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Sample records for interstellar extinction band

  1. Gas Phase Spectroscopy of Cold PAH Ions: Contribution to the Interstellar Extinction and the Diffuse Interstellar Bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biennier, L.; Salama, F.; Allamandola, L. J.; Scherer, J. J.; OKeefe, A.

    2002-01-01

    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon molecules (PAHs) are ubiquitous in the interstellar medium (ISM) and constitute the building blocks of interstellar dust grains. Despite their inferred important role in mediating the energetic and chemical processes in thc ISM, their exact contribution to the interstellar extinction, and in particular to the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) remains unclear. The DIBs are spectral absorption features observed in the line of sight of stars that are obscured by diffuse interstellar clouds. More than 200 bands have been reported to date spanning from the near UV to the near IR with bandwidths ranging from 0.4 to 40 Angstroms (Tielens & Snow 1995). The present consensus is that the DIBs arise from free flying, gas-phase, organic molecules and/or ions that are abundant under the typical conditions reigning in the diffuse ISM. PAHs have been proposed as possible carriers (Allamandola et al. 1985; Leger & DHendecourt 1985). The PAH hypothesis is consistent with the cosmic abundance of Carbon and Hydrogen and with the required photostability of the DIB carriers against the strong VUV radiation field in the diffuse interstellar clouds. A significant fraction of PAHs is expected to be ionized in the diffuse ISM.

  2. A TALE OF TWO MYSTERIES IN INTERSTELLAR ASTROPHYSICS: THE 2175 A EXTINCTION BUMP AND DIFFUSE INTERSTELLAR BANDS

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, F. Y.; Zhong, J. X.; Li Aigen E-mail: lia@missouri.edu

    2011-06-01

    The diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) are ubiquitous absorption spectral features arising from the tenuous material in the space between stars-the interstellar medium (ISM). Since their first detection nearly nine decades ago, over 400 DIBs have been observed in the visible and near-infrared wavelength range in both the Milky Way and external galaxies, both nearby and distant. However, the identity of the species responsible for these bands remains as one of the most enigmatic mysteries in astrophysics. An equally mysterious interstellar spectral signature is the 2175 A extinction bump, the strongest absorption feature observed in the ISM. Its carrier also remains unclear since its first detection 46 years ago. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules have long been proposed as a candidate for DIBs as their electronic transitions occur in the wavelength range where DIBs are often found. In recent years, the 2175 A extinction bump is also often attributed to the {pi}-{pi}* transition in PAHs. If PAHs are indeed responsible for both the 2175 A extinction feature and DIBs, their strengths may correlate. We perform an extensive literature search for lines of sight for which both the 2175 A extinction feature and DIBs have been measured. Unfortunately, we found no correlation between the strength of the 2175 A feature and the equivalent widths of the strongest DIBs. A possible explanation might be that DIBs are produced by small free gas-phase PAH molecules and ions, while the 2175 A bump is mainly from large PAHs or PAH clusters in condensed phase so that there is no tight correlation between DIBs and the 2175 A bump.

  3. Neutral and ionized polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, diffuse interstellar bands and the ultraviolet extinction curve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, Farid; Allamandola, Louis John

    1993-01-01

    Neutral naphthalene C10H8, phenanthrene C14H10 and pyrene C16H10 absorb strongly in the ultraviolet region and may contribute to the extinction curve. High abundances are required to produce detectable structures. The cations of these polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) absorb in the visible C10H8(+) has 13 discrete absorption bands which fall between 6800 and 4500 A. The strongest band at 6741 A falls close to the weak 6742 A diffuse interstellar band (DIB). Five other weaker bands also match DIBs. The possibility that C10H8(+) is responsible for some of the DIBs can be tested by searching for new DIBs at 6520 and 6151 A, other strong naphthalene cation band positions. If C10H8(+) is indeed responsible for the 6742 A feature, it accounts for 0.3% of the cosmic carbon. The spectrum of C16H10(+) is dominated by a strong band at 4435 A in an Ar matrix and 4395 A in Ne, wavelengths which fall very close to the strongest DIB at 4430 A. If C16H10(+) or a closely related pyrene-like ion, is indeed responsible for the 4430 A feature, it accounts for 0.2% of the cosmic carbon. An intense, very broad UV-to-visible continuum is reported which is associated with both ions and could explain how PAHs convert interstellar UV and visible radiation into IR radiation.

  4. INTERSTELLAR ANALOGS FROM DEFECTIVE CARBON NANOSTRUCTURES ACCOUNT FOR INTERSTELLAR EXTINCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Zhenquan; Abe, Hiroya; Sato, Kazuyoshi; Ohara, Satoshi; Chihara, Hiroki; Koike, Chiyoe; Kaneko, Kenji

    2010-11-15

    Because interstellar dust is closely related to the evolution of matter in the galactic environment and many other astrophysical phenomena, the laboratory synthesis of interstellar dust analogs has received significant attention over the past decade. To simulate the ultraviolet (UV) interstellar extinction feature at 217.5 nm originating from carbonaceous interstellar dust, many reports focused on the UV absorption properties of laboratory-synthesized interstellar dust analogs. However, no general relation has been established between UV interstellar extinction and artificial interstellar dust analogs. Here, we show that defective carbon nanostructures prepared by high-energy collisions exhibit a UV absorption feature at 220 nm which we suggest accounts for the UV interstellar extinction at 217.5 nm. The morphology of some carbon nanostructures is similar to that of nanocarbons discovered in the Allende meteorite. The similarity between the absorption feature of the defective carbon nanostructures and UV interstellar extinction indicates a strong correlation between the defective carbon nanostructures and interstellar dust.

  5. Interstellar extinction in the ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bless, R. C.; Savage, B. D.

    1972-01-01

    Interstellar extinction curves over the region 3600-1100 A for 17 stars are presented. The observations were made by the two Wisconsin spectrometers onboard the OAO-2 with spectral resolutions of 10 A and 20 A. The extinction curves generally show a pronounced maximum at 2175 plus or minus 25 A, a broad minimum in the region 1800-1350 A, and finally a rapid rise to the far ultraviolet. Large extinction variations from star to star are found, especially in the far ultraviolet; however, with only two possible exceptions in this sample, the wavelength at the maximum of the extinction bump is essentially constant. These data are combined with visual and infrared observations to display the extinction behavior over a range in wavelength of about a factor of 20.

  6. Investigation of ultraviolet interstellar extinction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Payne, C.; Haramundanis, K. L.

    1973-01-01

    Results concerning interstellar extinction in the ultraviolet are reported. These results were initially obtained by using data from main-sequence stars and were extended to include supergiants and emission stars. The principal finding of the analysis of ultraviolet extinction is not only that it is wavelength dependent, but that if changes with galactic longitude in the U3 passband (lambda sub eff = 1621 A); it does not change significantly in the U2 passband (lambda sub eff = 2308 A). Where data are available in the U4 passband (lambda sub eff = 1537 A), they confirm the rapid rise of extinction in the ultraviolet found by other investigators. However, in all cases, emission stars must be used with great caution. It is important to realize that while extinction continues to rise toward shorter wavelengths in the ultraviolet, including the shortest ultraviolet wavelengths measured (1100 A), it no longer plays an important role in the X-ray region (50 A).

  7. Interstellar fullerene compounds and diffuse interstellar bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omont, Alain

    2016-05-01

    Recently, the presence of fullerenes in the interstellar medium (ISM) has been confirmed and new findings suggest that these fullerenes may possibly form from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the ISM. Moreover, the first confirmed identification of two strong diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) with the fullerene, C60+, connects the long standing suggestion that various fullerenes could be DIB carriers. These new discoveries justify reassessing the overall importance of interstellar fullerene compounds, including fullerenes of various sizes with endohedral or exohedral inclusions and heterofullerenes (EEHFs). The phenomenology of fullerene compounds is complex. In addition to fullerene formation in grain shattering, fullerene formation from fully dehydrogenated PAHs in diffuse interstellar clouds could perhaps transform a significant percentage of the tail of low-mass PAH distribution into fullerenes including EEHFs. But many uncertain processes make it extremely difficult to assess their expected abundance, composition and size distribution, except for the substantial abundance measured for C60+. EEHFs share many properties with pure fullerenes, such as C60, as regards stability, formation/destruction and chemical processes, as well as many basic spectral features. Because DIBs are ubiquitous in all lines of sight in the ISM, we address several questions about the interstellar importance of various EEHFs, especially as possible carriers of diffuse interstellar bands. Specifically, we discuss basic interstellar properties and the likely contributions of fullerenes of various sizes and their charged counterparts such as C60+, and then in turn: 1) metallofullerenes; 2) heterofullerenes; 3) fulleranes; 4) fullerene-PAH compounds; 5) H2@C60. From this reassessment of the literature and from combining it with known DIB line identifications, we conclude that the general landscape of interstellar fullerene compounds is probably much richer than heretofore realized

  8. The Gaia-ESO Survey: Tracing interstellar extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultheis, M.; Kordopatis, G.; Recio-Blanco, A.; de Laverny, P.; Hill, V.; Gilmore, G.; Alfaro, E. J.; Costado, M. T.; Bensby, T.; Damiani, F.; Feltzing, S.; Flaccomio, E.; Lardo, C.; Jofre, P.; Prisinzano, L.; Zaggia, S.; Jimenez-Esteban, F.; Morbidelli, L.; Lanzafame, A. C.; Hourihane, A.; Worley, C.; Francois, P.

    2015-05-01

    Context. Large spectroscopic surveys have in recent years enabled computing three-dimensional interstellar extinction maps thanks to the accurate stellar atmospheric parameters and line-of-sight distances these surveys provide. Interstellar extinction maps are complementary to 3D maps extracted from photometry and allow a more thorough studying of the dust properties. Aims: Our goal is to use the high-resolution spectroscopic survey Gaia-ESO to obtain with a good distance resolution the interstellar extinction and its dependency as a function of the environment and the Galactocentric position. Methods: We used the stellar atmospheric parameters of more than 5000 stars, obtained from the Gaia-ESO survey second internal data release, and combined them with optical (SDSS) and near-infrared (VISTA) photometry as well as different sets of theoretical stellar isochrones to calculate line-of-sight extinction and distances. The extinction coefficients were then compared with the literature to discuss their dependency on the stellar parameters and position in the Galaxy. Results: Within the errors of our method, our work does not show any dependence of the interstellar extinction coefficient on the stellar atmospheric parameters. We find no evidence of a variation of E(J - H) /E(J - K) with the angle from the Galactic centre or with Galactocentric distance. This suggests that we are dealing with a uniform extinction law in the SDSS ugriz bands and the near-IR JHKs bands. Therefore, extinction maps built from mean colour-excesses that assume a constant extinction coefficient can be used without introducing any systematic errors. Based on observations collected with the FLAMES spectrograph at the VLT/UT2 telescope (Paranal Observatory, ESO, Chile), for the Gaia-ESO Large Public Survey, programme 188.B-300.Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  9. Correlation between molecular lines and diffuse interstellar bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szczerba, Richard; Krelowski, J.; Walker, G. A. H.; Kennelly, E. T.; Sneden, C.; Volk, Kevin; Hill, G.

    1994-01-01

    Observations are presented of the Diffuse Interstellar Bands (DIB's) at 4726, 4763, and 4789 A and at 5780 and 5797 A together with the ultraviolet lines of CH and CN molecules for stars with different shapes of UV extinction curve. The new results concerning the relationship between different characteristics of the interstellar clouds; molecular lines, blue and yellow DIB's, and UV extinction curves are discussed.

  10. Limited diversity of the interstellar extinction law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krełowski, J.; Strobel, A.

    2012-01-01

    We have applied the method of investigating extinction curves using statistically meaningful samples that was proposed by us 25 years ago. The extensive data sets of the ANS (Astronomical Netherlands Satellite) and 2MASS (Two Micron All Sky Survey) were used, together with U BV photometry to create average extinction curves for samples of OB stars. Our results demonstrate that in the vast majority of cases the extinction curves are very close to the mean galactic extinction curve. Only a few objects were found to be obviously discrepant from the average. The latter phenomenon may be related to nitrogen chemistry in translucent interstellar clouds. Data from ANS and 2MASS Tables A4-A6 are available at the CDS via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/AN/333/60

  11. The ultraviolet and visible spectrum of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon C10H8(+) - Possible contributions to the diffuse interstellar bands and to the ultraviolet-visible extinction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, F.; Allamandola, L. J.

    1992-01-01

    The properties of the cation of the PAH naphthalene (C10H8(+)) isolated in inert gas matrices under conditions relevant to astrophysical environments are described. The band at 6741 A is the strongest and falls close to the weak 6742 A diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs). Five other weaker bands also fall remarkably close to the positions of known DIBs. A very intense and broad continuum extended from the UV to the visible, which seems to be associated with the ion, is reported. The molar absorption coefficient at the peak of the continuum is 2.0 x 10 exp 6 cu dm/mol cm. If a continuum is a general property of PAH cations, this characteristic will have a strong impact on the understanding of how PAHs convert interstellar UV and visible radiation into IR radiation.

  12. VUV spectroscopy of carbon dust analogs: contribution to interstellar extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavilan, L.; Alata, I.; Le, K. C.; Pino, T.; Giuliani, A.; Dartois, E.

    2016-02-01

    Context. A full spectral characterization of carbonaceous dust analogs is necessary to understand their potential as carriers of observed astronomical spectral signatures such as the ubiquitous UV bump at 217.5 nm and the far-ultraviolet (FUV) rise common to interstellar extinction curves. Aims: Our goal is to study the spectral properties of carbonaceous dust analogs from the FUV to the mid-infrared (MIR) domain. We seek in particular to understand the spectra of these materials in the FUV range, for which laboratory studies are scarce. Methods: We produced analogs to carbonaceous interstellar dust encountered in various phases of the interstellar medium: amorphous hydrogenated carbons (a-C:H), for carbonaceous dust observed in the diffuse interstellar medium, and soot particles, for the polyaromatic component. Analogs to a-C:H dust were produced using a radio-frequency plasma reactor at low pressures, and soot nanoparticles films were produced in an ethylene (C2H4) flame. We measured transmission spectra of these thin films (thickness <100 nm) in the far-ultraviolet (190-250 nm) and in the vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV; 50-190 nm) regions using the APEX chamber at the DISCO beam line of the SOLEIL synchrotron radiation facility. These were also characterized through infrared microscopy at the SMIS beam line. Results: We successfully measured the transmission spectra of these analogs from λ = 1 μm to 50 nm. From these, we extracted the laboratory optical constants via Kramers-Kronig inversion. We used these constants for comparison to existing interstellar extinction curves. Conclusions: We extend the spectral measurements of these types of carbonaceous analogs into the VUV and link the spectral features in this range to the 3.4 μm band. We suggest that these two materials might contribute to different classes of interstellar extinction curves.

  13. C2 and Diffuse Interstellar Bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaźmierczak, M.; Schmidt, M.; Weselak, T.; Galazutdinov, G.; Krełowski, J.

    2014-02-01

    C2, the simplest multicarbon molecule is a useful astronomical tool, because the analysis of its lines allows to determine the physical conditions in interstellar clouds. C2 abundances give information about the chemistry of interstellar clouds, especially on the pathway to the formation of long-chain carbon molecules, which may be connected with carriers of diffuse interstellar bands (Douglas 1977, Thorburn et al. 2003). Here we summarize all relations between C2 and diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs).

  14. Stellar ultraviolet colors and interstellar extinction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peytremann, E.; Davis, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    A sample of celescope results is studied. Most of the sample stars belong to the Orion and Vela regions. Stars with visual excess E(B-V) less than 0.05 are selected in order to derive relationships of intrinsic color index versus spectral type. The resulting intrinsic color-color relations are compared with existing blanketed and unblanketed model calculations. Finally, the preceding intrinsic relations are utilized to derive some results on interstellar extinction. Owing to the rather large scatter in the celescope data, the Vela stars give the more significant results because their visible excess E(B-V) is, in general, larger than that for the Orion stars.

  15. The interstellar 4.62 micron band.

    PubMed

    Pendleton, Y J; Tielens, A G; Tokunaga, A T; Bernstein, M P

    1999-03-01

    We present new 4.5-5.1 micron (2210-1970 cm-1) spectra of embedded protostars, W33 A, AFGL 961 E, AFGL 2136, NGC 7538 IRS 9, and Mon R2 IRS 2, which contain a broad absorption feature located near 4.62 micron (2165 cm-1), commonly referred to in the literature as the "X-C triple bond N" band. The observed peak positions and widths of the interstellar band agree to within 2.5 cm-1 and 5 cm-1, respectively. The strengths of the interstellar 4.62 micrometers band and the ice absorption features in these spectra are not correlated, which suggests a diversity of environmental conditions for the ices we are observing. We explore several possible carriers of the interstellar band and review possible production pathways through far-ultraviolet photolysis (FUV), ion bombardment of interstellar ice analog mixtures, and acid-base reactions. Good fits to the interstellar spectra are obtained with an organic residue produced through ion bombardment of nitrogen-containing ices or with the OCN- ion produced either through acid-base reactions or FUV photolysis of NH3-containing ices.

  16. Ultraviolet photometry from the Orbiting Astronomical Observatory. II Interstellar extinction.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bless, R. C.; Savage, B. D.

    1972-01-01

    Evaluation of interstellar extinction curves over the region from 3600 to 1100 A for 17 stars. The observations were made by the two Wisconsin spectrometers on board the Orbiting Astronomical Observatory 2, with spectral resolutions of 10 and 20 A. The extinction curves generally show a pronounced maximum at 2175 plus or minus 25 A, a broad minimum in the region from 1800 to 1350 A, and finally a rapid rise to the far-ultraviolet. Large extinction variations from star to star are found, especially in the far-ultraviolet; however, with only two possible exceptions in this sample, the wavelength at the maximum of the extinction bump is essentially constant. These data are combined with visual and infrared observations to display the extinction behavior over a range in wavelength of about a factor of 20. The observations appear to require a multicomponent model of the interstellar dust.

  17. Infrared diffuse interstellar bands in the Galactic Centre region.

    PubMed

    Geballe, T R; Najarro, F; Figer, D F; Schlegelmilch, B W; de la Fuente, D

    2011-11-02

    The spectrum of any star viewed through a sufficient quantity of diffuse interstellar material reveals a number of absorption features collectively called 'diffuse interstellar bands' (DIBs). The first DIBs were reported about 90  years ago, and currently well over 500 are known. None of them has been convincingly identified with any specific element or molecule, although recent studies suggest that the DIB carriers are polyatomic molecules containing carbon. Most of the DIBs currently known are at visible and very near-infrared wavelengths, with only two previously known at wavelengths beyond one micrometre (10,000 ångströms), the longer of which is at 1.318 micrometres (ref. 6). Here we report 13 diffuse interstellar bands in the 1.5-1.8 micrometre interval on high-extinction sightlines towards stars in the Galactic Centre. We argue that they originate almost entirely in the Galactic Centre region, a considerably warmer and harsher environment than where DIBs have been observed previously. The relative strengths of these DIBs towards the Galactic Centre and the Cygnus OB2 diffuse cloud are consistent with their strengths scaling mainly with the extinction by diffuse material.

  18. Probing the diffuse interstellar medium with diffuse interstellar bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodorus van Loon, Jacco; Bailey, Mandy; Farhang, Amin; Javadi, Atefeh; Khosroshahi, Habib

    2015-08-01

    For a century already, a large number of absorption bands have been known at optical wavelengths, called the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs). While their carriers remain unidentified, the relative strengths of these bands in various environments make them interesting new probes of the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM). We present the results from two large, dedicated campaigns to map the ISM using DIBs measured in the high signal-to-noise spectra of hundreds of early-type stars: [1] in and around the Local Bubble using ESO's New Technology Telescope and the Isaac Newton Telescope, and [2] across both Magellanic Clouds using the Very Large Telescope and the Anglo-Australian Telescope. We discuss the implications for the structure and dynamics of the ISM, as well as the constraints these maps place on the nature of the carriers of the DIBs. Partial results have appeared in the recent literature (van Loon et al. 2013; Farhang et al. 2015a,b; Bailey, PhD thesis 2014) with the remainder being prepared for publication now.

  19. Remarks on a vibronic origin for the diffuse band spectrum. [of interstellar dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuth, J. A.; Donn, B.

    1984-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that the diffuse band spectrum could not originate as a series of vibronic transitions from atomic impurities in interstellar MgO grains as has recently been proposed since laboratory spectra of such materials show no evidence for such complex structure. Furthermore, recent observational evidence indicates that the extinction feature at 160 nm in the standard interstellar extinction curve upon which the identification of interstellar MgO was founded is actually the result of a calibration error in the original observational data.

  20. Interstellar Extinction in the Vicinity of the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotera, A. S.; Simpson, J. P.; Erickson, E. F.; Colgan, S. W. J.; Burton, M. G.

    1995-12-01

    Observations have been made at the Anglo-Australian Observatory using the facility Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (IRIS) of the regions surrounding the Arched and Straight Filaments, and the compact radio emission regions northeast of Sgr A, H1-H8 and A-D. Broad band J, H and K(') images were obtained in good conditions with seeing ~ 1''. The sensitivity for the images is limited by confusion at K(' ~ ) 14.5 mag, H ~ 16, and J ~ 17.5, increasing by ~ 3 mag the sensitivity of previous extinction studies (Catchpole, Whitelock & Glass 1990, M.N.R.A.S., 247, 479). Localized variations in the extinction are examined by means of color--magnitude diagrams and statistical variation with position of stellar densities and colors. Preliminary results of the average H-K(') values in regions of ~ 2.4 pc(2) show considerable variations, ranging between 1.5 and 3.0, with little correlation to the position of the radio emission features. In addition, observations were made of the thermal radio emission regions located within the broad band images. Observing in spectral mode using a 70''x2.0'' slit (resolution R ~ 250) at fixed right ascension while the telescope drifted in declination, data cubes (with axes alpha , delta and lambda ) are obtained from which images in Brgamma (2.166 mu m) are extracted. Brgamma images were obtained of G0.15-0.05 (the `Pistol\\rq), G0.18-0.04 (the `Sickle\\rq), G0.10+0.02, the compact radio emission regions A-D near Sgr A East, and H1, H2, H5-H8 north of Sgr A. Recombination theory is used to predict the expected Brgamma emission from the measured radio emission. By comparing the predicted and the measured Brgamma emission we have a second measure of the extinction in these regions. Taken together, these measurements allow us to determine the extent of any small scale variations in the interstellar extinction of these complex regions.

  1. Interstellar Dust Models Consistent with Extinction, Emission, and Abundance Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zubko, Viktor; Dwek, Eli; Arendt, Richard G.

    2004-01-01

    We present new interstellar dust models which have been derived by simultaneously fitting the far ultraviolet to near infrared extinction, the diffuse infrared emission, and, unlike previous models, the elemental abundances in dust for the diffuse interstellar medium. We found that dust models consisting of a mixture of spherical graphite and silicate grains, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules, in addition to porous composite particles containing silicate, organic refractory, and water ice, provide an improved .t to the UV-to-infrared extinction and infrared emission measurements, while consuming the amounts of elements well within the uncertainties of adopted interstellar abundances, including B star abundances. These models are a signi.cant improvement over the recent Li & Draine (2001, ApJ, 554, 778) model which requires an excessive amount of silicon to be locked up in dust: 48 ppm (atoms per million of H atoms), considerably more than the solar abundance of 34 ppm or the B star abundance of 19 ppm.

  2. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon ions and the diffuse interstellar bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, F.; Allamandola, L. J.

    1995-01-01

    Neutral naphthalene (C10H8), phenanthrene (C14H10), and pyrene (C16H10) absorb strongly in the ultraviolet and may contribute to the extinction curve. High abundances are required to produce detectable structures. The cations of these Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) absorb in the visible. C10H8(+) has 12 discrete absorption bands which fall between 6800 and 5000 A. The strongest band at 6741 A falls close to the weak 6742 A diffuse interstellar band (DIB). Five other weaker bands also match DIBs. The possibility that C10H8(+) is responsible for some of the DIBs can be tested by searching for new DIBS at 6520, 6151, and 5965 A, other moderately strong naphthalene cation band positions. If C10H8(+) is indeed responsible for the 6742 A feature, it accounts for 0.3% of the cosmic carbon. The spectrum of C16H10(+) is dominated by a strong band at 4435 A in an Ar matrix and 4395 A in a Ne matrix, a position which falls very close to the strongest DIB, that at 4430 A. If C16H10(+), or a closely related pyrene-like ion is indeed responsible for the 4430 A feature, it accounts for 0.2% of the cosmic carbon. We also report an intense, very broad UV-to-visible continuum which is associated with both ions and could explain how PAHs convert interstellar UV and visible radiation into IR.

  3. The diffuse interstellar bands - a brief review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geballe, T. R.

    2016-07-01

    The diffuse interstellar bands, or DIBs, are a large set of absorption features, mostly at optical and near infrared wavelengths, that are found in the spectra of reddened stars and other objects. They arise in interstellar gas and are observed toward numerous objects in our galaxy as well as in other galaxies. Although long thought to be associated with carbon-bearing molecules, none of them had been conclusively identified until last year, when several nearinfrared DIBs were matched to the laboratory spectrum of singly ionized buckminsterfullerene (C60 +). This development appears to have begun to solve what is perhaps the greatest unsolved mystery in astronomical spectroscopy. Also recently, new DIBs have been discovered at infrared wavelengths and are the longest wavelength DIBs ever found. I present the general characteristics of the DIBs and their history, emphasizing recent developments.

  4. Using Machine Learning to classify the diffuse interstellar bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baron, Dalya; Poznanski, Dovi; Watson, Darach; Yao, Yushu; Cox, Nick L. J.; Prochaska, J. Xavier

    2015-07-01

    Using over a million and a half extragalactic spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey we study the correlations of the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) in the Milky Way. We measure the correlation between DIB strength and dust extinction for 142 DIBs using 24 stacked spectra in the reddening range E(B - V) < 0.2, many more lines than ever studied before. Most of the DIBs do not correlate with dust extinction. However, we find 10 weak and barely studied DIBs with correlations that are higher than 0.7 with dust extinction and confirm the high correlation of additional five strong DIBs. Furthermore, we find a pair of DIBs, 5925.9 and 5927.5 Å, which exhibits significant negative correlation with dust extinction, indicating that their carrier may be depleted on dust. We use Machine Learning algorithms to divide the DIBs to spectroscopic families based on 250 stacked spectra. By removing the dust dependence, we study how DIBs follow their local environment. We thus obtain six groups of weak DIBs, four of which are tightly associated with C2 or CN absorption lines.

  5. Diffuse Interstellar Band Emission in the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton Williams, Theodore; Sarre, Peter; Marshall, Charlotte; Spekkens, Kristine; Kuzio de Naray, Rachel

    2015-08-01

    The longest-standing problem in astronomical spectroscopy is the identification of the carriers of the diffuse interstellar absorption bands (DIBs), the first examples of which were discovered on photographic plates almost 100 years ago. Most researchers consider a population of large carbon-based molecules to be responsible for the DIBs. Identification of the carriers would open a new probe of interstellar conditions and processes in interstellar clouds and could have implications far beyond - including the role of such molecules in star and planet formation and even for the origins of life. Only one clear-cut example exists where complementary emission (from a subset) of DIBs is seen - in the Red Rectangle nebula - where the emission is excited by radiation from the central star HD 44179.Recent Fabry-Perot observations towards galaxy NGC 1325 with the Southern African Large Telescope led to the serendipitous discovery of an emission feature centered at 6613 Å arising from material in the ISM of our Galaxy; this emission feature lies at the wavelength of one of the sharper and stronger diffuse bands normally seen in absorption, and it is one of the most prominent of the Red Rectangle emission bands. The flux of the feature is 4.2 ± 0.5 x 10-18 e/s/cm2 /arc-sec2. It appears that this is the first observation of emission from a diffuse band carrier in the ISM, excited in this case by the interstellar radiation field. Unlike the Red Rectangle, the emission from the ISM is expected to have a very low molecular rotational temperature, potentially as low as 3 K. Spectra of this nature will assist greatly in spectroscopic analysis and in refining the nature of the molecules responsible for the DIB spectrum.We present the discovery spectra and follow-up measurements for the expected strong DIB features at 6613, 5797, 5850 and 5418 Å, in fields near NGC 1325, near the Red Rectangle, and near Rho Ophiuchi.

  6. Interstellar extinction curve variations towards the inner Milky Way: a challenge to observational cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nataf, David M.; Gonzalez, Oscar A.; Casagrande, Luca; Zasowski, Gail; Wegg, Christopher; Wolf, Christian; Kunder, Andrea; Alonso-Garcia, Javier; Minniti, Dante; Rejkuba, Marina; Saito, Roberto K.; Valenti, Elena; Zoccali, Manuela; Poleski, Radosław; Pietrzyński, Grzegorz; Skowron, Jan; Soszyński, Igor; Szymański, Michał K.; Udalski, Andrzej; Ulaczyk, Krzysztof; Wyrzykowski, Łukasz

    2016-03-01

    We investigate interstellar extinction curve variations towards ˜4 deg2 of the inner Milky Way in VIJKs photometry from the OGLE-III (third phase of the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment) and VVV (VISTA Variables in the Via Lactea) surveys, with supporting evidence from diffuse interstellar bands and F435W, F625W photometry. We obtain independent measurements towards ˜2000 sightlines of AI, E(V - I), E(I - J) and E(J - Ks), with median precision and accuracy of 2 per cent. We find that the variations in the extinction ratios AI/E(V - I), E(I - J)/E(V - I) and E(J - Ks)/E(V - I) are large (exceeding 20 per cent), significant and positively correlated, as expected. However, both the mean values and the trends in these extinction ratios are drastically shifted from the predictions of Cardelli and Fitzpatrick, regardless of how RV is varied. Furthermore, we demonstrate that variations in the shape of the extinction curve have at least two degrees of freedom, and not one (e.g. RV), which we confirm with a principal component analysis. We derive a median value of = 13.44, which is ˜60 per cent higher than the `standard' value. We show that the Wesenheit magnitude WI = I - 1.61(I - J) is relatively impervious to extinction curve variations. Given that these extinction curves are linchpins of observational cosmology, and that it is generally assumed that RV variations correctly capture variations in the extinction curve, we argue that systematic errors in the distance ladder from studies of Type Ia supernovae and Cepheids may have been underestimated. Moreover, the reddening maps from the Planck experiment are shown to systematically overestimate dust extinction by ˜100 per cent and lack sensitivity to extinction curve variations.

  7. Extragalactic interstellar extinction curves: Indicators of local physical conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Cecchi-Pestellini, Cesare; Viti, Serena; Williams, David A. E-mail: sv@star.ucl.ac.uk

    2014-06-20

    Normalized interstellar extinction curves (ISECs) in the Milky Way and other galaxies show a variety of shapes. This variety is attributed to differences along different sight lines in the abundances of the several dust and gas components contributing to extinction. In this paper we propose that these abundance differences are not arbitrary but are a specific consequence of the physical conditions on those sight lines. If this proposal is correct, then it implies that ISECs contain information about physical conditions in the regions generating extinction. This may be particularly important for high redshift galaxies where information on the conditions may be difficult to obtain. We adopt a model of extinction carriers in which the solid and gaseous components are not immutable but respond time-dependently to the local physics. We validate this model by fitting extinction curves measured on sight lines in the Magellanic Clouds and obtained for the gamma-ray burst afterglow GRB 080605. We present results for this model as follows: (1) we show that computed ISECs are controlled by a small number of physical parameters, (2) we demonstrate the sensitivity of computed ISECs to these parameters, (3) we compute as examples ISECs for particular galaxy types, and (4) we note that different galaxy types have different shapes of ISEC.

  8. Extragalactic Diffuse Interstellar Bands: A Universal Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordiner, M. A.

    2014-02-01

    The first extragalactic diffuse interstellar band (DIB) detections were of λ4430 in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC and SMC) in the 1960s and 70s. Driven mainly by the increased sensitivity afforded by 8-10 m-class telescopes, the last 13 years have witnessed an explosion of DIB discoveries throughout the nearby and distant universe. This review focuses on the history of extragalactic DIB studies, including some of the important results that have come out of this field, and looks to the future for what can be learned about DIBs in external galaxies with the next generation of large telescopes. So far, DIBs have been observed in the Magellanic Clouds, starburst galaxies, DLAs, and nearby (<=30 Mpc distant) spiral galaxies, and are found to be ubiquitous in the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM) of extragalactic environments wherever dust is present. Important results include the finding that DIB carriers are significantly more closely related to dust than to neutral hydrogen, and that the λ6283 DIB tends to be anomalously weak in low-metallicity sightlines.

  9. Diffuse interstellar bands: a comprehensive laboratory study.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Fred M

    2006-12-01

    As a result of the search for the identity of the chromophores responsible for producing the diffuse interstellar bands, a comprehensive exposition of experimental data is presented, which implicates the following molecules: (1) The extremely stable organic molecules, magnesium tetrabenzoporphyrin (MgTBP) and H(2)TBP. (2) A paraffin matrix (referred to as "grains") containing TBPs. (3) A low concentration of pyridine (also within the grains), whose transmission window at 2175 A, accounts for the ubiquitous UV bump. The blue emission spectra associated with the central star, HD44179, of the Red Rectangle displays the fluorescence excitation spectra of bare MgTBP. This unique spectrum matches the low temperature lab data of MgTBP in the vapor phase. An effective grain temperature of 2.728 K (+/-0.008) was deduced, based on MgTBP's lowest measured vibrational state of 341 GHz.

  10. Low-excitation Herbig-Haro objects and interstellar extinction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, R. D.

    1985-01-01

    Previous work on low-excitation Herbig-Haro (HH) objects has confirmed the existence of a strongly-enhanced hydrogen two-photon continuum which is produced by low-velocity shocks in neutral material. The theoretical two-photon energy distribution was compared with that observed for HH 43. With the addition of optical (3300 lambda 7000A) data to the ultraviolet (1200 lambda 3100A) data obtained with the I.U.E, the wavelength dependence of interstellar extinction toward HH 43 has been determined.

  11. Identification of More Interstellar C60+ Bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, G. A. H.; Bohlender, D. A.; Maier, J. P.; Campbell, E. K.

    2015-10-01

    Based on gas-phase laboratory spectra at 6 K, Campbell et al. confirmed that the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) at 9632.7 and 9577.5 Å are due to absorption by the fullerene ion {{{C}}}60+. They also reported the detection of two other, weaker bands at 9428.5 and 9365.9 Å. These lie in spectral regions heavily contaminated by telluric water vapor lines. We acquired CFHT ESPaDOnS spectra of HD 183143 close to the zenith and chopped with a nearby standard to correct for the telluric line absorption which enabled us to detect a DIB at 9365.9 Å of relative width and strength comparable to the laboratory absorption. There is a DIB of similar strength and FWHM at 9362.5 Å. A stellar emission feature at 9429 Å prevented detection of the 9428.5 Å band. However, a CFHT archival spectrum of HD 169454, where emission is absent at 9429 Å, clearly shows the 9428.5 Å DIB with the expected strength and width. These results further confirm {{{C}}}60+ as a DIB carrier. Based on observations obtained at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), which is operated by the National Research Council of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l’Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique of France, and the University of Hawaii.

  12. MAPPING THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM WITH NEAR-INFRARED DIFFUSE INTERSTELLAR BANDS

    SciTech Connect

    Zasowski, G.; Ménard, B.; Bizyaev, D.; García-Hernández, D. A.; Pérez, A. E. García; Majewski, S. R.; Hayden, M. R.; Holtzman, J.; Kinemuchi, K.; Johnson, J. A.; Wilson, J. C.; Nidever, D. L.; Shetrone, M.

    2015-01-01

    We map the distribution and properties of the Milky Way's interstellar medium as traced by diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) detected in near-infrared stellar spectra from the SDSS-III/APOGEE survey. Focusing exclusively on the strongest DIB in the H band, at λ ∼ 1.527 μm, we present a projected map of the DIB absorption field in the Galactic plane, using a set of about 60,000 sightlines that reach up to 15 kpc from the Sun and probe up to 30 mag of visual extinction. The strength of this DIB is linearly correlated with dust reddening over three orders of magnitude in both DIB equivalent width (W {sub DIB}) and extinction, with a power law index of 1.01 ± 0.01, a mean relationship of W {sub DIB}/A{sub V} = 0.1 Å mag{sup –1} and a dispersion of ∼0.05 Å mag{sup –1} at extinctions characteristic of the Galactic midplane. These properties establish this DIB as a powerful, independent probe of dust extinction over a wide range of A{sub V} values. The subset of about 14,000 robustly detected DIB features have a W {sub DIB} distribution that follows an exponential trend. We empirically determine the intrinsic rest wavelength of this transition to be λ{sub 0} = 15 272.42 Å  and use it to calculate absolute radial velocities of the carrier, which display the kinematical signature of the rotating Galactic disk. We probe the DIB carrier distribution in three dimensions and show that it can be characterized by an exponential disk model with a scale height of about 100 pc and a scale length of about 5 kpc. Finally, we show that the DIB distribution also traces large-scale Galactic structures, including the Galactic long bar and the warp of the outer disk.

  13. New Interstellar Dust Models Consistent with Interstellar Extinction, Emission and Abundances Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zubko, V.; Dwek, E.; Arendt, R. G.; Oegerle, William (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We present new interstellar dust models that are consistent with both, the FUV to near-IR extinction and infrared (IR) emission measurements from the diffuse interstellar medium. The models are characterized by different dust compositions and abundances. The problem we solve consists of determining the size distribution of the various dust components of the model. This problem is a typical ill-posed inversion problem which we solve using the regularization approach. We reproduce the Li Draine (2001, ApJ, 554, 778) results, however their model requires an excessive amount of interstellar silicon (48 ppM of hydrogen compared to the 36 ppM available for an ISM of solar composition) to be locked up in dust. We found that dust models consisting of PAHs, amorphous silicate, graphite, and composite grains made up from silicates, organic refractory, and water ice, provide an improved fit to the extinction and IR emission measurements, while still requiring a subsolar amount of silicon to be in the dust. This research was supported by NASA Astrophysical Theory Program NRA 99-OSS-01.

  14. Diffuse interstellar band at 8620 Å in rave: A new method for detecting the diffuse interstellar band in spectra of cool stars

    SciTech Connect

    Kos, J.; Zwitter, T.; Grebel, E. K.; Bienayme, O.; Siebert, A.; Binney, J.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Freeman, K. C.; Gibson, B. K.; Gilmore, G.; Kordopatis, G.; Navarro, J. F.; Parker, Q.; Reid, W. A.; Seabroke, G.; Siviero, A.; Steinmetz, M.; Watson, F.; Wyse, R. F. G.

    2013-12-01

    Diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) are usually observed in spectra of hot stars, where interstellar lines are rarely blended with stellar ones. The need for hot stars is a strong limitation in the number of sightlines we can observe and their distribution in the Galaxy, as hot stars are rare and concentrated in the Galactic plane. We are introducing a new method, where interstellar lines can be observed in spectra of cool stars in large spectroscopic surveys. The method is completely automated and does not require prior knowledge of the stellar parameters. The main step is a construction of the stellar spectrum, which is done by finding other observed spectra that lack interstellar features and are otherwise very similar to the spectrum in question. Such spectra are then combined into a single stellar spectrum template, matching the stellar component of the observed spectrum. We demonstrate the performance of this new method on a sample of 482,430 Radial Velocity Experiment survey spectra. However, many spectra have to be combined (48 on average) in order to achieve a signal-to-noise ratio high enough to measure the profile of the DIB at 8620 Å, hence limiting the spatial information about the interstellar medium. We compare its equivalent width with extinction maps and with Bayesian reddening, calculated for individual stars, and provide a linear relation between the equivalent width and reddening. Separately from the introduced method, we calculate equivalent widths of the DIB in spectra of hot stars with known extinction and compare all three linear relations.

  15. Interstellar Extinction and Polarization by Graphite-Silicate Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, E. T.; Draine, B. T.

    2004-12-01

    The geometry of interstellar dust continues to be uncertain. In some models, intertellar grains are assumed to homogeneous spheres, with a suitable mixture of sizes and compositions in order to reproduce observations of of absorption and scattering (e.g., Weingartner & Draine 2001, or Zubko et al. 2004). However, it is often thought that the larger interstellar grains may be formed by agglomeration of smaller particles, with the resulting ``cluster'' being of nonuniform composition and having a ``fluffy'' geometry. The optical properties of such ``fluffy'' grains have sometimes been estimated using ``effective medium theory'' or other approximations, but it is now possible to directly calculate scattering and absorption using the discrete dipole approximation (Draine & Flatau 1994). We construct candidate clusters by random ballistic agglomeration of small graphite and silicate spheres, and calculate their scattering and absorption cross sections using the discrete dipole approximation code DDSCAT 6.x (Draine & Flatau 2004). We consider a model for interstellar dust consisting of very small grains plus clusters built by ballistic agglomeration with a suitable size distribution, and we test the model by trying to reproduce the observed wavelength dependence of interstellar extinction and polarization. This research was supported in part by NSF grants AST-0216105 and AST-0406883. References: Draine, B.T., & Flatau, P.J. 1994, JOSA, A11, 1491l Draine, B.T., & Flatau, P.J. 2004, http://arxiv.org/abs/astro-ph/0409262l Weingartner, J.C., & Draine, B.T. 2001, ApJ, 548, 296l Zubko, V., Dwek, E., & Arendt, R.G. 2004, ApJS, 152, 211l

  16. NEW ULTRAVIOLET EXTINCTION CURVES FOR INTERSTELLAR DUST IN M31

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, Geoffrey C.; Gordon, Karl D.; Bohlin, R. C.; Bianchi, Luciana C.; Massa, Derck L.; Wolff, Michael J.; Fitzpatrick, Edward L. E-mail: bohlin@stsci.edu E-mail: bianchi@jhu.edu E-mail: edward.fitzpatrick@villanova.edu

    2015-12-10

    New low-resolution UV spectra of a sample of reddened OB stars in M31 were obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope/STIS to study the wavelength dependence of interstellar extinction and the nature of the underlying dust grain populations. Extinction curves were constructed for four reddened sightlines in M31 paired with closely matching stellar atmosphere models. The new curves have a much higher signal-to-noise ratio than previous studies. Direct measurements of N(H i) were made using the Lyα absorption lines enabling gas-to-dust ratios to be calculated. The sightlines have a range in galactocentric distance of 5–14 kpc and represent dust from regions of different metallicities and gas-to-dust ratios. The metallicities sampled range from solar to 1.5 solar. The measured curves show similarity to those seen in the Milky Way and the Large Magellanic Cloud. The Maximum Entropy Method was used to investigate the dust composition and size distribution for the sightlines observed in this program, finding that the extinction curves can be produced with the available carbon and silicon abundances if the metallicity is super-solar.

  17. New Ultraviolet Extinction Curves for Interstellar Dust in M31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayton, Geoffrey C.; Gordon, Karl D.; Bianchi, Luciana C.; Massa, Derck L.; Fitzpatrick, Edward L.; Bohlin, R. C.; Wolff, Michael J.

    2015-12-01

    New low-resolution UV spectra of a sample of reddened OB stars in M31 were obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope/STIS to study the wavelength dependence of interstellar extinction and the nature of the underlying dust grain populations. Extinction curves were constructed for four reddened sightlines in M31 paired with closely matching stellar atmosphere models. The new curves have a much higher signal-to-noise ratio than previous studies. Direct measurements of N(H i) were made using the Lyα absorption lines enabling gas-to-dust ratios to be calculated. The sightlines have a range in galactocentric distance of 5-14 kpc and represent dust from regions of different metallicities and gas-to-dust ratios. The metallicities sampled range from solar to 1.5 solar. The measured curves show similarity to those seen in the Milky Way and the Large Magellanic Cloud. The Maximum Entropy Method was used to investigate the dust composition and size distribution for the sightlines observed in this program, finding that the extinction curves can be produced with the available carbon and silicon abundances if the metallicity is super-solar. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained by the Space Telescope Science Institute, and from the data archive at STScI. STScI is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  18. A Precise Determination of the Mid-infrared Interstellar Extinction Law Based on the APOGEE Spectroscopic Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Mengyao; Jiang, B. W.; Gao, Jian; Liu, Jiaming; Wang, Shu; Li, Aigen

    2016-06-01

    A precise measure of the mid-infrared interstellar extinction law is crucial for investigating the properties of interstellar dust, especially larger-sized grains. Based on the stellar parameters derived from the SDSS-III/Apache Point Observatory Galaxy Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) spectroscopic survey, we select a large sample of G-type and K-type giants as the tracers of the Galactic mid-infrared extinction. We calculate the intrinsic stellar color excesses from the stellar effective temperatures and use them to determine the mid-infrared extinction for a given line of sight. For the entire sky of the Milky Way surveyed by APOGEE, we derive the extinctions (relative to {A}{{{K}}{{S}}}, the K S-band extinction at wavelength λ = 2.16 μm) for the four Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) bands at 3.4, 4.6, 12, and 22 μm, the four Spitzer/Infrared Array Camera bands at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8 μm, the Spitzer/MIPS24 band at 23.7 μm, and, for the first time, the AKARI/S9W band at 8.23 μm. Our results agree with previous works in that the extinction curve is flat in the ˜3-8 μm wavelength range and is generally consistent with the {R}V = 5.5 model curve, except our determination exceeds the model prediction in the WISE/W4 band. Although some previous works found that the mid-IR extinction law appears to vary with the extinction depth {A}{{{K}}{{S}}}, no noticeable variation has been found in this work. The uncertainties are analyzed in terms of the bootstrap resampling method and Monte-Carlo simulation and are found to be rather small.

  19. Probing interstellar extinction in the Tarantula Nebula with red giant stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Marchi, Guido; Panagia, N.; Girardi, L.; Sabbi, E.

    2014-01-01

    We have studied the properties of the interstellar extinction in a field of 3‧ × 3‧ located about 6‧ SW of 30 Doradus in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). The observations with with the WFPC 2 camera on board the Hubble Space Telescope in the U, B, V , I and H bands show the presence of patchy extinction in this field. In particular, the colour-magnitude diagram (CMD) reveals an elongated stellar sequence, running almost parallel to the main sequence (MS), which is in reality made up of stars belonging to the red giant clump (RC) and spread across the CMD by the considerable and uneven extinction in this region. This allows us to derive in a quantitative way both the extinction law in the range 3 000-8 000 Å and the values of the absolute extinction towards more than 100 objects, thereby setting statistically significant constraints on the properties of the extinction in this area. We find an extinction curve considerably flatter than the standard Galactic one and than those derived before towards a sample of sight lines in the LMC. The value of RV = 5.6 that we find implies that in this region large grains dominate. Comparing the extinction towards the individual RC stars and a similar number of stars in the upper MS reveals that the latter span a narrower range of E(B - V) values, contrary to what has been found elsewhere in the LMC. We are now extending these studies to 30 Doradus itself and to a large portion of the Tarantula nebula using existing HST observations at ultraviolet, optical and near infrared wavelengths.

  20. Accurate Modeling of X-ray Extinction by Interstellar Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, John; Draine, B. T.

    2016-02-01

    Interstellar abundance determinations from fits to X-ray absorption edges often rely on the incorrect assumption that scattering is insignificant and can be ignored. We show instead that scattering contributes significantly to the attenuation of X-rays for realistic dust grain size distributions and substantially modifies the spectrum near absorption edges of elements present in grains. The dust attenuation modules used in major X-ray spectral fitting programs do not take this into account. We show that the consequences of neglecting scattering on the determination of interstellar elemental abundances are modest; however, scattering (along with uncertainties in the grain size distribution) must be taken into account when near-edge extinction fine structure is used to infer dust mineralogy. We advertise the benefits and accuracy of anomalous diffraction theory for both X-ray halo analysis and near edge absorption studies. We present an open source Fortran suite, General Geometry Anomalous Diffraction Theory (GGADT), that calculates X-ray absorption, scattering, and differential scattering cross sections for grains of arbitrary geometry and composition.

  1. On the interstellar extinction law toward young stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamzin, S. A.

    2006-03-01

    We have determined the atomic hydrogen column density N HI toward all of the young stars from the Taurus-Auriga-Perseus star-forming complex for which the corresponding spectra are available in the Hubble Space Telescope archive (nine stars) by analyzing the Lyα line profile. We show that the stars studied, except DR Tau, lie not far from the edge of the gaseous cloud of the star-forming region closest to us or, more precisely, inside the outer H I shell of the cloud. This shell with a column density of N HI ≃ 6 × 1020 cm-2 surrounds the molecular gas of the cloud composed of a diffuse component (the so-called diffuse screen) in which dense, compact TMC-1 cores are embedded. The properties of the dust grains toward the stars that lie at the front edge of the cloud most likely differ only slightly from those of the interstellar dust outside star-forming regions. This casts doubt on the validity of the hypothesis that the extinction curve toward young stars has an anomalously low amplitude of the 2175 Å bump—such an extinction curve is observed for the field stars HD 29647 and HD 283809 toward which the line of sight passes through the TMC-1 core.

  2. INTERSTELLAR EXTINCTION LAW TOWARD THE GALACTIC CENTER III: J, H, K{sub S} BANDS IN THE 2MASS AND THE MKO SYSTEMS, AND 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, 8.0 {mu}m IN THE SPITZER/IRAC SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiyama, Shogo; Nagata, Tetsuya; Tamura, Motohide; Hatano, Hirofumi; Kato, Daisuke; Tanabe, Toshihiko; Sugitani, Koji

    2009-05-10

    We have determined interstellar extinction law toward the Galactic center (GC) at the wavelength from 1.2 to 8.0 {mu}m, using point sources detected in the IRSF/SIRIUS near-infrared (NIR) survey and those in the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) and Spitzer/IRAC/GLIMPSE II catalogs. The central region |l | {approx}<3.{sup 0}0 and |b | {approx}<1.{sup 0}0 has been surveyed in the J, H, and K{sub S} bands with the IRSF telescope and the SIRIUS camera whose filters are similar to the Mauna Kea Observatories (MKO) NIR photometric system. Combined with the GLIMPSE II point source catalog, we made K{sub S} versus K{sub S} - {lambda} color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) where {lambda}=3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 {mu}m. The K{sub S} magnitudes of bulge red clump stars and the K{sub S} - {lambda} colors of red giant branches are used as a tracer of the reddening vector in the CMDs. From these magnitudes and colors, we have obtained the ratios of total-to-selective extinction A{sub K{sub S}}/E{sub K{sub S}}{sub -{lambda}} for the four IRAC bands. Combined with A{sub {lambda}}/A{sub K{sub S}} for the J and H bands derived by Nishiyama et al., we obtain A{sub J} :A{sub H} :A{sub K{sub S}}:A {sub [3.6]}:A {sub [4.5]}:A {sub [5.8]}:A {sub [8.0]} = 3.02:1.73:1:0.50:0.39:0.36:0.43 for the line of sight toward the GC. This confirms the flattening of the extinction curve at {lambda} {approx}> 3 {mu}m from a simple extrapolation of the power-law extinction at shorter wavelengths, in accordance with recent studies. The extinction law in the 2MASS J, H, and K{sub S} bands has also been calculated, and good agreement with that in the MKO system is found. Thus, it is established that the extinction in the wavelength range of J, H, and K{sub S} is well fitted by a power law of steep decrease A {sub {lambda}} {proportional_to} {lambda}{sup -2.0} toward the GC. In nearby molecular clouds and diffuse interstellar medium, the lack of reliable measurements of the total-to-selective extinction ratios

  3. Interstellar extinction law near the Galactic equator along the Camelopardalis, Perseus and Cassiopeia border

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zdanavičius, J.; Straižys, V.; Corbally, C. J.

    2002-09-01

    The interstellar reddening law is investigated along the Galactic equator near the Cam, Per and Cas border. We used seven-color photometry of O-B5 stars in the Vilnius photometric system in the optical range, photometry of the ANS orbiting observatory in the ultraviolet range and broad-band color indices V- K in the infrared. In the optical range (345-660 nm) the interstellar reddening law is found to be nearly normal. In the ultraviolet wavelengths shorter than the 330 nm ANS passband, the extinction is found to be slightly larger than the average. Some stars, for example HD 24432, exhibit much stronger ultraviolet extinction which is well seen already in the 345 nm passband of the Vilnius system. However, such stars are rare. The ratio R = A_V/EB-V is found to be 2.9, i.e., it is slightly smaller than the normal. This is confirmed by the study of the wavelength of maximum polarization of reddened stars in the area. Both the ultraviolet anomaly and the smaller R value are in good agreement with the Cardelli et al. (\\cite{carcm88}) prediction. We conclude that in the investigated area it is safe to use normal ratios of color excesses to calculate reddening-free Q-parameters for the classification of stars from photometric data in the optical spectral range.

  4. Putting the Diffuse Interstellar Bands on the Map - Literally!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Loon, J. Th.

    2014-02-01

    In a quest to further our understanding of the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM) as well as the unidentified carriers of the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs), we are mapping DIBs across the sky using hundreds of hot stars as background torches - globular clusters (in particular ω Centauri), nearby stars in and around the Local Bubble, and stars within the Magellanic Clouds. I describe the results so far obtained and our current experiments.

  5. Centrosymmetric molecules as possible carriers of diffuse interstellar bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaźmierczak, M.; Schmidt, M. R.; Galazutdinov, G. A.; Musaev, F. A.; Betelesky, Y.; Krełowski, J.

    2010-11-01

    In this paper, we present new data with interstellar C2 (Phillips bands A 1 Πu-X1 Σ+g), from observations made with the Ultraviolet-Visual Echelle Spectrograph of the European Southern Observatory. We have determined the interstellar column densities and excitation temperatures of C2 for nine Galactic lines. For seven of these, C2 has never been observed before, so in this case the still small sample of interstellar clouds (26 lines of sight), where a detailed analysis of C2 excitation has been made, has increased significantly. This paper is a continuation of previous works where interstellar molecules (C2 and diffuse interstellar bands) have been analysed. Because the sample of interstellar clouds with C2 has increased, we can show that the width and shape of the profiles of some diffuse interstellar bands (6196 and 5797 Å) apparently depend on the gas kinetic and rotational temperatures of C2; the profiles are broader because of the higher values of the gas kinetic and rotational temperatures of C2. There are also diffuse interstellar bands (4964 and 5850 Å) for which this effect does not exist. Based on observations made with ESO telescopes at the Paranal Observatory under programme IDs 266.D-5655(A), 67.C-0281(A), 71.C-0513(C), 67.D-0439(A) and 082.C-0566(A) and at La Silla under programme IDs 078.C-0403(A), 076.C-0164(A) and 073.C-0337(A). Also based on observations made with the 1.8-m telescope in South Korea and the 2-m telescope at the International Centre for Astronomical and Medico-Ecological Research, Terskol, Russia. E-mail: kazmierczak@astri.uni.torun.pl (MK); schmidt@ncac.torun.pl (MRS); runizag@gmail.com (GAG); ybialets@eso.org (YB); jacek@astri.uni.torun.pl (JK)

  6. Fullerenes, Organics and the Diffuse Interstellar Bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foing, Bernard H.

    2016-07-01

    The status of DIB research has strongly advanced since 20 years [1], as well as the quest for fullerenes, PAHs and large organics in space. In 1994 we reported the discovery of two near IR diffuse bands coincident with C60+, confirmed in subsequent years [2-6] and now by latest laboratory experiments. A number of DIB observational studies have been published, dealing with: DIB surveys [1,7-10]; measurements of DIB families, correlations and environment dependences [11-14]; extragalactic DIBs [15, 16]. Resolved substructures were detected [17,18] and compared to predicted rotational contours by large molecules [19]. Polarisation studies provided upper limits constraints [20, 21]. DIBs carriers have been linked with organic molecules observed in the interstellar medium [22-25] such as IR bands (assigned to PAHs), Extended Red Emission or recently detected Anomalous Microwave Emission (AME, assigned to spinning dust) and with spectroscopic IR emission bands measured with ISO or Spitzer. Fullerenes and PAHs have been proposed to explain some DIBs and specific molecules were searched in DIB spectra [eg 2-6, 26-31]. These could be present in various dehydrogenation and ionisation conditions [32,33]. Experiments in the laboratory and in space [eg 34-36] allow to measure the survival and by-products of these molecules. We review DIB observational results and their interpretation, and discuss the presence of large organics, fullerenes, PAHs, graphenes in space. References [1] Herbig, G. 1995 ARA&A33, 19; [2] Foing, B. & Ehrenfreund, P. 1994 Natur 369, 296; [3] Foing, B. & Ehrenfreund, P. 1997 A&A317, L59; [4] Foing, B. & Ehrenfreund, P. 1995 ASSL202, 65; [5] Ehrenfreund, P., Foing, B. H. 1997 AdSpR19, 1033; [6] Galazutdinov, G. A. et al. 2000 MNRAS317, 750; [7] Jenniskens, P., Desert, F.-X. 1994 A&AS106, 39; [8] Ehrenfreund, P. et al. 1997 A&A318, L28; [9] Tuairisg, S. Ó. et al. 2000 A&AS142, 225; [10] Cox, N. et al. 2005 A&A438, 187; [11] Cami, J. et al. 1997A&A.326, 822

  7. A bibliography of papers on the diffuse interstellar bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snow, Theodore P.; Barnes, Susan; Heitzmann, Maribeth

    1994-01-01

    Presented is a compilation of publications on the diffuse interstellar bands, found in the literature dating back to the first known mention of the bands. It has been attempted to make this list complete, but it must be recognized that some papers may be missing. Judgement was required in some cases where the diffuse bands are mentioned, but are not a central theme of a paper; in most instances we kept such papers in a list, rather than omitting them.

  8. A Unified Model of Polarized Extinction and Emission from Interstellar Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hensley, Brandon; Draine, Bruce T.

    2015-01-01

    Through full-sky observations of the polarized intensity of Galactic dust emission, the Planck satellite has furnished important new constraints on the composition, size, and shape of interstellar grains. We present new models of interstellar dust consisting of silicate and carbonaceous components of spheroidal shape that are consistent with available data on interstellar abundances, polarized and total extinction, and polarized and total emission in the diffuse interstellar medium. Possible contributions from ferromagnetic iron are also considered, including the polarization signatures of this component. We discuss updates to the Draine and Li 2007 optical properties of these components on the basis of new data, and present models that successfully reproduce the observed relatively flat NIR extinction curve. Finally, we discuss the prospects of extending our models to probe physical variations in the grain population in various Galactic environments, such as regions of high extinction, and in extragalactic sources, such as the Magellanic Clouds.

  9. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and the Diffuse Interstellar Bands: a Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, F.; Galazutdinov, G. A.; Krelowski, J.; Allamandola, L. J.; Musaev, F. A.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    We discuss the proposal relating the origin of some of the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) to neutral and ionized polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) present in interstellar clouds. Laboratory spectra of several PAHs, isolated at low temperature in inert gas matrices, are compared with an extensive set of astronomical spectra of reddened, early type stars. From this comparison, it is concluded that PAN ions are good candidates to explain some of the DIBs. Unambiguous assignments are difficult, however, due to the shift in wavelengths and the band broadening induced in the laboratory spectra by the solid matrix. Definitive band assignments and, ultimately, the test of the of the proposal that PAH ions carry some of the DIB must await the availability of gas-phase measurements in the laboratory. The present assessment offers a guideline for future laboratory experiments by allowing the preselection of promising PAH molecules to be studied in jet expansions.

  10. A Spanish-VO tool to estimate the spatial distribution of galactic interstellar extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales-Durán, C.; Rodrigo-Blanco, C.; Cabo-Cubeiro, P.; Llorente-de Andrés, F.; Solano-Márquez, E.

    The interstellar medium in our Galaxy is very inhomogeneus. The interstellar gas and dust are distributed irregularly in clouds, filaments arcs, bubbles and superstructures of different density from very high to extremely low. The knowledge of the spatial distribution of these features is of capital importance for different areas of the galactic and extragalactic astronomy. We present here a tool, developped in the frame of the Spanish Virtual Observatory, to know the variation of the extinction in any observing direction.

  11. A high-resolution study of near-infrared diffuse interstellar bands

    SciTech Connect

    Rawlings, M. G.; Adamson, A. J.; Kerr, T. H. E-mail: aadamson@gemini.edu

    2014-11-20

    We present high-resolution echelle spectroscopic observations of the two near-infrared (NIR) diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) at 13175 Å and 11797.5 Å. The DIBs have been observed in a number of diffuse interstellar medium sightlines that exhibit a wide range of visual extinctions. Band profiles are similar to those seen in narrow DIBs, clearly asymmetric and can be closely fitted in most cases using two simple Gaussian components. Gaussian fits were generally found to be more successful than fits based on a multiple-cloud model using a template DIB profile. For a sample of nine objects in which both bands are observed, the strength of both NIR DIBs generally increases with A(V), and we report a correlation between the two observed bands over a large A(V) range and widely separated lines of sight. The strength of the two bands is also compared against those of two visual DIBs and the diffuse ISM aliphatic dust absorption feature at 3.4 μm previously detected in the same sightlines. We find that the NIR DIBs do not exhibit notable (anti)correlations with either. Implications of these observations on possible DIB carrier species are discussed.

  12. Probing the Role of Carbon in the Interstellar Ultraviolet Extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Ajay; Li, Aigen

    2015-08-01

    We probe the role of carbon in the ultraviolet (UV) extinction by examining the relations between the amount of carbon required to be locked up in dust {[{{C}}/{{H}}]}{dust} with the 2175 \\mathringA extinction bump and the far-UV extinction rise, based on an analysis of the extinction curves along 16 Galactic sightlines for which the gas-phase carbon abundance is known and the 2175 \\mathringA extinction bump exhibits variable strengths and widths. We derive {[{{C}}/{{H}}]}{dust} from the Kramers-Kronig relation which relates the wavelength-integrated extinction to the total dust volume. This approach is less model-dependent since it does not require the knowledge of the detailed optical properties and size distribution of the dust.We also derive {[{{C}}/{{H}}]}{dust} from fitting the observed UV/optical/near-infrared extinction with a mixture of amorphous silicate and graphite. We find that the carbon depletion {[{{C}}/{{H}}]}{dust} tends to correlate with the strength of the 2175 \\mathringA bump, while the abundance of silicon depleted in dust shows no correlation with the 2175 \\mathringA bump. This supports graphite or polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules as the possible carrier of the 2175 \\mathringA bump. We also see that {[{{C}}/{{H}}]}{dust} shows a trend of correlating with 1/{R}V, where RV is the total-to-selective extinction ratio, suggesting that the far-UV extinction is more likely produced by small carbon dust than by small silicate dust.

  13. Two lines of sight with exceedingly anomalous ultraviolet interstellar extinction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardelli, Jason A.; Savage, Blair D.

    1988-01-01

    Low-resolution IUE data toward HD 62542 reveal an extinction curve with an extremely broad and weak UV extinction bump and the highest FUV extinction yet observed in the Milky Way. Parameters describing the central position and FWHM for weak bumps observed toward HD 62542 and HD 29647 are derived using analytical fitting techniques. In both cases, the bump central positions are shifted shortward of 2175 A with an initial wavelength of 2110 A for HD 62542 and an initial wavelength of 2128 A for HD 29647. The bump FWHM is found to be 1.29/micron and 1.62/micron for HD 62542 and HD 29647, respectively.

  14. Diffuse Interstellar Bands as Probes of Small-Scale Interstellar Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, K. T.; Cordiner, M. A.; Sarre, P. J.

    2014-02-01

    We present observations which probe the small-scale structure of the interstellar medium using diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs). Towards HD 168075/6 in the Eagle Nebula, significant differences in DIB absorption are found between the two lines of sight, which are separated by 0.25 pc, and λ 5797 exhibits a velocity shift. Similar data are presented for four stars in the μ Sgr system. We also present a search for variations in DIB absorption towards κ Vel, where the atomic lines are known to vary on scales of ~ 10 AU. Observations separated by ~ 9 yr yielded no evidence for changes in DIB absorption strength over this scale, but do reveal an unusual DIB spectrum.

  15. Interstellar Extinction in the Vicinity of the Galactic Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cotera, Angela S.; Simpson, Janet P.; Erickson, Edwin F.; Colgan, Sean W. J.

    1998-01-01

    We present J (1.2 microns) H (1-6 microns) K' (2.11 microns) and Br(gamma) (2.166 microns) images from four large regions within the central 40 pc of the Galaxy. Localized variations in the extinction, as determined by observations of the stellar population, are examined using the median H-K' color as a function of position within each region. As the value of the derived extinction from the stars is dependent upon the intrinsic magnitude of the assumed stellar type, the J-H vs. H-K' diagrams are first used to investigate the distribution of stellar types in the four regions. We find that there is a distinct OB population, contrary to earlier assumptions, with the ratio of K and M giants and supergiants to OB stars approximately twice that of the solar neighborhood. Although the on the scale of approx. 1 min. fluctuations in the extinction are on the order of A(sub V) approx. greater than 2, throughout the entire region the extinction varies from A(sub V) approx. greater than 25 to A(sub V) approx. less than 40. We also examine whether there is any variation in the extinction and stellar number density relative to the unusual radio features in these regions and do not find a significant correlation. Spectral imaging in Br(gamma) 2.166 microns emission shows a strong morphological correspondence between the 6 cm radio images and the diffuse Br(gamma) emission. By comparing the theoretical Br(gamma) flux derived from the radio flux using recombination theory, with our measured Br(gamma) flux, we obtain a second, independent, estimate of the extinction. We compare the two data sets and find that the extinction as derived from the stars is consistently greater, sometimes by a factor of two, than the value of the extinction derived from the Br(gamma) images. The derived extinction in various regions, however, is insufficient for any of these regions to be located behind the molecular clouds as previously observed in the Galactic Center, consistent with the theory that

  16. Interstellar Extinction in the Vicinity of the Galactic Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cotera, Angela S.; Simpson, Janet P.; Erickson, Edwin F.; Colgan, Sean W. J.; Burton, Michael G.; Allen, David A.

    2000-01-01

    We present J (1.2 microns), H (1-6 microns), K' (2.11 microns) and Br(gamma) (2.166 microns) images from four large regions within the central 40 pc of the Galaxy. Localized variations in the extinction, as determined by observations of the stellar population, are examined using the median H-K' color as a function of position within each region. As the value of the derived extinction from the stars is dependent upon the intrinsic magnitude of the assumed stellar type, the J-H vs. H-K' diagrams are first used to investigate the distribution of stellar types in the four regions. We find that there is a distinct OB population, contrary to earlier assumptions, with the ratio of K and M giants and supergiants to OB stars approximately twice that of the solar neighborhood. Although the on the scale of approx. l' fluctuations in the extinction are on the order of A(sub V) approx. 2, throughout the entire region the extinction varies from A(sub V) approx. greater than 25 to A(sub V) approx. less than 40. We also examine whether there is any variation in the extinction and stellar number density relative to the usual radio features in these regions and do not find a significant correlation. Spectral imaging in Br(gamma) 2.166 microns emission shows a strong morphological correspondence between the 6 cm radio images and the diffuse Br(gamma) emission. By comparing the theoretical Br(gamma) flux derived from the radio flux using recombination theory, with our measured Br(gamma) flux, we obtain a second, independent, estimate of the extinction. We compare the two data sets and find that the extinction as derived from the stars is consistently greater, sometimes by a factor of two, than the value of the extinction derived from the Br(gamma) images. The derived extinction in various regions, however, is insufficient for any of these regions-to be located behind the molecular clouds as previously observed in the Galactic Center, consistent with the theory that the observed radio

  17. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and the diffuse interstellar bands: a survey.

    PubMed

    Salama, F; Galazutdinov, G A; Krelowski, J; Allamandola, L J; Musaev, F A

    1999-11-20

    We discuss the proposal relating the origin of some of the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) to neutral and ionized polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) present in interstellar clouds. Laboratory spectra of several PAHs, isolated at low temperature in inert gas matrices, are compared with the spectra of five reddened early-type stars selected from an extensive set of astronomical spectra. From this comparison, it is concluded that PAH ions are good candidates to explain some of the DIBS. Unambiguous assignments are difficult, however, because of the shift in wavelengths and the band broadening induced in the laboratory spectra by the solid matrix. This situation is illustrated by a comparison with the gas-phase spectra made available recently for two PAH ions. Definitive band assignments and, ultimately, the test of the proposal that PAH ions carry some of the DIBs must await the availability of a larger set of gas-phase measurements in the laboratory. The present assessment offers a guideline for future laboratory experiments by allowing the preselection of promising PAH molecules to be studied in jet expansions.

  18. Estimating stellar parameters and interstellar extinction from evolutionary tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sichevsky, S.; Malkov, O.

    Developing methods for analyzing and extracting information from modern sky surveys is a challenging task in astrophysical studies. We study possibilities of parameterizing stars and interstellar medium from multicolor photometry performed in three modern photometric surveys: GALEX, SDSS, and 2MASS. For this purpose, we have developed a method to estimate stellar radius from effective temperature and gravity with the help of evolutionary tracks and model stellar atmospheres. In accordance with the evolution rate at every point of the evolutionary track, star formation rate, and initial mass function, a weight is assigned to the resulting value of radius that allows us to estimate the radius more accurately. The method is verified for the most populated areas of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram: main-sequence stars and red giants, and it was found to be rather precise (for main-sequence stars, the average relative error of radius and its standard deviation are 0.03% and 3.87%, respectively).

  19. Ultraviolet interstellar extinction in the large Magellanic Cloud using observations with the International Ultraviolet Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koornneef, J.; Code, A. D.

    1981-01-01

    Ten early-type supergiants in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) have been observed with the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE). The spectra (1150-3200 A) are shown, and their photometric properties are discussed. It is confirmed that the LMC interstellar extinction law for these stars deviates significantly from the average galactic law in the sense that the 2200 A feature is deficient in strength and that, in the far-ultraviolet (wavelength less than 2000 A), the observed LMC extinction law is significantly above the galactic curve.

  20. Towards a Unified Model of Polarized Emission and Extinction from Interstellar Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hensley, Brandon; Draine, Bruce T.

    2014-06-01

    We present models of interstellar grains that reproduce observational constraints on dust extinction, polarized extinction, infrared emission, and elemental abundances. Employing spheroidal graphite-PAH and "astrosilicate" grains of varying axial ratio, we constrain the size distribution and degree of alignment as a function of grain size. We discuss in particular the polarized emission from each model in the context of results from Planck as well as the effects of including contributions from ferromagnetic iron nanoparticles. We outline our next steps in developing a model of dust in the diffuse ISM by leveraging observational constraints on scattering and adapting our models to environments other than the diffuse ISM.

  1. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Interstellar extinction curves of OB stars (Wegner 2002)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegner, W.

    2003-02-01

    The paper presents a collection of 436 extinction curves covering the whole available range of wavelengths from satellite UV to near-IR. The data were taken from the ANS photometric catalogue (Cat. ) and from the compilations of IR photometric measurements. The data curves have been obtained with the aid of "artificial standards" Papaj et al. (1993A&A...273..575P) and Wegner (1994MNRAS.270..229W, 1995, Interstellar Absorption Structures in the Direction of Nearby OB stars, Wyd. Uczelniane WSP, Bydgoszcz, p. 1-383). The visual magnitudes and spectral classifications of O and B type stars with EB-V>=0.05 were taken from the SIMBAD database. The curves are given in the form of plots and tables E{lambda}-V/EB-V versus 1/{lambda}. The observed variety of extinction laws among slightly reddened stars is apparently due to the various physical parameters of interstellar clouds. (3 data files).

