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Sample records for interstellar hydrogen atom

  1. Hot hydrogen atoms reactions of interest in molecular evolution and interstellar chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, R. S.; Hong, K.; Hong, J. H.

    1974-01-01

    Hot hydrogen atoms which are photochemically generated initiate reactions among mixtures of methane, ethane, water and ammonia, to produce ethanol, organic amines, organic acids, and amino acids. Both ethanol and ethyl amine can also act as substrates for formation of amino acids. The one carbon substrate methane is sufficient as a carbon source to produce amino acids. Typical quantum yields for formation of amino acids are approximately 0.00002 to 0.00004. In one experiment, 6 protein amino acids were identified and 8 nonprotein amino acids verified utilizing gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. We propose that hot atoms, especially hydrogen, initiate reactions in the thermodynamic nonequilibrium environment of interstellar space as well as in the atmospheres of planets.

  2. Hot hydrogen atoms reactions of interest in molecular evolution and interstellar chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, R. S.; Hong, K.; Hong, J. H.

    1974-01-01

    Hot hydrogen atoms which are photochemically generated initiate reactions among mixtures of methane, ethane, water and ammonia, to produce ethanol, organic amines, organic acids, and amino acids. Both ethanol and ethyl amine can also act as substrates for formation of amino acids. The one carbon substrate methane is sufficient as a carbon source to produce amino acids. Typical quantum yields for formation of amino acids are approximately 0.00002 to 0.00004. In one experiment, 6 protein amino acids were identified and 8 nonprotein amino acids verified utilizing gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. We propose that hot atoms, especially hydrogen, initiate reactions in the thermodynamic nonequilibrium environment of interstellar space as well as in the atmospheres of planets.

  3. Hot hydrogen atoms - Initiators of reactions of interest in interstellar chemistry and evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, K.-Y.; Hong, J.-H.; Becker, R. S.

    1974-01-01

    Hot hydrogen atoms possess kinetic (or translational) energy in excess of that to be expected if the atoms were in thermal equilibrium with the surroundings. In the investigation reported the hot hydrogen atoms were generated by the photolysis of donor molecules. The light sources for the photolysis were 1000-watt xenon or 500-watt mercury lamps combined with a filter system. The experiments show that hot hydrogen atoms can initiate reactions among simple molecules to produce biomolecules of significance.

  4. Hot hydrogen atoms - Initiators of reactions of interest in interstellar chemistry and evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, K.-Y.; Hong, J.-H.; Becker, R. S.

    1974-01-01

    Hot hydrogen atoms possess kinetic (or translational) energy in excess of that to be expected if the atoms were in thermal equilibrium with the surroundings. In the investigation reported the hot hydrogen atoms were generated by the photolysis of donor molecules. The light sources for the photolysis were 1000-watt xenon or 500-watt mercury lamps combined with a filter system. The experiments show that hot hydrogen atoms can initiate reactions among simple molecules to produce biomolecules of significance.

  5. Interstellar hydrogen sulfide.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thaddeus, P.; Kutner, M. L.; Penzias, A. A.; Wilson, R. W.; Jefferts, K. B.

    1972-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide has been detected in seven Galactic sources by observation of a single line corresponding to the rotational transition from the 1(sub 10) to the 1(sub 01) levels at 168.7 GHz. The observations show that hydrogen sulfide is only a moderately common interstellar molecule comparable in abundance to H2CO and CS, but somewhat less abundant than HCN and much less abundant than CO.

  6. Interstellar hydrogen sulfide.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thaddeus, P.; Kutner, M. L.; Penzias, A. A.; Wilson, R. W.; Jefferts, K. B.

    1972-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide has been detected in seven Galactic sources by observation of a single line corresponding to the rotational transition from the 1(sub 10) to the 1(sub 01) levels at 168.7 GHz. The observations show that hydrogen sulfide is only a moderately common interstellar molecule comparable in abundance to H2CO and CS, but somewhat less abundant than HCN and much less abundant than CO.

  7. Adsorption and recombination of hydrogen atoms on a model graphite surface. [in interstellar space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aronowitz, S.; Chang, S.

    1985-01-01

    The adsorption and recombination of atomic hydrogen on a model graphite grain have been examined in a series of calculations in which a modified, iterative, extended Hueckel program was used. The hydrogen atom is found to be chemisorbed at a site with a zero-point binding energy of 0.7 eV and at an equilibrium distance of 2.25 A above the site. Despite a barrier of about 0.4 eV between adjacent sites, calculations suggest that at temperatures as low as 10 K, an H atom will tunnel through to adjacent sites in less than one nanosecond. However, a potential barrier to the recombination of two hydrogen atoms has been found which displays high sensitivity to the mutual arrangement of the two hydrogen atoms with respect to the graphite surface. Results show that at very low temperatures, recombinations can occur only by tunneling. Consistent with experiment, the region in which H2 begins to form exhibits a repulsive potential with respect to possible chemisorption of the incipient H2 entity.

  8. Components in interstellar molecular hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spitzer, L., Jr.; Morton, W. A.

    1976-01-01

    Results are reported for precise spectrophotometric measurements of the profiles of selected Lyman absorption lines produced by hydrogen molecules in various rotational levels along the line of sight to 13 stars which have shown some evidence for an increase in line width with increasing rotational quantum number (J). The line profiles were measured by multiple scans with the Copernicus satellite telescope. Based on analysis of the radial velocities, derivations of the column densities, and line-profile fitting, the following conclusions are made: (1) the increase in interstellar H2 line width with increasing J results from the presence of the most shortward component, which is relatively weak at low J but becomes more important at higher J; (2) the relative column densities found for the different J levels in each component may be fitted by a theoretical model in which rotational excitation is due to absorption of UV photons followed by radiative quadrupole spontaneous transitions or collisionally induced downward transitions between different J levels; (3) the atomic hydrogen density is between 300 and 1000 per cu cm in the most shortward component for each of three stars; (4) the approaching gas which produces each shortward component must be in the form of thin sheets; and (5) the sheets are the compressed gas behind a shock front moving through the interstellar medium.

  9. Discovery of Interstellar Hydrogen Fluoride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neufeld, David A.; Zmuidzinas, Jonas; Schilke, Peter; Phillips, Thomas G.

    1997-01-01

    We report the first detection of interstellar hydrogen fluoride. Using the Long Wavelength Spectrometer of the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO), we have detected the 121.6973 micron J = 2-1 line of HF in absorption toward the far-infrared continuum source Sagittarius B2. The detection is statistically significant at the 13 sigma level. On the basis of our model for the excitation of HF in Sgr B2, the observed line equivalent width of 1.0 nm implies a hydrogen fluoride abundance of about 3 x 10 (exp -10) relative to H, If the elemental abundance of fluorine in Sgr B2 is the same as that in the solar system, then HF accounts for about 2% of the total number of fluorine nuclei. We expect hydrogen fluoride to be the dominant reservoir of gas-phase fluorine in Sgr B2, because it is formed rapidly in exothermic reactions of atomic fluorine with either water or molecular hydrogen; thus, the measured HF abundance suggests a substantial depletion of fluorine onto dust grains. Similar conclusions regarding depletion have previously been reached for the case of chlorine in dense interstellar clouds. We also find evidence at a lower level of statistical significance (about 5 sigma) for an emission feature at the expected position of the 4(sub 32)-4(sub 23) 121.7219 micron line of water. The emission-line equivalent width of 0.5 mm for the water feature is consistent with the water abundance of 5 x 10(exp -6) relative to H, that has been inferred previously from observations of the hot core of Sgr B2.

  10. Discovery of Interstellar Hydrogen Fluoride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neufeld, David A.; Zmuidzinas, Jonas; Schilke, Peter; Phillips, Thomas G.

    1997-01-01

    We report the first detection of interstellar hydrogen fluoride. Using the Long Wavelength Spectrometer of the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO), we have detected the 121.6973 micron J = 2-1 line of HF in absorption toward the far-infrared continuum source Sagittarius B2. The detection is statistically significant at the 13 sigma level. On the basis of our model for the excitation of HF in Sgr B2, the observed line equivalent width of 1.0 nm implies a hydrogen fluoride abundance of approximately 3 x 10(exp -10) relative to H2. If the elemental abundance of fluorine in Sgr B2 is the same as that in the solar system, then HF accounts for approximately 2% of the total number of fluorine nuclei. We expect hydrogen fluoride to be the dominant reservoir of gas-phase fluorine in Sgr B2, because it is formed rapidly in exothermic reactions of atomic fluorine with either water or molecular hydrogen; thus, the measured HF abundance suggests a substantial depletion of fluorine onto dust grains. Similar conclusions regarding depletion have previously been reached for the case of chlorine in dense interstellar clouds. We also find evidence at a lower level of statistical significance (approximately 5 sigma) for an emission feature at the expected position of the 4(sub 32)-4(sub 23) 121.7219 micron line of water. The emission-line equivalent width of 0.5 nm for the water feature is consistent with the water abundance of 5 x 10(exp -6) relative to H2 that has been inferred previously from observations of the hot core of Sgr B2.

  11. Discovery of Interstellar Hydrogen Fluoride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neufeld, David A.; Zmuidzinas, Jonas; Schilke, Peter; Phillips, Thomas G.

    1997-01-01

    We report the first detection of interstellar hydrogen fluoride. Using the Long Wavelength Spectrometer of the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO), we have detected the 121.6973 micron J = 2-1 line of HF in absorption toward the far-infrared continuum source Sagittarius B2. The detection is statistically significant at the 13 sigma level. On the basis of our model for the excitation of HF in Sgr B2, the observed line equivalent width of 1.0 nm implies a hydrogen fluoride abundance of approximately 3 x 10(exp -10) relative to H2. If the elemental abundance of fluorine in Sgr B2 is the same as that in the solar system, then HF accounts for approximately 2% of the total number of fluorine nuclei. We expect hydrogen fluoride to be the dominant reservoir of gas-phase fluorine in Sgr B2, because it is formed rapidly in exothermic reactions of atomic fluorine with either water or molecular hydrogen; thus, the measured HF abundance suggests a substantial depletion of fluorine onto dust grains. Similar conclusions regarding depletion have previously been reached for the case of chlorine in dense interstellar clouds. We also find evidence at a lower level of statistical significance (approximately 5 sigma) for an emission feature at the expected position of the 4(sub 32)-4(sub 23) 121.7219 micron line of water. The emission-line equivalent width of 0.5 nm for the water feature is consistent with the water abundance of 5 x 10(exp -6) relative to H2 that has been inferred previously from observations of the hot core of Sgr B2.

  12. Discovery of Interstellar Hydrogen Fluoride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neufeld, David A.; Zmuidzinas, Jonas; Schilke, Peter; Phillips, Thomas G.

    1997-01-01

    We report the first detection of interstellar hydrogen fluoride. Using the Long Wavelength Spectrometer of the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO), we have detected the 121.6973 micron J = 2-1 line of HF in absorption toward the far-infrared continuum source Sagittarius B2. The detection is statistically significant at the 13 sigma level. On the basis of our model for the excitation of HF in Sgr B2, the observed line equivalent width of 1.0 nm implies a hydrogen fluoride abundance of about 3 x 10 (exp -10) relative to H, If the elemental abundance of fluorine in Sgr B2 is the same as that in the solar system, then HF accounts for about 2% of the total number of fluorine nuclei. We expect hydrogen fluoride to be the dominant reservoir of gas-phase fluorine in Sgr B2, because it is formed rapidly in exothermic reactions of atomic fluorine with either water or molecular hydrogen; thus, the measured HF abundance suggests a substantial depletion of fluorine onto dust grains. Similar conclusions regarding depletion have previously been reached for the case of chlorine in dense interstellar clouds. We also find evidence at a lower level of statistical significance (about 5 sigma) for an emission feature at the expected position of the 4(sub 32)-4(sub 23) 121.7219 micron line of water. The emission-line equivalent width of 0.5 mm for the water feature is consistent with the water abundance of 5 x 10(exp -6) relative to H, that has been inferred previously from observations of the hot core of Sgr B2.

  13. The hydrogen coverage of interstellar PAHs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Allamandola, L. J.; Barker, J. R.; Cohen, M.

    1987-01-01

    The rate at which the CH bond in interstellar Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) rupture due to the absorption of a UV photon has been calculated. The results show that small PAHs (less than or equal to 25 carbon atoms) are expected to be partially dehydrogenated in regions with intense UV fields, while large PAHs (greater than or equal to 25 atoms) are expected to be completely hydrogenated in those regions. Because estimate of the carbon content of interstellar PAHs lie in the range of 20 to 25 carbon atoms, dehydrogenation is probably not very important. Because of the absence of other emission features besides the 11.3 micrometer feature in ground-based 8 to 13 micrometer spectra, it has been suggested that interstellar PAHs are partially dehydrogenated. However, IRAS 8 to 22 micrometer spectra of most sources that show strong 7.7 and 11.2 micrometer emission features also show a plateau of emission extending from about 11.3 to 14 micrometer. Like the 11.3 micrometer feature, this new feature is attributed to the CH out of plane bending mode in PAHs. This new feature shows that interstellar PAHs are not as dehydrogenated as estimated from ground-based 8 to 13 micrometer spectra. It also constrains the molecular structure of interstellar PAHs. In particular, it seems that very condensed PAHs, such as coronene and circumcoronene, dominate the interstellar PAH mixture as expected from stability arguments.

  14. The hydrogen coverage of interstellar PAHs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, J. R.; Cohen, M.; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.; Allamandola, Louis J.; Barker, J. R.; Barker, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    The rate at which the CH bond in interstellar Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) rupture due to the absorption of a UV photon has been calculated. The results show that small PAHs (less than or equal to 25 carbon atoms) are expected to be partially dehydrogenated in regions with intense UV fields, while large PAHs (greater than or equal to 25 atoms) are expected to be completely hydrogenated in those regions. Because estimate of the carbon content of interstellar PAHs lie in the range of 20 to 25 carbon atoms, dehydrogenation is probably not very important. Because of the absence of other emission features besides the 11.3 micrometer feature in ground-based 8 to 13 micrometer spectra, it has been suggested that interstellar PAHs are partially dehydrogenated. However, IRAS 8 to 22 micrometer spectra of most sources that show strong 7.7 and 11.2 micrometer emission features also show a plateau of emission extending from about 11.3 to 14 micrometer. Like the 11.3 micrometer feature, this new feature is attributed to the CH out of plane bending mode in PAHs. This new feature shows that interstellar PAHs are not as dehydrogenated as estimated from ground-based 8 to 13 micrometer spectra. It also constrains the molecular structure of interstellar PAHs. In particular, it seems that very condensed PAHs, such as coronene and circumcoronene, dominate the interstellar PAH mixture as expected from stability arguments.

  15. Low-temperature surface formation of NH3 and HNCO: hydrogenation of nitrogen atoms in CO-rich interstellar ice analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedoseev, G.; Ioppolo, S.; Zhao, D.; Lamberts, T.; Linnartz, H.

    2015-01-01

    Solid-state astrochemical reaction pathways have the potential to link the formation of small nitrogen-bearing species, like NH3 and HNCO, and prebiotic molecules, specifically amino acids. To date, the chemical origin of such small nitrogen-containing species is still not well understood, despite the fact that ammonia is an abundant constituent of interstellar ices towards young stellar objects and quiescent molecular clouds. This is mainly because of the lack of dedicated laboratory studies. The aim of this work is to experimentally investigate the formation routes of NH3 and HNCO through non-energetic surface reactions in interstellar ice analogues under fully controlled laboratory conditions and at astrochemically relevant temperatures. This study focuses on the formation of NH3 and HNCO in CO-rich (non-polar) interstellar ices that simulate the CO freeze-out stage in dark interstellar cloud regions, well before thermal and energetic processing start to become relevant. We demonstrate and discuss the surface formation of solid HNCO through the interaction of CO molecules with NH radicals - one of the intermediates in the formation of solid NH3 upon sequential hydrogenation of N atoms. The importance of HNCO for astrobiology is discussed.

  16. Ionization of Interstellar Hydrogen Beyond the Termination Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruntman, Mike

    2016-11-01

    Models of solar wind interaction with the surrounding interstellar medium usually disregard ionization of interstellar hydrogen atoms beyond the solar wind termination shock. If and when included, the effects of ionization in the heliospheric interface region are often obscured by complexities of the interaction. This work assesses the importance of interstellar hydrogen ionization in the heliosheath. Photoionization could be accounted for in a straightforward way. In contrast, electron impact ionization is largely unknown because of poorly understood energy transfer to electrons at the termination shock and beyond. We first estimate the effect of photoionization and then use it as a yardstick to assess the role of electron impact ionization. The physical estimates show that ionization of interstellar hydrogen may lead to significant mass loading in the inner heliosheath which would slow down plasma flowing toward the heliotail and deplete populations of nonthermal protons, with the corresponding effect on heliospheric fluxes of energetic neutral atoms.

  17. Interstellar Hydrogen Gas Entering the Heliosphere: Four Years of IBEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saul, Lukas; Wurz, Peter

    2012-07-01

    Interstellar neutral gas enters the heliosphere unimpeded by solar wind and heliopause magnetic fields. Observations of this gas have determined the relative motion of our sun and the interstellar medium as well as properties of this medium. We report here on direct observations of interstellar neutral Hydrogen by NASA's IBEX satellite over four years of operation. The observed flux at 1AU is not constant but varies due to solar variability which affects the ionization rate and the radiation pressure. Further, the direction of the H flux is offset from other species. We explain these observations in the context of low energy neutral atom sensors developed at the University of Bern in Switzerland.

  18. Molecular hydrogen in interstellar dark clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, M.; Robinson, G. W.

    1976-01-01

    A simplified H2 formation mechanism is proposed in which small interstellar grains furnish the reaction sites. This mechanism results in a maximum value for the rate constant of about 2 by 10 to the -18th power per cu cm/sec for dark clouds at 10 K. Also, the nascent molecules are ejected in excited states, in qualitative agreement with Copernicus observations. A time-dependent treatment of the chemical evolution of a dark cloud with little or no ionizing radiation shows that the clouds require more than 10 million years to achieve chemical equilibrium. The observed residual atomic hydrogen in several dark clouds suggests that the clouds are 1 to 10 million years old. Other consequences of the temporal cloud model are in accord with astronomical observations.

  19. SOLAR RADIATION PRESSURE AND LOCAL INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM FLOW PARAMETERS FROM INTERSTELLAR BOUNDARY EXPLORER LOW ENERGY HYDROGEN MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Schwadron, N. A.; Moebius, E.; Kucharek, H.; Lee, M. A.; French, J.; Saul, L.; Wurz, P.; Bzowski, M.; Fuselier, S. A.; Livadiotis, G.; McComas, D. J.; Frisch, P.; Gruntman, M.; Mueller, H. R.

    2013-10-01

    Neutral hydrogen atoms that travel into the heliosphere from the local interstellar medium (LISM) experience strong effects due to charge exchange and radiation pressure from resonant absorption and re-emission of Lyα. The radiation pressure roughly compensates for the solar gravity. As a result, interstellar hydrogen atoms move along trajectories that are quite different than those of heavier interstellar species such as helium and oxygen, which experience relatively weak radiation pressure. Charge exchange leads to the loss of primary neutrals from the LISM and the addition of new secondary neutrals from the heliosheath. IBEX observations show clear effects of radiation pressure in a large longitudinal shift in the peak of interstellar hydrogen compared with that of interstellar helium. Here, we compare results from the Lee et al. interstellar neutral model with IBEX-Lo hydrogen observations to describe the distribution of hydrogen near 1 AU and provide new estimates of the solar radiation pressure. We find over the period analyzed from 2009 to 2011 that radiation pressure divided by the gravitational force (μ) has increased slightly from μ = 0.94 ± 0.04 in 2009 to μ = 1.01 ± 0.05 in 2011. We have also derived the speed, temperature, source longitude, and latitude of the neutral H atoms and find that these parameters are roughly consistent with those of interstellar He, particularly when considering the filtration effects that act on H in the outer heliosheath. Thus, our analysis shows that over the period from 2009 to 2011, we observe signatures of neutral H consistent with the primary distribution of atoms from the LISM and a radiation pressure that increases in the early rise of solar activity.

  20. HYDROGEN ATOM THERMAL PARAMETERS.

    PubMed

    JENSEN, L H; SUNDARALINGAM, M

    1964-09-11

    Isotropic hydrogen atom thermal parameters for N,N'- hexamethylenebispropionamide have been determined. They show a definite trend and vary from approximately the same as the mean thermal parameters for atoms other than hydrogen near the center of the molecule to appreciably greater for atoms near the end. The indicated trend for this compound, along with other results, provides the basis for a possible explanation of the anomolous values that have been obtained for hydrogen atom thermal parameters.

  1. Excitation of interstellar hydrogen chloride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neufild, David A.; Green, Sheldon

    1994-01-01

    We have computed new rate coefficients for the collisional excitation of HCl by He, in the close-coupled formalism and using an interaction potential determined recently by Willey, Choong, & DeLucia. Results have been obtained for temperatures between 10 K and 300 K. With the use of the infinite order sudden approximation, we have derived approximate expressions of general applicability which may be used to estimate how the rate constant for a transition (J to J prime) is apportioned among the various hyperfine states F prime of the final state J prime. Using these new rate coefficients, we have obtained predictions for the HCl rotational line strengths expected from a dense clump of interstellar gas, as a function of the HCl fractional abundance. Over a wide range of HCl abundances, we have found that the line luminosities are proportional to abundance(exp 2/3), a general result which can be explained using a simple analytical approximation. Our model for the excitation of HCl within a dense molecular cloud core indicates that the J = 1 goes to 0 line strengths measured by Blake, Keene, & Phillips toward the Orion Molecular Cloud (OMC-1) imply a fractional abundance n(HCl)/n(H2) approximately 2 x 10(exp -9), a value which amounts to only approximately 0.3% of the cosmic abundance of chlorine nuclei. Given a fractional abundance of 2 x 10(exp -9), the contribution of HCl emission to the total radiative cooling of a dense clump is small. For Orion, we predict a flux approximately 10(exp -19) W/sq cm for the HCl J = 3 goes to 2 line near 159.8 micrometers, suggesting that the strength of this line could be measured using the Infrared Space Observatory.

  2. LOCAL INTERSTELLAR NEUTRAL HYDROGEN SAMPLED IN SITU BY IBEX

    SciTech Connect

    Saul, Lukas; Wurz, Peter; Rodriguez, Diego; Scheer, Juergen; Moebius, Eberhard; Schwadron, Nathan; Kucharek, Harald; Leonard, Trevor; Bzowski, Maciej; Fuselier, Stephen; Crew, Geoff; McComas, Dave

    2012-02-01

    Hydrogen gas is the dominant component of the local interstellar medium. However, owing to ionization and interaction with the heliosphere, direct sampling of neutral hydrogen in the inner heliosphere is more difficult than sampling the local interstellar neutral helium, which penetrates deep into the heliosphere. In this paper, we report on the first detailed analysis of the direct sampling of neutral hydrogen from the local interstellar medium. We confirm that the arrival direction of hydrogen is offset from that of the local helium component. We further report the discovery of a variation of the penetrating hydrogen over the first two years of Interstellar Boundary Explorer observations. Observations are consistent with hydrogen experiencing an effective ratio of outward solar radiation pressure to inward gravitational force greater than unity ({mu} > 1); the temporal change observed in the local interstellar hydrogen flux can be explained with solar variability.

  3. Interstellar H_3^+: Herzberg and Hydrogenic Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, Takeshi

    2000-06-01

    Gerhard Herzberg was fascinated by the physics of hydrogen throughout his life (1,2) and studied spectra of a variety of hydrogenic species including H, H^-, H_2, H2 ^+ and H_3^+. He was the first to advocate the importance of spectroscopy of H_3^+, both from astronomical and chemical points of view. I shall talk on how his idea and enthusiasm have been succeeded by the younger generation and led to the detection of the laboratory spectrum of H_3^+, as well as to the detection of H_3^+ in astronomical objects such as planetary ionospheres, molecular clouds, and the diffuse interstellar medium. 1. G. Herzberg, Trans. R. Soc. Can. 5: 3 (1967). 2. G. Herzberg, Trans. R. Soc. Can. 20: 151 (1982).

  4. Atomic hydrogen rocket engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etters, R. D.; Flurchick, K.

    1981-01-01

    A rocket using atomic hydrogen propellant is discussed. An essential feature of the proposed engine is that the atomic hydrogen fuel is used as it is produced, thus eliminating the necessity of storage. The atomic hydrogen flows into a combustion chamber and recombines, producing high velocity molecular hydrogen which flows out an exhaust port. Standard thermodynamics, kinetic theory and wall recombination cross-sections are used to predict a thrust of approximately 1.4 N for a RF hydrogen flow rate of 4 x 10 to the 22nd/sec. Specific impulses are nominally from 1000 to 2000 sec. It is predicted that thrusts on the order of one Newton and specific impulses of up to 2200 sec are attainable with nominal RF discharge fluxes on the order of 10 to the 22nd atoms/sec; further refinements will probably not alter these predictions by more than a factor of two.

  5. Hot hydrogen in prebiological and interstellar chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagan, C.

    1975-01-01

    Two articles discuss the recent experimental work of Hong et al. on the production of amino acids and gas-phase organic compounds from the ultraviolet irradiation of simple gases, with hot hydrogen atoms used as the principal energy conversion agent. The reaction possibilities involving frozen ices are mentioned in both articles, as well as the significance of three-body collisions in this situation.

  6. Metastability of isoformyl ions in collisions with helium and hydrogen. [in interstellar molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, S.

    1984-01-01

    The stability of HOC(+) ions under conditions in interstellar molecular clouds is considered. In particular, the possibility that collisions with helium or hydrogen will induce isomerization to the stable HCO(+) form is examined theoretically. Portions of the electronic potential energy surfaces for interaction with He and H atoms are obtained from standard quantum mechanical calculations. Collisions with He atoms are found to be totally ineffective for inducing isomerization. Collisions with H atoms are found to be ineffective at low interstellar temperatures owing to a small (about 500 K) barrier in the entrance channel; at higher temperatures where this barrier can be overcome, however, collisions with hydrogen atoms do result in conversion to the stable HCO(+) form. Although detailed calculations are not presented, it is argued that low-energy collisions with H2 molecules are also ineffective in destroying the metastable ion.

  7. Dust clouds in Orion and the interstellar neutral hydrogen distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bystrova, N. V.

    1989-01-01

    According to published examples of the far IR observations in the Orion and its surroundings, several well defined dust clouds of different sizes and structure are present. For comparison of these clouds with the neutral hydrogen distribution on the area of approx. 1000 sq degs, the data from Pulkovo Sky Survey in the interstellar neutral Hydrogen Radio Line as well as special observations with the RATAN-600 telescope in 21 cm line were used. From the materials of Pulkovo HI Survey, the data were taken near the line emission at ten velocities between -21.8 and +25.6 km/s LSR for the structural component of the interstellar hydrogen emission. The results given concern mainly the Orion's Great Dust Cloud and the Lambda Orionis region where the information about the situation with the dust and interstellar hydrogen is very essential for interpretation.

  8. Deflection of the Interstellar Neutral Hydrogen Flow Across the Heliospheric Interface: an Interstellar Magnetic Compass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lallement, R.; Eric, Q.; Jean-Loup, B.; Dimitra, K.; Risto, P.

    2005-05-01

    Analyses of SOHO-SWAN observations show that the interstellar neutral H flow direction differs by about 4 degrees from the neutral He flow direction recently derived with an unprecedented accuracy using combined data sets (Mobius et al, 2004). The most likely explanation is a distortion of the heliospheric interface under the action of an inclined interstellar magnetic field, with imprints of the distorsion on the neutral H flow due to charge-transfer reactions between H atoms and ions. The direction of the ambient interstellar magnetic field and the heliospheric shape can be derived from the observed deviation. Implications for Voyager trajectories are discussed.

  9. Vacuum ultraviolet photolysis of hydrogenated amorphous carbons . I. Interstellar H2 and CH4 formation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alata, I.; Cruz-Diaz, G. A.; Muñoz Caro, G. M.; Dartois, E.

    2014-09-01

    Context. The interstellar hydrogenated amorphous carbons (HAC or a-C:H) observed in the diffuse medium are expected to disappear in a few million years, according to the destruction time scale from laboratory measurements. The existence of a-C:H results from the equilibrium between photodesorption, radiolysis, hydrogenation and resilience of the carbonaceous network. During this processing, many species are therefore injected into the gas phase, in particular H2, but also small organic molecules, radicals or fragments. Aims: We perform experiments on interstellar a-C:H analogs to quantify the release of these species in the interstellar medium. Methods: The vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photolysis of interstellar hydrogenated amorphous carbon analogs was performed at low (10 K) to ambient temperature, coupled to mass-spectrometry detection and temperature-programed desorption. Using deuterium isotopic substitution, the species produced were unambiguously separated from background contributions. Results: The VUV photolysis of hydrogenated amorphous carbons leads to the efficient production of H2 molecules, but also to small hydrocarbons. Conclusions: These species are formed predominantly in the bulk of the a-C:H analog carbonaceous network, in addition to the surface formation. Compared with species made by the recombination of H atoms and physisorbed on surfaces, they diffuse out at higher temperatures. In addition to the efficient production rate, it provides a significant formation route in environments where the short residence time scale for H atoms inhibits H2 formation on the surface, such as PDRs. The photolytic bulk production of H2 with carbonaceous hydrogenated amorphous carbon dust grains can provide a very large portion of the contribution to the H2 molecule formation. These dust grains also release small hydrocarbons (such as CH4) into the diffuse interstellar medium, which contribute to the formation of small carbonaceous radicals after being dissociated

  10. Charge transfer reactions in multiply charged ion-atom collisions. [in interstellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steigman, G.

    1975-01-01

    Charge-transfer reactions in collisions between highly charged ions and neutral atoms of hydrogen and/or helium may be rapid at thermal energies. If these reactions are rapid, they will suppress highly charged ions in H I regions and guarantee that the observed absorption features from such ions cannot originate in the interstellar gas. A discussion of such charge-transfer reactions is presented and compared with the available experimental data. The possible implications of these reactions for observations of the interstellar medium, H II regions, and planetary nebulae are outlined.

  11. Observations of interstellar hydrogen and deuterium toward Alpha Centauri A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landsman, W. B.; Henry, R. C.; Moos, H. W.; Linsky, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    A composite profile is presented of the Ly-alpha emission line of Alpha Cen A, obtained from 10 individual spectra with the high-resolution spectrograph aboard the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) satellite. There is excellent overall agreement with two previous Copernicus observations. Interstellar deuterium is detected, and a lower limit is set on the deuterium to hydrogen ratio of nDI/nHI greater than 8 x 10 to the -6th. In addition, the deuterium bulk velocity appears blueshifted by 8 + or - 2 km/s with respect to interstellar hydrogen, suggesting a nonuniform medium along the line of sight.

  12. Properties of nearby interstellar hydrogen deduced from Lyman-alpha sky background measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, G. E.

    1972-01-01

    For a sufficiently rapid relative motion of the solar system and the nearby interstellar gas, neutral atoms may be expected to penetrate the heliosphere before becoming ionized. Recent satellite measurements of the Lyman alpha emission above the geocorona indicate such an interstellar wind of neutral hydrogen emerging from the direction of Sagittarius and reaching to within a few astronomical units of the sun. A detailed model of the scattering of solar Lyman alpha from the spatial distribution of neutral hydrogen in interplanetary space is presented. This asymmetric distribution is established by solar wind and solar ultraviolet ionization processes along the trajectories of the incoming hydrogen atoms. The values of the interstellar density, the relative velocity, and the gas temperature are adjusted to agree with the Lyman alpha measurements. The results may be interpreted in terms of two models, the cold model and the hot model of the interstellar gas, depending on whether galactic Lyman alpha emission is present at its maximum allowable value or negligibly small.

  13. Local Interstellar Hydrogen's Disappearance at 1 Au: Four Years of IBEX in the Rising Solar Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saul, Lukas; Bzowski, Maciej; Fuselier, Stephen; Kubiak, Marzena; McComas, Dave; Möbius, Eberhard; Sokół, Justina; Rodríguez, Diego; Scheer, Juergen; Wurz, Peter

    2013-04-01

    NASA's Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) mission has recently opened a new window on the interstellar medium (ISM) by imaging neutral atoms. One "bright" feature in the sky is the interstellar wind flowing into the solar system. Composed of remnants of stellar explosions as well as primordial gas and plasma, the ISM is by no means uniform. The interaction of the local ISM with the solar wind shapes our heliospheric environment with hydrogen being the dominant component of the very local ISM. In this paper, we report on direct sampling of the neutral hydrogen of the local ISM over four years of IBEX observations. The hydrogen wind observed at 1 AU has decreased and nearly disappeared as the solar activity has increased over the last four years; the signal at 1 AU has dropped off in 2012 by a factor of ~8 to near background levels. The longitudinal offset has also increased with time presumably due to greater radiation pressure deflecting the interstellar wind. We present longitudinal and latitudinal arrival direction measurements of the bulk flow as measured over four years beginning at near solar minimum conditions. The H distribution we observe at 1 AU is expected to be different from that outside the heliopause due to ionization, photon pressure, gravity, and filtration by interactions with heliospheric plasma populations. These observations provide an important benchmark for modeling of the global heliospheric interaction. Based on these observations we suggest a further course of scientific action to observe neutral hydrogen over a full solar cycle with IBEX.

  14. LOCAL INTERSTELLAR HYDROGEN'S DISAPPEARANCE AT 1 AU: FOUR YEARS OF IBEX IN THE RISING SOLAR CYCLE

    SciTech Connect

    Saul, Lukas; Rodriguez, Diego; Scheer, Juergen; Wurz, Peter; Bzowski, Maciej; Kubiak, Marzena; Sokol, Justina; Fuselier, Stephen; McComas, Dave; Moebius, Eberhard

    2013-04-20

    NASA's Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) mission has recently opened a new window on the interstellar medium (ISM) by imaging neutral atoms. One ''bright'' feature in the sky is the interstellar wind flowing into the solar system. Composed of remnants of stellar explosions as well as primordial gas and plasma, the ISM is by no means uniform. The interaction of the local ISM with the solar wind shapes our heliospheric environment with hydrogen being the dominant component of the very local ISM. In this paper, we report on direct sampling of the neutral hydrogen of the local ISM over four years of IBEX observations. The hydrogen wind observed at 1 AU has decreased and nearly disappeared as the solar activity has increased over the last four years; the signal at 1 AU has dropped off in 2012 by a factor of {approx}8 to near background levels. The longitudinal offset has also increased with time presumably due to greater radiation pressure deflecting the interstellar wind. We present longitudinal and latitudinal arrival direction measurements of the bulk flow as measured over four years beginning at near solar minimum conditions. The H distribution we observe at 1 AU is expected to be different from that outside the heliopause due to ionization, photon pressure, gravity, and filtration by interactions with heliospheric plasma populations. These observations provide an important benchmark for modeling of the global heliospheric interaction. Based on these observations we suggest a further course of scientific action to observe neutral hydrogen over a full solar cycle with IBEX.

  15. Helium and Hydrogen of the Local Interstellar Mdium Observed in the Vicinity of the Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertaux, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    The Sun illuminates the hydrogen and helium atoms of the interstellar medium through which it travels. As a result, the Sun and the whole solar system are imbedded in a glow of the resonance lines of hydrogen (H Lyman alpha; 121.6nm) and helium (58.4nm). From the intensity distribution of the glow in the solar system, the density of H and He in the local interstellar medium (LISM) and the direction of the relative motion between the Sun and the LISM in the vicinity of the Sun are derived. The velocity module and the LISM temperature are more adequately found from a measurement of the Lyman alpha line shape, which is an image of the velocity distribution of H atoms. The result is summarized and together the methods of interpretation and difficulties are dicusssed.

  16. A survey of local interstellar hydrogen from OAO-2 observations of Lyman alpha absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, B. D.; Jenkins, E. B.

    1972-01-01

    The Wisconsin far ultraviolet spectrometer aboard OAO-2 observed the wavelength region near 1216 A for 69 stars of spectral type B2 or earlier. From the strength of the observed interstellar L sub alpha absorption, atomic hydrogen column densities were derived over distances averaging 300 pc away from the sun. The OAO data were compared to synthetic ultraviolet spectra, originally derived from earlier higher resolution rocket observations, which were computer processed to simulate the effects of absorption by different amounts of hydrogen followed by the instrumental blending.

  17. The effect of new interstellar medium parameters on the heliosphere and energetic neutral atoms from the interstellar boundary

    SciTech Connect

    Heerikhuisen, J.; Zirnstein, E. J.; Pogorelov, N. V.; Zank, G. P.; Funsten, H. O.

    2014-03-20

    We present new results from three-dimensional simulations of the solar wind interaction with the local interstellar medium (LISM) using recent observations by NASA's Interstellar Boundary EXplorer (IBEX) mission estimates of the velocity and temperature of the LISM. We investigate four strengths of the LISM magnetic field, from 1 to 4 μG, and adjust the LISM proton and hydrogen densities so that the distance to the termination shock (TS) in the directions of the Voyager spacecraft is just below 90 AU, and the density of hydrogen at the TS is close to 0.09 cm{sup –3} in the nose direction. The orientation of the magnetic field is chosen to point toward the center of the ribbon of enhanced energetic neutral atom (ENA) flux seen in the IBEX data. Our simulations show that the plasma and neutral properties in the outer heliosheath vary considerably as a function of the LISM magnetic field strength. We also show that the heliotail points downwind in all cases, though its structure is strongly affected by the external magnetic field. Comparison and consistency between the simulated ENA flux and the circularity of the ribbon as measured by IBEX are most consistent with a LISM magnetic field strength aligned with the center of the ribbon and a magnitude in the range 2.5-3 μG.

  18. The effect of new interstellar medium parameters on the heliosphere and energetic neutral atoms from the interstellar boundary

    SciTech Connect

    Heerikhuisen, J.; Zirnstein, E. J.; Funsten, H. O.; Pogorelov, N. V.; Zank, G. P.

    2014-03-05

    Here we present new results from three-dimensional simulations of the solar wind interaction with the local interstellar medium (LISM) using recent observations by NASA's Interstellar Boundary EXplorer (IBEX) mission estimates of the velocity and temperature of the LISM. We investigate four strengths of the LISM magnetic field, from 1 to 4 μG, and adjust the LISM proton and hydrogen densities so that the distance to the termination shock (TS) in the directions of the Voyager spacecraft is just below 90 AU, and the density of hydrogen at the TS is close to 0.09 cm-3 in the nose direction. The orientation of the magnetic field is chosen to point toward the center of the ribbon of enhanced energetic neutral atom (ENA) flux seen in the IBEX data. Our simulations show that the plasma and neutral properties in the outer heliosheath vary considerably as a function of the LISM magnetic field strength. We also show that the heliotail points downwind in all cases, though its structure is strongly affected by the external magnetic field. Lastly, comparison and consistency between the simulated ENA flux and the circularity of the ribbon as measured by IBEX are most consistent with a LISM magnetic field strength aligned with the center of the ribbon and a magnitude in the range 2.5-3 μG.

  19. The effect of new interstellar medium parameters on the heliosphere and energetic neutral atoms from the interstellar boundary

    DOE PAGES

    Heerikhuisen, J.; Zirnstein, E. J.; Funsten, H. O.; ...

    2014-03-05

    Here we present new results from three-dimensional simulations of the solar wind interaction with the local interstellar medium (LISM) using recent observations by NASA's Interstellar Boundary EXplorer (IBEX) mission estimates of the velocity and temperature of the LISM. We investigate four strengths of the LISM magnetic field, from 1 to 4 μG, and adjust the LISM proton and hydrogen densities so that the distance to the termination shock (TS) in the directions of the Voyager spacecraft is just below 90 AU, and the density of hydrogen at the TS is close to 0.09 cm-3 in the nose direction. The orientationmore » of the magnetic field is chosen to point toward the center of the ribbon of enhanced energetic neutral atom (ENA) flux seen in the IBEX data. Our simulations show that the plasma and neutral properties in the outer heliosheath vary considerably as a function of the LISM magnetic field strength. We also show that the heliotail points downwind in all cases, though its structure is strongly affected by the external magnetic field. Lastly, comparison and consistency between the simulated ENA flux and the circularity of the ribbon as measured by IBEX are most consistent with a LISM magnetic field strength aligned with the center of the ribbon and a magnitude in the range 2.5-3 μG.« less

  20. Abundance of atomic carbon /C I/ in dense interstellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, T. G.; Huggins, P. J.

    1981-01-01

    The abundance of interstellar neutral atomic carbon is investigated by means of its ground state fine-structure line emission at 492 GHz using the 91.5 cm telescope of NASAs Kuiper Airborne Observatory. Atomic carbon is found to be very abundant in dense interstellar molecular clouds with column densities of about 10 to the 19th per sq cm. Because the observations have considerably greater column densities than current theories of carbon chemistry, it is suggested that the physical conditions of these clouds are not as simple as assumed in the models. Various situations are discussed which would lead to large C I abundances, including the possibility that the chemical lifetimes of the clouds are relatively short.

  1. Laboratory Synthesis of Molecular Hydrogen on Surfaces of Interstellar Dust Grain Analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chi

    Molecular hydrogen is by far the most abundant molecule in space. H2 formation in the interstellar medium (ISM) is a fundamental process in astrophysics. The radiative association of two hydrogen atoms is a process too rare to be efficient because it involves forbidden roto-vibrational transitions, and gas-phase three-body reactions are rare in the diffuse ISM to explain H2 abundance. It has been recognized that H2 recombination occurs on surfaces of dust grains, where the grains act as the third body in the H + H reaction. This thesis reports on laboratory measurements of molecular hydrogen formation and recombination on surfaces of astrophysical interest. It also describes how atomic/molecular beam and surface science techniques can be used to study physical processes leading to the formation of hydrogen molecules at surfaces under conditions relevant to those encountered in the interstellar medium. Flash desorption experiments have been conducted to yield desorption energies, order of desorption kinetics and recombination efficiency (defined as the sticking probability S times the probability of recombination upon H-H encounter, γ) over a wide range of coverage. Significant recombination occurs only at the lowest temperatures (<20 K). The recombination rates are obtained as functions of surface temperature and exposure time to H and D atom beams. Our measurements give lower values for the recombination efficiency than model-based estimates. We propose that our results can be reconciled with average estimates of the recombination rate from astronomical observations, if the actual surface of an average grain is rougher, and its area bigger, than the one considered in models. On the basis of our experimental evidence, we recognize that there are two main regimes of H coverage that are of astrophysical importance; for each of them we provide an expression giving the production rate of molecular hydrogen in interstellar clouds.

  2. Thin film atomic hydrogen detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruber, C. L.

    1977-01-01

    Thin film and bead thermistor atomic surface recombination hydrogen detectors were investigated both experimentally and theoretically. Devices were constructed on a thin Mylar film substrate. Using suitable Wheatstone bridge techniques sensitivities of 80 microvolts/2x10 to the 13th power atoms/sec are attainable with response time constants on the order of 5 seconds.

  3. Hydrogen and deuterium in the local interstellar medium

    SciTech Connect

    Murthy, J.N.

    1987-01-01

    This work reports on the results of a series of IUE observations of interstellar HI and DI Ly..cap alpha.. absorption against the chromospheric Ly..cap alpha.. emission of the nearby late-type stars ..cap alpha.. Cen B(1.3 pc), epsilon Eri (3.3 pc), Procyon (3.5 pc), Altair (5.1 pc), Capella (13.2 pc), and HR 1099 (33 pc). The density, velocity dispersion, and bulk velocity of the neutral hydrogen along the line of sight to each of these stars was derived. Lower limits were placed on the deuterium-to-hydrogen (D/H) ratio towards the same stars. These IUE results are generally consistent with previous observations of the same stars with the Copernicus satellite showing that this modeling procedure is independent of stellar variations over a period of several years. The HI absorption profile towards Altair shows a broad saturated core and steep line wings, consistent with a multicomponent interstellar medium in that direction. The bulk velocities towards the other stars are consistent with a bulk flow from the approximate direction of the galactic center but do show local variations from a uniform flow, possibly indicating a complicated velocity structure even in the solar neighborhood. Interstellar deuterium is detected towards every star except Altair and the derived values for the D/H ratio are consistent with those previously found with Copernicus.

  4. Atomic hydrogen in planetary nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Stephen E.; Silverglate, Peter R.; Altschuler, Daniel R.; Giovanardi, Carlo

    1987-01-01

    The authors searched for neutral atomic hydrogen associated with 22 planetary nebulae and three evolved stars in the 21 cm line at the Arecibo Observatory. Objects whose radial velocities permitted discrimination from Galactic H I were chosen for observation. Hydrogen was detected in absorption from IC 4997. From the measurements new low limits are derived to the mass of atomic hydrogen associated with the undetected nebulae. Radio continuum observations were also made of several of the nebulae at 12.6 cm. The authors reexamine previous measurements of H I in planetary nebulae, and present the data on a consistent footing. The question of planetary nebula distances is considered at length. Finally, implications of the H I measurements for nebular evolution are discussed and it is suggested that atomic hydrogen seen in absorption was expelled from the progenitor star during the final 1000 yr prior to the onset of ionization.

  5. Charting the Interstellar Magnetic Field causing the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) Ribbon of Energetic Neutral Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisch, P. C.; Berdyugin, A.; Piirola, V.; Magalhaes, A. M.; Seriacopi, D. B.; Wiktorowicz, S. J.; Andersson, B.-G.; Funsten, H. O.; McComas, D. J.; Schwadron, N. A.; Slavin, J. D.; Hanson, A. J.; Fu, C.-W.

    2015-12-01

    .8}-27.6+23.5 between {B}{POL} and the bulk LSR velocity the local interstellar material indicates a geometry that is consistent with an expanding superbubble. The efficiency of grain alignment in the local interstellar medium has been assessed using stars where both polarization data and hydrogen column density data are available. Nearby stars appear to have larger polarizations than expected based on reddened sightlines, which is consistent with previous results, but uncertainties are large. Optical polarization and color excess E(B - V) data indicate the presence of nearby interstellar dust in the BICEP2 field. Color excess E(B - V) indicates an optical extinction of AV > 0.6 in the BICEP2 field, while the polarization data indicate that AV > 0.09 mag. The IBEX Ribbon ISMF extends to the boundaries of the BICEP2 region.

  6. Deuterium and hydrogen in the local interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dupree, A. K.; Baliunas, S. L.; Shipman, H. L.

    1977-01-01

    Densities of neutral hydrogen and deuterium are found from observation with the Copernicus satellite of the Ly-alpha line toward two nearby stars. The hydrogen density is 0.03 + or - 0.01 per cu cm toward Alpha Aur (Capella) and 0.20 + or - 0.05 per cu cm in the direction of Alpha Cen A, values indicating that the nearby (less than 14 pc) interstellar medium is inhomogeneous and can be of low density in certain directions. The ratios of deuterium to hydrogen - 3.9 (+5.7, -1.7) by 10 to the -5th power and 0.24 (+0.12, -0.07) by 10 to the -5th power for Alpha Aur and Alpha Cen A, respectively - suggest that variations in the deuterium abundance may exist.

  7. The Formation of Formaldehyde on Interstellar Carbonaceous Grain Analogs by O/H Atom Addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potapov, Alexey; Jäger, Cornelia; Henning, Thomas; Jonusas, Mindaugas; Krim, Lahouari

    2017-09-01

    An understanding of possible scenarios for the formation of astrophysically relevant molecules, particularly complex organic molecules, will bring us one step closer to the understanding of our astrochemical heritage. In this context, formaldehyde is an important molecule as a precursor of methanol, which in turn is a starting point for the formation of more complex organic species. In the present experiments, for the first time, following the synthesis of CO, formaldehyde has been produced on the surface of interstellar grain analogs, hydrogenated fullerene-like carbon grains, by O and H atom bombardment. The formation of H2CO is an indication for a possible methanol formation route in such systems.

  8. EXPERIMENTAL AND THEORETICAL STUDIES OF REACTIONS BETWEEN H ATOMS AND CARBANIONS OF INTERSTELLAR RELEVANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Zhibo; Eichelberger, Brian; Carpenter, Marshall Y.; Martinez, Oscar; Bierbaum, Veronica M.; Snow, Theodore P. E-mail: BEichelberger@jbu.ed E-mail: Oscar.Martinez@colorado.ed E-mail: Theodore.Snow@colorado.ed

    2010-11-10

    The recent detection of molecular anions in the interstellar medium (ISM) has highlighted the need for laboratory studies of negative ion chemistry. Hydrogen atoms are the most abundant atomic species in the ISM, and the chemistry of H atoms with anions may contribute to molecular synthesis in interstellar clouds. This work is a combined experimental and computational study of a series of anions reacting with H atoms by associative detachment (A{sup -} + H {yields} AH + e {sup -}). The anions include deprotonated nitriles (CH{sub 2}CN{sup -}, CH{sub 3}CHCN{sup -}, and (CH{sub 3}){sub 2}CCN{sup -}), acetaldehyde (HC(O)CH{sub 2} {sup -}), acetone (CH{sub 3}C(O)CH{sub 2} {sup -}), ethyl acetate (CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}OC(O)CH{sub 2} {sup -}), methanol (CH{sub 3}O{sup -}), and acetic acid (CH{sub 3}CO{sub 2} {sup -}). Experimental measurements of the reaction rate constants were made with the flowing afterglow-selected ion flow tube technique. Ab initio theoretical calculations were carried out to explore the reaction mechanism and investigate the factors influencing reaction efficiencies, which are largely proportional to reaction exothermicities. Other factors influencing reaction efficiencies include the charge density on the reactive site of the anion, the characteristics of the potential energy surfaces along the approach of the reactants, and angular momentum conservation of the anion-H atom collision.

  9. The sticking of atomic hydrogen on amorphous water ice

    SciTech Connect

    Veeraghattam, Vijay K.; Manrodt, Katie; Lewis, Steven P.; Stancil, P. C. E-mail: lewis@physast.uga.edu

    2014-07-20

    Using classical molecular dynamics, we have simulated the sticking and scattering process of a hydrogen atom on an amorphous ice film to predict the sticking probability of hydrogen on ice surfaces. A wide range of initial kinetic energies of the incident hydrogen atom (10 K-600 K) and two different ice temperatures (10 K and 70 K) were used to investigate this fundamental process in interstellar chemistry. We report here the sticking probability of atomic hydrogen as a function of incident kinetic energy, gas temperature, and substrate temperature, which can be used in astrophysical models. The current results are compared to previous theoretical and experimental studies that have reported a wide range in the sticking coefficient.

  10. The neutral atomic phases of the interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfire, M. G.; Hollenbach, D.; Mckee, C. F.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Bakes, E. L. O.

    1995-01-01

    We calculate the thermal equilibrium gas temperature of the diffuse interstellar medium. Our method incorporates a new photoelectric heating rate from small grains and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) that accounts for a size distribution of particles extending from 100 to 3 A radius. We also include a detailed treatment of the ionization rates and heating due to the soft X-ray background and due to cosmic rays. Phase diagrams (thermal pressure P versus hydrogen density n) are presented for gas that is illuminated by local interstellar far-ultraviolet (FUV) and X-ray radiation fields. A stable two-phase medium is produced with thermal pressure in the range P/k approximately = to 10(exp 3-4) K/cc. We demonstrate that photoelectric heating from PAHs dominates in the warm neutral phase (WNM) and cold neutral phase (CNM). If the C II (158 micrometers cooling per hydrogen nucleus in the solar neighborhood represents an average value for the Galaxy, we predict L(sub CII) approximately = to 7 x 10(exp 7) solar luminosities from the CNM in the Galaxy, comparable to that observed by the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE). We discuss the dependence of the results on absorbing column density, gas phase abundances, dust abundances and metallicity, FUV field, and the X-ray radiation field. These results will be useful in modeling the multiphase structure of high-velocity clouds in the halo, the interstellar matter (ISM) at other galactocentric radii, and the ISM in external galaxies and galactic nuclei.

  11. The neutral atomic phases of the interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfire, M. G.; Hollenbach, D.; Mckee, C. F.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Bakes, E. L. O.

    1995-01-01

    We calculate the thermal equilibrium gas temperature of the diffuse interstellar medium. Our method incorporates a new photoelectric heating rate from small grains and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) that accounts for a size distribution of particles extending from 100 to 3 A radius. We also include a detailed treatment of the ionization rates and heating due to the soft X-ray background and due to cosmic rays. Phase diagrams (thermal pressure P versus hydrogen density n) are presented for gas that is illuminated by local interstellar far-ultraviolet (FUV) and X-ray radiation fields. A stable two-phase medium is produced with thermal pressure in the range P/k approximately = to 10(exp 3-4) K/cc. We demonstrate that photoelectric heating from PAHs dominates in the warm neutral phase (WNM) and cold neutral phase (CNM). If the C II (158 micrometers cooling per hydrogen nucleus in the solar neighborhood represents an average value for the Galaxy, we predict L(sub CII) approximately = to 7 x 10(exp 7) solar luminosities from the CNM in the Galaxy, comparable to that observed by the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE). We discuss the dependence of the results on absorbing column density, gas phase abundances, dust abundances and metallicity, FUV field, and the X-ray radiation field. These results will be useful in modeling the multiphase structure of high-velocity clouds in the halo, the interstellar matter (ISM) at other galactocentric radii, and the ISM in external galaxies and galactic nuclei.

  12. The structure and evolution of hydrogenated amorphous carbon grains and mantles in the interstellar medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, A. P.; Duley, W. W.; Williams, D. A.

    1990-12-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous carbons (HACs) have been proposed as the major constituent of interstellar dust. The HAC model can account successfully for observed properties of interstellar dust, and has great predictive power. A review is presented of relevant laboratory data on amorphous carbon, known to exist in three major phases: graphitic, diamondlike, and polymeric. These data indicate the probable nature of HAC in the interstellar medium. The properties of the HAC dust model, the deposition of HAC in the interstellar medium, and its evolution as interstellar conditions change are summarized. The properties of laboratory HAC in its various forms account successfully for observed interstellar extinction and for variations in extinction, for infrared emission features, and for extended red emission seen in reflection nebulae. A full evolutionary sequence that links the various HAC modifications found in different interstellar environments is proposed. It is concluded that the interstellar dust is an active component of the interstellar medium, responsive to its environment.

  13. Hydrogen And Deuterium In The Local Interstellar Medium.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murthy, Jayant

    2016-03-01

    In this work we report on the results of a series of IUE observations of interstellar HI and DI Ly alpha absorption against the chromospheric Lyalpha emission of the nearby late -type stars alpha Cen B(1.3 pc), epsilon Eri (3.3 pc), Procyon (3.5 pc), Altair (5.1 pc), Capella (13.2 pc), and HR 1099 (33 pc). From these observations we have derived the density, velocity dispersion, and bulk velocity of the neutral hydrogen along the line of sight to each of these stars. We have also placed lower limits on the deuterium to hydrogen (D/H) ratio towards the same stars. Our IUE results are generally consistent with previous observations of the same stars with the Copernicus satellite showing that our modelling procedure is independent of stellar variations over a period of several years. The HI absorption profile towards Altair shows a broad saturated core and steep line wings, consistent with a multicomponent interstellar medium in that direction. The bulk velocities towards the other stars are consistent with a bulk flow from the approximate direction of the galactic center but do show local variations from a uniform flow, possibly indicating a complicated velocity structure even in the solar neighbourhood. Interstellar deuterium is detected towards every star except Altair and the derived values for the D/H ratio are consistent with those previously found with Copernicus. In particular, we confirm the strong lower limit of 1.9 times 10^{-5} on the D/H ratio found towards Capella and we also place a lower limit of 1.5 times 10 ^{-5} on the D/H ratio towards alpha Cen B. Although an interstellar D/H ratio of 2 times 10^ {-5} is consistent with all the observations of late-type stars, the lower D/H ratios found towards several hot stars may indicate real variations in the D/H ratio in the local interstellar medium. Finally, we discuss the reality of a step in the cosmic background and of several galactic emission lines found by Auriemma et al. (1984) and show that, in

  14. Hydrogenation reactions in interstellar CO ice analogues. A combined experimental/theoretical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, G. W.; Cuppen, H. M.; Ioppolo, S.; Romanzin, C.; Bisschop, S. E.; Andersson, S.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Linnartz, H.

    2009-10-01

    Context: Hydrogenation reactions of CO in inter- and circumstellar ices are regarded as an important starting point in the formation of more complex species. Previous laboratory measurements by two groups of the hydrogenation of CO ices provided controversial results about the formation rate of methanol. Aims: Our aim is to resolve this controversy by an independent investigation of the reaction scheme for a range of H-atom fluxes and different ice temperatures and thicknesses. To fully understand the laboratory data, the results are interpreted theoretically by means of continuous-time, random-walk Monte Carlo simulations. Methods: Reaction rates are determined by using a state-of-the-art ultra high vacuum experimental setup to bombard an interstellar CO ice analog with H atoms at room temperature. The reaction of CO + H into H2CO and subsequently CH3OH is monitored by a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer in a reflection absorption mode. In addition, after each completed measurement, a temperature programmed desorption experiment is performed to identify the produced species according to their mass spectra and to determine their abundance. Different H-atom fluxes, morphologies, and ice thicknesses are tested. The experimental results are interpreted using Monte Carlo simulations. This technique takes into account the layered structure of CO ice. Results: The formation of both formaldehyde and methanol via CO hydrogenation is confirmed at low temperature (T = 12{-}20 K). We confirm that the discrepancy between the two Japanese studies is caused mainly by a difference in the applied hydrogen atom flux, as proposed by Hidaka and coworkers. The production rate of formaldehyde is found to decrease and the penetration column to increase with temperature. Temperature-dependent reaction barriers and diffusion rates are inferred using a Monte Carlo physical chemical model. The model is extended to interstellar conditions to compare with observational H2CO/CH3OH data.

  15. Discovery of molecular hydrogen fluorescence in the diffuse interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Christopher; Hurwitz, Mark; Bowyer, Stuart

    1990-01-01

    The first detection of molecular hydrogen fluorescence in the diffuse interstellar medium is reported. Using the Berkeley UVX Shuttle Spectrometer, H2 Lyman band fluorescence has been observed in four directions, each with high significance. Molecular hydrogen fluorescence is detected in all directions that have previously been found to contain significant CO emission. A simple equilibrium model has been developed that includes attenuation of the incident UV radiation field by H2 line and dust continuum absorption. Evidence is found that the gas in the CO emission portions of the clouds may be clumpy, with a filling factor less than 0.2 and an average density greater than 30/cu cm in most cases.

  16. GPGPU Approach: Simulation of the Interaction of Heavy Interstellar Atoms with the Heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeStefano, A.

    2014-12-01

    Running simulations is an involved process taking many hours of computational time to complete. With the advent of cluster computing and parallel processing, problems may be solved in much less time compared to those run in serial. Specifically, NVIDIA released the parallel computing platform CUDA in 2007 giving researchers and programmers access to the GPU to solve generalized problems, and not those of just images.In current research, code has previously been developed to study the interaction of the heliosphere and heavy atoms from the local interstellar medium.Ionized species of hydrogen, helium and other heavy atoms are deflected by the heliosphere where as the neutral species are relatively unimpeded. Charge exchange of these neutral particles may occur between ionized species originating from the solar wind or other populations of pickup ions (PUI) modifying the shape and properties of the heliosphere, compared to one without neutrals. The details of the charge exchange interaction are element dependent and need to be investigated one by one. Current research has studied the interaction of local interstellar hydrogen with the heliosphere quite extensively with theory, simulations and modeling.Since hydrogen is the most abundant element care must be taken when coupling MHD equations with the charge exchange interactions. Simulation code has been developed to account for this dynamic problem and they have shown that the shape of the heliosphere is affected by this. Interstellar atoms heavier than hydrogen interacting with the heliosphere has been looked at as well, but not nearly with as much detail or sophisticated models as hydrogen. The heavy atom data collected by IBEX has in this sense been under-utilized by models.Previously, the simulation was computed with the use of MPI (Message Passing Interface) for parallelization. This approach provided a decrease in computational time. However, CUDA enables the programmer to take advantage of the computer

  17. Transport properties of atomic hydrogen.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, A. C.; Smith, F. J.

    1971-01-01

    Determination of a new set of values for the coefficients of viscosity and thermal conductivity of atomic hydrogen in the range from 1 to 100,000 K. The estimated error is about 5%. Quantal theory was used for low temperatures and classical theory for high temperatures. There is excellent agreement between the two theories as low as 20 K.-

  18. Transport properties of atomic hydrogen.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, A. C.; Smith, F. J.

    1971-01-01

    Determination of a new set of values for the coefficients of viscosity and thermal conductivity of atomic hydrogen in the range from 1 to 100,000 K. The estimated error is about 5%. Quantal theory was used for low temperatures and classical theory for high temperatures. There is excellent agreement between the two theories as low as 20 K.-

  19. Molecular hydrogen formation by excited atom radiative association

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latter, William B.; Black, John H.

    1991-01-01

    The results from a semiclassical calculation of the thermal rate coefficient for the radiative association process H(n = 2) + H(n = 1) - H2 + hv are presented (n is the principal quantum number of the separated hydrogen atoms). The relative importance of this reaction in various environments is briefly discussed. Models of the early universe around the epoch of recombination and protostellar winds have been calculated which include the excited atom process. Not surprisingly, it is shown that the excited atom process will not be important in the general interstellar medium, except possibly in environments where the amount of Ly-alpha photon trapping is large. Examples may be the material surrounding quasars, active galactic nuclei, and bright H II regions. The most likely application of this process might be within rapidly evolving systems where a large transient n = 2 population of neutral hydrogen could result in a burst of molecular hydrogen formation.

  20. Electron impact ionization rates for interstellar H and He atoms near interplanetary shocks: Ulysses observations

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, W.C.; Phillips, J.L.; Gosling, J.T.; Isenberg, P.A.

    1996-07-01

    Solar wind plasma data measured during the near-ecliptic phase of the Ulysses mission between October, 1990 and January, 1993 were studied to determine the relative importance of electron-impact ionization to the total ionization rates of interstellar hydrogen and helium atoms. During times of quiet flow conditions electron-impact ionization rates were found to be generally low, of the order of 1{percent} of the total ionization rates. However, just downstream of the strongest CME- and CIR-driven shock waves encountered by Ulysses, the electron impact-ionization rate at times was more than 10{percent} that of the charge-exchange rate for hydrogen and more than 100{percent} that of the photoionization rate for helium. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. The formation of molecules in interstellar clouds from singly and multiply ionized atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, W. D.

    1978-01-01

    The suggestion is considered that multiply ionized atoms produced by K- and L-shell X-ray ionization and cosmic-ray ionization can undergo ion-molecule reactions and also initiate molecule production. The role of X-rays in molecule production in general is discussed, and the contribution to molecule production of the C(+) radiative association with hydrogen is examined. Such gas-phase reactions of singly and multiply ionized atoms are used to calculate molecular abundances of carbon-, nitrogen-, and oxygen-bearing species. The column densities of the molecules are evaluated on the basis of a modified version of previously developed isobaric cloud models. It is found that reactions of multiply ionized carbon with H2 can contribute a significant fraction of the observed CH in diffuse interstellar clouds in the presence of diffuse X-ray structures or discrete X-ray sources and that substantial amounts of CH(+) can be produced under certain conditions.

  2. The formation of molecules in interstellar clouds from singly and multiply ionized atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, W. D.

