mars transfers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bérend, N.; Epenoy, R.; Cliquet, E.; Laurent-Varin, J.; Avril, S.

    2013-03-01

    Recent advances in electric propulsion technologies such as magnetoplasma rockets gave a new momentum to the study of nuclear electric propulsion concepts for Mars missions. Some recent works have been focused on very short Earth-to-Mars transfers of about 40 days with high-power, variable specific impulse propulsion systems [1]. While the interest of nuclear electric propulsion appears clearly with regard to the payload mass ratio (due to a high level of specific impulse), its interest with regard to the transfer time is more complex to define, as it depends on many design parameters. In this paper, a general analysis of the capability of nuclear electric propulsion systems considering both criteria (the payload mass ratio and the transfer time) is performed, and the technological requirements for fast Earth-Mars transfers are studied. This analysis has been performed in two steps. First, complete trajectory optimizations have been performed by CNES-DCT in order to obtain the propulsion requirements of the mission for different technological hypotheses regarding the engine technology (specific impulse levels and the throttling capability) and different mission requirements. The methodology used for designing fuel-optimal heliocentric trajectories, based on the Pontryagin's Maximum Principle will be presented. Trajectories have been computed for various power levels combined with either variable or fixed Isp. The second step consisted in evaluating a simpler method that could easily link the main mission requirements (the transfer time and the payload fraction) to the main technological requirements (the specific mass of the power generation system and the structure mass ratio of the whole vehicle, excluding the power generation system). Indeed, for power-limited systems, propulsion requirements can be characterized through the "trajectory characteristic" parameter, defined as the integral over time of the squared thrust acceleration. Technological requirements for

  19. Production of Cloned Korean Native Pig by Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer.

    PubMed

    Hwang, In-Sul; Kwon, Dae-Jin; Oh, Keun Bong; Ock, Sun-A; Chung, Hak-Jae; Cho, In-Cheol; Lee, Jeong-Woong; Im, Gi-Sun; Hwang, Seongsoo

    2015-06-01

    The Korean native pig (KNP) have been considered as animal models for animal biotechnology research because of their relatively small body size and their presumably highly inbred status due to the closed breeding program. However, little is reported about the use of KNP for animal biotechnology researches. This study was performed to establish the somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) protocol for the production of swine leukocyte antigens (SLA) homotype-defined SCNT KNP. The ear fibroblast cells originated from KNP were cultured and used as donor cell. After thawing, the donor cells were cultured for 1 hour with 15 μM roscovitine prior to the nuclear transfer. The numbers of reconstructed and parthenogenetic embryos transferred were 98 ± 35.2 and 145 ± 11.2, respectively. The pregnancy and delivery rate were 3/5 (60%) and 2/5 (40%). One healthy SLA homotype-defined SCNT KNP was successfully generated. The recipient-based individual cloning efficiency ranged from 0.65 to 1.08%. Taken together, it can be postulated that the methodological establishment of the production of SLA homotype-defined cloned KNP can be applied to the generation of transgenic cloned KNP as model animals for human disease and xenotransplantation researches.

  20. Birth of viable female dogs produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Jang, G; Kim, M K; Oh, H J; Hossein, M S; Fibrianto, Y H; Hong, S G; Park, J E; Kim, J J; Kim, H J; Kang, S K; Kim, D Y; Lee, B C

    2007-03-15

    Since the only viable cloned offspring born in dogs was a male, the purpose of the present study was to produce female puppies by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Adult ear fibroblasts from a 2-month-old female Afghan hound were isolated and used as donor cells. In vivo-matured canine oocytes surgically collected (approximately 72h after ovulation) from the oviducts of 23 donors were used for SCNT. After removal of the cumulus cells, oocytes were enucleated, microinjected, fused with a donor cell, and activated. A total of 167 reconstructed SCNT embryos were surgically transferred (Day 0) into the oviducts of 12 recipient bitches (average 13.9 embryos/recipient, range 6-22) with spontaneous, synchronous estrous cycles. Three pregnancies were detected by ultrasonography on Day 23, maintained to term, and three healthy female puppies (520, 460, and 520g), were delivered by Caesarean section on Day 60. These puppies were phenotypically and genotypically identical to the cell donor. In conclusion, we have provided the first demonstration that female dogs can be produced by nuclear transfer of ear fibroblasts into enucleated canine oocytes.

  1. Interspecies Interactions within Oral Microbial Communities

    PubMed Central

    Kuramitsu, Howard K.; He, Xuesong; Lux, Renate; Anderson, Maxwell H.; Shi, Wenyuan

    2007-01-01

    Summary: While reductionism has greatly advanced microbiology in the past 400 years, assembly of smaller pieces just could not explain the whole! Modern microbiologists are learning “system thinking” and “holism.” Such an approach is changing our understanding of microbial physiology and our ability to diagnose/treat microbial infections. This review uses oral microbial communities as a focal point to describe this new trend. With the common name “dental plaque,” oral microbial communities are some of the most complex microbial floras in the human body, consisting of more than 700 different bacterial species. For a very long time, oral microbiologists endeavored to use reductionism to identify the key genes or key pathogens responsible for oral microbial pathogenesis. The limitations of reductionism forced scientists to begin adopting new strategies using emerging concepts such as interspecies interaction, microbial community, biofilms, polymicrobial disease, etc. These new research directions indicate that the whole is much more than the simple sum of its parts, since the interactions between different parts resulted in many new physiological functions which cannot be observed with individual components. This review describes some of these interesting interspecies-interaction scenarios. PMID:18063722

  2. Interspecies Chimerism with Mammalian Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jun; Platero-Luengo, Aida; Sakurai, Masahiro; Sugawara, Atsushi; Gil, Maria Antonia; Yamauchi, Takayoshi; Suzuki, Keiichiro; Bogliotti, Yanina Soledad; Cuello, Cristina; Morales Valencia, Mariana; Okumura, Daiji; Luo, Jingping; Vilariño, Marcela; Parrilla, Inmaculada; Soto, Delia Alba; Martinez, Cristina A; Hishida, Tomoaki; Sánchez-Bautista, Sonia; Martinez-Martinez, M Llanos; Wang, Huili; Nohalez, Alicia; Aizawa, Emi; Martinez-Redondo, Paloma; Ocampo, Alejandro; Reddy, Pradeep; Roca, Jordi; Maga, Elizabeth A; Esteban, Concepcion Rodriguez; Berggren, W Travis; Nuñez Delicado, Estrella; Lajara, Jeronimo; Guillen, Isabel; Guillen, Pedro; Campistol, Josep M; Martinez, Emilio A; Ross, Pablo Juan; Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos

    2017-01-26

    Interspecies blastocyst complementation enables organ-specific enrichment of xenogenic pluripotent stem cell (PSC) derivatives. Here, we establish a versatile blastocyst complementation platform based on CRISPR-Cas9-mediated zygote genome editing and show enrichment of rat PSC-derivatives in several tissues of gene-edited organogenesis-disabled mice. Besides gaining insights into species evolution, embryogenesis, and human disease, interspecies blastocyst complementation might allow human organ generation in animals whose organ size, anatomy, and physiology are closer to humans. To date, however, whether human PSCs (hPSCs) can contribute to chimera formation in non-rodent species remains unknown. We systematically evaluate the chimeric competency of several types of hPSCs using a more diversified clade of mammals, the ungulates. We find that naïve hPSCs robustly engraft in both pig and cattle pre-implantation blastocysts but show limited contribution to post-implantation pig embryos. Instead, an intermediate hPSC type exhibits higher degree of chimerism and is able to generate differentiated progenies in post-implantation pig embryos.

  3. Development of porcine tetraploid somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos is influenced by oocyte nuclei.

    PubMed

    Fu, Bo; Liu, Di; Ma, Hong; Guo, Zhen-Hua; Wang, Liang; Li, Zhong-Qiu; Peng, Fu-Gang; Bai, Jing

    2016-02-01

    Cloning efficiency in mammalian systems remains low because reprogramming of donor cells is frequently incomplete. Nuclear factors in the oocyte are removed by enucleation, and this removal may adversely affect reprogramming efficiency. Here, we investigated the role of porcine oocyte nuclear factors during reprogramming. We introduced somatic cell nuclei into intact MII oocytes to establish tetraploid somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos containing both somatic nuclei and oocyte nuclei. We then examined the influence of the oocyte nucleus on tetraploid SCNT embryo development by assessing characteristics including pronucleus formation, cleavage rate, and blastocyst formation. Overall, tetraploid SCNT embryos have a higher developmental competence than do standard diploid SCNT embryos. Therefore, we have established an embryonic model in which a fetal fibroblast nucleus and an oocyte metaphase II plate coexist. Tetraploid SCNT represents a new research platform that is potentially useful for examining interactions between donor nuclei and oocyte nuclei. This platform should facilitate further understanding of the roles played by nuclear factors during reprogramming.

  4. Therapeutic potential of somatic cell nuclear transfer for degenerative disease caused by mitochondrial DNA mutations

    PubMed Central

    Greggains, Gareth D.; Lister, Lisa M.; Tuppen, Helen A. L.; Zhang, Qi; Needham, Louise H.; Prathalingam, Nilendran; Hyslop, Louise A.; Craven, Lyndsey; Polanski, Zbigniew; Murdoch, Alison P.; Turnbull, Douglass M.; Herbert, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) hold much promise in the quest for personalised cell therapies. However, the persistence of founder cell mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations limits the potential of iPSCs in the development of treatments for mtDNA disease. This problem may be overcome by using oocytes containing healthy mtDNA, to induce somatic cell nuclear reprogramming. However, the extent to which somatic cell mtDNA persists following fusion with human oocytes is unknown. Here we show that human nuclear transfer (NT) embryos contain very low levels of somatic cell mtDNA. In light of a recent report that embryonic stem cells can be derived from human NT embryos, our results highlight the therapeutic potential of NT for mtDNA disease, and underscore the importance of using human oocytes to pursue this goal. PMID:24457623

  5. Histone deacetylase inhibitor improves the development and acetylation levels of cat-cow interspecies cloned embryos.

    PubMed

    Wittayarat, Manita; Sato, Yoko; Do, Lanh Thi Kim; Morita, Yasuhiro; Chatdarong, Kaywalee; Techakumphu, Mongkol; Taniguchi, Masayasu; Otoi, Takeshige

    2013-08-01

    Abnormal epigenetic reprogramming, such as histone acetylation, might cause low efficiency of interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer (iSCNT). This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of trichostatin A (TSA) on the developmental competence and histone acetylation of iSCNT embryos reconstructed from cat somatic cells and bovine cytoplasm. The iSCNT cat and parthenogenetic bovine embryos were treated with various concentrations of TSA (0, 25, 50, or 100 nM) for 24 h, respectively, following fusion and activation. Treatment with 50 nM TSA produced significantly higher rates of cleavage and blastocyst formation (84.3% and 4.6%, respectively) of iSCNT embryos than the rates of non-TSA-treated iSCNT embryos (63.8% and 0%, respectively). Similarly, the treatment of 50 nM TSA increased the blastocyst formation rate of parthenogenetic bovine embryos. The acetylation levels of histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9) in the iSCNT embryos with the treatment of 50 nM TSA were similar to those of in vitro-fertilized embryos and significantly higher (p<0.05) than those of non-TSA-treated iSCNT embryos (control), irrespective of the embryonic development stage (two-cell, four-cell, and eight-cell stages). These results indicated that the treatment of 50 nM TSA postfusion was beneficial for development to the blastocyst stage of iSCNT cat embryos and correlated with the increasing levels of acetylation at H3K9.

  6. Development of human cloned blastocysts following somatic cell nuclear transfer with adult fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    French, Andrew J; Adams, Catharine A; Anderson, Linda S; Kitchen, John R; Hughes, Marcus R; Wood, Samuel H

    2008-02-01

    Nuclear transfer stem cells hold considerable promise in the field of regenerative medicine and cell-based drug discovery. In this study, a total of 29 oocytes were obtained from three young (20-24 years old) reproductive egg donors who had been successful in previous cycles. These oocytes, deemed by intended parents to be in excess of their reproductive needs, were donated for research without financial compensation by both the egg donor and intended parents after receiving informed consent. All intended parents successfully achieved ongoing pregnancies with the oocytes retained for reproductive purposes. Mature oocytes, obtained within 2 hours following transvaginal aspiration, were enucleated using one of two methods, extrusion or aspiration, after 45 minutes of incubation in cytochalasin B. Rates of oocyte lysis or degeneration did not differ between the two methods. Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos were constructed using two established adult male fibroblast lines of normal karyotype. High rates of pronuclear formation (66%), early cleavage (47%), and blastocyst (23%) development were observed following incubation in standard in vitro fertilization culture media. One cloned blastocyst was confirmed by DNA and mitochondrial DNA fingerprinting analyses, and DNA fingerprinting of two other cloned blastocysts indicated that they were also generated by SCNT. Blastocysts were also obtained from a limited number of parthenogenetically activated oocytes. This study demonstrates, for the first time, that SCNT can produce human blastocyst-stage embryos using nuclei obtained from differentiated adult cells and provides new information on methods that may be needed for a higher level of efficiency for human nuclear transfer.

  7. Somatic cell nuclear transfer-derived embryonic stem cell lines in humans: pros and cons.

    PubMed

    Langerova, Alena; Fulka, Helena; Fulka, Josef

    2013-12-01

    The recent paper, published by Mitalipov's group in Cell (Tachibana et al., 2013 ), reporting the production of human somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryonic stem cells (ESCs), opens again the debate if, in the era of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), the production of these cells is indeed necessary and, if so, whether they are different from ESCs produced from spare embryos and iPSCs. It is our opinion that these questions are very difficult to answer because it is still unclear whether and how normal ESCs differ from iPSCs.

  8. Nuclear propulsion systems for orbit transfer based on the particle bed reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, J.R.; Ludewig, H.; Horn, F.L.; Araj, K.; Benenati, R.; Lazareth, O.; Slovik, G.; Solon, M.; Tappe, W.; Belisle, J.

    1987-01-01

    The technology of nuclear direct propulsion orbit transfer systems based on the Particle Bed Reactor (PBR) is described. A 200 megawatt illustrative design is presented for LEO to GEO and other high ..delta..V missions. The PBR-NOTV can be used in a one-way mode with the shuttle or an expendable launch vehicle, e.g., the Titan 34D7, or as a two-way reusable space tug. In the one-way mode, payload capacity is almost three times greater than that of chemical OTV's. PBR technology status is described and development needs outlined.

  9. Nuclear-state population transfer by a train of coincident pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedaee-Shakarab, B.; Saadati-Niari, M.; Zolfagharpour, F.

    2016-11-01

    Population transfer of three-level Λ -like nuclei interacting with x-ray free electron lasers (XFEL) via a train of coincident pulses has been investigated theoretically. This study uses copropagating beams in which the frequency of the pump laser is different from that of the Stokes laser. We calculate the required laser intensities for each step which satisfy the condition of coincident-pulse technique in different nuclei. By employing the master equation and considering the effect of spontaneous emission, we show that complete nuclear population transfer occurs by choosing the appropriate number of pulse pairs. It is shown that the effect of laser intensity fluctuation is suppressed by increasing the number of pulse pairs. In this scheme, after each step, the populations of system are in stable states and the time delays between the neighboring pulses do not affect the transmission efficiency.

  10. Conservation of the Sapsaree (Canis familiaris), a Korean Natural Monument, using somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Jang, Goo; Hong, SoGun; Kang, JungTaek; Park, JungEun; Oh, HyunJu; Park, ChanKyu; Ha, JiHong; Kim, DaeYong; Kim, MinKyu; Lee, ByeongChun

    2009-09-01

    A recent emerging technology, somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), has been considered for conserving threatened or endangered species. Sapsaree is a native breed in Korea and has been designated as a Natural Monument. The aim of this study was to produce a Sapsaree by SCNT for breed conservation. Donor fibroblasts from a 9-year-old male Sapsaree were placed into the perivitelline spaces of enucleated in vivo matured oocytes and fused electrically. A total of 309 cloned embryos were transferred into the oviducts of 15 naturally synchronized recipients. Two recipients were diagnosed as pregnant, and each delivered one cloned puppy, both of which weighed 530 g. Overall, this study demonstrated that an endangered canine breed can be conserved by SCNT.

  11. Interspecies interactions and potential Influenza A virus risk in small swine farms in Peru

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The recent avian influenza epidemic in Asia and the H1N1 pandemic demonstrated that influenza A viruses pose a threat to global public health. The animal origins of the viruses confirmed the potential for interspecies transmission. Swine are hypothesized to be prime "mixing vessels" due to the dual receptivity of their trachea to human and avian strains. Additionally, avian and human influenza viruses have previously been isolated in swine. Therefore, understanding interspecies contact on smallholder swine farms and its potential role in the transmission of pathogens such as influenza virus is very important. Methods This qualitative study aimed to determine swine-associated interspecies contacts in two coastal areas of Peru. Direct observations were conducted at both small-scale confined and low-investment swine farms (n = 36) and in open areas where swine freely range during the day (n = 4). Interviews were also conducted with key stakeholders in swine farming. Results In both locations, the intermingling of swine and domestic birds was common. An unexpected contact with avian species was that swine were fed poultry mortality in 6/20 of the farms in Chancay. Human-swine contacts were common, with a higher frequency on the confined farms. Mixed farming of swine with chickens or ducks was observed in 36% of all farms. Human-avian interactions were less frequent overall. Use of adequate biosecurity and hygiene practices by farmers was suboptimal at both locations. Conclusions Close human-animal interaction, frequent interspecies contacts and suboptimal biosecurity and hygiene practices pose significant risks of interspecies influenza virus transmission. Farmers in small-scale swine production systems constitute a high-risk population and need to be recognized as key in preventing interspecies pathogen transfer. A two-pronged prevention approach, which offers educational activities for swine farmers about sound hygiene and biosecurity practices and

  12. Effect of culture medium type on canine adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells and developmental competence of interspecies cloned embryos.

    PubMed

    Kim, Geon A; Oh, Hyun Ju; Lee, Tae Hee; Lee, Ji Hyun; Oh, Sang Hwan; Lee, Ju Hyun; Kim, Jin Wook; Kim, Se Woon; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2014-01-15

    Canine adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs) are promising as donor cells for somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). It has been suggested that different cell cultures possess different capacities to support pre-implantation development of SCNT embryos. The aim of this study is to investigate whether two culture medium (RCMEP, Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium [DMEM]) affect gene expression of ASCs, subsequent development of interspecies SCNT (iSCNT) and gene expression of cloned embryos. The RCMEP-cultured cells contained significantly greater amounts of SOX2, NANOG, OCT4, DNMT1, and MeCP2 than DMEM-cultured cells (P < 0.05). In iSCNT, the use of DMEM medium for culturing cells resulted in similar development to the blastocyst stage than those derived from RCMEP cultured cells (4.5% and 3.2%, respectively; P > 0.05). The expression of all transcripts except for DNMT1 in cloned blastocysts from RCMEP cultured cells followed those of cloned blastocysts derived from DMEM cultured cells. The alteration of gene expression in ASCs by culture medium was not manifested in the iSCNT embryos derived from these cells. Although the culture medium can induce changes of gene expression by ASCs, such alterations in donor cells did not affect the developmental competence or gene expression patterns of iSCNT embryos.

  13. Concise Review: Embryonic Stem Cells Derived by Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer: A Horse in the Race?

    PubMed

    Wolf, Don P; Morey, Robert; Kang, Eunju; Ma, Hong; Hayama, Tomonari; Laurent, Louise C; Mitalipov, Shoukhrat

    2017-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESC) hold promise for the treatment of human medical conditions but are allogeneic. Here, we consider the differences between autologous pluripotent stem cells produced by nuclear transfer (NT-ESCs) and transcription factor-mediated, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) that impact the desirability of each of these cell types for clinical use. The derivation of NT-ESCs is more cumbersome and requires donor oocytes; however, the use of oocyte cytoplasm as the source of reprogramming factors is linked to a key advantage of NT-ESCs-the ability to replace mutant mitochondrial DNA in a patient cell (due to either age or inherited disease) with healthy donor mitochondria from an oocyte. Moreover, in epigenomic and transcriptomic comparisons between isogenic iPSCs and NT-ESCs, the latter produced cells that more closely resemble bona fide ESCs derived from fertilized embryos. Thus, although NT-ESCs are more difficult to generate than iPSCs, the ability of somatic cell nuclear transfer to replace aged or diseased mitochondria and the closer epigenomic and transcriptomic similarity between NT-ESCs and bona fide ESCs may make NT-ESCs superior for future applications in regenerative medicine. Stem Cells 2017;35:26-34.

  14. Comparative Analysis of Nuclear Transfer Embryo-Derived Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells. Part I: Cellular Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Kobolak, Julianna; Mamo, Solomon; Rungsiwiwut, Ruttachuk; Ujhelly, Olga; Csonka, Erika; Hadlaczky, Gyula

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Embryonic stem cells derived from nuclear transfer embryos (ntESCs) are particularly valuable for regenerative medicine, as they are a patient-specific and histocompatible cell source for the treatment of varying diseases. However, currently, little is known about their cellular and molecular profile. In the present study, in a mouse model different donor cell-derived ntESCs from various genetic backgrounds were compared with reference ESCs and analyzed comprehensively at the cellular level. A number of pluripotency marker genes were compared by flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry analysis. Significant differences at the protein level were observed for POU5F1, SOX2, FGF4, NANOG, and SSEA-1. However, such differences had no effect on in vitro cell differentiation and cell fate: derivatives of the three germ layers were detected in all ntESC lines. The neural and cardiac in vitro differentiation revealed minor differences between the cell lines, both at the mRNA and protein level. Karyotype analyses and cell growth studies did not reveal any significant variations. Despite some differences observed, the present study revealed that ntESC lines had similar differentiation competences compared to other ESCs. The results indicate that the observed differences may be related to the genotype rather than to the nuclear transfer technology. PMID:22204592

  15. Targeted disruption of Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated gene in miniature pigs by somatic cell nuclear transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Young June; Ahn, Kwang Sung; Kim, Minjeong; Kim, Min Ju; Park, Sang-Min; Ryu, Junghyun; Ahn, Jin Seop; Heo, Soon Young; Kang, Jee Hyun; Choi, You Jung; Choi, Seong-Jun; Shim, Hosup

    2014-10-03

    Highlights: • ATM gene-targeted pigs were produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer. • A novel large animal model for ataxia telangiectasia was developed. • The new model may provide an alternative to the mouse model. - Abstract: Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is a recessive autosomal disorder associated with pleiotropic phenotypes, including progressive cerebellar degeneration, gonad atrophy, and growth retardation. Even though A-T is known to be caused by the mutations in the Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene, the correlation between abnormal cellular physiology caused by ATM mutations and the multiple symptoms of A-T disease has not been clearly determined. None of the existing ATM mouse models properly reflects the extent to which neurological degeneration occurs in human. In an attempt to provide a large animal model for A-T, we produced gene-targeted pigs with mutations in the ATM gene by somatic cell nuclear transfer. The disrupted allele in the ATM gene of cloned piglets was confirmed via PCR and Southern blot analysis. The ATM gene-targeted pigs generated in the present study may provide an alternative to the current mouse model for the study of mechanisms underlying A-T disorder and for the development of new therapies.

  16. Human Nuclear Genome Transfer (So-Called Mitochondrial Replacement): Clearing the Underbrush.

    PubMed

    Baylis, Françoise

    2017-01-01

    In this article, I argue that there is no compelling therapeutic 'need' for human nuclear genome transfer (so-called mitochondrial replacement) to prevent mitochondrial diseases caused by mtDNA mutations. At most there is a strong interest in (i.e. 'want' for) this technology on the part of some women and couples at risk of having children with mitochondrial disease, and perhaps also a 'want' on the part of some researchers who see the technology as a useful precedent - one that provides them with 'a quiet way station' in which to refine the micromanipulations techniques essential for other human germline interventions and human cloning. In advance of this argument, I review basic information about mitochondrial disease and novel genetic strategies to prevent the transmission of mutated mitochondria. Next, I address common features of contemporary debates and discussions about so-called mitochondrial replacement. First, I contest the cliché that science-and-(bio)technology is fast outpacing ethics. Second, I dispute the accuracy of the term 'mitochondrial replacement'. Third, I provide a sustained critique of the purported 'need' for genetically-related children. In closing, I call into question the mainly liberal defense of human nuclear genome transfer. I suggest an alternative frame of reference that pays particular attention to issues of social justice. I conclude that our limited resources (time, talent, human eggs, and money) should be carefully expended in pursuit of the common good, which does not include pandering to acquired desires (i.e., wants).

  17. Somatic cell nuclear transfer: Infinite reproduction of a unique diploid genome

    SciTech Connect

    Kishigami, Satoshi Wakayama, Sayaka; Hosoi, Yoshihiko; Iritani, Akira; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2008-06-10

    In mammals, a diploid genome of an individual following fertilization of an egg and a spermatozoon is unique and irreproducible. This implies that the generated unique diploid genome is doomed with the individual ending. Even as cultured cells from the individual, they cannot normally proliferate in perpetuity because of the 'Hayflick limit'. However, Dolly, the sheep cloned from an adult mammary gland cell, changes this scenario. Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) enables us to produce offspring without germ cells, that is, to 'passage' a unique diploid genome. Animal cloning has also proven to be a powerful research tool for reprogramming in many mammals, notably mouse and cow. The mechanism underlying reprogramming, however, remains largely unknown and, animal cloning has been inefficient as a result. More momentously, in addition to abortion and fetal mortality, some cloned animals display possible premature aging phenotypes including early death and short telomere lengths. Under these inauspicious conditions, is it really possible for SCNT to preserve a diploid genome? Delightfully, in mouse and recently in primate, using SCNT we can produce nuclear transfer ES cells (ntES) more efficiently, which can preserve the eternal lifespan for the 'passage' of a unique diploid genome. Further, new somatic cloning technique using histone-deacetylase inhibitors has been developed which can significantly increase the previous cloning rates two to six times. Here, we introduce SCNT and its value as a preservation tool for a diploid genome while reviewing aging of cloned animals on cellular and individual levels.

  18. Embryo production and possible species preservation by nuclear transfer of somatic cells isolated from bovine semen.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Westhusin, Mark; Long, Charles; Johnson, Gregory; Burghardt, Robert; Kraemer, Duane

    2010-12-01

    Somatic cells in semen are a potential source of nuclei for nuclear transfer to produce genetically identical animals; this is especially important when an animal has died and the only viable genetic material available is frozen semen. Usefulness of somatic cells obtained from fresh (cultured) and frozen (isolated, not cultured) bovine semen for nuclear transfer was evaluated. Twelve ejaculates were collected from nine bulls representing three breeds: Charolais, Brahman, and crossbred Rodeo bull. All samples were processed immediately and cell growth was obtained from seven of the twelve ejaculates (58.3%). Cells from three bulls (with the best growth rates) were evaluated by optical microscopy and used in cloning experiments. In culture, these cells exhibited classic epithelial morphology and expressed cytokeratin and vimentin, indicating they were of epithelial origin. When cells from the three bulls were used as donor cells, 15.9% (18/113), 34.5% (29/84), and 14.4% (13/90) of the fused embryos developed into blastocysts, respectively. Of the blastocyst stage embryos, 38.9% (7/18), 72.4% (21/29), and 61.5% (8/13) hatched, respectively. Somatic cells isolated (not cultured) from frozen bovine semen were also used in the cloning experiments. Although cleavage occurred, no compact morulae or blastocysts were obtained. In conclusion, epithelial cell growth was obtained from fresh bovine ejaculates with relatively high efficiency. Somatic cells from semen can be used as nucleus donors to produce cloned blastocyst-stage embryos.

  19. Somatic cell nuclear transfer: infinite reproduction of a unique diploid genome.

    PubMed

    Kishigami, Satoshi; Wakayama, Sayaka; Hosoi, Yoshihiko; Iritani, Akira; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2008-06-10

    In mammals, a diploid genome of an individual following fertilization of an egg and a spermatozoon is unique and irreproducible. This implies that the generated unique diploid genome is doomed with the individual ending. Even as cultured cells from the individual, they cannot normally proliferate in perpetuity because of the "Hayflick limit". However, Dolly, the sheep cloned from an adult mammary gland cell, changes this scenario. Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) enables us to produce offspring without germ cells, that is, to "passage" a unique diploid genome. Animal cloning has also proven to be a powerful research tool for reprogramming in many mammals, notably mouse and cow. The mechanism underlying reprogramming, however, remains largely unknown and, animal cloning has been inefficient as a result. More momentously, in addition to abortion and fetal mortality, some cloned animals display possible premature aging phenotypes including early death and short telomere lengths. Under these inauspicious conditions, is it really possible for SCNT to preserve a diploid genome? Delightfully, in mouse and recently in primate, using SCNT we can produce nuclear transfer ES cells (ntES) more efficiently, which can preserve the eternal lifespan for the "passage" of a unique diploid genome. Further, new somatic cloning technique using histone-deacetylase inhibitors has been developed which can significantly increase the previous cloning rates two to six times. Here, we introduce SCNT and its value as a preservation tool for a diploid genome while reviewing aging of cloned animals on cellular and individual levels.

  20. Nuclear transfer with apoptotic bovine fibroblasts: can programmed cell death be reprogrammed?

    PubMed

    Miranda, Moyses dos Santos; Bressan, Fabiana Fernandes; De Bem, Tiago Henrique Camara; Merighe, Giovana Krempel Fonseca; Ohashi, Otávio Mitio; King, William Alan; Meirelles, Flavio Viera

    2012-06-01

    Cell death by apoptosis is considered to be irreversible. However, reports have indicated that its reversibility is possible if the cells have not yet reached the "point of no return." In order to add new information about this topic, we used cells at different moments of apoptotic process as nuclear donors in somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) in order to test if programmed cell death can be reversed. Adult bovine fibroblasts were treated with 10 μM of staurosporine (STP) for 3 h and analyzed for phosphatidylserine externalization (Annexin assay) and presence of active caspase-9. Annexin-positive (Anx+) and Caspase-9-positive (Casp-9+) cells were isolated by FACS and immediately transferred into enucleated in vitro matured bovine oocytes. After STP treatment, 89.9% of cells were Anx+ (4.6% in control cells; p<0.01) and 24.9% were Casp-9+ (2.4% in control cells; p<0.01). Fusion and cleavage were not affected by the use apoptotic cells (p>0.05). Also, the use of Anx+ cells did not affect blastocyst production compared to control (26.4% vs. 22.9%, respectively; p>0.05). However, blastocyst formation was affected by the use of Casp-9+ cells (12.3%; p<0.05). These findings contribute to the idea of that apoptosis is reversible only at early stages. Additionally, we hypothesize that the "point of no return" for apoptosis may be located around activation of Caspase-9.

  1. A horizontally transferred nuclear gene is associated with microhabitat variation in a natural plant population

    PubMed Central

    Tunlid, Anders; Ghatnekar, Lena

    2015-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer involves the non-sexual interspecific transmission of genetic material. Even if they are initially functional, horizontally transferred genes are expected to deteriorate into non-expressed pseudogenes, unless they become adaptively relevant in the recipient organism. However, little is known about the distributions of natural transgenes within wild species or the adaptive significance of natural transgenes within wild populations. Here, we examine the distribution of a natural plant-to-plant nuclear transgene in relation to environmental variation within a wild population. Festuca ovina is polymorphic for an extra (second) expressed copy of the nuclear gene (PgiC) encoding cytosolic phosphoglucose isomerase, with the extra PgiC locus having been acquired horizontally from the distantly related grass genus Poa. We investigated variation at PgiC in samples of F. ovina from a fine-scale, repeating patchwork of grassland microhabitats, replicated within spatially separated sites. Even after accounting for spatial effects, the distributions of F. ovina individuals carrying the additional PgiC locus, and one of the enzyme products encoded by the locus, are significantly associated with fine-scale habitat variation. Our results suggest that the PgiC transgene contributes, together with the unlinked ‘native’ PgiC locus, to local adaptation to a fine-scale mosaic of edaphic and biotic grassland microhabitats. PMID:26674953

  2. Histone deacetylase inhibitor significantly improved the cloning efficiency of porcine somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yongye; Tang, Xiaochun; Xie, Wanhua; Zhou, Yan; Li, Dong; Yao, Chaogang; Zhou, Yang; Zhu, Jianguo; Lai, Liangxue; Ouyang, Hongsheng; Pang, Daxin

    2011-12-01

    Valproic acid (VPA), a histone deacetylase inbibitor, has been shown to generate inducible pluripotent stem (iPS) cells from mouse and human fibroblasts with a significant higher efficiency. Because successful cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) undergoes a full reprogramming process in which the epigenetic state of a differentiated donor nuclear is converted into an embryonic totipotent state, we speculated that VPA would be useful in promoting cloning efficiency. Therefore, in the present study, we examined whether VPA can promote the developmental competence of SCNT embryos by improving the reprogramming state of donor nucleus. Here we report that 1 mM VPA for 14 to 16 h following activation significantly increased the rate of blastocyst formation of porcine SCNT embryos constructed from Landrace fetal fibroblast cells compared to the control (31.8 vs. 11.4%). However, we found that the acetylation level of Histone H3 lysine 14 and Histone H4 lysine 5 and expression level of Oct4, Sox2, and Klf4 was not significantly changed between VPA-treated and -untreated groups at the blastocyst stage. The SCNT embryos were transferred to 38 surrogates, and the cloning efficiency in the treated group was significantly improved compared with the control group. Taken together, we have demonstrated that VPA can improve both in vitro and in vivo development competence of porcine SCNT embryos.

  3. A novel method for somatic cell nuclear transfer to mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Pralong, Danièle; Mrozik, Krzysztof; Occhiodoro, Filomena; Wijesundara, Nishanthi; Sumer, Huseyin; Van Boxtel, Antonius L; Trounson, Alan; Verma, Paul J

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear reprogramming by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) provides a practical approach for generating autologous pluripotent cells from adult somatic cells. It has been shown that murine somatic cells can also be reprogrammed to a pluripotent-like state by fusion with embryonic stem (ES) cells. Typically, the first step in SCNT involves enucleation of the recipient cell. However, recent evidence suggests that enucleated diploid ES cells may lack reprogramming capabilities. Here we have developed methods whereby larger tetraploid ES cells are first generated by fusion of two mouse ES cell lines transfected with plasmids carrying different antibiotic-resistance cassettes, followed by double antibiotic selection. Tetraploid ES cells grown on tissue culture disks or wells can be efficiently enucleated (up to 99%) using a combination of cytochalasin B treatment and centrifugation, with cytoplasts generated from these cells larger than those obtained from normal diploid ES cells. Also, we show that the enucleation rate is dependent on centrifugation time and cell ploidy. Further, we demonstrate that normal diploid ES cells can be fused to tetraploid ES cells to form heterokaryons, and that selective differential centrifugation conditions can be applied where the tetraploid nucleus is removed while the diploid donor nucleus is retained. This technology opens new avenues for generating autologous, diploid pluripotent cells, and provides a dynamic model for studying nuclear reprogramming in ES cells.

  4. Genome sequence of the lager brewing yeast, an interspecies hybrid.

    PubMed

    Nakao, Yoshihiro; Kanamori, Takeshi; Itoh, Takehiko; Kodama, Yukiko; Rainieri, Sandra; Nakamura, Norihisa; Shimonaga, Tomoko; Hattori, Masahira; Ashikari, Toshihiko

    2009-04-01

    This work presents the genome sequencing of the lager brewing yeast (Saccharomyces pastorianus) Weihenstephan 34/70, a strain widely used in lager beer brewing. The 25 Mb genome comprises two nuclear sub-genomes originating from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces bayanus and one circular mitochondrial genome originating from S. bayanus. Thirty-six different types of chromosomes were found including eight chromosomes with translocations between the two sub-genomes, whose breakpoints are within the orthologous open reading frames. Several gene loci responsible for typical lager brewing yeast characteristics such as maltotriose uptake and sulfite production have been increased in number by chromosomal rearrangements. Despite an overall high degree of conservation of the synteny with S. cerevisiae and S. bayanus, the syntenies were not well conserved in the sub-telomeric regions that contain lager brewing yeast characteristic and specific genes. Deletion of larger chromosomal regions, a massive unilateral decrease of the ribosomal DNA cluster and bilateral truncations of over 60 genes reflect a post-hybridization evolution process. Truncations and deletions of less efficient maltose and maltotriose uptake genes may indicate the result of adaptation to brewing. The genome sequence of this interspecies hybrid yeast provides a new tool for better understanding of lager brewing yeast behavior in industrial beer production.

  5. [Some factors affecting in vitro development of porcine embryo reconstitution from somatic cells nuclear transfer].

    PubMed

    Zhang, De Fu; Wang, Ying; Chen, Yin; Wang, Kai; Schellander, Karl; Lin, Cai Lu

    2003-02-01

    In this paper, a study on reconstitution of porcine oocytes by using nuclear transfer with cumulus cells(CC) and fibroblast cells(FC) was carried out. Reconstituted oocytes which were the fusion with CC and showed a cleavage rate of 56.7%, developed to morula(11.7%) and blastocysts(6.7%) phases which were higher than those derived from the fusion with FC(p < 0.05). The results of this study also involved the effects of oocyte collection method and maturational age of recipient oocytes during the in vitro development of nuclear-transfer embryos which were reconstructed with cultured cumulus cells. The cumulus cells synchronized in G0/G1 phases through serum-starvation culture, were transferred into enucleated oocytes which were collected by aspiration or dissection method and cultured for 33 or 44 h. Reconstituted embryos were activated with a combination of calcium ionophore A23187 or electric pulsation and 6-DMAP, and cultured for 6 days. As for the oocytes collection methods, activation treatment in the presence of cytochalasin B did not affect the developmental rate of embryos reconstituted with 44-h-mature recipients. However, the development rate of reconstituted embryos with 33-h-mature recipients was significantly higher(p < 0.05) by activation with the combination of electric pulsation and 6-DMAP. These results suggest that reconstituted porcine embryos derived from cultured cumulus cells can develop to the blastocyst stage and that the development of the former could be improved by reconstruction with young oocyte cytoplast after the activation with the combination of electric pulsation and 6-DMAP.

  6. Transfer of 137Cs from Chernobyl debris and nuclear weapons fallout to different Swedish population groups.

    PubMed

    Rääf, C L; Hubbard, L; Falk, R; Agren, G; Vesanen, R

    2006-08-15

    Data from measurements on the body burden of (134)Cs, (137)Cs and (40)K in various Swedish populations between 1959 and 2001 has been compiled into a national database. The compilation is a co-operation between the Departments of Radiation Physics in Malmö and Göteborg, the National Radiation Protection Authority (SSI) and the Swedish Defense Research Agency (FOI). In a previous study the effective ecological half time and the associated effective dose to various Swedish populations due to internal contamination of (134)Cs and (137)Cs have been assessed using the database. In this study values of human body burden have been combined with data on the local and regional ground deposition of fallout from nuclear weapons tests (only (137)Cs) and Chernobyl debris (both (134)Cs and (137)Cs), which have enabled estimates of the radioecological transfer in the studied populations. The assessment of the database shows that the transfer of radiocesium from Chernobyl fallout to humans varies considerably between various populations in Sweden. In terms of committed effective dose over a 70 y period from internal contamination per unit activity deposition, the general (predominantly urban) Swedish population obtains 20-30 microSv/kBq m(-2). Four categories of populations exhibit higher radioecological transfer than the general population; i.) reindeer herders ( approximately 700 microSv/kBq m(-2)), ii.) hunters in the counties dominated by forest vegetation ( approximately 100 microSv/kBq m(-2)), iii.) rural non-farming populations living in sub-arctic areas (40-150 microSv/kBq m(-2)), and iv.) farmers ( approximately 50 microSv/kBq m(-2)). Two important factors determine the aggregate transfer from ground deposition to man; i.) dietary habits (intakes of foodstuff originating from natural and semi-natural ecosystems), and ii.) inclination to follow the recommended food restriction by the authorities. The transfer to the general population is considerably lower

  7. Application of Direct Assessment Approaches and Methodologies to Cathodically Protected Nuclear Waste Transfer Lines

    SciTech Connect

    Dahl, Megan M.; Pikas, Joseph; Edgemon, Glenn L.; Philo, Sarah

    2013-01-22

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site is responsible for the safe storage, retrieval, treatment, and disposal of approximately 54 million gallons (204 million liters) of radioactive waste generated since the site's inception in 1943. Today, the major structures involved in waste management at Hanford include 149 carbon steel single-shell tanks, 28 carbon-steel double-shell tanks, plus a network of buried metallic transfer lines and ancillary systems (pits, vaults, catch tanks, etc.) required to store, retrieve, and transfer waste within the tank farm system. Many of the waste management systems at Hanford are still in use today. In response to uncertainties regarding the structural integrity of these systems,' an independent, comprehensive integrity assessment of the Hanford Site piping system was performed. It was found that regulators do not require the cathodically protected pipelines located within the Hanford Site to be assessed by External Corrosion Direct Assessment (ECDA) or any other method used to ensure integrity. However, a case study is presented discussing the application of the direct assessment process on pipelines in such a nuclear environment. Assessment methodology and assessment results are contained herein. An approach is described for the monitoring, integration of outside data, and analysis of this information in order to identify whether coating deterioration accompanied by external corrosion is a threat for these waste transfer lines.

  8. Unusual horizontal transfer of a long interspersed nuclear element between distant vertebrate classes

    PubMed Central

    Kordis, Dusan; Gubensek, Franc

    1998-01-01

    We have shown previously by Southern blot analysis that Bov-B long interspersed nuclear elements (LINEs) are present in different Viperidae snake species. To address the question as to whether Bov-B LINEs really have been transmitted horizontally between vertebrate classes, the analysis has been extended to a larger number of vertebrate, invertebrate, and plant species. In this paper, the evolutionary origin of Bov-B LINEs is shown unequivocally to be in Squamata. The previously proposed horizontal transfer of Bov-B LINEs in vertebrates has been confirmed by their discontinuous phylogenetic distribution in Squamata (Serpentes and two lizard infra-orders) as well as in Ruminantia, by the high level of nucleotide identity, and by their phylogenetic relationships. The horizontal transfer of Bov-B LINEs from Squamata to the ancestor of Ruminantia is evident from the genetic distances and discontinuous phylogenetic distribution. The ancestor of Colubroidea snakes is a possible donor of Bov-B LINEs to Ruminantia. The timing of horizontal transfer has been estimated from the distribution of Bov-B LINEs in Ruminantia and the fossil data of Ruminantia to be 40–50 My ago. The phylogenetic relationships of Bov-B LINEs from the various Squamata species agrees with that of the species phylogeny, suggesting that Bov-B LINEs have been maintained stably by vertical transmission since the origin of Squamata in the Mesozoic era. PMID:9724768

  9. A mechanistic inter-species comparison of flicker sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, John R; Prescott, Neville B; Wathes, Christopher M

    2003-07-01

    The general validity of both the Rovamo [Vision Res. 39 (1999) 533] and Barten (Contrast sensitivity of the human eye, SPIE Optical Engineering Press, 1999), modulation transfer function models for describing flicker sensitivity in vertebrates was examined using published data for goldfish, chickens, tree shrews, ground squirrels, cats, pigeons and humans. Both models adequately described the flicker response in each species at frequencies greater than approximately 1 Hz. At lower frequencies, response predictions differed between the two models and this was due, in part, to dissimilar definitions of the role played by lateral inhibition in the retina. Modelled flicker sensitivity for a matched retinal illuminance condition enabled a direct inter-species comparison of signal processing response times at the photoreceptor level. The modelled results also quantified differences between species in post-retinal signal processing capability. Finally, the relationship between flicker frequency response curves and the perception of temporal signals in real visual scenes was examined for each species. It is proposed that the area under the flicker sensitivity function may offer a single "figure of merit" for specifying overall sensitivity to time signals in a species' environment.

  10. Simultaneous gene quantitation of multiple genes in individual bovine nuclear transfer blastocysts.

    PubMed

    Smith, Craig; Berg, Debbie; Beaumont, Sue; Standley, Neil T; Wells, David N; Pfeffer, Peter L

    2007-01-01

    During somatic cell nuclear transfer (NT), the transcriptional status of the donor cell has to be reprogrammed to reflect that of an embryo. We analysed the accuracy of this process by comparing transcript levels of four developmentally important genes (Oct4, Otx2, Ifitm3, GATA6), a gene involved in epigenetic regulation (Dnmt3a) and three housekeeping genes (beta-actin, beta-tubulin and GAPDH) in 21 NT blastocysts with that in genetically half-identical in vitro produced (IVP, n=19) and in vivo (n=15) bovine embryos. We have optimised an RNA-isolation and SYBR-green-based real-time RT-PCR procedure allowing the reproducible absolute quantification of multiple genes from a single blastocyst. Our data indicated that transcript levels did not differ significantly between stage and grade-matched zona-free NT and IVP embryos except for Ifitm3/Fragilis, which was expressed at twofold higher levels in NT blastocysts. Ifitm3 expression is confined to the inner cell mass at day 7 blastocysts and to the epiblast in day 14 embryos. No ectopic expression in the trophectoderm was seen in NT embryos. Gene expression in NT and IVP embryos increased between two- and threefold for all eight genes from early to late blastocyst stages. This increase exceeded the increase in cell number over this time period indicating an increase in transcript number per cell. Embryo quality (morphological grading) was correlated to cell number for NT and IVP embryos with grade 3 blastocysts containing 30% fewer cells. However, only NT embryos displayed a significant reduction in gene expression (50%) with loss of quality. Variability in gene expression levels was not significantly different in NT, IVP or in vivo embryos but differed among genes, suggesting that the stringency of regulation is intrinsic to a gene and not affected by culture or nuclear transfer. Oct4 levels exhibited the lowest variability. Analysing the total variability of all eight genes for individual embryos revealed that in

  11. Assessing Uncertainty of Interspecies Correlation Estimation Models for Aromatic Compounds

    EPA Science Inventory

    We developed Interspecies Correlation Estimation (ICE) models for aromatic compounds containing 1 to 4 benzene rings to assess uncertainty in toxicity extrapolation in two data compilation approaches. ICE models are mathematical relationships between surrogate and predicted test ...

