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Sample records for interspecies toxicity assessment

  1. SURROGATE SPECIES IN ASSESSING CONTAMINANT RISK FOR ENDANGERED FISHES, INCLUDING INTERSPECIES TOXICITY CORRELATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rainbow trout, fathead minnows, and sheepshead minnows were tested as surrogate species to assess contaminant risk for 17 endangered fishes and one toad species. Acute toxicity tests were conducted with carbaryl, copper, 4-nonylphenol, pentachlorophenol, and permethrin in accorda...

  2. Assessing Uncertainty of Interspecies Correlation Estimation Models for Aromatic Compounds

    EPA Science Inventory

    We developed Interspecies Correlation Estimation (ICE) models for aromatic compounds containing 1 to 4 benzene rings to assess uncertainty in toxicity extrapolation in two data compilation approaches. ICE models are mathematical relationships between surrogate and predicted test ...

  3. Acute toxicity of benzophenone-type UV filters for Photobacterium phosphoreum and Daphnia magna: QSAR analysis, interspecies relationship and integrated assessment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Sun, Ping; Liu, Hongxia; Yang, Shaogui; Wang, Liansheng; Wang, Zunyao

    2015-09-01

    The hazardous potential of benzophenone (BP)-type UV filters is becoming an issue of great concern due to the wide application of these compounds in many personal care products. In the present study, the toxicities of BPs to Photobacterium phosphoreum and Daphnia magna were determined. Next, density functional theory (DFT) and comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) descriptors were used to obtain more detailed insight into the structure - activity relationships and to preliminarily discuss the toxicity mechanism. Additionally, the sensitivities of the two organisms to BPs and the interspecies toxicity relationship were compared. Moreover, an approach for providing a global index of the environmental risk of BPs to aquatic organisms is proposed. The results demonstrated that the mechanism underlying the toxicity of BPs to P. phosphoreum is primarily related to their electronic properties, and the mechanism of toxicity to D. magna is hydrophobicity. Additionally, D. magna was more sensitive than P. phosphoreum to most of the BPs, with the exceptions of the polyhydric BPs. Moreover, comparisons with published data revealed a high interspecies correlation coefficient among the experimental toxicity values for D. magna and Dugesia japonica. Furthermore, hydrophobicity was also found to be the most important descriptor of integrated toxicity. This investigation will provide insight into the toxicity mechanisms and useful information for assessing the potential ecological risk of BP-type UV filters.

  4. Development of Species Sensitivity Distributions for Wildlife Using Interspecies Toxicity Correlation Models

    EPA Science Inventory

    Species sensitivity distributions (SSD) are cumulative distributions of chemical toxicity of multiple species and have had limited application in wildlife risk assessment because of relatively small datasets of wildlife toxicity values. Interspecies correlation estimation (ICE) m...

  5. ESTIMATION OF CHEMICAL TOXICITY TO WILDLIFE SPECIES USING INTERSPECIES CORRELATION MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ecological risks to wildlife are typically assessed using toxicity data for relataively few species and with limited understanding of differences in species sensitivity to contaminants. Empirical interspecies correlation models were derived from LD50 values for 49 wildlife speci...

  6. Interspecies correlations of toxicity to eight aquatic organisms: theoretical considerations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu J; Qin, Hong W; Su, Li M; Qin, Wei C; Zou, Ming Y; Sheng, Lian X; Zhao, Yuan H; Abraham, Michael H

    2010-09-15

    Interspecies correlations allow the prediction of toxicity to a number of other species. However, little attention has been paid to the theoretical considerations of the interspecies relationship based on the differences of bio-uptake and toxic mechanism between species. This study examines the interspecies correlations of toxicity between species of Vibrio fischeri, river bacteria, algae, Daphnia magna, carp, Tetrahymena pyriformis, fathead minnow and guppy based on the theoretical background. The results show that there are good interspecies correlations between marine bacterium and fresh water bacteria or fish and fish. It is suggested that compounds share the same bio-uptake and toxic mechanism of action between the species. On the other hand, poor interspecies relationships were found between toxicities to algae and T. pyriformis or D. magna. It is suggested that compounds have different toxic mechanisms of action between these species. Interspecies relationships can be improved by inclusion of the octanol/water partition coefficient or the energy of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital. They reflect the difference of bio-uptake or toxic mechanism of action between species for organic compounds. Benzoic acids show very different toxicity contributions to the three species, V. fischeri, D. magna and carp. They can be easily absorbed into the unicellular bacteria, V. fischeri. On the contrary, the skin and lipid content of multicellular organisms, such as D. magna and fish, can strongly inhibit the bio-uptake for ionizable compounds, which results in the different toxic effect between V. fischeri and D. magna or carp. Good correlation coefficients were observed between toxicities to V. fischeri and D. magna or fishes by inclusion of hydrophobic and ionization parameters. V. fischeri or D. magna can serve as a surrogate of fish toxicity for hydrophobic and ionizable compounds studied. Toxic mechanisms of action are discussed based on the theoretical background

  7. WEB-BASED INTERSPECIES CORRELATION ESTIMATION (WEB-ICE) FOR ACUTE TOXICITY: USER MANUAL V2

    EPA Science Inventory

    Predictive toxicological models are integral to environmental risk Assessment where data for most species are limited. Web-based Interspecies Correlation Estimation (Web-ICE) models are least square regressions that predict acute toxicity (LC50/LD50) of a chemical to a species, ...

  8. INTER-SPECIES MODELS FOR ACUTE AQUATIC TOXICITY BASED ON MECHANISM OF ACTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation will provide interspecies QSARs for acute toxicity to 17 aquatic species, such as fish, snail, tadpole, hydrozoan, crustacean, insect larvae, and bacteria developed using 5,000 toxic effect results for approximately 2400 chemicals.

  9. Augmenting aquatic species sensitivity distributions with interspecies toxicity estimation models

    EPA Science Inventory

    Species sensitivity distributions (SSD) are cumulative distribution functions of species toxicity values. The SSD approach is increasingly being used in ecological risk assessment, but is often limited by available toxicity data necessary for diverse species representation. In ...

  10. Web-based Interspecies Correlation Estimation (Web-ICE) for Acute Toxicity: User Manual Version 3.1

    EPA Science Inventory

    Predictive toxicological models are integral to ecological risk assessment because data for most species are limited. Web-based Interspecies Correlation Estimation (Web-ICE) models are least square regressions that predict acute toxicity (LC50/LD50) of a chemical to a species, ge...

  11. Using Web-based Interspecies Correlation Estimation (Web-ICE) models as a tool for acute toxicity prediction

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to assess risk of contaminants to taxa with limited or no toxicity data available, Interspecies Correlation Estimation (ICE) models have been developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to extrapolate contaminant sensitivity predictions based on data from commo...

  12. Interspecies quantitative structure-toxicity-toxicity (QSTTR) relationship modeling of ionic liquids. Toxicity of ionic liquids to V. fischeri, D. magna and S. vacuolatus.

    PubMed

    Das, Rudra Narayan; Roy, Kunal; Popelier, Paul L A

    2015-12-01

    Considering the increasing uses of ionic liquids (ILs) in various industrial processes and chemical engineering operations, a complete assessment of their hazardous profile is essential. In the absence of adequate experimental data, in silico modeling might be helpful in filling data gaps for the toxicity of ILs towards various ecological indicator organisms. Using the rationale of taxonomic relatedness, the development of predictive quantitative structure-toxicity-toxicity relationship (QSTTR) models allows predicting the toxicity of ILs to a particular species using available experimental toxicity data towards a different species. Such studies may employ, along with the available experimental toxicity data to a species, molecular structure features and physicochemical properties of chemicals as independent variables for prediction of the toxicity profile against another closely related species. A few such interspecies toxicity correlation models have been reported in the literature for diverse chemicals in general, but this approach has been rarely applied to the class of ionic liquids. The present study involves the use of IL toxicity data towards the bacteria Vibrio fischeri along with molecular structure derived information or computational descriptors like extended topochemical atom (ETA) indices, quantum topological molecular similarity (QTMS) descriptors and computed lipophilicity measure (logk0) for the interspecies exploration of the toxicity data towards green algae S. vacuolatus and crustacea Daphnia magna, separately. This modeling study has been performed in accordance with the OECD guidelines. Finally, predictions for a true external set have been performed to fill the data gap of toxicity towards daphnids and algae using the Vibrio toxicity data and molecular structure attributes. PMID:26414597

  13. Interspecies quantitative structure-toxicity-toxicity (QSTTR) relationship modeling of ionic liquids. Toxicity of ionic liquids to V. fischeri, D. magna and S. vacuolatus.

    PubMed

    Das, Rudra Narayan; Roy, Kunal; Popelier, Paul L A

    2015-12-01

    Considering the increasing uses of ionic liquids (ILs) in various industrial processes and chemical engineering operations, a complete assessment of their hazardous profile is essential. In the absence of adequate experimental data, in silico modeling might be helpful in filling data gaps for the toxicity of ILs towards various ecological indicator organisms. Using the rationale of taxonomic relatedness, the development of predictive quantitative structure-toxicity-toxicity relationship (QSTTR) models allows predicting the toxicity of ILs to a particular species using available experimental toxicity data towards a different species. Such studies may employ, along with the available experimental toxicity data to a species, molecular structure features and physicochemical properties of chemicals as independent variables for prediction of the toxicity profile against another closely related species. A few such interspecies toxicity correlation models have been reported in the literature for diverse chemicals in general, but this approach has been rarely applied to the class of ionic liquids. The present study involves the use of IL toxicity data towards the bacteria Vibrio fischeri along with molecular structure derived information or computational descriptors like extended topochemical atom (ETA) indices, quantum topological molecular similarity (QTMS) descriptors and computed lipophilicity measure (logk0) for the interspecies exploration of the toxicity data towards green algae S. vacuolatus and crustacea Daphnia magna, separately. This modeling study has been performed in accordance with the OECD guidelines. Finally, predictions for a true external set have been performed to fill the data gap of toxicity towards daphnids and algae using the Vibrio toxicity data and molecular structure attributes.

  14. Development of quantitative interspecies toxicity relationship modeling of chemicals to fish.

    PubMed

    Fatemi, M H; Mousa Shahroudi, E; Amini, Z

    2015-09-01

    In this work, quantitative interspecies-toxicity relationship methodologies were used to improve the prediction power of interspecies toxicity model. The most relevant descriptors selected by stepwise multiple linear regressions and toxicity of chemical to Daphnia magna were used to predict the toxicities of chemicals to fish. Modeling methods that were used for developing linear and nonlinear models were multiple linear regression (MLR), random forest (RF), artificial neural network (ANN) and support vector machine (SVM). The obtained results indicate the superiority of SVM model over other models. Robustness and reliability of the constructed SVM model were evaluated by using the leave-one-out cross-validation method (Q(2)=0.69, SPRESS=0.822) and Y-randomization test (R(2)=0.268 for 30 trail). Furthermore, the chemical applicability domains of these models were determined via leverage approach. The developed SVM model was used for the prediction of toxicity of 46 compounds that their experimental toxicities to a fish were not being reported earlier from their toxicities to D. magna and relevant molecular descriptors.

  15. Preliminary studies on model development for rodent toxicity and its interspecies correlation with aquatic toxicities of pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Das, Rudra Narayan; Sanderson, Hans; Mwambo, Andrew E; Roy, Kunal

    2013-03-01

    Environmental toxicity due to pharmaceuticals has been an issue of serious concern for long time. Development of chemometric models with reliable predictive power has been considered as an effective tool for the design of new drug agents with reduced or without ecotoxic potential. Considering a higher degree of similarity in genetic homology towards drug receptor with mammals, we have used a dataset of 194 compounds with reported rodent, fish, daphnia and algae toxicity data for extrapolation of their toxicity towards humans. Allowing for rodents as the most surrogate to human physiology, attempts have also been made to develop interspecies correlation models keeping rodent toxicity as dependent variable so that any drug without reported rodent toxicity can be predicted using fish, daphnia or algae toxicity data which can be consequently extrapolated to human toxicity. The developed models have been subjected to multiple validation strategies. Acceptable results have been obtained in both cases of direct and interspecies extrapolation quantitative structure-activity relationship models. PMID:23238824

  16. Development of Algal Interspecies Correlation Estimation Models for Chemical Hazard Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Web-based Interspecies Correlation Estimation (ICE) is an application developed to predict the acute toxicity of a chemical from 1 species to another taxon. Web-ICE models use the acute toxicity value for a surrogate species to predict effect values for other species, thus potent...

  17. Development of algal interspecies correlation estimation models for chemical hazard assessment.

    PubMed

    Brill, Jessica L; Belanger, Scott E; Chaney, Joel G; Dyer, Scott D; Raimondo, Sandy; Barron, Mace G; Pittinger, Charles A

    2016-09-01

    Web-based Interspecies Correlation Estimation (ICE) is an application developed to predict the acute toxicity of a chemical from 1 species to another taxon. Web-ICE models use the acute toxicity value for a surrogate species to predict effect values for other species, thus potentially filling in data gaps for a variety of environmental assessment purposes. Web-ICE has historically been dominated by aquatic and terrestrial animal prediction models. Web-ICE models for algal species were essentially absent and are addressed in the present study. A compilation of public and private sector-held algal toxicity data were compiled and reviewed for quality based on relevant aspects of individual studies. Interspecies correlations were constructed from the most commonly tested algal genera for a broad spectrum of chemicals. The ICE regressions were developed based on acute 72-h and 96-h endpoint values involving 1647 unique studies on 476 unique chemicals encompassing 40 genera and 70 species of green, blue-green, and diatom algae. Acceptance criteria for algal ICE models were established prior to evaluation of individual models and included a minimum sample size of 3, a statistically significant regression slope, and a slope estimation parameter ≥0.65. A total of 186 ICE models were possible at the genus level, with 21 meeting quality criteria; and 264 ICE models were developed at the species level, with 32 meeting quality criteria. Algal ICE models will have broad utility in screening environmental hazard assessments, data gap filling in certain regulatory scenarios, and as supplemental information to derive species sensitivity distributions. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:2368-2378. Published 2016 Wiley Periodicals Inc. on behalf of SETAC. This article is a US government work and, as such, is in the public domain in the United States of America.

  18. INTERSPECIES CORRELATION ESTIMATION (ICE) FOR ACUTE TOXICITY TO AQUATIC ORGANISMS AND WILDLIFE. II. USER MANUAL AND SOFTWARE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Asfaw, Amha, Mark R. Ellersieck and Foster L. Mayer. 2003. Interspecies Correlation Estimations (ICE) for Acute Toxicity to Aquatic Organisms and Wildlife. II. User Manual and Software. EPA/600/R-03/106. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, National Health and Environmental Effe...

  19. Estimation of Wildlife Hazard Levels Using Interspecies Correlation Models and Standard Laboratory Rodent Toxicity Data

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toxicity data from laboratory rodents are widely available and frequently used in human health assessments as an animal model. We explore the possibility of using single rodent acute toxicity values to predict chemical toxicity to a diversity of wildlife species and to estimate ...

  20. Comprehensive mollusk acute toxicity database improves the use of Interspecies Correlation Estimation (ICE) models to predict toxicity of untested freshwater and endangered mussel species

    EPA Science Inventory

    Interspecies correlation estimation (ICE) models extrapolate acute toxicity data from surrogate test species to untested taxa. A suite of ICE models developed from a comprehensive database is available on the US Environmental Protection Agency’s web-based application, Web-I...

  1. Interspecies quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) for eco-toxicity screening of chemicals: the role of physicochemical properties.

    PubMed

    Furuhama, A; Hasunuma, K; Aoki, Y

    2015-01-01

    In addition to molecular structure profiles, descriptors based on physicochemical properties are useful for explaining the eco-toxicities of chemicals. In a previous study we reported that a criterion based on the difference between the partition coefficient (log POW) and distribution coefficient (log D) values of chemicals enabled us to identify aromatic amines and phenols for which interspecies relationships with strong correlations could be developed for fish-daphnid and algal-daphnid toxicities. The chemicals that met the log D-based criterion were expected to have similar toxicity mechanisms (related to membrane penetration). Here, we investigated the applicability of log D-based criteria to the eco-toxicity of other kinds of chemicals, including aliphatic compounds. At pH 10, use of a log POW - log D > 0 criterion and omission of outliers resulted in the selection of more than 100 chemicals whose acute fish toxicities or algal growth inhibition toxicities were almost equal to their acute daphnid toxicities. The advantage of log D-based criteria is that they allow for simple, rapid screening and prioritizing of chemicals. However, inorganic molecules and chemicals containing certain structural elements cannot be evaluated, because calculated log D values are unavailable.

  2. Chemical toxicity to environmental bacteria: Quantitative structure activity relationships and interspecies correlations and comparisons (Volumes I and II)

    SciTech Connect

    Blum, D.J.W.

    1989-01-01

    Toxicity data were collected for four groups of bacteria and a fish. These data were collected for four groups of bacteria and a fish. These data were used to compare and correlate the toxicities to different organisms, and to develop Quantitative Structure Activity Relationships (QSARs) correlating chemical structure with toxicity. Chemical toxicity to aerobic heterotrophic bacteria, Nitrosomonas, and methanogens were measured using serum bottle techniques in order to determine the concentration of chemical which caused 50% inhibition in microorganism's activity. Toxicity to Photobacteria phosphoreum (Microtox bacteria) and fathead minnows was also tested or data collected from the literature. Toxicants included chlorinated and other substituted benzenes and phenols, chlorinated alkanes, and a variety of additional compounds covering a range of chemical structures. Data were obtained for 50 to 130 chemicals per species. The sensitivity of the organism fell into two groups with Microtox bacteria, Nitrosomonas, and fathead minnows showing significantly greater sensitivity than aerobic heterotrophs and methanogens. Highly successful interspecies correlations were found between Microtox and each of the other species.

  3. Application of the Web-based Interspecies Correlation Estimation (Web-ICE) tool to assess risks of national pesticide registrations to federally listed (threatened and endangered) species

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Academy of Science (NAS) recently recommended exploration of predictive tools, such as interspecies correlation estimation (ICE), to estimate acute toxicity values for listed species and support development of species sensitivity distributions (SSDs). We explored the...

  4. Daphnia and fish toxicity of (benzo)triazoles: validated QSAR models, and interspecies quantitative activity-activity modelling.

    PubMed

    Cassani, Stefano; Kovarich, Simona; Papa, Ester; Roy, Partha Pratim; van der Wal, Leon; Gramatica, Paola

    2013-08-15

    Due to their chemical properties synthetic triazoles and benzo-triazoles ((B)TAZs) are mainly distributed to the water compartments in the environment, and because of their wide use the potential effects on aquatic organisms are cause of concern. Non testing approaches like those based on quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) are valuable tools to maximize the information contained in existing experimental data and predict missing information while minimizing animal testing. In the present study, externally validated QSAR models for the prediction of acute (B)TAZs toxicity in Daphnia magna and Oncorhynchus mykiss have been developed according to the principles for the validation of QSARs and their acceptability for regulatory purposes, proposed by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). These models are based on theoretical molecular descriptors, and are statistically robust, externally predictive and characterized by a verifiable structural applicability domain. They have been applied to predict acute toxicity for over 300 (B)TAZs without experimental data, many of which are in the pre-registration list of the REACH regulation. Additionally, a model based on quantitative activity-activity relationships (QAAR) has been developed, which allows for interspecies extrapolation from daphnids to fish. The importance of QSAR/QAAR, especially when dealing with specific chemical classes like (B)TAZs, for screening and prioritization of pollutants under REACH, has been highlighted.

  5. Interspecies Correlation Estimation (ICE) models predict supplemental toxicity data for SSDs

    EPA Science Inventory

    Species sensitivity distributions (SSD) require a large number of toxicity values for a diversity of taxa to define a hazard level protective of multiple species. For most chemicals, measured toxicity data are limited to a few standard test species that are unlikely to adequately...

  6. Assessing functional annotation transfers with inter-species conserved coexpression: application to Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Plasmodium falciparum is the main causative agent of malaria. Of the 5 484 predicted genes of P. falciparum, about 57% do not have sufficient sequence similarity to characterized genes in other species to warrant functional assignments. Non-homology methods are thus needed to obtain functional clues for these uncharacterized genes. Gene expression data have been widely used in the recent years to help functional annotation in an intra-species way via the so-called Guilt By Association (GBA) principle. Results We propose a new method that uses gene expression data to assess inter-species annotation transfers. Our approach starts from a set of likely orthologs between a reference species (here S. cerevisiae and D. melanogaster) and a query species (P. falciparum). It aims at identifying clusters of coexpressed genes in the query species whose coexpression has been conserved in the reference species. These conserved clusters of coexpressed genes are then used to assess annotation transfers between genes with low sequence similarity, enabling reliable transfers of annotations from the reference to the query species. The approach was used with transcriptomic data sets of P. falciparum, S. cerevisiae and D. melanogaster, and enabled us to propose with high confidence new/refined annotations for several dozens hypothetical/putative P. falciparum genes. Notably, we revised the annotation of genes involved in ribosomal proteins and ribosome biogenesis and assembly, thus highlighting several potential drug targets. Conclusions Our approach uses both sequence similarity and gene expression data to help inter-species gene annotation transfers. Experiments show that this strategy improves the accuracy achieved when using solely sequence similarity and outperforms the accuracy of the GBA approach. In addition, our experiments with P. falciparum show that it can infer a function for numerous hypothetical genes. PMID:20078859

  7. Interspecies Extrapolation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Interspecies extrapolation encompasses two related but distinct topic areas that are germane to quantitative extrapolation and hence computational toxicology-dose scaling and parameter scaling. Dose scaling is the process of converting a dose determined in an experimental animal ...

  8. Identification of transcriptome SNPs between Xiphophorus lines and species for assessing allele specific gene expression within F1 interspecies hybrids☆

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yingjia; Catchen, Julian; Garcia, Tzintzuni; Amores, Angel; Beldroth, Ion; Wagner, Jonathon R; Zhang, Ziping; Postlethwait, John; Warren, Wes; Schartl, Manfred; Walter, Ronald B.

    2011-01-01

    Variations in gene expression are essential for the evolution of novel phenotypes and for speciation. Studying allelic specific gene expression (ASGE) within interspecies hybrids provides a unique opportunity to reveal underlying mechanisms of genetic variation. Using Xiphophorus interspecies hybrid fishes and high-throughput next generation sequencing technology, we were able to assess variations between two closely related vertebrate species, X. maculatus and X. couchianus, and their F1 interspecies hybrids. We constructed transcriptome-wide SNP polymorphism sets between two highly inbred X. maculatus lines (JP 163 A and B), and between X. maculatus and a second species, X. couchianus. The X. maculatus JP 163 A and B parental lines have been separated in the laboratory for ≈ 70 years and we were able to identify SNPs at a resolution of 1 SNP per 49 kb of transcriptome. In contrast, SNP polymorphisms between X. couchianus and X. maculatus species, which diverged ≈ 5–10 million years ago, were identified about every 700 bp. Using 6,524 transcripts with identified SNPs between the two parental species (X. maculatus and X. couchianus), we mapped RNA-seq reads to determine ASGE within F1 interspecies hybrids. We developed an in silico X. couchianus transcriptome by replacing 90,788 SNP bases for X. maculatus transcriptome with the consensus X. couchianus SNP bases and provide evidence that this procedure overcomes read mapping biases. Employment of the insilico reference transcriptome and tolerating 5 mismatches during read mapping allow direct assessment of ASGE in the F1 interspecies hybrids. Overall, these results show that Xiphophorus is a tractable vertebrate experimental model to investigate how genetic variations that occur during speciation may affect gene interactions and the regulation of gene expression. PMID:21466860

  9. Web-based Interspecies Correlation Estimation (Web-ICE) for Acute Toxicity: User Manual Version 3.3

    EPA Science Inventory

    Information on the acute toxicity to multiple species is needed for the assessment of the risks to, and the protection of, individuals, populations, and ecological communities. However, toxicity data are limited for the majority of species, while standard test species are general...

  10. Toxicity of lead (Pb) to freshwater green algae: development and validation of a bioavailability model and inter-species sensitivity comparison.

    PubMed

    De Schamphelaere, K A C; Nys, C; Janssen, C R

    2014-10-01

    model to reduce uncertainty in site-specific risk assessment. A model-based comparison with other species indicated that the sensitivity difference between P. subcapitata and two of the most chronically Pb-sensitive aquatic invertebrates (the crustacean Ceriodaphnia dubia and the snail Lymnaea stagnalis) is strongly pH dependent, with P. subcapitata becoming the most sensitive of the three at pH > 7.4. This indicates that inter-species differences in Pb bioavailability relationships should be accounted for in risk assessment and in the derivation of water quality criteria or environmental quality standards for Pb. The chronic toxicity data with three algae species and the bioavailability model presented here will help to provide a stronger scientific basis for evaluating ecological effects of Pb in the freshwater environment. PMID:25089923

  11. Toxicity of lead (Pb) to freshwater green algae: development and validation of a bioavailability model and inter-species sensitivity comparison.

    PubMed

    De Schamphelaere, K A C; Nys, C; Janssen, C R

    2014-10-01

    model to reduce uncertainty in site-specific risk assessment. A model-based comparison with other species indicated that the sensitivity difference between P. subcapitata and two of the most chronically Pb-sensitive aquatic invertebrates (the crustacean Ceriodaphnia dubia and the snail Lymnaea stagnalis) is strongly pH dependent, with P. subcapitata becoming the most sensitive of the three at pH > 7.4. This indicates that inter-species differences in Pb bioavailability relationships should be accounted for in risk assessment and in the derivation of water quality criteria or environmental quality standards for Pb. The chronic toxicity data with three algae species and the bioavailability model presented here will help to provide a stronger scientific basis for evaluating ecological effects of Pb in the freshwater environment.

  12. Reducing uncertainty in species sensitivity distributions with interspecies toxicity estimation models

    EPA Science Inventory

    Determining harmful levels of contaminants for a wide range of species is limited by available toxicological data. Ecological risk assessments typically depend on empirical data from only a few species that represent a narrow range of the life history spectrum. Extrapolation mo...

  13. Influence of Taxonomic Relatedness and Chemical Mode of Action in Acute Interspecies Estimation Models for Aquatic species

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ecological risks to aquatic organisms are typically assessed using toxicity data for relatively few species and with limited understanding of relative species sensitivity. We developed a comprehensive set of interspecies correlation estimation (ICE) models for aquatic organisms a...

  14. Estuarine ambient toxicity assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Hartwell, S.I.; Dawson, C.E.; Jordahl, D.M.

    1994-12-31

    This study was to determine if sediment and water column ambient toxicity bioassay results correlate with fish community IBI assessments in tributaries of the Chesapeake Bay watersheds that are impacted by industrial, urban and agricultural land use patterns. A battery of water column and sediment toxicity tests were conducted monthly in coordination with fish community sampling in four sub estuaries of the Chesapeake Bay. Fish were sampled with seines and bottom trawls. An association was found between dissolved oxygen and species richness in the trawls. Water column bioassays indicated mild toxicological contamination in industrial watershed estuaries. Results varied by month and species. Water quality in the rural and agricultural watershed estuaries was generally good. Sediment bioassays demonstrated significant toxicity in the industrialized area. Effects were seen in the urbanized estuary, but to a lesser extent. Fish egg survival effects were observed in the agricultural watershed estuary. The rural estuary sediment produced variable, but non-significant results. The industrial and urban sites were contaminated with heavy metals and organics.

  15. Web-based Interspecies Correlation Estimation (Web-ICE) for Acute Toxicity: User Manual 3.2

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Web-ICE Endangered Species module simultaneously estimates toxicity to taxa representing threatened or endangered species using up to 25 surrogates. This module batch processes toxicity values for endangered species from all species, genus, and family level models available f...

  16. Interspecies Correlation Estimation - Applications in Water Quality Criteria and Ecological Risk Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Water quality criteria (WQC) designate the maximum concentrations of water-borne toxicants that do not adversely affect specific protection goals under certain natural conditions. As the foundation of water quality standards, WQC provide a critical scientific basis for environmen...

  17. Proteomics in aquatic amphipods: can it be used to determine mechanisms of toxicity and interspecies responses after exposure to atrazine?

    PubMed

    Ralston-Hooper, Kimberly J; Sanchez, Brian C; Adamec, Jiri; Sepúlveda, María S

    2011-05-01

    Proteomics has gained popularity in the field of ecotoxicology as a holistic tool for unraveling novel mechanisms of toxicity and elucidating subtle effects of contaminant exposure. The holoarctic amphipod Diporeia spp. is declining at precipitous rates in the Great Lakes, and we are evaluating the use of the well-studied amphipod model Hyalella azteca as a surrogate for Diporeia spp. This article presents proteomics data from both amphipod species exposed to atrazine (ATZ) and one of its metabolites, desethylatrazine (DEA; 3 and 30 µg/L for 21 and 42 d). We used a proteomics approach to determine whether these two species of amphipods responded similarly to the same chemicals and to understand better the mechanisms of toxicity of ATZ and DEA in aquatic invertebrates. We observed disruption in energy production and mitochondrial function as well as hormesis in exposed organisms. In addition, we identified a two proteins (GAPDH and HSP 90 kDa) that have been linked to hormonal disruptions, suggesting potential endocrine disruption. Finally, we found that H. azteca and Diporeia spp. responded with similar proteomic profiles after ATZ and DEA exposure, suggesting that H. azteca may be used as a surrogate model organism for Diporeia spp.

  18. Interspecies differences in the hepatic metabolism of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin: role in toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Wroblewski, V.J.

    1987-01-01

    These studies examined the hepatic metabolism of TCDD in suspensions of isolated hepatocytes from the guinea pig and hamster. /sup 14/C- TCDD was metabolized at a similar rate in hepatocytes from the three species. TCDD pretreatment 72 hours prior to hepatocyte isolation increased cytochrome P-448-mediated monooxygenase activities and increased the rate of TCDD metabolism in rat and hamster hepatocytes 5-6-fold over the control rate. However, pretreatment of guinea pigs with TCDD had not effect on the rate of /sup 14/C-TCDD metabolism in isolated hepatocytes from this species. The findings suggest that the inability of TCDD to induce its own rate of hepatic metabolism in the guinea pig may contribute to the persistence of TCDD and unique sensitivity of this species to the acute toxicity of TCDD.

  19. Human and Rat ABC Transporter Efflux of Bisphenol A and Bisphenol A Glucuronide: Interspecies Comparison and Implications for Pharmacokinetic Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Significant interspecies differences exist between human and rodent with respect to absorption, distribution, and excretion of bisphenol A (BPA) and its primary metabolite, BPA-glucuronide (BPA-G). ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) transporter enzymes play important roles in these physi...

  20. Variation in sensitivity of aquatic species to toxicants: Practical consequences for effect assessment of chemical substances

    SciTech Connect

    Vaal, M.A.; Van Leeuwen, C.J.; Hoekstra, J.A.; Hermens, J.L.M.

    2000-04-01

    This study addresses the relation between the sensitivity of aquatic species and mode of action of different classes or organic chemicals. The authors analyzed large data sets of ecotoxicological information to reveal the interspecies variation in sensitivity, to relate this variation to the compounds' mode of action, and to explain the observed patterns using general biological information. Here the authors present a general framework and recommendations for risk assessment procedures. The authors recommend the use of toxicologically based classification schemes at an early stage of the risk assessment procedure. Screening programs are most efficiently run when only one species per compound is tested to prioritize substances. The toxicity of compounds belonging to the class of nonpolar narcotics is highly predictable and shows little interspecies variation. For these compounds quantitative structure-activity relationships (WSARs) can be used to estimate effect levels. Most effort should be put into testing reactive compounds and compounds with a specific mode of action as toxicity to some species can be 10{sup 5}--10{sup 6} times higher compared with less sensitive species. The use of assessment factors in effect assessment procedures may lead to an underestimation of effects on the more sensitive species. For many priority pollutants there is little information on their ecotoxicity. Predictive techniques are needed to compensate for this lack of data. Knowledge of the relation between modes of action of compounds and interspecies variation in sensitivity should be integrated in risk assessment procedures in order to make more efficient use of the limited financial resources available.

  1. Environmental complex mixture toxicity assessment.

    PubMed

    Gardner, H S; Brennan, L M; Toussaint, M W; Rosencrance, A B; Boncavage-Hennessey, E M; Wolfe, M J

    1998-12-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) was found as a contaminant in the well supplying water to an aquatic testing laboratory. The groundwater was routinely screened by a commercial laboratory for volatile and semivolatile compounds, metals, herbicides, pesticides, and polychlorinated biphenyls using U.S. Environmental Protection Agency methods. Although TCE was the only reportable peak on the gas chromatograph, with average concentrations of 0.200 mg/l, other small peaks were also present, indicating the possibility that the contamination was not limited to TCE alone. A chronic 6-month carcinogenicity assay was conducted on-site in a biomonitoring trailer, using the Japanese medaka fish (Oryzias latipes) in an initiation-promotion protocol, with diethylnitrosamine (DEN) as the initiator and the TCE-contaminated groundwater as a promoter. Study results indicated no evidence of carcinogenic potential of the groundwater without initiation. There was, however, a tumor-promotional effect of the groundwater after DEN initiation. A follow-up laboratory study was conducted using reagent grade TCE added to carbon-filtered groundwater to simulate TCE concentrations comparable to those found in the contaminated groundwater. Study results indicated no promotional effects of TCE. These studies emphasize the necessity for on-site bioassays to assess potential environmental hazards. In this instance, chemical analysis of the groundwater identified TCE as the only reportable contaminant, but other compounds present below reportable limits were noted and may have had a synergistic effect on tumor promotion observed with the groundwater exposure. Laboratory toxicity testing of single compounds can produce toxicity data specific to that compound for that species but cannot take into account the possible toxic effects of mixtures of compounds.

  2. Environmental complex mixture toxicity assessment.

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, H S; Brennan, L M; Toussaint, M W; Rosencrance, A B; Boncavage-Hennessey, E M; Wolfe, M J

    1998-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) was found as a contaminant in the well supplying water to an aquatic testing laboratory. The groundwater was routinely screened by a commercial laboratory for volatile and semivolatile compounds, metals, herbicides, pesticides, and polychlorinated biphenyls using U.S. Environmental Protection Agency methods. Although TCE was the only reportable peak on the gas chromatograph, with average concentrations of 0.200 mg/l, other small peaks were also present, indicating the possibility that the contamination was not limited to TCE alone. A chronic 6-month carcinogenicity assay was conducted on-site in a biomonitoring trailer, using the Japanese medaka fish (Oryzias latipes) in an initiation-promotion protocol, with diethylnitrosamine (DEN) as the initiator and the TCE-contaminated groundwater as a promoter. Study results indicated no evidence of carcinogenic potential of the groundwater without initiation. There was, however, a tumor-promotional effect of the groundwater after DEN initiation. A follow-up laboratory study was conducted using reagent grade TCE added to carbon-filtered groundwater to simulate TCE concentrations comparable to those found in the contaminated groundwater. Study results indicated no promotional effects of TCE. These studies emphasize the necessity for on-site bioassays to assess potential environmental hazards. In this instance, chemical analysis of the groundwater identified TCE as the only reportable contaminant, but other compounds present below reportable limits were noted and may have had a synergistic effect on tumor promotion observed with the groundwater exposure. Laboratory toxicity testing of single compounds can produce toxicity data specific to that compound for that species but cannot take into account the possible toxic effects of mixtures of compounds. Images Figure 2 PMID:9860885

  3. EXTRAPOLATION OF ACUTE TOXICITY AMONG AQUATIC SPECIES BASED ON MECHANISM OF ACTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presentation provides inter-species QSARs for acute toxicity to ciliates, fish and daphnia...The inter-species QSARs can be also useful in the analysis of the relative species sensitivity to a variety of pollutants and will be useful in assisting in risk assessments of potential ...

  4. Health assessment of exposure to developmental toxicants

    SciTech Connect

    Kimmel, C.A.

    1987-07-01

    In 1984, the U.S. EPA published proposed Guidelines for the Health Assessment of Suspect Developmental Toxicants. The assessment of data from studies on developmental effects of chemical exposure and the estimation of risk for humans is a difficult process. Although structure/activity relationships and data from short-term tests are often used in the risk-assessment process for assessing carcinogens, these are not useful as the first step in developmental toxicity risk assessment. Human epidemiological data are used, if available, but often the only available evidence is from animal studies. Therefore, the guidelines focus on the evaluation of data from routine animal testing studies.

  5. Direct toxicity assessment - Methods, evaluation, interpretation.

    PubMed

    Gruiz, Katalin; Fekete-Kertész, Ildikó; Kunglné-Nagy, Zsuzsanna; Hajdu, Csilla; Feigl, Viktória; Vaszita, Emese; Molnár, Mónika

    2016-09-01

    Direct toxicity assessment (DTA) results provide the scale of the actual adverse effect of contaminated environmental samples. DTA results are used in environmental risk management of contaminated water, soil and waste, without explicitly translating the results into chemical concentration. The end points are the same as in environmental toxicology in general, i.e. inhibition rate, decrease in the growth rate or in yield and the 'no effect' or the 'lowest effect' measurement points of the sample dilution-response curve. The measurement unit cannot be a concentration, since the contaminants and their content in the sample is unknown. Thus toxicity is expressed as the sample proportion causing a certain scale of inhibition or no inhibition. Another option for characterizing the scale of toxicity of an environmental sample is equivalencing. Toxicity equivalencing represents an interpretation tool which enables toxicity of unknown mixtures of chemicals be converted into the concentration of an equivalently toxic reference substance. Toxicity equivalencing, (i.e. expressing the toxicity of unknown contaminants as the concentration of the reference) makes DTA results better understandable for non-ecotoxicologists and other professionals educated and thinking based on the chemical model. This paper describes and discusses the role, the principles, the methodology and the interpretation of direct toxicity assessment (DTA) with the aim to contribute to the understanding of the necessity to integrate DTA results into environmental management of contaminated soil and water. The paper also introduces the benefits of the toxicity equivalency method. The use of DTA is illustrated through two case studies. The first case study focuses on DTA of treated wastewater with the aim to characterize the treatment efficacy of a biological wastewater treatment plant by frequent bioassaying. The second case study applied DTA to investigate the cover layers of two bauxite residue (red mud

  6. Direct toxicity assessment - Methods, evaluation, interpretation.

    PubMed

    Gruiz, Katalin; Fekete-Kertész, Ildikó; Kunglné-Nagy, Zsuzsanna; Hajdu, Csilla; Feigl, Viktória; Vaszita, Emese; Molnár, Mónika

    2016-09-01

    Direct toxicity assessment (DTA) results provide the scale of the actual adverse effect of contaminated environmental samples. DTA results are used in environmental risk management of contaminated water, soil and waste, without explicitly translating the results into chemical concentration. The end points are the same as in environmental toxicology in general, i.e. inhibition rate, decrease in the growth rate or in yield and the 'no effect' or the 'lowest effect' measurement points of the sample dilution-response curve. The measurement unit cannot be a concentration, since the contaminants and their content in the sample is unknown. Thus toxicity is expressed as the sample proportion causing a certain scale of inhibition or no inhibition. Another option for characterizing the scale of toxicity of an environmental sample is equivalencing. Toxicity equivalencing represents an interpretation tool which enables toxicity of unknown mixtures of chemicals be converted into the concentration of an equivalently toxic reference substance. Toxicity equivalencing, (i.e. expressing the toxicity of unknown contaminants as the concentration of the reference) makes DTA results better understandable for non-ecotoxicologists and other professionals educated and thinking based on the chemical model. This paper describes and discusses the role, the principles, the methodology and the interpretation of direct toxicity assessment (DTA) with the aim to contribute to the understanding of the necessity to integrate DTA results into environmental management of contaminated soil and water. The paper also introduces the benefits of the toxicity equivalency method. The use of DTA is illustrated through two case studies. The first case study focuses on DTA of treated wastewater with the aim to characterize the treatment efficacy of a biological wastewater treatment plant by frequent bioassaying. The second case study applied DTA to investigate the cover layers of two bauxite residue (red mud

  7. Interspecies extrapolation based on the RepDose database--a probabilistic approach.

    PubMed

    Escher, Sylvia E; Batke, Monika; Hoffmann-Doerr, Simone; Messinger, Horst; Mangelsdorf, Inge

    2013-04-12

    Repeated dose toxicity studies from the RepDose database (DB) were used to determine interspecies differences for rats and mice. NOEL (no observed effect level) ratios based on systemic effects were investigated for three different types of exposure: inhalation, oral food/drinking water and oral gavage. Furthermore, NOEL ratios for local effects in inhalation studies were evaluated. On the basis of the NOEL ratio distributions, interspecies assessment factors (AF) are evaluated. All data sets were best described by a lognormal distribution. No difference was seen between inhalation and oral exposure for systemic effects. Rats and mice were on average equally sensitive at equipotent doses with geometric mean (GM) values of 1 and geometric standard deviation (GSD) values ranging from 2.30 to 3.08. The local AF based on inhalation exposure resulted in a similar distribution with GM values of 1 and GSD values between 2.53 and 2.70. Our analysis confirms former analyses on interspecies differences, including also dog and human data. Furthermore it supports the principle of allometric scaling according to caloric demand in the case that body doses are applied. In conclusion, an interspecies distribution animal/human with a GM equal to allometric scaling and a GSD of 2.5 was derived.

  8. MODULAR APPLICATION OF COMPUTATIONAL MODELS OF INHALED REACTIVE GAS DOSIMETRY FOR RISK ASSESSMENT OF RESPIRATORY TRACT TOXICITY: CHLORINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Inhaled reactive gases typically cause respiratory tract toxicity with a prominent proximal to distal lesion pattern. This pattern is largely driven by airflow and interspecies differences between rodents and humans result from factors such as airway architecture, ventilation ra...

  9. Comparison of Species Sensitivity Distributions Derived from Interspecies Correlation Models to Distributions used to Derive Water Quality Criteria

    EPA Science Inventory

    Species sensitivity distributions (SSD) require a large number of measured toxicity values to define a chemical’s toxicity to multiple species. This investigation comprehensively evaluated the accuracy of SSDs generated from toxicity values predicted from interspecies correlation...

  10. NATIONAL-SCALE ASSESSMENT OF AIR TOXICS RISKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The national-scale assessment of air toxics risks is a modeling assessment which combines emission inventory development, atmospheric fate and transport modeling, exposure modeling, and risk assessment to characterize the risk associated with inhaling air toxics from outdoor sour...

  11. Toxicity assessment of urban stormwater runoff

    SciTech Connect

    Jacher, K.A.; Burton, G.A. Jr.

    1994-12-31

    Organic compounds such as petroleum derivatives, fuels, greases, and oil are considered major pollutants of nonpoint source runoff. Some polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been shown to have carcinogenic effects. A compounding problem of PAH`s in runoff is that they exhibit a photoinduced toxicity to aquatic organisms. Stormwater runoff from urban areas was assessed using Ceriodaphnia dubia, Daphnia magna, Pimephales promelas and Hyalella azteca laboratory test methods. Photoreactive responses of runoff water from parking lots was measured in the laboratory and field validated using Hyalella azteca in situ assessment. Organism exposure to urban runoff showed significantly depressed survival compared to laboratory and base flow conditions. Photoreactive responses show a 50% increase in toxicity during laboratory and in situ exposures. Due to the widespread loadings of PAHs and increased solar UV levels due to the depletion of the ozone layer, potential exists for impacts on aquatic ecosystems and must be incorporated into nonpoint source pollution assessments.

  12. Chesapeake Bay ambient toxicity-assessment workshop report

    SciTech Connect

    Krome, E.C.

    1990-05-01

    Proceedings of a workshop conducted in Annapolis, Maryland, July 25-27, 1989. Its purpose was to provide resource managers with the necessary information to better assess and evaluate the significance of toxic contaminants as causes of mortality and impaired growth and reproduction of Bay organisms. Plenary presentations addressed population risk assessment; sediment toxicity assessment; whole organism toxicity assessment; and suborganismal toxicity assessment. Subsequent group sessions developed conclusions, findings and recommendations.

  13. Sediment toxicity assessment through evaluation of the toxicity of interstitial water

    SciTech Connect

    Ankley, G.

    1989-01-01

    The interstitial-water-toxicity approach is a multiphase procedure for assessing sediment toxicity using interstitial (i.e., pore) water. The use of pore water for sediment toxicity assessment was based on the strong correlations between contaminant concentrations in pore water and toxicity (and/or bioaccumulation) of sediment-associated contaminants by benthic macroinvertebrates. The approach combines the quantitation of pore water toxicity with toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) procedures to identify and quantify chemical components responsible for sediment toxicity. TIE involves recently developed procedures for the identification of toxic compounds in aqueous samples containing complex mixtures of chemicals. In the interstitial water-toxicity method, TIE procedures are implemented in three phases to characterize pore-water toxicity, identify the suspected toxicant, and confirm toxicant identification.

  14. Aquatic Toxicity Assessment of Phosphate Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eunju; Yoo, Sunkyoung; Ro, Hee-Young; Han, Hye-Jin; Baek, Yong-Wook; Eom, Ig-Chun; Kim, Pilje; Choi, Kyunghee

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Tricalcium phosphate and calcium hydrogenorthophosphate are high production volume chemicals, mainly used as foodstuff additives, pharmaceuticals, lubricants, synthetic resin, and disinfectants. Phosphate has the potential to cause increased algal growth leading to eutrophication in the aquatic environment. However, there is no adequate information available on risk assessment or acute and chronic toxicity. The aim of this research is to evaluate the toxic potential of phosphate compounds in the aquatic environment. Methods An aquatic toxicity test of phosphate was conducted, and its physico-chemical properties were obtained from a database recommended in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) guidance manual. An ecotoxicity test using fish, Daphnia, and algae was conducted by the good laboratory practice facility according to the OECD TG guidelines for testing of chemicals, to secure reliable data. Results The results of the ecotoxicity tests of tricalcium phosphate and calcium hydrogenorthophosphate are as follows: In an acute toxicity test with Oryzias latipes, 96 hr 50% lethal concentration (LC50) was >100 (measured:>2.14) mg/L and >100 (measured: >13.5) mg/L, respectively. In the Daphnia test, 48 hr 50% effective concentration (EC50) was >100 (measured: >5.35) mg/L and >100 (measured: >2.9) mg/L, respectively. In a growth inhibition test with Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata, 72 hr EC50 was >100 (measured: >1.56) mg/L and >100 (measured: >4.4) mg/L, respectively. Conclusions Based on the results of the ecotoxicity test of phosphate using fish, Daphnia, and algae, L(E)C50 was above 100 mg/L (nominal), indicating no toxicity. In general, the total phosphorus concentration including phosphate in rivers and lakes reaches levels of several ppm, suggesting that phosphate has no toxic effects. However, excessive inflow of phosphate into aquatic ecosystems has the potential to cause eutrophication due to algal growth. PMID:23440935

  15. Subacute toxicity assessment of annatto in rat.

    PubMed

    Bautista, A R P L; Moreira, E L T; Batista, M S; Miranda, M S; Gomes, I C S

    2004-04-01

    Increased human use of annatto (Bixa orellana L), a red yellow food colorant, demands generation of toxicity data. The toxic effects of annatto powder (bixin 27%) have been assessed following administration of a subacute regimen (4 weeks, 20 doses) in Wistar male and female rats. A full study with three dose levels was considered unnecessary since no sign of toxicity had been noted in a preliminary experiment with 1000 mg/kg body weight/day as was recommended by the OECD guideline. In this study, annatto administered by gavage at a dose level of 2000 mg/kg/day decreased male body weight gain, but had no effect on either food intake or food conversion efficiency. Haematological and plasma biochemical examination as well necropsy performed at the end of administration (29th day) and observation (43rd day) periods revealed no alterations related with annatto administration. Kidney apoptosis occurred in 20% treated female rats in restricted areas without proliferation or tubular segments modification. The precise nature of apoptosis was not investigated in the present study. These findings suggest that annatto was no toxic to the rat. PMID:15019187

  16. Toxicity assessment of 4-amino-2-nitrotoluene.

    PubMed

    Houpt, John T; Leach, Glenn J; Williams, Larry R; Johnson, Mark S; Reddy, Gunda

    2013-01-01

    4-Amino-2-nitrotoluene (4A2NT; CAS 119-32-4) is a degradation product of 2,4-dinitrotoluene. The toxicity data on 4A2NT are limited. Therefore, we collected toxicity data from rats to assess environmental and human health effects from exposures. The approximate lethal dose for both sexes was 5000 mg/kg. A 14-day toxicity study in rats was conducted with 4A2NT in the feed at concentrations of 0, 125, 250, 500, 1000, and 2000 ppm. Based on a 14-day oral dose range toxicity study with 4A2NT in the feed, 2000 ppm was selected as highest concentration for a subsequent 90-day study. An oral 90-day subchronic toxicity study in rats was conducted with concentrations of 0, 500, 1000, or 2000 ppm of 4A2NT in the feed. The calculated consumed doses of 4A2NT in the feed were 0, 27, 52, or 115 mg/kg/d for males and 0, 32, 65, or 138 mg/kg/d for females. A no-observed adverse effect level could not be determined. The lowest observed adverse effect level was 27 mg/kg/d for males and 32 mg/kg/d for female rats based upon decreased body weight gain. The decreased body weight gain in male rats was the most sensitive adverse event observed in this study and was used to derive a benchmark dose (BMD). A BMD of 23.1 mg/kg/d and BMD with 10% effect level of 15.5 mg/kg/d were calculated for male rats, which were used to derive an oral reference dose (RfD). The human RfD of 1.26 μg/kg/d was derived using current United States Environmental Protection Agency guidelines.

  17. Toxicity assessment of tobacco products in vitro.

    PubMed

    Manuppello, Joseph R; Sullivan, Kristie M

    2015-03-01

    Driven by new regulatory demands to demonstrate risk reduction, the toxicity assessment of tobacco products increasingly employs innovative in vitro methods, including biphasic cell and tissue cultures exposed to whole cigarette smoke at the air-liquid interface, cell transformation assays, and genomic analyses. At the same time, novel tobacco products are increasingly compared to traditional cigarettes. This overview of in vitro toxicology studies of tobacco products reported in the last five years provides evidence to support the prioritisation of in vitro over in vivo methods by industry and their recommendation by regulatory authorities.

  18. Development of Interspecies Correlation Models for Petroleum Hydrocarbons

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estimating the consequences of petroleum products to water column organisms has commonly been hampered by limited acute toxicity data, which exists only for a relatively small number of test species. In this study, we developed petroleum-specific Interspecies Correlation Estimati...

  19. TOXICITY TESTS FOR SEDIMENT QUALITY ASSESSMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toxic sediments have contributed to a wide-variety of environmental problems around the world. The observed effects include direct toxic effects to aquatic life, bio-magnification of toxicants in the food chain, and economic impacts. This chapter discusses the use of toxicity...

  20. Assessing the potential toxicity of resuspended sediment

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnet, C.; Babut, M.; Ferard, J.F.; Martel, L.; Garric, J.

    2000-05-01

    Two moderately contaminated freshwater sediments (Sorel Harbour, St. Lawrence River, Canada) were subjected to a suspension event. The objective was to assess the environmental impact of the disposal of dredged material in water, in particular, the short-term effects of dumping on the water column and the long-term effects of dredged sediment deposits. In a series of microcosms, the sediments were left to stand for 25 d under flow-through conditions. In a second series of microcosms, sediments were vigorously suspended for 15 min before being left to settle and were submitted to the same treatment as reference sediments during the following 25 d. Physicochemical and biological parameters (Daphnia magna and Hydra attenuata survival) were measured in overlying water throughout the experiment. Sediment toxicity was assessed with Chironomus tentans and Hyalella azteca exposed to sediments collected at both the beginning and end of the 25-d period. Pore-water toxicity was evaluated with D. magna. During the suspension process, in the Sorel Harbour mixed sediment overlying water, the authors observed effects on H. attenuata survival and ammonia and metals (chromium, copper, and zinc) releases. Meanwhile, in reference (nonmixed) and mixed sediments as well as in associated pore waters, there were no significant chemical modifications no biological effects after the 25-d experiments. The developed approach, which attempts to simulate a dumping process, aims at allowing the assessment of the short- and long-term hazards resulting from a resuspension process in overlying water and in resettled sediments using both chemical and biological measurements.

  1. An assessment of air toxics in Minnesota.

    PubMed

    Pratt, G C; Palmer, K; Wu, C Y; Oliaei, F; Hollerbach, C; Fenske, M J

    2000-09-01

    We used monitoring and modeling to assess the concentrations of air toxics in the state of Minnesota. Model-predicted concentrations for 148 hazardous air pollutants were from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Cumulative Exposure Project (1990 data). Monitoring data consisted of samples of volatile organic compounds, carbonyls, and particulate matter [Less than and equal to] 10 microm in aerodynamic diameter collected at 25 sites throughout the state for varying periods of time (up to 8 years; 1991-1998). Ten pollutants exceeded health benchmark values at one or more sites by modeling, monitoring, or both (including acrolein, arsenic, benzene, 1,3-butadiene, carbon tetrachloride, chromium, chloroform, ethylene dibromide, formaldehyde, and nickel). Polycyclic organic matter also exceeded the benzo[a]pyrene health benchmark value assumed to represent this class of pollutants. The highest modeled and monitored concentrations of most pollutants were near the center of the Minneapolis-St. Paul metropolitan area; however, many smaller cities throughout the state also had elevated concentrations. Where direct comparisons were possible, monitored values often tended to exceed model estimates. Upper-bound excess lifetime inhalation cancer risks were estimated to range from 2.7 [times] 10(-5) to 140. 9 [times] 10(-5) (modeling) and 4.7 [times] 10(-5) to 11.0 [times] 10(-5) (using a smaller set of monitored carcinogens). Screening noncancer hazard indices summed over all end points ranged from 0.2 to 58.1 (modeling) and 0.6 to 2.0 (with a smaller set of monitored pollutants). For common sets of pollutants, the concentrations, cancer risks, and noncancer hazard indices were comparable between model-based estimates and monitored values. The inhalation cancer risk was apportioned to mobile sources (54%), area sources (22%), point sources (12%), and background (12%). This study provides evidence that air toxics are a public health concern in Minnesota.

  2. Lunar Airborne Dust Toxicity Hazard Assessments (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, B. L.; McKay, D. S.; Taylor, L. A.; Wallace, W. T.; James, J.; Riofrio, L.; Gonzalez, C. P.

    2009-12-01

    The Lunar Airborne Dust Toxicity Assessment Group (LADTAG) is developing data to set the permissible limits for human exposure to lunar dust. This standard will guide the design of airlocks and ports for EVA, as well as the requirements for filtering and monitoring the atmosphere in habitable vehicles, rovers and other modules. LADTAG’s recommendation for permissible exposure limits will be delivered to the Constellation Program in late 2010. The current worst-case exposure limit of 0.05 mg/m3, estimated by LADTAG in 2006, reflects the concern that lunar dust may be as toxic as quartz dust. Freshly-ground quartz is known to be more toxic than un-ground quartz dust. Our research has shown that the surfaces of lunar soil grains can be more readily activated by grinding than quartz. Activation was measured by the amount of free radicals generated—activated simulants generate Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) i.e., production of hydroxyl free radicals. Of the various influences in the lunar environment, micrometeorite bombardment probably creates the most long-lasting reactivity on the surfaces of grains, although solar wind impingement and short-wavelength UV radiation also contribute. The comminution process creates fractured surfaces with unsatisfied bonds. When these grains are inhaled and carried into the lungs, they will react with lung surfactant and cells, potentially causing tissue damage and disease. Tests on lunar simulants have shown that dissolution and leaching of metals can occur when the grains are exposed to water—the primary component of lung fluid. However, simulants may behave differently than actual lunar soils. Rodent toxicity testing will be done using the respirable fraction of actual lunar soils (particles with physical size of less than 2.5 micrometers). We are currently separating the fine material from the coarser material that comprises >95% of the mass of each soil sample. Dry sieving is not practical in this size range, so a new system

  3. Behavioral assessment of the toxicity of aspartame.

    PubMed

    Holder, M D; Yirmiya, R

    1989-01-01

    Six experiments with rats assessed the toxicity of aspartame with behavioral measures. The first three experiments used a conditioned taste aversion procedure since taste aversions are typically observed after a taste is followed by a toxin. Thirty min after thirsty rats drank a sweet solution they were intraperitoneally injected (Experiment 1) or intragastrically intubated (Experiment 2) with saline or 176, 352, or 704 mg/kg of aspartame. Relative to rats given saline, rats injected with 704 and 352 mg/kg aspartame showed strong and mild aversions, respectively. Rats injected with 176 mg/kg of aspartame or intubated with any dose of aspartame did not show taste aversions. In Experiment 3, rats voluntarily consumed an aspartame solution sweetened with saccharin for 7 hr each day. Consumption of the taste paired with aspartame was not reduced. When 352 mg/kg aspartame was injected (Experiment 4), but not when intubated (Experiment 5), 5 min prior to access to a running wheel, running was reduced. Wheel running was not affected by the voluntary consumption of aspartame (Experiment 6). The route of administration effect (intraperitoneal vs. intragastric) on behavior corresponded with the amino acid levels in blood plasma (Experiment 7). Aspartate, phenylalanine, tyrosine and glutamate levels increased more after the injection, than the intubation, of aspartame (176 mg/kg). Overall, the results suggest that aspartame may have adverse effects when intraperitoneally injected but not when the route of administration is oral.

  4. Toxic congener-specific analysis of PCBs: assessment of toxicity in equivalents of TCDD

    SciTech Connect

    Olafsson, P.G.; Bryan, A.M.

    1987-01-01

    High resolution capillary gas chromatographic analysis of the polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs) present in snapping turtle eggs, provided quantitative data on selected toxic congeners. The concentrations of these congeners have been converted into equivalent toxic concentrations of 2,3,7,8-tetrachloro-p-dibenzodioxin (TCDD). The toxic equivalent factors (TEFs), necessary to effect this transformation were derived from EC/sub 50/ values (half the concentration of the toxic congener required to produce the maximum effect) for aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase (AHH) induction associated with the corresponding toxic PCB congener or isomer. Summation of the resulting toxic equivalents provided a composite assessment of the toxicity of the PCB mixture in terms of an equivalent concentration of TCDD.

  5. Interspecies modeling of inhaled particle deposition patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Martonen, T.B.; Zhang, Z.; Yang, Y.

    1992-01-01

    To evaluate the potential toxic effects of ambient contaminants or therapeutic effects of airborne drugs, inhalation exposure experiments can be performed with surrogate laboratory animals. Herein, an interspecies particle deposition theory is presented for physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling. It is derived to improve animal testing protocols. The computer code describes the behavior and fate of particles in the lungs of human subjects and a selected surrogate, the laboratory rat. In the simulations CO2 is integrated with exposure chamber atmospheres, and its concentrations regulated to produce rat breathing profiles corresponding to selected levels of human physical activity. The dosimetric model is used to calculate total, compartmental (i.e., tracheobronchial and pulmonary), and localized distribution patterns of inhaled particles in rats and humans for comparable ventilatory conditions. It is demonstrated that the model can be used to predetermine the exposure conditions necessary to produce deposition patterns in rats that are equivalent to those in humans at prescribed physical activities.

  6. Assessing the toxic effects of ethylene glycol ethers using Quantitative Structure Toxicity Relationship models

    SciTech Connect

    Ruiz, Patricia; Mumtaz, Moiz; Gombar, Vijay

    2011-07-15

    Experimental determination of toxicity profiles consumes a great deal of time, money, and other resources. Consequently, businesses, societies, and regulators strive for reliable alternatives such as Quantitative Structure Toxicity Relationship (QSTR) models to fill gaps in toxicity profiles of compounds of concern to human health. The use of glycol ethers and their health effects have recently attracted the attention of international organizations such as the World Health Organization (WHO). The board members of Concise International Chemical Assessment Documents (CICAD) recently identified inadequate testing as well as gaps in toxicity profiles of ethylene glycol mono-n-alkyl ethers (EGEs). The CICAD board requested the ATSDR Computational Toxicology and Methods Development Laboratory to conduct QSTR assessments of certain specific toxicity endpoints for these chemicals. In order to evaluate the potential health effects of EGEs, CICAD proposed a critical QSTR analysis of the mutagenicity, carcinogenicity, and developmental effects of EGEs and other selected chemicals. We report here results of the application of QSTRs to assess rodent carcinogenicity, mutagenicity, and developmental toxicity of four EGEs: 2-methoxyethanol, 2-ethoxyethanol, 2-propoxyethanol, and 2-butoxyethanol and their metabolites. Neither mutagenicity nor carcinogenicity is indicated for the parent compounds, but these compounds are predicted to be developmental toxicants. The predicted toxicity effects were subjected to reverse QSTR (rQSTR) analysis to identify structural attributes that may be the main drivers of the developmental toxicity potential of these compounds.

  7. Zebrafish models for assessing developmental and reproductive toxicity.

    PubMed

    He, Jian-Hui; Gao, Ji-Min; Huang, Chang-Jiang; Li, Chun-Qi

    2014-01-01

    The zebrafish is increasingly used as a vertebrate animal model for in vivo drug discovery and for assessing chemical toxicity and safety. Numerous studies have confirmed that zebrafish and mammals are similar in their physiology, development, metabolism and pathways, and that zebrafish responses to toxic substances are highly predictive of mammalian responses. Developmental and reproductive toxicity assessments are an important part of new drug safety profiling. A significant number of drug candidates have failed in preclinical tests due to their adverse effect on development and reproductivity. Compared to conventional mammal testing, zebrafish testing for assessing developmental and reproductive toxicity offers several compelling experimental advantages, including transparency of embryo and larva, higher throughput, shorter test period, lower cost, smaller amount of compound required, easier manipulation and direct compound delivery. Toxicity and safety assessments using zebrafish have also been accepted by the FDA and EMEA for investigative new drug (IND) approval.

  8. Thermoregulation and its influence on toxicity assessment.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Christopher J; Spencer, Pamela J; Hotchkiss, Jon; Miller, Diane B; Hinderliter, Paul M; Pauluhn, Juergen

    2008-02-28

    The thermoregulatory system of laboratory rodents is susceptible to a variety of chemical toxicants. Because temperature directly affects the reaction of virtually all biological processes, it is critical to consider how changes in the thermoregulatory response to a toxicant may affect physiological, behavioral, and pathological endpoints. Researchers in industry and government laboratories are often faced with addressing how changes in body temperature of their experimental subjects may affect the outcome of a particular toxicity test and/or screening panel. However, many toxicologists are either unaware of the importance or ignore the potential impact of a toxic-induced change in body temperature. This paper endeavors to summarize the importance of thermoregulation in the study of toxicology and propose recommendations for thermometry that researchers may utilize in their toxicological studies. PMID:18096291

  9. THERMOREGULATION AND ITS INFLUENCE ON TOXICITY ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, Christopher J.; Spencer, Pamela J.; Hotchkiss, Jon; Miller, Diane B.; Hinderliter, Paul M.; Pauluhn, Jeurgen

    2008-02-28

    The thermoregulatory system of laboratory rodents is susceptible to a variety of chemical toxicants. Because temperature directly affects the reaction of virtually all biological processes, it is critical to consider how changes in the thermoregulatory response to a toxicant may affect physiological, behavioral, and pathological endpoints. Researchers in industry and government laboratories are often faced with addressing how changes in body temperature of their experimental subjects may affect the outcome of a particular toxicity test and/or screening panel. However, many toxicologists are either unaware of the importance or ignore the potential impact of a toxic-induced change in body temperature. This paper endeavors to summarize the importance of thermoregulation in the study of toxicology and propose recommendations for thermometry that researchers may utilize in their toxicological studies.

  10. Pesticide Toxicity Index: a tool for assessing potential toxicity of pesticide mixtures to freshwater aquatic organisms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nowell, Lisa H.; Norman, Julia E.; Moran, Patrick W.; Martin, Jeffrey D.; Stone, Wesley W.

    2014-01-01

    Pesticide mixtures are common in streams with agricultural or urban influence in the watershed. The Pesticide Toxicity Index (PTI) is a screening tool to assess potential aquatic toxicity of complex pesticide mixtures by combining measures of pesticide exposure and acute toxicity in an additive toxic-unit model. The PTI is determined separately for fish, cladocerans, and benthic invertebrates. This study expands the number of pesticides and degradates included in previous editions of the PTI from 124 to 492 pesticides and degradates, and includes two types of PTI for use in different applications, depending on study objectives. The Median-PTI was calculated from median toxicity values for individual pesticides, so is robust to outliers and is appropriate for comparing relative potential toxicity among samples, sites, or pesticides. The Sensitive-PTI uses the 5th percentile of available toxicity values, so is a more sensitive screening-level indicator of potential toxicity. PTI predictions of toxicity in environmental samples were tested using data aggregated from published field studies that measured pesticide concentrations and toxicity to Ceriodaphnia dubia in ambient stream water. C. dubia survival was reduced to ≤ 50% of controls in 44% of samples with Median-PTI values of 0.1–1, and to 0% in 96% of samples with Median-PTI values > 1. The PTI is a relative, but quantitative, indicator of potential toxicity that can be used to evaluate relationships between pesticide exposure and biological condition.

  11. Immunotoxic effects of environmental toxicants in fish - how to assess them?

    PubMed

    Segner, Helmut; Wenger, Michael; Möller, Anja Maria; Köllner, Bernd; Casanova-Nakayama, Ayako

    2011-08-01

    Numerous environmental chemicals, both long-known toxicants such as persistent organic pollutants as well as emerging contaminants such as pharmaceuticals, are known to modulate immune parameters of wildlife species, what can have adverse consequences for the fitness of individuals including their capability to resist pathogen infections. Despite frequent field observations of impaired immunocompetence and increased disease incidence in contaminant-exposed wildlife populations, the potential relevance of immunotoxic effects for the ecological impact of chemicals is rarely considered in ecotoxicological risk assessment. A limiting factor in the assessment of immunotoxic effects might be the complexity of the immune system what makes it difficult (1) to select appropriate exposure and effect parameters out of the many immune parameters which could be measured, and (2) to evaluate the significance of the selected parameters for the overall fitness and immunocompetence of the organism. Here, we present - on the example of teleost fishes - a brief discussion of how to assess chemical impact on the immune system using parameters at different levels of complexity and integration: immune mediators, humoral immune effectors, cellular immune defenses, macroscopical and microscopical responses of lymphoid tissues and organs, and host resistance to pathogens. Importantly, adverse effects of chemicals on immunocompetence may be detectable only after immune system activation, e.g., after pathogen challenge, but not in the resting immune system of non-infected fish. Current limitations to further development and implementation of immunotoxicity assays and parameters in ecotoxicological risk assessment are not primarily due to technological constraints, but are related from insufficient knowledge of (1) possible modes of action in the immune system, (2) the importance of intra- and inter-species immune system variability for the response against chemical stressors, and (3

  12. Toxicity of the pesticide alpha-cypermethrin to four soil nontarget invertebrates and implications for risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Hartnik, Thomas; Sverdrup, Line E; Jensen, John

    2008-06-01

    Alpha-cypermethrin, a synthetic pyrethroid, is used as an insecticide in agricultural settings and is increasingly replacing organophosphates and carbamates because of lower application rates and lower toxicity to mammals. Because very little is known about the acute and chronic toxicity of this compound for soil-living organisms, the present study investigated acute and sublethal toxicity of alpha-cypermethrin for four terrestrial invertebrate species in an agricultural soil from Norway. Bioassays with the earthworm Eisenia fetida, the potworm Enchytraeus crypticus, the springtail Folsomia candida, and the land snail Helix aspersa were performed according to slightly modified versions of Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (Paris, France) or International Organization for Standardization (Geneva, Switzerland) guidelines and resulted in median lethal concentrations of greater than >1,000 to 31.4 mg/kg and sublethal no-observed-effect concentrations of 2.51 to 82 mg/kg. A high acute to chronic ratio was found, especially in the earthworms. Interspecies differences in sensitivity may be explained by differences in exposure and differences in metabolization rate. When based on measured pore-water concentrations, terrestrial species overall appear to be approximately one order of magnitude less sensitive than aquatic species. Effect assessments conducted according to European guideline for risk assessment of pesticides reveal that assessments based on acute toxicity tests are not always conservative enough to determine environmentally safe concentrations in soil. Mandatory incorporation of sublethal toxicity data will ensure that in regions with temperate climate, the effects of pesticides on populations of soil-living organisms are unlikely.

  13. Assessment of Runoff Toxicity from Coated Surfaces

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presented in this paper are results from a field and laboratory study of the potential runoff toxicity from coated surfaces. The study results qualified and quantified the types and concentrations of pollutants in runoff from surfaces sealed with a variety of products. Coatings a...

  14. Cellular Metabolomics for Exposure and Toxicity Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have developed NMR automation and cell quench methods for cell culture-based metabolomics to study chemical exposure and toxicity. Our flow automation method is robust and free of cross contamination. The direct cell quench method is rapid and effective. Cell culture-based met...

  15. Regional Models for Sediment Toxicity Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper investigates the use of empirical models to predict the toxicity of sediment samples within a region to laboratory test organisms based on sediment chemistry. In earlier work, we used a large nationwide database of matching sediment chemistry and marine amphipod sedim...

  16. Toxicity assessment for RMA target contaminants. Volume 1. Endangerment assessment RMA, task 35. Final draft report

    SciTech Connect

    1987-06-01

    This report is detailed discussion of the evaluations performed to develop the toxicity assessment for RMA contaminants in soil. The objectives of the toxicity assessment are to determine the nature and extent of health and environmental hazards associated with exposure to contaminants present at the site and identify a quantitative index of toxicity for each target contaminant, referred to in this assessment as DT. The toxicity assessment for the RMA target contaminants has been performed consistent with published EPA guidelines and addresses only human health hazards associated with contaminants in soil. Each toxicity profile is composed of seven sections: 1. summary; 2. chemical and physical properties; and 3. transport and rate.

  17. Assessing variability in chemical acute toxicity of unionid mussels: Influence of intra- and interlaboratory testing, life stage, and species.

    PubMed

    Raimondo, Sandy; Lilavois, Crystal R; Lee, Larisa; Augspurger, Tom; Wang, Ning; Ingersoll, Chris G; Bauer, Candice; Hammer, Edward; Barron, Mace G

    2016-03-01

    The authors developed a toxicity database for unionid mussels to examine the extent of intra- and interlaboratory variability in acute toxicity tests with mussel larvae (glochidia) and juveniles; the extent of differential sensitivity of the 2 life stages; and the variation in sensitivity among commonly tested mussels (Lampsilis siliquoidea, Utterbackia imbecillis, and Villosa iris), commonly tested cladocerans (Daphnia magna and Ceriodaphnia dubia), and fish (Oncorhynchus mykiss, Pimephales promelas, and Lepomis macrochirus). The results of these analyses indicate that intralaboratory variability for median effect concentrations (EC50) averaged about 2-fold for both life stages, whereas interlaboratory variability averaged 3.6-fold for juvenile mussels and 6.3-fold for glochidia. The EC50s for juveniles and glochidia were within a factor of 2 of each other for 50% of paired records across chemicals, with juveniles more sensitive than glochidia by more than 2-fold for 33% of the comparisons made between life stages. There was a high concurrence of sensitivity of commonly tested L. siliquoidea, U. imbecillis, and V. iris to that of other mussels. However, this concurrence decreased as the taxonomic distance of the commonly tested cladocerans and fish to mussels increased. The compiled mussel database and determination of data variability will advance risk assessments by including more robust species sensitivity distributions, interspecies correlation estimates, and availability of taxon-specific empirically derived application factors for risk assessment. PMID:26369904

  18. Toxic real estate; Marketing site assessments

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, J.

    1989-03-01

    This paper reports on site assessment services in support of real estate transactions which appear to be an answer to marketing managers' dreams. It is a service that sells itself. Although the consensus among assessment consultants is that lenders and property developers currently are only dimly aware and somewhat resentful of the need for site assessments, the potential market for these services, they say, seems nearly boundless.