  2. Very Large Interstellar Grains as Evidenced by the Mid-infrared Extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shu; Li, Aigen; Jiang, B. W.

    2015-09-01

    The sizes of interstellar grains are widely distributed, ranging from a few angstroms to a few micrometers. The ultraviolet (UV) and optical extinction constrains the dust in the size range of a couple hundredths of micrometers to several submicrometers. The near and mid infrared (IR) emission constrains the nanometer-sized grains and angstrom-sized very large molecules. However, the quantity and size distribution of micrometer-sized grains remain unknown because they are gray in the UV/optical extinction and they are too cold and emit too little in the IR to be detected by IRAS, Spitzer, or Herschel. In this work, we employ the ˜3-8 μm mid-IR extinction, which is flat in both diffuse and dense regions to constrain the quantity, size, and composition of the μm-sized grain component. We find that, together with nano- and submicron-sized silicate and graphite (as well as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons), μm-sized graphite grains with C/H ≈ 137 ppm and a mean size of ˜1.2 μm closely fit the observed interstellar extinction of the Galactic diffuse interstellar medium from the far-UV to the mid-IR, as well as the near-IR to millimeter thermal emission obtained by COBE/DIRBE, COBE/FIRAS, and Planck up to λ ≲ 1000 μm. The μm-sized graphite component accounts for ˜14.6% of the total dust mass and ˜2.5% of the total IR emission. Dedicated to the late Professor J. Mayo Greenberg (1922.1.14-2001.11.29), of Leiden University who first suggested the possible existence of very large grains in the interstellar space.

  3. The detection of a broad interstellar extinction feature near 1700 A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carnochan, David J.

    1989-01-01

    A statistical examination of 126 extinction curves has revealed the presence of a second broad absorption feature similar in nature to the 2200 A feature. The feature is centered on wavelength 1706 A, has a full half-width of 350 A, and a mean central height of 0.21 magnitudes. The strength of the feature increases with E(B-V) supporting an interstellar origin, and on average it is 18 times weaker than the 2200 A feature.

  4. Dust in the small Magellanic cloud. 1: Interstellar polarization and extinction data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magalhaes, A. M.; Rodrigues, C. V.; Coyne, C. V.; Piirola, V.

    1996-01-01

    The typical extinction curve for the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), in contrast to that for the Galaxy, has no bump at 2175 A and has a steeper rise into the far ultraviolet. For the Galaxy the interpretation of the extinction and, therefore, the dust content of the interstellar medium has been greatly assisted by measurements of the wavelength dependence of the polarization. For the SMC no such measurements existed. Therefore, to further elucidate the dust properties in the SMC we have for the first time measured linear polarization with five colors in the optical region of the spectrum for a sample of reddened stars. For two of these stars, for which there were no existing UV spectrophotometric measurements, but for which we measured a relatively large polarization, we have also obtained data from the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) in order to study the extinction. We also attempt to correlate the SMC extinction and polarization data. The main results are: the wavelength of maximum polarization, lambda(sub max), in the SMC is typically smaller than that in the Galaxy; however, AZC 456, which shows the UV extinction bump, has a lambda(sub max) typical of that in the Galaxy, but its polarization curve is narrower and its bump is shifted to shorter wavelengths as compared to the Galaxy; and from an analysis of both the extinction and polarization data it appears that the SMC has typically smaller grains than those in the Galaxy. The absence of the extinction bump in the SMC has generally been thought to imply a lower carbon abundance in the SMC compared to the Galaxy. We interpret our results to mean that te size distribution of the interstellar grains, and not only the carbon abundance, is different in the SMC as compared to the Galaxy. In Paper 2 we present dust model fits to these observations.

  5. Diffuse interstellar bands versus known atomic and molecular species in the interstellar medium of M82 toward SN 2014J

    SciTech Connect

    Welty, Daniel E.; York, Donald G.; Ritchey, Adam M.; Dahlstrom, Julie A.

    2014-09-10

    We discuss the absorption due to various constituents of the interstellar medium (ISM) of M82 seen in moderately high-resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio optical spectra of SN 2014J. Complex absorption from M82 is seen, at velocities 45 ≲ v {sub LSR} ≲ 260 km s{sup –1}, for Na I, K I, Ca I, Ca II, CH, CH{sup +}, and CN; many of the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) are also detected. Comparisons of the column densities of the atomic and molecular species and the equivalent widths of the DIBs reveal both similarities and differences in relative abundances, compared to trends seen in the ISM of our Galaxy and the Magellanic Clouds. Of the 10 relatively strong DIBs considered here, 6 (including λ5780.5) have strengths within ±20% of the mean values seen in the local Galactic ISM, for comparable N(K I); 2 are weaker by 20%-45% and 2 (including λ5797.1) are stronger by 25%-40%. Weaker than 'expected' DIBs (relative to N(K I), N(Na I), and E(B – V)) in some Galactic sight lines and toward several other extragalactic supernovae appear to be associated with strong CN absorption and/or significant molecular fractions. While the N(CH)/N(K I) and N(CN)/N(CH) ratios seen toward SN 2014J are similar to those found in the local Galactic ISM, the combination of high N(CH{sup +})/N(CH) and high W(5797.1)/W(5780.5) ratios has not been seen elsewhere. The centroids of many of the M82 DIBs are shifted relative to the envelope of the K I profile—likely due to component-to-component variations in W(DIB)/N(K I) that may reflect the molecular content of the individual components. We compare estimates for the host galaxy reddening E(B – V) and visual extinction A {sub V} derived from the various interstellar species with the values estimated from optical and near-IR photometry of SN 2014J.

  6. Deviations of interstellar extinctions from the mean R-dependent extinction law

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathis, John S.; Cardelli, Jason A.

    1992-01-01

    An analysis is conducted of the deviations from the mean extinction law A(lambda)/A(V) over UV wavelengths emphasizing sightlines through bright nebulosities vs dark clouds. The stellar sample is subdivided into sight lines with defined properties, and different behavior is noted for the deviations in the dark-cloud and bright-nebula sight lines. The deviations are correlated within the same wavenumber interval, but unique shapes for the FUV rise in the deviations are observed. Distributions of silicate grains are considered to account for the extinctions at certain wavenumbers that would explain the observations. The FUV rise in the extinctions is theorized to be related to the UV extinction of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

  7. The diffuse interstellar bands and the Galactic latitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, Alan; Webster, Adrian

    1993-04-01

    Existing measurements of three of the diffuse interstellar bands are presented in a new way, in order to investigate how the relative strengths of different bands depend on the Galactic latitude of the stars in whose light they are seen. It is found that none of the three ratios of bandstrength amongst 4430, 5780, and 5797 A is constant, but all three are correlated with the modulus of the latitude. The abundance of the carrier of 4430 A relative to the others is found to be greatest at low latitude, while that of the carrier of 5797 A is greatest at high latitude. It is supposed that this dependence reflects a more basic dependence on height above and below the Galactic plane, the carrier of 4430 A evidently preferring conditions near the plane where the gas density is high and the carrier of 5797 A preferring the more tenuous gas further out. In terms of a recent theory in which the carriers are different hydrocarbon molecules and ions of the fullerane family, these results imply that, of the bands studied here, the carrier of 4430 A bears the most hydrogen atoms and that of 5797 A bears the fewest.

  8. Into the Darkness: Interstellar Extinction Near the Cepheus OB3 Molecular Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzpatrick, Edward L.; Jacklin, S.; Massa, D.

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of a followup investigation to a study performed by Massa and Savage (1984, ApJ, 279, 310) of the properties of UV interstellar extinction in the region of the Cepheus OB3 molecular cloud. That study was performed using UV photometry and spectro-photometry from the ANS and IUE satellites. We have extended this study into the IR, utilizing the uniform database of IR photometry available from the 2MASS project. This is a part of a larger program whose goal is to study the properties of extinction in localized regions, where we hope to find clues to dust grain growth and destruction processes through spatial correlations of extinction with distinct environmental properties. Similarly to Massa and Savage’s UV results, we find that the IR extinction properties on the Cepheus OB3 region vary systematically with the apparent proximity of the target stars to the molecular cloud. We also find that the UV extinction and the IR extinction are crudely correlated. The methodology leading to these results and their implications are discussed.

  9. AN ANALYSIS OF THE SHAPES OF INTERSTELLAR EXTINCTION CURVES. VI. THE NEAR-IR EXTINCTION LAW

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzpatrick, E. L.; Massa, D. E-mail: massa@derckmassa.net

    2009-07-10

    We combine new observations from the Hubble Space Telescope's Advanced Camera of Survey with existing data to investigate the wavelength dependence of near-IR (NIR) extinction. Previous studies suggest a power law form for NIR extinction, with a 'universal' value of the exponent, although some recent observations indicate that significant sight line-to-sight line variability may exist. We show that a power-law model for the NIR extinction provides an excellent fit to most extinction curves, but that the value of the power, {beta}, varies significantly from sight line to sight line. Therefore, it seems that a 'universal NIR extinction law' is not possible. Instead, we find that as {beta} decreases, R(V) {identical_to} A(V)/E(B - V) tends to increase, suggesting that NIR extinction curves which have been considered 'peculiar' may, in fact, be typical for different R(V) values. We show that the power-law parameters can depend on the wavelength interval used to derive them, with the {beta} increasing as longer wavelengths are included. This result implies that extrapolating power-law fits to determine R(V) is unreliable. To avoid this problem, we adopt a different functional form for NIR extinction. This new form mimics a power law whose exponent increases with wavelength, has only two free parameters, can fit all of our curves over a longer wavelength baseline and to higher precision, and produces R(V) values which are consistent with independent estimates and commonly used methods for estimating R(V). Furthermore, unlike the power-law model, it gives R(V)s that are independent of the wavelength interval used to derive them. It also suggests that the relation R(V) = -1.36 E(K-V)/(E(B-V)) - 0.79 can estimate R(V) to {+-}0.12. Finally, we use model extinction curves to show that our extinction curves are in accord with theoretical expectations, and demonstrate how large samples of observational quantities can provide useful constraints on the grain properties.

  10. VERY LARGE INTERSTELLAR GRAINS AS EVIDENCED BY THE MID-INFRARED EXTINCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shu; Jiang, B. W.; Li, Aigen E-mail: bjiang@bnu.edu.cn E-mail: lia@missouri.edu

    2015-09-20

    The sizes of interstellar grains are widely distributed, ranging from a few angstroms to a few micrometers. The ultraviolet (UV) and optical extinction constrains the dust in the size range of a couple hundredths of micrometers to several submicrometers. The near and mid infrared (IR) emission constrains the nanometer-sized grains and angstrom-sized very large molecules. However, the quantity and size distribution of micrometer-sized grains remain unknown because they are gray in the UV/optical extinction and they are too cold and emit too little in the IR to be detected by IRAS, Spitzer, or Herschel. In this work, we employ the ∼3–8 μm mid-IR extinction, which is flat in both diffuse and dense regions to constrain the quantity, size, and composition of the μm-sized grain component. We find that, together with nano- and submicron-sized silicate and graphite (as well as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons), μm-sized graphite grains with C/H ≈ 137 ppm and a mean size of ∼1.2 μm closely fit the observed interstellar extinction of the Galactic diffuse interstellar medium from the far-UV to the mid-IR, as well as the near-IR to millimeter thermal emission obtained by COBE/DIRBE, COBE/FIRAS, and Planck up to λ ≲ 1000 μm. The μm-sized graphite component accounts for ∼14.6% of the total dust mass and ∼2.5% of the total IR emission.

  11. Rejection of the C-7 Diffuse Interstellar Band Hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCall, B. J.; Thorburn, J.; Hobbs, L. M.; Oka, T.; York, D. G.

    2001-09-01

    Using the new high-resolution (~8 km s-1) echelle spectrograph on the 3.5 m telescope at the Apache Point Observatory, we have begun a high-sensitivity survey of the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) in a large sample of reddened stars. Now that we are 2 years into this long-term survey, our sample includes over 20 reddened stars that show at least one of the DIBs that had been suggested to be caused by C-7, based on the gas-phase measurement of the C-7 spectrum by J. P. Maier's group. The high-quality astronomical data from this larger sample of stars, along with the spectroscopic constants from the new laboratory work recently reported by Maier's group, have enabled us to examine more carefully the agreement between C-7 and the DIBs. We find that none of the C-7 bands match the DIBs in wavelength or expected profile. One of the DIBs (λ5748) attributed to C-7 is actually a stellar line. The two strongest DIBs attributed to C-7 (λ6270 and λ4964) are not correlated in strength, so they cannot share the same carrier. On the whole, we find no evidence supporting the hypothesis that C-7 is a carrier of the DIBs.

  12. Interstellar extinction toward the Cas OB6 association: Where is the dust?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, Margaret Murray; Clayton, Geoffrey C.

    1993-01-01

    We have completed a multiband (ultraviolet, optical, and near-infrared) study of the interstellar extinction properties of nine massive stars in IC 1805 and IC 1848, which are both part of Cas OB6 in the Perseus spiral arm. Our analysis includes determination of absolute extinction over the wavelength range from 3 micrometers to 1250 A. We have attempted to distinguish between foreground dust and dust local to Cas OB6. This is done by quantitatively comparing extinction laws of the least reddened sightlines (sampling mostly foreground dust) versus the most reddened sightlines (sampling a larger fraction of the dust in the Cas OB6 region). We have combined previous investigations to better understand the evolution of the interstellar medium in this active star forming region. We found no variation of extinction curve behavior between moderately reddend and heavily reddened Cas OB6 stars. None of the curves show any significant deviation from the Cardelli-Clayton-Mathis (CCM) R(sub upsilon)-dependent extinction. They are all consistent with that seen from diffuse dust. Most or all of the dust along the line of sight may be foreground to Cas OB6. Massive star forming regions can show significant deviations from CCM behavior which have been attributed to processing of the dust grains. Any dust local to the association must exist far from the hot stars in IC 1805 and IC 1848. A previous episode of star formation may have already cleared out the region of most of the gas and dust. Evidence for this can be seen in H I and IRAS data of the region.

  13. Linear and circular spectropolarimetry of diffuse interstellar bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, N. L. J.; Ehrenfreund, P.; Foing, B. H.; D'Hendecourt, L.; Salama, F.; Sarre, P. J.

    2011-07-01

    Context. The identification of the carriers of diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) remains one of the long-standing mysteries in astronomy. The detection of a polarisation signal in a DIB profile can be used to distinguish between a dust or gas-phase carrier. The polarisation profile can give additional information on the grain or molecular properties of the absorber. Aims: To measure the polarisation efficiency of the carriers of the diffuse interstellar bands. Methods: In order to detect and measure the linear and circular polarisation of the DIBs we observed reddened lines of sight showing continuum polarisation. For this study we selected two stars HD 197770 and HD 194279. We used high-resolution (R ~ 64 000) spectropolarimetry in the wavelength range from 3700 to 10 480 Å with the ESPaDOnS échelle spectrograph mounted at the CFHT. Results: High S/N and high resolution Stokes V (circular), Q and U (linear) spectra were obtained. We constrained upper limits by a factor of 10 for previously observed DIBs. Furthermore, we analysed ~30 additional DIBs for which no spectropolarimetry data has been obtained before. This included the 9577 Å DIB and the 8621 Å DIB. The former is attributed to the C60^+ fullerene, which could become aligned in a magnetic field. The latter shows a tight correlation with the amount of dust in the line-of-sight and therefore most likely may show a polarisation signal related the aligned grains. Conclusions: The lack of polarisation in 45 DIB profiles suggests that none of the absorption lines is induced by a grain-type carrier. The strict upper limits, less than ~0.01%, derived for the observed lines-of-sight imply that if DIBs are due to gas-phase molecules these carriers have polarisation efficiencies which are at least 6 times, and up to 300 times, smaller than those predicted for grain-related carriers. Based on observations obtained at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) which is operated by the National Research Council of

  14. The VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Survey. IX. The interstellar medium seen through diffuse interstellar bands and neutral sodium&

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Loon, J. Th.; Bailey, M.; Tatton, B. L.; Maíz Apellániz, J.; Crowther, P. A.; de Koter, A.; Evans, C. J.; Hénault-Brunet, V.; Howarth, I. D.; Richter, P.; Sana, H.; Simón-Díaz, S.; Taylor, W.; Walborn, N. R.

    2013-02-01

    Context. The Tarantula Nebula (a.k.a. 30 Dor) is a spectacular star-forming region in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), seen through gas in the Galactic disc and halo. Diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) offer a unique probe of the diffuse, cool-warm gas in these regions. Aims: The aim is to use DIBs as diagnostics of the local interstellar conditions, whilst at the same time deriving properties of the yet-unknown carriers of these enigmatic spectral features. Methods: Spectra of over 800 early-type stars from the Very Large Telescope Flames Tarantula Survey (VFTS) were analysed. Maps were created, separately, for the Galactic and LMC absorption in the DIBs at 4428 and 6614 Å and - in a smaller region near the central cluster R 136 - neutral sodium (the Na i D doublet); we also measured the DIBs at 5780 and 5797 Å. Results: The maps show strong 4428 and 6614 Å DIBs in the quiescent cloud complex to the south of 30 Dor but weak absorption in the harsher environments to the north (bubbles) and near the OB associations. The Na maps show at least five kinematic components in the LMC and a shell-like structure surrounding R 136, and small-scale structure in the Milky Way. The strengths of the 4428, 5780, 5797 and 6614 Å DIBs are correlated, also with Na absorption and visual extinction. The strong 4428 Å DIB is present already at low Na column density but the 6614, 5780 and 5797 Å DIBs start to be detectable at subsequently larger Na column densities. Conclusions: The carriers of the 4428, 6614, 5780 and 5797 Å DIBs are increasingly prone to removal from irradiated gas. The relative strength of the 5780 and 5797 Å DIBs clearly confirm the Tarantula Nebula as well as Galactic high-latitude gas to represent a harsh radiation environment. The resilience of the 4428 Å DIB suggests its carrier is large, compact and neutral. Structure is detected in the distribution of cool-warm gas on scales between one and >100 pc in the LMC and as little as 0.01 pc in the Sun

  15. Interstellar Extinction in the Direction of the Open Cluster M29

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straižys, V.; Vrba, F. J.; Boyle, R. P.; Milašius, K.; Černis, K.; Zdanavičius, K.; Zdanavičius, J.; Kazlauskas, A.; Macijauskas, M.; Janusz, R.

    2015-05-01

    The interstellar extinction is investigated in a 1.5 deg2 area in the direction of the open cluster M29 (NGC 6913) in Cygnus, centered at R.A. = 20h 24m, decl. = +38° 30‧. The study is based on photometric classification of 1110 stars in spectral and luminosity classes down to V = 19 mag using photometry in the Vilnius seven-color system published in Paper I (Milašius et al. 2013). Additionally, in the same area the extinction is investigated using 1147 red clump giants (RCGs), identified by combining selected two-color diagrams of the 2MASS and Spitzer surveys. The investigated area is divided into three parts with different obscuration and in these directions the extinction versus distance plots up to 5 kpc are presented. In the whole area a steep rise of the extinction is observed at a distance of ˜800 pc; it should be related to dust clouds in the Great Cygnus Rift obscuring the stars behind it by AV = 4.0-4.7 mag. RCGs exhibit much larger extinction values, up to {{A}{{Ks}}} = 1.2-1.3 mag in the more transparent areas and 1.45 mag in the northeastern part of the area and above it, where the dust cloud TGU H466 is located. These values of {{A}{{Ks}}} correspond to AV = 10-12 mag. We do not exclude the possibility that the largest values of the extinction belong not to RCGs but to some contaminating intrinsically red AGB stars penetrated through the applied RCG selection constraints. The extinction in the TGU H466 cloud probably originates in two cloud systems—the Great Cygnus Rift at 800 pc and the Cygnus X complex of dust and molecular clouds at 1.3-1.5 kpc.

  16. The interstellar C-H stretching band near 3.4 microns: constraints on the composition of organic material in the diffuse interstellar medium.

    PubMed

    Sandford, S A; Allamandola, L J; Tielens, A G; Sellgren, K; Tapia, M; Pendleton, Y

    1991-04-20

    To better constrain and quantify the composition of material in the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM), absorption spectra between 3600 and 2700 cm-1 (2.8 and 3.7 microns) have been taken of objects which have widely varying amounts of visual extinction along different lines of sight. The spectra of these objects contain a broad feature centered at approximately 3300 cm-1 (approximately 3.0 microns), attributed to O-H stretching vibrations, and/or a feature near 2950 cm-1 (3.4 microns) attributed to C-H stretching vibrations. The lack of correlation between the strengths of these two bands indicates that they do not arise from the same molecular carrier. The features in the 3100-2700 cm-1 (3.2-3.7 microns) region fall into one of two classes. We attribute the first class of features to material in the diffuse ISM on the basis of the similarity between the band profiles along the very different lines of sight to Galactic center source IRS 7 and VI Cygni #12. Similar features are also reported for Galactic center source IRS 3, Ve 2-45, and AFGL 2179. Higher resolution spectra of the objects OH 01-477 and T629-5, which are known to be M stars, are dominated by a series of narrow bands in this region. These bands are largely due to OH in the stars' photospheres. While the spectra of OH 01-477 and T629-5 are likely to contain C-H absorption from diffuse ISM dust, the strength of the overlapping photospheric OH features presently prevents us from quantifying the depths of the interstellar C-H feature towards these objects. The interstellar feature for Galactic center source IRS 7 has subpeaks near 2955, 2925, and 2870 cm-1 (+/- 5 cm-1), which we attribute to C-H stretching vibrations in the -CH2- and -CH3 groups of aliphatic hydrocarbons. These band positions fall within 5 cm-1 of the values normal for saturated aliphatics. The absence of a distinct band near 2855 cm-1 suggests that the material contains small amounts of electronegative groups like -O-H or -C triple bond

  17. Is a pyrene-like molecular ion the cause of the 4,430-A diffuse interstellar absorption band?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, F.; Allamandola, L. J.

    1992-01-01

    The diffuse interstellar band (DIB) absorption features of astronomical spectra are suggested by recent results to be separable from the grains that cause visual extinction. Attention is presently given to laboratory measurements of the optical spectrum of the pyrene cation C16H10(+), which is one of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecular candidates proposed as carriers for DIBs. This ion exhibits an intense but strangely broad continuum similar to that of the naphthalene cation, so that this may be a common feature of all PAH cations and the basis of an explanation for PAHs' converting of an interstellar radiation fraction as large as that from the UV and visible range down to the IR.

  18. Atlas of Interstellar Extinction Curves of OB Stars Covering the Whole Available Wavelength Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegner, W.

    The paper presents a collection of 436 extinction curves covering the whole available range of wavelengths from satellite UV to near-IR. The data were taken from the ANS photometric catalogue and from the compilations of IR photometric measurements. The data curves have been obtained with the aid of ``artificial standards": Papaj et al. (1993) and Wegner (1994, 1995). The visual magnitudes and spectral classifications of O and B type stars with EB-V>= 0.05 were taken from the SIMBAD database. The curves are given in the form of plots and tables E{lambda - V} / EB-V versus 1/λ. The observed variety of extinction laws among slightly reddened stars is apparently due to the various physical parameters of interstellar clouds.

  19. The Interstellar Polarization Feature Associated with the 2175 Angstrom Extinction Bump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, Geoffrey C.; Wolff, Michael J.; Kim, S. H.; Martin, P. G.; Anderson, C. M.

    1996-01-01

    The most successful model at fitting the wavelength dependence of interstellar extinction consists of two populations of bare silicate and graphite grains (Mathis, Rumpl & Nordsieck, (MRN)). The graphite grains are needed to fit the strong 2175 A extinction bump, with the silicates providing most of the smooth extinction seen at other wavelengths. From observations of the IR silicate absorption features, it was inferred that the silicate grains, non-spherical and aligned to the Galactic magnetic field, were responsible for the interstellar polarization. Aligned silicate grains make a very good fit to the smooth featureless UV polarization curves that comprise most of the observed sample. The lines of sight showing a UV polarization feature require something different, perhaps a second population of grains as do the fits to the extinction curve. The polarization wavelength dependence of HD 197770 can be fit by a MRN-like mixture of aligned bare silicate and graphite grains. However, none of the popular grain models including MRN envisaged an aligned bump grain population. It has been suggested that the extinction bump is not due to graphite but rather to a population of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). If the observed UV polarization features could be associated with the 2175 A bump then it would strengthen the argument that the bump must be due to grains rather than PAHs which are not likely to be aligned to the Galactic Magnetic field. The reality of ultraviolet polarization features has been confirmed by observations with ASTRO-2. The original detection toward HD 197770 has been confirmed and a new feature has been detected toward HD 147933-4. Both features have centroids lying close to 2175 A the location of the UV extinction bump. Two possibilities are considered for the source of the polarization bump, alignment of graphite grains responsible for the extinction bump or changes in the size distribution of the aligned silicate grains responsible for the

  20. Probing the Local Bubble with Diffuse Interstellar Bands (DIBs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Loon, Jacco Th.; Farhang, A.; Javadi, A.; Bailey, M.; Khosroshahi, H. G.

    The Sun lies in the middle of an enormous cavity of a million degree gas, known as the Local Bubble. The Local Bubble is surrounded by a wall of denser neutral and ionized gas. The Local Bubble extends around 100 pc in the plane of Galaxy and hundreds of parsecs vertically, but absorption-line surveys of neutral sodium and singly-ionized calcium have revealed a highly irregular structure and the presence of neutral clouds within an otherwise tenuous and hot gas. We have undertaken an all-sky, European-Iranian survey of the Local Bubble in the absorption of a number of diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) to offer a novel view of our neighbourhood. Our dedicated campaigns with ESO's New Technology Telescope and the ING's Isaac Newton Telescope comprise high signal-to-noise, medium-resolution spectra, concentrating on the 5780 and 5797 Å bands which trace ionized/irradiated and neutral/shielded environments, respectively; their carriers are unknown but likely to be large carbonaceous molecules. With about 660 sightlines towards early-type stars distributed over distances up to about 200 pc, our data allow us to reconstruct the first ever 3D DIB map of the Local Bubble, which we present here. While we confirm our expectations that the 5780 Å DIB is relatively strong compared to the 5797 Å DIB in hot/irradiated regions such as which prevail within the Local Bubble and its walls, and the opposite is true for cooler/shielded regions beyond the confines of the Local Bubble, we unexpectedly also detect DIB cloudlets inside of the Local Bubble. These results reveal new insight into the structure of the Local Bubble, as well as helping constrain our understanding of the carriers of the DIBs.

  1. Analysis of interstellar extinction towards the hypergiant Cyg OB2 No. 12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maryeva, O. V.; Chentsov, E. L.; Goranskij, V. P.; Karpov, S. V.

    The Cyg OB2 stellar association hosts an entire zoo of unique objects, and among them -- an enigmatic star Cyg OB2 No. 12 (Schulte 12, MT 304). MT 304 is enigmatic not only due to its highest luminosity (according to various estimates, it is one of the brightest stars in the Galaxy), but also because its reddening is anomalously large, greater than the mean reddening in the association. To explain the nature of anomalous reddening (AV≃ 10 mag) of MT 304, we carried out spectrophotometric observations of 25 stars located in its vicinity. We mapped interstellar extinction within the 2.5 arcmin radius and found it to increase towards MT 304. According to our results, the two most reddened stars in the association after MT 304 are J203240.35+411420.1 and J203239.90+411436.2, both located about 15 arcsec from it. Interstellar extinction AV towards these stars is about 9 mag. Our results favor the hypothesis of the circumstellar nature of reddening excess. In the second part of the paper we present the results of our modeling of MT 282 (B1 IV) and MT 343 (B1 V), which belong to the older population of the association and have ages greater than 10 Myr.

  2. Near Infrared Diffuse Interstellar Bands Toward the Cygnus OB2 Association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamano, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Naoto; Kondo, Sohei; Sameshima, Hiroaki; Nakanishi, Kenshi; Ikeda, Yuji; Yasui, Chikako; Mizumoto, Misaki; Matsunaga, Noriyuki; Fukue, Kei; Yamamoto, Ryo; Izumi, Natsuko; Mito, Hiroyuki; Nakaoka, Tetsuya; Kawanishi, Takafumi; Kitano, Ayaka; Otsubo, Shogo; Kinoshita, Masaomi; Kawakita, Hideyo

    2016-04-01

    We obtained the near-infrared (NIR) high-resolution (R ≡ λ/Δλ ∼ 20,000) spectra of the seven brightest early-type stars in the Cygnus OB2 association for investigating the environmental dependence of diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs). The WINERED spectrograph mounted on the Araki 1.3 m telescope in Japan was used to collect data. All 20 of the known DIBs within the wavelength coverage of WINERED (0.91 < λ < 1.36 μm) were clearly detected along all lines of sight because of their high flux density in the NIR wavelength range and the large extinction. The equivalent widths (EWs) of DIBs were not correlated with the column densities of C2 molecules, which trace the patchy dense component, suggesting that the NIR DIB carriers are distributed mainly in the diffuse component. On the basis of the correlations among the NIR DIBs both for stars in Cyg OB2 and stars observed previously, λλ10780, 10792, 11797, 12623, and 13175 are found to constitute a “family,” in which the DIBs are correlated well over the wide EW range. In contrast, the EW of λ10504 is found to remain almost constant over the stars in Cyg OB2. The extinction estimated from the average EW of λ10504 (AV ∼ 3.6 mag) roughly corresponds to the lower limit of the extinction distribution of OB stars in Cyg OB2. This suggests that λ10504 is absorbed only by the foreground clouds, implying that the carrier of λ10504 is completely destroyed in Cyg OB2, probably by the strong UV radiation field. The different behaviors of the DIBs may be caused by different properties of the DIB carriers.

  3. The Interstellar Extinction Towards the Milky Way Bulge with Planetary Nebulae, Red Clump, and RR Lyrae Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nataf, David M.

    2016-06-01

    I review the literature covering the issue of interstellar extinction towards the Milky Way bulge, with emphasis placed on findings from planetary nebulae, RR Lyrae, and red clump stars. I also report on observations from HI gas and globular clusters. I show that there has been substantial progress in this field in recent decades, most particularly from red clump stars. The spatial coverage of extinction maps has increased by a factor ~ 100 × in the past 20 yr, and the total-to-selective extinction ratios reported have shifted by ~ 20-25%, indicative of the improved accuracy and separately, of a steeper-than-standard extinction curve. Problems remain in modelling differential extinction, explaining anomalies involving the planetary nebulae, and understanding the difference between bulge extinction coefficients and `standard' literature values.

  4. Unusual relative strengths of the diffuse interstellar bands in some interstellar dust clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krelowski, J.; Walker, G. A. H.

    1986-01-01

    Some of the diffuse interstellar features (DIBs) in the spectra of certain stars at high galactic latitudes (1 is greater than 15 degrees) are unusually weak or absent while others have the strength expected for their color excess. In some cases the stars are probably reddened by single interstellar clouds. There appear to be three families of DIBs. The effects of these families are examined. The existance of the three families implies that at least three agents cause the DIBs and that the proportions of the agents or the physical conditions giving rise to the DIBs can vary from cloud to cloud.

  5. Interstellar polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: the infrared emission bands, the excitation/emission mechanism, and the astrophysical implications.

    PubMed

    Allamandola, L J; Tielens, A G; Barker, J R

    1989-12-01

    -frequency modes (for example, the 3040 cm-1, 3.3 micrometers band), the thermal approach overestimates the emission intensities. For calculations of molecular reactions (such as H-loss, deuterium enrichment, and carbon skeleton rearrangement) a thermal approximation is invalid. The relationship between PAH molecules and amorphous carbon particles is presented and their production in circumstellar shells is described. The most likely interstellar PAH molecular structures are discussed and the possibility of destructive reactions with interstellar oxygen and hydrogen atoms is considered in detailed and found to be unimportant. Interstellar PAH size and abundance estimates are made. On the order of a few percent of the available interstellar carbon is tied up in the small (20-40 carbon atom) PAHs which are responsible for the sharp features, and a similar amount is tied up in the larger (200-500 carbon atom) PAHs or PAH clusters and amorphous carbon particles which are responsible for the broad components underlying the 1600-1100 and 900-770 cm-1 (6-9 and 11-13 micrometers) regions. It is shown that the spectroscopic structure these PAHs and PAH-related materials produce in the UV portion of the interstellar extinction curve lie just below current detection limits but fall in the range detectable by the Hubble Space Telescope. Finally, the influence of PAH charge on the ultraviolet, visible, and infrared regions is described.

  6. Laboratory investigation of the contribution of complex aromatic/aliphatic polycyclic hybrid molecular structures to interstellar ultraviolet extinction and infrared emission.

    PubMed

    Arnoult, K M; Wdowiak, T J; Beegle, L W

    2000-06-01

    We have demonstrated by experiment that, in an energetic environment, a simple polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) such as naphthalene will undergo chemical reactions that produce a wide array of more complex species (an aggregate). For a stellar wind of a highly evolved star (post-asymptotic giant branch [post-AGB]), this process would be in addition to what is expected from reactions occurring under thermodynamic equilibrium. A surprising result of that work was that produced in substantial abundance are hydrogenated forms that are hybrids of polycyclic aromatic and polycyclic alkanes. Infrared spectroscopy described here reveals a spectral character for these materials that has much in common with that observed for the constituents of circumstellar clouds of post-AGB stars. It can be demonstrated that a methylene (-CH2-) substructure, as in cycloalkanes, is the likely carrier of the 6.9 microns band emission of dust that has recently been formed around IRAS 22272+5433, NGC 7027, and CPD -56 8032. Ultraviolet spectroscopy previously done with a lower limit of 190 nm had revealed that this molecular aggregate can contribute to the interstellar extinction feature at 2175 angstroms. We have now extended our UV spectroscopy of these materials to 110 nm by a vacuum ultraviolet technique. That work, described here, reveals new spectral characteristics and describes how material newly formed during the late stages of stellar evolution could have produced an extinction feature claimed to exist at 1700 angstroms in the spectrum of HD 145502 and also how the newly formed hydrocarbon material would be transformed/aged in the general interstellar environment. The contribution of this molecular aggregate to the rise in interstellar extinction at wavelengths below 1500 angstroms is also examined. The panspectral measurements of the materials produced in the laboratory, using plasmas of H, He, N, and O to convert the simple PAH naphthalene to an aggregate of complex species

  7. Laboratory investigation of the contribution of complex aromatic/aliphatic polycyclic hybrid molecular structures to interstellar ultraviolet extinction and infrared emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnoult, K. M.; Wdowiak, T. J.; Beegle, L. W.

    2000-01-01

    We have demonstrated by experiment that, in an energetic environment, a simple polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) such as naphthalene will undergo chemical reactions that produce a wide array of more complex species (an aggregate). For a stellar wind of a highly evolved star (post-asymptotic giant branch [post-AGB]), this process would be in addition to what is expected from reactions occurring under thermodynamic equilibrium. A surprising result of that work was that produced in substantial abundance are hydrogenated forms that are hybrids of polycyclic aromatic and polycyclic alkanes. Infrared spectroscopy described here reveals a spectral character for these materials that has much in common with that observed for the constituents of circumstellar clouds of post-AGB stars. It can be demonstrated that a methylene (-CH2-) substructure, as in cycloalkanes, is the likely carrier of the 6.9 microns band emission of dust that has recently been formed around IRAS 22272+5433, NGC 7027, and CPD -56 8032. Ultraviolet spectroscopy previously done with a lower limit of 190 nm had revealed that this molecular aggregate can contribute to the interstellar extinction feature at 2175 angstroms. We have now extended our UV spectroscopy of these materials to 110 nm by a vacuum ultraviolet technique. That work, described here, reveals new spectral characteristics and describes how material newly formed during the late stages of stellar evolution could have produced an extinction feature claimed to exist at 1700 angstroms in the spectrum of HD 145502 and also how the newly formed hydrocarbon material would be transformed/aged in the general interstellar environment. The contribution of this molecular aggregate to the rise in interstellar extinction at wavelengths below 1500 angstroms is also examined. The panspectral measurements of the materials produced in the laboratory, using plasmas of H, He, N, and O to convert the simple PAH naphthalene to an aggregate of complex species

  8. Interstellar Reddening Determination Trough the 2200 Å Dust Absorption Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, Carmen; Cassatella, Angelo; Bañó, Gisela

    A comparison is carried out between two methods to evaluate the correction for interstellar reddening: the three ultraviolet points method, and the traditional model fitting method. The two methods have been applied to a large sample of well known stars of spectral types O, B and A to test their reliability and to asses their general applicability.

  9. VizieR Online Data Catalog: 3D interstellar extinct. map within nearest kpc (Gontcharov, 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gontcharov, G. A.

    2016-07-01

    The product of the previously constructed 3D maps of stellar reddening (2010AstL...36..584G) and Rv variations (2012AstL...38...12G) has allowed us to produce a 3D interstellar extinction map within the nearest kiloparsec from the Sun with a spatial resolution of 100pc and an accuracy of 0.2m. This map is compared with the 2D reddening map by Schlegel et al. (1998ApJ...500..525S), the 3D extinction map at high latitudes by Jones et al. (2011AJ....142...44J), and the analytical 3D extinction models by Arenou et al. (1992A&A...258..104A) and Gontcharov (2009AstL...35..780G). In all cases, we have found good agreement and show that there are no systematic errors in the new map everywhere except the direction toward the Galactic center. We have found that the map by Schlegel et al. (1998ApJ...500..525S) reaches saturation near the Galactic equator at E(B-V)>0.8m, has a zero-point error and systematic errors gradually increasing with reddening, and among the analytical models those that take into account the extinction in the Gould Belt are more accurate. Our extinction map shows that it is determined by reddening variations at low latitudes and Rv variations at high ones. This naturally explains the contradictory data on the correlation or anticorrelation between reddening and Rv available in the literature. There is a correlation in a thin layer near the Galactic equator, because both reddening and Rv here increase toward the Galactic center. There is an anticorrelation outside this layer, because higher values of Rv correspond to lower reddening at high and middle latitudes. Systematic differences in sizes and other properties of the dust grains in different parts of the Galaxy manifest themselves in this way. The largest structures within the nearest kiloparsec, including the Local Bubble, the Gould Belt, the Great Tunnel, the Scorpius, Perseus, Orion, and other complexes, have manifested themselves in the constructed map. (1 data file).

  10. Small-scale-structure of the interstellar medium probed through diffuse band observations.

    PubMed

    Cordiner, Martin A; Fossey, Stephen J; Smith, Arfon M; Sarre, Peter J

    2006-01-01

    The carriers of the diffuse interstellar band spectrum represent an important baryonic component of the interstellar medium (ISM) and it is expected that their identification will contribute significantly to the understanding of the chemistry and physics of interstellar clouds. It is widely held that the carriers are linked to the presence of dust grains on account of the good correlation of their strengths with interstellar reddening, so they offer an important potential route to improving our understanding of the composition and chemistry of grains and grain surfaces. In addition to the challenge of making the spectral assignments, an important current question concerns the spatial distribution and physical state of interstellar material, with recent observational atomic and molecular line absorption studies suggesting that diffuse clouds are more 'clumpy' than previously thought. We describe here high signal-to-noise optical observations made at the Anglo-Australian Telescope using UCLES that were undertaken to investigate the spatial distribution of diffuse band carriers. We describe the first detection of 'small-scale-structure' in the diffuse band carrier distribution in the ISM, and comment on the possibilities that these data hold for contributing to the solution of the diffuse band problem and our understanding of the nature of small-scale-structure in the diffuse ISM.

  11. Is a pyrene-like molecular ion the cause of the 4,430-angstroms diffuse interstellar absorption band?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, F.; Allamandola, L. J.

    1992-01-01

    The diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs), ubiquitous absorption features in astronomical spectra, have been known since early this century and now number more than a hundred. Ranging from 4,400 angstroms to the near infrared, they differ markedly in depth, width and shape, making the concept of a single carrier unlikely. Whether they are due to gas or grains is not settled, but recent results suggest that the DIB carriers are quite separate from the grains that cause visual extinction. Among molecular candidates the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been proposed as the possible carriers of some of the DIBs, and we present here laboratory measurements of the optical spectrum of the pyrene cation C16H10+ in neon and argon matrices. The strongest absorption feature falls at 4,435 +/- 5 angstroms in the argon matrix and 4,395 +/- 5 angstroms in the neon matrix, both close to the strong 4,430-angstroms DIB. If this or a related pyrene-like species is responsible for this particular band, it must account for 0.2% of all cosmic carbon. The ion also shows an intense but puzzling broad continuum, extending from the ultraviolet to the visible, similar to what is seen in the naphthalene cation and perhaps therefore a common feature of all PAH cations. This may provide an explanation of how PAHs convert a large fraction of interstellar radiation from ultraviolet and visible wavelengths down to the infrared.

  12. Is a pyrene-like molecular ion the cause of the 4,430-angstroms diffuse interstellar absorption band?

    PubMed

    Salama, F; Allamandola, L J

    1992-07-01

    The diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs), ubiquitous absorption features in astronomical spectra, have been known since early this century and now number more than a hundred. Ranging from 4,400 angstroms to the near infrared, they differ markedly in depth, width and shape, making the concept of a single carrier unlikely. Whether they are due to gas or grains is not settled, but recent results suggest that the DIB carriers are quite separate from the grains that cause visual extinction. Among molecular candidates the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been proposed as the possible carriers of some of the DIBs, and we present here laboratory measurements of the optical spectrum of the pyrene cation C16H10+ in neon and argon matrices. The strongest absorption feature falls at 4,435 +/- 5 angstroms in the argon matrix and 4,395 +/- 5 angstroms in the neon matrix, both close to the strong 4,430-angstroms DIB. If this or a related pyrene-like species is responsible for this particular band, it must account for 0.2% of all cosmic carbon. The ion also shows an intense but puzzling broad continuum, extending from the ultraviolet to the visible, similar to what is seen in the naphthalene cation and perhaps therefore a common feature of all PAH cations. This may provide an explanation of how PAHs convert a large fraction of interstellar radiation from ultraviolet and visible wavelengths down to the infrared.

  13. On a vibronic origin for the diffuse band spectrum. [of interstellar absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuth, J. A.; Donn, B.

    1983-01-01

    Duley (1982) has proposed that many of the diffuse interstellar bands in the wavelength interval 542-677 nm arise from vibronic transitions of Cr (3+) ions in MgO grains. No explanation has been offered for the fact that as many as 85 of the possible 108 transitions of this system have not been observed in the interstellar medium. Moreover, the relative intensities of the diffuse bands which are observed appear to be inconsistent with their assignment. It is therefore concluded that this model is not consistent with the observations.

  14. SWIFT ULTRAVIOLET OBSERVATIONS OF SUPERNOVA 2014J IN M82: LARGE EXTINCTION FROM INTERSTELLAR DUST

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Peter J.; Smitka, Michael T.; Wang, Lifan; Krisciunas, Kevin; Breeveld, Alice; Kuin, N. Paul; Page, Mat; De Pasquale, Massimiliano; Hartmann, Dieter H.; Milne, Peter A.; Siegel, Michael

    2015-05-20

    We present optical and ultraviolet (UV) photometry and spectra of the very nearby and highly reddened supernova (SN) 2014J in M82 obtained with the Swift Ultra-Violet/Optical Telescope (UVOT). Comparison of the UVOT grism spectra of SN 2014J with Hubble Space Telescope observations of SN2011fe or UVOT grism spectra of SN 2012fr are consistent with an extinction law with a low value of R{sub V} ∼1.4. The high reddening causes the detected photon distribution in the broadband UV filters to have a much longer effective wavelength than for an unreddened SN. The light curve evolution is consistent with this shift and does not show a flattening due to photons being scattered back into the line of sight (LOS). The light curve shapes and color evolution are inconsistent with a contribution scattered into the LOS by circumstellar dust. We conclude that most or all of the high reddening must come from interstellar dust. We show that even for a single dust composition, there is not a unique reddening law caused by circumstellar scattering. Rather, when considering scattering from a time-variable source, we confirm earlier studies that the reddening law is a function of the dust geometry, column density, and epoch. We also show how an assumed geometry of dust as a foreground sheet in mixed stellar/dust systems will lead to a higher inferred R{sub V}. Rather than assuming the dust around SNe is peculiar, SNe may be useful probes of the interstellar reddening laws in other galaxies.

  15. The Gaia-ESO Survey: Extracting diffuse interstellar bands from cool star spectra. DIB-based interstellar medium line-of-sight structures at the kpc scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puspitarini, L.; Lallement, R.; Babusiaux, C.; Chen, H.-C.; Bonifacio, P.; Sbordone, L.; Caffau, E.; Duffau, S.; Hill, V.; Monreal-Ibero, A.; Royer, F.; Arenou, F.; Peralta, R.; Drew, J. E.; Bonito, R.; Lopez-Santiago, J.; Alfaro, E. J.; Bensby, T.; Bragaglia, A.; Flaccomio, E.; Lanzafame, A. C.; Pancino, E.; Recio-Blanco, A.; Smiljanic, R.; Costado, M. T.; Lardo, C.; de Laverny, P.; Zwitter, T.

    2015-01-01

    Aims: We study how diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) measured toward distance-distributed target stars can be used to locate dense interstellar (IS) clouds in the Galaxy and probe a line-of-sight (LOS) kinematical structure, a potentially useful tool when gaseous absorption lines are saturated or not available in the spectral range. Cool target stars are numerous enough for this purpose. Methods: We devised automated DIB-fitting methods appropriate for cool star spectra and multiple IS components. The data were fitted with a combination of a synthetic stellar spectrum, a synthetic telluric transmission, and empirical DIB profiles. The initial number of DIB components and their radial velocity were guided by HI 21 cm emission spectra, or, when available in the spectral range, IS neutral sodium absorption lines. For NaI, radial velocities of NaI lines and DIBs were maintained linked during a global simultaneous fit. In parallel, stellar distances and extinctions were estimated self-consistently by means of a 2D Bayesian method from spectroscopically-derived stellar parameters and photometric data. Results: We have analyzed Gaia-ESO Survey (GES) spectra of 225 stars that probe between ~2 and 10 kpc long LOS in five different regions of the Milky Way. The targets are the two CoRoT fields, two open clusters (NGC 4815 and γ Vel), and the Galactic bulge. Two OGLE fields toward the bulge observed before the GES are also included (205 target stars). Depending on the observed spectral intervals, we extracted one or more of the following DIBs: λλ 6283.8, 6613.6, and 8620.4. For each field, we compared the DIB strengths with the Bayesian distances and extinctions, and the DIB Doppler velocities with the HI emission spectra. Conclusions: For all fields, the DIB strength and the target extinction are well correlated. For targets that are widely distributed in distance, marked steps in DIBs and extinction radial distance profiles match each other and broadly correspond to the

  16. A weak diffuse interstellar band in the far-ultraviolet spectrum of zeta Ophiuchi?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripp, Todd M.; Cardelli, Jason A.; Savage, Blair D.

    1994-01-01

    Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS) observations at 3.5 km/s resolution reveal several new weak unidentified interstellar absorption lines in the ultraviolet spectrum of zeta Ophiuchi. The unidentified line at 1369.13 A has the appearance and characteristics of a weak diffuse interstellar band (DIB). The line has a smooth profile similar to many optical diffuse interstellar bands (i.e., a shallow asymmetric profile), it is clearly broader than identified interstellar lines near it in wavelength, and its full width at half maximum in ergs is comparable to the widths of the weak optical DIBs. The asymmetric profile cannot be attributed to blended absorption from diffuse clouds at different velocities; at this resolution the two principal cloud complexes on the sight line at heliocentric velocities of -27 and -15 km/s are clearly separated. We compare this unidentified absorption feature to identified interstellar atomic and molecular absorption lines and optical DIBs observed on the zeta Oph and xi Per sight lines, and we conclude that it is reasonable to suggest that this absorption feature might be a DIB. This is not a unique interpretation however; the unidentified line could alternatively be due to gas in the zeta Oph H II region or a blend of unknown neutral atomic or molecular absorption lines.

  17. Laboratory confirmation of C60(+) as the carrier of two diffuse interstellar bands.

    PubMed

    Campbell, E K; Holz, M; Gerlich, D; Maier, J P

    2015-07-16

    The diffuse interstellar bands are absorption lines seen towards reddened stars. None of the molecules responsible for these bands have been conclusively identified. Two bands at 9,632 ångströms and 9,577 ångströms were reported in 1994, and were suggested to arise from C60(+) molecules (ref. 3), on the basis of the proximity of these wavelengths to the absorption bands of C60(+) measured in a neon matrix. Confirmation of this assignment requires the gas-phase spectrum of C60(+). Here we report laboratory spectroscopy of C60(+) in the gas phase, cooled to 5.8 kelvin. The absorption spectrum has maxima at 9,632.7 ± 0.1 ångströms and 9,577.5 ± 0.1 ångströms, and the full widths at half-maximum of these bands are 2.2 ± 0.2 ångströms and 2.5 ± 0.2 ångströms, respectively. We conclude that we have positively identified the diffuse interstellar bands at 9,632 ångströms and 9,577 ångströms as arising from C60(+) in the interstellar medium. PMID:26178962

  18. The unidentified interstellar infrared bands: PAHs as carriers?

    PubMed

    Schlemmer, S; Cook, D J; Harrison, J A; Wurfel, B; Chapman, W; Saykally, R J

    1994-09-16

    Infrared emission spectra of gas-phase naphthalene and pyrene have been measured in the range of 3 to 7.5 micrometers with ultraviolet laser desorption-excitation and a spectroscopic technique featuring single-photon counting in the infrared. The spectra were compared with the unidentified infrared emission bands that are observed in many astronomical objects. Marked discrepancies between those observations and the laboratory emission spectra in the wavelengths and relative intensities of principal spectral features led to the conclusion that small neutral unsubstituted polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons cannot be the carriers of the unidentified infrared emission bands.

  19. FUSE Measurements of Rydberg Bands of Interstellar CO between 925 and 1150 Å

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheffer, Y.; Federman, S. R.; Andersson, B.-G.

    2003-11-01

    We report the detection of 11 Rydberg bands of CO in FUSE spectra of the sight line toward HD 203374A. Eight of these electronic bands are seen in the interstellar medium for the first time. Our simultaneous fit of five non-Rydberg A-X bands together with the strongest Rydberg band of CO, C-X (0-0), yields a four-component cloud structure toward the stellar target. With this model we synthesize the other Rydberg bands in order to derive their oscillator strengths. We find that the strength of some bands was underestimated in previously published results from laboratory measurements. The implication is important for theoretical calculations of the abundance of interstellar CO, because its dissociation and self-shielding depend on oscillator strengths for these bands. Based on observations made with the NASA-CNES-CSA Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE), which is operated for NASA by the Johns Hopkins University under NASA contract NAS5-32985.

  20. The dark cloud TGU H994 P1 (LDN 1399, LDN 1400, and LDN 1402): Interstellar extinction and distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straižys, V.; Čepas, V.; Boyle, R. P.; Munari, U.; Zdanavičius, J.; Maskoliūnas, M.; Kazlauskas, A.; Zdanavičius, K.

    2016-01-01

    The results of CCD photometry in the seven-colour Vilnius system, for about 1000 stars down to V = 20 mag and their two-dimensional spectral types, are used to investigate the interstellar extinction in a 1.5 square degree area in the direction of the dark cloud TGU H994 P1 (LDN 1399, LDN 1400 and LDN 1402) in Camelopardalis. Photometric classification of 18 brightest stars down to V = 12 mag was verified by the spectra obtained with the 1.22 m telescope of the Asiago Observatory. The interstellar extinction run with distance is investigated with the results of photometry in the Vilnius system, and 504 red clump giants, identified by combining the results of infrared photometry from the 2MASS and WISE surveys. A possible distance of 140 ± 11 pc to the TGU H994 P1 cloud seems to be acceptable. Alternative distances of the cloud are discussed. The complex of the Camelopardalis clouds probably has a considerable depth along the line of sight, similar to that observed in the Taurus-Auriga complex. The maximum extinction AV in the dark filaments is found to be about 6.5 mag. Full Table 2 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/585/A31

  1. The C4H radical and the diffuse interstellar bands. An ab initio study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolbuszewski, Marcin

    1994-01-01

    An ab initio study of the low-lying electronic states of C4H has been presented where the species studied has a chi(2)sigma(+) ground state and two low lying pi states. Based on the vertical and adiabatic excitation energies between those states it is suggested that the 4428 A diffuse interstellar band is not carried by C4H. The application of the particle in a box model shows strong coincidences between the strong DIB's and predicted wavelengths of pi-pi transitions in C(2n)H series. Based on those coincidences, it is suggested the C(2n)H species as good candidates for carriers of diffuse interstellar bands.

  2. ESO Diffuse Interstellar Bands Large Exploration Survey (EDIBLES) - Merging Observations and Laboratory Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, Farid

    2016-01-01

    The Diffuse Interstellar Bands (DIBs) are a set of 500 absorption bands that are detected in the spectra of stars with interstellar clouds in the line of sight. DIBs are found from the NUV to the NIR in the spectra of reddened stars spanning different interstellar environments in our local, and in other galaxies. DIB carriers are a significant part of the interstellar chemical inventory. They are stable and ubiquitous in a broad variety of environments and play a unique role in interstellar physics/chemistry. It has long been realized that the solving of the DIB problem requires a strong synergy between astronomical observations, laboratory astrophysics, and astrophysical modeling of line-of-sights. PAHs are among the molecular species that have been proposed as DIB carriers. We will present an assessment of the PAH-DIB model in view of the progress and the advances that have been achieved over the past years through a series of studies involving astronomical observations of DIBs, laboratory simulation of interstellar analogs for neutrals and ionized PAHs, theoretical calculations of PAH spectra and the modelization of diffuse and translucent interstellar clouds. We will present a summary of what has been learned from these complementary studies, the constraints that can now be derived for the PAHs as DIB carriers in the context of the PAH-DIB model and how these constraints can be applied to the EDIBLES project. The spectra of several neutral and ionized PAHs isolated in the gas phase at low temperature have been measured in the laboratory under experimental conditions that mimic interstellar conditions and are compared with an extensive set of astronomical spectra of reddened, early type stars. The comparisons of astronomical and laboratory data provide upper limits for the abundances of specific neutral PAH molecules and ions along specific lines-of-sight. Something that is not attainable from infrared observations alone. We present the characteristics of the

  3. Further Studies of λ 5797.1 Diffuse Interstellar Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, Takeshi; Hobbs, L. M.; Welty, Daniel E.; York, Donald G.; Dahlstrom, Julie; Witt, Adolf N.

    2015-06-01

    The λ~5797.1 DIB is unique with its sharp central feature. We simulated the spectrum based on three premises: (1) Its carrier molecule is polar as concluded from the anomalous spectrum toward the star Herschel 36. (2) The central feature is Q-branch of a parallel band of a prolate top. (3) The radiative temperature of the environment is T_r = 2.73 K. A comparison with observed spectrum indicated that the carrier contains 5-7 heavy atoms. To further strengthen this hypothesis, we have looked for vibronic satellites of the λ~5797.1 DIB. Since its anomaly toward Her 36 was ascribed to the lengthening of bonds upon the electronic excitation, vibronic satellites involving stretch vibrations are expected. Among the 73 DIBs observed toward HD 183143 to the blue of 5797.1 Å, two DIBs, λ~5545.1 and λ~5494.2 stand out as highly correlated with λ~5797.1 DIB. Their correlation coefficients 0.941 and 0.943, respectively, are not sufficiently high to establish the vibronic relation by themselves but can be explained as due to high uncertainties due to their weakness and their stellar blends. They are above the λ~5797.1 DIB by 784.0 cm-1 and 951.2 cm-1, respectively, approximately expected for stretching vibrations. Another observations which may possibly be explained by our hypothesis is the emission at 5800 Å from the Red Rectangle Nebula called RR 5800. Our analysis suggests that λ~5797.1 DIB and RR 5800 are consistently explained as caused by the same molecule. T.H. Kerr, R.E. Hibbins, S.J. Fossey, J.R. Miles, P.J. Sarre, ApJ 495, 941 (1998) T. Oka, D.E. Welty, S. Johnson, D.G. York, J. Dahlstrom, L.M. Hobbs, ApJ 773, 42 (2013) J. Huang, T. Oka, Mol. Phys. J.P. Maier Special Issue in press. G.D. Schmidt, A.N. Witt, ApJ 383, 698 (1991)

  4. Electronic Spectroscopy of [FePAH](+) Complexes in the Region of the Diffuse Interstellar Bands: Multireference Wave Function Studies on [FeC6H6](+).

    PubMed

    Lanza, Mathieu; Simon, Aude; Ben Amor, Nadia

    2015-06-11

    The low-energy states and electronic spectrum in the near-infrared-visible region of [FeC6H6](+) are studied by theoretical approaches. An exhaustive exploration of the potential energy surface of [FeC6H6](+) is performed using the density functional theory method. The ground state is found to be a (4)A1 state. The structures of the lowest energy states ((4)A2 and (4)A1) are used to perform multireference wave function calculations by means of the multistate complete active space with perturbation at the second order method. Contrary to the density functional theory results ((4)A1 ground state), multireference perturbative calculations show that the (4)A2 state is the ground state. The vertical electronic spectrum is computed and compared with the astronomical diffuse interstellar bands, a set of near-infrared-visible bands detected on the extinction curve in our and other galaxies. Many transitions are found in this domain, corresponding to d → d, d → 4s, or d → π* excitations, but few are allowed and, if they are, their oscillation strengths are small. Even though some band positions could match some of the observed bands, the relative intensities do not fit, making the contribution of the [Fe-C6H6](+) complexes to the diffuse interstellar bands questionable. This work, however, lays the foundation for the studies of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) complexed to Fe cations that are more likely to possess d → π* and π → π* transitions in the diffuse interstellar bands domain. PAH ligands indeed possess a larger number of π and π* orbitals, respectively, higher and lower in energy than those of C6H6, which are expected to lead to lower energy d → π* and π → π* transitions in [FePAH](+) than in [FeC6H6](+) complexes.

  5. Electronic Spectroscopy of [FePAH](+) Complexes in the Region of the Diffuse Interstellar Bands: Multireference Wave Function Studies on [FeC6H6](+).

    PubMed

    Lanza, Mathieu; Simon, Aude; Ben Amor, Nadia

    2015-06-11

    The low-energy states and electronic spectrum in the near-infrared-visible region of [FeC6H6](+) are studied by theoretical approaches. An exhaustive exploration of the potential energy surface of [FeC6H6](+) is performed using the density functional theory method. The ground state is found to be a (4)A1 state. The structures of the lowest energy states ((4)A2 and (4)A1) are used to perform multireference wave function calculations by means of the multistate complete active space with perturbation at the second order method. Contrary to the density functional theory results ((4)A1 ground state), multireference perturbative calculations show that the (4)A2 state is the ground state. The vertical electronic spectrum is computed and compared with the astronomical diffuse interstellar bands, a set of near-infrared-visible bands detected on the extinction curve in our and other galaxies. Many transitions are found in this domain, corresponding to d → d, d → 4s, or d → π* excitations, but few are allowed and, if they are, their oscillation strengths are small. Even though some band positions could match some of the observed bands, the relative intensities do not fit, making the contribution of the [Fe-C6H6](+) complexes to the diffuse interstellar bands questionable. This work, however, lays the foundation for the studies of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) complexed to Fe cations that are more likely to possess d → π* and π → π* transitions in the diffuse interstellar bands domain. PAH ligands indeed possess a larger number of π and π* orbitals, respectively, higher and lower in energy than those of C6H6, which are expected to lead to lower energy d → π* and π → π* transitions in [FePAH](+) than in [FeC6H6](+) complexes. PMID:25850680

  6. SMALL-SCALE STRUCTURE OF THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM TOWARD {rho} Oph STARS: DIFFUSE BAND OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Cordiner, M. A.; Smith, A. M.; Sarre, P. J.; Fossey, S. J.

    2013-02-10

    We present an investigation of small-scale structure in the distribution of large molecules/dust in the interstellar medium through observations of diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs). High signal-to-noise optical spectra were recorded toward the stars {rho} Oph A, B, C, and DE using the University College London Echelle Spectrograph on the Anglo-Australian Telescope. The strengths of some of the DIBs are found to differ by about 5%-9% between the close binary stars {rho} Oph A and B, which are separated by a projected distance on the sky of only c. 344 AU. This is the first star system in which such small-scale DIB strength variations have been reported. The observed variations are attributed to differences between a combination of carrier abundance and the physical conditions present along each sightline. The sightline toward {rho} Oph C contains relatively dense, molecule-rich material and has the strongest {lambda}{lambda}5850 and 4726 DIBs. The gas toward DE is more diffuse and is found to exhibit weak ''C{sub 2}'' (blue) DIBs and strong yellow/red DIBs. The differences in diffuse band strengths between lines of sight are, in some cases, significantly greater in magnitude than the corresponding variations among atomic and diatomic species, indicating that the DIBs can be sensitive tracers of interstellar cloud conditions.

  7. PROBING THE LOCAL BUBBLE WITH DIFFUSE INTERSTELLAR BANDS. III. THE NORTHERN HEMISPHERE DATA AND CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Farhang, Amin; Khosroshahi, Habib G.; Javadi, Atefeh; Van Loon, Jacco Th.

    2015-02-01

    We present new high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) observations of the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) in the Local Bubble and its surroundings. We observed 432 sightlines and obtain the equivalent widths of the λ5780 and λ5797 Å DIBs up to a distance of ∼200 pc. All of the observations were carried out using the Intermediate Dispersion Spectrograph on the 2.5 m Isaac Newton Telescope, during three years, to reach a minimum S/N of ∼2000. All of the λ5780 and λ5797 absorptions are presented in this paper and we tabulate the observed values of the interstellar parameters, λ5780, λ5797, Na ID{sub 1}, and Na ID{sub 2}, including the uncertainties.

  8. Probing the Local Bubble with Diffuse Interstellar Bands. III. The Northern Hemisphere Data and Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhang, Amin; Khosroshahi, Habib G.; Javadi, Atefeh; van Loon, Jacco Th.

    2015-02-01

    We present new high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) observations of the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) in the Local Bubble and its surroundings. We observed 432 sightlines and obtain the equivalent widths of the λ5780 and λ5797 Å DIBs up to a distance of ~200 pc. All of the observations were carried out using the Intermediate Dispersion Spectrograph on the 2.5 m Isaac Newton Telescope, during three years, to reach a minimum S/N of ~2000. All of the λ5780 and λ5797 absorptions are presented in this paper and we tabulate the observed values of the interstellar parameters, λ5780, λ5797, Na ID1, and Na ID2, including the uncertainties.

  9. Assessment of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-diffuse interstellar band proposal.

    PubMed

    Salama, F; Bakes, E L; Allamandola, L J; Tielens, A G

    1996-02-20

    The potential link between neutral and/or ionized polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and the diffuse interstellar band (DIB) carriers is examined. Based on the study of the general physical and chemical properties of PAHs, an assessment is made of their possible contribution to the DIB carriers. It is found that, under the conditions reigning in the diffuse interstellar medium, PAHs can be present in the form of neutral molecules as well as positive and/or negative ions. The charge distribution of small PAHs is dominated, however, by two charge states at one time with compact PAHs present only in the neutral and cationic forms. Each PAH has a distinct spectral signature depending on its charge state. Moreover, the spectra of ionized PAHs are always clearly dominated by a single band in the DIB spectral range. In the case of compact PAH ions, the strongest absorption band is of type A (i.e., the band is broad, falls in the high-energy range of the spectrum, and possesses a large oscillator strength), and seems to correlate with strong and broad DIBs. For noncompact PAH ions, the strongest absorption band is of type I (i.e., the band is narrow, falls in the low-energy range of the spectrum, and possesses a small oscillator strength), and seems to correlate with weak and narrow DIBs. Potential molecular size and structure constraints for interstellar PAHs are derived by comparing known DIB characteristics to the spectroscopic properties of PAHs. It is found that (i) only neutral PAHs larger than about 30 carbon atoms could, if present, contribute to the DIBs. (ii) For compact PAHs, only ions with less than about 250 carbon atoms could, if present, contribute to the DIBs. (iii) The observed distribution of the DIBs between strong/moderate and broad bands on the one hand and weak and narow bands on the other can easily be interpreted in the context of the PAH proposal by a distribution of compact and noncompact PAH ions, respectively. A plausible correlation

  10. Towards DIB mapping in galaxies beyond 100 Mpc. A radial profile of the λ5780.5 diffuse interstellar band in AM 1353-272 B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monreal-Ibero, A.; Weilbacher, P. M.; Wendt, M.; Selman, F.; Lallement, R.; Brinchmann, J.; Kamann, S.; Sandin, C.

    2015-04-01

    Context. Diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) are non-stellar weak absorption features of unknown origin found in the spectra of stars viewed through one or several clouds of the interstellar medium (ISM). Research of DIBs outside the Milky Way is currently very limited. In particular, spatially resolved investigations of DIBs outside of the Local Group are, to our knowledge, inexistent. Aims: In this contribution, we explore the capability of the high-sensitivity integral field spectrograph, MUSE, as a tool for mapping diffuse interstellar bands at distances larger than 100 Mpc. Methods: We used MUSE commissioning data for AM 1353-272 B, the member with the highest extinction of the Dentist's Chair, an interacting system of two spiral galaxies. High signal-to-noise spectra were created by co-adding the signal of many spatial elements distributed in a geometry of concentric elliptical half-rings. Results: We derived decreasing radial profiles for the equivalent width of the λ5780.5 DIB both in the receding and approaching side of the companion galaxy up to distances of ~4.6 kpc from the centre of the galaxy. The interstellar extinction as derived from the Hα/Hβ line ratio displays a similar trend, with decreasing values towards the external parts. This translates into an intrinsic correlation between the strength of the DIB and the extinction within AM 1353-272 B, consistent with the currently existing global trend between these quantities when using measurements for Galactic and extragalactic sightlines. Conclusions: It seems feasible to map the DIB strength in the Local Universe, which has up to now only been performed for the Milky Way. This offers a new approach to studying the relationship between DIBs and other characteristics and species of the ISM in addition to using galaxies in the Local Group or sightlines towards very bright targets outside the Local Group. Based on observations made with ESO telescopes at the La Silla Paranal Observatory under program

  11. Dark clouds in the vicinity of the emission nebula Sh2-205: interstellar extinction and distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straižys, V.; Čepas, V.; Boyle, R. P.; Zdanavičius, J.; Maskoliūnas, M.; Kazlauskas, A.; Zdanavičius, K.; Černis, K.

    2016-05-01

    Results of CCD photometry in the seven-colour Vilnius system for 922 stars down to V = 16-17 mag and for 302 stars down to 19.5 mag are used to investigate the interstellar extinction in an area of 1.5 square degrees in the direction of the P7 and P8 clumps of the dark cloud TGU H942, which lies in the vicinity of the emission nebula Sh2-205. In addition, we used 662 red clump giants that were identified by combining the 2MASS and WISE infrared surveys. The resulting plots of extinction versus distance were compared with previous results of the distribution and radial velocities of CO clouds and with dust maps in different passbands of the IRAS and WISE orbiting observatories. A possible distance of the front edge of the nearest cloud layer at 130 ± 10 pc was found. This dust layer probably covers all the investigated area, which results in extinction of up to 1.8 mag in some directions. A second rise of the extinction seems to be present at 500-600 pc. Within this layer, the clumps P7 and P8 of the dust cloud TGU H942, the Sh2-205 emission nebula, and the infrared cluster FSR 655 are probably located. In the direction of these clouds, we identified 88 young stellar objects and a new infrared cluster. Full Tables 1 and 2 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/590/A21

  12. Dust in the small Magellanic Cloud. 2: Dust models from interstellar polarization and extinction data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodrigues, C. V.; Magalhaes, A. M.; Coyne, G. V.

    1995-01-01

    We study the dust in the Small Magellanic Cloud using our polarization and extinction data (Paper 1) and existing dust models. The data suggest that the monotonic SMC extinction curve is related to values of lambda(sub max), the wavelength of maximum polarization, which are on the average smaller than the mean for the Galaxy. On the other hand, AZV 456, a star with an extinction similar to that for the Galaxy, shows a value of lambda(sub max) similar to the mean for the Galaxy. We discuss simultaneous dust model fits to extinction and polarization. Fits to the wavelength dependent polarization data are possible for stars with small lambda(sub max). In general, they imply dust size distributions which are narrower and have smaller mean sizes compared to typical size distributions for the Galaxy. However, stars with lambda(sub max) close to the Galactic norm, which also have a narrower polarization curve, cannot be fit adequately. This holds true for all of the dust models considered. The best fits to the extinction curves are obtained with a power law size distribution by assuming that the cylindrical and spherical silicate grains have a volume distribution which is continuous from the smaller spheres to the larger cylinders. The size distribution for the cylinders is taken from the fit to the polarization. The 'typical', monotonic SMC extinction curve can be fit well with graphite and silicate grains if a small fraction of the SMC carbon is locked up in the grain. However, amorphous carbon and silicate grains also fit the data well. AZV456, which has an extinction curve similar to that for the Galaxy, has a UV bump which is too blue to be fit by spherical graphite grains.

  13. EVIDENCE FOR DIACETYLENE CATION AS THE CARRIER OF A DIFFUSE INTERSTELLAR BAND

    SciTech Connect

    Krelowski, J.; Beletsky, Y.; LoCurto, G.; Galazutdinov, G. A.; Kolos, R.; Gronowski, M. E-mail: ybialets@eso.org E-mail: runizag@gmail.com

    2010-05-01

    High-quality spectra acquired at three different observatories point to the presence of a new diffuse interstellar band (DIB) at 5069 A. The spectral profile of this DIB matches published laboratory measurements of the diacetylene cation A {sup 2}{pi} {sub u} -X {sup 2}{pi} {sub g} (0-0) low-temperature gas-phase optical absorption. HC{sub 4}H{sup +} is approximately 60-80 times less abundant than CH along the analyzed lines of sight. Only an upper limit could presently be inferred from the search for an analogous band of the triacetylene cation HC{sub 6}H{sup +}, expected at 6001.1 A, which implies the HC{sub 6}H{sup +} to HC{sub 4}H{sup +} ratio of less than {approx}1/3.

  14. Experimental indication of a naphthalene-base molecular aggregate for the carrier of the 2175 angstroms interstellar extinction feature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beegle, L. W.; Wdowiak, T. J.; Robinson, M. S.; Cronin, J. R.; McGehee, M. D.; Clemett, S. J.; Gillette, S.