  12. Methanosarcina spp. Drive Vinyl Chloride Dechlorination via Interspecies Hydrogen Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Heimann, Axel C.; Batstone, Damien J.; Jakobsen, Rasmus

    2006-01-01

    Two highly enriched cultures containing Dehalococcoides spp. were used to study the effect of aceticlastic methanogens on reductive vinyl chloride (VC) dechlorination. In terms of aceticlastic methanogens, one culture was dominated by Methanosaeta, while the other culture was dominated by Methanosarcina, as determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Cultures amended with 2-bromoethanesulfonate (BES), an efficient inhibitor of methanogens, exhibited slow VC dechlorination when grown on acetate and VC. Methanogenic cultures dominated by Methanosaeta had no impact on dechlorination rates, compared to BES-amended controls. In contrast, methanogenic cultures dominated by Methanosarcina displayed up to sevenfold-higher rates of VC dechlorination than their BES-amended counterparts. Methanosarcina-dominated cultures converted a higher percentage of [2-14C]acetate to 14CO2 when concomitant VC dechlorination took place, compared to nondechlorinating controls. Respiratory indices increased from 0.12 in nondechlorinating cultures to 0.51 in actively dechlorinating cultures. During VC dechlorination, aqueous hydrogen (H2) concentrations dropped to 0.3 to 0.5 nM. However, upon complete VC consumption, H2 levels increased by a factor of 10 to 100, indicating active hydrogen production from acetate oxidation. This process was thermodynamically favorable by means of the extremely low H2 levels during dechlorination. VC degradation in nonmethanogenic cultures was not inhibited by BES but was limited by the availability of H2 as electron donor, in cultures both with and without BES. These findings all indicate that Methanosarcina (but not Methanosaeta), while cleaving acetate to methane, simultaneously oxidizes acetate to CO2 plus H2, driving hydrogenotrophic dehalorespiration of VC to ethene by Dehalococcoides. PMID:16598001

  13. Methanosarcina spp. drive vinyl chloride dechlorination via interspecies hydrogen transfer.

    PubMed

    Heimann, Axel C; Batstone, Damien J; Jakobsen, Rasmus

    2006-04-01

    Two highly enriched cultures containing Dehalococcoides spp. were used to study the effect of aceticlastic methanogens on reductive vinyl chloride (VC) dechlorination. In terms of aceticlastic methanogens, one culture was dominated by Methanosaeta, while the other culture was dominated by Methanosarcina, as determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Cultures amended with 2-bromoethanesulfonate (BES), an efficient inhibitor of methanogens, exhibited slow VC dechlorination when grown on acetate and VC. Methanogenic cultures dominated by Methanosaeta had no impact on dechlorination rates, compared to BES-amended controls. In contrast, methanogenic cultures dominated by Methanosarcina displayed up to sevenfold-higher rates of VC dechlorination than their BES-amended counterparts. Methanosarcina-dominated cultures converted a higher percentage of [2-(14)C]acetate to (14)CO(2) when concomitant VC dechlorination took place, compared to nondechlorinating controls. Respiratory indices increased from 0.12 in nondechlorinating cultures to 0.51 in actively dechlorinating cultures. During VC dechlorination, aqueous hydrogen (H(2)) concentrations dropped to 0.3 to 0.5 nM. However, upon complete VC consumption, H(2) levels increased by a factor of 10 to 100, indicating active hydrogen production from acetate oxidation. This process was thermodynamically favorable by means of the extremely low H(2) levels during dechlorination. VC degradation in nonmethanogenic cultures was not inhibited by BES but was limited by the availability of H(2) as electron donor, in cultures both with and without BES. These findings all indicate that Methanosarcina (but not Methanosaeta), while cleaving acetate to methane, simultaneously oxidizes acetate to CO(2) plus H(2), driving hydrogenotrophic dehalorespiration of VC to ethene by Dehalococcoides.

  14. Live embryo imaging to follow cell cycle and chromosomes stability after nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Balbach, Sebastian T; Boiani, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear transfer (NT) into mouse oocytes yields a transcriptionally and functionally heterogeneous population of cloned embryos. Most studies of NT embryos consider only embryos at predefined key stages (e.g., morula or blastocyst), that is, after the bulk of reprogramming has taken place. These retrospective approaches are of limited use to elucidate mechanisms of reprogramming and to predict developmental success. Observing cloned embryo development using live embryo cinematography has the potential to reveal otherwise undetectable embryo features. However, light exposure necessary for live cell cinematography is highly toxic to cloned embryos. Here we describe a protocol for combined bright-field and fluorescence live-cell imaging of histone H2b-GFP expressing mouse embryos, to record cell divisions up to the blastocyst stage. This protocol, which can be adapted to observe other reporters such as Oct4-GFP or Nanog-GFP, allowed us to quantitatively analyze cleavage kinetics of cloned embryos.

  15. Modeling Electronic-Nuclear Interactions for Excitation Energy Transfer Processes in Light-Harvesting Complexes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mi Kyung; Coker, David F

    2016-08-18

    An accurate approach for computing intermolecular and intrachromophore contributions to spectral densities to describe the electronic-nuclear interactions relevant for modeling excitation energy transfer processes in light harvesting systems is presented. The approach is based on molecular dynamics (MD) calculations of classical correlation functions of long-range contributions to excitation energy fluctuations and a separate harmonic analysis and single-point gradient quantum calculations for electron-intrachromophore vibrational couplings. A simple model is also presented that enables detailed analysis of the shortcomings of standard MD-based excitation energy fluctuation correlation function approaches. The method introduced here avoids these problems, and its reliability is demonstrated in accurate predictions for bacteriochlorophyll molecules in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson pigment-protein complex, where excellent agreement with experimental spectral densities is found. This efficient approach can provide instantaneous spectral densities for treating the influence of fluctuations in environmental dissipation on fast electronic relaxation.

  16. A Novel Method of Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer with Minimum Equipment.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, S M; Moulavi, F; Nasr-Esfahani, M H

    2015-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is an exceptional experimental biology technique with an arguably great contribution to our current understanding of developmental plasticity. Many students and young researchers are interested in taking advantage of SCNT virtues in their experiments but the cost of micromanipulation microscopes, intensive training programs, and also the sophisticated process of SCNT may dissuade them from entering this amazing field of science. Here, we describe the details of a streamlined manual method of SCNT that can be performed using very basic equipment found in every embryology laboratory: the Pasteur pipette and stereomicroscope. The overall method introduced is very simple and a person with no previous experience in cloning can learn and adopt the basic routines of this technique independently.

  17. Femtosecond laser based enucleation of porcine oocytes for somatic cell nuclear transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kütemeyer, K.; Lucas-Hahn, A.; Petersen, B.; Hassel, P.; Lemme, E.; Niemann, H.; Heisterkamp, A.

    2009-07-01

    Cloning of several mammalian species has been achieved by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) in recent years. However, this method still results in very low efficiencies around 1% which originate from suboptimal culture conditions and highly invasive techniques for oocyte enucleation and injection of the donor cell using micromanipulators. In this paper, we present a new minimal invasive method for oocyte imaging and enucleation based on the application of femtosecond (fs) laser pulses. After imaging of the oocyte with multiphoton microscopy, ultrashort pulses are focused onto the metaphase plate of MII-oocytes in order to ablate the DNA molecules. We show that fs laser based enucleation of porcine oocytes completely inhibits the first mitotic cleavage after parthenogenetic activation while maintaining intact oocyte morphology in most cases. In contrast, control groups without previous irradiation of the metaphase plate are able to develop to the blastocyst stage. Further experiments have to clarify the suitability of fs laser based enucleated oocytes for SCNT.

  18. Genomic Stability of Lyophilized Sheep Somatic Cells before and after Nuclear Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Iuso, Domenico; Czernik, Marta; Di Egidio, Fiorella; Sampino, Silvestre; Zacchini, Federica; Bochenek, Michal; Smorag, Zdzislaw; Modlinski, Jacek A.; Ptak, Grazyna; Loi, Pasqualino

    2013-01-01

    The unprecedented decline of biodiversity worldwide is urging scientists to collect and store biological material from seriously threatened animals, including large mammals. Lyophilization is being explored as a low-cost system for storage in bio-banks of cells that might be used to expand or restore endangered or extinct species through the procedure of Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer (SCNT). Here we report that the genome is intact in about 60% of lyophylized sheep lymphocytes, whereas DNA damage occurs randomly in the remaining 40%. Remarkably, lyophilized nuclei injected into enucleated oocytes are repaired by a robust DNA repairing activity of the oocytes, and show normal developmental competence. Cloned embryos derived from lyophylized cells exhibited chromosome and cellular composition comparable to those of embryos derived from fresh donor cells. These findings support the feasibility of lyophylization as a storage procedure of mammalian cells to be used for SCNT. PMID:23308098

  19. Genomic stability of lyophilized sheep somatic cells before and after nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Iuso, Domenico; Czernik, Marta; Di Egidio, Fiorella; Sampino, Silvestre; Zacchini, Federica; Bochenek, Michal; Smorag, Zdzislaw; Modlinski, Jacek A; Ptak, Grazyna; Loi, Pasqualino

    2013-01-01

    The unprecedented decline of biodiversity worldwide is urging scientists to collect and store biological material from seriously threatened animals, including large mammals. Lyophilization is being explored as a low-cost system for storage in bio-banks of cells that might be used to expand or restore endangered or extinct species through the procedure of Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer (SCNT). Here we report that the genome is intact in about 60% of lyophylized sheep lymphocytes, whereas DNA damage occurs randomly in the remaining 40%. Remarkably, lyophilized nuclei injected into enucleated oocytes are repaired by a robust DNA repairing activity of the oocytes, and show normal developmental competence. Cloned embryos derived from lyophylized cells exhibited chromosome and cellular composition comparable to those of embryos derived from fresh donor cells. These findings support the feasibility of lyophylization as a storage procedure of mammalian cells to be used for SCNT.

  20. Murine somatic cell nuclear transfer using reprogrammed donor cells expressing male germ cell-specific genes.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hoin; Park, Jong Im; Roh, Sangho

    2016-01-01

    In vivo-matured mouse oocytes were enucleated, and a single murine embryonic fibroblast (control or reprogrammed by introducing extracts from murine testis tissue, which showed expression of male germ cell-specific genes) was injected into the cytoplasm of the oocytes. The rate of blastocyst development and expression levels of Oct-4, Eomes and Cdx-2 were not significantly different in both experimental groups. However, the expression levels of Nanog, Sox9 and Glut-1 were significantly increased when reprogrammed cells were used as donor nuclei. Increased expression of Nanog can be supportive of complete reprogramming of somatic cell nuclear transfer murine embryos. The present study suggested that donor cells expressing male germ cell-specific genes can be reconstructed and can develop into embryos with normal high expression of developmentally essential genes.

  1. In vitro development of canine somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos in different culture media.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Hoon; No, Jin-Gu; Choi, Mi-Kyung; Yeom, Dong-Hyeon; Kim, Dong-Kyo; Yang, Byoung-Chul; Yoo, Jae Gyu; Kim, Min Kyu; Kim, Hong-Tea

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of three different culture media on the development of canine somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos. Canine cloned embryos were cultured in modified synthetic oviductal fluid (mSOF), porcine zygote medium-3 (PZM-3), or G1/G2 sequential media. Our results showed that the G1/G2 media yielded significantly higher morula and blastocyst development in canine SCNT embryos (26.1% and 7.8%, respectively) compared to PZM-3 (8.5% and 0%or mSOF (2.3% and 0%) media. In conclusion, this study suggests that blastocysts can be produced more efficiently using G1/G2 media to culture canine SCNT embryos.

  2. Somatic cell nuclear transfer and transgenesis in large animals: current and future insights.

    PubMed

    Galli, C; Lagutina, I; Perota, A; Colleoni, S; Duchi, R; Lucchini, F; Lazzari, G

    2012-06-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) was first developed in livestock for the purpose of accelerating the widespread use of superior genotypes. Although many problems still exist now after fifteen years of research owing to the limited understanding of genome reprogramming, SCNT has provided a powerful tool to make copies of selected individuals in different species, to study genome pluripotency and differentiation, opening new avenues of research in regenerative medicine and representing the main route for making transgenic livestock. Besides well-established methods to deliver transgenes, recent development in enzymatic engineering to edit the genome provides more precise and reproducible tools to target-specific genomic loci especially for producing knockout animals. The interest in generating transgenic livestock lies in the agricultural and biomedical areas and it is, in most cases, at the stage of research and development, with few exceptions that are making the way into practical applications.

  3. Bioactive conformation of stromelysin inhibitors determined by transferred nuclear Overhauser effects.

    PubMed Central

    Gonnella, N C; Bohacek, R; Zhang, X; Kolossváry, I; Paris, C G; Melton, R; Winter, C; Hu, S I; Ganu, V

    1995-01-01

    The transferred nuclear Overhauser effect has been used to determine the biologically active conformations of two stromelysin inhibitors. Both inhibitors used in this study were hydroxamic acids generated via chemical synthesis. These structures, representing the conformation of each inhibitor bound to stromelysin, superimposed with excellent agreement. The study also provided information on the shape and orientation of the S2' and S1' pockets of the enzyme relative to thermolysin. Comparisons were made between stromelysin and thermolysin inhibitors to critically examine thermolysin as a template for stromelysin-inhibitor design. The enzyme-bound conformations of these stromelysin inhibitors were determined for use as a template in conformationally restricted drug design. Images Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:7831311

  4. Parthenogenesis and somatic cell nuclear transfer in sheep oocytes using Polscope.

    PubMed

    Nandedkar, Pandit; Chohan, Parul; Patwardhan, Archana; Gaikwad, Santosh; Bhartiya, Deepa

    2009-07-01

    Parthenogenesis and Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) techniques, offer a unique approach to manipulate the genetic composition of derived human embryonic stem cells - an essential step if the full opportunities for disease modeling, drug discovery or individualized stem cell therapy are to be realized. The present study describes the use of sheep oocytes to acquire expertise and establish methods to reconstruct embryos for obtaining blastocysts before venturing into human SCNT where the oocytes are a very precious starting material. Maturation of sheep eggs in vitro for 20-24 hr resulted in 65% metaphase II (MII) eggs which were either parthenogenetically activated using calcium ionomycin or ethanol or subjected to SCNT using cumulus cell as somatic cell. Sixteen blastocysts were produced by parthenogenetic activation of 350 eggs whereas reconstructed embryos, after SCNT carried out in 139 eggs, progressed only up to morula stage. The procedure of parthenogenesis and SCNT will be useful to generate autologous ES cells using human eggs.

  5. Probing and Exploiting the Interplay between Nuclear and Electronic Motion in Charge Transfer Processes.

    PubMed

    Delor, Milan; Sazanovich, Igor V; Towrie, Michael; Weinstein, Julia A

    2015-04-21

    The Born-Oppenheimer approximation refers to the assumption that the nuclear and electronic wave functions describing a molecular system evolve and can be determined independently. It is now well-known that this approximation often breaks down and that nuclear-electronic (vibronic) coupling contributes greatly to the ultrafast photophysics and photochemistry observed in many systems ranging from simple molecules to biological organisms. In order to probe vibronic coupling in a time-dependent manner, one must use spectroscopic tools capable of correlating the motions of electrons and nuclei on an ultrafast time scale. Recent developments in nonlinear multidimensional electronic and vibrational spectroscopies allow monitoring both electronic and structural factors with unprecedented time and spatial resolution. In this Account, we present recent studies from our group that make use of different variants of frequency-domain transient two-dimensional infrared (T-2DIR) spectroscopy, a pulse sequence combining electronic and vibrational excitations in the form of a UV-visible pump, a narrowband (12 cm(-1)) IR pump, and a broadband (400 cm(-1)) IR probe. In the first example, T-2DIR is used to directly compare vibrational dynamics in the ground and relaxed electronic excited states of Re(Cl)(CO)3(4,4'-diethylester-2,2'-bipyridine) and Ru(4,4'-diethylester-2,2'-bipyridine)2(NCS)2, prototypical charge transfer complexes used in photocatalytic CO2 reduction and electron injection in dye-sensitized solar cells. The experiments show that intramolecular vibrational redistribution (IVR) and vibrational energy transfer (VET) are up to an order of magnitude faster in the triplet charge transfer excited state than in the ground state. These results show the influence of electronic arrangement on vibrational coupling patterns, with direct implications for vibronic coupling mechanisms in charge transfer excited states. In the second example, we show unambiguously that electronic and

  6. Quisinostat treatment improves histone acetylation and developmental competence of porcine somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos.

    PubMed

    Jin, Long; Guo, Qing; Zhu, Hai-Ying; Xing, Xiao-Xu; Zhang, Guang-Lei; Xuan, Mei-Fu; Luo, Qi-Rong; Luo, Zhao-Bo; Wang, Jun-Xia; Yin, Xi-Jun; Kang, Jin-Dan

    2017-02-22

    Abnormal epigenetic modifications are considered a main contributing factor to low cloning efficiency. In the present study, we explored the effects of quisinostat, a novel histone deacetylase inhibitor, on blastocyst formation rate in porcine somatic-cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos, on acetylation of histone H3 lysine 9 (AcH3K9), and on expression of POU5F1 protein and apoptosis-related genes BAX and BCL2. Our results showed that treatment with 10 nM quisinostat for 24 h significantly improved the development of reconstructed embryos compared to the untreated group (19.0 ± 1.6% vs. 10.2 ± 0.9%; P < 0.05). Quisinostat-treated SCNT embryos also possessed significantly increased AcH3K9 at the pseudo-pronuclear stage (P < 0.05), as well as improved immunostaining intensity for POU5F1 at the blastocyst stage (P < 0.05). While no statistical difference in BAX expression was observed, BCL2 transcript abundance was significantly different in the quisinostat-treated compared to the untreated control group. Of the 457 quisinostat-treated cloned embryos transferred into three surrogates, six fetuses developed from the one sow that became pregnant. These findings suggested that quisinostat can regulate gene expression and epigenetic modification, facilitating nuclear reprogramming and subsequently improving the developmental competence of pig SCNT embryos and blastocyst quality. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. Imprinted Genes and Satellite Loci Are Differentially Methylated in Bovine Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer Clones

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Chih-Jie; Lin, Chiao-Chieh; Shen, Perng-Chih; Cheng, Winston T.K.; Chen, Hsiao-Ling; Chang, Tsung-Chou; Liu, Shyh-Shyan

    2013-01-01

    Abstract In mammals, genome-wide epigenetic reprogramming systems exist in primordial germ cells and zygotes. These reprogramming systems play crucial roles in regulating genome functions during critical stages of embryonic development, and they confer the stability of gene expression during mammalian development. The frequent unexpected loss of progeny from somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is an ongoing problem. In this study, we used six cloned bovines (named NT-1 to NT-6), which were created by ear fibroblast nuclear transfer and displayed short life spans with multiple organ defects, as an experimental model. We focus here on three imprinted genes (IGF2, H19, and XIST) and four satellite loci (Satellite I, Satellite II, Art2, and VNTR) to investigate their methylation changes. The results revealed that aberrant methylation frequently occurred in the analyzed imprinted genes, but not in the satellite loci, of the cloned bovines. After the bovine fibroblast cells were treated with the 5-aza-2(′)-deoxycytidine (5-Aza-dc) demethylation agent, the methylation percentages of the XIST and H19 putative differentially methylated region (DMR) were significantly decreased (XIST, p<0.01; H19, p<0.05) followed by an increase in their mRNA expression levels (p<0.01). Furthermore, we found that five short-lived cloned bovines (NT-1 to NT-5) exhibited more severe aberrant methylation changes in the three imprinted genes examined than the little longer-lived clone (NT-6) compared with wild-type (WT) cows. Our data suggest that the reprogramming of the methylation-controlled regions between the imprinted genes and satellite loci are differences and may be involved with additional mechanisms that need further elucidation. PMID:23961768

  8. Production of nuclear transfer embryos by using somatic cells isolated from milk in buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Golla, K; Selokar, N L; Saini, M; Chauhan, M S; Manik, R S; Palta, P; Singla, S K

    2012-10-01

    Somatic cells in milk are a potential source of nuclei for nuclear transfer to produce genetically identical animals; this is especially important in animals that are susceptible to risks of bacterial infection on biopsy collection. In this study, a minimum of 10 milk samples were collected from each of the three buffaloes representing Murrah breed. All the samples were processed immediately and cell colonies were obtained. Cell colonies from one buffalo (MU-442) survived beyond 10 passages and were evaluated by fluorescence microscopy and used in nuclear transfer experiments. In culture, these cells expressed vimentin, indicating they were of fibroblast origin similar to ear cells. We compared the effectiveness of cloning using those milk-derived fibroblast (MDF) cells and fibroblast cells derived from the ear derived fibroblast (EDF). Fusion and cleavage rates of MDF-NT and EDF-NT embryos were found to be similar (92.43 ± 1.28% vs 94.98 ± 1.24%, and 80.27 ± 1.75% vs 84.56 ± 3.73%, respectively; p > 0.01); however, development to blastocyst stage and total cell number was higher for EDF-NT embryos (50.24 ± 2.54%, 227.14 ± 13.04, respectively, p < 0.01), than for MDF-NT embryos (16.44 ± 0.75%, 170.57 ± 4.50 respectively). We conclude that somatic cells from milk can be cultured effectively and used as nucleus donor to produce cloned blastocyst-stage embryos.

  9. Spent Nuclear Fuel Dry Transfer System Cold Demonstration Project Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, Max R; McKinnon, M. A.

    1999-12-01

    The spent nuclear fuel dry transfer system (DTS) provides an interface between large and small casks and between storage-only and transportation casks. It permits decommissioning of reactor pools after shutdown and allows the use of large storage-only casks for temporary onsite storage of spent nuclear fuel irrespective of reactor or fuel handling limitations at a reactor site. A cold demonstration of the DTS prototype was initiated in August 1996 at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The major components demonstrated included the fuel assembly handling subsystem, the shield plug/lid handling subsystem, the cask interface subsystem, the demonstration control subsystem, a support frame, and a closed circuit television and lighting system. The demonstration included a complete series of DTS operations from source cask receipt and opening through fuel transfer and closure of the receiving cask. The demonstration included both normal operations and recovery from off-normal events. It was designed to challenge the system to determine whether there were any activities that could be made to jeopardize the activities of another function or its safety. All known interlocks were challenged. The equipment ran smoothly and functioned as designed. A few "bugs" were corrected. Prior to completion of the demonstration testing, a number of DTS prototype systems were modified to apply lessons learned to date. Additional testing was performed to validate the modifications. In general, all the equipment worked exceptionally well. The demonstration also helped confirm cost estimates that had been made at several points in the development of the system.

  10. Review: Placental perturbations induce the developmental abnormalities often observed in bovine somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Chavatte-Palmer, P; Camous, S; Jammes, H; Le Cleac'h, N; Guillomot, M; Lee, R S F

    2012-02-01

    Since the first success in cloning sheep, the production of viable animals by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has developed significantly. Cattle are by far the most successfully cloned species but, despite this, the technique is still associated with a high incidence of pregnancy failure and accompanying placental and fetal pathologies. Pre- and early post-implantation losses can affect up to 70% of the pregnancies. In the surviving pregnancies, placentomegaly and fetal overgrowth are commonly observed, but the incidence varies widely, depending on the genotype of the nuclear donor cell and differences in SCNT procedures. In all cases, the placenta is central to the onset of the pathologies. Although cellular organisation of the SCNT placenta appears normal, placental vascularisation is modified and fetal-to-maternal tissue ratios are slightly increased in the SCNT placentomes. In terms of functionality, steroidogenesis is perturbed and abnormal estrogen production and metabolism probably play an important part in the increased gestation length and lack of preparation for parturition observed in SCNT recipients. Maternal plasma concentrations of pregnancy-associated glycoproteins are increased, mostly due to a reduction in turnover rate rather than increased placental production. Placental glucose transport and fructose synthesis appear to be modified and hyperfructosemia has been observed in neonatal SCNT calves. Gene expression analyses of the bovine SCNT placenta show that multiple pathways and functions are affected. Abnormal epigenetic re-programming appears to be a key component of the observed pathologies, as shown by studies on the expression of imprinted genes in SCNT placenta.

  11. Dnmt3l-knockout donor cells improve somatic cell nuclear transfer reprogramming efficiency.

    PubMed

    Liao, Hung-Fu; Mo, Chu-Fan; Wu, Shinn-Chih; Cheng, Dai-Han; Yu, Chih-Yun; Chang, Kai-Wei; Kao, Tzu-Hao; Lu, Chia-Wei; Pinskaya, Marina; Morillon, Antonin; Lin, Shih-Shun; Cheng, Winston T K; Bourc'his, Déborah; Bestor, Timothy; Sung, Li-Ying; Lin, Shau-Ping

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear transfer (NT) is a technique used to investigate the development and reprogramming potential of a single cell. DNA methyltransferase-3-like, which has been characterized as a repressive transcriptional regulator, is expressed in naturally fertilized egg and morula/blastocyst at pre-implantation stages. In this study, we demonstrate that the use of Dnmt3l-knockout (Dnmt3l-KO) donor cells in combination with Trichostatin A treatment improved the developmental efficiency and quality of the cloned embryos. Compared with the WT group, Dnmt3l-KO donor cell-derived cloned embryos exhibited increased cell numbers as well as restricted OCT4 expression in the inner cell mass (ICM) and silencing of transposable elements at the blastocyst stage. In addition, our results indicate that zygotic Dnmt3l is dispensable for cloned embryo development at pre-implantation stages. In Dnmt3l-KO mouse embryonic fibroblasts, we observed reduced nuclear localization of HDAC1, increased levels of the active histone mark H3K27ac and decreased accumulation of the repressive histone marks H3K27me3 and H3K9me3, suggesting that Dnmt3l-KO donor cells may offer a more permissive epigenetic state that is beneficial for NT reprogramming.

  12. Inheritance of mitochondrial DNA in serially recloned pigs by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT)

    SciTech Connect

    Do, Minhwa; Jang, Won-Gu; Hwang, Jeong Hee; Jang, Hoon; Kim, Eun-Jung; Jeong, Eun-Jeong; Shim, Hosup; Hwang, Sung Soo; Oh, Keon Bong; Byun, Sung June; Kim, Jin-Hoi; Lee, Jeong Woong

    2012-08-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We success serial SCNT through the third generation using pig fibroblasts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Donor-specific mtDNA in the recloned pigs was detected. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SCNT affect mtDNA mounts. -- Abstract: Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has been established for the transmission of specific nuclear DNA. However, the fate of donor mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) remains unclear. Here, we examined the fate of donor mtDNA in recloned pigs through third generations. Fibroblasts of recloned pigs were obtained from offspring of each generation produced by fusion of cultured fibroblasts from a Minnesota miniature pig (MMP) into enucleated oocytes of a Landrace pig. The D-loop regions from the mtDNA of donor and recipient differ at nucleotide sequence positions 16050 (A{yields}T), 16062 (T{yields}C), and 16135 (G{yields}A). In order to determine the fate of donor mtDNA in recloned pigs, we analyzed the D-loop region of the donor's mtDNA by allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR) and real-time PCR. Donor mtDNA was successfully detected in all recloned offspring (F1, F2, and F3). These results indicate that heteroplasmy that originate from donor and recipient mtDNA is maintained in recloned pigs, resulting from SCNT, unlike natural reproduction.

  13. Radiocesium Transfer in Forest Insect Communities after the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Seiji; Takamura, Noriko

    2017-01-01

    To understand radiocesium transfer in the forest insect food web, we investigated the activity concentrations of radiocesium in forest insects in the Fukushima and Ibaraki Prefectures approximately 1.5–2.5 years after the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant. We analyzed 34 species of insects sampled from 4 orders and 4 feeding functional groups (herbivore, carnivore, omnivore, and detritivore) from three sites in each prefecture. 137Cs activity concentrations were lowest in herbivorous species and were especially high in detritivorous and omnivorous species that feed on forest litter and fungi. Radiocesium activity concentrations in any given species reflected the degree of contamination of that species’ primary food sources since radiocesium activity concentrations were found to be the lowest in leaves and grass and the highest in litter, bark, and fungi. This study confirmed that litter and other highly contaminated forest components such as fungi, decaying wood, bryophytes, and lichens serve as sources of 137Cs transfer into the forest insect community. PMID:28125745

  14. Nuclear Motion Driven Ultrafast Photodissociative Charge Transfer of the PENNA Cation: An Experimental and Computational Study.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shoutian; Mignolet, Benoit; Fan, Lin; Li, Wen; Levine, Raphael D; Remacle, Francoise

    2017-02-23

    Ultrafast nuclear driven charge transfer prior to dissociation is an important process in modular systems as was demonstrated experimentally in the bifunctional molecule 2-phenylethyl-N,N-dimethylamine (PENNA) in work by Lehr et al. ( J. Phys. Chem. A 2005 , 109 , 8074 ). The ultrafast dynamics of PENNA photoexcited to the three lowest electronic states of the cation (D0, D1, and D2) was studied using quantum chemistry and surface hoping. We show that a conical intersection, localized in the Franck-Condon region, between the D0 and the D1 states, leads to an ultrafast charge transfer, computed here to be on a time scale of 65 fs, between the phenyl and the amine charged subunits. On the D0 ground state, the dissociation proceeds on the 60 ps time scale through a 19 kcal/mol late barrier. The computed kinetic energy release is in good agreement with a new experimental measurement of PENNA ionization by an 800 nm 30 fs intense laser pulse.

  15. Transfer of tritium released into the marine environment by French nuclear facilities bordering the English Channel.

    PubMed

    Fiévet, Bruno; Pommier, Julien; Voiseux, Claire; Bailly du Bois, Pascal; Laguionie, Philippe; Cossonnet, Catherine; Solier, Luc

    2013-06-18

    Controlled amounts of liquid tritium are discharged as tritiated water (HTO) by the nuclear industry into the English Channel. Because the isotopic discrimination between 3H and H is small, organically bound tritium (OBT) and HTO should show the same T/H ratio under steady-state conditions. We report data collected from the environment in the English Channel. Tritium concentrations measured in seawater HTO, as well as in biota HTO and OBT, confirm that tritium transfers from HTO to OBT result in conservation of the T/H ratio (ca. 1 × 10(-16)). The kinetics of the turnover of tritium between seawater HTO, biota HTO, and OBT was investigated. HTO in two algae and a mollusk is shown to exchange rapidly with seawater HTO. However, the overall tritium turnover between HTO and the whole-organism OBT is a slow process with a tritium biological half-life on the order of months. Nonsteady-state conditions exist where there are sharp changes in seawater HTO. As a consequence, for kinetic reasons, the T/H ratio in OBT may deviate transiently from that observed in HTO of samples from the marine ecosystem. Dynamic modeling is thus more realistic for predicting tritium transfers to biota OBT under nonsteady-state conditions.

  16. Composite dipolar recoupling: anisotropy compensated coherence transfer in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Khaneja, Navin; Kehlet, Cindie; Glaser, Steffen J; Nielsen, Niels Chr

    2006-03-21

    The efficiency of dipole-dipole coupling driven coherence transfer experiments in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of powder samples is limited by dispersion of the orientation of the internuclear vectors relative to the external magnetic field. Here we introduce general design principles and resulting pulse sequences that approach full polarization transfer efficiency for all crystallite orientations in a powder in magic-angle-spinning experiments. The methods compensate for the defocusing of coherence due to orientation dependent dipolar coupling interactions and inhomogeneous radio-frequency fields. The compensation scheme is very simple to implement as a scaffold (comb) of compensating pulses in which the pulse sequence to be improved may be inserted. The degree of compensation can be adjusted and should be balanced as a compromise between efficiency and length of the overall pulse sequence. We show by numerical and experimental data that the presented compensation protocol significantly improves the efficiency of known dipolar recoupling solid-state NMR experiments.

  17. Current status and applications of somatic cell nuclear transfer in dogs.

    PubMed

    Jang, Goo; Kim, Min Kyu; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2010-11-01

    Although somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) technology and applications are well developed in most domesticated and laboratory animals, their use in dogs has advanced only slowly. Many technical difficulties had to be overcome before preliminary experiments could be conducted. First, due to the very low efficiency of dog oocyte maturation in vitro, in vivo matured oocytes were generally used. The nucleus of an in vivo matured oocyte was removed and a donor cell (from fetal or adult fibroblasts) was injected into the oocyte. Secondly, fusion of the reconstructed oocytes was problematic, and it was found that a higher electrical voltage was necessary, in comparison to other mammalian species. By transferring the resulting fused oocytes into surrogate females, several cloned offspring were born. SCNT was also used for producing cloned wolves, validating reproductive technologies for aiding conservation of endangered or extinct breeds. Although examples of transgenesis in canine species are very sparse, SCNT studies are increasing, and together with the new field of gene targeting technology, they have been applied in many fields of veterinary or bio-medical science. This review summarizes the current status of SCNT in dogs and evaluates its potential future applications.

  18. Production of human apolipoprotein(a) transgenic NIBS miniature pigs by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Shimatsu, Yoshiki; Horii, Wataru; Nunoya, Tetsuo; Iwata, Akira; Fan, Jianglin; Ozawa, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    Most cases of ischemic heart disease and stroke occur as a result of atherosclerosis. The purpose of this study was to produce a new Nippon Institute for Biological Science (NIBS) miniature pig model by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) for studying atherosclerosis. The human apolipoprotein(a) (apo(a)) genes were transfected into kidney epithelial cells derived from a male and a female piglet. Male cells were used as donors initially, and 275 embryos were transferred to surrogates. Three offspring were delivered, and the production efficiency was 1.1% (3/275). Serial female cells were injected into 937 enucleated oocytes. Eight offspring were delivered (production efficiency: 0.9%) from surrogates. One male and 2 female transgenic miniature pigs matured well. Lipoprotein(a) was found in the male and one of the female transgenic animals. These results demonstrate successful production of human apo(a) transgenic NIBS miniature pigs by SCNT. Our goal is to establish a human apo(a) transgenic NIBS miniature pig colony for studying atherosclerosis.

  19. Generation of transgenic Wuzhishan miniature pigs expressing monomeric red fluorescent protein by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yue; Kang, Jin-Dan; Li, Suo; Wang, Wei; Jin, Jun-Xue; Hong, Yu; Cui, Cheng-du; Yan, Chang-Guo; Yin, Xi-Jun

    2013-08-01

    Red fluorescent protein and its variants enable researchers to study gene expression, localization, and protein-protein interactions in vitro in real-time. Fluorophores with higher wavelengths are usually preferred since they efficiently penetrate tissues and produce less toxic emissions. A recently developed fluorescent protein marker, monomeric red fluorescent protein (mRFP1), is particularly useful because of its rapid maturation and minimal interference with green fluorescent protein (GFP) and GFP-derived markers. We generated a pCX-mRFP1-pgk-neoR construct and evaluated the ability of mRFP1 to function as a fluorescent marker in transgenic Wuzhishan miniature pigs. Transgenic embryos were generated by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) of nuclei isolated from ear fibroblasts expressing mRFP1. Embryos generated by SCNT developed into blastocysts in vitro (11.65%; 31/266). Thereafter, a total of 685 transgenic embryos were transferred into the oviducts of three recipients, two of which became pregnant. Of these, one recipient had six aborted fetuses, whereas the other recipient gave birth to four offspring. All offspring expressed the pCX-mRFP1-pgk-neoR gene as shown by PCR and fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis. The transgenic pigs expressed mRFP1 in all organs and tissues at high levels. These results demonstrate that Wuzhishan miniature pigs can express mRFP1. To conclude, this transgenic animal represents an excellent model with widespread applications in medicine and agriculture.

  20. Supplement of autologous ooplasm into porcine somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos does not alter embryo development.

    PubMed

    Lee, W-J; Lee, J-H; Jeon, R-H; Jang, S-J; Lee, S-C; Park, J-S; Lee, S-L; King, W-A; Rho, G-J

    2017-02-13

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is considered as the technique in which a somatic cell is introduced into an enucleated oocyte to make a cloned animal. However, it is unavoidable to lose a small amount of the ooplasm during enucleation step during SCNT procedure. The present study was aimed to uncover whether the supplement of autologous ooplasm could ameliorate the oocyte competence so as to improve low efficiency of embryo development in porcine SCNT. Autologous ooplasm-transferred (AOT) embryos were generated by the supplementation with autologous ooplasm into SCNT embryos. They were comparatively evaluated with respect to embryo developmental potential, the number of apoptotic body formation and gene expression including embryonic lineage differentiation, apoptosis, epigenetics and mitochondrial activity in comparison with parthenogenetic, in vitro-fertilized (IVF) and SCNT embryos. Although AOT embryos showed perfect fusion of autologous donor ooplasm with recipient SCNT embryos, the supplement of autologous ooplasm could not ameliorate embryo developmental potential in regard to the rate of blastocyst formation, total cell number and the number of apoptotic body. Furthermore, overall gene expression of AOT embryos was presented with no significant alterations in comparison with that of SCNT embryos. Taken together, the results of AOT demonstrated inability to make relevant values improved from the level of SCNT embryos to their IVF counterparts.

  1. Finite-thrust optimization of interplanetary transfers of space vehicle with bimodal nuclear thermal propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharytonov, Oleksii M.; Kiforenko, Boris M.

    2011-08-01

    The nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) propulsion is one of the leading promising technologies for primary space propulsion for manned exploration of the solar system due to its high specific impulse capability and sufficiently high thrust-to-weight ratio. Another benefit of NTR is its possible bimodal design, when nuclear reactor is used for generation of a jet thrust in a high-thrust mode and (with an appropriate power conversion system) as a source of electric power to supply the payload and the electric engines in a low-thrust mode. The model of the NTR thrust control was developed considering high-thrust NTR as a propulsion system of limited power and exhaust velocity. For the proposed model the control of the thrust value is accomplished by the regulation of reactor thermal power and propellant mass flow rate. The problem of joint optimization of the combination of high- and low-thrust arcs and the parameters of bimodal NTR (BNTR) propulsion system is considered for the interplanetary transfers. The interplanetary trajectory of the space vehicle is formed by the high-thrust NTR burns, which define planet-centric maneuvers and by the low-thrust heliocentric arcs where the nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) is used. The high-thrust arcs are analyzed using finite-thrust approach. The motion of the corresponding dynamical system is realized in three phase spaces concerning the departure planet-centric maneuver by means of high-thrust NTR propulsion, the low-thrust NEP heliocentric maneuver and the approach high-thrust NTR planet-centric maneuver. The phase coordinates are related at the time instants of the change of the phase spaces due to the relations between the space vehicle masses. The optimal control analysis is performed using Pontryagin's maximum principle. The numerical results are analyzed for Earth-Mars "sprint" transfer. The optimal values of the parameters that define the masses of NTR and NEP subsystems have been evaluated. It is shown that the low

  2. Heat Transfer in Waste Glass Melts - Measurement and Implications for Nuclear Waste Vitrification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chuan

    Thermal properties of waste glass melts, such as high temperature density and thermal conductivity, are relevant to heat transfer processes in nuclear waste vitrification. Experimental measurement techniques were developed and applied to four nuclear waste glasses representative of those currently projected for treatment of Hanford HLW and LAW streams to study heat flow mechanisms in nuclear waste vitrification. Density measurement results by Archimedes' method indicated that densities of the melts investigated varied considerably with composition and temperature. Thermal diffusivities of waste melts were determined at nominal melter operating temperatures using a temperature-wave technique. Thermal conductivities were obtained by combining diffusivity data with the experimentally-acquired densities of the melts and their known heat capacities. The experimental results display quite large positive dependences of conductivities on temperature for some samples and much weaker positive temperature dependences for others. More importantly, there is observed a big change in the slopes of the conductivities versus temperature as temperature is increased for two of the melts, but not for the other two. This behavior was interpreted in terms of the changing contributions of radiation and conduction with temperature and composition dependence of the absorption coefficient. Based on the obtained thermal conductivities, a simple model for a waste glass melter was set up, which was used to analyze the relative contributions of conduction and radiation individually and collectively to the overall heat flow and to investigate factors and conditions that influence the radiation contribution to heat flow. The modeling results showed that unlike the case at lower temperatures, the radiant energy flow through waste melts could be predominant compared with conduction at temperature of about 900 °C or higher. However, heat flow due to radiation was roughly equal to that from

  3. Longitudinal study of reproductive performance of female cattle produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Polejaeva, Irina A; Broek, Diane M; Walker, Shawn C; Zhou, Wenli; Walton, Mark; Benninghoff, Abby D; Faber, David C

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether or not reproductive performance in cattle produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is significantly different from that of their genetic donors. To address this question, we directed two longitudinal studies using different embryo production procedures: (1) superovulation followed by artificial insemination (AI) and embryo collection and (2) ultrasound-guided ovum pick-up followed by in vitro fertilization (OPU-IVF). Collectively, these two studies represent the largest data set available for any species on the reproductive performance of female clones and their genetic donors as measured by their embryo production outcomes in commercial embryo production program. The large-scale study described herein was conducted over a six-year period of time and provides a unique comparison of 96 clones to the 40 corresponding genetic donors. To our knowledge, this is the first longitudinal study on the reproductive performance of cattle clones using OPU-IVF. With nearly 2,000 reproductive procedures performed and more than 9,200 transferable embryos produced, our observations show that the reproductive performance of cattle produced by SCNT is not different compared to their genetic donors for the production of transferable embryos after either AI followed by embryo collection (P = 0.77) or OPU-IVF (P = 0.97). These data are in agreement with previous reports showing that the reproductive capabilities of cloned cattle are equal to that of conventionally produced cattle. In conclusion, results of this longitudinal study once again demonstrate that cloning technology, in combination with superovulation, AI and embryo collection or OPU-IVF, provides a valuable tool for faster dissemination of superior maternal genetics.

  4. Longitudinal Study of Reproductive Performance of Female Cattle Produced by Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Polejaeva, Irina A.; Broek, Diane M.; Walker, Shawn C.; Zhou, Wenli; Walton, Mark; Benninghoff, Abby D.; Faber, David C.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether or not reproductive performance in cattle produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is significantly different from that of their genetic donors. To address this question, we directed two longitudinal studies using different embryo production procedures: (1) superovulation followed by artificial insemination (AI) and embryo collection and (2) ultrasound-guided ovum pick-up followed by in vitro fertilization (OPU-IVF). Collectively, these two studies represent the largest data set available for any species on the reproductive performance of female clones and their genetic donors as measured by their embryo production outcomes in commercial embryo production program. The large-scale study described herein was conducted over a six-year period of time and provides a unique comparison of 96 clones to the 40 corresponding genetic donors. To our knowledge, this is the first longitudinal study on the reproductive performance of cattle clones using OPU-IVF. With nearly 2,000 reproductive procedures performed and more than 9,200 transferable embryos produced, our observations show that the reproductive performance of cattle produced by SCNT is not different compared to their genetic donors for the production of transferable embryos after either AI followed by embryo collection (P = 0.77) or OPU-IVF (P = 0.97). These data are in agreement with previous reports showing that the reproductive capabilities of cloned cattle are equal to that of conventionally produced cattle. In conclusion, results of this longitudinal study once again demonstrate that cloning technology, in combination with superovulation, AI and embryo collection or OPU-IVF, provides a valuable tool for faster dissemination of superior maternal genetics. PMID:24391930

  5. Model ecosystems with random nonlinear interspecies interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Danielle O. C.; Fontanari, José F.

    2004-12-01

    The principle of competitive exclusion in ecology establishes that two species living together cannot occupy the same ecological niche. Here we present a model ecosystem in which the species are described by a series of phenotypic characters and the strength of the competition between two species is given by a nondecreasing (modulating) function of the number of common characters. Using analytical tools of statistical mechanics we find that the ecosystem diversity, defined as the fraction of species that coexist at equilibrium, decreases as the complexity (i.e., number of characters) of the species increases, regardless of the modulating function. By considering both selective and random elimination of the links in the community web, we show that ecosystems composed of simple species are more robust than those composed of complex species. In addition, we show that the puzzling result that there exists either rich or poor ecosystems for a linear modulating function is not typical of communities in which the interspecies interactions are determined by a complementarity rule.

  6. Large scale in vivo risk assessment of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) transmission through transfer of bovine embryos produced via somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT).

    PubMed

    Gregg, K; Gosch, G; Guerra, T; Chen, S H; Xiang, T; Broek, D; Bruner, B; Polejaeva, I

    2010-10-15

    The objective was to use the bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) as a model to assess the risk of infectious disease transmission in the system of in vitro embryo production and transfer via somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) technology. The risks of BVDV transmission in the SCNT embryo production were previously evaluated. In that in vitro study, following standard operating procedures (SOP), including pre-nuclear transfer donor cell testing, oocyte decontamination and virus-free cell and embryo culture conditions, SCNT embryos produced were free of detectable viral RNA. The current study focused on the evaluation of the potential risk of disease transmission from SCNT embryos to recipients, and the risk of producing persistently infected animals via SCNT embryo transfer. Blood samples were collected from 553 recipients of SCNT embryos and 438 cloned calves and tested for the presence of BVDV viral RNA via a sensitive real time PCR method. All samples tested were negative. These results, in conjunction with the previous in vitro study, confirmed that the established SCNT embryo production and transfer system is safe and presents no detectable risk of disease transmission.

  7. Mitochondrial DNA heteroplasmy in ovine fetuses and sheep cloned by somatic cell nuclear transfer

    PubMed Central

    Burgstaller, Jörg P; Schinogl, Pamela; Dinnyes, Andras; Müller, Mathias; Steinborn, Ralf

    2007-01-01

    Background The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of the cloned sheep "Dolly" and nine other ovine clones produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) was reported to consist only of recipient oocyte mtDNA without any detectable mtDNA contribution from the nucleus donor cell. In cattle, mouse and pig several or most of the clones showed transmission of nuclear donor mtDNA resulting in mitochondrial heteroplasmy. To clarify the discrepant transmission pattern of donor mtDNA in sheep clones we analysed the mtDNA composition of seven fetuses and five lambs cloned from fetal fibroblasts. Results The three fetal fibroblast donor cells used for SCNT harboured low mtDNA copy numbers per cell (A: 753 ± 54, B: 292 ± 33 and C: 561 ± 88). The ratio of donor to recipient oocyte mtDNAs was determined using a quantitative amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS) PCR (i.e. ARMS-qPCR). For quantification of SNP variants with frequencies below 0.1% we developed a restriction endonuclease-mediated selective quantitative PCR (REMS-qPCR). We report the first cases (n = 4 fetuses, n = 3 lambs) of recipient oocyte/nuclear donor mtDNA heteroplasmy in SCNT-derived ovine clones demonstrating that there is no species-effect hindering ovine nucleus-donor mtDNA from being transmitted to the somatic clonal offspring. Most of the heteroplasmic clones exhibited low-level heteroplasmy (0.1% to 0.9%, n = 6) indicating neutral transmission of parental mtDNAs. High-level heteroplasmy (6.8% to 46.5%) was observed in one case. This clone possessed a divergent recipient oocyte-derived mtDNA genotype with three rare amino acid changes compared to the donor including one substitution at an evolutionary conserved site. Conclusion Our study using state-of-the-art techniques for mtDNA quantification, like ARMS-qPCR and the novel REMS-qPCR, documents for the first time the transmission of donor mtDNA into somatic sheep clones. MtDNA heteroplasmy was detected in seven of 12 clones tested, whereby all but

  8. Coupled quantum-classical method for long range charge transfer: relevance of the nuclear motion to the quantum electron dynamics.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Robson; Hoff, Diego A; Rego, Luis G C

    2015-04-10

    Charge and excitonic-energy transfer phenomena are fundamental for energy conversion in solar cells as well as artificial photosynthesis. Currently, much interest is being paid to light-harvesting and energy transduction processes in supramolecular structures, where nuclear dynamics has a major influence on electronic quantum dynamics. For this reason, the simulation of long range electron transfer in supramolecular structures, under environmental conditions described within an atomistic framework, has been a difficult problem to study. This work describes a coupled quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics method that aims at describing long range charge transfer processes in supramolecular systems, taking into account the atomistic details of large molecular structures, the underlying nuclear motion, and environmental effects. The method is applied to investigate the relevance of electron-nuclei interaction on the mechanisms for photo-induced electron-hole pair separation in dye-sensitized interfaces as well as electronic dynamics in molecular structures.

  9. Coronavirus diversity, phylogeny and interspecies jumping.

    PubMed

    Woo, Patrick C Y; Lau, Susanna K P; Huang, Yi; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2009-10-01

    The SARS epidemic has boosted interest in research on coronavirus biodiversity and genomics. Before 2003, there were only 10 coronaviruses with complete genomes available. After the SARS epidemic, up to December 2008, there was an addition of 16 coronaviruses with complete genomes sequenced. These include two human coronaviruses (human coronavirus NL63 and human coronavirus HKU1), 10 other mammalian coronaviruses [bat SARS coronavirus, bat coronavirus (bat-CoV) HKU2, bat-CoV HKU4, bat-CoV HKU5, bat-CoV HKU8, bat-CoV HKU9, bat-CoV 512/2005, bat-CoV 1A, equine coronavirus, and beluga whale coronavirus] and four avian coronaviruses (turkey coronavirus, bulbul coronavirus HKU11, thrush coronavirus HKU12, and munia coronavirus HKU13). Two novel subgroups in group 2 coronavirus (groups 2c and 2d) and two novel subgroups in group 3 coronavirus (groups 3b and 3c) have been proposed. The diversity of coronaviruses is a result of the infidelity of RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, high frequency of homologous RNA recombination, and the large genomes of coronaviruses. Among all hosts, the diversity of coronaviruses is most evidenced in bats and birds, which may be a result of their species diversity, ability to fly, environmental pressures, and habits of roosting and flocking. The present evidence supports that bat coronaviruses are the gene pools of group 1 and 2 coronaviruses, whereas bird coronaviruses are the gene pools of group 3 coronaviruses. With the increasing number of coronaviruses, more and more closely related coronaviruses from distantly related animals have been observed, which were results of recent interspecies jumping and may be the cause of disastrous outbreaks of zoonotic diseases.