  19. Ecotoxicogenomic assessment of diclofenac toxicity in soil.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guangquan; den Braver, Michiel W; van Gestel, Cornelis A M; van Straalen, Nico M; Roelofs, Dick

    2015-04-01

    Diclofenac is widely used as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug leaving residues in the environment. To investigate effects on terrestrial ecosystems, we measured dissipation rate in soil and investigated ecotoxicological and transcriptome-wide responses in Folsomia candida. Exposure for 4 weeks to diclofenac reduced both survival and reproduction of F. candida in a dose-dependent manner. At concentrations ≥ 200 mg/kg soil diclofenac remained stable in the soil during a 21-day incubation period. Microarrays examined transcriptional changes at low and high diclofenac exposure concentrations. The results indicated that development and growth were severely hampered and immunity-related genes, mainly directed against bacteria and fungi, were significantly up-regulated. Furthermore, neural metabolic processes were significantly affected only at the high concentration. We conclude that diclofenac is toxic to non-target soil invertebrates, although its mode of action is different from the mammalian toxicity. The genetic markers proposed in this study may be promising early markers for diclofenac ecotoxicity.

  20. Assessing risk: Putting toxicity in perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, C.

    1993-08-01

    Opinions on risk assessment vary from believing the process to be a purely pursuit at one extreme to professing that it is merely a {open_quotes}plug and chug{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}turn the crank{close_quotes} exercise at the other. Those familiar with the field recognize, however, that risk assessment is basically a process of exercising good scientific analysis and judgement. More specifically, risk assessment is the devise by which one arrives at decisions concerning accidental chemical exposures, chemical tolerances in food, allowable workplace chemical exposures and chemicals in the environment from uncontrolled industrial and waste sites. This paper discussess risk assessment and relations to the Superfund.

  1. Assessing BMP Performance Using Microtox Toxicity Analysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Best Management Practices (BMPs) have been shown to be effective in reducing runoff and pollutants from urban areas and thus provide a mechanism to improve downstream water quality. Currently, BMP performance regarding water quality improvement is assessed through measuring each...

  2. Validating potential toxicity assays to assess petroleum hydrocarbon toxicity in polar soil.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Alexis Nadine; Snape, Ian; Siciliano, Steven Douglas

    2012-02-01

    Potential microbial activities are commonly used to assess soil toxicity of petroleum hydrocarbons (PHC) and are assumed to be a surrogate for microbial activity within the soil ecosystem. However, this assumption needs to be evaluated for frozen soil, in which microbial activity is limited by liquid water (θ(liquid)). Influence of θ(liquid) on in situ toxicity was evaluated and compared to the toxicity endpoints of potential microbial activities using soil from an aged diesel fuel spill at Casey Station, East Antarctica. To determine in situ toxicity, gross mineralization and nitrification rates were determined by the stable isotope dilution technique. Petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soil (0-8,000 mg kg(-1)), packed at bulk densities of 1.4, 1.7, and 2.0 g cm(-3) to manipulate liquid water content, was incubated at -5°C for one, two, and three months. Although θ(liquid) did not have a significant effect on gross mineralization or nitrification, gross nitrification was sensitive to PHC contamination, with toxicity decreasing over time. In contrast, gross mineralization was not sensitive to PHC contamination. Toxic response of gross nitrification was comparable to potential nitrification activity (PNA) with similar EC25 (effective concentration causing a 25% effect in the test population) values determined by both measurement endpoints (400 mg kg(-1) for gross nitrification compared to 200 mg kg(-1) for PNA), indicating that potential microbial activity assays are good surrogates for in situ toxicity of PHC contamination in polar regions.

  3. Assessing toxicity of copper nanoparticles across five cladoceran species.

    PubMed

    Song, Lan; Vijver, Martina G; de Snoo, Geert R; Peijnenburg, Willie J G M

    2015-08-01

    As a result of ever increasing applications, nanoparticles will eventually end up in the environment. However, currently no common principle has been established to help understand the toxicity of nanoparticles (NPs) across species. Therefore, it is difficult to estimate the potential risks of nanoparticles to untested species in the environment. The authors exposed 4 different sizes of copper nanoparticles (CuNPs) and 1 submicron-sized copper particle to 5 cladoceran species (Daphnia magna, Daphnia pulex, Daphnia galeata, Ceriodaphnia dubia, and Chydorus sphaericus) to investigate whether morphological attributes of species can help to assess the acute toxicity of CuNPs across species. The results showed that rod-shaped CuNPs caused much lower toxicity to all species than spherical CuNPs. Both the particles and ions contributed to the total toxicity of the CuNP suspensions. Moreover, the toxicity caused by particles in 5 different copper suspensions increases with decreasing body length, surface area, and body volume of neonates of 5 cladoceran species. Especially the correlations between body volume of the 5 cladoceran species tested and the corresponding toxicity caused by 5 different CuNPs were statistically significant, and in all cases radj (2) was higher than 0.51 (p < 0.001). The highest correlation was found between body volume and the toxicity of the 78-nm CuNPs (radj (2)  = 0.95, p < 0.001). To conclude, the correlations between attributes of cladoceran species and the toxicity of CuNPs reported in the present study evoke the possibility to assess and extrapolate the toxicity of nanoparticles across species with similar attributes.

  4. Assessing Reproductive Toxicity of Two Environmental Toxicants with a Novel in vitro Human Spermatogenic Model

    PubMed Central

    Easley, Charles A.; Bradner, Joshua M.; Moser, Amber; Rickman, Chelsea A.; McEachin, Zachary T.; Merritt, Megan M.; Hansen, Jason M.; Caudle, W. Michael

    2015-01-01

    Environmental influences and insults by reproductive toxicant exposure can lead to impaired spermatogenesis or infertility. Understanding how toxicants disrupt spermatogenesis is critical for determining how environmental factors contribute to impaired fertility. While current animal models are available, understanding of the reproductive toxic effects on human fertility requires a more robust model system. We recently demonstrated that human pluripotent stem cells can differentiate into spermatogonial stem cells/spermatogonia, primary and secondary spermatocytes, and haploid spermatids; a model that mimics many aspects of human spermatogenesis. Here, using this model system, we examine the effects of 2-bromopropane (2-BP) and 1–2, Dibromo-3-chloropropane (DBCP) on in vitro human spermatogenesis. 2-BP and DBCP are non-endocrine disrupting toxicants that are known to impact male fertility. We show that acute treatment with either 2-BP or DBCP induces a reduction in germ cell viability through apoptosis. 2-BP and DBCP affect viability of different cell populations as 2-BP primarily reduces spermatocyte viability whereas DBCP exerts a much greater effect on spermatogonia. Acute treatment with 2-BP or DBCP also reduces the percentage of haploid spermatids. Both 2-BP and DBCP induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation leading to an oxidized cellular environment. Taken together, these results suggest that acute exposure with 2-BP or DBCP causes human germ cell death in vitro by inducing ROS formation. This system represents a unique platform for assessing human reproductive toxicity potential of various environmental toxicants in a rapid, efficient, and unbiased format. PMID:25863443

  5. Toxicity assessment using different bioassays and microbial biosensors.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Sedky H A; Van Ginkel, Steven W; Hussein, Mohamed A M; Abskharon, Romany; Oh, Sang-Eun

    2016-01-01

    Toxicity assessment of water streams, wastewater, and contaminated sediments, is a very important part of environmental pollution monitoring. Evaluation of biological effects using a rapid, sensitive and cost effective method can indicate specific information on ecotoxicity assessment. Recently, different biological assays for toxicity assessment based on higher and lower organisms such as fish, invertebrates, plants and algal cells, and microbial bioassays have been used. This review focuses on microbial biosensors as an analytical device for environmental, food, and biomedical applications. Different techniques which are commonly used in microbial biosensing include amperometry, potentiometry, conductometry, voltammetry, microbial fuel cells, fluorescence, bioluminescence, and colorimetry. Examples of the use of different microbial biosensors in assessing a variety of environments are summarized. PMID:27071051

  6. PROSPECTIVE PREGNANCY STUDY DESIGNS FOR ASSESSING REPRODUCTIVE AND DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Prospective Pregnancy Study Designs for Assessing Reproductive and Developmental Toxicants
    Germaine M. Buck,1 Courtney D. Johnson,1 Joseph Stanford,2 Anne Sweeney,3 Laura Schieve,4 John Rockett,5 Sherry G. Selevan,6 Steve Schrader 7

    Abstract
    The origin of successfu...

  7. Essentiality, Toxicity and Uncertainty in the Risk Assessment of Manganese

    EPA Science Inventory

    Risk assessments of manganese by inhalation or oral routes of exposure typically acknowledge the duality of manganese as an essential element at low doses and a toxic metal at high doses. Previously, however, risk assessors were unable to describe manganese pharmacokinetics quant...

  8. Toxicological Considerations, Toxicity Assessment, and Risk Management of Inhaled Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Bakand, Shahnaz; Hayes, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    Novel engineered nanoparticles (NPs), nanomaterial (NM) products and composites, are continually emerging worldwide. Many potential benefits are expected from their commercial applications; however, these benefits should always be balanced against risks. Potential toxic effects of NM exposure have been highlighted, but, as there is a lack of understanding about potential interactions of nanomaterials (NMs) with biological systems, these side effects are often ignored. NPs are able to translocate to the bloodstream, cross body membrane barriers effectively, and affect organs and tissues at cellular and molecular levels. NPs may pass the blood–brain barrier (BBB) and gain access to the brain. The interactions of NPs with biological milieu and resulted toxic effects are significantly associated with their small size distribution, large surface area to mass ratio (SA/MR), and surface characteristics. NMs are able to cross tissue and cell membranes, enter into cellular compartments, and cause cellular injury as well as toxicity. The extremely large SA/MR of NPs is also available to undergo reactions. An increased surface area of the identical chemical will increase surface reactivity, adsorption properties, and potential toxicity. This review explores biological pathways of NPs, their toxic potential, and underlying mechanisms responsible for such toxic effects. The necessity of toxicological risk assessment to human health should be emphasised as an integral part of NM design and manufacture. PMID:27314324

  9. Toxicity assessment for RMA target contaminants. Volume 2. Endangerment assessment, RMA, task 35. Final draft report

    SciTech Connect

    1987-06-01

    This report is a detailed discussion of the evaluations performed to develop the toxicity assessment for RMA contaminants in soil. The objectives of the toxicity assessment are to: (1) determine the nature and extent of health and environmental hazards associated with exposure to contaminants present at the site and (2) identify a quantitative index of toxicity for each target contaminant, referred to in this assessment as DT. The toxicity assessment for the RMA target contaminants has been performed consistent with published EPA guidelines and addresses only human health hazards associated with contaminants in soil. Each toxicity profile is composed of seven sections: (1) summary; (2) chemical and physical properties; and (3) transport and fate.

  10. Toxicity and toxic potential of fly ash from municipal incinerators assessed by means of a fish early life stage test

    SciTech Connect

    Helder, T.; Stutterheim, E.; Olie, K.

    1982-01-01

    The toxicity and toxic potential of fly ash were assessed, using rainbow trout yolk sac fry. In contrast to fly ash itself, extracts of fly ash were extremely toxic, producing typical toxicopathological features fo TCDD-intoxication. By comparison with earlier experiments using pure 2,3,7,8-TCDD, the toxic potential of fly ash was roughly estimated to be 75-125 ng.g/sup -1/ toxic aequivalents TCDD. Obviously, this toxic potential is attributed for a minor part to 2,3,7,8-TCDD and for the greater part to the other chlorinated dioxin congeners and the dibenzofurans, present in fly ash.

  11. INTERSPECIES DOSIMETRY MODELS FOR PULMONARY PHARMACOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Interspecies Dosimetry Models for Pulmonary Pharmacology

    Ted B. Martonen, Jeffry D. Schroeter, and John S. Fleming

    Experimental Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangl...

  12. Liquid versus solid phase bioassays for dredged material toxicity assessment.

    PubMed

    Casado-Martínez, M C; Fernández, N; Forja, J M; DelValls, T A

    2007-05-01

    Since 1994 the results of the analyses of key chemical compounds (trace metals, polychlorinated biphenyls and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) and the comparison with the corresponding sediment quality guidelines (SQGs) are used in decision-making for dredged material management in Spain. Nonetheless in the last decades a tiered testing approach is promoted for assessing the physical and chemical characteristics of dredged sediments and their potential biological effects in the environment. Bioassays have been used for sediment toxicity assessment in Spain but few or no experiences are reported on harbour sediments. We studied the incidence of toxicity in the 7 d bioassay using rotifers (Brachionus plicatilis) and the 48 h bioassay using sea urchin (Paracentrotus lividus) embryos over a series of experiments employing 22 different elutriates. The relative performance of this exposure phase was not comparable to data on the 10-d acute toxicity test using the burrowing amphipod Corophium volutator and the polychaete Arenicola marina, carried out on the whole sediments. These results evidence the importance of the exposure route and the test selected in decision-making, as the toxicity registered for the undiluted elutriates was largely due to the different solubility of sediment-bound contaminants. This work and other studies indicate that for many sediments, a complete battery of test is recommended together with physico-chemical analyses to decide whether dredged sediments are suitable for open water disposal or not. PMID:17174396

  13. Human toxicity potentials for life-cycle assessment and toxics release inventory risk screening.

    PubMed

    Hertwich, E G; Mateles, S F; Pease, W S; McKone, T E

    2001-04-01

    The human toxicity potential (HTP), a calculated index that reflects the potential harm of a unit of chemical released into the environment, is based on both the inherent toxicity of a compound and its potential dose. It is used to weight emissions inventoried as part of a life-cycle assessment (LCA) or in the toxics release inventory (TRI) and to aggregate emissions in terms of a reference compound. Total emissions can be evaluated in terms of benzene equivalence (carcinogens) and toluene equivalents (noncarcinogens). The potential dose is calculated using a generic fate and exposure model, CalTOX, which determines the distribution of a chemical in a model environment and accounts for a number of exposure routes, including inhalation, ingestion of produce, fish, and meat, and dermal contact with water and soil. Toxicity is represented by the cancer potency q1* for carcinogens and the safe dose (RfD, RfC) for noncarcinogens. This article presents cancer and noncancer HTP values for air and surface-water emissions of 330 compounds. This list covers 258 chemicals listed in U.S. Environmental Protection Agency TRI, or 79 weight-% of the TRI releases to air reported in 1997.

  14. Hardwiring microbes via direct interspecies electron transfer: mechanisms and applications.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Qiwen; Call, Douglas F

    2016-08-10

    Multicellular microbial communities are important catalysts in engineered systems designed to treat wastewater, remediate contaminated sediments, and produce energy from biomass. Understanding the interspecies interactions within them is therefore essential to design effective processes. The flow of electrons within these communities is especially important in the determination of reaction possibilities (thermodynamics) and rates (kinetics). Conventional models of electron transfer incorporate the diffusion of metabolites generated by one organism and consumed by a second, frequently referred to as mediated interspecies electron transfer (MIET). Evidence has emerged in the last decade that another method, called direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET), may occur between organisms or in conjunction with electrically conductive materials. Recent research has suggested that DIET can be stimulated in engineered systems to improve desired treatment goals and energy recovery in systems such as anaerobic digesters and microbial electrochemical technologies. In this review, we summarize the latest understanding of DIET mechanisms, the associated microorganisms, and the underlying thermodynamics. We also critically examine approaches to stimulate DIET in engineered systems and assess their effectiveness. We find that in most cases attempts to promote DIET in mixed culture systems do not yield the improvements expected based on defined culture studies. Uncertainties of other processes that may be co-occurring in real systems, such as contaminant sorption and biofilm promotion, need to be further investigated. We conclude by identifying areas of future research related to DIET and its application in biological treatment processes. PMID:27349520

  15. Cetuximab With Concurrent Chemoradiation for Esophagogastric Cancer: Assessment of Toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Safran, Howard Suntharalingam, Mohan; Dipetrillo, Thomas; Ng, Thomas; Doyle, L. Austin; Krasna, Mark; Plette, Angela; Evans, Devon; Wanebo, Harold; Akerman, Paul; Spector, Jeremy; Kennedy, Nancy; Kennedy, Teresa

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility and toxicity of the addition of cetuximab with paclitaxel, carboplatin, and radiation for patients with esophagogastric cancer on a Phase II study. Methods and Materials: Patients with locoregional esophageal and proximal gastric cancer without distant organ metastases were eligible. All patients received cetuximab, paclitaxel, and carboplatin weekly for 6 weeks with 50.4 Gy radiation. Results: Sixty patients were enrolled, 57 with esophageal cancer and 3 with gastric cancer. Forty-eight had adenocarcinoma and 12 had squamous cell cancer. Fourteen of 60 patients (23%) had Grade 3 dermatologic toxicity consisting of a painful, pruritic acneiform rash on the face outside of the radiation field. The rates of Grades 3 and 4 esophagitis were 12% and 3%, respectively. Three patients had Grade 3/4 cetuximab hypersensitivity reactions and were not assessable for response. Forty of 57 patients (70%) had a complete clinical response after chemoradiation. Conclusion: Cetuximab can be safely administered with chemoradiation for esophageal cancer. Dermatologic toxicity and hypersensitivity reactions were associated with the addition of cetuximab. There was no increase in esophagitis or other radiation-enhanced toxicity.

  16. Aquatic acute toxicity assessments of molybdenum (+VI) to Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chi-Wei; Liang, Chenju; Yeh, Hui-Ju

    2016-03-01

    Generally, molybdenum (Mo) metals in the environment are very rare, but wastewater discharges from industrial processes may contain high concentrations of Mo, which has the potential to contaminate water or soil if not handled properly. In this study, the impact of three common compounds of hexavalent Mo (sodium molybdate (Na2MoO4‧2H2O), ammonium molybdate ((NH4)6Mo7O24‧4H2O) and molybdenum trioxide (MoO3)) in an aquatic system were assessed based on 48-h exposure acute toxicity to Daphnia magna (D. magna). The LC50 toxicities for associated conjugate ions including Na(+), Cl(-), SO4(2-), and NH4(+) were determined. Furthermore, the LC50 values for the three forms of hexavalent Mo were determined, and the acute toxicities of the Mo forms were found to follow the order: (NH4)6Mo7O24‧4H2O > MoO3 > Na2MoO4‧2H2O in solution. (NH4)6Mo7O24‧4H2O exhibited the lowest LC50 of 43.3 mg L(-1) (corresponding to 23.5 mg Mo L(-1)) among the three molybdenum salts. The research confirmed that the toxicity of molybdenum in the aquatic system is highly dependent on the form of molybdenum salts used, and is also associated with the influence of the background water quality.

  17. Safety assessment of essential and toxic metals in infant formulas.

    PubMed

    Sipahi, Hande; Eken, Ayşe; Aydın, Ahmet; Şahin, Gönül; Baydar, Terken

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess toxic metal (Cd, Pb and Al) contamination and levels of three essential trace elements (Mn, Cr and Co) in 63 infant formulas. In addition, the levels of these metals in the study samples were compared with the acceptable limits of toxic heavy metals and the recommended daily allowances (RDAs) of essential trace elements. According to our results, the toxic metal levels measured in the formulas were within the acceptable limits, with the exception of Al levels in 8 of the 63 samples. In 16 samples, Mn levels exceeded 600 μg/day, and the Cr content in 7 samples was higher than 5.5 μg/day, these amounts being the adequate intake levels for infants. Cobalt levels in 10 formulas were higher than the RDA. In view of these findings, which indicate that metal levels in infant formulas are generally much higher than those found in breast milk, breast milk should be preferred for infant feeding. Moreover, since infants are potentially more susceptible to metals, infant foods should be monitored regularly and checked for contamination by toxic metals as well as for levels of essential trace elements.

  18. Ross Hazardous and Toxic Materials Handling Facility: Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect

    URS Consultants, Inc.

    1992-06-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) owns a 200-acre facility in Washington State known as the Ross Complex. Activities at the Ross Complex routinely involve handling toxic substances such as oil-filled electrical equipment containing polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), organic and inorganic compounds for preserving wood transmission poles, and paints, solvents, waste oils, and pesticides and herbicides. Hazardous waste management is a common activity on-site, and hazardous and toxic substances are often generated from these and off-site activities. The subject of this environmental assessment (EA) concerns the consolidation of hazardous and toxic substances handling at the Complex. This environmental assessment has been developed to identify the potential environmental impacts of the construction and operation of the proposal. It has been prepared to meet the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) to determine if the proposed action is likely to have a significant impact on the environment. In addition to the design elements included within the project, mitigation measures have been identified within various sections that are now incorporated within the project. This facility would be designed to improve the current waste handling practices and to assist BPA in meeting Federal and state regulations.

  19. Reactor modeling in heterogeneous photocatalysis: toxicity and biodegradability assessment.

    PubMed

    Satuf, M L; José, S; Paggi, J C; Brandi, R J; Cassano, A E; Alfano, O M

    2010-01-01

    Photocatalysis employing titanium dioxide is a useful method to degrade a wide variety of organic and inorganic pollutants from water and air. However, the application of this advanced oxidation process at industrial scale requires the development of mathematical models to design and scale-up photocatalytic reactors. In the present work, intrinsic kinetic expressions previously obtained in a laboratory reactor are employed to predict the performance of a bench scale reactor of different configuration and operating conditions. 4-Chlorophenol was chosen as the model pollutant. The toxicity and biodegradability of the irradiated mixture in the bench photoreactor was also assessed. Good agreement was found between simulation and experimental data. The root mean square error of the estimations was 9.9%. The photocatalytic process clearly enhances the biodegradability of the reacting mixture, and the initial toxicity of the pollutant was significantly reduced by the treatment.

  20. The mechanism of dioxin toxicity: relationship to risk assessment.

    PubMed Central

    Birnbaum, L S

    1994-01-01

    Risk characterization involves hazard identification, determination of dose-response relationships, and exposure assessment. Improvement of the risk assessment process requires inclusion of the best available science. Recent findings in the area of dioxin toxicity have led to a major effort to reassess its risk. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), commonly referred to as "dioxin," is the most toxic member of a class of related chemicals including the polyhalogenated dibenzo-p-dioxins, dibenzofurans, biphenyls, naphthalenes, azo- and azoxy-benzenes, whose toxicities can be expressed as fractional equivalencies of TCDD. These chemicals exert their effects through interaction with a specific intracellular protein, the Ah receptor. While binding to the receptor is necessary, it is not sufficient to bring about a chain of events leading to various responses including enzyme induction, immunotoxicity, reproductive and endocrine effects, developmental toxicity, chloracne, tumor promotion, etc. Some of these responses appear to be linear at low doses. Immunotoxicity and effects on the reproductive system appear to be among the most sensitive responses. The Ah receptor functions as a transcriptional enhancer, interacting with a number of other regulatory proteins (heat shock proteins, kinases, translocases, DNA binding species). Interaction with specific base sequences in the DNA appear to be modulated by the presence of other growth factors, hormones and their receptors as well as other regulatory proteins. Thus, dioxin appears to function as a hormone, initiating a cascade of events that is dependent upon the environment of each cell and tissue. While Ah receptor variants exist, all vertebrates examined have demonstrated such a protein with similar numbers of receptors and binding affinity for TCDD. Most species respond similarly to dioxin and related compounds. While a given species may be an outlier for a given response, it will behave like other animals for

  1. Pesticide Toxicity Index--a tool for assessing potential toxicity of pesticide mixtures to freshwater aquatic organisms.

    PubMed

    Nowell, Lisa H; Norman, Julia E; Moran, Patrick W; Martin, Jeffrey D; Stone, Wesley W

    2014-04-01

    Pesticide mixtures are common in streams with agricultural or urban influence in the watershed. The Pesticide Toxicity Index (PTI) is a screening tool to assess potential aquatic toxicity of complex pesticide mixtures by combining measures of pesticide exposure and acute toxicity in an additive toxic-unit model. The PTI is determined separately for fish, cladocerans, and benthic invertebrates. This study expands the number of pesticides and degradates included in previous editions of the PTI from 124 to 492 pesticides and degradates, and includes two types of PTI for use in different applications, depending on study objectives. The Median-PTI was calculated from median toxicity values for individual pesticides, so is robust to outliers and is appropriate for comparing relative potential toxicity among samples, sites, or pesticides. The Sensitive-PTI uses the 5th percentile of available toxicity values, so is a more sensitive screening-level indicator of potential toxicity. PTI predictions of toxicity in environmental samples were tested using data aggregated from published field studies that measured pesticide concentrations and toxicity to Ceriodaphnia dubia in ambient stream water. C. dubia survival was reduced to ≤50% of controls in 44% of samples with Median-PTI values of 0.1-1, and to 0% in 96% of samples with Median-PTI values >1. The PTI is a relative, but quantitative, indicator of potential toxicity that can be used to evaluate relationships between pesticide exposure and biological condition.

  2. Reconciling laboratory and field assessments of neonicotinoid toxicity to honeybees.

    PubMed

    Henry, Mickaël; Cerrutti, Nicolas; Aupinel, Pierrick; Decourtye, Axel; Gayrard, Mélanie; Odoux, Jean-François; Pissard, Aurélien; Rüger, Charlotte; Bretagnolle, Vincent

    2015-11-22

    European governments have banned the use of three common neonicotinoid pesticides due to insufficiently identified risks to bees. This policy decision is controversial given the absence of clear consistency between toxicity assessments of those substances in the laboratory and in the field. Although laboratory trials report deleterious effects in honeybees at trace levels, field surveys reveal no decrease in the performance of honeybee colonies in the vicinity of treated fields. Here we provide the missing link, showing that individual honeybees near thiamethoxam-treated fields do indeed disappear at a faster rate, but the impact of this is buffered by the colonies' demographic regulation response. Although we could ascertain the exposure pathway of thiamethoxam residues from treated flowers to honeybee dietary nectar, we uncovered an unexpected pervasive co-occurrence of similar concentrations of imidacloprid, another neonicotinoid normally restricted to non-entomophilous crops in the study country. Thus, its origin and transfer pathways through the succession of annual crops need be elucidated to conveniently appraise the risks of combined neonicotinoid exposures. This study reconciles the conflicting laboratory and field toxicity assessments of neonicotinoids on honeybees and further highlights the difficulty in actually detecting non-intentional effects on the field through conventional risk assessment methods.

  3. Validation of an LDH Assay for Assessing Nanoparticle Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xianglu; Gelein, Robert; Corson, Nancy; Wade-Mercer, Pamela; Jiang, Jingkun; Biswas, Pratim; Finkelstein, Jacob N.; Elder, Alison; Oberdörster, Günter

    2014-01-01

    Studies showed that certain cytotoxicity assays were not suitable for assessing nanoparticle (NP) toxicity. We evaluated a lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay for assessing copper (Cu-40, 40 nm), silver (Ag-35, 35 nm; Ag-40, 40 nm), and titanium dioxide (TiO2-25, 25 nm) NPs by examining their potential to inactivate LDH and interference with β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), a substrate for the assay. We also performed a dissolution assay for some of the NPs. We found that the copper NPs, because of their high dissolution rate, could interfere with the LDH assay by inactivating LDH. Ag-35 could also inactivate LDH probably because of the carbon matrix used to cage the particles during synthesis. TiO2-25 NPs were found to adsorb LDH molecules. In conclusion, NP interference with the LDH assay depends on the type of NPs and the suitability of the assay for assessing NP toxicity should be examined case by case. PMID:21722700

  4. Toxicity testing, risk assessment, and options for dredged material management.

    PubMed

    Munns, Wayne R; Berry, Walter J; Dewitt, Theodore H

    2002-04-01

    Programs for evaluating proposed discharges of dredged material into waters of the United States specify a tiered testing and evaluation protocol that includes performance of acute and chronic bioassays to assess toxicity of the dredged sediments. Although these evaluations reflect the toxicological risks associated with disposal activities to some degree, analysis activities are limited to the sediments of each dredging project separately. Cumulative risks to water column and benthic organisms at and near the designated disposal site are therefore difficult to assess. An alternate approach is to focus attention on the disposal site, with the goal of understanding more directly the risks of multiple disposal events to receiving ecosystems. Here we review current US toxicity testing and evaluation protocols, and describe an application of ecological risk assessment that allows consideration of the temporal and spatial components of risk to receiving aquatic ecosystems. When expanded to include other disposal options, this approach can provide the basis for holistic management of dredged material disposal. PMID:12139319

  5. Toxicity of lunar dust assessed in inhalation-exposed rats

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Chiu-wing; Scully, Robert R.; Zhang, Ye; Renne, Roger A.; Hunter, Robert L.; McCluskey, Richard A.; Chen, Bean T.; Castranova, Vincent; Driscoll, Kevin E.; Gardner, Donald E.; McClellan, Roger O.; Cooper, Bonnie L.; McKay, David S.; Marshall, Linda; James, John T.

    2015-01-01

    Humans will again set foot on the moon. The moon is covered by a layer of fine dust, which can pose a respiratory hazard. We investigated the pulmonary toxicity of lunar dust in rats exposed to 0, 2.1, 6.8, 20.8 and 60.6 mg/m3 of respirable-size lunar dust for 4 weeks (6 h/day, 5 days/week); the aerosols in the nose-only exposure chambers were generated from a jet-mill ground preparation of a lunar soil collected during the Apollo 14 mission. After 4 weeks of exposure to air or lunar dust, groups of five rats were euthanized 1 day, 1 week, 4 weeks or 13 weeks after the last exposure for assessment of pulmonary toxicity. Biomarkers of toxicity assessed in bronchoalveolar fluids showed concentration-dependent changes; biomarkers that showed treatment effects were total cell and neutrophil counts, total protein concentrations and cellular enzymes (lactate dehydrogenase, glutamyl transferase and aspartate transaminase). No statistically significant differences in these biomarkers were detected between rats exposed to air and those exposed to the two low concentrations of lunar dust. Dose-dependent histopathology, including inflammation, septal thickening, fibrosis and granulomas, in the lung was observed at the two higher exposure concentrations. No lesions were detected in rats exposed to ≤6.8 mg/m3. This 4-week exposure study in rats showed that 6.8 mg/m3 was the highest no-observable-adverse-effect level (NOAEL). These results will be useful for assessing the health risk to humans of exposure to lunar dust, establishing human exposure limits and guiding the design of dust mitigation systems in lunar landers or habitats. PMID:24102467

  6. Toxicity of lunar dust assessed in inhalation-exposed rats.

    PubMed

    Lam, Chiu-wing; Scully, Robert R; Zhang, Ye; Renne, Roger A; Hunter, Robert L; McCluskey, Richard A; Chen, Bean T; Castranova, Vincent; Driscoll, Kevin E; Gardner, Donald E; McClellan, Roger O; Cooper, Bonnie L; McKay, David S; Marshall, Linda; James, John T

    2013-10-01

    Humans will again set foot on the moon. The moon is covered by a layer of fine dust, which can pose a respiratory hazard. We investigated the pulmonary toxicity of lunar dust in rats exposed to 0, 2.1, 6.8, 20.8 and 60.6 mg/m(3) of respirable-size lunar dust for 4 weeks (6 h/day, 5 days/week); the aerosols in the nose-only exposure chambers were generated from a jet-mill ground preparation of a lunar soil collected during the Apollo 14 mission. After 4 weeks of exposure to air or lunar dust, groups of five rats were euthanized 1 day, 1 week, 4 weeks or 13 weeks after the last exposure for assessment of pulmonary toxicity. Biomarkers of toxicity assessed in bronchoalveolar fluids showed concentration-dependent changes; biomarkers that showed treatment effects were total cell and neutrophil counts, total protein concentrations and cellular enzymes (lactate dehydrogenase, glutamyl transferase and aspartate transaminase). No statistically significant differences in these biomarkers were detected between rats exposed to air and those exposed to the two low concentrations of lunar dust. Dose-dependent histopathology, including inflammation, septal thickening, fibrosis and granulomas, in the lung was observed at the two higher exposure concentrations. No lesions were detected in rats exposed to ≤6.8 mg/m(3). This 4-week exposure study in rats showed that 6.8 mg/m(3) was the highest no-observable-adverse-effect level (NOAEL). These results will be useful for assessing the health risk to humans of exposure to lunar dust, establishing human exposure limits and guiding the design of dust mitigation systems in lunar landers or habitats. PMID:24102467

  7. Toxicity of lunar dust assessed in inhalation-exposed rats.

    PubMed

    Lam, Chiu-wing; Scully, Robert R; Zhang, Ye; Renne, Roger A; Hunter, Robert L; McCluskey, Richard A; Chen, Bean T; Castranova, Vincent; Driscoll, Kevin E; Gardner, Donald E; McClellan, Roger O; Cooper, Bonnie L; McKay, David S; Marshall, Linda; James, John T

    2013-10-01

    Humans will again set foot on the moon. The moon is covered by a layer of fine dust, which can pose a respiratory hazard. We investigated the pulmonary toxicity of lunar dust in rats exposed to 0, 2.1, 6.8, 20.8 and 60.6 mg/m(3) of respirable-size lunar dust for 4 weeks (6 h/day, 5 days/week); the aerosols in the nose-only exposure chambers were generated from a jet-mill ground preparation of a lunar soil collected during the Apollo 14 mission. After 4 weeks of exposure to air or lunar dust, groups of five rats were euthanized 1 day, 1 week, 4 weeks or 13 weeks after the last exposure for assessment of pulmonary toxicity. Biomarkers of toxicity assessed in bronchoalveolar fluids showed concentration-dependent changes; biomarkers that showed treatment effects were total cell and neutrophil counts, total protein concentrations and cellular enzymes (lactate dehydrogenase, glutamyl transferase and aspartate transaminase). No statistically significant differences in these biomarkers were detected between rats exposed to air and those exposed to the two low concentrations of lunar dust. Dose-dependent histopathology, including inflammation, septal thickening, fibrosis and granulomas, in the lung was observed at the two higher exposure concentrations. No lesions were detected in rats exposed to ≤6.8 mg/m(3). This 4-week exposure study in rats showed that 6.8 mg/m(3) was the highest no-observable-adverse-effect level (NOAEL). These results will be useful for assessing the health risk to humans of exposure to lunar dust, establishing human exposure limits and guiding the design of dust mitigation systems in lunar landers or habitats.

  8. Assessing variability in chemical acute toxicity of unionid mussels: Influence of intra- and inter-laboratory testing, life stage, and species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raimondo, Sandy; Lilavois, Crystal R.; Lee, Larisa; Augspurger, Tom; Wang, Ning; Ingersoll, Christopher G.; Bauer, Candice R.; Hammer, Edward J.; Barron, Mace G.

    2015-01-01

    We developed a toxicity database for unionid mussels to examine the extent of intra- and inter-laboratory variability in acute toxicity tests with mussel larvae (glochidia) and juveniles; the extent of differential sensitivity of the two life stages; and the variation in sensitivity among commonly tested mussels (Lampsilis siliquoidea, Utterbackia imbecillis, Villosa iris), commonly tested cladocerans (Daphnia magna, Ceriodaphnia dubia) and fish (Oncorhynchus mykiss, Pimephales promelas, Lepomis macrochirus). The results of these analyses indicate intra-laboratory variability for median effect concentrations (EC50) averaged about 2 fold for both life stages, while inter-laboratory variability averaged 3.6 fold for juvenile mussels and 6.3 fold for glochidia. The EC50s for juveniles and glochidia were within a factor of 2 of each other for 50% of paired records across chemicals, with juveniles more sensitive than glochidia by more than 2 fold for 33% of the comparisons made between life stages. There was a high concurrence of the sensitivity of commonly tested L. siliquoidea, U. imbecillis, and V. iris to that of other mussels. However, this concurrence decreases as the taxonomic distance of the commonly tested cladocerans and fish to mussels increases. The compiled mussel database and determination of data variability will advance risk assessments by including more robust species sensitivity distributions, interspecies correlation estimates, and availability of taxon-specific empirically derived application factors for risk assessment.

  9. Ecotoxicity of sediments in rivers: Invertebrate community, toxicity bioassays and the toxic unit approach as complementary assessment tools.

    PubMed

    de Castro-Català, Núria; Kuzmanovic, Maja; Roig, Neus; Sierra, Jordi; Ginebreda, Antoni; Barceló, Damià; Pérez, Sandra; Petrovic, Mira; Picó, Yolanda; Schuhmacher, Marta; Muñoz, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    The determination of the real toxicity of sediments in aquatic ecosystems is challenging and necessary for an appropriate risk assessment. Different approaches have been developed and applied over the last several decades. Currently, the joint implementation of chemical, ecological and toxicological tools is recommended for an appropriate and successful toxicity risk assessment. We chose the combination of the toxic unit approach with acute pore water tests (Vibrio fischeri, Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and Daphnia magna) and whole-sediment exposure tests (V. fischeri, Chironomus riparius), together with invertebrate community composition (multivariate analyses) to detect short and long-term responses of the organisms in four rivers of the Iberian Peninsula. High toxicity was detected in three sites (the downstream sites of the Llobregat and the Júcar, and the most upstream site of the Ebro). We identified organophosphate insecticides and metals as the main variables responsible for this toxicity, particularly in the whole-sediment tests. In particular, chlorpyrifos was mostly responsible for the toxicity (TUs) of D. magna, coinciding with the C. riparius mortality (long-term toxicity) in the mentioned sites, and copper was the main pollutant responsible for the short-term toxicity of P. subcapitata. The combination of the different approaches allowed us to detect ecotoxicological effects in organisms and identify the main contributors to the toxicity in these multi-stressed rivers. PMID:26118861

  10. Ecotoxicity of sediments in rivers: Invertebrate community, toxicity bioassays and the toxic unit approach as complementary assessment tools.

    PubMed

    de Castro-Català, Núria; Kuzmanovic, Maja; Roig, Neus; Sierra, Jordi; Ginebreda, Antoni; Barceló, Damià; Pérez, Sandra; Petrovic, Mira; Picó, Yolanda; Schuhmacher, Marta; Muñoz, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    The determination of the real toxicity of sediments in aquatic ecosystems is challenging and necessary for an appropriate risk assessment. Different approaches have been developed and applied over the last several decades. Currently, the joint implementation of chemical, ecological and toxicological tools is recommended for an appropriate and successful toxicity risk assessment. We chose the combination of the toxic unit approach with acute pore water tests (Vibrio fischeri, Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and Daphnia magna) and whole-sediment exposure tests (V. fischeri, Chironomus riparius), together with invertebrate community composition (multivariate analyses) to detect short and long-term responses of the organisms in four rivers of the Iberian Peninsula. High toxicity was detected in three sites (the downstream sites of the Llobregat and the Júcar, and the most upstream site of the Ebro). We identified organophosphate insecticides and metals as the main variables responsible for this toxicity, particularly in the whole-sediment tests. In particular, chlorpyrifos was mostly responsible for the toxicity (TUs) of D. magna, coinciding with the C. riparius mortality (long-term toxicity) in the mentioned sites, and copper was the main pollutant responsible for the short-term toxicity of P. subcapitata. The combination of the different approaches allowed us to detect ecotoxicological effects in organisms and identify the main contributors to the toxicity in these multi-stressed rivers.

  11. Field assessments in conjunction with whole effluent toxicity testing

    SciTech Connect

    La Point, T.W.; Waller, W.T.

    2000-01-01

    Whole effluent toxicity (WET) tests are widely used to assess potential effects of wastewater discharges on aquatic life. This paper represents a summary of chapters in a 1996 Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry-sponsored workshop and a literature review concerning linkages between WET testing and associated field biomonitoring. Most published studies thus far focus primarily on benthic macroinvertebrates and on effluent-dominated stream systems in which effluents demonstrate little or no significant acute toxicity. Fewer studies examine WET test predictability in other aquatic ecosystems (e.g., wetlands, estuaries, large rivers) or deal with instream biota such as fish and primary producers. Published results indicate that standards for the usual WET freshwater test species, Ceriodaphnia dubia and Pimephales promelas, may not always protect most of the species inhabiting a receiving stream. Although WET tests are useful in predicting aquatic individual responses, they are not meant to directly measure natural population or community responses. Further, they do not address bioconcentration or bioaccumulation of hydrophobic compounds; do not assess eutrophication effects in receiving systems; and lastly, do not reflect genotoxic effects or function to test for endocrine-disrupting chemicals. Consequently, a more direct evaluation of ecosystem health, using bioassessment techniques, may be needed to properly evaluate aquatic systems affected by wastewater discharges.

  12. Reliability of Quantitative Ultrasonic Assessment of Normal-Tissue Toxicity in Breast Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Emi J.; Chen Hao; Torres, Mylin; Andic, Fundagul; Liu Haoyang; Chen Zhengjia; Sun, Xiaoyan; Curran, Walter J.; Liu Tian

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: We have recently reported that ultrasound imaging, together with ultrasound tissue characterization (UTC), can provide quantitative assessment of radiation-induced normal-tissue toxicity. This study's purpose is to evaluate the reliability of our quantitative ultrasound technology in assessing acute and late normal-tissue toxicity in breast cancer radiotherapy. Method and Materials: Our ultrasound technique analyzes radiofrequency echo signals and provides quantitative measures of dermal, hypodermal, and glandular tissue toxicities. To facilitate easy clinical implementation, we further refined this technique by developing a semiautomatic ultrasound-based toxicity assessment tool (UBTAT). Seventy-two ultrasound studies of 26 patients (720 images) were analyzed. Images of 8 patients were evaluated for acute toxicity (<6 months postradiotherapy) and those of 18 patients were evaluated for late toxicity ({>=}6 months postradiotherapy). All patients were treated according to a standard radiotherapy protocol. To assess intraobserver reliability, one observer analyzed 720 images in UBTAT and then repeated the analysis 3 months later. To assess interobserver reliability, three observers (two radiation oncologists and one ultrasound expert) each analyzed 720 images in UBTAT. An intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to evaluate intra- and interobserver reliability. Ultrasound assessment and clinical evaluation were also compared. Results: Intraobserver ICC was 0.89 for dermal toxicity, 0.74 for hypodermal toxicity, and 0.96 for glandular tissue toxicity. Interobserver ICC was 0.78 for dermal toxicity, 0.74 for hypodermal toxicity, and 0.94 for glandular tissue toxicity. Statistical analysis found significant changes in dermal (p < 0.0001), hypodermal (p = 0.0027), and glandular tissue (p < 0.0001) assessments in the acute toxicity group. Ultrasound measurements correlated with clinical Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) toxicity scores of patients

  13. Toxico-Cheminformatics: New and Expanding Public Resources to Support Chemical Toxicity Assessments

    EPA Science Inventory

    High-throughput screening (HTS) technologies, along with efforts to improve public access to chemical toxicity information resources and to systematize older toxicity studies, have the potential to significantly improve information gathering efforts for chemical assessments and p...

  14. INTERSPECIES CORRELATION ESTIMATES PREDICT PROTECTIVE ENVIRONMENTAL CONCENTRATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental risk assessments often use multiple single species toxicity test results and species sensitivity distributions (SSDs) to derive a predicted no-effect concentration in the environment, typically the 5th percentile of the SSD, termed the HC5. The shape and location of...

  15. Toxicity assessment of nanosilver wound dressing in Wistar rat.

    PubMed

    Bidgoli, Sepideh Arbabi; Mahdavi, Moujan; Rezayat, Seyed Mahdi; Korani, Mitra; Amani, Amir; Ziarati, Parisa

    2013-05-07

    Antibiotic resistance to microorganisms is one of the major problems faced in the field of wound care in burns patients. Silver nanoparticles have come up as potent antimicrobial agent and are being evaluated in diverse medical applications ranging from silver based dressings to silver coated medical devices. We aimed in present study to test the release of nanosilver from nanosilver wound dressing and compare the dermal and systemic toxicity of nanosilver dressings in a repeated dose (21 days) model. Under general anesthesia, a limited standard 2nd degree burns were provided on the back of each rat in all treatment, negative control (simple dressing) and 5% silver nitrate groups, each contained 5 male wistar rats. According to the analysis made by atomic absorption spectrometry, the wound dressings released 0.599 ± 0.083 ppm of nanosilver during first 24 hrs of study. Daily observations were recoded and wounds were covered with new dressings each 24 hrs. Burn healing was observed in nanosilver wound dressing group in shorter time periods than the control groups. In toxicity assessment, this dressing didn't cause any hematological and histopathological abnormalities in treatment group but biochemical studies showed significant rise of plasma transaminase (ALT) at the endpoint (21 days) of the study (P=0.027). Portal mononuclear lymphoid and polymorphonuclear leukocyte infiltrations in three to four adjacent foci were recognized around the central hepatic vein in treatment group. Mild hepatotoxic effects of nanosilver wound dressing in wistar rat emphasize the necessity of more studies on toxicity potentials of low dose nanosilver by dermal applications.

  16. Assessing aluminium toxicity in streams affected by acid mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Waters, A S; Webster-Brown, J G

    2013-01-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) has degraded water quality and ecology in streams on the Stockton Plateau, the site of New Zealand's largest open-cast coal mining operation. This has previously been attributed largely to the effects of acidity and elevated aluminium (Al) concentrations. However, the toxicity of dissolved Al is dependent on speciation, which is influenced by pH which affects Al hydrolysis, as well as the concentrations of organic carbon and sulphate which complex Al. Methods for the assessment of the toxic fraction of Al, by chemical analysis and geochemical modelling, have been investigated in selected streams on the Stockton Plateau, where dissolved Al concentrations ranged from 0.034 to 27 mg L(-1). Modelling using PHREEQC indicated that between 0.2 and 85% of the dissolved Al was present as the free ion Al(3+), the most toxic Al species, which dominated in waters of pH = 3.8-4.8. Al-sulphate complexation reduced the Al(3+) concentration at lower pH, while Al-organic and -hydroxide complexes dominated at higher pH. Macroinvertebrate richness in the streams identified an Al(3+) 'threshold' of approximately 0.42 mg/L, above which taxa declined rapidly. Colorimetric 'Aluminon' analysis on unpreserved, unfiltered waters provided a better estimation of Al(3+) concentrations than inductively couple plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) on filtered, acidified waters. The Aluminon method does not react with particulate Al or strong Al complexes, often registering as little as 53% of the dissolved Al concentration determined by ICP-MS. PMID:23579831

  17. Assessing aluminium toxicity in streams affected by acid mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Waters, A S; Webster-Brown, J G

    2013-01-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) has degraded water quality and ecology in streams on the Stockton Plateau, the site of New Zealand's largest open-cast coal mining operation. This has previously been attributed largely to the effects of acidity and elevated aluminium (Al) concentrations. However, the toxicity of dissolved Al is dependent on speciation, which is influenced by pH which affects Al hydrolysis, as well as the concentrations of organic carbon and sulphate which complex Al. Methods for the assessment of the toxic fraction of Al, by chemical analysis and geochemical modelling, have been investigated in selected streams on the Stockton Plateau, where dissolved Al concentrations ranged from 0.034 to 27 mg L(-1). Modelling using PHREEQC indicated that between 0.2 and 85% of the dissolved Al was present as the free ion Al(3+), the most toxic Al species, which dominated in waters of pH = 3.8-4.8. Al-sulphate complexation reduced the Al(3+) concentration at lower pH, while Al-organic and -hydroxide complexes dominated at higher pH. Macroinvertebrate richness in the streams identified an Al(3+) 'threshold' of approximately 0.42 mg/L, above which taxa declined rapidly. Colorimetric 'Aluminon' analysis on unpreserved, unfiltered waters provided a better estimation of Al(3+) concentrations than inductively couple plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) on filtered, acidified waters. The Aluminon method does not react with particulate Al or strong Al complexes, often registering as little as 53% of the dissolved Al concentration determined by ICP-MS.

  18. Assessing the toxicity and biodegradability of deep eutectic solvents.

    PubMed

    Wen, Qing; Chen, Jing-Xin; Tang, Yu-Lin; Wang, Juan; Yang, Zhen

    2015-08-01

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) have emerged as a new type of promising ionic solvents with a broad range of potential applications. Although their ecotoxicological profile is still poorly known, DESs are generally regarded as "green" because they are composed of ammonium salts and H-bond donors (HBDs) which are considered to be eco-friendly. In this work, cholinium-based DESs comprised of choline chloride (ChCl) and choline acetate (ChAc) as the salt and urea (U), acetamide (A), glycerol (G) and ethylene glycol (EG) as the HBD were evaluated for their toxic effects on different living organisms such as Escherichia coli (a bacterium), Allium sativum (garlic, a plant) and hydra (an invertebrate), and their biodegradabilities were assessed by means of closed bottle tests. These DESs possessed an anti-bacterial property and exhibited inhibitory effects on the test organisms adopted, depending on the composition and concentration of the DES. The mechanism for the impact of DESs and their components on different living organisms can be associated to their interactions with the cellular membranes. Not all DESs can be considered readily biodegradable. By extending the limited knowledge about the toxicity and biodegradation of this particular solvent family, this investigation on DESs provides insight into our structure-based understanding of their ecotoxicological behavior. PMID:25800513

  19. ASSESSING RISKS FROM PHOTOACTIVATED TOXICITY OF PAHS TO AQUATIC ORGANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are one of the most ubiquitous classes of environmental contaminants. Although most PAHs are toxic only at concentrations large enough to cause narcosis, the toxicity of some can be greatly enhanced through mechanisms that involve molecul...

  20. Demonstration of the Web-based Interspecies Correlation Estimation (Web-ICE) modeling application

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Web-based Interspecies Correlation Estimation (Web-ICE) modeling application is available to the risk assessment community through a user-friendly internet platform (http://epa.gov/ceampubl/fchain/webice/). ICE models are log-linear least square regressions that predict acute...

  1. Benzothiazole toxicity assessment in support of synthetic turf field human health risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Ginsberg, Gary; Toal, Brian; Kurland, Tara

    2011-01-01

    Synthetic turf fields cushioned with crumb rubber may be a source of chemical exposure to those playing on the fields. Benzothiazole (BZT) may volatilize from crumb rubber and result in inhalation exposure. Benzothiazole has been the primary rubber-related chemical found in synthetic turf studies. However, risks associated with BZT have not been thoroughly assessed, primarily because of gaps in the database. This assessment provides toxicity information for a human health risk assessment involving BZT detected at five fields in Connecticut. BZT exerts acute toxicity and is a respiratory irritant and dermal sensitizer. In a genetic toxicity assay BZT was positive in Salmonella in the presence of metabolic activation. BZT metabolism involves ring-opening and formation of aromatic hydroxylamines, metabolites with mutagenic and carcinogenic potential. A structural analogue 2-mercaptobenzothiazole (2-MBZT) was more widely tested and so is used as a surrogate for some endpoints. 2-MBZT is a rodent carcinogen with rubber industry data supporting an association with human bladder cancer. The following BZT toxicity values were derived: (1) acute air target of 110 μg/m(3) based upon a BZT RD(50) study in mice relative to results for formaldehyde; (2) a chronic noncancer target of 18 μg/m(3) based upon the no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) in a subchronic dietary study in rats, dose route extrapolation, and uncertainty factors that combine to 1000; (3) a cancer unit risk of 1.8E-07/μg-m(3) based upon a published oral slope factor for 2-MBZT and dose-route extrapolation. While there are numerous uncertainties in the BZT toxicology database, this assessment enables BZT to be quantitatively assessed in risk assessments involving synthetic turf fields. However, this is only a screening-level assessment, and research that better defines BZT potency is needed.

  2. Improving Toxicity Assessment of Pesticide Mixtures: The Use of Polar Passive Sampling Devices Extracts in Microalgae Toxicity Tests

    PubMed Central

    Kim Tiam, Sandra; Fauvelle, Vincent; Morin, Soizic; Mazzella, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Complexity of contaminants exposure needs to be taking in account for an appropriate evaluation of risks related to mixtures of pesticides released in the ecosystems. Toxicity assessment of such mixtures can be made through a variety of toxicity tests reflecting different level of biological complexity. This paper reviews the recent developments of passive sampling techniques for polar compounds, especially Polar Organic Chemical Integrative Samplers (POCIS) and Chemcatcher® and the principal assessment techniques using microalgae in laboratory experiments. The progresses permitted by the coupled use of such passive samplers and ecotoxicology testing as well as their limitations are presented. Case studies combining passive sampling devices (PSD) extracts and toxicity assessment toward microorganisms at different biological scales from single organisms to communities level are presented. These case studies, respectively, aimed (i) at characterizing the “toxic potential” of waters using dose-response curves, and (ii) at performing microcosm experiments with increased environmental realism in the toxicant exposure in term of cocktail composition and concentration. Finally perspectives and limitations of such approaches for future applications in the area of environmental risk assessment are discussed. PMID:27667986

  3. Improving Toxicity Assessment of Pesticide Mixtures: The Use of Polar Passive Sampling Devices Extracts in Microalgae Toxicity Tests.

    PubMed

    Kim Tiam, Sandra; Fauvelle, Vincent; Morin, Soizic; Mazzella, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Complexity of contaminants exposure needs to be taking in account for an appropriate evaluation of risks related to mixtures of pesticides released in the ecosystems. Toxicity assessment of such mixtures can be made through a variety of toxicity tests reflecting different level of biological complexity. This paper reviews the recent developments of passive sampling techniques for polar compounds, especially Polar Organic Chemical Integrative Samplers (POCIS) and Chemcatcher® and the principal assessment techniques using microalgae in laboratory experiments. The progresses permitted by the coupled use of such passive samplers and ecotoxicology testing as well as their limitations are presented. Case studies combining passive sampling devices (PSD) extracts and toxicity assessment toward microorganisms at different biological scales from single organisms to communities level are presented. These case studies, respectively, aimed (i) at characterizing the "toxic potential" of waters using dose-response curves, and (ii) at performing microcosm experiments with increased environmental realism in the toxicant exposure in term of cocktail composition and concentration. Finally perspectives and limitations of such approaches for future applications in the area of environmental risk assessment are discussed.

  4. Improving Toxicity Assessment of Pesticide Mixtures: The Use of Polar Passive Sampling Devices Extracts in Microalgae Toxicity Tests

    PubMed Central

    Kim Tiam, Sandra; Fauvelle, Vincent; Morin, Soizic; Mazzella, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Complexity of contaminants exposure needs to be taking in account for an appropriate evaluation of risks related to mixtures of pesticides released in the ecosystems. Toxicity assessment of such mixtures can be made through a variety of toxicity tests reflecting different level of biological complexity. This paper reviews the recent developments of passive sampling techniques for polar compounds, especially Polar Organic Chemical Integrative Samplers (POCIS) and Chemcatcher® and the principal assessment techniques using microalgae in laboratory experiments. The progresses permitted by the coupled use of such passive samplers and ecotoxicology testing as well as their limitations are presented. Case studies combining passive sampling devices (PSD) extracts and toxicity assessment toward microorganisms at different biological scales from single organisms to communities level are presented. These case studies, respectively, aimed (i) at characterizing the “toxic potential” of waters using dose-response curves, and (ii) at performing microcosm experiments with increased environmental realism in the toxicant exposure in term of cocktail composition and concentration. Finally perspectives and limitations of such approaches for future applications in the area of environmental risk assessment are discussed.

  5. Improving Toxicity Assessment of Pesticide Mixtures: The Use of Polar Passive Sampling Devices Extracts in Microalgae Toxicity Tests.

    PubMed

    Kim Tiam, Sandra; Fauvelle, Vincent; Morin, Soizic; Mazzella, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Complexity of contaminants exposure needs to be taking in account for an appropriate evaluation of risks related to mixtures of pesticides released in the ecosystems. Toxicity assessment of such mixtures can be made through a variety of toxicity tests reflecting different level of biological complexity. This paper reviews the recent developments of passive sampling techniques for polar compounds, especially Polar Organic Chemical Integrative Samplers (POCIS) and Chemcatcher® and the principal assessment techniques using microalgae in laboratory experiments. The progresses permitted by the coupled use of such passive samplers and ecotoxicology testing as well as their limitations are presented. Case studies combining passive sampling devices (PSD) extracts and toxicity assessment toward microorganisms at different biological scales from single organisms to communities level are presented. These case studies, respectively, aimed (i) at characterizing the "toxic potential" of waters using dose-response curves, and (ii) at performing microcosm experiments with increased environmental realism in the toxicant exposure in term of cocktail composition and concentration. Finally perspectives and limitations of such approaches for future applications in the area of environmental risk assessment are discussed. PMID:27667986

  6. A test strategy for the assessment of additive attributed toxicity of tobacco products.

    PubMed

    Kienhuis, Anne S; Staal, Yvonne C M; Soeteman-Hernández, Lya G; van de Nobelen, Suzanne; Talhout, Reinskje

    2016-08-01

    The new EU Tobacco Product Directive (TPD) prohibits tobacco products containing additives that are toxic in unburnt form or that increase overall toxicity of the product. This paper proposes a strategy to assess additive attributed toxicity in the context of the TPD. Literature was searched on toxicity testing strategies for regulatory purposes from tobacco industry and governmental institutes. Although mainly traditional in vivo testing strategies have been applied to assess toxicity of unburnt additives and increases in overall toxicity of tobacco products due to additives, in vitro tests combined with toxicogenomics and validated using biomarkers of exposure and disease are most promising in this respect. As such, tests are needed that are sensitive enough to assess additive attributed toxicity above the overall toxicity of tobacco products, which can associate assay outcomes to human risk and exposure. In conclusion, new, sensitive in vitro assays are needed to conclude whether comparable testing allows for assessment of small changes in overall toxicity attributed to additives. A more pragmatic approach for implementation on a short-term is mandated lowering of toxic emission components. Combined with risk assessment, this approach allows assessment of effectiveness of harm reduction strategies, including banning or reducing of additives.

  7. Stepping backward to improve assessment of PCB congener toxicities.

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, L G

    1998-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are ubiquitous global contaminants that have been intensively investigated for three decades. They are broad-acting toxicants occurring in complex mixtures and accurate risk assessment has proven to be elusive. Focusing on a limited set of end points and emphasizing a fixed set of congeners have led to more streamlined data sets that are meant to expedite hazard characterization and risk assessment for the most potent congeners--aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonists. Unfortunately, this has made it impossible to confirm or deny significant contributions from the more prevalent components of the mixtures. PCBs may be only coincidentally present, rather than causal, in some diseases. Still, attempts to determine associations with incomplete residue data may lead to erroneous conclusions and make accurate risk assessment even more elusive. Responses not mediated through the AhR are presented and emphasize large data gaps. Dissimilar analytical reports emphasize that selection of analytes is not consistent. Collectively, these data confirm that AhR-focused objectives unintentionally created the impression that nonplanar PCBs have little if any potential for hazards to humans and wildlife. Near steady-state exposure of healthy adults are probably of minor consequence except for emerging correlations with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma; however, pulses of exposure to more labile mixtures may contribute to developmental effects without leaving a residue record. More broadly based criteria are suggested and harmonization of data collection and presentation are desirable. A more comprehensive list of PCB congeners is proposed that would provide more adequate data upon which to base associations with adverse outcomes. PMID:9539012

  8. In silico assessment of the acute toxicity of chemicals: recent advances and new model for multitasking prediction of toxic effect.

    PubMed

    Kleandrova, Valeria V; Luan, Feng; Speck-Planche, Alejandro; Cordeiro, M Natália D S

    2015-01-01

    The assessment of acute toxicity is one of the most important stages to ensure the safety of chemicals with potential applications in pharmaceutical sciences, biomedical research, or any other industrial branch. A huge and indiscriminate number of toxicity assays have been carried out on laboratory animals. In this sense, computational approaches involving models based on quantitative-structure activity/toxicity relationships (QSAR/QSTR) can help to rationalize time and financial costs. Here, we discuss the most significant advances in the last 6 years focused on the use of QSAR/QSTR models to predict acute toxicity of drugs/chemicals in laboratory animals, employing large and heterogeneous datasets. The advantages and drawbacks of the different QSAR/QSTR models are analyzed. As a contribution to the field, we introduce the first multitasking (mtk) QSTR model for simultaneous prediction of acute toxicity of compounds by considering different routes of administration, diverse breeds of laboratory animals, and the reliability of the experimental conditions. The mtk-QSTR model was based on artificial neural networks (ANN), allowing the classification of compounds as toxic or non-toxic. This model correctly classified more than 94% of the 1646 cases present in the whole dataset, and its applicability was demonstrated by performing predictions of different chemicals such as drugs, dietary supplements, and molecules which could serve as nanocarriers for drug delivery. The predictions given by the mtk-QSTR model are in very good agreement with the experimental results. PMID:25694074

  9. In silico assessment of the acute toxicity of chemicals: recent advances and new model for multitasking prediction of toxic effect.

    PubMed

    Kleandrova, Valeria V; Luan, Feng; Speck-Planche, Alejandro; Cordeiro, M Natália D S

    2015-01-01

    The assessment of acute toxicity is one of the most important stages to ensure the safety of chemicals with potential applications in pharmaceutical sciences, biomedical research, or any other industrial branch. A huge and indiscriminate number of toxicity assays have been carried out on laboratory animals. In this sense, computational approaches involving models based on quantitative-structure activity/toxicity relationships (QSAR/QSTR) can help to rationalize time and financial costs. Here, we discuss the most significant advances in the last 6 years focused on the use of QSAR/QSTR models to predict acute toxicity of drugs/chemicals in laboratory animals, employing large and heterogeneous datasets. The advantages and drawbacks of the different QSAR/QSTR models are analyzed. As a contribution to the field, we introduce the first multitasking (mtk) QSTR model for simultaneous prediction of acute toxicity of compounds by considering different routes of administration, diverse breeds of laboratory animals, and the reliability of the experimental conditions. The mtk-QSTR model was based on artificial neural networks (ANN), allowing the classification of compounds as toxic or non-toxic. This model correctly classified more than 94% of the 1646 cases present in the whole dataset, and its applicability was demonstrated by performing predictions of different chemicals such as drugs, dietary supplements, and molecules which could serve as nanocarriers for drug delivery. The predictions given by the mtk-QSTR model are in very good agreement with the experimental results.

  10. The problem of variability in assessing sediment toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    McIntosh, A.; Watzin, M.; Lacey, R.; Newbrough, K.; Williams, A.; King, J.

    1995-12-31

    An assessment of sediment-associated contaminants at 20 sites in Inner Burlington Harbor, Lake Champlain, underscores the challenges posed by working in highly variable environments. Chemical analyses revealed levels of several trace metals, including lead, silver and zinc, and total PAHs exceeding available severe effects guidelines. Biological measures, however, did not correlate strongly with areas of highest chemical contamination. In particular, the 48-hr Ceriodaphnia dubia test was a poor predictor of contaminant concentration, while the 10-day growth test with Chironomus tentans proved a stronger indicator. Additional tests in which larval fathead minnows were exposed to pore water proved inconclusive. Infaunal communities seemed to be responding to concentrations of organic matter, not contaminant levels. There was no demonstrable relationship between any taxonomic group, such as the number of genera of Chironomus, and contaminant level. Sites where the AVS/SEM ratios exceeded one did generally correspond with the sites where positive toxicity tests results occurred. Results of the study argue for the use of a weight-of-evidence approach when working in highly disturbed, highly variable environments.

  11. Toxicity Assessment of Contaminated Soils of Solid Domestic Waste Landfill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasko, O. A.; Mochalova, T. N.

    2014-08-01

    The paper delivers the analysis of an 18-year dynamic pattern of land pollutants concentration in the soils of a solid domestic waste landfill. It also presents the composition of the contaminated soils from different areas of the waste landfill during its operating period. The authors calculate the concentrations of the following pollutants: chrome, nickel, tin, vanadium, lead, cuprum, zinc, cobalt, beryllium, barium, yttrium, cadmium, arsenic, germanium, nitrate ions and petrochemicals and determine a consistent pattern of their spatial distribution within the waste landfill area as well as the dynamic pattern of their concentration. Test-objects are used in experiments to make an integral assessment of the polluted soil's impact on living organisms. It was discovered that the soil samples of an animal burial site are characterized by acute toxicity while the area of open waste dumping is the most dangerous in terms of a number of pollutants. This contradiction can be attributed to the synergetic effect of the polluted soil, which accounts for the regularities described by other researchers.

  12. Assessment of chronic inhalation non-cancer toxicity for diethylamine

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Roberta L.; Taiwo, Samuel O.; McCant, Darrell

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A non-cancer inhalation chronic toxicity assessment for diethylamine (DEA, CAS number 109-89-7) was conducted by the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. A chronic Reference Value (ReV) was determined based on a high-quality study conducted in mice and rats by the National Toxicology Program. Chronic inhalation ReVs are health-based exposure concentrations used in assessing health risks of long-term (i.e. lifetime) chemical exposure. DEA is used industrially as an organic intermediate to produce corrosion inhibitors, and is widely used in rubber, pharmaceuticals, resins, pesticides, insect repellants, dye processing and as a polymerization inhibitor. Although systemic effects have been noted at higher concentrations, DEA acts primarily as a respiratory irritant with effects occurring in the upper respiratory tract. Rats were exposed to 0, 31, 62.5 and 125 ppm DEA and mice to 0, 16, 31 and 62.5 ppm DEA for 6 h/day, 5 days/week for 105 weeks. Mice were slightly more sensitive than rats. The critical effect identified in mice was hyperostosis in the turbinates although DEA caused a number of other non-neoplatic lesions. Dose–response data were suitable to benchmark concentration (BMC) modeling. The human equivalent point of departure (PODHEC) was calculated from the 95% lower limit of the BMC(10) using default duration and animal-to-human dosimetric adjustments. Total uncertainty factors of 90 were applied to the PODHEC to account for variation in sensitivity within the human population, toxicodynamic differences between mice and humans, and database uncertainty. The chronic ReV for DEA is 11 ppb (33 µg/m3). PMID:26671196

  13. A method linking the toxic effects at community-level with contaminant concentrations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changyou; Su, Rongguo; Zhang, Yong; Liu, Gang

    2016-11-01

    In this study, we developed a method to quantify and link the toxic effects in community-level ecosystems with concentrations of petroleum hydrocarbons. The densities of Platymonas helgolandica var. tsingtaoensis, Isochrysis galbana, and Brachionus plicatilis in single-species tests and customized ecosystems were examined in response to a concentration gradient of petroleum hydrocarbons ranging from 0 to 8.0mgL(-1). A three-population ecological model with interspecies competition-grazing relationships was used to characterize population sizes with concentrations of petroleum hydrocarbons. A threshold concentration of the simplified plankton ecosystem of 0.376mgL(-1) for petroleum hydrocarbons was calculated from the proposed model, which was higher than the no-effect concentration of 0.056mgL(-1) derived from the single-species toxicity tests and the predicted no-effect concentration of 0.076mgL(-1) calculated from the species sensitivity distribution. This finding indicates that interspecies competition and grazing reduced the toxic effect of petroleum hydrocarbons at the community level. The sensitivity analysis for model parameters demonstrates that plankton population biomasses are highly sensitive to filtration rates. Antagonism between interspecies interactions and petroleum hydrocarbon toxicity was attributed to the reduced filtration rate and zooplankton grazing pressure. The proposed method is a simple means to address the concern regarding the impacts of ecological interactions on ecological risk assessments of pollutants.

  14. ROLE OF TOXICITY ASSESSMENT AND MONITORING IN MANAGING THE RECOVERY OF A WASTEWATER RECEIVING STREAM

    SciTech Connect

    Greeley Jr, Mark Stephen; Kszos, Lynn A; Stewart, Arthur J; Smith, John G

    2011-01-01

    We evaluate the roles of a long-term comprehensive toxicity assessment and monitoring program in management and for ecological recovery of a freshwater receiving stream impacted by industrial discharges and legacy contamination. National Pollution Discharge Elimination Permit (NPDES)-driven whole effluent toxicity (WET) tests using Ceriodaphnia and fathead minnows were conducted for more than twenty years to characterize wastewaters at the US National Nuclear Security Agency s Y-12 National Security Complex in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Ambient toxicity tests also were conducted to assess water samples from EFPC, the stream receiving the wastewater discharges. The ambient tests were conducted as part of an extensive biological monitoring program that included routine surveys of fish, invertebrate and periphyton communities. WET testing, associated toxicant identification evaluations (TIEs), and ambient toxicity monitoring were instrumental in identifying toxicants and their sources at the Y-12 Complex, guiding modifications to wastewater treatment procedures, and assessing the success of various pollution-abatement actions. Through time, as requirements changed and water quality improved, the toxicity monitoring program became more focused. Ambient testing with Ceriodaphnia and fathead minnow larvae also was supplemented with less-standardized but more-sensitive alternative laboratory and in situ bioassays. The Y-12 Complex biological monitoring experience demonstrates the significant roles effluent and ambient toxicity testing can have in controlling and managing toxic discharges to receiving waters. It also emphasizes the value of supplementing WET and standardized ambient toxicity tests with alternative laboratory and in situ toxicity tests tailored to address specific problems.

  15. URBAN STORMWATER TOXIC POLLUTANTS: ASSESSMENT, SOURCES, AND TREATABILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper summarizes an investigation to characterize and treat selected storm water contaminants that are listed as toxic pollutants (termed toxicants in this paper) in the Clean Water Act, Section 307 (Arbuckle et al., 1991). The first project phase investigated typical toxica...

  16. Interspecies systems biology uncovers metabolites affecting C. elegans gene expression and life history traits.

    PubMed

    Watson, Emma; MacNeil, Lesley T; Ritter, Ashlyn D; Yilmaz, L Safak; Rosebrock, Adam P; Caudy, Amy A; Walhout, Albertha J M

    2014-02-13

    Diet greatly influences gene expression and physiology. In mammals, elucidating the effects and mechanisms of individual nutrients is challenging due to the complexity of both the animal and its diet. Here, we used an interspecies systems biology approach with Caenorhabditis elegans and two of its bacterial diets, Escherichia coli and Comamonas aquatica, to identify metabolites that affect the animal's gene expression and physiology. We identify vitamin B12 as the major dilutable metabolite provided by Comamonas aq. that regulates gene expression, accelerates development, and reduces fertility but does not affect lifespan. We find that vitamin B12 has a dual role in the animal: it affects development and fertility via the methionine/S-Adenosylmethionine (SAM) cycle and breaks down the short-chain fatty acid propionic acid, preventing its toxic buildup. Our interspecies systems biology approach provides a paradigm for understanding complex interactions between diet and physiology.

  17. Interspecies Systems Biology Uncovers Metabolites Affecting C. elegans Gene Expression and Life History Traits

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Emma; MacNeil, Lesley T.; Ritter, Ashlyn D.; Yilmaz, L. Safak; Rosebrock, Adam P.; Caudy, Amy A.; Walhout, Albertha J. M.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Diet greatly influences gene expression and physiology. In mammals, elucidating the effects and mechanisms of individual nutrients is challenging due to the complexity of both the animal and its diet. Here we used an interspecies systems biology approach with Caenorhabditis elegans and two if its bacterial diets, Escherichia coli and Comamonas aquatica, to identify metabolites that affect the animal’s gene expression and physiology. We identify vitamin B12 as the major dilutable metabolite provided by Comamonas aq. that regulates gene expression, accelerates development and reduces fertility, but does not affect lifespan. We find that vitamin B12 has a dual role in the animal: it affects development and fertility via the methionine/S-Adenosylmethionine (SAM) cycle and breaks down the short-chain fatty acid propionic acid preventing its toxic buildup. Our interspecies systems biology approach provides a paradigm for understanding complex interactions between diet and physiology. PMID:24529378

  18. Reliability of quantitative ultrasonic assessment of normal-tissue toxicity in breast cancer radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Emi J.; Chen, Hao; Torres, Mylin; Andic, Fundagul; Liu, Hao-Yang; Chen, Zhengjia; Sun, Xiaoyan; Curran, Walter J; Liu, Tian

    2011-01-01

    Purpose We have recently reported that ultrasound imaging, together with ultrasound tissue characterization (UTC), can provide quantitative assessment of radiation-induced normal-tissue toxicity. This study’s purpose is to evaluate the reliability of our quantitative ultrasound technology in assessing acute and late normal-tissue toxicity in breast cancer radiotherapy. Method and Materials Our ultrasound technique analyzes radio-frequency echo signals and provides quantitative measures of dermal, hypodermal, and glandular-tissue toxicities. To facilitate easy clinical implementation, we further refined this technique by developing a semi-automatic ultrasound-based toxicity assessment tool (UBTAT). Seventy-two ultrasound studies of 26 patients (720 images) were analyzed. Images of 8 patients were evaluated for acute toxicity (<6 months post radiotherapy) and those of 18 patients were evaluated for late toxicity (≥6 months post radiotherapy). All patients were treated according to a standard radiotherapy protocol. To assess intra-observer reliability, one observer analyzed 720 images in UBTAT and then repeated the analysis 3 months later. To assess inter-observer reliability, three observers (two radiation oncologists and one ultrasound expert) each analyzed 720 images in UBTAT. An intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to evaluate intra- and inter-observer reliability. Ultrasound assessment and clinical evaluation were also compared. Results Intra-observer ICC was 0.89 for dermal toxicity, 0.74 for hypodermal toxicity, and 0.96 for glandular-tissue toxicity. Inter-observer ICC was 0.78 for dermal toxicity, 0.74 for hypodermal toxicity, and 0.94 for glandular-tissue toxicity. Statistical analysis found significant changes in dermal (p < 0.0001), hypodermal (p=0.0027), and glandular-tissue (p < 0.0001) assessments in the acute toxicity group. Ultrasound measurements correlated with clinical RTOG toxicity scores of patients in the late toxicity group

  19. Sequential assessment via daphnia and zebrafish for systematic toxicity screening of heterogeneous substances.

    PubMed

    Jang, Gun Hyuk; Park, Chang-Beom; Kang, Benedict J; Kim, Young Jun; Lee, Kwan Hyi

    2016-09-01

    Environment and organisms are persistently exposed by a mixture of various substances. However, the current evaluation method is mostly based on an individual substance's toxicity. A systematic toxicity evaluation of heterogeneous substances needs to be established. To demonstrate toxicity assessment of mixture, we chose a group of three typical ingredients in cosmetic sunscreen products that frequently enters ecosystems: benzophenone-3 (BP-3), ethylhexyl methoxycinnamate (EHMC), and titanium dioxide nanoparticle (TiO2 NP). We first determined a range of nominal toxic concentration of each ingredient or substance using Daphnia magna, and then for the subsequent organismal level phenotypic assessment, chose the wild-type zebrafish embryos. Any phenotype change, such as body deformation, led to further examinations on the specific organs of transgenic zebrafish embryos. Based on the systematic toxicity assessments of the heterogeneous substances, we offer a sequential environmental toxicity assessment protocol that starts off by utilizing Daphnia magna to determine a nominal concentration range of each substance and finishes by utilizing the zebrafish embryos to detect defects on the embryos caused by the heterogeneous substances. The protocol showed additive toxic effects of the mixtures. We propose a sequential environmental toxicity assessment protocol for the systematic toxicity screening of heterogeneous substances from Daphnia magna to zebrafish embryo in-vivo models.