    1997-01-01

    Experiments where the simple polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) naphthalene (C10H8) is subjected to the energetic environment of a plasma have resulted in the synthesis of a molecular aggregate that has ultraviolet spectral characteristics that suggest it provides insight into the nature of the carrier of the 2175 angstroms interstellar extinction feature and may be a laboratory analog. Ultraviolet, visible, infrared, and mass spectroscopy, along with gas chromatography, indicate that it is a molecular aggregate in which an aromatic double ring ("naphthalene") structural base serves as the electron "box" chromophore that gives rise to the envelope of the 2175 angstroms feature. This chromophore can also provide the peak of the feature or function as a mantle in concert with another peak provider such as graphite. The molecular base/chromophore manifests itself both as a structural component of an alkyl-aromatic polymer and as a substructure of hydrogenated PAH species. Its spectral and molecular characteristics are consistent with what is generally expected for a complex molecular aggregate that has a role as an interstellar constituent.

  15. Experimental indication of a naphthalene-base molecular aggregate for the carrier of the 2175 angstroms interstellar extinction feature.

    PubMed

    Beegle, L W; Wdowiak, T J; Robinson, M S; Cronin, J R; McGehee, M D; Clemett, S J; Gillette, S

    1997-10-01

    Experiments where the simple polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) naphthalene (C10H8) is subjected to the energetic environment of a plasma have resulted in the synthesis of a molecular aggregate that has ultraviolet spectral characteristics that suggest it provides insight into the nature of the carrier of the 2175 angstroms interstellar extinction feature and may be a laboratory analog. Ultraviolet, visible, infrared, and mass spectroscopy, along with gas chromatography, indicate that it is a molecular aggregate in which an aromatic double ring ("naphthalene") structural base serves as the electron "box" chromophore that gives rise to the envelope of the 2175 angstroms feature. This chromophore can also provide the peak of the feature or function as a mantle in concert with another peak provider such as graphite. The molecular base/chromophore manifests itself both as a structural component of an alkyl-aromatic polymer and as a substructure of hydrogenated PAH species. Its spectral and molecular characteristics are consistent with what is generally expected for a complex molecular aggregate that has a role as an interstellar constituent.

  16. A Catalog of 1.5273 um Diffuse Interstellar Bands Based on APOGEE Hot Telluric Calibrators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elyajouri, M.; Monreal-Ibero, A.; Remy, Q.; Lallement, R.

    2016-08-01

    High resolution stellar spectroscopic surveys provide massive amounts of diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) measurements. Data can be used to study the distribution of the DIB carriers and those environmental conditions that favor their formation. In parallel, recent studies have also proved that DIBs extracted from stellar spectra constitute new tools for building the 3D structure of the Galactic interstellar medium (ISM). The amount of details on the structure depends directly on the quantity of available lines of sight. Therefore there is a need to construct databases of high-quality DIB measurements as large as possible. We aim at providing the community with a catalog of high-quality measurements of the 1.5273 μm DIB toward a large fraction of the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) hot stars observed to correct for the telluric absorption and not used for ISM studies so far. This catalog would complement the extensive database recently extracted from the APOGEE observations and used for 3D ISM mapping. We devised a method to fit the stellar continuum of the hot calibration stars and extracted the DIB from the normalized spectrum. Severe selection criteria based on the absorption characteristics are applied to the results. In particular limiting constraints on the DIB widths and Doppler shifts are deduced from the H i 21 cm measurements, following a new technique of decomposition of the emission spectra. From ˜16,000 available hot telluric spectra we have extracted ˜6700 DIB measurements and their associated uncertainties. The statistical properties of the extracted absorptions are examined and our selection criteria are shown to provide a robust dataset. The resulting catalog contains the DIB total equivalent widths, central wavelengths and widths. We briefly illustrate its potential use for the stellar and interstellar communities.

  17. An investigation of the 661.3 nm diffuse interstellar band in Cepheid spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashuba, S. V.; Andrievsky, S. M.; Chekhonadskikh, F. A.; Luck, R. E.; Kovtyukh, V. V.; Korotin, S. A.; Krełowski, J.; Galazutdinov, G. A.

    2016-09-01

    We have investigated the diffuse interstellar band (DIB) at 661.3 nm seen in the spectra of Cepheid stars. After removal of the blending lines of ionized yttrium and neutral iron, we determined the equivalent widths (EWs) of the DIB and used these values to investigate the E(B - V)-DIB EW relation. The relation found from Cepheids matches that found in B stars. This relation can help to find the reddening for newly discovered Cepheids without extensive photometric data, and thus determine their distances. The relation between E(B - V) and the DIB EW does not yield precise reddening values. It is not a substitute for better photometric or spectroscopic methods. At best, it is indicative, but it provides some information that may not be otherwise available. Defining R* = E(B - V)/DIB EW, which we consider to be the analogue of R = E(B - V)/Av, we investigated the Galactic longitudinal dependence of R* assuming that the DIB EW value is representative of the interstellar absorption Av. We found that there is an apparent increase of the R* value that corresponds to the abnormal absorption seen towards Cygnus constellation. Finally, we constructed a 2D map of the DIB EW distribution in the Galactic disc basing on our rather limited sample of 253 spectra of 176 Cepheids.

  18. Excitation temperature of C2 and broadening of the 6196 Å diffuse interstellar band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaźmierczak, M.; Gnaciński, P.; Schmidt, M. R.; Galazutdinov, G.; Bondar, A.; Krełowski, J.

    2009-05-01

    This paper presents a finding of the correlation between the width of a strong diffuse interstellar band at 6196 Å and the excitation temperature of C2 based on high resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio spectra. The excitation temperature was determined from absorption lines of the Phillips A1Π_u-X1Σ+g and Mulliken D1Σ+_u-X1Σ+g systems. The width and shape of the narrow 6196 Å DIB profile apparently depend on the C2 temperature, being broader for higher values. Based on data collected at the ESO (8 m telescope at Paranal, 3.6 m and 2.2 m telescopes at La Silla) and observations made with the 1.8 m telescope in South Korea and the Cassegrain Fiber Environment in Hawaii.

  19. A Laboratory Search for the Carrier Molecules of the Diffuse Interstellar Bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockett, Mark; Wood, M. P.; Lawler, J. E.

    2010-01-01

    The identity of the carrier molecules of the Diffuse Interstellar Bands (DIBs) is the most durable mystery of spectroscopic astronomy. Though large Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are now suspected to be the source of the DIBs, no definitive matches have yet been made to laboratory PAH spectra. The Diffuse Interstellar Band Synchrotron Radiation Carrier Hunt (DIBSyRCH) experiment has been built at the Synchrotron Radiation Center (SRC) to test this hypothesis by conducting a spectroscopic survey of a broad range of cold, gas phase PAH molecules and ions. The key elements of this experiment are (1) the synchrotron radiation continuum from the SRC White Light beamline, (2) a custom echelle spectrograph and (3) the Cryogenic Circulating Advective Multi-Pass (CCAMP) absorption cell. Synchrotron radiation provides broad spectral coverage and high spectral radiance throughout the DIB region. Signal-to-noise ratios of up to 10,000 are achieved in one minute of integration in the 530-800 nm spectral window with resolution optimized for the DIBs (a second window covers 400-530 nm). The CCAMP absorption cell operates much like a wind tunnel. A small propeller drives a convective laminar flow of liquid nitrogen cooled neon buffer gas which circulates around the racetrack-like tube. The molecules of interest are entrained in this cold flow as they are evaporated from the crucible. They then enter the observation arm and interact with the synchrotron radiation. A multi-pass White cell extends the absorption pathlength to over 100 m. Preliminary results on light PAHs will be presented. This work is supported in part by NASA Headquarters under grant NNX08AQ09G. MHS is a NASA Earth and Space Science Fellow - grant NNX09AP54H. This work is based in part upon research conducted at the Synchrotron Radiation Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison, which is supported by the National Science Foundation under award no. DMR-0537588.

  20. FIRST INFRARED BAND STRENGTHS FOR AMORPHOUS CO{sub 2}, AN OVERLOOKED COMPONENT OF INTERSTELLAR ICES

    SciTech Connect

    Gerakines, Perry A.; Hudson, Reggie L.

    2015-08-01

    Solid carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) has long been recognized as a component of both interstellar and solar system ices, but a recent literature search has revealed significant qualitative and quantitative discrepancies in the laboratory spectra on which the abundances of extraterrestrial CO{sub 2} are based. Here we report new infrared (IR) spectra of amorphous CO{sub 2}-ice along with band intensities (band strengths) of four mid-IR absorptions, the first such results in the literature. A possible thickness dependence for amorphous-CO{sub 2} IR band shapes and positions also is investigated, and the three discordant reports of amorphous CO{sub 2} spectra in the literature are addressed. Applications of our results are discussed with an emphasis on laboratory investigations and results from astronomical observations. A careful comparison with earlier work shows that the IR spectra calculated from several databases for CO{sub 2} ices, all ices being made near 10 K, are not for amorphous CO{sub 2}, but rather for crystalline CO{sub 2} or crystalline-amorphous mixtures.

  1. The 2140 cm-1 (4.673 microns) solid CO band: the case for interstellar O2 and N2 and the photochemistry of nonpolar interstellar ice analogs.

    PubMed

    Elsila, J; Allamandola, L J; Sandford, S A

    1997-04-20

    The infrared spectra of CO frozen in nonpolar ices containing N2, CO2, O2, and H2O and the UV photochemistry of these interstellar/precometary ice analogs are reported. The spectra are used to test the hypothesis that the narrow 2140 cm-1 (4.673 microns) interstellar absorption feature attributed to solid CO might be produced by CO frozen in ices containing nonpolar species such as N2 and O2. It is shown that mixed molecular ices containing CO, N2, O2, and CO2 provide a good match to the interstellar band at all temperatures between 12 and 30 K both before and after photolysis. The optical constants (real and imaginary parts of the index of refraction) in the region of the solid CO feature are reported for several of these ices. The N2 and O2 absorptions at 2328 cm-1 (4.296 microns) and 1549 cm-1 (6.456 microns), respectively, are also shown. The best matches between the narrow interstellar band and the feature in the laboratory spectra of nonpolar ices are for samples which contain comparable amounts of N2, O2, CO2, and CO. Co-adding the CO band from an N2:O2:CO2:CO = 1:5:1/2:1 ice with that of an H2O:CO = 20:1 ice provides an excellent fit across the entire interstellar CO feature. The four-component, nonpolar ice accounts for the narrow 2140 cm-1 portion of the feature which is associated with quiescent regions of dense molecular clouds. Using this mixture, and applying the most recent cosmic abundance values, we derive that between 15% and 70% of the available interstellar N is in the form of frozen N2 along several lines of sight toward background stars. This is reduced to a range of 1%-30% for embedded objects with lines of sight more dominated by warmer grains. The cosmic abundance of O tied up in frozen O2 lies in the 10%-45% range toward background sources, and it is between 1% and 20% toward embedded objects. The amount of oxygen tied up in CO and CO2 frozen in nonpolar ices can be as much as 2%-10% toward background sources and on the order of 0

  2. The 2140 cm-1 (4.673 microns) solid CO band: the case for interstellar O2 and N2 and the photochemistry of nonpolar interstellar ice analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsila, J.; Allamandola, L. J.; Sandford, S. A.

    1997-01-01

    The infrared spectra of CO frozen in nonpolar ices containing N2, CO2, O2, and H2O and the UV photochemistry of these interstellar/precometary ice analogs are reported. The spectra are used to test the hypothesis that the narrow 2140 cm-1 (4.673 microns) interstellar absorption feature attributed to solid CO might be produced by CO frozen in ices containing nonpolar species such as N2 and O2. It is shown that mixed molecular ices containing CO, N2, O2, and CO2 provide a good match to the interstellar band at all temperatures between 12 and 30 K both before and after photolysis. The optical constants (real and imaginary parts of the index of refraction) in the region of the solid CO feature are reported for several of these ices. The N2 and O2 absorptions at 2328 cm-1 (4.296 microns) and 1549 cm-1 (6.456 microns), respectively, are also shown. The best matches between the narrow interstellar band and the feature in the laboratory spectra of nonpolar ices are for samples which contain comparable amounts of N2, O2, CO2, and CO. Co-adding the CO band from an N2:O2:CO2:CO = 1:5:1/2:1 ice with that of an H2O:CO = 20:1 ice provides an excellent fit across the entire interstellar CO feature. The four-component, nonpolar ice accounts for the narrow 2140 cm-1 portion of the feature which is associated with quiescent regions of dense molecular clouds. Using this mixture, and applying the most recent cosmic abundance values, we derive that between 15% and 70% of the available interstellar N is in the form of frozen N2 along several lines of sight toward background stars. This is reduced to a range of 1%-30% for embedded objects with lines of sight more dominated by warmer grains. The cosmic abundance of O tied up in frozen O2 lies in the 10%-45% range toward background sources, and it is between 1% and 20% toward embedded objects. The amount of oxygen tied up in CO and CO2 frozen in nonpolar ices can be as much as 2%-10% toward background sources and on the order of 0

  3. Probing the Local Bubble with diffuse interstellar bands. I. Project overview and southern hemisphere survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Mandy; van Loon, Jacco Th.; Farhang, Amin; Javadi, Atefeh; Khosroshahi, Habib G.; Sarre, Peter J.; Smith, Keith T.

    2016-01-01

    Context. The Sun traverses a low-density, hot entity called the Local Bubble. Despite its relevance to life on Earth, the conditions in the Local Bubble and its exact configuration are not very well known. Besides that, there is some unknown interstellar substance that causes a host of absorption bands across the optical spectrum, called diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs). Aims: We have started a project to chart the Local Bubble in a novel way and learn more about the carriers of the DIBs, by using DIBs as tracers of diffuse gas and environmental conditions. Methods: We conducted a high signal-to-noise spectroscopic survey of 670 nearby early-type stars to map DIB absorption in and around the Local Bubble. The project started with a southern hemisphere survey conducted at the European Southern Observatory's New Technology Telescope and has since been extended to an all-sky survey using the Isaac Newton Telescope. Results: In this first paper in the series, we introduce the overall project and present the results from the southern hemisphere survey. We make available a catalogue of equivalent-width measurements of the DIBs at 5780, 5797, 5850, 6196, 6203, 6270, 6283, and 6614 Å, of the interstellar Na i D lines at 5890 and 5896 Å, and of the stellar He i line at 5876 Å. We find that the 5780 Å DIB is relatively strong throughout, as compared to the 5797 Å DIB, but especially within the Local Bubble and at the interface with a more neutral medium. The 6203 Å DIB shows similar behaviour with respect to the 6196 Å DIB. Some nearby stars show surprisingly strong DIBs, whereas some distant stars show very weak DIBs, indicating small-scale structure within, as well as outside, the Local Bubble. The sight lines with non-detections trace the extent of the Local Bubble especially clearly and show it opening out into the halo. Conclusions: The Local Bubble has a wall that is in contact with hot gas and/or a harsh interstellar radiation field. That wall is perforated

  4. ANOMALOUS DIFFUSE INTERSTELLAR BANDS IN THE SPECTRUM OF HERSCHEL 36. II. ANALYSIS OF RADIATIVELY EXCITED CH{sup +}, CH, AND DIFFUSE INTERSTELLAR BANDS

    SciTech Connect

    Oka, Takeshi; Welty, Daniel E.; Johnson, Sean; York, Donald G.; Hobbs, L. M.; Dahlstrom, Julie

    2013-08-10

    Absorption spectra toward Herschel 36 (Her 36) for the A-bar{sup 1}{Pi} Leftwards-Open-Headed-Arrow X-tilde{sup 1}{Sigma} transitions of CH{sup +} in the J = 1 excited rotational level and for the A-bar{sup 2}{Delta} Leftwards-Open-Headed-Arrow X-tilde{sup 2}{Pi} transitions of CH in the J = 3/2 excited fine structure level have been analyzed. These excited levels are above their ground levels by 40.1 K and {approx}25.7 K and indicate high radiative temperatures of the environment of 14.6 K and 6.7 K, respectively. The effect of the high radiative temperature is more spectacular in some diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) observed toward Her 36; remarkable extended tails toward red (ETRs) were observed. We interpret these ETRs as being due to a small decrease of the rotational constants upon excitation of the excited electronic states. Along with radiative pumping of a great many high-J rotational levels, this causes the ETRs. In order to study this effect quantitatively, we have developed a model calculation in which the effects of collisions and radiation are treated simultaneously. The simplest case of linear molecules is considered. It has been found that the ETR is reproduced if the fraction of the variation of the rotational constant, {beta} {identical_to} (B' - B)/B, is sufficiently high (3%-5%) and the radiative temperature is high (T{sub r} > 50 K). Although modeling for general molecules is beyond the scope of this paper, the results indicate that the prototypical DIBs {lambda}5780.5, {lambda}5797.1, and {lambda}6613.6 which show the pronounced ETRs are due to polar molecules that are sensitive to the radiative excitation. The requirement of high {beta} favors relatively small molecules with three to six heavy atoms. DIBs {lambda}5849.8, {lambda}6196.0, and {lambda}6379.3 that do not show the pronounced ETRs are likely due to non-polar molecules or large polar molecules with small {beta}.

  5. Exploring the diffuse interstellar bands with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Ting-Wen; Ménard, Brice; Zhu, Guangtun

    2015-10-01

    We use star, galaxy and quasar spectra taken by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to map out the distribution of diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) induced by the Milky Way. After carefully removing the intrinsic spectral energy distribution of each source, we show that by stacking thousands of spectra, it is possible to measure statistical flux fluctuations at the 10-3 level, detect more than 20 DIBs and measure their strength as a function of position on the sky. We create a map of DIB absorption covering about 5000 deg2 and measure correlations with various tracers of the interstellar medium: atomic and molecular hydrogen, dust and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). After recovering known correlations, we show that each DIB has a different dependence on atomic and molecular hydrogen: while they are all positively correlated with N_{H I}, they exhibit a range of behaviours with N_{H_2} showing positive, negative or no correlation. We show that a simple parametrization involving only N_{H I} and N_{H_2} applied to all the DIBs is sufficient to reproduce a large collection of observational results reported in the literature: it allows us to naturally describe the relations between DIB strength and dust reddening (including the so-called skin effect), the related scatter, DIB pair-wise correlations and families, the affinity for σ/ζ-type environments and other correlations related to molecules. Our approach allows us to characterize DIB dependencies in a simple manner and provides us with a metric to characterize the similarity between different DIBs.

  6. Investigation of a laboratory candidate for the carrier of the 4430 A diffuse interstellar band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wdowiak, Thomas J.; Beegle, Luther W.; Lee, Wei; Robinson, Michael S.

    1994-01-01

    The 4430 A diffuse interstellar band (DIB) is unique among DIB's in that as one of the strong bands, it is the bluest strong band with no others observed at shorter wavelengths. This position at the edge of the DIF 'forrest' suggests it may be the easiest to replicate in the laboratory. In earlier experiments (Wdowiak 1980) an interesting candidate using a gas discharge followed by cryogenic matrix isolation was produced, and this report details its further investigation. This absorption feature, produced when 1 part CH4 in 200 parts Ar is discharged and frozen out approximately 10 K, is at a wavelength of 4500 A in the argon matrix. Our recent experiments strongly indicate it is due to a carbon-based reactive species that is stable against mercury vapor UV radiation, and not likely to be from a contaminant. The effect of matrix shift can be estimated by considering the blueward shift between Ar and Ne matrices in the cases of the pyrene and C60 cations. This suggests that a shift from 4500 A for an Af matrix to the vicinity of 4300 A for a Ne matrix and the gas phase is not unreasonable. A liquid He cooled Ne matrix isolation experiment was prepared to determine the wavelength of the feature in that matrix. Replacing CH4 with C2H2 results in an equivalent absorption due to C3, greatly diminished absorptions from C2 and Ch, and no observable feature at 4500 A. To date our experiments indicate CH4 is a favored precursor for production of the reactive carrier of the 4500 A feature. Perhaps C2H2 is not suitable because of its tendency to polymerize easily in the discharge.

  7. THE DIFFUSE INTERSTELLAR BANDS AND ANOMALOUS MICROWAVE EMISSION MAY ORIGINATE FROM THE SAME CARRIERS

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, L. S.; Cline, J. A.; Clark, F. O.; Lynch, D. K. E-mail: jcline@spectral.com E-mail: dave@thulescientific.com

    2015-11-10

    We argue that the observed spectroscopic and statistical properties of the diffuse interstellar band (DIB) carriers are those that are needed to produce the anomalous microwave emission (AME). We explore this idea using a carrier-impartial model for AME based on the observed DIB statistical properties. We show that an observed distribution of profile widths for narrow DIBs can be mapped into an AME spectrum. The mapping model is applied to width distributions observed for HD 204827 and HD 183143, selected because their spectroscopic and statistical properties bracket those for most other sight lines. The predicted AME spectra for these sight lines agree well with the range of spectral shapes, and peak frequencies, ∼23–31 GHz, typically observed for AME. We use the AME spectral profiles to derive a strong constraint between the average carrier size and its rotational temperature. The constraint is applied to a variety of postulated molecular carrier classes, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, fulleranes, hydrocarbon chains, and amorphous hydrocarbon clusters. The constraint favors small, cold carriers with average sizes of ∼8–15 carbon atoms, and average rotational temperatures of ∼3–10 K, depending on carrier type. We suggest new observations, analyses, and modeling efforts to help resolve the ambiguities with regard to carrier size and class, and to further clarify the DIB–AME relationship.

  8. PROBING THE LOCAL BUBBLE WITH DIFFUSE INTERSTELLAR BANDS. II. THE DIB PROPERTIES IN THE NORTHERN HEMISPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Farhang, Amin; Khosroshahi, Habib G.; Javadi, Atefeh; Molaeinezhad, Alireza; Tavasoli, Saeed; Habibi, Farhang; Kourkchi, Ehsan; Rezaei, Sara; Saberi, Maryam; Van Loon, Jacco Th.; Bailey, Mandy; Hardy, Liam

    2015-02-10

    We present a new high signal-to-noise ratio spectroscopic survey of the Northern hemisphere to probe the Local Bubble and its surroundings using the λ5780 Å and λ5797 Å diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs). We observed 432 sightlines to a distance of 200 pc over a duration of three years. In this study, we establish the λ5780 and λ5797 correlations with Na I, Ca II and E {sub B-V}, for both inside and outside the Local Bubble. The correlations show that among all neutral and ionized atoms, the correlation between Ca II and λ5780 is stronger than its correlation with λ5797, suggesting that λ5780 is more associated with regions where Ca{sup +} is more abundant. We study the λ5780 correlation with λ5797, which shows a tight correlation within and outside the Local Bubble. In addition, we investigate the DIB properties in UV irradiated and UV shielded regions. We find that, within and beyond the Local Bubble, λ5797 is located in denser parts of clouds, protected from UV irradiation, while λ5780 is located in the low-density regions of clouds.

  9. PAHs and the Diffuse Interstellar Bands. What have we Learned from the New Generation of Laboratory and Observational Studies?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, Farid

    2005-01-01

    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are an important and ubiquitous component of carbon-bearing materials in space. PAHs are the best-known candidates to account for the IR emission bands (UIR bands) and PAH spectral features are now being used as new probes of the ISM. PAHs are also thought to be among the carriers of the diffuse interstellar absorption bands (DIBs). In the model dealing with the interstellar spectral features, PAHs are present as a mixture of radicals, ions and neutral species. PAH ionization states reflect the ionization balance of the medium while PAH size, composition, and structure reflect the energetic and chemical history of the medium. A major challenge for laboratory astrophysics is to reproduce (in a realistic way) the physical conditions that exist in the emission and/or absorption interstellar zones, An extensive laboratory program has been developed at NASA Ames to characterize the physical and chemical properties of PAHs in astrophysical environments and to describe how they influence the radiation and energy balance in space and the interstellar chemistry. In particular, laboratory experiments provide measurements of the spectral characteristics of interstellar PAH analogs from the ultraviolet and visible range to the infrared range for comparison with astronomical data. This paper will focus on the recent progress made in the laboratory to measure the direct absorption spectra of neutral and ionized PAHs in the gas phase in the near-W and visible range in astrophysically relevant environments. These measurements provide data on PAHs and nanometer-sized particles that can now be directly compared to astronomical observations. The harsh physical conditions of the IS medium - characterized by a low temperature, an absence of collisions and strong V W radiation fields - are simulated in the laboratory by associating a molecular beam with an ionizing discharge to generate a cold plasma expansion. PAH ions are formed from the neutral

  10. Time Dependent Density Functional Theory Calculations of Large Compact PAH Cations: Implications for the Diffuse Interstellar Bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisman, Jennifer L.; Lee, Timothy J.; Salama, Farid; Gordon-Head, Martin; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the electronic absorption spectra of several maximally pericondensed polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon radical cations with time dependent density functional theory calculations. We find interesting trends in the vertical excitation energies and oscillator strengths for this series containing pyrene through circumcoronene, the largest species containing more than 50 carbon atoms. We discuss the implications of these new results for the size and structure distribution of the diffuse interstellar band carriers.

  11. A Critical Examination of the l-C3H-2 Spectrum and the Diffuse Interstellar Bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCall, B. J.; Oka, T.; Thorburn, J.; Hobbs, L. M.; York, D. G.

    2002-03-01

    It has recently been suggested by J. P. Maier's group that the origin band and three vibronic bands of the linear propadienylidene anion l-C3H-2 match the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs). We have examined the wavelength ranges in question using data from our ongoing DIB survey at the Apache Point Observatory. We find that the strongest DIB (λ6993) is not an acceptable wavelength match to the origin band of l-C3H-2, based on high-resolution laboratory data. The nondetection of interstellar features corresponding to the K=2<--1 and K=0<--1 branches of para l-C3H-2 also argues against the assignment of λ6993 to the K=1<--0 branch of ortho l-C3H-2. Two of the three DIBs that have been attributed to vibronic bands do not correlate in intensity with λ6993, providing further evidence against the assignment of this set of DIBs to l-C3H-2.

  12. On a common carrier hypothesis for the 6613.6 and 6196.0 Å diffuse interstellar bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glinski, R. J.; Eller, M. W.

    2016-09-01

    We explore via spectroscopic modeling whether the highly correlated diffuse interstellar bands at 6613.6 and 6196.0 Å might originate from a single molecule. Efforts were made to simulate the band contours of the DIBs along the three lines-of-sight, which have been observed by others at high resolution: HD179406, HD174165, and Her 36. Reasonable simultaneous fits were obtained using a prolate symmetric top molecule that exhibits transitions of two different band types, type-a parallel and type-b perpendicular bands. Two different excited states of a long- or heavy-chain, forked molecule are proposed. A minimum number of adjustable parameters were used including ground and excited state A and B rotational constants, an excited state centrifugal distortion constant, and three different rotational excitation temperatures. Points in favor and against the hypothesis are discussed.

  13. Interstellar dust particles and chemical species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krelowski, Jacek

    Absorption spectra of translucent interstellar clouds contain known molecular bands: of CN, CH+, CH, OH, OH+, NH, C2 and C3. Moreover, one can observe more than 400 unidentified absorption features known as diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) commonly believed to be carried by some complex, carbon bearing molecules (chain species based on a carbon scheleton, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, fullerenes). DIBs are optical features observed in absorption in starlight crossing tarnslucent interstellar clouds. Despite many laboratory based studies of possible DIB carriers, it has not been possible to unambiguously link these bands to specific species. This is unfortunate, as an identification of DIBs would substantially contribute to our understanding of chemical processes in the diffuse interstellar medium. The presence of substructures inside DIB profiles, discovered by Sarre et al. (1995) and Kerr et al. (1998), indicate that DIBs are likely molecular features of gas phase species. Sofar only three DIBs have been linked to specific molecules but none of these links was confirmed beyond a doubt. Extinction is likely caused by interstellar dust particles of various sizes and shapes. The recent surveys of the extinction law demonstrate a great variety of the observed curves which proves that grains differ from cloud to cloud. A majority of distant OB stars is observed through several clouds and thus we observe usually an ill-defined average which does not differ substantially from one distant object to another. The most popularly observed CH molecule does correlate with the extinction but it is a poor correlation. The abundance of CN molecule is completely uncorrelated with the colour excess. Seemingly an exceptionally high abundance of CN is observed together with high far-UV extinction and very low intensity of diffuse interstellar bands. Interstellar molecules can be formed either in the gas phase or on grain surfaces. Small grains, responsible for the far

  14. A SURVEY OF DIFFUSE INTERSTELLAR BANDS IN THE ANDROMEDA GALAXY: OPTICAL SPECTROSCOPY OF M31 OB STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Cordiner, Martin A.; Cox, Nick L. J.; Evans, Christopher J.; Trundle, Carrie; Smith, Keith T.; Sarre, Peter J.; Gordon, Karl D.

    2011-01-01

    We present the largest sample to date of intermediate-resolution blue-to-red optical spectra of B-type supergiants in M31 and undertake the first survey of diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) in this galaxy. Spectral classifications, radial velocities, and interstellar reddenings are presented for 34 stars in three regions of M31. Based on a subset of these stars with foreground-corrected reddening E{sup M31}{sub B-V}{>=} 0.05, the strengths of the M31 DIBs are analyzed with respect to the amount of dust, ultraviolet radiation field strength, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission flux. Radial velocities and equivalent widths are given for the {lambda}5780 and {lambda}6283 DIBs toward 11 stars. Equivalent widths are also presented for the following DIBs detected in three sightlines in M31: {lambda}{lambda}4428, 5705, 5780, 5797, 6203, 6269, 6283, 6379, 6613, 6660, and 6993. All of these M31 DIB carriers reside in clouds at radial velocities matching those of interstellar Na I and/or H I. The relationships between DIB equivalent widths and reddening (E{sup M31}{sub B-V}) are consistent with those observed in the local interstellar medium (ISM) of the Milky Way (MW). Many of the observed sightlines show DIB strengths (per unit reddening) which lie at the upper end of the range of Galactic values. DIB strengths per unit reddening are found (with 68% confidence) to correlate with the interstellar UV radiation field strength. The strongest DIBs are observed where the interstellar UV flux is lowest. The mean Spitzer 8/24 {mu}m emission ratio in our three fields is slightly lower than that measured in the MW, but we identify no correlation between this ratio and the DIB strengths in M31. Interstellar oxygen abundances derived from the spectra of three M31 H II regions in one of the fields indicate that the average metallicity of the ISM in that region is 12 + log [O/H] = 8.54 {+-} 0.18, which is approximately equal to the value in the solar neighborhood.

  15. Laboratory Determination of the Infrared Band Strengths of Pyrene Frozen in Water Ice: Implications for the Composition of Interstellar Ices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardegree-Ullman, E.E.; Gudipati, M.S.; Boogert, A.C.A.; Lignell, H.; Allamandola, L.J.; Stapelfeldt, K. R.; Werner, M.

    2014-01-01

    Broad infrared emission features (e.g., at 3.3, 6.2, 7.7, 8.6, and 11.3 micrometers) from the gas phase interstellar medium have long been attributed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). A significant portion (10 to 20%) of the Milky Way's carbon reservoir is locked in PAH molecules, which makes their characterization integral to our understanding of astrochemistry. In molecular clouds and the dense envelopes and disks of young stellar objects (YSOs), PAHs are expected to be frozen in the icy mantles of dust grains where they should reveal themselves through infrared absorption. To facilitate the search for frozen interstellar PAHs, laboratory experiments were conducted to determine the positions and strengths of the bands of pyrene mixed with H2O and deuterium oxide ices. The deuterium oxide mixtures are used to measure pyrene bands that are masked by the strong bands of H2O, leading to the first laboratory determination of the band strength for the CH stretching mode of pyrene in water ice near 3.25 micrometers. Our infrared band strengths were normalized to experimentally determined ultraviolet (UV) band strengths, and we find that they are generally approximately 50% larger than those reported by Bouwman et al. (2011) based on theoretical strengths. These improved band strengths were used to reexamine YSO spectra published by Boogert et al. (2008) to estimate the contribution of frozen PAHs to absorption in the 5 to 8 micrometer spectral region, taking into account the strength of the 3.25 micrometer CH stretching mode. It is found that frozen neutral PAHs contain 5 to 9% of the cosmic carbon budget, and account for 2 to 9% of the unidentified absorption in the 5 to 8 micrometer region.

  16. Laboratory determination of the infrared band strengths of pyrene frozen in water ice: Implications for the composition of interstellar ices

    SciTech Connect

    Hardegree-Ullman, E. E.; Gudipati, M. S.; Werner, M.; Boogert, A. C. A.; Lignell, H.; Allamandola, L. J.; Stapelfeldt, K. R. E-mail: gudipati@jpl.nasa.gov

    2014-04-01

    Broad infrared emission features (e.g., at 3.3, 6.2, 7.7, 8.6, and 11.3 μm) from the gas phase interstellar medium have long been attributed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). A significant portion (10%-20%) of the Milky Way's carbon reservoir is locked in PAH molecules, which makes their characterization integral to our understanding of astrochemistry. In molecular clouds and the dense envelopes and disks of young stellar objects (YSOs), PAHs are expected to be frozen in the icy mantles of dust grains where they should reveal themselves through infrared absorption. To facilitate the search for frozen interstellar PAHs, laboratory experiments were conducted to determine the positions and strengths of the bands of pyrene mixed with H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}O ices. The D{sub 2}O mixtures are used to measure pyrene bands that are masked by the strong bands of H{sub 2}O, leading to the first laboratory determination of the band strength for the CH stretching mode of pyrene in water ice near 3.25 μm. Our infrared band strengths were normalized to experimentally determined ultraviolet band strengths, and we find that they are generally ∼50% larger than those reported by Bouwman et al. based on theoretical strengths. These improved band strengths were used to reexamine YSO spectra published by Boogert et al. to estimate the contribution of frozen PAHs to absorption in the 5-8 μm spectral region, taking into account the strength of the 3.25 μm CH stretching mode. It is found that frozen neutral PAHs contain 5%-9% of the cosmic carbon budget and account for 2%-9% of the unidentified absorption in the 5-8 μm region.

  17. Fulleranes and Carbon Nanostructures in the Interstellar Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iglesias-Groth, Susana; Cataldo, Franco

    We review the potential contribution of single fullerenes and buckyonions to interstellar extinction. Photoabsorption spectra of these molecules are compared with some of the most relevant features of interstellar extinction, the UV bump, the far UV rise and the diffuse interstellar bands. According to semiempirical models, photoabsorption by fullerenes (single and multishell) could explain the shape, width and peak energy of the most prominent feature of the interstellar absorption, the UV bump at 2,175 Å. Other weaker transitions are predicted in the optical and near-infrared providing a potential explanation for diffuse interstellar bands. In particular, several fullerenes could contribute to the well known strong DIB at 4,430 Å comparing cross sections and available data for this DIB and the UV bump we estimate a density of fullerenes in the diffuse interstellar medium of 0.1-0.2 ppm. These molecules could then be a major reservoir for interstellar carbon. We give an estimation of the carbon fraction locked in these molecules. We discuss the rotation rates and electric dipole emission of hydrogenated icosahedral fullerenes in various phases of the interstellar medium. These molecules could be the carriers of the anomalous microwave emission detected by Watson et al. (Astrophys. J. 624:L89, 2005) in the Perseus molecular complex and Cassasus et al. (2006) in the dark cloud LDN 1622. Hydrogenated forms of fullerenes may account for the dust-correlated microwave emission detected in our Galaxy by Cosmic Microwave Background experiments.

  18. On the Nature of Interstellar Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyle, F.; Wickramasinghe, C.

    Data on interstellar extinction are interpreted to imply an identification of interstellar grains with naturally freeze-dried bacteria and algae. The total mass of such bacterial and algal cells in the galaxy is enormous, ~1040 g. The identification is based on Mie scattering calculations for an experimentally determined size distribution of bacteria. Agreement between our model calculations and astronomical data is remarkably precise over the wavelength intervals 1 μ-1 < λ-1 < 1.94 μ-1 and 2.5 μ-1 < λ-1 < 3.0 μ-1. Over the more restricted waveband 4000-5000 Å an excess interstellar absorption is found which is in uncannily close agreement with the absorption properties of phytoplankton pigments. The strongest of the diffuse interstellar bands are provisionally assigned to carotenoid-chlorophyll pigment complexes such as exist in algae and pigmented bacteria. The λ2200 Å interstellar absorption feature could be due to `degraded' cellulose strands which form spherical graphitic particles, but could equally well be due to protein-lipid-nucleic acid complexes in bacteria and viruses. Interstellar extinction at wavelengths λ < 1800 Å could be due to scattering by virus particles.

  19. STUDIES OF THE DIFFUSE INTERSTELLAR BANDS. IV. THE NEARLY PERFECT CORRELATION BETWEEN lambdalambda6196.0 AND 6613.6

    SciTech Connect

    McCall, Benjamin J.; Drosback, Meredith M.; Snow, Theodore P.; Thorburn, Julie A.; York, Donald G.; Hobbs, L. M.; Friedman, Scott D.; Rachford, Brian L.; Sonnentrucker, Paule; Welty, Daniel E.

    2010-01-10

    In a sample of 114 diffuse cloud sightlines spanning a wide range of interstellar environments, we find the equivalent widths of the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) lambda6196.0 and lambda6613.6 to be extremely well correlated, with a correlation coefficient of 0.986. A maximum likelihood functional relationship analysis shows that the observations are consistent with a perfect correlation if the observational errors, which are dominated by continuum placement and other systematics such as interfering lines, have been underestimated by a factor of 2. The quality of this correlation far exceeds other previously studied correlations, such as that between the lambda5780.5 DIB and either the color excess or the atomic hydrogen column density. The unusually tight correlation between these two DIBs would seem to suggest that they might represent the first pair of DIBs known to be due to the same molecular carrier. However, further theoretical work will be required to determine whether the different linewidths and band shapes of these two DIBs can be consistent with a common carrier. If the two DIBs do not in fact share the same molecular carrier, their two carriers must be chemically very closely related.

  20. INTERACTION BETWEEN THE BROAD-LINED TYPE Ic SUPERNOVA 2012ap AND CARRIERS OF DIFFUSE INTERSTELLAR BANDS

    SciTech Connect

    Milisavljevic, Dan; Margutti, Raffaella; Crabtree, Kyle N.; Soderberg, Alicia M.; Sanders, Nathan E.; Drout, Maria R.; Kamble, Atish; Chakraborti, Sayan; Kirshner, Robert P.; Foster, Jonathan B.; Fesen, Robert A.; Parrent, Jerod T.; Pickering, Timothy E.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Silverman, Jeffrey M.; Marion, G. H. Howie; Vinko, Jozsef; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Mazzali, Paolo; Maeda, Keiichi; and others

    2014-02-10

    Diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) are absorption features observed in optical and near-infrared spectra that are thought to be associated with carbon-rich polyatomic molecules in interstellar gas. However, because the central wavelengths of these bands do not correspond to electronic transitions of any known atomic or molecular species, their nature has remained uncertain since their discovery almost a century ago. Here we report on unusually strong DIBs in optical spectra of the broad-lined Type Ic supernova SN 2012ap that exhibit changes in equivalent width over short (≲ 30 days) timescales. The 4428 Å and 6283 Å DIB features get weaker with time, whereas the 5780 Å feature shows a marginal increase. These nonuniform changes suggest that the supernova is interacting with a nearby source of DIBs and that the DIB carriers possess high ionization potentials, such as small cations or charged fullerenes. We conclude that moderate-resolution spectra of supernovae with DIB absorptions obtained within weeks of outburst could reveal unique information about the mass-loss environment of their progenitor systems and provide new constraints on the properties of DIB carriers.

  1. Interaction Between the Broad-Lined Type Ic Supernova 2012ap and Carriers of Diffuse Interstellar Bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milisavljevic, Dan; Margutti, Raffaella; Crabtree, Kyle N.; Foster, Jonathan B.; Soderberg, Alicia M.; Fesen, Robert A.; Parrent, Jerod T.; Sanders, Nathan E.; Drout, Maria R.; Kamble, Atish; Cenko, S. Bradley

    2014-01-01

    The diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) are absorption features observed in optical and near-infrared spectra that are thought to be associated with carbon-rich polyatomic molecules in interstellar gas. However, because the central wavelengths of these bands do not correspond with electronic transitions of any known atomic or molecular species, their nature has remained uncertain since their discovery almost a century ago. Here we report on unusually strong DIBs in optical spectra of the broad- lined Type Ic supernova SN2012ap that exhibit changes in equivalent width over short (. 30 days) timescales. The 4428 A and 6283 A DIB features get weaker with time, whereas the 5780 A feature shows a marginal increase. These nonuniform changes suggest that the supernova is interacting with a nearby source of the DIBs and that the DIB carriers possess high ionization potentials, such as small cations or charged fullerenes. We conclude that moderate-resolution spectra of supernovae with DIB absorptions obtained within weeks of outburst could reveal unique information about the mass-loss environment of their progenitor systems and provide new constraints on the properties of DIB carriers.

  2. Ammonium and formate ions in interstellar ice analogues. Ice morphology and the elusive 6.85 μm band.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrero, V. J.; Mate, B.; Galvez, O.; Fernandez-Torre, D.; Moreno, M. A.; Escribano, R.

    2011-05-01

    Tentative identifications of ions in interstellar ices, based on mid IR spectra, have been reported in the literature for about two decades, but these identifications remain often vague or controversia. NH4+ and HCOO- are among the purportedly identified ions. In particular the ν4 deformation mode of NH4+ has been put forward as a firm candidate for the ubiquitous 6.85 μm band. For the generation of the ions in laboratory ice mixtures the samples are often processed with high energy photons or charged particles. On other occasions acid-base reactions of suitable precursors, which can be very efficient even at very low temperatures, are employed. These procedures, can shed light on astrophysical generation pathways, but can also lead to uncertainties in the assignment of newly formed spectral bands to a given species. In this work we have used a different approach. To minimize ambiguity we produce directly (compact) ice samples containing the ions of interest through the sudden freeze of aqueous solution droplets of NH4Cl, NaCOOH, and NH4COOH on a cold (14 K) Si substrate, where their spectra are recorded. In complementary experiments, NH4+ and HCOO- ions are produced through acid-base reactions in (porous) ices formed by co-deposition of H2O, NH3 and HCOOH. The comparison of the ice spectra with those of liquid solutions, solid salts, and DFT calculations indicate that the ν4 band of ammonium ions embedded in compact ice becomes very broad and disappears virtually. The broadening effect is also present, though not so marked, for HCCO-. In the porous ices there seems to be a segregation of NH4+HCOO- ionic networks from the ice that gives rise to more pronounced spectral features. We conclude that NH4+ is not a likely carrier for the prominent 6.85 μm band in the compact ices often assumed for the interstellar grain mantles.

  3. Interstellar Dust: Contributed Papers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tielens, Alexander G. G. M. (Editor); Allamandola, Louis J. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    A coherent picture of the dust composition and its physical characteristics in the various phases of the interstellar medium was the central theme. Topics addressed included: dust in diffuse interstellar medium; overidentified infrared emission features; dust in dense clouds; dust in galaxies; optical properties of dust grains; interstellar dust models; interstellar dust and the solar system; dust formation and destruction; UV, visible, and IR observations of interstellar extinction; and quantum-statistical calculations of IR emission from highly vibrationally excited polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules.

  4. STUDIES OF DIFFUSE INTERSTELLAR BANDS V. PAIRWISE CORRELATIONS OF EIGHT STRONG DIBs AND NEUTRAL HYDROGEN, MOLECULAR HYDROGEN, AND COLOR EXCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, Scott D.; Sonnentrucker, Paule; York, Donald G.; Hobbs, L. M.; McCall, Benjamin J.; Dahlstrom, Julie; Welty, Daniel E.; Drosback, Meredith M.; Rachford, Brian L.; Snow, Theodore P.

    2011-01-20

    We establish correlations between equivalent widths of eight diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs), and examine their correlations with atomic hydrogen, molecular hydrogen, and E{sub B-V}. The DIBs are centered at {lambda}{lambda} 5780.5, 6204.5, 6283.8, 6196.0, 6613.6, 5705.1, 5797.1, and 5487.7, in decreasing order of Pearson's correlation coefficient with N(H) (here defined as the column density of neutral hydrogen), ranging from 0.96 to 0.82. We find the equivalent width (EW) of {lambda}5780.5 is better correlated with column densities of H than with E{sub B-V} or H{sub 2}, confirming earlier results based on smaller data sets. We show that the same is true for six of the seven other DIBs presented here. Despite this similarity, the eight strong DIBs chosen are not correlated well enough with each other to suggest they come from the same carrier. We further conclude that these eight DIBs are more likely to be associated with H than with H{sub 2}, and hence are not preferentially located in the densest, most UV shielded parts of interstellar clouds. We suggest that they arise from different molecules found in diffuse H regions with very little H{sub 2} (molecular fraction f < 0.01). Of the 133 stars with available data in our study, there are three with significantly weaker {lambda}5780.5 than our mean H-{lambda}5780.5 relationship, all of which are in regions of high radiation fields, as previously noted by Herbig. The correlations will be useful in deriving interstellar parameters when direct methods are not available. For instance, with care, the value of N(H) can be derived from W{sub {lambda}}(5780.5).

  5. The 2140 cm(exp -1) (4.673 Microns) Solid CO Band: The Case for Interstellar O2 and N2 and the Photochemistry of Non-Polar Interstellar Ice Analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsila, Jamie; Allamandola, Louis J.; Sandford, Scott A.; Witteborn, Fred C. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    The infrared spectra of CO frozen in non-polar ices containing N2, CO2, O2, and H2O, and the ultraviolet photochemistry of these interstellar/precometary ice analogs are reported. The spectra are used to test the hypothesis that the narrow 2140/cm (4.673 micrometer) interstellar absorption feature attributed to solid CO might be produced by CO frozen in ices containing non-polar species such as N2 and O2. It is shown that mixed molecular ices containing CO, N2, O2, and CO2 provide a very good match to the interstellar band at all temperatures between 12 and 30 K both before and after photolysis. The optical constants (real and imaginary parts of the index of refraction) in the region of the solid CO feature are reported for several of these ices.

  6. The interstellar C-H stretching band near 3.4 microns - Constraints on the composition of organic material in the diffuse interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, S. A.; Allamandola, L. J.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Pendleton, Y.; Sellgren, K.

    1991-01-01

    The composition and history of dust in the diffuse ISM was studied using 3600-2700/cm absorption spectra of objects which have widely varying amounts of visual extinctions along different lines of sight. The 3300/cm and 2950/cm features are attributed to O-H and C-H stretching vibrations, respectively. The O-H feature in OH 32.8-0.3 is suggestive of circumstellar water ice and is probably not due to material in the diffuse ISM. The features in the 3100-2700/cm region are attributed either to C-H vibrations or to M stars. The spectra of the latter show a series of narrow features in this region that are identified with photospheric OH. Objects in which these bands are seen include OH 01-477, T629-5, and the Galactic center source IRS 7. The C-H stretch feature of diffuse ISM dust has subpeaks which fall within 5/cm of C-H stretching vibrations in the -CH2- and -CH3 groups of saturated aliphatic hydrocarbons.

  7. HIGH-RESOLUTION OPTICAL SPECTROSCOPY OF DY Cen: DIFFUSE INTERSTELLAR BANDS IN A PROTO-FULLERENE CIRCUMSTELLAR ENVIRONMENT?

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Hernandez, D. A.; Lambert, David L. E-mail: nkrao@iiap.res.in

    2012-11-01

    We search high-resolution and high-quality VLT/UVES optical spectra of the hot R Coronae Borealis star DY Cen for electronic transitions of the C{sub 60} molecule and diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs). We report the non-detection of the strongest C{sub 60} electronic transitions (e.g., those at {approx}3760, 3980, and 4024 A). The absence of C{sub 60} absorption bands may support recent laboratory results, which show that the {approx}7.0, 8.5, 17.4, and 18.8 {mu}m emission features seen in DY Cen-and other similar objects with polycyclic-aromatic-hydrocarbon-like dominated IR spectra-are attributable to proto-fullerenes or fullerene precursors rather than to C{sub 60}. DIBs toward DY Cen are normal for its reddening; the only exception is the DIB at 6284 A (possibly also the 7223 A DIB) which is found to be unusually strong. We also report the detection of a new broad (FWHM {approx} 2 A) and unidentified feature centered at {approx}4000 A. We suggest that this new band may be related to the circumstellar proto-fullerenes seen at infrared wavelengths.

  8. Three sets of fine extinction bands in a tectonically deformed vein-quartz single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derez, Tine; Van der Donck, Tom; Pennock, Gill; Drury, Martyn; Sintubin, Manuel

    2014-05-01

    Intracrystalline fine extinction bands (FEBs) in quartz, are narrow (less than 5µm thick), planar microstructures with a misorientation up to 5° with respect to the host crystal, occurring in closely spaced sets (spacing of 4-5μm). FEBs have been commonly attributed to a large range of brittle and/or crystal-plastic mechanisms, revealing considerable disagreement on the responsible crystal-plastic slip systems and the ambient conditions. Another question that arises, is whether or not the FEBs rotate from a basal plane orientation to orientations ranging between the basal and prism planes. Usually only one set of FEBs occurs in a single crystal, though two sets are observed, in particular with increasing strain. Tentatively, a maximum of two sets of sub-basal FEBs has been postulated to develop in a single quartz crystal in a tectonic context. However, we identified several crystals in naturally deformed vein-quartz containing three sets of FEBs. The vein-quartz has been deformed under sub-greenschist metamorphic conditions, during the late Palaeozoic Variscan orogeny, in the High-Ardenne slate belt (Belgium). The vein-quartz has been subjected to bulging dynamic recrystallisation and shows a high degree of undulatory extinction, abundant subgrains and wide extinction bands sub-parallel to the c-axis. We attempted to characterise these three sets of FEBs by means of light microscopy, EBSD-OIM and universal stage microscopy. In both cases studied the c-axis is inclined less than 8° with respect to the thin-section plane. The different sets of FEBs show a consistent orientation with respect to the c-axis. One set of FEBs deviates maximum 10° from the basal plane. The other two sets deviate between 15 and 35° from a basal plane orientation. Corresponding FEBs, at the same angle with respect to the c-axis, have similar morphologies. In relative EBSD orientation maps FEBs show a maximum misorientation of 3°, and have a lower pattern quality than the host crystal

  9. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Catalog of Eq.Widths of Interstellar 217nm Band (Friedemann 1992)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedemann, C.

    2005-03-01

    (from CDS Inf. Bull. 40, 31) The main task of the catalogue consists in a comprehensive collection of equivalent widths of the 217nm band derived from both spectrophotometric and filterphotometric measurements obtained with TD-1, OAO-2 and ANS satellites. These data concern reddened O, B stars with color excesses E(B-V) >= 0.02 mag. The extinction curve is approximated by the empirical formula introduced by Guertler et al. (1982AN....303..105G) e({lambda}) = A(i/{lambda} - 1/{lambda}o)n + B + C {kappa}({lambda}) The relative errors amount to about {delta}A/A = +/- 0.10, {delta}B/B = +/- 0.02 and {delta}C/C = +/- 0.03. (1 data file).

  10. Broad band X-ray Telescope observations of the hot interstellar media in NGC 1399 and NGC 4472

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serlemitsos, P. J.; Loewenstein, M.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Marshall, F. E.; Petre, R.

    1993-01-01

    We present our analysis and interpretation of spatially resolved X-ray spectroscopy of the elliptical galaxies NGC 1399 and NGC 4472 obtained with the Broad Band X-Ray Telescope. The X-ray emission from both galaxies is dominated by thermal emission from a hot interstellar medium. The temperature of the plasma in NGC 1399 is 1.0-1.2 keV with a mild positive temperature gradient; for NGC 4472 the average temperature is 0.7-1.0 keV. The temperature of NGC 1399, when combined with other X-ray and optical data, implies that, if the gas is gravitationally confined, about 70 percent of the mass inside a radius of about 8.6 arcmin (38 kpc) is nonluminous. The derived metallicities and metallicity gradients are consistent with optically determined stellar metallicities, and allow surprisingly small upper limits to be placed on Type Ia supernovae rates in both galaxies. The implications of this for the gasdynamical evolution of the two galaxies are discussed. Limits on the oxygen-to-iron ratio and the line-of-sight column density are derived. There is a possible detection of cold gas in the line of sight to NGC 1399 that exceeds the Galactic value. Constraints on the contribution from a harder spectral component are placed, and likely candidates for the origin of this secondary component are evaluated.

  11. Infrared spectra and band strengths of CH3SH, an interstellar molecule.

    PubMed

    Hudson, R L

    2016-09-28

    Three solid phases of CH3SH (methanethiol or methyl mercaptan) have been prepared and their mid-infrared spectra recorded at 10-110 K, with an emphasis on the 17-100 K region. Refractive indices have been measured at two temperatures and used to estimate ice densities and infrared band strengths. Vapor pressures for the two crystalline phases of CH3SH at 110 K are estimated. The behavior of amorphous CH3SH on warming is presented and discussed in terms of Ostwald's step rule. Comparisons to CH3OH under similar conditions are made, and some inconsistencies and ambiguities in the CH3SH literature are examined and corrected. PMID:27603120

  12. Extinction in young massive clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Marchi, Guido; Panagia, Nino

    2016-01-01

    Up to ages of ~100 Myr, massive clusters are still swamped in large amounts of gas and dust, causing considerable and uneven levels of extinction. At the same time, large grains (ices?) produced by type II supernovae profoundly alter the interstellar medium (ISM), thus resulting in extinction properties very different from those of the diffuse ISM. To obtain physically meaningful parameters of stars (luminosities, effective temperatures, masses, ages, etc.) we must understand and measure the local extinction law. We have developed a powerful method to unambiguously determine the extinction law everywhere across a cluster field, using multi-band photometry of red giant stars belonging to the red clump (RC) and are applying it to young massive clusters in the Local Group. In the Large Magellanic Cloud, with about 20 RC stars per arcmin2, for each field we can easily derive an accurate extinction curve over the entire wavelength range of the photometry. As an example, we present the extinction law of the Tarantula nebula (30 Dor) based on thousands of stars observed as part of the Hubble Tarantula Treasury Project. We discuss how the incautious adoption of the Milky Way extinction law in the analysis of massive star forming regions may lead to serious underestimates of the fluxes and of the star formation rates by factors of 2 or more.

  13. Cholinergic neuronal lesions in the medial septum and vertical limb of the diagonal bands of Broca induce contextual fear memory generalization and impair acquisition of fear extinction.

    PubMed

    Knox, Dayan; Keller, Samantha M

    2016-06-01

    Previous research has shown that the ventral medial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) and hippocampus (Hipp) are critical for extinction memory. Basal forebrain (BF) cholinergic input to the vmPFC and Hipp is critical for neural function in these substrates, which suggests BF cholinergic neurons may be critical for extinction memory. In order to test this hypothesis, we applied cholinergic lesions to different regions of the BF and observed the effects these lesions had on extinction memory. Complete BF cholinergic lesions induced contextual fear memory generalization, and this generalized fear was resistant to extinction. Animals with complete BF cholinergic lesions could not acquire cued fear extinction. Restricted cholinergic lesions in the medial septum and vertical diagonal bands of Broca (MS/vDBB) mimicked the effects that BF cholinergic lesions had on contextual fear memory generalization and acquisition of fear extinction. Cholinergic lesions in the horizontal diagonal band of Broca and nucleus basalis (hDBB/NBM) induced a small deficit in extinction of generalized contextual fear memory with no accompanying deficits in cued fear extinction. The results of this study reveal that MS/vDBB cholinergic neurons are critical for inhibition and extinction of generalized contextual fear memory, and via this process, may be critical for acquisition of cued fear extinction. Further studies delineating neural circuits and mechanisms through which MS/vDBB cholinergic neurons facilitate these emotional memory processes are needed. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26606423

  14. Cholinergic neuronal lesions in the medial septum and vertical limb of the diagonal bands of Broca induce contextual fear memory generalization and impair acquisition of fear extinction.

    PubMed

    Knox, Dayan; Keller, Samantha M

    2016-06-01

    Previous research has shown that the ventral medial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) and hippocampus (Hipp) are critical for extinction memory. Basal forebrain (BF) cholinergic input to the vmPFC and Hipp is critical for neural function in these substrates, which suggests BF cholinergic neurons may be critical for extinction memory. In order to test this hypothesis, we applied cholinergic lesions to different regions of the BF and observed the effects these lesions had on extinction memory. Complete BF cholinergic lesions induced contextual fear memory generalization, and this generalized fear was resistant to extinction. Animals with complete BF cholinergic lesions could not acquire cued fear extinction. Restricted cholinergic lesions in the medial septum and vertical diagonal bands of Broca (MS/vDBB) mimicked the effects that BF cholinergic lesions had on contextual fear memory generalization and acquisition of fear extinction. Cholinergic lesions in the horizontal diagonal band of Broca and nucleus basalis (hDBB/NBM) induced a small deficit in extinction of generalized contextual fear memory with no accompanying deficits in cued fear extinction. The results of this study reveal that MS/vDBB cholinergic neurons are critical for inhibition and extinction of generalized contextual fear memory, and via this process, may be critical for acquisition of cued fear extinction. Further studies delineating neural circuits and mechanisms through which MS/vDBB cholinergic neurons facilitate these emotional memory processes are needed. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Infrared extinction in the inner Milky Way through red clump giants

    SciTech Connect

    González-Fernández, C.; Asensio Ramos, A.; Garzón, F.; Cabrera-Lavers, A.; Hammersley, P. L.

    2014-02-20

    While the shape of the extinction curve in the infrared is considered to be set and the extinction ratios between infrared bands are usually taken to be approximately constant, a number of recent studies point to either a spatially variable behavior of the exponent of the power law or a different extinction law altogether. In this paper, we propose a method to analyze the overall behavior of the interstellar extinction by means of the red-clump population, and we apply it to those areas of the Milky Way where the presence of interstellar matter is heavily felt: areas located in 5° < l < 30° and b = 0°. We show that the extinction ratios traditionally used for the near infrared could be inappropriate for the inner Galaxy and we analyze the behavior of the extinction law from 1 μm to 8 μm.

  16. Interstellar and Cometary Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathis, John S.

    1997-01-01

    'Interstellar dust' forms a continuum of materials with differing properties which I divide into three classes on the basis of observations: (a) diffuse dust, in the low-density interstellar medium; (b) outer-cloud dust, observed in stars close enough to the outer edges of molecular clouds to be observed in the optical and ultraviolet regions of the spectrum, and (c) inner-cloud dust, deep within the cores of molecular clouds, and observed only in the infrared by means of absorption bands of C-H, C=O, 0-H, C(triple bond)N, etc. There is a surprising regularity of the extinction laws between diffuse- and outer-cloud dust. The entire mean extinction law from infrared through the observable ultraviolet spectrum can be characterized by a single parameter. There are real deviations from this mean law, larger than observational uncertainties, but they are much smaller than differences of the mean laws in diffuse- and outer-cloud dust. This fact shows that there are processes which operate over the entire distribution of grain sizes, and which change size distributions extremely efficiently. There is no evidence for mantles on grains in local diffuse and outer-cloud dust. The only published spectra of the star VI Cyg 12, the best candidate for showing mantles, does not show the 3.4 micro-m band which appreciable mantles would produce. Grains are larger in outer-cloud dust than diffuse dust because of coagulation, not accretion of extensive mantles. Core-mantle grains favored by J. M. Greenberg and collaborators, and composite grains of Mathis and Whiffen (1989), are discussed more extensively (naturally, I prefer the latter). The composite grains are fluffy and consist of silicates, amorphous carbon, and some graphite in the same grain. Grains deep within molecular clouds but before any processing within the solar system are presumably formed from the accretion of icy mantles on and within the coagulated outer-cloud grains. They should contain a mineral

  17. Interstellar and Cometary Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathis, John S.

    1997-12-01

    'Interstellar dust' forms a continuum of materials with differing properties which I divide into three classes on the basis of observations: (a) diffuse dust, in the low-density interstellar medium; (b) outer-cloud dust, observed in stars close enough to the outer edges of molecular clouds to be observed in the optical and ultraviolet regions of the spectrum, and (c) inner-cloud dust, deep within the cores of molecular clouds, and observed only in the infrared by means of absorption bands of C-H, C=O, 0-H, C(triple bond)N, etc. There is a surprising regularity of the extinction laws between diffuse- and outer-cloud dust. The entire mean extinction law from infrared through the observable ultraviolet spectrum can be characterized by a single parameter. There are real deviations from this mean law, larger than observational uncertainties, but they are much smaller than differences of the mean laws in diffuse- and outer-cloud dust. This fact shows that there are processes which operate over the entire distribution of grain sizes, and which change size distributions extremely efficiently. There is no evidence for mantles on grains in local diffuse and outer-cloud dust. The only published spectra of the star VI Cyg 12, the best candidate for showing mantles, does not show the 3.4 micro-m band which appreciable mantles would produce. Grains are larger in outer-cloud dust than diffuse dust because of coagulation, not accretion of extensive mantles. Core-mantle grains favored by J. M. Greenberg and collaborators, and composite grains of Mathis and Whiffen (1989), are discussed more extensively (naturally, I prefer the latter). The composite grains are fluffy and consist of silicates, amorphous carbon, and some graphite in the same grain. Grains deep within molecular clouds but before any processing within the solar system are presumably formed from the accretion of icy mantles on and within the coagulated outer-cloud grains. They should contain a mineral

  18. Observations of the near- to Mid-infrared Unidentified Emission Bands in the Interstellar Medium of the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Tamami I.; Sakon, Itsuki; Onaka, Takashi; Kaneda, Hidehiro; Umehata, Hideki; Ohsawa, Ryou

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of near- to mid-infrared slit spectroscopic observations (2.55-13.4 μm) of the diffuse emission toward nine positions in the Large Magellanic Cloud with the infrared camera on board AKARI. The target positions are selected to cover a wide range of the intensity of the incident radiation field. The unidentified infrared bands at 3.3, 6.2, 7.7, 8.6, and 11.3 μm are detected toward all the targets and ionized gas signatures; hydrogen recombination lines and ionic forbidden lines are detected toward three of them. We classify the targets into two groups: those without the ionized gas signatures (Group A) and those with the ionized signatures (Group B). Group A includes molecular clouds and photodissociation regions, whereas Group B consists of H II regions. In Group A, the band ratios of I 3.3 μm/I 11.3 μm, I 6.2 μm/I 11.3 μm, I 7.7 μm/I 11.3 μm, and I 8.6 μm/I 11.3 μm show positive correlation with the IRAS and AKARI colors, but those of Group B do not follow the correlation. We discuss the results in terms of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) model and attribute the difference to the destruction of small PAHs and an increase in the recombination due to the high electron density in Group B. In the present study, the 3.3 μm band provides crucial information on the size distribution and/or the excitation conditions of PAHs and plays a key role in the distinction of Group A from B. The results suggest the possibility of the diagram of I 3.3 μm/I 11.3 μm versus I 7.7 μm/I 11.3 μm as an efficient diagnostic tool to infer the physical conditions of the interstellar medium.

  19. Interstellar magnesium abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, M. J.; Dufton, P. L.; Hibbert, A.; York, D. G.

    1984-01-01

    An improved evaluation of the Mg II 1240 A doublet oscillator strength is used in conjunction with recently published Copernicus observations to derive accurate Mg II column densities toward 74 stars. These imply an average of 40 percent of interstellar magnesium is in the gaseous phase. Magnesium depletion is examined as a function of various interstellar extinction and density parameters, and the results are briefly discussed in terms of current depletion theories.

  20. Retrieval of aerosol refractive index from extinction spectra with a damped harmonic-oscillator band model.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Gareth E; Bass, Stephen F; Grainger, Roy G; Lambert, Alyn

    2005-03-01

    A new method for the retrieval of the spectral refractive indices of micrometer-sized particles from infrared aerosol extinction spectra has been developed. With this method we use a classical damped harmonic-oscillator model of molecular absorption in conjunction with Mie scattering to model extinction spectra, which we then fit to the measurements using a numerical optimal estimation algorithm. The main advantage of this method over the more traditional Kramers-Kronig approach is that it allows the full complex refractive-index spectra, along with the parameters of the particle size distribution, to be retrieved from a single extinction spectrum. The retrieval scheme has been extensively characterized and has been found to provide refractive indices with a maximum uncertainty of approximately 10% (with a minimum of approximately 0.1%). Comparison of refractive indices calculated from measurements of a ternary solution of HNO3, H2SO4, and H2O with those published in J. Phys. Chem. A 104, 783 (2000) show similar differences as found by other authors.

  1. Near-Infrared Band Strengths of Molecules Diluted in N2 and H2O Ice Mixtures Relevant to Interstellar and Planetary Ices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richey, Christina Rae; Gerakines, P.A.

    2012-01-01

    The relative abundances of ices in astrophysical environments rely on accurate laboratory measurements of physical parameters, such as band strengths (or absorption intensities), determined for the molecules of interest in relevant mixtures. In an extension of our previous study on pure-ice samples, here we focus on the near-infrared absorption features of molecules in mixtures with the dominant components of interstellar and planetary ices, H2O and N2. We present experimentally measured near-infrared spectral information (peak positions, widths, and band strengths) for both H2O- and N2-dominated mixtures of CO (carbon monoxide), CO2 (carbon dioxide), CH4 (methane), and NH3 (ammonia). Band strengths were determined during sample deposition by correlating the growth of near-infrared features (10,000-4000 per centimeter, 1-2.5 micrometers) with better-known mid-infrared features (4000-400 per centimeter, 2.5-25 micrometers) at longer wavelengths.

  2. Interstellar ice analogs: band strengths of H2O, CO2, CH3OH, and NH3 in the far-infrared region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuliano, B. M.; Escribano, R. M.; Martín-Doménech, R.; Dartois, E.; Muñoz Caro, G. M.

    2014-05-01

    Context. Whereas observational astronomy now routinely extends to the far-infrared region of the spectrum, systematic laboratory studies are sparse. In particular, experiments on laboratory analogs performed through the years have provided information mainly about the band positions and shapes, while information about the band strengths are scarce and derivable principally from the optical constants. Aims: We measure the band strengths in the far-infrared region of interstellar ice analogs of astrophysically relevant species, such as H2O, CO2, CH3OH, and NH3, deposited at low temperature (8-10 K), followed by warm-up, to induce amorphous-crystalline phase transitions when relevant. Methods: The spectra of pure H2O, NH3, and CH3OH ices have been measured in the near-, mid- and far-infrared spectroscopic regions using the Interstellar Astrochemistry Chamber (ISAC) ultra-high-vacuum setup. In addition, far-infrared spectra of NH3 and CO2 were measured using a different set-up equipped with a bolometer detector. Band strengths in the far-infrared region were estimated using the corresponding near- and mid-infrared values as a reference. We also performed theoretical calculations of the amorphous and crystalline structures of these molecules using solid state computational programs at density functional theory (DFT) level. Vibrational assignment and mode intensities for these ices were predicted. Results: Infrared band strengths in the 25-500 μm range have been determined for the considered ice samples by direct comparison in the near- and mid-infrared regions. Our values were compared to those we calculated from the literature complex index of refraction. We found differences of a factor of two between the two sets of values. Conclusions: The calculated far-infrared band strengths provide a benchmark for interpreting the observational data from future space telescope missions, allowing the estimation of the ice column densities.

  3. Interstellar Dust Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, Eli

    2004-01-01

    A viable interstellar dust model - characterized by the composition, morphology, and size distribution of the dust grains and by the abundance of the different elements locked up in the dust - should fit all observational constraints arising primarily from the interactions of the dust with incident radiation or the ambient gas. As a minimum, these should include the average interstellar extinction, the infrared emission from the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM), and the observed interstellar abundances of the various refractory elements. The last constraint has been largely ignored, resulting in dust models that require more elements to be in the dust phase than available in the ISM. In this talk I will describe the most recent advances towards the construction of a comprehensive dust model made by Zubko, Dwek, and Arendt, who, for the first time, included the interstellar abundances as explicit constraints in the construction of interstellar dust models. The results showed the existence of many distinct models that satisfy the basic set of observational constraints, including bare spherical silicate and graphite particles, PAHs, as well as spherical composite particles containing silicate, organic refractories, water ice, and voids. Recently, a new interstellar dust constituent has emerged, consisting of metallic needles. These needles constitute a very small fraction of the interstellar dust abundance, and their existence is primarily manifested in the 4 to 8 micron wavelength region, where they dominate the interstellar extinction. Preliminary studies show that these models may be distinguished by their X-ray halos, which are produced primarily by small angle scattering off large dust particles along the line of sight to bright X-ray sources, and probe dust properties largely inaccessible at other wavelengths.

  4. Extinction coefficients of CC and CC bands in ethyne and ethene molecules interacting with Cu+ and Ag+ in zeolites--IR studies and quantumchemical DFT calculations.

    PubMed

    Kozyra, Paweł; Góra-Marek, Kinga; Datka, Jerzy

    2015-02-01

    The values of extinction coefficients of CC and CC IR bands of ethyne and ethene interacting with Cu+ and Ag+ in zeolites were determined in quantitative IR experiments and also by quantumchemical DFT calculations with QM/MM method. Both experimental and calculated values were in very good agreement validating the reliability of calculations. The values of extinction coefficients of ethyne and ethene interacting with bare cations and cations embedded in zeolite-like clusters were calculated. The interaction of organic molecules with Cu+ and Ag+ in zeolites ZSM-5 and especially charge transfers between molecule, cation and zeolite framework was also discussed in relation to the values of extinction coefficients.

  5. High-energy Electron Irradiation of Interstellar Carbonaceous Dust Analogs: Cosmic-ray Effects on the Carriers of the 3.4 μm Absorption Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maté, Belén; Molpeceres, Germán; Jiménez-Redondo, Miguel; Tanarro, Isabel; Herrero, Víctor J.

    2016-11-01

    The effects of cosmic rays on the carriers of the interstellar 3.4 μm absorption band have been investigated in the laboratory. This band is attributed to stretching vibrations of CH3 and CH2 in carbonaceous dust. It is widely observed in the diffuse interstellar medium, but disappears in dense clouds. Destruction of CH3 and CH2 by cosmic rays could become relevant in dense clouds, shielded from the external ultraviolet field. For the simulations, samples of hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) have been irradiated with 5 keV electrons. The decay of the band intensity versus electron fluence reflects a-C:H dehydrogenation, which is well described by a model assuming that H2 molecules, formed by the recombination of H atoms liberated through CH bond breaking, diffuse out of the sample. The CH bond destruction rates derived from the present experiments are in good accordance with those from previous ion irradiation experiments of HAC. The experimental simplicity of electron bombardment has allowed the use of higher-energy doses than in the ion experiments. The effects of cosmic rays on the aliphatic components of cosmic dust are found to be small. The estimated cosmic-ray destruction times for the 3.4 μm band carriers lie in the 108 yr range and cannot account for the disappearance of this band in dense clouds, which have characteristic lifetimes of 3 × 107 yr. The results invite a more detailed investigation of the mechanisms of CH bond formation and breaking in the intermediate region between diffuse and dense clouds.