  10. Interspecies variation in axon-myelin relationships.

    PubMed

    Fraher, J P; O'Sullivan, A W

    2000-01-01

    The primary objective of this paper was to determine the extent and nature of interspecies differences in axon calibre and myelin sheath thickness and in the various relationships between these. Morphometric analysis of the axon perimeter-myelin sheath thickness relationship was performed on an equivalent nerve fibre population in a mammal, the rat, a bird, the chicken, an amphibian, the frog, a bony fish, the trout, and a cartilaginous fish, the dogfish. The abducent nerve was studied. It is especially suitable for this purpose because its fibres are closely similar in type and in peripheral distribution across the species studied. The relationship differed substantially between species. Differences were present in its setting, as described by the positions of the scatterplots, in the g ratio and in the regression and correlation data relating the parameters. Both parameters were markedly larger in the fish species than in all of the others. In addition, in rat, chicken, frog and trout, where large and small fibre classes could be differentiated clearly, the setting of the relationship between the two parameters was different for the two classes. In the main, variation in each of the parameters was greater between than within species. The larger fibres in the fish species were closely similar in axon perimeter and sheath thickness despite their long evolutionary separation. From this study and from others in the series, it may be concluded that there is no fixed or constant relationship between axon calibre and the thickness of the surrounding myelin sheath. Each nerve tends to have its own particular relationship and this differs between species.

  11. Interspecies Communication among Commensal and Pathogenic Streptococci

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Laura C.; LaSarre, Breah; Federle, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Quorum sensing (QS) regulates diverse and coordinated behaviors in bacteria, including the production of virulence factors, biofilm formation, sporulation, and competence development. It is now established that some streptococci utilize Rgg-type proteins in concert with short hydrophobic peptides (SHPs) to mediate QS, and sequence analysis reveals that several streptococcal species contain highly homologous Rgg/SHP pairs. In group A streptococcus (GAS), two SHPs (SHP2 and SHP3 [SHP2/3]) were previously identified to be important in GAS biofilm formation. SHP2/3 are detected by two antagonistic regulators, Rgg2 and Rgg3, which control expression of the shp genes. In group B streptococcus (GBS), RovS is a known virulence gene regulator and ortholog of Rgg2, whereas no apparent Rgg3 homolog exists. Adjacent to rovS is a gene (shp1520) encoding a peptide nearly identical to SHP2. Using isogenic mutant strains and transcriptional reporters, we confirmed that RovS/SHP1520 comprise a QS circuit in GBS. More important, we performed experiments demonstrating that production and secretion of SHP1520 by GBS can modulate Rgg2/3-regulated gene expression in GAS in trans; likewise, SHP2/3 production by GAS can stimulate RovS-mediated gene regulation in GBS. An isolate of Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis also produced a secreted factor capable of simulating the QS circuits of both GAS and GBS, and sequencing confirms the presence of an orthologous Rgg2/SHP2 pair in this species as well. To our knowledge, this is the first documented case of bidirectional signaling between streptococcal species in coculture and suggests a role for orthologous Rgg/SHP systems in interspecies communication between important human pathogens. PMID:23882015

  12. Production of transgenic dairy goat expressing human α-lactalbumin by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiujing; Cao, Shaoxian; Wang, Huili; Meng, Chunhua; Li, Jingxin; Jiang, Jin; Qian, Yong; Su, Lei; He, Qiang; Zhang, Qingxiao

    2015-02-01

    Production of human α-lactalbumin (hα-LA) transgenic cloned dairy goats has great potential in improving the nutritional value and perhaps increasing the yield of dairy goat milk. Here, a mammary-specific expression vector 5A, harboring goat β-lactoglobulin (βLG) promoter, the hα-LA gene, neo(r) and EGFP dual markers, was constructed. Then, it was effectively transfected into goat mammary epithelial cells (GMECs) and the expression of hα-LA was investigated. Both the hα-LA transcript and protein were detected in the transfected GMECs after the induction of hormonal signals. In addition, the 5A vector was introduced into dairy goat fetal fibroblasts (transfection efficiency ≈60-70%) to prepare competent transgenic donor cells. A total of 121 transgenic fibroblast clones were isolated by 96-well cell culture plates and screened with nested-PCR amplification and EGFP fluorescence. After being frozen for 8 months, the transgenic cells still showed high viabilities, verifying their ability as donor cells. Dairy goat cloned embryos were produced from these hα-LA transgenic donor cells by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), and the rates of fusion, cleavage, and the development to blastocyst stages were 81.8, 84.4, and 20.0%, respectively. A total of 726 reconstructed embryos derived from the transgenic cells were transferred to 74 recipients and pregnancy was confirmed at 90 days in 12 goats. Of six female kids born, two carried hα-LA and the hα-LA protein was detected in their milk. This study provides an effective system to prepare SCNT donor cells and transgenic animals for human recombinant proteins.

  13. Evaluation of porcine stem cell competence for somatic cell nuclear transfer and production of cloned animals.

    PubMed

    Secher, Jan O; Liu, Ying; Petkov, Stoyan; Luo, Yonglun; Li, Dong; Hall, Vanessa J; Schmidt, Mette; Callesen, Henrik; Bentzon, Jacob F; Sørensen, Charlotte B; Freude, Kristine K; Hyttel, Poul

    2017-03-01

    Porcine somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has been used extensively to create genetically modified pigs, but the efficiency of the methodology is still low. It has been hypothesized that pluripotent or multipotent stem cells might result in increased SCNT efficacy as these cells are closer than somatic cells to the epigenetic state found in the blastomeres and therefore need less reprogramming. Our group has worked with porcine SCNT during the last 20 years and here we describe our experience with SCNT of 3 different stem cell lines. The porcine stem cells used were: Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) created by lentiviral doxycycline-dependent reprogramming and cultered with a GSK3β- and MEK-inhibitor (2i) and leukemia inhibitor factor (LIF) (2i LIF DOX-iPSCs), iPSCs created by a plasmid-based reprogramming and cultured with 2i and fibroblast growth factor (FGF) (2i FGF Pl-iPSCs) and embryonic germ cells (EGCs), which have earlier been characterized as being multipotent. The SCNT efficiencies of these stem cell lines were compared with that of the two fibroblast cell lines from which the iPSC lines were derived. The blastocyst rates for the 2i LIF DOX-iPSCs were 14.7%, for the 2i FGF Pl-iPSC 10.1%, and for the EGCs 34.5% compared with the fibroblast lines yielding 36.7% and 25.2%. The fibroblast- and EGC-derived embryos were used for embryo transfer and produced live offspring at similar low rates of efficiency (3.2 and 4.0%, respectively) and with several instances of malformations. In conclusion, potentially pluripotent porcine stem cells resulted in lower rates of embryonic development upon SCNT than multipotent stem cells and differentiated somatic cells.

  14. TRANSFER OF EXCESS NUCLEAR MATERIAL FROM LOS ALAMOS TO SAVANNAH RIVER SITE FOR LONG-TERM DISPOSITION

    SciTech Connect

    C. W. HOTH; L. A. FOSTER; T. F YARBRO

    2001-06-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is preparing excess nuclear material for shipment to Savannah River Site (SRS) for final disposition. Prior to shipment the nuclear material will be stabilized and packaged to meet strict criteria. The criterion that must be met include: (1) the DOE stabilization, packaging and storage requirements for plutonium bearing materials, DOE-STD-3013, (2) shipping container packaging requirements, (3) SRS packaging and storage criteria, and (4) DOE Material Disposition criteria for either immobilization or MOX reactor fuel. Another issue in preparing for this transfer is the DOE certification of shipping containers and the availability of shipping containers. This transfer of the nuclear material is fully supported by the EM, DP and NN Sections of the DOE, as well as, by LANL and SRS, yet a strong collaboration is needed to meet all established requirements relating to stabilization, packaging, shipment, storage and final disposition. This paper will present the overall objectives, the issues and the planned strategy to accomplish this nuclear material transfer.

  15. Generation of biallelic knock-out sheep via gene-editing and somatic cell nuclear transfer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Honghui; Wang, Gui; Hao, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Guozhong; Qing, Yubo; Liu, Shuanghui; Qing, Lili; Pan, Weirong; Chen, Lei; Liu, Guichun; Zhao, Ruoping; Jia, Baoyu; Zeng, Luyao; Guo, Jianxiong; Zhao, Lixiao; Zhao, Heng; Lv, Chaoxiang; Xu, Kaixiang; Cheng, Wenmin; Li, Hushan; Zhao, Hong-Ye; Wang, Wen; Wei, Hong-Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Transgenic sheep can be used to achieve genetic improvements in breeds and as an important large-animal model for biomedical research. In this study, we generated a TALEN plasmid specific for ovine MSTN and transfected it into fetal fibroblast cells of STH sheep. MSTN biallelic-KO somatic cells were selected as nuclear donor cells for SCNT. In total, cloned embryos were transferred into 37 recipient gilts, 28 (75.7%) becoming pregnant and 15 delivering, resulting in 23 lambs, 12 of which were alive. Mutations in the lambs were verified via sequencing and T7EI assay, and the gene mutation site was consistent with that in the donor cells. Off-target analysis was performed, and no off-target mutations were detected. MSTN KO affected the mRNA expression of MSTN relative genes. The growth curve for the resulting sheep suggested that MSTN KO caused a remarkable increase in body weight compared with those of wild-type sheep. Histological analyses revealed that MSTN KO resulted in muscle fiber hypertrophy. These findings demonstrate the successful generation of MSTN biallelic-KO STH sheep via gene editing in somatic cells using TALEN technology and SCNT. These MSTN mutant sheep developed and grew normally, and exhibited increased body weight and muscle growth. PMID:27654750

  16. Primordial germ cell differentiation of nuclear transfer embryonic stem cells using surface modified electroconductive scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Eslami-Arshaghi, Tarlan; Vakilian, Saeid; Seyedjafari, Ehsan; Ardeshirylajimi, Abdolreza; Soleimani, Masoud; Salehi, Mohammad

    2016-12-30

    A combination of nanotopographical cues and surface modification of collagen and fibronectin is a potential platform in primordial germ cells (PGCs) differentiation. In the present study, the synergistic effect of nanotopography and surface modification on differentiation of nuclear transfer embryonic stem cells (nt-ESCs) toward PGC lineage was investigated. In order to achieve this goal, poly-anyline (PANi) was mix within poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA). Afterward, the random composite mats were fabricated using PLLA and PANi mix solution. The nanofiber topography notably upregulated the expressions of prdm14, mvh and c-kit compared with tissue culture polystyrene (TCP). Moreover, the combination of nanofiber topography and surface modification resulted in more enhancement of PGCs differentiation compared with non-modified nanofibrous scaffold. Additionally, gene expression results showed that mvh and c-kit were expressed at higher intensity in cells exposed to collagen and fibronectin rather than collagen or fibronectin solitary. These results demonstrated the importance of combined effect of collagen and fibronectin in order to develop a functional extracellular matrix (ECM) mimic in directing stem cell fate and the potential of such biofunctional scaffolds for treatment of infertility.

  17. Functional enucleation of porcine oocytes for somatic cell nuclear transfer using femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuetemeyer, K.; Lucas-Hahn, A.; Petersen, B.; Hassel, P.; Lemme, E.; Niemann, H.; Heisterkamp, A.

    2010-02-01

    Cloning of several mammalian species has been achieved by somatic cell nuclear transfer over the last decade. However, this method still results in very low efficiencies originating from biological and technical aspects. The highly-invasive mechanical enucleation belongs to the technical aspects and requires considerable micromanipulation skill. In this paper, we present a novel non-invasive method for combined oocyte imaging and automated functional enucleation using femtosecond (fs) laser pulses. After three-dimensional imaging of Hoechst-labeled porcine oocytes by multiphoton microscopy, our self-developed software automatically determined the metaphase plate position and shape. Subsequent irradiation of this volume with the very same laser at higher pulse energies in the low-density-plasma regime was used for metaphase plate ablation. We show that functional fs laser-based enucleation of porcine oocytes completely inhibited further embryonic development while maintaining intact oocyte morphology. In contrast, non-irradiated oocytes were able to develop to the blastocyst stage without significant differences to control oocytes. Our results indicate that fs laser systems offer great potential for oocyte imaging and enucleation as a fast, easy to use and reliable tool which may improve the efficiency of somatic cell clone production.

  18. Generation of biallelic knock-out sheep via gene-editing and somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Li, Honghui; Wang, Gui; Hao, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Guozhong; Qing, Yubo; Liu, Shuanghui; Qing, Lili; Pan, Weirong; Chen, Lei; Liu, Guichun; Zhao, Ruoping; Jia, Baoyu; Zeng, Luyao; Guo, Jianxiong; Zhao, Lixiao; Zhao, Heng; Lv, Chaoxiang; Xu, Kaixiang; Cheng, Wenmin; Li, Hushan; Zhao, Hong-Ye; Wang, Wen; Wei, Hong-Jiang

    2016-09-22

    Transgenic sheep can be used to achieve genetic improvements in breeds and as an important large-animal model for biomedical research. In this study, we generated a TALEN plasmid specific for ovine MSTN and transfected it into fetal fibroblast cells of STH sheep. MSTN biallelic-KO somatic cells were selected as nuclear donor cells for SCNT. In total, cloned embryos were transferred into 37 recipient gilts, 28 (75.7%) becoming pregnant and 15 delivering, resulting in 23 lambs, 12 of which were alive. Mutations in the lambs were verified via sequencing and T7EI assay, and the gene mutation site was consistent with that in the donor cells. Off-target analysis was performed, and no off-target mutations were detected. MSTN KO affected the mRNA expression of MSTN relative genes. The growth curve for the resulting sheep suggested that MSTN KO caused a remarkable increase in body weight compared with those of wild-type sheep. Histological analyses revealed that MSTN KO resulted in muscle fiber hypertrophy. These findings demonstrate the successful generation of MSTN biallelic-KO STH sheep via gene editing in somatic cells using TALEN technology and SCNT. These MSTN mutant sheep developed and grew normally, and exhibited increased body weight and muscle growth.

  19. The ability of mouse nuclear transfer embryonic stem cells to differentiate into primordial germ cells.

    PubMed

    Mansouri, Vahid; Salehi, Mohammad; Nourozian, Mohsen; Fadaei, Fatemeh; Farahani, Reza Mastery; Piryaei, Abbas; Delbari, Ali

    2015-05-01

    Nuclear transfer embryonic stem cells (ntESCs) show stem cell characteristics such as pluripotency but cause no immunological disorders. Although ntESCs are able to differentiate into somatic cells, the ability of ntESCs to differentiate into primordial germ cells (PGCs) has not been examined. In this work, we examined the capacity of mouse ntESCs to differentiate into PGCs in vitro. ntESCs aggregated to form embryoid bodies (EB) in EB culture medium supplemented with bone morphogenetic protein 4(BMP4) as the differentiation factor. The expression level of specific PGC genes was compared at days 4 and 8 using real time PCR. Flow cytometry and immunocytochemical staining were used to detect Mvh as a specific PGC marker. ntESCs expressed particular genes related to different stages of PGC development. Flow cytometry and immunocytochemical staining confirmed the presence of Mvh protein in a small number of cells. There were significant differences between cells that differentiated into PGCs in the group treated with Bmp4 compared to non-treated cells. These findings indicate that ntESCs can differentiate into putative PGCs. Improvement of ntESC differentiation into PGCs may be a reliable means of producing mature germ cells.

  20. Melatonin significantly improves the developmental competence of bovine somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos.

    PubMed

    Su, Jianmin; Wang, Yongsheng; Xing, Xupeng; Zhang, Lei; Sun, Hongzheng; Zhang, Yong

    2015-11-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is a promising technology, but its application is hampered by its low efficiency. Hence, the majority of SCNT embryos fail to develop to term. In this study, the antioxidant melatonin reduced apoptosis and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in bovine SCNT embryos. It also increased cell number, inner cell mass (ICM) cell numbers, and the ratio of ICM to total cells while improving the development of bovine SCNT embryos in vitro and in vivo. Gene expression analysis showed that melatonin suppressed the expression of the pro-apoptotic genes p53 and Bax and stimulated the expression of the antioxidant genes SOD1 and Gpx4, the anti-apoptotic gene BCL2L1, and the pluripotency-related gene SOX2 in SCNT blastocysts. We also analyzed the epigenetic modifications in bovine in vitro fertilization, melatonin-treated, and untreated SCNT embryos. The global H3K9ac levels of melatonin-treated SCNT embryos at the four-cell stage were higher than those of the untreated SCNT embryos. We conclude that exogenous melatonin affects the expression of genes related to apoptosis, antioxidant function, and development. Moreover, melatonin reduced apoptosis and ROS in bovine SCNT embryos and enhanced blastocyst quality, thereby ultimately improving bovine cloning efficiency.

  1. Mitochondrial and DNA damage in bovine somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos.

    PubMed

    Hwang, In-Sun; Bae, Hyo-Kyung; Cheong, Hee-Tae

    2013-01-01

    The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and subsequent mitochondrial and DNA damage in bovine somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos were examined. Bovine enucleated oocytes were electrofused with donor cells and then activated by a combination of Ca-ionophore and 6-dimethylaminopurine culture. The H2O2 and ˙OH radical levels, mitochondrial morphology and membrane potential (ΔΨ), and DNA fragmentation of SCNT and in vitro fertilized (IVF) embryos at the zygote stage were analyzed. The H2O2 (35.6 ± 1.1 pixels/embryo) and ˙OH radical levels (44.6 ± 1.2 pixels/embryo) of SCNT embryos were significantly higher than those of IVF embryos (19.2 ± 1.5 and 23.8 ± 1.8 pixels/embryo, respectively, p < 0.05). The mitochondria morphology of SCNT embryos was diffused within the cytoplasm. The ΔΨ of SCNT embryos was significantly lower (p < 0.05) than that of IVF embryos (0.95 ± 0.04 vs. 1.21 ± 0.06, red/green). Moreover, the comet tail length of SCNT embryos was longer than that of IVF embryos (515.5 ± 26.4 μm vs. 425.6 ± 25.0 μm, p < 0.05). These results indicate that mitochondrial and DNA damage increased in bovine SCNT embryos, which may have been induced by increased ROS levels.

  2. Embryonic development following somatic cell nuclear transfer impeded by persisting histone methylation.

    PubMed

    Matoba, Shogo; Liu, Yuting; Lu, Falong; Iwabuchi, Kumiko A; Shen, Li; Inoue, Azusa; Zhang, Yi

    2014-11-06

    Mammalian oocytes can reprogram somatic cells into a totipotent state enabling animal cloning through somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). However, the majority of SCNT embryos fail to develop to term due to undefined reprogramming defects. Here, we identify histone H3 lysine 9 trimethylation (H3K9me3) of donor cell genome as a major barrier for efficient reprogramming by SCNT. Comparative transcriptome analysis identified reprogramming resistant regions (RRRs) that are expressed normally at 2-cell mouse embryos generated by in vitro fertilization (IVF) but not SCNT. RRRs are enriched for H3K9me3 in donor somatic cells and its removal by ectopically expressed H3K9me3 demethylase Kdm4d not only reactivates the majority of RRRs, but also greatly improves SCNT efficiency. Furthermore, use of donor somatic nuclei depleted of H3K9 methyltransferases markedly improves SCNT efficiency. Our study thus identifies H3K9me3 as a critical epigenetic barrier in SCNT-mediated reprogramming and provides a promising approach for improving mammalian cloning efficiency.

  3. Targeted disruption of Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated gene in miniature pigs by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young June; Ahn, Kwang Sung; Kim, Minjeong; Kim, Min Ju; Park, Sang-Min; Ryu, Junghyun; Ahn, Jin Seop; Heo, Soon Young; Kang, Jee Hyun; Choi, You Jung; Choi, Seong-Jun; Shim, Hosup

    2014-10-03

    Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is a recessive autosomal disorder associated with pleiotropic phenotypes, including progressive cerebellar degeneration, gonad atrophy, and growth retardation. Even though A-T is known to be caused by the mutations in the Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene, the correlation between abnormal cellular physiology caused by ATM mutations and the multiple symptoms of A-T disease has not been clearly determined. None of the existing ATM mouse models properly reflects the extent to which neurological degeneration occurs in human. In an attempt to provide a large animal model for A-T, we produced gene-targeted pigs with mutations in the ATM gene by somatic cell nuclear transfer. The disrupted allele in the ATM gene of cloned piglets was confirmed via PCR and Southern blot analysis. The ATM gene-targeted pigs generated in the present study may provide an alternative to the current mouse model for the study of mechanisms underlying A-T disorder and for the development of new therapies.

  4. Cell cycle synchronization of canine ear fibroblasts for somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Koo, Ok Jae; Hossein, Mohammad Shamim; Hong, So Gun; Martinez-Conejero, Jose A; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2009-02-01

    Cycle synchronization of donor cells in the G0/G1 stage is a crucial step for successful somatic cell nuclear transfer. In the present report, we evaluated the effects of contact inhibition, serum starvation and the reagents - dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO), roscovitine and cycloheximide (CHX) - on synchronization of canine fibroblasts at the G0/G1 stage. Ear fibroblast cells were collected from a beagle dog, placed into culture and used for analysis at passages three to eight. The population doubling time was 36.5 h. The proportion of G0/G1 cells was significantly increased by contact inhibition (77.1%) as compared with cycling cells (70.1%); however, extending the duration of culture did not induce further synchronization. After 24 h of serum starvation, cells were effectively synchronized at G0/G1 (77.1%). Although synchronization was further increased gradually after 24 h and even showed significant difference after 72 h (82.8%) of starvation, the proportion of dead cells also significantly increased after 24 h. The percentage of cells at the G0/G1 phase was increased (as compared with controls) after 72 h treatment with DMSO (76.1%) and after 48 h treatment with CHX (73.0%) or roscovitine (72.5%). However, the rate of cell death was increased after 24 and 72 h of treatment with DMSO and CHX, respectively. Thus, we recommend the use of roscovitine for cell cycle synchronization of canine ear fibroblasts as a preparatory step for SCNT.

  5. Growth and hematologic characteristics of cloned dogs derived from adult somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung Eun; Kim, Min Kyu; Kang, Jung Taek; Oh, Hyun Ju; Hong, So Gun; Kim, Dae Young; Jang, Goo; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2010-04-01

    Three viable female dogs, which have the same genotype, have been successfully produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT); however, data on the growth pattern of cloned dogs are lacking. Thus, the aim of this study was (1) to assess growth parameters among those cloned dogs with measurement of body weight, height, and radiographic analysis of skull size and bone plate, and (2) to compare hematologic characteristics among the donor dog, cloned dogs, and age-matched control dogs. The cloned dogs were kept in the same environmental conditions. The body weight increased from 0.52, 0.46, and 0.52 kg at birth to 21.9, 22.9, and 20.4 kg at 68 weeks of age for individual cloned dogs, respectively. The withers height increased from 34.5, 32.6, and 35.2 cm at 8 weeks of age to 67.1 cm at 68 weeks of age in the three clones. The radiographic data demonstrated that patterns of bone growth were similar among cloned dogs, and all measured parameters of matured cloned dogs were similar with that of the fully grown donor dog. An age-specific pattern was identified on hematologic and serum biochemical measurements in both cloned dogs and age-matched controls. The parameters examined were within the normal reference ranges for healthy dogs. In conclusion, three genetically identical cloned dogs showed similar growth characteristics and had normal hematological and serum biochemical parameters.

  6. Multiple horizontal transfers of nuclear ribosomal genes between phylogenetically distinct grass lineages

    PubMed Central

    Mahelka, Václav; Krak, Karol; Kopecký, David; Fehrer, Judith; Šafář, Jan; Bartoš, Jan; Hobza, Roman; Blavet, Nicolas; Blattner, Frank R.

    2017-01-01

    The movement of nuclear DNA from one vascular plant species to another in the absence of fertilization is thought to be rare. Here, nonnative rRNA gene [ribosomal DNA (rDNA)] copies were identified in a set of 16 diploid barley (Hordeum) species; their origin was traceable via their internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequence to five distinct Panicoideae genera, a lineage that split from the Pooideae about 60 Mya. Phylogenetic, cytogenetic, and genomic analyses implied that the nonnative sequences were acquired between 1 and 5 Mya after a series of multiple events, with the result that some current Hordeum sp. individuals harbor up to five different panicoid rDNA units in addition to the native Hordeum rDNA copies. There was no evidence that any of the nonnative rDNA units were transcribed; some showed indications of having been silenced via pseudogenization. A single copy of a Panicum sp. rDNA unit present in H. bogdanii had been interrupted by a native transposable element and was surrounded by about 70 kbp of mostly noncoding sequence of panicoid origin. The data suggest that horizontal gene transfer between vascular plants is not a rare event, that it is not necessarily restricted to one or a few genes only, and that it can be selectively neutral. PMID:28137844

  7. In vitro and in vivo genotoxic effects of somatic cell nuclear transfer cloned cattle meat.

    PubMed

    Lee, Nam-Jin; Yang, Byoung-Chul; Jung, Yu-Ri; Lee, Jung-Won; Im, Gi-Sun; Seong, Hwan-Hoo; Park, Jin-Ki; Kang, Jong-Koo; Hwang, Seongsoo

    2011-09-01

    Although the nutritional composition and health status after consumption of the meat and milk derived from both conventionally bred (normal) and somatic cell nuclear transferred (cloned) animals and their progeny are not different, little is known about their food safeties like genetic toxicity. This study is performed to examine both in vitro (bacterial mutation and chromosome aberration) and in vivo (micronucleus) genotoxicity studies of cloned cattle meat. The concentrations of both normal and cloned cattle meat extracts (0-10×) were tested to five strains of bacteria (Salmonella typhimurium: TA98, TA100, TA1535, and TA1537; Escherichia coli: WP2uvrA) for bacterial mutation and to Chinese hamster lung (CHL/IU) cells for chromosome aberration, respectively. For micronucleus test, ICR mice were divided into five dietary groups: commercial pellets (control), pellets containing 5% (N-5) and 10% (N-10) normal cattle meat, and pellets containing 5% (C-5) and 10% (C-10) cloned cattle meat. No test substance-related genotoxicity was noted in the five bacterial strains, CHL/IU cells, or mouse bone marrow cells, suggesting that the cloned cattle meat potentially may be safe in terms of mutagenic hazards. Thus, it can be postulated that the cloned cattle meat do not induce any harmful genotoxic effects in vitro and in vivo.

  8. Interspecies interactions are an integral determinant of microbial community dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, Fatma A. A.; Suzuki, Kenshi; Ohtaki, Akihiro; Sagegami, Keita; Hirai, Hidetaka; Seno, Jun; Mizuno, Naoko; Inuzuka, Yuma; Saito, Yasuhisa; Tashiro, Yosuke; Hiraishi, Akira; Futamata, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the factors that determine the dynamics of bacterial communities in a complex system using multidisciplinary methods. Since natural and engineered microbial ecosystems are too complex to study, six types of synthetic microbial ecosystems (SMEs) were constructed under chemostat conditions with phenol as the sole carbon and energy source. Two to four phenol-degrading, phylogenetically and physiologically different bacterial strains were used in each SME. Phylogeny was based on the nucleotide sequence of 16S rRNA genes, while physiologic traits were based on kinetic and growth parameters on phenol. Two indices, J parameter and “interspecies interaction,” were compared to predict which strain would become dominant in an SME. The J parameter was calculated from kinetic and growth parameters. On the other hand, “interspecies interaction,” a new index proposed in this study, was evaluated by measuring the specific growth activity, which was determined on the basis of relative growth of a strain with or without the supernatant prepared from other bacterial cultures. Population densities of strains used in SMEs were enumerated by real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) targeting the gene encoding the large subunit of phenol hydroxylase and were compared to predictions made from J parameter and interspecies interaction calculations. In 4 of 6 SEMs tested the final dominant strain shown by real-time qPCR analyses coincided with the strain predicted by both the J parameter and the interspecies interaction. However, in SMEII-2 and SMEII-3 the final dominant Variovorax strains coincided with prediction of the interspecies interaction but not the J parameter. These results demonstrate that the effects of interspecies interactions within microbial communities contribute to determining the dynamics of the microbial ecosystem. PMID:26539177

  9. Interspecies Variability in Propylene Glycol Dinitrate-Induced Methemoglobin Formation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-11-01

    Interspecies Variability in Propylene Glycol Dinitrate-Induced Methemoglobin Formation’ * 2 J. F. WYMAN. B. H . GRAY. L. Hi. LEE. J. COLEMAN, C. FLEMMING...July 3. 1985 Interspecies \\’ariabilit% in Propylene Glkcol Dinitrate-Induced Methemoglohin Formation. Wsi’.J. F.GRAY. B. H .. LEE. L. H .. COLEMAN. J...and gI utathione-S-t ransferase. were assa~ed h % adaptation of existing methods to a centrifugal analtzer. ’The ab)~c ent~mes were rernosed from

  10. Frequent somatic transfer of mitochondrial DNA into the nuclear genome of human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ju, Young Seok; Tubio, Jose M C; Mifsud, William; Fu, Beiyuan; Davies, Helen R; Ramakrishna, Manasa; Li, Yilong; Yates, Lucy; Gundem, Gunes; Tarpey, Patrick S; Behjati, Sam; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Martin, Sancha; Fullam, Anthony; Gerstung, Moritz; Nangalia, Jyoti; Green, Anthony R; Caldas, Carlos; Borg, Åke; Tutt, Andrew; Lee, Ming Ta Michael; van't Veer, Laura J; Tan, Benita K T; Aparicio, Samuel; Span, Paul N; Martens, John W M; Knappskog, Stian; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Eyfjörd, Jórunn Erla; Myklebost, Ola; Flanagan, Adrienne M; Foster, Christopher; Neal, David E; Cooper, Colin; Eeles, Rosalind; Bova, Steven G; Lakhani, Sunil R; Desmedt, Christine; Thomas, Gilles; Richardson, Andrea L; Purdie, Colin A; Thompson, Alastair M; McDermott, Ultan; Yang, Fengtang; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Campbell, Peter J; Stratton, Michael R

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondrial genomes are separated from the nuclear genome for most of the cell cycle by the nuclear double membrane, intervening cytoplasm, and the mitochondrial double membrane. Despite these physical barriers, we show that somatically acquired mitochondrial-nuclear genome fusion sequences are present in cancer cells. Most occur in conjunction with intranuclear genomic rearrangements, and the features of the fusion fragments indicate that nonhomologous end joining and/or replication-dependent DNA double-strand break repair are the dominant mechanisms involved. Remarkably, mitochondrial-nuclear genome fusions occur at a similar rate per base pair of DNA as interchromosomal nuclear rearrangements, indicating the presence of a high frequency of contact between mitochondrial and nuclear DNA in some somatic cells. Transmission of mitochondrial DNA to the nuclear genome occurs in neoplastically transformed cells, but we do not exclude the possibility that some mitochondrial-nuclear DNA fusions observed in cancer occurred years earlier in normal somatic cells.

  11. Nuclear transfer of synchronized african wild cat somatic cells into enucleated domestic cat oocytes.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Martha C; Jenkins, Jill A; Giraldo, Angelica; Harris, Rebecca F; King, Amy; Dresser, Betsy L; Pope, Charles Earle

    2003-09-01

    The African wild cat is one of the smallest wild cats and its future is threatened by hybridization with domestic cats. Nuclear transfer, a valuable tool for retaining genetic variability, offers the possibility of species continuation rather than extinction. The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of somatic cell nuclei of the African wild cat (AWC) to dedifferentiate within domestic cat (DSH) cytoplasts and to support early development after nuclear transplantation. In experiment 1, distributions of AWC and DSH fibroblasts in each cell-cycle phase were assessed by flow cytometry using cells cultured to confluency and disaggregated with pronase, trypsin, or mechanical separation. Trypsin (89.0%) and pronase (93.0%) yielded higher proportions of AWC nuclei in the G0/G1 phase than mechanical separation (82.0%). In contrast, mechanical separation yielded higher percentages of DSH nuclei in the G0/G1 phase (86.6%) than pronase (79.7%) or trypsin (74.2%) treatments. In both species, pronase induced less DNA damage than trypsin. In experiment 2, the effects of serum starvation, culture to confluency, and exposure to roscovitine on the distribution of AWC and DSH fibroblasts in various phases of the cell cycle were determined. Flow cytometry analyses revealed that the dynamics of the cell cycle varied as culture conditions were modified. Specifically, a higher percentage of AWC and DSH nuclei were in the G0/G1 phase after cells were serum starved (83% vs. 96%) than were present in cycling cells (50% vs. 64%), after contact inhibition (61% vs. 88%), or after roscovitine (56% vs. 84%) treatment, respectively. In experiment 3, we evaluated the effects of cell synchronization and oocyte maturation (in vivo vs. in vitro) on the reconstruction and development of AWC-DSH- and DSH-DSH-cloned embryos. The method of cell synchronization did not affect the fusion and cleavage rate because only a slightly higher percentage of fused couplets cleaved when donor nuclei

  12. Nuclear transfer of synchronized African wild cat somatic cells into enucleated domestic cat oocytes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gomez, M.C.; Jenkins, J.A.; Giraldo, A.; Harris, R.F.; King, A.; Dresser, B.L.; Pope, C.E.

    2003-01-01

    The African wild cat is one of the smallest wild cats and its future is threatened by hybridization with domestic cats. Nuclear transfer, a valuable tool for retaining genetic variability, offers the possibility of species continuation rather than extinction. The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of somatic cell nuclei of the African wild cat (AWC) to dedifferentiate within domestic cat (DSH) cytoplasts and to support early development after nuclear transplantation. In experiment 1, distributions of AWC and DSH fibroblasts in each cell-cycle phase were assessed by flow cytometry using cells cultured to confluency and disaggregated with pronase, trypsin, or mechanical separation. Trypsin (89.0%) and pronase (93.0%) yielded higher proportions of AWC nuclei in the G0/G1 phase than mechanical separation (82.0%). In contrast, mechanical separation yielded higher percentages of DSH nuclei in the G0/G1 phase (86.6%) than pronase (79.7%) or trypsin (74.2%) treatments. In both species, pronase induced less DNA damage than trypsin. In experiment 2, the effects of serum starvation, culture to confluency, and exposure to roscovitine on the distribution of AWC and DSH fibroblasts in various phases of the cell cycle were determined. Flow cytometry analyses revealed that the dynamics of the cell cycle varied as culture conditions were modified. Specifically, a higher percentage of AWC and DSH nuclei were in the G0/G1 phase after cells were serum starved (83% vs. 96%) than were present in cycling cells (50% vs. 64%), after contact inhibition (61% vs. 88%), or after roscovitine (56% vs. 84%) treatment, respectively. In experiment 3, we evaluated the effects of cell synchronization and oocyte maturation (in vivo vs. in vitro) on the reconstruction and development of AWC-DSH- and DSH-DSH-cloned embryos. The method of cell synchronization did not affect the fusion and cleavage rate because only a slightly higher percentage of fused couplets cleaved when donor nuclei

  13. Vitamin C enhances in vitro and in vivo development of porcine somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Yongye; Tang, Xiaochun; Xie, Wanhua; Zhou, Yan; Li, Dong; Zhou, Yang; Zhu, Jianguo; Yuan, Ting; Lai, Liangxue; Pang, Daxin; Ouyang, Hongsheng

    2011-07-29

    Highlights: {yields} Report for the first time that vitamin C has a beneficial effect on the development of porcine SCNT embryos. {yields} The level of acH4K5 and Oct4 expression at blastocyst-stage was up-regulated after treatment. {yields} A higher rate of gestation and increased number of piglets born were harvested in the treated group. -- Abstract: The reprogramming of differentiated cells into a totipotent embryonic state through somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is still an inefficient process. Previous studies revealed that the generation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells from mouse and human fibroblasts could be significantly enhanced with vitamin C treatment. Here, we investigated the effects of vitamin C, to our knowledge for the first time, on the in vitro and in vivo development of porcine SCNT embryos. The rate of blastocyst development in SCNT embryos treated with 50 {mu}g/mL vitamin C 15 h after activation (36.0%) was significantly higher than that of untreated SCNT embryos (11.5%). The enhanced in vitro development rate of vitamin C-treated embryos was associated with an increased acetylation level of histone H4 lysine 5 and higher Oct4, Sox2 and Klf4 expression levels in blastocysts, as determined by real-time PCR. In addition, treatment with vitamin C resulted in an increased pregnancy rate in pigs. These findings suggest that treatment with vitamin C is beneficial for enhancement of the in vitro and in vivo development of porcine SCNT embryos.

  14. Comparison of reprogramming genes in induced pluripotent stem cells and nuclear transfer cloned embryos.

    PubMed

    Duan, Lian; Wang, Zhendong; Shen, Jingling; Shan, Zhiyan; Shen, Xinghui; Wu, Yanshuang; Sun, Ruizhen; Li, Tong; Yuan, Rui; Zhao, Qiaoshi; Bai, Guangyu; Gu, Yanli; Jin, Lianhong; Lei, Lei

    2014-08-01

    The most effective reprogramming methods, somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), are widely used in biological research and regenerative medicine, yet the mechanism that reprograms somatic cells to totipotency remains unclear and thus reprogramming efficiency is still low. Microarray technology has been employed in analyzing the transcriptomes changes during iPS reprogramming. Unfortunately, it is difficult to obtain enough DNA from SCNT reconstructed embryos to take advantage of this technology. In this study, we aimed to identify critical genes from the transcriptional profile for iPS reprogramming and compared expression levels of these genes in SCNT reprogramming. By integrating gene expression information from microarray databases and published studies comparing somatic cells with either miPSCs or mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs), we obtained two lists of co-upregulated genes. The gene ontology (GO) enriched analysis of these two lists demonstrated that the reprogramming process is associated with numerous biological processes. Specifically, we selected 32 genes related to heterochromatin, embryonic development, and cell cycle from our co-upregulated gene datasets and examined the gene expression level in iPSCs and SCNT embryos by qPCR. The results revealed that some reprogramming related genes in iPSCs were also expressed in SCNT reprogramming. We established the network of gene interactions that occur with genes differentially expressed in iPS and SCNT reprogramming and then performed GO analysis on the genes in the network. The network genes function in chromatin organization, heterochromatin, transcriptional regulation, and cell cycle. Further researches to improve reprogramming efficiency, especially in SCNT, will focus on functional studies of these selected genes.

  15. Generation of CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene-targeted pigs via somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaoqing; Xin, Jige; Fan, Nana; Zou, Qingjian; Huang, Jiao; Ouyang, Zhen; Zhao, Yu; Zhao, Bentian; Liu, Zhaoming; Lai, Sisi; Yi, Xiaoling; Guo, Lin; Esteban, Miguel A; Zeng, Yangzhi; Yang, Huaqiang; Lai, Liangxue

    2015-03-01

    The domestic pig has been widely used as an important large animal model. Precise and efficient genetic modification in pig provides a great promise in biomedical research. Recently, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated (Cas) system has been successfully used to produce many gene-targeted animals. However, these animals have been generated by co-injection of Cas9 mRNA and single-guide RNA (sgRNA) into one-cell stage embryos, which mostly resulted in mosaicism of the modification. One or two rounds of further breeding should be performed to obtain homozygotes with identical genotype and phenotype. To address this issue, gene-targeted somatic cells can be used as donor for somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) to produce gene-targeted animals with single and identical mutations. In this study, we applied Cas9/sgRNAs to effectively direct gene editing in porcine fetal fibroblasts and then mutant cell colonies were used as donor to generate homozygous gene-targeted pigs through single round of SCNT. As a result, we successfully obtained 15 tyrosinase (TYR) biallelic mutant pigs and 20 PARK2 and PINK1 double-gene knockout (KO) pigs. They were all homozygous and no off-target mutagenesis was detected by comprehensive analysis. TYR (-/-) pigs showed typical albinism and the expression of parkin and PINK1 were depleted in PARK2 (-/-)/PINK1 (-/-) pigs. The results demonstrated that single- or double-gene targeted pigs can be effectively achieved by using the CRISPR/Cas9 system combined with SCNT without mosaic mutation and detectable off-target effects. This gene-editing system provides an efficient, rapid, and less costly manner to generate genetically modified pigs or other large animals.

  16. Cloning missy: obtaining multiple offspring of a specific canine genotype by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Hossein, Mohammad Shamim; Jeong, Yeon Woo; Park, Sun Woo; Kim, Joung Joo; Lee, Eugine; Ko, Kyeong Hee; Kim, Huen Suk; Kim, Yeun Wook; Hyun, Sang Hwan; Shin, Taeyoung; Hawthorne, Lou; Hwang, Woo Suk

    2009-03-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate two activation methods for somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), namely, fusion and simultaneous activation (FSA, fusion medium contains calcium), versus fusion followed by chemical activation (F+CA, fusion medium does not contain calcium), and to evaluate the effects of parity of recipient dogs on the success of SCNT. Oocytes retrieved from outbred dogs were reconstructed with adult somatic cells collected from an 11-year-old female dog named Missy. In the FSA method, oocytes were fused and activated at the same time using two DC pulses of 1.75 kV/cm for 15 microsec. In the F+CA method, oocytes were fused with two DC pulses of 1.75 kV/cm for 15 microsec, and then activated 1 h after fusion by 10 microM calcium ionophore for 4 m and cultured for 4 h in 1.9 mM 6-dimethylaminopurine for postactivation. Activation method had a significant impact on the production efficiency of cloned dogs. There was a significant difference in full-term pregnancy rate and percentage of live puppies between the two methods (6.3% and 38.5% for FSA and F+CA, respectively). In our study, four out of five live offspring produced by F+CA survived versus FSA, which did not result in any surviving puppies. Overall, as few as 14 dogs and 54 reconstructed embryos were needed to produce a cloned puppy. In addition, the parity of recipient bitches had no effect on the success of SCNT in canine species. Both the nullipara and multipara bitches produced live puppies following SCNT-ET.

  17. Aberrant Expression of MICO1 and MICO1OS in Deceased Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer Calves.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guan-Nan; Yang, Wen-Zhi; Xu, Da; Li, Dong-Jie; Zhang, Cui; Chen, Wei-Na; Li, Shi-Jie

    2017-04-06

    Incomplete reprogramming of a donor nucleus following somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) results in aberrant expression of developmentally important genes, and is the primary source of the phenotypic abnormalities observed in cloned animals. Expression of non-coding RNAs in the murine Dlk1-Dio3 imprinted domain was previously shown to correlate with the pluripotency of mouse induced pluripotent stem cells. In this study, we examined the transcription of the bovine orthologs from this locus, MICO1 (Maternal intergenic circadian oscillating 1) and MICO1OS (MICO1 opposite strand), in tissues from artificially inseminated and SCNT calves that died during the perinatal period. A single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), a T-to-C transition, was used to analyze the allelic transcription of MICO1. Our results indicate monoallelic expression of the MICO1 C allele among the six analyzed tissues (heart, liver, spleen, lung, kidney, and brain) of artificially inseminated calves, indicating that this gene locus may be imprinted in bovine. Conversely, we observed variable allelic transcription of MICO1 in SCNT calves. We asked if DNA methylation regulated the monoallelic expression of MICO1 and MICO1OS by evaluating the methylation levels of six regions within or around this locus in tissues with normal or aberrant MICO1 transcription; all of the samples from either artificially inseminated or SCNT calves exhibited hypermethylation, implying that DNA methylation may not be involved in regulating its monoallelic expression. Furthermore, three imprinted genes (GTL2, MEG9, and DIO3) nearby MICO1 showed monoallelic expression in SCNT calves with aberrant MICO1 transcription, indicating that not all of the genes in the bovine DLK1-DIO3 domain are mis-regulated. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  18. Establishment of paternal genomic imprinting in mouse prospermatogonia analyzed by nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Kamimura, Satoshi; Hatanaka, Yuki; Hirasawa, Ryutaro; Matsumoto, Kazuya; Oikawa, Mami; Lee, Jiyoung; Matoba, Shogo; Mizutani, Eiji; Ogonuki, Narumi; Inoue, Kimiko; Kohda, Takashi; Ishino, Fumitoshi; Ogura, Atsuo

    2014-11-01

    In mice, the establishment of paternal genomic imprinting in male germ cells starts at midgestation, as suggested by DNA methylation analyses of differentially methylated regions (DMRs). However, this information is based on averages from mixed populations of germ cells, and the DNA methylation pattern might not always provide a full representation of imprinting status. To obtain more detailed information on the establishment of paternal imprinting, single prospermatogonia at Embryonic Days 15.5 (E15.5), E16.5, and E17.5 and at Day 0.5 after birth were cloned using nuclear transfer; previous reports suggested that cloned embryos reflected the donor's genomic imprinting status. Then, the resultant fetuses (E9.5) were analyzed for the DNA methylation pattern of three paternal DMRs (IG-DMR, H19 DMR, and Rasgrf1 DMR) and the expression pattern of imprinted genes therein. The overall data indicated that establishment of genomic imprinting in all paternally imprinted regions was completed by E17.5, following a short intermediate period at E16.5. Furthermore, comparison between the methylation status of DMRs and the expression profiles of imprinted genes suggested that methylation of the IG-DMR, but not the H19 DMR, solely governed the control of its imprinted gene cluster. The Rasgrf1 DMR seemed to be imprinted later than the other two genes. We also found that the methylation status of the Gtl2 DMR, the secondary DMR that acquires DNA methylation after fertilization, was likely to follow the methylation status of the upstream IG-DMR. Thus, the systematic analyses of prospermatogonium-derived embryos provided additional important information on the establishment of paternal imprinting.

  19. Differential effects of culture and nuclear transfer on relative transcript levels of genes with key roles during preimplantation.

    PubMed

    Moreira, P N; Fernández-Gonzalez, R; Ramirez, M A; Pérez-Crespo, M; Rizos, D; Pintado, B; Gutiérrez-Adán, A

    2006-02-01

    It is well known that the preimplantation culture environment to which embryos are exposed influences the expression of developmentally important genes. Recently, it has been reported that MEMalpha, a culture medium commonly used for somatic cells, allows high rates of preimplantation development and development to term of mouse somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos. The objective of this study was to compare the differential effects of this medium and of the nuclear transfer procedure on the relative mRNA abundance of several genes with key roles during preimplantation. The relative mRNA levels of nine genes (Glut 1, Glut 5, G6PDH, Bax, Survivin, Gpx 1, Oct4, mTert and IGF2bp1) were quantified at blastocyst stage on cumulus cell cloned embryos cultured in MEMalpha, as well as on in vivo cultured and MEMalpha cultured controls. Only three of the nine transcripts analysed (Glut 5, Gpx 1 and Igf2bp1) were significantly down-regulated at blastocyst stage in in vitro produced controls. However, most genes analysed in our MEMalpha cultured cloned embryos showed altered transcription levels. Interestingly, between cloned and in vitro produced controls only the transcription levels measured for Glut 1 were significantly different. This result suggests that Glut 1 may be a good marker for embryo quality after cumulus cell nuclear transfer.