  20. Sequential assessment via daphnia and zebrafish for systematic toxicity screening of heterogeneous substances.

    PubMed

    Jang, Gun Hyuk; Park, Chang-Beom; Kang, Benedict J; Kim, Young Jun; Lee, Kwan Hyi

    2016-09-01

    Environment and organisms are persistently exposed by a mixture of various substances. However, the current evaluation method is mostly based on an individual substance's toxicity. A systematic toxicity evaluation of heterogeneous substances needs to be established. To demonstrate toxicity assessment of mixture, we chose a group of three typical ingredients in cosmetic sunscreen products that frequently enters ecosystems: benzophenone-3 (BP-3), ethylhexyl methoxycinnamate (EHMC), and titanium dioxide nanoparticle (TiO2 NP). We first determined a range of nominal toxic concentration of each ingredient or substance using Daphnia magna, and then for the subsequent organismal level phenotypic assessment, chose the wild-type zebrafish embryos. Any phenotype change, such as body deformation, led to further examinations on the specific organs of transgenic zebrafish embryos. Based on the systematic toxicity assessments of the heterogeneous substances, we offer a sequential environmental toxicity assessment protocol that starts off by utilizing Daphnia magna to determine a nominal concentration range of each substance and finishes by utilizing the zebrafish embryos to detect defects on the embryos caused by the heterogeneous substances. The protocol showed additive toxic effects of the mixtures. We propose a sequential environmental toxicity assessment protocol for the systematic toxicity screening of heterogeneous substances from Daphnia magna to zebrafish embryo in-vivo models. PMID:27288628

  1. High-Content Screening for Assessing Nanomaterial Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Huo, Lingling; Chen, Rui; Shi, Xiaofei; Bai, Ru; Wang, Peng; Chang, Yanzhong; Chen, Chunying

    2015-02-01

    With rapid development of novel nanomaterials (NMs), the state of the art technologies with high efficiency and high-throughput characteristics had been applied for nanosafety evaluation. High-content screening (HCS), a cell-based multi-parametric image analysis technique, was adopted in the evaluation of eight different NMs in this study. A set of different endpoints including reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, Ca2+ transient, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and cellular pH levels were checked in human bronchial epithelial (16HBE) cells after incubating with NMs for 24 hours. All NMs induced significant increase of intracellular ROS levels in 16HBE cells, although the decrease of cell viability was only found in Ag and ZnO NMs-treated cells. MMP level had a dose-response decrease in Ag, ZnO and CeO2 NMs-treated cells, while showed a significant increase in TiO2 NMs-treated cells. All tested NMs showed significant up-regulation of cellular lysosomal pH levels. However, none of NMs caused significant changes in cellular Ca2+ level at 24-hour time point. HCS allows for efficient and reliable screening of multiple responses of cells simultaneously within one screen test, which can avoid the problematic interpretation of investigations when carried on a single toxicological endpoint. Therefore, the present data provide insight and inspiration that HCS is an effective and powerful method for image-based assessments with a broad set of biological endpoints in toxicity evaluation of nanomaterials.

  2. In vitro development of bison embryos using interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Seaby, R P; Alexander, B; King, W A; Mastromonaco, G F

    2013-12-01

    Interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer (interspecies SCNT) has been explored in many domestic and non-domestic animal species. However, problems arise during the development of these embryos, which may be related to species-specific differences in nuclear-cytoplasmic communication. The objectives of this study were to investigate the possibility of producing bison embryos in vitro using interspecies SCNT and assess the developmental potential of these embryos. Treatment groups consisted of cattle in vitro fertilization (IVF) and cattle SCNT as controls and wood bison SCNT, plains bison SCNT and wisent SCNT as experimental groups. Cleavage and blastocyst rates were assessed, and blastocyst quality was determined using total cell number, apoptotic incidence and relative quantification of mitochondria-related genes NRF1, MT-CYB and TFAM. These results indicate that embryos can be produced by interspecies SCNT in all bison species/subspecies (13.34-33.54% blastocyst rates). Although increased incidence of apoptosis was observed in bison SCNT blastocysts compared to cattle SCNT controls (10.45-12.69 vs 8.76, respectively) that corresponded with significantly lower cell numbers (80-87 cells vs >100 cells, respectively), no major differences were observed in the expression of NRF1, MT-CYB and TFAM. This study is the first to report the production of bison embryos by interspecies SCNT. Blastocyst development in all three bison species/subspecies was greater than the rates obtained in previous studies by IVF, which supports the potential role of SCNT for in vitro embryo production in this species. Yet, further investigation of developmental competence and the factors influencing blastocyst quality and viability is required.

  3. Informed toxicity assessment in drug discovery: systems-based toxicology.

    PubMed

    Mayne, James T; Ku, Warren W; Kennedy, Scott P

    2006-01-01

    Technological advances in the biological, chemical and in silico sciences have transformed many scientific disciplines, including toxicology. A vast new palate of toxicity testing tools is now available to investigators, enabling the generation of enormous amounts of data using only small amounts of test sample and at relatively low cost. In addition to these tools, the pharmaceutical industry has an urgent need for toxicity testing earlier in the process, based on the recognition that safety issues are the single largest cause of drug candidate attrition from development portfolios and the marketplace. However, along with the opportunity provided by new testing tools comes the dilemma of deciding which tools to use and, equally as important, when and why to use them. It may well be unwise to apply a new toxicity test or screening system simply because one can, as both false positive and false negative outcomes can quickly negate the value of a toxicity test system and may even have a net negative impact on drug discovery productivity. This can be true even of test systems that are considered to be 'validated' in the traditional sense. How then is an investigator or drug discovery organization to decide which of the new tools to use, and when to use them? Proposed herein is a strategy for identifying high-value toxicity testing systems and strategies based on program knowledge and informed decision-making. The decision to apply a certain toxicity testing system in this strategy is informed by knowledge of the pharmacological target, the chemical features of molecules active at the pharmacological target, and existing public domain or institutional learning. This 'fit-for-purpose' approach limits non-targeted or 'uninformed' toxicity screening to only those few test systems with high specificity, strong outcome concordance and molecular relevance to frequently encountered toxicity risks (eg, genotoxicity). Additional toxicity testing and screening is then conducted

  4. Sediment quality assessment and Toxicity Identification Evaluation studies in Lavaca Bay, Texas -- An estuarine Superfund site

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, R.S.; Biedenbach, J.; Hooten, R.; May, L.; Teas, T.

    1995-12-31

    A sediment quality assessment survey was conducted in the Lavaca Bay system which has been designated a Superfund site because of elevated concentrations of mercury and other contaminants (e.g., PAHs) in the sediments. Twenty-four stations were sampled in the initial survey. Sediment pore water was extracted pneumatically and the toxicity of the pore water determined using the sea urchin fertilization and embryological development assays. Based on the results of the toxicity tests, aliquots of the toxic sediments were analyzed for metals, PAHs, and pesticides. Based on these results, several of the most toxic sites were resampled and a preliminary Toxicity Identification Evaluation (TIE) was performed with the pore water using the sea urchin fertilization test. Preliminary results indicated that the toxic components were removed by adsorption on a C-18 column but were not affected by EDTA additions and, therefore, the primary toxicants are hydrophobic in nature.

  5. Physical assessment of toxicology at nanoscale: nano dose-metrics and toxicity factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pompa, P. P.; Vecchio, G.; Galeone, A.; Brunetti, V.; Maiorano, G.; Sabella, S.; Cingolani, R.

    2011-07-01

    In this work, we propose a systematic and reproducible evaluation of nanoparticles (NPs) toxicology in living systems, based on a physical assessment and quantification of the toxic effects of NPs by the experimental determination of the key parameter affecting the toxicity outcome (i.e., the number of NPs) and of the NPs ``toxicity factor''. Such a strategy was applied to a well determined scenario, i.e., the ingestion of citrate-capped gold NPs (AuNPs) of different sizes by the model system Drosophila melanogaster. Using these AuNPs as a reference toxicity standard, we were able to define different regions in the multiparametric space of toxicity, enabling the classification of the toxic levels of other nanomaterials, such as quantum dots and pegylated AuNPs. This approach may pave the way to a systematic classification of nanomaterials, leading to important developments in risk assessment and regulatory approval, as well as in a wide range of nanomedicine applications.

  6. [Toxicity tests and their application in safety assessment of water quality].

    PubMed

    Xu, Jian-Ying; Zhao, Chun-Tao; Wei, Dong-Bin

    2014-10-01

    The safety of water quality has important impacts not only on the health of ecological system, but also on the survival and development of human beings. The conventional assessment methods for water quality based on the concentration limits are not reliable. The toxicity tests can vividly reflect the whole adverse biological effects of multiple chemicals in water body, which has been regarded as a necessary supplement for conventional water quality assessment methods based on physicochemical parameters. Considering the chemical pollutants usually have various adverse biological effects, the ecotoxicity testing methods, including lethality, genotoxicity, endocrine disrupting effects, were classified according to the different toxicity types. Then, the potential applications of toxicity testing methods and corresponding evaluation indices in evaluating the toxicity characteristics of ambient water samples were discussed. Particularly, the safety assessment methods for water quality based on the toxicity tests, including potential toxicology, toxicity unit classification system, potential ecotoxic effect probe, and safety assessment of water quality based on toxicity test battery, were summarized. This paper not only systematically reviewed the progress of toxicity tests and their application in safety assessment of water quality, but also provided the scientific basis for the further development in the future.

  7. Assessing exposure to air toxics relative to asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Weisel, Clifford P

    2002-01-01

    Asthma is a respiratory disease whose prevalence has been increasing since the mid 1970s and that affects more than 14.6 million residents of the United States. Environmental triggers of asthma include air pollutants that are respiratory irritants. Air toxics emitted into the ambient air are listed in the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments as hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) if they can adversely affect human health, including the respiratory tract. HAPs include particulate and gaseous-phase pollutants, individual organic compounds and metals, and mixtures. Associations between asthma exacerbation and both particles and indoor volatile organic compounds (VOCs), often referred to as indoor air quality, have been reported. Studies conducted in the United States, Canada, and Europe over the past two decades have shown that most people living in the developed countries spend the majority of their time indoors and that the air concentrations of many air toxics or HAPs are higher indoors than in the ambient air in urban, suburban, and rural settings. Elevated indoor air concentrations result from emissions of air toxics from consumer products, household furnishings, and personal activities. The Relationship of Indoor, Outdoor and Personal Air (RIOPA) study was designed to oversample homes in close proximity to ambient sources, excluding residences where smokers lived, to determine the contribution of ambient emissions to air toxics exposure. The ratios of indoor to outdoor air concentrations of some VOCs in homes measured during RIOPA were much greater than one, and for most other VOCs that had indoor-to-outdoor ratios close to unity in the majority of homes, elevated ratios were found in the paired samples with the highest concentration. Thus, although ambient emissions contribute to exposure of some air toxics indoors as well as outdoors, this was not true for all of the air toxics and especially for the higher end of exposures to most volatile organic air toxics examined

  8. Assessing acute toxicity potential of persulfate ISCO treated water.

    PubMed

    Liang, Chenju; Wang, Chi-Wei

    2013-11-01

    Persulfate anion (S2O8(2-)), a widely used in situ chemical oxidation agent, is increasingly applied for environmental remediation. However, limited information on environmental and toxicological effects is available for the evaluation of the environmental risk of exposure to S2O8(2-), particularly after its application. In this study, the acute toxic effects on the common carp (Cyprinus carpio) were employed as a model to investigate S2O8(2-), sulfate ion (decomposition product of S2O8(2-)), hydrogen/hydroxide ions and also the mixtures of these ion species. Acute toxicity test results showed 96h median lethal concentrations (LC50) of 540±23mgL(-1) for S2O8(2-) and 4100±110mgL(-1) for SO4(2-). S2O8(2-) was considerably more toxic than its decomposition product SO4(2-). Additionally, solution pH was also an important factor influencing toxicity, and S2O8(2-) posed reduced acute toxicity when pH was in the range of 6-10. Water conductivity up to approximately 8000μScm(-1) did not appear to significantly increase fish mortality. In the mixture toxicity test (i.e., S2O8(2-)/OH(-)), LC50 values of 130±10mgL(-1) for S2O8(2-) and 23±2mgL(-1) for OH(-) were lower than those obtained from the individual toxicity tests and therefore exhibited higher toxicity to fish. However, upon complete decomposition of S2O8(2-) in the mixture, a reduction in acute toxicity may be expected. The results of this study revealed that it may be necessary and/or desirable to control the residual S2O8(2-)and pH after S2O8(2-) addition when potential exposure to an aquatic system is a concern.

  9. Assessment of acrylamide toxicity using a battery of standardised bioassays.

    PubMed

    Zovko, Mira; Vidaković-Cifrek, Željka; Cvetković, Želimira; Bošnir, Jasna; Šikić, Sandra

    2015-12-01

    Acrylamide is a monomer widely used as an intermediate in the production of organic chemicals, e.g. polyacrylamides (PAMs). Since PAMs are low cost chemicals with applications in various industries and waste- and drinking water treatment, a certain amount of non-polymerised acrylamide is expected to end up in waterways. PAMs are non-toxic but acrylamide induces neurotoxic effects in humans and genotoxic, reproductive, and carcinogenic effects in laboratory animals. In order to evaluate the effect of acrylamide on freshwater organisms, bioassays were conducted on four species: algae Desmodesmus subspicatus and Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata, duckweed Lemna minor and water flea Daphnia magna according to ISO (International Organization for Standardisation) standardised methods. This approach ensures the evaluation of acrylamide toxicity on organisms with different levels of organisation and the comparability of results, and it examines the value of using a battery of low-cost standardised bioassays in the monitoring of pollution and contamination of aquatic ecosystems. These results showed that EC50 values were lower for Desmodesmus subspicatus and Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata than for Daphnia magna and Lemna minor, which suggests an increased sensitivity of algae to acrylamide. According to the toxic unit approach, the values estimated by the Lemna minor and Daphnia magna bioassays, classify acrylamide as slightly toxic (TU=0-1; Class 1). The results obtained from algal bioassays (Desmodesmus subspicatus and Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata) revealed the toxic effect of acrylamide (TU=1-10; Class 2) on these organisms.

  10. Assessment of the toxic potential of hydrocarbon containing sludges.

    PubMed

    Morelli, I S; Vecchioli, G I; Del Panno, M T; Garré, M I; Costanza, O R; Painceira, M T

    1995-01-01

    A short-time period microbial toxicity test-battery was used for the investigation of acute toxicity and genotoxicity of five hydrocarbon containing sludges. Four sludges were obtained from a petrochemical industry and the fifth from a petroleum refinery. Some of the sludges had been stored for long periods. Bioremediation potential assays for soils polluted with each of the sludges were also considered. The sludges did not show acute toxicity in any of the microbial tests performed. However, when the diethylether soluble fractions of these sludges were analyzed some of them showed acute toxicity, for which the clearest results were obtained with the resazurin reduction method. The greatest toxicity detected with the Resazurin based method was found in the diethylether extracts of the freshly collected (not stored) sludges. On the other hand, the diethylether soluble fraction of those sludges that had been stored showed genotoxicity when analyzed with the Salmonella/microsome assay. After the incorporation of the sludges into the soil, increased bacterial counts were noted and substantial hydrocarbon elimination was achieved in 30 days, showing that bioremediation may be a possible technology for cleaning soils polluted with these sludges. PMID:15091525

  11. Assessment of the toxic potential of hydrocarbon containing sludges.

    PubMed

    Morelli, I S; Vecchioli, G I; Del Panno, M T; Garré, M I; Costanza, O R; Painceira, M T

    1995-01-01

    A short-time period microbial toxicity test-battery was used for the investigation of acute toxicity and genotoxicity of five hydrocarbon containing sludges. Four sludges were obtained from a petrochemical industry and the fifth from a petroleum refinery. Some of the sludges had been stored for long periods. Bioremediation potential assays for soils polluted with each of the sludges were also considered. The sludges did not show acute toxicity in any of the microbial tests performed. However, when the diethylether soluble fractions of these sludges were analyzed some of them showed acute toxicity, for which the clearest results were obtained with the resazurin reduction method. The greatest toxicity detected with the Resazurin based method was found in the diethylether extracts of the freshly collected (not stored) sludges. On the other hand, the diethylether soluble fraction of those sludges that had been stored showed genotoxicity when analyzed with the Salmonella/microsome assay. After the incorporation of the sludges into the soil, increased bacterial counts were noted and substantial hydrocarbon elimination was achieved in 30 days, showing that bioremediation may be a possible technology for cleaning soils polluted with these sludges.

  12. Assessment of acrylamide toxicity using a battery of standardised bioassays.

    PubMed

    Zovko, Mira; Vidaković-Cifrek, Željka; Cvetković, Želimira; Bošnir, Jasna; Šikić, Sandra

    2015-12-01

    Acrylamide is a monomer widely used as an intermediate in the production of organic chemicals, e.g. polyacrylamides (PAMs). Since PAMs are low cost chemicals with applications in various industries and waste- and drinking water treatment, a certain amount of non-polymerised acrylamide is expected to end up in waterways. PAMs are non-toxic but acrylamide induces neurotoxic effects in humans and genotoxic, reproductive, and carcinogenic effects in laboratory animals. In order to evaluate the effect of acrylamide on freshwater organisms, bioassays were conducted on four species: algae Desmodesmus subspicatus and Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata, duckweed Lemna minor and water flea Daphnia magna according to ISO (International Organization for Standardisation) standardised methods. This approach ensures the evaluation of acrylamide toxicity on organisms with different levels of organisation and the comparability of results, and it examines the value of using a battery of low-cost standardised bioassays in the monitoring of pollution and contamination of aquatic ecosystems. These results showed that EC50 values were lower for Desmodesmus subspicatus and Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata than for Daphnia magna and Lemna minor, which suggests an increased sensitivity of algae to acrylamide. According to the toxic unit approach, the values estimated by the Lemna minor and Daphnia magna bioassays, classify acrylamide as slightly toxic (TU=0-1; Class 1). The results obtained from algal bioassays (Desmodesmus subspicatus and Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata) revealed the toxic effect of acrylamide (TU=1-10; Class 2) on these organisms. PMID:26751864

  13. Toxicity assessment through multiple endpoint bioassays in soils posing environmental risk according to regulatory screening values.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Ruiz, A; Asensio, V; Zaldibar, B; Soto, M; Marigómez, I

    2014-01-01

    Toxicity profiles of two soils (a brownfield in Legazpi and an abandoned iron mine in Zugaztieta; Basque Country) contaminated with several metals (As, Zn, Pb and Cu in Legazpi; Zn, Pb, Cd and Cu in Zugaztieta) and petroleum hydrocarbons (in Legazpi) were determined using a multi-endpoint bioassay approach. Investigated soils exceeded screening values (SVs) of regulatory policies in force (Basque Country; Europe). Acute and chronic toxicity bioassays were conducted with a selected set of test species (Vibrio fischeri, Dictyostelium discoideum, Lactuca sativa, Raphanus sativus and Eisenia fetida) in combination with chemical analysis of soils and elutriates, as well as with bioaccumulation studies in earthworms. The sensitivity of the test species and the toxicity endpoints varied depending on the soil. It was concluded that whilst Zugaztieta soil showed very little or no toxicity, Legazpi soil was toxic according to almost all the toxicity tests (solid phase Microtox, D. discoideum inhibition of fruiting body formation and developmental cycle solid phase assays, lettuce seed germination and root elongation test, earthworm acute toxicity and reproduction tests, D. discoideum cell viability and replication elutriate assays). Thus, albeit both soils had similar SVs, their ecotoxicological risk, and therefore the need for intervening, was different for each soil as unveiled after toxicity profiling based on multiple endpoint bioassays. Such a toxicity profiling approach is suitable to be applied for scenario-targeted soil risk assessment in those cases where applicable national/regional soil legislation based on SVs demands further toxicity assessment. PMID:24819436

  14. Toxicity assessment through multiple endpoint bioassays in soils posing environmental risk according to regulatory screening values.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Ruiz, A; Asensio, V; Zaldibar, B; Soto, M; Marigómez, I

    2014-01-01

    Toxicity profiles of two soils (a brownfield in Legazpi and an abandoned iron mine in Zugaztieta; Basque Country) contaminated with several metals (As, Zn, Pb and Cu in Legazpi; Zn, Pb, Cd and Cu in Zugaztieta) and petroleum hydrocarbons (in Legazpi) were determined using a multi-endpoint bioassay approach. Investigated soils exceeded screening values (SVs) of regulatory policies in force (Basque Country; Europe). Acute and chronic toxicity bioassays were conducted with a selected set of test species (Vibrio fischeri, Dictyostelium discoideum, Lactuca sativa, Raphanus sativus and Eisenia fetida) in combination with chemical analysis of soils and elutriates, as well as with bioaccumulation studies in earthworms. The sensitivity of the test species and the toxicity endpoints varied depending on the soil. It was concluded that whilst Zugaztieta soil showed very little or no toxicity, Legazpi soil was toxic according to almost all the toxicity tests (solid phase Microtox, D. discoideum inhibition of fruiting body formation and developmental cycle solid phase assays, lettuce seed germination and root elongation test, earthworm acute toxicity and reproduction tests, D. discoideum cell viability and replication elutriate assays). Thus, albeit both soils had similar SVs, their ecotoxicological risk, and therefore the need for intervening, was different for each soil as unveiled after toxicity profiling based on multiple endpoint bioassays. Such a toxicity profiling approach is suitable to be applied for scenario-targeted soil risk assessment in those cases where applicable national/regional soil legislation based on SVs demands further toxicity assessment.

  15. Toxic Assessment of Triclosan and Triclocarban on Artemia salina.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaolu; Lu, Yin; Zhang, Deyong; Wang, Yinyin; Zhou, Xianshan; Xu, Huiying; Mei, Yu

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we investigated the possible acute toxic and genotoxic effects of triclosan (TCS) and triclocarban (TCC) on Artemia salina. Genotoxicity was evaluated using single-cell gel electrophoresis and apoptotic frequency assays (Annexin V-FITC/PI assay). Acute toxicity test results showed that TCC (LC50-24 h = 17.8 µg/L) was more toxic than TCS (LC50-24 h = 171.1 µg/L). Significant increases in both genotoxic biomarkers were observed at 24 h after initial exposure, indicating that these two chemicals are potentially dangerous for this aquatic biological model. Although further studies are required, a comparison of data both in vitro and in vivo allowed us to suggest possible mechanisms of action for TCS and TCC in this sentinel organism.

  16. Necessity of toxicity assessment in Turkish industrial discharges (examples from metal and textile industry effluents).

    PubMed

    Sponza, Delia Teresa

    2002-01-01

    Toxicity of some organic and inorganic chemicals to microorganisms is an important consideration in assessing their environmental impact against their economic benefits. Microorganisms play an important role in several environmental processes, both natural and engineered. Some organic and inorganics at toxic levels have been detected in industrial discharges resulting in plant upsets and discharge permit violations. In addition to this, even though in some cases the effluent wastewater does not exceed the discharge limits, the results of toxicity tests show potential toxicity. Toxicity knowledge of effluents can benefit treatment plant operators in optimising plant operation, setting pre-treatment standards, and protecting receiving water quality and in establishing sewer discharge permits to safeguard the plant. In the Turkish regulations only toxicity dilution factor (TDF) with fish is part of the toxicity monitoring program of permissible wastewater discharge. In various countries, laboratory studies involving the use of different organisms and protocol for toxicity assessment was conducted involving a number of discharges. In this study, it was aimed to investigate the acute toxicity of textile and metal industry wastewaters by traditional and enrichment toxicity tests and emphasize the importance of toxicity tests in wastewater discharge regulations. The enrichment toxicity tests are novel applications and give an idea whether there is potential toxicity or growth limiting and stimulation conditions. Different organisms were used such as bacteria (Floc and Coliform bacteria) algae (Chlorella sp.). fish (Lepistes sp.) and protozoan (Vorticella sp.) to represent four tropic levels. The textile industry results showed acute toxicity for at least one organism in 8 out of 23 effluent samples. Acute toxicity for at least two organisms in 7 out of 23 effluent sampling was observed for the metal industry. The toxicity test results were assessed with chemical analyses

  17. New technologies and approaches in toxicity testing and risk assessment (ESOT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The release of the National Research Council’s Report “Toxicity Testing in the 21st Century: A Vision and a Strategy” in 2007 initiated a broad-based movement in the toxicology community to re-think how toxicity testing and risk assessment are performed. Multiple efforts in the ...

  18. Assessing Toxic Risk. Teacher's Guide [and] Student Edition. Cornell Scientific Inquiry Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trautmann, Nancy M.; Carlsen, William S.; Krasny, Marianne E.; Cunningham, Christine M.

    The teacher's guide of "Assessing Toxic Risk" aims to help students conduct scientific research on relevant environmental topics. Using the research protocols in this book, students learn to carry out experiments known as bioassays. In this way, the toxicity of substances is evaluated by measuring its effect on living things. The text is organized…

  19. Estimating Toxicity Pathway Activating Doses for High Throughput Chemical Risk Assessments

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estimating a Toxicity Pathway Activating Dose (TPAD) from in vitro assays as an analog to a reference dose (RfD) derived from in vivo toxicity tests would facilitate high throughput risk assessments of thousands of data-poor environmental chemicals. Estimating a TPAD requires def...

  20. ASSESSING CONTAMINANT SENSITIVITY OF ENDANGERED AND THREATENED SPECIES: TOXICANT CLASSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Under the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act, the Toxic Substances Control Act and the Clean Water Act, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is charged with determining if the manufacture, use, or disposal of a chemical will present an unreasonable risk ...

  1. Practical approaches for evaluating adrenal toxicity in nonclinical safety assessment

    PubMed Central

    Inomata, Akira; Sasano, Hironobu

    2015-01-01

    The adrenal gland has characteristic morphological and biochemical features that render it particularly susceptible to the actions of xenobiotics. As is the case with other endocrine organs, the adrenal gland is under the control of upstream organs (hypothalamic-pituitary system) in vivo, often making it difficult to elucidate the mode of toxicity of a test article. It is very important, especially for pharmaceuticals, to determine whether a test article-related change is caused by a direct effect or other associated factors. In addition, antemortem data, including clinical signs, body weight, food consumption and clinical pathology, and postmortem data, including gross pathology, organ weight and histopathologic examination of the adrenal glands and other related organs, should be carefully monitored and evaluated. During evaluation, the following should also be taken into account: (1) species, sex and age of animals used, (2) metabolic activation by a cytochrome P450 enzyme(s) and (3) physicochemical properties and the metabolic pathway of the test article. In this review, we describe the following crucial points for toxicologic pathologists to consider when evaluating adrenal toxicity: functional anatomy, blood supply, hormone production in each compartment, steroid biosynthesis, potential medulla-cortex interaction, and species and gender differences in anatomical features and other features of the adrenal gland which could affect vulnerability to toxic effects. Finally practical approaches for evaluating adrenal toxicity in nonclinical safety studies are discussed. PMID:26441474

  2. Assessment of the In Vivo Toxicity of Gold Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-Shiun; Hung, Yao-Ching; Liau, Ian; Huang, G. Steve

    2009-08-01

    The environmental impact of nanoparticles is evident; however, their toxicity due to their nanosize is rarely discussed. Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) may serve as a promising model to address the size-dependent biological response to nanoparticles because they show good biocompatibility and their size can be controlled with great precision during their chemical synthesis. Naked GNPs ranging from 3 to 100 nm were injected intraperitoneally into BALB/C mice at a dose of 8 mg/kg/week. GNPs of 3, 5, 50, and 100 nm did not show harmful effects; however, GNPs ranging from 8 to 37 nm induced severe sickness in mice. Mice injected with GNPs in this range showed fatigue, loss of appetite, change of fur color, and weight loss. Starting from day 14, mice in this group exhibited a camel-like back and crooked spine. The majority of mice in these groups died within 21 days. Injection of 5 and 3 nm GNPs, however, did not induce sickness or lethality in mice. Pathological examination of the major organs of the mice in the diseased groups indicated an increase of Kupffer cells in the liver, loss of structural integrity in the lungs, and diffusion of white pulp in the spleen. The pathological abnormality was associated with the presence of gold particles at the diseased sites, which were verified by ex vivo Coherent anti-Stoke Raman scattering microscopy. Modifying the surface of the GNPs by incorporating immunogenic peptides ameliorated their toxicity. This reduction in the toxicity is associated with an increase in the ability to induce antibody response. The toxicity of GNPs may be a fundamental determinant of the environmental toxicity of nanoparticles.

  3. Selected Issues Associated with the Risk Assessment Process for Pesticides with Persistent, Bioaccumulative, and Toxic Characteristics

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Scientific Advisory Panel meeting will address selected scientific issues associated with assessing the potential ecological risks resulting from use of a pesticide active ingredient which has persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic (PBT) characteristics. EPA will pose speci...

  4. Long-term toxicity assessment of soils in a recovered area affected by a mining spill.

    PubMed

    Romero-Freire, A; García Fernández, I; Simón Torres, M; Martínez Garzón, F J; Martín Peinado, F J

    2016-01-01

    Residual pollution in the Guadiamar Green Corridor still remains after Aználcollar mine spill in 1998. The polluted areas are identified by the absence of vegetation, soil acidic pH and high concentrations of As, Pb, Zn and Cu. Soil toxicity was assessed by lettuce root elongation and induced soil respiration bioassays. In bare soils, total As and Pb concentrations and water-extractable levels for As, Zn and Cu exceeded the toxicity guidelines. Pollutants responsible for toxicity were different depending on the tested organism, with arsenic being most toxic for lettuce and the metal mixture to soil respiration. Soil properties, such as pH or organic carbon content, are key factors to control metal availability and toxicity in the area. According to our results, there is a risk of pollution to living organisms and the soil quality criteria established in the area should be revised to reduce the risk of toxicity.

  5. Assessment of Metal Toxicity in Marine Ecosystems: Comparative Toxicity Potentials for Nine Cationic Metals in Coastal Seawater.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yan; Rosenbaum, Ralph K; Hauschild, Michael Z

    2016-01-01

    This study is a first attempt to develop globally applicable and spatially differentiated marine comparative toxicity potentials (CTPs) or ecotoxicity characterization factors for metals in coastal seawater for use in life cycle assessment. The toxicity potentials are based exclusively on marine ecotoxicity data and take account of metal speciation and bioavailability. CTPs were developed for nine cationic metals (Cd, Cr(III), Co, Cu(II), Fe(III), Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn) in 64 large marine ecosystems (LMEs) covering all coastal waters in the world. The results showed that the CTP of a specific metal varies 3-4 orders of magnitude across LMEs, largely due to different seawater residence times. Therefore, the highest toxicity potential for metals was found in the LMEs with the longest seawater residence times. Across metals, the highest CTPs were observed for Cd, Pb, and Zn. At the concentration levels occurring in coastal seawaters, Fe acts not as a toxic agent but as an essential nutrient and thus has CTPs of zero.

  6. Urban land use, air toxics and public health: Assessing hazardous exposures at the neighborhood scale

    SciTech Connect

    Corburn, Jason . E-mail: jtc2105@columbia.edu

    2007-03-15

    Land use data are increasingly understood as important indicators of potential environmental health risk in urban areas where micro-scale or neighborhood level hazard exposure data are not routinely collected. This paper aims to offer a method for estimating the distribution of air toxics in urban neighborhoods using land use information because actual air monitoring data rarely exist at this scale. Using Geographic Information System spatial modeling tools, we estimate air toxics concentrations across neighborhoods in New York City and statistically compare our model with the US Environmental Protection Agency's National Air Toxic Assessment and air monitoring data across three NYC neighborhoods. We conclude that land use data can act as a good proxy for estimating neighborhood scale air toxics, particularly in the absence of monitoring data. In addition, the paper suggests that land use data can expand the reach of environmental impact assessments that routinely exclude analyses of potential exposures to urban air toxics at the neighborhood scale.

  7. Use of hydra for chronic toxicity assessment of waters intended for human consumption.

    PubMed

    Arkhipchuk, Victor V; Blaise, Christian; Malinovskaya, Maria V

    2006-07-01

    Methods developed with the cnidarian, Hydra attenuata (Pallas), have proven effective for screening acute toxicity in aqueous samples, whereas their use in revealing (sub)chronic toxic effects have had mitigated success. We therefore sought to explore manifestations of hydra mortality and abnormal morphological changes, as well as the reproductive capacity of hydras to further enhance the bioassay sensitivity and to assess (sub)chronic toxicity. These parameters were recorded following the onset of experiments after 8, 12 and 19-21 days of hydra exposure. Results obtained with potable waters (30 brands of bottled waters and artesian waters from 9 wells) showed chronic sublethal and lethal effects or reproduction rate inhibition for most samples. The effectiveness of the hydra toxicity test was demonstrated in comparison with other widely used bioassays. Our previous and present investigations suggest that hydra is a reliable and relevant test organism for the assessment of acute and chronic water toxicity.

  8. Importance of toxicokinetics for interspecies variation in sensitivity to chemicals.

    PubMed

    Nyman, Anna-Maija; Schirmer, Kristin; Ashauer, Roman

    2014-05-20

    Interspecies variation in sensitivity to synthetic chemicals can be orders of magnitude large. Species traits causing the variation can be related to toxicokinetics (uptake, distribution, biotransformation, elimination) or toxicodynamics (interaction with biological target sites). We present an approach to systematically measure and model the contribution of uptake, biotransformation, internal distribution, and elimination kinetics toward species sensitivity differences. The aim is to express sensitivity as target tissue specific, internal lethal concentrations. A case study with the pesticides diazinon, imidacloprid, and propiconazole and the aquatic invertebrates Gammarus pulex, Gammarus fossarum, and Lymnaea stagnalis illustrates the approach. L. stagnalis accumulates more pesticides than Gammaridae when measured in whole organisms but less in target tissues such as the nervous system. Toxicokinetics, i.e. biotransformation and distribution, explain the higher tolerance of L. stagnalis to the insecticide diazinon when compared to Gammaridae. L. stagnalis was again more tolerant to the other neurotoxicant imidacloprid; however, the difference in sensitivity could not be explained by toxicokinetics alone, indicating the importance of toxicodynamic differences. Sensitivity to propiconazole was comparable among all species and, when expressed as internal lethal concentrations, falls in the range of baseline toxicity.

  9. Automated manometric method to assess anaerobic toxicity of chemicals.

    PubMed

    Fdz-Polanco, F; Nieto, P; Pérez-Elvira, S I; Fdz-Polanco, M

    2006-01-01

    Industrial additives eventually used for different purposes (antifoaming, cleaning, bactericides, antiscale, etc) are discharged to the wastewater treatment plant. The anaerobic toxicity of these commercial products is not provided by suppliers. A new manometric method is developed and tested to evaluate anaerobic toxicity or inhibition using four different commercial products. Antifoaming Cleron 6 (50-200 ppm), bactericide Divosan-forte (0.05-1.0% v/v), bleach (0.1-1.0% v/v) and cleaning agent Topax 66 (0.10-1.0% v/v). According to the different methods proposed in the literature, from the methane production rate, it is possible to calculate both methanogenic activity evolution and final substrate removal and quantify the potential inhibitory effect of commercial additives. The experimental method is simple and reliable.

  10. Subacute toxicity assessment of water disinfection byproducts on zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Rácz, Gergely; Csenki, Zsolt; Kovács, Róbert; Hegyi, Arpád; Baska, Ferenc; Sujbert, László; Zsákovics, Ivett; Kis, Renáta; Gustafson, Ryan; Urbányi, Béla; Szende, Béla

    2012-07-01

    Disinfection of raw water is essential to the production of drinking water. However, by-products of disinfection may exert toxic effects. The potential toxic effects of two of these compounds, 4-ethylbenzaldehyde (EBA) and 2,4-difluoroaniline (DFA) were investigated using the zebrafish (Danio rerio) model. The two compounds, dissolved, were introduced in duplicate aquariums containing zebrafish in two different concentrations based on LC50 values. The aquarium water containing EBA or DFA was changed every 96 h throughout the 3 months of treatment. Behavior of the fish in each replicate was inspected twice daily. In course of treatment with both concentrations, fish exposed to DFA displayed behavior associated with visible anxiety, while EBA treated were lethargic and did not evade capture. Application of both concentrations of each component into the aquarium water resulted in dystrophic lesions in the liver, kidney and skin of the fish while preneoplastic lesions and tumors were not observed. PMID:22161134

  11. Interspecies scaling of regional drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Dedrick, R L

    1986-11-01

    Calculation of the pharmacokinetic advantage of regional drug administration requires knowledge of the relevant intercompartment transport parameter. In a lumped model this is the blood (or plasma) flow rate for intra-arterial drug infusion or the permeability-area product for intraperitoneal or intrathecal administration. It is suggested that the perfusion of many tissues and the intrinsic permeability of the peritoneal surface or the brain-cerebrospinal fluid interface are similar among mammals. This provides a clear allometric basis for interspecies scaling based on organ size or surface areas. Intra-arterial or intrathecal treatment of the brain or meninges is a particularly interesting problem because of the relatively large brain of humans and because increased folding results in a cortical surface area that is almost proportional to brain size. Major unresolved issues remain concerning the distributed character of the processes such as streaming of drug infused into an artery and nonuniform mixing of cerebrospinal fluid.

  12. Promoting interspecies electron transfer with biochar.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shanshan; Rotaru, Amelia-Elena; Shrestha, Pravin Malla; Malvankar, Nikhil S; Liu, Fanghua; Fan, Wei; Nevin, Kelly P; Lovley, Derek R

    2014-01-01

    Biochar, a charcoal-like product of the incomplete combustion of organic materials, is an increasingly popular soil amendment designed to improve soil fertility. We investigated the possibility that biochar could promote direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) in a manner similar to that previously reported for granular activated carbon (GAC). Although the biochars investigated were 1000 times less conductive than GAC, they stimulated DIET in co-cultures of Geobacter metallireducens with Geobacter sulfurreducens or Methanosarcina barkeri in which ethanol was the electron donor. Cells were attached to the biochar, yet not in close contact, suggesting that electrons were likely conducted through the biochar, rather than biological electrical connections. The finding that biochar can stimulate DIET may be an important consideration when amending soils with biochar and can help explain why biochar may enhance methane production from organic wastes under anaerobic conditions.

  13. Toxicity Assessment of Refill Liquids for Electronic Cigarettes

    PubMed Central

    Varlet, Vincent; Farsalinos, Konstantinos; Augsburger, Marc; Thomas, Aurélien; Etter, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed 42 models from 14 brands of refill liquids for e-cigarettes for the presence of micro-organisms, diethylene glycol, ethylene glycol, hydrocarbons, ethanol, aldehydes, tobacco-specific nitrosamines, and solvents. All the liquids under scrutiny complied with norms for the absence of yeast, mold, aerobic microbes, Staphylococcus aureus, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Diethylene glycol, ethylene glycol and ethanol were detected, but remained within limits authorized for food and pharmaceutical products. Terpenic compounds and aldehydes were found in the products, in particular formaldehyde and acrolein. No sample contained nitrosamines at levels above the limit of detection (1 μg/g). Residual solvents such as 1,3-butadiene, cyclohexane and acetone, to name a few, were found in some products. None of the products under scrutiny were totally exempt of potentially toxic compounds. However, for products other than nicotine, the oral acute toxicity of the e-liquids tested seems to be of minor concern. However, a minority of liquids, especially those with flavorings, showed particularly high ranges of chemicals, causing concerns about their potential toxicity in case of chronic oral exposure. PMID:25941845

  14. Toxicity assessment and microbial degradation of azo dyes.

    PubMed

    Puvaneswari, N; Muthukrishnan, J; Gunasekaran, P

    2006-08-01

    Toxic effluents containing azo dyes are discharged from various industries and they adversely affect water resources, soil fertility, aquatic organisms and ecosystem integrity. They pose toxicity (lethal effect, genotoxicity, mutagenicity and carcinogenicity) to aquatic organisms (fish, algae, bacteria, etc.) as well as animals. They are not readily degradable under natural conditions and are typically not removed from waste water by conventional waste water treatment systems. Benzidine based dyes have long been recognized as a human urinary bladder carcinogen and tumorigenic in a variety of laboratory animals. Several microorganisms have been found to decolourize, transform and even to completely mineralize azo dyes. A mixed culture of two Pseudomonas strains efficiently degraded mixture of 3-chlorobenzoate (3-CBA) and phenol/cresols. Azoreductases of different microorganisms are useful for the development of biodegradation systems as they catalyze reductive cleavage of azo groups (-N=N-) under mild conditions. In this review, toxic impacts of dyeing factory effluents on plants, fishes, and environment, and plausible bioremediation strategies for removal of azo dyes have been discussed.

  15. Evaluation of Chemical Warfare Agent Percutaneous Vapor Toxicity: Derivation of Toxicity Guidelines for Assessing Chemical Protective Ensembles.

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, A.P.

    2003-07-24

    Percutaneous vapor toxicity guidelines are provided for assessment and selection of chemical protective ensembles (CPEs) to be used by civilian and military first responders operating in a chemical warfare agent vapor environment. The agents evaluated include the G-series and VX nerve agents, the vesicant sulfur mustard (agent HD) and, to a lesser extent, the vesicant Lewisite (agent L). The focus of this evaluation is percutaneous vapor permeation of CPEs and the resulting skin absorption, as inhalation and ocular exposures are assumed to be largely eliminated through use of SCBA and full-face protective masks. Selection of appropriately protective CPE designs and materials incorporates a variety of test parameters to ensure operability, practicality, and adequacy. One aspect of adequacy assessment should be based on systems tests, which focus on effective protection of the most vulnerable body regions (e.g., the groin area), as identified in this analysis. The toxicity range of agent-specific cumulative exposures (Cts) derived in this analysis can be used as decision guidelines for CPE acceptance, in conjunction with weighting consideration towards more susceptible body regions. This toxicity range is bounded by the percutaneous vapor estimated minimal effect (EME{sub pv}) Ct (as the lower end) and the 1% population threshold effect (ECt{sub 01}) estimate. Assumptions of exposure duration used in CPE certification should consider that each agent-specific percutaneous vapor cumulative exposure Ct for a given endpoint is a constant for exposure durations between 30 min and 2 hours.

  16. In vivo assessment of toxicity and pharmacokinetics of methylglyoxal

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Manju; Talukdar, Dipa; Ghosh, Swapna; Bhattacharyya, Nivedita; Ray, Manju . E-mail: bcmr@mahendra.iacs.res.in; Ray, Subhankar

    2006-04-01

    Previous in vivo studies from several laboratories had shown remarkable curative effect of methylglyoxal on cancer-bearing animals. In contrast, most of the recent in vitro studies have assigned a toxic role for methylglyoxal. The present study was initiated with the objective to resolve whether methylglyoxal is truly toxic in vivo and to reassess its therapeutic potential. Four species of animals, both rodent and non-rodent, were treated with different doses of methylglyoxal through oral, subcutaneous and intravenous routes. Acute (treatment for only 1 day) toxicity tests had been done with mouse and rat. These animals received 2, 1 and 0.3 g of methylglyoxal/kg of body weight in a day through oral, subcutaneous and intravenous routes respectively. Chronic (treatment for around a month) toxicity test had been done with mouse, rat, rabbit and dog. Mouse, rat and dog received 1, 0.3 and 0.1 g of methylglyoxal/kg of body weight in a day through oral, subcutaneous and intravenous routes respectively. Rabbit received 0.55, 0.3 and 0.1 g of methylglyoxal/kg of body weight in a day through oral, subcutaneous and intravenous routes respectively. It had been observed that methylglyoxal had no deleterious effect on the physical and behavioral pattern of the treated animals. Fertility and teratogenecity studies were done with rats that were subjected to chronic toxicity tests. It had been observed that these animals produced healthy litters indicating no damage of the reproductive systems as well as no deleterious effect on the offspring. Studies on several biochemical and hematological parameters of methylglyoxal-treated rats and dogs and histological studies of several organs of methylglyoxal-treated mouse were performed. These studies indicated that methylglyoxal had no apparent deleterious effect on some vital organs of these animals. A detailed pharmacokinetic study was done with mouse after oral administration of methylglyoxal. The effect of methylglyoxal alone and in

  17. Test of significant toxicity: a statistical application for assessing whether an effluent or site water is truly toxic.

    PubMed

    Denton, Debra L; Diamond, Jerry; Zheng, Lei

    2011-05-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) and state agencies implement the Clean Water Act, in part, by evaluating the toxicity of effluent and surface water samples. A common goal for both regulatory authorities and permittees is confidence in an individual test result (e.g., no-observed-effect concentration [NOEC], pass/fail, 25% effective concentration [EC25]), which is used to make regulatory decisions, such as reasonable potential determinations, permit compliance, and watershed assessments. This paper discusses an additional statistical approach (test of significant toxicity [TST]), based on bioequivalence hypothesis testing, or, more appropriately, test of noninferiority, which examines whether there is a nontoxic effect at a single concentration of concern compared with a control. Unlike the traditional hypothesis testing approach in whole effluent toxicity (WET) testing, TST is designed to incorporate explicitly both α and β error rates at levels of toxicity that are unacceptable and acceptable, given routine laboratory test performance for a given test method. Regulatory management decisions are used to identify unacceptable toxicity levels for acute and chronic tests, and the null hypothesis is constructed such that test power is associated with the ability to declare correctly a truly nontoxic sample as acceptable. This approach provides a positive incentive to generate high-quality WET data to make informed decisions regarding regulatory decisions. This paper illustrates how α and β error rates were established for specific test method designs and tests the TST approach using both simulation analyses and actual WET data. In general, those WET test endpoints having higher routine (e.g., 50th percentile) within-test control variation, on average, have higher method-specific α values (type I error rate), to maintain a desired type II error rate. This paper delineates the technical underpinnings of this approach and demonstrates the benefits

  18. Applicability of ambient toxicity testing to national or regional water-quality assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elder, John F.

    1990-01-01

    Comprehensive assessment of the quality of natural waters requires a multifaceted approach. Descriptions of existing conditions may be achieved by various kinds of chemical and hydrologic analyses, whereas information about the effects of such conditions on living organisms depends on biological monitoring. Toxicity testing is one type of biological monitoring that can be used to identify possible effects of toxic contaminants. Based on experimentation designed to monitor responses of organisms to environmental stresses, toxicity testing may have diverse purposes in water-quality assessments. These purposes may include identification of areas that warrant further study because of poor water quality or unusual ecological features, verification of other types of monitoring, or assessment of contaminant effects on aquatic communities. Toxicity-test results are most effective when used as a complement to chemical analyses, hydrologic measurements, and other biological monitoring. However, all toxicity-testing procedures have certain limitations that must be considered in developing the methodology and applications of toxicity testing in any large-scale water-quality-assessment program. A wide variety of toxicity-test methods have been developed to fulfill the needs of diverse applications. The methods differ primarily in the selections made relative to four characteristics: (1) test species, (2) endpoint (acute or chronic), (3) test-enclosure type, and (4) test substance (toxicant) that functions as the environmental stress. Toxicity-test approaches vary in their capacity to meet the needs of large-scale assessments of existing water quality. Ambient testing, whereby the test organism is exposed to naturally occurring substances that contain toxicant mixtures in an organic or inorganic matrix, is more likely to meet these needs than are procedures that call for exposure of the test organisms to known concentrations of a single toxicant. However, meaningful

  19. Severe Pulmonary Toxicity After Myeloablative Conditioning Using Total Body Irradiation: An Assessment of Risk Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Kelsey, Chris R.; Horwitz, Mitchell E.; Chino, Junzo P.; Craciunescu, Oana; Steffey, Beverly; Folz, Rodney J.; Chao, Nelson J.; Rizzieri, David A.; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To assess factors associated with severe pulmonary toxicity after myeloablative conditioning using total body irradiation (TBI) followed by allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Methods and Materials: A total of 101 adult patients who underwent TBI-based myeloablative conditioning for hematologic malignancies at Duke University between 1998 and 2008 were reviewed. TBI was combined with high-dose cyclophosphamide, melphalan, fludarabine, or etoposide, depending on the underlying disease. Acute pulmonary toxicity, occurring within 90 days of transplantation, was scored using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Actuarial overall survival and the cumulative incidence of acute pulmonary toxicity were calculated via the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using a log-rank test. A binary logistic regression analysis was performed to assess factors independently associated with acute severe pulmonary toxicity. Results: The 90-day actuarial risk of developing severe (Grade 3-5) pulmonary toxicity was 33%. Actuarial survival at 90 days was 49% in patients with severe pulmonary toxicity vs. 94% in patients without (p < 0.001). On multivariate analysis, the number of prior chemotherapy regimens was the only factor independently associated with development of severe pulmonary toxicity (odds ratio, 2.7 per regimen). Conclusions: Severe acute pulmonary toxicity is prevalent after TBI-based myeloablative conditioning regimens, occurring in approximately 33% of patients. The number of prior chemotherapy regimens appears to be an important risk factor.

  20. Impact of Gestational Bisphenol A on Oxidative Stress and Free Fatty Acids: Human Association and Interspecies Animal Testing Studies

    PubMed Central

    Veiga-Lopez, Almudena; Pennathur, Subramaniam; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Patisaul, Heather B.; Dolinoy, Dana C.; Zeng, Lixia

    2015-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a high production volume chemical and an endocrine disruptor. Developmental exposures to BPA have been linked to adult metabolic pathologies, but the pathways through which these disruptions occur remain unknown. This is a comprehensive interspecies association vs causal study to evaluate risks posed by prenatal BPA exposure and to facilitate discovery of biomarkers of relevance to BPA toxicity. Samples from human pregnancies during the first trimester and at term, as well as fetal and/or adult samples from prenatally BPA-treated sheep, rats, and mice, were collected to assess the impact of BPA on free fatty acid and oxidative stress dynamics. Mothers exposed to higher BPA during early to midpregnancy and their matching term cord samples displayed increased 3-nitrotyrosine (NY), a marker of nitrosative stress. Maternal samples had increased palmitic acid, which was positively correlated with NY. Sheep fetuses and adult sheep and rats prenatally exposed to a human-relevant exposure dose of BPA showed increased systemic nitrosative stress. The strongest effect of BPA on circulating free fatty acids was observed in adult mice in the absence of increased oxidative stress. This is the first multispecies study that combines human association and animal causal studies assessing the risk posed by prenatal BPA exposure to metabolic health. This study provides evidence of the induction of nitrosative stress by prenatal BPA in both the mother and fetus at time of birth and is thus supportive of the use of maternal NY as a biomarker for offspring health. PMID:25603046

  1. Impact of gestational bisphenol A on oxidative stress and free fatty acids: Human association and interspecies animal testing studies.

    PubMed

    Veiga-Lopez, Almudena; Pennathur, Subramaniam; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Patisaul, Heather B; Dolinoy, Dana C; Zeng, Lixia; Padmanabhan, Vasantha

    2015-03-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a high production volume chemical and an endocrine disruptor. Developmental exposures to BPA have been linked to adult metabolic pathologies, but the pathways through which these disruptions occur remain unknown. This is a comprehensive interspecies association vs causal study to evaluate risks posed by prenatal BPA exposure and to facilitate discovery of biomarkers of relevance to BPA toxicity. Samples from human pregnancies during the first trimester and at term, as well as fetal and/or adult samples from prenatally BPA-treated sheep, rats, and mice, were collected to assess the impact of BPA on free fatty acid and oxidative stress dynamics. Mothers exposed to higher BPA during early to midpregnancy and their matching term cord samples displayed increased 3-nitrotyrosine (NY), a marker of nitrosative stress. Maternal samples had increased palmitic acid, which was positively correlated with NY. Sheep fetuses and adult sheep and rats prenatally exposed to a human-relevant exposure dose of BPA showed increased systemic nitrosative stress. The strongest effect of BPA on circulating free fatty acids was observed in adult mice in the absence of increased oxidative stress. This is the first multispecies study that combines human association and animal causal studies assessing the risk posed by prenatal BPA exposure to metabolic health. This study provides evidence of the induction of nitrosative stress by prenatal BPA in both the mother and fetus at time of birth and is thus supportive of the use of maternal NY as a biomarker for offspring health.

  2. TOXIC SUBSTANCES FROM COAL COMBUSTION A COMPREHENSIVE ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect

    A KOLKER; AF SAROFIM; CA PALMER; FE HUGGINS; GP HUFFMAN; J LIGHTY; JJ HELBLE; JOL WENDT; MR AMES; N YAP; R FINKELMAN; R. MAMANI-PACO; SJ MROCZKOWSKY; T PANAGIOTOU; W SEAMES

    1999-01-28

    The technical objectives of this project are: (a) To identify the effect of the mode-of-occurrence of toxic elements in coal on the partitioning of these elements among vapor, submicron fume, and fly ash during the combustion of pulverized coal, (b) To identify the mechanisms governing the post-vaporization interaction of toxic elements and major minerals or unburnt char, (c) To determine the effect of combustion environment (i.e., fuel rich or fuel lean) on the partitioning of trace elements among vapor, submicron fume, and fly ash during the combustion of pulverized coal, (d) To model the partitioning of toxic elements among various chemical species in the vapor phase and between the vapor phase and complex aluminosilicate melts, (e) To develop the new Toxics Partitioning Engineering Model (ToPEM), applicable to all combustion conditions including new fuels and coal blends, low-NO{sub x} combustion systems, and new power generation plants. A description of the work plan for accomplishing these objectives is presented in Section 2.1 of this report. The work discussed in this report covers the reporting period from 1 October 1998 to 31 December 1998. During this quarter, basic coal testing at USGS was completed. Total sulfur contents range from 0.43 wt-% in the Wyodak to 2.68 wt-% in the Ohio sample. In the North Dakota and Ohio samples, about half of the total sulfur is pyritic and half is organic. The North Dakota sample also contains a minor amount of sulfate, consistent with the presence of barite in this sample. In the Wyodak sample, the majority of the sulfur is organic. Preliminary mineralogy of the three Phase II coals was determined by SEM/EDX. The Ohio coal contains all of the five most common major phases: quartz, illitic clay, kaolinitic clay, pyrite and calcite. Based on this preliminary work, the North Dakota sample appears to lack both kaolinite and calcite, and the Wyodak sample appears to lack calcite. Subsequent SEM work will attempt to reconfirm

  3. Probabilistic ecological risk assessment of effluent toxicity of a wastewater reclamation plant based on process modeling.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Siyu; Huang, Yunqing; Sun, Fu; Li, Dan; He, Miao

    2016-09-01

    The growing use of reclaimed wastewater for environmental purposes such as stream flow augmentation requires comprehensive ecological risk assessment and management. This study applied a system analysis approach, regarding a wastewater reclamation plant (WRP) and its recipient water body as a whole system, and assessed the ecological risk of the recipient water body caused by the WRP effluent. Instead of specific contaminants, two toxicity indicators, i.e. genotoxicity and estrogenicity, were selected to directly measure the biological effects of all bio-available contaminants in the reclaimed wastewater, as well as characterize the ecological risk of the recipient water. A series of physically based models were developed to simulate the toxicity indicators in a WRP through a typical reclamation process, including ultrafiltration, ozonation, and chlorination. After being validated against the field monitoring data from a full-scale WRP in Beijing, the models were applied to simulate the probability distribution of effluent toxicity of the WRP through Latin Hypercube Sampling to account for the variability of influent toxicity and operation conditions. The simulated effluent toxicity was then used to derive the predicted environmental concentration (PEC) in the recipient stream, considering the variations of the toxicity and flow of the upstream inflow as well. The ratio of the PEC of each toxicity indicator to its corresponding predicted no-effect concentration was finally used for the probabilistic ecological risk assessment. Regional sensitivity analysis was also performed with the developed models to identify the critical control variables and strategies for ecological risk management. PMID:27219046

  4. Probabilistic ecological risk assessment of effluent toxicity of a wastewater reclamation plant based on process modeling.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Siyu; Huang, Yunqing; Sun, Fu; Li, Dan; He, Miao

    2016-09-01

    The growing use of reclaimed wastewater for environmental purposes such as stream flow augmentation requires comprehensive ecological risk assessment and management. This study applied a system analysis approach, regarding a wastewater reclamation plant (WRP) and its recipient water body as a whole system, and assessed the ecological risk of the recipient water body caused by the WRP effluent. Instead of specific contaminants, two toxicity indicators, i.e. genotoxicity and estrogenicity, were selected to directly measure the biological effects of all bio-available contaminants in the reclaimed wastewater, as well as characterize the ecological risk of the recipient water. A series of physically based models were developed to simulate the toxicity indicators in a WRP through a typical reclamation process, including ultrafiltration, ozonation, and chlorination. After being validated against the field monitoring data from a full-scale WRP in Beijing, the models were applied to simulate the probability distribution of effluent toxicity of the WRP through Latin Hypercube Sampling to account for the variability of influent toxicity and operation conditions. The simulated effluent toxicity was then used to derive the predicted environmental concentration (PEC) in the recipient stream, considering the variations of the toxicity and flow of the upstream inflow as well. The ratio of the PEC of each toxicity indicator to its corresponding predicted no-effect concentration was finally used for the probabilistic ecological risk assessment. Regional sensitivity analysis was also performed with the developed models to identify the critical control variables and strategies for ecological risk management.

  5. Web-based Interspecies Correlation Estimation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Web-ICE estimates acute toxicity (LC50/LD50) of a chemical to a species, genus, or family from the known toxicity of the chemical to a surrogate species. Web-ICE has modules to predict acute toxicity to aquatic (fish and invertebrates) and wildlife (birds and mammals) taxa for us...

  6. Occupational health assessment of chromite toxicity among Indian miners

    PubMed Central

    Das, Alok Prasad; Singh, Shikha

    2011-01-01

    Elevated concentration of hexavalent chromium pollution and contamination has contributed a major health hazard affecting more than 2 lakh mine workers and inhabitants residing in the Sukinda chromite mine of Odisha, India. Despite people suffering from several forms of ill health, physical and mental deformities, constant exposure to toxic wastes and chronic diseases as a result of chromite mining, there is a tragic gap in the availability of 'scientific’ studies and data on the health hazards of mining in India. Occupational Safety and Health Administration, Odisha State Pollution Control Board and the Odisha Voluntary Health Association data were used to compile the possible occupational health hazards, hexavalent chromium exposure and diseases among Sukinda chromite mines workers. Studies were reviewed to determine the routes of exposure and possible mechanism of chromium induced carcinogenicity among the workers. Our studies suggest all forms of hexavalent chromium are regarded as carcinogenic to workers however the most important routes of occupational exposure to Cr (VI) are inhalation and dermal contact. This review article outlines the physical, chemical, biological and psychosocial occupational health hazards of chromite mining and associated metallurgical processes to monitor the mining environment as well as the miners exposed to these toxicants to foster a safe work environment. The authors anticipate that the outcome of this manuscript will have an impact on Indian chromite mining industry that will subsequently bring about improvements in work conditions, develop intervention experiments in occupational health and safety programs. PMID:21808494

  7. Toxicity Assessment of Expired Pesticides to Green Algae Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata

    PubMed Central

    Satyavani, G.; Chandrasehar, G.; Varma, K. Krishna; Goparaju, A.; Ayyappan, S.; Reddy, P. Neelakanta; Murthy, P. Balakrishna

    2012-01-01

    In order to investigate the effect of expired pesticides on the yield and growth rate of green algae Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata, a study was conducted as per the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) guideline number 201. Fifteen expired pesticide formulations, most commonly used in Indian agriculture, were tested in comparison with their unexpired counterparts. The expired pesticide formulations studied belonged to various class and functional groups: organophosphate, pyrethroid-based insecticides; azole-based fungicides; acetamide, propionate, acetic acid-based herbicides; fungicides mixtures containing two actives—azole and dithiocarbamate. The toxicity endpoints of yield (EyC50: 0–72 h) and growth rate (ErC50: 0–72 h) of Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata for each pesticide formulation (both expired and unexpired pesticides) were determined statistically using TOXSTAT 3.5 version software. The results pointed out that some expired pesticide formulations exhibited higher toxicity to tested algal species, as compared to the corresponding unexpired pesticides. These data thus stress the need for greater care to dispose expired pesticides to water bodies, to avoid the effects on aquatic ecospecies tested. PMID:23762633

  8. Assessment of toxic metals in waste personal computers.

    PubMed

    Kolias, Konstantinos; Hahladakis, John N; Gidarakos, Evangelos

    2014-08-01

    Considering the enormous production of waste personal computers nowadays, it is obvious that the study of their composition is necessary in order to regulate their management and prevent any environmental contamination caused by their inappropriate disposal. This study aimed at determining the toxic metals content of motherboards (printed circuit boards), monitor glass and monitor plastic housing of two Cathode Ray Tube (CRT) monitors, three Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) monitors, one LCD touch screen monitor and six motherboards, all of which were discarded. In addition, concentrations of chromium (Cr), cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb) and mercury (Hg) were compared with the respective limits set by the RoHS 2002/95/EC Directive, that was recently renewed by the 2012/19/EU recast, in order to verify manufacturers' compliance with the regulation. The research included disassembly, pulverization, digestion and chemical analyses of all the aforementioned devices. The toxic metals content of all samples was determined using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS). The results demonstrated that concentrations of Pb in motherboards and funnel glass of devices with release dates before 2006, that is when the RoHS Directive came into force, exceeded the permissible limit. In general, except from Pb, higher metal concentrations were detected in motherboards in comparison with plastic housing and glass samples. Finally, the results of this work were encouraging, since concentrations of metals referred in the RoHS Directive were found in lower levels than the legislative limits.

  9. A comparative toxicity assessment of materials used in aquatic construction.

    PubMed

    Lalonde, Benoit A; Ernst, William; Julien, Gary; Jackman, Paula; Doe, Ken; Schaefer, Rebecca

    2011-10-01

    Comparative toxicity testing was performed on selected materials that may be used in aquatic construction projects. The tests were conducted on the following materials: (1) untreated wood species (hemlock [Tsuga ssp], Western red cedar (Thuja plicata), red oak [Quercus rubra], Douglas fir [Pseudotsuga menziesii], red pine [Pinus resinosa], and tamarack [Larix ssp]); (2) plastic wood; (3) Ecothermo wood hemlock stakes treated with preservatives (e.g., chromated copper arsenate [CCA], creosote, alkaline copper quaternary [ACQ], zinc naphthenate, copper naphthenate, and Lifetime Wood Treatment); (4) epoxy-coated steel; (5) hot-rolled steel; (6) zinc-coated steel; and (7) concrete. Those materials were used in acute lethality tests with rainbow trout, Daphnia magna, Vibrio fischeri and threespine stickleback. The results indicated the following general ranking of the materials (from the lowest to highest LC(50) values); ACQ > creosote > zinc naphthenate > copper naphthenate > CCA (treated at 22.4 kg/m(3)) > concrete > red pine > western red cedar > red oak > zinc-coated steel > epoxy-coated steel > CCA (6.4 kg/m(3)). Furthermore, the toxicity results indicated that plastic wood, certain untreated wood species (hemlock, tamarack, Douglas fir, and red oak), hot-rolled steel, Ecothermo wood, and wood treated with Lifetime Wood Treatment were generally nontoxic to the test species.

  10. Integration of Density Dependence and Concentration Response Models Provides an Ecologically Relevant Assessment of Populations Exposed to Toxicants

    EPA Science Inventory

    The assessment of toxic exposure on wildlife populations involves the integration of organism level effects measured in toxicity tests (e.g., chronic life cycle) and population models. These modeling exercises typically ignore density dependence, primarily because information on ...

  11. Assessing the pulmonary toxicity of single-walled carbon nanohorns

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, Rachel M; Voy, Brynn H; Glass-Mattie, Dana F; Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Saxton, Arnold; Donnel, Robert L.; Cheng, Mengdawn

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) may be pose a pulmonary hazard. We investigated the pulmonary toxicity of single-walled carbon nanohorns (SWCNHs), a relatively new carbon-based nanomaterial that is structurally similar to SWCNTs. Mice were exposed to 30 g of surfactant-suspended SWCNHs by pharyngeal aspiration and sacrificed 24 hours or 7 days post exposure. Total and differential cell counts and cytokine analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid demonstrated a mild inflammatory response which was mitigated by day 7 post exposure. Whole lung microarray analysis demonstrated that SWCNH-exposure did not lead to robust changes in gene expression. Finally, histological analysis showed no evidence of granuloma formation or fibrosis following SWCNH aspiration. These combined results suggest that SWCNH is a relatively innocuous nanomaterial when delivered to mice in vivo using aspiration as a delivery mechanism.

  12. Assessing the pulmonary toxicity of single-walled carbon nanohorns

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, Rachel M; Voy, Brynn H; Glass-Mattie, Dana F; Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Saxton, Arnold; Donnel, Robert L.; Cheng, Mengdawn

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) may pose a pulmonary hazard. We investigated the pulmonary toxicity of single-walled carbon nanohorns (SWCNHs), a relatively new carbon-based nanomaterial that is structurally similar to SWCNTs. Mice were exposed to 30 {micro}g of surfactant-suspended SWCNHs or an equal volume of vehicle control by pharyngeal aspiration and sacrificed 24 hours or 7 days post-exposure. Total and differential cell counts and cytokine analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid demonstrated a mild inflammatory response which was mitigated by day 7 post-exposure. Whole lung microarray analysis demonstrated that SWCNH-exposure did not lead to robust changes in gene expression. Finally, histological analysis showed no evidence of granuloma formation or fibrosis following SWCNH aspiration. These combined results suggest that SWCNH is a relatively innocuous nanomaterial when delivered to mice in vivo using aspiration as a delivery mechanism.

  13. Azadirachtin, a neem biopesticide: subchronic toxicity assessment in rats.

    PubMed

    Raizada, R B; Srivastava, M K; Kaushal, R A; Singh, R P

    2001-05-01

    Azadirachtin, a biopesticide obtained from neem, was subjected to subchronic toxicological testing to document its safety for use as a pesticide. Azadirachtin technical 12% orally administered to male and female rats at doses of 500, 1000 and 1500 mg/kg/day for 90 days did not produce any signs of toxicity, mortality, changes in tissue weight, pathology and serum and blood parameters. It can be suggested that azadirachtin at the highest dose tested is well tolerated by rats of both sexes. The highest dose, 1500 mg/kg, can be used as a basal dose for the determination of the no-observed-effect level (NOEL) of azadirachtin to calculate its safety margin. PMID:11313114

  14. Toxic substances form coal combustion--a co prehemsice assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Huggins, F.; Huffman, G.P.; Shah, N.

    1997-04-01

    The Clean Coal Act Amendments of 1990 identify a number of hazardous air pollutants as candidates for regulation. Should regulations be imposed on emission of these pollutants from coal-fired power plants, a sound understanding of the fundamental principles controlling their formation and partition will be needed. A new Toxics Partitioning Engineering Model (ToPEM) has been developed by a broad consortium to be useful to regulators and utility planners. During the last quarter coal analysis was completed on the final program coal, from the Wyodak Seam of the Powder River Basin, Combustion testing continued, including data collected on the self-sustained combustor. Efforts were directed to identify the governing mechanisms for trace element vaporization from the program coals. Mercury speciation and measurements were continued. Review of the existing trace element and organics emission literature was completed. And, model development was begun.

  15. Assessment of toxic metals in waste personal computers

    SciTech Connect

    Kolias, Konstantinos; Hahladakis, John N. Gidarakos, Evangelos

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • Waste personal computers were collected and dismantled in their main parts. • Motherboards, monitors and plastic housing were examined in their metal content. • Concentrations measured were compared to the RoHS Directive, 2002/95/EC. • Pb in motherboards and funnel glass of devices released <2006 was above the limit. • Waste personal computers need to be recycled and environmentally sound managed. - Abstract: Considering the enormous production of waste personal computers nowadays, it is obvious that the study of their composition is necessary in order to regulate their management and prevent any environmental contamination caused by their inappropriate disposal. This study aimed at determining the toxic metals content of motherboards (printed circuit boards), monitor glass and monitor plastic housing of two Cathode Ray Tube (CRT) monitors, three Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) monitors, one LCD touch screen monitor and six motherboards, all of which were discarded. In addition, concentrations of chromium (Cr), cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb) and mercury (Hg) were compared with the respective limits set by the RoHS 2002/95/EC Directive, that was recently renewed by the 2012/19/EU recast, in order to verify manufacturers’ compliance with the regulation. The research included disassembly, pulverization, digestion and chemical analyses of all the aforementioned devices. The toxic metals content of all samples was determined using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS). The results demonstrated that concentrations of Pb in motherboards and funnel glass of devices with release dates before 2006, that is when the RoHS Directive came into force, exceeded the permissible limit. In general, except from Pb, higher metal concentrations were detected in motherboards in comparison with plastic housing and glass samples. Finally, the results of this work were encouraging, since concentrations of metals referred in the RoHS Directive were found in

  16. APPLICATION OF A TIERED SURROGATE APPROACH TO IDENTIFY TOXICITY SURROGATES FOR HUMAN HEALTH RISK ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    APPLICATION OF A TIERED SURROGATE APPROACH TO IDENTIFY TOXICITY SURROGATES FOR HUMAN HEALTH RISK ASSESSMENT. P.R. Dodmane1, L.E. Lizarraga1, J.P. Kaiser2, S.C. Wesselkamper2, Q.J. Zhao2. 1ORISE Participant, U.S. EPA, National Center for Environmental Assessment (NCEA), Cincinnati...

  17. A REGIONAL SCALE TOXICITY ASSESSMENT OF SEDIMENT IN THE MID-ATLANTIC AND SOUTHERN ROCKIES, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of the Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP), sediment samples were collected to assess toxicity on a regional scale in streams and rivers in the Mid-Atlantic U.S. in 1994, 1997 and 1998, and in the Colorado Rocky Mountains in 1994 and 1995. Sample sites...

  18. Assessment of Supercritical Fluid Extraction Use in Whole Sediment Toxicity Identification Evaluations

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this investigation, supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) with pure CO2 was assessed as a confirmatory tool in Phase III of whole sediment toxicity identification evaluations (TIEs). The SFE procedure was assessed on two reference sediments and three contaminated sediments usi...

  19. Assessment of Jatropha curcas L. biodiesel seed cake toxicity using the zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo toxicity (ZFET) test.