  6. Photochemistry of interstellar molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stief, L. J.

    1971-01-01

    The photochemistry of two diatomic and eight polyatomic molecules is discussed quantitatively. For an interstellar molecule, the lifetime against photodecomposition depends upon the absorption cross section, the quantum yield or probability of dissociation following photon absorption, and the interstellar radiation field. The constant energy density of Habing is used for the unobserved regions of interstellar radiation field, and the field in obscuring clouds is estimated by combining the constant flux with the observed interstellar extinction curve covering the visible and ultraviolet regions. Lifetimes against photodecomposition in the unobscured regions and as a function of increasing optical thickness in obscuring clouds are calculated for the ten species. The results show that, except for CO, all the molecules have comparable lifetimes of less than one hundred years. Thus they can exist only in dense clouds and can never have been exposed to the unobscured radiation. The calculations further show that the lifetimes in clouds of moderate opacity are of the order of one million years.

  7. MID-INFRARED EXTINCTION AND ITS VARIATION WITH GALACTIC LONGITUDE

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Jian; Jiang, B. W.; Li Aigen E-mail: bjiang@bnu.edu.c

    2009-12-10

    Based on the data obtained from the Spitzer/Galactic Legacy Infrared Midplane Survey Extraordinaire (GLIPMSE) Legacy Program and the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) project, we derive the extinction in the four IRAC bands, [3.6], [4.5], [5.8], and [8.0] mum, relative to the 2MASS K{sub s} band (at 2.16 mum) for 131 GLIPMSE fields along the Galactic plane within |l| <= 65 deg., using red giants and red clump giants as tracers. As a whole, the mean extinction in the IRAC bands (normalized to the 2MASS K{sub s} band), A{sub [3.6]}/A{sub K{sub s}}approx0.63+-0.01, A{sub [4.5]}/A{sub K{sub s}}approx0.57+-0.03, A{sub [5.8]}/A{sub K{sub s}}approx0.49+-0.03, A{sub [8.0]}/A{sub K{sub s}}approx0.55+-0.03, exhibits little variation with wavelength (i.e., the extinction is somewhat flat or gray). This is consistent with previous studies and agrees with that predicted from the standard interstellar grain model for R{sub V} = 5.5 by Weingartner and Draine. As far as individual sightline is concerned, however, the wavelength dependence of the mid-infrared interstellar extinction A{sub l}ambda/A{sub K{sub s}} varies from one sightline to another, suggesting that there may not exist a 'universal' IR extinction law. We, for the first time, demonstrate the existence of systematic variations of extinction with Galactic longitude which appears to correlate with the locations of spiral arms as well as with the variation of the far-infrared luminosity of interstellar dust.

  8. Observational Evidence for Radiative Interstellar Grain Alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, B.; Potter, S. B.; Andersson, B.; Potter, S.

    2011-11-01

    The alignment mechanisms of interstellar dust grains is a long standing astrophysical problem. Interstellar polarization was first discovered in 1949 and soon thereafter attributed to dichroic extinction caused by asymmetric dust grains aligned with the magnetic field. For a long time the alignment mechanism was thought to involve paramagnetic relaxation in rapidly spinning dust grains. Modern theory indicates that the classical alignment mechanisms are likely not efficient, but rather favor alignment through direct radiative torques. We have used multi-band polarimetry towards stars probing six nearby clouds to show that the wavelength of maximum polarization is linearly correlated with the visual extinction (Andersson & Potter 2007; AP07; where further details can be found). We find a universal relation with a common positive slope between the clouds and a DC offset correlated with the average of the total-to-selective extinction < RV > . These results provide strong observational support for radiatively driven grain alignment. Recent observations of an additional set of ≍60 sightlines in the Taurus cloud confirm and strengthen these results.

  9. Hubble Tarantula Treasury Project - IV. The extinction law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Marchi, Guido; Panagia, Nino; Sabbi, Elena; Lennon, Daniel; Anderson, Jay; van der Marel, Roeland; Cignoni, Michele; Grebel, Eva K.; Larsen, Søren; Zaritsky, Dennis; Zeidler, Peter; Gouliermis, Dimitrios; Aloisi, Alessandra

    2016-02-01

    We report on the study of interstellar extinction across the Tarantula Nebula (30 Doradus), in the Large Magellanic Cloud, using observations from the Hubble Tarantula Treasury Project in the 0.3-1.6 μm range. The considerable and patchy extinction inside the nebula causes about 3500 red clump stars to be scattered along the reddening vector in the colour-magnitude diagrams, thereby allowing an accurate determination of the reddening slope in all bands. The measured slope of the reddening vector is remarkably steeper in all bands than in the the Galactic diffuse interstellar medium. At optical wavelengths, the larger ratio of total-to-selective extinction, namely RV = 4.5 ± 0.2, implies the presence of a grey component in the extinction law, due to a larger fraction of large grains. The extra large grains are most likely ices from supernova ejecta and will significantly alter the extinction properties of the region until they sublimate in 50-100 Myr. We discuss the implications of this extinction law for the Tarantula Nebula and in general for regions of massive star formation in galaxies. Our results suggest that fluxes of strongly star-forming regions are likely to be underestimated by a factor of about 2 in the optical.

  10. Broad Balmer Wings in BA Hyper/Supergiants Distorted by Diffuse Interstellar Bands: Five Examples in the 30 Doradus Region from the VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walborn, Nolan R.; Sana, Hugues; Evans, Christopher J.; Taylor, William D.; Sabbi, Elena; Barbá, Rodolfo H.; Morrell, Nidia I.; Maíz Apellániz, Jesús; Sota, Alfredo; Dufton, Philip L.; McEvoy, Catherine M.; Clark, J. Simon; Markova, Nevena; Ulaczyk, Krzysztof

    2015-08-01

    Extremely broad emission wings at Hβ and Hα have been found in VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Survey data for five very luminous BA supergiants in or near 30 Doradus in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The profiles of both lines are extremely asymmetrical, which we have found to be caused by very broad diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) in the longward wing of Hβ and the shortward wing of Hα. These DIBs are well known to interstellar but not to many stellar specialists, so that the asymmetries may be mistaken for intrinsic features. The broad emission wings are generally ascribed to electron scattering, although we note difficulties for that interpretation in some objects. Such profiles are known in some Galactic hyper/supergiants and are also seen in both active and quiescent Luminous Blue Variables (LBVs). No prior or current LBV activity is known in these 30 Dor stars, although a generic relationship to LBVs is not excluded; subject to further observational and theoretical investigation, it is possible that these very luminous supergiants are approaching the LBV stage for the first time. Their locations in the HRD and presumed evolutionary tracks are consistent with that possibility. The available evidence for spectroscopic variations of these objects is reviewed, while recent photometric monitoring does not reveal variability. A search for circumstellar nebulae has been conducted, with an indeterminate result for one of them.

  11. THE SEARCH FOR THE DIFFUSE INTERSTELLAR BANDS AND OTHER MOLECULES IN COMETS 17P (HOLMES) AND C/2007 W1 (BOATTINI)

    SciTech Connect

    O'Malia, K. K. J.; Snow, T. P.; Thorburn, J. A.; Hammergren, M.; Dembicky, J.; Hobbs, L. M.; York, D. G.

    2010-01-01

    We present the search for both diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) and molecules in Comet 17P (Holmes) and Comet C/2007 W1 (Boattini) occultation observations. Absorption spectra were taken during stellar occultations by Comet Holmes of 31 and beta Persei, and the occultation of BD+22 216 by Comet Boattini. While no signature of the comets was detected, we present upper limits for some common cometary molecules such as C{sub 2}, C{sub 3}, CH, CN and for the most common DIBs. We did not detect either comet in absorption, most likely because of the large distance between the line of sight to the star and the nucleus of the comet. Interstellar sight lines with comparable reddening to what was measured in Comet Holmes have DIB equivalent widths between 5 and 50 mA. However, future observations with closer approaches to a background star have great potential for spatially mapping molecule distributions in comets, and in discovering DIBs, if they are present, in comets. Future observations could detect DIBs and molecules if they are done: (1) less than approx10{sup 4}-10{sup 3} km from the nucleus (2) with a signal to noise in the background star of approx300 and (3) with a resolving power of at least 38,000.

  12. On the source of the dust extinction in type Ia supernovae and the discovery of anomalously strong Na I absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, M. M.; Morrell, Nidia; Hsiao, E. Y.; Campillay, Abdo; Contreras, Carlos; Simon, Joshua D.; Burns, Christopher R.; Persson, Sven E.; Thompson, I. B.; Freedman, Wendy L.; Cox, Nick L. J.; Foley, Ryan J.; Karakas, Amanda I.; Patat, F.; Sternberg, A.; Williams, R. E.; Gal-Yam, A.; Leonard, D. C.; Stritzinger, Maximilian; Folatelli, Gastón; and others

    2013-12-10

    High-dispersion observations of the Na I D λλ5890, 5896 and K I λλ7665, 7699 interstellar lines, and the diffuse interstellar band at 5780 Å in the spectra of 32 Type Ia supernovae are used as an independent means of probing dust extinction. We show that the dust extinction of the objects where the diffuse interstellar band at 5780 Å is detected is consistent with the visual extinction derived from the supernova colors. This strongly suggests that the dust producing the extinction is predominantly located in the interstellar medium of the host galaxies and not in circumstellar material associated with the progenitor system. One quarter of the supernovae display anomalously large Na I column densities in comparison to the amount of dust extinction derived from their colors. Remarkably, all of the cases of unusually strong Na I D absorption correspond to 'Blueshifted' profiles in the classification scheme of Sternberg et al. This coincidence suggests that outflowing circumstellar gas is responsible for at least some of the cases of anomalously large Na I column densities. Two supernovae with unusually strong Na I D absorption showed essentially normal K I column densities for the dust extinction implied by their colors, but this does not appear to be a universal characteristic. Overall, we find the most accurate predictor of individual supernova extinction to be the equivalent width of the diffuse interstellar band at 5780 Å, and provide an empirical relation for its use. Finally, we identify ways of producing significant enhancements of the Na abundance of circumstellar material in both the single-degenerate and double-degenerate scenarios for the progenitor system.

  13. Determination of the extinction law of dust in SNRs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Bin; Jiang, Biwei

    2016-06-01

    Dust plays an important role in astrophysics, and the demand to characterize and understand dust is increasingly appreciated. In addition to asymptotic giant branch stars evolved from low- and intermediate-mass star, supernovae (SNe) are an important contributor to interstellar dust. On the other hand, SNe destroy interstellar dust due to its violent shock waves. How much SNe contribute to and affect interstellar dust is very unclear. The estimation of amount of dust from per SN has an uncertainty of three orders. Rather than from the dust emission, we study the dust property of SNR through its extinction, which has the advantage of avoiding the very uncertain dust temperature. The SNR S147 is chosen as the first target. Based on the LAMOST spectroscopic survey and the UCAC4 photometric catalog, the intrinsic color index is derived with its relation to the effective temperature given the spectral luminosity and metallicity in a way similar to Wang & Jiang (2014). Based on the color excess in various bands, the extinction curve is derived. Finally, we present a dust model to fit the extinction curve, which explores the properties of the dust in S147 including the dust size distribution, dust composition and shape etc. The properties are compared with that of the normal interstellar dust.

  14. The Mid-IR Extinction Law in the LMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jian; Xue, Mengyao; Jiang, B. W.

    2013-03-01

    The mid-infrared (MIR) extinction law in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) at four IRAC bands is derived using the data of the Spitzer/SAGE Program. The derived mean extinctions are A [3.6]/A Ks = 0.68±0.03, A [4.5]/A Ks = 0.97±0.03, A [5.8]/A Ks = 0.54±0.04, and A [8.0]/A Ks = 0.58±0.07. The results show that: (1) The extinctions at [3.6], [5.8] and [8.0] of the LMC consist a flat curve, similar to that of the Milky Way (MW) predicted by the interstellar grain model at Rv = 5.5; (2) The extinction at [4.5] is clearly higher than the other three bands, which may be caused by the additional absorption of the 4.27μm CO2 ice and/or the 4.67μm CO ice in the LMC molecular clouds; (3) As far as individual sightlines are concerned, the MIR interstellar extinction law A λ/A Ks in the LMC varies with sightlines as the MW does.

  15. Detection of Interstellar CH3.

    PubMed

    Feuchtgruber; Helmich; van Dishoeck EF; Wright

    2000-06-01

    Observations with the Short Wavelength Spectrometer on board the Infrared Space Observatory have led to the first detection of the methyl radical CH(3) in the interstellar medium. The nu(2) Q-branch at 16.5 µm and the R(0) line at 16.0 µm have been unambiguously detected toward the Galactic center Sagittarius A*. The analysis of the measured bands gives a column density of &parl0;8.0+/-2.4&parr0;x1014 cm(-2) and an excitation temperature of 17+/-2 K. Gaseous CO at a similarly low excitation temperature and C(2)H(2) are detected for the same line of sight. Using constraints on the H(2) column density obtained from C(18)O and visual extinction, the inferred CH(3) abundance is &parl0;1.3+2.2-0.7&parr0;x10-8. The chemically related CH(4) molecule is not detected, but the pure rotational lines of CH are seen with the Long Wavelength Spectrometer. The absolute abundances and the CH(3)/CH(4) and CH(3)/CH ratios are inconsistent with published pure gas-phase models of dense clouds. The data require a mix of diffuse and translucent clouds with different densities and extinctions, and/or the development of translucent models in which gas-grain chemistry, freeze-out, and reactions of H with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and solid aliphatic material are included.

  16. Wavelength-resolved optical extinction measurements of aerosols using broad-band cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy over the spectral range of 445-480 nm.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Weixiong; Dong, Meili; Chen, Weidong; Gu, Xuejun; Hu, Changjin; Gao, Xiaoming; Huang, Wei; Zhang, Weijun

    2013-02-19

    Despite the significant progress in the measurements of aerosol extinction and absorption using spectroscopy approaches such as cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) and photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS), the widely used single-wavelength instruments may suffer from the interferences of gases absorption present in the real environment. A second instrument for simultaneous measurement of absorbing gases is required to characterize the effect of light extinction resulted from gases absorption. We present in this paper the development of a blue light-emitting diode (LED)-based incoherent broad-band cavity-enhanced spectroscopy (IBBCEAS) approach for broad-band measurements of wavelength-resolved aerosol extinction over the spectral range of 445-480 nm. This method also allows for simultaneous measurement of trace gases absorption present in the air sample using the same instrument. On the basis of the measured wavelength-dependent aerosol extinction cross section, the real part of the refractive index (RI) can be directly retrieved in a case where the RI does not vary strongly with the wavelength over the relevant spectral region. Laboratory-generated monodispersed aerosols, polystyrene latex spheres (PSL) and ammonium sulfate (AS), were employed for validation of the RI determination by IBBCEAS measurements. On the basis of a Mie scattering model, the real parts of the aerosol RI were retrieved from the measured wavelength-resolved extinction cross sections for both aerosol samples, which are in good agreement with the reported values. The developed IBBCEAS instrument was deployed for simultaneous measurements of aerosol extinction coefficient and NO(2) concentration in ambient air in a suburban site during two representative days. PMID:23320530

  17. Laboratory optical spectroscopy of the thiophenoxy radical and its profile simulation as a diffuse interstellar band based on rotational distribution by radiation and collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Araki, Mitsunori; Niwayama, Kei; Tsukiyama, Koichi

    2014-11-01

    The gas-phase optical absorption spectrum of the thiophenoxy radical (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}S), a diffuse interstellar band (DIB) candidate molecule, was observed in the discharge of thiophenol using a cavity ringdown spectrometer. The ground-state rotational constants of the thiophenoxy radical were theoretically calculated, and the excited-state rotational constants were determined from the observed rotational profile. The rotational profile of a near prolate molecule having C {sub 2v} symmetry was simulated on the basis of a rotational distribution model by radiation and collisions. Although the simulated profile did not agree with the observed DIBs, the upper limit of the column density for the thiophenoxy radical in the diffuse clouds toward HD 204827 was evaluated to be 2 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup –2}. The profile simulation indicates that rotational distribution by radiation and collisions is important to reproduce a rotational profile for a DIB candidate and that the near prolate C {sub 2v} molecule is a possible candidate for DIB with a band width variation dependent on the line of sight.

  18. A new model for the interpretation of the unidentified infrared bands (UIBS) of the diffuse interstellar medium and of the protoplanetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cataldo, Franco; Keheyan, Yeghis; Heymann, Dieter

    2002-04-01

    In this work we started from the basic idea that the pure polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) cannot be the real carriers of the unidentified infrared bands (UIBs), the emission spectra coming from a large variety of astronomical objects. Instead we propose a new model taken from petroleum chemistry which, we can show, is able to match both the UIBs and even the protoplanetary nebulae (PPNe) spectra. PAHs such as phenanthrene, benzoperylene, coronene and pentacene, are too pure and too specific to really exist in the interstellar medium. Instead our model proposes that the carrier of UIBs and PPNe are complex molecular mixtures like those obtained as fractions during the petroleum refining processes. These molecular mixtures are so complex that practically the investigators did not try to identify each individual component but characterized the mixture with an average molecular structure that takes into account both the average molecular weight and the average content of aromatic, naphtenic (cycloaliphatic) and aliphatic (paraffinic) fraction. We show by infrared spectroscopy that petroleum fractions obtained at certain steps of the refining process are able to match the UIBs and the PPNe infrared bands with the advantage of not being so specific as PAHs are. Namely we have used as samples a distillate aromatic extract (DAE) a treated residual aromatic extract (T-RAE) and finally a naphtenic oil. Among the three samples examined, the DAE sample was the best in matching the UIBs and PPNe spectra.

  19. Detection of organic matter in interstellar grains.

    PubMed

    Pendleton, Y J

    1997-06-01

    Star formation and the subsequent evolution of planetary systems occurs in dense molecular clouds, which are comprised, in part, of interstellar dust grains gathered from the diffuse interstellar medium (DISM). Radio observations of the interstellar medium reveal the presence of organic molecules in the gas phase and infrared observational studies provide details concerning the solid-state features in dust grains. In particular, a series of absorption bands have been observed near 3.4 microns (approximately 2940 cm-1) towards bright infrared objects which are seen through large column densities of interstellar dust. Comparisons of organic residues, produced under a variety of laboratory conditions, to the diffuse interstellar medium observations have shown that aliphatic hydrocarbon grains are responsible for the spectral absorption features observed near 3.4 microns (approximately 2940 cm-1). These hydrocarbons appear to carry the -CH2- and -CH3 functional groups in the abundance ratio CH2/CH3 approximately 2.5, and the amount of carbon tied up in this component is greater than 4% of the cosmic carbon available. On a galactic scale, the strength of the 3.4 microns band does not scale linearly with visual extinction, but instead increases more rapidly for objects near the Galactic Center. A similar trend is noted in the strength of the Si-O absorption band near 9.7 microns. The similar behavior of the C-H and Si-O stretching bands suggests that these two components may be coupled, perhaps in the form of grains with silicate cores and refractory organic mantles. The ubiquity of the hydrocarbon features seen in the near infrared near 3.4 microns throughout out Galaxy and in other galaxies demonstrates the widespread availability of such material for incorporation into the many newly forming planetary systems. The similarity of the 3.4 microns features in any organic material with aliphatic hydrocarbons underscores the need for complete astronomical observational

  20. THE MID-INFRARED EXTINCTION LAW AND ITS VARIATION IN THE COALSACK NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Shu; Gao Jian; Jiang, B. W.; Chen Yang; Li Aigen E-mail: jiangao@bnu.edu.cn E-mail: cheny@bnu.edu.cn

    2013-08-10

    In recent years, the wavelength dependence of interstellar extinction from the ultraviolet (UV) to the near- and mid-infrared (IR) has been studied extensively. Although it is well established that the UV/optical extinction law varies significantly among the different lines of sight, it is not clear how IR extinction varies among various environments. In this work, using the color-excess method and taking red giants as the extinction tracer, we determine interstellar extinction A{sub {lambda}} in the four Spitzer/IRAC bands in [3.6], [4.5], [5.8], [8.0] {mu}m (relative to A{sub K{sub s}}, extinction in the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) K{sub s} band at 2.16 {mu}m) of the Coalsack nebula, a nearby starless dark cloud, based on the data obtained from the 2MASS and Spitzer/GLIMPSE surveys. We select five individual regions across the nebula that span a wide variety of physical conditions ranging from diffuse and translucent to dense environments, as traced by the visual extinction, the Spitzer/MIPS 24 {mu}m emission, and CO emission. We find that A{sub {lambda}}/A{sub K{sub s}}, mid-IR extinction relative to A{sub K{sub s}}, decreases from diffuse to dense environments, which may be explained in terms of ineffective dust growth in dense regions. The mean extinction (relative to A{sub K{sub s}}) is calculated for the four IRAC bands as well and exhibits a flat mid-IR extinction law consistent with previous determinations for other regions. Extinction in the IRAC 4.5 {mu}m band is anomalously high, much higher than that of the other three IRAC bands, and cannot be explained in terms of CO and CO{sub 2} ice. Mid-IR extinction in the four IRAC bands has also been derived for four representative regions in the Coalsack Globule 2, which respectively exhibit strong ice absorption, moderate or weak ice absorption, and very weak or no ice absorption. The derived mid-IR extinction curves are all flat, with A{sub {lambda}}/A{sub K{sub s}} increasing with the decrease of the

  1. Interstellar Hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerin, Maryvonne; Neufeld, David A.; Goicoechea, Javier R.

    2016-09-01

    Interstellar hydrides—that is, molecules containing a single heavy element atom with one or more hydrogen atoms—were among the first molecules detected outside the solar system. They lie at the root of interstellar chemistry, being among the first species to form in initially atomic gas, along with molecular hydrogen and its associated ions. Because the chemical pathways leading to the formation of interstellar hydrides are relatively simple, the analysis of the observed abundances is relatively straightforward and provides key information about the environments where hydrides are found. Recent years have seen rapid progress in our understanding of interstellar hydrides, thanks largely to FIR and submillimeter observations performed with the Herschel Space Observatory. In this review, we discuss observations of interstellar hydrides, along with the advanced modeling approaches that have been used to interpret them and the unique information that has thereby been obtained.

  2. Interstellar molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D.

    1987-09-01

    Some 70 different molecular species have so far been detected variously in diffuse interstellar clouds, dense interstellar clouds, and circumstellar shells. Only simple (diatomic and triatomic) species exist in diffuse clouds because of the penetration of destructive UV radiations, whereas more complex (polyatomic) molecules survive in dense clouds as a result of the shielding against this UV radiation provided by dust grains. A current list of interstellar molecules is given together with a few other molecular species that have so far been detected only in circumstellar shells. Also listed are those interstellar species that contain rare isotopes of several elements. The gas phase ion chemistry is outlined via which the observed molecules are synthesized, and the process by which enrichment of the rare isotopes occurs in some interstellar molecules is described.

  3. Identification of the UIR bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Fred M.

    2016-06-01

    Starlight undergoing multiple scattering processes within fluffy grains results in extinction, UV 2175A bump, DIBs and the UIR bands. Spectroscopic lab and DIB data has identified the highly fluorescent molecule Dipyridyl Magnesium Tetrabenzoporphyrin (MgTBP). Reflection and Raman scattering experimental data will be presented which designates this molecule as the primary source for UIR signals. MgTBP sublimes at about 500OC. It is produced via high temperature plasma synthesis within and subsequently ejected from comets which in turn are by-products of solar system-planetary development. Interstellar dust is the left-over refuse which implies prodigious solar system evolution in each galaxy.

  4. Extinction measurements for optical band gap determination of soot in a series of nitrogen-diluted ethylene/air non-premixed flames.

    PubMed

    Adkins, Erin M; Miller, J Houston

    2015-01-28

    Visible light extinction was measured in a series of nitrogen-diluted, ethylene/air, non-premixed flames and this data was used to determine the optical band gap, OBG, as a function of flame position. Collimated light from a supercontinuum source is telescopically expanded and refocused to match the f- number of a dispersing monochromator. The dispersed light is split into a power metering channel and a channel that is periscoped and focused into the flame. The transmitted light is then recollimated and focussed onto a silicon photodiode detector. After tomographic reconstruction of the radial extinction field, the OBG was derived from the near-edge absorption feature using Tauc/Davis-Mott analysis. A slight evolution in OBG was observed throughout all flame systems with a consistent range of OBG observed between approximately 1.85 eV and 2.35 eV. Averaging over all positions the mean OBG was approximately 2.09 eV for all flame systems. Comparing these results to previously published computational results relating calculated HOMO-LUMO gaps for a variety of D2h PAH molecules to the number of aromatic rings in the structure, showed that the observed optical band gap is consistent with a PAH of about 14 rings or a conjugation length of 0.97 nm. This work provides experimental support to the model of soot formation where the transition from chemical to physical growth starts at a modest molecular size; about the size of circumpyrene.

  5. Interstellar Matters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verschuur, Gerrit L.

    In this provocative new book, radio astronomer and author Gerrit L. Verschuur describes the phenomena of scientific curiosity and discovery by following the exciting story of interstellar matter. The discovery of "stuff between the stars" was the result of decades of work by hundreds of astronomers, and the evolving recognition of its existence has profoundly changed the way we view the Universe. Verschuur begins with E.E. Barnard, who puzzled for a quarter century over the interpretation of photographs of dark patches between the stars. Verschuur then traces the tortuous path to acceptance of the existence of interstellar matter. He shares with us the thrill of discovery that motivates astronomers, the use of metaphors and modeling by scientist, and other tricks of the astronomical trade. Finally, we learn about the modern study of interstellar matter: the discovery of complex organic molecules between the stars and how they may have seeded the early earth with the precursors for life, new insights into star formation, the structure of the Milky Way and the elusive interstellar magnetic field. More than a history, Interstellar Matters is a detective story that evokes the excitement and serendipity of science against the background of a century of shared effort by the world community of astronomers. From the reviews: "I can't imagine anyone interested in astronomy who won't enjoy this book - it's chocked full of science, personalities and insights. We are products of the stuff between the stars - Verschuur tells the fascinating story of how its existence was discovered. Interstellar Matters is his best book, I think. It's certainly one of the best astronomy popularizations I've read." Leif J. Robinson, Sky and Teleskope#1

  6. ANOMALOUS DIFFUSE INTERSTELLAR BANDS IN THE SPECTRUM OF HERSCHEL 36. I. OBSERVATIONS OF ROTATIONALLY EXCITED CH AND CH{sup +} ABSORPTION AND STRONG, EXTENDED REDWARD WINGS ON SEVERAL DIBs

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlstrom, Julie; York, Donald G.; Welty, Daniel E.; Oka, Takeshi; Johnson, Sean; Jiang Zihao; Sherman, Reid; Hobbs, L. M.; Friedman, Scott D.; Sonnentrucker, Paule; Rachford, Brian L.; Snow, Theodore P.

    2013-08-10

    Anomalously broad diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) at 5780.5, 5797.1, 6196.0, and 6613.6 A are found in absorption along the line of sight to Herschel 36, the star illuminating the bright Hourglass region of the H II region Messier 8. Interstellar absorption from excited CH{sup +} in the J = 1 level and from excited CH in the J = 3/2 level is also seen. To our knowledge, neither those excited molecular lines nor such strongly extended DIBs have previously been seen in absorption from interstellar gas. These unusual features appear to arise in a small region near Herschel 36 which contains most of the neutral interstellar material in the sight line. The CH{sup +} and CH in that region are radiatively excited by strong far-IR radiation from the adjacent infrared source Her 36 SE. Similarly, the broadening of the DIBs toward Herschel 36 may be due to radiative pumping of closely spaced high-J rotational levels of relatively small, polar carrier molecules. If this picture of excited rotational states for the DIB carriers is correct and applicable to most DIBs, the 2.7 K cosmic microwave background may set the minimum widths (about 0.35 A) of known DIBs, with molecular processes and/or local radiation fields producing the larger widths found for the broader DIBs. Despite the intense local UV radiation field within the cluster NGC 6530, no previously undetected DIBs stronger than 10 mA in equivalent width are found in the optical spectrum of Herschel 36, suggesting that neither dissociation nor ionization of the carriers of the known DIBs by this intense field creates new carriers with easily detectable DIB-like features. Possibly related profile anomalies for several other DIBs are noted.

  7. Oxidative titrations of reduced cytochrome aa3: anisotropic extinction behavior observed in the heme alpha-band region.

    PubMed

    Schroedl, N A; Hartzell, C R

    1977-04-01

    Direct chemical titrations of reduced, purified cytochrome aa3 were monitored at 604 nm. Anaerobic oxidation by potassium ferricyanide or 1,1'-bis(hydroxymethyl)-ferricinium ion was compared with the natural substrate, molecular oxygen. The four electrons from reduced cytochrome aa3 were donated to one oxygen molecule, resulting in a linear titration with only fully oxidized or fully reduced enzyme molecules present. Unlike the linear or sigmoidal titrations which resulted from various reductive titrations reported previously, pronounced hyperbolic curves were obtained with the chemical oxidants. The midpoint potential values exhibited by the four metal centers of cytochrome aa3 were determined by computer simulation of the titration curves. A high potential pair of components (heme a = 340 mV, Cu = 340 mV) and a low potential pair (heme a = 220 mV, Cu = 240 mV) were observed, consistent with literature values. Unique to these equilibrium studies was a split in the heme a extinction coefficients at 604 nm. The low potential heme a component contributed 80-85% to the total absorbance change. A polarographic assay was used to verify that the integrity of cytochrome aa3 remained intact during equilibrium titrations spanning several hours. These experimental results indicate that simple chemical reversibility does not exist for cytochrome aa3 under anaerobic conditions.

  8. Interstellar grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snow, T. P.

    1986-01-01

    There are few aspects of interstellar grains that can be unambiguously defined. Very little can be said that is independent of models or presuppositions; hence issues are raised and questions categorized, rather than providing definitive answers. The questions are issues fall into three general areas; the general physical and chemical nature of the grains; the processes by which they are formed and destroyed; and future observational approaches.

  9. Interstellar extinction at 10-20 microns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Janet P.; Rubin, Robert H.

    1989-01-01

    The IRAS low-resolution spectra (LRS) spectra of 117 stars of excellent signal/noise with optically thin silicate dust shells were analyzed. The stellar continua (assumed to be a cool black body) were subtracted, and the resulting dust shell spectra were fit with simple models F(sub lambda) assuming uniform mass loss and dust temperature as a function of distance from the star, calculated using the optical constants for silcates of Draine (1985). From the comparison of the spectra and the models, functions for the emissivity, kappa(sub lambda), were derived.

  10. Interstellar grains within interstellar grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernatowicz, Thomas J.; Amari, Sachiko; Zinner, Ernst K.; Lewis, Roy S.

    1991-01-01

    Five interstellar graphite spherules extracted from the Murchison carbonaceous meteorite are studied. The isotopic and elemental compositions of individual particles are investigated with the help of an ion microprobe, and this analysis is augmented with structural studies of ultrathin sections of the grain interiors by transmission electron microscopy. As a result, the following procedure for the formation of the interstellar graphite spherule bearing TiC crystals is inferred: (1) high-temperature nucleation and rapid growth of the graphitic carbon spherule in the atmosphere of a carbon-rich star, (2) nucleation and growth of TiC crystals during continued growth of the graphitic spherule and the accretion of TiC onto the spherule, (3) quenching of the graphite growth process by depletion of C or by isolation of the spherule before other grain types could condense.

  11. The Extinction Properties of Heavily-Reddened Lines of Sight in the Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rawlings, M. G.; Adamson, A. J.; Whittet, D. C. B.

    1996-01-01

    Recent studies of the 3.4 micron C-H stretch absorption feature indicate a strong correlation between it and the 10 micron silicate band over a wide range of extinctions (A(sub v) = 3.9-31 magnitudes), but the relationships between their optical depths and the visual extinction are particularly poorly constrained at intermediate extinctions between 15 and 20 magnitudes. The objective prism survey published by Stephenson may help to alleviate this difficulty. It lists more than 400 extremely red stars lacking molecular absorption bands, suggesting that these are hot blue stars reddened by long path lengths of the Galactic ISM. The intrinsic properties of these stars are unfortunately only loosely constrained, and JHK photometry therefore does not accurately determine the interstellar extinction. Using the POSS I plates, we have attempted to produce self-consistent spectral types, luminosity classes and extinctions for the stars which Stephenson claims to be most heavily reddened. 14 out of 25 sources studied are consistent with OB supergiants. The results are highly sensitive to upper limits in the blue plate, and are not always consistent with Stephenson's claims of much higher reddening than that of a typical member of the Cygnus OB2 association. For the most heavily-reddened sources studied, a B-magnitude based on the faintest measurable value on the blue plate yielded a lower limit of about 9 magnitudes on the extinction.

  12. Variations in the Peak Position of the 6.2 micron Interstellar Emission Feature: A Tracer of N in the Interstellar Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Population

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudgins, Douglas M.; Bauschlicher, Charles W.; Allamandola, L. J.

    2005-01-01

    more nitrogen atoms within the interior of the carbon skeleton of a PAH cation induces a significant blueshift in the position of the dominant CC stretching feature of these compounds that is suf6cient to account for the position of the interstellar bands. Subsequent studies of the effects of substitution by other heteroatoms (O and Si), metal ion complexation (Fe(+), Mg(+), and Mg(2+)), and molecular symmetry variation-all of which fail to reproduce the blueshift observed in the PANH cations-indicate that N appears to be unique in its ability to accommodate the position of the interstellar 6.2 micron bands while simultaneously satisfying the other constraints of the astrophysical problem. This result implies that the peak position of the interstellar feature near 6.2 micron traces the degree of nitrogen substitution in the population, that most of the PAHs responsible for the interstellar IR emission features incorporate nitrogen within their aromatic networks, and that a lower limit of 1%-2% of the cosmic nitrogen is sequestered within the interstellar PAH population. Finally, in view of the ubiquity and abundance of interstellar PAHs and the permanent dipoles and distinctive electronic structures of these nitrogen-substituted variants, this work impacts a wide range of observational phenomena outside of the infrared region of the spectrum including the forest of unidentified molecular rotational features and the anomalous Galactic foreground emission in the microwave, and the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) and other structure in the interstellar extinction curve in the ulhviolet/visible. These astrophysical ramifications are discussed, and the dipole moments and rotational constants are tabulated to facilitate further investigations of the astrophysical role of nitrogen-substituted aromatic compounds.

  13. Variations in the Peak Position of the 6.2 μm Interstellar Emission Feature: A Tracer of N in the Interstellar Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudgins, Douglas M.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Allamandola, L. J.

    2005-10-01

    within the interior of the carbon skeleton of a PAH cation induces a significant blueshift in the position of the dominant CC stretching feature of these compounds that is sufficient to account for the position of the interstellar bands. Subsequent studies of the effects of substitution by other heteroatoms (O and Si), metal ion complexation (Fe+, Mg+, and Mg2+), and molecular symmetry variation-all of which fail to reproduce the blueshift observed in the PANH cations-indicate that N appears to be unique in its ability to accommodate the position of the interstellar 6.2 μm bands while simultaneously satisfying the other constraints of the astrophysical problem. This result implies that the peak position of the interstellar feature near 6.2 μm traces the degree of nitrogen substitution in the population, that most of the PAHs responsible for the interstellar IR emission features incorporate nitrogen within their aromatic networks, and that a lower limit of 1%-2% of the cosmic nitrogen is sequestered within the interstellar PAH population. Finally, in view of the ubiquity and abundance of interstellar PAHs and the permanent dipoles and distinctive electronic structures of these nitrogen-substituted variants, this work impacts a wide range of observational phenomena outside of the infrared region of the spectrum including the forest of unidentified molecular rotational features and the anomalous Galactic foreground emission in the microwave, and the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) and other structure in the interstellar extinction curve in the ultraviolet/visible. These astrophysical ramifications are discussed, and the dipole moments and rotational constants are tabulated to facilitate further investigations of the astrophysical role of nitrogen-substituted aromatic compounds.

  14. The peculiar extinction of Herschel 36

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donn, B.; Hecht, J. H.; Helfer, H. L.; Wolf, J.; Pipher, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    The extinction of Herschel 36 was measured and found to be peculiar in the same sense as that observed in Orion. Following the treatment of Mathis and Wallenhorst, this can be explained by the presence of large silicate and graphite grains than are normally found in the interstellar medium. Correcting the stellar flux for foreground extinction results in a residual extinction curve for the associated dust cloud, with an unusually small normalized extinction (less than 1.0) at 1500 A. This low UV extinction may be due to the effects of scattering by the dust cloud material.

  15. A study of the fundamental characteristics of 2175A extinction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardelli, Jason A.; Savage, Blair D.

    1987-01-01

    The characteristics of interstellar extinction were studied in the region of the 2175 A feature for lines of sight which appear to exhibit unusually weak ultraviolet extinction. The analysis was based upon a parameterization of the observed extinction via fitting specific mathematical functions in order to determine the position and width of the 2175 A feature. The data are currently being analyzed.

  16. THE MID-INFRARED EXTINCTION LAW IN THE OPHIUCHUS, PERSEUS, AND SERPENS MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, Nicholas L.; Mundy, Lee G.; Lai, Shih-Ping; Evans, Neal J. II

    2009-01-01

    We compute the mid-IR extinction law from 3.6 to 24 {mu}m in three molecular clouds-Ophiuchus, Perseus, and Serpens-by combining data from the 'Cores to Disks' Spitzer Legacy Science program with deep JHK{sub s} imaging. Using a new technique, we are able to calculate the line-of-sight (LOS) extinction law toward each background star in our fields. With these LOS measurements, we create, for the first time, maps of the {chi}{sup 2} deviation of the data from two extinction law models. Because our {chi}{sup 2} maps have the same spatial resolution as our extinction maps, we can directly observe the changing extinction law as a function of the total column density. In the Spitzer Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) bands, 3.6-8 {mu}m, we see evidence for grain growth. Below A{sub K{sub s}}= 0.5, our extinction law is well fitted by the Weingartner and Draine R{sub V} = 3.1 diffuse interstellar-medium dust model. As the extinction increases, our law gradually flattens, and for A{sub K{sub s}}{>=}1, the data are more consistent with the Weingartner and Draine R{sub V} = 5.5 model that uses larger maximum dust grain sizes. At 24 {mu}m, our extinction law is 2-4 times higher than the values predicted by theoretical dust models, but is more consistent with the observational results of Flaherty et al. Finally, from our {chi}{sup 2} maps we identify a region in Perseus where the IRAC extinction law is anomalously high considering its column density. A steeper near-IR extinction law than the one we have assumed may partially explain the IRAC extinction law in this region.

  17. Search for diffuse band profile variations in the rho Ophiuchi cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Snow, T.P.; Timothy, J.G.; Sear, S.

    1982-01-01

    High signal-to-noise profiles of the broad diffuse interstellar band at 4430 A were obtained on the 2.2-m telescope at the Mauna Kea Observatory, using the newly-developed pulse-counting multi-anode microchannel array detector system in an effort to determine whether the band profile varies with mean grain size as expected if the band is produced by absorbers embedded in grain lattices. The lack of profile variability over several lines of sight where independent evidence indicates that the mean grain size varies shows that lambda 4430 is probably not formed by the same grains that are responsible for interstellar extinction at visible wavelengths. The possibility that this band is created by a population of very small ( approximately 100 A) grains is still viable, as is the hypothesis that it has a molecular origin.

  18. A search for diffuse band profile variations in the rho Ophiuchi cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snow, T. P.; Timothy, J. G.; Sear, S.

    1982-01-01

    High signal-to-noise profiles of the broad diffuse interstellar band at 4430 A were obtained on the 2.2-m telescope at the Mauna Kea Observatory, using the newly-developed pulse-counting multi-anode microchannel array detector system in an effort to determine whether the band profile varies with mean grain size as expected if the band is produced by absorbers embedded in grain lattices. The lack of profile variability over several lines of sight where independent evidence indicates that the mean grain size varies shows that lambda 4430 is probably not formed by the same grains that are responsible for interstellar extinction at visible wavelengths. The possibility that this band is created by a population of very small ( approximately 100 A) grains is still viable, as is the hypothesis that it has a molecular origin.

  19. Radar Detection of Interstellar Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baggaley, J.

    2003-04-01

    As primordial building material of complexes like our own solar system, dust is centrally important in the evolution of such planetary systems. Circumstellar dust can be sensed associated with Young Stellar Objects, IR excess stars and forms the ejecta of red giants, carbon-rich stars and supernovae. Interstellar dust can be cumulatively sensed over astronomically long sight-lines by the extinction, scattering and polarisation of starlight. The direct detection of interstellar dust (ISD) particles flowing into the solar system is important because such observations can directly probe the local cloud interstellar dust environment and can sense discrete stellar sources. The Advanced Meteor Orbit Radar (AMOR) is a facility designed to measure the trajectories of dust impacting the Earth's atmosphere: the continuously operating radar is able to archive a large (˜ 10^6) data-base of dust trajectories and so is able to map the inflow directions of interstellar material into the solar system. Such Earth-based mapping of ISD dynamics complements the in-situ impact detections by space missions such as Ulysses and Stardust.

  20. Interstellar Alcohols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charnley, S. B.; Kress, M. E.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Millar, T. J.

    1995-01-01

    We have investigated the gas-phase chemistry in dense cores where ice mantles containing ethanol and other alcohols have been evaporated. Model calculations show that methanol, ethanol, propanol, and butanol drive a chemistry leading to the formation of several large ethers and esters. Of these molecules, methyl ethyl ether (CH3OC2H5) and diethyl ether (C2H5)2O attain the highest abundances and should be present in detectable quantities within cores rich in ethanol and methanol. Gas-phase reactions act to destroy evaporated ethanol and a low observed abundance of gas-phase C,H,OH does not rule out a high solid-phase abundance. Grain surface formation mechanisms and other possible gas-phase reactions driven by alcohols are discussed, as are observing strategies for the detection of these large interstellar molecules.

  1. Oscillator strengths for lines of the F/0, 0, 0/-X/0, 0, 0/ band of H2O at 111.5 nanometers and the abundance of H2O in diffuse interstellar clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, P. L.; Yoshino, K.; Griesinger, H. E.; Black, J. H.

    1981-11-01

    Absolute oscillator strengths (f-values) for rotational lines of the F˜ (0, 0, 0)-X˜(0, 0, 0) band of H2O at 111.5 nm have been measured with an uncertainty of ±40% using quantitative photographic techniques. The f-value for the 111-000 line, the one most likely to be seen in absorption in interstellar clouds, is (3.0 ± 1.2) × 10-2 This value is combined with a measured upper limit for absorption by this line in the ζ Oph cloud to show that the column density of H2O in the 000 level is less than 5.3 × 1012 cm-2. This upper limit is larger than the predictions of gas-phase, chemical models of this cloud. We show that definite detection of H2O in diffuse clouds at the level of this upper limit would be in conflict with models of molecular formation in shock-heated gas. The data analysis produced additional results: the absolute scale of the oscillator strengths for lines of the C˜(0, 0, 0)-X˜(0, 0, 0) band of H2O at 124 nm is reduced by 10%; the integrated absorption coefficients for P - and C-k bands are compared to calculated and measured values and agree within the experimental uncertainties.

  2. Near-Infrared Band Strengths of Molecules Diluted in N2 and H20 Ice Mixtures Relevant to Interstellar and Planetary Ices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richey, C. R.; Richey, Christina R.

    2012-01-01

    In order to determine the column density of a component of an ice from its infrared absorption features, the strengths of these features must be known. The peak positions, widths, profiles, and strengths of a certain ice component's infrared absorption features are affected be the overall composition of the ice. Many satellites within the solar system have surfaces that are dominated by H2O or N2 and ices in the interstellar medium (ISM) are primarily composed of H2O. The experiments presented here focus on the near-infrared absorption features of CO, CO2, CH4, and NH3 (nu=10,000-4,000/cm, lambda=1-2.5 microns) and the effects of diluting these molecules in N2 or H2O ice (mixture ratio of 5:1). This is a continuation of previous results published by our research group.

  3. A hidden reservoir of Fe/FeS in interstellar silicates?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, M.; Jones, A.; Ysard, N.

    2014-05-01

    Context. The depletion of iron and sulphur into dust in the interstellar medium and the exact nature of interstellar amorphous silicate grains is still an open question. Aims: We study the incorporation of iron and sulphur into amorphous silicates of olivine- and pyroxene-types and their effects on the dust spectroscopy and thermal emission. Methods: We used the Maxwell-Garnett effective-medium theory to construct the optical constants for a mixture of silicates, metallic iron, and iron sulphide. We also studied the effects of iron and iron sulphide in aggregate grains. Results: Iron sulphide inclusions within amorphous silicates that contain iron metal inclusions show no strong differences in the optical properties of the grains. A mix of amorphous olivine- and pyroxene-type silicate broadens the silicate features. An amorphous carbon mantle with a thickness of 10 nm on the silicate grains leads to an increase in absorption on the short-wavelength side of the 10 μm silicate band. Conclusions: The assumption of amorphous olivine-type and pyroxene-type silicates and a 10 nm thick amorphous carbon mantle better matches the interstellar silicate band profiles. Including iron nano-particles leads to an increase in the mid-IR extinction, while up to 5 ppm of sulphur can be incorporated as Fe/FeS nano inclusions into silicate grains without leaving a significant trace of its presence.

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Catalog of high extinction clouds (Rygl+, 2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rygl, K. L. J.; Wyrowski, F.; Schuller, F.; Menten, K. M.

    2010-04-01

    We made maps of the 3.6-4.5 microns color excess between the two shortest wavelength Spitzer IRAC bands (Fazio et al. 2004ApJS..154...10F). These can be converted to infrared extinction maps using the interstellar extinction law of Indebetouw et al. (2005ApJ...619..931I): one magnitude of 3.6-4.5 microns color excess corresponds to 81.8 magnitudes in visual extinction (see Eq. 2 in our article). Our maps cover -60 degree to 60 degree in Galactic longitude except for 1 degree around the Galactic center and have a resolution of 108". The color excess maps are available as fits files belonging to Fig. 1. All the unknown compact high extinction regions with a color excess above 0.25mag, which were not known as HII regions or high-mass protostellar objects, were catalogued in Table 1 as high extinction clouds (HECs). For a sample of 25 high extinction clouds in the first Galactic quadrant we observed the dust continuum emission at 1.2mm using the MAMBO-2 bolometer. These observations have a much higher angular resolution of 11", allowing to probe the clouds at subparsec scales and study the clumps with them. (10 data files).

  5. The size distribution of interstellar grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witt, Adolf N.

    1987-01-01

    Three major areas involving interstellar grains were investigated. First, studies were performed of scattering in reflection nebulae with the goal of deriving scattering characteristics of dust grains such as the albedo and the phase function asymmetry throughout the visible and the ultraviolet. Secondly, studies were performed of the wavelength dependence of interstellar extinction designed to demonstrate the wide range of grain size distributions naturally occurring in individual clouds in different parts of the galaxy. And thirdly, studies were also performed of the ultraviolet powered emission of dust grains in the 0.5 to 1.0 micron wavelength range in reflection nebulae. Findings considered of major importance are highlighted.

  6. Interstellar isomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Defrees, D.; Mclean, D.; Herbst, E.

    1986-01-01

    Both observational and theoretical studies of molecular clouds are hindered by many difficulties. One way to partially circumvent the difficulties of characterizing the chemistry within these objects is to study the relative abundances of isomers which are synthesized from a common set of precursors. Unfortunately, only one such system has been confirmed, the HCN/HNC pair of isomers. While the basic outlines of its chemistry have been known for some years, there are still many aspects of the chemistry which are unclear. Another potential pair of isomers is HCO+/HOC+; HCO+ is an abundant instellar molecule and a tentative identification of HOC+ has been made in Sgr B2. This identification is being challenged, however, based on theoretical and laboratory evidence that HOC+ reacts with H2. Another potential pair of interstellar isomers is methyl cyanide (CH3CN, acetonitrile) and methyl isocyanide (CH3NC). The cyanide is well known, however the isocyanide has yet to be observed despite theoretical predictions that appreciable quantities should be present.

  7. Extinction maps toward the Milky Way bulge: Two-dimensional and three-dimensional tests with apogee

    SciTech Connect

    Schultheis, M.; Zasowski, G.; Allende Prieto, C.; Beaton, R. L.; García Pérez, A. E.; Majewski, S. R.; Beers, T. C.; Bizyaev, D.; Frinchaboy, P. M.; Ge, J.; Hearty, F.; Schneider, D. P.; Holtzman, J.; Muna, D.; Nidever, D.; Shetrone, M. E-mail: gail.zasowski@gmail.com

    2014-07-01

    Galactic interstellar extinction maps are powerful and necessary tools for Milky Way structure and stellar population analyses, particularly toward the heavily reddened bulge and in the midplane. However, due to the difficulty of obtaining reliable extinction measures and distances for a large number of stars that are independent of these maps, tests of their accuracy and systematics have been limited. Our goal is to assess a variety of photometric stellar extinction estimates, including both two-dimensional and three-dimensional extinction maps, using independent extinction measures based on a large spectroscopic sample of stars toward the Milky Way bulge. We employ stellar atmospheric parameters derived from high-resolution H-band Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) spectra, combined with theoretical stellar isochrones, to calculate line-of-sight extinction and distances for a sample of more than 2400 giants toward the Milky Way bulge. We compare these extinction values to those predicted by individual near-IR and near+mid-IR stellar colors, two-dimensional bulge extinction maps, and three-dimensional extinction maps. The long baseline, near+mid-IR stellar colors are, on average, the most accurate predictors of the APOGEE extinction estimates, and the two-dimensional and three-dimensional extinction maps derived from different stellar populations along different sightlines show varying degrees of reliability. We present the results of all of the comparisons and discuss reasons for the observed discrepancies. We also demonstrate how the particular stellar atmospheric models adopted can have a strong impact on this type of analysis, and discuss related caveats.

  8. Photoluminescence by Interstellar Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijh, U. P.

    2005-08-01

    In this dissertation, we report on our study of interstellar dust through the process of photoluminescence (PL). We present the discovery of a new band of dust PL, blue luminescence (BL) with λpeak˜370 nm in the proto-planetary nebula known as the Red Rectangle (RR). We attribute this to fluorescence by small, 3-4-ringed polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules. Further analysis reveals additional independent evidence for the presence of small PAHs in this nebula. Detection of BL using long-slit spectroscopic observations in other ordinary reflection nebulae suggests that the BL carrier is an ubiquitous component of the ISM and is not restricted to the particular environment of the RR. We present the spatial distribution of the BL in these nebulae and find that the BL is spatially correlated with IR emission structures attributed to aromatic emission features (AEFs), attributed to PAHs. The carrier of the dust-associated photoluminescence process causing the extended red emission (ERE), known now for over twenty five years, remains unidentified. We constrain the character of the ERE carrier by determining the wavelengths of the radiation that initiates the ERE -- λ < 118 nm. We note that under interstellar conditions most PAH molecules are ionized to the di-cation stage by photons with E > 10.5 eV and that the electronic energy level structure of PAH di-cations is consistent with fluorescence in the wavelength band of the ERE. In the last few chapters of the dissertation we present first results from ongoing work: i) Using narrow-band imaging, we present the optical detection of the circum-binary disk of the RR in the light of the BL, and show that the morphology of the BL and ERE emissions in the RR nebula are almost mutually exclusive. It is very suggestive to attribute them to different ionization stages of the same family of carriers such as PAH molecules. ii) We also present a pure spectrum of the BL free of scattered light, resolved into seven

  9. PAHs in Translucent Interstellar Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salama, Farid; Galazutdinov, G.; Krelowski, J.; Biennier, L.; Beletsky, Y.; Song, I.

    2011-05-01

    We discuss the proposal of relating the origin of some of the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) to neutral polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) present in translucent interstellar clouds. The spectra of several cold, isolated gas-phase PAHs have been measured in the laboratory under experimental conditions that mimic the interstellar conditions and are compared with an extensive set of astronomical spectra of reddened, early type stars. This comparison provides - for the first time - accurate upper limits for the abundances of specific PAH molecules along specific lines-of-sight. Something that is not attainable from IR observations alone. The comparison of these unique laboratory data with high resolution, high S/N ratio astronomical observations leads to two major findings: (1) a finding specific to the individual molecules that were probed in this study and, which leads to the clear and unambiguous conclusion that the abundance of these specific neutral PAHs must be very low in the individual translucent interstellar clouds that were probed in this survey (PAH features remain below the level of detection) and, (2) a general finding that neutral PAHs exhibit intrinsic band profiles that are similar to the profile of the narrow DIBs indicating that the carriers of the narrow DIBs must have close molecular structure and characteristics. This study is the first quantitative survey of neutral PAHs in the optical range and it opens the way for unambiguous quantitative searches of PAHs in a variety of interstellar and circumstellar environments. // Reference: F. Salama et al. (2011) ApJ. 728 (1), 154 // Acknowledgements: F.S. acknowledges the support of the NASA's Space Mission Directorate APRA Program. J.K. acknowledges the financial support of the Polish State (grant N203 012 32/1550). The authors are deeply grateful to the ESO archive as well as to the ESO staff members for their active support.

  10. Tracking the organic refractory component from interstellar dust to comets.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, J M; Li, A

    1999-01-01

    The abundance and composition of complex organic (carbonaceous) material in the interstellar dust is followed as the dust evolves in its cyclic evolution between diffuse and dense clouds. Interstellar extinction, laboratory and space analog experiments, dust infrared absorption spectra, the cosmic abundance of the condensible atoms, and space and ground-based observations of comet dust are used to impose constraints on the organic dust component as mantles on silicate cores.

  11. A search for interstellar anthracene towards the Perseus anomalous microwave emission region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iglesias-Groth, S.; Manchado, A.; Rebolo, R.; González Hernández, J. I.; García-Hernández, D. A.; Lambert, D. L.

    2010-10-01

    We report the discovery of a new broad interstellar (or circumstellar) band at 7088.8 +/- 2.0 Å coincident to within the measurement uncertainties with the strongest band of the anthracene cation (C14H10+) as measured in gas-phase laboratory spectroscopy at low temperatures. The band is detected in the line of sight of star Cernis 52, a likely member of the very young star cluster IC 348, and is probably associated with cold absorbing material in an intervening molecular cloud of the Perseus star-forming region where various experiments have recently detected anomalous microwave emission. From the measured intensity and available oscillator strength we find a column density of implying that ~0.008 per cent of the carbon in the cloud could be in the form of C14H10+. A similar abundance has been recently claimed for the naphthalene cation in this cloud. This is the first location outside the Solar system where specific polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are identified. We report observations of interstellar lines of CH and CH+ that support a rather high column density for these species and for molecular hydrogen. The strength ratio of the two prominent diffuse interstellar bands at 5780 and 5797 Å suggests the presence of a `zeta'-type cloud in the line of sight (consistent with steep far-ultraviolet extinction and high molecular content). The presence of PAH cations and other related hydrogenated carbon molecules which are likely to occur in this type of clouds reinforces the suggestion that electric dipole radiation from fast-spinning PAHs is responsible of the anomalous microwave emission detected towards Perseus.

  12. EXTINCTION IN STAR-FORMING DISK GALAXIES FROM INCLINATION-DEPENDENT COMPOSITE SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Yip, Ching-Wa; Szalay, Alex S.; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.; Budavari, Tamas; Dobos, Laszlo; Csabai, Istvan E-mail: szalay@pha.jhu.ed

    2010-02-01

    Extinction in galaxies affects their observed properties. In scenarios describing the distribution of dust and stars in individual disk galaxies, the amplitude of the extinction can be modulated by the inclination of the galaxies. In this work, we investigate the inclination dependency in composite spectra of star-forming disk galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 5. In a volume-limited sample within a redshift range 0.065-0.075 and a r-band Petrosian absolute magnitude range -19.5 to -22 mag which exhibits a flat distribution of inclination, the inclined relative to face-on extinction in the stellar continuum is found empirically to increase with inclination in the g, r, and i bands. Within the central 0.5 intrinsic half-light radius of the galaxies, the g-band relative extinction in the stellar continuum for the highly inclined objects (axis ratio b/a = 0.1) is 1.2 mag, agreeing with previous studies. The extinction curve of the disk galaxies is given in the rest-frame wavelengths 3700-8000 A, identified with major optical emission and absorption lines in diagnostics. The Balmer decrement, Halpha/Hbeta, remains constant with inclination, suggesting a different kind of dust configuration and/or reddening mechanism in the H II region from that in the stellar continuum. One factor is shown to be the presence of spatially non-uniform interstellar extinction, presumably caused by clumped dust in the vicinity of the H II region.

  13. Rethinking Extinction.

    PubMed

    Dunsmoor, Joseph E; Niv, Yael; Daw, Nathaniel; Phelps, Elizabeth A

    2015-10-01

    Extinction serves as the leading theoretical framework and experimental model to describe how learned behaviors diminish through absence of anticipated reinforcement. In the past decade, extinction has moved beyond the realm of associative learning theory and behavioral experimentation in animals and has become a topic of considerable interest in the neuroscience of learning, memory, and emotion. Here, we review research and theories of extinction, both as a learning process and as a behavioral technique, and consider whether traditional understandings warrant a re-examination. We discuss the neurobiology, cognitive factors, and major computational theories, and revisit the predominant view that extinction results in new learning that interferes with expression of the original memory. Additionally, we reconsider the limitations of extinction as a technique to prevent the relapse of maladaptive behavior and discuss novel approaches, informed by contemporary theoretical advances, that augment traditional extinction methods to target and potentially alter maladaptive memories. PMID:26447572

  14. Rethinking Extinction

    PubMed Central

    Dunsmoor, Joseph E.; Niv, Yael; Daw, Nathaniel; Phelps, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    Extinction serves as the leading theoretical framework and experimental model to describe how learned behaviors diminish through absence of anticipated reinforcement. In the past decade, extinction has moved beyond the realm of associative learning theory and behavioral experimentation in animals and has become a topic of considerable interest in the neuroscience of learning, memory, and emotion. Here, we review research and theories of extinction, both as a learning process and as a behavioral technique, and consider whether traditional understandings warrant a re-examination. We discuss the neurobiology, cognitive factors, and major computational theories, and revisit the predominant view that extinction results in new learning that interferes with expression of the original memory. Additionally, we reconsider the limitations of extinction as a technique to prevent the relapse of maladaptive behavior, and discuss novel approaches, informed by contemporary theoretical advances, that augment traditional extinction methods to target and potentially alter maladaptive memories. PMID:26447572

  15. Rethinking Extinction.

    PubMed

    Dunsmoor, Joseph E; Niv, Yael; Daw, Nathaniel; Phelps, Elizabeth A

    2015-10-01

    Extinction serves as the leading theoretical framework and experimental model to describe how learned behaviors diminish through absence of anticipated reinforcement. In the past decade, extinction has moved beyond the realm of associative learning theory and behavioral experimentation in animals and has become a topic of considerable interest in the neuroscience of learning, memory, and emotion. Here, we review research and theories of extinction, both as a learning process and as a behavioral technique, and consider whether traditional understandings warrant a re-examination. We discuss the neurobiology, cognitive factors, and major computational theories, and revisit the predominant view that extinction results in new learning that interferes with expression of the original memory. Additionally, we reconsider the limitations of extinction as a technique to prevent the relapse of maladaptive behavior and discuss novel approaches, informed by contemporary theoretical advances, that augment traditional extinction methods to target and potentially alter maladaptive memories.

  16. Preliminary results on interstellar reddening as deduced from filter photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laget, M.

    1972-01-01

    Filter photometry has been used to derive the interstellar reddening law from stars through the study of a single spectral type, B0. The deficiency in the far ultraviolet flux of a supergiant relative to a main sequence star is compared with the difference in the flux distribution due to a change of one spectral class. Individual interstellar reddening curves show the general feature reported by Stecher (1969) and by Bless and Savage (1970). There is a large amount of scatter in the far ultraviolet which may be partially due to a real difference in interstellar extinction and partially due to observational inaccuracy.

  17. Extinction and Scattering Properties of Dust Around Red Supergiants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bright, Stacey; Clayton, G.; Massey, P.; Gordon, K.; Levesque, E.; Plez, B.

    2007-12-01

    We have been amassing a unique dataset which can be used to investigate the amount and nature of dust produced by red supergiants (RSGs) in very different environments. To this end, optical spectra are being obtained for RSGs in various galaxies in the Local Group. Moderate-resolution, high S/N, spectrophotometry, covering 3500-9000A, has been obtained for a sample of RSGs in the Milky Way and the Magellanic Clouds. Using the the MARCS stellar atmosphere models to fit the SEDs, we are deriving extinction curves from 3500A to the K-band for the Local Group RSGs. In particular, for the LMC and SMC stars, the problem is more tractable than for the Milky Way RSGs, given the small and relatively uniform foreground extinction of the Clouds. We will construct extinction curves using the classic "pair method". The feasibility of using the model SEDs as "unreddened" standards will be examined, as well as the more conventional pairing of stars that are closely matched in spectral type but have different reddenings. These extinction curves are actually attenuation curves since the RSG circumstellar dust shells are not resolved and light can be scattered back into the beam. In particular, we plan to examine the apparent NUV excess seen in the Galactic RSG extinction curves. The NUV excess is possibly due to scattering of the star's light by circumstellar dust and/or a larger average size than that typical of grains found in the diffuse interstellar medium. This project is being supported by NSF grant AST-0707691 and a LaSPACE Undergraduate Research Assistantship (NASA grant NNG05GH22H).

  18. Organic molecules in translucent interstellar clouds.

    PubMed

    Krełowski, Jacek

    2014-09-01

    Absorption spectra of translucent interstellar clouds contain many known molecular bands of CN, CH+, CH, OH, OH(+), NH, C2 and C3. Moreover, one can observe more than 400 unidentified absorption features, known as diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs), commonly believed to be carried by complex, carbon-bearing molecules. DIBs have been observed in extragalactic sources as well. High S/N spectra allow to determine precisely the corresponding column densities of the identified molecules, rotational temperatures which differ significantly from object to object in cases of centrosymmetric molecular species, and even the (12)C/(13)C abundance ratio. Despite many laboratory based studies of possible DIB carriers, it has not been possible to unambiguously link these bands to specific species. An identification of DIBs would substantially contribute to our understanding of chemical processes in the diffuse interstellar medium. The presence of substructures inside DIB profiles supports the idea that DIBs are very likely features of gas phase molecules. So far only three out of more than 400 DIBs have been linked to specific molecules but none of these links was confirmed beyond doubt. A DIB identification clearly requires a close cooperation between observers and experimentalists. The review presents the state-of-the-art of the investigations of the chemistry of interstellar translucent clouds i.e. how far our observations are sufficient to allow some hints concerning the chemistry of, the most common in the Galaxy, translucent interstellar clouds, likely situated quite far from the sources of radiation (stars). PMID:25467771

  19. Organic molecules in translucent interstellar clouds.

    PubMed

    Krełowski, Jacek

    2014-09-01

    Absorption spectra of translucent interstellar clouds contain many known molecular bands of CN, CH+, CH, OH, OH(+), NH, C2 and C3. Moreover, one can observe more than 400 unidentified absorption features, known as diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs), commonly believed to be carried by complex, carbon-bearing molecules. DIBs have been observed in extragalactic sources as well. High S/N spectra allow to determine precisely the corresponding column densities of the identified molecules, rotational temperatures which differ significantly from object to object in cases of centrosymmetric molecular species, and even the (12)C/(13)C abundance ratio. Despite many laboratory based studies of possible DIB carriers, it has not been possible to unambiguously link these bands to specific species. An identification of DIBs would substantially contribute to our understanding of chemical processes in the diffuse interstellar medium. The presence of substructures inside DIB profiles supports the idea that DIBs are very likely features of gas phase molecules. So far only three out of more than 400 DIBs have been linked to specific molecules but none of these links was confirmed beyond doubt. A DIB identification clearly requires a close cooperation between observers and experimentalists. The review presents the state-of-the-art of the investigations of the chemistry of interstellar translucent clouds i.e. how far our observations are sufficient to allow some hints concerning the chemistry of, the most common in the Galaxy, translucent interstellar clouds, likely situated quite far from the sources of radiation (stars).

  20. Extinction efficiency in the infrared (2-18 µm) of laboratory ice clouds: observations of scattering minima in the Christiansen bands of ice.

    PubMed

    Arnott, W P; Dong, Y Y; Hallett, J

    1995-01-20

    Extinction measurements with a laser diode (0.685 µm) and a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (2-18 µm) were performed on laboratory ice clouds (5 µm ≤ D ≤ 70 µm) grown at a variety of temperatures, and thus at a variety of crystal habits and average projected crystal area. Ice clouds were grown by nucleation of a supercooled water droplet cloud with a rod cooled with liquid nitrogen. The ice crystals observed were mainly plates and dendrites at the coldest temperatures (≈-15 °C) and were mainly columns and needles at warmer temperatures (≈-5 °C). The crystals were imaged with both a novel microscope equipped with a video camera and a heated glass slide and a continuously running Formvar replicator. The IR spectral optical-depth measurements reveal a narrow (0.5-µm-width) extinction minimum at 2.84 µm and a wider (3-µm-width) minimum at 10.5 µm. These partial windows are associated with wavelengths where the real part of the index of refraction for bulk ice has a relative minimum so that extinction is primarily due to absorption rather than scattering (i.e., the Christiansen effect). Bulk ice has absorption maxima near the window wavelengths. IR extinction efficiency has a noticeable wavelength dependence on the average projected crystal area and therefore on the temperaturedependent crystal properties. The average-size parameters in the visible for different temperatures ranged from 64 to 128, and in the IR they ranged from 2.5 to 44. The extinction efficiency and the single-scatter albedo for ice spheres as computed from Mie scattering also show evidence of the Christiansen effect.

  1. Near-infrared extinction with discretised stellar colours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juvela, M.; Montillaud, J.

    2016-01-01

    Context. Near-infrared (NIR) extinction remains one of the most reliable methods of measuring the column density of dense interstellar clouds. Extinction can be estimated using the reddening of the light of background stars. Several methods exist (e.g., NICE, NICER, NICEST, GNICER) to combine observations of several NIR bands into extinction maps. Aims: We present a new method of estimating extinction based on NIR multiband observations and examine its performance. Methods: Our basic method uses a discretised version of the distribution of intrinsic stellar colours directly. The extinction of individual stars and the average over a resolution element are estimated with Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods. Several variations of the basic method are tested, and the results are compared to NICER calculations. Results: In idealised settings or when photometric errors are large, the results of the new method are very close to those of NICER. Clear advantages can be seen when the distribution of intrinsic colours cannot be described well with a single covariance matrix. The MCMC framework makes it easy to consider additional effects such as those of completeness limits and contamination by galaxies or foreground stars. A priori information about relative column density variations at sub-beam scales can result in a significant increase in accuracy. For observations of high photometric precision, the results could be further improved by considering the magnitude dependence of the intrinsic colours. Conclusions: The MCMC computations are time-consuming, but the calculation of large extinction maps is already practical. The same methods can be used with direct optimisation, with significantly less computational work. Faster methods, like NICER, perform very well in many cases even when the basic assumptions no longer hold. The new methods are useful mostly when photometric errors are small, the distribution of intrinsic colours is well known, or one has prior knowledge

  2. Do you know the extinction in your young massive cluster?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Marchi, Guido; Panagia, Nino; Sabbi, Elena; HTTP Team

    2015-08-01

    Up to ages of a few 100 Myr, massive clusters are still swamped in large amounts of gas and dust from their primordial cocoons. This causes considerable and uneven levels of extinction across the cluster that we must understand and measure if we want to extract any physically meaningful parameters, from basic luminosities and effective temperatures to masses and ages. We have developed a powerful method to unambiguously determine the extinction law and the absolute value of the extinction in a uniform way across a cluster field, using multi-band photometry of red giant stars belonging to the red clump (RC). Since these stars share very similar physical properties, they allow us to derive the absolute extinction in a straightforward and reliable way. In the Magellanic Clouds, with about 20 RC stars arcmin-2 or ~150 objects in a typical HST pointing, we can easily derive a solid and self-consistent absolute extinction curve over the entire wavelength range of the photometry, with no need for spectroscopy.I will show an application of this method to the Hubble Tarantula Treasury Project's observations of the Tarantula nebula, containing the massive R136 cluster. We have measured the absolute extinction towards about 3600 objects and the extinction law in the range 0.3 - 1.6 μm. At optical wavelengths, the extinction curve is almost parallel to that of the diffuse Galactic interstellar medium (ISM), but the value of RV = AV/E(B-V) = 4.5 ± 0.2 that we measure indicates that in the optical there is an extra grey component due to a larger fraction of large grains. Using the RV = 3.1 value typical of the diffuse Galactic ISM would severely underestimate the luminosities and masses and overestimate the ages of the stars in the cluster. At wavelengths longer than ~ 1 μm, the contribution of this additional component tapers off as λ-1.5, like in the Milky Way, suggesting that the nature of the grains is otherwise similar to those in our Galaxy, but with a ~ 2 times higher

  3. Observational evidence of dust evolution in galactic extinction curves

    SciTech Connect

    Cecchi-Pestellini, Cesare; Casu, Silvia; Mulas, Giacomo; Zonca, Alberto E-mail: silvia@oa-cagliari.inaf.it E-mail: azonca@oa-cagliari.inaf.it

    2014-04-10

    Although structural and optical properties of hydrogenated amorphous carbons are known to respond to varying physical conditions, most conventional extinction models are basically curve fits with modest predictive power. We compare an evolutionary model of the physical properties of carbonaceous grain mantles with their determination by homogeneously fitting observationally derived Galactic extinction curves with the same physically well-defined dust model. We find that a large sample of observed Galactic extinction curves are compatible with the evolutionary scenario underlying such a model, requiring physical conditions fully consistent with standard density, temperature, radiation field intensity, and average age of diffuse interstellar clouds. Hence, through the study of interstellar extinction we may, in principle, understand the evolutionary history of the diffuse interstellar clouds.

  4. Science with the Galactic O-Star Spectroscopic Survey (GOSSS): the relationship between DIBs, the ISM, and extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penades Ordaz, M.; Maíz Apellániz, J.; Sota, A.; Alfaro, E. J.; Walborn, N. R.; Barbá, R. H.; Morrell, N. I.; Arias, J. I.; Gamen, R. C.

    2011-11-01

    In this poster we show our preliminary analysis of DIBs (Diffuse Interstellar Bands) and other interstellar absorption lines with the purpose of understanding their origin and their relationship with extinction. We use the biggest Galactic O-star blue-violet spectroscopic sample ever (GOSSS, see Maíz Apellániz, these proceedings). This sample allows a new insight on this topic because of the adequacy of O-star spectra, the sample number (700 by early 2010 and increasing; 400 are used here), and their distribution in the Milky Way disk. We confirm the high correlation coefficients between different DIBs and E(B-V), though the detailed behavior of each case shows small differences. We also detect a moderately low correlation coefficient between CaII lambda 3934 (Ca K) and E(B-V) with a peculiar spatial distribution that we ascribe to the relationship between line saturation and velocity profiles for CaII lambda 3934.

  5. Interstellar grain chemistry and organic molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allamandola, L. J.; Sandford, S. A.