  20. Improving the development of early bovine somatic-cell nuclear transfer embryos by treating adult donor cells with vitamin C.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huanhuan; Zhang, Lei; Guo, Zekun; Wang, Yongsheng; He, Rongjun; Qin, Yumin; Quan, Fusheng; Zhang, Yong

    2015-11-01

    Vitamin C (Vc) has been widely studied in cell and embryo culture, and has recently been demonstrated to promote cellular reprogramming. The objective of this study was to identify a suitable Vc concentration that, when used to treat adult bovine fibroblasts serving as donor cells for nuclear transfer, improved donor-cell physiology and the developmental potential of the cloned embryos that the donor nuclei were used to create. A Vc concentration of 0.15 mM promoted cell proliferation and increased donor-cell 5-hydroxy methyl cytosine levels 2.73-fold (P < 0.05). The blastocyst rate was also significantly improved after nuclear transfer (39.6% treated vs. 26.0% control, P < 0.05); the average number of apoptotic cells in cloned blastocysts was significantly reduced (2.2 vs. 4.4, P < 0.05); and the inner cell mass-to-trophectoderm ratio (38.25% vs. 30.75%, P < 0.05) and expression of SOX2 (3.71-fold, P < 0.05) and POU5F1 (3.15-fold, P < 0.05) were significantly increased. These results suggested that Vc promotes cell proliferation, decreases DNA methylation levels in donor cells, and improves the developmental competence of bovine somatic-cell nuclear transfer embryos.

  1. Effects of trichostatin A on histone acetylation and methylation characteristics in early porcine embryos after somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Cong, Peiqing; Zhu, Kongju; Ji, Qianqian; Zhao, Haijing; Chen, Yaosheng

    2013-09-01

    Until now, the efficiency of animal cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has remained low. Efforts to improve cloning efficiency have demonstrated a positive role of trichostatin A (TSA), an inhibitor of deacetylases, on the development of nuclear transfer (NT) embryos in many species. Here, we report the effects of TSA on pre-implantation development of porcine NT embryos. Our results showed that treatment of reconstructed porcine embryos with 50 nmol/L TSA for 24 h after activation significantly improved the production of blastocysts (P < 0.05), while treating donor cells with the same solution resulted in increases in cleavage rates and blastomere numbers (P < 0.05). However, TSA treatment of both donor cells and SCNT embryos did not improve blastocyst production, nor did it increase blastomere numbers. Using indirect immunofluorescence, we found that TSA treatment of NT embryos could improve the reprogramming of histone acetylation at lysine 9 of histone 3 (H3K9) and affect nuclear swelling of transferred nuclei. However, no apparent effect of TSA treatment on H3K9 dimethylation (H3K9me2) was observed. These findings suggest a positive effect of TSA treatment (either treating NT embryos or donor cells) on the development of porcine NT embryos, which is achieved by improving epigenetic reprogramming.

  2. Conventional and Bimodal Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) Artificial Gravity Mars Transfer Vehicle Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borowski, Stanley K.; McCurdy, David R.; Packard, Thomas W.

    2016-01-01

    A variety of countermeasures have been developed to address the debilitating physiological effects of zero-gravity (0-g) experienced by cosmonauts and astronauts during their approximately 0.5 to 1.2 year long stays in low Earth orbit (LEO). Longer interplanetary flights, combined with possible prolonged stays in Mars orbit, could subject crewmembers to up to approximately 2.5 years of weightlessness. In view of known and recently diagnosed problems associated with 0-g, an artificial gravity (AG) spacecraft offers many advantages and may indeed be an enabling technology for human flights to Mars. A number of important human factors must be taken into account in selecting the rotation radius, rotation rate, and orientation of the habitation module or modules. These factors include the gravity gradient effect, radial and tangential Coriolis forces, along with cross-coupled acceleration effects. Artificial gravity Mars transfer vehicle (MTV) concepts are presented that utilize both conventional NTR, as well as, enhanced bimodal nuclear thermal rocket (BNTR) propulsion. The NTR is a proven technology that generates high thrust and has a specific impulse (Isp) capability of approximately 900 s-twice that of today's best chemical rockets. The AG/MTV concepts using conventional Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) carry twin cylindrical International Space Station (ISS)- type habitation modules with their long axes oriented either perpendicular or parallel to the longitudinal spin axis of the MTV and utilize photovoltaic arrays (PVAs) for spacecraft power. The twin habitat modules are connected to a central operations hub located at the front of the MTV via two pressurized tunnels that provide the rotation radius for the habitat modules. For the BNTR AG/MTV option, each engine has its own closed secondary helium(He)-xenon (Xe) gas loop and Brayton Rotating Unit (BRU) that can generate 10s of kilowatts (kWe) of spacecraft electrical power during the mission coast phase

  3. Prolonged interval between fusion and activation impairs embryonic development by inducing chromosome scattering and nuclear aneuploidy in pig somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    You, Jinyoung; Song, Kilyoung; Lee, Eunsong

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of various intervals between electrofusion and activation (FA interval) on the nuclear remodelling and development of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos in pigs. Reconstructed oocytes were activated at 0 (simultaneous fusion and activation; SFA), 1, 2 and 3 h (delayed activation) after electrofusion; these groups were designated as DA1, DA2 and DA3, respectively. When oocyte nuclear status was examined at 0.5, 1, 2 and 3 h after electrofusion, the incidence of chromosome scattering was increased (P < 0.01) as the FA interval was extended (0.0%, 12.0%, 77.3% and 78.0%, respectively). Extending the FA interval led to an increase (P < 0.01) in the percentage of oocytes containing multiple (>or=3) pseudopronuclei (PPN) (0.0% of SFA; 5.3% of DA1; 21.7% of DA2; and 33.5% of DA3). The development of SCNT embryos to the blastocyst stage was decreased (P < 0.05) in DA2 (5.7%) and DA3 (5.0%) compared with SFA (18.1%) and DA1 (19.5%). Our results demonstrate that extending the FA interval impairs the development of SCNT pig embryos by inducing chromosome scattering and the formation of multiple PPN, which may result in increased nuclear aneuploidy.

  4. Hybrid approach for including electronic and nuclear quantum effects in molecular dynamics simulations of hydrogen transfer reactions in enzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billeter, Salomon R.; Webb, Simon P.; Iordanov, Tzvetelin; Agarwal, Pratul K.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2001-04-01

    A hybrid approach for simulating proton and hydride transfer reactions in enzymes is presented. The electronic quantum effects are incorporated with an empirical valence bond approach. The nuclear quantum effects of the transferring hydrogen are included with a mixed quantum/classical molecular dynamics method in which the hydrogen nucleus is described as a multidimensional vibrational wave function. The free energy profiles are obtained as functions of a collective reaction coordinate. A perturbation formula is derived to incorporate the vibrationally adiabatic nuclear quantum effects into the free energy profiles. The dynamical effects are studied with the molecular dynamics with quantum transitions (MDQT) surface hopping method, which incorporates nonadiabatic transitions among the adiabatic hydrogen vibrational states. The MDQT method is combined with a reactive flux approach to calculate the transmission coefficient and to investigate the real-time dynamics of reactive trajectories. This hybrid approach includes nuclear quantum effects such as zero point energy, hydrogen tunneling, and excited vibrational states, as well as the dynamics of the complete enzyme and solvent. The nuclear quantum effects are incorporated during the generation of the free energy profiles and dynamical trajectories rather than subsequently added as corrections. Moreover, this methodology provides detailed mechanistic information at the molecular level and allows the calculation of rates and kinetic isotope effects. An initial application of this approach to the enzyme liver alcohol dehydrogenase is also presented.

  5. Interspecies hybridization and recombination in Saccharomyces wine yeasts.

    PubMed

    Sipiczki, Matthias

    2008-11-01

    The ascomycetous yeasts traditionally referred to as the Saccharomyces sensu stricto complex are a group of closely related species that are isolated by a postzygotic barrier. They can easily hybridize; and their allodiploid hybrids propagate by mitotic divisions as efficiently as the parental strains, but can barely divide by meiosis, and thus rarely produce viable spores (sterile interspecies hybrids). The postzygotic isolation is not effective in allotetraploids that are able to carry out meiosis and produce viable spores (fertile interspecies hybrids). By application of molecular identification methods, double (Saccharomyces cerevisiae x Saccharomyces uvarum and S. cerevisiae x Saccharomyces kudriavzevii) and triple (S. cerevisiae x S. uvarum x S. kudriavzevii) hybrids were recently identified in yeast populations of fermenting grape must and cider in geographically distinct regions. The genetic analysis of these isolates and laboratory-bred hybrids revealed great variability of hybrid genome structures and demonstrated that the alloploid genome of the zygote can undergo drastic changes during mitotic and meiotic divisions of the hybrid cells. This genome-stabilization process involves loss of chromosomes and genes and recombination between the partner genomes. This article briefly reviews the results of the analysis of interspecies hybrids, proposes a model for the mechanism of genome stabilization and highlights the potential of interspecies hybridization in winemaking.

  6. Development of Interspecies Correlation Models for Petroleum Hydrocarbons

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estimating the consequences of petroleum products to water column organisms has commonly been hampered by limited acute toxicity data, which exists only for a relatively small number of test species. In this study, we developed petroleum-specific Interspecies Correlation Estimati...

  7. Accuracy in the quantification of chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) and relayed nuclear Overhauser enhancement (rNOE) saturation transfer effects.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Yong; Wang, Feng; Li, Hua; Xu, Junzhong; Gochberg, Daniel F; Gore, John C; Zu, Zhongliang

    2017-03-08

    Accurate quantification of chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) effects, including dipole-dipole mediated relayed nuclear Overhauser enhancement (rNOE) saturation transfer, is important for applications and studies of molecular concentration and transfer rate (and thereby pH or temperature). Although several quantification methods, such as Lorentzian difference (LD) analysis, multiple-pool Lorentzian fits, and the three-point method, have been extensively used in several preclinical and clinical applications, the accuracy of these methods has not been evaluated. Here we simulated multiple-pool Z spectra containing the pools that contribute to the main CEST and rNOE saturation transfer signals in the brain, numerically fit them using the different methods, and then compared their derived CEST metrics with the known solute concentrations and exchange rates. Our results show that the LD analysis overestimates contributions from amide proton transfer (APT) and intermediate exchanging amine protons; the three-point method significantly underestimates both APT and rNOE saturation transfer at -3.5 ppm (NOE(-3.5)). The multiple-pool Lorentzian fit is more accurate than the other two methods, but only at lower irradiation powers (≤1 μT at 9.4 T) within the range of our simulations. At higher irradiation powers, this method is also inaccurate because of the presence of a fast exchanging CEST signal that has a non-Lorentzian lineshape. Quantitative parameters derived from in vivo images of rodent brain tumor obtained using an irradiation power of 1 μT were also compared. Our results demonstrate that all three quantification methods show similar contrasts between tumor and contralateral normal tissue for both APT and the NOE(-3.5). However, the quantified values of the three methods are significantly different. Our work provides insight into the fitting accuracy obtainable in a complex tissue model and provides guidelines for evaluating other newly developed

  8. Efficient production of omega-3 fatty acid desaturase (sFat-1)-transgenic pigs by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Pan, DengKe; Zhang, Li; Zhou, YanRong; Feng, Chong; Long, Chuan; Liu, Xiao; Wan, Rong; Zhang, Jian; Lin, AiXing; Dong, EnQiu; Wang, ShuChen; Xu, HouGang; Chen, HongXing

    2010-04-01

    Omega-3(omega-3) fatty acid desaturase transgenic pigs may improve carcass fatty acid composition. The use of transgenic pigs is also an excellent large animal model for studying the role of omega-3 fatty acids in the prevention and treatment of coronary heart disease and cancer. Transgenic pigs carrying synthesized fatty acid desaturase-1 gene (sFat-1) from Caenorhabditis briggsae by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) were produced for the first time in China. Porcine fetal fibroblast cells were transfected with a sFat-1 expression cassette by the liposome-mediated method. Transgenic embryos were reconstructed by nuclear transfer of positive cells into enucleated in vitro matured oocytes. A total of 1889 reconstructed embryos were transferred into 10 naturally cycling gilts. Nine early pregnancies were established, 7 of which went to term. Twenty-one piglets were born. The cloning efficiency was 1.1% (born piglets/transferred embryos). The integration of the sFat-1 gene was confirmed in 15 live cloned piglets by PCR and Southern blot except for 2 piglets. Expression of the sFat-1 gene in 12 of 13 piglets was detected with RT-PCR. The data demonstrates that an efficient system for sFat-1 transgenic cloned pigs was developed, which led to the successful production of piglets expressing the sFat-1 gene.

  9. Effective Oocyte Vitrification and Survival Techniques for Bovine Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer.

    PubMed

    Park, Min Jee; Lee, Seung Eun; Kim, Eun Young; Lee, Jun Beom; Jeong, Chang Jin; Park, Se Pill

    2015-06-01

    Bovine somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) using vitrified-thawed (VT) oocytes has been studied; however, the cloning efficiency of these oocytes is not comparable with that of nonvitrified (non-V) fresh oocytes. This study sought to optimize the survival and cryopreservation of VT oocytes for SCNT. Co-culture with feeder cells that had been preincubated for 15 h significantly improved the survival of VT oocytes and their in vitro developmental potential following SCNT in comparison to co-culture with feeder cells that had been preincubated for 2, 5, or 24 h (p<0.05). Spindle assessment via the Oosight Microscopy Imaging System and microtubule staining revealed that vitrified metaphase II oocytes (VT group) were not suitable for SCNT. However, enucleating and/or activating oocytes prior to freezing enhanced their developmental potential and suitability for SCNT. The cloning efficiency of the enucleated-activated-vitrified-thawed (EAVT) group (21.6%) was better than that of the other vitrification groups [enucleated-vitrified-thawed (EVT) group, 13.7%; VT group, 15.0%; p<0.05] and was comparable with that of the non-V group (25.9%). The reactive oxygen species level was significantly lower in the EAVT group than in the other vitrification groups (p<0.05). mRNA levels of maternal genes (ZAR1, BMP15, and NLRP5) and a stress gene (HSF1) were lower in the vitrification groups than in the non-V group (p<0.05), whereas the level of phospho-p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase did not differ among the groups. Among the vitrification groups, blastocysts in the EAVT group had the best developmental potential, as judged by their high mRNA expression of developmental potential-related genes (POU5f1, Interferon-tau, and SLC2A5) and their low expression of proapoptotic (CASP3) and stress (Hsp70) genes. This study demonstrates that SCNT using bovine frozen-thawed oocytes can be successfully achieved using optimized vitrification and co-culture techniques.

  10. Defined media optimization for in vitro culture of bovine somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Jun; Xiong, Xian-Rong; Zhang, Hui; Li, Yan-Yan; Li, Qian; Wang, Yong-Sheng; Xu, Wen-Bing; Hua, Song; Zhang, Yong

    2012-12-01

    The objective was to establish an efficient defined culture medium for bovine somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos. In this study, modified synthetic oviductal fluid (mSOF) without bovine serum albumin (BSA) was used as the basic culture medium (BCM), whereas the control medium was BCM with BSA. In Experiment 1, adding polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) to BCM supported development of SCNT embryos to blastocyst stage, but blastocyst formation rate and blastocyst cell number were both lower (P < 0.05) compared to the undefined group (6.1 vs. 32.6% and 67.3 ± 3.4 vs. 109.3 ± 4.5, respectively). In Experiment 2, myo-inositol, a combination of insulin, transferrin and selenium (ITS), and epidermal growth factor (EGF) were added separately to PVA-supplemented BCM. The blastocyst formation rate and blastocyst cell number of those three groups were dramatically improved compared with that of PVA-supplemented group in Experiment 1 (18.5, 23.0, 24.1 vs. 6.1% and 82.7 ± 2.0, 84.3 ± 4.2, 95.3 ± 3.8 vs. 67.3 ± 3.4, respectively, P < 0.05), but were still lower compared with that of undefined group (33.7% and 113.8 ± 3.4, P < 0.05). In Experiment 3, when a combination of myo-inositol, ITS and EGF were added to PVA-supplemented BCM, blastocyst formation rate and blastocyst cell number were similar to that of undefined group (30.4 vs. 31.1% and 109.3 ± 4.4 vs. 112.0 ± 3.6, P > 0.05). In Experiment 4, when blastocysts were cryopreserved and subsequently thawed, there were no significant differences between the optimized defined group (Experiment 3) and undefined group in survival rate and 24 and 48 h hatching blastocyst rates. Furthermore, there were no significant differences in expression levels of H19, HSP70 and BAX in blastocysts derived from optimized defined medium and undefined medium, although the relative expression abundance of IGF-2 was significantly decreased in the former. In conclusion, a defined culture medium containing PVA, myo-inositol, ITS, and EGF

  11. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Activity Is Not Essential for the First Step of Nuclear Reprogramming in Bovine Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer.

    PubMed

    Tani, Tetsuya; Kato, Yoko

    2017-03-07

    For reprogramming a somatic nucleus during mammalian cloning, metaphase of the second meiotic division (MII) oocytes has been widely used as recipient cytoplasm. High activity of maturation-promoting factor (MPF) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) is believed to accelerate the remodeling and/or reprogramming of a somatic nucleus introduced into the ooplasm by somatic cell nuclear transfer. We demonstrated previously that the first step in nuclear reprogramming is not directly regulated by MPF and MAPK because activated oocytes in which MPF activity is diminished and MAPK activity is maintained can develop to the blastocyst stage after receiving an M phase somatic nucleus in bovine cloning. In this study, our aim was to test whether MAPK activity is necessary for the first step in nuclear reprogramming and/or chromatin remodeling (phosphorylation of histone H3 at Ser3, trimethylation of histone H3 at Lys 9, and acetylation of histone H3 at Lys14) in bovine somatic cloning. We found that it was not necessary, and neither was MPF activity.

  12. Nuclear transfer nTreg model reveals fate-determining TCR-β and novel peripheral nTreg precursors.

    PubMed

    Ku, Manching; Chang, Shih-En; Hernandez, Julio; Abadejos, Justin R; Sabouri-Ghomi, Mohsen; Muenchmeier, Niklas J; Schwarz, Anna; Valencia, Anna M; Kirak, Oktay

    2016-04-19

    To study the development and function of "natural-arising" T regulatory (nTreg) cells, we developed a novel nTreg model on pure nonobese diabetic background using epigenetic reprogramming via somatic cell nuclear transfer. On RAG1-deficient background, we found that monoclonal FoxP3(+)CD4(+)Treg cells developed in the thymus in the absence of other T cells. Adoptive transfer experiments revealed that the thymic niche is not a limiting factor in nTreg development. In addition, we showed that the T-cell receptor (TCR) β-chain of our nTreg model was not only sufficient to bias T-cell development toward the CD4 lineage, but we also demonstrated that this TCR β-chain was able to provide stronger TCR signals. This TCR-β-driven mechanism would thus unify former per se contradicting hypotheses of TCR-dependent and -independent nTreg development. Strikingly, peripheral FoxP3(-)CD4(+)T cells expressing the same TCR as this somatic cell nuclear transfer nTreg model had a reduced capability to differentiate into Th1 cells but were poised to differentiate better into induced nTreg cells, both in vitro and in vivo, representing a novel peripheral precursor subset of nTreg cells to which we refer to as pre-nTreg cells.

  13. Production of hGFAP-DsRed transgenic Guangxi Bama mini-pigs via somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Hu, L L; Lu, Y Q; Xu, H Y; Yang, X G; Lu, S S; Lu, K H

    2015-12-08

    The mini-pig is a useful animal model for human biomedical research due to its physiological similarity to humans and the ease of handling. In order to optimize the efficiency of production of transgenic Bama mini-pigs through somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), we examined the effects of contact inhibition, roscovitine treatment, and serum starvation on the cell cycle synchronization and transgenic cloned embryo development in vivo and in vitro after nuclear transfer. The analysis showed that the rates of G0/G1 stage cells in the contact inhibition (92.11%) and roscovitine treatment groups (89.59%) were significantly higher than in serum starvation group (80.82%). A higher rate of apoptosis was seen in the serum starvation group (14.13%) compared to the contact inhibition and roscovitine treatment groups (6.71 and 2.46% respectively, P < 0.05). There was a significant decrease in blastocyst yield in the serum starvation group (14.19%) compared to the roscovitine treatment and contact inhibition groups (21.31 and 20.32% respectively, P < 0.05). A total of 1070 transgenic cloned embryos derived from the three treatment groups were transferred to surrogate sows; one pregnancy was established and three embryos from the roscovitine treatment group successfully completed gestation. These results indicate that the roscovitine treatment was more effective at synchronizing transgenic kidney cells in Bama mini-pigs and allowed reconstructed embryos to develop to full term.

  14. Sensors and nuclear power. Report by the Technology Transfer Sensors Task Team

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-06-01

    The existing sensor systems for the basic process parameters in nuclear power plant operation have limitations with respect to accuracy, ease of maintenance and signal processing. These limitations comprise the economy of nuclear power generation. To reduce the costs and improve performance of nuclear power plant fabrication, operation, maintenance and repair we need to advance the sensor technology being applied in the nuclear industry. The economic viability and public acceptance of nuclear power will depend on how well we direct and apply technological advances to the industry. This report was prepared by a team with members representing a wide range of the nuclear industry embracing the university programs, national laboratories, architect engineers and reactor manufacturers. An intensive effort was made to survey current sensor technology, evaluate future trends and determine development needs. This included literature surveys, visits with utilities, universities, laboratories and organizations outside the nuclear industry. Several conferences were attended to take advantage of the access to experts in selected topics and to obtain opinions. Numerous telephone contacts and exchanges by mail supplemented the above efforts. Finally, the broad technical depth of the team members provided the basis for the stimulating working sessions during which this report was organized and drafted.

  15. Fates of donor and recipient mitochondrial DNA during generation of interspecies SCNT-derived human ES-like cells.

    PubMed

    Sha, Hong-ying; Chen, Jing-quan; Chen, Juan; Zhang, Peng-yue; Wang, Pu; Chen, Lu-ping; Cheng, Guo-xiang; Zhu, Jian-hong

    2009-12-01

    To investigate nuclear donor and cytoplast recipient mitochondria fate and their effects on generation of interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer (iSCNT)-derived human embryonic stem (ES)-like cells, iSCNT embryos were reconstructed between enucleated goat oocytes and human neural stem cells (hNSCs). A total of 10.74% cleaved embryos (13/121) developed to blastocyst stage. One typical primary ES-like (tpES-like) colony and two nontypical primary ES-like (non-tpES-like) colonies designated as non-tpES-like cell-1 and non-tpES-like cell-2, respectively, were obtained from the inner cell masses of iSCNT blastocysts. The tpES-like cells expressed ESC markers. Both human and goat mtDNA could be detected in the embryos at 2-8-, 16-32-cell, and blastocyst stages, and in tpES-like colony and two non-tpES-like colonies. Human mtDNA copies per cell from embryos at two- to eight-cell stage to the three colonies maintain almost its original level, whereas 2.88 x 10(5) goat mtDNA copies per oocyte decreased to 10.8 copies per tpES-like cell, 493 copies per non-tpES-like cell-1, and 77.6 copies per non-tpES-like cell-2, resulting in 43.75% (8.4/19.2), 1.24% (6.2/499), and 14.63% (13.3/90.9) mtDNA content in tpES-like cell, non-tpES-like cell-1, and non-tpES-like cell-2 was that of nuclear donor, respectively. Human-specific Tfam and Polg mRNA could be detected in cells of the three colonies. However, tpES-like colony failed to be passaged. The mRNA level of CoxIV encoded by nuclear donor in tpES-like cell was higher than that in non-tpES-like cell, but significantly lower than that of human ESC, suggesting proper nuclear-cytoplasmic communication would not be established in tpES-like cells. Thus, the data suggest that (1) goat oocytes could reprogram human neural stem cells (hNSCs) into embryonic state and further support the inner cell mass (ICM) of iSCNT blastocyst to form tpES-like colony; (2) nuclear donor mtDNA could be replicated and maintain its original level during

  16. Control of interspecies electron flow during anaerobic digestion: role of floc formation in syntrophic methanogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Thiele, J.H.; Chartrain, M.; Zeikus, J.G.

    1988-01-01

    The flora of an anaerobic whey-processing chemostat was separated by anaerobic sedimentation techniques into a free-living bacterial fraction and a bacterial floc fraction. The floc fraction constituted a major part (i.e., 57% total protein) of the total microbial population in the digestor, and it accounted for 87% of the total CO/sub 2/-dependent methanogenic activity and 76% of the total ethanol-consuming acetogenic activity. Lactose was degraded by both cellular fractions, but in the free flora fraction it was associated with higher intermediary levels of H/sub 2/, ethanol, butyrate, and propionate production. Electron microscopic analysis of flocs showed bacterial diversity and juxtapositioning of tentative Desulfovibrio and Methanobacterium species without significant microcolony formation. Ethanol, an intermediary product of lactose-hydrolyzing bacteria, was converted to acetate and methane within the flocs by interspecies electron transfer. Ethanol-dependent methane formation was compartmentalized and closely coupled kinetically within the flocs but without significant formation of H/sub 2/ gas. Physical disruption of flocs into fragments of 10- to 20-..mu..m diameter initially increased the H/sub 2/ partial pressure but did not change the carbon transformation kinetic patterns of ethanol metabolism or demonstrate a significant role for H/sub 2/ in CO/sub 2/ reduction to methane. The data demonstrate that floc formation in a whey-processing anaerobic digestor functions in juxtapositioning cells for interspecies electron transfer during syntrophic ethanol conversion into acetate and methane but by a mechanism which was independent of the available dissolved H/sub 2/ gas pool in the ecosystem.

  17. Explaining dehumanization among children: the interspecies model of prejudice.

    PubMed

    Costello, Kimberly; Hodson, Gordon

    2014-03-01

    Although many theoretical approaches have emerged to explain prejudices expressed by children, none incorporate outgroup dehumanization, a key predictor of prejudice among adults. According to the Interspecies Model of Prejudice, beliefs in the human-animal divide facilitate outgroup prejudice through fostering animalistic dehumanization (Costello & Hodson, 2010). In the present investigation, White children attributed Black children fewer 'uniquely human' characteristics, representing the first systematic evidence of racial dehumanization among children (Studies 1 and 2). In Study 2, path analyses supported the Interspecies Model of Prejudice: children's human-animal divide beliefs predicted greater racial prejudice, an effect explained by heightened racial dehumanization. Similar patterns emerged among parents. Furthermore, parent Social Dominance Orientation predicted child prejudice indirectly through children's endorsement of a hierarchical human-animal divide and subsequent dehumanizing tendencies. Encouragingly, children's human-animal divide perceptions were malleable to an experimental prime highlighting animal-human similarity. Implications for prejudice interventions are considered.

  18. Thermal expansion of UO2+x nuclear fuel rods from a model coupling heat transfer and oxygen diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Mihaila, Bogden; Zubelewicz, Aleksander; Stan, Marius; Ramirez, Juan

    2008-01-01

    We study the thermal expansion of UO{sub 2+x} nuclear fuel rod in the context of a model coupling heat transfer and oxygen diffusion discussed previously by J.C. Ramirez, M. Stan and P. Cristea [J. Nucl. Mat. 359 (2006) 174]. We report results of simulations performed for steady-state and time-dependent regimes in one-dimensional configurations. A variety of initial- and boundary-value scenarios are considered. We use material properties obtained from previously published correlations or from analysis of previously published data. All simulations were performed using the commercial code COMSOL Multiphysics{sup TM} and are readily extendable to include multidimensional effects.

  19. Nuclear spectroscopy study of the isotopes populated via multinucleon transfer in the 90Zr + 208Pb reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Ur, C. A.; Corradi, L.; Stefanini, A. M.; Behera, B. R.; Fioretto, E.; Gadea, A.; Latina, A.; Szilner, S.; Beghini, S.; Farnea, E.; Montagnoli, G.; Scarlassara, F.; Haas, F.; Pollarolo, G.

    2006-08-14

    The present work takes advantage of the multinucleon transfer mechanism between heavy reaction partners to study the population pattern of excited nuclear states in near spherical Zirconium isotopes following the 90Zr + 208Pb reaction at an energy closed to the Coulomb barrier. Both the projectile and the target are well known closed shell nuclei offering an optimum situation for clean experimental and theoretical conditions. Total kinetic energy loss (TKEL) distributions were compared with calculations performed with the GRAZING code. The ability to use the TKEL as a selection tool for the states at different excitation energies was shown.

  20. Summarizing lecture: factors influencing enzymatic H-transfers, analysis of nuclear tunnelling isotope effects and thermodynamic versus specific effects.

    PubMed

    Marcus, R A

    2006-08-29

    In the articles in this Discussion, a wide variety of topics are treated, including reorganization energy, initially introduced for electron transfers ('environmentally assisted tunnelling'), nuclear tunnelling, H/D and 12C/13C kinetic isotope effects (KIEs), the effect of changes of distal and nearby amino acid residues using site-directed mutagenesis, and dynamics versus statistical effects. A coordinate-free form of semi-classical theory is used to examine topics on data such as tunnelling versus 'over-the-barrier' paths and temperature and pressure effects on KIEs. The multidimensional semi-classical theory includes classically allowed and classically forbidden transitions. More generally, we address the question of relating kinetic to thermodynamic factors, as in the electron transfer field, so learning about specific versus thermodynamic effects in enzyme catalysis and KIEs.

  1. Radiation heat transfer calculations for the uranium fuel-containment region of the nuclear light bulb engine.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodgers, R. J.; Latham, T. S.; Krascella, N. L.

    1971-01-01

    Calculation results are reviewed of the radiant heat transfer characteristics in the fuel and buffer gas regions of a nuclear light bulb engine based on the transfer of energy by thermal radiation from gaseous uranium fuel in a neon vortex, through an internally cooled transparent wall, to seeded hydrogen propellant. The results indicate that the fraction of UV energy incident on the transparent walls increases with increasing power level. For the reference engine power level of 4600 megw, it is necessary to employ space radiators to reject the UV radiated energy absorbed by the transparent walls. This UV energy can be blocked by employing nitric oxide and oxygen seed gases in the fuel and buffer gas regions. However, this results in increased UV absorption in the buffer gas which also requires space radiators to reject the heat load.

  2. H3.3 replacement facilitates epigenetic reprogramming of donor nuclei in somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos.

    PubMed

    Wen, Duancheng; Banaszynski, Laura A; Rosenwaks, Zev; Allis, C David; Rafii, Shahin

    2014-01-01

    Transfer of a somatic nucleus into an enucleated oocyte is the most efficient approach for somatic cell reprogramming. While this process is known to involve extensive chromatin remodeling of the donor nucleus, the maternal factors responsible and the underlying chromatin-based mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here we discuss our recent findings demonstrating that the histone variant H3.3 plays an essential role in reprogramming and is required for reactivation of key pluripotency genes in somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos. Maternal-derived H3.3 replaces H3 in the donor nucleus shortly after oocyte activation, with the amount of replacement directly related to the differentiation status of the donor nucleus in SCNT embryos. We provide additional evidence to suggest that de novo synthesized H3.3 replaces histone H3 carrying repressive modifications in the donor nuclei of SCNT embryos, and hypothesize that replacement may occur at specific loci that must be reprogrammed for gene reactivation.

  3. Summarizing lecture: factors influencing enzymatic H-transfers, analysis of nuclear tunnelling isotope effects and thermodynamic versus specific effects

    PubMed Central

    Marcus, R.A

    2006-01-01

    In the articles in this Discussion, a wide variety of topics are treated, including reorganization energy, initially introduced for electron transfers (‘environmentally assisted tunnelling’), nuclear tunnelling, H/D and C12/C13 kinetic isotope effects (KIEs), the effect of changes of distal and nearby amino acid residues using site-directed mutagenesis, and dynamics versus statistical effects. A coordinate-free form of semi-classical theory is used to examine topics on data such as tunnelling versus ‘over-the-barrier’ paths and temperature and pressure effects on KIEs. The multidimensional semi-classical theory includes classically allowed and classically forbidden transitions. More generally, we address the question of relating kinetic to thermodynamic factors, as in the electron transfer field, so learning about specific versus thermodynamic effects in enzyme catalysis and KIEs. PMID:16873131

  4. Cross-species transferability of eastern white pine (Pinus strobus) nuclear microsatellite markers to five Mexican white pines.

    PubMed

    Villalobos-Arámbula, A R; Pérez de la Rosa, J A; Arias, A; Rajora, O P

    2014-09-12

    We examined cross-species transferability and usefulness of six nuclear microsatellite markers developed in consubgeneric eastern white pine (Pinus strobus) with regard to ecologically and commercially important Mexican white pine species of conservation genetics concern: Pinus chiapensis (Mart.) Andresen, P. flexilis James, P. strobiformis Engelm., P. ayacahuite Ehrenb. Ex Schltdl, and P. ayacahuite var. veitchii (Roezl) G.R. Shaw. Four to six microsatellite loci were found to be polymorphic in different species, with moderate to high informativeness in a relatively small number of samples (PIC/HE=0.25-0.93). This successful transfer sidesteps the time- and resource-consuming development of species-specific microsatellite markers, and will facilitate population and conservation genetic studies and genetic resource management of the less studied Mexican white pines.

  5. Conventional and Bimodal Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) Artificial Gravity Mars Transfer Vehicle Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borowski, Stanley K.; McCurdy, David R.; Packard, Thomas W.

    2014-01-01

    A variety of countermeasures have been developed to address the debilitating physiological effects of "zero-gravity" (0-g) experienced by cosmonauts and astronauts during their approximately 0.5-1.2 year long stays in LEO (Low Earth Orbit). Longer interplanetary flights, combined with possible prolonged stays in Mars orbit, could subject crewmembers to up to approximately 2.5 years of weightlessness. In view of known and recently diagnosed problems associated with 0-g, an artificial gravity spacecraft offers many advantages and may indeed be an enabling technology for human flights to Mars. A number of important human factors must be taken into account in selecting the rotation radius, rotation rate, and orientation of the habitation module or modules. These factors include the gravity gradient effect, radial and tangential Coriolis forces, along with cross-coupled acceleration effects. Artificial gravity (AG) Mars transfer vehicle (MTV) concepts are presented that utilize both conventional NTR, as well as, enhanced "bimodal" nuclear thermal rocket (BNTR) propulsion. The NTR is a proven technology that generates high thrust and has a specific impulse (I (sub sp)) capability of approximately 900 s - twice that of today's best chemical rockets. The AG/MTV concepts using conventional NTP carry twin cylindrical "ISS-type" habitation modules with their long axes oriented either perpendicular or parallel to the longitudinal spin axis of the MTV and utilize photovoltaic arrays (PVAs) for spacecraft power. The twin habitat modules are connected to a central operations hub located at the front of the MTV via two pressurized tunnels that provide the rotation radius for the habitat modules. For the BNTR AG/MTV option, each engine has its own "closed" secondary helium-xenon gas loop and Brayton rotating unit that can generate tens of kilowatts (kW (sub e)) of spacecraft electrical power during the mission coast phase eliminating the need for large PVAs. A single inflatable

  6. Mechanisms Underlying Mammalian Hybrid Sterility in Two Feline Interspecies Models

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Brian W.; Seabury, Christopher M.; Brashear, Wesley A.; Li, Gang; Roelke-Parker, Melody; Murphy, William J.

    2015-01-01

    The phenomenon of male sterility in interspecies hybrids has been observed for over a century, however, few genes influencing this recurrent phenotype have been identified. Genetic investigations have been primarily limited to a small number of model organisms, thus limiting our understanding of the underlying molecular basis of this well-documented “rule of speciation.” We utilized two interspecies hybrid cat breeds in a genome-wide association study employing the Illumina 63 K single-nucleotide polymorphism array. Collectively, we identified eight autosomal genes/gene regions underlying associations with hybrid male sterility (HMS) involved in the function of the blood-testis barrier, gamete structural development, and transcriptional regulation. We also identified several candidate hybrid sterility regions on the X chromosome, with most residing in close proximity to complex duplicated regions. Differential gene expression analyses revealed significant chromosome-wide upregulation of X chromosome transcripts in testes of sterile hybrids, which were enriched for genes involved in chromatin regulation of gene expression. Our expression results parallel those reported in Mus hybrids, supporting the “Large X-Effect” in mammalian HMS and the potential epigenetic basis for this phenomenon. These results support the value of the interspecies feline model as a powerful tool for comparison to rodent models of HMS, demonstrating unique aspects and potential commonalities that underpin mammalian reproductive isolation. PMID:26006188

  7. Natural interspecies recombinant bovine/porcine enterovirus in sheep.

    PubMed

    Boros, Akos; Pankovics, Péter; Knowles, Nick J; Reuter, Gábor

    2012-09-01

    Members of the genus Enterovirus (family Picornaviridae) are believed to be common and widespread among humans and different animal species, although only a few enteroviruses have been identified from animal sources. Intraspecies recombination among human enteroviruses is a well-known phenomenon, but only a few interspecies examples have been reported and, to our current knowledge, none of these have involved non-primate enteroviruses. In this study, we report the detection and complete genome characterization (using RT-PCR and long-range PCR) of a natural interspecies recombinant bovine/porcine enterovirus (ovine enterovirus type 1; OEV-1) in seven (44 %) of 16 faecal samples from 3-week-old domestic sheep (Ovis aries) collected in two consecutive years. Phylogenetic analysis of the complete coding region revealed that OEV-1 (ovine/TB4-OEV/2009/HUN; GenBank accession no. JQ277724) was a novel member of the species Porcine enterovirus B (PEV-B), implying the endemic presence of PEV-B viruses among sheep. However, the 5' UTR of OEV-1 showed a high degree of sequence and structural identity to bovine enteroviruses. The presumed recombination breakpoint was mapped to the end of the 5' UTR at nucleotide position 814 using sequence and SimPlot analyses. The interspecies-recombinant nature of OEV-1 suggests a closer relationship among bovine and porcine enteroviruses, enabling the exchange of at least some modular genetic elements that may evolve independently.

  8. Mechanisms Underlying Mammalian Hybrid Sterility in Two Feline Interspecies Models.

    PubMed

    Davis, Brian W; Seabury, Christopher M; Brashear, Wesley A; Li, Gang; Roelke-Parker, Melody; Murphy, William J

    2015-10-01

    The phenomenon of male sterility in interspecies hybrids has been observed for over a century, however, few genes influencing this recurrent phenotype have been identified. Genetic investigations have been primarily limited to a small number of model organisms, thus limiting our understanding of the underlying molecular basis of this well-documented "rule of speciation." We utilized two interspecies hybrid cat breeds in a genome-wide association study employing the Illumina 63 K single-nucleotide polymorphism array. Collectively, we identified eight autosomal genes/gene regions underlying associations with hybrid male sterility (HMS) involved in the function of the blood-testis barrier, gamete structural development, and transcriptional regulation. We also identified several candidate hybrid sterility regions on the X chromosome, with most residing in close proximity to complex duplicated regions. Differential gene expression analyses revealed significant chromosome-wide upregulation of X chromosome transcripts in testes of sterile hybrids, which were enriched for genes involved in chromatin regulation of gene expression. Our expression results parallel those reported in Mus hybrids, supporting the "Large X-Effect" in mammalian HMS and the potential epigenetic basis for this phenomenon. These results support the value of the interspecies feline model as a powerful tool for comparison to rodent models of HMS, demonstrating unique aspects and potential commonalities that underpin mammalian reproductive isolation.

  9. CFD Simulations of a Flow Mixing and Heat Transfer Enhancement in an Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    In, Wang-Kee; Chun, Tae-Hyun; Shin, Chang-Hwan; Oh, Dong-Seok

    2007-07-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis has been performed to investigate a flow-mixing and heat-transfer enhancement caused by a mixing-vane spacer in a LWR fuel assembly which is a rod bundle. This paper presents the CFD simulations of a flow mixing and heat transfer in a fully heated 5x5 array of a rod bundle with a split-vane and hybrid-vane spacer. The CFD prediction at a low Reynolds number of 42,000 showed a reasonably good agreement of the initial heat transfer enhancement with the measured one for a partially heated experiment using a similar spacer structure. The CFD simulation also predicted the decay rate of a normalized Nusselt number downstream of the split-vane spacer which agrees fairly well with those of the experiment and the correlation. The CFD calculations for the split vane and hybrid vane at the LWR operating conditions(Re = 500,000) predicted hot fuel spots in a streaky structure downstream of the spacer, which occurs due to the secondary flow occurring in an opposite direction near the fuel rod. However, the split-vane and hybrid-vane spacers are predicted to significantly enhance the overall heat transfer of a LWR nuclear fuel assembly. (authors)

  10. Cloned calves derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos cultured in chemically defined medium or modified synthetic oviduct fluid.

    PubMed

    Jang, Goo; Hong, So Gun; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2011-03-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is considered to be a critical tool for propagating valuable animals. To determine the productivity calves resulting from embryos derived with different culture media, enucleated oocytes matured in vitro were reconstructed with fetal fibroblasts, fused, and activated. The cloned embryos were cultured in modified synthetic oviduct fluid (mSOF) or a chemically defined medium (CDM) and developmental competence was monitored. After 7 days of culturing, the blastocysts were transferred into the uterine horn of estrus-synchronized recipients. SCNT embryos that were cultured in mSOF or CDM developed to the blastocysts stages at similar rates (26.6% vs. 22.5%, respectively). A total of 67 preimplantational stage embryos were transferred into 34 recipients and six cloned calves were born by caesarean section, or assisted or natural delivery. Survival of transferred blastocysts to live cloned calves in the mSOF and the CDM was 18.5% (to recipients), 9.6% (to blastocysts) and 42.9% (to recipients), 20.0% (to blastocysts), respectively. DNA analysis showed that all cloned calves were genetically identical to the donor cells. These results demonstrate that SCNT embryos cultured in CDM showed higher viability as judged by survival of the calves that came to term compared to blastocysts derived from mSOF cultures.

  11. Engineering design elements of a two-phase thermosyphon to transfer nuclear thermal energy to a hydrogen plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabharwall, Piyush

    Two hydrogen production processes, both powered by Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), are currently under investigation at the Idaho National Laboratory. The first is high-temperature steam electrolysis utilizing both heat and electricity and the second is thermo-chemical production through the sulfur-iodine process primarily utilizing heat. Both processes require high temperature (>850°C) for enhanced efficiency; temperatures indicative of NGNP. Safety and licensing mandates prudently dictate that the NGNP and the hydrogen production facility be physically isolated, perhaps requiring separation of over 100m. There are several options to transferring multi-megawatt thermal power over such a distance. One option is simply to produce only electricity, transfer by wire to the hydrogen plant, and then reconvert the electric energy to heat via Joule or induction heating. Electrical transport, however, suffers energy losses of 60-70% due to the thermal to electric conversion inherent in the Brayton cycle. A second option is thermal energy transport via a single-phase forced convection loop where a fluid is mechanically pumped between heat exchangers at the nuclear and hydrogen plants. High temperatures, however, present unique materials and pumping challenges. Single phase, low pressure helium is an attractive option for NGNP, but is not suitable for a single purpose facility dictated to hydrogen production because low pressure helium requires higher pumping power and makes the process very inefficient. A third option is two-phase heat transfer utilizing a high temperature thermosyphon. Heat transport occurs via evaporation and condensation, and the heat transport fluid is re-circulated by gravitational force. Thermosyphon has the capability to transport heat at high rates over appreciable distances, virtually isothermally and without any requirement for external pumping devices. For process heat, intermediate heat exchangers (IHX) are desired to transfer heat from

  12. Interspecies comparative genome hybridization and interspecies representational difference analysis reveal gross DNA differences between humans and great apes.

    PubMed

    Toder, R; Xia, Y; Bausch, E

    1998-09-01

    Comparative chromosome G-/R-banding, comparative gene mapping and chromosome painting techniques have demonstrated that only few chromosomal rearrangements occurred during great ape and human evolution. Interspecies comparative genome hybridization (CGH), used here in this study, between human, gorilla and pygmy chimpanzee revealed species-specific regions in all three species. In contrast to the human, a far more complex distribution of species-specific blocks was detected with CGH in gorilla and pygmy chimpanzee. Most of these blocks coincide with already described heterochromatic regions on gorilla and chimpanzee chromosomes. Representational difference analysis (RDA) was used to subtract the complex genome of gorilla against human in order to enrich gorilla-specific DNA sequences. Gorilla-specific clones isolated with this technique revealed a 32-bp repeat unit. These clones were mapped by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to the telomeric regions of gorilla chromosomes that had been shown by interspecies CGH to contain species-specific sequences.

  13. Effect of histone acetylation modification with MGCD0103, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, on nuclear reprogramming and the developmental competence of porcine somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos.

    PubMed

    Jin, Long; Zhu, Hai-Ying; Guo, Qing; Li, Xiao-Chen; Zhang, Yu-Chen; Cui, Cheng-Du; Li, Wen-Xue; Cui, Zheng-Yun; Yin, Xi-Jun; Kang, Jin-Dan

    2017-01-01

    Cloning remains as an important technique to enhance the reconstitution and distribution of animal population with high-genetic merit. One of the major detrimental factors of this technique is the abnormal epigenetic modifications. MGCD0103 is known as a histone deacetylase inhibitor. In this study, we investigated the effect of MGCD0103 on the in vitro blastocyst formation rate in porcine somatic cell nuclear transferred (SCNT) embryos and expression in acetylation of the histone H3 lysine 9 and histone H4 lysine 12. We compared the in vitro embryonic development of SCNT embryos treated with different concentrations of MGCD0103 for 24 hours. Our results reported that treating with 0.2-μM MGCD0103 for 24 hours effectively improved the development of SCNT embryos, in comparison to the control group (blastocyst formation rate, 25.5 vs. 10.7%, P < 0.05). Then we tested the in vitro development of SCNT embryos treated with 0.2-μM MGCD0103 for various intervals after activation. Treatment for 6 hours significantly improved the development of pig SCNT embryos, compared with the control group (blastocyst formation rate, 21.2 vs. 10.5%, P < 0.05). Furthermore, MGCD0103 supplementation significantly (P < 0.05) increases the average fluorescence intensity of AcH3K9 and AcH4K12 in embryos at the pseudo-pronuclear stage. To examine the in vivo development, MGCD0103-treated SCNT embryos were transferred into two surrogate sows, one of whom became pregnant and three fetuses developed. These results suggest that MGCD0103 can enhance the nuclear reprogramming and improve in vitro developmental potential of porcine SCNT embryos.

  14. Robotics and nuclear power. Report by the Technology Transfer Robotics Task Team

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-06-01

    A task team was formed at the request of the Department of Energy to evaluate and assess technology development needed for advanced robotics in the nuclear industry. The mission of these technologies is to provide the nuclear industry with the support for the application of advanced robotics to reduce nuclear power generating costs and enhance the safety of the personnel in the industry. The investigation included robotic and teleoperated systems. A robotic system is defined as a reprogrammable, multifunctional manipulator designed to move materials, parts, tools, or specialized devices through variable programmed motions for the performance of a variety of tasks. A teleoperated system includes an operator who remotely controls the system by direct viewing or through a vision system.

  15. Mitochondria and the success of somatic cell nuclear transfer cloning: from nuclear-mitochondrial interactions to mitochondrial complementation and mitochondrial DNA recombination.