    PubMed

    Hallare, Arnold V; Ruiz, Paulo Lorenzo S; Cariño, J C Earl D

    2014-05-01

    Consequent to the growing demand for alternative sources of energy, the seeds from Jatropha curcas remain to be the favorite for biodiesel production. However, a significant volume of the residual organic mass (seed cake) is produced during the extraction process, which raises concerns on safe waste disposal. In the present study, we assessed the toxicity of J. curcas seed cake using the zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryotoxicity test. Within 1-h post-fertilization (hpf), the fertilized eggs were exposed to five mass concentrations of J. curcas seed cake and were followed through 24, 48, and 72 hpf. Toxicity was evaluated based on lethal endpoints induced on zebrafish embryos namely egg coagulation, non-formation of somites, and non-detachment of tail. The lowest concentration tested, 1 g/L, was not able to elicit toxicity on embryos whereas 100 % mortality (based also on lethal endpoints) was recorded at the highest concentration at 2.15 g/L. The computed LC50 for the J. curcas seed cake was 1.61 g/L. No further increase in mortality was observed in the succeeding time points (48 and 72 hpf) indicating that J. curcas seed cake exerted acute toxicity on zebrafish embryos. Sublethal endpoints (yolk sac and pericardial edema) were noted at 72 hpf in zebrafish embryos exposed to higher concentrations. The observed lethal endpoints induced on zebrafish embryos were discussed in relation to the active principles, notably, phorbol esters that have remained in the seed cake even after extraction.

  20. Development of a Fully Automated Flow Injection Analyzer Implementing Bioluminescent Biosensors for Water Toxicity Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Komaitis, Efstratios; Vasiliou, Efstathios; Kremmydas, Gerasimos; Georgakopoulos, Dimitrios G.; Georgiou, Constantinos

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the development of an automated Flow Injection analyzer for water toxicity assessment. The analyzer is validated by assessing the toxicity of heavy metal (Pb2+, Hg2+ and Cu2+) solutions. One hundred μL of a Vibrio fischeri suspension are injected in a carrier solution containing different heavy metal concentrations. Biosensor cells are mixed with the toxic carrier solution in the mixing coil on the way to the detector. Response registered is % inhibition of biosensor bioluminescence due to heavy metal toxicity in comparison to that resulting by injecting the Vibrio fischeri suspension in deionised water. Carrier solutions of mercury showed higher toxicity than the other heavy metals, whereas all metals show concentration related levels of toxicity. The biosensor’s response to carrier solutions of different pHs was tested. Vibrio fischeri’s bioluminescence is promoted in the pH 5–10 range. Experiments indicate that the whole cell biosensor, as applied in the automated fluidic system, responds to various toxic solutions. PMID:22163592

  1. Development of a fully automated Flow Injection analyzer implementing bioluminescent biosensors for water toxicity assessment.

    PubMed

    Komaitis, Efstratios; Vasiliou, Efstathios; Kremmydas, Gerasimos; Georgakopoulos, Dimitrios G; Georgiou, Constantinos

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the development of an automated Flow Injection analyzer for water toxicity assessment. The analyzer is validated by assessing the toxicity of heavy metal (Pb(2+), Hg(2+) and Cu(2+)) solutions. One hundred μL of a Vibrio fischeri suspension are injected in a carrier solution containing different heavy metal concentrations. Biosensor cells are mixed with the toxic carrier solution in the mixing coil on the way to the detector. Response registered is % inhibition of biosensor bioluminescence due to heavy metal toxicity in comparison to that resulting by injecting the Vibrio fischeri suspension in deionised water. Carrier solutions of mercury showed higher toxicity than the other heavy metals, whereas all metals show concentration related levels of toxicity. The biosensor's response to carrier solutions of different pHs was tested. Vibrio fischeri's bioluminescence is promoted in the pH 5-10 range. Experiments indicate that the whole cell biosensor, as applied in the automated fluidic system, responds to various toxic solutions. PMID:22163592

  2. Application of simple and low-cost toxicity tests for ecotoxicological assessment of industrial wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Mehmet Emin; Aydin, Senar; Tongur, Süheyla; Kara, Gülnihal; Kolb, Marit; Bahadir, Müfit

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify and to apply appropriate biotests having the advantages of being highly sensitive, easy to run, relatively inexpensive and able to substitute fish toxicity tests due to ethical reasons of animal welfare. To perform an ecotoxicological assessment of industrial wastewaters, different microbiotests were conducted to substitute the fish toxicity test with Lebistes reticulatus through Vibrio fischeri, Thamnocephalus platyurus, Daphnia magna, Lemna minor and Lepidium sativum representing different trophic levels in the aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. Also, Algaltox F(TM) with Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and Protox F(TM) with Tetrahymena thermophila tests were carried out. However, they could not be applied successfully for the wastewater samples. Wastewater samples from seven different industrial zones comprising different industries were subjected to characterization through measuring their physical-chemical parameters and their toxicity versus the above-mentioned organisms. T. platyurus, D. magna and L. reticulatus were the most sensitive test organisms investigated for the wastewaters. Considering toxic unit values, generally wastewater samples were toxic according to Thamnotox F(TM), Daphtox F(TM) and fish toxicity tests. As an important outcome, it was concluded that Daphtox F(TM) and Thamnotox F(TM) could be a good alternative for the fish toxicity test, which is so far the sole toxicity test accepted by the Turkish Water Pollution Control Regulation. PMID:25951939

  3. Assessing BMP Performance Using Microtox Toxicity Analysis - Rhode Island

    EPA Science Inventory

    Best Management Practices (BMPs) have been shown to be effective in reducing runoff and pollutants from urban areas and thus provide a mechanism to improve downstream water quality. Currently, BMP performance regarding water quality improvement is assessed through measuring each...

  4. Assessing BMP Performance Using Microtox® Toxicity Analysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Best Management Practices (BMPs) have been shown to be effective in reducing runoff and pollutants from urban areas and thus provide a mechanism to improve downstream water quality. Currently, BMP performance regarding water quality improvement is assessed through measuring each...

  5. Toxic substances from coal combustion -- A comprehensive assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Senior, C.L.; Panagiotou, T.; Huggins, F.E.; Huffman, G.P.; Yap, N.; Wendt, J.O.L.; Seames, W.; Ames, M.R.; Sarofim, A.F.; Lighty, J.; Kolker, A.; Finkelman, R.; Palmer, C.A.; Mroczkowsky, S.J.; Helble, J.J.; Mamani-Paco, R.

    1999-07-30

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 identify a number of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) as candidates for regulation. Should regulations be imposed on HAP emissions from coal-fired power plants, a sound understanding of the fundamental principles controlling the formation and partitioning of toxic species during coal combustion will be needed. With support from the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC), the Electric Power Research Institute, and VTT (Finland), Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) has teamed with researchers from USGS, MIT, the University of Arizona (UA), the University of Kentucky (UK), the University of Connecticut (UC), the University of Utah (UU) and the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) to develop a broadly applicable emissions model useful to regulators and utility planners. The new Toxics Partitioning Engineering Model (ToPEM) will be applicable to all combustion conditions including new fuels and coal blends, low-NOx combustion systems, and new power generation plants. Development of ToPEM will be based on PSI's existing Engineering Model for Ash Formation (EMAF). This report covers the period from 1 April 1999 to 30 June 1999. During this quarter low temperature ashing and elemental analysis of the three Phase II coals were completed. Results from MIT and USGS are comparable. Plans were made for measurements of loss of trace elements during devolatilization and for single particle combustion studies at the University of Utah. The iodated charcoal trap was tested on coal combustion flue gas and was shown to collect both Hg and Se in from the vapor phase with 100% efficiency. Data from the University of Arizona self-sustained combustor were analyzed from the combustion of three coals: Ohio, Wyodak and Illinois No. 6. Ash size distributions and enrichment factors for selected trace elements were calculated. The correlation between the concentration of the more volatile trace elements in the ash and the

  6. Multifaceted toxicity assessment of catalyst composites in transgenic zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Jang, Gun Hyuk; Lee, Keon Yong; Choi, Jaewon; Kim, Sang Hoon; Lee, Kwan Hyi

    2016-09-01

    Recent development in the field of nanomaterials has given rise into the inquiries regarding the toxicological characteristics of the nanomaterials. While many individual nanomaterials have been screened for their toxicological effects, composites that accompany nanomaterials are not common subjects to such screening through toxicological assessment. One of the widely used composites that accompany nanomaterials is catalyst composite used to reduce air pollution, which was selected as a target composite with nanomaterials for the multifaceted toxicological assessment. As existing studies did not possess any significant data regarding such catalyst composites, this study focuses on investigating toxicological characteristics of catalyst composites from various angles in both in-vitro and in-vivo settings. Initial toxicological assessment on catalyst composites was conducted using HUVECs for cell viability assays, and subsequent in-vivo assay regarding their direct influence on living organisms was done. The zebrafish embryo and its transgenic lines were used in the in-vivo assays to obtain multifaceted analytic results. Data obtained from the in-vivo assays include blood vessel formation, mutated heart morphology, and heart functionality change. Our multifaceted toxicological assessment pointed out that chemical composites augmented with nanomaterials can too have toxicological threat as much as individual nanomaterials do and alarms us with their danger. This manuscript provides a multifaceted assessment for composites augmented with nanomaterials, of which their toxicological threats have been overlooked. PMID:27364464

  7. Multifaceted toxicity assessment of catalyst composites in transgenic zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Jang, Gun Hyuk; Lee, Keon Yong; Choi, Jaewon; Kim, Sang Hoon; Lee, Kwan Hyi

    2016-09-01

    Recent development in the field of nanomaterials has given rise into the inquiries regarding the toxicological characteristics of the nanomaterials. While many individual nanomaterials have been screened for their toxicological effects, composites that accompany nanomaterials are not common subjects to such screening through toxicological assessment. One of the widely used composites that accompany nanomaterials is catalyst composite used to reduce air pollution, which was selected as a target composite with nanomaterials for the multifaceted toxicological assessment. As existing studies did not possess any significant data regarding such catalyst composites, this study focuses on investigating toxicological characteristics of catalyst composites from various angles in both in-vitro and in-vivo settings. Initial toxicological assessment on catalyst composites was conducted using HUVECs for cell viability assays, and subsequent in-vivo assay regarding their direct influence on living organisms was done. The zebrafish embryo and its transgenic lines were used in the in-vivo assays to obtain multifaceted analytic results. Data obtained from the in-vivo assays include blood vessel formation, mutated heart morphology, and heart functionality change. Our multifaceted toxicological assessment pointed out that chemical composites augmented with nanomaterials can too have toxicological threat as much as individual nanomaterials do and alarms us with their danger. This manuscript provides a multifaceted assessment for composites augmented with nanomaterials, of which their toxicological threats have been overlooked.

  8. General considerations in ocular toxicity risk assessment from the toxicologists' viewpoints.

    PubMed

    Onodera, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Shoji; Otake, Seiji; Tomohiro, Masayuki; Shibuya, Kazumoto; Nomura, Mamoru

    2015-06-01

    Humans commonly obtain approximately 80% of external information from vision. Since loss of vision markedly decreases quality of life, risk assessments for visual toxicity of new drugs are extremely important. However, the ICH S4 guideline for nonclinical toxicity study of new drugs only indicates a brief instruction for ophthalmologic examinations, and submitted data for drug approval according only to this guideline are not always considered sufficient in light of ocular toxicity risk assessments. The eye is an assembly of many specialized sub-organs which have specific functions, and its integral maintenance of homeostasis plays an important role of visual function. When only a part of integrity of functions is lost, overall function of the eye might be commonly disturbed. Therefore, understanding of anatomy and physiology of these sub-organs may help know mechanisms of observed ocular changes. In ophthalmologic examinations in nonclinical toxicity studies, it is vital to understand the principles and features of each examination. Comparisons of findings between pre and post drug treatment as well as considerations of species differences, strain differences, age differences, and location/degree of abnormalities are essential. In addition, many kinds of spontaneous ocular findings are well known in experimental animals. To differentiate treatment-related changes from spontaneous findings, mastering basic skills for ophthalmologic examinations and taking advantage of collection of background data are necessary. For ocular toxicity risk assessments, while an evaluation of "sight-threatening" effects is most critical matter, "quality of vision" related findings also should be considered. To extrapolate animal data to human, clinical significances of ocular toxicity findings should be evaluated based on considerations for "species differences", "safety margins", "reversibility", and "risk-benefit balance". In addition, a detailed recording of features of lesions is

  9. General considerations in ocular toxicity risk assessment from the toxicologists' viewpoints.

    PubMed

    Onodera, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Shoji; Otake, Seiji; Tomohiro, Masayuki; Shibuya, Kazumoto; Nomura, Mamoru

    2015-06-01

    Humans commonly obtain approximately 80% of external information from vision. Since loss of vision markedly decreases quality of life, risk assessments for visual toxicity of new drugs are extremely important. However, the ICH S4 guideline for nonclinical toxicity study of new drugs only indicates a brief instruction for ophthalmologic examinations, and submitted data for drug approval according only to this guideline are not always considered sufficient in light of ocular toxicity risk assessments. The eye is an assembly of many specialized sub-organs which have specific functions, and its integral maintenance of homeostasis plays an important role of visual function. When only a part of integrity of functions is lost, overall function of the eye might be commonly disturbed. Therefore, understanding of anatomy and physiology of these sub-organs may help know mechanisms of observed ocular changes. In ophthalmologic examinations in nonclinical toxicity studies, it is vital to understand the principles and features of each examination. Comparisons of findings between pre and post drug treatment as well as considerations of species differences, strain differences, age differences, and location/degree of abnormalities are essential. In addition, many kinds of spontaneous ocular findings are well known in experimental animals. To differentiate treatment-related changes from spontaneous findings, mastering basic skills for ophthalmologic examinations and taking advantage of collection of background data are necessary. For ocular toxicity risk assessments, while an evaluation of "sight-threatening" effects is most critical matter, "quality of vision" related findings also should be considered. To extrapolate animal data to human, clinical significances of ocular toxicity findings should be evaluated based on considerations for "species differences", "safety margins", "reversibility", and "risk-benefit balance". In addition, a detailed recording of features of lesions is

  10. Genotoxicity and toxicity assessment in urban hydrographic basins.

    PubMed

    Cardozo, Tatiane Rocha; Rosa, Danielle Pereira; Feiden, Ilda Rosa; Rocha, Jocelita Aparecida Vaz; de Oliveira, Nânci Cristina D'Avila; da Silva Pereira, Tatiana; Pastoriza, Thienne Flores; da Motta Marques, David; de Lemos, Clarice Torres; Terra, Nara Regina; Vargas, Vera Maria Ferrão

    2006-01-31

    The genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of water in small urban basins was evaluated by the Salmonella/microsome assay and micronucleus test in V79 cells. The results showed that the cytotoxic effect was the most significant response in areas with medium to heavy urban occupation for both assays evaluated. Water samples from these areas include different concentrations of chloroform, bromodichloromethane, toluene, ethylbenzene, m,p-xylene and 1,4-dichlorobenzene. As to genotoxic damage, the presence of mainly direct-acting frameshift mutagens was detected in areas with less urban concentration and showed genotoxic activity in V79 cells in more heavily urbanized areas. Water organic extracts, evaluated using a microsuspension procedure, showed frameshift mutagenic activity in the presence of hepatic metabolization that increased as the population density grow. Chronic toxicity studies of sediment samples with the microcrustacean Daphnia magna showed that, while survival was not highly affected, reproductive inhibition was found in 92% of the observations. A retrospective diagnosis of water quality using traditional physicochemical parameters that defined the differential contribution of urban wastes at the three sites was associated with the biological assays. It became clear that the biological assays were of significant benefit in the diagnosis of risks of contamination of hydrographic basins by pollutants from urban non-point sources. PMID:16413222

  11. Toxicity of Lunar Dust in Lungs Assessed by Examining Biomarkers in Exposed Mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, C.-W.; James, J. T.; Zeidler-Erdely, P. C.; Castranova, V.; Young, S. H.; Quan, C. L.; Khan-Mayberry, N.; Taylor, L. A.

    2009-01-01

    NASA plans to build an outpost on the Moon for prolonged human habitation and research. The lunar surface is covered by a layer of soil, of which the finest portion is highly reactive dust. NASA has invited NIOSH to collaboratively investigate the toxicity of lunar dust. Dust samples of respirable sizes were aerodynamically isolated from two lunar soil samples of different maturities (cosmic exposure ages) collected during the Apollo 16 mission. The lunar dust samples, titanium dioxide, or quartz, suspended in normal saline or in Survanta (a bovine lung surfactant), were given to groups of 5 mice (C-57 male) by intrapharyngeal aspiration at 1, 0.3, or 0.1 mg/mouse. The mice were euthanized 7 or 30 days later, and their lungs were lavaged to assess the toxicity biomarkers in bronchioalveolar lavage fluids. The acellular fractions were assayed for total proteins, lactate dehydrogenase activities, and cytokines; the cellular portions were assessed for total cell counts and cell differentials. Results from the high-dose groups showed that lunar dust, suspended in saline, was more toxic than TiO 2, but less toxic than quartz. Lunar dust particles aggregate and settle out rapidly in water or saline, but not in Survanta. Lunar dust suspended in Survanta manifested greater toxicity than lunar dust in saline. The increase in toxicity presumably was due to that Survanta gave a better particle dispersion in the lungs. The two lunar dust samples showed similar toxicity. The overall results showed that lunar dust is more toxic than TiO 2 but less toxic than quartz.

  12. Model ecosystems with random nonlinear interspecies interactions.

    PubMed

    Santos, Danielle O C; Fontanari, José F

    2004-12-01

    The principle of competitive exclusion in ecology establishes that two species living together cannot occupy the same ecological niche. Here we present a model ecosystem in which the species are described by a series of phenotypic characters and the strength of the competition between two species is given by a nondecreasing (modulating) function of the number of common characters. Using analytical tools of statistical mechanics we find that the ecosystem diversity, defined as the fraction of species that coexist at equilibrium, decreases as the complexity (i.e., number of characters) of the species increases, regardless of the modulating function. By considering both selective and random elimination of the links in the community web, we show that ecosystems composed of simple species are more robust than those composed of complex species. In addition, we show that the puzzling result that there exists either rich or poor ecosystems for a linear modulating function is not typical of communities in which the interspecies interactions are determined by a complementarity rule.

  13. Extrapolating between toxicity endpoints of metal oxide nanoparticles: Predicting toxicity to Escherichia coli and human keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT) with Nano-QTTR.

    PubMed

    Kar, Supratik; Gajewicz, Agnieszka; Roy, Kunal; Leszczynski, Jerzy; Puzyn, Tomasz

    2016-04-01

    Synthesis of novel nanoparticles should always be accompanied by a comprehensive assessment of risk to human health and to ecosystem. Application of in silico models is encouraged by regulatory authorities to fill the data gaps related to the properties of nanoparticles affecting the environment and human health. Interspecies toxicity correlations provide a tool for estimation of contaminant's sensitivity with known levels of uncertainty for a diverse pool of species. We propose here first interspecies cytotoxicity correlation models between Escherichia coli (prokaryotic system) and human keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT) (eukaryotic system) to assess the discriminatory features for cytotoxicity of metal oxide nanoparticles. The nano-QTTR models can be employed for extrapolating cytotoxicity to E. coli and human keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT) for metal nanoparticles when the data for the other species are available. Informative illustrations of the contributing mechanisms of toxic action of the metal oxide nanoparticles to the HaCaT cell line as well as to the E. coli are identified from the developed nano quantitative toxicity-toxicity relationship (nano-QTTR) models.

  14. Development of a groundwater fungal strain as a tool for toxicity assessment.

    PubMed

    Lategan, Maria Josie; Hose, Grant C

    2014-12-01

    Despite the significant ecological role played by fungi in groundwater, their value as indicators of groundwater pollution is not known, as fungi are notoriously challenging to assess for toxicity because of their varied morphological components, in particular their filamentous structures. Hence they are rarely used in environmental risk assessments and monitoring programs for aquatic systems. A rapid, low cost, 1-step static toxicity test targeting the hyphal components of fungi was developed that subsequently demonstrated the sensitivity of a ubiquitous and dominant groundwater fungal strain to metal contaminants. The strain demonstrates sensitivity to chromium > copper > zinc and relative resistance to arsenic. The introduction of a novel group of groundwater microorganisms--the fungi-for toxicity evaluation will strengthen current risk assessment programs for these ecosystems.

  15. Assessing acute toxicities of pre- and post-treatment industrial wastewaters with Hydra attenuata: A comparative study of acute toxicity with the fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, L.J.; Staples, R.E.; Stahl, R.G. Jr. . Haskell Lab. for Toxicology and Industrial Medicine)

    1994-04-01

    This study was undertaken to (a) determine wastewater treatment effectiveness using two freshwater organisms, (b) compare acute toxicity results from the two species exposed to the wastewaters, and (c) link acute and potential developmental toxicity of wastewaters in one organism. The acute toxicities of several pretreatment and post-treatment industrial waste-water samples wee evaluated with adult Hydra attenuata and fathead minnows. The acute LC50s agreed closely when results in Hydra attenuata were compared with those from fathead minnow tests. Acute LC50s ranged from 3 to >100% of samples with hydra, and from 1.0 to >100% of sample with fathead minnows. The results provided strong evidence of treatment effectiveness because toxicity decreased with progressive stages of treatment. Previously the Hydra Developmental Toxicity Assay was used as a prescreen mainly for in vitro assessment of developmental toxicity with pure compounds and to prioritized toxicants according to selective toxicity to the developing embryo. Recently the authors modified the assay for testing natural waters and wastewaters; hence, some of the wastewater samples also were tested for their developmental toxicity. In this case, the relative selective toxicity of these wastewater samples ranged from 0.7 to 2.1, indicating that no sample was uniquely toxic to the developing embryo, although acute toxicity was manifested. Overall, their results indicate the Hydra Assay functions appropriately in assessments of acute and developmental toxicity of industrial wastewaters and may be a simple and useful tool in a battery of tests for broader scale detection of environmental hazards.

  16. The assessment of sewage sludge gasification by-products toxicity by ecotoxicologial test.

    PubMed

    Werle, Sebastian; Dudziak, Mariusz

    2015-08-01

    The process of gasification of sewage sludge generates by-products, which may be contaminated with toxic and hazardous substances, both organic and inorganic. It is therefore important to assess the environmental risk associated with this type of waste. The feasibility of using an ecotoxicological tests for this purpose was determined in the presented study. The applied tests contained indicator organisms belonging to various biological groups (bacteria, crustaceans, plants). The subject of the study were solid (ash, char) and liquid (tar) by-products generated during gasification (in a fixed bed reactor) of dried sewage sludge from various wastewater treatment systems. The tested samples were classified based on their toxic effect. The sensitivity of the indicator organisms to the tested material was determined. In-house procedures for the preparation for toxicity analysis of both sewage sludge and by-products generated during the gasification were presented. The scope of work also included the determination of the effect of selected process parameters (temperature, amount of gasifying agent) on the toxicity of gasification by-products depending on the sewage sludge source. It was shown that both the type of sewage sludge and the parameters of the gasification process affects the toxicity of the by-products of gasification. However, the results of toxicity studies also depend on the type of ecotoxicological test used, which is associated with a different sensitivity of the indicator organisms. Nevertheless, it may be concluded that the by-products formed during the gasification of the low toxicity sewage sludge can be regarded as non-toxic or low toxic. However, the results analysis of the gasification of the toxic sludge were not conclusive, which leads to further research needs in this area. PMID:25827844

  17. The assessment of sewage sludge gasification by-products toxicity by ecotoxicologial test.

    PubMed

    Werle, Sebastian; Dudziak, Mariusz

    2015-08-01

    The process of gasification of sewage sludge generates by-products, which may be contaminated with toxic and hazardous substances, both organic and inorganic. It is therefore important to assess the environmental risk associated with this type of waste. The feasibility of using an ecotoxicological tests for this purpose was determined in the presented study. The applied tests contained indicator organisms belonging to various biological groups (bacteria, crustaceans, plants). The subject of the study were solid (ash, char) and liquid (tar) by-products generated during gasification (in a fixed bed reactor) of dried sewage sludge from various wastewater treatment systems. The tested samples were classified based on their toxic effect. The sensitivity of the indicator organisms to the tested material was determined. In-house procedures for the preparation for toxicity analysis of both sewage sludge and by-products generated during the gasification were presented. The scope of work also included the determination of the effect of selected process parameters (temperature, amount of gasifying agent) on the toxicity of gasification by-products depending on the sewage sludge source. It was shown that both the type of sewage sludge and the parameters of the gasification process affects the toxicity of the by-products of gasification. However, the results of toxicity studies also depend on the type of ecotoxicological test used, which is associated with a different sensitivity of the indicator organisms. Nevertheless, it may be concluded that the by-products formed during the gasification of the low toxicity sewage sludge can be regarded as non-toxic or low toxic. However, the results analysis of the gasification of the toxic sludge were not conclusive, which leads to further research needs in this area.

  18. Toxic substances from coal combustion -- A comprehensive assessment

    SciTech Connect

    C.L. Senior; T. Panagiotou; F.E. Huggins; G.P. Huffman; N. Yap; J.O.L. Wendt; W. Seames; M.R. Ames; A.F Sarofim; J. Lighty; A. Kolker; R. Finkelman; C.A. Palmer; S.J. Mroczkowsky; J.J. Helble; R. Mamani-Paco

    1999-11-01

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 identify a number of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) as candidates for regulation. Should regulations be imposed on HAP emissions from coal-fired power plants, a sound understanding of the fundamental principles controlling the formation and partitioning of toxic species during coal combustion will be needed. With support from the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC), the Electric Power Research Institute, and VTT (Finland), Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) has teamed with researchers from USGS, MIT, the University of Arizona (UA), the University of Kentucky (UK), the University of Connecticut (UC), the University of Utah (UU) and the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) to develop a broadly applicable emissions model useful to regulators and utility planners. The new Toxics Partitioning Engineering Model (ToPEM) will be applicable to all combustion conditions including new fuels and coal blends, low-NOx combustion systems, and new power generation plants. Development of ToPEM will be based on PSI's existing Engineering Model for Ash Formation (EMAF). This report covers the reporting period from 1 July 1999 to 30 September 1999. During this period the MIT INAA procedures were revised to improve the quality of the analytical results. Two steps have been taken to reduce the analytical errors. A new nitric acid leaching procedure, modified from ASTM procedure D2492, section 7.3.1 for determination of pyritic sulfur, was developed by USGS and validated. To date, analytical results have been returned for all but the last complete round of the four-step leaching procedure. USGS analysts in Denver have halted development of the cold vapor atomic fluorescence technique for mercury analysis procedure in favor of a new direct analyzer for Hg that the USGS is in the process of acquiring. Since early June, emphasis at USGS has been placed on microanalysis of clay minerals in project coals in preparation

  19. Assessing the aquatic hazard of some branched and linear nonionic surfactants by biodegradation and toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Dorn, P.B.; Salanitro, J.P.; Evans, S.H.; Kravetz, L. . Westhollow Research Center)

    1993-10-01

    An aquatic hazard assessment was conducted for branched and linear nonionic surfactants using toxicity and biodegradation measurements. Four nonionic alcohol ethoxylate surfactants with different degrees of branching were evaluated for neat surfactant toxicity, degradation in laboratory sewage treatment units, and aquatic toxicity of treated effluents. Acute testing with neat surfactants showed ranges for EC50s of 1.3 to 11.6 mg/L for Daphnia, 1.6 to 6.1 mg/L for Pimephales promelas (fathead minnow), and 1.5 to 11.4 mg/L for Microtox[reg sign]. Chronic testing of algae showed NOECs of 1 to 10 mg/L and maximum acceptable toxicant concentrations (MATCs) of 0.8 to 14.2 mg/L. Seven-day chronic estimation tests showed MATCs of 0.6 to 41.4 mg/L for Pimephales promelas and 1 to 14 mg/L for Daphnia. Effluents collected from treatment units receiving a 50-mg/L surfactant feed at 25 C showed no acute toxicity to either Daphnia or fathead minnows, with the exception of a unit containing nonylphenol ethoxylate. Chronic effluent toxicity was greatest in effluent from the nonylphenol ethoxylate unit and least in the effluent from the linear alcohol ethoxylate unit. Chronic toxicity of the highly branched C[sub 13] alcohol ethoxylate effluent was greater than that for the linear alcohol ethoxylate unit effluent.

  20. Dioxin risk assessment: mechanisms of action and possible toxicity in human health.

    PubMed

    Tavakoly Sany, Seyedeh Belin; Hashim, Rosli; Salleh, Aishah; Rezayi, Majid; Karlen, David J; Razavizadeh, Bi Bi Marzieh; Abouzari-Lotf, Ebrahim

    2015-12-01

    Dioxin-like compounds (DLCs) have been classified by the World Health Organization (WHO) as one of the most persistent toxic chemical substances in the environment, and they are associated with several occupational activities and industrial accidents around the world. Since the end of the 1970s, these toxic chemicals have been banned because of their human toxicity potential, long half-life, wide dispersion, and they bioaccumulate in the food web. This review serves as a primer for environmental health professionals to provide guidance on short-term risk assessment of dioxin and to identify key findings for health and exposure assessment based on policies of different agencies. It also presents possible health effects of dioxins, mechanisms of action, toxic equivalency factors (TEFs), and dose-response characterization. Key studies related to toxicity values of dioxin-like compounds and their possible human health risk were identified through PubMed and supplemented with relevant studies characterized by reviewing the reference lists in the review articles and primary literature. Existing data decreases the scope of analyses and models in relevant studies to a manageable size by focusing on the set of important studies related to the perspective of developing toxicity values of DLCs. PMID:26514567

  1. Aquatic toxicity assessment of esters towards the Daphnia magna through PCA-ANFIS.

    PubMed

    Asadollahi-Baboli, M

    2013-10-01

    The widespread production of esters combined with their ability to migrate in different compartments, makes their environmental toxicity important. In this background, the multivariate image analysis-quantitative structure-toxicity relationship (MIA-QSTR) method coupled to principal component analysis-adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference systems (PCA-ANFIS) was applied to assess the toxicity of esters to Daphnia magna. In MIA-QSTR, pixels of chemical structures (2D images) stand for descriptors, and structural changes account for the variance in toxicities. The ANFIS procedure was capable of correlating the inputs (PCA scores) with the toxicities accurately. The PCA-ANFIS also was statistically validated for its predictive power using cross-validation, applicability domain and Y-scrambling evaluation procedures. The satisfactory results (R p (2) = 0.926, Q LOO (2) = 0.887, R L25%O (2) = 0.843, RMSELOO = 0.320 and RMSEL25%O = 0.379) suggests that the QSTR model could be proposed as an alternative method for aquatic toxicity assessment of esters allowing possible application in the European Union regulation REACH. PMID:23884170

  2. Assessment of combined toxicity of heavy metals from industrial wastewaters on Photobacterium phosphoreum T3S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeb, BibiSaima; Ping, Zheng; Mahmood, Qaisar; Lin, Qiu; Pervez, Arshid; Irshad, Muhammad; Bilal, Muhammad; Bhatti, Zulfiqar Ahmad; Shaheen, Shahida

    2016-02-01

    This research work is focusing on the toxicities of heavy metals of industrial origin to anaerobic digestion of the industrial wastewater. Photobacterium phosphoreum T3S was used as an indicator organism. The acute toxicities of heavy metals on P. phosphoreum T3S were assessed during 15-min half inhibitory concentration (IC50) as indicator at pH 5.5-6. Toxicity assays involved the assessment of multicomponent mixtures using TU and MTI approaches. The results of individual toxicity indicated that the toxicity of Cd, Cu and Pb on P. phosphoreum increased with increasing concentrations and there was a linear correlation. The 15-min IC50 values of Cd, Cu and Pb were 0.537, 1.905 and 1.231 mg/L, respectively, and their toxic order was Cd > Pb > Cu. The combined effects of Cd, Cu and Pb were assayed by equivalent concentration mixing method. The results showed that the combined effects of Cd + Cu, Cd + Pb, Cu + Pb, Cd + Cu + Pb were antagonistic, antagonistic and partly additive. The combined effect of three heavy metals was partly additive.

  3. Assessment of the epigenetic toxicity of a mixture of PAHs before and after biodegradation

    SciTech Connect

    Ghoshal, S.; Upham, B.L.; Rummel, A.M.; Trosko, J.E.; Weber, W.J. Jr.

    1999-07-01

    Subsurface contamination by nonaqueous phase liquids containing various polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are common at many industrial sites. PAHs are known carcinogens and the assessment of the toxicity of such complex chemical mixtures are required for human health-risk analysis models. In addition, the evaluation of the toxicity of residual chemicals that remain after remediation at contaminated sites is important in assessing the efficacy of remediation. In this study, a nonaqueous phase liquid comprised of toluene and eight PAHs was subjected to biodegradation under controlled conditions. The changes in chemical composition caused by biodegradation, and epigenetic toxicity of the residual after biodegradation in comparison to the epigenetic toxicity of the initial mixture have been evaluated. The epigenetic toxicity was determined using an assay of the gap junctional intercellular communication inhibition exhibited in rat liver epithelial cell cultures. The results suggest that some higher molecular weight components of the nonaqueous phase were not eliminated by biodegradation and the qualitative toxicity of the remaining fraction was comparable to the untreated nonaqueous phase liquid.

  4. Toxicity assessment of silica nanoparticles, functionalised silica nanoparticles, and HASE-grafted silica nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Clément, Laura; Zenerino, Arnaud; Hurel, Charlotte; Amigoni, Sonia; Taffin de Givenchy, Elisabeth; Guittard, Frédéric; Marmier, Nicolas

    2013-04-15

    Numerous nanomaterials have recently been developed, and numerous practical applications have been found in water treatment, medicine, cosmetics, and engineering. Associative polymers, such as hydrophobically modified alkali-soluble emulsion (HASE) systems are involved in several applications and have been extensively studied due to their ability to form three-dimensional networked gels. However, the data on the potential environmental effects of this polymers are scarce. The aim of this study is to assess the effect of functionalisation of silica nanoparticles, and coupling of functionalised silica nanoparticles to the associative polymer HASE on their toxicity. Thus, acute and chronic toxicity tests included a modified acute test (72 h) using daphnies, algae, and plants as model organisms. Gradient of toxicity varied with the tested organisms. Our results revealed that the functionalised nanoparticules and NP grafted polymer cause a global decrease in toxicity compared to commercial nanoparticule and HASE polymer. PMID:23474257

  5. A quantitative structure-activity relationship approach for assessing toxicity of mixture of organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Chang, C M; Ou, Y H; Liu, T-C; Lu, S-Y; Wang, M-K

    2016-06-01

    Four types of reactivity indices were employed to construct quantitative structure-activity relationships for the assessment of toxicity of organic chemical mixtures. Results of analysis indicated that the maximum positive charge of the hydrogen atom and the inverse of the apolar surface area are the most important descriptors for the toxicity of mixture of benzene and its derivatives to Vibrio fischeri. The toxicity of mixture of aromatic compounds to green alga Scenedesmus obliquus is mainly affected by the electron flow and electrostatic interactions. The electron-acceptance chemical potential and the maximum positive charge of the hydrogen atom are found to be the most important descriptors for the joint toxicity of aromatic compounds.

  6. TOXIC SUBSTANCES FROM COAL COMBUSTION-A COMPREHENSIVE ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect

    C.L. Senior; F. Huggins; G.P. Huffman; N. Shah; N. Yap; J.O.L. Wendt; W. Seames; M.R. Ames; A.F. Sarofim; S. Swenson; J.S. Lighty; A. Kolker; R. Finkelman; C.A. Palmer; S.J. Mroczkowski; J.J. Helble; R. Mamani-Paco; R. Sterling; G. Dunham; S. Miller

    2001-06-30

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 identify a number of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) as candidates for regulation. Should regulations be imposed on HAP emissions from coal-fired power plants, a sound understanding of the fundamental principles controlling the formation and partitioning of toxic species during coal combustion will be needed. With support from the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), the Electric Power Research Institute, and VTT (Finland), Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) has teamed with researchers from USGS, MIT, the University of Arizona (UA), the University of Kentucky (UK), the University of Connecticut (UC), the University of Utah (UU) and the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) to develop a broadly applicable emissions model useful to regulators and utility planners. The new Toxics Partitioning Engineering Model (ToPEM) will be applicable to all combustion conditions including new fuels and coal blends, low-NOx combustion systems, and new power generation plants. Development of ToPEM will be based on PSI's existing Engineering Model for Ash Formation (EMAF). The work discussed in this report covers the Phase II program. Five coals were studied (three in Phase I and two new ones in Phase II). In this work UK has used XAFS and Moessbauer spectroscopies to characterize elements in project coals. For coals, the principal use was to supply direct information about certain hazardous and other key elements (iron) to complement the more complete indirect investigation of elemental modes of occurrence being carried out by colleagues at USGS. Iterative selective leaching using ammonium acetate, HCl, HF, and HNO3, used in conjunction with mineral identification/quantification, and microanalysis of individual mineral grains, has allowed USGS to delineate modes of occurrence for 44 elements. The Phase II coals show rank-dependent systematic differences in trace-element modes of occurrence. The work at UU

  7. Risk assessment of an abandoned pyrite mine in Spain based on direct toxicity assays.

    PubMed

    García-Gómez, Concepción; Sánchez-Pardo, Beatriz; Esteban, Elvira; Peñalosa, Jesús Manuel; Fernández, María Dolores

    2014-02-01

    This research reports the risk assessment of an abandoned pyrite mine using direct toxicity assays of soil and groundwater samples taken at the site. The toxicity of As and heavy metals from mining soils to soil and aquatic organisms was studied using the Multispecies Soil System (MS-3) in soil columns. Ecotoxicological assessment was performed with soil samples diluted with a control soil at concentrations of 12.5, 25, 50 and 100% test soil/soil (w/w). In this way, changes in the mobility and bioavailability of soil contaminants due to changes in geochemical soil properties via soil dilution were studied. The toxicity of water samples was tested on algae and Daphnia magna. The assessment of the mining area indicated that the current presence of As and heavy metals at the site may cause injuries to soil and aquatic organisms in the entire research area. Moreover, this investigation demonstrated that changes in geochemical conditions can increase the availability of arsenic and, consequently, the environmental risk of these soils. A good correlation was not found between toxicity parameters and the concentrations of soil contaminants based on total and extracted element concentrations. This finding reinforces the usefulness of direct toxicity assays for evaluating environmental risk.

  8. Endangered species toxicity extrapolation using ICE models

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Research Council’s (NRC) report on assessing pesticide risks to threatened and endangered species (T&E) included the recommendation of using interspecies correlation models (ICE) as an alternative to general safety factors for extrapolating across species. ...

  9. Applicability of ambient toxicity testing to national or regional water-quality assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elder, J.F.

    1989-01-01

    Comprehensive assessment of the quality of natural waters requires a multifaceted approach. Based on experimentation designed to monitor responses of organisms to environmental stresses, toxicity testing may have diverse purposes in water quality assessments. These purposes may include identification that warrant further study because of poor water quality or unusual ecological features, verification of other types of monitoring, or assessment of contaminant effects on aquatic communities. A wide variety of toxicity test methods have been developed to fulfill the needs of diverse applications. The methods differ primarily in the full selections made relative to four characteristics: (1) test species, (2) endpoints (acute or chronic), (3) test enclosure type, and (4) test substance (toxicant) that functions as the environmental stress. Toxicity test approachs vary in their capacity to meet the needs of large-scale assessments of existing water quality. Ambient testing is more likely to meet these needs than are the procedures that call for exposure of the test organisms to known concentrations of a single toxicant. However, meaningful interpretation of ambient test results depend on the existence of accompanying chemical analysis of the ambient media. The ambient test substance may be water or sediments. Sediment tests have had limited application, but they are useful because of the fact that most toxicants tend to accumulate in sediments, and many test species either inhabit the sediments or are in frequent contact with them. Biochemical testing methods, which have been developing rapidly in recent years, are likely to be among the most useful procedures for large-scale water quality assessments. They are relatively rapid and simple, and more importantly, they focus on biochemical changes that are the initial responses of virtually all organisms to environmental stimuli. Most species are sensitive to relatively few toxicants and their sensitivities vary as

  10. Behavioural toxicity assessment of silver ions and nanoparticles on zebrafish using a locomotion profiling approach.

    PubMed

    Ašmonaitė, Giedrė; Boyer, Scott; Souza, Karine Bresolin de; Wassmur, Britt; Sturve, Joachim

    2016-04-01

    Zebrafish (Danio rerio) is not only a widely used species in the Fish Embryo Toxicity (FET) test but also an emerging model in behavioural ecotoxicology. By using automatic behaviour tracking technology, locomotion of developing zebrafish (ZF) larvae can be accurately recorded and potentially used in an ecotoxicological context to detect toxicant-induced behavioural alterations. In this study, we explored if and how quantitative locomotion data can be used for sub-lethal toxicity testing within the FET framework. We exposed ZF embryos to silver ions and nanoparticles, which previously have been reported to cause neurodevelopmental toxicity and behavioural retardation in early-life stages of ZF. Exposure to a broad range of silver (Ag(+) and AgNPs) concentrations was conducted, and developmental toxicity was assessed using FET criteria. For behavioural toxicity assessment, locomotion of exposed ZF eleutheroembryos (120hpf) was quantified according to a customised behavioural assay in an automatic video tracking system. A set of repeated episodes of dark/light stimulation were used to artificially stress ZF and evoke photo-motor responses, which were consequently utilized for locomotion profiling. Our locomotion-based behaviour profiling approach consisted of (1) dose-response ranking for multiple and single locomotion variables; (2) quantitative assessment of locomotion structure; and (3) analysis of ZF responsiveness to darkness stimulation. We documented that both silver forms caused adverse effects on development and inhibited hatchability and, most importantly, altered locomotion. High Ag(+) and AgNPs exposures significantly suppressed locomotion and a clear shift in locomotion towards inactivity was reported. Additionally, we noted that low, environmentally relevant Ag(+) concentrations may cause subordinate locomotive changes (hyperactivity) in developing fish. Overall, it was concluded that our locomotion-based behaviour-testing scheme can be used jointly

  11. Coronavirus diversity, phylogeny and interspecies jumping.

    PubMed

    Woo, Patrick C Y; Lau, Susanna K P; Huang, Yi; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2009-10-01

    The SARS epidemic has boosted interest in research on coronavirus biodiversity and genomics. Before 2003, there were only 10 coronaviruses with complete genomes available. After the SARS epidemic, up to December 2008, there was an addition of 16 coronaviruses with complete genomes sequenced. These include two human coronaviruses (human coronavirus NL63 and human coronavirus HKU1), 10 other mammalian coronaviruses [bat SARS coronavirus, bat coronavirus (bat-CoV) HKU2, bat-CoV HKU4, bat-CoV HKU5, bat-CoV HKU8, bat-CoV HKU9, bat-CoV 512/2005, bat-CoV 1A, equine coronavirus, and beluga whale coronavirus] and four avian coronaviruses (turkey coronavirus, bulbul coronavirus HKU11, thrush coronavirus HKU12, and munia coronavirus HKU13). Two novel subgroups in group 2 coronavirus (groups 2c and 2d) and two novel subgroups in group 3 coronavirus (groups 3b and 3c) have been proposed. The diversity of coronaviruses is a result of the infidelity of RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, high frequency of homologous RNA recombination, and the large genomes of coronaviruses. Among all hosts, the diversity of coronaviruses is most evidenced in bats and birds, which may be a result of their species diversity, ability to fly, environmental pressures, and habits of roosting and flocking. The present evidence supports that bat coronaviruses are the gene pools of group 1 and 2 coronaviruses, whereas bird coronaviruses are the gene pools of group 3 coronaviruses. With the increasing number of coronaviruses, more and more closely related coronaviruses from distantly related animals have been observed, which were results of recent interspecies jumping and may be the cause of disastrous outbreaks of zoonotic diseases. PMID:19546349

  12. The intersection of risk assessment and neurobehavioral toxicity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, B.; Elsner, J.; Clarkson, T. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    Neurobehavioral toxicology is now established as a core discipline of the environmental health sciences. Despite its recognized scientific prowess, stemming from its deep roots in psychology and neuroscience and its acknowledged successes, it faces additional demands and challenges. The latter, in fact, are a product of its achievements because success at one level leads to new and higher expectations. Now the discipline is counted upon to provide more definitive and extensive risk assessments than in the past. These new demands are the basis for the appraisals presented in the SGOMSEC 11 workshop. They extend beyond what would be offered in a primer of methodology. Instead, these appraisals are framed as issues into which what are usually construed as methodologies have been embedded.

  13. Physiologic assessment of fetal compromise: biomarkers of toxic exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Longo, L.D.

    1987-10-01

    Understanding the physiologic and endocrinologic basis of fetal development is a major goal of perinatal biology. During the past decade a number of technological developments have allowed more precise evaluation of the fetus in utero and diagnosis of abnormalities. Despite these methodological achievements, however, there are no specific biological markers currently available to indicate that exposure to a given xenobiotic is associated with a cellular, subcellular, or pharmacodynamic event. This paper evaluates the following issues: what are some of the unique physiologic and endocrinologic features of the fetal milieu interieur. What problems are peculiar to fetal assessment. What are some examples of validated biomarkers and their applicability. What promising biomarkers are on the horizon. How may molecular probes be of value as biological markers of fetal compromise. What are some of the major research gaps and needs, and how should research priorities be set. Some of these topics are addressed. Moreover, the more general role(s) that various diagnostic methods and biological markers can have in an understanding of the regulation of fetal growth and differentiation and the role of xenobiotics in affecting the normal course of events are discussed.

  14. Evaluation of the Reference Envelope Approach for Assessing Toxicity in Contaminated Surficial Urban Freshwater Sediments

    EPA Science Inventory

    The reference envelope (RE) has been proposed as an alternative approach to assess sediment toxicity to overcome limitations imposed by the use of control sediments including differences in non-contaminant characteristics and low statistical power when many test sediments are com...

  15. Toxicity assessment of Titanium Dioxide and Cerium Oxide nanoparticles in Arabidopsis thaliana L.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The production and applications of nanoparticles (NP) in diverse fields has steadily increased in recent decades; however, knowledge about risks of NP to human health and ecosystems is still scarce. In this study, we assessed potential toxicity of two commercially used engineere...

  16. TECHNICAL CHALLENGES ASSOCIATED WITH ASSESSING THE IN VITRO PULMONARY TOXICITY OF CARBON NANOTUBES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nanotechnology continues to produce a large number of diverse engineered nanomaterials (NMs) with novel physicochemical properties for a variety of applications. Test methods that accurately assess/predict the toxicity of NMs are critically needed and it is unclear whether curren...

  17. GENOMIC AND PROTEOMIC ANALYSIS OF SURROGATE TISSUES FOR ASSESSING TOXIC EXPOSURES AND DISEASE STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Genomic and Proteomic Analysis of Surrogate Tissues for Assessing Toxic Exposures and Disease States
    David J. Dix and John C. Rockett
    Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, USEPA, ...

  18. STRESS PATHWAY-BASED REPORTER ASSAYS TO ASSESS TOXICITY OF ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMICALS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is an increasing need for assays for the rapid and efficient assessment of toxicities of large numbers of environmental chemicals. To meet this need, we are developing cell-based reporter assays that measure the activation of key molecular stress pathways. We are using pro...

  19. Toxicity Assessment of Six Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles in Human Epidermal Keratinocytes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toxicity Assessment of Six Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles in Human Epidermal Keratinocytes Nanoparticle uptake in cells may be an important determinant of their potential cytotoxic and inflammatory effects. Six commercial TiO2 NP (A=Alfa Aesar,10nm, A*=Alfa Aesar 32nm, B=P25 27...

  20. Assessment of Airborne Particles. Fundamentals, Applications, and Implications to Inhalation Toxicity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercer, Thomas T., Ed.; And Others

    Concern over chemical and radioactive particulate matter in industry and over rapidly increasing air pollution has stimulated research both on the properties of airborne particles and methods for assessing them and on their biological effects following inhalation. The Third Rochester International Conference on Environmental Toxicity was,…

  1. Development and application of a multimetal multibiotic ligand model for assessing aquatic toxicity of metal mixtures.

    PubMed

    Santore, Robert C; Ryan, Adam C

    2015-04-01

    A multimetal, multiple binding site version of the biotic ligand model (mBLM) has been developed for predicting and explaining the bioavailability and toxicity of mixtures of metals to aquatic organisms. The mBLM was constructed by combining information from single-metal BLMs to preserve compatibility between the single-metal and multiple-metal approaches. The toxicities from individual metals were predicted by assuming additivity of the individual responses. Mixture toxicity was predicted based on both dissolved metal and mBLM-normalized bioavailable metal. Comparison of the 2 prediction methods indicates that metal mixtures frequently appear to have greater toxicity than an additive estimation of individual effects on a dissolved metal basis. However, on an mBLM-normalized basis, mixtures of metals appear to be additive or less than additive. This difference results from interactions between metals and ligands in solutions including natural organic matter, processes that are accounted for in the mBLM. As part of the mBLM approach, a technique for considering variability was developed to calculate confidence bounds (called response envelopes) around the central concentration-response relationship. Predictions using the mBLM and response envelope were compared with observed toxicity for a number of invertebrate and fish species. The results show that the mBLM is a useful tool for considering bioavailability when assessing the toxicity of metal mixtures.

  2. Assessment of phenolic herbicide toxicity and mode of action by different assays.

    PubMed

    Bettiol, Cinzia; De Vettori, Stefania; Minervini, Giovanni; Zuccon, Elisa; Marchetto, Davide; Ghirardini, Annamaria Volpi; Argese, Emanuele

    2016-04-01

    A phytotoxicity assay based on seed germination/root elongation has been optimized and used to evaluate the toxic effects of some phenolic herbicides. The method has been improved by investigating the influence of experimental conditions. Lepidium sativum was chosen as the most suitable species, showing high germinability, good repeatability of root length measurements, and low sensitivity to seed pretreatment. DMSO was the most appropriate solvent carrier for less water-soluble compounds. Three dinitrophenols and three hydroxybenzonitriles were tested: dinoterb, DNOC, 2,4-dinitrophenol, chloroxynil, bromoxynil, and ioxynil. Toxicity was also determined using the Vibrio fischeri Microtox® test, and a highly significant correlation was found between EC50 values obtained by the two assays. Dinoterb was the most toxic compound. The toxicity of hydroxybenzonitriles followed the order: ioxynil >bromoxynil >chloroxynil; L. sativum exhibited a slightly higher sensitivity than V. fischeri to these compounds. A QSAR analysis highlighted the importance of hydrophobic, electronic, and hydrogen-bonding interactions, in accordance with a mechanism of toxic action based on protonophoric uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation. The results suggest that the seed germination/root elongation assay with L. sativum is a valid tool for the assessment of xenobiotic toxicity and can be recommended as part of a test battery. PMID:26695414

  3. Health assessment of gasoline and fuel oxygenate vapors: reproductive toxicity assessment.

    PubMed

    Gray, Thomas M; Steup, David; Roberts, Linda G; O'Callaghan, James P; Hoffman, Gary; Schreiner, Ceinwen A; Clark, Charles R

    2014-11-01

    Vapor condensates of baseline gasoline (BGVC), or gasoline-blended with methyl tertiary butyl ether (G/MTBE), ethyl t-butyl ether (G/ETBE), t-amyl methyl ether (G/TAME), diisopropyl ether (G/DIPE), ethanol (G/EtOH), or t-butyl alcohol (G/TBA) were evaluated for reproductive toxicity in rats at target concentrations of 2000, 10,000, or 20,000mg/m(3), 6h/day, 7days/week. BGVC and G/MTBE were assessed over two generations, the others for one generation. BGVC and G/MTBE F1 offspring were evaluated for neuropathology and changes in regional brain glial fibrillary acidic protein content. No neurotoxicity was observed. Male kidney weight was increased consistent with light hydrocarbon nephropathy. In adult rats, decreased body weight gain and increased liver weight were seen. Spleen weight decreased in adults and pups exposed to G/TBA. No pathological changes to reproductive organs occurred in any study. Decreased food consumption was seen in G/TAME lactating females. Transient decreases in G/TAME offspring weights were observed during lactation. Except for a minor increase in time to mating in G/TBA which did not affect other reproductive parameters, there were no adverse reproductive findings. The NOAEL for reproductive and offspring parameters was 20,000mg/m(3) for all vapor condensates except for lower offspring NOAELs of 10,000mg/m(3) for G/TBA and 2000mg/m(3) for G/TAME. PMID:24813181

  4. Health assessment of gasoline and fuel oxygenate vapors: reproductive toxicity assessment.

    PubMed

    Gray, Thomas M; Steup, David; Roberts, Linda G; O'Callaghan, James P; Hoffman, Gary; Schreiner, Ceinwen A; Clark, Charles R

    2014-11-01

    Vapor condensates of baseline gasoline (BGVC), or gasoline-blended with methyl tertiary butyl ether (G/MTBE), ethyl t-butyl ether (G/ETBE), t-amyl methyl ether (G/TAME), diisopropyl ether (G/DIPE), ethanol (G/EtOH), or t-butyl alcohol (G/TBA) were evaluated for reproductive toxicity in rats at target concentrations of 2000, 10,000, or 20,000mg/m(3), 6h/day, 7days/week. BGVC and G/MTBE were assessed over two generations, the others for one generation. BGVC and G/MTBE F1 offspring were evaluated for neuropathology and changes in regional brain glial fibrillary acidic protein content. No neurotoxicity was observed. Male kidney weight was increased consistent with light hydrocarbon nephropathy. In adult rats, decreased body weight gain and increased liver weight were seen. Spleen weight decreased in adults and pups exposed to G/TBA. No pathological changes to reproductive organs occurred in any study. Decreased food consumption was seen in G/TAME lactating females. Transient decreases in G/TAME offspring weights were observed during lactation. Except for a minor increase in time to mating in G/TBA which did not affect other reproductive parameters, there were no adverse reproductive findings. The NOAEL for reproductive and offspring parameters was 20,000mg/m(3) for all vapor condensates except for lower offspring NOAELs of 10,000mg/m(3) for G/TBA and 2000mg/m(3) for G/TAME.

  5. Reference manual for toxicity and exposure assessment and risk characterization. CERCLA Baseline Risk Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-01

    The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA, 1980) (CERCLA or Superfund) was enacted to provide a program for identifying and responding to releases of hazardous substances into the environment. The Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA, 1986) was enacted to strengthen CERCLA by requiring that site clean-ups be permanent, and that they use treatments that significantly reduce the volume, toxicity, or mobility of hazardous pollutants. The National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP) (USEPA, 1985; USEPA, 1990) implements the CERCLA statute, presenting a process for (1) identifying and prioritizing sites requiring remediation and (2) assessing the extent of remedial action required at each site. The process includes performing two studies: a Remedial Investigation (RI) to evaluate the nature, extent, and expected consequences of site contamination, and a Feasibility Study (FS) to select an appropriate remedial alternative adequate to reduce such risks to acceptable levels. An integral part of the RI is the evaluation of human health risks posed by hazardous substance releases. This risk evaluation serves a number of purposes within the overall context of the RI/FS process, the most essential of which is to provide an understanding of ``baseline`` risks posed by a given site. Baseline risks are those risks that would exist if no remediation or institutional controls are applied at a site. This document was written to (1) guide risk assessors through the process of interpreting EPA BRA policy and (2) help risk assessors to discuss EPA policy with regulators, decision makers, and stakeholders as it relates to conditions at a particular DOE site.

  6. Dioxin-like and non-dioxin-like toxic effects of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs): implications for risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Giesy, J P; Kannan, K

    1998-11-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic contaminants in the environment. Individual PCB congeners exhibit different physicochemical properties and biological activities that result in different environmental distributions and toxicity profiles. The variable composition of PCB residues in environmental matrices and their different mechanisms of toxicity complicate the development of scientifically based regulations for the risk assessment. In this article various approaches for the assessment of risks of PCBs have been critically examined. Recent developments in the toxic equivalency factor (TEF) approach for the assessment of toxic effects due to dioxin-like PCBs have been examined. PCB exposure studies that describe non-dioxin-like toxic effects, particularly neurobehavioral effects and their effective doses in animals were compiled. A comparative assessment of effective doses for dioxin-like and non-dioxin-like effects by PCBs has been made to evaluate the relative significance of non-ortho-and ortho-substituted PCBs in risk assessment. Using mink as an example, relative merits and implications of using TEF and total PCB approaches for assessing the potential for toxic effects in wildlife was examined. There are several advantages and limitations associated with each method used for PCB risk assessment. Toxic effects due to coplanar PCBs occur at relatively smaller concentrations than those due to non-dioxin-like PCBs and therefore the TEF approach derives the risk assessment of PCBs, in the environment. The need for the refinement of TEF approach for more accurate assessment of risks is discussed. PMID:9861526

  7. Toxicity testing strategies for assessing water-quality conditions in receiving streams

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, A.J.

    1994-12-31

    This paper explores the use of short-term, EPA-approved laboratory toxicity tests for assessing water-quality conditions in streams and rivers. Strategies for the cost-effective application of such tests for long-term monitoring objectives are considered in the context of logistic constraints and statistical design. A subtle but important difference in objectives for effluent versus ambient testing is this: in effluent testing for regulatory purposes, a key objective is to determine how toxic an effluent is; in ambient testing, the main objective usually is that of determining if the water at a site is toxic. This difference shapes the strategy for cost-effective ambient testing and determines the framework for effective statistical analysis and interpretation of ambient toxicity test results. Recommendations derived as `` lessons learned`` from large-scale ambient toxicity testing programs for receiving streams at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities include: (1) testing more frequently with one species (preferably Ceriodaphnia) generally is more effective, in terms of information gained per dollar spent, than testing less frequently with two or more species; (2) use five or more sites per test period, plus two or more reference sites, whenever possible; (3) use four to six test periods per year; and (4) use diagnostic testing to supplement the ambient-testing program. Various laboratory and in situ methods for environmental assessment are now under development, but these methods probably will not gain acceptance for use in regulatory situations for many years. Rapid growth in need for ecological risk assessments outstrips the rate at which new test procedures are approved for regulatory purposes. Thus, laboratory tests for estimating possible environmental impacts of toxic or disruptive pollutants are likely to be used more frequently, not less frequently, during the next decade.

  8. Thermal stress and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Christopher J; Johnstone, Andrew F M; Aydin, Cenk

    2014-07-01

    Elevating ambient temperature above thermoneutrality exacerbates toxicity of most air pollutants, insecticides, and other toxic chemicals. On the other hand, safety and toxicity testing of toxicants and drugs is usually performed in mice and rats maintained at sub-thermoneutral temperatures of ~22∘C. When exposed to chemical toxicants under these relatively cool conditions, rodents typically undergo a regulated hypothermic response, characterized by preference for cooler ambient temperatures and controlled reduction in core temperature. Reducing core temperature delays the clearance of most toxicants from the body; however, a mild hypothermia also improves recovery and survival from the toxicant. Raising ambient temperature to thermoneutrality and above increases the rate of clearance of the toxicant but also exacerbates toxicity. Furthermore, heat stress combined with work or exercise is likely to worsen toxicity. Body temperature of large mammals, including humans, does not decrease as much in response to exposure to a toxicant. However, heat stress can nonetheless worsen toxic outcome in humans through a variety of mechanisms. For example, heat-induced sweating and elevation in skin blood flow accelerates uptake of some insecticides. Epidemiological studies suggest that thermal stress may exacerbate the toxicity of airborne pollutants such as ozone and particulate matter. Overall, translating results of studies in rodents to that of humans is a formidable task attributed in part to the interspecies differences in thermoregulatory response to the toxicants and to thermal stress. PMID:24944028

  9. Interspecies interactions are an integral determinant of microbial community dynamics.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Fatma A A; Suzuki, Kenshi; Ohtaki, Akihiro; Sagegami, Keita; Hirai, Hidetaka; Seno, Jun; Mizuno, Naoko; Inuzuka, Yuma; Saito, Yasuhisa; Tashiro, Yosuke; Hiraishi, Akira; Futamata, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the factors that determine the dynamics of bacterial communities in a complex system using multidisciplinary methods. Since natural and engineered microbial ecosystems are too complex to study, six types of synthetic microbial ecosystems (SMEs) were constructed under chemostat conditions with phenol as the sole carbon and energy source. Two to four phenol-degrading, phylogenetically and physiologically different bacterial strains were used in each SME. Phylogeny was based on the nucleotide sequence of 16S rRNA genes, while physiologic traits were based on kinetic and growth parameters on phenol. Two indices, J parameter and "interspecies interaction," were compared to predict which strain would become dominant in an SME. The J parameter was calculated from kinetic and growth parameters. On the other hand, "interspecies interaction," a new index proposed in this study, was evaluated by measuring the specific growth activity, which was determined on the basis of relative growth of a strain with or without the supernatant prepared from other bacterial cultures. Population densities of strains used in SMEs were enumerated by real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) targeting the gene encoding the large subunit of phenol hydroxylase and were compared to predictions made from J parameter and interspecies interaction calculations. In 4 of 6 SEMs tested the final dominant strain shown by real-time qPCR analyses coincided with the strain predicted by both the J parameter and the interspecies interaction. However, in SMEII-2 and SMEII-3 the final dominant Variovorax strains coincided with prediction of the interspecies interaction but not the J parameter. These results demonstrate that the effects of interspecies interactions within microbial communities contribute to determining the dynamics of the microbial ecosystem.

  10. Interspecies interactions are an integral determinant of microbial community dynamics.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Fatma A A; Suzuki, Kenshi; Ohtaki, Akihiro; Sagegami, Keita; Hirai, Hidetaka; Seno, Jun; Mizuno, Naoko; Inuzuka, Yuma; Saito, Yasuhisa; Tashiro, Yosuke; Hiraishi, Akira; Futamata, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the factors that determine the dynamics of bacterial communities in a complex system using multidisciplinary methods. Since natural and engineered microbial ecosystems are too complex to study, six types of synthetic microbial ecosystems (SMEs) were constructed under chemostat conditions with phenol as the sole carbon and energy source. Two to four phenol-degrading, phylogenetically and physiologically different bacterial strains were used in each SME. Phylogeny was based on the nucleotide sequence of 16S rRNA genes, while physiologic traits were based on kinetic and growth parameters on phenol. Two indices, J parameter and "interspecies interaction," were compared to predict which strain would become dominant in an SME. The J parameter was calculated from kinetic and growth parameters. On the other hand, "interspecies interaction," a new index proposed in this study, was evaluated by measuring the specific growth activity, which was determined on the basis of relative growth of a strain with or without the supernatant prepared from other bacterial cultures. Population densities of strains used in SMEs were enumerated by real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) targeting the gene encoding the large subunit of phenol hydroxylase and were compared to predictions made from J parameter and interspecies interaction calculations. In 4 of 6 SEMs tested the final dominant strain shown by real-time qPCR analyses coincided with the strain predicted by both the J parameter and the interspecies interaction. However, in SMEII-2 and SMEII-3 the final dominant Variovorax strains coincided with prediction of the interspecies interaction but not the J parameter. These results demonstrate that the effects of interspecies interactions within microbial communities contribute to determining the dynamics of the microbial ecosystem. PMID:26539177

  11. Interspecies interactions are an integral determinant of microbial community dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, Fatma A. A.; Suzuki, Kenshi; Ohtaki, Akihiro; Sagegami, Keita; Hirai, Hidetaka; Seno, Jun; Mizuno, Naoko; Inuzuka, Yuma; Saito, Yasuhisa; Tashiro, Yosuke; Hiraishi, Akira; Futamata, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the factors that determine the dynamics of bacterial communities in a complex system using multidisciplinary methods. Since natural and engineered microbial ecosystems are too complex to study, six types of synthetic microbial ecosystems (SMEs) were constructed under chemostat conditions with phenol as the sole carbon and energy source. Two to four phenol-degrading, phylogenetically and physiologically different bacterial strains were used in each SME. Phylogeny was based on the nucleotide sequence of 16S rRNA genes, while physiologic traits were based on kinetic and growth parameters on phenol. Two indices, J parameter and “interspecies interaction,” were compared to predict which strain would become dominant in an SME. The J parameter was calculated from kinetic and growth parameters. On the other hand, “interspecies interaction,” a new index proposed in this study, was evaluated by measuring the specific growth activity, which was determined on the basis of relative growth of a strain with or without the supernatant prepared from other bacterial cultures. Population densities of strains used in SMEs were enumerated by real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) targeting the gene encoding the large subunit of phenol hydroxylase and were compared to predictions made from J parameter and interspecies interaction calculations. In 4 of 6 SEMs tested the final dominant strain shown by real-time qPCR analyses coincided with the strain predicted by both the J parameter and the interspecies interaction. However, in SMEII-2 and SMEII-3 the final dominant Variovorax strains coincided with prediction of the interspecies interaction but not the J parameter. These results demonstrate that the effects of interspecies interactions within microbial communities contribute to determining the dynamics of the microbial ecosystem. PMID:26539177

  12. Toxicovigilance: A new approach for the hazard identification and risk assessment of toxicants in human beings

    SciTech Connect

    Descotes, Jacques . E-mail: jacques-georges.descotes@chu-lyon.fr; Testud, Francois

    2005-09-01

    The concept of toxicovigilance encompasses the active detection, validation and follow-up of clinical adverse events related to toxic exposures in human beings. Poison centers are key players in this function as poisoning statistics are essential to define the cause, incidence and severity of poisonings occurring in the general population. In addition, the systematic search for unexpected shifts in the recorded causes of poisonings, e.g., following the introduction of a new product, or change in the formulation or recommended use of an old product, allows for a rapid detection of potential adverse health consequences and the implementation of preventive or corrective measures. However, toxicovigilance is genuinely a medical and not only a statistical approach of human toxicity issues. In contrast to epidemiology, toxicovigilance is based on the in-depth medical assessment of acute or chronic intoxications on an individual basis, which requires detailed information that poison centers can rarely obtain via emergency telephone calls and that epidemiologists cannot collect or process. Validation of this medical information must primarily be based on toxicological expertise to help identify causal links between otherwise unexplained pathological conditions and documented toxic exposures. Thus, toxicovigilance can contribute to hazard identification and risk assessment by providing medically validated data which are often overlooked in the process of risk assessment. So far, very few structured toxicovigilance systems have been set up and hopefully national and international initiatives will bridge this gap in our knowledge of the toxicity of many chemicals and commercial products in human beings.

  13. Interspecies stress in momentum equations for dense binary particulate systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, D Z; Ma, X; Rauenzahn, R M

    2006-07-28

    For two-species particulate systems, ensemble averaged continuity and momentum equations for each species are derived based on the Liouville equation of the system. The ensemble average used is species specific. It is found that the interaction between species results in not only the interspecies force but also a stress in the momentum equations. In the limit that particles of one of the species can be considered as a continuum, the existence of the interspecies stress enables us to reduce the derived equations to the familiar form for dispersed two-phase flows.

  14. Application of a lux-based bioassay to assess soil toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Paton, G.I. |; Campbell, C.D.; Rattray, E.A.S.; Glover, L.A.; Killham, K.

    1995-12-31

    The expression of prokaryotic bioluminescence is linked with cell metabolism and accordingly bioassays have been developed using naturally bioluminescent bacteria to assess ecotoxicity. Advances in biotechnology have allowed the isolation of the lux genes (responsible for bioluminescence) from marine organisms and their insertion into terrestrial bacteria. This has enabled the use of ecologically relevant bacteria to assess toxicity by measuring bioluminescence response in the presence of toxins. The lux genes were inserted into Pseudomonas fluorescens and Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar trifolii as a multi-copy plasmid and also integrated into the chromosome. It was found that in aqueous solutions the plasmid constructs were more sensitive than the chromosomal constructs to a range of toxins. The order of toxicity for Ps. fluorescens was Zn = Cu > Cd > Ni > Cr > DCP and for R. trifolii Zn > Cu > Cd > DCP > Cr. The lux based bioassays were more reproducible and sensitive than ATP and dehydrogenase assays and offered greater sensitivity than Photobacterium phosphoreum assays to assess toxicity of inorganic pollutants. Extracts from 4 soil types were spiked with a range of toxins and when EC{sub 50} values were determined it was shown that toxicity was related to soil characteristics. This enabled the assay to be used to assess the Lee Valley soil experiment which represents an important international study of the effect of the application of contaminated sewage to land. High metal application rates had been shown to have serious implications for soil ecology. Chemical analysis, carried out 26 years after sewage addition confirmed that soil extracts still had increased metal concentrations. The lux-based bioassays, which proved to be rapid, reproducible and sensitive confirmed that the metals were still biologically available and hence toxic.

  15. Toxicity assessment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in sediments from European high mountain lakes.

    PubMed

    Quiroz, Roberto; Grimalt, Joan O; Fernández, Pilar

    2010-05-01

    Sediment quality guidelines and toxic equivalent factors have been used for assessment of the toxicity of sedimentary long-range atmospherically transported polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to the organisms living in high mountain European lakes. This method has provided indices that are consistent with experimental studies evaluating in situ sedimentary estrogenic activity or physiological response to AhR binding in fish from the same lakes. All examined lakes in north, central, west, northeast and southeast European mountains have shown sedimentary PAH concentrations that are above thresholds of no effect but only those situated in the southeast lakes district exhibited concentrations above the indices of probable effects. These mountains, Tatras, are also those having PAH concentrations of highest activity for AhR binding. Chrysene+triphenylene, dibenz[a]anthracene, benzo[k]fluoranthene and indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene are the main compounds responsible for the observed toxic effects.

  16. Dissecting the assays to assess microbial tolerance to toxic chemicals in bioprocessing.

    PubMed

    Zingaro, Kyle A; Nicolaou, Sergios A; Papoutsakis, Eleftherios T

    2013-11-01

    Microbial strains are increasingly used for the industrial production of chemicals and biofuels, but the toxicity of components in the feedstock and product streams limits process outputs. Selected or engineered microbes that thrive in the presence of toxic chemicals can be assessed using tolerance assays. Such assays must reasonably represent the conditions the cells will experience during the intended process and measure the appropriate physiological trait for the desired application. We review currently used tolerance assays, and examine the many parameters that affect assay outcomes. We identify and suggest the use of the best-suited assays for each industrial bioreactor operating condition, discuss next-generation assays, and propose a standardized approach for using assays to examine tolerance to toxic chemicals.

  17. Toxicity of five antibiotics and their mixtures towards photosynthetic aquatic organisms: implications for environmental risk assessment.

    PubMed

    González-Pleiter, Miguel; Gonzalo, Soledad; Rodea-Palomares, Ismael; Leganés, Francisco; Rosal, Roberto; Boltes, Karina; Marco, Eduardo; Fernández-Piñas, Francisca

    2013-04-15

    The individual and combined toxicities of amoxicillin, erythromycin, levofloxacin, norfloxacin and tetracycline have been examined in two organisms representative of the aquatic environment, the cyanobacterium Anabaena CPB4337 as a target organism and the green alga Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata as a non-target organism. The cyanobacterium was more sensitive than the green alga to the toxic effect of antibiotics. Erythromycin was highly toxic for both organisms; tetracycline was more toxic to the green algae whereas the quinolones levofloxacin and norfloxacin were more toxic to the cyanobacterium than to the green alga. Amoxicillin also displayed toxicity to the cyanobacterium but showed no toxicity to the green alga. The toxicological interactions of antibiotics in the whole range of effect levels either in binary or multicomponent mixtures were analyzed using the Combination Index (CI) method. In most cases, synergism clearly predominated both for the green alga and the cyanobacterium. The CI method was compared with the classical models of additivity Concentration Addition (CA) and Independent Action (IA) finding that CI could accurately predict deviations from additivity. Risk assessment was performed by calculating the ratio between Measured Environmental Concentration (MEC) and the Predicted No Effect Concentration (PNEC). A MEC/PNEC ratio higher than 1 was found for the binary erythromycin and tetracycline mixture in wastewater effluents, a combination which showed a strong synergism at low effect levels in both organisms. From the tested antibiotic mixtures, it can be concluded that certain specific combinations may pose a potential ecological risk for aquatic ecosystems with the present environmentally measured concentrations. PMID:23399078

  18. Pharmacology-based toxicity assessment: towards quantitative risk prediction in humans.

    PubMed

    Sahota, Tarjinder; Danhof, Meindert; Della Pasqua, Oscar

    2016-05-01

    Despite ongoing efforts to better understand the mechanisms underlying safety and toxicity, ~30% of the attrition in drug discovery and development is still due to safety concerns. Changes in current practice regarding the assessment of safety and toxicity are required to reduce late stage attrition and enable effective development of novel medicines. This review focuses on the implications of empirical evidence generation for the evaluation of safety and toxicity during drug development. A shift in paradigm is needed to (i) ensure that pharmacological concepts are incorporated into the evaluation of safety and toxicity; (ii) facilitate the integration of historical evidence and thereby the translation of findings across species as well as between in vitro and in vivo experiments and (iii) promote the use of experimental protocols tailored to address specific safety and toxicity questions. Based on historical examples, we highlight the challenges for the early characterisation of the safety profile of a new molecule and discuss how model-based methodologies can be applied for the design and analysis of experimental protocols. Issues relative to the scientific rationale are categorised and presented as a hierarchical tree describing the decision-making process. Focus is given to four different areas, namely, optimisation, translation, analytical construct and decision criteria. From a methodological perspective, the relevance of quantitative methods for estimation and extrapolation of risk from toxicology and safety pharmacology experimental protocols, such as points of departure and potency, is discussed in light of advancements in population and Bayesian modelling techniques (e.g. non-linear mixed effects modelling). Their use in the evaluation of pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic relationships (PKPD) has enabled great insight into the dose rationale for medicines in humans, both in terms of efficacy and adverse events. Comparable benefits

  19. Role of a Comprehensive Toxicity Assessment and Monitoring Program in the Management and Ecological Recovery of a Wastewater Receiving Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greeley, Mark S.; Kszos, Lynn A.; Morris, Gail W.; Smith, John G.; Stewart, Arthur J.