    1990-01-01

    The detection of prominant infrared absorption bands at 3250, 2170, 2138, 1670 and 1470 cm(-1) (3.08, 4.61, 4.677, 5.99 and 6.80 micron m) associated with molecular clouds show that mixed molecular (icy) grain mantles are an important component of the interstellar dust in the dense interstellar medium. These ices, which contain many organic molecules, may also be the production site of the more complex organic grain mantles detected in the diffuse interstellar medium. Theoretical calculations employing gas phase as well as grain surface reactions predict that the ices should be dominated only by the simple molecules H2O, H2CO, N2, CO, O2, NH3, CH4, possibly CH3OH, and their deuterated counterparts. However, spectroscopic observations in the 2500 to 1250 cm(-1)(4 to 8 micron m) range show substantial variation from source reactions alone. By comparing these astronomical spectra with the spectra of laboratory-produced analogs of interstellar ices, one can determine the composition and abundance of the materials frozen on the grains in dense clouds. Experiments are described in which the chemical evolution of an interstellar ice analog is determined during irradiation and subsequent warm-up. Particular attention is paid to the types of moderately complex organic materials produced during these experiments which are likely to be present in interstellar grains and cometary ices.

  6. Observations of interstellar zinc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jura, M.; York, D.

    1981-01-01

    The International Ultraviolet Explorer observations of interstellar zinc toward 10 stars are examined. It is found that zinc is at most only slightly depleted in the interstellar medium; its abundance may serve as a tracer of the true metallicity in the gas. The local interstellar medium has abundances that apparently are homogeneous to within a factor of two, when integrated over paths of about 500 pc, and this result is important for understanding the history of nucleosynthesis in the solar neighborhood. The intrinsic errors in detecting weak interstellar lines are analyzed and suggestions are made as to how this error limit may be lowered to 5 mA per target observation.

  7. NASA's IBEX Observes Interstellar Matter

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) has directly sampled multiple heavy elements from the Local Interstellar Cloud for the first time. It turns out that this interstellar material is not like...

  8. Local Interstellar Medium. International Astronomical Union Colloquium No. 81

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kondo, Y. (Editor); Bruhweiler, F. C. (Editor); Savage, B. D. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    Helium and hydrogen backscattering; ultraviolet and EUV absorption spectra; optical extinction and polarization; hot gases; soft X-ray observations; infrared and millimeter wavelengths; radio wavelengths and theoretical models of the interstellar matter within about 150 parsecs of the Sun were examined.

  9. Search for interstellar methane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knacke, R. F.; Kim, Y. H.; Noll, K. S.; Geballe, T. R.

    1990-01-01

    Researchers searched for interstellar methane in the spectra of infrared sources embedded in molecular clouds. New observations of several lines of the P and R branches of the nu 3 band of CH4 near 3.3 microns give column densities in the range N less than 1(-2) times 10 to the minus 16th power cm(-2). Resulting abundance ratios are (CH4)/(CO) less than 3.3 times 10 to the minus 2nd power toward GL961 in NGC 2244 and less than 2.4 times 10 to the minus 3rd power toward GL989 in the NGC 2264 molecular cloud. The limits, and those determined in earlier observations of BN in Orion and GL490, suggest that there is little methane in molecular clouds. The result agrees with predictions of chemical models. Exceptions could occur in clouds where oxygen may be depleted, for example by H2O freezing on grains. The present observations probably did not sample such regions.

  10. CaFe interstellar clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondar, A.; Kozak, M.; Gnaciński, P.; Galazutdinov, G. A.; Beletsky, Y.; Krełowski, J.

    2007-07-01

    A new kind of interstellar cloud is proposed. These are rare (just a few examples among ~300 lines of sight) objects with the CaI 4227-Å, FeI 3720-Å and 3860-Å lines stronger than those of KI (near 7699 Å) and NaI (near 3302 Å). We propose the name `CaFe' for these clouds. Apparently they occupy different volumes from the well-known interstellar HI clouds where the KI and ultraviolet NaI lines are dominant features. In the CaFe clouds we have not found either detectable molecular features (CH, CN) or diffuse interstellar bands which, as commonly believed, are carried by some complex, organic molecules. We have found the CaFe clouds only along sightlines toward hot, luminous (and thus distant) objects with high rates of mass loss. In principle, the observed gas-phase interstellar abundances reflect the combined effects of the nucleosynthetic history of the material, the depletion of heavy elements into dust grains and the ionization state of these elements which may depend on irradiation by neighbouring stars. Based on data collected using the Maestro spectrograph at the Terskol 2-m telescope, Russia; and on data collected using the ESO Feros spectrograph; and on data obtained from the ESO Science Archive Facility acquired with the UVES spectrograph, Chile. E-mail: `arctur'@rambler.ru (AB); marizak@astri.uni.torun.pl (MK); pg@iftia.univ.gda.pl (PG); gala@boao.re.kr (GAG); ybialets@eso.org (YB); jacek@astri.uni.torun.pl (JK)

  11. Boussard Interstellar Ramjet Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The Boussard Interstellar Ramjet engine concept uses interstellar hydrogen scooped up from its environment as the spacecraft passes by to provide propellant mass. The hydrogen is then ionized and then collected by an electromagentic field. In this image, an onboard laser is uded to heat the plasma, and the laser or electron beam is used to trigger fusion pulses thereby creating propulsion.

  12. Is interstellar archeology possible?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrigan, Richard A.

    2012-09-01

    Searching for signatures of cosmic-scale archeological artifacts such as Dyson spheres is an interesting alternative to conventional radio SETI. Uncovering such an artifact does not require the intentional transmission of a signal on the part of the original civilization. This type of search is called interstellar archeology or sometimes cosmic archeology. A variety of interstellar archeology signatures is discussed including non-natural planetary atmospheric constituents, stellar doping, Dyson spheres, as well as signatures of stellar, and galactic-scale engineering. The concept of a Fermi bubble due to interstellar migration is reviewed in the discussion of galactic signatures. These potential interstellar archeological signatures are classified using the Kardashev scale. A modified Drake equation is introduced. With few exceptions interstellar archeological signatures are clouded and beyond current technological capabilities. However SETI for so-called cultural transmissions and planetary atmosphere signatures are within reach.

  13. A prelude to interstellar flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, L. D.; Norton, H. N.

    1980-01-01

    A 20 to 50 year interstellar precursor mission extending 400 to 1000 AU from the solar system is outlined as a means of bringing out and solving engineering problems inherent in a star mission, and of studying the heliopause, the interstellar medium, and cosmic rays outside the heliosphere. Solar or laser sailing combined with a 500 kWe nuclear-electric propulsion system using fission would achieve a heliocentric excess velocity of 100km/s for the 32,000 kg spacecraft having a Shuttle derivative as a launch vehicle, and containing a Pluto flyby or separate orbiter powered by radioiosotope thermoelectric generators. X-band transmission using 40 w of power, a 15 m diameter spacecraft antenna and a 100 m receiving antenna on earth and providing 100 b/s is proposed, but a rate of 2 to 4 kb/s via 500 to 1000 w of power using the K-band and a 300 m diameter receiving antenna located on an Orbiting Deep Space Relay Station is also considered.

  14. Laboratory evidence for ionized polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szczepanski, Jan; Vala, Martin

    1993-01-01

    The infrared absorption from neutrals and cations of four PAHs - naphthalene, anthracene, pyrene, and perylene - integrated over the spectral regions corresponding to the interstellar bands are compared with astronomical observations. It is found that the interstellar bands cannot be explained solely on the basis of neutral PAH species, but that cations must be a significant, and in some cases dominant, component.

  15. PAH in the laboratory and interstellar space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wdowiak, Thomas J.; Flickinger, Gregory C.; Boyd, David A.

    1989-01-01

    The theory that polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a constituent of the interstellar medium, and a source of the IR emission bands at 3.3, 6.2, 7.7, 8.6, and 11.3 microns is being studied using PAH containing acid insoluble residue of the Orgueil CI meteorite and coal tar. FTIR spectra of Orgueil PAH material that has undergone thermal treatment, and a solvent insoluble fraction of coal tar that has been exposed to hydrogen plasma are presented. The UV excided luminescence spectrum of a solvent soluble coal tar film is also shown. Comparison of the lab measurements with observations appears to support the interstellar PAH theory, and shows the process of dehydrogenation expected to take place in the interstellar medium.

  16. Extinctions of life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sepkoski, J. J. Jr; Sepkoski JJ, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1988-01-01

    This meeting presentation examines mass extinctions through earth's history. Extinctions are charted for marine families and marine genera. Timing of marine genera extinctions is discussed. Periodicity in extinctions during the Mesozoic and Cenozoic eras is plotted and compared with Paleozoic extinction peaks. The role of extinction in evolution and mankind's role in present extinctions are examined.

  17. The Galactic Distribution of Aliphatic Hydrocarbons in the Diffuse Interstellar Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, Scott A.; Pendleton, Yvonne J.; Allamandola, Louis J.

    1995-01-01

    The infrared absorption feature near 2950/ cm (3.4 microns), characteristic of dust in the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM), is attributed to C-H stretching vibrations of aliphatic hydrocarbons. We show here that the strength of the band does not scale linearly with visual extinction everywhere, but instead increases more rapidly for objects near the center of the Galaxy, a behavior that parallels that of the Si-O stretching band due to silicate materials in the diffuse ISM. This implies that the grains responsible for the diffuse medium aliphatic C-H and silicate Si-O stretching bands are different from those responsible for much of the observed visual extinction. It also suggests that the distribution of the carbonaceous component of the diffuse ISM is not uniform throughout the Galaxy, but instead may increase in density toward the center of the Galaxy. The similar behavior of the C-H and Si-O stretching bands suggests that these two components may be coupled, perhaps in the form of silicate-core, organic-mantle grains. Several possible models of the distribution of this material are presented and it is demonstrated that the inner parts of the Galaxy has a carrier density that is 5 to 35 times higher than in the local ISM. Depending on the model used, the density of aliphatic material in the local ISM is found to be about 1 to 2 -CH3 groups /cc and about 2 to 5 -CH2- groups/cc. These densities are consistent with the strengths of the 2955 and 2925/ cm (3.38 and 3.42 microns) subfeatures (due to -CH3 and -CH2- groups, respectively) within the overall 2950/ cm (3.4 microns) band being described by the relations A(sub upsilon)/tau(sub 2925/cm) = 270 +/- 40 and A(sub upsilon)/tau(sub 2925/cm) = 250 +/- 40 in the local diffuse ISM.

  18. The galactic distribution of aliphatic hydrocarbons in the diffuse interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, Scott A.; Pendleton, Yvonne J.; Allamandola, Louis J.

    1995-01-01

    The infrared absorption feature near 2950(exp -1) (3.4 micron), characteristic of dust in the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM), is attributed to C-H stretching vibrations of aliphatic hydrocarbons. We show here that the strength of the band does not scale linearly with visual extinction everywhere, but instead increases more rapidly for objects near the center of the Galaxy, a behavior that parallels that of the Si-O stretching band due to silicate materials in the diffuse ISM. This implies that the grains responsible for the diffuse medium aliphatic C-H and silicate Si-O stretching bands are different from those responsible for much of the observed visual extinction. It also suggests that the distribution of the carbonaceous component of the diffuse ISM is not uniform throughout the Galaxy, but instead may increase in density toward the center of the Galaxy. The similar behavior of the C-H and Si-O stretching bands suggests that these two components may be coupled, perhaps in the form of silicate-core, organic-mantle grains. Several possible models of the distribution of this material are presented and it is demonstrated that the inner parts of the Galaxy has a carrier density that is 5 to 35 times higher than in the local ISM. Depending on the model used, the density of aliphatic material in the local ISM is found to be about 1 to 2 -CH3 groups m(exp -3) and about 2 to 5 -CH2- groups m(exp -3). These densities are consistent with the strengths of the 2955 and 2925 cm(exp -1) (3.4 micron) band being described by the relations A(sub nu)/tau(sub 2955 cm(exp -1)) = 270 +/- 40 and A(sub nu)/tau(sub 2925 cm(exp -1)) = 250 +/- 40 in the local diffuse ISM.

  19. Australian Extinctions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Massive extinctions of animals and the arrival of the first humans in ancient Australia--which occurred 45,000 to 55,000 years ago--may be linked. Researchers at the Carnegie Institution, University of Colorado, Australian National University, and Bates College believe that massive fires set by the first humans may have altered the ecosystem of…

  20. Pathway to the identification of C60+ in diffuse interstellar clouds.

    PubMed

    Maier, John P; Campbell, Ewen K

    2016-09-13

    The origin of the attenuation of starlight in diffuse clouds in interstellar space at specific wavelengths ranging from the visible to the near-infrared has been unknown since the first astronomical observations around a century ago. The absorption features, termed the diffuse interstellar bands, have subsequently been the subject of much research. Earlier this year four of these interstellar bands were shown to be due to the absorption by cold, gas phase [Formula: see text] molecules. This discovery provides the first answer to the problem of the diffuse interstellar bands and leads naturally to fascinating questions regarding the role of fullerenes and derivatives in interstellar chemistry. Here, we review the identification process placing special emphasis on the laboratory studies which have enabled spectroscopic measurement of large cations cooled to temperatures prevailing in the interstellar medium.This article is part of the themed issue 'Fullerenes: past, present and future, celebrating the 30th anniversary of Buckminster Fullerene'.

  1. Pathway to the identification of C60+ in diffuse interstellar clouds.

    PubMed

    Maier, John P; Campbell, Ewen K

    2016-09-13

    The origin of the attenuation of starlight in diffuse clouds in interstellar space at specific wavelengths ranging from the visible to the near-infrared has been unknown since the first astronomical observations around a century ago. The absorption features, termed the diffuse interstellar bands, have subsequently been the subject of much research. Earlier this year four of these interstellar bands were shown to be due to the absorption by cold, gas phase [Formula: see text] molecules. This discovery provides the first answer to the problem of the diffuse interstellar bands and leads naturally to fascinating questions regarding the role of fullerenes and derivatives in interstellar chemistry. Here, we review the identification process placing special emphasis on the laboratory studies which have enabled spectroscopic measurement of large cations cooled to temperatures prevailing in the interstellar medium.This article is part of the themed issue 'Fullerenes: past, present and future, celebrating the 30th anniversary of Buckminster Fullerene'. PMID:27501976

  2. Interstellar Dust Grain Alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, B.-G.; Lazarian, A.; Vaillancourt, John E.

    2015-08-01

    Interstellar polarization at optical-to-infrared wavelengths is known to arise from asymmetric dust grains aligned with the magnetic field. This effect provides a potentially powerful probe of magnetic field structure and strength if the details of the grain alignment can be reliably understood. Theory and observations have recently converged on a quantitative, predictive description of interstellar grain alignment based on radiative processes. The development of a general, analytical model for this radiative alignment torque (RAT) theory has allowed specific, testable predictions for realistic interstellar conditions. We outline the theoretical and observational arguments in favor of RAT alignment, as well as reasons the "classical" paramagnetic alignment mechanism is unlikely to work, except possibly for the very smallest grains. With further detailed characterization of the RAT mechanism, grain alignment and polarimetry promise to not only better constrain the interstellar magnetic field but also provide new information on the dust characteristics.

  3. Interstellar organic chemistry.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagan, C.

    1972-01-01

    Most of the interstellar organic molecules have been found in the large radio source Sagittarius B2 toward the galactic center, and in such regions as W51 and the IR source in the Orion nebula. Questions of the reliability of molecular identifications are discussed together with aspects of organic synthesis in condensing clouds, degradational origin, synthesis on grains, UV natural selection, interstellar biology, and contributions to planetary biology.

  4. Observations of interstellar zinc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    York, D. G.; Jura, M.

    1982-01-01

    IUE observations toward 10 stars have shown that zinc is not depleted in the interstellar medium by more than a factor of two, suggesting that its abundance may serve as a tracer of the true metallicity in the gas. A result pertinent to the history of nucleosynthesis in the solar neighborhood is that the local interstellar medium has abundances that appear to be homogeneous to within a factor of two, when integrated over paths of about 500 pc.

  5. Discovery of interstellar rubidium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jura, M.; Smith, W. H.

    1981-01-01

    Interstellar rubidium is detected through observations of the resonance line of Rb I at 7800 A towards zeta Oph. The abundance ratio of rubidium to potassium is estimated to be approximately solar, and if rubidium is generally found to have an abundance similar to potassium, it is indicated that the local interstellar medium is well mixed with a wide variety of the products of nucleosynthesis.

  6. Interstellar Propulsion Concepts Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forward, Robert L.

    2000-01-01

    NASA is investigating the feasibility of conducting extra-solar and interstellar missions over the next 10 to 50 years. An assessment of technologies supporting these near and far term objectives is required. To help meet these objectives the Principal Investigator assessed the feasibility of candidate propulsion systems for the proposed 'Interstellar Probe', a mission to send a spacecraft to the Heliopause at 250 AU and beyond.

  7. Interstellar Abundance Standards Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofia, Ulysses J.; Meyer, David M.

    2001-06-01

    We evaluate the stellar abundances often used to represent the total (gas plus dust) composition of the interstellar medium. Published abundances for B stars, young later type (F and G) stars, and the Sun are compared to the modeled dust-phase and measured gas-phase compositions of the interstellar medium. This study uses abundances for the five most populous elements in dust grains-C, O, Mg, Si, and Fe-and the cosmically abundant element, N. We find that B stars have metal abundances that are too low to be considered valid representations of the interstellar medium. The commonly invoked interstellar standard that is two-thirds of the solar composition is also rejected by recent observations. Young (<=2 Gyr) F and G disk stars and the Sun, however, cannot be ruled out as reliable proxies for the total interstellar composition. If their abundances are valid representations of the interstellar medium, then the apparent underabundance of carbon with respect to that required by dust models, i.e., the carbon crisis, is substantially eased.

  8. Carriers of the astronomical 2175 ? extinction feature

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, J; Dai, Z; Ernie, R; Browning, N; Graham, G; Weber, P; Smith, J; Hutcheon, I; Ishii, H; Bajt, S; Floss, C; Stadermann, F

    2004-07-20

    The 2175 {angstrom} extinction feature is by far the strongest spectral signature of interstellar dust observed by astronomers. Forty years after its discovery the origin of the feature and the nature of the carrier remain controversial. The feature is enigmatic because although its central wavelength is almost invariant its bandwidth varies strongly from one sightline to another, suggesting multiple carriers or a single carrier with variable properties. Using a monochromated transmission electron microscope and valence electron energy-loss spectroscopy we have detected a 5.7 eV (2175 {angstrom}) feature in submicrometer-sized interstellar grains within interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) collected in the stratosphere. The carriers are organic carbon and amorphous silicates that are abundant and closely associated with one another both in IDPs and in the interstellar medium. Multiple carriers rather than a single carrier may explain the invariant central wavelength and variable bandwidth of the astronomical 2175 {angstrom} feature.

  9. SEARCHING FOR NAPHTHALENE CATION ABSORPTION IN THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Searles, Justin M.; Destree, Joshua D.; Snow, Theodore P.; Salama, Farid; York, Donald G.; Dahlstrom, Julie E-mail: destree@colorado.edu E-mail: Farid.Salama@nasa.gov E-mail: jdahlstrom1@carthage.edu

    2011-05-01

    Interstellar naphthalene cations (C{sub 10}H{sup +}{sub 8}) have been proposed by a study to be the carriers of a small number of diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs). Using an archive of high signal-to-noise spectra obtained at the Apache Point Observatory, we used two methods to test the hypothesis. Both methods failed to detect significant absorption at lab wavelengths of interstellar spectra with laboratory spectra. We thereby conclude that C{sub 10}H{sup +}{sub 8} is not a DIB carrier in typical reddened sight lines.

  10. Interstellar Antifreeze: Ethylene Glycol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollis, J. M.; Lovas, F. J.; Jewell, P. R.; Coudert, L. H.

    2002-01-01

    Interstellar ethylene glycol (HOCH2CH2,OH) has been detected in emission toward the Galactic center source Sagittarius B2(N-LMH) by means of several millimeter-wave rotational torsional transitions of its lowest energy conformer. The types and kinds of molecules found to date in interstellar clouds suggest a chemistry that favors aldehydes and their corresponding reduced alcohols-e.g., formaldehyde (H2CO)/methanol (CH3OH), acetaldehyde (CH3CHO)/ethanol (CH3CH2OH). Similarly, ethylene glycol is the reduced alcohol of glycolaldehyde (CH2OHCHO), which has also been detected toward Sgr B2(N-LMH). While there is no consensus as to how any such large complex molecules are formed in the interstellar clouds, atomic hydrogen (H) and carbon monoxide (CO) could form formaldehyde on grain surfaces, but such surface chemistry beyond that point is uncertain. However, laboratory experiments have shown that the gas-phase reaction of atomic hydrogen (H) and solid-phase CO at 10-20 K can produce formaldehyde and methanol and that alcohols and other complex molecules can be synthesized from cometary ice analogs when subject to ionizing radiation at 15 K. Thus, the presence of aldehyde/ reduced alcohol pairs in interstellar clouds implies that such molecules are a product of a low-temperature chemistry on grain surfaces or in grain ice mantles. This work suggests that aldehydes and their corresponding reduced alcohols provide unique observational constraints on the formation of complex interstellar molecules.

  11. Some Open Questions in the Physics of Interstellar Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draine, Bruce T.

    2014-06-01

    Our efforts to understand interstellar dust proceed by trying to develop models that are consistent with the laws of physics as well as with the many observational constraints provided by astronomical observations, the meteoritic record, and observations of interstellar dust grains entering the solar system today.I will review some open questions in physics and surface chemistry that are important for current modeling of dust.Nature has provided us with hundreds of spectroscopic clues -- the diffuse interstellar bands -- and it is an embarrasment that we haven't yet been able to decipher them.Interstellar grains contain iron, which could be in ferromagnetic or ferrimagnetic materials. If so, does magnetic dissipation contribute significantly to emission from dust at microwave and submm frequencies? This can be addressed in the laboratory.We do know that interstellar grains are not spherical, but we don't know whether they are compact, or whether they are have extended "fluffy" structures. To find out, we will have to compare observed optical properties of interstellar dust with theoretical models. How can we calculate the optical properties of fluffy grains at wavelengths ranging from X-rays to far-infrared? Theoretical methods will be described.It seems very likely that interstellar grains are often destroyed in the ISM; if so, then the observed abundance of grains requires that new grain material be formed in interstellar space. How can grain materials "grow" in the ISM? In particular, is it possible to grow amorphous silicates in cold interstellar clouds? What about carbonaceous material, in particular the nanoparticles that are thought to be responsible for the strong "PAH" emission bands? The possibilities and limitations of laboratory studies will be discussed.

  12. Interpretation of far infra-red emission from interstellar grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caroff, L. J.; Salpeter, E. E.; Wagoner, R. V.; Werner, M. W.; Petrosian, V.

    1973-01-01

    Application of the Kramers-Kronig relations to grains in the interstellar medium. It is found that the recent UV, visual, and infrared extinction curves provide marginal evidence against silicates as the major cause of this extinction. In the far infrared, grains contribute little to the extinction, but can be observed in thermal emission. It is shown that the far infrared emission from grains in a given bandwidth sets a lower limit to the grain temperature. From observed intensities from the galactic plane at 100 microns and from Orion at 350 microns, minimum grain temperatures are found which are larger than the observed brightness temperature. The emission and extinction data can be used together to constrain the allowable range of parameters for the grains.

  13. Interstellar H3+

    PubMed Central

    Oka, Takeshi

    2006-01-01

    Protonated molecular hydrogen, H3+, is the simplest polyatomic molecule. It is the most abundantly produced interstellar molecule, next only to H2, although its steady state concentration is low because of its extremely high chemical reactivity. H3+ is a strong acid (proton donor) and initiates chains of ion-molecule reactions in interstellar space thus leading to formation of complex molecules. Here, I summarize the understandings on this fundamental species in interstellar space obtained from our infrared observations since its discovery in 1996 and discuss the recent observations and analyses of H3+ in the Central Molecular Zone near the Galatic center that led to a revelation of a vast amount of warm and diffuse gas existing in the region. PMID:16894171

  14. Interstellar H(3)(+).

    PubMed

    Oka, Takeshi

    2006-08-15

    Protonated molecular hydrogen, H(3)(+), is the simplest polyatomic molecule. It is the most abundantly produced interstellar molecule, next only to H(2), although its steady state concentration is low because of its extremely high chemical reactivity. H(3)(+) is a strong acid (proton donor) and initiates chains of ion-molecule reactions in interstellar space thus leading to formation of complex molecules. Here, I summarize the understandings on this fundamental species in interstellar space obtained from our infrared observations since its discovery in 1996 and discuss the recent observations and analyses of H(3)(+) in the Central Molecular Zone near the Galatic center that led to a revelation of a vast amount of warm and diffuse gas existing in the region.

  15. The interstellar gas experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lind, D. L.; Geiss, J.; Buehler, F.; Eugster, O.

    1992-01-01

    The Interstellar Gas Experiment (IGE) exposed thin metallic foils to collect neutral interstellar gas particles. These particles penetrate the solar system due to their motion relative to the sun. Thus, it is possible to entrap them in the collecting foils along with precipitating magnetospheric and perhaps some ambient atmospheric particles. For the entire duration of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) mission, seven of these foils collected particles arriving from seven different directions as seen from the spacecraft. In the mass spectroscopic analysis of the noble gas component of these particles, we have detected the isotopes of He-3, He-4, Ne-20, and Ne-22. In the foil analyses carried out so far, we find a distribution of particle arrival directions which shows that a significant part of the trapped particles are indeed interstellar atoms. The analysis needed to subtract the competing fluxes of magnetospheric and atmospheric particles is still in progress.

  16. On the Homogeneity of the Extinction Law in our Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondar, A.; Galazutdinov, G.; Patriarchi, P.; Krełowski, J.

    2006-06-01

    We analyze the extinction law towards several B1V stars -- members of our Galaxy, searching for possible discrepancies from the galactic average extinction curve. Our photometric data allow to build extinction curves in a very broad range: from extreme UV till infrared. Two--colour diagrams, based on the collected photometric data from the ANS UV satellite, published UBV measurements and on the infrared 2MASS data of the selected stars, are constructed. Slopes of the fitted straight lines are used to build the average extinction curve and to search for discrepant objects. The selected stars have also been observed spectroscopically from the Terskol and ESO Observatories; these spectra allow to check their Sp/L's. The spectra of only about 30% of the initially selected objects resemble closely that of HD144470, considered as the standard of B1 V type. Other spectra either show some emission features or belong clearly to another spectral types. They are not used to build the extinction curve. Two-colour diagrams, constructed for the selected B1 V stars, showing no emission stellar features, prove that the interstellar extinction law is homogeneous in the Galaxy. Both the shape of the curve and the total--to--selective extinction ratio do not differ from the galactic average and the canonical value (3.1) respectively. The circumstellar emissions usually cause some discrepancies from the average interstellar extinction law; the discrepancies observed in the extraterrestrial ultraviolet, usually follow some misclassifications.

  17. Exploring the gas-phase spectroscopy of interstellar PAH and dust analogs: Astrophysical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biennier, Ludovic; Salama, Farid; Allamandola, Lou; Gupta, Manish; O'Keefe, Anthony; Scherer, James J.

    We present and discuss the gas-phase electronic absorption spectra of selected ionized polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) measured in the UV-Visible-NIR range in an astrophysically relevant environment. This type of measurements provides data on PAHs and nanometer-sized particles that can now be directly compared to astronomical spectra of the UV interstellar (IS) extinction curve and of the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs). The harsh physical conditions of the IS medium - characterized by a low temperature, an absence of collisions and strong VUV radiation fields - are simulated in the laboratory by associating a molecular beam with an ionizing discharge to generate a cold plasma expansion. This source combines a pulsed slit supersonic free jet expansion of argon seeded with PAHs (< 1%) and an ionizing pulsed electronic discharge. PAH ions are formed from the neutral precursors in an isolated environment at low temperature (˜100 K). The spectra of PAH ions are measured using the complementary high sensitivity methods of Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) and Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy (ICOS). We have first applied this instrument to the measurement of the electronic spectrum of the cold Naphthalene (C10H8+) and Acenaphthene cations (C12H10+) (Biennier, L., Salama, F., Allamandola, L. J. & Scherer, J. J., `Pulsed discharge nozzle cavity ringdown spectroscopy of cold PAH ions', J. Chem Phys.;in press) that have been pre-selected from Matrix Isolation Spectroscopy (MIS) studies. The absorption spectrum of the Pyrene cation (C16H10+) has also been measured. These experiments provide unique information on the spectra of free, large carbon-containing molecules and ions in the gas phase. The electronic bands measured for this selection of PAH ions are all found to be intrinsically broad (>˜20 cm-1). The laboratory data are compared with recent astronomical spectra of large DIBs. Preliminary results also show that carbon nanoparticles (˜2 nm size

  18. A Rigorous Attempt to Verify Interstellar Glycine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, L. E.; Lovas, F. J.; Hollis, J. M.; Friedel, D. N.; Jewell, P. R.; Remijan, A.; Ilyushin, V. V.; Alekseev, E. A.; Dyubko, S. F.

    2004-01-01

    In 2003, Kuan, Charnley, and co-workers reported the detection of interstellar glycine (NH2CH2COOH) based on observations of 27 lines in 19 different spectral bands in one or more of the sources Sgr BP(N-LMH), Orion KL, and W51 e1/e2. They supported their detection report with rotational temperature diagrams for all three sources. In this paper, we present essential criteria which can be used in a straightforward analysis technique to confirm the identity of an interstellar asymmetric rotor such as glycine. We use new laboratory measurements of glycine as a basis for applying this analysis technique, both to our previously unpublished 12 m telescope data and to the previously published SEST data of Nummelin and colleagues. We conclude that key lines necessary for an interstellar glycine identification have not yet been found. We identify several common molecular candidates that should be examined further as more likely carriers of the lines reported as glycine. Finally, we illustrate that rotational temperature diagrams used without the support of correct spectroscopic assignments are not a reliable tool for the identification of interstellar molecules. Subject headings: ISM: abundances - ISM: clouds - ISM: individual (Sagittarius B2[N-

  19. The interstellar redding law in the ultraviolet deduced from filter photometry obtained by the OAO-2 satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laget, M.

    1972-01-01

    Filter photometry has been obtained of 16 BO stars at ten effective wavelengths in the range 4250-1430 A. The wavelength dependence of the interstellar reddening law, deduced from a least squares fit of the observed values to the reddening line at each band, is found in satisfactory agreement with that derived by Bless and Savage (1972). Toward the shorter wavelengths the increase of the computed probable error of the slope of the mean reddening line suggests that large fluctuations in the law may occur from star to star. Similar computations, separating main-sequence stars and supergiants, indicate that the large fluctuations of the law appear to be well related to the luminosity of the stars; the supergiants show systematically less extinction, this deficiency becoming large toward the far UV. The small number in the sample however, does not allow a general conclusion to be drawn.

  20. TIME VARIATION OF AV AND RV FOR TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE BEHIND INTERSTELLAR DUST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiaosheng; Biederman, M.; Herger, B.; Aldering, G. S.

    2014-01-01

    TIME VARIATION OF AV AND RV FOR TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE BEHIND NON-UNIFORM INTERSTELLAR DUST ABSTRACT We investigate the time variation of the visual extinction, AV, and the total-to-selective extinction ratio, RV, resulting from interstellar dust in front of an expanding photospheric disk of a type Ia supernova (SN Ia). We simulate interstellar dust clouds according to a power law power spectrum and produce extinction maps that either follow a pseudo-Gaussian distribution or a lognormal distribution. The RV maps are produced through a correlation between AV and RV. With maps of AV and RV generated in each case (pseudo-Gaussian and lognormal), we then compute the effective AV and RV for a SN as its photospheric disk expands behind the dust screen. We find for a small percentage of SNe the AV and RV values can vary by a large factor from day to day in the first 40 days after explosion.

  1. Voyager Interstellar Mission (VIM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudd, R.; Textor, G.

    1991-01-01

    The DSN (Deep Space Network) mission support requirements for the Voyager Interstellar Mission (VIM) are summarized. The general objectives of the VIM are to investigate the interplanetary and interstellar media and to continue the Voyager program of ultraviolet astronomy. The VIM will utilize both Voyager spacecraft for the period from January 1990 through December 2019. The mission objectives are outlined and the DSN support requirements are defined through the presentation of tables and narratives describing the spacecraft flight profile; DSN support coverage; frequency assignments; support parameters for telemetry, control and support systems; and tracking support responsibility.

  2. Impossible Extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cockell, Charles S.

    2003-03-01

    Every 225 million years the Earth, and all the life on it, completes one revolution around the Milky Way Galaxy. During this remarkable journey, life is influenced by calamitous changes. Comets and asteroids strike the surface of the Earth, stars explode, enormous volcanoes erupt, and, more recently, humans litter the planet with waste. Many animals and plants become extinct during the voyage, but humble microbes, simple creatures made of a single cell, survive this journey. This book takes a tour of the microbial world, from the coldest and deepest places on Earth to the hottest and highest, and witnesses some of the most catastrophic events that life can face. Impossible Extinction tells this remarkable story to the general reader by explaining how microbes have survived on Earth for over three billion years. Charles Cockell received his doctorate from the University of Oxford, and is currently a microbiologist with rhe Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence Institute (SETI), based at the British Antarctic Survey in Cambridge, UK. His research focusses on astrobiology, life in the extremes and the human exploration of Mars. Cockell has been on expeditions to the Arctic, Antarctic, Mongolia, and in 1993 he piloted a modified insect-collecting ultra-light aircraft over the Indonesian rainforests. He is Chair of the Twenty-one Eleven Foundation for Exploration, a charity that supports expeditions that forge links between space exploration and environmentalism.

  3. The Voyager Interstellar Mission.

    PubMed

    Rudd, R P; Hall, J C; Spradlin, G L

    1997-01-01

    The Voyager Interstellar Mission began on January 1, 1990, with the primary objective being to characterize the interplanetary medium beyond Neptune and to search for the transition region between the interplanetary medium and the interstellar medium. At the start of this mission, the two Voyager spacecraft had already been in flight for over twelve years, having successfully returned a wealth of scientific information about the planetary systems of Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune, and the interplanetary medium between Earth and Neptune. The two spacecraft have the potential to continue returning science data until around the year 2020. With this extended operating lifetime, there is a high likelihood of one of the two spacecraft penetrating the termination shock and possibly the heliopause boundary, and entering interstellar space before that time. This paper describes the Voyager Interstellar Mission--the mission objectives, the spacecraft and science payload, the mission operations system used to support operations, and the mission operations strategy being used to maximize science data return even in the event of certain potential spacecraft subsystem failures. The implementation of automated analysis tools to offset and enable reduced flight team staffing levels is also discussed.

  4. The Voyager Interstellar Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudd, R. P.; Hall, J. C.; Spradlin, G. L.

    1997-01-01

    The Voyager Interstellar Mission began on January 1, 1990, with the primary objective being to characterize the interplanetary medium beyond Neptune and to search for the transition region between the interplanetary medium and the interstellar medium. At the start of this mission, the two Voyager spacecraft had already been in flight for over twelve years, having successfully returned a wealth of scientific information about the planetary systems of Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune, and the interplanetary medium between Earth and Neptune. The two spacecraft have the potential to continue returning science data until around the year 2020. With this extended operating lifetime, there is a high likelihood of one of the two spacecraft penetrating the termination shock and possibly the heliopause boundary, and entering interstellar space before that time. This paper describes the Voyager Interstellar Mission--the mission objectives, the spacecraft and science payload, the mission operations system used to support operations, and the mission operations strategy being used to maximize science data return even in the event of certain potential spacecraft subsystem failures. The implementation of automated analysis tools to offset and enable reduced flight team staffing levels is also discussed.

  5. Interstellar molecular clouds.

    PubMed

    Bally, J

    1986-04-11

    The interstellar medium in our galaxy contains matter in a variety of states ranging from hot plasma to cold and dusty molecular gas. The molecular phase consists of giant clouds, which are the largest gravitationally bound objects in the galaxy, the primary reservoir of material for the ongoing birth of new stars, and the medium regulating the evolution of galactic disks.

  6. The Voyager Interstellar Mission.

    PubMed

    Rudd, R P; Hall, J C; Spradlin, G L

    1997-01-01

    The Voyager Interstellar Mission began on January 1, 1990, with the primary objective being to characterize the interplanetary medium beyond Neptune and to search for the transition region between the interplanetary medium and the interstellar medium. At the start of this mission, the two Voyager spacecraft had already been in flight for over twelve years, having successfully returned a wealth of scientific information about the planetary systems of Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune, and the interplanetary medium between Earth and Neptune. The two spacecraft have the potential to continue returning science data until around the year 2020. With this extended operating lifetime, there is a high likelihood of one of the two spacecraft penetrating the termination shock and possibly the heliopause boundary, and entering interstellar space before that time. This paper describes the Voyager Interstellar Mission--the mission objectives, the spacecraft and science payload, the mission operations system used to support operations, and the mission operations strategy being used to maximize science data return even in the event of certain potential spacecraft subsystem failures. The implementation of automated analysis tools to offset and enable reduced flight team staffing levels is also discussed. PMID:11540770

  7. Interstellar Dust: New Views After Spitzer, Herschel, and Planck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draine, Bruce T.

    2015-08-01

    The Spitzer, Herschel, and Planck missions have provided observational data that inform and challenge existing models for interstellar dust. These data will guide us in the development of a new generation of dust models.For dust in the general diffuse interstellar medium, these three missions have provided:* 5-20 um PAH emission spectra for a range of regions* determinations of the 10um and 18um silicate absorption and emission profiles in different environments* new determinations of the wavelength-dependent extinction in the mid-IR* spectral energy distributions out to 160um (with Spitzer), to 500um with Herschel, and out to 3mm with Planck* observations of "anomalous microwave emission" from dust near 1 cm* polarization of the dust emission from 4mm to 850um.Models for interstellar dust are constrained by these new data, and also by many other observational constraints, including extinction and polarization of starlight at optical wavelengths, the scattering of starllight by dust, scattering and extinction of X-rays by dust, and ground-based studies of the anomalous microwave emission.I will review where the models now stand, what appear to be the greatest challenges, and directions for future work.

  8. Search for interstellar adenine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarti, Sandip K.; Majumdar, Liton; Das, Ankan; Chakrabarti, Sonali

    2015-05-01

    It is long debated if pre-biotic molecules are indeed present in the interstellar medium. Despite substantial works pointing to their existence, pre-biotic molecules are yet to be discovered with a complete confidence. In this paper, our main aim is to study the chemical evolution of interstellar adenine under various circumstances. We prepare a large gas-grain chemical network by considering various pathways for the formation of adenine. Majumdar et al. (New Astron. 20:15, 2013) proposed that in the absence of adenine detection, one could try to trace two precursors of adenine, namely, HCCN and NH2CN. Recently Merz et al. (J. Phys. Chem. A 118:3637-3644, 2014), proposed another route for the formation of adenine in interstellar condition. They proposed two more precursor molecules. But it was not verified by any accurate gas-grain chemical model. Neither was it known if the production rate would be high or low. Our paper fills this important gap. We include this new pathways to find that the contribution through this pathways for the formation of Adenine is the most dominant one in the context of interstellar medium. We propose that observers may look for the two precursors (C3NH and HNCNH) in the interstellar media which are equally important for predicting abundances of adenine. We perform quantum chemical calculations to find out spectral properties of adenine and its two new precursor molecules in infrared, ultraviolet and sub-millimeter region. Our present study would be useful for predicting abundance of adenine.

  9. Structural Evolution of Interstellar Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammonds, Mark; Candian, Alessandra; Mori, Tamami; Usui, Fumihiko; Onaka, Takashi

    2015-08-01

    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are an important reservoir for molecular carbon in the interstellar medium (ISM), and investigations into their chemistry and behaviour may be important to the understanding of how carbon is processed from simple forms into complex prebiotic molecules such as those detected in chondritic meteorites. In this study, infrared astronomical data from AKARI and other observatories are used together with laboratory and theoretical data to study variations in the structure of emitting PAHs in interstellar environments using spectroscopic decomposition techniques and bands arising from carbon-hydrogen bond vibrations at wavelengths from 3 - 14 microns. Results and inferences are discussed in terms of the processing of large carbonaceous molecules in astrophysical environments.

  10. Extinction and dust properties in a clumpy medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scicluna, P.; Siebenmorgen, R.

    2015-12-01

    The dust content of the universe is primarily explored via its interaction with stellar photons, which are absorbed or scattered by the dust, producing the effect known as interstellar extinction. However, owing to the physical extension of the observing beam, real observations may detect a significant number of dust-scattered photons. This may result in a change in the observed (or effective) extinction with a dependence on the spatial distribution of the dust and the spatial resolution of the instrument. We investigate the influence of clumpy dust distributions on the effective extinction toward both embedded sources and those seen through the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM). We use a Monte Carlo radiative transfer code to examine the effective extinction for various geometries. By varying the number, optical depth and volume-filling factor of clumps inside the model for spherical shells and the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM), we explore the evolution of the extinction curve and effective optical depth. Depending on the number of scattering events in the beam, the extinction curve is observed to steepen in homogeneous media and flatten in clumpy media. As a result, clumpy dust distributions are able to reproduce extinction curves with arbitrary RV,eff, the effective ratio of total-to-selective extinction. The flattening is also able to "wash out" the 2175 Å bump and results in a shift of the peak to shorter wavelengths. The mean RV,eff of a shell is shown to correlate with the optical depth of an individual clump and the wavelength at which a clump becomes optically thick. Similar behaviour is seen for edge-on discs or tori. However, at grazing inclinations the combination of extinction and strong forward scattering results in chaotic behaviour. Caution is therefore advised when attempting to measure extinction in AGN tori for example or toward SNIa or GRB afterglows. In face-on discs, the shape of the scattered continuum is observed to change significantly

  11. Search for fullerenes and PAHs in the diffuse interstellar medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrenfreund, P.; Foing, B. H.

    1995-02-01

    Recent studies suggest carbon-containing molecules as the best candidates for carriers of the unidentified diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs). considering their abundance and ability to form stable bonds in interstellar space. We have searched for new DIBs in the near-IR and have detected two new diffuse bands that are consistent with laboratory measurements of C 60+ in a neon matrix. Criteria for this possible identification are discussed. From these observations and the DIB treasured absorption. we estimate that up to 0.9% of interstellar carbon could be in the form of C 60+ We also searched for poly cyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) canons and have derived corresponding limits for the presence of the coronene C 24H 12 and ovalene C 32H 14 cations in space. We have studied the ionization properties of these PAH cations, which could explain their selective destruction. From these results we discuss the role of fullerenes and PAHs as possible DIB carriers.

  12. Interstellar dust from the Milky Way to the Magellanic Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pei, Yichuan C.

    1992-01-01

    Interstellar dust in the Magellanic Clouds, with a weak or nearly absent 2175 A extinction feature, may be of interest in studies of galaxies in early stages of chemical evolution. To this inquiry, we extend the graphite-silicate grain model, introduced by Mathis, Rumpl, and Nordsieck and developed by Draine and Lee (1984) from the Milky Way to the Magellanic Clouds. We find that the empirical extinction curves in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds can be reproduced by adjusting only the relative abundances of graphite and silicate grains, while leaving all other model properties fixed to those appropriate for the Galactic extinction curve. Using the graphite-silicate models, we calculate the absorption and scattering optical depths, the mass-density ratio of interstellar dust to neutral hydrogen, and the Kramers-Kronig relation for all three galaxies. We also present a fitting function for the three extinction curves, valid not only over the observed range of wavelengths but also over the full range as predicted by the models. All the quantities we derived here are independent of the dust-to-gas ratios in the Milky Way and the Magellanic Clouds, and can be applied to other galaxies if they contain Galactic or Magellanic-type dust.

  13. Innovative interstellar explorer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNutt, R.; Innovative Interstellar Explorer Team

    Fundamental scientific questions about the interaction of the Sun with the interstellar medium can only be answered with in situ measurements. The problem is the development of a probe that can provide the required measurements and can reach a heliocentric distance of at least 200 astronomical units (AU) in 15 years or less, an average speed almost four times the 3.6 AU/yr speed of Voyager 1. The Innovative Interstellar Explorer (IIE) and its use of Radioisotope Electric Propulsion (REP) is now being studied under a NASA Vision Mission grant to enable such a mission. Speed is provided by a high-energy launch using current launch vehicle technology followed by long-term, low-thrust, continuous acceleration. The latter is provided by a kilowatt-class ion thruster running off of electricity provided by advanced Stirling radioisotope generators (SRGs) powered by Pu-238. While subject to mass and power limitations for the instruments on board, such an approach relies on known General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) Pu-238 technology and current launch vehicles for speed, both of which require little new development and have well-known regulatory requirements for launch. In addition, this approach avoids the intrinsically large masses associated with nuclear fission reactors and incorporates launch of all nuclear material directly into an Earth-escape trajectory. We discuss the ongoing trade studies and development of this approach to an Interstellar Probe

  14. Infrared emission spectra of candidate interstellar aromatic molecules.

    PubMed

    Cook, D J; Schlemmer, S; Balucani, N; Wagner, D R; Steiner, B; Saykally, R J

    1996-03-21

    Interstellar dust is responsible, through surface reactions, for the creation of molecular hydrogen, the main component of the interstellar clouds in which new stars form. Intermediate between small, gas-phase molecules and dust are the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Such molecules could account for 2-30% of the carbon in the Galaxy, and may provide nucleation sites for the formation of carbonaceous dust. Although PAHs have been proposed as the sources of the unidentified infrared emission bands that are observed in the spectra of a variety of interstellar sources, the emission characteristics of such molecules are still poorly understood. Here we report laboratory emission spectra of several representative PAHs, obtained in conditions approximating those of the interstellar medium, and measured over the entire spectral region spanned by the unidentified infrared bands. We find that neutral PAHs of small and moderate size can at best make only a minor contribution to these emission bands. Cations of these molecules, as well as much larger PAHs and their cations, remain viable candidates for the sources of these bands.

  15. Silicon Depletion in the Interstellar Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haris, U.; Parvathi, V. S.; Gudennavar, S. B.; Bubbly, S. G.; Murthy, J.; Sofia, U. J.

    2016-06-01

    We report interstellar silicon (Si) depletion and dust-phase column densities of Si along 131 Galactic sight lines using archival observations. The data were corrected for differences in the assumed oscillator strength. This is a much larger sample than previous studies but confirms the majority of results, which state that the depletion of Si is correlated with the average density of hydrogen along the line of sight (< n({{H}})> ) as well as the fraction of hydrogen in molecular form (f(H2)). We also find that the linear part of the extinction curve is independent of Si depletion. Si depletion is correlated with the bump strength (c3/RV) and the FUV curvature (c4/RV) suggesting that silicon plays a significant role in both the 2175 Å bump and the FUV rise.

  16. Carbon Chains in the Diffuse Interstellar Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thaddeus, P.

    1999-05-01

    Linear carbon chain molecules are the dominant fraction of the 125 molecules which have now been identified in interstellar clouds or circumstellar shells, and the only molecules which have been conclusively identified as carriers of optical diffuse interstellar bands are carbon chains (as discussed by Maier at this meeting). In our laboratory over the past two years we have succeeded in detecting 46 carbon chains by applying Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy to supersonic molecular beams of reactive species produced in a gas discharge. The radio spectrum of all - including hyperfine structure when present - has been measured to the point that the laboratory astrophysics is complete: very precise rest frequencies are in hand for astronomical searches, and six of the chains have in fact already been detected with large radio telescopes. Because the longer chains tend to have their strongest lines at low frequencies, the resurfaced Arecibo telescope and the Green Bank Telescope under construction promise to be especially effective search instruments. Carbon chains are by far the best candidates for the several hundred diffuse bands which have been identified since 1922, and since the chain densities achieved in the laboratory are fairly high by the standards of laser spectroscopy, the classical problem of the diffuse bands may be on the point of general solution.

  17. The Nature of Interstellar Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huss, G. R.

    2003-01-01

    The STARDUST mission is designed to collect dust the coma of comet Wild 2 and to collect interstellar dust on a second set of collectors. We have a reasonable idea of what to expect from the comet dust collection because the research community has been studying interplanetary dust particles for many years. It is less clear what we should expect from the interstellar dust. This presentation discusses what we might expect to find on the STARDUST interstellar dust collector.

  18. On Ion Clusters in the Interstellar Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donn, Bertram

    1960-01-01

    In a recent paper V.I. Krassovsky (1958) predicts the occurrence of clusters of large numbers of atoms and molecules around ions in the interstellar gas. He then proposes a number of physicochemical processes that would be considerably enhanced by the high particle density in such clusters. In particular, he suggests that absorption by negative ions formed in the clusters would account for the interstellar extinction without any necessity for the presence of grains. Because of the important consequences that ion clusters could have, it is necessary to examine their occurrence more fully. This note re-examines the formation of ion clusters in space and shows that even ion-molecule pairs are essentially non-existent. Ion clusters have been considered by Bloom and Margenau (1952) from the same point of view as that used by Krassovsky, whose basic reference (Joffe and Semenov 1933) unfortunately is not available. A different approach has been used by Eyring, Hirschfelder, and Taylor (1936) following the methods of chemical equilibrium. Both the references cited here enable one to conclude that clustering is negligible. Therefore, the treatment of Eyring et al. is more appropriate than the method of Bloom and Margenau, which depends on the statistical equilibrium of an atmosphere in a force field.

  19. Rnu-dependent optical and near-ultraviolet extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Donnell, James E.

    1994-02-01

    We have derived extinctions A(lambda)/A(V) at the wavelengths of the uvby filters for 22 stars, with a range of values of Rnu, from the sample of Cardelli, Clayton, & Mathis (1989, hereafter CCM). We have fit these extinctions, and also UBVRIJHKL, IUE and ANS extinction measurements, with linear relations A(lambda)/A/(V) = a+b/Rnu and fit a and b as a function of x(=1/lambda) with polynomials to obtain an Rnu-dependent mean extinction law (A(x)/A(V) = a(x) + b(x)/Rnu)in the optical and near-ultraviolet (1.1/micrometer less than or equal to 3.3/micrometer). This law is virtually identical to the CCM extinction law for large values of Rnu(Rnu approximately 5) but is slightly lower in the near-ultraviolet for smaller Rnu (Rnu approximately 3). The extinction law presented here agrees much better with a high-resolution extinction curve for the diffuse interstellar medium (Rnu approximately 3.1), presented by Bastiaansen (1992), than CCM. The deviations of individual extinction curves from the mean are dominated by observational errors. The wavelength resolution of this work is not high enough to show evidence for or against the existence of very broad structure in optical extinction curves.

  20. Stardust Interstellar Preliminary Examination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westphal, A.; Stardust Interstellar Preliminary Examation Team: http://www. ssl. berkeley. edu/~westphal/ISPE/

    2011-12-01

    A. J. Westphal, C. Allen, A. Ansari, S. Bajt, R. S. Bastien, H. A. Bechtel, J. Borg, F. E. Brenker, J. Bridges, D. E. Brownlee, M. Burchell, M. Burghammer, A. L. Butterworth, A. M. Davis, P. Cloetens, C. Floss, G. Flynn, D. Frank, Z. Gainsforth, E. Grün, P. R. Heck, J. K. Hillier, P. Hoppe, G. Huss, J. Huth, B. Hvide, A. Kearsley, A. J. King, B. Lai, J. Leitner, L. Lemelle, H. Leroux, R. Lettieri, W. Marchant, L. R. Nittler, R. Ogliore, F. Postberg, M. C. Price, S. A. Sandford, J.-A. Sans Tresseras, T. Schoonjans, S. Schmitz, G. Silversmit, A. Simionovici, V. A. Solé, R. Srama, T. Stephan, V. Sterken, J. Stodolna, R. M. Stroud, S. Sutton, M. Trieloff, P. Tsou, A. Tsuchiyama, T. Tyliszczak, B. Vekemans, L. Vincze, D. Zevin, M. E. Zolensky, >29,000 Stardust@home dusters ISPE author affiliations are at http://www.ssl.berkeley.edu/~westphal/ISPE/. In 2000 and 2002, a ~0.1m2 array of aerogel tiles and alumi-num foils onboard the Stardust spacecraft was exposed to the interstellar dust (ISD) stream for an integrated time of 200 days. The exposure took place in interplanetary space, beyond the orbit of Mars, and thus was free of the ubiquitous orbital debris in low-earth orbit that precludes effective searches for interstellar dust there. Despite the long exposure of the Stardust collector, <<100 ISD particles are expected to have been captured. The particles are thought to be ~1μm or less in size, and the total ISD collection is probably <10-6 by mass of the collection of cometary dust parti-cles captured in the Stardust cometary dust collector from the coma of the Jupiter-family comet Wild 2. Thus, although the first solid sample from the local interstellar medium is clearly of high interest, the diminutive size of the particles and the low numbers of particles present daunting challenges. Nevertheless, six recent developments have made a Preliminary Examination (PE) of this sample practical: (1) rapid automated digital optical scanning microscopy for three

  1. Evolution of interstellar ices.

    PubMed

    Allamandola, L J; Bernstein, M P; Sandford, S A; Walker, R L

    1999-01-01

    Infrared observations, combined with realistic laboratory simulations, have revolutionized our understanding of interstellar ice and dust, the building blocks of comets. Ices in molecular clouds are dominated by the very simple molecules H2O, CH3OH, NH3, CO, CO2, and probably H2CO and H2. More complex species including nitriles, ketones, and esters are also present, but at lower concentrations. The evidence for these, as well as the abundant, carbon-rich, interstellar, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is reviewed. Other possible contributors to the interstellar/pre-cometary ice composition include accretion of gas-phase molecules and in situ photochemical processing. By virtue of their low abundance, accretion of simple gas-phase species is shown to be the least important of the processes considered in determining ice composition. On the other hand, photochemical processing does play an important role in driving dust evolution and the composition of minor species. Ultraviolet photolysis of realistic laboratory analogs readily produces H2, H2CO, CO2, CO, CH4, HCO, and the moderately complex organic molecules: CH3CH2OH (ethanol), HC(=O)NH2 (formamide), CH3C(=O)NH2 (acetamide), R-CN (nitriles), and hexamethylenetetramine (HMT, C6H12N4), as well as more complex species including amides, ketones, and polyoxymethylenes (POMs). Inclusion of PAHs in the ices produces many species similar to those found in meteorites including aromatic alcohols, quinones and ethers. Photon assisted PAH-ice deuterium exchange also occurs. All of these species are readily formed and are therefore likely cometary constituents.

  2. Innovative interstellar explorer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNutt, Ralph L.; Gold, Robert E.; Krimigis, Tom; Roelof, Edmond C.; Gruntman, Mike; Gloeckler, George; Koehn, Patrick L.; Kurth, William S.; Oleson, Steven R.; Fiehler, Douglas I.; Horanyi, Mihaly; Mewaldt, Richard A.; Leary, James C.; Anderson, Brian J.

    2006-09-01

    An interstellar ``precursor'' mission has been under discussion in the scientific community for at least 30 years. Fundamental scientific questions about the interaction of the Sun with the interstellar medium can only be answered with in situ measurements that such a mission can provide. The Innovative Interstellar Explorer (IIE) and its use of Radioisotope Electric Propulsion (REP) is being studied under a NASA ``Vision Mission'' grant. Speed is provided by a combination of a high-energy launch, using current launch vehicle technology, a Jupiter gravity assist, and long-term, low-thrust, continuous acceleration provided by an ion thruster running off electricity provided by advanced radioisotope electric generators. A payload of ten instruments with an aggregate mass of ~35 kg and requiring ~30 W has been carefully chosen to address the compelling science questions. The nominal 20-day launch window opens on 22 October 2014 followed by a Jupiter gravity assist on 5 February 2016. The REP system accelerates the spacecraft to a ``burnout'' speed of 7.8 AU per year at 104 AU on 13 October 2032 (Voyager 1's current speed is ~3.6 AU/yr). The spacecraft will return at least 500 bits per second from at least 200 AU ~30 years after launch. Additional (backup) launch opportunities occur every 13 months to early 2018. In addition to addressing basic heliospheric science, the mission will ensure continued information on the far-heliospheric galactic cosmic ray population after the Voyagers have fallen silent and as the era of human Mars exploration begins.

  3. Interstellar medium simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitschwerdt, D.; de Avillez, M. A.; Feige, J.; Dettbarn, C.

    2012-06-01

    In this review we critically assess numerical simulations of the interstellar medium (ISM), and argue that 3D high resolution calculations are the most promising method to determine the structure of the interstellar gas and follow its evolution well into the nonlinear regime. Based on a Riemann solver adaptive mesh refinement code, we present a model, which fulfills the basic requirements of running it sufficiently long in order to erase memory effects of the initial conditions, set up a disk-halo fountain flow cycle, for converging solutions with increasing mesh refinement. We obtain the following results: (i) in a supernova driven ISM, high Reynolds number turbulence generates structures on all scales, (ii) the volume filling factor of the hot gas is substantially reduced due to the fountain flow, (iii) gas clouds are transient shock compressed layers, (iv) more than half of the gas mass resides in thermally unstable regimes, (v) O VI is distributed in patchy mixing layers, with the derived column densities being in agreement with FUSE and Copernicus observations, (vi) the electron density distribution up to distances of 8 kpc in the disk is consistent with pulsar dispersion measure observations, provided that the electron and ionization structure are not in equilibrium, (vii) the interstellar cooling function depends both on space and time (and not only on temperature and metallicity), (viii) the Local Bubble has been produced by 14-20 supernovae about 14 Myr ago, exploding in a moving group on its path through the local ISM, (ix) the nearest supernova explosion to Earth occurred 2.2 {×} 106 yr ago at a distance of {˜} 85 pc, in agreement with measurements of the radionuclide 60Fe found in the ferromanganese crust on the ocean floor.

  4. The Local Interstellar Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferlet, Roger

    Substantial progress in the field of the Local Interstellar Medium has been largely due to recent launches of space missions, mostly in the UV and X-ray domains, but also to ground-based observations, mainly in high resolution spectroscopy. However, a clear gap seems to remain between the wealth of new data and the theoretical understanding. This paper gives an overview of some observational aspects, with no attempt of completeness or doing justice to all the people involved in the field. As progress rarely evolves in straight paths, we can expect that our present picture of the solar system surroundings is not definitive.

  5. Phanerozoic Biodiversity Mass Extinctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bambach, Richard K.

    2006-05-01

    Recent analyses of Sepkoski's genus-level compendium show that only three events form a statistically separate class of high extinction intensities when only post-Early Ordovician intervals are considered, but geologists have called numerous events mass extinctions. Is this a conflict? A review of different methods of tabulating data from the Sepkoski database reveals 18 intervals during the Phanerozoic have peaks of both magnitude and rate of extinction that appear in each tabulating scheme. These intervals all fit Sepkoski's definition of mass extinction. However, they vary widely in timing and effect of extinction, demonstrating that mass extinctions are not a homogeneous group of events. No consensus has been reached on the kill mechanism for any marine mass extinction. In fact, adequate data on timing in ecologic, rather than geologic, time and on geographic and environmental distribution of extinction have not yet been systematically compiled for any extinction event.

  6. Charting the Interstellar Magnetic Field causing the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) Ribbon of Energetic Neutral Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisch, P. C.; Berdyugin, A.; Piirola, V.; Magalhaes, A. M.; Seriacopi, D. B.; Wiktorowicz, S. J.; Andersson, B.-G.; Funsten, H. O.; McComas, D. J.; Schwadron, N. A.; Slavin, J. D.; Hanson, A. J.; Fu, C.-W.

    2015-12-01

    .8}-27.6+23.5 between {B}{POL} and the bulk LSR velocity the local interstellar material indicates a geometry that is consistent with an expanding superbubble. The efficiency of grain alignment in the local interstellar medium has been assessed using stars where both polarization data and hydrogen column density data are available. Nearby stars appear to have larger polarizations than expected based on reddened sightlines, which is consistent with previous results, but uncertainties are large. Optical polarization and color excess E(B - V) data indicate the presence of nearby interstellar dust in the BICEP2 field. Color excess E(B - V) indicates an optical extinction of AV > 0.6 in the BICEP2 field, while the polarization data indicate that AV > 0.09 mag. The IBEX Ribbon ISMF extends to the boundaries of the BICEP2 region.

  7. Visualizing Interstellar's Wormhole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Oliver; von Tunzelmann, Eugénie; Franklin, Paul; Thorne, Kip S.

    2015-06-01

    Christopher Nolan's science fiction movie Interstellar offers a variety of opportunities for students in elementary courses on general relativity theory. This paper describes such opportunities, including: (i) At the motivational level, the manner in which elementary relativity concepts underlie the wormhole visualizations seen in the movie; (ii) At the briefest computational level, instructive calculations with simple but intriguing wormhole metrics, including, e.g., constructing embedding diagrams for the three-parameter wormhole that was used by our visual effects team and Christopher Nolan in scoping out possible wormhole geometries for the movie; (iii) Combining the proper reference frame of a camera with solutions of the geodesic equation, to construct a light-ray-tracing map backward in time from a camera's local sky to a wormhole's two celestial spheres; (iv) Implementing this map, for example, in Mathematica, Maple or Matlab, and using that implementation to construct images of what a camera sees when near or inside a wormhole; (v) With the student's implementation, exploring how the wormhole's three parameters influence what the camera sees—which is precisely how Christopher Nolan, using our implementation, chose the parameters for Interstellar's wormhole; (vi) Using the student's implementation, exploring the wormhole's Einstein ring and particularly the peculiar motions of star images near the ring, and exploring what it looks like to travel through a wormhole.

  8. An interstellar precursor mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, L. D.; Ivie, C.; Lewis, J. C.; Lipes, R.; Norton, H. N.; Stearns, J. W.; Stimpson, L. D.; Weissman, P.

    1980-01-01

    A mission out of the planetary system, launched about the year 2000, could provide valuable scientific data as well as test some of the technology for a later mission to another star. Primary scientific objectives for the precursor mission concern characteristics of the heliopause, the interstellar medium, stellar distances (by parallax measurements), low-energy cosmic rays, interplanetary gas distribution, and the mass of the solar system. Secondary objectives include investigation of Pluto. The mission should extend to 400-1000 AU from the sun. A heliocentric hyperbolic escape velocity of 50-100 km/sec or more is needed to attain this distance within a reasonable mission duration (20-50 years). The trajectory should be toward the incoming interstellar gas. For a year 2000 launch, a Pluto encounter and orbiter can be included. A second mission targeted parallel to the solar axis would also be worthwhile. The mission duration is 20 years, with an extended mission to a total of 50 years. A system using one or two stages of nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) was selected as a possible baseline. The most promising alternatives are ultralight solar sails or laser sailing, with the lasers in earth orbit, for example. The NEP baseline design allows the option of carrying a Pluto orbiter as a daughter spacecraft.

  9. Interstellar molecules and dense clouds.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rank, D. M.; Townes, C. H.; Welch, W. J.

    1971-01-01

    Current knowledge of the interstellar medium is discussed on the basis of recent published studies. The subjects considered include optical identification of interstellar molecules, radio molecular lines, interstellar clouds, isotopic abundances, formation and disappearance of interstellar molecules, and interstellar probing techniques. Diagrams are plotted for the distribution of galactic sources exhibiting molecular lines, for hydrogen molecule, hydrogen atom and electron abundances due to ionization, for the densities, velocities and temperature of NH3 in the direction of Sagitarius B2, for the lower rotational energy levels of H2CO, and for temporal spectral variations in masing H2O clouds of the radio source W49. Future applications of the maser and of molecular microscopy in this field are visualized.

  10. Interstellar clouds containing optically thin H2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jura, M.

    1975-01-01

    The theory of Black and Delgarno that the relative populations of the excited rotational levels of H2 can be understood in terms of cascading following absorption in the Lyman and Werner bands is employed to infer the gas densities and radiation fields within diffuse interstellar clouds containing H2 that is optically thin in those bands. The procedure is described for computing the populations of the different rotation levels, the relative distribution among the different rotation levels of newly formed H2 is determined on the basis of five simplified models, and the rate of H2 formation is estimated. The results are applied to delta Ori, two components of iota Ori, the second components of rho Leo and zeta Ori, tau Sco, gamma Vel, and zeta Pup. The inferred parameters are summarized for each cloud.

  11. Interstellar matter in early-type galaxies - Optical observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Dong-Woo

    1989-01-01

    Results of optical observations of 26 bright elliptical galaxies selected on the basis of IRAS data are discussed. Optical broadband imaging (using B and R filters) and narrow-band imaging (using H-alpha interference filters) have been performed to study dust patches and ionized gas. Long-split spectroscopy has also been made to determine gas kinematics and relative line ratios. The spectroscopic data confirm the presence and distribution of interstellar matter (dust lanes and ionized gas) seen in the direct imaging. Decoupled kinematics of interstellar gas and stars favors an external origin of the interstellar matter. However, for one isolated galaxy, an internal origin is not excluded. The rotation curves determined by optical emission lines are symmetric around the center in most galaxies observed. Galaxy masses and mass-to-light ratios are estimated using the rotation curves of the ionized gas.

  12. ULTRAVIOLET EXTINCTION AT HIGH GALACTIC LATITUDES

    SciTech Connect

    Peek, J. E. G.; Schiminovich, David

    2013-07-01

    In order to study the properties and effects of high Galactic latitude dust, we present an analysis of 373,303 galaxies selected from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer All-Sky Survey and Wide-field Infrared Explorer All-Sky Data Release. By examining the variation in aggregate ultraviolet colors and number density of these galaxies, we measure the extinction curve at high latitude. We additionally consider a population of spectroscopically selected galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to measure extinction in the optical. We find that dust at high latitude is neither quantitatively nor qualitatively consistent with standard reddening laws. Extinction in the FUV and NUV is {approx}10% and {approx}35% higher than expected, with significant variation across the sky. We find that no single R{sub V} parameter fits both the optical and ultraviolet extinction at high latitude, and that while both show detectable variation across the sky, these variations are not related. We propose that the overall trends we detect likely stem from an increase in very small silicate grains in the interstellar medium.

  13. Interstellar carbon in meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swart, P. K.; Grady, M. M.; Pillinger, C. T.; Lewis, R. S.; Anders, E.

    1983-01-01

    The Murchison and Allende chondrites contain up to 5 parts per million carbon that is enriched in carbon-13 by up to +1100 per mil (the ratio of carbon-12 to carbon-13 is approximately 42, compared to 88 to 93 for terrestrial carbon). This 'heavy' carbon is associated with neon-22 and with anomalous krypton and xenon showing the signature of the s-process (neutron capture on a slow time scale). It apparently represents interstellar grains ejected from late-type stars. A second anomalous xenon component ('CCFXe') is associated with a distinctive, light carbon (depleted in carbon-13 by 38 per mil), which, however, falls within the terrestrial range and hence may be of either local or exotic origin.

  14. An interstellar precursor mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, L. D.; Ivie, C.; Lewis, J. C.; Lipes, R. G.; Norton, H. N.; Stearns, J. W.; Stimpson, L.; Weissman, P.

    1977-01-01

    A mission out of the planetary system, with launch about the year 2000, could provide valuable scientific data as well as test some of the technology for a later mission to another star. Primary scientific objectives for the precursor mission concern characteristics of the heliopause, the interstellar medium, stellar distances (by parallax measurements), low energy cosmic rays, interplanetary gas distribution, and mass of the solar system. Secondary objectives include investigation of Pluto. Candidate science instruments are suggested. Individual spacecraft systems for the mission were considered, technology requirements and problem areas noted, and a number of recommendations made for technology study and advanced development. The most critical technology needs include attainment of 50-yr spacecraft lifetime and development of a long-life NEP system.

  15. Interstellar Dust Scattering Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, K. D.

    2004-05-01

    Studies of dust scattering properties in astrophysical objects with Milky Way interstellar dust are reviewed. Such objects are reflection nebulae, dark clouds, and the Diffuse Galactic Light (DGL). To ensure their basic quality, studies had to satisfy four basic criteria to be included in this review. These four criteria significantly reduced the scatter in dust properties measurements, especially in the case of the DGL. Determinations of dust scattering properties were found to be internally consistent for each object type as well as consistent between object types. The 2175 Å bump is seen as an absorption feature. Comparisons with dust grain models find general agreement with significant disagreements at particular wavelengths (especially in the far-ultraviolet). Finally, unanswered questions and future directions are enumerated.

  16. Optical spectroscopy of IRAS sources with infrared emission bands. II. IRAS 04324+5106, 06114+1745, 20319+3958, and 22539+5758

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, M.; Jones, B.F.; Walker, H.J.; Lick Observatory, Santa Cruz, CA; Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence Institute, Los Altos, CA )

    1989-06-01

    The paper presents long-slit optical spectra and microwave CO spectra of four nebulous counterparts to IRAS sources showing PAH emission features: 04324+5106, 06114+1745, 20319+3958, and 22539+5758. IRAS 22539+5758 is associated with a bipolar nebula. All are allied with B-type stars that suffer appreciable circumstellar extinction, and whose environs show atomic emission lines; three represent mixed reflection/emission nebulosities. Three show spectroscopic evidence for outflows at about 100 km/s. One, 06114+1745, exhibits indications of enhanced diffuse interstellar bands. It is concluded that extinction alone is insufficient to yield enhanced DIBs and that peculiar circumstellar abundances and/or physical conditions must play a role. 20 refs.

  17. Infrared absorption and emission characteristics of interstellar PAHs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, J. R.; Allamandola, Louis J.; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.; Barker, J. R.; Barker, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    The mid-infrared interstellar emission spectrum with features at 3.28, 6.2, 7.7, 8.7 and 11.3 microns is discussed in terms of the Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) hypothesis, which is based on the suggestive, but inconclusive comparison between the interstellar emission spectrum with the infrared absorption and Raman spectra of a few PAHs. The fundamental vibrations of PAHs and PAH-like species which determine the IR and Raman properties are discussed. Interstellar IR band emission is due to relaxation from highly vibrationally excited PAHs excited by ultraviolet photons. The excitation/emission process is described and the IR fluorescence from one PAH, chrysene, is traced. Generally, there is sufficient energy to populate several vibrational levels in each mode. Molecular vibrational potentials are anharmonic and emission from these higher levels will fall at lower frequencies and produce weak features to the red of the stronger fundamentals. This process is also described and can account for some spectroscopic details of the interstellar emission spectra previously unexplained. Analysis of the interstellar spectrum shows that PAHs contain between 20 and 30 carbon atoms are responsible for the emission.