    PubMed

    Hiendleder, Stefan; Zakhartchenko, Valeri; Wolf, Eckhard

    2005-01-01

    The overall success of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) cloning is rather unsatisfactory, both in terms of efficacy and from an animal health and welfare point of view. Most research activities have concentrated on epigenetic reprogramming problems as one major cause of SCNT failure. The present review addresses the limited success of mammalian SCNT from yet another viewpoint, the mitochondrial perspective. Mitochondria have a broad range of critical functions in cellular energy supply, cell signalling and programmed cell death and, thus, affect embryonic and fetal development, suggesting that inadequate or perturbed mitochondrial functions may adversely affect SCNT success. A survey of perinatal clinical data from human subjects with deficient mitochondrial respiratory chain activity has revealed a plethora of phenotypes that have striking similarities with abnormalities commonly encountered in SCNT fetuses and offspring. We discuss the limited experimental data on nuclear-mitochondrial interaction effects in SCNT and explore the potential effects in the context of new findings about the biology of mitochondria. These include mitochondrial fusion/fission, mitochondrial complementation and mitochondrial DNA recombination, processes that are likely to be affected by and impact on SCNT cloning. Furthermore, we indicate pathways that could link epigenetic reprogramming and mitochondria effects in SCNT and address questions and perspectives for future research.

  16. Generation of embryonic stem cells from mouse adipose-tissue derived cells via somatic cell nuclear transfer

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Yiren; Qin, Jilong; Zhou, Chikai; Li, Jinsong; Gao, Wei-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Somatic cells can be reprogrammed into embryonic stem cells (ESCs) by nuclear transfer (NT-ESCs), or into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) by the “Yamanaka method.” However, recent studies have indicated that mouse and human iPSCs are prone to epigenetic and transcriptional aberrations, and that NT-ESCs correspond more closely to ESCs derived from in vitro fertilized embryos than iPSCs. In addition, the procedure of NT-ESCs does not involve gene modification. Demonstration of generation of NT-ESCs using an easily-accessible source of adult cell types would be very important. Adipose tissue is a source of readily accessible donor cells and can be isolated from both males and females at different ages. Here we report that NT-ESCs can be generated from adipose tissue-derived cells (ADCs). At morphological, mRNA and protein levels, these NT-ESCs show classic ESC colonies, exhibit alkaline phosphatase (AP) activity, and display normal diploid karyotypes. Importantly, these cells express pluripotent markers including Oct4, Sox2, Nanog and SSEA-1. Furthermore, they can differentiate in vivo into various types of cells from 3 germinal layers by teratoma formation assays. This study demonstrates for the first time that ESCs can be generated from the adipose tissue by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) and suggests that ADCs can be a new donor-cell type for potential therapeutic cloning. PMID:25692793

  17. Generation of embryonic stem cells from mouse adipose-tissue derived cells via somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yiren; Qin, Jilong; Zhou, Chikai; Li, Jinsong; Gao, Wei-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Somatic cells can be reprogrammed into embryonic stem cells (ESCs) by nuclear transfer (NT-ESCs), or into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) by the "Yamanaka method." However, recent studies have indicated that mouse and human iPSCs are prone to epigenetic and transcriptional aberrations, and that NT-ESCs correspond more closely to ESCs derived from in vitro fertilized embryos than iPSCs. In addition, the procedure of NT-ESCs does not involve gene modification. Demonstration of generation of NT-ESCs using an easily-accessible source of adult cell types would be very important. Adipose tissue is a source of readily accessible donor cells and can be isolated from both males and females at different ages. Here we report that NT-ESCs can be generated from adipose tissue-derived cells (ADCs). At morphological, mRNA and protein levels, these NT-ESCs show classic ESC colonies, exhibit alkaline phosphatase (AP) activity, and display normal diploid karyotypes. Importantly, these cells express pluripotent markers including Oct4, Sox2, Nanog and SSEA-1. Furthermore, they can differentiate in vivo into various types of cells from 3 germinal layers by teratoma formation assays. This study demonstrates for the first time that ESCs can be generated from the adipose tissue by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) and suggests that ADCs can be a new donor-cell type for potential therapeutic cloning.

  18. MicroRNA-34c expression in donor cells influences the early development of somatic cell nuclear transfer bovine embryos.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Wang, Yongsheng; Zhang, Man; Du, Yue; Zhang, Yijun; Xing, Xupeng; Zhang, Lei; Su, JianMin; Zhang, Yong; Zheng, Yuemao

    2014-12-01

    The essence of the reprogramming activity of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos is to produce normal fertilized embryos. However, reprogramming of somatic cells is not as efficient as the reprogramming of sperm. In this report, we describe the effect of an inducible, specific miR-34 microRNA expression in donor cells that enables a similar level of sperm:transgene expression on the early development of SCNT embryos. Our results showed that donor cells with doxycycline (dox)-induced miR-34c expression for the preparation of SCNT embryos resulted in altered developmental rates, histone modification (H3K9ac and H3K4me3), and extent of apoptosis. The cleavage rate and blastocyst formation of the induced nuclear transfer (NT) group were significantly increased. The immunofluorescence signal of H3K9ac in embryos in the induced NT group significantly increased in two-cell- and eight-cell-stage embryos; that of H3K4me3 increased significantly in eight-cell-stage embryos. Although significant differences in staining signals of apoptosis were not detected between groups, lower apoptosis levels were observed in the induced NT group. In conclusion, miR-34c expression induced by dox treatment enhances the developmental potential of SCNT embryos, modifies the epigenetic status, and changes blastocyst quality.

  19. Factors Determining the Efficiency of Porcine Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer: Data Analysis with Over 200,000 Reconstructed Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tianbin; Dou, Hongwei; Xiang, Xi; Li, Yong; Pang, Xinzhi; Zhang, Yijie; Chen, Yu; Luan, Jing; Xu, Ying; Yang, Zhenzhen; Yang, Wenxian; Liu, Huan; Li, Feida; Wang, Hui; Yang, Huanming; Bolund, Lars; Vajta, Gabor

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Data analysis in somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) research is usually limited to several hundreds or thousands of reconstructed embryos. Here, we report mass results obtained with an established and consistent porcine SCNT system (handmade cloning [HMC]). During the experimental period, 228,230 reconstructed embryos and 82,969 blastocysts were produced. After being transferred into 656 recipients, 1070 piglets were obtained. First, the effects of different types of donor cells, including fetal fibroblasts (FFs), adult fibroblasts (AFs), adult preadipocytes (APs), and adult blood mesenchymal (BM) cells, were investigated on the further in vitro and in vivo development. Compared to adult donor cells (AFs, APs, BM cells, respectively), FF cells resulted in a lower blastocyst/reconstructed embryo rate (30.38% vs. 37.94%, 34.65%, and 34.87%, respectively), but a higher overall efficiency on the number of piglets born alive per total blastocysts transferred (1.50% vs. 0.86%, 1.03%, and 0.91%, respectively) and a lower rate of developmental abnormalities (10.87% vs. 56.57%, 24.39%, and 51.85%, respectively). Second, recloning was performed with cloned adult fibroblasts (CAFs) and cloned fetal fibroblasts (CFFs). When CAFs were used as the nuclear donor, fewer developmental abnormalities and higher overall efficiency were observed compared to AFs (56.57% vs. 28.13% and 0.86% vs. 1.59%, respectively). However, CFFs had an opposite effect on these parameters when compared with CAFs (94.12% vs. 10.87% and 0.31% vs. 1.50%, respectively). Third, effects of genetic modification on the efficiency of SCNT were investigated with transgenic fetal fibroblasts (TFFs) and gene knockout fetal fibroblasts (KOFFs). Genetic modification of FFs increased developmental abnormalities (38.96% and 25.24% vs. 10.87% for KOFFs, TFFs, and FFs, respectively). KOFFs resulted in lower overall efficiency compared to TFFs and FFs (0.68% vs. 1.62% and 1.50%, respectively). In conclusion

  20. Factors Determining the Efficiency of Porcine Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer: Data Analysis with Over 200,000 Reconstructed Embryos.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tianbin; Dou, Hongwei; Xiang, Xi; Li, Lin; Li, Yong; Lin, Lin; Pang, Xinzhi; Zhang, Yijie; Chen, Yu; Luan, Jing; Xu, Ying; Yang, Zhenzhen; Yang, Wenxian; Liu, Huan; Li, Feida; Wang, Hui; Yang, Huanming; Bolund, Lars; Vajta, Gabor; Du, Yutao

    2015-12-01

    Data analysis in somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) research is usually limited to several hundreds or thousands of reconstructed embryos. Here, we report mass results obtained with an established and consistent porcine SCNT system (handmade cloning [HMC]). During the experimental period, 228,230 reconstructed embryos and 82,969 blastocysts were produced. After being transferred into 656 recipients, 1070 piglets were obtained. First, the effects of different types of donor cells, including fetal fibroblasts (FFs), adult fibroblasts (AFs), adult preadipocytes (APs), and adult blood mesenchymal (BM) cells, were investigated on the further in vitro and in vivo development. Compared to adult donor cells (AFs, APs, BM cells, respectively), FF cells resulted in a lower blastocyst/reconstructed embryo rate (30.38% vs. 37.94%, 34.65%, and 34.87%, respectively), but a higher overall efficiency on the number of piglets born alive per total blastocysts transferred (1.50% vs. 0.86%, 1.03%, and 0.91%, respectively) and a lower rate of developmental abnormalities (10.87% vs. 56.57%, 24.39%, and 51.85%, respectively). Second, recloning was performed with cloned adult fibroblasts (CAFs) and cloned fetal fibroblasts (CFFs). When CAFs were used as the nuclear donor, fewer developmental abnormalities and higher overall efficiency were observed compared to AFs (56.57% vs. 28.13% and 0.86% vs. 1.59%, respectively). However, CFFs had an opposite effect on these parameters when compared with CAFs (94.12% vs. 10.87% and 0.31% vs. 1.50%, respectively). Third, effects of genetic modification on the efficiency of SCNT were investigated with transgenic fetal fibroblasts (TFFs) and gene knockout fetal fibroblasts (KOFFs). Genetic modification of FFs increased developmental abnormalities (38.96% and 25.24% vs. 10.87% for KOFFs, TFFs, and FFs, respectively). KOFFs resulted in lower overall efficiency compared to TFFs and FFs (0.68% vs. 1.62% and 1.50%, respectively). In conclusion, this is the

  1. Nuclear and Q{sup 2} dependence of quaselastic (e,e{prime}p) scattering at large momentum transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, H.E.; Geesaman, D.F.; Jones, C.E.

    1995-08-01

    An experiment was completed at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center in which measurements of the (e,e{prime}p) coincidence quasielastic cross section in nuclei were extended to the largest possible Q{sup 2} attainable with the Nuclear Physics Injector and the End Station A spectrometers. Coincidence measurements of the quasielastic (e,e{prime}p) cross section were made on nuclei from carbon to gold in the Q{sup 2} range of 1-7 (GeV/c){sup 2}. Several papers describing the results were published or submitted. Analysis of the data is in its final stages. In summary, the cross section for quasielastic {sup 12}C(e,e{prime}p) scattering was measured at momentum transfer Q{sup 2}=1, 3, 5, and 6.8 (GeV/c){sup 2}. The results are consistent with scattering from a single nucleon as the dominant process. The nuclear transparency is obtained and compared with theoretical calculations that incorporate color transparency effects. No significant rise of the transparency with Q{sup 2} is observed. Cross sections were reported for the reaction {sup 2}H(e,e{prime}p)n for momentum transfers in the range 1.2 {<=}Q{sup 2}{<=}6.8 (GeV/c){sup 2} and for missing momenta from 0 to 250 MeV/c. The longitudinal-transverse interference structure function was separated at Q{sup 2}=1.5 (GeV/c){sup 2}. The observables were compared to calculations performed in nonrelativistic and relativistic frameworks. The data are best described by a fully relativistic calculation. The A-dependence of the quasielastic A(e,e{prime}p) reaction was studied with {sup 2}H, C, Fe, and Au nuclei at momentum transfers Q{sup 2}=1, 3, 5, and 6.8 (GeV/c){sup 2}. The nuclear transparency T A,Q{sup 2}, a measure of the average probability that the struck proton escapes from the nucleu A without interaction, was extracted. Several calculations predict a significant increase in T with momentum transfer, a phenomenon known as color transparency. No significant rise within errors is seen for any of the nuclei studied.

  2. Rapid Elimination of the Histone Variant MacroH2A from Somatic Cell Heterochromatin after Nuclear Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ching-Chien; Gao, Shaorong; Sung, Li-Ying; Corry, Gareth N.; Ma, Yinghong; Nagy, Zsolt Peter; Tian, X. Cindy

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Oocytes contain a maternal store of the histone variant MacroH2A, which is eliminated from zygotes shortly after fertilization. Preimplantation embryos then execute three cell divisions without MacroH2A before the onset of embryonic MacroH2A expression at the 16-cell stage. During subsequent development, MacroH2A is expressed in most cells, where it is assembled into facultative heterochromatin. Because differentiated cells contain heterochromatin rich in MacroH2A, we investigated the fate of MacroH2A during somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). The results show that MacroH2A is rapidly eliminated from the chromosomes of transplanted somatic cell nuclei by a process in which MacroH2A is first stripped from chromosomes, and then degraded. Furthermore, MacroH2A is eliminated from transplanted nuclei by a mechanism requiring intact microtubules and nuclear envelope break down. Preimplantation SCNT embryos express endogenous MacroH2A once they reach the morula stage, similar to the timing observed in embryos produced by natural fertilization. We also show that the ability to reprogram somatic cell heterochromatin by SCNT is tied to the developmental stage of recipient cell cytoplasm because enucleated zygotes fail to support depletion of MacroH2A from transplanted somatic nuclei. Together, the results indicate that nuclear reprogramming by SCNT utilizes the same chromatin remodeling mechanisms that act upon the genome immediately after fertilization. PMID:20132012

  3. Establishment of pregnancy after the transfer of nuclear transfer embryos produced from the fusion of argali (Ovis ammon) nuclei into domestic sheep (Ovis aries) enucleated oocytes.

    PubMed

    White, K L; Bunch, T D; Mitalipov, S; Reed, W A

    1999-01-01

    Cloning mammalian species from cell lines of adult animals has been demonstrated. Aside from its importance for cloning multiple copies of genetically valuable livestock, cloning now has the potential to salvage endangered or even extinct species. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the bovine and domestic (Ovis aries) ovine oocyte cytoplasm on the nucleus of an established cell line from an endangered argali wild sheep (Ovis ammon) after nuclear transplantation. A fibroblast cell line was established from skin biopsies from an adult argali ram from the People's Republic of China. Early karyotype analysis of cells between 3-6 passages revealed a normal diploid chromosome number of 56. The argali karyotype consisted of 2 pairs of biarmed and 25 pairs of acrocentric autosomes, a large acrocentric and minute biarmed Y. Bovine ovaries were collected from a local abattoir, oocytes aspirated, and immediately placed in maturation medium consisting of M-199 containing 10% fetal bovine serum, 100 IU/mL penicillin, 100 microg/mL streptomycin, 0.5 microg/mL follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), 5.0 microg/mL luetinizing hormone (LH) and 1.0 microg/mL estradiol. Ovine (O. aries) oocytes were collected at surgery 25 hours postonset of estrus from the oviducts of superovulated donor animals. All cultures were carried out at 39 degrees C in a humidified atmosphere of 5% CO2 and air. In vitro matured MII bovine oocytes were enucleated 16-20 hours after onset of maturation and ovine oocytes within 2-3 hours after collection. Enucleation was confirmed using Hoechst 33342 and UV light. The donor argali cells were synchronized in G0-G1 phase by culturing in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM) plus 0.5% fetal bovine serum for 5-10 days. Fusion of nuclear donor cell to an enucleated oocyte (cytoplast) to produce nuclear transfer (NT) embryos was induced by 2 electric pulses of 1.4 kV/cm for 30 microsc. Fused NT embryos were activated after 24 hours of maturation

  4. Methyl-CpG-Binding Protein 2 Improves the Development of Mouse Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer Embryos.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen-Dong; Duan, Lian; Zhang, Zi-Hui; Song, Si-Hang; Bai, Guang-Yu; Zhang, Na; Shen, Xing-Hui; Shen, Jing-Ling; Lei, Lei

    2016-04-01

    Methyl-CpG-binding domain proteins (MBPs) connect DNA methylation and histone modification, which are the key changes of somatic cell reprogramming. Methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2) was the first discovered MBP that has been extensively studied in the neurodevelopmental disorder Rett syndrome. However, a role for MeCP2 during cellular reprogramming associated with somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has not been examined. In this study, we discovered that MeCP2 expression was significantly lower in embryos generated by SCNT compared with those generated by intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). We genetically modified mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) to overexpress MeCP2 and serve as donor cells for nuclear transfer (NT) to investigate the effects of MeCP2 on preimplantation development of SCNT embryos. The blastocyst rate (35.71%) of MeCP2 overexpressed embryos (NT(+)) was significantly greater than in nontransgenic embryos (NT(-), 24.29%). Furthermore, immunofluorescence experiments revealed that 5-methylcytosine (5mC) was transferred to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) to a greater extent in NT(+) embryos than in NT(-) embryos. Real-time PCR evaluation of gene expression also showed that embryonic development-associated genes, such as Oct4 and Nanog, were significantly higher in the NT(+) group compared to the NT(-) group. Collectively, these results suggested that MeCP2 facilitated Tet3 activity, enhanced expression of pluripotency-related genes, and eventually improved the development of NT embryos. Finally, we performed chromatin immunoprecipitation to identify direct targets of MeCP2 and constructed a protein interaction network to elucidate several putative MeCP2 targets.

  5. Nuclear fragmentation energy and momentum transfer distributions in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khandelwal, Govind S.; Khan, Ferdous

    1989-01-01

    An optical model description of energy and momentum transfer in relativistic heavy-ion collisions, based upon composite particle multiple scattering theory, is presented. Transverse and longitudinal momentum transfers to the projectile are shown to arise from the real and absorptive part of the optical potential, respectively. Comparisons of fragment momentum distribution observables with experiments are made and trends outlined based on our knowledge of the underlying nucleon-nucleon interaction. Corrections to the above calculations are discussed. Finally, use of the model as a tool for estimating collision impact parameters is indicated.

  6. The Caenorhabditis elegans SUN protein UNC-84 interacts with lamin to transfer forces from the cytoplasm to the nucleoskeleton during nuclear migration.

    PubMed

    Bone, Courtney R; Tapley, Erin C; Gorjánácz, Mátyás; Starr, Daniel A

    2014-09-15

    Nuclear migration is a critical component of many cellular and developmental processes. The nuclear envelope forms a barrier between the cytoplasm, where mechanical forces are generated, and the nucleoskeleton. The LINC complex consists of KASH proteins in the outer nuclear membrane and SUN proteins in the inner nuclear membrane that bridge the nuclear envelope. How forces are transferred from the LINC complex to the nucleoskeleton is poorly understood. The Caenorhabditis elegans lamin, LMN-1, is required for nuclear migration and interacts with the nucleoplasmic domain of the SUN protein UNC-84. This interaction is weakened by the unc-84(P91S) missense mutation. These mutant nuclei have an intermediate nuclear migration defect-live imaging of nuclei or LMN-1::GFP shows that many nuclei migrate normally, others initiate migration before subsequently failing, and others fail to begin migration. At least one other component of the nucleoskeleton, the NET5/Samp1/Ima1 homologue SAMP-1, plays a role in nuclear migration. We propose a nut-and-bolt model to explain how forces are dissipated across the nuclear envelope during nuclear migration. In this model, SUN/KASH bridges serve as bolts through the nuclear envelope, and nucleoskeleton components LMN-1 and SAMP-1 act as both nuts and washers on the inside of the nucleus.

  7. The Caenorhabditis elegans SUN protein UNC-84 interacts with lamin to transfer forces from the cytoplasm to the nucleoskeleton during nuclear migration

    PubMed Central

    Bone, Courtney R.; Tapley, Erin C.; Gorjánácz, Mátyás; Starr, Daniel A.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear migration is a critical component of many cellular and developmental processes. The nuclear envelope forms a barrier between the cytoplasm, where mechanical forces are generated, and the nucleoskeleton. The LINC complex consists of KASH proteins in the outer nuclear membrane and SUN proteins in the inner nuclear membrane that bridge the nuclear envelope. How forces are transferred from the LINC complex to the nucleoskeleton is poorly understood. The Caenorhabditis elegans lamin, LMN-1, is required for nuclear migration and interacts with the nucleoplasmic domain of the SUN protein UNC-84. This interaction is weakened by the unc-84(P91S) missense mutation. These mutant nuclei have an intermediate nuclear migration defect—live imaging of nuclei or LMN-1::GFP shows that many nuclei migrate normally, others initiate migration before subsequently failing, and others fail to begin migration. At least one other component of the nucleoskeleton, the NET5/Samp1/Ima1 homologue SAMP-1, plays a role in nuclear migration. We propose a nut-and-bolt model to explain how forces are dissipated across the nuclear envelope during nuclear migration. In this model, SUN/KASH bridges serve as bolts through the nuclear envelope, and nucleoskeleton components LMN-1 and SAMP-1 act as both nuts and washers on the inside of the nucleus. PMID:25057012

  8. Widespread interspecies homologous recombination reveals reticulate evolution within the genus Streptomyces.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Kun; Rong, Xiaoying; Huang, Ying

    2016-09-01

    Homologous recombination is increasingly being recognized as a driving force in microbial evolution. However, recombination in streptomycetes, a rich source of diverse secondary metabolites, particularly among different species, remains minimally investigated. In this study, the largest sample of Streptomyces species to date, consisting of 142 type strains spanning the genus, with available sequences of 16S rRNA, atpD, gyrB, recA, rpoB and trpB genes, were collected and subjected to a comprehensive population genetic analysis to generate an overall estimate of the level of Streptomyces interspecies genetic exchange and its effect on the evolution of this genus. The results indicate frequent homologous recombination among Streptomyces species, which occurred three times more frequently and was nearly 14 times more important than point mutation in nucleotide sequence divergence (ρ/θw=3.10, r/m=13.74). As a result, a facilitating effect on the evolutionary process and confusion in phylogenetic relationships were observed, as well as a number of specific transfer events of the six gene fragments. A resultant phylogenetic network depicted extensive horizontal genetic exchange which decays clonality in streptomycetes. Moreover, seven evolutionary lineage groups were identified in the present sample in the Structure analysis, generally consistent with morphological and physiological data, and the contribution of recombination was detected to be varied among them. Our analyses demonstrated a reticulate evolution within Streptomyces due to the high level of interspecies gene exchange, which greatly challenges the traditional tree-shaped phylogeny in this genus and may advance our evolutionary understanding of a genuine Streptomyces species.

  9. Transfer of elements relevant to nuclear fuel cycle from soil to boreal plants and animals in experimental meso- and microcosms.

    PubMed

    Tuovinen, Tiina S; Kasurinen, Anne; Häikiö, Elina; Tervahauta, Arja; Makkonen, Sari; Holopainen, Toini; Juutilainen, Jukka

    2016-01-01

    Uranium (U), cobalt (Co), molybdenum (Mo), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), thorium (Th) and zinc (Zn) occur naturally in soil but their radioactive isotopes can also be released into the environment during the nuclear fuel cycle. The transfer of these elements was studied in three different trophic levels in experimental mesocosms containing downy birch (Betula pubescens), narrow buckler fern (Dryopteris carthusiana) and Scandinavian small-reed (Calamagrostis purpurea ssp. Phragmitoides) as producers, snails (Arianta arbostorum) as herbivores, and earthworms (Lumbricus terrestris) as decomposers. To determine more precisely whether the element uptake of snails is mainly via their food (birch leaves) or both via soil and food, a separate microcosm experiment was also performed. The element uptake of snails did not generally depend on the presence of soil, indicating that the main uptake route was food, except for U, where soil contact was important for uptake when soil U concentration was high. Transfer of elements from soil to plants was not linear, i.e. it was not correctly described by constant concentration ratios (CR) commonly applied in radioecological modeling. Similar nonlinear transfer was found for the invertebrate animals included in this study: elements other than U were taken up more efficiently when element concentration in soil or food was low.

  10. Birth of Cloned Microminipigs Derived from Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer Embryos That Have Been Transiently Treated with Valproic Acid.

    PubMed

    Miyoshi, Kazuchika; Kawaguchi, Hiroaki; Maeda, Kosuke; Sato, Masahiro; Akioka, Kohei; Noguchi, Michiko; Horiuchi, Masahisa; Tanimoto, Akihide

    2016-11-01

    In our previous study, we found that treatment of miniature pig somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos with 4 mM valproic acid (VPA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor, for 48 hours after activation enhanced blastocyst formation rate and octamer-binding transcription factor-3/4 (Oct-3/4) gene expression at the late blastocyst stage; however, the production of viable cloned pups failed, when those VPA-treated SCNT embryos were transferred to recipients. This failure suggests that the present VPA treatment is suboptimal. In the present study, we explored the optimal conditions for VPA to have beneficial effects on the development of SCNT embryos. When miniature pig SCNT embryos were treated with 8 mM VPA for 24 hours after activation, both the rates of blastocyst formation and blastocysts expressing the Oct-3/4 gene were significantly (p < 0.05) improved. A similar increase in blastocyst formation was also observed when microminipig-derived cells were used as SCNT donors. Five cloned piglets were obtained after the transfer of 152 microminipig SCNT embryos that had been treated with 8 mM VPA for 24 hours. The results indicated that a short duration of treatment with VPA improves the development of both miniature pig and microminipig SCNT embryos, possibly via an enhanced reprogramming mechanism.

  11. High Power Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) for Cargo and Propellant Transfer Missions in Cislunar Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falck, Robert D.; Borowski, Stanley K.

    2003-01-01

    The performance of Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) in transporting cargo and propellant from Low Earth Orbit (LEO) to the first Earth-Moon Lagrange point (EML1) is examined. The baseline NEP vehicle utilizes a fission reactor system with Brayton power conversion for electric power generation to power multiple liquid hydrogen magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thrusters. Vehicle characteristics and performance levels are based on technology availability in a fifteen to twenty year timeframe. Results of numerical trajectory analyses are also provided.

  12. Optical nuclear polarization via hyperfine relaxation. Polarization mechanism in anthracene/tetracyanobenzene charge-transfer crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allgeier, J.; Macho, V.; Stehlik, D.; Vieth, H. M.; Auch, W.; Von Schütz, J. U.

    1982-03-01

    The large optical nuclear polarization (ONP) found in A/TCNB crystals is due to relaxation caused by the mobility of triplet excitons. The ONP field dependence gives an excitonic hopping rate of 3 × 10 9 s -1 (at 300 K). Exclusion of ONP by static hyperfine interaction (LAC ONP) is based on results of rf ONP experiments which allow an unambiguous distinction between the two processes.

  13. Radiocesium transfer from hillslopes to the Pacific Ocean after the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant accident: A review.

    PubMed

    Evrard, Olivier; Laceby, J Patrick; Lepage, Hugo; Onda, Yuichi; Cerdan, Olivier; Ayrault, Sophie

    2015-10-01

    The devastating tsunami triggered by the Great East Japan Earthquake on March 11, 2011 inundated the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) resulting in a loss of cooling and a series of explosions releasing the largest quantity of radioactive material into the atmosphere since the Chernobyl nuclear accident. Although 80% of the radionuclides from this accidental release were transported over the Pacific Ocean, 20% were deposited over Japanese coastal catchments that are subject to frequent typhoons. Among the radioisotopes released during the FDNPP accident, radiocesium ((134)Cs and (137)Cs) is considered the most serious current and future health risk for the local population. The goal of this review is to synthesize research relevant to the transfer of FDNPP derived radiocesium from hillslopes to the Pacific Ocean. After radiocesium fallout deposition on vegetation and soils, the contamination may remain stored in forest canopies, in vegetative litter on the ground, or in the soil. Once radiocesium contacts soil, it is quickly and almost irreversibly bound to fine soil particles. The kinetic energy of raindrops instigates the displacement of soil particles, and their bound radiocesium, which may be mobilized and transported with overland flow. Soil erosion is one of the main processes transferring particle-bound radiocesium from hillslopes through rivers and streams, and ultimately to the Pacific Ocean. Accordingly this review will summarize results regarding the fundamental processes and dynamics that govern radiocesium transfer from hillslopes to the Pacific Ocean published in the literature within the first four years after the FDNPP accident. The majority of radiocesium is reported to be transported in the particulate fraction, attached to fine particles. The contribution of the dissolved fraction to radiocesium migration is only relevant in base flows and is hypothesized to decline over time. Owing to the hydro-meteorological context of the

  14. Generation of human organs in pigs via interspecies blastocyst complementation.

    PubMed

    Wu, J; Platero Luengo, A; Gil, M A; Suzuki, K; Cuello, C; Morales Valencia, M; Parrilla, I; Martinez, C A; Nohalez, A; Roca, J; Martinez, E A; Izpisua Belmonte, J C

    2016-10-01

    More than eighteen years have passed since the first derivation of human embryonic stem cells (ESCs), but their clinical use is still met with several challenges, such as ethical concerns regarding the need of human embryos, tissue rejection after transplantation and tumour formation. The generation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) enables the access to patient-derived pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) and opens the door for personalized medicine as tissues/organs can potentially be generated from the same genetic background as the patient recipients, thus avoiding immune rejections or complication of immunosuppression strategies. In this regard, successful replacement, or augmentation, of the function of damaged tissue by patient-derived differentiated stem cells provides a promising cell replacement therapy for many devastating human diseases. Although human iPSCs can proliferate unlimitedly in culture and harbour the potential to generate all cell types in the adult body, currently, the functionality of differentiated cells is limited. An alternative strategy to realize the full potential of human iPSC for regenerative medicine is the in vivo tissue generation in large animal species via interspecies blastocyst complementation. As this technology is still in its infancy and there remains more questions than answers, thus in this review, we mainly focus the discussion on the conceptual framework, the emerging technologies and recent advances involved with interspecies blastocyst complementation, and will refer the readers to other more in-depth reviews on dynamic pluripotent stem cell states, genome editing and interspecies chimeras. Likewise, other emerging alternatives to combat the growing shortage of human organs, such as xenotransplantation or tissue engineering, topics that has been extensively reviewed, will not be covered here.

  15. Interspecies translation of disease networks increases robustness and predictive accuracy.

    PubMed

    Anvar, Seyed Yahya; Tucker, Allan; Vinciotti, Veronica; Venema, Andrea; van Ommen, Gert-Jan B; van der Maarel, Silvere M; Raz, Vered; 't Hoen, Peter A C

    2011-11-01

    Gene regulatory networks give important insights into the mechanisms underlying physiology and pathophysiology. The derivation of gene regulatory networks from high-throughput expression data via machine learning strategies is problematic as the reliability of these models is often compromised by limited and highly variable samples, heterogeneity in transcript isoforms, noise, and other artifacts. Here, we develop a novel algorithm, dubbed Dandelion, in which we construct and train intraspecies Bayesian networks that are translated and assessed on independent test sets from other species in a reiterative procedure. The interspecies disease networks are subjected to multi-layers of analysis and evaluation, leading to the identification of the most consistent relationships within the network structure. In this study, we demonstrate the performance of our algorithms on datasets from animal models of oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD) and patient materials. We show that the interspecies network of genes coding for the proteasome provide highly accurate predictions on gene expression levels and disease phenotype. Moreover, the cross-species translation increases the stability and robustness of these networks. Unlike existing modeling approaches, our algorithms do not require assumptions on notoriously difficult one-to-one mapping of protein orthologues or alternative transcripts and can deal with missing data. We show that the identified key components of the OPMD disease network can be confirmed in an unseen and independent disease model. This study presents a state-of-the-art strategy in constructing interspecies disease networks that provide crucial information on regulatory relationships among genes, leading to better understanding of the disease molecular mechanisms.

  16. ARMS CONTROL: U.S. Efforts to Control the Transfer of Nuclear-Capable Missile Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-11

    officials in September 1989. At this meeting, U.S. officials explained that Argentina’s program to develop the Condor II missile and transfer it to...MTCR partners, we have had a significant impact on the Condor missile program, which has involved the governments of Egypt, Iraq, and Argentina. Our...cooperative efforts with the Italian and German governments were successful in restricting exports from companies in those countries to the Condor program

  17. Double species Bose-Einstein condensate with tunable interspecies interactions.

    PubMed

    Thalhammer, G; Barontini, G; De Sarlo, L; Catani, J; Minardi, F; Inguscio, M

    2008-05-30

    We produce Bose-Einstein condensates of two different species, 87Rb and 41K, in an optical dipole trap in proximity of interspecies Feshbach resonances. We discover and characterize two Feshbach resonances, located around 35 and 79 G, by observing the three-body losses and the elastic cross section. The narrower resonance is exploited to create a double species condensate with tunable interactions. Our system opens the way to the exploration of double species Mott insulators and, more in general, of the quantum phase diagram of the two-species Bose-Hubbard model.

  18. Talk of the town: interspecies communication in oral biofilms.

    PubMed

    Jakubovics, N S

    2010-02-01

    Mature dental biofilms consist of towering microcolonies in which the resident bacterial cells interact with one another and exchange messages in the form of signalling molecules and metabolites. These structures have been compared with the bustling office blocks and apartment buildings of busy cities. Social and communication networks are the lifeblood of large communities, and there is mounting evidence that mutually beneficial interactions between microbial cells are essential to the development of biofilms in the oral cavity. This review discusses the mutualistic partnerships that form between oral bacteria, and the contribution of interspecies communication to the formation of mixed microbial communities.

  19. Generation of hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase gene knockout rabbits by homologous recombination and gene trapping through somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Yin, Mingru; Jiang, Weihua; Fang, Zhenfu; Kong, Pengcheng; Xing, Fengying; Li, Yao; Chen, Xuejin; Li, Shangang

    2015-11-02

    The rabbit is a common animal model that has been employed in studies on various human disorders, and the generation of genetically modified rabbit lines is highly desirable. Female rabbits have been successfully cloned from cumulus cells, and the somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) technology is well established. The present study generated hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene knockout rabbits using recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated homologous recombination and SCNT. Gene trap strategies were employed to enhance the gene targeting rates. The male and female gene knockout fibroblast cell lines were derived by different strategies. When male HPRT knockout cells were used for SCNT, no live rabbits were obtained. However, when female HPRT(+/-) cells were used for SCNT, live, healthy rabbits were generated. The cloned HPRT(+/-) rabbits were fertile at maturity. We demonstrate a new technique to produce gene-targeted rabbits. This approach may also be used in the genetic manipulation of different genes or in other species.

  20. Corrigendum to "Coupled thermochemical, isotopic evolution and heat transfer simulations in highly irradiated UO2 nuclear fuel"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piro, M. H. A.; Banfield, J.; Clarno, K.; Simunovic, S.; Besmann, T. M.; Lewis, B. J.; Thompson, W. T.

    2016-09-01

    Figs. 7-9 in "Coupled thermochemical, isotopic evolution and heat transfer simulations in highly irradiated UO2 nuclear fuel" [1] have a consistent error corresponding to the relative proportions of iodine. Reported concentrations of iodine in the original manuscript are approximately ten times higher than expected, and are comparable in atomic proportions to cesium. One would expect that the amount of cesium would be about one order of magnitude greater than iodine based on the difference in fission yields of 235U and 239Pu. A practical consequence of this error would affect the predicted quantity and chemical composition of iodine on the fuel surface, which is related to iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking [2].

  1. Nuclear donor cell lines considerably influence cloning efficiency and the incidence of large offspring syndrome in bovine somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Liu, J; Wang, Y; Su, J; Luo, Y; Quan, F; Zhang, Y

    2013-08-01

    Total five ear skin fibroblast lines (named F1, F2, F3, F4 and F5) from different newborn Holstein cows have been used as nuclear donor cells for producing cloned cows by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). The effects of these cell lines on both in vitro and in vivo developmental rates of cloned embryos, post-natal survivability and incidence of large offspring syndrome (LOS) were examined in this study. We found that the different cell lines possessed the same capacity to support pre-implantation development of cloned embryos, the cleavage and blastocyst formation rates ranged from 80.2 ± 0.9 to 84.5 ± 2.5% and 28.5 ± 0.9 to 33.3 ± 1.4%, respectively. However, their capacities to support the in vivo development of SCNT embryos showed significant differences (p < 0.05). The pregnancy rates at 90 and 240 day were significantly lower in groups F2 (4.9% and 3.3%) and F3 (5.4% and 5.4%) compared to groups F1 (23.3% and 16.3%), F4 (25.7% and 18.6%) and F5 (25.9% and 19.8%) (p < 0.05). The cloning efficiency was significantly higher in group F5 than those in group F1, F2, F3 and F4 (9.3% vs 4.1%, 1.2%, 2.0% and 5.0%, respectively, p < 0.05). Moreover, large offspring syndrome (LOS) incidence in group F5 was significantly lower than those in other groups (p < 0.05). All cloned offspring from cell line F1, F2, F3 and F4 showed LOS and gestation length delay, while all cloned offspring from F5 showed normal birthweight and gestation length. We concluded that the nuclear donor cell lines have significant impact on the in vivo development of cloned embryos and the incidence of LOS in cloned calves.

  2. Improvement of mouse cloning using nuclear transfer-derived embryonic stem cells and/or histone deacetylase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Wakayama, Sayaka; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear transfer-derived ES (ntES) cell lines can be established from somatic cell nuclei with a relatively high success rate. Although ntES cells have been shown to be equivalent to ES cells, there are ethical objections concerning human cells, such as the use of fresh oocyte donation from young healthy woman. In contrast, the use of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells for cloning poses few ethical problems and is a relatively easy technique compared with nuclear transfer. Therefore, although there are several reports proposing the use of ntES cells as a model of regenerative medicine, the use of these cells in preliminary medical research is waning. However, in theory, 5 to 10 donor cells can establish one ntES cell line and, once established, these cells will propagate indefinitely. These cells can be used to generate cloned animals from ntES cell lines using a second round of NT. Even in infertile and "unclonable" strains of mice, we can generate offspring from somatic cells by combining cloning with ntES technology. Moreover, cloned offspring can be generated potentially even from the nuclei of dead bodies or freeze-dried cells via ntES cells, such as from an extinct frozen animal. Currently, only the ntES technology is available for this purpose, because all other techniques, including iPS cell derivation, require significant numbers of living donor cells. This review describes how to improve the efficiency of cloning, the establishment of clone-derived embryonic stem cells and further applications.

  3. Engineered heart tissue graft derived from somatic cell nuclear transferred embryonic stem cells improve myocardial performance in infarcted rat heart.

    PubMed

    Lü, Shuanghong; Li, Ying; Gao, Shaorong; Liu, Sheng; Wang, Haibin; He, Wenjun; Zhou, Jin; Liu, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Ye; Lin, Qiuxia; Duan, Cumi; Yang, Xiangzhong Jerry; Wang, Changyong

    2010-12-01

    The concept of regenerating diseased myocardium by implanting engineered heart tissue (EHT) is intriguing. Yet it was limited by immune rejection and difficulties to be generated at a size with contractile properties. Somatic cell nuclear transfer is proposed as a practical strategy for generating autologous histocompatible stem (nuclear transferred embryonic stem [NT-ES]) cells to treat diseases. Nevertheless, it is controversial as NT-ES cells may pose risks in their therapeutic application. EHT from NT-ES cell-derived cardiomyocytes was generated through a series of improved techniques in a self-made mould to keep the EHTs from contraction and provide static stretch simultaneously. After 7 days of static and mechanical stretching, respectively, the EHTs were implanted to the infarcted rat heart. Four weeks after transplantation, the suitability of EHT in heart muscle repair after myocardial infarction was evaluated by histological examination, echocardiography and multielectrode array measurement. The results showed that large (thickness/diameter, 2-4 mm/10 mm) spontaneously contracting EHTs was generated successfully. The EHTs, which were derived from NT-ES cells, inte grated and electrically coupled to host myocardium and exerted beneficial effects on the left ventricular function of infarcted rat heart. No teratoma formation was observed in the rat heart implanted with EHTs for 4 weeks. NT-ES cells can be used as a source of seeding cells for cardiac tissue engineering. Large contractile EHT grafts can be constructed in vitro with the ability to survive after implantation and improve myocardial performance of infarcted rat hearts.

  4. Bovine somatic cell nuclear transfer using recipient oocytes recovered by ovum pick-up: effect of maternal lineage of oocyte donors.

    PubMed

    Brüggerhoff, Katja; Zakhartchenko, Valeri; Wenigerkind, Hendrik; Reichenbach, Horst-Dieter; Prelle, Katja; Schernthaner, Wolfgang; Alberio, Ramiro; Küchenhoff, Helmut; Stojkovic, Miodrag; Brem, Gottfried; Hiendleder, Stefan; Wolf, Eckhard

    2002-02-01

    The efficiency of bovine nuclear transfer using recipient oocytes recovered by ultrasound-guided follicle aspiration (ovum pick-up [OPU]) was investigated. Oocyte donors were selected from 2 distinct maternal lineages (A and B) differing in 11 nucleotide positions of the mitochondrial DNA control region. A total of 1342 cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) were recovered. The numbers of total COCs and class I/II COCs recovered from donors of lineage A were higher (P < 0.001) than those obtained from lineage B. Follicle aspiration once per week yielded a higher (P < 0.001) total number of COCs per session than aspiration twice per week, whereas the reproduction status of donors (heifer vs. cow) had no effect on OPU results. Of the 1342 oocytes recovered, 733 (55%) were successfully matured in vitro and used for nuclear transfer. Fusion was achieved in 550 (75%) karyoplast-cytoplast complexes (KCCs), resulting in 277 (50%) cleaved embryos on Day 3. On Day 7 of culture, 84 transferable embryos (15% based on fused KCCs) were obtained. After 38 transfers (10 single, 22 double, and 6 triple transfers), 9 recipients (8 double and 1 triple transfer) were diagnosed as pregnant on Day 28, corresponding to a pregnancy rate of 24%. The proportion of transferable embryos on Day 7 was significantly (P < 0.05) influenced by maternal lineage of oocyte donors and by the frequency of follicle aspiration. Our study demonstrates the feasibility of generating nuclear transfer embryos with defined cytoplasmic background. These will be valuable tools to experimentally dissect the effects of nuclear and cytoplasmic components on embryonic, fetal, and postnatal development.

  5. Effects of Trichostatin A and PXD101 on the In Vitro Development of Mouse Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer Embryos.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Xiaoyan; You, Haihong; Xiao, Xiong; Li, Nan; Li, Yuemin

    2017-02-01

    The low success rate of animal cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is believed to be associated with aberrant epigenetic nuclear reprogramming. It has been demonstrated that treatment with histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACis) enhances developmental potential of SCNT embryos. Previous studies in many species revealed that treatment of SCNT embryos with trichostatin A (TSA)-an HDACi-significantly enhances the in vitro development of SCNT embryos. In this study, we compared two different SCNT protocols with TSA and investigate, for the first time, the effect of another new HDACi, PXD101 (belinostat), on in vitro development of mouse SCNT embryo. Rates of blastocyst development in mouse SCNT embryos treated with either 5 nM TSA during (6 hours) and after (4 hours) activation (39.1%) or with 50 nM PXD101 during (6 hours) and after (4 hours) activation (40.2%) were significantly higher than those of nontreated SCNT embryos (11.5%) and both treatments also significantly improved the subsequent establishment of NT-ESCs in comparison with the nontreated group (38.1% and 40.9% vs. 11.8%). In conclusion, we optimized the TSA concentration and treatment timing and, for the first time, investigated the effect of PXD101 on mouse development of SCNT embryos and establishment of NT-ESCs.

  6. Rapamycin treatment during in vitro maturation of oocytes improves embryonic development after parthenogenesis and somatic cell nuclear transfer in pigs

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joohyeong; Park, Jong-Im; Yun, Jung Im; Lee, Yongjin; Yong, Hwanyul; Lee, Seung Tae; Park, Choon-Keun; Hyun, Sang-Hwan; Lee, Geun-Shik

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of rapamycin treatment during in vitro maturation (IVM) on oocyte maturation and embryonic development after parthenogenetic activation (PA) and somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) in pigs. Morphologically good (MGCOCs) and poor oocytes (MPCOCs) were untreated or treated with 1 nM rapamycin during 0-22 h, 22-42 h, or 0-42 h of IVM. Rapamycin had no significant effects on nuclear maturation and blastocyst formation after PA of MGCOCs. Blastocyst formation after PA was significantly increased by rapamycin treatment during 22-42 h and 0-42 h (46.6% and 46.5%, respectively) relative to the control (33.3%) and 0-22 h groups (38.6%) in MPCOCs. In SCNT, blastocyst formation tended to increase in MPCOCs treated with rapamycin during 0-42 h of IVM relative to untreated oocytes (20.3% vs. 14.3%, 0.05 < p < 0.1), while no improvement was observed in MGCOCs. Gene expression analysis revealed that transcript abundance of Beclin 1 and microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 mRNAs was significantly increased in MPCOCs by rapamycin relative to the control. Our results demonstrated that autophagy induction by rapamycin during IVM improved developmental competence of oocytes derived from MPCOCs. PMID:25797293

  7. Rapamycin treatment during in vitro maturation of oocytes improves embryonic development after parthenogenesis and somatic cell nuclear transfer in pigs.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joohyeong; Park, Jong-Im; Yun, Jung Im; Lee, Yongjin; Yong, Hwanyul; Lee, Seung Tae; Park, Choon-Keun; Hyun, Sang-Hwan; Lee, Geun-Shik; Lee, Eunsong

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of rapamycin treatment during in vitro maturation (IVM) on oocyte maturation and embryonic development after parthenogenetic activation (PA) and somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) in pigs. Morphologically good (MGCOCs) and poor oocytes (MPCOCs) were untreated or treated with 1 nM rapamycin during 0-22 h, 22-42 h, or 0-42 h of IVM. Rapamycin had no significant effects on nuclear maturation and blastocyst formation after PA of MGCOCs. Blastocyst formation after PA was significantly increased by rapamycin treatment during 22-42 h and 0-42 h (46.6% and 46.5%, respectively) relative to the control (33.3%) and 0-22 h groups (38.6%) in MPCOCs. In SCNT, blastocyst formation tended to increase in MPCOCs treated with rapamycin during 0-42 h of IVM relative to untreated oocytes (20.3% vs. 14.3%, 0.05 < p < 0.1), while no improvement was observed in MGCOCs. Gene expression analysis revealed that transcript abundance of Beclin 1 and microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 mRNAs was significantly increased in MPCOCs by rapamycin relative to the control. Our results demonstrated that autophagy induction by rapamycin during IVM improved developmental competence of oocytes derived from MPCOCs.

  8. Diploidized eggs reprogram adult somatic cell nuclei to pluripotency in nuclear transfer in medaka fish (Oryzias latipes).

    PubMed

    Bubenshchikova, Ekaterina; Kaftanovskaya, Elena; Motosugi, Nami; Fujimoto, Takafumi; Arai, Katsutoshi; Kinoshita, Masato; Hashimoto, Hisashi; Ozato, Kenjiro; Wakamatsu, Yuko

    2007-12-01

    Reprogramming of adult somatic cell nuclei to pluripotency has been unsuccessful in non-mammalian animals, primarily because of chromosomal aberrations in nuclear transplants, which are considered to be caused by asynchrony between the cell cycles of the recipient egg and donor nucleus. In order to normalize the chromosomal status, we used diploidized eggs by retention of second polar body release, instead of enucleated eggs, as recipients in nuclear transfer of primary culture cells from the caudal fin of adult green fluorescent protein gene (GFP) transgenic medaka fish (Oryzias latipes). We found that 2.7% of the reconstructed embryos grew into adults that expressed GFP in various tissues in the same pattern as in the donor fish. Moreover, these fish were diploid, fertile and capable of passing the marker gene to the next generation in Mendelian fashion. We hesitate to call these fish 'clones' because we used non-enucleated eggs as recipients; in effect, they may be chimeras consisting of cells derived from diploid recipient nuclei and donor nuclei. In either case, fish adult somatic cell nuclei were reprogrammed to pluripotency and differentiated into a variety of cell types including germ cells via the use of diploidized recipient eggs.