    2011-06-01

    National Pollution Discharge Elimination Permit (NPDES)-driven effluent toxicity tests using Ceriodaphnia dubia and fathead minnows were conducted for more than 20 years to assess and monitor the effects of wastewaters at the United States (U.S.) Department of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Complex) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Toxicity testing was also conducted on water samples from East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC), the wastewater receiving stream, as part of a comprehensive biological monitoring and assessment program. In this paper, we evaluate the roles of this long-term toxicity assessment and monitoring program in the management and ecological recovery of EFPC. Effluent toxicity testing, associated toxicant evaluation studies, and ambient toxicity monitoring were instrumental in identifying toxicant sources at the Y-12 Complex, guiding modifications to wastewater treatment procedures, and assessing the success of various pollution-abatement actions. The elimination of untreated wastewater discharges, the dechlorination of remaining wastewater streams, and the implementation of flow management at the stream headwaters were the primary actions associated with significant reductions in the toxicity of stream water in the upper reaches of EFPC from the late 1980s through mid 1990s. Through time, as regulatory requirements changed and water quality improved, emphasis shifted from comprehensive toxicity assessments to more focused toxicity monitoring efforts. Ambient toxicity testing with C. dubia and fathead minnows was supplemented with less-standardized but more sensitive alternative laboratory toxicity tests and in situ bioassays. The Y-12 Complex biological monitoring experience demonstrates the value of toxicity studies to the management of a wastewater receiving stream.

  20. Fish acute toxicity syndromes and their use in the QSAR approach to hazard assessment

    SciTech Connect

    McKim, J.M.; Bradbury, S.P.; Niemi, G.J.

    1987-04-01

    Implementation of the Toxic Substances Control Act of 1977 creates the need to reliably establish testing priorities because laboratory resources are limited and the number of industrial chemicals requiring evaluation is overwhelming. The use of quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) models as rapid and predictive screening tools to select more potentially hazardous chemicals for in-depth laboratory evaluation has been proposed. Further implementation and refinement of quantitative structure-toxicity relationships in aqueous toxicology and hazard assessment requires the development of a mode-of-action database. With such a database, a qualitative structure-activity relationship can be formulated to assign the proper mode of action, and respective QSAR, to a given chemical structure. In this review, the development of fish acute toxicity syndromes (FATS), which are toxic-response sets based on various behavioral and physiological-biochemical measurements, and their projected use in the mode-of-action database are outlined. Using behavioral parameters monitored in the fathead minnow during acute toxicity testing, FATS associated with acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors and narcotics could be reliably predicted. However, compounds classified as oxidative phosphorylation uncouplers or stimulants could not be resolved. Refinement of this approach by using respiratory-cardiovascular responses in the rainbow trout, enabled FATS associated with AChE inhibitors, convulsants, narcotics, respiratory blockers, respiratory membrane irritants, and uncouplers to be correctly predicted.

  1. Toxicity assessment of oil field produced water treated by evaporative processes to produce water to irrigation.

    PubMed

    Andrade, V T; Andrade, B G; Costa, B R S; Pereira, O A; Dezotti, M

    2010-01-01

    During the productive life of an oil well, a high quantity of produced water is extracted together with the oil, and it may achieve up to 99% in the end of the well's economical life. Desalination is one of mankind's earliest forms of saline water treatment, and nowadays, it is still a common process used throughout the world. A single-effect mechanical vapor compression (MVC) process was tested. This paper aims to assess the potential toxicity of produced water to be re-used in irrigation. Samples of both produced and distilled water were evaluated by 84 chemical parameters. The distilled produced water presented a reduction up to 97% for the majority of the analyzed parameters, including PAHs. Toxicity bioassays were performed with distilled produced water to evaluate the growth inhibition of Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata algae, the acute toxicity to Danio rerio fish, the germination inhibition of Lactuca sativa vegetable and the severity of toxicity, as well as behavior test with Lumbricid Earthworm Eisenia fetida. The ecotoxicological assays results showed no toxicity, indicating that the referred evaporative process can produce water to be reused in irrigation. PMID:20706017

  2. Assessment of metal toxicity in sediment pore water from Lake Macquarie, Australia.

    PubMed

    Doyle, C J; Pablo, F; Lim, R P; Hyne, R V

    2003-04-01

    Recent investigations into the level of heavy metal enrichment in the sediments of Lake Macquarie have indicated that significant contamination has occurred over the past 100 years, with elevated levels of lead, zinc, cadmium, copper, and selenium being observed in most parts of the lake. Pore water extracted from sediments showing the greatest contamination by these metals exhibited toxicity to the larval development of the sea urchin Heliocidaris tuberculata. However, an analysis of pore water metal concentrations revealed that the concentrations of these metals were too low to cause toxicity. Rather, pore water toxicity was highly correlated with manganese for the majority of sites sampled; subsequent spiking experiments confirmed manganese as a cause of toxicity. Current levels of manganese in the sediments of Lake Macquarie have arisen from natural sources and are not the result of anthropogenic activities. These results reiterate the importance of identifying the causes of toxicity in assessments of sediment contamination, particularly when testing sediment pore waters using sensitive early life stages. PMID:12712294

  3. Rat liver mitochondrial and microsomal tests for the assessment of quinone toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Bramble, L.A.; Boardman, G.D.; Dietrich, A.M. . Dept. of Civil Engineering); Bevan, D.R. . Dept. of Biochemistry)

    1994-02-01

    Short-term toxicity tests using mitochondrial and microsomal metabolism were developed and applied to a series of eight quinones. In the mitochondrial assay, the degree to which test compounds inhibited mitochondrial respiration varied from an effective concentration (EC50) of 9 to 125 [mu]M. In the microsomal assay, the maximum percentage of increase over control oxygen consumption rates elicited by the quinones ranged from 8 to 837%. The ability of the compounds to stimulate microsomal oxygen uptake reflects their capability to redox cycle and form reactive oxygen species. Results of the mitochondrial and microsomal assay were statistically correlated with several quinone physicochemical parameters and qualitatively compared to reduction potential. The biological response observed in both test systems appeared to be most strongly influenced by the reduction potential of the quinone. Biomechanisms of action were suggested on the basis of this relationship. To assess the ability of the mitochondrial and microsomal assays to indicate toxicity of the quinonoid compounds, results were statistically correlated with literature-derived toxicity data. It was concluded that the mitochondrial assay appears to be a valid indicator of acute toxicity, whereas the microsomal assay better portends the potential for chronic toxicity.

  4. Toxicity assessment and geochemical model of chromium leaching from AOD slag.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bao; Li, Junguo; Zeng, Yanan; Wang, Ziming

    2016-02-01

    AOD (Argon Oxygen Decarburization) slag is a by-product of the stainless steel refining process. The leaching toxicity of chromium from AOD slag cannot be ignored in the recycling process of the AOD slag. To assess the leaching toxicity of the AOD slag, batch leaching tests have been performed. PHREEQC simulations combined with FactSage were carried out based on the detailed mineralogical analysis and petrophysical data. Moreover, Pourbaix diagram of the Cr-H2O system was protracted by HSC 5.0 software to explore the chromium speciation in leachates. It was found that AOD slag leachate is an alkaline and reductive solution. The Pourbaix diagram of the Cr-H2O system indicated that trivalent chromium, such as Cr(OH)4(-), is the major chromium species in the experimental Eh-pH region considered. However, toxic hexavalent chromium was released with maximum concentrations of 30 µg L(-1) and 18 µg L(-1) at L/S 10 and 100, respectively, during the earlier leaching stage. It concluded that the AOD slag possessed a certain leaching toxicity. After 10 d of leaching, trivalent chromium was the dominant species in the leachates, which corresponded to the results of PHREEQC simulation. Leaching toxicity of AOD slag is based on the chromium speciation and its transformation. Great attention should be focused on such factors as aging, crystal form of chromium-enriched minerals, and electrochemical characteristics of the leachates.

  5. Toxicity assessment of oil field produced water treated by evaporative processes to produce water to irrigation.

    PubMed

    Andrade, V T; Andrade, B G; Costa, B R S; Pereira, O A; Dezotti, M

    2010-01-01

    During the productive life of an oil well, a high quantity of produced water is extracted together with the oil, and it may achieve up to 99% in the end of the well's economical life. Desalination is one of mankind's earliest forms of saline water treatment, and nowadays, it is still a common process used throughout the world. A single-effect mechanical vapor compression (MVC) process was tested. This paper aims to assess the potential toxicity of produced water to be re-used in irrigation. Samples of both produced and distilled water were evaluated by 84 chemical parameters. The distilled produced water presented a reduction up to 97% for the majority of the analyzed parameters, including PAHs. Toxicity bioassays were performed with distilled produced water to evaluate the growth inhibition of Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata algae, the acute toxicity to Danio rerio fish, the germination inhibition of Lactuca sativa vegetable and the severity of toxicity, as well as behavior test with Lumbricid Earthworm Eisenia fetida. The ecotoxicological assays results showed no toxicity, indicating that the referred evaporative process can produce water to be reused in irrigation.

  6. Sensitivity of isolated eggs of pond snails: a new method for toxicity assays and risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tengteng; Koene, Joris M; Dong, Xiaoxiao; Fu, Rongshu

    2013-05-01

    The concentration of heavy metals in the environment is normally low. We here address whether using the development of isolated pond snail Radix auricularia eggs would provide a more sensitive endpoint and whether the gelatinous matrix of the egg mass surrounding the eggs indeed protects the snail embryos. In the present study, artificial removal of the gelatinous matrix of egg masses greatly increased the sensitivity of developing eggs to a heavy metal (cadmium). The sensitivity of isolated eggs to cadmium was determined using several convenient endpoints, including mortality, hatching rate, and heart rate, with an acute toxicity test and a subchronic test. In the acute toxicity test, a 96-h LC(50) value of 58.26 μg/L cadmium was determined. In the subchronic toxicity test, sublethal effects in terms of a significant reduction in hatching rate could be found in the 25-μg/L treatment, and a significant decrease of heart rate was observed in both treatments (5 and 25 μg/L). The high sensitivity of isolated eggs indicates that such tests can be efficient for toxicity assays and risk assessment, although one needs to keep in mind that the ecologically relevant measure of toxicity will be how eggs are affected when they are still inside the egg mass.

  7. Determination of zeta potential in Planctomycetes and its application in heavy metals toxicity assessment.

    PubMed

    Lage, Olga Maria; Bondoso, Joana; Catita, José A M

    2012-10-01

    Zeta potential of Planctomycetes was evaluated under different environmental conditions and correlated to cell viability. Phylogenetically distinct strains of the Planctomycetes presented different negative zeta potential values. More negative values were associated with Rhodopirellula spp. and related to the great amount of fimbriae in these species. Milli-Q water was chosen as the best dispersion media to perform the measurements. Zeta potential increased with ionic strength and varied with pH. In the physiological range of pH 5.0-9, zeta potential remained low and Rhodopirellula sp. strain LF2 cells were viable. Out of this range, zeta potential increased significantly and viability decreased. The effect on zeta potential of arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, nickel, and zinc was assessed in Rhodopirellula sp. strain LF2. Zeta potential increased with increasing toxicity of the heavy metals in a dose-response way. This result was confirmed by the results observed for Rhodopirellula baltica strain SH1 under copper toxicity. Lead was the most toxic metal and zinc was the least toxic as observed by zeta potential and viability. The results support a correlation between zeta potential and cell viability which seem to indicate the possibility to use it as a viability predictor for the effects of heavy metals toxicity. PMID:22576374

  8. Assessment of swimming activity as an indicator of sublethal toxicity to the fathead minnow

    SciTech Connect

    Hovland, D.N. Jr.

    1994-12-31

    A simple, sensitive acute-bioassay was developed that looks at spontaneous swimming activity as an indicator of sublethal effect due to toxic insult. Although a large amount of work has been done validating aquatic behavior testing, there are still no standardized testing procedures or protocols for their use in assessing environmental impact of pollutants. Attempts were made in this research to develop a behavioral test that was objective and provided a basis for standardization and use in effluent testing. Tests were performed using copper sulfate and zinc sulfate as reference toxicants. Testing procedures involved 24-hour exposures to a range of toxicant concentrations with 12 fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) per concentration. Upon completion, during a 2-minute testing period in a cylindrical aquarium, individual fish were videotaped from above, then timed later to determine actual time in swimming motion, which was averaged for each concentration group. Results demonstrate the sensitivity of the test, as significant differences from controls in swimming activity were observed at concentrations of copper sulfate as low as 1.3 ppb and zinc sulfate as low as 3.5 ppb, both well below Federal criteria for water quality. It is hoped that further research will demonstrate the utility of sublethal, behavioral toxicity tests, and that these tests will be integrated into the battery of toxicity testing procedures currently used by regulatory agencies.

  9. Use of a rat ex-vivo testis culture method to assess toxicity of select known male reproductive toxicants.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Keith M; Seyler, David E; Durand, Philippe; Perrard, Marie-Hélène; Baker, Thomas K

    2016-04-01

    Due to the complex physiology of the testes, in vitro models have been largely unsuccessful at modeling testicular toxicity in vivo. We conducted a pilot study to evaluate the utility of the Durand ex vivo rat seminiferous tubule culture model [1-3] that supports spermatogenesis through meiosis II, including the formation of round spermatids. We used this system to evaluate the toxicity of four known testicular toxicants: 1,3-dinitrobenzene (DNB), 2-methoxyacetic acid (MAA), bisphenol A (BPA), and lindane over 21 days of culture. This organotypic culture system demonstrated the ability to successfully model in vivo testicular toxicity (Sertoli cell toxicity and disruption of meiosis) for all four compounds. These findings support the application of this system to study molecules and evaluate mechanisms of testicular toxicity. PMID:26802500

  10. Personal care product preservatives: risk assessment and mixture toxicities with an industrial wastewater.

    PubMed

    Carbajo, Jose B; Perdigón-Melón, Jose A; Petre, Alice L; Rosal, Roberto; Letón, Pedro; García-Calvo, Eloy

    2015-04-01

    The aquatic toxicity of eight preservatives frequently used in personal care products (PCPs) (iodopropynyl butylcarbamate, bronopol, diazolidinyl urea, benzalkonium chloride, zinc pyrithione, propylparaben, triclosan and a mixture of methylchloroisothiazolinone and methylisothiazolinone) was assessed by means of two different approaches: a battery of bioassays composed of single species tests of bacteria (Vibrio fischeri and Pseudomonas putida) and protozoa (Tetrahymena thermophila), and a whole biological community resazurin-based assay using activated sludge. The tested preservatives showed considerable toxicity in the studied bioassays, but with a marked difference in potency. In fact, all biocides except propylparaben and diazolidinyl urea had EC50 values lower than 1 mg L(-1) in at least one assay. Risk quotients for zinc pyrithione, benzalkonium chloride, iodopropynyl butylcarbamate and triclosan as well as the mixture of the studied preservatives exceeded 1, indicating a potential risk for the process performance and efficiency of municipal sewage treatment plants (STPs). These four single biocides explained more than 95% of the preservative mixture risk in all bioassays. Each individual preservative was also tested in combination with an industrial wastewater (IWW) from a cosmetics manufacturing facility. The toxicity assessment was performed on binary mixtures (preservative + IWW) and carried out using the median-effect principle, which is a special case of the concept of Concentration Addition (CA). Almost 70% of all experiments resulted in EC50 values within a factor of 2 of the values predicted by the median-effect principle (CI values between 0.5 and 2). The rest of the mixtures whose toxicity was mispredicted by CA were assessed with the alternative concept of Independent Action (IA), which showed higher predictive power for the biological community assay. Therefore, the concept used to accurately predict the toxicity of mixtures of a preservative

  11. Personal care product preservatives: risk assessment and mixture toxicities with an industrial wastewater.

    PubMed

    Carbajo, Jose B; Perdigón-Melón, Jose A; Petre, Alice L; Rosal, Roberto; Letón, Pedro; García-Calvo, Eloy

    2015-04-01

    The aquatic toxicity of eight preservatives frequently used in personal care products (PCPs) (iodopropynyl butylcarbamate, bronopol, diazolidinyl urea, benzalkonium chloride, zinc pyrithione, propylparaben, triclosan and a mixture of methylchloroisothiazolinone and methylisothiazolinone) was assessed by means of two different approaches: a battery of bioassays composed of single species tests of bacteria (Vibrio fischeri and Pseudomonas putida) and protozoa (Tetrahymena thermophila), and a whole biological community resazurin-based assay using activated sludge. The tested preservatives showed considerable toxicity in the studied bioassays, but with a marked difference in potency. In fact, all biocides except propylparaben and diazolidinyl urea had EC50 values lower than 1 mg L(-1) in at least one assay. Risk quotients for zinc pyrithione, benzalkonium chloride, iodopropynyl butylcarbamate and triclosan as well as the mixture of the studied preservatives exceeded 1, indicating a potential risk for the process performance and efficiency of municipal sewage treatment plants (STPs). These four single biocides explained more than 95% of the preservative mixture risk in all bioassays. Each individual preservative was also tested in combination with an industrial wastewater (IWW) from a cosmetics manufacturing facility. The toxicity assessment was performed on binary mixtures (preservative + IWW) and carried out using the median-effect principle, which is a special case of the concept of Concentration Addition (CA). Almost 70% of all experiments resulted in EC50 values within a factor of 2 of the values predicted by the median-effect principle (CI values between 0.5 and 2). The rest of the mixtures whose toxicity was mispredicted by CA were assessed with the alternative concept of Independent Action (IA), which showed higher predictive power for the biological community assay. Therefore, the concept used to accurately predict the toxicity of mixtures of a preservative

  12. Assessing time-integrated dissolved concentrations and predicting toxicity of metals during diel cycling in streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Balistrieri, Laurie S.; Nimick, David A.; Mebane, Christopher A.

    2012-01-01

    Evaluating water quality and the health of aquatic organisms is challenging in systems with systematic diel (24 h) or less predictable runoff-induced changes in water composition. To advance our understanding of how to evaluate environmental health in these dynamic systems, field studies of diel cycling were conducted in two streams (Silver Bow Creek and High Ore Creek) affected by historical mining activities in southwestern Montana. A combination of sampling and modeling tools was used to assess the toxicity of metals in these systems. Diffusive Gradients in Thin Films (DGT) samplers were deployed at multiple time intervals during diel sampling to confirm that DGT integrates time-varying concentrations of dissolved metals. Site specific water compositions, including time-integrated dissolved metal concentrations determined from DGT, a competitive, multiple-toxicant biotic ligand model, and the Windemere Humic Aqueous Model Version 6.0 (WHAM VI) were used to determine the equilibrium speciation of dissolved metals and biotic ligands. The model results were combined with previously collected toxicity data on cutthroat trout to derive a relationship that predicts the relative survivability of these fish at a given site. This integrative approach may prove useful for assessing water quality and toxicity of metals to aquatic organisms in dynamic systems and evaluating whether potential changes in environmental health of aquatic systems are due to anthropogenic activities or natural variability.

  13. Assessing urban stormwater toxicity: methodology evolution from point observations to longitudinal profiling.

    PubMed

    Grapentine, Lee; Rochfort, Quintin; Marsalek, Jiri

    2008-01-01

    The quality of aquatic habitat in a stormwater management facility located in Toronto, Ontario, was assessed by examining ecotoxicological responses of benthic invertebrates exposed to sediment and water from this system. Besides residential stormwater, the facility receives highway runoff contaminated with trace metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and road salt. The combined flow passes through two extended detention ponds (in series) and a vegetated outlet channel. Toxicity of surficial sediment collected from 14 longitudinally arrayed locations was assessed based on 10 acute and chronic endpoints from laboratory tests with four benthic organisms. Greatest overall toxicity was observed in sediment from sites in the upstream pond, where mortality to amphipods and mayflies reached up to 100%. Downstream pond sediment was less toxic on average than the upstream pond sediment, but not the outlet channel sediment where untreated stormwater discharges provided additional sources of contamination. Macroinvertebrate communities in sediment cores were depauperate and dominated by oligochaetes and chironomids, with minimum densities and diversity at the deeper central pond sites. While sediment toxicity was associated with high concentrations of trace metals and high-molecular weight PAHs, benthic community impoverishment appeared related to high water column salinity.

  14. Assessing the fate and toxicity of Thallium I and Thallium III to three aquatic organisms.

    PubMed

    Rickwood, C J; King, M; Huntsman-Mapila, P

    2015-05-01

    Thallium has been shown to significantly increase in both water and aquatic biota after exposure to metal mine effluent, however, there is a lack of knowledge as to its fate and effect in the aquatic environment. The objectives of this project were to assess (1) fate of thallium by conducting speciation analysis and determining the influence of water quality on toxicity and (2) effects of thallium (I) and (III) on three aquatic species; the algae, Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata, the invertebrate Ceriodaphnia dubia and the vertebrate Pimephales promelas. Speciation analysis proved challenging with poor recovery of thallium (I), however analysis with solutions >125μg/L revealed that over a 7-d period, recovery of thallium (III) was less than 15%, suggesting that the majority of thallium (III) was converted to Thallium (I). It was only in fresh solutions where recovery of Thallium (III) was greater than 80%. The lowest IC25s generated during our effects assessment for both Thallium (I) and (III) were more than 10-fold greater than the highest concentration recorded in receiving environments (8μg/L) and more than 100-fold greater than the current guideline (0.8μg/L). To assess the influence of water quality on thallium toxicity, the concentrations of both potassium and calcium were reduced in dilution water. When potassium was reduced for both C. dubia and P. subcapitata tests, the lowest IC25 generated was 5-fold higher than the current guideline, but within the range of concentrations reported in receiving environments for both Thallium (I) and (III). When calcium was reduced in dilution water, toxicity only increased in the Tl (III) tests with C. dubia; the IC25 for Tl(III), similar to the exposures conducted with reduced potassium, was within the range of total thallium concentrations reported in the receiving environment. Without an accurate, repeatable method to assess thallium speciation at low concentrations it is not possible to draw any firm conclusions

  15. Assessing the fate and toxicity of Thallium I and Thallium III to three aquatic organisms.

    PubMed

    Rickwood, C J; King, M; Huntsman-Mapila, P

    2015-05-01

    Thallium has been shown to significantly increase in both water and aquatic biota after exposure to metal mine effluent, however, there is a lack of knowledge as to its fate and effect in the aquatic environment. The objectives of this project were to assess (1) fate of thallium by conducting speciation analysis and determining the influence of water quality on toxicity and (2) effects of thallium (I) and (III) on three aquatic species; the algae, Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata, the invertebrate Ceriodaphnia dubia and the vertebrate Pimephales promelas. Speciation analysis proved challenging with poor recovery of thallium (I), however analysis with solutions >125μg/L revealed that over a 7-d period, recovery of thallium (III) was less than 15%, suggesting that the majority of thallium (III) was converted to Thallium (I). It was only in fresh solutions where recovery of Thallium (III) was greater than 80%. The lowest IC25s generated during our effects assessment for both Thallium (I) and (III) were more than 10-fold greater than the highest concentration recorded in receiving environments (8μg/L) and more than 100-fold greater than the current guideline (0.8μg/L). To assess the influence of water quality on thallium toxicity, the concentrations of both potassium and calcium were reduced in dilution water. When potassium was reduced for both C. dubia and P. subcapitata tests, the lowest IC25 generated was 5-fold higher than the current guideline, but within the range of concentrations reported in receiving environments for both Thallium (I) and (III). When calcium was reduced in dilution water, toxicity only increased in the Tl (III) tests with C. dubia; the IC25 for Tl(III), similar to the exposures conducted with reduced potassium, was within the range of total thallium concentrations reported in the receiving environment. Without an accurate, repeatable method to assess thallium speciation at low concentrations it is not possible to draw any firm conclusions

  16. Use of comparative genomics approaches to characterize interspecies differences in response to environmental chemicals: Challenges, opportunities, and research needs

    SciTech Connect

    Burgess-Herbert, Sarah L.; Euling, Susan Y.

    2013-09-15

    A critical challenge for environmental chemical risk assessment is the characterization and reduction of uncertainties introduced when extrapolating inferences from one species to another. The purpose of this article is to explore the challenges, opportunities, and research needs surrounding the issue of how genomics data and computational and systems level approaches can be applied to inform differences in response to environmental chemical exposure across species. We propose that the data, tools, and evolutionary framework of comparative genomics be adapted to inform interspecies differences in chemical mechanisms of action. We compare and contrast existing approaches, from disciplines as varied as evolutionary biology, systems biology, mathematics, and computer science, that can be used, modified, and combined in new ways to discover and characterize interspecies differences in chemical mechanism of action which, in turn, can be explored for application to risk assessment. We consider how genetic, protein, pathway, and network information can be interrogated from an evolutionary biology perspective to effectively characterize variations in biological processes of toxicological relevance among organisms. We conclude that comparative genomics approaches show promise for characterizing interspecies differences in mechanisms of action, and further, for improving our understanding of the uncertainties inherent in extrapolating inferences across species in both ecological and human health risk assessment. To achieve long-term relevance and consistent use in environmental chemical risk assessment, improved bioinformatics tools, computational methods robust to data gaps, and quantitative approaches for conducting extrapolations across species are critically needed. Specific areas ripe for research to address these needs are recommended.

  17. Toxicity testing of dispersed oil requires adherence to standardized protocols to assess potential real world effects.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Gina; Clark, James; Aurand, Don

    2013-06-01

    Recently, several researchers have attempted to address Deepwater Horizon incident environmental fate and effects issues using laboratory testing and extrapolation procedures that are not fully reliable measures for environmental assessments. The 2013 Rico-Martínez et al. publication utilized laboratory testing approaches that severely limit our ability to reliably extrapolate such results to meaningful real-world assessments. The authors did not adopt key methodological elements of oil and dispersed oil toxicity standards. Further, they drew real-world conclusions from static exposure tests without reporting actual exposure concentrations. Without this information, it is not possible to compare their results to other research or real spill events that measured and reported exposure concentrations. The 1990s' Chemical Response to Oil Spills: Ecological Effects Research Forum program was established to standardize and conduct exposure characterization in oil and dispersed oil aquatic toxicity testing (Aurand and Coelho, 2005). This commentary raises awareness regarding the necessity of standardized test protocols.

  18. Speciation Methods Used to Assess Potential Health Effects of Toxic Metals in Environmental Materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wolf, Ruth E.; Morman, Suzette A.; Plumlee, Geoffrey S.

    2008-01-01

    Assessing potential exposures to toxic metals or metalloids such as arsenic and chromium in environmental materials is important in protecting public health. The chemical form of an element in, or released from, a material is also important, since some forms, such as Cr(VI), are more toxic than others, for example, Cr(III). We have used a variety of procedures to assess potential exposures to hexavalent chromium in ash and burned soils from October 2007 southern California wildfires. Synthetic lung-fluid and de-ionized water extractions simulate release in the lungs and potential environmental releases due to rainfall. Extracts were analyzed for specific chromium and arsenic species using HPLC-ICP-MS methodology. Results indicate that the highly oxidizing environment in wildfires promotes some chromium conversion to Cr(VI), and that the caustic alkalinity of ash enhances Cr(VI) release and stability in lung fluids and rainfall.

  19. Optimizing the aquatic toxicity assessment under REACH through an integrated testing strategy (ITS).

    PubMed

    Lombardo, Anna; Roncaglioni, Alessandra; Benfenati, Emilio; Nendza, Monika; Segner, Helmut; Jeram, Sonja; Pauné, Eduard; Schüürmann, Gerrit

    2014-11-01

    To satisfy REACH requirements a high number of data on chemical of interest should be supplied to the European Chemicals Agency. To organize the various kinds of information and help the registrants to choose the best strategy to obtain the needed information limiting at the minimum the use of animal testing, integrated testing strategies (ITSs) schemes can be used. The present work deals with regulatory data requirements for assessing the hazards of chemicals to the aquatic pelagic environment. We present an ITS scheme for organizing and using the complex existing data available for aquatic toxicity assessment. An ITS to optimize the choice of the correct prediction strategy for aquatic pelagic toxicity is described. All existing information (like physico-chemical information), and all the alternative methods (like in silico, in vitro or the acute-to-chronic ratio) are considered. Moreover the weight of evidence approach to combine the available data is included. PMID:25262089

  20. ELEMENTAL ANALYSIS OF RESPIRABLE TIRE PARTICLES AND ASSESSMENT OF CARDIO-PULMONARY TOXICITY IN RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Elemental Analysis of Respirable Tire Particles and Assessment of Cardio-pulmonary Toxicity in Rats

    R.R. Gottipolu, PhD1, E. Landa, PhD2, J.K. McGee, MS1, M.C. Schladweiler, BS1, J.G. Wallenborn, MS3, A.D. Ledbetter, BS1, J.E. Richards, MS1 and U.P. Kodavanti, PhD1. 1NHEER...

  1. Assessing contaminant sensitivity of endangered and threatened aquatic species: Part I. Acute toxicity of five chemicals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dwyer, F.J.; Mayer, F.L.; Sappington, L.C.; Buckler, D.R.; Bridges, C.M.; Greer, I.E.; Hardesty, D.K.; Henke, C.E.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Kunz, J.L.; Whites, D.W.; Augspurger, T.; Mount, D.R.; Hattala, K.; Neuderfer, G.N.

    2005-01-01

    Assessment of contaminant impacts to federally identified endangered, threatened and candidate, and state-identified endangered species (collectively referred to as "listed" species) requires understanding of a species' sensitivities to particular chemicals. The most direct approach would be to determine the sensitivity of a listed species to a particular contaminant or perturbation. An indirect approach for aquatic species would be application of toxicity data obtained from standard test procedures and species commonly used in laboratory toxicity tests. Common test species (fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas; sheepshead minnow, Cyprinodon variegatus; and rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss) and 17 listed or closely related species were tested in acute 96-hour water exposures with five chemicals (carbaryl, copper, 4-nonylphenol, pentachlorophenol, and permethrin) representing a broad range of toxic modes of action. No single species was the most sensitive to all chemicals. For the three standard test species evaluated, the rainbow trout was more sensitive than either the fathead minnow or sheepshead minnow and was equal to or more sensitive than listed and related species 81% of the time. To estimate an LC50 for a listed species, a factor of 0.63 can be applied to the geometric mean LC50 of rainbow trout toxicity data, and more conservative factors can be determined using variance estimates (0.46 based on 1 SD of the mean and 0.33 based on 2 SD of the mean). Additionally, a low- or no-acute effect concentration can be estimated by multiplying the respective LC50 by a factor of approximately 0.56, which supports the United States Environmental Protection Agency approach of multiplying the final acute value by 0.5 (division by 2). When captive or locally abundant populations of listed fish are available, consideration should be given to direct testing. When direct toxicity testing cannot be performed, approaches for developing protective measures using common test

  2. Toxicity assessment of atmospheric particulate matter in the Mediterranean and Black Seas open waters.

    PubMed

    Mesquita, Sofia R; Dachs, Jordi; van Drooge, Barend L; Castro-Jiménez, Javier; Navarro-Martín, Laia; Barata, Carlos; Vieira, Natividade; Guimarães, Laura; Piña, Benjamin

    2016-03-01

    Atmospheric deposition of particulate matter (PM) is recognized as a relevant input vector for toxic compounds, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), into the marine environment. In this work we aimed to analyse the biological activity and potential adverse effects of PM constituents to aquatic organisms. Organic extracts of atmospheric PM samples from different sub-basins of the Mediterranean and Black Seas were screened using different toxicological tests. A yeast-based assay (AhR-RYA) revealed that dioxin-like activity correlated with the concentration of total PAHs in the PM samples, as well as with their predicted toxic equivalent values (TEQs). Although the zebrafish embryotoxicity test (the ZET assay) showed no major phenotypical adverse effects, up-regulation of mRNA expression of cyp1a, fos and development-related genes (previously described as related to PM toxicity) was observed in exposed embryos when compared to controls. Results showed that mRNA patterns of the studied genes followed a similar geographic distribution to both PAH content and dioxin-like activity of the corresponding extracts. The analysis also showed a distinct geographical pattern of activation of pancreatic markers previously related to airborne pollution, probably indicating a different subset of uncharacterized particle-bound toxicants. We propose the combination of the bioassays tested in the present study to be applied to future research with autochthonous species to assess exposure and potential toxic effects of ambient PM. The present study emphasizes the need for more in-depth studies into the toxic burden of atmospheric PM on aquatic ecosystems, in order to improve future regulatory guidelines. PMID:26745302

  3. Sediment and water toxicity evaluations for the Clinch River ecological risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, A.M.; Phipps, T.L.; Kszos, L.A.

    1995-12-31

    The sediment and surface water at three sites in the Clinch River and six sites in Poplar Creek were evaluated by means of toxicity tests with aquatic organisms. The results of these tests were used as one of the lines of evidence in an assessment of ecological risk due to contaminants, transported from the Oak Ridge Reservation, to the off-site sediment and water environment. Results from a suite of six whole sediment, elutriate and pore water toxicity tests were summarized in terms of survival (Hyalella azteca, Daphnia magna, Anodonta imbecillis, Ceriodaphnia dubia), fecundity (Daphnia magna) or light output reduction (Microtox{reg_sign}). Results from the water toxicity tests were summarized in terms of reduction in survival or fecundity of C. dubia, and survival or growth of Pimephales promelas. Toxicity test results (covering a period of about 1 6 months) showed little difference between reference site media and media from sites of concern. They also showed no strong spatial or temporal response pattern. These results are further supported by the presence of indigenous Chironomus and Hexagenia spp. in the sediment samples. Toxicity results will be discussed with respect to three issues. Two criteria were used to define significant differences between reference sites and sites of concern: a difference of 20%, and statistical significance at a = 0.05. Secondly, the relevance of comparing mean responses to control vs. reference site will be discussed. Lastly, toxicity results are consistent with site characterization information which suggest that contaminants of concern in sediment are buried under clean sediment, effectively isolating the material from potential human or ecological exposure.

  4. Toxicity of nonylphenol on the cnidarian Hydra attenuata and environmental risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Pachura-Bouchet, S; Blaise, C; Vasseur, P

    2006-08-01

    Alkylphenols and their derivatives, alkylphenol polyethoxylates (APEs), are synthetic chemicals of concern owing to their endocrine properties. Nonylphenol (NP) is a critical APE metabolite because of its recalcitrance to biodegradation, toxicity, and ability to bio-accumulate in aquatic organisms. Studies of NP effects in vertebrates demonstrated estrogenic disrupting properties in fish, birds, reptiles, and mammal cells in which NP displaces the natural estrogen from its receptor. Less is known on its toxicity toward invertebrates. Effects on reproduction have been reported, but toxicity on development has been poorly documented thus far. We investigated NP toxicity on survival and regeneration of the freshwater coelenterate Hydra attenuata. Hydra is known for its regenerative capacity and its sensitivity to chemical pollution. It has been used for over 20 years to screen for teratogenicity of chemicals (Johnson et al. (1982) Teratog Carcinog Mutagen 2:263-276). Our results showed that hydra appeared as one of the most sensitive species to acute and chronic toxicity of NP compared to several freshwater invertebrates. Regeneration was disrupted at NP concentrations lower than those affecting survival. Toxicity thresholds of NP for aquatic vertebrates and invertebrates are also reported and discussed in the context of environmental risk assessment and of water quality objectives recommended for surface waters in industrialized countries. NP levels have decreased during the last decade because of a voluntary agreement of surfactant producers and users. At present, concentrations of NP found in surface waters are far below 1 microg/L in Europe, but can reach several microg/L when wastewater treatment plant inefficiency occurs. PMID:16841324

  5. Toxicity assessment for petroleum-contaminated soil using terrestrial invertebrates and plant bioassays.

    PubMed

    Hentati, Olfa; Lachhab, Radhia; Ayadi, Mariem; Ksibi, Mohamed

    2013-04-01

    The assessment of soil quality after a chemical or oil spill and/or remediation effort may be measured by evaluating the toxicity of soil organisms. To enhance our understanding of the soil quality resulting from laboratory and oil field spill remediation, we assessed toxicity levels by using earthworms and springtails testing and plant growth experiments. Total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH)-contaminated soil samples were collected from an oilfield in Sfax, Tunisia. Two types of bioassays were performed. The first assessed the toxicity of spiked crude oil (API gravity 32) in Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development artificial soil. The second evaluated the habitat function through the avoidance responses of earthworms and springtails and the ability of Avena sativa to grow in TPH-contaminated soils diluted with farmland soil. The EC50 of petroleum-contaminated soil for earthworms was 644 mg of TPH/kg of soil at 14 days, with 67 % of the earthworms dying after 14 days when the TPH content reached 1,000 mg/kg. The average germination rate, calculated 8 days after sowing, varied between 64 and 74 % in low contaminated soils and less than 50 % in highly contaminated soils. PMID:22773148

  6. Toxicity assessment of the herbicide metolachlor comparative effects on bacterial and mitochondrial model systems.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Susana P; Fernandes, Maria A S; Martins, João D; Santos, Maria S; Moreno, António J M; Vicente, Joaquim A F; Videira, Romeu A; Jurado, Amália S

    2009-12-01

    Metolachlor is one of the most intensively used chloroacetamide herbicides. However, its effects on the environment and on non-target animals and humans as well as its interference at a cell/molecular level have not yet been fully elucidated. The aim of this study was: firstly, to evaluate the potential toxicity of metolachlor at a cell/subcellular level by using two in vitro biological model systems (a strain of Bacillus stearothermophilus and rat liver mitochondria); secondly, to evaluate the relative sensibility of these models to xenobiotics to reinforce their suitability for pollutant toxicity assessment. Our results show that metolachlor inhibits growth and impairs the respiratory activity of B.stearothermophilus at concentrations two to three orders of magnitude higher than those at which bacterial cells are affected by other pesticides. Also at concentrations significantly higher than those of other pesticides, metolachlor depressed the respiratory control ratio, membrane potential and respiration of rat liver mitochondria when malate/glutamate or succinate were used as respiratory substrates. Moreover, metolachlor impaired the respiratory activity of rat liver mitochondria in the same concentration range at which it inhibited bacterial respiratory system (0.4-5.0 micromol/mg of protein). In conclusion, the high concentration range at which metolachlor induces toxicity in vitro suggests that this compound is safer than other pesticides previously studied in our laboratory, using the same model systems. The good parallelism between metolachlor effects on both models and the toxicity data described in the literature, together with results obtained in our laboratory with other compounds, indicate the suitability of these systems to assess toxicity in vitro. PMID:19607910

  7. A comparison of mixture toxicity assessment: examining the chronic toxicity of atrazine, permethrin and chlorothalonil in mixtures to Ceriodaphnia cf. dubia.

    PubMed

    Phyu, Y L; Palmer, C G; Warne, M St J; Hose, G C; Chapman, J C; Lim, R P

    2011-11-01

    Pesticides predominantly occur in aquatic ecosystems as mixtures of varying complexity, yet relatively few studies have examined the toxicity of pesticide mixtures. Atrazine, chlorothalonil and permethrin are widely used pesticides that have different modes of action. This study examined the chronic toxicities (7-d reproductive impairment) of these pesticides in binary and ternary mixtures to the freshwater cladoceran Ceriodaphnia cf. dubia. The toxicity of the mixtures was compared to that predicted by the independent action (IA) model for mixtures, as this is the most appropriate model for chemicals with different modes of action. Following this they were compared to the toxicity predicted by the concentration addition (CA) model for mixtures. According to the IA model, the toxicity of the chlorothalonil plus atrazine mixture conformed to antagonism, while that of chlorothalonil and permethrin conformed to synergism. The toxicity of the atrazine and permethrin mixture as well as the ternary mixture conformed to IA implying there was either no interaction between the components of these mixtures and/or in the case of the ternary mixture the interactions cancelled each other out to result in IA. The synergistic and antagonistic mixtures deviated from IA by factors greater than 3 and less than 2.5, respectively. When the toxicity of the mixtures was compared to the predictions of the CA model, the binary mixture of chlorothalonil plus atrazine, permethrin plus atrazine and the ternary mixture all conformed to antagonism, while the binary mixture of chlorothalonil plus permethrin conformed to CA. Using the CA model provided estimates of mixture toxicity that did not markedly underestimate the measured toxicity, unlike the IA model, and therefore the CA model is the most suitable to use in ecological risk assessments of these pesticides.

  8. Assessment of heavy metals bioavailability and toxicity toward Vibrio fischeri in sediment of the Huelva estuary.

    PubMed

    Rosado, Daniel; Usero, José; Morillo, José

    2016-06-01

    Relationship between toxicity and bioavailable metals in sediments from the Huelva estuary and its littoral of influence was analyzed. Toxicity was assessed with Microtox® bioassay using a marine luminescent bacterium: Vibrio fischeri. Bioavailable metals were considered as both, acid extractable fraction of BCR procedure and the sum of exchangeable and bound to carbonates fractions of Tessier sequential extraction. A bioavailable metals index was calculated to integrate results in a single figure. Toxicity and bioavailable metals showed a similar pattern. Higher levels were found in the estuary than in the littoral (140 TU/g). In Huelva estuary, highest levels were found in the Tinto estuary (5725 TU/g), followed by the Odiel estuary (5100 TU/g) and the Padre Santo Canal (2500 TU/g). Results in this area were well over than those in nearby estuaries. Furthermore, they are similar to or even higher than those in other polluted sediments around the world. Bioavailable metal index showed a stronger correlation with acid extractable fraction of BCR (R(2) = 0.704) than that for the sum of exchangeable and bound to carbonates fractions of Tessier (R(2) = 0.661). These results suggest that bioavailable metals are an important source of sediment toxicity in the Huelva estuary and its littoral of influence, an area with one of the highest mortality risks of Spain. PMID:27002282

  9. Toxicological assessment of kretek cigarettes Part 4: mechanistic investigations, smoke chemistry and in vitro toxicity.

    PubMed

    Roemer, E; Dempsey, R; Lawless-Pyne, J; Lukman, S; Evans, A Deger; Trelles-Sticken, E; Wittke, S; Schorp, M K

    2014-12-01

    The smoke chemistry and in vitro toxicity of mainstream smoke (MS) was investigated in American-blended cigarettes with or without the addition of 2.5%, 5% or 10% eugenol to the tobacco and in Indonesian-blended cigarettes with and without the addition of cloves, cloves extracted with hot ethanol, and extracted cloves replenished with eugenol or clove oil. The addition of eugenol reduced the concentration of nearly all toxicants measured in MS as well as the in vitro cytotoxicity of the gas/vapor phase. Reductions were also seen in bacterial mutagenicity of the total particulate matter (TPM) assessed by the Ames Assay. The addition of extracted cloves led to increases and decreases of toxicant concentrations in MS. Replenishment with eugenol or clove oil decreased the toxicant concentrations; with most smoke constituent concentrations reduced below the concentration found in tobacco-only cigarettes. Cytotoxicity of the TPM was not affected by the clove preparations. However, GVP cytotoxicity was reduced (untreated cloves showing the highest reductions). Mutagenicity of TPM was decreased by the clove preparations. Mechanisms for the reductions, (up to 40%), are most likely due to dilution effects by eugenol, changed burning characteristics of the tobacco, and free radical scavenging by eugenol.

  10. Assessing chemical toxicity of ionic liquids on Vibrio fischeri: Correlation with structure and composition.

    PubMed

    Montalbán, Mercedes G; Hidalgo, Juana M; Collado-González, Mar; Díaz Baños, F Guillermo; Víllora, Gloria

    2016-07-01

    One of the most important properties of ionic liquids is their non-volatility, making them potentially "green" alternatives to volatile organic compounds. However, they are widely soluble in water, meaning that they can be released into aquatic ecosystems and so contribute to water pollution. Nevertheless, although the toxicity of ILs has been widely assessed in the literature, the information is still scarce due to the great number of ionic liquids that have been synthesized. The present work reports the toxicity of twenty-nine imidazolium-, pyridinium- and ammonium-based ionic liquids towards the bioluminescent photobacterium Vibrio fischeri. When the effect of the type of anion, the length of the alkyl chain of the cation, the cation core and the presence of a functionalized side chain in the cation on ionic liquid toxicity were analyzed, the main influence was seen to be exercised by the alkyl chain length. A Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships-based method was used to compare the experimental results with previously estimated values and very good agreement was obtained. A relationship between the toxicity, expressed as Log EC50, and the 1-octanol-water partition coefficient was established. PMID:27139120

  11. Toxicity of Lunar Dust in Lungs Assessed by Examining Biomarkers in Exposed Mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, C.-W.; James, J. T.; Zeidler-Erdely, P. C.; Castranova, V.; Young, S. H.; Quan, C. L.; Khan-Mayberry, N.; Taylor, L. A.

    2010-01-01

    NASA is contemplating to build an outpost on the Moon for prolonged human habitation and research. The lunar surface is covered by a layer of soil, of which the finest portion is highly reactive dust. Dust samples of respirable sizes were aerodynamically isolated from two lunar soil samples of different maturities (cosmic exposure ages) collected during the Apollo 16 mission. The lunar dust samples, TiO2, or quartz, suspended in normal saline were given to groups of 5 C57 male mice by intrapharyngeal aspiration at 0. 1, 0.3, or 1.0 mg/mouse. Because lunar dust aggregates rapidly in aqueous media, some tests were conducted with dusts suspended in Survanta/saline (1:1). The mice were euthanized 7 or 30 days later, and their lungs were lavaged to assess the presence of toxicity biomarkers in bronchioalveolar lavage fluids. The overall results showed that the two lunar dust samples were similar in toxicity, they were more toxic than T102 , but less toxic than quartz. This preliminary study is a part of the large study to obtain data for setting exposure limits for astronauts living on the Moon

  12. Toxicological assessment of kretek cigarettes Part 4: mechanistic investigations, smoke chemistry and in vitro toxicity.

    PubMed

    Roemer, E; Dempsey, R; Lawless-Pyne, J; Lukman, S; Evans, A Deger; Trelles-Sticken, E; Wittke, S; Schorp, M K

    2014-12-01

    The smoke chemistry and in vitro toxicity of mainstream smoke (MS) was investigated in American-blended cigarettes with or without the addition of 2.5%, 5% or 10% eugenol to the tobacco and in Indonesian-blended cigarettes with and without the addition of cloves, cloves extracted with hot ethanol, and extracted cloves replenished with eugenol or clove oil. The addition of eugenol reduced the concentration of nearly all toxicants measured in MS as well as the in vitro cytotoxicity of the gas/vapor phase. Reductions were also seen in bacterial mutagenicity of the total particulate matter (TPM) assessed by the Ames Assay. The addition of extracted cloves led to increases and decreases of toxicant concentrations in MS. Replenishment with eugenol or clove oil decreased the toxicant concentrations; with most smoke constituent concentrations reduced below the concentration found in tobacco-only cigarettes. Cytotoxicity of the TPM was not affected by the clove preparations. However, GVP cytotoxicity was reduced (untreated cloves showing the highest reductions). Mutagenicity of TPM was decreased by the clove preparations. Mechanisms for the reductions, (up to 40%), are most likely due to dilution effects by eugenol, changed burning characteristics of the tobacco, and free radical scavenging by eugenol. PMID:25455230

  13. Use of the aquatic plant Elodea canadensis to assess toxicity and genotoxicity of Yenisei River sediments.

    PubMed

    Zotina, Tatiana A; Trofimova, Elena A; Medvedeva, Marina Yu; Dementyev, Dmitry V; Bolsunovsky, Alexander Ya

    2015-10-01

    The toxicity, cytotoxicity, and genotoxicity of bulk sediments from the Yenisei River (Siberia, Russia) were estimated in laboratory bioassays based on several endpoints in the aquatic plant Elodea canadensis. The bottom sediment samples were collected in the Yenisei River upstream and downstream of the sources of chemical and radioactive contamination. The testing revealed different sensitivities of Elodea endpoints to the quality of the bottom sediment: weight of shoots < length of shoots < mitotic index < length of roots < percentage of abnormal cells. The response of the genotoxicity endpoint (percentage of cells with chromosome abnormalities in roots of Elodea) was the highest in sediments with chemical pollution, whereas the highest inhibition of toxicity endpoints (shoot and root length) occurred in sediments with the highest level of radioactive pollution. The extreme response of Elodea endpoints to the quality of certain sediment samples may be regarded as related to the possible presence of unknown toxicants. The results show that E. canadensis can be used as an indicator species in laboratory contact testing of bottom sediment. The responses of shoot and root length growth endpoints of Elodea can be recommended as basic sensitivity indicators of bottom sediment toxicity. Analysis of cells carrying abnormal chromosomes in the apical root meristem of Elodea can be performed optionally in the same test to assess the genotoxicity of sediments. PMID:25940213

  14. Assessment of toxic effects of triclosan on the terrestrial snail (Achatina fulica).

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaonan; Liu, Zhengtao; Wang, Wanhua; Yan, Zhenguang; Zhang, Cong; Wang, Weili; Chen, Lihong

    2014-08-01

    Triclosan (TCS) is a broad-spectrum antimicrobial agent used in personal care products, and as a result, is widespread in the environment. Toxicity tests of TCS on aquatic organisms have been reported, but limited toxicity data on terrestrial species are available. In this study, the 28-d chronic toxicity of TCS on the biomass, shell diameter growth, and total food intake of the terrestrial snail Achatina fulica were tested. Moreover, biochemical responses, including changes in the activity of catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), and the content of malondialdehyde (MDA), were examined after 14-d and 28-d exposure. Results showed that TCS had toxic effects on the biomass, shell diameter growth, and total food intake of A. fulica with no observed effect concentration (NOEC) values of 24 mg kg(-1). As for the antioxidant enzymes, TCS caused significant oxidative stress even at the low concentration of 24 mg kg(-1). The CAT and POD activities at the high concentrations of 200 and 340 mg kg(-1), respectively, were significantly inhibited. The SOD and CAT activity in treatments below 118 mg kg(-1) and the MDA content in all treatments showed dose-effect relationships. This study demonstrated that TCS caused adverse effects on terrestrial invertebrates, and provided valuable information for the risk assessment imposed by TCS in the terrestrial environment.

  15. Aquatic toxicity assessment of the additive 6-methylcoumarine using four experimental systems.

    PubMed

    Jos, A; Repetto, G; Ríos, J C; Del Peso, A; Salguero, M; Cameán, A M

    2009-01-01

    The toxicity assessment of chemicals is one of the main issues in the current policies in order to protect the health of the environment and human beings. Food and cosmetic additives have been extensively studied in relation to their toxicity to humans, but data about their ecotoxicological effects are scarce. The aim of this study was to evaluate the toxic effects of the additive 6-methylcoumarine in the aquatic milieu using a test battery comprising experimental model systems from different trophic levels. The inhibition of bioluminiscence was studied in the bacteria Vibrio fischeri (decomposer), the inhibition of growth was evaluated in the alga Chlorella vulgaris (producer) and immobilization was studied in the cladoceran Daphnia magna (first consumer). Finally, several end points were evaluated in the RTG-2 salmonid fish cell line, including neutral red uptake, protein content, methylthiazol tetrazolium salt metabolization, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity, lactate dehydrogenase activity and leakage, and morphology. The sensitivity of the test systems employed was as follows: V. fischeri > D. magna > C. vulgaris > RTG-2 cell line. The results show that 6-methylcoumarine is not expected to produce acute toxic effects on the aquatic biota. However, chronic and synergistic effects with other chemicals cannot be excluded and should be further investigated.

  16. Assessment of sub-chronic, hematological and histopathological toxicities of a herbal combination.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Shadab; Khan, Rafeeq Alam; Feroz, Zeeshan

    2015-11-01

    The herbal combination under study consists of Withania somnifera, Tribulus terrestris, Mucuna pruriens and Argyria speciosa. Present study is mainly designed to investigate the gross physical, sub-chronic, hematological and histopathological effects of the combination widely used for its stimulating, revitalizing and fertility boosting effects in Pakistan. Sub-chronic, hematological and histopathological outcomes of herbal combination were assessed on 27 albino rabbits weighing from 1000 gm-1500 gm after giving herbal combination for 60 days in two doses 27 and 81 mg/kg against control. No significant toxicity was revealed during the entire period of study, however some biochemical changes were observed in kidney and liver but these changes did not coincide with histopathological findings. There was no mortality and evidence of systemic toxicity including hematological toxicity following 60 days administration of herbal combination. Results of present study suggest that further studies are required on large number of animals before reaching to a definite conclusion, more over clinical studies should also be conducted to confirm the possible toxic effects of the herbal combination. PMID:26639483

  17. Application of short-term inhalation studies to assess the inhalation toxicity of nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A standard short-term inhalation study (STIS) was applied for hazard assessment of 13 metal oxide nanomaterials and micron-scale zinc oxide. Methods Rats were exposed to test material aerosols (ranging from 0.5 to 50 mg/m3) for five consecutive days with 14- or 21-day post-exposure observation. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and histopathological sections of the entire respiratory tract were examined. Pulmonary deposition and clearance and test material translocation into extra-pulmonary organs were assessed. Results Inhaled nanomaterials were found in the lung, in alveolar macrophages, and in the draining lymph nodes. Polyacrylate-coated silica was also found in the spleen, and both zinc oxides elicited olfactory epithelium necrosis. None of the other nanomaterials was recorded in extra-pulmonary organs. Eight nanomaterials did not elicit pulmonary effects, and their no observed adverse effect concentrations (NOAECs) were at least 10 mg/m3. Five materials (coated nano-TiO2, both ZnO, both CeO2) evoked concentration-dependent transient pulmonary inflammation. Most effects were at least partially reversible during the post-exposure period. Based on the NOAECs that were derived from quantitative parameters, with BALF polymorphonuclear (PMN) neutrophil counts and total protein concentration being most sensitive, or from the severity of histopathological findings, the materials were ranked by increasing toxic potency into 3 grades: lower toxic potency: BaSO4; SiO2.acrylate (by local NOAEC); SiO2.PEG; SiO2.phosphate; SiO2.amino; nano-ZrO2; ZrO2.TODA; ZrO2.acrylate; medium toxic potency: SiO2.naked; higher toxic potency: coated nano-TiO2; nano-CeO2; Al-doped nano-CeO2; micron-scale ZnO; coated nano-ZnO (and SiO2.acrylate by systemic no observed effect concentration (NOEC)). Conclusion The STIS revealed the type of effects of 13 nanomaterials, and micron-scale ZnO, information on their toxic potency, and the location and reversibility of effects

  18. Applicability of toxicity bioassays to ecological risk assessment in arid and semiarid ecosystems.

    SciTech Connect

    Markwiese, J. T.; Ryti, R. T.; Hooten, M. M.; Michael, D. I.; Hlohowskyj, I.; Environmental Assessment; Neptune and Company, Inc.

    2001-01-01

    Substantial tracts of land in the southwestern and western U.S. are undergoing or will require ERA. Toxicity bioassays employed in baseline ERAs are, for the most part. representative of mesic systems, and highly standardized test species (e.g., lettuce, earthworm) are generally not relevant to arid system toxicity testing. Conversely, relevant test species are often poorly characterized with regard to toxicant sensitivity and culture conditions. The applicability of toxicity bioassays to ecological risk assessment in arid and semiarid ecosystems was reviewed for bacteria and fungi, plants, terrestrial invertebrates, and terrestrial vertebrates. Bacteria and fungi are critical to soil processes, and understanding their ecology is important to understanding the ecological relevance of bioassays targeting either group. Terrestrial bacteria require a water film around soil particles to be active, while soil fungi can remain active in extremely dry soils. It is therefore expected that fungi will be of greater importance to arid and semiarid systems (Whitford 1989). If microbial processes are to be measured in soils of arid environments, it is recommended that bioassays target fungi. Regardless of the taxa studied, problems are associated with the standardization and interpretability of microbial tests, and regulatory acceptance may hinder widespread incorporation of microbial toxicity bioassays in arid system risk assessments. Plant toxicity bioassays are gaining recognition as sensitive indicators of soil conditions because they can provide a cost-effective and relatively rapid assessment of soil quality for both pre- and postremediation efforts. Although the choices of suitable plant species for assessing mesic system soils are numerous, the choices for arid system soils are limited. Guidance is provided for evaluating plant species with regard to their suitability for serving as representative arid system flora. Terrestrial invertebrates can survive and flourish in

  19. Predicting passive and active tissue:plasma partition coefficients: interindividual and interspecies variability.

    PubMed

    Ruark, Christopher D; Hack, C Eric; Robinson, Peter J; Mahle, Deirdre A; Gearhart, Jeffery M

    2014-07-01

    A mechanistic tissue composition model incorporating passive and active transport for the prediction of steady-state tissue:plasma partition coefficients (K(t:pl)) of chemicals in multiple mammalian species was used to assess interindividual and interspecies variability. This approach predicts K(t:pl) using chemical lipophilicity, pKa, phospholipid membrane binding, and the unbound plasma fraction, together with tissue fractions of water, neutral lipids, neutral and acidic phospholipids, proteins, and pH. Active transport K(t:pl) is predicted using Michaelis-Menten transport parameters. Species-specific biological properties were identified from 126 peer reviewed journal articles, listed in the Supporting Information, for mouse, rat, guinea pig, rabbit, beagle dog, pig, monkey, and human species. Means and coefficients of variation for biological properties were used in a Monte Carlo analysis to assess variability. The results show K(t:pl) interspecies variability for the brain, fat, heart, kidney, liver, lung, muscle, red blood cell, skin, and spleen, but uncertainty in the estimates obscured some differences. Compounds undergoing active transport are shown to have concentration-dependent K(t:pl). This tissue composition-based mechanistic model can be used to predict K(t:pl) for organic chemicals across eight species and 10 tissues, and can be an important component in drug development when scaling K(t:pl) from animal models to humans.

  20. Comparative study of non-invasive methods for assessing Daphnia magna embryo toxicity.

    PubMed

    Stensberg, Matthew C; Zeitchek, Michael Anthony; Inn, Kul; McLamore, Eric S; Porterfield, D Marshall; Sepúlveda, Maria S

    2014-09-01

    Embryos, unlike adults, are typically sessile, which allows for an increase in the available metrics that can be used to assess chemical toxicity. We investigate Daphnia magna development rate and oxygen consumption as toxicity metrics and compare them to arrested embryo development using four different techniques with potassium cyanide (KCN) as a common toxicant. The EC50 (95 % CI) for arrested development was 2,535 (1,747-3,677) μg/L KCN. Using pixel intensity changes, recorded with difference imaging, we semi-quantitatively assessed a decrease in development rate at 200 μg/L KCN, threefold lower than the arrested development lowest observed effect concentration (LOEC). Respirometry and self-referencing (SR) microsensors were two unique techniques used to assess oxygen consumption. Using respirometry, an increase in oxygen consumption was found in the 5 μg/L KCN treatment and a decrease for 148 μg/L, but no change was found for the 78 μg/L KCN treatment. Whereas, with SR microsensors, we were able to detect significant changes in oxygen consumption for all three treatments: 5, 78, and 148 μg/L KCN. While SR offered the highest sensitivity, the respirometry platform developed for this study was much easier to use to measure the same endpoint. Oxygen consumption may be subject to change during the development process, meaning consumption assessment techniques may only be useful only for short-term experiments. Development rate was a more sensitive endpoint though was only reliable four of the six embryonic developmental stages examined. Despite being the least sensitive endpoint, arrested embryo development was the only technique capable of assessing the embryos throughout all developmental stages. In conclusion, each metric has advantages and limitations, but because all are non-invasive, it is possible to use any combination of the three. PMID:24888613

  1. Toxicokinetics/toxicodynamics links bioavailability for assessing arsenic uptake and toxicity in three aquaculture species.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Yu; Liao, Chung-Min

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to link toxicokinetics/toxicodynamics (TK/TD) and bioavailability-based metal uptake kinetics to assess arsenic (As) uptake and bioaccumulation in three common farmed species of tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus), milkfish (Chanos chanos), and freshwater clam (Corbicula fluminea). We developed a mechanistic framework by linking damage assessment model (DAM) and bioavailability-based Michaelis-Menten model for describing TK/TD and As uptake mechanisms. The proposed model was verified with published acute toxicity data. The estimated TK/TD parameters were used to simulate the relationship between bioavailable As uptake and susceptibility probability. The As toxicity was also evaluated based on a constructed elimination-recovery scheme. Absorption rate constants were estimated to be 0.025, 0.016, and 0.175 mL g(-1) h(-1) and As uptake rate constant estimates were 22.875, 63.125, and 788.318 ng g(-1) h(-1) for tilapia, milkfish, and freshwater clam, respectively. Here we showed that a potential trade-off between capacities of As elimination and damage recovery was found among three farmed species. Moreover, the susceptibility probability can also be estimated by the elimination-recovery relations. This study suggested that bioavailability-based uptake kinetics and TK/TD-based DAM could be integrated for assessing metal uptake and toxicity in aquatic organisms. This study is useful to quantitatively assess the complex environmental behavior of metal uptake and implicate to risk assessment of metals in aquaculture systems.

  2. Integration of site-specific health information: Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry health assessments

    SciTech Connect

    Lesperance, A.M.; Siegel, M.R.

    1990-12-01

    The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry is required to conduct a health assessment of any site that is listed on or proposed for the US Environmental Protection Agency's National Priorities List. Sixteen US Department of Energy (DOE) sites currently fall into this category. Health assessments contain a qualitative description of impacts to public health and the environment from hazardous waste sites, as well as recommendations for actions to mitigate or eliminate risk. Because these recommendations may have major impacts on compliance activities at DOE facilities, the health assessments are an important source of information for the monitoring activities of DOE's Office of Environmental Compliance (OEC). This report provides an overview of the activities involved in preparing the health assessment, its role in environmental management, and its key elements.

  3. Risk assessment of toxic heavy metals in the abandoned metal mine areas, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. S.; Chon, H. T.

    2003-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the risk of adverse health effects on human exposure to toxic heavy metals influenced by past mining activities. Environmental geochemical survey was undertaken in the abandoned metal mine areas (Dongil Au-Ag-Cu-Zn mine, Okdong Cu-Pb-Zn mine, Myungbong Au-Ag mine). After appropriate sample preparation, tailings, soils, crop plants and groundwaters were analyzed for As, Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn by ICP-AES and ICP-MS. Health risk assessment of toxic heavy metals has been performed with chemical analytical data for environmental media. Arsenic and other heavy metals are highly elevated in the tailings from the Dongil mine (8,720 As mg/kg, 5.9 Cd mg/kg, 3,610 Cu mg/kg, 5,850 Pb mg/kg, 630 Zn mg/kg), but heavy metals except As from the Okdong mine (72 As mg/kg, 53.6 Cd mg/kg, 910 Cu mg/kg, 1,590 Pb mg/kg, 5,720 Zn mg/kg) and only As from the Myungbong mine (5,810 As mg/kg). These significant concentrations can impact on soils and waters around the tailing files. Also, elevated levels of As, Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn are found in agricultural soils from these mine areas. Risk assessment modeling is subdivided into main four stages, i.e. hazard identification, exposure assessment, toxicity (dose-response) assessment and risk characterization. In order to assess exposure it is necessary to calculate the average daily dose (ADD) of contaminant via the three identified pathways (soil, groundwater and food (rice grain) pathways). In dose-response assessment for non-carcinogens, reference doses (RfD) are calculated and that for carcinogens, slope factors (SF) are obtained by US-EPA IRIS database. In risk characterization, the results of toxicity assessment and exposure assessment are integrated to arrive at quantitative estimates of cancer risks and hazard quotients. Toxic (non-cancer) risks are indicated in terms of a hazard quotient (H.Q.) and this risk exists for H.Q.>1. The H.Q. values for only As from the Dongil and Myungbong mine areas are 2.1 and

  4. Whole effluent toxicity testing -- Usefulness, level of protection, and risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, P.M.

    2000-01-01

    The general status of whole effluent toxicity (WET) tests is assessed relative to their generally accepted purpose of identifying, characterizing, and eliminating effects of effluents on aquatic resources. Although WET tests are useful, they are not perfect tools. Imperfections include the innate variability of these tests, due both to biotic and anthropogenic factors; the reality of species differences both between the laboratory and the field and within the field; and differences between the laboratory and the receiving environment. Whole effluent toxicity tests may be overprotective, underprotective, or offer an uncertain level of protection. The implication of hormesis and inverted U-shaped dose responses for WET testing are reviewed in particular detail. Comparisons to field conditions indicate that WET tests are not reliable predictors of effects or lack of effects in the receiving environment. Whole effluent toxicity tests are only the first stage in a risk assessment and as such identify hazard, not risk. Identification of risk requires discarding the concept of independent applicability. The appropriate use of WET tests is identified in the context of their advantages and disadvantages.

  5. Assessment of the toxicity of cyclohexanone administered intravenously to Wistar and Gunn rats.

    PubMed

    Greener, Y; Martis, L; Indacochea-Redmond, N

    1982-09-01

    The toxicity of cyclohexanone, used as a solvent cement in polyvinyl chloride medical devices, was assessed in Wistar and Gunn rats. The Gunn rat was used because it has a negligible activity of UDP glucuronosyltransferase toward bilirubin and certain other aglycones. Cyclohexanone was administered iv for 28 consecutive days to Wistar and Gunn rats in two doses (50 and 100 mg/kg), using solutions containing 0.25 and 0.50 g per 100 ml, respectively, at a constant volume of 20 mg/kg. Saline (0.9% NaCl) was used as the control. Daily observations for signs of toxicity showed no adverse effects in Wistar or Gunn rats injected with either dose. Daily weight changes of control and test animals were similar. Ophthalmologic examinations revealed no treatment-related structural lesions. No adverse effects were noted when the data from the hemogram or clinical chemistry parameters were evaluated. Gross pathological and histopathologic assessment showed no alterations due to cyclohexanone treatment. Urinary excretions of total and glucuronide conjugates of cyclohexanol were similar for Wistar and Gunn rats; less than 1% was excreted as free cyclohexanone and cyclohexanol. It is concluded that the Gunn rat is capable of forming glucuronides of cyclohexanol and that cyclohexanone at these doses has a negligible toxic potential.

  6. Assessing time-integrated dissolved concentrations and predicting toxicity of metals during diel cycling in streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Balistrieri, Laurie S.; Nimick, David A.; Mebane, Christopher A.

    2012-01-01

    Evaluating water quality and the health of aquatic organisms is challenging in systems with systematic diel (24 hour) or less predictable runoff-induced changes in water composition. To advance our understanding of how to evaluate environmental health in these dynamic systems, field studies of diel cycling were conducted in two streams (Silver Bow Creek and High Ore Creek) affected by historical mining activities in southwestern Montana. A combination of sampling and modeling tools were used to assess the toxicity of metals in these systems. Diffusive Gradients in Thin Films (DGT) samplers were deployed at multiple time intervals during diel sampling to confirm that DGT integrates time-varying concentrations of dissolved metals. Thermodynamic speciation calculations using site specific water compositions, including time-integrated dissolved metal concentrations determined from DGT, and a competitive, multiple-metal biotic ligand model incorporated into the Windemere Humic Aqueous Model Version 6.0 (WHAM VI) were used to determine the chemical speciation of dissolved metals and biotic ligands. The model results were combined with previously collected toxicity data on cutthroat trout to derive a relationship that predicts the relative survivability of these fish at a given site. This integrative approach may prove useful for assessing water quality and toxicity of metals to aquatic organisms in dynamic systems and evaluating whether potential changes in environmental health of aquatic systems are due to anthropogenic activities or natural variability.

  7. The Applicability of Oxidative Stress Biomarkers in Assessing Chromium Induced Toxicity in the Fish Labeo rohita

    PubMed Central

    Khare, Ankur; Dange, Swati

    2014-01-01

    The evaluation of metal's toxicity in freshwater is one of the imperative areas of research and there is an emergent concern on the development of techniques for detecting toxic effects in aquatic animals. Oxidative stress biomarkers are very useful in assessing the health of aquatic life and more in depth studies are necessary to establish an exact cause effect relationship. Therefore, to study the effectiveness of this approach, a laboratory study was conducted in the fish Labeo rohita as a function of hexavalent chromium and the toxicity indices using a battery of oxidative stress biomarkers such as catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione reductase (GR) in the liver, muscle, gills, and brain have been studied along with biometric parameters, behavioral changes, and Cr bioaccumulation. A significant increased HSI was observed in contrast to CF which reduced significantly. SOD, CAT, and GR activity increased significantly in all the tissues of treated fishes. The bioaccumulation of Cr was highest in liver followed by gills, muscle, and brain. This study highlights the significance of using a set of integrated biomarker and advocate to include these parameters in National Water Quality Monitoring Program in areas potentially polluted with metals to assess the health of the ecosystem. PMID:25302308

  8. Modified Whole Effluent Toxicity Test to Assess and Decouple Wastewater Effects from Environmental Gradients

    PubMed Central

    Sauco, Sebastián; Gómez, Julio; Barboza, Francisco R.; Lercari, Diego; Defeo, Omar

    2013-01-01

    Environmental gradients and wastewater discharges produce aggregated effects on marine populations, obscuring the detection of human impact. Classical assessment methods do not include environmental effects in toxicity tests designs, which could lead to incorrect conclusions. We proposed a modified Whole Effluent Toxicity test (mWET) that includes environmental gradients in addition to effluent dilutions, together with the application of Generalized Linear Mixed Models (GLMM) to assess and decouple those effects. We tested this approach, analyzing the lethal effects of wastewater on a marine sandy beach bivalve affected by an artificial canal freshwater discharge used for rice crops irrigation. To this end, we compared bivalve mortality between canal water dilutions (CWd) and salinity controls (SC: without canal water). CWd were prepared by diluting the water effluent (sampled during the pesticide application period) with artificial marine water. The salinity gradient was included in the design by achieving the same final salinities in both CWd and SC, allowing us to account for the effects of salinity by including this variable as a random factor in the GLMM. Our approach detected significantly higher mortalities in CWd, indicating potential toxic effects of the effluent discharge. mWET represents an improvement over the internationally standardized WET tests, since it considers environmental variability and uses appropriate statistical analyses. PMID:23755304

  9. Assessment of chronic toxicity from stormwater runoff in Lincoln Creek, Milwaukee, WI

    SciTech Connect

    Kleist, J.; Crunkilton, R.

    1995-12-31

    Stormwater runoff is believed to be responsible for a severely degraded biotic community in Lincoln Creek, a stream which drains portions of metropolitan Milwaukee. A previous study using Ceriodaphnia dubia and Pimephales promelas indicated little or no acute toxicity could be attributed to stormwater runoff. The purpose of this study was to assess the potential for chronic toxicity in the stream during periods of stormwater runoff. Reproduction and survival in Daphnia magna, and growth and survival in P. promelas were monitored to assess chronic effects. Seven consecutive 14 day tests were performed between June and September, 1994, in eighteen flow-through aquaria housed within a US Geological Survey gauging station located adjacent to Lincoln Creek. Mortality in D. magna consistently did not occur before day 4 of exposure, but averaged 64% at day 14. Reproduction in D. magna and growth in P. promelas in surviving individuals was not significantly reduced; all effects were manifested as mortality. Results of data analysis after 14 days of exposure contrast markedly with analysis made earlier in the same test. Statistical interpretation of the mortality data at typical endpoints of 48 hours for invertebrates and 96 hours for fish failed to identify adverse impacts of stormwater runoff the authors observed in longer exposures. Short-term toxicity tests appear insensitive to the detection of contaminant related effects. Long-term tests (greater than 7 days) were needed to identify adverse biological impacts that could in part explain the severely degraded biotic community of this urban stream.