  18. Determining the extragalactic extinction law with SALT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkelman, Ido; Brosch, Noah; Kniazev, Alexei Y.; Buckley, David A. H.; O'Donoghue, Darragh; Hashimoto, Yas; Loaring, Nicola; Romero-Colmenero, Encarni; Still, Martin; Sefako, Ramotholo; Väisänen, Petri

    2008-11-01

    We present CCD imaging observations of early-type galaxies with dark lanes obtained with the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT) during its performance-verification phase. The observations were performed in six spectral bands that span the spectral range from the near-ultraviolet atmospheric cut-off to the near-infrared. We derive the extinction law by the extragalactic dust in the dark lanes in the spectral range 1.11 < λ-1 < 2.94μm-1 by fitting model galaxies to the unextinguished parts of the image, and subtracting from these the actual images. This procedure allows the derivation, with reasonably high signal-to-noise ratio, of the extinction in each spectral band we used for each resolution element of the image. We also introduce an alternative method to derive the extinction values by comparing various colour-index maps under the assumption of negligible intrinsic colour gradients in these galaxies. We than compare the results obtained using these two methods. We compare the total-to-selective extinction derived for these galaxies with previously obtained results and with similar extinction values of Milky Way dust to derive conclusions about the properties of extragalactic dust in different objects and conditions. We find that the extinction curves run parallel to the Galactic extinction curve, which implies that the properties of dust in the extragalactic environment are similar to those of the Milky Way, despite our original expectations. The ratio of the total V-band extinction to the selective extinction between the V and B bands is derived for each galaxy with an average of 2.82 +/- 0.38, compared to a canonical value of 3.1 for the Milky Way. The similar values imply that galaxies with well-defined dark lanes have characteristic dust grain sizes similar to those of Galactic dust. We use total optical extinction values to estimate the dust mass for each galaxy, compare these with dust masses derived from IRAS measurements, and find them in the

  19. Four Interstellar Dust Candidates from the Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westphal, A. J.; Allen, C.; Bajt, S.; Bechtel, H. A.; Borg, J.; Brenker, F.; Bridges, J.; Brownlee, D. E.; Burchell, M.; Burghammer, M.; Butterworth, A. L.; Cloetens, P.; Davis, A. M.; Floss, C.; Flynn, G. J.; Fougeray, P.; Frank, D.; Gainsforth, Z.; Grun, E.; Heck, P. R.; Jillier, J. K.; Hoppe, P.; Howard, L.; Hudson, B.; Huss, G. R.

    2011-01-01

    In January 2006, the Stardust sample return capsule returned to Earth bearing the first solid samples from a primitive solar system body, Comet 81P/Wild2, and a collector dedicated to the capture and return of contemporary interstellar dust. Both collectors were approx. 0.1 sq m in area and were composed of aerogel tiles (85% of the collecting area) and aluminum foils. The Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector (SIDC) was exposed to the interstellar dust stream for a total exposure factor of 20 sq m/day. The Stardust Interstellar Preliminary Examination (ISPE) is a consortium-based project to characterize the collection using nondestructive techniques. The goals and restrictions of the ISPE are described . A summary of analytical techniques is described.

  20. Variation of the extinction law in the Trifid nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cambrésy, L.; Rho, J.; Marshall, D. J.; Reach, W. T.

    2011-03-01

    Context. In the past few years, the extinction law has been measured in the infrared wavelengths for various molecular clouds and different laws have been obtained. Aims: In this paper we seek variations of the extinction law within the Trifid nebula region. Such variations would demonstrate local dust evolution linked to variation of the environment parameters such as the density or the interstellar radiation field. Methods: The extinction values, Aλ/AV, are obtained using the 2MASS, UKIDSS and Spitzer/GLIMPSE surveys. The technique is to inter-calibrate color-excess maps from different wavelengths to derive the extinction law and to map the extinction in the Trifid region. Results: We measured the extinction law at 3.6, 4.5, and 5.8 μm and we found a transition at AV ≈ 20 mag. Below this threshold the extinction law is as expected from models for RV = 5.5 whereas above 20 mag of visual extinction, it is flatter. Using these results the color-excess maps are converted into a composite extinction map of the Trifid nebula at a spatial resolution of 1 arcmin. A tridimensional analysis along the line-of-sight allowed us to estimate a distance of 2.7 ± 0.5 kpc for the Trifid. The comparison of the extinction with the 1.25 mm emission suggests the millimeter emissivity is enhanced in the dense condensations of the cloud. Conclusions: Our results suggest a dust transition at large extinction which has not been reported so far as well as dust emissivity variations.

  1. Is extinction forever?

    PubMed

    Smith-Patten, Brenda D; Bridge, Eli S; Crawford, Priscilla H C; Hough, Daniel J; Kelly, Jeffrey F; Patten, Michael A

    2015-05-01

    Mistrust of science has seeped into public perception of the most fundamental aspect of conservation-extinction. The term ought to be straightforward, and yet, there is a disconnect between scientific discussion and public views. This is not a mere semantic issue, rather one of communication. Within a population dynamics context, we say that a species went locally extinct, later to document its return. Conveying our findings matters, for when we use local extinction, an essentially nonsensical phrase, rather than extirpation, which is what is meant, then we contribute to, if not create outright, a problem for public understanding of conservation, particularly as local extinction is often shortened to extinction in media sources. The public that receives the message of our research void of context and modifiers comes away with the idea that extinction is not forever or, worse for conservation as a whole, that an extinction crisis has been invented.

  2. Is extinction forever?

    PubMed Central

    Bridge, Eli S.; Crawford, Priscilla H. C.; Hough, Daniel J.; Kelly, Jeffrey F.; Patten, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Mistrust of science has seeped into public perception of the most fundamental aspect of conservation—extinction. The term ought to be straightforward, and yet, there is a disconnect between scientific discussion and public views. This is not a mere semantic issue, rather one of communication. Within a population dynamics context, we say that a species went locally extinct, later to document its return. Conveying our findings matters, for when we use local extinction, an essentially nonsensical phrase, rather than extirpation, which is what is meant, then we contribute to, if not create outright, a problem for public understanding of conservation, particularly as local extinction is often shortened to extinction in media sources. The public that receives the message of our research void of context and modifiers comes away with the idea that extinction is not forever or, worse for conservation as a whole, that an extinction crisis has been invented. PMID:25711479

  3. The Interstellar Medium in the Small Magellanic Cloud: Results from MCELS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, P. F.; Smith, R. C.; Points, S. D.; MCELS Team

    2015-05-01

    The interstellar medium (ISM) provides the playing field where gas and dust are cycled into and out of stars through dynamic and complex interactions, including H II regions, planetary nebulae, supernovae and their remnants, superbubbles, and gigantic supershells. The relative proximity and low extinction make the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds ideal venues for studying the ISM: its constituents, energetics, and interaction with the underlying stellar populations. The Magellanic Cloud Emission Line Survey (MCELS) surveyed both the LMC and SMC over six years using the Curtis Schmidt Telescope at CTIO to produce deep images in Hα, [S II] and [O III] lines, plus matched red and green continuum bands for star subtraction. The survey covers the central 8×8 degrees of the LMC and 4.5× 3.5 degrees of the SMC—most of the gaseous extent of both galaxies—at a resolution of 5″ or better. This enables us to identify and study structures on scales ranging from 1 pc to global. In this paper we highlight some of the results from MCELS, concentrating on the SMC. These include deep inventories of PNe and SNRs, analysis of H II regions and their optical depth, and extended structures on the scale of the entire galaxy. We also include some brief historical anecdotes.

  4. PAH Clusters as Sources of Interstellar Infrared Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roser, J. E.; Ricca, A.

    2015-03-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (or PAHs) have been the subject of astrochemical research for several decades as principal sources of the interstellar aromatic infrared emission bands. PAH clusters could possibly contribute to these emission bands, but a lack of data on their infrared properties has made this hypothesis difficult to evaluate. Here we investigate homogeneous neutral PAH clusters by measuring the mid-infrared absorption spectra of the five nonlinear PAH molecules phenanthrene, chrysene, pyrene, perylene, and benzo[ghi]perylene within solid argon ice at a fixed temperature of 5 K. We attribute observed spectral shifts in their principal absorption bands as a function of argon/PAH ratio to clustering of the PAH molecules within the argon matrix. These shifts are related to the cluster structures forming in the matrix and the topology of the monomer PAH molecule. We predict that interstellar PAH molecules that are relatively large (no fewer than 50 carbon atoms per molecule) and compact will have clusters that contribute to the asymmetrically red-shaded profile of the interstellar 11.2 μm emission band.

  5. POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON CLUSTERS AS SOURCES OF INTERSTELLAR INFRARED EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Roser, J. E.; Ricca, A.

    2015-03-10

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (or PAHs) have been the subject of astrochemical research for several decades as principal sources of the interstellar aromatic infrared emission bands. PAH clusters could possibly contribute to these emission bands, but a lack of data on their infrared properties has made this hypothesis difficult to evaluate. Here we investigate homogeneous neutral PAH clusters by measuring the mid-infrared absorption spectra of the five nonlinear PAH molecules phenanthrene, chrysene, pyrene, perylene, and benzo[ghi]perylene within solid argon ice at a fixed temperature of 5 K. We attribute observed spectral shifts in their principal absorption bands as a function of argon/PAH ratio to clustering of the PAH molecules within the argon matrix. These shifts are related to the cluster structures forming in the matrix and the topology of the monomer PAH molecule. We predict that interstellar PAH molecules that are relatively large (no fewer than 50 carbon atoms per molecule) and compact will have clusters that contribute to the asymmetrically red-shaded profile of the interstellar 11.2 μm emission band.

  6. Carbon chain abundance in the diffuse interstellar medium.

    PubMed

    Allamandola, L J; Hudgins, D M; Bauschlicher, C W; Langhoff, S R

    1999-12-10

    Thanks to the mid-IR sensitivities of the ISO and IRTS orbiting spectrometers it is now possible to search the diffuse interstellar medium for heretofore inaccessible molecular emission. In view of the recent strong case for the presence of C(7-) (Kirkwood et al. 1998, Tulej et al. 1998),and the fact that carbon chains possess prominent infrared active modes in a very clean portion of the interstellar spectrum, we have analyzed the IRTS spectrum of the diffuse interstellar medium for the infrared signatures of these species. Theoretical and experimental infrared band frequencies and absolute intensities of many different carbon chain species are presented. These include cyanopolyynes, neutral and anionic linear carbon molecules, and neutral and ionized, even-numbered, hydrogenated carbon chains. We show that--as a family--these species have abundances in the diffuse ISM on the order of 10(-10) with respect to hydrogen, values consistent with their abundances in dense molecular clouds. Assuming an average length of 10 C atoms per C-chain implies that roughly a millionth of the cosmically available carbon is in the form of carbon chains and that carbon chains can account for a few percent of the visible to near-IR diffuse interstellar band (DIB) total equivalent width (not DIB number).

  7. Theoretical Modeling of Interstellar Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charnley, Steven

    2009-01-01

    The chemistry of complex interstellar organic molecules will be described. Gas phase processes that may build large carbon-chain species in cold molecular clouds will be summarized. Catalytic reactions on grain surfaces can lead to a large variety of organic species, and models of molecule formation by atom additions to multiply-bonded molecules will be presented. The subsequent desorption of these mixed molecular ices can initiate a distinctive organic chemistry in hot molecular cores. The general ion-molecule pathways leading to even larger organics will be outlined. The predictions of this theory will be compared with observations to show how possible organic formation pathways in the interstellar medium may be constrained. In particular, the success of the theory in explaining trends in the known interstellar organics, in predicting recently-detected interstellar molecules, and, just as importantly, non-detections, will be discussed.

  8. Bimodal extinction without cross-modal extinction.

    PubMed Central

    Inhoff, A W; Rafal, R D; Posner, M J

    1992-01-01

    Three patients with unilateral neurological injury were clinically examined. All showed consistent unilateral extinction in the tactile and visual modalities on simultaneous intramodal stimulation. There was virtually no evidence for cross-modal extinction, however, so that contralateral stimulation of one modality would have extinguished perception of ipsilateral stimuli in the other modality. It is concluded that the attentional system controlling the encoding of tactile and visual stimuli is not unified across the two sensory domains. PMID:1548496

  9. Detection of Interstellar Urea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Hsin-Lun; Remijan, Anthony J.; Snyder, Lewis E.; Looney, Leslie W.; Friedel, Douglas N.; Lovas, Francis J.; McCall, Benjamin J.; Hollis, Jan M.

    2010-11-01

    Urea, a molecule discovered in human urine by H. M. Rouelle in 1773, has a significant role in prebiotic chemistry. Previous BIMA observations have suggested that interstellar urea [(NH2)2CO] is a compact hot core molecule such as other large molecules (e.g. methyl formate and acetic acid). We have conducted an extensive search for urea toward the high mass hot molecular core Sgr B2(N-LMH) using BIMA, CARMA and the IRAM 30 m. Because the spectral lines of heavy molecules like urea tend to be weak and hot cores display lines from a wide range of molecules, it is necessary to detect a number of urea lines and apply sophisticated statistical tests before having confidence in an identification. The 1 mm resolution of CARMA enables favorable coupling of the source size and synthesized beam size, which was found to be essential for the detection of weak signals. We have detected a total of 65 spectral lines (32 molecular transitions and 33 unidentified transitions), most of which are narrower than the SEST survey (Nummelin et al. 1998) due to the small synthesized beam (2.5" x 2") of CARMA. It significantly resolves out the contamination by extended emission and reveals the eight weak urea lines that were previously blended with nearby transitions. Our analysis indicates that these lines are likely to be urea since the resulting observed line frequencies are coincident with a set of overlapping connecting urea lines, and the observed line intensities are consistent with the expected line strengths of urea. In addition, we have developed a new statistical approach to examine the spatial correlation between the observed lines by applying the Student's t test to the high resolution channel maps obtained from CARMA. The t test shows consistent spatial distributions from all eight candidate lines, suggesting a common molecular origin, urea. Our t test method could have a broad impact on the next generation of arrays, such as ALMA, because the new arrays will require a method

  10. The Interstellar Conspiracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Les; Matloff, Gregory L.

    2005-01-01

    If we were designing a human-carrying starship that could be launched in the not-too-distant future, it would almost certainly not use a warp drive to instantaneously bounce around the universe, as is done in Isaac Asimov's classic Foundation series or in episodes of Star Trek or Star Wars. Sadly, those starships that seem to be within technological reach could not even travel at high relativistic speeds, as does the interstellar ramjet in Poul Anderson's Tau Zero. Warp-speeds seem to be well outside the realm of currently understood physical law; proton-fusing ramjets may never be technologically feasible. Perhaps fortunately in our terrorist-plagued world, the economics of antimatter may never be attractive for large-scale starship propulsion. But interstellar travel will be possible within a few centuries, although it will certainly not be as fast as we might prefer. If humans learn how to hibernate, perhaps we will sleep our way to the stars, as do the crew in A. E. van Vogt's Far Centaurus. However, as discussed in a landmark paper in The Journal of the British Interplanetary Society, the most feasible approach to transporting a small human population to the planets (if any) of Alpha Centauri is the worldship. Such craft have often been featured in science fiction. See for example Arthur C. Clarke's Rendezvous with Rama, and Robert A. Heinlein's Orphans of the Sky. Worldships are essentially mobile versions of the O Neill free-space habitats. Constructed mostly from lunar and/or asteroidal materials, these solar-powered, multi-kilometer-dimension structures could house 10,000 to 100,000 humans in Earth-approximating environments. Artificial gravity would be provided by habitat rotation, and cosmic ray shielding would be provided by passive methods, such as habitat atmosphere and mass shielding, or magnetic fields. A late 21st century space-habitat venture might support itself economically by constructing large solar-powered satellites to beam energy back to

  11. MODELING GALACTIC EXTINCTION WITH DUST AND 'REAL' POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS

    SciTech Connect

    Mulas, Giacomo; Casu, Silvia; Cecchi-Pestellini, Cesare; Zonca, Alberto E-mail: silvia@oa-cagliari.inaf.it E-mail: azonca@oa-cagliari.inaf.it

    2013-07-01

    We investigate the remarkable apparent variety of galactic extinction curves by modeling extinction profiles with core-mantle grains and a collection of single polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Our aim is to translate a synthetic description of dust into physically well-grounded building blocks through the analysis of a statistically relevant sample of different extinction curves. All different flavors of observed extinction curves, ranging from the average galactic extinction curve to virtually 'bumpless' profiles, can be described by the present model. We prove that a mixture of a relatively small number (54 species in 4 charge states each) of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons can reproduce the features of the extinction curve in the ultraviolet, dismissing an old objection to the contribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons to the interstellar extinction curve. Despite the large number of free parameters (at most the 54 Multiplication-Sign 4 column densities of each species in each ionization state included in the molecular ensemble plus the 9 parameters defining the physical properties of classical particles), we can strongly constrain some physically relevant properties such as the total number of C atoms in all species and the mean charge of the mixture. Such properties are found to be largely independent of the adopted dust model whose variation provides effects that are orthogonal to those brought about by the molecular component. Finally, the fitting procedure, together with some physical sense, suggests (but does not require) the presence of an additional component of chemically different very small carbonaceous grains.

  12. L(alpha)-induced two-photon absorption of visible light emitted from an O-type star by H2(+) ions located near the surface of the Stromgren sphere surrounding the star: A possible explanation for the diffuse interstellar absorption bands (DIDs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glownia, James H.; Sorokin, Peter P.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, a new model is proposed to account for the DIB's (Diffuse Interstellar Bands). In this model, the DIB's result from a non-linear effect: resonantly-enhanced two-photon absorption of H(2+) ions located near the surface of the Stromgren sphere that surrounds an O- or B- type star. The strong light that is required to 'drive' the two-photon transition is provided by L(alpha) light emerging from the Stromgren sphere that bounds the H II region surrounding the star. A value of approximately 100 micro W/sq cm is estimated for the L(alpha) flux at the Stromgren radius, R(s), of a strong (O5) star. It is shown that a c.w. L(alpha) flux of this intensity should be sufficient to induce a few percent absorption for visible light radiated by the same star at a frequency (omega2) that completes an allowed two-photon transition, provided (1) the L(alpha) radiation happens to be nearly resonant with the frequency of a fully-allowed absorber transition that effectively represents the first step in the two-photon transition, and (2) an effective column density approximately 10(sup18)/sq cm of the absorber is present near the Stromgren sphere radius, R(sub s).

  13. A Science-enhanced Database of GALEX UV spectra to Characterize Interstellar Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, Luciana

    The Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) has performed the first surveys of the sky in the Ultraviolet (UV). Its unprecedented database, including almost 300 million photometric source measurements in far-UV (FUV) and near-UV (NUV), offers unique sensitivity for studying selected classes of astrophysical objects, such as hot stars, star-forming galaxies, and z<2 QSOs. GALEX imaging data have been amply mined; science-enhanced source catalogs enable comprehensive investigations long after the mission is concluded. GALEX has also collected 125,564 UV spectra (range 1344-2831Ang; resolution about 200(FUV) - 120(NUV)): a homogeneous template tenfold larger and at fainter fluxes than the IUE target sample. Yet, this unique resource has hardly been exploited, due to poor calibration and lack of standard quality assessment of the complex grism spectral extraction. The homogeneous set of >120,000 UV spectra distributed all over the sky will enable - among other investigations - derivation of UV extinction curves for thousands of sightlines throughout the Milky Way (MW), yielding information on properties of interstellar dust that cannot be obtained otherwise, and, furthermore, validating extinction maps derived from vastly larger photometric samples. Our proposed map of MW dust properties will be 3D, since Gaia will provide accurate distances for all stellar sources. The first step to make this study possible will be to classify all sources in the [grism, hence serendipitous] GALEX spectroscopic sample, and to assess quality and flux calibration. We will combine multi-band photometry of the spectral sources (GALEX, SDSS, Pan-STARRs, ...), any existing information (e.g., from SIMBAD), available IUE spectra (about 100) and SDSS spectra (8,000), besides examining the UV spectral features. Hot stellar sources constitute over half of the GALEX spectroscopic sample. For those with spectra of sufficient quality (about 9,000 in NUV, >1,000 in FUV+NUV) we will derive UV extinction

  14. Interstellar molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bally, J.

    1986-04-01

    The physical properties of the molecular phase of the interstellar medium are studied with regard to star formation and the structure of the Galaxy. Most observations of molecular clouds are made with single-dish, high-surface precision radio telescopes, with the best resolution attainable at 0.2 to 1 arcmin; the smallest structures that can be resolved are of order 10 to the 17th cm in diameter. It is now believed that: (1) most of the mass of the Galaxy is in the form of giant molecular clouds; (2) the largest clouds and those responsible for most massive star formation are concentrated in spiral arms; (3) the molecular clouds are the sites of perpetual star formation, and are significant in the chemical evolution of the Galaxy; (4) giant molecular clouds determine the evolution of the kinematic properties of galactic disk stars; (5) the total gas content is diminishing with time; and (6) most clouds have supersonic internal motions and do not form stars on a free-fall time scale. It is concluded that though progress has been made, more advanced instruments are needed to inspect the processes operating within stellar nurseries and to study the distribution of the molecular clouds in more distant galaxies. Instruments presently under construction which are designed to meet these ends are presented.

  15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: All-sky near-infrared extinction map (Juvela+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juvela, M.; Montillaud, J.

    2015-10-01

    An all-sky extinction map in units of J-band extinction (magnitudes). The map is given as a Healpix FITS file (NSIDE=4096, NESTED scheme) in Galactic projection. The map has been created with the NICER method, additionally using the information of local extinction gradients. The resolution is FWHM=3.0-arcmin. (2 data files).

  16. Stardust interstellar preliminary examination (ISPE).

    SciTech Connect

    Westphal, A.J.; Allen, C.; Bajt, S.; Basset, R.; Flynn, G.L.; Sutton, S.

    2009-03-23

    The Stardust Interstellar Preliminary Examination (ISPE) is a three-year effort to characterize the Stardust interstellar dust collection and collector using non-destructive techniques. We summarize the status of the ISPE. In January 2006 the Stardust sample return capsule returned to Earth bearing the first solid samples from a primitive solar system body, Comet 81P/Wild2, and a collector dedicated to the capture and return of contemporary interstellar dust. Both collectors were {approx}0.1 m{sup 2} in area and were composed of aerogel tiles (85% of the collecting area) and aluminum foils. The Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector (SIDC) was exposed to the interstellar dust stream for a total exposure factor of 20 m{sup 2}-day during two periods before the cometary encounter. The Stardust Interstellar Preliminary Examination (ISPE) is a three-year effort to characterize the collection using nondestructive techniques. The goals and restrictions of the ISPE are described in Westphal et al. The ISPE consists of six interdependent projects: (1) Candidate identification through automated digital microscopy and a massively distributed, calibrated search; (2) Candidate extraction and photodocumentation; (3) Characterization of candidates through synchrotron-based Fourier-Tranform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), Scanning X-Ray Fluoresence Microscopy (SXRF), and Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy (STXM); (4) Search for and analysis of craters in foils through FESEM scanning, Auger Spectroscopy and synchrotron-based Photoemission Electron Microscopy (PEEM); (5) Modeling of interstellar dust transport in the solar system; and (6) Laboratory simulations of hypervelocity dust impacts into the collecting media.

  17. Gradual extinction reduces reinstatement

    PubMed Central

    Shiban, Youssef; Wittmann, Jasmin; Weißinger, Mara; Mühlberger, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The current study investigated whether gradually reducing the frequency of aversive stimuli during extinction can prevent the return of fear. Thirty-one participants of a three-stage procedure (acquisition, extinction and a reinstatement test on day 2) were randomly assigned to a standard extinction (SE) and gradual extinction (GE) procedure. The two groups differed only in the extinction procedure. While the SE group ran through a regular extinction process without any negative events, the frequency of the aversive stimuli during the extinction phase was gradually reduced for the GE group. The unconditioned stimulus (US) was an air blast (5 bar, 10 ms). A spider and a scorpion were used as conditioned stimuli (CS). The outcome variables were contingency ratings and physiological measures (skin conductance response, SCR and startle response). There were no differences found between the two groups for the acquisition and extinction phases concerning contingency ratings, SCR, or startle response. GE compared to SE significantly reduced the return of fear in the reinstatement test for the startle response but not for SCR or contingency ratings. This study was successful in translating the findings in rodent to humans. The results suggest that the GE process is suitable for increasing the efficacy of fear extinction. PMID:26441581

  18. Mass extinction: a commentary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raup, D. M.

    1987-01-01

    Four neocatastrophist claims about mass extinction are currently being debated; they are that: 1, the late Cretaceous mass extinction was caused by large body impact; 2, as many as five other major extinctions were caused by impact; 3, the timing of extinction events since the Permian is uniformly periodic; and 4, the ages of impact craters on Earth are also periodic and in phase with the extinctions. Although strongly interconnected the four claims are independent in the sense that none depends on the others. Evidence for a link between impact and extinction is strong but still needs more confirmation through bed-by-bed and laboratory studies. An important area for future research is the question of whether extinction is a continuous process, with the rate increasing at times of mass extinctions, or whether it is episodic at all scales. If the latter is shown to be generally true, then species are at risk of extinction only rarely during their existence and catastrophism, in the sense of isolated events of extreme stress, is indicated. This is line of reasoning can only be considered an hypothesis for testing. In a larger context, paleontologists may benefit from a research strategy that looks to known Solar System and Galactic phenomena for predictions about environmental effects on earth. The recent success in the recognition of Milankovitch Cycles in the late Pleistocene record is an example of the potential of this research area.

  19. Interstellar Electron Density Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Hendrick Clark

    This study concerns the investigation of the form of the wavenumber spectrum of the Galactic electron density fluctuations through an examination of the scattering of the radio pulses emitted by pulsars as they propagate through the diffuse ionized interstellar gas. A widely used model for the electron density spectrum is based on the simple power-law: Pne(q)∝ q-β, where β = 11/3 is usually assumed, corresponding to Kolmogorov's turbulence spectrum. The simple Kolmogorov model provides satisfactory agreement for observations along many lines of sight; however, major inconsistencies remain. The inconsistencies suggest that an increase in the ratio of the power between the high (10-8[ m]-1≤ q<=10-7[ m]-1) and low (10-13[ m]-1≤ q<=10-12[ m]-1) wavenumbers is needed. This enhancement in the ratio can in turn be achieved by either including an inner scale, corresponding to a dissipation scale for the turbulent cascade, in the Kolmogorov spectrum or by considering steeper spectra. Spectra with spectral exponents β > 4 have been in general rejected based on observations of pulsar refractive scintillations. The special case of β = 4 has been given little attention and is analyzed in detail. Physically, this 'β = 4' model corresponds to the random distribution, both in location and orientation, of discrete objects with relatively sharp boundaries across the line of sight. An outer scale is included in the model to account for the average size of such objects. We compare the predictions of the inner-scale and β = 4 models both with published observations and observations we made as part of this investigation. We conclude that the form of the wavenumber spectrum is dependent on the line of sight. We propose a composite spectrum featuring a uniform background turbulence in presence of randomly distributed discrete objects, as modeled by the β = model.

  20. Interstellar Sweat Equity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, M. H.; Becker, R. E.; O'Donnell, D. J.; Brody, A. R.

    So, you have just launched aboard the Starship, headed to an exoplanet light years from Earth. You will spend the rest of your natural life on this journey in the expectation and hope that your grandchildren will arrive safely, land, and build a new settlement. You will need to govern the community onboard the Starship. This system of governance must meet unique requirements for participation, representation, and decision-making. On a spaceship that can fly and operate by itself, what will the crewmembers do for their generations in transit? Certainly, they will train and train again to practice the skills they will need upon arrival at a new world. However, this vicarious practice neither suffices to prepare the future pioneers for their destiny at a new star nor will it provide them with the satisfaction in their own work. To hone the crewmembers' inventive and technical skills, to challenge and prepare them for pioneering, the crew would build and expand the interstellar ship in transit. This transstellar ``sweat equity'' gives a stake in the enterprise to all the people, providing meaningful and useful activity to the new generations of crewmembers. They build all the new segments of the vessel from raw materials - including atmosphere - stored on board. Construction of new pressure shell modules would be one option, but they also reconstruct or fill-in existing pressurized volumes. The crew makes new life support system components and develops new agricultural modules in anticipation of their future needs. Upon arrival at the new star or planet, the crew shall apply these robustly developed skills and self-sufficient spirit to their new home.

  1. Radical formation, chemical processing, and explosion of interstellar grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    The ultraviolet radiation in interstellar space is shown to create a sufficient steady-state density of free radicals in the grain mantle material consisting of oxygen, carbon, nitrogen, and hydrogen to satisfy the critical condition for initiation of chain reactions. The criterion for minimum critical particle size for maintaining the chain reaction is of the order of the larger grain sizes in a distribution satisfying the average extinction and polarization measures. The triggering of the explosion of interstellar grains leading to the ejection of complex interstellar molecules is shown to be most probable where the grains are largest and where radiation is suddenly introduced; i.e., in regions of new star formation. Similar conditions prevail at the boundaries between very dark clouds and H II regions. When the energy released by the chemical activity of the free radicals is inadequate to explode the grain, the resulting mantle material must consist of extremely large organic molecules which are much more resistant to the hostile environment of H II regions than the classical dirty-ice mantles made up of water, methane, and ammonia.

  2. Interstellar abundances in dense, moderately reddened lines of sight. I - Observational evidence for density-dependent depletion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joseph, Charles L.; Snow, Theodore P., Jr.; Seab, C. Gregory; Crutcher, Richard M.

    1986-01-01

    The nature of dust-gas interactions, which are capable of modifying the size distribution of interstellar grains and thus causing changes in the selective extinction curve, are investigated through depletion studies. The gaseous abundances of 15 elements have been determined for several lines of sight toward moderately reddened stars, each having an anomalous extinction curve and a large abundance of cyanogen (CN). The basic result of this study is that certain elements appear to deplete preferentially in interstellar clouds having a large abundance of CN. Since CN is a sensitive indicator of the interstellar spatial density, the data might suggest that the unique pattern of enhanced depletion observed here represents the best observational evidence of accretion.

  3. Three-dimensional extinction mapping and selection effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sale, S. E.

    2015-09-01

    Selection effects can bedevil the inference of the properties of a population of astronomical catalogues, unavoidably biasing the observed catalogue. This is particularly true when mapping interstellar extinction in three dimensions: more extinguished stars are fainter and so generally less likely to appear in any magnitude limited catalogue of observations. This paper demonstrates how to account for this selection effect when mapping extinction, so that accurate and unbiased estimates of the true extinction are obtained. We advocate couching the description of the problem explicitly as a Poisson point process, which allows the likelihoods employed to be easily and correctly normalized in such a way that accounts for the selection functions applied to construct the catalogue of observations.

  4. Grain mantles: The impact on grain evolution and selective extinction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joseph, Charles L.

    1989-01-01

    Depletion studies are used to infer the presence of mantles and to constrain grain evolutionary models in the diffuse interstellar medium. The presence of these mantles appears to be important in the evolution of the grains inside diffuse as well as dense clouds. In dense clouds where the element-to-element abundances sometimes differ from those found in diffuse clouds, empirical relationships are starting to emerge between gas abundances and various types of peculiar selective extinction. These peculiar extinction curves may be the results of nonvolatile mantle formation on grain cores or may reflect chemical differences due to variations in the intrinsic metalicity from one cloud to another. A simple model of the time evolution of a parcel of gas and dust as observed by the depletion of two elements is presented. Different studies of grain evolution and selective extinction are discussed and compared.

  5. Interstellar Isotopes: Prospects with ALMA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charnley Steven B.

    2010-01-01

    Cold molecular clouds are natural environments for the enrichment of interstellar molecules in the heavy isotopes of H, C, N and O. Anomalously fractionated isotopic material is found in many primitive Solar System objects, such as meteorites and comets, that may trace interstellar matter that was incorporated into the Solar Nebula without undergoing significant processing. Models of the fractionation chemistry of H, C, N and O in dense molecular clouds, particularly in cores where substantial freeze-out of molecules on to dust has occurred, make several predictions that can be tested in the near future by molecular line observations. The range of fractionation ratios expected in different interstellar molecules will be discussed and the capabilities of ALMA for testing these models (e.g. in observing doubly-substituted isotopologues) will be outlined.

  6. Silicon chemistry in interstellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, William D.; Glassgold, A. E.

    1990-01-01

    A new model of interstellar silicon chemistry is presented that explains the lack of SiO detections in cold clouds and contains an exponential temperature dependence for the SiO abundance. A key aspect of the model is the sensitivity of SiO production by neutral silicon reactions to density and temperature, which arises from the dependence of the rate coefficients on the population of the excited fine-structure levels of the silicon atom. As part of the explanation of the lack of SiO detections at low temperatures and densities, the model also emphasizes the small efficiencies of the production routes and the correspondingly long times needed to reach equilibrium. Measurements of the abundance of SiO, in conjunction with theory, can provide information on the physical properties of interstellar clouds such as the abundance of oxygen bearing molecules and the depletion of interstellar silicon.

  7. An Interstellar Sail before 2020?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matloff, G. L.; Johnson, L.

    In 2017, NASA plans to launch the Near Earth Asteroid (NEA) Scout, a solar-photon-sail propelled probe to rendezvous with one or more near-Earth asteroids. According to a publication describing early design parameters, the spacecraft mass is 12 kg and the square sail has an area of 83 square meters. This craft, like many other NASA science missions, will likely remain functional after the completion of its primary mission. This paper investigates options for application of this spacecraft during its extended mission as an Interstellar Trailblazer. As well as kinematics, thermal aspects and the communications challenges are discussed. Although interstellar velocities for this craft will not be high and engineering the pre-perihelion trajectory will be challenging, an extended demonstration mission of this type would certainly spur interest in the development of true interstellar sails. As of December 2014, the design of this spacecraft continues to evolve. The performance estimates presented here may be overly conservative.

  8. Theory of interstellar medium diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahr, H. J.

    1983-01-01

    The theoretical interpretation of observed interplanetary resonance luminescence patterns is used as one of the must promising methods to determine the state of the local interstellar medium (LISM). However, these methods lead to discrepant results that would be hard to understand in the framework of any physical LISM scenario. Assuming that the observational data are reliable, two possibilities which could help to resolve these discrepancies are discussed: (1) the current modeling of resonance luminescence patterns is unsatisfactory and has to be improved, and (2) the extrapolated interstellar parameters are not indicative of the unperturbed LISM state, but rather designate an intermediate state attained in the outer regions of the solar system. It is shown that a quantitative treatment of the neutral gas-plasma interaction effects in the interface between the heliospheric and the interstellar plasmas is of major importance for the correct understanding of the whole complex.

  9. Interstellar dust as a cosmological foreground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkbeiner, Douglas Paul

    1999-11-01

    This dissertation explores the effect of interstellar dust in the Galaxy on cosmological measurements. We describe a map of dust temperature and column density produced with far IR data at 100 μm. This map may be used to predict optical extinction and reddening over the whole sky, and also serves as a template for microwave emission from dust. A dust emission model based on FIRAS data is presented, along with a prescription for extrapolation of the dust emission from 100 μm to longer wavelengths. In addition, measurements of the Cosmic IR Background at 60-240 μm are obtained by modeling zodiacal emission from the inter-planetary dust and its temporal variation as the Earth orbits the Sun. This emission is found to contain a factor of ~2 more energy than previously thought, based on SCUBA source counts. All of the maps described in this dissertation are available to the astronomical community, and instructions for use are included.

  10. Interrelationships between interstellar and interplanetary grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, D. D.

    1986-01-01

    The relationship between solar system dust (SSD) and interstellar dust particles (ISMD) is being reconsidered because of the discovery of isotopic anomalies in meteorites. Meteoritic, circumstellar/meteoritic, interstellar/meteoritic, planetary, and cometary data are reviewed.

  11. Measuring Interstellar Inheritance and Its Consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, C. M. O'D.; Nittler, L. R.; Davidson, J.; Ciesla, F. J.

    2016-08-01

    CIs, chondrite matrices and IDP accreted ~10 % of pristine interstellar material (ices, silicates, organics). The non-solar O isotopic compositions of most solar materials reflect early heating of interstellar dust and ices in FU Orionis outbursts.

  12. Beliefs about Human Extinction

    SciTech Connect

    Tonn, Bruce Edward

    2009-11-01

    This paper presents the results of a web-based survey about futures issues. Among many questions, respondents were asked whether they believe humans will become extinct. Forty-five percent of the almost 600 respondents believe that humans will become extinct. Many of those holding this believe felt that humans could become extinct within 500-1000 years. Others estimated extinction 5000 or more years into the future. A logistic regression model was estimated to explore the bases for this belief. It was found that people who describe themselves a secular are more likely to hold this belief than people who describe themselves as being Protestant. Older respondents and those who believe that humans have little control over their future also hold this belief. In addition, people who are more apt to think about the future and are better able to imagine potential futures tend to also believe that humans will become extinct.

  13. Dust Extinction toward Supernova 2014J in M82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jian; Jiang, B. W.; Li, Aigen; Li, Jun; Wang, Xiaofeng

    2015-08-01

    Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are powerful cosmological “standardizable candles” and the most precise distance indicators. However, the ultimate limiting factor in their use for precision cosmology rests on our ability to correct for the dust extinction toward them. SN 2014J in the starburst galaxy M82, the closest detected SN Ia in three decades, provides unparalleled opportunities to study the dust extinction. In order to derive the extinction as a function of wavelength, we model the color excesses toward SN 2014J observationally derived over a wide wavelength range in terms of dust models consisting of a mixture of silicate and graphite. The resulting extinction laws steeply rise toward the far ultraviolet, even steeper than that of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). We infer a visual extinction of AV≈1.9 mag, a reddening of E(B-V)≈1.1 mag, and a total-to-selective extinction ratio of RV≈1.7, consistent with that previously derived from photometric, spectroscopic and polarimetric observations. The size distributions of the dust in the interstellar medium toward SN 2014J are skewed toward substantially smaller grains than that of the Milky Way and the SMC.

  14. Interstellar Initiative Web Page Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Alkesh

    1999-01-01

    This summer at NASA/MSFC, I have contributed to two projects: Interstellar Initiative Web Page Design and Lenz's Law Relative Motion Demonstration. In the Web Design Project, I worked on an Outline. The Web Design Outline was developed to provide a foundation for a Hierarchy Tree Structure. The Outline would help design a Website information base for future and near-term missions. The Website would give in-depth information on Propulsion Systems and Interstellar Travel. The Lenz's Law Relative Motion Demonstrator is discussed in this volume by Russell Lee.

  15. Electric propulsion and interstellar flight

    SciTech Connect

    Matloff, G.L.

    1987-01-01

    Two general classes of interstellar space-flights are defined: endothermic and exothermic. Endothermic methods utilize power sources external to the vehicle and associated technology. Faster exothermic methods utilize on-board propulsive power sources or energy-beam technology. Various proposed endothermic electric propulsion methods are described. These include solar electric rockets, mass drivers, and ramjets. A review of previously suggested exothermic electric propulsion methods is presented. Following this review is a detailed discussion of possible near future application of the beamed-laser ramjet, mainly for ultimate relativistic travel. Electric/magnetic techniques offer an excellent possibility for decelerating an interstellar vehicle, regardless of the acceleration technique. 20 references.

  16. Interstellar Initiative Web Page Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Alkesh

    1999-10-01

    This summer at NASA/MSFC, I have contributed to two projects: Interstellar Initiative Web Page Design and Lenz's Law Relative Motion Demonstration. In the Web Design Project, I worked on an Outline. The Web Design Outline was developed to provide a foundation for a Hierarchy Tree Structure. The Outline would help design a Website information base for future and near-term missions. The Website would give in-depth information on Propulsion Systems and Interstellar Travel. The Lenz's Law Relative Motion Demonstrator is discussed in this volume by Russell Lee.

  17. Interstellar Flight by Particle Beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.

    2001-01-01

    Two difficulties with the use of laser-propelled lightsails for interstellar propulsion are the extremely low energy efficiency, and the extremely large lenses required. Both the energy efficiency and the required lens size may be greatly improved by use of a particle beam, rather than a light beam. The particle beam is reflected by a magnetic field on the spacecraft, for example, by a magnetic sail or a mini-magnetosphere inflated by a plasma current. This results in a net force on the sail with no expenditure of propellant, allowing extremely high delta-V missions, such as an interstellar probe, to be accomplished.

  18. Interstellar Grains: 50 Years On

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickramasinghe, N. Chandra

    2011-12-01

    Our understanding of the nature of interstellar grains has evolved considerably over the past half century with the present author and Fred Hoyle being intimately involved at several key stages of progress. The currently fashionable graphite-silicate-organic grain model has all its essential aspects unequivocally traceable to original peer-reviewedpublicationsbytheauthorand/orFredHoyle. Theprevailingreluctancetoaccepttheseclear-cut priorities may be linked to our further work that argued for interstellar grains and organics to have a biological provenance - a position perceived as heretical. The biological model, however, continues to provide a powerful unifying hypothesis for a vast amount of otherwise disconnected and disparate astronomical data.

  19. The formation of interstellar jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tenorio-Tagle, G.; Canto, J.; Rozyczka, M.

    1988-01-01

    The formation of interstellar jets by convergence of supersonic conical flows and the further dynamical evolution of these jets are investigated theoretically by means of numerical simulations. The results are presented in extensive graphs and characterized in detail. Strong radiative cooling is shown to result in jets with Mach numbers 2.5-29 propagating to lengths 50-100 times their original widths, with condensation of swept-up interstellar matter at Mach 5 or greater. The characteristics of so-called molecular outflows are well reproduced by the simulations of low-Mach-number and quasi-adiabatic jets.

  20. Diffuse interstellar clouds as a chemical laboratory - The chemistry of diatomic carbon species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Federman, S. R.; Huntress, W. T., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    The chemistry of C2, CH, and CO in diffuse interstellar clouds is analyzed and compared to absorption line measurements toward background stars. Analytical expressions in terms of column densities are derived for the rate equations. The results indicate that in clouds with 4 mag of visual extinction, the abundance of C+ has to decrease by a factor of about 15 from the value traditionally used for clouds with 1 mag of extinction. The rate coefficients for the reactions C+ + CH - C2+ + H and C+ + H2 - CH2+ + h-nu need to be reduced from previous estimates. Chemical arguments are presented for the revised rate coefficients.

  1. Mapping of interstellar clouds with infrared light scattered from dust: TMC-1N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinen, J.; Juvela, M.; Pelkonen, V.-M.; Rawlings, M. G.

    2013-10-01

    Context. Mapping of the near-infrared (NIR) scattered light is a recent method for the study of interstellar clouds, complementing other, more commonly used methods, like dust emission and extinction. Aims: Our goal is to study the usability of this method on larger scale, and compare the properties of a filamentary structure using infrared scattering and other methods. We also study the radiation field and differences in grain emissivity between diffuse and dense areas. Methods: We have used scattered NIR J, H, and K band surface brightness observations with WFCAM instrument to map a filament TMC-1N in Taurus Molecular Cloud, covering an area of 1° × 1° corresponding to ~(2.44 pc). We have converted the data into an optical depth map and compared the results with NIR extinction and Herschel observations of sub-mm dust emission. We have also modelled the filament with 3D radiative transfer calculations of scattered light. Results: We see the filament in scattered light in all three NIR bands. We note that our WFCAM observations in TMC-1N show notably lower intensity than previous results in Corona Australis using the same method. We show that 3D radiative transfer simulations predict similar scattered surface brightness levels as seen in the observations. However, changing the assumptions about the background can change the results of simulations notably. We derive emissivity, the ratio of FIR dust emission to column density, by using optical depth in the J band, τJ, obtained from NIR extinction map as an independent tracer of column density. We obtain a value 0.0013 for the ratio τ250/τJNicer. This leads to opacity or dust emission cross-section σe(250 μm) values 1.7-2.4 × 10-25 cm2/H, depending on assumptions of the extinction curve, which can change the results by over 40%. These values are twice as high as obtained for diffuse areas, at the lower limit of earlier results for denser areas. Conclusions: We show that NIR scattering can be a valuable tool

  2. Extinction and the fossil record

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sepkoski, J. J. Jr; Sepkoski JJ, ,. J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    The author examines evidence of mass extinctions in the fossil record and searches for reasons for such large extinctions. Five major mass extinctions eliminated at least 40 percent of animal genera in the oceans and from 65 to 95 percent of ocean species. Questions include the occurrence of gradual or catastrophic extinctions, causes, environment, the capacity of a perturbation to cause extinctions each time it happens, and the possibility and identification of complex events leading to a mass extinction.

  3. Evidence for an Interstellar Dust Filament in the Outer Heliosheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisch, P. C.; Andersson, B.-G.; Berdyugin, A.; Piirola, V.; Funsten, H. O.; Magalhaes, A. M.; Seriacopi, D. B.; McComas, D. J.; Schwadron, N. A.; Slavin, J. D.; Wiktorowicz, S. J.

    2015-05-01

    A recently discovered filament of polarized starlight that traces a coherent magnetic field is shown to have several properties that are consistent with an origin in the outer heliosheath of the heliosphere: (1) the magnetic field that provides the best fit to the polarization position angles is directed toward \\ell = 357.°3, b = 17.°0 (±11.°2) this direction is within 6.°7 ± 11.°2 of the observed upwind direction of the flow of interstellar neutral helium gas through the heliosphere. (2) The magnetic field is ordered; the component of the variation of the polarization position angles that can be attributed to magnetic turbulence is ±9.°6. (3) The axis of the elongated filament can be approximated by a line that defines an angle of 80° ± 14° with the plane that is formed by the interstellar magnetic field (ISMF) vector and the vector of the inflowing neutral gas (the {\\boldsymbol{BV}} plane). We propose that this polarization feature arises from aligned interstellar dust grains in the outer heliosheath where the interstellar plasma and magnetic field are deflected around the heliosphere. This interpretation suggests that the polarization is seen where stream lines of the flow and the draped ISMF lines are approximately parallel to each other and perpendicular to the sightline. An ordered magnetic field is required so that grain alignment is not disrupted during the interaction. The filament location is consistent with dust plumes previously predicted to form around the heliosphere. The proposed outer heliosheath location of the polarizing grains can be tested with three-dimensional models that track torques on asymmetric dust grains as they propagate through the heliosheath plasma, and using these models to evaluate grain alignment and the asymmetric extinction of the grains.

  4. Experimental interstellar organic chemistry - Preliminary findings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khare, B. N.; Sagan, C.

    1973-01-01

    Review of the results of some explicit experimental simulation of interstellar organic chemistry consisting in low-temperature high-vacuum UV irradiation of condensed simple gases known or suspected to be present in the interstellar medium. The results include the finding that acetonitrile may be present in the interstellar medium. The implication of this and other findings are discussed.

  5. Interstellar Aldehydes and their corresponding Reduced Alcohols: Interstellar Propanol?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etim, Emmanuel; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Das, Ankan; Gorai, Prasanta; Arunan, Elangannan

    2016-07-01

    There is a well-defined trend of aldehydes and their corresponding reduced alcohols among the known interstellar molecules; methanal (CH_2O) and methanol (CH_3OH); ethenone (C_2H_2O) and vinyl alcohol (CH_2CHOH); ethanal (C_2H_4O) and ethanol(C_2H_5OH); glycolaldehyde (C_2H_4O_2) and ethylene glycol(C_2H_6O_2). The reduced alcohol of propanal (CH_3CH_2CHO) which is propanol (CH_3CH_2CH_2OH) has not yet been observed but its isomer; ethyl methyl ether (CH_3CH_2OCH_3) is a known interstellar molecule. In this article, different studies are carried out in investigating the trend between aldehydes and their corresponding reduced alcohols and the deviation from the trend. Kinetically and with respect to the formation route, alcohols could have been produced from their corresponding reduced aldehydes via two successive hydrogen additions. This is plausible because of (a) the unquestionable high abundance of hydrogen, (b) presence of energy sources within some of the molecular clouds and (c) the ease at which successive hydrogen addition reaction occurs. In terms of stability, the observed alcohols are thermodynamically favorable as compared to their isomers. Regarding the formation process, the hydrogen addition reactions are believed to proceed on the surface of the interstellar grains which leads to the effect of interstellar hydrogen bonding. From the studies, propanol and propan-2-ol are found to be more strongly attached to the surface of the interstellar dust grains which affects its overall gas phase abundance as compared to its isomer ethyl methyl ether which has been observed.

  6. Two-Photon Absorption by H2 Molecules: Origin of the 2175A Astronomical Band?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokin, Peter P.; Glownia, James H.

    2007-04-01

    The near UV spectra of OB stars are often dominated by a broad extinction band peaking at 2175A. Forty years after its discovery, the origin of this band remains unknown, although it is usually attributed to linear scattering or linear absorption by interstellar dust particles. Here we report that two-photon absorption by H2 molecules in gaseous clouds enveloping OB stars should lead to a strong band peaking near 2175A. We first show that if the product of the H2 density in the gaseous cloud times the emitted stellar VUV flux is sufficiently great, the threshold for stimulated Rayleigh scattering will be exceeded, resulting in the generation of intense, monochromatic VUV light at the rest frame frequencies of H2 B- and C-state resonance lines originating from levels J''=0 and J''=1 of X0. This coherently generated light must necessarily propagate radially inwards towards the photosphere of the illuminating OB star, and therefore cannot be detected externally. However, this same light effectively constitutes intense ``first step'' monochromatic radiation that should induce continuum photons emitted by the OB star near 2175A to be strongly absorbed as ``second steps'' in resonantly-enhanced H2 two-photon transitions to two well known doubly-excited dissociative states of H2. Archival UV and VUV spectra of 185 OB stars strongly support our nonlinear model for the 2175A band.

  7. Is extinction age dependent?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doran, N.A.; Arnold, A.J.; Parker, W.C.; Huffer, F.W.

    2006-01-01

    Age-dependent extinction is an observation with important biological implications. Van Valen's Red Queen hypothesis triggered three decades of research testing its primary implication: that age is independent of extinction. In contrast to this, later studies with species-level data have indicated the possible presence of age dependence. Since the formulation of the Red Queen hypothesis, more powerful tests of survivorship models have been developed. This is the first report of the application of the Cox Proportional Hazards model to paleontological data. Planktonic foraminiferal morphospecies allow the taxonomic and precise stratigraphic resolution necessary for the Cox model. As a whole, planktonic foraminiferal morphospecies clearly show age-dependent extinction. In particular, the effect is attributable to the presence of shorter-ranged species (range < 4 myr) following extinction events. These shorter-ranged species also possess tests with unique morphological architecture. The morphological differences are probably epiphenomena of underlying developmental and heterochronic processes of shorter-ranged species that survived various extinction events. Extinction survivors carry developmental and morphological characteristics into postextinction recovery times, and this sets them apart from species populations established independently of extinction events. Copyright ?? 2006, SEPM (Society for Sedimentary Geology).

  8. Interstellar dust grain composition from high-resolution X-ray absorption edge structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corrales, Lia

    2016-06-01

    X-ray light is sufficient to excite electrons from n=1 (K-shell) and n=2 (L-shell) energy levels of neutral interstellar metals, causing a sharp increase in the absorption cross-section. Near the ionization energy, the shape of the photoelectric absorption edge depends strongly on whether the atom is isolated or bound in molecules or minerals (dust). With high resolution X-ray spectroscopy, we can directly measure the state of metals and the mineral composition of dust in the interstellar medium. In addition, the scattering contribution to the X-ray extinction cross-section can be used to gauge grain size, shape, and filling factor. In order to fully take advantage of major advances in high resolution X-ray spectroscopy, lab measurements of X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) from suspected interstellar minerals are required. Optical constants derived from the absorption measurements can be used with Mie scattering or anomalous diffraction theory in order to model the full extinction cross-sections from the interstellar medium. Much like quasar spectra are used to probe other intergalactic gas, absorption spectroscopy of Galactic X-ray binaries and bright stars will yield key insights to the mineralogy and evolution of dust grains in the Milky Way.

  9. Extinction Mapping of Nearby Galaxies with LEGUS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahre, Lauren; Walterbos, Rene A. M.; Sabbi, Elena; Thilker, David A.; Ubeda, Leonardo; LEGUS Science Team

    2016-01-01

    Using 5-band (NUV (2750 A), U, B, V, I) photometry from the Legacy ExtraGalactic Ultraviolet Survey (LEGUS), we generate extinction maps for nearby (within 10 Mpc) galaxies at resolutions of a few arcseconds. Dust is commonly used as a tracer for cold dense gas, either through IR and NIR emission maps or through extinction mapping. Extinction mapping has been used to trace dust column densities in the Milky Way, the Magellanic Clouds, and M31. The maps for M31 use IR and NIR photometry of red giant branch stars, which is more difficult to obtain for more distant galaxies. Our method uses the extinctions derived for individual massive stars using the isochrone-matching method described by Kim et al. (2012). With our 5-band photometry, which extends into the UV, we are able to trace even small amounts of extinction. These maps are then compared to HI and CO maps of the same galaxies with the goal of constraining the dust-to-gas mass ratio, which we can then correlate with the gas phase metallicity from other observations. This poster will demonstrate the technique on a few galaxies, but the project will subsequently be expanded to cover the full LEGUS sample of nearly 50 galaxies. These maps can then be used to correct massive star and cluster photometry and HII region Halpha observations for the effects of extinction in order to better characterize star formation rates and massive stellar populations for other projects, such as initial mass function studies and ionization balance studies for HII regions and the diffuse ionized gas.

  10. Isotopic Fractionation in Interstellar Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charnley, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Isotopically fractionated material is found in many solar system objects, including meteorites and comets. It is thought, in some cases, to trace interstellar material that was incorporated into the solar sys tem without undergoing significant processing. In this poster, we sho w the results of several models of the nitrogen, oxygen, and carbon f ractionation in proto-stellar cores.

  11. Stardust Interstellar Preliminary Examination (ISPE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westphal, A. J.; Allen, C.; Bajt, S.; Basset, R.; Bastien, R.; Bechtel, H.; Bleuet, P.; Borg, J.; Brenker F.; Bridges, J.

    2009-01-01

    In January 2006 the Stardust sample return capsule returned to Earth bearing the first solid samples from a primitive solar system body, C omet 81P/Wild2, and a collector dedicated to the capture and return o f contemporary interstellar dust. Both collectors were approximately 0.1m(exp 2) in area and were composed of aerogel tiles (85% of the co llecting area) and aluminum foils. The Stardust Interstellar Dust Col lector (SIDC) was exposed to the interstellar dust stream for a total exposure factor of 20 m(exp 2-) day during two periods before the co metary encounter. The Stardust Interstellar Preliminary Examination ( ISPE) is a three-year effort to characterize the collection using no ndestructive techniques. The ISPE consists of six interdependent proj ects: (1) Candidate identification through automated digital microsco py and a massively distributed, calibrated search (2) Candidate extr action and photodocumentation (3) Characterization of candidates thro ugh synchrotronbased FourierTranform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), S canning XRay Fluoresence Microscopy (SXRF), and Scanning Transmission Xray Microscopy (STXM) (4) Search for and analysis of craters in f oils through FESEM scanning, Auger Spectroscopy and synchrotronbased Photoemission Electron Microscopy (PEEM) (5) Modeling of interstell ar dust transport in the solar system (6) Laboratory simulations of h ypervelocity dust impacts into the collecting media

  12. Erratum: Interstellar Abundance Standards Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofia, U. J.; Meyer, D. M.

    2001-09-01

    In the Letter ``Interstellar Abundance Standards Revisited'' by U. J. Sofia and D. M. Meyer (ApJ, 554, L221 [2001]), Table 2 and its footnotes contain several typographical errors. The corrected table is shown below. We note that the solar reference standard now implies a positive abundance of nitrogen in halo dust.

  13. Term Projects on Interstellar Comets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mack, John E.

    1975-01-01

    Presents two calculations of the probability of detection of an interstellar comet, under the hypothesis that such comets would escape from comet clouds similar to that believed to surround the sun. Proposes three problems, each of which would be a reasonable term project for a motivated undergraduate. (Author/MLH)

  14. Diamonds in dense molecular clouds - A challenge to the standard interstellar medium paradigm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allamandola, L. J.; Sandford, S. A.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Herbst, T. M.

    1993-01-01

    Observations of a newly discovered infrared C-H stretching band indicate that interstellar diamond-like material appears to be characteristic of dense clouds. In sharp contrast, the spectral signature of dust in the diffuse interstellar medium is dominated by -CH2- and -CH3 groups. This dichotomy in the aliphatic organic component between the dense and diffuse media challenges standard assumptions about the processes occurring in, and interactions between, these two media. The ubiquity of this interstellar diamond-like material rules out models for meteoritic diamond formation in unusual circumstellar environments and implies that the formation of the diamond-like material is associated with common interstellar processes or stellar types.

  15. Diamonds in dense molecular clouds: a challenge to the standard interstellar medium paradigm.

    PubMed

    Allamandola, L J; Sandford, S A; Tielens, A G; Herbst, T M

    1993-04-01

    Observations of a newly discovered infrared C-H stretching band indicate that interstellar diamond-like material appears to be characteristic of dense clouds. In sharp contrast, the spectral signature of dust in the diffuse interstellar medium is dominated by -CH2- and -CH3 groups. This dichotomy in the aliphatic organic component between the dense and diffuse media challenges standard assumptions about the processes occurring in, and interactions between, these two media. The ubiquity of this interstellar diamond-like material rules out models for meteoritic diamond formation in unusual circumstellar environments and implies that the formation of the diamond-like material is associated with common interstellar processes or stellar types.

  16. The Inventory of Interstellar Materials Available for the Formation of the Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, Scott A.; Witteborn, Fred C. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    interstellar extinction call graphite! If my suggestion is correct it will help resolve the dilemma associated with the current over-subscription of cosmic C and should lead to some new approaches to both extinction models and the study of meteoritic interstellar microdiamonds.

  17. Interstellar matter research with the Copernicus satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spitzer, L., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    The use of the Copernicus satellite in an investigation of interstellar matter makes it possible to study absorption lines in the ultraviolet range which cannot be observed on the ground because of atmospheric absorption effects. A brief description is given of the satellite and the instrument used in the reported studies of interstellar matter. The results of the studies are discussed, giving attention to interstellar molecular hydrogen, the chemical composition of the interstellar gas, the coronal gas between the stars, and the interstellar abundance ratio of deuterium to hydrogen.

  18. The Sun's dusty interstellar environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterken, Veerle

    2016-07-01

    The Sun's dusty interstellar environment Interstellar dust from our immediate interstellar neighborhood travels through the solar system at speeds of ca. 26 km/s: the relative speed of the solar system with respect to the local interstellar cloud. On its way, its trajectories are altered by several forces like the solar radiation pressure force and Lorentz force. The latter is due to the charged dust particles that fly through the interplanetary magnetic field. These trajectories differ per particle type and size and lead to varying fluxes and directions of the flow inside of the solar system that depend on location but also on phase in the solar cycle. Hence, these fluxes and directions depend strongly on the configuration of the inner regions and outer regions of the heliosphere. Several missions have measured this dust in the solar system directly. The Ulysses dust detector data encompasses 16 years of intestellar dust fluxes and approximate directions, Stardust captured returned to Earth a few of these particles sucessfully, and finally the Cassini dust detector allowed for compositional information to be obtained from the impacts on the instrument. In this talk, we give an overview of the current status of interstellar dust research through the measurements made inside of the solar system, and we put them in perspective to the knowledge obtained from more classical astronomical means. In special, we focus on the interaction of the dust with the interplanetary magnetic field, and on what we learn about the dust (and the fields) by comparing the available dust data to computer simulations of dust trajectories. Finally, we synthesize the different methods of observation, their results, and give a preview on new research opportunities in the coming year(s).

  19. Temporal Dynamics of Recovery from Extinction Shortly after Extinction Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archbold, Georgina E.; Dobbek, Nick; Nader, Karim

    2013-01-01

    Evidence suggests that extinction is new learning. Memory acquisition involves both short-term memory (STM) and long-term memory (LTM) components; however, few studies have examined early phases of extinction retention. Retention of auditory fear extinction was examined at various time points. Shortly (1-4 h) after extinction acquisition…

  20. Modelling the extinction of Steller's sea cow

    PubMed Central

    Turvey, S.T; Risley, C.L

    2005-01-01

    Steller's sea cow, a giant sirenian discovered in 1741 and extinct by 1768, is one of the few megafaunal mammal species to have died out during the historical period. The species is traditionally considered to have been exterminated by ‘blitzkrieg’-style direct overharvesting for food, but it has also been proposed that its extinction resulted from a sea urchin population explosion triggered by extirpation of local sea otter populations that eliminated the shallow-water kelps on which sea cows fed. Hunting records from eighteenth century Russian expeditions to the Commander Islands, in conjunction with life-history data extrapolated from dugongs, permit modelling of sea cow extinction dynamics. Sea cows were massively and wastefully overexploited, being hunted at over seven times the sustainable limit, and suggesting that the initial Bering Island sea cow population must have been higher than suggested by previous researchers to allow the species to survive even until 1768. Environmental changes caused by sea otter declines are unlikely to have contributed to this extinction event. This indicates that megafaunal extinctions can be effected by small bands of hunters using pre-industrial technologies, and highlights the catastrophic impact of wastefulness when overexploiting resources mistakenly perceived as ‘infinite’. PMID:17148336

  1. Modelling the extinction of Steller's sea cow.

    PubMed

    Turvey, S T; Risley, C L

    2006-03-22

    Steller's sea cow, a giant sirenian discovered in 1741 and extinct by 1768, is one of the few megafaunal mammal species to have died out during the historical period. The species is traditionally considered to have been exterminated by 'blitzkrieg'-style direct overharvesting for food, but it has also been proposed that its extinction resulted from a sea urchin population explosion triggered by extirpation of local sea otter populations that eliminated the shallow-water kelps on which sea cows fed. Hunting records from eighteenth century Russian expeditions to the Commander Islands, in conjunction with life-history data extrapolated from dugongs, permit modelling of sea cow extinction dynamics. Sea cows were massively and wastefully overexploited, being hunted at over seven times the sustainable limit, and suggesting that the initial Bering Island sea cow population must have been higher than suggested by previous researchers to allow the species to survive even until 1768. Environmental changes caused by sea otter declines are unlikely to have contributed to this extinction event. This indicates that megafaunal extinctions can be effected by small bands of hunters using pre-industrial technologies, and highlights the catastrophic impact of wastefulness when overexploiting resources mistakenly perceived as 'infinite'.

  2. Hydrocarbon analogs of cosmic dust to trace the solid carbon abundance in the interstellar medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadallah, Kamel A. K.

    2015-01-01

    The spectral changes of hydrogenated amorphous carbon (HAC) could show variable distributions of solid carbon abundance in the interstellar medium (ISM). The variable optical properties of HAC analogs, produced by the laser ablation in a high vacuum, depends on the variation in its atomic and electronic structures. The fraction of hydrogen atoms in HAC increases proportionally with the laser's power. The available solid carbon tied up in the interstellar HAC, being the carrier of the interstellar 3.4 μ m and 4.6 μ m-1 bands, is indicated by the strength of these bands. Comparing the strength of these bands with those of laboratory data indicates that the amount of carbon in HAC analogs is not inherently sufficient. The lack in the solid carbon (locked solid carbon) in these analogs can be analytically estimated to facilitate the simulation of cosmic carbon dust. The results show a reduction in the locked solid carbon when the fraction of hydrogen atoms in HAC analogs increases. When this fraction becomes approximately 0.52 relative to the total number of hydrogen and carbon atoms, there is no lack of carbon in HAC analogs. The interstellar distribution of variable solid carbon abundance is attributed to the modification of cosmic HAC, which occurs as a result of the variation in its hydrogen atom fraction and the UV processing taking place in the interstellar environments. This distribution reveals more solid carbon abundances reside in the dust phase and may assist in resolving the carbon crisis.

  3. Near-Infrared Spectroscopy of Interstellar Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulanger, F.; Onaka, T.; Pilleri, P.; Joblin, C.

    2011-03-01

    Near infrared observations of reflection nebulae have set the historical ground for the discovery of interstellar PAHs, but since, space observations have focused on their mid-IR features, and data shortward of 5 μm have remained scarce. The Spitzer/IRAC images in the 3.6 and 4.5 μm channels do show that the near-IR emission from small dust particles is ubiquitous across the Galaxy, but provide no spectroscopic information. To investigate the nature of this near-IR dust emission, we have obtained AKARI spectroscopic observations, over the 2.5-5 μm spectral range, for a set of archetype PDRs mapped with the Spitzer spectrometer at mid-IR wavelengths. These AKARI data supplement earlier observations with the SWS ISO spectrometer, in providing the gain in sensitivity needed to observe low excitation sources, and the spatial information required to spatially correlate near-IR spectroscopic signatures with physical conditions and observed changes in mid-IR spectra. This paper presents the first results of the data analysis, in relation to two open questions on interstellar PAHs. (1) Is there an evolutionary link from aliphatic carbon dust to PAHs? (2) What is the origin of the near-IR dust continuum? The AKARI spectra display features longward of the main 3.29 μm PAH feature, and continuum emission. The intensity ratio between the features ascribed to aliphatic CH bonds and the 3.29 μm aromatic band, varies spatially in a way that may be interpreted as evidence for aromatization of the smallest dust particles by photo-processing. The continuum displays a striking step-increase across the 3.29 μm feature. We also present a spectrum of a photodissociation region with a feature at 4.65 μm, which has been speculated to be related to the CD stretch in aliphatic hydrocarbon side-groups on PAHs.

  4. Extinction with multiple excitors

    PubMed Central

    McConnell, Bridget L.; Miguez, Gonzalo; Miller, Ralph R.

    2012-01-01

    Four conditioned suppression experiments with rats, using an ABC renewal design, investigated the effects of compounding the target conditioned excitor with additional, nontarget conditioned excitors during extinction. Experiment 1 showed stronger extinction, as evidenced by less renewal, when the target excitor was extinguished in compound with a second excitor, relative to when it was extinguished with associatively neutral stimuli. Critically, this deepened extinction effect was attenuated (i.e., more renewal occurred) when a third excitor was added during extinction training. This novel demonstration contradicts the predictions of associative learning models based on total error reduction, but it is explicable in terms of a counteraction effect within the framework of the extended comparator hypothesis. The attenuated deepened extinction effect was replicated in Experiments 2a and 3, which also showed that pretraining consisting of weakening the association between the two additional excitors (Experiments 2a and 2b) or weakening the association between one of the additional excitors and the unconditioned stimulus (Experiment 3) attenuated the counteraction effect, thereby resulting in a decrease in responding to the target excitor. These results suggest that more than simple total error reduction determines responding after extinction. PMID:23055103

  5. Extinction of oscillating populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Naftali R.; Meerson, Baruch

    2016-03-01

    Established populations often exhibit oscillations in their sizes that, in the deterministic theory, correspond to a limit cycle in the space of population sizes. If a population is isolated, the intrinsic stochasticity of elemental processes can ultimately bring it to extinction. Here we study extinction of oscillating populations in a stochastic version of the Rosenzweig-MacArthur predator-prey model. To this end we develop a WKB (Wentzel, Kramers and Brillouin) approximation to the master equation, employing the characteristic population size as the large parameter. Similar WKB theories have been developed previously in the context of population extinction from an attracting multipopulation fixed point. We evaluate the extinction rates and find the most probable paths to extinction from the limit cycle by applying Floquet theory to the dynamics of an effective four-dimensional WKB Hamiltonian. We show that the entropic barriers to extinction change in a nonanalytic way as the system passes through the Hopf bifurcation. We also study the subleading pre-exponential factors of the WKB approximation.

  6. Extinction of oscillating populations.

    PubMed

    Smith, Naftali R; Meerson, Baruch

    2016-03-01

    Established populations often exhibit oscillations in their sizes that, in the deterministic theory, correspond to a limit cycle in the space of population sizes. If a population is isolated, the intrinsic stochasticity of elemental processes can ultimately bring it to extinction. Here we study extinction of oscillating populations in a stochastic version of the Rosenzweig-MacArthur predator-prey model. To this end we develop a WKB (Wentzel, Kramers and Brillouin) approximation to the master equation, employing the characteristic population size as the large parameter. Similar WKB theories have been developed previously in the context of population extinction from an attracting multipopulation fixed point. We evaluate the extinction rates and find the most probable paths to extinction from the limit cycle by applying Floquet theory to the dynamics of an effective four-dimensional WKB Hamiltonian. We show that the entropic barriers to extinction change in a nonanalytic way as the system passes through the Hopf bifurcation. We also study the subleading pre-exponential factors of the WKB approximation. PMID:27078294

  7. Interstellar dust. Evidence for interstellar origin of seven dust particles collected by the Stardust spacecraft.

    PubMed

    Westphal, Andrew J; Stroud, Rhonda M; Bechtel, Hans A; Brenker, Frank E; Butterworth, Anna L; Flynn, George J; Frank, David R; Gainsforth, Zack; Hillier, Jon K; Postberg, Frank; Simionovici, Alexandre S; Sterken, Veerle J; Nittler, Larry R; Allen, Carlton; Anderson, David; Ansari, Asna; Bajt, Saša; Bastien, Ron K; Bassim, Nabil; Bridges, John; Brownlee, Donald E; Burchell, Mark; Burghammer, Manfred; Changela, Hitesh; Cloetens, Peter; Davis, Andrew M; Doll, Ryan; Floss, Christine; Grün, Eberhard; Heck, Philipp R; Hoppe, Peter; Hudson, Bruce; Huth, Joachim; Kearsley, Anton; King, Ashley J; Lai, Barry; Leitner, Jan; Lemelle, Laurence; Leonard, Ariel; Leroux, Hugues; Lettieri, Robert; Marchant, William; Ogliore, Ryan; Ong, Wei Jia; Price, Mark C; Sandford, Scott A; Sans Tresseras, Juan-Angel; Schmitz, Sylvia; Schoonjans, Tom; Schreiber, Kate; Silversmit, Geert; Solé, Vicente A; Srama, Ralf; Stadermann, Frank; Stephan, Thomas; Stodolna, Julien; Sutton, Stephen; Trieloff, Mario; Tsou, Peter; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Vekemans, Bart; Vincze, Laszlo; Von Korff, Joshua; Wordsworth, Naomi; Zevin, Daniel; Zolensky, Michael E

    2014-08-15

    Seven particles captured by the Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector and returned to Earth for laboratory analysis have features consistent with an origin in the contemporary interstellar dust stream. More than 50 spacecraft debris particles were also identified. The interstellar dust candidates are readily distinguished from debris impacts on the basis of elemental composition and/or impact trajectory. The seven candidate interstellar particles are diverse in elemental composition, crystal structure, and size. The presence of crystalline grains and multiple iron-bearing phases, including sulfide, in some particles indicates that individual interstellar particles diverge from any one representative model of interstellar dust inferred from astronomical observations and theory.

  8. R(sub nu)-dependent optical and near-ultraviolet extinction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Donnell, James E.

    1994-01-01

    We have derived extinctions A(lambda)/A(V) at the wavelengths of the uvby filters for 22 stars, with a range of values of R(sub nu), from the sample of Cardelli, Clayton, & Mathis (1989, hereafter CCM). We have fit these extinctions, and also UBVRIJHKL, IUE and ANS extinction measurements, with linear relations A(lambda)/A/(V) = a+b/R(sub nu) and fit a and b as a function of x(=1/lambda) with polynomials to obtain an R(sub nu)-dependent mean extinction law (A(x)/A(V) = a(x) + b(x)/R(sub nu))in the optical and near-ultraviolet (1.1/micrometer less than or equal to 3.3/micrometer). This law is virtually identical to the CCM extinction law for large values of R(sub nu)(R(sub nu) approximately 5) but is slightly lower in the near-ultraviolet for smaller R(sub nu) (R(sub nu) approximately 3). The extinction law presented here agrees much better with a high-resolution extinction curve for the diffuse interstellar medium (R(sub nu) approximately 3.1), presented by Bastiaansen (1992), than CCM. The deviations of individual extinction curves from the mean are dominated by observational errors. The wavelength resolution of this work is not high enough to show evidence for or against the existence of very broad structure in optical extinction curves.