    1978-01-01

    The suggestion is considered that multiply ionized atoms produced by K- and L-shell X-ray ionization and cosmic-ray ionization can undergo ion-molecule reactions and also initiate molecule production. The role of X-rays in molecule production in general is discussed, and the contribution to molecule production of the C(+) radiative association with hydrogen is examined. Such gas-phase reactions of singly and multiply ionized atoms are used to calculate molecular abundances of carbon-, nitrogen-, and oxygen-bearing species. The column densities of the molecules are evaluated on the basis of a modified version of previously developed isobaric cloud models. It is found that reactions of multiply ionized carbon with H2 can contribute a significant fraction of the observed CH in diffuse interstellar clouds in the presence of diffuse X-ray structures or discrete X-ray sources and that substantial amounts of CH(+) can be produced under certain conditions.

  3. Energy storage possibilities of atomic hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etters, R. D.; Dugan, J. V., Jr.; Palmer, R.

    1976-01-01

    The possibility of storing large amounts of energy in a free radical system such as atomic hydrogen is analyzed. Attention is focused on theoretical calculations of the ground state properties of spin-aligned atomic triplet hydrogen, deuterium, and tritium. The solid-liquid phase transition in atomic hydrogen is also examined.

  4. Studies of Diffuse Interstellar Bands V. Pairwise Correlations of Eight Strong DIBs and Neutral Hydrogen, Molecular Hydrogen, and Color Excess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Scott D.; York, Donald G.; McCall, Benjamin J.; Dahlstrom, Julie; Sonnentrucker, Paule; Welty, Daniel E.; Drosback, Meredith M.; Hobbs, L. M.; Rachford, Brian L.; Snow, Theodore P.

    2011-01-01

    We establish correlations between equivalent widths of eight diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs), and examine their correlations with atomic hydrogen, molecular hydrogen, and E B-V . The DIBs are centered at λλ 5780.5, 6204.5, 6283.8, 6196.0, 6613.6, 5705.1, 5797.1, and 5487.7, in decreasing order of Pearson's correlation coefficient with N(H) (here defined as the column density of neutral hydrogen), ranging from 0.96 to 0.82. We find the equivalent width (EW) of λ5780.5 is better correlated with column densities of H than with E B-V or H2, confirming earlier results based on smaller data sets. We show that the same is true for six of the seven other DIBs presented here. Despite this similarity, the eight strong DIBs chosen are not correlated well enough with each other to suggest they come from the same carrier. We further conclude that these eight DIBs are more likely to be associated with H than with H2, and hence are not preferentially located in the densest, most UV shielded parts of interstellar clouds. We suggest that they arise from different molecules found in diffuse H regions with very little H2 (molecular fraction f < 0.01). Of the 133 stars with available data in our study, there are three with significantly weaker λ5780.5 than our mean H-λ5780.5 relationship, all of which are in regions of high radiation fields, as previously noted by Herbig. The correlations will be useful in deriving interstellar parameters when direct methods are not available. For instance, with care, the value of N(H) can be derived from W λ(5780.5).

  5. A massive cloud of cold atomic hydrogen in the outer Galaxy.

    PubMed

    Knee, L B; Brunt, C M

    2001-07-19

    A large fraction of the mass of the interstellar medium in our Galaxy is in the form of warm (103-104 K) and cool (50-100 K) atomic hydrogen (H i) gas. Cold (10-30 K) regions are thought to be dominated by dense clouds of molecular hydrogen. Cold H i is difficult to observe, and therefore our knowledge of its abundance and distribution in the interstellar medium is poor. The few known clouds of cold H i are much smaller in size and mass than typical molecular clouds. Here we report the discovery that the H i supershell GSH139-03-69 is very cold (10 K). It is about 2 kiloparsecs in size and as massive as the largest molecular complexes. The existence of such an immense structure composed of cold atomic hydrogen in the interstellar medium runs counter to the prevailing view that cold gas resides almost exclusively in clouds dominated by molecular hydrogen.

  6. NASA atomic hydrogen standards program: An update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhardt, V. S.; Kaufmann, D. C.; Adams, W. A.; Deluca, J. J.; Soucy, J. L.

    1976-01-01

    Comparisons are made between the NP series and the NX series of hydrogen masers. A field operable hydrogen maser (NR series) is also described. Atomic hydrogen primary frequency standards are in development stages. Standards are being developed for a hydrogen beam frequency standard and for a concertina hydrogen maser.

  7. Ultraviolet observations of cool stars. VII - Local interstellar hydrogen and deuterium Lyman-alpha

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclintock, W.; Henry, R. C.; Linsky, J. L.; Moos, H. W.

    1978-01-01

    High-resolution Copernicus spectra of Epsilon Eri and Epsilon Ind containing interstellar hydrogen and deuterium L-alpha absorption lines are presented, reduced, and analyzed. Parameters of the interstellar hydrogen and deuterium toward these two stars are derived independently, without any assumptions concerning the D/H ratio. Copernicus spectra of Alpha Aur and Alpha Cen A are reanalyzed, and limits on the D/H number-density ratio consistent with the data for all four stars are considered. A comparison of the present estimates for the parameters of the local interstellar medium with those obtained by other techniques shows that there is no compelling evidence for significant variations in the hydrogen density and D/H ratio in the local interstellar medium. On this basis the hypothesis of an approaching local interstellar cloud proposed by Vidal-Madjar et al. (1978) is rejected

  8. Observations of Interstellar Hydrogen Fluoride and Hydrogen Chloride in the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monje, Raquel R.; Lis, Darek C.; Phillips, Thomas G.; Goldsmith, Paul F.; Emprechtinger, Martin; Neufeld, David A.

    2011-06-01

    We present Herschel/HIFI observations of interstellar hydrogen chloride (HCl) and hydrogen fluoride (HF) along the line-of-sight towards Galactic sources with strong submillimeter continuum emission from the PRISMAS and HEXOS GT KP. The halogen-containing molecules are of special interest because of their unique thermochemistry and their important role as tracers of the neutral ISM. The detection of foreground absorption by HF J = 1--0 transition line in each source probes the distribution of HF throughout the Milky Way, in diffuse clouds with varying values of the visual extinction, as a potential valuable surrogate for molecular hydrogen. For the optically thin absorption components we calculate the column densities of HF. We find that, in many of the background clouds, the abundances of HF with respect to H_2 is consistent with the theoretical prediction that HF is the main reservoir of gas-phase fluorine for these clouds. Observations of hydrogen chloride isotopologues, H35Cl and H37Cl J = 1--0 transition line at different galactocentric distances provide insights of how elemental abundances change with location in the Galaxy. We model the HCl observations with a non-LTE radiative transfer model to derive gas densities and HCl column densities for sources with HCl emission. Interstellar HCl abundances and isotopic ratios [Cl35/Cl37] are essential for improving our understanding of stellar nucleosynthesis and global chemical enrichment and evolution in the Galaxy.

  9. Muonic Hydrogen Atomic Beam Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Glen

    2001-10-01

    Muonic hydrogen isotopes in hydrogen targets undergo a complex sequence of atomic and molecular interactions, possibly leading to one or more fusions catalyzed by the muon. Increasingly sophisticated theoretical descriptions have been matched by different experimental tactics to clarify two important features, resonant muonic molecular ion formation, and loss of the muon from attachment to a charged fusion product (sticking). For the former, one tactic has been to use a non-homogeneous solid target consisting of layers of different isotopic mixtures. The resulting muonic tritium atomic beam enabled a measurement of the resonance structure well above thermal energies, for target molecules of both D_2 and HD. The results confirm for the first time the essential features of the theory at these energies. The potential also exists to exploit the target technology in order to resolve apparent limitations in our understanding of sticking.

  10. Atomic and molecular gas in interstellar cirrus clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reach, William T.; Koo, Bon-Chul; Heiles, Carl

    1994-01-01

    The dust, atomic gas, and molecular gas content of a sample of 26 of isolated, degree-sized infrared clouds are compared. Half of the clouds have an infrared excess indicating the presence of H2, and 14 contain compact CO-emitting regions. Complete, high angular resolution H I and CO maps of one cloud, G236+39, resolve the transition between atomic and molecular H, as well as the location of CO formation. Assuming the infrared emission traces the total column density, H2 is inferred to be much more widely distributed than the CO. The CO rotational levels are subthermally excited, and the (2 - 1)/(1 - 0) line ratios suggest a density n(H2) approximately 200/cm(exp 3) where CO was detected. A model of H2 formation on grain surfaces balanced by self-shielded photodissociation fits the variation of infrared brightness with H I column density. Assuming a temperature of 80 K, typical of diffuse H2 (Savage et al. 1977), the H2 chemistry requires an average density n(H + 2H2) approximately 50/cm(exp 3). For G236+39, if the distance is 100 pc, the H I and H2 masses are estimated to be 90 and 70 solar mass, respectively. High-resolution H I and infrared maps of a smaller cloud, G249.0+73.7, reveal no evidence for molecular gas, which is likely due to the low total column density through this cloud. These results suggest the H2 and H I content are comparable for some interstellar cirrus clouds with column densities N(H I) greater than 4 x 10(exp 20)/cm(exp 2), even where CO was not detected.

  11. The Atomic to Molecular Transition in the Interstellar Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldsmith, Paul F.

    2012-01-01

    Study of H2 in UV and IR continues to surprise us with complexity of excitation state, OPR, and role in astrochemistry. Atomic H in molecular clouds is a very powerful tool suggesting that they are not "young" but that it takes millions of years to convert primarily atomic hydrogen clouds to 99.9% molecular form. Laboratory data suggests that H2 formation is efficient over broader range of temperatures than thought to be the case a few years ago, but range is still limited. Issues of complex grain morphology and surface structure make this a very difficult field in which to obtain definitively meaningful results. Ongoing and future observations of CI and CII will improve our understanding of the structure of clouds, their total mass, and how they have evolved and will continue to do so.

  12. Atomic hydrogen storage method and apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woollam, J. A. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    Atomic hydrogen, for use as a fuel or as an explosive, is stored in the presence of a strong magnetic field in exfoliated layered compounds such as molybdenum disulfide or an elemental layer material such as graphite. The compounds maintained at liquid helium temperatures and the atomic hydrogen is collected on the surfaces of the layered compound which are exposed during delamination (exfoliation). The strong magnetic field and the low temperature combine to prevent the atoms of hydrogen from recombining to form molecules.

  13. Hydrogen atom in phase space

    SciTech Connect

    Chetouani, L.; Hammann, T.F.

    1987-03-01

    The Hamiltonian of the three-dimensional hydrogen atom is reduced, in parabolic coordinates, to the Hamiltonians of two bidimensional harmonic oscillators, by doing several space-time transformations,separating the movement along the three parabolic directions (xi,eta,phi), and introducing two auxiliary angular variables psi and psi', 0less than or equal topsi, psi'less than or equal to2..pi... The Green's function is developed into partial Green's functions, and expressed in terms of two Green's functions that describe the movements along both the xi and eta axes. Introducing auxiliary Hamiltonians allows one to calculate the Green's function in the configurational space, via the phase-space evolution function of the two-dimensional harmonic oscillator. The auxiliary variables psi and psi' are eliminated by projection. The thus-obtained Green's function, save for a multiplicating factor, coincides with that calculated following the path-integral formalism.

  14. Ionisation of atomic hydrogen by positron impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spicher, Gottfried; Olsson, Bjorn; Raith, Wilhelm; Sinapius, Guenther; Sperber, Wolfgang

    1990-01-01

    With the crossed beam apparatus the relative impact-ionization cross section of atomic hydrogen by positron impact was measured. A layout of the scattering region is given. The first measurements on the ionization of atomic hydrogen by positron impact are also given.

  15. KAULAKYS: Inelastic collisions between hydrogen atoms and Rydberg atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barklem, Paul S.

    2017-01-01

    KAULAKYS calculates cross sections and rate coefficients for inelastic collisions between Rydberg atoms and hydrogen atoms according to the free electron model of Kaulakys (1986, 1991). It is written in IDL and requires the code MSWAVEF (ascl:1701.006) to calculate momentum-space wavefunctions. KAULAKYS can be easily adapted to collisions with perturbers other than hydrogen atoms by providing the appropriate scattering amplitudes.

  16. Benchmarking Attosecond Physics with Atomic Hydrogen

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-25

    Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 12 Mar 12 – 11 Mar 15 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Benchmarking attosecond physics with atomic hydrogen 5a...NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The research team obtained uniquely reliable reference data on atomic interactions with intense few-cycle laser pulses...AND SUBTITLE Benchmarking attosecond physics with atomic hydrogen 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA2386-12-1-4025 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER

  17. Detection of the 610 micron /492 GHz/ line of interstellar atomic carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, T. G.; Huggins, P. J.; Kuiper, T. B. H.; Miller, R. E.

    1980-01-01

    The ground-state transition of neutral atomic carbon, 3P1-3P0, has been detected in the interstellar medium at the frequency of 492.162 GHz determined in the laboratory by Saykally and Evenson (1980). The observations were made from the NASA Kuiper Airborne Observatory using an InSb heterodyne bolometer receiver. The line was detected as strong emission from eight molecular clouds and apparently provides a widely useful probe of the interstellar medium.

  18. Absorption Reveals and Hydrogen Addition Explains New Interstellar Aldehydes: Propenal and Propanal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollis, J. M.; Jewell, P. R.; Lovas, F. J.; Remijan, A.; Mollendal, H.

    2004-01-01

    New interstellar molecules propenal (CH2CHCHO) and propanal (CH3CH2CHO) have been detected largely in absorption toward the star-forming region Sagittarius B2(N) by means of rotational transitions observed with the 100-m Green Bank Telescope (GBT) operating in the range of 18 GHz (lambda approximately 1.7 cm) to 26 GHz (lambda approximately 1.2 cm). The GBT was also used to observe the previously reported interstellar aldehyde propynal (HC2CHO) in Sagittarius B2(N) which is known for large molecules believed to form on interstellar grains. The presence of these three interstellar aldehydes toward Sagittarius B2(N) strongly suggests that simple hydrogen addition on interstellar grains accounts for successively larger molecular species: from propynal to propenal and from propenal to propanal. Energy sources within Sagittarius B2(N) likely permit the hydrogen addition reactions on grain surfaces to proceed. This work demonstrates that successive hydrogen addition is probably an important chemistry route in the formation of a number of complex interstellar molecules. We also searched for but did not detect the three-carbon sugar glyceraldehyde (CH2OHCHOHCHO).

  19. One- and two-dimensional hydrogen atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassoun, G. Q.

    1981-02-01

    Certain one- and two-dimensional reductions of the three-dimensional Schrödinger equation of the hydrogen atom are considered. These reductions are carried out from the point of view of the two common sets of space coordinates: Cartesian and spherical. The resulting systems have features that relate more readily to the old quantum theory models of Bohr and Sommerfeld than the general three-dimensional hydrogen atom. Furthermore, the considerations yield interesting insights into the quantum mechanics of the hydrogen atom and may serve as helpful intermediary preparation, in an introductory presentation of the subject, for the unreduced three-dimensional case.

  20. Atomic hydrogen storage method and apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woollam, J. A. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Atomic hydrogen, for use as a fuel or as an explosive, is stored in the presence of a strong magnetic field in exfoliated layered compounds such as molybdenum disulfide or an elemental layer material such as graphite. The compound is maintained at liquid helium temperatures and the atomic hydrogen is collected on the surfaces of the layered compound which are exposed during delamination (exfoliation). The strong magnetic field and the low temperature combine to prevent the atoms of hydrogen from recombining to form molecules.

  1. Effects of hydrogen atom spin exchange collisions on atomic hydrogen maser oscillation frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crampton, S. B.

    1979-01-01

    Frequency shifts due to collisions between hydrogen atoms in an atomic hydrogen maser frequency standard are studied. Investigations of frequency shifts proportional to the spin exchange frequency shift cross section and those proportional to the duration of exchange collisions are discussed. The feasibility of operating a hydrogen frequency standard at liquid helium temperatures is examined.

  2. COMPETING MECHANISMS OF MOLECULAR HYDROGEN FORMATION IN CONDITIONS RELEVANT TO THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Lemaire, J. L.; Vidali, G.; Baouche, S.; Chehrouri, M.; Chaabouni, H.; Mokrane, H.

    2010-12-20

    The most efficient mechanism of the formation of molecular hydrogen in the current universe is by association of hydrogen atoms on the surface of interstellar dust grains. The details of the processes of its formation and release from the grain are of great importance in the physical and chemical evolution of the space environments where it takes place. The main puzzle is still the fate of the 4.5 eV released in H{sub 2} formation and whether it goes into internal energy (rovibrational excitation), translational kinetic energy, or heating of the grain. The modality of the release of this energy affects the dynamics of the ISM and its evolution toward star formation. We present results of the detection of the rovibrational states of the just-formed H{sub 2} as it leaves the surface of a silicate. We find that rovibrationally excited molecules are ejected into the gas phase immediately after formation over a much wider range of grain temperatures than anticipated. Our results can be explained by the presence of two mechanisms of molecule formation that operate in partially overlapping ranges of grain temperature. A preliminary analysis of the relative importance of these two mechanisms is given. These unexpected findings, which will be complemented with experiments on the influence of factors such as silicate morphology, should be of great interest to the astrophysics and astrochemistry communities.

  3. Photometric Observations of Interstellar Hydrogen by HDAC: In-flight Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Horst Uwe; Skorov, Yuri; Reulke, Ralf; Glaßmeier, Karl-Heinz; Reshetnyk, Volodymyr

    2014-05-01

    HDAC is part of the ultraviolet imaging spectrometer (UVIS) onboard the Cassini spacecraft. The instrument scans the Lyman-α emission lines of hydrogen and deuterium atoms. In the photometer mode only the CEM detector is used to register the signals within a 3 degree field of view (FOV). HDAC has been switched on in photometer mode most of the time producing a unique continuous data set for more than a decade. An analysis of the Lyman-α background data serves two purposes: determination of the parameters of the interstellar/interplanetary hydrogen and determination of the properties of the solar wind. The exhaustive pre-flight laboratory calibrations included evaluation of the absolute sensitivity of the instrument; evaluation of the instrument spectral sensitivity; evaluation of the off-axis response. During the mission these characteristics may change over time due to continuous time degradation of electronics and/or abrupt events. We have systematically analyzed photometric observations of the star SPICA in order to perform in-flight calibrations. All three aspects listed above were explored. We find that the instrument is still in good condition. The current sensitivity of 12 count/s/Rayleigh is sufficient to provide good signal to noise data. Off-axis responsivity is non-uniform and visibly differs from pre-flight determinations. At the same time the shape of the spatial sensitivity response is constant and can be used for all observations. Because of the rather wide FOV and spectral sensitivity of HDAC stellar contributions are always in the data. This leads to considerable disturbances in the measured signal during observations. In order to clean the data, we use the TD1 Catalog of Stellar Ultraviolet Fluxes. That allows us to estimate flux values around 120 nm for many bright UV stars. The developed software detects secondary local peaks and cleans the measurements visibly. HDAC is part of the Cassini UVIS instrument and is operated independently but

  4. Atomic hydrogen as a launch vehicle propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan A.

    1990-01-01

    An analysis of several atomic hydrogen launch vehicles was conducted. A discussion of the facilities and the technologies that would be needed for these vehicles is also presented. The Gross Liftoff Weights (GLOW) for two systems were estimated; their specific impulses (I sub sp) were 750 and 1500 lb (sub f)/s/lb(sub m). The atomic hydrogen launch vehicles were also compared to the currently planned Advanced Launch System design concepts. Very significant GLOW reductions of 52 to 58 percent are possible over the Advanced Launch System designs. Applying atomic hydrogen propellants to upper stages was also considered. Very high I(sub sp) (greater than 750 1b(sub f)/s/lb(sub m) is needed to enable a mass savings over advanced oxygen/hydrogen propulsion. Associated with the potential benefits of high I(sub sp) atomic hydrogen are several challenging problems. Very high magnetic fields are required to maintain the atomic hydrogen in a solid kilogauss (3 Tesla). Also the storage temperature of the propellant is 4 K. This very low temperature will require a large refrigeration facility for the launch vehicle. The design considerations for a very high recombination rate for the propellant are also discussed. A recombination rate of 210 cm/s is predicted for atomic hydrogen. This high recombination rate can produce very high acceleration for the launch vehicle. Unique insulation or segmentation to inhibit the propellant may be needed to reduce its recombination rate.

  5. Reactions of Ground State Nitrogen Atoms N(4S) with Astrochemically-Relevant Molecules on Interstellar Dusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krim, Lahouari; Nourry, Sendres

    2015-06-01

    In the last few years, ambitious programs were launched to probe the interstellar medium always more accurately. One of the major challenges of these missions remains the detection of prebiotic compounds and the understanding of reaction pathways leading to their formation. These complex heterogeneous reactions mainly occur on icy dust grains, and their studies require the coupling of laboratory experiments mimicking the extreme conditions of extreme cold and dilute media. For that purpose, we have developed an original experimental approach that combine the study of heterogeneous reactions (by exposing neutral molecules adsorbed on ice to non-energetic radicals H, OH, N...) and a neon matrix isolation study at very low temperatures, which is of paramount importance to isolate and characterize highly reactive reaction intermediates. Such experimental approach has already provided answers to many questions raised about some astrochemically-relevant reactions occurring in the ground state on the surface of dust grain ices in dense molecular clouds. The aim of this new present work is to show the implication of ground state atomic nitrogen on hydrogen atom abstraction reactions from some astrochemically-relevant species, at very low temperatures (3K-20K), without providing any external energy. Under cryogenic temperatures and with high barrier heights, such reactions involving N(4S) nitrogen atoms should not occur spontaneously and require an initiating energy. However, the detection of some radicals species as byproducts, in our solid samples left in the dark for hours at 10K, proves that hydrogen abstraction reactions involving ground state N(4S) nitrogen atoms may occur in solid phase at cryogenic temperatures. Our results show the efficiency of radical species formation stemming from non-energetic N-atoms and astrochemically-relevant molecules. We will then discuss how such reactions, involving nitrogen atoms in their ground states, might be the first key step

  6. Fine-structure transitions of interstellar atomic sulfur and silicon induced by collisions with helium.

    PubMed

    Lique, F; Kłos, J; Le Picard, S D

    2017-10-02

    Atomic sulfur and silicon are important constituents of the interstellar matter and are both used as tracers of the physical conditions in interstellar shocks and outflows. We present an investigation of the spin-orbit (de-)excitation of S((3)P) and Si((3)P) atoms induced by collisions with helium with the aim to improve the determination of atomic sulfur and silicon abundances in the interstellar medium from S and Si emission spectra. Quantum-mechanical calculations have been performed in order to determine rate coefficients for the fine-structure transitions in the 5-1000 K temperature range. The scattering calculations are based on new highly correlated ab initio potentials. The theoretical results show that the (de-)excitation of Si is much faster than that of S. The rate coefficients deduced from this study are in good agreement with previous experimental and theoretical findings despite some deviations at low temperatures. From the computation of critical densities defined as the ratios between Einstein coefficients and the sum of the relevant collisional de-excitation rate coefficients, we show that local thermodynamic equilibrium conditions are not fulfilled for analyzing S and Si emission spectra observed in the interstellar medium. Hence, the present rate coefficients will be extremely useful for the accurate determination of interstellar atomic sulfur and silicon abundances.

  7. AN ESTIMATE OF THE NEARBY INTERSTELLAR MAGNETIC FIELD USING NEUTRAL ATOMS

    SciTech Connect

    Heerikhuisen, J.; Pogorelov, N. V.

    2011-09-01

    The strength and orientation of the magnetic field in the nearby interstellar medium have remained elusive, despite continual improvements in observations and models. Data from NASA's Voyager mission and the Solar Wind ANisotropies (SWAN) experiment on board Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) have placed observational constraints on the magnetic field, and the more recent Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) data appear to also bear an imprint of the interstellar magnetic field (ISMF). In this paper, we combine computational models of the heliosphere with data from Voyager, SOHO/SWAN, and IBEX to estimate both the strength and direction of the nearby ISMF. On the basis of our simulations, we find that a field strength of 2-3 {mu}G pointing from ecliptic coordinates (220-224, 39-44), combined with an interstellar hydrogen density of {approx}0.15 cm{sup -3}, produces results most consistent with observations.

  8. The atomic hydrogen in the Saturnian magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, W.; Johnson, R. E.; Ip, W.

    2012-12-01

    The Voyager flyby observation have revealed that, in the Saturnian magnetosphere, a very broad distribution of the hydrogen atoms existed in a doughnut-shape region (Broadfoot et al., 1981). Shemansky and Hall (1992) showed that this atomic hydrogen cloud had an azimuthal asymmetry dependent on local time with higher intensity on the dusk side. Smyth and Marconi (1993) suggested that the accumulative effect of solar radiation pressure is important for the long-term orbital motion of the hydrogen atoms escaping from Titan and would explain this complex 3D morphology. From the modeling results, Ip (1996) also pointed out that, in addition to the Titan's hydrogen torus, the sun-lit hemisphere of Saturn's atmosphere and/or the ring system could be major sources of the hydrogen atoms in the inner magnetosphere (<~10RS). Recent Cassini UVIS observations confirm local-time asymmetry but also show the hydrogen cloud density increases with decreasing distance to Saturn's upper atmosphere (Shemansky et al., 2009) (Peak density is in Saturn itself). They suggested that there could be hydrogen plumes flowing outward from the Saturn's sun-lit hemisphere due to electron-impact dissociation of H2. The Saturnian system is also immersed in a vast gas cloud of H2O, O2 and H2 and their dissociative products like OH, O, and H, which are originated from Enceladus' plumes, the rings as well as the inner icy satellites, and Titan's exosphere (e.g. Johnson et al., 2006; Cassidy and Johnson, 2010; Tseng et al., 2010; 2011). In addition, the neutral hydrogen cloud is an important source of H+ for the magnetosphere. Therefore, in this paper, we will work on a global investigation of the atomic hydrogen cloud taking into account all possible sources: 1) Saturn's atmosphere, 2) the H2 atmosphere of main rings, 3) the Enceladus' H2O and OH torus, 4) Titan's H2 torus and 5) the atomic hydrogen directly escaping from Titan. We have found that the ejection velocity and angle distribution are

  9. The Hydrogen Atom: The Rutherford Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilton, Homer Benjamin

    1996-06-01

    Early this century Ernest Rutherford established the nuclear model of the hydrogen atom, presently taught as representing the best visual model after modification by Niels Bohr and Arnold Sommerfeld. It replaced the so-called "plum pudding" model of J. J. Thomson which held sway previously. While the Rutherford model represented a large step forward in our understanding of the hydrogen atom, questions remained, and still do.

  10. Energy storage possibilities of atomic hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etters, R. D.; Dugan, J. V., Jr.; Palmer, R.

    1976-01-01

    Several recent experiments designed to produce and store macroscopic quantities of atomic hydrogen are discussed. The bulk, ground state properties of atomic hydrogen, deuterium, and tritium systems are calculated assuming that all pair interactions occur via the atomic triplet potential. The conditions required to obtain this system, including inhibition of recombination through the energetically favorable singlet interaction, are discussed. The internal energy, pressure, and compressibility are calculated applying the Monte Carlo technique with a quantum mechanical variational wavefunction. The system studied consisted of 32 atoms in a box with periodic boundary conditions. Results show that atomic triplet hydrogen and deuterium remain gaseous at 0 K; i.e., the internal energy is positive at all molar volumes considered.

  11. Energy storage possibilities of atomic hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etters, R. D.; Dugan, J. V., Jr.; Palmer, R.

    1976-01-01

    Several recent experiments designed to produce and store macroscopic quantities of atomic hydrogen are discussed. The bulk, ground state properties of atomic hydrogen, deuterium, and tritium systems are calculated assuming that all pair interactions occur via the atomic triplet potential. The conditions required to obtain this system, including inhibition of recombination through the energetically favorable singlet interaction, are discussed. The internal energy, pressure, and compressibility are calculated applying the Monte Carlo technique with a quantum mechanical variational wavefunction. The system studied consisted of 32 atoms in a box with periodic boundary conditions. Results show that atomic triplet hydrogen and deuterium remain gaseous at 0 K; i.e., the internal energy is positive at all molar volumes considered.

  12. Solid Hydrogen Formed for Atomic Propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan A.

    2000-01-01

    Several experiments on the formation of solid hydrogen particles in liquid helium were recently conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field. The solid hydrogen experiments are the first step toward seeing these particles and determining their shape and size. The particles will ultimately store atoms of boron, carbon, or hydrogen, forming an atomic propellant. Atomic propellants will allow rocket vehicles to carry payloads many times heavier than possible with existing rockets or allow them to be much smaller and lighter. Solid hydrogen particles are preferred for storing atoms. Hydrogen is generally an excellent fuel with a low molecular weight. Very low temperature hydrogen particles (T < 4 K) can prevent the atoms from recombining, making it possible for their lifetime to be controlled. Also, particles that are less than 1 mm in diameter are preferred because they can flow easily into a pipe when suspended in liquid helium. The particles and atoms must remain at this low temperature until the fuel is introduced into the engine combustion (or recombination) chamber. Experiments were, therefore, planned to look at the particles and observe their formation and any changes while in liquid helium.

  13. IUE observations of neutral hydrogen and deuterium in the local interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landsman, W. B.; Murthy, J.; Henry, R. C.; Moos, H. W.; Linsky, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    Small-aperture, high-dispersion IUE spectra have been obtained of seven late-type stars that, in general, confirm previous Copernicus results concerning the distribution of hydrogen and deuterium in the local interstellar medium. In addition, the IUE Ly Alpha spectra of Altair, and of the Alpha Cen components, suggest that multiple velocity components exist in these two directions.

  14. Atomic hydrogen as a launch vehicle propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan A.

    1990-01-01

    An analysis of several atomic hydrogen launch vehicles was conducted. A discussion of the facilities and the technologies that would be needed for these vehicles is also presented. The Gross Liftoff Weights (GLOW) for two systems were estimated; their specific impulses (I sub sp) were 750 and 1500 lb(sub f)/s/lb(sub m). The atomic hydrogen launch vehicles were also compared to the currently planned Advanced Launch System design concepts. Very significant GLOW reductions of 52 to 58 percent are possible over the Advanced Launch System designs. Applying atomic hydrogen propellants to upper stages was also considered. Very high I(sub sp) (greater than 750 lb(sub f)/s/lb(sub m)) is needed to enable a mass savings over advanced oxygen/hydrogen propulsion. Associated with the potential benefits of high I(sub sp) atomic hydrogen are several challenging problems. Very high magnetic fields are required to maintain the atomic hydrogen in a solid hydrogen matrix. The magnetic field strength was estimated to be 30 kilogauss (3 Tesla). Also the storage temperature of the propellant is 4 K. This very low temperature will require a large refrigeration facility for the launch vehicle. The design considerations for a very high recombination rate for the propellant are also discussed. A recombination rate of 210 cm/s is predicted for atomic hydrogen. This high recombination rate can produce very high acceleration for the launch vehicle. Unique insulation or segmentation to inhibit the propellant may be needed to reduce its recombination rate.

  15. Atomic hydrogen as a launch vehicle propellant

    SciTech Connect

    Palaszewski, B.A.

    1990-01-01

    An analysis of several atomic hydrogen launch vehicles was conducted. A discussion of the facilities and the technologies that would be needed for these vehicles is also presented. The Gross Liftoff Weights (GLOW) for two systems were estimated; their specific impulses (I{sub sp}) were 750 and 1500 lb{sub f}/s/lb{sub m}. The atomic hydrogen launch vehicles were also compared to the currently planned Advanced Launch System design concepts. Very significant GLOW reductions of 52 to 58 percent are possible over the Advanced Launch System designs. Applying atomic hydrogen propellants to upper stages was also considered. Very high I{sub sp} (greater than 750 lb{sub f}/s/lb{sub m}) is needed to enable a mass savings over advanced oxygen/hydrogen propulsion. Associated with the potential benefits of high I(sub sp) atomic hydrogen are several challenging problems. Very high magnetic fields are required to maintain the atomic hydrogen in a solid hydrogen matrix. The magnetic field strength was estimated to be 30 kilogauss (3 Tesla). Also the storage temperature of the propellant is 4 K. This very low temperature will require a large refrigeration facility for the launch vehicle. The design considerations for a very high recombination rate for the propellant are also discussed. A recombination rate of 210 cm/s is predicted for atomic hydrogen. This high recombination rate can produce very high acceleration for the launch vehicle. Unique insulation or segmentation to inhibit the propellant may be needed to reduce its recombination rate.

  16. OBSERVATIONS OF THE INTERPLANETARY HYDROGEN DURING SOLAR CYCLES 23 AND 24. WHAT CAN WE DEDUCE ABOUT THE LOCAL INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM?

    SciTech Connect

    Vincent, Frédéric E.; Quémerais, Eric; Koutroumpa, Dimitra; Ben-Jaffel, Lotfi; Harris, Walter M.; Clarke, John

    2014-06-20

    Observations of interstellar helium atoms by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) spacecraft in 2009 reported a local interstellar medium (LISM) velocity vector different from the results of the Ulysses spacecraft between 1991 and 2002. The interplanetary hydrogen (IPH), a population of neutrals that fills the space between planets inside the heliosphere, carries the signatures of the LISM and its interaction with the solar wind. More than 40 yr of space-based studies of the backscattered solar Lyα emission from the IPH provided limited access to the velocity distribution, with the first temporal evolution map of the IPH line-shift during solar cycle 23. This work presents the results of the latest IPH observations made by the Hubble Space Telescope's Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph during solar cycle 24. These results have been compiled with previous measurements, including data from the Solar Wind Anisotropies instrument on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory. The whole set has been compared to physically realistic models to test both sets of LISM physical parameters as measured by Ulysses and IBEX, respectively. This comparison shows that the LISM velocity vector has not changed significantly since Ulysses measurements.

  17. Detection of interstellar hydrogen sulfide in cold, dark clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minh, Y. C.; Irvine, W. M.; Ziurys, L. M.

    1989-01-01

    Interstellar H2S has been detected toward the cold, dark clouds L134N and TMC 1. Total column densities at the SO peak of L134N and the NH3 peak of TMC 1 are found to be about 2.6 X 10 to the 13th/sq cm and 7.0 X 10 to the 12th/sq cm, respectively. The results suggest that grain surface reactions may play a major role in the synthesis of H2S in cold, dark clouds.

  18. Laboratory Experiments on the Reactions of PAH Cations with Molecules and Atoms of Interstellar Interest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LePage, V.; Lee, H. S.; Bierbaum, V. M.; Snow, T. P.

    1996-01-01

    The C10H8(+) cation and its dehydrogenated derivatives, C10H7(+) and C10H6(+), have been studied using a selected ion flow tube (SIFT). Reactions with molecules and atoms of interstellar interest show that C10H8(+) reacts with N md O to give neutral products HCN and CO, respectively. C10H6(+) and C10H6(+) are moderately reactive and reactions proceed through association with molecules. The implications of these results for the depletion of C10H(n)(+) in the interstellar medium are briefly discussed.

  19. The distribution of neutral hydrogen in the interstellar medium. 1: The data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fruscione, Antonella; Hawkins, Isabel; Jelinsky, Patrick; Wiercigroch, Alexandria

    1994-01-01

    We compile, from the existing literature, the largest sample to date (842 data points) of hydrogen column density measurements, N(H I), of the gas in the interstellar medium. We include only results obtained from absorption measurements toward individual stars (594 in our sample) in an effort to construct a three-dimensional picture of the interstellar gas. We derive hydrogen column densities toward a fraction of the stars in the sample from published column density measurements of metal ions. A three-dimensional physical model derived from this data set will be presented in a companion paper. The observed stars span distances from a few parsecs to a few thousand parsecs, and more than half of the sample serves to describe the local interstellar medium within a few hundred parsecs of the Sun. Hydrogen column densities range from 10(exp 17) to 10(exp 22)/sq cm. We describe here the various observational methods used to estimate the hydrogen column densities and present the table with the stellar and hydrogen column density data. The provided table is intended as a global reference work, not to introduce new results.

  20. Chiral glycine formation on cold interstellar grains by quantum tunneling hydrogen-deuterium substitution reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oba, Yasuhiro; Watanabe, Naoki; Osamura, Yoshihiro; Kouchi, Akira

    2015-08-01

    We report experimental evidence that chiral glycine (NH2CHDCOOH) is formed by the surface reaction of normal glycine (NH2CH2COOH) solid with deuterium (D) atom at 12 K under the simulative conditions of interstellar molecular clouds. Chiral glycine formation is most likely initiated by the tunneling abstraction reaction of H atom by D atom followed by the addition of D atom to the glycine radical (NH2CHCOOH). Given that chiral glycine can form in such a primordial low-temperature environment, it might source molecular chirality as molecular clouds evolve into planetary systems.

  1. Detection of interstellar pick-up hydrogen in the solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gloeckler, G.; Geiss, J.; Balsiger, H.; Fisk, L. A.; Galvin, A. B.; Ipavich, F. M.; Ogilvie, K. W.; Von Steiger, R.; Wilken, B.

    1993-01-01

    Interstellar hydrogen ionized primarily by the solar wind has been detected by the Solar Wind Ion Composition Spectrometer instrument on the Ulysses spacecraft at a distance of 4.8 AUs from the sun. This 'pick-up' hydrogen is identified by its distinct velocity distribution function, which drops abruptly at twice the local solar wind speed. From the measured fluxes of pick-up protons and singly charged helium, the number densities of neutral hydrogen and helium in the distant regions of the solar system are estimated to be 0.077 +/- 0.015 and 0.013 +/- 0.003 per cu cm, respectively.

  2. Detection of interstellar pick-up hydrogen in the solar system.

    PubMed

    Gloeckler, G; Galvin, A B; Ipavich, F M; Geiss, J; Balsiger, H; von Steiger, R; Fisk, L A; Ogilvie, K W; Wilken, B

    1993-07-02

    Interstellar hydrogen ionized primarily by the solar wind has been detected by the SWICS instrument on the Ulysses spacecraft at a distance of 4.8 astronomical units from the sun. This "pick-up" hydrogen is identified by its distinct velocity distribution function, which drops abruptly at twice the local solar wind speed. From the measured fluxes of pick-up protons and singly charged helium, the number densities of neutral hydrogen and helium in the distant regions of the solar system are estimated to be 0.077 +/- 0.015 and 0.013 +/- 0.003 per cubic centimeter, respectively.

  3. The heating of interstellar clouds by vibrationally excited molecular hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecher, T. P.; Williams, D. A.

    1972-01-01

    The possibility that vibrationally excited H2 may be collisionally de-excited, so providing a heating mechanism for interstellar clouds which operates by coupling the stellar radiation to the gas, is discussed. The majority of excitations in the Lyman and Werner bands of H2 return the molecules to the ground electronic state in a vibrationally excited level, the most favored level being 7. The heating rate obtained in this way is compared with other mechanisms which have been postulated, and the results of calculations of temperature as a function of depth into clouds of different densities are presented. It appears that this mechanism is a significant one, which should be taken into account in detailed models of dense clouds.

  4. The Direction of the Neutral Hydrogen Velocity in the Inner Heliosphere as a Possible Interstellar Magnetic Field Compass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogorelov, Nikolai V.; Zank, Gary P.

    2006-01-01

    We discuss the physical reasons that lead to the deflection of the interstellar neutral hydrogen flow from the direction of propagation of neutral helium in the inner heliosheath. On the basis of numerical simulations, the possibilities are investigated for deriving the orientation of the interstellar magnetic field as a function of the deflection angle.

  5. Radiation of partially ionized atomic hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soon, W. H.; Kunc, J. A.

    1990-01-01

    A nonlinear collisional-radiative model for determination of production of electrons, positive and negative ions, excited atoms, and spectral and continuum line intensities in stationary partially ionized atomic hydrogen is presented. Transport of radiation is included by coupling the rate equations for production of the electrons, ions, and excited atoms with the radiation escape factors, which are not constant but depend on plasma conditions. It is found that the contribution of the negative ion emission to the total continuum emission can be important. Comparison of the calculated total continuum emission coefficient, including the negative ion emission, is in good agreement with experimental results.

  6. Energetic hydrogen atoms in wave driven discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Felizardo, E.; Tatarova, E.; Henriques, J.; Dias, F. M.; Ferreira, C. M.; Gordiets, B.

    2011-07-25

    Doppler broadened H{sub {gamma}} emission was detected in high frequency (350 and 500 MHz) hydrogen surface wave sustained discharges, revealing the presence of fast excited H atoms with kinetic energies in the range 4-9 eV. Spatially resolved measurements of the Doppler-broadened emission indicate that these fast atoms are predominantly formed near the wall, which suggests that their generation may result from acceleration of H{sup +} ions in the radial dc space charge field followed by recombination at the wall and the return of the neutral atom to the gas phase.

  7. Compact microwave cavity for hydrogen atomic clock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Dejun; Zhang, Yan; Fu, Yigen; Zhang, Yanjun

    1992-01-01

    A summary is presented that introduces the compact microwave cavity used in the hydrogen atomic clock. Special emphasis is placed on derivation of theoretical calculating equations of main parameters of the microwave cavity. A brief description is given of several methods for discriminating the oscillating modes. Experimental data and respective calculated values are also presented.

  8. Photoionization of atomic hydrogen in electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Gorlov, Timofey V; Danilov, Viatcheslav V

    2010-01-01

    Laser assisted ionization of high energy hydrogen beams in magnetic fields opens wide application possibilities in accelerator physics and other fields. The key theoretical problem of the method is the calculation of the ionization probability of a hydrogen atom affected by laser and static electric fields in the particle rest frame. A method of solving this problem with the temporal Schr dinger equation including a continuum spectrum is presented in this paper in accurate form for the first time. This method allows finding the temporal evolution of the wave function of the hydrogen atom as a function of laser and static electric fields. Solving the problem of photoionization reveals quantum effects that cannot be described by the cross sectional approach. The effects play a key role in the problems of photoionization of H0 beams with the large angular or energy spread.

  9. Interstellar chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Klemperer, William

    2006-01-01

    In the past half century, radioastronomy has changed our perception and understanding of the universe. In this issue of PNAS, the molecular chemistry directly observed within the galaxy is discussed. For the most part, the description of the molecular transformations requires specific kinetic schemes rather than chemical thermodynamics. Ionization of the very abundant molecular hydrogen and atomic helium followed by their secondary reactions is discussed. The rich variety of organic species observed is a challenge for complete understanding. The role and nature of reactions involving grain surfaces as well as new spectroscopic observations of interstellar and circumstellar regions are topics presented in this special feature. PMID:16894148

  10. IUE observations of hydrogen and deuterium in the local interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, J.; Henry, R. C.; Moos, H. W.; Landsman, W. B.; Linsky, J. L.

    1987-01-01

    High-resolution Ly-alpha spectra of the late-type stars Epsilon Eri, Procyon, Altair, Capella, and HR 1099 taken with the short-wavelength camera on IUE are presented. The density, velocity dispersion, and bulk velocity of the interstellar H I toward each of the stars is derived from the spectra. Lower limits on the deuterium-to-hydrogen ratio toward these stars are obtained.

  11. IUE observations of hydrogen and deuterium in the local interstellar medium

    SciTech Connect

    Murthy, J.; Henry, R.C.; Moos, H.W.; Landsman, W.B.; Linsky, J.L.

    1987-04-01

    High-resolution Ly-alpha spectra of the late-type stars Epsilon Eri, Procyon, Altair, Capella, and HR 1099 taken with the short-wavelength camera on IUE are presented. The density, velocity dispersion, and bulk velocity of the interstellar H I toward each of the stars is derived from the spectra. Lower limits on the deuterium-to-hydrogen ratio toward these stars are obtained. 40 references.

  12. Hydrogen atom kinetics in capacitively coupled plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunomura, Shota; Katayama, Hirotaka; Yoshida, Isao

    2017-05-01

    Hydrogen (H) atom kinetics has been investigated in capacitively coupled very high frequency (VHF) discharges at powers of 16-780 mW cm-2 and H2 gas pressures of 0.1-2 Torr. The H atom density has been measured using vacuum ultra violet absorption spectroscopy (VUVAS) with a micro-discharge hollow cathode lamp as a VUV light source. The measurements have been performed in two different electrode configurations of discharges: conventional parallel-plate diode and triode with an intermediate mesh electrode. We find that in the triode configuration, the H atom density is strongly reduced across the mesh electrode. The H atom density varies from ˜1012 cm-3 to ˜1010 cm-3 by crossing the mesh with 0.2 mm in thickness and 36% in aperture ratio. The fluid model simulations for VHF discharge plasmas have been performed to study the H atom generation, diffusion and recombination kinetics. The simulations suggest that H atoms are generated in the bulk plasma, by the electron impact dissociation (e + H2 \\to e + 2H) and the ion-molecule reaction (H2 + + H2 \\to {{{H}}}3+ + H). The diffusion of H atoms is strongly limited by a mesh electrode, and thus the mesh geometry influences the spatial distribution of the H atoms. The loss of H atoms is dominated by the surface recombination.

  13. Diffuse Interstellar Bands versus Known Atomic and Molecular Species in the Interstellar Medium of M82 toward SN 2014J

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welty, Daniel E.; Ritchey, Adam M.; Dahlstrom, Julie A.; York, Donald G.

    2014-09-01

    We discuss the absorption due to various constituents of the interstellar medium (ISM) of M82 seen in moderately high-resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio optical spectra of SN 2014J. Complex absorption from M82 is seen, at velocities 45 <~ v LSR <~ 260 km s-1, for Na I, K I, Ca I, Ca II, CH, CH+, and CN; many of the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) are also detected. Comparisons of the column densities of the atomic and molecular species and the equivalent widths of the DIBs reveal both similarities and differences in relative abundances, compared to trends seen in the ISM of our Galaxy and the Magellanic Clouds. Of the 10 relatively strong DIBs considered here, 6 (including λ5780.5) have strengths within ±20% of the mean values seen in the local Galactic ISM, for comparable N(K I); 2 are weaker by 20%-45% and 2 (including λ5797.1) are stronger by 25%-40%. Weaker than "expected" DIBs (relative to N(K I), N(Na I), and E(B - V)) in some Galactic sight lines and toward several other extragalactic supernovae appear to be associated with strong CN absorption and/or significant molecular fractions. While the N(CH)/N(K I) and N(CN)/N(CH) ratios seen toward SN 2014J are similar to those found in the local Galactic ISM, the combination of high N(CH+)/N(CH) and high W(5797.1)/W(5780.5) ratios has not been seen elsewhere. The centroids of many of the M82 DIBs are shifted relative to the envelope of the K I profile—likely due to component-to-component variations in W(DIB)/N(K I) that may reflect the molecular content of the individual components. We compare estimates for the host galaxy reddening E(B - V) and visual extinction A V derived from the various interstellar species with the values estimated from optical and near-IR photometry of SN 2014J.

  14. Diffuse interstellar bands versus known atomic and molecular species in the interstellar medium of M82 toward SN 2014J

    SciTech Connect

    Welty, Daniel E.; York, Donald G.; Ritchey, Adam M.; Dahlstrom, Julie A.

    2014-09-10

    We discuss the absorption due to various constituents of the interstellar medium (ISM) of M82 seen in moderately high-resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio optical spectra of SN 2014J. Complex absorption from M82 is seen, at velocities 45 ≲ v {sub LSR} ≲ 260 km s{sup –1}, for Na I, K I, Ca I, Ca II, CH, CH{sup +}, and CN; many of the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) are also detected. Comparisons of the column densities of the atomic and molecular species and the equivalent widths of the DIBs reveal both similarities and differences in relative abundances, compared to trends seen in the ISM of our Galaxy and the Magellanic Clouds. Of the 10 relatively strong DIBs considered here, 6 (including λ5780.5) have strengths within ±20% of the mean values seen in the local Galactic ISM, for comparable N(K I); 2 are weaker by 20%-45% and 2 (including λ5797.1) are stronger by 25%-40%. Weaker than 'expected' DIBs (relative to N(K I), N(Na I), and E(B – V)) in some Galactic sight lines and toward several other extragalactic supernovae appear to be associated with strong CN absorption and/or significant molecular fractions. While the N(CH)/N(K I) and N(CN)/N(CH) ratios seen toward SN 2014J are similar to those found in the local Galactic ISM, the combination of high N(CH{sup +})/N(CH) and high W(5797.1)/W(5780.5) ratios has not been seen elsewhere. The centroids of many of the M82 DIBs are shifted relative to the envelope of the K I profile—likely due to component-to-component variations in W(DIB)/N(K I) that may reflect the molecular content of the individual components. We compare estimates for the host galaxy reddening E(B – V) and visual extinction A {sub V} derived from the various interstellar species with the values estimated from optical and near-IR photometry of SN 2014J.

  15. Atomic line emission analyzer for hydrogen isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1991-05-08

    Apparatus for isotopic analysis of hydrogen comprises a low pressure chamber into which a sample of hydrogen is introduced and then exposed to an electrical discharge to excite the electrons of the hydrogen atoms to higher energy states and thereby cause the emission of light on the return to lower energy states, a Fresnel prism made at least in part of a material anomalously dispersive to the wavelengths of interest for dispersing the emitted light, and a photodiode array for receiving the dispersed light. The light emitted by the sample is filtered to pass only the desired wavelengths, such as one of the lines of the Balmer series for hydrogen, the wavelengths of which differ slightly from one isotope to another. The output of the photodiode array is processed to determine the relative amounts of each isotope present in the sample. Additionally, the sample itself may be recovered using, a metal hydride.

  16. Atomic line emission analyzer for hydrogen isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1993-03-30

    Apparatus for isotopic analysis of hydrogen comprises a low pressure chamber into which a sample of hydrogen is introduced and then exposed to an electrical discharge to excite the electrons of the hydrogen atoms to higher energy states and thereby cause the emission of light on the return to lower energy states, a Fresnel prism made at least in part of a material anomalously dispersive to the wavelengths of interest for dispersing the emitted light, and a photodiode array for receiving the dispersed light. The light emitted by the sample is filtered to pass only the desired wavelengths, such as one of the lines of the Balmer series for hydrogen, the wavelengths of which differ slightly from one isotope to another. The output of the photodiode array is processed to determine the relative amounts of each isotope present in the sample. Additionally, the sample itself may be recovered using a metal hydride.

  17. Atomic line emission analyzer for hydrogen isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1993-01-01

    Apparatus for isotopic analysis of hydrogen comprises a low pressure chamber into which a sample of hydrogen is introduced and then exposed to an electrical discharge to excite the electrons of the hydrogen atoms to higher energy states and thereby cause the emission of light on the return to lower energy states, a Fresnel prism made at least in part of a material anomalously dispersive to the wavelengths of interest for dispersing the emitted light, and a photodiode array for receiving the dispersed light. The light emitted by the sample is filtered to pass only the desired wavelengths, such as one of the lines of the Balmer series for hydrogen, the wavelengths of which differ slightly from one isotope to another. The output of the photodiode array is processed to determine the relative amounts of each isotope present in the sample. Additionally, the sample itself may be recovered using a metal hydride.

  18. Interstellar molecules and dense clouds.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rank, D. M.; Townes, C. H.; Welch, W. J.

    1971-01-01

    Current knowledge of the interstellar medium is discussed on the basis of recent published studies. The subjects considered include optical identification of interstellar molecules, radio molecular lines, interstellar clouds, isotopic abundances, formation and disappearance of interstellar molecules, and interstellar probing techniques. Diagrams are plotted for the distribution of galactic sources exhibiting molecular lines, for hydrogen molecule, hydrogen atom and electron abundances due to ionization, for the densities, velocities and temperature of NH3 in the direction of Sagitarius B2, for the lower rotational energy levels of H2CO, and for temporal spectral variations in masing H2O clouds of the radio source W49. Future applications of the maser and of molecular microscopy in this field are visualized.

  19. A Simple and Accurate Network for Hydrogen and Carbon Chemistry in the Interstellar Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Munan; Ostriker, Eve C.; Wolfire, Mark G.

    2017-07-01

    Chemistry plays an important role in the interstellar medium (ISM), regulating the heating and cooling of the gas and determining abundances of molecular species that trace gas properties in observations. Although solving the time-dependent equations is necessary for accurate abundances and temperature in the dynamic ISM, a full chemical network is too computationally expensive to incorporate into numerical simulations. In this paper, we propose a new simplified chemical network for hydrogen and carbon chemistry in the atomic and molecular ISM. We compare results from our chemical network in detail with results from a full photodissociation region (PDR) code, and also with the Nelson & Langer (NL99) network previously adopted in the simulation literature. We show that our chemical network gives similar results to the PDR code in the equilibrium abundances of all species over a wide range of densities, temperature, and metallicities, whereas the NL99 network shows significant disagreement. Applying our network to 1D models, we find that the CO-dominated regime delimits the coldest gas and that the corresponding temperature tracks the cosmic-ray ionization rate in molecular clouds. We provide a simple fit for the locus of CO-dominated regions as a function of gas density and column. We also compare with observations of diffuse and translucent clouds. We find that the CO, {{CH}}x, and {{OH}}x abundances are consistent with equilibrium predictions for densities n=100{--}1000 {{cm}}-3, but the predicted equilibrium C abundance is higher than that seen in observations, signaling the potential importance of non-equilibrium/dynamical effects.

  20. The abundance of deuterium relative to hydrogen in interstellar space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    York, D. G.; Rogerson, J. B., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Copernicus satellite observations of the deuterium and hydrogen Lyman lines in the lines of sight to mu COl, gamma-2 Vel, alpha Cru AB, and alpha Vir AB are reported. Together with previously published data for beta Cen A, the results yield a value N(D)/N(H) of approximately 0.000018 (m.e.) or a total deuterium mass portion of approximately 0.000025. Values for all stars with their error bars are contained within a band ranging from 0.25 to 2.0 times the quoted mean ratio. These limits are probably representative of the region within 200 pc of the sun. The results for these stars are essentially independent of assumptions about the Doppler parameter describing the formation of the lines, although this value can be derived from the observations. The results are consistent with a maximum temperature of 6000 K for the lines of sight studied.

  1. The abundance of deuterium relative to hydrogen in interstellar space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    York, D. G.; Rogerson, J. B., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Copernicus satellite observations of the deuterium and hydrogen Lyman lines in the lines of sight to mu COl, gamma-2 Vel, alpha Cru AB, and alpha Vir AB are reported. Together with previously published data for beta Cen A, the results yield a value N(D)/N(H) of approximately 0.000018 (m.e.) or a total deuterium mass portion of approximately 0.000025. Values for all stars with their error bars are contained within a band ranging from 0.25 to 2.0 times the quoted mean ratio. These limits are probably representative of the region within 200 pc of the sun. The results for these stars are essentially independent of assumptions about the Doppler parameter describing the formation of the lines, although this value can be derived from the observations. The results are consistent with a maximum temperature of 6000 K for the lines of sight studied.

  2. Interstellar Pickup Hydrogen Observations from the Pioneer 10 and 11 Plasma Analyzers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mihalov, J. D.; Gazis, P. R.

    1995-01-01

    The Pioneer 10 and 11 Ames plasma analyzers included off-angle integrating counters used for the first exploration of magnetospheric plasmas at Jupiter and Saturn. When summed over multi-day intervals during interplanetary cruise, at times of relatively constant solar wind speed during 1972 to 1977, the resulting count rates show a dependence on acceptance energies of the plasma analyzer deflection plates. The count rates could be produced by energetic charged particles, solar wind protons moving at a large angle to the bulk flow, and interstellar pickup ions. We interpret the more energetic of two peaks that are sometimes observed as the signature of interstellar pickup hydrogen. This peak is located at just below twice the solar wind speed (V(sub SW)), when near 3 AU heliocentric distance, decreasing to just above V(sub SW) as the heliocentric distance increases. Also, in the 8 to 12 AU range of heliocentric distances, we identify the pickup hydrogen signature as a shelf that ends at an edge located below 2V(sub SW). During these observations, the spacecraft longitude relative to the upstream interstellar flow changes roughly from 25 deg, to 155 deg at the larger heliocentric distance. The peak at the smaller heliocentric distances is most consistent with a velocity distribution that is a shell in phase space, with limited thickening as the pickup ions are assimilated into the solar wind flow.

  3. Solid Hydrogen Experiments for Atomic Propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan

    2001-01-01

    This paper illustrates experiments that were conducted on the formation of solid hydrogen particles in liquid helium. Solid particles of hydrogen were frozen in liquid helium, and observed with a video camera. The solid hydrogen particle sizes, their molecular structure transitions, and their agglomeration times were estimated. article sizes of 1.8 to 4.6 mm (0.07 to 0. 18 in.) were measured. The particle agglomeration times were 0.5 to 11 min, depending on the loading of particles in the dewar. These experiments are the first step toward visually characterizing these particles, and allow designers to understand what issues must be addressed in atomic propellant feed system designs for future aerospace vehicles.

  4. Gauge-invariant hydrogen-atom Hamiltonian

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Weimin; Wang Fan; Chen Xiangsong; Lue Xiaofu

    2010-07-15

    For quantum mechanics of a charged particle in a classical external electromagnetic field, there is an apparent puzzle that the matrix element of the canonical momentum and Hamiltonian operators is gauge dependent. A resolution to this puzzle was recently provided by us [X.-S. Chen et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 232002 (2008)]. Based on the separation of the electromagnetic potential into pure-gauge and gauge-invariant parts, we have proposed a new set of momentum and Hamiltonian operators which satisfy both the requirement of gauge invariance and the relevant commutation relations. In this paper we report a check for the case of the hydrogen-atom problem: Starting from the Hamiltonian of the coupled electron, proton, and electromagnetic field, under the infinite proton mass approximation, we derive the gauge-invariant hydrogen-atom Hamiltonian and verify explicitly that this Hamiltonian is different from the Dirac Hamiltonian, which is the time translation generator of the system. The gauge-invariant Hamiltonian is the energy operator, whose eigenvalue is the energy of the hydrogen atom. It is generally time dependent. In this case, one can solve the energy eigenvalue equation at any specific instant of time. It is shown that the energy eigenvalues are gauge independent, and by suitably choosing the phase factor of the time-dependent eigenfunction, one can ensure that the time-dependent eigenfunction satisfies the Dirac equation.

  5. Experimental and Observational Studies of Molecular Hydrogen in Interstellar and Circumstellar Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoadley, Keri

    2017-08-01

    Understanding the evolution of gas over the lifetime of protoplanetary disks provides us with important clues about how planet formation mechanisms drive the diversity of exoplanetary systems observed to date. In the first part of my thesis, I discuss how I use fluorescent emission observations of molecular hydrogen (H2) in the far-ultraviolet (far-UV) with the Hubble Space Telescope to study the warm molecular regions (a < 10 AU) of planet-forming disks. I have created analytic disk models that produce synthetic H2 line profiles and statistically compare each disk realization with the data. I how the modeled radial distributions of H 2 help provide important constraints on the radiation properties of gas left in the inner disk of protoplanetary disks as they evolve. Additionally, I analyzed the absorption component of these fluorescence features, embedded within the hydrogen Lyman-alpha emission line produced by the accretion of material onto the host protostar. I present column density and temperature estimates for the H2 populations in each disk sightline, and discuss the behavior and possible spatial origins of these hot molecules. As part of my thesis, I address some observational requirements needed to gain further insights into the behavior of the warm, gaseous protoplanetary disk, focusing specifically on a spectrograph concept for the next-generation LUVOIR Surveyor. I discuss a testbed instrument, the Colorado High-resolution Echelle Stellar Spectrograph (CHESS), built as a demonstration of one component of the LUVOIR spectrograph and new technological improvements to UV optical components for the next generation of near- to far-UV astrophysical observatories. CHESS is a far-UV sounding rocket experiment designed to probe the warm and cool atoms and molecules near sites of recent star formation in the local interstellar medium. I present the science goals, design, research and development components, and calibration of the CHESS instrument. I provide

  6. Changes in interstellar atomic abundances from the galactic plane to the halo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, E. B.

    1982-01-01

    A few, specially selected interstellar absorption lines were measured in the high resolution, far ultraviolet spectra of 200 O and B type stars observed by the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE). For lines of sight extending beyond about 500 pc from the galactic plane, the abundance of singly ionized iron atoms increases relative to singly ionized sulfur. However, the relative abundances of singly ionized sulfur, silicon and aluminum do not seem to change appreciably. An explanation for the apparent increase of iron is the partial sputtering of material off the surfaces of dust grains by interstellar shocks. Another possibility might be that the ejecta from type I supernovae enrich the low density medium in the halo with iron.

  7. Hydrogenation of interstellar molecules: a survey for methylenimine (CH2NH)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickens, J. E.; Irvine, W. M.; DeVries, C. H.; Ohishi, M.

    1997-01-01

    Methylenimine (CH2NH) has been convincingly detected for the first time outside the Galactic center as part of a study of the hydrogenation of interstellar molecules. We have observed transitions from energy levels up to about 100 K above the ground state in the giant molecular clouds W51, Orion KL and G34.3 + 0.15. In addition, CH2NH was found at the " radical-ion peak" on the quiescent ridge of material in the Orion molecular cloud. The abundance ratio CH2NH/HCN at the radical-ion peak agrees with the predictions of recent gas-phase chemical models. This ratio is an order of magnitude higher in the warmer cloud cores, suggesting additional production pathways for CH2NH, probably on interstellar grains.

  8. Hydrogenation of interstellar molecules: a survey for methylenimine (CH2NH)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickens, J. E.; Irvine, W. M.; DeVries, C. H.; Ohishi, M.

    1997-01-01

    Methylenimine (CH2NH) has been convincingly detected for the first time outside the Galactic center as part of a study of the hydrogenation of interstellar molecules. We have observed transitions from energy levels up to about 100 K above the ground state in the giant molecular clouds W51, Orion KL and G34.3 + 0.15. In addition, CH2NH was found at the " radical-ion peak" on the quiescent ridge of material in the Orion molecular cloud. The abundance ratio CH2NH/HCN at the radical-ion peak agrees with the predictions of recent gas-phase chemical models. This ratio is an order of magnitude higher in the warmer cloud cores, suggesting additional production pathways for CH2NH, probably on interstellar grains.

  9. Interstellar Hydrogen in Galaxies: Radio observations of neutral hydrogen yield valuable information on the properties of galaxies.