  10. Zebrafish and clean water technology: assessing soil bioretention as a protective treatment for toxic urban runoff.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, J K; Davis, J W; Incardona, J P; Stark, J D; Anulacion, B F; Scholz, N L

    2014-12-01

    Urban stormwater contains a complex mixture of contaminants that can be acutely toxic to aquatic biota. Green stormwater infrastructure (GSI) is a set of evolving technologies intended to reduce impacts on natural systems by slowing and filtering runoff. The extent to which GSI methods work as intended is usually assessed in terms of water quantity (hydrology) and quality (chemistry). Biological indicators of GSI effectiveness have received less attention, despite an overarching goal of protecting the health of aquatic species. Here we use the zebrafish (Danio rerio) experimental model to evaluate bioinfiltration as a relatively inexpensive technology for treating runoff from an urban highway with dense motor vehicle traffic. Zebrafish embryos exposed to untreated runoff (48-96h; six storm events) displayed an array of developmental abnormalities, including delayed hatching, reduced growth, pericardial edema, microphthalmia (small eyes), and reduced swim bladder inflation. Three of the six storms were acutely lethal, and sublethal toxicity was evident across all storms, even when stormwater was diluted by as much as 95% in clean water. As anticipated from exposure to cardiotoxic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), untreated runoff also caused heart failure, as indicated by circulatory stasis, pericardial edema, and looping defects. Bioretention treatment dramatically improved stormwater quality and reversed nearly all forms of developmental toxicity. The zebrafish model therefore provides a versatile experimental platform for rapidly assessing GSI effectiveness.

  11. Safety assessment comparison methodology for toxic and radioactive wastes (SACO version 1.0)

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, C.; Simon, I.; Agueero, A.; Little, R.H.; Smith, G.M.

    1993-12-31

    As part of a research contract jointly funded by the Commission of the European Communities (CEC) and Empresa Nacional de Residuos Radiactivos S.A. (Enresa, Spain), the Instituto de Medioambiente of the CIEMAT Research Centre and Intera (UK) are developing and testing a general methodology (SACO) to assess the post-disposal environmental impact produced by waste disposal practices. The scope of the methodology includes toxic, radioactive and mixed hazardous wastes. The term toxic is interpreted broadly to include any kind of liquid or solid non-radioactive waste which could give rise to some detrimental environmental effects post-disposal. Radioactive wastes considered include the full range from low to high level solid wastes arising inside and outside the nuclear power industry. Mixed hazardous waste is taken to be waste presenting both radioactive and other toxic hazard potential. In this paper SACO version 1.0 methodology is presented and it is applied to the assessment of the impact of shallow and deep disposal of waste.

  12. Rapid toxicity assessment of sediments from estuarine ecosystems: A new tandem in vitro testing approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, B.T.; Long, E.R.

    1998-01-01

    Microtox?? and Mutatox?? were used to evaluate the acute toxicity and genotoxicity, respectively, of organic sediment extracts from Pensacola Bay and St. Andrew Bay, two estuaries that cover about 273 and 127 km2, respectively, along the Gulf coast of Florida, USA. The sensitivity and selectivity of these two bioluminescent toxicity assays were demonstrated in validation studies with over 50 pesticides, genotoxins, and industrial pollutants, both as single compounds and in complex mixtures. The 50% effective concentration (EC50) values of insecticides, petroleum products, and polychlorinated biphenyls determined by Microtox all tended to group around the mean EC50 value of 1.2 (0.8) mg/L. The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon sensitivity of Mutatox was in general similar to that reported in the Ames test. Surficial sediment samples were collected, extracted with dichloromethane, evaporated and concentrated under nitrogen, dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide, assayed for acute toxicity and genotoxicity, and compared with reference sediments. Samples with low EC50 values, and determined to be genotoxic, were detected in Massalina Bayou, Watson Bayou, East Bay, and St. Andrew Bay-East in St. Andrew Bay as well as Bayou Grande, Bayou Chico, and Bayou Texar in Pensacola Bay. An overview of these data sets analyzed by Spearman rank correlation showed a significant correlation between acute toxicity and genotoxicity (p < 0.05). Microtox and Mutatox in tandem was a sensitive, cost-effective, and rapid (<24 h) screening tool that identified troublesome areas of pollution and assessed the potential sediment toxicity of lipophilic contaminants in aquatic ecosystems.

  13. Toxicity assessment of individual ingredients of synthetic-based drilling muds (SBMs).

    PubMed

    Bakhtyar, Sajida; Gagnon, Marthe Monique

    2012-09-01

    Synthetic-based drilling muds (SBMs) offer excellent technical characteristics while providing improved environmental performance over other drilling muds. The low acute toxicity and high biodegradability of SBMs suggest their discharge at sea would cause minimal impacts on marine ecosystems, however, chronic toxicity testing has demonstrated adverse effects of SBMs on fish health. Sparse environmental monitoring data indicate effects of SBMs on bottom invertebrates. However, no environmental toxicity assessment has been performed on fish attracted to the cutting piles. SBM formulations are mostly composed of synthetic base oils, weighting agents, and drilling additives such as emulsifiers, fluid loss agents, wetting agents, and brine. The present study aimed to evaluate the impact of exposure to individual ingredients of SBMs on fish health. To do so, a suite of biomarkers [ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity, biliary metabolites, sorbitol dehydrogenase (SDH) activity, DNA damage, and heat shock protein] have been measured in pink snapper (Pagrus auratus) exposed for 21 days to individual ingredients of SBMs. The primary emulsifier (Emul S50) followed by the fluid loss agent (LSL 50) caused the strongest biochemical responses in fish. The synthetic base oil (Rheosyn) caused the least response in juvenile fish. The results suggest that the impact of Syndrill 80:20 on fish health might be reduced by replacement of the primary emulsifier Emul S50 with an alternative ingredient of less toxicity to aquatic biota. The research provides a basis for improving the environmental performance of SBMs by reducing the environmental risk of their discharge and providing environmental managers with information regarding the potential toxicity of individual ingredients. PMID:21928151

  14. Correlation of the five test methods to assess chemical toxicity and relation to physical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshioka, Y.; Ose, Y.; Sato, T.

    1986-08-01

    Biological tests using Orizias latipes (LC50 and oxygen uptake test), Moina macrocopa (LC50), and Dugesia japonica (head regeneration test and LC50) were carried out in order to clarify the mutual relationship of these test methods. The oxygen uptake rate of O. latipes was not effective to assess chemical toxicity. Adding the results of the growth inhibition test of Tetrahymena pyriformis (Yoshioka, Y., Ose, Y., and Sato, T. (1985). Sci. Total Environ. 43, 149-157), the correlation coefficients between each two test methods were calculated. The test results except EC50 and LC50 of D. japonica showed a good relation to each other. We determined the solubility and the n-octanol/water partition coefficient (P) of some chemicals used in the test. Log P interpreted the toxicity in mol/liter unit but not in mg/liter. Solubility was not a useful descripter neither in mol/liter nor in mg/liter unit.

  15. Degradation of roxarsone in a silt loam soil and its toxicity assessment.

    PubMed

    Liang, Tengfang; Ke, Zhengchen; Chen, Qing; Liu, Li; Chen, Guowei

    2014-10-01

    The land application of poultry or swine litter, containing large amounts of roxarsone, causes serious arsenic pollution in soil. Understanding biotransformation process of roxarsone and its potential risks favors proper disposal of roxarsone-contaminated animal litter, yet remains not achieved. We report an experimental study of biotransformation process of roxarsone in a silt loam soil under various soil moisture and temperature conditions, and the toxicity of roxarsone and its products from degradation. Results showed that soil moisture and higher temperature promoted roxarsone degradation, associating with emergent pentavalent arsenic. Analysis of fluorescein diacetate (FDA) hydrolysis activity revealed that roxarsone does not exert acute toxic on soil microbes. With the release of inorganic arsenic, FDA hydrolysis activity was inhibited gradually, as evidenced by ecotoxicological assessment using Photobacterium leiognathi. The results shade new lights on the dynamic roxarsone biotransformation processes in soil, which is important for guiding appropriate disposal of poultry or swine litter in the environment.

  16. Laboratory assessment of the toxicity of urban runoff on the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    SciTech Connect

    Medeiros, C.; Coler, R.A.; Calabrese, E.J.

    1984-01-01

    The early life stage effects of urban runoff (rain and snowmelt) on hatching, growth and survival of the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) was assessed in static and flow-through systems. The data indicate a Maximum Allowable Toxicant Concentration (MATC) and a reduction of growth to 50% of controls at 28% and 60% runoff, respectivley. Hatchability and average lengths were not as sensitive indicators of stress as millimeters produced per treatment. The data indicate a maximum toxicity in the fall which coincided with the reported drop in macroinvertebrate diversity during the same period, when untreated runoff events can contribute up to 1/4 of the river flow. The reduced diversity may be attributed to leachability and potential availability of sorbed concentrations of copper, lead, zinc, and cadmium in river sediments.

  17. Multispecies toxicity assessment of compost produced in bioremediation of an explosives-contaminated sediment

    SciTech Connect

    Gunderson, C.A.; Napolitano, G.E.; Wicker, L.F.; Richmond, J.E.; Stewart, A.J.; Kostuk, J.M.; Gibbs, M.H.

    1997-12-01

    A multispecies terrestrial test system was used to assess the environmental effectiveness of composting for bioremediation of explosives-contaminated soils. The assessment involved comparing biological responses, from the individual to the community level, in remediated and reference composts. A 6-month greenhouse study incorporated two soil invertebrate species, three plant species and an associated symbiont, and the naturally occurring complement of soil microorganisms. Measured parameters included growth and reproduction of earthworms and isopods; soil mote diversity; soil lipid class composition as an indicator of soil microbial community structure; plant growth, photosynthesis, and reproduction; and root nodulation and symbiotic N{sub 2} fixation. Additional short-term toxicity tests of seed germination and earthworm survival were performed to supplement the mesocosm data. Compost prepared from the explosives-contaminated soil inhibited several aspects of plant growth and physiology, but few adverse effects on soil invertebrates were detected. An initial lag in earthworm and isopod reproduction occurred in the reference compost, reflecting some inherent compost differences not associated with contamination, and highlighting the importance and the difficulty of finding appropriate reference soils for assessing hazardous waste sites or remediation technologies. Nonetheless, the results from this study suggested some nonlethal effects from the contaminated-soil compost, primarily to plants. The mesocosm methodology used in this study can bridge the gap between traditional short-term toxicity testing and longer term field assessments, and provide information on ecological effects by explicitly including measurements of multiple species across several levels of ecological organization.

  18. Protectiveness of species sensitivity distribution hazard concentrations for acute toxicity used in endangered species risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Raimondo, Sandy; Vivian, Deborah N; Delos, Charles; Barron, Mace G

    2008-12-01

    A primary objective of threatened and endangered species conservation is to ensure that chemical contaminants and other stressors do not adversely affect listed species. Assessments of the ecological risks of chemical exposures to listed species often rely on the use of surrogate species, safety factors, and species sensitivity distributions (SSDs) of chemical toxicity; however, the protectiveness of these approaches can be uncertain. We comprehensively evaluated the protectiveness of SSD first and fifth percentile hazard concentrations (HC1, HC5) relative to the application of safety factors using 68 SSDs generated from 1,482 acute (lethal concentration of 50%, or LC50) toxicity records for 291 species, including 24 endangered species (20 fish, four mussels). The SSD HC5s and HCls were lower than 97 and 99.5% of all endangered species mean acute LC50s, respectively. The HC5s were significantly less than the concentrations derived from applying safety factors of 5 and 10 to rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) toxicity data, and the HCls were generally lower than the concentrations derived from a safety factor of 100 applied to rainbow trout toxicity values. Comparison of relative sensitivity (SSD percentiles) of broad taxonomic groups showed that crustaceans were generally the most sensitive taxa and taxa sensitivity was related to chemical mechanism of action. Comparison of relative sensitivity of narrow fish taxonomic groups showed that standard test fish species were generally less sensitive than salmonids and listed fish. We recommend the use of SSDs as a distribution-based risk assessment approach that is generally protective of listed species.

  19. Assessment of the toxicity of wastewater from the metalworking industry treated using a conventional physico-chemical process.

    PubMed

    Machado, Rodrigo Matuella; Monteggia, Luiz Olinto; Arenzon, Alexandre; Curia, Ana Cristina

    2016-06-01

    This article presents results from a toxicity reduction evaluation program intended to describe wastewater from the metalworking industry that was treated using a conventional physico-chemical process. The toxicity of the wastewater for the microcrustacean Daphnia magna was predominantly expressive. Alkaline cyanide wastewater generated from electroplating accounted for the largest number of samples with expressive toxicity. When the raw wastewater concentrations in the batches were repeated, inexpressive toxicity variations were observed more frequently among the coagulated-flocculated samples. At the coagulation-flocculation step, 22.2 % of the treatments had reduced acute toxicity, 30.6 % showed increased toxicity, and 47.2 % remained unchanged. The conductivity and total dissolved solids contents of the wastewater indicated the presence of salts with charges that were inappropriate for the survival of daphnid. The wastewaters treated by neutralization and coagulation-flocculation had average metallic compound contents that were greater than the reference toxic concentrations reported in other studies, suggesting that metals likely contributed to the toxic effects of the wastewater on freshwater microcrustaceans. Thus, alternative coagulants and flocculants should be assessed, and feasible doses should be determined to improve wastewater treatment. In addition, advanced treatment processes should be assessed for their abilities to remove dissolved toxic salts and ions. PMID:27230425

  20. Assessment of the toxicity of wastewater from the metalworking industry treated using a conventional physico-chemical process.

    PubMed

    Machado, Rodrigo Matuella; Monteggia, Luiz Olinto; Arenzon, Alexandre; Curia, Ana Cristina

    2016-06-01

    This article presents results from a toxicity reduction evaluation program intended to describe wastewater from the metalworking industry that was treated using a conventional physico-chemical process. The toxicity of the wastewater for the microcrustacean Daphnia magna was predominantly expressive. Alkaline cyanide wastewater generated from electroplating accounted for the largest number of samples with expressive toxicity. When the raw wastewater concentrations in the batches were repeated, inexpressive toxicity variations were observed more frequently among the coagulated-flocculated samples. At the coagulation-flocculation step, 22.2 % of the treatments had reduced acute toxicity, 30.6 % showed increased toxicity, and 47.2 % remained unchanged. The conductivity and total dissolved solids contents of the wastewater indicated the presence of salts with charges that were inappropriate for the survival of daphnid. The wastewaters treated by neutralization and coagulation-flocculation had average metallic compound contents that were greater than the reference toxic concentrations reported in other studies, suggesting that metals likely contributed to the toxic effects of the wastewater on freshwater microcrustaceans. Thus, alternative coagulants and flocculants should be assessed, and feasible doses should be determined to improve wastewater treatment. In addition, advanced treatment processes should be assessed for their abilities to remove dissolved toxic salts and ions.

  1. Growing knowledge of using embryonic stem cells as a novel tool in developmental risk assessment of environmental toxicants.

    PubMed

    Rezvanfar, Mohammad Amin; Hodjat, Mahshid; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2016-08-01

    Developmental toxicology is an important area of novel toxicology. In recent years, there have been big concerns toward the increasing exposure to pharmaceutical agents, food additives, pesticides, occupational toxicants, and environmental pollutants, as well as their possible association with all aspects of male or female-mediated transient or permanent defects in progeny. Therefore, it is of great importance to look for new predictive models to evaluate environmental toxicants before they can harm the human health and embryo development. In this regard, new cell-based in vitro screening models have been developed and validated in predictive toxicology to minimize assay costs and animal usage. Stem cell-based models have been increasingly applied for predicting the toxicity of chemicals. One of the most promising existing in vitro developmental toxicity tests is the validated embryonic stem cell test (EST) which employs marine or human embryonic stem cells to assess the potential of chemicals embryotoxicity. These cells are very suitable for embryotoxicity assessment as they have been demonstrated to specify cellular developmental processes during early embryogenesis and gene expression patterns of differentiation to functionally competent specialized cell types. The present paper aimed at criticizing the human and experimental evidence for developmental toxic effects of environmental toxicants based on ESCs models. Accordingly, pesticides, heavy metals, plasticizers, nanomaterials and some solvents have been considered as the main evaluated environmental toxicants inducing developmental toxicity. At the end, current challenges, pros and cons of using ESCs as an alternative validated in vitro model for specific developmental toxicity screening are discussed.

  2. An integrated approach to improved toxicity prediction for the safety assessment during preclinical drug development using Hep G2 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Noor, Fozia Niklas, Jens Mueller-Vieira, Ursula Heinzle, Elmar

    2009-06-01

    Efficient and accurate safety assessment of compounds is extremely important in the preclinical development of drugs especially when hepatotoxicty is in question. Multiparameter and time resolved assays are expected to greatly improve the prediction of toxicity by assessing complex mechanisms of toxicity. An integrated approach is presented in which Hep G2 cells and primary rat hepatocytes are compared in frequently used cytotoxicity assays for parent compound toxicity. The interassay variability was determined. The cytotoxicity assays were also compared with a reliable alternative time resolved respirometric assay. The set of training compounds consisted of well known hepatotoxins; amiodarone, carbamazepine, clozapine, diclofenac, tacrine, troglitazone and verapamil. The sensitivity of both cell systems in each tested assay was determined. Results show that careful selection of assay parameters and inclusion of a kinetic time resolved assay improves prediction for non-metabolism mediated toxicity using Hep G2 cells as indicated by a sensitivity ratio of 1. The drugs with EC{sub 50} values 100 {mu}M or lower were considered toxic. The difference in the sensitivity of the two cell systems to carbamazepine which causes toxicity via reactive metabolites emphasizes the importance of human cell based in-vitro assays. Using the described system, primary rat hepatocytes do not offer advantage over the Hep G2 cells in parent compound toxicity evaluation. Moreover, respiration method is non invasive, highly sensitive and allows following the time course of toxicity. Respiration assay could serve as early indicator of changes that subsequently lead to toxicity.

  3. Explaining dehumanization among children: the interspecies model of prejudice.

    PubMed

    Costello, Kimberly; Hodson, Gordon

    2014-03-01

    Although many theoretical approaches have emerged to explain prejudices expressed by children, none incorporate outgroup dehumanization, a key predictor of prejudice among adults. According to the Interspecies Model of Prejudice, beliefs in the human-animal divide facilitate outgroup prejudice through fostering animalistic dehumanization (Costello & Hodson, 2010). In the present investigation, White children attributed Black children fewer 'uniquely human' characteristics, representing the first systematic evidence of racial dehumanization among children (Studies 1 and 2). In Study 2, path analyses supported the Interspecies Model of Prejudice: children's human-animal divide beliefs predicted greater racial prejudice, an effect explained by heightened racial dehumanization. Similar patterns emerged among parents. Furthermore, parent Social Dominance Orientation predicted child prejudice indirectly through children's endorsement of a hierarchical human-animal divide and subsequent dehumanizing tendencies. Encouragingly, children's human-animal divide perceptions were malleable to an experimental prime highlighting animal-human similarity. Implications for prejudice interventions are considered.

  4. Characterizing interspecies uncertainty using data from studies of anti-neoplastic agents in animals and humans

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Paul S. Keenan, Russell E.; Swartout, Jeffrey C.

    2008-11-15

    For most chemicals, the Reference Dose (RfD) is based on data from animal testing. The uncertainty introduced by the use of animal models has been termed interspecies uncertainty. The magnitude of the differences between the toxicity of a chemical in humans and test animals and its uncertainty can be investigated by evaluating the inter-chemical variation in the ratios of the doses associated with similar toxicological endpoints in test animals and humans. This study performs such an evaluation on a data set of 64 anti-neoplastic drugs. The data set provides matched responses in humans and four species of test animals: mice, rats, monkeys, and dogs. While the data have a number of limitations, the data show that when the drugs are evaluated on a body weight basis: 1) toxicity generally increases with a species' body weight; however, humans are not always more sensitive than test animals; 2) the animal to human dose ratios were less than 10 for most, but not all, drugs; 3) the current practice of using data from multiple species when setting RfDs lowers the probability of having a large value for the ratio. These findings provide insight into inter-chemical variation in animal to human extrapolations and suggest the need for additional collection and analysis of matched toxicity data in humans and test animals.

  5. Mechanisms Underlying Mammalian Hybrid Sterility in Two Feline Interspecies Models

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Brian W.; Seabury, Christopher M.; Brashear, Wesley A.; Li, Gang; Roelke-Parker, Melody; Murphy, William J.

    2015-01-01

    The phenomenon of male sterility in interspecies hybrids has been observed for over a century, however, few genes influencing this recurrent phenotype have been identified. Genetic investigations have been primarily limited to a small number of model organisms, thus limiting our understanding of the underlying molecular basis of this well-documented “rule of speciation.” We utilized two interspecies hybrid cat breeds in a genome-wide association study employing the Illumina 63 K single-nucleotide polymorphism array. Collectively, we identified eight autosomal genes/gene regions underlying associations with hybrid male sterility (HMS) involved in the function of the blood-testis barrier, gamete structural development, and transcriptional regulation. We also identified several candidate hybrid sterility regions on the X chromosome, with most residing in close proximity to complex duplicated regions. Differential gene expression analyses revealed significant chromosome-wide upregulation of X chromosome transcripts in testes of sterile hybrids, which were enriched for genes involved in chromatin regulation of gene expression. Our expression results parallel those reported in Mus hybrids, supporting the “Large X-Effect” in mammalian HMS and the potential epigenetic basis for this phenomenon. These results support the value of the interspecies feline model as a powerful tool for comparison to rodent models of HMS, demonstrating unique aspects and potential commonalities that underpin mammalian reproductive isolation. PMID:26006188

  6. Mechanisms Underlying Mammalian Hybrid Sterility in Two Feline Interspecies Models.

    PubMed

    Davis, Brian W; Seabury, Christopher M; Brashear, Wesley A; Li, Gang; Roelke-Parker, Melody; Murphy, William J

    2015-10-01

    The phenomenon of male sterility in interspecies hybrids has been observed for over a century, however, few genes influencing this recurrent phenotype have been identified. Genetic investigations have been primarily limited to a small number of model organisms, thus limiting our understanding of the underlying molecular basis of this well-documented "rule of speciation." We utilized two interspecies hybrid cat breeds in a genome-wide association study employing the Illumina 63 K single-nucleotide polymorphism array. Collectively, we identified eight autosomal genes/gene regions underlying associations with hybrid male sterility (HMS) involved in the function of the blood-testis barrier, gamete structural development, and transcriptional regulation. We also identified several candidate hybrid sterility regions on the X chromosome, with most residing in close proximity to complex duplicated regions. Differential gene expression analyses revealed significant chromosome-wide upregulation of X chromosome transcripts in testes of sterile hybrids, which were enriched for genes involved in chromatin regulation of gene expression. Our expression results parallel those reported in Mus hybrids, supporting the "Large X-Effect" in mammalian HMS and the potential epigenetic basis for this phenomenon. These results support the value of the interspecies feline model as a powerful tool for comparison to rodent models of HMS, demonstrating unique aspects and potential commonalities that underpin mammalian reproductive isolation. PMID:26006188

  7. Mechanisms Underlying Mammalian Hybrid Sterility in Two Feline Interspecies Models.

    PubMed

    Davis, Brian W; Seabury, Christopher M; Brashear, Wesley A; Li, Gang; Roelke-Parker, Melody; Murphy, William J

    2015-10-01

    The phenomenon of male sterility in interspecies hybrids has been observed for over a century, however, few genes influencing this recurrent phenotype have been identified. Genetic investigations have been primarily limited to a small number of model organisms, thus limiting our understanding of the underlying molecular basis of this well-documented "rule of speciation." We utilized two interspecies hybrid cat breeds in a genome-wide association study employing the Illumina 63 K single-nucleotide polymorphism array. Collectively, we identified eight autosomal genes/gene regions underlying associations with hybrid male sterility (HMS) involved in the function of the blood-testis barrier, gamete structural development, and transcriptional regulation. We also identified several candidate hybrid sterility regions on the X chromosome, with most residing in close proximity to complex duplicated regions. Differential gene expression analyses revealed significant chromosome-wide upregulation of X chromosome transcripts in testes of sterile hybrids, which were enriched for genes involved in chromatin regulation of gene expression. Our expression results parallel those reported in Mus hybrids, supporting the "Large X-Effect" in mammalian HMS and the potential epigenetic basis for this phenomenon. These results support the value of the interspecies feline model as a powerful tool for comparison to rodent models of HMS, demonstrating unique aspects and potential commonalities that underpin mammalian reproductive isolation.

  8. Natural interspecies recombinant bovine/porcine enterovirus in sheep.

    PubMed

    Boros, Akos; Pankovics, Péter; Knowles, Nick J; Reuter, Gábor

    2012-09-01

    Members of the genus Enterovirus (family Picornaviridae) are believed to be common and widespread among humans and different animal species, although only a few enteroviruses have been identified from animal sources. Intraspecies recombination among human enteroviruses is a well-known phenomenon, but only a few interspecies examples have been reported and, to our current knowledge, none of these have involved non-primate enteroviruses. In this study, we report the detection and complete genome characterization (using RT-PCR and long-range PCR) of a natural interspecies recombinant bovine/porcine enterovirus (ovine enterovirus type 1; OEV-1) in seven (44 %) of 16 faecal samples from 3-week-old domestic sheep (Ovis aries) collected in two consecutive years. Phylogenetic analysis of the complete coding region revealed that OEV-1 (ovine/TB4-OEV/2009/HUN; GenBank accession no. JQ277724) was a novel member of the species Porcine enterovirus B (PEV-B), implying the endemic presence of PEV-B viruses among sheep. However, the 5' UTR of OEV-1 showed a high degree of sequence and structural identity to bovine enteroviruses. The presumed recombination breakpoint was mapped to the end of the 5' UTR at nucleotide position 814 using sequence and SimPlot analyses. The interspecies-recombinant nature of OEV-1 suggests a closer relationship among bovine and porcine enteroviruses, enabling the exchange of at least some modular genetic elements that may evolve independently.

  9. Damascenine induced hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity in mice and in vitro assessed human erythrocyte toxicity.

    PubMed

    Bouguezza, Yacine; Khettal, Bachra; Tir, Lydia; Boudrioua, Souad

    2015-09-01

    Nigella damascena seed is characterized by the presence of the major alkaloid, damascenine and its related metabolites. To our knowledge, no detailed subchronic toxicological assessment of damascenine (DA) has been reported. The present study evaluated the potential toxicity of DA in vivo after sub-chronic intraperitoneal (i.p) administration in mice and in vitro following human erythrocyte hemolysis. In vivo, a total of 48 adult male and female Swiss albino mice were used in a sub-chronic toxicity study. The mice received intraperitoneally two doses of DA (20 and 100 mg/kg) for 28 days. Food intake, body weight and central body temperature were measured during the experiment. After completion of drug treatment, biochemical and histological analyses were performed. No mortality was observed in any of the treatment groups of mice, showing no toxic effects during the study. Neither were biochemical parameters altered; no significant differences were observed concerning glucose, bilirubin, aspartate transaminase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), urea, and creatinine parameters. No histopathological alterations were found in kidney and liver structures. In vitro, we focused on the human erythrocyte hemolytic process in the presence of several concentrations of DA. High level concentration of 1 000 μg/ml of DA revealed normal cell shapes and absence of hemolysis and deformation. PMID:27486370

  10. Toxicity assessment and modelling of Moringa oleifera seeds in water purification by whole cell bioreporter.

    PubMed

    Al-Anizi, Ali Adnan; Hellyer, Maria Theresa; Zhang, Dayi

    2014-06-01

    Moringa oleifera has been used as a coagulation reagent for drinking water purification, especially in developing countries such as Malawi. This research revealed the cytoxicity and genotoxicity of M. oleifera by Acinetobacter bioreporter. The results indicated that significant cytoxicity effects were observed when the powdered M. oleifera seeds concentration is from 1 to 50 mg/L. Through direct contact, ethanolic-water extraction and hexane extraction, the toxic effects of hydrophobic and hydrophilic components in M. oleifera seeds were distinguished. It suggested that the hydrophobic lipids contributed to the dominant cytoxicity, consequently resulting in the dominant genotoxicity in the water-soluble fraction due to limited dissolution when the M. oleifera seeds granule concentration was from 10 to 1000 mg/L. Based on cytoxicity and genotoxicity model, the LC50 and LC90 of M. oleifera seeds were 8.5 mg/L and 300 mg/L respectively and their genotoxicity was equivalent to 8.3 mg mitomycin C per 1.0 g dry M. oleifera seed. The toxicity of M. oleifera has also remarkable synergistic effects, suggesting whole cell bioreporter as an appropriate and complementary tool to chemical analysis for environmental toxicity assessment.

  11. Metal toxicity assessment of mobile phone parts using Milli Q water.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Sudesh; Yadav, Satyamanyu; Kumar, Pawan

    2014-07-01

    Environmentally safe disposal of end-of-life (EoL) or discarded mobile phone is a serious problem on account of their ever increasing number and toxic metals contents. In the present work, metal toxicity of mobile phone plastics, printed wire boards (PWBs) and batteries were assessed through dynamic batch leaching using Milli Q (MQ) water. Phone plastics failed Toxicity Characterization Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and Waste Extraction Test (WET) for Pb as the cumulative amount of Pb leached from plastics (5.33 mg/l) exceeded the regulatory limits (5.0mg/l) used in characterizing a waste as hazardous. Similarly, the average cumulative amount (21.83 mg/l) of Ni leached from PWBs exceeded the regulatory limit of 20mg/l and thus PWBs failed WET. Metals leached from batteries in small amounts (Cr: 0.40 mg/l and Ni: 0.15 mg/l). The presence of Fe in the batteries and its precipitation as oxides/hydroxides in the leaching solution hindered the leaching of other metals in MQ water. Both plastics and PWBs should be treated as hazardous waste and should not be disposed in open landfills. Further, MQ water leaching could provide good simulation of metals leaching from the mobile phones disposed at landfill sites.

  12. The synergistic toxicity of the multiple chemical mixtures: implications for risk assessment in the terrestrial environment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Wang, Yanhua; Qian, Yongzhong; Zhao, Xueping; Wang, Qiang

    2015-04-01

    The combined toxicity of five insecticides (chlorpyrifos, avermectin, imidacloprid, λ-cyhalothrin, and phoxim), two herbicides (atrazine and butachlor) and a heavy metal (cadmium) has been examined with the earthworm acute toxicity test. Toxicological interactions of these chemicals in four, five, six, seven, and eight-component mixtures were studied using the combination-index (CI) equation method. In four-component and five-component mixtures, the synergistic effects predominated at lower effect levels, while the patterns of interactions found in six, seven, and eight-component mixtures displayed synergism. The λ-CY+IMI+BUT+ATR+CPF+PHO combination displayed the most strongly synergistic interaction, with CI values ranging from 0.09 to 0.15. The nature of the interaction changes with the effect level and the relevance of synergistic effects increase with the complexity of the mixture. The CI method was compared with the classical models of concentration addition (CA) and independent action (IA) and we found that the CI method could accurately predict the combined toxicity. The predicted synergism resulted from co-existence of the pesticides and the heavy metal especially at low effect levels may have important implications in risk assessment for the real terrestrial environment.

  13. From streets to streams: assessing the toxicity potential of urban sediment by particle size

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Corsi, Steven R.; Selbig, William R.; Roger T. Bannerman,; ,

    2013-01-01

    Urban sediment can act as a transport mechanism for a variety of pollutants to move towards a receiving water body. The concentrations of these pollutants oftentimes exceed levels that are toxic to aquatic organisms. Many treatment structures are designed to capture coarse sediment but do not work well to similarly capture the fines. This study measured concentrations of select trace metals and PAHs in both the silt and sand fractions of urban sediment from four sources: stormwater bed, stormwater suspended, street dirt, and streambed. Concentrations were used to assess the toxic potential of sediment based on published sediment quality guidelines. All sources of sediment showed some level of toxic potential with stormwater bed sediment the highest followed by stormwater suspended, street dirt, and streambed. Both metal and PAH concentration distributions were highly correlated between the four sampling locations suggesting the presence of one or perhaps only a few sources of these pollutants which remain persistent as sediment is transported from street to stream. Comparison to other forms of combustion- and vehicle-related sources of PAHs revealed coal tar sealants to have the strongest correlation, in both the silt and sand fractions, at all four sampling sites. This information is important for environmental managers when selecting the most appropriate Best Management Practice (BMP) as a way to mitigate pollution conveyed in urban stormwater from source to sink.

  14. Evaluation of usefulness of Microbial Assay for Risk Assessment (MARA) in the cyanobacterial toxicity estimation.

    PubMed

    Sieroslawska, Anna

    2014-07-01

    The aim of the study was to elucidate the usefulness of the Microbial Assay for Risk Assessment (MARA) to evaluate toxicity in samples containing cyanobacterial products. Cyanobacterial extracts with different cyanotoxin contents and pure cyanotoxins-microcystin-LR, cylindrospermopsin and anatoxin-a-were tested. On the basis of the microbial reaction, MARA indicated only slight or no toxicity in the studied extracts. Similarly, no or low toxicity of pure toxins was detected at the concentrations used (up to 10 μg/ml). Weak relationships between the reactions of individual organisms exposed to cyanotoxin-containing extracts and to the same pure toxins were observed. On the other hand, inhibition of some organisms, such as Pichia anomalia, whose growth was not impacted by pure cyanotoxins, indicated the presence of other biologically active compounds in the studied extracts. In conclusion, MARA assay is not enough sensitive to be used as a good tool for cyanotoxin screening. It may, however, be applied in searching for antimicrobial/antifungal cyanobacteria-derived compounds. PMID:24682641

  15. Pharmacophore modeling and in silico toxicity assessment of potential anticancer agents from African medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Ntie-Kang, Fidele; Simoben, Conrad Veranso; Karaman, Berin; Ngwa, Valery Fuh; Judson, Philip Neville; Sippl, Wolfgang; Mbaze, Luc Meva'a

    2016-01-01

    Molecular modeling has been employed in the search for lead compounds of chemotherapy to fight cancer. In this study, pharmacophore models have been generated and validated for use in virtual screening protocols for eight known anticancer drug targets, including tyrosine kinase, protein kinase B β, cyclin-dependent kinase, protein farnesyltransferase, human protein kinase, glycogen synthase kinase, and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1. Pharmacophore models were validated through receiver operating characteristic and Güner-Henry scoring methods, indicating that several of the models generated could be useful for the identification of potential anticancer agents from natural product databases. The validated pharmacophore models were used as three-dimensional search queries for virtual screening of the newly developed AfroCancer database (~400 compounds from African medicinal plants), along with the Naturally Occurring Plant-based Anticancer Compound-Activity-Target dataset (comprising ~1,500 published naturally occurring plant-based compounds from around the world). Additionally, an in silico assessment of toxicity of the two datasets was carried out by the use of 88 toxicity end points predicted by the Lhasa's expert knowledge-based system (Derek), showing that only an insignificant proportion of the promising anticancer agents would be likely showing high toxicity profiles. A diversity study of the two datasets, carried out using the analysis of principal components from the most important physicochemical properties often used to access drug-likeness of compound datasets, showed that the two datasets do not occupy the same chemical space. PMID:27445461

  16. Biodegradability and toxicity assessment of a real textile wastewater effluent treated by an optimized electrocoagulation process.

    PubMed

    Manenti, Diego R; Módenes, Aparecido N; Soares, Petrick A; Boaventura, Rui A R; Palácio, Soraya M; Borba, Fernando H; Espinoza-Quiñones, Fernando R; Bergamasco, Rosângela; Vilar, Vítor J P

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the application of an iron electrode-based electrocoagulation (EC) process on the treatment of a real textile wastewater (RTW) was investigated. In order to perform an efficient integration of the EC process with a biological oxidation one, an enhancement in the biodegradability and low toxicity of final compounds was sought. Optimal values of EC reactor operation parameters (pH, current density and electrolysis time) were achieved by applying a full factorial 3(3) experimental design. Biodegradability and toxicity assays were performed on treated RTW samples obtained at the optimal values of: pH of the solution (7.0), current density (142.9 A m(-2)) and different electrolysis times. As response variables for the biodegradability and toxicity assessment, the Zahn-Wellens test (Dt), the ratio values of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) relative to low-molecular-weight carboxylates anions (LMCA) and lethal concentration 50 (LC50) were used. According to the Dt, the DOC/LMCA ratio and LC50, an electrolysis time of 15 min along with the optimal values of pH and current density were suggested as suitable for a next stage of treatment based on a biological oxidation process.

  17. Toxicity assessment of peptaibols and contaminated sediments on Crassostrea gigas embryos.

    PubMed

    Poirier, Laurence; Quiniou, Françoise; Ruiz, Nicolas; Montagu, Monique; Amiard, Jean-Claude; Pouchus, Yves François

    2007-08-01

    Peptaibols are known membrane-modifying peptides that were recently detected in marine sediments and mussels collected from a shellfish farming area (Fier d'Ars, Atlantic coast, France). In this investigation, embryotoxicity bioassays with oysters (Crassostrea gigas) were performed to assess acute toxicity of alamethicin and different groups of peptaibols produced by a Trichoderma longibrachiatum strain isolated from marine environment. C. gigas embryos appeared very sensitive to all the metabolites examined with higher toxic effects for long-sequence peptides (EC50 ranging from 10 to 64 nM). D-shaped larvae with mantle abnormality were particularly noticed when peptaibol concentrations increased. Disturbances of embryogenesis were also observed following exposure to organic and aqueous extract of sediments from Fier d'Ars (EC50=42.4 and 6.6 g L(-1) dry weight, respectively). Although peptaibol concentrations measured in these sediments could explain only a part of the toxic effects observed, this study suggests that these mycotoxins can induce larval abnormalities in a population of exposed animals at environmentally realistic concentrations. Their detection in coastal areas devoted to bivalve culture should be taken into account.

  18. Metal toxicity assessment of mobile phone parts using Milli Q water.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Sudesh; Yadav, Satyamanyu; Kumar, Pawan

    2014-07-01

    Environmentally safe disposal of end-of-life (EoL) or discarded mobile phone is a serious problem on account of their ever increasing number and toxic metals contents. In the present work, metal toxicity of mobile phone plastics, printed wire boards (PWBs) and batteries were assessed through dynamic batch leaching using Milli Q (MQ) water. Phone plastics failed Toxicity Characterization Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and Waste Extraction Test (WET) for Pb as the cumulative amount of Pb leached from plastics (5.33 mg/l) exceeded the regulatory limits (5.0mg/l) used in characterizing a waste as hazardous. Similarly, the average cumulative amount (21.83 mg/l) of Ni leached from PWBs exceeded the regulatory limit of 20mg/l and thus PWBs failed WET. Metals leached from batteries in small amounts (Cr: 0.40 mg/l and Ni: 0.15 mg/l). The presence of Fe in the batteries and its precipitation as oxides/hydroxides in the leaching solution hindered the leaching of other metals in MQ water. Both plastics and PWBs should be treated as hazardous waste and should not be disposed in open landfills. Further, MQ water leaching could provide good simulation of metals leaching from the mobile phones disposed at landfill sites. PMID:24685400

  19. Assessment of anthracene toxicity toward environmental eukaryotic microorganisms: Tetrahymena pyriformis and selected micromycetes.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, J L; Guiraud, P; Dusser, M; Kadri, M; Laffosse, J; Steiman, R; Bohatier, J

    2005-01-01

    The toxicity of anthracene, a nonmutagenic, noncarcinogenic, low-molecular-weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon present in the environment, was assessed using a ciliated protozoan, Tetrahymena pyriformis, and a selection of 10 micromycetes from different taxonomic groups living in two environmental compartments, namely aquatic and soil ecosystems. With T. pyriformis, a concentration-dependent inhibitory effect was shown on the cell proliferation rate, IC(50) = 33.40+/-4.84 mg/L (kinetic method). Phagocytosis of nonsoluble anthracene was confirmed by the presence of digestive vacuoles with photon microscopy. In fungi, anthracene did not exhibit a fungicide effect but showed a fungistatic action. Except for Absidia fusca and Cladosporium herbarum, the micromycetes showed a concentration-dependent decrease in growth. From IC(50) values determined by endpoint or kinetic methods, Rhodotorula glutinis and all of the Ascomycotina (except for Penicillium chrysogenum) were the most sensitive species, while Phanerochaete chrysosporium, P. chrysogenum, and the two Deuteromycotina were more resistant to anthracene. Our discussion focuses on the evaluation of toxicity by the two methods used for the calculation of the IC(50) values (endpoint and kinetic), the advantages of studying growth by a kinetic method (the dynamic aspect), and a comparison of toxicity to T. pyriformis and the different micromycetes.

  20. Ceriodaphnia and Chironomus in situ toxicity tests assessing the wastewater treatment efficacy of constructed wetlands

    SciTech Connect

    Barjaktarovic, L.; Nix, P.; Gulley, J.

    1995-12-31

    In situ toxicity tests were designed for Ceriodaphnia dubia and Chironomus tentans as part of a larger study designed to assess the effectiveness of constructed wetlands for the treatment of wastewater produced by oil production at Suncor OSG. The artificial wetlands were 50m long by 3m wide, with three replicates of the control and the treatment. Each wetland had four sample sites equidistant along its length, creating a gradient of treatment from site A being the most toxic to site D being the least toxic. Each test was conducted twice during the summer of 1994. Both the Ceriodaphnia and Chironomus test cages were a flow through design to allow for maximal exposure to the water within the wetlands. Mortality and reproduction were used as endpoints for Ceriodaphnia, whereas mortality and growth were used as endpoints for the Chironomus test. Test durations were fifteen and ten days respectively. Chironomus had very high mortality along the entire wetlands whereas Ceriodaphnia survival and fecundity increased along the length of the treatment wetlands. Both organisms had low mortality and high growth/fecundity in the control wetlands.

  1. Pharmacophore modeling and in silico toxicity assessment of potential anticancer agents from African medicinal plants

    PubMed Central

    Ntie-Kang, Fidele; Simoben, Conrad Veranso; Karaman, Berin; Ngwa, Valery Fuh; Judson, Philip Neville; Sippl, Wolfgang; Mbaze, Luc Meva’a

    2016-01-01

    Molecular modeling has been employed in the search for lead compounds of chemotherapy to fight cancer. In this study, pharmacophore models have been generated and validated for use in virtual screening protocols for eight known anticancer drug targets, including tyrosine kinase, protein kinase B β, cyclin-dependent kinase, protein farnesyltransferase, human protein kinase, glycogen synthase kinase, and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1. Pharmacophore models were validated through receiver operating characteristic and Güner–Henry scoring methods, indicating that several of the models generated could be useful for the identification of potential anticancer agents from natural product databases. The validated pharmacophore models were used as three-dimensional search queries for virtual screening of the newly developed AfroCancer database (~400 compounds from African medicinal plants), along with the Naturally Occurring Plant-based Anticancer Compound-Activity-Target dataset (comprising ~1,500 published naturally occurring plant-based compounds from around the world). Additionally, an in silico assessment of toxicity of the two datasets was carried out by the use of 88 toxicity end points predicted by the Lhasa’s expert knowledge-based system (Derek), showing that only an insignificant proportion of the promising anticancer agents would be likely showing high toxicity profiles. A diversity study of the two datasets, carried out using the analysis of principal components from the most important physicochemical properties often used to access drug-likeness of compound datasets, showed that the two datasets do not occupy the same chemical space. PMID:27445461

  2. Damascenine induced hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity in mice and in vitro assessed human erythrocyte toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Khettal, Bachra; Tir, Lydia; Boudrioua, Souad

    2015-01-01

    Nigella damascena seed is characterized by the presence of the major alkaloid, damascenine and its related metabolites. To our knowledge, no detailed subchronic toxicological assessment of damascenine (DA) has been reported. The present study evaluated the potential toxicity of DA in vivo after sub-chronic intraperitoneal (i.p) administration in mice and in vitro following human erythrocyte hemolysis. In vivo, a total of 48 adult male and female Swiss albino mice were used in a sub-chronic toxicity study. The mice received intraperitoneally two doses of DA (20 and 100 mg/kg) for 28 days. Food intake, body weight and central body temperature were measured during the experiment. After completion of drug treatment, biochemical and histological analyses were performed. No mortality was observed in any of the treatment groups of mice, showing no toxic effects during the study. Neither were biochemical parameters altered; no significant differences were observed concerning glucose, bilirubin, aspartate transaminase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), urea, and creatinine parameters. No histopathological alterations were found in kidney and liver structures. In vitro, we focused on the human erythrocyte hemolytic process in the presence of several concentrations of DA. High level concentration of 1 000 μg/ml of DA revealed normal cell shapes and absence of hemolysis and deformation. PMID:27486370

  3. Improving ecological risk assessment of persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic (PBT) chemicals by using an integrated modeling system - An example assessing chloroparaffins in riverine environments.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical risk assessment (CRA) is primarily carried out at the screening level relying on empirical relationships between chemical properties and tested toxicity effects. Ultimately, risk to aquatic ecosystems is strongly dependent on actual exposure, which depends on chemical pr...

  4. Integrated modeling systems to assess exposure and toxicity of chemicals in support of aquatic ecological risk assessment of methodologically challenging chemicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    From an exposure assessment perspective, persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic chemicals (PBTs) are some of the most challenging chemicals facing environmental decision makers today. Due to their general physico-chemical properties [e.g., high octanol-water partition coefficien...

  5. Treatment process and toxicities assessment of wastewater issued from anaerobic digestion of household wastes.

    PubMed

    Djelal, Hayet; Tahrani, Leyla; Fathallah, Salem; Cabrol, Audrey; Mansour, Hedi Ben

    2014-02-01

    Modern society grapples with large amounts of household waste. The anaerobic digestion of this waste offers a promising source for energy-rich biogas production but generates high toxic effluents that require treatment before reuse or disposal into the environment. This study aimed to investigate three techniques, namely coagulation/flocculation, electro-coagulation, and activated sludge, in terms of efficiency in the treatment of these effluents. It also aimed to assess their toxicity effects on the germination and growth of durum wheat Triticum aestivum L. seeds before and after 6 days of treatment. Activated sludge was most efficient in reducing chemical oxygen demand, turbidity, and conductivity (95.7 %, 15.8 %, and 37.5 %, respectively). The effluent treated with this technique induced a marked delay in germination (low mean time of germination) and a significant reduction in the percentages of seed germination and root and leaf growths. It was also noted to strongly induce lipid peroxidation in roots and leaves, which presumably explained the germination/growth inhibition of the wheat seeds. The effluent also induced marked lipid peroxidation effects and strongly inhibited the activities of butyrylcholinesterase in mice bone marrows. The effluent shows a high ability to inhibit the growth of three microalgae; these endpoints are useful tools to biomonitor the physico-chemical quality of this wastewater. Overall, while no significant alterations were observed in terms of animal and vegetable toxicities when the effluent was treated by coagulation/flocculation, activated sludge treatment proved efficient in reducing the toxicities induced by the untreated effluents. The results indicate that the application of this technique is promising with regards to attaining efficient, eco-friendly, and cost-effective strategies for the management and treatment of household waste. PMID:24072641

  6. Toxicity assessment of TiO₂ nanoparticles in zebrafish embryos under different exposure conditions.

    PubMed

    Clemente, Z; Castro, V L S S; Moura, M A M; Jonsson, C M; Fraceto, L F

    2014-02-01

    The popularity of TiO2 nanoparticles (nano-TiO2) lies in their wide range of nanotechnological applications, together with low toxicity. Meanwhile, recent studies have shown that the photocatalytic properties of this material can result in alterations in their behavior in the environment, causing effects that have not yet been fully elucidated. The objective of this study was to evaluate the toxicity of two formulations of nano-TiO2 under different illumination conditions, using an experimental model coherent with the principle of the three Rs of alternative animal experimentation (reduction, refinement, and replacement). Embryos of the fish Danio rerio were exposed for 96h to different concentrations of nano-TiO2 in the form of anatase (TA) or an anatase/rutile mixture (TM), under either visible light or a combination of visible and ultraviolet light (UV). The acute toxicity and sublethal parameters evaluated included survival rates, malformation, hatching, equilibrium, and overall length of the larvae, together with biochemical biomarkers (specific activities of catalase (CAT), glutathione S-transferase (GST), and acid phosphatase (AP)). Both TA and TM caused accelerated hatching of the larvae. Under UV irradiation, there was greater mortality of the larvae of the groups exposed to TM, compared to those exposed to TA. Exposure to TM under UV irradiation altered the equilibrium of the larvae. Alterations in the activities of CAT and GST were indicative of oxidative stress, although no clear dose-response relationship was observed. The effects of nano-TiO2 appeared to depend on both the type of formulation and the illumination condition. The findings contribute to elucidation of the factors involved in the toxicity of these nanoparticles, as well as to the establishment of protocols for risk assessments of nanotechnology. PMID:24418748

  7. Treatment process and toxicities assessment of wastewater issued from anaerobic digestion of household wastes.

    PubMed

    Djelal, Hayet; Tahrani, Leyla; Fathallah, Salem; Cabrol, Audrey; Mansour, Hedi Ben

    2014-02-01

    Modern society grapples with large amounts of household waste. The anaerobic digestion of this waste offers a promising source for energy-rich biogas production but generates high toxic effluents that require treatment before reuse or disposal into the environment. This study aimed to investigate three techniques, namely coagulation/flocculation, electro-coagulation, and activated sludge, in terms of efficiency in the treatment of these effluents. It also aimed to assess their toxicity effects on the germination and growth of durum wheat Triticum aestivum L. seeds before and after 6 days of treatment. Activated sludge was most efficient in reducing chemical oxygen demand, turbidity, and conductivity (95.7 %, 15.8 %, and 37.5 %, respectively). The effluent treated with this technique induced a marked delay in germination (low mean time of germination) and a significant reduction in the percentages of seed germination and root and leaf growths. It was also noted to strongly induce lipid peroxidation in roots and leaves, which presumably explained the germination/growth inhibition of the wheat seeds. The effluent also induced marked lipid peroxidation effects and strongly inhibited the activities of butyrylcholinesterase in mice bone marrows. The effluent shows a high ability to inhibit the growth of three microalgae; these endpoints are useful tools to biomonitor the physico-chemical quality of this wastewater. Overall, while no significant alterations were observed in terms of animal and vegetable toxicities when the effluent was treated by coagulation/flocculation, activated sludge treatment proved efficient in reducing the toxicities induced by the untreated effluents. The results indicate that the application of this technique is promising with regards to attaining efficient, eco-friendly, and cost-effective strategies for the management and treatment of household waste.

  8. Abatement of toxicity of effluents containing Cr(VI) by heterogeneous photocatalysis. Toxicity assessment by AMPHITOX assay.

    PubMed

    Hojman, Jonatan Y; Meichtry, J Martín; Litter, Marta I; Pérez Coll, Cristina S

    2015-12-01

    Toxicity of a Cr(VI) solution before and after treatment by TiO2 heterogeneous photocatalysis (HP) was performed with AMPHITOX bioassay. Changes in toxicity on Rhinella arenarum larvae for 10-d were monitored after exposure to an untreated Cr(VI) solution and to the same solution after HP treatment. The HP treatment of a 41.60 mg L(-1) Cr(VI) solution reduced to 37.5% the concentration of the metal ion. A 10-fold reduction in toxicity at acute exposure (72 h) and 150-fold reduction in toxicity after 240 h was found. Further, the LOEC value increased from 0.001% for the untreated solution to 0.153% after HP treatment. Moreover, the safe concentration in untreated solution corresponded to 0.0001% sample, and it was 0.01% after the treatment, i.e., 100 times higher. A saving of water of about 100,000 L per L of effluent would be possible through dilution to allow safer concentrations for discharge; the saving would reach the highest value (1,000,000 L per L) at 240 h. Sub-lethal effects were completely absent in larvae exposed to the treated solution. The AMPHITOX test allowed to detect chronic effects at low Cr concentrations, i.e. at environmentally relevant levels.

  9. Comparing rapid-screening and standard toxicity assays to assess known chemical contamination at a hazardous waste site

    SciTech Connect

    Martino, L.; Swigert, J.; Roberts, C.

    1995-12-31

    The thrust to streamline the Superfund site investigation/remediation program makes it critical for site investigators to utilize rapid screening methodologies to facilitate decision-making. However, screening methodologies providing information upon which decision-making is based must not only be rapid but also scientifically valid. This presentation compares and contrasts two rapid screening toxicity assessments, the Daphnia magna IQ Toxicity Test {trademark} and Microtox{trademark}, to a battery of standard aquatic toxicity tests using Lemna, Rana, Pimephales, Selenastruni and Ceriodaphnia. Chemical analysis of test water samples provided evidence of potential toxicological risk associated with the test samples. The study site was J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, a federal facility listed on the National Priority List that used to test and/or dispose of high explosives and chemical warfare agents in open pits or fields. Surface water samples from 20 sites were collected and used in the toxicity assessments. Water samples also were analyzed for explosives, chemical surety degradation compounds, Target Analyte List (inorganics), Target Compound List (organics) and selected pesticides and PCBs. The Microtox{trademark} assay did not reveal any toxicity present in the samples analyzed. Correlation analyses showed only slight correlation between the Daphnia magna IQ{trademark} assay and the standard 48-hour toxicity test. No correlation existed between the Microtox{trademark} assay and the aquatic toxicity tests. Results are discussed in light of the expected risk of the chemicals known to be present and the outcome of the toxicity tests.

  10. Derivation of water quality criteria of phenanthrene using interspecies correlation estimation models for aquatic life in China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiangyue; Liu, Zhengtao; Yan, Zhenguang; Yi, Xianliang

    2015-06-01

    Species sensitivity distribution (SSD) method has been widely used to derive water quality criteria (WQC). However, the toxicity data of some environmental pollutants are not easily accessible, especially for endangered and threatened species. Thus, it would be very desirable and economical to predict the toxicity of those species not subjected to toxicity test with the aid of a mathematical model. The interspecies correlation estimation (ICE) model (developed by the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA)) uses the initial toxicity estimate for one species to produce correlated toxicity values for multiple species, and it can be utilized to develop SSD and HC5 (hazardous concentration, 5th percentile). In this study, we explored the applicability of ICE to predict toxicity of phenanthrene to various species. ICE-based SSDs were generated using three surrogate species (Oncorhynchus mykiss, Lepomis macrochirus, and Daphnia magna) and compared with the metrical-based SSD. The corresponding HC5 of both models were also compared. The results showed there were no significant differences between HC5 derived from measured acute and ICE-based predicted values. The ICE model was verified as a valid approach for generating SSDs with limited toxicity data and deriving WQC for phenanthrene.

  11. Toxicity assessment of manufactured nanomaterials using the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiangxin; Zhang, Xuezhi; Chen, Yongsheng; Sommerfeld, Milton; Hu, Qiang

    2008-10-01

    With the rapid development of nanotechnology, there is an increasing risk of human and environmental exposure to nanotechnology-based materials and products. As water resources are particularly vulnerable to direct and indirect contamination of nonomaterials (NMs), the potential toxicity and environmental implication of NMs to aquatic organisms must be evaluated. In this study, we assessed potential toxicity of two commercially used NMs, titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) and quantum dots (QDs), using the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhartii as a model system. The response of the organism to NMs was assessed at physiological, biochemical, and molecular genetic levels. Growth kinetics showed that growth inhibition occurred during the first two to three days of cultivation in the presence of TiO(2) or QDs. Measurements of lipid peroxidation measurement indicated that oxidative stress of the cells occurred as early as 6 h after exposure to TiO(2) or QDs. The transcriptional expression profiling of four stress response genes (sod1, gpx, cat, and ptox2) revealed that transient up-regulation of these genes occurred in cultures containing as low as 1.0 mg L(-1) of TiO(2) or 0.1 mg L(-1) of QDs, and the maximum transcripts of cat, sod1, gpx, and ptox2 occurred at 1.5, 3, 3, and 6 h, respectively, and were proportional to the initial concentration of the NMs. As the cultures continued, recovery in growth was observed and the extent of recovery, as indicated by the final cell concentration, was dosage-dependent. QDs were found to be more toxic to Chlamydomonas cells than TiO(2) under our experimental conditions.

  12. Toxicity assessment of manufactured nanomaterials using the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiangxin; Zhang, Xuezhi; Chen, Yongsheng; Sommerfeld, Milton; Hu, Qiang

    2008-10-01

    With the rapid development of nanotechnology, there is an increasing risk of human and environmental exposure to nanotechnology-based materials and products. As water resources are particularly vulnerable to direct and indirect contamination of nonomaterials (NMs), the potential toxicity and environmental implication of NMs to aquatic organisms must be evaluated. In this study, we assessed potential toxicity of two commercially used NMs, titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) and quantum dots (QDs), using the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhartii as a model system. The response of the organism to NMs was assessed at physiological, biochemical, and molecular genetic levels. Growth kinetics showed that growth inhibition occurred during the first two to three days of cultivation in the presence of TiO(2) or QDs. Measurements of lipid peroxidation measurement indicated that oxidative stress of the cells occurred as early as 6 h after exposure to TiO(2) or QDs. The transcriptional expression profiling of four stress response genes (sod1, gpx, cat, and ptox2) revealed that transient up-regulation of these genes occurred in cultures containing as low as 1.0 mg L(-1) of TiO(2) or 0.1 mg L(-1) of QDs, and the maximum transcripts of cat, sod1, gpx, and ptox2 occurred at 1.5, 3, 3, and 6 h, respectively, and were proportional to the initial concentration of the NMs. As the cultures continued, recovery in growth was observed and the extent of recovery, as indicated by the final cell concentration, was dosage-dependent. QDs were found to be more toxic to Chlamydomonas cells than TiO(2) under our experimental conditions. PMID:18768203

  13. Determination of elemental toxicity migration limits, bioaccessibility and risk assessment of essential childcare products.

    PubMed

    Aboel Dahab, Ali; Elhag, Dhia Eldin A; Ahmed, Ammar Bourai; Al-Obaid, Humaida A

    2016-02-01

    Children especially infants are particularly sensitive to contaminant exposure, they are exposed to toxic substances including heavy metals via multiple pathways, i.e. food, air, water, soil and childcare products. To date, determination of metal bioaccessibility in teethers and feeding teats is missing in the literature; therefore, it is vitally important to assess their metal bioaccessibility and characterise the risk for children. The aim of this study is to determine the migration levels of toxic elements in teethers and feeding teats of different brands as a measure of metal bioaccessibility and characterise the risk for children exposed to these products. The migration limits of several heavy metals (Al, As, Ba, Cd, Co, Cu, Cr, Mn, Ni, Pb, Se, Sr, Zn) in different brands of teethers and feeding teats were determined simultaneously using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) adopting a protocol in the European standards for safety of toys. With the exception of Pb, the migration limits of all elements in all brands of teethers and feeding teats were below the specified limits. However, in the case of Pb, the migration was above the specified limits in all samples except one brand of feeding teats. Risk assessment expressed as hazard index (HI) was calculated for detected elements and all samples. Although HI was below 1.0 for all samples except one sample, the high Pb concentration would pose a considerable risk to children. Therefore, we recommend a more thorough research and risk characterisation taking into consideration the factors that affect HI values. Graphical Abstract Determination of metal bioaccessibility and risk characterisation of teethers and feeding teats ensure children safety against metal toxicity.

  14. Improved method for in vitro assessment of dermal toxicity for volatile organic chemicals.

    PubMed

    Rogers, James V; McDougal, James N

    2002-09-01

    Cell culture methods are being developed to assess the dermal toxicity (irritancy and corrosion) of chemicals. These in vitro methods are being validated to categorize chemicals as irritating or non-irritating to humans. Currently, these cell culture tests are useful to assist in the ranking of chemicals for irritancy, but they are not useful for quantitative risk assessment for two reasons. First, for volatile chemicals the amount of chemical in the media that the cells are exposed to may decrease with exposure time. Also, effective concentrations such as EC(50) and IC(50) are reported as the concentrations in the media not the skin tissue/cells. We have developed an in vitro approach for dermal toxicity testing of volatile chemicals that avoids these problems. Using sealed vials lacking a headspace, dermal equivalents (dermal fibroblasts in a collagen matrix) were exposed to culture medium containing a test chemical (m-xylene) and compared to a traditional open well culture system. We found that about 90% of the m-xylene was lost from the open well plates and the viability was 4-6 times greater than in the closed system. Partition coefficients were measured and used to estimate the m-xylene concentration in the fibroblasts. The EC(50) for m-xylene in the dermal equivalents was 833.13+/-35.33 microg m-xylene per gram of fibroblasts. This method will provide an effective approach to relate target cell chemical concentration to cellular responses. Based on this method, a biologically-based mathematical model could be used to determine an equivalent external dose for a specific toxic end point.

  15. Determination of elemental toxicity migration limits, bioaccessibility and risk assessment of essential childcare products.

    PubMed

    Aboel Dahab, Ali; Elhag, Dhia Eldin A; Ahmed, Ammar Bourai; Al-Obaid, Humaida A

    2016-02-01

    Children especially infants are particularly sensitive to contaminant exposure, they are exposed to toxic substances including heavy metals via multiple pathways, i.e. food, air, water, soil and childcare products. To date, determination of metal bioaccessibility in teethers and feeding teats is missing in the literature; therefore, it is vitally important to assess their metal bioaccessibility and characterise the risk for children. The aim of this study is to determine the migration levels of toxic elements in teethers and feeding teats of different brands as a measure of metal bioaccessibility and characterise the risk for children exposed to these products. The migration limits of several heavy metals (Al, As, Ba, Cd, Co, Cu, Cr, Mn, Ni, Pb, Se, Sr, Zn) in different brands of teethers and feeding teats were determined simultaneously using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) adopting a protocol in the European standards for safety of toys. With the exception of Pb, the migration limits of all elements in all brands of teethers and feeding teats were below the specified limits. However, in the case of Pb, the migration was above the specified limits in all samples except one brand of feeding teats. Risk assessment expressed as hazard index (HI) was calculated for detected elements and all samples. Although HI was below 1.0 for all samples except one sample, the high Pb concentration would pose a considerable risk to children. Therefore, we recommend a more thorough research and risk characterisation taking into consideration the factors that affect HI values. Graphical Abstract Determination of metal bioaccessibility and risk characterisation of teethers and feeding teats ensure children safety against metal toxicity. PMID:26490916

  16. Adverse Outcome Pathways as Tools to Assess Drug-Induced Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Vinken, Mathieu

    2016-01-01

    Adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) are novel tools in toxicology and human risk assessment with broad potential. AOPs are designed to provide a clear-cut mechanistic representation of toxicological effects that span over different layers of biological organization. AOPs share a common structure consisting of a molecular initiating event, a series of key events connected by key event relationships, and an adverse outcome. Development and evaluation of AOPs ideally complies with guidelines issued by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. AOP frameworks have yet been proposed for major types of drug-induced injury, especially in the liver, including steatosis, fibrosis, and cholestasis. These newly postulated AOPs can serve a number of purposes pertinent to safety assessment of drugs, in particular the establishment of quantitative structure-activity relationships, the development of novel in vitro toxicity screening tests, and the elaboration of prioritization strategies. PMID:27311472

  17. Safety evaluation of turmeric polysaccharide extract: assessment of mutagenicity and acute oral toxicity.

    PubMed

    Velusami, Chandrasekaran Chinampudur; Boddapati, Srinivasa Rao; Hongasandra Srinivasa, Srikanth; Richard, Edwin Jothie; Joseph, Joshua Allan; Balasubramanian, Murali; Agarwal, Amit

    2013-01-01

    Curcuma longa Linn. (Zingiberaceae) commonly known as turmeric has long been used for centuries as a spice and household remedy. The present study was carried out to assess the possible mutagenic potential and acute oral toxicity of polysaccharide extract of turmeric rhizome (NR-INF-02) using standard tests. The standard battery of in vitro genotoxicity tests, bacterial reverse mutation test (BRMT), chromosome aberration (CA), and micronucleus (MN) tests were employed to assess the possible mutagenic activity of NR-INF-02 (Turmacin). The results showed no mutagenic effect with NR-INF-02 up to a dose of 5000 µg/mL in BRMT. The results on CA and MN tests revealed the non clastogenic activity of NR-INF-02 in a dose range of 250.36 to 2500 µg/mL with and without metabolic activation (S9). In acute oral toxicity study, NR-INF-02 was found to be safe up to 5 g/kg body weight in Wistar rats. Overall, results indicated that polysaccharide extract of C. longa was found to be genotoxically safe and also exhibited maximum tolerable dose of more than 5 g/kg rat body weight. PMID:24455673

  18. A multi-species approach to toxicity assessment of a soil remediation technology

    SciTech Connect

    Gunderson, C.A.; Kostuck, J.M.; Gibbs, M.H.; Napolitano, G.E.; Wicker, L.F.; Richmond, J.E.; Stewart, A.J.

    1994-12-31

    A multi-species terrestrial test system was developed to test the biological effectiveness of composting as a soil-remediation technology. A suite of responses were evaluated across multiple scales to form a chain of evidence predictive of longer-term effects at higher levels. The authors compared responses of soil microorganisms, two soil invertebrates, and three plant species to two compost types (the final product from a US Army explosives composting study, and an uncontaminated reference compost). The authors evaluated plant growth and physiology (photosynthesis, root modulation and symbiotic N2-fixation), invertebrate growth and reproduction, and soil microbial populations. Compost from the contaminated soil inhibited several aspects of plant performance, but produced few adverse effects on invertebrates. An initial lag in invertebrate reproduction in the reference compost, however, suggested differences not associated with residual contamination and highlighted a difficulty inherent in soil toxicity assessment: finding an appropriate reference soil. Nevertheless, the results from this system and complementary shorter-term tests suggested some non-lethal adverse effects from the contaminated-soil compost, primarily to plants. This methodology can bridge the gap between traditional short-term toxicity testing and longer-term field assessments and provide information on ecological effects by explicitly including measurements at several levels of ecological organization.

  19. Assessment of toxicity of a glyphosate-based formulation using bacterial systems in lake water.

    PubMed

    Amorós, I; Alonso, J L; Romaguera, S; Carrasco, J M

    2007-05-01

    A new Aeromonas bioassay is described to assess the potential harmful effects of the glyphosate-based herbicide, Roundup, in the Albufera lake, a protected area near Valencia. Viability markers as membrane integrity, culturability and beta-galactosidase production of Aeromonas caviae were studied to determine the influence of the herbicide in the bacterial cells. Data from the multifactor analysis of variance test showed no significant differences (P>0.05) between A. caviae counts of viability markers at the studied concentrations (0, 50 and 100 mg l-1 of glyphosate). The effects of Roundup on microbial biota present in the lake were assessed by measuring the number of indigenous mesophilic Aeromonas in presence of different amounts of the herbicide at 0, 50 and 100 mg l-1 of glyphosate. In samples containing 50 and 100 mg l-1 of glyphosate a significant (P<0.05) increase in Aeromonas spp. counts and accompanying flora was observed. The acute toxicity of Roundup and of Roundup diluted with Albufera lake water to Microtox luminescent bacterium (Vibrio fischeri) also was determined. The EC50 values obtained were 36.4 mg l-1 and 64.0 mgl-1 of glyphosate respectively. The acidity (pH 4.5) of the herbicide formulation was the responsible of the observed toxicity.

  20. Safety Evaluation of Turmeric Polysaccharide Extract: Assessment of Mutagenicity and Acute Oral Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Velusami, Chandrasekaran Chinampudur; Boddapati, Srinivasa Rao; Hongasandra Srinivasa, Srikanth; Richard, Edwin Jothie; Balasubramanian, Murali

    2013-01-01

    Curcuma longa Linn. (Zingiberaceae) commonly known as turmeric has long been used for centuries as a spice and household remedy. The present study was carried out to assess the possible mutagenic potential and acute oral toxicity of polysaccharide extract of turmeric rhizome (NR-INF-02) using standard tests. The standard battery of in vitro genotoxicity tests, bacterial reverse mutation test (BRMT), chromosome aberration (CA), and micronucleus (MN) tests were employed to assess the possible mutagenic activity of NR-INF-02 (Turmacin). The results showed no mutagenic effect with NR-INF-02 up to a dose of 5000 µg/mL in BRMT. The results on CA and MN tests revealed the non clastogenic activity of NR-INF-02 in a dose range of 250.36 to 2500 µg/mL with and without metabolic activation (S9). In acute oral toxicity study, NR-INF-02 was found to be safe up to 5 g/kg body weight in Wistar rats. Overall, results indicated that polysaccharide extract of C. longa was found to be genotoxically safe and also exhibited maximum tolerable dose of more than 5 g/kg rat body weight. PMID:24455673

  1. Toxicity assessment of environmental pollutant phenanthrene in clam Venerupis philippinarum using oxidative stress biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Pan, Luqing; Tao, Yanxia

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this study was to assess potential toxic effects of phenanthrene (PHE) on tissues of clam Venerupis philippinarum using parameters of antioxidant defenses and oxidative stress. Antioxidant biomarkers including ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD), glutathione S-transferase (GST), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione (GSH), as well as DNA damage and lipid peroxidation (LPO) in gills and digestive glands of V. philippinarum, were analyzed after a 1-, 3-, 6-, 10- and 15-day exposure to seawater containing PHE at concentrations of 2, 10, 50 μg/L. The results showed that the activity of most antioxidant enzymes was induced throughout the exposure period, and different trends were detected with time of exposure. The oxidative stress could be obviously caused in the gills and digestive glands under the experimental conditions. Overall, our results show that digestive glands are more sensitive to marine environmental stressors than gills, and GSH is proposed as potential useful biomarker as it showed good correlation with the target contaminant. This could provide useful information for toxic risk assessment of environmental pollutant PHE.

  2. Limitations of toxicity characterization in life cycle assessment: Can adverse outcome pathways provide a new foundation?

    PubMed

    Gust, Kurt A; Collier, Zachary A; Mayo, Michael L; Stanley, Jacob K; Gong, Ping; Chappell, Mark A

    2016-07-01

    Life cycle assessment (LCA) has considerable merit for holistic evaluation of product planning, development, production, and disposal, with the inherent benefit of providing a forecast of potential health and environmental impacts. However, a technical review of current life cycle impact assessment (LCIA) methods revealed limitations within the biological effects assessment protocols, including: simplistic assessment approaches and models; an inability to integrate emerging types of toxicity data; a reliance on linear impact assessment models; a lack of methods to mitigate uncertainty; and no explicit consideration of effects in species of concern. The purpose of the current study is to demonstrate that a new concept in toxicological and regulatory assessment, the adverse outcome pathway (AOP), has many useful attributes of potential use to ameliorate many of these problems, to expand data utility and model robustness, and to enable more accurate and defensible biological effects assessments within LCIA. Background, context, and examples have been provided to demonstrate these potential benefits. We additionally propose that these benefits can be most effectively realized through development of quantitative AOPs (qAOPs) crafted to meet the needs of the LCIA framework. As a means to stimulate qAOP research and development in support of LCIA, we propose 3 conceptual classes of qAOP, each with unique inherent attributes for supporting LCIA: 1) mechanistic, including computational toxicology models; 2) probabilistic, including Bayesian networks and supervised machine learning models; and 3) weight of evidence, including models built using decision-analytic methods. Overall, we have highlighted a number of potential applications of qAOPs that can refine and add value to LCIA. As the AOP concept and support framework matures, we see the potential for qAOPs to serve a foundational role for next-generation effects characterization within LCIA. Integr Environ Assess Manag

  3. Is Boric Acid Toxic to Reproduction in Humans? Assessment of the Animal Reproductive Toxicity Data and Epidemiological Study Results.