  9. A search for interstellar scandium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snow, T. P., Jr.; Dodgen, S. L.

    1980-01-01

    The resonance line of Sc II at 3642.785 A has been sought in the interstellar spectrum of Zeta Oph, resulting in an upper limit N(Sc II) not greater than 8.6 billion/sq cm and a depletion of this element at least by a factor of 200, if Sc III contributes a negligible column density. The present upper limit may be somewhat below the level expected under the grain-formation model for interstellar depletions, and is consistent with the abundance expected if the depletions are due to gas-grain collisions. The new limit on this element helps to support the hypothesis that species within a specific range of ionization potential are preferentially depleted.

  10. Interstellar Polarization and Magnetic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Terry Jay

    Polarimetry of starlight observed through dust and observations of polarized thermal emission from this dust are some of the few ways to observe the presence of magnetic fields in the interstellar medium. Not only is the strength and overall geometry of the magnetic field important in physical processes in the ISM, the turbulent component to the field also plays an important role. Turbulence in the field is directly tied to turbulence in the gas and consequently to the dynamics of the gas, on both large and small scales. Using interstellar polarization to measure parameters relating to turbulence in the magnetic field is necessarily an indirect process. In this chapter we explore several techniques and results for using polarimetry to explore the turbulent component of the magnetic field in the Galaxy.

  11. One Kilogram Interstellar Colony Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mole, A.

    Small interstellar colony probes based on nanotechnology will become possible long before giant multi-generation ships become affordable. A beam generator and magnetic sail can accelerate a one kg probe to .1 c, braking via the interstellar field can decelerate it, and the field in a distant solar system can allow it to maneuver to an extrasolar planet. A heat shield is used for landing and nanobots emerge to build ever-larger robots and construct colony infrastructure. Humans can then be generated from genomes stored as data in computer memory. Technology is evolving towards these capabilities and should reach the required level in fifty years. The plan appears to be affordable, with the principal cost being the beam generator, estimated at $17 billion.

  12. Interstellar Grains: 50 Years on

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickramasinghe, N. C.

    Our understanding of the nature of interstellar grains has evolved considerably over the past half century with the present author and Fred Hoyle being intimately involved at several key stages of progress. The currently fashionable graphite-silicate-organic grain model has all its essential aspects unequivocally traceable to original peer-reviewed publications by the author and/or Fred Hoyle. The prevailing reluctance to accept these clear-cut priorities may be linked to our further work that argued for interstellar grains and organics to have a biological provenance -- a position perceived as heretical. The biological model, however, continues to provide a powerful unifying hypothesis for a vast amount of otherwise disconnected and disparate astronomical data.

  13. Evolutionary models of interstellar chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, Sheo S.

    1987-01-01

    The goal of evolutionary models of interstellar chemistry is to understand how interstellar clouds came to be the way they are, how they will change with time, and to place them in an evolutionary sequence with other celestial objects such as stars. An improved Mark II version of an earlier model of chemistry in dynamically evolving clouds is presented. The Mark II model suggests that the conventional elemental C/O ratio less than one can explain the observed abundances of CI and the nondetection of O2 in dense clouds. Coupled chemical-dynamical models seem to have the potential to generate many observable discriminators of the evolutionary tracks. This is exciting, because, in general, purely dynamical models do not yield enough verifiable discriminators of the predicted tracks.

  14. Interstellar organic matter in meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, J.; Epstein, S.

    1983-01-01

    Deuterium-enriched hydrogen is present in organic matter in such meteorites as noncarbonaceous chondrites. The majority of the unequilibrated primitive meteorites contain hydrogen whose D/H ratios are greater than 0.0003, requiring enrichment (relative to cosmic hydrogen) by isotope exchange reactions taking place below 150 K. The D/H values presented are the lower limits for the organic compounds derived from interstellar molecules, since all processes subsequent to their formation, including terrestrial contamination, decrease their D/H ratios. In contrast, the D/H ratios of hydrogen associated with hydrated silicates are relatively uniform for the meteorites analyzed. The C-13/C-12 ratios of organic matter, irrespective of D/H ratio, lie well within those observed for the earth. Present findings suggest that other interstellar material, in addition to organic matter, is preserved and is present in high D/H ratio meteorites.

  15. Silicon chemistry in interstellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, William D.; Glassgold, A. E.

    1989-01-01

    Interstellar SiO was discovered shortly after CO but it has been detected mainly in high density and high temperature regions associated with outflow sources. A new model of interstellar silicon chemistry that explains the lack of SiO detections in cold clouds is presented which contains an exponential temperature dependence for the SiO abundance. A key aspect of the model is the sensitivity of SiO production by neutral silicon reactions to density and temperature, which arises from the dependence of the rate coefficients on the population of the excited fine structure levels of the silicon atom. This effect was originally pointed out in the context of neutral reactions of carbon and oxygen by Graff, who noted that the leading term in neutral atom-molecule interactions involves the quadrupole moment of the atom. Similar to the case of carbon, the requirement that Si has a quadrupole moment requires population of the J = 1 level, which lies 111K above the J = 0 ground state and has a critical density n(cr) equal to or greater than 10(6)/cu cm. The SiO abundance then has a temperature dependence proportional to exp(-111/T) and a quadratic density dependence for n less than n(cr). As part of the explanation of the lack of SiO detections at low temperatures and densities, this model also emphasizes the small efficiencies of the production routes and the correspondingly long times needed to reach equilibrium. Measurements of the abundance of SiO, in conjunction with theory, can provide information on the physical properties of interstellar clouds such as the abundances of oxygen bearing molecules and the depletion of interstellar silicon.

  16. Cost considerations for interstellar missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, Dana G.

    This paper examines the technical and economic feasibility of interstellar exploration. Three candidate interstellar propulsion systems are evaluated with respect to technical viability and compared on an estimated cost basis. Two of the systems, the laser-propelled lightsail (LPL) and the particle-beam propelled magsail (PBPM), appear to be technically feasible and capable supporting one-way probes to nearby star systems within the lifetime of the principal investigators, if enough energy is available. The third propulsion system, the antimatter rocket, requires additional proof of concept demonstrations before its feasibility can be evaluated. Computer simulations of the acceleration and deceleration interactions of LPL and PBPM were completed and spacecraft configurations optimized for minimum energy usage are noted. The optimum LPL transfers about ten percent of the laser beam energy into kinetic energy of the spacecraft while the optimum PBPM transfers about thirty percent. Since particle beam generators are roughly twice as energy efficient as large lasers, the PBPM propulsion system requires roughly one-sixth the busbar electrical energy a LPL system would require to launch an identical payload. The total beam energy requirement for an interstellar probe mission is roughly 10 20 joules, which would require the complete fissioning of one thousand tons of Uranium assuming thirty-five percent powerplant efficiency. This is roughly equivalent to a recurring cost per flight of 3.0 Billion dollars in reactor grade enriched uranium using today's prices. Therefore, interstellar flight is an expensive proposition, but not unaffordable, if the nonrecurring costs of building the powerplant can be minimized.

  17. Representing culture in interstellar messages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakoch, Douglas A.

    2008-09-01

    As scholars involved with the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) have contemplated how we might portray humankind in any messages sent to civilizations beyond Earth, one of the challenges they face is adequately representing the diversity of human cultures. For example, in a 2003 workshop in Paris sponsored by the SETI Institute, the International Academy of Astronautics (IAA) SETI Permanent Study Group, the International Society for the Arts, Sciences and Technology (ISAST), and the John Templeton Foundation, a varied group of artists, scientists, and scholars from the humanities considered how to encode notions of altruism in interstellar messages . Though the group represented 10 countries, most were from Europe and North America, leading to the group's recommendation that subsequent discussions on the topic should include more globally representative perspectives. As a result, the IAA Study Group on Interstellar Message Construction and the SETI Institute sponsored a follow-up workshop in Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA in February 2005. The Santa Fe workshop brought together scholars from a range of disciplines including anthropology, archaeology, chemistry, communication science, philosophy, and psychology. Participants included scholars familiar with interstellar message design as well as specialists in cross-cultural research who had participated in the Symposium on Altruism in Cross-cultural Perspective, held just prior to the workshop during the annual conference of the Society for Cross-cultural Research . The workshop included discussion of how cultural understandings of altruism can complement and critique the more biologically based models of altruism proposed for interstellar messages at the 2003 Paris workshop. This paper, written by the chair of both the Paris and Santa Fe workshops, will explore the challenges of communicating concepts of altruism that draw on both biological

  18. Classification and properties of UV extinction curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbaro, G.; Mazzei, P.; Morbidelli, L.; Patriarchi, P.; Perinotto, M.

    2001-01-01

    The catalog of Savage et al. (\\cite{ref27}) reporting colour excesses of 1415 stars from ANS photometry offers the opportunity to deeply investigate the characteristics of UV extinction curves which differ from the standard extinction of the diffuse interstellar medium. To this aim we have selected a sample of 252 curves, which have been compared with the relations derived by Cardelli et al. (\\cite{ref4}; CCM in the following) for a variety of R_V values in the range 2.4-5 and have been classified as normal if they fit at least one of the CCM curves or anomalous otherwise. We find that normal curves with small R_V are just as numerous as those with large R_V. The anomalous objects are arranged into two groups according to the strength of the bump at 0.217 mu . For a given value of c_2 this increases along the sequence: type A anomalous, normals and type B anomalous, suggesting that this sequence should correspond to an increase of the amount of small grains along the sightline. Considerations concerning the environmental characteristics indicate that the anomalous behaviour is not necessarily tied to the existence of dense gas clouds along the line of sight.

  19. RUBIDIUM IN THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Kyle M.; Federman, S. R.; Knauth, David C.; Lambert, David L. E-mail: steven.federman@utoledo.ed E-mail: dll@astro.as.utexas.ed

    2009-11-20

    We present observations of interstellar rubidium toward o Per, zeta Per, AE Aur, HD 147889, chi Oph, zeta Oph, and 20 Aql. Theory suggests that stable {sup 85}Rb and long-lived {sup 87}Rb are produced predominantly by high-mass stars, through a combination of the weak s- and r-processes. The {sup 85}Rb/{sup 87}Rb ratio was determined from measurements of the Rb I line at 7800 A and was compared to the solar system meteoritic ratio of 2.59. Within 1sigma uncertainties, all directions except HD 147889 have Rb isotope ratios consistent with the solar system value. The ratio toward HD 147889 is much lower than the meteoritic value and similar to that toward rho Oph A; both lines of sight probe the Rho Ophiuchus Molecular Cloud. The earlier result was attributed to a deficit of r-processed {sup 85}Rb. Our larger sample suggests instead that {sup 87}Rb is enhanced in these two lines of sight. When the total elemental abundance of Rb is compared to the K elemental abundance, the interstellar Rb/K ratio is significantly lower than the meteoritic ratio for all the sight lines in this study. Available interstellar samples for other s- and r- process elements are used to help interpret these results.

  20. Hybridization and extinction.

    PubMed

    Todesco, Marco; Pascual, Mariana A; Owens, Gregory L; Ostevik, Katherine L; Moyers, Brook T; Hübner, Sariel; Heredia, Sylvia M; Hahn, Min A; Caseys, Celine; Bock, Dan G; Rieseberg, Loren H

    2016-08-01

    Hybridization may drive rare taxa to extinction through genetic swamping, where the rare form is replaced by hybrids, or by demographic swamping, where population growth rates are reduced due to the wasteful production of maladaptive hybrids. Conversely, hybridization may rescue the viability of small, inbred populations. Understanding the factors that contribute to destructive versus constructive outcomes of hybridization is key to managing conservation concerns. Here, we survey the literature for studies of hybridization and extinction to identify the ecological, evolutionary, and genetic factors that critically affect extinction risk through hybridization. We find that while extinction risk is highly situation dependent, genetic swamping is much more frequent than demographic swamping. In addition, human involvement is associated with increased risk and high reproductive isolation with reduced risk. Although climate change is predicted to increase the risk of hybridization-induced extinction, we find little empirical support for this prediction. Similarly, theoretical and experimental studies imply that genetic rescue through hybridization may be equally or more probable than demographic swamping, but our literature survey failed to support this claim. We conclude that halting the introduction of hybridization-prone exotics and restoring mature and diverse habitats that are resistant to hybrid establishment should be management priorities. PMID:27468307

  1. Stress and Fear Extinction.

    PubMed

    Maren, Stephen; Holmes, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Stress has a critical role in the development and expression of many psychiatric disorders, and is a defining feature of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Stress also limits the efficacy of behavioral therapies aimed at limiting pathological fear, such as exposure therapy. Here we examine emerging evidence that stress impairs recovery from trauma by impairing fear extinction, a form of learning thought to underlie the suppression of trauma-related fear memories. We describe the major structural and functional abnormalities in brain regions that are particularly vulnerable to stress, including the amygdala, prefrontal cortex, and hippocampus, which may underlie stress-induced impairments in extinction. We also discuss some of the stress-induced neurochemical and molecular alterations in these brain regions that are associated with extinction deficits, and the potential for targeting these changes to prevent or reverse impaired extinction. A better understanding of the neurobiological basis of stress effects on extinction promises to yield novel approaches to improving therapeutic outcomes for PTSD and other anxiety and trauma-related disorders.

  2. Dust evolution processes constrained by extinction curves in nearby galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Kuan-Chou; Hirashita, Hiroyuki; Michałowski, Michał J.

    2016-09-01

    Extinction curves, especially those in the Milky Way (MW), the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), and the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), have provided us with a clue to the dust properties in the nearby Universe. We examine whether or not these extinction curves can be explained by well-known dust evolution processes. We treat the dust production in stellar ejecta, destruction in supernova shocks, dust growth by accretion and coagulation, and dust disruption by shattering. To make a survey of the large parameter space possible, we simplify the treatment of the grain size distribution evolution by adopting the "two-size approximation," in which we divide the grain population into small (≲0.03 μm) and large (≳0.03 μm) grains. It is confirmed that the MW extinction curve can be reproduced in reasonable ranges for the time-scale of the above processes with a silicate-graphite mixture. This indicates that the MW extinction curve is a natural consequence of the dust evolution through the above processes. We also find that the same models fail to reproduce the SMC/LMC extinction curves. Nevertheless, this failure can be remedied by giving higher supernova destruction rates for small dust particles dust and considering amorphous carbon for carbonaceous dust; these modifications in fact fall in line with previous studies. Therefore, we conclude that the current dust evolution scenario composed of the aforementioned processes is successful in explaining the extinction curves. All the extinction curves favor efficient interstellar processing of dust, especially strong grain growth by accretion and coagulation.

  3. POROSITY AND BAND-STRENGTH MEASUREMENTS OF MULTI-PHASE COMPOSITE ICES

    SciTech Connect

    Bossa, Jean-Baptiste; Fransen, Coen; Cazaux, Stéphanie; Linnartz, Harold; Maté, Belén; Ortigoso, Juan; Pilling, Sergio; Rocha, Will Robson Monteiro

    2015-11-20

    We use experimental mid-infrared optical constants and extended effective medium approximations to determine the porosity and the band strengths of multi-phase composite ices grown at 30 K. A set of porous H{sub 2}O:CH{sub 4} ices are taken as a prototypical example. As a benchmark and proof of concept, the stoichiometry of the ice constituents is retreived with good accuracy from the refractive indices and the extinction coefficients of the reference binary ice mixtures with known compositions. Accurate band strengths are then calculated from experimental mid-infrared spectra of complex ices. We notice that the presence of pores has only a small effect on the overall band strengths, whereas a water dilution can considerably alter them. Different levels of porosity are observed depending on the abundance of methane used as a gas contaminant premixed with water prior to background deposition. The absorption profiles are also found to vary with deposition rate. To explain this, we use Monte Carlo simulations and we observe that the deposition rate strongly affects the pore size distribution as well as the ice morphology through reorganization processes. Extrapolated to genuine interstellar ices, the methodology presented in this paper can be used to evaluate the porosity and to quantify the relative abundances from observational data.

  4. Biological extinction in earth history

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raup, D. M.

    1986-01-01

    Virtually all plant and animal species that have ever lived on the earth are extinct. For this reason alone, extinction must play an important role in the evolution of life. The five largest mass extinctions of the past 600 million years are of greatest interest, but there is also a spectrum of smaller events, many of which indicate biological systems in profound stress. Extinction may be episodic at all scales, with relatively long periods of stability alternating with short-lived extinction events. Most extinction episodes are biologically selective, and further analysis of the victims and survivors offers the greatest chance of deducing the proximal causes of extinction. A drop in sea level and climatic change are most frequently invoked to explain mass extinctions, but new theories of collisions with extraterrestrial bodies are gaining favor. Extinction may be constructive in a Darwinian sense or it may only perturb the system by eliminating those organisms that happen to be susceptible to geologically rare stresses.

  5. Species extinction mires ecosystem

    SciTech Connect

    Holzman, D.

    1990-03-26

    Extinction is normal in the evolution of life, but amphibians, insects, birds and mammals are vanishing at an alarming pace. While habitat destruction, overexploitation and pollution are among the main causes, some disappearances cannot be explained. The extinction problem among amphibians mirrors the general, worldwide phenomenon. A synergism of insults may be responsible. Chance events such as a dry year might occasionally clean out a pond. But a larger lake nearby would replenish it. Now acid pollution adds to the ponds' burden while stocking of amphibian-eating sport fish in the lake - which happens even in natural parks - would destroy the source of replenishment. Some fear that extinctions ultimately could destroy nature's fabric.

  6. Controversy over mass extinctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katzoff, Judith A.

    The notion that mass extinctions of species occur at 26-million-year (m.y.) intervals received wide attention in the scientific and popular press a little over a year ago. According to the theory, some sort of periodic extra-terrestrial event had led to the episodes of extinction; comet showers brought on by any of a variety of causes were frequently offered as one explanation.Now the idea is back in the news, this time drawing criticism. An article published in the June 20 issue of Nature criticizes the original analysis, by David Raup and John Sepkoski of the University of Chicago, on the grounds that their data base was overly pared down and that they used a biased definition for mass extinction. Raup and his supporters say that papers now in press will answer the objections.

  7. Primary interstellar neutrals in the heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Hans R.; Moebius, Eberhard; Bzowski, Maciej; Kubiak, Marzena; Pogorelov, Nikolai; Heerikhuisen, Jacob

    Among other accomplishments, IBEX has detected direct interstellar helium and oxygen. With the help of a 3D MHD/kinetic hydrogen background heliosphere model by Pogorelov and Heerikhuisen, the distributions of primary interstellar neutrals throughout the heliosphere are calculated, identifying contributions from direct and indirect particle trajectories. The results are converted into expected fluxes at IBEX. The comparison of these fluxes to the measurements characterizes the density of neutrals in the pristine interstellar medium, and their filtration in the heliosphere.

  8. Supernovae and mass extinctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenbergh, S.

    1994-01-01

    Shklovsky and others have suggested that some of the major extinctions in the geological record might have been triggered by explosions of nearby supernovae. The frequency of such extinction events will depend on the galactic supernova frequency and on the distance up to which a supernova explosion will produce lethal effects upon terrestrial life. In the present note it will be assumed that a killer supernova has to occur so close to Earth that it will be embedded in a young, active, supernova remnant. Such young remnants typically have radii approximately less than 3 pc (1 x 10(exp 19) cm). Larger (more pessimistic?) killer radii have been adopted by Ruderman, Romig, and by Ellis and Schramm. From observations of historical supernovae, van den Bergh finds that core-collapse (types Ib and II) supernovae occur within 4 kpc of the Sun at a rate of 0.2 plus or minus 0.1 per century. Adopting a layer thickness of 0.3 kpc for the galacitc disk, this corresponds to a rate of approximately 1.3 x 10(exp -4) supernovae pc(exp -3) g.y.(exp -1). Including supernovae of type Ia will increase the total supernovae rate to approximately 1.5 x 10(exp -4) supernovae pc(exp -3) g.y.(exp -1). For a lethal radius of R pc the rate of killer events will therefore be 1.7 (R/3)(exp 3) x 10(exp -2) supernovae per g.y. However, a frequency of a few extinctions per g.y. is required to account for the extinctions observed during the phanerozoic. With R (extinction) approximately 3 pc, the galactic supernova frequency is therefore too low by 2 orders of magnitude to account for the major extinctions in the geological record.

  9. Extinction from a paleontological perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raup, D. M.

    1993-01-01

    Extinction of widespread species is common in evolutionary time (millions of years) but rare in ecological time (hundreds or thousands of years). In the fossil record, there appears to be a smooth continuum between background and mass extinction; and the clustering of extinctions at mass extinctions cannot be explained by the chance coincidence of independent events. Although some extinction is selective, much is apparently random in that survivors have no recognizable superiority over victims. Extinction certainly plays an important role in evolution, but whether it is constructive or destructive has not yet been determined.

  10. Interstellar dust spectra between 2. 5 and 3. 3. mu. m: A search for hydrated silicates

    SciTech Connect

    Knacke, R.F.; Puetter, R.C.; Erickson, E.; McCorkle, S.

    1985-09-01

    Spectra in the 2.5--3.3 ..mu..m wavelength region of VI Cyg 12, AFGL 2205, and AFGL 2885 were obtained in a search for bound water, hydroxyl groups, and hydrated minerals in interstellar dust. No new absorption bands were found. Comparison of expected strengths of bands of serpentine and chlorite-like minerals with the data suggests that less than 25% and 50%, respectively, of the silicate in the grains is composed of these materials.

  11. Interstellar dust spectra between 2. 5 and 3. 3 microns - a search for hydrated silicates

    SciTech Connect

    Knacke, R.F.; Mccorkle, S.; Puetter, R.C.; Erickson, E.

    1985-09-01

    Spectra in the 2.5-3.3 micron wavelength region of VI Cyg 12, AFGL 2205, and AFGL 2885 were obtained in a search for bound water, hydroxyl groups, and hydrated minerals in interstellar dust. No new absorption bands were found. Comparison of expected strengths of bands of serpentine and chlorite-like minerals with the data suggests that less than 25 percent and 50 percent, respectively, of the silicate in the grains is composed of these materials. 22 references.

  12. The heliosphere's interstellar interaction: no bow shock.

    PubMed

    McComas, D J; Alexashov, D; Bzowski, M; Fahr, H; Heerikhuisen, J; Izmodenov, V; Lee, M A; Möbius, E; Pogorelov, N; Schwadron, N A; Zank, G P

    2012-06-01

    As the Sun moves through the local interstellar medium, its supersonic, ionized solar wind carves out a cavity called the heliosphere. Recent observations from the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) spacecraft show that the relative motion of the Sun with respect to the interstellar medium is slower and in a somewhat different direction than previously thought. Here, we provide combined consensus values for this velocity vector and show that they have important implications for the global interstellar interaction. In particular, the velocity is almost certainly slower than the fast magnetosonic speed, with no bow shock forming ahead of the heliosphere, as was widely expected in the past. PMID:22582011

  13. DETERMINING INTERSTELLAR CARBON ABUNDANCES FROM STRONG-LINE TRANSITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Sofia, U. J.; Parvathi, V. S.; Babu, B. R. S.; Murthy, J.

    2011-01-15

    Carbon is arguably the most important element in the interstellar medium, yet its abundance in gas and dust is poorly understood due to a paucity of data. We explore the possibility of substantially increasing our knowledge of interstellar carbon by applying and assessing a new method for determining the column density of the dominant ion of interstellar carbon in diffuse neutral lines of sight. The method relies on profile fitting of the strong transition of C II at 1334 A in spectra continuum normalized with stellar models. We apply our method to six sight lines for which the carbon abundance has previously been determined with a weak intersystem absorption transition. Our strong-line method consistently shows a significantly lower gas-phase C abundance than the measurements from the weak lines. This result implies that more carbon could reside in dust than was previously thought. This has implications for dust models, which often suffer from a lack of sufficient carbon to plausibly explain extinction. There is no immediately clear explanation for the difference found between the strong- and weak-line C II determinations, but there are indications that the results from the method presented here have advantages over the weak-line column densities. If this is the case, then the reported oscillator strength for the C II transition at 2325 A may be too small. Our findings further suggest that damping wings modeled with a single absorption component may not produce accurate abundances. This problem could affect a large number of H I abundances determined through absorption line analysis that are reported in the literature.

  14. Interstellar grains in primitive meteorites - Diamond, silicon carbide, and graphite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anders, Edward; Zinner, Ernst

    1993-01-01

    Primitive meteorites contain a few parts per million (ppm) of pristine interstellar grains that provide information on nuclear and chemical processes in stars. Their interstellar origin is proven by highly anomalous isotopic ratios, varying more than 1000-fold for elements such as C and N. Most grains isolated thus far are stable only under highly reducing conditions (C/O greater than 1), and apparently are 'stardust' formed in stellar atmospheres. Microdiamonds, of median size about 10 A, are most abundant (about 400-1800 ppm) but least understood. They contain anomalous noble gases including Xe-HL, which shows the signature of the r- and p-processes. Silicon carbide, of grain size 0.2-10 microns and abundance about 6 ppm, shows the signature of the s-process and apparently comes mainly from red giant carbon (AGB) stars of 1-3 solar masses. Some grains appear to be not less than 10 exp 9 a older than the solar system. Graphite spherules of grain size 0.8-7 microns and abundance less than 2 ppm contain highly anomalous C and noble gases, as well as large amounts of fossil Mg-26 from the decay of extinct Al-26. They seem to come from at least three sources, probably AGB stars, novae, and Wolf-Rayet stars.

  15. Observations of photoevaporating interstellar clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCullough, Peter Rankin

    1993-01-01

    In the first part of this thesis, we present a tabulation of parameters for 50 globules, most of which are bright-rimmed clouds, observed in transitions of (12)CO, (13)CS, CS, and HCO(+) with a 1 diameter beam. H-alpha images for many bright-rimmed clouds and long-slit H-alpha spectra of two such clouds are presented. The observations are interpreted in terms of the rocket effect and D-critical ionization fronts. The elongated clouds (the so-called elephant trunk globules and cometary clouds) tend to point toward their source of ionization, although a possible counter example is presented. They often have velocity gradients along their lengths; a few examples are newly presented along with others collected from the literature. Mechanisms for forming elongated clouds are discussed. Also, means of determining the three-dimensional geometry of an H II region are discussed. The hypothesis that bright rims implode clouds and induce star formation is reviewed and found to be controversial . In the second part, we present images of the Orion Trapezium made with a unique adaptive optics system that uses either starlight or Rayleigh-backscattered laser light to correct for atmospheric wavefront distortion. The H-alpha and I band images reveal the region around the bright Trapezium stars, which has been studied extensively at radio wavelengths. Approximately one half of the stars in this region are positionally associated with knots of ionized gas, known as pigs, which are interpreted as photoevaporating envelopes of low mass stars. Disks are not observed directly but are inferred from the relatively low extinction to the stars inside the pigs. The comet-like morphology of the pigs is the result of an equilibrium between photoionization, recombination, and shadowing, interaction with the wind from theta1C Ori is not required. The sizes of the ionized component of the envelopes increase with distance from the source of ionization, theta1C Ori. The size-distance relationship

  16. Observations of Photoevaporating Interstellar Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCullough, Peter Rankin

    1995-01-01

    In the first part of this thesis, we present a tabulation of parameters for 50 globules, most of which are bright-rimmed clouds, observed in transitions of 12CO, 13CO, CS, and HCO+ with a 1 arcminute diameter beam. H-alpha images for many bright-rimmed clouds and long-slit H-alpha spectra of two such clouds are presented. The observations are interpreted in terms of the rocket effect and D-critical ionization fronts. The elongated clouds (the so called elephant trunk globules and cometary clouds) tend to point toward their source of ionization, although a possible counter-example is presented. They often have velocity gradients along their lengths; a few examples are newly presented along with others collected from the literature. Mechanisms for forming elongated clouds are discussed. Also, means of determining the three-dimensional geometry of an H II region are discussed. The hypothesis that bright rims implode clouds and induce star formation is reviewed and found to be controversial. In the second part, we present images of the Orion Trapezium made with a unique adaptive optics system that uses either starlight or Rayleigh-backscattered laser light to correct for atmospheric wavefront distortion. The H-alpha and I band images reveal the region around the bright Trapezium stars, which has been studied extensively at radio wavelengths. Approximately one half of the stars in this region are positionally associated with knots of ionized gas, known as pigs, which are interpreted as photoevaporating envelopes of low mass stars. Disks are not observed directly but are inferred from the relatively low extinction to the stars inside the pigs. The comet-like morphology of the pigs is the result of an equilibrium between photoionization, recombination, and shadowing; interaction with the wind from theta-1C ~Ori is not required. The sizes of the ionized component of the envelopes increase with distance from the source of ionization, theta-1C Ori. The size

  17. Constraining the Properties of Cold Interstellar Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spraggs, Mary Elizabeth; Gibson, Steven J.

    2016-01-01

    Since the interstellar medium (ISM) plays an integral role in star formation and galactic structure, it is important to understand the evolution of clouds over time, including the processes of cooling and condensation that lead to the formation of new stars. This work aims to constrain and better understand the physical properties of the cold ISM by utilizing large surveys of neutral atomic hydrogen (HI) 21cm spectral line emission and absorption, carbon monoxide (CO) 2.6mm line emission, and multi-band infrared dust thermal continuum emission. We identify areas where the gas may be cooling and forming molecules using HI self-absorption (HISA), in which cold foreground HI absorbs radiation from warmer background HI emission.We are developing an algorithm that uses total gas column densities inferred from Planck and other FIR/sub-mm data in parallel with CO and HISA spectral line data to determine the gas temperature, density, molecular abundance, and other properties as functions of position. We can then map these properties to study their variation throughout an individual cloud as well as any dependencies on location or environment within the Galaxy.Funding for this work was provided by the National Science Foundation, the NASA Kentucky Space Grant Consortium, the WKU Ogden College of Science and Engineering, and the Carol Martin Gatton Academy for Mathematics and Science in Kentucky.

  18. Mechanisms of fear extinction.

    PubMed

    Myers, K M; Davis, M

    2007-02-01

    Excessive fear and anxiety are hallmarks of a variety of disabling anxiety disorders that affect millions of people throughout the world. Hence, a greater understanding of the brain mechanisms involved in the inhibition of fear and anxiety is attracting increasing interest in the research community. In the laboratory, fear inhibition most often is studied through a procedure in which a previously fear conditioned organism is exposed to a fear-eliciting cue in the absence of any aversive event. This procedure results in a decline in conditioned fear responses that is attributed to a process called fear extinction. Extensive empirical work by behavioral psychologists has revealed basic behavioral characteristics of extinction, and theoretical accounts have emphasized extinction as a form of inhibitory learning as opposed to an erasure of acquired fear. Guided by this work, neuroscientists have begun to dissect the neural mechanisms involved, including the regions in which extinction-related plasticity occurs and the cellular and molecular processes that are engaged. The present paper will cover behavioral, theoretical and neurobiological work, and will conclude with a discussion of clinical implications.

  19. Context, Learning, and Extinction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gershman, Samuel J.; Blei, David M.; Niv, Yael

    2010-01-01

    A. Redish et al. (2007) proposed a reinforcement learning model of context-dependent learning and extinction in conditioning experiments, using the idea of "state classification" to categorize new observations into states. In the current article, the authors propose an interpretation of this idea in terms of normative statistical inference. They…

  20. Unexpectedly many extinct hominins.

    PubMed

    Bokma, Folmer; van den Brink, Valentijn; Stadler, Tanja

    2012-09-01

    Recent studies indicate that Neanderthal and Denisova hominins may have been separate species, while debate continues on the status of Homo floresiensis. The decade-long debate between "splitters," who recognize over 20 hominin species, and "lumpers," who maintain that all these fossils belong to just a few lineages, illustrates that we do not know how many extinct hominin species to expect. Here, we present probability distributions for the number of speciation events and the number of contemporary species along a branch of a phylogeny. With estimates of hominin speciation and extincton rates, we then show that the expected total number of extinct hominin species is 8, but may be as high as 27. We also show that it is highly unlikely that three very recent species disappeared due to natural, background extinction. This may indicate that human-like remains are too easily considered distinct species. Otherwise, the evidence suggesting that Neanderthal and the Denisova hominin represent distinct species implies a recent wave of extinctions, ostensibly driven by the only survivor, H. sapiens. PMID:22946817

  1. Biogeography and extinction

    SciTech Connect

    Jablonski, D.

    1985-01-01

    The geographic ranges of species and clades, and the deployment of those clades among biogeographic provinces, are important determinants of rates and patterns of extinction. Studies of Late Cretaceous mollusks of the Gulf and Atlantic Coastal Plain confirm that species duration is closely correlated with geographic range during times of normal, background extinction. When species that originate in the last 2 myr of the Cretaceous, the correlation increases significantly. The fact that even these truncated species frequently attained broad geographic ranges indicates that during background times duration is a function of geographic range and not vice versa. However, during the end-Cretaceous mass extinction, it is clade geographic range and not the within-province ranges of its constituent species that determines survivorship: about 55% of the widespread genera but only 12% of the endemic genera survive, regardless of the ranges of their individual species. Thus, clade geographic range is an irreducible property, with effects decoupled from species-level or organismic traits that determine species' geographic ranges. Clades with tropical distributions suffer disproportionately, again independent of species' geographic range magnitudes. Survivorship of taxa or morphologies during mass extinctions may have little to do with adaptation at the organismic or even species level, but depends at least in part on clade-level traits that are less important during background times.

  2. Cognitive Processes in Extinction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovibond, Peter F.

    2004-01-01

    Human conditioning research shows that learning is closely related to consciously available contingency knowledge, requires attentional resources, and is influenced by language. This research suggests a cognitive model in which extinction consists of changes in contingency beliefs in long-term memory. Laboratory and clinical evidence on extinction…

  3. HERSCHEL OBSERVATIONS OF INTERSTELLAR CHLORONIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Neufeld, David A.; Indriolo, Nick; Roueff, Evelyne; Le Bourlot, Jacques; Le Petit, Franck; Snell, Ronald L.; Lis, Dariusz; Monje, Raquel; Phillips, Thomas G.; Benz, Arnold O.; Bruderer, Simon; Black, John H.; Larsson, Bengt; De Luca, Massimo; Gerin, Maryvonne; Goldsmith, Paul F.; Gupta, Harshal; Melnick, Gary J.; Menten, Karl M.; Nagy, Zsofia; and others

    2012-03-20

    Using the Herschel Space Observatory's Heterodyne Instrument for the Far-Infrared, we have observed para-chloronium (H{sub 2}Cl{sup +}) toward six sources in the Galaxy. We detected interstellar chloronium absorption in foreground molecular clouds along the sight lines to the bright submillimeter continuum sources Sgr A (+50 km s{sup -1} cloud) and W31C. Both the para-H{sup 35}{sub 2}Cl{sup +} and para-H{sup 37}{sub 2}Cl{sup +} isotopologues were detected, through observations of their 1{sub 11}-0{sub 00} transitions at rest frequencies of 485.42 and 484.23 GHz, respectively. For an assumed ortho-to-para ratio (OPR) of 3, the observed optical depths imply that chloronium accounts for {approx}4%-12% of chlorine nuclei in the gas phase. We detected interstellar chloronium emission from two sources in the Orion Molecular Cloud 1: the Orion Bar photodissociation region and the Orion South condensation. For an assumed OPR of 3 for chloronium, the observed emission line fluxes imply total beam-averaged column densities of {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} cm{sup -2} and {approx}1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} cm{sup -2}, respectively, for chloronium in these two sources. We obtained upper limits on the para-H{sup 35}{sub 2}Cl{sup +} line strengths toward H{sub 2} Peak 1 in the Orion Molecular cloud and toward the massive young star AFGL 2591. The chloronium abundances inferred in this study are typically at least a factor {approx}10 larger than the predictions of steady-state theoretical models for the chemistry of interstellar molecules containing chlorine. Several explanations for this discrepancy were investigated, but none has proven satisfactory, and thus the large observed abundances of chloronium remain puzzling.

  4. Herschel Observations of Interstellar Chloronium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neufeld, David A.; Roueff, Evelyne; Snell, Ronald L.; Lis, Dariusz; Benz, Arnold O.; Bruderer, Simon; Black, John H.; De Luca, Massimo; Gerin, Maryvonne; Goldsmith, Paul F.; Gupta, Harshal; Indriolo, Nick; Le Bourlot, Jacques; Le Petit, Franck; Larsson, Bengt; Melnick, Gary J.; Menten, Karl M.; Monje, Raquel; Nagy, Zsófia; Phillips, Thomas G.; Sandqvist, Aage; Sonnentrucker, Paule; van der Tak, Floris; Wolfire, Mark G.

    2012-03-01

    Using the Herschel Space Observatory's Heterodyne Instrument for the Far-Infrared, we have observed para-chloronium (H2Cl+) toward six sources in the Galaxy. We detected interstellar chloronium absorption in foreground molecular clouds along the sight lines to the bright submillimeter continuum sources Sgr A (+50 km s-1 cloud) and W31C. Both the para-H35 2Cl+ and para-H37 2Cl+ isotopologues were detected, through observations of their 111-000 transitions at rest frequencies of 485.42 and 484.23 GHz, respectively. For an assumed ortho-to-para ratio (OPR) of 3, the observed optical depths imply that chloronium accounts for ~4%-12% of chlorine nuclei in the gas phase. We detected interstellar chloronium emission from two sources in the Orion Molecular Cloud 1: the Orion Bar photodissociation region and the Orion South condensation. For an assumed OPR of 3 for chloronium, the observed emission line fluxes imply total beam-averaged column densities of ~2 × 1013 cm-2 and ~1.2 × 1013 cm-2, respectively, for chloronium in these two sources. We obtained upper limits on the para-H35 2Cl+ line strengths toward H2 Peak 1 in the Orion Molecular cloud and toward the massive young star AFGL 2591. The chloronium abundances inferred in this study are typically at least a factor ~10 larger than the predictions of steady-state theoretical models for the chemistry of interstellar molecules containing chlorine. Several explanations for this discrepancy were investigated, but none has proven satisfactory, and thus the large observed abundances of chloronium remain puzzling. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  5. Deuterium enrichment of interstellar dusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Ankan; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Majumdar, Liton; Sahu, Dipen

    2016-07-01

    High abundance of some abundant and simple interstellar species could be explained by considering the chemistry that occurs on interstellar dusts. Because of its simplicity, the rate equation method is widely used to study the surface chemistry. However, because the recombination efficiency for the formation of any surface species is highly dependent on various physical and chemical parameters, the Monte Carlo method is best suited for addressing the randomness of the processes. We carry out Monte-Carlo simulation to study deuterium enrichment of interstellar grain mantle under various physical conditions. Based on the physical properties, various types of clouds are considered. We find that in diffuse cloud regions, very strong radiation fields persists and hardly a few layers of surface species are formed. In translucent cloud regions with a moderate radiation field, significant number of layers would be produced and surface coverage is mainly dominated by photo-dissociation products such as, C, CH_3, CH_2D, OH and OD. In the intermediate dense cloud regions (having number density of total hydrogen nuclei in all forms ˜2 × 10^4 cm^{-3}), water and methanol along with their deuterated derivatives are efficiently formed. For much higher density regions (˜10^6 cm^{-3}), water and methanol productions are suppressed but surface coverage of CO, CO_2, O_2, O_3 are dramatically increased. We find a very high degree of fractionation of water and methanol. Observational results support a high fractionation of methanol but surprisingly water fractionation is found to be low. This is in contradiction with our model results indicating alternative routes for de-fractionation of water.

  6. Extinction times in experimental populations.

    PubMed

    Drake, John M

    2006-09-01

    Predicting population extinctions is a key element of quantitative conservation biology and population ecology. Although stochastic population theories have long been used to obtain theoretical distributions of population extinction times, model-based predictions have rarely been tested. Here I report results from a quantitative analysis of extinction time in 281 experimental populations of water fleas (Daphnia magna) in variable environments. To my knowledge, this is the first quantitative estimate of the shape of the distribution of population extinction times based on extinction data for any species. The finding that the distribution of population extinction times was extraordinarily peaked is consistent with theoretical predictions for density-independent populations, but inconsistent with predictions for density-dependent populations. The tail of the extinction time distribution was not exponential. These results imply that our current theories of extinction are inadequate. Future work should focus on how demographic stochasticity scales with population size and effects of nonrandom variable environments on population growth and decline.

  7. Ecology: Dynamics of Indirect Extinction.

    PubMed

    Montoya, Jose M

    2015-12-01

    The experimental identification of the mechanism by which extinctions of predators trigger further predator extinctions emphasizes the role of indirect effects between species in disturbed ecosystems. It also has deep consequences for the hidden magnitude of the current biodiversity crisis.

  8. Properties and evolution of dust in the interstellar medium.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flagey, N.

    2007-10-01

    My thesis is dedicated to the properties and evolution of the dust in the Galactic interstellar medium (ISM), particularly the small sizes end of the dust size distribution. Throughout these three years, new infrared (IR) observations provided by the Spitzer Space Telescope helped me to bring my own contribution to the knowledge of the dust lifecycle. In order to get a view as global as possible, I have studied three different interstellar environments : the diffuse Galactic medium, a molecular cloud and a star forming region. I analyzed one line of sight that points towards the diffuse Galactic ISM, away from bright star forming regions. Combining spectroscopic and photometric data, I have built a mean Galactic near to mid IR spectrum of the dust, that I have afterwards used as a reference. The Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) bands are present on top of a continuum. In order to interpret the band intensity ratios in terms of PAHs size and ionization state, I have updated our dust model so that it takes into account the size dependent ionization state of the PAHs. The diffuse ISM spectrum is fit for a PAH mean size of about 60 carbon atoms and a cation fraction of about 40%. Molecular size and charged PAHs are thus present within the diffuse medium. A 3-5 μm continuum, first detected in reflection nebulae, is observed to be present in the diffuse ISM emission. This continuum accounts for 70% of the emission in the Spitzer/IRAC 3.6μm filter. Its origin is still unknown. I show that it is neither scattered light nor PAH fluorescence, as this process would require a photon conversion efficiency above 100%. I used Spitzer observations to quantify spatial variations of PAHs properties across the galaxy and on small scales within the Taurus molecular cloud. Analysis of a set of Galactic diffuse ISM sight lines show that the PAHs mean size exhibits significant dispersion, from 40 to 80 carbon atoms, while their ionization fraction stays constant within error

  9. The Identification of Complex Organic Molecules in the Interstellar Medium: Using Lasers and Matrix Isolation Spectroscopy to Simulate the Interstellar Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Bradley M.

    1998-01-01

    The Astrochemistry Group at NASA Ames Research Center is interested in the identification of large organic molecules in the interstellar medium Many smaller organic species (e.g. hydrocarbons, alcohols, etc.) have been previously identified by their radiofrequency signature due to molecular rotations. However, this becomes increasingly difficult to observe as the size of the molecule increases. Our group in interested in the identification of the carriers of the Diffuse Interstellar Bands (absorption features observed throughout the visible and near-infrared in the spectra of stars, due to species in the interstellar medium). Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) and related molecules are thought to be good candidates for these carriers. Laboratory experiments am performed at Ames to simulate the interstellar environment, and to compare spectra obtained from molecules in the laboratory to those derived astronomically. We are also interested in PAHs with respect to their possible connection to the UIR (Unidentified infrared) and ERE (Extended Red Emission) bands - emission features found to emanate from particular regions of our galaxy (e.g. Orion nebula, Red Rectangle, etc.). An old, "tried and proven spectroscopic technique, matrix isolation spectroscopy creates molecular conditions ideal for performing laboratory astrophysics.

  10. Observational analysis of the well-correlated diffuse bands: 6196 and 6614 Å

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krełowski, J.; Galazutdinov, G. A.; Bondar, A.; Beletsky, Y.

    2016-08-01

    We confirm, using spectra from seven observatories, that the diffuse bands 6196 and 6614 are very tightly correlated. However, their strength ratio is not constant as well as profile shapes. Apparently, the two interstellar features do not react in unison to the varying physical conditions of different interstellar clouds.

  11. Mass Extinctions Past and Present.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allmon, Warren Douglas

    1987-01-01

    Discusses some parallels that seem to exist between mass extinction recognizable in the geologic record and the impending extinction of a significant proportion of the earth's species due largely to tropical deforestation. Describes some recent theories of causal factors and periodicities in mass extinction. (Author/TW)

  12. VAPID: Voigt Absorption-Profile [Interstellar] Dabbler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howarth, Ian D.

    2015-06-01

    VAPID (Voigt Absorption Profile [Interstellar] Dabbler) models interstellar absorption lines. It predicts profiles and optimizes model parameters by least-squares fitting to observed spectra. VAPID allows cloud parameters to be optimized with respect to several different data set simultaneously; those data sets may include observations of different transitions of a given species, and may have different S/N ratios and resolutions.

  13. Ultraviolet studies of the interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blades, J. C.

    1984-01-01

    Copernicus satellite and IUE investigations of the chemical composition and physical condition of interstellar gas and dust in our Galaxy, and in external systems are reviewed. The local interstellar environment, dust, and the distribution of gas away from the plane of our Galaxy are covered.

  14. Unusual Dynamics of Extinction in a Simple Ecological Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Somdatta; Parthasarathy, S.

    1996-02-01

    Studies on natural populations and harvesting biological resources have led to the view, commonly held, that (i) populations exhibiting chaotic oscillations run a high risk of extinction; and (ii) a decrease in emigration / exploitation may reduce the risk of extinction. Here we describe a simple ecological model with emigration / depletion that shows behavior in contrast to this. This model displays unusual dynamics of extinction and survival, where populations growing beyond a critical rate can persist within a band of high depletion rates, whereas extinction occurs for lower depletion rates. Though prior to extinction at lower depletion rates the population exhibits chaotic dynamics with large amplitudes of variation and very low minima, at higher depletion rates the population persists at chaos but with reduced variation and increased minima. For still higher values, within the band of persistence, the dynamics show period reversal leading to stability. These results illustrate that chaos does not necessarily lead to population extinction. In addition, the persistence of populations at high depletion rates has important implications in the considerations of strategies for the management of biological resources.

  15. Short-term climate change and the extinction of the snail Rhachistia aldabrae (Gastropoda: Pulmonata).

    PubMed

    Gerlach, Justin

    2007-10-22

    The only known population of the Aldabra banded snail Rhachistia aldabrae declined through the late twentieth century, leading to its extinction in the late 1990s. This occurred within a stable habitat and its extinction is attributable to decreasing rainfall on Aldabra atoll, associated with regional changes in rainfall patterns in the late twentieth and early twenty-first century. It is proposed that the extinction of this species is a direct result of decreasing rainfall leading to increased mortality of juvenile snails.

  16. Ultraviolet photometry from the Orbiting Astronomical Observatory. XX - The ultraviolet extinction bump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, B. D.

    1975-01-01

    Ultraviolet extinction bumps are investigated in the interstellar extinction curves between 1800 and 3600 A for 36 stars which have (B-V) excesses ranging from 0.03 to 0.55 and are mostly confined to the brighter OB associations distributed along the galactic plane. Each extinction curve is found to have a broad bump which peaks near 2175 A and whose position and profile appear to be constant among all the stars. It is shown that the bump is probably interstellar in origin and that the constancy of its position and shape places such severe restrictions on grain geometrical parameters that classical scattering theory cannot be used to explain the feature unless the dust grains in widely separated regions of space and with very different physical conditions are assumed to have nearly identical size and shape distributions. Three extinction curves which extend to 1100 A are examined and found to have the same general characteristics as the others. Several extinction curves are analyzed for fine structure, but no convincing evidence is found in the present interval. Some processes are discussed which may be responsible for the bumps.

  17. PROBING THE ROLE OF CARBON IN ULTRAVIOLET EXTINCTION ALONG GALACTIC SIGHT LINES

    SciTech Connect

    Parvathi, V. S.; Babu, B. R. S.; Sofia, U. J.; Murthy, J. E-mail: brsbabu@gmail.com E-mail: jmurthy@yahoo.com

    2012-11-20

    We report previously undetermined interstellar gas and dust-phase carbon abundances along 15 Galactic sight lines based on archival data of the strong 1334.5323 A transition observed with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph. These are combined with previously reported carbon measurements along six sight lines to produce a complete sample of interstellar C II measurements determined with the 1334 A transition. Our data set includes a variety of Galactic disk environments characterized by different extinctions and samples paths ranging over three orders of magnitude in average density of hydrogen ((n(H))). Our data support the idea that dust, specifically carbon-based grains, are processed in the neutral interstellar medium. We, however, do not find that the abundance of carbon in dust or the grain-size distribution is related to the strength of the 2175 A bump. This is surprising, given that many current models have polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as the bump-producing dust.

  18. Laboratory studies of the infrared small-particle extinction of amorphous silicates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraetschmer, W.

    1986-01-01

    The broad interstellar IR extinction features located at 9.7 and 18 microns wavelength are believed to originate from silicate dust grains. Cosmic abundances suggest that the silicate should have a chemical composition similar to that of olivine, (Mg,Fe)2 SiO4. Olivine is a very common terrestrial silicate mineral of crystalline structure. However, crystalline olivine grains do not fit the interstellar features well. Based on spectroscopic data obtained in laboratory studies and astronomical observations it was concluded that the interstellar silicate grains consist of a material with amorphous rather than crystalline structure. The astronomical arguments and the results obtained in our laboratory experiments which support this view are reviewed.

  19. CORRELATING THE INTERSTELLAR MAGNETIC FIELD WITH PROTOSTELLAR JETS AND ITS SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Targon, C. G.; Rodrigues, C. V.

    2011-12-10

    This paper combines new CCD polarimetric data with previous information about protostellar objects in a search for correlations involving the interstellar magnetic field (ISMF). Specifically, we carried out an optical polarimetric study of a sample of 28 fields of 10' Multiplication-Sign 10' located in the neighborhood of protostellar jets and randomly spread over the Galaxy. The polarimetry of a large number of field stars is used to estimate both the average and dispersion of the ISMF direction in each region. The results of the applied statistical tests are as follows. Concerning the alignment between the jet direction and the ISMF, the whole sample does not show alignment. There is, however, a statistically significant alignment for objects of Classes 0 and I. Regarding the ISMF dispersion, our sample presents values slightly larger for regions containing T Tauri objects than for those harboring younger protostars. Moreover, the ISMF dispersion in regions containing high-mass objects tends to be larger than in those including only low-mass protostars. In our sample, the mean interstellar polarization as a function of the average interstellar extinction in a region reaches a maximum value around 3% for A(V) = 5, after which it decreases. Our data also show a clear correlation of the mean value of the interstellar polarization with the dispersion of the ISMF: the larger the dispersion, the smaller the polarization. Based on a comparison of our and previous results, we suggest that the dispersion in regions forming stars is larger than in quiescent regions.

  20. Atoms in carbon cages as a source of interstellar diffuse lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballester, J. L.; Antoniewicz, P. R.; Smoluchowski, R.

    1990-01-01

    A model to describe the resonance absorption lines of various atoms trapped in closed carbon cages is presented. These systems may be responsible for some of the as yet unexplained diffuse interstellar bands. Model potentials for possible atom-C60 systems are obtained and used to calculate the resonance lines. The trapped atoms considered are O, N, Si, Mg, Al, Na, and S, and in all cases the resonance lines are shifted toward the red as compared to the isolated atoms. The calculated wavelengths are compared to the range of wavelengths observed for the diffuse interstellar bands, and good agreement is found for Mg and Si resonance lines. Other lines may be caused by other than resonance transitions or by trapped molecules. The oscillator strengths and the abundances are evaluated and compared with observation. Mechanisms to explain the observed band width of the lines and the existence of certain correlated pairs of lines are discussed.

  1. Anthracene Clusters and the Interstellar Infrared Emission Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roser, J. E.; Ricca, A.; Allamandola, L. J.

    2014-03-01

    The unidentified infrared bands are ubiquitous in the interstellar medium and typically attributed to emission from neutral and ionized polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (or PAHs). The contribution of neutral PAH clusters to these bands has been impossible to determine due to a paucity of infrared spectral data. Here we investigated neutral clusters of the three-ring PAH anthracene using FTIR absorption spectroscopy of anthracene matrix-isolated at varying concentrations in solid argon. In order to determine likely cluster structures of the embedded molecules, we also calculated theoretical absorption spectra for the anthracene monomer through hexamer using density functional theory with a dispersion correction (DFT-D). The DFT-D calculations have been calibrated for the anthracene dimer using the second-order Møller-Plesset approach. Because there is some support for the hypothesis that three or four-ring PAHs are present in the Red Rectangle nebula, we discuss the application of our results to this nebula in particular as well as to the interstellar infrared emission in general.

  2. Anthracene clusters and the interstellar infrared emission features

    SciTech Connect

    Roser, J. E.; Ricca, A.; Allamandola, L. J.

    2014-03-10

    The unidentified infrared bands are ubiquitous in the interstellar medium and typically attributed to emission from neutral and ionized polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (or PAHs). The contribution of neutral PAH clusters to these bands has been impossible to determine due to a paucity of infrared spectral data. Here we investigated neutral clusters of the three-ring PAH anthracene using FTIR absorption spectroscopy of anthracene matrix-isolated at varying concentrations in solid argon. In order to determine likely cluster structures of the embedded molecules, we also calculated theoretical absorption spectra for the anthracene monomer through hexamer using density functional theory with a dispersion correction (DFT-D). The DFT-D calculations have been calibrated for the anthracene dimer using the second-order Møller-Plesset approach. Because there is some support for the hypothesis that three or four-ring PAHs are present in the Red Rectangle nebula, we discuss the application of our results to this nebula in particular as well as to the interstellar infrared emission in general.

  3. An infrared spectral match between GEMS and interstellar grains.

    PubMed

    Bradley, J P; Keller, L P; Snow, T P; Hanner, M S; Flynn, G J; Gezo, J C; Clemett, S J; Brownlee, D E; Bowey, J E

    1999-09-10

    Infrared spectral properties of silicate grains in interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) were compared with those of astronomical silicates. The approximately 10-micrometer silicon-oxygen stretch bands of IDPs containing enstatite (MgSiO3), forsterite (Mg2SiO4), and glass with embedded metal and sulfides (GEMS) exhibit fine structure and bandwidths similar to those of solar system comets and some pre-main sequence Herbig Ae/Be stars. Some GEMS exhibit a broad, featureless silicon-oxygen stretch band similar to those observed in interstellar molecular clouds and young stellar objects. These GEMS provide a spectral match to astronomical "amorphous" silicates, one of the fundamental building blocks from which the solar system is presumed to have formed.

  4. Discreteness induced extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, Renato Vieira; da Silva, Linaena Méricy

    2015-11-01

    Two simple models based on ecological problems are discussed from the point of view of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics. It is shown how discrepant may be the results of the models that include spatial distribution with discrete interactions when compared with the continuous analogous models. In the continuous case we have, under certain circumstances, the population explosion. When we take into account the finiteness of the population, we get the opposite result, extinction. We will analyze how these results depend on the dimension d of the space and describe the phenomenon of the "Discreteness Inducing Extinction" (DIE). The results are interpreted in the context of the "paradox of sex", an old problem of evolutionary biology.

  5. Pulsar extinction. [astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturrock, P. A.; Baker, K.; Turk, J. S.

    1975-01-01

    Radio emission from pulsars, attributed to an instability associated with the creation of electron-positron pairs from gamma rays was investigated. The condition for pair creation therefore lead to an extinction condition. The relevant physical processes were analyzed in the context of a mathematical model, according to which radiation originated at the polar caps and magnetic field lines changed from a closed configuration to an open configuration at the force balance or corotation radius.

  6. Optical atmospheric extinction over Cerro Paranal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patat, F.; Moehler, S.; O'Brien, K.; Pompei, E.; Bensby, T.; Carraro, G.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Fox, A.; Gavignaud, I.; James, G.; Korhonen, H.; Ledoux, C.; Randall, S.; Sana, H.; Smoker, J.; Stefl, S.; Szeifert, T.

    2011-03-01

    Aims: The present study was conducted to determine the optical extinction curve for Cerro Paranal under typical clear-sky observing conditions, with the purpose of providing the community with a function to be used to correct the observed spectra, with an accuracy of 0.01 mag airmass-1. Additionally, this work was meant to analyze the variability of the various components, to derive the main atmospheric parameters, and to set a term of reference for future studies, especially in view of the construction of the Extremely Large Telescope on the nearby Cerro Armazones. Methods: The extinction curve of Paranal was obtained through low-resolution spectroscopy of 8 spectrophotometric standard stars observed with FORS1 mounted at the 8.2 m Very Large Telescope, covering a spectral range 3300-8000 Å. A total of 600 spectra were collected on more than 40 nights distributed over six months, from October 2008 to March 2009. The average extinction curve was derived using a global fit algorithm, which allowed us to simultaneously combine all the available data. The main atmospheric parameters were retrieved using the LBLRTM radiative transfer code, which was also utilised to study the impact of variability of the main molecular bands of O2, O3, and H2O, and to estimate their column densities. Results: In general, the extinction curve of Paranal appears to conform to those derived for other astronomical sites in the Atacama desert, like La Silla and Cerro Tololo. However, a systematic deficit with respect to the extinction curve derived for Cerro Tololo before the El Chichón eruption is detected below 4000 Å. We attribute this downturn to a non standard aerosol composition, probably revealing the presence of volcanic pollutants above the Atacama desert. An analysis of all spectroscopic extinction curves obtained since 1974 shows that the aerosol composition has been evolving during the last 35 years. The persistence of traces of non meteorologic haze suggests the effect of

  7. BRILLIANT PEBBLES: A METHOD FOR DETECTION OF VERY LARGE INTERSTELLAR GRAINS

    SciTech Connect

    Socrates, Aristotle; Draine, Bruce T. E-mail: draine@astro.princeton.edu

    2009-09-01

    A photon of wavelength {lambda} {approx} 1 {mu}m interacting with a dust grain of radius a{sub p} {approx} 1 mm (a 'pebble') undergoes scattering in the forward direction, largely within a small characteristic diffraction angle {theta}{sub s} {approx} {lambda}/a{sub p} {approx} 100''. Though millimeter-size dust grains contribute negligibly to the interstellar medium's visual extinction, the signal they produce in scattered light may be detectable, especially for variable sources. Observations of light scattered at small angles allow for the direct measurement of the large grain population; variable sources can also yield tomographic information of the interstellar medium's mass distribution. The ability to detect brilliant pebble halos requires a careful understanding of the instrument point-spread function.

  8. Interstellar Silicate Dust: Modeling and Grain Alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Indrajit

    We examine some aspects of the alignment of silicate dust grains with respect to the interstellar magnetic field. First, we consider possible observational constraints on the magnetic properties of the grains. Second, we investigate the role of collisions with gas atoms and the production of H2 molecules on the grain surface in the alignment process when the grain is drifting in the gaseous medium. Paramagnetism associated with Fe content in the dust is thought to play a critical role in alignment. Min et al (2007) claimed that the Fe content of the silicate dust can be constrained by the shape of the 10 μm extinction feature. They found low Fe abundances, potentially posing problems for grain alignment theories. We revisit this analysis modeling the grains with irregularly shaped Gaussian Random Sphere (GRS). We give a comprehensive review of all the relevant constraints researchers apply and discuss their effects on the inferred mineralogy. Also, we extend this analysis to examine whether constraints can be placed on the presence of Fe-rich inclusions which could yield "super-paramagnetism". This possibility has long been speculated, but so far observational constraints are lacking. Every time a gas atom collides with a grain, the grain's angular momentum is slightly modified. Likewise when an H2 molecule forms on the surface and is ejected. Here also we model the grain with GRS shape and considered various scenarios about how the colliding gas particles depart the grain. We develop theoretical and computational tools to estimate the torques associated with these aforementioned events for a range of grain drift speeds---from low subsonic to high supersonic speeds. Code results were verified with spherical grain for which analytical results were available. Finally, the above torque results were used to study the grain rotational dynamics. Solving dynamical equations we examine how these torques influence the grain alignment process. Our analysis suggests that

  9. Extinction law in the range 0.4 - 4.8 μm and the 8620 Å DIB towards the stellar cluster Westerlund 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damineli, A.; Almeida, L. A.; Blum, R. D.; Damineli, D. S. C.; Navarete, F.; Rubinho, M. S.; Teodoro, M.

    2016-08-01

    The young stellar cluster Westerlund 1 (Wd 1: l = 339.6°, b = -0.4°) is one of the most massive in the local Universe, but accurate parameters are pending on better determination of its extinction and distance. Based on our photometry and data collected from other sources, we have derived a reddening law for the cluster line-of-sight representative of the Galactic Plane (-5° < b <+5°) in the window 0.4-4.8 μm: The power law exponent α = 2.13±0.08 is much steeper than those published a decade ago (1.6-1.8) and our index RV = 2.50 ± 0.04 also differs from them, but in very good agreement with recent works based on deep surveys in the inner Galaxy. As a consequence, the total extinction AKs = 0.74±0.08 (AV = 11.40± 2.40) is substantially smaller than previous results(0.91-1.13), part of which (AKs = 0.63 or AV = 9.66) is from the ISM. The extinction in front of the cluster spans a range of ΔAV ˜8.7 with a gradient increasing from SW to NE across the cluster face, following the same general trend of warm dust distribution. The map of the J - Ks colour index also shows a trend of reddening in this direction. We measured the equivalent width of the diffuse interstellar band at 8620 Å (the "GAIA DIB") for Wd 1 cluster members and derived the relation AKs = 0.612 EW - 0.191 EW2. This extends the Munari et al. (2008) relation, valid for EB - V < 1, to the non-linear regime (AV > 4).

  10. Interstellar Precursors of Meteoritic Organics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charnley, S. B.

    2003-01-01

    The organic inventory initially available to protostellar disks is the first step on the long chemical path to the development of Life. The early earth may have obtained most its volatile material from the arrival of meteorites and comets at its surface. Determining the most likely distribution of meteoritic and cometary organic molecules that could seed primitive planets is a major goal since it sets the initial conditions for, at least part of, the phase of prebiotic chemical evolution. Observations and measurements of the chemical composition of primitive Solar System organics, and of dense molecular clouds, should allow the construction of coherent theoretical picture of the development of organic complexity from interstellar biogenic material to the beginning of prebiotic evolution.

  11. Discovery of Interstellar Hydrogen Fluoride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neufeld, David A.; Zmuidzinas, Jonas; Schilke, Peter; Phillips, Thomas G.

    1997-01-01

    We report the first detection of interstellar hydrogen fluoride. Using the Long Wavelength Spectrometer of the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO), we have detected the 121.6973 micron J = 2-1 line of HF in absorption toward the far-infrared continuum source Sagittarius B2. The detection is statistically significant at the 13 sigma level. On the basis of our model for the excitation of HF in Sgr B2, the observed line equivalent width of 1.0 nm implies a hydrogen fluoride abundance of approximately 3 x 10(exp -10) relative to H2. If the elemental abundance of fluorine in Sgr B2 is the same as that in the solar system, then HF accounts for approximately 2% of the total number of fluorine nuclei. We expect hydrogen fluoride to be the dominant reservoir of gas-phase fluorine in Sgr B2, because it is formed rapidly in exothermic reactions of atomic fluorine with either water or molecular hydrogen; thus, the measured HF abundance suggests a substantial depletion of fluorine onto dust grains. Similar conclusions regarding depletion have previously been reached for the case of chlorine in dense interstellar clouds. We also find evidence at a lower level of statistical significance (approximately 5 sigma) for an emission feature at the expected position of the 4(sub 32)-4(sub 23) 121.7219 micron line of water. The emission-line equivalent width of 0.5 nm for the water feature is consistent with the water abundance of 5 x 10(exp -6) relative to H2 that has been inferred previously from observations of the hot core of Sgr B2.

  12. Discovery of Interstellar Hydrogen Fluoride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neufeld, David A.; Zmuidzinas, Jonas; Schilke, Peter; Phillips, Thomas G.

    1997-01-01

    We report the first detection of interstellar hydrogen fluoride. Using the Long Wavelength Spectrometer of the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO), we have detected the 121.6973 micron J = 2-1 line of HF in absorption toward the far-infrared continuum source Sagittarius B2. The detection is statistically significant at the 13 sigma level. On the basis of our model for the excitation of HF in Sgr B2, the observed line equivalent width of 1.0 nm implies a hydrogen fluoride abundance of about 3 x 10 (exp -10) relative to H, If the elemental abundance of fluorine in Sgr B2 is the same as that in the solar system, then HF accounts for about 2% of the total number of fluorine nuclei. We expect hydrogen fluoride to be the dominant reservoir of gas-phase fluorine in Sgr B2, because it is formed rapidly in exothermic reactions of atomic fluorine with either water or molecular hydrogen; thus, the measured HF abundance suggests a substantial depletion of fluorine onto dust grains. Similar conclusions regarding depletion have previously been reached for the case of chlorine in dense interstellar clouds. We also find evidence at a lower level of statistical significance (about 5 sigma) for an emission feature at the expected position of the 4(sub 32)-4(sub 23) 121.7219 micron line of water. The emission-line equivalent width of 0.5 mm for the water feature is consistent with the water abundance of 5 x 10(exp -6) relative to H, that has been inferred previously from observations of the hot core of Sgr B2.

  13. Enigmatic Extinction: An Investigation of the 2175Å Extinction Bump in M101

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danowski, Meredith E.; Cook, Timothy; Gordon, Karl D.; Chakrabarti, Supriya; Lawton, Brandon L.; Misselt, Karl A.

    2014-06-01

    Evidence from studies of starburst galaxies indicates that active formation of high mass stars modifies the UV dust extinction curve as seen by a lack of the characteristic 2175Å bump. For over 45 years, the source of the 2175Å extinction feature has yet to be positively identified. Small aromatic/PAH grains are suggested as a leading contender in dust grain models. The face-on spiral galaxy M101 is an ideal laboratory for the study of dust, with many well-studied HII regions and a steep metallicity and ionization gradient.The Interstellar Medium Absorption Gradient Experiment Rocket (IMAGER) probes the correlation between dust extinction, and the metallicity and radiation environment in M101 at ultraviolet wavelengths. IMAGER simultaneously images M101 in three 400Å-wide bandpasses, measuring the apparent strength of the 2175Å bump and the UV continuum.Combining data from IMAGER with high S/N far- and near- UV observations from the MAMA detectors on the Hubble STIS instrument, we examine the apparent strength of the 2175Å bump in HII regions of M101. With additional infrared data from Spitzer, the DIRTY radiative transfer model, and stellar evolution models, we probe the correlation between the 2175Å feature and the aromatic/PAH features across HII regions of varying metallicity and radiation field hardness. The results of this experiment will directly impact our understanding of the nature of dust and our ability to accurately account for the effects of dust on observations at all redshifts.

  14. A Numerical Investigation of the Extinction of Low Strain Rate Diffusion Flames by an Agent in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puri, Ishwar K.

    2004-01-01

    Our goal has been to investigate the influence of both dilution and radiation on the extinction process of nonpremixed flames at low strain rates. Simulations have been performed by using a counterflow code and three radiation models have been included in it, namely, the optically thin, the narrowband, and discrete ordinate models. The counterflow flame code OPPDIFF was modified to account for heat transfer losses by radiation from the hot gases. The discrete ordinate method (DOM) approximation was first suggested by Chandrasekhar for solving problems in interstellar atmospheres. Carlson and Lathrop developed the method for solving multi-dimensional problem in neutron transport. Only recently has the method received attention in the field of heat transfer. Due to the applicability of the discrete ordinate method for thermal radiation problems involving flames, the narrowband code RADCAL was modified to calculate the radiative properties of the gases. A non-premixed counterflow flame was simulated with the discrete ordinate method for radiative emissions. In comparison with two other models, it was found that the heat losses were comparable with the optically thin and simple narrowband model. The optically thin model had the highest heat losses followed by the DOM model and the narrow-band model.

  15. Infrared absorption and emission characteristics of interstellar PAHs (Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon)

    SciTech Connect

    Allamandola, L.J.; Tielens, A.G.G.M.; Barker, J.R.

    1986-01-01

    The mid-infrared interstellar emission spectrum with features at 3050, 1610, 1300, 1150, and 885 cm/sup -1/ (3.28, 6.2, 7.7, 8.7 and 11.3 microns) is discussed in terms of the Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) hypothesis. This hypothesis is based on the suggestive, but inconclusive comparison between the interstellar emission spectrum with the infrared absorption and Raman spectra of a few PAHs. The fundamental vibrations of PAHs and PAH-like species which determine the ir and Raman properties are discussed. Interstellar ir band emission is due to relaxation from highly vibrationally excited PAHs which have been excited by ultraviolet photons. The excitation/emission process is described in general and the ir fluorescence from one PAH, chrysene, is traced in detail. Generally, there is sufficient energy to populate several vibrational levels in each mode. Molecular vibrational potentials are anharmonic and emission from these higher levels will fall at lower frequencies and produce weak features to the red of the stronger fundamentals. This process is also described and can account for some spectroscopic details of the interstellar emission spectra previously unexplained. Analysis of the interstellar spectrum shows that PAHs containing between 20 and 30 carbon atoms are responsible for the emission. 43 refs., 11 figs.

  16. Niagara Falls Cascade Model for Interstellar Energetic Ions in the Heliosheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, John F.

    The origin of anomalous cosmic ray ions has long been assumed to be heliospheric pickup ion production from interstellar neutrals and acceleration at the solar wind termination shock. The Voyager-1 shock crossing showed a well-defined boundary for sharply increased keV ion fluxes in the heliosheath but no sign of local acceleration. Ion flux spectra at keV to MeV energies are instead unfolding with outward passage to approximate the E(-1.5) power-law expected for compressional magnetic tubulence. This spectrum provides excellent connection over many energy decades of a maxwellian distribution for local interstellar plasma ions to well-known flux spectra of high energy galactic ions at GeV energies. The Niagara Falls cascade model is proposed that the heliosheath is a transitional region for direct entry of ions from the local interstellar ‘river’ through a permeable heliopause into the supersonic outer heliosphere. As Voyager-1 moves outwards in the heliosheath to the heliopause, energy-dependent transport features can appear in the transitional 0.01 - 1 GeV/n energy band but otherwise a general unfolding to the interstellar limiting spectrum should continue by this model. Spectral regions then become dominated by bulk plasma flow at low energy, cascade transport at intermediate energies, and interstellar shock acceleration at higher energies.

  17. Chemical abundances in cold, dark interstellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irvine, William M.; Kaifu, Norio; Ohishi, Masatoshi

    1991-01-01

    Current tabulations are presented of the entire range of known interstellar molecules, giving attention to that subset which has been identified in the cold, dark interstellar clouds out of which the sun has been suggested to have formed. The molecular abundances of two such clouds, Taurus Molecular Cloud 1 and Lynd's 134N, exhibit prepossessing chemical differences despite considerable physical similarities. This discrepancy may be accounted for by the two clouds' differing evolutionary stages. Two novel classes of interstellar molecules are noted: sulfur-terminated carbon chains and silicon-terminated ones.