    PubMed

    Roberts, M S

    1974-02-01

    Measurement of the 21-cm line radiation originating from the interstellar neutral hydrogen in a galaxy yields information on the total mass and total hydrogen content of the galaxy. The ratio of these two quantities is correlated with structural type in the sense that the later type galaxies contain a higher fraction of their total mass in the form of interstellar hydrogen This ratio is one of the few physical parameters known to correlate with structural type. It need not, however, reflect an evolutionary sequence, such as more hydrogen implying a younger galaxy. Efficiency of conversion of hydrogen to stars can just as easily explain the correlation. Except for the very latest systems, the total mass of a spiral does not appear to be correlated with type. Red shifts of galaxies measured at optical wavelengths and at 21 cm are in excellent agreement. The form of the Doppler expression has been shown to hold over a wavelength range of 5 x 105. All spirals earlier than type Ir which have been studied with adequate resolution show a central minimum in their hydrogen distribution. The region of maximum projected HI surface density occurs at some distance from the center. In the earlier type spirals the optical arms are located in the region of this maximum surface density. In the later type spirals the maximum HI density and prominent optical arms are less well correlated and, at times, are anticorrelated. Detailed studies of the HI distribution and motions within a galaxy require the high relative resolution of beam synthesis arrays. We may expect significant new information from such studies, which are now in progress. Filled-aperture telescopes will supply the necessary observations at zero spacing and vital statistical information on large numbers of galaxies, peculiar systems and groups and clusters of galaxies. The two types of telescope systems will complement one another. In the near future we should have a much better description of spiral galaxies and, we

  10. Solid Hydrogen Particles Analyzed for Atomic Fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan A.

    2001-01-01

    Solid hydrogen particles have been selected as a means of storing atomic propellants in future launch vehicles (refs. 1 to 2). In preparation for this, hydrogen particle formation in liquid helium was tested experimentally. These experiments were conducted to visually characterize the particles and to observe their formation and molecular transformations (aging) while in liquid helium. The particle sizes, molecular transformations, and agglomeration times were estimated from video image analyses. The experiments were conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center in the Supplemental Multilayer Insulation Research Facility (SMIRF, ref. 3). The facility has a vacuum tank, into which the experimental setup was placed. The vacuum tank prevented heat leaks and subsequent boiloff of the liquid helium, and the supporting systems maintained the temperature and pressure of the liquid helium bath where the solid particles were created. As the operation of the apparatus was developed, the hydrogen particles were easily visualized. The figures (ref. 1) show images from the experimental runs. The first image shows the initial particle freezing, and the second image shows the particles after the small particles have agglomerated. The particles finally all clump, but stick together loosely. The solid particles tended to agglomerate within a maximum of 11 min, and the agglomerate was very weak. Because the hydrogen particles are buoyant in the helium, the agglomerate tends to compact itself into a flat pancake on the surface of the helium. This pancake agglomerate is easily broken apart by reducing the pressure above the liquid. The weak agglomerate implies that the particles can be used as a gelling agent for the liquid helium, as well as a storage medium for atomic boron, carbon, or hydrogen. The smallest particle sizes that resulted from the initial freezing experiments were about 1.8 mm. About 50 percent of the particles formed were between 1.8 to 4.6 mm in diameter. These very

  11. Fourteen Years of Atomic Hydrogen from SABER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, L. A.; Mlynczak, M. G.

    2015-12-01

    We present results for atomic hydrogen in the mesopause region (80-100 km) derived from measurements made by the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) instrument on the TIMED satellite. SABER has been measuring the vertical distribution of infrared radiation emitted by various atmospheric gases for nearly 14 years, providing important information about chemical species, including atomic oxygen, atomic hydrogen, ozone and hydroxyl; temperature; and the radiation budget in the upper atmosphere. The methodology for the derivation of daytime and nighttime concentrations and volume mixing ratios will be presented. Zonal mean and global average daytime and nighttime concentrations of H, which demonstrate excellent agreement between 87 and 95 km, have been calculated and the results are compared with observations from the Solar Mesosphere Explorer (SME) satellite made nearly 30 years ago. Variability over the course of the SABER mission will be shown, including the apparent inverse dependence on the solar cycle, which stems from the temperature dependence of various reaction rate coefficients for H photochemistry. Results for H near solar max will be compared for Solar Cycles 23 and 24.

  12. Interstellar Antifreeze: Ethylene Glycol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollis, J. M.; Lovas, F. J.; Jewell, P. R.; Coudert, L. H.

    2002-05-01

    Interstellar ethylene glycol (HOCH2CH2OH) has been detected in emission toward the Galactic center source Sagittarius B2(N-LMH) by means of several millimeter-wave rotational torsional transitions of its lowest energy conformer. The types and kinds of molecules found to date in interstellar clouds suggest a chemistry that favors aldehydes and their corresponding reduced alcohols-e.g., formaldehyde (H2CO)/methanol (CH3OH), acetaldehyde (CH3CHO)/ethanol (CH3CH2OH). Similarly, ethylene glycol is the reduced alcohol of glycolaldehyde (CH2OHCHO), which has also been detected toward Sgr B2(N-LMH). While there is no consensus as to how any such large complex molecules are formed in the interstellar clouds, atomic hydrogen (H) and carbon monoxide (CO) could form formaldehyde on grain surfaces, but such surface chemistry beyond that point is uncertain. However, laboratory experiments have shown that the gas-phase reaction of atomic hydrogen (H) and solid-phase CO at 10-20 K can produce formaldehyde and methanol and that alcohols and other complex molecules can be synthesized from cometary ice analogs when subject to ionizing radiation at 15 K. Thus, the presence of aldehyde/reduced alcohol pairs in interstellar clouds implies that such molecules are a product of a low-temperature chemistry on grain surfaces or in grain ice mantles. This work suggests that aldehydes and their corresponding reduced alcohols provide unique observational constraints on the formation of complex interstellar molecules.

  13. Interstellar Antifreeze: Ethylene Glycol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollis, J. M.; Lovas, F. J.; Jewell, P. R.; Coudert, L. H.

    2002-01-01

    Interstellar ethylene glycol (HOCH2CH2,OH) has been detected in emission toward the Galactic center source Sagittarius B2(N-LMH) by means of several millimeter-wave rotational torsional transitions of its lowest energy conformer. The types and kinds of molecules found to date in interstellar clouds suggest a chemistry that favors aldehydes and their corresponding reduced alcohols-e.g., formaldehyde (H2CO)/methanol (CH3OH), acetaldehyde (CH3CHO)/ethanol (CH3CH2OH). Similarly, ethylene glycol is the reduced alcohol of glycolaldehyde (CH2OHCHO), which has also been detected toward Sgr B2(N-LMH). While there is no consensus as to how any such large complex molecules are formed in the interstellar clouds, atomic hydrogen (H) and carbon monoxide (CO) could form formaldehyde on grain surfaces, but such surface chemistry beyond that point is uncertain. However, laboratory experiments have shown that the gas-phase reaction of atomic hydrogen (H) and solid-phase CO at 10-20 K can produce formaldehyde and methanol and that alcohols and other complex molecules can be synthesized from cometary ice analogs when subject to ionizing radiation at 15 K. Thus, the presence of aldehyde/ reduced alcohol pairs in interstellar clouds implies that such molecules are a product of a low-temperature chemistry on grain surfaces or in grain ice mantles. This work suggests that aldehydes and their corresponding reduced alcohols provide unique observational constraints on the formation of complex interstellar molecules.

  14. Interstellar Antifreeze: Ethylene Glycol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollis, J. M.; Lovas, F. J.; Jewell, P. R.; Coudert, L. H.

    2002-01-01

    Interstellar ethylene glycol (HOCH2CH2,OH) has been detected in emission toward the Galactic center source Sagittarius B2(N-LMH) by means of several millimeter-wave rotational torsional transitions of its lowest energy conformer. The types and kinds of molecules found to date in interstellar clouds suggest a chemistry that favors aldehydes and their corresponding reduced alcohols-e.g., formaldehyde (H2CO)/methanol (CH3OH), acetaldehyde (CH3CHO)/ethanol (CH3CH2OH). Similarly, ethylene glycol is the reduced alcohol of glycolaldehyde (CH2OHCHO), which has also been detected toward Sgr B2(N-LMH). While there is no consensus as to how any such large complex molecules are formed in the interstellar clouds, atomic hydrogen (H) and carbon monoxide (CO) could form formaldehyde on grain surfaces, but such surface chemistry beyond that point is uncertain. However, laboratory experiments have shown that the gas-phase reaction of atomic hydrogen (H) and solid-phase CO at 10-20 K can produce formaldehyde and methanol and that alcohols and other complex molecules can be synthesized from cometary ice analogs when subject to ionizing radiation at 15 K. Thus, the presence of aldehyde/ reduced alcohol pairs in interstellar clouds implies that such molecules are a product of a low-temperature chemistry on grain surfaces or in grain ice mantles. This work suggests that aldehydes and their corresponding reduced alcohols provide unique observational constraints on the formation of complex interstellar molecules.

  15. Infrared emission from hydrogenated amorphous carbon and amorphous carbon grains in the interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duley, W. W.; Jones, A. P.; Taylor, S. D.; Williams, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    The correlations deduced by Boulanger et al. (1990) from IRAS maps of the Chamaeleon, Taurus and Ursa Major molecular cloud complexes are interpreted in terms of the evolutionary hydrogenated amorphous carbon model of interstellar dust. In particular, regions of relatively strong 12-micron emission may be regions where recently accreted carbon is being converted by ambient UV to small PAHs in situ. Regions of weak 12-micron emission are probably quiescent regions where carbon has been annealed to amorphous carbon. Observational consequences of these inferences are briefly described.

  16. Non-thermal hydrogen atoms in the terrestrial upper thermosphere

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Jianqi; Waldrop, Lara

    2016-01-01

    Model predictions of the distribution and dynamical transport of hydrogen atoms in the terrestrial atmosphere have long-standing discrepancies with ultraviolet remote sensing measurements, indicating likely deficiencies in conventional theories regarding this crucial atmospheric constituent. Here we report the existence of non-thermal hydrogen atoms that are much hotter than the ambient oxygen atoms in the upper thermosphere. Analysis of satellite measurements indicates that the upper thermospheric hydrogen temperature, more precisely the mean kinetic energy of the atomic hydrogen population, increases significantly with declining solar activity, contrary to contemporary understanding of thermospheric behaviour. The existence of hot hydrogen atoms in the upper thermosphere, which is the key to reconciling model predictions and observations, is likely a consequence of low atomic oxygen density leading to incomplete collisional thermalization of the hydrogen population following its kinetic energization through interactions with hot atomic or ionized constituents in the ionosphere, plasmasphere or magnetosphere. PMID:27922018

  17. Non-thermal hydrogen atoms in the terrestrial upper thermosphere.

    PubMed

    Qin, Jianqi; Waldrop, Lara

    2016-12-06

    Model predictions of the distribution and dynamical transport of hydrogen atoms in the terrestrial atmosphere have long-standing discrepancies with ultraviolet remote sensing measurements, indicating likely deficiencies in conventional theories regarding this crucial atmospheric constituent. Here we report the existence of non-thermal hydrogen atoms that are much hotter than the ambient oxygen atoms in the upper thermosphere. Analysis of satellite measurements indicates that the upper thermospheric hydrogen temperature, more precisely the mean kinetic energy of the atomic hydrogen population, increases significantly with declining solar activity, contrary to contemporary understanding of thermospheric behaviour. The existence of hot hydrogen atoms in the upper thermosphere, which is the key to reconciling model predictions and observations, is likely a consequence of low atomic oxygen density leading to incomplete collisional thermalization of the hydrogen population following its kinetic energization through interactions with hot atomic or ionized constituents in the ionosphere, plasmasphere or magnetosphere.

  18. Non-thermal hydrogen atoms in the terrestrial upper thermosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Jianqi; Waldrop, Lara

    2016-12-01

    Model predictions of the distribution and dynamical transport of hydrogen atoms in the terrestrial atmosphere have long-standing discrepancies with ultraviolet remote sensing measurements, indicating likely deficiencies in conventional theories regarding this crucial atmospheric constituent. Here we report the existence of non-thermal hydrogen atoms that are much hotter than the ambient oxygen atoms in the upper thermosphere. Analysis of satellite measurements indicates that the upper thermospheric hydrogen temperature, more precisely the mean kinetic energy of the atomic hydrogen population, increases significantly with declining solar activity, contrary to contemporary understanding of thermospheric behaviour. The existence of hot hydrogen atoms in the upper thermosphere, which is the key to reconciling model predictions and observations, is likely a consequence of low atomic oxygen density leading to incomplete collisional thermalization of the hydrogen population following its kinetic energization through interactions with hot atomic or ionized constituents in the ionosphere, plasmasphere or magnetosphere.

  19. The ratio of neutral hydrogen to neutral helium in the local interstellar medium

    SciTech Connect

    Green, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    The results are described from a sounding rocket borne EUV spectrometer that was designed and built. This instrument operated from 400 to 1150A with a spectral resolution of approx. 15A. The instrument effective area was about 1 sq cm. The instrument was successfully launched, and observed the nearby DA white dwarf G191-B2B. From this observation, it was determined that the stellar effective temperature is 61,000 + or -4000 to 6000K, and the ratio of helium to hydrogen in the stellar photosphere is 1.0 + or -0.68 to 2.2 x 10(exp -4). Additionally, the neutral column densities of helium and hydrogen were measured to the star. The neutral helium column density was determined from the first observation of the interstellar absorption edge at 504A. The ratio of neutral helium to neutral hydrogen constrains the mean ionization of the warm gas along the line of sight to G191-B2B. The fractional ionization of hydrogen (H II/H) is approx. less than 20 percent, unless significant helium ionization is present as well. The scenario where the fractional ionization of hydrogen is high (H II/H) approx. less than 40 percent and the helium is neutral is ruled out with 99 percent certainty. This result is consistent with some recent theoretical calculations. Using these results, a self-consistent model of the local interstellar medium along the line of sight to G191-B2B is developed. In addition, an unexpected emission feature at 584A was detected in this observation with a high level of significance. Possible sources of this emission are examined, including the companion K dwarf G191-B2A, and an emission nebula near or around G191-B2B.

  20. Energetic neutral atom and interstellar flow observations with IBEX: Implications for the global heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwadron, N. A.; McComas, D. J.; Christian, E. R.; Desai, M. I.; Funsten, H. O.; Fuselier, S. A.; Moebius, E.; Reno, M.; Scherrer, J.; Zirnstein, E.

    2016-03-01

    Since launch in Oct. 2008, IBEX, with its two energetic neutral atom (ENA) cameras, has provided humankind with the first-ever global images of the complex boundary separating the heliosphere from the local interstellar medium (LISM). IBEX's energy-resolved all-sky maps, collected every six months, are yielding remarkable new insights into the heliospheres structure as it is shaped by the combined forces of the local interstellar flow, the local interstellar magnetic field (LISMF), and the evolving solar wind. IBEX has also acquired the first images of ENAs backscattered from the surface of the moon as well as global images of the magnetospheric response to solar wind disturbances. IBEX thus addresses all three Heliophysics science objectives set forth in the 2014 Science Plan for NASAs Science Mission Directorate (SMD) as well as the goals in the recent Solar and Space Physics Decadal Survey (NRC 2012). In addition, with the information it provides on the properties of the LISM and the LISMF, IBEX represents a unique bridge between heliophysics and astrophysics, and fills in critical knowledge for understanding the habitability of exoplanetary systems and the future habitability of Earth and the solar system. Because of the few-year time lag due to solar wind and ENA transport, IBEX observed the solar wind/ LISM interaction characteristic of declining phase/solar minimum conditions. In the continuing mission, IBEX captures the response of the interstellar boundaries to the changing structure of the solar wind in its transition toward the "mini" solar maximum and possibly the decline into the next solar minimum. The continuing IBEX mission affords never-to-be-repeated opportunities to coordinate global imaging of the heliospheric boundary with in-situ measurements by the Voyagers as they pass beyond the heliopause and start to directly sample the LISM.

  1. Energetic neutral atom and interstellar flow observations with IBEX: Implications for the global heliosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Schwadron, N. A.; McComas, D. J.; Desai, M. I.; Fuselier, S. A.; Christian, E. R.; Funsten, H. O.; Moebius, E.; Reno, M.; Scherrer, J.; Zirnstein, E.

    2016-03-25

    Since launch in Oct. 2008, IBEX, with its two energetic neutral atom (ENA) cameras, has provided humankind with the first-ever global images of the complex boundary separating the heliosphere from the local interstellar medium (LISM). IBEX’s energy-resolved all-sky maps, collected every six months, are yielding remarkable new insights into the heliospheres structure as it is shaped by the combined forces of the local interstellar flow, the local interstellar magnetic field (LISMF), and the evolving solar wind. IBEX has also acquired the first images of ENAs backscattered from the surface of the moon as well as global images of the magnetospheric response to solar wind disturbances. IBEX thus addresses all three Heliophysics science objectives set forth in the 2014 Science Plan for NASAs Science Mission Directorate (SMD) as well as the goals in the recent Solar and Space Physics Decadal Survey (NRC 2012). In addition, with the information it provides on the properties of the LISM and the LISMF, IBEX represents a unique bridge between heliophysics and astrophysics, and fills in critical knowledge for understanding the habitability of exoplanetary systems and the future habitability of Earth and the solar system. Because of the few-year time lag due to solar wind and ENA transport, IBEX observed the solar wind/ LISM interaction characteristic of declining phase/solar minimum conditions. In the continuing mission, IBEX captures the response of the interstellar boundaries to the changing structure of the solar wind in its transition toward the “mini” solar maximum and possibly the decline into the next solar minimum. The continuing IBEX mission affords never-to-be-repeated opportunities to coordinate global imaging of the heliospheric boundary with in-situ measurements by the Voyagers as they pass beyond the heliopause and start to directly sample the LISM.

  2. Atomic Hydrogen in a Galactic Center Outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClure-Griffiths, N. M.; Green, J. A.; Hill, A. S.; Lockman, F. J.; Dickey, J. M.; Gaensler, B. M.; Green, A. J.

    2013-06-01

    We describe a population of small, high-velocity, atomic hydrogen clouds, loops, and filaments found above and below the disk near the Galactic center. The objects have a mean radius of 15 pc, velocity widths of ~14 km s-1, and are observed at |z| heights up to 700 pc. The velocity distribution of the clouds shows no signature of Galactic rotation. We propose a scenario where the clouds are associated with an outflow from a central star-forming region at the Galactic center. We discuss the clouds as entrained material traveling at ~200 km s-1 in a Galactic wind.

  3. Positron impact ionization of atomic hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Acacia, P.; Campeanu, R.I.; Horbatsch, M.

    1993-05-01

    We will present integrated cross sections for ionization of atomic hydrogen by positrons. These have been calculated in a distorted-wave approximation using energy-dependent effective charges in the final channel as well as static and polarization potentials in the initial channel. We present two models for calculating the energy-dependent effective charges both of which produce results in good agreement with the recent experimental measurements of Spicher et al. This is in contrast to previous distorted-wave calculations which used fixed effective charges as well as classical trajectory calculations. Both of these latter methods produced results which were substantially below ours and the experimental data.

  4. Isotope effects of hydrogen and atom tunnelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchachenko, A. L.; Pliss, E. M.

    2016-06-01

    The abnormally high mass-dependent isotope effects in liquid-phase hydrogen (deuterium) atom transfer reactions, which are customarily regarded as quantum effects, are actually the products of two classical effects, namely, kinetic and thermodynamic ones. The former is determined by the rate constants for atom transfer and the latter is caused by nonbonded (or noncovalent) isotope effects in the solvation of protiated and deuterated reacting molecules. This product can mimic the large isotope effects that are usually attributed to tunnelling. In enzymatic reactions, tunnelling is of particular interest; its existence characterizes an enzyme as a rigid molecular machine in which the residence time of reactants on the reaction coordinate exceeds the waiting time for the tunnelling event. The magnitude of isotope effect becomes a characteristic parameter of the internal dynamics of the enzyme catalytic site. The bibliography includes 61 references.

  5. Functionalization of Carbon Nanotubes using Atomic Hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khare, Bishun N.; Cassell, Alan M.; Nguyen, Cattien V.; Meyyappan, M.; Han, Jie; Arnold, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We have investigated the irradiation of multi walled and single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with atomic hydrogen. After irradiating the SWNT sample, a band at 2940/cm (3.4 microns) that is characteristic of the C-H stretching mode is observed using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Additional confirmation of SWNT functionalization is tested by irradiating with atomic deuterium. A weak band in the region 1940/cm (5.2 micron) to 2450/cm (4.1 micron) corresponding to C-D stretching mode is also observed in the FTIR spectrum. This technique provides a clean gas phase process for the functionalization of SWNTs, which could lead to further chemical manipulation and/or the tuning of the electronic properties of SWNTs for nanodevice applications.

  6. The interaction of hydrogen with the {010} surfaces of Mg and Fe olivine as models for interstellar dust grains: a density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Downing, C A; Ahmady, B; Catlow, C R A; de Leeuw, N H

    2013-07-13

    There is no consensus as yet to account for the significant presence of water on the terrestrial planets, but suggested sources include direct hydrogen adsorption from the parent molecular cloud after the planets' formation, and delivery of hydrous material via comets or asteroids external to the zone of the terrestrial planets. Alternatively, a more recent idea is that water may have directly adsorbed onto the interstellar dust grains involved in planetary formation. In this work, we use electronic structure calculations based on the density functional theory to investigate and compare the bulk and {010} surface structures of the magnesium and iron end-members of the silicate mineral olivine, namely forsterite and fayalite, respectively. We also report our results on the adsorption of atomic hydrogen at the mineral surfaces, where our calculations show that there is no activation barrier to the adsorption of atomic hydrogen at these surfaces. Furthermore, different surface sites activate the atom to form either adsorbed hydride or proton species in the form of hydroxy groups on the same surface, which indicates that these mineral surfaces may have acted as catalytic sites in the immobilization and reaction of hydrogen atoms to form dihydrogen gas or water molecules.

  7. The interaction of hydrogen with the {010} surfaces of Mg and Fe olivine as models for interstellar dust grains: a density functional theory study

    PubMed Central

    Downing, C. A.; Ahmady, B.; Catlow, C. R. A.; de Leeuw, N. H.

    2013-01-01

    There is no consensus as yet to account for the significant presence of water on the terrestrial planets, but suggested sources include direct hydrogen adsorption from the parent molecular cloud after the planets’ formation, and delivery of hydrous material via comets or asteroids external to the zone of the terrestrial planets. Alternatively, a more recent idea is that water may have directly adsorbed onto the interstellar dust grains involved in planetary formation. In this work, we use electronic structure calculations based on the density functional theory to investigate and compare the bulk and {010} surface structures of the magnesium and iron end-members of the silicate mineral olivine, namely forsterite and fayalite, respectively. We also report our results on the adsorption of atomic hydrogen at the mineral surfaces, where our calculations show that there is no activation barrier to the adsorption of atomic hydrogen at these surfaces. Furthermore, different surface sites activate the atom to form either adsorbed hydride or proton species in the form of hydroxy groups on the same surface, which indicates that these mineral surfaces may have acted as catalytic sites in the immobilization and reaction of hydrogen atoms to form dihydrogen gas or water molecules. PMID:23734054

  8. Hydrogen atom addition to the surface of graphene nanoflakes: A density functional theory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachikawa, Hiroto

    2017-02-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) provide a 2-dimensional (2D) reaction surface in 3-dimensional (3D) interstellar space and have been utilized as a model of graphene surfaces. In the present study, the reaction of PAHs with atomic hydrogen was investigated by means of density functional theory (DFT) to systematically elucidate the binding nature of atomic hydrogen to graphene nanoflakes. PAHs with n = 4-37 were chosen, where n indicates the number of benzene rings. Activation energies of hydrogen addition to the graphene surface were calculated to be 5.2-7.0 kcal/mol at the CAM-B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) level, which is almost constant for all PAHs. The binding energies of hydrogen atom were slightly dependent on the size (n): 14.8-28.5 kcal/mol. The absorption spectra showed that a long tail is generated at the low-energy region after hydrogen addition to the graphene surface. The electronic states of hydrogenated graphenes were discussed on the basis of theoretical results.

  9. Mapping atomic and diffuse interstellar band absorption across the Magellanic Clouds and the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Mandy; van Loon, Jacco Th.; Sarre, Peter J.; Beckman, John E.

    2015-12-01

    Diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) trace warm neutral and weakly ionized diffuse interstellar medium (ISM). Here we present a dedicated, high signal-to-noise spectroscopic survey of two of the strongest DIBs, at 5780 and 5797 Å, in optical spectra of 666 early-type stars in the Small and Large Magellanic Clouds, along with measurements of the atomic Na I D and Ca II K lines. The resulting maps show for the first time the distribution of DIB carriers across large swathes of galaxies, as well as the foreground Milky Way ISM. We confirm the association of the 5797 Å DIB with neutral gas, and the 5780 Å DIB with more translucent gas, generally tracing the star-forming regions within the Magellanic Clouds. Likewise, the Na I D line traces the denser ISM whereas the Ca II K line traces the more diffuse, warmer gas. The Ca II K line has an additional component at ˜200-220 km s-1 seen towards both Magellanic Clouds; this may be associated with a pan-Magellanic halo. Both the atomic lines and DIBs show sub-pc-scale structure in the Galactic foreground absorption; the 5780 and 5797 Å DIBs show very little correlation on these small scales, as do the Ca II K and Na I D lines. This suggests that good correlations between the 5780 and 5797 Å DIBs, or between Ca II K and Na I D, arise from the superposition of multiple interstellar structures. Similarity in behaviour between DIBs and Na I in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and Milky Way suggests the abundance of DIB carriers scales in proportion to metallicity.

  10. Collisional excitation of NH3 by atomic and molecular hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouhafs, N.; Rist, C.; Daniel, F.; Dumouchel, F.; Lique, F.; Wiesenfeld, L.; Faure, A.

    2017-09-01

    We report extensive theoretical calculations on the rotation-inversion excitation of interstellar ammonia (NH3) due to collisions with atomic and molecular hydrogen (both para- and ortho-H2). Close-coupling calculations are performed for total energies in the range 1-2000 cm-1 and rotational cross-sections are obtained for all transitions amongst the lowest 17 and 34 rotation-inversion levels of ortho- and para-NH3, respectively. Rate coefficients are deduced for kinetic temperatures up to 200 K. Propensity rules for the three colliding partners are discussed and we also compare the new results to previous calculations for the spherically symmetrical He and para-H2 projectiles. Significant differences are found between the different sets of calculations. Finally, we test the impact of the new rate coefficients on the calibration of the ammonia thermometer. We find that the calibration curve is only weakly sensitive to the colliding partner and we confirm that the ammonia thermometer is robust.

  11. Electron impact ionization rates for interstellar neutral H and He atoms near interplanetary shocks: Ulysses observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, W. C.; Phillips, J. L.; Gosling, J. T.; Isenberg, P. A.

    1995-01-01

    During average solar wind flow conditions at 1 AU, ionization rates of interstellar neutrals that penetrate into the inner heliosphere are dominated by charge exchange with solar wind protons for H atoms, and by photoionization for He atoms. During occurrences of strong, coronal mass ejection (CME)-driven interplanetary shock waves near 1 AU, electron impact ionization can make substantial, if not dominating, contributions to interstellar neutral ionization rates in the regions downstream of the shocks. However, electron impact ionization is expected to be relatively less important with increasing heliocentric distance because of the decrease in electron temperature. Ulysses encountered many CME-driven shocks during its journey to and beyond Jupiter, and in addition, encountered a number of strong corotating interaction region (CIR) shocks. These shocks generally occur only beyond approximately 2 AU. Many of the CIR shocks were very strong rivalling the Earth's bow shock in electron heating. We have compared electron impact ionization rates calculated from electron velocity distributions measured downstream from CIR shocks using the Ulysses SWOOPS experiment to charge-exchange rates calculated from measured proton number fluxes and the photoionization rate estimated from an assumed solar photon spectrum typical of solar maximum conditions. We find that, although normally the ratio of electron-impact ionization rates to charge-exchange (for H) and to photoionization (for He) rates amounts to only about one and a few tens of percent, respectively, downstream of some of the stronger CIR shocks they amount to more than 10% and greater than 100%, respectively.

  12. Atomic hydrogen propellants: Historical perspectives and future possibilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan

    1993-01-01

    Atomic hydrogen, a very high density free-radical propellant, is anticipated to generate a specific impulse of 600-1500 lb-f sec/lb-mass performance; this may facilitate the development of unique launch vehicles. A development status evaluation is presently given for atomic hydrogen investigations. It is noted that breakthroughs are required in the production, storage, and transfer of atomic hydrogen, before this fuel can become a viable rocket propellant.

  13. Atomic hydrogen storage. [cryotrapping and magnetic field strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woollam, J. A. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    Atomic hydrogen, for use as a fuel or as an explosive, is stored in the presence of a strong magnetic field in exfoliated layered compounds such as molybdenum disulfide or an elemental layer material such as graphite. The compound is maintained at liquid temperatures and the atomic hydrogen is collected on the surfaces of the layered compound which are exposed during delamination (exfoliation). The strong magnetic field and the low temperature combine to prevent the atoms of hydrogen from recombining to form molecules.

  14. Hydrogen atom in a laser-plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falaye, Babatunde J.; Sun, Guo-Hua; Liman, Muhammed S.; Oyewumi, K. J.; Dong, Shi-Hai

    2016-11-01

    We scrutinize the behaviour of the eigenvalues of a hydrogen atom in a quantum plasma as it interacts with an electric field directed along θ  =  π and is exposed to linearly polarized intense laser field radiation. We refer to the interaction of the plasma with the laser light as laser-plasma. Using the Kramers-Henneberger (KH) unitary transformation, which is the semiclassical counterpart of the Block-Nordsieck transformation in the quantized field formalism, the squared vector potential that appears in the equation of motion is eliminated and the resultant equation is expressed in the KH frame. Within this frame, the resulting potential and the corresponding wavefunction have been expanded in Fourier series, and using Ehlotzky’s approximation we obtain a laser-dressed potential to simulate an intense laser field. By fitting the exponential-cosine-screened Coulomb potential into the laser-dressed potential, and then expanding it in Taylor series up to O≤ft({{r}4},α 09\\right) , we obtain the eigensolution (eigenvalues and wavefunction) of the hydrogen atom in laser-plasma encircled by an electric field, within the framework of perturbation theory formalism. Our numerical results show that for a weak external electric field and a very large Debye screening parameter length, the system is strongly repulsive, in contrast with the case for a strong external electric field and a small Debye screening parameter length, when the system is very attractive. This work has potential applications in the areas of atomic and molecular processes in external fields, including interactions with strong fields and short pulses.

  15. Activation of extended red emission photoluminescence in carbon solids by exposure to atomic hydrogen and UV radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furton, Douglas G.; Witt, Adolf N.

    1993-01-01

    We report on new laboratory results which relate directly to the observation of strongly enhanced extended red emission (ERE) by interstellar dust in H2 photodissociation zones. The ERE has been attributed to photoluminescence by hydrogenated amorphous carbon (HAC). We are demonstrating that exposure to thermally dissociated atomic hydrogen will restore the photoluminescence efficiency of previously annealed HAC. Also, pure amorphous carbon (AC), not previously photoluminescent, can be induced to photoluminesce by exposure to atomic hydrogen. This conversion of AC into HAC is greatly enhanced by the presence of UV irradiation. The presence of dense, warm atomic hydrogen and a strong UV radiation field are characteristic environmental properties of H2 dissociation zones. Our results lend strong support to the HAC photoluminescence explanation for ERE.

  16. Activation of extended red emission photoluminescence in carbon solids by exposure to atomic hydrogen and UV radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furton, Douglas G.; Witt, Adolf N.

    1993-01-01

    We report on new laboratory results which relate directly to the observation of strongly enhanced extended red emission (ERE) by interstellar dust in H2 photodissociation zones. The ERE has been attributed to photoluminescence by hydrogenated amorphous carbon (HAC). We are demonstrating that exposure to thermally dissociated atomic hydrogen will restore the photoluminescence efficiency of previously annealed HAC. Also, pure amorphous carbon (AC), not previously photoluminescent, can be induced to photoluminesce by exposure to atomic hydrogen. This conversion of AC into HAC is greatly enhanced by the presence of UV irradiation. The presence of dense, warm atomic hydrogen and a strong UV radiation field are characteristic environmental properties of H2 dissociation zones. Our results lend strong support to the HAC photoluminescence explanation for ERE.

  17. SEPARATION OF THE INTERSTELLAR BOUNDARY EXPLORER RIBBON FROM GLOBALLY DISTRIBUTED ENERGETIC NEUTRAL ATOM FLUX

    SciTech Connect

    Schwadron, N. A.; Kucharek, H.; Moebius, E. E-mail: harald.kucharek@unh.edu

    2011-04-10

    The Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) observes a remarkable feature, the IBEX ribbon, which has energetic neutral atom (ENA) flux over a narrow region {approx}20{sup 0} wide, a factor of 2-3 higher than the more globally distributed ENA flux. Here, we separate ENA emissions in the ribbon from the distributed flux by applying a transparency mask over the ribbon and regions of high emissions, and then solve for the distributed flux using an interpolation scheme. Our analysis shows that the energy spectrum and spatial distribution of the ribbon are distinct from the surrounding globally distributed flux. The ribbon energy spectrum shows a knee between {approx}1 and 4 keV, and the angular distribution is approximately independent of energy. In contrast, the distributed flux does not show a clear knee and more closely conforms to a power law over much of the sky. Consistent with previous analyses, the slope of the power law steepens from the nose to tail, suggesting a weaker termination shock toward the tail as compared to the nose. The knee in the energy spectrum of the ribbon suggests that its source plasma population is generated via a distinct physical process. Both the slope in the energy distribution of the distributed flux and the knee in the energy distribution of the ribbon are ordered by latitude. The heliotail may be identified in maps of globally distributed flux as a broad region of low flux centered {approx}44{sup 0}W of the interstellar downwind direction, suggesting heliotail deflection by the interstellar magnetic field.

  18. Atomic Data Revisions for Transitions Relevant to Observations of Interstellar, Circumgalactic, and Intergalactic Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cashman, Frances H.; Kulkarni, Varsha P.; Kisielius, Romas; Ferland, Gary J.; Bogdanovich, Pavel

    2017-05-01

    Measurements of element abundances in galaxies from astrophysical spectroscopy depend sensitively on the atomic data used. With the goal of making the latest atomic data accessible to the community, we present a compilation of selected atomic data for resonant absorption lines at wavelengths longward of 911.753 Å (the H i Lyman limit), for key heavy elements (heavier than atomic number 5) of astrophysical interest. In particular, we focus on the transitions of those ions that have been observed in the Milky Way interstellar medium (ISM), the circumgalactic medium (CGM) of the Milky Way and/or other galaxies, and the intergalactic medium (IGM). We provide wavelengths, oscillator strengths, associated accuracy grades, and references to the oscillator strength determinations. We also attempt to compare and assess the recent oscillator strength determinations. For about 22% of the lines that have updated oscillator strength values, the differences between the former values and the updated ones are ≳0.1 dex. Our compilation will be a useful resource for absorption line studies of the ISM, as well as studies of the CGM and IGM traced by sight lines to quasars and gamma-ray bursts. Studies (including those enabled by future generations of extremely large telescopes) of absorption by galaxies against the light of background galaxies will also benefit from our compilation.

  19. Radiation Effects in Hydrogen-Laden Porous Water Ice Films: Implications for Interstellar Ices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raut, Ujjwal; Baragiola, Raul; Mitchell, Emma; Shi, Jianming

    H _{2} is the dominant gas in the dense clouds of the interstellar medium (ISM). At densities of 10 (5) cm (-3) , an H _{2} molecule arrives at the surface of a 0.1 mum-sized, ice-covered dust grain once every few seconds [1]. At 10 K, H _{2} can diffuse into the pores of the ice mantle and adsorb at high-energy binding sites, loading the ice with hydrogen over the lifetime of the cloud. These icy grains are also impacted by galactic cosmic rays and stellar winds (in clouds with embedded protostar). Based on the available cosmic proton flux spectrum [2], we estimate a small impact rate of nearly 1 hit per year on a 0.1 μm sized grain, or 10 (-7) times the impact frequency of the neutral H _{2}. The energy deposited by such impacts can release the adsorbed H _{2} into the gas phase (impact desorption or sputtering). Recently, we have reported on a new process of ion-induced enhanced adsorption, where molecules from the gas phase are incorporated into the film when irradiation is performed in the presence of ambient gas [3]. The interplay between ion-induced ejection and adsorption can be important in determining the gas-solid balance in the ISM. To understand the effects of cosmic rays/stellar winds impacts on interstellar ice immersed in H _{2} gas, we have performed irradiation of porous amorphous ice films loaded with H _{2} through co-deposition or adsorption following growth. The irradiations were performed with 100 keV H (+) using fluxes of 10 (10) -10 (12) H (+) cm (-2) s (-1) at 7 K, in presence of ambient H _{2} at pressures ranging from 10 (-5) to 10 (-8) Torr. Our initial results show a net loss in adsorbed H _{2} during irradiation, from competing ion-induced ejection and adsorption. The H _{2} loss per ion decreases exponentially with fluence, with a cross-section of 10 (-13) cm (2) . In addition to hydrogen removal, irradiation also leads to trapping of H _{2} in the ice film, from closing of the pores during irradiation [4]. As a result, 2.6 percent

  20. Energetic neutral atoms measured by the interstellar boundary explorer (IBEX): evidence for multiple heliosheath populations

    DOE PAGES

    Desai, M. I.; Allegrini, F. A.; Bzowski, M.; ...

    2013-12-13

    Energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) observed by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) provide powerful diagnostics about the origin of the progenitor ion populations and the physical mechanisms responsible for their production. In this paper, we extend the work of Desai et al. and Fuselier et al. and combine and compare ENA spectra from the first 3 yr of observations by the IBEX-Hi and -Lo ENA imagers along the lines-of-sight (LOSs) from the inner heliosphere through to the locations of Voyager 1 and 2 with results from an updated physics-based model of the three-dimensional heliosphere and its constituent ion populations. Our resultsmore » show that (1) IBEX ENA fluxes and spectra above ~0.7 keV measured along the LOSs of the Voyagers are consistent with several models in which the parent pickup ion (PUI) populations originate in the inner heliosheath, and (2) a significant fraction of lower energy ENAs between ~0.1-0.5 keV may originate from interstellar neutral gas charge-exchanging with a non-thermalized (hot) population of PUIs in the outer heliosheath beyond the heliopause. Here we discuss the implications of ENAs observed by IBEX originating from distinct parent populations as well as from two distinct locations in the heliospheric interface. In conclusion, these results indicate that ENA spectral measurements at various energies can be used to remotely probe distinct physical processes operating in vastly different regions of the distant heliosphere.« less

  1. Energetic neutral atoms measured by the interstellar boundary explorer (IBEX): evidence for multiple heliosheath populations

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, M. I.; Allegrini, F. A.; Bzowski, M.; Dayeh, M. A.; Funsten, H.; Fuselier, S. A.; Heerikhuisen, J.; Kubiak, M. A.; McComas, D. J.; Pogorelov, N. V.; Schwadron, N. A.; Sokół, J. M.; Zank, G. P.; Zirnstein, E. J.

    2013-12-13

    Energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) observed by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) provide powerful diagnostics about the origin of the progenitor ion populations and the physical mechanisms responsible for their production. In this paper, we extend the work of Desai et al. and Fuselier et al. and combine and compare ENA spectra from the first 3 yr of observations by the IBEX-Hi and -Lo ENA imagers along the lines-of-sight (LOSs) from the inner heliosphere through to the locations of Voyager 1 and 2 with results from an updated physics-based model of the three-dimensional heliosphere and its constituent ion populations. Our results show that (1) IBEX ENA fluxes and spectra above ~0.7 keV measured along the LOSs of the Voyagers are consistent with several models in which the parent pickup ion (PUI) populations originate in the inner heliosheath, and (2) a significant fraction of lower energy ENAs between ~0.1-0.5 keV may originate from interstellar neutral gas charge-exchanging with a non-thermalized (hot) population of PUIs in the outer heliosheath beyond the heliopause. Here we discuss the implications of ENAs observed by IBEX originating from distinct parent populations as well as from two distinct locations in the heliospheric interface. In conclusion, these results indicate that ENA spectral measurements at various energies can be used to remotely probe distinct physical processes operating in vastly different regions of the distant heliosphere.

  2. Atomic hydrogen maser investigations of hydrogen atom interactions from 4 k to 12 k. Annual summary report 1 Mar 83-29 Feb 84

    SciTech Connect

    Crampton, S.B.

    1983-11-20

    Techniques and data developed during previous studies of the ground state hyperfine resonance of hydrogen atoms intermittently adsorbed on molecular hydrogen surfaces are applied to the development of a Very Low Temperature Atomic Hydrogen Maser incorporating a state-selected hydrogen atom beam with thermal speeds near 5 K. Studies are made of adsorption of hydrogen atoms on molecular hydrogen and atomic neon solid surfaces at 4 K to 12 K.

  3. Diffuse Atomic and Molecular Gas in the Interstellar Medium of M82 toward SN 2014J

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritchey, Adam M.; Welty, Daniel E.; Dahlstrom, Julie A.; York, Donald G.

    2015-02-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of interstellar absorption lines seen in moderately high resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio optical spectra of SN 2014J in M82. Our observations were acquired over the course of six nights, covering the period from ~6 days before to ~30 days after the supernova reached its maximum B-band brightness. We examine complex absorption from Na I, Ca II, K I, Ca I, CH+, CH, and CN, arising primarily from diffuse gas in the interstellar medium (ISM) of M82. We detect Li I absorption over a range in velocity consistent with that exhibited by the strongest Na I and K I components associated with M82; this is the first detection of interstellar Li in a galaxy outside of the Local Group. There are no significant temporal variations in the absorption-line profiles over the 37 days sampled by our observations. The relative abundances of the various interstellar species detected reveal that the ISM of M82 probed by SN 2014J consists of a mixture of diffuse atomic and molecular clouds characterized by a wide range of physical/environmental conditions. Decreasing N(Na I)/N(Ca II) ratios and increasing N(Ca I)/N(K I) ratios with increasing velocity are indicative of reduced depletion in the higher-velocity material. Significant component-to-component scatter in the N(Na I)/N(Ca II) and N(Ca I)/N(Ca II) ratios may be due to variations in the local ionization conditions. An apparent anti-correlation between the N(CH+)/N(CH) and N(Ca I)/N(Ca II) ratios can be understood in terms of an opposite dependence on gas density and radiation field strength, while the overall high CH+ abundance may be indicative of enhanced turbulence in the ISM of M82. The Li abundance also seems to be enhanced in M82, which supports the conclusions of recent gamma-ray emission studies that the cosmic-ray acceleration processes are greatly enhanced in this starburst galaxy.

  4. Reactions of Azine Anions with Nitrogen and Oxygen Atoms: Implications for Titan's Upper Atmosphere and Interstellar Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhe-Chen; Cole, Callie A; Demarais, Nicholas J; Snow, Theodore P; Bierbaum, Veronica M

    2015-08-26

    Azines are important in many extraterrestrial environments, from the atmosphere of Titan to the interstellar medium. They have been implicated as possible carriers of the diffuse interstellar bands in astronomy, indicating their persistence in interstellar space. Most importantly, they constitute the basic building blocks of DNA and RNA, so their chemical reactivity in these environments has significant astrobiological implications. In addition, N and O atoms are widely observed in the ISM and in the ionospheres of planets and moons. However, the chemical reactions of molecular anions with abundant interstellar and atmospheric atomic species are largely unexplored. In this paper, gas-phase reactions of deprotonated anions of benzene, pyridine, pyridazine, pyrimidine, pyrazine, and s-triazine with N and O atoms are studied both experimentally and computationally. In all cases, the major reaction channel is associative electron detachment; these reactions are particularly important since they control the balance between negative ions and free electron densities. The reactions of the azine anions with N atoms exhibit larger rate constants than reactions of corresponding chain anions. The reactions of azine anions with O atoms are even more rapid, with complex product patterns for different reactants. The mechanisms are studied theoretically by employing density functional theory; spin conversion is found to be important in determining some product distributions. The rich gas-phase chemistry observed in this work provides a better understanding of ion-atom reactions and their contributions to ionospheric chemistry as well as the chemical processing that occurs in the boundary layers between diffuse and dense interstellar clouds.

  5. Determining interstellar hydrogen and deuterium column densities by means of the Lyman channel of the SPECTRUM UV Rowland spectrograph: a pre-launch feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franchini, Mariagrazia; Morossi, Carlo; Vladilo, G.

    1996-10-01

    approximately 0.1 dex accuracy in the `observed' column densities, were derived by varying the input interstellar hydrogen column density. As a result, we show that the Lyman channel of the SPECTRUM UV Rowland spectrograph is up to the task of deriving accurate H and D column densities of low and medium column density interstellar clouds while it fails for N(HI) >= 10(superscript 21) atoms cm(superscript -2).

  6. Reaction of anthracene with atomic ions of interstellar interest. A FALP measurement at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canosa, A.; Laubé, S.; Rebrion, C.; Pasquerault, D.; Gomet, J. C.; Rowe, B. R.

    1995-11-01

    We present the results obtained on studying the reaction of anthracene with some atomic ions of interstellar interest (He + and C +) and with Ar +. Rate coefficients have been measured at room temperature (293 K) in afterglow experiments using flowing afterglow Langmuir probe-mass spectrometer apparatus. Reactions proceed with rate coefficients of respectively 5.2 × 10 -9, 3 × 10 -9, 1 × 10 -9 cm 3 s -1 for He +, C + and Ar +. The results were obtained with an uncertainty of about 30% and were found to be close to the Langevin rate. The nature of the products has also been investigated. More particularly, the evidence for carbon accretion and for the production of doubly charged species is discussed.

  7. THERMAL REACTIONS OF OXYGEN ATOMS WITH ALKENES AT LOW TEMPERATURES ON INTERSTELLAR DUST

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, Michael D.; Price, Stephen D. E-mail: s.d.price@ucl.ac.uk

    2011-11-10

    Laboratory experiments show that the thermal heterogeneous reactions of oxygen atoms may contribute to the synthesis of epoxides in interstellar clouds. The data set also indicates that the contribution of these pathways to epoxide formation, in comparison to non-thermal routes, is likely to be strongly temperature dependent. Our results indicate that an increased abundance of epoxides, relative to the corresponding aldehydes, could be an observational signature of a significant contribution to molecular oxidation via thermal O atom reactions with alkenes. Specifically surface science experiments show that both C{sub 2}H{sub 4}O and C{sub 3}H{sub 6}O are readily formed from reactions of ethene and propene molecules with thermalized oxygen atoms at temperatures in the range of 12-90 K. It is clear from our experiments that these reactions, on a graphite surface, proceed with significantly reduced reaction barriers compared with those operating in the gas phase. For both the C{sub 2}H{sub 4} + O and the C{sub 3}H{sub 6} + O reactions, the surface reaction barriers we determine are reduced by approximately an order of magnitude compared with the barriers in the gas phase. The modeling of our experimental results, which determines these reaction barriers, also extracts desorption energies and rate coefficients for the title reactions. Our results clearly show that the major product from the O + C{sub 2}H{sub 4} reaction is ethylene oxide, an epoxide.

  8. Atomic Velocity Distributions Out of Hydrogen Maser Dissociators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-02-15

    REPORT SSD-TR-90-02 10 Atomic Velocity Distributions Out of Hydrogen 0’) Maser Dissociators B. JADUSZLIWER and Y. C. CHAN Chemistry and Physics...Maser Dissociators 12 PERSONAL AUTHOP4S) Jaduszliwer, B.; and Chan, Y. C. 13a. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME COVERED 14. DATE OF REPORT (ba, AMa, Day) 15...number) FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP _...Atomic clocks Hydrogen maser; Hydrogen dissociator ; Velocity distributions. K .-K / - 19. ABSTRACT (Contum on reverse

  9. Hirshfeld atom refinement for modelling strong hydrogen bonds.

    PubMed

    Woińska, Magdalena; Jayatilaka, Dylan; Spackman, Mark A; Edwards, Alison J; Dominiak, Paulina M; Woźniak, Krzysztof; Nishibori, Eiji; Sugimoto, Kunihisa; Grabowsky, Simon

    2014-09-01

    High-resolution low-temperature synchrotron X-ray diffraction data of the salt L-phenylalaninium hydrogen maleate are used to test the new automated iterative Hirshfeld atom refinement (HAR) procedure for the modelling of strong hydrogen bonds. The HAR models used present the first examples of Z' > 1 treatments in the framework of wavefunction-based refinement methods. L-Phenylalaninium hydrogen maleate exhibits several hydrogen bonds in its crystal structure, of which the shortest and the most challenging to model is the O-H...O intramolecular hydrogen bond present in the hydrogen maleate anion (O...O distance is about 2.41 Å). In particular, the reconstruction of the electron density in the hydrogen maleate moiety and the determination of hydrogen-atom properties [positions, bond distances and anisotropic displacement parameters (ADPs)] are the focus of the study. For comparison to the HAR results, different spherical (independent atom model, IAM) and aspherical (free multipole model, MM; transferable aspherical atom model, TAAM) X-ray refinement techniques as well as results from a low-temperature neutron-diffraction experiment are employed. Hydrogen-atom ADPs are furthermore compared to those derived from a TLS/rigid-body (SHADE) treatment of the X-ray structures. The reference neutron-diffraction experiment reveals a truly symmetric hydrogen bond in the hydrogen maleate anion. Only with HAR is it possible to freely refine hydrogen-atom positions and ADPs from the X-ray data, which leads to the best electron-density model and the closest agreement with the structural parameters derived from the neutron-diffraction experiment, e.g. the symmetric hydrogen position can be reproduced. The multipole-based refinement techniques (MM and TAAM) yield slightly asymmetric positions, whereas the IAM yields a significantly asymmetric position.

  10. Atomic Velocity Distributions Out of Hydrogen Maser Dissociators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-11-01

    ATOMIC VELOCITY DISTRIBUTIONS OUT OF HYDROGEN MASER DISSOCIATORS Bernardo Jaduszliwer and Yat C. Chan Chemistry and Physics Laboratory The... dissociators , of the type used in hydrogen masers. This work was moti- vated by lang-term reliability issues related to the possible usc of masers as...hydrogen budgct will depend not only on the dissoci - ation efficiency, but also the vclocity distribution of the hydrogen atorrls leaving the

  11. The one-dimensional hydrogen atom revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palma, G.; Raff, U.

    2006-09-01

    The one-dimensional Schrodinger hydrogen atom is an interesting mathematical and physical problem for the study of bound states, eigenfunctions, and quantum-degeneracy issues. This one-dimensional physical system has given rise to some intriguing controversy for more than four decades. Presently, still no definite consensus seems to have been reached. We reanalyzed this apparently controversial problem, approaching it from a Fourier-transform representation method combined with some fundamental (basic) ideas found in self-adjoint extensions of symmetric operators. In disagreement with some previous claims, we found that the complete Balmer energy spectrum is obtained together with an odd-parity set of eigenfunctions. Closed-form solutions in both coordinate and momentum spaces were obtained. No twofold degeneracy was observed as predicted by the degeneracy theorem in one dimension, though it does not necessarily have to hold for potentials with singularities. No ground state with infinite energy exists since the corresponding eigenfunction does not satisfy the Schrodinger equation at the origin.

  12. Effects of hydrogen atoms on surface conductivity of diamond film

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Fengbin Cui, Yan; Qu, Min; Di, Jiejian

    2015-04-15

    To investigate the effects of surface chemisorbed hydrogen atoms and hydrogen atoms in the subsurface region of diamond on surface conductivity, models of hydrogen atoms chemisorbed on diamond with (100) orientation and various concentrations of hydrogen atoms in the subsurface layer of the diamond were built. By using the first-principles method based on density functional theory, the equilibrium geometries and densities of states of the models were studied. The results showed that the surface chemisorbed hydrogen alone could not induce high surface conductivity. In addition, isolated hydrogen atoms in the subsurface layer of the diamond prefer to exist at the bond centre site of the C-C bond. However, such a structure would induce deep localized states, which could not improve the surface conductivity. When the hydrogen concentration increases, the C-H-C-H structure and C-3H{sub bc}-C structure in the subsurface region are more stable than other configurations. The former is not beneficial to the increase of the surface conductivity. However, the latter would induce strong surface states near the Fermi level, which would give rise to high surface conductivity. Thus, a high concentration of subsurface hydrogen atoms in diamond would make significant contributions to surface conductivity.

  13. The Interstellar Boundary Explorer High Energy (IBEX-Hi) Neutral Atom Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funsten, H. O.; Allegrini, F.; Bochsler, P.; Dunn, G.; Ellis, S.; Everett, D.; Fagan, M. J.; Fuselier, S. A.; Granoff, M.; Gruntman, M.; Guthrie, A. A.; Hanley, J.; Harper, R. W.; Heirtzler, D.; Janzen, P.; Kihara, K. H.; King, B.; Kucharek, H.; Manzo, M. P.; Maple, M.; Mashburn, K.; McComas, D. J.; Moebius, E.; Nolin, J.; Piazza, D.; Pope, S.; Reisenfeld, D. B.; Rodriguez, B.; Roelof, E. C.; Saul, L.; Turco, S.; Valek, P.; Weidner, S.; Wurz, P.; Zaffke, S.

    2009-08-01

    The IBEX-Hi Neutral Atom Imager of the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) mission is designed to measure energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) originating from the interaction region between the heliosphere and the local interstellar medium (LISM). These ENAs are plasma ions that have been heated in the interaction region and neutralized by charge exchange with the cold neutral atoms of the LISM that freely flow through the interaction region. IBEX-Hi is a single pixel ENA imager that covers the ENA spectral range from 0.38 to 6 keV and shares significant energy overlap and overall design philosophy with the IBEX-Lo sensor. Because of the anticipated low flux of these ENAs at 1 AU, the sensor has a large geometric factor and incorporates numerous techniques to minimize noise and backgrounds. The IBEX-Hi sensor has a field-of-view (FOV) of 6.5°×6.5° FWHM, and a 6.5°×360° swath of the sky is imaged over each spacecraft spin. IBEX-Hi utilizes an ultrathin carbon foil to ionize ENAs in order to measure their energy by subsequent electrostatic analysis. A multiple coincidence detection scheme using channel electron multiplier (CEM) detectors enables reliable detection of ENAs in the presence of substantial noise. During normal operation, the sensor steps through six energy steps every 12 spacecraft spins. Over a single IBEX orbit of about 8 days, a single 6.5°×360° swath of the sky is viewed, and re-pointing of the spin axis toward the Sun near perigee of each IBEX orbit moves the ecliptic longitude by about 8° every orbit such that a full sky map is acquired every six months. These global maps, covering the spectral range of IBEX-Hi and coupled to the IBEX-Lo maps at lower and overlapping energies, will answer fundamental questions about the structure and dynamics of the interaction region between the heliosphere and the LISM.

  14. The Distribution of Interstellar Molecular Hydrogen in the Galactic Disk and Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, W. V.; Hurwitz, M.

    2001-12-01

    Dixon et al. (BAAS, 31, 1476, 1999) derive molecular-hydrogen column densities from the spectra of 57 early-type stars observed with the Berkeley Extreme and Far-Ultraviolet Spectrometer (BEFS), part of the ORFEUS telescope, which flew on the ORFEUS-SPAS I and II space-shuttle missions in 1993 and 1996, respectively. We have analyzed their results, investigating the distribution of molecular hydrogen with |z|, the distance from the Galactic plane. We find that the majority of interstellar H2 clouds follow an exponential density distribution with a scale height of 50 +/- 20 pc. Toward stars with very low projected H2 column densities, we find evidence for a second population of low-density molecular clouds for which n(H2) increases linearly with |z|. If not an artifact of the small sample size or a selection effect, this density profile suggests either an increase in the rate of molecular formation or a decrease in the rate of molecular destruction in these clouds with distance from the plane. We consider a model in which a decrease in the rate of molecular destruction results from a drop in the Galactic FUV background with |z| and show that it can qualitatively reproduce the observed distribution of cloud densities. This research is supported by NASA grant NAG5-696.

  15. The interplanetary hydrogen and helium glow and the inferred interstellar gas properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Judge, D. L.

    1983-01-01

    Observations of the interplanetary hydrogen and helium glow have been obtained by a number of spacecraft and rocket experiments during the past fifteen years. Important results have been established on the temperature, density, velocity, spatial dependence, and hydrogen to helium ratio. However, only four spacecraft launched to date are investigating the outer solar system and of these four the Pioneer 10 spacecraft is the farthest out at 28 A.U. Observations from this spacecraft at great distances have permitted an improved analysis of the effects which are only evident at large distances from the Sun. Perhaps the most significant result in this regard is the clear evidence of the importance of multiple scattering of solar Ly-alpha; an effect which has not been observed in earlier work. Ignoring this effect can lead to a gross overestimate of the local galactic glow. Current best estimates of the galactic glow and the local interstellar wind parameters obtained by the Pioneer 10 photometer at great distances are presented, in addition to complementary experimental observations of particular interest.

  16. Surface characterization of silica glass substrates treated by atomic hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Hiroyuki; Masuno, Atsunobu; Ishibashi, Keiji; Tawarayama, Hiromasa; Zhang, Yingjiu; Utsuno, Futoshi; Koya, Kazuo; Fujinoki, Akira; Kawazoe, Hiroshi

    2013-12-15

    Silica glass substrates with very flat surfaces were exposed to atomic hydrogen at different temperatures and durations. An atomic force microscope was used to measure root-mean-square (RMS) roughness and two-dimensional power spectral density (PSD). In the treatment with atomic hydrogen up to 900 °C, there was no significant change in the surface. By the treatment at 1000 °C, the changes in the RMS roughness and the PSD curves were observed. It was suggested that these changes were caused by etching due to reactions of atomic hydrogen with surface silica. By analysis based on the k-correlation model, it was found that the spatial frequency of the asperities became higher with an increase of the treatment time. Furthermore, the data showed that atomic hydrogen can flatten silica glass surfaces by controlling heat-treatment conditions. - Highlights: • Silica glass surface was treated by atomic hydrogen at various temperatures. • Surface roughness was measured by an atomic force microscope. • Roughness data were analyzed by two-dimensional power spectral density. • Atomic hydrogen can flatten silica glass surfaces.

  17. ON THE APPARENT ASSOCIATIONS BETWEEN INTERSTELLAR NEUTRAL HYDROGEN STRUCTURE AND (WMAP) HIGH-FREQUENCY CONTINUUM EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Verschuur, Gerrit L.

    2010-03-10

    Galactic neutral hydrogen (H I) within a few hundred parsecs of the Sun contains structure with an angular distribution that is similar to small-scale structure observed by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP). A total of 108 associated pairs of associated H I and WMAP features have now been cataloged using H I data mapped in 2 km s{sup -1} intervals and these pairs show a typical offset of 0.{sup 0}8. A large-scale statistical test for a direct association is carried out that casts little additional light on whether the these small offsets are merely coincidental or carry information. To pursue the issue further, the nature of several of the features within the foreground H I most closely associated with WMAP structure is examined in detail and it is shown that the cross-correlation coefficient for well-matched pairs of structures is of order unity. It is shown that free-free emission from electrons in unresolved density enhancements in interstellar space could theoretically produce high-frequency radio continuum radiation at the levels observed by WMAP and that such emission will appear nearly flat across the WMAP frequency range. Evidence for such structure in the interstellar medium already exists in the literature. Until higher angular resolution observations of the high-frequency continuum emission structure as well as the apparently associated H I structure become available, it may be difficult to rule out the possibility that some if not all the small-scale structure usually attributed to the cosmic microwave background may have a galactic origin.

  18. Hydrogen atom as a four-dimensional oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, A.C.

    1980-08-01

    A coordinate transformation which exhibits the rotational invariance of the hydrogen atom in four-dimensional Hilbert space is introduced. The coordinates are shown to be directly related to the spherical polar and parabolic coordinates in position space. With the use of the transformation, the Schroedinger equation for the hydrogen atom left-multiplied by 4r is transformed into one for a four-dimensional harmonic oscillator. Solutions are obtained and related to the hydrogenic wave functions. Group-theoretical implications of the transformation and its application to the hydrogen Stark problem are briefly discussed.

  19. Molecular Hydrogen in Diffuse Interstellar Clouds of Arbitrary Three-Dimensional Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaans, Marco; Neufeld, David A.

    1997-01-01

    We have constructed three-dimensional models for the equilibrium abundance of molecular hydrogen in diffuse interstellar clouds of arbitrary geometry that are illuminated by ultraviolet radiation. The position-dependent photodissociation rate of H2 in such clouds was computed with a 26 ray approximation to model the attenuation of the incident ultraviolet radiation field by dust and by H2 line absorption. We have applied our modeling technique to the isolated diffuse cloud G236+39, assuming that the cloud has a constant density and that the thickness of the cloud along the line of sight is at every point proportional to the 100 micron continuum intensity measured by IRAS. We find that our model can successfully account for observed variations in the ratio of 100 micron continuum intensity to H I column density, with larger values of that ratio occurring along lines of sight in which the molecular hydrogen fraction is expected to be the largest. Using a standard chi square analysis to assess the goodness of fit of our models, we find (at the 60 a level) that a three-dimensional model is more successful in matching the observational data than a one-dimensional model in which the geometrical extent of the cloud along the line of sight is assumed to be much smaller than its extent in the plane of the sky. If D is the distance to G236 + 39, and given standard assumptions about the rate of grain-catalyzed H2 formation, we find that the cloud has an extent along the line of sight that is 0.9 +/- 0.1 times its mean extent projected onto the plane of the sky and a gas density of 53 +/- 8 (100 pc/D) H nuclei/cc and is illuminated by a radiation field of 1.1 +/- 0.2 (100 pc/D) times the mean interstellar radiation field. The derived 100 micron emissivity per nucleon is 1.13 +/- 0.06 x 10(exp -20) MJy/sr sq cm.

  20. Embedded-atom method potential for modeling hydrogen and hydrogen-defect interaction in tungsten.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Fang; Shu, Xiaolin; Lu, Guang-Hong; Gao, Fei

    2017-08-17

    An embedded-atom method potential has been developed for modeling hydrogen in body-centered-cubic (bcc) tungsten by fitting to an extensive database of density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Comprehensive evaluations of the new potential are conducted by comparing various hydrogen properties with DFT calculations and available experimental data, as well as all the other tungsten-hydrogen potentials. The new potential accurately reproduces the point defect properties of hydrogen, the interaction among hydrogen atoms, the interplay between hydrogen and a monovacancy, and the thermal diffusion of hydrogen in tungsten. The successful validation of the new potential confirms its good reliability and transferability, which enables large-scale atomistic simulations of tungsten-hydrogen system. The new potential is afterward employed to investigate the interplay between hydrogen and other defects, including [111] self-interstitial atoms (SIAs) and vacancy clusters in tungsten. It is found that both the [111] SIAs and the vacancy clusters exhibit considerable attraction for hydrogen. Hydrogen solution and diffusion in strained tungsten are also studied using the present potential, which demonstrates that tensile (compressive) stress facilitates (impedes) hydrogen solution, and isotropic tensile (compressive) stress impedes (facilitates) hydrogen diffusion while anisotropic tensile (compressive) stress facilitates (impedes) hydrogen diffusion. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  1. Reactions of substituted benzene anions with N and O atoms: Chemistry in Titan's upper atmosphere and the interstellar medium.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhe-Chen; Bierbaum, Veronica M

    2016-06-07

    The likely existence of aromatic anions in many important extraterrestrial environments, from the atmosphere of Titan to the interstellar medium (ISM), is attracting increasing attention. Nitrogen and oxygen atoms are also widely observed in the ISM and in the ionospheres of planets and moons. In the current work, we extend previous studies to explore the reactivity of prototypical aromatic anions (deprotonated toluene, aniline, and phenol) with N and O atoms both experimentally and computationally. The benzyl and anilinide anions both exhibit slow associative electron detachment (AED) processes with N atom, and moderate reactivity with O atom in which AED dominates but ionic products are also formed. The reactivity of phenoxide is dramatically different; there is no measurable reaction with N atom, and the moderate reactivity with O atom produces almost exclusively ionic products. The reaction mechanisms are studied theoretically by employing density functional theory calculations, and spin conversion is found to be critical for understanding some product distributions. This work provides insight into the rich gas-phase chemistry of aromatic ion-atom reactions and their relevance to ionospheric and interstellar chemistry.

  2. Reactions of substituted benzene anions with N and O atoms: Chemistry in Titan's upper atmosphere and the interstellar medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhe-Chen; Bierbaum, Veronica M.