  9. Gene Resistance to Transcriptional Reprogramming following Nuclear Transfer Is Directly Mediated by Multiple Chromatin-Repressive Pathways.

    PubMed

    Jullien, Jerome; Vodnala, Munender; Pasque, Vincent; Oikawa, Mami; Miyamoto, Kei; Allen, George; David, Sarah Anne; Brochard, Vincent; Wang, Stan; Bradshaw, Charles; Koseki, Haruhiko; Sartorelli, Vittorio; Beaujean, Nathalie; Gurdon, John

    2017-03-02

    Understanding the mechanism of resistance of genes to reactivation will help improve the success of nuclear reprogramming. Using mouse embryonic fibroblast nuclei with normal or reduced DNA methylation in combination with chromatin modifiers able to erase H3K9me3, H3K27me3, and H2AK119ub1 from transplanted nuclei, we reveal the basis for resistance of genes to transcriptional reprogramming by oocyte factors. A majority of genes is affected by more than one type of treatment, suggesting that resistance can require repression through multiple epigenetic mechanisms. We classify resistant genes according to their sensitivity to 11 chromatin modifier combinations, revealing the existence of synergistic as well as adverse effects of chromatin modifiers on removal of resistance. We further demonstrate that the chromatin modifier USP21 reduces resistance through its H2AK119 deubiquitylation activity. Finally, we provide evidence that H2A ubiquitylation also contributes to resistance to transcriptional reprogramming in mouse nuclear transfer embryos.

  10. Transferred nuclear Overhauser effect analyses of membrane-bound enkephalin analogues by sup 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance: Correlation between activities and membrane-bound conformations

    SciTech Connect

    Milon, Alain; Miyazawa, Tatsuo; Higashijima, Tsutomu )

    1990-01-09

    Leu-enkephalin, (D-Ala{sup 2})Leu-enkephalin, and (D-Ala{sup 2})Leu-enkephalinamide (agonists) and (L-Ala{sup 2})Leu-enkephalin (inactive analogue) bind to lipid bilayer consisting of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylserine. The conformations that these compounds assume, once bound to perdeuterated phospholipid bilayer, have been shown to be unique, as shown by the transferred nuclear Overhauser effect (TRNOE) of {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy. In addition, their location in the bilayer was analyzed by TRNOE in the presence of spin-labeled phospholipids. These analyses showed a clear relationship between the activity and the peptide-membrane interaction. The three active peptides, when bound to membranes, adopt the same conformation, characterized by a type II{prime} {beta}-turn around Gly{sup 3}-Phe and a {gamma}-turn around Gly{sup 2} (or D-Ala{sup 2}). The inactive analogue, (L-Ala{sup 2})Leu-enkephalin, displayed a completely different TRNOE pattern corresponding to a different conformation in the membrane-bound state. The tyrosine residue of the active compounds is not inserted into the interior of membrane, but it is inserted into the bilayer for the L-Ala{sup 2} analogue. According to these results, (L-Ala{sup 2})Leu-enkephalin may be explained to be inactive because the mode of binding to the membranes is different from that of active compounds.

  11. Bacterioplankton assembly and interspecies interaction indicating increasing coastal eutrophication.

    PubMed

    Dai, Wenfang; Zhang, Jinjie; Tu, Qichao; Deng, Ye; Qiu, Qiongfen; Xiong, Jinbo

    2017-06-01

    Anthropogenic perturbations impose negative effects on coastal ecosystems, such as increasing levels of eutrophication. Given the biogeochemical significance of microorganisms, understanding the processes and mechanisms underlying their spatial distribution under changing environmental conditions is critical. To address this question, we examined how coastal bacterioplankton communities respond to increasing eutrophication levels created by anthropogenic perturbations. The results showed that the magnitude of changes in the bacterioplankton community compositions (BCCs) and the importance of deterministic processes that constrained bacterial assembly were closely associated with eutrophication levels. Moreover, increasing eutrophication significantly (P < 0.001) attenuated the distance decay rate, with a random spatial distribution of BCCs in the undisturbed location. In contrast, the complexity of interspecies interaction was enhanced under moderate eutrophication levels but declined under heavy eutrophication. Changes in the relative abundances of 27 bacterial families were significantly correlated with eutrophication levels. Notably, the pattern of enrichment or decrease for a given bacterial family was consistent with its known ecological functions. Our findings demonstrate that the magnitude of changes in BCCs and underlying determinism are dependent on eutrophication levels. However, the buffer capacity of bacterioplankton community is limited, with disrupted interspecies interaction occurring under heavy eutrophication. As such, bacterial assemblages are sensitive to changes in environmental conditions and could thus potentially serve as bio-indicators for increasing eutrophication.

  12. A yeast pheromone-based inter-species communication system.

    PubMed

    Hennig, Stefan; Clemens, André; Rödel, Gerhard; Ostermann, Kai

    2015-02-01

    We report on a pheromone-based inter-species communication system, allowing for a controlled cell-cell communication between the two species Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe as a proof of principle. It exploits the mating response pathways of the two yeast species employing the pheromones, α- or P-factor, as signaling molecules. The authentic and chimeric pheromone-encoding genes were engineered to code for the P-factor in S. cerevisiae and the α-factor in S. pombe. Upon transformation of the respective constructs, cells were enabled to express the mating pheromone of the opposite species. The supernatant of cultures of S. pombe cells expressing α-factor were able to induce a G1 arrest in the cell cycle, a change in morphology to the typical shmoo effect and expression driven by the pheromone-responsive FIG1 promoter in S. cerevisiae. The supernatant of cultures of S. cerevisiae cells expressing P-factor similarly induced cell cycle arrest in G1, an alteration in morphology typical for mating as well as the activation of the pheromone-responsive promoters of the rep1 and sxa2 genes in a pheromone-hypersensitive reporter strain of S. pombe. Apparently, both heterologous pheromones were correctly processed and secreted in an active form by the cells of the other species. Our data clearly show that the species-specific pheromone systems of yeast species can be exploited for a controlled inter-species communication.

  13. First report on interspecies quantitative correlation of ecotoxicity of pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Kar, Supratik; Roy, Kunal

    2010-10-01

    Pharmaceuticals being extensively and progressively used in human and veterinary medicine are emerging as significant environmental contaminants. Pharmaceuticals are designed to have a specific mode of action and many of them are persistent in the body. These features among others make pharmaceuticals to be evaluated for potential effects on aquatic flora and fauna. Low levels of pharmaceuticals have been detected in many countries in sewage treatment plant effluents, surface waters, groundwater and drinking waters. In contrast, there is a general scarcity of publicly available ecotoxicological data concerning pharmaceuticals. Interspecies toxicity correlations provide a tool for estimating contaminant sensitivity with known levels of uncertainty for a diversity of wildlife species. In this context, we have developed interspecies toxicity correlation between Daphnia magna (zooplankton) and fish (species according to OECD guidelines) assessing the ecotoxicological hazard potential of diverse 77 pharmaceuticals. The developed models are validated and consensus models are presented to predict toxicity of the individual compounds for any one species when the data for the other species are available. Informative illustrations of the contributing structural fragments which are responsible for the greater toxicity of the diverse pharmaceuticals are identified by the developed models. Developed models are also used to predict fish toxicities of 59 pharmaceuticals (for which Daphnia toxicities are present) and Daphnia toxicities of 30 pharmaceuticals (for which fish toxicities are present). This study will allow a better and comprehensive risk assessment of pharmaceuticals for which toxicity data is missing for a particular endpoint.

  14. Evolutionary Role of Interspecies Hybridization and Genetic Exchanges in Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Dujon, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Forced interspecific hybridization has been used in yeasts for many years to study speciation or to construct artificial strains with novel fermentative and metabolic properties. Recent genome analyses indicate that natural hybrids are also generated spontaneously between yeasts belonging to distinct species, creating lineages with novel phenotypes, varied genetic stability, or altered virulence in the case of pathogens. Large segmental introgressions from evolutionarily distant species are also visible in some yeast genomes, suggesting that interspecific genetic exchanges occur during evolution. The origin of this phenomenon remains unclear, but it is likely based on weak prezygotic barriers, limited Dobzhansky-Muller (DM) incompatibilities, and rapid clonal expansions. Newly formed interspecies hybrids suffer rapid changes in the genetic contribution of each parent, including chromosome loss or aneuploidy, translocations, and loss of heterozygosity, that, except in a few recently studied cases, remain to be characterized more precisely at the genomic level by use of modern technologies. We review here known cases of natural or artificially formed interspecies hybrids between yeasts and discuss their potential importance in terms of genome evolution. Problems of meiotic fertility, ploidy constraint, gene and gene product compatibility, and nucleomitochondrial interactions are discussed and placed in the context of other known mechanisms of yeast genome evolution as a model for eukaryotes. PMID:23204364

  15. Photoprotection and triplet energy transfer in higher plants: the role of electronic and nuclear fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Cupellini, Lorenzo; Jurinovich, Sandro; Prandi, Ingrid G; Caprasecca, Stefano; Mennucci, Benedetta

    2016-04-28

    Photosynthetic organisms employ several photoprotection strategies to avoid damage due to the excess energy in high light conditions. Among these, quenching of triplet chlorophylls by neighboring carotenoids (Cars) is fundamental in preventing the formation of singlet oxygen. Cars are able to accept the triplets from chlorophylls by triplet energy transfer (TET). We have here studied TET rates in CP29, a minor light-harvesting complex (LHC) of the Photosystem II in plants. A fully atomistic strategy combining classical molecular dynamics of the LHC in its natural environment with a hybrid time-dependent density functional theory/polarizable MM description of the TET is used. We find that the structural fluctuations of the pigment-protein complex can largely enhance the transfer rates with respect to those predicted using the crystal structure, reducing the triplet quenching times in the subnanosecond scale. These findings add a new perspective for the interpretation of the photoprotection function and its relation with structural motions of the LHC.

  16. A Multi-Dimensional Heat Transfer Model of a Tie-Tube and Hexagonal Fuel Element for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gomez, C. F.; Mireles, O. R.; Stewart, E.

    2016-01-01

    The Space Capable Cryogenic Thermal Engine (SCCTE) effort considers a nuclear thermal rocket design based around a Low-Enriched Uranium (LEU) design fission reactor. The reactor core is comprised of bundled hexagonal fuel elements that directly heat hydrogen for expansion in a thrust chamber and hexagonal tie-tubes that house zirconium hydride moderator mass for the purpose of thermalizing fast neutrons resulting from fission events. Created 3D steady state Hex fuel rod model with 1D flow channels. Hand Calculation were used to set up initial conditions for fluid flow. The Hex Fuel rod uses 1D flow paths to model the channels using empirical correlations for heat transfer in a pipe. Created a 2-D axisymmetric transient to steady state model using the CFD turbulent flow and Heat Transfer module in COMSOL. This model was developed to find and understand the hydrogen flow that might effect the thermal gradients axially and at the end of the tie tube where the flow turns and enters an annulus. The Hex fuel rod and Tie tube models were made based on requirements given to us by CSNR and the SCCTE team. The models helped simplify and understand the physics and assumptions. Using pipe correlations reduced the complexity of the 3-D fuel rod model and is numerically more stable and computationally more time-efficient compared to the CFD approach. The 2-D axisymmetric tie tube model can be used as a reference "Virtual test model" for comparing and improving 3-D Models.

  17. Developmental regulation of an snRNP core protein epitope during pig embryogenesis and after nuclear transfer for cloning.

    PubMed

    Prather, R S; Rickords, L F

    1992-10-01

    The appearance and stabilization of a core protein epitope of the snRNP is developmentally regulated during pig embryogenesis. The epitope recognized by the monoclonal antibody Y12 is present in the germinal vesicle of mature oocytes and interphase nuclei of late 4-cell stage (24 to 30 hours post cleavage to the 4-cell stage) to blastocyst stage embryos. There was no antibody localization within pronuclei, or nuclei of 2-cell or early 4-cell stage embryos. Zygotes or 2-cell stage embryos cultured in the presence of alpha-amanitin to the late 4-cell stage showed no immunoreactivity, whereas control embryos had immunoreactivity. Thus antibody localization was correlated with RNA synthesis and RNA processing that begins by 24 hours post cleavage to the 4-cell stage. A final experiment showed no detectable immunoreactivity in 16-cell stage nuclei that had been transferred to enucleated activated meiotic metaphase II oocytes. Since immunoreactivity is associated with active RNA synthesis and RNA processing, it suggests that the 16-cell stage nucleus, which is RNA synthetically active, does not process RNA after nuclear transfer to an enucleated activated meiotic metaphase II oocyte.

  18. Effect of epigenetic modification with trichostatin A and S-adenosylhomocysteine on developmental competence and POU5F1-EGFP expression of interspecies cloned embryos in dog.

    PubMed

    Mousai, M; Hosseini, S M; Hajian, M; Jafarpour, F; Asgari, V; Forouzanfar, M; Nasr-Esfahani, M H

    2015-10-01

    Adult canine fibroblasts stably transfected with either cytomegalovirus (CMV) or POU5F1 promoter-driven enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) were used to investigate if pre-treatment of these donor cells with two epigenetic drugs [trichostatin A (TSA), or S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH)] can improve the efficiency of interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer (iSCNT). Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), analyses revealed that TSA, but not SAH, treatment of both transgenic and non-transgenic fibroblasts significantly increased acetylation levels compared with untreated relatives. The expression levels of Bcl2 and P53 were significantly affected in TSA-treated cells compared with untreated cells, whereas SAH treatment had no significant effect on cell apoptosis. Irrespective of epigenetic modification, dog/bovine iSCNT embryos had overall similar rates of cleavage and development to 8-16-cell and morula stages in non-transgenic groups. For transgenic reconstructed embryos, however, TSA and SAH could significantly improve development to 8-16-cell and morula stages compared with control. Even though, irrespective of cell transgenesis and epigenetic modification, none of the iSCNT embryos developed to the blastocyst stage. The iSCNT embryos carrying CMV-EGFP expressed EGFP at all developmental stages (2-cell, 4-cell, 8-16-cell, and morula) without mosaicism, while no POU5F1-EGFP signal was observed in any stage of developing iSCNT embryos irrespective of TSA/SAH epigenetic modifications. These results indicated that bovine oocytes partially remodel canine fibroblasts and that TSA and SAH have marginal beneficial effects on this process.

  19. An approach for producing transgenic cloned cows by nuclear transfer of cells transfected with human alpha 1-antitrypsin gene.

    PubMed

    Jang, Goo; Bhuiyan, M M U; Jeon, Hyun Yong; Ko, Kyeong Hee; Park, Hee Jung; Kim, Min Kyu; Kim, Joung Ju; Kang, Sung Keun; Lee, Byeong Chun; Hwang, Woo Suk

    2006-06-01

    In an attempt to produce transgenic cloned cows secreting alpha 1-antitrypsin (alpha1-AT) protein into milk, bovine cumulus cells were transfected with a plasmid containing an alpha1-AT gene and green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene using Fugene 6 as a lipid carrier. The GFP-expressing cells were selected and transferred into enucleated bovine oocytes. Couplets were fused, chemically activated and cultured. Developmental competence was monitored and the number of inner cell mass (ICM) and trophectoderm (TE) cells in blastocysts were counted after differential staining. The percentage of blastocysts was lower (P < 0.05) in transgenic cloned embryos compared to non-transgenic cloned embryos (23% versus 35%). No difference in the numbers of ICM and TE cells between the two groups of embryos was observed. One or two GFP-expressing blastocysts were transferred into the uterus of each recipient cow. Out of 49 recipient cows, three pregnancies were detected by non-return estrus and rectal palpation. However, the pregnancies failed to maintain to term; two fetuses were aborted at Day 60 and 150, respectively, and one fetus at Day 240. The genomic DNA from the aborted fetus was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to investigate integration of the transgene in the fetus. The expected PCR product was sequenced and was identical to the sequence of alpha1-AT transgene. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that developmental competence of cloned embryos derived from transgenic donor cells was lower than embryos derived from non-transfected donor cells. Although we failed to obtain a viable transgenic cloned calf, integration of alpha1-AT gene into the fetus presents the possibility of producing transgenic cloned cows by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

  20. Adenosine conformations of nucleotides bound to methionyl tRNA synthetase by transferred nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Murali, N; Lin, Y; Mechulam, Y; Plateau, P; Rao, B D

    1997-01-01

    The conformations of MgATP and AMP bound to a monomeric tryptic fragment of methionyl tRNA synthetase have been investigated by two-dimensional proton transferred nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (TRNOESY). The sample protocol was chosen to minimize contributions from adventitious binding of the nucleotides to the observed NOE. The experiments were performed at 500 MHz on three different complexes, E.MgATP, E.MgATP.L-methioninol, and E.AMP.L-methioninol. A starter set of distances obtained by fitting NOE build-up curves (not involving H5' and H5") were used to determine a CHARMm energy-minimized structure. The positioning of the H5' and H5" protons was determined on the basis of a conformational search of the torsion angle to obtain the best fit with the observed NOEs for their superposed resonance. Using this structure, a relaxation matrix was set up to calculate theoretical build-up curves for all of the NOEs and compare them with the observed curves. The final structures deduced for the adenosine moieties in the three complexes are very similar, and are described by a glycosidic torsion angle (chi) of 56 degrees +/- 5 degrees and a phase angle of pseudorotation (P) in the range of 47 degrees to 52 degrees, describing a 3(4)T-4E sugar pucker. The glycosidic torsion angle, chi, deduced here for this adenylyl transfer enzyme and those determined previously for three phosphoryl transfer enzymes (creatine kinase, arginine kinase, and pyruvate kinase), and one pyrophosphoryl enzyme (PRibPP synthetase), are all in the range 52 degrees +/- 8 degrees. The narrow range of values suggests a possible common motif for the recognition and binding of the adenosine moiety at the active sites of ATP-utilizing enzymes, irrespective of the point of cleavage on the phosphate chain. Images FIGURE 6 PMID:9129831

  1. Production of cloned dogs by decreasing the interval between fusion and activation during somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sue; Park, Sun Woo; Hossein, Mohammad Shamim; Jeong, Yeon Woo; Kim, Joung Joo; Lee, Eugine; Kim, Yeun Wook; Hyun, Sang Hwan; Shin, Taeyoung; Hwang, Woo Suk

    2009-05-01

    To improve the efficiency of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) in dogs, we evaluated whether or not the interval between fusion and activation affects the success rate of SCNT. Oocytes retrieved from outbred dogs were reconstructed with adult somatic cells from a male or female Golden Retriever. In total, 151 and 225 reconstructed oocytes were transferred to 9 and 14 naturally synchronized surrogates for male and female donor cells, respectively. Chromosomal morphology was evaluated in 12 oocytes held for an interval of 2 hr between fusion and activation and 14 oocytes held for an interval of 4 hr. Three hundred seventy-six and 288 embryos were transferred to 23 and 16 surrogates for the 2 and 4 hr interval groups, respectively. Both the male (two pregnant surrogates gave birth to three puppies) and female (one pregnant surrogate gave birth to one puppy) donor cells gave birth to live puppies (P > 0.05). In the 2 hr group, significantly more reconstructed oocytes showed condensed, metaphase-like chromosomes compared to the 4 hr group (P < 0.05). A significantly higher pregnancy rate and a greater number of live born puppies were observed in the 2 hr group (13.0% and 1.1%, respectively) compared to the 4 hr group (0%) (P < 0.05). In total, three surrogate dogs carried pregnancies to term and four puppies were born. These results demonstrate that decreasing the interval between fusion and activation increases the success rate of clone production and pregnancy. These results may increase the overall efficiency of SCNT in the canine family.

  2. Nuclear Effects in Quasi-Elastic and Delta Resonance Production at Low Momentum Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demgen, John Gibney

    Analysis of data collected by the MINERvA experiment is done by showing the distribution of charged hadron energy for interactions that have low momentum transfer. This distribution reveals major discrepancies between the detector data and the standard MINERvA interaction model with only a simple global Fermi gas model. Adding additional model elements, the random phase approximation (RPA), meson exchange current (MEC), and a reduction of resonance delta production improve this discrepancy. Special attention is paid to resonance delta production systematic uncertainties, which do not make up these discrepancies even when added with resolution and biasing systematic uncertainties. Eye- scanning of events in this region also show a discrepancy, but we were insensitive to two-proton events, the predicted signature of the MEC process.

  3. Novel method for the nuclear transfer of adult somatic cells in medaka fish (Oryzias latipes): use of diploidized eggs as recipients.

    PubMed

    Wakamatsu, Yuko

    2008-08-01

    Until recently, the nuclear transfer of adult somatic cell nuclei in fish has been unsuccessful. This is primarily because of chromosomal aberrations in nuclear transplants, which are thought to arise due to asynchrony between the cell cycles of the recipient egg and donor nucleus. We recently succeeded in circumventing this difficulty by using a new nuclear transfer method in medaka fish (Oryzias latipes). Instead of enucleated eggs, the method uses non-enucleated and diploidized eggs, obtained by retention of the second polar body release, as recipients in the nuclear transfer of primary culture cells from the caudal fin of an adult green fluorescent protein gene (GFP)-transgenic strain. We found that 2.7% of the reconstructed embryos grew into diploid and fertile adults exhibiting donor expression characteristics and transmission of the GFP marker gene to progeny. The mechanism underlying the generation of nuclear transplants using this method is unknown at present; however, analyses of donor and recipient nuclei behavior and the cytoskeletal mechanisms involved in the early developmental stages, as well as the special ability of diploidized eggs to facilitate reprogramming of the donor nuclei will result in elucidation of the mechanism.

  4. Distribution and interspecies contact of feral swine and cattle on rangeland in south Texas: implications for disease transmission.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Susan M; Scott, H Morgan; de la Garza, Guadalupe R; Deck, Aubrey L; Cathey, James C

    2010-01-01

    The last outbreak of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) in the United States occurred in 1929. Since that time, numbers and distribution of feral swine (Sus scrofa) have increased greatly, especially in the southern states. This creates a potential risk to livestock production because swine are susceptible to, and can be carriers of, several economically harmful diseases of livestock. Most importantly, swine are potent amplifiers of FMD virus. In this study, global positioning system (GPS) collars were placed on rangeland cattle (Bos indicus x taurus) and feral swine to determine shared habitat use by these species on a large ranch in south Texas from 2004 to 2006. The aim was to identify locations and rates of interspecies contact that may result in effective transfer of FMD virus, should an outbreak occur. In shrubland and riparian areas, animals were dispersed, so contacts within and between species were relatively infrequent. Indirect contacts, whereby cattle and feral swine used the same location (within 20 m) within a 360-min period, occurred primarily at water sources, and seasonally in irrigated forage fields and along ranch roads. Direct contacts between species (animals <20 m apart and within 15 min) were rare and occurred primarily at water sources. Changes in ranch management practices are suggested to reduce interspecies contact should an FMD disease outbreak occur. This information can also be used to improve current epidemiologic models to better fit free-ranging animal populations.

  5. Effective donor cell fusion conditions for production of cloned dogs by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Park, JungEun; Oh, HyunJu; Hong, SoGun; Kim, MinJung; Kim, GeonA; Koo, OkJae; Kang, SungKeun; Jang, Goo; Lee, ByeongChun

    2011-03-01

    As shown by the birth of the first cloned dog 'Snuppy', a protocol to produce viable cloned dogs has been reported. In order to evaluate optimum fusion conditions for improving dog cloning efficiency, in vivo matured oocytes were reconstructed with adult somatic cells from a female Pekingese using different fusion conditions. Fusion with needle vs chamber methods, and with low vs high pulse strength was compared by evaluating fusion rate and in vivo development of canine cloned embryos. The fusion rates in the high voltage groups were significantly higher than in the low voltage groups regardless of fusion method (83.5 vs 66.1% for the needle fusion method, 67.4 vs 37.9% for the fusion chamber method). After embryo transfer, one each pregnancy was detected after using the needle fusion method with high and low voltage and in the chamber fusion method with high voltage, whereas no pregnancy was detected using the chamber method with low voltage. However, only the pregnancy from the needle fusion method with high voltage was maintained to term and one healthy puppy was delivered. The results of the present study demonstrated that two DC pulses of 3.8 to 4.0 kV/cm for 15 μsec using the needle fusion method were the most effective method for the production of cloned dogs under the conditions of this experiment.

  6. Heat Transfer Salts for Nuclear Reactor Systems - Chemistry Control, Corrosion Mitigation, and Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Mark; Sridharan, Kumar; Morgan, Dane; Peterson, Per; Calderoni, Pattrick; Scheele, Randall; Casekka, Andrew; McNamara, Bruce

    2015-01-22

    The concept of a molten salt reactor has existed for nearly sixty years. Previously all work was done during a large collaborative effort at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, culminating in a research reactor which operated for 15,000 hours without major error. This technical success has garnished interest in modern, high temperature, reactor schemes. Research using molten fluoride salts for nuclear applications requires a steady supply of high grade molten salts. There is no bulk supplier of research grade fluoride salts in the world, so a facility which could provide all the salt needed for testing at the University of Wisconsin had to be produced. Two salt purification devices were made for this purpose, a large scale purifier, and a small scale purifier, each designed to clean the salts from impurities and reduce their corrosion potential. As of now, the small scale has performed with flibe salt, hydrogen, and hydrogen fluoride, yielding clean salt. This salt is currently being used in corrosion testing facilities at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the University of Wisconsin. Working with the beryllium based salts requires extensive safety measures and health monitoring to prevent the development of acute or chronic beryllium disease, two pulmonary diseases created by an allergic reaction to beryllium in the lungs. Extensive health monitoring, engineering controls, and environment monitoring had to be set up with the University of Wisconsin department of Environment, Health and Safety. The hydrogen fluoride required for purification was also an extreme health hazard requiring thoughtful planning and execution. These dangers have made research a slow and tedious process. Simple processes, such as chemical handling and clean-up, can take large amounts of ingenuity and time. Other work has complemented the experimental research at Wisconsin to advance high temperature reactor goals. Modeling work has been performed in house to re

  7. Post-fusion treatment with MG132 increases transcription factor expression in somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos in pigs.

    PubMed

    You, Jinyoung; Lee, Joohyeong; Kim, Jinyoung; Park, Junhong; Lee, Eunsong

    2010-02-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effect of post-fusion treatment of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) oocytes with the proteasomal inhibitor MG132 on maturation promoting factor (MPF) activity, nuclear remodeling, embryonic development, and gene expression of cloned pig embryos. Immediately after electrofusion, SCNT oocytes were treated with MG132 and/or caffeine for 2 hr, vanadate for 0.5 hr, or vanadate for 0.5 hr followed by MG132 for 1.5 hr. Of the MG132 concentrations tested (0-5 microM), the 1 microM concentration showed a higher rate of blastocyst formation (25.9%) than 0 (14.2%), 0.5 (16.9%), and 5 microM (16.9%). Post-fusion treatment with MG132, caffeine, and both MG132 and caffeine improved blastocyst formation (22.1%, 21.4%, and 24.4%, respectively), whereas vanadate treatment inhibited blastocyst formation (6.5%) compared to the control (11.1%). When examined 2 hr after fusion and 1 hr after activation, MPF activity remained at a higher (P < 0.05) level in SCNT oocytes that were treated post-fusion with caffeine and/or MG132, but it was decreased by vanadate. The rate of oocytes showing premature chromosome condensation was not altered by MG132 but was decreased by vanadate treatment. In addition, formation of single pronuclei was increased by MG132 compared to control and vanadate treatment. MG132-treated embryos showed increased expression of POU5F1, DPPA2, DPPA3, DPPA5, and NDP52l1 genes compared to control embryos. Our results demonstrate that post-fusion treatment of SCNT oocytes with MG132 prevents MPF degradation and increases expression of transcription factors in SCNT embryos, which are necessary for normal development of SCNT embryos.

  8. Effect of radiocesium transfer on ambient dose rate in forest environments affected by the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant accident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, H.

    2015-12-01

    We investigated the transfer of canopy-intercepted radiocesium to the forest floor during 3 years following the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. The cesium-137 (Cs-137) contents in throughfall, stemflow, and litterfall were monitored in two coniferous stands (plantation of Japanese cedar) and a deciduous broad-leaved forest stand (Japanese oak with red pine). We also measured the ambient dose rate (ADR) at different heights in the forest using a survey meter and a portable Ge gamma-ray detector. Total Cs-137 deposition flux from the canopy to forest floor for the mature cedar, young cedar, and the mixed broad-leaved stands were 166 kBq/m2, 174 kBq/m2, and 60 kBq/m2, respectively. These values correspond to 38%, 40% and 13% of total atmospheric input after the accident. The ambient dose rate in forest exhibited height dependency and its vertical distribution varied with forest type and stand age. The ambient dose rate showed an exponential decrease with time for all the forest sites, however the decreasing trend differed depending on the height of dose measurement and forest type. The ambient dose rate at the canopy (approx. 10 m-height) decreased faster than that expected from physical decay of the two radiocesium isotopes, whereas those at the forest floor varied between the three forest stands. The radiocesium deposition via throughfall seemed to increase ambient dose rate during the first 200 days after the accident, however there was no clear relationship between litterfall and ambient dose rate since 400 days after the accident. These data suggested that the ambient dose rate in forest environment varied both spatially and temporally reflecting the transfer of radiocesium from canopy to forest floor. However, further monitoring investigation and analysis are required to determine the effect of litterfall on long-term trend of ambient dose rate in forest environments.

  9. Establishment and characterization of fetal fibroblast cell lines for generating human lysozyme transgenic goats by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Luo, Yan; Zheng, Liming; Liu, Qingqing; Yang, Zhongcai; Wang, Yongsheng; Su, Jianmin; Quan, Fusheng; Zhang, Yong

    2013-10-01

    This study was performed to qualify goat fetal fibroblast (GFF) cell lines for genetic modification and somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) to produce human lysozyme (hLYZ) transgenic goats. Nine GFF cell lines were established from different fetuses, and the proliferative lifespan and chromosomal stability were analyzed. The results suggested that cell lines with a longer lifespan had stable chromosomes compared with those of cells lines with a shorter lifespan. According to the proliferative lifespan, we divided GFF cell lines into two groups: cell lines with a long lifespan (GFF1/2/7/8/9; group L) and cell lines with a short lifespan (GFF3/4/5/6; group S). Next, a hLYZ expression vector was introduced into these cell lines by electroporation. The efficiencies of colony formation, expansion in culture, and the quality of transgenic clonal cell lines were significant higher in group L than those in group S. The mean fusion rate and blastocyst rate in group L were higher than those in group S (80.3 ± 1.7 vs. 65.1 ± 4.2 % and 19.5 ± 0.6 vs. 15.1 ± 1.1 %, respectively, P < 0.05). After transferring cloned embryos into the oviducts of recipient goats, three live kids were born. PCR and Southern blot analyses confirmed integration of the transgene in cloned goats. In conclusion, the lifespan of GFF cell lines has a major effect on the efficiency to produce transgenic cloned goats. Therefore, the proliferative lifespan of primary cells may be used as a criterion to characterize the quality of cell lines for genetic modification and SCNT.

  10. Stochastic anomaly of methylome but persistent SRY hypermethylation in disorder of sex development in canine somatic cell nuclear transfer

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Young-Hee; Lu, Hanlin; Park, Chi-Hun; Li, Meiyan; Luo, Huijuan; Kim, Joung Joo; Liu, Siyang; Ko, Kyeong Hee; Huang, Shujia; Hwang, In Sung; Kang, Mi Na; Gong, Desheng; Park, Kang Bae; Choi, Eun Ji; Park, Jung Hyun; Jeong, Yeon Woo; Moon, Changjong; Hyun, Sang-Hwan; Kim, Nam Hyung; Jeung, Eui-Bae; Yang, Huanming; Hwang, Woo Suk; Gao, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) provides an excellent model for studying epigenomic reprogramming during mammalian development. We mapped the whole genome and whole methylome for potential anomalies of mutations or epimutations in SCNT-generated dogs with XY chromosomal sex but complete gonadal dysgenesis, which is classified as 78, XY disorder of sex development (DSD). Whole genome sequencing revealed no potential genomic variations that could explain the pathogenesis of DSD. However, extensive but stochastic anomalies of genome-wide DNA methylation were discovered in these SCNT DSD dogs. Persistent abnormal hypermethylation of the SRY gene was observed together with its down-regulated mRNA and protein expression. Failure of SRY expression due to hypermethylation was further correlated with silencing of a serial of testis determining genes, including SOX9, SF1, SOX8, AMH and DMRT1 in an early embryonic development stage at E34 in the XYDSD gonad, and high activation of the female specific genes, including FOXL2, RSPO1, CYP19A1, WNT4, ERα and ERβ, after one postnatal year in the ovotestis. Our results demonstrate that incomplete demethylation on the SRY gene is the driving cause of XYDSD in these XY DSD dogs, indicating a central role of epigenetic regulation in sex determination. PMID:27501986

  11. Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer Followed by CRIPSR/Cas9 Microinjection Results in Highly Efficient Genome Editing in Cloned Pigs.

    PubMed

    Sheets, Timothy P; Park, Chi-Hun; Park, Ki-Eun; Powell, Anne; Donovan, David M; Telugu, Bhanu P

    2016-12-03

    The domestic pig is an ideal "dual purpose" animal model for agricultural and biomedical research. With the availability of genome editing tools such as clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) and associated nuclease Cas9 (CRISPR/Cas9), it is now possible to perform site-specific alterations with relative ease, and will likely help realize the potential of this valuable model. In this article, we investigated for the first time a combination of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) and direct injection of CRISPR/Cas ribonucleoprotein complex targeting GRB10 into the reconstituted oocytes to generate GRB10 ablated Ossabaw fetuses. This strategy resulted in highly efficient (100%) generation of biallelic modifications in cloned fetuses. By combining SCNT with CRISPR/Cas9 microinjection, genome edited animals can now be produced without the need to manage a founder herd, while simultaneously eliminating the need for laborious in vitro culture and screening. Our approach utilizes standard cloning techniques while simultaneously performing genome editing in the cloned zygotes of a large animal model for agriculture and biomedical applications.

  12. Improved Cloning Efficiency and Developmental Potential in Bovine Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer with the Oosight Imaging System

    PubMed Central

    Park, Min Jee; Park, Hyo Young; Noh, Eun Ji; Noh, Eun Hyung; Park, Kyoung Sik; Lee, Jun Beom; Jeong, Chang Jin; Riu, Key Zung

    2012-01-01

    Abstract In somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) procedures, exquisite enucleation of the recipient oocyte is critical to cloning efficiency. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of two enucleation systems, Hoechst staining and UV irradiation (hereafter, irradiation group) and Oosight imaging (hereafter, Oosight group), on the in vitro production of bovine SCNT embryos. In the Oosight group, the apoptotic index (2.8±0.5 vs. 7.3±1.2) was lower, and the fusion rate (75.6% vs. 62.9%), cleavage rate (78.0% vs. 63.7%), blastocyst rate (40.2% vs. 29.2%), and total cell number (128.3±4.8 vs. 112.2±7.6) were higher than those in the irradiation group (all p<0.05). The overall efficiency after SCNT was twice as high in the Oosight group as that in the irradiation group (p<0.05). The relative mRNA expression levels of Oct4, Nanog, Interferon-tau, and Dnmt3A were higher and those of Caspase-3 and Hsp70 were lower in the Oosight group compared with the irradiation group (p<0.05). This is the first report to show the positive effect of the Oosight imaging system on molecular gene expression in the SCNT embryo. The Oosight imaging system may become the preferred choice for enucleation because it is less detrimental to the developmental potential of bovine SCNT embryos. PMID:22816525

  13. Stochastic anomaly of methylome but persistent SRY hypermethylation in disorder of sex development in canine somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Young-Hee; Lu, Hanlin; Park, Chi-Hun; Li, Meiyan; Luo, Huijuan; Kim, Joung Joo; Liu, Siyang; Ko, Kyeong Hee; Huang, Shujia; Hwang, In Sung; Kang, Mi Na; Gong, Desheng; Park, Kang Bae; Choi, Eun Ji; Park, Jung Hyun; Jeong, Yeon Woo; Moon, Changjong; Hyun, Sang-Hwan; Kim, Nam Hyung; Jeung, Eui-Bae; Yang, Huanming; Hwang, Woo Suk; Gao, Fei

    2016-08-09

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) provides an excellent model for studying epigenomic reprogramming during mammalian development. We mapped the whole genome and whole methylome for potential anomalies of mutations or epimutations in SCNT-generated dogs with XY chromosomal sex but complete gonadal dysgenesis, which is classified as 78, XY disorder of sex development (DSD). Whole genome sequencing revealed no potential genomic variations that could explain the pathogenesis of DSD. However, extensive but stochastic anomalies of genome-wide DNA methylation were discovered in these SCNT DSD dogs. Persistent abnormal hypermethylation of the SRY gene was observed together with its down-regulated mRNA and protein expression. Failure of SRY expression due to hypermethylation was further correlated with silencing of a serial of testis determining genes, including SOX9, SF1, SOX8, AMH and DMRT1 in an early embryonic development stage at E34 in the XY(DSD) gonad, and high activation of the female specific genes, including FOXL2, RSPO1, CYP19A1, WNT4, ERα and ERβ, after one postnatal year in the ovotestis. Our results demonstrate that incomplete demethylation on the SRY gene is the driving cause of XY(DSD) in these XY DSD dogs, indicating a central role of epigenetic regulation in sex determination.

  14. [The risk of congenital malformations and genomic imprinting defects in assisted reproductive technologies and nuclear transfer cloning].

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, Carlos Y

    2005-09-01

    Recent studies show that assisted reproductive technologies (ART), whether in vitro fertilization (IVF) or intra-cytoplasmatic sperm injection (ICSI) or applied to cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) are associated to a higher risk of congenital malformations and errors in deprogramming, maintenance or reprogramming genomic imprinting in humans and animals. IVF and ICSI are also associated to an increased admission to neonatal intensive care units and more need for health care resources in infancy. A mutagenic effect of a chemical used in SCNT has been reported and gene depression was found in bovine embryos obtained by IVF or SCNT. The causes of these anomalies could be pathological conditions for which ART is applied, a direct effect of technologies on the zygotes or embryos, avoidance for zygotes or embryos of the oviduct path that is needed to elicit necessary immunity or genomic programming processes, or adaptive selective steps acquired during thousands of millions of generations in evolution. The knowledge of evolution is emphasized as essential in the scientific ethical analysis.

  15. Generation of hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase gene knockout rabbits by homologous recombination and gene trapping through somatic cell nuclear transfer

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Mingru; Jiang, Weihua; Fang, Zhenfu; Kong, Pengcheng; Xing, Fengying; Li, Yao; Chen, Xuejin; Li, Shangang

    2015-01-01

    The rabbit is a common animal model that has been employed in studies on various human disorders, and the generation of genetically modified rabbit lines is highly desirable. Female rabbits have been successfully cloned from cumulus cells, and the somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) technology is well established. The present study generated hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene knockout rabbits using recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated homologous recombination and SCNT. Gene trap strategies were employed to enhance the gene targeting rates. The male and female gene knockout fibroblast cell lines were derived by different strategies. When male HPRT knockout cells were used for SCNT, no live rabbits were obtained. However, when female HPRT+/− cells were used for SCNT, live, healthy rabbits were generated. The cloned HPRT+/− rabbits were fertile at maturity. We demonstrate a new technique to produce gene-targeted rabbits. This approach may also be used in the genetic manipulation of different genes or in other species. PMID:26522387

  16. Generation of porcine fetal fibroblasts expressing the tetracycline-inducible Cas9 gene by somatic cell nuclear transfer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guoqian; Liu, Kai; Wei, Hengxi; Li, Li; Zhang, Shouquan

    2016-01-01

    Cas9 endonuclease, from so-called clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated (Cas) systems of Streptococcus pyogenes, type II functions as an RNA-guided endonuclease and edits the genomes of prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms, including deletion and insertion by DNA double-stranded break repair mechanisms. In previous studies, it was observed that Cas9, with a genome-scale lentiviral single-guide RNA library, could be applied to a loss-of-function genetic screen, although the loss-of-function genes have yet to be verified in vitro and this approach has not been used in porcine cells. Based on these observations, lentiviral Cas9 was used to infect porcine primary fibroblasts to achieve cell colonies carrying Cas9 endonuclease. Subsequently, porcine fetal fibroblasts expressing the tetracycline-inducible Cas9 gene were generated by somatic cell nuclear transfer, and three 30 day transgenic porcine fetal fibroblasts (PFFs) were obtained. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR), reverse transcription-PCR and western blot analysis indicated that the PFFs were Cas9-positive. In addition, one of the three integrations was located near to known functional genes in the PFF1 cell line, whereas neither of the integrations was located in the PFF1 or PFF2 cell lines. It was hypothesized that these transgenic PFFs may be useful for conditional genomic editing in pigs, and for generating ideal modified porcine models. PMID:27430306

  17. Relationships of survival time, productivity and cause of death with telomere lengths of cows produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Konishi, Kazuyuki; Yonai, Miharu; Kaneyama, Kanako; Ito, Satoshi; Matsuda, Hideo; Yoshioka, Hajime; Nagai, Takashi; Imai, Kei

    2011-10-01

    The reproductive ability, milk-producing capacity, survival time and relationships of these parameters with telomere length were investigated in 4 groups of cows produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Each group was produced using the same donor cells (6 Holstein (1H), 3 Holstein (2H), 4 Jersey (1J) and 5 Japanese Black (1B) cows). As controls, 47 Holstein cows produced by artificial insemination were used. The SCNT cows were artificially inseminated, and multiple deliveries were performed after successive rounds of breeding and conception. No correlation was observed between the telomere length and survival time in the SCNT cows. Causes of death of SCNT cows included accidents, accident-associated infections, inappropriate management, acute mastitis and hypocalcemia. The lifetime productivity of SCNT cows was superior to those of the controls and cell donor cows. All SCNT beef cows with a relatively light burden of lactation remained alive and showed significantly prolonged survival time compared with the cows in the SCNT dairy breeds. These results suggest that the lifetime productivity of SCNT cows was favorable, and their survival time was more strongly influenced by environmental burdens, such as pregnancy, delivery, lactation and feeding management, than by the telomere length.

  18. Effects of 3-hydroxyflavone on the cellular and molecular characteristics of bovine embryos produced by somatic-cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Su, Jianmin; Wang, Yongsheng; Li, Wenzhe; Gao, Mingqing; Ma, Yefei; Hua, Song; Quan, Fusheng; Zhang, Yong

    2014-03-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of 3-hydroxyflavone, a natural antioxidant pigment enriched in vegetables, on the developmental cellular and molecular characteristics of bovine somatic-cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos. There were no significant differences in the cleavage rate at 48 hr of culture or in the inner cell mass (ICM)-to-trophectoderm (TE) ratio between 3-hydroxyflavone addition and untreated (control) groups (P > 0.05). 3-hydroxyflavone (20 µM) did, however, increase the cleavage rate at 24 hr of culture and the blastocyst-formation rate on Days 6 and 7 (P < 0.05); decrease the levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species in two-, four-, and eight-cell stage embryos (P < 0.05); increase H3K9ac levels in two- and four-cell stages (P < 0.05); increase the total cell number; and decrease the apoptosis index in Day-7 blastocysts. Furthermore, the addition of 3-hydroxyflavone resulted in lower expression of the stress-related gene HSP70.1 and pro-apoptotic gene BAX, as well as higher expression of the anti-apoptotic gene BCL-xL and pluripotency-related genes OCT4 and SOX2 in Day-7 blastocysts produced by SCNT (P < 0.05). The addition of 3-hydroxyflavone during in vitro culture thus exerted beneficial effects on preimplantation development of bovine SCNT embryos both at the cellular and molecular levels.

  19. Generation of GGTA1 biallelic knockout pigs via zinc-finger nucleases and somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Bao, Lei; Chen, HaiDe; Jong, UiMyong; Rim, CholHo; Li, WenLing; Lin, XiJuan; Zhang, Dan; Luo, Qiong; Cui, Chun; Huang, HeFeng; Zhang, Yan; Xiao, Lei; Fu, ZhiXin

    2014-02-01

    Genetically modified pigs are valuable models of human disease and donors of xenotransplanted organs. Conventional gene targeting in pig somatic cells is extremely inefficient. Zinc-finger nuclease (ZFN) technology has been shown to be a powerful tool for efficiently inducing mutations in the genome. However, ZFN-mediated targeting in pigs has rarely been achieved. Here, we used ZFNs to knock out the porcine α-1, 3-galactosyl-transferase (GGTA1) gene, which generates Gal epitopes that trigger hyperacute immune rejection in pig-to-human transplantation. Primary pig fibroblasts were transfected with ZFNs targeting the coding region of GGTA1. Eighteen mono-allelic and four biallelic knockout cell clones were obtained after drug selection with efficiencies of 23.4% and 5.2%, respectively. The biallelic cells were used to produce cloned pigs via somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Three GGTA1 null piglets were born, and one knockout primary fibroblast cell line was established from a cloned fetus. Gal epitopes on GGTA1 null pig cells were completely eliminated from the cell membrane. Functionally, GGTA1 knockout cells were protected from complement-mediated immune attacks when incubated with human serum. This study demonstrated that ZFN is an efficient tool in creating gene-modified pigs. GGTA1 null pigs and GGTA1 null fetal fibroblasts would benefit research and pig-to-human transplantation.

  20. Histone Demethylase Expression Enhances Human Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer Efficiency and Promotes Derivation of Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Chung, Young Gie; Matoba, Shogo; Liu, Yuting; Eum, Jin Hee; Lu, Falong; Jiang, Wei; Lee, Jeoung Eun; Sepilian, Vicken; Cha, Kwang Yul; Lee, Dong Ryul; Zhang, Yi

    2015-12-03

    The extremely low efficiency of human embryonic stem cell (hESC) derivation using somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) limits its potential application. Blastocyst formation from human SCNT embryos occurs at a low rate and with only some oocyte donors. We previously showed in mice that reduction of histone H3 lysine 9 trimethylation (H3K9me3) through ectopic expression of the H3K9me3 demethylase Kdm4d greatly improves SCNT embryo development. Here we show that overexpression of a related H3K9me3 demethylase KDM4A improves human SCNT, and that, as in mice, H3K9me3 in the human somatic cell genome is an SCNT reprogramming barrier. Overexpression of KDM4A significantly improves the blastocyst formation rate in human SCNT embryos by facilitating transcriptional reprogramming, allowing efficient derivation of SCNT-derived ESCs using adult Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD) patient somatic nuclei donors. This conserved mechanistic insight has potential applications for improving SCNT in a variety of contexts, including regenerative medicine.

  1. Comparison of the efficiency of Banna miniature inbred pig somatic cell nuclear transfer among different donor cells.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hongjiang; Qing, Yubo; Pan, Weirong; Zhao, Hongye; Li, Honghui; Cheng, Wenmin; Zhao, Lu; Xu, Chengsheng; Li, Hong; Li, Si; Ye, Lei; Wei, Taiyun; Li, Xiaobing; Fu, Guowen; Li, Wengui; Xin, Jige; Zeng, Yangzhi

    2013-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is an important method of breeding quality varieties, expanding groups, and preserving endangered species. However, the viability of SCNT embryos is poor, and the cloned rate of animal production is low in pig. This study aims to investigate the gene function and establish a disease model of Banna miniature inbred pig. SCNT with donor cells derived from fetal, newborn, and adult fibroblasts was performed, and the cloning efficiencies among the donor cells were compared. The results showed that the cleavage and blastocyst formation rates did not significantly differ between the reconstructed embryos derived from the fetal (74.3% and 27.4%) and newborn (76.4% and 21.8%) fibroblasts of the Banna miniature inbred pig (P>0.05). However, both fetal and newborn fibroblast groups showed significantly higher rates than the adult fibroblast group (61.9% and 13.0%; P<0.05). The pregnancy rates of the recipients in the fetal and newborn fibroblast groups (60% and 80%, respectively) were higher than those in the adult fibroblast group. Eight, three, and one cloned piglet were obtained from reconstructed embryos of the fetal, newborn, and adult fibroblasts, respectively. Microsatellite analyses results indicated that the genotypes of all cloning piglets were identical to their donor cells and that the genetic homozygosity of the Banna miniature inbred pig was higher than those of the recipients. Therefore, the offspring was successfully cloned using the fetal, newborn, and adult fibroblasts of Banna miniature inbred pig as donor cells.