  18. Speckles in interstellar radio-wave scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, K. M.; Gwinn, C. R.; Reynolds, J.; King, E. A.; Jauncey, D.; Nicholson, G.; Flanagan, C.; Preston, R. A.; Jones, D. L.

    1991-01-01

    Observations of speckles in the scattering disk of the Vela pulsar are presented and speckle techniques for studying and circumventing scattering of radio waves by the turbulent interstellar plasma are discussed. The speckle pattern contains, in a hologrammatic fashion, complete information on the structure of the radio source as well as the distribution of the scattering material. Speckle observations of interstellar scattering of radio waves are difficult because of their characteristically short timescales and narrow bandwidths. Here, first observations are presented, taken at 13 cm wavelength with elements of the SHEVE VLBI network, of speckles in interstellar scattering.

  19. Spatial distribution of interstellar dust in the Sun's vicinity. Comparison with neutral sodium-bearing gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergely, J.-L.; Valette, B.; Lallement, R.; Raimond, S.

    2010-07-01

    Aims: 3D tomography of the interstellar dust and gas may be useful in many respects, from the physical and chemical evolution of the interstellar medium itself to foreground decontamination of the cosmic microwave background, or various studies of the environments of specific objects. However, while spectral data cubes of the galactic emission become increasingly precise, the information on the distance to the emitting regions has not progressed as well and relies essentially on the galactic rotation curve. Our goal here is to bring more precise information on the distance to nearby interstellar dust and gas clouds within 250 pc. Methods: We apply the best available calibration methods to a carefully screened set of stellar Strömgren photometry data for targets possessing a Hipparcos parallax and spectral type classification. We combine the derived interstellar extinctions and the parallax distances for about 6000 stars to build a 3D tomography of the local dust. We use an inversion method based on a regularized Bayesian approach and a least squares criterion, optimized for this specific data set. We apply the same inversion technique to a totally independent set of neutral sodium absorption data available for about 1700 target stars. Results: We obtain 3D maps of the opacity and the distance to the main dust-bearing clouds within 250 pc and identify in those maps well-known dark clouds and high galactic more diffuse entities. We calculate the integrated extinction between the Sun and the cube boundary and compare this with the total galactic extinction derived from infrared 2D maps. The two quantities reach similar values at high latitudes, as expected if the local dust content is satisfyingly reproduced and the dust is closer than 250 pc. Those maps show a larger high latitude dust opacity in the North compared to the South, reinforcing earlier evidences. Interestingly the gas maps do not show the same asymmetry, suggesting a polar asymmetry of the dust to gas

  20. Global observations of the interstellar interaction from the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX).

    PubMed

    McComas, D J; Allegrini, F; Bochsler, P; Bzowski, M; Christian, E R; Crew, G B; DeMajistre, R; Fahr, H; Fichtner, H; Frisch, P C; Funsten, H O; Fuselier, S A; Gloeckler, G; Gruntman, M; Heerikhuisen, J; Izmodenov, V; Janzen, P; Knappenberger, P; Krimigis, S; Kucharek, H; Lee, M; Livadiotis, G; Livi, S; MacDowall, R J; Mitchell, D; Möbius, E; Moore, T; Pogorelov, N V; Reisenfeld, D; Roelof, E; Saul, L; Schwadron, N A; Valek, P W; Vanderspek, R; Wurz, P; Zank, G P

    2009-11-13

    The Sun moves through the local interstellar medium, continuously emitting ionized, supersonic solar wind plasma and carving out a cavity in interstellar space called the heliosphere. The recently launched Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) spacecraft has completed its first all-sky maps of the interstellar interaction at the edge of the heliosphere by imaging energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) emanating from this region. We found a bright ribbon of ENA emission, unpredicted by prior models or theories, that may be ordered by the local interstellar magnetic field interacting with the heliosphere. This ribbon is superposed on globally distributed flux variations ordered by both the solar wind structure and the direction of motion through the interstellar medium. Our results indicate that the external galactic environment strongly imprints the heliosphere. PMID:19833923

  1. The Evolution of the Interstellar Medium as Traced by Mid and Far-IR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stacey, Gordon

    2011-05-01

    I will discuss how the mid and far-infrared fine structure lines of abundant atoms and ions can be used to trace the evolution of the interstellar medium in galaxies from earliest times to the present. These lines are of particular interest as they are both easily excited and suffer relatively little from extinction by dust. I plan a review of the current state of knowledge, followed by a discussion of the new science that will be enabled with the advent of SPICA and ALMA.

  2. Extinction in human fear conditioning.

    PubMed

    Hermans, Dirk; Craske, Michelle G; Mineka, Susan; Lovibond, Peter F

    2006-08-15

    Although most extinction research is conducted in animal laboratories, the study of extinction learning in human fear conditioning has gained increasing attention over the last decade. The most important findings from human fear extinction are reviewed in this article. Specifically, we review experimental investigations of the impact of conditioned inhibitors, conditioned exciters, context renewal, and reinstatement on fear extinction in human samples. We discuss data from laboratory studies of the extinction of aversively conditioned stimuli, as well as results from experimental clinical work with fearful or anxious individuals. We present directions for future research, in particular the need for further investigation of differences between animal and human conditioning outcomes, and research examining the role of both automatic and higher-order cognitive processes in human conditioning and extinction.

  3. Extinction events can accelerate evolution.

    PubMed

    Lehman, Joel; Miikkulainen, Risto

    2015-01-01

    Extinction events impact the trajectory of biological evolution significantly. They are often viewed as upheavals to the evolutionary process. In contrast, this paper supports the hypothesis that although they are unpredictably destructive, extinction events may in the long term accelerate evolution by increasing evolvability. In particular, if extinction events extinguish indiscriminately many ways of life, indirectly they may select for the ability to expand rapidly through vacated niches. Lineages with such an ability are more likely to persist through multiple extinctions. Lending computational support for this hypothesis, this paper shows how increased evolvability will result from simulated extinction events in two computational models of evolved behavior. The conclusion is that although they are destructive in the short term, extinction events may make evolution more prolific in the long term.

  4. Extinction Events Can Accelerate Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Lehman, Joel; Miikkulainen, Risto

    2015-01-01

    Extinction events impact the trajectory of biological evolution significantly. They are often viewed as upheavals to the evolutionary process. In contrast, this paper supports the hypothesis that although they are unpredictably destructive, extinction events may in the long term accelerate evolution by increasing evolvability. In particular, if extinction events extinguish indiscriminately many ways of life, indirectly they may select for the ability to expand rapidly through vacated niches. Lineages with such an ability are more likely to persist through multiple extinctions. Lending computational support for this hypothesis, this paper shows how increased evolvability will result from simulated extinction events in two computational models of evolved behavior. The conclusion is that although they are destructive in the short term, extinction events may make evolution more prolific in the long term. PMID:26266804

  5. Laboratory comparisons of organic materials to interstellar dust and the Murchison meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendleton, Y. J.

    1995-01-01

    Spectra of objects which lie along several lines of sight through the diffuse interstellar medium (DISM) reveal an absorption feature near 3.4 micrometers, which has been attributed to saturated aliphatic hydrocarbons on interstellar grains. The similarity of the absorption bands near 3.4 micrometers (2950 cm-1) along different lines of sight indicates that the carrier of this band lies in the diffuse dust. Several materials have been proposed as "fits" to the 3.4 micrometers feature over the years. A comparison of these identifications is presented. These comparisons illustrate the need for high resolution, high signal-to-noise observational data as a means of distinguishing between laboratory organics as matches to the interstellar material. Although any material containing hydrocarbons will produce features in the 3.4 micrometers region, the proposed "matches" to the DISM do differ in detail. These differences may help in the analyses of the chemical composition and physical processes which led to the production of the DISM organics, although ISO Observations through the 5-8 micrometers spectral region are essential for a definitive identification. A remarkable similarity between the spectrum of the diffuse dust and an organic extract from the Murchison meteorite suggests that some of the interstellar organic material may be preserved in primitive solar system bodies. The 3.4 micrometers absorption feature (in the rest frame) has recently been detected in external galaxies, indicating the widespread availability of organic material for incorporation into planetary systems.

  6. The ``Shiva Hypothesis'': Impacts, Mass Extinctions, and the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rampino, Michael R.; Haggerty, Bruce M.

    1996-02-01

    The “Shiva Hypothesis”, in which recurrent, cyclical mass extinctions of life on Earth result from impacts of comets or asteroids, provides a possible unification of important processes in astrophysics, planetary geology, and the history of life. Collisions with Earth-crossing asteroids and comets ≥ a few km in diameter are calculated to produce widespread environmental disasters (dust clouds, wildfires), and occur with the proper frequency to account for the record of five major mass extinctions (from ≥ 108 Mt TNT impacts) and ~ 20 minor mass extinctions (from 107 108 Mt impacts) recorded in the past 540 million years. Recent studies of a number of extinctions show evidence of severe environmental disturbances and mass mortality consistent with the expected after-effects (dust clouds, wildfires) of catastrophic impacts. At least six cases of features generally considered diagnostic of large impacts (e.g., large impact craters, layers with high platinum-group elements, shock-related minerals, and/or microtektites) are known at or close to extinction-event boundaries. Six additional cases of elevated iridium levels at or near extinction boundaries are of the amplitude that might be expected from collision of relatively low-Ir objects such as comets. The records of cratering and mass extinction show a correlation, and might be explained by a combination of periodic and stochastic impactors. The mass extinction record shows evidence for a periodic component of about 26 to 30 Myr, and an ~ 30 Myr periodic component has been detected in impact craters by some workers, with recent pulses of impacts in the last 2 3 million years, and at ~ 35, 65, and 95 million years ago. A cyclical astronomical pacemaker for such pulses of impacts may involve the motions of the Earth through the Milky Way Galaxy. As the Solar System revolves around the galactic center, it also oscillates up and down through the plane of the disk-shaped galaxy with a half-cycle ~ 30±3 Myr. This

  7. Gas absorption and dust extinction towards the Orion Nebula Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasenberger, Birgit; Forbrich, Jan; Alves, João; Wolk, Scott J.; Meingast, Stefan; Getman, Konstantin V.; Pillitteri, Ignazio

    2016-08-01

    Aims: We characterise the relation between the gas and dust content of the interstellar medium towards young stellar objects in the Orion Nebula Cluster. Methods: X-ray observations provide estimates of the absorbing equivalent hydrogen column density NH based on spectral fits. Near-infrared extinction values are calculated from intrinsic and observed colour magnitudes (J - H) and (H - Ks) as given by the VISTA Orion A survey. A linear fit of the correlation between column density and extinction values AV yields an estimate of the NH/AV ratio. We investigate systematic uncertainties of the results by describing and (if possible) quantifying the influence of circumstellar material and the adopted extinction law, X-ray models, and elemental abundances on the NH/AV ratio. Results: Assuming a Galactic extinction law with RV = 3.1 and solar abundances by Anders & Grevesse (1989, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 53, 197), we deduce an NH/AV ratio of (1.39 ± 0.14) × 1021 cm-2 mag-1 for Class III sources in the Orion Nebula Cluster where the given error does not include systematic uncertainties. This ratio is consistent with similar studies in other star-forming regions and approximately 31% lower than the Galactic value. We find no obvious trends in the spatial distribution of NH/AV ratios. Changes in the assumed extinction law and elemental abundances are demonstrated to have a relevant impact on deduced AV and NH values, respectively. Large systematic uncertainties associated with metal abundances in the Orion Nebula Cluster represent the primary limitation for the deduction of a definitive NH/AV ratio and the physical interpretation of these results. The catalogue is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/593/A7

  8. Comets, interstellar clouds and star clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donn, B.

    1976-01-01

    The association of comets with star formation in clusters is elaborated. This hypothesis is also used to explain origin and evaluation of the Oort cloud, the composition of comets, and relationships between cometary and interstellar molecules.

  9. Interstellar material in the solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, J. A.

    1986-01-01

    All the substance of the Earth and other terrestrial planets once existed in the form of interstellar grains and gas. A major aspect of solar system formation (and undoubtedly of star formation generally) is the complex series of processes that converted infalling interstellar grains into planets. A cryptic record of these processes is preserved in certain samples of planetary materials, such as chondritic meteorites, that were preserved in a relatively unchanged form since the beginning. It is to be expected that some of these primitive materials might contain or even consist of preserved presolar interstellar grains. The identification and study of such grains, the ancestors of our planetary system, is a matter of intense interest. Types of primitive material accessible or potentially accessible, and component of or relationship to presolar interstellar grains are discussed.

  10. Interstellar Polycyclic Aromatic Compounds and Astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudgins, Douglas M.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Over the past fifteen years, thanks to significant, parallel advancements in observational, experimental, and theoretical techniques, tremendous strides have been made in our understanding of the role polycyclic aromatic compounds (PAC) in the interstellar medium (ISM). Twenty years ago, the notion of an abundant population of large, carbon rich molecules in the ISM was considered preposterous. Today, the unmistakable spectroscopic signatures of PAC - shockingly large molecules by previous interstellar chemistry standards - are recognized throughout the Universe. In this paper, we will examine the interstellar PAC model and its importance to astrophysics, including: (1) the evidence which led to inception of the model; (2) the ensuing laboratory and theoretical studies of the fundamental spectroscopic properties of PAC by which the model has been refined and extended; and (3) a few examples of how the model is being exploited to derive insight into the nature of the interstellar PAC population.

  11. Detection of H3+ in interstellar space.

    PubMed

    Geballe, T R; Oka, T

    1996-11-28

    The H3+ ion is widely believed to play an important role in interstellar chemistry, by initiating the chains of reactions that lead to the production of many of the complex molecular species observed in the interstellar medium. The presence of H3+ in the interstellar medium was first suggested in 1961, and its infrared spectrum was measured in the laboratory in 1980. But attempts to detect it in interstellar space have hitherto proved unsuccessful. Here we report the detection of H3+ absorption in the spectra of two molecular clouds. Although the present results do not permit an accurate determination of the H3+ abundances, these ions appear nevertheless to be present in sufficient quantities to drive much of the chemistry in molecular clouds. It should soon be possible to obtain more accurate measurements, and thus better quantify the role of ion-neutral reactions in the chemical evolution of molecular clouds.

  12. Cosmocultural Evolution: Cosmic Motivation for Interstellar Travel?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupisella, M.

    Motivations for interstellar travel can vary widely from practical survival motivations to wider-ranging moral obligations to future generations. But it may also be fruitful to explore what, if any, "cosmic" relevance there may be regarding interstellar travel. Cosmocultural evolution can be defined as the coevolution of cosmos and culture, with cultural evolution playing an important and perhaps critical role in the overall evolution of the universe. Strong versions of cosmocultural evolution might suggest that cultural evolution may have unlimited potential as a cosmic force. In such a worldview, the advancement of cultural beings throughout the universe could have significant cosmic relevance, perhaps providing additional motivation for interstellar travel. This paper will explore some potential philosophical and policy implications for interstellar travel of a cosmocultural evolutionary perspective and other related concepts, including some from a recent NASA book, Cosmos and Culture: Cultural Evolution in a Cosmic Context.

  13. Deuterium Abundance in the Local Interstellar Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferlet, R.; Gry, C.; Vidal-Madjar, A.

    1984-01-01

    The present situation of deuterium abundance evaluation in interstellar space is discussed, and it is shown that it should be or = .00001 by studying in more detail lambda the Sco line of sight and by observing two NaI interstellar components toward that star, it can be shown that the D/H evaluation made toward lambda Sco is in fact related to the local interstellar medium (less than 10 pc from the Sun). Because this evaluation is also or = .00001 it is in striking contrast with the one made toward alpha Aur (D/H or = .000018 confirming the fact that the deuterium abundance in the local interstellar medium varies by at least a factor of two over few parsecs.

  14. The impact of mass extinctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flessa, Karl W.

    1988-01-01

    In the years since Snowbird an explosive growth of research on the patterns, causes, and consequences of extinction was seen. The fossil record of extinction is better known, stratigraphic sections were scrutinized in great detail, and additional markers of environmental change were discovered in the rock record. However flawed, the fossil record is the only record that exists of natural extinction. Compilations from the primary literature contain a faint periodic signal: the extinctions of the past 250 my may be regulary spaced. The reality of the periodicity remains a subject for debate. The implications of periodicity are so profound that the debate is sure to continue. The greater precision from stratigraphic sections spanning extinction events has yet to resolve controversies concerning the rates at which extinctions occurred. Some sections seem to record sudden terminations, while others suggest gradual or steplike environmental deterioration. Unfortunately, the manner in which the strata record extinctions and compile stratigraphic ranges makes a strictly literal reading of the fossil record inadvisable. Much progress was made in the study of mass extinctions. The issues are more sharply defined but they are not fully resolved. Scenarios should look back to the phenomena they purport to explain - not just an iridium-rich layer, but the complex fabric of a mass extinction.

  15. Periodicity in marine extinction events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sepkoski, J. John, Jr.; Raup, David M.

    1986-01-01

    The periodicity of extinction events is examined in detail. In particular, the temporal distribution of specific, identifiable extinction events is analyzed. The nature and limitations of the data base on the global fossil record is discussed in order to establish limits of resolution in statistical analyses. Peaks in extinction intensity which appear to differ significantly from background levels are considered, and new analyses of the temporal distribution of these peaks are presented. Finally, some possible causes of periodicity and of interdependence among extinction events over the last quarter billion years of earth history are examined.

  16. A new interstellar molecule - Tricarbon monoxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthews, H. E.; Irvine, W. M.; Friberg, P.; Brown, R. D.; Godfrey, P. D.

    1984-01-01

    The C3O molecule, whose pure rotational spectrum has only recently been studied in the laboratory, has been detected in the cold, dark interstellar Taurus Molecular Cloud 1. Since C3O is the first interstelar carbon chain molecule to contain oxygen, its existence places an important new constraint on chemical schemes for cold interstellar clouds. The abundance of C3O can be understood in terms of purely gas-phase ion-molecule chemistry.

  17. The Abundance of Interstellar Fluorine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauroesch, James T.

    2005-01-01

    The primary objective of this program was to obtain FUSE observations of the interstellar absorption lines of F I at 951 and 954 Angstroms to derive the abundance of fluorine toward the star HD 164816. The nucleosynthetic source(s) of fluorine are still a matter of debate - the present day abundance of fluorine can potentially constrain models for pulsationally driven dredge-up in asymptotic giant branch stars. An accurate measure for the depletion behavior of fluorine will determine whether it may be detectable in QSO absorption line systems - an unambiguous detection of fluorine at suitably high redshifts would provide the best evidence to date for the neutrino process in massive stars. Furthermore, due to its extreme reactivity, measurement of the gas-phase interstellar fluorine abundance is important for models of grain chemistry. Despite the importance of measuring the interstellar fluorine abundance, at the time of our proposal only one previous detection has been made due to the low relative abundance of fluorine, the lack of lines outside the far-UV, and the blending of the available F I transitions with lines of Hz. The star HD 164816 is associated with the Lagoon nebula (M8), and at a distance of approximately 1.5 kpc probes both distant and local gas. Beginning April 8th, 2004 FUSE FP-Split observations of the star HD 164816 were obtained for this program. This data became available in the FUSE data archive May 21, 2004, and these observations were then downloaded and we began our analysis. Our analysis procedure has involved (1) fitting stellar models to the FUSE spectra, (2) using the multiple lines of Hz and N I at other wavelengths in the FUSE bandpass to derive column densities for the lines of H2 and N I which are blended with the F I features at 951 and 954 angstroms (3) the measurement of the column densities of F I and the species O I and C1 I which are important species for the dis-entangling of dust and nucleosynthetic effects. As discussed in

  18. The pharmacology of extinction.

    PubMed

    Huxtable, R J

    1992-08-01

    It is impossible to predict what compounds of pharmacological interest may be present in an unexamined species. The extinction of such species may result, therefore, in the loss of therapeutically significant compounds. The fact that science will never know what has been lost does not lessen the significance of the loss. A number of species are discussed to exemplify the potential loss. Ginkgo biloba is an ancient plant, apparently saved from a natural extinction by human intervention. From this tree, the ginkgolides have been isolated. These are potent inhibitors of platelet activating factor and hold promise in the treatment of cerebral ischemia and brain edema. Two species, the tree Taxus brevifolia and the leech Hirudo medicinalis, are threatened as a result of human activity. Both have recently yielded complex compounds of therapeutic importance. The antitumor agent, taxol, is obtained from T. brevifolia and the thrombin inhibitor, hirudin, is found in H. medicinalis. Catharanthus roseus, source of the anticancer agents vincristine and vinblastine, although not threatened, derives from a largely unexamined but severely stressed ecosystem of some 5000 plant species. In other examples, ethnobotanical knowledge of certain plants may be lost while the species survive, as exemplified by the suppression of the Aztec ethnobotany of Mesoamerica by the invading Spanish. Finally, the fallacy of the 'snail darter syndrome', where species may be viewed as too insignificant to worry about, is exposed by consideration of the pharmacological activities of a sea hare (a shell-less marine mollusc) and various leeches.

  19. Experimental and Theoretical Studies of Interstellar Grains. Ph.D. Thesis - Maryland Univ., College Park, 1982

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuth, J. A., III

    1981-01-01

    Steady state vibrational populations of SiO and CO in dilute black body radiation fields were calculated as a function of total pressure, kinetic temperature and chemical composition of the gas. Approximate calculations for polyatomic molecules are presented. Vibrational disequilibrium becomes increasingly significant as total pressure and radiation density decrease. Many regions of postulated grain formation are found to be far from thermal equilibrium before the onset of nucleation. Calculations based upon classical nucleation theory or equilibrium thermodynamics are expected to be of dubious value in such regions. Laboratory measurements of the extinction of small iron and magnetite grains were made from 195 nm to 830 nm and found to be consistent with predictions based upon published optical constants. This implies that small iron particles are not responsible for the 220 nm interstellar extinction features. Additional measurements are discussed.

  20. Determining the extragalactic extinction law with SALT - II. Additional sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkelman, Ido; Brosch, Noah; Kniazev, Alexei Y.; Väisänen, Petri; Buckley, David A. H.; O'Donoghue, Darragh; Gulbis, Amanda; Hashimoto, Yas; Loaring, Nicola; Romero-Colmenero, Encarni; Sefako, Ramotholo

    2010-12-01

    We present new results from an ongoing programme to study the dust extragalactic extinction law in E/S0 galaxies with dust lanes with the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT) during its performance verification phase. The wavelength dependence of the dust extinction for seven galaxies is derived in six spectral bands ranging from the near-ultraviolet atmospheric cut-off to the near-infrared. The derivation of an extinction law is performed by fitting model galaxies to the unextinguished parts of the image in each spectral band, and subtracting from these the actual images. We compare our results with the derived extinction law in the Galaxy and find them to run parallel to the Galactic extinction curve with a mean total-to-selective extinction value of RV = 2.71 +/- 0.43. We use total optical extinction values to estimate the dust mass for each galaxy, compare these with dust masses derived from IRAS measurements, and find them to range from 104 to 107 Msolar. We study the case of the well-known dust-lane galaxy NGC2685 for which Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (HST/WFPC2) data are available to test the dust distribution on different scales. Our results imply a scale-free dust distribution across the dust lanes, at least within ~1arcsec (~60 pc) regions. Based on observations made with the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT). E-mail: ido@wise.tau.ac.il (IF); noah@wise.tau.ac.il (NB); akniazev@saao.ac.za (AYK); petri@saao.ac.za (PV); dibnob@saao.ac.za (DAHB); dod@saao.ac.za (DO); amanda@saao.ac.za (AG); hashimot@ntnu.edu.tw (YH); nsl@saao.ac.za (NL); erc@saao.ac.za (ER-C); rrs@saao.ac.za (RS)

  1. The hydrogen coverage of interstellar PAHs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, J. R.; Cohen, M.; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.; Allamandola, Louis J.; Barker, J. R.; Barker, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    The rate at which the CH bond in interstellar Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) rupture due to the absorption of a UV photon has been calculated. The results show that small PAHs (less than or equal to 25 carbon atoms) are expected to be partially dehydrogenated in regions with intense UV fields, while large PAHs (greater than or equal to 25 atoms) are expected to be completely hydrogenated in those regions. Because estimate of the carbon content of interstellar PAHs lie in the range of 20 to 25 carbon atoms, dehydrogenation is probably not very important. Because of the absence of other emission features besides the 11.3 micrometer feature in ground-based 8 to 13 micrometer spectra, it has been suggested that interstellar PAHs are partially dehydrogenated. However, IRAS 8 to 22 micrometer spectra of most sources that show strong 7.7 and 11.2 micrometer emission features also show a plateau of emission extending from about 11.3 to 14 micrometer. Like the 11.3 micrometer feature, this new feature is attributed to the CH out of plane bending mode in PAHs. This new feature shows that interstellar PAHs are not as dehydrogenated as estimated from ground-based 8 to 13 micrometer spectra. It also constrains the molecular structure of interstellar PAHs. In particular, it seems that very condensed PAHs, such as coronene and circumcoronene, dominate the interstellar PAH mixture as expected from stability arguments.

  2. The hydrogen coverage of interstellar PAHs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Allamandola, L. J.; Barker, J. R.; Cohen, M.

    1987-01-01

    The rate at which the CH bond in interstellar Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) rupture due to the absorption of a UV photon has been calculated. The results show that small PAHs (less than or equal to 25 carbon atoms) are expected to be partially dehydrogenated in regions with intense UV fields, while large PAHs (greater than or equal to 25 atoms) are expected to be completely hydrogenated in those regions. Because estimate of the carbon content of interstellar PAHs lie in the range of 20 to 25 carbon atoms, dehydrogenation is probably not very important. Because of the absence of other emission features besides the 11.3 micrometer feature in ground-based 8 to 13 micrometer spectra, it has been suggested that interstellar PAHs are partially dehydrogenated. However, IRAS 8 to 22 micrometer spectra of most sources that show strong 7.7 and 11.2 micrometer emission features also show a plateau of emission extending from about 11.3 to 14 micrometer. Like the 11.3 micrometer feature, this new feature is attributed to the CH out of plane bending mode in PAHs. This new feature shows that interstellar PAHs are not as dehydrogenated as estimated from ground-based 8 to 13 micrometer spectra. It also constrains the molecular structure of interstellar PAHs. In particular, it seems that very condensed PAHs, such as coronene and circumcoronene, dominate the interstellar PAH mixture as expected from stability arguments.

  3. A Heliosphere Buffeted by Interstellar Turbulence?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jokipii, J. R.; Giacalone, J.

    2014-12-01

    Recent observations from IBEX combined with previous measurements from other sources suggest new, local, effects of interstellar turbulence. Observations of various interstellar parameters such as the magnetic field, fluid velocity and electron density, over large spatial scales, have revealed a broadband Kolmogorov spectrum of interstellar turbulence which pervades most of interstellar space. The outer scale (or coherence scale of this turbulence) is found to be approximately 10^19 cm and the inner cutoff scale is less than 1000 km. The root-mean-square relative fluctuation in the fluid and the magnetic-field parameters is of order unity. If this turbulence exists at the heliosphere, the root-mean-square relative fluctuations at 100 (heliospheric) AU scales is approximately 0.1. The recently published value for the change In observed velocity direction for the interstellar flow relative to the heliosphere (Frisch, etal, 2014)is consistent with this. Similarly, interpreting the width of the IBEX ribbon in terms of a fluctuating magnetic field also is in agreement with this picture. Observations of TeV cosmic rays can also be explained. Potential effects of these fluctuations in the interstellar medium on the heliosphere will be discussed. Reference: Frisch, etal, Science, 341, 480

  4. AN OPTICAL SURVEY FOR MILLIMETER-SIZED INTERSTELLAR METEOROIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Musci, R.; Weryk, R. J.; Brown, P.; Campbell-Brown, M. D.; Wiegert, P. A.

    2012-02-01

    We report high-resolution multi-station observations of meteors by the Canadian Automated Meteor Observatory recorded from 2009 June to 2010 August. Our survey has a limiting detection magnitude of +5 mag in R band, equivalent to a limiting meteoroid mass of {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7} kg. The high metric trajectory accuracy (of the order of 30 m perpendicular to the solution and 200 m along track) allows us to determine velocities with average uncertainty of <1.5% in speed and {approx}0.{sup 0}4 in the radiant direction. A total of 1739 meteors had measured orbits. The data have been searched for meteors in hyperbolic orbits, which are potentially of interstellar origin. We found 22 potential hyperbolic meteors among our sample, with only two of them having a speed at least 3{sigma} above the hyperbolic limit. For our one-year survey we find no clear evidence of interstellar meteoroids at millimeter sizes in a weighted time-area product of {approx}10{sup 4} km{sup 2} hr. Backward integrations performed for these 22 potentially hyperbolic meteors to check for close encounters with planets show no considerable changes in their orbits. Detailed examination leads us to conclude that our few identified events are most likely the result of measurement error. We find an upper limit of f{sub ISP} < 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} km{sup -2} hr{sup -1} for the flux of interstellar meteoroids at Earth with a limiting mass of m > 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7} kg.

  5. The Physical Character of Small-Scale Interstellar Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauroesch, James T.

    2005-01-01

    The primary objective of this program was to obtain FUSE observations of the multiple interstellar absorption lines of H2 toward the members of 3 resolvable binary/multiple star systems to explore the physical conditions in known interstellar small-scale structures. Each of the selected systems was meant to address a different aspect of the models for the origin of these structures: 1) The stars HD 32039/40 were meant to probe a temporally varying component which probed a cloud with an inferred size of tens to a few hundreds of AU. The goal was to see if there was any significant H2 associated with this component; 2) The star HD 36408B and its companion HD 36408A (observed as part of FUSE GTO program P119) show significant spatial and temporal (proper motion induced) Na I column variations in a strong, relatively isolated component, as well as a relatively simple component structure. The key goal here was to identify any differences in H2 or C I excitation between the sightlines, and to measure the physical conditions (primarily density and temperature) in the temporally varying component; 3) The stars HD 206267C and HD 206267D are highly reddened sightlines which showed significant variations in K I and molecular absorption lines in multiple velocity components. Coupled with FUSE GTO observations of HD 206267A (program P116), the goal was to study the variations in H2 along sightlines which are significantly more distant, with larger separations, and with greater extinctions than the other selected binary systems.

  6. Modeling Extragalactic Extinction through Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zonca, Alberto; Cecchi-Pestellini, Cesare; Mulas, Giacomo; Casu, Silvia; Aresu, Giambattista

    2016-09-01

    We analyze extragalactic extinction profiles derived through gamma-ray burst afterglows, using a dust model specifically constructed on the assumption that dust grains are not immutable but respond, time-dependently, to the local physics. Such a model includes core-mantle spherical particles of mixed chemical composition (silicate core, sp2, and sp3 carbonaceous layers), and an additional molecular component in the form of free-flying polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. We fit most of the observed extinction profiles. Failures occur for lines of sight, presenting remarkable rises blueward of the bump. We find a tendency for the carbon chemical structure to become more aliphatic with the galactic activity, and to some extent with increasing redshifts. Moreover, the contribution of the molecular component to the total extinction is more important in younger objects. The results of the fitting procedure (either successes and failures) may be naturally interpreted through an evolutionary prescription based on the carbon cycle in the interstellar medium of galaxies.

  7. Plasmonic modes and extinction properties of a random nanocomposite cylinder

    SciTech Connect

    Moradi, Afshin

    2014-04-15

    We study the properties of surface plasmon-polariton waves of a random metal-dielectric nanocomposite cylinder, consisting of bulk metal embedded with dielectric nanoparticles. We use the Maxwell-Garnett formulation to model the effective dielectric function of the composite medium and show that there exist two surface mode bands. We investigate the extinction properties of the system, and obtain the dependence of the extinction spectrum on the nanoparticles’ shape and concentration as well as the cylinder radius and the incidence angle for both TE and TM polarization.

  8. Characterization of Interstellar Organic Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Gencaga, Deniz; Knuth, Kevin H.; Carbon, Duane F.

    2008-11-06

    Understanding the origins of life has been one of the greatest dreams throughout history. It is now known that star-forming regions contain complex organic molecules, known as Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs), each of which has particular infrared spectral characteristics. By understanding which PAH species are found in specific star-forming regions, we can better understand the biochemistry that takes place in interstellar clouds. Identifying and classifying PAHs is not an easy task: we can only observe a single superposition of PAH spectra at any given astrophysical site, with the PAH species perhaps numbering in the hundreds or even thousands. This is a challenging source separation problem since we have only one observation composed of numerous mixed sources. However, it is made easier with the help of a library of hundreds of PAH spectra. In order to separate PAH molecules from their mixture, we need to identify the specific species and their unique concentrations that would provide the given mixture. We develop a Bayesian approach for this problem where sources are separated from their mixture by Metropolis Hastings algorithm. Separated PAH concentrations are provided with their error bars, illustrating the uncertainties involved in the estimation process. The approach is demonstrated on synthetic spectral mixtures using spectral resolutions from the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). Performance of the method is tested for different noise levels.

  9. Interstellar Transfer of Planetary Microbiota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallis, Max K.; Wickramasinghe, N. C.

    Panspermia theories require the transport of micro-organisms in a viable form from one astronomical location to another. The evidence of material ejection from planetary surfaces, of dynamical orbit evolution and of potential survival on landing is setting a firm basis for interplanetary panspermia. Pathways for interstellar panspermia are less clear. We compare the direct route, whereby life-bearing planetary ejecta exit the solar system and risk radiation hazards en route to nearby stellar systems, and an indirect route whereby ejecta hitch a ride within the shielded environment of comets of the Edgeworth- Kuiper Belt that are subsequently expelled from the solar system. We identify solutions to the delivery problem. Delivery to fully-fledged planetary systems of either the direct ejecta or the ejecta borne by comets depends on dynamical capture and is of very low efficiency. However, delivery into a proto-planetary disc of an early solar-type nebula and into pre-stellar molecular clouds is effective, because the solid grains efficiently sputter the incoming material in hypervelocity collisions. The total mass of terrestrial fertile material delivered to nearby pre-stellar systems as the solar system moves through the galaxy is from kilogrammes up to a tonne. Subject to further study of bio-viability under irradiation and fragmenting collisions, a few kg of original grains and sputtered fragments could be sufficient to seed the planetary system with a wide range of solar system micro-organisms.

  10. INTERSTELLAR SILICATE DUST IN FIVE QUASAR ABSORPTION SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, Varsha P.; Torres-Garcia, Legna M.; Som, Debopam; York, Donald G.; Welty, Daniel E.; Vladilo, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    We report on a study of interstellar silicate dust in five quasar absorption systems at 0.44 < z{sub abs} < 1.31 toward quasars Q0235+164, 3C196, Q0852+3435, Q0937+5628, and Q1203+0634, using data from the Infrared Spectrograph on board the Spitzer Space Telescope. In the absorbers toward Q0235+164, 3C196, Q0852+3435, and Q0937+5628, the 9.7 {mu}m silicate feature is detected in absorption at {approx}5{sigma}-10{sigma} significance, with rest-frame equivalent widths of {approx}0.2-0.5 {mu}m. For Q1203+0634, the noisy data allow us to make only a 3.6{sigma} detection of absorption at 10 {mu}m. Fits to the redshifted 9.7 {mu}m features with four possible template profiles indicate that the laboratory amorphous olivine profile generally provides the best fit, with inferred peak optical depths of {tau}{sub 9.7} {approx} 0.08-0.18. For three of the quasars with optical spectra available from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, the Large Magellanic Cloud supershell extinction curve provides the best formal fits, with E(B - V) of 0.34-0.54 mag. A 2175 A extinction bump at the absorber redshift (known to exist in Q0235+164) appears to be present at >2.8{sigma} level in Q0852+3435, >2.5{sigma} level in Q1203+0634, and marginally at nearly 2{sigma} level in Q0937+5628. We briefly explore possible correlations between {tau}{sub 9.7} and the color excess, the strength of the 2175 A bump, and the metallicity (which appears to be relatively high for these absorbers, in the range of {approx}>0.1 solar to supersolar). While our measurements are consistent with a linear relation between {tau}{sub 9.7} and E(B - V), the {tau}{sub 9.7}/E(B - V) ratios for these quasar absorbers appear to be higher than those for diffuse interstellar clouds in the Milky Way, closer to values observed for the Galactic center. Some of these quasar sightlines may trace regions in the bulges of the galaxies responsible for the absorption systems.

  11. Multi-Wavelength Study of Nearby Dwarf Galaxies: Properties of Low-Metallicity Interstellar Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galliano, Frédéric

    2004-04-01

    This thesis is devoted to the multi-wavelength observations and the modelling of dust, in nearby low-metallicity dwarf galaxies. The main motivations of this project are: (i) the study of dust properties - composition, size distribution, etc. - in non-solar interstellar media; (ii) the study of global spectral energy distributions of dwarf galaxies which are thought, due to their chemical youth, to be similar to primordial galaxies that we can not observe; and (iii) obtaining informations about the chemical evolution of these galaxies by studying the gas-to-dust mass ratio. I begin with the detailed study of mid-infrared ISO spectra of these galaxies. The main spectral characteristics that we outline are: (i) the weakness of the aromatic band emission, compared to what is observed in normal starburst galaxies; (ii) the similarity with Galactic HII region spectra - a steep very small grain continuum and prominent ionic lines. After that, we study the spectra of a more diversified sample - spiral, starburst, dwarf galaxies and HII regions - in order to plot the band ratios. The 6.2/11.3, 7.7/11.3 and 8.6/11.3 correlations are, for the first time, established on such a large sample. They show that dwarf galaxies occupy a particular region in this diagram, different than the one occupied by Galactic HII regions, inducing a different PAH structure - ionization, hydrogenation, size, etc. The second step of this project is the modelling of the spectral energy distributions of four dwarf galaxies (He 2-10, II Zw 40, NGC 1140, NG 1569), from ultraviolet to millimeter. In order to achieve this goal, I have added, to our own observations, data from the litterature. The modelling is done self-consistently, using constraints on dust emission, stellar radiation and on ionic lines. We synthesize the spectral energy distributions of these galaxies, as well as the corresponding extinction curves. The properties that we are able to outline are that: (i) the emission is dominated by

  12. Complex Organics from Laboratory Simulated Interstellar Ices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dworkin, J. P.

    2003-01-01

    Many of the volatiles in interstellar dense clouds exist in ices surrounding dust grains. The low temperatures of these ices (T < 50 K) preclude most chemical reactions, but photolysis can drive reactions that produce a suite of new species, many of which are complex organics. We study the UV and proton radiation processing of interstellar ice analogs to explore links between interstellar chemistry, the organics in comets and meteorites, and the origin of life on Earth. The high D/H ratios in some interstellar species, and the knowledge that many of the organics in primitive meteorites are D-enriched, suggest that such links are plausible. Once identified, these species may serve as markers of interstellar heritage of cometary dust and meteorites. Of particular interest are our findings that UV photolysis of interstellar ice analogs produce molecules of importance in current living organisms, including quinones, amphiphiles, and amino acids. Quinones are essential in vital metabolic roles such as electron transport. Studies show that quinones should be made wherever polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are photolyzed in interstellar ices. In the case of anthracene-containing ices, we have observed the production of 9-anthrone and 9,10 anthraquinone, both of which have been observed in the Murchison meteorite. Amphiphiles are also made when mixed molecular ices are photolyzed. These amphiphiles self-assemble into fluorescent vesicles when placed in liquid water, as do Murchison extracts. Both have the ability to trap an ionic dye. Photolysis of plausible ices can also produce alanine, serine, and glycine as well as a number of small alcohols and amines. Flash heating of the room temperature residue generated by such experiments generates mass spectral distributions similar to those of IDPs. The detection of high D/H ratios in some interstellar molecular species, and the knowledge that many of the organics, such as hydroxy and amino acids, in primitive meteorites are D

  13. On the origin of extinction in the Coma cluster of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rephaeli, Y.; Dwek, Eli; Mather, John C.

    1989-01-01

    Visual extinction of distant clusters seen through the Coma cluster seem to suggest that dust may be present in the hot x ray emitting intracluster gas. However, the Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) failed to detect any infrared emission from the cluster at the level expected from the extinction measurements. Researchers carried out a detailed analysis of the properties of intracluster dust in the context of a model which includes continuous injection of dust by the cluster galaxies, grain destruction by sputtering, and transient grain heating by the hot plasma. Computed infrared fluxes are in agreement with the upper limit obtained from the IRAS. The calculations, and the constraint implied by the IRAS observations, suggest that the intracluster dust must be significantly depleted compared to interstellar abundances. Researchers discuss possible explanations for the discrepancy between the observed visual extinction and the IRAS upper limit.

  14. Laboratory absorption spectra of molecules at interstellar cloud temperatures - First measurements on CO at about 97 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, P. L.; Yoshino, K.; Stark, G.; Ito, K.; Stevens, M. H.

    1991-01-01

    In the 91-100 nm spectral region, where absorption of photons by interstellar CO usually leads to dissociation, laboratory spectra obtained at 295 K show that most CO bands are both overlapped and perturbed. Reliable band oscillator strengths cannot be extracted from such spectra. As a consequence, synthetic extreme-ultraviolet absorption spectra for CO at the low temperatures that prevail in interstellar clouds are uncertain. A supersonic expansion technique has been used to cool CO to 30 K and three bands in the 97-nm region have been studied with high spectral resolution. The measured spectrum at 30 K is in reasonable agreement with some published modeled spectra, but the ratios of integrated cross sections are somewhat different from those determined from low resolution spectra obtained at 295 K, in which the bands are blended.

  15. Origins of interstellar and solar system: Carbonaceous materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feigelson, Eric D.

    1994-01-01

    Carbon is a crucial atom in cosmochemistry. It is well-established that carbon is synthesized in stellar interiors after the main sequence, is ejected by red giants as small carbonaceous grains during their 'carbon star' phase, resides in the interstellar medium, and was later incorporated into the solar system. The mechanisms of carbon grain formation and later chemical processing are complex because, with only small thermodynamic differences, carbon can take on a bewildering variety of forms: diamond; oxides; carbides; graphite; aliphatic hydrocarbons; polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH's); fullerenes; amorphous carbon; and other compounds. These are evidence for many of the forms of carbon found in astronomical observations. We seek to understand the possible astrophysical sites and conditions of the origins of different forms of carbon by combining state-of-the-art capabilities of carbon chemistry with astrophysical modeling. The work is a collaboration between Prof. Frenklach, a leading carbon materials scientist with both laboratory and computer modeling expertise and Prof. Feigelson, an astrophysicist with interests in star formation. The largest effort under this grant was devoted to developing this concept into a comprehensive quantitative model. In addition to explaining the astronomical properties of red giants producing carbonaceous grains, our model also can incorporate recent meteoritic findings. Finally, our induced nucleation grain formation model provides a natural explanation for the widespread presence of PAH emission bands in the Galactic interstellar medium. A brief synopsis of other activities sponsored under this grant and a list of publications from this grant is included.

  16. THE STRUCTURE, ORIGIN, AND EVOLUTION OF INTERSTELLAR HYDROCARBON GRAINS

    SciTech Connect

    Chiar, J. E.; Ricca, A.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Adamson, A. J. E-mail: Alessandra.Ricca@1.nasa.gov E-mail: aadamson@gemini.edu

    2013-06-10

    Many materials have been considered for the carrier of the hydrocarbon absorption bands observed in the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM). In order to refine the model for ISM hydrocarbon grains, we analyze the observed aromatic (3.28, 6.2 {mu}m) and aliphatic (3.4 {mu}m) hydrocarbon absorption features in the diffuse ISM along the line of sight toward the Galactic center Quintuplet Cluster. Observationally, sp {sup 2} bonds can be measured in astronomical spectra using the 6.2 {mu}m CC aromatic stretch feature, whereas the 3.4 {mu}m aliphatic feature can be used to quantify the fraction of sp {sup 3} bonds. The fractional abundance of these components allows us to place the Galactic diffuse ISM hydrocarbons on a ternary phase diagram. We conclude that the Galactic hydrocarbon dust has, on average, a low H/C ratio and sp {sup 3} content and is highly aromatic. We have placed the results of our analysis within the context of the evolution of carbon dust in the ISM. We argue that interstellar carbon dust consists of a large core of aromatic carbon surrounded by a thin mantle of hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H), a structure that is a natural consequence of the processing of stardust grains in the ISM.

  17. The prebiotic molecules observed in the interstellar gas

    PubMed Central

    Thaddeus, P

    2006-01-01

    Over 130 molecules have been identified in the interstellar gas and circumstellar shells, the largest among them is a carbon chain with 13 atoms and molecular weight of 147 (twice that of the simplest amino acid glycine). The high reliability of astronomical identifications, as well as the fairly accurate quantitative analysis which can often be achieved, is emphasized. Glycine itself has been claimed, but a recent analysis indicates that few, if any, of the astronomical radio lines attributed to glycine are actually from that molecule. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have long been proposed as the source of the unidentified infrared bands between 3 and 16 μm, but no single PAH has been identified in space, partly because PAHs generally have weak or non-existent radio spectra. A remarkable exception is the non-planar corannulene molecule (C20H10) that has a strong radio spectrum; in the rich molecular cloud TMC-1, it is found that less than 10−5 of the carbon is contained in this molecule, suggesting that PAHs are not the dominant large molecules in the interstellar gas, as has been claimed. Owing to inherent spectroscopic limitations, determining the structures of the large molecules in space may require capture of the dust grains, which are continually entering the outer Solar System. PMID:17008209

  18. The prebiotic molecules observed in the interstellar gas.

    PubMed

    Thaddeus, P

    2006-10-29

    Over 130 molecules have been identified in the interstellar gas and circumstellar shells, the largest among them is a carbon chain with 13 atoms and molecular weight of 147 (twice that of the simplest amino acid glycine). The high reliability of astronomical identifications, as well as the fairly accurate quantitative analysis which can often be achieved, is emphasized. Glycine itself has been claimed, but a recent analysis indicates that few, if any, of the astronomical radio lines attributed to glycine are actually from that molecule. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have long been proposed as the source of the unidentified infrared bands between 3 and 16 microm, but no single PAH has been identified in space, partly because PAHs generally have weak or non-existent radio spectra. A remarkable exception is the non-planar corannulene molecule (C20H10) that has a strong radio spectrum; in the rich molecular cloud TMC-1, it is found that less than 10-5 of the carbon is contained in this molecule, suggesting that PAHs are not the dominant large molecules in the interstellar gas, as has been claimed. Owing to inherent spectroscopic limitations, determining the structures of the large molecules in space may require capture of the dust grains, which are continually entering the outer Solar System. PMID:17008209

  19. A SENSITIVE SPECTRAL SURVEY OF INTERSTELLAR FEATURES IN THE NEAR-UV [3050-3700 Å

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatt, N. H.; Cami, J. E-mail: jcami@uwo.ca

    2015-02-01

    We present a comprehensive and sensitive unbiased survey of interstellar features in the near-UV range (3050-3700 Å). We combined a large number of VLT/UVES archival observations of a sample of highly reddened early-type stars—typical diffuse interstellar band targets—and unreddened standards. We stacked the individual observations to obtain a reddened ''superspectrum'' in the interstellar rest frame with a signal-to-noise ratio exceeding 1500. We compared this to the analogous geocentric and stellar rest frame superspectra as well as to an unreddened superspectrum to find interstellar absorption features. We find 30 known features (11 atomic and 19 molecular) and tentatively detect up to 7 new interstellar absorption lines of unknown origin. Our survey is sensitive to narrow and weak features; telluric residuals preclude us from detecting broader features. For each sightline, we measured fundamental parameters (radial velocities, line widths, and equivalent widths) of the detected interstellar features. We also revisit upper limits for the column densities of small, neutral polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules that have strong transitions in this wavelength range.

  20. Ecology: Dynamics of Indirect Extinction.

    PubMed

    Montoya, Jose M

    2015-12-01

    The experimental identification of the mechanism by which extinctions of predators trigger further predator extinctions emphasizes the role of indirect effects between species in disturbed ecosystems. It also has deep consequences for the hidden magnitude of the current biodiversity crisis. PMID:26654371

  1. Pleistocene extinctions: haunting the survivors.

    PubMed

    Hofreiter, Michael

    2007-08-01

    For many years, the megafaunal extinctions at the end of the Pleistocene have been assumed to have affected only those species that became extinct. However, recent analyses show that the surviving species may also have experienced losses in terms of genetic and ecological diversity. PMID:17686436

  2. Acoustic integrated extinction

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Andrew N.

    2015-01-01

    The integrated extinction (IE) is defined as the integral of the scattering cross section as a function of wavelength. Sohl et al. (2007 J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 122, 3206–3210. (doi:10.1121/1.2801546)) derived an IE expression for acoustic scattering that is causal, i.e. the scattered wavefront in the forward direction arrives later than the incident plane wave in the background medium. The IE formula was based on electromagnetic results, for which scattering is causal by default. Here, we derive a formula for the acoustic IE that is valid for causal and non-causal scattering. The general result is expressed as an integral of the time-dependent forward scattering function. The IE reduces to a finite integral for scatterers with zero long-wavelength monopole and dipole amplitudes. Implications for acoustic cloaking are discussed and a new metric is proposed for broadband acoustic transparency. PMID:27547100

  3. The mid-infrared extinction law in the darkest cores of the Pipe Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ascenso, J.; Lada, C. J.; Alves, J.; Román-Zúñiga, C. G.; Lombardi, M.

    2013-01-01

    Context. The properties of dust grains, in particular their size distribution, are expected to differ from the interstellar medium to the high-density regions within molecular clouds. Aims: We measure the mid-infrared extinction law produced by dense material in molecular cloud cores. Since the extinction at these wavelengths is caused by dust, the extinction law in cores should depart from what is found in low-density environments if the dust grains have different properties. Methods: We used the unbiased LINES method to measure the slope of the reddening vectors in color-color diagrams. We derived the mid-infrared extinction law toward the dense cores B59 and FeSt 1-457 in the Pipe Nebula over a range of visual extinction between 10 and 50 mag, using a combination of Spitzer/IRAC and ESO NTT/VLT data. Results: The mid-infrared extinction law in both cores departs significantly from a power law between 3.6 and 8 μm, suggesting that these cores contain dust with a considerable fraction of large dust grains. We find no evidence of any dependence in the extinction law with column density up to 50 mag of visual extinction in these cores, and no evidence of any variation between our result and those for other clouds at lower column densities reported elsewhere in the literature. This suggests either that large grains are present even in low column density regions or that the existing dust models need to be revised at mid-infrared wavelengths. We find a small but significant difference in the extinction law of the two cores, which we tentatively associate with the onset of star formation in B59. Based on observations made with ESO Telescopes at the La Silla Paranal Observatory under program IDs 62.I-0866, 65.I-0083, 67.C-0514, and 069.C-0426.

  4. Measuring Extinction with ALE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmer, Peter C.; McGraw, J. T.; Gimmestad, G. G.; Roberts, D.; Stewart, J.; Smith, J.; Fitch, J.

    2007-12-01

    ALE (Astronomical LIDAR for Extinction) is deployed at the University of New Mexico's (UNM) Campus Observatory in Albuquerque, NM. It has begun a year-long testing phase prior deployment at McDonald Observatory in support of the CCD/Transit Instrument II (CTI-II). ALE is designed to produce a high-precision measurement of atmospheric absorption and scattering above the observatory site every ten minutes of every moderately clear night. LIDAR (LIght Detection And Ranging) is the VIS/UV/IR analog of radar, using a laser, telescope and time-gated photodetector instead of a radio transmitter, dish and receiver. In the case of ALE -- an elastic backscatter LIDAR -- 20ns-long, eye-safe laser pulses are launched 2500 times per second from a 0.32m transmitting telescope co-mounted with a 50mm short-range receiver on an alt-az mounted 0.67m long-range receiver. Photons from the laser pulse are scattered and absorbed as the pulse propagates through the atmosphere, a portion of which are scattered into the field of view of the short- and long-range receiver telescopes and detected by a photomultiplier. The properties of a given volume of atmosphere along the LIDAR path are inferred from both the altitude-resolved backscatter signal as well as the attenuation of backscatter signal from altitudes above it. We present ALE profiles from the commissioning phase and demonstrate some of the astronomically interesting atmospheric information that can be gleaned from these data, including, but not limited to, total line-of-sight extinction. This project is funded by NSF Grant 0421087.

  5. Extinction of Harrington's mountain goat.

    PubMed

    Mead, J I; Martin, P S; Euler, R C; Long, A; Jull, A J; Toolin, L J; Donahue, D J; Linick, T W

    1986-02-01

    Keratinous horn sheaths of the extinct Harrington's mountain goat, Oreamnos harringtoni, were recovered at or near the surface of dry caves of the Grand Canyon, Arizona. Twenty-three separate specimens from two caves were dated nondestructively by the tandem accelerator mass spectrometer (TAMS). Both the TAMS and the conventional dates indicate that Harrington's mountain goat occupied the Grand Canyon for at least 19,000 years prior to becoming extinct by 11,160 +/- 125 radiocarbon years before present. The youngest average radiocarbon dates on Shasta ground sloths, Nothrotheriops shastensis, from the region are not significantly younger than those on extinct mountain goats. Rather than sequential extinction with Harrington's mountain goat disappearing from the Grand Canyon before the ground sloths, as one might predict in view of evidence of climatic warming at the time, the losses were concurrent. Both extinctions coincide with the regional arrival of Clovis hunters.

  6. Extinction of Harrington's mountain goat

    SciTech Connect

    Mead, J.I.; Martin, P.S.; Euler, R.C.; Long, A.; Jull, A.J.T.; Toolin, L.J.; Donahue, D.J.; Linick, T.W.

    1986-02-01

    Keratinous horn sheaths of the extinct Harrington's mountain goat, Oreamnos harringtoni, were recovered at or near the surface of dry caves of the Grand Canyon, Arizona. Twenty-three separate specimens from two caves were dated nondestructively by the tandem accelerator mass spectrometer (TAMS). Both the TAMS and the conventional dates indicate that Harrington's mountain goat occupied the Grand Canyon for at least 19,000 years prior to becoming extinct by 11,160 +/- 125 radiocarbon years before present. The youngest average radiocarbon dates on Shasta ground sloths, Nothrotheriops shastensis, from the region are not significantly younger than those on extinct mountain goats. Rather than sequential extinction with Harrington's mountain goat disappearing from the Grand Canyon before the ground sloths, as one might predict in view of evidence of climatic warming at the time, the losses were concurrent. Both extinctions coincide with the regional arrival of Clovis hunters.

  7. Extinction of Harrington's Mountain Goat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mead, Jim I.; Martin, Paul S.; Euler, Robert C.; Long, Austin; Jull, A. J. T.; Toolin, Laurence J.; Donahue, Douglas J.; Linick, T. W.

    1986-02-01

    Keratinous horn sheaths of the extinct Harrington's mountain goat, Oreamnos harringtoni, were recovered at or near the surface of dry caves of the Grand Canyon, Arizona. Twenty-three separate specimens from two caves were dated nondestructively by the tandem accelerator mass spectrometer (TAMS). Both the TAMS and the conventional dates indicate that Harrington's mountain goat occupied the Grand Canyon for at least 19,000 years prior to becoming extinct by 11,160 ± 125 radiocarbon years before present. The youngest average radiocarbon dates on Shasta ground sloths, Nothrotheriops shastensis, from the region are not significantly younger than those on extinct mountain goats. Rather than sequential extinction with Harrington's mountain goat disappearing from the Grand Canyon before the ground sloths, as one might predict in view of evidence of climatic warming at the time, the losses were concurrent. Both extinctions coincide with the regional arrival of Clovis hunters.

  8. Physical Dust Models for the Extinction toward Supernova 2014J in M82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jian; Jiang, B. W.; Li, Aigen; Li, Jun; Wang, Xiaofeng

    2015-07-01

    Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are powerful cosmological “standardizable candles” and the most precise distance indicators. However, a limiting factor in their use for precision cosmology rests on our ability to correct for the dust extinction toward them. SN 2014J in the starburst galaxy M82, the closest detected SN Ia in three decades, provides unparalleled opportunities to study the dust extinction toward an SN Ia. In order to derive the extinction as a function of wavelength, we model the color excesses toward SN 2014J, which are observationally derived over a wide wavelength range, in terms of dust models consisting of a mixture of silicate and graphite. The resulting extinction laws steeply, rise toward the far-ultraviolet, even steeper than that of the SMC. We infer a visual extinction of {A}V≈ 1.9 {mag}, a reddening of E(B-V)≈ 1.1 {mag}, and a total-to-selective extinction ratio of RV ≈ 1.7, consistent with that previously derived from photometric, spectroscopic, and polarimetric observations. The size distributions of the dust in the interstellar medium toward SN 2014J are skewed toward substantially smaller grains than that of the Milky Way and the SMC.

  9. USING M DWARF SPECTRA TO MAP EXTINCTION IN THE LOCAL GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, David O.; West, Andrew A.; Foster, Jonathan B.

    2011-08-15

    We use spectra of more than 56,000 M dwarfs from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) to create a high-latitude extinction map of the local Galaxy. Our technique compares spectra from the stars in the SDSS Data Release 7 M dwarf sample in low-extinction lines of sight, as determined by Schlegel et al., to other SDSS M dwarf spectra in order to derive improved distance estimates and accurate line-of-sight extinctions. Unlike most previous studies, which have used a two-color method to determine extinction, we fit extinction curves to fluxes across the spectral range from 5700 to 9200 A for every star in our sample. Our result is an A{sub V} map that extends from a few tens of pc to approximately 2 kpc away from the Sun. We also use a similar technique to create a map of R{sub V} values within approximately 1 kpc of the Sun and find that they are consistent with the widely accepted diffuse interstellar medium value of 3.1. Using our extinction data, we derive a dust scale height for the local Galaxy of 119 {+-} 15 pc and find evidence for a local dust cavity.

  10. Interstellar dust spectra between 2.5 and 3.3 microns - A search for hydrated silicates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knacke, R. F.; Mccorkle, S.; Puetter, R. C.; Erickson, E.

    1985-01-01

    Spectra in the 2.5-3.3 micron wavelength region of VI Cyg 12, AFGL 2205, and AFGL 2885 were obtained in a search for bound water, hydroxyl groups, and hydrated minerals in interstellar dust. No new absorption bands were found. Comparison of expected strengths of bands of serpentine and chlorite-like minerals with the data suggests that less than 25 percent and 50 percent, respectively, of the silicate in the grains is composed of these materials.

  11. The end-Permian mass extinction: A complex, multicausal extinction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erwin, D. H.

    1994-01-01

    The end-Permian mass extinction was the most extensive in the history of life and remains one of the most complex. Understanding its causes is particularly important because it anchors the putative 26-m.y. pattern of periodic extinction. However, there is no good evidence for an impact and this extinction appears to be more complex than others, involving at least three phases. The first began with the onset of a marine regression during the Late Permian and resulting elimination of most marine basins, reduction in habitat area, and increased climatic instability; the first pulse of tetrapod extinctions occurred in South Africa at this time. The second phase involved increased regression in many areas (although apparently not in South China) and heightened climatic instability and environmental degradation. Release of gas hydrates, oxidation of marine carbon, and the eruption of the Siberian flood basalts occurred during this phase. The final phase of the extinction episode began with the earliest Triassic marine regression and destruction of nearshore continental habitats. Some evidence suggests oceanic anoxia may have developed during the final phase of the extinction, although it appears to have been insufficient to the sole cause of the extinction.

  12. Organic chemistry and biology of the interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagan, C.

    1973-01-01

    Interstellar organic chemistry is discussed as the field of study emerging from the discovery of microwave lines of formaldehyde and of hydrogen cyanide in the interstellar medium. The reliability of molecular identifications and comparisons of interstellar and cometary compounds are considered, along with the degradational origin of simple organics. It is pointed out that the contribution of interstellar organic chemistry to problems in biology is not substantive but analogical. The interstellar medium reveals the operation of chemical processes which, on earth and perhaps on vast numbers of planets throughout the universe, led to the origin of life, but the actual molecules of the interstellar medium are unlikely to play any significant biological role.

  13. Summer School on Interstellar Processes: Abstracts of contributed papers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenbach, D. J. (Editor); Thronson, H. A., Jr. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    The Summer School on Interstellar Processes was held to discuss the current understanding of the interstellar medium and to analyze the basic physical processes underlying interstellar phenomena. Extended abstracts of the contributed papers given at the meeting are presented. Many of the papers concerned the local structure and kinematics of the interstellar medium and focused on such objects as star formation regions, molecular clouds, HII regions, reflection nebulae, planetary nebulae, supernova remnants, and shock waves. Other papers studied the galactic-scale structure of the interstellar medium either in the Milky Way or other galaxies. Some emphasis was given to observations of interstellar grains and

  14. Theoretical modeling of the infrared fluorescence from interstellar polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutte, W. A.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Allamandola, L. J.

    1993-01-01

    We have modeled the family of interstellar IR emission bands at 3.3, 6.2, 7.7, 8.6, 11.3, and 12.7 microns by calculating the fluorescence from a size distribution of interstellar polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) embedded in the radiation field of a hot star. It is found that the various emission bands are dominated by distinctly different PAHs, from molecules with much less than about 80 C atoms for the 3.3 micron feature, to molecules with 10 exp 2-10 exp 5 C atoms for the emission in the IRAS 12 and 25 micron bands. We quantitatively describe the influence on the emergent spectrum of various PAH properties such as the molecular structure, the amount of dehydrogenation, the intrinsic strength of the IR active modes, and the size distribution. Comparing our model results to the emission spectrum from the Orion Bar region, we conclude that interstellar PAHs are likely fully, or almost fully, hydrogenated. Moreover, it is found that the intrinsic strengths of the 6.2 and 7.7 micron C-C stretching modes, and the 8.6 micron C-H in-plane bending mode are 2-6 times larger than measured for neutral PAHs in the laboratory.

  15. Aspects of the interstellar medium in starburst galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fanelli, Michael N.

    1990-01-01

    Researchers are engaged in a multifaceted program to investigate the stellar content and star formation history of actively star-forming galaxies. A large body of stellar spectra have been examined to identify spectral features characteristic of specific stellar types. These spectral diagnostics are then calibrated in terms of temperature (spectral type), gravity (luminosity class) and metallicity. The spectral data is compiled into a stellar library whose members represent specific locations in the HR diagram. Through the use of population synthesis techniques, both optimizing and evolutionary approaches, the stellar luminosity function in composite populations can be determined by analysis of their integrated light. Researchers have concentrated on the ultraviolet wavelength region (lambda lambda 1200 to 3200), utilizing the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) archives supplemented by additional observations. In the optical, virtually all stars will contribute to the integrated light. In the ultraviolet however, cool stars will produce negligible flux due to their steep ultraviolet-to-visual continua, greatly simplifying the investigation of the hot component in a composite population. The researchers' initial stellar library has been applied to several blue compact galaxies, (BCGs), a class of starburst galaxy which is UV luminous. BCGs possess a complex interstellar medium which affects the emergent stellar continuum in several ways. This presents a challenge to the stellar analysis but affords insight into the properties of the gas and dust from which the massive OB stars have formed. The optimizing synthesis method solves for the stellar luminosity function and extinction simultaneously. This therefore provides an independent measure of the extinction affecting the hot population component. Despite the rise of the reddening law towards the ultraviolet, BCGs are found to be brighter in the ultraviolet than expected.

  16. Aspects of the interstellar medium in starburst galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanelli, Michael N.

    1990-07-01

    Researchers are engaged in a multifaceted program to investigate the stellar content and star formation history of actively star-forming galaxies. A large body of stellar spectra have been examined to identify spectral features characteristic of specific stellar types. These spectral diagnostics are then calibrated in terms of temperature (spectral type), gravity (luminosity class) and metallicity. The spectral data is compiled into a stellar library whose members represent specific locations in the HR diagram. Through the use of population synthesis techniques, both optimizing and evolutionary approaches, the stellar luminosity function in composite populations can be determined by analysis of their integrated light. Researchers have concentrated on the ultraviolet wavelength region (lambda lambda 1200 to 3200), utilizing the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) archives supplemented by additional observations. In the optical, virtually all stars will contribute to the integrated light. In the ultraviolet however, cool stars will produce negligible flux due to their steep ultraviolet-to-visual continua, greatly simplifying the investigation of the hot component in a composite population. The researchers' initial stellar library has been applied to several blue compact galaxies, (BCGs), a class of starburst galaxy which is UV luminous. BCGs possess a complex interstellar medium which affects the emergent stellar continuum in several ways. This presents a challenge to the stellar analysis but affords insight into the properties of the gas and dust from which the massive OB stars have formed. The optimizing synthesis method solves for the stellar luminosity function and extinction simultaneously. This therefore provides an independent measure of the extinction affecting the hot population component. Despite the rise of the reddening law towards the ultraviolet, BCGs are found to be brighter in the ultraviolet than expected.

  17. Spectral observations of diffuse FUV emission from the hot phase of the interstellar medium with DUVE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korpela, Eric John

    One of the keys to understanding the structure and distribution of interstellar matter in the galaxy is understanding the distribution of the low density hot (105 K-106 K) phase of the interstellar medium (ISM). Because of its low density and lack of easily observable tracers, this phase is much more difficult to observe than the cooler high density components of the ISM. Because gas of this temperature emits mainly in the far ultraviolet (912 A-1800 A), extreme ultraviolet (80 A-912 A), and (for gas hotter than 106 K) X-rays, observations in these bands can provide important constraints to the distribution of this gas. Because of interstellar opacity at EUV wavelengths, only FUV and X- ray observations can provide clues to the properties of hot gas outside the immediate solar neighborhood. I present results from a search for FUV emission from the diffuse ISM conducted with an orbital FUV spectrometer, DUVE, which was launched in July, 1992. The DUVE spectrometer, which covers the band from 950 A to 1080 A with 3.2 A resolution, observed a region of low neutral hydrogen column density near the south galactic pole for a total effective integration time of 1583 seconds. The only emission line detected was a geocoronal hydrogen line at 1026 A. I am able to place upper limits to several emission features that provide constraints to interstellar plasma parameters. I am also able to place limits to continuum emission throughout the bandpass. I compare these limits and other diffuse observations with several models of the structure of the interstellar medium and discuss the ramifications of these models.

  18. Spectral Observations of Diffuse FUV Emission from the Hot Phase of the Interstellar Medium with DUVE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korpela, Eric John

    One of the keys to understanding the structure and distribution of interstellar matter in the galaxy is understanding the distribution of the low density hot (105 K-106 K) phase of the interstellar medium (ISM). Because of its low density and lack of easily observable tracers, this phase is much more difficult to observe than the cooler high density components of the ISM. Because gas of this temperature emits mainly in the far ultraviolet (912 A-1800 A), extreme ultraviolet (80 A-912 A), and (for gas hotter than 106 K) X-rays, observations in these bands can provide important constraints to the distribution of this gas. Because of interstellar opacity at EUV wavelengths, only FUV and X-ray observations can provide clues to the properties of hot gas outside the immediate solar neighborhood. I present results from a search for FUV emission from the diffuse ISM conducted with an orbital FUV spectrometer, DUVE, which was launched in July, 1992. The DUVE spectrometer, which covers the band from 950 A to 1080 A with 3.2 A resolution, observed a region of low neutral hydrogen column density near the south galactic pole for a total effective integration time of 1583 seconds. The only emission line detected was a geocoronal hydrogen line at 1026 A. I am able to place upper limits to several emission features that provide constraints to interstellar plasma parameters. I am also able to place limits to continuum emission throughout the bandpass. I compare these limits and other diffuse observations with several models of the structure of the interstellar medium and discuss the ramifications of these models.

  19. Hydrocarbons on Saturns Satellites: Relationship to Interstellar Dust and the Solar Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruikshank, D. P.

    2012-01-01

    To understand the origin and evolution of our Solar System, and the basic components that led to life on Earth, we study interstellar and planetary spectroscopic signatures. The possible relationship of organic material detected in carbonaceous meteorites, interplanetary dust particles (IDPs), comets and the interstellar medium have been the source of speculation over the years as the composition and processes that governed the early solar nebula have been explored to understand the extent to which primitive material survived or became processed. The Cassini VIMS has provided new data relevant to this problem. Three of Saturn's satellites, Phoebe, Iapetus, and Hyperion, are found to have aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons on their surfaces. The aromatic hydrocarbon signature (C-H stretching mode at 3.28 micrometers) is proportionally significantly stronger (relative to the aliphatic bands) than that seen in other Solar System bodies (e.g., comets) and materials (Stardust samples, IDPs, meteorites) and the distinctive sub-features of the 3.4 micrometer aliphatic band (CH2 and CH3 groups) are reminiscent of those widely detected throughout the diffuse ISM. Phoebe may be a captured object that originated in the region beyond the present orbit of Neptune, where the solar nebula contained a large fraction of original interstellar ice and dust that was less processed than material closer to the Sun. Debris from Phoebe now resident on Iapetus and Hyperion, as well as o Phoebe itself, thus presents a unique blend of hydrocarbons, amenable to comparisons with interstellar hydrocarbons and other Solar System materials. The dust ring surrounding Saturn, in which Phoebe is embedded, probably originated from a collision with Phoebe. Dust ring particles are the likely source of the organic-bearing materials, and perhaps the recently identified small particles of Fe detected on Saturn's satellites. Lab measurements of the absolute band strengths of representative aliphatic and

  20. Excitation of interstellar hydrogen chloride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neufild, David A.; Green, Sheldon

    1994-01-01

    We have computed new rate coefficients for the collisional excitation of HCl by He, in the close-coupled formalism and using an interaction potential determined recently by Willey, Choong, & DeLucia. Results have been obtained for temperatures between 10 K and 300 K. With the use of the infinite order sudden approximation, we have derived approximate expressions of general applicability which may be used to estimate how the rate constant for a transition (J to J prime) is apportioned among the various hyperfine states F prime of the final state J prime. Using these new rate coefficients, we have obtained predictions for the HCl rotational line strengths expected from a dense clump of interstellar gas, as a function of the HCl fractional abundance. Over a wide range of HCl abundances, we have found that the line luminosities are proportional to abundance(exp 2/3), a general result which can be explained using a simple analytical approximation. Our model for the excitation of HCl within a dense molecular cloud core indicates that the J = 1 goes to 0 line strengths measured by Blake, Keene, & Phillips toward the Orion Molecular Cloud (OMC-1) imply a fractional abundance n(HCl)/n(H2) approximately 2 x 10(exp -9), a value which amounts to only approximately 0.3% of the cosmic abundance of chlorine nuclei. Given a fractional abundance of 2 x 10(exp -9), the contribution of HCl emission to the total radiative cooling of a dense clump is small. For Orion, we predict a flux approximately 10(exp -19) W/sq cm for the HCl J = 3 goes to 2 line near 159.8 micrometers, suggesting that the strength of this line could be measured using the Infrared Space Observatory.