    2016-06-01

    The likely existence of aromatic anions in many important extraterrestrial environments, from the atmosphere of Titan to the interstellar medium (ISM), is attracting increasing attention. Nitrogen and oxygen atoms are also widely observed in the ISM and in the ionospheres of planets and moons. In the current work, we extend previous studies to explore the reactivity of prototypical aromatic anions (deprotonated toluene, aniline, and phenol) with N and O atoms both experimentally and computationally. The benzyl and anilinide anions both exhibit slow associative electron detachment (AED) processes with N atom, and moderate reactivity with O atom in which AED dominates but ionic products are also formed. The reactivity of phenoxide is dramatically different; there is no measurable reaction with N atom, and the moderate reactivity with O atom produces almost exclusively ionic products. The reaction mechanisms are studied theoretically by employing density functional theory calculations, and spin conversion is found to be critical for understanding some product distributions. This work provides insight into the rich gas-phase chemistry of aromatic ion-atom reactions and their relevance to ionospheric and interstellar chemistry.

  3. A reanalysis of the observed interplanetary hydrogen L alpha emission profiles and the derived local interstellar gas temperature and velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, F. M.; Judge, D. L.

    1980-07-01

    An improved model of the interplanetary emission profile is presented. In this model we utilize a new version of the modified Danby-Camm velocity distribution function to calculate emission profiles, and it appears to be very efficient. Using this model, the hydrogen Lα profiles are determined for various viewing directions, and at a solar distance of 1 AU. It is found that the linewidth of the emission profiles and their Doppler shifts depend strongly on the viewing direction, as well as the assumed interstellar temperature. Previous determinations of the interstellar temperature T0 and the inflow velocity Vb, using approximate theoretical hydrogen profiles, are found to be inadequate. These values are recalculated and are determined to be T0 = 7000 ± 1200K and Vb = 19 ± 3 km s-1.

  4. The ratio of deuterium to hydrogen in interstellar space. III - The lines of sight to Zeta Puppis and Gamma Cassiopeiae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vidal-Madjar, A.; Laurent, C.; Bonnet, R. M.; York, D. G.

    1977-01-01

    An extensive set of measurements of the ratio of deuterium to hydrogen in the interstellar medium has been undertaken. The general observing program is described along with the data reduction techniques used to separate the complex deuterium and hydrogen profiles, and the results of the measurements for two stars, Zeta Pup and Gamma Cas. For Gamma Cas, log N(D)/N(H) is found to be approximately -4.8, in agreement with previous measurements. For Zeta Pup, a complicated structure of absorbing clouds in the interstellar medium is inferred. The best value of log N(D)/N(H) is about -4.6 for each of two components. One component is probably more complex than can be demonstrated directly at the resolution employed, and log N(D)N(H) could be -4.0 or larger in this component.

  5. Hydrogenation and dehydrogenation of interstellar PAHs: Spectral characteristics and H2 formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, H.; Candian, A.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    2016-10-01

    Context. We have modelled the abundance distribution and IR emission of the first 3 members of the coronene family in the north-west photodissociation region of the well-studied reflection nebulae NGC 7023. Aims: Our aim was 3-fold: i) analyze the distribution of abundances; (ii) examine the spectral footprints from the hydrogenation state of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs); and (iii) assess the role of PAHs in the formation of H2 in photodissociation regions. Methods: To model the physical conditions inside the cloud, we used the Meudon PDR Code, and we gave this as input to our kinetic model. We used specific molecular properties for each PAH, based on the latest data available at the present time. We considered the loss of an H atom or an H2 molecule as multiphoton processes, and we worked under the premise that PAHs with extra H atoms can form H2 through an Eley-Rideal abstraction mechanism. Results: In terms of abundances, we can distinguish clear differences with PAH size. The smallest PAH, coronene (C24H12), is found to be easily destroyed down to the complete loss of all of its H atoms. The largest species circumcircumcoronene (C96H24), is found in its normal hydrogenated state. The intermediate size molecule, circumcoronene (C54H18), shows an intermediate behaviour with respect to the other two, where partial dehydrogenation is observed inside the cloud. Regarding spectral variations, we find that the emission spectra in NGC 7023 are dominated by the variation in the ionization of the dominant hydrogenation state of each species at each point inside the cloud. It is difficult to "catch" the effect of dehydrogenation in the emitted PAH spectra since, for any conditions, only PAHs within a narrow size range will be susceptible to dehydrogenation, being quickly stripped off of all H atoms (and may isomerize to cages or fullerenes). The 3 μm region is the most sensitive one towards the hydrogenation level of PAHs. Conclusions: Based on our results, we

  6. Atomic hydrogen and nitrogen distributions from atmosphere explorer measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breig, Edward L.

    1992-01-01

    We were selective as to our approach to research activities, and devoted primary attention to two investigations concerning the global behavior of atomic hydrogen in the Earth's upper atmosphere. We derive the thermospheric concentration of H by applying the condition of charge-exchange equilibrium between hydrogen and oxygen atoms and ions to in-situ measurements of F-region composition and temperature from the series of Atmosphere Explorer (AE) aeronomy satellites. Progress and accomplishments on these chosen research projects are summarized.

  7. Atomic hydrogen adsorption on a Stone Wales defect in graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letardi, Sara; Celino, Massimo; Cleri, Fabrizio; Rosato, Vittorio

    2002-01-01

    Ab initio electronic structure calculations have been used to evaluate the binding energy of atomic hydrogen to graphite lattice defects. Results show that carbon sites belonging to a Stone-Wales defect are preferred binding sites with respect to undefected sites. Upon hydrogen adsorption, carbon sites undergo a sizeable tetragonalization effect which is more pronounced on the defected sizes.

  8. Use of Hilbert Curves in Parallelized CUDA code: Interaction of Interstellar Atoms with the Heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Destefano, Anthony; Heerikhuisen, Jacob

    2015-04-01

    Fully 3D particle simulations can be a computationally and memory expensive task, especially when high resolution grid cells are required. The problem becomes further complicated when parallelization is needed. In this work we focus on computational methods to solve these difficulties. Hilbert curves are used to map the 3D particle space to the 1D contiguous memory space. This method of organization allows for minimized cache misses on the GPU as well as a sorted structure that is equivalent to an octal tree data structure. This type of sorted structure is attractive for uses in adaptive mesh implementations due to the logarithm search time. Implementations using the Message Passing Interface (MPI) library and NVIDIA's parallel computing platform CUDA will be compared, as MPI is commonly used on server nodes with many CPU's. We will also compare static grid structures with those of adaptive mesh structures. The physical test bed will be simulating heavy interstellar atoms interacting with a background plasma, the heliosphere, simulated from fully consistent coupled MHD/kinetic particle code. It is known that charge exchange is an important factor in space plasmas, specifically it modifies the structure of the heliosphere itself. We would like to thank the Alabama Supercomputer Authority for the use of their computational resources.

  9. Topics in atomic hydrogen standard research and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, H. E.

    1971-01-01

    Hydrogen maser based frequency and time standards have been in continuous use at NASA tracking stations since February 1970, while laboratory work at Goddard has continued in the further development and improvement of hydrogen masers. Concurrently, experimental work has been in progress with a new frequency standard based upon the hydrogen atom using the molecular beam magnetic resonance method. Much of the hydrogen maser technology is directly applicable to the new hydrogen beam standard, and calculations based upon realistic data indicate that the accuracy potential of the hydrogen atomic beam exceeds that of either the cesium beam tube or the hydrogen maser, possibly by several orders of magnitude. In addition, with successful development, the hydrogen beam standard will have several other performance advantages over other devices, particularly exceptional stability and long continuous operating life. Experimental work with a new laboratory hydrogen beam device has recently resulted in the first resonance transition curves, measurements of relative state populations, beam intensities, etc. The most important aspects of both the hydrogen maser and the hydrogen beam work are covered.

  10. A new and simple approach to determine the abundance of hydrogen molecules on interstellar ice mantles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hincelin, U.; Chang, Q.; Herbst, E.

    2015-02-01

    Context. Water is usually the main component of ice mantles, which cover the cores of dust grains in cold portions of dense interstellar clouds. When molecular hydrogen is adsorbed onto an icy mantle through physisorption, a common assumption in gas-grain rate-equation models is to use an adsorption energy for molecular hydrogen on a pure water substrate. However, at high density and low temperature, when H2 is efficiently adsorbed onto the mantle, its surface abundance can be strongly overestimated if this assumption is still used. Unfortunately, the more detailed microscopic Monte Carlo treatment cannot be used to study the abundance of H2 in ice mantles if a full gas-grain network is utilized. Aims: We present a numerical method adapted for rate-equation models that takes into account the possibility that an H2 molecule can, while diffusing on the surface, find itself bound to another hydrogen molecule, with a far weaker bond than the H2-water bond, which can lead to more efficient desorption. We label the ensuing desorption "encounter desorption". Methods: The method is implemented first in a simple system consisting only of hydrogen molecules at steady state between gas and dust using the rate-equation approach and comparing the results with the results of a microscopic Monte Carlo calculation. We then discuss the use of the rate-equation approach with encounter desorption embedded in a complete gas-grain chemical network. Results: For the simple system, the rate-equation model with encounter desorption reproduces the H2 granular coverage computed by the microscopic Monte Carlo model at 10 K for a gas density from 104 to 1012 cm-3, and yields up to a factor 4 difference above 1012 cm-3. The H2 granular coverage is also reproduced by a complete gas-grain network. We use the rate-equation approach to study the gas-grain chemistry of cold dense regions with and without the encounter desorption mechanism. We find that the grain surface and gas phase species can be

  11. Solid Hydrogen Particles and Flow Rates Analyzed for Atomic Fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan A.

    2003-01-01

    The experiments were conducted at Glenn's Small Multipurpose Research Facility (SMIRF, ref. 5). The experimental setup was placed in the facility's vacuum tank to prevent heat leaks and subsequent boiloff of the liquid helium. Supporting systems maintained the temperature and pressure of the liquid helium bath where the solid particles were created. Solid hydrogen particle formation was tested from February 23 to April 2, 2001. Millimeter-sized solid-hydrogen particles were formed in a Dewar of liquid helium as a prelude to creating atomic fuels and propellants for aerospace vehicles. Atomic fuels or propellants are created when atomic boron, carbon, or hydrogen is stored in solid hydrogen particles. The current testing characterized the solid hydrogen particles without the atomic species, as a first step to creating a feed system for the atomic fuels and propellants. This testing did not create atomic species, but only sought to understand the solid hydrogen particle formation and behavior in the liquid helium. In these tests, video images of the solid particle formation were recorded, and the total mass flow rate of the hydrogen was measured. The mass of hydrogen that went into the gaseous phase was also recorded using a commercially available residual gas analyzer. The temperatures, pressures, and flow rates of the liquids and gases in the test apparatus were recorded as well. Testing conducted in 1999 recorded particles as small as 2 to 5 mm in diameter. The current testing extended the testing conditions to a very cold Dewar ullage gas of about 20 to 90 K above the 4 K liquid helium. With the very cold Dewar gas, the hydrogen freezing process took on new dimensions, in some cases creating particles so small that they seemed to be microscopic, appearing as infinitesimally small scintillations on the videotaped images.

  12. Concerted hydrogen atom exchange between three HF molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komornicki, Andrew; Dixon, David A.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1992-01-01

    The termolecular reaction involving concerted hydrogen-atom exchange between three HF molecules was investigated with particular attention given to the effects of correlation at the various stationary points along the reaction. Using large segmented Gaussian basis sets to locate the (HF)3 stationary points at the SCF level, the geometries of the stable hydrogen-bonded trimer, which is of C(3h) symmetry, were located, together with the transition state for hydrogen exchange, which is of D(3h) symmetry. Then, using a large atomic natural orbital basis and correlating all valence electrons, the energetics of the exchange reaction were evaluated at the correlated level.

  13. Characterization of an atomic hydrogen source for charge exchange experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Leutenegger, M. A.; Betancourt-Martinez, G. L.; Hell, N.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Porter, F. S.

    2016-11-15

    We characterized the dissociation fraction of a thermal dissociation atomic hydrogen source by injecting the mixed atomic and molecular output of the source into an electron beam ion trap containing highly charged ions and recording the x-ray spectrum generated by charge exchange using a high-resolution x-ray calorimeter spectrometer. We exploit the fact that the charge exchange state-selective capture cross sections are very different for atomic and molecular hydrogen incident on the same ions, enabling a clear spectroscopic diagnostic of the neutral species.

  14. Characterization of an atomic hydrogen source for charge exchange experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leutenegger, M. A.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Betancourt-Martinez, G. L.; Brown, G. V.; Hell, N.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Magee, E. W.; Porter, F. S.

    2016-11-01

    We characterized the dissociation fraction of a thermal dissociation atomic hydrogen source by injecting the mixed atomic and molecular output of the source into an electron beam ion trap containing highly charged ions and recording the x-ray spectrum generated by charge exchange using a high-resolution x-ray calorimeter spectrometer. We exploit the fact that the charge exchange state-selective capture cross sections are very different for atomic and molecular hydrogen incident on the same ions, enabling a clear spectroscopic diagnostic of the neutral species.

  15. Characterization of an Atomic Hydrogen Source for Charge Exchange Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leutenegger, M. A.; Beierdorfer, P.; Betancourt-Martinez, G. L.; Brown, G. V.; Hell, N; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Magee, E. W.; Porter, F. S.

    2016-01-01

    We characterized the dissociation fraction of a thermal dissociation atomic hydrogen source byinjecting the mixed atomic and molecular output of the source into an electron beam ion trapcontaining highly charged ions and recording the x-ray spectrum generated by charge exchangeusing a high-resolution x-ray calorimeter spectrometer. We exploit the fact that the charge exchangestate-selective capture cross sections are very different for atomic and molecular hydrogen incidenton the same ions, enabling a clear spectroscopic diagnostic of the neutral species.

  16. Precision Spectroscopy of Atomic Hydrogen and the Proton Size Puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udem, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Precise determination of transition frequencies of simple atomic systems are required for a number of fundamental applications such as tests of quantum electrodynamics (QED), the determination of fundamental constants and nuclear charge radii. The sharpest transition in atomic hydrogen occurs between the metastable 2S state and the 1S ground state. Its transition frequency has now been measured with almost 15 digits accuracy using an optical frequency comb and a cesium atomic clock as a reference. A recent measurement of the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen is in significant contradiction to the hydrogen data if QED calculations are assumed to be correct. We hope to contribute to the resolution of this so called `proton size puzzle' by providing additional experimental input from the hydrogen side.

  17. Stability of the interstellar hydrogen inflow longitude from 20 years of SOHO/SWAN observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koutroumpa, D.; Quémerais, E.; Katushkina, O.; Lallement, R.; Bertaux, J.-L.; Schmidt, W.

    2017-01-01

    Aims: A recent debate on the decade-long stability of the interstellar He flow vector, and in particular the flow longitude, has prompted us to check for any variability in the interstellar H flow vector as observed by the SWAN instrument on board SOHO. Methods: We used a simple model-independent method to determine the interstellar H flow longitude, based on the parallax effects induced on the Lyman-α intensity measured by SWAN following the satellite motion around the Sun. Results: Our results show that the interstellar H flow vector longitude does not vary significantly from an average value of 252.9°± 1.4° throughout the 20-year span of the SWAN dataset, further strengthening the arguments for the stability of the interstellar gas flow.

  18. Investigation of low temperature atomic hydrogen spin-exchange collisions using a cryogenic hydrogen maser

    SciTech Connect

    Walsworth, R.L.; Mattison, E.M.; Vessot, R.F.C.; Silvera, I.F.

    1993-05-01

    We have used a cryogenic hydrogen maser to study ground state atomic hydrogen spin-exchange collisions at temperatures near 0.5 K. Recent quantum-mechanical treatments of low energy atomic collisions predict that hyperfine-induced spin-exchange frequency shifts will become large at low temperatures, and will affect the performance of new atomic frequency standards such as the cryogenic hydrogen maser and the cesium fountain. We have measured the effects of low temperature spin-exchange collisions on maser line-broadening and frequency, and in particular the hyperfine-induced frequency shift.

  19. Fast metastable hydrogen atoms from H2 molecules: twin atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimèche, A.; Houdoux, D.; Rahmat, G.; Dulieu, O.; Schneider, I. F.; Medina, A.; Jalbert, G.; Zappa, F.; de Carvalho, C. R.; Nascimento, R. F.; de Castro Faria, N. V.; Robert, J.

    2015-01-01

    It is a difficult task to obtain "twin atoms", i.e. pairs of massive particles such that one can perform experiments in the same fashion that is routinely done with "twin photons". One possible route to obtain such pairs is by dissociating homonuclear diatomic molecules. We address this possibility by investigating the production of metastable H(2s) atoms coming from the dissociation of cold H2 molecules produced in a Campargue nozzle beam crossing an electron beam from a high intensity pulsed electron gun. Dissociation by electron impact was chosen to avoid limitations of target molecular excited states due to selection rules. Detectors placed several centimeters away from the collision center, and aligned with respect to possible common molecular dissociation channel, analyze the neutral fragments as a function of their time-of-flight (TOF) through Lyman-α detection. Evidence for the first time observed coincidence of pairs of H(2s) atoms obtained this way is presented.

  20. Latitudinal and Energy Dependence of Energetic Neutral Atom Spectral Indices Measured by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, M. I.; Allegrini, F.; Dayeh, M. A.; Funsten, H.; Heerikhuisen, J.; McComas, D. J.; Fuselier, S. A.; Pogorelov, N.; Schwadron, N. A.; Zank, G. P.; Zirnstein, E. J.

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the latitudinal and energy dependence of the globally distributed 0.5-6 keV energetic neutral atom (ENA) spectra measured by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) during the first 3 yrs of the mission. Our results are: (1) the ENA spectral indices at the two lowest energies (0.89 and 1.47 keV) exhibit no clear trend with ecliptic latitude θ, while those at ˜2.29 and ˜3.41 keV exhibit a clear latitudinal pattern; flatter spectra occur above 60° latitude and steeper spectra occur ±30° of the equator. (2) The latitudinal dependence of the spectral indices at different energies can be represented by the cosine function γ ={{a}0}+{{a}1}cos ({{a}2}θ ) with unique offsets, amplitudes, and phase angles; the higher energy ENA indices transition to successively larger amplitudes within ±45° of the equator. Our results confirm the previously reported latitudinal organization of the ENA spectra and their remarkable similarity to that of the solar wind (SW) speed observed by Ulysses in the inner heliosphere. While earlier studies showed that the ˜0.5-6 keV globally distributed ENA spectral indices could be represented as single power laws over much of the sky, our new results indicate that this is an over-simplification because the spectral indices have an energy and latitude dependence. This dependence is an important factor that must be taken into consideration by models and simulations that seek to map the IBEX ENA observations back to the latitudinal profile of the SW speed structure observed in the inner heliosphere.

  1. Latittudinal and energy dependence of energetic neutral atom spectral indices measured by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer

    DOE PAGES

    Desai, M. I.; Allegrini, F.; Dayeh, M. A.; ...

    2015-03-30

    Here, we investigate the latitudinal and energy dependence of the globally distributed 0.5-6 keV energetic neutral atom (ENA) spectra measured by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) during the first 3 yrs of the mission. Our results are: (1) the ENA spectral indices at the two lowest energies (0.89 and 1.47 keV) exhibit no clear trend with ecliptic latitude θ, while those at ~2.29 and ~3.41 keV exhibit a clear latitudinal pattern; flatter spectra occur above 60° latitude and steeper spectra occur ±30° of the equator. (2) The latitudinal dependence of the spectral indices at different energies can be represented bymore » the cosine function γ =a0 + a1 cos (a2θ) with unique offsets, amplitudes, and phase angles; the higher energy ENA indices transition to successively larger amplitudes within ±45° of the equator. The results confirm the previously reported latitudinal organization of the ENA spectra and their remarkable similarity to that of the solar wind (SW) speed observed by Ulysses in the inner heliosphere. And while earlier studies showed that the ~0.5-6 keV globally distributed ENA spectral indices could be represented as single power laws over much of the sky, our new results indicate that this is an over-simplification because the spectral indices have an energy and latitude dependence. Furthermore, this dependence is an important factor that must be taken into consideration by models and simulations that seek to map the IBEX ENA observations back to the latitudinal profile of the SW speed structure observed in the inner heliosphere.« less

  2. Latittudinal and energy dependence of energetic neutral atom spectral indices measured by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, M. I.; Allegrini, F.; Dayeh, M. A.; Funsten, H.; Heerikhuisen, J.; McComas, D. J.; Fuselier, S. A.; Pogorelov, N.; Schwadron, N. A.; Zank, G. P.; Zirnstein, E. J.

    2015-03-30

    Here, we investigate the latitudinal and energy dependence of the globally distributed 0.5-6 keV energetic neutral atom (ENA) spectra measured by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) during the first 3 yrs of the mission. Our results are: (1) the ENA spectral indices at the two lowest energies (0.89 and 1.47 keV) exhibit no clear trend with ecliptic latitude θ, while those at ~2.29 and ~3.41 keV exhibit a clear latitudinal pattern; flatter spectra occur above 60° latitude and steeper spectra occur ±30° of the equator. (2) The latitudinal dependence of the spectral indices at different energies can be represented by the cosine function γ =a0 + a1 cos (a2θ) with unique offsets, amplitudes, and phase angles; the higher energy ENA indices transition to successively larger amplitudes within ±45° of the equator. The results confirm the previously reported latitudinal organization of the ENA spectra and their remarkable similarity to that of the solar wind (SW) speed observed by Ulysses in the inner heliosphere. And while earlier studies showed that the ~0.5-6 keV globally distributed ENA spectral indices could be represented as single power laws over much of the sky, our new results indicate that this is an over-simplification because the spectral indices have an energy and latitude dependence. Furthermore, this dependence is an important factor that must be taken into consideration by models and simulations that seek to map the IBEX ENA observations back to the latitudinal profile of the SW speed structure observed in the inner heliosphere.

  3. Atomic Diffusion in Solid Molecular Hydrogen

    PubMed Central

    Belonoshko, Anatoly B.; Ramzan, Muhammad; Mao, Ho-kwang; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2013-01-01

    We performed ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of the C2c and Cmca-12 phases of hydrogen at pressures from 210 to 350 GPa. These phases were predicted to be stable at 0 K and pressures above 200 GPa. However, systematic studies of temperature impact on properties of these phases have not been performed so far. Filling this gap, we observed that on temperature increase diffusion sets in the Cmca-12 phase, being absent in C2c. We explored the mechanism of diffusion and computed melting curve of hydrogen at extreme pressures. The results suggest that the recent experiments claiming conductive hydrogen at the pressure around 260 GPa and ambient temperature might be explained by the diffusion. The diffusion might also be the reason for the difference in Raman spectra obtained in recent experiments. PMID:23902995

  4. Atomic diffusion in solid molecular hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Belonoshko, Anatoly B; Ramzan, Muhammad; Mao, Ho-Kwang; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2013-01-01

    We performed ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of the C2c and Cmca-12 phases of hydrogen at pressures from 210 to 350 GPa. These phases were predicted to be stable at 0 K and pressures above 200 GPa. However, systematic studies of temperature impact on properties of these phases have not been performed so far. Filling this gap, we observed that on temperature increase diffusion sets in the Cmca-12 phase, being absent in C2c. We explored the mechanism of diffusion and computed melting curve of hydrogen at extreme pressures. The results suggest that the recent experiments claiming conductive hydrogen at the pressure around 260 GPa and ambient temperature might be explained by the diffusion. The diffusion might also be the reason for the difference in Raman spectra obtained in recent experiments.

  5. Diffusion mobility of the hydrogen atom with allowance for the anharmonic attenuation of migrating atom state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashlev, Y. A.

    2017-04-01

    Evolution of vibration relaxation of hydrogen atoms in metals with the close-packed lattice at high and medium temperatures is investigated based on non-equilibrium statistical thermodynamics, in that number on using the retarded two-time Green function method. In accordance with main kinetic equation - the generalized Fokker- Plank- Kolmogorov equation, anharmonism of hydrogen atoms vibration in potential wells does not make any contribution to collision effects. It influences the relaxation processes at the expense of interference of fourth order anharmonism with single-phonon scattering on impurity hydrogen atoms. Therefore, the total relaxation time of vibration energy of system metal-hydrogen is written as a product of two factors: relaxation time of system in harmonic approximation and dimensionless anharmonic attenuation of quantum hydrogen state.

  6. FUSE Survey of Interstellar Molecular Hydrogen Toward 45 High-Latitude AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillmon, K.; Shull, J. M.; Danforth, C.; Tumlinson, J.

    2006-06-01

    We report results from a Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) survey of interstellar molecular hydrogen (H2) along 45 sightlines to background AGN at high Galactic latitudes (|b| > 20°). The high-latitude sightlines are effective at probing diffuse gas in the low Galactic halo, including large-scale gaseous structures. FUSE spectra of 87% (39 of 45) of the observed AGN show detectable Galactic H2 absorption from the Lyman and Werner bands between 920 and 1126 Å, with detected column densities ranging from N(H2)=1014.17-19.82 cm-2. Our survey is sensitive to N(H2)>1013.8-14.6 cm-2, depending on the S/N (2--11 per pixel) and spectral resolution (R=15,000-20,000). The broad range of column densities indicates large fluctuations in the spatial structure of high-latitude H2 clouds, particularly at b > 54°. In the northern hemisphere, we identify many regions of low N(H2) (≤ 1015 cm-2) between (l=60°-180° and b>54°). These ``H2 holes" may be related to the ``Northern Chimney" (region of low Na I absorption, Lallement et al. 2003) and the ``Lockman Hole" (region of low NHI, Lockman et al. 1986). A comparison of these high-latitude results with those from our FUSE survey of ˜130 OB-star sightlines in the Galactic disk suggests that that halo and disk clouds have different physical properties. The mean rotational temperature, < T01halo > = 125 ± 15 K, is higher than that found in the Galactic disk, < T01disk >= 86 ± 20 K. Because this H2 temperature is elevated compared to gas in the Milky Way disk (Savage et al. 1977; Shull et al. 2004) or in the LMC/SMC (Tumlinson et al. 2002), it may imply enhanced heating or reduced cooling rates in Galactic halo diffuse H2 clouds. The transition to appreciable molecular fractions, fH2 > 0.01, in our halo sample occurs at a lower total hydrogen column density (log NHhalo = 20.35) than in the Galactic disk (log NHdisk = 20.7), possibly indicating reduced H2 photodissociation rates offsetting a lower formation rate on

  7. A FUSE Survey of Interstellar Molecular Hydrogen toward High-Latitude AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillmon, Kristen; Shull, J. Michael; Tumlinson, Jason; Danforth, Charles

    2006-01-01

    We report results from a Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) survey of interstellar molecular hydrogen (H2) along 45 sight lines to AGNs at high Galactic latitudes (b>20deg). Most (39 out of 45) of the sight lines show detectable Galactic H2 absorption from Lyman and Werner bands between 1000 and 1126 Å, with column densities ranging from NH2=1014.17 to 1019.82 cm-2. In the northern Galactic hemisphere, we identify many regions of low NH2 (<=1015 cm-2) between l=60deg and 180° and at b>54deg. These ``H2 holes'' provide valuable, uncontaminated sight lines for extragalactic UV spectroscopy, and a few may be related to the ``Northern Chimney'' (low Na I absorption) and the ``Lockman Hole'' (low NHI). A comparison of high-latitude H2 with 139 OB star sight lines surveyed in the Galactic disk suggests that high-latitude and disk H2 clouds may have different rates of heating, cooling, and UV excitation. For rotational states J=0 and 1, the mean excitation temperature at high latitude, =124+/-8 K, is somewhat higher than that in the Galactic disk, =86+/-20 K. For J>=2, the mean =498+/-28 K, and the column-density ratios, N(3)/N(1), N(4)/N(0), and N(4)/N(2), indicate a comparable degree of UV excitation in the disk and low halo for sight lines with NH2>=1018 cm-2. The distribution of molecular fractions at high latitude shows a transition at lower total hydrogen column density (logNhlH~20.38+/-0.13) than in the Galactic disk (logNdiskH~20.7). If the UV radiation fields are similar in disk and low halo, this suggests an enhanced H2 (dust-catalyzed) formation rate in higher density, compressed clouds, which could be detectable as high-latitude, sheetlike infrared cirrus.

  8. Cold atomic hydrogen in the inner galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickey, J. M.; Garwood, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    The VLA is used to measure 21 cm absorption in directions with the absolute value of b less than 1 deg., the absolute value of 1 less than 25 deg. to probe the cool atomic gas in the inner galaxy. Abundant H I absorption is detected; typical lines are deep and narrow, sometimes blending in velocity with adjacent features. Unlike 21 cm emission not all allowed velocities are covered: large portions of the l-v diagram are optically thin. Although not similar to H I emission, the absorption shows a striking correspondence with CO emission in the inner galaxy: essentially every strong feature detected in one survey is seen in the other. The provisional conclusion is that in the inner galaxy most cool atomic gas is associated with molecular cloud complexes. There are few or no cold atomic clouds devoid of molecules in the inner galaxy, although these are common in the outer galaxy.

  9. Differential cross sections for muonic atom scattering from hydrogenic molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Adamczak, Andrzej

    2006-10-15

    The differential cross sections for low-energy muonic hydrogen atom scattering from hydrogenic molecules are directly expressed by the corresponding amplitudes for muonic atom scattering from hydrogen-isotope nuclei. The energy and angular dependence of these three-body amplitudes is thus taken naturally into account in scattering from molecules, without involving any pseudopotentials. Effects of the internal motion of nuclei inside the target molecules are included for every initial rotational-vibrational state. These effects are very significant as the considered three-body amplitudes often vary strongly within the energy interval < or approx. 0.1 eV. The differential cross sections, calculated using the presented method, have been successfully used for planning and interpreting many experiments in low-energy muon physics. Studies of {mu}{sup -} nuclear capture in p{mu} and the measurement of the Lamb shift in p{mu} atoms created in H{sub 2} gaseous targets are recent examples.

  10. Thermochemical nonequilibrium in atomic hydrogen at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, R. K.

    1972-01-01

    A numerical study of the nonequilibrium flow of atomic hydrogen in a cascade arc was performed to obtain insight into the physics of the hydrogen cascade arc. A rigorous mathematical model of the flow problem was formulated, incorporating the important nonequilibrium transport phenomena and atomic processes which occur in atomic hydrogen. Realistic boundary conditions, including consideration of the wall electrostatic sheath phenomenon, were included in the model. The governing equations of the asymptotic region of the cascade arc were obtained by writing conservation of mass and energy equations for the electron subgas, an energy conservation equation for heavy particles and an equation of state. Finite-difference operators for variable grid spacing were applied to the governing equations and the resulting system of strongly coupled, stiff equations were solved numerically by the Newton-Raphson method.

  11. Measurements of atomic splittings in atomic hydrogen and the proton charge radius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hessels, E. A.

    2016-09-01

    The proton charge radius can be determined from precise measurements of atomic hydrogen spectroscopy. A review of the relevant measurements will be given, including an update on our measurement of the n=2 Lamb shift. The values obtained from hydrogen will be compared to those obtained from muonic hydrogen and from electron-proton elastic scattering measurements. This work is funded by NSERC, CRC and CFI.

  12. Multiple scattering and charged-particle - hydrogen-atom collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franco, V.; Thomas, B. K.

    1979-01-01

    Glauber-approximation scattering amplitudes for charged-particle - hydrogen-atom elastic and inelastic collisions are derived directly in terms of the known particle-electron and particle-proton Coulomb scattering amplitudes and the known hydrogen-atom form factors. It is shown that the particle-hydrogen amplitude contains no single-scattering term. The double-scattering term is obtained as a two-dimensional integral in momentum space. It is demonstrated how the result can be used as the starting point for an alternative and relatively simple derivation, in closed form, of the Glauber particle-hydrogen scattering amplitude for transitions from the ground state to an arbitrary (nlm) state.

  13. Inactivation of bacteriophage, DNA, and ribonuclease by thermal hydrogen atoms.

    PubMed

    Jung, H; Kürzinger, K

    1968-12-01

    T1 phage, BU-T1 phage, infectious DNA extracted from phage phiX 174, and chromatographically purified ribonuclease were exposed to thermal hydrogen atoms, and the loss of plaque-forming ability, infectivity, or enzymatic activity was determined after various exposure times. Atomic hydrogen was generated by two different methods: (1) by a high-frequency discharge in hydrogen gas and (2) by irradiating a foil of polyethyleneter-ephthalate with 2-MeV protons. With increasing exposure time the surviving fraction of all objects tested approaches a constant level. After subtracting this constant "indestructible" fraction in either system, all objects were inactivated according to exponential curves. Furthermore, no BU sensitization was found to occur in BU-T1 phage exposed to atomic hydrogen, whereas gamma irradiation of samples from the same batches revealed a BU effect of a factor of 2.2. These experiments demonstrate hydrogen atoms to be efficient in causing biological damage. Consequently the terminology of "direct" and "indirect" radiation effect may have to be redefined.

  14. Atomic hydrogen distribution. [in Titan atmospheric model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabarie, N.

    1974-01-01

    Several possible H2 vertical distributions in Titan's atmosphere are considered with the constraint of 5 km-A a total quantity. Approximative calculations show that hydrogen distribution is quite sensitive to two other parameters of Titan's atmosphere: the temperature and the presence of other constituents. The escape fluxes of H and H2 are also estimated as well as the consequent distributions trapped in the Saturnian system.

  15. Relativistic Hydrogen-Like Atom on a Noncommutative Phase Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masum, Huseyin; Dulat, Sayipjamal; Tohti, Mutallip

    2017-09-01

    The energy levels of hydrogen-like atom on a noncommutative phase space were studied in the framework of relativistic quantum mechanics. The leading order corrections to energy levels 2 S 1/2, 2 P 1/2 and 2 P 3/2 were obtained by using the 𝜃 and the \\bar θ modified Dirac Hamiltonian of hydrogen-like atom on a noncommutative phase space. The degeneracy of the energy levels 2 P 1/2 and 2 P 3/2 were removed completely by 𝜃-correction. And the \\bar θ -correction shifts these energy levels.

  16. Energy Levels of 'Hydrogen Atom' in Discrete Time Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Khrennikov, Andrei; Volovich, Yaroslav

    2006-01-04

    We analyze dynamical consequences of a conjecture that there exists a fundamental (indivisible) quant of time. In particular we study the problem of discrete energy levels of hydrogen atom. We are able to reconstruct potential which in discrete time formalism leads to energy levels of unperturbed hydrogen atom. We also consider linear energy levels of quantum harmonic oscillator and show how they are produced in the discrete time formalism. More generally, we show that in discrete time formalism finite motion in central potential leads to discrete energy spectrum, the property which is common for quantum mechanical theory. Thus deterministic (but discrete time{exclamation_point}) dynamics is compatible with discrete energy levels.

  17. Hydrogen Atoms Cause Long-Range Electronic Effects on Graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffieux, P.; Gröning, O.; Schwaller, P.; Schlapbach, L.; Gröning, P.

    2000-05-01

    We report on long-range electronic effects caused by hydrogen-carbon interaction at the graphite surface. Two types of defects could be distinguished with a combined mode of scanning tunneling microscopy and atomic force microscopy: chemisorption of hydrogen on the basal plane of graphite and atomic vacancy formation. Both types show a \\(3×3\\)R30° superlattice in the local density of states but have a different topographic structure. The range of modifications in the electronic structure, of fundamental importance for electronic devices based on carbon nanostructures, has been found to be of the order of 20-25 lattice constants.

  18. Recombination of hydrogen atoms on fine-grain graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drenik, Aleksander; Vesel, Alenka; Kreter, Arkadi; Mozetič, Miran

    2011-04-01

    The probability of recombination of hydrogen atoms on surfaces of fine-grain graphite EK98 was investigated as a function of surface roughness. The source of hydrogen atoms used in this experiment was weakly ionised plasma created with an inductively coupled radiofrequency generator at pressures from 30 Pa to 175 Pa in hydrogen. Hydrogen atom density was measured by means of fibre optic catalytic probes. The recombination coefficient of the graphite samples was determined by observing their impact on the spatial distribution of the atom density in a closed side-arm of the reactor. Smith's diffusion model was used to calculate the values of the recombination coefficient. The measured recombination coefficient was found to increase much faster than the measured effective surface. This discrepancy is explained by the fact that on a surface which is not perfectly flat, there is a finite probability for multiple collisions. Impinging atoms collide more than once with the surface before they are reflected into the surface, which results in a larger probability of recombination.

  19. Hydrogen atom temperature measured with wavelength-modulated laser absorption spectroscopy in large scale filament arc negative hydrogen ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, H. Goto, M.; Tsumori, K.; Kisaki, M.; Ikeda, K.; Nagaoka, K.; Osakabe, M.; Takeiri, Y.; Kaneko, O.; Nishiyama, S.; Sasaki, K.

    2015-04-08

    The velocity distribution function of hydrogen atoms is one of the useful parameters to understand particle dynamics from negative hydrogen production to extraction in a negative hydrogen ion source. Hydrogen atom temperature is one of the indicators of the velocity distribution function. To find a feasibility of hydrogen atom temperature measurement in large scale filament arc negative hydrogen ion source for fusion, a model calculation of wavelength-modulated laser absorption spectroscopy of the hydrogen Balmer alpha line was performed. By utilizing a wide range tunable diode laser, we successfully obtained the hydrogen atom temperature of ∼3000 K in the vicinity of the plasma grid electrode. The hydrogen atom temperature increases as well as the arc power, and becomes constant after decreasing with the filling of hydrogen gas pressure.

  20. Photoionization of atoms and molecules. [of hydrogen, helium, and xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samson, J. A. R.

    1976-01-01

    A literature review on the present state of knowledge in photoionization is presented. Various experimental techniques that have been developed to study photoionization, such as fluorescence and photoelectron spectroscopy, mass spectroscopy, are examined. Various atoms and molecules were chosen to illustrate these techniques, specifically helium and xenon atoms and hydrogen molecules. Specialized photoionization such as in positive and negative ions, excited states, and free radicals is also treated. Absorption cross sections and ionization potentials are also discussed.

  1. Quantum tunneling of hydrogen atom in dissociation of photoexcited methylamine.

    PubMed

    Marom, Ran; Levi, Chen; Weiss, Tal; Rosenwaks, Salman; Zeiri, Yehuda; Kosloff, Ronnie; Bar, Ilana

    2010-09-16

    The probability of hydrogen atom release, following photoexcitation of methylamine, CH(3)NH(2), is found to increase extensively as higher vibrational states on the first excited electronic state are accessed. This behavior is consistent with theoretical calculations, based on the probability of H atom tunneling through an energy barrier on the excited potential energy surface, implying that N-H bond breaking is dominated by quantum tunneling.

  2. Interstellar Grain Surface Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Chemistry on grain surfaces plays an Important role in the formation of interstellar Ices, It can also influence the composition of the gas phase through outgassing near luminous, newly formed stars. This paper reviews the chemical processes taking place on Interstellar grain surfaces with the emphasis on those transforming CO into other hydrocarbons. At low, molecular cloud temperatures (approximately equal to 10K), physisorption processes dominate interstellar grain surface chemistry and GO is largely hydrogenated through reactions with atomic H and oxidized through reactions with atomic O. The former will lead to the formation of H2CO and CH3OH ices, while the latter results in CO2 ice. The observational evidence for these ices in molecular clouds will be discussed. Very close to protostars, the gas and grain temperatures are much higher (approximately equal to 500K) and chemisorption processes, including catalytic surface reactions, becomes important. This will be illustrated based upon our studies of the Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis of CH4 from CO on metallic surfaces. Likely, this process has played an important role in the early solar nebula. Observational consequences will be pointed out.

  3. Probing the heliosphere with energetic hydrogen atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsieh, K. C.; Shih, K. L.; Jokipii, J. R.; Grzedzielski, S.

    1992-01-01

    The idea of using energetic neutral atoms (ENAs), produced by charge exchange between energetic ions and ambient neutral atoms, as a diagnostic tool to investigate planetary magnetospheres from a distance has been extended to the investigation of the heliosphere. The paper explores what one can reasonably expect of the heliospheric ENA (HSENA) and what criteria would be imposed on HSENA instruments by concentrating on 10-10 exp 3 keV protons in quiet-time interplanetary space, solar-flare events, corotating interaction regions, and populations have distinctive signatures and that the detection of these particles can reveal energy spatial and propagation of ions in 3D interplanetary space, including the solar-wind termination shock. Such breadth of information could not be gained by in situ means.

  4. Hydrogen-related contrast in atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, René; Schwarz, Alexander; Wiesendanger, Roland

    2009-07-01

    We study the effect of hydrogen adsorption on gadolinium islands epitaxially grown on W(110) utilizing atomic force microscopy operated in the non-contact regime. In constant force images, gadolinium islands exhibit two height levels, corresponding to hydrogen covered and clean gadolinium areas, respectively. The experimentally measured height differences are strongly bias dependent, showing that the contrast pattern is dominated by electrostatic tip-sample forces. We interpret our experimental findings in terms of a local reduction of the work function and the presence of localized charges on hydrogen covered areas. Both effects lead to a variation of the contact potential difference between tip and surface areas, which are clean or hydrogen covered gadolinium. After clarifying the electrostatic contrast formation, we can unambiguously identify regions of clean gadolinium on the islands. These results are important for further magnetic exchange force microscopy based studies, because hydrogen also alters the magnetic properties locally.

  5. How solvent modulates hydroxyl radical reactivity in hydrogen atom abstractions.

    PubMed

    Mitroka, Susan; Zimmeck, Stephanie; Troya, Diego; Tanko, James M

    2010-03-10

    The hydroxyl radical (HO*) is a highly reactive oxygen-centered radical whose bimolecular rate constants for reaction with organic compounds (hydrogen atom abstraction) approach the diffusion-controlled limit in aqueous solution. The results reported herein show that hydroxyl radical is considerably less reactive in dipolar, aprotic solvents such as acetonitrile. This diminished reactivity is explained on the basis of a polarized transition state for hydrogen abstraction, in which the oxygen of the hydroxyl radical becomes highly negative and can serve as a hydrogen bond acceptor. Because acetonitrile cannot participate as a hydrogen bond donor, the transition state cannot be stabilized by hydrogen bonding, and the reaction rate is lower; the opposite is true when water is the solvent. This hypothesis explains hydroxyl radical reactivity both in solution and in the gas phase and may be the basis for a "containment strategy" used by Nature when hydroxyl radical is produced endogenously.

  6. Hydrogen-related contrast in atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, René; Schwarz, Alexander; Wiesendanger, Roland

    2009-07-01

    We study the effect of hydrogen adsorption on gadolinium islands epitaxially grown on W(110) utilizing atomic force microscopy operated in the non-contact regime. In constant force images, gadolinium islands exhibit two height levels, corresponding to hydrogen covered and clean gadolinium areas, respectively. The experimentally measured height differences are strongly bias dependent, showing that the contrast pattern is dominated by electrostatic tip-sample forces. We interpret our experimental findings in terms of a local reduction of the work function and the presence of localized charges on hydrogen covered areas. Both effects lead to a variation of the contact potential difference between tip and surface areas, which are clean or hydrogen covered gadolinium. After clarifying the electrostatic contrast formation, we can unambiguously identify regions of clean gadolinium on the islands. These results are important for further magnetic exchange force microscopy based studies, because hydrogen also alters the magnetic properties locally.

  7. Boussard Interstellar Ramjet Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The Boussard Interstellar Ramjet engine concept uses interstellar hydrogen scooped up from its environment as the spacecraft passes by to provide propellant mass. The hydrogen is then ionized and then collected by an electromagentic field. In this image, an onboard laser is uded to heat the plasma, and the laser or electron beam is used to trigger fusion pulses thereby creating propulsion.

  8. The Connection Between Star Formation and the Interstellar Media in Simulations of Evolving Galaxies with a Focus on Molecular Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Charlotte R.

    Star formation as part of galaxy evolution is a highly non-linear process, involving interactions between gas heating and cooling, galactic dynamics, smooth and clumpy accretion, and stellar feedback. Modeling it even on parsecs scales requires the use of hydrodynamic simulations and the modeling of complex physical processes. One area that has been neglected in most previous simulations is the cold, molecular phase of the interstellar medium from which stars form. I addressed that lack in this thesis through the implementation of molecular hydrogen (H2) physics in the galaxy formation code, GASOLINE. In this implementation, the non-equilibrium H2 abundances are calculated based on the local formation and destruction rates of H2, including the effects of shielding. Both self-shielding and shielding from dust are included and protect against the cosmic background radiation and local Lyman-Werner radiation. With the implementation of H2, I was able to implement additional low temperature H2 cooling and H2-based star formation. Using this code, I researched the effects of this cold gas phase and supernova feedback on star formation in galaxy formation simulations. I first analyzed the effect of supernova feedback on star formation and morphology in galaxies of different masses and resolution, simulated without H2. From this sample, I determined the appropriate spatial and mass resolutions for star formation and feedback to converge. Notably, the 1010 M⊙ galaxy simulation was on the cusp of forming a disk, making its morphology highly sensitivity to resolution. Following the implementation of H2 , I tested the code by calculating the transition from atomic to molecular gas on similar isolated galaxy simulations. I then researched the effect of including H2-physics on star formation in a cosmological dwarf galaxy simulation. The combination of extra cooling from H2 and shielding resulted in the formation of a cold, molecular gas phase within a clumpier interstellar

  9. Imaging detection of spin-polarized hydrogen atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broderick, Bernadette M.; Chernyak, Vladimir Y.; Smolin, Andrey G.; Vasyutinskii, Oleg S.; Suits, Arthur G.

    2015-08-01

    We demonstrate that a two-color high-n Rydberg excitation of hydrogen atoms using a circularly polarized tagging laser may be combined with pulsed-field ionization to allow for direct velocity map imaging of the H atom spin polarization. In this proof-of-principle study we only detect the incoherent spin polarization for a single velocity component in the 213 nm dissociation of HBr, but anticipate that by combining this strategy with slice imaging, the full velocity dependent H atom spin polarization may be obtained in a single experimental geometry.

  10. Hydrogen atom spectrum and the lamb shift in noncommutative QED.

    PubMed

    Chaichian, M; Sheikh-Jabbari, M M; Tureanu, A

    2001-03-26

    We have calculated the energy levels of the hydrogen atom as well as the Lamb shift within the noncommutative quantum electrodynamics theory. The results show deviations from the usual QED both on the classical and the quantum levels. On both levels, the deviations depend on the parameter of space/space noncommutativity.

  11. Higher-order Sternheimer shieldings of the hydrogen atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler, P. W.; Steiner, E.

    Multiple perturbation theory is used to calculate the response of the electric field gradient at the nucleus of the hydrogen atom to external non-uniform fields. The parallel component of the field gradient at the nucleus in an axial field F with gradient F' and second derivative F'' has the perturbation expansion: [Enlarge Image

  12. Variational Perturbation Treatment of the Confined Hydrogen Atom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, H. E., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    The Schrodinger equation for the ground state of a hydrogen atom confined at the centre of an impenetrable cavity is treated using variational perturbation theory. Energies calculated from variational perturbation theory are comparable in accuracy to the results from a direct numerical solution. The goal of this exercise is to introduce the…

  13. Quantum-Classical Connection for Hydrogen Atom-Like Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Syam, Debapriyo; Roy, Arup

    2011-01-01

    The Bohr-Sommerfeld quantum theory specifies the rules of quantization for circular and elliptical orbits for a one-electron hydrogen atom-like system. This article illustrates how a formula connecting the principal quantum number "n" and the length of the major axis of an elliptical orbit may be arrived at starting from the quantum…

  14. The Confined Hydrogen Atom with a Moving Nucleus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandez, Francisco M.

    2010-01-01

    We study the hydrogen atom confined to a spherical box with impenetrable walls but, unlike earlier pedagogical articles on the subject, we assume that the nucleus also moves. We obtain the ground-state energy approximately by means of first-order perturbation theory and show that it is greater than that for the case in which the nucleus is clamped…

  15. The Confined Hydrogen Atom with a Moving Nucleus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandez, Francisco M.

    2010-01-01

    We study the hydrogen atom confined to a spherical box with impenetrable walls but, unlike earlier pedagogical articles on the subject, we assume that the nucleus also moves. We obtain the ground-state energy approximately by means of first-order perturbation theory and show that it is greater than that for the case in which the nucleus is clamped…

  16. Variational Perturbation Treatment of the Confined Hydrogen Atom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, H. E., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    The Schrodinger equation for the ground state of a hydrogen atom confined at the centre of an impenetrable cavity is treated using variational perturbation theory. Energies calculated from variational perturbation theory are comparable in accuracy to the results from a direct numerical solution. The goal of this exercise is to introduce the…

  17. Probability of Locating the Electron in a Hydrogen Atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mak, Thomas C. W.; Li, Wai-Kee

    2000-04-01

    A variety of numerical problems, along with their solutions, regarding the probability of locating the electron in a hydrogen atom are given. These problems range from simple substitution exercises to graduate-level take-home questions. Comments on the physical meaning of some of the results are also provided. These problems may be easily modified by teachers to suit their purposes.

  18. Atomic hydrogen maser investigations of hydrogen atom interactions from 4 to 12 K. Final report, 1 March 1980-28 February 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Crampton, S.B.

    1986-03-24

    Techniques developed during previous studies of the ground-state hyperfine resonance of hydrogen atoms intermittently adsorbed on molecular hydrogen surfaces were used to develop a cryogenic atomic-hydrogen maser using a 5 K state-selected H-atom beam and solid-neon storage surfaces near 10 K temperature. The physical parameters affecting the use of such a device for frequency metrology and precision measurements of atomic parameters were determined.

  19. Microwave plasma generation of hydrogen atoms for rocket propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, R.; Filpus, J.; Morin, T.; Snellenberger, R.; Asmussen, J.; Hawley, M.; Kerber, R.

    1981-01-01

    A flow microwave plasma reaction system is used to study the conversion of hydrogen to hydrogen atoms as a function of pressure, power density, cavity tuning, cavity mode, and time in the plasma zone. Hydrogen atom concentration is measured down-stream from the plasma by NOCl titration. Extensive modeling of the plasma and recombination zones is performed with the plasma zone treated as a backmix reaction system and the recombination zone treated as a plug flow. The thermodynamics and kinetics of the recombination process are examined in detail to provide an understanding of the conversion of recombination energy to gas kinetic energy. It is found that cavity tuning, discharge stability, and optimum power coupling are critically dependent on the system pressure, but nearly independent of the flow rate.

  20. Microwave plasma generation of hydrogen atoms for rocket propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, R.; Filpus, J.; Morin, T.; Snellenberger, R.; Asmussen, J.; Hawley, M.; Kerber, R.

    1981-01-01

    A flow microwave plasma reaction system is used to study the conversion of hydrogen to hydrogen atoms as a function of pressure, power density, cavity tuning, cavity mode, and time in the plasma zone. Hydrogen atom concentration is measured down-stream from the plasma by NOCl titration. Extensive modeling of the plasma and recombination zones is performed with the plasma zone treated as a backmix reaction system and the recombination zone treated as a plug flow. The thermodynamics and kinetics of the recombination process are examined in detail to provide an understanding of the conversion of recombination energy to gas kinetic energy. It is found that cavity tuning, discharge stability, and optimum power coupling are critically dependent on the system pressure, but nearly independent of the flow rate.

  1. Suprathermal oxygen atoms in the Martian upper atmosphere: Contribution of the proton and hydrogen atom precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shematovich, V. I.

    2017-07-01

    This is a study of the kinetics and transport of hot oxygen atoms in the transition region (from the thermosphere to the exosphere) of the Martian upper atmosphere. It is assumed that the source of the hot oxygen atoms is the transfer of momentum and energy in elastic collisions between thermal atmospheric oxygen atoms and the high-energy protons and hydrogen atoms precipitating onto the Martian upper atmosphere from the solar-wind plasma. The distribution functions of suprathermal oxygen atoms by the kinetic energy are calculated. It is shown that the exosphere is populated by a large number of suprathermal oxygen atoms with kinetic energies up to the escape energy 2 eV; i.e., a hot oxygen corona is formed around Mars. The transfer of energy from the precipitating solar-wind plasma protons and hydrogen atoms to the thermal oxygen atoms leads to the formation of an additional nonthermal escape flux of atomic oxygen from the Martian atmosphere. The precipitation-induced escape flux of hot oxygen atoms may become dominant under the conditions of extreme solar events, such as solar flares and coronal mass ejections, as shown by recent observations onboard NASA's MAVEN spacecraft (Jakosky et al., 2015).

  2. Atomic hydrogen maser active oscillator cavity and bulb design optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, H. E.; Washburn, P. J.

    1984-01-01

    The performance characteristics and reliability of the active oscillator atomic hydrogen maser depend upon oscillation parameters which characterize the interaction region of the maser, the resonant cavity and atom storage bulb assembly. With particular attention to use of the cavity frequency switching servo (1) to reduce cavity pulling, it is important to maintain high oscillation level, high atomic beam flux utilization efficiency, small spin exchange parameter and high cavity quality factor. It is also desirable to have a small and rigid cavity and bulb structure and to minimize the cavity temperature sensitivity. Curves for a novel hydrogen maser cavity configuration which is partially loaded with a quartz dielectric cylinder and show the relationships between cavity length, cavity diameter, bulb size, dielectric thickness, cavity quality factor, filling factor and cavity frequency temperature coefficient are presented. The results are discussed in terms of improvement in maser performance resulting from particular design choices.

  3. Hybrid simulations of the hydrogen energetic neutral atoms at Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, K.; Jarvinen, R.; Kallio, E.; Janhunen, P.; Galli, A.; Wurz, P.; Barabash, S.

    2008-09-01

    Abstract An energetic neutral atom (ENA) is produced when a charge exchange reaction happens between an energetic ion and a neutral atom. At Mars, the energetic ions are typically solar wind protons and the neutrals are hydrogen atoms of the planetary exosphere. The ASPERA-3 experiment on Mars Express has provided the first measurements of ENAs at Mars. These measurements give a unique global view of the solar wind interaction with Mars. In the present study, the properties of hydrogen ENAs at Mars are investigated using a 3-D quasi-neutral hybrid model, which has been successfully applied to the study of solar wind-planet interactions at different planets, such as Mercury, Venus, and Mars. Our preliminary simulation results give ENA intensity images similar to the ones obtained from ASPERA- 3/NPD observations, although there are still discrepancies due to uncertainties in the current exospheric models.

  4. Antiproton-hydrogen atom rearrangement-annihilation cross section

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, D.L. Jr.

    1986-08-22

    For antiproton energies of several eV or less, annihilation in matter occurs through atomic rearrangement processes in which the antiproton becomes bound to a nucleus prior to annihilation. Existing calculations of the antiproton-hydrogen atom rearrangement cross section are semiclassical and employ the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. They also employ various arguments in regard to the behavior of the system when the Born-Oppenheimer approximation breaks down at small antiproton-proton separations. These arguments indicate that rearrangement is essentially irreversible. In the present study, a detailed investigation was made of the antiproton-hydrogen atom system when the Born-Oppenheimer approximation breaks down. The results of this study indicate that the previous arguments were approximately correct, but that there is a significant probability for rearrangement reversing prior to annihilation. This probability is estimated to be about 20%. 8 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Atomic cobalt on nitrogen-doped graphene for hydrogen generation

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Huilong; Dong, Juncai; Arellano-Jiménez, M. Josefina; Ye, Gonglan; Dong Kim, Nam; Samuel, Errol L.G.; Peng, Zhiwei; Zhu, Zhuan; Qin, Fan; Bao, Jiming; Yacaman, Miguel Jose; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Chen, Dongliang; Tour, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Reduction of water to hydrogen through electrocatalysis holds great promise for clean energy, but its large-scale application relies on the development of inexpensive and efficient catalysts to replace precious platinum catalysts. Here we report an electrocatalyst for hydrogen generation based on very small amounts of cobalt dispersed as individual atoms on nitrogen-doped graphene. This catalyst is robust and highly active in aqueous media with very low overpotentials (30 mV). A variety of analytical techniques and electrochemical measurements suggest that the catalytically active sites are associated with the metal centres coordinated to nitrogen. This unusual atomic constitution of supported metals is suggestive of a new approach to preparing extremely efficient single-atom catalysts. PMID:26487368

  6. Correlation of Hydrogen-Atom Abstraction Reaction Efficiencies for Aryl Radicals with their Vertical Electron Affinities and the Vertical Ionization Energies of the Hydrogen Atom Donors

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Linhong; Nash, John J.

    2009-01-01

    The factors that control the reactivities of aryl radicals toward hydrogen-atom donors were studied by using a dual-cell Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT – ICR). Hydrogen-atom abstraction reaction efficiencies for two substrates, cyclohexane and isopropanol, were measured for twenty-three structurally different, positively-charged aryl radicals, which included dehydrobenzenes, dehydronaphthalenes, dehydropyridines, and dehydro(iso)quinolines. A logarithmic correlation was found between the hydrogen-atom abstraction reaction efficiencies and the (calculated) vertical electron affinities (EA) of the aryl radicals. Transition state energies calculated for three of the aryl radicals with isopropanol were found to correlate linearly with their (calculated) EAs. No correlation was found between the hydrogen-atom abstraction reaction efficiencies and the (calculated) enthalpy changes for the reactions. Measurement of the reaction efficiencies for the reactions of several different hydrogen-atom donors with a few selected aryl radicals revealed a logarithmic correlation between the hydrogen-atom abstraction reaction efficiencies and the vertical ionization energies (IE) of the hydrogen-atom donors, but not the lowest homolytic X – H (X = heavy atom) bond dissociation energies of the hydrogen-atom donors. Examination of the hydrogen-atom abstraction reactions of twenty-nine different aryl radicals and eighteen different hydrogen-atom donors showed that the reaction efficiency increases (logarithmically) as the difference between the IE of the hydrogen-atom donor and the EA of the aryl radical decreases. This dependence is likely to result from the increasing polarization, and concomitant stabilization, of the transition state as the energy difference between the neutral and ionic reactants decreases. Thus, the hydrogen-atom abstraction reaction efficiency for an aryl radical can be “tuned” by structural changes that influence either

  7. Correlation of hydrogen-atom abstraction reaction efficiencies for aryl radicals with their vertical electron affinities and the vertical ionization energies of the hydrogen-atom donors.

    PubMed

    Jing, Linhong; Nash, John J; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I

    2008-12-31

    The factors that control the reactivities of aryl radicals toward hydrogen-atom donors were studied by using a dual-cell Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer. Hydrogen-atom abstraction reaction efficiencies for two substrates, cyclohexane and isopropyl alcohol, were measured for 23 structurally different, positively charged aryl radicals, which included dehydrobenzenes, dehydronaphthalenes, dehydropyridines, and dehydro(iso)quinolines. A logarithmic correlation was found between the hydrogen-atom abstraction reaction efficiencies and the (calculated) vertical electron affinities (EA) of the aryl radicals. Transition state energies calculated for the reaction of three of the aryl radicals with isopropyl alcohol were found to correlate linearly with their (calculated) EAs. No correlation was found between the hydrogen-atom abstraction reaction efficiencies and the (calculated) enthalpy changes for the reactions. Measurement of the reaction efficiencies for the reactions of 15 different hydrogen-atom donors with two selected aryl radicals revealed a logarithmic correlation between the hydrogen-atom abstraction reaction efficiencies and the vertical ionization energies (IE) of the hydrogen-atom donors, but not the lowest homolytic X-H (X = heavy atom) bond dissociation energies of the hydrogen-atom donors. Examination of the hydrogen-atom abstraction reactions of 29 different aryl radicals and 18 different hydrogen-atom donors showed that the reaction efficiency increases (logarithmically) as the difference between the IE of the hydrogen-atom donor and the EA of the aryl radical decreases. This dependence is likely to result from the increasing polarization, and concomitant stabilization, of the transition state. Thus, the hydrogen-atom abstraction reaction efficiency for an aryl radical can be "tuned" by structural changes that influence either the vertical EA of the aryl radical or the vertical IE of the hydrogen atom donor.

  8. Production of Excited Atomic Hydrogen from Methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machacek, J. R.; Andrianarijaona, V. M.; Furst, J. E.; Gay, T. J.; Kilcoyne, A. L. D.; Landers, A. L.; McLaughlin, K. W.

    2009-05-01

    We have measured the production of Lyα and Hα fluorescence from atomic H for the photodissociation of CH4 by linearly-polarized photons with energies between 20 and 65 eV. Comparison between our Lyα relative cross section and that previously reported [1] show different peak height ratios. This also occurs in the Hα cross section when compared to previous data [2]. We do not observe as significant a drop in either cross section above 35 eV. Our measurements were taken with pressures two orders of magnitude lower than those used in ref. [1]. We present comparisons between data sets and a discussion of possible systematic effects. [1] H. Fukuzawa et al., J. Phys. B. 38, 565 (2005). [2] M. Kato et al., J. Phys. B. 35, 4383 (2002). Support provided by the NSF (Grant PHY-0653379), DOE (LBNL/ALS) and ANSTO (Access to Major Research Facilities Programme).

  9. The interstellar deuterium-to-hydrogen ratio - A reevaluation of Lyman absorption-line measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccullough, Peter R.

    1992-01-01

    The D/H ratio in the local interstellar medium is evaluated based upon previously published measurements of Lyman absorption lines together with the hypothesis that the D/H ratio is constant. A unique value for the D/H ratio of 1.5 (+/- 0.2) x 10 exp -5 by number is shown to be consistent with all published determinations made with the Copernicus and the International Ultraviolet Explorer satellites. The possibility that the D/H ratio may vary substantially in the local interstellar medium is considered and found to be unnecessary.

  10. Heteroatom-doped hydrogenated amorphous carbons, a-C:H:X. "Volatile" silicon, sulphur and nitrogen depletion, blue photoluminescence, diffuse interstellar bands and ferro-magnetic carbon grain connections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, A. P.

    2013-07-01

    Context. Hydrogenated amorphous carbons, a-C:H, can incorporate a variety of heteroatoms, which can lead to interesting effects. Aims: We investigate the doping of interstellar a-C:H grains with, principally, Si, O, N and S atoms within the astrophysical context. Methods: A search of the literature on doped a-C:H reveals a number of interesting phenomena of relevance to astrophysics. Results: X dopants in a-C:H:X materials can affect the sp3/sp2 ratio (X = Si, O and N), lead to blue photoluminescence (undoped or X = N), induce ferromagnetic-like behaviour (X = N and S) or simply be incorporated (depleted) into the structure (X = Si, O, N and S). Si and N atoms could also incorporate into fullerenes, possibly forming colour-centres that could mimic diffuse interstellar bands. Conclusions: Doped a-C:H grains could explain several dust-related conundrums, such as: "volatile" Si in photo-dissociation regions, S and N depletion in molecular clouds, blue luminescence, some diffuse interstellar bands and ferromagnetism in carbonaceous grains.

  11. Hydrogen-exchange reactions via hot hydrogen atoms produced in the dissociation process of molecular hydrogen on Ir{111}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moritani, Kousuke; Okada, Michio; Nakamura, Mamiko; Kasai, Toshio; Murata, Yoshitada

    2001-12-01

    Adsorption and reaction of hydrogen (deuterium) on the Ir{111} surface has been studied with temperature-programmed desorption and direct measurements of desorbing molecules using a quadrupole mass spectrometer at ˜100 K. H2 exposure of the D-precovered Ir{111} surface was found to induce the desorption of HD and D2 molecules. This result suggests that energetic H atoms (hot H atoms) produced in the dissociation process of incident H2 molecules react with preadsorbed D atoms and desorb as HD molecules or produce secondary energetic D atoms via energy transfer. Secondary energetic D atoms (secondary hot D atoms) also induce the associative reactions with preadsorbed D atoms and desorb as D2 molecules. We will discuss the hot-H-atom-mediated reaction based on both empirical and steady-state approximation models for interpreting the present experimental results.