  2. An ideal oocyte activation protocol and embryo culture conditions for somatic cell nuclear transfer using sheep oocytes.

    PubMed

    Patel, Hiren; Chougule, Shruti; Chohan, Parul; Shah, Naval; Bhartiya, Deepa

    2014-10-01

    Pluripotent stem cells are possibly the best candidates for regenerative medicine, and somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is one of the viable options to make patient-specific embryonic stem cells. Till date efficacy of SCNT embryos is very low and requires further improvement like ideal oocyte activation and in vitro culture system. The aim of the present study was to evaluate ideal oocyte activation using different stimulation protocols and to study the effect of cumulus co-culture conditions on embryo development. Results demonstrate that between electric stimulation and chemical stimulation using calcium ionomycin and ionophore, best oocyte activation was obtained using calcium ionomycin (5 microM for 5 min) which resulted in 83% cleavage followed by 7% of early blastocyst which further increased to 15% when a cumulus bed was also introduced during embryo culture. Sequential modified Charles Rosenkrans 2 (mCR2) medium was used for embryo culture in which glucose levels were increased from 1 mM to 5 mM from Day 3 onwards. SCNT using cumulus cells as donor somatic cell, calcium ionomycin to activate the reconstructed oocyte and embryo culture on a cumulus bed in sequential mCR2 medium, resulted in the development of 6% embryos to early blastocyst stage. Such technological advances will make SCNT a viable option to make patient-specific pluripotent stem cell lines in near future.

  3. Donor cells at the G1 phase enhance homogeneous gene expression among blastomeres in bovine somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Daisaku; Kasamatsu, Aya; Ideta, Atsushi; Urakawa, Manami; Matsumoto, Kazuya; Hosoi, Yoshihiko; Iritani, Akira; Aoyagi, Yoshito; Saeki, Kazuhiro

    2012-02-01

    The success rate of bovine somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos to full term has been reported to be higher with G1 cells than with G0 cells. To better understand the reason for this, we analyzed the kinetics of luminescence activity in bovine SCNT embryos from G0 and G1 cells carrying a luciferase gene under the control of the β-actin promoter during early embryonic development. At 60-h postfusion, when bovine embryonic gene activation (EGA) begins, the luminescence activity was higher in G1-SCNT embryos than G0-SCNT embryos. Moreover, half of the G1-SCNT embryos exhibited homogeneous luminescence among the blastomeres, whereas more than half of the G0-SCNT embryos exhibited mosaic luminescence. To characterize the differential luminescence pattern in SCNT embryos, the expressions of several endogenous genes and the level of DNA methylation were determined in all blastomeres of SCNT embryos with or without luminescence. The expressions of several development-related genes (H2AFZ, GJA1, and BAX) and level of DNA methylation of the SCNT embryos with luminescence were the same as those of normal embryos produced by in vitro fertilization. A higher success rate in G1-SCNT embryos is thought to contribute to homogeneous expression among all blastomeres at EGA.

  4. Production of somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos using in vitro-grown and in vitro-matured oocytes in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Hironobu; Kida, Yuta; Oh, Noriyoshi; Kitada, Kensaku; Matsumoto, Kazuya; Saeki, Kazuhiro; Taniguchi, Takeshi; Hosoi, Yoshihiko

    2015-08-01

    We examined growing oocytes collected from follicles remaining in superovulated rabbit ovaries, that were grown (in vitro growth, IVG) and matured (in vitro maturation, IVM) in vitro. We produced somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos using the mature oocytes and examined whether these embryos have the ability to develop to the blastocyst stage. In addition, we examined the effects of trichostatin A (TSA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi), on the developmental competence of SCNT embryos derived from IVG-IVM oocytes. After growth for 7 days and maturation for 14-16 h in vitro, the growing oocytes reached the metaphase II stage (51.4%). After SCNT, these reconstructed embryos reached the blastocyst stage (20%). Furthermore, the rate of development to the blastocyst stage and the number of cells in the blastocysts in SCNT embryos derived from IVG-IVM oocytes were significantly higher for TSA-treated embryos compared with TSA-untreated embryos (40.6 versus 21.4% and 353.1 ± 59.1 versus 202.5 ± 54.6, P < 0.05). These results indicate that rabbit SCNT embryos using IVG-IVM oocytes have the developmental competence to reach the blastocyst stage.

  5. Telomere elongation and naive pluripotent stem cells achieved from telomerase haplo-insufficient cells by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Sung, Li-Ying; Chang, Wei-Fang; Zhang, Qian; Liu, Chia-Chia; Liou, Jun-Yang; Chang, Chia-Chun; Ou-Yang, Huan; Guo, Renpeng; Fu, Haifeng; Cheng, Winston T K; Ding, Shih-Torng; Chen, Chuan-Mu; Okuka, Maja; Keefe, David L; Chen, Y Eugene; Liu, Lin; Xu, Jie

    2014-12-11

    Haplo-insufficiency of telomerase genes in humans leads to telomere syndromes such as dyskeratosis congenital and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Generation of pluripotent stem cells from telomerase haplo-insufficient donor cells would provide unique opportunities toward the realization of patient-specific stem cell therapies. Recently, pluripotent human embryonic stem cells (ntESCs) have been efficiently achieved by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). We tested the hypothesis that SCNT could effectively elongate shortening telomeres of telomerase haplo-insufficient cells in the ntESCs with relevant mouse models. Indeed, telomeres of telomerase haplo-insufficient (Terc(+/-)) mouse cells are elongated in ntESCs. Moreover, ntESCs derived from Terc(+/-) cells exhibit naive pluripotency as evidenced by generation of Terc(+/-) ntESC clone pups by tetraploid embryo complementation, the most stringent test of naive pluripotency. These data suggest that SCNT could offer a powerful tool to reprogram telomeres and to discover the factors for robust restoration of telomeres and pluripotency of telomerase haplo-insufficient somatic cells.

  6. Morphological abnormalities, impaired fetal development and decrease in myostatin expression following somatic cell nuclear transfer in dogs.

    PubMed

    Hong, Il-Hwa; Jeong, Yeon-Woo; Shin, Taeyoung; Hyun, Sang-Hwan; Park, Jin-Kyu; Ki, Mi-Ran; Han, Seon-Young; Park, Se-Il; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Eun-Mi; Kim, Ah-Young; You, Sang-Young; Hwang, Woo-Suk; Jeong, Kyu-Shik

    2011-05-01

    Several mammals, including dogs, have been successfully cloned using somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), but the efficiency of generating normal, live offspring is relatively low. Although the high failure rate has been attributed to incomplete reprogramming of the somatic nuclei during the cloning process, the exact cause is not fully known. To elucidate the cause of death in cloned offspring, 12 deceased offspring cloned by SCNT were necropsied. The clones were either stillborn just prior to delivery or died with dyspnea shortly after birth. On gross examination, defects in the anterior abdominal wall and increased heart and liver sizes were found. Notably, a significant increase in muscle mass and macroglossia lesions were observed in deceased SCNT-cloned dogs. Interestingly, the expression of myostatin, a negative regulator of muscle growth during embryogenesis, was down-regulated at the mRNA level in tongues and skeletal muscles of SCNT-cloned dogs compared with a normal dog. Results of the present study suggest that decreased expression of myostatin in SCNT-cloned dogs may be involved in morphological abnormalities such as increased muscle mass and macroglossia, which may contribute to impaired fetal development and poor survival rates.

  7. Glucose parameters are altered in mouse offspring produced by assisted reproductive technologies and somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Scott, Karen A; Yamazaki, Yukiko; Yamamoto, Miyuki; Lin, Yanling; Melhorn, Susan J; Krause, Eric G; Woods, Stephen C; Yanagimachi, Ryuzo; Sakai, Randall R; Tamashiro, Kellie L K

    2010-08-01

    Fortunately, the majority of children conceived through assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs) appear healthy; however, metabolic abnormalities, including elevated glucose and increased and altered adipose tissue deposition, have been reported in adolescents. To parse out factors that may be responsible, we investigated the effects of two different ARTs--in vitro fertilization (IVF) and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI)--as well as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) on glucose clearance, body weight, and body composition of young adult mice. Female and male mice generated through ART weighed more than control (naturally conceived [STOCK]) mice at birth. No differences in body weight were observed in males up to 8 wk of age. ART females took longer than control mice to clear a glucose bolus, with glucose clearance most impaired in SCNT females. IVF females secreted more insulin and had a higher insulin peak 15 min after glucose injection compared with all other groups. Male mice exhibited no differences in glucose clearance, but IVF males required more insulin to do so. SCNT females weighed more than IVF, ICSI, and STOCK females, and they had higher fat content than ICSI females and higher leptin levels than all other groups. These results show that glucose parameters are altered in young adult mice conceived through techniques associated with ART before onset of obesity and may be responsible for its development later in life. The present study suggests that more investigation regarding the long-term effects of manipulations associated with ART is warranted.

  8. Improved cloning efficiency and developmental potential in bovine somatic cell nuclear transfer with the oosight imaging system.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Young; Park, Min Jee; Park, Hyo Young; Noh, Eun Ji; Noh, Eun Hyung; Park, Kyoung Sik; Lee, Jun Beom; Jeong, Chang Jin; Riu, Key Zung; Park, Se Pill

    2012-08-01

    In somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) procedures, exquisite enucleation of the recipient oocyte is critical to cloning efficiency. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of two enucleation systems, Hoechst staining and UV irradiation (hereafter, irradiation group) and Oosight imaging (hereafter, Oosight group), on the in vitro production of bovine SCNT embryos. In the Oosight group, the apoptotic index (2.8 ± 0.5 vs. 7.3 ± 1.2) was lower, and the fusion rate (75.6% vs. 62.9%), cleavage rate (78.0% vs. 63.7%), blastocyst rate (40.2% vs. 29.2%), and total cell number (128.3±4.8 vs. 112.2 ± 7.6) were higher than those in the irradiation group (all p<0.05). The overall efficiency after SCNT was twice as high in the Oosight group as that in the irradiation group (p<0.05). The relative mRNA expression levels of Oct4, Nanog, Interferon-tau, and Dnmt3A were higher and those of Caspase-3 and Hsp70 were lower in the Oosight group compared with the irradiation group (p<0.05). This is the first report to show the positive effect of the Oosight imaging system on molecular gene expression in the SCNT embryo. The Oosight imaging system may become the preferred choice for enucleation because it is less detrimental to the developmental potential of bovine SCNT embryos.

  9. Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer Followed by CRIPSR/Cas9 Microinjection Results in Highly Efficient Genome Editing in Cloned Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Sheets, Timothy P.; Park, Chi-Hun; Park, Ki-Eun; Powell, Anne; Donovan, David M.; Telugu, Bhanu P.

    2016-01-01

    The domestic pig is an ideal “dual purpose” animal model for agricultural and biomedical research. With the availability of genome editing tools such as clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) and associated nuclease Cas9 (CRISPR/Cas9), it is now possible to perform site-specific alterations with relative ease, and will likely help realize the potential of this valuable model. In this article, we investigated for the first time a combination of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) and direct injection of CRISPR/Cas ribonucleoprotein complex targeting GRB10 into the reconstituted oocytes to generate GRB10 ablated Ossabaw fetuses. This strategy resulted in highly efficient (100%) generation of biallelic modifications in cloned fetuses. By combining SCNT with CRISPR/Cas9 microinjection, genome edited animals can now be produced without the need to manage a founder herd, while simultaneously eliminating the need for laborious in vitro culture and screening. Our approach utilizes standard cloning techniques while simultaneously performing genome editing in the cloned zygotes of a large animal model for agriculture and biomedical applications. PMID:27918485

  10. Novel Mammalian Herpesviruses and Lineages within the Gammaherpesvirinae: Cospeciation and Interspecies Transfer▿

    PubMed Central

    Ehlers, Bernhard; Dural, Güzin; Yasmum, Nezlisah; Lembo, Tiziana; de Thoisy, Benoit; Ryser-Degiorgis, Marie-Pierre; Ulrich, Rainer G.; McGeoch, Duncan J.

    2008-01-01

    Novel members of the subfamily Gammaherpesvirinae, hosted by eight mammalian species from six orders (Primates, Artiodactyla, Perissodactyla, Carnivora, Scandentia, and Eulipotyphla), were discovered using PCR with pan-herpesvirus DNA polymerase (DPOL) gene primers and genus-specific glycoprotein B (gB) gene primers. The gB and DPOL sequences of each virus species were connected by long-distance PCR, and contiguous sequences of approximately 3.4 kbp were compiled. Six additional gammaherpesviruses from four mammalian host orders (Artiodactyla, Perissodactyla, Primates, and Proboscidea), for which only short DPOL sequences were known, were analyzed in the same manner. Together with available corresponding sequences for 31 other gammaherpesviruses, alignments of encoded amino acid sequences were made and used for phylogenetic analyses by maximum-likelihood and Bayesian Monte Carlo Markov chain methods to derive a tree which contained two major loci of unresolved branching details. The tree was rooted by parallel analyses that included alpha- and betaherpesvirus sequences. This gammaherpesvirus tree contains 11 major lineages and presents the widest view to date of phylogenetic relationships in any subfamily of the Herpesviridae, as well as the most complex in the number of deep lineages. The tree's branching pattern can be interpreted only in part in terms of the cospeciation of virus and host lineages, and a substantial incidence of the interspecies transfer of viruses must also be invoked. PMID:18216123

  11. Valproic acid developmental toxicity and pharmacokinetics in the rhesus monkey: an interspecies comparison.

    PubMed

    Hendrickx, A G; Nau, H; Binkerd, P; Rowland, J M; Rowland, J R; Cukierski, M J; Cukierski, M A

    1988-10-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the developmental toxicity and drug distributional and metabolic characteristics of prenatal valproic acid (VPA) exposure in rhesus monkeys. Oral administration of 20-600 mg/kg/day VPA (approximately 1-15 X human therapeutic dose) to 33 animals on variable gestational days (GD) during organogenesis resulted in dose-dependent developmental toxicity manifested as increased embryo/fetal mortality, intrauterine growth retardation, and craniofacial and skeletal defects. Biphasic plasma elimination curves were observed for total and free VPA on the first (GD 21) and last (GD 50) days of treatment in the 100- and 200-mg/kg/day dose groups. VPA exhibited dose-independent elimination kinetics at the plasma concentrations observed in this study. There was no significant change in pharmacokinetic parameters (maternal plasma elimination rate, area under the curve, peak plasma concentration) between the first and last days of treatment at either dose level. Placental transfer studies indicated that embryos were exposed to half the free VPA concentrations present in maternal plasma on GD 37. Comparisons of interspecies sensitivity to VPA-induced developmental toxicity in the mouse, rat, monkey, and man are made.

  12. Uptake of airborne semivolatile organic compounds in agricultural plants: Field measurements of interspecies variability

    SciTech Connect

    Boehme, F.; Welsch-Pausch, K.; McLachlan, M.S.

    1999-06-01

    The accumulation of semivolatile organic compounds (SOCs) in plants is important because plants are the major vector of these compounds into terrestrial food chains and because plants play an important role in scavenging SOCs from the atmosphere and transferring them to the soil. Agricultural plants are of particular interest because they are a key link in the atmosphere-fodder-milk/beef food chain that accounts for much of background human exposure to persistent lipophilic organic pollutants such as PCBs and PCDD/Fs. In this study the accumulation of PCBs, PCDD/Fs, PAHs, and some chlorobenzenes was determined in eight grassland species as well as maize and sunflower leaves collected simultaneously at a semirural site in Central Europe. Air samples were collected at the same site during the growth of these plants, and the particle-bound and gaseous concentrations were determined. A newly developed interpretive framework was employed to analyze the data, and it was established whether the accumulation of a given compound was due primarily to equilibrium partitioning, kinetically limited gaseous deposition, or particle-bound deposition. The interspecies variability in uptake was then examined, and it was found that for those compounds which had accumulated primarily via kinetically limited gaseous deposition and particle-bound deposition the variation among the 10 species was generally a factor of <4.

  13. Potential of adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells and skeletal muscle-derived satellite cells for somatic cell nuclear transfer mediated transgenesis in Arbas Cashmere goats.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yu; Wu, Haiqing; Ma, Yuzhen; Yuan, Jianlong; Liang, Hao; Liu, Dongjun

    2014-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer is used to generate genetic models for research and new, genetically modified livestock varieties. Goat fetal fibroblast cells (gFFCs) are the predominant nuclear donors in Cashmere goat transgenic cloning, but have disadvantages. We evaluated the potential of goat adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (gADSCs) and goat skeletal muscle-derived satellite cells (gMDSCs) for somatic cell nuclear transfer, evaluating their proliferation, pluripotency, transfection efficiency and capacity to support full term development of embryos after additive gene transfer or homologous recombination. gADSCs and gMDSCs were isolated by enzyme digestion and differentiated into neurocytes, myotube cells and insulin-producing cells. Neuron-specific enolase, fast muscle myosin and insulin expression were determined by immunohistochemistry. Following somatic cell nuclear transfer with donor cells derived from gADSCs, gMDSCs and gFFCs, transfection and cloning efficiencies were compared. Red fluorescent protein levels were determined by quantitative PCR and western blotting. 5-Methylcytosine, H4K5, H4K12 and H3K18 were determined immunohistochemically. gADSCs and gMDSCs were maintained in culture for up to 65 passages, whereas gFFCs could be passaged barely more than 15 times. gADSCs and gMDSCs had higher fluorescent colony forming efficiency and greater convergence (20%) and cleavage (10%) rates than gFFCs, and exhibited differing H4K5 histone modification patterns after somatic cell nuclear transfer and in vitro cultivation. After transfection with a pDsRed2-1 expression plasmid, the integrated exogenous genes did not influence the pluripotency of gADSCs-pDsRed2-1 or gMDSCs-pDsRed2-1. DsRed2 mRNA expression by cloned embryos derived from gADSCs-pDsRed2-1 or gMDSCs-pDsRed2-1 was more than twice that of gFFCs-pDsRed2-1 embryos (P<0.01). Pregnancy rates of gADSCs-pDsRed2-1 and gMDSCs-pDsRed2-1 recipients were higher than those of gFFCs-pDsRed2-1 recipients (P

  14. Interspecies singlet pairing in a mixture of two spin-1 Bose condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Jie; Li Tiantian; Zhang Yunbo

    2011-02-15

    We study the ground-state properties of a mixture formed by two spin-1 condensates in the absence of an external magnetic field. As the collisional symmetry between interspecies bosonic atoms is broken, the interspecies coupling interaction ({beta}) and interspecies singlet-pairing interaction ({gamma}) arise. The ground state can be calculated using the angular momentum theory analytically for {gamma}=0. The full quantum approach of exact diagonalization is adopted numerically to consider the more general case as {gamma}{ne}0. We illustrate the competition between the two interspecies interactions and find that as singlet-pairing interaction dominates (or the total spin vanishes), there are still different types of singlet formations which are well determined by {beta}.

  15. INTER-SPECIES MODELS FOR ACUTE AQUATIC TOXICITY BASED ON MECHANISM OF ACTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation will provide interspecies QSARs for acute toxicity to 17 aquatic species, such as fish, snail, tadpole, hydrozoan, crustacean, insect larvae, and bacteria developed using 5,000 toxic effect results for approximately 2400 chemicals.

  16. Development of Species Sensitivity Distributions for Wildlife Using Interspecies Toxicity Correlation Models

    EPA Science Inventory

    Species sensitivity distributions (SSD) are cumulative distributions of chemical toxicity of multiple species and have had limited application in wildlife risk assessment because of relatively small datasets of wildlife toxicity values. Interspecies correlation estimation (ICE) m...

  17. ESTIMATION OF CHEMICAL TOXICITY TO WILDLIFE SPECIES USING INTERSPECIES CORRELATION MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ecological risks to wildlife are typically assessed using toxicity data for relataively few species and with limited understanding of differences in species sensitivity to contaminants. Empirical interspecies correlation models were derived from LD50 values for 49 wildlife speci...

  18. Interspecies differences in metabolism of arsenic by cultured primary hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Drobna, Zuzana; Walton, Felecia S.; Harmon, Anne W.; Thomas, David J.; Styblo, Miroslav

    2010-05-15

    Biomethylation is the major pathway for the metabolism of inorganic arsenic (iAs) in many mammalian species, including the human. However, significant interspecies differences have been reported in the rate of in vivo metabolism of iAs and in yields of iAs metabolites found in urine. Liver is considered the primary site for the methylation of iAs and arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (As3mt) is the key enzyme in this pathway. Thus, the As3mt-catalyzed methylation of iAs in the liver determines in part the rate and the pattern of iAs metabolism in various species. We examined kinetics and concentration-response patterns for iAs methylation by cultured primary hepatocytes derived from human, rat, mice, dog, rabbit, and rhesus monkey. Hepatocytes were exposed to [{sup 73}As]arsenite (iAs{sup III}; 0.3, 0.9, 3.0, 9.0 or 30 nmol As/mg protein) for 24 h and radiolabeled metabolites were analyzed in cells and culture media. Hepatocytes from all six species methylated iAs{sup III} to methylarsenic (MAs) and dimethylarsenic (DMAs). Notably, dog, rat and monkey hepatocytes were considerably more efficient methylators of iAs{sup III} than mouse, rabbit or human hepatocytes. The low efficiency of mouse, rabbit and human hepatocytes to methylate iAs{sup III} was associated with inhibition of DMAs production by moderate concentrations of iAs{sup III} and with retention of iAs and MAs in cells. No significant correlations were found between the rate of iAs methylation and the thioredoxin reductase activity or glutathione concentration, two factors that modulate the activity of recombinant As3mt. No associations between the rates of iAs methylation and As3mt protein structures were found for the six species examined. Immunoblot analyses indicate that the superior arsenic methylation capacities of dog, rat and monkey hepatocytes examined in this study may be associated with a higher As3mt expression. However, factors other than As3mt expression may also contribute to

  19. Space transfer concepts and analysis for exploration missions. Implementation plan and element description document (draft final). Volume 5: Nuclear electric propulsion vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) concept design developed in support of the Space Transfer Concepts and Analysis for Exploration Missions (STCAEM) study is presented. The evolution of the NEP concept is described along with the requirements, guidelines, and assumptions for the design. Operating modes and options are defined and a systems description of the vehicle is presented. Artificial gravity configuration options and space and ground support systems are discussed. Finally, an implementation plan is presented which addresses technology needs, schedules, facilities and costs.

  20. Continuing evolution and interspecies transmission of influenza viruses in live bird markets in Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun-Jeong; Kwon, Ji-Sun; Lee, Dong-Hun; Lee, Yu-Na; Youn, Ha-Na; Lee, Youn-Jeong; Kim, Min-Chul; Jeong, Ok-Mi; Kang, Hyun-Mi; Kwon, Jun-Hun; Lee, Joong-Bok; Park, Seung-Yong; Choi, In-Soo; Song, Chang-Seon

    2010-03-01

    Live bird markets (LBMs) provide an ideal environment for the evolution and interspecies transfer of avian influenza viruses (AIVs). In this study, we analyzed AIVs present in LBMs in Korea during the winter seasons of 2006-08. Sixty-five AIVs that belong to four hemagglutination (HA) subtypes ofAIV (H3, H4, H6, and H9) were isolated from 644 pooled tissue or swab samples collected in LBMs. Most H9 subtypes of AIVs were isolated from Galliformes (chickens, silky fowls, pheasants, and guinea fowls), and other subtypes were isolated from Anseriformes (Pekin ducks and mallards). In addition, we obtained a single H3N2 virus from nasal swabs of dogs sold in LBMs, and the virus was genetically identical to the canine influenza virus (CIV) isolated from pet dogs in Korea. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that the Korean H9N2 viruses prevalent in chickens have provided their gene segments to AIVs circulating in ducks. These gene transfers facilitated reassortment events among AIVs and likely generated the ancestors of CIV in Korea. An animal challenge study using chickens, quail, mice, and dogs had shown that the H4 and H6 subtypes could replicate in mice and that some H4 and H6 viruses could replicate in chickens without preadaptation. In addition, two H3 subtype viruses (H3N2 and H3N8) induced interstitial pneumonia that accompanied clinical signs and seroconversion in dogs. Our findings indicate that the newly evolved AIVs have been continuously generated by reassortment in ducks, and these reassortments could result in expanding the host range of AIVs.

  1. Bovine SNRPN methylation imprint in oocytes and day 17 in vitro-produced and somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos.

    PubMed

    Lucifero, Diana; Suzuki, João; Bordignon, Vilceu; Martel, Josée; Vigneault, Christian; Therrien, Jacinthe; Filion, France; Smith, Lawrence C; Trasler, Jacquetta M

    2006-10-01

    Findings from recent studies have suggested that the low survival rate of animals derived via somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) may be in part due to epigenetic abnormalities brought about by this procedure. DNA methylation is an epigenetic modification of DNA that is implicated in the regulation of imprinted genes. Genes subject to genomic imprinting are expressed monoallelically in a parent of origin-dependent manner and are important for embryo growth, placental function, and neurobehavioral processes. The vast majority of imprinted genes have been studied in mice and humans. Herein, our objectives were to characterize the bovine SNRPN gene in gametes and to compare its methylation profile in in vivo-produced, in vitro-produced, and SCNT-derived Day 17 elongating embryos. A CpG island within the 5' region of SNRPN was identified and examined using bisulfite sequencing. SNRPN alleles were unmethylated in sperm, methylated in oocytes, and approximately 50% methylated in somatic samples. The examined SNRPN region appeared for the most part to be normally methylated in three in vivo-produced Day 17 embryos and in eight in vitro-produced Day 17 embryos examined, while alleles from Day 17 SCNT embryos were severely hypomethylated in seven of eight embryos. In this study, we showed that the SNRPN methylation profiles previously observed in mouse and human studies are also conserved in cattle. Moreover, SCNT-derived Day 17 elongating embryos were abnormally hypomethylated compared with in vivo-produced and in vitro-produced embryos, which in turn suggests that SCNT may lead to faulty reprogramming or maintenance of methylation imprints at this locus.

  2. Vitamin C supplementation enhances compact morulae formation but reduces the hatching blastocyst rate of bovine somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Wang, Yong-Sheng; Wang, Li-Jun; Zhang, Hui; Li, Rui-Zhe; Cui, Chen-Chen; Li, Wen-Zhe; Zhang, Yong; Jin, Ya-Ping

    2014-08-01

    Vitamin C, an antioxidant that reduces reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cells, is capable of significantly improving the developmental competence of porcine and mouse somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos, both in vitro and in vivo. In the present study, the effects of vitamin C on the developmental competence of bovine SCNT embryos were investigated. The results indicated that vitamin C (40 μg/mL) positively affected the scavenging of intracellular ROS, cleavage rate at 24 h (76.67 vs. 68.26%, p<0.05), compact morulae formation (60.83 vs. 51.30%, p<0.05), and the blastomere apoptosis index (3.70 ± 1.41 vs. 4.43% ± 1.65, p<0.05) of bovine SCNT embryos. However, vitamin C supplementation did not significantly affect the blastocyst formation rate and proportion of inner cell mass over total cells per blastocyst on day 7. Moreover, vitamin C supplementation obviously impaired the total cell numbers per blastocyst (97.20 ± 11.35 vs. 88.57 ± 10.43, p<0.05) on day 7 and the hatching blastocysts formation rate on day 9 (26.51 vs. 50.65%, p<0.05) compared with that of the untreated group. Vitamin C supplementation preferentially improved the viability of bovine SCNT embryos prior to the blastocyst stage, but did not enhance the formation and quality of blastocysts in vitro. In conclusion, the effect of vitamin C on the development of bovine SCNT embryos is complex, and vitamin C is not a suitable antioxidant chemical for the in vitro culture of bovine SCNT embryos.

  3. Comparative analysis of various donor cell types for somatic cell nuclear transfer and its association with apoptosis and senescence.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunhye; Hyun, Sang-Hwan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to characterize potential somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) donor cells by comparing two lines of transfected cells with their non‑modified parental controls in culture. Fetal fibroblasts used in the study originated from crossbred Landrace x Yorkshire x Duroc (LYD) or Yucatan mini‑pigs. The LYD fibroblasts were modified by the transfection of a tetracycline on/off gene, whereas Yucatan fibroblasts were triple transfected with the complement regulatory factors, human decay‑accelerating factor and human CD59, as well as H‑transferase. At the 9th doubling passage, parameters associated with senescence and apoptosis, including morphology, mRNA expression (TP53, Bcl‑2, Bax) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, were evaluated. Population doubling (PD) time was calculated by assessing the time required for cell numbers to double by averaging the three cell passages. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction revealed that when comparing LYD with Yucatan fibroblasts, the latter exhibited a lower relative expression of TP53 and a higher relative expression of antiproliferative Bcl‑2, which correlated with the PD time results (26 and 40 h, respectively). Tetracycline on/off transfected cell lines exhibited a lower relative expression of antiapoptotic Bcl‑2 compared with their originating LYD cells. Similarly, triple transgenic cells exhibited higher TP53 and Bax mRNA expression levels than their non‑transgenic counterparts. For ROS measurement, cells were incubated with 2',7'‑dichlorofluorescin diacetate under the same conditions and were analyzed by flow cytometry. Yucatan fibroblasts exhibited higher ROS content than LYD cells. In addition, the two transgenic cell lines produced higher ROS levels than their corresponding non‑transfected cell lines. In conclusion, these results indicate that characteristics associated with senescence and apoptosis in transfected cells during culture may affect the efficiency of

  4. Autologous somatic cell nuclear transfer in pigs using recipient oocytes and donor cells from the same animal.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eunsong; Song, Kilyoung

    2007-12-01

    The objective of the present study was to examine the feasibility of the production of autologous porcine somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) blastocysts using oocytes and donor cells from slaughtered ovaries. Therefore, we attempted to optimize autologous SCNT by examining the effects of electrical fusion conditions and donor cell type on cell fusion and the development of SCNT embryos. Four types of donor cells were used: 1) denuded cumulus cells (DCCs) collected from in vitro-matured (IVM) oocytes; 2) cumulus cells collected from oocytes after 22 h of IVM and cultured for 18 h (CCCs); 3) follicular cells obtained from follicular contents and cultured for 40 h (CFCs); and 4) adult skin fibroblasts. The DCCs showed a significantly (p < 0.01) lower rate of fusion than the CCCs when two pulses of 170 V/mm DC were applied for 50 microsec (19 +/- 2% vs. 77 +/-3%). The rate of DCC fusion with oocytes was increased by the application of two DC pulses of 190 V/mm for 30 microsec, although this was still lower than the rate of fusion in the CCCs (33 +/- 1% vs. 80 +/- 2%). The rates of cleavage (57 +/- 5%) and blastocyst formation (1 +/- 1%) in the DCC-derived embryos did not differ from those (55 +/- 6% and 3 +/- 1%, respectively) in the CCC- derived SCNT embryos. Autologous SCNT embryos derived from CFCs (5 +/- 2%) showed higher levels of blastocyst formation (p < 0.01) than CCC-derived autologous SCNT embryos (1 +/- 0%). In conclusion, the results of the present study show that culturing cumulus and follicular cells before SCNT enhances cell fusion with oocytes and that CFCs are superior to CCCs in the production of higher numbers of autologous SCNT blastocysts.

  5. Passage number of porcine embryonic germ cells affects epigenetic status and blastocyst rate following somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Gao, Yu; Petkov, Stoyan; Purup, Stig; Hyttel, Poul; Callesen, Henrik

    2014-06-10

    Epigenetic instability of donor cells due to long-term in vitro culture may influence the success rate of subsequent somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Therefore, the present study was designed (1) to investigate the epigenetic changes after prolonged culture in vitro of porcine embryonic germ (EG) cells, including differences in expression levels of both DNA methylation and demethylation-related genes and catalyses of histone modifications, and (2) to assess the efficiency of SCNT using EG cells from different passages. Results showed that genes either associated with DNA demethylation including DNMTs and TET1 or genes related to histone acetylation including HDACs were highly expressed in EG cells at higher passages when compared to EG cells at lower passages. In addition, the expression level of H3K27me3 functional methylase EZH2 increased while no changes were observed on H3K27me3 demethylase JMJD3 in relation to passage number. Moreover, the expression levels of both the H3K4me3 methylase MLL1 and the H3K4me3 demethylase RBP2 were increased at high passages. By using lower passage (numbers 3-5) EG cells as donor cells, the SCNT efficiency was significantly lower compared with use of fetal fibroblast donor cells. However, similar blastocyst rates were achieved when using higher passage (numbers 9-12) EG cells as donor cells. In conclusion, the present study suggests that the epigenetic status of EG cells change with increasing passage numbers, and that higher passage number EG cells are better primed for SCNT.

  6. Nuclear transfer alters the DNA methylation status of specific genes in fertilized and parthenogenetically activated mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hikichi, Takafusa; Kohda, Takashi; Wakayama, Sayaka; Ishino, Fumitoshi; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2008-03-01

    Recent cloning technology has been demonstrated successfully using nuclear transfer (NT) techniques to generate embryonic stem (ES) cells. Mice can be cloned from adult somatic cells or ES cells by NT, and such cloned embryos can be used to establish new NT-ES cell lines. However, ES cells derived from parthenogenetic embryos show epigenetic disorders and low potential for normal differentiation unless used to produce subsequent generations of NT-ES lines. Thus, enucleated oocytes can initialize epigenetic modification, but the extent and efficacy of this remain unclear. In this study, our goal was to clarify why the contribution rate of ES cells derived from parthenogenetic embryos (pES) cells appears to improve after NT. We compared gene expression profiles between pES and NT-pES cell lines using DNA microarray analysis and allele-specific DNA methylation analysis. Although changes in expression level were observed for 4% of 34,967 genes, only 81 (0.2%) showed common changes across multiple cell lines. In particular, the expression level of a paternally expressed gene, U2af1-rs1, was significantly increased in all NT-pES cell lines investigated. The methylation status at the upstream differentially methylated region of U2af1-rs1 was also changed significantly after NT. This was observed in NT-pES cells, but also in conventionally produced NT-ES cells, which has never been reported previously. These results suggest that NT affects the epigenetic status of a few gene regions in common and that a change in the methylation status of U2af1-rs1 could be used as a genetic marker to investigate the effects of NT.

  7. Genetic reprogramming of transcription factor ap-2gamma in bovine somatic cell nuclear transfer preimplantation embryos and placentomes.

    PubMed

    Aston, Kenneth I; Li, Gugan-Peng; Hicks, Brady A; Winger, Quinton A; White, Kenneth L

    2009-03-01

    Bovine somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) efficiency remains very low despite a tremendous amount of research devoted to its improvement over the past decade. Frequent early and mid-gestational losses are commonly accompanied by placental abnormalities. A transcription factor, activating protein AP-2gamma, has been shown to be necessary for proper placental development in the mouse. We first evaluated the expression of the gene coding for AP-2gamma (Tfap2c) in several bovine fibroblast donor cell lines and found it was not expressed. Subsequently we determined the expression profile of Tfap2c in oocytes and various stages of preimplantation in vitro fertilized (IVF) embryos. Tfap2c was undetectable in oocytes and early embryos, and was detectable at relatively high levels in morula and blastocyst IVF embryos. The lack of expression in oocytes and donor cells means Tfap2c must be induced in the zygote at the morula stage in properly reprogrammed embryos. SCNT embryos expressed Tfap2c at the eight-cell stage, 2 days earlier than control embryos. Control embryos first expressed Tfap2c at the morula stage, and at this stage Tfap2c was significantly lower in the SCNT embryos. No differences in expression were detected at the blastocyst stage. To determine whether Tfap2c was properly reprogrammed in the placenta of SCNT pregnancies, we evaluated its expression in cotyledons and caruncles of SCNT and control pregnancies between days 55 and 90 gestation. Expression of Tfap2c in caruncles significantly increased between days 55 and 90, while expression in cotyledons was relatively consistent over that same period. Expression levels in SCNT tissues were not different from controls. This data indicates Tfap2c expression is altered in early preimplantation SCNT embryos, which may have developmental consequences resulting from genes influenced by Tfap2c, but expression was not different at the blastocyst stage and in placentomes.

  8. Using a nano-flare probe to detect RNA in live donor cells prior to somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Fu, Bo; Ren, Liang; Liu, Di; Ma, Jian-Zhang; An, Tie-Zhu; Yang, Xiu-Qin; Ma, Hong; Guo, Zhen-Hua; Zhu, Meng; Bai, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Many transgenes are silenced in mammalian cells (donor cells used for somatic cell nuclear transfer [SCNT]). Silencing correlated with a repressed chromatin structure or suppressed promoter, and it impeded the production of transgenic animals. Gene transcription studies in live cells are challenging because of the drawbacks of reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Nano-flare probes provide an effective approach to detect RNA in living cells. We used 18S RNA, a housekeeping gene, as a reference gene. This study aimed to establish a platform to detect RNA in single living donor cells using a Nano-flare probe prior to SCNT and to verify the safety and validity of the Nano-flare probe in order to provide a technical foundation for rescuing silenced transgenes in transgenic cloned embryos. We investigated cytotoxic effect of the 18S RNA-Nano-flare probe on porcine fetal fibroblasts, characterized the distribution of the 18S RNA-Nano-flare probe in living cells and investigated the effect of the 18S RNA-Nano-flare probe on the development of cloned embryos after SCNT. The cytotoxic effect of the 18S RNA-Nano-flare probe on porcine fetal fibroblasts was dose-dependent, and 18S RNA was detected using the 18S RNA-Nano-flare probe. In addition, treating donor cells with 500 pM 18S RNA-Nano-flare probe did not have adverse effects on the development of SCNT embryos at the pre-implantation stage. In conclusion, we established a preliminary platform to detect RNA in live donor cells using a Nano-flare probe prior to SCNT.

  9. Plutonium from Above-Ground Nuclear Tests in Milk Teeth: Investigation of Placental Transfer in Children Born between 1951 and 1995 in Switzerland

    PubMed Central

    Froidevaux, Pascal; Haldimann, Max

    2008-01-01

    Background Occupational risks, the present nuclear threat, and the potential danger associated with nuclear power have raised concerns regarding the metabolism of plutonium in pregnant women. Objective We measured plutonium levels in the milk teeth of children born between 1951 and 1995 to assess the potential risk that plutonium incorporated by pregnant women might pose to the radiosensitive tissues of the fetus through placenta transfer. Methods We used milk teeth, whose enamel is formed during pregnancy, to investigate the transfer of plutonium from the mother’s blood plasma to the fetus. We measured plutonium using sensitive sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry techniques. We compared our results with those of a previous study on strontium-90 (90Sr) released into the atmosphere after nuclear bomb tests. Results Results show that plutonium activity peaks in the milk teeth of children born about 10 years before the highest recorded levels of plutonium fallout. By contrast, 90Sr, which is known to cross the placenta barrier, manifests differently in milk teeth, in accordance with 90Sr fallout deposition as a function of time. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that plutonium found in milk teeth is caused by fallout that was inhaled around the time the milk teeth were shed and not from any accumulation during pregnancy through placenta transfer. Thus, plutonium may not represent a radiologic risk for the radiosensitive tissues of the fetus. PMID:19079728

  10. Revival of extinct species using nuclear transfer: hope for the mammoth, true for the Pyrenean ibex, but is it time for "conservation cloning"?

    PubMed

    Piña-Aguilar, Raul E; Lopez-Saucedo, Janet; Sheffield, Richard; Ruiz-Galaz, Lilia I; Barroso-Padilla, Jose de J; Gutiérrez-Gutiérrez, Antonio

    2009-09-01

    Recent accomplishments in the fields of nuclear transfer and genomics, such as the cloned offspring production from frozen mouse cells, cryopreserved at not too low temperatures without cryoprotectors; or the sequencing of wooly mammoth genome, have opened the opportunity for the revival of extinct species. As expected, they are receiving a lot of publicity in the media and also scientific attention. Furthermore, it was recently published the "revival" of the first extinct subspecie: the Pyrenean ibex (Capra pyrenaica pyrenaica), a wild goat extinct in 2000. This strengthens the field of cloning as it had been tarnished by induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS) and other methods of reprogramming. However, for biological conservation purposes, cloning is not generally accepted as an alternative for animal conservation, and there is an ongoing debate between reproductive scientists and conservation specialists. Although we believe that nuclear transfer technologies have an opportunity in conservation efforts for some species that are on the brink of extinction and that population status, geographical isolation, reproductive characteristics, and human pressure create a situation that is almost unsustainable. In this article we discuss the barriers in cloning mammoths and cloning controversies in conservation from a zoological perspective, citing the species that might benefit from nuclear transfer techniques in the arduous journey so as not to disappear forever from this, our world.

  11. Revisiting Suppression of Interspecies Hybrid Male Lethality in Caenorhabditis Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Lauren E.; Haag, Eric S.

    2017-01-01

    Within the nematode genus Caenorhabditis, Caenorhabditis briggsae and C. nigoni are among the most closely related species known. They differ in sexual mode, with C. nigoni retaining the ancestral XO male–XX female outcrossing system, while C. briggsae recently evolved self-fertility and an XX-biased sex ratio. Wild-type C. briggsae and C. nigoni can produce fertile hybrid XX female progeny, but XO progeny are either 100% inviable (when C. briggsae is the mother) or viable but sterile (when C. nigoni is the mother). A recent study provided evidence suggesting that loss of the Cbr-him-8 meiotic regulator in C. briggsae hermaphrodites allowed them to produce viable and fertile hybrid XO male progeny when mated to C. nigoni. Because such males would be useful for a variety of genetic experiments, we sought to verify this result. Preliminary crosses with wild-type C. briggsae hermaphrodites occasionally produced fertile males, but they could not be confirmed to be interspecies hybrids. Using an RNA interference (RNAi) protocol that eliminates any possibility of self-progeny in Cbr-him-8 hermaphrodites, we found sterile males bearing the C. nigoni X chromosome, but no fertile males bearing the C. briggsae X, as in wild-type crosses. Our results suggest that the apparent rescue of XO hybrid viability and fertility is due to incomplete purging of self-sperm prior to mating. PMID:28209763

  12. Nicotine Enhances Interspecies Relationship between Streptococcus mutans and Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shiyu; Qiu, Wei; Zhang, Keke; Zhou, Xuedong; Ren, Biao; He, Jinzhi; Xu, Xin; Cheng, Lei; Li, Mingyun

    2017-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans and Candida albicans are common microorganisms in the human oral cavity. The synergistic relationship between these two species has been deeply explored in many studies. In the present study, the effect of alkaloid nicotine on the interspecies between S. mutans and C. albicans is explored. We developed a dual-species biofilm model and studied biofilm biomass, biofilm structure, synthesis of extracellular polysaccharides (EPS), and expression of glucosyltransferases (Gtfs). Biofilm formation and bacterial and fungal cell numbers in dual-species biofilms increased in the presence of nicotine. More C. albicans cells were present in the dual-species biofilms in the nicotine-treated groups as determined by scanning electron microscopy. The synthesis of EPS was increased by 1 mg/ml of nicotine as detected by confocal laser scanning microscopy. The result of qRT-PCR showed gtfs expression was upregulated when 1 mg/ml of nicotine was used. We speculate that nicotine promoted the growth of S. mutans, and more S. mutans cells attracted more C. albicans cells due to the interaction between two species. Since S. mutans and C. albicans are putative pathogens for dental caries, the enhancement of the synergistic relationship by nicotine may contribute to caries development in smokers.

  13. Nicotine Enhances Interspecies Relationship between Streptococcus mutans and Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Wei; Zhang, Keke; Zhou, Xuedong; Ren, Biao; He, Jinzhi; Xu, Xin

    2017-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans and Candida albicans are common microorganisms in the human oral cavity. The synergistic relationship between these two species has been deeply explored in many studies. In the present study, the effect of alkaloid nicotine on the interspecies between S. mutans and C. albicans is explored. We developed a dual-species biofilm model and studied biofilm biomass, biofilm structure, synthesis of extracellular polysaccharides (EPS), and expression of glucosyltransferases (Gtfs). Biofilm formation and bacterial and fungal cell numbers in dual-species biofilms increased in the presence of nicotine. More C. albicans cells were present in the dual-species biofilms in the nicotine-treated groups as determined by scanning electron microscopy. The synthesis of EPS was increased by 1 mg/ml of nicotine as detected by confocal laser scanning microscopy. The result of qRT-PCR showed gtfs expression was upregulated when 1 mg/ml of nicotine was used. We speculate that nicotine promoted the growth of S. mutans, and more S. mutans cells attracted more C. albicans cells due to the interaction between two species. Since S. mutans and C. albicans are putative pathogens for dental caries, the enhancement of the synergistic relationship by nicotine may contribute to caries development in smokers. PMID:28280743

  14. Inter-species interconnections in acid mine drainage microbial communities

    PubMed Central

    Comolli, Luis R.; Banfield, Jill F.

    2014-01-01

    Metagenomic studies are revolutionizing our understanding of microbes in the biosphere. They have uncovered numerous proteins of unknown function in tens of essentially unstudied lineages that lack cultivated representatives. Notably, few of these microorganisms have been visualized, and even fewer have been described ultra-structurally in their essentially intact, physiologically relevant states. Here, we present cryogenic transmission electron microscope (cryo-TEM) 2D images and 3D tomographic datasets for archaeal species from natural acid mine drainage (AMD) microbial communities. Ultrastructural findings indicate the importance of microbial interconnectedness via a range of mechanisms, including direct cytoplasmic bridges and pervasive pili. The data also suggest a variety of biological structures associated with cell-cell interfaces that lack explanation. Some may play roles in inter-species interactions. Interdependences amongst the archaea may have confounded prior isolation efforts. Overall, the findings underline knowledge gaps related to archaeal cell components and highlight the likely importance of co-evolution in shaping microbial lineages. PMID:25120533

  15. Interspecies tunneling in one-dimensional Bose mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Pflanzer, Anika C.; Zoellner, Sascha; Schmelcher, Peter

    2010-02-15

    We study the ground-state properties and quantum dynamics of few-boson mixtures with strong interspecies repulsion in one-dimensional traps. If one species localizes at the center, e.g., due to a very large mass compared to the other component, it represents an effective barrier for the latter, and the system can be mapped onto identical bosons in a double well. For weaker localization, the barrier atoms begin to respond to the light component, leading to an induced attraction between the mobile atoms that may even outweigh their bare intraspecies repulsion. To explain the resulting effects, we derive an effective Hubbard model for the lighter species accounting for the back action of the barrier in correction terms to the lattice parameters. Also the tunneling is drastically affected: by varying the degree of localization of the 'barrier' atoms, the dynamics of intrinsically noninteracting bosons can change from Rabi oscillations to effective pair tunneling. For identical fermions (or fermionized bosons), this leads to the tunneling of attractively bound pairs.