    PubMed

    Duydu, Yalçın; Başaran, Nurşen; Ustündağ, Aylin; Aydın, Sevtap; Undeğer, Ulkü; Ataman, Osman Yavuz; Aydos, Kaan; Düker, Yalçın; Ickstadt, Katja; Waltrup, Brita Schulze; Golka, Klaus; Bolt, Hermann Maximilian

    2016-01-01

    Boric acid and sodium borates are classified as toxic to reproduction in the CLP Regulation under "Category 1B" with the hazard statement of "H360FD". This classification is based on the reprotoxic effects of boric acid and sodium borates in animal experiments at high doses. However, boron mediated reprotoxic effects have not been proven in epidemiological studies so far. The epidemiological study performed in Bandırma boric acid production plant is the most comprehensive published study in this field with 204 voluntarily participated male workers. Sperm quality parameters (sperm morphology, concentration and motility parameters), FSH, LH and testosterone levels were determined in all participated employees as the reproductive toxicity biomarkers of males. However, boron mediated unfavorable effects on reproduction in male workers have not been determined even in the workers under very high daily boron exposure (0.21 mg B/kg-bw/day) conditions. The NOAEL for rat reproductive toxicity is equivalent to a blood boron level of 2020 ng/g. This level is higher than the mean blood boron concentration (223.89 ± 69.49 ng/g) of the high exposure group workers in Bandırma boric acid production plant (Turkey) by a factor of 9. Accordingly, classifying boric acid and sodium borates under "Category 1B" as "presumed reproductive human toxicant in the CLP regulation seems scientifically not reasonable. The results of the epidemiological studies (including the study performed in China) support for a down-classification of boric acid from the category 1B, H360FD to category 2, H361d, (suspected of damaging the unborn child). PMID:26511087

  4. Is Boric Acid Toxic to Reproduction in Humans? Assessment of the Animal Reproductive Toxicity Data and Epidemiological Study Results.

    PubMed

    Duydu, Yalçın; Başaran, Nurşen; Ustündağ, Aylin; Aydın, Sevtap; Undeğer, Ulkü; Ataman, Osman Yavuz; Aydos, Kaan; Düker, Yalçın; Ickstadt, Katja; Waltrup, Brita Schulze; Golka, Klaus; Bolt, Hermann Maximilian

    2016-01-01

    Boric acid and sodium borates are classified as toxic to reproduction in the CLP Regulation under "Category 1B" with the hazard statement of "H360FD". This classification is based on the reprotoxic effects of boric acid and sodium borates in animal experiments at high doses. However, boron mediated reprotoxic effects have not been proven in epidemiological studies so far. The epidemiological study performed in Bandırma boric acid production plant is the most comprehensive published study in this field with 204 voluntarily participated male workers. Sperm quality parameters (sperm morphology, concentration and motility parameters), FSH, LH and testosterone levels were determined in all participated employees as the reproductive toxicity biomarkers of males. However, boron mediated unfavorable effects on reproduction in male workers have not been determined even in the workers under very high daily boron exposure (0.21 mg B/kg-bw/day) conditions. The NOAEL for rat reproductive toxicity is equivalent to a blood boron level of 2020 ng/g. This level is higher than the mean blood boron concentration (223.89 ± 69.49 ng/g) of the high exposure group workers in Bandırma boric acid production plant (Turkey) by a factor of 9. Accordingly, classifying boric acid and sodium borates under "Category 1B" as "presumed reproductive human toxicant in the CLP regulation seems scientifically not reasonable. The results of the epidemiological studies (including the study performed in China) support for a down-classification of boric acid from the category 1B, H360FD to category 2, H361d, (suspected of damaging the unborn child).

  5. Patient-Assessed Late Toxicity Rates and Principal Component Analysis After Image-Guided Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Skala, Marketa; Rosewall, Tara; Dawson, Laura; Divanbeigi, Lorella; Lockwood, Gina; Thomas, Christopher; Crook, Juanita; Chung, Peter; Warde, Padraig; Catton, Charles . E-mail: charles.catton@rmp.uhn.on.ca

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: The aims of this study were to determine the incidence of patient-assessed late toxicity after high-dose, image-guided radiation therapy in a cohort of men with prostate cancer; and to correlate toxicity with conventional dosimetric parameters and rectal and bladder dose-volume histograms (DVH) reduced using principal component analysis. Methods and Materials: Toxicity questionnaires were sent to 690 men treated for localized prostate cancer to 75.6 Gy or 79.8 Gy using three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) or intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) between 1997 and 2003 at the Princess Margaret Hospital. Toxicity was graded according to the modified Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG)-late effects normal tissue (LENT) scoring system. Late rectal and bladder toxicity scores were dichotomized as < Grade 2 and {>=} Grade 2, and correlated with dosimetric parameters and with the first three principal components of rectal and bladder DVHs. Results: In all, 63% of the patients completed the questionnaire. At a median follow-up of 37 months, the incidence of late rectal toxicity RTOG Grades 1, 2, and 3 was 25.2%, 2.5%, and 0.7% respectively. The incidence of late urinary toxicity RTOG Grade 1, 2, and 3 was 16.5%, 8.8%, and 0.9% respectively. Maintenance of erectile function sufficient for intercourse was reported in 68%. No dosimetric parameter analyzed, including principal component analysis reduction of DVHs, correlated with late toxicity. Conclusions: Postal questionnaire was effective for collection of patient-assessed late toxicity data. The incidence of late toxicity was low, with a lack of correlation to dosimetric parameters. We attribute this to the use of conformal techniques and daily image guidance.

  6. Improving reptile ecological risk assessment: oral and dermal toxicity of pesticides to a common lizard species (Sceloporus occidentalis).

    PubMed

    Weir, Scott M; Yu, Shuangying; Talent, Larry G; Maul, Jonathan D; Anderson, Todd A; Salice, Christopher J

    2015-08-01

    Reptiles have been understudied in ecotoxicology, which limits consideration in ecological risk assessments. The goals of the present study were 3-fold: to improve oral and dermal dosing methodologies for reptiles, to generate reptile toxicity data for pesticides, and to correlate reptile and avian toxicity. The authors first assessed the toxicity of different dosing vehicles: 100 μL of water, propylene glycol, and acetone were not toxic. The authors then assessed the oral and dermal toxicity of 4 pesticides following the up-and-down procedure. Neither brodifacoum nor chlorothalonil caused mortality at doses ≤ 1750 μg/g. Under the "neat pesticide" oral exposure, endosulfan (median lethal dose [LD50] = 9.8 μg/g) was more toxic than λ-cyhalothrin (LD50 = 916.5 μg/g). Neither chemical was toxic via dermal exposure. An acetone dosing vehicle increased λ-cyhalothrin toxicity (oral LD50 = 9.8 μg/g; dermal LD50 = 17.5 μg/g), but not endosulfan. Finally, changes in dosing method and husbandry significantly increased dermal λ-cyhalothrin LD50s, which highlights the importance of standardized methods. The authors combined data from the present study with other reptile LD50s to correlate with available avian data. When only definitive LD50s were used in the analysis, a strong correlation was found between avian and reptile toxicity. The results suggest it is possible to build predictive relationships between avian and reptile LD50s. More research is needed, however, to understand trends associated with chemical classes and modes of action. PMID:25760295

  7. Improving reptile ecological risk assessment: oral and dermal toxicity of pesticides to a common lizard species (Sceloporus occidentalis).

    PubMed

    Weir, Scott M; Yu, Shuangying; Talent, Larry G; Maul, Jonathan D; Anderson, Todd A; Salice, Christopher J

    2015-08-01

    Reptiles have been understudied in ecotoxicology, which limits consideration in ecological risk assessments. The goals of the present study were 3-fold: to improve oral and dermal dosing methodologies for reptiles, to generate reptile toxicity data for pesticides, and to correlate reptile and avian toxicity. The authors first assessed the toxicity of different dosing vehicles: 100 μL of water, propylene glycol, and acetone were not toxic. The authors then assessed the oral and dermal toxicity of 4 pesticides following the up-and-down procedure. Neither brodifacoum nor chlorothalonil caused mortality at doses ≤ 1750 μg/g. Under the "neat pesticide" oral exposure, endosulfan (median lethal dose [LD50] = 9.8 μg/g) was more toxic than λ-cyhalothrin (LD50 = 916.5 μg/g). Neither chemical was toxic via dermal exposure. An acetone dosing vehicle increased λ-cyhalothrin toxicity (oral LD50 = 9.8 μg/g; dermal LD50 = 17.5 μg/g), but not endosulfan. Finally, changes in dosing method and husbandry significantly increased dermal λ-cyhalothrin LD50s, which highlights the importance of standardized methods. The authors combined data from the present study with other reptile LD50s to correlate with available avian data. When only definitive LD50s were used in the analysis, a strong correlation was found between avian and reptile toxicity. The results suggest it is possible to build predictive relationships between avian and reptile LD50s. More research is needed, however, to understand trends associated with chemical classes and modes of action.

  8. Toxicity bioassays for ecological risk assessment in arid and semiarid ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Markwiese, J T; Ryti, R T; Hooten, M M; Michael, D I; Hlohowskyj, I

    2001-01-01

    Substantial tracts of land in the southwestern and western U.S. are undergoing or will require ERA. Toxicity bioassays employed in baseline ERAs are, for the most part. representative of mesic systems, and highly standardized test species (e.g., lettuce, earthworm) are generally not relevant to arid system toxicity testing. Conversely, relevant test species are often poorly characterized with regard to toxicant sensitivity and culture conditions. The applicability of toxicity bioassays to ecological risk assessment in arid and semiarid ecosystems was reviewed for bacteria and fungi, plants, terrestrial invertebrates, and terrestrial vertebrates. Bacteria and fungi are critical to soil processes, and understanding their ecology is important to understanding the ecological relevance of bioassays targeting either group. Terrestrial bacteria require a water film around soil particles to be active, while soil fungi can remain active in extremely dry soils. It is therefore expected that fungi will be of greater importance to arid and semiarid systems (Whitford 1989). If microbial processes are to be measured in soils of arid environments, it is recommended that bioassays target fungi. Regardless of the taxa studied, problems are associated with the standardization and interpretability of microbial tests, and regulatory acceptance may hinder widespread incorporation of microbial toxicity bioassays in arid system risk assessments. Plant toxicity bioassays are gaining recognition as sensitive indicators of soil conditions because they can provide a cost-effective and relatively rapid assessment of soil quality for both pre- and postremediation efforts. Phytotoxicity evaluations commonly target germination because environmental stressors have the greatest potential for exerting adverse effects in the early stages of growth. In arid systems, seeds respond rapidly to precipitation events, and it is typically after germination has occurred that plants must cope with water

  9. Assessment of the use of the AVS concept for the routine toxicity monitoring of contaminated freshwater sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Vangheluwe, M.L.; Janssen, C.R.; Goyvaerts, M.P.; Cooman, P.

    1995-12-31

    Acid volatile sulfides (AVS) have been shown to be an important factor mediating the bioavailability of heavy metals in sediments and have consequently been suggested as a possible predictive tool for toxicity assessment of these matrices. The potential use and limitations of the AVS method for predictive toxicity screening and priority setting was assessed in a large scale sediment monitoring study (Flanders, Belgium). The acute toxicity of 50 metal contaminated freshwater sediments, with varying metal concentrations and sediment characteristics, were tested using the Microtox{reg_sign} Solid Phase test and the 10 day test with Chironomus riparius and Hyalella azteca. Uni and multivariate statistical techniques were used to asses the relations between acute toxicity and SEM/AVS ratio`s and to evaluate the influence of sediment characteristics on metal bioavailability and toxicity. In general, the results of this study indicate that the AVS-toxicity relationship proposed in literature does have certain limitations. Finally, the potential use of a concentration-addition model for predicting metal-mixture toxicity in sediments will be presented and discussed.

  10. Effects of storage temperature and duration on toxicity of sediments assessed by Crassostrea gigas oyster embryo bioassay

    SciTech Connect

    Beiras, R.; His, E.; Seaman, M.N.L.

    1998-10-01

    The effects of temperature and duration of storage on the toxicity of estuarine sediments were investigated with the Crassostrea gigas oyster embryo bioassay. Sediments ranging from unpolluted (controls) to extremely polluted with heavy metals (>100 ppm Hg, Cu, Zn, and Pb) and total hydrocarbons (>1,000 ppm) were collected from sites in southwest France and northern Spain, Control sediments were toxic only at the highest concentrations tested and after freezing in liquid nitrogen ({minus}196 C). Polluted sediments significantly reduced the success of oyster embryogenesis. Analysis of variance showed that the effect of storage temperature on toxicity increased with the prolongation of storage. Prolonged storage of fresh (4 C) sediments resulted in a loss of toxicity, which was more rapid in the less-polluted sediments. Deep-frozen sediments ({minus}196 C) were highly toxic regardless of origin and storage time, and because deep-freezing causes spurious toxicity in the control samples, it cannot be recommended for toxicological studies. In the context of the assessment of sediment toxicity by embryo-larval bioassays, fresh (4 C) storage is recommended when sediments need to be stored for no longer than a few days. The advisable duration of fresh storage to avoid false-negative results is directly related to the degree of toxicity. Should the sediments require prolonged storage, freezing at {minus}20 C appears to be the best choice.

  11. Interspecies metabolism of heterocyclic aromatic amines

    SciTech Connect

    Turesky, R.J.; Welti, D.H.; Fay, L.B.

    1996-12-31

    2-Amino-3,8-dimethylimadazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (MeIQx) and other heterocyclic aromatic amines (HAAs) are rodent carcinogens and potential human carcinogens formed in cooked meats and fish. Metabolic activation of MeIQx to a genotoxin occurs through cytochrome P450 mediated N-oxidation to form N-hydroxy-MeIQx which may undergo further activation by esterification to product species which bind to DNA. Pathways of MeIQx metabolism have been elucidated in rodents and nonhuman primates to develop strategies of human biomonitoring. In addition to N-oxidation, predominant routes of detoxification include direct conjugation at the exoyclic amino group with sulfate or glucuronic acid and cytochrome P450 mediated ring oxidation. Analysis of urine from five human subjects exposed to MeIQx reveals that phase II conjugation reactions to the exocyclic amine group are prominent detoxifaction pathways while heterocyclic ring oxidation is a minor pathway. Notably, the N{sup 2-} glucuronide conjugate of N-hydroxy-MeIQx is an important metabolite in human urine. Several other metabolites have been detected in human urine which have not been previously identified in rats or nonhuman primates. Similarities and differences exist in the metabolic processing of MeIQx by humans and other species and may be a critical determinant in assessing the human health risk of HAAs.

  12. Assessing single and joint toxicity of three phenylurea herbicides using Lemna minor and Vibrio fischeri bioassays.

    PubMed

    Gatidou, Georgia; Stasinakis, Athanasios S; Iatrou, Evangelia I

    2015-01-01

    Single and joint toxicity of three substituted urea herbicides, namely monolinuron [3-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-methoxy-1-methylurea], linuron [3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1-methoxy-1-methylurea] and diuron [1-(3,4 dichlorophenyl)-3,3 dimethyl urea], were studied. The duckweed Lemna minor and the luminescent bacterium Vibrio fischeri were used for the toxicity assessment and they were exposed to various concentrations of the herbicides, individually and in binary mixtures. The exposure time was 7d for the duckweed and 30 min for the bacterium. Estimation of EC50 values was performed by frond counting and reduction in light output for Lemna minor and Vibrio fischeri, respectively. Lemna minor was found to be much more sensitive than Vibrio fischeri to target compounds. The toxicity of the three herbicides applied solely was estimated to be in decreasing order: diuron (EC50=28.3 μg L(-1))≈linuron (EC50=30.5 μg L(-1))>monolinuron (EC50=300 μg L(-1)) for the duckweed and linuron (EC50=8.2 mg L(-1))>diuron (EC50=9.2 mg L(-1))>monolinuron (EC50=11.2 mg L(-1)) for the bacterium. Based on the environmental concentrations reported in the literature and EC50 values obtained from Lemna minor experiments, Risk Quotients (RQ) much higher than 1 were calculated for diuron and linuron. In Lemna minor experiments, combination of target compounds resulted to additive effects due to their same mode of phenylurea action on photosynthetic organisms. Regarding Vibrio fischeri, synergistic, additive and antagonistic effects were observed, which varied according to the concentrations of target compounds.

  13. Using Bioassays and Species Sensitivity Distributions to Assess Herbicide Toxicity towards Benthic Diatoms

    PubMed Central

    Larras, Floriane; Bouchez, Agnès; Rimet, Frédéric; Montuelle, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    Although benthic diatoms are widely used in ecological studies of aquatic systems, there is still a dearth of data concerning species sensitivities towards several contaminants. Within the same community, different species may respond differently depending on their physiological and ecological characteristics. This lack of knowledge makes specific appropriate risk assessment impossible. To find out whether species sensitivity distribution (SSD) could be used to estimate the risk of herbicide toxicity for diatoms, we need to know whether their sensitivity depends on their physiological and ecological characteristics. We carried out single-species bioassays on 11 diatom species exposed to 8 herbicides. Dose-responses relationships were used to extrapolate the Effective Concentration 5 (EC5) and the Effective Concentration 50 (EC50) for each exposure. These data were used to fit a SSD curve for each herbicide, and to determine the Hazardous concentration 5 (HC5) and 50 (HC50). Our results revealed a high level of variability of the sensitivity in the set of species tested. For photosystem-II inhibitor (PSII) herbicides, diatoms species displayed a typical grouping of sensitivity levels consistent with their trophic mode and their ecological guild. N-heterotroph and “motile” guild species were more tolerant of PSII inhibitors, while N-autotroph and “low profile” guild species were more sensitive. Comprehensive SSD curves were obtained for 5 herbicides, but not for sulfonylurea herbicides or for dimetachlor, which had toxicity levels that were below the range of concentration tested. The SSD curves provided the following ranking of toxicity: diuron> terbutryn> isoproturon> atrazine> metolachlor. The HC that affected 5% of the species revealed that, even at the usual environmental concentrations of herbicides, diatom assemblages could be affected, especially by isoproturon, terbutryn, and diuron. PMID:22952981

  14. In vivo monitoring of toxic metals: assessment of neutron activation and x-ray fluorescence techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, K.J.

    1986-01-01

    To date, cadmium, lead, aluminum, and mercury have been measured in vivo in humans. The possibilities of monitoring other toxic metals have also been demonstrated, but no human studies have been performed. Neutron activation analysis appears to be most suitable for Cd and Al measurements, while x-ray fluorescence is ideally suited for measurement of lead in superficial bone. Filtered neutron beams and polarized x-ray sources are being developed which will improve in vivo detection limits. Even so, several of the current facilities are already suitable for use in epidemiological studies of selected populations with suspected long-term low-level ''environmental'' exposures. Evaluation and diagnosis of patients presenting with general clinical symptoms attributable to possible toxic metal exposure may be assisted by in vivo examination. Continued in vivo monitoring of industrial workers, especially follow-up measurements, will provide the first direct assessment of changes in body burden and a direct measure of the biological life-times of these metals in humans. 50 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Assessment of four different test designs for Hyalella azteca 10 days sediment toxicity test

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez-Romero, P. |; Oris, J.T.; Bailer, J.; DePoy, M.

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this study was to assess the adequacy of four experimental designs of the Hyalella azteca 10 days sediment toxicity test. The authors conducted a series of sediment toxicity tests using an EPA recommended experimental design (8 chambers with 10 organisms per treatment) and three other designs. These had the same total number of organisms (80) per treatment and the same sediment:water ratio (1:1.5) but different number of chambers (4,2,1). The number of organisms recovered, the time to sort and count the animals, as well as the time to make a water change were compared for these four designs. Logistic regression was used to analyze the recovery data while one-way analysis of variance methods were used to analyze the time responses. The results showed that the four treatments were comparable in terms of proportion of organisms recovered. However, the sorting time and the water change time decreased as the number of chambers decreased, making those designs with less chambers more desirable.

  16. Algal photosynthetic responses to toxic metals and herbicides assessed by chlorophyll a fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Kumar, K Suresh; Dahms, Hans-Uwe; Lee, Jae-Seong; Kim, Hyung Chul; Lee, Won Chan; Shin, Kyung-Hoon

    2014-06-01

    Chlorophyll a fluorescence is established as a rapid, non-intrusive technique to monitor photosynthetic performance of plants and algae, as well as to analyze their protective responses. Apart from its utility in determining the physiological status of photosynthesizers in the natural environment, chlorophyll a fluorescence-based methods are applied in ecophysiological and toxicological studies to examine the effect of environmental changes and pollutants on plants and algae (microalgae and seaweeds). Pollutants or environmental changes cause alteration of the photosynthetic capacity which could be evaluated by fluorescence kinetics. Hence, evaluating key fluorescence parameters and assessing photosynthetic performances would provide an insight regarding the probable causes of changes in photosynthetic performances. This technique quintessentially provides non-invasive determination of changes in the photosynthetic apparatus prior to the appearance of visible damage. It is reliable, economically feasible, time-saving, highly sensitive, versatile, accurate, non-invasive and portable; thereby comprising an excellent alternative for detecting pollution. The present review demonstrates the applicability of chlorophyll a fluorescence in determining photochemical responses of algae exposed to environmental toxicants (such as toxic metals and herbicides). PMID:24632123

  17. Assessment of biocompatibility of 3D printed photopolymers using zebrafish embryo toxicity assays.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, N P; Zhu, F; Hall, C J; Reboud, J; Crosier, P S; Patton, E E; Wlodkowic, D; Cooper, J M

    2016-01-21

    3D printing has emerged as a rapid and cost-efficient manufacturing technique to enable the fabrication of bespoke, complex prototypes. If the technology is to have a significant impact in biomedical applications, such as drug discovery and molecular diagnostics, the devices produced must be biologically compatible to enable their use with established reference assays and protocols. In this work we demonstrate that we can adapt the Fish Embryo Test (FET) as a new method to quantify the toxicity of 3D printed microfluidic devices. We assessed the biocompatibility of four commercially available 3D printing polymers (VisiJetCrystal EX200, Watershed 11122XC, Fototec SLA 7150 Clear and ABSplus P-430), through the observation of key developmental markers in the developing zebrafish embryos. Results show all of the photopolymers to be highly toxic to the embryos, resulting in fatality, although we do demonstrate that post-printing treatment of Fototec 7150 makes it suitable for zebrafish culture within the FET. PMID:26646354

  18. Health Hazard Assessment and Toxicity Clearances in the Army Acquisition Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macko, Joseph A., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    The United States Army Materiel Command, Army Acquisition Pollution Prevention Support Office (AAPPSO) is responsible for creating and managing the U.S. Army Wide Acquisition Pollution Prevention Program. They have established Integrated Process Teams (IPTs) within each of the Major Subordinate Commands of the Army Materiel Command. AAPPSO provides centralized integration, coordination, and oversight of the Army Acquisition Pollution Prevention Program (AAPPP) , and the IPTs provide the decentralized execution of the AAPPSO program. AAPPSO issues policy and guidance, provides resources and prioritizes P2 efforts. It is the policy of the (AAPPP) to require United States Army Surgeon General approval of all materials or substances that will be used as an alternative to existing hazardous materials, toxic materials and substances, and ozone-depleting substances. The Army has a formal process established to address this effort. Army Regulation 40-10 requires a Health Hazard Assessment (HHA) during the Acquisition milestones of a new Army system. Army Regulation 40-5 addresses the Toxicity Clearance (TC) process to evaluate new chemicals and materials prior to acceptance as an alternative. U.S. Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine is the Army's matrixed medical health organization that performs the HHA and TC mission.

  19. Safety assessment of dietary bamboo charcoal powder: a 90-day subchronic oral toxicity and mutagenicity studies.

    PubMed

    Zhenchao, Jia; Yuting, Zhong; Jiuming, Yan; Yedan, Lu; Yang, Song; Jinyao, Chen; Lishi, Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Vegetable carbon has been used as food additive in EU (E153) and China for many years; however, no experimental data have been available on its dietary safety. This study was designed to evaluate the subchronic toxicity and genotoxicity of bamboo charcoal powder (BCP). In the study of subchronic oral toxicity, BCP was administered orally at doses of 2.81, 5.62, and 11.24 g/kg BW for 90 days to SD rats. Additional satellite groups from the control group and high dose group were observed for a 28-day recovery period. At the end of the treatment and recovery periods, animals were sacrificed, and their organs were weighed and blood samples were collected. The toxicological endpoints observed included clinical signs, food consumption, body and organ weights, hematological and biochemical parameters, macroscopic and microscopic examinations. The results showed no significant differences between the BCP treated groups and control group. The genotoxicity of BCP was assessed with the Salmonella typhimurium mutagenicity assay (Ames test) and a combination of comet assay and mammalian erythrocyte micronucleus protocol. The results did not reveal any genotoxicity of BCP. Based on our study, the no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) for BCP is 11.24 g/kg BW/day.

  20. Toxicity assessment of a common laundry detergent using the freshwater flagellate Euglena gracilis.

    PubMed

    Azizullah, Azizullah; Richter, Peter; Häder, Donat-Peter

    2011-09-01

    Synthetic detergents are among the commonly used chemicals in everyday life. Detergents, reaching aquatic environments through domestic and municipal wastewater, can cause many different effects in aquatic organisms. The present study was aimed at the toxicity evaluation of a commonly used laundry detergent, Ariel, using the freshwater flagellate Euglena gracilis as a biotest organism. Different parameters of the flagellate like motility, swimming velocity, cell shape, gravitactic orientation, photosynthesis and concentration of light harvesting pigments were used as end points for the toxicity assessment. No Observed Effect Concentration (NOEC) and EC(50) values were calculated for the end point parameters at four different incubation times, i.e. 0, 6, 24 and 72 h. After 72 h incubation, swimming velocity of the cells was found to be the most sensitive parameter giving NOEC and EC(50) values of 10.8 and 34 mg L(-1), respectively. After 72 h exposure to the detergent, chlorophyll a and total carotenoids were significantly decreased in cultures treated with Ariel at concentrations of 50 mg L(-1) and above while chlorophyll b significantly decreased at concentrations above 750 mg L(-1). The maximum inhibitory effect on the quantum yield of photosystem II was observed after 24 h exposure and thereafter a recovery trend was observed. Motility, gravitaxis and cell shape were strongly impaired immediately upon exposure to the detergent, but with increasing exposure time these parameters showed acclimatization to the stress and thus the NOEC values obtained after 72 h were higher than those immediately after exposure.

  1. Algal photosynthetic responses to toxic metals and herbicides assessed by chlorophyll a fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Kumar, K Suresh; Dahms, Hans-Uwe; Lee, Jae-Seong; Kim, Hyung Chul; Lee, Won Chan; Shin, Kyung-Hoon

    2014-06-01

    Chlorophyll a fluorescence is established as a rapid, non-intrusive technique to monitor photosynthetic performance of plants and algae, as well as to analyze their protective responses. Apart from its utility in determining the physiological status of photosynthesizers in the natural environment, chlorophyll a fluorescence-based methods are applied in ecophysiological and toxicological studies to examine the effect of environmental changes and pollutants on plants and algae (microalgae and seaweeds). Pollutants or environmental changes cause alteration of the photosynthetic capacity which could be evaluated by fluorescence kinetics. Hence, evaluating key fluorescence parameters and assessing photosynthetic performances would provide an insight regarding the probable causes of changes in photosynthetic performances. This technique quintessentially provides non-invasive determination of changes in the photosynthetic apparatus prior to the appearance of visible damage. It is reliable, economically feasible, time-saving, highly sensitive, versatile, accurate, non-invasive and portable; thereby comprising an excellent alternative for detecting pollution. The present review demonstrates the applicability of chlorophyll a fluorescence in determining photochemical responses of algae exposed to environmental toxicants (such as toxic metals and herbicides).

  2. Microfluidic platform integrated with worm-counting setup for assessing manganese toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Beibei; Li, Yinbao; He, Qidi; Qin, Jun; Yu, Yanyan; Li, Xinchun; Zhang, Lin; Yao, Meicun; Liu, Junshan; Chen, Zuanguang

    2014-01-01

    We reported a new microfluidic system integrated with worm responders for evaluating the environmental manganese toxicity. The micro device consists of worm loading units, worm observing chambers, and a radial concentration gradient generator (CGG). Eight T-shape worm loading units of the micro device were used to load the exact number of worms into the corresponding eight chambers with the assistance of worm responders and doorsills. The worm responder, as a key component, was employed for performing automated worm-counting assay through electric impedance sensing. This label-free and non-invasive worm-counting technique was applied to the microsystem for the first time. In addition, the disk-shaped CGG can generate a range of stepwise concentrations of the appointed chemical automatically and simultaneously. Due to the scalable architecture of radial CGG, it has the potential to increase the throughput of the assay. Dopaminergic (DAergic) neurotoxicity of manganese on C. elegans was quantitatively assessed via the observation of green fluorescence protein-tagged DAergic neurons of the strain BZ555 on-chip. In addition, oxidative stress triggered by manganese was evaluated by the quantitative fluorescence intensity of the strain CL2166. By scoring the survival ratio and stroke frequency of worms, we characterized the dose- and time-dependent mobility defects of the manganese-exposed worms. Furthermore, we applied the microsystem to investigate the effect of natural antioxidants to protect manganese-induced toxicity. PMID:25538805

  3. An assessment of molecular pathways of obesity susceptible to nutrient, toxicant and genetically induced epigenetic perturbation.

    PubMed

    Xue, Jing; Ideraabdullah, Folami Y

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, the etiology of human disease has greatly improved with the inclusion of epigenetic mechanisms, in particular as a common link between environment and disease. However, for most diseases we lack a detailed interpretation of the epigenetic regulatory pathways perturbed by environment and causal mechanisms. Here, we focus on recent findings elucidating nutrient-related epigenetic changes linked to obesity. We highlight studies demonstrating that obesity is a complex disease linked to disruption of epigenetically regulated metabolic pathways in the brain, adipose tissue and liver. These pathways regulate (1) homeostatic and hedonic eating behaviors, (2) adipocyte differentiation and fat accumulation, and (3) energy expenditure. By compiling these data, we illustrate that obesity-related phenotypes are repeatedly linked to disruption of critical epigenetic mechanisms that regulate key metabolic genes. These data are supported by genetic mutation of key epigenetic regulators, and many of the diet-induced epigenetic mechanisms of obesity are also perturbed by exposure to environmental toxicants. Identifying similarly perturbed epigenetic mechanisms in multiple experimental models of obesity strengthens the translational applications of these findings. We also discuss many of the ongoing challenges to understanding the role of environmentally induced epigenetic pathways in obesity and suggest future studies to elucidate these roles. This assessment illustrates our current understanding of molecular pathways of obesity that are susceptible to environmental perturbation via epigenetic mechanisms. Thus, it lays the groundwork for dissecting the complex interactions between diet, genes and toxicants that contribute to obesity and obesity-related phenotypes. PMID:27012616

  4. The assessment of inflammatory activity and toxicity of treated sewage using RAW264.7 cells

    PubMed Central

    Makene, Vedastus W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Toxicity and inflammatory activity of wastewater samples were evaluated using RAW264.7 cells as a bioassay model. The RAW264.7 cell cultures were exposed to sterile filtered wastewater samples collected from a sewage treatment plant. Cell viability was evaluated using WST‐1 and XTT assays. Inflammatory effects of samples were assessed by determination of nitric oxide (NO) and interleukin 6 (IL‐6). The NO was estimated using the Griess reaction and IL‐6 was measured by enzyme‐linked immunoassay. All samples had no toxicity effects to RAW264.7 cells, however they significantly (P < 0.001) induced NO and IL‐6 production. The highest NO (12.5 ± 0.38 μM) and IL‐6 (25383.84 ± 2327 pg/mL) production was induced by postbiofiltration sample. Final effluent induced the lowest inflammatory response, which indicates effective sewage treatment. In conclusion, wastewater samples can induce inflammatory activities in RAW264.7 cells. The RAW264.7 cells, therefore, can be used as a model for monitoring the quality of treated sewage. PMID:26900395

  5. Toxicity assessment of tannery effluent treated by an optimized photo-Fenton process.

    PubMed

    Borba, Fernando Henrique; Módenes, Aparecido Nivaldo; Espinoza-Quiñones, Fernando Rodolfo; Manenti, Diego Ricieri; Bergamasco, Rosangela; Mora, Nora Diaz

    2013-01-01

    In this work, an optimized photo-Fenton process was applied to remove pollutants from tannery industrial effluent (TIE) with its final toxicity level being assessed by a lettuce-seed-based bioassay test. A full 33 factorial design was applied for the optimization of long-term photo-Fenton experiments. The oPtimum conditions of the photo-Fenton process were attained at concentration values of 0.3 g Fe(2+) L(-1) and 20 g H2O2 L(-1) and pH3, for 120 min UV irradiation time. Reactor operating parameter (ROP) effects on the removal of chemical oxygen demand, colour, turbidity, total suspended solids and total volatile solids were evaluated, suggesting that a broad range of ROP values are also suitable to give results very near to those of the photo-Fenton experiments under optimal conditions. Based on the low calculated median lethal dose (LD50) values from a lettuce-seed-based bioassay test, we suggest that recalcitrant substances are present in treated TIE samples. A possible cause of the high toxicity level could partly be attributed to the nitrate concentration, which was not completely abated by the photo-Fenton process. Apart from this, the photo-Fenton process can be used as a part of an industrial effluent treatment system in order to abate high organic pollutant loads. PMID:23837315

  6. The current practice of health risk assessment: Potential impact on standards for toxic air contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Paustenbach, D.J.; Jernigan, J.D.; Finley, B.L.; Ripple, S.R.; Keenan, R.E. )

    1990-12-01

    Since the Bhopal incident, the public has placed pressure on regulatory agencies to set community exposure limits for the dozens of chemicals that may be released by manufacturing facilities. More or less objective limits can be established for the vast majority of these chemicals through the use of risk assessment. However, each step of the risk assessment process (i.e., hazard identification, dose-response assessment, exposure assessment, and risk characterization) contains a number of pitfalls that scientists need to avoid to ensure that valid limits are established. For example, in the hazard identification step there has been little discrimination among animal carcinogens with respect to mechanism of action or the epidemiology experience. In the dose-response portion, rarely is the range of plausible estimated risks presented. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PB-PK) models should be used to understand the difference between the tissue doses and the administered dose, as well as the difference in target tissue concentrations of the toxicant between rodents and humans. Biologically-based models like the Moolgavkar-Knudson-Venzon (MKV) should be developed and used, when appropriate. The exposure assessment step can be significantly improved by using more sensitive and specific sampling and analytical methods, more accurate exposure parameters, and computer models that can account for complex environmental factors. Whenever possible, model predictions of exposure and uptake should be validated by biological monitoring of exposed persons (urine, blood, adipose) or by field measurements of plants, soil, fish, air, or water. In each portion of an assessment, the weight of evidence approach should be used to identify the most defensible value. 129 refs.

  7. Chironomus tentans life-cycle test: Design and evaluation for use in assessing toxicity of contaminated sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Benoit, D.A.; Sibley, P.K.; Ankley, G.T.; Juenemann, J.L.

    1997-06-01

    The development and standardization of toxicity test methods for assessing toxicity of contaminated freshwater sediments has focused predominantly on short-term exposures and lethality. In many situations, however, toxicity is more likely to become manifest over long periods of time so there is need for standardized testing procedures by which sublethal sediment toxicity can be adequately assessed. In this study, the authors present and evaluate a new life cycle test, using the midge Chironomus tentans, which enables the assessment of sublethal toxicity of contaminated sediments. The test is initiated with newly hatched larvae and uses four effects-based endpoints to assess toxicity: survival, growth, emergence, and reproduction. Survival is determined at 20 d and at the end of the test by back-calculating through emergence data. Growth can be determined at 20 d, which corresponds to the 10-d endpoint in the 10-d C. tentans growth test initiated with 10-d-old larvae. From day 23 to the end of the test, emergence and reproduction are monitored daily. The number of eggs per female is determined for each egg mass, which is then incubated for 6 d to determine hatching success. Each treatment in the life cycle test is terminated separately after 7 consecutive days without emergence. The authors evaluated the life cycle test by following one generation of C. tentans in sediments collected from the upper Mississippi River. Survival of larvae exceeded 90% at 20 d. Of these larvae, between 60 and 70% successfully emerged; survivorship among pupae and adults exceeded 85%. Mean egg production ranged from 906 to 1,107 eggs per female. The test required 65 d to complete, including pretest preparation. These data show that the C. tentans life cycle test can be used to assess sublethal toxicity accurately in contaminated sediments and provides a suitable compliment to the standard C. tentans 10-d test.

  8. Cloning Endangered Felids by Interspecies Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Martha C; Pope, C Earle

    2015-01-01

    In 2003, the first wild felid was produced by interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer. Since then other wild felid clone offspring have been produced by using the same technique with minor modifications. This chapter describes detailed protocols used in our laboratory for (1) the isolation, culture, and preparation of fibroblast cells as donor nucleus, and (2) embryo reconstruction with domestic cat enucleated oocytes to produce cloned embryos that develop to the blastocyst stage in vitro and, after transfer into synchronized recipients, establish successful pregnancies.

  9. Double Species Bose-Einstein Condensate with Tunable Interspecies Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Thalhammer, G.; Barontini, G.; De Sarlo, L.; Catani, J.; Minardi, F.; Inguscio, M.

    2008-05-30

    We produce Bose-Einstein condensates of two different species, {sup 87}Rb and {sup 41}K, in an optical dipole trap in proximity of interspecies Feshbach resonances. We discover and characterize two Feshbach resonances, located around 35 and 79 G, by observing the three-body losses and the elastic cross section. The narrower resonance is exploited to create a double species condensate with tunable interactions. Our system opens the way to the exploration of double species Mott insulators and, more in general, of the quantum phase diagram of the two-species Bose-Hubbard model.

  10. Analysis of nuclear export using photoactivatable GFP fusion proteins and interspecies heterokaryons.

    PubMed

    Nakrieko, Kerry-Ann; Ivanova, Iordanka A; Dagnino, Lina

    2010-01-01

    In this chapter, we review protocols for the analysis of nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of transcription factors and nuclear proteins, using two different approaches. The first involves the use of photoactivatable forms of the protein of interest by fusion to photoactivatable green fluorescent protein to follow its movement out of the nucleus by live-cell confocal microscopy. This methodology allows for the kinetic characterization of protein movements as well as measurement of steady-state levels. In a second procedure to assess the ability of a nuclear protein to move into and out of the nucleus, we describe the use of interspecies heterokaryon assays, which provide a measurement of steady-state distribution. These technologies are directly applicable to the analysis of nucleocytoplasmic movements not only of transcription factors, but also other nuclear proteins.

  11. Kinetics of azoreductase and assessment of toxicity of metabolic products from azo dyes by Pseudomonas luteola.

    PubMed

    Hu, T L

    2001-01-01

    This is a continuous study on a decolorization strain, Pseudomonas luteola, which involves treating seven azo dyes with different structures. This study focuses mainly on determining both the mechanism of decolorization by P. luteola and the activity of azoreductase from P. luteola as well as identifying and assessing the toxicity of metabolic products of azo dyes. The growth of P. luteola reached the stationary phase after shaking incubation for 24 hours. Then, while being kept static, the color of seven tested azo dyes (100 mg/l) could be removed. The proportion of color removal was between 59-99%, which figure is related to the structure of the dye. Monoazo dyes (RP2B, V2RP and Red 22) showed the fastest rate of decolorization, i.e. from 0.23-0.44 mg dye-mg cell-1 hr-1. P. luteola could remove the color of V2RP and a leather dye at a concentration of 200 mg/l, and as to the rest of the azo dyes, it could remove at a concentration of up to 100 mg/l. Decolorization of RP2B and Red 22 required activation energy of 7.00 J/mol and 6.63 J/mole, respectively, indicating that it was easier for azoreductase to decolorize structurally simple dyes. The kinetics of azoreductase towards seven azo dyes suggested a competitive inhibition model be applied. Microtox was used to analyze the toxicity of the metabolic products of azo dyes. EC50 showed differences in toxicity before and after the azo dyes had been metabolized. Analysis revealed significant differences between the results obtained by EC50 with Blue 15 and those obtained with the leather dye, indicating that the toxicities of the metabolic products were increased. The differences obtained by EC50 with Red 22, RP2P and V2RP were small, and Black 22 showed no such difference. Sulfanic acid and orthanilic acid may be the intermediate products of Violet 9 and RP2B, respectively. However, according to FT-IR analysis, aromatic amines were present in the metabolic product.

  12. A new index to assess chemicals increasing the greenhouse effect based on their toxicity to algae.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; Zhang, Xiaoxian; Tian, Dayong; Gao, Ya; Lin, Zhifen; Liu, Ying; Kong, Lingyun

    2015-11-01

    CO2, as the typical greenhouse gas causing the greenhouse effect, is a major global environmental problem and has attracted increasing attention from governments. Using algae to eliminate CO2, which has been proposed as an effective way to reduce the greenhouse effect in the past decades, can be disturbed by a growing number of artificial chemicals. Thus, seven types of chemicals and Selenastrum capricornutum (algae) were examined in this study, and the good consistency between the toxicity of artificial chemicals to algae and the disturbance of carbon fixation by the chemicals was revealed. This consistency showed that the disturbance of an increasing number of artificial chemicals to the carbon fixation of algae might be a "malware" worsening the global greenhouse effect. Therefore, this study proposes an original, promising index to assess the risk of deepening the greenhouse effect by artificial chemicals before they are produced and marketed. PMID:26520250

  13. A new index to assess chemicals increasing the greenhouse effect based on their toxicity to algae.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; Zhang, Xiaoxian; Tian, Dayong; Gao, Ya; Lin, Zhifen; Liu, Ying; Kong, Lingyun

    2015-11-01

    CO2, as the typical greenhouse gas causing the greenhouse effect, is a major global environmental problem and has attracted increasing attention from governments. Using algae to eliminate CO2, which has been proposed as an effective way to reduce the greenhouse effect in the past decades, can be disturbed by a growing number of artificial chemicals. Thus, seven types of chemicals and Selenastrum capricornutum (algae) were examined in this study, and the good consistency between the toxicity of artificial chemicals to algae and the disturbance of carbon fixation by the chemicals was revealed. This consistency showed that the disturbance of an increasing number of artificial chemicals to the carbon fixation of algae might be a "malware" worsening the global greenhouse effect. Therefore, this study proposes an original, promising index to assess the risk of deepening the greenhouse effect by artificial chemicals before they are produced and marketed.

  14. Phenotypic and molecular characterization of intrauterine fetal growth restriction in interspecies sheep pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Chávez-García, A; Vázquez-Martínez, E R; Murcia, C; Rodríguez, A; Cerbón, M; Mejía, O

    2015-10-01

    Interspecies pregnancies between closely related species are usually performed in livestock to obtain improved and enriched offspring. Indeed, different hybrids have been obtained for research purposes since many years ago, and the maternal-fetal interactions have been studied as a possible strategy for species preservation. The aim of this study was to characterize by physiological and molecular approaches the interspecies pregnancy between bighorn sheep () and domestic sheep (). Hybrids were obtained by artificial insemination; the blood pressure and protein urine levels were measured during the last two-thirds of gestation. After parturition, offspring and placentas were weighed and measured and cotyledons were counted and weighed and their surface area determined. Plasma samples were obtained between wk 8 and 21 of gestation to assess progesterone (P4), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and placental growth factor (PlGF) levels and cell-free RNA was isolated during the same period to assess hypoxia-inducible factor-1 α (α) gene expression. Hybrid and normal pregnancies were analyzed using physiological and molecular parameters during the last two-thirds of gestation (wk 8-21). The results show that during the measurement period, ewes with a hybrid pregnancy presented normal blood pressure and no alteration in urinary protein content. However, compared with sheep with a normal pregnancy, those with a hybrid pregnancy had a decrease in fetal and placental growth as well as in the cotyledonary surface area. Furthermore, in the hybrid group, there was placental insufficiency, characterized by a decrease in P4 production, as well as indications of endothelial dysfunction, characterized an increase in plasma levels of VEGF and PlGF as well as in plasma gene expression of α. Overall, the results indicate that hybrids of and presented intrauterine growth restriction, essentially due to altered endothelial function and chronic placental insufficiency

  15. Life cycle toxicity assessment of pesticides used in integrated and organic production of oranges in the Comunidad Valenciana, Spain.

    PubMed

    Juraske, Ronnie; Sanjuán, Neus

    2011-02-01

    The relative impacts of 25 pesticides including acaricides, fungicides, herbicides, insecticides, and post-harvest fungicides, used in the production of oranges in Spain were assessed with current life cycle impact assessment (LCIA) tools. Chemical specific concentrations were combined with pesticide emission data and information on chemical toxicity to assess human toxicity and freshwater ecotoxicity impacts. As a case study, the relative impacts of two orange production systems in the region of Valencia, integrated pest management (IP) and organic production (OP), were assessed. The evaluation of active ingredients showed that on average acaricides have the highest human toxicity impact scores, while for freshwater ecotoxicity insecticides show the highest impact. In both impact categories the lowest impact scores were calculated for herbicides. In the production of 1 kg of orange fruits, where several kinds of pesticides are combined, results show that post-harvest fungicides can contribute more than 95% to the aggregate human toxicity impacts. More than 85% of aquatic ecotoxicity is generated by fungicides applied before harvest. The potential to reduce impacts on freshwater ecosystems is seven orders of magnitude, while impacts on human health can be reduced by two orders of magnitude. Hence, this stresses the importance of a careful pre-selection of active ingredients. In both impact categories, organic production represents the least toxic pest-control method.

  16. The potential role of earthworms in toxicity assessment of terrestrial hazardous waste sites

    SciTech Connect

    Goven, A.J.; Fitzpatrick, L.C.; Venables, B.J.

    1994-12-31

    Understanding the toxic potential and mechanisms of action of environmental xenobiotics is fundamental for assessing risk to public and environmental health. Current established protocols with earthworms focus primarily on defining the lethal effects of chemicals associated with soil contamination. Development of sublethal assays, until recently, has been largely ignored. Here the authors develop rationale for use of earthworms as a model organism for comprehensive assessment of risks to higher wildlife from contaminated soils and hazardous waste sites. They present a panel of lethal (LC/LD50`s) and sublethal measurement endpoint biomarkers, developed within the framework of the National Toxicology Program`s tiered immunotoxicity protocol for mice and according to published criteria for good measurement endpoints, that represent sensitive phylogenetically-conserved processes. Specifically the authors discuss immunosuppressive effects of terrestrial heavy metal and organic contamination on the innate, nonspecific and specific immune responses of earthworm, Lumbricus terrestris, coelomocytes in terms of total and differential cell counts, lysozyme activity, nitroblue tetrazolium dye reduction, phagocytic activity and secretary rosette formation. Findings indicate that sensitive phylogenetically conserved immune responses present in invertebrates can be used to assess or predict risk to wildlife from contaminated soils.

  17. Evaluation of In Vitro Assays For Assessing the Toxicity of Cigarette Smoke and Smokeless Tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Wan, J.; Johnson, M.; Schilz, J.; Djordjevic, M.V.; Rice, J.R.; Shields, P.G.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction In vitro toxicology studies of tobacco and tobacco smoke have been used to understand why tobacco use causes cancer and to assess the toxicological impact of tobacco product design changes. The need for toxicology studies has been heightened given that the FDA’s newly granted authority over tobacco products requires mandating performance standards for tobacco products and evaluate manufacturers’ health claims. The goal of this review is to critically evaluate in vitro toxicology methods related to cancer for assessing tobacco products and to identify related research gaps. Methods PubMed database searches were used to identify tobacco-related in vitro toxicology studies published since 1980. Articles published prior to 1980 with high relevance also were identified. The data was compiled to examine: 1) goals of the study; 2) methods for collecting test substances; 3) experimental designs; 4) toxicological endpoints, and; 5) relevance to cancer risk. Results A variety of in vitro assays are available to assess tobacco and tobacco smoke that address different modes of action, mostly using non-human cell models. Smokeless tobacco products perform poorly in these assays. While reliable as a screening tool for qualitative assessments, the available in vitro assays have been poorly validated for quantitative comparisons of different products. Assay batteries have not been developed, although they exist for non-tobacco assessments. Extrapolating data from in vitro studies to human risks remains hypothetical. Conclusions In vitro toxicology methods are useful for screening toxicity, but better methods are needed for today’s context of regulation and evaluation of health claims. PMID:19959677

  18. Chemical-chemical interaction between cyanogenic toxicants and aldehydes: a mechanism-based QSAR approach to assess toxicological joint effects.

    PubMed

    Lin, Z; Wei, D; Wang, X; Yin, K; Zhao, D

    2004-04-01

    A QSAR approach was proposed to assess toxicological joint effects based on the mechanism of chemical-chemical interactions between cyanogenic toxicants and aldehydes. It has been observed that the chemical-chemical interaction between cyanogenic toxicants and aldehydes resulted in the formation of carbanion intermediates, and therefore this interaction led to different toxicological joint effects between cyanogenic toxicants and aldehydes. Analysis of this chemical-chemical interaction showed that the formation of carbanion intermediate highly depended on the charge of the carbon atom in the -CHO of aldehydes and this of the carbon atom (C*) in the carbochain of cyanogenic toxicant. By using the Hammett Constant (sigma(p)) to measure the charge of carbon atom in the -CHO of aldehydes, a mechanism-based QSAR approach (M = 0.316 - 4.386sigma(p) with r2 = 0.933, SE = 0.082, F = 55.389, p = 0.002, M = sum of toxic units) was proposed to assess the toxicological joint effects between alpha-hydroxy-isobutyronitrile and individual aliphatic aldehydes. Another one (M = 0.978 - 0.720sigma(p) with r2 = 0.852, SE = 0.152, F = 40.148, p = 0.0001) was also proposed to assess the toxicological joint effects between alpha-hydroxy-isobutyronitrile and individual aromatic aldehydes. Lastly, by using the charge of carbon atom (C*) in the carbochain of cyanogenic toxicant, a mechanism-based QSAR model (M = -0.161 - 7.721C* with r2 = 0.847, SE = 0.227, F = 27.657, p = 0.003) was derived to assess toxicological joint effects between p-nitrobenzaldehyde and cyanogenic toxicants.

  19. Reverse osmosis pretreatment method for toxicity assessment of domestic wastewater using Vibrio qinghaiensis sp.-Q67.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaoyan Y; Wang, Xiaochang C; Hao Ngo, Huu; Guo, Wenshan; Wu, Maoni N; Wang, Na

    2013-11-01

    Luminescent bacterial test is a fast and sensitive method for acute toxicity assessment of water and wastewater. In this study, an improved toxicity testing method was developed using the freshwater luminescent bacteria Vibrio qinghaiensis sp.-Q67 that involved pretreatment of water samples with reverse osmosis (RO) to eliminate the interferences caused by nutrients in concentrated samples and to improve the reliability and sensitivity of the analysis. Because water samples contain low concentrations of several target toxic substances, rapid acute toxicity testing method that is commonly employed does not achieve enough sensitivity. The proposed RO pretreatment could effectively enrich organic and inorganic substances in water samples to enable a more effective and sensitive toxicity evaluation. The kinetic characteristics of toxicity of raw sewage and secondary effluent were evaluated based on the relative luminescence unit (RLU) curves and time-concentration-effect surfaces. It was observed that when the exposure time was prolonged to 8-h or longer, the bacteria reached the logarithmic growth stage. Hence, the stimulating effects of the coexisting ions (such as Na(+), K(+), NO3(-)) in the concentrated samples could be well eliminated. A 10-h exposure time in proposed Q67 test was found to quantitatively evaluate the toxicity of the organic and inorganic pollutants in the RO-concentrated samples.

  20. Reverse osmosis pretreatment method for toxicity assessment of domestic wastewater using Vibrio qinghaiensis sp.-Q67.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaoyan Y; Wang, Xiaochang C; Hao Ngo, Huu; Guo, Wenshan; Wu, Maoni N; Wang, Na

    2013-11-01

    Luminescent bacterial test is a fast and sensitive method for acute toxicity assessment of water and wastewater. In this study, an improved toxicity testing method was developed using the freshwater luminescent bacteria Vibrio qinghaiensis sp.-Q67 that involved pretreatment of water samples with reverse osmosis (RO) to eliminate the interferences caused by nutrients in concentrated samples and to improve the reliability and sensitivity of the analysis. Because water samples contain low concentrations of several target toxic substances, rapid acute toxicity testing method that is commonly employed does not achieve enough sensitivity. The proposed RO pretreatment could effectively enrich organic and inorganic substances in water samples to enable a more effective and sensitive toxicity evaluation. The kinetic characteristics of toxicity of raw sewage and secondary effluent were evaluated based on the relative luminescence unit (RLU) curves and time-concentration-effect surfaces. It was observed that when the exposure time was prolonged to 8-h or longer, the bacteria reached the logarithmic growth stage. Hence, the stimulating effects of the coexisting ions (such as Na(+), K(+), NO3(-)) in the concentrated samples could be well eliminated. A 10-h exposure time in proposed Q67 test was found to quantitatively evaluate the toxicity of the organic and inorganic pollutants in the RO-concentrated samples. PMID:23988093

  1. Sediment porewater toxicity assessment studies in the vicinity of offshore oil and gas production platforms in the Gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carr, R.S.; Chapman, D.C.; Presley, B.J.; Biedenbach, J.M.; Robertson, L.; Boothe, P.; Kilada, R.; Wade, T.; Montagna, P.

    1996-01-01

    As part of a multidisciplinary program to assess the potential long-term impacts of offshore oil and gas exploration and production activities in the Gulf of Mexico, sediment chemical analyses and porewater toxicity tests were conducted in the vicinity of five offshore platforms. Based on data from sea urchin fertilization and embryological development assays, toxicity was observed near four of the five platforms sampled; the majority of the toxic samples were collected within 150 m of a platform. There was excellent agreement among the results of porewater tests with three different species (sea urchin embryological development, polychaete reproduction, and copepod nauplii survival). The sediment concentrations of several metals were well in excess of sediment quality assessment guidelines at a number of stations, and good agreement was observed between predicted and observed toxicity. Porewater metal concentrations compared with EC50, LOEC, and NOEC values generated for water-only exposures indicated that the porewater concentrations for several metals were high enough to account for the observed toxicity. Results of these studies utilizing highly sensitive toxicity tests suggest that the contaminant-induced impacts from offshore platforms are limited to a localized area in the immediate vicinity of the platforms. ?? 1996 NRC.

  2. A review of carbon nanotube toxicity and assessment of potential occupational and environmental health risks.

    PubMed

    Lam, Chiu-Wing; James, John T; McCluskey, Richard; Arepalli, Sivaram; Hunter, Robert L

    2006-03-01

    Nanotechnology has emerged at the forefront of science research and technology development. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are major building blocks of this new technology. They possess unique electrical, mechanical, and thermal properties, with potential wide applications in the electronics, computer, aerospace, and other industries. CNTs exist in two forms, single-wall (SWCNTs) and multi-wall (MWCNTs). They are manufactured predominately by electrical arc discharge, laser ablation and chemical vapor deposition processes; these processes involve thermally stripping carbon atoms off from carbon-bearing compounds. SWCNT formation requires catalytic metals. There has been a great concern that if CNTs, which are very light, enter the working environment as suspended particulate matter (PM) of respirable sizes, they could pose an occupational inhalation exposure hazard. Very recently, MWCNTs and other carbonaceous nanoparticles in fine (<2.5 microm) PM aggregates have been found in combustion streams of methane, propane, and natural-gas flames of typical stoves; indoor and outdoor fine PM samples were reported to contain significant fractions of MWCNTs. Here we review several rodent studies in which test dusts were administered intratracheally or intrapharyngeally to assess the pulmonary toxicity of manufactured CNTs, and a few in vitro studies to assess biomarkers of toxicity released in CNT-treated skin cell cultures. The results of the rodent studies collectively showed that regardless of the process by which CNTs were synthesized and the types and amounts of metals they contained, CNTs were capable of producing inflammation, epithelioid granulomas (microscopic nodules), fibrosis, and biochemical/toxicological changes in the lungs. Comparative toxicity studies in which mice were given equal weights of test materials showed that SWCNTs were more toxic than quartz, which is considered a serious occupational health hazard if it is chronically inhaled; ultrafine carbon black

  3. A review of carbon nanotube toxicity and assessment of potential occupational and environmental health risks.

    PubMed

    Lam, Chiu-Wing; James, John T; McCluskey, Richard; Arepalli, Sivaram; Hunter, Robert L

    2006-03-01

    Nanotechnology has emerged at the forefront of science research and technology development. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are major building blocks of this new technology. They possess unique electrical, mechanical, and thermal properties, with potential wide applications in the electronics, computer, aerospace, and other industries. CNTs exist in two forms, single-wall (SWCNTs) and multi-wall (MWCNTs). They are manufactured predominately by electrical arc discharge, laser ablation and chemical vapor deposition processes; these processes involve thermally stripping carbon atoms off from carbon-bearing compounds. SWCNT formation requires catalytic metals. There has been a great concern that if CNTs, which are very light, enter the working environment as suspended particulate matter (PM) of respirable sizes, they could pose an occupational inhalation exposure hazard. Very recently, MWCNTs and other carbonaceous nanoparticles in fine (<2.5 microm) PM aggregates have been found in combustion streams of methane, propane, and natural-gas flames of typical stoves; indoor and outdoor fine PM samples were reported to contain significant fractions of MWCNTs. Here we review several rodent studies in which test dusts were administered intratracheally or intrapharyngeally to assess the pulmonary toxicity of manufactured CNTs, and a few in vitro studies to assess biomarkers of toxicity released in CNT-treated skin cell cultures. The results of the rodent studies collectively showed that regardless of the process by which CNTs were synthesized and the types and amounts of metals they contained, CNTs were capable of producing inflammation, epithelioid granulomas (microscopic nodules), fibrosis, and biochemical/toxicological changes in the lungs. Comparative toxicity studies in which mice were given equal weights of test materials showed that SWCNTs were more toxic than quartz, which is considered a serious occupational health hazard if it is chronically inhaled; ultrafine carbon black

  4. Evolutionary Role of Interspecies Hybridization and Genetic Exchanges in Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Dujon, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Forced interspecific hybridization has been used in yeasts for many years to study speciation or to construct artificial strains with novel fermentative and metabolic properties. Recent genome analyses indicate that natural hybrids are also generated spontaneously between yeasts belonging to distinct species, creating lineages with novel phenotypes, varied genetic stability, or altered virulence in the case of pathogens. Large segmental introgressions from evolutionarily distant species are also visible in some yeast genomes, suggesting that interspecific genetic exchanges occur during evolution. The origin of this phenomenon remains unclear, but it is likely based on weak prezygotic barriers, limited Dobzhansky-Muller (DM) incompatibilities, and rapid clonal expansions. Newly formed interspecies hybrids suffer rapid changes in the genetic contribution of each parent, including chromosome loss or aneuploidy, translocations, and loss of heterozygosity, that, except in a few recently studied cases, remain to be characterized more precisely at the genomic level by use of modern technologies. We review here known cases of natural or artificially formed interspecies hybrids between yeasts and discuss their potential importance in terms of genome evolution. Problems of meiotic fertility, ploidy constraint, gene and gene product compatibility, and nucleomitochondrial interactions are discussed and placed in the context of other known mechanisms of yeast genome evolution as a model for eukaryotes. PMID:23204364

  5. Direct Interspecies Electron Transfer between Geobacter metallireducens and Methanosarcina barkeri

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Pravin Malla; Liu, Fanghua; Markovaite, Beatrice; Chen, Shanshan; Nevin, Kelly P.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2014-01-01

    Direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) is potentially an effective form of syntrophy in methanogenic communities, but little is known about the diversity of methanogens capable of DIET. The ability of Methanosarcina barkeri to participate in DIET was evaluated in coculture with Geobacter metallireducens. Cocultures formed aggregates that shared electrons via DIET during the stoichiometric conversion of ethanol to methane. Cocultures could not be initiated with a pilin-deficient G. metallireducens strain, suggesting that long-range electron transfer along pili was important for DIET. Amendments of granular activated carbon permitted the pilin-deficient G. metallireducens isolates to share electrons with M. barkeri, demonstrating that this conductive material could substitute for pili in promoting DIET. When M. barkeri was grown in coculture with the H2-producing Pelobacter carbinolicus, incapable of DIET, M. barkeri utilized H2 as an electron donor but metabolized little of the acetate that P. carbinolicus produced. This suggested that H2, but not electrons derived from DIET, inhibited acetate metabolism. P. carbinolicus-M. barkeri cocultures did not aggregate, demonstrating that, unlike DIET, close physical contact was not necessary for interspecies H2 transfer. M. barkeri is the second methanogen found to accept electrons via DIET and the first methanogen known to be capable of using either H2 or electrons derived from DIET for CO2 reduction. Furthermore, M. barkeri is genetically tractable, making it a model organism for elucidating mechanisms by which methanogens make biological electrical connections with other cells. PMID:24837373

  6. Accumulation of trace metals in sediments in a Mediterranean Lagoon: Usefulness of metal sediment fractionation and elutriate toxicity assessment.

    PubMed

    Zaaboub, Noureddine; Martins, Maria Virgínia Alves; Dhib, Amel; Béjaoui, Béchir; Galgani, François; El Bour, Monia; Aleya, Lotfi

    2015-12-01

    The authors investigated sediment quality in Bizerte Lagoon (Tunisia) focusing on geochemical characteristics, metal sediment fractionation and elutriate toxicity assessment. Nickel, Cu, Zn, Pb, Cr and Cd partitioning in sediments was studied; accumulation and bioavailability were elucidated using enrichment factors, sequential extractions, redox potential, acid volatile sulfide and biotest procedures in toxicity evaluation. Results revealed an accumulation for Pb and Zn, reaching 99 and 460 mg kg(-1) respectively. In addition, the acid volatile sulfide values were high in both eastern and western lagoon areas, thus affecting metal availability. Mean enrichment factor values for Pb and Zn were 4.8 and 4.9, respectively, with these elements as the main contributors to the lagoon's moderate enrichment level. Toxicity levels were influenced by accumulation of Zn in different surface sediment areas. Core sediments were investigated in areas with the highest metal concentrations; metal fractionation and biotest confirmed that Zn contributes to sediment toxicity. PMID:26412262

  7. Accumulation of trace metals in sediments in a Mediterranean Lagoon: Usefulness of metal sediment fractionation and elutriate toxicity assessment.

    PubMed

    Zaaboub, Noureddine; Martins, Maria Virgínia Alves; Dhib, Amel; Béjaoui, Béchir; Galgani, François; El Bour, Monia; Aleya, Lotfi

    2015-12-01

    The authors investigated sediment quality in Bizerte Lagoon (Tunisia) focusing on geochemical characteristics, metal sediment fractionation and elutriate toxicity assessment. Nickel, Cu, Zn, Pb, Cr and Cd partitioning in sediments was studied; accumulation and bioavailability were elucidated using enrichment factors, sequential extractions, redox potential, acid volatile sulfide and biotest procedures in toxicity evaluation. Results revealed an accumulation for Pb and Zn, reaching 99 and 460 mg kg(-1) respectively. In addition, the acid volatile sulfide values were high in both eastern and western lagoon areas, thus affecting metal availability. Mean enrichment factor values for Pb and Zn were 4.8 and 4.9, respectively, with these elements as the main contributors to the lagoon's moderate enrichment level. Toxicity levels were influenced by accumulation of Zn in different surface sediment areas. Core sediments were investigated in areas with the highest metal concentrations; metal fractionation and biotest confirmed that Zn contributes to sediment toxicity.

  8. A TOXICITY ASSESSMENT APPROACH TO EVALUATING IN-SITU BIOREMEDIATION OF PAH CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Freshwater and marine sediment toxicity tests were used to measure baseline toxicity of sediment samples collected from New Jersey/New York Harbor (NJ/NY) (non-PAH- contaminated) sediment (ERC). Four freshwater toxicity tests were used: 1) amphipod (Hyalella azteca) mortality and...

  9. A chronic toxicity test for the tropical marine snail Nassarius dorsatus to assess the toxicity of copper, aluminium, gallium, and molybdenum.

    PubMed

    Trenfield, Melanie A; van Dam, Joost W; Harford, Andrew J; Parry, David; Streten, Claire; Gibb, Karen; van Dam, Rick A

    2016-07-01

    Chronic toxicity test methods for assessing the toxicity of contaminants to tropical marine organisms are generally lacking. A 96-h chronic growth rate toxicity test was developed for the larval stage of the tropical dogwhelk, Nassarius dorsatus. Growth rates of N. dorsatus larvae were assessed following exposures to copper (Cu), aluminium (Al), gallium (Ga), and molybdenum (Mo). Exposure to Cu at 28 °C validated the sensitivity of the test method, with 10% (EC10) and 50% (EC50) effect concentrations of 4.2 μg/L and 7.3 μg/L Cu, respectively. The EC10 and EC50 values for Al (<0.45-μm filtered fraction) at 28 °C were 115 μg/L and 185 μg/L, respectively. The toxicity of Cu and Al was also assessed at 24 °C and 31 °C, representing average year-round water temperatures for subtropical and tropical Australian coastal environments. At 24 °C, the growth rate of control larvae was reduced by 52% compared with the growth rate at 28 °C and there was an increase in sensitivity to Cu (EC50 = 4.7 μg/L) but a similar sensitivity to Al (EC50 = 180 μg/L). At 31 °C the control growth rate increased by 35% from that measured at 28 °C and there was reduced sensitivity to both Cu and Al (EC50s = 8.5 μg/L and 642 μg/L, respectively). There was minimal toxicity resulting from Ga (EC50 = 4560 μg/L) and Mo (no effect at ≤7000 μg/L Mo). Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1788-1795. © 2015 SETAC. PMID:26643415

  10. A chronic toxicity test for the tropical marine snail Nassarius dorsatus to assess the toxicity of copper, aluminium, gallium, and molybdenum.

    PubMed

    Trenfield, Melanie A; van Dam, Joost W; Harford, Andrew J; Parry, David; Streten, Claire; Gibb, Karen; van Dam, Rick A

    2016-07-01

    Chronic toxicity test methods for assessing the toxicity of contaminants to tropical marine organisms are generally lacking. A 96-h chronic growth rate toxicity test was developed for the larval stage of the tropical dogwhelk, Nassarius dorsatus. Growth rates of N. dorsatus larvae were assessed following exposures to copper (Cu), aluminium (Al), gallium (Ga), and molybdenum (Mo). Exposure to Cu at 28 °C validated the sensitivity of the test method, with 10% (EC10) and 50% (EC50) effect concentrations of 4.2 μg/L and 7.3 μg/L Cu, respectively. The EC10 and EC50 values for Al (<0.45-μm filtered fraction) at 28 °C were 115 μg/L and 185 μg/L, respectively. The toxicity of Cu and Al was also assessed at 24 °C and 31 °C, representing average year-round water temperatures for subtropical and tropical Australian coastal environments. At 24 °C, the growth rate of control larvae was reduced by 52% compared with the growth rate at 28 °C and there was an increase in sensitivity to Cu (EC50 = 4.7 μg/L) but a similar sensitivity to Al (EC50 = 180 μg/L). At 31 °C the control growth rate increased by 35% from that measured at 28 °C and there was reduced sensitivity to both Cu and Al (EC50s = 8.5 μg/L and 642 μg/L, respectively). There was minimal toxicity resulting from Ga (EC50 = 4560 μg/L) and Mo (no effect at ≤7000 μg/L Mo). Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1788-1795. © 2015 SETAC.

  11. Toxicity assessment of sediments from the Grand Calumet River and Indiana Harbor Canal in northwestern Indiana, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ingersoll, C.G.; MacDonald, D.D.; Brumbaugh, W.G.; Johnson, B.T.; Kemble, N.E.; Kunz, J.L.; May, T.W.; Wang, N.; Smith, J.R.; Sparks, D.W.; Ireland, D.S.

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the toxicity of sediments from the Grand Calumet River and Indiana Harbor Canal located in northwestern Indiana, USA. Toxicity tests used in this assessment included 10-day sediment exposures with the amphipod Hyalella azteca, 31-day sediment exposures with the oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus, and the Microtox?? Solid-Phase Sediment Toxicity Test. A total of 30 sampling stations were selected in locations that had limited historic matching toxicity and chemistry data. Toxic effects on amphipod survival were observed in 60% of the samples from the assessment area. Results of a toxicity test with oligochaetes indicated that sediments from the assessment area were too toxic to be used in proposed bioaccumulation testing. Measurement of amphipod length after the 10-day exposures did not provide useful information beyond that provided by the survival endpoint. Seven of the 15 samples that were identified as toxic in the amphipod tests were not identified as toxic in the Microtox test, indicating that the 10-day H. azteca test was more sensitive than the Microtox test. Samples that were toxic tended to have the highest concentrations of metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The toxic samples often had an excess of simultaneously extracted metals (SEM) relative to acid volatile sulfide (AVS) and had multiple exceedances of probable effect concentrations (PECs). Metals may have contributed to the toxicity of samples that had both an excess molar concentration of SEM relative to AVS and elevated concentrations of metals in pore water. However, of the samples that had an excess of SEM relative to AVS, only 38% of these samples had elevated concentration of metals in pore water. The lack of correspondence between SEM-AVS and pore water metals indicates that there are variables in addition to AVS controlling the concentrations of metals in pore water. A mean PEC quotient of 3

  12. Advances in exposure and toxicity assessment of particulate matter: An overview of presentations at the 2009 Toxicology and Risk Assessment Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Gunasekar, Palur G.; Stanek, Lindsay W.

    2011-07-15

    The 2009 Toxicology and Risk Assessment Conference (TRAC) session on 'Advances in Exposure and Toxicity Assessment of Particulate Matter' was held in April 2009 in West Chester, OH. The goal of this session was to bring together toxicology, geology and risk assessment experts from the Department of Defense and academia to examine issues in exposure assessment and report on recent epidemiological findings of health effects associated with particulate matter (PM) exposure. Important aspects of PM exposure research are to detect and monitor low levels of PM with various chemical compositions and to assess the health risks associated with these exposures. As part of the overall theme, some presenters discussed collection methods for sand and dust from Iraqi and Afghanistan regions, health issues among deployed personnel, and future directions for risk assessment research among these populations. The remaining speakers focused on the toxicity of ultrafine PM and the characterization of aerosols generated during ballistic impacts of tungsten heavy alloys.

  13. Life Cycle Assessment of urban wastewater reuse with ozonation as tertiary treatment: a focus on toxicity-related impacts.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Ivan; Rodríguez, Antonio; Rosal, Roberto; Fernández-Alba, Amadeo R

    2009-02-01

    Life Cycle Assessment has been used to compare different scenarios involving wastewater reuse, with special focus on toxicity-related impact categories. The study is based on bench-scale experiments applying ozone and ozone in combination with hydrogen peroxide to a wastewater effluent from a Spanish sewage treatment plant. Two alternative characterisation models have been used to account for toxicity of chemical substances, namely USES-LCA and EDIP97. Four alternative scenarios have been assessed: wastewater discharge plus desalination supply, wastewater reuse without tertiary treatment, wastewater reuse after applying a tertiary treatment consisting on ozonation, and wastewater reuse after applying ozonation in combination with hydrogen peroxide. The results highlight the importance of including wastewater pollutants in LCA of wastewater systems assessing toxicity, since the contribution of wastewater pollutants to the overall toxicity scores in this case study can be above 90%. Key pollutants here are not only heavy metals and other priority pollutants, but also non-regulated pollutants such as pharmaceuticals and personal care products. Wastewater reuse after applying any of the tertiary treatments considered appears as the best choice from an ecotoxicity perspective. As for human toxicity, differences between scenarios are smaller, and taking into account the experimental and modelling uncertainty, the benefits of tertiary treatment are not so clear. From a global warming potential perspective, tertiary treatments involve a potential 85% reduction of greenhouse gas emissions when compared with desalination.

  14. Indium arsenide as a material for biological applications: Assessment of surface modifications, toxicity, and biocompatibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewett, Scott A.