  12. Reactivity and Catalytic Activity of Hydrogen Atom Chemisorbed Silver Clusters.

    PubMed

    Manzoor, Dar; Pal, Sourav

    2015-06-18

    Metal clusters of silver have attracted recent interest of researchers as a result of their potential in different catalytic applications and low cost. However, due to the completely filled d orbital and very high first ionization potential of the silver atom, the silver-based catalysts interact very weakly with the reacting molecules. In the current work, density functional theory calculations were carried out to investigate the effect of hydrogen atom chemisorption on the reactivity and catalytic properties of inert silver clusters. Our results affirm that the hydrogen atom chemisorption leads to enhancement in the binding energy of the adsorbed O2 molecule on the inert silver clusters. The increase in the binding energy is also characterized by the decrease in the Ag-O and increase in the O-O bond lengths in the case of the AgnH silver clusters. Pertinent to the increase in the O-O bond length, a significant red shift in the O-O stretching frequency is also noted in the case of the AgnH silver clusters. Moreover, the hydrogen atom chemisorbed silver clusters show low reaction barriers and high heat of formation of the final products for the environmentally important CO oxidation reaction as compared to the parent catalytically inactive clusters. The obtained results were compared with those of the corresponding gold and hydrogen atom chemisorbed gold clusters obtained at the same level of theory. It is expected the current computational study will provide key insights for future advances in the design of efficient nanosilver-based catalysts through the adsorption of a small atom or a ligand.

  13. Interstellar Hydrogen Fluxes Measured by IBEX-Lo in 2009: Numerical Modeling and Comparison with the Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katushkina, O. A.; Izmodenov, V. V.; Alexashov, D. B.; Schwadron, N. A.; McComas, D. J.

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we perform numerical modeling of the interstellar hydrogen fluxes measured by IBEX-Lo during orbit 23 (spring 2009) using a state-of-the-art kinetic model of the interstellar neutral hydrogen distribution in the heliosphere. This model takes into account the temporal and heliolatitudinal variations of the solar parameters as well as the non-Maxwellian kinetic properties of the hydrogen distribution due to charge exchange in the heliospheric interface. We found that there is a qualitative difference between the IBEX-Lo data and the modeling results obtained with the three-dimensional, time-dependent model. Namely, the model predicts a larger count rate in energy bin 2 (20-41 eV) than in energy bin 1 (11-21 eV), while the data shows the opposite case. We perform study of the model parameter effects on the IBEX-Lo fluxes and the ratio of fluxes in two energy channels. We show that the most important parameter, which has a major influence on the ratio of the fluxes in the two energy bins, is the solar radiation pressure. The parameter fitting procedure shows that the best agreement between the model result and the data occurs when the ratio of the solar radiation pressure to the solar gravitation, μ0, is {1.26}-0.076+0.06, and the total ionization rate of hydrogen at 1 AU is {β }E,0={3.7}-0.35+0.39× {10}-7 s-1. We have found that the value of μ0 is much larger than μ0 = 0.89, which is the value derived from the integrated solar Lyα flux data for the period of time studied. We discuss possible reasons for the differences.

  14. Experimental interstellar organic chemistry: Preliminary findings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khare, B. N.; Sagan, C.

    1971-01-01

    In a simulation of interstellar organic chemistry in dense interstellar clouds or on grain surfaces, formaldehyde, water vapor, ammonia and ethane are deposited on a quartz cold finger and ultraviolet-irradiated in high vacuum at 77K. The HCHO photolytic pathway which produces an aldehyde radical and a superthermal hydrogen atom initiates solid phase chain reactions leading to a range of new compounds, including methanol, ethanol, acetaldehyde, acetonitrile, acetone, methyl formate, and possibly formic acid. Higher nitriles are anticipated. Genetic relations among these interstellar organic molecules (e.g., the Cannizzaro and Tischenko reactions) must exist. Some of them, rather than being synthesized from smaller molecules, may be degradation products of larger organic molecules, such as hexamethylene tetramine, which are candidate consitituents of the interstellar grains. The experiments reported here may also be relevant to cometary chemistry.

  15. Classical-field model of the hydrogen atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashkovskiy, Sergey A.

    2017-06-01

    It is shown that all of the basic properties of the hydrogen atom can be consistently described in terms of classical electrodynamics if instead of considering the electron to be a particle, we consider an electrically charged classical wave field—an "electron wave"—which is held by the electrostatic field of the proton. It is shown that quantum mechanics must be considered not as a theory of particles but as a classical field theory in the spirit of classical electrodynamics. In this case, we are not faced with difficulties in interpreting the results of the theory. In the framework of classical electrodynamics, all of the well-known regularities of the spontaneous emission of the hydrogen atom are obtained, which is usually derived in the framework of quantum electrodynamics. It is shown that there are no discrete states and discrete energy levels of the atom: the energy of the atom and its states change continuously. An explanation of the conventional corpuscular-statistical interpretation of atomic phenomena is given. It is shown that this explanation is only a misinterpretation of continuous deterministic processes. In the framework of classical electrodynamics, the nonlinear Schrödinger equation is obtained, which accounts for the inverse action of self-electromagnetic radiation of the electron wave and completely describes the spontaneous emissions of an atom.

  16. Classical-field model of the hydrogen atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashkovskiy, Sergey A.

    2017-02-01

    It is shown that all of the basic properties of the hydrogen atom can be consistently described in terms of classical electrodynamics if instead of considering the electron to be a particle, we consider an electrically charged classical wave field—an "electron wave"—which is held by the electrostatic field of the proton. It is shown that quantum mechanics must be considered not as a theory of particles but as a classical field theory in the spirit of classical electrodynamics. In this case, we are not faced with difficulties in interpreting the results of the theory. In the framework of classical electrodynamics, all of the well-known regularities of the spontaneous emission of the hydrogen atom are obtained, which is usually derived in the framework of quantum electrodynamics. It is shown that there are no discrete states and discrete energy levels of the atom: the energy of the atom and its states change continuously. An explanation of the conventional corpuscular-statistical interpretation of atomic phenomena is given. It is shown that this explanation is only a misinterpretation of continuous deterministic processes. In the framework of classical electrodynamics, the nonlinear Schrödinger equation is obtained, which accounts for the inverse action of self-electromagnetic radiation of the electron wave and completely describes the spontaneous emissions of an atom.

  17. Electron-impact ionization of atomic hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Baertschy, Mark D.

    2000-02-01

    Since the invention of quantum mechanics, even the simplest example of collisional breakup in a system of charged particles, e- + H → H+ + e- + e+, has stood as one of the last unsolved fundamental problems in atomic physics. A complete solution requires calculating the energies and directions for a final state in which three charged particles are moving apart. Advances in the formal description of three-body breakup have yet to lead to a viable computational method. Traditional approaches, based on two-body formalisms, have been unable to produce differential cross sections for the three-body final state. Now, by using a mathematical transformation of the Schrodinger equation that makes the final state tractable, a complete solution has finally been achieved, Under this transformation, the scattering wave function can be calculated without imposing explicit scattering boundary conditions. This approach has produced the first triple differential cross sections that agree on an absolute scale with experiment as well as the first ab initio calculations of the single differential cross section.

  18. Molecular to atomic phase transition in hydrogen under high pressure.

    PubMed

    McMinis, Jeremy; Clay, Raymond C; Lee, Donghwa; Morales, Miguel A

    2015-03-13

    The metallization of high-pressure hydrogen, together with the associated molecular to atomic transition, is one of the most important problems in the field of high-pressure physics. It is also currently a matter of intense debate due to the existence of conflicting experimental reports on the observation of metallic hydrogen on a diamond-anvil cell. Theoretical calculations have typically relied on a mean-field description of electronic correlation through density functional theory, a theory with well-known limitations in the description of metal-insulator transitions. In fact, the predictions of the pressure-driven dissociation of molecules in high-pressure hydrogen by density functional theory is strongly affected by the chosen exchange-correlation functional. In this Letter, we use quantum Monte Carlo calculations to study the molecular to atomic transition in hydrogen. We obtain a transition pressure of 447(3) GPa, in excellent agreement with the best experimental estimate of the transition 450 GPa based on an extrapolation to zero band gap from experimental measurements. Additionally, we find that C2/c is stable almost up to the molecular to atomic transition, in contrast to previous density functional theory (DFT) and DFT+quantum Monte Carlo studies which predict large stability regimes for intermediary molecular phases.

  19. Single Platinum Atoms Electrocatalysts: Oxygen Reduction and Hydrogen Oxidation Reactions

    DOE PAGES

    Vukmirovic, Miomir B.; Teeluck, Krishani M.; Liu, Ping; ...

    2017-08-08

    We prepared atomically dispersed catalyst consisting of Pt atoms arranged in a c(2 × 2) array on RuO2(110) substrate. A large interatomic distance of Pt atoms in a c(2 × 2) phase precludes the reactants to interact with more than one Pt atoms. A strong bond of Pt atoms with RuO2 prevents agglomeration of Pt atoms to form 2D-islands or 3D-clusters. The activities of single Pt atom catalyst for the oxygen reduction and hydrogen oxidation reactions were determined and compared with those of bulk Pt. It has lower catalytic activity for the oxygen reduction reaction and similar activity for hydrogenmore » oxidation reaction compared to Pt(111). This was explained by a large calculated up-shift of the dband center of Pt atoms and larger Pt-Pt interatomic distance than that of Pt(111). Our information is of considerable interest for further development of electrocatalysis.« less

  20. Atomic Hydrogen in the Saturnian System: Voyager Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smyth, William H.; Marconi, M. L.

    2006-09-01

    The existence of atomic hydrogen in the Saturnian system has been known for over three decades. Despite extensive observations and modeling over this period of time, the spatial morphology and kinetic nature of the circumplanetary hydrogen are still not well understood. The reasons for this lack of understanding are that the basic physical nature of the sources of hydrogen is poorly characterized and that the only detailed spatial measurements of hydrogen are from remote Lyman-α emissions acquired by the Voyager mission, with recent Cassini mission measurements not yet available. The Voyager 1 and 2 UVS observations of Shemansky and Hall (JGR 97, 4143-4161, 1992) have therefore been modeled by combining the numerically efficient approach of Smyth and Marconi (Icarus 101, 18-32, 1993) for the calculation of orbits with the Saturnian plasma model of Richardson (GRL 22, 1177-1180, 1995). Although the model-data comparison is limited by the quality of the Voyager data, H source rates for a Titan source of 3.3 - 4.8 x 1027 atoms s-1 and, for the first time, H source rates larger by about a factor of four for an overall interior icy-satellite source of 1.4 - 1.9 x 1028 atoms s-1 are obtained. These source rates for Titanogenic hydrogen are consistent with previous estimates. These rates for the overall interior icy-satellite source are consistent with recent estimates of those for other water-group species based on observational considerations but are substantially higher than source strengths based on estimated sputtering rates. The larger interior icy-satellite source rate is now recognized from Cassini mission data as likely supplied by the newly discovered gas jet escaping from the south pole of Enceladus. In addition to the H source rates, some broad constraints on the energy and spatial distribution of hydrogen in the Saturnian system will also be presented.

  1. Distinct metallization and atomization transitions in dense liquid hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Mazzola, Guglielmo; Sorella, Sandro

    2015-03-13

    We perform molecular dynamics simulations driven by accurate quantum Monte Carlo forces on dense liquid hydrogen. There is a recent report of a complete atomization transition between a mixed molecular-atomic liquid and a completely dissociated fluid in an almost unaccessible pressure range [Nat. Commun. 5, 3487 (2014)]. Here, instead, we identify a different transition between the fully molecular liquid and the mixed-atomic fluid at ∼400  GPa, i.e., in a much more interesting pressure range. We provide numerical evidence supporting the metallic behavior of this intermediate phase. Therefore, we predict that the metallization at finite temperature occurs in this partially dissociated molecular fluid, well before the complete atomization of the liquid. At high temperature this first-order transition becomes a crossover, in very good agreement with the experimental observation. Several systematic tests supporting the quality of our large scale calculations are also reported.

  2. CN radical hydrogenation from solid H2 reactions, an alternative way of HCN formation in the interstellar medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borget, Fabien; Müller, Sandra; Grote, Dirk; Theulé, Patrice; Vinogradoff, Vassilissa; Chiavassa, Thierry; Sander, Wolfram

    2017-01-01

    Context. Molecular hydrogen (H2) is the most abundant molecule of the interstellar medium (ISM) in gas phase and it has been assumed to exist in solid state or as coating on grains. Aims: Our goal is to show that solid H2 can act as a hydrogenation agent, reacting with CN radicals to form HCN. Methods: In a H2 matrix, we studied the hydrogenation of the CN radical generated from the vacuum ultraviolet photolysis (VUV-photolysis) of C2N2 at 3.8 K. We modified the wavelengths and the host gas in order to be sure that CN radicals can abstract H from H2 molecules. Results: HCN monomers, dimers, and oligomers have been characterised by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). H2CN as well as CN radicals have also been clearly observed during the photolysis performed at 3.8 K. Conclusions: H2 is a hydrogenation reagent towards CN radicals producing HCN. This type of reaction should be taken into account for the reactivity at low temperature in contaminated H2 ice macro-particles (CHIMPs), H2 flakes or in the first sublayers of grains where solid H2 has accumulated.

  3. Observations of interstellar chlorine and phosphorus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jura, M.; York, D. G.

    1978-01-01

    Copernicus observations of interstellar Cl I, Cl II, and P II UV lines toward 10 stars are reported. Column densities are estimated for each species, and upper limits are computed for HCl column densities. Derivation of the gas-phase abundances of chlorine and phosphorus indicates that the averages of both the chlorine and the phosphorus logarithmic abundances relative to hydrogen are between 5.0 and 5.1. It is suggested that interstellar chlorine may be depleted by about a factor of 3 relative to the solar abundance and that interstellar phosphorus is depleted by a factor of 2 to 3. The results are shown to support the prediction that chlorine is ionized in regions containing primarily atomic oxygen and is neutral in regions where there is a significant amount of molecular hydrogen. The photoionization rate of neutral chlorine toward 15 Mon is estimated, and it is concluded that most chlorine is contained within the gas phase.

  4. Observations of interstellar chlorine and phosphorus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jura, M.; York, D. G.

    1978-01-01

    Copernicus observations of interstellar Cl I, Cl II, and P II UV lines toward 10 stars are reported. Column densities are estimated for each species, and upper limits are computed for HCl column densities. Derivation of the gas-phase abundances of chlorine and phosphorus indicates that the averages of both the chlorine and the phosphorus logarithmic abundances relative to hydrogen are between 5.0 and 5.1. It is suggested that interstellar chlorine may be depleted by about a factor of 3 relative to the solar abundance and that interstellar phosphorus is depleted by a factor of 2 to 3. The results are shown to support the prediction that chlorine is ionized in regions containing primarily atomic oxygen and is neutral in regions where there is a significant amount of molecular hydrogen. The photoionization rate of neutral chlorine toward 15 Mon is estimated, and it is concluded that most chlorine is contained within the gas phase.

  5. Atomic hydrogen maser measurements with wall surfaces of carbon tetrafluoride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vessot, R. F. C.; Mattison, E. M.; Imbier, E. A.; Zhai, Z. C.

    1984-01-01

    The principal objectives of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory cold maser research programs are given. This work is aimed principally at understanding more about the interaction of hydrogen atoms with wall coatings of fluorinated ethylene propylene (Dupont Teflon FEP-120 co-polymer) and of carbon tetrafluoride (CE4). The principal measured quantity in these experiments is the wall shift of the maser's output frequency. The wall shift per atomic collision was calculated from the measured wall frequency shift. This assumes that the wall surface area is smooth on a molecular scale.

  6. Laser stripping of hydrogen atoms by direct ionization

    DOE PAGES

    Brunetti, E.; Becker, W.; Bryant, H. C.; ...

    2015-05-08

    Direct ionization of hydrogen atoms by laser irradiation is investigated as a potential new scheme to generate proton beams without stripping foils. The time-dependent Schrödinger equation describing the atom-radiation interaction is numerically solved obtaining accurate ionization cross-sections for a broad range of laser wavelengths, durations and energies. Parameters are identified where the Doppler frequency up-shift of radiation colliding with relativistic particles can lead to efficient ionization over large volumes and broad bandwidths using currently available lasers.

  7. Effects of wall coatings and temperature on hydrogen atom surface recombination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, E. L.; Baker, C. E.

    1973-01-01

    The efficiency of various surface coatings and materials toward inhibiting hydrogen atom surface recombination was investigated over a temperature range of 77 to 298 K. A flow discharge, mass spectrometer technique was used to make the experimental measurements. Hydrogen atoms were monitored directly, and these measurements were expressed as ratios of mass spectrometer peak heights for atomic and molecular hydrogen. Several of the surface coatings studied were efficient at reducing hydrogen atom surface recombination at room temperature. However, as the temperature was lowered, this efficiency was drastically reduced. Calibration of the mass spectrometer for atomic and molecular hydrogen indicated that mass spectrometer discrimination against hydrogen atoms was severe. Mass spectrometer sensitivity for hydrogen atoms was only about one-sixth of that for molecular hydrogen.

  8. A discrete variable representation for electron-hydrogen atom scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Gaucher, Lionel Francis

    1994-08-01

    A discrete variable representation (DVR) suitable for treating the quantum scattering of a low energy electron from a hydrogen atom is presented. The benefits of DVR techniques (e.g. the removal of the requirement of calculating multidimensional potential energy matrix elements and the availability of iterative sparse matrix diagonalization/inversion algorithms) have for many years been applied successfully to studies of quantum molecular scattering. Unfortunately, the presence of a Coulomb singularity at the electrically unshielded center of a hydrogen atom requires high radial grid point densities in this region of the scattering coordinate, while the presence of finite kinetic energy in the asymptotic scattering electron also requires a sufficiently large radial grid point density at moderate distances from the nucleus. The constraints imposed by these two length scales have made application of current DVR methods to this scattering event difficult.

  9. Semirelativistic model for ionization of atomic hydrogen by electron impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attaourti, Y.; Taj, S.; Manaut, B.

    2005-06-01

    We present a semirelativistic model for the description of the ionization process of atomic hydrogen by electron impact in the first Born approximation by using the Darwin wave function to describe the bound state of atomic hydrogen and the Sommerfeld-Maue wave function to describe the ejected electron. This model, accurate to first order in Z/c in the relativistic correction, shows that, even at low kinetic energies of the incident electron, spin effects are small but not negligible. These effects become noticeable with increasing incident electron energies. All analytical calculations are exact and our semirelativistic results are compared with the results obtained in the nonrelativistic Coulomb Born approximation both for the coplanar asymmetric and the binary coplanar geometries.

  10. Semirelativistic model for ionization of atomic hydrogen by electron impact

    SciTech Connect

    Attaourti, Y.; Taj, S.; Manaut, B.

    2005-06-15

    We present a semirelativistic model for the description of the ionization process of atomic hydrogen by electron impact in the first Born approximation by using the Darwin wave function to describe the bound state of atomic hydrogen and the Sommerfeld-Maue wave function to describe the ejected electron. This model, accurate to first order in Z/c in the relativistic correction, shows that, even at low kinetic energies of the incident electron, spin effects are small but not negligible. These effects become noticeable with increasing incident electron energies. All analytical calculations are exact and our semirelativistic results are compared with the results obtained in the nonrelativistic Coulomb Born approximation both for the coplanar asymmetric and the binary coplanar geometries.

  11. Fluorescence Quenching of Benzaldehyde in Water by Hydrogen Atom Abstraction.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Katharyn; Bunz, Uwe H F; Dreuw, Andreas

    2016-09-05

    We computed the mechanism of fluorescence quenching of benzaldehyde in water through relaxed potential energy surface scans. Time-dependent density functional theory calculations along the protonation coordinate from water to benzaldehyde reveal that photoexcitation to the bright ππ* (S3 ) state is immediately followed by ultrafast decay to the nπ* (S1 ) state. Evolving along this state, benzaldehyde (BA) abstracts a hydrogen atom, resulting in a BAH(.) and OH(.) radical pair. Benzaldehyde does not act as photobase in water, but abstracts a hydrogen atom from a nearby solvent molecule. The system finally decays back to the ground state by non-radiative decay and an electron transfers back to the OH(.) radical. Proton transfer from BAH(+) to OH(-) restores the initial situation, BA in water. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Solid Hydrogen Experiments for Atomic Propellants: Image Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents the results of detailed analyses of the images from experiments that were conducted on the formation of solid hydrogen particles in liquid helium. Solid particles of hydrogen were frozen in liquid helium, and observed with a video camera. The solid hydrogen particle sizes, their agglomerates, and the total mass of hydrogen particles were estimated. Particle sizes of 1.9 to 8 mm (0.075 to 0.315 in.) were measured. The particle agglomerate sizes and areas were measured, and the total mass of solid hydrogen was computed. A total mass of from 0.22 to 7.9 grams of hydrogen was frozen. Compaction and expansion of the agglomerate implied that the particles remain independent particles, and can be separated and controlled. These experiment image analyses are one of the first steps toward visually characterizing these particles, and allow designers to understand what issues must be addressed in atomic propellant feed system designs for future aerospace vehicles.

  13. Hydrogenated fullerenes dimer, peanut and capsule: An atomic comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    EL-Barbary, A. A.

    2016-04-01

    Hydrogenated fullerenes are detected in the Universe in space but their identification is still unsolved task. Therefore, this paper provides useful information about hydrogenated fullerenes (dimer, peanut and capsule) using DFT method at the B3LYP/6-31G(d) level of theory. The stability, geometric structures, hydrogen adsorption energies and NMR chemical shifts are calculated. The results show that the energy of most stable isomer of C118 dimer is lower than the energies sum of C60 and C58 cages by 1.77 eV and the energy per carbon atom of C144 capsule is more stable than C60 cage by 126.98 meV. Also, endohedral Ti-doped C118 dimer and C128 peanut are found to be most stable structures than exohedral Ti-doped C118 dimer and C128 peanut by 2.19 eV/Ti and 3.52 eV/Ti, respectively. The hydrogenation process is found to be enhanced (especially at the caps) for endohedral Ti-doped C118 dimer and C128 peanut through electronic surface modifications. The most active hydrogenation sites are selected and it is found that the most stable hydrogenation sites are Houts1 and Houts3 for fullerenes and endohedral Ti-doped fullerenes, respectively.

  14. Solar wind/local interstellar medium interaction including charge exchange with neural hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pauls, H. Louis; Zank, Gary P.

    1995-01-01

    We present results from a hydrodynamic model of the interaction of the solar wind with the local interstellar medium (LISM), self-consistently taking into account the effects of charge exchange between the plasma component and the interstellar neutrals. The simulation is fully time dependent, and is carried out in two or three dimensions, depending on whether the helio-latitudinal dependence of the solar wind speed and number density (both giving rise to three dimensional effects) are included. As a first approximation it is assumed that the neutral component of the flow can be described by a single, isotropic fluid. Clearly, this is not the actual situation, since charge exchange with the supersonic solar wind plasma in the region of the nose results in a 'second' neutral fluid propagating in the opposite direction as that of the LISM neutrals.

  15. Dynamical localization: Hydrogen atoms in magnetic and microwave fields

    SciTech Connect

    Benvenuto, F.; Casati, G.; Shepelyansky, D.L.

    1997-03-01

    We show that dynamical localization for excited hydrogen atoms in magnetic and microwave fields takes place at quite low microwave frequency ({omega}n{sup 3}{lt}1). Estimates of the localization length are given for different parameter regimes, showing that the quantum delocalization border drops significantly as compared to the case of zero magnetic field. This opens up broad possibilities for laboratory investigations. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  16. Lamb shift in the hydrogen atom: Leading logarithmic corrections

    SciTech Connect

    Karshenboim, S.G.

    1995-04-01

    The leading logarithmic correction to the difference of the Lamb shifts of the 1s{sub 1/2} and 2s{sub 1/2} levels is found. The difference {Delta}E{sub L}(1s{sub 1/2}) {minus} 8{Delta}E{sub L}(2s{sub 1/2}) for the hydrogen atom is found to be {minus}187.236(11) MHz. 13 refs., 2 figs.

  17. A real ``thought'' experiment for the hydrogen atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, I. E.; Weigold, E.

    1983-02-01

    The absolute square of the normalized position-space wave function of the electron in a hydrogen atom is interpreted as the probability distribution for observations of the position of the electron. This is only a thought experiment, since the electron's position cannot be observed. The first observation of the momentum distribution of the electron directly verifies the probability interpretation of the momentum-space wave function.

  18. Ground-state structures of atomic metallic hydrogen.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Jeffrey M; Ceperley, David M

    2011-04-22

    Ab initio random structure searching using density functional theory is used to determine the ground-state structures of atomic metallic hydrogen from 500 GPa to 5 TPa. Including proton zero-point motion within the harmonic approximation, we estimate that molecular hydrogen dissociates into a monatomic body-centered tetragonal structure near 500 GPa (r(s)=1.23) that remains stable to 1 TPa (r(s)=1.11). At higher pressures, hydrogen stabilizes in an …ABCABC… planar structure that is similar to the ground state of lithium, but with a different stacking sequence. With increasing pressure, this structure compresses to the face-centered cubic lattice near 3.5 TPa (r(s)=0.92).

  19. Manufacture and deflagration of an atomic hydrogen propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, G.

    1974-01-01

    It is observed that the use of very low temperatures (in the range from 0.1 to 1.5 K) produced by advanced cryogenic apparatus and the use of very strong magnetic fields (in the range from 50 to 100 kG) produced by superconducting magnets can yield a significant improvement in the atomic hydrogen trapping effectiveness of an H2 matrix. The use of a radioactive beta-ray emiter isotope may yield H-H2 propellants (with a specific impulse of about 740 sec) by secondary electron impact dissociations of H2 in an impregnated matrix maintained below 1 K in a strong magnetic field. Another method for manufacturing an H-H2 propellant involves bombardment of supercooled solid H2 with a cyclotron-produced beam of 10-MeV hydrogen atoms. The matrix-isolated atomic hydrogen must be used directly without prior melting as a solid propellant, and an analysis of the steady deflagration is presented.

  20. Alkane desaturation by concerted double hydrogen atom transfer to benzyne.

    PubMed

    Niu, Dawen; Willoughby, Patrick H; Woods, Brian P; Baire, Beeraiah; Hoye, Thomas R

    2013-09-26

    The removal of two vicinal hydrogen atoms from an alkane to produce an alkene is a challenge for synthetic chemists. In nature, desaturases and acetylenases are adept at achieving this essential oxidative functionalization reaction, for example during the biosynthesis of unsaturated fatty acids, eicosanoids, gibberellins and carotenoids. Alkane-to-alkene conversion almost always involves one or more chemical intermediates in a multistep reaction pathway; these may be either isolable species (such as alcohols or alkyl halides) or reactive intermediates (such as carbocations, alkyl radicals, or σ-alkyl-metal species). Here we report a desaturation reaction of simple, unactivated alkanes that is mechanistically unique. We show that benzynes are capable of the concerted removal of two vicinal hydrogen atoms from a hydrocarbon. The discovery of this exothermic, net redox process was enabled by the simple thermal generation of reactive benzyne intermediates through the hexadehydro-Diels-Alder cycloisomerization reaction of triyne substrates. We are not aware of any single-step, bimolecular reaction in which two hydrogen atoms are simultaneously transferred from a saturated alkane. Computational studies indicate a preferred geometry with eclipsed vicinal C-H bonds in the alkane donor.

  1. The hydrogen atom in plasmas with an external electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Bahar, M. K.; Soylu, A.

    2014-09-15

    We numerically solve the Schrödinger equation, using a more general exponential cosine screened Coulomb (MGECSC) potential with an electric field, in order to investigate the screening and weak external electric field effects on the hydrogen atom in plasmas. The MGECSC potential is examined for four different cases, corresponding to different screening parameters of the potential and the external electric field. The influences of the different screening parameters and the weak external electric field on the energy eigenvalues are determined by solving the corresponding equations using the asymptotic iteration method (AIM). It is found that the corresponding energy values shift when a weak external electric field is applied to the hydrogen atom in a plasma. This study shows that a more general exponential cosine screened Coulomb potential allows the influence of an applied, weak, external electric field on the hydrogen atom to be investigated in detail, for both Debye and quantum plasmas simultaneously. This suggests that such a potential would be useful in modeling similar effects in other applications of plasma physics, and that AIM is an appropriate method for solving the Schrödinger equation, the solution of which becomes more complex due to the use of the MGECSC potential with an applied external electric field.

  2. Zero-Temperature Structures of Atomic Metallic Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahon, Jeffrey; Ceperley, David

    2011-03-01

    Since the first prediction of an atomic metallic phase of hydrogen by Wigner and Huntington over 75 years ago, there have been many theoretical efforts aimed at determining the crystal structures of the zero-temperature phases. We present results from ab initio random structure searching with density functional theory performed to determine the ground state structures from 500 GPa to 5 TPa. We estimate that molecular hydrogen dissociates into a monatomic body-centered tetragonal structure near 500 GPa (rs = 1.225), which then remains stable to 2.5 TPa (rs = 0.969). At higher pressures, hydrogen stabilizes in an . . . ABCABC . . . planar structure that is remarkably similar to the ground state of lithium, which compresses to the face-centered cubic lattice beyond 5 TPa (rs < 0.86). Our results provide a complete ab initio description of the atomic metallic crystal structures of hydrogen, resolving one of the most fundamental and long outstanding issues concerning the structures of the elements.

  3. The atomic hydrogen cloud in the saturnian system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, W.-L.; Johnson, R. E.; Ip, W.-H.

    2013-09-01

    The importance of Titan's H torus shaped by solar radiation pressure and of hydrogen atoms flowing out of Saturn's atmosphere in forming the broad hydrogen cloud in Saturn's magnetosphere is still debated. Since the Saturnian system also contains a water product torus which originates from the Enceladus plumes, the icy ring particles, and the inner icy satellites, as well as Titan's H2 torus, we have carried out a global investigation of the atomic hydrogen cloud taking into account all sources. We show that the velocity and angle distributions of the hot H ejected from Saturn's atmosphere following electron-impact dissociation of H2 are modified by collisions with the ambient atmospheric H2 and H. This in turn affects the morphology of the escaping hydrogen from Saturn, as does the morphology of the ionospheric electron distribution. Although an exact agreement with the Cassini observations is not obtained, our simulations show that H directly escaping from Titan is the dominant contributor in the outer magnetosphere. Of the total number of H observed by Cassini from 1 to 5RS, ∼5.7×1034, our simulations suggest ∼20% is from dissociation in the Enceladus torus, ∼5-10% is from dissociation of H2 in the atmosphere of the main rings, and ∼50% is from Titan's H torus, implying that ∼20% comes from Saturn atmosphere.

  4. Laboratory simulations of chemical reactions on dust grains in the interstellar medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roser, Joseph E.

    Dust grains exert a major influence upon the chemical composition of the interstellar medium: photoelectrons emitted from the dust grains are the primary energy source for heating interstellar gas, dust grains in dense molecular clouds can accumulate layers of frozen interstellar gases that participate in solid phase chemical reactions, and the most abundant molecule in the Universe, molecular hydrogen, primarily forms from hydrogen atoms adsorbed onto grain surfaces. Molecular hydrogen influences the evolution of molecular clouds by acting as a coolant during the gravitational collapse of the cloud and serving as a precursor for the formation of many molecular species. A complete description of molecular hydrogen formation in molecular clouds requires an understanding of the efficiency of hydrogen atom recombination on ice surfaces. Observations of interstellar carbon dioxide ice have the potential for serving as a diagnostic sign of the evolution of interstellar ice layers but require a satisfactory explanation of the formation mechanisms of interstellar CO 2 . This work describes a series of investigations that were designed to study the properties of interstellar dust grains and to obtain and analyze data for astrophysically important chemical reactions. We measured the recombination efficiency of H atoms on the surface of amorphous H 2 O ices and measured the kinetics of H 2 formation and desorption on different morphologies of ice substrate. We demonstrated that the hydrogen atom recombination kinetics depend upon the morphology of the ice layer and that the recombination efficiency is consistent with observations of molecular clouds. We also demonstrated that CO and O can be trapped within an amorphous H 2 O ice layer at temperatures greater than their sublimation temperatures and that the reaction CO (ads) + O (ads) [arrow right] CO 2,(ads) can produce appreciable amounts of CO2 within an interstellar ice layer in the absence of ultraviolet or cosmic

  5. Evolution of energetic neutral atom spectra as measured by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer during its first seven years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayeh, Maher A.; Heerikhuisen, Jacob; McComas, David; Schwadron, Nathan; Desai, Mihir; Zirnstein, Eric J.

    2016-07-01

    The Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) mission continues to provide remote Energetic Neutral Atom (ENA) measurements produced by charge exchange between energetic protons and interstellar neutrals at the edge of our heliosphere. Using the first seven years of IBEX-Hi ENA measurements (January 2009 through December 2015), we examine the evolution of the spectral slopes in four different energy bands, namely, ˜0.7-1.1 keV, ˜1.1-1.7 keV, ˜1.7-2.7 keV, and ˜2.7-4.3 keV, across different regions of the sky. Results show that spectral slopes at each energy band are characterized with unique distribution properties (e.g., width, shape, and mode), which vary in time at different rates and in both directions (distribution modes increase or decrease). We attempt to explain these results in context of ENA source regions, solar wind temporal variations, and changes in the heliosheath thickness and its plasma properties. These results provide insights into ENA production mechanisms, properties of their plasma progenitors, and how they relate to changes in the solar wind.

  6. Solar Wind Charge Exchange Studies of Highly Charged Ions on Atomic Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Draganic, Ilija N; Seely, D. G.; McCammon, D; Havener, Charles C

    2011-01-01

    Accurate studies of low energy charge exchange (CX) are critical to understanding underlying soft X ray radiation processes in the interaction of highly charged ions from the solar wind with the neutral atoms and molecules in the heliosphere, cometary comas, planetary atmospheres, interstellar winds, etc.. Particularly important are the CX cross sections for bare, H like, and He like ions of C, N, O and Ne, which are the dominant charge states for these heavier elements in the solar wind. Absolute total cross sections for single electron capture by H like ions of C, N, O and fully stripped O ions from atomic hydrogen have been measured in an expanded range of relative collision energies (5 eV u 20 keV u) and compared to previous H oven measurements. The present measurements are performed using a merged beams technique with intense highly charged ion beams extracted from a 14.5 GHz ECR ion source installed on a high voltage platform at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. For the collision energy range of 0.3 keV u 3.3 keV u, which corresponds to typical ion velocities in the solar wind, the new measurements are in good agreement with previous H oven measurements. The experimental results are discussed in detail and compared with theoretical calculations where available.

  7. Solar Wind Charge Exchange Studies Of Highly Charged Ions On Atomic Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Draganic, I. N.; Havener, C. C.; Seely, D. G.; McCammon, D.

    2011-06-01

    Accurate studies of low-energy charge exchange (CX) are critical to understanding underlying soft X-ray radiation processes in the interaction of highly charged ions from the solar wind with the neutral atoms and molecules in the heliosphere, cometary comas, planetary atmospheres, interstellar winds, etc.. Particularly important are the CX cross sections for bare, H-like, and He-like ions of C, N, O and Ne, which are the dominant charge states for these heavier elements in the solar wind. Absolute total cross sections for single electron capture by H-like ions of C, N, O and fully-stripped O ions from atomic hydrogen have been measured in an expanded range of relative collision energies (5 eV/u-20 keV/u) and compared to previous H-oven measurements. The present measurements are performed using a merged-beams technique with intense highly charged ion beams extracted from a 14.5 GHz ECR ion source installed on a high voltage platform at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. For the collision energy range of 0.3 keV/u-3.3 keV/u, which corresponds to typical ion velocities in the solar wind, the new measurements are in good agreement with previous H-oven measurements. The experimental results are discussed in detail and compared with theoretical calculations where available.

  8. Atomic oxygen, atomic hydrogen, and chemical heating rates derived from SABER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mlynczak, M. G.

    The SABER instrument on the TIMED satellite measures the infrared OH airglow at 2.0 um in the terrestrial mesosphere. These measurements are inverted to provide the volume emissions rates of the OH(9-7 + 8-6) bands. These high-lying bands are formed directly upon the reaction of atomic hydrogen and ozone and thus the measured volume emission rate is a direct measure of the rate of reaction. The SABER OH emission rates and the measured SABER ozone are used to derive the concentration of atomic hydrogen in the mesopause region. The emission rate is also a direct measure of the rate of energy deposition due to the reaction of atomic hydrogen and ozone. Rates of chemical heating are then readily derived upon provision of atmospheric temperature and density from SABER. Under the assumption of photochemical steady state in the production and loss of ozone, the emission rates can also be used to derive atomic oxygen. The abundances of H and O enable the computation of rates of chemical heating due to numerous exothermic reactions. A key to these derivations lies in the knowledge of the rate of quenching/reaction of vibrationally excited OH with atomic oxygen. We present the SABER airglow models, data inversion approach, and results for O, H, and chemical heating.

  9. THE DYNAMICS OF HYDROGEN ATOM ABSTRACTION FROM POLYATOMIC MOLECULES.

    SciTech Connect

    LIU,X.; SUITS,A.G.

    2002-11-21

    The hydrogen atom abstraction reaction is an important fundamental process that is extensively involved in atmospheric and combustion chemistry. The practical significance of this type of reaction with polyatomic hydrocarbons is manifest, which has led to many kinetics studies. The detailed understanding of these reactions requires corresponding dynamics studies. However, in comparison to the A + HX {radical} AH + X reactions, the study of the dynamics of A + HR {yields} AH + R reactions is much more difficult, both experimentally and theoretically (here and in the following, A stands for an atom, X stands for a halogen atom, and R stands for a polyatomic hydrocarbon radical). The complication stems from the structured R, in contrast to the structureless X. First of all, there are many internal degrees of freedom in R that can participate in the reaction. In addition, there are different carbon sites from which an H atom can be abstracted, and the dynamics are correspondingly different; there are also multiple identical carbon sites in HR and in the picture of a local reaction, there exist competitions between neighboring H atoms, and so on. Despite this complexity, there have been continuing efforts to obtain insight into the dynamics of these reactions. In this chapter, some examples are presented, including the reactions of ground state H, Cl, and O atoms, with particular focus on our recent work using imaging to obtain the differential cross sections for these reactions.

  10. Reactions of butadiyne. 1: The reaction with hydrogen atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwanebeck, W.; Warnatz, J.

    1984-01-01

    The reaction of hydrogen (H) atoms with butadiene (C4H2) was studied at room temperature in a pressure range between w mbar and 10 mbar. The primary step was an addition of H to C4H2 which is in its high pressure range at p 1 mbar. Under these conditions the following addition of a second H atom lies in the transition region between low and high pressure range. Vibrationally excited C4H4 can be deactivated to form buten-(1)-yne-(3)(C4H4) or decomposes into two C2H2 molecules. The rate constant at room temperature for primary step is given. The second order rate constant for the consumption of buten-(1)-yne-(3) is an H atom excess at room temperature is given.

  11. Low conductance of nickel atomic junctions in hydrogen atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuaishuai; Xie, Yi-Qun; Hu, Yibin

    2017-08-01

    The low conductance of nickel atomic junctions in the hydrogen environment is studied using the nonequilibrium Green's function theory combined with first-principles calculations. The Ni junction bridged by a H2 molecule has a conductance of approximately 0.7 G 0. This conductance is contributed by the anti-bonding state of the H2 molecule, which forms a bonding state with the 3 d orbitals of the nearby Ni atoms. In contrast, the Ni junction bridged by the two single H atoms has a conductance of approximately 1 G 0, which is weakly spin-polarized. The spin-up channels were found to contribute mostly to the conductance at a small junction gap, while the spin-down channels play a dominant role at a larger junction gap.

  12. Detecting extra dimensions by Hydrogen-like atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan-Ping, Zhou; Peng, Zhou; Hao-Xue, Qiao

    2015-01-01

    We reconsider the idea in spectroscopy of detecting extra dimensions by regarding the nucleus as a homogeneous sphere. In our results, it turns out that the gravitational potential inside the nucleus is much stronger than the potential induced by a particle in the same regime in ref. [16], and thus a more significant correction of the ground state energy of hydrogen-like atoms is obtained, which can be used to determine the existence of ADD's extra dimensions. In order to get a larger order of magnitude for the correction, it is better to apply our theory to high-Z atoms or muonic atoms, where the volume of the nucleus can't be ignored and the relativistic effect is important. Our work is based on the Dirac equation in aweak gravity field, and the result is more precise.

  13. Elastic interactions between hydrogen atoms in metals. I. Lattice forces and displacements

    SciTech Connect

    Shirley, A.I.; Hall, C.K.

    1986-06-15

    This is the first of a series of papers in which a second-order perturbation theory is derived for the Hamiltonian of a metal hydride. The theory, which is called the fully harmonic lattice approximation, or FHLA, goes beyond the customary harmonic treatment of Horner and Wagner to include second-order terms for the hydrogen-hydrogen and metal-hydrogen potentials. These terms account for the hydrogen-concentration dependences of a metal hydride's volume and elastic constants; their inclusion should result in a better representation of the free-energy and phase-change behavior at high hydrogen concentration. In this paper, the forces between hydrogen atoms and metal atoms are evaluated using the FHLA. Two types of forces result: direct forces, between an isolated hydrogen atom and a metal atom, and indirect forces, which are effective forces between a hydrogen atom and a metal atom caused by the presence of a neighboring hydrogen atom. Both the direct and indirect forces each have two components: a permanent part, which is equivalent to the force exerted by a hydrogen atom on a metal atom in the pure (hydrogen-free) metal lattice, and an induced part, which corrects the permanent part for the effects of the hydrogen atom on the metal-metal couplings. These four forces are evaluated for the hydrogen-niobium system. The indirect forces have one-tenth the magnitude and are of opposite sign to the direct forces. The induced component of the force is approximately one-third the size of the permanent component, and opposite to it in sign. The displacements of the metal atoms surrounding an isolated hydrogen atom or a pair of hydrogen atoms are also evaluated. These are compared with the results of previous harmonic-approximation calculations and of experiments on the hydrogen-niobium system.

  14. Recombination efficiency of molecular hydrogen on interstellar grains and its effect on pro duction of H2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharyya, K.; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.

    2005-12-01

    We study the efficiency of molecular hydrogen recombination on grain surfaces using both the rate equation (which tracks the average number of species) and the master equation (which tracks the expectation values of the species). We have incorporated Langmuir-Hinselwood rejection term in obtaining the efficiency. We use this result to compute H2 production rates as a function of the grain temperature and accretion rate of atomic hydrogen. Our general conclusion is that the H2 formation efficiency is very much dependent on the grain temperature and the accretion rate of the atomic hydrogen on grains. We provide tables of H2 production rates which could be readily used for future calculation of production of more complex molecules in the gas phase.

  15. Concerted hydrogen atom exchange between three HF molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komornicki, Andrew; Dixon, David A.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1992-01-01

    We have investigated the termolecular reaction involving concerted hydrogen exchange between three HF molecules, with particular emphasis on the effects of correlation at the various stationary points along the reaction. Using an extended basis, we have located the geometries of the stable hydrogen-bonded trimer, which is of C(sub 3h) symmetry, and the transition state for hydrogen exchange, which is of D(sub 3h) symmetry. The energies of the exchange reation were then evaluated at the correlated level, using a large atomic natural orbital basis and correlating all valence electrons. Several correlation treatments were used, namely, configration interaction with single and double excitations, coupled-pair functional, and coupled-cluster methods. We are thus able to measure the effect of accounting for size-extensivity. Zero-point corrections to the correlated level energetics were determined using analytic second derivative techniques at the SCF level. Our best calculations, which include the effects of connected triple excitations in the coupled-cluster procedure, indicate that the trimer is bound by 9 +/- 1 kcal/mol relative to three separate monomers, in excellent agreement with previous estimates. The barrier to concerted hydrogen exchange is 15 kcal/mol above the trimer, or only 4.7 kcal/mol above three separated monomers. Thus the barrier to hydrogen exchange between HF molecules via this termolecular process is very low.

  16. Distribution of the Atomic Component in the Local Interstellar Medium. the Warm Neutral Intercloud Medium (wnm).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppel, W. G. L.; Marronetti, P.; Benagalia, P.

    1990-11-01

    RESUMEN : Se do'-- ' ti--'s `3' pCrfii ":-::' in:- a JI- nea de 2J rrn dci HI para Cs r%ud. r i com -." ..nte bia 'a del medjo intere=-telar. l metodo ce baa n ci :..: i3:'-i oaussiano de las contr'ibucioncc- de di-ha corno': ..:c'n+. a en los oerfiles. Los r'inc oaic :. r..' : t":. o r.-"r:st. n resLtfnidci.--' en las Fipuras 1 2 u.''e dan J `:- re ' ec:t.i' e"'.:.-. jl'-.'.. -. tribucic-es de la densidad dE? columr N)H `/ .ta \\` .`i(:) ,fj,:,'t.' radial V en funri6n de I. a osic:i6n 1., : Two atlas of orofiles of .1-cf; ha'.' ' been tr,'E-:"::i for computino the HI--emission d'. e to Lhe j (He i :-:: ` H -).- bina 1974 and Colomb,, Po"ppel and Hei le . .4'..) . ih& m: thod is based on a #` anpr'o>'imation Cf the rontr-ibutior:s of the WNM to the profiles. The main are summ-. 'i:.ed here in the form of two maps .howin the di :'.tributions of and of the radial velocit respectivel as a ..r,t.ion of and b (Fios. I and 2). Key : INTERSTELLAR-CLOUDS - INTERSTELLAR-GENERAL - GALAXY- STRUCTURE

  17. On the Formation of Interstellar Water Ice: Constraints from a Search for Hydrogen Peroxide Ice in Molecular Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. G.; Charnely, S. B.; Pendleton, Y. J.; Wright, C. M.; Maldoni, M. M.; Robinson, G.

    2011-01-01

    Recent surface chemistry experiments have shown that the hydrogenation of molecular oxygen on interstellar dust grains is a plausible formation mechanism, via hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), for the production of water (H2O) ice mantles in the dense interstellar medium. Theoretical chemistry models also predict the formation of a significant abundance of H2O2 ice in grain mantles by this route. At their upper limits, the predicted and experimental abundances are sufficiently high that H2O2 should be detectable in molecular cloud ice spectra. To investigate this further, laboratory spectra have been obtained for H2O2/H2O ice films between 2.5 and 200 micron, from 10 to 180 K, containing 3%, 30%, and 97% H2O2 ice. Integrated absorbances for all the absorption features in low-temperature H2O2 ice have been derived from these spectra. For identifying H2O2 ice, the key results are the presence of unique features near 3.5, 7.0, and 11.3 micron. Comparing the laboratory spectra with the spectra of a group of 24 protostars and field stars, all of which have strong H2O ice absorption bands, no absorption features are found that can definitely be identified with H2O2 ice. In the absence of definite H2O2 features, the H2O2 abundance is constrained by its possible contribution to the weak absorption feature near 3.47 micron found on the long-wavelength wing of the 3 micron H2O ice band. This gives an average upper limit for H2O2, as a percentage of H2O, of 9% +/- 4%. This is a strong constraint on parameters for surface chemistry experiments and dense cloud chemistry models.

  18. On the Formation of Interstellar Water Ice: Constraints from a Search for Hydrogen Peroxide Ice in Molecular Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. G.; Charnely, S. B.; Pendleton, Y. J.; Wright, C. M.; Maldoni, M. M.; Robinson, G.

    2011-01-01

    Recent surface chemistry experiments have shown that the hydrogenation of molecular oxygen on interstellar dust grains is a plausible formation mechanism, via hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), for the production of water (H2O) ice mantles in the dense interstellar medium. Theoretical chemistry models also predict the formation of a significant abundance of H2O2 ice in grain mantles by this route. At their upper limits, the predicted and experimental abundances are sufficiently high that H2O2 should be detectable in molecular cloud ice spectra. To investigate this further, laboratory spectra have been obtained for H2O2/H2O ice films between 2.5 and 200 micron, from 10 to 180 K, containing 3%, 30%, and 97% H2O2 ice. Integrated absorbances for all the absorption features in low-temperature H2O2 ice have been derived from these spectra. For identifying H2O2 ice, the key results are the presence of unique features near 3.5, 7.0, and 11.3 micron. Comparing the laboratory spectra with the spectra of a group of 24 protostars and field stars, all of which have strong H2O ice absorption bands, no absorption features are found that can definitely be identified with H2O2 ice. In the absence of definite H2O2 features, the H2O2 abundance is constrained by its possible contribution to the weak absorption feature near 3.47 micron found on the long-wavelength wing of the 3 micron H2O ice band. This gives an average upper limit for H2O2, as a percentage of H2O, of 9% +/- 4%. This is a strong constraint on parameters for surface chemistry experiments and dense cloud chemistry models.

  19. The Simplicity of Perfect Atoms: Degeneracies in Supersymmetric Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Rube, Tomas; Wacker, Jay G.; /SLAC /Stanford U., ITP

    2011-08-19

    Supersymmetric QED hydrogen-like bound states are remarkably similar to non-supersymmetric hydrogen, including an accidental degeneracy of the fine structure and which is broken by the Lamb shift. This article classifies the states, calculates the leading order spectrum, and illustrates the results in several limits. The relation to other non-relativistic bound states is explored. Supersymmetric bound states provide a laboratory for studying dynamics in supersymmetric theories. Bound states like hydrogen provide a framework for understanding the qualitative dynamics of QCD mesons, a supersymmetric version of QED can provide a qualitative picture for the symmetries and states of superQCD mesons. Furthermore, recent interest in dark matter as a composite state, leads to asking how supersymmetry acts upon these composite states [4-7]. This article calculates the leading order corrections to a hydrogen-like atoms in an exactly supersymmetric version of QED. Much of the degeneracy is broken by the fine structure and a seminal calculation was performed in [1] for positronium, see [2] for an N = 2 version of positronium. Supersymmetric hydrogen is a similar except for the absence of annihilation diagrams, see [3] for an independent calculation. In the heavy proton mass limit, the supersymmetric interactions of the theory become irrelevant operators, suppressed by powers of the proton mass like the magnetic moment operator in QED and the fine structure is identical to the non-supersymmetric theory. This article finds that fine structure spectrum of supersymmetric spectrum of hydrogen has an accidental degeneracy which is exactly analogous to the accidental degeneracy of the l = 0 and l = 1 levels of the n = 2; j = 1/2 state of hydrogen. The supersymmetric version of the Lamb shift lifts the residual degeneracy and this article computes the logarithmically enhanced breaking.

  20. Goddard high-resolution spectrograph observations of the local interstellar medium and the deuterium/hydrogen ratio along the line of sight toward Capella

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Brown, Alexander; Gayley, Ken; Diplas, Athanassios; Savage, Blair D.; Ayres, Thomas R.; Landsman, Wayne; Shore, Steven N.; Heap, Sara R.

    1993-01-01

    HST Goddard High-Resolution Spectrograph observations of the 1216, 2600, and 2800 A spectral regions are analyzed for the spectroscopic binary system Capella, obtained at orbital phase 0.26 with 3.27-3.57 km/s resolution and high SNR. The column densities of H I, D I, Mg II, and Fe II for the local interstellar medium along this 12.5 pc line of sight, together with estimates of the temperature and turbulent velocity are inferred. It is inferred that the atomic deuterium/hydrogen ratio by number is 1.65(+0.07, -0.18) x 10 exp -5 for this line of sight. Galactic evolution calculations indicate that the primordial D/H ratio probably lies in the range of (1.5-3) x (D/H)LISM. If H0 = 80 km/s Mpc, as recent evidence suggests, then the baryonic density in units of the Einstein-de Sitter closure density is 0.023-0.031. Thus the universe is argued to expand forever, unless nonbaryonic matter greatly exceeds the amount of baryonic matter.

  1. Hydrogen-hydrogen interaction in planar biphenyl: a theoretical study based on the interacting quantum atoms and Hirshfeld atomic energy partitioning methods.

    PubMed

    Eskandari, Kiamars; Van Alsenoy, Christian

    2014-10-05

    The nature of H-H interaction between ortho-hydrogen atoms in planar biphenyl is investigated by two different atomic energy partitioning methods, namely fractional occupation iterative Hirshfeld (FOHI) and interacting quantum atoms (IQA), and compared with the traditional virial-based approach of quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM). In agreement with Bader's hypothesis of H-H bonding, partitioning the atomic energy into intra-atomic and interatomic terms reveals that there is a net attractive interaction between the ortho-hydrogens in the planar biphenyl. This falsifies the classical view of steric repulsion between the hydrogens. In addition, in contrast to the traditional QTAIM energy analysis, both FOHI and IQA show that the total atomic energy of the ortho-hydrogens remains almost constant when they participate in the H-H interaction. Although, the interatomic part of atomic energy of the hydrogens plays a stabilizing role during the formation of the H-H bond, it is almost compensated by the destabilizing effects of the intra-atomic parts and consequently, the total energy of the hydrogens remains constant. The trends in the changes of intra-atomic and interatomic energy terms of ortho-hydrogens during H-H bond formation are very similar to those observed for the H2 molecule.

  2. Interstellar PAHs and Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    Interstellar dust and large polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAHs) molecules are important components of the Interstellar Medium of galaxies where, among other things, they regulate the opacity, influence the heating and cooling of neutral atomic and molecular gas, and provide active surfaces for chemistry. Through this interaction with gas, photons, and energetic ions, dust and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules influence key processes in the evolution of the interstellar medium and in turn are modified in their physical and chemical properties. This complex feedback drives the evolution of galaxies and its observational characteristics. In this chapter, our understanding of interstellar dust and large polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules is described. Besides observations and their analysis, this chapter describes the physical processes involved, the life cycle of interstellar dust, and some aspects of the role of interstellar dust and PAHs in the evolution of the interstellar medium.

  3. The interstellar depletion mystery, or where have all those atoms gone. [cosmic abundance as grain model evidence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, J. M.

    1974-01-01

    The observed depletion of intermediate-weight elements O, C, and N from the interstellar medium is shown to be significantly greater than can be accounted for by accretion on interstellar dust. A number of possible explanations are presented, ranging from the existence in interstellar space of many 'snowballs' intermediate in size between dust grains and comets to the existence of many far more complicated interstellar molecules than have been detected.

  4. Role of Double Hydrogen Atom Transfer Reactions in Atmospheric Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manoj; Sinha, Amitabha; Francisco, Joseph S

    2016-05-17

    Hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) reactions are ubiquitous and play a crucial role in chemistries occurring in the atmosphere, biology, and industry. In the atmosphere, the most common and traditional HAT reaction is that associated with the OH radical abstracting a hydrogen atom from the plethora of organic molecules in the troposphere via R-H + OH → R + H2O. This reaction motif involves a single hydrogen transfer. More recently, in the literature, there is an emerging framework for a new class of HAT reactions that involves double hydrogen transfers. These reactions are broadly classified into four categories: (i) addition, (ii) elimination, (iii) substitution, and (iv) rearrangement. Hydration and dehydration are classic examples of addition and elimination reactions, respectively whereas tautomerization or isomerization belongs to a class of rearrangement reactions. Atmospheric acids and water typically mediate these reactions. Organic and inorganic acids are present in appreciable levels in the atmosphere and are capable of facilitating two-point hydrogen bonding interactions with oxygenates possessing an hydroxyl and/or carbonyl-type functionality. As a result, acids influence the reactivity of oxygenates and, thus, the energetics and kinetics of their HAT-based chemistries. The steric and electronic effects of acids play an important role in determining the efficacy of acid catalysis. Acids that reduce the steric strain of 1:1 substrate···acid complex are generally better catalysts. Among a family of monocarboxylic acids, the electronic effects become important; barrier to the catalyzed reaction correlates strongly with the pKa of the acid. Under acid catalysis, the hydration of carbonyl compounds leads to the barrierless formation of diols, which can serve as seed particles for atmospheric aerosol growth. The hydration of sulfur trioxide, which is the principle mechanism for atmospheric sulfuric acid formation, also becomes barrierless under acid catalysis

  5. Tungsten deposition by hydrogen-atom reaction with tungsten hexafluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, W.W.

    1991-01-01

    Using gaseous hydrogen atoms with WF[sub 6], tungsten atoms can be produced in a gas-phase reaction. The atoms then deposit in a near-room temperature process, which results in the formation of tungsten films. The W atoms (10[sup 10]-10[sup 11]/cm[sup 3]) were measured in situ by atomic absorption spectroscopy during the CVD process. Deposited W films were characterized by Auger electron spectroscopy, Rutherford backscattering, and X-ray diffraction. The surface morphology of the deposited films and filled holes was studied using scanning electron microscopy. The deposited films were highly adherent to different substrates, such as Si, SiO[sub 2], Ti/Si, TiN/Si and Teflon. The reaction mechanism and kinetics were studied. The experimental results indicated that this method has three advantages compared to conventional CVD or PECVD: (1) film growth occurs at low temperatures; (2) deposition takes place in a plasma-free environment; and (3) a low level of impurities results in high-quality adherent films.

  6. Some properties of Stark states of hydrogenic atoms and ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hey, J. D.

    2007-10-01

    The motivation for this work is the problem of providing accurate values of the atomic transition matrix elements for the Stark components of Rydberg Rydberg transitions in atomic hydrogen and hydrogenic ions, for use in spectral line broadening calculations applicable to cool, low-density plasmas, such as those found in H II regions. Since conventional methods of calculating these transition matrix elements cannot be used for the high principal quantum numbers now easily attained in radio astronomical spectra, we attempt to show that the recurrence relation (ladder operator) method recently employed by Watson (2006 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 39 1889 97) and Hey (2006 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 39 2641 64) can be taken over into the parabolic coordinate system used to describe the Stark states of the atomic (ionic) radiators. The present method is therefore suggested as potentially useful for extending the work of Griem (1967 Astrophys. J. 148 547 58, 2005 Astrophys. J. 620 L133 4), Watson (2006), Stambulchik et al (2007 Phys. Rev. E 75 016401(9 pp) on Stark broadening in transitions between states of high principal quantum number, to physical conditions where the binary, impact approximation is no longer strictly applicable to both electron and ion perturbers. Another possible field of application is the study of Stark mixing transitions in 'ultracold' Rydberg atoms perturbed by long-range interactions with slow atoms and ions. Preparatory to the derivation of recurrence relations for states of different principal quantum number, a number of properties and recurrence relations are also found for states of identical principal quantum number, including the analogue in parabolic coordinates to the relations of Pasternack (1937 Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 23 91 4, 250) in spherical polar coordinates.

  7. Site Change of Hydrogen in Niobium on Alloying with Oversized Ta Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi, Eiichi; Yoshii, Motoyasu; Okada, Yoshinori; Matsuba, Hiroshi; Miyahara, Kazuya; Koike, Shigetoshi; Sugawara, Takamasa; Shishido, Toetsu; Ogiwara, Kiyoshi

    2009-06-01

    In order to clarify a difference in hydrogen interaction with oversized solute atoms and with undersized solute atoms in bcc metals in the low solute concentration region, the site occupancy of hydrogen in Nb alloyed with 5 at. % of oversized Ta atoms has been studied at room temperature for hydrogen concentrations of 0.018 and 0.025 at the hydrogen-to-metal-atom ratio (CH=[H]/[M]) by the channelling method utilizing a nuclear reaction 1H(11B,α)αα with a 11B beam of an energy of 2.03 MeV. Clearly different from the result on hydrogen in Nb alloyed with undersized Mo atoms, in both specimens H atoms are distributed over tetrahedral (T) sites and the displaced-T sites (d-T sites) which are displaced from T sites by about 0.25 Å towards their nearest neighbour octahedral (O) sites. The T site is more favourable for hydrogen occupancy, but the number of available T sites is limited, and excess H atoms occupy the d-T sites. Therefore, in contrast to a strong attractive interaction between hydrogen and undersized Mo atoms (trapping), there exists no such a strong attractive interaction between hydrogen and oversized Ta atoms. It is considered that the trapping of hydrogen by undersized solute atoms is effective to the large enhancement of the terminal solubility of hydrogen (TSH) on alloying with undersized solute atoms, at least, in the low solute concentration region.

  8. Carrier transport characteristics of H-terminated diamond films prepared using molecular hydrogen and atomic hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jin-long; Chen, Liang-xian; Zheng, Yu-ting; Wang, Jing-jing; Feng, Zhi-hong; Li, Cheng-ming

    2017-07-01

    The H-terminated diamond films, which exhibit high surface conductivity, have been used in high-frequency and high-power electronic devices. In this paper, the surface conductive channel on specimens from the same diamond film was obtained by hydrogen plasma treatment and by heating under a hydrogen atmosphere, respectively, and the surface carrier transport characteristics of both samples were compared and evaluated. The results show that the carrier mobility and carrier density of the sample treated by hydrogen plasma are 15 cm2·V-1·s-1 and greater than 5 × 1012 cm-2, respectively, and that the carrier mobilities measured at five different areas are similar. Compared to the hydrogen-plasma-treated specimen, the thermally hydrogenated specimen exhibits a lower surface conductivity, a carrier density one order of magnitude lower, and a carrier mobility that varies from 2 to 33 cm2·V-1·s-1. The activated hydrogen atoms restructure the diamond surface, remove the scratches, and passivate the surface states via the etching effect during the hydrogen plasma treatment process, which maintains a higher carrier density and a more stable carrier mobility.

  9. Observations of molecular and atomic gas in photodissociation regions. [interstellar chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, D. T.; Howe, J. E.

    1989-01-01

    Dense gas at the ionized/neutral boundaries of molecular clouds illuminated by far-UV photons plays an important role in the appearance of the neutral interstellar medium. It also is a laboratory for the study of UV-photochemistry and of a number of heating and cooling phenomena not seen elsewhere. Fine structure lines of neutral and low ionization potential species dominate the cooling in the outer part of the photodissociation regions. Observations of these lines show that the regions are dense and highly clumped. Observations of H2 and CO show that heating by UV photons plays a significant role in the excitation of molecular lines near the H II/neutral boundary. Warm CO is more abundant in these regions than predicted by the standard theoretical models. Optical reflection nebulas provide an ideal laboratory for the study of photodissocciation region phenomena.

  10. Observations of molecular and atomic gas in photodissociation regions. [interstellar chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, D. T.; Howe, J. E.

    1989-01-01

    Dense gas at the ionized/neutral boundaries of molecular clouds illuminated by far-UV photons plays an important role in the appearance of the neutral interstellar medium. It also is a laboratory for the study of UV-photochemistry and of a number of heating and cooling phenomena not seen elsewhere. Fine structure lines of neutral and low ionization potential species dominate the cooling in the outer part of the photodissociation regions. Observations of these lines show that the regions are dense and highly clumped. Observations of H2 and CO show that heating by UV photons plays a significant role in the excitation of molecular lines near the H II/neutral boundary. Warm CO is more abundant in these regions than predicted by the standard theoretical models. Optical reflection nebulas provide an ideal laboratory for the study of photodissocciation region phenomena.

  11. Thermal hydrogen-atom transfer from methane: A mechanistic exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Helmut

    2015-06-01

    Hydrogen-atom transfer (HAT) constitutes a key process in a broad range of chemical transformations as it covers heterogeneous, homogeneous, and enzymatic reactions. While open-shell metal oxo species [MO]rad are no longer regarded as being involved in the heterogeneously catalyzed oxidative coupling of methane (2CH4 + → C2H6 + H2O), these reagents are rather versatile in bringing about (gas-phase) hydrogen-atom transfer, even from methane at ambient conditions. In this mini-review, various mechanistic scenarios will be presented, and it will be demonstrated how these are affected by the composition of the metal-oxide cluster ions. Examples will be discussed, how 'doping' the clusters permits the control of the charge and spin situation at the active site and, thus, the course of the reaction. Also, the interplay between supposedly inert support material and the active site - the so-called 'aristocratic atoms' - of the gas-phase catalyst will be addressed. Finally, gas-phase HAT from methane will be analyzed in the broader context of thermal activation of inert Csbnd H bonds by metal-oxo species.