  16. Revisiting Suppression of Interspecies Hybrid Male Lethality in Caenorhabditis Nematodes.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Lauren E; Haag, Eric S

    2017-02-16

    Within the nematode genus Caenorhabditis, C. briggsae and C. nigoni are among the most closely related species known. They differ in sexual mode, with C. nigoni retaining the ancestral XO male-XX female outcrossing system, while C. briggsae recently evolved self-fertility and an XX-biased sex ratio. Wild-type C. briggsae and C. nigoni can produce fertile hybrid XX female progeny, but XO progeny are either 100% inviable (when C. briggsae is the mother) or viable but sterile (when C. nigoni is the mother). A recent study provided evidence suggesting that loss of the Cbr-him-8 meiotic regulator in C. briggsae hermaphrodites allowed them to produce viable and fertile hybrid XO male progeny when mated to C. nigoni Because such males would be useful for a variety of genetic experiments, we sought to verify this result. Preliminary crosses with wild-type C. briggsae hermaphrodites occasionally produced fertile males, but they could not be confirmed to be interspecies hybrids. Using an RNA interference protocol that eliminates any possibility of self-progeny in Cbr-him-8 hermaphrodites, we find sterile males bearing the C. nigoni X chromosome, but no fertile males bearing the C. briggsae X, as in wild-type crosses. Our results suggest that the apparent rescue of XO hybrid viability and fertility is due to incomplete purging of self-sperm prior to mating.

  17. Diversity of Streptococcus mutans strains in bacterial interspecies interactions.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaolan; Hoogenkamp, Michel A; Ling, Junqi; Crielaard, Wim; Deng, Dong Mei

    2014-02-01

    Biofilms are matrix-enclosed microbial population adhere to each other and to surfaces. Compared to planktonic bacterial cells, biofilm cells show much higher levels of antimicrobial resistance. We aimed to investigate Streptococcus mutans strain diversity in biofilm formation and chlorhexidine (CHX) resistance of single S. mutans and dual S. mutans-Enterococcus faecalis biofilms. Four clinical S. mutans strains (C180-2, C67-1, HG723 and UA159) formed 24-h biofilms with or without an E. faecalis strain. These biofilms were treated for 10 min with 0.025% CHX. Biofilm formation, CHX resistance and S.mutans-E. faecalis interactions were evaluated by biomass staining, resazurin metabolism, viable count and competition agar assays. The main finding is that the presence of E. faecalis generally reduced all dual-species biofilm formation, but the proportions of S. mutans in the dual-species biofilms as well as CHX resistance displayed a clear S. mutans strain dependence. In particular, decreased resistance against CHX was observed in dual S. mutans C67-1 biofilms, while increased resistance was found in dual S. mutans UA159 biofilms. In conclusion, the interaction of S. mutans with E. faecalis in biofilms varies between strains, which underlines the importance of studying strain diversity in inter-species virulence modulation and biofilm antimicrobial resistance.

  18. Ovum pick up, intracytoplasmic sperm injection and somatic cell nuclear transfer in cattle, buffalo and horses: from the research laboratory to clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Galli, Cesare; Duchi, Roberto; Colleoni, Silvia; Lagutina, Irina; Lazzari, Giovanna

    2014-01-01

    Assisted reproductive techniques developed for cattle in the last 25 years, like ovum pick up (OPU), intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), and somatic cell nuclear transfer, have been transferred and adapted to buffalo and horses. The successful clinical applications of these techniques require both the clinical skills specific to each animal species and an experienced laboratory team to support the in vitro phase of the work. In cattle, OPU can be considered a consolidated technology that is rapidly outpacing conventional superovulation for embryo transfer. In buffalo, OPU represents the only possibility for embryo production to advance the implementation of embryo-based biotechnologies in that industry, although it is still mainly in the developmental phase. In the horse, OPU is now an established procedure for breeding from infertile and sporting mares throughout the year. It requires ICSI that in the horse, contrary to what happens in cattle and buffalo, is very efficient and the only option because conventional IVF does not work. Somatic cell nuclear transfer is destined to fill a very small niche for generating animals of extremely high commercial value. The efficiency is low, but because normal animals can be generated it is likely that advancing our knowledge in that field might improve the technology and reduce its cost.

  19. Thermal-Hydraulic Analyses of Heat Transfer Fluid Requirements and Characteristics for Coupling A Hydrogen Production Plant to a High-Temperature Nuclear Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    C. B. Davis; C. H. Oh; R. B. Barner; D. F. Wilson

    2005-06-01

    The Department of Energy is investigating the use of high-temperature nuclear reactors to produce hydrogen using either thermochemical cycles or high-temperature electrolysis. Although the hydrogen production processes are in an early stage of development, coupling either of these processes to the hightemperature reactor requires both efficient heat transfer and adequate separation of the facilities to assure that off-normal events in the production facility do not impact the nuclear power plant. An intermediate heat transport loop will be required to separate the operations and safety functions of the nuclear and hydrogen plants. A next generation high-temperature reactor could be envisioned as a single-purpose facility that produces hydrogen or a dual-purpose facility that produces hydrogen and electricity. Early plants, such as the proposed Next Generation Nuclear Plant, may be dual-purpose facilities that demonstrate both hydrogen and efficient electrical generation. Later plants could be single-purpose facilities. At this stage of development, both single- and dual-purpose facilities need to be understood. Seven possible configurations for a system that transfers heat between the nuclear reactor and the hydrogen and/or electrical generation plants were identified. These configurations included both direct and indirect cycles for the production of electricity. Both helium and liquid salts were considered as the working fluid in the intermediate heat transport loop. Methods were developed to perform thermalhydraulic and cycle-efficiency evaluations of the different configurations and coolants. The thermalhydraulic evaluations estimated the sizes of various components in the intermediate heat transport loop for the different configurations. The relative sizes of components provide a relative indication of the capital cost associated with the various configurations. Estimates of the overall cycle efficiency of the various configurations were also determined. The

  20. Genome-Wide Dynamic Profiling of Histone Methylation during Nuclear Transfer-Mediated Porcine Somatic Cell Reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zubing; Li, Yunsheng; Chen, Zhen; Wang, Heng; Zhang, Meiling; Zhou, Naru; Wu, Ronghua; Ling, Yinghui; Fang, Fugui; Li, Ning; Zhang, Yunhai

    2015-01-01

    The low full-term developmental efficiency of porcine somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos is mainly attributed to imperfect epigenetic reprogramming in the early embryos. However, dynamic expression patterns of histone methylation involved in epigenetic reprogramming progression during porcine SCNT embryo early development remain to be unknown. In this study, we characterized and compared the expression patterns of multiple histone methylation markers including transcriptionally repressive (H3K9me2, H3K9me3, H3K27me2, H3K27me3, H4K20me2 and H4K20me3) and active modifications (H3K4me2, H3K4me3, H3K36me2, H3K36me3, H3K79me2 and H3K79me3) in SCNT early embryos from different developmental stages with that from in vitro fertilization (IVF) counterparts. We found that the expression level of H3K9me2, H3K9me3 and H4K20me3 of SCNT embryos from 1-cell to 4-cell stages was significantly higher than that in the IVF embryos. We also detected a symmetric distribution pattern of H3K9me2 between inner cell mass (ICM) and trophectoderm (TE) in SCNT blastocysts. The expression level of H3K9me2 in both lineages from SCNT expanded blastocyst onwards was significantly higher than that in IVF counterparts. The expression level of H4K20me2 was significantly lower in SCNT embryos from morula to blastocyst stage compared with IVF embryos. However, no aberrant dynamic reprogramming of H3K27me2/3 occurred during early developmental stages of SCNT embryos. The expression of H3K4me3 was higher in SCNT embryos at 4-cell stage than that of IVF embryos. H3K4me2 expression in SCNT embryos from 8-cell stage to blastocyst stage was lower than that in the IVF embryos. Dynamic patterns of other active histone methylation markers were similar between SCNT and IVF embryos. Taken together, histone methylation exhibited developmentally stage-specific abnormal expression patterns in porcine SCNT early embryos.

  1. Genome-Wide Dynamic Profiling of Histone Methylation during Nuclear Transfer-Mediated Porcine Somatic Cell Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhen; Wang, Heng; Zhang, Meiling; Zhou, Naru; Wu, Ronghua; Ling, Yinghui; Fang, Fugui; Li, Ning; Zhang, Yunhai

    2015-01-01

    The low full-term developmental efficiency of porcine somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos is mainly attributed to imperfect epigenetic reprogramming in the early embryos. However, dynamic expression patterns of histone methylation involved in epigenetic reprogramming progression during porcine SCNT embryo early development remain to be unknown. In this study, we characterized and compared the expression patterns of multiple histone methylation markers including transcriptionally repressive (H3K9me2, H3K9me3, H3K27me2, H3K27me3, H4K20me2 and H4K20me3) and active modifications (H3K4me2, H3K4me3, H3K36me2, H3K36me3, H3K79me2 and H3K79me3) in SCNT early embryos from different developmental stages with that from in vitro fertilization (IVF) counterparts. We found that the expression level of H3K9me2, H3K9me3 and H4K20me3 of SCNT embryos from 1-cell to 4-cell stages was significantly higher than that in the IVF embryos. We also detected a symmetric distribution pattern of H3K9me2 between inner cell mass (ICM) and trophectoderm (TE) in SCNT blastocysts. The expression level of H3K9me2 in both lineages from SCNT expanded blastocyst onwards was significantly higher than that in IVF counterparts. The expression level of H4K20me2 was significantly lower in SCNT embryos from morula to blastocyst stage compared with IVF embryos. However, no aberrant dynamic reprogramming of H3K27me2/3 occurred during early developmental stages of SCNT embryos. The expression of H3K4me3 was higher in SCNT embryos at 4-cell stage than that of IVF embryos. H3K4me2 expression in SCNT embryos from 8-cell stage to blastocyst stage was lower than that in the IVF embryos. Dynamic patterns of other active histone methylation markers were similar between SCNT and IVF embryos. Taken together, histone methylation exhibited developmentally stage-specific abnormal expression patterns in porcine SCNT early embryos. PMID:26683029

  2. Effects of long-term in vitro culturing of transgenic bovine donor fibroblasts on cell viability and in vitro developmental potential after nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Bressan, F F; Miranda, M S; Bajgelman, M C; Perecin, F; Mesquita, L G; Fantinato-Neto, P; Merighe, G F K; Strauss, B E; Meirelles, F V

    2013-04-01

    Genetically modified animals have numerous applications, ranging from basic research to livestock production and agriculture. Recent progress in animal cloning by nuclear transfer has made possible the production of transgenic animals using previously genetically modified cell lineages. However, to produce such lineages, an additional time for in vitro culturing and great manipulation is needed. Herein, we aimed to characterize different aspects of genetically modified cells compared to control cells, and we also analyzed the development rate of embryos produced by nuclear transfer by using them as nuclei donors after short or long periods of in vitro culturing (early versus late passages). We hypothesized that the genetic material inserted in the genome of these cells, associated with the prolonged time in culture, ultimately alters cell growth physiology and cell viability, which leads to impaired nuclei reprogramming potential and consequent reduction in the production of cloned blastocysts. Fetal fibroblasts expressing the enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein gene (eGFP) cultured for different periods in vitro were analyzed with respect to chromosomal numeric abnormalities, nuclear DNA fragmentation, the ratio of BAX and BCL2 gene transcripts, and the intensity of mitochondrial membrane potential, and they were then used as nuclei donors for somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Early passages were defined as fewer than 11 passages, and late passages were 18th passage (18(th)p) to 21(st)p. No differences were observed in the percentage of cells with chromosomal abnormalities or in the mitochondrial membrane potential analysis. eGFP cells in late passages and control cells in early passages were not different regarding DNA fragmentation; however, control cells in late passages presented higher fragmentation (P < 0.05). The Bax and Bcl2 gene expression ratio in control and transgenic cells presented different patterns regarding cell conditions during culture. For

  3. Interspecies comparisons of tissues DNA damage, repair, fixation, and replication

    SciTech Connect

    Slaga, T.J.

    1988-04-01

    The many anatomical, physiological, and biochemical differences among various mammalian species make it difficult to extrapolate carcinogenic potency data from animals to humans. The process is further complicated by the multistep origin of most malignant tumors in animals and humans due to the interaction of target cells with both endogenous and exogenous factors. Species differences in these aspects of carcinogenesis must also be considered when attempting to evaluate the carcinogenic risks of chemicals to humans. Cancer development in animals involves at least three distinct stages: initiation, promotion, and progression. Intra- and interspecies differences in susceptibility to carcinogenesis may be related to any one or a combination of these stages. Variation in species susceptibility to tumor initiation may result from differences in the abilities of various species to metabolize a potential carcinogen to an ultimate carcinogenic form and/or to detoxify the carcinogen. Most comparative studies among species have only revealed subtle differences in metabolism. DNA adducts from several activated carcinogens have been found to be the same in a number of tissues from various species, including humans. Capacity for DNA repair is apparently a critical factor in the initiation of carcinogenesis in target cells of different species but is less critical among mice that differ in susceptibility to two-stage carcinogenesis of the skin and liver. Susceptibility variations among stocks and strains to such carcinogenesis appear to be related to alterations in tumor promotion. Additional comparative studies are critically needed on all aspects of carcinogenesis to permit effective extrapolation of carcinogenic potency data from animals to humans.

  4. Interspecies comparisons of tissue DNA damage, repair, fixation, and replication.

    PubMed Central

    Slaga, T J

    1988-01-01

    The many anatomical, physiological, and biochemical differences among various mammalian species make it difficult to extrapolate carcinogenic potency data from animals to humans. The process is further complicated by the multistep origin of most malignant tumors in animals and humans due to the interaction of target cells with both endogenous and exogenous factors. Species differences in these aspects of carcinogenesis must also be considered when attempting to evaluate the carcinogenic risks of chemicals to humans. Cancer development in animals involves at least three distinct stages: initiation, promotion, and progression. Intra- and interspecies differences in susceptibility to carcinogenesis may be related to any one or a combination of these stages. Variation in species susceptibility to tumor initiation may result from differences in the abilities of various species to metabolize a potential carcinogen to an ultimate carcinogenic form and/or to detoxify the carcinogen. Most comparative studies among species have only revealed subtle differences in metabolism. DNA adducts from several activated carcinogens have been found to be the same in a number of tissues from various species, including humans. Capacity for DNA repair is apparently a critical factor in the initiation of carcinogenesis in target cells of different species but is less critical among mice that differ in susceptibility to two-stage carcinogenesis of the skin and liver. Susceptibility variations among stocks and strains to such carcinogenesis appear to be related to alterations in tumor promotion. Additional comparative studies are critically needed on all aspects of carcinogenesis to permit effective extrapolation of carcinogenic potency data from animals to humans. PMID:3289910

  5. Interspecies variations in Bordetella catecholamine receptor gene regulation and function.

    PubMed

    Brickman, Timothy J; Suhadolc, Ryan J; Armstrong, Sandra K

    2015-12-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica can use catecholamines to obtain iron from transferrin and lactoferrin via uptake pathways involving the BfrA, BfrD, and BfrE outer membrane receptor proteins, and although Bordetella pertussis has the bfrD and bfrE genes, the role of these genes in iron uptake has not been demonstrated. In this study, the bfrD and bfrE genes of B. pertussis were shown to be functional in B. bronchiseptica, but neither B. bronchiseptica bfrD nor bfrE imparted catecholamine utilization to B. pertussis. Gene fusion analyses found that expression of B. bronchiseptica bfrA was increased during iron starvation, as is common for iron receptor genes, but that expression of the bfrD and bfrE genes of both species was decreased during iron limitation. As shown previously for B. pertussis, bfrD expression in B. bronchiseptica was also dependent on the BvgAS virulence regulatory system; however, in contrast to the case in B. pertussis, the known modulators nicotinic acid and sulfate, which silence Bvg-activated genes, did not silence expression of bfrD in B. bronchiseptica. Further studies using a B. bronchiseptica bvgAS mutant expressing the B. pertussis bvgAS genes revealed that the interspecies differences in bfrD modulation are partly due to BvgAS differences. Mouse respiratory infection experiments determined that catecholamine utilization contributes to the in vivo fitness of B. bronchiseptica and B. pertussis. Additional evidence of the in vivo importance of the B. pertussis receptors was obtained from serologic studies demonstrating pertussis patient serum reactivity with the B. pertussis BfrD and BfrE proteins.

  6. ISAAC - InterSpecies Analysing Application using Containers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Information about genes, transcripts and proteins is spread over a wide variety of databases. Different tools have been developed using these databases to identify biological signals in gene lists from large scale analysis. Mostly, they search for enrichments of specific features. But, these tools do not allow an explorative walk through different views and to change the gene lists according to newly upcoming stories. Results To fill this niche, we have developed ISAAC, the InterSpecies Analysing Application using Containers. The central idea of this web based tool is to enable the analysis of sets of genes, transcripts and proteins under different biological viewpoints and to interactively modify these sets at any point of the analysis. Detailed history and snapshot information allows tracing each action. Furthermore, one can easily switch back to previous states and perform new analyses. Currently, sets can be viewed in the context of genomes, protein functions, protein interactions, pathways, regulation, diseases and drugs. Additionally, users can switch between species with an automatic, orthology based translation of existing gene sets. As todays research usually is performed in larger teams and consortia, ISAAC provides group based functionalities. Here, sets as well as results of analyses can be exchanged between members of groups. Conclusions ISAAC fills the gap between primary databases and tools for the analysis of large gene lists. With its highly modular, JavaEE based design, the implementation of new modules is straight forward. Furthermore, ISAAC comes with an extensive web-based administration interface including tools for the integration of third party data. Thus, a local installation is easily feasible. In summary, ISAAC is tailor made for highly explorative interactive analyses of gene, transcript and protein sets in a collaborative environment. PMID:24428905

  7. Interspecies Variations in Bordetella Catecholamine Receptor Gene Regulation and Function

    PubMed Central

    Brickman, Timothy J.; Suhadolc, Ryan J.

    2015-01-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica can use catecholamines to obtain iron from transferrin and lactoferrin via uptake pathways involving the BfrA, BfrD, and BfrE outer membrane receptor proteins, and although Bordetella pertussis has the bfrD and bfrE genes, the role of these genes in iron uptake has not been demonstrated. In this study, the bfrD and bfrE genes of B. pertussis were shown to be functional in B. bronchiseptica, but neither B. bronchiseptica bfrD nor bfrE imparted catecholamine utilization to B. pertussis. Gene fusion analyses found that expression of B. bronchiseptica bfrA was increased during iron starvation, as is common for iron receptor genes, but that expression of the bfrD and bfrE genes of both species was decreased during iron limitation. As shown previously for B. pertussis, bfrD expression in B. bronchiseptica was also dependent on the BvgAS virulence regulatory system; however, in contrast to the case in B. pertussis, the known modulators nicotinic acid and sulfate, which silence Bvg-activated genes, did not silence expression of bfrD in B. bronchiseptica. Further studies using a B. bronchiseptica bvgAS mutant expressing the B. pertussis bvgAS genes revealed that the interspecies differences in bfrD modulation are partly due to BvgAS differences. Mouse respiratory infection experiments determined that catecholamine utilization contributes to the in vivo fitness of B. bronchiseptica and B. pertussis. Additional evidence of the in vivo importance of the B. pertussis receptors was obtained from serologic studies demonstrating pertussis patient serum reactivity with the B. pertussis BfrD and BfrE proteins. PMID:26371128

  8. Observation of interspecies ion separation in inertial-confinement-fusion implosions

    DOE PAGES

    Hsu, Scott C.; Joshi, Tirtha Raj; Hakel, Peter; ...

    2016-10-24

    Here we report direct experimental evidence of interspecies ion separation in direct-drive, inertial-confinement-fusion experiments on the OMEGA laser facility. These experiments, which used plastic capsules with D2/Ar gas fill (1% Ar by atom), were designed specifically to reveal interspecies ion separation by exploiting the predicted, strong ion thermo-diffusion between ion species of large mass and charge difference. Via detailed analyses of imaging x-ray-spectroscopy data, we extract Ar-atom-fraction radial profiles at different times, and observe both enhancement and depletion compared to the initial 1%-Ar gas fill. The experimental results are interpreted with radiation-hydrodynamic simulations that include recently implemented, first-principles models ofmore » interspecies ion diffusion. Finally, the experimentally inferred Ar-atom-fraction profiles agree reasonably, but not exactly, with calculated profiles associated with the incoming and rebounding first shock.« less

  9. Observation of interspecies ion separation in inertial-confinement-fusion implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Scott C.; Joshi, Tirtha Raj; Hakel, Peter; Vold, Erik Lehman; Schmitt, Mark J.; Hoffman, Nelson M.; Rauenzahn, Rick M.; Kagan, Grigory; Tang, Xianzhu; Mancini, Roberto C.; Kim, Yong Ho; Herrmann, Hans W.

    2016-10-24

    Here we report direct experimental evidence of interspecies ion separation in direct-drive, inertial-confinement-fusion experiments on the OMEGA laser facility. These experiments, which used plastic capsules with D2/Ar gas fill (1% Ar by atom), were designed specifically to reveal interspecies ion separation by exploiting the predicted, strong ion thermo-diffusion between ion species of large mass and charge difference. Via detailed analyses of imaging x-ray-spectroscopy data, we extract Ar-atom-fraction radial profiles at different times, and observe both enhancement and depletion compared to the initial 1%-Ar gas fill. The experimental results are interpreted with radiation-hydrodynamic simulations that include recently implemented, first-principles models of interspecies ion diffusion. Finally, the experimentally inferred Ar-atom-fraction profiles agree reasonably, but not exactly, with calculated profiles associated with the incoming and rebounding first shock.

  10. Observation of interspecies ion separation in inertial-confinement-fusion implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, S. C.; Joshi, T. R.; Hakel, P.; Vold, E. L.; Schmitt, M. J.; Hoffman, N. M.; Rauenzahn, R. M.; Kagan, G.; Tang, X.-Z.; Mancini, R. C.; Kim, Y.; Herrmann, H. W.

    2016-09-01

    We report direct experimental evidence of interspecies ion separation in direct-drive, inertial-confinement-fusion experiments on the OMEGA laser facility. These experiments, which used plastic capsules with D2/Ar gas fill (1% Ar by atom), were designed specifically to reveal interspecies ion separation by exploiting the predicted, strong ion thermo-diffusion between ion species of large mass and charge difference. Via detailed analyses of imaging x-ray-spectroscopy data, we extract Ar-atom-fraction radial profiles at different times, and observe both enhancement and depletion compared to the initial 1%-Ar gas fill. The experimental results are interpreted with radiation-hydrodynamic simulations that include recently implemented, first-principles models of interspecies ion diffusion. The experimentally inferred Ar-atom-fraction profiles agree reasonably, but not exactly, with calculated profiles associated with the incoming and rebounding first shock.

  11. Xenopus egg extract treatment reduced global DNA methylation of donor cells and enhanced somatic cell nuclear transfer embryo development in pigs.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoyu; Mao, Jiude; Walters, Eric M; Zhao, Ming-Tao; Teson, Jennifer; Lee, Kiho; Prather, Randall S

    2012-04-01

    The efficiency to produce offspring by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is low. It has been showed that treatment of donor cells with Xenopus oocyte extract increased live births in ovine and handmade cloned embryo development in pigs. Scriptaid treatment after oocyte activation is another approach to improve SCNT efficiency. The present study was carried out to investigate (a) the effects of treatment of donor cells with Xenopus egg extract on donor cell DNA methylation at days 0 and 4 with two digitonin permeabilization concentrations (10 and 15 μg/mL), (b) the effects of treatment of donor cells with Xenopus egg extract on early development of cloned embryos, and (c) the effects of combined treatments, treating donor cells with extract before nuclear transfer and treatment of cloned embryos with scriptaid after oocyte activation, on embryo development. Compared to the control, a decrease of DNA methylation in donor cells was observed at 2.5 h after extract treatment. However, this effect was not observed after the cells were cultured for four more days. More embryos developed into blastocysts in the Xenopus egg extract-treated group than in the control (13.4±1.9% vs. 9.1±1.9%, p=0.01). Furthermore, scriptaid treatment of cloned embryos further increased the frequency of development to blastocyst, compared to the control reconstructed with the same extract-treated cells (22.5±0.9% vs. 15.3±0.9%, p<0.01). In addition, egg extract treatments increased the cell number in the blastocysts. This study demonstrated that Xenopus egg extract treatment reduced donor cell DNA methylation and enhanced the SCNT embryo development. Moreover, the combined treatments of donor cells with egg extract before nuclear transfer and of cloned embryos with scriptaid could improve cloned embryo development additively.

  12. Genetic polymorphisms, growth performance, hematological parameters, serum enzymes, and reproductive characteristics in phenotypically normal Landrace boars produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Chen, C H; Jiang, B H; Huang, S Y; Yang, T S; Lee, K H; Tu, C F; Wu, S C

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the performances of cloned pigs and their offspring is critical to evaluate the practical applications of somatic cell nuclear transfer. In this study, genetic polymorphism, growth performance, hematological parameters, and reproduction characteristics of cloned Landrace boars were compared with those of controls. In addition, the growth performance of clone offspring was also evaluated. A total of 479 reconstructed embryos were transferred to five recipient pigs and resulted in the delivery of 14 piglets (overall cloning of 2.9%) from two litters. Analyses of microsatellite markers and polymorphisms of the specific genes confirmed that the 14 clones were genetically identical to the nuclear donor and maintained the desirable genotypes. Growth performance of five healthy, phenotypically normal cloned boars from one litter and eight of their male offspring did not differ from age, breed, and management-matched controls. Although some significant differences were observed between cloned and control boars in hematological and serum enzymes, most of these parameters were within the normal range. Cloned boars had less (P < 0.05) normal sperm in the ejaculated boars than in control boars (71.4% vs. 77.9%, respectively), but sperm production (ejaculate volume, sperm concentration, and total sperm) did not differ between these groups. In addition, use of frozen-thawed semen from cloned boars for insemination produced results that seemed comparable to a control. In conclusion, the present study reported that somatic cell nuclear transfer is effective in reproducing preferred genetic traits and has potential applications to conserve elite bloodlines in a routine pig breeding program.

  13. Xenopus Egg Extract Treatment Reduced Global DNA Methylation of Donor Cells and Enhanced Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer Embryo Development in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Jiude; Walters, Eric M.; Zhao, Ming-Tao; Teson, Jennifer; Lee, Kiho

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The efficiency to produce offspring by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is low. It has been showed that treatment of donor cells with Xenopus oocyte extract increased live births in ovine and handmade cloned embryo development in pigs. Scriptaid treatment after oocyte activation is another approach to improve SCNT efficiency. The present study was carried out to investigate (a) the effects of treatment of donor cells with Xenopus egg extract on donor cell DNA methylation at days 0 and 4 with two digitonin permeabilization concentrations (10 and 15 μg/mL), (b) the effects of treatment of donor cells with Xenopus egg extract on early development of cloned embryos, and (c) the effects of combined treatments, treating donor cells with extract before nuclear transfer and treatment of cloned embryos with scriptaid after oocyte activation, on embryo development. Compared to the control, a decrease of DNA methylation in donor cells was observed at 2.5 h after extract treatment. However, this effect was not observed after the cells were cultured for four more days. More embryos developed into blastocysts in the Xenopus egg extract-treated group than in the control (13.4±1.9% vs. 9.1±1.9%, p=0.01). Furthermore, scriptaid treatment of cloned embryos further increased the frequency of development to blastocyst, compared to the control reconstructed with the same extract-treated cells (22.5±0.9% vs. 15.3±0.9%, p<0.01). In addition, egg extract treatments increased the cell number in the blastocysts. This study demonstrated that Xenopus egg extract treatment reduced donor cell DNA methylation and enhanced the SCNT embryo development. Moreover, the combined treatments of donor cells with egg extract before nuclear transfer and of cloned embryos with scriptaid could improve cloned embryo development additively. PMID:23515109

  14. [Interspecies covariation analysis of dominant tree species in secondary succession of forest communities in Heishiding Natural Reserve, Guangdong Province].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xianye; Wang, Bosun; Li, Mingguang; Chen, Zhanghe

    2004-03-01

    Based on a 2 x 2 contingency table, the Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient and Spearman rank correlation coefficient were used to analyses the interspecies covariation of dominant tree species in different communities of secondary succession series in Heishiding Natural Reserve, Guangdong Province. In early succession stage, 14 pairs of tree species showed a significant interspecies covariation, and 9 pairs of species showed a negative coraviation, indicating that the species pairs needed the same habitats, while five pairs of species showed a positive covariation, which indicated that the species pairs needed different habitats. In the stage of needle broad-leaved mixed forest, only 5 pairs of species showed a significant interspecies covariation, and they were all positive covariation, which indicated the main species needed the same habitats and the interspecies competition were going. In the stage of evergreen broadleaved forest dominated by heliophytes, 4 pairs of species showed a significant interspecies covariation, which was the least one in secondary succession series. Three pairs of them showed a positive covariation. It was the result of interspecies competition that the species pairs needed the same habitats. In the stage of evergreen broadleaved forest dominated by mesophytes, 20 pairs of species showed a significant interspecies covariation, which was the most one in secondary succession series. Nineteen pairs of them showed a positive covariation. It showed positive covariation between species in upper tree layer and in middle or lower tree layer, but dominant species in upper tree layer had no significant interspecies covariation.

  15. Chemically Assisted Enucleation Results in Higher G6PD Expression in Early Bovine Female Embryos Obtained by Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Clara Slade; Tetzner, Tatiane Almeida Drummond; de Lima, Marina Ragagnin; de Melo, Danilas Salinet; Niciura, Simone Cristina Méo; Garcia, Joaquim Mansano

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Despite extensive efforts, low efficiency is still an issue in bovine somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). The hypothesis of our study was that the use of cytoplasts produced by chemically assisted enucleation (EN) would improve nuclear reprogramming in nuclear transfer (NT)–derived embryos because it results in lower damage and higher cytoplasm content than conventional EN. For that purpose, we investigated the expression of two X-linked genes: X inactive-specific transcript (XIST) and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD). In the first experiment, gene expression was assessed in day-7 female blastocysts from embryonic cell NT (ECNT) groups [conventional, ECNT conv; chemically assisted, ECNT deme (demecolcine)]. Whereas in the ECNT conv group, only one embryo (25%; n=4) expressed XIST transcripts, most embryos showed XIST expression (75%; n=4) in the ECNT deme group. However, no significant differences in transcript abundance of XIST and G6PD were found when comparing the embryos from all groups. In a second experiment using somatic cells as nuclear donors, we evaluated gene expression profiles in female SCNT-derived embryos. No significant differences in relative abundance (RA) of XIST transcripts were observed among the groups. Nonetheless, higher (p<0.05) levels of G6PD were observed in SCNT deme and in vitro–derived groups in comparison to SCNT conv. To know whether higher G6PD expression in embryos derived from SCNT chemically assisted EN indicates higher metabolism in embryos considered of superior quality or if the presence of higher reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels generated by the increased oxygen consumption triggers G6PD activation, the expression of genes related to stress response should be investigated in embryos produced by that technique. PMID:22908977

  16. Space transfer concepts and analysis for exploration missions. Implementation plan and element description document (draft final). Volume 3: Nuclear thermal rocket vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This document presents the nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) concept design developed in support of the Space Transfer Concepts and Analysis for Exploration Missions (STCAEM) study. The evolution of the NTR concept is described along with the requirements, guidelines and assumptions for the design. Operating modes and options are defined and a systems description of the vehicle is presented. Artificial gravity configuration options and space and ground support systems are discussed. Finally, an implementation plan is presented which addresses technology needs, schedules, facilities and costs.

  17. Interspecies transmission and emergence of novel viruses: lessons from bats and birds.

    PubMed

    Chan, Jasper Fuk-Woo; To, Kelvin Kai-Wang; Tse, Herman; Jin, Dong-Yan; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2013-10-01

    As exemplified by coronaviruses and influenza viruses, bats and birds are natural reservoirs for providing viral genes during evolution of new virus species and viruses for interspecies transmission. These warm-blooded vertebrates display high species biodiversity, roosting and migratory behavior, and a unique adaptive immune system, which are favorable characteristics for asymptomatic shedding, dissemination, and mixing of different viruses for the generation of novel mutant, recombinant, or reassortant RNA viruses. The increased intrusion of humans into wildlife habitats and overcrowding of different wildlife species in wet markets and farms have also facilitated the interspecies transmission between different animal species.

  18. Positive effects of treatment of donor cells with aphidicolin on the preimplantation development of somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos in Chinese Bama mini-pig (Sus Scrofa).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ting-Yu; Dai, Jian-Jun; Wu, Cai-Feng; Gu, Xiao-Long; Liu, Liang; Wu, Zhi-Qiang; Xie, Yi-Ni; Wu, Bin; Chen, Hui-Lan; Li, Yao; Chen, Xue-Jin; Zhang, De-Fu

    2012-02-01

    To optimize somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) procedures in mini-pigs, the present study was designed to examine the effects of donor cell types and aphidicolin (APC) treatment on in vitro development of reconstructed embryos. Oviduct epithelial cells (OEC), ear fibroblast cells (EFC) and cumulus cells (CC) derived from mini-pigs were treated with serum starvation only or serum starvation followed by treatment of 0.1 µg/mL APC. The reconstructed embryos were cultured for 7 days to evaluate their developmental competency. Cleavage and blastocyst formation rates of reconstructed embryos derived from the OEC by APC treatment were significantly higher than the serum starvation (61.82% vs. 56.25%, 24.55% vs. 17.86%; P < 0.05). The cleavage rate from the EFC was significantly increased by APC treatment compared to serum starvation only (63.36% vs. 57.01%; P < 0.05). In the ooctyes with the CC, the reconstructed embryos could yield high blastocyst formation rate by APC treatment (29.63%; P < 0.05). In the presence of APC, CC gave rise to the highest cleavage and blastocyst formation rates among the three cell types. Therefore, our results suggest that treatment of CC with serum starvation plus APC prior to nuclear transfer is more suitable in SCNT of mini-pigs.

  19. The prevalence of embryonic remnants following the recovery of post-hatching bovine embryos produced in vitro or by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Alexopoulos, Natalie I; French, Andrew J

    2009-08-01

    The reliable collection of peri-implantation embryos in the bovine has important ramifications to post-transfer consequences, particularly in the elucidation of mechanisms associated with post-hatching embryo development and to perturbations in developmental growth following transfer. This study analyzed both in vitro produced (IVP) and somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryo-like structures (ELS) recovered at Day (D) 14 and D21. The recovered ELS were subsequently processed for histological examination. At D14 and D21, many of the embryos recovered in the IVP group conformed to the appropriate stage of development. However, a significant number of anomalies were present in the SCNT groups when examined in more detail. Histological examination revealed that irrespective of whether these embryos had undergone trophoblast expansion to an ovoid, tubular or filamentous morphology, many had a degenerated hypoblast layer and a large proportion did not possess an epiblast and therefore could not differentiate into any of the three germ layers as would be expected at the neural groove or somite stage. The prevalence of this developmental pattern was random and did not correlate with treatment (IVP or SCNT) or with types of structures recovered. The rapid embryo elongation period also coincides with the time of greatest embryonic loss and these observations could have important implications for assessing the recovery of embryos post-transfer where incorrect morphological assessment could lead to false implantation and pregnancy determination rates. The implementation of additional methodology is required to adequately characterize the quality of IVP and SCNT-derived embryos collected post-transfer.

  20. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells are an attractive donor cell type for production of cloned pigs as well as genetically modified cloned pigs by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Li, Zicong; He, Xiaoyan; Chen, Liwen; Shi, Junsong; Zhou, Rong; Xu, Weihua; Liu, Dewu; Wu, Zhenfang

    2013-10-01

    The somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) technique has been widely applied to clone pigs or to produce genetically modified pigs. Currently, this technique relies mainly on using terminally differentiated fibroblasts as donor cells. To improve cloning efficiency, only partially differentiated multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), thought to be more easily reprogrammed to a pluripotent state, have been used as nuclear donors in pig SCNT. Although in vitro-cultured embryos cloned from porcine MSCs (MSCs-embryos) were shown to have higher preimplantation developmental ability than cloned embryos reconstructed from fibroblasts (Fs-embryos), the difference in in vivo full-term developmental rate between porcine MSCs-embryos and Fs-embryos has not been investigated so far. In this study, we demonstrated that blastocyst total cell number and full-term survival abilities of MSCs-embryos were significantly higher than those of Fs-embryos cloned from the same donor pig. The enhanced developmental potential of MSCs-embryos may be associated with their nuclear donors' DNA methylation profile, because we found that the methylation level of imprinting genes and repeat sequences differed between MSCs and fibroblasts. In addition, we showed that use of transgenic porcine MSCs generated from transgene plasmid transfection as donor cells for SCNT can produce live transgenic cloned pigs. These results strongly suggest that porcine bone marrow MSCs are a desirable donor cell type for production of cloned pigs and genetically modified cloned pigs via SCNT.

  1. Transcriptomic evidence that longevity of acquired plastids in the photosynthetic slugs Elysia timida and Plakobranchus ocellatus does not entail lateral transfer of algal nuclear genes.

    PubMed

    Wägele, Heike; Deusch, Oliver; Händeler, Katharina; Martin, Rainer; Schmitt, Valerie; Christa, Gregor; Pinzger, Britta; Gould, Sven B; Dagan, Tal; Klussmann-Kolb, Annette; Martin, William

    2011-01-01

    Sacoglossan sea slugs are unique in the animal kingdom in that they sequester and maintain active plastids that they acquire from the siphonaceous algae upon which they feed, making the animals photosynthetic. Although most sacoglossan species digest their freshly ingested plastids within hours, four species from the family Plakobranchidae retain their stolen plastids (kleptoplasts) in a photosynthetically active state on timescales of weeks to months. The molecular basis of plastid maintenance within the cytosol of digestive gland cells in these photosynthetic metazoans is yet unknown but is widely thought to involve gene transfer from the algal food source to the slugs based upon previous investigations of single genes. Indeed, normal plastid development requires hundreds of nuclear-encoded proteins, with protein turnover in photosystem II in particular known to be rapid under various conditions. Moreover, only algal plastids, not the algal nuclei, are sequestered by the animals during feeding. If algal nuclear genes are transferred to the animal either during feeding or in the germ line, and if they are expressed, then they should be readily detectable with deep-sequencing methods. We have sequenced expressed mRNAs from actively photosynthesizing, starved individuals of two photosynthetic sea slug species, Plakobranchus ocellatus Van Hasselt, 1824 and Elysia timida Risso, 1818. We find that nuclear-encoded, algal-derived genes specific to photosynthetic function are expressed neither in P. ocellatus nor in E. timida. Despite their dramatic plastid longevity, these photosynthetic sacoglossan slugs do not express genes acquired from algal nuclei in order to maintain plastid function.

  2. Augmenting Species Diversity in Water Quality Criteria Derivation using Interspecies Correlation Models

    EPA Science Inventory

    The specific requirements for taxa diversity of the 1985 guidelines have limited the number of ambient water quality criteria (AWQC) developed for aquatic life protection. The EPA developed the Web-based Interspecies Correlation Estimation (Web-ICE) tool to allow extrapolation of...

  3. Development of Algal Interspecies Correlation Estimation Models for Chemical Hazard Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Web-based Interspecies Correlation Estimation (ICE) is an application developed to predict the acute toxicity of a chemical from 1 species to another taxon. Web-ICE models use the acute toxicity value for a surrogate species to predict effect values for other species, thus potent...

  4. Efficient plant gene identification based on interspecies mapping of full-length cDNAs.

    PubMed

    Amano, Naoki; Tanaka, Tsuyoshi; Numa, Hisataka; Sakai, Hiroaki; Itoh, Takeshi

    2010-10-01

    We present an annotation pipeline that accurately predicts exon-intron structures and protein-coding sequences (CDSs) on the basis of full-length cDNAs (FLcDNAs). This annotation pipeline was used to identify genes in 10 plant genomes. In particular, we show that interspecies mapping of FLcDNAs to genomes is of great value in fully utilizing FLcDNA resources whose availability is limited to several species. Because low sequence conservation at 5'- and 3'-ends of FLcDNAs between different species tends to result in truncated CDSs, we developed an improved algorithm to identify complete CDSs by the extension of both ends of truncated CDSs. Interspecies mapping of 71 801 monocot FLcDNAs to the Oryza sativa genome led to the detection of 22 142 protein-coding regions. Moreover, in comparing two mapping programs and three ab initio prediction programs, we found that our pipeline was more capable of identifying complete CDSs. As demonstrated by monocot interspecies mapping, in which nucleotide identity between FLcDNAs and the genome was ∼80%, the resultant inferred CDSs were sufficiently accurate. Finally, we applied both inter- and intraspecies mapping to 10 monocot and dicot genomes and identified genes in 210 551 loci. Interspecies mapping of FLcDNAs is expected to effectively predict genes and CDSs in newly sequenced genomes.

  5. Investigation of Interspecies Interactions within Marine Micromonosporaceae Using an Improved Co-Culture Approach.

    PubMed

    Adnani, Navid; Vazquez-Rivera, Emmanuel; Adibhatla, Srikar N; Ellis, Gregory A; Braun, Doug R; Bugni, Tim S

    2015-09-24

    With respect to bacterial natural products, a significant outcome of the genomic era was that the biosynthetic potential in many microorganisms surpassed the number of compounds isolated under standard laboratory growth conditions, particularly among certain members in the phylum Actinobacteria. Our group, as well as others, investigated interspecies interactions, via co-culture, as a technique to coax bacteria to produce novel natural products. While co-culture provides new opportunities, challenges exist and questions surrounding these methods remain unanswered. In marine bacteria, for example, how prevalent are interspecies interactions and how commonly do interactions result in novel natural products? In an attempt to begin to answer basic questions surrounding co-culture of marine microorganisms, we have tested both antibiotic activity-based and LC/MS-based methods to evaluate Micromonosporaceae secondary metabolite production in co-culture. Overall, our investigation of 65 Micromonosporaceae led to the identification of 12 Micromonosporaceae across three genera that produced unique metabolites in co-culture. Our results suggest that interspecies interactions were prevalent between marine Micromonosporaceae and marine mycolic acid-containing bacteria. Furthermore, our approach highlights a sensitive and rapid method for investigating interspecies interactions in search of novel antibiotics, secondary metabolites, and genes.

  6. Demonstration of the Web-based Interspecies Correlation Estimation (Web-ICE) modeling application

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Web-based Interspecies Correlation Estimation (Web-ICE) modeling application is available to the risk assessment community through a user-friendly internet platform (http://epa.gov/ceampubl/fchain/webice/). ICE models are log-linear least square regressions that predict acute...

  7. USE OF INTERSPECIES CORRELATION ESTIMATIONS TO PREDICT HC5'S BASED ON MINIMAL DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dyer, S., S. Belanger, J. Chaney, D. Versteeg and F. Mayer. In press. Use of Interspecies Correlation Estimations to Predict HC5's Based on Minimal Data (Abstract). To be presented at the SETAC Fourth World Congress, 14-18 November 2004, Portland, OR. 1 p. (ERL,GB R1013).

  8. Investigation of Interspecies Interactions within Marine Micromonosporaceae Using an Improved Co-Culture Approach

    PubMed Central

    Adnani, Navid; Vazquez-Rivera, Emmanuel; Adibhatla, Srikar N.; Ellis, Gregory A.; Braun, Doug R.; Bugni, Tim S.

    2015-01-01

    With respect to bacterial natural products, a significant outcome of the genomic era was that the biosynthetic potential in many microorganisms surpassed the number of compounds isolated under standard laboratory growth conditions, particularly among certain members in the phylum Actinobacteria. Our group, as well as others, investigated interspecies interactions, via co-culture, as a technique to coax bacteria to produce novel natural products. While co-culture provides new opportunities, challenges exist and questions surrounding these methods remain unanswered. In marine bacteria, for example, how prevalent are interspecies interactions and how commonly do interactions result in novel natural products? In an attempt to begin to answer basic questions surrounding co-culture of marine microorganisms, we have tested both antibiotic activity-based and LC/MS-based methods to evaluate Micromonosporaceae secondary metabolite production in co-culture. Overall, our investigation of 65 Micromonosporaceae led to the identification of 12 Micromonosporaceae across three genera that produced unique metabolites in co-culture. Our results suggest that interspecies interactions were prevalent between marine Micromonosporaceae and marine mycolic acid-containing bacteria. Furthermore, our approach highlights a sensitive and rapid method for investigating interspecies interactions in search of novel antibiotics, secondary metabolites, and genes. PMID:26404321

  9. Validation and Application of Pharmacokinetic Models for Interspecies Extrapolations in Toxicity Risk Assessments of Volatile Organics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-21

    GROUP SUB-GROUP Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model Saturable metab- olism, Respiratory eliminationi Ialocarbon Inhalation expo- sure, H...nlocarbon oral exposure, Interspecles extrapolations, Pharmacokinetics , l,l,]-trichloroethane, 1,l-dichloroethylene, 19 ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if...necessary and identify by block number) In pursuit of the goal of establishing a scientific basis for the interspecies extrapo- lation of pharmacokinetic

  10. Being Nature: Interspecies Articulation as a Species-Specific Practice of Relating to Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rautio, Pauliina

    2013-01-01

    Rather than categorically teaching us ways to be less anthropocentric, environmental education could be about educating us of the ways in which we already are nature as human animals. In this paper, one species-specific practice of human relating to environment--interspecies articulation--is argued as one way of being nature. Interspecies…

  11. Interspecies extrapolation based on the RepDose database--a probabilistic approach.

    PubMed

    Escher, Sylvia E; Batke, Monika; Hoffmann-Doerr, Simone; Messinger, Horst; Mangelsdorf, Inge

    2013-04-12

    Repeated dose toxicity studies from the RepDose database (DB) were used to determine interspecies differences for rats and mice. NOEL (no observed effect level) ratios based on systemic effects were investigated for three different types of exposure: inhalation, oral food/drinking water and oral gavage. Furthermore, NOEL ratios for local effects in inhalation studies were evaluated. On the basis of the NOEL ratio distributions, interspecies assessment factors (AF) are evaluated. All data sets were best described by a lognormal distribution. No difference was seen between inhalation and oral exposure for systemic effects. Rats and mice were on average equally sensitive at equipotent doses with geometric mean (GM) values of 1 and geometric standard deviation (GSD) values ranging from 2.30 to 3.08. The local AF based on inhalation exposure resulted in a similar distribution with GM values of 1 and GSD values between 2.53 and 2.70. Our analysis confirms former analyses on interspecies differences, including also dog and human data. Furthermore it supports the principle of allometric scaling according to caloric demand in the case that body doses are applied. In conclusion, an interspecies distribution animal/human with a GM equal to allometric scaling and a GSD of 2.5 was derived.

  12. Acute toxicity prediction to threatened and endangered species using Interspecies Correlation Estimation (ICE) models

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluating contaminant sensitivity of threatened and endangered (listed) species and protectiveness of chemical regulations often depends on toxicity data for commonly tested surrogate species. The U.S. EPA’s Internet application Web-ICE is a suite of Interspecies Correlati...

  13. WEB-BASED INTERSPECIES CORRELATION ESTIMATION (WEB-ICE) FOR ACUTE TOXICITY: USER MANUAL V2

    EPA Science Inventory

    Predictive toxicological models are integral to environmental risk Assessment where data for most species are limited. Web-based Interspecies Correlation Estimation (Web-ICE) models are least square regressions that predict acute toxicity (LC50/LD50) of a chemical to a species, ...

  14. 'CATT' A project on Co-operation and Technology Transfer on Long-Term Radioactive Waste Management for EU Member States with Small Nuclear Programmes

    SciTech Connect

    Mathieson, J.; Lindberg, C.

    2006-07-01

    Many of the European Union'