    III-V semiconductors such as InAs have recently been employed in a variety of applications where the electronic and optical characteristics of traditional, silicon-based materials are inadequate. InAs has a narrow band gap and very high electron mobility in the near-surface region, which makes it very attractive for high performance transistors, optical applications, and chemical sensing. However, InAs forms an unstable surface oxide layer in ambient conditions, which can corrode over time and leach toxic indium and arsenic components. Current research has gone into making InAs more attractive for biological applications through passivation of the surface by adlayer adsorption. In particular, wet-chemical methods are current routes of exploration due to their simplicity, low cost, and flexibility in the type of passivating molecule. This dissertation focuses on surface modifications of InAs using wet-chemical methods in order to further its use in biological applications. First, the adsorption of collagen binding peptides and mixed peptide/thiol adlayers onto InAs was assessed. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) along with atomic force microscopy (AFM) data suggested that the peptides successfully adsorbed onto InAs, but were only able to block oxide regrowth to a relatively low extent. This low passivation ability is due to the lack of covalent bonds of the peptide to InAs, which are necessary to effectively block oxide regrowth. The addition of a thiol, in the form of mixed peptide/thiol adlayers greatly enhanced passivation of InAs while maintaining peptide presence on the surface. Thiols form tight, covalent bonds with InAs, which prevents oxide regrowth. The presence of the collagen-binding peptide on the surface opens the door to subsequent modification with collagen or polyelectrolyte-based adlayers. Next, the stability and toxicity of modified InAs substrates were determined using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and zebrafish

  15. Multi-level assessment of chronic toxicity of estuarine sediments with the amphipod Gammarus locusta: I. Biochemical endpoints.

    PubMed

    Neuparth, Teresa; Correia, Ana D; Costa, Filipe O; Lima, Gláucia; Costa, Maria Helena

    2005-07-01

    We report on biomarker responses conducted as part of a multi-level assessment of the chronic toxicity of estuarine sediments to the amphipod Gammarus locusta. A companion article accounts for organism and population-level effects. Five moderately contaminated sediments from two Portuguese estuaries, Sado and Tagus, were assessed. Three of them were muddy and two were sandy sediments. The objective was to assess sediments that were not acutely toxic. Three of the sediments met this criterion, the other two were diluted (50% and 75%) with clean sediment until acute toxicity was absent. Following 28-d exposures, the amphipods were analysed for whole-body metal bioaccumulation, metallothionein induction (MT), DNA strand breakage (SB) and lipid peroxidation (LP). Two of the muddy sediments did not cause chronic toxicity. These findings were consistent with responses at organism and population levels that showed higher growth rates and improvement of reproductive traits for amphipods exposed to these two sediments. Two other sediments, one muddy and one sandy, exhibited pronounced chronic toxicity, affecting SB, MT induction (in muddy sediment), survival and reproduction. Potential toxicants involved in these effects were identified. The last sandy sediment exhibited some loss of DNA integrity, however growth was also enhanced. Present results, together with the organism/population-level data, and also benthic communities information, were analysed under a weight-of-evidence approach. By providing evidence of exposure (or lack of it) to contaminants in sediments, the biomarkers here applied assisted in distinguishing toxicants' impacts in test organisms from the confounding influence of other geochemical features of the sediments. PMID:15649528

  16. A tutorial for analysing the cost-effectiveness of alternative methods for assessing chemical toxicity: the case of acute oral toxicity prediction.

    PubMed

    Norlen, Hedvig; Worth, Andrew P; Gabbert, Silke

    2014-05-01

    Compared with traditional animal methods for toxicity testing, in vitro and in silico methods are widely considered to permit a more cost-effective assessment of chemicals. However, how to assess the cost-effectiveness of alternative methods has remained unclear. This paper offers a user-oriented tutorial for applying cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) to alternative (non-animal) methods. The purpose is to illustrate how CEA facilitates the identification of the alternative method, or the combination of methods, that offers the highest information gain per unit of cost. We illustrate how information gains and costs of single methods and method combinations can be assessed. By using acute oral toxicity as an example, we apply CEA to a set of four in silico methods (ToxSuite, TOPKAT, TEST, ADMET Predictor), one in vitro method (the 3T3 Neutral Red Uptake cytotoxicity assay), and various combinations of these methods. Our results underline that in silico tools are more cost-effective than the in vitro test. Battery combinations of alternative methods, however, do not necessarily outperform single methods, because additional information gains from the battery are easily outweighed by additional costs. PMID:24901905

  17. Evaporation and air-stripping to assess and reduce ethanolamines toxicity in oily wastewater.

    PubMed

    Libralato, G; Ghirardini, A Volpi; Avezzù, F

    2008-05-30

    Toxicity from industrial oily wastewater remains a problem even after conventional activated sludge treatment process, because of the persistence of some toxicant compounds. This work verified the removal efficiency of organic and inorganic pollutants and the effects of evaporation and air-stripping techniques on oily wastewater toxicity reduction. In a lab-scale plant, a vacuum evaporation procedure at three different temperatures and an air-stripping stage were tested on oily wastewater. Toxicity reduction/removal was observed at each treatment step via Microtox bioassay. A case study monitoring real scale evaporation was also done in a full-size wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). To implement part of a general project of toxicity reduction evaluation, additional investigations took into account the monoethanolamine (MEA), diethanolamine (DEA) and triethanolamine (TEA) role in toxicity definition after the evaporation phase, both as pure substances and mixtures. Only MEA and TEA appeared to contribute towards effluent toxicity.

  18. The relative teratogenic index and teratogenic potency: proposed components of developmental toxicity risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Fabro, S; Shull, G; Brown, N A

    1982-01-01

    , 1.6; phenacemide, 3.3; trimethadione, 4.0; and sodium valproate, 4.1. For these data, tD05 and RTI clearly represent the differing teratogenic potencies and hazards of the tested compounds. it is suggested that these parameters may be useful in comparative teratogenicity studies and may be valuable components of developmental toxicity risk assessment.

  19. Exploratory breath analyses for assessing toxic dermal exposures of firefighters during suppression of structural burns.

    PubMed

    Pleil, Joachim D; Stiegel, Matthew A; Fent, Kenneth W

    2014-09-01

    Firefighters wear fireproof clothing and self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) during rescue and fire suppression activities to protect against acute effects from heat and toxic chemicals. Fire services are also concerned about long-term health outcomes from chemical exposures over a working lifetime, in particular about low-level exposures that might serve as initiating events for adverse outcome pathways (AOP) leading to cancer. As part of a larger US National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) study of dermal exposure protection from safety gear used by the City of Chicago firefighters, we collected pre- and post-fire fighting breath samples and analyzed for single-ring and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as bioindicators of occupational exposure to gas-phase toxicants. Under the assumption that SCBA protects completely against inhalation exposures, any changes in the exhaled profile of combustion products were attributed to dermal exposures from gas and particle penetration through the protective clothing. Two separate rounds of firefighting activity were performed each with 15 firefighters per round. Exhaled breath samples were collected onto adsorbent tubes and analyzed with gas-chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) with a targeted approach using selective ion monitoring. We found that single ring aromatics and some PAHs were statistically elevated in post-firefighting samples of some individuals, suggesting that fire protective gear may allow for dermal exposures to airborne contaminants. However, in comparison to a previous occupational study of Air Force maintenance personnel where similar compounds were measured, these exposures are much lower suggesting that firefighters' gear is very effective. This study suggests that exhaled breath sampling and analysis for specific targeted compounds is a suitable method for assessing systemic dermal exposure in a simple and non-invasive manner.

  20. Exploratory breath analyses for assessing toxic dermal exposures of firefighters during suppression of structural burns.

    PubMed

    Pleil, Joachim D; Stiegel, Matthew A; Fent, Kenneth W

    2014-09-01

    Firefighters wear fireproof clothing and self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) during rescue and fire suppression activities to protect against acute effects from heat and toxic chemicals. Fire services are also concerned about long-term health outcomes from chemical exposures over a working lifetime, in particular about low-level exposures that might serve as initiating events for adverse outcome pathways (AOP) leading to cancer. As part of a larger US National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) study of dermal exposure protection from safety gear used by the City of Chicago firefighters, we collected pre- and post-fire fighting breath samples and analyzed for single-ring and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as bioindicators of occupational exposure to gas-phase toxicants. Under the assumption that SCBA protects completely against inhalation exposures, any changes in the exhaled profile of combustion products were attributed to dermal exposures from gas and particle penetration through the protective clothing. Two separate rounds of firefighting activity were performed each with 15 firefighters per round. Exhaled breath samples were collected onto adsorbent tubes and analyzed with gas-chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) with a targeted approach using selective ion monitoring. We found that single ring aromatics and some PAHs were statistically elevated in post-firefighting samples of some individuals, suggesting that fire protective gear may allow for dermal exposures to airborne contaminants. However, in comparison to a previous occupational study of Air Force maintenance personnel where similar compounds were measured, these exposures are much lower suggesting that firefighters' gear is very effective. This study suggests that exhaled breath sampling and analysis for specific targeted compounds is a suitable method for assessing systemic dermal exposure in a simple and non-invasive manner. PMID:25190461

  1. An experimental assessment of toxic potential of nanoparticle preparation of heavy metals in streptozotocin induced diabetes.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Sonia; Srinivasan, B P; Akarte, Atul Sureshrao

    2013-11-01

    Nanoparticle preparations of heavy metals have attracted enormous scientific and technological interest. Biologically produced nanoparticle preparations of heavy metals are elaborately described in traditional texts and being widely prescribed. The underlying interactions of nano preparations within the physiological fluids are key feature to understand their biological impact. In this perspective, we performed an experimental assessment of the toxicity potential of a marketed metallic preparation named Vasant Kusumakar Ras (VKR), wherein different heavy metals in composite form are reduced to nanoparticle size to produce the desired effect in diabetes and its complications. VKR (50mg/kg) was administered to Albino Wistar rats rendered diabetic using streptozotocin (90mg/kg) in 2 days old neonates. Anti-hyperglycemic effect was observed with VKR along with increased levels of plasma insulin. Renal variables including total proteins and albumin along with glomerular filtration rate were found to improve biochemically. The results were supplemented by effects on different inflammatory and growth factors like TNF-α, nitric oxide, TGF-β and VEGF. However, the results observed in kidney histopathology were not in accordance with the biochemical parameters. Inflammation observed in kidney was confirmed by immunostaining metallothionein, which was due to the accumulation of heavy metals. Furthermore, mercury accumulation in kidney further confirmed by autometallography, which activated mononuclear phagocyte system, which generated an immune response. This was further supported by increase in the extent of apoptosis in kidney tissues. In conclusion, nanoparticle preparations of heavy metals can be toxic to kidney if it is not regulated with respect to its surface chemistry and dosage.

  2. Assessment of toxic potential of primary and secondary particulates/aerosols from biodiesel vis-à-vis mineral diesel fuelled engine.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Avinash Kumar; Gupta, Tarun; Dixit, Neelabh; Shukla, Pravesh Chandra

    2013-05-01

    Toxicity of engine out emissions from primary and secondary aerosols has been a major cause of concern for human health and environmental impact. This study aims to evaluate comparative toxicity of nanoparticles emitted from a modern common rail direct injection engine (CRDI) fuelled with biodiesel blend (B20) vis-à-vis mineral diesel. The toxicity and potential health hazards of exhaust particles were assessed using various parameters such as nanoparticle size and number distribution, surface area distribution, elemental and organic carbon content and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons adsorbed onto the particle surfaces, followed by toxic equivalent factor assessment. It was found that biodiesel particulate toxicity was considerably lower in comparison to mineral diesel.

  3. Assessment of Sociodemographic and Geographic Disparities in Cancer Risk from Air Toxics in South Carolina

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Sacoby; Burwell-Naney, Kristen; Jiang, Chengsheng; Zhang, Hongmei; Samantapudi, Ashok; Murray, Rianna; Dalemarre, Laura; Rice, LaShanta; Williams, Edith

    2015-01-01

    Populations of color and low-income communities are often disproportionately burdened by exposures to various environmental contaminants, including air pollution. Some air pollutants have carcinogenic properties that are particularly problematic in South Carolina (SC), a state that consistently has high rates of cancer mortality for all sites. The purpose of this study was to assess cancer risk disparities in SC by linking risk estimates from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s 2005 National Air Toxics Assessment (NATA) with sociodemographic data from the 2000 US Census Bureau. Specifically, NATA risk data for varying risk categories were linked by tract ID and analyzed with sociodemographic variables from the 2000 census using R. The average change in cancer risk from all sources by sociodemographic variable was quantified using multiple linear regression models. Spatial methods were further employed using ArcGIS 10 to assess the distribution of all source risk and percent non-white at each census tract level. The relative risk estimates of the proportion of high cancer risk tracts (defined as the top 10% of cancer risk in SC) and their respective 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated between the first and latter three quartiles defined by sociodemographic factors, while the variance in the percentage of high cancer risk between quartile groups was tested using Pearson’s chi-square. The average total cancer risk for SC was 26.8 people/million (ppl/million). The risk from on-road sources was approximately 5.8 ppl/million, higher than the risk from major, area, and non-road sources (1.8, 2.6, and 1.3 ppl/million), respectively. Based on our findings, addressing on-road sources may decrease the disproportionate cancer risk burden among low-income populations and communities of color in SC. PMID:26037107

  4. Assessment of sociodemographic and geographic disparities in cancer risk from air toxics in South Carolina.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Sacoby; Burwell-Naney, Kristen; Jiang, Chengsheng; Zhang, Hongmei; Samantapudi, Ashok; Murray, Rianna; Dalemarre, Laura; Rice, LaShanta; Williams, Edith

    2015-07-01

    Populations of color and low-income communities are often disproportionately burdened by exposures to various environmental contaminants, including air pollution. Some air pollutants have carcinogenic properties that are particularly problematic in South Carolina (SC), a state that consistently has high rates of cancer mortality for all sites. The purpose of this study was to assess cancer risk disparities in SC by linking risk estimates from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's 2005 National Air Toxics Assessment (NATA) with sociodemographic data from the 2000 US Census Bureau. Specifically, NATA risk data for varying risk categories were linked by tract ID and analyzed with sociodemographic variables from the 2000 census using R. The average change in cancer risk from all sources by sociodemographic variable was quantified using multiple linear regression models. Spatial methods were further employed using ArcGIS 10 to assess the distribution of all source risk and percent non-white at each census tract level. The relative risk (RR) estimates of the proportion of high cancer risk tracts (defined as the top 10% of cancer risk in SC) and their respective 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated between the first and latter three quartiles defined by sociodemographic factors, while the variance in the percentage of high cancer risk between quartile groups was tested using Pearson's chi-square. The average total cancer risk for SC was 26.8 people/million (ppl/million). The risk from on-road sources was approximately 5.8 ppl/million, higher than the risk from major, area, and non-road sources (1.8, 2.6, and 1.3 ppl/million), respectively. Based on our findings, addressing on-road sources may decrease the disproportionate cancer risk burden among low-income populations and communities of color in SC.

  5. Evaluation of suitable endpoints for assessing the impacts of toxicants at the community level.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Bayo, Francisco; Goka, Kouchi

    2012-04-01

    Assessment of ecological impacts of toxicants relies currently on extrapolation of effects observed at organismal or population levels. The uncertainty inherent to such extrapolations, together with the impossibility of predicting ecological effects of chemical mixtures, can only be resolved by adopting approaches that consider toxicological endpoints at a community or ecological level. Experimental data from micro- and mesocosms provide estimates of community effect levels, which can then be used to confirm or correct the extrapolations from theoretical methods such as species sensitivity distributions (SSDs) or others. When assessing impacts, the choice of sensitive community endpoints is important. Four community endpoints (species richness, abundance, diversity and similarity indices) were evaluated in their ability to assess impacts of two insecticides, imidacloprid and etofenprox, and their mixture on aquatic and benthic communities from artificial rice paddies. Proportional changes of each community endpoint were expressed by ratios between their values in the treatment and control paddies. Regression lines fitted to the endpoint ratios against the time series of chemical concentrations were used to predict percentile impacts in the communities. The abundance endpoint appears to be the most sensitive indicator of the communities' response, but the Czekanowski similarity index described best the structural changes that occur in all communities. Aquatic arthropods were more sensitive to the mixture of both insecticides than zooplankton and benthic communities. Estimated protective levels for 95% of aquatic species exposed to imidacloprid (<0.01-1.0 μg l(-1)) were slightly lower than predicted by SSD, whereas for etofenprox the protective concentrations in water (<0.01-0.58 μg l(-1)) were an order of magnitude lower than SSD's predictions. PMID:22120543

  6. Assessment of sociodemographic and geographic disparities in cancer risk from air toxics in South Carolina.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Sacoby; Burwell-Naney, Kristen; Jiang, Chengsheng; Zhang, Hongmei; Samantapudi, Ashok; Murray, Rianna; Dalemarre, Laura; Rice, LaShanta; Williams, Edith

    2015-07-01

    Populations of color and low-income communities are often disproportionately burdened by exposures to various environmental contaminants, including air pollution. Some air pollutants have carcinogenic properties that are particularly problematic in South Carolina (SC), a state that consistently has high rates of cancer mortality for all sites. The purpose of this study was to assess cancer risk disparities in SC by linking risk estimates from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's 2005 National Air Toxics Assessment (NATA) with sociodemographic data from the 2000 US Census Bureau. Specifically, NATA risk data for varying risk categories were linked by tract ID and analyzed with sociodemographic variables from the 2000 census using R. The average change in cancer risk from all sources by sociodemographic variable was quantified using multiple linear regression models. Spatial methods were further employed using ArcGIS 10 to assess the distribution of all source risk and percent non-white at each census tract level. The relative risk (RR) estimates of the proportion of high cancer risk tracts (defined as the top 10% of cancer risk in SC) and their respective 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated between the first and latter three quartiles defined by sociodemographic factors, while the variance in the percentage of high cancer risk between quartile groups was tested using Pearson's chi-square. The average total cancer risk for SC was 26.8 people/million (ppl/million). The risk from on-road sources was approximately 5.8 ppl/million, higher than the risk from major, area, and non-road sources (1.8, 2.6, and 1.3 ppl/million), respectively. Based on our findings, addressing on-road sources may decrease the disproportionate cancer risk burden among low-income populations and communities of color in SC. PMID:26037107

  7. An Evaluation of EPA's National-Scale Air Toxics Assessment (NATA): Comparison with Benzene Measurements in Detroit, Michigan

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. EPA periodically evaluates ambient concentrations, human exposures, and health risks for 180 hazardous air pollutants plus diesel particulate matter using modeled estimates from the National-Scale Air Toxics Assessment (NATA). NATA publishes estimates at the spatial reso...

  8. Implementing Toxicity Testing in the 21st Century (TT21C): Making safety decisions using toxicity pathways, and progress in a prototype risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Adeleye, Yeyejide; Andersen, Melvin; Clewell, Rebecca; Davies, Michael; Dent, Matthew; Edwards, Sue; Fowler, Paul; Malcomber, Sophie; Nicol, Beate; Scott, Andrew; Scott, Sharon; Sun, Bin; Westmoreland, Carl; White, Andrew; Zhang, Qiang; Carmichael, Paul L

    2015-06-01

    Risk assessment methodologies in toxicology have remained largely unchanged for decades. The default approach uses high dose animal studies, together with human exposure estimates, and conservative assessment (uncertainty) factors or linear extrapolations to determine whether a specific chemical exposure is 'safe' or 'unsafe'. Although some incremental changes have appeared over the years, results from all new approaches are still judged against this process of extrapolating high-dose effects in animals to low-dose exposures in humans. The US National Research Council blueprint for change, entitled Toxicity Testing in the 21st Century: A Vision and Strategy called for a transformation of toxicity testing from a system based on high-dose studies in laboratory animals to one founded primarily on in vitro methods that evaluate changes in normal cellular signalling pathways using human-relevant cells or tissues. More recently, this concept of pathways-based approaches to risk assessment has been expanded by the description of 'Adverse Outcome Pathways' (AOPs). The question, however, has been how to translate this AOP/TT21C vision into the practical tools that will be useful to those expected to make safety decisions. We have sought to provide a practical example of how the TT21C vision can be implemented to facilitate a safety assessment for a commercial chemical without the use of animal testing. To this end, the key elements of the TT21C vision have been broken down to a set of actions that can be brought together to achieve such a safety assessment. Such components of a pathways-based risk assessment have been widely discussed, however to-date, no worked examples of the entire risk assessment process exist. In order to begin to test the process, we have taken the approach of examining a prototype toxicity pathway (DNA damage responses mediated by the p53 network) and constructing a strategy for the development of a pathway based risk assessment for a specific

  9. Qualitative toxicity assessment of silver nanoparticles on the fresh water bacterial isolates and consortium at low level of exposure concentration.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Deepak; Kumari, Jyoti; Pakrashi, Sunandan; Dalai, Swayamprava; Raichur, Ashok M; Sastry, T P; Mandal, A B; Chandrasekaran, N; Mukherjee, Amitava

    2014-10-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) pose a high risk of exposure to the natural environment owing to their extensive usage in various consumer products. In the present study we attempted to understand the harmful effect of AgNPs at environmentally relevant low concentration levels (≤1ppm) towards two different freshwater bacterial isolates and their consortium. The standard plate count assay suggested that the AgNPs were toxic towards the fresh water bacterial isolates as well as the consortium, though toxicity was significantly reduced for the cells in the consortium. The oxidative stress assessment and membrane permeability studies corroborated with the toxicity data. The detailed electron microscopic studies suggested the cell degrading potential of the AgNPs, and the FT-IR studies confirmed the involvement of the surface groups in the toxic effects. No significant ion leaching from the AgNPs was observed at the applied concentration levels signifying the dominant role of the particle size, and size distribution in bacterial toxicity. The reduced toxicity for the cells in the consortium than the individual isolates has major significance in further studies on the ecotoxicity of the AgNPs.

  10. Toxicity assessment and bioaccumulation in zebrafish embryos exposed to carbon nanotubes suspended in Pluronic® F-108

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ruhung; Meredith, Alicea N.; Lee, Michael; Deutsch, Dakota; Miadzvedskaya, Lizaveta; Braun, Elizabeth; Pantano, Paul; Harper, Stacey; Draper, Rockford

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are often suspended in Pluronic® surfactants by sonication, which may confound toxicity studies because sonication of surfactants can create degradation products that are toxic to mammalian cells. Here, we present a toxicity assessment of Pluronic® F-108 with and without suspended CNTs using embryonic zebrafish as an in vivo model. Pluronic® sonolytic degradation products were toxic to zebrafish embryos just as they were to mammalian cells. When the toxic Pluronic® fragments were removed, there was little effect of pristine multi-walled CNTs (pMWNTs), carboxylated MWNTs (cMWNTs) or pristine single-walled carbon nanotubes (pSWNTs) on embryo viability and development, even at high concentrations. A gel electrophoretic method coupled with Raman imaging was developed to measure the bioaccumulation of CNTs by zebrafish embryos, and dose-dependent uptake of CNTs was observed. These data indicate that embryos accumulate pMWNTs, cMWNTs and pSWNTs yet there is very little embryo toxicity. PMID:26559437

  11. Toxicity assessment in marine sediment for the Terra Nova environmental effects monitoring program (1997-2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whiteway, Sandra A.; Paine, Michael D.; Wells, Trudy A.; DeBlois, Elisabeth M.; Kilgour, Bruce W.; Tracy, Ellen; Crowley, Roger D.; Williams, Urban P.; Janes, G. Gregory

    2014-12-01

    This paper discusses toxicity test results on sediments from the Terra Nova offshore oil development. The Terra Nova Field is located on the Grand Banks approximately 350 km southeast of Newfoundland (Canada). The amphipod (Rhepoxynius abronius) survival and solid phase luminescent bacteria (Vibrio fischeri, or Microtox) assays were conducted on sediment samples collected from approximately 50 stations per program year around Terra Nova during baseline (1997), prior to drilling, and in 2000, 2001, 2002, 2004, 2006, 2008 and 2010 after drilling began. The frequency of toxic responses in the amphipod toxicity test was low. Of the ten stations that were toxic in environmental effects monitoring (EEM) years, only one (station 30(FE)) was toxic in more than one year and could be directly attributed to Terra Nova project activities. In contrast, 65 (18%) of 364 EEM samples were toxic to Microtox. Microtox toxicity in EEM years was not related to distance from Terra Nova drill centres or concentrations of >C10-C21 hydrocarbons or barium, the primary constituents of the synthetic-based drill muds used at Terra Nova. Of the variables tested, fines and strontium levels showed the strongest (positive) correlations with toxicity. Neither fines nor strontium levels were affected by drill cuttings discharge at Terra Nova, except at station 30(FE) (and that station was not toxic to Microtox). Benthic macro-invertebrate abundance, richness and diversity were greater in toxic than in non-toxic sediments. Therefore, Microtox responses indicating toxicity were associated with positive biological responses in the field. This result may have been an indirect function of the increased abundance of most invertebrate taxa in less sandy sediments with higher gravel content, where fines and strontium levels and, consequently, toxicity to Microtox were high; or chemical substances released by biodegradation of organic matter, where invertebrates are abundant, may be toxic to Microtox. Given

  12. Comparative toxicity assessment of ozone and activated carbon treated sewage effluents using an in vivo test battery.

    PubMed

    Stalter, Daniel; Magdeburg, Axel; Oehlmann, Jörg

    2010-04-01

    Wastewater treatment plants do not eliminate micropollutants completely and are thus important point sources for these substances. Ozonation and activated carbon treatment might be beneficial for ecosystem health as these techniques provide effective barriers to organic contaminants. However, a toxicity evaluation is required to investigate toxicity reduction and to assess the potential formation of toxic oxidation byproducts during ozonation. Therefore a comparative toxicity evaluation of different treated wastewater effluents was performed on site at a half scale treatment plant equipped with an ozonation step and an activated carbon treatment step in parallel subsequent to conventional activated sludge treatment. For this purpose four invertebrate and one higher plant toxicity test were selected to assess potential biological effects on whole organisms. The reproduction test with the mudsnail Potamopyrgus antipodarum exhibited a decreased reproductive output after advanced treatment compared to conventional treatment. This indicates an effective estrogenicity removal by ozonation and activated carbon treatment and is confirmed by results of the yeast estrogen screen with a reduction of in vitro estrogenic activity by >75%. The Lumbriculus variegatus test revealed a significantly enhanced toxicity after ozonation compared to conventional treatment whereas this effect was reduced following subsequent sand filtration. When ozonation was applied, a significantly increased genotoxicity was observed, detected with the comet assay using haemolymph of the zebra mussel. Again, this effect was removed by subsequent sand filtration to the level of conventional treatment. Activated carbon treatment even resulted in a significant reduction of genotoxicity. Adverse effects after the ozone reactor are possibly a result of the formation of toxic oxidation byproducts. Biologically active sand filtration obviously is an effective barrier to such compounds.

  13. Cell cultures are more sensitive than Saccharamoyces cervisiae tests for assessing the toxicity of aquatic pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Mochida, K.; Gomyoda, M.; Fujita, T.; Yamagata, K.

    1988-07-01

    Cultured fish and human cells have been used as bioassay systems for the evaluation of the toxicity of aquatic pollutants. Numerous assays using bacteria and yeast have also been used for such purposes. The authors report the toxicity of aquatic pollutants (Cd, Hg, and Ni), using cell culture systems and the yeast Saccharomyces cervisiae test. Cd, Hg, and Ni were chosen as model compounds of pollutants because the related toxicity is now fairly well established.

  14. Toxicity of binary mixtures of metals and pyrethroid insecticides to Daphnia magna Straus. Implications for multi-substance risks assessment.

    PubMed

    Barata, Carlos; Baird, D J; Nogueira, A J A; Soares, A M V M; Riva, M C

    2006-06-10

    Two different concepts, termed concentration addition (CA) and independent action (IA), describe general relationships between the effects of single substances and their corresponding mixtures allowing calculation of an expected mixture toxicity on the basis of known toxicities of the mixture components. Both concepts are limited to cases in which all substances in a mixture influence the same experimental endpoint, and are usually tested against a "fixed ratio design" where the mixture ratio is kept constant throughout the studies and the overall concentration of the mixture is systematically varied. With this design, interaction among toxic components across different mixture ratios and endpoints (i.e. lethal versus sublethal) is not assessed. In this study lethal and sublethal (feeding) responses of Daphnia magna individuals to single and binary combinations of similarly and dissimilarly acting chemicals including the metals (cadmium, copper) and the pyrethroid insecticides (lambda-cyhalothrin and deltamethrin) were assayed using a composite experimental design to test for interactions among toxic components across mixture effect levels, mixture ratios, lethal and sublethal toxic effects. To account for inter-experiment response variability, in each binary mixture toxicity assay the toxicity of the individual mixture constituents was also assessed. Model adequacy was then evaluated comparing the slopes and elevations of predicted versus observed mixture toxicity curves with those estimated for the individual components. Model predictive abilities changed across endpoints. The IA concept was able to predict accurately mixture toxicities of dissimilarly acting chemicals for lethal responses, whereas the CA concept did so in three out of four pairings for feeding response, irrespective of the chemical mode of action. Interaction effects across mixture effect levels, evidenced by crossing slopes, were only observed for the binary mixture Cd and Cu for lethal effects

  15. Toxicity assessment of Hanford Site wastes by bacterial bioluminescence. [Photobacter phosphoreum:a3

    SciTech Connect

    Rebagay, T.V.; Dodd, D.A.; Voogd, J.A.

    1991-09-01

    This paper examines the toxicity of the nonradioactive component of low-level wastes stored in tanks on the Hanford reservation. The use of a faster, cheaper bioassay to replace the 96 hour fish acute toxicity test is examined. The new bioassay is based on loss of bioluminescence of {und Photobacter phosphoreum} (commonly called Microtox) following exposure to toxic materials. This bioassay is calibrated and compares well to the standard fish acute toxicity test for characterization of Hanford Wastes. 4 refs., 11 figs., 11 tabs. (MHB)

  16. An alternative pluripotent state confers interspecies chimaeric competency.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jun; Okamura, Daiji; Li, Mo; Suzuki, Keiichiro; Luo, Chongyuan; Ma, Li; He, Yupeng; Li, Zhongwei; Benner, Chris; Tamura, Isao; Krause, Marie N; Nery, Joseph R; Du, Tingting; Zhang, Zhuzhu; Hishida, Tomoaki; Takahashi, Yuta; Aizawa, Emi; Kim, Na Young; Lajara, Jeronimo; Guillen, Pedro; Campistol, Josep M; Esteban, Concepcion Rodriguez; Ross, Pablo J; Saghatelian, Alan; Ren, Bing; Ecker, Joseph R; Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos

    2015-05-21

    Pluripotency, the ability to generate any cell type of the body, is an evanescent attribute of embryonic cells. Transitory pluripotent cells can be captured at different time points during embryogenesis and maintained as embryonic stem cells or epiblast stem cells in culture. Since ontogenesis is a dynamic process in both space and time, it seems counterintuitive that these two temporal states represent the full spectrum of organismal pluripotency. Here we show that by modulating culture parameters, a stem-cell type with unique spatial characteristics and distinct molecular and functional features, designated as region-selective pluripotent stem cells (rsPSCs), can be efficiently obtained from mouse embryos and primate pluripotent stem cells, including humans. The ease of culturing and editing the genome of human rsPSCs offers advantages for regenerative medicine applications. The unique ability of human rsPSCs to generate post-implantation interspecies chimaeric embryos may facilitate our understanding of early human development and evolution.

  17. Observation of interspecies 6Li-133Cs Feshbach resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Repp, M.; Pires, R.; Ulmanis, J.; Heck, R.; Kuhnle, E. D.; Weidemüller, M.; Tiemann, E.

    2013-01-01

    We report on the observation of 19 interspecies Feshbach resonances in an optically trapped ultracold Bose-Fermi mixture of 133Cs and 6Li in the two energetically lowest spin states. We assign the resonances to s- and p-wave molecular channels by a coupled-channels calculation, resulting in an accurate determination of LiCs ground-state potentials. Fits of the resonance position based on the undressed asymptotic bound state model do not provide the same level of accuracy as the coupled-channels calculation. Several broad s-wave resonances provide prospects to create fermionic LiCs molecules with a large dipole moment via Feshbach association followed by stimulated Raman passage. Two of the s-wave resonances overlap with a zero crossing of the Cs scattering length, which offers prospects for the investigation of polarons in an ultracold Li-Cs mixture.

  18. Cytogenetic analysis of experimental interspecies goat-sheep chimera.

    PubMed

    Jaszczak, K; Członkowska, M; Guszkiewicz, A; Parada, R

    1991-01-01

    Chromosomal analysis was carried out on blood lymphocytes, skin fibroblasts, and germinal cells of an interspecies goat-sheep chimera. This chimera was produced by aggregation of blastomeres of goat and sheep embryos. A cell chimerism 54,XX/60,XY was found in blood lymphocytes and skin fibroblasts. At birth the percentage of lymphocytes with karyotype 54,XX (sheep) amounted to 80% and with karyotype 60,XY (goat) to 20%. With age the percentage of lymphocytes with chromosome complement 54,XX increased, so that at 18 months it was 94% sheep and 6% goat. At the same age, in skin fibroblasts the percentage of cells with goat karyotype reached 25%. Analysis of germinal cells showed in spermatogonia the presence of only karyotype 60,XY and in primary spermatocytes of 29 autosomal bivalents and the sex bivalent XY. PMID:2061596

  19. Syntrophic growth via quinone-mediated interspecies electron transfer

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Jessica A.; Nevin, Kelly P.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms by which microbial species exchange electrons are of interest because interspecies electron transfer can expand the metabolic capabilities of microbial communities. Previous studies with the humic substance analog anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) suggested that quinone-mediated interspecies electron transfer (QUIET) is feasible, but it was not determined if sufficient energy is available from QUIET to support the growth of both species. Furthermore, there have been no previous studies on the mechanisms for the oxidation of anthrahydroquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AHQDS). A co-culture of Geobacter metallireducens and G. sulfurreducens metabolized ethanol with the reduction of fumarate much faster in the presence of AQDS, and there was an increase in cell protein. G. sulfurreducens was more abundant, consistent with G. sulfurreducens obtaining electrons from acetate that G. metallireducens produced from ethanol, as well as from AHQDS. Co-cultures initiated with a citrate synthase-deficient strain of G. sulfurreducens that was unable to use acetate as an electron donor also metabolized ethanol with the reduction of fumarate and cell growth, but acetate accumulated over time. G. sulfurreducens and G. metallireducens were equally abundant in these co-cultures reflecting the inability of the citrate synthase-deficient strain of G. sulfurreducens to metabolize acetate. Evaluation of the mechanisms by which G. sulfurreducens accepts electrons from AHQDS demonstrated that a strain deficient in outer-surface c-type cytochromes that are required for AQDS reduction was as effective at QUIET as the wild-type strain. Deletion of additional genes previously implicated in extracellular electron transfer also had no impact on QUIET. These results demonstrate that QUIET can yield sufficient energy to support the growth of both syntrophic partners, but that the mechanisms by which electrons are derived from extracellular hydroquinones require further investigation. PMID

  20. Geriatric assessment predicts survival and toxicities in elderly myeloma patients: an International Myeloma Working Group report

    PubMed Central

    Bringhen, Sara; Mateos, Maria-Victoria; Larocca, Alessandra; Facon, Thierry; Kumar, Shaji K.; Offidani, Massimo; McCarthy, Philip; Evangelista, Andrea; Lonial, Sagar; Zweegman, Sonja; Musto, Pellegrino; Terpos, Evangelos; Belch, Andrew; Hajek, Roman; Ludwig, Heinz; Stewart, A. Keith; Moreau, Philippe; Anderson, Kenneth; Einsele, Hermann; Durie, Brian G. M.; Dimopoulos, Meletios A.; Landgren, Ola; San Miguel, Jesus F.; Richardson, Paul; Sonneveld, Pieter; Rajkumar, S. Vincent

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a pooled analysis of 869 individual newly diagnosed elderly patient data from 3 prospective trials. At diagnosis, a geriatric assessment had been performed. An additive scoring system (range 0-5), based on age, comorbidities, and cognitive and physical conditions, was developed to identify 3 groups: fit (score = 0, 39%), intermediate fitness (score = 1, 31%), and frail (score ≥2, 30%). The 3-year overall survival was 84% in fit, 76% in intermediate-fitness (hazard ratio [HR], 1.61; P = .042), and 57% in frail (HR, 3.57; P < .001) patients. The cumulative incidence of grade ≥3 nonhematologic adverse events at 12 months was 22.2% in fit, 26.4% in intermediate-fitness (HR, 1.23; P = .217), and 34.0% in frail (HR, 1.74; P < .001) patients. The cumulative incidence of treatment discontinuation at 12 months was 16.5% in fit, 20.8% in intermediate-fitness (HR, 1.41; P = .052), and 31.2% in frail (HR, 2.21; P < .001) patients. Our frailty score predicts mortality and the risk of toxicity in elderly myeloma patients. The International Myeloma Working group proposes this score for the measurement of frailty in designing future clinical trials. These trials are registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01093136 (EMN01), #NCT01190787 (26866138MMY2069), and #NCT01346787 (IST-CAR-506). PMID:25628469

  1. Degradation of Thiamethoxam in aqueous solution by ozonation: Influencing factors, intermediates, degradation mechanism and toxicity assessment.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qinghua; Ge, Yanan; Zuo, Peng; Shi, Dong; Jia, Shouhua

    2016-03-01

    This paper focuses on the degradation of Thiamethoxam (THIA) in aqueous solution by ozonation. Four influencing factors: pH, THIA initial concentration, ozone concentration and temperature were investigated in order to optimize the conditions, and pH showed the greatest impact; the removal efficiency reached up to 71.19% under the condition of pH 5-11, THIA initial concentration 50-300 mg L(-1), the ozone concentration 10-22.5 mg L(-1) at 293-308 K after 90 min. Four main intermediates were separated and identified and the possible degradation mechanism was proposed. The luminous intensity of photobacteria and the chemical oxygen demand (COD) were measured to assess the changes of toxicity and mineralization in ozonation process, and results showed that the inhibition rate decreased by 60% and 76% of COD was removed after 180 min with the THIA initial concentration was 200 mg L(-1). Our study powerfully demonstrates that the degradation of THIA in aqueous solution by ozonation is a promising technology.

  2. Subacute toxicity assessment of diflubenzuron, an insect growth regulator, in adult male rats.

    PubMed

    de Barros, Aline Lima; Cavalheiro, Gabriela Finoto; de Souza, Alexsandra Vila Maior; Traesel, Giseli Karenina; Anselmo-Franci, Janete A; Kassuya, Cândida Aparecida Leite; Arena, Arielle Cristina

    2016-04-01

    Diflubenzuron (DFB), an insecticide and acaricide insect growth regulator, can be used in agriculture against insect predators and in public health programs, to control insects and vectors, mainly Aedes aegypti larvae. Due to the lack of toxicological assessments of this compound, the objective of the present study was to evaluate the toxicological effects of subacute exposure to the DFB insecticide in adult male rats. Adult male rats were exposed (gavage) to 0, 2, 4, or 8 mg/kg of DFB for 28 days. No clinical signs of toxicity were observed in the DFB-treated animals of the experimental groups. However, there was an increase in serum levels of alanine aminotransferase in the group that received 8 mg/kg/DFB/day and urea at doses of 4 and 8 mg/kg/DFB/day, without altering other biochemical or hematological parameters. The subacute exposure to the lowest dose of DFB caused significant decrease in testis weight, daily sperm production, and in number of sperm in the epididymis in relation to the control group. However, no alterations were observed in the sperm morphology, testicular, epididymis, liver and kidney histology, or testosterone levels. These findings unveiled the hazardous effects of DFB on male reproduction after the subacute exposure and special attention should be addressed to the effects of low doses of this pesticide.

  3. Toxicological assessment of kretek cigarettes Part 3: kretek and American-blended cigarettes, inhalation toxicity.

    PubMed

    Piadé, J-J; Roemer, E; Dempsey, R; Weiler, H; Meurrens, K; Vanscheeuwijck, P; Schorp, M K

    2014-12-01

    A typical Indonesian kretek cigarette brand and an experimental kretek reference cigarette were compared to the reference cigarette 2R4F in two 90-day inhalation studies. Male and female rats were exposed nose-only to mainstream smoke for 6 hours daily, for 90 consecutive days. Biological endpoints were assessed according to OECD guideline 413, with special emphasis on respiratory tract histopathology and on lung inflammation (broncho-alveolar lavage fluid levels of neutrophils, macrophages and lymphocytes). Histopathological alterations included: in the nose, hyperplasia and squamous metaplasia of the respiratory epithelium and squamous metaplasia and atrophy of the olfactory epithelium; in the larynx, epithelial squamous metaplasia and hyperplasia; in the lungs, accumulation of macrophages in alveoli and goblet cell hyperplasia in bronchial epithelium. The findings were qualitatively consistent with observations from previous similar studies on conventional cigarettes. Compared to 2R4F cigarette, however, kretek smoke exposure was associated with a pronounced attenuation of pulmonary inflammation and less severe histopathological changes in the respiratory tract. Neutrophilic inflammation was also significantly lower (>70%). These results are consistent with the observations made on smoke chemistry and in vitro toxicology. They do not support any increased toxicity of the smoke of kretek cigarettes compared to conventional American-blended cigarettes. PMID:25455226

  4. Pharmacological assessment of the medicinal potential of Acacia mearnsii De Wild.: antimicrobial and toxicity activities.

    PubMed

    Olajuyigbe, Olufunmiso O; Afolayan, Anthony J

    2012-01-01

    Acacia mearnsii De Wild. (Fabaceae) is a medicinal plant used in the treatment of microbial infections in South Africa without scientific validation of its bioactivity and toxicity. The antimicrobial activity of the crude acetone extract was evaluated by both agar diffusion and macrobroth dilution methods while its cytotoxicity effect was assessed with brine shrimp lethality assay. The study showed that both bacterial and fungal isolates were highly inhibited by the crude extract. The MIC values for the gram-positive bacteria (78.1-312.5) μg/mL, gram-negative bacteria (39.1-625) μg/mL and fungal isolates (625-5000) μg/mL differ significantly. The bacteria were more susceptible than the fungal strains tested. The antibiosis determination showed that the extract was more (75%) bactericidal than bacteriostatic (25%) and more fungicidal (66.67%) than fungistatic (33.33%). The cytotoxic activity of the extract was observed between 31.25 μg/mL and 500 μg/mL and the LC(50) value (112.36 μg/mL) indicates that the extract was nontoxic in the brine shrimp lethality assay (LC(50) > 100 μg/mL). These results support the use of A. mearnsii in traditional medicine for treatment of microbial infections. The extract exhibiting significant broad spectrum antimicrobial activity and nontoxic effects has potential to yield active antimicrobial compounds. PMID:22605976

  5. Bioavailability assessment of essential and toxic metals in edible nuts and seeds.

    PubMed

    Moreda-Piñeiro, Jorge; Herbello-Hermelo, Paloma; Domínguez-González, Raquel; Bermejo-Barrera, Pilar; Moreda-Piñeiro, Antonio

    2016-08-15

    Bioavailability of essential and toxic metals in edible nuts and seeds has been assessed by using an in vitro dialyzability approach. The samples studied included walnuts, Brazil nuts, Macadamia nuts, pecans, hazelnuts, chestnuts, cashews, peanuts, pistachios and seeds (almond, pine, pumpkin and sunflower). Metals were measured by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry in dialyzates and also in samples after a microwave assisted acid digestion pre-treatment. Low dialyzability percentages were found for Al, Fe and Hg; moderate percentages were found for Ba, Ca, Cd, Co, Cu, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Mo, P, Pb, Se, Sr, Tl and Zn; and high dialyzability ratios were found for As, Cr and Ni. The highest dialyzability percentages were found in raw chestnuts and raw hazelnuts. Metal dialyzability was found to be negatively affected by fat content. Positive correlation was found between carbohydrate content and metal dialyzability ratios. Protein and dietary fibre content did not influence metal bioavailability. Predicted dialyzability for some metals based on fat and protein content could also be established.

  6. Pharmacological Assessment of the Medicinal Potential of Acacia mearnsii De Wild.: Antimicrobial and Toxicity Activities

    PubMed Central

    Olajuyigbe, Olufunmiso O.; Afolayan, Anthony J.

    2012-01-01

    Acacia mearnsii De Wild. (Fabaceae) is a medicinal plant used in the treatment of microbial infections in South Africa without scientific validation of its bioactivity and toxicity. The antimicrobial activity of the crude acetone extract was evaluated by both agar diffusion and macrobroth dilution methods while its cytotoxicity effect was assessed with brine shrimp lethality assay. The study showed that both bacterial and fungal isolates were highly inhibited by the crude extract. The MIC values for the gram-positive bacteria (78.1–312.5) μg/mL, gram-negative bacteria (39.1–625) μg/mL and fungal isolates (625–5000) μg/mL differ significantly. The bacteria were more susceptible than the fungal strains tested. The antibiosis determination showed that the extract was more (75%) bactericidal than bacteriostatic (25%) and more fungicidal (66.67%) than fungistatic (33.33%). The cytotoxic activity of the extract was observed between 31.25 μg/mL and 500 μg/mL and the LC50 value (112.36 μg/mL) indicates that the extract was nontoxic in the brine shrimp lethality assay (LC50 > 100 μg/mL). These results support the use of A. mearnsii in traditional medicine for treatment of microbial infections. The extract exhibiting significant broad spectrum antimicrobial activity and nontoxic effects has potential to yield active antimicrobial compounds. PMID:22605976

  7. Comprehensive sediment toxicity assessment of Hessian surface waters using Lumbriculus variegatus and Chironomus riparius.

    PubMed

    Galluba, Simone; Oetken, Matthias; Oehlmann, Jörg

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was a sediment assessment of predominantly small rivers in the German federal state of Hesse. For this purpose, sediment samples were taken at 50 study sites with different contamination levels. The benthic invertebrates Chironomus riparius (Diptera) and Lumbriculus variegatus (Oligochaeta) were used as test species and exposed to whole sediments in chronic laboratory experiments. The bioassays were carried out on the basis of OECD guidelines 218 and 225 for the testing of chemicals. For about 50 % of the study sites chemical analytical data for pollutants from environmentally important substance classes like metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, and organotin compounds were available. These data were used to analyze correlations between effects in the bioassays and measured chemical contaminations at sampling sites. For 22 % of the sediments ecologically relevant adverse effects were observed. In the majority of these cases effects occurred in only one of the biotests, and only one sediment sample exerted a negative effect on both test organisms. There was no significant correlation between biological responses and chemical data considering substance classes. However, there was a weak positive correlation between arsenic concentration and both worm number and worm biomass as well as a weak positive correlation between single PAHs and worm biomass. In some sediment tests elevated ammonia concentrations occurred in the overlying water so that an influence of these partially toxic concentrations on the test results cannot be ruled out. PMID:22375534

  8. Development of an in vitro test system for assessment of male, reproductive toxicity.

    PubMed

    Habas, Khaled; Anderson, Diana; Brinkworth, Martin

    2014-02-10

    There is a need for improved reproductive toxicology assays that do not require large numbers of animals but are sensitive and informative. Therefore, Staput velocity-sedimentation separation followed by culture of specific mouse testicular cells was used as such a system. The specificity of separation was assessed using immunocytochemistry to identify spermatids, spermatocytes and spermatogonia. The efficacy of the system to detect toxicity was then evaluated by analysing the effects of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) by the terminal uridine-deoxynucleotide end-labelling (TUNEL) assay to show the rate of apoptosis induced among the different types of germ cells. We found that 2 h of treatment at both 1 and 10 μM induced increases of over ∼10-fold in the percentage of apoptotic cells (p≤0.001), confirming that testicular germ cells are prone to apoptosis at very low concentrations of H2O2. It was also demonstrated for the first time for this compound that spermatogonia are significantly more susceptible than spermatocytes, which are more affected than spermatids. This reflects the proportion of actively dividing cells in these cell types, suggesting a mechanism for the differential sensitivity. The approach should thus form the basis of a useful test system for reproductive and genetic toxicology in the future.

  9. Toxicity, uptake kinetics and behavior assessment in zebrafish embryos following exposure to perfluorooctanesulphonicacid (PFOS)

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Haihua; Huang, Changjiang; Wang, Lijun; Ye, Xiaowei; Bai, Chenglian; Simonich, Michael T.; Tanguay, Robert L.; Dong, Qiaoxiang

    2014-01-01

    Perfluorooctanesulphonicacid (PFOS), a persistent organic contaminant, has been widely detected in the environment, wildlife and humans, but few studies have assessed its effect on aquatic organisms. The present study evaluated the effect of PFOS on zebrafish embryos. Zebrafish embryos exhibited bent spine and developmental toxicity after exposure to various PFOS concentrations (0.01-16.0 μM) from 6 to 120 hour post-fertilization (hpf). The LC50 at 120 hpf was 4.39 μM and the EC50 at 120 hpf was 2.23 μM. PFOS induced apoptosis at 24 hpf was consistently located in the brain, eye, and tail region of embryos. PFOS elevated the basal rate of swimming after 4 days of exposure, and larvae exposed to PFOS (0.5-8.0μM) for only 1 h at 6 dpf swam faster with increasing PFOS concentration. Larvae exposed to 16.0 μM PFOS for 24 h periods from 1 to 121 hpf showed the highest incidence of malformations in the 97-121 hpf window. Continuous exposure to PFOS from 1 to 121 hpf resulted in a steady accumulation with no evidence of elimination. Our results further the understanding of the health risks of PFOS to aquatic organisms and identify additional research needed on PFOS toxicology. PMID:20171748

  10. Assessing the Renal Toxicity of Capstone Depleted Uranium Oxides and Other Uranium Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Roszell, Laurie E.; Hahn, Fletcher; Lee, Robyn B.; Parkhurst, MaryAnn

    2009-02-26

    The primary target for uranium toxicity is the kidney. The most frequently used guideline for uranium kidney burdens is the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP) value of 3 µg U/g kidney, a value that is based largely upon chronic studies in animals. In the present effort, we have developed a risk model equation to assess potential outcomes of acute uranium exposure. Twenty-seven previously published case studies in which workers were acutely exposed to soluble compounds of uranium (as a result of workplace accidents) were analyzed. Kidney burdens of uranium for these individuals were determined based on uranium in the urine, and correlated with health effects observed over a period of up to 38 years. Based upon the severity of health effects, each individual was assigned a score (- to +++) and then placed into an Effect Group. A discriminant analysis was used to build a model equation to predict the Effect Group based on the amount of uranium in the kidneys. The model equation was able to predict the Effect Group with 85% accuracy. The risk model was used to predict the Effect Group for Soldiers exposed to DU as a result of friendly fire incidents during the 1991 Gulf War. This model equation can also be used to predict the Effect Group of new cases in which acute exposures to uranium have occurred.

  11. Verified spider bites in Oregon (USA) with the intent to assess hobo spider venom toxicity.

    PubMed

    McKeown, Nathanael; Vetter, Richard S; Hendrickson, Robert G

    2014-06-01

    This study compiled 33 verified spider bites from the state of Oregon (USA). The initial goal was to amass a series of bites by the hobo spider to assess whether it possesses toxic venom, a supposition which is currently in a contested state. None of the 33 bites from several spider species developed significant medical symptoms nor did dermonecrosis occur. The most common biters were the yellow sac spider, Cheiracanthium mildei (N = 10) and orb-weavers of the genus Araneus (N = 6). There were 10 bites from three genera of funnel web spiders of the family Agelenidae including one hobo spider bite and one from the congeneric giant house spider which is readily confused as a hobo spider. The hobo spider bite resulted in pain, redness, twitching in the calf muscle and resolved in 12 h. Also generated from this study were possibly the first records of bites from spiders of the genera Callobius (Amaurobiidae) and Antrodiaetus (Antrodiaetidae), both with minor manifestations.

  12. Development of a method for assessing the toxicity of volatile organic contaminants (VOCs) to soil biota

    SciTech Connect

    Cureton, P.M.; Lintott, D.; Balch, G.; Goudey, S.

    1994-12-31

    A method was developed to assess the toxicity of VOCs to plants and earthworms (survival of Eisenia foetida). The procedures followed were based on Greene et al. Gas samples for head space analyses were removed, at test initiation a termination, through a bulkhead fitting in the lid equipped with septa. Treatment levels were prepared, at low temperature to minimize volatilization, by spiking a soil sample with the compound of interest and then serially diluting it with clean soil. Root elongation tests were conducted on filter paper supported by 70 mesh silica sand spiked with the volatile of interest. Soils were then inundated with water, shaken with heating, and the headspace reanalyzed for the total contaminant concentration in the test system (total equals headspace plus adsorbed). Enclosing the seeds and worms in containers did not appear to have detrimental effects. VOCs tested included benzene, xylene, toluene, ethylbenzene, tetrachloroethylene, and 1,1,2-trichloroethylene. Each test was repeated three times with different batches of soil, seed lots and worms from different colonies. Endpoints derived based on nominal and measured concentrations included: NOEC, LOEC, LC{sub 50} and LC{sub 25} for earthworm mortality and EC{sub 50} and EC{sub 25} for emergence and root elongation.

  13. Health assessment of gasoline and fuel oxygenate vapors: subchronic inhalation toxicity.

    PubMed

    Clark, Charles R; Schreiner, Ceinwen A; Parker, Craig M; Gray, Thomas M; Hoffman, Gary M

    2014-11-01

    Sprague Dawley rats were exposed via inhalation to vapor condensates of either gasoline or gasoline combined with various fuel oxygenates to assess whether their use in gasoline influences the hazard of evaporative emissions. Test substances included vapor condensates prepared from an EPA described "baseline gasoline" (BGVC), or gasoline combined with methyl tertiary butyl ether (G/MTBE), ethyl t-butyl ether (G/ETBE), t-amyl methyl ether (G/TAME), diisopropyl ether (G/DIPE), ethanol (G/EtOH), or t-butyl alcohol (G/TBA). Target concentrations were 0, 2000, 10,000 or 20,000mg/m(3) and exposures were for 6h/day, 5days/week for 13weeks. A portion of the animals were maintained for a four week recovery period to determine the reversibility of potential adverse effects. Increased kidney weight and light hydrocarbon nephropathy (LHN) were observed in treated male rats in all studies which were reversible or nearly reversible after 4weeks recovery. LHN is unique to male rats and is not relevant to human toxicity. The no observed effect level (NOAEL) in all studies was 10,000mg/m(3), except for G/MTBE (<2000) and G/TBA (2000). The results provide evidence that use of the studied oxygenates are unlikely to increase the hazard of evaporative emissions during refueling, compared to those from gasoline alone. PMID:25020274

  14. Arsenic toxicity, mutagenesis, and carcinogenesis--a health risk assessment and management approach.

    PubMed

    Tchounwou, Paul B; Centeno, Jose A; Patlolla, Anita K

    2004-01-01

    A comprehensive analysis of published data indicates that arsenic exposure induces cardiovascular diseases, developmental abnormalities, neurologic and neurobehavioral disorders, diabetes, hearing loss, hematologic disorders, and various types of cancer. Although exposure may occur via the dermal, and parenteral routes, the main pathways of exposure include ingestion, and inhalation. The severity of adverse health effects is related to the chemical form of arsenic, and is also time- and dose-dependent. Recent reports have pointed out that arsenic poisoning appears to be one of the major public health problems of pandemic nature. Acute and chronic exposure to arsenic has been reported in several countries of the world where a large proportion of drinking water (groundwater) is contaminated with high concentrations of arsenic. Research has also pointed significantly higher standardized mortality rates for cancers of the bladder, kidney, skin, liver, and colon in many areas of arsenic pollution. There is therefore a great need for developing a comprehensive health risk assessment (RA) concept that should be used by public health officials and environmental managers for an effective management of the health effects associated with arsenic exposure. With a special emphasis on arsenic toxicity, mutagenesis, and carcinogenesis, this paper is aimed at using the National Academy of Science's RA framework as a guide, for developing a RA paradigm for arsenic based on a comprehensive analysis of the currently available scientific information on its physical and chemical properties, production and use, fate and transport, toxicokinetics, systemic and carcinogenic health effects, regulatory and health guidelines, analytical guidelines and treatment technologies.

  15. Health assessment of gasoline and fuel oxygenate vapors: subchronic inhalation toxicity.

    PubMed

    Clark, Charles R; Schreiner, Ceinwen A; Parker, Craig M; Gray, Thomas M; Hoffman, Gary M

    2014-11-01

    Sprague Dawley rats were exposed via inhalation to vapor condensates of either gasoline or gasoline combined with various fuel oxygenates to assess whether their use in gasoline influences the hazard of evaporative emissions. Test substances included vapor condensates prepared from an EPA described "baseline gasoline" (BGVC), or gasoline combined with methyl tertiary butyl ether (G/MTBE), ethyl t-butyl ether (G/ETBE), t-amyl methyl ether (G/TAME), diisopropyl ether (G/DIPE), ethanol (G/EtOH), or t-butyl alcohol (G/TBA). Target concentrations were 0, 2000, 10,000 or 20,000mg/m(3) and exposures were for 6h/day, 5days/week for 13weeks. A portion of the animals were maintained for a four week recovery period to determine the reversibility of potential adverse effects. Increased kidney weight and light hydrocarbon nephropathy (LHN) were observed in treated male rats in all studies which were reversible or nearly reversible after 4weeks recovery. LHN is unique to male rats and is not relevant to human toxicity. The no observed effect level (NOAEL) in all studies was 10,000mg/m(3), except for G/MTBE (<2000) and G/TBA (2000). The results provide evidence that use of the studied oxygenates are unlikely to increase the hazard of evaporative emissions during refueling, compared to those from gasoline alone.

  16. Toxicological assessment of kretek cigarettes Part 3: kretek and American-blended cigarettes, inhalation toxicity.

    PubMed

    Piadé, J-J; Roemer, E; Dempsey, R; Weiler, H; Meurrens, K; Vanscheeuwijck, P; Schorp, M K

    2014-12-01

    A typical Indonesian kretek cigarette brand and an experimental kretek reference cigarette were compared to the reference cigarette 2R4F in two 90-day inhalation studies. Male and female rats were exposed nose-only to mainstream smoke for 6 hours daily, for 90 consecutive days. Biological endpoints were assessed according to OECD guideline 413, with special emphasis on respiratory tract histopathology and on lung inflammation (broncho-alveolar lavage fluid levels of neutrophils, macrophages and lymphocytes). Histopathological alterations included: in the nose, hyperplasia and squamous metaplasia of the respiratory epithelium and squamous metaplasia and atrophy of the olfactory epithelium; in the larynx, epithelial squamous metaplasia and hyperplasia; in the lungs, accumulation of macrophages in alveoli and goblet cell hyperplasia in bronchial epithelium. The findings were qualitatively consistent with observations from previous similar studies on conventional cigarettes. Compared to 2R4F cigarette, however, kretek smoke exposure was associated with a pronounced attenuation of pulmonary inflammation and less severe histopathological changes in the respiratory tract. Neutrophilic inflammation was also significantly lower (>70%). These results are consistent with the observations made on smoke chemistry and in vitro toxicology. They do not support any increased toxicity of the smoke of kretek cigarettes compared to conventional American-blended cigarettes.

  17. Bioavailability assessment of essential and toxic metals in edible nuts and seeds.

    PubMed

    Moreda-Piñeiro, Jorge; Herbello-Hermelo, Paloma; Domínguez-González, Raquel; Bermejo-Barrera, Pilar; Moreda-Piñeiro, Antonio

    2016-08-15

    Bioavailability of essential and toxic metals in edible nuts and seeds has been assessed by using an in vitro dialyzability approach. The samples studied included walnuts, Brazil nuts, Macadamia nuts, pecans, hazelnuts, chestnuts, cashews, peanuts, pistachios and seeds (almond, pine, pumpkin and sunflower). Metals were measured by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry in dialyzates and also in samples after a microwave assisted acid digestion pre-treatment. Low dialyzability percentages were found for Al, Fe and Hg; moderate percentages were found for Ba, Ca, Cd, Co, Cu, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Mo, P, Pb, Se, Sr, Tl and Zn; and high dialyzability ratios were found for As, Cr and Ni. The highest dialyzability percentages were found in raw chestnuts and raw hazelnuts. Metal dialyzability was found to be negatively affected by fat content. Positive correlation was found between carbohydrate content and metal dialyzability ratios. Protein and dietary fibre content did not influence metal bioavailability. Predicted dialyzability for some metals based on fat and protein content could also be established. PMID:27006225

  18. Water and sediment toxicity assessment by use of behavioural responses of medicinal leeches.

    PubMed

    Petrauskiene, Laima

    2003-03-01

    Behaviour has been shown to be a sensitive indicator of chemically induced stress and pathology in aquatic organisms. However, ecotoxicological investigations on medicinal leech are restricted because of scarce leech resources in natural waters. We used artificially bred medicinal leech (Hirudo medicinalis L.) of two different ages: young (1-2 weeks old) and adult leeches (1 year old). Animals were exposed to: (1) waters of Lake Drukshiai-the cooler of Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant, (2) sediments of the river Nemunas and (3) solution of heavy metal model mixture (HMMM). The following behavioural responses of leech were investigated: mobility (number of moving individuals within certain periods of time), avoidance response (number of individuals escaping the tested water or sediments) changes in body shape (contractions of some muscles, abnormal position of suckers) and feeding activity (longevity of attachment process, interruptions of feeding bouts, size of blood meal). Mobility of young leeches was increased in the tested waters of Lake Drukshiai, whereas adult leeches showed no changes of this index. Avoidance response as well as impaired feeding activity (prolonged attachment process or completely suppressed attachment reflex, decreased size of blood meal) was observed in young leeches exposed to the waters from Lake Drukshiai and in adult animals exposed to all three kind of trials mentioned above. Avoidance response and changes in mobility were recorded during the first hour of exposure to tested samples; therefore, these responses can be used as an express method for water and sediment pollution assessment. Impaired feeding activity was recorded after 1-3-week exposure: this response may be used in assessing a chronic toxicity of pollution. Medicinal leech, due to its sensitivity, simplicity of measured indices and ease of laboratory maintenance, can be used as a test organism in ecotoxicity studies. PMID:12605921

  19. Water and sediment toxicity assessment by use of behavioural responses of medicinal leeches.

    PubMed

    Petrauskiene, Laima

    2003-03-01

    Behaviour has been shown to be a sensitive indicator of chemically induced stress and pathology in aquatic organisms. However, ecotoxicological investigations on medicinal leech are restricted because of scarce leech resources in natural waters. We used artificially bred medicinal leech (Hirudo medicinalis L.) of two different ages: young (1-2 weeks old) and adult leeches (1 year old). Animals were exposed to: (1) waters of Lake Drukshiai-the cooler of Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant, (2) sediments of the river Nemunas and (3) solution of heavy metal model mixture (HMMM). The following behavioural responses of leech were investigated: mobility (number of moving individuals within certain periods of time), avoidance response (number of individuals escaping the tested water or sediments) changes in body shape (contractions of some muscles, abnormal position of suckers) and feeding activity (longevity of attachment process, interruptions of feeding bouts, size of blood meal). Mobility of young leeches was increased in the tested waters of Lake Drukshiai, whereas adult leeches showed no changes of this index. Avoidance response as well as impaired feeding activity (prolonged attachment process or completely suppressed attachment reflex, decreased size of blood meal) was observed in young leeches exposed to the waters from Lake Drukshiai and in adult animals exposed to all three kind of trials mentioned above. Avoidance response and changes in mobility were recorded during the first hour of exposure to tested samples; therefore, these responses can be used as an express method for water and sediment pollution assessment. Impaired feeding activity was recorded after 1-3-week exposure: this response may be used in assessing a chronic toxicity of pollution. Medicinal leech, due to its sensitivity, simplicity of measured indices and ease of laboratory maintenance, can be used as a test organism in ecotoxicity studies.

  20. The medicinal leech as a convenient tool for water toxicity assessment.

    PubMed

    Petrauskiene, Laima

    2004-08-01

    Medicinal leeches previously were used in various toxicological and pharmacological studies because they are sensitive and easy to keep under laboratory conditions. Toxicological studies using leeches became restricted when their natural sources decreased dramatically. We breed medicinal leeches under laboratory conditions and have the possibility of using them for various investigations. The aim of the current study was to investigate changes in behavioral and physiological responses of leeches exposed to a heavy metal model mixture (HMMM). The composition of the HMMM was determined on the basis of the average annual amounts of representative metals (Zn, Mn, Cu, Cr, Ni, Cd, and Pb) in wastewater discharging from the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant. An annual average was considered a concentration of 1%. Animals were exposed to 0.13%, 0.25%, 0.5%, 1%, and 2% concentrations of the HMMM. The avoidance responses, changes in body weight, feeding behavior, and excretion rates of the leeches were recorded. Avoidance response was observed in animals treated with 1% and 2% concentrations of the HMMM during the first 2 h of exposure. A decrease in body weight was recorded after a 4-week exposure to all tested concentrations. Disturbances in feeding behavior were observed after a 4-week exposure to 0.13%-2% concentrations. An increase in the defecation rate was observed during the 5-week exposure to 0.25%-2% concentrations. The excretion rate via nephridia was decreased during postfeeding period after exposure to 0.25%-2% concentrations. The avoidance response of medicinal leeches can be used as an express method for water quality assessment, whereas physiological responses may be used for the assessment of chronic toxicity of polluted environments.

  1. Toxic Aluminium and Heavy Metals in Groundwater of Middle Russia: Health Risk Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Momot, Olga; Synzynys, Boris

    2005-01-01

    Two approaches are distinguished in modern ecological monitoring. The first one is physicochemical analysis of environmental objects with respect to maximum allowable concentrations (MACs) of chemical substances, which is performed by standards methods in accordance with state regulations. The second approach (biological monitoring) is based on the methodology of biotesting and bio indication. The task of this work is to create biotests for estimation of Al and other metals toxicity in ground water and to compare these results with physicochemical analysis dates. Risk assessment for heavy metals contaminated groundwater was also performed. Risk assessment was performed accordingly EPA US recommendation and gave results about 90 per 100000 citizens for Al and 402 per 100000 for mixture of different heavy metals. For comparison: risk for earth background radiation for Middle Russia is (Individual dose 1 millisivert per year) consist 5 per 100000 people. It was shown that groundwater consist HCO3− ions (360 mg/l), sometimes Al compounds 0.21–0.65 mg/l (MAC for Al is 0.5 mg/l for Russia). Other groundwater contain Hg – 0.004 mg/l (MAC – 0.0005 mg/l); Cr – 0.072 mg/l (MAC – 0.05 mg/l); As – less than 0.03 mg/l (MAC – 0.05 mg/l). We developed plant biotest for estimation of groundwater quality with barley roots, tradescatia and others. Some biotests parameters correlate with HCO3−, Cl−, SO42− and metal ions content positively, for another biotest this correlation is strongly negative. The quality of groundwater near Obninsk and in Kaluga Region is very different but hasn’t been changed since the year 1998. PMID:16705820

  2. Assessment of plant toxicity threshold of several heat transfer and storage fluids and eutectic salts

    SciTech Connect

    Nishita, H.

    1980-10-01

    Plant toxicity threshold levels of several heat transfer and storage fluids and eutectic salts were determined by using a modified Neubauer technique. Barley seed germination and seedling growth were used for the toxicity tests. The general order of toxicity of the fluids applied to three mineral soils was ethylene gloycol > Dow 200 much greater than Caloria HT43 > Therminol 66. The toxicity order of the fluids applied to an organic soil was ethylene glycol > Caloria HT43 > Dow 200 > Therminol 66. Thus, Therminol 66 was the least toxic among the fluids used. Among the eutectic salts tested Dupont HITEC was more toxic than 8.4 percent NaCl-86.3 percent NaNO/sub 3/-5.3 percent Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ mixture in three of the four soils used. In the fourth soil there was no apparent difference of toxicity between the two salt mixtures. Depending on the fluid and the salt mixture, the toxicity threshold levels for barley seedlings ranged from 4451 to 317,488 ppM in the soils used.

  3. A TOXICITY ASSESSMENT APPROACH FOR THE EVALUATION OF IN-SITU BIOREMEDIATION OF PAH CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Freshwater and marine sediment toxicity test were used to measure baseline toxicity of sediment samples collected from New York/New Jersey Harbor (NY/NJH) and East River (ER) (PAH contaminated) sediments and to determine the effectiveness of the developed biotreatment strategies ...

  4. 40 CFR 79.62 - Subchronic toxicity study with specific health effect assessments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... references should be consulted. (1) 40 CFR 798.2450, Inhalation toxicity. (2) 40 CFR 798.2675, Oral Toxicity.../teratology guideline is found in § 79.63. (ii) Micronucleus (MN) Assay. The MN assay is an in vivo... vehicle/engine emissions. The MN assay detects damage to the chromosomes or mitotic apparatus of cells...

  5. 40 CFR 79.62 - Subchronic toxicity study with specific health effect assessments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... references should be consulted. (1) 40 CFR 798.2450, Inhalation toxicity. (2) 40 CFR 798.2675, Oral Toxicity.../teratology guideline is found in § 79.63. (ii) Micronucleus (MN) Assay. The MN assay is an in vivo... vehicle/engine emissions. The MN assay detects damage to the chromosomes or mitotic apparatus of cells...

  6. 40 CFR 79.62 - Subchronic toxicity study with specific health effect assessments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... references should be consulted. (1) 40 CFR 798.2450, Inhalation toxicity. (2) 40 CFR 798.2675, Oral Toxicity.../teratology guideline is found in § 79.63. (ii) Micronucleus (MN) Assay. The MN assay is an in vivo... vehicle/engine emissions. The MN assay detects damage to the chromosomes or mitotic apparatus of cells...

  7. Identification of phototransformation products of the antiepileptic drug gabapentin: Biodegradability and initial assessment of toxicity.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Manuel; Menz, Jakob; Olsson, Oliver; Kümmerer, Klaus

    2015-11-15

    The anticonvulsant drug Gabapentin (GAB) is used for the treatment of various diseases (e.g. epilepsy, bipolar disorder, neuropathic pain) and is being consumed in high amounts. As GAB is not metabolized and shows a weak elimination in sewage treatment plants (STPs), it has been detected in surface water and even in raw potable water. Moreover, the confirmed teratogenic effects of GAB indicate the need for further investigations regarding options for the elimination of GAB in the water cycle. Little is known about the behavior of GAB during treatment with UV light, which is normally used for the disinfection of potable water and discussed for advanced wastewater treatment. In this study, GAB was exposed to polychromatic UV irradiation at different initial concentrations in aqueous solution. Afterwards the structures of the resulting phototransformation products (PTPs) were identified and elucidated by means of high-resolution mass spectrometry. GAB and photolytic mixtures were submitted to the Closed Bottle Test (CBT; OECD 301 D) to assess biodegradability. Furthermore, the toxicity of GAB and its photolytic mixtures was initially addressed on screening level using a modified luminescent bacteria test (LBT) and the umu-test (ISO/FDIS 13829). Environmentally realistic concentrations of GAB were disclosed by predicting STP influent concentrations (24.3 and 23.2 μg L(-1)). GAB with initial concentration of 100 mg L(-1) was eliminated by 80% after 128 min of direct UV irradiation, but just 9% of non-purgeable organic carbon (NPOC) was removed indicating the formation of dead-end transformation products (TPs). Structures of different PTPs were elucidated and several identical PTPs could also be identified at lower initial treatment concentrations (20 mg L(-1), 5 mg L(-1), 1 mg L(-1) and 0.1 mg L(-1)). GAB was classified as not readily biodegradable. Moreover, photo treatment did not result in better biodegradable PTPs. With increasing UV treatment duration, photolytic

  8. Use of passive samplers for improving oil toxicity and spill effects assessment.

    PubMed

    Letinski, Daniel; Parkerton, Thomas; Redman, Aaron; Manning, Ryan; Bragin, Gail; Febbo, Eric; Palandro, David; Nedwed, Tim

    2014-09-15

    Methods that quantify dissolved hydrocarbons are needed to link oil exposures to toxicity. Solid phase microextraction (SPME) fibers can serve this purpose. If fibers are equilibrated with oiled water, dissolved hydrocarbons partition to and are concentrated on the fiber. The absorbed concentration (Cpolymer) can be quantified by thermal desorption using GC/FID. Further, given that the site of toxic action is hypothesized as biota lipid and partitioning of hydrocarbons to lipid and fibers is well correlated, Cpolymer is hypothesized to be a surrogate for toxicity prediction. To test this method, toxicity data for physically and chemically dispersed oils were generated for shrimp, Americamysis bahia, and compared to test exposures characterized by Cpolymer. Results indicated that Cpolymer reliably predicted toxicity across oils and dispersions. To illustrate field application, SPME results are reported for oil spills at the Ohmsett facility. SPME fibers provide a practical tool to improve characterization of oil exposures and predict effects in future lab and field studies. PMID:2509658