  12. The alpha Centauri Line of Sight: D/H Ratio, Physical Properties of Local Interstellar Gas, and Measurement of Heated Hydrogen (The 'Hydrogen Wall') Near the Heliopause

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Wood, Brian E.

    1996-01-01

    We analyze high-resolution spectra of the nearby (1.34 pc) stars alpha Cen A (G2 V) and alpha Cen B (K1 V), which were obtained with the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope. The observations consist of echelle spectra of the Mg II 2800 A and Fe II 2599 A resonance lines and the Lyman-alpha lines of hydrogen and deuterium. The interstellar gas has a velocity (v = - 18.0 +/- 0.2 km/s) consistent with the local flow vector proposed for this line of sight by Lailement & Berlin (1992). The temperature and nonthermal velocity inferred from the Fe II, Mg II, and D I line profiles are T = 5400 +/- 500 K and xi = 1.20 +/- 0.25 km/s, respectively. However, single-component fits to the H I Lyman-alpha lines yield a Doppler parameter (b(sub HI) = 11.80 km/s) that implies a significantly warmer temperature of 8350 K, and the velocity of the H I absorption (v = - 15.8 +/- 0.2 km/s) is redshifted by about 2.2 km/s with respect to the Fe II, Mg II, and D I lines. The one-component model of the interstellar gas suggests natural logarithm N base HI = 18.03 +/- 0.01 and D/H = (5.7 +/- 0.2) x 10(exp -6) . These parameters lead to a good fit to the observed spectra, but this model does not explain the higher temperature and redshift of H I relative to the other interstellar lines. The most sensible way to resolve the discrepancy between H(I) and the other lines is to add a second absorption component to the H(I) lines. This second component is hotter (T approx. equals 30,000 K), is redshifted relative to the primary component by 2-4 km/s, and has a column density too low to be detected in the Fe(II), Mg(II), and D(I) lines. We propose that the gas responsible for this component is located near the heliopause, consisting of the heated H I gas from the interstellar medium that is compressed by the solar wind. This so-called 'hydrogen wall' is predicted by recent multifluid gasdynamical models of the interstellar gas and solar wind interaction. Our data

  13. The alpha Centauri Line of Sight: D/H Ratio, Physical Properties of Local Interstellar Gas, and Measurement of Heated Hydrogen (The 'Hydrogen Wall') Near the Heliopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Wood, Brian E.

    1996-05-01

    We analyze high-resolution spectra of the nearby (1.34 pc) stars alpha Cen A (G2 V) and alpha Cen B (K1 V), which were obtained with the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope. The observations consist of echelle spectra of the Mg II 2800 A and Fe II 2599 A resonance lines and the Lyman-alpha lines of hydrogen and deuterium. The interstellar gas has a velocity (v = - 18.0 +/- 0.2 km/s) consistent with the local flow vector proposed for this line of sight by Lailement & Berlin (1992). The temperature and nonthermal velocity inferred from the Fe II, Mg II, and D I line profiles are T = 5400 +/- 500 K and xi = 1.20 +/- 0.25 km/s, respectively. However, single-component fits to the H I Lyman-alpha lines yield a Doppler parameter (bHI = 11.80 km/s) that implies a significantly warmer temperature of 8350 K, and the velocity of the H I absorption (v = - 15.8 +/- 0.2 km/s) is redshifted by about 2.2 km/s with respect to the Fe II, Mg II, and D I lines. The one-component model of the interstellar gas suggests natural logarithm N base HI = 18.03 +/- 0.01 and D/H = (5.7 +/- 0.2) x 10-6 . These parameters lead to a good fit to the observed spectra, but this model does not explain the higher temperature and redshift of H I relative to the other interstellar lines. The most sensible way to resolve the discrepancy between H(I) and the other lines is to add a second absorption component to the H(I) lines. This second component is hotter (T approx. equals 30,000 K), is redshifted relative to the primary component by 2-4 km/s, and has a column density too low to be detected in the Fe(II), Mg(II), and D(I) lines. We propose that the gas responsible for this component is located near the heliopause, consisting of the heated H I gas from the interstellar medium that is compressed by the solar wind. This so-called 'hydrogen wall' is predicted by recent multifluid gasdynamical models of the interstellar gas and solar wind interaction. Our data provide the

  14. Kinetic modeling of α-hydrogen abstractions from unsaturated and saturated oxygenate compounds by hydrogen atoms.

    PubMed

    Paraskevas, Paschalis D; Sabbe, Maarten K; Reyniers, Marie-Françoise; Papayannakos, Nikos G; Marin, Guy B

    2014-10-09

    Hydrogen-abstraction reactions play a significant role in thermal biomass conversion processes, as well as regular gasification, pyrolysis, or combustion. In this work, a group additivity model is constructed that allows prediction of reaction rates and Arrhenius parameters of hydrogen abstractions by hydrogen atoms from alcohols, ethers, esters, peroxides, ketones, aldehydes, acids, and diketones in a broad temperature range (300-2000 K). A training set of 60 reactions was developed with rate coefficients and Arrhenius parameters calculated by the CBS-QB3 method in the high-pressure limit with tunneling corrections using Eckart tunneling coefficients. From this set of reactions, 15 group additive values were derived for the forward and the reverse reaction, 4 referring to primary and 11 to secondary contributions. The accuracy of the model is validated upon an ab initio and an experimental validation set of 19 and 21 reaction rates, respectively, showing that reaction rates can be predicted with a mean factor of deviation of 2 for the ab initio and 3 for the experimental values. Hence, this work illustrates that the developed group additive model can be reliably applied for the accurate prediction of kinetics of α-hydrogen abstractions by hydrogen atoms from a broad range of oxygenates.

  15. Effects due to adsorbed atoms upon angular and energy distributions of surface produced negative hydrogen ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, M.; Bacal, M.; Kasuya, T.; Kato, S.; Kenmotsu, T.; Sasao, M.

    2013-02-01

    Exposure to Cs added hydrogen discharge makes surface of plasma grid of a negative hydrogen ion source covered with Cs and hydrogen. A Monte-Carlo particle simulation code ACAT was run to evaluate the effects due to adsorbed Cs and H atoms upon the angular and energy distributions of H atoms leaving the surface. Accumulation of H atoms on the surface reduces particle reflection coefficients and the mean energy of backscattered H atoms. Angular distributions of H atoms reflected from the hydrogen covered surface tend to be under-cosine at lower energies. Desorption of adsorbed H atoms is more efficient for hydrogen positive ions than for Cs positive ions at lower incident energy. At higher energy more than 100 eV, Cs ions desorb adsorbed H atoms more efficiently than hydrogen ions.

  16. Trapped Hydrogen Spectroscopy: Fundamental Constants and Atomic Clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willmann, Lorenz

    2002-05-01

    Ultra high resolution spectroscopy was an essential ingredient in the realisation and observation of Bose-Einstein condensation of atomic hydrogen(D.G. Fried, T. Killian, L. Willmann, D. Landhuis, S. Moss, D. Kleppner, and T. Greytak, Phys. Rev. Lett. 81), 3807 (1998). That experiment is a good starting point to explore the possibilities for future spectroscopy of trapped ultracold hydrogen. Of particular interest are two aspects. Firstly, the exploitation of the intrinsically small linewidth of the 1S-2S transition of only 1.3 Hz as an optical frequency standard. Secondly, the precision determination of the 2S-nS energy splittings in hydrogen, which can be used to determine the Rydberg constant, the Lamb shift or the proton charge radius. We will combine these two aspects in the experiment. The absolut value of the hydrogen 1S-2S transition frequency(M. Niering, R. Holzwarth, J. Reichert, P. Pokasov, Th. Udem, M. Weitz, T. W. Hänsch, P. Lemonde, G. Santarelli, M. Abgrall, P. Laurent, C. Salomon, and A. Clairon, Phys. Rev. Lett. 84), 5496 (2000) serves as an optical frequency standard for the measurements of the 2S-nS transition frequencies. The frequencies will be linked by a frequency comb generated by a mode locked laser. Currently, a femto second laser is being set up in collaboration with the group of F. Kärtner at MIT. The source of trapped atoms in the metastable 2S state is laser excitation of the 1S-2S transition, thus the 2S-nS spectroscopy can be done at the same time and in the same trapping field to reduce systematic effects.

  17. Angular distribution of electrons elastically scattered from hydrogen atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Shyn, T. W.; Cho, S. Y.

    1989-08-01

    Absolute elastic differential cross sections of atomic hydrogen have been measured by a modulated crossed-beam method. The energy and angular range covered were from 5 to 30 eV and from 12/degree/ to 156/degree/, respectively. The present results agree with the previous measurements within the experimental uncertainty below 15 eV, but it is found that the present results show stronger backward scattering (/gt/120/degree/) than the previous measurement and theoretical results by more than a factor of 2 above 20 eV.

  18. Interference-encoded photoionization time delays in the hydrogen atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stodolna, A. S.; Lépine, F.; Rouzée, A.; Cohen, S.; Gijsbertsen, A.; Jungmann-Smith, J. H.; Bordas, C.; Vrakking, M. J. J.

    2017-08-01

    We present the observation of a checkerboard-like interference pattern in transverse momentum distributions measured for near-threshold photoionization of hydrogen atoms in a DC electric field. We analyze the pattern in terms of constructive and destructive interference between electron trajectories that directly leave the vicinity of the ion and indirect trajectories that remain in the vicinity of the ion for one or more orbital periods, and show that the interference pattern can be discussed in terms of ionization time delays between these two classes of trajectories.

  19. Interstellar abundances - Gas and dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Field, G. B.

    1974-01-01

    Data on abundances of interstellar atoms, ions and molecules in front of zeta Oph are assembled and analyzed. The gas-phase abundances of at least 11 heavy elements are significantly lower, relative to hydrogen, than in the solar system. The abundance deficiencies of certain elements correlate with the temperatures derived theoretically for particle condensation in stellar atmospheres or nebulae, suggesting that these elements have condensed into dust grains near stars. There is evidence that other elements have accreted onto such grains after their arrival in interstellar space. The extinction spectrum of zeta Oph can be explained qualitatively and, to a degree, quantitatively by dust grains composed of silicates, graphite, silicon carbide, and iron, with mantles composed of complex molecules of H, C, N, and O. This composition is consistent with the observed gas-phase deficiencies.

  20. H2 Molecular Clusters with Embedded Molecules and Atoms as the Source of the Diffuse Interstellar Bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernstein, L. S.; Clark, F. O.; Lynch, D. K.

    2013-05-01

    We suggest that the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) arise from absorption lines of electronic transitions in molecular clusters primarily composed of a single molecule, atom, or ion ("seed"), embedded in a single-layer shell of H2 molecules. Less abundant variants of the cluster, including two seed molecules and/or a two-layer shell of H2 molecules, may also occur. The lines are broadened, blended, and wavelength-shifted by interactions between the seed and surrounding H2 shell. We refer to these clusters as contaminated H2 clusters (CHCs). We show that CHC spectroscopy matches the diversity of observed DIB spectral profiles and provides good fits to several DIB profiles based on a rotational temperature of 10 K. CHCs arise from ~centimeter-sized, dirty H2 ice balls, called contaminated H2 ice macro-particles (CHIMPs), formed in cold, dense, giant molecular clouds (GMCs), and later released into the interstellar medium (ISM) upon GMC disruption. Attractive interactions, arising from Van der Waals and ion-induced dipole potentials, between the seeds and H2 molecules enable CHIMPs to attain centimeter-sized dimensions. When an ultraviolet (UV) photon is absorbed in the outer layer of a CHIMP, it heats the icy matrix and expels CHCs into the ISM. While CHCs are quickly destroyed by absorbing UV photons, they are replenished by the slowly eroding CHIMPs. Since CHCs require UV photons for their release, they are most abundant at, but not limited to, the edges of UV-opaque molecular clouds, consistent with the observed, preferred location of DIBs. An inherent property of CHCs, which can be characterized as nanometer size, spinning, dipolar dust grains, is that they emit in the radio-frequency region. We also show that the CHCs offer a natural explanation for the anomalous microwave emission feature in the ~10-100 GHz spectral region.

  1. Hot hydrogen atom reactions moderated by H2 and He.

    PubMed

    Aronowitz, S; Scattergood, T; Flores, J; Chang, S

    1986-01-01

    Photolysis experiments were performed on the H2-CD4-NH3 and the He-CD4-NH3 systems. The photolysis (1849 angstoms) involved only NH3. Mixtures of H2:CD4:NH3 included all combinations of the ratios (200,400,800):(10,20,40):4. Two He:CD4:NH3 mixtures were examined where the ratios equalled the combinations 100:(10,20):4. Abstraction of a D from CD4 by the photolytically produced hot hydrogen from ammonia was monitored by mass spectrometric determination of HD. Both experiment and semiempirical hot-atom theory show that H2 is a very poor thermalizer of hot hydrogens with excess kinetic energy of about 2 eV. Applications of the hard-sphere collision model to the H2-CD4-NH3 system results in predicted ratios of net HD production to NH3 decomposition that were two orders of magnitude smaller than the experimental ratios. On the other hand, helium is found to be a very efficient thermalizer; here, the classical model yields reasonable agreement with experiments. Application of a semiempirical hot-atom program gave quantitative agreement with experiment for either system.

  2. Hydrogen-like atom with nonnegative quantum distribution function

    SciTech Connect

    Zorin, A. V. Sevastianov, L. A.

    2007-04-15

    Among numerous approaches to probabilistic interpretation of conventional quantum mechanics (CQM), the closest to N. Bohr's idea of the correspondence principle is the Blokhintzev-Terletsky approach of the quantum distribution function (QDF) on the coordinate-momentum (q, p) phase space. The detailed investigation of this approach has led to the correspondence rule of V.V. Kuryshkin parametrically dependent on a set of auxiliary functions. According to investigations of numerous authors, the existence and the explicit form of QDF depends on the correspondence rule between classical functions A(q, p) and quantum operator A. At the same time, the QDF corresponding to all known quantization rules turns out to be alternating in sign or overly complex valued. Finally nonexistence of nonnegative QDF in CQM was proved. On the other hand, from this follows the possibility to construct quantum mechanics where a nonnegative QDF exists. We consider a certain set of auxiliary functions to construct explicit expressions for operators O(H) for the hydrogen atom. Naturally, these operators differ from the related operator H in CQM, so that spherical coordinates are no longer separable for a hydrogen-like atom in quantum mechanics with nonnegative QDF.

  3. Hot hydrogen atom reactions moderated by H2 and He

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aronowitz, S.; Scattergood, T.; Flores, J.; Chang, S.

    1986-01-01

    Photolysis experiments were performed on the H2-CD4-NH3 and He-CD4-NH3 systems. The photolysis (1849 A) involved only NH3. Mixtures of H2:CD4:NH3 included all combinations of the ratios (200,400,800):(10,20,40):4. Two He:CD4:NH3 mixtures were examined where the ratios equalled the combinations 100:(10,20):4. Abstraction of a D from CD4 by the photolytically produced hot hydrogen from ammonia was monitored by mass spectrometric determination of HD. Both experiment and semiempirical hot-atom theory show that H2 is a very poor thermalizer of hot hydrogens with excess kinetic energy of about 2 eV. Applications of the hard-sphere collision model to the H2-CD4-NH3 system resulted in predicted ratios of net HD production to NH3 decomposition that were two orders of magnitude smaller than the experimental ratios. On the other hand, helium is found to be a very efficient thermalizer; here, the classical model yields reasonable agreement with experiments. Application of a semiempirical hot-atom program gave quantitative agreement with experiment for either system.

  4. Photoionization of the hydrogen atom in strong magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potekhin, Aleksandr IU.; Pavlov, George G.

    1993-01-01

    The photoionization of the hydrogen atom in magnetic fields B about 10 exp 11 - 10 exp 13 G typical of the surface layers of neutron stars is investigated analytically and numerically. We consider the photoionization from various tightly bound and hydrogen-like states of the atom for photons with arbitrary polarizations and wave-vector directions. It is shown that the length form of the interaction matrix elements is more appropriate in the adiabatic approximation than the velocity form, at least in the most important frequency range omega much less than omega(B), where omega(B) is the electron cyclotron frequency. Use of the length form yields nonzero cross sections for photon polarizations perpendicular to the magnetic field at omega less than omega(B); these cross sections are the ones that most strongly affect the properties of the radiation escaping from an optically thick medium, e.g., from the atmosphere of a neutron star. The results of the numerical calculations are fitted by simple analytical formulas.

  5. Atomic hydrogen in the spiral galaxy NGC 3631

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapen, J. H.

    1997-04-01

    New high-resolution, high-sensitivity Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope Hi synthesis observations of the spiral galaxy NGC 3631 are presented. In the total atomic hydrogen map, the spiral arms are well distinguished from the interarm regions, while the sensitivity allows detection of Hi in all but a few isolated regions of the areas between the spiral arms. Most of the atomic hydrogen is located within the optical disc, but the Hi extends to some 1.5R_opt. The Hi follows the spiral arms, and streaming motions of up to ~15 km s^-1 (projected) can be identified from the velocity field. Assuming a constant inclination angle of 17 deg, a rotation curve is derived which is declining slightly in the outer parts of the disc. An analysis of a residual velocity field, obtained after the subtraction of an axisymmetric model based on the rotation curve, confirms the existence of streaming motions near the spiral arms in an otherwise undisturbed disc.

  6. Atomic hydrogen for low temperature atomic hydrogen masers and in-vacuum dissociators for VLG-11 series masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vessot, R. F. C.

    1984-01-01

    The operation of a cryogenically-cooled hydrogen maser using an RF plasma dissociator operating at liquid nitrogen temperature (77K) in confunction with a state selector magnet whose dimensions are suitable for slow atoms is studied. The focusing characteristics for a hexapole state selector magnet with maximum fields at the pole tips, provide a maximum acceptance angle for atoms at the most probable velocity in the beam. By thermally isolating the RF circuitry from the dissociator glassware, only dielectric losses in the glass and the energy coupled to the plasma will result in the boil-off of liquid nitrogen. It is estimated that this is about one watt and thus a loss rate of approximately .022 liters pr hour is anticipated.

  7. Synthesis of FeH5: A layered structure with atomic hydrogen slabs.

    PubMed

    Pépin, C M; Geneste, G; Dewaele, A; Mezouar, M; Loubeyre, P

    2017-07-28

    High pressure promotes the formation of polyhydrides with unusually high hydrogen-to-metal ratios. These polyhydrides have complex hydrogenic sublattices. We synthesized iron pentahydride (FeH5) by a direct reaction between iron and H2 above 130 gigapascals in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell. FeH5 exhibits a structure built of atomic hydrogen only. It consists of intercalated layers of quasicubic FeH3 units and four-plane slabs of thin atomic hydrogen. The distribution of the valence electron density indicates a bonding between hydrogen and iron atoms but none between hydrogen atoms, presenting a two-dimensional metallic character. The discovery of FeH5 suggests a low-pressure path to make materials that approach bulk dense atomic hydrogen. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  8. Synthesis of FeH5: A layered structure with atomic hydrogen slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pépin, C. M.; Geneste, G.; Dewaele, A.; Mezouar, M.; Loubeyre, P.

    2017-07-01

    High pressure promotes the formation of polyhydrides with unusually high hydrogen-to-metal ratios. These polyhydrides have complex hydrogenic sublattices. We synthesized iron pentahydride (FeH5) by a direct reaction between iron and H2 above 130 gigapascals in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell. FeH5 exhibits a structure built of atomic hydrogen only. It consists of intercalated layers of quasicubic FeH3 units and four-plane slabs of thin atomic hydrogen. The distribution of the valence electron density indicates a bonding between hydrogen and iron atoms but none between hydrogen atoms, presenting a two-dimensional metallic character. The discovery of FeH5 suggests a low-pressure path to make materials that approach bulk dense atomic hydrogen.

  9. New effect in Stark spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen: dynamic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Gavrilenko, V.P.; Oks, E.A.

    1981-06-01

    We investigate analytically the spectrum of the hydrogen atom in an electric field E(t) = E/sub 0/ cos ..omega..t+F, where FperpendicularE/sub 0/. In the case when the splitting in the time-averaged field < E(t) > coincides with (2--1) ..omega.., where perpendicular = 1, 2, 3..., an effect called dynamic resonance is produced. The resonance occurs between the quasienergy states and is multiparticle and multiphoton. The hydrogen spectral lines undergo additional splitting under these conditions. The theory of dynamic resonance provides a physical explanation of the results of the numerical calculation of the L/sub ..cap alpha../ spectrum in crossed electric fields E/sub 0/ cos ..omega..t and F, as reported by Cohn, Bakshi, and Kalman (Phys. Rev. Lett. 29, 324 (1974)). We show also that fields with fixed phases and fields with random phases can exert different resonant action on the hydrogen spectral lines that start from levels with n> or =3. The dynamic resonance effect can be experimentally observed ad used both in laser physics and in plasma physics (in particular, to detect Langmuir solitons).

  10. The ground state properties of spin-aligned atomic hydrogen, deuterium, and tritium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etters, R. D.; Dugan, J. V., Jr.; Palmer, R. W.

    1975-01-01

    The internal energy, pressure, and compressibility of ground-state, spin-aligned atomic hydrogen, deuterium, and tritium are calculated assuming that all pair interactions occur via the atomic triplet (spin-aligned) potential. The conditions required to obtain atomic hydrogen and its isotopes in bulk are discussed; such a development would be of value in propulsion systems because of the light mass and energetic recombination of atomic hydrogen. Results show that atomic triplet hydrogen and deuterium remain gaseous at 0 K, and that tritium forms a liquid with a binding energy of approximately -0.75 K per atom at a molar volume of 130 cu cm per mole. The pair distribution function for these systems is calculated, and the predicted superfluid behavior of atomic triplet hydrogen and tritium is briefly discussed.

  11. The ground state properties of spin-aligned atomic hydrogen, deuterium, and tritium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etters, R. D.; Dugan, J. V., Jr.; Palmer, R. W.

    1975-01-01

    The internal energy, pressure, and compressibility of ground-state, spin-aligned atomic hydrogen, deuterium, and tritium are calculated assuming that all pair interactions occur via the atomic triplet (spin-aligned) potential. The conditions required to obtain atomic hydrogen and its isotopes in bulk are discussed; such a development would be of value in propulsion systems because of the light mass and energetic recombination of atomic hydrogen. Results show that atomic triplet hydrogen and deuterium remain gaseous at 0 K, and that tritium forms a liquid with a binding energy of approximately -0.75 K per atom at a molar volume of 130 cu cm per mole. The pair distribution function for these systems is calculated, and the predicted superfluid behavior of atomic triplet hydrogen and tritium is briefly discussed.

  12. ON THE FORMATION OF INTERSTELLAR WATER ICE: CONSTRAINTS FROM A SEARCH FOR HYDROGEN PEROXIDE ICE IN MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R. G.; Wright, C. M.; Robinson, G.; Charnley, S. B.; Pendleton, Y. J.; Maldoni, M. M. E-mail: c.wright@adfa.edu.au E-mail: Steven.B.Charnley@nasa.gov

    2011-12-20

    Recent surface chemistry experiments have shown that the hydrogenation of molecular oxygen on interstellar dust grains is a plausible formation mechanism, via hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}), for the production of water (H{sub 2}O) ice mantles in the dense interstellar medium. Theoretical chemistry models also predict the formation of a significant abundance of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} ice in grain mantles by this route. At their upper limits, the predicted and experimental abundances are sufficiently high that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} should be detectable in molecular cloud ice spectra. To investigate this further, laboratory spectra have been obtained for H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O ice films between 2.5 and 200 {mu}m, from 10 to 180 K, containing 3%, 30%, and 97% H{sub 2}O{sub 2} ice. Integrated absorbances for all the absorption features in low-temperature H{sub 2}O{sub 2} ice have been derived from these spectra. For identifying H{sub 2}O{sub 2} ice, the key results are the presence of unique features near 3.5, 7.0, and 11.3 {mu}m. Comparing the laboratory spectra with the spectra of a group of 24 protostars and field stars, all of which have strong H{sub 2}O ice absorption bands, no absorption features are found that can definitely be identified with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} ice. In the absence of definite H{sub 2}O{sub 2} features, the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} abundance is constrained by its possible contribution to the weak absorption feature near 3.47 {mu}m found on the long-wavelength wing of the 3 {mu}m H{sub 2}O ice band. This gives an average upper limit for H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, as a percentage of H{sub 2}O, of 9% {+-} 4%. This is a strong constraint on parameters for surface chemistry experiments and dense cloud chemistry models.

  13. The ratio of carbon monoxide to molecular hydrogen in interstellar dark clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickman, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    LTE (C-13)O column densities are compared with the corresponding values of beam-convolved visual extinction at more than 100 locations within 38 different interstellar dark clouds. A roughly linear correlation is found to exist between these two quantities for visual extinctions in the range from about 1.5 to 5 mag. It is argued that this correlation can be extended up to about 10 mag and that the standard gas-to-extinction ratio can be expected to remain valid in the sources studied. The correlation of LTE (C-13)O column density with visual extinction is used to obtain an equation for the H2 column density associated with a given (C-13)O column density. It is shown that if the clouds studied are assumed to be chemically homogeneous, the equation obtained implies that at least 12% of all gas-phase carbon is in the form of CO. Comparison of the observational data with various theories proposed for molecule formation in dark clouds indicates that Langer's (1977) ion-molecule scheme accounts well for the observations when the fractionation channel of Watson et al. (1976) is included.

  14. IUE observations of interstellar hydrogen and deuterium toward Alpha Centauri B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landsman, W. B.; Murthy, J.; Henry, R. C.; Moos, H. W.; Linsky, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    A high dispersion profile is presented of the Lyman-alpha emission toward Alpha Cen B as recorded in two images taken with the IUE spacecraft. The spectra were examined with a three-parameter Gaussian or five-parameter solar-type profile to derive the intrinsic background stellar emission. Voight absorption profiles were calculated for the intervening H I and D I gas. A uniform, thermally broadened medium was assumed, with the calculations being based on the free stellar parameters of density, velocity dispersion and the bulk velocity of H I, and the density of D I. The use of a small aperture is shown to have been effective in eliminating geocoronal and interplanetary diffuse Ly-alpha contamination. The H I absorption profile toward Alpha Cen B is found to be equivalent to that toward Alpha Cen A, indicating that the H I profiles derived are essentially independent of stellar emission. Less success, however, was attained in obtaining any definitive D I profile, although an asymmetry in the blue and red wings of the Lyman-alpha emissions did show the presence of absorption by interstellar deuterium and allow setting a lower limit of 0.00001 for the D I/H I ratio.

  15. Hydrogen Column Density Evaluations toward Capella: Consequences on the Interstellar Deuterium Abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal-Madjar, A.; Ferlet, R.

    2002-06-01

    The deuterium abundance evaluation in the direction of Capella has for a long time been used as a reference for the local interstellar medium (ISM) within our Galaxy. We show here that broad and weak H I components could be present on the Capella line of sight, leading to a large new additional systematic uncertainty on the N(H I) evaluation. We find the D/H ratio toward Capella to be equal to 1.67(+/-0.3)×10-5 with almost identical χ2 for all the fits (this range includes only the systematic error; the 2 σ statistical one is almost negligible in comparison). We conclude that D/H evaluations over H I column densities below 1019 cm-2 (even perhaps below 1020 cm-2 if demonstrated by additional observations) may present larger uncertainties than previously anticipated. We mention that the D/O ratio might be a better tracer for D I variations in the ISM as recently measured by the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer.

  16. A reanalysis of the observed interplanetary hydrogen L. cap alpha. emission profiles and the derived local interstellar gas temperature and velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, F.M.; Judge, D.L.

    1980-07-01

    An improved model of the interplanetary emission profile is presented. In this model we utilize a new version of the modified Danby-Camm velocity distribution function to calculate emission profiles, and it appears to be very efficient. Using this model, the hydrogen L..cap alpha.. profiles are determined for various viewing directions, and at a solar distance of 1 AU. It is found that the linewidth of the emission profiles and their Doppler shifts depend strongly on the viewing direction, as well as the assumed interstellar temperature. Previous determinations of the interstellar temperature T/sub 0/ and the inflow velocity V/sub b/, using approximate theoretical hydrogen profiles, are found to be inadequate. These values are recalculated and are determined to be T/sub 0/=7000 +- 1200 K and V/sub b/=19 +- 3 km s/sup -1/.

  17. Dimeric configurations of atomic hydrogen adsorbed on a monolayer hexagonal boron nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Jianzhang; Hao, Ruirui; Ji, Linan; Feng, Shujian; Sun, Tianye

    2017-10-01

    Atomic hydrogen adsorbed on the two-dimensional monolayer hexagonal boron nitride is systematically discussed based on dispersion-corrected density function theory (DFT-D). Main emphasis has been placed on aggregation states of two hydrogen atoms, including equal or ectopic adsorption with single side, and double-sided adsorption. The hydrogen atoms are chemisorbed on the top of boron sites, while they are physisorbed on the top of nitrogen or honeycomb sites. Furthermore, two adsorbed hydrogen atoms are most likely to keep close to form meta-TB dimer with single side. Besides, a possible stabilizing mechanism related to the adsorbed performance is investigated.

  18. HST STIS Observations of Interstellar Chlorine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Valerie Rose; Dirks, Cody; Meyer, David M.; Cartledge, Stefan I. B.

    2017-01-01

    Among the dominant ions of abundant elements in the diffuse interstellar medium, only chlorine (Cl II) has a rapid exothermic reaction with molecular hydrogen (H2) that should lead to the dominance of its atomic form (Cl I) in clouds where most of the hydrogen is in H2. We present the results of an archival study of the interstellar Cl I λ1347.24 absorption observed at high spectral resolution toward 41 stars with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) onboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Our key goals in this survey are to explore the relationship between interstellar N(Cl I) and N(H2) with a larger sample and a larger N(H2) range (16.44 < log N(H2) < 20.87) than the Copernicus interstellar survey of Moomey et al. (2012). We additionally contrast it with the high-z QSO damped Lyman-alpha system (DLA) findings of Balashev et al. (2015). We find that for log N(H2) > 19.0, the HST STIS sample is consistent with the Copernicus data and high-z DLA samples in indicating a linear trend of increasing N(Cl I) with increasing N(H2). Furthermore, all of the interstellar sightlines with log f(H2) > -0.5 have log N(Cl I) > 13.5, and those with log f(H2) < -1.5 have log N(Cl I) < 13.5, where f(H2)=2N(H2)/[2N(H2)+N(H I)] is the fractional amount of H2 in H. Consequently, observations of interstellar Cl I can potentially trace the H2 fraction of the “CO-dark” gas marking the transition between diffuse atomic and dense CO molecular clouds.

  19. Positron impact excitations of hydrogen atom embedded in weakly coupled plasmas: Formation of Rydberg atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rej, Pramit; Ghoshal, Arijit

    2014-09-01

    Formation of Rydberg atoms due to 1s → n l m excitations of hydrogen, for arbitrary n, l, m, by positron impact in weakly coupled plasma has been investigated using a distorted-wave theory in the momentum space. The interactions among the charged particles in the plasma have been represented by Debye-Huckel potentials. Making use of a simple variationally determined wave function for the hydrogen atom, it has been possible to obtain the distorted-wave scattering amplitude in a closed analytical form. A detailed study has been made on the effects of plasma screening on the differential and total cross sections in the energy range 20-300 eV of incident positron. For the unscreened case, our results agree nicely with some of the most accurate results available in the literature. To the best of our knowledge, such a study on the differential and total cross sections for 1s → n l m inelastic positron-hydrogen collisions for arbitrary n, l, m in weakly coupled plasmas is the first reported in the literature.

  20. Positron impact excitations of hydrogen atom embedded in weakly coupled plasmas: Formation of Rydberg atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Rej, Pramit; Ghoshal, Arijit

    2014-09-15

    Formation of Rydberg atoms due to 1s→nlm excitations of hydrogen, for arbitrary n, l, m, by positron impact in weakly coupled plasma has been investigated using a distorted-wave theory in the momentum space. The interactions among the charged particles in the plasma have been represented by Debye-Huckel potentials. Making use of a simple variationally determined wave function for the hydrogen atom, it has been possible to obtain the distorted-wave scattering amplitude in a closed analytical form. A detailed study has been made on the effects of plasma screening on the differential and total cross sections in the energy range 20–300 eV of incident positron. For the unscreened case, our results agree nicely with some of the most accurate results available in the literature. To the best of our knowledge, such a study on the differential and total cross sections for 1s→nlm inelastic positron-hydrogen collisions for arbitrary n, l, m in weakly coupled plasmas is the first reported in the literature.

  1. Theory of catalytic dissociation of hydrogen atoms on a metal surface

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantinov, O. V. Dymnikov, V. D.; Mittsev, M. A.

    2008-08-15

    The model of hydrogen atom ionization near a metal surface is discussed on the basis of a comparison between the metal work function and the atom ionization energy. In the theoretical calculation, it is shown that the hydrogen atom ionization energy decreases when the atom approaches the metal surface. The ionization energy vanishes when the distance between proton and the metal surface is somewhat less than the Bohr radius.

  2. CW ESR studies of impurity-helium condensates containing krypton and hydrogen atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Järvinen, J.; Bernard, E. P.; Boltnev, R. E.; Khmelenko, V. V.; Lee, D. M.

    2009-02-01

    Impurity-Helium condensates (IHCs) containing krypton and hydrogen atoms have been studied in superfluid helium-4 via CW ESR techniques. The IHCs studied in this work are gel-like aggregates of nanoclusters composed of krypton and hydrogen atoms. We have found that such samples contain very high average concentrations of hydrogen atoms (~1018cm-3) as obtained by integration of the microwave absorption signal. Local concentrations (~1019cm-3) of H atoms were calculated from the ESR line width. Detailed studies of the ESR line shapes lead to the conclusion that a large fraction of the H atoms lies on the krypton cluster surfaces.

  3. H_2 Emission as a Large-Scale Tracer of Molecular Hydrogen in Interstellar Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhman, M. L.; Jaffe, D. T.

    1994-12-01

    We have detected extremely extended (>1.5deg , or 12 pc) near-infrared H_2 line emission from the Orion A giant molecular cloud. We have used a new instrument, the University of Texas Near-Infrared Fabry-Perot spectrometer, which is optimized for the detection of low surface brightness line emission from 1.4 microns to 2.4 microns (Luhman et al. 1995, PASP, in press). Our Orion observations show that we can directly trace H_2 along the outlying surfaces of interstellar molecular clouds, well away from the star-forming cores. The diffuse, extended H_2 emission provides a unique new view of molecular clouds to complement conventional large-scale tracers such as CO and is an excellent probe of cloud energetics. In Orion, we have mapped the emission in the 1.601 microns v=6--4 Q(1), 2.121 microns v=1--0 S(1), and 2.247 microns v=2--1 S(1) lines of H_2. The surface brightness of the extended H_2 line emission is 10(-6) to 10(-5) ergs s(-1) cm(-2) sr(-1) . Based on the distribution and relative strengths of the H_2 emission lines, we conclude that H_2 excited by ultraviolet radiation dominates the global H_2 line emission from the Orion molecular cloud, even though this cloud has a powerful shock-excited H_2 source in its core. We are comparing our H_2 data and observations of the 63 microns [O I] and 158 microns [C II] emission to the predictions of theoretical models of photodissociation or photon dominated regions to examine the physical conditions throughout the Orion A cloud. This work was supported by the David and Lucile Packard Foundation through a fellowship to D.T.J. and by a NASA Graduate Traineeship grant NGT-50998 held by M.L.L.

  4. Molecular dynamics simulation of effect of hydrogen atoms on crack propagation behavior of α-Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, H. Y.; Zhang, L.; Xiao, M. X.

    2016-12-01

    The effect of the hydrogen concentration and hydrogen distribution on the mechanical properties of α-Fe with a pre-existing unilateral crack under tensile loading is investigated by molecular dynamics simulation. The results reveal that the models present good ductility when the front region of crack tip has high local hydrogen concentration. The peak stress of α-Fe decreases with increasing hydrogen concentration. The studies also indicate that for the samples with hydrogen atoms, the crack propagation behavior is independent of the model size and boundaries. In addition, the crack propagation behavior is significantly influenced by the distribution of hydrogen atoms.

  5. On the nature of interstellar organic chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charnley, Steven B.

    1997-01-01

    A theory for the origin of all organic molecules observed in regions of massive and low-mass star formation, as well as in dark molecular clouds is described. On dust grains, single atom addition reactions and stability of the intermediate radicals, mechanisms similar to those believed to form the organic component of the Murchison meteorite, lead to a very limited number of mantle compositions depending upon the degree of hydrogenation. The key step in the theory is the formation of the formyl radical by H atom addition (by quantum tunnelling) to CO. Subsequent H atom additions lead to formaldehyde and methanol, as previously suggested; C, N, and O atoms can also undergo additions to HCO. For increasing hydrogenation, the mantle types include one in which there is little contribution from formyl-initiated chemistry; one in which an acetylenic chain develops through C atom additions; and others where the acetylenic chain is increasingly hydrogenated to form aldehydes and alcohols. Following evaporation of grain mantles, such as occurs in protostellar hot cores, these molecules can form new organics, for example, by alkyl cation transfer from alcohols. In dark clouds, different mantles lead to different gas phase organics. This scenario accounts naturally for the formation of many interstellar organics for which none presently exists, predicts observable correlations between specific interstellar molecules, indicates the presence of many new organic molecules and why several others are not observed.

  6. Generation of atomic H in a hydrogen matrix by tritium decay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeleznik, F. J.

    1976-01-01

    Webeler's (1976) experimental results for the generation of atomic hydrogen in a hydrogen matrix by tritium decay are reexamined with a variant of Rosen's (1976) mathematical treatment. The analysis retains Rosen's equations for the number densities of trapped and mobile hydrogen atoms, but replaces his enthalpy equation with an equation for the directly measured temperature. Theoretical expressions are derived for the dependence of storage time, recombination time, and maximum density of trapped hydrogen atoms as a function of temperature for a given tritium concentration. A comparison of predictions for the maximum trapped atomic hydrogen number density as a function of storage time reveals that Rosen's estimate for the maximum number density of hydrogen atoms for the zero magnetic field case is a little more optimistic than the estimate obtained in the paper.

  7. Reaction of benzene with atomic carbon: pathways to fulvenallene and the fulvenallenyl radical in extraterrestrial atmospheres and the interstellar medium.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Gabriel

    2014-06-05

    The reaction of benzene with ground-state atomic carbon, C((3)P), has been investigated using the G3X-K composite quantum chemical method. A suite of novel energetically favorable pathways that lead to previously unconsidered products are identified. Reaction is initiated by barrierless C atom cycloaddition to benzene on the triplet surface, producing a vibrationally excited [C7H6]* adduct that can dissociate to the cycloheptatrienyl radical (+ H) via a relatively loose transition state 4.4 kcal mol(-1) below the reactant energies. This study also identifies that this reaction adduct can isomerize to generate five-membered ring intermediates that can further dissociate to the global C7H5 minima, the fulvenallenyl radical (+ H), or to c-C5H4 and acetylene, with limiting barriers around 20 and 10 kcal mol(-1) below the reactants, respectively. If intersystem crossing to the singlet surface occurs, isomerization pathways that are lower-yet in energy are available leading to the C7H6 minima fulvenallene, with all barriers over 40 kcal mol(-1) below the reactants. From here further barrierless fragmentation to fulvenallenyl + H can proceed at ca. 25 kcal mol(-1) below the reactants. In the reducing atmospheres of planets like Jupiter and satellites like Titan, where benzene and C((3)P) are both expected, it is proposed that fulvenallene and the fulvenallenyl radical would be the dominant products of the C6H6 + C((3)P) reaction. Fulvenallenyl may also be a significant reaction product under collision-free conditions representative of the interstellar medium, although further work is required here to confirm the identity of the C7H5 radical product.

  8. Effects of atomic hydrogen and deuterium exposure on high polarization GaAs photocathodes

    SciTech Connect

    M. Baylac; P. Adderley; J. Brittian; J. Clark; T. Day; J. Grames; J. Hansknecht; M. Poelker; M. Stutzman; A. T. Wu; A. S. Terekhov

    2005-12-01

    Strained-layer GaAs and strained-superlattice GaAs photocathodes are used at Jefferson Laboratory to create high average current beams of highly spin-polarized electrons. High electron yield, or quantum efficiency (QE), is obtained only when the photocathode surface is atomically clean. For years, exposure to atomic hydrogen or deuterium has been the photocathode cleaning technique employed at Jefferson Laboratory. This work demonstrates that atomic hydrogen cleaning is not necessary when precautions are taken to ensure that clean photocathode material from the vendor is not inadvertently dirtied while samples are prepared for installation inside photoemission guns. Moreover, this work demonstrates that QE and beam polarization can be significantly reduced when clean high-polarization photocathode material is exposed to atomic hydrogen from an rf dissociator-style atomic hydrogen source. Surface analysis provides some insight into the mechanisms that degrade QE and polarization due to atomic hydrogen cleaning.

  9. Phase Space Structures Explain Hydrogen Atom Roaming in Formaldehyde Decomposition.

    PubMed

    Mauguière, Frédéric A L; Collins, Peter; Kramer, Zeb C; Carpenter, Barry K; Ezra, Gregory S; Farantos, Stavros C; Wiggins, Stephen

    2015-10-15

    We re-examine the prototypical roaming reaction--hydrogen atom roaming in formaldehyde decomposition--from a phase space perspective. Specifically, we address the question "why do trajectories roam, rather than dissociate through the radical channel?" We describe and compute the phase space structures that define and control all possible reactive events for this reaction, as well as provide a dynamically exact description of the roaming region in phase space. Using these phase space constructs, we show that in the roaming region, there is an unstable periodic orbit whose stable and unstable manifolds define a conduit that both encompasses all roaming trajectories exiting the formaldehyde well and shepherds them toward the H2···CO well.

  10. Entropy and complexity analysis of hydrogenic Rydberg atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez-Rosa, S.; Toranzo, I. V.; Dehesa, J. S.; Sanchez-Moreno, P.

    2013-05-15

    The internal disorder of hydrogenic Rydberg atoms as contained in their position and momentum probability densities is examined by means of the following information-theoretic spreading quantities: the radial and logarithmic expectation values, the Shannon entropy, and the Fisher information. As well, the complexity measures of Cramer-Rao, Fisher-Shannon, and Lopez Ruiz-Mancini-Calvet types are investigated in both reciprocal spaces. The leading term of these quantities is rigorously calculated by use of the asymptotic properties of the concomitant entropic functionals of the Laguerre and Gegenbauer orthogonal polynomials which control the wavefunctions of the Rydberg states in both position and momentum spaces. The associated generalized Heisenberg-like, logarithmic and entropic uncertainty relations are also given. Finally, application to linear (l= 0), circular (l=n- 1), and quasicircular (l=n- 2) states is explicitly done.

  11. Dirac equation in very special relativity for hydrogen atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maluf, R. V.; Silva, J. E. G.; Cruz, W. T.; Almeida, C. A. S.

    2014-11-01

    In this work, we study the modified Dirac equation in the framework of very special relativity (VSR). The low-energy regime is accessed and the nonrelativistic Hamiltonian is obtained. It turns out that this Hamiltonian is similar to that achieved from the Standard Model Extension (SME) via coupling of the spinor field to a Lorentz-violating term, but new features arise inherited from the non-local character of the VSR. In addition, the implications of the VSR-modified Lorentz symmetry on the spectrum of a hydrogen atom are determined by calculating the first-order energy corrections in the context of standard quantum mechanics. Among the results, we highlight that the modified Hamiltonian provides non-vanishing corrections which lift the degeneracy of the energy levels and allow us to find an upper bound upon the VSR-parameter.

  12. Laser-assisted positron-impact ionization of atomic hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Pan, Juan; Li, Shu-Min; Berakdar, Jamal

    2007-03-15

    We study the ionization of atomic hydrogen by a fast positron in the presence of an external linearly polarized laser field. We concentrate on the limit of a small momentum transfer and describe the fast positron's continuum states by Volkov wave functions. The ejected electron is described by a Coulomb-Volkov wave function. We are limited to small laser intensities such that the dressed state of the target is treatable within the time-dependent perturbation theory, even though the laser intensity is still quite high by laboratory standards. Numerical results for the triply differential cross sections and their dependencies on laser-field parameters are discussed and compared with the results of laser-assisted ionization by electron impact.

  13. Inelastic cross sections for positron scattering from atomic hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, M.; Hofmann, A.; Raith, W.; Sperber, W.; Jacobsen, F.; Lynn, K.G.

    1994-12-31

    Positronium formation (Ps) cross sections for positrons impinging on atomic hydrogen were measured in the impact energy range from 13eV to 255eV at the High Intensity Positron (HIP) beam at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The Ps-formation cross section was found to rise rapidly from the threshold at 6.8eV to a maximum value of (2.98 {plus_minus} 0.18) {times} 10{sup {minus}16} cm{sup 2} for {approx} 15eV positrons. By 75eV it drops below the detection limit of 0.17 {times} 10{sup {minus}16} cm{sup 2} which is the present level of statistical uncertainty. The experiment was modified to enable the measurement of doubly differential scattering cross sections.

  14. Interstellar propagation and the isotopic composition of hydrogen in the galactic cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beatty, J. J.

    1985-01-01

    Preliminary results of a study of the propagation of the quartet of stable isotopes of hydrogen and helium are reported. A mean pathlength of 7.5 + or - 0.5 g/sq cms at approximately 300 MeV/nucleon is required to explain the low energy deuterium spectrum. This pathlength is consistent with pathlengths derived from the elements with Z 2, but is a (He-3/He-4) measurement of Jordan and P. Meyer (1984). The propagation calculations reported here incorporate the preliminary results of an updated nuclear interaction cross section survey covering the period since the review by J. P. Meyer (1972).

  15. Transient absorption spectra of the laser-dressed hydrogen atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Mitsuko; Chu, Shih-I.

    2013-10-01

    We present a theoretical study of transient absorption spectra of laser-dressed hydrogen atoms, based on numerical solutions of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. The timing of absorption is controlled by the delay between an extreme ultra violet (XUV) pulse and an infrared (IR) laser field. The XUV pulse is isolated and several hundred attoseconds in duration, which acts as a pump to drive the ground-state electron to excited p states. The subsequent interaction with the IR field produces dressed states, which manifest as sidebands between the 1s-np absorption spectra separated by one IR-photon energy. We demonstrate that the population of dressed states is maximized when the timing of the XUV pulse coincides with the zero crossing of the IR field, and that their energies can be manipulated in a subcycle time scale by adding a chirp to the IR field. An alternative perspective to the problem is to think of the XUV pulse as a probe to detect the dynamical ac Stark shifts. Our results indicate that the accidental degeneracy of the hydrogen excited states is removed while they are dressed by the IR field, leading to large ac Stark shifts. Furthermore, we observe the Autler-Townes doublets for the n=2 and 3 levels using the 656 nm dressing field, but their separation does not agree with the prediction by the conventional three-level model that neglects the dynamical ac Stark shifts.

  16. Positron scattering from hydrogen atom embedded in dense quantum plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Arka; Kamali, M. Z. M.; Ghoshal, Arijit; Ratnavelu, K.

    2013-08-01

    Scattering of positrons from the ground state of hydrogen atoms embedded in dense quantum plasma has been investigated by applying a formulation of the three-body collision problem in the form of coupled multi-channel two-body Lippmann-Schwinger equations. The interactions among the charged particles in dense quantum plasma have been represented by exponential cosine-screened Coulomb potentials. Variationally determined hydrogenic wave function has been employed to calculate the partial-wave scattering amplitude. Plasma screening effects on various possible mode of fragmentation of the system e++H(1s) during the collision, such as 1s →1s and 2s→2s elastic collisions, 1s→2s excitation, positronium formation, elastic proton-positronium collisions, have been reported in the energy range 13.6-350 eV. Furthermore, a comparison has been made on the plasma screening effect of a dense quantum plasma with that of a weakly coupled plasma for which the plasma screening effect has been represented by the Debye model. Our results for the unscreened case are in fair agreement with some of the most accurate results available in the literature.

  17. Positron scattering from hydrogen atom embedded in dense quantum plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, Arka; Kamali, M. Z. M.; Ghoshal, Arijit; Ratnavelu, K.

    2013-08-15

    Scattering of positrons from the ground state of hydrogen atoms embedded in dense quantum plasma has been investigated by applying a formulation of the three-body collision problem in the form of coupled multi-channel two-body Lippmann-Schwinger equations. The interactions among the charged particles in dense quantum plasma have been represented by exponential cosine-screened Coulomb potentials. Variationally determined hydrogenic wave function has been employed to calculate the partial-wave scattering amplitude. Plasma screening effects on various possible mode of fragmentation of the system e{sup +}+H(1s) during the collision, such as 1s→1s and 2s→2s elastic collisions, 1s→2s excitation, positronium formation, elastic proton-positronium collisions, have been reported in the energy range 13.6-350 eV. Furthermore, a comparison has been made on the plasma screening effect of a dense quantum plasma with that of a weakly coupled plasma for which the plasma screening effect has been represented by the Debye model. Our results for the unscreened case are in fair agreement with some of the most accurate results available in the literature.

  18. Determination of atomic hydrogen densities in the MLT and thermospheric regions from coincident ground-based and satellite airglow data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mierkiewicz, E. J.; Bishop, J.; Roesler, F. L.; Nossal, S. M.; Gomez, J. F.; Madsen, G. J.

    2003-04-01

    Coincident ground- and satellite-based geocoronal hydrogen emission data are presented, along with forward-modeling analysis results. Atomic hydrogen plays several unique roles in the terrestrial atmosphere. For example, as a daughter of the important mesospheric minor species H2O and CH4, knowledge of the MLT atomic hydrogen density distribution and associated vertical flux may prove to be valuable in understanding the chemistry in that region. The interactions of the geocorona, plasmasphere, and ring current via atomic hydrogen transport provide another example of increasing interest, given the use of energetic neutral atom imaging in recent (e.g., NASA/IMAGE) and upcoming magnetospheric missions. Recent advances in Fabry-Perot instrumentation (e.g., annular summing spectroscopy) have greatly increased the quality and quantity of ground-based geocoronal Balmer α emissions data, and have enabled the first detailed ground-based measurements of the extremely faint (sub-Rayleigh) Balmer β airglow. Extensive Balmer α and β data sets have been obtained with two large aperture (15 cm), double-etalon, Fabry-Perot spectrometers located at Pine Bluff, WI (PBO) and at Kitt Peak, AZ (WHαM). Absolute intensity calibration has been made through comparisons with well-established nebular emission sources. Complementing these measurements, satellite missions have provided large data sets of FUV and EUV emission measurements, including Lyman line intensities. The EURD instrument for measurements of the diffuse interstellar radiation field, on the Spanish satellite MiniSAT-01, provided numerous data sets coincident with our ground-based measurements. Data and analysis results for early March 2000 are being presented. The Balmer α and β intensity measurements, through the intensity variations with solar depression angle and viewing geometry, provide tight constraints on thermospheric and exospheric atomic hydrogen abundances. The coincident EURD measurements of Lyman β and

  19. Local interstellar magnetic field determined from the interstellar boundary explorer ribbon

    SciTech Connect

    Zirnstein, E. J.; Heerikhuisen, J.; Funsten, H. O.; Livadiotis, G.; McComas, D. J.; Pogorelov, N. V.

    2016-02-08

    The solar wind emanating from the Sun interacts with the local interstellar medium (LISM), forming the heliosphere. Hydrogen energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) produced by the solar-interstellar interaction carry important information about plasma properties from the boundaries of the heliosphere, and are currently being measured by NASA's Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX). IBEX observations show the existence of a “ribbon” of intense ENA emission projecting a circle on the celestial sphere that is centered near the local interstellar magnetic field (ISMF) vector. Here we show that the source of the IBEX ribbon as a function of ENA energy outside the heliosphere, uniquely coupled to the draping of the ISMF around the heliopause, can be used to precisely determine the magnitude (2.93 ± 0.08 μG) and direction (227.°28 ± 0.°69, 34.°62 ± 0.°45 in ecliptic longitude and latitude) of the pristine ISMF far (~1000 AU) from the Sun. We find that the ISMF vector is offset from the ribbon center by ~8.°3 toward the direction of motion of the heliosphere through the LISM, and their vectors form a plane that is consistent with the direction of deflected interstellar neutral hydrogen, thought to be controlled by the ISMF. Lastly, our results yield draped ISMF properties close to that observed by Voyager 1, the only spacecraft to directly measure the ISMF close to the heliosphere, and give predictions of the pristine ISMF that Voyager 1 has yet to sample.

  20. Quantum dynamics of hydrogen atoms on graphene. II. Sticking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonfanti, Matteo; Jackson, Bret; Hughes, Keith H.; Burghardt, Irene; Martinazzo, Rocco

    2015-09-01

    Following our recent system-bath modeling of the interaction between a hydrogen atom and a graphene surface [Bonfanti et al., J. Chem. Phys. 143, 124703 (2015)], we present the results of converged quantum scattering calculations on the activated sticking dynamics. The focus of this study is the collinear scattering on a surface at zero temperature, which is treated with high-dimensional wavepacket propagations with the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method. At low collision energies, barrier-crossing dominates the sticking and any projectile that overcomes the barrier gets trapped in the chemisorption well. However, at high collision energies, energy transfer to the surface is a limiting factor, and fast H atoms hardly dissipate their excess energy and stick on the surface. As a consequence, the sticking coefficient is maximum (˜0.65) at an energy which is about one and half larger than the barrier height. Comparison of the results with classical and quasi-classical calculations shows that quantum fluctuations of the lattice play a primary role in the dynamics. A simple impulsive model describing the collision of a classical projectile with a quantum surface is developed which reproduces the quantum results remarkably well for all but the lowest energies, thereby capturing the essential physics of the activated sticking dynamics investigated.

  1. Anharmonic effects in atomic hydrogen: Superconductivity and lattice dynamical stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borinaga, Miguel; Errea, Ion; Calandra, Matteo; Mauri, Francesco; Bergara, Aitor

    2016-05-01

    We present first-principles calculations of metallic atomic hydrogen in the 400-600 GPa pressure range in a tetragonal structure with space group I 41/a m d , which is predicted to be its first atomic phase. Our calculations show a band structure close to the free-electron-like limit due to the high electronic kinetic energy induced by pressure. Bands are properly described even in the independent electron approximation fully neglecting the electron-electron interaction. Linear-response harmonic calculations show a dynamically stable phonon spectrum with marked Kohn anomalies. Even if the electron-electron interaction has a minor role in the electronic bands, the inclusion of electronic exchange and correlation in the density response is essential to obtain a dynamically stable structure. Anharmonic effects, which are calculated within the stochastic self-consistent harmonic approximation, harden high-energy optical modes and soften transverse acoustic modes up to a 20% in energy. Despite a large impact of anharmonicity has been predicted in several high-pressure hydrides, here the superconducting critical temperature is barely affected by anharmonicity, as it is lowered from its harmonic 318 K value only to 300 K at 500 GPa. We attribute the small impact of anharmonicity on superconductivity to the absence of softened optical modes and the fairly uniform distribution of the electron-phonon coupling among the vibrational modes.

  2. Hyperfine coupling of the hydrogen atom in high temperature water.

    PubMed

    Nuzhdin, Kirill; Bartels, David M

    2013-03-28

    The hyperfine coupling constant of the hydrogen atom has been measured in pressurized liquid water up to 300 °C. The reduced constant A(water)∕A(vacuum) is 0.9939 at room temperature, and decreases to a minimum of 0.9918 at 240 °C. The reduced constant then increases at higher temperature. The g-factor is 2.002244(10) at room temperature and decreases to 2.00221(1) at 240 °C. The change in g-factor is proportional to the change in hyperfine coupling. The behavior below 110 °C is in excellent agreement with a previously proposed model in which the H atom is confined to a harmonic solvent cage, and vibrations within the cage mix "p-type" character into the wavefunction, resulting inA(water)∕A(vacuum) < 1. The harmonic model breaks down above 130 °C. We demonstrate that a classical binary collision model using approximate partial molar volume information can recover the observed minima near 240 °C.

  3. Quantum dynamics of hydrogen atoms on graphene. II. Sticking

    SciTech Connect

    Bonfanti, Matteo; Jackson, Bret; Hughes, Keith H.; Burghardt, Irene

    2015-09-28

    Following our recent system-bath modeling of the interaction between a hydrogen atom and a graphene surface [Bonfanti et al., J. Chem. Phys. 143, 124703 (2015)], we present the results of converged quantum scattering calculations on the activated sticking dynamics. The focus of this study is the collinear scattering on a surface at zero temperature, which is treated with high-dimensional wavepacket propagations with the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method. At low collision energies, barrier-crossing dominates the sticking and any projectile that overcomes the barrier gets trapped in the chemisorption well. However, at high collision energies, energy transfer to the surface is a limiting factor, and fast H atoms hardly dissipate their excess energy and stick on the surface. As a consequence, the sticking coefficient is maximum (∼0.65) at an energy which is about one and half larger than the barrier height. Comparison of the results with classical and quasi-classical calculations shows that quantum fluctuations of the lattice play a primary role in the dynamics. A simple impulsive model describing the collision of a classical projectile with a quantum surface is developed which reproduces the quantum results remarkably well for all but the lowest energies, thereby capturing the essential physics of the activated sticking dynamics investigated.

  4. Quantum dynamics of hydrogen atoms on graphene. II. Sticking.

    PubMed

    Bonfanti, Matteo; Jackson, Bret; Hughes, Keith H; Burghardt, Irene; Martinazzo, Rocco

    2015-09-28

    Following our recent system-bath modeling of the interaction between a hydrogen atom and a graphene surface [Bonfanti et al., J. Chem. Phys. 143, 124703 (2015)], we present the results of converged quantum scattering calculations on the activated sticking dynamics. The focus of this study is the collinear scattering on a surface at zero temperature, which is treated with high-dimensional wavepacket propagations with the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method. At low collision energies, barrier-crossing dominates the sticking and any projectile that overcomes the barrier gets trapped in the chemisorption well. However, at high collision energies, energy transfer to the surface is a limiting factor, and fast H atoms hardly dissipate their excess energy and stick on the surface. As a consequence, the sticking coefficient is maximum (∼0.65) at an energy which is about one and half larger than the barrier height. Comparison of the results with classical and quasi-classical calculations shows that quantum fluctuations of the lattice play a primary role in the dynamics. A simple impulsive model describing the collision of a classical projectile with a quantum surface is developed which reproduces the quantum results remarkably well for all but the lowest energies, thereby capturing the essential physics of the activated sticking dynamics investigated.

  5. Hydrogen isotopic substitution of solid methylamine through atomic surface reactions at low temperatures: A potential contribution to the D/H ratio of methylamine in molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oba, Yasuhiro; Chigai, Takeshi; Osamura, Yoshihiro; Watanabe, Naoki; Kouchi, Akira

    2014-01-01

    We experimentally studied hydrogen (H)-deuterium (D) substitution reactions of solid methylamine (CH3NH2) under astrophysically relevant conditions. We also calculated the potential energy surface for the H-D substitution reactions of methylamine isotopologues using quantum chemical methods. Despite the relatively large energy barrier of more than 18 kJ mol-1, CH3NH2 reacted with D atoms to yield deuterated methylamines at 10 K, suggesting that the H-D substitution reaction proceeds through quantum tunneling. Deuterated methylamines reacted with H atoms as well. On the basis of present results, we propose that methylamine has potential for D enrichment through atomic surface reactions on interstellar grains at very low temperatures in molecular clouds. D enrichment would occur in particular in the methyl group of methylamine.

  6. Schrodinger Equation Solutions that Lead to the Solution for the Hydrogen Atom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newhouse, Paul F.; McGill, K.C.

    2004-01-01

    Two exercises that would provide beginning quantum theory students with an introduction to more advanced quantum mechanical treatments, especially the hydrogen atom are given. The exercises are stepwise in difficulty, leading naturally to the full hydrogen atom development and greatly extend the pedagogy of most multidimensional Cartesian systems…

  7. Schrodinger Equation Solutions that Lead to the Solution for the Hydrogen Atom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newhouse, Paul F.; McGill, K.C.

    2004-01-01

    Two exercises that would provide beginning quantum theory students with an introduction to more advanced quantum mechanical treatments, especially the hydrogen atom are given. The exercises are stepwise in difficulty, leading naturally to the full hydrogen atom development and greatly extend the pedagogy of most multidimensional Cartesian systems…

  8. Two Wide-Angle Imaging Neutral-Atom Spectrometers and Interstellar Boundary Explorer energetic neutral atom imaging of the 5 April 2010 substorm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McComas, D. J.; Buzulukova, N.; Connors, M. G.; Dayeh, M. A.; Goldstein, J.; Funsten, H. O.; Fuselier, S.; Schwadron, N. A.; Valek, P.

    2012-03-01

    This study is the first to combine energetic neutral atom (ENA) observations from Two Wide-Angle Imaging Neutral-Atom Spectrometers (TWINS) and Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX). Here we examine the arrival of an interplanetary shock and the subsequent geomagnetically effective substorm on 5 April 2010, which was associated with the Galaxy 15 communications satellite anomaly. IBEX shows sharply enhanced ENA emissions immediately upon compression of the dayside magnetosphere at 08:26:17+/-9 s UT. The compression drove a markedly different spectral shape for the dayside emissions, with a strong enhancement at energies >1 keV, which persisted for hours after the shock arrival, consistent with the higher solar wind speed, density, and dynamic pressure (˜10 nPa) after the shock. TWINS ENA observations indicate a slower response of the ring current and precipitation of ring current ions as low-altitude emissions ˜15 min later, with the >50 keV ion precipitation leading the <10 keV precipitation by ˜20 min. These observations suggest internal magnetospheric processes are occurring after compression of the magnetosphere and before the ring current ions end up in the loss cone and precipitate into the ionosphere. We also compare MHD simulation results with both the TWINS and IBEX ENA observations; while the overall fluxes and distributions of emissions were generally similar, there were significant quantitative differences. Such differences emphasize the complexity of the magnetospheric system and importance of the global perspective for macroscopic magnetospheric studies. Finally, Appendix A documents important details of the TWINS data processing, including improved binning procedures, smoothing of images to a given level of statistical accuracy, and differential background subtraction.

  9. Exchange of carbon-bound hydrogen atoms ortho to the hydroxyl group in tyrosine.

    PubMed

    Martin, R B; Morlino, V J

    1965-10-22

    The carbon-bound hydrogen atoms of tyrosine that exchange with solvent protons in strongly acid solutions at about 100 degrees C are not the methylene hydrogen atoms but a pair on the aromatic ring. Of the two pairs of protons on the aromatic ring, observed in the proton magnetic resonance spectra, the pair at higher field undergoes exchange in 2.4N DCI at 100 degrees C. Other hydrogen atoms, attached either to aliphatic or aromatic carbon atoms, exhibit no noticeable exchange under the same conditions. From a chemicalshift analysis the exchanging protons are assigned as those ortho to the hydroxyl group on the aromatic ring.

  10. Positron impact excitations of hydrogen atom embedded in dense quantum plasmas: Formation of Rydberg atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Rej, Pramit; Ghoshal, Arijit

    2014-11-15

    Formation of Rydberg atoms due to 1 s → nlm excitations of hydrogen by positron impact, for arbitrary n, l, m, in dense quantum plasma has been investigated using a distorted wave theory which includes screened dipole polarization potential. The interactions among the charged particles in the plasma have been represented by exponential cosine-screened Coulomb potentials. Making use of a simple variationally determined hydrogen wave function, it has been possible to obtain the distorted wave scattering amplitude in a closed analytical form. A detailed study has been made to explore the structure of differential and total cross sections in the energy range 20–300 eV of incident positron. For the unscreened case, our results agree nicely with some of the most accurate results available in the literature. To the best of our knowledge, such a study on the differential and total cross sections for 1 s → nlm inelastic positron-hydrogen collisions in dense quantum plasma is the first reported in the literature.

  11. Atomic orbitals of the nonrelativistic hydrogen atom in a four-dimensional Riemann space through the path integral formalism

    SciTech Connect

    Grinberg, H.; Maranon, J.; Vucetich, H.

    1983-01-15

    The Kustaanheimo--Stiefel transformation together with the well-known expansion of the kernel of an isotropic harmonic oscillator is used to generate the atomic orbitals of the nonrelativistic hydrogen atom in a four-dimensional Riemann space through the path integral formalism. Group theoretical implications of the present problem are briefly discussed.

  12. Perturbation hydrogen-atom spectrum in deformed space with minimal length

    SciTech Connect

    Stetsko, M. M.; Tkachuk, V. M.

    2006-07-15

    We studied energy spectrum for the hydrogen atom with deformed Heisenberg algebra leading to the minimal length. We developed the correct perturbation theory free of divergences. It gives a possibility to calculate analytically in the three-dimensional case the corrections to s levels of the hydrogen atom caused by the minimal length. Comparing our results with the experimental data from precision hydrogen spectroscopy an upper bound for the minimal length is obtained.

  13. New horizons in chemical propulsion. [processes using free radicals, atomic hydrogen, excited species, etc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, W.

    1973-01-01

    After a review of the work of the late-Fifties on free radicals for propulsion, it is concluded that atomic hydrogen would provide a potentially large increase in specific impulse. Work conducted to find an approach for isolating atomic hydrogen is considered. Other possibilities for obtaining propellants of greatly increased capability might be connected with the technology for the generation of activated states of gases, metallic hydrogen, fuels obtained from other planets, and laser transfer of energy.

  14. How Ewen and Purcell discovered the 21-cm interstellar hydrogen line.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephan, K. D.

    1999-02-01

    The story of how Harold Irving Ewen and Edward Mills Purcell detected the first spectral line ever observed in radio astronomy, in 1951, has been told for general audiences by Robert Buderi (1996). The present article has a different purpose. The technical roots of Ewen and Purcell's achievement reveal much about the way science often depends upon "borrowed" technologies, which were not developed with the needs of science in mind. The design and construction of the equipment is described in detail. As Ewen's photographs, records, and recollections show, he and Purcell had access to an unusual combination of scientific knowledge, engineering know-how, critical hardware, and technical assistance at Harvard, in 1950 and 1951. This combination gave them a competitive edge over similar research groups in Holland and Australia, who were also striving to detect the hydrogen line, and who succeeded only weeks after the Harvard researchers did. The story also shows that Ewen and Purcell did their groundbreaking scientific work in the "small-science" style that prevailed before World War II, while receiving substantial indirect help from one of the first big-science projects at Harvard.

  15. Metal-Free Hydrogen Atom Transfer from Water: Expeditious Hydrogenation of N-Heterocycles Mediated by Diboronic Acid.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yun-Tao; Sun, Xiao-Tao; Zhang, Ling; Luo, Kai; Wu, Lei

    2016-11-21

    A hydrogenation of N-heterocycles mediated by diboronic acid with water as the hydrogen atom source is reported. A variety of N-heterocycles can be hydrogenated with medium to excellent yields within 10 min. Complete deuterium incorporation from stoichiometric D2 O onto substrates further exemplifies the H/D atom sources. Mechanism studies reveal that the reduction proceeds with initial 1,2-addition, in which diboronic acid synergistically activates substrates and water via a six-membered ring transition state.

  16. The EAGLE simulations: atomic hydrogen associated with galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crain, Robert A.; Bahé, Yannick M.; Lagos, Claudia del P.; Rahmati, Alireza; Schaye, Joop; McCarthy, Ian G.; Marasco, Antonino; Bower, Richard G.; Schaller, Matthieu; Theuns, Tom; van der Hulst, Thijs

    2017-02-01

    We examine the properties of atomic hydrogen (H I) associated with galaxies in the Evolution and Assembly of GaLaxies and their Environments (EAGLE) simulations of galaxy formation. EAGLE's feedback parameters were calibrated to reproduce the stellar mass function and galaxy sizes at z = 0.1, and we assess whether this calibration also yields realistic H I properties. We estimate the self-shielding density with a fitting function calibrated using radiation transport simulations, and correct for molecular hydrogen with empirical or theoretical relations. The `standard-resolution' simulations systematically underestimate H I column densities, leading to an H I deficiency in low-mass (M⋆ < 1010 M⊙) galaxies and poor reproduction of the observed H I mass function. These shortcomings are largely absent from EAGLE simulations featuring a factor of 8 (2) better mass (spatial) resolution, within which the H I mass of galaxies evolves more mildly from z = 1 to 0 than in the standard-resolution simulations. The largest volume simulation reproduces the observed clustering of H I systems, and its dependence on H I richness. At fixed M⋆, galaxies acquire more H I in simulations with stronger feedback, as they become associated with more massive haloes and higher infall rates. They acquire less H I in simulations with a greater star formation efficiency, since the star formation and feedback necessary to balance the infall rate is produced by smaller gas reservoirs. The simulations indicate that the H I of present-day galaxies was acquired primarily by the smooth accretion of ionized, intergalactic gas at z ≃ 1, which later self-shields, and that only a small fraction is contributed by the reincorporation of gas previously heated strongly by feedback. H I reservoirs are highly dynamic: over 40 per cent of H I associated with z = 0.1 galaxies is converted to stars or ejected by z = 0.

  17. Tracing Interstellar Magnetic Field Using Velocity Gradient Technique: Application to Atomic Hydrogen Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuen, Ka Ho; Lazarian, A.

    2017-03-01

    The advancement of our understanding of MHD turbulence opens ways to develop new techniques to probe magnetic fields. In MHD turbulence, the velocity gradients are expected to be perpendicular to magnetic fields and this fact was used by González-Casanova & Lazarian to introduce a new technique to trace magnetic fields using velocity centroid gradients (VCGs). The latter can be obtained from spectroscopic observations. We apply the technique to GALFA-H i survey data and then compare the directions of magnetic fields obtained with our technique to the direction of magnetic fields obtained using PLANCK polarization. We find an excellent correspondence between the two ways of magnetic field tracing, which is obvious via the visual comparison and through the measuring of the statistics of magnetic field fluctuations obtained with the polarization data and our technique. This suggests that the VCGs have a potential for measuring of the foreground magnetic field fluctuations, and thus provide a new way of separating foreground and CMB polarization signals.

  18. High brightness neutral hydrogen in M31: A new probe of interstellar pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, Robert; Walterbos, Rene

    1990-01-01

    An observational parameter of our own Galaxy, the peak brightness temperature of neutral hydrogen in emission, was determined almost twenty years ago (Burton 1970). This quantity, although possessing a degree of local variations, has a remarkably consistent peak value of 125 K towards spiral arm segments with a few isolated peaks extending to 135 K, once sufficient spatial and velocity resolution are used (less than or equal to 70 pc, less than or equal to 5 km/s) to resolve the emission peaks. The higher spatial and velocity resolution of more recent surveys has not led to the detection of higher brightnesses. For many years this remarkable observational result has received little attention, primarily because similar data for other galaxies, which would allow a meaningful comparison and analysis, did not exist. Recently this situation has changed. A Westerbork survey of M33 (Deul and Van der Hulst 1987, and private comm.) with 40 pc x 8 km/s resolution has revealed consistent peak values of only 95 plus or minus 5 K (although there is still some question of whether the velocity resolution was sufficient in this case), while a Very Large Array (VLA) survey of M31 (Braun 1989a) with 35 pc x 5 km/s resolution has shown consistent peak values but at a temperature of 155 to 165 K. It has become clear that although peak HI brightness seems to be a well-defined quantity within individual galaxies (with a degree of local variation) there are very significant differences in this quantity amongst different galaxies. Researchers embarked on an observational program directed at a sample of 11 nearby galaxies: NGC 55, 247, 7793, 3031, 2366, 2403, 4236, 4826, 4736, 4244, and 5457. They hope to determine the gas properties and phases as a function of both galaxy type and position within the galaxies utilizing high resolution HI observations and optical narrow band imagery and spectroscopy which are now underway.

  19. Kinetic modeling of primary and secondary oxygen atom fluxes at 1 AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balyukin, Igor; Katushkina, Olga; Alexashov, Dmitry; Izmodenov, Vladislav

    2016-07-01

    The first quantitative measurements of the interstellar heavy (oxygen and neon) neutral atoms obtained on the IBEX spacecraft were presented in Park et al. (ApJS, 2015). Qualitative analysis of these data shows that the secondary component of the interstellar oxygen atoms was also measured along with the primary interstellar atoms. This component is formed near the heliopause due to process of charge exchange of interstellar oxygen ions with hydrogen atoms and its existence in the heliosphere was previously predicted theoretically (Izmodenov et al, 1997, 1999, 2001). Quantitative analysis of fluxes of interstellar heavy neutral atoms is only possible with the help of a model which takes into account both filtration of the primary and origin of the secondary interstellar oxygen in the region of interaction of the solar wind with the local interstellar medium as well as a detailed simulation of the motion of interstellar atoms inside the heliosphere. This simulation must take into account the temporal and heliolatitudinal dependences of ionization, the process of charge exchange with the protons of the solar wind and the effect of the solar gravitational attraction. This paper presents the results of modeling interstellar oxygen and neon atoms in the heliospheric shock layer and inside the heliosphere based on a new three-dimensional kinetic-MHD model of the solar wind interaction with the local interstellar medium (Izmodenov and Alexashov, ApJS, 2015) and the comparison of this results with the data obtained on the IBEX spacecraft.

  20. Emission of fast non-Maxwellian hydrogen atoms in low-density laboratory plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, Christian; Marchuk, Oleksandr; Pospieszczyk, Albrecht; Dickheuer, Sven

    2017-03-01

    The source of strong and broad emission of the Balmer-α line in mixed plasmas of hydrogen (or deuterium) and noble gases in front of metallic surfaces is a subject of controversial discussion of many plasma types. In this work the excitation source of the Balmer lines is investigated by means of optical emission spectroscopy in the plasma device PSI-2. Neutral fast non-Maxwellian hydrogen atoms are produced by acceleration of hydrogen ions towards an electrode immersed into the plasma. By variation of the electrode potential the energy of ions and in turn of reflected fast atoms can be varied in the range of 40-300 eV. The fast atoms in front of the electrode are observed simultaneously by an Echelle spectrometer (0.001 nm/channel) and by an imaging spectrometer (0.01 nm/channel) up to few cm in the plasma. Intense excitation channels of the Balmer lines are observed when hydrogen is mixed with argon or with krypton. Especially in Ar-H and Ar-D mixed plasmas the emission of fast hydrogen atoms is very strong. Intermixing hydrogen with other noble gases (He, Ne or Xe) one observes the same effect however the emission is one order of magnitude less compared to Kr-H or Kr-D plasmas. It is shown, that the key process, impacting this emission, is the binary collision between the fast neutral hydrogen atom and the noble gas atom. Two possible sources of excitation are discussed in details: one is the excitation of hydrogen atoms by argon atoms in the ground state and the second one is the process of the so-called excitation transfer between the metastable states of noble gases and hydrogen. In the latter case the atomic data for excitation of Balmer lines are still not available in literature. Further experimental investigations are required to conclude on the source process of fast atom emission.

  1. Peripherally hydrogenated neutral polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as carriers of the 3 micron interstellar infrared emission complex: results from single-photon infrared emission spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, D. R.; Kim, H. S.; Saykally, R. J.

    2000-01-01

    Infrared emission spectra of five gas-phase UV laser-excited polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) containing aliphatic hydrogens are compared with the main 3.3 microns and associated interstellar unidentified infrared emission bands (UIRs). We show that neutral PAHs can account for the majority of the 3 microns emission complex while making little contribution to the other UIR bands; peripherally hydrogenated PAHs produce a better match to astrophysical data than do those containing methyl side groups; 3.4 microns plateau emission is shown to be a general spectral feature of vibrationally excited PAHs containing aliphatic hydrogens, especially those containing methyl groups; and finally, hot-band and overtone emissions arising from aromatic C-H vibrations are not observed in laboratory emission spectra, and therefore, in contrast to current assignments, are not expected to be observed in the UIRs.

  2. Peripherally hydrogenated neutral polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as carriers of the 3 micron interstellar infrared emission complex: results from single-photon infrared emission spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, D. R.; Kim, H. S.; Saykally, R. J.

    2000-01-01

    Infrared emission spectra of five gas-phase UV laser-excited polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) containing aliphatic hydrogens are compared with the main 3.3 microns and associated interstellar unidentified infrared emission bands (UIRs). We show that neutral PAHs can account for the majority of the 3 microns emission complex while making little contribution to the other UIR bands; peripherally hydrogenated PAHs produce a better match to astrophysical data than do those containing methyl side groups; 3.4 microns plateau emission is shown to be a general spectral feature of vibrationally excited PAHs containing aliphatic hydrogens, especially those containing methyl groups; and finally, hot-band and overtone emissions arising from aromatic C-H vibrations are not observed in laboratory emission spectra, and therefore, in contrast to current assignments, are not expected to be observed in the UIRs.

  3. Peripherally hydrogenated neutral polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as carriers of the 3 micron interstellar infrared emission complex: results from single-photon infrared emission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wagner, D R; Kim, H S; Saykally, R J

    2000-12-20

    Infrared emission spectra of five gas-phase UV laser-excited polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) containing aliphatic hydrogens are compared with the main 3.3 microns and associated interstellar unidentified infrared emission bands (UIRs). We show that neutral PAHs can account for the majority of the 3 microns emission complex while making little contribution to the other UIR bands; peripherally hydrogenated PAHs produce a better match to astrophysical data than do those containing methyl side groups; 3.4 microns plateau emission is shown to be a general spectral feature of vibrationally excited PAHs containing aliphatic hydrogens, especially those containing methyl groups; and finally, hot-band and overtone emissions arising from aromatic C-H vibrations are not observed in laboratory emission spectra, and therefore, in contrast to current assignments, are not expected to be observed in the UIRs.

  4. Hydrogen abstraction from the hydrazine molecule by an oxygen atom.

    PubMed

    Spada, Rene F K; Ferrão, Luiz F A; Rocha, Roberta J; Iha, Koshun; Rocco, José A F F; Roberto-Neto, Orlando; Lischka, Hans; Machado, Francisco B C

    2015-03-05

    Thermochemical and kinetics properties of the hydrogen abstraction from the hydrazine molecule (N2H4) by an oxygen atom were computed using high-level ab initio methods and the M06-2X DFT functional with aug-cc-pVXZ (X = T, Q) and maug-cc-pVTZ basis sets, respectively. The properties along the reaction path were obtained using the dual-level methodology to build the minimum energy path with the potential energy surface obtained with the M06-2X method and thermochemical properties corrected with the CCSD(T)/CBS//M06-2X/maug-cc-pVTZ results. The thermal rate constants were calculated in the framework of variational transition-state theory. Wells on both sides of the reaction (reactants and products) were found and considered in the chemical kinetics calculations. Additionally, the product yields were investigated by means of a study of the triplet and singlet surfaces of the N2H4 + O → N2H2 + H2O reaction.

  5. On emission from a hydrogen-like atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skobelev, V. V.

    2016-02-01

    A solution of the Dirac equation for an electron in the field of a point nucleus ( Ze) has been obtained as an eigenfunction of the Schrödinger Hamiltonian and the spin projection operator Σ3. With the use of this solution, the probability W (ν) of the emission of a neutrino per unit time from a hydrogen-like atom, (Ze)* to (Ze) + ν bar ν, has been calculated for the first time in the first order of the parameter Ze ≪ 1. The probability W (ν) appears to be rather small, and the corresponding lifetime τ(ν) = [ W (ν)]-1 is much larger than the age of the Universe; correspondingly, this process cannot affect the balance of low-energy neutrinos. The smallness of W (ν) is due not only to the presence of the obvious "weak" factor ( Gm p 2 )2( m/ mp)4 in the expression for W (ν), but also primarily to the "electromagnetic" factor ( Zα)12, which can be revealed only in a particular calculation. It has been argued within quantum electrodynamics with the mentioned wavefunctions that photon emission, ( Ze)* → ( Ze) + γ, can be absent (analysis of photon emission requires the further development of the method), whereas axion emission, ( Ze)* → ( Ze) + a, can occur, although the last two effects have not been considered in detail.

  6. Slow Collisions of Si3+ with Atomic Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, D. C.; Gu, J.-P.; Saha, B. C.; Liebermann, H. P.; Funke, P.; Buenker, R. J.

    2010-03-01

    Low energy electron capture from hydrogen atom by multi-charged ions continues to be of interest and applications include both magnetically confined fusion and astrophysical plasmas. The charge exchange process reported here, Si^3+ + H -> Si^2+ + H^+ is an important destruction mechanism of Si^3+ in photo-ionized gas. The soft X-ray emission from comets has been explained by charge transfer of solar wind ions, among them Si^3+, with neutrals in the cometary gas vapor. The state selective cross sections are evaluated using the full quantum [1] and semi-classical molecular orbital close coupling (MOCC) [2] methods. Adiabatic potentials and wave functions for a number of low-lying singlet and triplet states of and symmetry are calculated wing the MRD-CI package [3]. Details will be presented at the conference. [4pt] [1] L. B. Zhao, D. C. Joseph, B. C. Saha, H. P. Liebermann, P. Funke and R. J. Buenker, Phys. Rev A, 79, 034701 (1009).[0pt] [2] M. Kimura and N. F. Lane, At. Mol. Opt. Phys 26, 79 (1990).[0pt] [3] R. J. Buenker, ``Current Aspects of Quantum Chemistry 1981, Vol 21, edited by R. Carbo (Elsevier, Amsterdam) p 17.

  7. Atomic mechanism and prediction of hydrogen embrittlement in iron.

    PubMed

    Song, Jun; Curtin, W A

    2013-02-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement in metals has posed a serious obstacle to designing strong and reliable structural materials for many decades, and predictive physical mechanisms still do not exist. Here, a new H embrittlement mechanism operating at the atomic scale in α-iron is demonstrated. Direct molecular dynamics simulations reveal a ductile-to-brittle transition caused by the suppression of dislocation emission at the crack tip due to aggregation of H, which then permits brittle-cleavage failure followed by slow crack growth. The atomistic embrittlement mechanism is then connected to material states and loading conditions through a kinetic model for H delivery to the crack-tip region. Parameter-free predictions of embrittlement thresholds in Fe-based steels over a range of H concentrations, mechanical loading rates and H diffusion rates are found to be in excellent agreement with experiments. This work provides a mechanistic, predictive framework for interpreting experiments, designing structural components and guiding the design of embrittlement-resistant materials.

  8. Calculation of muon transfer from muonic hydrogen to atomic oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Dupays, Arnaud; Lepetit, Bruno; Beswick, J. Alberto; Rizzo, Carlo; Bakalov, Dimitar

    2003-06-01

    The muon-transfer probabilities between muonic hydrogen and an oxygen atom are calculated in a constrained geometry one-dimensional model for collision energies between 10{sup -6} and 10{sup 3} eV. For relative translational energies below 10{sup -1} eV, for which the de Broglie wavelength (>1 Aa) is much larger than the characteristic distance of the potential interaction ({approx}0.1 Aa), the problem corresponds to an ultracold collision. The close-coupling time-independent quantum equations are written in terms of hyperspherical coordinates and a diabatic-by-sectors basis set. The muon-transfer probabilities are qualitatively interpreted in terms of a model involving two Landau-Zener crossings together with the threshold energy dependence. Based on this analysis, a simple procedure to estimate the energy dependence of the muon-transfer rate in three dimensions is proposed. These estimated rates are discussed in the light of previous model calculations and available experimental data for this process. It is concluded that the high transfer rates at epithermal energies inferred from experiments are unlikely to be correct.

  9. Charge exchange and ionization in hydrogen atom-fully stripped ion collisions in Debye plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H.; Wang, J. G.; He, B.; Qiu, Y. B.; Janev, R. K.

    2007-05-15

    The processes of charge exchange and ionization in collisions of ground state hydrogen atom with fully stripped ions in a weakly coupled plasma are studied by the classical trajectory Monte Carlo method in the collision energy range 10-900 keV/amu. The interparticle interactions are described by the Debye-Hueckel model with inclusion of dynamical effects associated with the projectile velocity. The microcanonical distribution of initial state electronic coordinates and momenta has been determined by inclusion of plasma screening effects. The cross section dependencies on plasma parameters and ion charge and velocity are investigated. It is shown that plasma effects on charge exchange and ionization cross sections are significant and particularly pronounced at low collision velocities. The results of systematic cross section calculations for different values of Debye screening length (in the range 1-50a{sub 0}) and ion charges (in the range 1-14) are presented.

  10. Hydrogen diffusion and stabilization in single-crystal VO2 micro/nanobeams by direct atomic hydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jian; Ji, Heng; Swift, Michael W; Hardy, Will J; Peng, Zhiwei; Fan, Xiujun; Nevidomskyy, Andriy H; Tour, James M; Natelson, Douglas

    2014-09-10

    We report measurements of the diffusion of atomic hydrogen in single crystalline VO2 micro/nanobeams by direct exposure to atomic hydrogen, without catalyst. The atomic hydrogen is generated by a hot filament, and the doping process takes place at moderate temperature (373 K). Undoped VO2 has a metal-to-insulator phase transition at ∼340 K between a high-temperature, rutile, metallic phase and a low-temperature, monoclinic, insulating phase with a resistance exhibiting a semiconductor-like temperature dependence. Atomic hydrogenation results in stabilization of the metallic phase of VO2 micro/nanobeams down to 2 K, the lowest point we could reach in our measurement setup. Optical characterization shows that hydrogen atoms prefer to diffuse along the c axis of rutile (a axis of monoclinic) VO2, along the oxygen "channels". Based on observing the movement of the hydrogen diffusion front in single crystalline VO2 beams, we estimate the diffusion constant for hydrogen along the c axis of the rutile phase to be 6.7 × 10(-10) cm(2)/s at approximately 373 K, exceeding the value in isostructural TiO2 by ∼38×. Moreover, we find that the diffusion constant along the c axis of the rutile phase exceeds that along the equivalent a axis of the monoclinic phase by at least 3 orders of magnitude. This remarkable change in kinetics must originate from the distortion of the "channels" when the unit cell doubles along this direction upon cooling into the monoclinic structure. Ab initio calculation results are in good agreement with the experimental trends in the relative kinetics of the two phases. This raises the possibility of a switchable membrane for hydrogen transport.

  11. Atomic velocity distributions out of hydrogen-maser dissociators. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Jaduszliwer, B.; Chan, Y.C.

    1990-02-15

    Velocity distributions are determined for atoms effusing out of radio frequency discharge hydrogen dissociators, of the type used in hydrogen masers. This work was motivated by long-term reliability issues related to the possible use of masers as freqency standards for satellites. A primary issue is the maser's hydrogen budget, because many of the common failure modes of a maser involve either the hydrogen source or sink. Because the focusing properties of the state-selecting magnets are velocity dependent, the overall hydrogen budget will depend not only on the dissociation efficiency but also on the velocity distribution of the hydrogen atoms leaving the dissociation. Many times, that distribution has been tacitly assumed to be Maxwellian at wall temperature, but pressure in the dissociator increases. Operating the dissociator to yield a matched to that distribution may significantly improve the efficiency hydrogen use by the maser.

  12. Trapping of hydrogen atoms in X-irradiated salts at room temperature and the decay kinetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, C. E.; Philipp, W. H.; Marsik, S. J.

    1974-01-01

    The salts (hypophosphites, formates, a phosphite, a phosphate, and an oxalate) were X-irradiated, whereby hydrogen formed chemically by a radiolytic process becomes trapped in the solid. By room temperature vacuum extraction, the kinetics for the evolution of this trapped hydrogen was studied mass spectrometrically. All salts except two exhibited second-order kinetics. The two exceptions (NaH2PO2(H2O) and K2HPO4) showed first-order kinetics. Based on experimental results, the escape of hydrogen involves three steps: the diffusion of hydrogen atoms from the bulk to the surface, association of these atoms on the surface (rate controlling step for second-order hydrogen evolution), and the desorption of molecular hydrogen from the surface. The hydrogen does not escape if the irradiated salt is stored in air, apparently because adsorbed air molecules occupy surface sites required in the escape mechanism.

  13. Characterization of intramolecular hydrogen bonds by atomic charges and charge fluxes.

    PubMed

    Baranović, Goran; Biliškov, Nikola; Vojta, Danijela

    2012-08-16

    The electronic charge redistribution and the infrared intensities of the two types of intramolecular hydrogen bonds, O-H···O and O-H···π, of o-hydroxy- and o-ethynylphenol, respectively, together with a set of related intermolecular hydrogen bond complexes are described in terms of atomic charges and charge fluxes derived from atomic polar tensors calculated at the B3LYP/cc-pVTZ level of theory. The polarizable continuum model shows that both the atomic charges and charge fluxes are strongly dependent on solvent. It is shown that their values for the OH bond in an intramolecular hydrogen bond are not much different from those for the "free" OH bond, but the changes are toward the values found for an intermolecular hydrogen bond. The intermolecular hydrogen bond is characterized not only by the decreased atomic charge but also by the enlarged charge flux term of the same sign producing thus an enormous increase in IR intensity. The overall behavior of the charges and fluxes of the hydrogen atom in OH and ≡CH bonds agree well with the observed spectroscopic characteristics of inter- and intramolecular hydrogen bonding. The main reason for the differences between the two types of the hydrogen bond lies in the molecular structure because favorable linear proton donor-acceptor arrangement is not possible to achieve within a small molecule. The calculated intensities (in vacuo and in polarizable continuum) are only in qualitative agreement with the measured data.

  14. Signatures of Quantum-Tunneling Diffusion of Hydrogen Atoms on Water Ice at 10 K.

    PubMed

    Kuwahata, K; Hama, T; Kouchi, A; Watanabe, N

    2015-09-25

    Reported here is the first observation of the tunneling surface diffusion of a hydrogen (H) atom on water ice. Photostimulated desorption and resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization methods were used to determine the diffusion rates at 10 K on amorphous solid water and polycrystalline ice. H-atom diffusion on polycrystalline ice was 2 orders of magnitude faster than that of deuterium atoms, indicating the occurrence of tunneling diffusion. Whether diffusion is by tunneling or thermal hopping also depends on the diffusion length of the atoms and the morphology of the surface. Our findings contribute to a better understanding of elementary physicochemical processes of hydrogen on cosmic ice dust.

  15. Quantitative laser atom probe analyses of hydrogenation-disproportionated Nd-Fe-B powders.

    PubMed

    Sepehri-Amin, H; Ohkubo, T; Nishiuchi, T; Hirosawa, S; Hono, K

    2011-05-01

    We report a successful atom probe tomography of hydrides in hydrogenation-disproportionated Nd-Fe-B powder using a green femtosecond laser. The atom probe specimens were prepared from one particle of powder using the focused ion beam lift-out method. The atom probe tomography taken from an α-Fe/NdH(2) structure suggested that B and Ga (trace added element) were partitioned in the NdH(2) phase. The hydrogen concentration of 64 at% determined from the atom probe analysis was in excellent agreement with the stoichiometry of the NdH(2) phase.

  16. Ab Initio Vibrational Levels For HO2 and Vibrational Splittings for Hydrogen Atom Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barclay, V. J.; Dateo, Christopher E.; Hamilton, I. P.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    We calculate vibrational levels and wave functions for HO2 using the recently reported ab initio potential energy surface of Walch and Duchovic. There is intramolecular hydrogen atom transfer when the hydrogen atom tunnels through a T-shaped saddle point separating two equivalent equilibrium geometries, and correspondingly, the energy levels are split. We focus on vibrational levels and wave functions with significant splitting. The first three vibrational levels with splitting greater than 2/cm are (15 0), (0 7 1) and (0 8 0) where V(sub 2) is the O-O-H bend quantum number. We discuss the dynamics of hydrogen atom transfer; in particular, the O-O distances at which hydrogen atom transfer is most probable for these vibrational levels. The material of the proposed presentation was reviewed and the technical content will not reveal any information not already in the public domain and will not give any foreign industry or government a competitive advantage.

  17. Chloroform as a hydrogen atom donor in Barton reductive decarboxylation reactions.

    PubMed

    Ho, Junming; Zheng, Jingjing; Meana-Pañeda, Rubén; Truhlar, Donald G; Ko, Eun Jung; Savage, G Paul; Williams, Craig M; Coote, Michelle L; Tsanaktsidis, John

    2013-07-05

    The utility of chloroform as both a solvent and a hydrogen atom donor in Barton reductive decarboxylation of a range of carboxylic acids was recently demonstrated (Ko, E. J. et al. Org. Lett. 2011, 13, 1944). In the present work, a combination of electronic structure calculations, direct dynamics calculations, and experimental studies was carried out to investigate how chloroform acts as a hydrogen atom donor in Barton reductive decarboxylations and to determine the scope of this process. The results from this study show that hydrogen atom transfer from chloroform occurs directly under kinetic control and is aided by a combination of polar effects and quantum mechanical tunneling. Chloroform acts as an effective hydrogen atom donor for primary, secondary, and tertiary alkyl radicals, although significant chlorination was also observed with unstrained tertiary carboxylic acids.

  18. Ab Initio Vibrational Levels For HO2 and Vibrational Splittings for Hydrogen Atom Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barclay, V. J.; Dateo, Christopher E.; Hamilton, I. P.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    We calculate vibrational levels and wave functions for HO2 using the recently reported ab initio potential energy surface of Walch and Duchovic. There is intramolecular hydrogen atom transfer when the hydrogen atom tunnels through a T-shaped saddle point separating two equivalent equilibrium geometries, and correspondingly, the energy levels are split. We focus on vibrational levels and wave functions with significant splitting. The first three vibrational levels with splitting greater than 2/cm are (15 0), (0 7 1) and (0 8 0) where V(sub 2) is the O-O-H bend quantum number. We discuss the dynamics of hydrogen atom transfer; in particular, the O-O distances at which hydrogen atom transfer is most probable for these vibrational levels. The material of the proposed presentation was reviewed and the technical content will not reveal any information not already in the public domain and will not give any foreign industry or government a competitive advantage.

  19. Atomic Hydrogen in the Mesopause Region Derived From the SABER Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Torres, F. J.; Mlynczak, M. G.; Russell, J. M.; Marsh, D.; Smith, A.

    2005-12-01

    The Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) instrument simultaneously measures temperature, density, ozone, and emission from the high-lying states of the hydroxyl (OH) radical. Near the mesopause the excited OH states are produced directly from the reaction of atomic hydrogen and ozone. Measurements of emission from these states can be used to derive the density of atomic hydrogen in the airglow layer of this region. SABER is now providing measurements of atomic hydrogen continuously, night and day. In this paper we review the derivation of the atomic hydrogen from SABER measurements and compare results with photochemical model calculations. The uncertainty of the H abundance due to the non-LTE rate coefficients used in the analysis of the OH airglow is also assessed.

  20. Direct observation of hydrogen atom dynamics and interactions by ultrahigh resolution neutron protein crystallography.

    PubMed

    Chen, Julian C-H; Hanson, B Leif; Fisher, S Zoë; Langan, Paul; Kovalevsky, Andrey Y

    2012-09-18

    The 1.1 Å, ultrahigh resolution neutron structure of hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchanged crambin is reported. Two hundred ninety-nine out of 315, or 94.9%, of the hydrogen atom positions in the protein have been experimentally derived and resolved through nuclear density maps. A number of unconventional interactions are clearly defined, including a potential O─H…π interaction between a water molecule and the aromatic ring of residue Y44, as well as a number of potential C─H…O hydrogen bonds. Hydrogen bonding networks that are ambiguous in the 0.85 Å ultrahigh resolution X-ray structure can be resolved by accurate orientation of water molecules. Furthermore, the high resolution of the reported structure has allowed for the anisotropic description of 36 deuterium atoms in the protein. The visibility of hydrogen and deuterium atoms in the nuclear density maps is discussed in relation to the resolution of the neutron data.

  1. Evidence of wave-particle duality for single fast hydrogen atoms.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, H T; Fischer, D; Berenyi, Z; Cocke, C L; Gudmundsson, M; Haag, N; Johansson, H A B; Källberg, A; Levin, S B; Reinhed, P; Sassenberg, U; Schuch, R; Simonsson, A; Støchkel, K; Cederquist, H

    2008-08-22

    We report the direct observation of interference effects in a Young's double-slit experiment where the interfering waves are two spatially separated components of the de Broglie wave of single 1.3 MeV hydrogen atoms formed close to either target nucleus in H++H2 electron-transfer collisions. Quantum interference strongly influences the results even though the hydrogen atoms have a de Broglie wavelength, lambda_{dB}, as small as 25 fm.

  2. Bubble growth from clustered hydrogen and helium atoms in tungsten under a fusion environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Yu-Wei; Kong, Xiang-Shan; Wu, Xuebang; Liu, C. S.; Chen, J. L.; Luo, G.-N.

    2017-01-01

    Bubbles seriously degrade the mechanical properties of tungsten and thus threaten the safety of nuclear fusion devices, however, the underlying atomic mechanism of bubble growth from clustered hydrogen and helium atoms is still mysterious. In this work, first-principles calculations are therefore carried out to assess the stability of tungsten atoms around both hydrogen and helium clusters. We find that the closest vacancy-formation energies of interstitial hydrogen and helium clusters are substantially decreased. The first-nearest and second-nearest vacancy-formation energies close to vacancy-hydrogen clusters decrease in a step-like way to  ˜0, while those close to vacancy-helium clusters are reduced almost linearly to  ˜-5.46 eV when atom number reaches 10. The vacancy-formation energies closest to helium clusters are more significantly reduced than those nearest to hydrogen clusters, whatever the clusters are embedded at interstitial sites or vacancies. The reduction of vacancy-formation energies results in instability and thus emission of tungsten atoms close to interstitial helium and vacancy-helium clusters, which illustrates the experimental results, that the tungsten atoms can be emitted from the vicinity of vacancy-helium clusters. In addition, the emission of unstable tungsten atoms close to hydrogen clusters may become possible once they are disturbed by the environment. The emission of tungsten atoms facilitates the growth and evolution of hydrogen and helium clusters and ultimately the bubble formation. The results also explain the bubble formation even if no displacement damage is produced in tungsten exposed to low-energy hydrogen and helium plasma.

  3. Corrections to the ns levels of the hydrogen atom in deformed space with minimal length

    SciTech Connect

    Stetsko, M. M.

    2006-12-15

    We investigated the hydrogen atom problem with deformed Heisenberg algebra leading to the existence of a minimal length. Using modified perturbation theory developed in our previous work [Stetsko and Tkachuk, Phys. Rev. A 74, 012101 (2006)] we calculated the corrections to the arbitrary s levels for the hydrogen atom. We obtained a simple relation for the estimation of the minimal length. We also compared the estimation of minimal length obtained here with the results obtained in previous investigations.

  4. Erwin Schrödinger, Wave Mechanics, and the Hydrogen Atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lange, Owen L.

    1996-06-01

    A brief account is given of some of the main events in Erwin Schrödinger's life, the circumstances leading to his discovery of wave mechanics in 1925-1926, and the application of this mechanics to a model of the hydrogen atom. Two methods of solving this model are outlined, namely, Sommerfeld's polynomial method and Schrödinger's shift operator method. The relation to Pauli's analysis of the quantum-mechanical hydrogen atom is also discussed.

  5. Thermal stability of hydrogen and sulfur atoms in a-SiSx:H films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Takashi; Nitta, Shoji; Wang, S. L.; Taylor, P. C.

    1996-11-01

    The thermal stability of hydrogen and sulfur atoms in a-SiSx:H films is studied using gas effusion spectra and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis. Two evolution peaks of hydrogen are found above 400 °C in gas effusion spectra of a-SiSx:H films. Sulfur atoms are evolved only above 550 °C. The stability of sulfur and the relationship of dangling bonds to sulfur effusion are discussed.

  6. A new way to measure the composition of the interstellar gas surrounding the heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruntman, Michael A.

    1993-01-01

    The composition of neutral gas in the Local Interstellar Medium can be studied by direct, in situ measuring of interstellar neutral atoms penetrating into interplanetary space. A novel experimental approach for in situ atom detection, which has never been used earlier in space, is proposed. The technique is based on the conversion of neutral atoms to negative ions at a specially prepared sensitive surface. Negative ions are subsequently analyzed and detected in an essentially noise-free, multicoincidence mode. It is shown that interstellar hydrogen, deuterium, and oxygen atoms can be measured by the proposed technique. The experiment can be performed from a high-apogee Earth-orbiting satellite or from a deep space probe.

  7. The hydrogen density of the local interstellar medium and an upper limit to the galactic glow determined from Pioneer 10 ultraviolet photometer observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, F. M.; Gangopadhyay, P.; Ogawa, H. S.; Judge, D. L.

    1988-01-01

    Pioneer 10 Lyman-alpha data obtained beyond the heliocentric distance of 30 AU are used here to determine the local ISM hydrogen density and downwind Galactic glow. The resulting asymptotic interstellar hydrogen density obtained using a conventional interplanetary model is 0.06/cu cm, and the Galactic Lyman-alpha glow is found to be negligible in the downwind direction. Discrepancies are found between observations and the conventional theoretical predictions of the glow dependence on radial distance. Based solely on data obtained between 30 and 39 AU, a better fit is obtained with a constant density distribution beyond 30 AU. In this case, a density of 0.05/cu cm and Galactic glow of 1.5 R is obtained. These results suggest that a complex density distribution may be more appropriate than either the conventional exponential distribution or the constant distribution.

  8. Hydrogen atoms in protein structures: high-resolution X-ray diffraction structure of the DFPase

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hydrogen atoms represent about half of the total number of atoms in proteins and are often involved in substrate recognition and catalysis. Unfortunately, X-ray protein crystallography at usual resolution fails to access directly their positioning, mainly because light atoms display weak contributions to diffraction. However, sub-Ångstrom diffraction data, careful modeling and a proper refinement strategy can allow the positioning of a significant part of hydrogen atoms. Results A comprehensive study on the X-ray structure of the diisopropyl-fluorophosphatase (DFPase) was performed, and the hydrogen atoms were modeled, including those of solvent molecules. This model was compared to the available neutron structure of DFPase, and differences in the protein and the active site solvation were noticed. Conclusions A further examination of the DFPase X-ray structure provides substantial evidence about the presence of an activated water molecule that may constitute an interesting piece of information as regard to the enzymatic hydrolysis mechanism. PMID:23915572

  9. Hydrogen atoms in protein structures: high-resolution X-ray diffraction structure of the DFPase.

    PubMed

    Elias, Mikael; Liebschner, Dorothee; Koepke, Jurgen; Lecomte, Claude; Guillot, Benoit; Jelsch, Christian; Chabriere, Eric

    2013-08-02

    Hydrogen atoms represent about half of the total number of atoms in proteins and are often involved in substrate recognition and catalysis. Unfortunately, X-ray protein crystallography at usual resolution fails to access directly their positioning, mainly because light atoms display weak contributions to diffraction. However, sub-Ångstrom diffraction data, careful modeling and a proper refinement strategy can allow the positioning of a significant part of hydrogen atoms. A comprehensive study on the X-ray structure of the diisopropyl-fluorophosphatase (DFPase) was performed, and the hydrogen atoms were modeled, including those of solvent molecules. This model was compared to the available neutron structure of DFPase, and differences in the protein and the active site solvation were noticed. A further examination of the DFPase X-ray structure provides substantial evidence about the presence of an activated water molecule that may constitute an interesting piece of information as regard to the enzymatic hydrolysis mechanism.

  10. Fluorescence (TALIF) measurement of atomic hydrogen concentration in a coplanar surface dielectric barrier discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrkvičková, M.; Ráheľ, J.; Dvořák, P.; Trunec, D.; Morávek, T.

    2016-10-01

    Spatially and temporally resolved measurements of atomic hydrogen concentration above the dielectric of coplanar barrier discharge are presented for atmospheric pressure in 2.2% H2/Ar. The measurements were carried out in the afterglow phase by means of two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence (TALIF). The difficulties of employing the TALIF technique in close proximity to the dielectric surface wall were successfully addressed by taking measurements on a suitable convexly curved dielectric barrier, and by proper mathematical treatment of parasitic signals from laser-surface interactions. It was found that the maximum atomic hydrogen concentration is situated closest to the dielectric wall from which it gradually decays. The maximum absolute concentration was more than 1022 m-3. In the afterglow phase, the concentration of atomic hydrogen above the dielectric surface stays constant for a considerable time (10 μs-1 ms), with longer times for areas situated farther from the dielectric surface. The existence of such a temporal plateau was explained by the presented 1D model: the recombination losses of atomic hydrogen farther from the dielectric surface are compensated by the diffusion of atomic hydrogen from regions close to the dielectric surface. The fact that a temporal plateau exists even closest to the dielectric surface suggests that the dielectric surface acts as a source of atomic hydrogen in the afterglow phase.

  11. Atomic-Scale Mechanism for Hydrogenation of o-Cresol on Pt Catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yaping; Liu, Zhimin; Xue, Wenhua; Crossley, Steven; Jentoft, Friederike; Wang, Sanwu

    Biofuels derived from lignocellulosic biomass have received significant attention lately due to increasing environmental concerns. With first-principles density-functional theory and ab initio molecular dynamic simulations, we investigated the atomic-scale mechanism of o-cresol hydrogenation on the Pt(111) surface. The formation of 2-methyl-cyclohexanone (the intermediate product) was found to involve two steps. The first step is the dehydrogenation, that is, the H atom in the hydroxyl group moves to the Pt surface. The second step is the hydrogenation, that is, the H atoms on Pt react with the carbon atoms in the aromatic ring. The first step involves a smaller barrier, suggesting that dehydrogenation occurs first, followed by hydrogenation of the ring. In particular, tautomerization is found to occur via a two-step process over the catalyst. On the other hand, 2-methyl-cyclohexanol (the final product) is produced through two paths. One is direct hydrogenation of the aromatic ring. Another pathway includes partial hydrogenation of the ring, dehydrogenation of -OH group, finally hydrogenation of remaining C atoms and the O atom. Our theoretical results agree well with the experimental observations. Supported by DOE (DE-SC0004600). This research used the supercomputer resources of NERSC, XSEDE, TACC.

  12. Interstellar PAHs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allamandola, Louis J.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Tremendous strides have been made in our understanding of interstellar material over the past twenty years thanks to significant, parallel developments in two closely related areas: observational astronomy and laboratory astrophysics. Twenty years ago the composition of interstellar dust was largely guessed at and the notion of abundant, gas phase, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) anywhere in the interstellar medium (ISM) considered impossible. Today the dust composition of the diffuse and dense ISM is reasonably well constrained and the spectroscopic case for interstellar PAHs, shockingly large molecules by early interstellar chemistry standards, is very strong.

  13. Hydrogen maser wall shift experiments and determination of the unperturbed hyperfine frequency of the ground state of the hydrogen atom

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Y.M.; Hua, Y.L.; Chen, C.B.; Gao, J.H.; Shen, W.

    1980-12-01

    Experiments on hydrogen maser wall shift are described in detail. Values of K(40 C) -293 + or - 17 mHz.cm and a(40 C) (-17 + or 2) x 10 to the -3rd per deg C were obtained. The unperturbed hyperfine frequency of the ground state of the hydrogen atom was obtained by comparing five hydrogen masers to Loran C signals for one month. The average value with respect to TAI is 1,420,405,751.768 + or - 0.002 Hz.

  14. Hot hydrogen and oxygen atoms in the upper atmospheres of Venus and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagy, Andrew F.; Kim, Jhoon; Cravens, Thomas E.

    1990-01-01

    Optical observations of hot atoms in the atmospheres of Venus and Mars are briefly reviewed. A summary of hot hydrogen and oxygen production and loss processes is given. Results of some recent model calculations as well as a number of new results of the hot hydrogen and oxygen populations are presented and their implication in terms of solar wind interaction processes is discussed.

  15. Hydrogen sulphide in cardiovascular system: A cascade from interaction between sulphur atoms and signalling molecules.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ming-Jie; Cai, Wen-Jie; Zhu, Yi-Chun

    2016-05-15

    As a gasotransmitter, hydrogen sulphide exerts its extensive physiological and pathophysiological effects in mammals. The interaction between sulphur atoms and signalling molecules forms a cascade that modulates cellular functions and homeostasis. In this review, we focus on the signalling mechanism underlying the effect of hydrogen sulphide in the cardiovascular system and metabolism as well as the biological relevance to human diseases.

  16. Molecule formation and infrared emission in fast interstellar shocks. II - Dissociation speeds for interstellar shock waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenbach, D.; Mckee, C. F.

    1980-01-01

    The postshock destruction of molecules is examined, including the processes of (1) collisions with neutral hydrogen atoms and molecules, (2) electronic collisions, and (3) neutral chemical reactions with atoms, particularly atomic hydrogen. By using conservative estimates of collisional dissociation rates from individual vibrational states, it is found that process (1) leads to the destruction of molecular hydrogen behind shocks with speeds equal to or greater than 25 km/s if the preshock molecular gas has hydrogen nucleus densities of equal to or greater than 10 to the 4th/cu cm. At lower densities (100 per cu cm), destruction occurs for shock speeds equal to or greater than 50 km/s and process (2) dominates. Dissociation of molecules such as CO, H2O, and O2 follows the destruction of H2, as the resultant hydrogen atoms chemically dissociate the metal atoms from their bonds (process 3) in the hot postshock gas. These results demonstrate that many of the observed high-speed interstellar molecules, if shock accelerated, must have dissociated and reformed in the postshock gas.

  17. Understanding hydrogen atom transfer: from bond strengths to Marcus theory.

    PubMed

    Mayer, James M

    2011-01-18

    Hydrogen atom transfer (HAT), a key step in many chemical, environmental, and biological processes, is one of the fundamental chemical reactions: A-H + B → A + H-B. Traditional HAT involves p-block radicals such as tert-BuO(•) abstracting H(•) from organic molecules. More recently, the recognition that transition metal species undergo HAT has led to a broader perspective, with HAT viewed as a type of proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET). When transition metal complexes oxidize substrates by removing H(•) (e(-) + H(+)), typically the electron transfers to the metal and the proton to a ligand. Examples with iron-imidazolinate, vanadium-oxo, and many other complexes are discussed. Although these complexes may not "look like" main group radicals, they have the same pattern of reactivity. For instance, their HAT rate constants parallel the A-H bond strengths within a series of similar reactions. Like main group radicals, they abstract H(•) much faster from O-H bonds than from C-H bonds of the same strength, showing that driving force is not the only determinant of reactivity. This Account describes our development of a conceptual framework for HAT with a Marcus theory approach. In the simplest model, the cross relation uses the self-exchange rate constants (k(AH/A) for AH + A) and the equilibrium constant to predict the rate constant for AH + B: k(AH/B) = (k(AH/A)k(BH/B)K(eq)f)(1/2). For a variety of transition metal oxidants, k(AH/B) is predicted within one or two orders of magnitude with only a few exceptions. For 36 organic reactions of oxyl radicals, k(AH/B) is predicted with an average deviation of a factor of 3.8, and within a factor of 5 for all but six of the reactions. These reactions involve both O-H or C-H bonds, occur in either water or organic solvents, and occur over a range of 10(28) in K(eq) and 10(13) in k(AH/B). The treatment of organic reactions includes the well-established kinetic solvent effect on HAT reactions. This is one of a number

  18. Interstellar molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townes, C. H.

    1976-01-01

    Progress in the discovery and study of interstellar molecules is summarized. The 36 molecular species thus far identified in interstellar space are listed in several groups which include simple hydrides, oxides, and sulfides, various derivatives of ammonia, molecules involving linear carbon chains, cyanides, and molecules related in structure to formaldehyde, alcohols, or ethers. Several free radicals are described, the discovery of molecules in external galaxies is discussed, and possible mechanisms for molecular formation are noted. Methods for examining relative isotopic abundances by measuring molecules in interstellar clouds are outlined, mechanisms for the excitation of interstellar molecules are reviewed, and values are presented for the C-12/C-13 abundance ratio in a number of interstellar clouds. The detection of interstellar masers is discussed along with pumping mechanisms and masing transitions in H2CO, CH, OH, and SiO. The nature of dense interstellar clouds is examined in terms of several simple and complex cloud models, with emphasis on multiple condensation models.

  19. Interstellar initiatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drysdale, Alan; Vick, Jerry

    1991-01-01

    Issues related to space exploration beyond the solar system are introduced and discussed including the interstellar medium and interstellar probes and communication. The characteristics of the interstellar medium cannot be accurately predicted, and four probes are described that are intended to travel beyond the solar system and transmit data regarding the interstellar medium. Interstellar communication is shown to be technically feasible with existing technology, and the problems associated with manned interstellar travel are listed. Factors limiting the possibilities of such travel include propulsion options, energy requirements, and the amount of time required for a given mission to a nearby star. Interstellar space is shown to be of interest to astronomers because of the possibilities of long-baseline observations in a clean observational environment.

  20. Elemental nitrogen partitioning in dense interstellar clouds

    PubMed Central

    Daranlot, Julien; Hincelin, Ugo; Bergeat, Astrid; Costes, Michel; Loison, Jean-Christophe; Wakelam, Valentine; Hickson, Kevin M.

    2012-01-01

    Many chemical models of dense interstellar clouds predict that the majority of gas-phase elemental nitrogen should be present as N2, with an abundance approximately five orders of magnitude less than that of hydrogen. As a homonuclear diatomic molecule, N2 is difficult to detect spectroscopically through infrared or millimeter-wavelength transitions. Therefore, its abundance is often inferred indirectly through its reaction product N2H+. Two main formation mechanisms, each involving two radical-radical reactions, are the source of N2 in such environments. Here we report measurements of the low temperature rate constants for one of these processes, the N + CN reaction, down to 56 K. The measured rate constants for this reaction, and those recently determined for two other reactions implicated in N2 formation, are tested using a gas-grain model employing a critically evaluated chemical network. We show that the amount of interstellar nitrogen present as N2 depends on the competition between its gas-phase formation and the depletion of atomic nitrogen onto grains. As the reactions controlling N2 formation are inefficient, we argue that N2 does not represent the main reservoir species for interstellar nitrogen. Instead, elevated abundances of more labile forms of nitrogen such as NH3 should be present on interstellar ices, promoting the eventual formation of nitrogen-bearing organic molecules. PMID:22689957

  1. Interstellar matter research with the Copernicus satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spitzer, L., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    The use of the Copernicus satellite in an investigation of interstellar matter makes it possible to study absorption lines in the ultraviolet range which cannot be observed on the ground because of atmospheric absorption effects. A brief description is given of the satellite and the instrument used in the reported studies of interstellar matter. The results of the studies are discussed, giving attention to interstellar molecular hydrogen, the chemical composition of the interstellar gas, the coronal gas between the stars, and the interstellar abundance ratio of deuterium to hydrogen.

  2. The simplicity of perfect atoms: Degeneracies in supersymmetric hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Rube, Tomas; Wacker, Jay G.

    2011-06-15

    Supersymmetric QED hydrogen-like bound states are remarkably similar to nonsupersymmetric hydrogen, including an accidental degeneracy of the fine structure and is broken by the Lamb shift. This article classifies the states, calculates the leading order spectrum, and illustrates the results in several limits. The relation to other nonrelativistic bound states is explored.

  3. The simplicity of perfect atoms: Degeneracies in supersymmetric hydrogen

    DOE PAGES

    Rube, Tomas; Wacker, Jay G.

    2011-06-07

    In this study, supersymmetric QED hydrogen-like bound states are remarkably similar to nonsupersymmetric hydrogen, including an accidental degeneracy of the fine structure and is broken by the Lamb shift. This article classifies the states, calculates the leading order spectrum, and illustrates the results in several limits. The relation to other nonrelativistic bound states is explored.

  4. Hydrogen atoms can be located accurately and precisely by x-ray crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Woińska, Magdalena; Grabowsky, Simon; Dominiak, Paulina M.; Woźniak, Krzysztof; Jayatilaka, Dylan

    2016-01-01

    Precise and accurate structural information on hydrogen atoms is crucial to the study of energies of interactions important for crystal engineering, materials science, medicine, and pharmacy, and to the estimation of physical and chemical properties in solids. However, hydrogen atoms only scatter x-radiation weakly, so x-rays have not been used routinely to locate them accurately. Textbooks and teaching classes still emphasize that hydrogen atoms cannot be located with x-rays close to heavy elements; instead, neutron diffraction is needed. We show that, contrary to widespread expectation, hydrogen atoms can be located very accurately using x-ray diffraction, yielding bond lengths involving hydrogen atoms (A–H) that are in agreement with results from neutron diffraction mostly within a single standard deviation. The precision of the determination is also comparable between x-ray and neutron diffraction results. This has been achieved at resolutions as low as 0.8 Å using Hirshfeld atom refinement (HAR). We have applied HAR to 81 crystal structures of organic molecules and compared the A–H bond lengths with those from neutron measurements for A–H bonds sorted into bonds of the same class. We further show in a selection of inorganic compounds that hydrogen atoms can be located in bridging positions and close to heavy transition metals accurately and precisely. We anticipate that, in the future, conventional x-radiation sources at in-house diffractometers can be used routinely for locating hydrogen atoms in small molecules accurately instead of large-scale facilities such as spallation sources or nuclear reactors. PMID:27386545

  5. Hydrogen atoms can be located accurately and precisely by x-ray crystallography.

    PubMed

    Woińska, Magdalena; Grabowsky, Simon; Dominiak, Paulina M; Woźniak, Krzysztof; Jayatilaka, Dylan

    2016-05-01

    Precise and accurate structural information on hydrogen atoms is crucial to the study of energies of interactions important for crystal engineering, materials science, medicine, and pharmacy, and to the estimation of physical and chemical properties in solids. However, hydrogen atoms only scatter x-radiation weakly, so x-rays have not been used routinely to locate them accurately. Textbooks and teaching classes still emphasize that hydrogen atoms cannot be located with x-rays close to heavy elements; instead, neutron diffraction is needed. We show that, contrary to widespread expectation, hydrogen atoms can be located very accurately using x-ray diffraction, yielding bond lengths involving hydrogen atoms (A-H) that are in agreement with results from neutron diffraction mostly within a single standard deviation. The precision of the determination is also comparable between x-ray and neutron diffraction results. This has been achieved at resolutions as low as 0.8 Å using Hirshfeld atom refinement (HAR). We have applied HAR to 81 crystal structures of organic molecules and compared the A-H bond lengths with those from neutron measurements for A-H bonds sorted into bonds of the same class. We further show in a selection of inorganic compounds that hydrogen atoms can be located in bridging positions and close to heavy transition metals accurately and precisely. We anticipate that, in the future, conventional x-radiation sources at in-house diffractometers can be used routinely for locating hydrogen atoms in small molecules accurately instead of large-scale facilities such as spallation sources or nuclear reactors.

  6. The hydrogen-atom environment of the ether oxygen atom in crystal structures of some representative muscarinic agonists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroon, J.; Scherrenberg, R. L.; Kooijman, H.; Kanters, J. A.

    1990-06-01

    The hypothesis that the ether oxygen atom in muscarinic agonists acts as a hydrogen-bond acceptor is supported by evidence from crystallographic data. The same evidence suggests that in such interactions N +CH⋯O bonds donated by the ligand to the receptor may be involved.

  7. Platinum single-atom and cluster catalysis of the hydrogen evolution reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Niancai; Stambula, Samantha; Wang, Da; Banis, Mohammad Norouzi; Liu, Jian; Riese, Adam; Xiao, Biwei; Li, Ruying; Sham, Tsun-Kong; Liu, Li-Min; Botton, Gianluigi A.; Sun, Xueliang

    2016-11-01

    Platinum-based catalysts have been considered the most effective electrocatalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction in water splitting. However, platinum utilization in these electrocatalysts is extremely low, as the active sites are only located on the surface of the catalyst particles. Downsizing catalyst nanoparticles to single atoms is highly desirable to maximize their efficiency by utilizing nearly all platinum atoms. Here we report on a practical synthesis method to produce isolated single platinum atoms and clusters using the atomic layer deposition technique. The single platinum atom catalysts are investigated for the hydrogen evolution reaction, where they exhibit significantly enhanced catalytic activity (up to 37 times) and high stability in comparison with the state-of-the-art commercial platinum/carbon catalysts. The X-ray absorption fine structure and density functional theory analyses indicate that the partially unoccupied density of states of the platinum atoms' 5d orbitals on the nitrogen-doped graphene are responsible for the excellent performance.

  8. Identification of titanium-hydrogen complexes with up to four hydrogen atoms in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Scheffler, L.; Kolkovsky, Vl. Weber, J.

    2015-02-28

    Using high-resolution Laplace deep level transient spectroscopy studies, several TiH-related complexes (E40′, E170, E170′, and E260) were observed in wet-chemically etched and H-plasma treated n-type Si. We assign E40′ and E170 to two different configurations of Ti with one H atom. Both of them are shown to behave as single donor states with an activation enthalpy of E{sub C} − 0.07 eV (E40′) and E{sub C} − 0.34 eV (E170) in the upper half of Si. E170′ with an activation energy of E{sub C} − 0.37 eV is correlated with the donor state of the Ti{sub i}H{sub 2} defect, whereas E260 is attributed to the donor state of Ti{sub i}H{sub 3}. Besides the TiH defects, the presence of electrically inactive TiH{sub 4} is reported. No titanium-hydrogen-related levels were observed in p-type Si.

  9. Broadening and shift of Fe I lines perturbed by atomic hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, M.T.; Marmolino, C.; Roberti, R.; Severino, G.

    1987-01-01

    The broadening and shift parameters for a number of Fe I lines perturbed by atomic hydrogen are computed using the interatomic potential due to Hindmarsh et al (1967, 1970). It is also shown that the rms radius and the effective radius of the radiating atom, which determine the force constants in the interatomic potential, can be simply related to each other depending on the orbital quantum number of the atomic level.

  10. Atomic-Sized Pores Enhanced Electrocatalysis of TaS2 Nanosheets for Hydrogen Evolution.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Tan, Yongwen; Liu, Pan; Guo, Chenguang; Luo, Min; Han, Jiuhui; Lin, Tianquan; Huang, Fuqiang; Chen, Mingwei

    2016-10-01

    A plasma oxidation method is developed to fabricate atomic-scale pores in the basal planes of electrochemically inert TaS2 nanosheets to functionalize the 2D crystals with high electrocatalysis for hydrogen evolution reaction. Quantitative measurements of under-coordinated atoms at edges of the pores by aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy reveal the intrinsic correlation between the defective atomic sites and electrocatalytic activities of 2D TaS2 .

  11. Asymptotic expansions of the electron momentum densities of the atoms from hydrogen through lawrencium

    SciTech Connect

    Thakkar, A.J.; Wonfor, A.L.; Pedersen, W.A.

    1987-07-15

    The first three coefficients in each of the small p Maclaurin and large p asymptotic expansions of the spherically averaged electron momentum densities of the ground states of the 103 neutral atoms from hydrogen through lawrencium, 73 atomic cations and 41 atomic anions are calculated from nonrelativistic self-consistent-field wave functions. These coefficients should be useful in the analysis of experimental Compton profiles. An analysis of the periodic behavior of these coefficients is given.

  12. 2s Hyperfine splitting in light hydrogen-like atoms: Theory and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Karshenboim, S. G. Kolachevsky, N. N.; Ivanov, V. G.; Fischer, M.; Fendel, P.; Haensch, T. W.

    2006-03-15

    Since the combination D{sub 21} = 8f{sub HFS}(2s)-f{sub HFS}(1s) of hyperfine intervals in hydrogen and light two-body hydrogen-like atomic systems weakly depends on the nuclear structure, comparison between theory and experiment can be sensitive to high order QED corrections. New theoretical and experimental results are presented. Calculations have been performed for the hydrogen and deuterium atoms and for the helium-3 ion. Experiments on the 2s hyperfine splitting (responsible for the dominant contribution to the error in D{sub 21}) have been conducted for hydrogen and deuterium. The theory and experiment are in good agreement, and their accuracy is comparable to that attained in verifying the QED theory of the hyperfine splitting in leptonic atoms (muonium and positronium)

  13. The formation of excited atoms during charge exchange between hydrogen ions and alkali atoms. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nieman, R. A.

    1971-01-01

    The charge exchange cross sections for protons and various alkali atoms are calculated using the classical approximation of Gryzinski. It is assumed that the hydrogen atoms resulting from charge exchange exist in all possible excited states. Charge transfer collisions between protons and potassium as well as protons and sodium atoms are studied. The energy range investigated is between 4 and 30 keV. The theoretical calculations of the capture cross section and the cross section for the creation of metastable 2S hydrogen are compared to experimental values. Good quantitative agreement is found for the capture cross section but only qualitative agreement for the metastable cross section. Analysis of the Lyman alpha window in molecular oxygen suggests that measured values of the metastable cross section may be in error. Thick alkali target data are also presented. This allows the determination of the total electron loss cross section. Finally, some work was done with H2(+).

  14. Interaction of atomic hydrogen with native oxides on InP(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, E. J.; Houzay, F.; Moison, J. M.

    1992-05-01

    The (100) surface of InP covered with its native oxides has been exposed to increasing doses of atomic hydrogen and studied by surface-sensitive techniques. Carbon and oxygen coverages which cannot be desorbed by thermal cleaning can be completely removed at 300°C under atomic hydrogen. At this temperature, exposures to atomic hydrogen between 104 and 105 L of H2 remove the weakly bonded oxygen and carbon atoms. Exposures above 106 L lead to a surface-decomposition of InP evidenced by the decrease of the P2p/In4d intensity ration and the appearance of metallic indium. At room temperature, exposures to atomic hydrogen between 104 and 105 L desorb CO molecules and modify the nature of the native oxides. At higher exposures and up to 107 L of H2, the remaining oxide passivates the surface against the action of atomic hydrogen. These new results are discussed in relation with the cleaning action of hydrides on III-V compound surfaces.

  15. Insights into hydrogen atom adsorption on and the electrochemical properties of nitrogen-substituted carbon materials.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Z H; Hatori, H; Wang, S B; Lu, G Q

    2005-09-08

    The nitrogen substitution in carbon materials is investigated theoretically using the density functional theory method. Our calculations show that nitrogen substitution decreases the hydrogen adsorption energy if hydrogen atoms are adsorbed on both nitrogen atoms and the neighboring carbon atoms. On the contrary, the hydrogen adsorption energy can be increased if hydrogen atoms are adsorbed only on the neighboring carbon atoms. The reason can be explained by the electronic structures analysis of N-substituted graphene sheets. Nitrogen substitution reduces the pi electron conjugation and increases the HOMO energy of a graphene sheet, and the nitrogen atom is not stable due to its 3-valent character. This raises an interesting research topic on the optimization of the N-substitution degree, and is important to many applications such as hydrogen storage and the tokamaks device. The electronic structure studies also explain well why nitrogen substitution increases the capacitance but decreases the electron conductivity of carbon electrodes as was experimentally observed in our experiments on the supercapacitor.

  16. Modeling of hydrogen atom diffusion and response behavior of hydrogen sensors in Pd-Y alloy nanofilm.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Li, Yanli; Huang, Pengcheng; Song, Han; Zhang, Gang

    2016-11-15

    To detect hydrogen gas leakage rapidly, many types of hydrogen sensors containing palladium alloy film have been proposed and fabricated to date. However, the mechanisms and factors that determine the response rate of such hydrogen sensor have not been established theoretically. The manners in which response time is forecasted and sensitive film is designed are key issues in developing hydrogen sensors with nanometer film. In this paper, a unilateral diffusion model of hydrogen atoms in Pd alloy based on Fick's second law is proposed to describe the Pd-H reaction process. Model simulation shows that the hydrogen sensor response time with Pd alloy film is dominated by two factors (film thickness and hydrogen diffusion coefficient). Finally, a series of response rate experiments with varying thicknesses of Pd-Y (yttrium) alloy film are implemented to verify model validity. Our proposed model can help researchers in the precise optimization of film thickness to realize a simultaneously speedy and sensitive hydrogen sensor. This study also aids in evaluating the influence of manufacturing errors on performances and comparing the performances of sensors with different thicknesses.

  17. Modeling of hydrogen atom diffusion and response behavior of hydrogen sensors in Pd–Y alloy nanofilm

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yi; Li, Yanli; Huang, Pengcheng; Song, Han; Zhang, Gang

    2016-01-01

    To detect hydrogen gas leakage rapidly, many types of hydrogen sensors containing palladium alloy film have been proposed and fabricated to date. However, the mechanisms and factors that determine the response rate of such hydrogen sensor have not been established theoretically. The manners in which response time is forecasted and sensitive film is designed are key issues in developing hydrogen sensors with nanometer film. In this paper, a unilateral diffusion model of hydrogen atoms in Pd alloy based on Fick’s second law is proposed to describe the Pd–H reaction process. Model simulation shows that the hydrogen sensor response time with Pd alloy film is dominated by two factors (film thickness and hydrogen diffusion coefficient). Finally, a series of response rate experiments with varying thicknesses of Pd–Y (yttrium) alloy film are implemented to verify model validity. Our proposed model can help researchers in the precise optimization of film thickness to realize a simultaneously speedy and sensitive hydrogen sensor. This study also aids in evaluating the influence of manufacturing errors on performances and comparing the performances of sensors with different thicknesses. PMID:27845408

  18. Modeling of hydrogen atom diffusion and response behavior of hydrogen sensors in Pd–Y alloy nanofilm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi; Li, Yanli; Huang, Pengcheng; Song, Han; Zhang, Gang

    2016-11-01

    To detect hydrogen gas leakage rapidly, many types of hydrogen sensors containing palladium alloy film have been proposed and fabricated to date. However, the mechanisms and factors that determine the response rate of such hydrogen sensor have not been established theoretically. The manners in which response time is forecasted and sensitive film is designed are key issues in developing hydrogen sensors with nanometer film. In this paper, a unilateral diffusion model of hydrogen atoms in Pd alloy based on Fick’s second law is proposed to describe the Pd–H reaction process. Model simulation shows that the hydrogen sensor response time with Pd alloy film is dominated by two factors (film thickness and hydrogen diffusion coefficient). Finally, a series of response rate experiments with varying thicknesses of Pd–Y (yttrium) alloy film are implemented to verify model validity. Our proposed model can help researchers in the precise optimization of film thickness to realize a simultaneously speedy and sensitive hydrogen sensor. This study also aids in evaluating the influence of manufacturing errors on performances and comparing the performances of sensors with different thicknesses.

  19. Reversible single spin control of individual magnetic molecule by hydrogen atom adsorption.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liwei; Yang, Kai; Jiang, Yuhang; Song, Boqun; Xiao, Wende; Li, Linfei; Zhou, Haitao; Wang, Yeliang; Du, Shixuan; Ouyang, Min; Hofer, Werner A; Castro Neto, Antonio H; Gao, Hong-Jun

    2013-01-01

    The reversible control of a single spin of an atom or a molecule is of great interest in Kondo physics and a potential application in spin based electronics. Here we demonstrate that the Kondo resonance of manganese phthalocyanine molecules on a Au(111) substrate have been reversibly switched off and on via a robust route through attachment and detachment of single hydrogen atom to the magnetic core of the molecule. As further revealed by density functional theory calculations, even though the total number of electrons of the Mn ion remains almost the same in the process, gaining one single hydrogen atom leads to redistribution of charges within 3d orbitals with a reduction of the molecular spin state from S = 3/2 to S = 1 that directly contributes to the Kondo resonance disappearance. This process is reversed by a local voltage pulse or thermal annealing to desorb the hydrogen atom.

  20. Insights into the Hydrogen-Atom Transfer of the Blue Aroxyl.

    PubMed

    Bächle, Josua; Marković, Marijana; Kelterer, Anne-Marie; Grampp, Günter

    2017-07-26

    An experimental and theoretical study on hydrogen-atom transfer dynamics in the hydrogen-bonded substituted phenol/phenoxyl complex of the blue aroxyl (2,4,6-tri-tert-butylphenoxyl) is presented. The experimental exchange dynamics is determined in different organic solvents from the temperature-dependent alternating line-width effect in the continuous-wave ESR spectrum. From bent Arrhenius plots, effective tunnelling contributions with parallel heavy-atom motion are concluded. To clarify the transfer mechanism, reaction paths for different conformers of the substituted phenol/phenoxyl complex are modelled theoretically. Various DFT and post-Hartree-Fock methods including multireference methods are applied. From the comparison of experimental and theoretical data it is concluded that the system favours concerted hydrogen-atom transfer along a parabolic reaction path caused by heavy-atom motion. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Atomically isolated nickel species anchored on graphitized carbon for efficient hydrogen evolution electrocatalysis

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Lili; Liu, Peng Fei; Yan, Xuecheng; Gu, Lin; Yang, Zhen Zhong; Yang, Hua Gui; Qiu, Shilun; Yao, Xiangdong

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen production through electrochemical process is at the heart of key renewable energy technologies including water splitting and hydrogen fuel cells. Despite tremendous efforts, exploring cheap, efficient and durable electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution still remains as a great challenge. Here we synthesize a nickel–carbon-based catalyst, from carbonization of metal-organic frameworks, to replace currently best-known platinum-based materials for electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution. This nickel-carbon-based catalyst can be activated to obtain isolated nickel atoms on the graphitic carbon support when applying electrochemical potential, exhibiting highly efficient hydrogen evolution performance with high exchange current density of 1.2 mA cm−2 and impressive durability. This work may enable new opportunities for designing and tuning properties of electrocatalysts at atomic scale for large-scale water electrolysis. PMID:26861684

  2. Atomically isolated nickel species anchored on graphitized carbon for efficient hydrogen evolution electrocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Lili; Liu, Peng Fei; Yan, Xuecheng; Gu, Lin; Yang, Zhen Zhong; Yang, Hua Gui; Qiu, Shilun; Yao, Xiangdong

    2016-02-01

    Hydrogen production through electrochemical process is at the heart of key renewable energy technologies including water splitting and hydrogen fuel cells. Despite tremendous efforts, exploring cheap, efficient and durable electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution still remains as a great challenge. Here we synthesize a nickel-carbon-based catalyst, from carbonization of metal-organic frameworks, to replace currently best-known platinum-based materials for electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution. This nickel-carbon-based catalyst can be activated to obtain isolated nickel atoms on the graphitic carbon support when applying electrochemical potential, exhibiting highly efficient hydrogen evolution performance with high exchange current density of 1.2 mA cm-2 and impressive durability. This work may enable new opportunities for designing and tuning properties of electrocatalysts at atomic scale for large-scale water electrolysis.

  3. Atomic hydrogen in. gamma. -irradiated hydroxides of alkaline-earth elements

    SciTech Connect

    Spitsyn, V.I.; Yurik, T.K.; Barsova, L.I.

    1982-04-01

    Atomic hydrogen is an important intermediate product formed in the radiolysis of compounds containing X-H bonds. H atoms have been detected in irradiated matrices of H/sub 2/ and inert gases at 4/sup 0/K, in irradiated ice and frozen solutions of acids in irradiated salts and in other systems. Here results are presented from a study of the ESR spectra of H atoms generated in polycrystalline hydroxides of alkaline-earth elements that have been ..gamma..-irradiated at 77/sup 0/K, after preliminary treatment at various temperatures. For the first time stabilization of atomic hydrogen in ..gamma..-irradiated polycrystalline alkaline-earth element hydroxides has been detected. Depending on the degree of dehydroxylation, several types of hydrogen atoms may be stabilized in the hydroxides, these hydrogen atoms having different radiospectroscopic parameters. In the magnesium-calcium-strontium-barium hydroxide series, a regular decrease has been found in the hfi constants for H atoms with the cations in the immediate surroundings. A direct proportionality has been found between the parameters ..delta..A/A/sub 0/ and the polarizability of the cation.

  4. Integrated numerical prediction of atomization process of liquid hydrogen jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishimoto, Jun; Ohira, Katsuhide; Okabayashi, Kazuki; Chitose, Keiko

    2008-05-01

    The 3-D structure of the liquid atomization behavior of an LH jet flow through a pinhole nozzle is numerically investigated and visualized by a new type of integrated simulation technique. The present computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis focuses on the thermodynamic effect on the consecutive breakup of a cryogenic liquid column, the formation of a liquid film, and the generation of droplets in the outlet section of the pinhole nozzle. Utilizing the governing equations for a high-speed turbulent cryogenic jet flow through a pinhole nozzle based on the thermal nonequilibrium LES-VOF model in conjunction with the CSF model, an integrated parallel computation is performed to clarify the detailed atomization process of a high-speed LH2 jet flow through a pinhole nozzle and to acquire data, which is difficult to confirm by experiment, such as atomization length, liquid core shape, droplet-size distribution, spray angle, droplet velocity profiles, and thermal field surrounding the atomizing jet flow. According to the present computation, the cryogenic atomization rate and the LH2 droplets-gas two-phase flow characteristics are found to be controlled by the turbulence perturbation upstream of the pinhole nozzle, hydrodynamic instabilities at the gas-liquid interface and shear stress between the liquid core and the periphery of the LH2 jet. Furthermore, calculation of the effect of cryogenic atomization on the jet thermal field shows that such atomization extensively enhances the thermal diffusion surrounding the LH2 jet flow.

  5. Ion irradiation of carbonaceous interstellar analogues. Effects of cosmic rays on the 3.4 μm interstellar absorption band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godard, M.; Féraud, G.; Chabot, M.; Carpentier, Y.; Pino, T.; Brunetto, R.; Duprat, J.; Engrand, C.; Bréchignac, P.; D'Hendecourt, L.; Dartois, E.

    2011-05-01

    Context. A 3.4 μm absorption band (around 2900 cm-1), assigned to aliphatic C-H stretching modes of hydrogenated amorphous carbons (a-C:H), is widely observed in the diffuse interstellar medium, but disappears or is modified in dense clouds. This spectral difference between different phases of the interstellar medium reflects the processing of dust in different environments. Cosmic ray bombardment is one of the interstellar processes that make carbonaceous dust evolve. Aims: We investigate the effects of cosmic rays on the interstellar 3.4 μm absorption band carriers. Methods: Samples of carbonaceous interstellar analogues (a-C:H and soot) were irradiated at room temperature by swift ions with energy in the MeV range (from 0.2 to 160 MeV). The dehydrogenation and chemical bonding modifications that occurred during irradiation were studied with IR spectroscopy. Results: For all samples and all ions/energies used, we observed a decrease of the aliphatic C-H absorption bands intensity with the ion fluence. This evolution agrees with a model that describes the hydrogen loss as caused by the molecular recombination of two free H atoms created by the breaking of C-H bonds by the impinging ions. The corresponding destruction cross section and asymptotic hydrogen content are obtained for each experiment and their behaviour over a large range of ion stopping powers are inferred. Using elemental abundances and energy distributions of galactic cosmic rays, we investigated the implications of these results in different astrophysical environments. The results are compared to the processing by UV photons and H atoms in different regions of the interstellar medium. Conclusions: The destruction of aliphatic C-H bonds by cosmic rays occurs in characteristic times of a few 108 years, and it appears that even at longer time scales, cosmic rays alone cannot explain the observed disappearance of this spectral signature in dense regions. In diffuse interstellar medium, the formation

  6. Origin of the smaller conductances of Rh, Pb, and Co atomic junctions in hydrogen environment

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xue; Chen, Mingyan; Ye, Xiang; Xie, Yi-qun; Ke, San-huang

    2015-02-14

    We study theoretically the structural and electronic origins of the smaller conductances (one conductance quantum, G{sub 0}, and smaller) of Rh, Pb, and Co metal atomic junctions (MAJs) in a hydrogen environment, as were measured in recent experiments. For the Rh MAJs, the 1G{sub 0} conductance is attributed to a stable contact bridged by a single hydrogen molecule whose antibonding state provides a single transport channel. For the Pb and Co MAJs the 1G{sub 0} conductance is, however, ascribed to a linear atomic chain adsorbing two dissociated H atoms, which largely reduces the density of states at the Fermi energy with respect to the pure ones. On the other hand, the small conductances of 0.3G{sub 0} (Rh) and 0.2G{sub 0} (Co) are due to H-decorated atomic chains connected to electrodes by a H atom.

  7. Symmetry in chemistry from the hydrogen atom to proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kellman, Michael E.

    1996-01-01

    The last 2 decades have seen discoveries in highly excited states of atoms and molecules of phenomena that are qualitatively different from the “planetary” model of the atom, and the near-rigid model of molecules, characteristic of these systems in their low-energy states. A unified view is emerging in terms of approximate dynamical symmetry principles. Highly excited states of two-electron atoms display “molecular” behavior of a nonrigid linear structure undergoing collective rotation and vibration. Highly excited states of molecules described in the “standard molecular model” display normal mode couplings, which induce bifurcations on the route to molecular chaos. New approaches such as rigid–nonrigid correlation, vibrons, and quantum groups suggest a unified view of collective electronic motion in atoms and nuclear motion in molecules. PMID:8962040

  8. Concentration of atomic hydrogen in a dielectric barrier discharge measured by two-photon absorption fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvořák, P.; Talába, M.; Obrusník, A.; Kratzer, J.; Dědina, J.

    2017-08-01

    Two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence (TALIF) was utilized for measuring the concentration of atomic hydrogen in a volume dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) ignited in mixtures of Ar, H2 and O2 at atmospheric pressure. The method was calibrated by TALIF of krypton diluted in argon at atmospheric pressure, proving that three-body collisions had a negligible effect on quenching of excited krypton atoms. The diagnostic study was complemented with a 3D numerical model of the gas flow and a zero-dimensional model of the chemistry in order to better understand the reaction kinetics and identify the key pathways leading to the production and destruction of atomic hydrogen. It was determined that the density of atomic hydrogen in Ar-H2 mixtures was in the order of 1021 m-3 and decreased when oxygen was added into the gas mixture. Spatially resolved measurements and simulations revealed a sharply bordered region with low atomic hydrogen concentration when oxygen was added to the gas mixture. At substoichiometric oxygen/hydrogen ratios, this H-poor region is confined to an area close to the gas inlet and it is shown that the size of this region is not only influenced by the chemistry but also by the gas flow patterns. Experimentally, it was observed that a decrease in H2 concentration in the feeding Ar-H2 mixture led to an increase in H production in the DBD.

  9. Hydrogen-induced atomic rearrangement in MgPd{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Kohlmann, H. . E-mail: h.kohlmann@mx.uni-saarland.de; Renaudin, G.; Yvon, K.; Wannek, C.; Harbrecht, B.

    2005-04-15

    The hydrogenation behavior of MgPd{sub 3} has been studied by in situ X-ray powder diffraction and by neutron powder diffraction. At room temperature and p {approx}500kPa hydrogen pressure its structure is capable of incorporating up to one hydrogen atom per formula unit ({alpha}-MgPd{sub 3}H{sub {approx}}{sub 1}), thereby retaining a tetragonal ZrAl{sub 3}-type metal atom arrangement. Upon heating to 750K in a hydrogen atmosphere of 610kPa it transforms into a cubic modification with AuCu{sub 3}-type metal atom arrangement ({beta}-MgPd{sub 3}H{sub {approx}}{sub 0.7}). Neutron diffraction on the deuteride reveals an anion deficient anti-perovskite-type structure ({beta}-MgPd{sub 3}D{sub 0.67}, a=398.200(7)pm) in which octahedral sites surrounded exclusively by palladium atoms are occupied by deuterium. Complete removal of hydrogen (480K, 1Pa) stabilizes a new binary modification ({beta}-MgPd{sub 3}, a=391.78(2)pm) crystallizing with a primitive cubic AuCu{sub 3}-type structure. Mechanical treatment (grinding) transforms both {alpha} and {beta} modifications of MgPd{sub 3} into a cubic face-centered solid solution Mg{sub 0.25}Pd{sub 0.75} showing a random distribution of magnesium and palladium atoms.

  10. Surface Magnetism of Cobalt Nanoislands Controlled by Atomic Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jewook; Park, Changwon; Yoon, Mina; Li, An-Ping

    2016-12-01

    Controlling the spin states of the surface and interface is key to spintronic applications of magnetic materials. We report the evolution of surface magnetism of Co nanoislands on Cu(111) upon hydrogen adsorption and desorption with the hope of realizing reversible control of spin-dependent tunneling. Spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy reveals three types of hydrogen-induced surface superstructures, 1H-(2 × 2), 2H-(2 × 2), and 6H-(3 × 3), with increasing H coverage. The prominent magnetic surface states of Co, while being preserved at low H coverage, become suppressed as the H coverage level increases, which can then be recovered by H desorption. First-principles calculations reveal the origin of the observed magnetic surface states by capturing the asymmetry between the spin-polarized surface states and identify the role of hydrogen in controlling the magnetic states. This study offers new insights into the chemical control of magnetism in low-dimensional systems.

  11. Adsorption and migration behavior of Si atoms on the hydrogen-terminated diamond (001) surface: A first principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xuejie; Qiao, Haimao; Kang, Congjie; Ren, Yuan; Tan, Xin; Sun, Shiyang

    2017-10-01

    The adsorption and migration activation energies of a silicon (Si) atom on a hydrogen-terminated diamond (001) surface were calculated using first principles methods based on density functional theory. On the fully hydrogen-terminated surface, the surface carbon atoms possess saturated bonds. The Si atom cannot bond with the surface carbon atoms; thus, the adsorption energy of the Si atom is low. However, on the hydrogen-terminated surface with one or two open radical sites (ORS), the adsorption energy of a Si atom increases to 3.1 eV and even up to 4.7 eV, thereby forming a stable configuration. Along the three ORS in the direction of dimer row or chain, a Si atom can migrate between two deep basins with migration activation energies at 1.5 or 1.3 eV. Given the relatively large energy barrier at approximately 3.8 or 4.7 eV, escaping from the deep basin is difficult for the Si atom. This investigation showed that the number and distribution of ORS, namely, the adsorption site of hydrogen atoms and the removal site of surface hydrogen atoms, can affect the adsorption and migration of Si atoms on the hydrogen-terminated diamond surface. Electron structure analysis further reveals that the reactivity of the surface C atoms and the charge transfer amount between the Si and surface C atoms affect the adsorption and migration of Si atoms.

  12. Positron scattering from hydrogen atom with screened Coulomb potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Ghoshal, Arijit; Nayek, Sujay; Kamali, M. Z. M.; Ratnavelu, K.

    2014-03-05

    Elastic positron-hydrogen collisions with screened Coulomb potentials have been investigated using a second-order distorted wave Born approximation in the momentum space. Two types of potentials have been considered, namely, static screened Coulomb potential and exponential cosine-screened Coulomb potential. Using a simple variationally determined hydrogenic wave function it has been possible to obtain the scattering amplitude in a closed form. A detailed study has been made on the differential and total cross sections in the energy range 20–300 eV.

  13. STM observation of the chemical reaction of atomic hydrogen on the N-adsorbed Cu(001) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, Takuma; Yamada, Masamichi; Komori, Fumio

    2017-01-01

    Chemical reaction of atomic hydrogen with the N-adsorbed Cu(001) surfaces was investigated at room temperature by scanning tunnel microscopy. At the low exposure of atomic hydrogen, it reacted with the N atoms and turned to be the NH species on the surface. The reaction rate is proportional to the amount of the unreacted N atoms. By increasing the exposure of atomic hydrogen from this condition, the amount of nitrogen species on the surface decreased. This is attributed to the formation of ammonia and its desorption from the surface. The NH species on the surface turn to NH3 through the surface NH2 species by atomic hydrogen. Coexistence of the clean Cu surface enhances the rate of ammonia formation owing to atomic hydrogen migrating on the clean surface.

  14. Hydrogen atom reactivity toward aqueous tert-butyl alcohol.

    PubMed

    Lymar, Sergei V; Schwarz, Harold A

    2012-02-09

    Through a combination of pulse radiolysis, purification, and analysis techniques, the rate constant for the H + (CH(3))(3)COH → H(2) + (•)CH(2)C(CH(3))(2)OH reaction in aqueous solution is definitively determined to be (1.0 ± 0.15) × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1), which is about half of the tabulated number and 10 times lower than the more recently suggested revision. Our value fits on the Polanyi-type, rate-enthalpy linear correlation ln(k/n) = (0.80 ± 0.05)ΔH + (3.2 ± 0.8) that is found for the analogous reactions of other aqueous aliphatic alcohols with n equivalent abstractable H atoms. The existence of such a correlation and its large slope are interpreted as an indication of the mechanistic similarity of the H atom abstraction from α- and β-carbon atoms in alcohols occurring through the late, product-like transition state. tert-Butyl alcohol is commonly contaminated by much more reactive secondary and primary alcohols (2-propanol, 2-butanol, ethanol, and methanol), whose content can be sufficient for nearly quantitative scavenging of the H atoms, skewing the H atom reactivity pattern, and explaining the disparity of the literature data on the H + (CH(3))(3)COH rate constant. The ubiquitous use of tert-butyl alcohol in pulse radiolysis for investigating H atom reactivity and the results of this work suggest that many other previously reported rate constants for the H atom, particularly the smaller ones, may be in jeopardy.

  15. LOCAL INTERSTELLAR MAGNETIC FIELD DETERMINED FROM THE INTERSTELLAR BOUNDARY EXPLORER RIBBON

    SciTech Connect

    Zirnstein, E. J.; Livadiotis, G.; McComas, D. J.; Heerikhuisen, J.; Pogorelov, N. V.; Funsten, H. O.

    2016-02-10

    The solar wind emanating from the Sun interacts with the local interstellar medium (LISM), forming the heliosphere. Hydrogen energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) produced by the solar-interstellar interaction carry important information about plasma properties from the boundaries of the heliosphere, and are currently being measured by NASA's Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX). IBEX observations show the existence of a “ribbon” of intense ENA emission projecting a circle on the celestial sphere that is centered near the local interstellar magnetic field (ISMF) vector. Here we show that the source of the IBEX ribbon as a function of ENA energy outside the heliosphere, uniquely coupled to the draping of the ISMF around the heliopause, can be used to precisely determine the magnitude (2.93 ± 0.08 μG) and direction (227.°28 ± 0.°69, 34.°62 ± 0.°45 in ecliptic longitude and latitude) of the pristine ISMF far (∼1000 AU) from the Sun. We find that the ISMF vector is offset from the ribbon center by ∼8.°3 toward the direction of motion of the heliosphere through the LISM, and their vectors form a plane that is consistent with the direction of deflected interstellar neutral hydrogen, thought to be controlled by the ISMF. Our results yield draped ISMF properties close to that observed by Voyager 1, the only spacecraft to directly measure the ISMF close to the heliosphere, and give predictions of the pristine ISMF that Voyager 1 has yet to sample.

  16. Local interstellar magnetic field determined from the interstellar boundary explorer ribbon

    DOE PAGES

    Zirnstein, E. J.; Heerikhuisen, J.; Funsten, H. O.; ...

    2016-02-08

    The solar wind emanating from the Sun interacts with the local interstellar medium (LISM), forming the heliosphere. Hydrogen energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) produced by the solar-interstellar interaction carry important information about plasma properties from the boundaries of the heliosphere, and are currently being measured by NASA's Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX). IBEX observations show the existence of a “ribbon” of intense ENA emission projecting a circle on the celestial sphere that is centered near the local interstellar magnetic field (ISMF) vector. Here we show that the source of the IBEX ribbon as a function of ENA energy outside the heliosphere, uniquelymore » coupled to the draping of the ISMF around the heliopause, can be used to precisely determine the magnitude (2.93 ± 0.08 μG) and direction (227.°28 ± 0.°69, 34.°62 ± 0.°45 in ecliptic longitude and latitude) of the pristine ISMF far (~1000 AU) from the Sun. We find that the ISMF vector is offset from the ribbon center by ~8.°3 toward the direction of motion of the heliosphere through the LISM, and their vectors form a plane that is consistent with the direction of deflected interstellar neutral hydrogen, thought to be controlled by the ISMF. Lastly, our results yield draped ISMF properties close to that observed by Voyager 1, the only spacecraft to directly measure the ISMF close to the heliosphere, and give predictions of the pristine ISMF that Voyager 1 has yet to sample.« less

  17. A New Time-Dependent Scattering Theory: Application to the Capture of Antiprotons by Hydrogen Atoms and Helium Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, X. M.; Hino, K.; Toshima, N.

    2008-08-08

    We present a theoretical method for Coulomb three-body rearrangement collisions solving a Chew-Goldberger-type integral equation directly. The scattering boundary condition is automatically satisfied by adiabatically switching on the interaction between the projectile and target. Hence the outgoing wave function is obtained without the tedious procedure of adjusting the total wave function in the asymptotic region. All the dynamical information can be derived from the scattering wave function obtained on pseudo-spectral grids numerically. Using this method, we obtained the state-specified capture cross sections when antiprotons collide with hydrogen atoms or helium atoms. Differing from the capture processes of antiprotons by hydrogen atoms, the anomalous bumpy structures are revealed in the total angular momentum dependent capture cross sections by helium atoms. Further analysis shows that the bumps arise from the partial channel closing due to the removal of the energy degeneracy in the antiprotonic helium atom. The ejected electron energy distributions are also provided for the comparison with future experiments.

  18. General model of depolarization and transfer of polarization of singly ionized atoms by collisions with hydrogen atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derouich, M.

    2017-02-01

    Simulations of the generation of the atomic polarization is necessary for interpreting the second solar spectrum. For this purpose, it is important to rigorously determine the effects of the isotropic collisions with neutral hydrogen on the atomic polarization of the neutral atoms, ionized atoms and molecules. Our aim is to treat in generality the problem of depolarizing isotropic collisions between singly ionized atoms and neutral hydrogen in its ground state. Using our numerical code, we computed the collisional depolarization rates of the p-levels of ions for large number of values of the effective principal quantum number n* and the Unsöld energy Ep. Then, genetic programming has been utilized to fit the available depolarization rates. As a result, strongly non-linear relationships between the collisional depolarization rates, n* and Ep are obtained, and are shown to reproduce the original data with accuracy clearly better than 10%. These relationships allow quick calculations of the depolarizing collisional rates of any simple ion which is very useful for the solar physics community. In addition, the depolarization rates associated to the complex ions and to the hyperfine levels can be easily derived from our results. In this work we have shown that by using powerful numerical approach and our collisional method, general model giving the depolarization of the ions can be obtained to be exploited for solar applications.

  19. The hydrogen atom confined by one and two hard cones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarsa, A.; Alcaraz-Pelegrina, J. M.; Le Sech, C.

    2017-02-01

    The bound states of the H atom in a semi-infinite space limited by one or two conical boundaries are studied. The exact solution when the nucleus is located at the apex of the conical boundaries is obtained. A rapid increase of the energy when the cone angle opens and tends to π / 2 is found. A second situation with the atom separated from the summit of the cone is considered. The changes on the energy and the electronic structure are analyzed. The quantum force is evaluated by calculating the energy derivative versus the distance to the cone vertex. One of the forces exerted on the tip of an Atomic Force Microscope can be modelized by a hard cone probing the electron cloud in the contact mode. Our numerical results show that the quantum force present an important dependence with the cone angle and it vanishes rapidly as the distance increases.

  20. Al13H-: hydrogen atom site selectivity and the shell model.

    PubMed

    Grubisic, A; Li, X; Stokes, S T; Vetter, K; Ganteför, G F; Bowen, K H; Jena, P; Kiran, B; Burgert, R; Schnöckel, H

    2009-09-28

    Using a combination of anion photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations, we explored the influence of the shell model on H atom site selectivity in Al(13)H(-). Photoelectron spectra revealed that Al(13)H(-) has two anionic isomers and for both of them provided vertical detachment energies (VDEs). Theoretical calculations found that the structures of these anionic isomers differ by the position of the hydrogen atom. In one, the hydrogen atom is radially bonded, while in the other, hydrogen caps a triangular face. VDEs for both anionic isomers as well as other energetic relationships were also calculated. Comparison of the measured versus calculated VDE values permitted the structure of each isomer to be confirmed and correlated with its observed photoelectron spectrum. Shell model, electron-counting considerations correctly predicted the relative stabilities of the anionic isomers and identified the stable structure of neutral Al(13)H.

  1. Al13H-: Hydrogen atom site selectivity and the shell model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grubisic, A.; Li, X.; Stokes, S. T.; Vetter, K.; Ganteför, G. F.; Bowen, K. H.; Jena, P.; Kiran, B.; Burgert, R.; Schnöckel, H.

    2009-09-01

    Using a combination of anion photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations, we explored the influence of the shell model on H atom site selectivity in Al13H-. Photoelectron spectra revealed that Al13H- has two anionic isomers and for both of them provided vertical detachment energies (VDEs). Theoretical calculations found that the structures of these anionic isomers differ by the position of the hydrogen atom. In one, the hydrogen atom is radially bonded, while in the other, hydrogen caps a triangular face. VDEs for both anionic isomers as well as other energetic relationships were also calculated. Comparison of the measured versus calculated VDE values permitted the structure of each isomer to be confirmed and correlated with its observed photoelectron spectrum. Shell model, electron-counting considerations correctly predicted the relative stabilities of the anionic isomers and identified the stable structure of neutral Al13H.

  2. DFT study of adsorption and diffusion of atomic hydrogen on metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, Elizabeth del V.; Amaya-Roncancio, Sebastián; Avalle, Lucía B.; Linares, Daniel H.; Gimenez, M. Cecilia

    2017-10-01

    An extensive study of adsorption and diffusion of hydrogen atoms on (100) surfaces of fcc Au, Cu, Ag and Pt was performed by means of DFT calculations. Bulk properties of those metals were calculated and compared with previous results. The adsorption distances and energies of the hydrogen atom on top, hollow and bridge sites of the (100) surfaces were calculated in order to elucidate preferential adsorption sites of hydrogen on each metal. All these calculations were done in conjunction with a study of charge distribution. Finally, diffusion of the H atom from the most stable adsorption site to the nearest neighbouring site was studied in order to obtain diffusion barrier and diffusion velocity values. The highest diffusion velocity was found to be v = 6.44 ×1011 s-1 for the case of Ag, whereas the lowest was v = 1.13 ×107 s-1 for Au.

  3. Quantum mechanical study of atomic hydrogen interaction with a fluorinated boron-substituted coronene radical.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Smith, Sean C; Nanbu, Shinkoh; Nakamura, Hiroki

    2009-04-08

    In this work we study the transmission of atomic hydrogen across a fluorinated boron-substituted coronene radical (C(19)H(12)BF(6)) as a model for partially fluorinated and boron-doped nanotubes or fullerenes. Complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) and multi-reference configuration interaction (MRCI) methods are employed to calculate the potential energy surfaces for both ground and excited electronic states, and one-dimensional R-matrix propagation is utilized to investigate the transmission/reflection dynamics of atomic hydrogen, through the central six-member ring of the fluorinated boron-substituted coronene radical. The quantum scattering includes resonance effects as well as non-adiabatic transitions between the ground and excited electronic states. Within the sudden approximation, both centre and off-centre approach trajectories have been investigated. Implications for atomic hydrogen encapsulation by carbon nanotube and fullerene are discussed.

  4. Hydrogen dissociation and spillover on individual isolated palladium atoms.

    PubMed

    Tierney, Heather L; Baber, Ashleigh E; Kitchin, John R; Sykes, E Charles H

    2009-12-11

    Using a combination of low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory it is demonstrated how the nature of an inert host metal of an alloy can affect the thermodynamics and kinetics of a reaction pathway in a much more profound way than simply a dilution, electronic, or geometric effect. This study reveals that individual, isolated Pd atoms can promote H2 dissociation and spillover onto a Cu(111) surface, but that the same mechanism is not observed for an identical array of Pd atoms in Au(111).

  5. Hydrogen Dissociation and Spillover on Individual Isolated Palladium Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Tierney, Heather L.; Baber, Ashleigh E.; Sykes, E. Charles H.; Kitchin, John R.

    2009-12-11

    Using a combination of low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory it is demonstrated how the nature of an inert host metal of an alloy can affect the thermodynamics and kinetics of a reaction pathway in a much more profound way than simply a dilution, electronic, or geometric effect. This study reveals that individual, isolated Pd atoms can promote H{sub 2} dissociation and spillover onto a Cu(111) surface, but that the same mechanism is not observed for an identical array of Pd atoms in Au(111).

  6. Interstellar H(3)(+).

    PubMed

    Oka, Takeshi

    2006-08-15

    Protonated molecular hydrogen, H(3)(+), is the simplest polyatomic molecule. It is the most abundantly produced interstellar molecule, next only to H(2), although its steady state concentration is low because of its extremely high chemical reactivity. H(3)(+) is a strong acid (proton donor) and initiates chains of ion-molecule reactions in interstellar space thus leading to formation of complex molecules. Here, I summarize the understandings on this fundamental species in interstellar space obtained from our infrared observations since its discovery in 1996 and discuss the recent observations and analyses of H(3)(+) in the Central Molecular Zone near the Galatic center that led to a revelation of a vast amount of warm and diffuse gas existing in the region.

  7. Interstellar H3+

    PubMed Central

    Oka, Takeshi

    2006-01-01

    Protonated molecular hydrogen, H3+, is the simplest polyatomic molecule. It is the most abundantly produced interstellar molecule, next only to H2, although its steady state concentration is low because of its extremely high chemical reactivity. H3+ is a strong acid (proton donor) and initiates chains of ion-molecule reactions in interstellar space thus leading to formation of complex molecules. Here, I summarize the understandings on this fundamental species in interstellar space obtained from our infrared observations since its discovery in 1996 and discuss the recent observations and analyses of H3+ in the Central Molecular Zone near the Galatic center that led to a revelation of a vast amount of warm and diffuse gas existing in the region. PMID:16894171

  8. Lewis acid-water/alcohol complexes as hydrogen atom donors in radical reactions.

    PubMed

    Povie, Guillaume; Renaud, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Water or low molecular weight alcohols are, due to their availability, low price and low toxicity ideal reagents for organic synthesis. Recently, it was reported that, despite the very strong BDE of the O-H bond, they can be used as hydrogen atom donors in place of expensive and/or toxic group 14 metal hydrides when boron and titanium(III) Lewis acids are present. This finding represents a considerable innovation and uncovers a new perspective on the paradigm of hydrogen atom transfers to radicals. We discuss here the influence of complex formation and other association processes on the efficacy of the hydrogen transfer step. A delicate balance between activation by complex formation and deactivation by further hydrogen bonding is operative.

  9. Direct observation of individual hydrogen atoms at trapping sites in a ferritic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.-S.; Haley, D.; Gerstl, S. S. A.; London, A. J.; Sweeney, F.; Wepf, R. A.; Rainforth, W. M.; Bagot, P. A. J.; Moody, M. P.

    2017-03-01

    The design of atomic-scale microstructural traps to limit the diffusion of hydrogen is one key strategy in the development of hydrogen-embrittlement-resistant materials. In the case of bearing steels, an effective trapping mechanism may be the incorporation of finely dispersed V-Mo-Nb carbides in a ferrite matrix. First, we charged a ferritic steel with deuterium by means of electrolytic loading to achieve a high hydrogen concentration. We then immobilized it in the microstructure with a cryogenic transfer protocol before atom probe tomography (APT) analysis. Using APT, we show trapping of hydrogen within the core of these carbides with quantitative composition profiles. Furthermore, with this method the experiment can be feasibly replicated in any APT-equipped laboratory by using a simple cold chain.

  10. Direct observation of individual hydrogen atoms at trapping sites in a ferritic steel.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y-S; Haley, D; Gerstl, S S A; London, A J; Sweeney, F; Wepf, R A; Rainforth, W M; Bagot, P A J; Moody, M P

    2017-03-17

    The design of atomic-scale microstructural traps to limit the diffusion of hydrogen is one key strategy in the development of hydrogen-embrittlement-resistant materials. In the case of bearing steels, an effective trapping mechanism may be the incorporation of finely dispersed V-Mo-Nb carbides in a ferrite matrix. First, we charged a ferritic steel with deuterium by means of electrolytic loading to achieve a high hydrogen concentration. We then immobilized it in the microstructure with a cryogenic transfer protocol before atom probe tomography (APT) analysis. Using APT, we show trapping of hydrogen within the core of these carbides with quantitative composition profiles. Furthermore, with this method the experiment can be feasibly replicated in any APT-equipped laboratory by using a simple cold chain.

  11. Infrared diffuse interstellar bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galazutdinov, G. A.; Lee, Jae-Joon; Han, Inwoo; Lee, Byeong-Cheol; Valyavin, G.; Krełowski, J.

    2017-05-01

    We present high-resolution (R ˜ 45 000) profiles of 14 diffuse interstellar bands in the ˜1.45 to ˜2.45 μm range based on spectra obtained with the Immersion Grating INfrared Spectrograph at the McDonald Observatory. The revised list of diffuse bands with accurately estimated rest wavelengths includes six new features. The diffuse band at 15 268.2 Å demonstrates a very symmetric profile shape and thus can serve as a reference for finding the 'interstellar correction' to the rest wavelength frame in the H range, which suffers from a lack of known atomic/molecular lines.

  12. Hydrogen atom migration in the oxidation of aldehydes - O(3P) + H2CO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dupuis, M.; Lester, W. A., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    An ab initio study of hydrogen atom migration in methylenebis(oxy)H2CO2(3B2) to form triplet formic acid HCOOH (3A1) is reported. From HF, MCHF, and CI calculated energy barriers, the activation energy is estimated to be no less than 30 kcal/mol. It is concluded that the hydrogen migration channel is not accessible in recent room temperature experiments on the O(3P) + H2CO reaction.

  13. Two-photon ionization of atomic hydrogen with elliptically polarized light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kassaee, A.; Rustgi, M. L.; Long, S. A. T.

    1988-01-01

    The theory of two-photon ionization of a hydrogenic state in the nonrelativistic dipole approximation is generalized for elliptically polarized light. An application to the metastable 2S state of atomic hydrogen is made. Significant differences in the angular distribution of the outgoing electrons are found depending upon the polarization of the photons. It is claimed that two-photon ionization employing elliptically polarized photons from lasers may provide an additional test for the theories of multiphoton ionization.

  14. Classical stabilization of the hydrogen atom in a monochromatic field

    SciTech Connect

    Benvenuto, F.; Casati, G. ); Shepelyansky, D.L. )

    1993-02-01

    We report the results of analytical and numerical investigations on the ionization of a classical atom in a strong, linearly polarized, monochromatic field. We show that the ionization probability decreases with increasing field intensity at field amplitudes much larger than the classical chaos border. This effect should be observable in real laboratory experiments.

  15. LOX/Hydrogen Coaxial Injector Atomization Test Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaller, M.

    1990-01-01

    Quantitative information about the atomization of injector sprays is needed to improve the accuracy of computational models that predict the performance and stability margin of liquid propellant rocket engines. To obtain this data, a facility for the study of spray atomization is being established at NASA-Lewis to determine the drop size and velocity distributions occurring in vaporizing liquid sprays at supercritical pressures. Hardware configuration and test conditions are selected to make the cold flow simulant testing correspond as closely as possible to conditions in liquid oxygen (LOX)/gaseous H2 rocket engines. Drop size correlations from the literature, developed for liquid/gas coaxial injector geometries, are used to make drop size predictions for LOX/H2 coaxial injectors. The mean drop size predictions for a single element coaxial injector range from 0.1 to 2000 microns, emphasizing the need for additional studies of the atomization process in LOX/H2 engines. Selection of cold flow simulants, measured techniques, and hardware for LOX/H2 atomization simulations are discussed.

  16. LOX/hydrogen coaxial injector atomization test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaller, M.

    1990-01-01

    Quantitative information about the atomization of injector sprays is needed to improve the accuracy of computational models that predict the performance and stability margin of liquid propellant rocket engines. To obtain this data, a facility for the study of spray atomization is being established at NASA-Lewis to determine the drop size and velocity distributions occurring in vaporizing liquid sprays at supercritical pressures. Hardware configuration and test conditions are selected to make the cold flow simulant testing correspond as closely as possible to conditions in liquid oxygen (LOX)/gaseous H2 rocket engines. Drop size correlations from the literature, developed for liquid/gas coaxial injector geometries, are used to make drop size predictions for LOX/H2 coaxial injectors. The mean drop size predictions for a single element coaxial injector range from 0.1 to 2000 microns, emphasizing the need for additional studies of the atomization process in LOX/H2 engines. Selection of cold flow simulants, measurement techniques, and hardware for LOX/H2 atomization simulations are discussed.

  17. Positron scattering from hydrogen atom embedded in weakly coupled plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoshal, Arijit; Kamali, M. Z. M.; Ratnavelu, K.

    2013-01-01

    The positron-hydrogen collision problem in weakly coupled plasma environment has been investigated by applying a formulation of the three-body collision problem in the form of coupled multi-channel two-body Lippmann-Schwinger equations. The interactions among the charged particles in the plasma have been represented by Debye-Huckel potentials. A simple variational hydrogenic wave function has been employed to calculate the partial-wave scattering amplitude. Plasma screening effects on various possible mode of fragmentation of the system e++H(1s) during the collision, such as 1s →1s and 2s→2s elastic collisions, 1s→2s excitation, positronium formation, elastic proton-positronium collisions, have been reported. Furthermore, a detailed study has been made on differential and total cross sections of the above processes in the energy range 13.6-350 eV of the incident positron.

  18. Conformer-specific hydrogen atom tunnelling in trifluoromethylhydroxycarbene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mardyukov, Artur; Quanz, Henrik; Schreiner, Peter R.

    2017-01-01

    Conformational control of organic reactions is at the heart of the biomolecular sciences. To achieve a particular reactivity, one of many conformers may be selected, for instance, by a (bio)catalyst, as the geometrically most suited and appropriately reactive species. The equilibration of energetically close-lying conformers is typically assumed to be facile and less energetically taxing than the reaction under consideration itself: this is termed the 'Curtin-Hammett principle'. Here, we show that the trans conformer of trifluoromethylhydroxycarbene preferentially rearranges through a facile quantum-mechanical hydrogen tunnelling pathway, while its cis conformer is entirely unreactive. Hence, this presents the first example of a conformer-specific hydrogen tunnelling reaction. The Curtin-Hammett principle is not applicable, due to the high barrier between the two conformers.

  19. Hydrogen Embrittlement of Metals: Atomic hydrogen from a variety of sources reduces the ductility of many metals.

    PubMed

    Rogers, H C

    1968-03-08

    Hydrogen interacts with many metals to reduce their ductility (2) and frequently their strength also. It enters metals in the atomic form, diffusing very rapidly even at normal temperatures. During melting and fabrication, as well as during use, there are various ways in which metals come in contact with hydrogen and absorb it. The absorbed hydrogen may react irreversibly with oxides or carbides in some metals to produce a permanently degraded structure. It may also recombine at internal surfaces of defects of various types to form gaseous molecular hydrogen under pressures sufficiently high to form metal blisters when the recombination occurs near the outer surface. In other metals, brittle hydrides that lower the mechanical properties of the metal are formed. Another type of embrittlement is reversible, depending on the presence of hydrogen in the metal lattice during deformation for its occurrence. Under some conditions the failure may be delayed for long periods. A number of different mechanisms have been postulated to explain reversible embrittlement. According to some theories hydrogen interferes with the processes of plastic deformation in metals, while according to others it enhances the tendency for cracking.

  20. Deformylation Reaction by a Nonheme Manganese(III)-Peroxo Complex via Initial Hydrogen-Atom Abstraction.

    PubMed

    Barman, Prasenjit; Upadhyay, Pranav; Faponle, Abayomi S; Kumar, Jitendra; Nag, Sayanta Sekhar; Kumar, Devesh; Sastri, Chivukula V; de Visser, Sam P

    2016-09-05

    Metal-peroxo intermediates are key species in the catalytic cycles of nonheme metalloenzymes, but their chemical properties and reactivity patterns are still poorly understood. The synthesis and characterization of a manganese(III)-peroxo complex with a pentadentate bispidine ligand system and its reactivity with aldehydes was studied. Manganese(III)-peroxo can react through hydrogen-atom abstraction reactions instead of the commonly proposed nucleophilic addition reaction. Evidence of the mechanism comes from experiments which identify a primary kinetic isotope effect of 5.4 for the deformylation reaction. Computational modeling supports the established mechanism and identifies the origin of the reactivity preference of hydrogen-atom abstraction over nucleophilic addition.

  1. Resonant Coherent Excitation of Fast Hydrogen Atoms in Front of a LiF(001) Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Auth, C.; Mertens, A.; Winter, H.; Borisov, A.G.; Garcia de Abajo, F.J.

    1997-12-01

    We have scattered protons and hydrogen atoms with energies of some keV from a LiF(001) surface under a grazing angle of incidence. From the intensity of Lyman-{alpha} radiation (transition from n=2 to n=1, {lambda}=121.6 nm ) as a function of projectile energy for different azimuthal orientations of the crystal surface, we find clear evidence for a resonant coherent excitation of n=2 states of hydrogen atoms in the oscillating electric field in front of the insulator surface. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  2. Reduction of uranium hexafluoride to tetrafluoride by using the hydrogen atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksandrov, B. P.; Gordon, E. B.; Ivanov, A. V.; Kotov, A. A.; Smirnov, V. E.

    2016-09-01

    We consider the reduction of UF6 to UF4 by chemical reaction with hydrogen atoms originated in the powerful chemical generator. The principal design of such a chemical convertor is described. The results of the mathematical modeling of the thermodynamics and kinetics of the UF6 to UF4 reduction process are analyzed. The few options for the hydrogen atom generator design are proposed. A layout of the experimental setup with the chemical reactor is presented. The high efficiency together with the ability of the process scaling without loss of its efficiency makes this approach to the uranium hexafluoride depletion into tetrafluoride promising for its application in the industry.

  3. High-precision optical measurement of the 2S hyperfine interval in atomic hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Kolachevsky, N; Fischer, M; Karshenboim, S G; Hänsch, T W

    2004-01-23

    We have applied an optical method to the measurement of the 2S hyperfine interval in atomic hydrogen. The interval has been measured by means of two-photon spectroscopy of the 1S-2S transition on a hydrogen atomic beam shielded from external magnetic fields. The measured value of the 2S hyperfine interval is equal to 177 556 860(16) Hz and represents the most precise measurement of this interval to date. The theoretical evaluation of the specific combination of 1S and 2S hyperfine intervals D21 is in fair agreement (within 1.4 sigma) with the value for D21 deduced from our measurement.

  4. Surface Magnetism of Cobalt Nanoislands Controlled by Atomic Hydrogen

    DOE PAGES

    Park, Jewook; Park, Changwon; Yoon, Mina; ...

    2016-12-01

    Controlling the spin states of the surface and interface is key to spintronic applications of magnetic materials. We report the evolution of surface magnetism of Co nanoislands on Cu(111) upon hydrogen adsorption and desorption with the hope of realizing reversible control of spin-dependent tunneling. Spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy reveals three types of hydrogen-induced surface superstructures, 1H-(2 × 2), 2H-(2 × 2), and 6H-(3 × 3), with increasing H coverage. The prominent magnetic surface states of Co, while being preserved at low H coverage, become suppressed as the H coverage level increases, which can then be recovered by H desorption. First-principlesmore » calculations reveal the origin of the observed magnetic surface states by capturing the asymmetry between the spin-polarized surface states and identify the role of hydrogen in controlling the magnetic states. This study offers new insights into the chemical control of magnetism in low-dimensional systems.« less

  5. Surface Magnetism of Cobalt Nanoislands Controlled by Atomic Hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Park, Jewook; Park, Changwon; Yoon, Mina; Li, An-Ping

    2017-01-11

    Controlling the spin states of the surface and interface is key to spintronic applications of magnetic materials. Here, we report the evolution of surface magnetism of Co nanoislands on Cu(111) upon hydrogen adsorption and desorption with the hope of realizing reversible control of spin-dependent tunneling. Spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy reveals three types of hydrogen-induced surface superstructures, 1H-(2 × 2), 2H-(2 × 2), and 6H-(3 × 3), with increasing H coverage. The prominent magnetic surface states of Co, while being preserved at low H coverage, become suppressed as the H coverage level increases, which can then be recovered by H desorption. First-principles calculations reveal the origin of the observed magnetic surface states by capturing the asymmetry between the spin-polarized surface states and identify the role of hydrogen in controlling the magnetic states. Our study offers new insights into the chemical control of magnetism in low-dimensional systems.

  6. Possibility of nonexistence of hot and superhot hydrogen atoms in electrical discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Loureiro, J.; Amorim, J.

    2010-09-15

    Recently, the existence of extremely energetic hydrogen atoms in electrical discharges has been proposed in the literature with large controversy, from the analysis of the anomalous broadening of hydrogen Balmer lines. In this paper, the velocity distribution of H atoms and the profiles of the emitting atom lines created by the exothermic reaction H{sub 2}{sup +}+H{sub 2}{yields}H{sub 3}{sup +}+H+{Delta}E are calculated, as a function of the internal energy defect {Delta}E. The shapes found for the non-Maxwell-Boltzmann distributions resulting in non-Gaussian line profiles raise serious arguments against the existence of hot and superhot H atoms as it has been proposed, at least with those temperatures.

  7. New power source from fractional quantum energy levels of atomic hydrogen that surpasses internal combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, R. L.; Ray, P.; Dhandapani, B.; Nansteel, M.; Chen, X.; He, J.

    2002-12-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectroscopy was recorded on microwave discharges of helium with 2% hydrogen. Novel emission lines were observed with energies of q·13.6 eV where q=1,2,3,4,6,7,8,9, or 11 or these lines inelastically scattered by helium atoms wherein 21.2 eV was absorbed in the excitation of He (1s 2) to He (1s 12p 1). These lines were identified as hydrogen transitions to electronic energy levels below the 'ground' state corresponding to fractional quantum numbers. Significant line broadening corresponding to an average hydrogen atom temperature of 33-38 eV was observed for helium-hydrogen discharge plasmas; whereas pure hydrogen showed no excessive broadening corresponding to an average hydrogen atom temperature of ≈3 eV. Since a significant increase in H temperature was observed with helium-hydrogen discharge plasmas, and energetic hydrino lines were observed at short wavelengths in the corresponding microwave plasmas that required a very significant reaction rate due to low photon detection efficiency in this region, the power balance was measured on the helium-hydrogen microwave plasmas. With a microwave input power of 30 W, the thermal output power was measured to be at least 300 W corresponding to a reactor temperature rise from room temperature to 900 °C within 90 s, a power density of 30 MW/m 3, and an energy balance of about -4×10 5 kJ/mol H 2 compared to the enthalpy of combustion of hydrogen of -241.8 kJ/mol H 2.

  8. Ground state properties of solid and liquid spin-aligned atomic hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danilowicz, R. L.; Dugan, J. V., Jr.; Etters, R. D.

    1976-01-01

    Calculations of the ground state energy in the solid phase were performed with the aid of a variational approach. The Morse potential form of the atomic triple potential computed by Kolos and Wolniewicz (1965) was employed for the calculations. The ground state energies of both the liquid and solid phases of spin-aligned atomic hydrogen around the volume of the transition are presented in a graph.

  9. Photolytic-interference-free, femtosecond two-photon fluorescence imaging of atomic hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Kulatilaka, Waruna D; Gord, James R; Katta, Viswanath R; Roy, Sukesh

    2012-08-01

    We discuss photolytic-interference-free, high-repetition-rate imaging of reaction intermediates in flames and plasmas using femtosecond (fs) multiphoton excitation. The high peak power of fs pulses enables efficient nonlinear excitation, while the low energy nearly eliminates interfering single-photon photodissociation processes. We demonstrate proof-of-principle, interference-free, two-photon laser-induced fluorescence line imaging of atomic hydrogen in hydrocarbon flames and discuss the method's implications for certain other atomic and molecular species.

  10. The interstellar gas experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lind, D. L.; Geiss, J.; Buehler, F.; Eugster, O.

    1992-01-01

    The Interstellar Gas Experiment (IGE) exposed thin metallic foils to collect neutral interstellar gas particles. These particles penetrate the solar system due to their motion relative to the sun. Thus, it is possible to entrap them in the collecting foils along with precipitating magnetospheric and perhaps some ambient atmospheric particles. For the entire duration of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) mission, seven of these foils collected particles arriving from seven different directions as seen from the spacecraft. In the mass spectroscopic analysis of the noble gas component of these particles, we have detected the isotopes of He-3, He-4, Ne-20, and Ne-22. In the foil analyses carried out so far, we find a distribution of particle arrival directions which shows that a significant part of the trapped particles are indeed interstellar atoms. The analysis needed to subtract the competing fluxes of magnetospheric and atmospheric particles is still in progress.

  11. Atomic Scale Structure of (001) Hydrogen-Induced Platelets in Germanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, Marie-Laure; Pizzagalli, Laurent; Pailloux, Fréderic; Barbot, Jean François

    2009-04-01

    An accurate characterization of the structure of hydrogen-induced platelets is a prerequisite for investigating both hydrogen aggregation and formation of larger defects. On the basis of quantitative high resolution transmission electron microscopy experiments combined with extensive first principles calculations, we present a model for the atomic structure of (001) hydrogen-induced platelets in germanium. It involves broken Ge-Ge bonds in the [001] direction that are dihydride passivated, vacancies, and trapped H2 molecules, showing that the species involved in platelet formation depend on the habit plane. This model explains all previous experimental observations.

  12. Interstellar isomeric species: Energy, stability and abundance relationship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etim, Emmanuel E.; Arunan, Elangannan

    2016-12-01

    Accurate enthalpies of formation are reported for known and potential interstellar isomeric species using high-level ab initio quantum-chemical calculations. A total of 130 molecules comprising of 31 isomeric groups and 24 cyanide/isocyanide pairs with molecules ranging from 3 to 12 atoms have been considered. The results show an interesting relationship between energy, stability and abundance (ESA) existing among these molecules. Among the isomeric species, isomers with lower enthalpies of formation are more easily observed in the interstellar medium compared to their counterparts with higher enthalpies of formation. Available data in the literature confirm the high abundance of the most stable isomer over other isomers in the different groups considered. Potential for interstellar hydrogen bonding accounts for the few exceptions observed. Thus, in general, it suffices to say that the interstellar abundances of related species could be linked to their stabilities if other factors do not dominate. The immediate consequences of this relationship in addressing some of the whys and wherefores among interstellar molecules and in predicting some possible candidates for future astronomical observations are discussed.

  13. Hydrogen-atom spectrum under a minimal-length hypothesis

    SciTech Connect

    Benczik, Sandor; Chang, Lay Nam; Minic, Djordje; Takeuchi, Tatsu

    2005-07-15

    The energy spectrum of the Coulomb potential with minimal length commutation relations [X{sub i},P{sub j}]=i({Dirac_h}/2{pi}){l_brace}{delta}{sub ij}(1+{beta}P{sup 2})+{beta}{sup '}P{sub i}P{sub j}{r_brace} is determined both numerically and perturbatively for arbitrary values of {beta}{sup '}/{beta} and angular momenta l. The constraint on the minimal length scale from precision hydrogen spectroscopy data is of the order of a few GeV{sup -1}, weaker than previously claimed.

  14. Hydrogen transport diagnostics by atomic and molecular emission line profiles simultaneously measured for large helical device

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, K.; Shikama, T.; Hasuo, M.; Goto, M.; Morita, S.

    2013-01-15

    We observe the Balmer-{alpha}, -{beta}, and -{gamma} lines of hydrogen atoms and Q branches of the Fulcher-{alpha} band of hydrogen molecules simultaneously with their polarization resolved for large helical device. From the fit including the line splits and the polarization dependences by the Zeeman effect, the emission locations, intensities, and the temperatures of the atoms and molecules are determined. The emission locations of the hydrogen atoms are determined outside but close to the last closed flux surface (LCFS). The results are consistent with a previous work (Phys. Plasmas 12, 042501 (2005)). On the other hand, the emission locations of the molecules are determined to be in the divertor legs, which is farer from those of the atoms. The kinetic energy of the atoms is 1 {approx} 20 eV, while the rotational temperature of molecules is {approx}0.04 eV. Additionally, substantial wings, which originate from high velocity atoms and are not reproduced by the conventional spectral analysis, are observed in the Balmer line profiles. We develop a one-dimensional model to simulate the transport of the atoms and molecules. The model reproduces the differences of the emission locations of the atoms and molecules when their initial temperatures are assumed to be 3 eV and 0.04 eV, respectively. From the model, the wings of the Balmer-{alpha} line is attributed to the high velocity atoms exist deep inside the LCFS, which are generated by the charge exchange collisions with hot protons there.

  15. Nucleon polarizabilities: From Compton scattering to hydrogen atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagelstein, Franziska; Miskimen, Rory; Pascalutsa, Vladimir

    2016-05-01

    We review the current state of knowledge of the nucleon polarizabilities and of their role in nucleon Compton scattering and in hydrogen spectrum. We discuss the basic concepts, the recent lattice QCD calculations and advances in chiral effective-field theory. On the experimental side, we review the ongoing programs aimed to measure the nucleon (scalar and spin) polarizabilities via the Compton scattering processes, with real and virtual photons. A great part of the review is devoted to the general constraints based on unitarity, causality, discrete and continuous symmetries, which result in model-independent relations involving nucleon polarizabilities. We (re-)derive a variety of such relations and discuss their empirical value. The proton polarizability effects are presently the major sources of uncertainty in the assessment of the muonic hydrogen Lamb shift and hyperfine structure. Recent calculations of these effects are reviewed here in the context of the "proton-radius puzzle". We conclude with summary plots of the recent results and prospects for the near-future work.

  16. Zirconium-nickel crystals—hydrogen accumulators: Dissolution and penetration of hydrogen atoms in alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matysina, Z. A.; Zaginaichenko, S. Yu.; Shchur, D. V.; Gabdullin, M. T.; Kamenetskaya, E. A.

    2016-07-01

    The calculation of the free energy, thermodynamic equilibrium equations, and kinetic equations of the intermetallic compound Zr2NiH x has been carried out based on molecular-kinetic concepts. The equilibrium hydrogen concentration depending on the temperature, pressure, and energy parameters has been calculated. The absorption-desorption of hydrogen has been studied, and the possibility of the realization of the hysteresis effect has been revealed. The kinetics of the dissolution and permeability of hydrogen is considered, the time dependence of these values has been found, and conditions for the extremum character of their time dependence have been determined. Relaxation times of the dissolution and permeability of hydrogen into the alloy have been calculated. The calculation results are compared with the experimental data available in the literature.

  17. A laser driven source of spin polarized atomic hydrogen and deuterium

    SciTech Connect

    Poelker, M.; Coulter, K.P.; Holt, R.J.; Jones, C.E.; Kowalczyk, R.S.; Young, L.; Toporkov, D.

    1993-07-01

    Recent results from a laser-driven source of polarized hydrogen (H) and deuterium (D) are presented. The performance of the source is described as a function of atomic flow rate and magnetic field. The data suggest that because atomic densities in the source are high, the system can approach spin-temperature equilibrium although applied magnetic fields are much larger than the critical field of the atoms. The authors also observe that potassium contamination in the source emittance can be reduced to a negligible amount using a teflon-lined transport tube.

  18. A spectroscopic study of hydrogen atom and molecule collisions. Progress report, 1994--1997

    SciTech Connect

    Kielkopf, J.F.

    1997-01-15

    In this project the fundamental processes which occur in low energy collisions of excited states of atomic hydrogen with other atoms and ions are being studied with optical, vacuum ultraviolet and laser spectroscopy. This report covers the period from 1994 to early 1997. We begin here with a brief description of the status of the work at the beginning of this project period, then discuss the goals for this period, our results, and the work in progress now. As the accompanying renewal proposal describes in more detail, the purpose of our work is to understand low energy atom-atom collisions during which light is emitted or absorbed. Because of their fundamental character, such collisions of atomic hydrogen could play a central role if experimental data could be compared with a priori theory. Some interactions involving atomic hydrogen can be calculated very accurately, namely those of H{sub 2}, H{sup +}{sub 2} H{sub 3}, and H{sup +}{sub 3}, and simpler diatomic radicals including OH, CH, and NH. The primary difficulty from the experimental side has been the development of techniques to observe neutral atomic hydrogen interactions at densities high enough for spectral line broadening effects to be observable. This specific research discusses in this report are: laser-produced plasmas in H{sub 2},H{sub 2}+H{sub 2}O, and H{sub 2}+Na; layman alpha wing; line shape theory; ArF laser interaction with H{sub 2}; and work in progress.

  19. Carbon chain abundance in the diffuse interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allamandola, L. J.; Hudgins, D. M.; Bauschlicher, C. W. Jr; Langhoff, S. R.

    1999-01-01

    Thanks to the mid-IR sensitivities of the ISO and IRTS orbiting spectrometers it is now possible to search the diffuse interstellar medium for heretofore inaccessible molecular emission. In view of the recent strong case for the presence of C(7-) (Kirkwood et al. 1998, Tulej et al. 1998),and the fact that carbon chains possess prominent infrared active modes in a very clean portion of the interstellar spectrum, we have analyzed the IRTS spectrum of the diffuse interstellar medium for the infrared signatures of these species. Theoretical and experimental infrared band frequencies and absolute intensities of many different carbon chain species are presented. These include cyanopolyynes, neutral and anionic linear carbon molecules, and neutral and ionized, even-numbered, hydrogenated carbon chains. We show that--as a family--these species have abundances in the diffuse ISM on the order of 10(-10) with respect to hydrogen, values consistent with their abundances in dense molecular clouds. Assuming an average length of 10 C atoms per C-chain implies that roughly a millionth of the cosmically available carbon is in the form of carbon chains and that carbon chains can account for a few percent of the visible to near-IR diffuse interstellar band (DIB) total equivalent width (not DIB number).

  20. Atomic and molecular hydrogen from Titan in the Kronian magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eviatar, Aharon; Podolak, Morris; Richardson, John D.

    1990-01-01

    The question of the neutral gas and plasma population in the region of the Kronian magnetosphere, outside the plasma mantle and inside the magnetopause, dominated by the efflux of Titan's atmosphere is considered. A model that has been used successfully to describe the inner magnetosphere is applied to this region under constraints derived from the plasma science and ultraviolet spectrometer experiments on Voyager. It is shown that it is not possible to reconcile the results of these two experiments simultaneously with the values of the atomic and molecular source strengths of the atmosphere of Titan extant in the literature. The possible sources of the discrepancy are delineated.